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Sample records for cnidarian dinoflagellate mutualism

  1. Regulation of cnidarian-dinoflagellate mutualisms: Evidence that activation of a host TGFβ innate immune pathway promotes tolerance of the symbiont.

    PubMed

    Detournay, Olivier; Schnitzler, Christine E; Poole, Angela; Weis, Virginia M

    2012-12-01

    Animals must manage interactions with beneficial as well as detrimental microbes. Immunity therefore includes strategies for both resistance to and tolerance of microbial invaders. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) cytokines have many functions in animals including a tolerance-promoting (tolerogenic) role in immunity in vertebrates. TGFβ pathways are present in basal metazoans such as cnidarians but their potential role in immunity has never been explored. This study takes a two-part approach to examining an immune function for TGFβ in cnidarians. First bioinformatic analyses of the model anemone Aiptasia pallida were used to identify TGFβ pathway components and explore the hypothesis that an immune function for TGFβs existed prior to the evolution of vertebrates. A TGFβ ligand from A. pallida was identified as one that groups closely with vertebrate TGFβs that have an immune function. Second, cellular analyses of A. pallida were used to examine a role for a TGFβ pathway in the regulation of cnidarian-dinoflagellate mutualisms. These interactions are stable under ambient conditions but collapse under elevated temperature, a phenomenon called cnidarian bleaching. Addition of exogenous human TGFβ suppressed an immune response measured as LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production by the host. Addition of anti-TGFβ to block a putative TGFβ pathway resulted in immune stimulation and a failure of the symbionts to successfully colonize the host. Finally, addition of exogenous TGFβ suppressed immune stimulation in heat-stressed animals and partially abolished a bleaching response. These findings suggest that the dinoflagellate symbionts somehow promote host tolerance through activation of tolerogenic host immune pathways, a strategy employed by some intracellular protozoan parasites during their invasion of vertebrates. Insight into the ancient, conserved nature of host-microbe interactions gained from this cnidarian-dinoflagellate model is valuable to

  2. Cell Biology of Cnidarian-Dinoflagellate Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Allemand, Denis; Weis, Virginia M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The symbiosis between cnidarians (e.g., corals or sea anemones) and intracellular dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium is of immense ecological importance. In particular, this symbiosis promotes the growth and survival of reef corals in nutrient-poor tropical waters; indeed, coral reefs could not exist without this symbiosis. However, our fundamental understanding of the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and of its links to coral calcification remains poor. Here we review what we currently know about the cell biology of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis. In doing so, we aim to refocus attention on fundamental cellular aspects that have been somewhat neglected since the early to mid-1980s, when a more ecological approach began to dominate. We review the four major processes that we believe underlie the various phases of establishment and persistence in the cnidarian/coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis: (i) recognition and phagocytosis, (ii) regulation of host-symbiont biomass, (iii) metabolic exchange and nutrient trafficking, and (iv) calcification. Where appropriate, we draw upon examples from a range of cnidarian-alga symbioses, including the symbiosis between green Hydra and its intracellular chlorophyte symbiont, which has considerable potential to inform our understanding of the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis. Ultimately, we provide a comprehensive overview of the history of the field, its current status, and where it should be going in the future. PMID:22688813

  3. The scavenger receptor repertoire in six cnidarian species and its putative role in cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Emilie F.; Poole, Angela Z.; Davy, Simon K.

    2016-01-01

    Many cnidarians engage in a mutualism with endosymbiotic photosynthetic dinoflagellates that forms the basis of the coral reef ecosystem. Interpartner interaction and regulation includes involvement of the host innate immune system. Basal metazoans, including cnidarians have diverse and complex innate immune repertoires that are just beginning to be described. Scavenger receptors (SR) are a diverse superfamily of innate immunity genes that recognize a broad array of microbial ligands and participate in phagocytosis of invading microbes. The superfamily includes subclades named SR-A through SR-I that are categorized based on the arrangement of sequence domains including the scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR), the C-type lectin (CTLD) and the CD36 domains. Previous functional and gene expression studies on cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis have implicated SR-like proteins in interpartner communication and regulation. In this study, we characterized the SR repertoire from a combination of genomic and transcriptomic resources from six cnidarian species in the Class Anthozoa. We combined these bioinformatic analyses with functional experiments using the SR inhibitor fucoidan to explore a role for SRs in cnidarian symbiosis and immunity. Bioinformatic searches revealed a large diversity of SR-like genes that resembled SR-As, SR-Bs, SR-Es and SR-Is. SRCRs, CTLDs and CD36 domains were identified in multiple sequences in combinations that were highly homologous to vertebrate SRs as well as in proteins with novel domain combinations. Phylogenetic analyses of CD36 domains of the SR-B-like sequences from a diversity of metazoans grouped cnidarian with bilaterian sequences separate from other basal metazoans. All cnidarian sequences grouped together with moderate support in a subclade separately from bilaterian sequences. Functional experiments were carried out on the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida that engages in a symbiosis with Symbiodinium minutum (clade B1

  4. Are Niemann-Pick type C proteins key players in cnidarian-dinoflagellate endosymbioses?

    PubMed

    Dani, Vincent; Ganot, Philippe; Priouzeau, Fabrice; Furla, Paola; Sabourault, Cecile

    2014-09-01

    The symbiotic interaction between cnidarians, such as corals and sea anemones, and the unicellular algae Symbiodinium is regulated by yet poorly understood cellular mechanisms, despite the ecological importance of coral reefs. These mechanisms, including host-symbiont recognition and metabolic exchange, control symbiosis stability under normal conditions, but also lead to symbiosis breakdown (bleaching) during stress. This study describes the repertoire of the sterol-trafficking proteins Niemann-Pick type C (NPC1 and NPC2) in the symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis. We found one NPC1 gene in contrast to the two genes (NPC1 and NPC1L1) present in vertebrate genomes. While only one NPC2 gene is present in many metazoans, this gene has been duplicated in cnidarians, and we detected four NPC2 genes in A. viridis. However, only one gene (AvNPC2-d) was upregulated in symbiotic relative to aposymbiotic sea anemones and displayed higher expression in the gastrodermis (symbiont-containing tissue) than in the epidermis. We performed immunolabelling experiments on tentacle cross sections and demonstrated that the AvNPC2-d protein was closely associated with symbiosomes. In addition, AvNPC1 and AvNPC2-d gene expression was strongly downregulated during stress. These data suggest that AvNPC2-d is involved in both the stability and dysfunction of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbioses.

  5. Adaptations to endosymbiosis in a cnidarian-dinoflagellate association: differential gene expression and specific gene duplications.

    PubMed

    Ganot, Philippe; Moya, Aurélie; Magnone, Virginie; Allemand, Denis; Furla, Paola; Sabourault, Cécile

    2011-07-01

    Trophic endosymbiosis between anthozoans and photosynthetic dinoflagellates forms the key foundation of reef ecosystems. Dysfunction and collapse of symbiosis lead to bleaching (symbiont expulsion), which is responsible for the severe worldwide decline of coral reefs. Molecular signals are central to the stability of this partnership and are therefore closely related to coral health. To decipher inter-partner signaling, we developed genomic resources (cDNA library and microarrays) from the symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis. Here we describe differential expression between symbiotic (also called zooxanthellate anemones) or aposymbiotic (also called bleached) A. viridis specimens, using microarray hybridizations and qPCR experiments. We mapped, for the first time, transcript abundance separately in the epidermal cell layer and the gastrodermal cells that host photosynthetic symbionts. Transcriptomic profiles showed large inter-individual variability, indicating that aposymbiosis could be induced by different pathways. We defined a restricted subset of 39 common genes that are characteristic of the symbiotic or aposymbiotic states. We demonstrated that transcription of many genes belonging to this set is specifically enhanced in the symbiotic cells (gastroderm). A model is proposed where the aposymbiotic and therefore heterotrophic state triggers vesicular trafficking, whereas the symbiotic and therefore autotrophic state favors metabolic exchanges between host and symbiont. Several genetic pathways were investigated in more detail: i) a key vitamin K-dependant process involved in the dinoflagellate-cnidarian recognition; ii) two cnidarian tissue-specific carbonic anhydrases involved in the carbon transfer from the environment to the intracellular symbionts; iii) host collagen synthesis, mostly supported by the symbiotic tissue. Further, we identified specific gene duplications and showed that the cnidarian-specific isoform was also up-regulated both in the

  6. Comparative Lipid Profiling of the Cnidarian Aiptasia pallida and Its Dinoflagellate Symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Teresa A.; Schmeitzel, John L.; Klein, Joshua A.; Hwang, Janice J.; Schwarz, Jodi A.

    2013-01-01

    Corals and other cnidarians house photosynthetic dinoflagellate symbionts within membrane-bound compartments inside gastrodermal cells. Nutritional interchanges between the partners produce carbohydrates and lipids for metabolism, growth, energy stores, and cellular structures. Although lipids play a central role in the both the energetics and the structural/morphological features of the symbiosis, previous research has primarily focused on the fatty acid and neutral lipid composition of the host and symbiont. In this study we conducted a mass spectrometry-based survey of the lipidomic changes associated with symbiosis in the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida, an important model system for coral symbiosis. Lipid extracts from A. pallida in and out of symbiosis with its symbiont Symbiodinium were prepared and analyzed using negative-ion electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Through this analysis we have identified, by exact mass and collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry (MS/MS), several classes of glycerophospholipids in A. pallida. Several molecular species of di-acyl phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine as well as 1-alkyl, 2-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidycholine were identified. The 1-alkyl, 2-acyl PEs are acid sensitive suggestive that they are plasmalogen PEs possessing a double bond at the 1-position of the alkyl linked chain. In addition, we identified several molecular species of phosphonosphingolipids called ceramide aminoethylphosphonates in anemone lipid extracts by the release of a characteristic negative product ion at m/z 124.014 during MS/MS analysis. Sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG), an anionic lipid often found in photosynthetic organisms, was identified as a prominent component of Symbiodinium lipid extracts. A comparison of anemone lipid profiles revealed a subset of lipids that show dramatic differences in abundance when anemones are in the symbiotic state as compared to the non

  7. Apoptosis and autophagy as mechanisms of dinoflagellate symbiont release during cnidarian bleaching: every which way you lose.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Simon R; Schnitzler, Christine E; Weis, Virginia M

    2007-12-22

    Cnidarian bleaching results from the breakdown in the symbiosis between the host cnidarian and its dinoflagellate symbiont. Coral bleaching in recent years has increasingly caused degradation and mortality of coral reefs on a global scale. Although much is understood about the environmental causes of bleaching, the underlying cellular mechanisms of symbiont release that drive the process are just beginning to be described. In this study, we investigated the roles of two cellular pathways, host cell apoptosis and autophagy, in the bleaching process of the symbiotic anemone Aiptasia pallida. Host cell apoptosis was experimentally manipulated using gene knockdown of an anemone caspase by RNA interference, chemical inhibition of caspase using ZVAD-fmk and an apoptosis-inducer wortmannin. Autophagy was manipulated by chemical inhibition using wortmannin or induction using rapamycin. The applications of multiple single treatments resulted in some increased bleaching in anemones under control conditions but no significant drop in bleaching in individuals subjected to a hyperthermic stress. These results indicated that no single pathway is responsible for symbiont release during bleaching. However, when multiple inhibitors were applied simultaneously to block both apoptosis and autophagy, there was a significant reduction in bleaching in heat-stressed anemones. Our results allow us to formulate a model for cellular processes involved in the control of cnidarian bleaching where apoptosis and autophagy act together in a see-saw mechanism such that if one is inhibited the other is induced. Similar interconnectivity between apoptosis and autophagy has previously been shown in vertebrates including involvement in an innate immune response to pathogens and parasites. This suggests that the bleaching response could be a modified immune response that recognizes and removes dysfunctional symbionts.

  8. Elucidating the evolutionary relationships of the Aiptasiidae, a widespread cnidarian-dinoflagellate model system (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Actiniaria: Metridioidea).

    PubMed

    Grajales, Alejandro; Rodríguez, Estefanía

    2016-01-01

    Sea anemones of the family Aiptasiidae sensu Grajales and Rodríguez (2014) are conspicuous members of shallow-water environments, including several species widely used as model systems for the study of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and coral bleaching. Although previously published phylogenetic studies of sea anemones recovered Aiptasiidae as polyphyletic, they only included a sparse sample in terms of its taxonomic diversity and membership of the family had not been yet revised. This study explores the phylogenetic relationships of this family using five molecular markers and including newly collected material from the geographical distribution of most of the currently described genera and species. We find a monophyletic family Aiptasiidae. All the currently proposed genera were recovered as monophyletic units, a finding also supported by diagnostic morphological characters. Our results confirm Bellactis and Laviactis as members of Aiptasiidae, also in agreement with previous morphological studies. The monophyly of the group is congruent with the morphological homogeneity of the members of this family. The obtained results also allow discussing the evolution of morphological characters within the family. Furthermore, we find evidence for and describe a new cryptic species, Exaiptasia brasiliensis sp. nov., based on molecular data, geographical distribution, and the identity of its endosymbiotic dinoflagellate.

  9. Metabolite profiling of symbiont and host during thermal stress and bleaching in a model cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Hillyer, Katie E; Tumanov, Sergey; Villas-Bôas, Silas; Davy, Simon K

    2016-02-01

    Bleaching (dinoflagellate symbiont loss) is one of the greatest threats facing coral reefs. The functional cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, which forms coral reefs, is based on the bi-directional exchange of nutrients. During thermal stress this exchange breaks down; however, major gaps remain in our understanding of the roles of free metabolite pools in symbiosis and homeostasis. In this study we applied gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to explore thermally induced changes in intracellular pools of amino and non-amino organic acids in each partner of the model sea anemone Aiptasia sp. and its dinoflagellate symbiont. Elevated temperatures (32 °C for 6 days) resulted in symbiont photoinhibition and bleaching. Thermal stress induced distinct changes in the metabolite profiles of both partners, associated with alterations to central metabolism, oxidative state, cell structure, biosynthesis and signalling. Principally, we detected elevated pools of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the symbiont, indicative of modifications to lipogenesis/lysis, membrane structure and nitrogen assimilation. In contrast, reductions of multiple PUFAs were detected in host pools, indicative of increased metabolism, peroxidation and/or reduced translocation of these groups. Accumulations of glycolysis intermediates were also observed in both partners, associated with photoinhibition and downstream reductions in carbohydrate metabolism. Correspondingly, we detected accumulations of amino acids and intermediate groups in both partners, with roles in gluconeogenesis and acclimation responses to oxidative stress. These data further our understanding of cellular responses to thermal stress in the symbiosis and generate hypotheses relating to the secondary roles of a number of compounds in homeostasis and heat-stress resistance.

  10. The Role of Complement in Cnidarian-Dinoflagellate Symbiosis and Immune Challenge in the Sea Anemone Aiptasia pallida

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Angela Z.; Kitchen, Sheila A.; Weis, Virginia M.

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is an innate immune pathway that in vertebrates, is responsible for initial recognition and ultimately phagocytosis and destruction of microbes. Several complement molecules including C3, Factor B, and mannose binding lectin associated serine proteases (MASP) have been characterized in invertebrates and while most studies have focused on their conserved role in defense against pathogens, little is known about their role in managing beneficial microbes. The purpose of this study was to (1) characterize complement pathway genes in the symbiotic sea anemone Aiptasia pallida, (2) investigate the evolution of complement genes in invertebrates, and (3) examine the potential dual role of complement genes Factor B and MASP in the onset and maintenance of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and immune challenge using qPCR based studies. The results demonstrate that A. pallida has multiple Factor B genes (Ap_Bf-1, Ap_Bf-2a, and Ap_Bf-2b) and one MASP gene (Ap_MASP). Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the evolutionary history of complement genes is complex, and there have been many gene duplications or gene loss events, even within members of the same phylum. Gene expression analyses revealed a potential role for complement in both onset and maintenance of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and immune challenge. Specifically, Ap_Bf-1 and Ap_MASP are significantly upregulated in the light at the onset of symbiosis and in response to challenge with the pathogen Serratia marcescens suggesting that they play a role in the initial recognition of both beneficial and harmful microbes. Ap_Bf-2b in contrast, was generally downregulated during the onset and maintenance of symbiosis and in response to challenge with S. marcescens. Therefore, the exact role of Ap_Bf-2b in response to microbes remains unclear, but the results suggest that the presence of microbes leads to repressed expression. Together, these results indicate functional divergence between Ap_Bf-1

  11. Extensive differences in gene expression between symbiotic and aposymbiotic cnidarians.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Erik M; Mouchka, Morgan E; Burriesci, Matthew S; Gallo, Natalya D; Schwarz, Jodi A; Pringle, John R

    2014-02-19

    Coral reefs provide habitats for a disproportionate number of marine species relative to the small area of the oceans that they occupy. The mutualism between the cnidarian animal hosts and their intracellular dinoflagellate symbionts provides the nutritional foundation for coral growth and formation of reef structures, because algal photosynthesis can provide >90% of the total energy of the host. Disruption of this symbiosis ("coral bleaching") is occurring on a large scale due primarily to anthropogenic factors and poses a major threat to the future of coral reefs. Despite the importance of this symbiosis, the cellular mechanisms involved in its establishment, maintenance, and breakdown remain largely unknown. We report our continued development of genomic tools to study these mechanisms in Aiptasia, a small sea anemone with great promise as a model system for studies of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis. Specifically, we have generated de novo assemblies of the transcriptomes of both a clonal line of symbiotic anemones and their endogenous dinoflagellate symbionts. We then compared transcript abundances in animals with and without dinoflagellates. This analysis identified >900 differentially expressed genes and allowed us to generate testable hypotheses about the cellular functions affected by symbiosis establishment. The differentially regulated transcripts include >60 encoding proteins that may play roles in transporting various nutrients between the symbiotic partners; many more encoding proteins functioning in several metabolic pathways, providing clues regarding how the transported nutrients may be used by the partners; and several encoding proteins that may be involved in host recognition and tolerance of the dinoflagellate.

  12. Extensive Differences in Gene Expression Between Symbiotic and Aposymbiotic Cnidarians

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Erik M.; Mouchka, Morgan E.; Burriesci, Matthew S.; Gallo, Natalya D.; Schwarz, Jodi A.; Pringle, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Coral reefs provide habitats for a disproportionate number of marine species relative to the small area of the oceans that they occupy. The mutualism between the cnidarian animal hosts and their intracellular dinoflagellate symbionts provides the nutritional foundation for coral growth and formation of reef structures, because algal photosynthesis can provide >90% of the total energy of the host. Disruption of this symbiosis (“coral bleaching”) is occurring on a large scale due primarily to anthropogenic factors and poses a major threat to the future of coral reefs. Despite the importance of this symbiosis, the cellular mechanisms involved in its establishment, maintenance, and breakdown remain largely unknown. We report our continued development of genomic tools to study these mechanisms in Aiptasia, a small sea anemone with great promise as a model system for studies of cnidarian–dinoflagellate symbiosis. Specifically, we have generated de novo assemblies of the transcriptomes of both a clonal line of symbiotic anemones and their endogenous dinoflagellate symbionts. We then compared transcript abundances in animals with and without dinoflagellates. This analysis identified >900 differentially expressed genes and allowed us to generate testable hypotheses about the cellular functions affected by symbiosis establishment. The differentially regulated transcripts include >60 encoding proteins that may play roles in transporting various nutrients between the symbiotic partners; many more encoding proteins functioning in several metabolic pathways, providing clues regarding how the transported nutrients may be used by the partners; and several encoding proteins that may be involved in host recognition and tolerance of the dinoflagellate. PMID:24368779

  13. Coral larvae exhibit few measurable transcriptional changes during the onset of coral-dinoflagellate endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Christine E; Weis, Virginia M

    2010-06-01

    The cellular mechanisms controlling the successful establishment of a stable mutualism between cnidarians and their dinoflagellate partners are largely unknown. The planula larva of the solitary Hawaiian scleractinian coral Fungia scutaria and its dinoflagellate symbiont Symbiodinium sp. type C1f represents an ideal model for studying the onset of cnidarian-dinoflagellate endosymbiosis due to the predictable availability of gametes, the ability to raise non-symbiotic larvae and establish the symbiosis experimentally, and the ability to precisely quantify infection success. The goal of this study was to identify genes differentially expressed in F. scutaria larvae during the initiation of endosymbiosis with Symbiodinium sp. C1f. Newly symbiotic larvae were compared to non-symbiotic larvae using a custom cDNA microarray. The 5184-feature array was constructed with cDNA libraries from newly symbiotic and non-symbiotic F. scutaria larvae, including 3072 features (60%) that were enriched for either state by subtractive hybridization. Our analyses revealed very few changes in the F. scutaria transcriptome as a result of infection with Symbiodinium sp. C1f, similar to other studies focused on the early stages of this symbiotic interaction. We suggest that these results may be due, in part, to an inability to detect the transcriptional signal from the small percentage of infected cells compared to uninfected cells. We discuss several other potential explanations for this result, including suggesting that certain types of Symbiodinium sp. may have evolved mechanisms to suppress or circumvent cnidarian host responses to infection.

  14. Isolation of clonal axenic strains of the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium and their growth and host specificity(1).

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tingting; Hambleton, Elizabeth A; DeNofrio, Jan C; Pringle, John R; Grossman, Arthur R

    2013-06-01

    The cnidarian-dinoflagellate mutualism is integral to the survival of the coral-reef ecosystem. Despite the enormous ecological and economic importance of corals, their cellular and molecular biology and the ways in which they respond to environmental change are still poorly understood. We have been developing a proxy system for examining the coral mutualism in which the dinoflagellate symbiont Symbiodinium is introduced into a clonal population of the host Aiptasia, a small sea anemone closely related to corals. To further develop the tools for this system, we generated five clonal, axenic strains of Symbiodinium and verified the lack of contaminants by growth on rich medium, microscopic examination, and PCR analysis. These strains were assigned to clades A (two strains), B, E, and F based on their chloroplast 23S rDNA sequences. Growth studies in liquid cultures showed that the clade B strain and one of the clade A strains were able to grow photoautotrophically (in light with no fixed carbon), mixotrophically (in light with fixed carbon), or heterotrophically (in dark with fixed carbon). The clade E strain, thought to be free-living, was able to grow photoautotrophically but not heterotrophically. Infection of an aposymbiotic Aiptasia host with the axenic strains showed consistent patterns of specificity, with only the clade B and one of the clade A strains able to successfully establish symbiosis. Overall, the Aiptasia-Symbiodinium association represents an important model system for dissecting aspects of the physiology and cellular and molecular biology of cnidarian-dinoflagellate mutualism and exploring issues that bear directly on coral bleaching.

  15. Study of cnidarian-algal symbiosis in the "omics" age.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eli; Weis, Virginia M

    2012-08-01

    The symbiotic associations between cnidarians and dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium) support productive and diverse ecosystems in coral reefs. Many aspects of this association, including the mechanistic basis of host-symbiont recognition and metabolic interaction, remain poorly understood. The first completed genome sequence for a symbiotic anthozoan is now available (the coral Acropora digitifera), and extensive expressed sequence tag resources are available for a variety of other symbiotic corals and anemones. These resources make it possible to profile gene expression, protein abundance, and protein localization associated with the symbiotic state. Here we review the history of "omics" studies of cnidarian-algal symbiosis and the current availability of sequence resources for corals and anemones, identifying genes putatively involved in symbiosis across 10 anthozoan species. The public availability of candidate symbiosis-associated genes leaves the field of cnidarian-algal symbiosis poised for in-depth comparative studies of sequence diversity and gene expression and for targeted functional studies of genes associated with symbiosis. Reviewing the progress to date suggests directions for future investigations of cnidarian-algal symbiosis that include (i) sequencing of Symbiodinium, (ii) proteomic analysis of the symbiosome membrane complex, (iii) glycomic analysis of Symbiodinium cell surfaces, and (iv) expression profiling of the gastrodermal cells hosting Symbiodinium.

  16. Trans-generational specificity within a cnidarian-algal symbiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, D. M.; Coffroth, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    Ocean warming and other anthropogenic stresses threaten the symbiosis between tropical reef cnidarians and their dinoflagellate endosymbionts ( Symbiodinium). Offspring of many cnidarians acquire their algal symbionts from the environment, and such flexibility could allow corals to respond to environmental changes between generations. To investigate the effect of both habitat and host genotype on symbiont acquisition, we transplanted aposymbiotic offspring of the common Caribbean octocoral Briareum asbestinum to (1) an environmentally different habitat that lacked B. asbestinum and (2) an environmentally similar habitat where local adults harbored Symbiodinium phylotypes that differed from parental colonies. Symbiont acquisition and establishment of symbioses over time was followed using a within-clade DNA marker (23S chloroplast rDNA) and a within-phylotype marker (unique alleles at a single microsatellite locus). Early in the symbiosis, B. asbestinum juveniles harbored multiple symbiont phylotypes, regardless of source (parent or site). However, with time ( 4 yr), offspring established symbioses with the symbiont phylotype dominant in the parental colonies, regardless of transplant location. Within-phylotype analyses of the symbionts revealed a similar pattern, with offspring acquiring the allelic variant common in symbionts in the parental population regardless of the environment in which the offspring was reared. These data suggest that in this host species, host-symbiont specificity is a genetically determined trait. If this level of specificity is widespread among other symbiotic cnidarians, many cnidarian-algal symbioses may not be able to respond to rapid, climate change-associated environmental changes by means of between-generation switching of symbionts.

  17. Induction of Gametogenesis in the Cnidarian Endosymbiosis Model Aiptasia sp.

    PubMed

    Grawunder, Désirée; Hambleton, Elizabeth A; Bucher, Madeline; Wolfowicz, Iliona; Bechtoldt, Natascha; Guse, Annika

    2015-10-26

    Endosymbiosis is widespread among cnidarians and is of high ecological relevance. The tropical sea anemone Aiptasia sp. is a laboratory model system for endosymbiosis between reef-building corals and photosynthetic dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium. Here we identify the key environmental cues to induce reproducible spawning in Aiptasia under controlled laboratory conditions. We find that simulating a lunar cycle with blue-wavelength light is necessary to promote abundant gamete production and synchronous release in well-fed animals. Sexual reproduction rates are genetically determined and differ among clonal lines under similar conditions. We also find the inverse difference in rates of asexual reproduction. This study provides the requisite basis for further development of the Aiptasia model system, allowing analysis of basic cellular and molecular mechanisms in the laboratory as well as investigations of broad questions of ecological and evolutionary relevance.

  18. Induction of Gametogenesis in the Cnidarian Endosymbiosis Model Aiptasia sp.

    PubMed Central

    Grawunder, Désirée; Hambleton, Elizabeth A.; Bucher, Madeline; Wolfowicz, Iliona; Bechtoldt, Natascha; Guse, Annika

    2015-01-01

    Endosymbiosis is widespread among cnidarians and is of high ecological relevance. The tropical sea anemone Aiptasia sp. is a laboratory model system for endosymbiosis between reef-building corals and photosynthetic dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium. Here we identify the key environmental cues to induce reproducible spawning in Aiptasia under controlled laboratory conditions. We find that simulating a lunar cycle with blue-wavelength light is necessary to promote abundant gamete production and synchronous release in well-fed animals. Sexual reproduction rates are genetically determined and differ among clonal lines under similar conditions. We also find the inverse difference in rates of asexual reproduction. This study provides the requisite basis for further development of the Aiptasia model system, allowing analysis of basic cellular and molecular mechanisms in the laboratory as well as investigations of broad questions of ecological and evolutionary relevance. PMID:26498008

  19. Acquisition and Use of Nematocysts by Cnidarian Predators

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Paul G.

    2009-01-01

    Although toxic, physically destructive, and produced solely by cnidarians, cnidocysts are acquired, stored, and used by some predators of cnidarians. Despite knowledge of this phenomenon for well over a century, little empirical evidence details the mechanisms of how (and even why) these organisms use organelles of cnidarians. However, in the past twenty years a number of published experimental investigations address two of the fundamental questions of nematocyst acquisition and use by cnidarian predators: 1) how are cnidarian predators protected from cnidocyst discharge during feeding, and 2) how are the nematocysts used by the predator? PMID:19269306

  20. Interactions of cnidarian toxins with the immune system.

    PubMed

    Suput, Dusan

    2011-10-01

    Cnidarians comprise four classes of toxic marine animals: Anthozoa, Cubozoa, Scyphozoa and Hydrozoa. They are the largest and probably the oldest phylum of toxic marine animals. Any contact with a cnidarian, especially the box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri), can be fatal, but most cnidarians do not possess sufficiently strong venomous apparatus to penetrate the human skin, whereas others rarely come into contact with human beings. Only a small, almost negligible percentage of the vast wealth of cnidarian toxins has been studied in detail. Many polypeptide cnidarian toxins are immunogenic, and cross-reactivity between several jellyfish venoms has been reported. Cnidarians also possess components of innate immunity, and some of those components have been preserved in evolution. On the other hand, cnidarian toxins have already been used for the design of immunotoxins to treat cancer, whereas other cnidarian toxins can modulate the immune system in mammals, including man. This review will focus on a short overview of cnidarian toxins, on the innate immunity of cnidarians, and on the mode of action of cnidarian toxins which can modulate the immune system in mammals. Emphasis is palced on those toxins which block voltage activated potassium channels in the cells of the immune system.

  1. Cnidarian phylogenetic relationships as revealed by mitogenomics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cnidaria (corals, sea anemones, hydroids, jellyfish) is a phylum of relatively simple aquatic animals characterized by the presence of the cnidocyst: a cell containing a giant capsular organelle with an eversible tubule (cnida). Species within Cnidaria have life cycles that involve one or both of the two distinct body forms, a typically benthic polyp, which may or may not be colonial, and a typically pelagic mostly solitary medusa. The currently accepted taxonomic scheme subdivides Cnidaria into two main assemblages: Anthozoa (Hexacorallia + Octocorallia) – cnidarians with a reproductive polyp and the absence of a medusa stage – and Medusozoa (Cubozoa, Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa, Staurozoa) – cnidarians that usually possess a reproductive medusa stage. Hypothesized relationships among these taxa greatly impact interpretations of cnidarian character evolution. Results We expanded the sampling of cnidarian mitochondrial genomes, particularly from Medusozoa, to reevaluate phylogenetic relationships within Cnidaria. Our phylogenetic analyses based on a mitochogenomic dataset support many prior hypotheses, including monophyly of Hexacorallia, Octocorallia, Medusozoa, Cubozoa, Staurozoa, Hydrozoa, Carybdeida, Chirodropida, and Hydroidolina, but reject the monophyly of Anthozoa, indicating that the Octocorallia + Medusozoa relationship is not the result of sampling bias, as proposed earlier. Further, our analyses contradict Scyphozoa [Discomedusae + Coronatae], Acraspeda [Cubozoa + Scyphozoa], as well as the hypothesis that Staurozoa is the sister group to all the other medusozoans. Conclusions Cnidarian mitochondrial genomic data contain phylogenetic signal informative for understanding the evolutionary history of this phylum. Mitogenome-based phylogenies, which reject the monophyly of Anthozoa, provide further evidence for the polyp-first hypothesis. By rejecting the traditional Acraspeda and Scyphozoa hypotheses, these analyses suggest that

  2. Functional diversity in coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Stat, Michael; Morris, Emily; Gates, Ruth D

    2008-07-08

    Symbioses are widespread in nature and occur along a continuum from parasitism to mutualism. Coral-dinoflagellate symbioses are defined as mutualistic because both partners receive benefit from the association via the exchange of nutrients. This successful interaction underpins the growth and formation of coral reefs. The symbiotic dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium is genetically diverse containing eight divergent lineages (clades A-H). Corals predominantly associate with clade C Symbiodinium and to a lesser extent with clades A, B, D, F, and G. Variation in the function and interactive physiology of different coral-dinoflagellate assemblages is virtually unexplored but is an important consideration when developing the contextual framework of factors that contribute to coral reef resilience. In this study, we present evidence that clade A Symbiodinium are functionally less beneficial to corals than the dominant clade C Symbiodinium and may represent parasitic rather than mutualistic symbionts. Our hypothesis is supported by (i) a significant correlation between the presence of Symbiodinium clade A and health-compromised coral; (ii) a phylogeny and genetic diversity within Symbiodinium that suggests a different evolutionary trajectory for clade A compared with the other dominant Symbiodinium lineages; and (iii) a significantly lower amount of carbon fixed and released by clade A in the presence of a coral synthetic host factor as compared with the dominant coral symbiont lineage, clade C. Collectively, these data suggest that along the symbiotic continuum the interaction between clade A Symbiodinium and corals may be closer to parasitism than mutualism.

  3. Aiptasia sp. larvae as a model to reveal mechanisms of symbiont selection in cnidarians

    PubMed Central

    Wolfowicz, Iliona; Baumgarten, Sebastian; Voss, Philipp A.; Hambleton, Elizabeth A.; Voolstra, Christian R.; Hatta, Masayuki; Guse, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Symbiosis, defined as the persistent association between two distinct species, is an evolutionary and ecologically critical phenomenon facilitating survival of both partners in diverse habitats. The biodiversity of coral reef ecosystems depends on a functional symbiosis with photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the highly diverse genus Symbiodinium, which reside in coral host cells and continuously support their nutrition. The mechanisms underlying symbiont selection to establish a stable endosymbiosis in non-symbiotic juvenile corals are unclear. Here we show for the first time that symbiont selection patterns for larvae of two Acropora coral species and the model anemone Aiptasia are similar under controlled conditions. We find that Aiptasia larvae distinguish between compatible and incompatible symbionts during uptake into the gastric cavity and phagocytosis. Using RNA-Seq, we identify a set of candidate genes potentially involved in symbiosis establishment. Together, our data complement existing molecular resources to mechanistically dissect symbiont phagocytosis in cnidarians under controlled conditions, thereby strengthening the role of Aiptasia larvae as a powerful model for cnidarian endosymbiosis establishment. PMID:27582179

  4. Aiptasia sp. larvae as a model to reveal mechanisms of symbiont selection in cnidarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfowicz, Iliona; Baumgarten, Sebastian; Voss, Philipp A.; Hambleton, Elizabeth A.; Voolstra, Christian R.; Hatta, Masayuki; Guse, Annika

    2016-09-01

    Symbiosis, defined as the persistent association between two distinct species, is an evolutionary and ecologically critical phenomenon facilitating survival of both partners in diverse habitats. The biodiversity of coral reef ecosystems depends on a functional symbiosis with photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the highly diverse genus Symbiodinium, which reside in coral host cells and continuously support their nutrition. The mechanisms underlying symbiont selection to establish a stable endosymbiosis in non-symbiotic juvenile corals are unclear. Here we show for the first time that symbiont selection patterns for larvae of two Acropora coral species and the model anemone Aiptasia are similar under controlled conditions. We find that Aiptasia larvae distinguish between compatible and incompatible symbionts during uptake into the gastric cavity and phagocytosis. Using RNA-Seq, we identify a set of candidate genes potentially involved in symbiosis establishment. Together, our data complement existing molecular resources to mechanistically dissect symbiont phagocytosis in cnidarians under controlled conditions, thereby strengthening the role of Aiptasia larvae as a powerful model for cnidarian endosymbiosis establishment.

  5. Mapping carbon fate during bleaching in a model cnidarian symbiosis: the application of (13) C metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Hillyer, Katie E; Dias, Daniel A; Lutz, Adrian; Roessner, Ute; Davy, Simon K

    2017-03-08

    Coral bleaching is a major threat to the persistence of coral reefs. Yet we lack detailed knowledge of the metabolic interactions that determine symbiosis function and bleaching-induced change. We mapped autotrophic carbon fate within the free metabolite pools of both partners of a model cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis (Aiptasia-Symbiodinium) during exposure to thermal stress via the stable isotope tracer ((13) C bicarbonate), coupled to GC-MS. Symbiont photodamage and pronounced bleaching coincided with substantial increases in the turnover of non(13) C-labelled pools in the dinoflagellate (lipid and starch store catabolism). However, (13) C enrichment of multiple compounds associated with ongoing carbon fixation and de novo biosynthesis pathways was maintained (glucose, fatty acid and lipogenesis intermediates). Minimal change was also observed in host pools of (13) C-enriched glucose (a major symbiont-derived mobile product). However, host pathways downstream showed altered carbon fate and/or pool composition, with accumulation of compatible solutes and nonenzymic antioxidant precursors. In hospite symbionts continue to provide mobile products to the host, but at a significant cost to themselves, necessitating the mobilization of energy stores. These data highlight the need to further elucidate the role of metabolic interactions between symbiotic partners, during the process of thermal acclimation and coral bleaching.

  6. Diversity of Cnidarian Muscles: Function, Anatomy, Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Leclère, Lucas; Röttinger, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The ability to perform muscle contractions is one of the most important and distinctive features of eumetazoans. As the sister group to bilaterians, cnidarians (sea anemones, corals, jellyfish, and hydroids) hold an informative phylogenetic position for understanding muscle evolution. Here, we review current knowledge on muscle function, diversity, development, regeneration and evolution in cnidarians. Cnidarian muscles are involved in various activities, such as feeding, escape, locomotion and defense, in close association with the nervous system. This variety is reflected in the large diversity of muscle organizations found in Cnidaria. Smooth epithelial muscle is thought to be the most common type, and is inferred to be the ancestral muscle type for Cnidaria, while striated muscle fibers and non-epithelial myocytes would have been convergently acquired within Cnidaria. Current knowledge of cnidarian muscle development and its regeneration is limited. While orthologs of myogenic regulatory factors such as MyoD have yet to be found in cnidarian genomes, striated muscle formation potentially involves well-conserved myogenic genes, such as twist and mef2. Although satellite cells have yet to be identified in cnidarians, muscle plasticity (e.g., de- and re-differentiation, fiber repolarization) in a regenerative context and its potential role during regeneration has started to be addressed in a few cnidarian systems. The development of novel tools to study those organisms has created new opportunities to investigate in depth the development and regeneration of cnidarian muscle cells and how they contribute to the regenerative process. PMID:28168188

  7. Diversity of Cnidarian Muscles: Function, Anatomy, Development and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Leclère, Lucas; Röttinger, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The ability to perform muscle contractions is one of the most important and distinctive features of eumetazoans. As the sister group to bilaterians, cnidarians (sea anemones, corals, jellyfish, and hydroids) hold an informative phylogenetic position for understanding muscle evolution. Here, we review current knowledge on muscle function, diversity, development, regeneration and evolution in cnidarians. Cnidarian muscles are involved in various activities, such as feeding, escape, locomotion and defense, in close association with the nervous system. This variety is reflected in the large diversity of muscle organizations found in Cnidaria. Smooth epithelial muscle is thought to be the most common type, and is inferred to be the ancestral muscle type for Cnidaria, while striated muscle fibers and non-epithelial myocytes would have been convergently acquired within Cnidaria. Current knowledge of cnidarian muscle development and its regeneration is limited. While orthologs of myogenic regulatory factors such as MyoD have yet to be found in cnidarian genomes, striated muscle formation potentially involves well-conserved myogenic genes, such as twist and mef2. Although satellite cells have yet to be identified in cnidarians, muscle plasticity (e.g., de- and re-differentiation, fiber repolarization) in a regenerative context and its potential role during regeneration has started to be addressed in a few cnidarian systems. The development of novel tools to study those organisms has created new opportunities to investigate in depth the development and regeneration of cnidarian muscle cells and how they contribute to the regenerative process.

  8. CnidBase: The Cnidarian Evolutionary Genomics Database

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Joseph F.; Finnerty, John R.

    2003-01-01

    CnidBase, the Cnidarian Evolutionary Genomics Database, is a tool for investigating the evolutionary, developmental and ecological factors that affect gene expression and gene function in cnidarians. In turn, CnidBase will help to illuminate the role of specific genes in shaping cnidarian biodiversity in the present day and in the distant past. CnidBase highlights evolutionary changes between species within the phylum Cnidaria and structures genomic and expression data to facilitate comparisons to non-cnidarian metazoans. CnidBase aims to further the progress that has already been made in the realm of cnidarian evolutionary genomics by creating a central community resource which will help drive future research and facilitate more accurate classification and comparison of new experimental data with existing data. CnidBase is available at http://cnidbase.bu.edu/. PMID:12519972

  9. Speciation and symbiotic dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Blank, R J; Trench, R K

    1985-08-16

    Morphometric analyses based on three-dimensional reconstruction of the nuclei of four different strains of the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium microadriaticum, the algae that inhabit corals, giant clams, and other marine invertebrates, revealed marked differences in chromosome numbers and chromosome volumes. The differences are not consistent with different ploidy states within the same species, but can most easily be interpreted as indicating different species.

  10. Methodological approaches for nanotoxicology using cnidarian models.

    PubMed

    Ambrosone, Alfredo; Tortiglione, Claudia

    2013-03-01

    The remarkable amenability of aquatic invertebrates to laboratory manipulation has already made a few species belonging to the phylum Cnidaria as attracting systems for exploring animal development. The proliferation of molecular and genomic tools, including the whole genomic sequence of the freshwater polyp Hydra vulgaris and the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, further enhances the promise of these species to investigate the evolution of key aspects of development biology. In addition, the facility with which cnidarian population can be investigated within their natural ecological context suggests that these models may be profitably expanded to address important questions in ecology and toxicology. In this review, we explore the traits that make Hydra and Nematostella exceptionally attractive model organisms in context of nanotoxicology, and highlight a number of methods and developments likely to further increase that utility in the near future.

  11. Back to the Basics: Cnidarians Start to Fire.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Thomas C G; Klimovich, Alexander; Domazet-Lošo, Tomislav; Gründer, Stefan; Holstein, Thomas W; Jékely, Gáspár; Miller, David J; Murillo-Rincon, Andrea P; Rentzsch, Fabian; Richards, Gemma S; Schröder, Katja; Technau, Ulrich; Yuste, Rafael

    2017-02-01

    The nervous systems of cnidarians, pre-bilaterian animals that diverged close to the base of the metazoan radiation, are structurally simple and thus have great potential to reveal fundamental principles of neural circuits. Unfortunately, cnidarians have thus far been relatively intractable to electrophysiological and genetic techniques and consequently have been largely passed over by neurobiologists. However, recent advances in molecular and imaging methods are fueling a renaissance of interest in and research into cnidarians nervous systems. Here, we review current knowledge on the nervous systems of cnidarian species and propose that researchers should seize this opportunity and undertake the study of members of this phylum as strategic experimental systems with great basic and translational relevance for neuroscience.

  12. Theoretical Study of Dinoflagellate Bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Yu; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2017-03-01

    Dinoflagellates are the most ubiquitous luminescent protists in the marine environment and have drawn much attention for their crucial roles in marine ecosystems. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence has been applied in underwater target detection. The luminescent system of dinoflagellates is a typical luciferin-luciferase one. However, the excited-state oxyluciferin is not the light emitter of dinoflagellate bioluminescence as in most luciferin-luciferase bioluminescent organisms. The oxyluciferin of bioluminescent dinoflagellates is not fluorescent, whereas its luciferin emits bright fluorescence with similar wavelength of the bioluminescence. What is the light emitter of dinoflagellate bioluminescence and what is the chemical process of the light emission like? These questions have not been answered by the limited experimental evidence so far. In this study, for the first time, the density functional calculation is employed to investigate the geometries and properties of luciferin and oxyluciferin of bioluminescent dinoflagellate. The calculated results agree with the experimental observations and indicate the luciferin or its analogue, rather than oxyluciferin, is the bioluminophore of dinoflagellate bioluminescence. A rough mechanism involving energy transfer is proposed for dinoflagellate bioluminescence.

  13. Evidence that glucose is the major transferred metabolite in dinoflagellate–cnidarian symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Burriesci, Matthew S.; Raab, Theodore K.; Pringle, John R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Reef-building corals and many other cnidarians are symbiotic with dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. It has long been known that the endosymbiotic algae transfer much of their photosynthetically fixed carbon to the host and that this can provide much of the host's total energy. However, it has remained unclear which metabolite(s) are directly translocated from the algae into the host tissue. We reexamined this question in the small sea anemone Aiptasia using labeling of intact animals in the light with 13C-bicarbonate, rapid homogenization and separation of animal and algal fractions, and analysis of metabolite labeling by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We found labeled glucose in the animal fraction within 2 min of exposure to 13C-bicarbonate, whereas no significant labeling of other compounds was observed within the first 10 min. Although considerable previous evidence has suggested that glycerol might be a major translocated metabolite, we saw no significant labeling of glycerol within the first hour, and incubation of intact animals with 13C-labeled glycerol did not result in a rapid production of 13C-glucose. In contrast, when Symbiodinium cells freshly isolated from host tissue were exposed to light and 13C-bicarbonate in the presence of host homogenate, labeled glycerol, but not glucose, was detected in the medium. We also observed early production of labeled glucose, but not glycerol, in three coral species. Taken together, the results suggest that glucose is the major translocated metabolite in dinoflagellate–cnidarian symbiosis and that the release of glycerol from isolated algae may be part of a stress response. PMID:22956249

  14. Thermal stress promotes host mitochondrial degradation in symbiotic cnidarians: are the batteries of the reef going to run out?

    PubMed

    Dunn, Simon R; Pernice, Mathieu; Green, Kathryn; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Dove, Sophie G

    2012-01-01

    The symbiotic relationship between cnidarians and their dinoflagellate symbionts, Symbiodinium spp, which underpins the formation of tropical coral reefs, can be destabilized by rapid changes to environmental conditions. Although some studies have concluded that a breakdown in the symbiosis begins with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation within the symbiont due to a decoupling of photosynthesis, others have reported the release of viable symbionts via a variety of host cell derived mechanisms. We explored an alternative model focused upon changes in host cnidarian mitochondrial integrity in response to thermal stress. Mitochondria are often likened to being batteries of the cell, providing energy in the form of ATP, and controlling cellular pathway activation and ROS generation. The overall morphology of host mitochondria was compared to that of associated symbionts under an experimental thermal stress using confocal and electron microscopy. The results demonstrate that hyperthermic stress induces the degradation of cnidarian host mitochondria that is independent of symbiont cellular deterioration. The potential sites of host mitochondrial disruption were also assessed by measuring changes in the expression of genes associated with electron transport and ATP synthesis using quantitative RT-PCR. The primary site of degradation appeared to be downstream of complex III of the electron transport chain with a significant reduction in host cytochrome c and ATP synthase expression. The consequences of reduced expression could limit the capacity of the host to mitigate ROS generation and maintain both organelle integrity and cellular energy supplies. The disruption of host mitochondria, cellular homeostasis, and subsequent cell death irrespective of symbiont integrity highlights the importance of the host response to thermal stress and in symbiosis dysfunction that has substantial implications for understanding how coral reefs will survive in the face of

  15. Thermal Stress Promotes Host Mitochondrial Degradation in Symbiotic Cnidarians: Are the Batteries of the Reef Going to Run Out?

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Simon R.; Pernice, Mathieu; Green, Kathryn; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Dove, Sophie G.

    2012-01-01

    The symbiotic relationship between cnidarians and their dinoflagellate symbionts, Symbiodinium spp, which underpins the formation of tropical coral reefs, can be destabilized by rapid changes to environmental conditions. Although some studies have concluded that a breakdown in the symbiosis begins with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation within the symbiont due to a decoupling of photosynthesis, others have reported the release of viable symbionts via a variety of host cell derived mechanisms. We explored an alternative model focused upon changes in host cnidarian mitochondrial integrity in response to thermal stress. Mitochondria are often likened to being batteries of the cell, providing energy in the form of ATP, and controlling cellular pathway activation and ROS generation. The overall morphology of host mitochondria was compared to that of associated symbionts under an experimental thermal stress using confocal and electron microscopy. The results demonstrate that hyperthermic stress induces the degradation of cnidarian host mitochondria that is independent of symbiont cellular deterioration. The potential sites of host mitochondrial disruption were also assessed by measuring changes in the expression of genes associated with electron transport and ATP synthesis using quantitative RT-PCR. The primary site of degradation appeared to be downstream of complex III of the electron transport chain with a significant reduction in host cytochrome c and ATP synthase expression. The consequences of reduced expression could limit the capacity of the host to mitigate ROS generation and maintain both organelle integrity and cellular energy supplies. The disruption of host mitochondria, cellular homeostasis, and subsequent cell death irrespective of symbiont integrity highlights the importance of the host response to thermal stress and in symbiosis dysfunction that has substantial implications for understanding how coral reefs will survive in the face of

  16. The cellular and molecular basis of cnidarian neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rentzsch, Fabian; Layden, Michael; Manuel, Michaël

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenesis initiates during early development and it continues through later developmental stages and in adult animals to enable expansion, remodeling, and homeostasis of the nervous system. The generation of nerve cells has been analyzed in detail in few bilaterian model organisms, leaving open many questions about the evolution of this process. As the sister group to bilaterians, cnidarians occupy an informative phylogenetic position to address the early evolution of cellular and molecular aspects of neurogenesis and to understand common principles of neural development. Here we review studies in several cnidarian model systems that have revealed significant similarities and interesting differences compared to neurogenesis in bilaterian species, and between different cnidarian taxa. Cnidarian neurogenesis is currently best understood in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, where it includes epithelial neural progenitor cells that express transcription factors of the soxB and atonal families. Notch signaling regulates the number of these neural progenitor cells, achaete-scute and dmrt genes are required for their further development and Wnt and BMP signaling appear to be involved in the patterning of the nervous system. In contrast to many vertebrates and Drosophila, cnidarians have a high capacity to generate neurons throughout their lifetime and during regeneration. Utilizing this feature of cnidarian biology will likely allow gaining new insights into the similarities and differences of embryonic and regenerative neurogenesis. The use of different cnidarian model systems and their expanding experimental toolkits will thus continue to provide a better understanding of evolutionary and developmental aspects of nervous system formation. WIREs Dev Biol 2017, 6:e257. doi: 10.1002/wdev.257 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  17. Evolution of eumetazoan nervous systems: insights from cnidarians

    PubMed Central

    Kelava, Iva; Rentzsch, Fabian; Technau, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians, the sister group to bilaterians, have a simple diffuse nervous system. This morphological simplicity and their phylogenetic position make them a crucial group in the study of the evolution of the nervous system. The development of their nervous systems is of particular interest, as by uncovering the genetic programme that underlies it, and comparing it with the bilaterian developmental programme, it is possible to make assumptions about the genes and processes involved in the development of ancestral nervous systems. Recent advances in sequencing methods, genetic interference techniques and transgenic technology have enabled us to get a first glimpse into the molecular network underlying the development of a cnidarian nervous system—in particular the nervous system of the anthozoan Nematostella vectensis. It appears that much of the genetic network of the nervous system development is partly conserved between cnidarians and bilaterians, with Wnt and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling, and Sox genes playing a crucial part in the differentiation of neurons. However, cnidarians possess some specific characteristics, and further studies are necessary to elucidate the full regulatory network. The work on cnidarian neurogenesis further accentuates the need to study non-model organisms in order to gain insights into processes that shaped present-day lineages during the course of evolution. PMID:26554048

  18. Molecular assessment of heterotrophy and prey digestion in zooxanthellate cnidarians.

    PubMed

    Leal, M C; Nejstgaard, J C; Calado, R; Thompson, M E; Frischer, M E

    2014-08-01

    Zooxanthellate cnidarians are trophically complex, relying on both autotrophy and heterotrophy. Although several aspects of heterotrophy have been studied in these organisms, information linking prey capture with digestion is still missing. We used prey-specific PCR-based tools to assess feeding and prey digestion of two zooxanthellate cnidarians - the tropical sea anemone Aiptasia sp. and the scleractinian coral Oculina arbuscula. Prey DNA disappeared rapidly for the initial 1-3 days, whereas complete digestion of prey DNA required up to 10 days in O. arbuscula and 5 or 6 days in Aiptasia sp. depending on prey species. These digestion times are considerably longer than previously reported from microscopy-based examination of zooxanthellate cnidarians and prey DNA breakdown in other marine invertebrates, but similar to prey DNA breakdown reported from terrestrial invertebrates such as heteroptera and spiders. Deprivation of external prey induced increased digestion rates during the first days after feeding in O. arbuscula, but after 6 days of digestion, there were no differences in the remaining prey levels in fed and unfed corals. This study indicates that prey digestion by symbiotic corals may be slower than previously reported and varies with the type of prey, the cnidarian species and its feeding history. These observations have important implications for bioenergetic and trophodynamic studies on zooxanthellate cnidarians.

  19. Hemolytic venoms from marine cnidarian jellyfish – an overview

    PubMed Central

    Mariottini, Gian Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Cnidarian jellyfish are viewed as an emergent problem in several coastal zones throughout the world. Recurrent outbreaks pose a serious threat to tourists and bathers, as well as to sea-workers, involving health and economical aspects. As a rule, cnidarian stinging as a consequence of nematocyst firing induces merely local symptoms but cardiovascular or neurological complications can also occur. Hemolysis is a frequent effect of cnidarian stinging; this dangerous condition is known to be caused by several venoms and can sometimes be lethal. At present, the bulk of data concerning hemolytic cnidarian venoms comes from the study of benthic species, such as sea anemones and soft corals, but hemolytic factors were found in venoms of several siphonophore, cubozoan and scyphozoan jellyfish, which are mainly involved in the envenomation of bathers and sea-workers. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review the scientific literature concerning the hemolytic venoms from cnidarian jellyfish taking into consideration their importance in human pathology as well as health implications and possible therapeutic measures. PMID:25386336

  20. Development and Symbiosis Establishment in the Cnidarian Endosymbiosis Model Aiptasia sp.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Madeline; Wolfowicz, Iliona; Voss, Philipp A; Hambleton, Elizabeth A; Guse, Annika

    2016-01-25

    Symbiosis between photosynthetic algae and heterotrophic organisms is widespread. One prominent example of high ecological relevance is the endosymbiosis between dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium and reef-building corals, which typically acquire symbionts anew each generation during larval stages. The tropical sea anemone Aiptasia sp. is a laboratory model system for this endosymbiosis and, similar to corals, produces non-symbiotic larvae that establish symbiosis by phagocytosing Symbiodinium from the environment into the endoderm. Here we generate the first overview of Aiptasia embryogenesis and larval development and establish in situ hybridization to analyze expression patterns of key early developmental regulators. Next, we quantify morphological changes in developing larvae and find a substantial enlargement of the gastric cavity over time. Symbiont acquisition starts soon after mouth formation and symbionts occupy a major portion of the host cell in which they reside. During the first 14 days of development, infection efficiency remains constant while in contrast, localization of phagocytosed symbionts changes, indicating that the occurrence of functional phagocytosing cells may be developmentally regulated. Taken together, here we provide the essential framework to further develop Aiptasia as a model system for the analysis of symbiosis establishment in cnidarian larvae at the molecular level.

  1. Symbiotic state influences life-history strategy of a clonal cnidarian

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Brian L.; Dimond, James L.; Muller-Parker, Gisèle

    2014-01-01

    Along the North American Pacific coast, the common intertidal sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima engages in facultative, flexible symbioses with Symbiodinium muscatinei (a dinoflagellate) and Elliptochloris marina (a chlorophyte). Determining how symbiotic state affects host fitness is essential to understanding the ecological significance of engaging in such flexible relationships with diverse symbionts. Fitness consequences of hosting S. muscatinei, E. marina or negligible numbers of either symbiont (aposymbiosis) were investigated by measuring growth, cloning by fission and gonad development after 8.5–11 months of sustained exposure to high, moderate or low irradiance under seasonal environmental conditions. Both symbiotic state and irradiance affected host fitness, leading to divergent life-history strategies. Moderate and high irradiances led to a greater level of gonad development in individuals hosting E. marina, while high irradiance and high summer temperature promoted cloning in individuals hosting S. muscatinei and reduced fitness of aposymbiotic anemones. Associating with S. muscatinei may contribute to the success of A. elegantissima as a spatial competitor on the high shore: (i) by offsetting the costs of living under high temperature and irradiance conditions, and (ii) by promoting a high fission rate and clonal expansion. Our results suggest that basic life-history characteristics of a clonal cnidarian can be affected by the identity of the endosymbionts it hosts. PMID:25009060

  2. A novel minicollagen gene links cnidarians and myxozoans

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Jason W.; Okamura, Beth; Hartikainen, Hanna; Secombes, Chris J.

    2011-01-01

    Myxozoans are enigmatic endoparasitic organisms sharing morphological features with bilateria, protists and cnidarians. This, coupled with their highly divergent gene sequences, has greatly obscured their phylogenetic affinities. Here we report the sequencing and characterization of a minicollagen homologue (designated Tb-Ncol-1) in the myxozoan Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae. Minicollagens are phylum-specific genes encoding cnidarian nematocyst proteins. Sequence analysis revealed a cysteine-rich domain (CRD) architecture and genomic organization similar to group 1 minicollagens. Homology modelling predicted similar three-dimensional structures to Hydra CRDs despite deviations from the canonical pattern of group 1 minicollagens. The discovery of this minicollagen gene strongly supports myxozoans as cnidarians that have radiated as endoparasites of freshwater, marine and terrestrial hosts. It also reveals novel protein sequence variation of relevance to understanding the evolution of nematocyst complexity, and indicates a molecular/morphological link between myxozoan polar capsules and cnidarian nematocysts. Our study is the first to illustrate the power of using genes related to a taxon-specific novelty for phylogenetic inference within the Metazoa, and it exemplifies how the evolutionary relationships of other metazoans characterized by extreme sequence divergence could be similarly resolved. PMID:20810433

  3. Symbiosis induces widespread changes in the proteome of the model cnidarian Aiptasia.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Clinton A; Ameismeier, Michael F; Peng, Lifeng; Weis, Virginia M; Grossman, Arthur R; Davy, Simon K

    2016-07-01

    Coral reef ecosystems are metabolically founded on the mutualism between corals and photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. The glass anemone Aiptasia sp. has become a tractable model for this symbiosis, and recent advances in genetic information have enabled the use of mass spectrometry-based proteomics in this model. We utilized label-free liquid chromatography electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry to analyze the effects of symbiosis on the proteomes of symbiotic and aposymbiotic Aiptasia. We identified and obtained relative quantification of more than 3,300 proteins in 1,578 protein clusters, with 81 protein clusters showing significantly different expression between symbiotic states. Symbiotic anemones showed significantly higher expression of proteins involved in lipid storage and transport, nitrogen transport and cycling, intracellular trafficking, endocytosis and inorganic carbon transport. These changes reflect shifts in host metabolism and nutrient reserves due to increased nutritional exchange with the symbionts, as well as mechanisms for supplying inorganic nutrients to the algae. Aposymbiotic anemones exhibited increased expression of multiple systems responsible for mediating reactive oxygen stress, suggesting that the host derives direct or indirect protection from oxidative stress while in symbiosis. Aposymbiotic anemones also increased their expression of an array of proteases and chitinases, indicating a metabolic shift from autotrophy to heterotrophy. These results provide a comprehensive Aiptasia proteome with more direct relative quantification of protein abundance than transcriptomic methods. The extension of "omics" techniques to this model system will allow more powerful studies of coral physiology, ecosystem function, and the effects of biotic and abiotic stress on the coral-dinoflagellate mutualism.

  4. Endobiotic bacteria and their pathogenic potential in cnidarian tentacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuett, Christian; Doepke, Hilke

    2010-09-01

    Endobiotic bacteria colonize the tentacles of cnidaria. This paper provides first insight into the bacterial spectrum and its potential of pathogenic activities inside four cnidarian species. Sample material originating from Scottish waters comprises the jellyfish species Cyanea capillata and C. lamarckii, hydrozoa Tubularia indivisa and sea anemone Sagartia elegans. Mixed cultures of endobiotic bacteria, pure cultures selected on basis of haemolysis, but also lyophilized samples were prepared from tentacles and used for DGGE-profiling with subsequent phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA fragments. Bacteria were detected in each of the cnidarian species tested. Twenty-one bacterial species including four groups of closely related organisms were found in culture material. The species within these groups could not be differentiated from each other (one group of Pseudoalteromonas spp., two groups of Shewanella spp., one group of Vibrio spp.). Each of the hosts exhibits a specific endobacterial spectrum. Solely Cyanea lamarckii harboured Moritella viscosa. Only in Cyanea capillata, members of the Shewanella group #2 and the species Pseudoalteromonas arctica, Shewanella violacea, Sulfitobacter pontiacus and Arcobacter butzleri were detected. Hydrozoa Tubularia indivisa provided an amazingly wide spectrum of nine bacterial species. Exclusively, in the sea anemone Sagartia elegans, the bacterial species P. aliena was found. Overall eleven bacterial species detected were described recently as novel species. Four 16S rDNA fragments generated from lyophilized material displayed extremely low relationship to their next neighbours. These organisms are regarded as members of the endobiotic “terra incognita”. Since the origin of cnidarian toxins is unclear, the possible pathogenic activity of endobiotic bacteria has to be taken into account. Literature data show that their next neighbours display an interesting diversity of haemolytic, septicaemic and necrotic actions including

  5. Putting the N in dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Dagenais-Bellefeuille, Steve; Morse, David

    2013-01-01

    The cosmopolitan presence of dinoflagellates in aquatic habitats is now believed to be a direct consequence of the different trophic modes they have developed through evolution. While heterotrophs ingest food and photoautotrophs photosynthesize, mixotrophic species are able to use both strategies to harvest energy and nutrients. These different trophic modes are of particular importance when nitrogen nutrition is considered. Nitrogen is required for the synthesis of amino acids, nucleic acids, chlorophylls, and toxins, and thus changes in the concentrations of various nitrogenous compounds can strongly affect both primary and secondary metabolism. For example, high nitrogen concentration is correlated with rampant cell division resulting in the formation of the algal blooms commonly called red tides. Conversely, nitrogen starvation results in cell cycle arrest and induces a series of physiological, behavioral and transcriptomic modifications to ensure survival. This review will combine physiological, biochemical, and transcriptomic data to assess the mechanism and impact of nitrogen metabolism in dinoflagellates and to compare the dinoflagellate responses with those of diatoms. PMID:24363653

  6. Expression of Pax gene family members in the anthozoan cnidarian, Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    Matus, David Q; Pang, Kevin; Daly, Meg; Martindale, Mark Q

    2007-01-01

    Pax genes are a family of homeodomain transcription factors that have been isolated from protostomes (e.g., eight in Drosophilia) and deuterostomes (e.g., nine in vertebrates) as well as outside the Bilateria, from sponges, a placozoan, and several classes of cnidarians. The genome of an anthozoan cnidarian, the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis, has been surveyed by both degenerate polymerase chain reaction and in silico for the presence of Pax genes. N. vectensis possesses seven Pax genes, which are orthologous to cnidarian Pax genes (A,B,C, and D) previously identified in another anthozoan, a coral, Acropora millepora. Phylogenetic analyses including data from nonchordate deuterostomes indicates that there were five Pax gene classes in the protostome-deuterostome ancestor, but only three in the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor, with PaxD class genes lost in medusozoan cnidarians. Pax genes play diverse roles in bilaterians, including eye formation (e.g., Pax6), segmentation (e.g., Pax3/7 class genes), and neural patterning (e.g., Pox-neuro, Pax2/5/8). We show the first expression data for members of all four Pax classes in a single species of cnidarian. N. vectensis Pax genes are expressed in both a cell-type and region-specific manner during embryogenesis, and likely play a role in patterning specific components of the cnidarian ectodermal nerve net. The results of these patterns are discussed with respect to Pax gene evolution in the Bilateria.

  7. Dinoflagellate phylogeny revisited: Using ribosomal proteins to resolve deep branching dinoflagellate clades

    PubMed Central

    Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R.; Gornik, Sebastian G.; Concepcion, Gregory T.; Waller, Ross F.; Mendez, Gregory S.; Lippmeier, J. Casey; Delwiche, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    The alveolates are composed of three major lineages, the ciliates, dinoflagellates, and apicomplexans. Together these ‘protist’ taxa play key roles in primary production and ecology, as well as in illness of humans and other animals. The interface between the dinoflagellate and apicomplexan clades has been an area of recent discovery, blurring the distinction between these two clades. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis has yet to determine the position of basal dinoflagellate clades hence the deepest branches of the dinoflagellate tree currently remain unresolved. Large-scale mRNA sequencing was applied to 11 species of dinoflagellates, including strains of the syndinean genera Hematodinium and Amoebophrya, parasites of crustaceans and dinoflagellates, respectively, to optimize and update the dinoflagellate tree. From the transcriptome-scale data a total of 73 ribosomal protein-coding genes were selected for phylogeny. After individual gene orthology assessment, the genes were concatenated into a >15,000 amino acid alignment with 76 taxa from dinoflagellates, apicomplexans, ciliates, and the outgroup heterokonts. Overall the tree was well resolved and supported, when the data was subsampled with gblocks or constraint trees were tested with the approximately unbiased test. The deepest branches of the dinoflagellate tree can now be resolved with strong support, and provides a clearer view of the evolution of the distinctive traits of dinoflagellates. PMID:24135237

  8. Diversity and Divergence of Dinoflagellate Histone Proteins.

    PubMed

    Marinov, Georgi K; Lynch, Michael

    2015-12-08

    Histone proteins and the nucleosomal organization of chromatin are near-universal eukaroytic features, with the exception of dinoflagellates. Previous studies have suggested that histones do not play a major role in the packaging of dinoflagellate genomes, although several genomic and transcriptomic surveys have detected a full set of core histone genes. Here, transcriptomic and genomic sequence data from multiple dinoflagellate lineages are analyzed, and the diversity of histone proteins and their variants characterized, with particular focus on their potential post-translational modifications and the conservation of the histone code. In addition, the set of putative epigenetic mark readers and writers, chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones are examined. Dinoflagellates clearly express the most derived set of histones among all autonomous eukaryote nuclei, consistent with a combination of relaxation of sequence constraints imposed by the histone code and the presence of numerous specialized histone variants. The histone code itself appears to have diverged significantly in some of its components, yet others are conserved, implying conservation of the associated biochemical processes. Specifically, and with major implications for the function of histones in dinoflagellates, the results presented here strongly suggest that transcription through nucleosomal arrays happens in dinoflagellates. Finally, the plausible roles of histones in dinoflagellate nuclei are discussed.

  9. Bioluminescence in Dinoflagellates: Evidence that the Adaptive Value of Bioluminescence in Dinoflagellates is Concentration Dependent.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Karen A; Widder, Edith A

    2017-03-01

    Three major hypotheses have been proposed to explain why dinoflagellate bioluminescence deters copepod grazing: startle response, aposematic warning, and burglar alarm. These hypotheses propose dinoflagellate bioluminescence (A) startles predatory copepods, (B) warns potential predators of toxicity, and (C) draws the attention of higher order visual predators to the copepod's location. While the burglar alarm is the most commonly accepted hypothesis, it requires a high concentration of bioluminescent dinoflagellates to be effective, meaning the bioluminescence selective advantage at lower, more commonly observed, dinoflagellate concentrations may result from another function (e.g. startle response or aposematic warning). Therefore, a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate copepod grazing (Acartia tonsa) on bioluminescent dinoflagellates (during bioluminescent and nonbioluminescent phases, corresponding to night and day, respectively) at different concentrations (10, 1000, and 3000 cells mL(-1) ), on toxic (Pyrodinium bahamense var. bahamense) and nontoxic (Lingulodinium polyedrum) bioluminescent dinoflagellates, and in the presence of nonluminescent diatoms (Thalassiosira eccentrica). Changes in copepod ingestion rates, clearance rates, and feeding preferences as a result of these experimental factors, particularly during the mixed trails with nonluminescent diatoms, indicate there is a concentration threshold at which the burglar alarm becomes effective and below which dinoflagellate bioluminescence functions as an aposematic warning.

  10. Endobacteria in the tentacles of selected cnidarian species and in the cerata of their nudibranch predators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doepke, Hilke; Herrmann, Karl; Schuett, Christian

    2012-03-01

    This is the first genetic analysis comparing cultured endobacteria discovered in the tentacles of cnidarian species ( Tubularia indivisa, Tubularia larynx, Corymorpha nutans, Sagartia elegans) with those found in the cerata tips of selected nudibranch species ( Berghia caerulescens, Coryphella lineata, Coryphella gracilis, Janolus cristatus, Polycera faeroensis, Polycera quadrilineata, Doto coronata, Dendronotus frondosus). Shared pathogenic activities were found among other microorganisms in the Pseudoalteromonas tetraodonis group (TTX), and the Vibrio splendidus group (haemolytic, septicaemic, necrotic activity). Specific autochthonous endobacteria of extremely low similarity to their next neighbours were detected in nudibranch cerata. These organisms are regarded as new and unknown endobacteria; among them were Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea (95%), Orientia tsutsugamushi (84%), Gracilimonas tropica (96%), Balneola alkaliphia (95%), Loktanella rosea (97%). SEM micrographs provide insight into endobacterial aggregates in cnidarian tentacles and nudibranch cerata. Since certain nudibranch predators prey on cnidarian species, it is assumed that cnidarian tentacle bacteria are directly transferred to nudibranch cerata. The pathogenic endobacteria may contribute to the chemical defence of both the nudibranch and cnidarian species investigated.

  11. Immortality and the base of multicellular life: Lessons from cnidarian stem cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Hoang, Van Thanh; Mättner, Robert; Holstein, Thomas W

    2009-12-01

    Cnidarians are phylogenetically basal members of the animal kingdom (>600 million years old). Together with plants they share some remarkable features that cannot be found in higher animals. Cnidarians and plants exhibit an almost unlimited regeneration capacity and immortality. Immortality can be ascribed to the asexual mode of reproduction that requires cells with an unlimited self-renewal capacity. We propose that the basic properties of animal stem cells are tightly linked to this archaic mode of reproduction. The cnidarian stem cells can give rise to a number of differentiated cell types including neuronal and germ cells. The genomes of Hydra and Nematostella, representatives of two major cnidarian classes indicate a surprising complexity of both genomes, which is in the range of vertebrates. Recent work indicates that highly conserved signalling pathways control Hydra stem cell differentiation. Furthermore, the availability of genomic resources and novel technologies provide approaches to analyse these cells in vivo. Studies of stem cells in cnidarians will therefore open important insights into the basic mechanisms of stem cell biology. Their critical phylogenetic position at the base of the metazoan branch in the tree of life makes them an important link in unravelling the common mechanisms of stem cell biology between animals and plants.

  12. Taxonomic and Environmental Variation of Metabolite Profiles in Marine Dinoflagellates of the Genus Symbiodinium

    PubMed Central

    Klueter, Anke; Crandall, Jesse B.; Archer, Frederick I.; Teece, Mark A.; Coffroth, Mary Alice

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms in terrestrial and marine ecosystems are essential to environmental sustainability. In the marine environment, invertebrates often depend on metabolic cooperation with their endosymbionts. Coral reefs, one of the most important marine ecosystems, are based on the symbiosis between a broad diversity of dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium and a wide phyletic diversity of hosts (i.e., cnidarian, molluscan, poriferan). This diversity is reflected in the ecology and physiology of the symbionts, yet the underlying biochemical mechanisms are still poorly understood. We examined metabolite profiles of four cultured species of Symbiodinium known to form viable symbioses with reef-building corals, S. microadriaticum (cp-type A194), S. minutum (cp-type B184), S. psygmophilum (cp-type B224) and S. trenchii (cp-type D206). Metabolite profiles were shown to differ among Symbiodinium species and were found to be affected by their physiological response to growth in different temperatures and light regimes. A combined Random Forests and Bayesian analysis revealed that the four Symbiodinium species examined primarily differed in their production of sterols and sugars, including a C29 stanol and the two sterols C28Δ5 and C28Δ5,22, as well as differences in metabolite abundances of a hexose and inositol. Inositol levels were also strongly affected by changes in temperature across all Symbiodinium species. Our results offer a detailed view of the metabolite profile characteristic of marine symbiotic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium, and identify patterns of metabolites related to several growth conditions. PMID:25693143

  13. Puncture mechanics of cnidarian cnidocysts: a natural actuator

    PubMed Central

    Oppegard, Shawn C; Anderson, Peter A; Eddington, David T

    2009-01-01

    Background Cnidocysts isolated from cnidarian organisms are attractive as a drug-delivery platform due to their fast, efficient delivery of toxins. The cnidocyst could be utilized as the means to deliver therapeutics in a wearable drug-delivery patch. Cnidocysts have been previously shown to discharge upon stimulation via electrical, mechanical, and chemical pathways. Cnidocysts isolated from the Portuguese Man O' War jellyfish (Physalia physalis) are attractive for this purpose because they possess relatively long threads, are capable of puncturing through hard fish scales, and are stable for years. Results As a first step in using cnidocysts as a functional component of a drug delivery system, the puncture mechanics of the thread were characterized. Tentacle-contained cnidocysts were used as a best-case scenario due to physical immobilization of the cnidocysts within the tentacle. Ex vivo tentacle-contained cnidocysts from Physalia possessed an elastic modulus puncture threshold of approximately 1-2 MPa, based on puncture tests of materials with a gamut of hardness. Also, a method for inducing discharge of isolated cnidocysts was found, utilizing water as the stimulant. Preliminary lectin-binding experiments were performed using fluorophore-conjugated lectins as a possible means to immobilize the isolated cnidocyst capsule, and prevent reorientation upon triggering. Lectins bound homogeneously to the surface of the capsule, suggesting the lectins could be used for cnidocyst immobilization but not orientation. Conclusion Cnidocysts were found to puncture materials up to 1 MPa in hardness, can be discharged in a dry state using water as a stimulant, and bind homogeneously to lectins, a potential means of immobilization. The information gained from this preliminary work will aid in determining the materials and design of the patch that could be used for drug delivery. PMID:19785761

  14. Evolution of linear mitochondrial genomes in medusozoan cnidarians.

    PubMed

    Kayal, Ehsan; Bentlage, Bastian; Collins, Allen G; Kayal, Mohsen; Pirro, Stacy; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2012-01-01

    In nearly all animals, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) consists of a single circular molecule that encodes several subunits of the protein complexes involved in oxidative phosphorylation as well as part of the machinery for their expression. By contrast, mtDNA in species belonging to Medusozoa (one of the two major lineages in the phylum Cnidaria) comprises one to several linear molecules. Many questions remain on the ubiquity of linear mtDNA in medusozoans and the mechanisms responsible for its evolution, replication, and transcription. To address some of these questions, we determined the sequences of nearly complete linear mtDNA from 24 species representing all four medusozoan classes: Cubozoa, Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa, and Staurozoa. All newly determined medusozoan mitochondrial genomes harbor the 17 genes typical for cnidarians and map as linear molecules with a high degree of gene order conservation relative to the anthozoans. In addition, two open reading frames (ORFs), polB and ORF314, are identified in cubozoan, schyphozoan, staurozoan, and trachyline hydrozoan mtDNA. polB belongs to the B-type DNA polymerase gene family, while the product of ORF314 may act as a terminal protein that binds telomeres. We posit that these two ORFs are remnants of a linear plasmid that invaded the mitochondrial genomes of the last common ancestor of Medusozoa and are responsible for its linearity. Hydroidolinan hydrozoans have lost the two ORFs and instead have duplicated cox1 at each end of their mitochondrial chromosome(s). Fragmentation of mtDNA occurred independently in Cubozoa and Hydridae (Hydrozoa, Hydroidolina). Our broad sampling allows us to reconstruct the evolutionary history of linear mtDNA in medusozoans.

  15. Evolution of Linear Mitochondrial Genomes in Medusozoan Cnidarians

    PubMed Central

    Kayal, Ehsan; Bentlage, Bastian; Collins, Allen G.; Pirro, Stacy; Lavrov, Dennis V.

    2012-01-01

    In nearly all animals, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) consists of a single circular molecule that encodes several subunits of the protein complexes involved in oxidative phosphorylation as well as part of the machinery for their expression. By contrast, mtDNA in species belonging to Medusozoa (one of the two major lineages in the phylum Cnidaria) comprises one to several linear molecules. Many questions remain on the ubiquity of linear mtDNA in medusozoans and the mechanisms responsible for its evolution, replication, and transcription. To address some of these questions, we determined the sequences of nearly complete linear mtDNA from 24 species representing all four medusozoan classes: Cubozoa, Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa, and Staurozoa. All newly determined medusozoan mitochondrial genomes harbor the 17 genes typical for cnidarians and map as linear molecules with a high degree of gene order conservation relative to the anthozoans. In addition, two open reading frames (ORFs), polB and ORF314, are identified in cubozoan, schyphozoan, staurozoan, and trachyline hydrozoan mtDNA. polB belongs to the B-type DNA polymerase gene family, while the product of ORF314 may act as a terminal protein that binds telomeres. We posit that these two ORFs are remnants of a linear plasmid that invaded the mitochondrial genomes of the last common ancestor of Medusozoa and are responsible for its linearity. Hydroidolinan hydrozoans have lost the two ORFs and instead have duplicated cox1 at each end of their mitochondrial chromosome(s). Fragmentation of mtDNA occurred independently in Cubozoa and Hydridae (Hydrozoa, Hydroidolina). Our broad sampling allows us to reconstruct the evolutionary history of linear mtDNA in medusozoans. PMID:22113796

  16. Thicker host tissues moderate light stress in a cnidarian endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Dimond, James L; Holzman, Benjamin J; Bingham, Brian L

    2012-07-01

    The susceptibility of algal-cnidarian holobionts to environmental stress is dependent on attributes of both host and symbiont, but the role of the host is often unclear. We examined the influence of the host on symbiont light stress, comparing the photophysiology of the chlorophyte symbiont Elliptochloris marina in two species of sea anemones in the genus Anthopleura. After 3 months of acclimation in outdoor tanks, polyp photoprotective contraction behavior was similar between the two host species, but photochemical efficiency was 1.5 times higher in A. xanthogrammica than in A. elegantissima. Maximum relative electron transport rates, derived from rapid light curves, were 1.5 times higher in A. xanthogrammica than in A. elegantissima when symbionts were inside intact tissues, but were not significantly different between host species upon removal of outer (epidermis and mesoglea) tissue layers from symbiont-containing gastrodermal cells. Tissues of A. xanthogrammica were 1.8 times thicker than those of A. elegantissima, with outer tissue layers attenuating 1.6 times more light. We found no significant differences in light absorption properties per unit volume of tissue, confirming the direct effect of tissue thickness on light attenuation. The thicker tissues of A. xanthogrammica thus provide a favorable environment for E. marina - a relatively stress-susceptible symbiont - and may explain its higher prevalence and expanded range in A. xanthogrammica along the Pacific coast of North America. Our findings also support a photoprotective role for thicker host tissues in reef corals that has long been thought to influence variability in bleaching susceptibility among coral taxa.

  17. Heated Debates: Hot-Water Immersion or Ice Packs as First Aid for Cnidarian Envenomations?

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Christie L; Yanagihara, Angel A

    2016-04-01

    Cnidarian envenomations are an important public health problem, responsible for more deaths than shark attacks annually. For this reason, optimization of first-aid care is essential. According to the published literature, cnidarian venoms and toxins are heat labile at temperatures safe for human application, which supports the use of hot-water immersion of the sting area(s). However, ice packs are often recommended and used by emergency personnel. After conducting a systematic review of the evidence for the use of heat or ice in the treatment of cnidarian envenomations, we conclude that the majority of studies to date support the use of hot-water immersion for pain relief and improved health outcomes.

  18. Heated Debates: Hot-Water Immersion or Ice Packs as First Aid for Cnidarian Envenomations?

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Christie L.; Yanagihara, Angel A.

    2016-01-01

    Cnidarian envenomations are an important public health problem, responsible for more deaths than shark attacks annually. For this reason, optimization of first-aid care is essential. According to the published literature, cnidarian venoms and toxins are heat labile at temperatures safe for human application, which supports the use of hot-water immersion of the sting area(s). However, ice packs are often recommended and used by emergency personnel. After conducting a systematic review of the evidence for the use of heat or ice in the treatment of cnidarian envenomations, we conclude that the majority of studies to date support the use of hot-water immersion for pain relief and improved health outcomes. PMID:27043628

  19. Dinoflagellates associated with freshwater sponges from the ancient lake baikal.

    PubMed

    Annenkova, Natalia V; Lavrov, Dennis V; Belikov, Sergey I

    2011-04-01

    Dinoflagellates are a diverse group of protists that are common in both marine and freshwater environments. While the biology of marine dinoflagellates has been the focus of several recent studies, their freshwater relatives remain little-investigated. In the present study we explore the diversity of dinoflagellates in Lake Baikal by identifying and analyzing dinoflagellate sequences for 18S rDNA and ITS-2 from total DNA extracted from three species of endemic Baikalian sponges (Baikalospongia intermedia,Baikalospongia rectaand Lubomirskia incrustans). Phylogenetic analyses of these sequences revealed extensive dinoflagellate diversity in Lake Baikal. We found two groups of sequences clustering within the order Suessiales, known for its symbiotic relationships with various invertebrates. Thus they may be regarded as potential symbionts of Baikalian sponges. In addition,Gyrodinium helveticum, representatives from the genus Gymnodinium, dinoflagellates close to the family Pfiesteriaceae, and a few dinoflagellates without definite affiliation were detected. No pronounced difference in the distribution of dinoflagellates among the studied sponges was found, except for the absence of the Piscinoodinium-like dinoflagellates inL. incrustans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of the diversity of dinoflagellates in freshwater sponges, the first systematic investigation of dinoflagellate molecular diversity in Lake Baikal and the first finding of members of the order Suessiales as symbionts of freshwater invertebrates.

  20. A genomic approach to coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis: studies of Acropora digitifera and Symbiodinium minutum

    PubMed Central

    Shinzato, Chuya; Mungpakdee, Sutada; Satoh, Nori; Shoguchi, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    Far more intimate knowledge of scleractinian coral biology is essential in order to understand how diverse coral-symbiont endosymbioses have been established. In particular, molecular and cellular mechanisms enabling the establishment and maintenance of obligate endosymbiosis with photosynthetic dinoflagellates require further clarification. By extension, such understanding may also shed light upon environmental conditions that promote the collapse of this mutualism. Genomic data undergird studies of all symbiotic processes. Here we review recent genomic data derived from the scleractinian coral, Acropora digitifera, and the endosymbiotic dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium minutum. We discuss Acropora genes involved in calcification, embryonic development, innate immunity, apoptosis, autophagy, UV resistance, fluorescence, photoreceptors, circadian clocks, etc. We also detail gene loss in amino acid metabolism that may explain at least part of the Acropora stress-response. Characteristic features of the Symbiodinium genome are also reviewed, focusing on the expansion of certain gene families, the molecular basis for permanently condensed chromatin, unique spliceosomal splicing, and unusual gene arrangement. Salient features of the Symbiodinium plastid and mitochondrial genomes are also illuminated. Although many questions regarding these interdependent genomes remain, we summarize information necessary for future studies of coral-dinoflagellate endosymbiosis. PMID:25071748

  1. LIPID BIOMARKER ANALYSIS OF MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many marine eukaryotic algae have been shown to possess characteristic chemotaxonomic lipid biomarkers. Dinoflagellates in particular are often characterized by the presence of sterols and pigments that are rarely found in other classes of algae. To evaluate the utility of chemic...

  2. Transcriptomic investigation of wound healing and regeneration in the cnidarian Calliactis polypus

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Zachary K.; Pavasovic, Ana; Hock, Daniella H.; Prentis, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Wound healing and regeneration in cnidarian species, a group that forms the sister phylum to Bilateria, remains poorly characterised despite the ability of many cnidarians to rapidly repair injuries, regenerate lost structures, or re-form whole organisms from small populations of somatic cells. Here we present results from a fully replicated RNA-Seq experiment to identify genes that are differentially expressed in the sea anemone Calliactis polypus following catastrophic injury. We find that a large-scale transcriptomic response is established in C. polypus, comprising an abundance of genes involved in tissue patterning, energy dynamics, immunity, cellular communication, and extracellular matrix remodelling. We also identified a substantial proportion of uncharacterised genes that were differentially expressed during regeneration, that appear to be restricted to cnidarians. Overall, our study serves to both identify the role that conserved genes play in eumetazoan wound healing and regeneration, as well as to highlight the lack of information regarding many genes involved in this process. We suggest that functional analysis of the large group of uncharacterised genes found in our study may contribute to better understanding of the regenerative capacity of cnidarians, as well as provide insight into how wound healing and regeneration has evolved in different lineages. PMID:28150733

  3. Dinoflagellate Toxins Responsible for Ciguatera Food Poisoning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-10

    AD____ AD-A 194 466 DNOFLACU.ATh TOXINS RESIONSIBLE FOR CIGUATERA FOOD POISONING Annual Summary Report 0 Donald M. Miller 10 December 1987 Supported...21701-5012 62770A 162770A87] AA 7 7 A11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) DINOFLAGELLATE TOXINS RESPONSIBLE FOR CIGUATERA FOOD POISONING .12...occurring in humans who have become intoxicated from eating poison fish. Fish spontaneously accumulate the toxin through the food chain or directly from

  4. Bacterial community associated with Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellate cultures.

    PubMed

    Alavi, M; Miller, T; Erlandson, K; Schneider, R; Belas, R

    2001-06-01

    Dinoflagellates (Eukaryota; Alveolata; Dinophyceae) are single-cell eukaryotic microorganisms implicated in many toxic outbreaks in the marine and estuarine environment. Co-existing with dinoflagellate communities are bacterial assemblages that undergo changes in species composition, compete for nutrients and produce bioactive compounds, including toxins. As part of an investigation to understand the role of the bacteria in dinoflagellate physiology and toxigenesis, we have characterized the bacterial community associated with laboratory cultures of four 'Pfiesteria-like' dinoflagellates isolated from 1997 fish killing events in Chesapeake Bay. A polymerase chain reaction with oligonucleotide primers specific to prokaryotic 16S rDNA gene sequences was used to characterize the total bacterial population, including culturable and non-culturable species, as well as possible endosymbiotic bacteria. The results indicate a diverse group of over 30 bacteria species co-existing in the dinoflagellate cultures. The broad phylogenetic types of dinoflagellate-associated bacteria were generally similar, although not identical, to those bacterial types found in association with other harmful algal species. Dinoflagellates were made axenic, and the culturable bacteria were added back to determine the contribution of the bacteria to dinoflagellate growth. Confocal scanning laser fluorescence microscopy with 16S rDNA probes was used to demonstrate a physical association of a subset of the bacteria and the dinoflagellate cells. These data point to a key component in the bacterial community being species in the marine alpha-proteobacteria group, most closely associated with the alpha-3 or SAR83 cluster.

  5. Transcription and Maturation of mRNA in Dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sougata; Morse, David

    2013-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are of great importance to the marine ecosystem, yet scant details of how gene expression is regulated at the transcriptional level are available. Transcription is of interest in the context of the chromatin structure in the dinoflagellates as it shows many differences from more typical eukaryotic cells. Here we canvas recent transcriptome profiles to identify the molecular building blocks available for the construction of the transcriptional machinery and contrast these with those used by other systems. Dinoflagellates display a clear paucity of specific transcription factors, although surprisingly, the rest of the basic transcriptional machinery is not markedly different from what is found in the close relatives to the dinoflagellates. PMID:27694765

  6. Recognizing diversity in coral symbiotic dinoflagellate communities.

    PubMed

    Apprill, Amy M; Gates, Ruth D

    2007-03-01

    A detailed understanding of how diversity in endosymbiotic dinoflagellate communities maps onto the physiological range of coral hosts is critical to predicting how coral reef ecosystems will respond to climate change. Species-level taxonomy of the dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium has been predominantly examined using the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal array (rDNA ITS2) and downstream screening for dominant types using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Here, ITS2 diversity in the communities of Symbiodinium harboured by two Hawaiian coral species was explored using direct sequencing of clone libraries. We resolved sixfold to eightfold greater diversity per coral species than previously reported, the majority of which corresponds to a novel and distinct phylogenetic lineage. We evaluated how these sequences migrate in DGGE and demonstrate that this method does not effectively resolve this diversity. We conclude that the Porites spp. examined here harbour diverse assemblages of novel Symbiodinium types and that cloning and sequencing is an effective methodological approach for resolving the complexity of endosymbiotic dinoflagellate communities harboured by reef corals.

  7. DIVISION IN THE DINOFLAGELLATE GYRODINIUM COHNII (SCHILLER)

    PubMed Central

    Kubai, Donna F.; Ris, Hans

    1969-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are of interest because their chromosomes resemble the nucleoplasm of prokaryotes both chemically and ultrastructurally. We have studied nuclear division in the dinoflagellate Gyrodinium cohnii (Schiller), using cells obtained from cultures undergoing phasic growth. Electron micrographs of serial sections were used to prepare three-dimensional reconstructions of nuclei and chromosomes at various stages of nuclear division. During division, a complex process of invagination of the intact nuclear envelope takes place at one side of the nucleus and results in the formation of parallel cylindrical cytoplasmic channels through the nucleus. These invaginations contain bundles of microtubules, and each of the bundles comes to lie in the cytoplasm of a cylindrical channel. Nuclear constriction occurs perpendicular to these channels without displacement of the microtubules. There are no associations between chromosomes and the cytoplasmic microtubules. In dividing cells most chromosomes become V-shaped, and the apices of the V's make contact with the membrane surrounding cytoplasmic channels. It is proposed that the membrane surrounding cytoplasmic channels in the dividing nucleus may be involved in the separation of daughter chromosomes. Thus, dinoflagellates may resemble prokaryotes in the manner of genophore separation as well as in genophore chemistry and ultrastructure. PMID:5761923

  8. Mutually Exclusive Uncertainty Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan

    2016-11-01

    The uncertainty principle is one of the characteristic properties of quantum theory based on incompatibility. Apart from the incompatible relation of quantum states, mutually exclusiveness is another remarkable phenomenon in the information- theoretic foundation of quantum theory. We investigate the role of mutual exclusive physical states in the recent work of stronger uncertainty relations for all incompatible observables by Mccone and Pati and generalize the weighted uncertainty relation to the product form as well as their multi-observable analogues. The new bounds capture both incompatibility and mutually exclusiveness, and are tighter compared with the existing bounds.

  9. Mutually Exclusive Uncertainty Relations.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan

    2016-11-08

    The uncertainty principle is one of the characteristic properties of quantum theory based on incompatibility. Apart from the incompatible relation of quantum states, mutually exclusiveness is another remarkable phenomenon in the information- theoretic foundation of quantum theory. We investigate the role of mutual exclusive physical states in the recent work of stronger uncertainty relations for all incompatible observables by Mccone and Pati and generalize the weighted uncertainty relation to the product form as well as their multi-observable analogues. The new bounds capture both incompatibility and mutually exclusiveness, and are tighter compared with the existing bounds.

  10. Mutually Exclusive Uncertainty Relations

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan

    2016-01-01

    The uncertainty principle is one of the characteristic properties of quantum theory based on incompatibility. Apart from the incompatible relation of quantum states, mutually exclusiveness is another remarkable phenomenon in the information- theoretic foundation of quantum theory. We investigate the role of mutual exclusive physical states in the recent work of stronger uncertainty relations for all incompatible observables by Mccone and Pati and generalize the weighted uncertainty relation to the product form as well as their multi-observable analogues. The new bounds capture both incompatibility and mutually exclusiveness, and are tighter compared with the existing bounds. PMID:27824161

  11. Evolution of mutualism between species

    SciTech Connect

    Post, W.M.; Travis, C.C.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent theoretical work on mutualism, the interaction between species populations that is mutually beneficial, is reviewed. Several ecological facts that should be addressed in the construction of dynamic models for mutualism are examined. Basic terminology is clarified. (PSB)

  12. Expanded functional diversity of shaker K(+) channels in cnidarians is driven by gene expansion.

    PubMed

    Jegla, Timothy; Marlow, Heather Q; Chen, Bihan; Simmons, David K; Jacobo, Sarah M; Martindale, Mark Q

    2012-01-01

    The genome of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis (starlet sea anemone) provides a molecular genetic view into the first nervous systems, which appeared in a late common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Nematostella has a surprisingly large and diverse set of neuronal signaling genes including paralogs of most neuronal signaling molecules found in higher metazoans. Several ion channel gene families are highly expanded in the sea anemone, including three subfamilies of the Shaker K(+) channel gene family: Shaker (Kv1), Shaw (Kv3) and Shal (Kv4). In order to better understand the physiological significance of these voltage-gated K(+) channel expansions, we analyzed the function of 18 members of the 20 gene Shaker subfamily in Nematostella. Six of the Nematostella Shaker genes express functional homotetrameric K(+) channels in vitro. These include functional orthologs of bilaterian Shakers and channels with an unusually high threshold for voltage activation. We identified 11 Nematostella Shaker genes with a distinct "silent" or "regulatory" phenotype; these encode subunits that function only in heteromeric channels and serve to further diversify Nematostella Shaker channel gating properties. Subunits with the regulatory phenotype have not previously been found in the Shaker subfamily, but have evolved independently in the Shab (Kv2) family in vertebrates and the Shal family in a cnidarian. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that regulatory subunits were present in ancestral cnidarians, but have continued to diversity at a high rate after the split between anthozoans and hydrozoans. Comparison of Shaker family gene complements from diverse metazoan species reveals frequent, large scale duplication has produced highly unique sets of Shaker channels in the major metazoan lineages.

  13. The sphingosine rheostat is involved in the cnidarian heat stress response but not necessarily in bleaching.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Sheila A; Weis, Virginia M

    2017-02-22

    Sphingolipids play important roles in mitigating cellular heat and oxidative stress by altering membrane fluidity, receptor clustering and gene expression. Accumulation of signaling sphingolipids that comprise the sphingosine rheostat, pro-apoptotic sphingosine (Sph) and pro-survival sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), is key to determining cell fate. Reef-building corals and other symbiotic cnidarians living in shallow tropical waters can experience elevated seawater temperature and high UV irradiance, two stressors that are increasing in frequency and severity with climate change. In symbiotic cnidarians, these stressors disrupt the photosynthetic machinery of the endosymbiont and ultimately result in the collapse of the partnership (dysbiosis), known as cnidarian bleaching. In a previous study, exogenously applied sphingolipids altered heat-induced bleaching in the symbiotic anemone Aiptasia pallida, but endogenous regulation of these lipids is unknown. Here, we characterized the role of the rheostat in the cnidarian heat stress response (HSR) and in dysbiosis. Gene expression of rheostat enzymes sphingosine kinase (AP-SPHK) and S1P phosphatase (AP-SGPP), and concentrations of sphingolipids were quantified from anemones incubated at elevated temperatures. We observed a biphasic HSR in A. pallida. At early exposure, rheostat gene expression and lipid levels were suppressed while gene expression of a heat stress biomarker increased and 40% of symbionts were lost. After longer incubations at the highest temperature, AP-SGPP and then Sph levels both increased. These results indicate that the sphingosine rheostat in A. pallida does not participate in initiation of dysbiosis, but instead functions in the chronic response to prolonged heat stress that promotes host survival.

  14. Precambrian animal life: probable developmental and adult cnidarian forms from Southwest China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jun-Yuan; Oliveri, Paola; Gao, Feng; Dornbos, Stephen Q.; Li, Chia-Wei; Bottjer, David J.; Davidson, Eric H.

    2002-01-01

    The evolutionary divergence of cnidarian and bilaterian lineages from their remote metazoan ancestor occurred at an unknown depth in time before the Cambrian, since crown group representatives of each are found in Lower Cambrian fossil assemblages. We report here a variety of putative embryonic, larval, and adult microfossils deriving from Precambrian phosphorite deposits of Southwest China, which may predate the Cambrian radiation by 25-45 million years. These are most probably of cnidarian affinity. Large numbers of fossilized early planula-like larvae were observed under the microscope in sections. Though several forms are represented, the majority display remarkable conformity, which is inconsistent with the alternative that they are artifactual mineral inclusions. Some of these fossils are preserved in such high resolution that individual cells can be discerned. We confirm in detail an earlier report of the presence in the same deposits of tabulates, an extinct crown group anthozoan form. Other sections reveal structures that most closely resemble sections of basal modern corals. A large number of fossils similar to modern hydrozoan gastrulae were also observed. These again displayed great morphological consistency. Though only a single example is available, a microscopic animal remarkably similar to a modern adult hydrozoan is also presented. Taken together, the new observations reported in this paper indicate the existence of a diverse and already differentiated cnidarian fauna, long before the Cambrian evolutionary event. It follows that at least stem group bilaterians must also have been present at this time.

  15. Precambrian animal life: probable developmental and adult cnidarian forms from Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Yuan; Oliveri, Paola; Gao, Feng; Dornbos, Stephen Q; Li, Chia-Wei; Bottjer, David J; Davidson, Eric H

    2002-08-01

    The evolutionary divergence of cnidarian and bilaterian lineages from their remote metazoan ancestor occurred at an unknown depth in time before the Cambrian, since crown group representatives of each are found in Lower Cambrian fossil assemblages. We report here a variety of putative embryonic, larval, and adult microfossils deriving from Precambrian phosphorite deposits of Southwest China, which may predate the Cambrian radiation by 25-45 million years. These are most probably of cnidarian affinity. Large numbers of fossilized early planula-like larvae were observed under the microscope in sections. Though several forms are represented, the majority display remarkable conformity, which is inconsistent with the alternative that they are artifactual mineral inclusions. Some of these fossils are preserved in such high resolution that individual cells can be discerned. We confirm in detail an earlier report of the presence in the same deposits of tabulates, an extinct crown group anthozoan form. Other sections reveal structures that most closely resemble sections of basal modern corals. A large number of fossils similar to modern hydrozoan gastrulae were also observed. These again displayed great morphological consistency. Though only a single example is available, a microscopic animal remarkably similar to a modern adult hydrozoan is also presented. Taken together, the new observations reported in this paper indicate the existence of a diverse and already differentiated cnidarian fauna, long before the Cambrian evolutionary event. It follows that at least stem group bilaterians must also have been present at this time.

  16. Towards an Ecological Understanding of Dinoflagellate Cyst Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Isabel; Figueroa, Rosa Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The life cycle of many dinoflagellates includes at least one nonflagellated benthic stage (cyst). In the literature, the different types of dinoflagellate cysts are mainly defined based on morphological (number and type of layers in the cell wall) and functional (long- or short-term endurance) differences. These characteristics were initially thought to clearly distinguish pellicle (thin-walled) cysts from resting (double-walled) dinoflagellate cysts. The former were considered short-term (temporal) and the latter long-term (resting) cysts. However, during the last two decades further knowledge has highlighted the great intricacy of dinoflagellate life histories, the ecological significance of cyst stages, and the need to clarify the functional and morphological complexities of the different cyst types. Here we review and, when necessary, redefine the concepts of resting and pellicle cysts, examining both their structural and their functional characteristics in the context of the life cycle strategies of several dinoflagellate species. PMID:27694774

  17. Mutually Exclusive, Complementary, or . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schloemer, Cathy G.

    2016-01-01

    Whether students are beginning their study of probability or are well into it, distinctions between complementary sets and mutually exclusive sets can be confusing. Cathy Schloemer writes in this article that for years she used typical classroom examples but was not happy with the student engagement or the level of understanding they produced.…

  18. Mutual Adaptaion in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siskin, Leslie Santee

    2016-01-01

    Building on an expanded concept of mutual adaptation, this chapter explores a distinctive and successful aspect of International Baccalaureate's effort to scale up, as they moved to expand their programs and support services in Title I schools. Based on a three-year, mixed-methods study, it offers a case where we see not only local adaptations…

  19. Carbonic Anhydrases in Cnidarians: Novel Perspectives from the Octocorallian Corallium rubrum

    PubMed Central

    Le Goff, Carine; Ganot, Philippe; Zoccola, Didier; Caminiti-Segonds, Natacha; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Although the ability to elaborate calcium carbonate biominerals was apparently gained independently during animal evolution, members of the alpha carbonic anhydrases (α-CAs) family, which catalyze the interconversion of CO2 into HCO3-, are involved in the biomineralization process across metazoans. In the Mediterranean red coral Corallium rubrum, inhibition studies suggest an essential role of CAs in the synthesis of two biominerals produced in this octocoral, the axial skeleton and the sclerites. Hitherto no molecular characterization of these enzymes was available. In the present study we determined the complete set of α-CAs in C. rubrum by data mining the genome and transcriptome, and measured their differential gene expression between calcifying and non-calcifying tissues. We identified six isozymes (CruCA1-6), one cytosolic and five secreted/membrane-bound among which one lacked two of the three zinc-binding histidines and was so referred to as a carbonic anhydrase related protein (CARP). One secreted isozyme (CruCA4) showed specific expression both by qPCR and western-blot in the calcifying tissues, suggesting its involvement in biomineralization. Moreover, phylogenetic analyses of α-CAs, identified in six representative cnidarians with complete genome, support an independent recruitment of α-CAs for biomineralization within anthozoans. Finally, characterization of cnidarian CARPs highlighted two families: the monophyletic cytosolic CARPs, and the polyphyletic secreted CARPs harboring a cnidarian specific cysteine disulfide bridge. Alignment of the cytosolic CARPs revealed an evolutionary conserved R-H-Q motif in place of the characteristic zinc-binding H-H-H necessary for the catalytic function of α-CAs. PMID:27513959

  20. Regulation of intracellular pH in cnidarians: response to acidosis in Anemonia viridis.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Julien; Venn, Alexander; Tambutté, Éric; Ganot, Philippe; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2014-02-01

    The regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) is a fundamental aspect of cell physiology that has received little attention in studies of the phylum Cnidaria, which includes ecologically important sea anemones and reef-building corals. Like all organisms, cnidarians must maintain pH homeostasis to counterbalance reductions in pHi, which can arise because of changes in either intrinsic or extrinsic parameters. Corals and sea anemones face natural daily changes in internal fluids, where the extracellular pH can range from 8.9 during the day to 7.4 at night. Furthermore, cnidarians are likely to experience future CO₂-driven declines in seawater pH, a process known as ocean acidification. Here, we carried out the first mechanistic investigation to determine how cnidarian pHi regulation responds to decreases in extracellular and intracellular pH. Using the anemone Anemonia viridis, we employed confocal live cell imaging and a pH-sensitive dye to track the dynamics of pHi after intracellular acidosis induced by acute exposure to decreases in seawater pH and NH₄Cl prepulses. The investigation was conducted on cells that contained intracellular symbiotic algae (Symbiodinium sp.) and on symbiont-free endoderm cells. Experiments using inhibitors and Na⁺-free seawater indicate a potential role of Na⁺/H⁺ plasma membrane exchangers (NHEs) in mediating pHi recovery following intracellular acidosis in both cell types. We also measured the buffering capacity of cells, and obtained values between 20.8 and 43.8 mM per pH unit, which are comparable to those in other invertebrates. Our findings provide the first steps towards a better understanding of acid-base regulation in these basal metazoans, for which information on cell physiology is extremely limited.

  1. Old Weapons for New Wars: Bioactive Molecules From Cnidarian Internal Defense Systems.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Trapani M; Giovanna, Parisi M; Maria, Maisano; Angela, Mauceri; Matteo, Cammarata

    2016-01-01

    The renewed interest in the study of genes of immunity in Cnidaria has led to additional information to the scenario of the first stages of immunity evolution revealing the cellular processes involved in symbiosis, in the regulation of homeostasis and in the fight against infections. The recent study with new molecular and functional approach on these organisms have therefore contributed with unexpected information on the knowledge of the stages of capturing activities and defense mechanisms strongly associated with toxin production. Cnidarians are diblastic aquatic animals with radial symmetry; they represent the ancestral state of Metazoa, they are the simplest multicellular organisms that have reached the level of tissue organization.The Cnidaria phylum has evolved using biotoxins as defense or predation mechanisms for ensure survival in hostile and competitive environments such as the seas and oceans. From benthic and pelagic species a large number of toxic compounds that have been determined can have an active role in the development of various antiviral, anticancer and antibacterial functions. Although the immune defense response of these animals is scarcely known, the tissues and the mucus produced by cnidarians are involved in immune defense and contain a large variety of peptides such as sodium and potassium channel neurotoxins, cytolysins, phospholipase A2 (PLA2), acid-sensing ion channel peptide toxins (ASICs) and other toxins, classified following biochemical and pharmacological studies on the basis of functional, molecular and structural parameters. These basal metazoan in fact, are far from "simple" in the range of methods at their disposal to deal with potential prey but also invading microbes and pathogens. They could also take advantage of the multi-functionality of some of their toxins, for example, some bioactive molecules have characteristics of toxicity associated with a potential antimicrobial activity. The interest in cnidarians was not only

  2. Photoregulation in a Kleptochloroplastidic Dinoflagellate, Dinophysis acuta

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Per J.; Ojamäe, Karin; Berge, Terje; Trampe, Erik C. L.; Nielsen, Lasse T.; Lips, Inga; Kühl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Some phagotrophic organisms can retain chloroplasts of their photosynthetic prey as so-called kleptochloroplasts and maintain their function for shorter or longer periods of time. Here we show for the first time that the dinoflagellate Dinophysis acuta takes control over “third-hand” chloroplasts obtained from its ciliate prey Mesodinium spp. that originally ingested the cryptophyte chloroplasts. With its kleptochloroplasts, D. acuta can synthesize photosynthetic as well as photoprotective pigments under long-term starvation in the light. Variable chlorophyll fluorescence measurements showed that the kleptochloroplasts were fully functional during 1 month of prey starvation, while the chlorophyll a-specific inorganic carbon uptake decreased within days of prey starvation under an irradiance of 100 μmol photons m-2 s-1. While D. acuta cells can regulate their pigmentation and function of kleptochloroplasts they apparently lose the ability to maintain high inorganic carbon fixation rates. PMID:27303378

  3. Population dynamics of red tide dinoflagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Timothy; Zingone, Adriana

    2014-03-01

    Sea-surface discolorations due to high concentrations of phytoplankton are called red tides. Their ecological significance is a long standing puzzle, and they are sometimes considered pathological. Here we propose that many red tides, particularly but not exclusively those composed of certain autotrophic dinoflagellates, are presexual/sexual swarms, essential links in their complex life cycles. This view provides a rationale for the appearance of these organisms in thin surface layers, and helps explain their ephemeral nature. We suggest that further understanding of this phenomenon, and of phytoplankton ecology in general, would benefit from attention to the 'net reproductive value‧ (r) over the whole life cycle as well as to the division rate (μ) of the vegetative phase. It is argued that r is strategically adapted to seasonal cycles and long term environmental variability, while μ reflects tactical needs (timing) and constraints (grazers, parasites) on vegetative growth.

  4. Pfiesteria piscicida, P. shumwayae, and other Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Miller, Todd R; Belas, Robert

    2003-03-01

    Pfiesteria piscicida and Pfiesteria shumwayae are estuarine dinoflagellates thought to be responsible for massive fish deaths and associated human illnesses in the southeastern United States. These dinoflagellates are described as having a complex life cycle involving flagellated zoospores, cysts, and amoeboid stages. Although no Pfiesteria toxin has been identified, certain strains of these dinoflagellates are thought to produce a water-soluble toxin that can kill fish and cause human illness. Recent reports show no evidence for amoeboid stages and indicate that a much more simplified life cycle exists. In addition, researchers have shown that P. shumwayae only kills fish through direct contact that does not necessarily involve the production of one or more toxins. This review summarizes these and other recent findings with an emphasis on establishing basic facts regarding the toxicity and life history of Pfiesteria dinoflagellates.

  5. LIPID BIOMARKER CHARACTERIZATION OF BLOOM-RELATED DINOFLAGELLATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Marine eukaryotic algae synthesize an array of lipids of chemotaxonomic utility that are potentially valuable in characterizing phytoplankton communities. Sterols and photopigments characteristic of dinoflagellates are rarely found in other algal classes. Long chain (C28) highly ...

  6. Evolution of saxitoxin synthesis in cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Jeremiah D; Wisecaver, Jennifer H; Brosnahan, Michael L; Kulis, David M; Anderson, Donald M; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Plumley, F Gerald; Erdner, Deana L

    2013-01-01

    Dinoflagellates produce a variety of toxic secondary metabolites that have a significant impact on marine ecosystems and fisheries. Saxitoxin (STX), the cause of paralytic shellfish poisoning, is produced by three marine dinoflagellate genera and is also made by some freshwater cyanobacteria. Genes involved in STX synthesis have been identified in cyanobacteria but are yet to be reported in the massive genomes of dinoflagellates. We have assembled comprehensive transcriptome data sets for several STX-producing dinoflagellates and a related non-toxic species and have identified 265 putative homologs of 13 cyanobacterial STX synthesis genes, including all of the genes directly involved in toxin synthesis. Putative homologs of four proteins group closely in phylogenies with cyanobacteria and are likely the functional homologs of sxtA, sxtG, and sxtB in dinoflagellates. However, the phylogenies do not support the transfer of these genes directly between toxic cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates. SxtA is split into two proteins in the dinoflagellates corresponding to the N-terminal portion containing the methyltransferase and acyl carrier protein domains and a C-terminal portion with the aminotransferase domain. Homologs of sxtB and N-terminal sxtA are present in non-toxic strains, suggesting their functions may not be limited to saxitoxin production. Only homologs of the C-terminus of sxtA and sxtG were found exclusively in toxic strains. A more thorough survey of STX+ dinoflagellates will be needed to determine if these two genes may be specific to SXT production in dinoflagellates. The A. tamarense transcriptome does not contain homologs for the remaining STX genes. Nevertheless, we identified candidate genes with similar predicted biochemical activities that account for the missing functions. These results suggest that the STX synthesis pathway was likely assembled independently in the distantly related cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates, although using some

  7. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance... insurance business within the United States, and all mutual marine insurance companies and mutual fire...

  8. Changes in marine dinoflagellate and diatom abundance under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinder, Stephanie L.; Hays, Graeme C.; Edwards, Martin; Roberts, Emily C.; Walne, Anthony W.; Gravenor, Mike B.

    2012-04-01

    Marine diatoms and dinoflagellates play a variety of key ecosystem roles as important primary producers (diatoms and some dinoflagellates) and grazers (some dinoflagellates). Additionally some are harmful algal bloom (HAB) species and there is widespread concern that HAB species may be increasing accompanied by major negative socio-economic impacts, including threats to human health and marine harvesting. Using 92,263 samples from the Continuous Plankton Recorder survey, we generated a 50-year (1960-2009) time series of diatom and dinoflagellate occurrence in the northeast Atlantic and North Sea. Dinoflagellates, including both HAB taxa (for example, Prorocentrum spp.) and non-HAB taxa (for example, Ceratium furca), have declined in abundance, particularly since 2006. In contrast, diatom abundance has not shown this decline with some common diatoms, including both HAB (for example, Pseudo-nitzschia spp.) and non-HAB (for example, Thalassiosira spp.) taxa, increasing in abundance. Overall these changes have led to a marked increase in the relative abundance of diatoms versus dinoflagellates. Our analyses, including Granger tests to identify criteria of causality, indicate that this switch is driven by an interaction effect of both increasing sea surface temperatures combined with increasingly windy conditions in summer.

  9. Cnidarian-like embryos associated with the first shelly fossils in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouchinsky, Artem; Bengtson, Stefan; Gershwin, Lisa-Ann

    1999-07-01

    Phosphatized spheroids, ˜0.5 mm in diameter, in the Lower Cambrian Manykay Formation at the Bol'shaya Kuonamka River in northern Sakha (Yakutia) are interpreted as cnidarian embryos of late developmental stages. One of the poles has a double cross-like structure, consisting of two sets of four bands each. The bands of the upper set radiate at 90° from each other; those of the lower set also radiate at about right angles from each other, but the set is rotated 45° in respect to the upper set. Although there is a resemblance to the cross-like arrangements of cells in pregastrulation spiralian eggs, in particular those of annelids, the combined evidence favors an interpretation of the bands as incipient tentacles of a cnidarian actinula larva. The embryos occur with one of the first assemblages of shelly fossils in northern Siberia, that of the Angustiochrea lata zone. The co-occurring shelly fossils, anabaritids, probably also represent the phylum Cnidaria, but because their tubes have a consistent triradial symmetry, the connection with the tetraradially symmetrical embryos is problematic. The size of the embryos suggests that they are nonplanktotrophic, and the presence of actinula-like features suggests the lack of a free planula stage.

  10. Defending against pathogens – immunological priming and its molecular basis in a sea anemone, cnidarian

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tanya; Rodriguez-Lanetty, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians, in general, are long-lived organisms and hence may repeatedly encounter common pathogens during their lifespans. It remains unknown whether these early diverging animals possess some type of immunological reaction that strengthens the defense response upon repeated infections, such as that described in more evolutionary derived organisms. Here we show results that sea anemones that had previously encountered a pathogen under sub-lethal conditions had a higher survivorship during a subsequently lethal challenge than naïve anemones that encountered the pathogen for the first time. Anemones subjected to the lethal challenge two and four weeks after the sub-lethal exposure presented seven- and five-fold increases in survival, respectively, compared to the naïve anemones. However, anemones challenged six weeks after the sub-lethal exposure showed no increase in survivorship. We argue that this short-lasting priming of the defense response could be ecologically relevant if pathogen encounters are restricted to short seasons characterized by high stress. Furthermore, we discovered significant changes in proteomic profiles between naïve sea anemones and those primed after pathogen exposure suggesting a clear molecular signature associated with immunological priming in cnidarians. Our findings reveal that immunological priming may have evolved much earlier in the tree of life than previously thought. PMID:26628080

  11. Bicarbonate transporters in corals point towards a key step in the evolution of cnidarian calcification

    PubMed Central

    Zoccola, Didier; Ganot, Philippe; Bertucci, Anthony; Caminiti-Segonds, Natacha; Techer, Nathalie; Voolstra, Christian R; Aranda, Manuel; Tambutté, Eric; Allemand, Denis; Casey, Joseph R; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The bicarbonate ion (HCO3−) is involved in two major physiological processes in corals, biomineralization and photosynthesis, yet no molecular data on bicarbonate transporters are available. Here, we characterized plasma membrane-type HCO3− transporters in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. Eight solute carrier (SLC) genes were found in the genome: five homologs of mammalian-type SLC4 family members, and three of mammalian-type SLC26 family members. Using relative expression analysis and immunostaining, we analyzed the cellular distribution of these transporters and conducted phylogenetic analyses to determine the extent of conservation among cnidarian model organisms. Our data suggest that the SLC4γ isoform is specific to scleractinian corals and responsible for supplying HCO3− to the site of calcification. Taken together, SLC4γ appears to be one of the key genes for skeleton building in corals, which bears profound implications for our understanding of coral biomineralization and the evolution of scleractinian corals within cnidarians. PMID:26040894

  12. Antimicrobials from Cnidarians. A New Perspective for Anti-Infective Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Mariottini, Gian Luigi; Grice, Irwin Darren

    2016-01-01

    The ability of microbes to counter the scientific and therapeutic advancements achieved during the second half of the twentieth century to provide effective disease treatments is currently a significant challenge for researchers in biology and medicine. The discovery of antibiotics, and the subsequent development of synthetic antimicrobial compounds, altered our therapeutic approach towards infectious diseases, and improved the quality and length of life for humans and other organisms. The current alarming rise in cases of antibiotic-resistance has forced biomedical researchers to explore new ways to recognize and/or produce new antimicrobials or to find other approaches for existing therapeutics. Aquatic organisms are known to be a source of compounds having the potential to play a role in fighting the battle against pathogenic microbes. In this connection, cnidarians occupy a pre-eminent role. Over the past few decades several studies have explored the antimicrobial/antibiotic properties of cnidarian extracts with the aim of isolating compounds possessing useful therapeutic features. This paper aims to review the existing data on this subject, taking into account the possible utilization of identified compounds. PMID:27005633

  13. [Survey of cnidarian accident records in some beaches of the coast of Pernambuco (Brazil)].

    PubMed

    Neves, Ricardo F; Amaral, Fernanda D; Steiner, Andrea Q

    2007-01-01

    Cnidarians are among the most venomous organisms known to man. They are characterized by stinging cells called cnidocytes, and several species, such as the Portuguese-man-of-war and the jellyfish, can cause harm to human beings. Despite not attracting () much attention on the Brazilian coast, the studies that have been carried out to date show that the occurrence of this kind of accident is significant. The aim of this study was to survey cnidarian related accidents with beach goers on some beaches of the state of Pernambuco, as well as to investigate the knowledge of relevant professions on this theme. () Archives of hospitals and life guard posts were visited for the survey, and 17 professionals were interviewed. During the visits, records were obtained for a total of 35 accidents at Boa Viagem Beach (Recife) over a two-year period, as well as informal records of an average of four to five cases a week at Piedade Beach and an average of two to three cases a week for Pontas de Pedras Beach. As to the knowledge of the professionals interviewed, most answers agree, in general, with the literature available, despite a certain level of inadequate or insufficient information on the theme.

  14. Growth, feeding and ecological roles of the mixotrophic and heterotrophic dinoflagellates in marine planktonic food webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hae Jin; Yoo, Yeong Du; Kim, Jae Seong; Seong, Kyeong Ah; Kang, Nam Seon; Kim, Tae Hoon

    2010-06-01

    Planktonic mixotrophic and heterotrophic dinoflagellates are ubiquitous protists and often abundant in marine environments. Recently many phototrophic dinoflagellate species have been revealed to be mixotrophic organisms and also it is suggested that most dinoflagellates may be mixotrophic or heterotrophic protists. The mixotrophic and heterotrophic dinoflagellates are able to feed on diverse prey items including bacteria, picoeukaryotes, nanoflagellates, diatoms, other dinoflagellates, heterotrophic protists, and metazoans due to their diverse feeding mechanisms. In turn they are ingested by many kinds of predators. Thus, the roles of the dinoflagellates in marine planktonic food webs are very diverse. The present paper reviewed the kind of prey which mixotrophic and heterotrophic dinoflagellates are able to feed on, feeding mechanisms, growth and ingestion rates of dinoflagellates, grazing impact by dinoflagellate predators on natural prey populations, predators on dinoflagellates, and red tides dominated by dinoflagellates. Based on this information, we suggested a new marine planktonic food web focusing on mixotrophic and heterotrophic dinoflagellates and provided an insight on the roles of dinoflagellates in the food web.

  15. A data mining approach to dinoflagellate clustering according to sterol composition: Correlations with evolutionary history.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined the sterol compositions of 102 dinoflagellates (including several previously unexamined species) using clustering techniques as a means of determining the relatedness of the organisms. In addition, dinoflagellate sterol-based relationships were compared statistically to dinoflag...

  16. Niche partitioning of closely related symbiotic dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Sampayo, Eugenia M; Franceschinis, Lorenzo; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Dove, Sophie

    2007-09-01

    Reef-building corals are fundamental to the most diverse marine ecosystems, yet a detailed understanding of the processes involved in the establishment, persistence and ecology of the coral-dinoflagellate association remains largely unknown. This study explores symbiont diversity in relation to habitat by employing a broad-scale sampling regime using ITS2 and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Samples from Pocillopora damicornis, Stylophora pistillata and Seriatopora hystrix all harboured host-specific clade C symbiont types at Heron Island (Great Barrier Reef, Australia). While Ser. hystrix associated with a single symbiont profile along its entire depth distribution, both P. damicornis and Sty. pistillata associated with multiple symbiont profiles that showed a strong zonation with depth. It is shown that, with an increased sampling effort, previously identified 'rare' symbiont types within this group of host species are in fact environmental specialists. A multivariate approach was used to expand on the common distinction of symbionts by a single genetic identity. It shows merit in its capacity not only to include all the variability present within the marker region but also to reliably represent ecological diversification of symbionts. Furthermore, the cohesive species concept is explored to explain how niche partitioning may drive diversification of closely related symbiont lineages. This study provides thus evidence that closely related symbionts are ecologically distinct and fulfil their own niche within the ecosystem provided by the host and external environment.

  17. Phylogeny of ultra-rapidly evolving dinoflagellate chloroplast genes: a possible common origin for sporozoan and dinoflagellate plastids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Green, B R; Cavalier-Smith, T

    2000-07-01

    Complete chloroplast 23S rRNA and psbA genes from five peridinin-containing dinoflagellates (Heterocapsa pygmaea, Heterocapsa niei, Heterocapsa rotun-data, Amphidinium carterae, and Protoceratium reticulatum) were amplified by PCR and sequenced; partial sequences were obtained from Thoracosphaera heimii and Scrippsiella trochoidea. Comparison with chloroplast 23S rRNA and psbA genes of other organisms shows that dinoflagellate chloroplast genes are the most divergent and rapidly evolving of all. Quartet puzzling, maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, neighbor joining, and LogDet trees were constructed. Intersite rate variation and invariant sites were allowed for with quartet puzzling and neighbor joining. All psbA and 23S rRNA trees showed peridinin-containing dinoflagellate chloroplasts as monophyletic. In psbA trees they are related to those of chromists and red algae. In 23S rRNA trees, dinoflagellates are always the sisters of Sporozoa (apicomplexans); maximum likelihood analysis of Heterocapsa triquetra 16S rRNA also groups the dinoflagellate and sporozoan sequences, but the other methods were inconsistent. Thus, dinoflagellate chloroplasts may actually be related to sporozoan plastids, but the possibility of reproducible long-branch artifacts cannot be strongly ruled out. The results for all three genes fit the idea that dinoflagellate chloroplasts originated from red algae by a secondary endosymbiosis, possibly the same one as for chromists and Sporozoa. The marked disagreement between 16S rRNA trees using different phylogenetic algorithms indicates that this is a rather poor molecule for elucidating overall chloroplast phylogeny. We discuss possible reasons why both plastid and mitochondrial genomes of alveolates (Dinozoa, Sporozoa and Ciliophora) have ultra-rapid substitution rates and a proneness to unique genomic rearrangements.

  18. Telomere maintenance in liquid crystalline chromosomes of dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Fojtová, Miloslava; Wong, Joseph T Y; Dvorácková, Martina; Yan, Kosmo T H; Sýkorová, Eva; Fajkus, Jirí

    2010-10-01

    The organisation of dinoflagellate chromosomes is exceptional among eukaryotes. Their genomes are the largest in the Eukarya domain, chromosomes lack histones and may exist in liquid crystalline state. Therefore, the study of the structural and functional properties of dinoflagellate chromosomes is of high interest. In this work, we have analysed the telomeres and telomerase in two Dinoflagellata species, Karenia papilionacea and Crypthecodinium cohnii. Active telomerase, synthesising exclusively Arabidopsis-type telomere sequences, was detected in cell extracts. The terminal position of TTTAGGG repeats was determined by in situ hybridisation and BAL31 digestion methods and provides evidence for the linear characteristic of dinoflagellate chromosomes. The length of telomeric tracts, 25-80 kb, is the largest among unicellular eukaryotic organisms to date. Both the presence of long arrays of perfect telomeric repeats at the ends of dinoflagellate chromosomes and the existence of active telomerase as the primary tool for their high-fidelity maintenance demonstrate the general importance of these structures throughout eukaryotes. We conclude that whilst chromosomes of dinoflagellates are unique in many aspects of their structure and composition, their telomere maintenance follows the most common scenario.

  19. Nervous system immunohistochemistry of the parasitic cnidarian Polypodium hydriforme at its free-living stage.

    PubMed

    Raikova, Ekaterina V; Raikova, Olga I

    2016-04-01

    Polypodium hydriforme, the only species in Polypodiozoa, which is currently considered a class of Cnidaria, and likely a sister group to Medusozoa (together with Myxozoa), is a cnidarian adapted to intracellular parasitism inside sturgeon oocytes. Free-living P. hydriforme lives on river bottoms; it walks on supporting tentacles and uses sensory tentacles to capture food and bring it to the mouth. The nervous system of free-living P. hydriforme was studied by confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry using antibodies to FMRF-amide and α-tubulin combined with phalloidin-staining of F-actin fibres. A sensory FMRF-amide immunoreactive (IR) nerve net and an α-tubulin IR nerve net have been identified. The FMRF-amide IR nerve net underlies the epidermis along the tentacles and around the mouth; it consists of neurites emanating from epidermal sensory cells and basiepidermal ganglion cells, and it connects with cnidocytes. A deeper-lying α-tubulin IR nerve net occurs only in tentacles and looks like chains of different-sized beads crossing the mesoglea and entwining muscles. Anti-α-tubulin staining also reveals microtubules in muscle cells following the longitudinal muscle fibres or the thin circular F-actin fibres of the tentacles. Cnidocytes in the tentacles are embedded in a regular hexagonal non-neural network formed by the tubulin IR cytoskeleton of epidermal cells. Cnidocils of the cnidocytes around the mouth and in walking tentacles are identical, but those in sensory tentacles differ in length and width. The possible homology of the tubulin IR nerve net with motor nerve nets of cnidarians is discussed. The absence of a classic nerve ring around the mouth and the lack of specialised sense organs are considered to be plesiomorphic characters for Cnidaria.

  20. Activation of the cnidarian oxidative stress response by ultraviolet radiation, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and crude oil

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, A. M.; Reitzel, A. M.; Kwok, C. K.; Jenny, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Organisms are continuously exposed to reactive chemicals capable of causing oxidative stress and cellular damage. Antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases (SODs) and catalases, are present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes and provide an important means of neutralizing such oxidants. Studies in cnidarians have previously documented the occurrence of antioxidant enzymes (transcript expression, protein expression and/or enzymatic activity), but most of these studies have not been conducted in species with sequenced genomes or included phylogenetic analyses, making it difficult to compare results across species due to uncertainties in the relationships between genes. Through searches of the genome of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis Stephenson, one catalase gene and six SOD family members were identified, including three copper/zinc-containing SODs (CuZnSODs), two manganese-containing SODs (MnSODs) and one copper chaperone of SOD (CCS). In 24 h acute toxicity tests, juvenile N. vectensis showed enhanced sensitivity to combinations of ultraviolet radiation (UV) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, specifically pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene and fluoranthene) relative to either stressor alone. Adult N. vectensis exhibited little or no mortality following UV, benzo[a]pyrene or crude oil exposure but exhibited changes in gene expression. Antioxidant enzyme transcripts were both upregulated and downregulated following UV and/or chemical exposure. Expression patterns were most strongly affected by UV exposure but varied between experiments, suggesting that responses vary according to the intensity and duration of exposure. These experiments provide a basis for comparison with other cnidarian taxa and for further studies of the oxidative stress response in N. vectensis. PMID:24436378

  1. Peridinialean dinoflagellate plate patterns, labels and homologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Tabulation patterns for peridinialean dinoflagellate thecae and cysts have been traditionally expressed using a plate labelling system described by C.A. Kofoid in the early 1900's. This system can obscure dinoflagellate plate homologies and has not always been strictly applied. The plate-labelling system presented here introduces new series labels but incorporates key features and ideas from the more recently proposed systems of G.L. Eaton and F.J.R. Taylor, as modified by W.R. Evitt. Plate-series recognition begins with the cingulum (C-series) and proceeds from the cingulum toward the apex for the three series of the epitheca/epicyst and proceeds from the cingulum toward the antapex for the two series of the hypotheca/hypocyst. The epithecal/epicystal model consists of eight plates that touch the anterior margin of the cingulum (E-series: plates E1-E7, ES), seven plates toward the apex that touch the E-series plates (M-series: R, M1-M6), and up to seven plates near the apex that do not touch E-series plates (D-series: Dp-Dv). The hypothecal/hypocystal model consists of eight plates that touch the posterior margin of the cingulum (H-series: H1-H6,HR,HS) and three plates toward the antapex (T1-T3). Epithecal/epicystal tabulation patterns come in both 8- and 7- models, corresponding to eight and seven plates, respectively, in the E-series. Hypothecal/hypocystal tabulation patterns also come in both 8- and 7-models, corresponding to eight and seven plates, respectively, in the H-series. By convention, the 7-model epitheca/epicyst has no plates E1 and M1; the 7-model hypotheca/hypocyst has no plate H6. Within an 8-model or 7-model, the system emphasizes plates that are presumed to be homologous by giving them identical labels. I introduce the adjectives "monothigmate", "dithigmate," and "trithigmate" to designate plates touching one, two, and three plates, respectively, of the adjacent series. The term "thigmation" applies to the analysis of plate contacts between

  2. Covariant mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Schultz, Jussi; Toigo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    The connection between maximal sets of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) in a prime-power dimensional Hilbert space and finite phase-space geometries is well known. In this article, we classify MUBs according to their degree of covariance with respect to the natural symmetries of a finite phase-space, which are the group of its affine symplectic transformations. We prove that there exist maximal sets of MUBs that are covariant with respect to the full group only in odd prime-power dimensional spaces, and in this case, their equivalence class is actually unique. Despite this limitation, we show that in dimension 2r covariance can still be achieved by restricting to proper subgroups of the symplectic group, that constitute the finite analogues of the oscillator group. For these subgroups, we explicitly construct the unitary operators yielding the covariance.

  3. Environmental Barcoding Reveals Massive Dinoflagellate Diversity in Marine Environments

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Rowena F.; Horak, Ales; Andrew, Rose L.; Coffroth, Mary-Alice; Andersen, Robert A.; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Jameson, Ian; Hoppenrath, Mona; Véron, Benoît; Kasai, Fumai; Brand, Jerry; James, Erick R.; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Dinoflagellates are an ecologically important group of protists with important functions as primary producers, coral symbionts and in toxic red tides. Although widely studied, the natural diversity of dinoflagellates is not well known. DNA barcoding has been utilized successfully for many protist groups. We used this approach to systematically sample known “species”, as a reference to measure the natural diversity in three marine environments. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we assembled a large cytochrome c oxidase 1 (COI) barcode database from 8 public algal culture collections plus 3 private collections worldwide resulting in 336 individual barcodes linked to specific cultures. We demonstrate that COI can identify to the species level in 15 dinoflagellate genera, generally in agreement with existing species names. Exceptions were found in species belonging to genera that were generally already known to be taxonomically challenging, such as Alexandrium or Symbiodinium. Using this barcode database as a baseline for cultured dinoflagellate diversity, we investigated the natural diversity in three diverse marine environments (Northeast Pacific, Northwest Atlantic, and Caribbean), including an evaluation of single-cell barcoding to identify uncultivated groups. From all three environments, the great majority of barcodes were not represented by any known cultured dinoflagellate, and we also observed an explosion in the diversity of genera that previously contained a modest number of known species, belonging to Kareniaceae. In total, 91.5% of non-identical environmental barcodes represent distinct species, but only 51 out of 603 unique environmental barcodes could be linked to cultured species using a conservative cut-off based on distances between cultured species. Conclusions/Significance COI barcoding was successful in identifying species from 70% of cultured genera. When applied to environmental samples, it revealed a massive amount of

  4. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire... marine insurance companies and mutual fire insurance companies exclusively issuing either...

  5. Cnidarians as a source of new marine bioactive compounds--an overview of the last decade and future steps for bioprospecting.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Joana; Peixe, Luisa; Gomes, Newton C M; Calado, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Marine invertebrates are rich sources of bioactive compounds and their biotechnological potential attracts scientific and economic interest worldwide. Although sponges are the foremost providers of marine bioactive compounds, cnidarians are also being studied with promising results. This diverse group of marine invertebrates includes over 11,000 species, 7500 of them belonging to the class Anthozoa. We present an overview of some of the most promising marine bioactive compounds from a therapeutic point of view isolated from cnidarians in the first decade of the 21st century. Anthozoan orders Alcyonacea and Gorgonacea exhibit by far the highest number of species yielding promising compounds. Antitumor activity has been the major area of interest in the screening of cnidarian compounds, the most promising ones being terpenoids (monoterpenoids, diterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids). We also discuss the future of bioprospecting for new marine bioactive compounds produced by cnidarians.

  6. Gene Expression Variation Resolves Species and Individual Strains among Coral-Associated Dinoflagellates within the Genus Symbiodinium

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, John E.; Baumgarten, Sebastian; Michell, Craig T.; Baums, Iliana B.; LaJeunesse, Todd C.; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    Reef-building corals depend on symbiotic mutualisms with photosynthetic dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium. This large microalgal group comprises many highly divergent lineages (“Clades A–I”) and hundreds of undescribed species. Given their ecological importance, efforts have turned to genomic approaches to characterize the functional ecology of Symbiodinium. To date, investigators have only compared gene expression between representatives from separate clades—the equivalent of contrasting genera or families in other dinoflagellate groups—making it impossible to distinguish between clade-level and species-level functional differences. Here, we examined the transcriptomes of four species within one Symbiodinium clade (Clade B) at ∼20,000 orthologous genes, as well as multiple isoclonal cell lines within species (i.e., cultured strains). These species span two major adaptive radiations within Clade B, each encompassing both host-specialized and ecologically cryptic taxa. Species-specific expression differences were consistently enriched for photosynthesis-related genes, likely reflecting selection pressures driving niche diversification. Transcriptional variation among strains involved fatty acid metabolism and biosynthesis pathways. Such differences among individuals are potentially a major source of physiological variation, contributing to the functional diversity of coral holobionts composed of unique host–symbiont genotype pairings. Our findings expand the genomic resources available for this important symbiont group and emphasize the power of comparative transcriptomics as a method for studying speciation processes and interindividual variation in nonmodel organisms. PMID:26868597

  7. Evaluation of photo-reactive siderophore producing bacteria before, during and after a bloom of the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum.

    PubMed

    Yarimizu, Kyoko; Polido, Geraldine; Gärdes, Astrid; Carter, Melissa L; Hilbern, Mary; Carrano, Carl J

    2014-06-01

    Evidence is increasing for a mutualistic relationship between phytoplankton and heterotrophic marine bacteria. It has been proposed that bacteria producing photoactive iron binding compounds known as siderophores could play an important role in such mutualistic associations by producing bioavailable iron utilizable by phytoplankton and in exchange receive autotrophically derived DOM. In order to understand the potential role photoactive siderophores might be playing in bacterial-algal mutualism or marine biogeochemistry in general, it is important to be able to detect and quantify their presence in various environments. One approach to accomplish that end is to make use of high sensitivity genomics technology (qPCR) to search for siderophore biosynthesis genes related to the production of photoactive siderophores. In this way one can access their "biochemical potential" and utilize this information as a proxy for the presence of these siderophores in the marine environment. In this report we studied the correlation of the presence of bacteria producing one of the three photoactive siderophores relative to total bacterial and dinoflagellate numbers from surface water at the Scripps Pier before, during, and after fall bloom of the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum. We believe that these findings will aid us in gauging the importance of photoactive siderophores in the marine environment and in harmful algal bloom dynamics in particular.

  8. Estimating mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraskov, Alexander; Stögbauer, Harald; Grassberger, Peter

    2004-06-01

    We present two classes of improved estimators for mutual information M(X,Y) , from samples of random points distributed according to some joint probability density μ(x,y) . In contrast to conventional estimators based on binnings, they are based on entropy estimates from k -nearest neighbor distances. This means that they are data efficient (with k=1 we resolve structures down to the smallest possible scales), adaptive (the resolution is higher where data are more numerous), and have minimal bias. Indeed, the bias of the underlying entropy estimates is mainly due to nonuniformity of the density at the smallest resolved scale, giving typically systematic errors which scale as functions of k/N for N points. Numerically, we find that both families become exact for independent distributions, i.e. the estimator M̂ (X,Y) vanishes (up to statistical fluctuations) if μ(x,y)=μ(x)μ(y) . This holds for all tested marginal distributions and for all dimensions of x and y . In addition, we give estimators for redundancies between more than two random variables. We compare our algorithms in detail with existing algorithms. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of our estimators for assessing the actual independence of components obtained from independent component analysis (ICA), for improving ICA, and for estimating the reliability of blind source separation.

  9. Chemotaxis of Silicibacter sp. Strain TM1040 toward Dinoflagellate Products†

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Todd R.; Hnilicka, Kristin; Dziedzic, Amanda; Desplats, Paula; Belas, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The α-proteobacteria phylogenetically related to the Roseobacter clade are predominantly responsible for the degradation of organosulfur compounds, including the algal osmolyte dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). Silicibacter sp. strain TM1040, isolated from a DMSP-producing Pfiesteria piscicida dinoflagellate culture, degrades DMSP, producing 3-methylmercaptopropionate. TM1040 possesses three lophotrichous flagella and is highly motile, leading to a hypothesis that TM1040 interacts with P. piscicida through a chemotactic response to compounds produced by its dinoflagellate host. A combination of a rapid chemotaxis screening assay and a quantitative capillary assay were used to measure chemotaxis of TM1040. These bacteria are highly attracted to dinoflagellate homogenates; however, the response decreases when homogenates are preheated to 80°C. To help identify the essential attractant molecules within the homogenates, a series of pure compounds were tested for their ability to serve as attractants. The results show that TM1040 is strongly attracted to amino acids and DMSP metabolites, while being only mildly responsive to sugars and the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Adding pure DMSP, methionine, or valine to the chemotaxis buffer resulted in a decreased response to the homogenates, indicating that exogenous addition of these chemicals blocks chemotaxis and suggesting that DMSP and amino acids are essential attractant molecules in the dinoflagellate homogenates. The implication of Silicibacter sp. strain TM1040 chemotaxis in establishing and maintaining its interaction with P. piscicida is discussed. PMID:15294804

  10. Biosynthesis and Molecular Genetics of Polyketides in Marine Dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Kellmann, Ralf; Stüken, Anke; Orr, Russell J. S.; Svendsen, Helene M.; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.

    2010-01-01

    Marine dinoflagellates are the single most important group of algae that produce toxins, which have a global impact on human activities. The toxins are chemically diverse, and include macrolides, cyclic polyethers, spirolides and purine alkaloids. Whereas there is a multitude of studies describing the pharmacology of these toxins, there is limited or no knowledge regarding the biochemistry and molecular genetics involved in their biosynthesis. Recently, however, exciting advances have been made. Expressed sequence tag sequencing studies have revealed important insights into the transcriptomes of dinoflagellates, whereas other studies have implicated polyketide synthase genes in the biosynthesis of cyclic polyether toxins, and the molecular genetic basis for the biosynthesis of paralytic shellfish toxins has been elucidated in cyanobacteria. This review summarises the recent progress that has been made regarding the unusual genomes of dinoflagellates, the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of dinoflagellate toxins. In addition, the evolution of these metabolic pathways will be discussed, and an outlook for future research and possible applications is provided. PMID:20479965

  11. [Biological mutualism, concepts and models].

    PubMed

    Perru, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Mutualism is a biological association for a mutual benefit between two different species. In this paper, firstly, we examine the history and signification of mutualism in relation to symbiosis. Then, we consider the link between concepts and models of mutualism. Models of mutualism depend on different concepts we use: If mutualism is situated at populations' level, it will be expressed by Lotka-Volterra models, concerning exclusively populations' size. If mutualism is considered as a resources' exchange or a biological market increasing the fitness of these organisms, it will be described at an individual level by a cost-benefit model. Our analysis will be limited to the history and epistemology of Lotka-Volterra models and we hypothesize that these models are adapted at first to translate dynamic evolutions of mutualism. They render stability or variations of size and assume that there are clear distinctions and a state of equilibrium between populations of different species. Italian mathematician Vito Volterra demonstrated that biological associations consist in a constant relation between some species. In 1931 and 1935, Volterra described the general form of antagonistic or mutualistic biological associations by the same differential equations. We recognize that these equations have been more used to model competition or prey-predator interactions, but a simple sign change allows describing mutualism. The epistemological problem is the following: Volterra's equations help us to conceptualize a global phenomenon. However, mutualistic interactions may have stronger effects away from equilibrium and these effects may be better understood at individual level. We conclude that, between 1985 and 2000, some researchers carried on working and converting Lotka-Volterra models but this description appeared as insufficient. So, other researchers adopted an economical viewpoint, considering mutualism as a biological market.

  12. Differential Responses to Wnt and PCP Disruption Predict Expression and Developmental Function of Conserved and Novel Genes in a Cnidarian

    PubMed Central

    Lapébie, Pascal; Ruggiero, Antonella; Barreau, Carine; Chevalier, Sandra; Chang, Patrick; Dru, Philippe; Houliston, Evelyn; Momose, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We have used Digital Gene Expression analysis to identify, without bilaterian bias, regulators of cnidarian embryonic patterning. Transcriptome comparison between un-manipulated Clytia early gastrula embryos and ones in which the key polarity regulator Wnt3 was inhibited using morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (Wnt3-MO) identified a set of significantly over and under-expressed transcripts. These code for candidate Wnt signaling modulators, orthologs of other transcription factors, secreted and transmembrane proteins known as developmental regulators in bilaterian models or previously uncharacterized, and also many cnidarian-restricted proteins. Comparisons between embryos injected with morpholinos targeting Wnt3 and its receptor Fz1 defined four transcript classes showing remarkable correlation with spatiotemporal expression profiles. Class 1 and 3 transcripts tended to show sustained expression at “oral” and “aboral” poles respectively of the developing planula larva, class 2 transcripts in cells ingressing into the endodermal region during gastrulation, while class 4 gene expression was repressed at the early gastrula stage. The preferential effect of Fz1-MO on expression of class 2 and 4 transcripts can be attributed to Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) disruption, since it was closely matched by morpholino knockdown of the specific PCP protein Strabismus. We conclude that endoderm and post gastrula-specific gene expression is particularly sensitive to PCP disruption while Wnt-/β-catenin signaling dominates gene regulation along the oral-aboral axis. Phenotype analysis using morpholinos targeting a subset of transcripts indicated developmental roles consistent with expression profiles for both conserved and cnidarian-restricted genes. Overall our unbiased screen allowed systematic identification of regionally expressed genes and provided functional support for a shared eumetazoan developmental regulatory gene set with both predicted and previously

  13. Insights into a dinoflagellate genome through expressed sequence tag analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Jeremiah D; Scheetz, Todd E; Yoon, Hwan Su; Soares, Marcelo B; Bonaldo, Maria F; Casavant, Thomas L; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2005-01-01

    Background Dinoflagellates are important marine primary producers and grazers and cause toxic "red tides". These taxa are characterized by many unique features such as immense genomes, the absence of nucleosomes, and photosynthetic organelles (plastids) that have been gained and lost multiple times. We generated EST sequences from non-normalized and normalized cDNA libraries from a culture of the toxic species Alexandrium tamarense to elucidate dinoflagellate evolution. Previous analyses of these data have clarified plastid origin and here we study the gene content, annotate the ESTs, and analyze the genes that are putatively involved in DNA packaging. Results Approximately 20% of the 6,723 unique (11,171 total 3'-reads) ESTs data could be annotated using Blast searches against GenBank. Several putative dinoflagellate-specific mRNAs were identified, including one novel plastid protein. Dinoflagellate genes, similar to other eukaryotes, have a high GC-content that is reflected in the amino acid codon usage. Highly represented transcripts include histone-like (HLP) and luciferin binding proteins and several genes occur in families that encode nearly identical proteins. We also identified rare transcripts encoding a predicted protein highly similar to histone H2A.X. We speculate this histone may be retained for its role in DNA double-strand break repair. Conclusion This is the most extensive collection to date of ESTs from a toxic dinoflagellate. These data will be instrumental to future research to understand the unique and complex cell biology of these organisms and for potentially identifying the genes involved in toxin production. PMID:15921535

  14. Characterization of Two Dinoflagellate Cold Shock Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Beauchemin, Mathieu; Roy, Sougata; Pelletier, Sarah; Averback, Alexandra; Lanthier, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Roughly two-thirds of the proteins annotated as transcription factors in dinoflagellate transcriptomes are cold shock domain-containing proteins (CSPs), an uncommon condition in eukaryotic organisms. However, no functional analysis has ever been reported for a dinoflagellate CSP, and so it is not known if they do in fact act as transcription factors. We describe here some of the properties of two CSPs from the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum, LpCSP1 and LpCSP2, which contain a glycine-rich C-terminal domain and an N-terminal cold shock domain phylogenetically related to those in bacteria. However, neither of the two LpCSPs act like the bacterial CSP, since they do not functionally complement the Escherichia coli quadruple cold shock domain protein mutant BX04, and cold shock does not induce LpCSP1 and LpCSP2 to detectable levels, based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Both CSPs bind to RNA and single-stranded DNA in a nonspecific manner in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and both proteins also bind double-stranded DNA nonspecifically, albeit more weakly. These CSPs are thus unlikely to act alone as sequence-specific transcription factors. IMPORTANCE Dinoflagellate transcriptomes contain cold shock domain proteins as the major component of the proteins annotated as transcription factors. We show here that the major family of cold shock domain proteins in the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium do not bind specific sequences, suggesting that transcriptional control is not a predominant mechanism for regulating gene expression in this group of protists. PMID:27303711

  15. Analogous biomineralization processes between the fossil coral Calceola sandalina (Rugosa, Devonian) and other Recent and fossil cnidarians.

    PubMed

    Coronado, Ismael; Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Rodríguez, Sergio

    2016-11-01

    The current work represents a distinctive study about the biomineral properties of exceptionally good preserved skeletons of Calceola sandalina from the Middle Devonian of Couvin (Belgium), Smara (Morocco) and (Algeria) and their relation in the evolution of biomineralization of cnidarians. Structural and crystallographic analyses of the skeletons have been done by petrographic microscopy, electron scanning microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), computer-integrated polarization microscopy (CIP) and electron microprobe analysis (EMPA). Calceola skeletons have many similarities with other cnidarians, mainly with other Palaeozoic corals as Syringoporicae: The microcrystals are composed of co-oriented nanocrystals that remind to mesocrystals, suggesting a biocrystallization process by particle attachment (CPA). The relationship between the nanocrystals and microcrystals suggest a growth mode similar to mineral bridges. A similar model was described for Syringoporicae corals (Tabulata) and it is similar to the coordinated-growth mode described in scleractinians and molluscs. Calceola skeletons show also a convergent structure with scleractinian forming Rapid Accretion Deposits (RAD), which share some structural and chemical properties. These evidences suggest analogous processes of biomineralization derived from a stem group of cnidarians. The results of this paper highlight the value of biomineralization studies in fossil organisms to understand the evolution of biomineralization mechanism through Phanerozoic.

  16. The Hedgehog gene family of the cnidarian, Nematostella vectensis, and implications for understanding metazoan Hedgehog pathway evolution

    PubMed Central

    Matus, David Q.; Magie, Craig; Pang, Kevin; Martindale, Mark Q; Thomsen, Gerald H.

    2008-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling is an important component of cell-cell communication during bilaterian development, and abnormal Hedgehog signaling contributes to disease and birth defects. Hedgehog genes are composed of a ligand (“hedge”) domain and an autocatalytic intein (“hog”) domain. Hedgehog (hh) ligands bind to a conserved set of receptors and activate downstream signal transduction pathways terminating with Gli/Ci transcription factors. We have identified five intein-containing genes in the anthozoan cnidarian Nematostella vectensis, two of which (NvHh1 and NvHh2) contain definitive hedgehog ligand domains, suggesting that to date, cnidarians are the earliest branching metazoan phylum to possess definitive Hh orthologs. Expression analysis of NvHh1 and NvHh2, the receptor NvPatched and a downstream transcription factor NvGli (a Gli3/Ci ortholog) indicate that these genes may have conserved roles in planar and trans-epithelial signaling during gut and germline development, while the three remaining intein-containing genes (NvHint1,2,3) are expressed in a cell-type specific manner in putative neural precursors. Metazoan intein-containing genes that lack a ligand domain have previously only been identified within nematodes. However, phylogenetic analyses suggest that these nematode inteins may be derived from an ancestral nematode true hedgehog gene, and that the non-bilaterian intein-containing genes identified here may represent an ancestral state prior to the domain swapping events that resulted in the formation of true hedgehog genes in the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor. Genomic surveys of N. vectensis suggest that most of the components of both protostome and deuterostome Hh signaling pathways are present in anthozoans and that some appear to have been lost in ecdysozoan lineages. Cnidarians possess many bilaterian cell-cell signaling pathways (Wnt, TGFß, FGF and Hh) that appear to act in concert to pattern tissues along the oral-aboral axis of the polyp

  17. Ammonium excretion in two benthic cnidarians: Alcyonium digitatum (Linnaeus, 1758) and Urticina felina (Linnaeus, 1767)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migné, A.; Davoult, D.

    1997-05-01

    As part of an evaluation of nitrogen fluxes between the water column and a macrobenthic community of the Strait of Dover (eastern English Channel), ammonium excretion was measured throughout the year in two common cnidarians (the octocoral Alcyonium digitatum and the sea anemone Urticina felina) which together accounted for 37% of the biomass. Mean ammonium excretion rates were 6.48 (±2.44 s.d.) μg N g -1 h -1 (ash-free dry weight) for A. digitatum and 4.12 (±l.38 s.d.) μg N g -1 h -1 for U. felina. Seasonal variations were observed in the excretion of A. digitatum, whereas such variations were less pronounced in U. felina. These trends are discussed in relation to temperature, food availability, nutritional state and nutritional habits of the two species. The results of this and a previous study indicate a nitrogen production of 18.9 g N m -2 y -1 for the entire benthic community.

  18. Relative Contributions of Various Cellular Mechanisms to Loss of Algae during Cnidarian Bleaching.

    PubMed

    Bieri, Tamaki; Onishi, Masayuki; Xiang, Tingting; Grossman, Arthur R; Pringle, John R

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to stress such as high seawater temperature, corals and other cnidarians can bleach due to loss of symbiotic algae from the host tissue and/or loss of pigments from the algae. Although the environmental conditions that trigger bleaching are reasonably well known, its cellular and molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Previous studies have reported the occurrence of at least four different cellular mechanisms for the loss of symbiotic algae from the host tissue: in situ degradation of algae, exocytic release of algae from the host, detachment of host cells containing algae, and death of host cells containing algae. The relative contributions of these several mechanisms to bleaching remain unclear, and it is also not known whether these relative contributions change in animals subjected to different types and/or durations of stresses. In this study, we used a clonal population of the small sea anemone Aiptasia, exposed individuals to various precisely controlled stress conditions, and quantitatively assessed the several possible bleaching mechanisms in parallel. Under all stress conditions tested, except for acute cold shock at 4°C, expulsion of intact algae from the host cells appeared to be by far the predominant mechanism of bleaching. During acute cold shock, in situ degradation of algae and host-cell detachment also became quantitatively significant, and the algae released under these conditions appeared to be severely damaged.

  19. Distinct mechanisms underlie oral vs aboral regeneration in the cnidarian Hydractinia echinata

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Brian; Thompson, Kerry; Frank, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians possess remarkable powers of regeneration, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this capability are unclear. Studying the hydrozoan Hydractinia echinata we show that a burst of stem cell proliferation occurs following decapitation, forming a blastema at the oral pole within 24 hr. This process is necessary for head regeneration. Knocking down Piwi1, Vasa, Pl10 or Ncol1 expressed by blastema cells inhibited regeneration but not blastema formation. EdU pulse-chase experiments and in vivo tracking of individual transgenic Piwi1+ stem cells showed that the cellular source for blastema formation is migration of stem cells from a remote area. Surprisingly, no blastema developed at the aboral pole after stolon removal. Instead, polyps transformed into stolons and then budded polyps. Hence, distinct mechanisms act to regenerate different body parts in Hydractinia. This model, where stem cell behavior can be monitored in vivo at single cell resolution, offers new insights for regenerative biology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05506.001 PMID:25884246

  20. Functional Characterization of Cnidarian HCN Channels Points to an Early Evolution of Ih

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Emma C.; Layden, Michael J.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Kamel, Bishoy; Medina, Monica; Simpson, Eboni; Jegla, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    HCN channels play a unique role in bilaterian physiology as the only hyperpolarization-gated cation channels. Their voltage-gating is regulated by cyclic nucleotides and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Activation of HCN channels provides the depolarizing current in response to hyperpolarization that is critical for intrinsic rhythmicity in neurons and the sinoatrial node. Additionally, HCN channels regulate dendritic excitability in a wide variety of neurons. Little is known about the early functional evolution of HCN channels, but the presence of HCN sequences in basal metazoan phyla and choanoflagellates, a protozoan sister group to the metazoans, indicate that the gene family predates metazoan emergence. We functionally characterized two HCN channel orthologs from Nematostella vectensis (Cnidaria, Anthozoa) to determine which properties of HCN channels were established prior to the emergence of bilaterians. We find Nematostella HCN channels share all the major functional features of bilaterian HCNs, including reversed voltage-dependence, activation by cAMP and PIP2, and block by extracellular Cs+. Thus bilaterian-like HCN channels were already present in the common parahoxozoan ancestor of bilaterians and cnidarians, at a time when the functional diversity of voltage-gated K+ channels was rapidly expanding. NvHCN1 and NvHCN2 are expressed broadly in planulae and in both the endoderm and ectoderm of juvenile polyps. PMID:26555239

  1. Relative Contributions of Various Cellular Mechanisms to Loss of Algae during Cnidarian Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Bieri, Tamaki; Onishi, Masayuki; Xiang, Tingting; Grossman, Arthur R.; Pringle, John R

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to stress such as high seawater temperature, corals and other cnidarians can bleach due to loss of symbiotic algae from the host tissue and/or loss of pigments from the algae. Although the environmental conditions that trigger bleaching are reasonably well known, its cellular and molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Previous studies have reported the occurrence of at least four different cellular mechanisms for the loss of symbiotic algae from the host tissue: in situ degradation of algae, exocytic release of algae from the host, detachment of host cells containing algae, and death of host cells containing algae. The relative contributions of these several mechanisms to bleaching remain unclear, and it is also not known whether these relative contributions change in animals subjected to different types and/or durations of stresses. In this study, we used a clonal population of the small sea anemone Aiptasia, exposed individuals to various precisely controlled stress conditions, and quantitatively assessed the several possible bleaching mechanisms in parallel. Under all stress conditions tested, except for acute cold shock at 4°C, expulsion of intact algae from the host cells appeared to be by far the predominant mechanism of bleaching. During acute cold shock, in situ degradation of algae and host-cell detachment also became quantitatively significant, and the algae released under these conditions appeared to be severely damaged. PMID:27119147

  2. New roles for Nanos in neural cell fate determination revealed by studies in a cnidarian.

    PubMed

    Kanska, Justyna; Frank, Uri

    2013-07-15

    Nanos is a pan-metazoan germline marker, important for germ cell development and maintenance. In flies, Nanos also acts in posterior and neural development, but these functions have not been demonstrated experimentally in other animals. Using the cnidarian Hydractinia we have uncovered novel roles for Nanos in neural cell fate determination. Ectopic expression of Nanos2 increased the numbers of embryonic stinging cell progenitors, but decreased the numbers of neurons. Downregulation of Nanos2 had the opposite effect. Furthermore, Nanos2 blocked maturation of committed, post-mitotic nematoblasts. Hence, Nanos2 acts as a switch between two differentiation pathways, increasing the numbers of nematoblasts at the expense of neuroblasts, but preventing nematocyte maturation. Nanos2 ectopic expression also caused patterning defects, but these were not associated with deregulation of Wnt signaling, showing that the basic anterior-posterior polarity remained intact, and suggesting that numerical imbalance between nematocytes and neurons might have caused these defects, affecting axial patterning only indirectly. We propose that the functions of Nanos in germ cells and in neural development are evolutionarily conserved, but its role in posterior patterning is an insect or arthropod innovation.

  3. A puzzling homology: a brittle star using a putative cnidarian-type luciferase for bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Delroisse, Jérôme; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther; Blaue, Stefanie; Ortega-Martinez, Olga; Eeckhaut, Igor; Flammang, Patrick; Mallefet, Jérôme

    2017-04-01

    Bioluminescence relies on the oxidation of a luciferin substrate catalysed by a luciferase enzyme. Luciferins and luciferases are generic terms used to describe a large variety of substrates and enzymes. Whereas luciferins can be shared by phylogenetically distant organisms which feed on organisms producing them, luciferases have been thought to be lineage-specific enzymes. Numerous light emission systems would then have co-emerged independently along the tree of life resulting in a plethora of non-homologous luciferases. Here, we identify for the first time a candidate luciferase of a luminous echinoderm, the ophiuroid Amphiura filiformis Phylogenomic analyses identified the brittle star predicted luciferase as homologous to the luciferase of the sea pansy Renilla (Cnidaria), contradicting with the traditional viewpoint according to which luciferases would generally be of convergent origins. The similarity between the Renilla and Amphiura luciferases allowed us to detect the latter using anti-Renilla luciferase antibodies. Luciferase expression was specifically localized in the spines which were demonstrated to be the bioluminescent organs in vivo However, enzymes homologous to the Renilla luciferase but unable to trigger light emission were also identified in non-luminous echinoderms and metazoans. Our findings strongly indicate that those enzymes, belonging to the haloalkane dehalogenase family, might then have been convergently co-opted into luciferases in cnidarians and echinoderms. In these two benthic suspension-feeding species, similar ecological pressures would constitute strong selective forces for the functional shift of these enzymes and the emergence of bioluminescence.

  4. FGF signaling in gastrulation and neural development in Nematostella vectensis, an anthozoan cnidarian.

    PubMed

    Matus, David Q; Thomsen, Gerald H; Martindale, Mark Q

    2007-02-01

    The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signal transduction pathway serves as one of the key regulators of early metazoan development, displaying conserved roles in the specification of endodermal, mesodermal, and neural fates during vertebrate development. FGF signals also regulate gastrulation, in part, by triggering epithelial to mesenchymal transitions in embryos of both vertebrates and invertebrates. Thus, FGF signals coordinate gastrulation movements across many different phyla. To help understand the breadth of FGF signaling deployment across the animal kingdom, we have examined the presence and expression of genes encoding FGF pathway components in the anthozoan cnidarian Nematostella vectensis. We isolated three FGF ligands (NvFGF8A, NvFGF8B, and NvFGF1A), two FGF receptors (NvFGFRa and NvFGFRb), and two orthologs of vertebrate FGF responsive genes, Sprouty (NvSprouty), an inhibitor of FGF signaling, and Churchill (NvChurchill), a Zn finger transcription factor. We found these FGF ligands, receptors, and response gene expressed asymmetrically along the oral/aboral axis during gastrulation and in a developing chemosensory structure of planula stages known as the apical tuft. These results suggest a conserved role for FGF signaling molecules in coordinating both gastrulation and neural induction that predates the Cambrian explosion and the origins of the Bilateria.

  5. Crustose coralline algae and a cnidarian neuropeptide trigger larval settlement in two coral reef sponges.

    PubMed

    Whalan, Steve; Webster, Nicole S; Negri, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    In sessile marine invertebrates, larval settlement is fundamental to population maintenance and persistence. Cues contributing to the settlement choices and metamorphosis of larvae have important implications for the success of individuals and populations, but cues mediating larval settlement for many marine invertebrates are largely unknown. This study assessed larval settlement in two common Great Barrier Reef sponges, Coscinoderma matthewsi and Rhopaloeides odorabile, to cues that enhance settlement and metamorphosis in various species of scleractinian coral larvae. Methanol extracts of the crustose coralline algae (CCA), Porolithon onkodes, corresponding to a range of concentrations, were used to determine the settlement responses of sponge larvae. Cnidarian neuropeptides (GLW-amide neuropeptides) were also tested as a settlement cue. Settlement in both sponge species was approximately two-fold higher in response to live chips of CCA and optimum concentrations of CCA extract compared to 0.2 µm filtered sea water controls. Metamorphosis also increased when larvae were exposed to GLW-amide neuropeptides; R. odorabile mean metamorphosis reached 42.0±5.8% compared to 16.0±2.4% in seawater controls and in C. matthewsi mean metamorphosis reached 68.3±5.4% compared to 36.7±3.3% in seawater controls. These results demonstrate the contributing role chemosensory communication plays in the ability of sponge larvae to identify suitable habitat for successful recruitment. It also raises the possibility that larvae from distinct phyla may share signal transduction pathways involved in metamorphosis.

  6. Profiling of adhesive-related genes in the freshwater cnidarian Hydra magnipapillata by transcriptomics and proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcelo; Ostermann, Thomas; Kremeser, Leopold; Lindner, Herbert; Beisel, Christian; Berezikov, Eugene; Hobmayer, Bert; Ladurner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The differentiated ectodermal basal disc cells of the freshwater cnidarian Hydra secrete proteinaceous glue to temporarily attach themselves to underwater surfaces. Using transcriptome sequencing and a basal disc-specific RNA-seq combined with in situ hybridisation a highly specific set of candidate adhesive genes was identified. A de novo transcriptome assembly of 55,849 transcripts (>200 bp) was generated using paired-end and single reads from Illumina libraries constructed from different polyp conditions. Differential transcriptomics and spatial gene expression analysis by in situ hybridisation allowed the identification of 40 transcripts exclusively expressed in the ectodermal basal disc cells. Comparisons after mass spectrometry analysis of the adhesive secretion showed a total of 21 transcripts to be basal disc specific and eventually secreted through basal disc cells. This is the first study to survey adhesion-related genes in Hydra. The candidate list presented in this study provides a platform for unravelling the molecular mechanism of underwater adhesion of Hydra. PMID:27661452

  7. Uncertainty relation for mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeloch, James; Broadbent, Curtis J.; Howell, John C.

    2014-12-01

    We postulate the existence of a universal uncertainty relation between the quantum and classical mutual informations between pairs of quantum systems. Specifically, we propose that the sum of the classical mutual information, determined by two mutually unbiased pairs of observables, never exceeds the quantum mutual information. We call this the complementary-quantum correlation (CQC) relation and prove its validity for pure states, for states with one maximally mixed subsystem, and for all states when one measurement is minimally disturbing. We provide results of a Monte Carlo simulation suggesting that the CQC relation is generally valid. Importantly, we also show that the CQC relation represents an improvement to an entropic uncertainty principle in the presence of a quantum memory, and that it can be used to verify an achievable secret key rate in the quantum one-time pad cryptographic protocol.

  8. The endosymbiotic dinoflagellates ( Symbiodinium sp.) of corals are parasites and mutualists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, M. P.; Stat, M.; Gates, R. D.

    2013-09-01

    The evolutionary success and continued survival of reef-building corals under increasing environmental change will, in part, be determined by the composition of their endosymbiotic dinoflagellate communities ( Symbiodinium sp.). Recent research suggests that differences in the phylotype composition of Symbiodinium in the same host can lead to different outcomes for the host when exposed to similar environmental conditions. One explanation for these observations is that symbioses between corals and Symbiodinium represent a continuum of interaction states that encompass mutualisms and parasitisms consistent with current evolutionary theory developed for other symbiotic systems. Here, we discuss the evidence supporting the existence of a parasitic to mutualistic continuum in Symbiodinium interactions and propose that a consideration of the evolutionary ecology of these associations will advance our understanding of how environmental change will influence the ecological outcomes in these important symbioses. We advocate that a robust taxonomic structure for Symbiodinium sp. and empirical studies on sexual reproduction in Symbiodinium, the stability of interaction states among Symbiodinium symbioses spatially and temporally and how interaction states change as the environment changes will generate data for models that accurately forecast how climate change will influence the persistence of corals and the reefs they structure.

  9. SxtA gene sequence analysis of dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norshaha, Safida Anira; Latib, Norhidayu Abdul; Usup, Gires; Yusof, Nurul Yuziana Mohd

    2015-09-01

    The dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum is typically known for the production of potent neurotoxins such as saxitoxin, affecting the health of human seafood consumers via paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). These phenomena is related to the harmful algal blooms (HABs) that is believed to be influenced by environmental and nutritional factors. Previous study has revealed that SxtA gene is a starting gene that involved in the saxitoxin production pathway. The aim of this study was to analyse the sequence of the sxtA gene in A. minutum. The dinoflagellates culture was cultured at temperature 26°C with 16:8-hour light:dark photocycle. After the samples were harvested, RNA was extracted, complementary DNA (cDNA) was synthesised and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were then purified and cloned before sequenced. The SxtA sequence obtained was then analyzed in order to identify the presence of SxtA gene in Alexandrium minutum.

  10. Copepods induce paralytic shellfish toxin production in marine dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Selander, Erik; Thor, Peter; Toth, Gunilla; Pavia, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Among the thousands of unicellular phytoplankton species described in the sea, some frequently occurring and bloom-forming marine dinoflagellates are known to produce the potent neurotoxins causing paralytic shellfish poisoning. The natural function of these toxins is not clear, although they have been hypothesized to act as a chemical defence towards grazers. Here, we show that waterborne cues from the copepod Acartia tonsa induce paralytic shellfish toxin (PST) production in the harmful algal bloom-forming dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum. Induced A. minutum contained up to 2.5 times more toxins than controls and was more resistant to further copepod grazing. Ingestion of non-toxic alternative prey was not affected by the presence of induced A. minutum. The ability of A. minutum to sense and respond to the presence of grazers by increased PST production and increased resistance to grazing may facilitate the formation of harmful algal blooms in the sea. PMID:16769640

  11. Global dinoflagellate event associated with the late Paleocene thermal maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, Erica M.; Heilmann-Clausen, Claus; Brinkhuis, Henk; Morgans, Hugh E. G.; Rogers, Karyne M.; Egger, Hans; Schmitz, Birger

    2001-04-01

    The late Paleocene thermal maximum, or LPTM (ca. 55 Ma), represents a geologically brief time interval (˜220 k.y.) characterized by profound global warming and associated environmental change. The LPTM is marked by a prominent negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) interpreted to reflect a massive and abrupt input of 12C-enriched carbon to the ocean-atmosphere reservoir, possibly as a result of catastrophic gas-hydrate release, on time scales equivalent to present-day rates of anthropogenic carbon input. The LPTM corresponds to important changes in the global distribution of biota, including mass extinction of marine benthic organisms. The dinoflagellate cyst record indicates that surface- dwelling marine plankton in marginal seas also underwent significant perturbations during the LPTM. We report on the dramatic response of representatives of the genus Apectodinium from two upper Paleocene lower Eocene sections in the Southern (New Zealand) and Northern (Austria) Hemispheres, where the dinoflagellate records are directly correlated with the CIE, benthic foraminifera extinction event, and calcareous nannofossil zonation. The results indicate that the inception of Apectodinium-dominated assemblages appears to be synchronous on a global scale, and that the event is precisely coincident with the beginning of the LPTM. Apectodinium markedly declined in abundance near the end of the LPTM. This Apectodinium event may be associated with (1) exceptionally high global sea-surface temperatures and/or (2) a significant increase in marginal-marine surface-water productivity. Such a globally synchronous acme of dinoflagellate cysts is unprecedented within the dinoflagellate cyst fossil record.

  12. MICROSPECTROPHOTOMETRY AS A METHOD TO IDENTIFY KLEPTOPLASTIDS IN THE NAKED FRESHWATER DINOFLAGELLATE GYMNODINIUM ACIDOTUM(1).

    PubMed

    Barsanti, Laura; Evangelista, Valtere; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Coltelli, Primo; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2009-12-01

    A relatively small number of freshwater dinoflagellates are involved in symbiotic association with cryptophytes. The chloroplasts of the cryptophytes are retained by the dinoflagellate and give it the characteristic phycobilin pigmentation, either phycoerythrin or phycocyanin. The pigment characterization of the retained chloroplasts can give precise and accurate information about the type of cryptophyte preyed upon by the dinoflagellate. For this purpose, we performed microspectrophotometric evaluation of the pigments of Gymnodinium acidotum Nygaard and three different cryptophytes present in samples collected from a tributary of the river Arno, in Tuscany (Italy). The comparison of the different spectroscopic data allowed us to discriminate effectively among the cryptophytes preyed upon by the dinoflagellate.

  13. Rampant polyuridylylation of plastid gene transcripts in the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunling; Morse, David

    2006-01-01

    Dinoflagellate plastid genes are believed to be encoded on small generally unigenic plasmid-like minicircles. The minicircle gene complement has reached saturation with an incomplete set of plastid genes (18) compared with typical functional plastids (60–200). While some of the missing plastid genes have recently been found in the nucleus, it is still unknown if additional genes, not located on minicircles, might also contribute to the plastid genome. Sequencing of tailed RNA showed that transcripts derived from the known minicircle genes psbA and atpB contained a homogenous 3′ polyuridine tract of 25–40 residues. This unusual modification suggested that random sequencing of a poly(dA) primed cDNA library could be used to characterize the plastid transcriptome. We have recovered only 12 different polyuridylylated transcripts from our library, all of which are encoded on minicircles in several dinoflagellate species. The correspondence of all polyuridylylated transcripts with previously described minicircle genes thus supports the dinoflagellate plastid as harbouring the smallest genome of any functional chloroplast. Interestingly, northern blots indicate that the majority of transcripts are modified, suggesting that polyuridylylation is unlikely to act as a degradation signal as do the heterogeneous poly(A)-rich extensions of transcripts in cyanobacteria and other plastids. PMID:16434702

  14. Oceanic heterotrophic dinoflagellates: distribution, abundance, and role as microzooplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    The primary objectives of this thesis were to determine the distribution and abundance of heterotrophic dinoflagellates across the Gulf Stream system off Cape Hatteras and to assess the potential grazing impact of these microheterotrophs in plankton communities. A list of species encountered in this study and their trophic status based on epifluorescence is presented, as well as observations on the presence of external or internal symbionts. The abundance of heterotrophic dinoflagellates across the Gulf Stream region off Cape Hatteras was determined from bimonthly net tow samples over a year and from whole water samples in March. Their average abundance was twice that of net ciliates in the net plankton and ten times that of ciliates in the nanoplankton. An isotope technique was developed to measure grazing rates of individual dinoflaggellates and other microzooplankton which cannot be separated in natural populations on the basis of size. /sup 3/H-thymidine and /sup 14/C-bicarbonate were used to label natural heterotrophic (bacteria and bacterivores) and autotrophic (phytoplankton and herbivores) food, respectively. Estimates of the grazing impact of heterotrophic kinoflagellates relative to other groups of heterotrophs on phytoplankton and bacteria were made by combining abundance data and clearance rates. Such calculations suggested that heterotrophic dinoflagellates may be an important group of grazers in oceanic waters.

  15. Photosynthetic characteristics and organization of chlorophyll in marine dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Prézelin, Barbara B.; Alberte, Randall S.

    1978-01-01

    The photosystem I reaction center complex, the P-700-chlorophyll a-protein, has been isolated from the photosynthetic membranes of two marine dinoflagellates, Gonyaulax polyedra and Glenodinium sp., by detergent solubilization with Triton X-100. The complexes isolated from the two species were indistinguishable, exhibiting identical absorption properties (400-700 nm) at both room (300 K) and low (77 K) temperature. The room temperature, red wavelength maximum was at 675 nm. The absorption properties, kinetics of photobleaching, sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoretic mobilities, and chlorophyll a/P-700 ratio (50 ± 10) of the P-700-chlorophyll a-protein complexes from the two species also were essentially the same and similar to those properties characterizing P-700-chlorophyll a-protein complexes of higher plants and green algae. Photosynthetic unit sizes were determined for cells grown at 1000 μW/cm2. Both dinoflagellates had unit sizes (total chlorophyll/P-700 ratios) of about 600, even though the distribution of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and peridinin in the light-harvesting components differed in Gonyaulax and Glenodinium. The number of photosynthetic units per cell in the two species correlates directly with their photosynthetic activities. A model is presented for the distribution of chlorophyll in the photosynthetic apparatus of these dinoflagellates which accounts for the known role of the isolated pigment-protein complexes and for the known photoadaptive physiology in pigmentation and photosynthesis for these species. PMID:16592518

  16. The importance of spatial heterogeneity and self-restraint on mutualism stability - a quantitative review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Wu; Dunn, Derek W; Luo, Jun; He, Jun-Zhou; Shi, Lei

    2015-10-05

    Understanding the factors that enable mutualisms to evolve and to subsequently remain stable over time, is essential to fully understand patterns of global biodiversity and for evidence based conservation policy. Theoretically, spatial heterogeneity of mutualists, through increased likelihood of fidelity between cooperative partners in structured populations, and 'self-restraint' of symbionts, due to selection against high levels of virulence leading to short-term host overexploitation, will result in either a positive correlation between the reproductive success of both mutualists prior to the total exploitation of any host resource or no correlation after any host resource has been fully exploited. A quantitative review by meta-analysis on the results of 96 studies from 35 papers, showed no evidence of a significant fitness correlation between mutualists across a range of systems that captured much taxonomic diversity. However, when the data were split according to four categories of host: 1) cnidarian corals, 2) woody plants, 3) herbaceous plants, and 4) insects, a significantly positive effect in corals was revealed. The trends for the remaining three categories did not significantly differ to zero. Our results suggest that stability in mutualisms requires alternative processes, or mechanisms in addition to, spatial heterogeneity of hosts and/or 'self-restraint' of symbionts.

  17. The importance of spatial heterogeneity and self-restraint on mutualism stability - a quantitative review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-Wu; Dunn, Derek W.; Luo, Jun; He, Jun-Zhou; Shi, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the factors that enable mutualisms to evolve and to subsequently remain stable over time, is essential to fully understand patterns of global biodiversity and for evidence based conservation policy. Theoretically, spatial heterogeneity of mutualists, through increased likelihood of fidelity between cooperative partners in structured populations, and ‘self-restraint’ of symbionts, due to selection against high levels of virulence leading to short-term host overexploitation, will result in either a positive correlation between the reproductive success of both mutualists prior to the total exploitation of any host resource or no correlation after any host resource has been fully exploited. A quantitative review by meta-analysis on the results of 96 studies from 35 papers, showed no evidence of a significant fitness correlation between mutualists across a range of systems that captured much taxonomic diversity. However, when the data were split according to four categories of host: 1) cnidarian corals, 2) woody plants, 3) herbaceous plants, and 4) insects, a significantly positive effect in corals was revealed. The trends for the remaining three categories did not significantly differ to zero. Our results suggest that stability in mutualisms requires alternative processes, or mechanisms in addition to, spatial heterogeneity of hosts and/or ‘self-restraint’ of symbionts.

  18. Comparative culture and toxicity studies between the toxic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida and a morphologically similar cryptoperidiniopsoid dinoflagellate.

    PubMed

    Marshall; Gordon; Seaborn; Dyer; Dunstan; Seaborn

    2000-12-01

    A series of fish bioassays using cultures of the toxic dinoflagellate, Pfiesteria piscicida and a cryptoperidiniopsoid dinoflagellate indicated various degrees of toxicity for Pfiesteria piscicida and no toxicity by the cryptoperidiniopsoid. P. piscicida maintained toxicity in the presence of live fish, and this toxicity was perpetuated following a series of inoculations to other culture vessels. Differences in the onset and magnitude of the fish deaths occurred, requiring 16 days for the initial fish death when using P. piscicida from a culture that had previously been maintained on algal cells, to kills within hours when using a culture that had recently (previous day) killed fish. Autopsies of moribund fish from the test and control fish bioassays indicated a general lack of bacterial infection, which ensued following death of other autopsied fish. Moreover, bacterial comparisons of waters in the fish bioassay and control fish cultures indicated that similar bacterial concentrations were present. Neither oxygen or ammonia levels were determined to be factors in the fish death. Life stages of a cryptoperidiniopsoid dinoflagellate from Virginia estuaries were also identified, including motile zoospore, gametes, planozygote, amoebae, and cyst stages. The cryptoperidiniopsioid did not initiate fish deaths in bioassays conducted over a 14-week period at zoospore concentrations of ca. 700-800 cells ml(-1). Elemental X-ray analysis of the scales from cysts of this dinoflagellate and P. piscicida indicate that they both contain silicon. Overall, the data from this study demonstrate that the cryptoperidiniopsoid possesses several similar life stages and feeding patterns as P. piscicida, but was not toxic to fish.

  19. Feeding by the Pfiesteria-like heterotrophic dinoflagellate Luciella masanensis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hae Jin; Ha, Jeong Hyun; Yoo, Yeong Du; Park, Jae Yeon; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Kang, Nam Seon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Hyung Seop; Yih, Won Ho

    2007-01-01

    To explore the feeding ecology of the Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellate (PLD) Luciella masanensis (GenBank Accession no. AM050344, previously Lucy), we investigated the feeding behavior and the kinds of prey species that L. masanensis fed on and determined its growth and ingestion rates of L. masanensis when it fed on the dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae and an unidentified cryptophyte species (equivalent spherical diam., ESD=5.6 microm), which were the dominant phototrophic species when L. masanensis and similar small heterotrophic dinoflagellates were abundant in Masan Bay, Korea in 2005. Additionally, these parameters were also measured for L. masanensis fed on blood cells of the perch Lateolabrax japonicus and the raphidophyte Heterosigma akashiwo in the laboratory. Luciella masanensis fed on prey cells by using a peduncle after anchoring the prey with tow filament, and was able to feed on diverse prey such as cryptophytes, raphidophytes, diatoms, mixotrophic dinoflagellates, and the blood cells of fish and humans. Among the prey species tested in the present study, perch blood cells were observed to be the optimal prey for L. masanensis. Specific growth rates of L. masanensis feeding on perch blood cells, A. carterae, H. akashiwo, and the cryptophyte, either increased continuously or became saturated with increasing the mean prey concentration. The maximum specific growth rate of L. masanensis feeding on perch blood cells (1.46/day) was much greater than that of A. carterae (0.59/day), the cryptophyte (0.24/day), or H. akashiwo (0.20/day). The maximum ingestion rate of L. masanensis on perch blood cells (2.6 ng C/grazer/day) was also much higher than that of A. carterae (0.32 ng C/grazer/day), the cryptophyte (0.44 ng C/grazer/day), or H. akashiwo (0.16 ng C/grazer/day). The kinds of prey species which L. masanensis is able to feed on were the same as those of Pfiesteria piscicida, but very different from those of another PLD Stoeckeria algicida. However, the

  20. Acceptable symbiont cell size differs among cnidarian species and may limit symbiont diversity.

    PubMed

    Biquand, Elise; Okubo, Nami; Aihara, Yusuke; Rolland, Vivien; Hayward, David C; Hatta, Masayuki; Minagawa, Jun; Maruyama, Tadashi; Takahashi, Shunichi

    2017-03-21

    Reef-building corals form symbiotic relationships with dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. Symbiodinium are genetically and physiologically diverse, and corals may be able to adapt to different environments by altering their dominant Symbiodinium phylotype. Notably, each coral species associates only with specific Symbiodinium phylotypes, and consequently the diversity of symbionts available to the host is limited by the species specificity. Currently, it is widely presumed that species specificity is determined by the combination of cell-surface molecules on the host and symbiont. Here we show experimental evidence supporting a new model to explain at least part of the specificity in coral-Symbiodinium symbiosis. Using the laboratory model Aiptasia-Symbiodinium system, we found that symbiont infectivity is related to cell size; larger Symbiodinium phylotypes are less likely to establish a symbiotic relationship with the host Aiptasia. This size dependency is further supported by experiments where symbionts were replaced by artificial fluorescent microspheres. Finally, experiments using two different coral species demonstrate that our size-dependent-infection model can be expanded to coral-Symbiodinium symbiosis, with the acceptability of large-sized Symbiodinium phylotypes differing between two coral species. Thus the selectivity of the host for symbiont cell size can affect the diversity of symbionts in corals.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 21 March 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2017.17.

  1. Mutual Respect and Civic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary theories of civic education frequently appeal to an ideal of mutual respect in the context of ethical, ethical and religious disagreement. This paper critically examines two recently popular criticisms of this ideal. The first, coming from a postmodern direction, charges that the ideal is hypocritical in its effort to be maximally…

  2. Hospital mutual aid evacuation plan.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R

    1997-02-01

    Health care facilities need to be prepared for disasters such as floods, tornadoes and earthquakes. Rochester, NY, and its surrounding communities devised a hospital mutual aid evacuation plan in the event a disaster occurs and also to comply with the Joint Commission. This document discusses the plan's development process and also provides the end result.

  3. Mimosine, the Allelochemical from the leguminous tree Leucaena leucocephala, selectively enhances cell proliferation in dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Patrick K K; Wong, Francis T W; Wong, Joseph T Y

    2002-10-01

    Mimosine, the allelochemical from the leguminous tree Leucaena leucocephala, is toxic to most terrestrial animals and plants. We report here that while mimosine inhibits major phytoplankton groups, it enhances cell proliferation in dinoflagellates. On addition to coastal seawater samples, mimosine is able to confer a growth advantage to dinoflagellates. The use of mimosine will promote the isolation and culture of this group of phytoplankton.

  4. Viable cell sorting of dinoflagellates by multi-parametric flow cytometry.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electronic cell sorting for isolation and culture of dinoflagellates and other marine eukaryotic phytoplankton was compared to the traditional method of manually picking of cells using a micropipette. Trauma to electronically sorted cells was not a limiting factor as fragile dinoflagellates, such a...

  5. STRATEGIES OF MARINE DINOFLAGELLATE SURVIVAL AND SOME RULES OF ASSEMBLY. (R829368)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dinoflagellate ecology is based on multiple adaptive strategies and species having diverse habitat preferences. Nine types of mixing-irradiance-nutrient habitats selecting for specific marine dinoflagellate life-form types are recognised, with five rules of assembly proposed t...

  6. The mitochondrial genome of Hydra oligactis (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa) sheds new light on animal mtDNA evolution and cnidarian phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Kayal, Ehsan; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2008-02-29

    The 16,314-nuceotide sequence of the linear mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule of Hydra oligactis (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa)--the first from the class Hydrozoa--has been determined. This sequence contains genes for 13 energy pathway proteins, small and large subunit rRNAs, and methionine and tryptophan tRNAs, as is typical for cnidarians. All genes have the same transcriptional orientation and their arrangement in the genome is similar to that of the jellyfish Aurelia aurita. In addition, a partial copy of cox1 is present at one end of the molecule in a transcriptional orientation opposite to the rest of the genes, forming a part of inverted terminal repeat characteristic of linear mtDNA and linear mitochondrial plasmids. The sequence close to at least one end of the molecule contains several homonucleotide runs as well as small inverted repeats that are able to form strong secondary structures and may be involved in mtDNA maintenance and expression. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial genes of H. oligactis and other cnidarians supports the Medusozoa hypothesis but also suggests that Anthozoa may be paraphyletic, with octocorallians more closely related to the Medusozoa than to the Hexacorallia. The latter inference implies that Anthozoa is paraphyletic and that the polyp (rather than a medusa) is the ancestral body type in Cnidaria.

  7. First Description of Sulphur-Oxidizing Bacterial Symbiosis in a Cnidarian (Medusozoa) Living in Sulphidic Shallow-Water Environments

    PubMed Central

    Abouna, Sylvie; Gonzalez-Rizzo, Silvina; Grimonprez, Adrien; Gros, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Background Since the discovery of thioautotrophic bacterial symbiosis in the giant tubeworm Riftia pachyptila, there has been great impetus to investigate such partnerships in other invertebrates. In this study, we present the occurrence of a sulphur-oxidizing symbiosis in a metazoan belonging to the phylum Cnidaria in which this event has never been described previously. Methodology/Principal Findings Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) observations and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXs) analysis, were employed to unveil the presence of prokaryotes population bearing elemental sulphur granules, growing on the body surface of the metazoan. Phylogenetic assessments were also undertaken to identify this invertebrate and microorganisms in thiotrophic symbiosis. Our results showed the occurrence of a thiotrophic symbiosis in a cnidarian identified as Cladonema sp. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report describing the occurrence of a sulphur-oxidizing symbiosis in a cnidarian. Furthermore, of the two adult morphologies, the polyp and medusa, this mutualistic association was found restricted to the polyp form of Cladonema sp. PMID:26011278

  8. Role of Pax genes in eye evolution: a cnidarian PaxB gene uniting Pax2 and Pax6 functions.

    PubMed

    Kozmik, Zbynek; Daube, Michael; Frei, Erich; Norman, Barbara; Kos, Lidia; Dishaw, Larry J; Noll, Markus; Piatigorsky, Joram

    2003-11-01

    PaxB from Tripedalia cystophora, a cubomedusan jellyfish possessing complex eyes (ocelli), was characterized. PaxB, the only Pax gene found in this cnidarian, is expressed in the larva, retina, lens, and statocyst. PaxB contains a Pax2/5/8-type paired domain and octapeptide, but a Pax6 prd-type homeodomain. Pax2/5/8-like properties of PaxB include a DNA binding specificity of the paired domain, activation and inhibitory domains, and the ability to rescue spa(pol), a Drosophila Pax2 eye mutant. Like Pax6, PaxB activates jellyfish crystallin and Drosophila rhodopsin rh6 promoters and induces small ectopic eyes in Drosophila. Pax6 has been considered a "master" control gene for eye development. Our data suggest that the ancestor of jellyfish PaxB, a PaxB-like protein, was the primordial Pax protein in eye evolution and that Pax6-like genes evolved in triploblasts after separation from Cnidaria, raising the possibility that cnidarian and sophisticated triploblastic eyes arose independently.

  9. CONCENTRATIONS OF DIMETHYLSULFONIOPROPIONATE AND DIMETHYL SULFIDE ARE STRAIN-SPECIFIC IN SYMBIOTIC DINOFLAGELLATES (SYMBIODINIUM SP., DINOPHYCEAE)(1).

    PubMed

    Steinke, Michael; Brading, Patrick; Kerrison, Philip; Warner, Mark E; Suggett, David J

    2011-08-01

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) are sulfur compounds that may function as antioxidants in algae. Symbiotic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium show strain-specific differences in their susceptibility to temperature-induced oxidative stress and have been shown to contain high concentrations of DMSP. We investigated continuous cultures of four strains from distinct phylotypes (A1, A13, A2, and B1) that can be characterized by differential thermal tolerances. We hypothesized that strains with high thermal tolerance have higher concentrations of DMSP and DMS in comparison to strains with low thermal tolerance. DMSP concentrations were strain-specific with highest concentrations occurring in A1 (225 ± 3.5 mmol · L(-1 ) cell volume [CV]) and lowest in A2 (158 ± 3.8 mmol · L(-1 ) CV). Both strains have high thermal tolerance. Strains with low thermal tolerance (A13 and B1) showed DMSP concentrations in between these extremes (194 ± 19.0 and 160 ± 6.1 mmol · L(-1 ) CV, respectively). DMS data further confirmed this general pattern with high DMS concentrations in A1 and A13 (4.1 ± 1.22 and 2.1 ± 0.37 mmol · L(-1 ) CV, respectively) and low DMS concentrations in A2 and B1 (0.3 ± 0.06 and 0.5 ± 0.22 mmol · L(-1) CV, respectively). Hence, the strain-specific differences in DMSP and DMS concentrations did not match the different abilities of the four phylotypes to withstand thermal stress. Future work should quantify the possible dynamics in DMSP and DMS concentrations during periods of high oxidative stress in Symbiodinium sp. and address the role of these antioxidants in zooxanthellate cnidarians.

  10. Hyperdiversity of Genes Encoding Integral Light-Harvesting Proteins in the Dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp

    PubMed Central

    Boldt, Lynda; Yellowlees, David; Leggat, William

    2012-01-01

    The superfamily of light-harvesting complex (LHC) proteins is comprised of proteins with diverse functions in light-harvesting and photoprotection. LHC proteins bind chlorophyll (Chl) and carotenoids and include a family of LHCs that bind Chl a and c. Dinophytes (dinoflagellates) are predominantly Chl c binding algal taxa, bind peridinin or fucoxanthin as the primary carotenoid, and can possess a number of LHC subfamilies. Here we report 11 LHC sequences for the chlorophyll a-chlorophyll c2-peridinin protein complex (acpPC) subfamily isolated from Symbiodinium sp. C3, an ecologically important peridinin binding dinoflagellate taxa. Phylogenetic analysis of these proteins suggests the acpPC subfamily forms at least three clades within the Chl a/c binding LHC family; Clade 1 clusters with rhodophyte, cryptophyte and peridinin binding dinoflagellate sequences, Clade 2 with peridinin binding dinoflagellate sequences only and Clades 3 with heterokontophytes, fucoxanthin and peridinin binding dinoflagellate sequences. PMID:23112815

  11. Recent radiation in a marine and freshwater dinoflagellate species flock

    PubMed Central

    Annenkova, Nataliia V; Hansen, Gert; Moestrup, Øjvind; Rengefors, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Processes of rapid radiation among unicellular eukaryotes are much less studied than among multicellular organisms. We have investigated a lineage of cold-water microeukaryotes (protists) that appear to have diverged recently. This lineage stands in stark contrast to known examples of phylogenetically closely related protists, in which genetic difference is typically larger than morphological differences. We found that the group not only consists of the marine-brackish dinoflagellate species Scrippsiella hangoei and the freshwater species Peridinium aciculiferum as discovered previously but also of a whole species flock. The additional species include Peridinium euryceps and Peridinium baicalense, which are restricted to a few lakes, in particular to the ancient Lake Baikal, Russia, and freshwater S. hangoei from Lake Baikal. These species are characterized by relatively large conspicuous morphological differences, which have given rise to the different species descriptions. However, our scanning electron microscopic studies indicate that they belong to a single genus according to traditional morphological characterization of dinoflagellates (thecal plate patterns). Moreover, we found that they have identical SSU (small subunit) rDNA fragments and distinct but very small differences in the DNA markers LSU (large subunit) rDNA, ITS2 (internal transcribed spacer 2) and COB (cytochrome b) gene, which are used to delineate dinoflagellates species. As some of the species co-occur, and all four have small but species–specific sequence differences, we suggest that these taxa are not a case of phenotypic plasticity but originated via recent adaptive radiation. We propose that this is the first clear example among free-living microeukaryotes of recent rapid diversification into several species followed by dispersion to environments with different ecological conditions. PMID:25603395

  12. New-old hemoglobin-like proteins of symbiotic dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Rosic, Nedeljka N; Leggat, William; Kaniewska, Paulina; Dove, Sophie; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2013-01-01

    Symbiotic dinoflagellates are unicellular photosynthetic algae that live in mutualistic symbioses with many marine organisms. Within the transcriptome of coral endosymbionts Symbiodinium sp. (type C3), we discovered the sequences of two novel and highly polymorphic hemoglobin-like genes and proposed their 3D protein structures. At the protein level, four isoforms shared between 87 and 97% sequence identity for Hb-1 and 78–99% for Hb-2, whereas between Hb-1 and Hb-2 proteins, only 15–21% sequence homology has been preserved. Phylogenetic analyses of the dinoflagellate encoding Hb sequences have revealed a separate evolutionary origin of the discovered globin genes and indicated the possibility of horizontal gene transfer. Transcriptional regulation of the Hb-like genes was studied in the reef-building coral Acropora aspera exposed to elevated temperatures (6–7°C above average sea temperature) over a 24-h period and a 72-h period, as well as to nutrient stress. Exposure to elevated temperatures resulted in an increased Hb-1 gene expression of 31% after 72 h only, whereas transcript abundance of the Hb-2 gene was enhanced by up to 59% by both 1-day and 3-day thermal stress conditions. Nutrient stress also increased gene expression of Hb-2 gene by 70%. Our findings describe the differential expression patterns of two novel Hb genes from symbiotic dinoflagellates and their polymorphic nature. Furthermore, the inducible nature of Hb-2 gene by both thermal and nutrient stressors indicates a prospective role of this form of hemoglobin in the initial coral–algal responses to changes in environmental conditions. This novel hemoglobin has potential use as a stress biomarker. PMID:23610627

  13. Biogeography of dinoflagellate cysts in northwest Atlantic estuaries.

    PubMed

    Price, Andrea M; Pospelova, Vera; Coffin, Michael R S; Latimer, James S; Chmura, Gail L

    2016-08-01

    Few biogeographic studies of dinoflagellate cysts include the near-shore estuarine environment. We determine the effect of estuary type, biogeography, and water quality on the spatial distribution of organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts from the Northeast USA (Maine to Delaware) and Canada (Prince Edward Island). A total of 69 surface sediment samples were collected from 27 estuaries, from sites with surface salinities >20. Dinoflagellate cysts were examined microscopically and compared to environmental parameters using multivariate ordination techniques. The spatial distribution of cyst taxa reflects biogeographic provinces established by other marine organisms, with Cape Cod separating the northern Acadian Province from the southern Virginian Province. Species such as Lingulodinium machaerophorum and Polysphaeridinium zoharyi were found almost exclusively in the Virginian Province, while others such as Dubridinium spp. and Islandinium? cezare were more abundant in the Acadian Province. Tidal range, sea surface temperature (SST), and sea surface salinity (SSS) are statistically significant parameters influencing cyst assemblages. Samples from the same type of estuary cluster together in canonical correspondence analysis when the estuaries are within the same biogeographic province. The large geographic extent of this study, encompassing four main estuary types (riverine, lagoon, coastal embayment, and fjord), allowed us to determine that the type of estuary has an important influence on cyst assemblages. Due to greater seasonal variations in SSTs and SSSs in estuaries compared to the open ocean, cyst assemblages show distinct latitudinal trends. The estuarine context is important for understanding present-day species distribution, the factors controlling them, and to better predict how they may change in the future.

  14. Nematode-Bacteria Mutualism: Selection Within the Mutualism Supersedes Selection Outside of the Mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Morran, Levi T.; Penley, McKenna J.; Byrd, Victoria S.; Meyer, Andrew J.; O’Sullivan, Timothy S.; Bashey, Farrah; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi; Lively, Curtis M.

    2016-01-01

    The coevolution of interacting species can lead to co-dependent mutualists. Little is known about the effect of selection on partners within verses apart from the association. Here, we determined the effect of selection on bacteria (Xenorhabdus nematophila) both within and apart from its mutualistic partner (a nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae). In nature, the two species cooperatively infect and kill arthropods. We passaged the bacteria either together with (M+), or isolated from (M−), nematodes under two different selection regimes: random selection (S−) and selection for increased virulence against arthropod hosts (S+). We found that the isolated bacteria evolved greater virulence under selection for greater virulence (M−S+) than under random selection (M−S−). In addition, the response to selection in the isolated bacteria (M−S+) caused a breakdown of the mutualism following reintroduction to the nematode. Finally, selection for greater virulence did not alter the evolutionary trajectories of bacteria passaged within the mutualism (M+S+ = M+S−), indicating that selection for the maintenance of the mutualism was stronger than selection for increased virulence. The results show that selection on isolated mutualists can rapidly breakdown beneficial interactions between species, but that selection within a mutualism can supersede external selection, potentially generating co-dependence over time. PMID:26867502

  15. Discovery of the toxic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria in northern European waters.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Tengs, Torstein; Vatne, Andreas; Bowers, Holly A; Oldach, David W; Burkholder, JoAnn M; Glasgow, Howard B; Rublee, Parke A; Klaveness, Dag

    2002-01-22

    Several dinoflagellate strains of the genus Pfiesteria were isolated by culturing techniques from sediment samples taken in the Oslofjord region of Norway. Pfiesteria piscicida, well known as a fish killer from the Atlantic coast of America, was identified by genetic methods and light microscopy. The related species Pfiesteria shumwayae was attracted from the sediment by the presence of fish, and has proved toxic. This present survey demonstrates the wide distribution of these potentially harmful species, but so far they have not been connected with fish kills in Europe.

  16. A dinoflagellate mutant with higher frequency of multiple fission.

    PubMed

    Lam, C M; Chong, C; Wong, J T

    2001-01-01

    The dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii Biecheler propagates by both binary and multiple fission. By a newly developed mutagenesis protocol based on using ethyl methanesulfonate and a cell size screening method, a cell cycle mutant, mf2, was isolated with giant cells which predominantly divide by multiple fission. The average cell size of the mutant mf2 is larger than the control C. cohnii. Cell cycle synchronization experiments suggest that mutant mf2, when compared with the control strain, has a prolonged G1 phase with a corresponding delay of the G2 + M phase.

  17. Pluto-charon mutual events

    SciTech Connect

    Binzel, R.P. )

    1989-11-01

    Since 1985, planetary astronomers have been working to take advantage of a once-per-century apparent alignment between Pluto and its satellite, Charon, which has allowed mutual occultation and transit events to be observed. There events, which will cease in 1990, have permitted the first precise determinations of their individual radii, densities, and surface compositions. In addition, information on their surface albedo distributions can be obtained.

  18. Mutuality in the provision of Scottish healthcare.

    PubMed

    Howieson, Brian

    2015-11-01

    The backdrop to this article is provided by the Better Health, Better Care Action Plan (Scottish Government, 2007), Section 1 of which is entitled 'Towards a Mutual NHS'. According to Better Health, Better Care (Scottish Government, 2007: 5): 'Mutual organisations are designed to serve their members. They are designed to gather people around a common sense of purpose. They are designed to bring the organisation together in what people often call "co-production."' The aim of this article is to précis the current knowledge of mutuality in the provision of Scottish healthcare. In detail, it will: introduce the 'mutual' organisation; offer a historical perspective of mutuality; suggest why healthcare mutuality is important; and briefly, detail the differences in mutual health-care policy in England and Scotland. It is hoped that this analysis will help researchers and practitioners alike appreciate further the philosophy of mutuality in the provision of Scottish healthcare.

  19. Ultrastructural features of the benthic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata (Dinophyceae).

    PubMed

    Escalera, Laura; Benvenuto, Giovanna; Scalco, Eleonora; Zingone, Adriana; Montresor, Marina

    2014-05-01

    The toxic benthic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata has considerably expanded its distribution range in the last decade, posing risks to human health. Several aspects of this species are still poorly known. We studied ultrastructural features of cultivated and natural populations of Ostreopsis cf. ovata from the Gulf of Naples (Mediterranean Sea) using confocal laser scanning, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. New information on the morphology and location of several sulcal plates was gained and a new plate designation is suggested that better fits the one applied to other Gonyaulacales. The microtubular component of the cytoskeleton, revealed using an anti-β-tubulin antibody, consisted of a cortical layer of microtubules arranged asymmetrically in the episome and in the hyposome, complemented by a complex inner microtubular system running from the sulcal area towards the internal part of the cell. The conspicuous canal was delimited by two thick, burin-shaped lobes ending in a tubular ventral opening. The canal was surrounded by mucocysts discharging their content into it. A similar structure has been reported in other benthic and planktonic dinoflagellates and may be interpreted as an example of convergent evolution in species producing large amounts of mucus.

  20. Grazer cues induce stealth behavior in marine dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Selander, Erik; Jakobsen, Hans H.; Lombard, Fabien; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Chain formation is common among phytoplankton organisms but the underlying reasons and consequences are poorly understood. Here we show that chain formation is strongly impaired by waterborne cues from copepod grazers in the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense. Chains of Alexandrium cells exposed to copepod cues responded by splitting into single cells or shorter chains. Motion analysis revealed significantly lower swimming velocities for single cells compared with chains, with two- to fivefold higher simulated predator encounter rates for two- and four-cell chains, respectively. In addition, the few remaining two-cell chains in grazed treatments were swimming at approximately half the speed of two-cell chains in treatments without grazers, which reduced encounter rates with grazers to values similar to that of single cells. Chain length plasticity and swimming behavior constitute unique mechanisms to reduce encounters with grazers. We argue that dinoflagellates can regulate the balance between motility and predator avoidance by adjusting chain length. The high predator encounter rate for motile chains may have contributed to the low prevalence of chain formation in motile phytoplankton compared with in nonmotile phytoplankton where chain formation is more common. PMID:21368128

  1. Significance of plankton community structure and nutrient availability for the control of dinoflagellate blooms by parasites: a modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Alves-de-Souza, Catharina; Pecqueur, David; Le Floc'h, Emilie; Mas, Sébastien; Roques, Cécile; Mostajir, Behzad; Vidussi, Franscesca; Velo-Suárez, Lourdes; Sourisseau, Marc; Fouilland, Eric; Guillou, Laure

    2015-01-01

    Dinoflagellate blooms are frequently observed under temporary eutrophication of coastal waters after heavy rains. Growth of these opportunistic microalgae is believed to be promoted by sudden input of nutrients and the absence or inefficiency of their natural enemies, such as grazers and parasites. Here, numerical simulations indicate that increasing nutrient availability not only promotes the formation of dinoflagellate blooms but can also stimulate their control by protozoan parasites. Moreover, high abundance of phytoplankton other than dinoflagellate hosts might have a significant dilution effect on the control of dinoflagellate blooms by parasites, either by resource competition with dinoflagellates (thus limiting the number of hosts available for infection) or by affecting numerical-functional responses of grazers that consume free-living parasite stages. These outcomes indicate that although both dinoflagellates and their protozoan parasites are directly affected by nutrient availability, the efficacy of the parasitic control of dinoflagellate blooms under temporary eutrophication depends strongly on the structure of the plankton community as a whole.

  2. 76 FR 36625 - Mutual Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  3. 76 FR 20458 - Mutual Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  4. NanoSIMS study of trophic interactions in the coral-dinoflagellate endosymbiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Christophe; Mathieu, Pernice; Domart-Coulon, Isabelle; Djediat, Chakib; Spangenberg, Jorge; Alexander, Duncan; Hignette, Michel; Meziane, Tarik; Meibom, Anders

    2013-04-01

    Tropical and subtropical reef-building corals generally form a stable endosymbiotic association with autotrophic single-celled dinoflagellate algae, commonly known as "zooxanthellae", which is crucial for the development of coral reef ecosystems. In the present work, the spatial and temporal dynamics of trophic interactions between corals and their dinoflagellates was investigated in situ and at a subcellular level in the reef-building coral Pocillopora damicornis. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and quantitative NanoSIMS isotopic imaging of tissue ultra-thin sections (70 nm) were combined to precisely track the assimilation and the fate of 15N-labeled compounds (ammonium, nitrate and aspartic acid) within each symbiotic partner of the coral-dinoflagellate association. Among our main results, we found that (i) both dinoflagellate algae and coral tissue rapidly assimilate ammonium and aspartic acid from the environment, (ii) however only the dinoflagellates assimilate nitrate, (ii) nitrogen is rapidly and temporary stored within the dinoflagellate cells into uric acid crystals, and (iii) the dinoflagellate endosymbionts translocate nitrogenous compounds to their coral host. This study paves the way for exploring in details the wide range of metabolic interactions between partners of any symbiosis in the biosphere.

  5. Combined heat shock protein 90 and ribosomal RNA sequence phylogeny supports multiple replacements of dinoflagellate plastids.

    PubMed

    Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Minge, Marianne A; Cavalier-Smith, Tom; Nedreklepp, Joachim M; Klaveness, Dag; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2006-01-01

    Dinoflagellates harbour diverse plastids obtained from several algal groups, including haptophytes, diatoms, cryptophytes, and prasinophytes. Their major plastid type with the accessory pigment peridinin is found in the vast majority of photosynthetic species. Some species of dinoflagellates have other aberrantly pigmented plastids. We sequenced the nuclear small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of the "green" dinoflagellate Gymnodinium chlorophorum and show that it is sister to Lepidodinium viride, indicating that their common ancestor obtained the prasinophyte (or other green alga) plastid in one event. As the placement of dinoflagellate species that acquired green algal or haptophyte plastids is unclear from small and large subunit (LSU) rRNA trees, we tested the usefulness of the heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 gene for dinoflagellate phylogeny by sequencing it from four species with aberrant plastids (G. chlorophorum, Karlodinium micrum, Karenia brevis, and Karenia mikimotoi) plus Alexandrium tamarense, and constructing phylogenetic trees for Hsp90 and rRNAs, separately and together. Analyses of the Hsp90 and concatenated data suggest an ancestral origin of the peridinin-containing plastid, and two independent replacements of the peridinin plastid soon after the early radiation of the dinoflagellates. Thus, the Hsp90 gene seems to be a promising phylogenetic marker for dinoflagellate phylogeny.

  6. When Naked Became Armored: An Eight-Gene Phylogeny Reveals Monophyletic Origin of Theca in Dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Russell J. S.; Murray, Shauna A.; Stüken, Anke; Rhodes, Lesley; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.

    2012-01-01

    The dinoflagellates are a diverse lineage of microbial eukaryotes. Dinoflagellate monophyly and their position within the group Alveolata are well established. However, phylogenetic relationships between dinoflagellate orders remain unresolved. To date, only a limited number of dinoflagellate studies have used a broad taxon sample with more than two concatenated markers. This lack of resolution makes it difficult to determine the evolution of major phenotypic characters such as morphological features or toxin production e.g. saxitoxin. Here we present an improved dinoflagellate phylogeny, based on eight genes, with the broadest taxon sampling to date. Fifty-five sequences for eight phylogenetic markers from nuclear and mitochondrial regions were amplified from 13 species, four orders, and concatenated phylogenetic inferences were conducted with orthologous sequences. Phylogenetic resolution is increased with addition of support for the deepest branches, though can be improved yet further. We show for the first time that the characteristic dinoflagellate thecal plates, cellulosic material that is present within the sub-cuticular alveoli, appears to have had a single origin. In addition, the monophyly of most dinoflagellate orders is confirmed: the Dinophysiales, the Gonyaulacales, the Prorocentrales, the Suessiales, and the Syndiniales. Our improved phylogeny, along with results of PCR to detect the sxtA gene in various lineages, allows us to suggest that this gene was probably acquired separately in Gymnodinium and the common ancestor of Alexandrium and Pyrodinium and subsequently lost in some descendent species of Alexandrium. PMID:23185516

  7. Dinoflagellate Phylogeny as Inferred from Heat Shock Protein 90 and Ribosomal Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenrath, Mona; Leander, Brian S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Interrelationships among dinoflagellates in molecular phylogenies are largely unresolved, especially in the deepest branches. Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences provide phylogenetic signals only at the tips of the dinoflagellate tree. Two reasons for the poor resolution of deep dinoflagellate relationships using rDNA sequences are (1) most sites are relatively conserved and (2) there are different evolutionary rates among sites in different lineages. Therefore, alternative molecular markers are required to address the deeper phylogenetic relationships among dinoflagellates. Preliminary evidence indicates that the heat shock protein 90 gene (Hsp90) will provide an informative marker, mainly because this gene is relatively long and appears to have relatively uniform rates of evolution in different lineages. Methodology/Principal Findings We more than doubled the previous dataset of Hsp90 sequences from dinoflagellates by generating additional sequences from 17 different species, representing seven different orders. In order to concatenate the Hsp90 data with rDNA sequences, we supplemented the Hsp90 sequences with three new SSU rDNA sequences and five new LSU rDNA sequences. The new Hsp90 sequences were generated, in part, from four additional heterotrophic dinoflagellates and the type species for six different genera. Molecular phylogenetic analyses resulted in a paraphyletic assemblage near the base of the dinoflagellate tree consisting of only athecate species. However, Noctiluca was never part of this assemblage and branched in a position that was nested within other lineages of dinokaryotes. The phylogenetic trees inferred from Hsp90 sequences were consistent with trees inferred from rDNA sequences in that the backbone of the dinoflagellate clade was largely unresolved. Conclusions/Significance The sequence conservation in both Hsp90 and rDNA sequences and the poor resolution of the deepest nodes suggests that dinoflagellates reflect an explosive

  8. Structural molecular components of septate junctions in cnidarians point to the origin of epithelial junctions in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ganot, Philippe; Zoccola, Didier; Tambutté, Eric; Voolstra, Christian R; Aranda, Manuel; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Septate junctions (SJs) insure barrier properties and control paracellular diffusion of solutes across epithelia in invertebrates. However, the origin and evolution of their molecular constituents in Metazoa have not been firmly established. Here, we investigated the genomes of early branching metazoan representatives to reconstruct the phylogeny of the molecular components of SJs. Although Claudins and SJ cytoplasmic adaptor components appeared successively throughout metazoan evolution, the structural components of SJs arose at the time of Placozoa/Cnidaria/Bilateria radiation. We also show that in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata, the structural SJ component Neurexin IV colocalizes with the cortical actin network at the apical border of the cells, at the place of SJs. We propose a model for SJ components in Cnidaria. Moreover, our study reveals an unanticipated diversity of SJ structural component variants in cnidarians. This diversity correlates with gene-specific expression in calcifying and noncalcifying tissues, suggesting specific paracellular pathways across the cell layers of these diploblastic animals.

  9. Characterization of Small HSPs from Anemonia viridis Reveals Insights into Molecular Evolution of Alpha Crystallin Genes among Cnidarians

    PubMed Central

    Nicosia, Aldo; Maggio, Teresa; Mazzola, Salvatore; Gianguzza, Fabrizio; Cuttitta, Angela; Costa, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Gene family encoding small Heat-Shock Proteins (sHSPs containing α-crystallin domain) are found both in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms; however, there is limited knowledge of their evolution. In this study, two small HSP genes termed AvHSP28.6 and AvHSP27, both organized in one intron and two exons, were characterised in the Mediterranean snakelocks anemone Anemonia viridis. The release of the genome sequence of Hydra magnipapillata and Nematostella vectensis enabled a comprehensive study of the molecular evolution of α-crystallin gene family among cnidarians. Most of the H. magnipapillata sHSP genes share the same gene organization described for AvHSP28.6 and AvHSP27, differing from the sHSP genes of N. vectensis which mainly show an intronless architecture. The different genomic organization of sHSPs, the phylogenetic analyses based on protein sequences, and the relationships among Cnidarians, suggest that the A.viridis sHSPs represent the common ancestor from which H. magnipapillata genes directly evolved through segmental genome duplication. Additionally retroposition events may be considered responsible for the divergence of sHSP genes of N. vectensis from A. viridis. Analyses of transcriptional expression profile showed that AvHSP28.6 was constitutively expressed among different tissues from both ectodermal and endodermal layers of the adult sea anemones, under normal physiological conditions and also under different stress condition. Specifically, we profiled the transcriptional activation of AvHSP28.6 after challenges with different abiotic/biotic stresses showing induction by extreme temperatures, heavy metals exposure and immune stimulation. Conversely, no AvHSP27 transcript was detected in such dissected tissues, in adult whole body cDNA library or under stress conditions. Hence, the involvement of AvHSP28.6 gene in the sea anemone defensome is strongly suggested. PMID:25251681

  10. Waveguide mutually pumped phase conjugators.

    PubMed

    James, S W; Youden, K E; Jeffrey, P M; Eason, R W; Chandler, P J; Zhang, L; Townsend, P D

    1993-09-20

    The operation of the bridge mutually pumped phase conjugator is reported in a planar waveguide structure in photorefractive BaTiO(3). The waveguide was fabricated by the technique of ion implantation, using 1.5-MeVH(+) ions at a dose of 10(16) ions/cm(2). An order of magnitude decrease in response time is observed in the waveguide as compared with typical values obtained in bulk crystals, probably as a result of a combination of the optical confinement within the waveguide and possible modification of the charge-transport properties induced by the implantation process.

  11. Molecular Detection of Bioluminescent Dinoflagellates in Surface Waters of the Patagonian Shelf during Early Austral Summer 2008

    PubMed Central

    Valiadi, Martha; Painter, Stuart C.; Allen, John T.; Balch, William M.; Iglesias-Rodriguez, M. Debora

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of bioluminescent dinoflagellates in the Patagonian Shelf region using “universal” PCR primers for the dinoflagellate luciferase gene. Luciferase gene sequences and single cell PCR tests, in conjunction with taxonomic identification by microscopy, allowed us to identify and quantify bioluminescent dinoflagellates. We compared these data to coincidental discrete optical measurements of stimulable bioluminescence intensity. Molecular detection of the luciferase gene showed that bioluminescent dinoflagellates were widespread across the majority of the Patagonian Shelf region. Their presence was comparatively underestimated by optical bioluminescence measurements, whose magnitude was affected by interspecific differences in bioluminescence intensity and by the presence of other bioluminescent organisms. Molecular and microscopy data showed that the complex hydrography of the area played an important role in determining the distribution and composition of dinoflagellate populations. Dinoflagellates were absent south of the Falkland Islands where the cold, nutrient-rich, and well-mixed waters of the Falklands Current favoured diatoms instead. Diverse populations of dinoflagellates were present in the warmer, more stratified waters of the Patagonian Shelf and Falklands Current as it warmed northwards. Here, the dinoflagellate population composition could be related to distinct water masses. Our results provide new insight into the prevalence of bioluminescent dinoflagellates in Patagonian Shelf waters and demonstrate that a molecular approach to the detection of bioluminescent dinoflagellates in natural waters is a promising tool for ecological studies of these organisms. PMID:24918444

  12. Seasonality in the distribution of dinoflagellates with special reference to harmful algal species in tropical coastal environment, Bay of Bengal.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Gouri; Mohanty, A K; Samantara, M K; Satpathy, K K

    2014-10-01

    A study was carried out in the coastal waters of Kalpakkam, southeast coast of India, to find out the seasonal variation in dinoflagellate community structure. Samples were collected for a period of 4 years during 2006-2010. During the study 69 species of dinoflagellates were encountered among which Ceratium furca and Prorocentrum micans were most common during all the seasons. Genus Ceratium was found to be the most diverse one with 23 species which was followed by genus Protoperidinium with 16 species. Of 69 species, 27 species were considered as dominant based on their abundance during pre-monsoon (PRM), monsoon (MON) and post-monsoon (POM) periods. Relatively high density and diversity of dinoflagellates were encountered during the PRM period as compared to the MON and POM periods. Abundance pattern of dinoflagellates for three seasons showed the following trend: PRM > POM > MON. Salinity showed a positive correlation with dinoflagellate community showing its importance in dinoflagellate growth and sustenance. Ammonia and phosphate developed negative correlation with dinoflagellate density indicating the utilization of these nutrients by the dinoflagellate community. The presence of three dinoflagellate associations, broadly representing the three seasons experienced at this location, was evident from the cluster analysis. The study revealed presence of 19 relatively abundant toxic/red tide forming dinoflagellate species in the coastal waters of Kalpakkam.

  13. Defense mutualisms enhance plant diversification

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Marjorie G.; Agrawal, Anurag A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of plants to form mutualistic relationships with animal defenders has long been suspected to influence their evolutionary success, both by decreasing extinction risk and by increasing opportunity for speciation through an expanded realized niche. Nonetheless, the hypothesis that defense mutualisms consistently enhance plant diversification across lineages has not been well tested due to a lack of phenotypic and phylogenetic information. Using a global analysis, we show that the >100 vascular plant families in which species have evolved extrafloral nectaries (EFNs), sugar-secreting organs that recruit arthropod mutualists, have twofold higher diversification rates than families that lack species with EFNs. Zooming in on six distantly related plant clades, trait-dependent diversification models confirmed the tendency for lineages with EFNs to display increased rates of diversification. These results were consistent across methodological approaches. Inference using reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to model the placement and number of rate shifts revealed that high net diversification rates in EFN clades were driven by an increased number of positive rate shifts following EFN evolution compared with sister clades, suggesting that EFNs may be indirect facilitators of diversification. Our replicated analysis indicates that defense mutualisms put lineages on a path toward increased diversification rates within and between clades, and is concordant with the hypothesis that mutualistic interactions with animals can have an impact on deep macroevolutionary patterns and enhance plant diversity. PMID:25349406

  14. New insights into shear-sensitivity in dinoflagellate microalgae.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Rodríguez, J J; López-Rosales, L; Sánchez-Mirón, A; García-Camacho, F; Molina-Grima, E; Chalmers, J J

    2016-01-01

    A modification of a flow contraction device was used to subject shear-sensitive microalgae to well-defined hydrodynamic forces. The aim of the study was to elucidate if the inhibition of shear-induced growth commonly observed in dinoflagellate microalgae is in effect due to cell fragility that results in cell breakage even at low levels of turbulence. The microalgae assayed did not show any cell breakage even at energy dissipation rates (EDR) around 10(12)Wm(-3), implausible in culture devices. Conversely, animal cells, tested for comparison purposes, showed high physical cell damage at average EDR levels of 10(7)Wm(-3). Besides, very short exposures to high levels of EDR promoted variations in the membrane fluidity of the microalgae assayed, which might trigger mechanosensory cellular mechanisms. Average EDR values of only about 4·10(5)Wm(-3) increased cell membrane fluidity in microalgae whereas, in animal cells, they did not.

  15. Mycosporine-like amino acids from coral dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Rosic, Nedeljka N; Dove, Sophie

    2011-12-01

    Coral reefs are one of the most important marine ecosystems, providing habitat for approximately a quarter of all marine organisms. Within the foundation of this ecosystem, reef-building corals form mutualistic symbioses with unicellular photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. Exposure to UV radiation (UVR) (280 to 400 nm) especially when combined with thermal stress has been recognized as an important abiotic factor leading to the loss of algal symbionts from coral tissue and/or a reduction in their pigment concentration and coral bleaching. UVR may damage biological macromolecules, increase the level of mutagenesis in cells, and destabilize the symbiosis between the coral host and their dinoflagellate symbionts. In nature, corals and other marine organisms are protected from harmful UVR through several important photoprotective mechanisms that include the synthesis of UV-absorbing compounds such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs). MAAs are small (<400-Da), colorless, water-soluble compounds made of a cyclohexenone or cyclohexenimine chromophore that is bound to an amino acid residue or its imino alcohol. These secondary metabolites are natural biological sunscreens characterized by a maximum absorbance in the UVA and UVB ranges of 310 to 362 nm. In addition to their photoprotective role, MAAs act as antioxidants scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and suppressing singlet oxygen-induced damage. It has been proposed that MAAs are synthesized during the first part of the shikimate pathway, and recently, it has been suggested that they are synthesized in the pentose phosphate pathway. The shikimate pathway is not found in animals, but in plants and microbes, it connects the metabolism of carbohydrates to the biosynthesis of aromatic compounds. However, both the complete enzymatic pathway of MAA synthesis and the extent of their regulation by environmental conditions are not known. This minireview discusses the current knowledge of MAA

  16. Dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence inferred from the gene sequence: Evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Michel; Maroteaux, Luc

    1986-01-01

    We present the complete sequence of the nuclear-encoded small-ribosomal-subunit RNA inferred from the cloned gene sequence of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. The dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence of 1798 nucleotides is contained in a family of 200 tandemly repeated genes per haploid genome. A tentative model of the secondary structure of P. micans 17S rRNA is presented. This sequence is compared with the small-ribosomal-subunit rRNA of Xenopus laevis (Animalia), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fungi), Zea mays (Planta), Dictyostelium discoideum (Protoctista), and Halobacterium volcanii (Monera). Although the secondary structure of the dinoflagellate 17S rRNA presents most of the eukaryotic characteristics, it contains sufficient archaeobacterial-like structural features to reinforce the view that dinoflagellates branch off very early from the eukaryotic lineage. PMID:16578795

  17. Dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence inferred from the gene sequence: Evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Herzog, M; Maroteaux, L

    1986-11-01

    We present the complete sequence of the nuclear-encoded small-ribosomal-subunit RNA inferred from the cloned gene sequence of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. The dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence of 1798 nucleotides is contained in a family of 200 tandemly repeated genes per haploid genome. A tentative model of the secondary structure of P. micans 17S rRNA is presented. This sequence is compared with the small-ribosomal-subunit rRNA of Xenopus laevis (Animalia), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fungi), Zea mays (Planta), Dictyostelium discoideum (Protoctista), and Halobacterium volcanii (Monera). Although the secondary structure of the dinoflagellate 17S rRNA presents most of the eukaryotic characteristics, it contains sufficient archaeobacterial-like structural features to reinforce the view that dinoflagellates branch off very early from the eukaryotic lineage.

  18. MECHANISMS OF FLUID SHEAR-INDUCED INHIBITION OF POPULATION GROWTH IN A RED-TIDE DINOFLAGELLATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Net population growth of some dinoflagellates is inhibited by fluid shear at shear stresses comparable with those generated during oceanic turbulence. Decreased net growth may occur through lowered cell division, increased mortality, or both. The dominant mechanism under various ...

  19. Simulation and analysis of a model dinoflagellate predator-prey system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoleni, M. J.; Antonelli, T.; Coyne, K. J.; Rossi, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    This paper analyzes the dynamics of a model dinoflagellate predator-prey system and uses simulations to validate theoretical and experimental studies. A simple model for predator-prey interactions is derived by drawing upon analogies from chemical kinetics. This model is then modified to account for inefficiencies in predation. Simulation results are shown to closely match the model predictions. Additional simulations are then run which are based on experimental observations of predatory dinoflagellate behavior, and this study specifically investigates how the predatory dinoflagellate Karlodinium veneficum uses toxins to immobilize its prey and increase its feeding rate. These simulations account for complex dynamics that were not included in the basic models, and the results from these computational simulations closely match the experimentally observed predatory behavior of K. veneficum and reinforce the notion that predatory dinoflagellates utilize toxins to increase their feeding rate.

  20. The influence of demersal trawl fishing gears on the resuspension of dinoflagellate cysts.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lyndsay; Bresnan, Eileen; Summerbell, Keith; O'Neill, Finbarr Gerard

    2013-01-15

    To investigate the influence of towed demersal fishing gears on dinoflagellate cyst resuspension, towing trials with four gear components were carried out at three sites of differing sediment type in the Moray Firth, Scotland. Samples of sediment plumes were collected using plankton nets mounted on a towed sledge. Diversity of resuspended dinoflagellate cysts was similar at all sites and included Protoperidinium and Gonyaulax spp., Proroceratium reticulatum and unidentified 'round brown' cysts. Cyst concentrations per gram of resuspended sediment varied by gear component and sediment particle size distribution. Gear components with lower hydrodynamic drag generated wakes with smaller shear stresses, mobilising fewer larger sand particles, giving larger concentrations of cysts. Muddy sediments contained higher cyst concentrations which declined with increasing grain size. This study has shown that fishing gear and sediment type can influence the redistribution of dinoflagellate cysts and highlights the importance this may have in relation to dinoflagellate blooms.

  1. LIPID BIOMARKER CHARACTERIZATION OF BLOOM-RELATED DINOFLAGELLATES AND OTHER EUKARYOTIC ALGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Marine eukaryotic algae synthesize an array of lipids of chemotaxonomic utility that are potentially valuable in characterizing phytoplankton communities. Sterols and photopigments characteristic of dinoflagellates are rarely found in other algal classes. Long chain (C28) highly ...

  2. Identification of Genetic Modules Mediating the Jekyll and Hyde Interaction of Dinoroseobacter shibae with the Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Tomasch, Jürgen; Michael, Victoria; Bhuju, Sabin; Jarek, Michael; Petersen, Jörn; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The co-cultivation of the alphaproteobacterium Dinoroseobacter shibae with the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum is characterized by a mutualistic phase followed by a pathogenic phase in which the bacterium kills aging algae. Thus it resembles the “Jekyll-and-Hyde” interaction that has been proposed for other algae and Roseobacter. Here, we identified key genetic components of this interaction. Analysis of the transcriptome of D. shibae in co-culture with P. minimum revealed growth phase dependent changes in the expression of quorum sensing, the CtrA phosphorelay, and flagella biosynthesis genes. Deletion of the histidine kinase gene cckA which is part of the CtrA phosphorelay or the flagella genes fliC or flgK resulted in complete lack of growth stimulation of P. minimum in co-culture with the D. shibae mutants. By contrast, pathogenicity was entirely dependent on one of the extrachromosomal elements of D. shibae, the 191 kb plasmid. The data show that flagella and the CtrA phosphorelay are required for establishing mutualism and prove a cell density dependent killing effect of D. shibae on P. minimum which is mediated by an unknown factor encoded on the 191 kb plasmid. PMID:26617596

  3. Genomes of coral dinoflagellate symbionts highlight evolutionary adaptations conducive to a symbiotic lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, M.; Li, Y.; Liew, Y. J.; Baumgarten, S.; Simakov, O.; Wilson, M. C.; Piel, J.; Ashoor, H.; Bougouffa, S.; Bajic, V. B.; Ryu, T.; Ravasi, T.; Bayer, T.; Micklem, G.; Kim, H.; Bhak, J.; LaJeunesse, T. C.; Voolstra, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite half a century of research, the biology of dinoflagellates remains enigmatic: they defy many functional and genetic traits attributed to typical eukaryotic cells. Genomic approaches to study dinoflagellates are often stymied due to their large, multi-gigabase genomes. Members of the genus Symbiodinium are photosynthetic endosymbionts of stony corals that provide the foundation of coral reef ecosystems. Their smaller genome sizes provide an opportunity to interrogate evolution and functionality of dinoflagellate genomes and endosymbiosis. We sequenced the genome of the ancestral Symbiodinium microadriaticum and compared it to the genomes of the more derived Symbiodinium minutum and Symbiodinium kawagutii and eukaryote model systems as well as transcriptomes from other dinoflagellates. Comparative analyses of genome and transcriptome protein sets show that all dinoflagellates, not only Symbiodinium, possess significantly more transmembrane transporters involved in the exchange of amino acids, lipids, and glycerol than other eukaryotes. Importantly, we find that only Symbiodinium harbor an extensive transporter repertoire associated with the provisioning of carbon and nitrogen. Analyses of these transporters show species-specific expansions, which provides a genomic basis to explain differential compatibilities to an array of hosts and environments, and highlights the putative importance of gene duplications as an evolutionary mechanism in dinoflagellates and Symbiodinium. PMID:28004835

  4. The Large Mitochondrial Genome of Symbiodinium minutum Reveals Conserved Noncoding Sequences between Dinoflagellates and Apicomplexans

    PubMed Central

    Shoguchi, Eiichi; Shinzato, Chuya; Hisata, Kanako; Satoh, Nori; Mungpakdee, Sutada

    2015-01-01

    Even though mitochondrial genomes, which characterize eukaryotic cells, were first discovered more than 50 years ago, mitochondrial genomics remains an important topic in molecular biology and genome sciences. The Phylum Alveolata comprises three major groups (ciliates, apicomplexans, and dinoflagellates), the mitochondrial genomes of which have diverged widely. Even though the gene content of dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes is reportedly comparable to that of apicomplexans, the highly fragmented and rearranged genome structures of dinoflagellates have frustrated whole genomic analysis. Consequently, noncoding sequences and gene arrangements of dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes have not been well characterized. Here we report that the continuous assembled genome (∼326 kb) of the dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium minutum, is AT-rich (∼64.3%) and that it contains three protein-coding genes. Based upon in silico analysis, the remaining 99% of the genome comprises transcriptomic noncoding sequences. RNA edited sites and unique, possible start and stop codons clarify conserved regions among dinoflagellates. Our massive transcriptome analysis shows that almost all regions of the genome are transcribed, including 27 possible fragmented ribosomal RNA genes and 12 uncharacterized small RNAs that are similar to mitochondrial RNA genes of the malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Gene map comparisons show that gene order is only slightly conserved between S. minutum and P. falciparum. However, small RNAs and intergenic sequences share sequence similarities with P. falciparum, suggesting that the function of noncoding sequences has been preserved despite development of very different genome structures. PMID:26199191

  5. Genetic Diversity, Morphological Uniformity and Polyketide Production in Dinoflagellates (Amphidinium, Dinoflagellata)

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenrath, Mona; Neilan, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are an intriguing group of eukaryotes, showing many unusual morphological and genetic features. Some groups of dinoflagellates are morphologically highly uniform, despite indications of genetic diversity. The species Amphidinium carterae is abundant and cosmopolitan in marine environments, grows easily in culture, and has therefore been used as a ‘model’ dinoflagellate in research into dinoflagellate genetics, polyketide production and photosynthesis. We have investigated the diversity of ‘cryptic’ species of Amphidinium that are morphologically similar to A. carterae, including the very similar species Amphidinium massartii, based on light and electron microscopy, two nuclear gene regions (LSU rDNA and ITS rDNA) and one mitochondrial gene region (cytochrome b). We found that six genetically distinct cryptic species (clades) exist within the species A. massartii and four within A. carterae, and that these clades differ from one another in molecular sequences at levels comparable to other dinoflagellate species, genera or even families. Using primers based on an alignment of alveolate ketosynthase sequences, we isolated partial ketosynthase genes from several Amphidinium species. We compared these genes to known dinoflagellate ketosynthase genes and investigated the evolution and diversity of the strains of Amphidinium that produce them. PMID:22675531

  6. A Comparative Overview of the Flagellar Apparatus of Dinoflagellate, Perkinsids and Colpodellids

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Noriko; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are a member of the Alveolata, and elucidation of the early evolution of alveolates is important for our understanding of dinoflagellates, and vice versa. The ultrastructure of the flagellar apparatus has been described from several dinoflagellates in the last few decades, and the basic components appear to be well conserved. The typical dinoflagellate apparatus is composed of two basal bodies surrounded by striated collars attached to a connective fiber. The longitudinal basal body is connected to a longitudinal microtubular root (LMR; equivalent of R1) and single microtubular root (R2), whereas the transverse basal body is connected to a transverse microtubular root (TMR; R3) and transverse striated root (TSR) with a microtubule (R4). Some of these components, especially the connective fibers and collars, are dinoflagellate specific characteristics that make their flagellar apparatus relatively complex. We also compare these structures with the flagellar apparatus from a number of close relatives of dinoflagellates and their sister, the apicomplexans, including colpodellids, perkinsids, and Psammosa. Though the ultrastructural knowledge of these lineages is still relatively modest, it provides us with an interesting viewpoint of the character evolution of the flagellar apparatus among those lineages. PMID:27694777

  7. Analysis of Gambierdiscus transcriptome data supports ancient origins of mixotrophic pathways in dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Price, Dana C; Farinholt, Natalie; Gates, Colin; Shumaker, Alexander; Wagner, Nicole E; Bienfang, Paul; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2016-12-01

    Toxic dinoflagellates pose serious threats to human health and to fisheries. The genus Gambierdiscus is significant in this respect because its members produce ciguatoxin that accumulates in predominantly tropical marine food webs and leads to ciguatera fish poisoning. Understanding the biology of toxic dinoflagellates is crucial to developing control strategies. To this end, we generated a de novo transcriptome library from G. caribaeus and studied its growth under different culture conditions to elucidate pathways of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) utilization. We also gathered available dinoflagellate transcriptome data to trace the evolutionary history of C and N pathways in this phylum. We find that rather than being specific adaptations to the epiphytic lifestyle in G. caribaeus, the majority of dinoflagellates share a large array of genes that putatively confer mixotrophy and the ability to use N via the ornithine-urea cycle and nitric oxide synthase production. These results suggest that prior to plastid endosymbiosis, the dinoflagellate ancestor possessed complex pathways that linked metabolism, intercellular signaling, and stress responses to environmental cues that have been maintained by extant photosynthetic species. This metabolic flexibility likely explains the success of dinoflagellates in marine ecosystems and may presage difficulties in controlling the spread of toxic species.

  8. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. 1.831-1 Section 1.831-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual...

  9. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. 1.831-1 Section 1.831-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual...

  10. Construction of bacteria-eukaryote synthetic mutualism.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Isao; Hosoda, Kazufumi; Suzuki, Shingo; Yamamoto, Kayo; Kihara, Kumiko; Mori, Kotaro; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2013-08-01

    Mutualism is ubiquitous in nature but is known to be intrinsically vulnerable with regard to both population dynamics and evolution. Synthetic ecology has indicated that it is feasible for organisms to establish novel mutualism merely through encountering each other by showing that it is feasible to construct synthetic mutualism between organisms. However, bacteria-eukaryote mutualism, which is ecologically important, has not yet been constructed. In this study, we synthetically constructed mutualism between a bacterium and a eukaryote by using two model organisms. We mixed a bacterium, Escherichia coli (a genetically engineered glutamine auxotroph), and an amoeba, Dictyostelium discoideum, in 14 sets of conditions in which each species could not grow in monoculture but potentially could grow in coculture. Under a single condition in which the bacterium and amoeba mutually compensated for the lack of required nutrients (lipoic acid and glutamine, respectively), both species grew continuously through several subcultures, essentially establishing mutualism. Our results shed light on the establishment of bacteria-eukaryote mutualism and indicate that a bacterium and eukaryote pair in nature also has a non-negligible possibility of establishing novel mutualism if the organisms are potentially mutualistic.

  11. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... business within the United States, and all mutual marine insurance companies and mutual fire or flood insurance companies exclusively issuing perpetual policies or whose principal business is the issuance of...) Foreign insurance companies not carrying on an insurance business within the United States are not...

  12. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... insurance business within the United States, and all mutual marine insurance companies and mutual fire or flood insurance companies exclusively issuing perpetual policies or whose principal business is the...) Foreign insurance companies not carrying on an insurance business within the United States are not...

  13. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... beginning after December 31, 1962. 1.831-3 Section 1.831-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine...

  14. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... beginning after December 31, 1962. 1.831-3 Section 1.831-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine...

  15. Evolution of Hox-like genes in Cnidaria: Study of Hydra Hox repertoire reveals tailor-made Hox-code for Cnidarians.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Puli Chandramouli; Unni, Manu K; Gungi, Akhila; Agarwal, Pallavi; Galande, Sanjeev

    2015-11-01

    Hox and ParaHox genes play decisive roles in patterning the anterior-posterior body axis in Bilateria. Evolutionary origin of Hox genes and primary body axis predate the divergence of Bilateria and Cnidaria. However, function of Cnidarian Hox-like genes and their regulation in axis determination is obscure due to studies limited to a few representative model systems. Present investigation is conducted using Hydra, a Hydrozoan member of phylum Cnidaria, to gain insights into the roles of Cnidarian Hox-like genes in primary axis formation. Here, we report identification of six Hox-like genes from our in-house transcriptome data. Phylogenetic analysis of these genes shows bilaterian counterparts of Hox1, Gsx and Mox. Additionally, we report CnoxB_HVUL, CnoxC2_HVUL and CnoxC3_HVUL belonging to two Cnidarian specific groups. In situ hybridization analysis of Hydra homologues provided important clues about their possible roles in pattern formation of polyps and bud development. Specifically, Hox1_HVUL is regulated by Wnt signaling and plays critical role in head formation. Collating information about expression patterns of different Hox-like genes from previous reports and this study reveals no conformity within Cnidaria. Indicating that unlike in Bilateria, there is no consolidated Hox-code determining primary body axis in Cnidaria.

  16. A new model for myxosporean (Myxozoa) development explains the endogenous budding phenomenon, the nature of cell within cell life stages and evolution of parasitism from a cnidarian ancestor.

    PubMed

    Morris, D J

    2012-08-01

    The phylum Myxozoa is composed of endoparasitic species that have predominately been recorded within aquatic vertebrates. The simple body form of a trophic cell containing other cells within it, as observed within these hosts, has provided few clues to relationships with other organisms. In addition, the placement of the group using molecular phylogenies has proved very difficult, although the majority of analyses now suggest that they are cnidarians. There have been relatively few studies of myxozoan stages within invertebrate hosts, even though these exhibit multicellular and sexual stages that may provide clues to myxozoan evolution. Therefore an ultrastructural examination of a myxozoan infection of a freshwater oligochaete was conducted, to reassess and formulate a model for myxozoan development in these hosts. This deemed that meiosis occurs within the oligochaete, but that fertilisation is not immediate. Rather, the resultant haploid germ cell (oocyte) is engulfed by a diploid sporogonic cell (nurse cell) to form a sporoplasm. It is this sporoplasm that infects the fish, resulting in the multicellular stages observed. Fertilisation occurs after the parasites leave the fish and enter the oligochaete host. The nurse cell/oocyte model explains previously conflicting evidence in the literature regarding myxosporean biology, and aligns phenomena considered distinctive to the Myxozoa, such as endogenous budding and cell within cell development, with processes recorded in cnidarians. Finally, the evolutionary origin of the Myxozoa as cnidarian parasites of ova is hypothesised.

  17. Effects of the bacterial algicide IRI-160AA on cellular morphology of harmful dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Pokrzywinski, Kaytee L; Tilney, Charles L; Modla, Shannon; Caplan, Jeffery L; Ross, Jean; Warner, Mark E; Coyne, Kathryn J

    2017-02-01

    The algicide, IRI-160AA, induces mortality in dinoflagellates but not other species of algae, suggesting that a shared characteristic or feature renders this class of phytoplankton vulnerable to the algicide. In contrast to other eukaryotic species, the genome of dinoflagellates is stabilized by high concentrations of divalent cations and transition metals and contains large amounts of DNA with unusual base modifications. These distinctions set dinoflagellates apart from other phytoplankton and suggest that the nucleus may be a dinoflagellate-specific target for IRI-160AA. In this study, morphological and ultrastructural changes in three dinoflagellate species, Prorocentrum minimum, Karlodinium veneficum and Gyrodinium instriatum, were evaluated after short-term exposure to IRI-160AA using super resolution structured illumination microscopy (SR-SIM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Exposure to the algicide resulted in cytoplasmic membrane blebbing, differing chloroplast morphologies, nuclear expansion, and chromosome expulsion and/or destabilization. TEM analysis showed that chromosomes of algicide-treated K. veneficum appeared electron dense with fibrous protrusions. In algicide-treated P. minimum and G. instriatum, chromosome decompaction occurred, while for P. minimum, nuclear expulsion was also observed for several cells. Results of this investigation demonstrate that exposure to the algicide destabilizes dinoflagellate chromosomes, although it was not clear if the nucleus was the primary target of the algicide or if the observed effects on chromosomal structure were due to downstream impacts. In all cases, changes in cellular morphology and ultrastructure were observed within two hours, suggesting that the algicide may be an effective and rapid approach to mitigate dinoflagellate blooms.

  18. Progressive and Biased Divergent Evolution Underpins the Origin and Diversification of Peridinin Dinoflagellate Plastids.

    PubMed

    Dorrell, Richard G; Klinger, Christen M; Newby, Robert J; Butterfield, Erin R; Richardson, Elisabeth; Dacks, Joel B; Howe, Christopher J; Nisbet, Ellen R; Bowler, Chris

    2016-11-04

    Dinoflagellates are algae of tremendous importance to ecosystems and to public health. The cell biology and genome organization of dinoflagellate species is highly unusual. For example, the plastid genomes of peridinin-containing dinoflagellates encode only a minimal number of genes arranged on small elements termed "minicircles". Previous studies of peridinin plastid genes have found evidence for divergent sequence evolution, including extensive substitutions, novel insertions and deletions, and use of alternative translation initiation codons. Understanding the extent of this divergent evolution has been hampered by the lack of characterized peridinin plastid sequences. We have identified over 300 previously unannotated peridinin plastid mRNAs from published transcriptome projects, vastly increasing the number of sequences available. Using these data, we have produced a well-resolved phylogeny of peridinin plastid lineages, which uncovers several novel relationships within the dinoflagellates. This enables us to define changes to plastid sequences that occurred early in dinoflagellate evolution, and that have contributed to the subsequent diversification of individual dinoflagellate clades. We find that the origin of the peridinin dinoflagellates was specifically accompanied by elevations both in the overall number of substitutions that occurred on plastid sequences, and in the Ka/Ks ratio associated with plastid sequences, consistent with changes in selective pressure. These substitutions, alongside other changes, have accumulated progressively in individual peridinin plastid lineages. Throughout our entire dataset, we identify a persistent bias toward non-synonymous substitutions occurring on sequences encoding photosystem I subunits and stromal regions of peridinin plastid proteins, which may have underpinned the evolution of this unusual organelle.

  19. [Maintaining solidarity: is mutuality the solution?].

    PubMed

    Gevers, J K M; Ploem, M C

    2013-01-01

    Solidarity is essentially the willingness to contribute to the community and its demands, which may even involve contributing more than one is expecting to receive. Another principle is mutuality: this refers to a balance between rights and obligations or between mutual obligations. In its advisory document 'The importance of mutuality......solidarity takes work!', The Dutch Council for Public Health and Health Care underlines the importance of ensuring solidarity within the Dutch health care system, e.g. by encouraging patients to take responsibility for their own health, possibly by introducing elements of mutuality. In our contribution, we comment on the Council's advice. Although we fully agree with the overall conclusion that solidarity should be maintained within the system, we do not see how the introduction of increased mutuality will contribute to this goal.

  20. Distribution of planktonic cnidarians in response to South Atlantic Central Water intrusion in the South Brazilian Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira Júnior, Miodeli; Brandini, Frederico P.; Codina, Juan C. U.

    2014-10-01

    Five oceanographic cruises were made between November 2005 and June 2006, sampling a cross-shelf transect off the South Brazilian Bight (SBB; 26°46‧S) to follow the seasonal development of the South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) intrusion over the shelf and its influence on the assemblage of planktonic cnidarians. An onshore wind-driven bottom intrusion of the SACW was clearly perceptible, reaching the coast in January. From March onward, the SACW influence was gradually displaced seaward due to wind and tidal mixing. By late June the SACW influence was offshore and the inshore was dominated by low-salinity waters (<34.5). The abundance, distribution, and general taxonomic composition of both medusae and siphonophores were strongly influenced by the onshore intrusion of the SACW. An inshore-offshore gradient was clear. The Canonical Correspondence Analysis suggested that coastal species - dominated by Liriope tetraphylla, actinula larvae and Muggiaea kochi - were mostly related to food availability and a vertically mixed environment inshore, and their abundance and extent were reduced during intrusion periods. In contrast, species with offshore affinities tended to increase their abundance and distribution during intrusion periods, and were mostly related to the presence of thermal stratification and a deep chlorophyll maximum layer. Most of these offshore species, such as Aglaura hemistoma, Rhopalonema velatum and many calycophorans, are associated with the warm upper layer. However, high concentrations of large (>20 mm in diameter) Solmaris corona were observed exclusively in cold waters, suggesting this medusa is a SACW indicator.

  1. New cell motility model observed in parasitic cnidarian Sphaerospora molnari (Myxozoa:Myxosporea) blood stages in fish.

    PubMed

    Hartigan, A; Estensoro, I; Vancová, M; Bílý, T; Patra, S; Eszterbauer, E; Holzer, A S

    2016-12-16

    Cellular motility is essential for microscopic parasites, it is used to reach the host, migrate through tissues, or evade host immune reactions. Many cells employ an evolutionary conserved motor protein- actin, to crawl or glide along a substrate. We describe the peculiar movement of Sphaerospora molnari, a myxozoan parasite with proliferating blood stages in its host, common carp. Myxozoa are highly adapted parasitic cnidarians alternately infecting vertebrates and invertebrates. S. molnari blood stages (SMBS) have developed a unique "dancing" behaviour, using the external membrane as a motility effector to rotate and move the cell. SMBS movement is exceptionally fast compared to other myxozoans, non-directional and constant. The movement is based on two cytoplasmic actins that are highly divergent from those of other metazoans. We produced a specific polyclonal actin antibody for the staining and immunolabelling of S. molnari's microfilaments since we found that neither commercial antibodies nor phalloidin recognised the protein or microfilaments. We show the in situ localization of this actin in the parasite and discuss the importance of this motility for evasion from the cellular host immune response in vitro. This new type of motility holds key insights into the evolution of cellular motility and associated proteins.

  2. New cell motility model observed in parasitic cnidarian Sphaerospora molnari (Myxozoa:Myxosporea) blood stages in fish

    PubMed Central

    Hartigan, A.; Estensoro, I.; Vancová, M.; Bílý, T.; Patra, S.; Eszterbauer, E.; Holzer, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular motility is essential for microscopic parasites, it is used to reach the host, migrate through tissues, or evade host immune reactions. Many cells employ an evolutionary conserved motor protein– actin, to crawl or glide along a substrate. We describe the peculiar movement of Sphaerospora molnari, a myxozoan parasite with proliferating blood stages in its host, common carp. Myxozoa are highly adapted parasitic cnidarians alternately infecting vertebrates and invertebrates. S. molnari blood stages (SMBS) have developed a unique “dancing” behaviour, using the external membrane as a motility effector to rotate and move the cell. SMBS movement is exceptionally fast compared to other myxozoans, non-directional and constant. The movement is based on two cytoplasmic actins that are highly divergent from those of other metazoans. We produced a specific polyclonal actin antibody for the staining and immunolabelling of S. molnari’s microfilaments since we found that neither commercial antibodies nor phalloidin recognised the protein or microfilaments. We show the in situ localization of this actin in the parasite and discuss the importance of this motility for evasion from the cellular host immune response in vitro. This new type of motility holds key insights into the evolution of cellular motility and associated proteins. PMID:27982057

  3. Proteomic analysis of symbiosome membranes in Cnidaria-dinoflagellate endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shao-En; Wang, Yu-Bao; Wang, Li-Hsueh; Chen, Wan-Nan Uang; Lu, Chi-Yu; Fang, Lee-Shing; Chen, Chii-Shiarng

    2010-03-01

    Symbiosomes are specific intracellular membrane-bound vacuoles containing microalgae in a mutualistic Cnidaria (host)-dinoflagellate (symbiont) association. The symbiosome membrane is originally derived from host plasma membranes during phagocytosis of the symbiont; however, its molecular components and functions are not clear. In order to investigate the protein components of the symbiosome membranes, homogenous symbiosomes were isolated from the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella and their purities and membrane intactness examined by Western blot analysis for host contaminants and microscopic analysis using various fluorescent probes, respectively. Pure and intact symbiosomes were then subjected to biotinylation by a cell impermeant agent (Biotin-XX sulfosuccinimidyl ester) to label membrane surface proteins. The biotinylated proteins, both Triton X-100 soluble and insoluble fractions, were subjected to 2-D SDS-PAGE and identified by MS using an LC-nano-ESI-MS/MS. A total of 17 proteins were identified. Based on their different subcellular origins and functional categories, it indicates that symbiosome membranes serve as the interface for interaction between host and symbiont by fulfilling several crucial cellular functions such as those of membrane receptors/cell recognition, cytoskeletal remodeling, ATP synthesis/proton homeostasis, transporters, stress responses/chaperones, and anti-apoptosis. The results of proteomic analysis not only indicate the molecular identity of the symbiosome membrane, but also provide insight into the possible role of symbiosome membranes during the endosymbiotic association.

  4. An epizootic of Florida manatees associated with a dinoflagellate bloom

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Shea, T.J.; Rathbun, G.B.; Bonde, R.K.; Buergelt, C.D.; Odell, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    Over a 10-wk period in early 1982, 39 Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) were found dead in the lower Caloosahatchee River and nearby waters of southwestern Florida. Two were killed by boats. The remainder showed no evidence of trauma. Lesions indicative of infectious agents were not identified, and bacteriological and contaminant residue findings were unremarkable. Nonspecific lesions of congestion and hemorrhage were identified in brain tissue. Numerous reports were also received of manatee morbidity. Some distressed manatees showed no biochemical lesions in clinical analyses of blood samples and recovered quickly. Timing of manatee illnesses coincided with fish and double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) mortality and morbidity. A widespread bloom of the dinoflagellate red tide organism (Gymnodinium breve) also coincided with these incidents. G. breve produces potent neurotoxins (brevetoxins). Circumstantial evidence links these events, and possible routes of exposure may include ingestion of filter-feeding ascidians. Ecological conditions that magnified the extent of the epizootic included an early dispersal of manatees into the area from a nearby winter aggregation site and unusually high salinities that facilitated the inshore spread of the red tide bloom. Management responses to future episodes of red tide in manatee areas are suggested.

  5. Global distribution of ciguatera causing dinoflagellates in the genus Gambierdiscus.

    PubMed

    Litaker, R Wayne; Vandersea, Mark W; Faust, Maria A; Kibler, Steven R; Nau, Amy W; Holland, William C; Chinain, Mireille; Holmes, Michael J; Tester, Patricia A

    2010-10-01

    Dinoflagellates in the genus Gambierdiscus produce toxins that bioaccumulate in tropical and sub-tropical fishes causing ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP). Little is known about the diversity and distribution of Gambierdiscus species, the degree to which individual species vary in toxicity, and the role each plays in causing CFP. This paper presents the first global distribution of Gambierdiscus species. Phylogenetic analyses of the existing isolates indicate that five species are endemic to the Atlantic (including the Caribbean/West Indies and Gulf of Mexico), five are endemic to the tropical Pacific, and that two species, Gambierdiscus carpenteri and Gambierdiscus caribaeus are globally distributed. The differences in Gambierdiscus species composition in the Atlantic and Pacific correlated with structural differences in the ciguatoxins reported from Atlantic and Pacific fish. This correlation supports the hypothesis that Gambierdiscus species in each region produce different toxin suites. A literature survey indicated a >100-fold variation in toxicity among species compared with a 2 to 9-fold within species variation due to changing growth conditions. These observations suggest that CFP events are driven more by inherent differences in species toxicity than by environmental modulation. How variations in species toxicity may affect the development of an early warning system for CFP is discussed.

  6. Lipid biomarkers in Symbiodinium dinoflagellates: new indicators of thermal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneeland, J.; Hughen, K.; Cervino, J.; Hauff, B.; Eglinton, T.

    2013-12-01

    Lipid content and fatty acid profiles of corals and their dinoflagellate endosymbionts are known to vary in response to high-temperature stress. To better understand the heat-stress response in these symbionts, we investigated cultures of Symbiodinium goreauii type C1 and Symbiodinium sp. clade subtype D1 grown under a range of temperatures and durations. The predominant lipids produced by Symbiodinium are palmitic (C16) and stearic (C18) saturated fatty acids and their unsaturated analogs, the polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6, n-3; DHA), and a variety of sterols. Prolonged exposure to high temperature causes the relative amount of unsaturated acids within the C18 fatty acids in Symbiodinium tissue to decrease. Thermal stress also causes a decrease in abundance of fatty acids relative to sterols, as well as the more specific ratio of DHA to an algal 4-methyl sterol. These shifts in fatty acid unsaturation and fatty acid-to-sterol ratios are common to both types C1 and D1, but the apparent thermal threshold of lipid changes is lower for type C1. This work indicates that ratios among free fatty acids and sterols in Symbiodinium can be used as sensitive indicators of thermal stress. If the Symbiodinium lipid stress response is unchanged in hospite, the algal heat-stress biomarkers we have identified could be measured to detect thermal stress within the coral holobiont. These results provide new insights into the potential role of lipids in the overall Symbiodinium thermal stress response.

  7. 5-Hydroxymethyluracil in the DNA of a Dinoflagellate

    PubMed Central

    Rae, Peter M. M.

    1973-01-01

    During the characterization of DNA from the dinoflagellate Gyrodinium cohnii, a large discrepancy was detected between the estimation of guanine + cytosine content from the buoyant density of the DNA in CsCl (56.1% G+C) and from the midpoint (Tm) of its hyperchromicity induced by a thermal gradient (35.6% G+C). Composition analyses of 32P-labeled nucleotides revealed an actual G+C content of 41.3%, and the presence of an unusual nucleotide amounting to about 37% of the expected thymidylate in unfractionated DNA-a feature that can explain the aberrant behavior of the DNA. The chromatographic properties of the unusual base and UV spectral analyses of the base and its corresponding nucleotide are consistent with its identification as hydroxymethyluracil. This base is not uniformly interspersed with thymine in the DNA. About 10% of Gyrodinium DNA is contributed by a fraction with low hydroxymethyluracil content, which behaves anomalously in Ag+-Cs2SO4 density gradients but not in CsCl. Images PMID:4515611

  8. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  9. 12 CFR 239.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 239.3... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. (a) A mutual savings association may not reorganize to become...

  10. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  11. 12 CFR 239.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 239.3... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. (a) A mutual savings association may not reorganize to become...

  12. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  13. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  14. 12 CFR 239.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 239.3... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. (a) A mutual savings association may not reorganize to become...

  15. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  16. A dinoflagellate cyst record of Holocene climate and hydrological changes along the southeastern Swedish Baltic coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shi-Yong; Berglund, Björn E.

    2007-03-01

    A high-resolution, well-dated dinoflagellate cyst record from a lagoon of the southeastern Swedish Baltic Sea reveals climate and hydrological changes during the Holocene. Marine dinoflagellate cysts occurred initially at about 8600 cal yr BP, indicating the onset of the Littorina transgression in the southeastern Swedish lowland associated with global sea level rise, and thus the opening of the Danish straits. Both the species diversity and the total accumulation rates of dinoflagellate cysts continued to increase by 7000 cal yr BP and then decreased progressively. This pattern reveals the first-order change in local sea level as a function of ice-volume-equivalent sea level rise versus isostatic land uplift. Superimposed upon this local sea level trend, well-defined fluctuations of the total accumulation rates of dinoflagellate cysts occurred on quasi-1000- and 500-yr frequency bands particularly between 7500 and 4000 cal yr BP, when the connection between the Baltic basin and the North Atlantic was broader. A close correlation of the total accumulation rates of dinoflagellate cysts with GISP2 ice core sea-salt ions suggests that fluctuations of Baltic surface conditions during the middle Holocene might have been regulated by quasi-periodic variations of the prevailing southwesterly winds, most likely through a system similar to the dipole oscillation of the modern North Atlantic atmosphere.

  17. Dinoflagellate nuclear SSU rRNA phylogeny suggests multiple plastid losses and replacements.

    PubMed

    Saldarriaga, J F; Taylor, F J; Keeling, P J; Cavalier-Smith, T

    2001-09-01

    Dinoflagellates are a trophically diverse group of protists with photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic members that appears to incorporate and lose endosymbionts relatively easily. To trace the gain and loss of plastids in dinoflagellates, we have sequenced the nuclear small subunit rRNA gene of 28 photosynthetic and four non-photosynthetic species, and produced phylogenetic trees with a total of 81 dinoflagellate sequences. Patterns of plastid gain, loss, and replacement were plotted onto this phylogeny. With the exception of the apparently early-diverging Syndiniales and Noctilucales, all non-photosynthetic dinoflagellates are very likely to have had photosynthetic ancestors with peridinin-containing plastids. The same is true for all dinoflagellates with plastids other than the peridinin-containing plastid: their ancestors have replaced one type of plastid for another, in some cases most likely through a non-photosynthetic intermediate. Eight independent instances of plastid loss and three of replacement can be inferred from existing data, but as more non-photosynthetic lineages are characterized these numbers will surely grow.

  18. Horizontal Gene Transfer is a Significant Driver of Gene Innovation in Dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Brosnahan, Michael L.; Hackett, Jeremiah D.

    2013-01-01

    The dinoflagellates are an evolutionarily and ecologically important group of microbial eukaryotes. Previous work suggests that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is an important source of gene innovation in these organisms. However, dinoflagellate genomes are notoriously large and complex, making genomic investigation of this phenomenon impractical with currently available sequencing technology. Fortunately, de novo transcriptome sequencing and assembly provides an alternative approach for investigating HGT. We sequenced the transcriptome of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense Group IV to investigate how HGT has contributed to gene innovation in this group. Our comprehensive A. tamarense Group IV gene set was compared with those of 16 other eukaryotic genomes. Ancestral gene content reconstruction of ortholog groups shows that A. tamarense Group IV has the largest number of gene families gained (314–1,563 depending on inference method) relative to all other organisms in the analysis (0–782). Phylogenomic analysis indicates that genes horizontally acquired from bacteria are a significant proportion of this gene influx, as are genes transferred from other eukaryotes either through HGT or endosymbiosis. The dinoflagellates also display curious cases of gene loss associated with mitochondrial metabolism including the entire Complex I of oxidative phosphorylation. Some of these missing genes have been functionally replaced by bacterial and eukaryotic xenologs. The transcriptome of A. tamarense Group IV lends strong support to a growing body of evidence that dinoflagellate genomes are extraordinarily impacted by HGT. PMID:24259313

  19. Comparative gene expression in toxic versus non-toxic strains of the marine dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum typically produces paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins, which are known only from cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates. While a PSP toxin gene cluster has recently been characterized in cyanobacteria, the genetic background of PSP toxin production in dinoflagellates remains elusive. Results We constructed and analysed an expressed sequence tag (EST) library of A. minutum, which contained 15,703 read sequences yielding a total of 4,320 unique expressed clusters. Of these clusters, 72% combined the forward-and reverse reads of at least one bacterial clone. This sequence resource was then used to construct an oligonucleotide microarray. We analysed the expression of all clusters in three different strains. While the cyanobacterial PSP toxin genes were not found among the A. minutum sequences, 192 genes were differentially expressed between toxic and non-toxic strains. Conclusions Based on this study and on the lack of identified PSP synthesis genes in the two existent Alexandrium tamarense EST libraries, we propose that the PSP toxin genes in dinoflagellates might be more different from their cyanobacterial counterparts than would be expected in the case of a recent gene transfer. As a starting point to identify possible PSP toxin-associated genes in dinoflagellates without relying on a priori sequence information, the sequences only present in mRNA pools of the toxic strain can be seen as putative candidates involved in toxin synthesis and regulation, or acclimation to intracellular PSP toxins. PMID:20403159

  20. Sedimentary Records of Harmful Bloom-Producing Dinoflagellates from Alvarado Lagoon (Southwestern Gulf of Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limoges, A.; Mertens, K. N.; ruiz-Fernandez, A. C.; Sánchez Cabeza, J. A.; de Vernal, A.

    2014-12-01

    Organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst assemblages were studied from a sediment core collected in Alvarado Lagoon (southwestern Gulf of Mexico) in order to evaluate their use as tracers of toxic algal blooms. The sedimentary record spans the last ~560 years (CE) and shows high abundances of Polysphaeridium zoharyi, the cyst of the dinoflagellate Pyrodinium bahamense, which is known to cause toxic blooms. Cyst fluxes in the sediment of the Alvarado lagoon suggest frequent blooms of Pyrodinium bahamense in the past hundreds of years. Moreover, the high concentrations of the cysts (~ 4000 cysts g-1) in the "modern" surface sediment reveal that the area is susceptible to be affected by future blooms, especially during seasons of heavy rain and wind, when cysts are resuspended in the water column. The dinoflagellate cyst bank in sediment deserves special attention as it may constitute a source for the export of cells in adjacent regions. The cyst of other harmful dinoflagellates have been recovered in the sediment. They notably include those of the benthic dinoflagellate Bysmatrum subsalsum, which is here reported for the first time.

  1. Effect of different solvents extracts and mode of action of Loktanella spp. Gb03 on toxic dinoflagellate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, Anmar; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2016-11-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the algicidal activity of Loktanella sp. Gb-03 bacterial extracts against toxic dinoflagellate, using various polar and non-polar solvents. For this purpose, six different solvent extracts were prepared (i.e. methanol, ethyl acetate, hexane, chloroform, acetonitrile and water). Ratio of 1:100 (v:v) (extract to dinoflagellate culture) of each extract was used for preliminary algicidal activity screening against toxic dinoflagellate Coolia malaynesis. Dinoflagellate cells at the stationary phase (1.0 × 103 cells/ mL) were treated with 1% (v/v) of each extract by using 24-well microplate. The plates were then incubated for 24 hours at dinoflagellate culture condition (under a light intensity of 140 µmol m-2s-1 and 12:12 hours light:dark photoperiod). The result of algicidal activity screening showed that all 6 extracts from Loktanella sp. Gb-03 had different ranges of algicidal activity against the toxic dinoflagellates. Ethyl acetate extract showed the highest activity against C. malaynesis and also other harmful dinoflagellate (Alexandrium sp. Alexandrium leei, Alexandrium affine, Alexandrium tamiyavanichi, Alexandrium tamarense, Gambierdiscus belizeanus, and Ostreopsis). This study was the first to explore the algicidal activity of Loktanella sp. Gb-03 extracts against toxic dinoflagellate with ethyl acetate as the best solvent to extract algicidal active compounds.

  2. Still Acting Green: Continued Expression of Photosynthetic Genes in the Heterotrophic Dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida (Peridiniales, Alveolata)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gwang Hoon; Jeong, Hae Jin; Yoo, Yeong Du; Kim, Sunju; Han, Ji Hee; Han, Jong Won; Zuccarello, Giuseppe C.

    2013-01-01

    The loss of photosynthetic function should lead to the cessation of expression and finally loss of photosynthetic genes in the new heterotroph. Dinoflagellates are known to have lost their photosynthetic ability several times. Dinoflagellates have also acquired photosynthesis from other organisms, either on a long-term basis or as “kleptoplastids” multiple times. The fate of photosynthetic gene expression in heterotrophs can be informative into evolution of gene expression patterns after functional loss, and the dinoflagellates ability to acquire new photosynthetic function through additional endosymbiosis. To explore this we analyzed a large-scale EST database consisting of 151,091 unique sequences (29,170 contigs, 120,921 singletons) obtained from 454 pyrosequencing of the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida. About 597 contigs from P. piscicida showed significant homology (E-value dinoflagellates, while the light-harvesting genes are derived from diatoms, or diatoms that are tertiary plastids in other dinoflagellates. The continued expression of many genes involved in photosynthetic pathways indicates that the loss of transcriptional regulation may occur well after plastid loss and could explain the organism's ability to “capture” new plastids (i.e. different secondary endosymbiosis or tertiary symbioses) to renew photosynthetic function. PMID:23874554

  3. Still acting green: continued expression of photosynthetic genes in the heterotrophic Dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida (Peridiniales, Alveolata).

    PubMed

    Kim, Gwang Hoon; Jeong, Hae Jin; Yoo, Yeong Du; Kim, Sunju; Han, Ji Hee; Han, Jong Won; Zuccarello, Giuseppe C

    2013-01-01

    The loss of photosynthetic function should lead to the cessation of expression and finally loss of photosynthetic genes in the new heterotroph. Dinoflagellates are known to have lost their photosynthetic ability several times. Dinoflagellates have also acquired photosynthesis from other organisms, either on a long-term basis or as "kleptoplastids" multiple times. The fate of photosynthetic gene expression in heterotrophs can be informative into evolution of gene expression patterns after functional loss, and the dinoflagellates ability to acquire new photosynthetic function through additional endosymbiosis. To explore this we analyzed a large-scale EST database consisting of 151,091 unique sequences (29,170 contigs, 120,921 singletons) obtained from 454 pyrosequencing of the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida. About 597 contigs from P. piscicida showed significant homology (E-value dinoflagellates, while the light-harvesting genes are derived from diatoms, or diatoms that are tertiary plastids in other dinoflagellates. The continued expression of many genes involved in photosynthetic pathways indicates that the loss of transcriptional regulation may occur well after plastid loss and could explain the organism's ability to "capture" new plastids (i.e. different secondary endosymbiosis or tertiary symbioses) to renew photosynthetic function.

  4. Toxicity of benthic dinoflagellates on grazing, behavior and survival of the brine shrimp Artemia salina.

    PubMed

    Neves, Raquel A F; Fernandes, Tainá; Santos, Luciano Neves Dos; Nascimento, Silvia M

    2017-01-01

    Harmful algae may differently affect their primary grazers, causing sub-lethal effects and/or leading to their death. The present study aim to compare the effects of three toxic benthic dinoflagellates on clearance and grazing rates, behavioral changes, and survival of Artemia salina. Feeding assays consisted in 1-h incubations of brine shrimps with the toxic Prorocentrum lima, Gambierdiscus excentricus and Ostreopsis cf. ovata and the non-toxic Tetraselmis sp. Brine shrimps fed unselectively on all toxic and non-toxic algal preys, without significant differences in clearance and ingestion rates. Acute toxicity assays were performed with dinoflagellate cells in two growth phases during 7-h to assess differences in cell toxicity to A. salina. Additionally, exposure to cell-free medium was performed to evaluate its effects on A. salina survival. The behavior of brine shrimps significantly changed during exposure to the toxic dinoflagellates, becoming immobile at the bottom by the end of the trials. Dinoflagellates significantly affected A. salina survival with 100% mortality after 7-h exposure to cells in exponential phase (all treatments) and to P. lima in stationary phase. Mortality rates of brine shrimps exposed to O. cf. ovata and G. excentricus in stationary phase were 91% and 75%, respectively. However, incubations of the brine shrimps with cell-free medium did not affect A. salina survivorship. Significant differences in toxic effects between cell growth phases were only found in the survival rates of A. salina exposed to G. excentricus. Acute exposure to benthic toxic dinoflagellates induced harmful effects on behavior and survival of A. salina. Negative effects related to the toxicity of benthic dinoflagellates are thus expected on their primary grazers making them more vulnerable to predation and vectors of toxins through the marine food webs.

  5. Evidence for the retention of two evolutionary distinct plastids in dinoflagellates with diatom endosymbionts.

    PubMed

    Hehenberger, Elisabeth; Imanian, Behzad; Burki, Fabien; Keeling, Patrick J

    2014-09-01

    Dinoflagellates harboring diatom endosymbionts (termed "dinotoms") have undergone a process often referred to as "tertiary endosymbiosis"--the uptake of algae containing secondary plastids and integration of those plastids into the new host. In contrast to other tertiary plastids, and most secondary plastids, the endosymbiont of dinotoms is distinctly less reduced, retaining a number of cellular features, such as their nucleus and mitochondria and others, in addition to their plastid. This has resulted in redundancy between host and endosymbiont, at least between some mitochondrial and cytosolic metabolism, where this has been investigated. The question of plastidial redundancy is particularly interesting as the fate of the host dinoflagellate plastid is unclear. The host cytosol possesses an eyespot that has been postulated to be a remnant of the ancestral peridinin plastid, but this has not been tested, nor has its possible retention of plastid functions. To investigate this possibility, we searched for plastid-associated pathways and functions in transcriptomic data sets from three dinotom species. We show that the dinoflagellate host has indeed retained genes for plastid-associated pathways and that these genes encode targeting peptides similar to those of other dinoflagellate plastid-targeted proteins. Moreover, we also identified one gene encoding an essential component of the dinoflagellate plastid protein import machinery, altogether suggesting the presence of a functioning plastid import system in the host, and by extension a relict plastid. The presence of the same plastid-associated pathways in the endosymbiont also extends the known functional redundancy in dinotoms, further confirming the unusual state of plastid integration in this group of dinoflagellates.

  6. Symbiodinium Transcriptomes: Genome Insights into the Dinoflagellate Symbionts of Reef-Building Corals

    PubMed Central

    Sunagawa, Shinichi; Yum, Lauren K.; DeSalvo, Michael K.; Lindquist, Erika; Coffroth, Mary Alice; Voolstra, Christian R.; Medina, Mónica

    2012-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are unicellular algae that are ubiquitously abundant in aquatic environments. Species of the genus Symbiodinium form symbiotic relationships with reef-building corals and other marine invertebrates. Despite their ecologic importance, little is known about the genetics of dinoflagellates in general and Symbiodinium in particular. Here, we used 454 sequencing to generate transcriptome data from two Symbiodinium species from different clades (clade A and clade B). With more than 56,000 assembled sequences per species, these data represent the largest transcriptomic resource for dinoflagellates to date. Our results corroborate previous observations that dinoflagellates possess the complete nucleosome machinery. We found a complete set of core histones as well as several H3 variants and H2A.Z in one species. Furthermore, transcriptome analysis points toward a low number of transcription factors in Symbiodinium spp. that also differ in the distribution of DNA-binding domains relative to other eukaryotes. In particular the cold shock domain was predominant among transcription factors. Additionally, we found a high number of antioxidative genes in comparison to non-symbiotic but evolutionary related organisms. These findings might be of relevance in the context of the role that Symbiodinium spp. play as coral symbionts. Our data represent the most comprehensive dinoflagellate EST data set to date. This study provides a comprehensive resource to further analyze the genetic makeup, metabolic capacities, and gene repertoire of Symbiodinium and dinoflagellates. Overall, our findings indicate that Symbiodinium possesses some unique characteristics, in particular the transcriptional regulation in Symbiodinium may differ from the currently known mechanisms of eukaryotic gene regulation. PMID:22529998

  7. The variability in DMSP content and DMSP lyase activity in marine dinoflagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruana, Amandine M. N.; Malin, Gill

    2014-01-01

    More than 20 years ago Maureen Keller and co-workers published a study that identified dinoflagellates as an important marine phytoplankton group with respect to the production of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP). Here, we present a synthesis and analysis of all the DMSP and DMSP lyase activity (DLA) measurements currently available for dinoflagellates. The data cover 110 species and strains and reveal over 6 orders of magnitude variability in intracellular DMSP concentrations and substantial variations in DLA in 23 strains. Inter-specific variability was explored with reference to a range of biological characteristics. The presence of a theca did not appear to be related to DMSP concentration but there was a potential relationship with toxicity (P = 0.06) and bioluminescent species produced significantly lower concentrations (P < 0.01) than non-bioluminescent ones. DMSP concentrations were related to plastid types (P < 0.05); dinoflagellates with haptophyte-like plastids contained lower amounts of DMSP than those with peridinin plastids (P < 0.01), whereas those containing cryptomonad-like plastids tended to have higher DMSP concentrations. Heterotrophic dinoflagellates were also considered given their importance in the natural environment. They are the only heterotrophs known to synthesise DMSP and this ability may support the theory that they are of photosynthetic origin. However, the heterotrophic species investigated so far suggest wide variability in DMSP content and the species Oxyrrhis marina had no detectable DMSP. The oceanic province of origin significantly affected the DMSP concentrations (P < 0.05) with higher DMSP content observed in dinoflagellates from the Mediterranean province, the Kuroshio Current province and the East Coastal Australian province. Overall this study supports the concept that DMSP-containing dinoflagellates are an important potential source of DMS to the global atmosphere and highlights current gaps in knowledge.

  8. Evidence for the Retention of Two Evolutionary Distinct Plastids in Dinoflagellates with Diatom Endosymbionts

    PubMed Central

    Hehenberger, Elisabeth; Imanian, Behzad; Burki, Fabien; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Dinoflagellates harboring diatom endosymbionts (termed “dinotoms”) have undergone a process often referred to as “tertiary endosymbiosis”—the uptake of algae containing secondary plastids and integration of those plastids into the new host. In contrast to other tertiary plastids, and most secondary plastids, the endosymbiont of dinotoms is distinctly less reduced, retaining a number of cellular features, such as their nucleus and mitochondria and others, in addition to their plastid. This has resulted in redundancy between host and endosymbiont, at least between some mitochondrial and cytosolic metabolism, where this has been investigated. The question of plastidial redundancy is particularly interesting as the fate of the host dinoflagellate plastid is unclear. The host cytosol possesses an eyespot that has been postulated to be a remnant of the ancestral peridinin plastid, but this has not been tested, nor has its possible retention of plastid functions. To investigate this possibility, we searched for plastid-associated pathways and functions in transcriptomic data sets from three dinotom species. We show that the dinoflagellate host has indeed retained genes for plastid-associated pathways and that these genes encode targeting peptides similar to those of other dinoflagellate plastid-targeted proteins. Moreover, we also identified one gene encoding an essential component of the dinoflagellate plastid protein import machinery, altogether suggesting the presence of a functioning plastid import system in the host, and by extension a relict plastid. The presence of the same plastid-associated pathways in the endosymbiont also extends the known functional redundancy in dinotoms, further confirming the unusual state of plastid integration in this group of dinoflagellates. PMID:25172904

  9. Mycorrhiza: A Common Form of Mutualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medve, Richard J.

    1978-01-01

    Mycorrhizae are among the most common examples of mutualism. This article discusses their structure, symbolic relationship, factors affecting formation and applying research. Questions are posed and answers suggested. (MA)

  10. Phenological shifts and the fate of mutualisms

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Nicole E.; CaraDonna, Paul J.; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is altering the timing of life history events in a wide array of species, many of which are involved in mutualistic interactions. Because many mutualisms can form only if partner species are able to locate each other in time, differential phenological shifts are likely to influence their strength, duration and outcome. At the extreme, climate change-driven shifts in phenology may result in phenological mismatch: the partial or complete loss of temporal overlap of mutualistic species. We have a growing understanding of how, when, and why phenological change can alter one type of mutualism–pollination. However, as we show here, there has been a surprising lack of attention to other types of mutualism. We generate a set of predictions about the characteristics that may predispose mutualisms in general to phenological mismatches. We focus not on the consequences of such mismatches but rather on the likelihood that mismatches will develop. We explore the influence of three key characteristics of mutualism: 1) intimacy, 2) seasonality and duration, and 3) obligacy and specificity. We predict that the following characteristics of mutualism may increase the likelihood of phenological mismatch: 1) a non-symbiotic life history in which co-dispersal is absent; 2) brief, seasonal interactions; and 3) facultative, generalized interactions. We then review the limited available data in light of our a priori predictions and point to mutualisms that are more and less likely to be at risk of becoming phenologically mismatched, emphasizing the need for research on mutualisms other than plant–pollinator interactions. Future studies should explicitly focus on mutualism characteristics to determine whether and how changing phenologies will affect mutualistic interactions. PMID:25883391

  11. Host–symbiont recombination versus natural selection in the response of coral–dinoflagellate symbioses to environmental disturbance

    PubMed Central

    LaJeunesse, Todd C.; Smith, Robin; Walther, Mariana; Pinzón, Jorge; Pettay, Daniel T.; McGinley, Michael; Aschaffenburg, Matthew; Medina-Rosas, Pedro; Cupul-Magaña, Amilcar L.; Pérez, Andrés López; Reyes-Bonilla, Hector; Warner, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Mutualisms between reef-building corals and endosymbiotic dinoflagellates are particularly sensitive to environmental stress, yet the ecosystems they construct have endured major oscillations in global climate. During the winter of 2008, an extreme cold-water event occurred in the Gulf of California that bleached corals in the genus Pocillopora harbouring a thermally ‘sensitive’ symbiont, designated Symbiodinium C1b-c, while colonies possessing Symbiodinium D1 were mostly unaffected. Certain bleached colonies recovered quickly while others suffered partial or complete mortality. In most colonies, no appreciable change was observed in the identity of the original symbiont, indicating that these partnerships are stable. During the initial phases of recovery, a third species of symbiont B1Aiptasia, genetically identical to that harboured by the invasive anemone, Aiptasia sp., grew opportunistically and was visible as light-yellow patches on the branch tips of several colonies. However, this symbiont did not persist and was displaced in all cases by C1b-c several months later. Colonies with D1 were abundant at inshore habitats along the continental eastern Pacific, where seasonal turbidity is high relative to offshore islands. Environmental conditions of the central and southern coasts of Mexico were not sufficient to explain the exclusivity of D1 Pocillopora in these regions. It is possible that mass mortalities associated with major thermal disturbances during the 1997–1998 El Niño Southern Oscillation eliminated C1b-c holobionts from these locations. The differential loss of Pocillopora holobionts in response to thermal stress suggests that natural selection on existing variation can cause rapid and significant shifts in the frequency of particular coral–algal partnerships. However, coral populations may take decades to recover following episodes of severe selection, thereby raising considerable uncertainty about the long-term viability of these communities

  12. Host-symbiont recombination versus natural selection in the response of coral-dinoflagellate symbioses to environmental disturbance.

    PubMed

    LaJeunesse, Todd C; Smith, Robin; Walther, Mariana; Pinzón, Jorge; Pettay, Daniel T; McGinley, Michael; Aschaffenburg, Matthew; Medina-Rosas, Pedro; Cupul-Magaña, Amilcar L; Pérez, Andrés López; Reyes-Bonilla, Hector; Warner, Mark E

    2010-10-07

    Mutualisms between reef-building corals and endosymbiotic dinoflagellates are particularly sensitive to environmental stress, yet the ecosystems they construct have endured major oscillations in global climate. During the winter of 2008, an extreme cold-water event occurred in the Gulf of California that bleached corals in the genus Pocillopora harbouring a thermally 'sensitive' symbiont, designated Symbiodinium C1b-c, while colonies possessing Symbiodinium D1 were mostly unaffected. Certain bleached colonies recovered quickly while others suffered partial or complete mortality. In most colonies, no appreciable change was observed in the identity of the original symbiont, indicating that these partnerships are stable. During the initial phases of recovery, a third species of symbiont B1(Aiptasia), genetically identical to that harboured by the invasive anemone, Aiptasia sp., grew opportunistically and was visible as light-yellow patches on the branch tips of several colonies. However, this symbiont did not persist and was displaced in all cases by C1b-c several months later. Colonies with D1 were abundant at inshore habitats along the continental eastern Pacific, where seasonal turbidity is high relative to offshore islands. Environmental conditions of the central and southern coasts of Mexico were not sufficient to explain the exclusivity of D1 Pocillopora in these regions. It is possible that mass mortalities associated with major thermal disturbances during the 1997-1998 El Niño Southern Oscillation eliminated C1b-c holobionts from these locations. The differential loss of Pocillopora holobionts in response to thermal stress suggests that natural selection on existing variation can cause rapid and significant shifts in the frequency of particular coral-algal partnerships. However, coral populations may take decades to recover following episodes of severe selection, thereby raising considerable uncertainty about the long-term viability of these communities.

  13. Identification of amoebae implicated in the life cycle of Pfiesteria and Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peglar, M.T.; Nerad, T.A.; Anderson, O.R.; Gillevet, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess whether amoebae commonly found in mesohaline environments are in fact stages in the life cycles of Pfiesteria and Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellates. Primary isolations of amoebae and dinoflagellates were made from water and sediment samples from five tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Additional amoebae were also cloned from bioassay aquaria where fish mortality was attributed to Pfiesteria. Electron microscopy and small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequence analysis of these isolates clearly demonstrated that the commonly depicted amoeboid form of Pfiesteria is very likely a species of Korotnevella and is unrelated to Pfiesteria or Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellates. We have determined that the Pfiesteria and Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellates examined in this study undergo a typical homothallic life cycle without amoeboid stages. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that cloned amoebae sharing morphological characteristics described for stages in the life cycle of Pfiesteria do not transform into dinozoites. The strict clonal isolation and cultivation techniques used in this study substantially support the conclusion that the amoebae and some of the flagellates depicted in the life cycle of Pfiesteria are environmental contaminants of the Pfiesteria culture system and that the Ambush Predator Hypothesis needs to be rigorously reevaluated.

  14. THE RED-TIDE DINOFLAGELLATE, ALEXANDRIUM MONILATUM, SUPPRESSES GROWTH OF MIXED NATURAL PHYTOPLANKTON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alexandrium monilatum is a large, chain-forming, autotrophic dinoflagellate associated with red-tides and fish kills along the US Gulf of Mexico coast. When cultured inocula of A. monilatum were added to nutrient-amended seawater samples, growth rates and biomass yields of the na...

  15. Identification of amoebae implicated in the life cycle of Pfiesteria and Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Peglar, Michael T; Nerad, Thomas A; Anderson, O Roger; Gillevet, Patrick M

    2004-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess whether amoebae commonly found in mesohaline environments are in fact stages in the life cycles of Pfiesteria and Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellates. Primary isolations of amoebae and dinoflagellates were made from water and sediment samples from five tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Additional amoebae were also cloned from bioassay aquaria where fish mortality was attributed to Pfiesteria. Electron microscopy and small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequence analysis of these isolates clearly demonstrated that the commonly depicted amoeboid form of Pfiisteria is very likely a species of Korotnevella and is unrelated to Pfiesteria or Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellates. We have determined that the Pfiesteria and Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellates examined in this study undergo a typical homothallic life cycle without amoeboid stages. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that cloned amoebae sharing morphological characteristics described for stages in the life cycle of Pfiesteria do not transform into dinozoites. The strict clonal isolation and cultivation techniques used in this study substantially support the conclusion that the amoebae and some of the flagellates depicted in the life cycle of Pfiesteria are environmental contaminants of the Pfiesteria culture system and that the Ambush Predator Hypothesis needs to be rigorously reevaluated.

  16. Fish lesions in the Chesapeake Bay: Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellates and other etiologies.

    PubMed

    Kane, A S; Oldach, D; Reimschuessel, R

    1998-05-01

    Ulcerative lesions and mass mortalities of Atlantic estuarine fish, particularly menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus), have been associated with exposure to Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellates and their toxins. We collected fish from the Chicamacomico River, Maryland, and observed solitary ulcerative lesions on the majority of menhaden sampled. One striped bass (Morone saxatilis) had an area of reddening around the base of the dorsal fin. Bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), yellow perch (Perca flavescens), and carp (Cyprinus carpio) were externally nonremarkable. Histologically ulcerative menhaden lesions demonstrated marked chronic inflammatory infiltrate in large areas of exposed necrotic muscle. The ulcers contained granulomata with fungal hyphae in the necrotic tissue. Gram negative rod-shaped bacteria were also observed in the lesions, a common finding in ulcers of aquatic organisms. Our data suggest that typical ulcerative lesions observed on fish from areas of Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellate blooms are reflective of dermatosis, which may be related to a variety of individual or combined environmental stressors. Exposure to dinoflagellate toxin)s) potentially represents one such stressor. The role of Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellate toxin in fish primary lesion development is currently under investigation.

  17. Systematics of a Kleptoplastidal Dinoflagellate, Gymnodinium eucyaneum Hu (Dinophyceae), and Its Cryptomonad Endosymbiont

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Shuang; Zhang, Qi; Zhu, Huan; Cheng, Yingyin; Liu, Guoxiang; Hu, Zhengyu

    2013-01-01

    New specimens of the kleptoplastidal dinoflagellate Gymnodinium eucyaneum Hu were collected in China. We investigated the systematics of the dinoflagellate and the origin of its endosymbiont based on light morphology and phylogenetic analyses using multiple DNA sequences. Cells were dorsoventrally flattened with a sharply acute hypocone and a hemispherical epicone. The confusion between G. eucyaneum and G. acidotum Nygaard still needs to be resolved. We found that the hypocone was conspicuously larger than the epicone in most G. eucyaneum cells, which differed from G. acidotum, but there were a few cells whose hypocone and epicone were of nearly the same size. In addition, there was only one site difference in the partial nuclear LSU rDNA sequences of a sample from Japan given the name G. acidotum and G. eucyaneum in the present study, which suggest that G. eucyaneum may be a synonym of G. acidotum. Spectroscopic analyses and phylogenetic analyses based on nucleomorph SSU rDNA sequences and chloroplast 23 s rDNA sequences suggested that the endosymbiont of G. eucyaneum was derived from Chroomonas (Cryptophyta), and that it was most closely related to C. coerulea Skuja. Moreover, the newly reported kleptoplastidal dinoflagellates G. myriopyrenoides and G. eucyaneum in our study were very similar, and the taxonomy of kleptoplastidal dinoflagellates was discussed. PMID:23308288

  18. Toxin and Growth Responses of the Neurotoxic Dinoflagellate Vulcanodinium rugosum to Varying Temperature and Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Abadie, Eric; Muguet, Alexia; Berteaux, Tom; Chomérat, Nicolas; Hess, Philipp; Roque D’OrbCastel, Emmanuelle; Masseret, Estelle; Laabir, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Vulcanodinium rugosum, a recently described species, produces pinnatoxins. The IFR-VRU-01 strain, isolated from a French Mediterranean lagoon in 2010 and identified as the causative dinoflagellate contaminating mussels in the Ingril Lagoon (French Mediterranean) with pinnatoxin-G, was grown in an enriched natural seawater medium. We tested the effect of temperature and salinity on growth, pinnatoxin-G production and chlorophyll a levels of this dinoflagellate. These factors were tested in combinations of five temperatures (15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 °C) and five salinities (20, 25, 30, 35 and 40) at an irradiance of 100 µmol photon m−2 s−1. V. rugosum can grow at temperatures and salinities ranging from 20 °C to 30 °C and 20 to 40, respectively. The optimal combination for growth (0.39 ± 0.11 d−1) was a temperature of 25 °C and a salinity of 40. Results suggest that V. rugosum is euryhaline and thermophile which could explain why this dinoflagellate develops in situ only from June to September. V. rugosum growth rate and pinnatoxin-G production were highest at temperatures ranging between 25 and 30 °C. This suggests that the dinoflagellate may give rise to extensive blooms in the coming decades caused by the climate change-related increases in temperature expected in the Mediterranean coasts. PMID:27164144

  19. GROWTH RATES, PHYSIOLOGICAL INDICATORS AND ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION OF THE RED-TIDE DINOFLAGELLATE, ALEXANDRIUM MONILATUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alexandrium monilatum is a thecate, autotrophic, bioluminescent and chain-forming dinoflagellate. Although it has been known to be associated with red tides and fish kills along the US Gulf of Mexico coast for almost 50 years, little basic physiological information is available f...

  20. LIPID CLASS DISTRIBUTION OF HIGHLY UNSATURATED LONG-CHAIN FATTY ACIDS IN MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Very-long-chain highly unsaturated C28 fatty acids (HUFAs), found in a number of dinoflagellates, are released as methyl esters from phospholipids obtained by fractionation of lipid extracts. By contrast, the highly unsaturated C18 fatty acid octadecapentaenoic acid (18:5n-3), co...

  1. STEROLS OF THE HETEROTROPHIC DINOFLAGELLATE, PFIESTERIA PISCICIDA (DINOPHYCEAE): IS THERE A LIPID BIOMARKER?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within United States waters, blooms of the dinoflagellate, Pfiesteria piscicida, have been recorded on an almost regular basis in the Chesapeake Bay and surrounding mid-Atlantic regions for the last two decades. Despite the apparent significance of such blooms to the environment ...

  2. A single-cell view of ammonium assimilation in coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Pernice, Mathieu; Meibom, Anders; Van Den Heuvel, Annamieke; Kopp, Christophe; Domart-Coulon, Isabelle; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Dove, Sophie

    2012-07-01

    Assimilation of inorganic nitrogen from nutrient-poor tropical seas is an essential challenge for the endosymbiosis between reef-building corals and dinoflagellates. Despite the clear evidence that reef-building corals can use ammonium as inorganic nitrogen source, the dynamics and precise roles of host and symbionts in this fundamental process remain unclear. Here, we combine high spatial resolution ion microprobe imaging (NanoSIMS) and pulse-chase isotopic labeling in order to track the dynamics of ammonium incorporation within the intact symbiosis between the reef-building coral Acropora aspera and its dinoflagellate symbionts. We demonstrate that both dinoflagellate and animal cells have the capacity to rapidly fix nitrogen from seawater enriched in ammonium (in less than one hour). Further, by establishing the relative strengths of the capability to assimilate nitrogen for each cell compartment, we infer that dinoflagellate symbionts can fix 14 to 23 times more nitrogen than their coral host cells in response to a sudden pulse of ammonium-enriched seawater. Given the importance of nitrogen in cell maintenance, growth and functioning, the capability to fix ammonium from seawater into the symbiotic system may be a key component of coral nutrition. Interestingly, this metabolic response appears to be triggered rapidly by episodic nitrogen availability. The methods and results presented in this study open up for the exploration of dynamics and spatial patterns associated with metabolic activities and nutritional interactions in a multitude of organisms that live in symbiotic relationships.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Membrane Lipids in Psychrophilic and Mesophilic Freshwater Dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Anesi, Andrea; Obertegger, Ulrike; Hansen, Gert; Sukenik, Assaf; Flaim, Giovanna; Guella, Graziano

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the lipid profiles of ten dinoflagellate species originating from different freshwater habitats and grown at 4, 13, or 20°C akin to their natural occurrence. Lipids were determined by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-ElectroSpray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry in positive and negative ion modes. Besides the well-studied monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) lipids, our study revealed the presence of intact molecular lipid species of trigalactosyldiacylglycerols, betaine diacylglyceryl-carboxyhydroxymethylcholine, sulfolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerols (SQDG) and phospholipids, in particular phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. In multivariate ordination, the freshwater dinoflagellates studied could be distinguished into two groups based on their lipid profiles. Peridinium aciculiferum, Borghiella dodgei, B. tenuissima and Tovellia coronata belonged to group 1 while Ceratium cornutum, Gymnodinium palustre, Jadwigia applanata, P. cinctum, P. willei, and P. gatunense belonged to group 2. Indicator species analysis evidenced that group 1 was characterized by 36:9 MGDG and 36:9 DGDG and group 2 by 38:9 and 38:10 MGDG, 38:9 and 38:10 DGDG and 34:1 SQDG. We suggest that the grouping of dinoflagellates indicated their range of temperature tolerance. Furthermore, non-thylakoid lipids were linked to dinoflagellate phylogeny based on the large ribosomal sub-unit (28S LSU) rather than their temperature tolerance. Thus certain lipids better reflected habitat adaptation while other lipids better reflected genetic diversity. PMID:27148341

  4. GROWTH RATES AND ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION OF ALEXANDRIUM MONILATUM, A REDTIDE DINOFLAGELLATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The combined effects of temperature and salinity on growth of Alexandrium monilatum were studied in laboratory cultures. This toxic, red-tide dinoflagellate grew faster with higher temperatures, up to a maximum of approximately 1 division d-1 at 31 C. Salinities above 15 psu had ...

  5. Adaptations and selection of harmful and other dinoflagellate species in upwelling systems 1. Morphology and adaptive polymorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smayda, T. J.

    2010-04-01

    The complex three-dimensional physical structure, spatial scale and the variations in the upwelling-relaxation cycles characterizing eastern boundary upwelling systems are summarized. It is suggested that upwelling systems and their bloom dynamics should be accorded the status of biomes. A unique upwelling dinoflagellate flora is not found. The harmful, red tide and other dinoflagellates selected to bloom are cosmopolitan in distribution and commonly bloom in coastal habitats. The morphological features of 27 dinoflagellate species that bloom in upwelling systems are compared to identify commonalities in form and function adaptations relevant to their upwelling occurrences. The upwelling dinoflagellate species are morphologically, physiologically, ecologically and toxicologically diverse; a unique set of morphological traits specifically evolved for growth in upwelling systems is not evident. The absence of a unique dinoflagellate upwelling flora is unexpected given the challenges to survival and growth in upwelling systems posed by the energetic physical conditions and spatial and temporal complexity of upwelling dynamics. Cellular defense mechanisms - “armouring” and small cell formation - against external and internal cellular damage resulting from turbulence-induced stress-strain, and the occurrence of morphological streamlining to facilitate swimming-based strategies adaptive to growth in upwelling systems are evaluated. The occurrence of autotomy, ecdysis, thecal resorption and regeneration, seasonal cyclomorphosis and polymorphism (form variation) among dinoflagellates is evaluated. The impressive commonality and rapidity of ecomorph formation suggest autoregulated polymorphism is potentially an important mode of adaptation available to upwelling dinoflagellates, and specifically directed towards adjustment of their flotation (swim:sink ratio) capacity. However, seasonal cyclomorphosis and regional and local displays of adaptive polymorphism are traits

  6. Mutual Information Rate and Bounds for It

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Murilo S.; Rubinger, Rero M.; Viana, Emilson R.; Sartorelli, José C.; Parlitz, Ulrich; Grebogi, Celso

    2012-01-01

    The amount of information exchanged per unit of time between two nodes in a dynamical network or between two data sets is a powerful concept for analysing complex systems. This quantity, known as the mutual information rate (MIR), is calculated from the mutual information, which is rigorously defined only for random systems. Moreover, the definition of mutual information is based on probabilities of significant events. This work offers a simple alternative way to calculate the MIR in dynamical (deterministic) networks or between two time series (not fully deterministic), and to calculate its upper and lower bounds without having to calculate probabilities, but rather in terms of well known and well defined quantities in dynamical systems. As possible applications of our bounds, we study the relationship between synchronisation and the exchange of information in a system of two coupled maps and in experimental networks of coupled oscillators. PMID:23112809

  7. Integrating plant carbon dynamics with mutualism ecology.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Elizabeth G

    2016-04-01

    Plants reward microbial and animal mutualists with carbohydrates to obtain nutrients, defense, pollination, and dispersal. Under a fixed carbon budget, plants must allocate carbon to their mutualists at the expense of allocation to growth, reproduction, or storage. Such carbon trade-offs are indirectly expressed when a plant exhibits reduced growth or fecundity in the presence of its mutualist. Because carbon regulates the costs of all plant mutualisms, carbon dynamics are a common platform for integrating these costs in the face of ecological complexity and context dependence. The ecophysiology of whole-plant carbon allocation could thus elucidate the ecology and evolution of plant mutualisms. If mutualisms are costly to plants, then they must be important but frequently underestimated sinks in the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  8. Mutual information and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamma, A.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the metastable, symmetry-breaking ground states of quantum many-body Hamiltonians have vanishing quantum mutual information between macroscopically separated regions and are thus the most classical ones among all possible quantum ground states. This statement is obvious only when the symmetry-breaking ground states are simple product states, e.g., at the factorization point. On the other hand, symmetry-breaking states are in general entangled along the entire ordered phase, and to show that they actually feature the least macroscopic correlations compared to their symmetric superpositions is highly nontrivial. We prove this result in general, by considering the quantum mutual information based on the two-Rényi entanglement entropy and using a locality result stemming from quasiadiabatic continuation. Moreover, in the paradigmatic case of the exactly solvable one-dimensional quantum X Y model, we further verify the general result by considering also the quantum mutual information based on the von Neumann entanglement entropy.

  9. Loktanella spp. Gb03 as an algicidal bacterium, isolated from the culture of Dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus belizeanus

    PubMed Central

    Bloh, Anmar Hameed; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Bacteria associated with harmful algal blooms can play a crucial role in regulating algal blooms in the environment. This study aimed at isolating and identifying algicidal bacteria in Dinoflagellate culture and to determine the optimum growth requirement of the algicidal bacteria, Loktanella sp. Gb-03. Materials and Methods: The Dinoflagellate culture used in this study was supplied by Professor Gires Usup's Laboratory, School of Environmental and Natural Resources Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia, Malaysia. The culture was used for the isolation of Loktanella sp., using biochemical tests, API 20 ONE kits. The fatty acid content of the isolates and the algicidal activity were further evaluated, and the phenotype was determined through the phylogenetic tree. Results: Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming, short rod-shaped, aerobic bacteria (Gb01, Gb02, Gb03, Gb04, Gb05, and Gb06) were isolated from the Dinoflagellate culture. The colonies were pink in color, convex with a smooth surface and entire edge. The optimum growth temperature for the Loktanella sp. Gb03 isolate was determined to be 30°C, in 1% of NaCl and pH7. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the bacterium belonged to the genus Loktanella of the class Alphaproteobacteria and formed a tight cluster with the type strain of Loktanella pyoseonensis (97.0% sequence similarity). Conclusion: On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic data and genetic distinctiveness, strain Gb-03, were placed in the genus Loktanella as the type strain of species. Moreover, it has algicidal activity against seven toxic Dinoflagellate. The algicidal property of the isolated Loktanella is vital, especially where biological control is needed to mitigate algal bloom or targeted Dinoflagellates. PMID:27051199

  10. Biology of the Marine Heterotrophic Dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina: Current Status and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiling; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Sheng; Lin, Senjie

    2013-10-21

    Heterotrophic dinoflagellates are prevalent protists in marine environments, which play an important role in the carbon cycling and energy flow in the marine planktonic community. Oxyrrhismarina (Dinophyceae), a widespread heterotrophic dinoflagellate, is a model species used for a broad range of ecological, biogeographic, and evolutionary studies. Despite the increasing research effort on this species, there lacks a synthesis of the existing data and a coherent picture of this organism. Here we reviewed the literature to provide an overview of what is known regarding the biology of O. marina, and identify areas where further studies are needed. As an early branch of the dinoflagellate lineage, O. marina shares similarity with typical dinoflagellates in permanent condensed chromosomes, less abundant nucleosome proteins compared to other eukaryotes, multiple gene copies, the occurrence of trans-splicing in nucleus-encoded mRNAs, highly fragmented mitochondrial genome, and disuse of ATG as a start codon for mitochondrial genes. On the other hand, O. marina also exhibits some distinct cytological features (e.g., different flagellar structure, absence of girdle and sulcus or pustules, use of intranuclear spindle in mitosis, presence of nuclear plaque, and absence of birefringent periodic banded chromosomal structure) and genetic features (e.g., a single histone-like DNA-associated protein, cob-cox3 gene fusion, 5' oligo-U cap in the mitochondrial transcripts of protein-coding genes, the absence of mRNA editing, the presence of stop codon in the fused cob-cox3 mRNA produced by post-transcriptional oligoadenylation, and vestigial plastid genes). The best-studied biology of this dinoflagellate is probably the prey and predators types, which include a wide range of organisms. On the other hand, the abundance of this species in the natural waters and its controlling factors, genome organization and gene expression regulation that underlie the unusual cytological and

  11. Biology of the Marine Heterotrophic Dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiling; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Sheng; Lin, Senjie

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrophic dinoflagellates are prevalent protists in marine environments, which play an important role in the carbon cycling and energy flow in the marine planktonic community. Oxyrrhis marina (Dinophyceae), a widespread heterotrophic dinoflagellate, is a model species used for a broad range of ecological, biogeographic, and evolutionary studies. Despite the increasing research effort on this species, there lacks a synthesis of the existing data and a coherent picture of this organism. Here we reviewed the literature to provide an overview of what is known regarding the biology of O. marina, and identify areas where further studies are needed. As an early branch of the dinoflagellate lineage, O. marina shares similarity with typical dinoflagellates in permanent condensed chromosomes, less abundant nucleosome proteins compared to other eukaryotes, multiple gene copies, the occurrence of trans-splicing in nucleus-encoded mRNAs, highly fragmented mitochondrial genome, and disuse of ATG as a start codon for mitochondrial genes. On the other hand, O. marina also exhibits some distinct cytological features (e.g., different flagellar structure, absence of girdle and sulcus or pustules, use of intranuclear spindle in mitosis, presence of nuclear plaque, and absence of birefringent periodic banded chromosomal structure) and genetic features (e.g., a single histone-like DNA-associated protein, cob-cox3 gene fusion, 5′ oligo-U cap in the mitochondrial transcripts of protein-coding genes, the absence of mRNA editing, the presence of stop codon in the fused cob-cox3 mRNA produced by post-transcriptional oligoadenylation, and vestigial plastid genes). The best-studied biology of this dinoflagellate is probably the prey and predators types, which include a wide range of organisms. On the other hand, the abundance of this species in the natural waters and its controlling factors, genome organization and gene expression regulation that underlie the unusual cytological and

  12. Immobilized growth of the peridinin-producing marine dinoflagellate Symbiodinium in a simple biofilm photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Benstein, Ruben Maximilian; Cebi, Zehra; Podola, Björn; Melkonian, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Products from phototrophic dinoflagellates such as toxins or pigments are potentially important for applications in the biomedical sciences, especially in drug development. However, the technical cultivation of these organisms is often problematic due to their sensitivity to hydrodynamic (shear) stress that is a characteristic of suspension-based closed photobioreactors (PBRs). It is thus often thought that most species of dinoflagellates are non-cultivable at a technical scale. Recent advances in the development of biofilm PBRs that rely on immobilization of microalgae may hold potential to circumvent this major technical problem in dinoflagellate cultivation. In the present study, the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium voratum was grown immobilized on a Twin-Layer PBR for isolation of the carotenoid peridinin, an anti-cancerogenic compound. Biomass productivities ranged from 1.0 to 11.0 g m(-2) day(-1) dry matter per vertical growth surface and a maximal biomass yield of 114.5 g m(-2), depending on light intensity, supplementary CO2, and type of substrate (paper or polycarbonate membrane) used. Compared to a suspension culture, the performance of the Twin-Layer PBRs exhibited significantly higher growth rates and maximal biomass yield. In the Twin-Layer PBR a maximal peridinin productivity of 24 mg m(-2) day(-1) was determined at a light intensity of 74 μmol m(-2) s(-1), although the highest peridinin content per dry weight (1.7 % w/w) was attained at lower light intensities. The results demonstrate that a biofilm-based PBR that minimizes hydrodynamic shear forces is applicable to technical-scale cultivation of dinoflagellates and may foster biotechnological applications of these abundant marine protists.

  13. Conceptual Alignment: How Brains Achieve Mutual Understanding.

    PubMed

    Stolk, Arjen; Verhagen, Lennart; Toni, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    We share our thoughts with other minds, but we do not understand how. Having a common language certainly helps, but infants' and tourists' communicative success clearly illustrates that sharing thoughts does not require signals with a pre-assigned meaning. In fact, human communicators jointly build a fleeting conceptual space in which signals are a means to seek and provide evidence for mutual understanding. Recent work has started to capture the neural mechanisms supporting those fleeting conceptual alignments. The evidence suggests that communicators and addressees achieve mutual understanding by using the same computational procedures, implemented in the same neuronal substrate, and operating over temporal scales independent from the signals' occurrences.

  14. Multispecies microbial mutualisms on coral reefs: the host as a habitat.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Nancy; Rohwer, Forest

    2003-10-01

    Reef-building corals associate with a diverse array of eukaryotic and noneukaryotic microbes. Best known are dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium ("zooxanthellae"), which are photosynthetic symbionts found in all reef-building corals. Once considered a single species, they are now recognized as several large, genetically diverse groups that often co-occur within a single host species or colony. Variation among Symbiodinium in host identities, tolerance to stress, and ability to colonize hosts has been documented, but there is little information on the ecology of zooxanthellar free-living stages and how different zooxanthellae perform as partners. Other microbial associates of reef corals are much less well known, but studies indicate that individual coral colonies host diverse assemblages of bacteria, some of which seem to have species-specific associations. This diversity of microbial associates has important evolutionary and ecological implications. Most mutualisms evolve as balanced reciprocations that allow partners to detect cheaters, particularly when partners are potentially diverse and can be transmitted horizontally. Thus, environmental stresses that incapacitate the ability of partners to reciprocate can destabilize associations by eliciting rejection by their hosts. Coral bleaching (the loss of zooxanthellae) and coral diseases, both increasing over the last several decades, may be examples of stress-related mutualistic instability.

  15. Mutual Group Hypnosis: A Social Interaction Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Shirley

    Mutual Group Hypnosis is discussed in terms of its similarity to group dynamics in general and in terms of its similarity to a social interaction program (Role Modeling) designed to foster the expression of warmth and acceptance among group members. Hypnosis also fosters a regression to prelogical thought processes in the service of the ego. Group…

  16. Mutually unbiased bases and generalized Bell states

    SciTech Connect

    Klimov, Andrei B.; Sych, Denis; Sanchez-Soto, Luis L.; Leuchs, Gerd

    2009-05-15

    We employ a straightforward relation between mutually unbiased and Bell bases to extend the latter in terms of a direct construction for the former. We analyze in detail the properties of these generalized Bell states, showing that they constitute an appropriate tool for testing entanglement in bipartite multiqudit systems.

  17. Do Mutual Children Cement Bonds in Stepfamilies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1988-01-01

    Interviewed 105 midwestern stepfamilies, 39 of whom had reproduced together. Found no significant differences between families with mutual children and those without in terms of marital adjustment, stepparent- and parent-child relationships, and stepfamily affect. It was not possible to predict which families were most likely to reproduce together…

  18. Mutual diffusion of interacting membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Abney, J R; Scalettar, B A; Owicki, J C

    1989-01-01

    The generalized Stokes-Einstein equation is used, together with the two-dimensional pressure equation, to analyze mutual diffusion in concentrated membrane systems. These equations can be used to investigate the role that both direct and hydrodynamic interactions play in determining diffusive behavior. Here only direct interactions are explicitly incorporated into the theory at high densities; however, both direct and hydrodynamic interactions are analyzed for some dilute solutions. We look at diffusion in the presence of weak attractions, soft repulsions, and hard-core repulsions. It is found that, at low densities, attractions retard mutual diffusion while repulsions enhance it. Mechanistically, attractions tend to tether particles together and oppose the dissipation of gradients or fluctuations in concentration, while repulsions provide a driving force that pushes particles apart. At higher concentrations, changes in the structure of the fluid enhance mutual diffusion even in the presence of attractions. It is shown that the theoretical description of postelectrophoresis relaxation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy experiments must be modified if interacting systems are studied. The effects of interactions on mutual diffusion coefficients have probably already been seen in postelectrophoresis relaxation experiments. PMID:2775829

  19. Mutual Coupling Compensation on Spectral-based DOA Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanudin, R.

    2016-11-01

    Direction of arrival (DOA) estimation using isotropic antenna arrays are commonly being implemented without considering the mutual coupling effect in between the array elements. This paper presents an analysis of DOA estimation with mutual coupling compensation using a linear antenna array. Mutual coupling effect is represented by mutual coupling coefficients and taken into account when calculating the array output. The mutual coupling compensation technique exploits a banded mutual coupling matrix to reduce the computational complexity. The banded matrix reflects the relationship between mutual coupling effect and the element spacing in an antenna array. The analysis is being carried out using the Capon algorithm, one of spectral-based DOA algorithms, for estimating the DOA of incoming signals. Computer simulations are performed to show the performance of the mutual coupling compensation technique on DOA estimation. Simulation results show that, in term of estimation resolution, the mutual coupling compensation technique manages to obtain a comparable results compared to the case without mutual coupling consideration. However, the mutual coupling compensation technique produces significant estimation error compared to the case without mutual coupling. The study concludes that the banded matrix of mutual coupling coefficients should be properly designed to improve the performance of mutual coupling compensation technique in DOA estimation.

  20. High Sequence Variability, Diverse Subcellular Localizations, and Ecological Implications of Alkaline Phosphatase in Dinoflagellates and Other Eukaryotic Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Zhang, Huan; Cui, Yudong; Lin, Senjie

    2012-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is a key enzyme for phytoplankton to utilize dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) when dissolved inorganic phosphorus is limited. While three major types of AP and their correspondingly diverse subcellular localization have been recognized in bacteria, little is known about AP in eukaryotic phytoplankton such as dinoflagellates. Here, we isolated a full-length AP cDNA from a latest-diverging dinoflagellate genus Alexandrium, and conducted comparative analyses with homologs from a relatively basal (Amphidinium carterae) and late-diverging (Karenia brevis) lineage of dinoflagellates as well as other eukaryotic algae. New data and previous studies indicate that AP is common in dinoflagellates and most other major eukaryotic groups of phytoplankton. AP sequences are more variable than many other genes studied in dinoflagellates, and are divergent among different eukaryotic phytoplankton lineages. Sequence comparison to the other characterized APs suggests that dinoflagellates and some other eukaryotic phytoplankton possess the putative AP as phoA type, but some other eukaryotic phytoplankton seem to have other types. Phylogenetic analyses based on AP amino acid sequences indicated that the “red-type” eukaryotic lineages formed a monophyletic group, suggesting a common origin of their APs. As different amino acid sequences have been found to predictably determine different spatial distribution in the cells, which may facilitate access to different pools of DOP, existing computational models were adopted to predict the subcellular localizations of putative AP in the three dinoflagellates and other eukaryotic phytoplankton. Results showed different subcellular localizations of APs in different dinoflagellates and other lineages. The linkage between AP sequence divergence, subcellular localization, and ecological niche differentiation requires rigorous experimental verification, and this study now provides a framework for such a future effort

  1. Plant invasions--the role of mutualisms.

    PubMed

    Richardson, D M; Allsopp, N; D'Antonio, C M; Milton, S J; Rejmánek, M

    2000-02-01

    Many introduced plant species rely on mutualisms in their new habitats to overcome barriers to establishment and to become naturalized and, in some cases, invasive. Mutualisms involving animal-mediated pollination and seed dispersal, and symbioses between plant roots and microbiota often facilitate invasions. The spread of many alien plants, particularly woody ones, depends on pollinator mutualisms. Most alien plants are well served by generalist pollinators (insects and birds), and pollinator limitation does not appear to be a major barrier for the spread of introduced plants (special conditions relating to Ficus and orchids are described). Seeds of many of the most notorious plant invaders are dispersed by animals, mainly birds and mammals. Our review supports the view that tightly coevolved, plant-vertebrate seed dispersal systems are extremely rare. Vertebrate-dispersed plants are generally not limited reproductively by the lack of dispersers. Most mycorrhizal plants form associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi which, because of their low specificity, do not seem to play a major role in facilitating or hindering plant invasions (except possibly on remote islands such as the Galapagos which are poor in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi). The lack of symbionts has, however, been a major barrier for many ectomycorrhizal plants, notably for Pinus spp. in parts of the southern hemisphere. The roles of nitrogen-fixing associations between legumes and rhizobia and between actinorhizal plants and Frankia spp. in promoting or hindering invasions have been virtually ignored in the invasions literature. Symbionts required to induce nitrogen fixation in many plants are extremely widespread, but intentional introductions of symbionts have altered the invasibility of many, if not most, systems. Some of the world's worst invasive alien species only invaded after the introduction of symbionts. Mutualisms in the new environment sometimes re-unite the same species that form

  2. Syltodinium listii gen. et spec. nov., a marine ectoparasitic dinoflagellate on eggs of copepods and rotifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drebes, Gerhard

    1988-09-01

    Syltodinium listii is described as a new marine ectoparasitic dinoflagellate. In culture experiments the species was found feeding on eggs of planktonic copepods and rotifers. The dinospore penetrates the host by a peduncle, and transforms into a trophont by sucking out the egg contents phagotrophically. After detaching from the host, the mature trophont settles down to become a palmelloid multiplication stage. By repeated binary fission, up to 16 or 32 gymnodinoid, colourless dinospores are formed inside a gelatinous envelope. The parasite retains its dinoflagellate (monadoid) nature throughout its whole vegetative life cycle. Even during the trophic and multiplication phase the species remains latently motile. Despite some resemblance to Dissodinium, there are sufficient reasons for the establishment of the new genus Syltodinium.

  3. Modelling dinoflagellates as an approach to the seasonal forecasting of bioluminescence in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcinko, Charlotte L. J.; Martin, Adrian P.; Allen, John T.

    2014-11-01

    Bioluminescence within ocean surface waters is of significant interest because it can enhance the study of subsurface movement and organisms. Little is known about how bioluminescence potential (BPOT) varies spatially and temporally in the open ocean. However, light emitted from dinoflagellates often dominates the stimulated bioluminescence field. As a first step towards forecasting surface ocean bioluminescence in the open ocean, a simple ecological model is developed which simulates seasonal changes in dinoflagellate abundance. How forecasting seasonal changes in BPOT may be achieved through combining such a model with relationships derived from observations is discussed and an example is given. The study illustrates a potential new approach to forecasting BPOT through explicitly modelling the population dynamics of a prolific bioluminescent phylum. The model developed here offers a promising platform for the future operational forecasting of the broad temporal changes in bioluminescence within the North Atlantic. Such forecasting of seasonal patterns could provide valuable information for the targeting of scientific field campaigns.

  4. The Hidden Sexuality of Alexandrium Minutum: An Example of Overlooked Sex in Dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Rosa I.; Dapena, Carlos; Bravo, Isabel; Cuadrado, Angeles

    2015-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are haploid eukaryotic microalgae in which rapid proliferation causes dense blooms, with harmful health and economic effects to humans. The proliferation mode is mainly asexual, as the sexual cycle is believed to be rare and restricted to stressful environmental conditions. However, sexuality is key to explaining the recurrence of many dinoflagellate blooms because in many species the fate of the planktonic zygotes (planozygotes) is the formation of resistant cysts in the seabed (encystment). Nevertheless, recent research has shown that individually isolated planozygotes in the lab can enter other routes besides encystment, a behavior of which the relevance has not been explored at the population level. In this study, using imaging flow cytometry, cell sorting, and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH), we followed DNA content and nuclear changes in a population of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum that was induced to encystment. Our results first show that planozygotes behave like a population with an “encystment-independent” division cycle, which is light-controlled and follows the same Light:Dark (L:D) pattern as the cycle governing the haploid mitosis. Resting cyst formation was the fate of just a small fraction of the planozygotes formed and was restricted to a period of strongly limited nutrient conditions. The diploid-haploid turnover between L:D cycles was consistent with two-step meiosis. However, the diel and morphological division pattern of the planozygote division also suggests mitosis, which would imply that this species is not haplontic, as previously considered, but biphasic, because individuals could undergo mitotic divisions in both the sexual (diploid) and the asexual (haploid) phases. We also report incomplete genome duplication processes. Our work calls for a reconsideration of the dogma of rare sex in dinoflagellates. PMID:26599692

  5. Latest Quaternary palaeoceanographic change in the eastern North Atlantic based upon a dinoflagellate cyst event ecostratigraphy.

    PubMed

    Harland, Rex; Polovodova Asteman, Irina; Morley, Audrey; Morris, Angela; Harris, Anthony; Howe, John A

    2016-05-01

    The analyses of dinoflagellate cyst records, from the latest Quaternary sediments recovered from DSDP Core 610A taken on the Feni Ridge in the southern Rockall Trough, and part of core MD01-2461 on the continental margin of the Porcupine Seabight in the eastern North Atlantic Ocean, has provided evidence for significant oceanographic change encompassing the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and part of the Holocene. This together with other published records has led to a regional evaluation of oceanographic change in the eastern North Atlantic over the past 68 ka, based upon a distinctive dinoflagellate event ecostratigraphy. These changes reflect changes in the surface waters of the North Atlantic Current (NAC), and perhaps the deeper thermohaline Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), driving fundamental regime changes within the phytoplanktonic communities. Three distinctive dinoflagellate cyst associations based upon both factor and cluster analyses have been recognised. Associations characterised by Bitectatodinium tepikiense (between 61.1 ± 6.2 to 13.4 ± 1.1 ka BP), Nematosphaeropsis labyrinthus (between 10.5 ± 0.3 and 11.45 ± 0.8 ka. BP), and the cyst of Protoceratium reticulatum (between 8.5 ± 0.9 and 5.2 ± 1.3 ka. BP) indicate major change within the eastern North Atlantic oceanography. The transitions between these changes occur over a relatively short time span (c.1.5 ka), given our sampling resolution, and have the potential to be incorporated into an event stratigraphy through the latest Quaternary as recommended by the INTIMATE (INTegrating Ice core, MArine and TErrestrial records) group. The inclusion of a dinoflagellate cyst event stratigraphy would highlight changes within the phytoplankton of the North Atlantic Ocean as a fully glacial world changed to our present interglacial.

  6. A new polyether ladder compound produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis.

    PubMed

    Bourdelais, Andrea J; Jacocks, Henry M; Wright, Jeffrey L C; Bigwarfe, Paul M; Baden, Daniel G

    2005-01-01

    A new ladder-frame polyether compound containing five fused ether rings was isolated from laboratory cultures of the marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. This compound, named brevenal, and its dimethyl acetal derivative both competitively displace brevetoxin from its binding site in rat brain synaptosomes. Significantly, these compounds are also nontoxic to fish and antagonize the toxic effects of brevetoxins in fish. The structure and biological activity of brevenal, as well as the dimethyl acetal derivative, are described in this paper.

  7. Seasonal Changes of Bioluminescence in Photosynthetic and Heterotrophic Dinoflagellates at San Clemente Island

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    the northern Sargasso Sea : seasonal and vertical distribution. Mar. Biol. 104: 153- 164 Seasonal Changes of Bioluminescence in Photosynthetic and...bioluminescence in the northern Sargasso Sea . Mar. Biol. 113: 329-339 Bityukov, E.P., Rybasov, V.P., Shaida, V.G. (1967). Annual variations of the...geographically. Dinoflagellates are most abundant in coastal waters and inland seas and are less abundant in the open ocean (Colebrook and Robinson, 1965

  8. Hardware device binding and mutual authentication

    DOEpatents

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-03-04

    Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion by substitution may be achieved by including a cryptographic unit within a computing device for binding multiple hardware devices and mutually authenticating the devices. The cryptographic unit includes a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a binding PUF value. The cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF value during an enrollment phase and subsequent authentication phases. During a subsequent authentication phase, the cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF values of the multiple hardware devices to generate a challenge to send to the other device, and to verify a challenge received from the other device to mutually authenticate the hardware devices.

  9. Adaptations and selection of harmful and other dinoflagellate species in upwelling systems. 2. Motility and migratory behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smayda, T. J.

    2010-04-01

    The motility and migrational behaviour of upwelling dinoflagellates as adaptations for growth in upwelling systems is evaluated. Traits considered include hydrodynamic streamlining; chain formation; motility rates of single cells and chains; adaptations to turbulence; turbulence sensing; and migrational scattering to avoid turbulence, including its role in the maintenance of indigenous populations. Motility rates are compared to vertical mixing and upwelling rates. Diverse combinations of cell shape, size and motility rates characterize the dinoflagellate species selected for growth in physically energetic upwelling systems. Specific or unique combinations of cell shape, size, propulsion system and swimming rate are not evident. The traits are shared with dinoflagellates generally, and probably reflect their swim-based ecology. Experimental evidence - primarily from Alexandrium catenella - suggests upwelling dinoflagellates can sense turbulence leading to three distinct, but coherent, adaptive responses: chain formation (in such species); increased swimming speed (including non-chain-forming species); and the capacity to re-orient swimming trajectory in response to changes in turbulence, and at time-scales appropriate to survival and growth in the turbulence field being experienced. The added swimming power that dinoflagellates gain through chain formation does not appear to be a major requirement for their selection or success in upwelling systems. Only three of the 42 most prominent dinoflagellates that bloom in eastern boundary upwelling systems form chains, a representation far below expectations. Most chain-forming dinoflagellates are excluded from those upwelling systems. The role of temperature in this exclusion is evaluated. Field and experimental evidence suggests that strong turbulence would be required to overwhelm the swimming-based ecology of the upwelling dinoflagellates and deter their blooms. The Yamazaki-Kamykowski model demonstrating that the

  10. Mutual synchronization of weakly coupled gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rozental, R. M.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Sergeev, A. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Ginzburg, N. S.

    2015-09-15

    The processes of synchronization of two weakly coupled gyrotrons are studied within the framework of non-stationary equations with non-fixed longitudinal field structure. With the allowance for a small difference of the free oscillation frequencies of the gyrotrons, we found a certain range of parameters where mutual synchronization is possible while a high electronic efficiency is remained. It is also shown that synchronization regimes can be realized even under random fluctuations of the parameters of the electron beams.

  11. Three-Ship Mutual Interference Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1965-11-16

    increase beyond this event; the data before Event 500 do not show these effects. Short duration transmit-receive misalignment as observed aboard GARCIA , is...on BELKNAP and GARCIA have not been noted on McCLOY. ii 10 CONFIDENTIAL CONFIDENTIAL TRACOR, jNC - , S, Aig? Te~oS 3. CORRECTED SEA TEST LOG Complete...frequency band causing mutual influence. In this example, chart #1 shows BELKNAP and GARCIA influencing McCLOY at a higher frequency band. Sanborn

  12. Combating isolation: Building mutual mentoring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Anne J.

    2015-12-01

    Women physicists can often feel isolated at work. Support from a grant through the ADVANCE program of the National Science Foundation (U.S. government funding) created mutual mentoring networks aimed at combating isolation specifically for women faculty at undergraduate-only institutions. This paper will discuss the organization of one such network, what contributed to its success, some of the outcomes, and how it might be implemented in other contexts.

  13. Molecular approaches to the investigation of viable dinoflagellate cysts in natural sediments from estuarine environments.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Kathryn J; Craig Cary, S

    2005-01-01

    Molecular methods offer an efficient alternative to microscopic identification of dinoflagellate cysts in natural sediments. Unfortunately, amplification of DNA also detects the presence of dead cells and is not a reliable indication of cyst viability. Because mRNA transcripts are more labile than DNA, the presence of specific transcripts may be used as a proxy for cyst viability. Here, we evaluate mRNA detection capabilities for identification of viable cysts of the dinoflagellate, Pfiesteria piscicida, in natural sediment samples. We targeted transcripts for cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, cytochrome b (COB), and Tags 343 and 277, recently identified by serial analysis of gene expression. Expression was confirmed in laboratory cultures and compared with natural sediment samples. Three of the transcripts were detected in sediments by RT-PCR. The fourth transcript, for COB, was not detected in sediments, perhaps because of down-regulation of the gene in anoxic conditions. Our results suggest that methods targeting specific mRNA transcripts may be useful for detection of viable cysts in natural sediment samples. In addition, dinoflagellate cysts, which sustain extended periods of anoxia, may provide an important source of data for studies of anoxia tolerance by microbial eukaryotes.

  14. Climate anomalies generate an exceptional dinoflagellate bloom in San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.; Schraga, T.S.; Lopez, C.B.; Knowles, N.; Grover, Labiosa R.; Dugdale, R.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a large dinoflagellate bloom, unprecedented in nearly three decades of observation, that developed in San Francisco Bay (SFB) during September 2004. SFB is highly enriched in nutrients but has low summer-autumn algal biomass because wind stress and tidally induced bottom stress produce a well mixed and light-limited pelagic habitat. The bloom coincided with calm winds and record high air temperatures that stratified the water column and suppressed mixing long enough for motile dinoflagellates to grow and accumulate in surface waters. This event-scale climate pattern, produced by an upper-atmosphere high-pressure anomaly off the U.S. west coast, followed a summer of weak coastal upwelling and high dinoflagellate biomass in coastal waters that apparently seeded the SFB bloom. This event suggests that some red tides are responses to changes in local physical dynamics that are driven by large-scale atmospheric processes and operate over both the event scale of biomass growth and the antecedent seasonal scale that shapes the bloom community. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Spring bloom dinoflagellate cyst dynamics in three eastern sub-basins of the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sildever, Sirje; Kremp, Anke; Enke, Annely; Buschmann, Fred; Maljutenko, Ilja; Lips, Inga

    2017-04-01

    Dinoflagellate cyst abundance and species composition were investigated before, during and after the spring bloom in the Gulf of Finland, north-eastern Baltic Proper and Gulf of Riga in order to detect spatial and temporal dynamics. Transport of newly formed cysts by currents was modelled to explore the possible distance travelled by cysts before sedimentation. The cyst community of the spring bloom dinoflagellates was dominated by the cysts of Biecheleria baltica in all basins, despite its marginal value in the planktonic spring bloom community in the Gulf of Riga. Dinoflagellate cyst abundance in the surface sediments displayed temporal dynamics in all basins, however, this appeared to be also influenced by physical processes. The model simulation showed that newly formed cysts are transported around 10-30 km from the point of origin before deposited. The latter suggests that transport of resting stages in the water column significantly affects spatial cyst distribution in the sediments and thus needs to be considered in the interpretation of temporal biological productivity patterns of a water body from cyst proxies.

  16. The synthesis of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) by cultured, symbiotic dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    T Banaszak1 A; LaJeunesse; Trench

    2000-06-28

    We tested the hypothesis that there is a relation between phylotypes (phylogenetic types, as determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and partial sequence analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSUrDNA)) and the synthesis of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) by symbiotic dinoflagellates under the influence of ultraviolet radiation (UV-B/A) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). We exposed 27 isolates of symbiotic dinoflagellates simultaneously to UV-B/A and PAR, and subsequently determined the MAAs present in cell extracts and in the media. The algae used included 24 isolates of Symbiodinium spp. originating from jellyfishes, sea anemones, zoanthids, scleractinians, octocorals, and bivalves, and three others in the genera Gymnodinium, Gloeodinium and Amphidinium from a jellyfish, an hydrocoral and a flatworm, respectively. In this study, all of the phylotype A Symbiodinium spp. synthesized up to three identified MAAs. None of the 11 cultured phylotypes B and C Symbiodinium spp. synthesized MAAs. The three non-Symbiodinium symbionts also synthesized up to three MAAs. The results support a conclusion that phylotype A Symbiodinium spp. have a high predilection for the synthesis of MAAs, while phylotypes B and C do not. Synthesis of MAAs by symbiotic dinoflagellates in culture does not appear to relate directly to depths or to the UV exposure regimes from which the consortia were collected.

  17. Digital holographic microscopy reveals prey-induced changes in swimming behavior of predatory dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jian; Malkiel, Edwin; Katz, Joseph; Adolf, Jason; Belas, Robert; Place, Allen R

    2007-10-30

    The shallow depth of field of conventional microscopy hampers analyses of 3D swimming behavior of fast dinoflagellates, whose motility influences macroassemblages of these cells into often-observed dense "blooms." The present analysis of cinematic digital holographic microscopy data enables simultaneous tracking and characterization of swimming of thousands of cells within dense suspensions. We focus on Karlodinium veneficum and Pfiesteria piscicida, mixotrophic and heterotrophic dinoflagellates, respectively, and their preys. Nearest-neighbor distance analysis shows that predator and prey cells are randomly distributed relative to themselves, but, in mixed culture, each predator clusters around its respective prey. Both dinoflagellate species exhibit complex highly variable swimming behavior as characterized by radius and pitch of helical swimming trajectories and by translational and angular velocity. K. veneficum moves in both left- and right-hand helices, whereas P. piscicida swims only in right-hand helices. When presented with its prey (Storeatula major), the slower K. veneficum reduces its velocity, radius, and pitch but increases its angular velocity, changes that reduce its hydrodynamic signature while still scanning its environment as "a spinning antenna." Conversely, the faster P. piscicida increases its speed, radius, and angular velocity but slightly reduces its pitch when exposed to prey (Rhodomonas sp.), suggesting the preferred predation tactics of an "active hunter."

  18. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules Governing Facilities Used to Provide Commercial Mobile Radio Services § 90.165 Procedures for mutually exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed...

  19. Sequence comparisons via algorithmic mutual information

    SciTech Connect

    Milosavijevic, A.

    1994-12-31

    One of the main problems in DNA and protein sequence comparisons is to decide whether observed similarity of two sequences should be explained by their relatedness or by mere presence of some shared internal structure, e.g., shared internal tandem repeats. The standard methods that are based on statistics or classical information theory can be used to discover either internal structure or mutual sequence similarity, but cannot take into account both. Consequently, currently used methods for sequence comparison employ {open_quotes}masking{close_quotes} techniques that simply eliminate sequences that exhibit internal repetitive structure prior to sequence comparisons. The {open_quotes}masking{close_quotes} approach precludes discovery of homologous sequences of moderate or low complexity, which abound at both DNA and protein levels. As a solution to this problem, we propose a general method that is based on algorithmic information theory and minimal length encoding. We show that algorithmic mutual information factors out the sequence similarity that is due to shared internal structure and thus enables discovery of truly related sequences. We extend the recently developed algorithmic significance method to show that significance depends exponentially on algorithmic mutual information.

  20. Observations of Pluto-Charon mutual events

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, C.; Di Martino, M.; Ferreri, W.; Osservatorio Astronomico, Turin )

    1989-07-01

    As part of the planned 'Pluto-Charon Mutual Eclipse Season Campaign', one mutual event was observed at the ESO Observatory on July 10, 1986 and seven mutual events were observed at the Serra La Nave stellar station of Catania Astrophysical Observatory from April 29 to July 21, 1987. At ESO the measurements were performed at the 61-cm Bochum telescope equipped with a photon-counting system and U, B, V, filters; at Serra La Nave the Cassegrain focus of the 91-cm reflector was equipped with a photon-counting system and B and V filters. The observed light losses and contact times do not show relevant systematic deviations from the predicted ones. An examination of the behavior of the B and V light curves gives slight indications of a different slope of the B and V light loss of the same event for a superior or an inferior event, and shows that the superior events are shallower at wavelengths longer than B. 6 refs.

  1. Distribution of CpG Motifs in Upstream Gene Domains in a Reef Coral and Sea Anemone: Implications for Epigenetics in Cnidarians

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Adam G.; Hoadley, Kenneth D.; Warner, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Coral reefs are under assault from stressors including global warming, ocean acidification, and urbanization. Knowing how these factors impact the future fate of reefs requires delineating stress responses across ecological, organismal and cellular scales. Recent advances in coral reef biology have integrated molecular processes with ecological fitness and have identified putative suites of temperature acclimation genes in a Scleractinian coral Acropora hyacinthus. We wondered what unique characteristics of these genes determined their coordinate expression in response to temperature acclimation, and whether or not other corals and cnidarians would likewise possess these features. Here, we focus on cytosine methylation as an epigenetic DNA modification that is responsive to environmental stressors. We identify common conserved patterns of cytosine-guanosine dinucleotide (CpG) motif frequencies in upstream promoter domains of different functional gene groups in two cnidarian genomes: a coral (Acropora digitifera) and an anemone (Nematostella vectensis). Our analyses show that CpG motif frequencies are prominent in the promoter domains of functional genes associated with environmental adaptation, particularly those identified in A. hyacinthus. Densities of CpG sites in upstream promoter domains near the transcriptional start site (TSS) are 1.38x higher than genomic background levels upstream of -2000 bp from the TSS. The increase in CpG usage suggests selection to allow for DNA methylation events to occur more frequently within 1 kb of the TSS. In addition, observed shifts in CpG densities among functional groups of genes suggests a potential role for epigenetic DNA methylation within promoter domains to impact functional gene expression responses in A. digitifera and N. vectensis. Identifying promoter epigenetic sequence motifs among genes within specific functional groups establishes an approach to describe integrated cellular responses to environmental stress in

  2. Distribution of CpG Motifs in Upstream Gene Domains in a Reef Coral and Sea Anemone: Implications for Epigenetics in Cnidarians.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Adam G; Hoadley, Kenneth D; Warner, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Coral reefs are under assault from stressors including global warming, ocean acidification, and urbanization. Knowing how these factors impact the future fate of reefs requires delineating stress responses across ecological, organismal and cellular scales. Recent advances in coral reef biology have integrated molecular processes with ecological fitness and have identified putative suites of temperature acclimation genes in a Scleractinian coral Acropora hyacinthus. We wondered what unique characteristics of these genes determined their coordinate expression in response to temperature acclimation, and whether or not other corals and cnidarians would likewise possess these features. Here, we focus on cytosine methylation as an epigenetic DNA modification that is responsive to environmental stressors. We identify common conserved patterns of cytosine-guanosine dinucleotide (CpG) motif frequencies in upstream promoter domains of different functional gene groups in two cnidarian genomes: a coral (Acropora digitifera) and an anemone (Nematostella vectensis). Our analyses show that CpG motif frequencies are prominent in the promoter domains of functional genes associated with environmental adaptation, particularly those identified in A. hyacinthus. Densities of CpG sites in upstream promoter domains near the transcriptional start site (TSS) are 1.38x higher than genomic background levels upstream of -2000 bp from the TSS. The increase in CpG usage suggests selection to allow for DNA methylation events to occur more frequently within 1 kb of the TSS. In addition, observed shifts in CpG densities among functional groups of genes suggests a potential role for epigenetic DNA methylation within promoter domains to impact functional gene expression responses in A. digitifera and N. vectensis. Identifying promoter epigenetic sequence motifs among genes within specific functional groups establishes an approach to describe integrated cellular responses to environmental stress in

  3. In situ observation of harmful dinoflagellate bloom in the eastern coast of Kyushu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hisashi; Murakami, Hirishi; Miyamura, Kazuyoshi; Siawanto, Eko; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ishizaka, Joji

    2014-05-01

    Oita coast, where is in the eastern coast of Kyushu, Japan, is a richly fish aquaculture area. However, sometimes harmful algal blooms occur in this region, especially harmful dinoflagellates blooms, and cultured fish mortality occurs. Ocean color remote sensing is expected as a useful tool to reduce the financial damage of harmful algal blooms. However, ocean color data is low accuracy in the coastal region because colored dissolved organic matter and suspended solid are dominant. More optical data of harmful algal blooms are required because there are few data in harmful algal blooms. The field observation was conducted to understand the inherent optical property of harmful dinoflagellate bloom in the eastern coast of Oita prefecture on April and August 2013. Chlorophyll-a maximum (>24 mg m^-3) was observed in the subsurface layer on April 2013. The dominant phytoplankton species in this chlorophyll-a maximum layer was dinoflagellate Cochlodinium polykrikoides (>300 cells ml^-1) and early stage of the bloom was formed. Peak of the remote sensing reflectance was near 565nm due to strong phytoplankton absorption within 400 ~ 500 nm domain from the subsurface bloom layer. Moreover, high phytoplankton absorption coefficient was observed at the shorter wavelength (< 400nm). This strong absorption might be due to mycosporine-like amino acids, which absorb the UV (Kahru and Mitchell, 1998). And this subsurface C. polykrikoides bloom was detected by using dinoflagellate bloom detection algorithm, which is a simpler new satellite remote sensing-based harmful algal blooms detection method for JAXA's GCOM-C/SGLI (Siswanto et al., 2013). However, detection of the dinoflagellate Karenia mikimotoi bloom by using the algorithm on August 2013 was difficult as colored dissolved organic matter and detritus absorptions were high. Although the algorithm could detect the early stage of C. polycrikoides bloom, the algorithm improvement to detect the harmful algal blooms in the case II

  4. Novel insight into the role of heterotrophic dinoflagellates in the fate of crude oil in the sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeda, Rodrigo; Connelly, Tara L.; Buskey, Edward J.

    2014-12-01

    Although planktonic protozoans are likely to interact with dispersed crude oil after a spill, protozoan-mediated processes affecting crude oil pollution in the sea are still not well known. Here, we present the first evidence of ingestion and defecation of physically or chemically dispersed crude oil droplets (1-86 μm in diameter) by heterotrophic dinoflagellates, major components of marine planktonic food webs. At a crude oil concentration commonly found after an oil spill (1 μL L-1), the heterotrophic dinoflagellates Noctiluca scintillans and Gyrodinium spirale grew and ingested ~0.37 μg-oil μg-Cdino-1 d-1, which could represent ~17% to 100% of dispersed oil in surface waters when heterotrophic dinoflagellates are abundant or bloom. Egestion of faecal pellets containing crude oil by heterotrophic dinoflagellates could contribute to the sinking and flux of toxic petroleum hydrocarbons in coastal waters. Our study indicates that crude oil ingestion by heterotrophic dinoflagellates is a noteworthy route by which petroleum enters marine food webs and a previously overlooked biological process influencing the fate of crude oil in the sea after spills.

  5. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of a Toxin-Producing Dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella and Its Non-Toxic Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Shu-Fei; Lin, Lin; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    The dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria are two major kingdoms of life producing paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), a large group of neurotoxic alkaloids causing paralytic shellfish poisonings around the world. In contrast to the well elucidated PST biosynthetic genes in cyanobacteria, little is known about the dinoflagellates. This study compared transcriptome profiles of a toxin-producing dinoflagellate, Alexandrium catenella (ACHK-T), and its non-toxic mutant form (ACHK-NT) using RNA-seq. All clean reads were assembled de novo into a total of 113,674 unigenes, and 66,812 unigenes were annotated in the known databases. Out of them, 35 genes were found to express differentially between the two strains. The up-regulated genes in ACHK-NT were involved in photosynthesis, carbon fixation and amino acid metabolism processes, indicating that more carbon and energy were utilized for cell growth. Among the down-regulated genes, expression of a unigene assigned to the long isoform of sxtA, the initiator of toxin biosynthesis in cyanobacteria, was significantly depressed, suggesting that this long transcript of sxtA might be directly involved in toxin biosynthesis and its depression resulted in the loss of the ability to synthesize PSTs in ACHK-NT. In addition, 101 putative homologs of 12 cyanobacterial sxt genes were identified, and the sxtO and sxtZ genes were identified in dinoflagellates for the first time. The findings of this study should shed light on the biosynthesis of PSTs in the dinoflagellates. PMID:25421324

  6. Novel insight into the role of heterotrophic dinoflagellates in the fate of crude oil in the sea

    PubMed Central

    Almeda, Rodrigo; Connelly, Tara L.; Buskey, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Although planktonic protozoans are likely to interact with dispersed crude oil after a spill, protozoan-mediated processes affecting crude oil pollution in the sea are still not well known. Here, we present the first evidence of ingestion and defecation of physically or chemically dispersed crude oil droplets (1–86 μm in diameter) by heterotrophic dinoflagellates, major components of marine planktonic food webs. At a crude oil concentration commonly found after an oil spill (1 μL L−1), the heterotrophic dinoflagellates Noctiluca scintillans and Gyrodinium spirale grew and ingested ~0.37 μg-oil μg-Cdino−1 d−1, which could represent ~17% to 100% of dispersed oil in surface waters when heterotrophic dinoflagellates are abundant or bloom. Egestion of faecal pellets containing crude oil by heterotrophic dinoflagellates could contribute to the sinking and flux of toxic petroleum hydrocarbons in coastal waters. Our study indicates that crude oil ingestion by heterotrophic dinoflagellates is a noteworthy route by which petroleum enters marine food webs and a previously overlooked biological process influencing the fate of crude oil in the sea after spills. PMID:25523528

  7. Novel insight into the role of heterotrophic dinoflagellates in the fate of crude oil in the sea.

    PubMed

    Almeda, Rodrigo; Connelly, Tara L; Buskey, Edward J

    2014-12-19

    Although planktonic protozoans are likely to interact with dispersed crude oil after a spill, protozoan-mediated processes affecting crude oil pollution in the sea are still not well known. Here, we present the first evidence of ingestion and defecation of physically or chemically dispersed crude oil droplets (1-86 μm in diameter) by heterotrophic dinoflagellates, major components of marine planktonic food webs. At a crude oil concentration commonly found after an oil spill (1 μL L(-1)), the heterotrophic dinoflagellates Noctiluca scintillans and Gyrodinium spirale grew and ingested ~0.37 μg-oil μg-C(dino)(-1) d(-1), which could represent ~17% to 100% of dispersed oil in surface waters when heterotrophic dinoflagellates are abundant or bloom. Egestion of faecal pellets containing crude oil by heterotrophic dinoflagellates could contribute to the sinking and flux of toxic petroleum hydrocarbons in coastal waters. Our study indicates that crude oil ingestion by heterotrophic dinoflagellates is a noteworthy route by which petroleum enters marine food webs and a previously overlooked biological process influencing the fate of crude oil in the sea after spills.

  8. Identity theory and personality theory: mutual relevance.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Sheldon

    2007-12-01

    Some personality psychologists have found a structural symbolic interactionist frame and identity theory relevant to their work. This frame and theory, developed in sociology, are first reviewed. Emphasized in the review are a multiple identity conception of self, identities as internalized expectations derived from roles embedded in organized networks of social interaction, and a view of social structures as facilitators in bringing people into networks or constraints in keeping them out, subsequently, attention turns to a discussion of the mutual relevance of structural symbolic interactionism/identity theory and personality theory, looking to extensions of the current literature on these topics.

  9. Creating a culture of mutual respect.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Kathryn; Mestel, Pamela; Feldman, David L

    2010-04-01

    The Joint Commission mandates that hospitals seeking accreditation have a process to define and address disruptive behavior. Leaders at Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, took the initiative to create a code of mutual respect that not only requires respectful behavior, but also encourages sensitivity and awareness to the causes of frustration that often lead to inappropriate behavior. Steps to implementing the code included selecting code advocates, setting up a system for mediating disputes, tracking and addressing operational system issues, providing training for personnel, developing a formal accountability process, and measuring the results.

  10. Generalized mutual information of quantum critical chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz, F. C.; Rajabpour, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    We study the generalized mutual information I˜n of the ground state of different critical quantum chains. The generalized mutual information definition that we use is based on the well established concept of the Rényi divergence. We calculate this quantity numerically for several distinct quantum chains having either discrete Z (Q ) symmetries (Q -state Potts model with Q =2 ,3 ,4 and Z (Q ) parafermionic models with Q =5 ,6 ,7 ,8 and also Ashkin-Teller model with different anisotropies) or the U (1 ) continuous symmetries (Klein-Gordon field theory, X X Z and spin-1 Fateev-Zamolodchikov quantum chains with different anisotropies). For the spin chains these calculations were done by expressing the ground-state wave functions in two special bases. Our results indicate some general behavior for particular ranges of values of the parameter n that defines I˜n. For a system, with total size L and subsystem sizes ℓ and L -ℓ , the I˜n has a logarithmic leading behavior given by c/˜n4 log[L/π sin(π/ℓ L ) ] where the coefficient c˜n is linearly dependent on the central charge c of the underlying conformal field theory describing the system's critical properties.

  11. A dual-species co-cultivation system to study the interactions between Roseobacters and dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Tomasch, Jürgen; Jarek, Michael; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Some microalgae in nature live in symbiosis with microorganisms that can enhance or inhibit growth, thus influencing the dynamics of phytoplankton blooms. In spite of the great ecological importance of these interactions, very few defined laboratory systems are available to study them in detail. Here we present a co-cultivation system consisting of the toxic phototrophic dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum and the photoheterotrophic alphaproteobacterium Dinoroseobacter shibae. In a mineral medium lacking a carbon source, vitamins for the bacterium and the essential vitamin B12 for the dinoflagellate, growth dynamics reproducibly went from a mutualistic phase, where both algae and bacteria grow, to a pathogenic phase, where the algae are killed by the bacteria. The data show a “Jekyll and Hyde” lifestyle that had been proposed but not previously demonstrated. We used RNAseq and microarray analysis to determine which genes of D. shibae are transcribed and differentially expressed in a light dependent way at an early time-point of the co-culture when the bacterium grows very slowly. Enrichment of bacterial mRNA for transcriptome analysis was optimized, but none of the available methods proved capable of removing dinoflagellate ribosomal RNA completely. RNAseq showed that a phasin encoding gene (phaP1) which is part of the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) metabolism operon represented approximately 10% of all transcripts. Five genes for aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis were down-regulated in the light, indicating that the photosynthesis apparatus was functional. A betaine-choline-carnitine-transporter (BCCT) that may be used for dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) uptake was the highest up-regulated gene in the light. The data suggest that at this early mutualistic phase of the symbiosis, PHA degradation might be the main carbon and energy source of D. shibae, supplemented in the light by degradation of DMSP and aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis. PMID:25009539

  12. RNA Sequencing Revealed Numerous Polyketide Synthase Genes in the Harmful Dinoflagellate Karenia mikimotoi

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Kei; Okuda, Shujiro; Nakayama, Kei; Shikata, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Fumio; Yamaguchi, Haruo; Skamoto, Setsuko; Yamaguchi, Mineo; Tomaru, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The dinoflagellate Karenia mikimotoi forms blooms in the coastal waters of temperate regions and occasionally causes massive fish and invertebrate mortality. This study aimed to elucidate the toxic effect of K. mikimotoi on marine organisms by using the genomics approach; RNA-sequence libraries were constructed, and data were analyzed to identify toxin-related genes. Next-generation sequencing produced 153,406 transcript contigs from the axenic culture of K. mikimotoi. BLASTX analysis against all assembled contigs revealed that 208 contigs were polyketide synthase (PKS) sequences. Thus, K. mikimotoi was thought to have several genes encoding PKS metabolites and to likely produce toxin-like polyketide molecules. Of all the sequences, approximately 30 encoded eight PKS genes, which were remarkably similar to those of Karenia brevis. Our phylogenetic analyses showed that these genes belonged to a new group of PKS type-I genes. Phylogenetic and active domain analyses showed that the amino acid sequence of four among eight Karenia PKS genes was not similar to any of the reported PKS genes. These PKS genes might possibly be associated with the synthesis of polyketide toxins produced by Karenia species. Further, a homology search revealed 10 contigs that were similar to a toxin gene responsible for the synthesis of saxitoxin (sxtA) in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense. These contigs encoded A1–A3 domains of sxtA genes. Thus, this study identified some transcripts in K. mikimotoi that might be associated with several putative toxin-related genes. The findings of this study might help understand the mechanism of toxicity of K. mikimotoi and other dinoflagellates. PMID:26561394

  13. Unarmoured dinoflagellates with a small hyposome: Torodinium and Lebouridinium gen. nov. for Katodinium glaucum (Gymnodiniales, Dinophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Fernando; Takayama, Haruyoshi; Moreira, David; López-García, Purificación

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the morphology and evolutionary relationships of Torodinium spp. and Katodinium glaucum, unarmoured dinoflagellates characterized by a small hyposome. An emended generic description of Torodinium was proposed based on light and scanning electron microscopy. Torodinium exhibited a unique combination of morphological features including a minute hyposome, a long episome with longitudinal ribs and a canal of unknown function on the dextro-lateral side. Unlike any known dinoflagellate both cingulum and sulcus extended in the episome. The apex surface showed ribs that converged in a bill-like projection. The shape of the apical groove was a circular spiral that extended around the apex running in 2.5 turns in an anticlockwise direction. The type species T. teredo was usually longer than T. robustum. The longitudinal outline of T. teredo was linear, with almost parallel margins, a circular transversal section, a relatively large hyposome and a conspicuous bill-like projection. The longitudinal outline of T. robustum was oblong, widened in the middle, with an ellipsoidal transversal section, a small hyposome and a less prominent bill-like projection. Several morphological features of Katodinium glaucum (=Gyrodinium glaucum) resembled Gyrodinium, such as the cingular displacement, longitudinal ribs, trichocysts, rod-shaped and refractile bodies and a capsule that surrounded the spherical nucleus. Distinctive features of K. glaucum were the horseshoeshaped apical groove under a tongue-shaped notch pointed towards the dorsal side, and a bifurcated proximal end of the cingulum. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Torodinium spp. and K. glaucum formed two independent lineages with no close relationships with other known dinoflagellates. The morphology of K. glaucum was distant from the type species of Katodinium. We propose the new genus and combination Lebouridinium glaucum gen. nov., comb. nov. for the species Katodinium glaucum. PMID:27284214

  14. Dinoflagellate tandem array gene transcripts are highly conserved and not polycistronic

    PubMed Central

    Beauchemin, Mathieu; Roy, Sougata; Daoust, Philippe; Dagenais-Bellefeuille, Steve; Bertomeu, Thierry; Letourneau, Louis; Lang, B. Franz; Morse, David

    2012-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are an important component of the marine biota, but a large genome with high–copy number (up to 5,000) tandem gene arrays has made genomic sequencing problematic. More importantly, little is known about the expression and conservation of these unusual gene arrays. We assembled de novo a gene catalog of 74,655 contigs for the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum from RNA-Seq (Illumina) reads. The catalog contains 93% of a Lingulodinium EST dataset deposited in GenBank and 94% of the enzymes in 16 primary metabolic KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathways, indicating it is a good representation of the transcriptome. Analysis of the catalog shows a marked underrepresentation of DNA-binding proteins and DNA-binding domains compared with other algae. Despite this, we found no evidence to support the proposal of polycistronic transcription, including a marked underrepresentation of sequences corresponding to the intergenic spacers of two tandem array genes. We also have used RNA-Seq to assess the degree of sequence conservation in tandem array genes and found their transcripts to be highly conserved. Interestingly, some of the sequences in the catalog have only bacterial homologs and are potential candidates for horizontal gene transfer. These presumably were transferred as single-copy genes, and because they are now all GC-rich, any derived from AT-rich contexts must have experienced extensive mutation. Our study not only has provided the most complete dinoflagellate gene catalog known to date, it has also exploited RNA-Seq to address fundamental issues in basic transcription mechanisms and sequence conservation in these algae. PMID:23019363

  15. Evolution of dinoflagellate unigenic minicircles and the partially concerted divergence of their putative replicon origins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoduo; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Green, Beverley R

    2002-04-01

    Dinoflagellate chloroplast genes are unique in that each gene is on a separate minicircular chromosome. To understand the origin and evolution of this exceptional genomic organization we completely sequenced chloroplast psbA and 23S rRNA gene minicircles from four dinoflagellates: three closely related Heterocapsa species (H. pygmaea, H. rotundata, and H. niei) and the very distantly related Amphidinium carterae. We also completely sequenced a Protoceratium reticulatum minicircle with a 23S rRNA gene of novel structure. Comparison of these minicircles with those previously sequenced from H. triquetra and A. operculatum shows that in addition to the single gene all have noncoding regions of approximately a kilobase, which are likely to include a replication origin, promoter, and perhaps segregation sequences. The noncoding regions always have a high potential for folding into hairpins and loops. In all six dinoflagellate strains for which multiple minicircles are fully sequenced, parts of the noncoding regions, designated cores, are almost identical between the psbA and 23S rRNA minicircles, but the remainder is very different. There are two, three, or four cores per circle, sometimes highly related in sequence, but no sequence identity is detectable between cores of different species, even within one genus. This contrast between very high core conservation within a species, but none among species, indicates that cores are diverging relatively rapidly in a concerted manner. This is the first well-established case of concerted evolution of noncoding regions on numerous separate chromosomes. It differs from concerted evolution among tandemly repeated spacers between rRNA genes, and that of inverted repeats in plant chloroplast genomes, in involving only the noncoding DNA cores. We present two models for the origin of chloroplast gene minicircles in dinoflagellates from a typical ancestral multigenic chloroplast genome. Both involve substantial genomic reduction and

  16. Grazing of heterotrophic dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans (Mcartney) Kofoid on Gymnodinium catenatum Graham.

    PubMed

    Alonso Rodríguez, Rosalba; Ochoa, José Luis; Uribe Alcocer, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    A dinoflagellate bloom ("red tide" event) dominated by the toxic Gymnodinium catenatum Graham (Gymnodiniales, Dinophyceae; 99.7%) and the noxious Noctiluca scintillans (Mcartney) Kofoid (Noctilucaceae, Dinophyceae; 0.3%) was observed in Bahia de Mazatlán Bay, México, on 24-26 January 2000. Photographic and microscopic analysis of samples during such an event, allowed us to collect evidence of a marked The particularity of grazing of G. catrenatum by by N. scintillans cells, suggesting a mechanism of "biocontrol" between these species that may contribute to attenuate a potentially toxic phenomenon under natural conditions.

  17. Eutrophication signals in the sedimentary record of dinoflagellate cysts in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, Barrie

    2009-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the current status of eutrophication signals from the sedimentary records of dinoflagellate cysts in coastal waters, particularly of NW Europe. There is a dearth of the multi-decadal time series data from plankton needed to document eutrophication, and the cysts may provide an alternative source of information. Two different eutrophication signals have been described so far from cyst records: 1) from the Oslofjord, comprising a marked increase in total cyst concentrations (interpreted as probably reflecting increased phytoplankton productivity), with Lingulodinium polyedrum cysts accounting for most of the increase (interpreted as a species particularly benefiting from added nutrients from cultural eutrophication in late summer when nutrients otherwise may be limiting); and 2) the heterotroph signal, from several other Norwegian fjords and Tokyo Bay, Japan, involving both cases of increased cyst concentrations and others with no particular increase, but with a marked proportional increase in cysts of heterotrophic species (interpreted as reflecting increased diatoms and possibly other prey for the heterotrophic dinoflagellates and/or more unfavourable conditions for autotrophs, e.g. from shading). These signals should be used critically, and there is a particular need to distinguish between eutrophication signals and climate signals that may be co-occurring at a given time. Work by various authors has generally supported the concept of these cyst-based signals since they were first published, including both further records from cored sediments from other parts of the world and studies relating cyst distributions in surface sediments to gradients of pollution and nutrients from sewage discharge. Recent, unpublished work by Dale and Sætre, linked cyst signals in cored sediments to the timing of collapse of local fisheries at different times within the past fifty years in four fjord systems along the Norwegian Skagerrak coast

  18. Production of a reference transcriptome and transcriptomic database (EdwardsiellaBase) for the lined sea anemone, Edwardsiella lineata, a parasitic cnidarian

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The lined sea anemone Edwardsiella lineata is an informative model system for evolutionary-developmental studies of parasitism. In this species, it is possible to compare alternate developmental pathways leading from a larva to either a free-living polyp or a vermiform parasite that inhabits the mesoglea of a ctenophore host. Additionally, E. lineata is confamilial with the model cnidarian Nematostella vectensis, providing an opportunity for comparative genomic, molecular and organismal studies. Description We generated a reference transcriptome for E. lineata via high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated from five developmental stages (parasite; parasite-to-larva transition; larva; larva-to-adult transition; adult). The transcriptome comprises 90,440 contigs assembled from >15 billion nucleotides of DNA sequence. Using a molecular clock approach, we estimated the divergence between E. lineata and N. vectensis at 215–364 million years ago. Based on gene ontology and metabolic pathway analyses and gene family surveys (bHLH-PAS, deiodinases, Fox genes, LIM homeodomains, minicollagens, nuclear receptors, Sox genes, and Wnts), the transcriptome of E. lineata is comparable in depth and completeness to N. vectensis. Analyses of protein motifs and revealed extensive conservation between the proteins of these two edwardsiid anemones, although we show the NF-κB protein of E. lineata reflects the ancestral structure, while the NF-κB protein of N. vectensis has undergone a split that separates the DNA-binding domain from the inhibitory domain. All contigs have been deposited in a public database (EdwardsiellaBase), where they may be searched according to contig ID, gene ontology, protein family motif (Pfam), enzyme commission number, and BLAST. The alignment of the raw reads to the contigs can also be visualized via JBrowse. Conclusions The transcriptomic data and database described here provide a platform for studying the evolutionary developmental genomics

  19. Mutual information-based facial expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazar, Mliki; Hammami, Mohamed; Hanêne, Ben-Abdallah

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces a novel low-computation discriminative regions representation for expression analysis task. The proposed approach relies on interesting studies in psychology which show that most of the descriptive and responsible regions for facial expression are located around some face parts. The contributions of this work lie in the proposition of new approach which supports automatic facial expression recognition based on automatic regions selection. The regions selection step aims to select the descriptive regions responsible or facial expression and was performed using Mutual Information (MI) technique. For facial feature extraction, we have applied Local Binary Patterns Pattern (LBP) on Gradient image to encode salient micro-patterns of facial expressions. Experimental studies have shown that using discriminative regions provide better results than using the whole face regions whilst reducing features vector dimension.

  20. Concurrent behavior: Are the interpretations mutually exclusive?

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, David O.

    1982-01-01

    The experimental literature is replete with examples of behavior which occur concurrently with a schedule of reinforcement. These concurrent behaviors, often with similar topographies and occurring under like circumstances, may be interpreted as functionally autonomous, collateral, adjunctive, superstitious or mediating behavior. The degree to which the interaction of concurrent and schedule controlled behavior is used in the interpretation of behavior illustrated the importance of distinguishing among these interpretations by experimental procedure. The present paper reviews the characteristics of these interpretations, and discusses the experimental procedures necessary to distinguish among them. The paper concludes that the interpretations are mutually exclusive and refer to distinct behaviors, but that the distinction between any two of the interpretations requires more than one experimental procedure. PMID:22478568

  1. Mutually-antagonistic interactions in baseball networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2010-03-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the networks and examine their sensitivity to baseball’s rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to (1) compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions and (2) include information about which particular players a given player has faced. We find that a player’s position in the network does not correlate with his placement in the random walker ranking. However, network position does have a substantial effect on the robustness of ranking placement to changes in head-to-head matchups.

  2. Propagating Resource Constraints Using Mutual Exclusion Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy; Sanchez, Romeo; Do, Minh B.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the most recent techniques for propagating resource constraints in Constraint Based scheduling is Energy Constraint. This technique focuses in precedence based scheduling, where precedence relations are taken into account rather than the absolute position of activities. Although, this particular technique proved to be efficient on discrete unary resources, it provides only loose bounds for jobs using discrete multi-capacity resources. In this paper we show how mutual exclusion reasoning can be used to propagate time bounds for activities using discrete resources. We show that our technique based on critical path analysis and mutex reasoning is just as effective on unary resources, and also shows that it is more effective on multi-capacity resources, through both examples and empirical study.

  3. On the Mutual Coupling Between Circular Resonant Slots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abou-Khousa, M. A.; Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.

    2007-01-01

    For near- and far-field microwave imaging purposes, array of circular resonant slots can be utilized to sample the electric field at a given reference plane. In general, the sensitivity of such array probes is impaired by the mutual coupling present between the radiating elements. The mutual coupling problem poses a design tradeoff between the resolution of the array and its sensitivity. In this paper, we investigate the mutual coupling between circular resonant slots in conducting ground plane both numerically and experimentally. Based on the analysis of the dominant coupling mechanism, i.e., the surface currents, various remedies to reduce the slots' mutual coupling are proposed and verified.

  4. On the Mutual Coupling between Circular Resonant Slots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abou-Khousa, M. A.; Kharkovshy, S.; Zoughi, R.

    2007-01-01

    For near- and far-field microwave imaging purposes, array of circular resonant slots can be utilized to sample the electric field at a given reference plane. In general, the sensitivity of such an array is impaired by the existing mutual coupling between the radiating elements or in this case circular slots. The mutual coupling problem imposes a design tradeoff between the resolution of the array and the overall system sensitivity and dynamic range. In this paper, the mutual coupling between circular resonant slots in conducting ground plane is investigated both numerically and experimentally. In particular, the mutual coupling in the E- and H-plane configurations of two identical slots is studied.

  5. Quantitative estimation of Holocene surface salinity variation in the Black Sea using dinoflagellate cyst process length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Kenneth Neil; Bradley, Lee R.; Takano, Yoshihito; Mudie, Petra J.; Marret, Fabienne; Aksu, Ali E.; Hiscott, Richard N.; Verleye, Thomas J.; Mousing, Erik A.; Smyrnova, Ludmila L.; Bagheri, Siamak; Mansor, Mashhor; Pospelova, Vera; Matsuoka, Kazumi

    2012-04-01

    Reconstruction of salinity in the Holocene Black Sea has been an ongoing debate over the past four decades. Here we calibrate summer surface water salinity in the Black Sea, Sea of Azov and Caspian Sea with the process length of the dinoflagellate cyst Lingulodinium machaerophorum. We then apply this calibration to make a regional reconstruction of paleosalinity in the Black Sea, calculated by averaging out process length variation observed at four core sites from the Black Sea with high sedimentation rates and dated by multiple mollusk shell ages. Results show a very gradual change of salinity from ˜14 ± 0.91 psu around 9.9 cal ka BP to a minimum ˜12.3 ± 0.91 psu around 8.5 cal ka BP, reaching current salinities of ˜17.1 ± 0.91 psu around 4.1 cal ka BP. The resolution of our sampling is about 250 years, and it fails to reveal a catastrophic salinization event at ˜9.14 cal ka BP advocated by other researchers. The dinoflagellate cyst salinity-proxy does not record large Holocene salinity fluctuations, and after early Holocene freshening, it shows correspondence to the regional sea-level curve of Brückner et al. (2010) derived from Balabanov (2007).

  6. Edouard Chatton (1883-1947) and the dinoflagellate protists: concepts and models.

    PubMed

    Soyer-Gobillard, Marie-Odile

    2006-09-01

    Edouard Chatton contributed to our knowledge of single-celled protoctists, especially ciliates and dinoflagellates, free-living and/or symbiotic, in relation to the marine invertebrate animals in which they reside. More than the description of many new families, genera and species, and of their life cycles, he anticipated several major concepts of cell biology, including the fundamental difference between prokaryote and eukaryote protists, long time before the advent of electron microscopy. These concepts included: the reproductive ability of the kinetosome-centriole system; the homology of the kinetosome with the mitotic centriole of animal cells; and the different kinds of mitotic systems. Chatton trained more than thirty student collaborators, among them Andre Lwoff, who won the 1965 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Later, the great cell biologist Hans Ris and I completed Chatton's light microscopy descriptions on syndinian mitosis dinoflagellate. We had at our disposal sophisticated electron microscopes as well as biochemical and molecular techniques and thus succeeded in corroborating the correct interpretation by Chatton of chromosome structure and mitotic cytology.

  7. Concentration-dependent organization of DNA by the dinoflagellate histone-like protein HCc3

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yuk-Hang; Wong, Joseph T. Y.

    2007-01-01

    The liquid crystalline chromosomes of dinoflagellates are the alternative to the nucleosome-based organization of chromosomes in the eukaryotes. These nucleosome-less chromosomes have to devise novel ways to maintain active parts of the genome. The dinoflagellate histone-like protein HCc3 has significant sequence identity with the bacterial DNA-binding protein HU. HCc3 also has a secondary structure resembling HU in silico. We have examined HCc3 in its recombinant form. Experiments on DNA-cellulose revealed its DNA-binding activity is on the C-terminal domain. The N-terminal domain is responsible for intermolecular oligomerization as demonstrated by cross-linking studies. However, HCc3 could not complement Escherichia coli HU-deficient mutants, suggesting functional differences. In ligation assays, HCc3-induced DNA concatenation but not ring closure as the DNA-bending HU does. The basic HCc3 was an efficient DNA condensing agent, but it did not behave like an ordinary polycationic compound. HCc3 also induced specific structures with DNA in a concentration-dependent manner, as demonstrated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). At moderate concentration of HCc3, DNA bridging and bundling were observed; at high concentrations, the complexes were even more condensed. These results are consistent with a biophysical role for HCc3 in maintaining extended DNA loops at the periphery of liquid crystalline chromosomes. PMID:17412706

  8. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Cell Cycle of the Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum donghaiense (Dinophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Da-Zhi; Zhang, Ying-Jiao; Zhang, Shu-Fei; Lin, Lin; Hong, Hua-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are the major causative agents of harmful algal blooms in the coastal zone, which has resulted in adverse effects on the marine ecosystem and public health, and has become a global concern. Knowledge of cell cycle regulation in proliferating cells is essential for understanding bloom dynamics, and so this study compared the protein profiles of Prorocentrum donghaiense at different cell cycle phases and identified differentially expressed proteins using 2-D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. The results showed that the synchronized cells of P. donghaiense completed a cell cycle within 24 hours and cell division was phased with the diurnal cycle. Comparison of the protein profiles at four cell cycle phases (G1, S, early and late G2/M) showed that 53 protein spots altered significantly in abundance. Among them, 41 were identified to be involved in a variety of biological processes, e.g. cell cycle and division, RNA metabolism, protein and amino acid metabolism, energy and carbon metabolism, oxidation-reduction processes, and ABC transport. The periodic expression of these proteins was critical to maintain the proper order and function of the cell cycle. This study, to our knowledge, for the first time revealed the major biological processes occurring at different cell cycle phases which provided new insights into the mechanisms regulating the cell cycle and growth of dinoflagellates. PMID:23691081

  9. Recording High Resolution 3D Lagrangian Motions In Marine Dinoflagellates using Digital Holographic Microscopic Cinematography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, J.; Malkiel, E.; Katz, J.; Place, A. R.; Belas, R.

    2006-11-01

    Detailed data on swimming behavior and locomotion for dense population of dinoflagellates constitutes a key component to understanding cell migration, cell-cell interactions and predator-prey dynamics, all of which affect algae bloom dynamics. Due to the multi-dimensional nature of flagellated cell motions, spatial-temporal Lagrangian measurements of multiple cells in high concentration are very limited. Here we present detailed data on 3D Lagrangian motions for three marine dinoflagellates: Oxyrrhis marina, Karlodinium veneficum, and Pfiesteria piscicida, using digital holographic microscopic cinematography. The measurements are performed in a 5x5x25mm cuvette with cell densities varying from 50,000 ˜ 90,000 cells/ml. Approximately 200-500 cells are tracked simultaneously for 12s at 60fps in a sample volume of 1x1x5 mm at a spatial resolution of 0.4x0.4x2 μm. We fully resolve the longitudinal flagella (˜200nm) along with the Lagrangian trajectory of each organism. Species dependent swimming behavior are identified and categorized quantitatively by velocities, radii of curvature, and rotations of pitch. Statistics on locomotion, temporal & spatial scales, and diffusion rate show substantial differences between species. The scaling between turning radius and cell dimension can be explained by a distributed stokeslet model for a self-propelled body.

  10. Osmotic stress does not trigger brevetoxin production in the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis

    PubMed Central

    Sunda, William G.; Burleson, Cheska; Hardison, D. Ransom; Morey, Jeanine S.; Wang, Zhihong; Wolny, Jennifer; Corcoran, Alina A.; Flewelling, Leanne J.; Van Dolah, Frances M.

    2013-01-01

    With the global proliferation of toxic harmful algal bloom species, there is a need to identify the environmental and biological factors that regulate toxin production. One such species, Karenia brevis, forms nearly annual blooms that threaten coastal regions throughout the Gulf of Mexico. This dinoflagellate produces brevetoxins, which are potent neurotoxins that cause neurotoxic shellfish poisoning and respiratory illness in humans, as well as massive fish kills. A recent publication reported that a rapid decrease in salinity increased cellular toxin quotas in K. brevis and hypothesized that brevetoxins serve a role in osmoregulation. This finding implied that salinity shifts could significantly alter the toxic effects of blooms. We repeated the original experiments separately in three different laboratories and found no evidence for increased brevetoxin production in response to low-salinity stress in any of the eight K. brevis strains we tested, including three used in the original study. Thus, we find no support for an osmoregulatory function of brevetoxins. The original publication also stated that there was no known cellular function for brevetoxins. However, there is increasing evidence that brevetoxins promote survival of the dinoflagellates by deterring grazing by zooplankton. Whether they have other as-yet-unidentified cellular functions is currently unknown. PMID:23754363

  11. Axenic culture of the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria shumwayae in a semi-defined medium.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Hayley M; Burkholder, Joann M; Parrow, Matthew W

    2009-01-01

    A semi-defined, biphasic culture medium was developed that supported the axenic growth of three strains of the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria shumwayae. Maximum cell yields and division rates in the semi-defined medium ranged from 0.1 x 10(5) to 4.0 x 10(5) cells/ml and 0.5 to 1.7 divisions/day, respectively, and depended on the concentration of the major components in the medium as well as the P. shumwayae strain. The medium contained high concentrations of certain dissolved and particulate organic compounds, including amino acids and lipids. Pfiesteria shumwayae flagellated cells were attracted to insoluble lipids present in the medium and appeared to feed on the lipid particles, suggesting that phagocytosis may be required for growth in axenic culture. Development of a semi-defined medium represents significant progress toward a completely defined axenic culture medium and subsequent determination of the biochemical requirements of P. shumwayae, needed to advance understanding of the nutritional ecology of this species. Further, this medium provides an economical, simplified method for generating high cell densities of P. shumwayae in axenic culture that will facilitate controlled investigations on the physiology and biochemistry of this heterotrophic dinoflagellate.

  12. The case of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to the peculiar dinoflagellate plastid genome

    PubMed Central

    Mackiewicz, Paweł; Bodył, Andrzej; Moszczyński, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Organelle genomes lose their genes by transfer to host nuclear genomes, but only occasionally are enriched by foreign genes from other sources. In contrast to mitochondria, plastid genomes are especially resistant to such horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and thus every gene acquired in this way is notable. An exceptional case of HGT was recently recognized in the peculiar peridinin plastid genome of dinoflagellates, which is organized in plasmid-like minicircles. Genomic and phylogenetic analyses of Ceratium horridum and Pyrocystis lunula minicircles revealed four genes and one unannotated open reading frame that probably were gained from bacteria belonging to the Bacteroidetes. Such bacteria seem to be a good source of genes because close endosymbiotic associations between them and dinoflagellates have been observed. The HGT-acquired genes are involved in plastid functions characteristic of other photosynthetic eukaryotes, and their arrangement resembles bacterial operons. These studies indicate that the peridinin plastid genome, usually regarded as having resulted from reduction and fragmentation of a typical plastid genome derived from red algae, may have a chimeric origin that includes bacterial contributions. Potential contamination of the Ceratium and Pyrocystis plastid genomes by bacterial sequences and the controversial localization of their minicircles in the nucleus are also discussed. PMID:24195014

  13. Multi-gene analysis of Symbiodinium dinoflagellates: a perspective on rarity, symbiosis, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Pochon, Xavier; Putnam, Hollie M; Gates, Ruth D

    2014-01-01

    Symbiodinium, a large group of dinoflagellates, live in symbiosis with marine protists, invertebrate metazoans, and free-living in the environment. Symbiodinium are functionally variable and play critical energetic roles in symbiosis. Our knowledge of Symbiodinium has been historically constrained by the limited number of molecular markers available to study evolution in the genus. Here we compare six functional genes, representing three cellular compartments, in the nine known Symbiodinium lineages. Despite striking similarities among the single gene phylogenies from distinct organelles, none were evolutionarily identical. A fully concatenated reconstruction, however, yielded a well-resolved topology identical to the current benchmark nr28S gene. Evolutionary rates differed among cellular compartments and clades, a pattern largely driven by higher rates of evolution in the chloroplast genes of Symbiodinium clades D2 and I. The rapid rates of evolution observed amongst these relatively uncommon Symbiodinium lineages in the functionally critical chloroplast may translate into potential innovation for the symbiosis. The multi-gene analysis highlights the potential power of assessing genome-wide evolutionary patterns using recent advances in sequencing technology and emphasizes the importance of integrating ecological data with more comprehensive sampling of free-living and symbiotic Symbiodinium in assessing the evolutionary adaptation of this enigmatic dinoflagellate.

  14. Gonyaulax taylorii, a new yessotoxins-producer dinoflagellate species from Chilean waters.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Gonzalo; Uribe, Eduardo; Regueiro, Jorge; Blanco, Juan; Fraga, Santiago

    2016-09-01

    In summer 2009, during a survey in Bahía Mejillones, a dense bloom of a dinoflagellate from the genus Gonyaulax was detected, as well as the presence of yessotoxin. Phytoplankton samples were analyzed in detail by light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), revealing the presence of Gonyaulax taylorii. Morphological examination showed that the cells in the bloom fit in Gonyaulax jollifei Murray et Whitting sensu Dodge, subsequently classified as Gonyaulax taylorii by Carbonell-Moore. In this context, some inconsistencies have been found in regard to the holotype; the plate 1"' appears as two plates, 1‴ and 2‴, showing a suture that does not exist in Dodge's figure of G. jollifei, from where the holotype was drawn, nor within the samples collected. Therefore, this plate has been originally described erroneously as two plates named 1"' and 2"' instead of only one named 1‴. After this correction, this species has five instead of six postcingular plates. For this reason, the description of this species must be emended. Phytoplankton net samples were found to contain yessotoxin and homoyessotoxin, with concentrations below 1pgcell(-1). The present study identifies, therefore, the dinoflagellate G. taylorii as a new source of yessotoxins.

  15. THE NATURE AND PROCESSING OF RIBOSOMAL RIBONUCLEIC ACID IN A DINOFLAGELLATE

    PubMed Central

    Rae, Peter M. M.

    1970-01-01

    Certain features of the dinoflagellate nucleus suggest that it represents a primitive form of eukaryotic nucleus. For this reason, it was of interest to characterize dinoflagellate ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and its mode of synthesis to determine if it also deviated from typical eukaryotic patterns. Gyrodinium cohnii was chosen for this examination. Gyrodinium ribosomal RNA species are 16 and 25s as judged by their sedimentation velocities in isokinetic sucrose gradients. These values are typical of higher plants. In addition, the RNA cosedimented precisely with rRNA from the ciliate Tetrahymena. Nucleotide ratio analyses revealed a GMP + CMP content of 46% for both species of rRNA. The kinetics of incorporation of a radioactive precursor into ribosomal RNA have also been studied, and it seems likely that the maturation of rRNA starts with the synthesis of a 38s molecule. This serves as precursor to the 16s species, and, after a 27s intermediate, the 25s ribosomal component. The process is similar to that in other eukaryotes. The structure of the nucleolus has also been examined, and is seen to be typically eukaryotic. PMID:5459003

  16. Spatial distribution of the phytoplankton in the White Sea during atypical domination of dinoflagellates (July 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyash, L. V.; Zhitina, L. S.; Belevich, T. A.; Shevchenko, V. P.; Kravchishina, M. D.; Pantyulin, A. N.; Tolstikov, A. V.; Chultsova, A. L.

    2016-05-01

    The species composition and biomass of phytoplankton, concentrations of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and nutrients, and accompanying hydrophysical conditions have been studied in the White Sea on July 6-11, 2009. The temperature of the surface water layer was lower than the multiyear average in July. Dinoflagellates dominated in the entire studied area; this was not the typical event for July. We suggest that domination of dinoflagellates was caused by low water temperature, when the nutrient regeneration rate was insufficient to support diatom growth. The abundance of microalgae and the structure of the phytoplankton community depended on the water structure. Variations in the phytoplankton community structure were caused not by substitution of specific species but rather by variability of the abundance of a single species, Heterocapsa triquetra. The highest phytoplankton biomass has been recorded in weakly stratified waters, where tidal mixing supplied the income of inorganic nutrients. The income of nutrients to the photic layer was limited in the stratified waters of Dvina Bay during the summer low-water period, so the phytoplankton abundance was low. We suggest that the lens of surface desalinated water presumably originated from the outlet of the Dvina River was registered in the central part of the White Sea.

  17. Potential distribution of the invasive freshwater dinoflagellate Ceratium furcoides (Levander) Langhans (Dinophyta) in South America.

    PubMed

    Meichtry de Zaburlín, Norma; Vogler, Roberto E; Molina, María J; Llano, Víctor M

    2016-04-01

    Dinoflagellates of the genus Ceratium are predominantly found in marine environments, with a few species in inland waters. Over the last decades, the freshwater species Ceratium hirundinella and Ceratium furcoides have colonized and invaded several South American basins. The purpose of this study was to create a distribution model for the invasive dinoflagellate C. furcoides in South America in order to further investigate the basins at potential risk, as well as the environmental conditions that influence its expansion. This species is known to develop blooms due to its mobility, resistance to sedimentation, and optimized use of resources. Although nontoxic, blooms of the species cause many problems to both the natural ecosystems and water users. Potential distribution was predicted by using a maximum entropy algorithm (MaxEnt). Model was run with 101 occurrences obtained from the scientific literature, and climatic, hydrological and topographic variables. The developed model had a very good performance for the study area. The most susceptible areas identified were mainly concentrated in the basins between southeastern Brazil and northeastern Argentina. Besides already affected regions, new potentially suitable areas were identified in temperate regions of South America. The information generated here will be useful for authorities responsible for water and watershed management to monitor the spread of this species and address problems related to its establishment in new environments.

  18. Long-term dinoflagellate culture performance in a commercial photobioreactor: Amphidinium carterae case.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Grünewald, C; Bayliss, C; Fonlut, F; Chapuli, E

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the culture performance of a dinoflagellate in a commercial photobioreactor. The results obtained during this long-term experiment allow to confirm that Amphidinium carterae is a promising dinoflagellate that can be exploited successfully in closed systems, in semi-continuous mode in indoor and outdoor environments. The average results in an indoor 5cm light-path 320L photobioreactor were, in terms of specific growth rate (0.29d(-1)), duplication time (3.1d(-1)) and dry biomass productivity (78mgL(-1)d(-1)). Specific compounds production was found including ω3 and ω6 fatty acids and, pigments (Peridinin, β-carotene). These promising results, besides unique characteristics found during the exploitation period such as resistance to mechanical stress, self-control of contaminant organisms, and quick cells aggregation when the culture is not in turbulence conditions, makes A. carterae one of the new target species suitable for commercially exploitation on an industrial scale.

  19. Multi-gene analysis of Symbiodinium dinoflagellates: a perspective on rarity, symbiosis, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Hollie M.; Gates, Ruth D.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiodinium, a large group of dinoflagellates, live in symbiosis with marine protists, invertebrate metazoans, and free-living in the environment. Symbiodinium are functionally variable and play critical energetic roles in symbiosis. Our knowledge of Symbiodinium has been historically constrained by the limited number of molecular markers available to study evolution in the genus. Here we compare six functional genes, representing three cellular compartments, in the nine known Symbiodinium lineages. Despite striking similarities among the single gene phylogenies from distinct organelles, none were evolutionarily identical. A fully concatenated reconstruction, however, yielded a well-resolved topology identical to the current benchmark nr28S gene. Evolutionary rates differed among cellular compartments and clades, a pattern largely driven by higher rates of evolution in the chloroplast genes of Symbiodinium clades D2 and I. The rapid rates of evolution observed amongst these relatively uncommon Symbiodinium lineages in the functionally critical chloroplast may translate into potential innovation for the symbiosis. The multi-gene analysis highlights the potential power of assessing genome-wide evolutionary patterns using recent advances in sequencing technology and emphasizes the importance of integrating ecological data with more comprehensive sampling of free-living and symbiotic Symbiodinium in assessing the evolutionary adaptation of this enigmatic dinoflagellate. PMID:24883254

  20. The cnidarian origin of the proto-oncogenes NF-κB/STAT and WNT-like oncogenic pathway drives the ctenophores (Review).

    PubMed

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2015-10-01

    The cell survival pathways of the diploblastic early multicellular eukaryotic hosts contain and operate the molecular machinery resembling those of malignantly transformed individual cells of highly advanced multicellular hosts (including Homo). In the present review, the STAT/NF-κB pathway of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis is compared with that of human tumors (malignant lymphomas, including Reed-Sternberg cells) pointing out similarities, including possible viral initiation in both cases. In the ctenophore genome and proteome, β-catenin gains intranuclear advantages due to a physiologically weak destructive complex in the cytoplasm, and lack of natural inhibitors (the dickkopfs). Thus, a scenario similar to what tumor cells initiate and achieve is presented through several constitutive loss-of-function type mutations in the destructive complex and in the elimination of inhibitors. Vice versa, malignantly transformed individual cells of advanced multicellular hosts assume pheno-genotypic resemblance to cells of unicellular or early multicellular hosts, and presumably to their ancient predecessors, by returning to the semblance of immortality and to the resumption of the state of high degree of resistance to physicochemical insults. Human leukemogenic and oncogenic pathways are presented for comparisons. The supreme bioengineers RNA/DNA complex encoded both the malignantly transformed immortal cell and the human cerebral cortex. The former generates molecules for the immortality of cellular life in the Universe. The latter invents the inhibitors of the process in order to gain control over it.

  1. The cnidarian origin of the proto-oncogenes NF-κB/STAT and WNT-like oncogenic pathway drives the ctenophores (Review)

    PubMed Central

    SINKOVICS, JOSEPH G.

    2015-01-01

    The cell survival pathways of the diploblastic early multicellular eukaryotic hosts contain and operate the molecular machinery resembling those of malignantly transformed individual cells of highly advanced multicellular hosts (including Homo). In the present review, the STAT/NF-κB pathway of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis is compared with that of human tumors (malignant lymphomas, including Reed-Sternberg cells) pointing out similarities, including possible viral initiation in both cases. In the ctenophore genome and proteome, β-catenin gains intranuclear advantages due to a physiologically weak destructive complex in the cytoplasm, and lack of natural inhibitors (the Dickkopfs). Thus, a scenario similar to what tumor cells initiate and achieve is presented through several constitutive loss-of-function type mutations in the destructive complex and in the elimination of inhibitors. Vice versa, malignantly transformed individual cells of advanced multicellular hosts assume pheno-genotypic resemblance to cells of unicellular or early multicellular hosts, and presumably to their ancient predecessors, by returning to the semblance of immortality and to the resumption of the state of high degree of resistance to physicochemical insults. Human leukemogenic and oncogenic pathways are presented for comparisons. The supreme bioengineers RNA/DNA complex encoded both the malignantly transformed immortal cell and the human cerebral cortex. The former generates molecules for the immortality of cellular life in the Universe. The latter invents the inhibitors of the process in order to gain control over it. PMID:26239915

  2. Quantitative analysis of dinoflagellates and diatoms community via Miseq sequencing of actin gene and v9 region of 18S rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liliang; Sui, Zhenghong; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Miseq sequencing and data analysis for the actin gene and v9 region of 18S rDNA of 7 simulated samples consisting of different mixture of dinoflagellates and diatoms were carried out. Not all the species were detectable in all the 18S v9 samples, and sequence percent in all the v9 samples were not consistent with the corresponding cell percent which may suggest that 18S rDNA copy number in different cells of these species differed greatly which result in the large deviation of the amplification. And 18S rDNA amplification of the microalgae was prone to be contaminated by fungus. The amplification of actin gene all was from the dinoflagellates because of its targeted degenerate primers. All the actin sequences of dinoflagellates were detected in the act samples except act4, and sequence percentage of the dinoflagellates in the act samples was not completely consistent with the dinoflagellates percentage of cell samples, but with certain amplification deviations. Indexes of alpha diversity of actin gene sequencing may be better reflection of community structure, and beta diversity analysis could cluster the dinoflagellates samples with identical or similar composition together and was distinguishable with blooming simulating samples at the generic level. Hence, actin gene was more proper than rDNA as the molecular marker for the community analysis of the dinoflagellates. PMID:27721499

  3. Rapidly diverging evolution of an atypical alkaline phosphatase (PhoAaty) in marine phytoplankton: insights from dinoflagellate alkaline phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Wang, Lu; Shi, Xinguo; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is a key enzyme that enables marine phytoplankton to scavenge phosphorus (P) from dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) when inorganic phosphate is scarce in the ocean. Yet how the AP gene has evolved in phytoplankton, particularly dinoflagellates, is poorly understood. We sequenced full-length AP genes and corresponding complementary DNA (cDNA) from 15 strains (10 species), representing four classes of the core dinoflagellate lineage, Gymnodiniales, Prorocentrales, Suessiales, and Gonyaulacales. Dinoflagellate AP gene sequences exhibited high variability, containing variable introns, pseudogenes, single nucleotide polymorphisms and consequent variations in amino acid sequence, indicative of gene duplication events and consistent with the “birth-and-death” model of gene evolution. Further sequence comparison showed that dinoflagellate APs likely belong to an atypical type AP (PhoAaty), which shares conserved motifs with counterparts in marine bacteria, cyanobacteria, green algae, haptophytes, and stramenopiles. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that PhoAaty probably originated from an ancestral gene in bacteria and evolved divergently in marine phytoplankton. Because variations in AP amino acid sequences may lead to differential subcellular localization and potentially different metal ion requirements, the multiple types of APs in algae may have resulted from selection for diversifying strategies to utilize DOP in the P variable marine environment. PMID:26379645

  4. PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIP OF THE RED TIDE DINOFLAGELLATE GYMNODINIUM BREVE TO OTHER MEMBERS OF THE GENERA GYMNODINIUM AND GYRODINIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phylogenetic relationships between the red-tide dinoflagellate Gymnodinium breve and other members of the genera Gymnodinium and Gyrodinium have not been studied at the molecular level. G. breve is most noted for its production of brevetoxin, which has been linked to extensive f...

  5. Ecology of the red-tide dinoflagellate Ceratium furca: distribution, mixotrophy, and grazing impact on ciliate populations of Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Smalley, Gabriela W; Coats, D Wayne

    2002-01-01

    Ceratium furca is a primarily photosynthetic dinoflagellate also capable of ingesting other protists. During 1995 and 1996, we documented the abundance of C. furca in Chesapeake Bay and determined grazing rates on prey labeled with fluorescent microspheres. Abundance usually remained below 20 cells ml(-1), although the species was capable of localized late-summer blooms (< or = 478 cells ml(-1)) in the more saline lower to mid-Bay region. Feeding rates ranged from 0 to 0.11 prey dinoflagellate(-1) h(-1) or from 0 to 37 pg C dinoflagellate(-1) h(-1) and were highest at lower salinities. Clearance rates averaged 2.5 +/- 0.35 microl dinoflagellate(-1) h(-1). Impact of C. furca feeding on prey populations was higher in the lower Bay, averaging 67% of Strobilidium spp. removed d(-1). Ingestion rates were positively correlated with prey abundance and dissolved inorganic nitrogen, but negatively with salinity, depth, dissolved inorganic phosphorus, and inorganic P:N ratio. Daily consumption of prey biomass by C. furca averaged 4.6% of body carbon, 6.5% of body nitrogen, and 4.0% of body phosphorus. with maximal values of 36, 51, and 32%, respectively. Thus, the ability to exploit an organic nutrient source when inorganic nutrients are limiting may give C. furca a competitive advantage over purely photosynthetic species.

  6. Genome Sequence of Bacillus sp. Strain UMTAT18 Isolated from the Dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamiyavanichii Found in the Straits of Malacca

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Gan Han; Mohd Noor, Mohd Ezhar; Sung, Yeong Yik; Usup, Gires

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus sp. strain UMTAT18 was isolated from the harmful dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamiyavanichii. Its genome consists of 5,479,367 bp with 5,546 open reading frames, 102 tRNAs, and 29 rRNAs. Gene clusters for biosynthesis of nonribosomal peptides, bacteriocin, and lantipeptide were identified. It also contains siderophore and genes related to stress tolerance. PMID:27795265

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS INFLUENCING THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF DINOFLAGELLATE CYST ASSEMBLAGES IN SHALLOW LAGOONS IN SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface sediment samples from 24 sites within eleven back-barrier lagoons of Rhode Island and Massachusetts (USA) contain abundant (200-6000 cysts cm-3) and diverse (up to 40 taxa) dinoflagellate cyst assemblages. The lowest cyst concentrations and diversity are observed in lagoo...

  8. BIOCHEMISTRY OF DINOFLAGELLATE LIPIDS, WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO THE FATTY ACID AND STEROL COMPOSITION OF A KARENIA BREVIS BLOOM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leblond, Jeffrey D., Terence J. Evens and Peter J. Chapman. 2003. Biochemistry of Dinoflagellate Lipids, with Particular Reference to the Fatty Acid and Sterol Composition of a Karenia brevis Bloom. Phycologia. 42(4):324-331. (ERL,GB 1160).

    The harmful marine dinoflagella...

  9. BIO-OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE DINOFLAGELLATE GYMNODINIUM BREVE AND THE DIATOM THALASSIOSIRA WEISSFLOGII IN OUTDOOR TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bio-optical signatures of harmful algal blooms can be used to define ocean color satellite algorithms. We characterized the bio-optical properties of nutrient-replete cultures of the red tide dinoflagellate Gymnodinium breve and the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii. We cultur...

  10. CHEMOSENSORY ATTRACTION OF ZOOSPORES OF THE ESTUARINE DINOFLAGELLATES, PFIESTERIA PISCICIDA AND P. SHUMWAYAE, TO FINFISH MUCUS AND EXCRETA. (R825551)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxic strains of the estuarine dinoflagellates, Pfiesteria piscicida and P. shumwayae, can cause fish death and disease, whereas other estuarine `lookalike' species such as cryptoperidiniopsoids have not been ichthyotoxic under ecologically rel...

  11. DINOFLAGELLATE CYST RECORDS AND HUMAN DISTURBANCE IN TWO NEIGHBORING ESTUARIES, NEW BEDFORD HARBOR AND APPONAGANSETT BAY, MASSACHUSETTS, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The dinoflagellate cyst records in sediments from New Bedford Harbor and Apponagansett Bay demonstrate sensitivity to environmental change caused by human activity in the watersheds over the last 500 years. Changes in the species richness, as well as absolute and relative abundan...

  12. Dinoflagellate cyst production in Hudson Bay, the world's largest inland sea, based on monthly sediment trap data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkilä, Maija; Pospelova, Vera; Forest, Alexandre; Stern, Gary

    2014-05-01

    Phytoplankters, microscopic primary producers of oceans are capable of responding rapidly to environmental fluctuations due to their high cell replication rates. Fast phytoplankton growth maybe balanced out by equally fast consumption by herbivorous grazers. In high-latitude marine systems, seasonal fluctuations in plankton biomass are essentially linked to light regime controlled by the waxing and waning sea-ice cover. In addition, nutrient limitation in surface waters, seasonal temperature fluctuations and changes in freshwater inputs may play important roles. In cold-water seas, many planktonic organisms cope with seasonal harshness by the production of benthic dormant stages. Dinoflagellates are a diverse group of single-celled plankton, constituting major marine primary producers, as well as herbivorous grazers of the microbial loop. Many dinoflagellate species produce highly resistant, organic-walled resting cysts that are archived in sediments and have been increasingly used to reconstruct past environmental conditions, e.g., sea-surface temperature and salinity, productivity, sea-ice cover and eutrophication. Marine sediment core sequences are characterized by slow accumulation rates and high mixing rates: the top centimeter of surface sediment from an arctic shelf may correspond to several years or decades of deposition. Consequently, sedimentary archives do not give direct information on long-term changes in seasonal bloom patterns or cues of annually recurring life-cycle events. We used two particle-intercepting sediment traps moored in eastern and western Hudson Bay, respectively, to study monthly fluctuations in dinoflagellate cyst production from October 2005 to September 2006. The traps were deployed close to the seafloor and recovered during the ArcticNet annual expeditions onboard the CCGS Amundsen in 2005 and the CCGS Pierre Radisson in 2006. We document the seasonal succession of dinoflagellate cyst taxa, together with cyst species composition

  13. Higher Education and Foster Grandparent Programs: Exploring Mutual Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, James R.; O'Quin, Jo Ann

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight ways in which programs within institutions of higher education and Foster Grandparent Programs can interact to their mutual benefit. Given federal and state initiatives to develop linkages between institutions of higher education and community service sites, mutual benefits exist at the program level for…

  14. 76 FR 20459 - Mutual to Stock Conversion Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual to Stock Conversion Application AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual to Stock Conversion Application. OMB Number: 1550-0014. Form Numbers... furnished in the application in order to determine the safety and soundness of the proposed stock...

  15. 76 FR 35084 - Mutual to Stock Conversion Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual to Stock Conversion Application AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision... following information collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual to Stock Conversion Application. OMB Number... proposed stock conversion. The purpose of the information collection is to provide OTS with the...

  16. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules... exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed in... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for mutually exclusive...

  17. 47 CFR 22.131 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Licensing Requirements and Procedures Applications and Notifications § 22... procedures in this section for processing mutually exclusive applications in the Public Mobile Services... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for mutually exclusive...

  18. Mutuality, Self-Silencing, and Disordered Eating in College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler, Lisa S.; Riggs, Shelley A.; Stabb, Sally D.; Marshall, David M.

    2006-01-01

    The current study examined patterns of association among mutuality, self-silencing, and disordered eating in an ethnically diverse sample of college women (N = 149). Partner mutuality and overall self-silencing were negatively correlated and together were associated with six disordered eating indices. All four self-silencing subscales were…

  19. 7 CFR 550.13 - Mutuality of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mutuality of interest. 550.13 Section 550.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT.... Mutual interest exists when both parties benefit in the same qualitative way from the objectives of...

  20. 7 CFR 550.13 - Mutuality of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mutuality of interest. 550.13 Section 550.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT.... Mutual interest exists when both parties benefit in the same qualitative way from the objectives of...

  1. 7 CFR 550.13 - Mutuality of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mutuality of interest. 550.13 Section 550.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT.... Mutual interest exists when both parties benefit in the same qualitative way from the objectives of...

  2. 7 CFR 550.13 - Mutuality of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mutuality of interest. 550.13 Section 550.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT.... Mutual interest exists when both parties benefit in the same qualitative way from the objectives of...

  3. 7 CFR 550.13 - Mutuality of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mutuality of interest. 550.13 Section 550.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT.... Mutual interest exists when both parties benefit in the same qualitative way from the objectives of...

  4. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for mutually exclusive applications... filing dates) as acceptable for filing. (4) Window filing group. A window filing group comprises mutually exclusive applications whose filing date is within an announced filing window. An announced filing window...

  5. Economic game theory for mutualism and cooperation.

    PubMed

    Archetti, Marco; Scheuring, István; Hoffman, Moshe; Frederickson, Megan E; Pierce, Naomi E; Yu, Douglas W

    2011-12-01

    We review recent work at the interface of economic game theory and evolutionary biology that provides new insights into the evolution of partner choice, host sanctions, partner fidelity feedback and public goods. (1) The theory of games with asymmetrical information shows that the right incentives allow hosts to screen-out parasites and screen-in mutualists, explaining successful partner choice in the absence of signalling. Applications range from ant-plants to microbiomes. (2) Contract theory distinguishes two longstanding but weakly differentiated explanations of host response to defectors: host sanctions and partner fidelity feedback. Host traits that selectively punish misbehaving symbionts are parsimoniously interpreted as pre-adaptations. Yucca-moth and legume-rhizobia mutualisms are argued to be examples of partner fidelity feedback. (3) The theory of public goods shows that cooperation in multi-player interactions can evolve in the absence of assortment, in one-shot social dilemmas among non-kin. Applications include alarm calls in vertebrates and exoenzymes in microbes.

  6. Mutualism between tree shrews and pitcher plants

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Jonathan A; Chin, Lijin

    2010-01-01

    Three species of Nepenthes pitcher plants from Borneo engage in a mutualistic interaction with mountain tree shrews, the basis of which is the exchange of nutritional resources. The plants produce modified “toilet pitchers” that produce copious amounts of exudates, the latter serving as a food source for tree shrews. The exudates are only accessible to the tree shrews when they position their hindquarters over the pitcher orifice. Tree shrews mark valuable resources with feces and regularly defecate into the pitchers when they visit them to feed. Feces represent a valuable source of nitrogen for these Nepenthes species, but there are many facets of the mutualism that are yet to be investigated. These include, but are not limited to, seasonal variation in exudate production rates by the plants, behavioral ecology of visiting tree shrews and the mechanism by which the plants signal to tree shrews that their pitchers represent a food source. Further research into this extraordinary animal-plant interaction is required to gain a better understanding of the benefits to the participating species. PMID:20861680

  7. Observation of mutual neutralization in detached plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akira, Tonegawa; Isao, Shirota; Ken'ichi, Yoshida; Masataka, Ono; Kazutaka, Kawamura; Tuguhiro, Watanabe; Nobuyoshi, Ohyabu; Hajime, Suzuki; Kazuo, Takayama

    2001-10-01

    Mutual neutralization in collisions between negative ions and positive ions in molecular activated recombination (MAR) has been observed in a high density magnetized sheet plasma source TPDSHEET-IV(Test Plasma produced by Directed current for SHEET plasma) device. Measurements of the negative ion density of hydrogen atom, the electron density, electron temperature, and the heat load to the target plate were carried out in hydrogen high density plasma with hydrogen gas puff. A cylindrical probe made of tungsten ( 0.4 x 2 cm) was used to measure the spatial profiles of H- by a probe-assisted laser photodetachment The Balmer spectra of visible light emission from hydrogen or helium atoms were detected in front of the target plate. A small amount of secondary hydrogen gas puffing into a hydrogen plasma reduced strongly the heat flux to the target and increased rapidly the density of negative ions of hydrogen atom in the circumference of the plasma, while the conventional radiative and three-body recombination processes were disappeared. These results can be well explained by taking the charge exchange recombination of MAR in the detached plasma into account.

  8. Quantum mutual information along unitary orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jevtic, Sania; Jennings, David; Rudolph, Terry

    2012-05-01

    Motivated by thermodynamic considerations, we analyze the variation of the quantum mutual information on a unitary orbit of a bipartite system's state with and without global constraints such as energy conservation. We solve the full optimization problem for the smallest system of two qubits and explore thoroughly the effect of unitary operations on the space of reduced-state spectra. We then provide applications of these ideas to physical processes within closed quantum systems such as a generalized collision model approach to thermal equilibrium and a global Maxwell demon playing tricks on local observers. For higher dimensions, the maximization of correlations is relatively straightforward for equal-sized subsystems, however their minimization displays nontrivial structures. We characterize a set of separable states in which the minimally correlated state resides: a collection of classically correlated states admitting a particular “Young tableau” form. Furthermore, a partial order exists on this set with respect to individual marginal entropies, and the presence of a “see-saw effect” for these entropies forces a finer analysis to determine the optimal tableau.

  9. Heat-stress and light-stress induce different cellular pathologies in the symbiotic dinoflagellate during coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Downs, C A; McDougall, Kathleen E; Woodley, Cheryl M; Fauth, John E; Richmond, Robert H; Kushmaro, Ariel; Gibb, Stuart W; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex), usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy) of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C) under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m(-2) s(-1) PAR) at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response) were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching.

  10. Heat-Stress and Light-Stress Induce Different Cellular Pathologies in the Symbiotic Dinoflagellate during Coral Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Downs, C. A.; McDougall, Kathleen E.; Woodley, Cheryl M.; Fauth, John E.; Richmond, Robert H.; Kushmaro, Ariel; Gibb, Stuart W.; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K.; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex), usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy) of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C) under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m−2 s−1 PAR) at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response) were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching. PMID:24324575

  11. Quantified small-scale turbulence inhibits a red tide dinoflagellate, Gonyaulax polyedra Stein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, William H.; Gibson, Carl H.

    1990-10-01

    The development of marine dinoflagellate red tides off southern California requires optimal temperature and light regimes, a source of nutrients that may be supplied by wind-induced upwelling and upmixing, and vertical migration by cells to this source. Red tides occur after the winds decrease and the water becomes highly stratified with a shallow mixed layer. This implies low turbulence levels may be an additional requirement for red tide development. Because dinoflagellates with sizes about 35 μm are much smaller than the inertial-viscous, or Kolmogorov scales L κ ≡ (ν 3/ɛ) 1/4 = (ν/γ) 1/2 of oceanic turbulence, the important flow parameters are the viscous dissipation rate per unit mass ɛ (cm 2s -3 or ergs g -1s -1), the rate-of-strain γ ≡ (ɛ/ν) 1/2 ( rad s -1) , and the stress τ ≡ μγ (dyne cm -2), where ν is the kinematic viscosity and μ is the dynamic viscosity. In the present work we have cultured the red tide dinoflagellate, Gonyaulax polyedra Stein, under conditions of known ɛ, γ and τ. Growth was inhibited at ɛ values from 0.18 to 164 cm 2 s -3 (γ from 4.4 to 132 rad s -1) but not at 0.05 ( γ = 2.2) so the threshold stress τ for growth inhibition was 0.02-0.04 dyne cm -2 (0.002-0.004 Pa). This is in the expected range for light winds at the sea surface, suggesting small-scale scale turbulence is the reason higher winds inhibit red tides. Threshold turbulence levels are related to calculated surface levels at various wind speeds and to postulated subsurface euphotic zone levels under incipient red tide conditions. Motile cells in shear-inhibited cultures lost their ability to swim forward vigorously but rather spun in place due to the loss of longitudinal (trailing) flagella, observed microscopically, without loss of girdle flagella.

  12. Mutual Information Between GPS Measurements and Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Bebbington, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    Prior to the wide deployment of Continuous GPS stations in the early 1990s, there were a number of well-documented deformation rate changes observed before large earthquakes. GPS measurements provide the opportunity for systematic investigation of pre-, co- and post-seismic deformation anomalies, but contain much noise that needs to be filtered out of the observations. Assuming the existence of an earthquake cycle (for example, mainshock--aftershock--quiescence--precursory seismicity), a hidden Markov model (HMM) provides a natural framework for analyzing the observed GPS data. For two case studies of a) deep earthquakes in the central North Island, New Zealand, and b) shallow earthquakes in Southern California, an HMM fitted to the trend ranges of the GPS measurements can classify the deformation data into different patterns which form proxies for states of the earthquake cycle. Mutual information can be used to examine whether there is any relation between these patterns, in particular the Viterbi path, and subsequent (or previous) earthquakes. One class of GPS movements (identified by the HMM as having the largest range of deformation rate changes) appears to have some precursory character for earthquakes with minimum magnitude 5.1 (central North Island, New Zealand, 26 earthquakes in 1747 days) and 4.5 (Southern California, 50 earthquakes in 3815 days). We define a ``Time of Increased Probability'' (TIP) as being a 10-day interval (central North Island, New Zealand) or a 20-day interval (Southern California) following entry (as identified by the Viterbi algorithm) to the `precursory' hidden state, and examine the performance of this in probabilistically forecasting subsequent earthquakes.

  13. The protozoa dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina contains selenoproteins and the relevant translation apparatus.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Takashi; Beika, Asa; Hattori, Asuka; Kohno, Yoshinori; Kato, Koichi H; Mizutani, Takaharu

    2003-01-03

    In the phylogenetic tree, selenoproteins and the corresponding translation machinery are found in Archaea, Eubacteria, and animals, but not in fungi and higher plants. As very little is known about Protozoa, we searched for the presence of selenoproteins in the primitive dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina, belonging to the Protoctista kingdom. Four selenoproteins could be obtained from O. marina cells cultured in the presence of 75Se. Using O. marina or bovine liver cytosolic extracts, we could serylate and selenylate in vitro total O. marina tRNAs. Moreover, the existence of a tRNA(Sec) could be deduced from in vivo experiments. Lastly, an anti-serum against the specialized mammalian translation elongation factor mSelB reacted with a protein of 48-kDa molecular mass. Altogether, our data showed that O. marina contains selenoproteins and suggests that the corresponding translation machinery is related to that found in animals.

  14. Karmitoxin: An Amine-Containing Polyhydroxy-Polyene Toxin from the Marine Dinoflagellate Karlodinium armiger.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Silas Anselm; Binzer, Sofie Bjørnholt; Hoeck, Casper; Meier, Sebastian; de Medeiros, Livia Soman; Andersen, Nikolaj Gedsted; Place, Allen; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Hansen, Per Juel; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2017-04-05

    Marine algae from the genus Karlodinium are known to be involved in fish-killing events worldwide. Here we report for the first time the chemistry and bioactivity of a natural product from the newly described mixotrophic dinoflagellate Karlodinium armiger. Our work describes the isolation and structural characterization of a new polyhydroxy-polyene named karmitoxin. The structure elucidation work was facilitated by use of (13)C enrichment and high-field 2D NMR spectroscopy, where (1)H-(13)C long-range correlations turned out to be very informative. Karmitoxin is structurally related to amphidinols and karlotoxins; however it differs by containing the longest carbon-carbon backbone discovered for this class of compounds, as well as a primary amino group. Karmitoxin showed potent nanomolar cytotoxic activity in an RTgill-W1 cell assay as well as rapid immobilization and eventual mortality of the copepod Acartia tonsa, a natural grazer of K. armiger.

  15. A newly emerging toxic dinoflagellate, Pfiesteria piscicida: natural ecology and toxicosis to fish and other species.

    PubMed

    Faith, S A; Miller, C A

    2000-02-01

    Pfiesteria, a toxic dinoflagellate, recently has emerged as a cause of fish kills near the East Coast. Recent research into one species. Pfiesteria piscicida, has revealed a complex life cycle of at least 24 stages. Metamorphosis of one stage to another often depends on presence or absence of fish. Growth of P piscicida is promoted both directly and indirectly by nutrients such as inorganic phosphate and nitrate, as well as organic phosphate, and may be related to effluent-induced blooms. Sewage and agricultural runoff flowing into estuaries often provide these nutrients and may be correlated with the majority of fish kills in the Atlantic coastal region of the US (5). P piscicida is extremely toxic, with a low density capable of killing fish within 3 minutes (1,3,12). Fish exposed to sublethal doses of the toxin have prominent lesions. The syndrome leads to population level death losses and associated economic losses in local fisheries.

  16. Transcriptomic responses of the calanoid copepod Calanus finmarchicus to the saxitoxin producing dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C.; Lenz, Petra H.

    2016-05-01

    In the Gulf of Maine, the copepod Calanus finmarchicus co-occurs with the neurotoxin-producing dinoflagellate, Alexandrium fundyense. The copepod is resistant to this toxic alga, but little is known about other effects. Gene expression profiles were used to investigate the physiological response of females feeding for two and five days on a control diet or a diet containing either a low or a high dose of A. fundyense. The physiological responses to the two experimental diets were similar, but changed between the time points. At 5-days the response was characterized by down-regulated genes involved in energy metabolism. Detoxification was not a major component of the response. Instead, genes involved in digestion were consistently regulated, suggesting that food assimilation may have been affected. Thus, predicted increases in the frequency of blooms of A. fundyense could affect C. finmarchicus populations by changing the individuals’ energy budget and reducing their ability to build lipid reserves.

  17. Constraints on the vital effect in coccolithophore and dinoflagellate calcite by oxygen isotopic modification of seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermoso, Michaël; Horner, Tristan J.; Minoletti, Fabrice; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we show that there are independent controls of 18O/16O and 13C/12C fractionation in coccolithophore and dinoflagellate calcite due to the contrasting kinetics of each isotope system. We demonstrate that the direction and magnitude of the oxygen isotope fractionation with respect to equilibrium is related to the balance between calcification rate and the replenishment of the internal pool of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). As such, in fast growing cells, such as those of Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica (forming the so-called “heavy group”), calcification of the internal carbon pool occurs faster than complete isotopic re-adjustment of the internal DIC pool with H2O molecules. Hence, coccoliths reflect the heavy oxygen isotope signature of the CO2 overprinting the whole DIC pool. Conversely, in large and slow growing cells, such as Coccolithus pelagicus ssp. braarudii, complete re-equilibration is achieved due to limited influx of CO2 leading to coccoliths that are precipitated in conditions close to isotopic equilibrium (“equilibrium group”). Species exhibiting the most negative oxygen isotope composition, such as Calcidiscus leptoporus (“light group”), precipitate coccolith under increased pH in the coccolith vesicle, as previously documented by the “carbonate ion effect”. We suggest that, for the carbon isotope system, any observed deviation from isotopic equilibrium is only “apparent”, as the carbon isotopic composition in coccolith calcite is controlled by a Rayleigh fractionation originating from preferential incorporation of 12C into organic matter. Therefore, species with low PIC/POC ratios as E. huxleyi and G. oceanica are shifted towards positive carbon isotope values as a result of predominant carbon fixation into the organic matter. By contrast, cells with higher PIC/POC as C. braarudii and C. leptoporus maintain, to some extent, the original negative isotopic composition of the CO2. The calcareous

  18. Marine dinoflagellate cysts as indicators of eutrophication and industrial pollution: a discussion.

    PubMed

    Dale, B

    2001-01-17

    The results from an investigation of dinoflagellate cysts as indicators of eutrophication in Tokyo Bay, Japan, by Matsuoka [Sci Total Environ 231 (1999) 17] are discussed with reference to other pertinent literature not discussed in the original article. Both the Japanese study and previous work from Norwegian fjords show that pollution (including cultural eutrophication) may produce changes in the phytoplankton reflected by a shift from more autotrophic--to more heterotrophic--dominance of cyst assemblages. However, this is a proportional change that seems likely to result from reduced autotrophic production rather than the increased heterotrophic production suggested by Matsuoka. This is not unequivocal evidence of eutrophication, since Tokyo Bay is impacted also by heavy industrial pollution, the possible effects of which cannot be distinguished, and the quantitative method used for estimating changes in cyst productivity is flawed.

  19. Massive gene transfer and extensive RNA editing of a symbiotic dinoflagellate plastid genome.

    PubMed

    Mungpakdee, Sutada; Shinzato, Chuya; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Kawashima, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Ryo; Hisata, Kanako; Tanaka, Makiko; Goto, Hiroki; Fujie, Manabu; Lin, Senjie; Satoh, Nori; Shoguchi, Eiichi

    2014-05-31

    Genome sequencing of Symbiodinium minutum revealed that 95 of 109 plastid-associated genes have been transferred to the nuclear genome and subsequently expanded by gene duplication. Only 14 genes remain in plastids and occur as DNA minicircles. Each minicircle (1.8-3.3 kb) contains one gene and a conserved noncoding region containing putative promoters and RNA-binding sites. Nine types of RNA editing, including a novel G/U type, were discovered in minicircle transcripts but not in genes transferred to the nucleus. In contrast to DNA editing sites in dinoflagellate mitochondria, which tend to be highly conserved across all taxa, editing sites employed in DNA minicircles are highly variable from species to species. Editing is crucial for core photosystem protein function. It restores evolutionarily conserved amino acids and increases peptidyl hydropathy. It also increases protein plasticity necessary to initiate photosystem complex assembly.

  20. The Genus Neoceratium (Planktonic Dinoflagellates) as a Potential Indicator of Ocean Warming.

    PubMed

    Tunin-Ley, Alina; Lemée, Rodolphe

    2013-10-25

    Among the planktonic dinoflagellates, the species-rich genus Neoceratium has particularly remarkable features that include its easily recognizable outline and large size. This ubiquitous genus shows consistent presence in all plankton samples and has been a model for numerous studies since the end of the 19th century. It has already been described as a good candidate to monitor water masses and describe ocean circulation. We argue that the sensitivity displayed by Neoceratium to water temperature also makes it relevant as an indicator of ocean warming. The advantages and interests of using Neoceratium species to monitor climate change on a large scale are reassessed in view of recent advances in understanding their biology and ecology.

  1. Proteomic profile in Perna viridis after exposed to Prorocentrum lima, a dinoflagellate producing DSP toxins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Zou, Ying; Weng, Hui-wen; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Dong

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, we compared protein profiles in gills of Perna viridis after exposure to Prorocentrumlima, a dinoflagellate producing DSP toxins, and identified the differential abundances of protein spots using 2D-electrophoresis. After exposure to P. lima, the level of okadaic acid (a main component of DSP toxins) in gills of P. viridis significantly increased at 6 h, but mussels were all apparently healthy without death. Among the 28 identified protein spots by MALDI TOF/TOF-MS, 12 proteins were up-regulated and 16 were down-regulated in the P. lima-exposed mussels. These identified proteins were involved in various biological activities, such as metabolism, cytoskeleton, signal transduction, response to oxidative stress and detoxification. Taken together, our results indicated that the presence of P. lima caused DSP toxins accumulation in mussel gill, and might consequently induce cytoskeletonal disorganization,oxidative stress, a dysfunction in metabolism and ubiquitination/proteasome activity.

  2. Gymnoxanthella radiolariae gen. et sp. nov. (Dinophyceae), a dinoflagellate symbiont from solitary polycystine radiolarians.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Tomoko; Horiguchi, Takeo; Mayama, Shigeki; Takahashi, Osamu

    2016-02-01

    The symbiotic dinoflagellate Gymnoxanthella radiolariae T. Yuasa et T. Horiguchi gen. et sp. nov. isolated from polycystine radiolarians is described herein based on light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy as well as molecular phylogenetic analyses of SSU and LSU rDNA sequences. Motile cells of G. radiolariae were obtained in culture, and appeared to be unarmored. The cells were 9.1-11.4 μm long and 5.7-9.4 μm wide, and oval to elongate oval in the ventral view. They possessed an counterclockwise horseshoe-shaped apical groove, a nuclear envelope with vesicular chambers, cingulum displacement with one cingulum width, and the nuclear fibrous connective; all of these are characteristics of Gymnodinium sensu stricto (Gymnodinium s.s.). Molecular phylogenetic analyses also indicated that G. radiolariae belongs to the clade of Gymnodinium s.s. However, in our molecular phylogenetic trees, G. radiolariae was distantly related to Gymnodinium fuscum, the type species of Gymnodinium. Based on the consistent morphological, genetic, and ecological divergence of our species with the other genera and species of Gymnodinium s.s., we considered it justified to erect a new, separate genus and species G. radiolariae gen. et sp. nov. As for the peridinioid symbiont of radiolarians, Brandtodinium has been erected as a new genus instead of Zooxanthella, but the name Zooxanthella is still valid. Brandtodinium is a junior synonym of Zooxanthella. Our results suggest that at least two dinoflagellate symbiont species, peridinioid Zooxanthella nutricula and gymnodinioid G. radiolariae, exist in radiolarians, and that they may have been mixed and reported as "Z. nutricula" since the 19th century.

  3. Development of real-time PCR assays for rapid detection of Pfiesteria piscicida and related dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Bowers, H A; Tengs, T; Glasgow, H B; Burkholder, J M; Rublee, P A; Oldach, D W

    2000-11-01

    Pfiesteria complex species are heterotrophic and mixotrophic dinoflagellates that have been recognized as harmful algal bloom species associated with adverse fish and human health effects along the East Coast of North America, particularly in its largest (Chesapeake Bay in Maryland) and second largest (Albermarle-Pamlico Sound in North Carolina) estuaries. In response to impacts on human health and the economy, monitoring programs to detect the organism have been implemented in affected areas. However, until recently, specific identification of the two toxic species known thus far, Pfiesteria piscicida and P. shumwayae (sp. nov.), required scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM is a labor-intensive process in which a small number of cells can be analyzed, posing limitations when the method is applied to environmental estuarine water samples. To overcome these problems, we developed a real-time PCR-based assay that permits rapid and specific identification of these organisms in culture and heterogeneous environmental water samples. Various factors likely to be encountered when assessing environmental samples were addressed, and assay specificity was validated through screening of a comprehensive panel of cultures, including the two recognized Pfiesteria species, morphologically similar species, and a wide range of other estuarine dinoflagellates. Assay sensitivity and sample stability were established for both unpreserved and fixative (acidic Lugol's solution)-preserved samples. The effects of background DNA on organism detection and enumeration were also explored, and based on these results, we conclude that the assay may be utilized to derive quantitative data. This real-time PCR-based method will be useful for many other applications, including adaptation for field-based technology.

  4. A family of selfish minicircular chromosomes with jumbled chloroplast gene fragments from a dinoflagellate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Cavalier-Smith, T; Green, B R

    2001-08-01

    Chloroplast genes of several dinoflagellate species are located on unigenic DNA minicircular chromosomes. We have now completely sequenced five aberrant minicircular chromosomes from the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra. These probably nonfunctional DNA circles lack complete genes, with each being composed of several short fragments of two or three different chloroplast genes and a common conserved region with a tripartite 9G-9A-9G core like the putative replicon origin of functional single-gene circular chloroplast chromosomes. Their sequences imply that all five circles evolved by differential deletions and duplications from common ancestral circles bearing fragments of four genes: psbA, psbC, 16S rRNA, and 23S rRNA. It appears that recombination between separate unigenic chromosomes initially gave intermediate heterodimers, which were subsequently stabilized by deletions that included part or all of one putative replicon origin. We suggest that homologous recombination at the 9G-9A-9G core regions produced a psbA/psbC heterodimer which generated two distinct chimeric circles by differential deletions and duplications. A 23S/16S rRNA heterodimer more likely formed by illegitimate recombination between 16S and 23S rRNA genes. Homologous recombination between the 9G-9A-9G core regions of both heterodimers and additional differential deletions and duplications could then have yielded the other three circles. Near identity of the gene fragments and 9G-9A-9G cores, despite diverging adjacent regions, may be maintained by gene conversion. The conserved organization of the 9G-9A-9G cores alone favors the idea that they are replicon origins and suggests that they may enable the aberrant minicircles to parasitize the chloroplast's replication machinery as selfish circles.

  5. Betaines and dimethylsulfoniopropionate as major osmolytes in cnidaria with endosymbiotic dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Yancey, Paul H; Heppenstall, Marina; Ly, Steven; Andrell, Raymond M; Gates, Ruth D; Carter, Virginia L; Hagedorn, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Most marine invertebrates and algae are osmoconformers whose cells accumulate organic osmolytes that provide half or more of cellular osmotic pressure. These solutes are primarily free amino acids and glycine betaine in most invertebrates and small carbohydrates and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) in many algae. Corals with endosymbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium spp.) have been reported to obtain from the symbionts potential organic osmolytes such as glycerol, amino acids, and DMSP. However, corals and their endosymbionts have not been fully analyzed for osmolytes. We quantified small carbohydrates, free amino acids, methylamines, and DMSP in tissues of the corals Fungia scutaria, Pocillopora damicornis, Pocillopora meandrina, Montipora capitata, Porites compressa, and Porites lobata (all with symbionts) plus Tubastrea aurea (asymbiotic) from Kaneohe Bay, Oahu (Hawaii). Glycine betaine, at 33-69 mmol/kg wet mass, was found to constitute 90% or more of the measured organic solutes in all except the Porites species. Those were dominated by proline betaine and dimethyltaurine. DMSP was found at 0.5-3 mmol/kg in all species with endosymbionts. Freshly isolated Symbiodinium from Fungia, P. damicornis, and P. compressa were also analyzed. DMSP and glycine betaine dominated in the first two; Porites endosymbionts had DMSP, proline betaine, and dimethyltaurine. In all specimens, glycerol and glucose were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography only at 0-1 mmol/kg wet mass. An enzymatic assay for glycerol plus glycerol 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate yielded 1-10 mmol/kg. Cassiopeia andromeda (upside-down jelly; Scyphozoan) and Aiptasia puchella (solitary anemone; Anthozoan) were also analyzed; both have endosymbiotic dinoflagellates. In both, glycine betaine, taurine, and DMSP were the dominant osmolytes. In summary, methylated osmolytes dominate in many Cnidaria; in those with algal symbionts, host and symbiont have similar methylated amino

  6. Differential effects of ocean acidification on carbon acquisition in two bloom-forming dinoflagellate species.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, Tim; Van de Waal, Dedmer B; Rost, Björn

    2014-08-01

    Dinoflagellates represent a cosmopolitan group of phytoplankton with the ability to form harmful algal blooms. Featuring a Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) with very low CO2 affinities, photosynthesis of this group may be particularly prone to carbon limitation and thus benefit from rising atmospheric CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) under ocean acidification (OA). Here, we investigated the consequences of OA on two bloom-forming dinoflagellate species, the calcareous Scrippsiella trochoidea and the toxic Alexandrium tamarense. Using dilute batch incubations, we assessed growth characteristics over a range of pCO2 (i.e. 180-1200 µatm). To understand the underlying physiology, several aspects of inorganic carbon acquisition were investigated by membrane-inlet mass spectrometry. Our results show that both species kept growth rates constant over the tested pCO2 range, but we observed a number of species-specific responses. For instance, biomass production and cell size decreased in S. trochoidea, while A. tamarense was not responsive to OA in these measures. In terms of oxygen fluxes, rates of photosynthesis and respiration remained unaltered in S. trochoidea whereas respiration increased in A. tamarense under OA. Both species featured efficient carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) with a CO2-dependent contribution of HCO3(-) uptake. In S. trochoidea, the CCM was further facilitated by exceptionally high and CO2-independent carbonic anhydrase activity. Comparing both species, a general trade-off between maximum rates of photosynthesis and respective affinities is indicated. In conclusion, our results demonstrate effective CCMs in both species, yet very different strategies to adjust their carbon acquisition. This regulation in CCMs enables both species to maintain growth over a wide range of ecologically relevant pCO2 .

  7. CO2-dependent carbon isotope fractionation in dinoflagellates relates to their inorganic carbon fluxes.

    PubMed

    Hoins, Mirja; Eberlein, Tim; Van de Waal, Dedmer B; Sluijs, Appy; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Rost, Björn

    2016-08-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation (εp) between the inorganic carbon source and organic matter has been proposed to be a function of pCO2. To understand the CO2-dependency of εp and species-specific differences therein, inorganic carbon fluxes in the four dinoflagellate species Alexandrium fundyense, Scrippsiella trochoidea, Gonyaulax spinifera and Protoceratium reticulatum have been measured by means of membrane-inlet mass spectrometry. In-vivo assays were carried out at different CO2 concentrations, representing a range of pCO2 from 180 to 1200 μatm. The relative bicarbonate contribution (i.e. the ratio of bicarbonate uptake to total inorganic carbon uptake) and leakage (i.e. the ratio of CO2 efflux to total inorganic carbon uptake) varied from 0.2 to 0.5 and 0.4 to 0.7, respectively, and differed significantly between species. These ratios were fed into a single-compartment model, and εp values were calculated and compared to carbon isotope fractionation measured under the same conditions. For all investigated species, modeled and measured εp values were comparable (A. fundyense, S. trochoidea, P. reticulatum) and/or showed similar trends with pCO2 (A. fundyense, G. spinifera, P. reticulatum). Offsets are attributed to biases in inorganic flux measurements, an overestimated fractionation factor for the CO2-fixing enzyme RubisCO, or the fact that intracellular inorganic carbon fluxes were not taken into account in the model. This study demonstrates that CO2-dependency in εp can largely be explained by the inorganic carbon fluxes of the individual dinoflagellates.

  8. Effects of Lugol's iodine solution and formalin on cell volume of three bloom-forming dinoflagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Sun, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Yongfang

    2016-09-01

    Fixatives are traditionally used in marine ecosystem research. The bias introduced by fixatives on the dimensions of plankton cells may lead to an overestimation or underestimation of the carbon biomass. To determine the impact of traditional fixatives on dinoflagellates during short- and long-term fixation, we analyzed the degree of change in three bloom-forming dinoflagellates (Prorocentrum micans, Scrippsiella trochoidea and Noctiluca scintillans) brought about by Lugol's iodine solution (hereafter Lugol's) and formalin. The fixation effects were species-specific. P. micans cell volume showed no significant change following long-term preservation, and S. trochoidea swelled by approximately 8.06% in Lugol's and by 20.97% in formalin as a percentage of the live cell volume, respectively. N. scintillans shrank significantly in both fixatives. The volume change due to formalin in N. scintillans was not concentration-dependent, whereas the volume shrinkage of N. scintillans cells fixed with Lugol's at a concentration of 2% was nearly six-fold that in cells fixed with Lugol's at a concentration of 0.6%-0.8%. To better estimate the volume of N. scintillans fixed in formalin at a concentration of 5%, we suggest that the conversion relationship was as follows: volume of live cell=volume of intact fixed cell/0.61. Apart from size change, damage induced by fixatives on N. scintillans was obvious. Lugol's is not a suitable fixative for N. scintillans due to high frequency of broken cells. Accurate carbon biomass estimate of N. scintillans should be performed on live samples. These findings help to improve the estimate of phytoplankton cell volume and carbon biomass in marine ecosystem.

  9. miRNAs Do Not Regulate Circadian Protein Synthesis in the Dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum

    PubMed Central

    Dagenais-Bellefeuille, Steve; Beauchemin, Mathieu; Morse, David

    2017-01-01

    Dinoflagellates have been shown to express miRNA by bioinformatics and RNA blot (Northern) analyses. However, it is not yet known if miRNAs are able to alter gene expression in this class of organisms. We have assessed the possibility that miRNA may mediate circadian regulation of gene expression in the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum using the Luciferin Binding Protein (LBP) as a specific example. LBP is a good candidate for regulation by miRNA since mRNA levels are constant over the daily cycle while protein synthesis is restricted by the circadian clock to a period of several hours at the start of the night phase. The transcriptome contains a potential DICER and an ARGONAUTE, suggesting the machinery for generating miRNAs is present. Furthermore, a probe directed against an abundant Symbiodinium miRNA cross reacts on Northern blots. However, L. polyedrum has no small RNAs detectable by ethidium bromide staining, even though higher plant miRNAs run in parallel are readily observed. Illumina sequencing of small RNAs showed that the majority of reads did not have a match in the L. polyedrum transcriptome, and those that did were almost all sense strand mRNA fragments. A direct search for 18–26 nucleotide long RNAs capable of forming duplexes with a 2 base 3’ overhang detected 53 different potential miRNAs, none of which was able to target any of the known circadian regulated genes. Lastly, a microscopy-based test to assess synthesis of the naturally fluorescent LBP in single cells showed that neither double-stranded nor antisense lbp RNA introduced into cells by microparticle bombardment prior to the time of LBP synthesis were able to reduce the amount of LBP produced. Taken together, our results indicate that circadian control of protein synthesis in L. polyedrum is not mediated by miRNAs. PMID:28103286

  10. Identifying and Characterizing Alternative Molecular Markers for the Symbiotic and Free-Living Dinoflagellate Genus Symbiodinium

    PubMed Central

    Pochon, Xavier; Putnam, Hollie M.; Burki, Fabien; Gates, Ruth D.

    2012-01-01

    Dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium are best known as endosymbionts of corals and other invertebrate as well as protist hosts, but also exist free-living in coastal environments. Despite their importance in marine ecosystems, less than 10 loci have been used to explore phylogenetic relationships in this group, and only the multi-copy nuclear ribosomal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions 1 and 2 have been used to characterize fine-scale genetic diversity within the nine clades (A–I) that comprise the genus. Here, we describe a three-step molecular approach focused on 1) identifying new candidate genes for phylogenetic analysis of Symbiodinium spp., 2) characterizing the phylogenetic relationship of these candidate genes from DNA samples spanning eight Symbiodinium clades (A–H), and 3) conducting in-depth phylogenetic analyses of candidate genes displaying genetic divergences equal or higher than those within the ITS-2 of Symbiodinium clade C. To this end, we used bioinformatics tools and reciprocal comparisons to identify homologous genes from 55,551 cDNA sequences representing two Symbiodinium and six additional dinoflagellate EST libraries. Of the 84 candidate genes identified, 7 Symbiodinium genes (elf2, coI, coIII, cob, calmodulin, rad24, and actin) were characterized by sequencing 23 DNA samples spanning eight Symbiodinium clades (A–H). Four genes displaying higher rates of genetic divergences than ITS-2 within clade C were selected for in-depth phylogenetic analyses, which revealed that calmodulin has limited taxonomic utility but that coI, rad24, and actin behave predictably with respect to Symbiodinium lineage C and are potential candidates as new markers for this group. The approach for targeting candidate genes described here can serve as a model for future studies aimed at identifying and testing new phylogenetically informative genes for taxa where transcriptomic and genomics data are available. PMID:22238660

  11. Spatial Mutual Information Based Hyperspectral Band Selection for Classification

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The amount of information involved in hyperspectral imaging is large. Hyperspectral band selection is a popular method for reducing dimensionality. Several information based measures such as mutual information have been proposed to reduce information redundancy among spectral bands. Unfortunately, mutual information does not take into account the spatial dependency between adjacent pixels in images thus reducing its robustness as a similarity measure. In this paper, we propose a new band selection method based on spatial mutual information. As validation criteria, a supervised classification method using support vector machine (SVM) is used. Experimental results of the classification of hyperspectral datasets show that the proposed method can achieve more accurate results. PMID:25918742

  12. Molecular phylogeny of ocelloid-bearing dinoflagellates (Warnowiaceae) as inferred from SSU and LSU rDNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenrath, Mona; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Handy, Sara M; Delwiche, Charles F; Leander, Brian S

    2009-01-01

    Background Dinoflagellates represent a major lineage of unicellular eukaryotes with unparalleled diversity and complexity in morphological features. The monophyly of dinoflagellates has been convincingly demonstrated, but the interrelationships among dinoflagellate lineages still remain largely unresolved. Warnowiid dinoflagellates are among the most remarkable eukaryotes known because of their possession of highly elaborate ultrastructural systems: pistons, nematocysts, and ocelloids. Complex organelles like these are evolutionary innovations found only in a few athecate dinoflagellates. Moreover, the taxonomy of warnowiids is extremely confusing and inferences about the evolutionary history of this lineage are mired by the absence of molecular phylogenetic data from any member of the group. In this study, we provide the first molecular phylogenetic data for warnowiids and couple them with a review of warnowiid morphological features in order to formulate a hypothetical framework for understanding character evolution within the group. These data also enabled us to evaluate the evolutionary relationship(s) between warnowiids and the other group of dinoflagellates with complex organelles: polykrikoids. Results Molecular phylogenetic analyses of SSU and LSU rDNA sequences demonstrated that warnowiids form a well-supported clade that falls within the more inclusive Gymnodinium sensu stricto clade. These data also confirmed that polykrikoids are members of the Gymnodinium sensu stricto clade as well; however, a specific sister relationship between the warnowiid clade and the polykrikoid clade was unresolved in all of our analyses. Nonetheless, the new DNA sequences from different isolates of warnowiids provided organismal anchors for several previously unidentified sequences derived from environmental DNA surveys of marine biodiversity. Conclusion Comparative morphological data and molecular phylogenetic data demonstrate that the polykrikoid and the warnowiid clade are

  13. Entanglement patterns in mutually unbiased basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Jay

    2011-08-15

    A few simply stated rules govern the entanglement patterns that can occur in mutually unbiased basis sets (MUBs) and constrain the combinations of such patterns that can coexist in full complements of MUBs. We consider Hilbert spaces of prime power dimensions (D=p{sup N}), as realized by systems of N prime-state particles, where full complements of D+1 MUBs are known to exist, and we assume only that MUBs are eigenbases of generalized Pauli operators, without using any particular construction. The general rules include the following: (1) In any MUB, a given particle appears either in a pure state or totally entangled and (2) in any full MUB complement, each particle is pure in (p+1) bases (not necessarily the same ones) and totally entangled in the remaining (p{sup N}-p). It follows that the maximum number of product bases is p+1 and, when this number is realized, all remaining (p{sup N}-p) bases in the complement are characterized by the total entanglement of every particle. This ''standard distribution'' is inescapable for two-particle systems (of any p), where only product and generalized Bell bases are admissible MUB types. This and the following results generalize previous results for qubits [Phys. Rev. A 65. 032320 (2002); Phys. Rev. A 72, 062310 (2005)] and qutrits [Phys. Rev. A 70, 012302 (2004)], drawing particularly upon [Phys. Rev. A 72, 062310 (2005)]. With three particles there are three MUB types, and these may be combined in (p+2) different ways to form full complements. With N=4, there are 6 MUB types for p=2, but new MUB types become possible with larger p, and these are essential to realizing full complements. With this example, we argue that new MUB types that show new entanglement patterns should enter with every step in N and, also, when N is a prime plus 1, at a critical p value, p=N-1. Such MUBs should play critical roles in filling complements.

  14. 47 CFR 27.321 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Application, Licensing, and Processing Rules for WCS § 27.321... Commission's rules governing the Wireless Communications Services involved. The Commission uses the general procedures in this section for processing mutually exclusive applications in the Wireless...

  15. 47 CFR 27.321 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Application, Licensing, and Processing Rules for WCS § 27.321... Commission's rules governing the Wireless Communications Services involved. The Commission uses the general procedures in this section for processing mutually exclusive applications in the Wireless...

  16. 47 CFR 27.321 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Application, Licensing, and Processing Rules for WCS § 27.321... Commission's rules governing the Wireless Communications Services involved. The Commission uses the general procedures in this section for processing mutually exclusive applications in the Wireless...

  17. 47 CFR 27.321 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Application, Licensing, and Processing Rules for WCS § 27.321... Commission's rules governing the Wireless Communications Services involved. The Commission uses the general procedures in this section for processing mutually exclusive applications in the Wireless...

  18. 47 CFR 27.321 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Application, Licensing, and Processing Rules for WCS § 27.321... Commission's rules governing the Wireless Communications Services involved. The Commission uses the general procedures in this section for processing mutually exclusive applications in the Wireless...

  19. Mutual intentions as a causal framework for social groups.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Alexander; Dunham, Yarrow

    2017-02-24

    Children's early emerging intuitive theories are specialized for different conceptual domains. Recently attention has turned to children's concepts of social groups, finding that children believe that many social groups mark uniquely social information such as allegiances and obligations. But another critical component of intuitive theories, the causal beliefs that underlie category membership, has received less attention. We propose that children believe membership in these groups is constituted by mutual intentions: i.e., all group members (including the individual) intend for an individual to be a member and all group members (including the individual) have common knowledge of these intentions. Children in a broad age range (4-9) applied a mutual-intentional framework to newly encountered social groups early in development (Experiment 1, 2, 4). Further, they deploy this mutual-intentional framework selectively, withholding it from essentialized social categories such as gender (Experiment 3). Mutual intentionality appears to be a vital aspect of children's naïve sociology.

  20. Nonlinear pattern analysis of ventricular premature beats by mutual information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osaka, M.; Saitoh, H.; Yokoshima, T.; Kishida, H.; Hayakawa, H.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    The frequency of ventricular premature beats (VPBs) has been related to the risk of mortality. However, little is known about the temporal pattern of occurrence of VPBs and its relationship to autonomic activity. Hence, we applied a general correlation measure, mutual information, to quantify how VPBs are generated over time. We also used mutual information to determine the correlation between VPB production and heart rate in order to evaluate effects of autonomic activity on VPB production. We examined twenty subjects with more than 3000 VPBs/day and simulated random time series of VPB occurrence. We found that mutual information values could be used to characterize quantitatively the temporal patterns of VPB generation. Our data suggest that VPB production is not random and VPBs generated with a higher value of mutual information may be more greatly affected by autonomic activity.

  1. Mutual impedance of nonplanar-skew sinusoidal dipoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, J. H.; Geary, N. H.

    1975-01-01

    The mutual impedance expressions for parallel dipoles in terms of sine-integrals and cosine-integrals have been published by King (1957). The investigation reported provides analogous expressions for nonparallel dipoles. The expressions presented are most useful when the monopoles are close together. The theory of moment methods shows an approach for employing the mutual impedance of filamentary sinusoidal dipoles to calculate the impedance and scattering properties of straight and bent wires with small but finite diameter.

  2. Viscosity and mutual diffusion in strongly asymmetric binary ionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, Sorin

    2005-05-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results for the viscosity and mutual diffusion constant of a strongly asymmetric binary ionic mixture. We compare the results with available theoretical models previously tested for much smaller asymmetries. For the case of viscosity we propose a predictive framework based on the linear mixing rule, while for mutual diffusion we discuss some consistency problems of widely used Boltzmann-equation-based models.

  3. Viscosity and mutual diffusion in strongly asymmetric plasma mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, S

    2004-09-07

    The authors present molecular dynamics simulation results for the viscosity and mutual diffusion constant of a strongly asymmetric two-component plasma (TCP). They compare the results with available theoretical models previously tested for much smaller asymmetries. for the case of viscosity they propose a new predictive framework based on the linear mixing rule, while for mutual diffusion they point out some consistency problems of widely used Boltzmann equation based models.

  4. Quantum process reconstruction based on mutually unbiased basis

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Perez, A.; Saavedra, C.; Klimov, A. B.

    2011-05-15

    We study a quantum process reconstruction based on the use of mutually unbiased projectors (MUB projectors) as input states for a D-dimensional quantum system, with D being a power of a prime number. This approach connects the results of quantum-state tomography using mutually unbiased bases with the coefficients of a quantum process, expanded in terms of MUB projectors. We also study the performance of the reconstruction scheme against random errors when measuring probabilities at the MUB projectors.

  5. Non-rigid registration using higher-order mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueckert, D.; Clarkson, M. J.; Hill, D. L. G.; Hawkes, D. J.

    2000-03-01

    Non-rigid registration of multi-modality images is an important tool for assessing temporal and structural changesbetween images. For rigid registration, voxel similarity measures like mutual information have been shown to alignimages from different modalities accurately and robustly. For non-rigid registration, mutual information can besensitive to local variations of intensity which in MR images may be caused by RF inhomogeneity. The reasonfor the sensitivity of mutual information towards intensity variations stems from the fact that mutual informationignores any spatial information. In this paper we propose an extension of the mutual information framework whichincorporates spatial information about higher-order image structure into the registration process and has the potentialto improve the accuracy and robustness of non-rigid registration in the presence of intensity variations. We haveapplied the non-rigid registration algorithm to a number of simulated MR brain images of a digital phantom whichhave been degraded by a simulated intensity shading and a known deformation. In addition, we have applied thealgorithm for the non-rigid registration of eight pre- and post-operative brain MR images which were acquired withan interventional MR scanner and therefore have substantial intensity shading due to RF field inhomogeneities. Inall cases the second-order estimate of mutual information leads to robust and accurate registration.

  6. An invasive plant-fungal mutualism reduces arthropod diversity.

    PubMed

    Rudgers, Jennifer A; Clay, Keith

    2008-08-01

    Ecological theory holds that competition and predation are the most important biotic forces affecting the composition of communities. Here, we expand this framework by demonstrating that mutualism can fundamentally alter community and food web structure. In large, replicated field plots, we manipulated the mutualism between a dominant plant (Lolium arundinaceum) and symbiotic fungal endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum). The presence of the mutualism reduced arthropod abundance up to 70%, reduced arthropod diversity nearly 20%, shifted arthropod species composition relative to endophyte-free plots and suppressed the biomass and richness of other plant species in the community. Herbivorous arthropods were more strongly affected than carnivores, and for both herbivores and carnivores, effects of the mutualism appeared to propagate indirectly via organisms occurring more basally in the food web. The influence of the mutualism was as great or greater than previously documented effects of competition and predation on arthropod communities. Our work demonstrates that a keystone mutualism can significantly reduce arthropod biodiversity at a broad community scale.

  7. Spectral image analysis of mutual illumination between florescent objects.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Shoji; Kato, Keiji; Hirai, Keita; Horiuchi, Takahiko

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a method for modeling and component estimation of the spectral images of the mutual illumination phenomenon between two fluorescent objects. First, we briefly describe the bispectral characteristics of a single fluorescent object, which are summarized as a Donaldson matrix. We suppose that two fluorescent objects with different bispectral characteristics are located close together under a uniform illumination. Second, we model the mutual illumination between two objects. It is shown that the spectral composition of the mutual illumination is summarized with four components: (1) diffuse reflection, (2) diffuse-diffuse interreflection, (3) fluorescent self-luminescence, and (4) interreflection by mutual fluorescent illumination. Third, we develop algorithms for estimating the spectral image components from the observed images influenced by the mutual illumination. When the exact Donaldson matrices caused by the mutual illumination influence are unknown, we have to solve a non-linear estimation problem to estimate both the spectral functions and the location weights. An iterative algorithm is then proposed to solve the problem based on the alternate estimation of the spectral functions and the location weights. In our experiments, the feasibility of the proposed method is shown in three cases: the known Donaldson matrices, weak interreflection, and strong interreflection.

  8. DESCRIPTION OF TYRANNODINIUM GEN. NOV., A FRESHWATER DINOFLAGELLATE CLOSELY RELATED TO THE MARINE PFIESTERIA-LIKE SPECIES(1).

    PubMed

    Calado, António J; Craveiro, Sandra C; Daugbjerg, Niels; Moestrup, Øjvind

    2009-10-01

    On the basis of morphological (light and electron microscopy) as well molecular data, we show that the widely distributed freshwater dinoflagellate presently known as Peridiniopsis berolinensis is a member of the family Pfiesteriaceae, an otherwise marine and estuarine family of dinoflagellates. P. berolinensis is a close relative of the marine species, which it resembles in morphology, mode of swimming, food-uptake mechanism, and partial LSU rRNA sequences. It differs from all known genera of the family in plate tabulation. P. berolinensis is only distantly related to the type species of Peridiniopsis, P. borgei, and is therefore transferred to the new genus Tyrannodinium as T. berolinense comb. nov. T. berolinense is a very common freshwater flagellate that feeds vigorously on other protists and is able to consume injured metazoans much larger than itself. Production of toxins has not been reported.

  9. Isolation, purification and spectrometric analysis of PSP toxins from moraxella sp., a bacterium associated with a toxic dinoflagellate

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, S.D.; Doucette, G.J.

    1994-12-31

    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) is a seafood intoxication syndrome caused by the injestion of shellfish contaminated with toxins produced by algae known as dinoflagellates. The PSP toxins, saxitoxin and its derivatives, act to block voltage-dependent sodium channels and can cause paralysis and even death at higher doses. It is well documented that bacteria coexist with many harmful or toxic algal species, though the exact nature of the association in relation to toxin production is unknown. Recently, the bacterium Moraxella sp. was isolated from the PSP toxin producing dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense. Through HPLC analysis and saxitoxin receptor binding assays performed on crude bacterial extracts, it appears that Moraxella sp. is capable of producing saxitoxin and several of its derivatives. However, physical confirmation (e.g. mass spectrometry) of these results is still needed.

  10. Water flux management and phytoplankton communities in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon. Part II: Mixotrophy of dinoflagellates as an adaptive strategy?

    PubMed

    Cecchi, P; Garrido, M; Collos, Y; Pasqualini, V

    2016-07-15

    Dinoflagellate proliferation is common in coastal waters, and trophic strategies are often advanced to explain the success of these organisms. The Biguglia lagoon is a Mediterranean brackish ecosystem where eutrophication has long been an issue, and where dominance of dinoflagellates has persisted for several years. Monthly monitoring of fluorescence-based properties of phytoplankton communities carried out in 2010 suggested that photosynthesis alone could not support the observed situation all year round. Contrasting food webs developed depending on the hydrological season, with a gradual shift from autotrophy to heterotrophy. Progressively, microphytoplankton assemblages became unequivocally dominated by a Prorocentrum minimum bloom, which exhibited very weak effective photosynthetic performance, whereas paradoxically its theoretical capacities remained fully operational. Different environmental hypotheses explaining this discrepancy were examined, but rejected. We conclude that P. minimum bloom persistence is sustained by mixotrophic strategies, with complex compromises between phototrophy and phagotrophy, as evidenced by fluorescence-based observations.

  11. Palaeobiogeographic implications of Late Bajocian-Late Callovian (Middle Jurassic) dinoflagellate cysts from the Central Alborz Mountains, northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Nejad, Ebrahim; Sabbaghiyan, Hossein; Mosaddegh, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The Dalichai Formation with an age of Late Bajocian-Late Callovian was sampled in Central Alborz Mountains of northern Iran and studied for palynological, palaeobiogeographical and palynocorrelation purposes. Palynological studies revealed diverse and well-preserved dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and lead to identification of three zones i.e., Cribroperidiniumcrispum (Late Bajocian), Dichadogonyaulaxsellwoodii (Bathonian to Early Callovian) and Ctenidodiniumcontinuum (Early to Middle Callovian) Zones. Subzone a of the D. sellwoodii Zone (Early to Middle Bathonian) was also differentiated. This biozonation corresponds to those recognised in Northwest Europe. Furthermore, the ammonoid families recorded including Phylloceratidae, Oppeliidae, Reineckeiidae, Perisphinctidae, Haploceratidae, Parkinsoniidae and Sphaeroceratidae, which confirm the Late Bajocian to Late Callovian age, are quite similar to those of Northwest Europe and the northwestern Tethys. The close similarities of the dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and ammonite fauna of northern Iran with those of Northwest Europe and the northwestern Tethys during the Middle Jurassic indicate direct but episodic marine connection and faunal exchange between the two areas.

  12. The chemical mimicking of the mechanical stimulation, photoinhibition, and recovery from photoinhibition of bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellate, Gonyaulax polyedra

    SciTech Connect

    Hamman, J.P.; Seliger, H.H.

    1982-06-01

    Mechanically stimulable bioluminescence and photoinhibition of sensitivity to mechanical stimulation in the marine dinoflagellate Gonyaulax polyedra can be mimicked by a number of cations, proportional to the logarithm of their external concentrations. The data are consistent with mechanical stimulability as a membrane depolarization resulting in an increase in H/sup +/ ions at bioluminescence sites and with photoinhibition as a hyperpolarization of the cell membrane.

  13. The chemical mimicking of the mechanical stimulation, photoinhibition, and recovery from photoinhibition of bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellate, Gonyaulax polyedra

    SciTech Connect

    Hamman, J.P.; Seliger, H.H.

    1982-01-01

    Mechanically stimulable bioluminescence and photoinhibition of sensitivity to mechanical stimulation in the marine dinoflagellate Gonyaulax polyedra can be mimicked by a number of cations, proportional to the logarithm of their external concentrations. The data are consistent with mechanical stimulability as a membrane depolarization resulting in an increase in H/sup +/ ions at bioluminescence sites and with photoinhibition as a hyperpolarization of the cell membrane.

  14. The toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis encodes novel type I-like polyketide synthases containing discrete catalytic domains.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Emily A; Van Dolah, Frances M

    2008-07-01

    Karenia brevis is the Florida red tide dinoflagellate responsible for detrimental effects on human and environmental health through the production of brevetoxins. Brevetoxins are thought to be synthesized by a polyketide synthase (PKS) complex, but the gene cluster for this PKS has yet to be identified. Here, eight PKS transcripts were identified in K. brevis by high throughput cDNA library screening. Full length sequences were obtained through 3' and 5' RACE, which demonstrated the presence of polyadenylation, 3'-UTRs, and an identical dinoflagellate-specific spliced leader sequence at the 5' end of PKS transcripts. Six transcripts encoded for individual ketosynthase (KS) domains, one ketoreductase (KR), and one transcript encoded both acyl carrier protein (ACP) and KS domains. Transcript lengths ranged from 1875 to 3397 nucleotides, based on sequence analysis, and were confirmed by northern blotting. Baysian phylogenetic analysis of the K. brevis KS domains placed them well within the protist type I PKS clade. Thus although most similar to type I modular PKSs, the presence of individual catalytic domains on separate transcripts suggests a protein structure more similar to type II PKSs, in which each catalytic domain resides on an individual protein. These results identify an unprecedented PKS structure in a toxic dinoflagellate.

  15. Life-cycle, ultrastructure, and phylogeny of Parvilucifera corolla sp. nov. (Alveolata, Perkinsozoa), a parasitoid of dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Reñé, Albert; Alacid, Elisabet; Figueroa, Rosa Isabel; Rodríguez, Francisco; Garcés, Esther

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies of marine protists have revealed parasites to be key components of marine communities. Here we describe a new species of the parasitoid genus Parvilucifera that was observed infecting the dinoflagellate Durinskia baltica in salt marshes of the Catalan coast (NW Mediterranean). In parallel, the same species was detected after the incubation of seawater from the Canary Islands (Lanzarote, NE Atlantic). The successful isolation of strains from both localities allowed description of the life cycle, ultrastructure, and phylogeny of the species. Its infection mechanism consists of a free-living zoospore that penetrates a dinoflagellate cell. The resulting trophont gradually degrades the dinoflagellate cytoplasm while growing in size. Once the host is consumed, schizogony of the parasitoid yields a sporocyte. After cytokinesis is complete, the newly formed zoospores are released into the environment and are ready to infect new host cells. A distinguishing feature of the species is the radial arrangement of its zoospores around the central area of the sporocyte during their formation. The species shows a close morphological similarity with other species of the genus, including P. infectans, P. sinerae, and P. rostrata.

  16. Differential distribution of diatoms and dinoflagellates in a cyclonic eddy confined in the Bay of La Paz, Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coria-Monter, Erik; Monreal-Gómez, María. Adela; Salas-de-León, David Alberto; Aldeco-Ramírez, Javier; Merino-Ibarra, Martín.

    2014-09-01

    The differential distribution of diatoms and dinoflagellates in the Bay of La Paz, Gulf of California, Mexico, was analyzed in summer of 2009, when a cyclonic eddy confined in the bay dominated the circulation. An uplift of the nutricline in the eddy drove high concentrations of nutrients to the euphotic layer. A differential phytoplankton distribution was observed to be associated with the eddy: there was an abundance of dinoflagellates close to the center of the cyclonic eddy, whereas diatoms were more abundant at the periphery. A significant inverse correlation (R = -0.62, p < 0.002) was found between the temperature at 25 m depth and the dinoflagellates abundance. Based on the temporal evolution of chlorophyll measured by MODIS satellite images, and a conceptual model proposed for the lifecycle of eddies, the cyclonic eddy may have been an old decaying structure. The effect of the cyclonic eddy on the phytoplankton distribution in this small semienclosed region was apparently similar to that found in larger eddies in the open ocean, but this is the first time such a differential distribution has been found associated to a confined eddy.

  17. Cell cycle arrest and biochemical changes accompanying cell death in harmful dinoflagellates following exposure to bacterial algicide IRI-160AA

    PubMed Central

    Pokrzywinski, Kaytee L.; Tilney, Charles L.; Warner, Mark E.; Coyne, Kathryn J.

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria may play a role in regulating harmful algal blooms, but little is known about the biochemical and physiological changes associated with cell death induced by algicidal bacteria. Previous work characterized an algicidal exudate (IRI-160AA) produced by Shewanella sp. IRI-160 that is effective against dinoflagellates, while having little to no effect on other phytoplankton species in laboratory culture experiments. The objective of this study was to evaluate biochemical changes associated with cell death and impacts on the cell cycle in three dinoflagellate species (Prorocentrum minimum, Karlodinium veneficum and Gyrodinium instriatum) after exposure to IRI-160AA. In this study, IRI-160AA induced cell cycle arrest in all dinoflagellates examined. Several indicators for programmed cell death (PCD) that are often observed in phytoplankton in response to a variety of stressors were also evaluated. Cell death was accompanied by significant increases in DNA degradation, intra- and extracellular ROS concentrations and DEVDase (caspase-3 like) protease activity, which have been associated with PCD in other phytoplankton species. Overall, results of this investigation provide strong evidence that treatment with the bacterial algicide, IRI-160AA results in cell cycle arrest and induces biochemical changes consistent with stress-related cell death responses observed in other phytoplankton. PMID:28332589

  18. Immunological and physiological responses of the periwinkle Littorina littorea during and after exposure to the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum.

    PubMed

    Neves, Raquel A F; Figueiredo, Gisela M; Valentin, Jean Louis; da Silva Scardua, Patricia Mirella; Hégaret, Hélène

    2015-03-01

    Species of the dinoflagellate genus Alexandrium produce phycotoxins responsible for paralytic shellfish poisoning. Blooms of Alexandrium minutum reach very high concentrations of vegetative cells in the water column; and when these blooms occur, large numbers of toxic cysts can be produced and deposited on sediments becoming available to benthic species. The present study investigated the potential effect of exposure to toxic cysts of A. minutum on the periwinkle Littorinalittorea. Snails were exposed for nine days to pellicle cysts of toxic and non-toxic dinoflagellates, A. minutum and Heterocapsa triquetra, respectively, followed by six days of depuration while they were fed only H. triquetra. Toxin accumulation, condition index, immune and histopathological responses were analyzed. Histological alterations were also monitored in snails exposed to a harmful A. minutum bloom, which naturally occurred in the Bay of Brest. Snails exposed to toxic cysts showed abnormal behavior that seems to be toxin-induced and possibly related to muscle paralysis. Periwinkles accumulated toxins by preying on toxic cysts and accumulation appeared dependent on the time of exposure, increasing during intoxication period but tending to stabilize during depuration period. Toxic exposure also seemed to negatively affect hemocyte viability and functions, as ROS production and phagocytosis. Histological analyses revealed that toxic exposure induced damages on digestive organs of snails, both in laboratory and natural systems. This study demonstrates that an exposure to the toxic dinoflagellate A. minutum leads to sublethal effects on L. littorea, which may alter individual fitness and increase the susceptibility of snails to pathogens and diseases.

  19. Cell cycle arrest and biochemical changes accompanying cell death in harmful dinoflagellates following exposure to bacterial algicide IRI-160AA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrzywinski, Kaytee L.; Tilney, Charles L.; Warner, Mark E.; Coyne, Kathryn J.

    2017-03-01

    Bacteria may play a role in regulating harmful algal blooms, but little is known about the biochemical and physiological changes associated with cell death induced by algicidal bacteria. Previous work characterized an algicidal exudate (IRI-160AA) produced by Shewanella sp. IRI-160 that is effective against dinoflagellates, while having little to no effect on other phytoplankton species in laboratory culture experiments. The objective of this study was to evaluate biochemical changes associated with cell death and impacts on the cell cycle in three dinoflagellate species (Prorocentrum minimum, Karlodinium veneficum and Gyrodinium instriatum) after exposure to IRI-160AA. In this study, IRI-160AA induced cell cycle arrest in all dinoflagellates examined. Several indicators for programmed cell death (PCD) that are often observed in phytoplankton in response to a variety of stressors were also evaluated. Cell death was accompanied by significant increases in DNA degradation, intra- and extracellular ROS concentrations and DEVDase (caspase-3 like) protease activity, which have been associated with PCD in other phytoplankton species. Overall, results of this investigation provide strong evidence that treatment with the bacterial algicide, IRI-160AA results in cell cycle arrest and induces biochemical changes consistent with stress-related cell death responses observed in other phytoplankton.

  20. Location of B- and Z-DNA in the chromosomes of a primitive eukaryote dinoflagellate

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The usual conformation of DNA is a right-handed double helix (B-DNA). DNA with stretches of alternating purine-pyrimidine (G-C or A-T) can form a left-handed helix (Z-DNA). The transition B----Z, facilitated by the presence of divalent cations, cytosine methylation, or constraints on DNA such as superhelicity may play a role in the regulation of gene expression and/or in DNA compaction (Zarling, D. A., D. J. Arndt-Jovin, M. Robert-Nicoud, L. P. McIntosh, R. Tomae, and T. M. Jovin. 1984. J. Mol. Biol. 176:369-415). Divalent cations are also important in the structure of the quasi-permanently condensed chromosomes of dinoflagellate protists (Herzog, M., and M.-O. Soyer. 1983. Eur. J. Cell Biol. 30:33-41) which also have superhelicity in their DNA. The absence of histones in dinoflagellate chromosomes suggest that the search for Z-DNA sequences might be fruitful and could provide one indication of the physiological role of this particular DNA conformation. We report a complete immunofluorescent and immunogold analysis of the nuclei of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans E. using monoclonal and polyclonal anti-B and anti-Z-DNA antibodies. Positive labeling was obtained with immunofluorescence using squash preparations and cryosections, both of which showed the intranuclear presence of the two DNA conformations. In ultrathin sections of aldehyde-prefixed, osmium-fixed, and epoxy-embedded cells, we have localized B-DNA and Z-DNA either with single or double immunolabeling using IgG labeled with 5- and 7-nm gold particles, respectively. Chromosomal nucleofilaments of dividing or nondividing chromosomes, as seen in ultrathin sections in their arch-shaped configuration, are abundantly labeled with anti-B-DNA antibody. Extrachromosomal anti-B- DNA labeling is also detected on the nucleoplasm that corresponds to DNA loops; we confirm the presence of these loops previously described external to the chromosomes (Soyer, M.-O., and O. K. Haapala. 1974. Chromosoma (Berl.). 47

  1. A general framework for effectiveness concepts in mutualisms.

    PubMed

    Schupp, Eugene W; Jordano, Pedro; Gómez, José María

    2017-03-28

    A core interest in studies of mutualistic interactions is the 'effectiveness' of mutualists in providing benefits to their partners. In plant-animal mutualisms it is widely accepted that the total effect of a mutualist on its partner is estimated as (1) a 'quantity' component multiplied by (2) a 'quality' component, although the meanings of 'effectiveness,' 'quantity,' and 'quality' and which terms are applied to these metrics vary greatly across studies. In addition, a similar quantity × quality = total effect approach has not been applied to other types of mutualisms, although it could be informative. Lastly, when a total effect approach has been applied, it has invariably been from a phytocentric perspective, focussing on the effects of animal mutualists on their plant partner. This lack of a common framework of 'effectiveness' of mutualistic interactions limits generalisation and the development of a broader understanding of the ecology and evolution of mutualisms. In this paper, we propose a general framework and demonstrate its utility by applying it to both partners in five different types of mutualisms: pollination, seed dispersal, plant protection, rhizobial, and mycorrhizal mutualisms. We then briefly discuss the flexibility of the framework, potential limitations, and relationship to other approaches.

  2. Persistence of pollination mutualisms in the presence of ants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanshi; Wang, Shikun

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers plant-pollinator-ant systems in which the plant-pollinator interaction is mutualistic but ants have both positive and negative effects on plants. The ants also interfere with pollinators by preventing them from accessing plants. While a Beddington-DeAngelis (BD) formula can describe the plant-pollinator interaction, the formula is extended in this paper to characterize the pollination mutualism under the ant interference. Then, a plant-pollinator-ant system with the extended BD functional response is discussed, and global dynamics of the model demonstrate the mechanisms by which pollination mutualism can persist in the presence of ants. When the ant interference is strong, it can result in extinction of pollinators. Moreover, if the ants depend on pollination mutualism for survival, the strong interference could drive pollinators into extinction, which consequently lead to extinction of the ants themselves. When the ant interference is weak, a cooperation between plant-ant and plant-pollinator mutualisms could occur, which promotes survival of both ants and pollinators, especially in the case that ants (respectively, pollinators) cannot survive in the absence of pollinators (respectively, ants). Even when the level of ant interference remains invariant, varying ants' negative effect on plants can result in survival/extinction of both ants and pollinators. Therefore, our results provide an explanation for the persistence of pollination mutualism when there exist ants.

  3. Population dynamics and mutualism: Functional responses of benefits and costs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2002-01-01

    We develop an approach for studying population dynamics resulting from mutualism by employing functional responses based on density‐dependent benefits and costs. These functional responses express how the population growth rate of a mutualist is modified by the density of its partner. We present several possible dependencies of gross benefits and costs, and hence net effects, to a mutualist as functions of the density of its partner. Net effects to mutualists are likely a monotonically saturating or unimodal function of the density of their partner. We show that fundamental differences in the growth, limitation, and dynamics of a population can occur when net effects to that population change linearly, unimodally, or in a saturating fashion. We use the mutualism between senita cactus and its pollinating seed‐eating moth as an example to show the influence of different benefit and cost functional responses on population dynamics and stability of mutualisms. We investigated two mechanisms that may alter this mutualism's functional responses: distribution of eggs among flowers and fruit abortion. Differences in how benefits and costs vary with density can alter the stability of this mutualism. In particular, fruit abortion may allow for a stable equilibrium where none could otherwise exist.

  4. Mutualism Disruption Threatens Global Plant Biodiversity: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Clare E.; Zavaleta, Erika S.; Tershy, Bernie; Croll, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Background As global environmental change accelerates, biodiversity losses can disrupt interspecific interactions. Extinctions of mutualist partners can create “widow” species, which may face reduced ecological fitness. Hypothetically, such mutualism disruptions could have cascading effects on biodiversity by causing additional species coextinctions. However, the scope of this problem – the magnitude of biodiversity that may lose mutualist partners and the consequences of these losses – remains unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a systematic review and synthesis of data from a broad range of sources to estimate the threat posed by vertebrate extinctions to the global biodiversity of vertebrate-dispersed and -pollinated plants. Though enormous research gaps persist, our analysis identified Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and global oceanic islands as geographic regions at particular risk of disruption of these mutualisms; within these regions, percentages of plant species likely affected range from 2.1–4.5%. Widowed plants are likely to experience reproductive declines of 40–58%, potentially threatening their persistence in the context of other global change stresses. Conclusions Our systematic approach demonstrates that thousands of species may be impacted by disruption in one class of mutualisms, but extinctions will likely disrupt other mutualisms, as well. Although uncertainty is high, there is evidence that mutualism disruption directly threatens significant biodiversity in some geographic regions. Conservation measures with explicit focus on mutualistic functions could be necessary to bolster populations of widowed species and maintain ecosystem functions. PMID:23840571

  5. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Charter

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Charter A Appendix... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Pt. 239, App. A Appendix A to Part 239—Mutual Holding Company Model Charter FEDERAL MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANY CHARTER Section 1: Corporate...

  6. 12 CFR >appendix A to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Charter

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Charter A... FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Pt. 239, App. A >Appendix A to Part 239—Mutual Holding Company Model Charter FEDERAL MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANY CHARTER Section...

  7. 12 CFR Appendix C to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws C Appendix... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Pt. 239, App. C Appendix C to Part 239—Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws MODEL BYLAWS FOR MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES The term “trustees” may...

  8. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Charter

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Charter A Appendix... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Pt. 239, App. A Appendix A to Part 239—Mutual Holding Company Model Charter FEDERAL MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANY CHARTER Section 1: Corporate...

  9. 12 CFR Appendix C to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws C Appendix... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Pt. 239, App. C Appendix C to Part 239—Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws MODEL BYLAWS FOR MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES The term “trustees” may...

  10. 12 CFR Appendix C to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws C Appendix... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Pt. 239, App. C Appendix C to Part 239—Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws MODEL BYLAWS FOR MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES The term “trustees” may...

  11. Early Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima in the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis

    PubMed Central

    Prego-Faraldo, María Verónica; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Laffon, Blanca; Mendez, Josefina; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxins (DTXs) are the main toxins responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) intoxications during harmful algal blooms (HABs). Although the genotoxic and cytotoxic responses to OA have been evaluated in vitro, the in vivo effects of these toxins have not yet been fully explored. The present work fills this gap by evaluating the in vivo effects of the exposure to the DSP-toxin-producing dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima during the simulation of an early HAB episode in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The obtained results revealed that in vivo exposure to this toxic microalgae induced early genotoxicity in hemocytes, as a consequence of oxidative DNA damage. In addition, the DNA damage observed in gill cells seems to be mainly influenced by exposure time and P. lima concentration, similarly to the case of the oxidative damage found in hemocytes exposed in vitro to OA. In both cell types, the absence of DNA damage at low toxin concentrations is consistent with the notion suggesting that this level of toxicity does not disturb the antioxidant balance. Lastly, in vivo exposure to growing P. lima cell densities increased apoptosis but not necrosis, probably due to the presence of a high number of protein apoptosis inhibitors in molluscs. Overall, this work sheds light into the in vivo genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of P. lima. In doing so, it also demonstrates for the first time the potential of the modified (OGG1) comet assay for assessing oxidative DNA damage caused by marine toxins in marine invertebrates. PMID:27231936

  12. Toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in hepatopancreas of shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhongxiu; Li, Jian; Li, Jitao; Tan, Zhijun; Ren, Hai; Zhao, Fazhen

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the inductive effect of Alexandrium tamarense, a toxic dinoflagellate producing paralytic shellfish poison, on oxidative stress and apoptosis in hepatopancreas of Chinese shrimp, Fenneropenaeus chinensis. The individuals of F. chinensis were exposed to 200 and 1000 cells mL-1 of A. tamarense with their superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities, malonyldialdehyde (MDA) concentration, and caspase gene ( FcCasp) expression in hepatopancreas determined at 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. In addition, apoptosis in hepatopancreas of F. chinensis at 96 h after exposure was determined through terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The hepatopancreatic SOD and GST activities of F. chinensis exposed to 1000 cells mL-1 of A. tamarense showed a bell-shaped response to exposure time. The hepatopancreatic MDA concentration of F. chinensis exposed to 1000 cells mL-1 of A. tamarense increased gradually from 48 to 96 h, and such a trend corresponded to the decrease of GST activity. The hepatopancreatic FcCasp transcript abundance of F. chinensis exposed to 1000 cells mL-1 of A. tamarense was positively and linearly correlated to MDA concentration. Results of TUNEL assay showed that exposure to 1000 cells mL-1 of A. tamarense induced apoptosis in the hepatopancreas of F. chinensis. Our study revealed that A. tamarense exposure influenced the antioxidative status of F. chinensis and caused lipid peroxidation and apoptosis in the hepatopancreas of shrimp.

  13. AXENIC CULTIVATION OF THE HETEROTROPHIC DINOFLAGELLATE PFIESTERIA SHUMWAYAE AND OBSERVATIONS ON FEEDING BEHAVIOR(1).

    PubMed

    Skelton, Hayley M; Burkholder, JoAnn M; Parrow, Matthew W

    2008-12-01

    Pfiesteria shumwayae Glasgow et J. M. Burkh. [=Pseudopfiesteria shumwayae (Glasgow et J. M. Burkh.) Litaker, Steid., P. L. Mason, Shields et P. A. Tester] is a heterotrophic dinoflagellate commonly found in temperate, estuarine waters. P. shumwayae can feed on other protists, fish, and invertebrates, but research on the biochemical requirements of this species has been restricted by the lack of axenic cultures. An undefined, biphasic culture medium was formulated that supported the axenic growth of two of three strains of P. shumwayae. The medium contained chicken egg yolk as a major component. Successful growth depended on the method used to sterilize the medium, and maximum cell yields (10(4)  · mL(-1) ) were similar to those attained in previous research when P. shumwayae was cultured with living fish or microalgae. Additionally, P. shumwayae flagellate cells ingested particles present in the biphasic medium, allowing detailed observations of feeding behavior. This research is an initial step toward a chemically defined axenic culture medium and determination of P. shumwayae metabolic requirements.

  14. Endosymbiosis undone by stepwise elimination of the plastid in a parasitic dinoflagellate

    PubMed Central

    Gornik, Sebastian G.; Febrimarsa; Cassin, Andrew M.; MacRae, James I.; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Rchiad, Zineb; McConville, Malcolm J.; Bacic, Antony; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Pain, Arnab; Waller, Ross F.

    2015-01-01

    Organelle gain through endosymbiosis has been integral to the origin and diversification of eukaryotes, and, once gained, plastids and mitochondria seem seldom lost. Indeed, discovery of nonphotosynthetic plastids in many eukaryotes—notably, the apicoplast in apicomplexan parasites such as the malaria pathogen Plasmodium—highlights the essential metabolic functions performed by plastids beyond photosynthesis. Once a cell becomes reliant on these ancillary functions, organelle dependence is apparently difficult to overcome. Previous examples of endosymbiotic organelle loss (either mitochondria or plastids), which have been invoked to explain the origin of eukaryotic diversity, have subsequently been recognized as organelle reduction to cryptic forms, such as mitosomes and apicoplasts. Integration of these ancient symbionts with their hosts has been too well developed to reverse. Here, we provide evidence that the dinoflagellate Hematodinium sp., a marine parasite of crustaceans, represents a rare case of endosymbiotic organelle loss by the elimination of the plastid. Extensive RNA and genomic sequencing data provide no evidence for a plastid organelle, but, rather, reveal a metabolic decoupling from known plastid functions that typically impede organelle loss. This independence has been achieved through retention of ancestral anabolic pathways, enzyme relocation from the plastid to the cytosol, and metabolic scavenging from the parasite’s host. Hematodinium sp. thus represents a further dimension of endosymbiosis—life after the organelle. PMID:25902514

  15. Characterization of a planctomycete associated with the marine dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans Her.

    PubMed

    Lage, Olga Maria

    2013-10-01

    During attempts to obtain axenic the cultures of the marine dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans, a microorganism with peculiar features was isolated. This contaminant resisted the physical and antibiotic treatments performed. Subsequent characterization showed that in agar plates this microorganism develops round granular pink colonies. It is a salt-dependent mesophilic and chemoheterotrophic Gram negative bacterium with a rod to ovoid shape, presenting cell motility in young cultures. Cell division occurs by cell budding. The bacterium forms aggregates with a variable number of cells that are stacked by fibrillar glycoproteic material, the holdfast. A tuft of numerous short glycoproteic fimbriae emerges from one pole of the cell. Preeminent granular inclusions, also of glycoproteic nature, are present in the cytoplasm. Several structural and compositional aspects of the cell envelope and cytoplasm are provided. The production of fibrillar material and the existence of the polar appendages suggest that this microorganism should occur in aquatic environments bound to substrates and could be associated with P. micans in natural marine habitats. Based on the characteristics displayed, this microorganism is a member of the Planctomycetes, order Planctomycetales.

  16. Heterotrophic feeding as a newly identified survival strategy of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hae Jin; Du Yoo, Yeong; Kang, Nam Seon; Lim, An Suk; Seong, Kyeong Ah; Lee, Sung Yeon; Lee, Moo Joon; Lee, Kyung Ha; Kim, Hyung Seop; Shin, Woongghi; Nam, Seung Won; Yih, Wonho; Lee, Kitack

    2012-07-01

    Survival of free-living and symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium spp.) in coral reefs is critical to the maintenance of a healthy coral community. Most coral reefs exist in oligotrophic waters, and their survival strategy in such nutrient-depleted waters remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that two strains of Symbiodinium spp. cultured from the environment and acquired from the tissues of the coral Alveopora japonica had the ability to feed heterotrophically. Symbiodinium spp. fed on heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria (Synechococcus spp.), and small microalgae in both nutrient-replete and nutrient-depleted conditions. Cultured free-living Symbiodinium spp. displayed no autotrophic growth under nitrogen-depleted conditions, but grew when provided with prey. Our results indicate that Symbiodinium spp.'s mixotrophic activity greatly increases their chance of survival and their population growth under nitrogen-depleted conditions, which tend to prevail in coral habitats. In particular, free-living Symbiodinium cells acquired considerable nitrogen from algal prey, comparable to or greater than the direct uptake of ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, or urea. In addition, free-living Symbiodinium spp. can be a sink for planktonic cyanobacteria (Synechococcus spp.) and remove substantial portions of Synechococcus populations from coral reef waters. Our discovery of Symbiodinium's feeding alters our conventional views of the survival strategies of photosynthetic Symbiodinium and corals.

  17. Rapid growth and concerted sexual transitions by a bloom of the harmful dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense (Dinophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Velo‐Suárez, Lourdes; Ralston, David K.; Fox, Sophia E.; Sehein, Taylor R.; Shalapyonok, Alexi; Sosik, Heidi M.; Olson, Robert J.; Anderson, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transitions between life cycle stages by the harmful dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense are critical for the initiation and termination of its blooms. To quantify these transitions in a single population, an Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB), was deployed in Salt Pond (Eastham, Massachusetts), a small, tidally flushed kettle pond that hosts near annual, localized A. fundyense blooms. Machine‐based image classifiers differentiating A. fundyense life cycle stages were developed and results were compared to manually corrected IFCB samples, manual microscopy‐based estimates of A. fundyense abundance, previously published data describing prevalence of the parasite Amoebophrya, and a continuous culture of A. fundyense infected with Amoebophrya. In Salt Pond, a development phase of sustained vegetative division lasted approximately 3 weeks and was followed by a rapid and near complete conversion to small, gamete cells. The gametic period (∼3 d) coincided with a spike in the frequency of fusing gametes (up to 5% of A. fundyense images) and was followed by a zygotic phase (∼4 d) during which cell sizes returned to their normal range but cell division and diel vertical migration ceased. Cell division during bloom development was strongly phased, enabling estimation of daily rates of division, which were more than twice those predicted from batch cultures grown at similar temperatures in replete medium. Data from the Salt Pond deployment provide the first continuous record of an A. fundyense population through its complete bloom cycle and demonstrate growth and sexual induction rates much higher than are typically observed in culture. PMID:27667858

  18. Circadian rhythms of cell cycle processes in the marine dinoflagellate Gonyaulax polyedra.

    PubMed

    Vicker, M G; Becker, J; Gebauer, G; Schill, W; Rensing, L

    1988-01-01

    The circadian expression of several growth properties was examined in the dinoflagellate Gonyaulax polyedra under constant light and light-dark conditions. The cell concentration, mean cell volume and rate of DNA synthesis varied in a circadian rhythm, with the primary maximum of cytokinesis and DNA synthesis at about dawn. High rates of cell mortality also occurred during phases related to events of cytokinesis, and may be important in the expression of the other rhythms and in "red tide" generation. Flow-cytofluorimetric analysis indicated that cells of a population contain either a relatively high or a low amount of DNA, but the proportion of cells in each of these classes and the absolute amount of DNA in each cell varied rhythmically depending on the circadian time. This DNA-distribution pattern was unlike the usual G1-S-G2+M pattern typical of eukaryotic cell populations. Isotopically labelled thymidine, used as a marker of DNA synthesis, was continuously incorporated; but the incorporation rate fluctuated in a regular pattern that repeated each circadian period.

  19. Antialgal and antilarval activities of bioactive compounds extracted from the marine dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xianyu; Han, Xiurong; Gao, Min; Su, Rongguo; Wang, Ke; Li, Xuzhao; Lu, Wei

    2016-12-01

    With the global ban on the application of organotin-based marine coatings by the International Maritime Organization, the development of environmentally friendly, low-toxic and nontoxic antifouling compounds for marine industries has become an urgent need. Marine microorganisms have been considered as a potential source of natural antifoulants. In this study, the antifouling potential of marine dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae, the toxic and red-tide microalgae, was investigated. We performed a series of operations to extract the bioactive substances from Amphidinium carterae and tested their antialgal and antilarval activities. The crude extract of Amphidinium carterae showed significant antialgal activity and the EC50 value against Skeletonema costatum was 55.4 μg mL-1. After purification, the isolated bioactive substances (the organic extract C) exhibited much higher antialgal and antilarval activities with EC50 of 12.9 μg mL-1 against Skeletonema costatum and LC50 of 15.1 μg mL-1 against Amphibalanus amphitrite larvae. Subsequently, IR, Q-TOFMS, and GC-MS were utilized for the structural elucidation of the bioactive compounds, and a series of unsaturated and saturated 16- to 22-carbon fatty acids were detected. The data suggested the bioactive compounds isolated from Amphidinium carterae exhibited a significant inhibiting effect against the diatom Skeletonema costatum and Amphibalanus amphitrite larvae, and could be substitutes for persistent, toxic antifouling compounds.

  20. Macroalgal-Associated Dinoflagellates Belonging to the Genus Symbiodinium in Caribbean Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Porto, Isabel; Granados, Camila; Restrepo, Juan C.; Sánchez, Juan A.

    2008-01-01

    Coral-algal symbiosis has been a subject of great attention during the last two decades in response to global coral reef decline. However, the occurrence and dispersion of free-living dinoflagellates belonging to the genus Symbiodinium are less documented. Here ecological and molecular evidence is presented demonstrating the existence of demersal free-living Symbiodinium populations in Caribbean reefs and the possible role of the stoplight parrotfish (Sparisoma viride) as Symbiodinium spp. dispersers. Communities of free-living Symbiodinium were found within macroalgal beds consisting of Halimeda spp., Lobophora variegata, Amphiroa spp., Caulerpa spp. and Dictyota spp. Viable Symbiodinium spp. cells were isolated and cultured from macroalgal beds and S. viride feces. Further identification of Symbiodinium spp. type was determined by length variation in the Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS2, nuclear rDNA) and length variation in domain V of the chloroplast large subunit ribosomal DNA (cp23S-rDNA). Determination of free-living Symbiodinium and mechanisms of dispersal is important in understanding the life cycle of Symbiodinium spp. PMID:18478069

  1. Molecular isotopic and dinoflagellate evidence for Late Holocene freshening of the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Baas, Marianne; Brinkhuis, Henk; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    The Black Sea is the world's largest anoxic basin with oxygen-free conditions below water depths of approximately 100 m resulting from strong density stratification. The salinity of its surface water likely varied substantially over time due to variations in freshwater input from large rivers and in the saline bottom water of Mediterranean origin coming across the shallow sill of the Bosporus. However, long-term reconstructions of surface water salinities are lacking. The invasion of the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi in the Black Sea at approximately 2720 a, responsible for a marked change in sediment composition (lithology), has been commonly attributed to salinity levels rising above 11. We analyzed the δD values of long-chain alkenones produced by haptophyte algae, mainly E. huxleyi, in a core from the eastern basin of the Black Sea to reconstruct past variations in sea surface salinities, and combined this with relative salinity changes generated from organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) distributions from the same core. Combined results indicate a substantial freshening of Black Sea surface waters in the last 3000 years, suggesting that sea surface salinity was substantially higher than the present-day salinity of approximately 18 at the time E. huxleyi invaded the Black Sea.

  2. Balechina and the New Genus Cucumeridinium Gen. Nov. (Dinophyceae), Unarmored Dinoflagellates with Thick Cell Coverings

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Fernando; López-García, Purificación; Takayama, Haruyoshi; Moreira, David

    2016-01-01

    The genus Balechina (=subgenus Pachydinium) was established for heterotrophic gymnodinioid dinoflagellates with a thick cell covering. The type species, B. pachydermata (=Gymnodinium pachydermatum), showed numerous fine longitudinal striae, whereas B. coerulea (=G. coeruleum) showed ~24 prominent longitudinal surface ridges or furrows and a distinctive blue pigmentation. We have investigated the morphology and molecular phylogeny of these taxa and the species Gymnodinium cucumis, G. lira and G. amphora from the western Mediterranean, Brazil and Japan. Sudden contractions at the cingulum level were seen in B. pachydermata, which also showed a high morphological variability which included morphotypes that have been described as Amphidinium vasculum, G. amphora, G. dogielii and G. gracile sensu Kofoid and Swezy. Molecular phylogeny based on small subunit rRNA gene sequences revealed that Balechina coerulea, G. cucumis and G. lira formed a clade distantly related to the clade of the type species, B. pachydermata, and G. amphora. We propose the new genus Cucumeridinium for the species with longitudinal ridges and a circular apical groove (Cucumeridinium coeruleum comb. nov., C. lira comb. nov. and C. cucumis comb. nov.), and Gymnodinium canus and G. costatum are considered synonyms of C. coeruleum. The genus Balechina remains for the species with a double-layer cell covering, bossed surface with fine striae, and an elongated elliptical apical groove. At present, the genus is monotypic containing only B. pachydermata. PMID:26987004

  3. From homothally to heterothally: Mating preferences and genetic variation within clones of the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Rosa Isabel; Rengefors, Karin; Bravo, Isabel; Bensch, Staffan

    2010-02-01

    The chain-forming dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum Graham is responsible for outbreaks of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), a human health threat in coastal waters. Sexuality in this species is of great importance in its bloom dynamics, and has been shown to be very complex but lacks an explanation. For this reason, we tested if unreported homothallic behavior and rapid genetic changes may clarify the sexual system of this alga. To achieve this objective, 12 clonal strains collected from the Spanish coast were analyzed for the presence of sexual reproduction. Mating affinity results, self-compatibility studies, and genetic fingerprinting (amplified fragment length polymorphism, AFLP) analysis on clonal strains, showed three facts not previously described for this species: (i) That there is a continuous mating system within G. catenatum, with either self-compatible strains (homothallic), or strains that needed to be outcrossed (heterothallic), and with a range of differences in cyst production among the crosses. (ii) There was intraclonal genetic variation, i.e. genetic variation within an asexual lineage. Moreover, the variability among homothallic clones was smaller than among the heterothallic ones. (iii) Sibling strains (the two strains established by the germination of one cyst) increased their intra- and inter-sexual compatibility with time. To summarize, we have found that G. catenatum's sexual system is much more complex than previously described, including complex homothallic/heterothallic behaviors. Additionally, high rates of genetic variability may arise in clonal strains, although explanations for the mechanisms responsible are still lacking.

  4. Phosphate deficiency promotes coral bleaching and is reflected by the ultrastructure of symbiotic dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Rosset, Sabrina; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Reed, Adam J; D'Angelo, Cecilia

    2017-02-24

    Enrichment of reef environments with dissolved inorganic nutrients is considered a major threat to the survival of corals living in symbiosis with dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium sp.). We argue, however, that the direct negative effects on the symbiosis are not necessarily caused by the nutrient enrichment itself but by the phosphorus starvation of the algal symbionts that can be caused by skewed nitrogen (N) to phosphorus (P) ratios. We exposed corals to imbalanced N:P ratios in long-term experiments and found that the undersupply of phosphate severely disturbed the symbiosis, indicated by the loss of coral biomass, malfunctioning of algal photosynthesis and bleaching of the corals. In contrast, the corals tolerated an undersupply with nitrogen at high phosphate concentrations without negative effects on symbiont photosynthesis, suggesting a better adaptation to nitrogen limitation. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that the signatures of ultrastructural biomarkers represent versatile tools for the classification of nutrient stress in symbiotic algae. Notably, high N:P ratios in the water were clearly identified by the accumulation of uric acid crystals.

  5. Macroalgal-associated dinoflagellates belonging to the genus Symbiodinium in Caribbean reefs.

    PubMed

    Porto, Isabel; Granados, Camila; Restrepo, Juan C; Sánchez, Juan A

    2008-05-14

    Coral-algal symbiosis has been a subject of great attention during the last two decades in response to global coral reef decline. However, the occurrence and dispersion of free-living dinoflagellates belonging to the genus Symbiodinium are less documented. Here ecological and molecular evidence is presented demonstrating the existence of demersal free-living Symbiodinium populations in Caribbean reefs and the possible role of the stoplight parrotfish (Sparisoma viride) as Symbiodinium spp. dispersers. Communities of free-living Symbiodinium were found within macroalgal beds consisting of Halimeda spp., Lobophora variegata, Amphiroa spp., Caulerpa spp. and Dictyota spp. Viable Symbiodinium spp. cells were isolated and cultured from macroalgal beds and S. viride feces. Further identification of Symbiodinium spp. type was determined by length variation in the Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS2, nuclear rDNA) and length variation in domain V of the chloroplast large subunit ribosomal DNA (cp23S-rDNA). Determination of free-living Symbiodinium and mechanisms of dispersal is important in understanding the life cycle of Symbiodinium spp.

  6. Early Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima in the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Prego-Faraldo, María Verónica; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Laffon, Blanca; Mendez, Josefina; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M

    2016-05-24

    Okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxins (DTXs) are the main toxins responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) intoxications during harmful algal blooms (HABs). Although the genotoxic and cytotoxic responses to OA have been evaluated in vitro, the in vivo effects of these toxins have not yet been fully explored. The present work fills this gap by evaluating the in vivo effects of the exposure to the DSP-toxin-producing dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima during the simulation of an early HAB episode in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The obtained results revealed that in vivo exposure to this toxic microalgae induced early genotoxicity in hemocytes, as a consequence of oxidative DNA damage. In addition, the DNA damage observed in gill cells seems to be mainly influenced by exposure time and P. lima concentration, similarly to the case of the oxidative damage found in hemocytes exposed in vitro to OA. In both cell types, the absence of DNA damage at low toxin concentrations is consistent with the notion suggesting that this level of toxicity does not disturb the antioxidant balance. Lastly, in vivo exposure to growing P. lima cell densities increased apoptosis but not necrosis, probably due to the presence of a high number of protein apoptosis inhibitors in molluscs. Overall, this work sheds light into the in vivo genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of P. lima. In doing so, it also demonstrates for the first time the potential of the modified (OGG1) comet assay for assessing oxidative DNA damage caused by marine toxins in marine invertebrates.

  7. Biotransformation and assimilation of dietary lipids by Calanus feeding on a dinoflagellate

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, H.R.; Eglinton, G. ); O'Hara, S.C.M.; Corner, E.D.S. )

    1987-11-01

    Stage V and adult females of the marine copepod Calanus helgolandicus were fed in the laboratory on the dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea at three concentrations calculated to represent pelagic ocean to bloom conditions. The identification and quantification of sterols, fatty acids and alcohols present in the algal diet, copepods and their faecal pellets were then carried out using computerized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (C-GC-MS). The results showed marked differences in the proportion of the three lipid classes removed, with highest values found for fatty acids and the lowest for sterols. Up to 97% of ingested algal fatty acids were removed by the copepod, with a preference towards the removal of polyunsaturated acids. Algal sterols were also removed by Calanus; the percentage composition and concentration of sterols in faecal pellets differing from the algal diet at all three food levels. Evidence that the removal of lipids from the diet represented assimilation by the copepods was provided by the further finding that during the feeding period (20 hr) all three lipid classes increased in animal tissues. Quantitative measurements of individual sterols revealed that significant amounts of 4-methyl and 4-desmethyl sterols having the 8(14) and 17(20) unsaturation were removed at all dietary levels. In contrast, ring-saturated stanols were not removed and appear to pass through the gut quantitatively.

  8. Biomass and lipid production of dinoflagellates and raphidophytes in indoor and outdoor photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Grünewald, C; Garcés, E; Alacid, E; Rossi, S; Camp, J

    2013-02-01

    The principal fatty acids from the lipid profiles of two autochthonous dinoflagellates (Alexandrium minutum and Karlodinium veneficum) and one raphidophyte (Heterosigma akashiwo) maintained in bubble column photobioreactors under outdoor culture conditions are described for the first time. The biomass production, lipid content and lipid productivity of these three species were determined and the results compared to those obtained when the strains were cultured indoors. Under the latter condition, the biotic values did not significantly differ among species, whereas under outdoor conditions, differences in both duplication time and fatty acids content were observed. Specifically, A. minutum had higher biomass productivity (0.35 g·L⁻¹ day⁻¹), lipid productivity (80.7 mg lipid·L⁻¹ day⁻¹) and lipid concentration (252 mg lipid·L⁻¹) at harvest time (stationary phase) in outdoor conditions. In all three strains, the growth rate and physiological response to the light and temperature fluctuations of outdoor conditions greatly impacted the production parameters. Nonetheless, the species could be successfully grown in an outdoor photobioreactor and were of sufficient robustness to enable the establishment of long-term cultures yielding consistent biomass and lipid production.

  9. Grazers and vitamins shape chain formation in a bloom-forming dinoflagellate, Cochlodinium polykrikoides.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaodong; Lonsdale, Darcy J; Gobler, Christopher J

    2010-10-01

    Predators influence the phenotype of prey through both natural selection and induction. We investigated the effects of grazers and nutrients on chain formation in a dinoflagellate, Cochlodinium polykrikoides, which forms dense blooms and has deleterious effects on marine ecosystems around the world. Field populations of C. polykrikoides formed longer chains than laboratory cultures without grazers. In the field, chain length of C. polykrikoides was positively correlated with the abundance of the copepod Acartia tonsa. Chain length of C. polykrikoides increased when exposed to live females of A. tonsa or its fresh (<24 h post-isolation) exudates for 48 h. These results suggest that dissolved chemical cues released by A. tonsa induce chain formation in C. polykrikoides. Ingestion rate of A. tonsa on four-cell chains of C. polykrikoides was lower than on single cells, suggesting that chain formation may be an effective anti-grazing defense. Finally, nutrient amendment experiments demonstrated that vitamins (B(1), B(7), and B(12)) increased the chain length of C. polykrikoides both singly and collectively, while trace metals and inorganic nutrients did not, showing that vitamins may also influence chain formation in this species.

  10. Cohesive molecular genetic data delineate species diversity in the dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium.

    PubMed

    Sampayo, E M; Dove, S; Lajeunesse, T C

    2009-02-01

    The diversity of symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium) in pocilloporid corals originating from various reef habitats surrounding Heron Island, southern Great Barrier Reef, was examined by targeting ribosomal, mitochondrial, and chloroplast genes using six methods that analyse for sequence differences. The ability of each of 13 genetic analyses to characterize eight ecologically distinct Symbiodinium spp. was dependent on the level of conservation of the gene region targeted and the technique used. Other than differences in resolution, phylogenetic reconstructions using nuclear and organelle gene sequences were complementary and when combined produced a well-resolved phylogeny. Analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacers using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting in combination with sequencing of dominant bands provided a precise method for rapidly resolving and characterizing symbionts into ecologically and evolutionarily distinct units of diversity. Single-stranded conformation polymorphisms of the nuclear ribosomal large subunit (D1/D2 domain) identified the same number of ecologically distinct Symbiodinium spp., but profiles were less distinctive. The repetitive sequencing of bacterially cloned ITS2 polymerase chain reaction amplifications generated numerous sequence variants that clustered together according to the symbiont under analysis. The phylogenetic relationships between these clusters show how intragenomic variation in the ribosomal array diverges among closely related eukaryotic genomes. The strong correlation between phylogenetically independent lineages with different ecological and physiological attributes establishes a clear basis for assigning species designations to members of the genus Symbiodinium.

  11. Inactivation of dinoflagellate Scripsiella trochoidea in synthetic ballast water by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhishan; Jiang, Wenju; Zhang, Yi; Lim, T M

    2015-01-01

    Ship-borne ballast water contributes significantly to the transfer of non-indigenous species across aquatic environments. To reduce the risk of bio-invasion, ballast water should be treated before discharge. In this study, the efficiencies of several conventional and advanced oxidation processes were investigated for potential ballast water treatment, using a marine dinoflagellate species, Scripsiella trochoidea, as the indicator organism. A stable and consistent culture was obtained and treated by ultraviolet (UV) light, ozone (O3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and their various combinations. UV apparently inactivated the cells after only 10 s of irradiation, but subsequently photo-reactivation of the cells was observed for all methods involving UV. O3 exhibited 100% inactivation efficiency after 5 min treatment, while H2O2 only achieved maximum 80% inactivation in the same duration. Combined methods, e.g. UV/O3 and UV/H2O2, were found to inhibit photo-reactivation and improve treatment efficiency to some degree, indicating the effectiveness of using combined treatment processes. The total residual oxidant (TRO) levels of the methods were determined, and the results indicated that UV and O3 generated the lowest and highest TRO, respectively. The synergic effect of combined processes on TRO generation was found to be insignificant, and thus UV/O3 was recommended as a potentially suitable treatment process for ballast water.

  12. Mortality in cultures of the dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae during culture senescence and darkness.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Daniel J.; Berges, John A.

    2004-01-01

    The study of cell death in higher plants and animals has revealed the existence of an active ('programmed') process in most types of cell, and similarities in cell death between plants, animals, yeast and bacteria suggest an evolutionarily ancient origin of programmed cell death (PCD). Despite their global importance in primary production, information on algal cell death is limited. Algal cell death could have similarities with metazoan cell death. One morphotype of metazoan PCD, apoptosis, can be induced by light deprivation in the unicellular chlorophyte Dunaliella tertiolecta. The situation in other algal taxa is less clear. We used a model dinoflagellate (Amphidinium carterae) to test whether mortality during darkness and culture senescence showed apoptotic characteristics. Using transmission electron microscopy, fluorescent biomarkers, chlorophyll fluorescence and particulate carbon analysis we analysed the process of cell mortality and found that light deprivation caused mass mortality. By contrast, fewer dead cells (5-20% of the population) were found in late-phase cultures, while a similar degenerate cell morphology (shrunken, chlorotic) was observed. On morphological grounds, our observations suggest that the apoptotic cell death described in D. tertiolecta does not occur in A. carterae. Greater similarity was found with paraptosis, a recently proposed alternative morphotype of PCD. A paraptotic conclusion is supported by inconclusive DNA fragmentation results. We emphasize the care that must be taken in transferring fundamental paradigms between phylogenetically diverse cell types and we argue for a greater consistency in the burden of proof needed to assign causality to cell death processes. PMID:15475328

  13. Characterization of tamulamides A and B, polyethers isolated from the marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis.

    PubMed

    Truxal, Laura T; Bourdelais, Andrea J; Jacocks, Henry; Abraham, William M; Baden, Daniel G

    2010-04-23

    Florida red tides occur as the result of blooms of the marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. K. brevis is known to produce several families of fused polyether ladder compounds. The most notable compounds are the brevetoxins, potent neurotoxins that activate mammalian sodium channels. Additional fused polyether ladder compounds produced by K. brevis include brevenal, brevisin, and hemibrevetoxin B, all with varying affinities for the same binding site on voltage-sensitive sodium channels. The structure elucidation and biological activity of two additional fused polyether ladder compounds containing seven fused ether rings will be described in this paper. Tamulamide A (MW = 638.30) and tamulamide B (MW = 624.29) were isolated from K. brevis cultures, and their structures elucidated using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Tamulamides A and B were both found to compete with tritiated brevetoxin-3 ([(3)H]-PbTx-3) for its binding site on rat brain synaptosomes. However, unlike the brevetoxins, tamulamides A and B showed no toxicity to fish at doses up to 200 nM and did not cause significant bronchoconstriction in sheep pulmonary assays.

  14. Relevance of the dinoflagellate Gonyaulax fragilis in mucilage formations of the Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Pistocchi, Rossella; Cangini, Monica; Totti, Cecilia; Urbani, Ranieri; Guerrini, Franca; Romagnoli, Tiziana; Sist, Paola; Palamidesi, Simona; Boni, Laurita; Pompei, Marinella

    2005-12-15

    Oceanographic cruises were carried out monthly from June 1999 to July 2002 to follow the mucilage formation process in the Northern Adriatic Sea. Results show that in correspondence with these events the dinoflagellate Gonyaulax fragilis (Schütt) Kofoid was observed both in the water column and within mucilage aggregates. In the water column, increasing abundances were observed from May until July, with values never exceeding 8500 cells l(-1). Much higher densities were observed within superficial gelatinous aggregates (22800-3400000 cells l(-1)). In mucilage samples, a large number of decomposing cells were present, together with abundant alive cells, enveloped in exudates. G. fragilis isolated from mucilage samples was cultured in three different culture media; it was characterized by a low growth rate but it produced a high amount of polysaccharides. The highest yield both in terms of cell number and carbohydrate production was observed in the medium having the highest nitrogen and phosphorus content and the lowest N/P ratio. The monomeric composition of G. fragilis carbohydrates, compared with that of mucilage samples, showed that in both natural and cultured samples galactose was the most abundant sugar; in addition, an overall good correlation, especially between the monomeric carbohydrate composition of G. fragilis grown in f/2 medium and that of a mucilage sample in which this species was present in high density, was observed.

  15. Arctic Dinoflagellate Migration Marks the Oligocene Glacial Maximum: Implications for the Rupelian-Chattian Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Simaeys, S.; Brinkhuis, H.; Pross, J.; Williams, G. L.; Zachos, J. C.

    2004-12-01

    Various geochemical and biotic climate proxies, and notably deep-sea benthic foraminiferal δ 18O records indicate that the Eocene 'greenhouse' state of the Earth gradually evolved towards an earliest Oligocene 'icehouse' state, eventually triggering the abrupt appearance of large continental ice-sheets on Antarctic at ˜33.3 Ma (Oi-1 event). This, however, was only the first of two major glacial events in the Oligocene. Benthic foraminiferal δ 18O records show a second positive excursion in the mid Oligocene, consistent with a significant ice-sheet expansion and/or cooling at 27.1 Ma (Oi-2b) coincident with magnetosubchron C9n. Here, we report on a mid Oligocene, globally synchronous, Arctic dinoflagellate migration event, calibrated against the upper half of C9n. A sudden appearance, and abundance increases of the Arctic taxon Svalbardella at lower-middle latitudes coincides with the so-called Oi-2b benthic δ 18O event, dated at ˜27.1 Ma. This phenomenon is taken to indicate significant high-latitude surface water cooling, concomitant Antarctic ice-sheet growth, and sea level lowering. The duration of the Svalbardella migrations, and the episode of profound cooling is estimated as ˜500 ka, and is here termed the Oligocene Glacial Maximum (OGM). Our records suggest a close link between the OGM, sea-level fall, and the classic Rupelian-Chattian boundary, magnetostratigraphically dating this boundary as ˜27.1 Ma.

  16. Identification of a vacuolar proton channel that triggers the bioluminescent flash in dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Juan D.; Haq, Saddef; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan; Nowak, Kristine F.; Nowak, Scott J.; Morgan, Deri; Cherny, Vladimir V.; Sapp, Maredith M.; Bernstein, Steven; Bolt, Andrew; DeCoursey, Thomas E.; Place, Allen R.; Smith, Susan M. E.

    2017-01-01

    In 1972, J. Woodland Hastings and colleagues predicted the existence of a proton selective channel (HV1) that opens in response to depolarizing voltage across the vacuole membrane of bioluminescent dinoflagellates and conducts protons into specialized luminescence compartments (scintillons), thereby causing a pH drop that triggers light emission. HV1 channels were subsequently identified and demonstrated to have important functions in a multitude of eukaryotic cells. Here we report a predicted protein from Lingulodinium polyedrum that displays hallmark properties of bona fide HV1, including time-dependent opening with depolarization, perfect proton selectivity, and characteristic ΔpH dependent gating. Western blotting and fluorescence confocal microscopy of isolated L. polyedrum scintillons immunostained with antibody to LpHV1 confirm LpHV1’s predicted organellar location. Proteomics analysis demonstrates that isolated scintillon preparations contain peptides that map to LpHV1. Finally, Zn2+ inhibits both LpHV1 proton current and the acid-induced flash in isolated scintillons. These results implicate LpHV1 as the voltage gated proton channel that triggers bioluminescence in L. polyedrum, confirming Hastings’ hypothesis. The same channel likely mediates the action potential that communicates the signal along the tonoplast to the scintillon. PMID:28178296

  17. Heterotrophic feeding as a newly identified survival strategy of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hae Jin; Yoo, Yeong Du; Kang, Nam Seon; Lim, An Suk; Seong, Kyeong Ah; Lee, Sung Yeon; Lee, Moo Joon; Lee, Kyung Ha; Kim, Hyung Seop; Shin, Woongghi; Nam, Seung Won; Yih, Wonho; Lee, Kitack

    2012-01-01

    Survival of free-living and symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium spp.) in coral reefs is critical to the maintenance of a healthy coral community. Most coral reefs exist in oligotrophic waters, and their survival strategy in such nutrient-depleted waters remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that two strains of Symbiodinium spp. cultured from the environment and acquired from the tissues of the coral Alveopora japonica had the ability to feed heterotrophically. Symbiodinium spp. fed on heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria (Synechococcus spp.), and small microalgae in both nutrient-replete and nutrient-depleted conditions. Cultured free-living Symbiodinium spp. displayed no autotrophic growth under nitrogen-depleted conditions, but grew when provided with prey. Our results indicate that Symbiodinium spp.’s mixotrophic activity greatly increases their chance of survival and their population growth under nitrogen-depleted conditions, which tend to prevail in coral habitats. In particular, free-living Symbiodinium cells acquired considerable nitrogen from algal prey, comparable to or greater than the direct uptake of ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, or urea. In addition, free-living Symbiodinium spp. can be a sink for planktonic cyanobacteria (Synechococcus spp.) and remove substantial portions of Synechococcus populations from coral reef waters. Our discovery of Symbiodinium’s feeding alters our conventional views of the survival strategies of photosynthetic Symbiodinium and corals. PMID:22814379

  18. Control of the red tide dinoflagellate Cochlodinium polykrikoides by ozone in seawater.

    PubMed

    Shin, Minjung; Lee, Hye-Jin; Kim, Min Sik; Park, Noh-Back; Lee, Changha

    2017-02-01

    The inactivation of C. polykrikoides, a red tide dinoflagellate, by ozonation was investigated in seawater by monitoring numbers of viable and total cells. Parameters affecting the inactivation efficacy of C. polykrikoides such as the ozone dose, initial cell concentration, pH, and temperature were examined. The viable cell number rapidly decreased in the initial stage of the reaction (mostly in 1-2 min), whereas the decrease in total cell number was relatively slow and steady. Increasing ozone dose and decreasing initial cell concentration increased the inactivation efficacy of C. polykrikoides, while increasing pH and temperature decreased the cell inactivation efficacy. The addition of humic acid (a promoter for the ozone decomposition) inhibited the inactivation of C. polykrikoides, whereas bicarbonate ion (an inhibitor for the ozone decomposition) accelerated the C. polykrikoides inactivation. Observations regarding the effects of pH, temperature, humic acid, and bicarbonate ion collectively indicate that the inactivation of C. polykrikoides by ozonation is mainly attributed to oxidative cell damages by molecular ozone, rather than by hydroxyl radical, produced during the ozone decomposition. At high ozone dose (e.g., 5 mg/L), hypobromous acid formed by the reaction of bromide with ozone may partially contribute to cell inactivation. The use of ozone of less than 1 mg/L produced 0.75-2.03 μg/L bromate.

  19. Identification of a vacuolar proton channel that triggers the bioluminescent flash in dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Juan D; Haq, Saddef; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan; Nowak, Kristine F; Nowak, Scott J; Morgan, Deri; Cherny, Vladimir V; Sapp, Maredith M; Bernstein, Steven; Bolt, Andrew; DeCoursey, Thomas E; Place, Allen R; Smith, Susan M E

    2017-01-01

    In 1972, J. Woodland Hastings and colleagues predicted the existence of a proton selective channel (HV1) that opens in response to depolarizing voltage across the vacuole membrane of bioluminescent dinoflagellates and conducts protons into specialized luminescence compartments (scintillons), thereby causing a pH drop that triggers light emission. HV1 channels were subsequently identified and demonstrated to have important functions in a multitude of eukaryotic cells. Here we report a predicted protein from Lingulodinium polyedrum that displays hallmark properties of bona fide HV1, including time-dependent opening with depolarization, perfect proton selectivity, and characteristic ΔpH dependent gating. Western blotting and fluorescence confocal microscopy of isolated L. polyedrum scintillons immunostained with antibody to LpHV1 confirm LpHV1's predicted organellar location. Proteomics analysis demonstrates that isolated scintillon preparations contain peptides that map to LpHV1. Finally, Zn2+ inhibits both LpHV1 proton current and the acid-induced flash in isolated scintillons. These results implicate LpHV1 as the voltage gated proton channel that triggers bioluminescence in L. polyedrum, confirming Hastings' hypothesis. The same channel likely mediates the action potential that communicates the signal along the tonoplast to the scintillon.

  20. 2D-PAGE protein analysis of dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum based on three different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latib, Norhidayu Abdul; Norshaha, Safida Anira; Usup, Gires; Yusof, Nurul Yuziana Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Harmful algae bloom or red tide seems to be considered as threat to ecosystem, especially to human consumption because of the production of neurotoxin by dinoflagellates species such as Alexandrium minutum which can lead to paralytic shellfish poisoning. The aim of this study is to determine the most suitable method for protein extraction of A. minutum followed by determination of differential protein expression of A. minutum on three different temperatures (15°C, 26°C and 31.5°C). After the optimization, the protein extract was subjected to two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to compare the intensity and distribution of the protein spots. Based on quantitative and qualitative protein assessment, use of Trizol reagent is the most suitable method to extract protein from A. minutum. 2-DE analysis of the samples results in different distribution and intensity of the protein spots were compared between 15°C, 26°C and 31.5°C.

  1. Endosymbiosis undone by stepwise elimination of the plastid in a parasitic dinoflagellate.

    PubMed

    Gornik, Sebastian G; Febrimarsa; Cassin, Andrew M; MacRae, James I; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Rchiad, Zineb; McConville, Malcolm J; Bacic, Antony; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Pain, Arnab; Waller, Ross F

    2015-05-05

    Organelle gain through endosymbiosis has been integral to the origin and diversification of eukaryotes, and, once gained, plastids and mitochondria seem seldom lost. Indeed, discovery of nonphotosynthetic plastids in many eukaryotes--notably, the apicoplast in apicomplexan parasites such as the malaria pathogen Plasmodium--highlights the essential metabolic functions performed by plastids beyond photosynthesis. Once a cell becomes reliant on these ancillary functions, organelle dependence is apparently difficult to overcome. Previous examples of endosymbiotic organelle loss (either mitochondria or plastids), which have been invoked to explain the origin of eukaryotic diversity, have subsequently been recognized as organelle reduction to cryptic forms, such as mitosomes and apicoplasts. Integration of these ancient symbionts with their hosts has been too well developed to reverse. Here, we provide evidence that the dinoflagellate Hematodinium sp., a marine parasite of crustaceans, represents a rare case of endosymbiotic organelle loss by the elimination of the plastid. Extensive RNA and genomic sequencing data provide no evidence for a plastid organelle, but, rather, reveal a metabolic decoupling from known plastid functions that typically impede organelle loss. This independence has been achieved through retention of ancestral anabolic pathways, enzyme relocation from the plastid to the cytosol, and metabolic scavenging from the parasite's host. Hematodinium sp. thus represents a further dimension of endosymbiosis--life after the organelle.

  2. Long-range RNA pairings contribute to mutually exclusive splicing.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuan; Yang, Yun; Dai, Lanzhi; Cao, Guozheng; Chen, Ran; Hong, Weiling; Liu, Baoping; Shi, Yang; Meng, Yijun; Shi, Feng; Xiao, Mu; Jin, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Mutually exclusive splicing is an important means of increasing the protein repertoire, by which the Down's syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) gene potentially generates 38,016 different isoforms in Drosophila melanogaster. However, the regulatory mechanisms remain obscure due to the complexity of the Dscam exon cluster. Here, we reveal a molecular model for the regulation of the mutually exclusive splicing of the serpent pre-mRNA based on competition between upstream and downstream RNA pairings. Such dual RNA pairings confer fine tuning of the inclusion of alternative exons. Moreover, we demonstrate that the splicing outcome of alternative exons is mediated in relative pairing strength-correlated mode. Combined comparative genomics analysis and experimental evidence revealed similar bidirectional structural architectures in exon clusters 4 and 9 of the Dscam gene. Our findings provide a novel mechanistic framework for the regulation of mutually exclusive splicing and may offer potentially applicable insights into long-range RNA-RNA interactions in gene regulatory networks.

  3. Sparse Bayesian Learning for DOA Estimation with Mutual Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jisheng; Hu, Nan; Xu, Weichao; Chang, Chunqi

    2015-01-01

    Sparse Bayesian learning (SBL) has given renewed interest to the problem of direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation. It is generally assumed that the measurement matrix in SBL is precisely known. Unfortunately, this assumption may be invalid in practice due to the imperfect manifold caused by unknown or misspecified mutual coupling. This paper describes a modified SBL method for joint estimation of DOAs and mutual coupling coefficients with uniform linear arrays (ULAs). Unlike the existing method that only uses stationary priors, our new approach utilizes a hierarchical form of the Student t prior to enforce the sparsity of the unknown signal more heavily. We also provide a distinct Bayesian inference for the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm, which can update the mutual coupling coefficients more efficiently. Another difference is that our method uses an additional singular value decomposition (SVD) to reduce the computational complexity of the signal reconstruction process and the sensitivity to the measurement noise. PMID:26501284

  4. Occurrence and characteristics of mutual interference between LIDAR scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gunzung; Eom, Jeongsook; Park, Seonghyeon; Park, Yongwan

    2015-05-01

    The LIDAR scanner is at the heart of object detection of the self-driving car. Mutual interference between LIDAR scanners has not been regarded as a problem because the percentage of vehicles equipped with LIDAR scanners was very rare. With the growing number of autonomous vehicle equipped with LIDAR scanner operated close to each other at the same time, the LIDAR scanner may receive laser pulses from other LIDAR scanners. In this paper, three types of experiments and their results are shown, according to the arrangement of two LIDAR scanners. We will show the probability that any LIDAR scanner will interfere mutually by considering spatial and temporal overlaps. It will present some typical mutual interference scenario and report an analysis of the interference mechanism.

  5. Arrays of mutually coupled receiver coils: theory and application.

    PubMed

    Wright, S M; Magin, R L; Kelton, J R

    1991-01-01

    Specialized receiver coils having a small sensitive region can provide an improvement in SNR for MR imaging and spectroscopy, at the expense of limiting the usable field of view. This work presents a technique for designing coil arrays that allows the size and location of the sensitive region to be selected remotely. Only one element of the coil array is directly connected to the receiver, allowing flexibility in system design and implementation. A method is presented for the analysis and design of mutually coupled coil arrays of any number of elements of arbitrary shape. The analysis includes mutual coupling effects between primary coils, to allow multiple primary coils to be used simultaneously. A controller system allows remote selection of the sensitive region and automatically matches the impedance of the array to the preamplifier. Results obtained using a mutually coupled coil array designed for spine imaging are shown.

  6. Homosexual mutuality: variation on a theme by Erik Erikson.

    PubMed

    Sohier, R

    The exploratory descriptive study described here was conducted in order to produce the initial empirical evidence to support reformulation of the theoretical construct of heterosexual mutuality (Erikson, 1975). Six persons were interviewed in depth on tape in order to locate them on one of four identity statuses constructed by Marcia (1964, 1966, 1973). The tool was modified and extended to meet the purposes of the study. The questions are directed toward illumination of conflictual moments in the life cycle when the ability to make appropriate decisions engenders character growth, and supports the personality integration of adulthood. An ability to make decisions results in personality integration. The small study provides evidence that there exists a homosexual mutuality (contrary to Erikson's position) which is no less valuable than heterosexual mutuality, and forms an equal basis for adult personality integration.

  7. Empirical study of the tails of mutual fund size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzkopf, Yonathan; Farmer, J. Doyne

    2010-06-01

    The mutual fund industry manages about a quarter of the assets in the U.S. stock market and thus plays an important role in the U.S. economy. The question of how much control is concentrated in the hands of the largest players is best quantitatively discussed in terms of the tail behavior of the mutual fund size distribution. We study the distribution empirically and show that the tail is much better described by a log-normal than a power law, indicating less concentration than, for example, personal income. The results are highly statistically significant and are consistent across fifteen years. This contradicts a recent theory concerning the origin of the power law tails of the trading volume distribution. Based on the analysis in a companion paper, the log-normality is to be expected, and indicates that the distribution of mutual funds remains perpetually out of equilibrium.

  8. Early Paleogene dinoflagellate cysts from ODP Hole 959D, Côte d'Ivoire-Ghana Transform Margin, West Africa: New species, biostratigraphy and paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Walaa K.; Oboh-Ikuenobe, Francisca E.

    2016-11-01

    A nearly continuous sedimentary record from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 959 (Hole 959D) in the Côte d'Ivoire-Ghana Transform Margin provides the opportunity to study Lower Paleogene palynology in this equatorial region. This paper presents data for 117 dinoflagellate cyst taxa recorded in 18 samples covering a 91-m interval from 867.60 mbsf to 776.32 mbsf. Preservation of dinoflagellate cysts varied from poor to excellent, and recovery was almost superabundant. Based on last or first occurrence of dinoflagellate cyst events, five zones (zone 1 to zone 5) were identified. The concentration of several dinoflagellate cyst events in the Thanetian interval suggests the presence of hiatuses or condensed horizons as inferred in previous studies of nearby localities. Frequent to common abundance of Apectodinium in the upper Thanetian sediments apparently records the global episodes of intense climatic warming that characterized the latest Paleocene to earliest Eocene time. An assemblage dominated by species of Operculodinium, Spiniferites, and Tectatodinium confirms the outer neritic to oceanic depositional setting of the drill hole as previously inferred from lithologic characteristics. Finally, four new dinoflagellate cyst taxa, Adnatosphaeridium ivoriense, Diphyes digitum, Eocladopyxis furculum and Tectatodinium nigeriaense that were observed only in the Paleocene interval, have been formally identified and described in detail.

  9. Analysis of the Mutual Inductance Particle Velocimeter (MIPV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    yKeU’v-T-.-’j-i^fi.T mmmmmm AD/A-004 219 ANALYSIS OF THE MUTUAL INDUCTANCE PARTICLE VELOCIMETER (MIPV) Joseph D. Renick Air Force...REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 1. REPORT NUMBER AFWL-TR-74-205 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO 4. TITLE fand SubtUU.) ANALYSIS OF THE MUTUAL INDUCTANCE...Resistance as a Function of Stress for Several Metals 109 C-2 Geometry for One-Dimensional Shock Response Analysis HI C-3 Shock Equilibration of

  10. Cross Correlation versus Normalized Mutual Information on Image Registration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Bin; Tilton, James C.; Lin, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    This is the first study to quantitatively assess and compare cross correlation and normalized mutual information methods used to register images in subpixel scale. The study shows that the normalized mutual information method is less sensitive to unaligned edges due to the spectral response differences than is cross correlation. This characteristic makes the normalized image resolution a better candidate for band to band registration. Improved band-to-band registration in the data from satellite-borne instruments will result in improved retrievals of key science measurements such as cloud properties, vegetation, snow and fire.

  11. Analysis and Synthesis of Microstrip Antennas Including Mutual Coupling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    E N 11. TITLE (/b*I* Secwfty OuodlCaUOn~) Analysis and Synthesis of Microstrip Antennas Including Mutual Coupling 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) K~oichiro...GROUP SUB-GROUP Array Antennas, Microstrip Antennas, Array Analysis, Array Synthesis, Array Theory, Microwave Network Analysi! 19. ABSTRACT (Continue...VIRGI-J~NIA TECH ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS OF [. MICROSTRIP ANTENNAS INCLUDING MUTUAL COUPLING o0000 0 0 a o 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 00 0 00 o00000 0o000 0 0 0 a 0 0 0o

  12. Biochemical Machines for the Interconversion of Mutual Information and Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Thomas; Jones, Nick S.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Ouldridge, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a physically realizable information-driven device consisting of an enzyme in a chemical bath, interacting with pairs of molecules prepared in correlated states. These correlations persist without direct interaction and thus store free energy equal to the mutual information. The enzyme can harness this free energy, and that stored in the individual molecular states, to do chemical work. Alternatively, the enzyme can use the chemical driving to create mutual information. A modified system can function without external intervention, approaching biological systems more closely.

  13. Separability criteria via sets of mutually unbiased measurements.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Gao, Ting; Yan, Fengli

    2015-08-17

    Mutually unbiased measurements (MUMs) are generalized from the concept of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) and include the complete set of MUBs as a special case, but they are superior to MUBs as they do not need to be rank one projectors. We investigate entanglement detection using sets of MUMs and derive separability criteria for multipartite qudit systems, arbitrary high-dimensional bipartite systems of a d1-dimensional subsystem and a d2-dimensional subsystem, and multipartite systems of multi-level subsystems. These criteria are of the advantages of more effective and wider application range than previous criteria. They provide experimental implementation in detecting entanglement of unknown quantum states.

  14. A Mutual Support Group for Young Problem Gamblers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binde, Per

    2012-01-01

    A Swedish mutual support group for young problem gamblers is described and discussed. During the study period, 116 weekly meetings occurred, usually involving six to ten participants; in total, 69 problem gamblers (66 male and three female), aged 17-25, and 23 partners and friends attended the meetings. Half the gamblers had problems with Internet…

  15. 77 FR 48566 - The Hartford Mutual Funds, Inc., et al.;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION The Hartford Mutual Funds, Inc., et al.; Notice of Application August 8, 2012. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission (``Commission''). ACTION: Notice of an application under section 6(c) of...

  16. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled to... not available in other bands. During the initial filing window, frequency coordination is not...

  17. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled to... not available in other bands. During the initial filing window, frequency coordination is not...

  18. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled to... not available in other bands. During the initial filing window, frequency coordination is not...

  19. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled to... not available in other bands. During the initial filing window, frequency coordination is not...

  20. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled to... not available in other bands. During the initial filing window, frequency coordination is not...

  1. Mutual Funds as a Form of Collective Investment in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tershukova, Marina B.; Savinov, Oleg G.; Zhegalova, Elena V.; Zhuruhinc, Georgy I.; Zhegalova, Alexandra S.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research problem inspired with the fact nowadays there is a need for theoretical generalization based on international experience the essence of the collective investment system and the rationale for prioritizing the mutual funds development as the most attractive form of collective investment. The goal of the article lies in…

  2. Is Action Research Necessarily Collaborative? Changing Mutuality within a Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sousa, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a study on collaboration within an action research project that was conducted by university researchers and elementary school teachers in the Azores, Portugal. More specifically, it examines how different kinds of participants worked together in different phases of the project. The notion of mutuality (i.e., the relative…

  3. Mutual Intercultural Relations among University Students in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gui, Yongxia; Safdar, Saba; Berry, John

    2016-01-01

    The current study examies the views of both international and domestic students in Canada using the conceptual and empirical framework from the MIRIPS (Mutual Intercultural Relations in Plural Societies) project (http://www.victoria.ac.nz/cacr/research/mirips). Two hypotheses were examined. First is the "multiculturalism hypothesis"…

  4. Mutual information area laws for thermal free fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernigau, H.; Kastoryano, M. J.; Eisert, J.

    2015-02-01

    We provide a rigorous and asymptotically exact expression of the mutual information of translationally invariant free fermionic lattice systems in a Gibbs state. In order to arrive at this result, we introduce a novel framework for computing determinants of Töplitz operators with smooth symbols, and for treating Töplitz matrices with system size dependent entries. The asymptotically exact mutual information for a partition of the 1D lattice satisfies an area law, with a prefactor which we compute explicitly. As examples, we discuss the fermionic XX model in one dimension and free fermionic models on the torus in higher dimensions in detail. Special emphasis is put on the discussion of the temperature dependence of the mutual information, scaling like the logarithm of the inverse temperature, hence confirming an expression suggested by conformal field theory. We also comment on the applicability of the formalism to treat open systems driven by quantum noise. In the appendix, we derive useful bounds to the mutual information in terms of purities. Finally, we provide a detailed error analysis for finite system sizes. This analysis is valuable in its own right for the abstract theory of Töplitz determinants.

  5. Mutual Aid: A Key to Survival for Black Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Alex J.

    1977-01-01

    In the Brotherhood Crusade, a black mutual aid, self-help organization, Los Angeles blacks joined together to effect independence within the professions and the social service delivery systems, rejecting incorporation into the United Way, the major L.A. fund-raising organization. This article presents findings of a study of Crusade participants.…

  6. 12 CFR 563.74 - Mutual capital certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... dividend may be paid if such payment would constitute a violation of 12 U.S.C. 1828(b); (v) Not be... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mutual capital certificates. 563.74 Section 563... of filing of the application are in accordance with the provisions of this section. (b)...

  7. 12 CFR 563.74 - Mutual capital certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... dividend may be paid if such payment would constitute a violation of 12 U.S.C. 1828(b); (v) Not be... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Mutual capital certificates. 563.74 Section 563... of filing of the application are in accordance with the provisions of this section. (b)...

  8. 12 CFR 544.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... by the association. (3) Corporate governance procedures. A Federal mutual association may elect to follow the corporate governance procedures of the laws of the state where the main office of the... corporate governance procedures, and shall file a copy of such bylaws, which are effective upon...

  9. 12 CFR 144.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the association. (3) Corporate governance procedures. A Federal mutual association may elect to follow the corporate governance procedures of the laws of the state where the main office of the institution... corporate governance procedures, and shall file a copy of such bylaws, which are effective upon...

  10. 12 CFR 544.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... by the association. (3) Corporate governance procedures. A Federal mutual association may elect to follow the corporate governance procedures of the laws of the state where the main office of the... corporate governance procedures, and shall file a copy of such bylaws, which are effective upon...

  11. 12 CFR 144.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the association. (3) Corporate governance procedures. A Federal mutual association may elect to follow the corporate governance procedures of the laws of the state where the main office of the institution... corporate governance procedures, and shall file a copy of such bylaws, which are effective upon...

  12. 12 CFR 544.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... by the association. (3) Corporate governance procedures. A Federal mutual association may elect to follow the corporate governance procedures of the laws of the state where the main office of the... corporate governance procedures, and shall file a copy of such bylaws, which are effective upon...

  13. 12 CFR 144.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the association. (3) Corporate governance procedures. A Federal mutual association may elect to follow the corporate governance procedures of the laws of the state where the main office of the institution... corporate governance procedures, and shall file a copy of such bylaws, which are effective upon...

  14. 12 CFR 544.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... by the association. (3) Corporate governance procedures. A Federal mutual association may elect to follow the corporate governance procedures of the laws of the state where the main office of the... corporate governance procedures, and shall file a copy of such bylaws, which are effective upon...

  15. Using Mutual Information for Adaptive Item Comparison and Student Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chao-Lin

    2005-01-01

    The author analyzes properties of mutual information between dichotomous concepts and test items. The properties generalize some common intuitions about item comparison, and provide principled foundations for designing item-selection heuristics for student assessment in computer-assisted educational systems. The proposed item-selection strategies…

  16. International Mutual Recognition: Progress and Prospects. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Paul

    Increasing the mobility of service providers, including professionals, via mutual recognition (of regulatory systems) agreements (MRAs) has become a significant issue worldwide. Despite increasing interest in MRAs, it may be argued that MRAs are but one of a larger range of major developments that have fueled current interest in occupational…

  17. Mutual Suppression: Comment on Paulhus et Al. (2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Paulhus, Robins, Trzesniewski, and Tracy ("Multivariate Behavioral Research," 2004, 39, 305-328) suggested that the three types of two-predictor suppression situations--classical suppression, cooperative suppression, and net suppression--can all be considered special cases of mutual suppression, in that the magnitude of each of the two…

  18. The blind leading the blind: Mutual refinement of approximate theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedar, Smadar T.; Bresina, John L.; Dent, C. Lisa

    1991-01-01

    The mutual refinement theory, a method for refining world models in a reactive system, is described. The method detects failures, explains their causes, and repairs the approximate models which cause the failures. The approach focuses on using one approximate model to refine another.

  19. Mutual Information Item Selection in Adaptive Classification Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    A general approach for item selection in adaptive multiple-category classification tests is provided. The approach uses mutual information (MI), a special case of the Kullback-Leibler distance, or relative entropy. MI works efficiently with the sequential probability ratio test and alleviates the difficulties encountered with using other local-…

  20. Multi-Transiting Systems and Exoplanet Mutual Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Jared; Ragozzine, D.; Holman, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, studies of transiting exoplanets- planets that cross in front of their host star- have focused almost exclusively upon systems where there is only one transiting planet. Those studies that have considered additional planets have mostly done so with the goal of determining the perturbing effects that additional planets would have upon the orbit, and therefore the light curve, of the transiting planet. This work considers, in detail, a specific type of event known as an exoplanet mutual event. Such events occur when one planet passes in front of another. While such events can occur whether or not these planets are transiting, predicting and understanding these events is best done in systems with multiple transiting planets. We estimate, through an ensemble simulation, how frequently exoplanet mutual events occur and which systems are most likely to undergo exoplanet mutual events. We also investigate what information can be learned about not only the planets themselves but also the orbital architecture in such systems. We conclude that while ODT (overlapping double-transit) events occur with a much lower frequency than PPO (planet-planet occultation) events, ODT mutual events are capable of producing detectable signals, that Kepler will detect a few, and recommend that candidate systems for these events, such as KOI 191, be observed in short cadence(Steffen et. al 2010, Holman et. al 2010). This work is supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 0754568 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  1. Mutual information in a dilute, asymmetric neural network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Elliot

    We study the computational properties of a neural network consisting of binary neurons with dilute asymmetric synaptic connections. This simple model allows us to simulate large networks which can reflect more of the architecture and dynamics of real neural networks. Our main goal is to determine the dynamical behavior that maximizes the network's ability to perform computations. To this end, we apply information theory, measuring the average mutual information between pairs of pre- and post-synaptic neurons. Communication of information between neurons is an essential requirement for collective computation. Previous workers have demonstrated that neural networks with asymmetric connections undergo a transition from ordered to chaotic behavior as certain network parameters, such as the connectivity, are changed. We find that the average mutual information has a peak near the order-chaos transition, implying that the network can most efficiently communicate information between cells in this region. The mutual information peak becomes increasingly pronounced when the basic model is extended to incorporate more biologically realistic features, such as a variable threshold and nonlinear summation of inputs. We find that the peak in mutual information near the phase transition is a robust feature of the system for a wide range of assumptions about post-synaptic integration.

  2. A Swedish Mutual Support Society of Problem Gamblers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binde, Per

    2012-01-01

    Mutual support societies for problem gamblers have existed in Sweden for 20 years. They have helped more people with gambling problems than any other institution inside or outside the Swedish health care system. This paper outlines the background of these societies and describes the meetings of one of them. Data come from interviews with members…

  3. Antagonists in Mutual Antipathies: A Person-Oriented Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guroglu, Berna; Haselager, Gerbert J. T.; van Lieshout, Cornelis F. M.; Scholte, Ron H. J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the heterogeneity of mutual antipathy relationships. Separate cluster analyses of peer interactions of early adolescents (mean age 11 years) and adolescents (mean age of 14) yielded 3 "types of individuals" in each age group, namely Prosocial, Antisocial, and Withdrawn. Prevalence analysis of the 6 possible combinations of…

  4. No effect of diffraction on Pluto-Charon mutual events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tholen, D. J.; Hubbard, W. B.

    1988-01-01

    Mulholland and Gustafson (1987) made the interesting suggestion that observations of Pluto-Charon mutual events might show significant dependence on both wavelength and telescope aperture because of diffraction effects. In this letter, observations are presented that show the predicted effects to be absent and demonstrate that the parameters of the system are such that the events can be accurately analyzed with geometrical optics.

  5. Evolution of the Fusarium–Euwallacea ambrosia beetle mutualism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Euwallacea – Fusarium mutualistic symbiosis represents one of the independent evolutionary origins of fungus-farming. Diversification time estimates place the evolutionary origin of this mutualism in the early Miocene approximately 21 million years ago. Fusarium is best known as one of the most ...

  6. Synchronization and symmetry breaking in mutually coupled fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Rogers-Dakin, Elizabeth A; García-Ojalvo, Jordi; DeShazer, David J; Roy, Rajarshi

    2006-04-01

    We experimentally study the synchronization and the emergence of leader-follower dynamics in two time-delayed mutually coupled fiber ring lasers. We utilize spatiotemporal representations of time series to establish the roles of leader and follower in the synchronized dynamics.

  7. Synchronization and symmetry breaking in mutually coupled fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers-Dakin, Elizabeth A.; García-Ojalvo, Jordi; Deshazer, David J.; Roy, Rajarshi

    2006-04-01

    We experimentally study the synchronization and the emergence of leader-follower dynamics in two time-delayed mutually coupled fiber ring lasers. We utilize spatiotemporal representations of time series to establish the roles of leader and follower in the synchronized dynamics.

  8. Ecological genomics of mutualism decline in nitrogen-fixing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Christie R.; Lau, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic changes can influence mutualism evolution; however, the genomic regions underpinning mutualism that are most affected by environmental change are generally unknown, even in well-studied model mutualisms like the interaction between legumes and their nitrogen (N)-fixing rhizobia. Such genomic information can shed light on the agents and targets of selection maintaining cooperation in nature. We recently demonstrated that N-fertilization has caused an evolutionary decline in mutualistic partner quality in the rhizobia that form symbiosis with clover. Here, population genomic analyses of N-fertilized versus control rhizobium populations indicate that evolutionary differentiation at a key symbiosis gene region on the symbiotic plasmid (pSym) contributes to partner quality decline. Moreover, patterns of genetic variation at selected loci were consistent with recent positive selection within N-fertilized environments, suggesting that N-rich environments might select for less beneficial rhizobia. By studying the molecular population genomics of a natural bacterial population within a long-term ecological field experiment, we find that: (i) the N environment is indeed a potent selective force mediating mutualism evolution in this symbiosis, (ii) natural variation in rhizobium partner quality is mediated in part by key symbiosis genes on the symbiotic plasmid, and (iii) differentiation at selected genes occurred in the context of otherwise recombining genomes, resembling eukaryotic models of adaptation. PMID:26962142

  9. Functional analysis of mutual behavior in laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lavinia; Hackenberg, Timothy D.

    2015-01-01

    Three pairs of rats were trained to synchronize their lever pressing according to a mutual reinforcement contingency, in which alternating lever presses that fell within a 500-ms window were reinforced with food. In Experiment 1, rats worked in adjacent chambers separated by a transparent barrier, and the effects of the mutual reinforcement contingency were compared to those under yoked-control conditions that provided the same rate of food reinforcement but without the temporal coordination response requirement. In Experiment 2, coordinated behavior was compared with and without a barrier, and across different barrier types: transparent, opaque, wire mesh. In Experiment 3, the effects of social familiarity were assessed by switching partners, enabling a comparison of coordinated behavior with familiar and unfamiliar partners. The overall pattern of results shows that the coordinated behavior of two rats was (a) maintained by mutual reinforcement contingencies, (b) unrelated to the type or presence of a barrier separating the rats, and (c) sufficiently flexible to adjust to the presence and behavior of an unfamiliar partner. Taken as a whole, the study illustrates a promising approach to conceptualizing and analyzing behavioral mechanisms of mutual behavior, an important component of an integrated study of social behavior. PMID:26479279

  10. A Delicate Balance: Maintaining Mutualism to Prevent Disease

    PubMed Central

    Van Tyne, Daria; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbial ecosystem is complex, and few of the principles that contribute to homeostasis in health are well understood. Pham et al. (2014) show that a network including the epithelial interleukin-22 receptor protects against infection with the opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis through promotion of host-microbiota mutualism. PMID:25299326

  11. Stable carbon isotope fractionation of organic cyst-forming dinoflagellates: Evaluating the potential for a CO2 proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoins, Mirja; Van de Waal, Dedmer B.; Eberlein, Tim; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Rost, Björn; Sluijs, Appy

    2015-07-01

    Over the past decades, significant progress has been made regarding the quantification and mechanistic understanding of stable carbon isotope fractionation (13C fractionation) in photosynthetic unicellular organisms in response to changes in the partial pressure of atmospheric CO2 (pCO2). However, hardly any data is available for organic cyst-forming dinoflagellates while this is an ecologically important group with a unique fossil record. We performed dilute batch experiments with four harmful dinoflagellate species known for their ability to form organic cysts: Alexandrium tamarense, Scrippsiella trochoidea, Gonyaulax spinifera and Protoceratium reticulatum. Cells were grown at a range of dissolved CO2 concentrations characterizing past, modern and projected future values (∼5-50 μmol L-1), representing atmospheric pCO2 of 180, 380, 800 and 1200 μatm. In all tested species, 13C fractionation depends on CO2 with a slope of up to 0.17‰ (μmol L)-1. Even more consistent correlations were found between 13C fractionation and the combined effects of particulate organic carbon quota (POC quota; pg C cell-1) and CO2. Carbon isotope fractionation as well as its response to CO2 is species-specific. These results may be interpreted as a first step towards a proxy for past pCO2 based on carbon isotope ratios of fossil organic dinoflagellate cysts. However, additional culture experiments focusing on environmental variables other than pCO2, physiological underpinning of the recorded response, testing for possible offsets in 13C values between cells and cysts, as well as field calibration studies are required to establish a reliable proxy.

  12. Dinoflagellate cysts as indicators of palaeoenvironmental and sea-level change: the Late Cenomanian - Early Coniacian (Cretaceous) of Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olde, Kate; Jarvis, Ian; Pearce, Martin; Tocher, Bruce

    2014-05-01

    The Late Cretaceous represented a period of greenhouse climate of Earth history, and was characterised by high temperatures, high atmospheric CO2 and high eustatic sea level, with large areas of shallow, warm, epicontinental sea. Understanding the dynamics of the Late Cretaceous climate is important for understanding the Earth System and the impact of modern climate change. The productive Late Cretaceous oceans led to the deposition of a large portion of the world's oil and gas resources, so reconstruction of depositional environments and refinement of stratigraphic correlation are important for the petroleum industry. Dinoflagellates were a prolific and diverse group within the phyto- and zooplankton throughout Late Cretaceous oceans, and their cysts display good preservation across different facies, and so are a good group for biostratigraphic and palaeoenvironmental study. Selected results from a high-resolution quantitative study of the palynology from 5 European Upper Cenomanian to the Lower Coniacian (Upper Cretaceous) sections are summarised, along with their carbon stable-isotope chemostratigraphy. The sections are from a range of palaeolatitudes and basins, including the North Sea Basin, the Anglo-Paris Basin, the Bohemian Basin, the Polish Trough and the Vocontian Basin. Palynological assemblages differ between sections in the concentration of palynomorphs, proportions of terrestrial and marine palynomorphs, and in the diversity and varying proportions of species of dinoflagellate cysts (dinocysts). Dinocyst distribution is considered to have been controlled largely by nutrient levels, but was also impacted by temperature, sea level, and water mass changes. Influxes of certain species are related to changes in salinity, changes in temperature, and water mass change, and increased communication between basins. High dinocyst abundance, and particularly a high proportion of peridinioid cysts (which are thought to be derived from eutrophy

  13. Lutetian to Priabonian organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst assemblages from the northwestern Tethyan margin (Adelholzen Section, Eastern Alps, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Omar; Egger, Hans

    2015-04-01

    At the Adelholzen section (SE-Germany), a 13 m thick shallow marine Lutetian sequence (Adelholzen beds) comprising shallow benthic foraminifera Zones SBZ13 to SBZ15 (Briguglio in Gebhardt et al., 2013) is overlain by a 1 m thick brownish layer rich in glauconite and ferrigenous phosphate. This layer forms the top of the Adelholzen beds. It marks the onset of strong basin subsidence in the late Lutetian and is separated from the Priabonian by a stratigraphic gap comprising a major part of the Bartonian. The Priabonian marlstone (Stockletten) is 4 m thick at the Adelholzen section. It contains rich and high diverse planktonic foraminifera assemblages ("Globigerina marl") indicating bathyal conditions. Twenty eight samples from the Adelholzen beds and the Stockletten were processed for palynology at the Geological Survey of Austria following standard procedures. Palynological slides were examined for relative abundances of organic walled dinoflagellate cysts (dinocysts). One-hundred organic-walled dinocyst species were identified at the Adelholzen section. Stratigraphically important dinoflagellate cyst taxa for the assignment of the Adelholzen beds to the Lutetian are Wilsonidium echinosuturatum, Dracodinium waipawaense, Wetzeliella articulata, Areoligera coronata, Cordosphaeridium cantharellus, Hystrichokolpoma pusillum and Aireiana spp. Stratigraphically important dinoflagellate cyst taxa for the assignment of the Stockletten to the Priabonian are Diphyes ficusoides, Distatodinium ellipticum, Nematosphaeropsis labyrinthus, Rhombodinium longimanum, Rhombodinium perforatum, and Selenopemphix nephroides. Remarkable bioevents in the section are the abundant occurrences of Areoligera coronata and Cordosphaeridium gracile in the basal greensand. In the overlying marlstone and marly limestone Homotryblium tenuispinosum is the dominating species and the first specimens of Impagidinium dispertitum occur indicating open marine conditions.

  14. New details from the complete life cycle of the red-tide dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans (Ehrenberg) McCartney.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Endoh, Hiroshi

    2006-09-01

    Noctilucid protozoans are among the dinoflagellates that cause red tides. Sexual reproduction may occur in this group, as they sometimes undergo gametogenesis. However, the life cycle, in particular the developmental process after gamete fusion, has not been fully elucidated. We have been able to maintain clonal cultures of Noctiluca scintillans throughout the whole life cycle and have revealed new details of various stages. In trophont populations, a small fraction of cells spontaneously transform into gametogenic cells, which undergo two successive nuclear divisions, without cellular division, probably corresponding to meiosis. The products of nuclear division migrate to the cell surface with a small amount of cytoplasm, and there further synchronously divide 6-8 times, during which the division products are connected by thin cytoplasmic bridges. Thus, numerous gametes with a semi-spindle body shape are released from the mother cell ghost. They retain two flagella that differ in length and motion, as is typical of dinoflagellates. The presence of longitudinal and transverse grooves indicates that dinoflagellate-like characteristics are conserved in the gametes, although they are not present in the specialized trophonts. Zygotes with four flagella result from the fusion of two isogametes. The zygotes change shape from spindle to spherical, with a reduction in flagellar number. The developing cell acquires a tentacle and crust, similar to large trophonts, and begins to develop a cytoplasmic network, thus completing the transformation into a miniscule trophont. These early trophonts grow to maturity as cell size increases. Our observations of the life cycle of N. scintillans may provide clues for understanding the evolutionary origin of noctilucae.

  15. Ecology of the ciguatera causing dinoflagellates from the Northern Great Barrier Reef: changes in community distribution and coastal eutrophication.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Mark P; Lewis, Richard J; Morton, Steve

    2013-12-15

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is known to be caused by the ciguatoxins from the dinoflagellate genus Gambierdiscus, however, there is the potential for other toxins such as okadaic acid and dinophysistoxins from the genus Prorocentrum, and palytoxin from the genus Ostreopsis, to contaminate seafood. These genera may also be indicators of ecosystem health and potentially impact on coral reef ecosystems and the role they may play in the succession of coral to macroalgae dominated reefs has not been researched. Sixteen GBR field sites spanning inshore, mid-lagoon and outer lagoon (offshore) regions were studied. Samples were collected from September 2006 to December 2007 and abundance of benthic dinoflagellates on different host macroalgae and concentration of nutrients present in the water column were determined. The maximum abundance of Prorocentrum, Ostreopsis and Gambierdiscus found was 112, 793 and 50 cells per gram wet weight of host macroalgae, respectively. The average level of Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen (DIN) in the water column across all sites (0.03 mg/L) was found to be more than double the threshold critical value (0.013 mg/L) for healthy coral reefs. Compared to a previous study 1984, there is evidence of a major shift in the distribution and abundance of these dinoflagellates. Inshore reefs have either of Prorocentrum (as at Green Island) or Ostreopsis (as at Magnetic Island) dominating the macroalgal surface niche which was once dominated by Gambierdiscus, whilst at offshore regions Gambierdiscus is still dominant. This succession may be linked to the ongoing eutrophication of the GBR lagoon and have consequences for the sources of toxins for ongoing cases of ciguatera.

  16. Global Analysis of mRNA Half-Lives and de novo Transcription in a Dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis

    PubMed Central

    Morey, Jeanine S.; Van Dolah, Frances M.

    2013-01-01

    Dinoflagellates possess many physiological processes that appear to be under post-transcriptional control. However, the extent to which their genes are regulated post-transcriptionally remains unresolved. To gain insight into the roles of differential mRNA stability and de novo transcription in dinoflagellates, we biosynthetically labeled RNA with 4-thiouracil to isolate newly transcribed and pre-existing RNA pools in Karenia brevis. These isolated fractions were then used for analysis of global mRNA stability and de novo transcription by hybridization to a K. brevis microarray. Global K. brevis mRNA half-lives were calculated from the ratio of newly transcribed to pre-existing RNA for 7086 array features using the online software HALO (Half-life Organizer). Overall, mRNA half-lives were substantially longer than reported in other organisms studied at the global level, ranging from 42 minutes to greater than 144 h, with a median of 33 hours. Consistent with well-documented trends observed in other organisms, housekeeping processes, including energy metabolism and transport, were significantly enriched in the most highly stable messages. Shorter-lived transcripts included a higher proportion of transcriptional regulation, stress response, and other response/regulatory processes. One such family of proteins involved in post-transcriptional regulation in chloroplasts and mitochondria, the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins, had dramatically shorter half-lives when compared to the arrayed transcriptome. As transcript abundances for PPR proteins were previously observed to rapidly increase in response to nutrient addition, we queried the newly synthesized RNA pools at 1 and 4 h following nitrate addition to N-depleted cultures. Transcriptome-wide there was little evidence of increases in the rate of de novo transcription during the first 4 h, relative to that in N-depleted cells, and no evidence for increased PPR protein transcription. These results lend support to

  17. Photosynthetic Carbon Isotope Fractionation of the Marine Dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense: A Chemostat Investigation of Taxonomic and Physiological Controls on the Stable Carbon Isotope Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, E.; Carter, S. J.; Pearson, A.

    2015-12-01

    Interpretations of stable carbon isotope excursions in the sedimentary record are strengthened by laboratory culture studies investigating the photosynthetic carbon isotope fractionation (ɛp) of marine phytoplankton taxa with long geological records. These studies are essential for understanding organic matter δ13C signals in terms of environmental changes (e.g., atmospheric pCO2 and nutrient availability) or taxonomic changes (e.g., algal species succession and community composition). Dinoflagellates are among the most widespread and ecologically dominant primary producers in modern oceans and throughout the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Compared to more recently evolved phytoplankton taxa, however, dinoflagellate carbon isotope fractionation has received relatively little mechanistic study. Several dilute batch culture experiments with dinoflagellates have investigated ɛp as a function of CO2 availability, but the influences of changing growth rates, nutrient limitation, pH, and irradiance require further systematic exploration. We investigated stable carbon isotope fractionation in the marine dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense under nitrate-limited conditions in a chemostat culture system in which full DIC system parameters, including the concentration and δ13C value of CO2, were determined. Growth rates were varied between experiments, and cells were grown under continuous light. Previously reported ɛp values for seven dinoflagellate species including A. tamarense ranged from approximately -1 to 14‰ in nutrient-replete batch culture studies ([CO2] = 0-50 µmol kg-1). In contrast, in chemostat conditions we measured ɛp values on the order of 20‰ ([CO2] = 20-30 µmol kg-1). These experiments provide an initial step toward understanding the physiological controls on ɛp in dinoflagellates and illuminating the role of algal taxonomy in shaping the Phanerozoic stable carbon isotope record.

  18. Dinoflagellate cysts as indicators of millennial scale climatic and oceanographic variability in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (Mexico) during the Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Andrea M.; Mertens, Kenneth N.; Pospelova, *Vera; Pedersen, Thomas F.; Ganeshram, Raja S.

    2015-04-01

    A high-resolution record of organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst production in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (Mexico) reveals a complex paleoceanographic history over the last ~40 ka. Guaymas Basin is an excellent location to perform high resolution studies of changes in Late Quaternary climate and paleo-productivity because it is characterized by high primary productivity, high sedimentation rates, and low oxygen bottom waters. These factors contribute to the deposition and preservation of laminated sediments throughout large portions of core MD02-2515. This is one of the first studies in the Northeast Pacific to document dinoflagellate cyst production at a centennial to millennial scale throughout the Late Quaternary. Based on the cyst assemblages three major dinoflagellate cyst zones were established, and roughly correspond to Marine Isotope Stages 1 to 3. The most dominant dinoflagellate cyst taxa found throughout the core were Brigantedinium spp. and Operculodinium centrocarpum. Dansgaard-Oeschger event 8 is observed in the dinoflagellate cyst record, and is characterized by an increase in warm water taxa such as Spiniferites pachydermus. Other intervals of interest are the Younger Dryas where cooler sea-surface conditions are not recorded, and the Holocene which is characterized by the consistent presence of warm water species Stelladinium reidii, Tuberculodinidum vancampoae, Bitectatodinium spongium and an increase in Quinquecuspis concreta. Changes in cyst assemblages, concentrations and species diversity, along with geochemical data reflect major orbital to millennial-scale climatic and oceanographic changes. Keywords: Dansgaard-Oeschger events; dinoflagellate cyst; Gulf of California; late Quaternary climate change; upwelling; Younger Dryas.

  19. Isolation and characterization of proliferating cell nuclear antigen from the dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Hou, Yubo; Lin, Senjie

    2006-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a co-factor of DNA polymerases delta and epsilon, is essential for DNA replication and repair. Understanding the structure and expression characteristics of this gene in dinoflagellates would enable us to gain insights into how the cell cycle in these enigmatic eukaryotes is regulated and whether this gene can be a growth marker of these ecologically important organisms. We analyzed pcna and its encoded protein from Pfiesteria piscicida (Ppi_PCNA). Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RNA ligase mediated-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-RACE) methods, Ppi_pcna cDNA was isolated; it contained a coding region for 258 amino acid residues (aa) preceded by various 5'- and 3'-untranslated ends. The deduced protein length was similar to that of typical vertebrate and plant PCNA. PCR using genomic DNA as the template yielded multiple products whose sequences revealed multiple copies of pcna in tandem repeats separated by an unknown sequence. Using real-time PCR, we estimated 41+/-7 copies of this gene in each P. piscicida cell. Reverse transcription real-time PCR indicated a similar pcna mRNA level between the exponential and the stationary growth phases. Western blot analysis revealed a slightly higher PCNA level (<2-fold) in the exponential than in the stationary growth phases. We conclude that (1) P. piscicida possesses a typical eukaryote PCNA; (2) unlike in other eukaryotes, pcna in P. piscicida occurs in multiple copies arranged in tandem; and (3) regulation of P. piscicida PCNA probably lies in post-translational modification.

  20. Light-Promoted Rhodopsin Expression and Starvation Survival in the Marine Dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiling; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of microbial rhodopsins in marine proteobacteria changed the dogma that photosynthesis is the only pathway to use the solar energy for biological utilization in the marine environment. Although homologs of these rhodopsins have been identified in dinoflagellates, the diversity of the encoding genes and their physiological roles remain unexplored. As an initial step toward addressing the gap, we conducted high-throughput transcriptome sequencing on Oxyrrhis marina to retrieve rhodopsin transcripts, rapid amplification of cDNA ends to isolate full-length cDNAs of dominant representatives, and quantitative reverse-transcription PCR to investigate their expression under varying conditions. Our phylogenetic analyses showed that O. marina contained both the proton-pumping type (PR) and sensory type (SR) rhodopsins, and the transcriptome data showed that the PR type dominated over the SR type. We compared rhodopsin gene expression for cultures kept under light: dark cycle and continuous darkness in a time course of 24 days without feeding. Although both types of rhodopsin were expressed under the two conditions, the expression levels of PR were much higher than SR, consistent with the transcriptomic data. Furthermore, relative to cultures kept in the dark, rhodopsin expression levels and cell survival rate were both higher in cultures grown in the light. This is the first report of light-dependent promotion of starvation survival and concomitant promotion of PR expression in a eukaryote. While direct evidence needs to come from functional test on rhodopsins in vitro or gene knockout/knockdown experiments, our results suggest that the proton-pumping rhodopsin might be responsible for the light-enhanced survival of O. marina, as previously demonstrated in bacteria. PMID:25506945