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Sample records for cnn chaos source

  1. Cnn: a Paradigm for Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Leon O.

    The following sections are included: * What is a CNN? * Part I: Standard CNNs * Standard CNNs are uniquely specified by CNN genes * Oscillations and chaos from standard CNNs * Complete stability criteria for standard CNNs * Bistable criterion * Coding the CNN gene * Edge detection CNN * Corner detection CNN * A gallery of basic CNN genes * Does there exist a CNN gene for solving Minsky's global connectivity problem? * Decoding the CNN gene * Examples of input-output CNN operators * Uncoupled CNN genes * Boolean CNN genes and truth tables * What task can an uncoupled Boolean CNN gene Perform? * Bifurcation of CNN genes * The game-of-life CNN gene * The CNN universal machine * Generalized cellular automata * A glimpse at some real-world CNN applications * Part II: Autonomous CNNs * Pattern formation in standard CNNs * Characterization of stable equilibria * The dynamics of pattern formation * CNN pattern formation in biology and physics * Pattern formation in reaction-diffusion CNNs * Nonlinear waves in reaction-diffusion CNNs * Simulating nonlinear PDEs via autonomous CNNs * Part III: Local Activity: The Genesis of Complexity * Transistors and local activity: What do they have to common? * Nonlinear circuit models for reaction-diffusion CNNs * What is local activity? * Cell equilibrium points * Local state equations and local power flows * Local activity in reaction-diffusion CNN cells * Testing for local activity * Testing one-port CNN cells for local activity * Testing two-port CNN cells for local activity * Why is local activity necessary for pattern formation? * How to choose locally-active CNN parameters? * Local activity and stability are different concepts * The local activity dogma

  2. Distributed source coding using chaos-based cryptosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Junwei; Wong, Kwok-Wo; Chen, Jianyong

    2012-12-01

    A distributed source coding scheme is proposed by incorporating a chaos-based cryptosystem in the Slepian-Wolf coding. The punctured codeword generated by the chaos-based cryptosystem results in ambiguity at the decoder side. This ambiguity can be removed by the maximum a posteriori decoding with the help of side information. In this way, encryption and source coding are performed simultaneously. This leads to a simple encoder structure with low implementation complexity. Simulation results show that the encoder complexity is lower than that of existing distributed source coding schemes. Moreover, at small block size, the proposed scheme has a performance comparable to existing distributed source coding schemes.

  3. Sources of Chaos in Planetary Systems Formed Through Numerical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Matthew S.

    2017-01-01

    The formation of the solar system’s terrestrial planets has been numerically modeled in countless works, and many other studies have been devoted to char- acterizing our modern planets’ chaotic dynamical state. However, it is still not known whether our planets fragile chaotic state is an expected outcome of terrestrial planet accretion. We use a large suite of numerical simulations to present a detailed analysis and characterization of the dynamical chaos in 145 different systems produced via terrestrial planet formation in Kaib & Cowan (2015). These systems were created in the presence of a fully formed Jupiter and Saturn, using a variety of different initial conditions. We provide the first analysis of the dynamical states of fully evolved (4.5 Gyr) planetary systems formed using numerical simulations. We find that dynamical chaos is preva- lent in roughly half of the systems, with the largest source of the chaos being perturbations from Jupiter. Chaos is most prevalent in systems that form 4 or 5 terrestrial planets. Additionally, an eccentric Jupiter and Saturn is shown to enhance the prevalence of chaos in systems. Furthermore, systems with a center of mass highly concentrated between 0.8-1.2 AU generally prove to be less chaotic than systems with more exotic mass distributions. Through the process of evolving systems to the current epoch, we show that late instabilities are quite common in our systems. Of greatest interest, many of the sources of chaos observed in our own solar system (such as the secularly driven chaos between Mercury and Jupiter) are shown to be common outcomes of terrestrial planetary formation. Thus, the solar system’s marginally stable, chaotic state may naturally arise from the process of terrestrial planet formation.

  4. Nonlinear characteristics (chaos) of high-power microwave (HPM) sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudet, John A.; Luginsland, John W.; Wallace, Christopher B.

    2000-07-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of dynamical systems and chaotic behavior have resulted in the investigation of HPM source design issues. Modern dynamical systems theory can improve our understanding of the dynamics of space charge dominated beams and the RF waveforms generated by them. This paper will review the work done to date using time series analysis techniques to study the state space dynamics of high power microwave sources using simulation (particle-in-cell) code results. Low-dimensional chaos has been observed in simulation results from a variety of HPM sources, including the MILO (Magnetically Insulated Line Oscillator). Additionally, the particle behavior within the diode portion of HPM tubes can have chaotic characteristics. Knowing when these features occur and how they develop are important first steps in our ability to control and/or eliminate them. Central to understanding source behavior is the initial use of joint time frequency analysis to assess whether the dynamics are stationary or not. Subsequently we use delay coordinate embedding techniques to reconstruct an effective state space global dynamics. From this, Poincare sections are examined. Lyapunov exponents are then calculated to determine whether the behavior of the source is noise or deterministic chaos.

  5. Synchrotron light sources: The search for quantum chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, Fred

    2001-02-01

    A storage ring is a specialized synchrotron in which a stored beam of relativistic electrons produces radiation in the vuv and x-ray regions of the spectrum. High-brightness radiation is used at the ALS to study doubly excited autoionizing states of the helium atom in the search for quantum chaos.

  6. Outflow channel sources, reactivation, and chaos formation, Xanthe Terra, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, J.A.P.; Sasaki, S.; Kuzmin, R.O.; Dohm, J.M.; Tanaka, K.L.; Miyamoto, H.; Kurita, K.; Komatsu, G.; Fairen, A.G.; Ferris, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    The undulating, warped, and densely fractured surfaces of highland regions east of Valles Marineris (located north of the eastern Aureum Chaos, east of the Hydraotes Chaos, and south of the Hydaspis Chaos) resulted from extensional surface warping related to ground subsidence, caused when pressurized water confined in subterranean caverns was released to the surface. Water emanations formed crater lakes and resulted in channeling episodes involved in the excavation of Ares, Tiu, and Simud Valles of the eastern part of the circum-Chryse outflow channel system. Progressive surface subsidence and associated reduction of the subsurface cavernous volume, and/or episodes of magmatic-driven activity, led to increases of the hydrostatic pressure, resulting in reactivation of both catastrophic and non-catastrophic outflow activity. Ancient cratered highland and basin materials that underwent large-scale subsidence grade into densely fractured terrains. Collapse of rock materials in these regions resulted in the formation of chaotic terrains, which occur in and near the headwaters of the eastern circum-Chryse outflow channels. The deepest chaotic terrain in the Hydaspis Chaos region resulted from the collapse of pre-existing outflow channel floors. The release of volatiles and related collapse may have included water emanations not necessarily linked to catastrophic outflow. Basal warming related to dike intrusions, thermokarst activity involving wet sediments and/or dissected ice-enriched country rock, permafrost exposed to the atmosphere by extensional tectonism and channel incision, and/or the injection of water into porous floor material, may have enhanced outflow channel floor instability and subsequent collapse. In addition to the possible genetic linkage to outflow channel development dating back to at least the Late Noachian, clear disruption of impact craters with pristine ejecta blankets and rims, as well as preservation of fine tectonic fabrics, suggest that

  7. Outflow channel sources, reactivation, and chaos formation, Xanthe Terra, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jose A. P.; Sasaki, Sho; Kuzmin, Ruslan O.; Dohm, James M.; Tanaka, Ken L.; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Kurita, Kei; Komatsu, Goro; Fairén, A. G.; Ferris, Justin C.

    2005-05-01

    The undulating, warped, and densely fractured surfaces of highland regions east of Valles Marineris (located north of the eastern Aureum Chaos, east of the Hydraotes Chaos, and south of the Hydaspis Chaos) resulted from extensional surface warping related to ground subsidence, caused when pressurized water confined in subterranean caverns was released to the surface. Water emanations formed crater lakes and resulted in channeling episodes involved in the excavation of Ares, Tiu, and Simud Valles of the eastern part of the circum-Chryse outflow channel system. Progressive surface subsidence and associated reduction of the subsurface cavernous volume, and/or episodes of magmatic-driven activity, led to increases of the hydrostatic pressure, resulting in reactivation of both catastrophic and non-catastrophic outflow activity. Ancient cratered highland and basin materials that underwent large-scale subsidence grade into densely fractured terrains. Collapse of rock materials in these regions resulted in the formation of chaotic terrains, which occur in and near the headwaters of the eastern circum-Chryse outflow channels. The deepest chaotic terrain in the Hydaspis Chaos region resulted from the collapse of pre-existing outflow channel floors. The release of volatiles and related collapse may have included water emanations not necessarily linked to catastrophic outflow. Basal warming related to dike intrusions, thermokarst activity involving wet sediments and/or dissected ice-enriched country rock, permafrost exposed to the atmosphere by extensional tectonism and channel incision, and/or the injection of water into porous floor material, may have enhanced outflow channel floor instability and subsequent collapse. In addition to the possible genetic linkage to outflow channel development dating back to at least the Late Noachian, clear disruption of impact craters with pristine ejecta blankets and rims, as well as preservation of fine tectonic fabrics, suggest that

  8. Mammogram analysis using CNN algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liszka, Gyorgy; Roska, Tamas; Zarandy, Akos; Hegyesi, J.; Kek, L.; Rekeczky, Csaba

    1995-05-01

    Analogic CNN algorithms were developed and introduced to detect the major pathological signs of the breast cancer in x-ray mammogram images. The reported algorithms can detect the microcalcifications and the spiculi around a given tumor kernel.

  9. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. July 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. The daily CNN Newsroom broadcast is supported by a Daily Classroom Guide, written by professional educators. These classroom guides are designed to accompany CNN Newsroom broadcasts for a given month,…

  10. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. July 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. The daily CNN Newsroom broadcast is supported by a Daily Classroom Guide, written by professional educators. These classroom guides are designed to accompany CNN Newsroom broadcasts for a given month,…

  11. Synthesizing Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, Jonathan; Corron, Ned; Hayes, Scott; Pethel, Shawn

    2007-03-01

    Chaos is usually attributed only to nonlinear systems. Yet it was recently shown that chaotic waveforms can be synthesized by linear superposition of randomly polarized basis functions. The basis function contains a growing oscillation that terminates in a large pulse. We show that this function is easily realized when viewed backward in time as a pulse followed by ringing decay. Consequently, a linear filter driven by random pulses outputs a waveform that, when viewed backward in time, exhibits essential qualities of chaos, i.e. determinism and a positive Lyapunov exponent. This phenomenon suggests that chaos may be connected to physical theories whose framework is not that of a deterministic dynamical system. We demonstrate that synthesizing chaos requires a balance between the topological entropy of the random source and the dissipation in the filter. Surprisingly, using different encodings of the random source, the same filter can produce both Lorenz-like and R"ossler-like waveforms. The different encodings can be viewed as grammar restrictions on a more general encoding that produces a chaotic superset encompassing the Lorenz and R"ossler paradigms of nonlinear dynamics. Thus, the language of deterministic chaos provides a useful description for a class of signals not generated by a deterministic system.

  12. Ikeda-like chaos on a dynamically filtered supercontinuum light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chembo, Yanne K.; Jacquot, Maxime; Dudley, John M.; Larger, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate temporal chaos in a color-selection mechanism from the visible spectrum of a supercontinuum light source. The color-selection mechanism is governed by an acousto-optoelectronic nonlinear delayed-feedback scheme modeled by an Ikeda-like equation. Initially motivated by the design of a broad audience live demonstrator in the framework of the International Year of Light 2015, the setup also provides a different experimental tool to investigate the dynamical complexity of delayed-feedback dynamics. Deterministic hyperchaos is analyzed here from the experimental time series. A projection method identifies the delay parameter, for which the chaotic strange attractor originally evolving in an infinite-dimensional phase space can be revealed in a two-dimensional subspace.

  13. Hydaspis Chaos

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-11-21

    This image of Hydaspis Chaos from NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows the source terrain for several outflow channels on Mars. VIS Instrument. Latitude 3.2, Longitude 333.2 East. 19 meter/pixel resolution. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04000

  14. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. January 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. These Daily Classroom Guides support broadcasts of CNN Newsroom for January 1999. Each guide contains program rundowns for that day's broadcast, discussion activities, and links to external Web sites.…

  15. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. September 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for September 2-29, 1997, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student…

  16. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. January 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. These Daily Classroom Guides support broadcasts of CNN Newsroom for January 1999. Each guide contains program rundowns for that day's broadcast, discussion activities, and links to external Web sites.…

  17. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. September 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for September 2-29, 1997, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student…

  18. Chaos gray-coded genetic algorithm and its application for pollution source identifications in convection diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaohua; Yang, Zhifeng; Yin, Xinan; Li, Jianqiang

    2008-10-01

    In order to reduce the computational amount and improve computational precision for nonlinear optimizations and pollution source identification in convection-diffusion equation, a new algorithm, chaos gray-coded genetic algorithm (CGGA) is proposed, in which initial population are generated by chaos mapping, and new chaos mutation and Hooke-Jeeves evolution operation are used. With the shrinking of searching range, CGGA gradually directs to an optimal result with the excellent individuals obtained by gray-coded genetic algorithm. Its convergence is analyzed. It is very efficient in maintaining the population diversity during the evolution process of gray-coded genetic algorithm. This new algorithm overcomes any Hamming-cliff phenomena existing in other encoding genetic algorithm. Its efficiency is verified by application of 20 nonlinear test functions of 1-20 variables compared with standard binary-coded genetic algorithm and improved genetic algorithm. The position and intensity of pollution source are well found by CGGA. Compared with Gray-coded hybrid-accelerated genetic algorithm and pure random search algorithm, CGGA has rapider convergent speed and higher calculation precision.

  19. Evaluation of CNN as anthropomorphic model observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massanes, Francesc; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2017-03-01

    Model observers (MO) are widely used in medical imaging to act as surrogates of human observers in task-based image quality evaluation, frequently towards optimization of reconstruction algorithms. In this paper, we explore the use of convolutional neural networks (CNN) to be used as MO. We will compare CNN MO to alternative MO currently being proposed and used such as the relevance vector machine based MO and channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). As the success of the CNN, and other deep learning approaches, is rooted in large data sets availability, which is rarely the case in medical imaging systems task-performance evaluation, we will evaluate CNN performance on both large and small training data sets.

  20. Aurorae Chaos

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-22

    Located at the eastern end of Vallis Marineris is the region of chaos called Aurorae. This image from NASA Mars Odyssey is from the northern part of Aurorae Chaos and contains mesas separated by complex low lying regions.

  1. A CNN-Specific Integrated Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malki, Suleyman; Spaanenburg, Lambert

    2009-12-01

    Integrated Processors (IP) are algorithm-specific cores that either by programming or by configuration can be re-used within many microelectronic systems. This paper looks at Cellular Neural Networks (CNN) to become realized as IP. First current digital implementations are reviewed, and the memoryprocessor bandwidth issues are analyzed. Then a generic view is taken on the structure of the network, and a new intra-communication protocol based on rotating wheels is proposed. It is shown that this provides for guaranteed high-performance with a minimal network interface. The resulting node is small and supports multi-level CNN designs, giving the system a 30-fold increase in capacity compared to classical designs. As it facilitates multiple operations on a single image, and single operations on multiple images, with minimal access to the external image memory, balancing the internal and external data transfer requirements optimizes the system operation. In conventional digital CNN designs, the treatment of boundary nodes requires additional logic to handle the CNN value propagation scheme. In the new architecture, only a slight modification of the existing cells is necessary to model the boundary effect. A typical prototype for visual pattern recognition will house 4096 CNN cells with a 2% overhead for making it an IP.

  2. Multiple sources and multiple measures based traffic flow prediction using the chaos theory and support vector regression method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Anyu; Jiang, Xiao; Li, Yongfu; Zhang, Chao; Zhu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    This study proposes a multiple sources and multiple measures based traffic flow prediction algorithm using the chaos theory and support vector regression method. In particular, first, the chaotic characteristics of traffic flow associated with the speed, occupancy, and flow are identified using the maximum Lyapunov exponent. Then, the phase space of multiple measures chaotic time series are reconstructed based on the phase space reconstruction theory and fused into a same multi-dimensional phase space using the Bayesian estimation theory. In addition, the support vector regression (SVR) model is designed to predict the traffic flow. Numerical experiments are performed using the data from multiple sources. The results show that, compared with the single measure, the proposed method has better performance for the short-term traffic flow prediction in terms of the accuracy and timeliness.

  3. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, February 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of February 2002, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Afghanistan's interim leader is making a global impression (February…

  4. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. July 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for July 1-30, 1999, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related new terms. Top stories include: Kosovo after the strikes, and saving the Everglades (July 1-2);…

  5. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, July 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of July 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Mexican voters go to polls in a landmark election (July 3); Mexico's…

  6. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, September 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of September 2001 provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: shark attacks ignite controversy in some Florida communities,…

  7. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, February 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of February 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Libyan intelligence agent is convicted of the Lockerbie bombing, and…

  8. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. July 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for July 1-30, 1999, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related new terms. Top stories include: Kosovo after the strikes, and saving the Everglades (July 1-2);…

  9. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. June 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. These daily classroom guides present top stories, headlines, environmental news, and other current events, along with suggested class discussion topics and activities to accompany the broadcasts for one…

  10. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. December 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for December 1-17, 1999, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: World AIDS Day, World Trade Organization protests in Seattle,…

  11. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, November 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of November 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: economic stimulus and U.S. steps up the bombing campaign in…

  12. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. November 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for November 1-30, 1999, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: EgyptAir Flight 990 crash, Oslo summit, India cyclone,…

  13. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, June 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Learning, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of June 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Indonesian President Wahid faces impeachment (June 1); suicide bombing…

  14. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, March 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of March 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Seattle earthquake and U.S. economy working class communities fear a…

  15. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, June 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of June 2002, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Major topics covered include: the Kashmir conflict; the Pakistan and the Kazahkstan Summit;…

  16. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, December 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of December 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: the United States Supreme Court hears the presidential candidates'…

  17. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, December 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of December 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: President Bush responds to the recent acts of terrorism in Israel,…

  18. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, March 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Newtown, PA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of March, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, Web links, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: primary victories in the Bush campaign and preparations by Gore and Bradley for the…

  19. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, June 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of June 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: President Clinton prepares to visit Germany, and federal court of…

  20. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, September 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of September 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: FBI arrests a suspect in the Emulex hoax case (September 1); U.S.…

  1. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, March 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of March 2002, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Lead stories include: the U.S. expands the War on Terrorism into the Republic of Georgia and…

  2. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. April 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Newtown, PA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of April, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to related World Wide Web sites, and lists of related news terms. Top stories include: NATO includes Belgrade in its targets, three U.S.…

  3. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. June 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for June 1-30, 1999, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: NATO bombings in Belgrade amid peace negotiations, people of South…

  4. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. March 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. These daily classroom guides present top stories, headlines, environmental news, and other current events, along with suggested class discussion topics and activities to accompany the broadcasts for one…

  5. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. February 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Newtown, PA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of February, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to related World Wide Web sites, and lists of related news terms. Topics include: Monica Lewinsky scheduled to be deposed for the Senate,…

  6. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, April 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of April 2001 provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic is arrested, a Chinese…

  7. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. November 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for November 1-30, 1999, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: EgyptAir Flight 990 crash, Oslo summit, India cyclone,…

  8. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. November, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of November, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: Iraq refuses to cooperate with United Nations weapons inspectors, expansion of…

  9. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, October 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of October 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Stories include: Taliban update/tribal troubles, U.S. officials report progress in the…

  10. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. August 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for August 2-31, 1999, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: the drought and heatwave in the northeastern United…

  11. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, March 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Newtown, PA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of March, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, Web links, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: primary victories in the Bush campaign and preparations by Gore and Bradley for the…

  12. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, June 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Learning, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of June 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Indonesian President Wahid faces impeachment (June 1); suicide bombing…

  13. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, October 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Newtown, PA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of October 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Chinese authorities detain Falun Gong protesters on Tiananmen Square…

  14. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, September 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of September 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: FBI arrests a suspect in the Emulex hoax case (September 1); U.S.…

  15. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, August 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of August 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: special series on the teenage brain, and MTV celebrates its 20th…

  16. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, August 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of August 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: the GOP opens its 37th national convention in Philadelphia, outraged…

  17. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, August 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of August 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: special series on the teenage brain, and MTV celebrates its 20th…

  18. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, December 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of December 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: President Bush responds to the recent acts of terrorism in Israel,…

  19. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. February 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for February 1-29, 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: significance of the New Hampshire Primary, victors in the New…

  20. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. October, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of October, 1998, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: scientists find trace fossil evidence of billion-year old worms, the…

  1. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. August, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These guides are designed to accompany CNN Newsroom, a daily 15-minute news program produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. Top stories include: peace talks stalled due to a suicide bombing in a Jerusalem market; inauguration of Iran's new president; UPS strike; budget agreement signed into law; news on teenage drug…

  2. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. August 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These Classroom Guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of August, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to pertinent World Wide Web sites, and lists of related news terms. Topics include: meetings over weapons inspections in Iraq could either…

  3. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. June, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of June, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: France gets a new government and Prime Minister as the Socialist Party defeats the…

  4. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. December 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for December 1-17, 1999, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: World AIDS Day, World Trade Organization protests in Seattle,…

  5. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. June 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. These daily classroom guides present top stories, headlines, environmental news, and other current events, along with suggested class discussion topics and activities to accompany the broadcasts for one…

  6. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. April 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Newtown, PA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of April, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to related World Wide Web sites, and lists of related news terms. Top stories include: NATO includes Belgrade in its targets, three U.S.…

  7. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, May 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of May 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: President Bush will announce his plans for a missile defense system,…

  8. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, May 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of May 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: President Bush will announce his plans for a missile defense system,…

  9. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, November 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of November 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: independent U.S. oil companies struggle to survive, U.S.…

  10. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. November, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of November, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: Iraq refuses to cooperate with United Nations weapons inspectors, expansion of…

  11. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. September 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for September 1-30, 1999, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Venezuela constitutional crisis, Panama's first female…

  12. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, November 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of November 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: independent U.S. oil companies struggle to survive, U.S.…

  13. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. May 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Newtown, PA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of May, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to related World Wide Web sites, and lists of related news terms. Top stories include: Reverend Jesse Jackson secures release of U.S. soldiers…

  14. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, October 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Newtown, PA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of October 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Chinese authorities detain Falun Gong protesters on Tiananmen Square…

  15. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, April 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Newtown, PA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of April 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: failure of settlement talks between Microsoft and the U.S. government,…

  16. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, July 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Learning, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of July 2002, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Lead stories include: authorities arrest a man accused of starting the Rodeo fire in Arizona,…

  17. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. January 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for January 3-28, 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: issues of the Millennium, 100 hours of the Millennium, Mideast…

  18. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. February 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Newtown, PA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of February, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to related World Wide Web sites, and lists of related news terms. Topics include: Monica Lewinsky scheduled to be deposed for the Senate,…

  19. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. June 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for June 1-30, 1999, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: NATO bombings in Belgrade amid peace negotiations, people of South…

  20. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, May 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Newtown, PA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of May 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: U.S. Government files a proposal to split up Microsoft, terrorism source…

  1. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, April 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of April 2001 provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic is arrested, a Chinese…

  2. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, January 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of January 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: George W. Bush nominates the last three vacant Cabinet posts,…

  3. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, January 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of January 2002, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: tensions escalate between Pakistan and India, (January 3-4); the…

  4. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, July 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of July 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Mexican voters go to polls in a landmark election (July 3); Mexico's…

  5. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. February 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for February 1-29, 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: significance of the New Hampshire Primary, victors in the New…

  6. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, April 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of April 2002, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Israeli soldiers attack Yasser Arafat's headquarters in Ramallah,…

  7. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. August 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These Classroom Guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of August, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to pertinent World Wide Web sites, and lists of related news terms. Topics include: meetings over weapons inspections in Iraq could either…

  8. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. October, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of October, 1998, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: scientists find trace fossil evidence of billion-year old worms, the…

  9. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, January 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of January 2002, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: tensions escalate between Pakistan and India, (January 3-4); the…

  10. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. September 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of September, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: the reaction of world markets to Russia's Duma rejection of Viktor…

  11. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. October 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for October 1-29, 1999, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: nuclear accident in Japan (October 1); debate over the nuclear…

  12. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. September 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of September, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: the reaction of world markets to Russia's Duma rejection of Viktor…

  13. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. March 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. These daily classroom guides present top stories, headlines, environmental news, and other current events, along with suggested class discussion topics and activities to accompany the broadcasts for one…

  14. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, June 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of June 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: President Clinton prepares to visit Germany, and federal court of…

  15. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, November 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of November 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: economic stimulus and U.S. steps up the bombing campaign in…

  16. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, July 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of July 2001 provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Slobodan Milosevic prepares to go before the U.N. war crimes tribunal,…

  17. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, March 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of March 2002, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Lead stories include: the U.S. expands the War on Terrorism into the Republic of Georgia and…

  18. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. January 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for January 3-28, 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: issues of the Millennium, 100 hours of the Millennium, Mideast…

  19. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, January 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of January 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: George W. Bush nominates the last three vacant Cabinet posts,…

  20. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, December 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of December 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: the United States Supreme Court hears the presidential candidates'…

  1. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, April 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of April 2002, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Israeli soldiers attack Yasser Arafat's headquarters in Ramallah,…

  2. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, July 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Learning, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of July 2002, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Lead stories include: authorities arrest a man accused of starting the Rodeo fire in Arizona,…

  3. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. August 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for August 2-31, 1999, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: the drought and heatwave in the northeastern United…

  4. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. October 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of October, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: bedroom community business, freedom of expression and…

  5. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, June 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of June 2002, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Major topics covered include: the Kashmir conflict; the Pakistan and the Kazahkstan Summit;…

  6. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, August 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of August 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: the GOP opens its 37th national convention in Philadelphia, outraged…

  7. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. August, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These guides are designed to accompany CNN Newsroom, a daily 15-minute news program produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. Top stories include: peace talks stalled due to a suicide bombing in a Jerusalem market; inauguration of Iran's new president; UPS strike; budget agreement signed into law; news on teenage drug…

  8. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. October 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for October 1-29, 1999, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: nuclear accident in Japan (October 1); debate over the nuclear…

  9. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. June, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of June, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: France gets a new government and Prime Minister as the Socialist Party defeats the…

  10. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, February 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of February 2002, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Afghanistan's interim leader is making a global impression (February…

  11. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, March 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of March 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Seattle earthquake and U.S. economy working class communities fear a…

  12. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. July, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free of charge to participating schools. This guide is designed to accompany the program for July 1997. Top stories include the following: Britain's hand over of Hong Kong to the People's Republic of China; regulating business on the…

  13. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, April 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Newtown, PA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of April 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: failure of settlement talks between Microsoft and the U.S. government,…

  14. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, February 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of February 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Libyan intelligence agent is convicted of the Lockerbie bombing, and…

  15. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. July, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free of charge to participating schools. This guide is designed to accompany the program for July 1997. Top stories include the following: Britain's hand over of Hong Kong to the People's Republic of China; regulating business on the…

  16. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, October 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of October 2001, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Stories include: Taliban update/tribal troubles, U.S. officials report progress in the…

  17. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, July 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of July 2001 provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Slobodan Milosevic prepares to go before the U.N. war crimes tribunal,…

  18. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. May 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Newtown, PA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of May, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to related World Wide Web sites, and lists of related news terms. Top stories include: Reverend Jesse Jackson secures release of U.S. soldiers…

  19. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, September 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of September 2001 provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: shark attacks ignite controversy in some Florida communities,…

  20. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, May 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Newtown, PA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of May 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: U.S. Government files a proposal to split up Microsoft, terrorism source…

  1. Hydraotes Chaos

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-08

    This image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows a small portion of Hydraotes Chaos. Chaos is defined as a distinctive area of broken terrain. Topographically, chaos regions have hills/mesas/plateaus surroundied by lower elevation valleys that crisscross in random directions. Orbit Number: 63872 Latitude: 1.633 Longitude: 325.687 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2016-05-08 00:41 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20777

  2. Colored chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, B.

    1997-09-22

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: ergodicity and chaos; Hamiltonian dynamics; metric properties; Lyapunov exponents; KS entropy; dynamical realization; lattice formulation; and numerical results.

  3. The Centrosome-Specific Phosphorylation of Cnn by Polo/Plk1 Drives Cnn Scaffold Assembly and Centrosome Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Conduit, Paul T.; Feng, Zhe; Richens, Jennifer H.; Baumbach, Janina; Wainman, Alan; Bakshi, Suruchi D.; Dobbelaere, Jeroen; Johnson, Steven; Lea, Susan M.; Raff, Jordan W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Centrosomes are important cell organizers. They consist of a pair of centrioles surrounded by pericentriolar material (PCM) that expands dramatically during mitosis—a process termed centrosome maturation. How centrosomes mature remains mysterious. Here, we identify a domain in Drosophila Cnn that appears to be phosphorylated by Polo/Plk1 specifically at centrosomes during mitosis. The phosphorylation promotes the assembly of a Cnn scaffold around the centrioles that is in constant flux, with Cnn molecules recruited continuously around the centrioles as the scaffold spreads slowly outward. Mutations that block Cnn phosphorylation strongly inhibit scaffold assembly and centrosome maturation, whereas phosphomimicking mutations allow Cnn to multimerize in vitro and to spontaneously form cytoplasmic scaffolds in vivo that organize microtubules independently of centrosomes. We conclude that Polo/Plk1 initiates the phosphorylation-dependent assembly of a Cnn scaffold around centrioles that is essential for efficient centrosome maturation in flies. PMID:24656740

  4. Aurorae Chaos

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-12

    Aurorae Chaos is located at the eastern end of the chasmata forming Vallis Marineris. This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft is very close to the chasmata and at a higher elevation than the floor of the chasmata.

  5. Aurorae Chaos

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-01

    The landslide deposit in this image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft is located in Aurorae Chaos distinctive area of broken terrain. Several regions of chaotic terrain are located on the eastern end of the Valles Marineris system.

  6. Galaxias Chaos

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-11-17

    Fracturing and erosion in this region is creating chaos terrain. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 33.9N, Longitude 147.2E. 19 meter/pixel resolution. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA01792

  7. Arsinoes Chaos

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-02-26

    This image from NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows the easternmost end of Valles Marineris, where a rugged, jumbled terrain known as chaos displays a stratigraphy that could be described as precarious.

  8. Transition to chaos in a square enclosure containing internal heat sources

    SciTech Connect

    Baytas, A.C.

    1995-09-01

    A numerical investigation is performed to study the transition from steady to chaotic flow of a fluid confined in a two-dimensional square cavity. The cavity has rigid walls of constant temperature containing uniformly distributed internal heat source. Effects of the Rayleigh number of flow and heat transfer rates are studied. In addition to, same problem is solved for sinusoidally changing internal heat source to show its effect on the flow model and heat transfer of the enclosures. Details of oscillatory solutions and flow bifurcations are presented.

  9. Defining chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Brian R.; Ott, Edward

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we propose, discuss, and illustrate a computationally feasible definition of chaos which can be applied very generally to situations that are commonly encountered, including attractors, repellers, and non-periodically forced systems. This definition is based on an entropy-like quantity, which we call “expansion entropy,” and we define chaos as occurring when this quantity is positive. We relate and compare expansion entropy to the well-known concept of topological entropy to which it is equivalent under appropriate conditions. We also present example illustrations, discuss computational implementations, and point out issues arising from attempts at giving definitions of chaos that are not entropy-based.

  10. Source of human ventilatory chaos: lessons from switching controlled mechanical ventilation to inspiratory pressure support in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Mangin, Laurence; Fiamma, Marie-Noëlle; Straus, Christian; Derenne, Jean-Philippe; Zelter, Marc; Clerici, Christine; Similowski, Thomas

    2008-04-30

    Ventilatory flow measured at the airway opening in humans exhibits a complex dynamics that has the features of chaos. Currently available data point to a neural origin of this feature, but the role of respiratory mechanics has not been specifically assessed. In this aim, we studied 17 critically ill mechanically ventilated patients during a switch form an entirely machine-controlled assistance mode (assist-controlled ventilation ACV) to a patient-driven mode (inspiratory pressure support IPS). Breath-by-breath respiratory variability was assessed with the coefficient of variation of tidal volume, total cycle time, inspiratory time, expiratory time, mean inspiratory flow, duty cycle. The detection of chaos was performed with the noise titration technique. When present, chaos was characterized with numerical indexes (correlation dimension, irregularity; largest Lyapunov exponent, sensitivity to initial conditions). Expectedly, the coefficients of variations of the respiratory variables were higher during IPS than during ACV. During ACV, noise titration failed to detect nonlinearities in 12 patients who did not exhibit signs of spontaneous respiratory activity. This indicates that the mechanical properties of the respiratory system were not sufficient to produce ventilatory chaos in the presence of a nonlinear command (ventilator clock). A positive noise limit was found in the remaining 5 cases, but these patients exhibited signs of active expiratory control (highly variable expiratory time, respiratory frequency higher than the set frequency). A positive noise limit was also observed in 16/17 patients during IPS (p<0.001). These observations suggest that ventilatory chaos predominantly has a neural origin (intrinsic to the respiratory central pattern generators, resulting from their perturbation by respiratory afferents, or both), with little contribution of respiratory mechanics, if any.

  11. Optical chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Milonni, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of chaos in nonlinear optics and laser physics will be reviewed. Attention will then be focused on the possibility of chaotic behavior in individual atoms and molecules driven by intense radiation fields. 46 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Perfect chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-12-01

    Laser noise and chaos are unwanted elements in most circumstances. However, scientists have now learnt how to put them to good use to generate high-quality random bit sequences. Atsushi Uchida from Saitama University in Japan tells Nature Photonics how.

  13. Three-Class Mammogram Classification Based on Descriptive CNN Features

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qianni; Jadoon, Adeel

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel classification technique for large data set of mammograms using a deep learning method is proposed. The proposed model targets a three-class classification study (normal, malignant, and benign cases). In our model we have presented two methods, namely, convolutional neural network-discrete wavelet (CNN-DW) and convolutional neural network-curvelet transform (CNN-CT). An augmented data set is generated by using mammogram patches. To enhance the contrast of mammogram images, the data set is filtered by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE). In the CNN-DW method, enhanced mammogram images are decomposed as its four subbands by means of two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform (2D-DWT), while in the second method discrete curvelet transform (DCT) is used. In both methods, dense scale invariant feature (DSIFT) for all subbands is extracted. Input data matrix containing these subband features of all the mammogram patches is created that is processed as input to convolutional neural network (CNN). Softmax layer and support vector machine (SVM) layer are used to train CNN for classification. Proposed methods have been compared with existing methods in terms of accuracy rate, error rate, and various validation assessment measures. CNN-DW and CNN-CT have achieved accuracy rate of 81.83% and 83.74%, respectively. Simulation results clearly validate the significance and impact of our proposed model as compared to other well-known existing techniques. PMID:28191461

  14. Quantum Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Giulio; Chirikov, Boris

    1995-04-01

    Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction: 1. The legacy of chaos in quantum mechanics G. Casati and B. V. Chirikov; Part I. Classical Chaos and Quantum Localization: 2. Stochastic behaviour of a quantum pendulum under a periodic perturbation G. Casati, B. V. Chirikov, F. M. Izrailev and J. Ford; 3. Quantum dynamics of a nonintegrable system D. R. Grempel, R. E. Prange and S. E. Fishman; 4. Excitation of molecular rotation by periodic microwave pulses. A testing ground for Anderson localization R. Blümel, S. Fishman and U. Smilansky; 5. Localization of diffusive excitation in multi-level systems D. K. Shepelyansky; 6. Classical and quantum chaos for a kicked top F. Haake, M. Kus and R. Scharf; 7. Self-similarity in quantum dynamics L. E. Reichl and L. Haoming; 8. Time irreversibility of classically chaotic quantum dynamics K. Ikeda; 9. Effect of noise on time-dependent quantum chaos E. Ott, T. M. Antonsen Jr and J. D. Hanson; 10. Dynamical localization, dissipation and noise R. F. Graham; 11. Maximum entropy models and quantum transmission in disordered systems J.-L. Pichard and M. Sanquer; 12. Solid state 'atoms' in intense oscillating fields M. S. Sherwin; Part II. Atoms in Strong Fields: 13. Localization of classically chaotic diffusion for hydrogen atoms in microwave fields J. E. Bayfield, G. Casati, I. Guarneri and D. W. Sokol; 14. Inhibition of quantum transport due to 'scars' of unstable periodic orbits R. V. Jensen, M. M. Sanders, M. Saraceno and B. Sundaram; 15. Rubidium Rydberg atoms in strong fields G. Benson, G. Raithel and H. Walther; 16. Diamagnetic Rydberg atom: confrontation of calculated and observed spectra C.-H. Iu, G. R. Welch, M. M. Kash, D. Kleppner, D. Delande and J. C. Gay; 17. Semiclassical approximation for the quantum states of a hydrogen atom in a magnetic field near the ionization limit M. Y. Kuchiev and O. P. Sushkov; 18. The semiclassical helium atom D. Wintgen, K. Richter and G. Tanner; 19. Stretched helium: a model for quantum chaos

  15. Quantum Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Giulio; Chirikov, Boris

    2006-11-01

    Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction: 1. The legacy of chaos in quantum mechanics G. Casati and B. V. Chirikov; Part I. Classical Chaos and Quantum Localization: 2. Stochastic behaviour of a quantum pendulum under a periodic perturbation G. Casati, B. V. Chirikov, F. M. Izrailev and J. Ford; 3. Quantum dynamics of a nonintegrable system D. R. Grempel, R. E. Prange and S. E. Fishman; 4. Excitation of molecular rotation by periodic microwave pulses. A testing ground for Anderson localization R. Blümel, S. Fishman and U. Smilansky; 5. Localization of diffusive excitation in multi-level systems D. K. Shepelyansky; 6. Classical and quantum chaos for a kicked top F. Haake, M. Kus and R. Scharf; 7. Self-similarity in quantum dynamics L. E. Reichl and L. Haoming; 8. Time irreversibility of classically chaotic quantum dynamics K. Ikeda; 9. Effect of noise on time-dependent quantum chaos E. Ott, T. M. Antonsen Jr and J. D. Hanson; 10. Dynamical localization, dissipation and noise R. F. Graham; 11. Maximum entropy models and quantum transmission in disordered systems J.-L. Pichard and M. Sanquer; 12. Solid state 'atoms' in intense oscillating fields M. S. Sherwin; Part II. Atoms in Strong Fields: 13. Localization of classically chaotic diffusion for hydrogen atoms in microwave fields J. E. Bayfield, G. Casati, I. Guarneri and D. W. Sokol; 14. Inhibition of quantum transport due to 'scars' of unstable periodic orbits R. V. Jensen, M. M. Sanders, M. Saraceno and B. Sundaram; 15. Rubidium Rydberg atoms in strong fields G. Benson, G. Raithel and H. Walther; 16. Diamagnetic Rydberg atom: confrontation of calculated and observed spectra C.-H. Iu, G. R. Welch, M. M. Kash, D. Kleppner, D. Delande and J. C. Gay; 17. Semiclassical approximation for the quantum states of a hydrogen atom in a magnetic field near the ionization limit M. Y. Kuchiev and O. P. Sushkov; 18. The semiclassical helium atom D. Wintgen, K. Richter and G. Tanner; 19. Stretched helium: a model for quantum chaos

  16. God's Stuff: The Constructive Powers of Chaos for Teaching Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willhauck, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Order and organization are valued in the classroom, and there is a prevailing understanding that chaos should be avoided. Yet chaos can also be potent space or a source from which new things spring forth. This article investigates biblical, scientific, and cultural understandings of chaos to discover how these contribute to a revelatory metaphor…

  17. God's Stuff: The Constructive Powers of Chaos for Teaching Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willhauck, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Order and organization are valued in the classroom, and there is a prevailing understanding that chaos should be avoided. Yet chaos can also be potent space or a source from which new things spring forth. This article investigates biblical, scientific, and cultural understandings of chaos to discover how these contribute to a revelatory metaphor…

  18. Synthesizing folded band chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corron, Ned J.; Hayes, Scott T.; Pethel, Shawn D.; Blakely, Jonathan N.

    2007-04-01

    A randomly driven linear filter that synthesizes Lorenz-like, reverse-time chaos is shown also to produce Rössler-like folded band wave forms when driven using a different encoding of the random source. The relationship between the topological entropy of the random source, dissipation in the linear filter, and the positive Lyapunov exponent for the reverse-time wave form is exposed. The two drive encodings are viewed as grammar restrictions on a more general encoding that produces a chaotic superset encompassing both the Lorenz butterfly and Rössler folded band paradigms of nonlinear dynamics.

  19. Convergent chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradas, Marc; Pumir, Alain; Huber, Greg; Wilkinson, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Chaos is widely understood as being a consequence of sensitive dependence upon initial conditions. This is the result of an instability in phase space, which separates trajectories exponentially. Here, we demonstrate that this criterion should be refined. Despite their overall intrinsic instability, trajectories may be very strongly convergent in phase space over extremely long periods, as revealed by our investigation of a simple chaotic system (a realistic model for small bodies in a turbulent flow). We establish that this strong convergence is a multi-facetted phenomenon, in which the clustering is intense, widespread and balanced by lacunarity of other regions. Power laws, indicative of scale-free features, characterize the distribution of particles in the system. We use large-deviation and extreme-value statistics to explain the effect. Our results show that the interpretation of the ‘butterfly effect’ needs to be carefully qualified. We argue that the combination of mixing and clustering processes makes our specific model relevant to understanding the evolution of simple organisms. Lastly, this notion of convergent chaos, which implies the existence of conditions for which uncertainties are unexpectedly small, may also be relevant to the valuation of insurance and futures contracts.

  20. Calponin Isoforms CNN1, CNN2 and CNN3: Regulators for Actin Cytoskeleton Functions in Smooth Muscle and Non-Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rong; Jin, J-P

    2016-01-01

    Calponin is an actin filament-associated regulatory protein expressed in smooth muscle and multiple types of non-muscle cells. Three homologous genes, CNN1, CNN2 and CNN3, encoding calponin isoforms 1, 2, and 3, respectively, are present in vertebrate species. All three calponin isoforms are actin-binding proteins with functions in inhibiting actin-activated myosin ATPase and stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton, while each isoform executes different physiological roles based on their cell type-specific expressions. Calponin 1 is specifically expressed in smooth muscle cells and plays a role in fine-tuning smooth muscle contractility. Calponin 2 is expressed in both smooth muscle and non-muscle cells and regulates multiple actin cytoskeleton-based functions. Calponin 3 participates in actin cytoskeleton-based activities in embryonic development and myogenesis. Phosphorylation has been extensively studied for the regulation of calponin functions. Cytoskeleton tension regulates the transcription of CNN2 gene and the degradation of calponin 2 protein. This review summarizes our knowledge learned from studies over the past three decades, focusing on the evolutionary lineage of calponin isoform genes, their tissue- and cell type-specific expressions, structure-function relationships, and mechanoregulation. PMID:26970176

  1. Bio-inspired nano-sensor-enhanced CNN visual computer.

    PubMed

    Porod, Wolfgang; Werblin, Frank; Chua, Leon O; Roska, Tamas; Rodriguez-Vazquez, Angel; Roska, Botond; Fay, Patrick; Bernstein, Gary H; Huang, Yih-Fang; Csurgay, Arpad I

    2004-05-01

    Nanotechnology opens new ways to utilize recent discoveries in biological image processing by translating the underlying functional concepts into the design of CNN (cellular neural/nonlinear network)-based systems incorporating nanoelectronic devices. There is a natural intersection joining studies of retinal processing, spatio-temporal nonlinear dynamics embodied in CNN, and the possibility of miniaturizing the technology through nanotechnology. This intersection serves as the springboard for our multidisciplinary project. Biological feature and motion detectors map directly into the spatio-temporal dynamics of CNN for target recognition, image stabilization, and tracking. The neural interactions underlying color processing will drive the development of nanoscale multispectral sensor arrays for image fusion. Implementing such nanoscale sensors on a CNN platform will allow the implementation of device feedback control, a hallmark of biological sensory systems. These biologically inspired CNN subroutines are incorporated into the new world of analog-and-logic algorithms and software, containing also many other active-wave computing mechanisms, including nature-inspired (physics and chemistry) as well as PDE-based sophisticated spatio-temporal algorithms. Our goal is to design and develop several miniature prototype devices for target detection, navigation, tracking, and robotics. This paper presents an example illustrating the synergies emerging from the convergence of nanotechnology, biotechnology, and information and cognitive science.

  2. Gullies of Gorgonus Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    above image to get a high-resolution view, and then focus on the trenches at the bottom. Running down the walls of the trough are the thin, dark lines of the gullies. Beneath the grooved, gully channels are faint, softer-looking fans of material. These are called alluvial deposits. Alluvial simply means all of the sand, gravel, and dirt that is carried and deposited by a liquid. On Earth, that liquid is typically water. As the liquid carves the gully, the eroded material from the channels get carried along and deposited below in fan-like shapes. These gully features were initially discovered by Odyssey's sister orbiter, Mars Global Surveyor, and caused quite a bit of emotional chaos in the scientific community when they were announced. Why? If you look closely, you can see that the gullies seem to form from a specific layer in the wall. That is, they all seem to begin at roughly the same point on the wall. That suggests that maybe, just maybe, there's a subsurface source of water at that layer that sometimes leaks out and runs down the walls to form both the gullies and the skirt-like fans of deposits beneath them. Other scientists, however, loudly assert that another liquid besides water could have carved the gullies. The debate sometimes gets so intense, you'd think that the opposing sides would want to turn each other's ideas to stone! But not for long. While the debate rages on, the neat thing is that everyone's really united. The goal is to find out, and the way to find out is to keep proposing different hypotheses and testing them out. That's the excitement of science, where everyone's solid research counts, and divergent views are appreciated for keeping science sound.

  3. Gullies of Gorgonus Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    above image to get a high-resolution view, and then focus on the trenches at the bottom. Running down the walls of the trough are the thin, dark lines of the gullies. Beneath the grooved, gully channels are faint, softer-looking fans of material. These are called alluvial deposits. Alluvial simply means all of the sand, gravel, and dirt that is carried and deposited by a liquid. On Earth, that liquid is typically water. As the liquid carves the gully, the eroded material from the channels get carried along and deposited below in fan-like shapes. These gully features were initially discovered by Odyssey's sister orbiter, Mars Global Surveyor, and caused quite a bit of emotional chaos in the scientific community when they were announced. Why? If you look closely, you can see that the gullies seem to form from a specific layer in the wall. That is, they all seem to begin at roughly the same point on the wall. That suggests that maybe, just maybe, there's a subsurface source of water at that layer that sometimes leaks out and runs down the walls to form both the gullies and the skirt-like fans of deposits beneath them. Other scientists, however, loudly assert that another liquid besides water could have carved the gullies. The debate sometimes gets so intense, you'd think that the opposing sides would want to turn each other's ideas to stone! But not for long. While the debate rages on, the neat thing is that everyone's really united. The goal is to find out, and the way to find out is to keep proposing different hypotheses and testing them out. That's the excitement of science, where everyone's solid research counts, and divergent views are appreciated for keeping science sound.

  4. Contributions of Cnn to Bio-Robotics and Brain Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, Paolo; Patané, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The paradigm of Cellular Non-linear Networks is ubiquitously applied in different research fields. In this chapter the breakthrough in bio-robotics and brain science research is focused. In particular the implementation of CNN-based CPGs is discussed proposing different implementations on bio-inspired robots: hexapods, lamprey-like structures, crab-inspired platforms and others. Furthermore the locomotion control system has been extended following a bottom-up procedure to include higher cognitive capabilities. The CNN paradigm was applied to design and implement perceptual architecture inspired by the insect world. Reaction-Diffusion CNN systems have been used to model the arousal of behavioral solution optimized to the on-going environmental conditions. An approach based on Turing patterns is illustrated including experimental results on navigation control with a roving robot. Finally, interesting works based on the olfactory system of insects, modeled with the Winner-less Competition principle, are reported and discussed.

  5. !CHAOS: A cloud of controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angius, S.; Bisegni, C.; Ciuffetti, P.; Di Pirro, G.; Foggetta, L. G.; Galletti, F.; Gargana, R.; Gioscio, E.; Maselli, D.; Mazzitelli, G.; Michelotti, A.; Orrù, R.; Pistoni, M.; Spagnoli, F.; Spigone, D.; Stecchi, A.; Tonto, T.; Tota, M. A.; Catani, L.; Di Giulio, C.; Salina, G.; Buzzi, P.; Checcucci, B.; Lubrano, P.; Piccini, M.; Fattibene, E.; Michelotto, M.; Cavallaro, S. R.; Diana, B. F.; Enrico, F.; Pulvirenti, S.

    2016-01-01

    The paper is aimed to present the !CHAOS open source project aimed to develop a prototype of a national private Cloud Computing infrastructure, devoted to accelerator control systems and large experiments of High Energy Physics (HEP). The !CHAOS project has been financed by MIUR (Italian Ministry of Research and Education) and aims to develop a new concept of control system and data acquisition framework by providing, with a high level of aaabstraction, all the services needed for controlling and managing a large scientific, or non-scientific, infrastructure. A beta version of the !CHAOS infrastructure will be released at the end of December 2015 and will run on private Cloud infrastructures based on OpenStack.

  6. Quantum signatures of chaos or quantum chaos?

    SciTech Connect

    Bunakov, V. E.

    2016-11-15

    A critical analysis of the present-day concept of chaos in quantum systems as nothing but a “quantum signature” of chaos in classical mechanics is given. In contrast to the existing semi-intuitive guesses, a definition of classical and quantum chaos is proposed on the basis of the Liouville–Arnold theorem: a quantum chaotic system featuring N degrees of freedom should have M < N independent first integrals of motion (good quantum numbers) specified by the symmetry of the Hamiltonian of the system. Quantitative measures of quantum chaos that, in the classical limit, go over to the Lyapunov exponent and the classical stability parameter are proposed. The proposed criteria of quantum chaos are applied to solving standard problems of modern dynamical chaos theory.

  7. Quantum signatures of chaos or quantum chaos?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunakov, V. E.

    2016-11-01

    A critical analysis of the present-day concept of chaos in quantum systems as nothing but a "quantum signature" of chaos in classical mechanics is given. In contrast to the existing semi-intuitive guesses, a definition of classical and quantum chaos is proposed on the basis of the Liouville-Arnold theorem: a quantum chaotic system featuring N degrees of freedom should have M < N independent first integrals of motion (good quantum numbers) specified by the symmetry of the Hamiltonian of the system. Quantitative measures of quantum chaos that, in the classical limit, go over to the Lyapunov exponent and the classical stability parameter are proposed. The proposed criteria of quantum chaos are applied to solving standard problems of modern dynamical chaos theory.

  8. The end of a monolith: Deconstructing the Cnn-Polo interaction.

    PubMed

    Eisman, Robert C; Phelps, Melissa A S; Kaufman, Thomas C

    2016-04-02

    In Drosophila melanogaster a functional pericentriolar matrix (PCM) at mitotic centrosomes requires Centrosomin-Long Form (Cnn-LF) proteins. Moreover, tissue culture cells have shown that the centrosomal localization of both Cnn-LF and Polo kinase are co-dependent, suggesting a direct interaction. Our recent study found Cnn potentially binds to and is phosphorylated by Polo kinase at 2 residues encoded by Exon1A, the initiating exon of a subset of Cnn isoforms. These interactions are required for the centrosomal localization of Cnn-LF in syncytial embryos and a mutation of either phosphorylation site is sufficient to block localization of both mutant and wild-type Cnn when they are co-expressed. Immunoprecipitation experiments show that Cnn-LF interacts directly with mitotically activated Polo kinase and requires the 2 phosphorylation sites in Exon1A. These IP experiments also show that Cnn-LF proteins form multimers. Depending on the stoichiometry between functional and mutant peptides, heteromultimers exhibit dominant negative or positive trans-complementation (rescue) effects on mitosis. Additionally, following the completion of meiosis, Cnn-Short Form (Cnn-SF) proteins are required for polar body formation in embryos, a process previously shown to require Polo kinase. These findings, when combined with previous work, clearly demonstrate the complexity of cnn and show that a view of cnn as encoding a single peptide is too simplistic.

  9. Spatial distribution of 137Cs in surface soil under different land uses in Chao Phraya watershed: Potential used as sediment source tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srisuksawad, K.; porntepkasemsan, B.; Noipow, N.; Omanee, A.; Wiriyakitnateekul, W.; Chouybudha, R.; Srimawong, P.

    2015-05-01

    Sediment fingerprinting techniques involves the discrimination of sediment sources based on differences in source material properties and quantification of the relative contributions from these sources to sediment delivered downstream to the river catchments. Results of the previous study indicated that fallout radionuclides (FRNs); 137Cs and excess 210Pb (210Pbex) are the most suitable radionuclides to be used as sediments sources tracers. This study investigated the spatial distribution of 137Cs in soil under different land uses in Chao Phraya watershed; the most significant watershed in Thailand. Emphasis was placed on discriminating among potential sediment sources including the cultivated (upland crops), pasture field, uncultivated (swamp, forest, and grass field), and channel erosion (stream and river bank). One hundred and twenty four soil samples were collected from all sources and determining for 137Cs. The 137Cs mass activities in pasture areas varied from the limit of detection (LLD) to 1.22±0.05 with the average of 0.64±0.14 Bq kg-1. In cultivated areas the 137Cs mass activities varied from LLD to 1.41±0.04 with the average of 0.38±0.04 Bq kg-1. The 137Cs mass activities were higher in uncultivated areas varied from 0.12±0.03 to 1.73±0.05 with the average of 0.76±0.15 Bq kg-1. The 137Cs mass activities in channel bank varied from LLD to 1.16±0.04 with the average of 0.39±0.05 Bq kg-1.GIS and geospatial interpolations revealed pattern in the spatial concentrations of 137Cs and indicated important differences in its distributions showing the differences behaviour of 137Cs in different land uses.

  10. Mesas in Aureum Chaos

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-31

    This image taken by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveals meter-scale yard-scale surface textures of mesas and knobs in the Aureum Chaos region of Mars. Aureum Chaos is a wide region of plateaus, mesas, and knobs.

  11. Chaos and Fractals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Ray

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an educational game called "The Chaos Game" which produces complicated fractal images. Two basic computer programs are included. The production of fractal images by the Sierpinski gasket and the Chaos Game programs is discussed. (CW)

  12. Chaos and Fractals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Ray

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an educational game called "The Chaos Game" which produces complicated fractal images. Two basic computer programs are included. The production of fractal images by the Sierpinski gasket and the Chaos Game programs is discussed. (CW)

  13. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. January 1-31, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of January, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: U.S. House of Representatives prepares for ethics battle, diplomatic immunity,…

  14. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. December 1-31, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for December 1-20, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: eighth annual World AIDS Day, protests in Belgrade, Mother Theresa's condition…

  15. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. May 2-31, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of May provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) and Palestine, Hawaiian…

  16. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. July 1-29, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of July provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) Yasser Arafat and online projects (July 1); (2) Yasser Arafat, athletes as…

  17. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. April 1-29, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of April provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) peace in the Middle East, Tom Bradley, and minority superheroes (April 1);…

  18. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. February 1-28, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of February, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: elections in Pakistan for a new prime minister, U.S. President Clinton unveils…

  19. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. May 1-31, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of May, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: Chelsea Clinton decides to attend Stanford University, Zaire's president and rebel…

  20. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. May 1-31, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of May provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guide include: (1) security systems and security at the Olympics, drawing to scale, civil war in…

  1. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. September 1-30, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of September, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: the women's conference in China, "No Man Is an…

  2. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, November 1-30, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of November 1997, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: U.S. leaders call for the use of force as Iraq refuses to permit access…

  3. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. February 1-28, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of February, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: elections in Pakistan for a new prime minister, U.S. President Clinton unveils…

  4. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. February 1-28, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of February, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: United States lobbies for support for possible air strike against Iraq,…

  5. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. July 1-31, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of July provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) British Prime Minister John Major, trade and Tijuana, sports physics, and…

  6. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. March 1-31, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of March, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: negative campaign ads, the end of the Sarajevo siege, alternative medicine in…

  7. Eighth Grade Reading Improvement with CNN Newsroom and "USA Today."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamorano, Wanda Jean

    A practicum was designed to improve the reading growth and achievement of 60 eighth-grade students who were one or more years behind grade level by utilizing CNN Newsroom and the "USA Today" newspaper as an integral part of the reading program. Pre- and posttests were administered to measure outcomes. The six areas measured were: (1)…

  8. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. October 1-31, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of October, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: immigrants illegally in the United States try to gain legal status before being…

  9. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. February 1-29, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) broadcasts for the month of February, 1996 provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Each daily guide includes a Black History Month biographical profile. Other topics covered…

  10. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. December 1-18, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for December 1-18, 1998, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, links to relevant World Wide Web sites, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: World AIDS Day/AIDS history, Exxon and Mobile announce a…

  11. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. March 1-31, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of March, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: United Nations (UN) and Iraq interpret their recent deal in different ways,…

  12. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. January 1-31, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of January, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: teen obesity, the Yangtze River Dam and its hydroelectric…

  13. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. July 1-29, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of July provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) Yasser Arafat and online projects (July 1); (2) Yasser Arafat, athletes as…

  14. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. December 1-31, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for December 1-20, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: eighth annual World AIDS Day, protests in Belgrade, Mother Theresa's condition…

  15. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. May 2-31, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of May provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) and Palestine, Hawaiian…

  16. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. January 1-30, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of January, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: the first mission to the moon in 25 years, Kenya reelects Daniel Arap Moi to…

  17. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. July 1-31, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of July provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) British Prime Minister John Major, trade and Tijuana, sports physics, and…

  18. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. March 1-31, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of March, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: monkeys cloned in Oregon, Iran suffers massive earthquake, tornados affect…

  19. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. May 1-29, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. These guides are designed to accompany the program broadcasts for May 1-29, 1998. Top stories include: effects of a labor strike on Denmark's economy (May 1); the new currency of the European Union, the…

  20. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. March 14-31, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of March provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) Bophuthatswana, Best Quest, language immersion, Bosnia diaries, Nepal,…

  1. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. December 1-31, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of December, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: Japan hosts the Climate Change Conference, space shuttle is unable to deploy…

  2. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. June 1-30, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of June provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) Congressman Dan Rostenkowski, D-Day, cars and Singapore, Rodney King civil…

  3. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. March 14-31, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of March provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) Bophuthatswana, Best Quest, language immersion, Bosnia diaries, Nepal,…

  4. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. November 1-30, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of November, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: presidential candidates travel the United States searching for votes, FBI…

  5. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. April 1-30, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. These daily Classroom Guides are designed to accompany the broadcast, and contain activities for discussing top stories, headlines, and other current events topics; each guide also includes World Wide…

  6. Tiled architecture of a CNN-mostly IP system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaanenburg, Lambert; Malki, Suleyman

    2009-05-01

    Multi-core architectures have been popularized with the advent of the IBM CELL. On a finer grain the problems in scheduling multi-cores have already existed in the tiled architectures, such as the EPIC and Da Vinci. It is not easy to evaluate the performance of a schedule on such architecture as historical data are not available. One solution is to compile algorithms for which an optimal schedule is known by analysis. A typical example is an algorithm that is already defined in terms of many collaborating simple nodes, such as a Cellular Neural Network (CNN). A simple node with a local register stack together with a 'rotating wheel' internal communication mechanism has been proposed. Though the basic CNN allows for a tiled implementation of a tiled algorithm on a tiled structure, a practical CNN system will have to disturb this regularity by the additional need for arithmetical and logical operations. Arithmetic operations are needed for instance to accommodate for low-level image processing, while logical operations are needed to fork and merge different data streams without use of the external memory. It is found that the 'rotating wheel' internal communication mechanism still handles such mechanisms without the need for global control. Overall the CNN system provides for a practical network size as implemented on a FPGA, can be easily used as embedded IP and provides a clear benchmark for a multi-core compiler.

  7. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. June 1-30, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of June provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussions, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) amusement park physics, media resources and literacy, and the war in Bosnia…

  8. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, October 1-31, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of October, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: the Middle East peace summit in Washington, DC, Israel's Netanyahu and…

  9. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. May 1-29, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. These guides are designed to accompany the program broadcasts for May 1-29, 1998. Top stories include: effects of a labor strike on Denmark's economy (May 1); the new currency of the European Union, the…

  10. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, November 1-30, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of November, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: the Bosnia peace talks, hot-air balloons, salt…

  11. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. August 1-31, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of August provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) Haiti, exploration of Mars, Rwandan refugees, Goodwill Games, Paris…

  12. CNN Newsroom Guides: April 3-28, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of April provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guide include: (1) reckless driving, hearing impairment, ancient to modern cities,…

  13. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. January 1-30, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of January, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: the first mission to the moon in 25 years, Kenya reelects Daniel Arap Moi to…

  14. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. June 1-30, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of June provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussions, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) amusement park physics, media resources and literacy, and the war in Bosnia…

  15. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. May 1-31, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of May, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: Chelsea Clinton decides to attend Stanford University, Zaire's president and rebel…

  16. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. November 1-30, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of November, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: presidential candidates travel the United States searching for votes, FBI…

  17. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, November 1-30, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of November 1997, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: U.S. leaders call for the use of force as Iraq refuses to permit access…

  18. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, December 1-31, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the first half of the month of December, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered include: President Clinton's visit to Northern Ireland,…

  19. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. February 1-29, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) broadcasts for the month of February, 1996 provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Each daily guide includes a Black History Month biographical profile. Other topics covered…

  20. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. June 1-30, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of June provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) Congressman Dan Rostenkowski, D-Day, cars and Singapore, Rodney King civil…

  1. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. January 1-31, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of January, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: teen obesity, the Yangtze River Dam and its hydroelectric…

  2. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. October 1-31, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of October, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: immigrants illegally in the United States try to gain legal status before being…

  3. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. September 1-30, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of August provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) truce in Northern Ireland, school censorship, scientific method, burial…

  4. Going Deeper With Contextual CNN for Hyperspectral Image Classification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungtae; Kwon, Heesung

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we describe a novel deep convolutional neural network (CNN) that is deeper and wider than other existing deep networks for hyperspectral image classification. Unlike current state-of-the-art approaches in CNN-based hyperspectral image classification, the proposed network, called contextual deep CNN, can optimally explore local contextual interactions by jointly exploiting local spatio-spectral relationships of neighboring individual pixel vectors. The joint exploitation of the spatio-spectral information is achieved by a multi-scale convolutional filter bank used as an initial component of the proposed CNN pipeline. The initial spatial and spectral feature maps obtained from the multi-scale filter bank are then combined together to form a joint spatio-spectral feature map. The joint feature map representing rich spectral and spatial properties of the hyperspectral image is then fed through a fully convolutional network that eventually predicts the corresponding label of each pixel vector. The proposed approach is tested on three benchmark data sets: the Indian Pines data set, the Salinas data set, and the University of Pavia data set. Performance comparison shows enhanced classification performance of the proposed approach over the current state-of-the-art on the three data sets.

  5. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. December 1-31, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of December, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: Japan hosts the Climate Change Conference, space shuttle is unable to deploy…

  6. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. March 1-31, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of March, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: United Nations (UN) and Iraq interpret their recent deal in different ways,…

  7. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. August 1-31, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of August provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) Haiti, exploration of Mars, Rwandan refugees, Goodwill Games, Paris…

  8. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. April 1-29, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of April provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) peace in the Middle East, Tom Bradley, and minority superheroes (April 1);…

  9. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, May 1-31, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of May, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and lists of related news terms. Topics covered include: United States-Israel anti-terrorism accord, the comeback of baseball…

  10. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. September 1-30, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of August provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) truce in Northern Ireland, school censorship, scientific method, burial…

  11. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. March 1-31, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of March, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: monkeys cloned in Oregon, Iran suffers massive earthquake, tornados affect…

  12. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. April 1-30, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of April, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Headlines include: Arab League boycott, Zaire peace talks, Russia and Belarus sign agreement,…

  13. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, December 1-31, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the first half of the month of December, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered include: President Clinton's visit to Northern Ireland,…

  14. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. April 1-30, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of April, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Headlines include: Arab League boycott, Zaire peace talks, Russia and Belarus sign agreement,…

  15. CNN Newsroom Guides. March 1-31, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of March provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guide include: (1) investment terminology, Republican presidential nominations, the shuttle…

  16. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. February 1-28, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of February, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: United States lobbies for support for possible air strike against Iraq,…

  17. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. April 1-30, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    CNN Newsroom is a daily 15-minute commercial-free news program specifically produced for classroom use and provided free to participating schools. These daily Classroom Guides are designed to accompany the broadcast, and contain activities for discussing top stories, headlines, and other current events topics; each guide also includes World Wide…

  18. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, May 1-31, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily Cable News Network (CNN) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of May, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and lists of related news terms. Topics covered include: United States-Israel anti-terrorism accord, the comeback of baseball…

  19. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. January 1-31, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of January, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: U.S. House of Representatives prepares for ethics battle, diplomatic immunity,…

  20. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, November 1-30, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of November, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: the Bosnia peace talks, hot-air balloons, salt…

  1. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, October 1-31, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of October, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: the Middle East peace summit in Washington, DC, Israel's Netanyahu and…

  2. The Case for Chaos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedford, Crayton W.

    1998-01-01

    Outlines a course on fractal geometry and chaos theory. Discusses how chaos theory and fractal geometry have begun to appear as separate units in the mathematics curriculum and offers an eight unit course by pulling together units related to chaos theory and fractal geometry. Contains 25 references. (ASK)

  3. Embrace the Chaos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huwe, Terence K.

    2009-01-01

    "Embracing the chaos" is an ongoing challenge for librarians. Embracing the chaos means librarians must have a plan for responding to the flood of new products, widgets, web tools, and gizmos that students use daily. In this article, the author argues that library instruction and access services have been grappling with that chaos with…

  4. The Case for Chaos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedford, Crayton W.

    1998-01-01

    Outlines a course on fractal geometry and chaos theory. Discusses how chaos theory and fractal geometry have begun to appear as separate units in the mathematics curriculum and offers an eight unit course by pulling together units related to chaos theory and fractal geometry. Contains 25 references. (ASK)

  5. Embrace the Chaos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huwe, Terence K.

    2009-01-01

    "Embracing the chaos" is an ongoing challenge for librarians. Embracing the chaos means librarians must have a plan for responding to the flood of new products, widgets, web tools, and gizmos that students use daily. In this article, the author argues that library instruction and access services have been grappling with that chaos with…

  6. Seasonal variation and potential sources of Cryptosporidium contamination in surface waters of Chao Phraya River and Bang Pu Nature Reserve pier, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Koompapong, Khuanchai; Sukthana, Yaowalark

    2012-07-01

    Using molecular techniques, a longitudinal study was conducted with the aims at identifying the seasonal difference of Cryptosporidium contamination in surface water as well as analyzing the potential sources based on species information. One hundred forty-four water samples were collected, 72 samples from the Chao Phraya River, Thailand, collected in the summer, rainy and cool seasons and 72 samples from sea water at Bang Pu Nature Reserve pier, collected before, during and after the presence of migratory seagulls. Total prevalence of Cryptosporidium contamination in river and sea water locations was 11% and 6%, respectively. The highest prevalence was observed at the end of rainy season continuing into the cool season in river water (29%) and in sea water (12%). During the rainy season, prevalence of Cryptosporidium was 4% in river and sea water samples, but none in summer season. All positive samples from the river was C. parvum, while C. meleagridis (1), and C. serpentis (1) were obtained from sea water. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genetic study in Thailand of Cryptosporidium spp contamination in river and sea water locations and the first report of C. serpentis, suggesting that humans, household pets, farm animals, wildlife and migratory birds may be the potential sources of the parasites. The findings are of use for implementing preventive measures to reduce the transmission of cryptosporidiosis to both humans and animals.

  7. Chaos in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecar, Myron; Franklin, Fred A.; Holman, Matthew J.; Murray, Norman J.

    2001-01-01

    The physical basis of chaos in the solar system is now better understood: In all cases investigated so far, chaotic orbits result from overlapping resonances. Perhaps the clearest examples are found in the asteroid belt. Overlapping resonances account for its kirkwood gaps and were used to predict and find evidence for very narrow gaps in the outer belt. Further afield, about one new "short-peroid" comet is discovered each year. They are believed to come from the "Kuiper Belt" (at 40 AU or more) via chaotic orbits produced by mean-motion and secular resonances with Neptune. Finally, the planetary system itself is not immune from chaos. In the inner solar system, overlapping secular resonances have been identified as the possible source of chaos. For example, Mercury in 1012 years, may suffer a close encounter with Venus or plunge into the Sun. In the outer solar system, three-body resonances have been identified as a source of chaos, but on an even longer time scale of 109 times the age of the solar system. On the human time scale, the planets do follow their orbits in a stately procession, and we can predict their trajectories for hundreds of thousands of years. That is because the mavericks, with shorter instability times, have long since been ejected. The solar system is not stable; it is just old!

  8. Image processing for a tactile/vision substitution system using digital CNN.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Nan; Yu, Sung-Nien; Hu, Jin-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    In view of the parallel processing and easy implementation properties of CNN, we propose to use digital CNN as the image processor of a tactile/vision substitution system (TVSS). The digital CNN processor is used to execute the wavelet down-sampling filtering and the half-toning operations, aiming to extract important features from the images. A template combination method is used to embed the two image processing functions into a single CNN processor. The digital CNN processor is implemented on an intellectual property (IP) and is implemented on a XILINX VIRTEX II 2000 FPGA board. Experiments are designated to test the capability of the CNN processor in the recognition of characters and human subjects in different environments. The experiments demonstrates impressive results, which proves the proposed digital CNN processor a powerful component in the design of efficient tactile/vision substitution systems for the visually impaired people.

  9. External Source of Infection and Nutritional Efficiency Control Chaos in a Predator-Prey Model with Disease in the Predator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pada Das, Krishna; Roy, Prodip; Ghosh, Subhabrata; Maiti, Somnath

    This paper deals with an eco-epidemiological approach with disease circulating through the predator species. Disease circulation in the predator species can be possible by contact as well as by external sources. Here, we try to discuss the role of external source of infection along with nutritional value on system dynamics. To establish our findings, we have worked out the local and global stability analysis of the equilibrium points with Hopf bifurcation analysis associated with interior equilibrium point. The ecological consequence by ecological basic reproduction number as well as the disease basic reproduction number or basic reproductive ratio are obtained and we have analyzed the community structure of the particular system with the help of ecological and disease basic reproduction numbers. Further we pay attention to the chaotic dynamics which is produced by disease circulating in predator species by contact. Our numerical simulations reveal that eco-epidemiological system without external source of infection induced chaotic dynamics for increasing force of infection due to contact, whereas in the presence of external source of infection, it exhibits stable solution. It is also observed that nutritional value can prevent chaotic dynamics. We conclude that chaotic dynamics can be controlled by the external source of infection as well as nutritional value. We apply basic tools of nonlinear dynamics such as Poincare section and maximum Lyapunov exponent to investigate chaotic behavior of the system.

  10. Unpredictable points and chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmet, Marat; Fen, Mehmet Onur

    2016-11-01

    It is revealed that a special kind of Poisson stable point, which we call an unpredictable point, gives rise to the existence of chaos in the quasi-minimal set. The existing definitions of chaos are formulated in sets of motions. This is the first time in the literature that description of chaos is initiated from a single motion. The theoretical results are exemplified by means of the symbolic dynamics.

  11. Proceedings of the 2nd Experimental Chaos Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditto, William; Pecora, Lou; Shlesinger, Michael; Spano, Mark; Vohra, Sandeep

    1995-02-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Introduction * Spatiotemporal Phenomena * Experimental Studies of Chaotic Mixing * Using Random Maps in the Analysis of Experimental Fluid Flows * Transition to Spatiotemporal Chaos in a Reaction-Diffusion System * Ion-Dynamical Chaos in Plasmas * Optics * Chaos in a Synchronously Driven Optical Resonator * Chaos, Patterns and Defects in Stimulated Scattering Phenomena * Test of the Normal Form for a Subcritical Bifurcation * Observation of Bifurcations and Chaos in a Driven Fiber Optic Coil * Applications -- Communications * Robustness and Signal Recovery in a Synchronized Chaotic System * Synchronizing Nonautonomous Chaotic Circuits * Synchronization of Pulse-Coupled Chaotic Oscillators * Ocean Transmission Effects on Chaotic Signals * Controlling Symbolic Dynamics for Communication * Applications -- Control * Analysis of Nonlinear Actuators Using Chaotic Waveforms * Controlling Chaos in a Quasiperiodic Electronic System * Control of Chaos in a CO2 Laser * General Research * Video-Based Analysis of Bifurcation Phenomena in Radio-Frequency-Excited Inert Gas Plasmas * Transition from Soliton to Chaotic Motion During the Impact of a Nonlinear Structure * Sonoluminescence in a Single Bubble: Periodic, Quasiperiodic and Chaotic Light Source * Quantum Chaos Experiments Using Microwave Cavities * Experiments on Quantum Chaos With and Without Time Reversibility * When Small Noise Imposed on Deterministic Dynamics Becomes Important * Biology * Chaos Control for Cardiac Arrhythmias * Irregularities in Spike Trains of Cat Retinal Ganglion Cells * Broad-Band Synchronization in Monkey Neocortex * Applicability of Correlation Dimension Calculations to Blood Pressure Signal in Rats * Tests for Deterministic Chaos in Noisy Time Series * The Crayfish Mechanoreceptor Cell: A Biological Example of Stochastic Resonance * Chemistry * Chaos During Heterogeneous Chemical Reactions * Stabilizing and Tracking Unstable Periodic

  12. A CNN based Hybrid approach towards automatic image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, Pattathal V.; Katiyar, Sunil K.

    2013-06-01

    Image registration is a key component of various image processing operations which involve the analysis of different image data sets. Automatic image registration domains have witnessed the application of many intelligent methodologies over the past decade; however inability to properly model object shape as well as contextual information had limited the attainable accuracy. In this paper, we propose a framework for accurate feature shape modeling and adaptive resampling using advanced techniques such as Vector Machines, Cellular Neural Network (CNN), SIFT, coreset, and Cellular Automata. CNN has found to be effective in improving feature matching as well as resampling stages of registration and complexity of the approach has been considerably reduced using corset optimization The salient features of this work are cellular neural network approach based SIFT feature point optimisation, adaptive resampling and intelligent object modelling. Developed methodology has been compared with contemporary methods using different statistical measures. Investigations over various satellite images revealed that considerable success was achieved with the approach. System has dynamically used spectral and spatial information for representing contextual knowledge using CNN-prolog approach. Methodology also illustrated to be effective in providing intelligent interpretation and adaptive resampling. Rejestracja obrazu jest kluczowym składnikiem różnych operacji jego przetwarzania. W ostatnich latach do automatycznej rejestracji obrazu wykorzystuje się metody sztucznej inteligencji, których największą wadą, obniżającą dokładność uzyskanych wyników jest brak możliwości dobrego wymodelowania kształtu i informacji kontekstowych. W niniejszej pracy zaproponowano zasady dokładnego modelowania kształtu oraz adaptacyjnego resamplingu z wykorzystaniem zaawansowanych technik, takich jak Vector Machines (VM), komórkowa sieć neuronowa (CNN), przesiewanie (SIFT), Coreset i

  13. CNN3 is regulated by microRNA-1 during muscle development in pigs.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhonglin; Liang, Ruyi; Zhao, Shuanping; Wang, Ruiqi; Huang, Ruihua; Li, Kui

    2014-01-01

    The calponin 3 (CNN3) gene has important functions involved in skeletal muscle development. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play critical role in myogenesis by influencing the mRNA stability or protein translation of target gene. Based on paired microRNA and mRNA profiling in the prenatal skeletal muscle of pigs, our previous study suggested that CNN3 was differentially expressed and a potential target for miR-1. To further understand the biological function and regulation mechanism of CNN3, we performed co-expression analysis of CNN3 and miR-1 in developmental skeletal muscle tissues (16 stages) from Tongcheng (a Chinese domestic breed, obese-type) and Landrace (a Western, lean-type) pigs, respectively. Subsequently, dual luciferase and western blot assays were carried out. During skeletal muscle development, we observe a significantly negative expression correlation between the miR-1 and CNN3 at mRNA level. Our dual luciferase and western blot results suggested that the CNN3 gene was regulated by miR-1. We identified four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) contained within the CNN3 gene. Association analysis indicated that these CNN3 SNPs are significantly associated with birth weight (BW) and the 21-day weaning weight of the piglets examined. These facts indicate that CNN3 is a candidate gene associated with growth traits and regulated by miR-1 during skeletal muscle development in pigs.

  14. Teaching as Chaos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Bryan; Dustin, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors advance a metaphor born of chaos theory that views the college classroom as a complex dynamical system. The authors reason further that "teaching as chaos" provides a more accurate representation of the teaching-learning process than the existing linear scientific metaphors on which traditional learning assessments are…

  15. Understanding chaos via nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cejnar, Pavel; Stránský, Pavel

    2014-01-08

    We use two models of nuclear collective dynamics-the geometric collective model and the interacting boson model-to illustrate principles of classical and quantum chaos. We propose these models as a suitable testing ground for further elaborations of the general theory of chaos in both classical and quantum domains.

  16. "Chaos Rules" Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, David

    2011-01-01

    About 20 years ago, while lost in the midst of his PhD research, the author mused over proposed titles for his thesis. He was pretty pleased with himself when he came up with "Chaos Rules" (the implied double meaning was deliberate), or more completely, "Chaos Rules: An Exploration of the Work of Instructional Designers in Distance Education." He…

  17. Topology and Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garity, Dennis J.; Repovš, Dušan

    2008-11-01

    We discuss some basic topological techniques used in the study of chaotic dynamical systems. This paper is partially motivated by a talk given by the second author at the 7th international summer school and conference Chaos 2008: Let's Face Chaos Through Nonlinear Dynamics (CAMTP, University of Maribor, Slovenia, 29 June-13 July 2008).

  18. Chaos in Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alex

    1999-05-11

    Chaos is a general phenomenon in nonlinear dynamical systems. Accelerators--storage rings in particular--in which particles are stored for 10{sup 10} revolutions constitute a particularly intricate nonlinear dynamical system. (In comparison, the earth has revolved around the sun for only 10{sup 9} turns.) Storage rings therefore provide an ideal testing ground for chaos physics. In fact, it is the chaos phenomenon that imposes one of the key design criteria for these accelerators. One might arguably say that the demise of the Superconducting Super Collider project originated from a misjudgement in its chaos analysis at one point along its design path, leading to its first substantial cost escalation. This talk gives an elementary introduction to the study of chaos in accelerators.

  19. Model for Shock Wave Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasimov, Aslan R.; Faria, Luiz M.; Rosales, Rodolfo R.

    2013-03-01

    We propose the following model equation, ut+1/2(u2-uus)x=f(x,us) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting mixtures. The equation is given on the half line, x<0, and the shock is located at x=0 for any t≥0. Here, us(t) is the shock state and the source term f is taken to mimic the chemical energy release in detonations. This equation retains the essential physics needed to reproduce many properties of detonations in gaseous reactive mixtures: steady traveling wave solutions, instability of such solutions, and the onset of chaos. Our model is the first (to our knowledge) to describe chaos in shock waves by a scalar first-order partial differential equation. The chaos arises in the equation thanks to an interplay between the nonlinearity of the inviscid Burgers equation and a novel forcing term that is nonlocal in nature and has deep physical roots in reactive Euler equations.

  20. HCP: A Flexible CNN Framework for Multi-label Image Classification.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yunchao; Xia, Wei; Lin, Min; Huang, Junshi; Ni, Bingbing; Dong, Jian; Zhao, Yao; Yan, Shuicheng

    2015-10-26

    Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) has demonstrated promising performance in single-label image classification tasks. However, how CNN best copes with multi-label images still remains an open problem, mainly due to the complex underlying object layouts and insufficient multi-label training images. In this work, we propose a flexible deep CNN infrastructure, called Hypotheses-CNN-Pooling (HCP), where an arbitrary number of object segment hypotheses are taken as the inputs, then a shared CNN is connected with each hypothesis, and finally the CNN output results from different hypotheses are aggregated with max pooling to produce the ultimate multi-label predictions. Some unique characteristics of this flexible deep CNN infrastructure include: 1) no ground-truth bounding box information is required for training; 2) the whole HCP infrastructure is robust to possibly noisy and/or redundant hypotheses; 3) the shared CNN is flexible and can be well pre-trained with a large-scale single-label image dataset, e.g., ImageNet; and 4) it may naturally output multi-label prediction results. Experimental results on Pascal VOC 2007 and VOC 2012 multi-label image datasets well demonstrate the superiority of the proposed HCP infrastructure over other state-of-the-arts. In particular, the mAP reaches 90.5% by HCP only and 93.2% after the fusion with our complementary result in [44] based on hand-crafted features on the VOC 2012 dataset.

  1. Chaos and Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandrup, H. E.

    2002-09-01

    This talk summarises a combined theoretical and numerical investigation of the role of chaos and transient chaos in time-dependent Hamiltonian systems which aim to model elliptical galaxies. The existence of large amounts of chaos in near-equilibrium configurations is of potential importance because configurations incorporating large numbers of chaotic orbits appear to be substantially more susceptible than nearly integrable systems to various irregularities associated with, e.g., internal substructures, satellite galaxies, and/or the effects of a high density environment. Alternatively, transient chaos, reflecting exponential sensitivity over comparatively short time intervals, can prove important by significantly increasing the overall efficiency of violent relaxation so as to facilitate a more rapid evolution towards a `well-mixed' equilibrium. Completely conclusive `smoking gun' evidence for chaos and chaotic mixing has not yet been obtained, although evidence for the presence of chaos can in principle be extracted from such data sets as provided by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Interestingly, however, arguments completely analogous to those applied to self-gravitating systems also suggest the presence of chaos in charged particle beams, a setting which is amenable to controlled experiments.

  2. Chaos-free oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Joana G.; Gallas, Marcia R.; Gallas, Jason A. C.

    2017-05-01

    Oscillators have widespread applications in micro- and nanomechanical devices, in lasers of various types, in chemical and biochemical models, among others. However, applications are normally marred by the presence of chaos, requiring expensive control techniques to bypass it. Here, we show that the low-frequency limit of driven systems, a poorly explored region, is a wide chaos-free zone. Specifically, for a popular model of micro- and nanomechanical devices and for the Brusselator, we report the discovery of an unexpectedly wide mosaic of phases resulting from stable periodic oscillations of increasing complexity but totally free from chaos.

  3. Inspecting rapidly moving surfaces for small defects using CNN cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blug, Andreas; Carl, Daniel; Höfler, Heinrich

    2013-04-01

    A continuous increase in production speed and manufacturing precision raises a demand for the automated detection of small image features on rapidly moving surfaces. An example are wire drawing processes where kilometers of cylindrical metal surfaces moving with 10 m/s have to be inspected for defects such as scratches, dents, grooves, or chatter marks with a lateral size of 100 μm in real time. Up to now, complex eddy current systems are used for quality control instead of line cameras, because the ratio between lateral feature size and surface speed is limited by the data transport between camera and computer. This bottleneck is avoided by "cellular neural network" (CNN) cameras which enable image processing directly on the camera chip. This article reports results achieved with a demonstrator based on this novel analogue camera - computer system. The results show that computational speed and accuracy of the analogue computer system are sufficient to detect and discriminate the different types of defects. Area images with 176 x 144 pixels are acquired and evaluated in real time with frame rates of 4 to 10 kHz - depending on the number of defects to be detected. These frame rates correspond to equivalent line rates on line cameras between 360 and 880 kHz, a number far beyond the available features. Using the relation between lateral feature size and surface speed as a figure of merit, the CNN based system outperforms conventional image processing systems by an order of magnitude.

  4. Chaos, Fractals, and Polynomials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tylee, J. Louis; Tylee, Thomas B.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses chaos theory; linear algebraic equations and the numerical solution of polynomials, including the use of the Newton-Raphson technique to find polynomial roots; fractals; search region and coordinate systems; convergence; and generating color fractals on a computer. (LRW)

  5. Chaos, Fractals, and Polynomials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tylee, J. Louis; Tylee, Thomas B.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses chaos theory; linear algebraic equations and the numerical solution of polynomials, including the use of the Newton-Raphson technique to find polynomial roots; fractals; search region and coordinate systems; convergence; and generating color fractals on a computer. (LRW)

  6. Exploiting chaos for applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ditto, William L.; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2015-09-15

    We discuss how understanding the nature of chaotic dynamics allows us to control these systems. A controlled chaotic system can then serve as a versatile pattern generator that can be used for a range of application. Specifically, we will discuss the application of controlled chaos to the design of novel computational paradigms. Thus, we present an illustrative research arc, starting with ideas of control, based on the general understanding of chaos, moving over to applications that influence the course of building better devices.

  7. Decoherence, determinism and chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noyes, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The author claims by now to have made his case that modern work on fractals and chaos theory has already removed the presumption that classical physics is 'deterministic'. Further, he claims that in so far as classical relativistic field theory (i.e. electromagnetism and gravitation) are scale invariant, they are self-consistent only if the idea of 'test-particle' is introduced from outside the theory. Einstein spent the last years of his life trying to use singularities in the metric as 'particles' or to get them out of the nonlinearities in a grand unified theory, in vain. So classical physics in this sense cannot be the fundamental theory. However, the author claims to have shown that if he introduces a 'scale invariance bounded from below' by measurement accuracy, then Tanimura's generalization of the Feynman proof as reconstructed by Dyson allows him to make a consistent classical theory for decoherent sources sinks. Restoring coherence to classical physics via relativistic action at a distance is left as a task for the future. Relativistic quantum mechanics, properly reconstructed from a finite and discrete basis, emerges in much better shape. The concept of particles has to be replaced by no-yes particulate events, and particle-antiparticle pair creation and annihilation properly formulated.

  8. Decoherence, determinism and chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.

    1994-01-01

    The author claims by now to have made his case that modern work on fractals and chaos theory has already removed the presumption that classical physics is `deterministic`. Further, he claims that in so far as classical relativistic field theory (i.e. electromagnetism and gravitation) are scale invariant, they are self-consistent only if the idea of `test-particle` is introduced from outside the theory. Einstein spent the last years of his life trying to use singularities in the metric as `particles` or to get them out of the non-linearities in a grand unified theory -- in vain. So classical physics in this sense cannot be the fundamental theory. However, the author claims to have shown that if he introduces a `scale invariance bounded from below` by measurement accuracy, then Tanimura`s generalization of the Feynman proof as reconstructed by Dyson allows him to make a consistent classical theory for decoherent sources sinks. Restoring coherence to classical physics via relativistic action-at-a distance is left as a task for the future. Relativistic quantum mechanics, properly reconstructed from a finite and discrete basis, emerges in much better shape. The concept of `particles has to be replaced by NO-YES particulate events, and particle-antiparticle pair creation and annihilation properly formulated.

  9. Mining key elements for severe convection prediction based on CNN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Pan, Ning; Zhang, Changan; Sha, Hongzhou; Zhang, Bolei; Liu, Liang; Zhang, Meng

    2017-04-01

    Severe convective weather is a kind of weather disasters accompanied by heavy rainfall, gust wind, hail, etc. Along with recent developments on remote sensing and numerical modeling, there are high-volume and long-term observational and modeling data accumulated to capture massive severe convective events over particular areas and time periods. With those high-volume and high-variety weather data, most of the existing studies and methods carry out the dynamical laws, cause analysis, potential rule study, and prediction enhancement by utilizing the governing equations from fluid dynamics and thermodynamics. In this study, a key-element mining method is proposed for severe convection prediction based on convolution neural network (CNN). It aims to identify the key areas and key elements from huge amounts of historical weather data including conventional measurements, weather radar, satellite, so as numerical modeling and/or reanalysis data. Under this manner, the machine-learning based method could help the human forecasters on their decision-making on operational weather forecasts on severe convective weathers by extracting key information from the real-time and historical weather big data. In this paper, it first utilizes computer vision technology to complete the data preprocessing work of the meteorological variables. Then, it utilizes the information such as radar map and expert knowledge to annotate all images automatically. And finally, by using CNN model, it cloud analyze and evaluate each weather elements (e.g., particular variables, patterns, features, etc.), and identify key areas of those critical weather elements, then help forecasters quickly screen out the key elements from huge amounts of observation data by current weather conditions. Based on the rich weather measurement and model data (up to 10 years) over Fujian province in China, where the severe convective weathers are very active during the summer months, experimental tests are conducted with

  10. BrainNetCNN: Convolutional neural networks for brain networks; towards predicting neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Jeremy; Brown, Colin J; Miller, Steven P; Booth, Brian G; Chau, Vann; Grunau, Ruth E; Zwicker, Jill G; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2017-02-01

    We propose BrainNetCNN, a convolutional neural network (CNN) framework to predict clinical neurodevelopmental outcomes from brain networks. In contrast to the spatially local convolutions done in traditional image-based CNNs, our BrainNetCNN is composed of novel edge-to-edge, edge-to-node and node-to-graph convolutional filters that leverage the topological locality of structural brain networks. We apply the BrainNetCNN framework to predict cognitive and motor developmental outcome scores from structural brain networks of infants born preterm. Diffusion tensor images (DTI) of preterm infants, acquired between 27 and 46 weeks gestational age, were used to construct a dataset of structural brain connectivity networks. We first demonstrate the predictive capabilities of BrainNetCNN on synthetic phantom networks with simulated injury patterns and added noise. BrainNetCNN outperforms a fully connected neural-network with the same number of model parameters on both phantoms with focal and diffuse injury patterns. We then apply our method to the task of joint prediction of Bayley-III cognitive and motor scores, assessed at 18 months of age, adjusted for prematurity. We show that our BrainNetCNN framework outperforms a variety of other methods on the same data. Furthermore, BrainNetCNN is able to identify an infant's postmenstrual age to within about 2 weeks. Finally, we explore the high-level features learned by BrainNetCNN by visualizing the importance of each connection in the brain with respect to predicting the outcome scores. These findings are then discussed in the context of the anatomy and function of the developing preterm infant brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Lane marking detection based on waveform analysis and CNN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yang Yang; Chen, Hou Jin; Hao, Xiao Li

    2017-06-01

    Lane markings detection is a very important part of the ADAS to avoid traffic accidents. In order to obtain accurate lane markings, in this work, a novel and efficient algorithm is proposed, which analyses the waveform generated from the road image after inverse perspective mapping (IPM). The algorithm includes two main stages: the first stage uses an image preprocessing including a CNN to reduce the background and enhance the lane markings. The second stage obtains the waveform of the road image and analyzes the waveform to get lanes. The contribution of this work is that we introduce local and global features of the waveform to detect the lane markings. The results indicate the proposed method is robust in detecting and fitting the lane markings.

  12. Fractal Patterns and Chaos Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devaney, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Teachers incorporate the chaos game and the concept of a fractal into various areas of the algebra and geometry curriculum. The chaos game approach to fractals provides teachers with an opportunity to help students comprehend the geometry of affine transformations.

  13. Order, Chaos and All That!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasser, L.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of ideas about the concept of chaos is surveyed. Discussed are chaos in deterministic, dynamic systems; order in dissipative systems; and thermodynamics and irreversibility. Included are logistic and bifurcation maps to illustrate points made in the discussion. (CW)

  14. Fractal Patterns and Chaos Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devaney, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Teachers incorporate the chaos game and the concept of a fractal into various areas of the algebra and geometry curriculum. The chaos game approach to fractals provides teachers with an opportunity to help students comprehend the geometry of affine transformations.

  15. Order, Chaos and All That!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasser, L.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of ideas about the concept of chaos is surveyed. Discussed are chaos in deterministic, dynamic systems; order in dissipative systems; and thermodynamics and irreversibility. Included are logistic and bifurcation maps to illustrate points made in the discussion. (CW)

  16. Chaos and insect ecology

    Treesearch

    Jesse A. Logan; Fred P. Hain

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in applied mathematical analysis have uncovered a fascinating and unexpected dynamical richness that underlies behavior of even the simplest non-linear mathematical models. Due to the complexity of solutions to these non-linear equations, a new mathematical term, chaos, has been coined to describe the resulting dynamics. This term captures the notion...

  17. Gastric precancerous diseases classification using CNN with a concise model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Hu, Weiling; Chen, Fei; Yang, Yuanhang; Wang, Liangjing; Duan, Huilong; Si, Jianmin

    2017-01-01

    Gastric precancerous diseases (GPD) may deteriorate into early gastric cancer if misdiagnosed, so it is important to help doctors recognize GPD accurately and quickly. In this paper, we realize the classification of 3-class GPD, namely, polyp, erosion, and ulcer using convolutional neural networks (CNN) with a concise model called the Gastric Precancerous Disease Network (GPDNet). GPDNet introduces fire modules from SqueezeNet to reduce the model size and parameters about 10 times while improving speed for quick classification. To maintain classification accuracy with fewer parameters, we propose an innovative method called iterative reinforced learning (IRL). After training GPDNet from scratch, we apply IRL to fine-tune the parameters whose values are close to 0, and then we take the modified model as a pretrained model for the next training. The result shows that IRL can improve the accuracy about 9% after 6 iterations. The final classification accuracy of our GPDNet was 88.90%, which is promising for clinical GPD recognition. PMID:28950010

  18. Deep Convolutional Neural Networks for Computer-Aided Detection: CNN Architectures, Dataset Characteristics and Transfer Learning

    PubMed Central

    Hoo-Chang, Shin; Roth, Holger R.; Gao, Mingchen; Lu, Le; Xu, Ziyue; Nogues, Isabella; Yao, Jianhua; Mollura, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in image recognition, primarily due to the availability of large-scale annotated datasets (i.e. ImageNet) and the revival of deep convolutional neural networks (CNN). CNNs enable learning data-driven, highly representative, layered hierarchical image features from sufficient training data. However, obtaining datasets as comprehensively annotated as ImageNet in the medical imaging domain remains a challenge. There are currently three major techniques that successfully employ CNNs to medical image classification: training the CNN from scratch, using off-the-shelf pre-trained CNN features, and conducting unsupervised CNN pre-training with supervised fine-tuning. Another effective method is transfer learning, i.e., fine-tuning CNN models (supervised) pre-trained from natural image dataset to medical image tasks (although domain transfer between two medical image datasets is also possible). In this paper, we exploit three important, but previously understudied factors of employing deep convolutional neural networks to computer-aided detection problems. We first explore and evaluate different CNN architectures. The studied models contain 5 thousand to 160 million parameters, and vary in numbers of layers. We then evaluate the influence of dataset scale and spatial image context on performance. Finally, we examine when and why transfer learning from pre-trained ImageNet (via fine-tuning) can be useful. We study two specific computeraided detection (CADe) problems, namely thoraco-abdominal lymph node (LN) detection and interstitial lung disease (ILD) classification. We achieve the state-of-the-art performance on the mediastinal LN detection, with 85% sensitivity at 3 false positive per patient, and report the first five-fold cross-validation classification results on predicting axial CT slices with ILD categories. Our extensive empirical evaluation, CNN model analysis and valuable insights can be extended to the design of high performance

  19. Chaos in neurons and its application: Perspective of chaos engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Yoshito; Oku, Makito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2012-12-01

    We review our recent work on chaos in neurons and its application to neural networks from perspective of chaos engineering. Especially, we analyze a dataset of a squid giant axon by newly combining our previous work of identifying Devaney's chaos with surrogate data analysis, and show that an axon can behave chaotically. Based on this knowledge, we use a chaotic neuron model to investigate possible information processing in the brain.

  20. Towards completing the cyclopropenylidene cycle: rovibrational analysis of cyclic N3(+), CNN, HCNN(+), and CNC().

    PubMed

    Fortenberry, Ryan C; Lee, Timothy J; Huang, Xinchuan

    2017-08-30

    The simple aromatic hydrocarbon, cyclopropenylidene (c-C3H2), is a known, naturally-occurring molecule. The question remains as to whether its isoelectronic, cyclic, fellow aromatics of c-N3(+), c-CNN, HCNN(+), and c-CNC(-) are as well. Each of these are exciting objects for observation of Titan, and the rotational constants and vibrational frequencies produced here will allow for remote sensing of Titan's atmosphere or other astrophysical or terrestrial sources. None of these four aromatic species are vibrationally strong absorbers/emitters, but the two ions, HCNN(+) and c-CNC(-), have dipole moments of greater than 3 D and 1 D, respectively, making them good targets for rotational spectroscopic observation. Each of these molecules is shown here to exhibit its own, unique vibrational properties, but the general trends put the vibrational behavior for corresponding fundamental modes within close ranges of one another, even producing nearly the same heavy atom, symmetric stretching frequencies for HCNN(+) and c-C3H2 at 1600 cm(-1). The c-N3(+) cation is confirmed to be fairly unstable and has almost no intensity in its ν2 fundamental. Hence, it will likely remain difficult to characterize experimentally.

  1. Prevalence of chaos in planetary systems formed through embryo accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Matthew S.; Kaib, Nathan A.

    2017-05-01

    The formation of the solar system's terrestrial planets has been numerically modeled in various works, and many other studies have been devoted to characterizing our modern planets' chaotic dynamical state. However, it is still not known whether our planets fragile chaotic state is an expected outcome of terrestrial planet accretion. We use a suite of numerical simulations to present a detailed analysis and characterization of the dynamical chaos in 145 different systems produced via terrestrial planet formation in Kaib and Cowan (2015). These systems were created in the presence of a fully formed Jupiter and Saturn, using a variety of different initial conditions. They are not meant to provide a detailed replication of the actual present solar system, but rather serve as a sample of similar systems for comparison and analysis. We find that dynamical chaos is prevalent in roughly half of the systems we form. We show that this chaos disappears in the majority of such systems when Jupiter is removed, implying that the largest source of chaos is perturbations from Jupiter. Chaos is most prevalent in systems that form 4 or 5 terrestrial planets. Additionally, an eccentric Jupiter and Saturn is shown to enhance the prevalence of chaos in systems. Furthermore, systems in our sample with a center of mass highly concentrated between ∼0.8-1.2 AU generally prove to be less chaotic than systems with more exotic mass distributions. Through the process of evolving systems to the current epoch, we show that late instabilities are quite common in our systems. Of greatest interest, many of the sources of chaos observed in our own solar system (such as the secularly driven chaos between Mercury and Jupiter) are shown to be common outcomes of terrestrial planetary formation. Thus, consistent with previous studies such as Laskar (1996), the solar system's marginally stable, chaotic state may naturally arise from the process of terrestrial planet formation.

  2. The joy of transient chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Tél, Tamás

    2015-09-15

    We intend to show that transient chaos is a very appealing, but still not widely appreciated, subfield of nonlinear dynamics. Besides flashing its basic properties and giving a brief overview of the many applications, a few recent transient-chaos-related subjects are introduced in some detail. These include the dynamics of decision making, dispersion, and sedimentation of volcanic ash, doubly transient chaos of undriven autonomous mechanical systems, and a dynamical systems approach to energy absorption or explosion.

  3. Chaos control of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Garfinkel, A; Weiss, J N; Ditto, W L; Spano, M L

    1995-01-01

    Chaos theory has shown that many disordered and erratic phenomena are in fact deterministic, and can be understood causally and controlled. The prospect that cardiac arrhythmias might be instances of deterministic chaos is therefore intriguing. We used a recently developed method of chaos control to stabilize a ouabain-induced arrhythmia in rabbit ventricular tissue in vitro. Extension of these results to clinically significant arrhythmias such as fibrillation will require overcoming the additional obstacles of spatiotemporal complexity.

  4. Quantum chaos meets coherent control.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jiangbin; Brumer, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Coherent control of atomic and molecular processes has been a rapidly developing field. Applications of coherent control to large and complex molecular systems are expected to encounter the effects of chaos in the underlying classical dynamics, i.e., quantum chaos. Hence, recent work has focused on examining control in model chaotic systems. This work is reviewed, with an emphasis on a variety of new quantum phenomena that are of interest to both areas of quantum chaos and coherent control.

  5. Chaos in quantum channels

    DOE PAGES

    Hosur, Pavan; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Roberts, Daniel A.; ...

    2016-02-01

    For this research, we study chaos and scrambling in unitary channels by considering their entanglement properties as states. Using out-of-time-order correlation functions to diagnose chaos, we characterize the ability of a channel to process quantum information. We show that the generic decay of such correlators implies that any input subsystem must have near vanishing mutual information with almost all partitions of the output. Additionally, we propose the negativity of the tripartite information of the channel as a general diagnostic of scrambling. This measures the delocalization of information and is closely related to the decay of out-of-time-order correlators. We back upmore » our results with numerics in two non-integrable models and analytic results in a perfect tensor network model of chaotic time evolution. In conclusion, these results show that the butterfly effect in quantum systems implies the information-theoretic definition of scrambling.« less

  6. Chaos in quantum channels

    SciTech Connect

    Hosur, Pavan; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Roberts, Daniel A.; Yoshida, Beni

    2016-02-01

    For this research, we study chaos and scrambling in unitary channels by considering their entanglement properties as states. Using out-of-time-order correlation functions to diagnose chaos, we characterize the ability of a channel to process quantum information. We show that the generic decay of such correlators implies that any input subsystem must have near vanishing mutual information with almost all partitions of the output. Additionally, we propose the negativity of the tripartite information of the channel as a general diagnostic of scrambling. This measures the delocalization of information and is closely related to the decay of out-of-time-order correlators. We back up our results with numerics in two non-integrable models and analytic results in a perfect tensor network model of chaotic time evolution. In conclusion, these results show that the butterfly effect in quantum systems implies the information-theoretic definition of scrambling.

  7. Wireless communication with chaos.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hai-Peng; Baptista, Murilo S; Grebogi, Celso

    2013-05-03

    The modern world fully relies on wireless communication. Because of intrinsic physical constraints of the wireless physical media (multipath, damping, and filtering), signals carrying information are strongly modified, preventing information from being transmitted with a high bit rate. We show that, though a chaotic signal is strongly modified by the wireless physical media, its Lyapunov exponents remain unaltered, suggesting that the information transmitted is not modified by the channel. For some particular chaotic signals, we have indeed proved that the dynamic description of both the transmitted and the received signals is identical and shown that the capacity of the chaos-based wireless channel is unaffected by the multipath propagation of the physical media. These physical properties of chaotic signals warrant an effective chaos-based wireless communication system.

  8. Controlling chaos faster

    SciTech Connect

    Bick, Christian; Kolodziejski, Christoph; Timme, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Predictive feedback control is an easy-to-implement method to stabilize unknown unstable periodic orbits in chaotic dynamical systems. Predictive feedback control is severely limited because asymptotic convergence speed decreases with stronger instabilities which in turn are typical for larger target periods, rendering it harder to effectively stabilize periodic orbits of large period. Here, we study stalled chaos control, where the application of control is stalled to make use of the chaotic, uncontrolled dynamics, and introduce an adaptation paradigm to overcome this limitation and speed up convergence. This modified control scheme is not only capable of stabilizing more periodic orbits than the original predictive feedback control but also speeds up convergence for typical chaotic maps, as illustrated in both theory and application. The proposed adaptation scheme provides a way to tune parameters online, yielding a broadly applicable, fast chaos control that converges reliably, even for periodic orbits of large period.

  9. Controlling chaos faster.

    PubMed

    Bick, Christian; Kolodziejski, Christoph; Timme, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Predictive feedback control is an easy-to-implement method to stabilize unknown unstable periodic orbits in chaotic dynamical systems. Predictive feedback control is severely limited because asymptotic convergence speed decreases with stronger instabilities which in turn are typical for larger target periods, rendering it harder to effectively stabilize periodic orbits of large period. Here, we study stalled chaos control, where the application of control is stalled to make use of the chaotic, uncontrolled dynamics, and introduce an adaptation paradigm to overcome this limitation and speed up convergence. This modified control scheme is not only capable of stabilizing more periodic orbits than the original predictive feedback control but also speeds up convergence for typical chaotic maps, as illustrated in both theory and application. The proposed adaptation scheme provides a way to tune parameters online, yielding a broadly applicable, fast chaos control that converges reliably, even for periodic orbits of large period.

  10. Enhancement of ELDA Tracker Based on CNN Features and Adaptive Model Update

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Changxin; Shi, Huizhang; Yu, Jin-Gang; Sang, Nong

    2016-01-01

    Appearance representation and the observation model are the most important components in designing a robust visual tracking algorithm for video-based sensors. Additionally, the exemplar-based linear discriminant analysis (ELDA) model has shown good performance in object tracking. Based on that, we improve the ELDA tracking algorithm by deep convolutional neural network (CNN) features and adaptive model update. Deep CNN features have been successfully used in various computer vision tasks. Extracting CNN features on all of the candidate windows is time consuming. To address this problem, a two-step CNN feature extraction method is proposed by separately computing convolutional layers and fully-connected layers. Due to the strong discriminative ability of CNN features and the exemplar-based model, we update both object and background models to improve their adaptivity and to deal with the tradeoff between discriminative ability and adaptivity. An object updating method is proposed to select the “good” models (detectors), which are quite discriminative and uncorrelated to other selected models. Meanwhile, we build the background model as a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to adapt to complex scenes, which is initialized offline and updated online. The proposed tracker is evaluated on a benchmark dataset of 50 video sequences with various challenges. It achieves the best overall performance among the compared state-of-the-art trackers, which demonstrates the effectiveness and robustness of our tracking algorithm. PMID:27092505

  11. CNN-SVM for Microvascular Morphological Type Recognition with Data Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Di-Xiu; Zhang, Rong; Feng, Hui; Wang, Ya-Lei

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the problem of feature extraction and the classification of microvascular morphological types to aid esophageal cancer detection. We present a patch-based system with a hybrid SVM model with data augmentation for intraepithelial papillary capillary loop recognition. A greedy patch-generating algorithm and a specialized CNN named NBI-Net are designed to extract hierarchical features from patches. We investigate a series of data augmentation techniques to progressively improve the prediction invariance of image scaling and rotation. For classifier boosting, SVM is used as an alternative to softmax to enhance generalization ability. The effectiveness of CNN feature representation ability is discussed for a set of widely used CNN models, including AlexNet, VGG-16, and GoogLeNet. Experiments are conducted on the NBI-ME dataset. The recognition rate is up to 92.74% on the patch level with data augmentation and classifier boosting. The results show that the combined CNN-SVM model beats models of traditional features with SVM as well as the original CNN with softmax. The synthesis results indicate that our system is able to assist clinical diagnosis to a certain extent.

  12. Noise tolerant spatiotemporal chaos computing.

    PubMed

    Kia, Behnam; Kia, Sarvenaz; Lindner, John F; Sinha, Sudeshna; Ditto, William L

    2014-12-01

    We introduce and design a noise tolerant chaos computing system based on a coupled map lattice (CML) and the noise reduction capabilities inherent in coupled dynamical systems. The resulting spatiotemporal chaos computing system is more robust to noise than a single map chaos computing system. In this CML based approach to computing, under the coupled dynamics, the local noise from different nodes of the lattice diffuses across the lattice, and it attenuates each other's effects, resulting in a system with less noise content and a more robust chaos computing architecture.

  13. Noise tolerant spatiotemporal chaos computing

    SciTech Connect

    Kia, Behnam; Kia, Sarvenaz; Ditto, William L.; Lindner, John F.; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2014-12-01

    We introduce and design a noise tolerant chaos computing system based on a coupled map lattice (CML) and the noise reduction capabilities inherent in coupled dynamical systems. The resulting spatiotemporal chaos computing system is more robust to noise than a single map chaos computing system. In this CML based approach to computing, under the coupled dynamics, the local noise from different nodes of the lattice diffuses across the lattice, and it attenuates each other's effects, resulting in a system with less noise content and a more robust chaos computing architecture.

  14. Tailoring wavelets for chaos control.

    PubMed

    Wei, G W; Zhan, Meng; Lai, C-H

    2002-12-31

    Chaos is a class of ubiquitous phenomena and controlling chaos is of great interest and importance. In this Letter, we introduce wavelet controlled dynamics as a new paradigm of dynamical control. We find that by modifying a tiny fraction of the wavelet subspaces of a coupling matrix, we could dramatically enhance the transverse stability of the synchronous manifold of a chaotic system. Wavelet controlled Hopf bifurcation from chaos is observed. Our approach provides a robust strategy for controlling chaos and other dynamical systems in nature.

  15. Arsinoes Chaos Landforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    23 October 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned rock outcrops, possibly sedimentary rocks, in the Arsinoes Chaos region east of the Valles Marineris trough system. These rocky materials were once below the martian surface. These features are located near 7.2oS, 27.9oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  16. Failure of chaos control

    PubMed

    van De Water W; de Weger J

    2000-11-01

    We study the control of chaos in an experiment on a parametrically excited pendulum whose excitation mechanism is not perfect. This imperfection leads to a weakly excited degree of freedom with an associated small eigenvalue. Although the state of the pendulum could be characterized well and although the perturbation is weak, we fail to control chaos. From a numerical model we learn that the small eigenvalue cannot be ignored when attempting control. However, the estimate of this eigenvalue from an (experimental) time series is elusive. The reason is that points in an experimental time series are distributed according to the natural measure. It is this extremely uneven distribution of points that thwarts attempts to measure eigenvalues that are very different. Another consequence of the phase-space distribution of points for control is the occurrence of logarithmic-oscillations in the waiting time before control can be attempted. We come to the conclusion that chaos needs to be destroyed before the information needed for its control can be obtained.

  17. Weak quantum chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukuljan, Ivan; Grozdanov, Sašo; Prosen, Tomaž

    2017-08-01

    Out-of-time-ordered correlation functions (OTOCs) are presently being extensively debated as quantifiers of dynamical chaos in interacting quantum many-body systems. We argue that in quantum spin and fermionic systems, where all local operators are bounded, an OTOC of local observables is bounded as well and thus its exponential growth is merely transient. As a better measure of quantum chaos in such systems, we propose, and study, the density of the OTOC of extensive sums of local observables, which can exhibit indefinite growth in the thermodynamic limit. We demonstrate this for the kicked quantum Ising model by using large-scale numerical results and an analytic solution in the integrable regime. In a generic case, we observe the growth of the OTOC density to be linear in time. We prove that this density in general, locally interacting, nonintegrable quantum spin and fermionic dynamical systems exhibits growth that is at most polynomial in time—a phenomenon, which we term weak quantum chaos. In the special case of the model being integrable and the observables under consideration quadratic, the OTOC density saturates to a plateau.

  18. Generalized Stability in an Array of Nonlinear Dynamic Systems with Applications to Chaotic CNN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Lequan; Chen, Guanrong

    This paper introduces a generalized stability with respect to a transformation (GST) for a coupled discrete array of difference systems (CDADS) and a coupled continuous array of differential systems (CCADS). Some constructive theorems provide general representations of GST in both CDADS and CCADS. Using these theorems, one can design GST-based CADS and CCADS via appropriate transformations. As examples, the results are applied to autonomous and nonautonomous coupled discrete and differentiable Lorenz cellular neural network (CNN) CADS and CCADS; differentiable Chen CNN CCADS, and discrete sine-function CNN CADS. Extensive numerical simulations show their complex dynamic behaviors. The established theorems provide insights for better understanding of some new phenomena of complex discrete and continuously-differentiable networks.

  19. CNN-coupled Humanoid Panoramic Annular Lens (PAL)-Optical System for Military Applications (Feasibility Study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greguss, Pal

    2002-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking OPTOPAL Panoramic Metrology Consulting as follows: This investigation will consist of adaptation of a Hungarian-developed single-piece imaging block, the Panoramic Annular Lens (PAL) and the CNN chip for a few military applications. A polar beam splitter will be placed immediately after the relay lens to obtain two image planes, one will be used by the existing 64X64 CNN-UM focal plane array processor chip. The other image plane will be projected on the space-variant CMOS retina-like digital camera GIOTTO. Using this configuration enables us to compensate for the relatively low pixel number of the CNN-UM array processor; further it will allow a real time switching from log-polar imaging to regular imaging and allow for the design of the humanoid PAL optical system.

  20. Chaos synchronization in networks of semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen; Aviad, Yaara; Reidler, Igor; Song, Helun; Huang, Yuyang; Biermann, Klaus; Rosenbluh, Michael; Zhang, Yaohui; Grahn, Holger T.; Kanter, Ido

    2015-11-01

    Chaos synchronization has been demonstrated as a useful building block for various tasks in secure communications, including a source of all-electronic ultrafast physical random number generators based on room temperature spontaneous chaotic oscillations in a DC-biased weakly coupled GaAs/Al0.45Ga0.55As semiconductor superlattice (SSL). Here, we experimentally demonstrate the emergence of several types of chaos synchronization, e.g. leader-laggard, face-to-face and zero-lag synchronization in network motifs of coupled SSLs consisting of unidirectional and mutual coupling as well as self-feedback coupling. Each type of synchronization clearly reflects the symmetry of the topology of its network motif. The emergence of a chaotic SSL without external feedback and synchronization among different structured SSLs open up the possibility for advanced secure multi-user communication methods based on large networks of coupled SSLs.

  1. Deep Convolutional Neural Networks for Computer-Aided Detection: CNN Architectures, Dataset Characteristics and Transfer Learning.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hoo-Chang; Roth, Holger R; Gao, Mingchen; Lu, Le; Xu, Ziyue; Nogues, Isabella; Yao, Jianhua; Mollura, Daniel; Summers, Ronald M

    2016-05-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in image recognition, primarily due to the availability of large-scale annotated datasets and deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs). CNNs enable learning data-driven, highly representative, hierarchical image features from sufficient training data. However, obtaining datasets as comprehensively annotated as ImageNet in the medical imaging domain remains a challenge. There are currently three major techniques that successfully employ CNNs to medical image classification: training the CNN from scratch, using off-the-shelf pre-trained CNN features, and conducting unsupervised CNN pre-training with supervised fine-tuning. Another effective method is transfer learning, i.e., fine-tuning CNN models pre-trained from natural image dataset to medical image tasks. In this paper, we exploit three important, but previously understudied factors of employing deep convolutional neural networks to computer-aided detection problems. We first explore and evaluate different CNN architectures. The studied models contain 5 thousand to 160 million parameters, and vary in numbers of layers. We then evaluate the influence of dataset scale and spatial image context on performance. Finally, we examine when and why transfer learning from pre-trained ImageNet (via fine-tuning) can be useful. We study two specific computer-aided detection (CADe) problems, namely thoraco-abdominal lymph node (LN) detection and interstitial lung disease (ILD) classification. We achieve the state-of-the-art performance on the mediastinal LN detection, and report the first five-fold cross-validation classification results on predicting axial CT slices with ILD categories. Our extensive empirical evaluation, CNN model analysis and valuable insights can be extended to the design of high performance CAD systems for other medical imaging tasks.

  2. Real-time vehicle detection and tracking in video based on faster R-CNN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongjie; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xin

    2017-08-01

    Vehicle detection and tracking is a significant part in auxiliary vehicle driving system. Using the traditional detection method based on image information has encountered enormous difficulties, especially in complex background. To solve this problem, a detection method based on deep learning, Faster R-CNN, which has very high detection accuracy and flexibility, is introduced. An algorithm of target tracking with the combination of Camshift and Kalman filter is proposed for vehicle tracking. The computation time of Faster R-CNN cannot achieve realtime detection. We use multi-thread technique to detect and track vehicle by parallel computation for real-time application.

  3. Chaos Theory and Post Modernism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Chaos theory is often associated with post modernism. However, one may make the point that both terms are misunderstood. The point of this article is to define both terms and indicate their relationship. Description: Chaos theory is associated with a definition of a theory dealing with variables (butterflies) that are not directly related to a…

  4. Chaos Theory and Post Modernism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Chaos theory is often associated with post modernism. However, one may make the point that both terms are misunderstood. The point of this article is to define both terms and indicate their relationship. Description: Chaos theory is associated with a definition of a theory dealing with variables (butterflies) that are not directly related to a…

  5. Death and revival of chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszás, Bálint; Feudel, Ulrike; Tél, Tamás

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the death and revival of chaos under the impact of a monotonous time-dependent forcing that changes its strength with a non-negligible rate. Starting on a chaotic attractor it is found that the complexity of the dynamics remains very pronounced even when the driving amplitude has decayed to rather small values. When after the death of chaos the strength of the forcing is increased again with the same rate of change, chaos is found to revive but with a different history. This leads to the appearance of a hysteresis in the complexity of the dynamics. To characterize these dynamics, the concept of snapshot attractors is used, and the corresponding ensemble approach proves to be superior to a single trajectory description, that turns out to be nonrepresentative. The death (revival) of chaos is manifested in a drop (jump) of the standard deviation of one of the phase-space coordinates of the ensemble; the details of this chaos-nonchaos transition depend on the ratio of the characteristic times of the amplitude change and of the internal dynamics. It is demonstrated that chaos cannot die out as long as underlying transient chaos is present in the parameter space. As a condition for a "quasistatically slow" switch-off, we derive an inequality which cannot be fulfilled in practice over extended parameter ranges where transient chaos is present. These observations need to be taken into account when discussing the implications of "climate change scenarios" in any nonlinear dynamical system.

  6. Chaos Criminology: A critical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Adrienne L.

    There has been a push since the early 1980's for a paradigm shift in criminology from a Newtonian-based ontology to one of quantum physics. Primarily this effort has taken the form of integrating Chaos Theory into Criminology into what this thesis calls 'Chaos Criminology'. However, with the melding of any two fields, terms and concepts need to be translated properly, which has yet to be done. In addition to proving a translation between fields, this thesis also uses a set of criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of the current use of Chaos Theory in Criminology. While the results of the theory evaluation reveal that the current Chaos Criminology work is severely lacking and in need of development, there is some promise in the development of Marx's dialectical materialism with Chaos Theory.

  7. [Shedding light on chaos theory].

    PubMed

    Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2004-06-01

    Gleick (1987) said that only three twentieth century scientific theories would be important enough to continue be of use in the twenty-first century: The Theory of Relativity, Quantum Theory, and Chaos Theory. Chaos Theory has become a craze which is being used to forge a new scientific system. It has also been extensively applied in a variety of professions. The purpose of this article is to introduce chaos theory and its nursing applications. Chaos is a sign of regular order. This is to say that chaos theory emphasizes the intrinsic potential for regular order within disordered phenomena. It is to be hoped that this article will inspire more nursing scientists to apply this concept to clinical, research, or administrative fields in our profession.

  8. Iani Chaos - False Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-01-04

    The THEMIS camera contains 5 filters. The data from different filters can be combined in multiple ways to create a false color image. These false color images may reveal subtle variations of the surface not easily identified in a single band image. Today's false color image shows part of Iani Chaos. The "dark blue" material is likely basaltic sand. Orbit Number: 18037 Latitude: -1.05225 Longitude: 341.26 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2006-01-07 10:45. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20228

  9. Aram Chaos Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    8 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcrops of light-toned, sedimentary rock among darker-toned mesas in Aram Chaos. Dark, windblown megaripples -- large ripples -- are also present at this location.

    Location near: 3.0oN, 21.6oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  10. Landslide in Aureum Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    15 May 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the results of a small landslide off of a hillslope in the Aureum Chaos region of Mars. Mass movement occurred from right (the slope) to left (the lobate feature pointed left). Small dark dots in the landslide area are large boulders. This feature is located near 2.6oS, 24.5oW. This picture covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the left/upper left.

  11. Landslide in Aureum Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    15 May 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the results of a small landslide off of a hillslope in the Aureum Chaos region of Mars. Mass movement occurred from right (the slope) to left (the lobate feature pointed left). Small dark dots in the landslide area are large boulders. This feature is located near 2.6oS, 24.5oW. This picture covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the left/upper left.

  12. Chaos and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-08-01

    The main research effort was an attempt to find low order systems possessing chaotic behavior which could successfully model turbulent flow. The reason for searching for low order systems is the strongly suggestive evidence that chaos disappears in systems with a large number of degrees of freedom. Recent work on symplectic integration of Hamiltonian systems indicates that for Hamiltonian systems chaos may be no more than numerical error growing exponentially, and is absent when the numerical scheme conserves the Poincare invariants and the symplectic structure. A great deal was learned about vortical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations and new solutions of a weakly nonlinear approximation were found, which suggest the existence of Navier-Stokes solutions which will describe a vortical description of the laminar turbulent interface. An interesting application of dynamical system theory to a problem of kinematic mixing showed that the use of these ideas could reduce the dimension of the system in order to make computations feasible, and predict the qualitative development of the distribution of mixed tracer in an unsteady flow.

  13. Explorations in Chaos Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Armando; Bixler, David

    2012-03-01

    Chaos Theory is an interesting and important branch of physics. Many physical systems, such as weather or fluid flow, exhibit chaotic behavior. Experiments in simple mechanical or electrical systems, as well as simple simulations can be used as methods of studying chaos. Using a mechanical method, we connected a speaker and to a frequency modulator to bounce a table tennis ball. We recorded the ball's motion at different frequencies using a video camera. Using Tracker software we observed it's position versus it's velocity in order to analyze its chaotic behavior. For a simple simulation, we used the visual-based programming in LabView to examine chaotic behavior produced by some non-linear differential equations. Results from both the mechanical system and the simulations will be discussed. For future work, we plan to continue to explore some chaotic simulations and perform a sequence of experiments with an electrical system. Exploring these nonlinear chaotic systems can help us to better understand and model many phenomena found in nature.

  14. Ariadnes Colles Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 18 June 2002) Among the many varied landscapes on Mars the term chaos is applied to those places that have a jumbled, blocky appearance. Most of the better known chaotic terrain occurs in the northern hemisphere but there are other occurrences in the southern hemisphere, three of which are centered on 180 degrees west longitude. Ariadnes Colles, Atlantis, and Gorgonum Chaos all share similar features: relatively bright, irregularly shaped knobs and mesas that rise above a dark, sand-covered, hummocky floor. Close inspection of this THEMIS image shows that the darker material tends to lap up to the base of the knobs and stops where the slopes are steep. On some of the lowest knobs, the dark material appears to overtop them. The knobs themselves are highly eroded, many having a pitted appearance. Images from the camera on Mars Global Surveyor clearly show that the dark material is sand, based on its mantling appearance and the presence of dunes. It looks as though the material that composes the knobs was probably a continuous layer that was subsequently heavily eroded. While it is likely that the dark sand is responsible for some of the erosion it is also possible that the this landscape was eroded by some other process and the sand was emplaced at a later time.

  15. Beyond a Gaussian Denoiser: Residual Learning of Deep CNN for Image Denoising.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Zuo, Wangmeng; Chen, Yunjin; Meng, Deyu; Zhang, Lei

    2017-02-01

    Discriminative model learning for image denoising has been recently attracting considerable attentions due to its favorable denoising performance. In this paper, we take one step forward by investigating the construction of feed-forward denoising convolutional neural networks (DnCNNs) to embrace the progress in very deep architecture, learning algorithm, and regularization method into image denoising. Specifically, residual learning and batch normalization are utilized to speed up the training process as well as boost the denoising performance. Different from the existing discriminative denoising models which usually train a specific model for additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) at a certain noise level, our DnCNN model is able to handle Gaussian denoising with unknown noise level (i.e., blind Gaussian denoising). With the residual learning strategy, DnCNN implicitly removes the latent clean image in the hidden layers. This property motivates us to train a single DnCNN model to tackle with several general image denoising tasks such as Gaussian denoising, single image super-resolution and JPEG image deblocking. Our extensive experiments demonstrate that our DnCNN model can not only exhibit high effectiveness in several general image denoising tasks, but also be efficiently implemented by benefiting from GPU computing.

  16. Beyond a Gaussian Denoiser: Residual Learning of Deep CNN for Image Denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Zuo, Wangmeng; Chen, Yunjin; Meng, Deyu; Zhang, Lei

    2017-07-01

    Discriminative model learning for image denoising has been recently attracting considerable attentions due to its favorable denoising performance. In this paper, we take one step forward by investigating the construction of feed-forward denoising convolutional neural networks (DnCNNs) to embrace the progress in very deep architecture, learning algorithm, and regularization method into image denoising. Specifically, residual learning and batch normalization are utilized to speed up the training process as well as boost the denoising performance. Different from the existing discriminative denoising models which usually train a specific model for additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) at a certain noise level, our DnCNN model is able to handle Gaussian denoising with unknown noise level (i.e., blind Gaussian denoising). With the residual learning strategy, DnCNN implicitly removes the latent clean image in the hidden layers. This property motivates us to train a single DnCNN model to tackle with several general image denoising tasks such as Gaussian denoising, single image super-resolution and JPEG image deblocking. Our extensive experiments demonstrate that our DnCNN model can not only exhibit high effectiveness in several general image denoising tasks, but also be efficiently implemented by benefiting from GPU computing.

  17. Interphase centrosome organization by the PLP-Cnn scaffold is required for centrosome function

    PubMed Central

    Lerit, Dorothy A.; Jordan, Holly A.; Poulton, John S.; Fagerstrom, Carey J.; Galletta, Brian J.; Peifer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Pericentriolar material (PCM) mediates the microtubule (MT) nucleation and anchoring activity of centrosomes. A scaffold organized by Centrosomin (Cnn) serves to ensure proper PCM architecture and functional changes in centrosome activity with each cell cycle. Here, we investigate the mechanisms that spatially restrict and temporally coordinate centrosome scaffold formation. Focusing on the mitotic-to-interphase transition in Drosophila melanogaster embryos, we show that the elaboration of the interphase Cnn scaffold defines a major structural rearrangement of the centrosome. We identify an unprecedented role for Pericentrin-like protein (PLP), which localizes to the tips of extended Cnn flares, to maintain robust interphase centrosome activity and promote the formation of interphase MT asters required for normal nuclear spacing, centrosome segregation, and compartmentalization of the syncytial embryo. Our data reveal that Cnn and PLP directly interact at two defined sites to coordinate the cell cycle–dependent rearrangement and scaffolding activity of the centrosome to permit normal centrosome organization, cell division, and embryonic viability. PMID:26150390

  18. Visual Cortex Inspired CNN Model for Feature Construction in Text Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hongping; Niu, Zhendong; Zhang, Chunxia; Ma, Jing; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Recently, biologically inspired models are gradually proposed to solve the problem in text analysis. Convolutional neural networks (CNN) are hierarchical artificial neural networks, which include a various of multilayer perceptrons. According to biological research, CNN can be improved by bringing in the attention modulation and memory processing of primate visual cortex. In this paper, we employ the above properties of primate visual cortex to improve CNN and propose a biological-mechanism-driven-feature-construction based answer recommendation method (BMFC-ARM), which is used to recommend the best answer for the corresponding given questions in community question answering. BMFC-ARM is an improved CNN with four channels respectively representing questions, answers, asker information and answerer information, and mainly contains two stages: biological mechanism driven feature construction (BMFC) and answer ranking. BMFC imitates the attention modulation property by introducing the asker information and answerer information of given questions and the similarity between them, and imitates the memory processing property through bringing in the user reputation information for answerers. Then the feature vector for answer ranking is constructed by fusing the asker-answerer similarities, answerer's reputation and the corresponding vectors of question, answer, asker, and answerer. Finally, the Softmax is used at the stage of answer ranking to get best answers by the feature vector. The experimental results of answer recommendation on the Stackexchange dataset show that BMFC-ARM exhibits better performance. PMID:27471460

  19. Faster R-CNN: Towards Real-Time Object Detection with Region Proposal Networks.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shaoqing; He, Kaiming; Girshick, Ross; Sun, Jian

    2017-06-01

    State-of-the-art object detection networks depend on region proposal algorithms to hypothesize object locations. Advances like SPPnet [1] and Fast R-CNN [2] have reduced the running time of these detection networks, exposing region proposal computation as a bottleneck. In this work, we introduce a Region Proposal Network (RPN) that shares full-image convolutional features with the detection network, thus enabling nearly cost-free region proposals. An RPN is a fully convolutional network that simultaneously predicts object bounds and objectness scores at each position. The RPN is trained end-to-end to generate high-quality region proposals, which are used by Fast R-CNN for detection. We further merge RPN and Fast R-CNN into a single network by sharing their convolutional features-using the recently popular terminology of neural networks with 'attention' mechanisms, the RPN component tells the unified network where to look. For the very deep VGG-16 model [3] , our detection system has a frame rate of 5 fps (including all steps) on a GPU, while achieving state-of-the-art object detection accuracy on PASCAL VOC 2007, 2012, and MS COCO datasets with only 300 proposals per image. In ILSVRC and COCO 2015 competitions, Faster R-CNN and RPN are the foundations of the 1st-place winning entries in several tracks. Code has been made publicly available.

  20. Multistability, chaos, and random signal generation in semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Lei; Huang, Danhong; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Historically, semiconductor superlattices, artificial periodic structures of different semiconductor materials, were invented with the purpose of engineering or manipulating the electronic properties of semiconductor devices. A key application lies in generating radiation sources, amplifiers, and detectors in the "unusual" spectral range of subterahertz and terahertz (0.1-10 THz), which cannot be readily realized using conventional radiation sources, the so-called THz gap. Efforts in the past three decades have demonstrated various nonlinear dynamical behaviors including chaos, suggesting the potential to exploit chaos in semiconductor superlattices as random signal sources (e.g., random number generators) in the THz frequency range. We consider a realistic model of hot electrons in semiconductor superlattice, taking into account the induced space charge field. Through a systematic exploration of the phase space we find that, when the system is subject to an external electrical driving of a single frequency, chaos is typically associated with the occurrence of multistability. That is, for a given parameter setting, while there are initial conditions that lead to chaotic trajectories, simultaneously there are other initial conditions that lead to regular motions. Transition to multistability, i.e., the emergence of multistability with chaos as a system parameter passes through a critical point, is found and argued to be abrupt. Multistability thus presents an obstacle to utilizing the superlattice system as a reliable and robust random signal source. However, we demonstrate that, when an additional driving field of incommensurate frequency is applied, multistability can be eliminated, with chaos representing the only possible asymptotic behavior of the system. In such a case, a random initial condition will lead to a trajectory landing in a chaotic attractor with probability 1, making quasiperiodically driven semiconductor superlattices potentially as a reliable

  1. Multistability, chaos, and random signal generation in semiconductor superlattices.

    PubMed

    Ying, Lei; Huang, Danhong; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Historically, semiconductor superlattices, artificial periodic structures of different semiconductor materials, were invented with the purpose of engineering or manipulating the electronic properties of semiconductor devices. A key application lies in generating radiation sources, amplifiers, and detectors in the "unusual" spectral range of subterahertz and terahertz (0.1-10 THz), which cannot be readily realized using conventional radiation sources, the so-called THz gap. Efforts in the past three decades have demonstrated various nonlinear dynamical behaviors including chaos, suggesting the potential to exploit chaos in semiconductor superlattices as random signal sources (e.g., random number generators) in the THz frequency range. We consider a realistic model of hot electrons in semiconductor superlattice, taking into account the induced space charge field. Through a systematic exploration of the phase space we find that, when the system is subject to an external electrical driving of a single frequency, chaos is typically associated with the occurrence of multistability. That is, for a given parameter setting, while there are initial conditions that lead to chaotic trajectories, simultaneously there are other initial conditions that lead to regular motions. Transition to multistability, i.e., the emergence of multistability with chaos as a system parameter passes through a critical point, is found and argued to be abrupt. Multistability thus presents an obstacle to utilizing the superlattice system as a reliable and robust random signal source. However, we demonstrate that, when an additional driving field of incommensurate frequency is applied, multistability can be eliminated, with chaos representing the only possible asymptotic behavior of the system. In such a case, a random initial condition will lead to a trajectory landing in a chaotic attractor with probability 1, making quasiperiodically driven semiconductor superlattices potentially as a reliable

  2. Stalling chaos control accelerates convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bick, Christian; Kolodziejski, Christoph; Timme, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Since chaos control has found its way into many applications, the development of fast, easy-to-implement and universally applicable chaos control methods is of crucial importance. Predictive feedback control has been widely applied but suffers from a speed limit imposed by highly unstable periodic orbits. We show that this limit can be overcome by stalling the control, thereby taking advantage of the stable directions of the uncontrolled chaotic map. This analytical finding is confirmed by numerical simulations, giving a chaos-control method that is capable of successfully stabilizing periodic orbits of high period.

  3. Quantum chaos in nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bunakov, V. E.

    2016-07-15

    A definition of classical and quantum chaos on the basis of the Liouville–Arnold theorem is proposed. According to this definition, a chaotic quantum system that has N degrees of freedom should have M < N independent first integrals of motion (good quantum numbers) that are determined by the symmetry of the Hamiltonian for the system being considered. Quantitative measures of quantum chaos are established. In the classical limit, they go over to the Lyapunov exponent or the classical stability parameter. The use of quantum-chaos parameters in nuclear physics is demonstrated.

  4. CNN pincer ruthenium catalysts for hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation of ketones: experimental and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Baratta, Walter; Baldino, Salvatore; Calhorda, Maria José; Costa, Paulo J; Esposito, Gennaro; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Magnolia, Santo; Mealli, Carlo; Messaoudi, Abdelatif; Mason, Sax A; Veiros, Luis F

    2014-10-13

    Reaction of [RuCl(CNN)(dppb)] (1-Cl) (HCNN=2-aminomethyl-6-(4-methylphenyl)pyridine; dppb=Ph2 P(CH2 )4 PPh2 ) with NaOCH2 CF3 leads to the amine-alkoxide [Ru(CNN)(OCH2 CF3 )(dppb)] (1-OCH2 CF3 ), whose neutron diffraction study reveals a short RuO⋅⋅⋅HN bond length. Treatment of 1-Cl with NaOEt and EtOH affords the alkoxide [Ru(CNN)(OEt)(dppb)]⋅(EtOH)n (1-OEt⋅n EtOH), which equilibrates with the hydride [RuH(CNN)(dppb)] (1-H) and acetaldehyde. Compound 1-OEt⋅n EtOH reacts reversibly with H2 leading to 1-H and EtOH through dihydrogen splitting. NMR spectroscopic studies on 1-OEt⋅n EtOH and 1-H reveal hydrogen bond interactions and exchange processes. The chloride 1-Cl catalyzes the hydrogenation (5 atm of H2 ) of ketones to alcohols (turnover frequency (TOF) up to 6.5×10(4) h(-1) , 40 °C). DFT calculations were performed on the reaction of [RuH(CNN')(dmpb)] (2-H) (HCNN'=2-aminomethyl-6-(phenyl)pyridine; dmpb=Me2 P(CH2 )4 PMe2 ) with acetone and with one molecule of 2-propanol, in alcohol, with the alkoxide complex being the most stable species. In the first step, the Ru-hydride transfers one hydrogen atom to the carbon of the ketone, whereas the second hydrogen transfer from NH2 is mediated by the alcohol and leads to the key "amide" intermediate. Regeneration of the hydride complex may occur by reaction with 2-propanol or with H2 ; both pathways have low barriers and are alcohol assisted.

  5. An Amino-Terminal Polo Kinase Interaction Motif Acts in the Regulation of Centrosome Formation and Reveals a Novel Function for centrosomin (cnn) in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Eisman, Robert C; Phelps, Melissa A S; Kaufman, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The formation of the pericentriolar matrix (PCM) and a fully functional centrosome in syncytial Drosophila melanogaster embryos requires the rapid transport of Cnn during initiation of the centrosome replication cycle. We show a Cnn and Polo kinase interaction is apparently required during embryogenesis and involves the exon 1A-initiating coding exon, suggesting a subset of Cnn splice variants is regulated by Polo kinase. During PCM formation exon 1A Cnn-Long Form proteins likely bind Polo kinase before phosphorylation by Polo for Cnn transport to the centrosome. Loss of either of these interactions in a portion of the total Cnn protein pool is sufficient to remove native Cnn from the pool, thereby altering the normal localization dynamics of Cnn to the PCM. Additionally, Cnn-Short Form proteins are required for polar body formation, a process known to require Polo kinase after the completion of meiosis. Exon 1A Cnn-LF and Cnn-SF proteins, in conjunction with Polo kinase, are required at the completion of meiosis and for the formation of functional centrosomes during early embryogenesis.

  6. An Amino-Terminal Polo Kinase Interaction Motif Acts in the Regulation of Centrosome Formation and Reveals a Novel Function for centrosomin (cnn) in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Eisman, Robert C.; Phelps, Melissa A. S.; Kaufman, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the pericentriolar matrix (PCM) and a fully functional centrosome in syncytial Drosophila melanogaster embryos requires the rapid transport of Cnn during initiation of the centrosome replication cycle. We show a Cnn and Polo kinase interaction is apparently required during embryogenesis and involves the exon 1A-initiating coding exon, suggesting a subset of Cnn splice variants is regulated by Polo kinase. During PCM formation exon 1A Cnn-Long Form proteins likely bind Polo kinase before phosphorylation by Polo for Cnn transport to the centrosome. Loss of either of these interactions in a portion of the total Cnn protein pool is sufficient to remove native Cnn from the pool, thereby altering the normal localization dynamics of Cnn to the PCM. Additionally, Cnn-Short Form proteins are required for polar body formation, a process known to require Polo kinase after the completion of meiosis. Exon 1A Cnn-LF and Cnn-SF proteins, in conjunction with Polo kinase, are required at the completion of meiosis and for the formation of functional centrosomes during early embryogenesis. PMID:26447129

  7. Chaos-Dchroot Version 2

    SciTech Connect

    Grondona, M.

    2007-08-22

    The CHAOS dchroot utilities is a set of software used to prepare and manage "alternate root" filesystems on Linux systems. These alternate roots can be used to provide an alternate set of system software for testing and compatibility purposes.

  8. Chaos and complexity by design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Daniel A.; Yoshida, Beni

    2017-04-01

    We study the relationship between quantum chaos and pseudorandomness by developing probes of unitary design. A natural probe of randomness is the "frame poten-tial," which is minimized by unitary k-designs and measures the 2-norm distance between the Haar random unitary ensemble and another ensemble. A natural probe of quantum chaos is out-of-time-order (OTO) four-point correlation functions. We show that the norm squared of a generalization of out-of-time-order 2 k-point correlators is proportional to the kth frame potential, providing a quantitative connection between chaos and pseudorandomness. Additionally, we prove that these 2 k-point correlators for Pauli operators completely determine the k-fold channel of an ensemble of unitary operators. Finally, we use a counting argument to obtain a lower bound on the quantum circuit complexity in terms of the frame potential. This provides a direct link between chaos, complexity, and randomness.

  9. Chaos and microbial systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kot, M.

    1991-01-01

    Much of the recent work in nonlinear dynamics has centered on new techniques for identifying order in seemingly chaotic systems. To determine the robustness of these techniques, chaos must, to some extent, be brought into the laboratory. Preliminary investigations of the forded double-Monod equations, a model for a predator and a prey in a chemostat with periodic variation of inflowing substrate, suggested that simple microbial systems might provide the perfect framework for determining the efficacy and relevance of the new nonlinear dynamics in dealing with complex population dynamics. Progress in two areas of research, mathematical analysis and computer simulation of the periodically forced double-Monod equations and of related models; and experimental (chemostat) population studies that evaluate the accuracy and generality of the models, (and also judge the usefulness of various new techniques of nonlinear dynamics to the study of populations) is reported.

  10. The Chaos Within Sudoku

    PubMed Central

    Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária; Toroczkai, Zoltán

    2012-01-01

    The mathematical structure of Sudoku puzzles is akin to hard constraint satisfaction problems lying at the basis of many applications, including protein folding and the ground-state problem of glassy spin systems. Via an exact mapping of Sudoku into a deterministic, continuous-time dynamical system, here we show that the difficulty of Sudoku translates into transient chaotic behavior exhibited by this system. We also show that the escape rate κ, an invariant of transient chaos, provides a scalar measure of the puzzle's hardness that correlates well with human difficulty ratings. Accordingly, η = −log10 κ can be used to define a “Richter”-type scale for puzzle hardness, with easy puzzles having 0 < η ≤ 1, medium ones 1 < η ≤ 2, hard with 2 < η ≤ 3 and ultra-hard with η > 3. To our best knowledge, there are no known puzzles with η > 4. PMID:23061008

  11. Eos Chaos Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    11 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered rock outcrops in Eos Chaos, located near the east end of the Valles Marineris trough system. The outcrops occur in the form of a distinct, circular butte (upper half of image) and a high slope (lower half of image). The rocks might be sedimentary rocks, similar to those found elsewhere exposed in the Valles Marineris system and the chaotic terrain to the east of the region.

    Location near: 12.9oS, 49.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  12. Chaos Theory and International Relations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    benefit decision makers, who can avoid mistakes by testing their decisions with the help of mathematical models . This thesis provides an overview of Chaos...international relations domain, Chaos Theory is modeled in two specific international relations puzzles, bipolarity and democratic peace, to show the...utility of the theory in this social science field. The results of the model are compared with the conventional international theories of Liberalism and

  13. Controlling chaos-assisted directed transport via quantum resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Jintao; Zou, Mingliang; Luo, Yunrong; Hai, Wenhua

    2016-06-15

    We report on the first demonstration of chaos-assisted directed transport of a quantum particle held in an amplitude-modulated and tilted optical lattice, through a resonance-induced double-mean displacement relating to the true classically chaotic orbits. The transport velocity is controlled by the driving amplitude and the sign of tilt, and also depends on the phase of the initial state. The chaos-assisted transport feature can be verified experimentally by using a source of single atoms to detect the double-mean displacement one by one, and can be extended to different scientific fields.

  14. Chaos as compositional order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angharad Pound, Eleri

    Composition is a combination of determined combinations of notes, durations and timbres usually decided upon in advance by a composer who plans carefully the sounds she desires. There is also always an element of chance present in acoustic music due to the 'human' element of the performance in that the performers will add their own interpretation of the dynamics and errors in terms of precise durations and pitches. Some composers have exploited this chance element more than others, allowing more space within the composition for the performers to make choices during the course of the piece. Composers such as Cage and Bussotti offer varying degrees of freedom within pieces resulting in unpredictability of the resulting sound of the composition. Other composers attempt to control as far as possible every parameter of the music as seen in serialist composers such as Webern and Boulez. This paper is delivered from the point of view of a composer who is intrigued by the relationship between the notation and the resultant sound, specifically, in terms of the relationship between the written elements determined by the composer and the unpredictability that arises due to those elements which cannot or are deliberately not written. These elements are then l to the interpretation and/or choice of the performer during the performance resulting in a composition which differs sonically from performance to performance. Chaos offers this combination of determination and the appearance of disorder: a clear structure within which are a number of elaborate chaotic-appearing options. The paper will focus on a composition-in-progress for voices which will offer the performers some choices based on the idea of sensitivity on initial conditions. Each singer will be provided with a set of headphones through which they will be fed a choice of pitches, the choices made for the first few pitches will determine the choices provided to the singer later on in the composition. The paper will

  15. a Rough Set Decision Tree Based Mlp-Cnn for Very High Resolution Remotely Sensed Image Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Pan, X.; Zhang, S. Q.; Li, H. P.; Atkinson, P. M.

    2017-09-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing have witnessed a great amount of very high resolution (VHR) images acquired at sub-metre spatial resolution. These VHR remotely sensed data has post enormous challenges in processing, analysing and classifying them effectively due to the high spatial complexity and heterogeneity. Although many computer-aid classification methods that based on machine learning approaches have been developed over the past decades, most of them are developed toward pixel level spectral differentiation, e.g. Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP), which are unable to exploit abundant spatial details within VHR images. This paper introduced a rough set model as a general framework to objectively characterize the uncertainty in CNN classification results, and further partition them into correctness and incorrectness on the map. The correct classification regions of CNN were trusted and maintained, whereas the misclassification areas were reclassified using a decision tree with both CNN and MLP. The effectiveness of the proposed rough set decision tree based MLP-CNN was tested using an urban area at Bournemouth, United Kingdom. The MLP-CNN, well capturing the complementarity between CNN and MLP through the rough set based decision tree, achieved the best classification performance both visually and numerically. Therefore, this research paves the way to achieve fully automatic and effective VHR image classification.

  16. Center of Gravity Analysis and Chaos Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    postulates, a social construct based on Chaos Theory, and explores the interactions of the elements of power. Lastly, it shows methods to identify and disrupt COGs based upon the dynamics of Chaos Theory.

  17. Using CNN Features to Better Understand What Makes Visual Artworks Special

    PubMed Central

    Brachmann, Anselm; Barth, Erhardt; Redies, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    One of the goal of computational aesthetics is to understand what is special about visual artworks. By analyzing image statistics, contemporary methods in computer vision enable researchers to identify properties that distinguish artworks from other (non-art) types of images. Such knowledge will eventually allow inferences with regard to the possible neural mechanisms that underlie aesthetic perception in the human visual system. In the present study, we define measures that capture variances of features of a well-established Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), which was trained on millions of images to recognize objects. Using an image dataset that represents traditional Western, Islamic and Chinese art, as well as various types of non-art images, we show that we need only two variance measures to distinguish between the artworks and non-art images with a high classification accuracy of 93.0%. Results for the first variance measure imply that, in the artworks, the subregions of an image tend to be filled with pictorial elements, to which many diverse CNN features respond (richness of feature responses). Results for the second measure imply that this diversity is tied to a relatively large variability of the responses of individual CNN feature across the subregions of an image. We hypothesize that this combination of richness and variability of CNN feature responses is one of properties that makes traditional visual artworks special. We discuss the possible neural underpinnings of this perceptual quality of artworks and propose to study the same quality also in other types of aesthetic stimuli, such as music and literature. PMID:28588537

  18. A CNN based neurobiology inspired approach for retinal image quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Dwarikanath; Roy, Pallab K; Sedai, Suman; Garnavi, Rahil

    2016-08-01

    Retinal image quality assessment (IQA) algorithms use different hand crafted features for training classifiers without considering the working of the human visual system (HVS) which plays an important role in IQA. We propose a convolutional neural network (CNN) based approach that determines image quality using the underlying principles behind the working of the HVS. CNNs provide a principled approach to feature learning and hence higher accuracy in decision making. Experimental results demonstrate the superior performance of our proposed algorithm over competing methods.

  19. Cognitive aspects of chaos in random networks.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Gaetano L

    2012-01-01

    A special case of deterministic chaos that is independent of the architecture of the connections has been observed in a computer model of a purely excitatory neuronal network. Chaos onsets when the level of connectivity is critically low. The results indicate a typical period-doubling route to chaos as the connectivity decreases. A cognitive interpretation of such type of chaos, based on information theory and phase-transitions, is proposed.

  20. Chaos and microbial systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kot, M.

    1990-07-01

    A recurrent theme of much recent research is that seemingly random fluctuations often occur as the result of simple deterministic mechanisms. Hence, much of the recent work in nonlinear dynamics has centered on new techniques for identifying order in seemingly chaotic systems. To determine the robustness of these techniques, chaos must, to some extent, be brought into the laboratory. Preliminary investigations of the forced double-Monod equations, a model for a predator and a prey in a chemostat with periodic variation in inflowing substrate concentration, suggest that simple microbial systems may provide the perfect framework for determining the efficacy and relevance of the new nonlinear dynamics in dealing with complex population dynamics. This research has two main goals, that is the mathematical analysis and computer simulation of the periodically forced double-Monod equations and of related models; and experimental (chemostat) population studies that evaluate the accuracy and generality of the models, and that judge the usefulness of various new techniques of nonlinear dynamics to the study of populations.

  1. Neural chaos and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bob, P; Chladek, J; Susta, M; Glaslova, K; Jagla, F; Kukleta, M

    2007-12-01

    Recent data indicate that random-like processes are related to the defects in the organization of semantic memory in schizophrenia which is more disorganized and less definable than those of controls with more semantic links and more bizarre and atypical associations. These aspects of schizophrenic cognition are similar to characteristics of chaotic nonlinear dynamical systems. In this context, the hypothesis tested in this study is that dynamic changes of electrodermal activity (EDA) as a measure of brain and autonomic activity may serve as a characteristic which can be used as an indicator of possible neural chaotic process in schizophrenia. In the present study, bilateral EDA in rest conditions were measured in 40 schizophrenic patients and 40 healthy subjects. Results of nonlinear and statistical analysis indicate left-side significant differences of positive largest Lyapunov exponents in schizophrenia patients compared to the control group. This might be interpreted that the neural activity during rest in schizophrenic patients is significantly more chaotic than in the control group. The relationship was confirmed by surrogate data testing. These data suggest that increased neural chaos in patients with schizophrenia may influence brain processes that can cause random-like disorganization of mental processes.

  2. Building CHAOS: An Operating System for Livermore Linux Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Garlick, J E; Dunlap, C M

    2003-02-21

    The Livermore Computing (LC) Linux Integration and Development Project (the Linux Project) produces and supports the Clustered High Availability Operating System (CHAOS), a cluster operating environment based on Red Hat Linux. Each CHAOS release begins with a set of requirements and ends with a formally tested, packaged, and documented release suitable for use on LC's production Linux clusters. One characteristic of CHAOS is that component software packages come from different sources under varying degrees of project control. Some are developed by the Linux Project, some are developed by other LC projects, some are external open source projects, and some are commercial software packages. A challenge to the Linux Project is to adhere to release schedules and testing disciplines in a diverse, highly decentralized development environment. Communication channels are maintained for externally developed packages in order to obtain support, influence development decisions, and coordinate/understand release schedules. The Linux Project embraces open source by releasing locally developed packages under open source license, by collaborating with open source projects where mutually beneficial, and by preferring open source over proprietary software. Project members generally use open source development tools. The Linux Project requires system administrators and developers to work together to resolve problems that arise in production. This tight coupling of production and development is a key strategy for making a product that directly addresses LC's production requirements. It is another challenge to balance support and development activities in such a way that one does not overwhelm the other.

  3. Relations between distributional and Devaney chaos.

    PubMed

    Oprocha, Piotr

    2006-09-01

    Recently, it was proven that chaos in the sense of Devaney and weak mixing both imply chaos in the sense of Li and Yorke. In this article we give explicit examples that any of these two implications do not hold for distributional chaos.

  4. DTU candidate field models for IGRF-12 and the CHAOS-5 geomagnetic field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, Christopher C.; Olsen, Nils; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars

    2015-07-01

    We present DTU's candidate field models for IGRF-12 and the parent field model from which they were derived, CHAOS-5. Ten months of magnetic field observations from ESA's Swarm mission, together with up-to-date ground observatory monthly means, were used to supplement the data sources previously used to construct CHAOS-4. The internal field part of CHAOS-5, from which our IGRF-12 candidate models were extracted, is time-dependent up to spherical harmonic degree 20 and involves sixth-order splines with a 0.5 year knot spacing. In CHAOS-5, compared with CHAOS-4, we update only the low-degree internal field model (degrees 1 to 24) and the associated external field model. The high-degree internal field (degrees 25 to 90) is taken from the same model CHAOS-4h, based on low-altitude CHAMP data, which was used in CHAOS-4. We find that CHAOS-5 is able to consistently fit magnetic field data from six independent low Earth orbit satellites: Ørsted, CHAMP, SAC-C and the three Swarm satellites (A, B and C). It also adequately describes the secular variation measured at ground observatories. CHAOS-5 thus contributes to an initial validation of the quality of the Swarm magnetic data, in particular demonstrating that Huber weighted rms model residuals to Swarm vector field data are lower than those to Ørsted and CHAMP vector data (when either one or two star cameras were operating). CHAOS-5 shows three pulses of secular acceleration at the core surface over the past decade; the 2006 and 2009 pulses have previously been documented, but the 2013 pulse has only recently been identified. The spatial signature of the 2013 pulse at the core surface, under the Atlantic sector where it is strongest, is well correlated with the 2006 pulse, but anti-correlated with the 2009 pulse.

  5. Chaos in Periodic Discrete Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yuming; Zhang, Lijuan; Yu, Panpan; Huang, Qiuling

    This paper focuses on chaos in periodic discrete systems, whose state space may vary with time. Some close relationships between some chaotic dynamical behaviors of a periodic discrete system and its autonomous induced system are given. Based on these relationships, several criteria of chaos are established and some sufficient conditions for no chaos are given for periodic discrete systems. Further, it is shown that a finite-dimensional linear periodic discrete system is not chaotic in the sense of Li-Yorke or Wiggins. In particular, an interesting problem of whether nonchaotic rules may generate a chaotic system is studied, with some examples provided, one of which surprisingly shows that a composition of globally asymptotically stable maps can be chaotic. In addition, some properties of sign pattern matrices of non-negative square matrices are given for convenience of the study.

  6. On CFT and quantum chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turiaci, Gustavo J.; Verlinde, Herman

    2016-12-01

    We make three observations that help clarify the relation between CFT and quantum chaos. We show that any 1+1-D system in which conformal symmetry is non-linearly realized exhibits two main characteristics of chaos: maximal Lyapunov behavior and a spectrum of Ruelle resonances. We use this insight to identify a lattice model for quantum chaos, built from parafermionic spin variables with an equation of motion given by a Y-system. Finally we point to a relation between the spectrum of Ruelle resonances of a CFT and the analytic properties of OPE coefficients between light and heavy operators. In our model, this spectrum agrees with the quasi-normal modes of the BTZ black hole.

  7. Controlling chaos with simple limiters

    PubMed

    Corron; Pethel; Hopper

    2000-04-24

    New experimental results demonstrate that chaos control can be accomplished using controllers that are very simple relative to the system being controlled. Chaotic dynamics in a driven pendulum and a double scroll circuit are controlled using an adjustable, passive limiter-a weight for the pendulum and a diode for the circuit. For both experiments, multiple unstable periodic orbits are selectively controlled using minimal perturbations. These physical examples suggest that chaos control can be practically applied to a much wider array of important problems than initially thought possible.

  8. Enhancing chaoticity of spatiotemporal chaos.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowen; Zhang, Heqiao; Xue, Yu; Hu, Gang

    2005-01-01

    In some practical situations strong chaos is needed. This introduces the task of chaos control with enhancing chaoticity rather than suppressing chaoticity. In this paper a simple method of linear amplifications incorporating modulo operations is suggested to make spatiotemporal systems, which may be originally chaotic or nonchaotic, strongly chaotic. Specifically, this control can eliminate periodic windows, increase the values and the number of positive Lyapunov exponents, make the probability distributions of the output chaotic sequences more homogeneous, and reduce the correlations of chaotic outputs for different times and different space units. The applicability of the method to practical tasks, in particular to random number generators and secure communications, is briefly discussed.

  9. ergodicity and chaos in geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aadel, S.; Gaiumi, M.

    2009-04-01

    The past three dicades can be considered as a period in which the fundamentals of scientific epistemology have been subjected to drastic revision.The dissemination of the general theory of systems in 1972 , one year after the death of ludwing von Berthalanfi , the proposition of fuzzy logic by Zade, and the foemulation of chaos theory in 1986 by Harison and Biswas allserved to explode the myth that scientific thought was invulnerable. This paper , which has resulted from the theoretical investigation of project based on the paraglicial sediment and glacial evidence on the Zagros-pishkoh to explain the elements of chaos theory and their compatibility with ergodic geomorphology

  10. Some new surprises in chaos.

    PubMed

    Bunimovich, Leonid A; Vela-Arevalo, Luz V

    2015-09-01

    "Chaos is found in greatest abundance wherever order is being sought.It always defeats order, because it is better organized"Terry PratchettA brief review is presented of some recent findings in the theory of chaotic dynamics. We also prove a statement that could be naturally considered as a dual one to the Poincaré theorem on recurrences. Numerical results demonstrate that some parts of the phase space of chaotic systems are more likely to be visited earlier than other parts. A new class of chaotic focusing billiards is discussed that clearly violates the main condition considered to be necessary for chaos in focusing billiards.

  11. Two career chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauxe, L.

    2002-12-01

    When I finished graduate school I suppose I imagined myself as my dad. He worked hard, loved his job and family, made a good living. But I also saw myself as my mom - making a home, raising kids, cooking dinner, saving the world. I thought: I can handle being my mom and my dad. I can handle being a scientist and a mother. I can DO this.ÿ What I never imagined was the chaotic dynamic of the two career couple. The motions of bodies moving in response to the force of gravity cannot be predicted exactly if there are too many bodies. They dance in a jerky jumble, now faster, then slowly, bouncing, jostling, bumping and flying apart. Just so are the career trajectories of the two career couple. One rises up, the other, slower, pulls it down; overtaking, blocking preventing, now supporting, pulling along, now holding back - not moving, leap frogging, racing in opposite directions and snapping back together with a crack.ÿ The problem is non-linear. The outcome depends on feedback, whether positive or negative. The outcome cannot be predicted. Cannot be determined.ÿ Perhaps it cannot be done. Perhaps both husband and wife cannot be both mother and father. Too many mothers, too many fathers. Chaos.ÿ But I believe it can be done. Not like our mothers and fathers but a different way. And maybe our jerky paths will keep us sharp, make us work harder, and lead us through lives that at least cannot be described as dull.ÿ

  12. Chaos: A historical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lighthill, James

    In this introductory lecture I'd like to offer a broad historical perspective regarding the relatively recent general recognition: (a) that mechanical systems satisfying Newton's laws may be subject to the essentially unpredictable type of behavior which the word CHAOS describes—in other words, the recognition (b) that quantum effects are not required; (c) so that, notwithstanding Heisenberg, uncertainty is there on the basis of the good old classical mechanics based on Newton's Laws. But first of all I'll remind you that there are two kinds of laws in science, which we may exemplify by Kepler's Laws and Newton's Laws. Kepler in 1609 completed some very detailed observations of the motions of Mars; together with a full geometrical description of them, in the Copernican sun-centered flame of reference, as motions in a constant orbit in the shape of an ellipse with the Sun as focus. A decade later Kepler had published the Epitome Astronomiae Copernicanae (a rather more substantial work than the Dialogo which later got Galileo into some difficulties), and had there described in detail his most famous discovery: Kepler's three empirical laws concerning planetary orbits. These laws, of the elliptical shapes of orbits, of the radius covering equal areas in equal times, and of the proportionality of the square of the orbital period to the cube of the major axis, were shown from the observations to be closely satisfied by the Earth and by the five then known planets; and furthermore, by the four satellites of Jupiter which Galileo had recently discovered.

  13. Chaos and chaotic dynamics in economics.

    PubMed

    Faggini, Marisa

    2009-07-01

    Proponents of chaos theory attempted to articulate a new, more realistic, scientific world-view contradictory to the fundamental notions of the Newtonian view of science. Nonlinearity and chaos give the opportunity of a reconciliation of economics with a more realistic representation of its phenomena. Chaos theory represents a means for enhancing both the methodological and theoretical foundations for exploring the complexity of economic phenomena. This paper offers an overview of the applications of chaos theory in economics highlighting that recognizing the existence of deterministic chaos in economics is important from both a theoretical and practical point of view.

  14. Chaos, brain and divided consciousness.

    PubMed

    Bob, Petr

    2007-01-01

    with schizophrenia and depression. Increased level of psychopathological symptoms indicates close relationship to the right-left EDA asymmetry and asymmetry of information entropy calculated by non-linear recurrence quantification analysis of EDA records. Because epileptiform activity has specific chaotic behaviour and calculated information entropy from EDA records reflects the complexity of the deterministic structure in the system there is a relevant assumption that unilaterally increased complexity may produce interhemispheric disbalance and increased chaoticity which hypothetically may serve as a dynamic source of epileptiform discharges related to trauma induced kindling mechanism. Specific form of chaotic inner organization which cannot be explained only as a consequence of external causality support also psychophysiological data that lead to the so-called self-organizing theory of dreaming by Kahn and Hobson. This study suggests that self-organizing theory of dreaming is particularly important with respect to problem of memory formation and processing during dissociative states characteristic for dreams. Recent data and also findings of this study support the research utility of chaos theory in psychology and neuroscience, and also its conceptual view of dynamic ordering factors and self-organization underlying psychological processes and brain physiology.

  15. The Chaos Theory of Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, Jim E. H.; Pryor, Robert G. L.

    2011-01-01

    The Chaos Theory of Careers (CTC; Pryor & Bright, 2011) construes both individuals and the contexts in which they develop their careers in terms of complex dynamical systems. Such systems perpetually operate under influences of stability and change both internally and in relation to each other. The CTC introduces new concepts to account for…

  16. Chaos and complexity by design

    DOE PAGES

    Roberts, Daniel A.; Yoshida, Beni

    2017-04-20

    We study the relationship between quantum chaos and pseudorandomness by developing probes of unitary design. A natural probe of randomness is the “frame poten-tial,” which is minimized by unitary k-designs and measures the 2-norm distance between the Haar random unitary ensemble and another ensemble. A natural probe of quantum chaos is out-of-time-order (OTO) four-point correlation functions. We also show that the norm squared of a generalization of out-of-time-order 2k-point correlators is proportional to the kth frame potential, providing a quantitative connection between chaos and pseudorandomness. In addition, we prove that these 2k-point correlators for Pauli operators completely determine the k-foldmore » channel of an ensemble of unitary operators. Finally, we use a counting argument to obtain a lower bound on the quantum circuit complexity in terms of the frame potential. This provides a direct link between chaos, complexity, and randomness.« less

  17. The Chaos Theory of Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Robert G. L.; Bright, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Four theoretical streams--contexualism/ecology, systems theory, realism/constructivism, and chaos theory--contributed to a theory of individuals as complex, unique, nonlinear, adaptive chaotic and open systems. Individuals use purposive action to construct careers but can make maladaptive and inappropriate choices. (Contains 42 references.) (SK)

  18. Continuing Through Iani Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image continues the northward trend through the Iani Chaos region. Compare this image to Monday's and Tuesday's. This image was collected during the Southern Fall season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -0.1 Longitude 342.6 East (17.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001

  19. Pre-trained D-CNN models for detecting complex events in unconstrained videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Joseph P.; Fu, Yun

    2016-05-01

    Rapid event detection faces an emergent need to process large videos collections; whether surveillance videos or unconstrained web videos, the ability to automatically recognize high-level, complex events is a challenging task. Motivated by pre-existing methods being complex, computationally demanding, and often non-replicable, we designed a simple system that is quick, effective and carries minimal overhead in terms of memory and storage. Our system is clearly described, modular in nature, replicable on any Desktop, and demonstrated with extensive experiments, backed by insightful analysis on different Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), as stand-alone and fused with others. With a large corpus of unconstrained, real-world video data, we examine the usefulness of different CNN models as features extractors for modeling high-level events, i.e., pre-trained CNNs that differ in architectures, training data, and number of outputs. For each CNN, we use 1-fps from all training exemplar to train one-vs-rest SVMs for each event. To represent videos, frame-level features were fused using a variety of techniques. The best being to max-pool between predetermined shot boundaries, then average-pool to form the final video-level descriptor. Through extensive analysis, several insights were found on using pre-trained CNNs as off-the-shelf feature extractors for the task of event detection. Fusing SVMs of different CNNs revealed some interesting facts, finding some combinations to be complimentary. It was concluded that no single CNN works best for all events, as some events are more object-driven while others are more scene-based. Our top performance resulted from learning event-dependent weights for different CNNs.

  20. Strategy and Structure for Online News Production - Case Studies of CNN and NRK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumsvik, Arne H.

    This cross-national comparative case study of online news production analyzes the strategies of Cable News Network (CNN) and the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK), aiming at understanding of the implications of organizational strategy on the role of journalists, explains why traditional media organizations have a tendency to develop a multi-platform approach (distributing content on several platforms, such as television, online, mobile) rather than developing the cross-media (with interplay between media types) or multimedia approach anticipated by both scholars and practitioners.

  1. Noise-enhanced spontaneous chaos in semiconductor superlattices at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvaro, M.; Carretero, M.; Bonilla, L. L.

    2014-08-01

    Physical systems exhibiting fast spontaneous chaotic oscillations are used to generate high-quality true random sequences in random number generators. The concept of using fast practical entropy sources to produce true random sequences is crucial to make storage and transfer of data more secure at very high speeds. While the first high-speed devices were chaotic semiconductor lasers, the discovery of spontaneous chaos in semiconductor superlattices at room temperature provides a valuable nanotechnology alternative. Spontaneous chaos was observed in 1996 experiments at temperatures below liquid nitrogen. Here we show spontaneous chaos at room temperature appears in idealized superlattices for voltage ranges where sharp transitions between different oscillation modes occur. Internal and external noises broaden these voltage ranges and enhance the sensitivity to initial conditions in the superlattice snail-shaped chaotic attractor thereby rendering spontaneous chaos more robust.

  2. Meaning Finds a Way: Chaos (Theory) and Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyburz, Bonnie Lenore

    2004-01-01

    The explanatory power provided by the chaos theory is explored. A dynamic and reciprocal relationship between culture and chaos theory indicates that the progressive cultural work may be formed by the cross-disciplinary resonance of chaos theory.

  3. Analyzing the Appropriateness of Internet-Based School News Programs for Social Studies Classrooms: "CNN Student News" as a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journell, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a research study on the appropriateness for social studies classrooms of "CNN Student News," a free online news program specifically aimed at middle and high school students. The author conducted a content analysis of "CNN Student News" during October 2012 and evaluated the program's content for…

  4. Analyzing the Appropriateness of Internet-Based School News Programs for Social Studies Classrooms: "CNN Student News" as a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journell, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a research study on the appropriateness for social studies classrooms of "CNN Student News," a free online news program specifically aimed at middle and high school students. The author conducted a content analysis of "CNN Student News" during October 2012 and evaluated the program's content for…

  5. Length scale of interaction in spatiotemporal chaos.

    PubMed

    Stahlke, Dan; Wackerbauer, Renate

    2011-04-01

    Extensive systems have no long scale correlations and behave as a sum of their parts. Various techniques are introduced to determine a characteristic length scale of interaction beyond which spatiotemporal chaos is extensive in reaction-diffusion networks. Information about network size, boundary condition, or abnormalities in network topology gets scrambled in spatiotemporal chaos, and the attenuation of information provides such characteristic length scales. Space-time information flow associated with the recovery of spatiotemporal chaos from finite perturbations, a concept somewhat opposite to the paradigm of Lyapunov exponents, defines another characteristic length scale. High-precision computational studies of asymptotic spatiotemporal chaos in the complex Ginzburg-Landau system and transient spatiotemporal chaos in the Gray-Scott network show that these different length scales are comparable and thus suitable to define a length scale of interaction. Preliminary studies demonstrate the relevance of these length scales for stable chaos.

  6. Does chaos assist localization or delocalization?

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Jintao; Luo, Yunrong; Hai, Wenhua; Lu, Gengbiao

    2014-12-01

    We aim at a long-standing contradiction between chaos-assisted tunneling and chaos-related localization study quantum transport of a single particle held in an amplitude-modulated and tilted optical lattice. We find some near-resonant regions crossing chaotic and regular regions in the parameter space, and demonstrate that chaos can heighten velocity of delocalization in the chaos-resonance overlapping regions, while chaos may aid localization in the other chaotic regions. The degree of localization enhances with increasing the distance between parameter points and near-resonant regions. The results could be useful for experimentally manipulating chaos-assisted transport of single particles in optical or solid-state lattices.

  7. Finding Order and Direction from Chaos: A Comparison of Chaos Career Counseling and Trait Matching Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Hannah; Bright, Jim E. H.; Pryor, Robert G. L.

    2005-01-01

    Chaos career counseling, based on the Chaos Theory of Careers (R. G. L. Pryor & J. E. H. Bright, 2003a, 2003b), was compared with trait matching career counseling and a wait list control. Sixty university students who attended the Careers Research and Assessment Service seeking career advice were randomly assigned to the chaos intervention, the…

  8. Gypsum and Associated Sulfates in Iani Chaos, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, M. S.; Greenwood, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    chaotic mounds. 6) Formation of gypsum deposits due to the influx and evaporation of additional water. 7) Burial. 8) Exhumation and active erosion of layered deposits. This history requires two major episodes of recharge separated by an uncomformity, consistent with previous geophysical and geomorphic constraints. The meter-scale layering is likely due to fluctuations in water depth on a shorter time scale. The positive identification of gypsum at Iani makes it rare among layered deposits of the Valles Marineris system in which Mg, Fe-rich and other polyhydrated sulfates are documented (gypsum has been previously identified in Iani Chaos and subsequently challenged in the literature; each of these analyses utilized OMEGA data, which is at a coarser spatial resolution than CRISM). The presence of gypsum in Iani may reflect more Ca-rich source waters due to differences in source rocks and/or weathering intensity or duration. Alternatively, potential gypsum deposits associated with other sulfates may be rendered undetectable by CRISM and OMEGA due to their conversion to anhydrite which occurs at ~130°C. The presence of both Mg and Ca sulfates within Iani may be a consequence of different source waters through time or due to different exposures of predicted evaporative sequences by erosion.

  9. Quantum chaos: An entropy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sl/omczyński, Wojciech; Życzkowski, Karol

    1994-11-01

    A new definition of the entropy of a given dynamical system and of an instrument describing the measurement process is proposed within the operational approach to quantum mechanics. It generalizes other definitions of entropy, in both the classical and quantum cases. The Kolmogorov-Sinai (KS) entropy is obtained for a classical system and the sharp measurement instrument. For a quantum system and a coherent states instrument, a new quantity, coherent states entropy, is defined. It may be used to measure chaos in quantum mechanics. The following correspondence principle is proved: the upper limit of the coherent states entropy of a quantum map as ℏ→0 is less than or equal to the KS-entropy of the corresponding classical map. ``Chaos umpire sits, And by decision more imbroils the fray By which he reigns: next him high arbiter Chance governs all.'' John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book II

  10. Spatiotemporal chaos from bursting dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Berenstein, Igal; De Decker, Yannick

    2015-08-14

    In this paper, we study the emergence of spatiotemporal chaos from mixed-mode oscillations, by using an extended Oregonator model. We show that bursting dynamics consisting of fast/slow mixed mode oscillations along a single attractor can lead to spatiotemporal chaotic dynamics, although the spatially homogeneous solution is itself non-chaotic. This behavior is observed far from the Hopf bifurcation and takes the form of a spatiotemporal intermittency where the system locally alternates between the fast and the slow phases of the mixed mode oscillations. We expect this form of spatiotemporal chaos to be generic for models in which one or several slow variables are coupled to activator-inhibitor type of oscillators.

  11. A quantum correction to chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared

    2016-05-01

    We use results on Virasoro conformal blocks to study chaotic dynamics in CFT2 at large central charge c. The Lyapunov exponent λ L , which is a diagnostic for the early onset of chaos, receives 1 /c corrections that may be interpreted as {λ}_L=2π /β(1+12/c) . However, out of time order correlators receive other equally important 1 /c suppressed contributions that do not have such a simple interpretation. We revisit the proof of a bound on λ L that emerges at large c, focusing on CFT2 and explaining why our results do not conflict with the analysis leading to the bound. We also comment on relationships between chaos, scattering, causality, and bulk locality.

  12. A history of chaos theory.

    PubMed

    Oestreicher, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Whether every effect can be precisely linked to a given cause or to a list of causes has been a matter of debate for centuries, particularly during the 17th century, when astronomers became capable of predicting the trajectories of planets. Recent mathematical models applied to physics have included the idea that given phenomena cannot be predicted precisely, although they can be predicted to some extent, in line with the chaos theory. Concepts such as deterministic models, sensitivity to initial conditions, strange attractors, and fractal dimensions are inherent to the development of this theory A few situations involving normal or abnormal endogenous rhythms in biology have been analyzed following the principles of chaos theory. This is particularly the case with cardiac arrhythmias, but less so with biological clocks and circadian rhythms.

  13. A history of chaos theory

    PubMed Central

    Oestreicher, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Whether every effect can be precisely linked to a given cause or to a list of causes has been a matter of debate for centuries, particularly during the 17th century when astronomers became capable of predicting the trajectories of planets. Recent mathematical models applied to physics have included the idea that given phenomena cannot be predicted precisely although they can be predicted to some extent in line with the chaos theory Concepts such as deterministic models, sensitivity to initial conditions, strange attractors, and fractal dimensions are inherent to the development of this theory, A few situations involving normal or abnormal endogenous rhythms in biology have been analyzed following the principles of chaos theory This is particularly the case with cardiac arrhythmias, but less so with biological clocks and circadian rhythms. PMID:17969865

  14. Convection and chaos in fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, J.

    1987-01-01

    This book describes some of the progress made in understanding the phenomena of various hydrodynamic instabilities for the past 30 years. Among them the exact results for the onset of Rayleigh-Benard convection are discussed. Approximate techniques like the amplitude equations and few-mode truncations are treated at length. The reviews of the routes to chaos in dynamical systems and the characteristics of the chaotic state are also discussed here. Finally, certain features of the Taylor Couette instability and the effect of parametric modulation on hydrodynamic instabilities are also included. This book also discusses the results at all stages of experiments. Contents: Onset of Convection: Rayleigh-Benard Geometry for Simple Fluids; Amplitude Equations; Few-Mode Truncation: Lorentz Model; Characteristics of Chaotic Behavior, Routes to Chaos; On Experiments; Thermohaline Systems; Onset of Convection; Binary Liquids; Nonlinear Effects; Taylor-Couette flow; Magnetohydrodynamic Convection; Modulated Systems.

  15. Controlling fast chaos in delay dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Blakely, Jonathan N; Illing, Lucas; Gauthier, Daniel J

    2004-05-14

    We introduce a novel approach for controlling fast chaos in time-delay dynamical systems and use it to control a chaotic photonic device with a characteristic time scale of approximately 12 ns. Our approach is a prescription for how to implement existing chaos-control algorithms in a way that exploits the system's inherent time delay and allows control even in the presence of substantial control-loop latency (the finite time it takes signals to propagate through the components in the controller). This research paves the way for applications exploiting fast control of chaos, such as chaos-based communication schemes and stabilizing the behavior of ultrafast lasers.

  16. Discrimination of Oil Slicks and Lookalikes in Polarimetric SAR Images Using CNN

    PubMed Central

    An, Jubai

    2017-01-01

    Oil slicks and lookalikes (e.g., plant oil and oil emulsion) all appear as dark areas in polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images and are highly heterogeneous, so it is very difficult to use a single feature that can allow classification of dark objects in polarimetric SAR images as oil slicks or lookalikes. We established multi-feature fusion to support the discrimination of oil slicks and lookalikes. In the paper, simple discrimination analysis is used to rationalize a preferred features subset. The features analyzed include entropy, alpha, and Single-bounce Eigenvalue Relative Difference (SERD) in the C-band polarimetric mode. We also propose a novel SAR image discrimination method for oil slicks and lookalikes based on Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). The regions of interest are selected as the training and testing samples for CNN on the three kinds of polarimetric feature images. The proposed method is applied to a training data set of 5400 samples, including 1800 crude oil, 1800 plant oil, and 1800 oil emulsion samples. In the end, the effectiveness of the method is demonstrated through the analysis of some experimental results. The classification accuracy obtained using 900 samples of test data is 91.33%. It is here observed that the proposed method not only can accurately identify the dark spots on SAR images but also verify the ability of the proposed algorithm to classify unstructured features. PMID:28792477

  17. S-Cnn Ship Detection from High-Resolution Remote Sensing Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruiqian; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Kao; Feng, Chen; Zhang, Jiadong

    2016-06-01

    Reliable ship detection plays an important role in both military and civil fields. However, it makes the task difficult with high-resolution remote sensing images with complex background and various types of ships with different poses, shapes and scales. Related works mostly used gray and shape features to detect ships, which obtain results with poor robustness and efficiency. To detect ships more automatically and robustly, we propose a novel ship detection method based on the convolutional neural networks (CNNs), called SCNN, fed with specifically designed proposals extracted from the ship model combined with an improved saliency detection method. Firstly we creatively propose two ship models, the "V" ship head model and the "||" ship body one, to localize the ship proposals from the line segments extracted from a test image. Next, for offshore ships with relatively small sizes, which cannot be efficiently picked out by the ship models due to the lack of reliable line segments, we propose an improved saliency detection method to find these proposals. Therefore, these two kinds of ship proposals are fed to the trained CNN for robust and efficient detection. Experimental results on a large amount of representative remote sensing images with different kinds of ships with varied poses, shapes and scales demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of our proposed S-CNN-Based ship detector.

  18. A Multi-modal, Discriminative and Spatially Invariant CNN for RGB-D Object Labeling.

    PubMed

    Asif, Umar; Bennamoun, Mohammed; Sohel, Ferdous

    2017-08-30

    While deep convolutional neural networks have shown a remarkable success in image classification, the problems of inter-class similarities, intra-class variances, the effective combination of multimodal data, and the spatial variability in images of objects remain to be major challenges. To address these problems, this paper proposes a novel framework to learn a discriminative and spatially invariant classification model for object and indoor scene recognition using multimodal RGB-D imagery. This is achieved through three postulates: 1) spatial invariance - this is achieved by combining a spatial transformer network with a deep convolutional neural network to learn features which are invariant to spatial translations, rotations, and scale changes, 2) high discriminative capability - this is achieved by introducing Fisher encoding within the CNN architecture to learn features which have small inter-class similarities and large intra-class compactness, and 3) multimodal hierarchical fusion - this is achieved through the regularization of semantic segmentation to a multi-modal CNN architecture, where class probabilities are estimated at different hierarchical levels (i.e., imageand pixel-levels), and fused into a Conditional Random Field (CRF)- based inference hypothesis, the optimization of which produces consistent class labels in RGB-D images. Extensive experimental evaluations on RGB-D object and scene datasets, and live video streams (acquired from Kinect) show that our framework produces superior object and scene classification results compared to the state-of-the-art methods.

  19. Discrimination of Oil Slicks and Lookalikes in Polarimetric SAR Images Using CNN.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hao; Wu, Danni; An, Jubai

    2017-08-09

    Oil slicks and lookalikes (e.g., plant oil and oil emulsion) all appear as dark areas in polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images and are highly heterogeneous, so it is very difficult to use a single feature that can allow classification of dark objects in polarimetric SAR images as oil slicks or lookalikes. We established multi-feature fusion to support the discrimination of oil slicks and lookalikes. In the paper, simple discrimination analysis is used to rationalize a preferred features subset. The features analyzed include entropy, alpha, and Single-bounce Eigenvalue Relative Difference (SERD) in the C-band polarimetric mode. We also propose a novel SAR image discrimination method for oil slicks and lookalikes based on Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). The regions of interest are selected as the training and testing samples for CNN on the three kinds of polarimetric feature images. The proposed method is applied to a training data set of 5400 samples, including 1800 crude oil, 1800 plant oil, and 1800 oil emulsion samples. In the end, the effectiveness of the method is demonstrated through the analysis of some experimental results. The classification accuracy obtained using 900 samples of test data is 91.33%. It is here observed that the proposed method not only can accurately identify the dark spots on SAR images but also verify the ability of the proposed algorithm to classify unstructured features.

  20. Application of new advanced CNN structure with adaptive thresholds to color edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shaojiang; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Xipeng; Wei, Pengcheng; Qin, Mingfu

    2012-04-01

    Color edge detection is much more efficient than gray scale detection when edges exist at the boundary between regions of different colors with no change in intensity. This paper presents adaptive templates, which are capable of detecting various color and intensity changes in color image. To avoid conception of multilayer proposed in literatures, modification has been done to the CNN structure. This modified structure allows a matrix C, which carries the change information of pixels, to replace the control parts in the basic CNN equation. This modification is necessary because in multilayer structure, it faces the challenge of how to represent the intrinsic relationship among each primary layer. Additionally, in order to enhance the accuracy of edge detection, adaptive detection threshold is employed. The adaptive thresholds are considered to be alterable criteria in designing matrix C. The proposed synthetic system not only avoids the problem which is engendered by multi-layers but also exploits full information of pixels themselves. Experimental results prove that the proposed method is efficient.

  1. Stochastic Estimation via Polynomial Chaos

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    homogeneous chaos cast in three dimensions is a measurable function ρ with );,,( 321 βρρ ...0 * )()( ),( )(),(),( xx α xxαα   D j P j j D dw tx dwtxtx (13) In equation (13), the first term is evaluated by...noting that the probability measure is written as  dwdw

  2. Analysis of FBC deterministic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, C.S.

    1996-06-01

    It has recently been discovered that the performance of a number of fossil energy conversion devices such as fluidized beds, pulsed combustors, steady combustors, and internal combustion engines are affected by deterministic chaos. It is now recognized that understanding and controlling the chaotic elements of these devices can lead to significantly improved energy efficiency and reduced emissions. Application of these techniques to key fossil energy processes are expected to provide important competitive advantages for U.S. industry.

  3. Temperature chaos and quenched heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barucca, Paolo; Parisi, Giorgio; Rizzo, Tommaso

    2014-03-01

    We present a treatable generalization of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model which introduces correlations in the elements of the coupling matrix through multiplicative disorder on the single variables and investigate the consequences on the phase diagram. We define a generalized qEA parameter and test the structural stability of the SK results in this correlated case evaluating the de Almeida-Thouless line of the model. As a main result we demonstrate the increase of temperature chaos effects due to heterogeneities.

  4. Sedimentary Rocks of Aram Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    10 May 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcroppings of light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock within Aram Chaos, an ancient, partly-filled impact crater located near 3.2oN, 19.9oW. This 1.5 meters (5 feet) per pixel picture is illuminated by sunlight from the left and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across.

  5. Chaos in a complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, T.E.

    2005-08-15

    Chaotic dynamics is observed experimentally in a complex (dusty) plasma of three particles. A low-frequency sinusoidal modulation of the plasma density excites both the center-of-mass and breathing modes. Low-dimensional chaos is seen for a 1:2 resonance between these modes. A strange attractor with a dimension of 2.48{+-}0.05 is observed. The largest Lyapunov exponent is positive.

  6. Universality in chaos of particle motion near black hole horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Tanahashi, Norihiro

    2017-01-01

    The motion of a particle near a horizon of a spherically symmetric static black hole is shown to possess a universal Lyapunov exponent of chaos bounded by its surface gravity. To probe the horizon, we introduce an electromagnetic or scalar force to the particle so that it does not fall into the horizon. There appears an unstable maximum of the total potential where the evaluated maximal Lyapunov exponent is found to be to the surface gravity of the black hole. This value is independent of the external forces, the particle mass and background geometry, and in this sense this Lyapunov exponent is universal. Unless there are other sources of chaos, the Lyapunov exponent is subject to an inequality λ ≤2 π TBH/ℏ, which is identical to the bound recently discovered by Maldacena, Shenker, and Stanford.

  7. Classical chaos and its correspondence in superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, C.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fang, M.; Hoi, I.; Kelly, J.; Megrant, A.; O'Malley, P.; Quintana, C.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Barends, R.; Chen, Yu; Fowler, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Mutus, J.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Martinis, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    Advances in superconducting qubits have made it possible to experimentally investigate quantum-classical correspondence by constructing quantum systems with chaotic classical limits. We study the quantum equivalent of a classical spinning top using three fully coupled qubits that behave as a single spin-3/2 and subject the spin to a sequence of non-linear rotations. The resulting entanglement bears a striking resemblance to the classical phase space, including bifurcation, and suggests that classical chaos manifests itself as quantum entanglement. Studying the orientation of the spin-3/2 reveals that the rotations which generate chaos and entanglement are at the same time the source of disagreement between the quantum and classical trajectories. Our experiment highlights the correspondence between classical non-linear dynamics and interacting quantum systems.

  8. Improving the chaos bandwidth of a semiconductor laser with phase-conjugate feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Émeric; Wolfersberger, Delphine; Sciamanna, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Common applications using optical chaos in a semiconductor laser include, among others, random number generation and chaos-encrypted communications. They rely on chaos of high dimension with a large bandwidth and a high entropy growth rate to achieve good results. Optical chaos from a semiconductor laser with conventional optical feedback (COF) is typically used as the primary source of chaos. Additional enhancing techniques are used to enlarge the chaos bandwidth. In this contribution, we show experimentally how using phase-conjugate feedback (PCF) can naturally produce a chaos of higher bandwidth than COF. PCF is an alternative to COF which consists of feeding the conjugate of the optical output back into the laser cavity, with a time-delay. Thanks to an oscilloscope with a fast sampling rate, and a large bandwidth, we were able to measure and observe the time-resolved frequency dynamics with a good precision. In the regime of low-frequency fluctuations (LFF), where dropouts of optical power occur randomly, we were able to compare the difference in dynamics before and after a dropout, for PCF and COF. In the range of attainable reflectivities, we measured a bandwidth increase of up to 27 % with PCF when compared to COF. Interestingly, we found that high-frequency dynamics are enabled before dropouts in PCF, where it was theoretically shown that the system jumps between destabilized self-pulsing states at harmonics of the external-cavity frequency, the so-called external-cavity modes (ECMs). This observation tends to confirm that ECMs in PCF are indeed fundamentally different than ECMs in COF, where they are simple steady-states. Finally, we believe that the enhancing techniques used with COF could also be used with PCF to obtain even wider chaotic bandwidths. These results could lead to studies about the dimension and the entropy growth rate of chaos from a laser diode with PCF.

  9. Discretization chaos - Feedback control and transition to chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, Walter J.; Athalye, Amit M.

    1990-01-01

    Problems in the design of feedback controllers for chaotic dynamical systems are considered theoretically, focusing on two cases where chaos arises only when a nonchaotic continuous-time system is discretized into a simpler discrete-time systems (exponential discretization and pseudo-Euler integration applied to Lotka-Volterra competition and prey-predator systems). Numerical simulation results are presented in extensive graphs and discussed in detail. It is concluded that care must be taken in applying standard dynamical-systems methods to control systems that may be discontinuous or nondifferentiable.

  10. Discretization chaos - Feedback control and transition to chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, Walter J.; Athalye, Amit M.

    1990-01-01

    Problems in the design of feedback controllers for chaotic dynamical systems are considered theoretically, focusing on two cases where chaos arises only when a nonchaotic continuous-time system is discretized into a simpler discrete-time systems (exponential discretization and pseudo-Euler integration applied to Lotka-Volterra competition and prey-predator systems). Numerical simulation results are presented in extensive graphs and discussed in detail. It is concluded that care must be taken in applying standard dynamical-systems methods to control systems that may be discontinuous or nondifferentiable.

  11. Strange Attractors: Chaos Theory and Composition Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesse, Doug

    Chaos theory provides a powerful lens for re-seeing a number of issues in composition studies ranging in scale from achieving a generative model for text production to articulating the very nature of the discipline. Chaos systems are nonlinear, have complex forms, manifest recursive symmetries between scale levels, have feedback mechanisms, and…

  12. A novel cloning template designing method by using an artificial bee colony algorithm for edge detection of CNN based imaging sensors.

    PubMed

    Parmaksızoğlu, Selami; Alçı, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Cellular Neural Networks (CNNs) have been widely used recently in applications such as edge detection, noise reduction and object detection, which are among the main computer imaging processes. They can also be realized as hardware based imaging sensors. The fact that hardware CNN models produce robust and effective results has attracted the attention of researchers using these structures within image sensors. Realization of desired CNN behavior such as edge detection can be achieved by correctly setting a cloning template without changing the structure of the CNN. To achieve different behaviors effectively, designing a cloning template is one of the most important research topics in this field. In this study, the edge detecting process that is used as a preliminary process for segmentation, identification and coding applications is conducted by using CNN structures. In order to design the cloning template of goal-oriented CNN architecture, an Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm which is inspired from the foraging behavior of honeybees is used and the performance analysis of ABC for this application is examined with multiple runs. The CNN template generated by the ABC algorithm is tested by using artificial and real test images. The results are subjectively and quantitatively compared with well-known classical edge detection methods, and other CNN based edge detector cloning templates available in the imaging literature. The results show that the proposed method is more successful than other methods.

  13. A Novel Cloning Template Designing Method by Using an Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm for Edge Detection of CNN Based Imaging Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Parmaksızoğlu, Selami; Alçı, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Cellular Neural Networks (CNNs) have been widely used recently in applications such as edge detection, noise reduction and object detection, which are among the main computer imaging processes. They can also be realized as hardware based imaging sensors. The fact that hardware CNN models produce robust and effective results has attracted the attention of researchers using these structures within image sensors. Realization of desired CNN behavior such as edge detection can be achieved by correctly setting a cloning template without changing the structure of the CNN. To achieve different behaviors effectively, designing a cloning template is one of the most important research topics in this field. In this study, the edge detecting process that is used as a preliminary process for segmentation, identification and coding applications is conducted by using CNN structures. In order to design the cloning template of goal-oriented CNN architecture, an Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm which is inspired from the foraging behavior of honeybees is used and the performance analysis of ABC for this application is examined with multiple runs. The CNN template generated by the ABC algorithm is tested by using artificial and real test images. The results are subjectively and quantitatively compared with well-known classical edge detection methods, and other CNN based edge detector cloning templates available in the imaging literature. The results show that the proposed method is more successful than other methods. PMID:22163903

  14. Scaling of chaos in strongly nonlinear lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Mulansky, Mario

    2014-06-15

    Although it is now understood that chaos in complex classical systems is the foundation of thermodynamic behavior, the detailed relations between the microscopic properties of the chaotic dynamics and the macroscopic thermodynamic observations still remain mostly in the dark. In this work, we numerically analyze the probability of chaos in strongly nonlinear Hamiltonian systems and find different scaling properties depending on the nonlinear structure of the model. We argue that these different scaling laws of chaos have definite consequences for the macroscopic diffusive behavior, as chaos is the microscopic mechanism of diffusion. This is compared with previous results on chaotic diffusion [M. Mulansky and A. Pikovsky, New J. Phys. 15, 053015 (2013)], and a relation between microscopic chaos and macroscopic diffusion is established.

  15. Life Out of Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrhenius, Gustaf

    2002-01-01

    Doctinary overlays on the definition of life can effectively be avoided by focusing discussion on microorganisms, their vital processes, and their genetic pedigree. To reach beyond these present and highly advanced forms of life and to inquire about its origin it is necessary to consider the requirements imposed by the environment. These requirements include geophysically and geochemically acceptable conjectures for the generation of source compounds, their concentration from dilute solution, and their selective combination into functional biomolecules. For vital function these macromolecules require programming in the form of specific sequence motifs. This critical programming constitutes the scientifically least understood process in the origin of life. Once this stage has been surpassed the laws of Darwinian evolution can operate in ways that are understood and experimentally demonstrated.

  16. Life Out of Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrhenius, Gustaf

    2002-01-01

    Doctinary overlays on the definition of life can effectively be avoided by focusing discussion on microorganisms, their vital processes, and their genetic pedigree. To reach beyond these present and highly advanced forms of life and to inquire about its origin it is necessary to consider the requirements imposed by the environment. These requirements include geophysically and geochemically acceptable conjectures for the generation of source compounds, their concentration from dilute solution, and their selective combination into functional biomolecules. For vital function these macromolecules require programming in the form of specific sequence motifs. This critical programming constitutes the scientifically least understood process in the origin of life. Once this stage has been surpassed the laws of Darwinian evolution can operate in ways that are understood and experimentally demonstrated.

  17. Deterministic chaos in entangled eigenstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, K. G.; Förster, S.

    2008-05-01

    We investigate the problem of deterministic chaos in connection with entangled states using the Bohmian formulation of quantum mechanics. We show for a two particle system in a harmonic oscillator potential, that in a case of entanglement and three energy eigen-values the maximum Lyapunov-parameters of a representative ensemble of trajectories for large times develops to a narrow positive distribution, which indicates nearly complete chaotic dynamics. We also present in short results from two time-dependent systems, the anisotropic and the Rabi oscillator.

  18. Monohydrated Sulfates in Aurorae Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of sulfate-containing deposits in Aurorae Chaos was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 0653 UTC (2:53 a.m. EDT) on June 10, 2007, near 7.5 degrees south latitude, 327.25 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 40 meters (132 feet) across. The region covered is roughly 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    Aurorae Chaos lies east of the Valles Marineris canyon system. Its western edge extends toward Capri and Eos Chasmata, while its eastern edge connects with Aureum Chaos. Some 750 kilometers (466 miles) wide, Aurorae Chaos is most likely the result of collapsed surface material that settled when subsurface ice or water was released.

    The top panel in the montage above shows the location of the CRISM image on a mosaic taken by the Mars Odyssey spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). The CRISM data covers an area featuring several knobs of erosion-resistant material at one end of what appears to be a large teardrop shaped plateau. Similar plateaus occur throughout the interior of Valles Marineris, and they are formed of younger, typically layered rocks that post-date formation of the canyon system. Many of the deposits contain sulfate-rich layers, hinting at ancient saltwater.

    The center left image, an infrared false color image, reveals a swath of light-colored material draped over the knobs. The center right image unveils the mineralogical composition of the area, with yellow representing monohydrated sulfates (sulfates with one water molecule incorporated into each molecule of the mineral).

    The lower two images are renderings of data draped over topography with 5 times vertical exaggeration. These images provide a view of the topography and reveal how the monohydrated sulfate-containing deposits drape over the knobs and also an outcrop in lower-elevation parts of the

  19. Some new surprises in chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Bunimovich, Leonid A.; Vela-Arevalo, Luz V.

    2015-09-15

    A brief review is presented of some recent findings in the theory of chaotic dynamics. We also prove a statement that could be naturally considered as a dual one to the Poincaré theorem on recurrences. Numerical results demonstrate that some parts of the phase space of chaotic systems are more likely to be visited earlier than other parts. A new class of chaotic focusing billiards is discussed that clearly violates the main condition considered to be necessary for chaos in focusing billiards.

  20. Decoherence, determinism and chaos revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.

    1994-11-15

    We suggest that the derivation of the free space Maxwell Equations for classical electromagnetism, using a discrete ordered calculus developed by L.H. Kauffman and T. Etter, necessarily pushes the discussion of determinism in natural science down to the level of relativistic quantum mechanics and hence renders the mathematical phenomena studied in deterministic chaos research irrelevant to the question of whether the world investigated by physics is deterministic. We believe that this argument reinforces Suppes` contention that the issue of determinism versus indeterminism should be viewed as a Kantian antinomy incapable of investigation using currently available scientific tools.

  1. Slope Monitoring in Aram Chaos

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-22

    This image from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows some striking dark downslope flows in Aram Chaos. Since this is a dark, low-dust setting, these are probably not slope streaks (which form in bright dusty areas). This image can provide us with another look, particularly in order to detect any changes. Recurring slope lineae (RSL) are another type of dark streak seen on Martian slopes and are thought to form from flow of liquid water. Do these streaks behave like RSL? Additional images such as this one allow us to test whether these streaks grow seasonally and recur annually. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19364

  2. Sedimentary Rocks of Aram Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 February 2004 Aram Chaos is a large meteor impact crater that was nearly filled with sediment. Over time, this sediment was hardened to form sedimentary rock. Today, much of the eastern half of the crater has exposures of light-toned sedimentary rock, such as the outcrops shown in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. The picture is located near 2.0oN, 20.3oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  3. Input reconstruction of chaos sensors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dongchuan; Liu, Fang; Lai, Pik-Yin

    2008-06-01

    Although the sensitivity of sensors can be significantly enhanced using chaotic dynamics due to its extremely sensitive dependence on initial conditions and parameters, how to reconstruct the measured signal from the distorted sensor response becomes challenging. In this paper we suggest an effective method to reconstruct the measured signal from the distorted (chaotic) response of chaos sensors. This measurement signal reconstruction method applies the neural network techniques for system structure identification and therefore does not require the precise information of the sensor's dynamics. We discuss also how to improve the robustness of reconstruction. Some examples are presented to illustrate the measurement signal reconstruction method suggested.

  4. Heuristic versus Systematic Processing of Specialist versus Generalist Sources in Online Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Yoon Jeon; Sundar, S. Shyam

    2010-01-01

    In exploring why specialist sources (e.g., CNN.com) are more persuasive than generalist sources (e.g., CBS.com), this study examines theoretical mechanisms related to information-processing differences caused by these sources. When we have a chain of sources (Websites and agents) in online media, does specialization of one of them bias the…

  5. Heuristic versus Systematic Processing of Specialist versus Generalist Sources in Online Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Yoon Jeon; Sundar, S. Shyam

    2010-01-01

    In exploring why specialist sources (e.g., CNN.com) are more persuasive than generalist sources (e.g., CBS.com), this study examines theoretical mechanisms related to information-processing differences caused by these sources. When we have a chain of sources (Websites and agents) in online media, does specialization of one of them bias the…

  6. Catastrophic ice lake collapse in Aram Chaos, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roda, Manuel; Kleinhans, Maarten G.; Zegers, Tanja E.; Oosthoek, Jelmer H. P.

    2014-07-01

    Hesperian chaotic terrains have been recognized as the source of outflow channels formed by catastrophic outflows. Four main scenarios have been proposed for the formation of chaotic terrains that involve different amounts of water and single or multiple outflow events. Here, we test these scenarios with morphological and structural analyses of imagery and elevation data for Aram Chaos in conjunction with numerical modeling of the morphological evolution of the catastrophic carving of the outflow valley. The morphological and geological analyses of Aram Chaos suggest large-scale collapse and subsidence (1500 m) of the entire area, which is consistent with a massive expulsion of liquid water from the subsurface in one single event. The combined observations suggest a complex process starting with the outflow of water from two small channels, followed by continuous groundwater sapping and headward erosion and ending with a catastrophic lake rim collapse and carving of the Aram Valley, which is synchronous with the 2.5 Ga stage of the Ares Vallis formation. The water volume and formative time scale required to carve the Aram channels indicate that a single, rapid (maximum tens of days) and catastrophic (flood volume of 9.3 × 104 km3) event carved the outflow channel. We conclude that a sub-ice lake collapse model can best explain the features of the Aram Chaos Valley system as well as the time scale required for its formation.

  7. Invoking the muse: Dada's chaos.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Diane

    2014-07-01

    Dada, a self-proclaimed (anti)art (non)movement, took shape in 1916 among a group of writers and artists who rejected the traditions of a stagnating bourgeoisie. Instead, they adopted means of creative expression that embraced chaos, stoked instability and undermined logic, an outburst that overturned centuries of classical and Romantic aesthetics. Paradoxically, this insistence on disorder foreshadowed a new order in understanding creativity. Nearly one hundred years later, Nonlinear Dynamical Systems theory (NDS) gives renewed currency to Dada's visionary perspective on chance, chaos and creative cognition. This paper explores commonalities between NDS-theory and this early precursor of the nonlinear paradigm, suggesting that their conceptual synergy illuminates what it means to 'be creative' beyond the disciplinary boundaries of either. Key features are discussed within a 5P model of creativity based on Rhodes' 4P framework (Person, Process, Press, Product), to which I add Participant-Viewer for the interactivity of observer-observed. Grounded in my own art practice, several techniques are then put forward as non-methodical methods that invoke creative border zones, those regions where Dada's chance and design are wedded in a dialectical tension of opposites.

  8. Yardangs in Arsinoes Chaos, Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-04

    This view of Martian surface features shaped by effects of winds was captured by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Jan. 4, 2015. The spacecraft has been orbiting Mars since March 2006. On Feb. 7, 2015, it completed its 40,000th orbit around Mars. Several terrain types converge in this scene from the Arsinoes Chaos region of Mars, which is in the far eastern portion of Mars' Valles Marineris canyon system. The jumbled chaos terrain is likely related to massive water-carved outflow channels that started in this area and flowed north onto Mars' northern plains. The slightly curving bright terrain is composed of yardangs. Yardangs are portions of rock that have been sandblasted into long, skinny ridges by saltating (or bouncing) sand particles blowing in the wind. Transverse sand ridges lie between the yardangs (zoom in). These sand ridges are termed "transverse aeolian ridges" and are not moving in Mars' current climate. They are a mystery -- midway in height between dunes (formed from saltating sand) and ripples (formed by "splashed" sand grains). The location is at 7 degrees south latitude, 332 degrees east latitude. The image is an excerpt from HiRISE observation ESP_039563_1730. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19291

  9. Quantifying chaos for ecological stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Jorge; Januário, Cristina; Martins, Nuno; Sardanyés, Josep

    2010-09-01

    The theory of ecological stoichiometry considers ecological interactions among species with different chemical compositions. Both experimental and theoretical investigations have shown the importance of species composition in the outcome of the population dynamics. A recent study of a theoretical three-species food chain model considering stoichiometry [B. Deng and I. Loladze, Chaos 17, 033108 (2007)] shows that coexistence between two consumers predating on the same prey is possible via chaos. In this work we study the topological and dynamical measures of the chaotic attractors found in such a model under ecological relevant parameters. By using the theory of symbolic dynamics, we first compute the topological entropy associated with unimodal Poincaré return maps obtained by Deng and Loladze from a dimension reduction. With this measure we numerically prove chaotic competitive coexistence, which is characterized by positive topological entropy and positive Lyapunov exponents, achieved when the first predator reduces its maximum growth rate, as happens at increasing δ1. However, for higher values of δ1 the dynamics become again stable due to an asymmetric bubble-like bifurcation scenario. We also show that a decrease in the efficiency of the predator sensitive to prey's quality (increasing parameter ζ) stabilizes the dynamics. Finally, we estimate the fractal dimension of the chaotic attractors for the stoichiometric ecological model.

  10. Quantifying chaos for ecological stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Jorge; Januário, Cristina; Martins, Nuno; Sardanyés, Josep

    2010-09-01

    The theory of ecological stoichiometry considers ecological interactions among species with different chemical compositions. Both experimental and theoretical investigations have shown the importance of species composition in the outcome of the population dynamics. A recent study of a theoretical three-species food chain model considering stoichiometry [B. Deng and I. Loladze, Chaos 17, 033108 (2007)] shows that coexistence between two consumers predating on the same prey is possible via chaos. In this work we study the topological and dynamical measures of the chaotic attractors found in such a model under ecological relevant parameters. By using the theory of symbolic dynamics, we first compute the topological entropy associated with unimodal Poincaré return maps obtained by Deng and Loladze from a dimension reduction. With this measure we numerically prove chaotic competitive coexistence, which is characterized by positive topological entropy and positive Lyapunov exponents, achieved when the first predator reduces its maximum growth rate, as happens at increasing δ1. However, for higher values of δ1 the dynamics become again stable due to an asymmetric bubble-like bifurcation scenario. We also show that a decrease in the efficiency of the predator sensitive to prey's quality (increasing parameter ζ) stabilizes the dynamics. Finally, we estimate the fractal dimension of the chaotic attractors for the stoichiometric ecological model.

  11. Competitive coexistence in stoichiometric chaos.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bo; Loladze, Irakli

    2007-09-01

    Classical predator-prey models, such as Lotka-Volterra, track the abundance of prey, but ignore its quality. Yet, in the past decade, some new and occasionally counterintuitive effects of prey quality on food web dynamics emerged from both experiments and mathematical modeling. The underpinning of this work is the theory of ecological stoichiometry that is centered on the fact that each organism is a mixture of multiple chemical elements such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P). The ratios of these elements can vary within and among species, providing simple ways to represent prey quality as its C:N or C:P ratios. When these ratios modeled to vary, as they frequently do in nature, seemingly paradoxical results can arise such as the extinction of a predator that has an abundant and accessible prey. Here, for the first time, we show analytically that the reduction in prey quality can give rise to chaotic oscillations. In particular, when competing predators differ in their sensitivity to prey quality then all species can coexist via chaotic fluctuations. The chaos generating mechanism is based on the existence of a junction-fold point on the nullcline surfaces of the species. Conditions on parameters are found for such a point, and the singular perturbation method and the kneading sequence analysis are used to demonstrate the existence of a period-doubling cascade to chaos as a result of the point.

  12. Titration of chaos with added noise

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Chi-Sang; Barahona, Mauricio

    2001-01-01

    Deterministic chaos has been implicated in numerous natural and man-made complex phenomena ranging from quantum to astronomical scales and in disciplines as diverse as meteorology, physiology, ecology, and economics. However, the lack of a definitive test of chaos vs. random noise in experimental time series has led to considerable controversy in many fields. Here we propose a numerical titration procedure as a simple “litmus test” for highly sensitive, specific, and robust detection of chaos in short noisy data without the need for intensive surrogate data testing. We show that the controlled addition of white or colored noise to a signal with a preexisting noise floor results in a titration index that: (i) faithfully tracks the onset of deterministic chaos in all standard bifurcation routes to chaos; and (ii) gives a relative measure of chaos intensity. Such reliable detection and quantification of chaos under severe conditions of relatively low signal-to-noise ratio is of great interest, as it may open potential practical ways of identifying, forecasting, and controlling complex behaviors in a wide variety of physical, biomedical, and socioeconomic systems. PMID:11416195

  13. Titration of chaos with added noise.

    PubMed

    Poon, C S; Barahona, M

    2001-06-19

    Deterministic chaos has been implicated in numerous natural and man-made complex phenomena ranging from quantum to astronomical scales and in disciplines as diverse as meteorology, physiology, ecology, and economics. However, the lack of a definitive test of chaos vs. random noise in experimental time series has led to considerable controversy in many fields. Here we propose a numerical titration procedure as a simple "litmus test" for highly sensitive, specific, and robust detection of chaos in short noisy data without the need for intensive surrogate data testing. We show that the controlled addition of white or colored noise to a signal with a preexisting noise floor results in a titration index that: (i) faithfully tracks the onset of deterministic chaos in all standard bifurcation routes to chaos; and (ii) gives a relative measure of chaos intensity. Such reliable detection and quantification of chaos under severe conditions of relatively low signal-to-noise ratio is of great interest, as it may open potential practical ways of identifying, forecasting, and controlling complex behaviors in a wide variety of physical, biomedical, and socioeconomic systems.

  14. The topography of chaos terrain on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, G.; Prockter, L. M.; Schenk, P.

    2010-12-01

    Chaos terrain and lenticulae are commonly observed surface features unique to the Galilean satellite Europa. Chaos terrain occurs as discrete regions of the satellite’s surface 10s to 100s of km in size that are disrupted into isolated plates surrounded by hummocky matrix material. Lenticulae occur as positive- or negative-relief domes km to 10s of km in diameter that can disrupt the original surface in a manner similar to chaos terrain. Evidence suggests that they each form via an endogenic process involving the interaction of a mobile substrate with the brittle surface and it has been proposed that ice shell thinning or surface yielding coupled with brine production represents the most plausible mechanism for the formation of these features. These similarities in morphology and formation mechanism indicate they may represent a continuum process. We explore whether larger chaos terrain represent the coalescence of smaller lenticulae by examining topography within chaos to determine whether it contains domes on length scales similar to lenticulae. Schenk and Pappalardo (2004) alluded to the presence of several prominent domes within Conamara Chaos and we have previously shown that at least 4 and as many as 9 domes with length scales similar to lenticulae are present within and along the margins of the feature. This was accomplished by using Fourier analysis to decompose the topographic signature of Conamara Chaos and the surrounding terrain into discrete wavelength components. A low-pass filter was then used to strip away shorter wavelength components of the topography associated with the region and determine if longer wavelength features were present within the terrain. Here we present new work identifying the presence, size, and distribution of domes within the boundaries of other chaos terrains across the surface of Europa and discuss implications for chaos formation.

  15. Chaos in Magnetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, W. N.; DeHaas, T.; Van Compernolle, B.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic Flux Ropes Immersed in a uniform magnetoplasma are observed to twist about themselves, writhe about each other and rotate about a central axis. They are kink unstable and smash into one another as they move. Full three dimensional magnetic field and flows are measured at thousands of time steps. Each collision results in magnetic field line generation and the generation of a quasi-seperatrix layer and induced electric fields. Three dimensional magnetic field lines are computed by conditionally averaging the data using correlation techniques. The permutation entropy1 ,which is related to the Lyapunov exponent, can be calculated from the the time series of the magnetic field data (this is also done with flows) and used to calculate the positions of the data on a Jensen Shannon complexity map2. The location of data on this map indicates if the magnetic fields are stochastic, or fall into regions of minimal or maximal complexity. The complexity is a function of space and time. The complexity map, and analysis will be explained in the course of the talk. Other types of chaotic dynamical models such as the Lorentz, Gissinger and Henon process also fall on the map and can give a clue to the nature of the flux rope turbulence. The ropes fall in the region of the C-H plane where chaotic systems lie. The entropy and complexity change in space and time which reflects the change and possibly type of chaos associated with the ropes. The maps give insight as to the type of chaos (deterministic chaos, fractional diffusion , Levi flights..) and underlying dynamical process. The power spectra of much of the magnetic and flow data is exponential and Lorentzian structures in the time domain are embedded in them. Other quantities such as the Hurst exponent are evaluated for both magnetic fields and plasma flow. Work Supported by a UC-LANL Lab fund and the Basic Plasma Science Facility which is funded by DOE and NSF. 1) C. Bandt, B. Pompe, Phys. Rev. Lett., 88,174102 (2007) 2

  16. Optimized chaos control with simple limiters.

    PubMed

    Wagner, C; Stoop, R

    2001-01-01

    We present an elementary derivation of chaos control with simple limiters using the logistic map and the Henon map as examples. This derivation provides conditions for optimal stabilization of unstable periodic orbits of a chaotic attractor.

  17. Chaos automata: iterated function systems with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashlock, Dan; Golden, Jim

    2003-07-01

    Transforming biological sequences into fractals in order to visualize them is a long standing technique, in the form of the traditional four-cornered chaos game. In this paper we give a generalization of the standard chaos game visualization for DNA sequences. It incorporates iterated function systems that are called under the control of a finite state automaton, yielding a DNA to fractal transformation system with memory. We term these fractal visualizers chaos automata. The use of memory enables association of widely separated sequence events in the drawing of the fractal, finessing the “forgetfulness” of other fractal visualization methods. We use a genetic algorithm to train chaos automata to distinguish introns and exons in Zea mays (corn). A substantial issue treated here is the creation of a fitness function that leads to good visual separation of distinct data types.

  18. Homoclinic chaos and energy condition violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzle, J. Mark; Röhr, Niklas; Uggla, Claes

    2006-09-01

    In this letter we discuss the connection between so-called homoclinic chaos and the violation of energy conditions in locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type IX models, where the matter is assumed to be nontilted dust and a positive cosmological constant. We show that homoclinic chaos in these models is an artifact of unphysical assumptions: it requires that there exist solutions with positive matter energy density ρ>0 that evolve through the singularity and beyond as solutions with negative matter energy density ρ<0. Homoclinic chaos is absent when it is assumed that the dust particles always retain their positive mass. In addition, we discuss more general models: for solutions that are not locally rotationally symmetric we demonstrate that the construction of extensions through the singularity, which is required for homoclinic chaos, is not possible in general.

  19. The danger of wishing for chaos.

    PubMed

    McSharry, Patrick

    2005-10-01

    With the discovery of chaos came the hope of finding simple models that would be capable of explaining complex phenomena. Numerous papers claimed to find low-dimensional chaos in a number of areas ranging from the weather to the stock market. Years later, many of these claims have been disproved and the fantastic hopes pinned on chaos have been toned down as research with more realistic objectives follows. The difficulty in calculating reliable estimates of the correlation dimension and the maximal Lyapunov exponent, two of the hallmarks of chaos, are explored. Given that nonlinear dynamics is a relatively new and growing field of science, the need for statistical testing is greater than ever. Surrogate data provides one possible approach but great care is needed in generating relevant surrogates and in interpreting the results. Examples of misleading applications and challenges for the future of research in nonlinear dynamics are discussed.

  20. Adapted polynomial chaos expansion for failure detection

    SciTech Connect

    Paffrath, M. Wever, U.

    2007-09-10

    In this paper, we consider two methods of computation of failure probabilities by adapted polynomial chaos expansions. The performance of the two methods is demonstrated by a predator-prey model and a chemical reaction problem.

  1. Adapted polynomial chaos expansion for failure detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paffrath, M.; Wever, U.

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we consider two methods of computation of failure probabilities by adapted polynomial chaos expansions. The performance of the two methods is demonstrated by a predator-prey model and a chemical reaction problem.

  2. Fundamental concepts of quantum chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robnik, M.

    2016-09-01

    We review the fundamental concepts of quantum chaos in Hamiltonian systems. The quantum evolution of bound systems does not possess the sensitive dependence on initial conditions, and thus no chaotic behaviour occurs, whereas the study of the stationary solutions of the Schrödinger equation in the quantum phase space (Wigner functions) reveals precise analogy of the structure of the classical phase portrait. We analyze the regular eigenstates associated with invariant tori in the classical phase space, and the chaotic eigenstates associated with the classically chaotic regions, and the corresponding energy spectra. The effects of quantum localization of the chaotic eigenstates are treated phenomenologically, resulting in Brody-like level statistics, which can be found also at very high-lying levels, while the coupling between the regular and the irregular eigenstates due to tunneling, and of the corresponding levels, manifests itself only in low-lying levels.

  3. The Minerals of Aureum Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation of 3-dimensional model with 5x vertical exaggeration

    This image of chaotic terrain in the Aureum Chaos region of Mars was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 0858UTC (3:58 a.m. EST) on January 24, 2008, near 3.66 degrees south latitude, 26.5 degrees west longitude. The image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across. The image is about 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    Aureum Chaos is a 368 kilometer (229 mile) wide area of chaotic terrain in the eastern part of Valles Marineris. The chaotic terrain is thought to have formed by collapse of the surrounding Margaritifer Terra highland region. Aureum Chaos contains heavily eroded, randomly oriented mesas, plateaus, and knobs many revealing distinct layered deposits along their slopes. These deposits may be formed from remnants of the collapsed highlands, sand carried by Martian winds, dust or volcanic ash that settled out of the atmosphere, or sediments laid down on the floor of an ancient lake.

    The top panel in the montage above shows the location of the CRISM image on a mosaic taken by the Mars Odyssey spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). The CRISM data cover a narrow plateau near the edge of the chaotic terrain, that stretches across from the southwest to the northeast.

    The lower left image, an infrared false color image, reveals the plateau and several eroded knobs of varying sizes. The plateau's layer-cake structure is similar to that of other layered outcrops in Valles Marineris.

    The lower right image reveals the strengths of mineral spectral features overlain on a black-and-white version of the infrared image. Areas shaded in red hold more of the mineral pyroxene, a primary component of basaltic rocks that are prevalent in the highlands. Spots of green

  4. Chaos, Fractals and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. Michael T.

    2016-12-01

    This paper gives an up-to-date account of chaos and fractals, in a popular pictorial style for the general scientific reader. A brief historical account covers the development of the subject from Newton’s laws of motion to the astronomy of Poincaré and the weather forecasting of Lorenz. Emphasis is given to the important underlying concepts, embracing the fractal properties of coastlines and the logistics of population dynamics. A wide variety of applications include: NASA’s discovery and use of zero-fuel chaotic “superhighways” between the planets; erratic chaotic solutions generated by Euler’s method in mathematics; atomic force microscopy; spontaneous pattern formation in chemical and biological systems; impact mechanics in offshore engineering and the chatter of cutting tools; controlling chaotic heartbeats. Reference is made to a number of interactive simulations and movies accessible on the web.

  5. Compressive Sensing with Optical Chaos

    PubMed Central

    Rontani, D.; Choi, D.; Chang, C.-Y.; Locquet, A.; Citrin, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) is a technique to sample a sparse signal below the Nyquist-Shannon limit, yet still enabling its reconstruction. As such, CS permits an extremely parsimonious way to store and transmit large and important classes of signals and images that would be far more data intensive should they be sampled following the prescription of the Nyquist-Shannon theorem. CS has found applications as diverse as seismology and biomedical imaging. In this work, we use actual optical signals generated from temporal intensity chaos from external-cavity semiconductor lasers (ECSL) to construct the sensing matrix that is employed to compress a sparse signal. The chaotic time series produced having their relevant dynamics on the 100 ps timescale, our results open the way to ultrahigh-speed compression of sparse signals. PMID:27910863

  6. Menstruation, perimenopause, and chaos theory.

    PubMed

    Derry, Paula S; Derry, Gregory N

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that menstruation, including the transition to menopause, results from a specific kind of complex system, namely, one that is nonlinear, dynamical, and chaotic. A complexity-based perspective changes how we think about and research menstruation-related health problems and positive health. Chaotic systems are deterministic but not predictable, characterized by sensitivity to initial conditions and strange attractors. Chaos theory provides a coherent framework that qualitatively accounts for puzzling results from perimenopause research. It directs attention to variability within and between women, adaptation, lifespan development, and the need for complex explanations of disease. Whether the menstrual cycle is chaotic can be empirically tested, and a summary of our research on 20- to 40-year-old women is provided.

  7. Detecting chaos from time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaofeng, Gong; Lai, C. H.

    2000-02-01

    In this paper, an entirely data-based method to detect chaos from the time series is developed by introducing icons/Journals/Common/epsilon" ALT="epsilon" ALIGN="TOP"/> p -neighbour points (the p -steps icons/Journals/Common/epsilon" ALT="epsilon" ALIGN="TOP"/> -neighbour points). We demonstrate that for deterministic chaotic systems, there exists a linear relationship between the logarithm of the average number of icons/Journals/Common/epsilon" ALT="epsilon" ALIGN="TOP"/> p -neighbour points, lnn p ,icons/Journals/Common/epsilon" ALT="epsilon" ALIGN="TOP"/> , and the time step, p . The coefficient can be related to the KS entropy of the system. The effects of the embedding dimension and noise are also discussed.

  8. Control of collective network chaos.

    PubMed

    Wagemakers, Alexandre; Barreto, Ernest; Sanjuán, Miguel A F; So, Paul

    2014-06-01

    Under certain conditions, the collective behavior of a large globally-coupled heterogeneous network of coupled oscillators, as quantified by the macroscopic mean field or order parameter, can exhibit low-dimensional chaotic behavior. Recent advances describe how a small set of "reduced" ordinary differential equations can be derived that captures this mean field behavior. Here, we show that chaos control algorithms designed using the reduced equations can be successfully applied to imperfect realizations of the full network. To systematically study the effectiveness of this technique, we measure the quality of control as we relax conditions that are required for the strict accuracy of the reduced equations, and hence, the controller. Although the effects are network-dependent, we show that the method is effective for surprisingly small networks, for modest departures from global coupling, and even with mild inaccuracy in the estimate of network heterogeneity.

  9. Control of collective network chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemakers, Alexandre; Barreto, Ernest; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.; So, Paul

    2014-06-01

    Under certain conditions, the collective behavior of a large globally-coupled heterogeneous network of coupled oscillators, as quantified by the macroscopic mean field or order parameter, can exhibit low-dimensional chaotic behavior. Recent advances describe how a small set of "reduced" ordinary differential equations can be derived that captures this mean field behavior. Here, we show that chaos control algorithms designed using the reduced equations can be successfully applied to imperfect realizations of the full network. To systematically study the effectiveness of this technique, we measure the quality of control as we relax conditions that are required for the strict accuracy of the reduced equations, and hence, the controller. Although the effects are network-dependent, we show that the method is effective for surprisingly small networks, for modest departures from global coupling, and even with mild inaccuracy in the estimate of network heterogeneity.

  10. Chaos Theory and Protein Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, James; Clarage, James

    2010-10-01

    Chaos theory, commonly known as the butterfly effect, states that a small change in a complex system may cause large changes in the system as time moves forward. This phenomenon was first discovered by Henri Poincare in the 1880's. The computer programs NAMD, VMD (Visual Molecular Dynamics) and Mathematica were used to calculate the movements and graphically analyze the trajectories of the protein ubiquitin. A small change was applied to a single atom's initial position in the x-coordinate to see how it would affect the future dynamics and trajectory of the protein. Our findings indicate an exponential divergence from the controlled trajectory with a Lyapunov exponent = 10.5 [1/ps]. In other words after less than a picosecond (trillionth of a second) the dynamics of a small biophysical system is no longer predictable, even though the underlying Newtonian physical laws are completely deterministic.

  11. Compressive Sensing with Optical Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, D.; Choi, D.; Chang, C.-Y.; Locquet, A.; Citrin, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) is a technique to sample a sparse signal below the Nyquist-Shannon limit, yet still enabling its reconstruction. As such, CS permits an extremely parsimonious way to store and transmit large and important classes of signals and images that would be far more data intensive should they be sampled following the prescription of the Nyquist-Shannon theorem. CS has found applications as diverse as seismology and biomedical imaging. In this work, we use actual optical signals generated from temporal intensity chaos from external-cavity semiconductor lasers (ECSL) to construct the sensing matrix that is employed to compress a sparse signal. The chaotic time series produced having their relevant dynamics on the 100 ps timescale, our results open the way to ultrahigh-speed compression of sparse signals.

  12. Control of collective network chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Wagemakers, Alexandre Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2014-06-01

    Under certain conditions, the collective behavior of a large globally-coupled heterogeneous network of coupled oscillators, as quantified by the macroscopic mean field or order parameter, can exhibit low-dimensional chaotic behavior. Recent advances describe how a small set of “reduced” ordinary differential equations can be derived that captures this mean field behavior. Here, we show that chaos control algorithms designed using the reduced equations can be successfully applied to imperfect realizations of the full network. To systematically study the effectiveness of this technique, we measure the quality of control as we relax conditions that are required for the strict accuracy of the reduced equations, and hence, the controller. Although the effects are network-dependent, we show that the method is effective for surprisingly small networks, for modest departures from global coupling, and even with mild inaccuracy in the estimate of network heterogeneity.

  13. Chaos on the conveyor belt.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Bulcsú; Járai-Szabó, Ferenc; Tél, Tamás; Néda, Zoltán

    2013-04-01

    The dynamics of a spring-block train placed on a moving conveyor belt is investigated both by simple experiments and computer simulations. The first block is connected by a spring to an external static point and, due to the dragging effect of the belt, the blocks undergo complex stick-slip dynamics. A qualitative agreement with the experimental results can be achieved only by taking into account the spatial inhomogeneity of the friction force on the belt's surface, modeled as noise. As a function of the velocity of the conveyor belt and the noise strength, the system exhibits complex, self-organized critical, sometimes chaotic, dynamics and phase transition-like behavior. Noise-induced chaos and intermittency is also observed. Simulations suggest that the maximum complexity of the dynamical states is achieved for a relatively small number of blocks (around five).

  14. Chaos in blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Wagner, C D; Nafz, B; Persson, P B

    1996-03-01

    A number of control mechanisms are comprised within blood pressure regulation, ranging from events on the cellular level up to circulating hormones. Despite their vast number, blood pressure fluctuations occur preferably within a certain range (under physiological conditions). A specific class of dynamic systems has been extensively studied over the past several years: nonlinear coupled systems, which often reveal a characteristic form of motion termed "chaos". The system is restricted to a certain range in phase space, but the motion is never periodic. The attractor the system moves on has a non-integer dimension. What all chaotic systems have in common is their sensitive dependence on initial conditions. The question arises as to whether blood pressure regulation can be explained by such models. Many efforts have been made to characterise heart rate variability and EEG dynamics by parameters of chaos theory (e.g., fractal dimensions and Lyapunov exponents). These method were successfully applied to dynamics observed in single organs, but very few studies have dealt with blood pressure dynamics. This mini-review first gives an overview on the history of blood pressure dynamics and the methods suitable to characterise the dynamics by means of tools derived from the field of nonlinear dynamics. Then applications to systemic blood pressure are discussed. After a short survey on heart rate variability, which is indirectly reflected in blood pressure variability, some dynamic aspects of resistance vessels are given. Intriguingly, systemic blood pressure reveals a change in fractal dimensions and Lyapunov exponents, when the major short-term control mechanism--the arterial baroreflex--is disrupted. Indeed it seems that cardiovascular time series can be described by tools from nonlinear dynamics [66]. These methods allow a novel description of some important aspects of biological systems. Both the linear and the nonlinear tools complement each other and can be useful in

  15. How Did You Get into Chaos?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, Marco; Kurths, Jürgen; Romano, M. Carmen; Moura, Alessandro; Károlyi, György

    In the celebratory dinner honouring Celso Grebogi's 60th birthday, a number of scientists in the area of chaos were asked by James Yorke to tell the tale about how they got involved in the field. Since all the participants have played crucial roles in the development of the subject, their stories give unique insights into the historical development of dynamical systems and chaos. We have transcribed their tales here.

  16. Terminal chaos for information processing in neurodynamics.

    PubMed

    Zak, M

    1991-01-01

    New nonlinear phenomenon-terminal chaos caused by failure of the Lipschitz condition at equilibrium points of dynamical systems is introduced. It is shown that terminal chaos has a well organized probabilistic structure which can be predicted and controlled. This gives an opportunity to exploit this phenomenon for information processing. It appears that chaotic states of neurons activity are associated with higher level of cognitive processes such as generalization and abstraction.

  17. Effect of Chaos on Relativistic Quantum Tunneling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Effect of chaos on relativistic quantum tunneling This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article...of chaos on relativistic quantum tunneling 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...tunneling dynamics even in the relativistic quantum regime. Similar phenomena have been observed in graphene. A physical theory is developed to

  18. Detecting nonlinearity and chaos in epidemic data

    SciTech Connect

    Ellner, S.; Gallant, A.R.; Theiler, J. |

    1993-08-01

    Historical data on recurrent epidemics have been central to the debate about the prevalence of chaos in biological population dynamics. Schaffer and Kot who first recognized that the abundance and accuracy of disease incidence data opened the door to applying a range of methods for detecting chaos that had been devised in the early 1980`s. Using attractor reconstruction, estimates of dynamical invariants, and comparisons between data and simulation of SEIR models, the ``case for chaos in childhood epidemics`` was made through a series of influential papers beginning in the mid 1980`s. The proposition that the precise timing and magnitude of epidemic outbreaks are deterministic but chaotic is appealing, since it raises the hope of finding determinism and simplicity beneath the apparently stochastic and complicated surface of the data. The initial enthusiasm for methods of detecting chaos in data has been followed by critical re-evaluations of their limitations. Early hopes of a ``one size fits all`` algorithm to diagnose chaos vs. noise in any data set have given way to a recognition that a variety of methods must be used, and interpretation of results must take into account the limitations of each method and the imperfections of the data. Our goals here are to outline some newer methods for detecting nonlinearity and chaos that have a solid statistical basis and are suited to epidemic data, and to begin a re-evaluation of the claims for nonlinear dynamics and chaos in epidemics using these newer methods. We also identify features of epidemic data that create problems for the older, better known methods of detecting chaos. When we ask ``are epidemics nonlinear?``, we are not questioning the existence of global nonlinearities in epidemic dynamics, such as nonlinear transmission rates. Our question is whether the data`s deviations from an annual cyclic trend (which would reflect global nonlinearities) are described by a linear, noise-driven stochastic process.

  19. Tachyons, Lamb shifts and superluminal chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaschitz, R.

    2000-10-01

    An elementary account on the origins of cosmic chaos in an open and multiply connected universe is given; there is a finite region in the open 3-space in which the world-lines of galaxies are chaotic, and the mixing taking place in this chaotic nucleus of the universe provides a mechanism to create equidistribution. The galaxy background defines a distinguished frame of reference and a unique cosmic time order; in this context superluminal signal transfer is studied. Tachyons are described by a real Proca field with negative mass square, coupled to a current of subluminal matter. Estimates on tachyon mixing in the geometric optics limit are derived. The potential of a static point source in this field theory is a damped periodic function. We treat this tachyon potential as a perturbation of the Coulomb potential, and study its effects on energy levels in hydrogenic systems. By comparing the induced level shifts to high-precision Lamb shift measurements and QED calculations, we suggest a tachyon mass of 2.1 keV/c2 and estimate the tachyonic coupling strength to subluminal matter. The impact of the tachyon field on ground state hyperfine transitions in hydrogen and muonium is investigated. Bounds on atomic transition rates effected by tachyon radiation as well as estimates on the spectral energy density of a possible cosmic tachyon background radiation are derived.

  20. Observational Manifestation of Chaos in Astrophysical Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, A.; Marov, M.; Miller, R.

    2002-12-01

    This book addresses a broad range of problems related to observed manifestations of chaotic motions in galactic and stellar objects, by invoking basic theory, numerical modeling, and observational evidence. For the first time, methods of stochastic dynamics are applied to actually observed astronomical objects, e.g. the gaseous disc of the spiral galaxy NGC 3631. In the latter case, the existence of chaotic trajectories in the boundary of giant vortices was recently found by the calculation of the Lyapunov characteristic number of these trajectories. The reader will find research results on the peculiarities of chaotic system behaviour; a study of the integrals of motion in self-consistent systems; numerical modeling results of the evolution process of disk systems involving resonance excitation of the density waves in spiral galaxies; a review of specific formations in stars and high-energy sources demonstrating their stochastic nature; a discussion of the peculiarities of the precessional motion of the accretion disk and relativistic jets in the double system SS 433; etc. This book stands out as the first one that deals with the problem of chaos in real astrophysical objects. It is intended for graduate and post-graduate students in the fields of non-linear dynamics, astrophysics, planetary and space physics; specifically for those dealing with computer modeling of the relevant processes. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-0935-6

  1. Genotoxicity of drinking water from Chao Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Q.; Jiao, Q.C.; Huang, X.M.; Jiang, J.P.; Cui, S.Q.; Yao, G.H.; Jiang, Z.R.; Zhao, H.K.; Wang, N.Y.

    1999-02-01

    Genotoxic activity appears to originate primarily from reactions of chlorine with humic substances in the source waters. Comparisons of extracts of settled versus chlorinated water have confirmed that chlorinating during water treatment produces mutagenic activity in the mutagenicity tests. Present work on XAD-2 extracts of raw, chlorinated (treated), and settled water from the Chao Lake region of China has involved a battery of mutagenicity assays for various genetic endpoints: the Salmonella test, the sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) induction in Chinese hamster lung (CHL) cells, and the micronucleus (MN) induction in the peripheral blood erythrocytes of silver carp. Extracts of raw and treated water but not the settled water are mutagenic in the Salmonella assay. On the other hand, extracts of three water samples show activity in the SCE and MN assays, especially the raw and treated water. These data show that contamination and chlorinating contribute mutagens to drinking water and suggest that the mammalian assays may be more sensitive for detecting mutagenicity in aquatic environment than the Salmonella test.

  2. Route to chaos for combustion instability in ducted laminar premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabiraj, Lipika; Saurabh, Aditya; Wahi, Pankaj; Sujith, R. I.

    2012-06-01

    Complex thermoacoustic oscillations are observed experimentally in a simple laboratory combustor that burns lean premixed fuel-air mixture, as a result of nonlinear interaction between the acoustic field and the combustion processes. The application of nonlinear time series analysis, particularly techniques based on phase space reconstruction from acquired pressure data, reveals rich dynamical behavior and the existence of several complex states. A route to chaos for thermoacoustic instability is established experimentally for the first time. We show that, as the location of the heat source is gradually varied, self-excited periodic thermoacoustic oscillations undergo transition to chaos via the Ruelle-Takens scenario.

  3. Chaos on Europa: Transition from solid ice to slush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, G. C.

    2011-12-01

    About a quarter of Jupiter's moon Europa is covered by patches of "chaotic" terrain where some parts of the preexisting surface have been disrupted into "plates" that are tilted and translated, and other parts have been replaced by an irregular hummocky matrix of jumbled ice blocks. Catastrophic ice-fluid interactions on the Earth offer attractive analogies to advance our understanding of the formation of chaotic terrain on Europa. The morphology of chaos terrain indicates a sharp change in mechanical properties between the undisrupted plates and the highly disrupted matrix. Where plates are locally higher than the matrix, the boundary is a steep cliff, but where the matrix is locally higher, the boundary is rounded like a viscous flow. This indicates that the plates are behaving as solid ice, while the adjacent matrix is behaving as a fluid. The horizontal translation and tilting of the solid ice plates indicates that the material beneath them must also be acting as a fluid. The transition from solid ice to slushy matrix is not always accompanied by horizontal motion; for example background ridges can be continuously traced over large areas of chaos matrix in Thrace Macula. In some areas, the boundary between plates and matrix appears to be controlled by the existence of prominent ridges, but the matrix may either go around the ridge, or be contained entirely within the outline of the ridge. Perhaps fractures associated with preexisting ridges affect the subsurface flow of liquid within the ice shell, and control the transition between solid ice and slush. In color and spectroscopic data, chaos matrix is accompanied by an unknown dark substance, which could include hydrated salts or sulfuric acid (Carlson et al. 2009). Dark material can also be found separate from the matrix, in topographically low areas immediately surrounding chaos terrain. After chaos formation, the matrix may still exhibit mechanical properties different from the surrounding ice, as evidenced

  4. Nonlinear forecasting as a way of distinguishing chaos from measurement error in time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara, George; May, Robert M.

    1990-04-01

    An approach is presented for making short-term predictions about the trajectories of chaotic dynamical systems. The method is applied to data on measles, chickenpox, and marine phytoplankton populations, to show how apparent noise associated with deterministic chaos can be distinguished from sampling error and other sources of externally induced environmental noise.

  5. Chaos in World Politics: A Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Manuel Alberto Martins; Filipe, José António Candeias Bonito; Coelho, Manuel F. P.; Pedro, Isabel C.

    Chaos theory results from natural scientists' findings in the area of non-linear dynamics. The importance of related models has increased in the last decades, by studying the temporal evolution of non-linear systems. In consequence, chaos is one of the concepts that most rapidly have been expanded in what research topics respects. Considering that relationships in non-linear systems are unstable, chaos theory aims to understand and to explain this kind of unpredictable aspects of nature, social life, the uncertainties, the nonlinearities, the disorders and confusion, scientifically it represents a disarray connection, but basically it involves much more than that. The existing close relationship between change and time seems essential to understand what happens in the basics of chaos theory. In fact, this theory got a crucial role in the explanation of many phenomena. The relevance of this kind of theories has been well recognized to explain social phenomena and has permitted new advances in the study of social systems. Chaos theory has also been applied, particularly in the context of politics, in this area. The goal of this chapter is to make a reflection on chaos theory - and dynamical systems such as the theories of complexity - in terms of the interpretation of political issues, considering some kind of events in the political context and also considering the macro-strategic ideas of states positioning in the international stage.

  6. Remote pedestrians detection at night time in FIR Image using contrast filtering and locally projected region based CNN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehwan; Kim, Sungho

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a novel method to detect the remote pedestrians. After producing the human temperature based brightness enhancement image using the temperature data input, we generates the regions of interest (ROIs) by the multiscale contrast filtering based approach including the biased hysteresis threshold and clustering, remote pedestrian's height, pixel area and central position information. Afterwards, we conduct local vertical and horizontal projection based ROI refinement and weak aspect ratio based ROI limitation to solve the problem of region expansion in the contrast filtering stage. Finally, we detect the remote pedestrians by validating the final ROIs using transfer learning with convolutional neural network (CNN) feature, following non-maximal suppression (NMS) with strong aspect ratio limitation to improve the detection performance. In the experimental results, we confirmed that the proposed contrast filtering and locally projected region based CNN (CFLP-CNN) outperforms the baseline method by 8% in term of logaveraged miss rate. Also, the proposed method is more effective than the baseline approach and the proposed method provides the better regions that are suitably adjusted to the shape and appearance of remote pedestrians, which makes it detect the pedestrian that didn't find in the baseline approach and are able to help detect pedestrians by splitting the people group into a person.

  7. Dynamical calculations of charge-transfer-to-solvent excited states of small I- (CH3CN)n clusters.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Toshiyuki

    2006-06-08

    Relaxation dynamics of photoexcited charge-transfer-to-solvent (CTTS) states for the I(-)(CH(3)CN)(n) (n = 2 and 3) clusters has been theoretically studied using electronic structure methods. First, we have calculated several lowest singlet and triplet potential energy surfaces using the multireference configuration interaction method. It was found that the character of the singlet CTTS excited-state potential surfaces is very similar to that of the triplet CTTS states. Due to a small singlet-triplet splitting, the lowest triplet potential energy surface was used as a good model to understand the dynamics of the photoexcited singlet CTTS states. We have carried out direct molecular dynamics simulations on the lowest triplet surface at the B3LYP level. When an I(-) anion is exteriorly solvated by CH(3)CN molecules, we found that the (CH(3)CN)(n)(-) anion cluster is effectively produced. In addition, when the I(-) anion is placed in the interior in I(-)(CH(3)CN)(n) clusters, photoexcitation gives an acetonitrile monomer anion plus neutral monomers. However, if the initial geometric configuration is distorted from the minimum structure, we also found that the (CH(3)CN)(2)(-) anion cluster, where an excess electron is internally trapped, is formed via I(-)(CH(3)CN)(2) + hnu --> I + (CH(3)CN)(2)(-) process.

  8. SES and CHAOS as environmental mediators of cognitive ability: A longitudinal genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Hart, Sara A; Petrill, Stephen A; Deckard, Kirby Deater; Thompson, Lee A

    2007-05-01

    This study examined shared environmental influences on the longitudinal stability of general cognitive ability, as mediated by socioeconomic status and chaos in the home, using 287 pairs of elementary school-age twins drawn from the Western Reserve Reading Project (WRRP). General cognitive ability was evaluated at two annual assessments using the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Test. SES was examined using the highest level of education achieved by the mother of the twins, and chaos by a 6-item parent-report questionnaire. Results suggest that SES and CHAOS not only account for independent sources of shared environmental influences related to general cognitive ability at a given measurement occasion, but these effects also account for a portion of the longitudinal stability of general cognitive ability in early childhood.

  9. Dangerous noncompliance: a narrative analysis of a CNN special investigation of mental illness.

    PubMed

    Glick, Douglas; Applbaum, Kalman

    2010-08-01

    Prevention of illness has become a central theme in debates over strategies to reduce healthcare costs. Severe mental illness poses a special challenge to the paradigm of rational prevention, the principal strategy of which is adherence to pharmacological therapies. With the contraction in the US of in-patient psychiatric care from the 1960s onwards, the mentally ill have become more visible among the homeless and among those caught up in the penal system. Their characteristic visibility contributes to their image as threatening. The perceived dangerousness and the combined societal and economic costs associated with the illness have generated a heightened, and in some venues even a sensationalized rhetoric surrounding the questions of responsibility and control, which we consider in terms of compliance. Using the linguistic method of discourse analysis, we analyze one high profile instance - an episode of CNN's 'Special Investigations Unit', which aired several times in the summer of 2007 - to demonstrate a narrative linking of the high social costs and failures associated with noncompliance and, therefore, the imperative of enforcing it for the safety of society. Through the semiotic reduction of a 'poetic parallelism', the episode reflects and reinforces existing cultural models for mental illness, including its status as straightforward biological disease amenable to pharmacological therapy but which remains uncontrolled due to widespread noncompliance.

  10. Genome chaos: survival strategy during crisis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo; Stevens, Joshua B; Horne, Steven D; Abdallah, Batoul Y; Ye, Karen J; Bremer, Steven W; Ye, Christine J; Chen, David J; Heng, Henry H

    2014-01-01

    Genome chaos, a process of complex, rapid genome re-organization, results in the formation of chaotic genomes, which is followed by the potential to establish stable genomes. It was initially detected through cytogenetic analyses, and recently confirmed by whole-genome sequencing efforts which identified multiple subtypes including "chromothripsis", "chromoplexy", "chromoanasynthesis", and "chromoanagenesis". Although genome chaos occurs commonly in tumors, both the mechanism and detailed aspects of the process are unknown due to the inability of observing its evolution over time in clinical samples. Here, an experimental system to monitor the evolutionary process of genome chaos was developed to elucidate its mechanisms. Genome chaos occurs following exposure to chemotherapeutics with different mechanisms, which act collectively as stressors. Characterization of the karyotype and its dynamic changes prior to, during, and after induction of genome chaos demonstrates that chromosome fragmentation (C-Frag) occurs just prior to chaotic genome formation. Chaotic genomes seem to form by random rejoining of chromosomal fragments, in part through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Stress induced genome chaos results in increased karyotypic heterogeneity. Such increased evolutionary potential is demonstrated by the identification of increased transcriptome dynamics associated with high levels of karyotypic variance. In contrast to impacting on a limited number of cancer genes, re-organized genomes lead to new system dynamics essential for cancer evolution. Genome chaos acts as a mechanism of rapid, adaptive, genome-based evolution that plays an essential role in promoting rapid macroevolution of new genome-defined systems during crisis, which may explain some unwanted consequences of cancer treatment.

  11. Irreversible evolution of quantum chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugulava, A.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Nickoladze, K.

    2005-05-01

    The pendulum is the simplest system having all the basic properties inherent in dynamic stochastic systems. In the present paper we investigate the pendulum with the aim to reveal the properties of a quantum analogue of dynamic stochasticity or, in other words, to obtain the basic properties of quantum chaos. It is shown that a periodic perturbation of the quantum pendulum (similarly to the classical one) in the neighborhood of the separatrix can bring about irreversible phenomena. As a result of recurrent passages between degenerate states, the system gets self-chaotized and passes from the pure state to the mixed one. Chaotization involves the states, the branch points of whose levels participate in a slow “drift” of the system along the Mathieu characteristics this “drift” being caused by a slowly changing variable field. Recurrent relations are obtained for populations of levels participating in the irreversible evolution process. It is shown that the entropy of the system first grows and, after reaching the equilibrium state, acquires a constant value.

  12. Elucidating Mechanisms of Extensive Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egolf, David A.; Melnikov, Ilarion V.; Pesch, Werner; Ecke, Robert E.

    2001-06-01

    We report studies of the mechanism for the generation of chaotic disorder in a phenomenon found in nature, Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC), in a regime exhaustively studied experimentally. Through large-scale, parallel-computational studies of the detailed space-time evolution of the dynamical degrees of freedom, we find that the Spiral Defect Chaos (SDC) state of RBC is spatially- and temporally- localized to defect creation/annihilation events (D.A. Egolf, I.V. Melnikov, W. Pesch, and R.E. Ecke, Nature, 404:733--736, 2000), and we elucidate how these divergent, but very brief, events lead to eventual macroscopic differences between initially similar flow patterns. We also demonstrate that SDC is extensively chaotic, in that the number of dynamical degrees of freedom (the fractal dimension) is proportional to the system size, suggesting the possibility for a hydrodynamic-like description of the long-wavelength properties of SDC. The computational technique employed shows promise for analyzing a wide variety of extended dynamical systems.

  13. Chaos control with ion propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slíz, J.; Kovács, T.; Süli, Á.

    2017-06-01

    The escape dynamics around the triangular Lagrangian point L5 in the real Sun-Earth-Moon-Spacecraft system is investigated. Appearance of the finite time chaotic behaviour suggests that widely used methods and concepts of dynamical system theory can be useful in constructing a desired mission design. Existing chaos control methods are modified in such a way that we are able to protect a test particle from escape. We introduce initial condition maps in order to have a suitable numerical method to describe the motion in high dimensional phase space. Results show that the structure of initial condition maps can be split into two well-defined domains. One of these two parts has a regular contiguous shape and is responsible for long time escape; it is a long-lived island. The other one shows a filamentary fractal structure in initial condition maps. The short time escape is governed by this object. This study focuses on a low-cost method which successfully transfers a reference trajectory between these two regions using an appropriate continuous control force. A comparison of the Earth-Moon transfer is also presented to show the efficiency of our method.

  14. Regularly timed events amid chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, Jonathan N.; Cooper, Roy M.; Corron, Ned J.

    2015-11-01

    We show rigorously that the solutions of a class of chaotic oscillators are characterized by regularly timed events in which the derivative of the solution is instantaneously zero. The perfect regularity of these events is in stark contrast with the well-known unpredictability of chaos. We explore some consequences of these regularly timed events through experiments using chaotic electronic circuits. First, we show that a feedback loop can be implemented to phase lock the regularly timed events to a periodic external signal. In this arrangement the external signal regulates the timing of the chaotic signal but does not strictly lock its phase. That is, phase slips of the chaotic oscillation persist without disturbing timing of the regular events. Second, we couple the regularly timed events of one chaotic oscillator to those of another. A state of synchronization is observed where the oscillators exhibit synchronized regular events while their chaotic amplitudes and phases evolve independently. Finally, we add additional coupling to synchronize the amplitudes, as well, however in the opposite direction illustrating the independence of the amplitudes from the regularly timed events.

  15. Generic superweak chaos induced by Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Ben-Harush, Moti; Dana, Itzhack

    2016-05-01

    We introduce and study the "kicked Hall system" (KHS), i.e., charged particles periodically kicked in the presence of uniform magnetic (B) and electric (E) fields that are perpendicular to each other and to the kicking direction. We show that for resonant values of B and E and in the weak-chaos regime of sufficiently small nonintegrability parameter κ (the kicking strength), there exists a generic family of periodic kicking potentials for which the Hall effect from B and E significantly suppresses the weak chaos, replacing it by "superweak" chaos (SWC). This means that the system behaves as if the kicking strength were κ^{2} rather than κ. For E=0, SWC is known to be a classical fingerprint of quantum antiresonance, but it occurs under much less generic conditions, in particular only for very special kicking potentials. Manifestations of SWC are a decrease in the instability of periodic orbits and a narrowing of the chaotic layers, relative to the ordinary weak-chaos case. Also, for global SWC, taking place on an infinite "stochastic web" in phase space, the chaotic diffusion on the web is much slower than the weak-chaos one. Thus, the Hall effect can be relatively stabilizing for small κ. In some special cases, the effect is shown to cause ballistic motion for almost all parameter values. The generic global SWC on stochastic webs in the KHS appears to be the two-dimensional closest analog to the Arnol'd web in higher dimensional systems.

  16. The Capabilities of Chaos and Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Abel, David L.

    2009-01-01

    To what degree could chaos and complexity have organized a Peptide or RNA World of crude yet necessarily integrated protometabolism? How far could such protolife evolve in the absence of a heritable linear digital symbol system that could mutate, instruct, regulate, optimize and maintain metabolic homeostasis? To address these questions, chaos, complexity, self-ordered states, and organization must all be carefully defined and distinguished. In addition their cause-and-effect relationships and mechanisms of action must be delineated. Are there any formal (non physical, abstract, conceptual, algorithmic) components to chaos, complexity, self-ordering and organization, or are they entirely physicodynamic (physical, mass/energy interaction alone)? Chaos and complexity can produce some fascinating self-ordered phenomena. But can spontaneous chaos and complexity steer events and processes toward pragmatic benefit, select function over non function, optimize algorithms, integrate circuits, produce computational halting, organize processes into formal systems, control and regulate existing systems toward greater efficiency? The question is pursued of whether there might be some yet-to-be discovered new law of biology that will elucidate the derivation of prescriptive information and control. “System” will be rigorously defined. Can a low-informational rapid succession of Prigogine’s dissipative structures self-order into bona fide organization? PMID:19333445

  17. The Nature (and Nurture) of Children's Perceptions of Family Chaos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanscombe, Ken B.; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Jaffee, Sara R.; Plomin, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Chaos in the home is a key environment in cognitive and behavioural development. However, we show that children's experience of home chaos is partly genetically mediated. We assessed children's perceptions of household chaos at ages 9 and 12 in 2337 pairs of twins. Using child-specific reports allowed us to use structural equation modelling to…

  18. Household Chaos--Links with Parenting and Child Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coldwell, Joanne; Pike, Alison; Dunn, Judy

    2006-01-01

    Background: The study aimed to confirm previous findings showing links between household chaos and parenting in addition to examining whether household chaos was predictive of children's behaviour over and above parenting. In addition, we investigated whether household chaos acts as a moderator between parenting and children's behaviour. Method:…

  19. The Nature (and Nurture) of Children's Perceptions of Family Chaos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanscombe, Ken B.; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Jaffee, Sara R.; Plomin, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Chaos in the home is a key environment in cognitive and behavioural development. However, we show that children's experience of home chaos is partly genetically mediated. We assessed children's perceptions of household chaos at ages 9 and 12 in 2337 pairs of twins. Using child-specific reports allowed us to use structural equation modelling to…

  20. Experimental Evidence of Chaos from Memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia; Gale, Ella

    Until now, most memristor-based chaotic circuits proposed in the literature are based on mathematical models which assume ideal characteristics such as piecewise-linear or cubic nonlinearities. The idea, illustrated here and originating from the experimental approach for device characterization, is to realize a chaotic system exploiting the nonlinearity of only one memristor with a very simple experimental set-up using feedback. In this way, a simple circuit is obtained and chaos is experimentally observed and is confirmed by the calculation of the largest Lyapunov exponent. Numerical results using the Strukov model support the existence of robust chaos in our circuit. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental demonstration of chaos in a real memristor circuit and suggests that memristors are well placed for hardware encryption.

  1. Chaos, dynamical structure, and climate variability

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, H.B.

    1996-06-01

    Deterministic chaos in dynamical systems offers a new paradigm for understanding irregular fluctuations. Techniques for identifying deterministic chaos from observed data, without recourse to mathematical models, are being developed. Powerful methods exist for reconstructing multidimensional phase space from an observed time series of a single scalar variable; these methods are invaluable when only a single scalar record of the dynamics is available. However in some applications multiple concurrent time series may be available for consideration as phase space coordinates. Here we propose some basic analytical tools for such multichannel time series data, and illustrate them by applications to a simple synthetic model of chaos, to a low-order model of atmospheric circulation, and to two high-resolution paleoclimate proxy data series. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Applications of chaos in biology and medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Ditto, W.L.

    1996-06-01

    Before its discovery chaos was inevitably confused with randomness and indeterminacy. Because may systems {ital appeared} random, they were actually thought to {ital be} random. This was true despite the fact that many of these systems seemed to display intermittent almost periodic behavior before returning to more {open_quote}{open_quote}random{close_quote}{close_quote} or irregular motion. Indeed this observation leads to one of the defining features of chaos: the superposition of a very large number of unstable periodic motions. Thus the identification in biological systems of unstable periodic or fixed point behavior consistent with chaos makes new therapeutic strategies possible. Recently we were able to exploit such unstable periodic fixed points to achieve control in two experimental systems: in cardiac tissue and brain tissue. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Harnessing quantum transport by transient chaos.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso; Pecora, Louis M

    2013-03-01

    Chaos has long been recognized to be generally advantageous from the perspective of control. In particular, the infinite number of unstable periodic orbits embedded in a chaotic set and the intrinsically sensitive dependence on initial conditions imply that a chaotic system can be controlled to a desirable state by using small perturbations. Investigation of chaos control, however, was largely limited to nonlinear dynamical systems in the classical realm. In this paper, we show that chaos may be used to modulate or harness quantum mechanical systems. To be concrete, we focus on quantum transport through nanostructures, a problem of considerable interest in nanoscience, where a key feature is conductance fluctuations. We articulate and demonstrate that chaos, more specifically transient chaos, can be effective in modulating the conductance-fluctuation patterns. Experimentally, this can be achieved by applying an external gate voltage in a device of suitable geometry to generate classically inaccessible potential barriers. Adjusting the gate voltage allows the characteristics of the dynamical invariant set responsible for transient chaos to be varied in a desirable manner which, in turn, can induce continuous changes in the statistical characteristics of the quantum conductance-fluctuation pattern. To understand the physical mechanism of our scheme, we develop a theory based on analyzing the spectrum of the generalized non-Hermitian Hamiltonian that includes the effect of leads, or electronic waveguides, as self-energy terms. As the escape rate of the underlying non-attracting chaotic set is increased, the imaginary part of the complex eigenenergy becomes increasingly large so that pointer states are more difficult to form, making smoother the conductance-fluctuation pattern.

  4. Rotation of an oblate satellite: Chaos control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnopolski, M.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: This paper investigates the chaotic rotation of an oblate satellite in the context of chaos control. Methods: A model of planar oscillations, described with the Beletskii equation, was investigated. The Hamiltonian formalism was utilized to employ a control method for suppressing chaos. Results: An additive control term, which is an order of magnitude smaller than the potential, is constructed. This allows not only for significantly diminished diffusion of the trajectory in the phase space, but turns the purely chaotic motion into strictly periodic motion.

  5. The uncertainty principle and quantum chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chirikov, Boris V.

    1993-01-01

    The conception of quantum chaos is described in some detail. The most striking feature of this novel phenomenon is that all the properties of classical dynamical chaos persist here but, typically, on the finite and different time scales only. The ultimate origin of such a universal quantum stability is in the fundamental uncertainty principle which makes discrete the phase space and, hence, the spectrum of bounded quantum motion. Reformulation of the ergodic theory, as a part of the general theory of dynamical systems, is briefly discussed.

  6. Signatures of chaos in the Brillouin zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Aaron; Barr, Ariel; Porter, Max D.; Reichl, Linda E.

    2017-10-01

    When the classical dynamics of a particle in a finite two-dimensional billiard undergoes a transition to chaos, the quantum dynamics of the particle also shows manifestations of chaos in the form of scarring of wave functions and changes in energy level spacing distributions. If we "tile" an infinite plane with such billiards, we find that the Bloch states on the lattice undergo avoided crossings, energy level spacing statistics change from Poisson-like to Wigner-like, and energy sheets of the Brillouin zone begin to "mix" as the classical dynamics of the billiard changes from regular to chaotic behavior.

  7. Experimental realization of chaos control by thresholding.

    PubMed

    Murali, K; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2003-07-01

    We report the experimental verification of thresholding as a versatile tool for efficient and flexible chaos control. The strategy here simply involves monitoring a single state variable and resetting it when it exceeds a threshold. We demonstrate the success of the technique in rapidly controlling different chaotic electrical circuits, including a hyperchaotic circuit, onto stable fixed points and limit cycles of different periods, by thresholding just one variable. The simplicity of this controller entailing no run-time computation, and the ease and rapidity of switching between different targets it offers, suggests a potent tool for chaos based applications.

  8. Problems with Chaos in String Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.

    I review the main ideas of the pre-big-bang cosmology scenario emphasizing the role of different boundary conditions in comparison to the standard ones which appear in quantum cosmology. My main issue is duality symmetry - a very general feature of string theory - and its role in suppressing chaos in Bianchi type IX "Mixmaster" universes within the framework of the tree-level low-energy-effectiveactions for strings. Finally, I discuss the ways to possibly `generate' chaos in string cosmology by admitting dilaton potential/massive string modes, more spacetime dimensions or nonlinear Yang-Mills-Lorentz-Chern-Simons terms into the action.

  9. Stochastic Representation of Chaos using Terminal Attractors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2005-01-01

    A nonlinear version of the Liouville equation based upon terminal attractors is proposed for describing post-instability motions of dynamical systems with exponential divergence of trajectories such as those leading to chaos and turbulence. As a result, the post-instability motions are represented by expectations, variances, and higher moments of the state variables as functions of time. The proposed approach can be applied to conservative chaos, and in particular, to n-bodies problem, as well as to dissipative systems, and in particular, to chaotic attractors and turbulence.

  10. Quantum chaos and thermalization in gapped systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rigol, Marcos; Santos, Lea F.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the onset of thermalization and quantum chaos in finite one-dimensional gapped systems of hard-core bosons. Integrability in these systems is broken by next-nearest-neighbor repulsive interactions, which also generate a superfluid to insulator transition. By employing full exact diagonalization, we study chaos indicators and few-body observables. We show that with increasing system size, chaotic behavior is seen over a broader range of parameters and, in particular, deeper into the insulating phase. Concomitantly, we observe that, as the system size increases, the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis extends its range of validity inside the insulating phase and is accompanied by the thermalization of the system.

  11. Quantum chaos on a critical Fermi surface.

    PubMed

    Patel, Aavishkar A; Sachdev, Subir

    2017-02-21

    We compute parameters characterizing many-body quantum chaos for a critical Fermi surface without quasiparticle excitations. We examine a theory of [Formula: see text] species of fermions at nonzero density coupled to a [Formula: see text] gauge field in two spatial dimensions and determine the Lyapunov rate and the butterfly velocity in an extended random-phase approximation. The thermal diffusivity is found to be universally related to these chaos parameters; i.e., the relationship is independent of [Formula: see text], the gauge-coupling constant, the Fermi velocity, the Fermi surface curvature, and high-energy details.

  12. An introduction to chaos theory in CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulliam, Thomas H.

    1990-01-01

    The popular subject 'chaos theory' has captured the imagination of a wide variety of scientists and engineers. CFD has always been faced with nonlinear systems and it is natural to assume that nonlinear dynamics will play a role at sometime in such work. This paper will attempt to introduce some of the concepts and analysis procedures associated with nonlinear dynamics theory. In particular, results from computations of an airfoil at high angle of attack which exhibits a sequence of bifurcations for single frequency unsteady shedding through period doublings cascading into low dimensional chaos are used to present and demonstrate various aspects of nonlinear dynamics in CFD.

  13. Low-dimensional chaos in turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vastano, John A.

    1989-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations are being performed on two different fluid flows in an attempt to discover the mechanism underlying the transition to turbulence in each. The first system is Taylor-Couette flow; the second, two-dimensional flow over an airfoil. Both flows exhibit a gradual transition to high-dimensional turbulence through low-dimensional chaos. The hope is that the instabilities leading to chaos will be easier to relate to physical processes in this case, and that the understanding of these mechanisms can then be applied to a wider array of turbulent systems.

  14. Conservative spatial chaos of buckled elastic linkages.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Attila; Károlyi, György

    2006-09-01

    Buckling of an elastic linkage under general loading is investigated. We show that buckling is related to an initial value problem, which is always a conservative, area-preserving mapping, even if the original static problem is nonconservative. In some special cases, we construct the global bifurcation diagrams, and argue that their complicated structure is a consequence of spatial chaos. We characterize spatial chaos by the associated initial value problem's topological entropy, which turns out to be related to the number of buckled configurations.

  15. Quantum chaos on a critical Fermi surface

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Aavishkar A.

    2017-01-01

    We compute parameters characterizing many-body quantum chaos for a critical Fermi surface without quasiparticle excitations. We examine a theory of N species of fermions at nonzero density coupled to a U(1) gauge field in two spatial dimensions and determine the Lyapunov rate and the butterfly velocity in an extended random-phase approximation. The thermal diffusivity is found to be universally related to these chaos parameters; i.e., the relationship is independent of N, the gauge-coupling constant, the Fermi velocity, the Fermi surface curvature, and high-energy details. PMID:28174270

  16. Chaos in an imperfectly premixed model combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Kabiraj, Lipika Saurabh, Aditya; Paschereit, Christian O.; Karimi, Nader; Sailor, Anna; Mastorakos, Epaminondas; Dowling, Ann P.

    2015-02-15

    This article reports nonlinear bifurcations observed in a laboratory scale, turbulent combustor operating under imperfectly premixed mode with global equivalence ratio as the control parameter. The results indicate that the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability correspond to quasi-periodic bifurcation to low-dimensional, deterministic chaos, a route that is common to a variety of dissipative nonlinear systems. The results support the recent identification of bifurcation scenarios in a laminar premixed flame combustor (Kabiraj et al., Chaos: Interdiscip. J. Nonlinear Sci. 22, 023129 (2012)) and extend the observation to a practically relevant combustor configuration.

  17. AIDS in India: constructive chaos?

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, A

    1991-08-01

    Until recently, the only sustained AIDS activity in India has been alarmist media attention complemented by occasional messages calling for comfort and dignity. Public perception of the AIDS epidemic in India has been effectively shaped by mass media. Press reports have, however, bolstered awareness of the problem among literate elements of urban populations. In the absence of sustained guidance in the campaign against AIDS, responsibility has fallen to voluntary health activists who have become catalysts for community awareness and participation. This voluntary initiative, in effect, seems to be the only immediate avenue for constructive public action, and signals the gradual development of an AIDS network in India. Proceedings from a seminar in Ahmedabad are discussed, and include plans for an information and education program targeting sex workers, health and communication programs for 150 commercial blood donors and their agents, surveillance and awareness programs for safer blood and blood products, and dialogue with the business community and trade unions. Despite the lack of coordination among volunteers and activists, every major city in India now has an AIDS group. A controversial bill on AIDS has ben circulating through government ministries and committees since mid-1989, a national AIDS committee exists with the Secretary of Health as its director, and a 3-year medium-term national plan exists for the reduction of AIDS and HIV infection and morbidity. UNICEF programs target mothers and children for AIDS awareness, and blood testing facilities are expected to be expanded. The article considers the present chaos effectively productive in forcing the Indian population to face up to previously taboo issued of sexuality, sex education, and sexually transmitted disease.

  18. Counterintuitive Constraints on Chaos Formation Set by Heat Flux through Europa's Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Models for the formation of disruptive chaos features on the icy surface of Europa fall into two broad categories: either chaos is formed when basal heating causes localized melting and thinning of the ice shell, or basal heating drives diapiric convection within the ice shell. We argue that in both of these cases, heating of the ice shell from below does not lead to chaos formation at the location of heating. If chaos is formed when a localized oceanic heat source, such as a hydrothermal plume, "melts through" the ice crust, we must consider what happens to the melted liquid. If Europa's ocean is salty, the melt will form a buoyant pool inside the melted cavity, leading to a stable interface between cold fresh meltwater and warm salty seawater. This stable interface acts like an ablative heat shield, protecting the ice from further damage. Some heat can be transferred across the stable layer by double diffusion, but this transfer is very inefficient. We calculate that local ocean heating cannot be balanced by local flux through the stable layer: instead, the warm ocean water must spread laterally until it is delivering heat to the ice base on a regional or global scale (a heating zone hundreds or thousands of km across, for conservative parameters.) If chaos is formed by diapiric solid-state convection within the ice shell, many investigators have assumed that diapirism and chaos should be most prevalent where the basal heat flux is strongest. We argue that this is not the case. In Rayleigh-Benard convection, increasing the heat flux will make convection more vigorous --- if and only if the convecting layer thickness does not change. We argue that increased basal heat flux will thin the ice shell, reducing its Rayleigh number and making convection less likely, not more. This insight allows us to reverse the logic of recent discussions of the relationship between ocean circulation and chaos (for instance, Soderlund et al, 2013 LPSC). We argue that global oceanic

  19. Chaos and Gas-Assisted Capture of Kozai Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruba, V.; Nesvorny, D.; Cuk, M.; Burns, J. A.; Rand, R.

    2003-05-01

    Carruba et al. (2003) previously studied a layer of chaos for satellites in Kozai resonance, i.e., satellites whose argument of pericenter, instead of circulating from 0 to 360 degrees, librates around +/- 90 degrees. By performing numerical simulations with test particles covering the orbital space surrounding S/2000S5, a satellite of Saturn currently in this resonance, and by applying the Frequency Analysis Method of Laskar (Laskar, 1993, 1999), we identified a layer of chaos at the transition between circulation and libration. We now further investigate this chaotic boundary and try to determine its cause(s). Our simulations suggest that, for the case of S5, perturbations from Jupiter are needed to create the chaotic boundary. In order to understand if secular or short-period terms in the disturbing potential of Jupiter are actually responsible for the appearance of the layer of chaos we are performing simulations where test particles are subjected to perturbations from a Jupiter on a fictitious orbit whose parameters are determined using the Bretagnon model (Bretagnon and Francou 1992). By perfoming simulations with Jovian orbits that only include either secular or secular and short-period terms, we are confident we shall be able to identify the source of chaos. Another problem posed by the existence of the chaotic boundary is its possible relevance for capture mechanisms. In this work we have modified the SWIFT-WHM integrator to account for gas-drag, according to the model of Cuk and Burns (2003). Preliminary results of our simulations suggest that, for typical values of gas density at the mid-point of the disk (6*10-9 g/cm3), the chaotic layer does not affect the capture of satellites into Kozai resonance. The chaotic layer might, however, still play a role in the very last phases of capture, when the gas-disk is dissipating. We are currently investigating different sets of gas-densities and disk parameters. As Cuk et al. (2002) found, preliminary results of

  20. Accessing Creativity: Jungian Night Sea Journeys, Wandering Minds, and Chaos.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Diane

    2016-01-01

    NDS theory has been meaningfully applied to the dynamics of creativity and psychology. These complex systems have much in common, including a broad definition of "product" as new order emerging from disorder, a new whole (etymologically, 'health') out of disintegration or destabilization. From a nonlinear dynamical systems perspective, this paper explores the far-from-equilibrium zone of creative incubation: first in the Jungian night sea journey, a primordial myth of psychological and creative transformation; then in the neuroscience of mind wandering, the well-spring of creative ideation within the larger neural matrix. Finally, chaos theory grounds the elusive subject of creativity, modeling chaotic generation of idea elements that tend toward strange attractors, combine unpredictably, and produce change by means of tension between opposites, particularly notes consciousness (light) and the poetic unconscious (darkness). Examples from my own artwork illustrate this dialectical process. Considered together, the unconscious mythic sea journey, the unknowing wandering mind, and the generative paradigm of deterministic chaos suggest conditions that facilitate creativity across disciplines, providing fresh indications that the darkness of the unknown or irrational is, paradoxically, the illuminative source and strength of creativity.

  1. Weak nanoscale chaos and anomalous relaxation in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Alexey K.

    2017-06-01

    Anomalous nonexponential relaxation in hydrated biomolecules is commonly attributed to the complexity of the free-energy landscapes, similarly to polymers and glasses. It was found recently that the hydrogen-bond breathing of terminal DNA base pairs exhibits a slow power-law relaxation attributable to weak Hamiltonian chaos, with parameters similar to experimental data. Here, the relationship is studied between this motion and spectroscopic signals measured in DNA with a small molecular photoprobe inserted into the base-pair stack. To this end, the earlier computational approach in combination with an analytical theory is applied to the experimental DNA fragment. It is found that the intensity of breathing dynamics is strongly increased in the internal base pairs that flank the photoprobe, with anomalous relaxation quantitatively close to that in terminal base pairs. A physical mechanism is proposed to explain the coupling between the relaxation of base-pair breathing and the experimental response signal. It is concluded that the algebraic relaxation observed experimentally is very likely a manifestation of weakly chaotic dynamics of hydrogen-bond breathing in the base pairs stacked to the photoprobe and that the weak nanoscale chaos can represent an ubiquitous hidden source of nonexponential relaxation in ultrafast spectroscopy.

  2. Chaos in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Richard J.

    The dynamics of reacting chemical systems is governed by typically polynomial differential equations that may contain nonlinear terms and/or embedded feedback loops. Thus the dynamics of such systems may exhibit features associated with nonlinear dynamical systems, including (among others): temporal oscillations, excitability, multistability, reaction-diffusion-driven formation of spatial patterns, and deterministic chaos. These behaviors are exhibited in the concentrations of intermediate chemical species. Bifurcations occur between particular dynamic behaviors as system parameters are varied. The governing differential equations of reacting chemical systems have as variables the concentrations of all chemical species involved, as well as controllable parameters, including temperature, the initial concentrations of all chemical species, and fixed reaction-rate constants. A discussion is presented of the kinetics of chemical reactions as well as some thermodynamic considerations important to the appearance of temporal oscillations and other nonlinear dynamic behaviors, e.g., deterministic chaos. The behavior, chemical details, and mechanism of the oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction (BZR) are described. Furthermore, experimental and mathematical evidence is presented that the BZR does indeed exhibit deterministic chaos when run in a flow reactor. The origin of this chaos seems to be in toroidal dynamics in which flow-driven oscillations in the control species bromomalonic acid couple with the BZR limit cycle...

  3. Chaos in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Richard J.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of reacting chemical systems is governed by typically polynomial differential equations that may contain nonlinear terms and/or embedded feedback loops. Thus the dynamics of such systems may exhibit features associated with nonlinear dynamical systems, including (among others): temporal oscillations, excitability, multistability, reaction-diffusion-driven formation of spatial patterns, and deterministic chaos. These behaviors are exhibited in the concentrations of intermediate chemical species. Bifurcations occur between particular dynamic behaviors as system parameters are varied. The governing differential equations of reacting chemical systems have as variables the concentrations of all chemical species involved, as well as controllable parameters, including temperature, the initial concentrations of all chemical species, and fixed reaction-rate constants. A discussion is presented of the kinetics of chemical reactions as well as some thermodynamic considerations important to the appearance of temporal oscillations and other nonlinear dynamic behaviors, e.g., deterministic chaos. The behavior, chemical details, and mechanism of the oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction (BZR) are described. Furthermore, experimental and mathematical evidence is presented that the BZR does indeed exhibit deterministic chaos when run in a flow reactor. The origin of this chaos seems to be in toroidal dynamics in which flow-driven oscillations in the control species bromomalonic acid couple with the BZR limit cycle.

  4. Order, chaos and nuclear dynamics: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1990-08-01

    This is an introductory lecture illustrating by simple examples the anticipated effect on collective nuclear dynamics of a transition from order to chaos in the motions of nucleons inside an idealized nucleus. The destruction of order is paralleled by a transition from a rubber-like to a honey-like behaviour of the independent-particle nuclear model. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Neural control: Chaos control sets the pace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöll, Eckehard

    2010-03-01

    Even simple creatures, such as cockroaches, are capable of complex responses to changes in their environment. But robots usually require complicated dedicated control circuits to perform just a single action. Chaos control theory could allow simpler control strategies to realize more complex behaviour.

  6. Probability Simulations by Non-Lipschitz Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that classical probabilities, and in particular, probabilistic Turing machine, can be simulated by combining chaos and non-Lipschitz dynamics, without utilization of any man-made devices. Self-organizing properties of systems coupling simulated and calculated probabilities and their link to quantum computations are discussed.

  7. Chao Formalism and Kondratenko Crossing Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. S.; Chao, A. W.; Krisch, A. D.; Leonova, M. A.; Morozov, V. S.; Sivers, D. W.; Wong, V. K.; Gebel, R.; Lehrach, A.; Lorentz, B.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; Schnase, A.; Stockhorst, H.; Hinterberger, F.; Ulbrich, K.; Kondratenko, A. M.

    2007-06-13

    We recently started testing Chao's proposed new matrix formalism for describing the spin dynamics due to a single spin resonance; this seems to be the first generalization of the Froissart-Stora equation since it was published in 1960. The Chao matrix formalism allows one to calculate analytically the polarization's behavior inside a resonance, which is not possible using the Froissart-Stora equation. We recently tested some Chao formalism predictions using a 1.85 GeV/c polarized deuteron beam stored in COSY. We swept an rf dipole's frequency through 200 Hz while varying the distance from the sweep's end frequency to an rf-induced spin resonance's central frequency. While the Froissart-Stora formula can make no prediction in this case, the data seem to support the Chao formalism.We also started investigating the new Kondratenko method to preserve beam polarization during a spin resonance crossing; the method uses 3 rapid changes of the crossing rate near the resonance. With a proper choice of crossing parameters, Kondratenko Crossing may better preserve the polarization than simple fast crossing. We tested Kondratenko's idea using 2.1 GeV/c polarized protons stored in COSY; the frequency of a ferrite rf dipole was swept though an rf-induced spin resonance using Kondratenko's crossing shape. We have not yet observed a significant advantage of Kondratenko Crossing over simple fast crossing. We plan to study it further by choosing better crossing parameters and a smaller momentum spread.

  8. How to Generate Chaos at Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Describes an electronic circuit that can function as a prototype for chaotic systems. Specific applied voltages produce chaotic signals that can be viewed with an oscilloscope or be made audible with a home stereo system. Provides directions for assembly with typical costs, mathematical basis of chaos theory, and experimental extensions. (JJK)

  9. Chaos in Practice: Techniques for Career Counsellors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Robert G. L.; Bright, Jim

    2005-01-01

    The chaos theory of careers emphasises continual change, the centrality and importance of chance events, the potential of minor events to have disproportionately large impacts on subsequent events, and the capacity for dramatic phase shifts in career behaviour. This approach challenges traditional approaches to career counselling, assumptions…

  10. A Framework for Chaos Theory Career Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Robert G. L.

    2010-01-01

    Theory in career development counselling provides a map that counsellors can use to understand and structure the career counselling process. It also provides a means to communicate this understanding and structuring to their clients as part of the counselling intervention. The chaos theory of careers draws attention to the complexity,…

  11. Chaos in atmospheric-pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. L.; Iza, F.; Janson, N. B.; Kong, M. G.

    2012-06-01

    We report detailed characterization of a low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma jet that exhibits regimes of periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic behaviors. Power spectra, phase portraits, stroboscopic section and bifurcation diagram of the discharge current combine to comprehensively demonstrate the existence of chaos, and this evidence is strengthened with a nonlinear dynamics analysis using two control parameters that maps out periodic, period-multiplication, and chaotic regimes over a wide range of the input voltage and gas flow rate. In addition, optical emission signatures of excited plasma species are used as the second and independent observable to demonstrate the presence of chaos and period-doubling in both the concentrations and composition of plasma species, suggesting a similar array of periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic regimes in plasma chemistry. The presence of quasi-periodic and chaotic regimes in structurally unbounded low-temperature atmospheric plasmas not only is important as a fundamental scientific topic but also has interesting implications for their numerous applications. Chaos may be undesirable for industrial applications where cycle-to-cycle reproducibility is important, yet for treatment of cell-containing materials including living tissues it may offer a novel route to combat some of the major challenges in medicine such as drug resistance. Chaos in low-temperature atmospheric plasmas and its effective control are likely to open up new vistas for medical technologies.

  12. Integrability and Chaos: The Classical Uncertainty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masoliver, Jaume; Ros, Ana

    2011-01-01

    In recent years there has been a considerable increase in the publishing of textbooks and monographs covering what was formerly known as random or irregular deterministic motion, now referred to as deterministic chaos. There is still substantial interest in a matter that is included in many graduate and even undergraduate courses on classical…

  13. Deterministic representation of chaos in classical dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1985-01-01

    Chaos in an Anosov-type mechanical system is eliminated by referring the governing equations to a specially selected rapidly oscillating (non-inertial) frame of reference in which the stabilization effect is caused by inertia forces. The result is generalized to any orbitally unstable mechanical system.

  14. Chaos, Collaboration, and Curriculum: A Deliberative Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, Katherine E.

    1998-01-01

    Presents curriculum as a complex social process. Explores chaos theory as a metaphor for understanding curriculum and a framework for viewing the curriculum-development process. Provides examples of collaborative leadership (described by David Chrislip and Carl Larson) and shows how they might answer Joseph Schwab's call for a deliberative…

  15. Criticality and Chaos in Systems of Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostilli, Massimo; Figueiredo, Wagner

    2016-01-01

    We consider a simple model of communities interacting via bilinear terms. After analyzing the thermal equilibrium case, which can be described by an Hamiltonian, we introduce the dynamics that, for Ising-like variables, reduces to a Glauber-like dynamics. We analyze and compare four different versions of the dynamics: flow (differential equations), map (discretetime dynamics), local-time update flow, and local-time update map. The presence of only bilinear interactions prevent the flow cases to develop any dynamical instability, the system converging always to the thermal equilibrium. The situation is different for the map when unfriendly couplings are involved, where period-two oscillations arise. In the case of the map with local-time updates, oscillations of any period and chaos can arise as a consequence of the reciprocal “tension” accumulated among the communities during their sleeping time interval. The resulting chaos can be of two kinds: true chaos characterized by positive Lyapunov exponent and bifurcation cascades, or marginal chaos characterized by zero Lyapunov exponent and critical continuous regions.

  16. Chaos Theory for the Practical Military Mind

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    01MAR1997 Report Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle Chaos Theory for the Practical Military Mind Contract Number Grant Number...military professional is a practically- minded individual. This is not, stereotypes aside, the result of an inflexible, unimaginative nature, but comes

  17. Integrability and Chaos: The Classical Uncertainty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masoliver, Jaume; Ros, Ana

    2011-01-01

    In recent years there has been a considerable increase in the publishing of textbooks and monographs covering what was formerly known as random or irregular deterministic motion, now referred to as deterministic chaos. There is still substantial interest in a matter that is included in many graduate and even undergraduate courses on classical…

  18. Control and synchronization of spatiotemporal chaos.

    PubMed

    Ahlborn, Alexander; Parlitz, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Chaos control methods for the Ginzburg-Landau equation are presented using homogeneously, inhomogeneously, and locally applied multiple delayed feedback signals. In particular, it is shown that a small number of control cells is sufficient for stabilizing plane waves or for trapping spiral waves, and that successful control is closely connected to synchronization of the dynamics in regions close to the control cells.

  19. Chaos Theory in the Arts and Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhinnie, Harold J.

    This paper explores questions associated with chaos theory as it relates to problems in the arts. It reviews the work of several scholars including Minai, Eckersley, Pickover, the Kirsches, and the Molnars. The document directs special attention toward three basic areas in art and design education, which are: (1) the integration of the computer…

  20. Chaos: Connecting Science and the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagan, Seamus; Paddy, David

    2005-01-01

    We describe a team-taught course entitled Chaos in Science and Literature. Our course goals were to place science in a nontechnological context, emphasizing its intellectual and cultural aspects, and to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas between "scientists" and "humanists," with the authors serving as role models. (Contains 4 figures.)

  1. Deterministic representation of chaos in classical dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1985-01-01

    Chaos in an Anosov-type mechanical system is eliminated by referring the governing equations to a specially selected rapidly oscillating (non-inertial) frame of reference in which the stabilization effect is caused by inertia forces. The result is generalized to any orbitally unstable mechanical system.

  2. Controlling chaos to solutions with complex eigenvalues.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh-Jong; Lee, Hoyun

    2003-02-01

    We derive formulas for parameter and variable perturbations to control chaos using linearized dynamics. They are available irrespective of the dimension of the system, the number of perturbed parameters or variables, and the kinds of eigenvalues of the linearized dynamics. We illustrate this using the two coupled Duffing oscillators and the two coupled standard maps.

  3. Chaos in plasma simulation and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, C.; Newman, D.E.; Sprott, J.C.

    1993-09-01

    We investigate the possibility that chaos and simple determinism are governing the dynamics of reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas using data from both numerical simulations and experiment. A large repertoire of nonlinear analysis techniques is used to identify low dimensional chaos. These tools include phase portraits and Poincard sections, correlation dimension, the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents and short term predictability. In addition, nonlinear noise reduction techniques are applied to the experimental data in an attempt to extract any underlying deterministic dynamics. Two model systems are used to simulate the plasma dynamics. These are -the DEBS code, which models global RFP dynamics, and the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM) model, which models drift wave turbulence. Data from both simulations show strong indications of low,dimensional chaos and simple determinism. Experimental data were obtained from the Madison Symmetric Torus RFP and consist of a wide array of both global and local diagnostic signals. None of the signals shows any indication of low dimensional chaos or other simple determinism. Moreover, most of the analysis tools indicate the experimental system is very high dimensional with properties similar to noise. Nonlinear noise reduction is unsuccessful at extracting an underlying deterministic system.

  4. [Chaos theory: a fascinating concept for oncologists].

    PubMed

    Denis, F; Letellier, C

    2012-05-01

    The oncologist is confronted daily by questions related to the fact that any patient presents a specific evolution for his cancer: he is challenged by very different, unexpected and often unpredictable outcomes, in some of his patients. The mathematical approach used today to describe this evolution has recourse to statistics and probability laws: such an approach does not ultimately apply to one particular patient, but to a given more or less heterogeneous population. This approach therefore poorly characterizes the dynamics of this disease and does not allow to state whether a patient is cured, to predict if he will relapse and when this could occur, and in what form, nor to predict the response to treatment and, in particular, to radiation therapy. Chaos theory, not well known by oncologists, could allow a better understanding of these issues. Developed to investigate complex systems producing behaviours that cannot be predicted due to a great sensitivity to initial conditions, chaos theory is rich of suitable concepts for a new approach of cancer dynamics. This article is three-fold: to provide a brief introduction to chaos theory, to clarify the main connecting points between chaos and carcinogenesis and to point out few promising research perspectives, especially in radiotherapy.

  5. Classical chaos in atom-field systems.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Carlos, J; Bastarrachea-Magnani, M A; Lerma-Hernández, S; Hirsch, J G

    2016-08-01

    The relation between the onset of chaos and critical phenomena, like quantum phase transitions (QPTs) and excited-state quantum phase transitions (ESQPTs), is analyzed for atom-field systems. While it has been speculated that the onset of hard chaos is associated with ESQPTs based in the resonant case, the off-resonant cases, and a close look at the vicinity of the QPTs in resonance, show clearly that both phenomena, ESQPTs and chaos, respond to different mechanisms. The results are supported in a detailed numerical study of the dynamics of the semiclassical Hamiltonian of the Dicke model. The appearance of chaos is quantified calculating the largest Lyapunov exponent for a wide sample of initial conditions in the whole available phase space for a given energy. The percentage of the available phase space with chaotic trajectories is evaluated as a function of energy and coupling between the qubit and bosonic part, allowing us to obtain maps in the space of coupling and energy, where ergodic properties are observed in the model. Different sets of Hamiltonian parameters are considered, including resonant and off-resonant cases.

  6. Bringing Order to the Chaos

    PubMed Central

    Swanstrom, Lee L.; Park, Adrian; Arregui, Marty; Franklin, Morris; Smith, C Daniel; Blaney, Christina

    2006-01-01

    satisfaction with the process. Conclusion: The MISFC has been successful at realizing its goals of bringing order to the past chaos of the MIS and GI fellowship situation. Its current iteration, the Fellowship Council, is in the process of introducing an accreditation process to further ensure the highest quality of postgraduate training in the fields of GI and endoscopic surgery. PMID:16552191

  7. Iani Chaos in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image of a portion of the Iani Chaos region was collected during the Southern Fall season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.6 Longitude 342.4 East (17.6 West). 36 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The

  8. Encoding in Balanced Networks: Revisiting Spike Patterns and Chaos in Stimulus-Driven Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lajoie, Guillaume; Thivierge, Jean-Philippe; Shea-Brown, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Highly connected recurrent neural networks often produce chaotic dynamics, meaning their precise activity is sensitive to small perturbations. What are the consequences of chaos for how such networks encode streams of temporal stimuli? On the one hand, chaos is a strong source of randomness, suggesting that small changes in stimuli will be obscured by intrinsically generated variability. On the other hand, recent work shows that the type of chaos that occurs in spiking networks can have a surprisingly low-dimensional structure, suggesting that there may be room for fine stimulus features to be precisely resolved. Here we show that strongly chaotic networks produce patterned spikes that reliably encode time-dependent stimuli: using a decoder sensitive to spike times on timescales of 10’s of ms, one can easily distinguish responses to very similar inputs. Moreover, recurrence serves to distribute signals throughout chaotic networks so that small groups of cells can encode substantial information about signals arriving elsewhere. A conclusion is that the presence of strong chaos in recurrent networks need not exclude precise encoding of temporal stimuli via spike patterns. PMID:27973557

  9. CNN based Malaria Diagnosis from Focus-stack of Blood Smear Images Acquired using Custom-built Slide Scanner.

    PubMed

    Gopakumar, G; Swetha, M; Gorthi, Sai Siva; Sai Subrahmanyam, Gorthi R K

    2017-08-29

    This paper introduces a focus stacking based approach for automated quantitative detection of Plasmodium falciparum malaria from blood smear. For the detection, a custom designed convolutional neural network (CNN) operating on focus stack of images is used. The cell counting problem is addressed as the segmentation problem and we propose a two level segmentation strategy. Use of CNN operating on focus stack for the detection of malaria is first of its kind, and it not only improved the detection accuracy (both in terms of sensitivity (97.06%) and specificity (98.50%)) but also favoured the processing on cell patches and avoided the need for hand-engineered features. The slide images are acquired with a custom-built portable slide scanner made from low-cost, off-the-shelf components and is suitable for Point-of-Care Diagnostics. The proposed approach of employing sophisticated algorithmic processing together with inexpensive instrumentation can potentially benefit clinicians to enable malaria diagnosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Fuzzy-C-Means Clustering Based Segmentation and CNN-Classification for Accurate Segmentation of Lung Nodules

    PubMed

    K, Jalal Deen; R, Ganesan; A, Merline

    2017-07-27

    Objective: Accurate segmentation of abnormal and healthy lungs is very crucial for a steadfast computer-aided disease diagnostics. Methods: For this purpose a stack of chest CT scans are processed. In this paper, novel methods are proposed for segmentation of the multimodal grayscale lung CT scan. In the conventional methods using Markov–Gibbs Random Field (MGRF) model the required regions of interest (ROI) are identified. Result: The results of proposed FCM and CNN based process are compared with the results obtained from the conventional method using MGRF model. The results illustrate that the proposed method can able to segment the various kinds of complex multimodal medical images precisely. Conclusion: However, in this paper, to obtain an exact boundary of the regions, every empirical dispersion of the image is computed by Fuzzy C-Means Clustering segmentation. A classification process based on the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) classifier is accomplished to distinguish the normal tissue and the abnormal tissue. The experimental evaluation is done using the Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) database. Creative Commons Attribution License

  11. THEORY OF SECULAR CHAOS AND MERCURY'S ORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Lithwick, Yoram; Wu Yanqin

    2011-09-20

    We study the chaotic orbital evolution of planetary systems, focusing on secular (i.e., orbit-averaged) interactions, which dominate on long timescales. We first focus on the evolution of a test particle that is forced by multiple planets. To linear order in eccentricity and inclination, its orbit precesses with constant frequencies. But nonlinearities modify the frequencies, and can shift them into and out of resonance with either the planets' eigenfrequencies (forming eccentricity or inclination secular resonances), or with linear combinations of those frequencies (forming mixed high-order secular resonances). The overlap of these nonlinear secular resonances drives secular chaos. We calculate the locations and widths of nonlinear secular resonances, display them together on a newly developed map (the 'map of the mean momenta'), and find good agreement between analytical and numerical results. This map also graphically demonstrates how chaos emerges from overlapping secular resonances. We then apply this newfound understanding to Mercury to elucidate the origin of its orbital chaos. We find that since Mercury's two free precession frequencies (in eccentricity and inclination) lie within {approx}25% of two other eigenfrequencies in the solar system (those of the Jupiter-dominated eccentricity mode and the Venus-dominated inclination mode), secular resonances involving these four modes overlap and cause Mercury's chaos. We confirm this with N-body integrations by showing that a slew of these resonant angles alternately librate and circulate. Our new analytical understanding allows us to calculate the criterion for Mercury to become chaotic: Jupiter and Venus must have eccentricity and inclination of a few percent. The timescale for Mercury's chaotic diffusion depends sensitively on the forcing. As it is, Mercury appears to be perched on the threshold for chaos, with an instability timescale comparable to the lifetime of the solar system.

  12. [Chaos and fractals and their applications in electrocardial signal research].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qing; Guo, Yongxin; Zhang, Zhengguo

    2009-06-01

    Chaos and fractals are ubiquitous phenomena of nature. A system with fractal structure usually behaves chaos. As a complicated nonlinear dynamics system, heart has fractals structure and behaves as chaos. The deeper inherent mechanism of heart can be opened out when the chaos and fractals theory is utilized in the research of the electrical activity of heart. Generally a time series of a system was used for describing the status of the strange attractor of the system. The indices include Poincare plot, fractals dimension, Lyapunov exponent, entropy, scaling exponent, Hurst index and so on. In this article, the basic concepts and the methods of chaos and fractals were introduced firstly. Then the applications of chaos and fractals theories in the study of electrocardial signal were expounded with example of how they are used for ventricular fibrillation.

  13. Optomechanically induced stochastic resonance and chaos transfer between optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monifi, Faraz; Zhang, Jing; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Peng, Bo; Liu, Yu-Xi; Bo, Fang; Nori, Franco; Yang, Lan

    2016-06-01

    Chaotic dynamics has been reported in many physical systems and has affected almost every field of science. Chaos involves hypersensitivity to the initial conditions of a system and introduces unpredictability into its output. Thus, it is often unwanted. Interestingly, the very same features make chaos a powerful tool to suppress decoherence, achieve secure communication and replace background noise in stochastic resonance—a counterintuitive concept that a system's ability to transfer information can be coherently amplified by adding noise. Here, we report the first demonstration of chaos-induced stochastic resonance in an optomechanical system, as well as the optomechanically mediated chaos transfer between two optical fields such that they follow the same route to chaos. These results will contribute to the understanding of nonlinear phenomena and chaos in optomechanical systems, and may find applications in the chaotic transfer of information and for improving the detection of otherwise undetectable signals in optomechanical systems.

  14. Determination of ionization energies of CnN (n=4-12): Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization experiments and theoretical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Zhou, Jia; Sun, Bian Jian; Lie, Jie Shiuan; Chang, Agnes H.H.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-06-10

    Results from single photon vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of astrophysically relevant CnN clusters, n = 4 - 12, in the photon energy range of 8.0 eV to 12.8 eV are presented. The experimental photoionization efficiency curves, combined with electronic structure calculations, provide improved ionization energies of the CnN species. A search through numerous nitrogen-terminated CnN isomers for n=4-9 indicates that the linear isomer has the lowest energy, and therefore should be the most abundant isomer in the molecular beam. Comparison with calculated results also shed light on the energetics of the linear CnN clusters, particularly in the trends of the even-carbon and the odd-carbon series. These results can help guide the search of potential astronomical observations of these neutral molecules together with their cations in highly ionized regions or regions with a high UV/VUV photon flux (ranging from the visible to VUV with flux maxima in the Lyman- region) in the interstellar medium.

  15. Determination of ionization energies of CnN (n=4-12): Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization experiments and theoretical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Zhou, Jia; Sun, Bian Jian; Lie, Jie Shiuan; Chang, Agnes H.H.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-02

    Results from single photon vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of astrophysically relevant CnN clusters, n = 4 - 12, in the photon energy range of 8.0 eV to 12.8 eV are presented. The experimental photoionization efficiency curves, combined with electronic structure calculations, provide improved ionization energies of the CnN species. A search through numerous nitrogen-terminated CnN isomers for n=4-9 indicates that the linear isomer has the lowest energy, and therefore should be the most abundant isomer in the molecular beam. Comparison with calculated results also shed light on the energetics of the linear CnN clusters, particularly in the trends of the even-carbon and the odd-carbon series. These results can help guide the search of potential astronomical observations of these neutral molecules together with their cations in highly ionized regions or regions with a high UV/VUV photon flux (ranging from the visible to VUV with flux maxima in the Lyman-a region) in the interstellar medium.

  16. Temperature Chaos in Some Spherical Mixed p-Spin Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Kuo; Panchenko, Dmitry

    2017-03-01

    We give two types of examples of the spherical mixed even- p-spin models for which chaos in temperature holds. These complement some known results for the spherical pure p-spin models and for models with Ising spins. For example, in contrast to a recent result of Subag who showed absence of chaos in temperature in the spherical pure p-spin models for p≥3, we show that even a smaller order perturbation induces temperature chaos.

  17. Quantum chaos on a critical Fermi surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Aavishkar A.; Sachdev, Subir

    2017-02-01

    We compute parameters characterizing many-body quantum chaos for a critical Fermi surface without quasiparticle excitations. We examine a theory of NN species of fermions at nonzero density coupled to a U(1)U(1) gauge field in two spatial dimensions and determine the Lyapunov rate and the butterfly velocity in an extended random-phase approximation. The thermal diffusivity is found to be universally related to these chaos parameters; i.e., the relationship is independent of NN, the gauge-coupling constant, the Fermi velocity, the Fermi surface curvature, and high-energy details.

  18. Polynomial chaos representation of databases on manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soize, C.; Ghanem, R.

    2017-04-01

    Characterizing the polynomial chaos expansion (PCE) of a vector-valued random variable with probability distribution concentrated on a manifold is a relevant problem in data-driven settings. The probability distribution of such random vectors is multimodal in general, leading to potentially very slow convergence of the PCE. In this paper, we build on a recent development for estimating and sampling from probabilities concentrated on a diffusion manifold. The proposed methodology constructs a PCE of the random vector together with an associated generator that samples from the target probability distribution which is estimated from data concentrated in the neighborhood of the manifold. The method is robust and remains efficient for high dimension and large datasets. The resulting polynomial chaos construction on manifolds permits the adaptation of many uncertainty quantification and statistical tools to emerging questions motivated by data-driven queries.

  19. Stochastic Representation of Chaos Using Terminal Attractors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2006-01-01

    A nonlinear version of the Liouville equation based on terminal attractors is part of a mathematical formalism for describing postinstability motions of dynamical systems characterized by exponential divergences of trajectories leading to chaos (including turbulence as a form of chaos). The formalism can be applied to both conservative systems (e.g., multibody systems in celestial mechanics) and dissipative systems (e.g., viscous fluids). The development of the present formalism was undertaken in an effort to remove positive Lyapunov exponents. The means chosen to accomplish this is coupling of the governing dynamical equations with the corresponding Liouville equation that describes the evolution of the flow of error probability. The underlying idea is to suppress the divergences of different trajectories that correspond to different initial conditions, without affecting a target trajectory, which is one that starts with prescribed initial conditions.

  20. Tuning quantum measurements to control chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastman, Jessica K.; Hope, Joseph J.; Carvalho, André R. R.

    2017-03-01

    Environment-induced decoherence has long been recognised as being of crucial importance in the study of chaos in quantum systems. In particular, the exact form and strength of the system-environment interaction play a major role in the quantum-to-classical transition of chaotic systems. In this work we focus on the effect of varying monitoring strategies, i.e. for a given decoherence model and a fixed environmental coupling, there is still freedom on how to monitor a quantum system. We show here that there is a region between the deep quantum regime and the classical limit where the choice of the monitoring parameter allows one to control the complex behaviour of the system, leading to either the emergence or suppression of chaos. Our work shows that this is a result from the interplay between quantum interference effects induced by the nonlinear dynamics and the effectiveness of the decoherence for different measurement schemes.