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  1. CNS Myelination Requires Cytoplasmic Dynein Function

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Michele L.; Shin, Jimann; Kearns, Christina A.; Langworthy, Melissa M.; Snell, Heather; Walker, Macie B.; Appel, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytoplasmic dynein provides the main motor force for minus-end-directed transport of cargo on microtubules. Within the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS), proliferation, neuronal migration and retrograde axon transport are among the cellular functions known to require dynein. Accordingly, mutations of DYNC1H1, which encodes the heavy chain subunit of cytoplasmic dynein, have been linked to developmental brain malformations and axonal pathologies. Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating glial cell type of the CNS, migrate from their origins to their target axons and subsequently extend multiple long processes that ensheath axons with specialized insulating membrane. These processes are filled with microtubules, which facilitate molecular transport of myelin components. However, whether oligodendrocytes require cytoplasmic dynein to ensheath axons with myelin is not known. Results We identified a mutation of zebrafish dync1h1 in a forward genetic screen that caused a deficit of oligodendrocytes. Using in vivo imaging and gene expression analyses, we additionally found evidence that dync1h1 promotes axon ensheathment and myelin gene expression. Conclusions In addition to its well known roles in axon transport and neuronal migration, cytoplasmic dynein contributes to neural development by promoting myelination. PMID:25488883

  2. Endocannabinoids and synaptic function in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Hashimotodani, Yuki; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako; Kano, Masanobu

    2007-04-01

    Marijuana affects neural functions through the binding of its active component (Delta(9)-THC) to cannabinoid receptors in the CNS. Recent studies have elucidated that endogenous ligands for cannabinoid receptors, endocannabinoids, serve as retrograde messengers at central synapses. Endocannabinoids are produced on demand in activity-dependent manners and released from postsynaptic neurons. The released endocannabinoids travel backward across the synapse, activate presynaptic CB1 cannabinoid receptors, and modulate presynaptic functions. Retrograde endocannabinoid signaling is crucial for certain forms of short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity at excitatory or inhibitory synapses in many brain regions, and thereby contributes to various aspects of brain function including learning and memory. Molecular identities of the CB1 receptor and enzymes involved in production and degradation of endocannabinoids have been elucidated. Anatomical studies have demonstrated unique distributions of these molecules around synapses, which provide morphological bases for the roles of endocannabinoids as retrograde messengers. CB1-knockout mice exhibit various behavioral abnormalities and multiple defects in synaptic plasticity, supporting the notion that endocannabinoid signaling is involved in various aspects of neural function. In this review article, the authors describe molecular mechanisms of the endocannabinoid-mediated synaptic modulation and its possible physiological significance.

  3. IL-6 regulation of synaptic function in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Gruol, Donna L

    2015-09-01

    A growing body of evidence supports a role for glial-produced neuroimmune factors, including the cytokine IL-6, in CNS physiology and pathology. CNS expression of IL-6 has been documented in the normal CNS at low levels and at elevated levels in several neurodegenerative or psychiatric disease states as well as in CNS infection and injury. The altered CNS function associated with these conditions raises the possibility that IL-6 has neuronal or synaptic actions. Studies in in vitro and in vivo models confirmed this possibility and showed that IL-6 can regulate a number of important neuronal and synaptic functions including synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity, an important cellular mechanism of memory and learning. Behavioral studies in animal models provided further evidence of an important role for IL-6 as a regulator of CNS pathways that are critical to cognitive function. This review summarizes studies that have lead to our current state of knowledge. In spite of the progress that has been made, there is a need for a greater understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological actions of IL-6 in the CNS, the mechanisms underlying these actions, conditions that induce production of IL-6 in the CNS and therapeutic strategies that could ameliorate or promote IL-6 actions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Neuroimmunology and Synaptic Function'.

  4. Alpha-mannosidosis: characterization of CNS pathology and correlation between CNS pathology and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Borgwardt, L; Danielsen, E R; Thomsen, C; Månsson, J E; Taouatas, N; Thuesen, A M; Olsen, K J; Fogh, J; Dali, C I; Lund, A M

    2015-07-23

    Alpha-mannosidosis (AM) (OMIM 248500) is a rare lysosomal storage disease. The understanding of the central nervous system (CNS) pathology is limited. This study is the first describing the CNS pathology and the correlation between the CNS pathology and intellectual disabilities in human AM. Thirty-four patients, aged 6-35 years, with AM were included. Data from 13 healthy controls were included in the analysis of the magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Measurements of CNS neurodegeneration biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), CSF-oligosaccharides, and performance of cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRS were carried out. On MRI, 5 of 10 patients had occipital white matter (WM) signal abnormalities, and 6 of 10 patients had age-inappropriate myelination. MRS demonstrated significantly elevated mannose complex in gray matter and WM. We found elevated concentrations of tau-protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein and neurofilament light protein in 97 patients, 74% and 41% of CSF samples, respectively. A negative correlation between CSF-biomarkers and cognitive function and CSF-oligosaccharides and cognitive function was found. The combination of MRS/MRI changes, elevated concentrations of CSF-biomarkers and CSF-oligosaccharides suggests gliosis and reduced myelination, as part of the CNS pathology in AM. Our data demonstrate early neuropathological changes, which may be taken into consideration when planning initiation of treatment.

  5. The role of MeCP2 in CNS development and function

    PubMed Central

    Na, Elisa S.; Monteggia, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is a direct consequence of functional mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein-2 (MeCP2) gene, which has focused attention on epigenetic mechanisms in neurons. MeCP2 is widely believed to be a transcriptional repressor although it may have additional functions in the CNS. Genetic mouse models that compromise MeCP2 function demonstrate that homeostatic regulation of MeCP2 is necessary for normal CNS functioning. Recent work has also demonstrated that MeCP2 plays an important role in mediating synaptic transmission in the CNS in particular, spontaneous neurotransmission and short-term synaptic plasticity. This review will discuss the role of MeCP2 in CNS development and function, as well as a potential important role for MeCP2 and epigenetic processes involved in mediating transcriptional repression in Rett syndrome. PMID:20515694

  6. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine alter monocyte, macrophage and T cell functions: implications for HAND.

    PubMed

    Gaskill, Peter J; Calderon, Tina M; Coley, Jacqueline S; Berman, Joan W

    2013-06-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from HIV infection remain a major public health problem as individuals live longer due to the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). As many as 70 % of HIV infected people have HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Many HIV infected individuals abuse drugs, such as cocaine, heroin or methamphetamine, that may be important cofactors in the development of HIV CNS disease. Despite different mechanisms of action, all drugs of abuse increase extracellular dopamine in the CNS. The effects of dopamine on HIV neuropathogenesis are not well understood, and drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which different types of drugs of abuse impact the development of HAND. Monocytes and macrophages are central to HIV infection of the CNS and to HAND. While T cells have not been shown to be a major factor in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis, studies indicate that T cells may play a larger role in the development of HAND in HIV infected drug abusers. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may dysregulate functions of, or increase HIV infection in, monocytes, macrophages and T cells in the brain. Thus, characterizing the effects of dopamine on these cells is important for understanding the mechanisms that mediate the development of HAND in drug abusers.

  7. Functional CB2 type cannabinoid receptors at CNS synapses.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Nicola H; Stanford, Ian M; Woodhall, Gavin L

    2009-09-01

    To date, it has been thought that cannabinoid receptors in CNS are primarily of the CB1R subtype, with CB2R expressed only in glia and peripheral tissues. However, evidence for the expression of CB2 type cannabinoid receptors at neuronal sites in the CNS is building through anatomical localization of receptors and mRNA in neurons and behavioural studies of central effects of CB2R agonists. In the medial entorhinal area of the rat, we found that blockade of CB1R did not occlude suppression of GABAergic inhibition by the non-specific endogenous cannabinoid 2-AG, suggesting that CB1R could not account fully for the effects of 2-AG. Suppression could be mimicked using the CB2R agonist JWH-133 and reversed by the CB2R inverse agonist AM-630, indicating the presence of functional CB2R. When we reversed the order of drug application AM-630 blocked the effects of the CB2R agonist JWH-133, but not the CB1R inverse agonist LY320135. JTE-907, a CB2R inverse agonist structurally unrelated to AM-630 elicited increased GABAergic neurotransmission at picomolar concentrations. Analysis of mIPSCs revealed that CB2R effects were restricted to action potential dependent, but not action potential independent GABA release. These data provide pharmacological evidence for functional CB2R at CNS synapses.

  8. Maternal stress, nutrition and physical activity: Impact on immune function, CNS development and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Teixeira, Antônio L; Silverman, Marni N

    2015-08-18

    Evidence suggests that maternal and fetal immune dysfunction may impact fetal brain development and could play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders, although the definitive pathophysiological mechanisms are still not completely understood. Stress, malnutrition and physical inactivity are three maternal behavioral lifestyle factors that can influence immune and central nervous system (CNS) functions in both the mother and fetus, and may therefore, increase risk for neurodevelopmental/psychiatric disorders. First, we will briefly review some aspects of maternal-fetal immune system interactions and development of immune tolerance. Second, we will discuss the bidirectional communication between the immune system and CNS and the pathways by which immune dysfunction could contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders. Third, we will discuss the effects of prenatal stress and malnutrition (over and undernutrition) on perinatal programming of the CNS and immune system, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. Finally, we will discuss the beneficial impact of physical fitness during pregnancy on the maternal-fetal unit and infant and how regular physical activity and exercise can be an effective buffer against stress- and inflammatory-related disorders. Although regular physical activity has been shown to promote neuroplasticity and an anti-inflammatory state in the adult, there is a paucity of studies evaluating its impact on CNS and immune function during pregnancy. Implementing stress reduction, proper nutrition and ample physical activity during pregnancy and the childbearing period may be an efficient strategy to counteract the impact of maternal stress and malnutrition/obesity on the developing fetus. Such behavioral interventions could have an impact on early development of the CNS and immune system and contribute to the prevention of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Further research is needed to elucidate this relationship and the underlying

  9. Citrate, a Ubiquitous Key Metabolite with Regulatory Function in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Westergaard, Niels; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Belhage, Bo; Schousboe, Arne

    2017-01-05

    Citrate is key constituent of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, serves as substrate for fatty acid and sterol biosynthesis, and functions as a key regulator of intermediary energy metabolism. Ursula Sonnewald had initiated studies using for the first time both proton- and (13)C-NMR to investigate metabolic processes in cultured neurons and astrocytes resulting in the important observation that citrate was specifically synthesized in and released from astrocytes in large amounts which is in keeping with the high concentration found in the CSF. The aim of this review is to highlight the possible roles of citrate in physiological and pathophysiological processes in the CNS. An interesting feature of citrate is its ability to chelate Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Zn(2+)and thereby playing a pivotal role as an endogenous modulator of glutamate receptors and in particular the NMDA subtypes of these receptors in the CNS. Besides its presence in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) citrate is also found in high amounts in prostate fluid reaching concentrations as high as 180 mM and here Zn(2+) seems also to play an important role, which makes prostate cells interesting for comparison of features of citrate and Zn(2+) between these cells and cells in the CNS.

  10. Neurobiology of microglial action in CNS injuries: receptor-mediated signaling mechanisms and functional roles

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoming; Liou, Anthony K.F.; Leak, Rehana K.; Xu, Mingyue; An, Chengrui; Suenaga, Jun; Shi, Yejie; Gao, Yanqin; Zheng, Ping; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Microglia are the first line of immune defense against central nervous system (CNS) injuries and disorders. These highly plastic cells play dualistic roles in neuronal injury and recovery and are known for their ability to assume diverse phenotypes. A broad range of surface receptors are expressed on microglia and mediate microglial ‘On’ or ‘Off’ responses to signals from other host cells as well as invading microorganisms. The integrated actions of these receptors result in tightly regulated biological functions, including cell mobility, phagocytosis, the induction of acquired immunity, and trophic factor/inflammatory mediator release. Over the last few years, significant advances have been made towards deciphering the signaling mechanisms related to these receptors and their specific cellular functions. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of the surface receptors involved in microglial activation, with an emphasis on their engagement of distinct functional programs and their roles in CNS injuries. It will become evident from this review that microglial homeostasis is carefully maintained by multiple counterbalanced strategies, including, but not limited to, ‘On’ and ‘Off’ receptor signaling. Specific regulation of theses microglial receptors may be a promising therapeutic strategy against CNS injuries. PMID:24923657

  11. The role of zinc in the pathogenesis and treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Implications of zinc homeostasis for proper CNS function.

    PubMed

    Tyszka-Czochara, Małgorzata; Grzywacz, Agata; Gdula-Argasińska, Joanna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Wiliński, Bogdan; Opoka, Włodzimierz

    2014-01-01

    Zinc, the essential trace element, is known to play multiple biological functions in human organism. This metal is a component of many structural as well as regulatory and catalytic proteins. The precise regulation of zinc homeostasis is essential for central nervous system and for the whole organism. Zinc plays a significant role in the brain development and in the proper brain function at every stage of life. This article is a review of knowledge about the role of zinc in central nervous system (CNS) function. The influence of this biometal on etiopathogenesis, prevention and treatment of selected brain diseases and disorders was discussed. Zinc imbalance can result not only from insufficient dietary intake, but also from impaired activity of zinc transport proteins and zinc dependent regulation of metabolic pathways. It is known that some neurodegenerative processes are connected with zinc dyshomeostasis and it may influence the state of Alzheimer's disease, depression and ageing-connected loss of cognitive function. The exact role of zinc and zinc-binding proteins in CNS pathogenesis processes is being under intensive investigation. The appropriate zinc supplementation in brain diseases may help in the prevention as well as in the proper treatment of several brain dysfunctions.

  12. Ursolic acid plays a role in Nepeta sibthorpii Bentham CNS depressing effects.

    PubMed

    Taviano, M F; Miceli, N; Monforte, M T; Tzakou, O; Galati, E M

    2007-04-01

    The sedative, anticonvulsant and analgesic activity of ursolic acid, a terpenoid bioassay-isolated from Nepeta sibthorpii Bentham, was evaluated in mice. The oral administration of ursolic acid (2.3 mg/kg) produced a significant depressant effect on CNS by reducing spontaneous motor activity and the number and lethality of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures. Two models of nociception, the writhing test and the hot plate test, were also used to examine the analgesic effect of ursolic acid. At a dose of 2.3 mg/kg, ursolic acid caused an inhibition of acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, but was inactive in the hot plate test. Treatment at a higher dose (20 mg/kg) significantly increased the reaction time in the hot plate test. This effect, reversed by naloxone, evidently involves opioid receptors, but the analgesic activity of ursolic acid may be related also to the antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties of this compound.

  13. Alterations of CNS structure & function by charged particle radiation & resultant oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Gregory; Chang, Polly; Favre, Cecile; Fike, John; Komarova, Natalia; Limoli, Charles; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Obenaus, Andre; Raber, Jacob; Spigelman, Igor; Soltesz, Ivan; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Stampanoni, Marco; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Wodarz, Dominik

    were complex and suggested continuous remodeling of the brain for up to 6 months. Thus we demonstrated a suite of CNS structural and functional changes after proton and iron ion exposure in the low dose regime. Based on these findings we will now test whether oxidative stress mediates the reactions of CNS to radiation exposure and what role radiation quality and dose rate play in the responses. We will use cultured neural precursor cells (mouse human) to detect changes in oxidative status and differentiation as functions of charged particle charge and velocity. These results will inform the selection of particles for many in vivo measurements that will compare wild type mice to a transgenic strain that over-expresses a human catalase gene (which inactivates hydrogen peroxide) in the mitochondrial compartment. This will explicitly test the role of reactive oxygen species in mediating the mechanisms underlying the CNS endpoints that we will measure. We will extend the electrophysiological measurements on individual nerves in hippocampal slices to characterize both inhibitory and excitatory synapses. Further, multi-electrode arrays will be used to follow correlated electrical activity in different hippocampal regions in order to understand network-level function as well as synaptic efficacy and plasticity. Controlled oxidative stress on irradiated samples will explore whether response mechanisms are shared. To link alterations in neurogenesis to performance we will explore behavioral changes mediated by the hippocampus simultaneously with measures of expression of the Arc gene in newly-born neurons. This will test whether decrements in performance correlate with loss of new cells and whether behavior properly stimulates functional integration of the new cells; the behavioral paradigm will be contextual fear conditioning. We will develop mathematical frameworks for CNS responses to radiation in order to inform risk estimates. Finally, we will couple a high

  14. Executive Functions Development and Playing Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, Ana Lucia; de Souza, Maria Thereza C. Coelho

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss executive functions and playing games, considering Piaget's work (1967) and the neuropsychological framework (Barkley, 1997, 2000; Cypel, 2007). Two questions guide the discussion: What are the intersections between playing games and the development of executive functions? Can we stimulate children with learning…

  15. The effects of gut microbiota on CNS function in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tillisch, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    The role of the gastrointestinal microbiota in human brain development and function is an area of increasing interest and research. Preclinical models suggest a role for the microbiota in broad aspects of human health, including mood, cognition, and chronic pain. Early human studies suggest that altering the microbiota with beneficial bacteria, or probiotics, can lead to changes in brain function, as well as subjective reports of mood. As the mechanisms of bidirectional communication between the brain and microbiota are better understood, it is expected that these pathways will be harnessed to provide novel methods to enhance health and treat disease. PMID:24838095

  16. The effects of gut microbiota on CNS function in humans.

    PubMed

    Tillisch, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    The role of the gastrointestinal microbiota in human brain development and function is an area of increasing interest and research. Preclinical models suggest a role for the microbiota in broad aspects of human health, including mood, cognition, and chronic pain. Early human studies suggest that altering the microbiota with beneficial bacteria, or probiotics, can lead to changes in brain function, as well as subjective reports of mood. As the mechanisms of bidirectional communication between the brain and microbiota are better understood, it is expected that these pathways will be harnessed to provide novel methods to enhance health and treat disease.

  17. Inhibition of Poly-ADP-Ribosylation Fails to Increase Axonal Regeneration or Improve Functional Recovery after Adult Mammalian CNS Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingxing; Byrne, Alexandra B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract After traumatic damage of the brain or spinal cord, many surviving neurons are disconnected, and recovery of function is limited by poor axon regeneration. Recent data have suggested that poly ADP-ribosylation plays a role in limiting axonal regrowth such that inhibition of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) may have therapeutic efficacy for neurological recovery after trauma. Here, we tested systemic administration of the PARP inhibitor, veliparib, and showed effective suppression of PARylation in the mouse CNS. After optic nerve crush injury or dorsal hemisection of the thoracic spinal cord in mice, treatment with veliparib at doses with pharmacodynamic action had no benefit for axonal regeneration or functional recovery. We considered whether PARP gene family specificity might play a role. In vitro mouse cerebral cortex axon regeneration experiments revealed that short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated suppression of PARP1 promoted axonal regeneration, whereas suppression of other PARP isoforms either had no effect or decreased regeneration. Therefore, we examined recovery from neurological trauma in mice lacking PARP1. No increase of axonal regeneration was observed in Parp1–/– mice after optic nerve crush injury or dorsal hemisection of the thoracic spinal cord, and there was no improvement in motor function recovery. Thus, comprehensive in vivo analysis reveals no indication that clinical PARP inhibitors will on their own provide benefit for recovery from CNS trauma. PMID:28032120

  18. Novel Functional Properties of Drosophila CNS Glutamate Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Dharkar, Poorva; Han, Tae-Hee; Serpe, Mihaela; Lee, Chi-Hon; Mayer, Mark L.

    2016-12-01

    Phylogenetic analysis reveals AMPA, kainate, and NMDA receptor families in insect genomes, suggesting conserved functional properties corresponding to their vertebrate counterparts. However, heterologous expression of the Drosophila kainate receptor DKaiR1D and the AMPA receptor DGluR1A revealed novel ligand selectivity at odds with the classification used for vertebrate glutamate receptor ion channels (iGluRs). DKaiR1D forms a rapidly activating and desensitizing receptor that is inhibited by both NMDA and the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5; crystallization of the KaiR1D ligand-binding domain reveals that these ligands stabilize open cleft conformations, explaining their action as antagonists. Surprisingly, the AMPA receptor DGluR1A shows weak activation by its namesake agonist AMPA and also by quisqualate. Crystallization of the DGluR1A ligand-binding domain reveals amino acid exchanges that interfere with binding of these ligands. The unexpected ligand-binding profiles of insect iGluRs allows classical tools to be used in novel approaches for the study of synaptic regulation.

  19. Neuromodulatory function of neuropeptides in the normal CNS.

    PubMed

    Merighi, Adalberto; Salio, Chiara; Ferrini, Francesco; Lossi, Laura

    2011-12-01

    Neuropeptides are small protein molecules produced and released by discrete cell populations of the central and peripheral nervous systems through the regulated secretory pathway and acting on neural substrates. Inside the nerve cells, neuropeptides are selectively stored within large granular vesicles (LGVs), and commonly coexist in neurons with low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, amino acids, and catecholamines). Storage in LGVs is responsible for a relatively slow response to secretion that requires enhanced or repeated stimulation. Coexistence (i.e. the concurrent presence of a neuropeptide with other messenger molecules in individual neurons), and co-storage (i.e. the localization of two or more neuropeptides within individual LGVs in neurons) give rise to a complicated series of pre- and post-synaptic functional interactions with low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters. The typically slow response and action of neuropeptides as compared to fast-neurotransmitters such as excitatory/inhibitory amino acids and catecholamines is also due to the type of receptors that trigger neuropeptide actions onto target cells. Almost all neuropeptides act on G-protein coupled receptors that, upon ligand binding, activate an intracellular cascade of molecular enzymatic events, eventually leading to cellular responses. The latter occur in a time span (seconds or more) considerably longer (milliseconds) than that of low-molecular-weight fast-neurotransmitters, directly operating through ion channel receptors. As reviewed here, combined immunocytochemical visualization of neuropeptides and their receptors at the ultrastructural level and electrophysiological studies, have been fundamental to better unravel the role of neuropeptides in neuron-to-neuron communication.

  20. Use of functional imaging across clinical phases in CNS drug development

    PubMed Central

    Borsook, D; Becerra, L; Fava, M

    2013-01-01

    The use of novel brain biomarkers using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging holds potential of making central nervous system (CNS) drug development more efficient. By evaluating changes in brain function in the disease state or drug effects on brain function, the technology opens up the possibility of obtaining objective data on drug effects in the living awake brain. By providing objective data, imaging may improve the probability of success of identifying useful drugs to treat CNS diseases across all clinical phases (I–IV) of drug development. The evolution of functional imaging and the promise it holds to contribute to drug development will require the development of standards (including good imaging practice), but, if well integrated into drug development, functional imaging can define markers of CNS penetration, drug dosing and target engagement (even for drugs that are not amenable to positron emission tomography imaging) in phase I; differentiate objective measures of efficacy and side effects and responders vs non-responders in phase II, evaluate differences between placebo and drug in phase III trials and provide insights into disease modification in phase IV trials. PMID:23860483

  1. Host microbiota constantly control maturation and function of microglia in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Erny, Daniel; Hrabě de Angelis, Anna Lena; Jaitin, Diego; Wieghofer, Peter; Staszewski, Ori; David, Eyal; Keren-Shaul, Hadas; Mahlakoiv, Tanel; Jakobshagen, Kristin; Buch, Thorsten; Schwierzeck, Vera; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Chun, Eunyoung; Garrett, Wendy S; McCoy, Kathy D; Diefenbach, Andreas; Staeheli, Peter; Stecher, Bärbel; Amit, Ido; Prinz, Marco

    2015-07-01

    As the tissue macrophages of the CNS, microglia are critically involved in diseases of the CNS. However, it remains unknown what controls their maturation and activation under homeostatic conditions. We observed substantial contributions of the host microbiota to microglia homeostasis, as germ-free (GF) mice displayed global defects in microglia with altered cell proportions and an immature phenotype, leading to impaired innate immune responses. Temporal eradication of host microbiota severely changed microglia properties. Limited microbiota complexity also resulted in defective microglia. In contrast, recolonization with a complex microbiota partially restored microglia features. We determined that short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), microbiota-derived bacterial fermentation products, regulated microglia homeostasis. Accordingly, mice deficient for the SCFA receptor FFAR2 mirrored microglia defects found under GF conditions. These findings suggest that host bacteria vitally regulate microglia maturation and function, whereas microglia impairment can be rectified to some extent by complex microbiota.

  2. Functional macrophage heterogeneity in a mouse model of autoimmune CNS pathology

    PubMed Central

    London, Anat; Benhar, Inbal; Mattapallil, Mary J.; Mack, Matthias; Caspi, Rachel R.; Schwartz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Functional macrophage heterogeneity is well appreciated outside the CNS in wound healing and cancer, and was recently also demonstrated in several CNS compartments following “sterile” insults. Yet, such heterogeneity was largely overlooked in the context of inflammatory autoimmune pathology, in which macrophages were mainly associated with disease induction and propagation. Here, we show the diversity of monocyte-derived macrophages along the course of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), an inflammatory condition affecting the ocular system, serving a model for CNS autoimmune pathology. Disease induction resulted in the appearance of a distinct myeloid population in the retina, and in the infiltration of monocyte-derived macrophages that were absent from control eyes. During the disease course, the frequency of CX3CR1high infiltrating macrophages that express markers associated with inflammation-resolving activity was increased, along with a decrease in the frequency of inflammation-associated, Ly6C+ macrophages. Inhibition of monocyte infiltration at the induction phase of EAU prevented disease onset, while monocyte depletion at the resolution phase resulted in a decrease in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, and in exacerbated disease. Thus, monocyte-derived macrophages display distinct phenotypes throughout the disease course, even in an immune-induced pathology, reflecting their differential roles in disease induction and resolution. PMID:23447691

  3. Loss of methylation at the IFNG promoter and CNS-1 is associated with the development of functional IFN-γ memory in human CD4(+) T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jun; Chang, Hyun-Dong; Ivascu, Claudia; Qian, Yu; Rezai, Soheila; Okhrimenko, Anna; Cosmi, Lorenzo; Maggi, Laura; Eckhardt, Florian; Wu, Peihua; Sieper, Joachim; Alexander, Tobias; Annunziato, Francesco; Gossen, Manfred; Li, Jun; Radbruch, Andreas; Thiel, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Cytokine memory for IFN-γ production by effector/memory Th1 cells plays a key role in both protective and pathological immune responses. To understand the epigenetic mechanism determining the ontogeny of effector/memory Th1 cells characterized by stable effector functions, we identified a T-cell-specific methylation pattern at the IFNG promoter and CNS-1 in ex vivo effector/memory Th1 cells, and investigated methylation dynamics of these regions during the development of effector/memory Th1 cells. During Th1 differentiation, demethylation occurred at both the promoter and CNS-1 regions of IFNG as early as 16 h, and this process was independent of cell proliferation and DNA synthesis. Using an IFN-γ capture assay, we found early IFN-γ-producing cells from 2-day differentiating cultures acquired "permissive" levels of demethylation and developed into effector/memory Th1 cells undergoing progressive demethylation at the IFNG promoter and CNS-1 when induced by IL-12. Methylation levels of these regions in effector/memory Th1 cells of peripheral blood from rheumatoid arthritis patients correlated inversely with reduced frequencies of IFN-γ-producers, coincident with recruitment of effector/memory Th1 cells to the site of inflammation. Thus, after termination of TCR stimulation, IL-12 signaling potentiates the stable functional IFN-γ memory in effector/memory Th1 cells characterized by hypomethylation at the IFNG promoter and CNS-1.

  4. Tcf7l2/Tcf4 Transcriptional Repressor Function Requires HDAC Activity in the Developing Vertebrate CNS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Matise, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of functionally distinct neuronal subtypes within the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) requires the precise regulation of progenitor gene expression in specific neuronal territories during early embryogenesis. Accumulating evidence has implicated histone deacetylase (HDAC) proteins in cell specification, proliferation, and differentiation in diverse embryonic and adult tissues. However, although HDAC proteins have shown to be expressed in the developing vertebrate neural tube, their specific role in CNS neural progenitor fate specification remains unclear. Prior work from our lab showed that the Tcf7l2/Tcf4 transcription factor plays a key role in ventral progenitor lineage segregation by differential repression of two key specification factors, Nkx2.2 and Olig2. In this study, we found that administration of HDAC inhibitors (Valproic Acid (VPA), Trichostatin-A (TSA), or sodium butyrate) in chick embryos in ovo disrupted normal progenitor gene segregation in the developing neural tube, indicating that HDAC activity is required for this process. Further, using functional and pharmacological approaches in vivo, we found that HDAC activity is required for the differential repression of Nkx2.2 and Olig2 by Tcf7l2/Tcf4. Finally, using dominant-negative functional assays, we provide evidence that Tcf7l2/Tcf4 repression also requires Gro/TLE/Grg co-repressor factors. Together, our data support a model where the transcriptional repressor activity of Tcf7l2/Tcf4 involves functional interactions with both HDAC and Gro/TLE/Grg co-factors at specific target gene regulatory elements in the developing neural tube, and that this activity is required for the proper segregation of the Nkx2.2 (p3) and Olig2 (pMN) expressing cells from a common progenitor pool. PMID:27668865

  5. Functional conservation of atonal and Math1 in the CNS and PNS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Arie, N.; Hassan, B. A.; Bermingham, N. A.; Malicki, D. M.; Armstrong, D.; Matzuk, M.; Bellen, H. J.; Zoghbi, H. Y.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the extent to which atonal and its mouse homolog Math1 exhibit functional conservation, we inserted (beta)-galactosidase (lacZ) into the Math1 locus and analyzed its expression, evaluated consequences of loss of Math1 function, and expressed Math1 in atonal mutant flies. lacZ under the control of Math1 regulatory elements duplicated the previously known expression pattern of Math1 in the CNS (i.e., the neural tube, dorsal spinal cord, brainstem, and cerebellar external granule neurons) but also revealed new sites of expression: PNS mechanoreceptors (inner ear hair cells and Merkel cells) and articular chondrocytes. Expressing Math1 induced ectopic chordotonal organs (CHOs) in wild-type flies and partially rescued CHO loss in atonal mutant embryos. These data demonstrate that both the mouse and fly homologs encode lineage identity information and, more interestingly, that some of the cells dependent on this information serve similar mechanoreceptor functions.

  6. The DOCK protein sponge binds to ELMO and functions in Drosophila embryonic CNS development.

    PubMed

    Biersmith, Bridget; Liu, Ze Cindy; Bauman, Kenneth; Geisbrecht, Erika R

    2011-01-25

    Cell morphogenesis, which requires rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, is essential to coordinate the development of tissues such as the musculature and nervous system during normal embryonic development. One class of signaling proteins that regulate actin cytoskeletal rearrangement is the evolutionarily conserved CDM (C. elegansCed-5, human DOCK180, DrosophilaMyoblast city, or Mbc) family of proteins, which function as unconventional guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the small GTPase Rac. This CDM-Rac protein complex is sufficient for Rac activation, but is enhanced upon the association of CDM proteins with the ELMO/Ced-12 family of proteins. We identified and characterized the role of Drosophila Sponge (Spg), the vertebrate DOCK3/DOCK4 counterpart as an ELMO-interacting protein. Our analysis shows Spg mRNA and protein is expressed in the visceral musculature and developing nervous system, suggesting a role for Spg in later embryogenesis. As maternal null mutants of spg die early in development, we utilized genetic interaction analysis to uncover the role of Spg in central nervous system (CNS) development. Consistent with its role in ELMO-dependent pathways, we found genetic interactions with spg and elmo mutants exhibited aberrant axonal defects. In addition, our data suggests Ncad may be responsible for recruiting Spg to the membrane, possibly in CNS development. Our findings not only characterize the role of a new DOCK family member, but help to further understand the role of signaling downstream of N-cadherin in neuronal development.

  7. AKAP12 Mediates Barrier Functions of Fibrotic Scars during CNS Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jong-Ho; Wee, Hee-Jun; Seo, Ji Hae; Ahn, Bum Ju; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Yang, Jun-Mo; Lee, Sae-Won; Kim, Eun Hee; Lee, Ok-Hee; Heo, Ji Hoe; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Gelman, Irwin H.; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H.; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2014-01-01

    The repair process after CNS injury shows a well-organized cascade of three distinct stages: inflammation, new tissue formation, and remodeling. In the new tissue formation stage, various cells migrate and form the fibrotic scar surrounding the lesion site. The fibrotic scar is known as an obstacle for axonal regeneration in the remodeling stage. However, the role of the fibrotic scar in the new tissue formation stage remains largely unknown. We found that the number of A-kinase anchoring protein 12 (AKAP12)-positive cells in the fibrotic scar was increased over time, and the cells formed a structure which traps various immune cells. Furthermore, the AKAP12-positive cells strongly express junction proteins which enable the structure to function as a physical barrier. In in vivo validation, AKAP12 knock-out (KO) mice showed leakage from a lesion, resulting from an impaired structure with the loss of the junction complex. Consistently, focal brain injury in the AKAP12 KO mice led to extended inflammation and more severe tissue damage compared to the wild type (WT) mice. Accordingly, our results suggest that AKAP12-positive cells in the fibrotic scar may restrict excessive inflammation, demonstrating certain mechanisms that could underlie the beneficial actions of the fibrotic scar in the new tissue formation stage during the CNS repair process. PMID:24760034

  8. Imaginary Play Companions: Characteristics and Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyan-Masih, V.

    1986-01-01

    Investigates some of the following characteristics associated with young children playing with imaginary play companions (IPCs): intelligence, parental and socioeconomic and educational background, family size, and birth order. Compares these children to those without IPCs. (HOD)

  9. ERK1/2 Activation in Preexisting Oligodendrocytes of Adult Mice Drives New Myelin Synthesis and Enhanced CNS Function

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Marisa A.; Urbanek, Kelly; Torres, Lester; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus; Rubio, Maria E.

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence shows that mechanisms controlling CNS plasticity extend beyond the synapse and that alterations in myelin can modify conduction velocity, leading to changes in neural circuitry. Although it is widely accepted that newly generated oligodendrocytes (OLs) produce myelin in the adult CNS, the contribution of preexisting OLs to functional myelin remodeling is not known. Here, we show that sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in preexisting OLs of adult mice is sufficient to drive increased myelin thickness, faster conduction speeds, and enhanced hippocampal-dependent emotional learning. Although preexisting OLs do not normally contribute to remyelination, we show that sustained activation of ERK1/2 renders them able to do so. These data suggest that strategies designed to push mature OLs to reinitiate myelination may be beneficial both for enhancing remyelination in demyelinating diseases and for increasing neural plasticity in the adult CNS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Myelin is a crucial regulator of CNS plasticity, function, and repair. Although it is generally accepted that new myelin production in the adult CNS is initiated by newly generated oligodendrocytes (OLs), great interest remains in additionally driving mature preexisting OLs to make myelin. The ability to induce myelination by the larger population of preexisting OLs carries the potential for enhanced remyelination in demyelinating diseases and increased neural plasticity in the adult CNS. Here, we show that sustained activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathway is sufficient to drive mature OLs in the adult mouse CNS to reinitiate myelination, leading to new myelin wraps and functional changes. PMID:27581459

  10. Microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages: functionally distinct populations that act in concert in CNS plasticity and repair

    PubMed Central

    London, Anat; Cohen, Merav; Schwartz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Functional macrophage heterogeneity is recognized outside the central nervous system (CNS), where alternatively activated macrophages can perform immune-resolving functions. Such functional heterogeneity was largely ignored in the CNS, with respect to the resident microglia and the myeloid-derived cells recruited from the blood following injury or disease, previously defined as blood-derived microglia; both were indistinguishably perceived detrimental. Our studies have led us to view the myeloid-derived infiltrating cells as functionally distinct from the resident microglia, and accordingly, to name them monocyte-derived macrophages (mo-MΦ). Although microglia perform various maintenance and protective roles, under certain conditions when they can no longer provide protection, mo-MΦ are recruited to the damaged CNS; there, they act not as microglial replacements but rather assistant cells, providing activities that cannot be timely performed by the resident cells. Here, we focus on the functional heterogeneity of microglia/mo-MΦ, emphasizing that, as opposed to the mo-MΦ, microglia often fail to timely acquire the phenotype essential for CNS repair. PMID:23596391

  11. Expression and localization of the Parkin co-regulated gene in mouse CNS suggests a role in ependymal cilia function.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Gabrielle R; Tan, Jacqueline T; Brody, Kate M; Taylor, Juliet M; Delatycki, Martin B; Lockhart, Paul J

    2009-08-21

    Parkin Co-Regulated Gene (PACRG) is a gene that shares a bi-directional promoter with the Parkinson's disease associated gene parkin. The functional role of PACRG is not well understood, although the gene has been associated with parkinsonian syndromes and more recently with eukaryotic cilia and flagella. We investigated the expression of Pacrg in the mouse brain by in situ hybridization and observed robust expression of Pacrg in the cells associated with the lateral, third and fourth ventricle, in addition to the aqueduct of Sylvius and choroid plexus. For all regions of Pacrg expression identified, strong expression was observed in the newborn period and this was maintained into adulthood. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Pacrg was a component of the ependymal cells and cilia lining the ventricles. Based on our results and the previous association of PACRG homologues with cilia and flagella, we propose that Pacrg is a component of the ependymal cilia and may play an important role in motile cilia development and/or function in the CNS.

  12. Transcript Diversification in the Nervous System: A to I RNA Editing in CNS Function and Disease Development

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Aamira; Jantsch, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing by adenosine deaminases that act on RNA converts adenosines to inosines in coding and non-coding regions of mRNAs. Inosines are interpreted as guanosines and hence, this type of editing can change codons, alter splice patterns, or influence the fate of an RNA. A to I editing is most abundant in the central nervous system (CNS). Here, targets for this type of nucleotide modification frequently encode receptors and channels. In many cases, the editing-induced amino acid exchanges alter the properties of the receptors and channels. Consistently, changes in editing patterns are frequently found associated with diseases of the CNS. In this review we describe the mechanisms of RNA editing and focus on target mRNAs of editing that are functionally relevant to normal and aberrant CNS activity. PMID:22787438

  13. DNA methylation functions as a critical regulator of Kir4.1 expression during CNS development.

    PubMed

    Nwaobi, Sinifunanya E; Lin, Erica; Peramsetty, Sasank R; Olsen, Michelle L

    2014-03-01

    Kir4.1, a glial-specific K+ channel, is critical for normal CNS development. Studies using both global and glial-specific knockout of Kir4.1 reveal abnormal CNS development with the loss of the channel. Specifically, Kir4.1 knockout animals are characterized by ataxia, severe hypomyelination, and early postnatal death. Additionally, Kir4.1 has emerged as a key player in several CNS diseases. Notably, decreased Kir4.1 protein expression occurs in several human CNS pathologies including CNS ischemic injury, spinal cord injury, epilepsy, ALS, and Alzheimer's disease. Despite the emerging significance of Kir4.1 in normal and pathological conditions, its mechanisms of regulation are unknown. Here, we report the first epigenetic regulation of a K+ channel in the CNS. Robust developmental upregulation of Kir4.1 expression in rats is coincident with reductions in DNA methylation of the Kir4.1 gene, KCNJ10. Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals a dynamic interaction between KCNJ10 and DNA methyltransferase 1 during development. Finally, demethylation of the KCNJ10 promoter is necessary for transcription. These findings indicate DNA methylation is a key regulator of Kir4.1 transcription. Given the essential role of Kir4.1 in normal CNS development, understanding the regulation of this K+ channel is critical to understanding normal glial biology.

  14. Physical activity play: the nature and function of a neglected aspect of playing.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, A D; Smith, P K

    1998-06-01

    In this review, we consider the nature and possible developmental functions of physical activity play, defined as a playful context combined with a dimension of physical vigor. We distinguish 3 kinds of physical activity play, with consecutive age peaks: rhythmic stereotypies peaking in infancy, exercise play peaking during the preschool years, and rough-and-tumble play peaking in middle childhood. Gender differences (greater prevalence in males) characterize the latter 2 forms. Function is considered in terms of beneficial immediate and deferred consequences in physical, cognitive, and social domains. Whereas most theories assume that children's play has deferred benefits, we suggest that forms of physical activity play serve primarily immediate developmental functions. Rhythmic stereotypies in infancy are hypothesized to improve control of specific motor patterns. Exercise play is hypothesized to function primarily for strength and endurance training; less clear evidence exists for possible benefits for fat reduction and thermoregulation. In addition, there may be cognitive benefits of exercise play that we hypothesize to be largely incidental to its playful or physical nature. Rough-and-tumble play has a distinctive social component; we hypothesize that it serves primarily dominance functions; evidence for benefits to fighting skills or to emotional coding are more equivocal. Further research is indicated, given the potentially important implications for children's education, health, and development.

  15. Preschoolers' Free Play--Connections with Emotional and Social Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veiga, Guida; Neto, Carlos; Rieffe, Carolien

    2016-01-01

    Play has an important role in various aspects of children's development. However, time for free play has declined substantially over the last decades. To date, few studies have focused on the relationship between opportunities for free play and children's social functioning. The aims of this study are to examine whether children´s free play is…

  16. Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Fred; Sharapan, Hedda

    1993-01-01

    Contends that, in childhood, work and play seem to come together. Says that for young children their play is their work, and the more adults encourage children to play, the more they emphasize important lifelong resource. Examines some uses of children's play, making and building, artwork, dramatic play, monsters and superheroes, gun play, and…

  17. CNS development: an overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowakowski, R. S.; Hayes, N. L.

    1999-01-01

    The basic principles of the development of the central nervous system (CNS) are reviewed, and their implications for both normal and abnormal development of the brain are discussed. The goals of this review are (a) to provide a set of concepts to aid in understanding the variety of complex processes that occur during CNS development, (b) to illustrate how these concepts contribute to our knowledge of the normal anatomy of the adult brain, and (c) to provide a basis for understanding how modifications of normal developmental processes by traumatic injury, by environmental or experiential influences, or by genetic variations may lead to modifications in the resultant structure and function of the adult CNS.

  18. Functional correction of CNS phenotypes in a lysosomal storage disease model using adeno-associated virus type 4 vectors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gumei; Martins, Inês; Wemmie, John A; Chiorini, John A; Davidson, Beverly L

    2005-10-12

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) represent a significant portion of inborn metabolic disorders. More than 60% of LSDs have CNS involvement. LSD therapies for systemic diseases have been developed, but efficacy does not extend to the CNS. In this study, we tested whether adeno-associated virus type 4 (AAV4) vectors could mediate global functional and pathological improvements in a murine model of mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII) caused by beta-glucuronidase deficiency. Recombinant AAV4 vectors encoding beta-glucuronidase were injected unilaterally into the lateral ventricle of MPS VII mice with established disease. Transduced ependyma expressed high levels of recombinant enzyme, with secreted enzyme penetrating cerebral and cerebellar structures, as well as the brainstem. Immunohistochemical studies revealed close association of recombinant enzyme and brain microvasculature, indicating that beta-glucuronidase reached brain parenchyma via the perivascular spaces lining blood vessels. Aversive associative learning was tested by context fear conditioning. Compared with age-matched heterozygous controls, affected mice showed impaired conditioned fear response and context discrimination. This behavioral deficit was reversed 6 weeks after gene transfer in AAV4 beta-glucuronidase-treated MPS VII mice. Our data show that ependymal cells can serve as a source of enzyme secretion into the surrounding brain parenchyma and CSF. Secreted enzymes subsequently spread via various routes to reach structures throughout the brain and mediated pathological and functional disease correction. Together, our proof-of-principal experiments suggest a unique and efficient manner for treating the global CNS deficits in LSD patients.

  19. Biologic scaffold for CNS repair.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanwei; Modo, Michel; Badylak, Stephen F

    2014-05-01

    Injury to the CNS typically results in significant morbidity and endogenous repair mechanisms are limited in their ability to restore fully functional CNS tissue. Biologic scaffolds composed of individual purified components have been shown to facilitate functional tissue reconstruction following CNS injury. Extracellular matrix scaffolds derived from mammalian tissues retain a number of bioactive molecules and their ability for CNS repair has recently been recognized. In addition, novel biomaterials for dural mater repairs are of clinical interest as the dura provides barrier function and maintains homeostasis to CNS. The present article describes the application of regenerative medicine principles to the CNS tissues and dural mater repair. While many approaches have been exploring the use of cells and/or therapeutic molecules, the strategies described herein focus upon the use of extracellular matrix scaffolds derived from mammalian tissues that are free of cells and exogenous factors.

  20. Play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    Designing a game with a serious purpose involves considering the worlds of Reality and Meaning yet it is undeniably impossible to create a game without a third world, one that is specifically concerned with what makes a game a game: the play elements. This third world, the world of people like designers and artists, and disciplines as computer science and game design, I call the world of Play and this level is devoted to it. The level starts off with some of the misperceptions people have of play. Unlike some may think, we play all the time, even when we grow old—this was also very noticeable in designing the game Levee Patroller as the team exhibited very playful behavior at many occasions. From there, I go into the aspects that characterize this world. The first concerns the goal of the game. This relates to the objectives people have to achieve within the game. This is constituted by the second aspect: the gameplay. Taking actions and facing challenges is subsequently constituted by a gameworld, which concerns the third aspect. And all of it is not possible without the fourth and final aspect, the type of technology that creates and facilitates the game. The four aspects together make up a “game concept” and from this world such a concept can be judged on the basis of three closely interrelated criteria: engagement, immersion, and fun.

  1. The brain renin-angiotensin system: a diversity of functions and implications for CNS diseases.

    PubMed

    Wright, John W; Harding, Joseph W

    2013-01-01

    The classic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was initially described as a hormone system designed to mediate cardiovascular and body water regulation, with angiotensin II as its major effector. The discovery of an independent local brain RAS composed of the necessary functional components (angiotensinogen, peptidases, angiotensins, and specific receptor proteins) significantly expanded the possible physiological and pharmacological functions of this system. This review first describes the enzymatic pathways resulting in active angiotensin ligands and their interaction with AT(1), AT(2), and AT(4) receptor subtypes. Next, we discuss the classic physiologies and behaviors controlled by the RAS including cardiovascular, thirst, and sodium appetite. A final section summarizes non-classic functions and clinical conditions mediated by the brain RAS with focus on memory and Alzheimer's disease. There is no doubt that the brain RAS is an important component in the development of dementia. It also appears to play a role in normal memory consolidation and retrieval. The presently available anti-dementia drugs are proving to be reasonably ineffective, thus alternative treatment approaches must be developed. At the same time, presently available drugs must be tested for their efficacy to treat newly identified syndromes and diseases connected with the RAS. The list of non-classic physiologies and behaviors is ever increasing in both number and scope, attesting to the multidimensional influences of the RAS. Such diversity in function presents a dilemma for both researchers and clinicians. Namely, the blunting of RAS subsystems in the hopes of combating one constellation of underlying causes and disease symptoms may be counter-balanced by unanticipated and unwanted consequences to another RAS subsystem. For example, the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and AT(1) and/or AT(2) receptor blockers have shown great promise in the treatment of cardiovascular related

  2. PET Studies on P-glycoprotein function in the blood-brain barrier: how it affects uptake and binding of drugs within the CNS.

    PubMed

    Elsinga, Philip H; Hendrikse, N Harry; Bart, Joost; Vaalburg, Willem; van Waarde, Aren

    2004-01-01

    Permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the factors determining the bioavailability of therapeutic drugs. The BBB only allows entry of lipophilic compounds with low molecular weights by passive diffusion. However, many lipophilic drugs show negligible brain uptake. They are substrates for transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug-resistance associated protein (MRP) and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs). The action of these carrier systems results in rapid efflux of xenobiotics from the central nervous system (CNS). Classification of candidate drugs as substrates or inhibitors of such carrier proteins is of crucial importance in drug development. Positron emission tomography (PET) can play an important role in the screening process by providing in vivo information, after the putative drug has passed in vitro tests. Although radiolabeled probes for MRP and OATP function are not yet available, many radiotracers have been prepared to study P-glycoprotein function in vivo with PET. These include alkaloids ((11)C-colchicine), antineoplastic agents ((11)C-daunorubicin, (18)F-paclitaxel), modulators of L-type calcium channels ((11)C-(+/-)verapamil, (11)C-R(+)-verapamil), beta-adrenoceptor antagonists ((11)C-(S)-carazolol, (18)F-(S)-1'-fluorocarazolol, (11)C-carvedilol), serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonists ((18)F-MPPF), opioid receptor antagonists ((11)C-loperamide, (11)C-carfentanyl), and various (64)Cu-labeled copper complexes. Studies in experimental animals have indicated that it is possible to assess P-glycoprotein function in the BBB and its effect on the uptake and binding of drugs within the intact CNS, using suitable P-gp modulators labeled with positron emitters. Provided that radiopharmaceuticals (and P-gp modulators) can be developed for human use, several exciting fields of study may be explored, viz. (i) direct evaluation of the effect of modulators on the cerebral uptake of therapeutic drugs; (ii) assessment of

  3. Chronic low-level domoic acid exposure alters gene transcription and impairs mitochondrial function in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Hiolski, Emma M; Kendrick, Preston S; Frame, Elizabeth R; Myers, Mark S; Bammler, Theo K; Beyer, Richard P; Farin, Federico M; Wilkerson, Hui-wen; Smith, Donald R; Marcinek, David J; Lefebvre, Kathi A

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid is an algal-derived seafood toxin that functions as a glutamate agonist and exerts excitotoxicity via overstimulation of glutamate receptors (AMPA, NMDA) in the central nervous system (CNS). At high (symptomatic) doses, domoic acid is well-known to cause seizures, brain lesions and memory loss; however, a significant knowledge gap exists regarding the health impacts of repeated low-level (asymptomatic) exposure. Here, we investigated the impacts of low-level repetitive domoic acid exposure on gene transcription and mitochondrial function in the vertebrate CNS using a zebrafish model in order to: 1) identify transcriptional biomarkers of exposure; and 2) examine potential pathophysiology that may occur in the absence of overt excitotoxic symptoms. We found that transcription of genes related to neurological function and development were significantly altered, and that asymptomatic exposure impaired mitochondrial function. Interestingly, the transcriptome response was highly-variable across the exposure duration (36 weeks), with little to no overlap of specific genes across the six exposure time points (2, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 weeks). Moreover, there were no apparent similarities at any time point with the gene transcriptome profile exhibited by the glud1 mouse model of chronic moderate excess glutamate release. These results suggest that although the fundamental mechanisms of toxicity may be similar, gene transcriptome responses to domoic acid exposure do not extrapolate well between different exposure durations. However, the observed impairment of mitochondrial function based on respiration rates and mitochondrial protein content suggests that repetitive low-level exposure does have fundamental cellular level impacts that could contribute to chronic health consequences. PMID:25033243

  4. Scientific basis for learning transfer from movements to urinary bladder functions for bladder repair in human patients with CNS injury.

    PubMed

    Schalow, G

    2010-01-01

    Coordination Dynamics Therapy (CDT) has been shown to be able to partly repair CNS injury. The repair is based on a movement-based re-learning theory which requires at least three levels of description: the movement or pattern (and anamnesis) level, the collective variable level, and the neuron level. Upon CDT not only the actually performed movement pattern itself is repaired, but the entire dynamics of CNS organization is improved, which is the theoretical basis for (re-) learning transfer. The transfer of learning for repair from jumping on springboard and exercising on a special CDT and recording device to urinary bladder functions is investigated at the neuron level. At the movement or pattern level, the improvement of central nervous system (CNS) functioning in human patients can be seen (or partly measured) by the improvement of the performance of the pattern. At the collective variable level, coordination tendencies can be measured by the so-called 'coordination dynamics' before, during and after treatment. At the neuron level, re-learning can additionally be assessed by surface electromyography (sEMG) as alterations of single motor unit firings and motor programs. But to express the ongoing interaction between the numerous neural, muscular, and metabolic elements involved in perception and action, it is relevant to inquire how the individual afferent and efferent neurons adjust their phase and frequency coordination to other neurons to satisfy learning task requirements. With the single-nerve fibre action potential recording method it was possible to measure that distributed single neurons communicate by phase and frequency coordination. It is shown that this timed firing of neurons is getting impaired upon injury and has to be improved by learning The stability of phase and frequency coordination among afferent and efferent neuron firings can be related to pattern stability. The stability of phase and frequency coordination at the neuron level can

  5. Defining modulatory inputs into CNS neuronal subclasses by functional pharmacological profiling

    PubMed Central

    Raghuraman, Shrinivasan; Garcia, Alfredo J.; Anderson, Tatiana M.; Twede, Vernon D.; Curtice, Kigen J.; Chase, Kevin; Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Teichert, Russell W.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we defined neuronal subclasses within the mouse peripheral nervous system using an experimental strategy called “constellation pharmacology.” Here we demonstrate the broad applicability of constellation pharmacology by extending it to the CNS and specifically to the ventral respiratory column (VRC) of mouse brainstem, a region containing the neuronal network controlling respiratory rhythm. Analysis of dissociated cells from this locus revealed three major cell classes, each encompassing multiple subclasses. We broadly analyzed the combinations (constellations) of receptors and ion channels expressed within VRC cell classes and subclasses. These were strikingly different from the constellations of receptors and ion channels found in subclasses of peripheral neurons from mouse dorsal root ganglia. Within the VRC cell population, a subset of dissociated neurons responded to substance P, putatively corresponding to inspiratory pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC) neurons. Using constellation pharmacology, we found that these substance P-responsive neurons also responded to histamine, and about half responded to bradykinin. Electrophysiological studies conducted in brainstem slices confirmed that preBötC neurons responsive to substance P exhibited similar responsiveness to bradykinin and histamine. The results demonstrate the predictive utility of constellation pharmacology for defining modulatory inputs into specific neuronal subclasses within central neuronal networks. PMID:24733934

  6. Selective ORAI1 inhibition ameliorates autoimmune CNS inflammation by suppressing effector but not regulatory T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Ulrike; Shaw, Patrick J.; Kozhaya, Lina; Subramanian, Raju; Gaida, Kevin; Unutmaz, Derya; McBride, Helen J.; Feske, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The function of CD4+ T cells is dependent on Ca2+ influx through Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels formed by ORAI proteins. To investigate the role of ORAI1 in pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17 cells and autoimmune diseases, we genetically and pharmacologically modulated ORAI1 function. Immunization of mice lacking Orai1 in T cells with MOG peptide resulted in attenuated severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The numbers of T cells and innate immune cells in the CNS of ORAI1-deficient animals were strongly reduced along with almost completely abolished production of IL-17, IFN-γ and GM-CSF despite only partially reduced Ca2+ influx. In Th1 and Th17 cells differentiated in vitro, ORAI1 was required for cytokine production but not the expression of Th1- and Th17-specific transcription factors T-bet and RORγt. The differentiation and function of induced iTreg cells, by contrast, was independent of ORAI1. Importantly, induced genetic deletion of Orai1 in adoptively transferred, MOG-specific T cells was able to halt EAE progression after disease onset. Likewise, treatment of wild-type mice with a selective CRAC channel inhibitor after EAE onset ameliorated disease. Genetic deletion of Orai1 and pharmacological ORAI1 inhibition reduced the leukocyte numbers in the CNS and attenuated Th1/Th17 cell-mediated cytokine production. In human CD4+ T cells, CRAC channel inhibition reduced the expression of IL-17, IFN-γ and other cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings support the conclusion that Th1 and Th17 cell function is particularly dependent on CRAC channels, which could be exploited as a therapeutic approach to T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:26673135

  7. Study of Functional Status of CNS in Human-Operator in Conditions of Imitation Deep Spase Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marina, Skedina; Michael, Potapov; Anna, Kovaleva

    Functional status (FS) of CNS may influence human’s behavior and his professional activity. The purpose of study - analysis of FS CNS of human-operator in conditions of long-term isolation. The studies were conducted within the framework of the project «Mars-500» which simulates of interplanetary flight isolation conditions of different durations. We examined nine people aged from 26 to 40 years. Synchronous registration of classical bioelectric activity of brain (EEG) and a cerebral power exchange (a level of constant brain potential (LCP)) was carried out for study of functional status of CNS using the hardware-software complex «Neuro-KM - Omega-Neyroanalizator» (Ltd. «Statokin», Russia). The synchronical registration was performed in seven unipolar leads on a «10-20» (Fp1, Fp2, T3, T4, O1, O2, Cz) combined with the placement of reference electrode on the earlobe and «biological zero» electrode - on the wrist. During 105-days isolation with 3 volunteers on day 52 the following was observed: simultaneous displacement of α-rhythm localization, increase of its frequency by 10% with a decrease in the index and disorganization of α-activity, emergence of asymmetry. Appearance of LCP asymmetry for more than 5 mV (in one case - with a strong dominance of the left hemisphere) was registered with the overall reduction of the amplitude, indicating a stress reaction in isolation. Before 520-days isolation (6 volunteers) 3 from them had signs of stress reaction in accordance to EEG with: displacement of α-rhythm localization, increase of its frequency by 1-2 Hz and increase level LCP. During isolation before «exit on a surface of Mars» individual fluctuations of EEG and LCP were observed depending on the specifics of the crew activities. Directly «exit on a surface of Mars» for 2 volunteers of «crew of Mars» the increase in power of α-rhythm was observed. Other members of crew showed decrease power of α-rhythm. At various stages of experiment in 35

  8. Playing with functions of positive type, classical and quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniello, Paolo

    2015-06-01

    A function of positive type can be defined as a positive functional on a convolution algebra of a locally compact group. In the case where the group is abelian, by Bochner’s theorem a function of positive type is, up to normalization, the Fourier transform of a probability measure. Therefore, considering the group of translations on phase space, a suitably normalized phase-space function of positive type can be regarded as a realization of a classical state. Thus, it may be called a function of classical positive type. Replacing the ordinary convolution on phase space with the twisted convolution, one obtains a noncommutative algebra of functions whose positive functionals we may call functions of quantum positive type. In fact, by a quantum version of Bochner’s theorem, a continuous function of quantum positive type is, up to normalization, the (symplectic) Fourier transform of a Wigner quasi-probability distribution; hence, it can be regarded as a phase-space realization of a quantum state. Playing with functions of positive type—classical and quantum—one is led in a natural way to consider a class of semigroups of operators, the classical-quantum semigroups. The physical meaning of these mathematical objects is unveiled via quantization, so obtaining a class of quantum dynamical semigroups that, borrowing terminology from quantum information science, may be called classical-noise semigroups.

  9. Intrinsic electrical properties of mammalian neurons and CNS function: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2014-01-01

    This brief review summarizes work done in mammalian neuroscience concerning the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of four neuronal types; Cerebellar Purkinje cells, inferior olivary cells, thalamic cells, and some cortical interneurons. It is a personal perspective addressing an interesting time in neuroscience when the reflex view of brain function, as the paradigm to understand global neuroscience, began to be modified toward one in which sensory input modulates rather than dictates brain function. The perspective of the paper is not a comprehensive description of the intrinsic electrical properties of all nerve cells but rather addresses a set of cell types that provide indicative examples of mechanisms that modulate brain function.

  10. Intrinsic electrical properties of mammalian neurons and CNS function: a historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2014-01-01

    This brief review summarizes work done in mammalian neuroscience concerning the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of four neuronal types; Cerebellar Purkinje cells, inferior olivary cells, thalamic cells, and some cortical interneurons. It is a personal perspective addressing an interesting time in neuroscience when the reflex view of brain function, as the paradigm to understand global neuroscience, began to be modified toward one in which sensory input modulates rather than dictates brain function. The perspective of the paper is not a comprehensive description of the intrinsic electrical properties of all nerve cells but rather addresses a set of cell types that provide indicative examples of mechanisms that modulate brain function. PMID:25408634

  11. Intensity of guitar playing as a function of auditory feedback.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C I; Pick, H L; Garber, S R; Siegel, G M

    1978-06-01

    Subjects played an electric guitar while auditory feedback was attenuated or amplified at seven sidetone levels varying 10-dB steps around a comfortable listening level. The sidetone signal was presented in quiet (experiment I) and several levels of white noise (experiment II). Subjects compensated for feedback changes, demonstrating a sidetone amplification as well as a Lombard effect. The similarity of these results to those found previously for speech suggests that guitar playing can be a useful analog for the function of auditory feedback in speech production. Unlike previous findings for speech, the sidetone-amplification effect was not potentiated by masking, consistent with a hypothesis that potentiation in speech is attributable to interference with bone conduction caused by the masking noise.

  12. Interleukin 35-Producing B Cells (i35-Breg): A New Mediator of Regulatory B-Cell Functions in CNS Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Egwuagu, Charles E; Yu, Cheng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation contributes to neuronal deficits in neurodegenerative CNS (central nervous system) autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and uveitis. The major goal of most treatment modalities for CNS autoimmune diseases is to limit inflammatory responses in the CNS; immune-suppressive drugs are the therapy of choice. However, lifelong immunosuppression increases the occurrence of infections, nephrotoxicity, malignancies, cataractogenesis, and glaucoma, which can greatly impair quality of life for the patient. Biologics that target pathogenic T cells is an alternative approach that is gaining wide acceptance as indicated by the popularity of a variety of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved anti-inflammatory compounds and humanized antibodies such as Zenapax, Etanercept, Remicade, anti-ICAM, rapamycin, or tacrolimus. B cells are also potential therapeutic targets because they provide costimulatory signals that activate pathogenic T cells and secrete cytokines that promote autoimmune pathology. B cells also produce autoreactive antibodies implicated in several organ-specific and systemic autoimmune diseases including lupus erythematosus, Graves' disease, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. On the other hand, recent studies have led to the discovery of several regulatory B-cell (Breg) populations that suppress immune responses and autoimmune diseases. In this review, we present a brief overview of Breg phenotypes and in particular, the newly discovered IL35-producing regulatory B cell (i35-Breg). We discuss the critical roles played by i35-Bregs in regulating autoimmune diseases and the potential use of adoptive Breg therapy in CNS autoimmune diseases.

  13. New insights in the biology of BDNF synthesis and release: implications in CNS function.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael E; Xu, Baoji; Lu, Bai; Hempstead, Barbara L

    2009-10-14

    BDNF has pleiotropic effects on neuronal development and synaptic plasticity that underlie circuit formation and cognitive function. Recent breakthroughs reveal that neuronal activity regulates BDNF cell biology, including Bdnf transcription, dendritic targeting and trafficking of BDNF mRNA and protein, and secretion and extracellular conversion of proBDNF to mature BDNF. Defects in these mechanisms contribute differentially to cognitive dysfunction and anxiety-like behaviors. Here we review recent studies, presented at a symposium at Neuroscience 2009, that describe regulatory mechanisms that permit rapid and dynamic refinement of BDNF actions in neurons.

  14. Bezafibrate improves mitochondrial function in the CNS of a mouse model of mitochondrial encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Noe, Natalie; Dillon, Lloye; Lellek, Veronika; Diaz, Francisca; Hida, Aline; Moraes, Carlos T.; Wenz, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction frequently affects the central nervous system. Here, we investigated the effect of bezafibrate treatment on neuronal mitochondrial function and its impact on the progression of a mitochondrial encephalopathy. We used a murine model with a forebrain-specific cytochrome c oxidase deficiency caused by conditional deletion of the COX10 gene. In this mouse model, bezafibrate-administration improved the phenotype of the mice associated with an increase in mitochondrial proteins and mitochondrial ATP generating capacity. Bezafibrate-treatment also attenuated astrogliosis and decreased the level of inflammatory markers in the affected tissues. Overall, bezafibrate had a neuroprotective effect in this mouse model of mitochondrial encephalopathy. These findings imply that bezafibrate might be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23261681

  15. GLT-1-Dependent Disruption of CNS Glutamate Homeostasis and Neuronal Function by the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    David, Clément N.; Frias, Elma S.; Szu, Jenny I.; Vieira, Philip A.; Hubbard, Jacqueline A.; Lovelace, Jonathan; Michael, Marena; Worth, Danielle; McGovern, Kathryn E.; Ethell, Iryna M.; Stanley, B. Glenn; Korzus, Edward; Fiacco, Todd A.; Binder, Devin K.; Wilson, Emma H.

    2016-01-01

    The immune privileged nature of the CNS can make it vulnerable to chronic and latent infections. Little is known about the effects of lifelong brain infections, and thus inflammation, on the neurological health of the host. Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite that can infect any mammalian nucleated cell with average worldwide seroprevalence rates of 30%. Infection by Toxoplasma is characterized by the lifelong presence of parasitic cysts within neurons in the brain, requiring a competent immune system to prevent parasite reactivation and encephalitis. In the immunocompetent individual, Toxoplasma infection is largely asymptomatic, however many recent studies suggest a strong correlation with certain neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Here, we demonstrate a significant reduction in the primary astrocytic glutamate transporter, GLT-1, following infection with Toxoplasma. Using microdialysis of the murine frontal cortex over the course of infection, a significant increase in extracellular concentrations of glutamate is observed. Consistent with glutamate dysregulation, analysis of neurons reveal changes in morphology including a reduction in dendritic spines, VGlut1 and NeuN immunoreactivity. Furthermore, behavioral testing and EEG recordings point to significant changes in neuronal output. Finally, these changes in neuronal connectivity are dependent on infection-induced downregulation of GLT-1 as treatment with the ß-lactam antibiotic ceftriaxone, rescues extracellular glutamate concentrations, neuronal pathology and function. Altogether, these data demonstrate that following an infection with T. gondii, the delicate regulation of glutamate by astrocytes is disrupted and accounts for a range of deficits observed in chronic infection. PMID:27281462

  16. How child's play impacts executive function--related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Executive functions refer to an array of organizing and self-regulating behaviors often associated with maturation of the prefrontal cortex. In fact, young children with rudimentary neurodevelopment of the prefrontal cortex develop ways to inhibit impulses and regulate behavior from a very early age. Can executive functioning be impacted by intervention, practice, or training? What interventions impact development of executive function in childhood, and how can these be studied? Several programs are reviewed that propose to positively impact executive/self-regulation skills. Evidence-based programs are contrasted with popular programs that have little empirical basis but have apparent wide acceptance by educators and families. As self-regulation has critical implications for later school and life success, interventions may well attenuate the negative consequences of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, brain injury, and social stressors. Programs with active play components may be more successful in eliciting improved executive function (defined here as self-regulation) because of the importance of motor learning early on and because of the social motivation aspects of learning. Caution is advised in the recommendation of programs where there is little empirical basis to support program claims. Carefully planned outcome studies can help bring the most effective components of programs to the mainstream.

  17. Epigenetic Modulators of Monocytic Function: Implication for Steady State and Disease in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Papavasiliou, F. Nina; Chung, Young Cheul; Gagnidze, Khatuna; Hajdarovic, Kaitlyn H.; Cole, Dan C.; Bulloch, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations are necessary for the establishment of functional and phenotypic diversity in the populations of immune cells of the monocytic lineage. The epigenetic status of individual genes at different time points defines their transcriptional responses throughout development and in response to environmental stimuli. Epigenetic states are defined at the level of DNA modifications, chromatin modifications, as well as at the level of RNA base changes through RNA editing. Drawing from lessons regarding the epigenome and epitranscriptome of cells of the monocytic lineage in the periphery, and from recently published RNAseq data deriving from brain-resident monocytes, we discuss the impact of modulation of these epigenetic states and how they affect processes important for the development of a healthy brain, as well as mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease and aging. An understanding of the varied brain responses and pathologies in light of these novel gene regulatory systems in monocytes will lead to important new insights in the understanding of the aging process and the treatment and diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26834738

  18. Aquaporin-4: orthogonal array assembly, CNS functions, and role in neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S; Ratelade, Julien; Rossi, Andrea; Zhang, Hua; Tradtrantip, Lukmanee

    2011-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is a water-selective transporter expressed in astrocytes throughout the central nervous system, as well as in kidney, lung, stomach and skeletal muscle. The two AQP4 isoforms produced by alternative spicing, M1 and M23 AQP4, form heterotetramers that assemble in cell plasma membranes in supramolecular structures called orthogonal arrays of particles (OAPs). Phenotype analysis of AQP4-null mice indicates the involvement of AQP4 in brain and spinal cord water balance, astrocyte migration, neural signal transduction and neuroinflammation. AQP4-null mice manifest reduced brain swelling in cytotoxic cerebral edema, but increased brain swelling in vasogenic edema and hydrocephalus. AQP4 deficiency also increases seizure duration, impairs glial scarring, and reduces the severity of autoimmune neuroinflammation. Each of these phenotypes is likely explicable on the basis of reduced astrocyte water permeability in AQP4 deficiency. AQP4 is also involved in the neuroinflammatory demyelinating disease neuromyelitis optica (NMO), where autoantibodies (NMO-IgG) targeting AQP4 produce astrocyte damage and inflammation. Mice administered NMO-IgG and human complement by intracerebral injection develop characteristic NMO lesions with neuroinflammation, demyelination, perivascular complement deposition and loss of glial fibrillary acidic protein and AQP4 immunoreactivity. Our findings suggest the potential utility of AQP4-based therapeutics, including small-molecule modulators of AQP4 water transport function for therapy of brain swelling, injury and epilepsy, as well as small-molecule or monoclonal antibody blockers of NMO-IgG binding to AQP4 for therapy of NMO. PMID:21552296

  19. Phylogenetic Analysis of the NEEP21/Calcyon/P19 Family of Endocytic Proteins: Evidence for Functional Evolution in the Vertebrate CNS

    PubMed Central

    Muthusamy, Nagendran; Ahmed, Sanaa A.; Rana, Brinda K.; Navarre, Sammy; Kozlowski, David J.; Liberles, David A.; Bergson, Clare

    2014-01-01

    Endocytosis and vesicle trafficking are required for optimal neural transmission. Yet, little is currently known about the evolution of neuronal proteins regulating these processes. Here, we report the first phylogenetic study of NEEP21, calcyon, and P19, a family of neuronal proteins implicated in synaptic receptor endocytosis and recycling, as well as in membrane protein trafficking in the somatodendritic and axonal compartments of differentiated neurons. Database searches identified orthologs for P19 and NEEP21 in bony fish, but not urochordate or invertebrate phyla. Calcyon orthologs were only retrieved from mammalian databases and distant relatives from teleost fish. In situ localization of the P19 zebrafish ortholog, and extant progenitor of the gene family, revealed a CNS specific expression pattern. Based on non-synonymous nucleotide substitution rates, the calcyon genes appear to be under less intense negative selective pressure. Indeed, a functional group II WW domain binding motif was detected in primate and human calcyon, but not in non-primate orthologs. Sequencing of the calcyon gene from 80 human subjects revealed a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism that abrogated group II WW domain protein binding. Altogether, our data indicate the NEEP21/calcyon/P19 gene family emerged, and underwent two rounds of gene duplication relatively late in metazoan evolution (but early in vertebrate evolution at the latest). As functional studies suggest NEEP21 and calcyon play related, but distinct roles in regulating vesicle trafficking at synapses, and in neurons in general, we propose the family arose in chordates to support a more diverse range of synaptic and behavioral responses. PMID:19760447

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of the NEEP21/calcyon/P19 family of endocytic proteins: evidence for functional evolution in the vertebrate CNS.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, Nagendran; Ahmed, Sanaa A; Rana, Brinda K; Navarre, Sammy; Kozlowski, David J; Liberles, David A; Bergson, Clare

    2009-10-01

    Endocytosis and vesicle trafficking are required for optimal neural transmission. Yet, little is currently known about the evolution of neuronal proteins regulating these processes. Here, we report the first phylogenetic study of NEEP21, calcyon, and P19, a family of neuronal proteins implicated in synaptic receptor endocytosis and recycling, as well as in membrane protein trafficking in the somatodendritic and axonal compartments of differentiated neurons. Database searches identified orthologs for P19 and NEEP21 in bony fish, but not urochordate or invertebrate phyla. Calcyon orthologs were only retrieved from mammalian databases and distant relatives from teleost fish. In situ localization of the P19 zebrafish ortholog, and extant progenitor of the gene family, revealed a CNS specific expression pattern. Based on non-synonymous nucleotide substitution rates, the calcyon genes appear to be under less intense negative selective pressure. Indeed, a functional group II WW domain binding motif was detected in primate and human calcyon, but not in non-primate orthologs. Sequencing of the calcyon gene from 80 human subjects revealed a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism that abrogated group II WW domain protein binding. Altogether, our data indicate the NEEP21/calcyon/P19 gene family emerged, and underwent two rounds of gene duplication relatively late in metazoan evolution (but early in vertebrate evolution at the latest). As functional studies suggest NEEP21 and calcyon play related, but distinct roles in regulating vesicle trafficking at synapses, and in neurons in general, we propose the family arose in chordates to support a more diverse range of synaptic and behavioral responses.

  1. Word Play: The Creation and Function of Novel Words in the Pretend Play of Two Siblings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwokah, Evangeline E.; Graves, Kelly N.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the creation of novel words by two English-speaking male siblings, ages five- and six-years-old, during a fourteen-month period of weekly play sessions. The questions the article addresses are: Did the boys produce novel words? What types of words? Why were these words created? and Did they become a permanent part of the…

  2. Change as a Function of Play: Toot! Toot!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Jay K.

    Following the work of Vygotsky, this paper explores three dimensions of change in play therapy: linear, additive, and emergent pivotal structures. In therapeutic play, the child expresses actions and initiates movements, sounds, and gestures. Then, seemingly "out of the blue," the child shifts such gestures to an episode containing…

  3. Histamine and Immune Biomarkers in CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cacabelos, Ramón; Torrellas, Clara; Fernández-Novoa, Lucía; López-Muñoz, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimmune dysregulation is a common phenomenon in different forms of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Cross-links between central and peripheral immune mechanisms appear to be disrupted as reflected by a series of immune markers (CD3, CD4, CD7, HLA-DR, CD25, CD28, and CD56) which show variability in brain disorders such as anxiety, depression, psychosis, stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, migraine, epilepsy, vascular dementia, mental retardation, cerebrovascular encephalopathy, multiple sclerosis, brain tumors, cranial nerve neuropathies, mental retardation, and posttraumatic brain injury. Histamine (HA) is a pleiotropic monoamine involved in several neurophysiological functions, neuroimmune regulation, and CNS pathogenesis. Changes in brain HA show an age- and sex-related pattern, and alterations in brain HA levels are present in different CNS regions of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Brain HA in neuronal and nonneuronal compartments plays a dual role (neurotrophic versus neurotoxic) in a tissue-specific manner. Pathogenic mechanisms associated with neuroimmune dysregulation in AD involve HA, interleukin-1β, and TNF-α, whose aberrant expression contributes to neuroinflammation as an aggravating factor for neurodegeneration and premature neuronal death. PMID:27190492

  4. Nanomedicines for the Treatment of CNS Diseases.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jessica L; Mahato, Ram I

    2017-03-01

    Targeting and delivering macromolecular therapeutics to the central nervous system (CNS) has been a major challenge. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the main obstacle that must be overcome to allow compounds to reach their targets in the brain. Therefore, much effort has been channelled into improving transport of therapeutics across the BBB and into the CNS including the use of nanoparticles. In this thematic issue, several reviews and original research are presented that address "Nanomedicines for CNS Diseases." The articles in this issue are concentrated on either CNS-HIV disease or CNS tumors. In regards to CNS-HIV disease, there are two reviews that discuss the role of nanoparticles for improving the delivery of HIV therapeutics to the CNS. In addition, there are two original articles focusing on therapies for CNS-HIV, one of them uses nanoparticles for delivery of siRNA specific to a key protein in autophagy to microglia, and another discusses nanoparticle delivery of a soluble mediator to suppress neuroinflammation. Furthermore, a comprehensive review about gene therapy for CNS neurological diseases is also included. Finally, this issue also includes review articles on enhanced drug targeting to CNS tumors. These articles include a review on the use of nanoparticles for CNS tumors, a review on functionalization (ligands) of nanoparticles for drug targeting to the brain tumor by overcoming BBB, and the final review discusses the use of macrophages as a delivery vehicle to CNS tumors. This thematic issue provides a wealth of knowledge on using nanomedicines for CNS diseases.

  5. The Diverse Roles of Microglia in the Neurodegenerative Aspects of Central Nervous System (CNS) Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kaitlyn K.; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) involve inflammatory components and result in neurodegenerative processes. Microglia, the resident macrophages of the CNS, are the first responders after insults to the CNS and comprise a major link between the inflammation and neurodegeneration. Here, we will focus on the roles of microglia in two autoimmune diseases: the prevalent condition of multiple sclerosis (MS) and the much rarer Rasmussen’s encephalitis (RE). Although there is an abundance of evidence that microglia actively contribute to neuronal damage in pathological states such as MS and RE, there is also evidence of important reparative functions. As current research supports a more complex and diverse array of functions and phenotypes that microglia can assume, it is an especially interesting time to examine what is known about both the damaging and restorative roles that microglia can play in the inflammatory CNS setting. We will also discuss the pharmacological approaches to modulating microglia towards a more neuroprotective state. PMID:28245617

  6. Revisiting the concept of CNS immune privilege

    PubMed Central

    Louveau, Antoine; Harris, Tajie H.; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the study of the interactions between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS) has often focused on pathological conditions, the importance of neuroimmune communication in CNS homeostasis and function has become clear over that last two decades. Here we discuss the progression of our understanding of the interaction between the peripheral immune system and the CNS. We examine the notion of immune privilege of the CNS in light of both earlier findings and recent studies revealing a functional meningeal lymphatic system that drains cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to the deep cervical lymph nodes, and consider the implications of a revised perspective on the immune privilege of the CNS on the etiology and pathology of different neurological disorders. PMID:26431936

  7. Executive function predicts the development of play skills for verbal preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Faja, Susan; Dawson, Geraldine; Sullivan, Katherine; Meltzoff, Andrew N; Estes, Annette; Bernier, Raphael

    2016-12-01

    Executive function and play skills develop in early childhood and are linked to cognitive and language ability. The present study examined these abilities longitudinally in two groups with autism spectrum disorder-a group with higher initial language (n = 30) and a group with lower initial language ability (n = 36). Among the lower language group, concurrent nonverbal cognitive ability contributed most to individual differences in executive function and play skills. For the higher language group, executive function during preschool significantly predicted play ability at age 6 over and above intelligence, but early play did not predict later executive function. These results suggested that factors related to the development of play and executive function differ for subgroups of children with different language abilities and that early executive function skills may be critical in order for verbal children with autism to develop play. Autism Res 2016, 9: 1274-1284. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. CNS and spinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Andre D; Panigrahy, Ashok; Fitz, Charles R

    2016-01-01

    Primary CNS tumors consist of a diverse group of neoplasms originating from various cell types in the CNS. Brain tumors are the most common solid malignancy in children under the age of 15 years and the second leading cause of cancer death after leukemia. The most common brain neoplasms in children differ consistently from those in older age groups. Pediatric brain tumors demonstrate distinct patterns of occurrence and biologic behavior according to sex, age, and race. This chapter highlights the imaging features of the most common tumors that affect the child's CNS (brain and spinal cord).

  9. Evolutionary Functions of Social Play: Life Histories, Sex Differences, and Emotion Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFreniere, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Many research findings about animal play apply to children's play, revealing structural and functional similarities with mammals in general and primates in particular. After an introduction to life-history theory, and before turning to humans, the author reviews research about the two mammals in which play has been studied the most extensively:…

  10. Review of Interventions to Increase Functional and Symbolic Play in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Russell; Machalicek, Wendy; O'Reilly, Mark; Sigafoos, Jeff; Rispoli, Mandy; Shogren, Karrie; Regester, April

    2009-01-01

    Play is widely acknowledged to be an integral part of human development and children with autism often experience substantial delays in the development of play behaviors. This review updates older reviews by covering the last 10 years of research targeting functional and symbolic play in children with autism. The review differs from other reviews…

  11. Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors & CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) are complex disease states that represent a major challenge for modern medicine. Although etiology is often unknown, it is established that multiple factors such as defects in genetics and/or epigenetics, the environment as well as imbalance in neurotransmitter receptor systems are all at play in determining an individual’s susceptibility to disease. Gene therapy is currently not available and therefore, most conditions are treated with pharmacological agents that modify neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Here, I provide a review of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) and the roles they fulfill in numerous CNS disorders. Specifically, I argue that our understanding of iGluRs has reached a critical turning point to permit, for the first time, a comprehensive re-evaluation of their role in the cause of disease. I illustrate this by highlighting how defects in AMPA receptor trafficking are important to Fragile X mental retardation and ectopic expression of kainate (KA) receptor synapses contributes to the pathology of temporal lobe epilepsy. Finally, I discuss how parallel advances in studies of other neurotransmitter systems may allow pharmacologists to work towards a cure for many CNS disorders rather than developing drugs to treat their symptoms. PMID:18537642

  12. Brief Functional Analysis and Intervention Evaluation for Treatment of Saliva-Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luiselli, James K.; Ricciardi, Joseph N.; Schmidt, Sarah; Tarr, Melissa

    2004-01-01

    We conducted a brief (8 days) functional analysis to identify sources of control over persistent saliva-play displayed by a 6-year old child with autism in a school setting. The functional analysis suggested that saliva-play was maintained by automatic reinforcement, leading to an intervention evaluation (3 days) that compared two methods of…

  13. The Role of High Level Play as a Predictor Social Functioning in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Margaret M.; Wainwright, Laurel D.

    2010-01-01

    Play and social abilities of a group of children diagnosed with high functioning autism were compared to a second group diagnosed with a variety of developmental language disorders (DLD). The children with autism engaged in fewer acts of high level play. The children with autism also had significantly lower social functioning than the DLD group…

  14. Long-Term Neurocognitive Functioning and Social Attainment in Adult Survivors of Pediatric CNS Tumors: Results From the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Krasin, Matthew J.; Liu, Wei; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Ojha, Rohit P.; Sadighi, Zsila S.; Gupta, Pankaj; Kimberg, Cara; Srivastava, Deokumar; Merchant, Thomas E.; Gajjar, Amar; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Krull, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the prevalence and severity of neurocognitive impairment in adult survivors of pediatric CNS tumors and to examine associated treatment exposures. Patients and Methods Participants included 224 survivors of CNS tumors who were treated at St Jude Children's Research Hospital (current median age [range], 26 years [19 to 53 years]; time from diagnosis, 18 years [11 to 42 years]) and completed neurocognitive testing. Information on cranial radiation therapy (CRT) doses and parameters of delivery were abstracted from medical records. The prevalence of severe impairment (ie, at least two standard deviations below normative mean) was compared across radiation treatment groups (no CRT, focal irradiation, craniospinal irradiation) using the χ2 test. Log-binomial models were used to estimate risk ratios (RRs) and corresponding 95% CIs for severe impairment. Results In multivariable models, craniospinal irradiation was associated with a 1.5- to threefold increased risk of severe impairment compared with no CRT (eg, intelligence: RR = 2.70; 95% CI, 1.37 to 5.34; memory: RR = 2.93; 95% CI, 1.69 to 5.08; executive function: RR = 1.74; 95% CI, 1.24 to 2.45). Seizures were associated with impaired academic performance (RR = 1.48; 95% CI, 1.02 to 2.14), attention (RR = 1.54; 95% CI, 1.12 to 2.13), and memory (RR = 1.44; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.99). Hydrocephalus with shunt placement was associated with impaired intelligence (RR = 1.78; 95% CI, 1.12 to 2.82) and memory (RR = 1.42; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.95). Differential follow-up time contributed to variability in prevalence estimates between survivors treated with older nonconformal and those treated with more contemporary conformal radiation therapy methods. Neurocognitive impairment was significantly associated with lower educational attainment, unemployment, and nonindependent living. Conclusion Survivors of pediatric CNS tumors are at risk of severe neurocognitive impairment in adulthood. The prevalence of severe

  15. Cell-Autonomous and Non-cell-autonomous Function of Hox Genes Specify Segmental Neuroblast Identity in the Gnathal Region of the Embryonic CNS in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Becker, Henrike; Renner, Simone; Technau, Gerhard M; Berger, Christian

    2016-03-01

    During central nervous system (CNS) development neural stem cells (Neuroblasts, NBs) have to acquire an identity appropriate to their location. In thoracic and abdominal segments of Drosophila, the expression pattern of Bithorax-Complex Hox genes is known to specify the segmental identity of NBs prior to their delamination from the neuroectoderm. Compared to the thoracic, ground state segmental units in the head region are derived to different degrees, and the precise mechanism of segmental specification of NBs in this region is still unclear. We identified and characterized a set of serially homologous NB-lineages in the gnathal segments and used one of them (NB6-4 lineage) as a model to investigate the mechanism conferring segment-specific identities to gnathal NBs. We show that NB6-4 is primarily determined by the cell-autonomous function of the Hox gene Deformed (Dfd). Interestingly, however, it also requires a non-cell-autonomous function of labial and Antennapedia that are expressed in adjacent anterior or posterior compartments. We identify the secreted molecule Amalgam (Ama) as a downstream target of the Antennapedia-Complex Hox genes labial, Dfd, Sex combs reduced and Antennapedia. In conjunction with its receptor Neurotactin (Nrt) and the effector kinase Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl), Ama is necessary in parallel to the cell-autonomous Dfd pathway for the correct specification of the maxillary identity of NB6-4. Both pathways repress CyclinE (CycE) and loss of function of either of these pathways leads to a partial transformation (40%), whereas simultaneous mutation of both pathways leads to a complete transformation (100%) of NB6-4 segmental identity. Finally, we provide genetic evidences, that the Ama-Nrt-Abl-pathway regulates CycE expression by altering the function of the Hippo effector Yorkie in embryonic NBs. The disclosure of a non-cell-autonomous influence of Hox genes on neural stem cells provides new insight into the process of segmental

  16. Cell-Autonomous and Non-cell-autonomous Function of Hox Genes Specify Segmental Neuroblast Identity in the Gnathal Region of the Embryonic CNS in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Henrike; Renner, Simone; Technau, Gerhard M.; Berger, Christian

    2016-01-01

    During central nervous system (CNS) development neural stem cells (Neuroblasts, NBs) have to acquire an identity appropriate to their location. In thoracic and abdominal segments of Drosophila, the expression pattern of Bithorax-Complex Hox genes is known to specify the segmental identity of NBs prior to their delamination from the neuroectoderm. Compared to the thoracic, ground state segmental units in the head region are derived to different degrees, and the precise mechanism of segmental specification of NBs in this region is still unclear. We identified and characterized a set of serially homologous NB-lineages in the gnathal segments and used one of them (NB6-4 lineage) as a model to investigate the mechanism conferring segment-specific identities to gnathal NBs. We show that NB6-4 is primarily determined by the cell-autonomous function of the Hox gene Deformed (Dfd). Interestingly, however, it also requires a non-cell-autonomous function of labial and Antennapedia that are expressed in adjacent anterior or posterior compartments. We identify the secreted molecule Amalgam (Ama) as a downstream target of the Antennapedia-Complex Hox genes labial, Dfd, Sex combs reduced and Antennapedia. In conjunction with its receptor Neurotactin (Nrt) and the effector kinase Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl), Ama is necessary in parallel to the cell-autonomous Dfd pathway for the correct specification of the maxillary identity of NB6-4. Both pathways repress CyclinE (CycE) and loss of function of either of these pathways leads to a partial transformation (40%), whereas simultaneous mutation of both pathways leads to a complete transformation (100%) of NB6-4 segmental identity. Finally, we provide genetic evidences, that the Ama-Nrt-Abl-pathway regulates CycE expression by altering the function of the Hippo effector Yorkie in embryonic NBs. The disclosure of a non-cell-autonomous influence of Hox genes on neural stem cells provides new insight into the process of segmental

  17. Pomalidomide shows significant therapeutic activity against CNS lymphoma with a major impact on the tumor microenvironment in murine models.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhimin; Qiu, Yushi; Personett, David; Huang, Peng; Edenfield, Brandy; Katz, Jason; Babusis, Darius; Tang, Yang; Shirely, Michael A; Moghaddam, Mehran F; Copland, John A; Tun, Han W

    2013-01-01

    Primary CNS lymphoma carries a poor prognosis. Novel therapeutic agents are urgently needed. Pomalidomide (POM) is a novel immunomodulatory drug with anti-lymphoma activity. CNS pharmacokinetic analysis was performed in rats to assess the CNS penetration of POM. Preclinical evaluation of POM was performed in two murine models to assess its therapeutic activity against CNS lymphoma. The impact of POM on the CNS lymphoma immune microenvironment was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. In vitro cell culture experiments were carried out to further investigate the impact of POM on the biology of macrophages. POM crosses the blood brain barrier with CNS penetration of ~ 39%. Preclinical evaluations showed that it had significant therapeutic activity against CNS lymphoma with significant reduction in tumor growth rate and prolongation of survival, that it had a major impact on the tumor microenvironment with an increase in macrophages and natural killer cells, and that it decreased M2-polarized tumor-associated macrophages and increased M1-polarized macrophages when macrophages were evaluated based on polarization status. In vitro studies using various macrophage models showed that POM converted the polarization status of IL4-stimulated macrophages from M2 to M1, that M2 to M1 conversion by POM in the polarization status of lymphoma-associated macrophages is dependent on the presence of NK cells, that POM induced M2 to M1 conversion in the polarization of macrophages by inactivating STAT6 signaling and activating STAT1 signaling, and that POM functionally increased the phagocytic activity of macrophages. Based on our findings, POM is a promising therapeutic agent for CNS lymphoma with excellent CNS penetration, significant preclinical therapeutic activity, and a major impact on the tumor microenvironment. It can induce significant biological changes in tumor-associated macrophages, which likely play a major role in its therapeutic activity against CNS

  18. Connexin and pannexin signaling pathways, an architectural blueprint for CNS physiology and pathology?

    PubMed

    Decrock, Elke; De Bock, Marijke; Wang, Nan; Bultynck, Geert; Giaume, Christian; Naus, Christian C; Green, Colin R; Leybaert, Luc

    2015-08-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is composed of a highly heterogeneous population of cells. Dynamic interactions between different compartments (neuronal, glial, and vascular systems) drive CNS function and allow to integrate and process information as well as to respond accordingly. Communication within this functional unit, coined the neuro-glio-vascular unit (NGVU), typically relies on two main mechanisms: direct cell-cell coupling via gap junction channels (GJCs) and paracrine communication via the extracellular compartment, two routes to which channels composed of transmembrane connexin (Cx) or pannexin (Panx) proteins can contribute. Multiple isoforms of both protein families are present in the CNS and each CNS cell type is characterized by a unique Cx/Panx portfolio. Over the last two decades, research has uncovered a multilevel platform via which Cxs and Panxs can influence different cellular functions within a tissue: (1) Cx GJCs enable a direct cell-cell communication of small molecules, (2) Cx hemichannels and Panx channels can contribute to autocrine/paracrine signaling pathways, and (3) different structural domains of these proteins allow for channel-independent functions, such as cell-cell adhesion, interactions with the cytoskeleton, and the activation of intracellular signaling pathways. In this paper, we discuss current knowledge on their multifaceted contribution to brain development and to specific processes in the NGVU, including synaptic transmission and plasticity, glial signaling, vasomotor control, and blood-brain barrier integrity in the mature CNS. By highlighting both physiological and pathological conditions, it becomes evident that Cxs and Panxs can play a dual role in the CNS and that an accurate fine-tuning of each signaling mechanism is crucial for normal CNS physiology.

  19. Enhancing CNS repair in neurological disease: challenges arising from neurodegeneration and rewiring of the network.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohua; Warrington, Arthur E; Bieber, Allan J; Rodriguez, Moses

    2011-07-01

    Repair of the central nervous system (CNS) constitutes an integral part of treating neurological disease and plays a crucial role in restoring CNS architecture and function. Distinct strategies have been developed to reconstruct the damaged neural tissue, with many tested preclinically in animal models. We review cell replacement-based repair strategies. By taking spinal cord injury, cerebral ischaemia and degenerative CNS disorders as examples for CNS repair, we discuss progress and potential problems in utilizing embryonic stem cells and adult neural/non-neural stem cells to repair cell loss in the CNS. Nevertheless, CNS repair is not simply a matter of cell transplantation. The major challenge is to induce regenerating neural cells to integrate into the neural network and compensate for damaged neural function. The neural cells confront an environment very different from that of the developmental stage in which these cells differentiate to form interwoven networks. During the repair process, one of the challenges is neurodegeneration, which can develop from interrupted innervations to/from the targets, chronic inflammation, ischaemia, aging or idiopathic neural toxicity. Neurodegeneration, which occurs on the basis of a characteristic vascular and neural web, usually presents as a chronically progressive process with unknown aetiology. Currently, there is no effective treatment to stop or slow down neurodegeneration. Pathological changes from patients with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis indicate a broken homeostasis in the CNS. We discuss how the blood-brain barrier and neural networks are formed to maintain CNS homeostasis and their contribution to neurodegeneration in diseased conditions. Another challenge is that some inhibitors produced by CNS injury do not facilitate the regenerating neural cells to incorporate into a pre-existing network. We review glial responses to CNS injury. Of note, the reactive astrocytes

  20. Dosage-sensitive and complementary functions of roundabout and commissureless control axon crossing of the CNS midline.

    PubMed

    Kidd, T; Russell, C; Goodman, C S; Tear, G

    1998-01-01

    commissureless and roundabout lead to complementary mutant phenotypes in which either too few or too many axons cross the midline. The robo;comm double-mutant phenotype is identical to robo alone, suggesting that in the absence of robo, comm is no longer required. Comm is expressed on midline cells; Robo is expressed in a dynamic fashion on growth cones and appears to function as an axon guidance receptor. robo function is dosage-sensitive. Overexpression of comm is also dosage-sensitive and leads to a phenotype identical to robo loss-of-function. Comm controls Robo expression; increasing Comm leads to a reduction of Robo protein. The levels of Comm and Robo appear to be tightly regulated to assure that only certain growth cones cross the midline and that those growth cones that do cross never do so again.

  1. ABC transporters in the CNS - an inventory.

    PubMed

    Hartz, A M S; Bauer, B

    2011-04-01

    In the present review we provide a summary of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the central nervous system (CNS). Our review is focused on transporters of the ABC A, B, C, D, and G families that have been detected in the cells of the neurovascular unit/blood-brain barrier including brain capillary endothelial cells, pericytes, astrocytes, and neurons, as well as in other brain cells, such as microglia, oligodendrocytes, and choroid plexus epithelial cells. In this review, we provide an overview, organized by ABC family, of transporter expression, localization, and function. We summarize recent findings on ABC transporter regulation in the CNS and address the role of ABC transporters in CNS diseases including brain cancer, seizures/epilepsy, and Alzheimer's disease. Finally, we discuss new therapeutic strategies focused on ABC transporters in CNS disease.

  2. Fact or fiction? A longitudinal study of play and the development of reflective functioning.

    PubMed

    Tessier, V P; Normandin, L; Ensink, K; Fonagy, P

    2016-01-01

    In Fonagy and Target's (1996, 2000) developmental model of mentalization, play is theorized as a precursor of later mentalization and reflective function (RF); however, the relationship between play and later mentalization and RF has yet to be empirically tested. These processes are particularly important in the context of trauma, but an empirical model of the relationships among mentalization, play, and trauma is currently lacking. The aim of this longitudinal study was to examine whether children's capacity to engage in pretend play, to symbolize, and to make play narratives was associated with later RF in those children. Thirty-nine sexually abused children and 21 nonabused children (aged 3 to 8) participated in the study. The Children's Play Therapy Instrument was used to assess children's free play. Three years after the play assessment, children's RF was assessed using the Child Attachment Interview, coded with the Child and Adolescent Reflective Functioning Scale. Pretend play completion was associated with later other-understanding. Play was also found to mediate the relationship between sexual abuse and children's later mentalization regarding others. These findings are consistent with Fonagy and Target's emphasis on the role of pretend play in the development of a nuanced sense of the qualities of the mind and reality. In sum, the findings lend support to Fonagy and Target's account of playing with reality, and the development of mentalization suggests that it may be more than "fiction." Furthermore, these results suggest that children's ability to create meaningful and coherent play sequences after sexual abuse is associated with the development of a better understanding of their relationships with others. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed.

  3. Transcriptional Regulation of CXCL5 in HIV-1-Infected Macrophages and Its Functional Consequences on CNS Pathology.

    PubMed

    Guha, Debjani; Klamar, Cynthia R; Reinhart, Todd; Ayyavoo, Velpandi

    2015-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected monocytes/macrophages and microglia release increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including ELR+ (containing glutamic acid-leucine-arginine motif) chemokines. To investigate the role of HIV-1 infection on chemokine regulation, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) from normal donors were infected with HIV-1 and the expression of chemokines and their downstream biological functions were evaluated. Among the tested chemokines, CXCL5 was upregulated significantly both at the mRNA and protein level in the HIV-1-infected MDMs compared with mock-infected cultures. Upregulation of CXCL5 in the HIV-1-infected MDMs is, in part, regulated by increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production and phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Functional analyses indicate that HIV-1-induced overexpression of CXCL5 has enhanced the ability to attract neutrophils, as observed by chemotaxis assay. However, exposure of NT2, SH-SY5Y cells, and primary neurons to HIV-1-infected MDM supernatants resulted in cell death that was not rescued by anti-CXCL5 antibody suggesting that CXCL5 does not have direct effect on neuronal death. Together, these results suggest that the increased level of CXCL5 in tissue compartments, including the central nervous system of HIV-1-infected individuals might alter the inflammatory response through the infiltration of neutrophils into tissue compartment, thus causing secondary effects on resident cells.

  4. [INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL FACTORS ON PERSONAL SOCIAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL ADAPTATION AND FUNCTIONAL STATE OF THE CNS IN NORTHERN CHILDREN].

    PubMed

    Iovleva, N N; Soroko, S I

    2015-06-01

    The results of the socio-psychological and psycho-physiological study of children and adolescents rural secondary school in a remote area of the Arkhangelsk region were studied. It was found that the poor situation of children in families at social risk leads to a decrease in their school performance, motivation to succeed and, in some cases, to reduce their personal social and psychological adaptation. However, in general, the level of personal social and psychological adaptation in the majority of surveyed students is high enough. As complementary social institutions, the family and the school, in some cases, can compensate for a number of adverse social and psychological factors. Pupils from social risk groups functional state of the central nervous system has been significantly reduced compared with children who are brought up in affluent families. In the North adverse social factors may increase the effects of the harsh climatic conditions and are an important risk factor for children's health.

  5. CNS myelin induces regulatory functions of DC-SIGN–expressing, antigen-presenting cells via cognate interaction with MOG

    PubMed Central

    García-Vallejo, J.J.; Ilarregui, J.M.; Kalay, H.; Chamorro, S.; Koning, N.; Unger, W.W.; Ambrosini, M.; Montserrat, V.; Fernandes, R.J.; Bruijns, S.C.M.; van Weering, J.R.T.; Paauw, N.J.; O’Toole, T.; van Horssen, J.; van der Valk, P.; Nazmi, K.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Bajramovic, J.; Dijkstra, C.D.; ’t Hart, B.A.

    2014-01-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a constituent of central nervous system myelin, is an important autoantigen in the neuroinflammatory disease multiple sclerosis (MS). However, its function remains unknown. Here, we show that, in healthy human myelin, MOG is decorated with fucosylated N-glycans that support recognition by the C-type lectin receptor (CLR) DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3–grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) on microglia and DCs. The interaction of MOG with DC-SIGN in the context of simultaneous TLR4 activation resulted in enhanced IL-10 secretion and decreased T cell proliferation in a DC-SIGN-, glycosylation-, and Raf1-dependent manner. Exposure of oligodendrocytes to proinflammatory factors resulted in the down-regulation of fucosyltransferase expression, reflected by altered glycosylation at the MS lesion site. Indeed, removal of fucose on myelin reduced DC-SIGN–dependent homeostatic control, and resulted in inflammasome activation, increased T cell proliferation, and differentiation toward a Th17-prone phenotype. These data demonstrate a new role for myelin glycosylation in the control of immune homeostasis in the healthy human brain through the MOG–DC-SIGN homeostatic regulatory axis, which is comprised by inflammatory insults that affect glycosylation. This phenomenon should be considered as a basis to restore immune tolerance in MS. PMID:24935259

  6. Relationships between electronic game play, obesity, and psychosocial functioning in young men.

    PubMed

    Wack, Elizabeth; Tantleff-Dunn, Stacey

    2009-04-01

    Most estimates suggest that American youth are spending a large amount of time playing video and computer games, spurring researchers to examine the impact this media has on various aspects of health and psychosocial functioning. The current study investigated relationships between frequency of electronic game play and obesity, the social/emotional context of electronic game play, and academic performance among 219 college-aged males. Current game players reported a weekly average of 9.73 hours of game play, with almost 10% of current players reporting an average of 35 hours of play per week. Results indicated that frequency of play was not significantly related to body mass index or grade point average. However, there was a significant positive correlation between frequency of play and self-reported frequency of playing when bored, lonely, or stressed. As opposed to the general conception of electronic gaming as detrimental to functioning, the results suggest that gaming among college-aged men may provide a healthy source of socialization, relaxation, and coping.

  7. The effects of fantastical pretend-play on the development of executive functions: An intervention study.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Rachel B; Gilpin, Ansley T; Brown, Melissa M; Meyer, Brooke A

    2016-05-01

    Although recent correlational studies have found a relationship between fantasy orientation (FO; i.e., a child's propensity to play in a fantastical realm) and higher order cognitive skills called executive functions (EFs), no work has addressed the causality and directionality of this relationship. The current study experimentally examined the directionality of the observed relationship between FO and EF development in preschool-aged children through an innovative play intervention employing a randomized controlled design. A sample of 110 children between the ages of 3 and 5years were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: fantastical pretend-play intervention, non-imaginative play intervention, or business-as-usual control. Results revealed that children who participated in a 5-week fantastical pretend-play intervention showed improvements in EFs, whereas children in the other two conditions did not. Within the fantastical pretend-play condition, children who were highly engaged in the play and those who were highly fantastical demonstrated the greatest gains in EFs. These data provide evidence for the equifinal relationship between fantasy-oriented play and EF development, such that engaging in fantasy-oriented play may be one of many ways to directly enhance EF development.

  8. Enhanced functional connectivity and increased gray matter volume of insula related to action video game playing

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Diankun; He, Hui; Liu, Dongbo; Ma, Weiyi; Dong, Li; Luo, Cheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that distinct insular subregions are associated with particular neural networks (e.g., attentional and sensorimotor networks). Based on the evidence that playing action video games (AVGs) facilitates attentional and sensorimotor functions, this study examined the relation between AVG experience and the plasticity of insular subregions and the functional networks therein that are related to attentional and sensorimotor functions. By comparing AVG experts and amateurs, we found that AVG experts had enhanced functional connectivity and grey matter volume in insular subregions. Furthermore, AVG experts exhibited increased functional connectivity between the attentional and sensorimotor networks, and the experience-related enhancement was predominantly evident in the left insula, an understudied brain area. Thus, AVG playing may enhance functional integration of insular subregions and the pertinent networks therein. PMID:25880157

  9. Immune cell trafficking from the brain maintains CNS immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mohammad G; Tsai, Vicky W W; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Hassanpour, Masoud; Li, Hui; Hart, Prue H; Breit, Samuel N; Sawchenko, Paul E; Brown, David A

    2014-03-01

    In the CNS, no pathway dedicated to immune surveillance has been characterized for preventing the anti-CNS immune responses that develop in autoimmune neuroinflammatory disease. Here, we identified a pathway for immune cells to traffic from the brain that is associated with the rostral migratory stream (RMS), which is a forebrain source of newly generated neurons. Evaluation of fluorescently labeled leukocyte migration in mice revealed that DCs travel via the RMS from the CNS to the cervical LNs (CxLNs), where they present antigen to T cells. Pharmacologic interruption of immune cell traffic with the mononuclear cell-sequestering drug fingolimod influenced anti-CNS T cell responses in the CxLNs and modulated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) severity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Fingolimod treatment also induced EAE in a disease-resistant transgenic mouse strain by altering DC-mediated Treg functions in CxLNs and disrupting CNS immune tolerance. These data describe an immune cell pathway that originates in the CNS and is capable of dampening anti-CNS immune responses in the periphery. Furthermore, these data provide insight into how fingolimod treatment might exacerbate CNS neuroinflammation in some cases and suggest that focal therapeutic interventions, outside the CNS have the potential to selectively modify anti-CNS immunity.

  10. Emerging roles of system [Formula: see text] antiporter and its inhibition in CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhaval; Kharkar, Prashant S; Nandave, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    System [Formula: see text] is an antiporter belonging to the hetero(di)meric amino acid transporter family. It is located on astrocytes as well as on blood-brain barrier within the CNS. It plays a pivotal role in free radical neutralization as well as neuronal signalling by regulating the glutathione production which occurs via the exchange of intracellular glutamate with extracellular cystine at 1:1 molar ratio. Understandably, it is a vital component responsible for the maintenance of neuronal homeostasis (e.g. redox state). Hence, it could be postulated that any perturbation in system [Formula: see text] function may contribute, directly or indirectly, to the pathophysiology of a variety of CNS disorders like Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, drug addiction, depression, multiple sclerosis, hypoglycemic neuronal cell death, glioma, and excitotoxicity, making system [Formula: see text] a promising target for treating CNS disorders. In recent times, recognizing the potential of this target, variety of inhibitors has been synthesized by modifying commercially available potent inhibitors including sulfasalazine, erastin, and sorafenib. Although, they have demonstrated efficacy, the in-depth data is still lacking to warrant their use for the treatment of aforementioned CNS disorders. In this review, we discuss the in-depth role of system [Formula: see text] transporter in maintaining normal physiology as well as in the pathophysiology of CNS diseases. Additionally, we have also listed some of the potent inhibitors of system [Formula: see text]. In conclusion, the critical role of system [Formula: see text] in multiple CNS disorders and advanced research on its inhibitors have promising future prospects for better management of the CNS ailments.

  11. Arginase-1 is expressed exclusively by infiltrating myeloid cells in CNS injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, Andrew D; Passos Dos Santos, Rosmarini; Zarruk, Juan Guillermo; Salmon, Christopher K; Kroner, Antje; David, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    Resident microglia and infiltrating myeloid cells play important roles in the onset, propagation, and resolution of inflammation in central nervous system (CNS) injury and disease. Identifying cell type-specific mechanisms will help to appropriately target interventions for tissue repair. Arginase-1 (Arg-1) is a well characterised modulator of tissue repair and its expression correlates with recovery after CNS injury. Here we assessed the cellular localisation of Arg-1 in two models of CNS damage. Using microglia specific antibodies, P2ry12 and Fc receptor-like S (FCRLS), we show the LysM-EGFP reporter mouse is an excellent model to distinguish infiltrating myeloid cells from resident microglia. We show that Arg-1 is expressed exclusively in infiltrating myeloid cells but not microglia in models of spinal cord injury (SCI) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Our in vitro studies suggest that factors in the CNS environment prevent expression of Arg-1 in microglia in vivo. This work suggests different functional roles for these cells in CNS injury and repair and shows that such repair pathways can be switched on in infiltrating myeloid cells in pro-inflammatory environments.

  12. Functional Play at 2 Years of Age: Effects of Prenatal Maternal Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laplante, David P.; Zelazo, Philip R.; Brunet, Alain; King, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    Toddler toy play evolves in a predictable manner and provides a valid, nonverbal measure of cognitive function unbiased by social behaviors. Research on prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) indicates that exposure to stress in utero results in developmental deficits. We hypothesized that children exposed to high objective PNMS from a natural disaster…

  13. Play versus Alone Conditions as Controls during Functional Analyses of Self-Injurious Escape Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahng, SungWoo; Iwata, Brian A.

    1998-01-01

    A study compared effects of continuous reinforcement (play) and alone conditions as controls during functional analyses for 66 individuals whose self-injurious behavior (SIB) was maintained by escape. SIB was lower during both control conditions than it was during the test (demand) condition. SIB was lowest during the alone condition. (Author/CR)

  14. The Relationship between Symbolic Play and Executive Function in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Rachel; Dissanayake, Cheryl; Ihsen, Elfriede; Hammond, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    The role of executive function, specifically inhibitory control and generativity, in symbolic play was investigated in 20 children aged 48-89 months. Assessment of inhibitory control was via the Sun-Moon Stroop task, and generativity was assessed with the Semantic Fluency task, as well as a new object substitution task which required children to…

  15. CNS Diseases and Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Allegri, Pia; Rissotto, Roberto; Herbort, Carl P.; Murialdo, Ugo

    2011-01-01

    A number of inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic and idiopathic disorders affect the eye and the central nervous system (CNS) concurrently or at different time frames. These conditions pose a diagnostic challenge to the clinician since they may present with similar ocular and neurological manifestations. The purpose of this review is to describe major neurological syndromes including multiple sclerosis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, other autoimmune syndromes, and several infectious diseases which may affect the eye. This article may serve as a guide for the diagnosis and treatment of such disorders. It should be noted that these conditions have been viewed from a neurologist’s perspective thereby neurologic involvement is stressed. PMID:22454751

  16. CNS involvement in hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsies (HNPP).

    PubMed

    Tackenberg, B; Möller, J C; Rindock, H; Bien, S; Sommer, N; Oertel, W H; Rosenow, F; Schepelmann, K; Hamer, H M; Bandmann, O

    2006-12-26

    We assessed seven patients with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) with 16 electrophysiological tests and cranial MRI for CNS abnormalities. Mean latencies differed between patients with HNPP and controls for the blink reflex, the jaw-opening reflex, and acoustic evoked potentials. MRI abnormalities were observed in four patients. Our study suggests subclinical but functionally relevant CNS myelin damage in HNPP.

  17. Gestational cortisol and social play shape development of marmosets' HPA functioning and behavioral responses to stressors.

    PubMed

    Mustoe, Aaryn C; Taylor, Jack H; Birnie, Andrew K; Huffman, Michelle C; French, Jeffrey A

    2014-09-01

    Both gestational cortisol exposure (GCE) and variability in postnatal environments can shape the later-life behavioral and endocrine outcomes of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. We examined the influence of GCE and social play on HPA functioning in developing marmosets. Maternal urinary cortisol samples were collected across pregnancy to determine GCE for 28 marmoset offspring (19 litters). We administered a social separation stressor to offspring at 6, 12, and 18 months of age, during which we collected urinary cortisol samples and behavioral observations. Increased GCE was associated with increased basal cortisol levels and cortisol reactivity, but the strength of this relationship decreased across age. Increased social play was associated with decreased basal cortisol levels and a marginally greater reduction in cortisol reactivity as offspring aged, regardless of offspring GCE. Thus, GCE is associated with HPA functioning, but socially enriching postnatal environments can alter the effects associated with increased fetal exposure to glucocorticoids.

  18. RNAi therapeutics for CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Ryan L; Davidson, Beverly L

    2010-06-18

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a process of sequence-specific gene silencing and serves as a powerful molecular tool to manipulate gene expression in vitro and in vivo. RNAi technologies have been applied to study gene function and validate drug targets. Researchers are investigating RNAi-based compounds as novel therapeutics to treat a variety of human diseases that are currently lacking sufficient treatment. To date, numerous studies support that RNAi therapeutics can improve disease phenotypes in various rodent models of human disease. Here, we focus on the development of RNAi-based therapies aimed at treating neurological disorders for which reduction of mutant or toxic gene expression may provide clinical benefit. We review RNAi-based gene-silencing strategies, proof-of-concept studies testing therapeutic RNAi for CNS disorders, and highlight the most recent research aimed at transitioning RNAi-based therapeutics toward clinical trials.

  19. CNS regulation of appetite.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Joanne A; Dovey, Terry M; Blundell, John E; Halford, Jason C G

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews the regulation of appetite from a biopsychological perspective. It considers psychological experiences and peripheral nutritional systems (both episodic and tonic) and addresses their relationship with the CNS networks that process and integrate their input. Whilst such regulatory aspects of obesity focus on homeostatic control mechanisms, in the modern environment hedonic aspects of appetite are also critical. Enhanced knowledge of the complexity of appetite regulation and the mechanisms that sustain obesity indicate the challenge presented by management of the obesity epidemic. Nonetheless, effective control of appetite expression remains a critical therapeutic target for weight management. Currently, strategies which utilise a combination of agents to target both homeostatic and hedonic control mechanisms represent the most promising approaches. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central Control of Food Intake'.

  20. Investigating the Function of Play Bows in Dog and Wolf Puppies (Canis lupus familiaris, Canis lupus occidentalis)

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Julia; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Smuts, Barbara; Range, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Animals utilize behavioral signals across a range of different contexts in order to communicate with others and produce probable behavioral outcomes. During play animals frequently adopt action patterns used in other contexts. Researchers have therefore hypothesized that play signals have evolved to clarify communicative intent. One highly stereotyped play signal is the canid play bow, but its function remains contested. In order to clarify how canid puppies use play bows, we used data on play bows in immature wolves (ages 2.7–7.8 months) and dogs (ages 2 to 5 months) to test hypotheses evaluated in a previous study of adult dogs. We found that young dogs used play bows similarly to adult dogs; play bows most often occurred after a brief pause in play followed by complementary highly active play states. However, while the relative number of play bows and total observation time was similar between dog and wolf puppies, wolves did not follow this behavioral pattern, as play bows were unsuccessful in eliciting further play activity by the partner. While some similarities for the function of play bows in dog and wolf puppies were documented, it appears that play bows may function differently in wolf puppies in regards to re-initiating play. PMID:28033358

  1. CNS Multiparameter Optimization Approach: Is it in Accordance with Occam's Razor Principle?

    PubMed

    Raevsky, Oleg A

    2016-04-01

    A detailed analysis of the possibility of using the Multiparameter Optimization approach (MPO) for CNS/non-CNS classification of drugs was carried out. This work has shown that MPO descriptors are able to describe only part of chemical transport in the CNS connected with transmembrane diffusion. Hence the "intuitive" CNS MPO approach with arbitrary selection of descriptors and calculations of score functions, search of thresholds of classification, and absence of any chemometric procedures, leads to rather modest accuracy of CNS/non-CNS classification models.

  2. [Imaging features of CNS tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Semlali, S; El Kharras, A; Mahi, M; Hsaini, Y; Benameur, M; Aziz, N; Chaouir, S; Akjouj, S

    2008-02-01

    CNS tuberculosis remains relatively frequent in endemic regions. Both CT and MRI are valuable for diagnosis. Even though non-specific, MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging and proton spectroscopy is more sensitive than CT for detection of some lesions. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the imaging features of CNS tuberculosis.

  3. Models of CNS radiation damage during space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopewell, J. W.

    1994-10-01

    The primary structural and functional arrangement of the different cell types within the CNS are reviewed. This was undertaken with a view to providing a better understanding of the complex interrelationships that may contribute to the pathogenesis of lesions in this tissue after exposure to ionizing radiation. The spectrum of possible CNS radiation-induced syndromes are discussed although not all have an immediate relevance to exposure during space flight. The specific characteristics of the lesions observed would appear to be dose related. Very high doses may produce an acute CNS syndrome that can cause death. Of the delayed lesions, selective coagulation necrosis of white matter and a later appearing vascular microangiopathy, have been reported in patients after cancer therapy doses. Lower doses, perhaps very low doses, may produce a delayed generalised CNS atrophy; this effect and the probability of the induction of CNS tumors could potentially have the greatest significance for space flight.

  4. Decellularization technology in CNS tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Lin, Xian-Feng; Wang, Li-Ren; Lin, Yi-Qian; Wang, Jiang-Tao; Liu, Wen-Yue; Zhu, Gui-Qi; Braddock, Martin; Zhong, Ming; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Decellularization methodologies have been successfully used in a variety of tissue engineering and regenerative technologies and methods of decellularization have been developed for target tissues and organs of interest. The technology to promote regeneration and functional recovery in the CNS, including brain and spinal cord, has, however, made slow progress mainly because the intrinsic regenerative potential of the CNS is regarded as low. To date, currently available therapies have been unable to provide significant functional recovery and successful therapies, which could provide functional restoration to the injured brain and spinal cord are controversial. In this review, the authors provide a critical analysis, comparing the advantages and limitations of the major decellularization methods and considering the effects of these methods upon the biologic scaffold material. The authors also review studies that supplement decellularized grafts with exogenous factors, such as stem cells and growth factors, to both promote and enhance regeneration through decellularized allografts.

  5. The role of dendritic cells in CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Zozulya, Alla L.; Clarkson, Benjamin D.; Ortler, Sonja; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated, central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disease. Clinical and histopathological features suggest an inflammatory etiology involving resident CNS innate cells as well as invading adaptive immune cells. Encephalitogenic myelin-reactive T cells have been implicated in the initiation of an inflammatory cascade, eventually resulting in demyelination and axonal damage (the histological hallmarks of MS). Dendritic cells (DC) have recently emerged as key modulators of this immunopathological cascade, as supported by studies in humans and experimental disease models. In one such model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), CNS microvessel-associated DC have been shown to be essential for local antigen recognition by myelin-reactive T cells. Moreover, the functional state and compartmental distribution of DC derived from CNS and associated lymphatics seem to be limiting factors in both the induction and effector phases of EAE. Moreover, DC modulate and balance the recruitment of encephalitogenic and regulatory T cells into CNS tissue. This capacity is critically influenced by DC surface expression of co-stimulatory or co-inhibitory molecules. The fact that DC accumulate in the CNS before T cells and can direct T-cell responses suggests that they are key determinants of CNS autoimmune outcomes. Here we provide a comprehensive review of recent advances in our understanding of CNS-derived DC and their relevance to neuroinflammation. PMID:20217033

  6. LINGO-1 and its role in CNS repair.

    PubMed

    Mi, Sha; Sandrock, Alfred; Miller, Robert H

    2008-01-01

    LINGO-1 is selectively expressed in the CNS on both oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) and neurons. Its expression is developmentally regulated in the normal CNS, as well as up-regulated in human or rat models of neuropathologies. LINGO-1 functions as a negative regulator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination, neuronal survival and axonal regeneration. Across diverse animal CNS disease models, targeted LINGO-1 inhibition was found to promote neuron and oligodendrocyte survival, axon regeneration, oligodendrocyte differentiation, remyelination and improved functional recovery. The targeted inhibition of LINGO-1 therefore presents a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of neurological diseases.

  7. The Efficacy of Exergames Played Proximally and over the Internet on Cognitive Functioning for Online Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kooiman, Brian J.; Sheehan, Dwayne P.

    2014-01-01

    Exergames (active video games that require kinesthetic movement) played in proximity to other players or against a gaming machine have been linked to positive increases in cognitive functioning. This study tested to see if remote exergame play over the Internet had an impact similar to exergames that are played in proximity. The study shows that…

  8. The Function of Play in the Development of the Social Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellis, Sergio M.; Pellis, Vivien C.; Bell, Heather C.

    2010-01-01

    Rough-and-tumble play, or play fighting, is common in the young of many mammals. Research on play fighting among rats shows that there are many levels of neural control over this behavior: subcortical mechanisms mediate the motivation and behavior of such play, and the cortex provides mechanisms by which the play changes with age and context. The…

  9. The Therapeutic Potential of Targeting Substance P/NK-1R Interactions in Inflammatory CNS Disorders.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M Brittany; Young, Ada D; Marriott, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory responses of resident central nervous system (CNS) cells are now known to play a critical role in the initiation and progression of an array of infectious and sterile neuroinflammatory disorders such as meningitis, encephalitis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS). Regulating glial inflammatory responses in a timely manner is therefore critical in preserving normal CNS functions. The neuropeptide substance P is produced at high levels within the CNS and its selective receptor, the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK-1R), is abundantly expressed by neurons and is present on glial cell types including microglia and astrocytes. In addition to its functions as a neurotransmitter in the perception of pain and its essential role in gut motility, this tachykinin is widely recognized to exacerbate inflammation at peripheral sites including the skin, gastrointestinal tract and the lungs. Recently, a number of studies have identified a role for substance P and NK-1R interactions in neuroinflammation and described the ability of this neuropeptide to alter the immune functions of activated microglia and astrocytes. In this review article, we describe the expression of substance P and its receptor by resident CNS cells, and we discuss the ability of this neuropeptide to exacerbate the inflammatory responses of glia and immune cells that are recruited to the brain during neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, we discuss the available data indicating that the NK-1R-mediated augmentation of such responses appears to be detrimental during microbial infection and some sterile neurodegenerative disorders, and propose the repurposed use of NK-1R antagonists, of a type that are currently approved as anti-emetic and anti-anxiolytic agents, as an adjunct therapy to ameliorate the inflammatory CNS damage in these conditions.

  10. The Therapeutic Potential of Targeting Substance P/NK-1R Interactions in Inflammatory CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. Brittany; Young, Ada D.; Marriott, Ian

    2017-01-01

    The inflammatory responses of resident central nervous system (CNS) cells are now known to play a critical role in the initiation and progression of an array of infectious and sterile neuroinflammatory disorders such as meningitis, encephalitis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and multiple sclerosis (MS). Regulating glial inflammatory responses in a timely manner is therefore critical in preserving normal CNS functions. The neuropeptide substance P is produced at high levels within the CNS and its selective receptor, the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK-1R), is abundantly expressed by neurons and is present on glial cell types including microglia and astrocytes. In addition to its functions as a neurotransmitter in the perception of pain and its essential role in gut motility, this tachykinin is widely recognized to exacerbate inflammation at peripheral sites including the skin, gastrointestinal tract and the lungs. Recently, a number of studies have identified a role for substance P and NK-1R interactions in neuroinflammation and described the ability of this neuropeptide to alter the immune functions of activated microglia and astrocytes. In this review article, we describe the expression of substance P and its receptor by resident CNS cells, and we discuss the ability of this neuropeptide to exacerbate the inflammatory responses of glia and immune cells that are recruited to the brain during neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, we discuss the available data indicating that the NK-1R-mediated augmentation of such responses appears to be detrimental during microbial infection and some sterile neurodegenerative disorders, and propose the repurposed use of NK-1R antagonists, of a type that are currently approved as anti-emetic and anti-anxiolytic agents, as an adjunct therapy to ameliorate the inflammatory CNS damage in these conditions. PMID:28101005

  11. MusicGlove: motivating and quantifying hand movement rehabilitation by using functional grips to play music.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Nizan; Chan, Vicky; Zondervan, Danny; Bachman, Mark; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2011-01-01

    People with stroke typically must perform much of their hand exercise at home without professional assistance as soon as two weeks after the stroke. Without feedback and encouragement, individuals often lose motivation to practice using the affected hand, and this disuse contributes to further declines in hand function. We developed the MusicGlove as a way to facilitate and motivate at home practice of hand movement. This low-cost device uses music as an interactive and motivating medium to guide hand exercise and to quantitatively assess hand movement recovery. It requires the user to practice functional movements, including pincer grip, key-pinch grip, and finger-thumb opposition, by using those movements to play different musical notes, played along to songs displayed by an interactive computer game. We report here the design of the glove and the results of a single-session experiment with 10 participants with chronic stroke. We found that the glove is well suited for use by people with an impairment level quantified by a Box and Blocks score of at least around 7; that the glove can be used to obtain a measure of hand dexterity (% of notes hit) that correlates strongly with the Box and Blocks score; and that the incorporation of music into training significantly improved both objective measures of hand motor performance and self-ratings of motivation for training in the single session.

  12. Immunopathophysiology of pediatric CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, Amit; Hintzen, Rogier Q; Dale, Russell C; Rostasy, Kevin; Brück, Wolfgang; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-08-30

    Elucidating pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the spectrum of pediatric-onset CNS demyelinating diseases, particularly those that may distinguish multiple sclerosis (MS) from other entities, promises to both improve diagnostics and guide more-informed therapeutic decisions. Observations that pediatric- and adult-onset MS share the same genetic and environmental risk factors support the view that these conditions represent essentially the same illness manifesting at different ages. Nonetheless, special consideration must be given when CNS inflammation manifests in early life, at a time when multiple organs (including immune and nervous systems) are actively maturing. CSF analysis in pediatric-onset MS points to chronic CNS inflammation, supported by observations from limited pathologic material available for study. Emerging results implicate abnormalities in both effector and regulatory T cell subsets, and potentially immune senescence, in children with MS. Although CNS-directed antibodies (including antibodies recognizing myelin antigens; Kir4.1) can be documented in pediatric-onset MS, their pathophysiologic significance (as in adults) remains unclear. This is in contrast to the presence of serum and/or CSF antibodies recognizing aquaporin-4, which, when measured using validated cell-based assays, supports the diagnosis of a neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, distinct from MS. Presence of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies documented with similar cell-based assays may also be associated with pathophysiologically distinct disease phenotypes in children. The substantial impact of pediatric-onset MS on normal brain development and function underscores the importance of elucidating both the immunobiology and neurobiology of disease. Ongoing efforts are aimed at developing and validating biological measures that define pathophysiologically distinct monophasic and chronic forms of pediatric CNS demyelination.

  13. Hyperosmotic activation of CNS sympathetic drive: implications for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Toney, Glenn M; Stocker, Sean D

    2010-01-01

    Evidence now indicates that exaggerated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) significantly contributes to salt-sensitive cardiovascular diseases. Although CNS mechanisms that support the elevation of SNA in various cardiovascular disease models have been intensively studied, many mechanistic details remain unknown. In recent years, studies have shown that SNA can rise as a result of both acute and chronic increases of body fluid osmolality. These findings have raised the possibility that salt-sensitive cardiovascular diseases could result, at least in part, from direct osmosensory activation of CNS sympathetic drive. In this brief review we emphasize recent findings from several laboratories, including our own, which demonstrate that neurons of the forebrain organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT) play a pivotal role in triggering hyperosmotic activation of SNA by recruiting neurons in specific regions of the hypothalamus, brainstem and spinal cord. Although OVLT neurons are intrinsically osmosensitive and shrink when exposed to extracellular hypertonicity, it is not yet clear if these processes are functionally linked. Whereas acute hypertonic activation of OVLT neurons critically depends on TRPV1 channels, studies in TRPV1−/− mice suggest that acute and long-term osmoregulatory responses remain largely intact. Therefore, acute and chronic osmosensory transduction by OVLT neurons may be mediated by distinct mechanisms. We speculate that organic osmolytes such as taurine and possibly novel processes such as extracellular acidification could contribute to long-term osmosensory transduction by OVLT neurons and might therefore participate in the elevation of SNA in salt-sensitive cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20603334

  14. Risk and survival outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jessica W; Wernicke, A Gabriella

    2016-08-01

    Patients treated with cranial radiation are at risk of developing secondary CNS tumors. Understanding the incidence, treatment, and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors plays a role in clinical decision-making and patient education. Additionally, as meningiomas and pituitary tumors have been detected at increasing rates across all ages and may potentially be treated with radiation, it is important to know and communicate the risk of secondary tumors in children and adults. After conducting an extensive literature search, we identified publications that report incidence and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors. We reviewed 14 studies in children, which reported that radiation confers a 7- to 10-fold increase in subsequent CNS tumors, with a 20-year cumulative incidence ranging from 1.03 to 28.9 %. The latency period for secondary tumors ranged from 5.5 to 30 years, with gliomas developing in 5-10 years and meningiomas developing around 15 years after radiation. We also reviewed seven studies in adults, where the two strongest studies showed no increased risk while the remaining studies found a higher risk compared to the general population. The latency period for secondary CNS tumors in adults ranged from 5 to 34 years. Treatment and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors have been documented in four case series, which did not conclusively demonstrate that secondary CNS tumors fared worse than primary CNS tumors. Radiation-induced CNS tumors remain a rare occurrence that should not by itself impede radiation treatment. Additional investigation is needed on the risk of radiation-induced tumors in adults and the long-term outcomes of these tumors.

  15. The evolutionarily dynamic IFN-inducible GTPase proteins play conserved immune functions in vertebrates and cephalochordates.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Zhang, Juyong; Sun, Yi; Wang, Hua; Wang, Yiquan

    2009-07-01

    Interferon (IFN)-inducible GTPases currently include four families of proteins: myxovirus resistant proteins (Mxs), guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), immunity-related GTPase proteins (IRGs), and very large inducible GTPase proteins (VLIGs). They are all under conserved regulation by IFNs in humans and mice and play a critical role in preventing microbial infections. However, differences between vertebrates are poorly characterized, and their evolutionary origins have not been studied in detail. In this study, we performed comparative genomic analysis of the four families in 18 representative animals that yielded several unexpected results. Firstly, we found that Mx, GBP, and IRG protein families arose before the divergence of chordate subphyla, but VLIG emerged solely in vertebrates. Secondly, IRG, GBP, and VLIG families have experienced a high rate of gene gain and loss during the evolution, with the GBP family being lost entirely in two pufferfish and VLIG family lost in primates and carnivores. Thirdly, the regulation of these genes by IFNs is highly conserved throughout vertebrates although the VLIG protein sequences in fish have lost the first 870 amino acid residues. Finally, amphioxus IFN-inducible GTPase genes are all highly expressed in immune-related organs such as gill, liver, and intestine and are upregulated after challenge with PolyI:C and pathogens, although no IFNs or their receptors were detected in the current amphioxus genome database. These results suggest that IFN-inducible GTPase genes play conserved immune functions both in vertebrates and in cephalochordates.

  16. [Influence of a CNS pathology on the electrocochleography response].

    PubMed

    Arslan, E; Lupi, G; Rosignoli, M

    1994-01-01

    This study analyzed 73 electrocochleographic recordings made in children with a normal hearing threshold, selected retrospectively from 1563 recordings made between 1973 and 1990. The aim of the study was to check the original findings for any correlation between the various response parameters which might be indicative of a pathological condition. Compound action potential (AP) latency and amplitude, presynaptic summation potential (SP) and cochlear microphonic (CM) amplitudes and AP rapid adaptation behavior were calculated and recordings were associated with clinical information on aetiologic diagnosis, otoscopic examination, impedance measurement data and the finding of any central nervous system (CNS) pathology. The trend of the amplitudes as a function of the intensity of all three potentials (input-output functions), CM and SP in particular, demonstrated unexpected scattered values especially towards the high intensities. This was found correlated to the presence of CNS pathology. The comparison between the two groups (with vs without CNS pathology) with the aid of the Student's t-test proved statically significant, especially for CM and SP amplitudes while rather less so for AP amplitude. In particular, all CM and SP amplitude values outside the confidence intervals (calculated as 95% of normal cases) revealed CNS pathology. It has been suggested that the influence of the CNS on cochlear function is due to a disturbed function of the olicocochlear bundle, which is known to have an inhibitory effect on cochlear dynamics; furthermore, there is also proof that it can be activated regardless of any ipso-and/or contra-lateral acoustic stimulation. The effects observed on the electrocochleography in cases with CNS disorders would thus be explained by an interruption of the olivocochlear bundle at the CNS level or a disruption of the CNS mechanism capable of controlling its activation.

  17. The Processing of Airspace Concept Evaluations Using FASTE-CNS as a Pre- or Post-Simulation CNS Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mainger, Steve

    2004-01-01

    As NASA speculates on and explores the future of aviation, the technological and physical aspects of our environment increasing become hurdles that must be overcome for success. Research into methods for overcoming some of these selected hurdles have been purposed by several NASA research partners as concepts. The task of establishing a common evaluation environment was placed on NASA's Virtual Airspace Simulation Technologies (VAST) project (sub-project of VAMS), and they responded with the development of the Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES). As one examines the ACES environment from a communication, navigation or surveillance (CNS) perspective, the simulation parameters are built with assumed perfection in the transactions associated with CNS. To truly evaluate these concepts in a realistic sense, the contributions/effects of CNS must be part of the ACES. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has supported the Virtual Airspace Modeling and Simulation (VAMS) project through the continued development of CNS models and analysis capabilities which supports the ACES environment. NASA GRC initiated the development a communications traffic loading analysis tool, called the Future Aeronautical Sub-network Traffic Emulator for Communications, Navigation and Surveillance (FASTE-CNS), as part of this support. This tool allows for forecasting of communications load with the understanding that, there is no single, common source for loading models used to evaluate the existing and planned communications channels; and that, consensus and accuracy in the traffic load models is a very important input to the decisions being made on the acceptability of communication techniques used to fulfill the aeronautical requirements. Leveraging off the existing capabilities of the FASTE-CNS tool, GRC has called for FASTE-CNS to have the functionality to pre- and post-process the simulation runs of ACES to report on instances when traffic density, frequency congestion or aircraft spacing

  18. Loss of Coupling Distinguishes GJB1 Mutations Associated with CNS Manifestations of CMT1X from Those Without CNS Manifestations.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Charles K; Goman, Mikhail; Wong, Sarah; Scherer, Steven S; Kleopa, Kleopas A; Peinado, Alejandro; Freidin, Mona M

    2017-01-10

    CMT1X, an X-linked inherited neuropathy, is caused by mutations in GJB1, which codes for Cx32, a gap junction protein expressed by Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes. Many GJB1 mutations cause central nervous system (CNS) abnormality in males, including stable subclinical signs and, less often, short-duration episodes characterized by motor difficulties and altered consciousness. However, some mutations have no apparent CNS effects. What distinguishes mutations with and without CNS manifestations has been unclear. Here we studied a total of 14 Cx32 mutations, 10 of which are associated with florid episodic CNS clinical syndromes in addition to peripheral neuropathy. The other 4 mutations exhibit neuropathy without clinical or subclinical CNS abnormalities. These "PNS-only" mutations (Y151C, V181M, R183C and L239I) form gap junction plaques and produce levels of junctional coupling similar to those for wild-type Cx32. In contrast, mutants with CNS manifestations (F51L, E102del, V139M, R142Q, R142W, R164W T55I, R164Q and C168Y) either form no morphological gap junction plaques or, if they do, produce little or no detectable junctional coupling. Thus, PNS and CNS abnormalities may involve different aspects of connexin function.

  19. Loss of Coupling Distinguishes GJB1 Mutations Associated with CNS Manifestations of CMT1X from Those Without CNS Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Charles K.; Goman, Mikhail; Wong, Sarah; Scherer, Steven S.; Kleopa, Kleopas A.; Peinado, Alejandro; Freidin, Mona M.

    2017-01-01

    CMT1X, an X-linked inherited neuropathy, is caused by mutations in GJB1, which codes for Cx32, a gap junction protein expressed by Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes. Many GJB1 mutations cause central nervous system (CNS) abnormality in males, including stable subclinical signs and, less often, short-duration episodes characterized by motor difficulties and altered consciousness. However, some mutations have no apparent CNS effects. What distinguishes mutations with and without CNS manifestations has been unclear. Here we studied a total of 14 Cx32 mutations, 10 of which are associated with florid episodic CNS clinical syndromes in addition to peripheral neuropathy. The other 4 mutations exhibit neuropathy without clinical or subclinical CNS abnormalities. These “PNS-only” mutations (Y151C, V181M, R183C and L239I) form gap junction plaques and produce levels of junctional coupling similar to those for wild-type Cx32. In contrast, mutants with CNS manifestations (F51L, E102del, V139M, R142Q, R142W, R164W T55I, R164Q and C168Y) either form no morphological gap junction plaques or, if they do, produce little or no detectable junctional coupling. Thus, PNS and CNS abnormalities may involve different aspects of connexin function. PMID:28071741

  20. Does gender play a role in functional asymmetry of ventromedial prefrontal cortex?

    PubMed

    Tranel, Daniel; Damasio, Hanna; Denburg, Natalie L; Bechara, Antoine

    2005-12-01

    We found previously in a lesion study that the right-sided sector of the ventromedial prefrontal cortices (VMPCs) was critical for social/emotional functioning and decision-making, whereas the left side appeared to be less important. It so happened that all but one of the subjects in that study were men, and the one woman did not fit the pattern very well. This prompted a follow-up investigation, in which we explored the following question: Does gender play a role in the development of defects in social conduct, emotional functioning and decision-making, following unilateral VMPC damage? We culled from our Patient Registry same-sex pairs of men or women patients who had comparable unilateral VMPC damage in either the left or right hemisphere. Two male pairs and one female pair were formed, and we included two additional women with unilateral right VMPC damage (8 patients in all). The domains of measurement covered social conduct, emotional processing and personality, and decision-making. We found a systematic effect of gender on the pattern of left-right asymmetry in VMPC. In men, there were severe defects following unilateral right VMPC damage, but not following left-sided damage. In women, there were defects following unilateral left VMPC damage; following right-sided damage, however, defects were mild or absent. The findings suggest that men and women may use different strategies to solve similar problems--e.g. men may use a more holistic, gestalt-type strategy, and women may use a more analytic, verbally-mediated strategy. Such differences could reflect asymmetric, gender-related differences in the neurobiology of left and right VMPC sectors.

  1. Neurospora COP9 signalosome integrity plays major roles for hyphal growth, conidial development, and circadian function.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhipeng; Wang, Ying; Cai, Gaihong; He, Qun

    2012-01-01

    The COP9 signalosome (CSN) is a highly conserved multifunctional complex that has two major biochemical roles: cleaving NEDD8 from cullin proteins and maintaining the stability of CRL components. We used mutation analysis to confirm that the JAMM domain of the CSN-5 subunit is responsible for NEDD8 cleavage from cullin proteins in Neurospora crassa. Point mutations of key residues in the metal-binding motif (EX(n)HXHX(10)D) of the CSN-5 JAMM domain disrupted CSN deneddylation activity without interfering with assembly of the CSN complex or interactions between CSN and cullin proteins. Surprisingly, CSN-5 with a mutated JAMM domain partially rescued the phenotypic defects observed in a csn-5 mutant. We found that, even without its deneddylation activity, the CSN can partially maintain the stability of the SCF(FWD-1) complex and partially restore the degradation of the circadian clock protein FREQUENCY (FRQ) in vivo. Furthermore, we showed that CSN containing mutant CSN-5 efficiently prevents degradation of the substrate receptors of CRLs. Finally, we found that deletion of the CAND1 ortholog in N. crassa had little effect on the conidiation circadian rhythm. Our results suggest that CSN integrity plays major roles in hyphal growth, conidial development, and circadian function in N. crassa.

  2. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Molecular Switches Regulating CNS Axon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Kundi, Sarina; Ahmed, Zubair

    2012-01-01

    The poor or lack of injured adult central nervous system (CNS) axon regeneration results in devastating consequences and poor functional recovery. The interplay between the intrinsic and extrinsic factors contributes to robust inhibition of axon regeneration of injured CNS neurons. The insufficient or lack of trophic support for injured neurons is considered as one of the major obstacles contributing to their failure to survive and regrow their axons after injury. In the CNS, many of the signalling pathways associated with neuronal survival and axon regeneration are regulated by several classes of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) that respond to a variety of ligands. This paper highlights and summarises the most relevant recent findings pertinent to different classes of the RTK family of molecules, with a particular focus on elucidating their role in CNS axon regeneration. PMID:22848811

  3. Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacogenetic, and Other Factors Influencing CNS Penetration of Antiretrovirals

    PubMed Central

    Babalola, Chinedum Peace; Morse, Gene D.; Taiwo, Babafemi

    2016-01-01

    Neurological complications associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are a matter of great concern. While antiretroviral (ARV) drugs are the cornerstone of HIV treatment and typically produce neurological benefit, some ARV drugs have limited CNS penetration while others have been associated with neurotoxicity. CNS penetration is a function of several factors including sieving role of blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers and activity of innate drug transporters. Other factors are related to pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics of the specific ARV agent or mediated by drug interactions, local inflammation, and blood flow. In this review, we provide an overview of the various factors influencing CNS penetration of ARV drugs with an emphasis on those commonly used in sub-Saharan Africa. We also summarize some key associations between ARV drug penetration, CNS efficacy, and neurotoxicity. PMID:27777797

  4. The human LIS1 is downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma and plays a tumor suppressor function

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Zhen; Tang, Xin; Gao, Yuan; Da, Liang; Song, Hai; Wang, Suiquan; Tiollais, Pierre; Li, Tsaiping; Zhao, Mujun

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} LIS1 mRNA and protein levels are decreased in 70% HCC tissues. {yields} Downregulation of LIS1 expression induces oncogenic transformation of QSG7701 and NIH3T3 cells in vitro and in vivo. {yields} LIS1 downregulation leads to mitotic errors including spindle and chromosome defects. {yields} Ectopic expression of LIS1 could significantly inhibit HCC cell proliferation and colony formation. {yields} Our results suggest that LIS1 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in the development and progression of HCC. -- Abstract: The human lissencephaly-1 gene (LIS1) is a disease gene responsible for Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome (MDL). LIS1 gene is located in the region of chromosome 17p13.3 that is frequency deleted in MDL patients and in human liver cancer cells. However, the expression and significance of LIS1 in liver cancer remain unknown. Here, we investigated the expression of LIS1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues by real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that the mRNA and protein levels of LIS1 were downregulated in about 70% of HCC tissues, and this downregulation was significantly associated with tumor progression. Functional studies showed that the reduction of LIS1 expression in the normal human liver cell line QSG7701 or the mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 by shRNA resulted in colony formation in soft agar and xenograft tumor formation in nude mice, demonstrating that a decrease in the LIS1 level can promote the oncogenic transformation of cells. We also observed that the phenotypes of LIS1-knockdown cells displayed various defective mitotic structures, suggesting that the mechanism by which reduced LIS1 levels results in tumorigenesis is associated with its role in mitosis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of LIS1 could significantly inhibit HCC cell proliferation and colony formation. Our results suggest that LIS1 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in the

  5. Young Mothers' Play with Their Toddlers: Individual Variability as a Function of Psychosocial Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Joan Riley; Easterbrooks, M. Ann

    2007-01-01

    There is no one style of parenting which characterizes young mothers as a group. In addition, life circumstances play an important role in shaping maternal behaviour. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of maternal play behaviour and contextual (social and personal) factors associated with these different patterns. In this study, 107…

  6. Basic Concepts of CNS Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowakowski, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of this review are to: (1) provide a set of concepts to aid in the understanding of complex processes which occur during central nervous system (CNS) development; (2) illustrate how they contribute to our knowlege of adult brain anatomy; and (3) delineate how modifications of normal developmental processes may affect the structure and…

  7. On the complexity of classical guitar playing: functional adaptations to task constraints.

    PubMed

    Heijink, Hank; Meulenbroek, Ruud G J

    2002-12-01

    The authors performed a behavioral study of the complexity of left-hand finger movements in classical guitar playing. Six professional guitarists played movement sequences in a fixed tempo. Left-hand finger movements were recorded in 3 dimensions, and the guitar sound was recorded synchronously. Assuming that performers prefer to avoid extreme joint angles when moving, the authors hypothesized 3 complexity factors. The results showed differential effects of the complexity factors on the performance measures and on participants' judgments of complexity. The results demonstrated that keeping the joints in the middle of their range is an important principle in guitar playing, and players exploit the available tolerance in timing and placement of the left-hand fingers to control the acoustic output variability.

  8. Ubiquitin-proteasome pathway components as therapeutic targets for CNS maladies.

    PubMed

    Upadhya, Sudarshan C; Hegde, Ashok N

    2005-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), abnormal deposition of insoluble protein aggregates or inclusion bodies within nerve cells is commonly observed in association with several neurodegenerative diseases. The ubiquitinated protein aggregates are believed to result from malfunction or overload of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway or from structural changes in the protein substrates which prevent their recognition and degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Impaired proteolysis might also contribute to the synaptic dysfunction seen early in neurodegenerative diseases because the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is known to play a role in normal functioning of synapses. Because specificity of the ubiquitin proteasome mediated proteolysis is determined by specific ubiquitin ligases (E3s), identification of specific E3s and their allosteric modulators are likely to provide effective therapeutic targets for the treatment of several CNS disorders. Another unexplored area for the discovery of drug targets is the proteasome. Although many inhibitors of the proteasome are available, no effective drugs exist that can stimulate the proteasome. Since abnormal protein aggregation is a common feature of different neurodegenerative diseases, enhancement of proteasome activity might be an efficient way to remove the aggregates that accumulate in the brain. In this review, we discuss how the components of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway could be potential targets for therapy of CNS diseases and disorders.

  9. Prodrug approaches for CNS delivery.

    PubMed

    Rautio, Jarkko; Laine, Krista; Gynther, Mikko; Savolainen, Jouko

    2008-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) drug delivery remains a major challenge, despite extensive efforts that have been made to develop novel strategies to overcome obstacles. Prodrugs are bioreversible derivatives of drug molecules that must undergo an enzymatic and/or chemical transformation in vivo to release the active parent drug, which subsequently exerts the desired pharmacological effect. In both drug discovery and drug development, prodrugs have become an established tool for improving physicochemical, biopharmaceutical or pharmacokinetic properties of pharmacologically active agents that overcome barriers to a drug's usefulness. This review provides insight into various prodrug strategies explored to date for CNS drug delivery, including lipophilic prodrugs, carrier- and receptor-mediated prodrug delivery systems, and gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy.

  10. A Novel CNS-Restricted Isoform of the IL-1R Accessory Protein Modulates Neuronal Responses to IL-1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Dirk E.; Lipsky, Brian P.; Russell, Chris; Ketchem, Randal R.; Kirchner, Jacqueline; Hensley, Kelly; Boissonneault, Vincent; Plante, Marie-Michèle; Rivest, Serge; Huang, Yangyang; Friedman, Wilma; Sims, John E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY IL-1 has multiple functions in both the periphery and the central nervous system (CNS) and is regulated at many levels. We identified a novel isoform of the IL-1R Accessory Protein (termed AcPb) that is expressed exclusively in the CNS. AcPb interacted with IL-1 and the IL-1 receptor but was unable to mediate canonical IL-1 responses. AcPb expression, however, modulated neuronal gene expression in response to IL-1 treatment in vitro. Animals lacking AcPb demonstrated an intact peripheral IL-1 response and developed experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) similarly to wild type mice. AcPb-deficient mice were instead more vulnerable to local inflammatory challenge in the CNS and suffered enhanced neuronal degeneration as compared to AcP-deficient or wild type mice. These findings implicate AcPb as an additional component of the highly regulated IL-1 system and suggest it may play a role in modulating CNS responses to IL-1 and the interplay between inflammation and neuronal survival. PMID:19481478

  11. Central Nervous System (CNS) Delivery of Glucocorticoids Is Fine-Tuned by Saturable Transporters at the Blood-CNS Barriers and Nonbarrier Regions

    PubMed Central

    Pariante, Carmine M.; Jamel, Sara; Thomas, Sarah A.

    2010-01-01

    Proper functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis depends on the ability of glucocorticoids (GCs), mainly cortisol in humans and corticosterone in rodents, to access brain targets and regulate their own secretion. Being highly lipophilic, GCs have been assumed to passively diffuse through the cell membrane. However, the access of these GCs to the brain may be a more complicated process, because the free movement of molecules into the central nervous system (CNS) is restricted by the presence of the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers. GCs do interact with some transporter systems, including the efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein, and members of the organic anion transporter polypeptide (oatp) family, both of which have been found at the blood-CNS barriers. Using an in situ brain/choroid plexus perfusion, P-glycoprotein was shown to not majorly regulate the access of [3H]cortisol and [3H]corticosterone to the choroid plexus or pituitary gland. Interactions of [3H]cortisol and [3H]corticosterone with saturable influx transporters were detected at the hypothalamus, cerebellum, choroid plexus, and pituitary gland. Oatp2 seems to have some role in the influx of [3H]cortisol and [3H]corticosterone to the choroid plexus and the pituitary gland and other transporters, unlikely to be oatp2, may play a very minor role in the access of [3H]cortisol and [3H]corticosterone to the brain, as well as having a significant effect on [3H]glucocorticoid receptor accumulation in the pituitary gland. Overall, these data suggest that the majority of cortisol and corticosterone present in the plasma diffuse into the CNS and that transporters do not play a major role in the accumulation of these GCs in the brain. PMID:20881247

  12. The role of peripheral immune cells in the CNS in steady state and disease.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Marco; Priller, Josef

    2017-02-01

    The CNS is protected by the immune system, including cells that reside directly within the CNS and help to ensure proper neural function, as well as cells that traffic into the CNS with disease. The CNS-resident immune system is comprised mainly of innate immune cells and operates under homeostatic conditions. These myeloid cells in the CNS parenchyma and at CNS-periphery interfaces are highly specialized but also extremely plastic cells that immediately react to any changes in CNS homeostasis and become reactive in the context of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease. However, when the blood-brain barrier is impaired during CNS diseases such as multiple sclerosis or altered with cerebral ischemia, peripheral adaptive and innate immune cells, including monocytes, neutrophils, T cells and B cells, can enter the CNS, where they execute distinct cell-mediated effects. On the basis of these observations, we assess strategies for targeting peripheral immune cells to reduce CNS disease burden.

  13. Play with online virtual pets as a method to improve mirror neuron and real world functioning in autistic children.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, Eric Lewin

    2008-01-01

    Autism is a severe disease with no known cause and no cure or treatment. Recently, ourselves and subsequently others found that so-called "mirror neurons" - neurons that respond not only when a person moves, but upon observation of movement in another - are dysfunctional in autistic children. Here I suggest an easy, simple, inexpensive and fun method to improve mirror neuron functioning in autistic children, increase appreciation in autistic children for the theory of mind and thinking of others, and most importantly hopefully to improve real world functioning: play with virtual online pets that are the "embodiment" of a stuffed animal the child has. Adoption and then care and play with online pets forces, in a fun way, one to think about the world through the eyes and needs of the pet. A simple method to test this play with online virtual pet therapy is described.

  14. Neuronal intrinsic barriers for axon regeneration in the adult CNS

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fang; He, Zhigang

    2010-01-01

    A major reason for the devastating and permanent disabilities after spinal cord and other types of CNS injury is the failure of injured axons to regenerate and to re-build the functional circuits. Thus, a long-standing goal has been to develop strategies that could promote axon regeneration and restore functions. Recent studies revealed that simply removing extracellular inhibitory activities is insufficient for successful axon regeneration in the adult CNS. On the other side, evidence from different species and different models is accumulating to support the notion that diminished intrinsic regenerative ability of mature neurons is a major contributor to regeneration failure. This review will summarize the molecular mechanisms regulating intrinsic axon growth capacity in the adult CNS and discuss potential implications for therapeutic strategies. PMID:20418094

  15. Mothers' Reports of Play Dates and Observation of School Playground Behavior of Children Having High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Frederick D.; Gorospe, Clarissa M.; Chang, Ya-Chih; Sugar, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are generally included with typically developing peers at school. They have difficulties interacting with peers on the school playground. Previous literature suggests that having play dates in the home may be related to better peer acceptance at school. Methods: This study…

  16. CNS reservoirs for HIV: implications for eradication.

    PubMed

    Hellmuth, Joanna; Valcour, Victor; Spudich, Serena

    2015-04-01

    Controversy exists as to whether the central nervous system (CNS) serves as a reservoir site for HIV, in part reflecting the varying perspectives on what constitutes a 'reservoir' versus a mere site of latent viral integration. However, if the CNS proves to be a site of HIV persistence capable of replicating and reseeding the periphery, leading to failure of virological control, this privileged anatomical site would need dedicated consideration during the development of HIV cure strategies. In this review we discuss the current literature focused on the question of the CNS as a reservoir for HIV, covering the clinical evidence for continued CNS involvement despite suppressive therapy, the theorised dynamics of HIV integration into the CNS, as well as studies indicating that HIV can replicate independently and compartmentalise in the CNS. The unique cellular and anatomical sites of HIV integration in the CNS are also reviewed, as are the potential implications for HIV cure strategies.

  17. Astrocyte scar formation aids CNS axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Mark A.; Burda, Joshua E.; Ren, Yilong; Ao, Yan; O’Shea, Timothy M.; Kawaguchi, Riki; Coppola, Giovanni; Khakh, Baljit S.; Deming, Timothy J.; Sofroniew, Michael V.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Transected axons fail to regrow in the mature central nervous system (CNS). Astrocyte scars are widely regarded as causal in this failure. Here, using three genetically targeted loss-of-function manipulations in adult mice, we show that preventing astrocyte scar formation, attenuating scar-forming astrocytes, or deleting chronic astrocyte scars all failed to result in spontaneous regrowth of transected corticospinal, sensory or serotonergic axons through severe spinal cord injury (SCI) lesions. In striking contrast, sustained local delivery via hydrogel depots of required axon-specific growth factors not present in SCI lesions, plus growth-activating priming injuries, stimulated robust, laminin-dependent sensory axon regrowth past scar-forming astrocytes and inhibitory molecules in SCI lesions. Preventing astrocyte scar formation significantly reduced this stimulated axon regrowth. RNA sequencing revealed that astrocytes and non-astrocyte cells in SCI lesions express multiple axon-growth supporting molecules. Our findings show that contrary to prevailing dogma, astrocyte scar formation aids rather than prevents CNS axon regeneration. PMID:27027288

  18. Collision avoidance behavior as a function of aging and tennis playing.

    PubMed

    Lobjois, Régis; Benguigui, Nicolas; Bertsch, Jean; Broderick, Michael P

    2008-02-01

    Daily living often requires pedestrians and drivers to adapt their behavior to the displacement of other objects in their environment in order to avoid collision. Yet little research has paid attention to the effect of age on the completion of such a challenging task. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between age and collision avoidance skill and whether a sporting activity affects this. Three age groups (20-30, 60-70, and 70-80 years) of tennis players and non-players launched a projectile toward a target in order to hit it before it was hit by another "object" (a stimulus represented by apparent motion of lights). If the participant judged that time-to-collision (TTC) of the moving stimulus was not long enough for him/her to launch the projectile in time to arrive before the stimulus, the participant had to inhibit the launching. Results showed that for the non-players the number of errors in the 70-80 year-old group was significantly higher than those of the 20-30 and 60-70 year-old groups, which did not differ from each other. However, this increase was not observed in the 70-80 year-old tennis players, demonstrating a beneficial effect of playing tennis on collision avoidance skill. Results also revealed that the older groups of both tennis players and non-players were subject to the typical age-related increase in response time. Additional analyses indicated that the 70-80 year-old non-players did not adjust their actions to these age-related changes in response time. The older tennis-playing participants, however, were more likely to adjust collision avoidance behavior to their diminished response times.

  19. Executive function plays a role in coordinating different perspectives, particularly when one's own perspective is involved.

    PubMed

    Fizke, Ella; Barthel, Dana; Peters, Thomas; Rakoczy, Hannes

    2014-03-01

    While developmental experiments with children and elderly subjects, work with neuropsychological patients and adult experimental studies have consistently found close relations between executive function and theory of mind, the foundation of this relation still remains somewhat unclear. One prominent account holds that executive function is specifically involved in ascribing such mental states, paradigmatically beliefs, that aim at representing the world truly because ascribing such states requires inhibition of normative defaults (beliefs being true) (e.g. Sabbagh, Moses, & Shiverick, 2006). The present studies systematically tested for the role of executive function in different forms of mental state ascription as a function of the type of state ascribed (beliefs or desires) and the first person involvement of the ascriber (whether she herself has an attitude conflicting with one to be ascribed to someone else) in young children. The results reveal that (i) executive function is related not only to belief ascription but equally to desire ascription when both are matched in terms of logical complexity (such that two subjective attitudes have to be ascribed to two agents that are incompatible with each other). (ii) Both for desires and for beliefs, these relations are strongest in such tasks where the ascriber herself is one of the two agents, i.e. has a belief or desire herself that stands in contrast to that to be ascribed to someone else. All in all, these findings suggest that executive function figures in coordinating perspectives more generally, not only epistemic ones, and in particular in coordinating others' and one's own conflicting perspectives.

  20. In vivo imaging of the neurovascular unit in CNS disease

    PubMed Central

    Merlini, Mario; Davalos, Dimitrios; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    The neurovascular unit—comprised of glia, pericytes, neurons and cerebrovasculature—is a dynamic interface that ensures physiological central nervous system (CNS) functioning. In disease dynamic remodeling of the neurovascular interface triggers a cascade of responses that determine the extent of CNS degeneration and repair. The dynamics of these processes can be adequately captured by imaging in vivo, which allows the study of cellular responses to environmental stimuli and cell-cell interactions in the living brain in real time. This perspective focuses on intravital imaging studies of the neurovascular unit in stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer disease (AD) models and discusses their potential for identifying novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25197615

  1. Mechanisms regulating regional localization of inflammation during CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Emily; Simmons, Sarah B.; Castelli, Luca; Goverman, Joan M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by inflammatory, demyelinating lesions localized in the brain and spinal cord. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of MS that is induced by activating myelin-specific T cells and exhibits immune cell infiltrates in the CNS similar to those seen in MS. Both MS and EAE exhibit disease heterogeneity, reflecting variations in clinical course and localization of lesions within the CNS. Collectively, the differences seen in MS and EAE suggest that the brain and spinal cord function as unique microenvironments that respond differently to infiltrating immune cells. This review addresses the roles of the cytokines interferon-γ and interleukin-17 in determining the localization of inflammation to the brain or spinal cord in EAE. PMID:22725963

  2. Intermediate Filaments Play a Pivotal Role in Regulating Cell Architecture and Function*

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Jason; Kuczmarski, Edward R.; Herrmann, Harald; Goldman, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) are composed of one or more members of a large family of cytoskeletal proteins, whose expression is cell- and tissue type-specific. Their importance in regulating the physiological properties of cells is becoming widely recognized in functions ranging from cell motility to signal transduction. IF proteins assemble into nanoscale biopolymers with unique strain-hardening properties that are related to their roles in regulating the mechanical integrity of cells. Furthermore, mutations in the genes encoding IF proteins cause a wide range of human diseases. Due to the number of different types of IF proteins, we have limited this short review to cover structure and function topics mainly related to the simpler homopolymeric IF networks composed of vimentin, and specifically for diseases, the related muscle-specific desmin IF networks. PMID:25957409

  3. Olfactory receptor accessory proteins play crucial roles in receptor function and gene choice

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ruchira; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Davison, Ian; Ikegami, Kentaro; Chien, Ming-Shan; You, Helena; Chi, Quiyi; Kubota, Momoka; Yohda, Masafumi; Ehlers, Michael; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Each of the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) chooses to express a single G protein-coupled olfactory receptor (OR) from a pool of hundreds. Here, we show the receptor transporting protein (RTP) family members play a dual role in both normal OR trafficking and determining OR gene choice probabilities. Rtp1 and Rtp2 double knockout mice (RTP1,2DKO) show OR trafficking defects and decreased OSN activation. Surprisingly, we discovered a small subset of the ORs are expressed in larger numbers of OSNs despite the presence of fewer total OSNs in RTP1,2DKO. Unlike typical ORs, some overrepresented ORs show robust cell surface expression in heterologous cells without the co-expression of RTPs. We present a model in which developing OSNs exhibit unstable OR expression until they choose to express an OR that exits the ER or undergo cell death. Our study sheds light on the new link between OR protein trafficking and OR transcriptional regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21895.001 PMID:28262096

  4. TLR4 plays a crucial role in MSC-induced inhibition of NK cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ying; Liu, Jin; Liu, Yang; Qin, Yaru; Luo, Qun; Wang, Quanli; Duan, Haifeng

    2015-08-21

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a kind of stromal cell within the tumor microenvironment. In our research, MSC derived from acute myeloid leukemia patients' bone marrow (AML-MSC) and lung cancer tissues (LC-MSC) as well as normal bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) cultured in conditioned medium of HeLa cells were found to have higher expressions of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) mRNA compared with BM-MSC. The sorted TLR4-positive MSC (TLR4+ MSC) differed in cytokine (interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) secretion from those of unsorted MSC. MSC was reported to inhibit natural killer (NK) cell proliferation and function. In this research, we confirmed that TLR4+ MSC aggravate this suppression. Furthermore, when TLR4 in the sorted cells were stimulated by LPS or following blocked by antibody, the suppression on NK cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were more intensive or recovered respectively. Compared to unsorted MSC, NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells were also inhibited by TLR4+ MSC. These findings suggest that activation of TLR4 pathway is important for TLR4+ MSC and MSC to obstruct anti-tumor immunity by inhibiting NK cell function, which may provide a potential stroma-targeted tumor therapy. - Highlights: • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NK cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NKG2D expression on NK cells and NK cell cytotoxicity. • The distinguished cytokine expression of TLR4+ MSC may contribute to the inhibition on NK cell function.

  5. Conditional Disruption of Calpain in the CNS Alters Dendrite Morphology, Impairs LTP, and Promotes Neuronal Survival following Injury

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Mandana; Ma, Chun-lei; Farazifard, Rasoul; Zhu, Guoqi; Zhang, Yi; Vanderluit, Jacqueline; Zoltewicz, Joanna Susie; Hage, Fadi; Savitt, Joseph M.; Lagace, Diane C.; Slack, Ruth S.; Beique, Jean-Claude; Baudry, Michel; Greer, Peter A.; Bergeron, Richard; Park, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitous classical (typical) calpains, calpain-1 and calpain-2, are Ca+2-dependent cysteine proteases, which have been associated with numerous physiological and pathological cellular functions. However, a clear understanding of the role of calpains in the CNS has been hampered by the lack of appropriate deletion paradigms in the brain. In this study, we describe a unique model of conditional deletion of both calpain-1 and calpain-2 activities in mouse brain, which more definitively assesses the role of these ubiquitous proteases in brain development/function and pathology. Surprisingly, we show that these calpains are not critical for gross CNS development. However, calpain-1/calpain-2 loss leads to reduced dendritic branching complexity and spine density deficits associated with major deterioration in hippocampal long-term potentiation and spatial memory. Moreover, calpain-1/calpain-2-deficient neurons were significantly resistant to injury induced by excitotoxic stress or mitochondrial toxicity. Examination of downstream target showed that the conversion of the Cdk5 activator, p35, to pathogenic p25 form, occurred only in the presence of calpain and that it played a major role in calpain-mediated neuronal death. These findings unequivocally establish two central roles of calpain-1/calpain-2 in CNS function in plasticity and neuronal death. PMID:23536090

  6. TLR4 plays a crucial role in MSC-induced inhibition of NK cell function.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; Liu, Jin; Liu, Yang; Qin, Yaru; Luo, Qun; Wang, Quanli; Duan, Haifeng

    2015-08-21

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a kind of stromal cell within the tumor microenvironment. In our research, MSC derived from acute myeloid leukemia patients' bone marrow (AML-MSC) and lung cancer tissues (LC-MSC) as well as normal bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) cultured in conditioned medium of HeLa cells were found to have higher expressions of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) mRNA compared with BM-MSC. The sorted TLR4-positive MSC (TLR4+ MSC) differed in cytokine (interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) secretion from those of unsorted MSC. MSC was reported to inhibit natural killer (NK) cell proliferation and function. In this research, we confirmed that TLR4+ MSC aggravate this suppression. Furthermore, when TLR4 in the sorted cells were stimulated by LPS or following blocked by antibody, the suppression on NK cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were more intensive or recovered respectively. Compared to unsorted MSC, NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells were also inhibited by TLR4+ MSC. These findings suggest that activation of TLR4 pathway is important for TLR4+ MSC and MSC to obstruct anti-tumor immunity by inhibiting NK cell function, which may provide a potential stroma-targeted tumor therapy.

  7. Leptin and the CNS Control of Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Gregory J.; Schwartz, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of body fat stores and blood glucose levels is critical for survival. This review highlights growing evidence that leptin action in the central nervous system (CNS) plays a key role in both processes. Investigation into underlying mechanisms has begun to clarify the physiological role of leptin in the control of glucose metabolism and raises interesting new possibilities for the treatment of diabetes and related disorders. PMID:21527729

  8. AQP4-Dependent Water Transport Plays a Functional Role in Exercise-Induced Skeletal Muscle Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Basco, Davide; Blaauw, Bert; Pisani, Francesco; Sparaneo, Angelo; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Mola, Maria Grazia; Reggiani, Carlo; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In this study we assess the functional role of Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) in the skeletal muscle by analyzing whether physical activity modulates AQP4 expression and whether the absence of AQP4 has an effect on osmotic behavior, muscle contractile properties, and physical activity. To this purpose, rats and mice were trained on the treadmill for 10 (D10) and 30 (D30) days and tested with exercise to exhaustion, and muscles were used for immunoblotting, RT-PCR, and fiber-type distribution analysis. Taking advantage of the AQP4 KO murine model, functional analysis of AQP4 was performed on dissected muscle fibers and sarcolemma vesicles. Moreover, WT and AQP4 KO mice were subjected to both voluntary and forced activity. Rat fast-twitch muscles showed a twofold increase in AQP4 protein in D10 and D30 rats compared to sedentary rats. Such increase positively correlated with the animal performance, since highest level of AQP4 protein was found in high runner rats. Interestingly, no shift in muscle fiber composition nor an increase in AQP4-positive fibers was found. Furthermore, no changes in AQP4 mRNA after exercise were detected, suggesting that post-translational events are likely to be responsible for AQP4 modulation. Experiments performed on AQP4 KO mice revealed a strong impairment in osmotic responses as well as in forced and voluntary activities compared to WT mice, even though force development amplitude and contractile properties were unvaried. Our findings definitively demonstrate the physiological role of AQP4 in supporting muscle contractile activity and metabolic changes that occur in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during prolonged exercise. PMID:23520529

  9. AQP4-dependent water transport plays a functional role in exercise-induced skeletal muscle adaptations.

    PubMed

    Basco, Davide; Blaauw, Bert; Pisani, Francesco; Sparaneo, Angelo; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Mola, Maria Grazia; Reggiani, Carlo; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In this study we assess the functional role of Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) in the skeletal muscle by analyzing whether physical activity modulates AQP4 expression and whether the absence of AQP4 has an effect on osmotic behavior, muscle contractile properties, and physical activity. To this purpose, rats and mice were trained on the treadmill for 10 (D10) and 30 (D30) days and tested with exercise to exhaustion, and muscles were used for immunoblotting, RT-PCR, and fiber-type distribution analysis. Taking advantage of the AQP4 KO murine model, functional analysis of AQP4 was performed on dissected muscle fibers and sarcolemma vesicles. Moreover, WT and AQP4 KO mice were subjected to both voluntary and forced activity. Rat fast-twitch muscles showed a twofold increase in AQP4 protein in D10 and D30 rats compared to sedentary rats. Such increase positively correlated with the animal performance, since highest level of AQP4 protein was found in high runner rats. Interestingly, no shift in muscle fiber composition nor an increase in AQP4-positive fibers was found. Furthermore, no changes in AQP4 mRNA after exercise were detected, suggesting that post-translational events are likely to be responsible for AQP4 modulation. Experiments performed on AQP4 KO mice revealed a strong impairment in osmotic responses as well as in forced and voluntary activities compared to WT mice, even though force development amplitude and contractile properties were unvaried. Our findings definitively demonstrate the physiological role of AQP4 in supporting muscle contractile activity and metabolic changes that occur in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during prolonged exercise.

  10. Causes of CNS inflammation and potential targets for anticonvulsants.

    PubMed

    Falip, Mercé; Salas-Puig, Xavier; Cara, Carlos

    2013-08-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important endogenous defence mechanisms in an organism. It has been suggested that inflammation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of a number of human epilepsies and convulsive disorders, and there is clinical and experimental evidence to suggest that inflammatory processes within the CNS may either contribute to or be a consequence of epileptogenesis. This review discusses evidence from human studies on the role of inflammation in epilepsy and highlights potential new targets in the inflammatory cascade for antiepileptic drugs. A number of mechanisms have been shown to be involved in CNS inflammatory reactions. These include an inflammatory response at the level of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), immune-mediated damage to the CNS, stress-induced release of inflammatory mediators and direct neuronal dysfunction or damage as a result of inflammatory reactions. Mediators of inflammation in the CNS include interleukin (IL)-1β, tumour necrosis factor-α, nuclear factor-κB and toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). IL-1β, BBB and high-mobility group box-1-TLR4 signalling appear to be the most promising targets for anticonvulsant agents directed at inflammation. Such agents may provide effective therapy for drug-resistant epilepsies in the future.

  11. Safety Evaluation of CNS Administered Biologics-Study Design, Data Interpretation, and Translation to the Clinic.

    PubMed

    Vuillemenot, Brian R; Korte, Sven; Wright, Teresa L; Adams, Eric L; Boyd, Robert B; Butt, Mark T

    2016-07-01

    Many central nervous system (CNS) diseases are inadequately treated by systemically administered therapies due to the blood brain barrier (BBB), which prevents achieving adequate drug concentrations at sites of action. Due to the increasing prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases and the inability of most systemically administered therapies to cross the BBB, direct CNS delivery will likely play an increasing role in treatment. Administration of large molecules, cells, viral vectors, oligonucleotides, and other novel therapies directly to the CNS via the subarachnoid space, ventricular system, or parenchyma overcomes this obstacle. Clinical experience with direct CNS administration of small molecule therapies suggests that this approach may be efficacious for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders using biological therapies. Risks of administration into the brain tissue or cerebrospinal fluid include local damage from implantation of the delivery system and/or administration of the therapeutic and reactions affecting the CNS. Preclinical safety studies on CNS administered compounds must differentiate between the effects of the test article, the delivery device, and/or the vehicle, and assess exacerbations of reactions due to combinations of effects. Animal models characterized for safety assessment of CNS administered therapeutics have enabled human trials, but interpretation can be challenging. This manuscript outlines the challenges of preclinical intrathecal/intracerebroventricular/intraparenchymal studies, evaluation of results, considerations for special endpoints, and translation of preclinical findings to enable first-in-human trials. Recommendations will be made based on the authors' collective experience with conducting these studies to enable clinical development of CNS-administered biologics.

  12. Role of GFAP in CNS injuries

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The role of GFAP in CNS injury is reviewed as revealed by studies using GFAP null mice. In order to provide background information for these studies, the effects of absence of GFAP in the uninjured astrocyte is also described. Activities attributable to GFAP include suppressing neuronal proliferation and neurite extension in the mature brain, forming a physical barrier to isolate damaged tissue, regulating blood flow following ischemia, contributing to the blood-brain barrier, supporting myelination, and providing mechanical strength. However, findings for many of these roles have been variable among laboratories, pointing to the presence of unappreciated complexity in GFAP function. One complexity may be regional differences in GFAP activities; others are yet to be discovered. PMID:24508671

  13. Shifts in reinforcement signalling while playing slot-machines as a function of prior experience and impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Shao, R; Read, J; Behrens, T E J; Rogers, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electronic gaming machines (EGMs) offer significant revenue streams for mercantile gambling. However, limited clinical and experimental evidence suggests that EGMs are associated with heightened risks of clinically problematic patterns of play. Little is known about the neural structures that might mediate the transition from exploratory EGM play to the ‘addictive' play seen in problem gamblers; neither is it known how personality traits associated with gambling activity (and gambling problems) influence reinforcement processing while playing EGMs. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in healthy participants, we show that a single episode of slot-machine play is subsequently associated with reduced amplitudes of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent signals within reinforcement-related structures, such as the ventral striatum and caudate nucleus, following winning game outcomes; but increased amplitudes of anticipatory signals within the ventral striatum and amygdala while watching the game reels spin. Trait impulsivity enhanced positive signals within the ventral striatum and amygdala following the delivery of winning outcomes but diminished positive signals following the experience of almost-winning ('near-misses'). These results indicate that a single episode of slot-machine play engages the well-characterised reinforcement-learning mechanisms mediated by ascending dopamine mesolimbic and mesostriatal pathways, to shift reward value of EGMs away from game outcomes towards anticipatory states. Impulsivity, itself linked to problem gambling and heightened vulnerability to other addictive disorders, is associated with divergent coding of winning outcomes and almost-winning experiences within the ventral striatum and amygdala, potentially enhancing the reward value of successful slot-machine game outcomes but, at the same time, modulating the aversive motivational consequences of near-miss outcomes. PMID:23321810

  14. Shifts in reinforcement signalling while playing slot-machines as a function of prior experience and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Shao, R; Read, J; Behrens, T E J; Rogers, R D

    2013-01-15

    Electronic gaming machines (EGMs) offer significant revenue streams for mercantile gambling. However, limited clinical and experimental evidence suggests that EGMs are associated with heightened risks of clinically problematic patterns of play. Little is known about the neural structures that might mediate the transition from exploratory EGM play to the 'addictive' play seen in problem gamblers; neither is it known how personality traits associated with gambling activity (and gambling problems) influence reinforcement processing while playing EGMs. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in healthy participants, we show that a single episode of slot-machine play is subsequently associated with reduced amplitudes of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent signals within reinforcement-related structures, such as the ventral striatum and caudate nucleus, following winning game outcomes; but increased amplitudes of anticipatory signals within the ventral striatum and amygdala while watching the game reels spin. Trait impulsivity enhanced positive signals within the ventral striatum and amygdala following the delivery of winning outcomes but diminished positive signals following the experience of almost-winning ('near-misses'). These results indicate that a single episode of slot-machine play engages the well-characterised reinforcement-learning mechanisms mediated by ascending dopamine mesolimbic and mesostriatal pathways, to shift reward value of EGMs away from game outcomes towards anticipatory states. Impulsivity, itself linked to problem gambling and heightened vulnerability to other addictive disorders, is associated with divergent coding of winning outcomes and almost-winning experiences within the ventral striatum and amygdala, potentially enhancing the reward value of successful slot-machine game outcomes but, at the same time, modulating the aversive motivational consequences of near-miss outcomes.

  15. Shifts in reinforcement signalling while playing slot-machines as a function of prior experience and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Shao, R; Read, J; Behrens, T E J; Rogers, R D

    2013-02-26

    Electronic gaming machines (EGMs) offer significant revenue streams for mercantile gambling. However, limited clinical and experimental evidence suggests that EGMs are associated with heightened risks of clinically problematic patterns of play. Little is known about the neural structures that might mediate the transition from exploratory EGM play to the ‘addictive’ play seen in problem gamblers; neither is it known how personality traits associated with gambling activity (and gambling problems) influence reinforcement processing while playing EGMs. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in healthy participants, we show that a single episode of slot-machine play is subsequently associated with reduced amplitudes of blood-oxygenation level-dependent signals within reinforcement-related structures, such as the ventral striatum and caudate nucleus, following winning game outcomes; but increased amplitudes of anticipatory signals within the ventral striatum and amygdala while watching the game reels spin. Trait impulsivity enhanced positive signals within the ventral striatum and amygdala following the delivery of winning outcomes but diminished positive signals following the experience of almost-winning (’near-misses’). These results indicate that a single episode of slot-machine play engages the well-characterised reinforcement-learning mechanisms mediated by ascending dopamine mesolimbic and mesostriatal pathways, to shift reward value of EGMs away from game outcomes towards anticipatory states. Impulsivity, itself linked to problem gambling and heightened vulnerability to other addictive disorders, is associated with divergent coding of winning outcomes and almost-winning experiences within the ventral striatum and amygdala, potentially enhancing the reward value of successful slot-machine game outcomes but, at the same time,modulating the aversive motivational consequences of near-miss outcomes.

  16. Interleukin-7 is decreased and maybe plays a pro-inflammatory function in primary immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Yuan; Zhang, Dong-Lei; Zhang, Xian; Liu, Xiao-Fan; Xue, Feng; Yang, Ren-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disease with many immune dysfunctions, including over-proliferation and apoptosis resistance of auto-reactive lymphocytes. This study aimed to determine the effects of interleukin (IL)-7 on the cytokine production and survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells from ITP patients. We found that the plasma IL-7 levels in peripheral blood from ITP patients were lower than that of the normal controls, and it had positive correlation with platelet counts. However, the levels of IL-7 did not change in bone marrow serum of ITP patients compared with that of normal controls. The result of further stimulation experiments in vitro showed that IL-7 up-regulated the apoptosis of autologous platelets, promoted the proliferation and secretion of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α as well as IL-10 of lymphocyte both from peripheral blood and bone marrow. As the role of IL-7 in apoptosis-resistance and stimulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, we speculated that decreased IL-7 in peripheral blood, maybe, is a consequence of the negative feedback of the pro-inflammatory function in ITP patients.

  17. Dispersion quality of amine functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes plays critical roles in polymerase chain reaction enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuce, Meral; Budak, Hikmet

    2014-12-01

    Impact of dispersion quality of NH2-MWCNTs (13-18 nm in diameter with a length between 1 and 12 µm, >99 % purity) in the amplification efficiency of a random DNA oligonucleotide library (96 bp) was investigated. Amplification yield in the presence of non-filtered NH2-MWCNT dispersion, filtered NH2-MWCNT dispersion and surface-attached NH2-MWCNTs was explored, and physical interactions between NH2-MWCNTs and major PCR reagents including DNA template, wild type Taq DNA polymerase enzyme and primers were determined using high resolution polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The results revealed that presence of NH2-MWCNT dispersion which was sonicated, centrifuged and filtered, enhanced the total PCR efficiency up to 70 % while the presence of NH2-MWCNT only centrifuged after sonication, inhibited the reaction significantly at similar concentrations. Furthermore, the NH2-MWCNTs coupled covalently onto magnetic microspheres, contributed for the specificity enhancement whilst decreasing the amplification efficiency by 30 % at the maximum concentration, which suggests a removable enhancement system for sensitive applications. On the other hand, the relative hydrodynamic size distribution measurements displayed a clear difference between the filtered NH2 and non-filtered NH2-MWCNT water dispersions, which justifies the inhibition of the amplification by the non-filtered NH2-MWCNTs containing big agglomerates and bundles. Finally, we demonstrated that major PCR components adsorb onto the NH2-MWCNTs with diverse affinities, and maintain their functions after adsorption, which provides a good framework to further develop tunable NH2-MWCNT-carriers to be utilized in various nanobiotechnology and material science applications.

  18. Cannabinoid-dopamine interaction in the pathophysiology and treatment of CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Hernández, Mariluz; Ramos, José A

    2010-06-01

    Endocannabinoids and their receptors, mainly the CB(1) receptor type, function as a retrograde signaling system in many synapses within the CNS, particularly in GABAergic and glutamatergic synapses. They also play a modulatory function on dopamine (DA) transmission, although CB(1) receptors do not appear to be located in dopaminergic terminals, at least in the major brain regions receiving dopaminergic innervation, e.g., the caudate-putamen and the nucleus accumbens/prefrontal cortex. Therefore, the effects of cannabinoids on DA transmission and DA-related behaviors are generally indirect and exerted through the modulation of GABA and glutamate inputs received by dopaminergic neurons. Recent evidence suggest, however, that certain eicosanoid-derived cannabinoids may directly activate TRPV(1) receptors, which have been found in some dopaminergic pathways, thus allowing a direct regulation of DA function. Through this direct mechanism or through indirect mechanisms involving GABA or glutamate neurons, cannabinoids may interact with DA transmission in the CNS and this has an important influence in various DA-related neurobiological processes (e.g., control of movement, motivation/reward) and, particularly, on different pathologies affecting these processes like basal ganglia disorders, schizophrenia, and drug addiction. The present review will address the current literature supporting these cannabinoid-DA interactions, with emphasis in aspects dealing with the neurochemical, physiological, and pharmacological/therapeutic bases of these interactions.

  19. Neuron-specific SALM5 limits inflammation in the CNS via its interaction with HVEM.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuwen; Yao, Sheng; Augustine, Mathew M; Xu, Haiying; Wang, Jun; Sun, Jingwei; Broadwater, Megan; Ruff, William; Luo, Liqun; Zhu, Gefeng; Tamada, Koji; Chen, Lieping

    2016-04-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is an immune-privileged organ with the capacity to prevent excessive inflammation. Aside from the blood-brain barrier, active immunosuppressive mechanisms remain largely unknown. We report that a neuron-specific molecule, synaptic adhesion-like molecule 5 (SALM5), is a crucial contributor to CNS immune privilege. We found that SALM5 suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in the CNS and that a SALM-specific monoclonal antibody promoted inflammation in the CNS, and thereby aggravated clinical symptoms of mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In addition, we identified herpes virus entry mediator as a functional receptor that mediates SALM5's suppressive function. Our findings reveal a molecular link between the neuronal system and the immune system, and provide potential therapeutic targets for the control of CNS diseases.

  20. Functional Connectivity Is Altered in Concussed Adolescent Athletes Despite Medical Clearance to Return to Play: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Mary R.; Li, Xiaoqi; Lin, Xiaodi; Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Ott, Summer; Biekman, Brian; Hunter, Jill V.; Dash, Pramod K.; Taylor, Brian A.; Levin, Harvey S.

    2016-01-01

    Recovery following sports-related concussion (SRC) is slower and often more complicated in young adolescent athletes than in collegiate players. Further, the clinical decision to return to play is currently based on symptoms and cognitive performance without direct knowledge of brain function. We tested the hypothesis that brain functional connectivity (FC) would be aberrant in recently concussed, asymptomatic athletes who had been cleared to return to play. A seed-based FC analysis measured the FC of the default mode network (DMN) (seeds = anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), right lateral parietal cortex, and left lateral parietal cortex) 30 days after SRC in asymptomatic high school athletes cleared to return to play (n = 13) and was compared to the FC of high school athletes with orthopedic injury (OI) (n = 13). The SRC group demonstrated greater FC than the OI group between the PCC and the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex, as well as between the right lateral parietal cortex and lateral temporal cortex (with regions both outside of and within the DMN). Additionally, the OI group demonstrated greater FC than the SRC group between right lateral parietal cortex and supramarginal gyrus. When relating the FC results to verbal memory performance approximately 1 week and 1 month after injury, significantly different between-group relations were found for the posterior cingulate and right lateral parietal cortex seeds. However, the groups did not differ in verbal memory at 1 month. We suggest that changes in FC are apparent 1-month post-SRC despite resolution of post-concussion symptoms and recovery of cognitive performance in adolescent athletes cleared to return to play. PMID:27504104

  1. Histone regulation in the CNS: basic principles of epigenetic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Maze, Ian; Noh, Kyung-Min; Allis, C David

    2013-01-01

    Postmitotic neurons are subject to a vast array of environmental influences that require the nuclear integration of intracellular signaling events to promote a wide variety of neuroplastic states associated with synaptic function, circuit formation, and behavioral memory. Over the last decade, much attention has been paid to the roles of transcription and chromatin regulation in guiding fundamental aspects of neuronal function. A great deal of this work has centered on neurodevelopmental and adulthood plasticity, with increased focus in the areas of neuropharmacology and molecular psychiatry. Here, we attempt to provide a broad overview of chromatin regulation, as it relates to central nervous system (CNS) function, with specific emphasis on the modes of histone posttranslational modifications, chromatin remodeling, and histone variant exchange. Understanding the functions of chromatin in the context of the CNS will aid in the future development of pharmacological therapeutics aimed at alleviating devastating neurological disorders.

  2. Myelin damage and repair in pathologic CNS: challenges and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Arsalan; Dyck, Scott M.; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) results in oligodendrocyte cell death and progressive demyelination. Demyelinated axons undergo considerable physiological changes and molecular reorganizations that collectively result in axonal dysfunction, degeneration and loss of sensory and motor functions. Endogenous adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells and neural stem/progenitor cells contribute to the replacement of oligodendrocytes, however, the extent and quality of endogenous remyelination is suboptimal. Emerging evidence indicates that optimal remyelination is restricted by multiple factors including (i) low levels of factors that promote oligodendrogenesis; (ii) cell death among newly generated oligodendrocytes, (iii) inhibitory factors in the post-injury milieu that impede remyelination, and (iv) deficient expression of key growth factors essential for proper re-construction of a highly organized myelin sheath. Considering these challenges, over the past several years, a number of cell-based strategies have been developed to optimize remyelination therapeutically. Outcomes of these basic and preclinical discoveries are promising and signify the importance of remyelination as a mechanism for improving functions in CNS injuries. In this review, we provide an overview on: (1) the precise organization of myelinated axons and the reciprocal axo-myelin interactions that warrant properly balanced physiological activities within the CNS; (2) underlying cause of demyelination and the structural and functional consequences of demyelination in axons following injury and disease; (3) the endogenous mechanisms of oligodendrocyte replacement; (4) the modulatory role of reactive astrocytes and inflammatory cells in remyelination; and (5) the current status of cell-based therapies for promoting remyelination. Careful elucidation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of demyelination in the pathologic CNS is a key to better understanding the impact of remyelination for

  3. Outdoor Play and Play Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Heather

    1985-01-01

    Discusses aspects of the play environment and its effect on children's play behavior. Indoor and outdoor play spaces are considered along with factors affecting the use of outdoor environments for play. Children's preferences for different outdoor play environments and for various play structures are explored. Guides for choosing play equipment…

  4. Palmitoylethanolamide in CNS health and disease.

    PubMed

    Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Russo, Roberto; Calignano, Antonio; Meli, Rosaria

    2014-08-01

    The existence of acylethanolamides (AEs) in the mammalian brain has been known for decades. Among AEs, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is abundant in the central nervous system (CNS) and conspicuously produced by neurons and glial cells. Antihyperalgesic and neuroprotective properties of PEA have been mainly related to the reduction of neuronal firing and to control of inflammation. Growing evidence suggest that PEA may be neuroprotective during CNS neurodegenerative diseases. Advances in the understanding of the physiology and pharmacology of PEA have potentiated its interest as useful biological tool for disease management. Several rapid non-genomic and delayed genomic mechanisms of action have been identified for PEA as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α dependent. First, an early molecular control, through Ca(+2)-activated intermediate- and/or big-conductance K(+) channels opening, drives to rapid neuronal hyperpolarization. This is reinforced by the increase of the inward Cl(-) currents due to the modulation of the gamma aminobutyric acid A receptor and by the desensitization of the transient receptor potential channel type V1. Moreover, the gene transcription-mediated mechanism sustains the long-term anti-inflammatory effects, by reducing pro-inflammatory enzyme expression and increasing neurosteroid synthesis. Overall, the integration of these different modes of action allows PEA to exert an immediate and prolonged efficacious control in neuron signaling either on inflammatory process or neuronal excitability, maintaining cellular homeostasis. In this review, we will discuss the effect of PEA on metabolism, behavior, inflammation and pain perception, related to the control of central functions and the emerging evidence demonstrating its therapeutic efficacy in several neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. The genetic and epigenetic landscape for CNS drug discovery targeting cross-diagnostic behavioral domains.

    PubMed

    de Mooij-van Malsen, Annetrude J G; Pjetri, Eneda; Kas, Martien J

    2015-04-15

    Animal studies play a central role in the identification and testing of novel drugs for CNS disorders. In his longstanding career, Berend Olivier has significantly contributed to CNS drug discovery by applying and supporting novel views and methodologies in the fields of behavioral neuroscience, pharmacology, and (epi-) genetics. Here we review and put forward some of these integrated approaches that have led to a productive collaboration and new insights into the genetic and epigenetic regulation of neurobehavioural traits related to psychiatric disorders.

  6. CNS Schwann cells display oligodendrocyte precursor-like potassium channel activation and antigenic expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kegler, Kristel; Imbschweiler, Ilka; Ulrich, Reiner; Kovermann, Peter; Fahlke, Christoph; Deschl, Ulrich; Kalkuhl, Arno; Baumgärnter, Wolfgang; Wewetzer, Konstantin

    2014-06-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) injury triggers production of myelinating Schwann cells from endogenous oligodendrocyte precursors (OLPs). These CNS Schwann cells may be attractive candidates for novel therapeutic strategies aiming to promote endogenous CNS repair. However, CNS Schwann cells have been so far mainly characterized in situ regarding morphology and marker expression, and it has remained enigmatic whether they display functional properties distinct from peripheral nervous system (PNS) Schwann cells. Potassium channels (K+) have been implicated in progenitor and glial cell proliferation after injury and may, therefore, represent a suitable pharmacological target. In the present study, we focused on the function and expression of voltage-gated K+ channels Kv(1-12) and accessory β-subunits in purified adult canine CNS and PNS Schwann cell cultures using electrophysiology and microarray analysis and characterized their antigenic phenotype. We show here that K+ channels differed significantly in both cell types. While CNS Schwann cells displayed prominent K D-mediated K+ currents, PNS Schwann cells elicited K(D-) and K(A-type) K+ currents. Inhibition of K+ currents by TEA and Ba2+ was more effective in CNS Schwann cells. These functional differences were not paralleled by differential mRNA expression of Kv(1-12) and accessory β-subunits. However, O4/A2B5 and GFAP expressions were significantly higher and lower, respectively, in CNS than in PNS Schwann cells. Taken together, this is the first evidence that CNS Schwann cells display specific properties not shared by their peripheral counterpart. Both Kv currents and increased O4/A2B5 expression were reminiscent of OLPs suggesting that CNS Schwann cells retain OLP features during maturation.

  7. Current approaches to enhance CNS delivery of drugs across the brain barriers

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cui-Tao; Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Wong, Ho Lun; Cai, Jun; Peng, Lei; Tian, Xin-Qiao

    2014-01-01

    Although many agents have therapeutic potentials for central nervous system (CNS) diseases, few of these agents have been clinically used because of the brain barriers. As the protective barrier of the CNS, the blood–brain barrier and the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier maintain the brain microenvironment, neuronal activity, and proper functioning of the CNS. Different strategies for efficient CNS delivery have been studied. This article reviews the current approaches to open or facilitate penetration across these barriers for enhanced drug delivery to the CNS. These approaches are summarized into three broad categories: noninvasive, invasive, and miscellaneous techniques. The progresses made using these approaches are reviewed, and the associated mechanisms and problems are discussed. PMID:24872687

  8. Imaging of CNS Tumors in Children: Advances and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Vézina, Louis-Gilbert

    2009-01-01

    MR technology is constantly improving. Functional imaging techniques such as MR spectroscopy, perfusion imaging, diffusion imaging and diffusion tensor imaging are increasingly utilized in the pediatric patient with a brain tumor. However estimate of tumor size remains the primary imaging endpoint in the evaluation of response to treatment; validation across institutions and vendor platforms of MRI functional parameters is necessary given the relative uncommon occurrence of brain tumors in children. Pediatric neuroimaging can be challenging, and the optimal way to image children with CNS tumors is not uniformly applied across all centers. Application of proper scanning techniques and validation of functional imaging techniques should lead to improved care of children with CNS tumors PMID:18952579

  9. MHCII-independent CD4+ T cells protect injured CNS neurons via IL-4.

    PubMed

    Walsh, James T; Hendrix, Sven; Boato, Francesco; Smirnov, Igor; Zheng, Jingjing; Lukens, John R; Gadani, Sachin; Hechler, Daniel; Gölz, Greta; Rosenberger, Karen; Kammertöns, Thomas; Vogt, Johannes; Vogelaar, Christina; Siffrin, Volker; Radjavi, Ali; Fernandez-Castaneda, Anthony; Gaultier, Alban; Gold, Ralf; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Nitsch, Robert; Zipp, Frauke; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-02-01

    A body of experimental evidence suggests that T cells mediate neuroprotection following CNS injury; however, the antigen specificity of these T cells and how they mediate neuroprotection are unknown. Here, we have provided evidence that T cell-mediated neuroprotection after CNS injury can occur independently of major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) signaling to T cell receptors (TCRs). Using two murine models of CNS injury, we determined that damage-associated molecular mediators that originate from injured CNS tissue induce a population of neuroprotective, IL-4-producing T cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Compared with wild-type mice, IL-4-deficient animals had decreased functional recovery following CNS injury; however, transfer of CD4+ T cells from wild-type mice, but not from IL-4-deficient mice, enhanced neuronal survival. Using a culture-based system, we determined that T cell-derived IL-4 protects and induces recovery of injured neurons by activation of neuronal IL-4 receptors, which potentiated neurotrophin signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways. Together, these findings demonstrate that damage-associated molecules from the injured CNS induce a neuroprotective T cell response that is independent of MHCII/TCR interactions and is MyD88 dependent. Moreover, our results indicate that IL-4 mediates neuroprotection and recovery of the injured CNS and suggest that strategies to enhance IL-4-producing CD4+ T cells have potential to attenuate axonal damage in the course of CNS injury in trauma, inflammation, or neurodegeneration.

  10. Clitoria ternatea and the CNS.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neeti N; Ohal, C C; Shroff, S K; Bhutada, R H; Somani, R S; Kasture, V S; Kasture, S B

    2003-06-01

    The present investigation was aimed at determining the spectrum of activity of the methanolic extract of Clitoria ternatea (CT) on the CNS. The CT was studied for its effect on cognitive behavior, anxiety, depression, stress and convulsions induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) and maximum electroshock (MES). To explain these effects, the effect of CT was also studied on behavior mediated by dopamine (DA), noradrenaline, serotonin and acetylcholine. The extract decreased time required to occupy the central platform (transfer latency, TL) in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and increased discrimination index in the object recognition test, indicating nootropic activity. The extract was more active in the object recognition test than in the EPM. The extract increased occupancy in the open arm of EPM by 160% and in the lit box of the light/dark exploration test by 157%, indicating its anxiolytic activity. It decreased the duration of immobility in tail suspension test (suggesting its antidepressant activity), reduced stress-induced ulcers and reduced the convulsing action of PTZ and MES. The extract exhibited tendency to reduce the intensity of behavior mediated via serotonin and acetylcholine. The effect on DA- and noradrenaline-mediated behavior was not significant. In conclusion, the extract was found to possess nootropic, anxiolytic, antidepressant, anticonvulsant and antistress activity. Further studies are necessary to isolate the active principle responsible for the activities and to understand its mode of action.

  11. Playful Gaming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makedon, Alexander

    A philosophical analysis of play and games is undertaken in this paper. Playful gaming, which is shown to be a synthesis of play and games, is utilized as a category for undertaking the examination of play and games. The significance of playful gaming to education is demonstrated through analyses of Plato's, Dewey's, Sartre's, and Marcuse's…

  12. Towards Therapeutic Applications of Arthropod Venom K+-Channel Blockers in CNS Neurologic Diseases Involving Memory Acquisition and Storage

    PubMed Central

    Gati, Christiano D. C.; Mortari, Márcia R.; Schwartz, Elisabeth F.

    2012-01-01

    Potassium channels are the most heterogeneous and widely distributed group of ion channels and play important functions in all cells, in both normal and pathological mechanisms, including learning and memory processes. Being fundamental for many diverse physiological processes, K+-channels are recognized as potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of several Central Nervous System (CNS) diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, schizophrenia, HIV-1-associated dementia, and epilepsy. Blockers of these channels are therefore potential candidates for the symptomatic treatment of these neuropathies, through their neurological effects. Venomous animals have evolved a wide set of toxins for prey capture and defense. These compounds, mainly peptides, act on various pharmacological targets, making them an innumerable source of ligands for answering experimental paradigms, as well as for therapeutic application. This paper provides an overview of CNS K+-channels involved in memory acquisition and storage and aims at evaluating the use of highly selective K+-channel blockers derived from arthropod venoms as potential therapeutic agents for CNS diseases involving learning and memory mechanisms. PMID:22701481

  13. VIP and PACAP: neuropeptide modulators of CNS inflammation, injury, and repair

    PubMed Central

    Waschek, JA

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory processes play both regenerative and destructive roles in multiple sclerosis, stroke, CNS trauma, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and aging-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's. Endogenous defence mechanisms against these pathologies include those that are directly neuroprotective, and those that modulate the expression of inflammatory mediators in microglia, astrocytes, and invading inflammatory cells. While a number of mechanisms and molecules have been identified that can directly promote neuronal survival, less is known about how the brain protects itself from harmful inflammation, and further, how it co-opts the healing function of the immune system to promote CNS repair. The two closely related neuroprotective peptides, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP), which are up-regulated in neurons and immune cells after injury and/or inflammation, are known to protect neurons, but also exert powerful in vivo immunomodulatory actions, which are primarily anti-inflammatory. These peptide actions are mediated by high-affinity receptors expressed not only on neurons, but also astrocytes, microglia and peripheral inflammatory cells. Well-established immunomodulatory actions of these peptides are to inhibit macrophage and microglia production and release of inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α and IFN-γ, and polarization of T-cell responses away from Th1 and Th17, and towards a Th2 phenotype. More recent studies have revealed that these peptides can also promote the production of both natural and inducible subsets of regulatory T-cells. The neuroprotective and immunomodulatory actions of VIP and PACAP suggest that receptors for these peptides may be therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases and other forms of CNS injury. PMID:23517078

  14. Electrophoretic deposition of cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) and CNs/alginate nanocomposite coatings and free standing membranes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; de Larraya, Uxua Pérez; Garmendia, Nere; Lasheras-Zubiate, María; Cordero-Arias, Luis; Virtanen, Sannakaisa; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) and CNs-based alginate composite coatings for biomedical applications. The mechanism of anodic deposition of CNs and co-deposition of CNs/alginate composites was analyzed based on the results of zeta-potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses. The capability of the EPD technique for manipulating the orientation of CNs and for the preparation of multilayer CNs coatings was demonstrated. The nanotopographic surface roughness and hydrophilicity of the deposited coatings were measured and discussed. Electrochemical testing demonstrated that a significant degree of corrosion protection of stainless steel could be achieved when CNs-containing coatings were present. Additionally, the one-step EPD-based processing of free-standing CNs/alginate membranes was demonstrated confirming the versatility of EPD to fabricate free-standing membrane structures compared to a layer-by-layer deposition technique. CNs and CNs/alginate nanocomposite coatings produced by EPD are potential candidates for biomedical, cell technology and drug delivery applications.

  15. Dimer monomer transition and dimer re-formation play important role for ATM cellular function during DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Fengxia; Zhang, Minjie; Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Wang, Dong; Chang, Shuang; Xu, Ye; Price, Brendan; Sun, Yingli

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. • The PETPVFRLT box of ATM plays a key role in its dimer dissociation in DNA repair. • The dephosphorylation of ATM is critical for dimer re-formation after DNA repair. - Abstract: The ATM protein kinase, is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recruited and activated by DNA double-strand breaks, mediates responses to ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Here we show that ATM is held inactive in unirradiated cells as a dimer and phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. Cellular irradiation induces rapid intermolecular autophosphorylation of serine 1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates cellular ATM kinase activity. ATM cannot phosphorylate the substrates when it could not undergo dimer monomer transition. After DNA repair, the active monomer will undergo dephosphorylation to form dimer again and dephosphorylation is critical for dimer re-formation. Our work reveals novel function of ATM dimer monomer transition and explains why ATM dimer monomer transition plays such important role for ATM cellular activity during DNA repair.

  16. The influence of playing a non-reward game on motor ability and executive function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Araújo Lima, Alisson Menezes; Cordeiro Hirata, Fabiana de Campos; Sales de Bruin, Gabriela; Salani Mota, Rosa Maria; Bruin, Veralice Meireles Sales de

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the acute effect of playing games on executive function and motor ability in Parkinson's disease (PD). Consecutive cases with PD were studied with the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Mini-Mental State examination (MMSE), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Stroop test, finger tapping and 14-meter walk test. After randomization, patients performed a game of dominoes and were tested before and after experiment being further categorized as control, winners or non-winners. Forty patients, 27 male (67.5%), aged 48 to 84 years (63.2 ± 8.5), Hoehn & Yahr I to III were included. Twenty-eight (70%) presented depressive symptoms (BDI > 10). Groups (Control N = 13; Winners = 14 and Non-winners = 13) were not different regarding age, disease duration, age at onset, BMI, MMSE scores, depressive symptoms, levodopa dose, and previous practice of games. Winners presented significantly better results on executive function (Stroop test, p = 0.002) and on motor activity (Finger tapping, p = 0.01). Non-winners showed a trend of better performance in the 14-meter-walk test. This study shows that the practice of a non-reward game acutely improved memory and motor skills in PD. Our results suggest a role for the reward system in the modulation of the dopaminergic function of the basal ganglia in these patients.

  17. Light-dependent maintenance of hydraulic function in mangrove branches: do xylary chloroplasts play a role in embolism repair?

    PubMed

    Schmitz, N; Egerton, J J G; Lovelock, C E; Ball, M C

    2012-07-01

    • To clarify the role of branch photosynthesis in tree functioning, the presence and function of chloroplasts in branch xylem tissue were studied in a diverse range of mangrove species growing in Australia. • The presence of xylary chloroplasts was observed via chlorophyll fluorescence of transverse sections. Paired, attached branches were selected to study the effects of covering branches with aluminium foil on the gas exchange characteristics of leaves and the hydraulic conductivity of branches. • Xylary chloroplasts occurred in all species, but were differently distributed among living cell types in the xylem. Covering stems altered the gas exchange characteristics of leaves, such that water-use efficiency was greater in exposed leaves of covered than of uncovered branches. • Leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity of stems was lower in covered than in uncovered branches, implicating stem photosynthesis in the maintenance of hydraulic function. Given their proximity to xylem vessels, we suggest that xylary chloroplasts may play a role in light-dependent repair of embolized xylem vessels.

  18. The Influence of Playing a Non-Reward Game on Motor Ability and Executive Function in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Alisson Menezes Araújo; de Campos Cordeiro Hirata, Fabiana; de Bruin, Gabriela Sales; Mota, Rosa Maria Salani; de Bruin, Veralice Meireles Sales

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the acute effect of playing games on executive function and motor ability in Parkinson's disease (PD). Consecutive cases with PD were studied with the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Mini-Mental State examination (MMSE), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Stroop test, finger tapping and 14-meter walk test. After randomization, patients performed a game of dominoes and were tested before and after experiment being further categorized as control, winners or non-winners. Forty patients, 27 male (67.5%), aged 48 to 84 years (63.2 ± 8.5), Hoehn & Yahr I to III were included. Twenty-eight (70%) presented depressive symptoms (BDI > 10). Groups (Control N = 13; Winners = 14 and Non-winners = 13) were not different regarding age, disease duration, age at onset, BMI, MMSE scores, depressive symptoms, levodopa dose, and previous practice of games. Winners presented significantly better results on executive function (Stroop test, p = 0.002) and on motor activity (Finger tapping, p = 0.01). Non-winners showed a trend of better performance in the 14-meter-walk test. This study shows that the practice of a non-reward game acutely improved memory and motor skills in PD. Our results suggest a role for the reward system in the modulation of the dopaminergic function of the basal ganglia in these patients. PMID:22530266

  19. Dimer monomer transition and dimer re-formation play important role for ATM cellular function during DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Du, Fengxia; Zhang, Minjie; Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Wang, Dong; Chang, Shuang; Xu, Ye; Price, Brendan; Sun, Yingli

    2014-10-03

    The ATM protein kinase, is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recruited and activated by DNA double-strand breaks, mediates responses to ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Here we show that ATM is held inactive in unirradiated cells as a dimer and phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. Cellular irradiation induces rapid intermolecular autophosphorylation of serine 1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates cellular ATM kinase activity. ATM cannot phosphorylate the substrates when it could not undergo dimer monomer transition. After DNA repair, the active monomer will undergo dephosphorylation to form dimer again and dephosphorylation is critical for dimer re-formation. Our work reveals novel function of ATM dimer monomer transition and explains why ATM dimer monomer transition plays such important role for ATM cellular activity during DNA repair.

  20. Clinical Applications Involving CNS Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Boris; McCown, Thomas; Leone, Paola; Gray, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) have traditionally been the most difficult to treat by traditional pharmacological methods, due mostly to the blood–brain barrier and the difficulties associated with repeated drug administration targeting the CNS. Viral vector gene transfer represents a way to permanently provide a therapeutic protein within the nervous system after a single administration, whether this be a gene replacement strategy for an inherited disorder or a disease-modifying protein for a disease such as Parkinson's. Gene therapy approaches for CNS disorders has evolved considerably over the last two decades. Although a breakthrough treatment has remained elusive, current strategies are now considerably safer and potentially much more effective. This chapter will explore the past, current, and future status of CNS gene therapy, focusing on clinical trials utilizing adeno-associated virus and lentiviral vectors. PMID:25311921

  1. Nanotechnology-novel therapeutics for CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Maya; Kessler, John A

    2012-04-24

    Research into treatments for diseases of the CNS has made impressive strides in the past few decades, but therapeutic options are limited for many patients with CNS disorders. Nanotechnology has emerged as an exciting and promising new means of treating neurological disease, with the potential to fundamentally change the way we approach CNS-targeted therapeutics. Molecules can be nanoengineered to cross the blood-brain barrier, target specific cell or signalling systems, respond to endogenous stimuli, or act as vehicles for gene delivery, or as a matrix to promote axon elongation and support cell survival. The wide variety of available nanotechnologies allows the selection of a nanoscale material with the characteristics best suited to the therapeutic challenges posed by an individual CNS disorder. In this Review, we describe recent advances in the development of nanotechnology for the treatment of neurological disorders-in particular, neurodegenerative disease and malignant brain tumours-and for the promotion of neuroregeneration.

  2. Molecular stress response in the CNS of mice after systemic exposureto interferon-alpha, ionizing radiation and ketamine

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Xiu R.; Marchetti, Francesco; Lu, Xiaochen; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-03-03

    We previously showed that the expression of troponin T1 (Tnnt 1) was induced in the central nervous system (CNS) of adultmice 30 min after treatment with ketamine, a glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that Tnnt 1 expression may be an early molecular biomarker of stress response in the CNS of mice. To further evaluate this hypothesis, we investigated the regional expression of Tnnt 1 in the mouse brain using RNA in situ hybridization 4 h after systemic exposure to interferon-a (IFN-a) and gamma ionizing radiation, both of which have be associated with wide ranges of neuropsychiatric complications. Adult B6C3F1 male mice were treated with either human IFN-a (a single i.p. injection at 1 x 105 IU/kg) or whole body gamma-radiation (10 cGy or 2 Gy). Patterns of Tnnt 1 transcript expression were compared in various CNS regions after IFN-a, radiation and ketamine treatments (previous study). Tnnt 1 expression was consistently induced in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex and hippocampus after all treatment regimens including 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Regional expression of Tnnt 1 was induced in Purkinje cells of cerebellum after ionizing radiation and ketamine treatment; but not after IFN-a treatment. None of the three treatments induced Tnnt 1 expression in glial cells. The patterns of Tnnt 1 expression in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex andhippocampus, which are both known to play important roles in cognitive function, memory and emotion, suggest that the expression of Tnnt 1 may be an early molecular biomarker of induced CNS stress.

  3. TSC1/TSC2 Signaling in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Han, Juliette M.; Sahin, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Over the past several years, the study of a hereditary tumor syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), has shed light on the regulation of cellular proliferation and growth. TSC is an autosomal dominant disorder that is due to inactivating mutations in TSC1 or TSC2 and characterized by benign tumors (hamartomas) involving multiple organ systems. The TSC1/2 complex has been found to play a crucial role in an evolutionarily-conserved signaling pathway that regulates cell growth: the mTORC1 pathway. This pathway promotes anabolic processes and inhibits catabolic processes in response to extracellular and intracellular factors. Findings in cancer biology have reinforced the critical role for TSC1/2 in cell growth and proliferation. In contrast to cancer cells, in the CNS, the TSC1/2 complex not only regulates cell growth/proliferation, but also orchestrates an intricate and finely tuned system that has distinctive roles under different conditions, depending on cell type, stage of development, and subcellular localization. Overall, TSC1/2 signaling in the CNS, via its multi-faceted roles, contributes to proper neural connectivity. Here, we will review the TSC signaling in the CNS. PMID:21329690

  4. Neural Stem Cell Transplantation and CNS Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Rodolfo; Hamblin, Milton H; Lee, Jean-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    In neurological disorders, pathological lesions in the central nervous system (CNS) may be globally dispersed throughout the brain or localized to specific regions. Although native neural stem cells (NSCs) are present in the adult mammalian brain, intrinsic self-repair of injured adult CNS tissue is inadequate or ineffective. The brain's poor regenerative ability may be due to the fact that NSCs are restricted to discrete locations, are few in number, or are surrounded by a microenvironment that does not support neuronal differentiation. Therapeutic potential of NSC transplantation in CNS diseases characterized by global degeneration requires that gene products and/or replaced cells be widely distributed. Global degenerative CNS diseases include inherited pediatric neurodegenerative diseases (inborn errors of metabolism, including lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), such as Tay-Sachs-related Sandhoff disease), hypoxic or ischemic encephalopathy, and some adult CNS diseases (such as multiple sclerosis). Both mouse and human NSCs express many chemokines and chemokine receptors (including CXCR4 and adhesion molecules, such as integrins, selectins, and immunoglobulins) that mediate homing to sources of inflammatory chemokines, such as SDF-1α. In mammalian brains of all ages, NSCs may be attracted even at a great distance to regions of neurodegeneration. Consequently, NSC transplantation presents a promising strategy for treating many CNS diseases.

  5. Knowledge-Based, Central Nervous System (CNS) Lead Selection and Lead Optimization for CNS Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is the major area that is affected by aging. Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), brain cancer, and stroke are the CNS diseases that will cost trillions of dollars for their treatment. Achievement of appropriate blood–brain barrier (BBB) penetration is often considered a significant hurdle in the CNS drug discovery process. On the other hand, BBB penetration may be a liability for many of the non-CNS drug targets, and a clear understanding of the physicochemical and structural differences between CNS and non-CNS drugs may assist both research areas. Because of the numerous and challenging issues in CNS drug discovery and the low success rates, pharmaceutical companies are beginning to deprioritize their drug discovery efforts in the CNS arena. Prompted by these challenges and to aid in the design of high-quality, efficacious CNS compounds, we analyzed the physicochemical property and the chemical structural profiles of 317 CNS and 626 non-CNS oral drugs. The conclusions derived provide an ideal property profile for lead selection and the property modification strategy during the lead optimization process. A list of substructural units that may be useful for CNS drug design was also provided here. A classification tree was also developed to differentiate between CNS drugs and non-CNS oral drugs. The combined analysis provided the following guidelines for designing high-quality CNS drugs: (i) topological molecular polar surface area of <76 Å2 (25–60 Å2), (ii) at least one (one or two, including one aliphatic amine) nitrogen, (iii) fewer than seven (two to four) linear chains outside of rings, (iv) fewer than three (zero or one) polar hydrogen atoms, (v) volume of 740–970 Å3, (vi) solvent accessible surface area of 460–580 Å2, and (vii) positive QikProp parameter CNS. The ranges within parentheses may be used during lead optimization. One violation to this proposed profile may be acceptable. The

  6. Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required for CNS, but not non-CNS, angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Daneman, Richard; Agalliu, Dritan; Zhou, Lu; Kuhnert, Frank; Kuo, Calvin J.; Barres, Ben A.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the importance of CNS blood vessels, the molecular mechanisms that regulate CNS angiogenesis and blood−brain barrier (BBB) formation are largely unknown. Here we analyze the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in regulating the formation of CNS blood vessels. First, through the analysis of TOP-Gal Wnt reporter mice, we identify that canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is specifically activated in CNS, but not non-CNS, blood vessels during development. This activation correlates with the expression of different Wnt ligands by neural progenitor cells in distinct locations throughout the CNS, including Wnt7a and Wnt7b in ventral regions and Wnt1, Wnt3, Wnt3a, and Wnt4 in dorsal regions. Blockade of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in vivo specifically disrupts CNS, but not non-CNS, angiogenesis. These defects include reduction in vessel number, loss of capillary beds, and the formation of hemorrhagic vascular malformations that remain adherent to the meninges. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signaling regulates the expression of the BBB-specific glucose transporter glut-1. Taken together these experiments reveal an essential role for Wnt/β-catenin signaling in driving CNS-specific angiogenesis and provide molecular evidence that angiogenesis and BBB formation are in part linked. PMID:19129494

  7. A philosophy for CNS radiotracer design.

    PubMed

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C; Ricq, Emily L; Hooker, Jacob M

    2014-10-21

    Decades after its discovery, positron emission tomography (PET) remains the premier tool for imaging neurochemistry in living humans. Technological improvements in radiolabeling methods, camera design, and image analysis have kept PET in the forefront. In addition, the use of PET imaging has expanded because researchers have developed new radiotracers that visualize receptors, transporters, enzymes, and other molecular targets within the human brain. However, of the thousands of proteins in the central nervous system (CNS), researchers have successfully imaged fewer than 40 human proteins. To address the critical need for new radiotracers, this Account expounds on the decisions, strategies, and pitfalls of CNS radiotracer development based on our current experience in this area. We discuss the five key components of radiotracer development for human imaging: choosing a biomedical question, selection of a biological target, design of the radiotracer chemical structure, evaluation of candidate radiotracers, and analysis of preclinical imaging. It is particularly important to analyze the market of scientists or companies who might use a new radiotracer and carefully select a relevant biomedical question(s) for that audience. In the selection of a specific biological target, we emphasize how target localization and identity can constrain this process and discuss the optimal target density and affinity ratios needed for binding-based radiotracers. In addition, we discuss various PET test-retest variability requirements for monitoring changes in density, occupancy, or functionality for new radiotracers. In the synthesis of new radiotracer structures, high-throughput, modular syntheses have proved valuable, and these processes provide compounds with sites for late-stage radioisotope installation. As a result, researchers can manage the time constraints associated with the limited half-lives of isotopes. In order to evaluate brain uptake, a number of methods are available

  8. A Philosophy for CNS Radiotracer Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Decades after its discovery, positron emission tomography (PET) remains the premier tool for imaging neurochemistry in living humans. Technological improvements in radiolabeling methods, camera design, and image analysis have kept PET in the forefront. In addition, the use of PET imaging has expanded because researchers have developed new radiotracers that visualize receptors, transporters, enzymes, and other molecular targets within the human brain. However, of the thousands of proteins in the central nervous system (CNS), researchers have successfully imaged fewer than 40 human proteins. To address the critical need for new radiotracers, this Account expounds on the decisions, strategies, and pitfalls of CNS radiotracer development based on our current experience in this area. We discuss the five key components of radiotracer development for human imaging: choosing a biomedical question, selection of a biological target, design of the radiotracer chemical structure, evaluation of candidate radiotracers, and analysis of preclinical imaging. It is particularly important to analyze the market of scientists or companies who might use a new radiotracer and carefully select a relevant biomedical question(s) for that audience. In the selection of a specific biological target, we emphasize how target localization and identity can constrain this process and discuss the optimal target density and affinity ratios needed for binding-based radiotracers. In addition, we discuss various PET test–retest variability requirements for monitoring changes in density, occupancy, or functionality for new radiotracers. In the synthesis of new radiotracer structures, high-throughput, modular syntheses have proved valuable, and these processes provide compounds with sites for late-stage radioisotope installation. As a result, researchers can manage the time constraints associated with the limited half-lives of isotopes. In order to evaluate brain uptake, a number of methods

  9. A philosophy for CNS radiotracer design

    DOE PAGES

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C.; Ricq, Emily L.; Hooker, Jacob M.

    2014-10-01

    Decades after its discovery, positron emission tomography (PET) remains the premier tool for imaging neurochemistry in living humans. Technological improvements in radiolabeling methods, camera design, and image analysis have kept PET in the forefront. In addition, the use of PET imaging has expanded because researchers have developed new radiotracers that visualize receptors, transporters, enzymes, and other molecular targets within the human brain. However, of the thousands of proteins in the central nervous system (CNS), researchers have successfully imaged fewer than 40 human proteins. To address the critical need for new radiotracers, this Account expounds on the decisions, strategies, and pitfallsmore » of CNS radiotracer development based on our current experience in this area. We discuss the five key components of radiotracer development for human imaging: choosing a biomedical question, selection of a biological target, design of the radiotracer chemical structure, evaluation of candidate radiotracers, and analysis of preclinical imaging. It is particularly important to analyze the market of scientists or companies who might use a new radiotracer and carefully select a relevant biomedical question(s) for that audience. In the selection of a specific biological target, we emphasize how target localization and identity can constrain this process and discuss the optimal target density and affinity ratios needed for binding-based radiotracers. In addition, we discuss various PET test–retest variability requirements for monitoring changes in density, occupancy, or functionality for new radiotracers. In the synthesis of new radiotracer structures, high-throughput, modular syntheses have proved valuable, and these processes provide compounds with sites for late-stage radioisotope installation. As a result, researchers can manage the time constraints associated with the limited half-lives of isotopes. In order to evaluate brain uptake, a number of methods are

  10. A philosophy for CNS radiotracer design

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C.; Ricq, Emily L.; Hooker, Jacob M.

    2014-10-01

    Decades after its discovery, positron emission tomography (PET) remains the premier tool for imaging neurochemistry in living humans. Technological improvements in radiolabeling methods, camera design, and image analysis have kept PET in the forefront. In addition, the use of PET imaging has expanded because researchers have developed new radiotracers that visualize receptors, transporters, enzymes, and other molecular targets within the human brain. However, of the thousands of proteins in the central nervous system (CNS), researchers have successfully imaged fewer than 40 human proteins. To address the critical need for new radiotracers, this Account expounds on the decisions, strategies, and pitfalls of CNS radiotracer development based on our current experience in this area. We discuss the five key components of radiotracer development for human imaging: choosing a biomedical question, selection of a biological target, design of the radiotracer chemical structure, evaluation of candidate radiotracers, and analysis of preclinical imaging. It is particularly important to analyze the market of scientists or companies who might use a new radiotracer and carefully select a relevant biomedical question(s) for that audience. In the selection of a specific biological target, we emphasize how target localization and identity can constrain this process and discuss the optimal target density and affinity ratios needed for binding-based radiotracers. In addition, we discuss various PET test–retest variability requirements for monitoring changes in density, occupancy, or functionality for new radiotracers. In the synthesis of new radiotracer structures, high-throughput, modular syntheses have proved valuable, and these processes provide compounds with sites for late-stage radioisotope installation. As a result, researchers can manage the time constraints associated with the limited half-lives of isotopes. In order to evaluate brain uptake, a number of methods are

  11. ATF4 plays a pivotal role in the development of functional hematopoietic stem cells in mouse fetal liver.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunze; Zhou, Jie; Liu, Dan; Dong, Fang; Cheng, Hui; Wang, Weili; Pang, Yakun; Wang, Yajie; Mu, Xiaohuan; Ni, Yanli; Li, Zhuan; Xu, Huiyu; Hao, Sha; Wang, Xiaochen; Ma, Shihui; Wang, Qian-fei; Xiao, Guozhi; Yuan, Weiping; Liu, Bing; Cheng, Tao

    2015-11-19

    The fetal liver (FL) serves as a predominant site for expansion of functional hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during mouse embryogenesis. However, the mechanisms for HSC development in FL remain poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that deletion of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) significantly impaired hematopoietic development and reduced HSC self-renewal in FL. In contrast, generation of the first HSC population in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region was not affected. The migration activity of ATF4(-/-) HSCs was moderately reduced. Interestingly, the HSC-supporting ability of both endothelial and stromal cells in FL was significantly compromised in the absence of ATF4. Gene profiling using RNA-seq revealed downregulated expression of a panel of cytokines in ATF4(-/-) stromal cells, including angiopoietin-like protein 3 (Angptl3) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA). Addition of Angptl3, but not VEGFA, partially rescued the repopulating defect of ATF4(-/-) HSCs in the culture. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay in conjunction with silencing RNA-mediated silencing and complementary DNA overexpression showed transcriptional control of Angptl3 by ATF4. To summarize, ATF4 plays a pivotal role in functional expansion and repopulating efficiency of HSCs in developing FL, and it acts through upregulating transcription of cytokines such as Angptl3 in the microenvironment.

  12. Play Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Ritesh

    2010-01-01

    Play therapy represents a unique form of treatment that is not only geared toward young children, but is translated into a language children can comprehend and utilize—the language of play. For the referring provider or practitioner, questions may remain regarding the nature, course, and efficacy of play therapy. This article reviews the theoretical underpinnings of play therapy, some practical considerations, and finally a summary of the current state of research in regard to play therapy. The authors present the practicing psychiatrist with a road map for referring a patient to play therapy or initiating it in appropriate cases. PMID:21103141

  13. Inhibition of CRMP2 phosphorylation repairs CNS by regulating neurotrophic and inhibitory responses.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Jun; Owada, Kazuki; Kitamura, Yoshiteru; Goshima, Yoshio; Ohshima, Toshio

    2016-03-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) regeneration is restricted by both the lack of neurotrophic responses and the presence of inhibitory factors. As of yet, a common mediator of these two pathways has not been identified. Microtubule dynamics is responsible for several key processes after CNS injuries: intracellular trafficking of receptors for neurotrophic factors, axonal retraction by inhibitory factors, and secondary tissue damages by inflammation and scarring. Kinases regulating microtubule organization, such as Cdk5 or GSK3β, may play pivotal roles during CNS recovery, but the molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) stabilizes cytoskeletal polymerization, while CRMP2 phosphorylation by Cdk5 and GSK3β loses its affinity for cytoskeleton proteins, leading to the inhibition of axonal growth. Here, we characterized CRMP2 phosphorylation as the first crucial factor regulating neurotrophic and inhibitory responses after spinal cord injury (SCI). We found that pharmacological inhibition of GSK3β enhanced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-induced axonal growth response in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. DRG neurons from CRMP2 knock-in (Crmp2KI/KI) mice, where CRMP2 phosphorylation was eliminated, showed elevated sensitivity to BDNF as well. Additionally, cultured Crmp2KI/KI neurons exhibited suppressed axonal growth inhibition by chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG). These data suggest a couple of new molecular insights: the BDNF/GSK3β/CRMP2 and CSPG/GSK3β/CRMP2 pathways. Next, we tested the significance of CRMP2 phosphorylation after CNS injury in vivo. The phosphorylation level of CRMP2 was enhanced in the injured spinal cord. Crmp2KI/KI mice exhibited prominent recovery of locomotive and nociceptive functions after SCI, which correlated with the enhanced axonal growth of the motor and sensory neurons. Neuroprotective effects against SCI, such as microtubule stabilization, reduced inflammation

  14. Two inwardly rectifying potassium channels, Irk1 and Irk2, play redundant roles in Drosophila renal tubule function

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yipin; Baum, Michel; Huang, Chou-Long

    2015-01-01

    Inwardly rectifying potassium channels play essential roles in renal physiology across phyla. Barium-sensitive K+ conductances are found on the basolateral membrane of a variety of insect Malpighian (renal) tubules, including Drosophila melanogaster. We found that barium decreases the lumen-positive transepithelial potential difference in isolated perfused Drosophila tubules and decreases fluid secretion and transepithelial K+ flux. In those insect species in which it has been studied, transcripts from multiple genes encoding inwardly rectifying K+ channels are expressed in the renal (Malpighian) tubule. In Drosophila melanogaster, this includes transcripts of the Irk1, Irk2, and Irk3 genes. The role of each of these gene products in renal tubule function is unknown. We found that simultaneous knockdown of Irk1 and Irk2 in the principal cell of the fly tubule decreases transepithelial K+ flux, with no additive effect of Irk3 knockdown, and decreases barium sensitivity of transepithelial K+ flux by ∼50%. Knockdown of any of the three inwardly rectifying K+ channels individually has no effect, nor does knocking down Irk3 simultaneously with Irk1 or Irk2. Irk1/Irk2 principal cell double-knockdown tubules remain sensitive to the kaliuretic effect of cAMP. Inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase with ouabain and Irk1/Irk2 double knockdown have additive effects on K+ flux, and 75% of transepithelial K+ transport is due to Irk1/Irk2 or ouabain-sensitive pathways. In conclusion, Irk1 and Irk2 play redundant roles in transepithelial ion transport in the Drosophila melanogaster renal tubule and are additive to Na+/K+-ATPase-dependent pathways. PMID:26224687

  15. Autoradiographic visualization of CNS receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M.M.; Moody, T.W.

    1986-03-01

    Receptors for VIP were characterized in the rat CNS. /sup 125/I-VIP bound with high affinity to rat brain slices. Binding was time dependent and specific. Pharmacology studies indicated that specific /sup 125/I-VIP binding was inhibited with high affinity by VIP and low affinity by secretin and PHI. Using in vitro autoradiographic techniques high grain densities were present in the dentate gyrus, pineal gland, supraoptic and suprachiasmatic nuclei, superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus and the area postrema. Moderate grain densities were present in the olfactory bulb and tubercle, cerebral cortex, nucleus accumbens, caudate putamen, interstitial nucleus of the stria terminalis, paraventricular thalamic nucleus, medial amygdaloid nucleus, subiculum and the medial geniculate nucleus. Grains were absent in the corpus callosum and controls treated with 1 microM unlabeled VIP. The discrete regional distribution of VIP receptors suggest that it may function as an important modulator of neural activity in the CNS.

  16. Treatment Options for Medulloblastoma and CNS Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET)

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Roger J.

    2016-01-01

    The amount of residual disease after surgery better correlates with survival for medulloblastomas than for CNS PNETs. Maximal surgical resection of tumor should be done, only if additional permanent, neurologic deficits can be spared. Patients should have a staging work-up to assess the extent of disease. This includes postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, MRI of the entire spine and lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sampling for cytological examination, if deemed safe. Radiation therapy to the entire CNS axis is required, with a greater dose (boost) given to the region of the primary site or any bulky residual disease for older children. Adjuvant chemotherapy must be given even if no evidence of disease after radiation therapy exists, as the risk of relapse is substantial after radiation alone. Subsets of younger children with medulloblastoma, arbitrarily defined as those younger than 3 years of age in some studies and 4 or even 5 years in other studies, can be effectively treated with chemotherapy alone. Recent genomic studies have revealed further subtypes of disease than previously recognized. Clinical trials to exploit these biologic differences are required to assess potential efficacy of targeted agents. The treatment of medulloblastoma and CNS PNET can cause significant impairment in neurologic function. Evaluations by physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy and neurocognitive assessments should be obtained, as needed. After therapy is completed, survivors need follow-up of endocrine function, surveillance scans and psychosocial support. PMID:23979905

  17. CNS uptake of bortezomib is enhanced by P-glycoprotein inhibition: implications for spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Foran, Emily; Kwon, Deborah Y; Nofziger, Jonathan H; Arnold, Eveline S; Hall, Matthew D; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Burnett, Barrington G

    2016-04-01

    The development of therapeutics for neurological disorders is constrained by limited access to the central nervous system (CNS). ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, particularly P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), are expressed on the luminal surface of capillaries in the CNS and transport drugs out of the endothelium back into the blood against the concentration gradient. Survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, which is deficient in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), is a target of the ubiquitin proteasome system. Inhibiting the proteasome in a rodent model of SMA with bortezomib increases SMN protein levels in peripheral tissues but not the CNS, because bortezomib has poor CNS penetrance. We sought to determine if we could inhibit SMN degradation in the CNS of SMA mice with a combination of bortezomib and the ABC transporter inhibitor tariquidar. In cultured cells we show that bortezomib is a substrate of P-gp. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that intraperitoneal co-administration of tariquidar increased the CNS penetrance of bortezomib, and reduced proteasome activity in the brain and spinal cord. This correlated with increased SMN protein levels and improved survival and motor function of SMA mice. These findings show that CNS penetrance of treatment for this neurological disorder can be improved by inhibiting drug efflux at the blood-brain barrier.

  18. HIV-1 target cells in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sarah B; Arrildt, Kathryn T; Sturdevant, Christa B; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2015-06-01

    HIV-1 replication in the central nervous system (CNS) is typically limited by the availability of target cells. HIV-1 variants that are transmitted and dominate the early stages of infection almost exclusively use the CCR5 coreceptor and are well adapted to entering, and thus infecting, cells expressing high CD4 densities similar to those found on CD4+ T cells. While the "immune privileged" CNS is largely devoid of CD4+ T cells, macrophage and microglia are abundant throughout the CNS. These cells likely express CD4 densities that are too low to facilitate efficient entry or allow sustained replication by most HIV-1 isolates. Examination of CNS viral populations reveals that late in disease the CNS of some individuals contains HIV-1 lineages that have evolved the ability to enter cells expressing low levels of CD4 and are well-adapted to entering macrophages. These macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) viruses are able to maintain sustained replication in the CNS for many generations, and their presence is associated with severe neurocognitive impairment. Whether conditions such as pleocytosis are necessary for macrophage-tropic viruses to emerge in the CNS is unknown, and extensive examinations of macrophage-tropic variants have not revealed a genetic signature of this phenotype. It is clear, however, that macrophage tropism is rare among HIV-1 isolates and is not transmitted, but is important due to its pathogenic effects on hosts. Prior to the evolution of macrophage-tropic variants, the viruses that are predominately infecting T cells (R5 T cell-tropic) may infect macrophages at a low level and inefficiently, but this could contribute to the reservoir.

  19. HIV-1 target cells in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Sarah B.; Arrildt, Kathryn T.; Sturdevant, Christa B.; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 replication in the central nervous system (CNS) is typically limited by the availability of target cells. HIV-1 variants that are transmitted and dominate the early stages of infection almost exclusively use the CCR5 coreceptor and are well adapted to entering, and thus infecting, cells expressing high CD4 densities similar to those found on CD4+ T cells. While the “immune privileged” CNS is largely devoid of CD4+ T cells, macrophage and microglia are abundant throughout the CNS. These cells likely express CD4 densities that are too low to facilitate efficient entry or allow sustained replication by most HIV-1 isolates. Examination of CNS viral populations reveals that late in disease the CNS of some individuals contains HIV-1 lineages that have evolved the ability to enter cells expressing low levels of CD4 and are well-adapted to entering macrophages. These macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) viruses are able to maintain sustained replication in the CNS for many generations, and their presence is associated with severe neurocognitive impairment. Whether conditions such as pleocytosis are necessary for macrophage-tropic viruses to emerge in the CNS is unknown, and extensive examinations of macrophage-tropic variants have not revealed a genetic signature of this phenotype. It is clear, however, that macrophage tropism is rare among HIV-1 isolates and is not transmitted, but is important due to its pathogenic effects on hosts. Prior to the evolution of macrophage-tropic variants, the viruses that are predominately infecting T cells (R5 T cell-tropic) may infect macrophages at a low level and inefficiently, but this could contribute to the reservoir. PMID:25236812

  20. City Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dargan, Amanda; Zeitlin, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Today, fewer city blocks preserve the confidence of lifestyle and urban geography that sustain traditional games and outdoor play. Large groups of children choosing sides and organizing Red Rover games are no longer commonplace. Teachers must encourage free play; urban planners must build cities that are safe play havens. (MLH)

  1. Development of the Contextual Assessment of Social Skills (CASS): A Role Play Measure of Social Skill for Individuals with High-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratto, Allison B.; Turner-Brown, Lauren; Rupp, Betty M.; Mesibov, Gary B.; Penn, David L.

    2011-01-01

    This study piloted a role play assessment of conversational skills for adolescents and young adults with high-functioning autism/Asperger syndrome (HFA/AS). Participants completed two semi-structured role plays, in which social context was manipulated by changing the confederate's level of interest in the conversation. Participants' social…

  2. Nitric oxide plays a role in the regulation of adrenal blood flow and adrenocorticomedullary functions in the llama fetus

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Raquel A; Sánchez, Gina; Liberona, Leonel; Sanhueza, Emilia M; Giussani, Dino A; Blanco, Carlos E; Hanson, Mark A; Llanos, Aníbal J

    2002-01-01

    The hypothesis that nitric oxide plays a key role in the regulation of adrenal blood flow and plasma concentrations of cortisol and catecholamines under basal and hypoxaemic conditions in the llama fetus was tested. At 0.6-0.8 of gestation, 11 llama fetuses were surgically prepared for long-term recording under anaesthesia with vascular and amniotic catheters. Following recovery all fetuses underwent an experimental protocol based on 1 h of normoxaemia, 1 h of hypoxaemia and 1 h of recovery. In nine fetuses, the protocol occurred during fetal i.v. infusion with saline and in five fetuses during fetal i.v. treatment with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor l-NAME. Adrenal blood flow was determined by the radiolabelled microsphere method during each of the experimental periods during saline infusion and treatment with l-NAME. Treatment with l-NAME during normoxaemia led to a marked fall in adrenal blood flow and a pronounced increase in plasma catecholamine concentrations, but it did not affect plasma ACTH or cortisol levels. In saline-infused fetuses, acute hypoxaemia elicited an increase in adrenal blood flow and in plasma ACTH, cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations. Treatment with l-NAME did not affect the increase in fetal plasma ACTH, but prevented the increments in adrenal blood flow and in plasma cortisol and adrenaline concentrations during hypoxaemia in the llama fetus. In contrast, l-NAME further enhanced the increase in fetal plasma noradrenaline. These data support the hypothesis that nitric oxide has important roles in the regulation of adrenal blood flow and adrenal corticomedullary functions during normoxaemia and hypoxaemia functions in the late gestation llama fetus. PMID:12356897

  3. Play Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lawver, Timothy; Blankenship, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Play therapy is a treatment modality in which the therapist engages in play with the child. Its use has been documented in a variety of settings and with a variety of diagnoses. Treating within the context of play brings the therapist and the therapy to the level of the child. By way of an introduction to this approach, a case is presented of a six-year-old boy with oppositional defiant disorder. The presentation focuses on the events and interactions of a typical session with an established patient. The primary issues of the session are aggression, self worth, and self efficacy. These themes manifest themselves through the content of the child’s play and narration of his actions. The therapist then reflects these back to the child while gently encouraging the child toward more positive play. Though the example is one of nondirective play therapy, a wide range of variation exists under the heading of play therapy. PMID:19724720

  4. Disturbance of oligodendrocyte function plays a key role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shingo; Hattori, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Shoko; Ito, Akira; Tohyama, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    The major psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia (SZ) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are thought to be multifactorial diseases related to both genetic and environmental factors. However, the genes responsible and the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of SZ and MDD remain unclear. We previously reported that abnormalities of disrupted-in-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) and DISC1 binding zinc finger (DBZ) might cause major psychiatric disorders such as SZ. Interestingly, both DISC and DBZ have been further detected in oligodendrocytes and implicated in regulating oligodendrocyte differentiation. DISC1 negatively regulates the differentiation of oligodendrocytes, whereas DBZ plays a positive regulatory role in oligodendrocyte differentiation. We have reported that repeated stressful events, one of the major risk factors of MDD, can induce sustained upregulation of plasma corticosterone levels and serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinase 1 (Sgk1) mRNA expression in oligodendrocytes. Repeated stressful events can also activate the SGK1 cascade and cause excess arborization of oligodendrocyte processes, which is thought to be related to depressive-like symptoms. In this review, we discuss the expression of DISC1, DBZ, and SGK1 in oligodendrocytes, their roles in the regulation of oligodendrocyte function, possible interactions of DISC1 and DBZ in relation to SZ, and the activation of the SGK1 signaling cascade in relation to MDD.

  5. Disturbance of Oligodendrocyte Function Plays a Key Role in the Pathogenesis of Schizophrenia and Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Akira; Tohyama, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    The major psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia (SZ) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are thought to be multifactorial diseases related to both genetic and environmental factors. However, the genes responsible and the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of SZ and MDD remain unclear. We previously reported that abnormalities of disrupted-in-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) and DISC1 binding zinc finger (DBZ) might cause major psychiatric disorders such as SZ. Interestingly, both DISC and DBZ have been further detected in oligodendrocytes and implicated in regulating oligodendrocyte differentiation. DISC1 negatively regulates the differentiation of oligodendrocytes, whereas DBZ plays a positive regulatory role in oligodendrocyte differentiation. We have reported that repeated stressful events, one of the major risk factors of MDD, can induce sustained upregulation of plasma corticosterone levels and serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinase 1 (Sgk1) mRNA expression in oligodendrocytes. Repeated stressful events can also activate the SGK1 cascade and cause excess arborization of oligodendrocyte processes, which is thought to be related to depressive-like symptoms. In this review, we discuss the expression of DISC1, DBZ, and SGK1 in oligodendrocytes, their roles in the regulation of oligodendrocyte function, possible interactions of DISC1 and DBZ in relation to SZ, and the activation of the SGK1 signaling cascade in relation to MDD. PMID:25705664

  6. Macrophage IL-12p70 Signaling Prevents HSV-1–Induced CNS Autoimmunity Triggered by Autoaggressive CD4+ Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Kevin R.; Gate, David; Zandian, Mandana; Allen, Sariah J.; Rajasagi, Naveen Kumar; van Rooijen, Nico; Chen, Shuang; Arditi, Moshe; Rouse, Barry T.; Flavell, Richard A.; Town, Terrence; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain self-tolerance and function to suppress overly exuberant immune responses. However, it is unclear whether innate immune cells modulate Treg function. Here the authors examined the role of innate immunity in lymphomyeloid homeostasis. Methods. The involvement of B cells, dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages, natural killer (NK) cells, and T cells in central nervous system (CNS) demyelination in different strains of mice infected ocularly with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was investigated. Results. The authors found that depletion of macrophages, but not DCs, B cells, NK cells, CD4+ T cells, or CD8+ T cells, induced CNS demyelination irrespective of virus or mouse strain. As with macrophage depletion, mice deficient in interleukin (IL)-12p35 or IL-12p40 showed CNS demyelination after HSV-1 infection, whereas demyelination was undetectable in HSV-1–infected, IL-23p19–deficient, or Epstein-Barr virus–induced gene 3-deficient mice. Demyelination could be rescued in macrophage-depleted mice after the injection of IL-12p70 DNA and in IL-12p35−/− or IL-12p40−/− mice after injection with IL-12p35 or IL-12p40 DNA or with recombinant viruses expressing IL-12p35 or IL-12p40. Using FoxP3-, CD4-, CD8-, or CD25-depletion and gene-deficient mouse approaches, the authors demonstrated that HSV-1–induced demyelination was blocked in the absence of CD4, CD25, or FoxP3 in macrophage-depleted mice. Flow cytometry showed an elevation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells in the spleens of infected macrophage-depleted mice, and adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+ T cells to infected macrophage-depleted severe combined immunodeficient mice induced CNS demyelination. Conclusions. The authors demonstrated that macrophage IL-12p70 signaling plays an important role in maintaining immune homeostasis in the CNS by preventing the development of autoaggressive CD4+ Tregs. PMID:21220560

  7. Play Sheets. Let's Play! Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Buffalo. Center for Assistive Technology.

    This collection of play sheets for parents and early intervention personnel was developed by the "Let's Play! Project," a 3-year federally supported project that worked to promote play in infants and toddlers with disabilities through the use of "low-tech" assistive technology. Each single page guide provides guidance to…

  8. Ecrg4 expression and its product augurin in the choroid plexus: impact on fetal brain development, cerebrospinal fluid homeostasis and neuroprogenitor cell response to CNS injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    increased proliferation of GFAP-positive cells and induced a dose-dependent hydrocephalus-like phenotype that could be rescued by co-injection of antisense morpholinos with Ecrg4 mRNA. Conclusion An unusually elevated expression of the Ecrg4 gene in the CP implies that its product, augurin, plays a role in CP-CSF-CNS function. The results are all consistent with a model whereby an injury-induced decrease in augurin dysinhibits target cells at the ependymal-subependymal interface. We speculate that the ability of CP and ependymal epithelium to alter the progenitor cell response to CNS injury may be mediated, in part by Ecrg4. If so, the canonic control of its promoter by DNA methylation may implicate epigenetic mechanisms in neuroprogenitor fate and function in the CNS. PMID:21349154

  9. PPAR agonists as therapeutics for CNS trauma and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mandrekar-Colucci, Shweta; Sauerbeck, Andrew; Popovich, Phillip G.; McTigue, Dana M.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury or disease of the spinal cord and brain elicits multiple cellular and biochemical reactions that together cause or are associated with neuropathology. Specifically, injury or disease elicits acute infiltration and activation of immune cells, death of neurons and glia, mitochondrial dysfunction, and the secretion of substrates that inhibit axon regeneration. In some diseases, inflammation is chronic or non-resolving. Ligands that target PPARs (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors), a group of ligand-activated transcription factors, are promising therapeutics for neurologic disease and CNS injury because their activation affects many, if not all, of these interrelated pathologic mechanisms. PPAR activation can simultaneously weaken or reprogram the immune response, stimulate metabolic and mitochondrial function, promote axon growth and induce progenitor cells to differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes. PPAR activation has beneficial effects in many pre-clinical models of neurodegenerative diseases and CNS injury; however, the mechanisms through which PPARs exert these effects have yet to be fully elucidated. In this review we discuss current literature supporting the role of PPAR activation as a therapeutic target for treating traumatic injury and degenerative diseases of the CNS. PMID:24215544

  10. Reassembly of Excitable Domains after CNS Axon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Miguel A.; de Lima, Silmara; Gilbert, Hui-Ya; Giger, Roman J.; Benowitz, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Action potential initiation and propagation in myelinated axons require ion channel clustering at axon initial segments (AIS) and nodes of Ranvier. Disruption of these domains after injury impairs nervous system function. Traditionally, injured CNS axons are considered refractory to regeneration, but some recent approaches challenge this view by showing robust long-distance regeneration. However, whether these approaches allow remyelination and promote the reestablishment of AIS and nodes of Ranvier is unknown. Using mouse optic nerve crush as a model for CNS traumatic injury, we performed a detailed analysis of AIS and node disruption after nerve crush. We found significant disruption of AIS and loss of nodes within days of the crush, and complete loss of nodes 1 week after injury. Genetic deletion of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), coupled with stimulation of RGCs by inflammation and cAMP, dramatically enhanced regeneration. With this treatment, we found significant reestablishment of RGC AIS, remyelination, and even reassembly of nodes in regions proximal, within, and distal to the crush site. Remyelination began near the retina, progressed distally, and was confirmed by electron microscopy. Although axons grew rapidly, remyelination and nodal ion channel clustering was much slower. Finally, genetic deletion of ankyrinG from RGCs to block AIS reassembly did not affect axon regeneration, indicating that preservation of neuronal polarity is not required for axon regeneration. Together, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that regenerating CNS axons can be remyelinated and reassemble new AIS and nodes of Ranvier. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We show, for the first time, that regenerated CNS axons have the capacity to both remyelinate and reassemble the axon initial segments and nodes of Ranvier necessary for rapid and efficient action potential propagation. PMID:27581456

  11. Dealing with Danger in the CNS: The Response of the Immune System to Injury.

    PubMed

    Gadani, Sachin P; Walsh, James T; Lukens, John R; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-07-01

    Fighting pathogens and maintaining tissue homeostasis are prerequisites for survival. Both of these functions are upheld by the immune system, though the latter is often overlooked in the context of the CNS. The mere presence of immune cells in the CNS was long considered a hallmark of pathology, but this view has been recently challenged by studies demonstrating that immunological signaling can confer pivotal neuroprotective effects on the injured CNS. In this review, we describe the temporal sequence of immunological events that follow CNS injury. Beginning with immediate changes at the injury site, including death of neural cells and release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), and progressing through innate and adaptive immune responses, we describe the cascade of inflammatory mediators and the implications of their post-injury effects. We conclude by proposing a revised interpretation of immune privilege in the brain, which takes beneficial neuro-immune communications into account.

  12. Immunosuppressive Mechanisms of Malignant Gliomas: Parallels at Non-CNS Sites

    PubMed Central

    Perng, Powell; Lim, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) possesses powerful local and global immunosuppressive capabilities that modulate unwanted inflammatory reactions in nervous tissue. These same immune-modulatory mechanisms are also co-opted by malignant brain tumors and pose a formidable challenge to brain tumor immunotherapy. Routes by which malignant gliomas coordinate immunosuppression include the mechanical and functional barriers of the CNS; immunosuppressive cytokines and catabolites; immune checkpoint molecules; tumor-infiltrating immune cells; and suppressor immune cells. The challenges to overcoming tumor-induced immunosuppression, however, are not unique to the brain, and several analogous immunosuppressive mechanisms also exist for primary tumors outside of the CNS. Ultimately, the immune responses in the CNS are linked and complementary to immune processes in the periphery, and advances in tumor immunotherapy in peripheral sites may therefore illuminate novel approaches to brain tumor immunotherapy, and vice versa. PMID:26217588

  13. Competitive versus cooperative exergame play for African American adolescents' executive function skills: short-term effects in a long-term training intervention.

    PubMed

    Staiano, Amanda E; Abraham, Anisha A; Calvert, Sandra L

    2012-03-01

    Exergames are videogames that require gross motor activity, thereby combining gaming with physical activity. This study examined the role of competitive versus cooperative exergame play on short-term changes in executive function skills, following a 10-week exergame training intervention. Fifty-four low-income overweight and obese African American adolescents were randomly assigned to a competitive exergame condition, a cooperative exergame condition, or a no-play control group. Youths in the competitive exergame condition improved in executive function skills more than did those in the cooperative exergame condition and the no-play control group. Weight loss during the intervention was also significantly positively correlated with improved executive function skills. The findings link competitive exergame play to beneficial cognitive outcomes for at-risk ethnic minority adolescents.

  14. Why Play?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weininger, O.

    This paper draws together briefly theories and knowledge from research in morphology and cognitive psychology, as well as some hypothetical information from traditional psychiatry, to show the ramifications of play in children's development. Play is defined as any of a wide variety of behaviors through which an individual attempts to discover what…

  15. Playful Gaming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makedon, Alex

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the concept of playful gaming (an idea not expressed fully by either term alone) and uses it as an analytical tool to study the playfulness of games in the context of several social phenomena; i.e., social change, socialization, utopian systems, and educational gaming. An extensive reference list is provided. (MBR)

  16. Playing Shakespeare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashian, Kathleen Ryniker

    1993-01-01

    Describes a yearlong project at 12 Catholic middle schools in the Diocese of Arlington, Virginia, to incorporate the plays of William Shakespeare into the curriculum. Teachers attended university lectures and directed students in performances of the plays. Concludes that Shakespeare can be understood and enjoyed by middle school students. (BCY)

  17. Shadow Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Hilson, Margilee P.

    2012-01-01

    A bunny rabbit playfully hops across the wall. Then hands realign and fingers shift to make a hawk soar toward the ceiling. Most children have enjoyed the delightful experience of playing with shadow puppets. The authors build on this natural curiosity to help students link shadows to complex astronomical concepts such as seasons. The…

  18. TNF and its receptors in the CNS: The essential, the desirable and the deleterious effects.

    PubMed

    Probert, L

    2015-08-27

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is the prototypic pro-inflammatory cytokine. It is central to host defense and inflammatory responses but under certain circumstances also triggers cell death and tissue degeneration. Its pleiotropic effects often lead to opposing outcomes during the development of immune-mediated diseases, particularly those affecting the central nervous system (CNS). The reported contradictions may result from lack of precision in discussing TNF. TNF signaling comprises at minimum a two-ligand (soluble and transmembrane TNF) and two-receptor (TNFR1 and TNFR2) system, with ligands and receptors both differentially expressed and regulated on different cell types. The "functional multiplicity" this engenders is the focus of much research, but there is still no general consensus on functional outcomes of TNF signaling in general, let alone in the CNS. In this review, evidence showing the effects of TNF in the CNS under physiological and pathophysiological conditions is placed in the context of major advances in understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern TNF function in general. Thus the roles of TNF signaling in the CNS shift from the conventional dichotomy of beneficial and deleterious, that mainly explain effects under pathological conditions, to incorporate a growing number of "essential" and "desirable" roles for TNF and its main cellular source in the CNS, microglia, under physiological conditions including regulation of neuronal activity and maintenance of myelin. An improved holistic view of TNF function in the CNS might better reconcile the expansive experimental data with stark clinical evidence that reduced functioning of TNF and its dominant pro-inflammatory receptor, TNFR1, are risk factors for the development of multiple sclerosis. It will also facilitate the safe translation of basic research findings from animal models to humans and propel the development of more selective anti-TNF therapies aimed at selectively

  19. Immunohistological localization of 5-HT in the CNS and feeding system of the Stable Fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    5-HT immunoreactive neurons were detected in the CNS of the stable fly. The finding of strong innervations of the cibarial pump muscles and the foregut by 5-HT IR neurons in the feeding-related systems suggests that 5-HT may play a crucial role in the control of the feeding behavior in both the larv...

  20. Environmental Enrichment Stimulates Immune Cell Secretion of Exosomes That Promote CNS Myelination and May Regulate Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kraig, Richard P.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) consists of increased physical, intellectual and social activity, and has wide-ranging effects, including enhancing cognition, learning and memory, and motor coordination. Animal studies have demonstrated that EE improves outcome of brain trauma and neurodegenerative disorders, including demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis, making it a promising therapeutic option. However, the complexity of applying a robust EE paradigm makes clinical use difficult. A better understanding of the signaling involved in EE-based neuroprotection may allow for development of effective mimetics as an alternative. In prior work, we found that exosomes isolated from the serum of rats exposed to EE impact CNS myelination. Exosomes are naturally occurring nanovesicles containing mRNA, miRNA, and protein, which play important roles in cell function, disease, and immunomodulation. When applied to hippocampal slice cultures or nasally administered to naïve rats, EE serum exosomes significantly increase myelin content, oligodendrocyte precursor (OPC) and neural stem cell levels, and reduce oxidative stress. We found that rat EE exosomes were enriched in miR-219, which is necessary and sufficient for OPC differentiation into myelinating cells. Thus, peripherally produced exosomes may be a useful therapy for remyelination. Here, we aim to better characterize the impact of EE on CNS health and to determine the cellular source of nutritive exosomes found in serum. We found that exosomes isolated from various circulating immune cell types all increased slice culture myelin content, contained miR-219, and reduced oxidative stress, suggesting that EE globally alters immune function in a way that supports brain health. PMID:26993508

  1. MHCII-independent CD4+ T cells protect injured CNS neurons via IL-4

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, James T.; Hendrix, Sven; Boato, Francesco; Smirnov, Igor; Zheng, Jingjing; Lukens, John R.; Gadani, Sachin; Hechler, Daniel; Gölz, Greta; Rosenberger, Karen; Kammertöns, Thomas; Vogt, Johannes; Vogelaar, Christina; Siffrin, Volker; Radjavi, Ali; Fernandez-Castaneda, Anthony; Gaultier, Alban; Gold, Ralf; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Nitsch, Robert; Zipp, Frauke; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    A body of experimental evidence suggests that T cells mediate neuroprotection following CNS injury; however, the antigen specificity of these T cells and how they mediate neuroprotection are unknown. Here, we have provided evidence that T cell–mediated neuroprotection after CNS injury can occur independently of major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) signaling to T cell receptors (TCRs). Using two murine models of CNS injury, we determined that damage-associated molecular mediators that originate from injured CNS tissue induce a population of neuroprotective, IL-4–producing T cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Compared with wild-type mice, IL-4–deficient animals had decreased functional recovery following CNS injury; however, transfer of CD4+ T cells from wild-type mice, but not from IL-4–deficient mice, enhanced neuronal survival. Using a culture-based system, we determined that T cell–derived IL-4 protects and induces recovery of injured neurons by activation of neuronal IL-4 receptors, which potentiated neurotrophin signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways. Together, these findings demonstrate that damage-associated molecules from the injured CNS induce a neuroprotective T cell response that is independent of MHCII/TCR interactions and is MyD88 dependent. Moreover, our results indicate that IL-4 mediates neuroprotection and recovery of the injured CNS and suggest that strategies to enhance IL-4–producing CD4+ T cells have potential to attenuate axonal damage in the course of CNS injury in trauma, inflammation, or neurodegeneration. PMID:25607842

  2. Innate-Adaptive Crosstalk: How Dendritic Cells Shape Immune Responses in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Héninger, Erika; Harris, Melissa G; Lee, JangEun; Sandor, Matyas; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a heterogeneous group of professional antigen presenting cells that lie in a nexus between innate and adaptive immunity because they recognize and respond to danger signals and subsequently initiate and regulate effector T-cell responses. Initially thought to be absent from the CNS, both plasmacytoid and conventional DCs as well as DC precursors have recently been detected in several CNS compartments where they are seemingly poised for responding to injury and pathogens. Additionally, monocyte-derived DCs rapidly accumulate in the inflamed CNS where they, along with other DC subsets, may function to locally regulate effector T-cells and/or carry antigens to CNS-draining cervical lymph nodes. In this review we highlight recent research showing that (a) distinct inflammatory stimuli differentially recruit DC subsets to the CNS; (b) DC recruitment across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is regulated by adhesion molecules, growth factors, and chemokines; and (c) DCs positively or negatively regulate immune responses in the CNS. PMID:21948376

  3. The Involvement of the Myelin-Associated Inhibitors and Their Receptors in CNS Plasticity and Injury.

    PubMed

    Boghdadi, Anthony G; Teo, Leon; Bourne, James A

    2017-02-22

    The limited capacity for the central nervous system (CNS) to repair itself was first described over 100 years ago by Spanish neuroscientist Ramon Y. Cajal. However, the exact mechanisms underlying this failure in neuronal regeneration remain unclear and, as such, no effective therapeutics yet exist. Numerous studies have attempted to elucidate the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that inhibit neuronal repair with increasing evidence suggesting that several inhibitory factors and repulsive guidance cues active during development actually persist into adulthood and may be contributing to the inhibition of repair. For example, in the injured adult CNS, there are various inhibitory factors that impede the outgrowth of neurites from damaged neurons. One of the most potent of these neurite outgrowth inhibitors is the group of proteins known as the myelin-associated inhibitors (MAIs), present mainly on the membranes of oligodendroglia. Several studies have shown that interfering with these proteins can have positive outcomes in CNS injury models by promoting neurite outgrowth and improving functional recovery. As such, the MAIs, their receptors, and downstream effectors are valid drug targets for the treatment of CNS injury. This review will discuss the current literature on MAIs in the context of CNS development, plasticity, and injury. Molecules that interfere with the MAIs and their receptors as potential candidates for the treatment of CNS injury will additionally be introduced in the context of preclinical and clinical trials.

  4. Protective Autoimmunity: A Unifying Model for the Immune Network Involved in CNS Repair.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michal; Raposo, Catarina

    2014-08-01

    Immune activity in the CNS parenchyma under various acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions has been often interpreted as a sign of pathological inflammation. The apparent resemblance of the local neuroinflammatory processes to autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), generated the view that, despite differences in etiology and pathology, neurodegenerative disorders with a local inflammatory component can benefit from systemic anti-inflammatory therapy. In addition, as CNS self-reactive T cells are associated with the etiology of MS, autoimmunity was assumed to solely reflect pathology, and therefore, was universally linked to autoimmune disease. Yet, it is becoming increasingly clear that CNS-specific T cells, along with circulating and local innate immune cells, can enhance CNS healing processes following non-infectious injuries, or any deviation from homeostasis, including chronic pathological conditions. Here, we discuss the theory of "protective autoimmunity," which describes the activity of an immune cell network encompassing effector and regulatory T cells with specificity for CNS antigens, in CNS maintenance and repair. Such an immune network, evoked in response to external and internal threats, functions in a tightly regulated way, ensuring restoration of the brain's equilibrium and return to homeostasis.

  5. Assessment of cognitive performance using CNS vital signs after electroconvulsive treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wysokiński, Adam; Dzienniak, Małgorzata; Kłoszewska, Iwona

    2014-03-01

    Little is known how electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) affects cognitive functions in subjects with schizophrenia. Assessment of cognitive functions in subjects with schizophrenia treated with ECT was performed using CNS Vital Signs computerized battery of tests. Thirteen patients treated with ECT plus antipsychotics were assessed before and after 12 to 15 bilateral ECT sessions. We did not find any important changes between pre-ECT and post-ECT cognitive performance. We also found that CNS Vital Signs is a useful computerized battery test for assessing cognitive functions of subjects treated with ECT.

  6. Primary Central Nervous System (CNS) Lymphoma B Cell Receptors Recognize CNS Proteins.

    PubMed

    Montesinos-Rongen, Manuel; Purschke, Frauke G; Brunn, Anna; May, Caroline; Nordhoff, Eckhard; Marcus, Katrin; Deckert, Martina

    2015-08-01

    Primary lymphoma of the CNS (PCNSL) is a diffuse large B cell lymphoma confined to the CNS. To elucidate its peculiar organ tropism, we generated recombinant Abs (recAbs) identical to the BCR of 23 PCNSLs from immunocompetent patients. Although none of the recAbs showed self-reactivity upon testing with common autoantigens, they recognized 1547 proteins present on a large-scale protein microarray, indicating polyreactivity. Interestingly, proteins (GRINL1A, centaurin-α, BAIAP2) recognized by the recAbs are physiologically expressed by CNS neurons. Furthermore, 87% (20/23) of the recAbs, including all Abs derived from IGHV4-34 using PCNSL, recognized galectin-3, which was upregulated on microglia/macrophages, astrocytes, and cerebral endothelial cells upon CNS invasion by PCNSL. Thus, PCNSL Ig may recognize CNS proteins as self-Ags. Their interaction may contribute to BCR signaling with sustained NF-κB activation and, ultimately, may foster tumor cell proliferation and survival. These data may also explain, at least in part, the affinity of PCNSL cells for the CNS.

  7. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier exacerbates spreading depression in the locust CNS.

    PubMed

    Spong, Kristin E; Rochon-Terry, Geneviève; Money, Tomas G A; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2014-07-01

    In response to cellular stress in the nervous system of the locust (Locusta migratoria) neural function is interrupted in association with ionic disturbances propagating throughout nervous tissue (Spreading depression; SD). The insect blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a critical role in the regulation of ion levels within the CNS. We investigated how a disruption in barrier function by transient exposure to 3M urea affects locusts' vulnerability to disturbances in ion levels. Repetitive SD was induced by bath application of ouabain and the extracellular potassium concentration ([K(+)]o) within the metathoracic ganglion (MTG) was monitored. Urea treatment increased the susceptibility to ouabain and caused a progressive impairment in the ability to maintain baseline [K(+)]o levels during episodes of repetitive SD. Additionally, using a within animal protocol we demonstrate that waves of SD, induced by high K(+), propagate throughout the MTG faster following disruption of the BBB. Lastly, we show that targeting the BBB of intact animals reduces their ability to sustain neural function during anoxic conditions. Our findings indicate that locust's ability to withstand stress is diminished following a reduction in barrier function likely due to an impairment of the ability of neural tissue to maintain ionic gradients.

  8. N-Acetylaspartate in the CNS: From Neurodiagnostics to Neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, John R.; Ross, Brian; Arun, Peethambaran; Madhavarao, Chikkathur N.; Namboodiri, M. A. A.

    2007-01-01

    will be required to more fully understand the biochemical functions served by NAA in CNS development and activity, and additional functions are likely to be discovered. PMID:17275978

  9. Playing Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Juan E.

    The acceptance of animation technologies is increasing. Video games, such as Sony PlayStation (SONY, 2002), have become part of the culture for young people from kindergarten through undergraduate school. Animation technologies have been implemented into educational systems in the form of animated pedagogical agents (Johnson, 2000). The research…

  10. Sweet Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Shuk-kwan S.; Lo, Jane-Jane

    2010-01-01

    This article features Sweet play math, a "math by the month" activity that involves decorating and making sugar cubes. Teachers may want to substitute straws, paper squares, alphabet blocks, or such commercially made manipulatives as Unifix[R] cubes for the real sweets. Given no allergy concerns, teachers and students alike would enjoy some sweet…

  11. Clay Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  12. Type I interferons and microbial metabolites of tryptophan modulate astrocyte activity and CNS inflammation via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    PubMed Central

    Rothhammer, Veit; Mascanfroni, Ivan D.; Bunse, Lukas; Takenaka, Maisa C.; Kenison, Jessica E.; Mayo, Lior; Chao, Chun-Cheih; Patel, Bonny; Yan, Raymond; Blain, Manon; Alvarez, Jorge I.; Kébir, Hania; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Jung, Steffen; Obholzer, Nikolaus; Pochet, Nathalie; Clish, Clary B.; Prinz, Marco; Prat, Alexandre; Antel, Jack; Quintana, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes play important roles in the central nervous system (CNS) during health and disease. Through genome-wide analyses we detected a transcriptional response to type I interferons (IFN-I) in astrocytes during experimental CNS autoimmunity and also in CNS lesions from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. IFN-I signaling in astrocytes reduces inflammation and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) disease scores via the ligand-activated transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2). The anti-inflammatory effects of nasally administered IFN-β are partly mediated by AhR. Dietary tryptophan is metabolized by the gut microbiota into AhR agonists that act on astrocytes to limit CNS inflammation. EAE scores were increased following ampicillin treatment during the recovery phase, and CNS inflammation was reduced in antibiotic-treated mice by supplementation with the tryptophan metabolites indole, indoxyl-3-sulfate (I3S), indole-3-propionic acid (IPA) and indole-3-aldehyde (IAld), or the bacterial enzyme tryptophanase. In individuals with MS, the circulating levels of AhR agonists were decreased. These findings suggest that IFN-I produced in the CNS act in combination with metabolites derived from dietary tryptophan by the gut flora to activate AhR signaling in astrocytes and suppress CNS inflammation. PMID:27158906

  13. Interneuron Progenitor Transplantation to Treat CNS Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chohan, Muhammad O.; Moore, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Due to the inadequacy of endogenous repair mechanisms diseases of the nervous system remain a major challenge to scientists and clinicians. Stem cell based therapy is an exciting and viable strategy that has been shown to ameliorate or even reverse symptoms of CNS dysfunction in preclinical animal models. Of particular importance has been the use of GABAergic interneuron progenitors as a therapeutic strategy. Born in the neurogenic niches of the ventral telencephalon, interneuron progenitors retain their unique capacity to disperse, integrate and induce plasticity in adult host circuitries following transplantation. Here we discuss the potential of interneuron based transplantation strategies as it relates to CNS disease therapeutics. We also discuss mechanisms underlying their therapeutic efficacy and some of the challenges that face the field. PMID:27582692

  14. VIIP: Central Nervous System (CNS) Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vera, Jerry; Mulugeta, Lealem; Nelson, Emily; Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross; Myers, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Current long-duration missions to the International Space Station and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit expose astronauts to increased risk of Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. It has been hypothesized that the headward shift of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood in microgravity may cause significant elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP), which in turn may then induce VIIP syndrome through interaction with various biomechanical pathways. However, there is insufficient evidence to confirm this hypothesis. In this light, we are developing lumped-parameter models of fluid transport in the central nervous system (CNS) as a means to simulate the influence of microgravity on ICP. The CNS models will also be used in concert with the lumped parameter and finite element models of the eye described in the related IWS works submitted by Nelson et al., Feola et al. and Ethier et al.

  15. Experimental Study of Stellar Reactions at CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Amadio, G.; Hayakawa, S.; He, J. J.; Saito, A.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Fukunishi, N.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.; Kato, S.; Tanaka, M. H.; Fuchi, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Kwon, K.; Lee, C. S.; Khiem, Le Hong; Chen, A.

    2006-11-02

    After a brief review on low-energy RI beam production technology, nuclear astrophysics programs at CNS are presented including a scope of the field in the Wako campus. The CRIB project involves a total development of the whole facility to maximize the low-energy RI beam intensities, including the ion source, the AVF cyclotron and the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, Some recent nuclear astrophysics experiments performed with the RI beams were discussed, including the measurement of the 14O({alpha},p)17F reaction, the key stellar reaction for the onset of the high-temperature rp-process. The first experiment performed with a newly installed high-resolution magnetic spectrograph PA of CNS was also presented. Collaboration possibilities for nuclear astrophysics in the RIKEN campus are also touched.

  16. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M. )

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery.

  17. Agile delivery of protein therapeutics to CNS.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiang; Manickam, Devika S; Brynskikh, Anna; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2014-09-28

    A variety of therapeutic proteins have shown potential to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Challenge to deliver these protein molecules to the brain is well known. Proteins administered through parenteral routes are often excluded from the brain because of their poor bioavailability and the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Barriers also exist to proteins administered through non-parenteral routes that bypass the BBB. Several strategies have shown promise in delivering proteins to the brain. This review, first, describes the physiology and pathology of the BBB that underscore the rationale and needs of each strategy to be applied. Second, major classes of protein therapeutics along with some key factors that affect their delivery outcomes are presented. Third, different routes of protein administration (parenteral, central intracerebroventricular and intraparenchymal, intranasal and intrathecal) are discussed along with key barriers to CNS delivery associated with each route. Finally, current delivery strategies involving chemical modification of proteins and use of particle-based carriers are overviewed using examples from literature and our own work. Whereas most of these studies are in the early stage, some provide proof of mechanism of increased protein delivery to the brain in relevant models of CNS diseases, while in few cases proof of concept had been attained in clinical studies. This review will be useful to broad audience of students, academicians and industry professionals who consider critical issues of protein delivery to the brain and aim developing and studying effective brain delivery systems for protein therapeutics.

  18. Agile Delivery of Protein Therapeutics to CNS

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiang; Manickam, Devika S.; Brynskikh, Anna; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    A variety of therapeutic proteins have shown potential to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Challenge to deliver these protein molecules to the brain is well known. Proteins administered through parenteral routes are often excluded from the brain because of their poor bioavailability and the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Barriers also exist to proteins administered through non-parenteral routes that bypass the BBB. Several strategies have shown promise in delivering proteins to the brain. This review, first, describes the physiology and pathology of the BBB that underscore the rationale and needs of each strategy to be applied. Second, major classes of protein therapeutics along with some key factors that affect their delivery outcomes are presented. Third, different routes of protein administration (parenteral, central intracerebroventricular and intraparenchymal, intranasal and intrathecal) are discussed along with key barriers to CNS delivery associated with each route. Finally, current delivery strategies involving chemical modification of proteins and use of particle-based carriers are overviewed using examples from literature and our own work. Whereas most of these studies are in the early stage, some provide proof of mechanism of increased protein delivery to the brain in relevant models of CNS diseases, while in few cases proof of concept had been attained in clinical studies. This review will be useful to broad audience of students, academicians and industry professionals who consider critical issues of protein delivery to the brain and aim developing and studying effective brain delivery systems for protein therapeutics. PMID:24956489

  19. cJun promotes CNS axon growth

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Jessica K; Martinez, Yania; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2014-01-01

    A number of genes regulate regeneration of peripheral axons, but their ability to drive axon growth and regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) remains largely untested. To address this question we overexpressed eight transcription factors and one small GTPase alone and in pairwise combinations to test whether combinatorial overexpression would have a synergistic impact on CNS neuron neurite growth. The Jun oncogene/signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (JUN/STAT6) combination increased neurite growth in dissociated cortical neurons and in injured cortical slices. In injured cortical slices, JUN overexpression increased axon growth to a similar extent as JUN and STAT6 together. Interestingly, JUN overexpression was not associated with increased growth associated protein 43 (GAP43) or integrin alpha 7 (ITGA7) expression, though these are predicted transcriptional targets. This study demonstrates that JUN overexpression in cortical neurons stimulates axon growth, but does so independently of changes in expression of genes thought to be critical for JUN’s effects on axon growth. We conclude that JUN activity underlies this CNS axonal growth response, and that it is mechanistically distinct from peripheral regeneration responses, in which increases in JUN expression coincide with increases in GAP43 expression. PMID:24521823

  20. Competitive versus Cooperative Exergame Play for African American Adolescents' Executive Function Skills: Short-Term Effects in a Long-Term Training Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staiano, Amanda E.; Abraham, Anisha A.; Calvert, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Exergames are videogames that require gross motor activity, thereby combining gaming with physical activity. This study examined the role of competitive versus cooperative exergame play on short-term changes in executive function skills, following a 10-week exergame training intervention. Fifty-four low-income overweight and obese African American…

  1. Critical role for prokineticin 2 in CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Hamdan, Mhamad; Costanza, Massimo; Fontana, Elena; Di Dario, Marco; Musio, Silvia; Congiu, Cenzo; Onnis, Valentina; Lattanzi, Roberta; Radaelli, Marta; Martinelli, Vittorio; Salvadori, Severo; Negri, Lucia; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Farina, Cinthia; Balboni, Gianfranco; Steinman, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the potential role of prokineticin 2 (PK2), a bioactive peptide involved in multiple biological functions including immune modulation, in CNS autoimmune demyelinating disease. Methods: We investigated the expression of PK2 in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), and in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. We evaluated the biological effects of PK2 on expression of EAE and on development of T-cell response against myelin by blocking PK2 in vivo with PK2 receptor antagonists. We treated with PK2 immune cells activated against myelin antigen to explore the immune-modulating effects of this peptide in vitro. Results: Pk2 messenger RNA was upregulated in spinal cord and lymph node cells (LNCs) of mice with EAE. PK2 protein was expressed in EAE inflammatory infiltrates and was increased in sera during EAE. In patients with relapsing-remitting MS, transcripts for PK2 were significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells compared with healthy controls, and PK2 serum concentrations were significantly higher. A PK2 receptor antagonist prevented or attenuated established EAE in chronic and relapsing-remitting models, reduced CNS inflammation and demyelination, and decreased the production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17A cytokines in LNCs while increasing IL-10. PK2 in vitro increased IFN-γ and IL-17A and reduced IL-10 in splenocytes activated against myelin antigen. Conclusion: These data suggest that PK2 is a critical immune regulator in CNS autoimmune demyelination and may represent a new target for therapy. PMID:25884014

  2. Playing RNase P evolution: swapping the RNA catalyst for a protein reveals functional uniformity of highly divergent enzyme forms.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christoph; Hartig, Andreas; Hartmann, Roland K; Rossmanith, Walter

    2014-08-01

    The RNase P family is a diverse group of endonucleases responsible for the removal of 5' extensions from tRNA precursors. The diversity of enzyme forms finds its extremes in the eukaryal nucleus where RNA-based catalysis by complex ribonucleoproteins in some organisms contrasts with single-polypeptide enzymes in others. Such structural contrast suggests associated functional differences, and the complexity of the ribonucleoprotein was indeed proposed to broaden the enzyme's functionality beyond tRNA processing. To explore functional overlap and differences between most divergent forms of RNase P, we replaced the nuclear RNase P of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a 10-subunit ribonucleoprotein, with Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP3, a single monomeric protein. Surprisingly, the RNase P-swapped yeast strains were viable, displayed essentially unimpaired growth under a wide variety of conditions, and, in a certain genetic background, their fitness even slightly exceeded that of the wild type. The molecular analysis of the RNase P-swapped strains showed a minor disturbance in tRNA metabolism, but did not point to any RNase P substrates or functions beyond that. Altogether, these results indicate the full functional exchangeability of the highly dissimilar enzymes. Our study thereby establishes the RNase P family, with its combination of structural diversity and functional uniformity, as an extreme case of convergent evolution. It moreover suggests that the apparently gratuitous complexity of some RNase P forms is the result of constructive neutral evolution rather than reflecting increased functional versatility.

  3. Nanotechnology approaches to crossing the blood-brain barrier and drug delivery to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gabriel A

    2008-12-10

    Nanotechnologies are materials and devices that have a functional organization in at least one dimension on the nanometer (one billionth of a meter) scale, ranging from a few to about 100 nanometers. Nanoengineered materials and devices aimed at biologic applications and medicine in general, and neuroscience in particular, are designed fundamentally to interface and interact with cells and their tissues at the molecular level. One particularly important area of nanotechnology application to the central nervous system (CNS) is the development of technologies and approaches for delivering drugs and other small molecules such as genes, oligonucleotides, and contrast agents across the blood brain barrier (BBB). The BBB protects and isolates CNS structures (i.e. the brain and spinal cord) from the rest of the body, and creates a unique biochemical and immunological environment. Clinically, there are a number of scenarios where drugs or other small molecules need to gain access to the CNS following systemic administration, which necessitates being able to cross the BBB. Nanotechnologies can potentially be designed to carry out multiple specific functions at once or in a predefined sequence, an important requirement for the clinically successful delivery and use of drugs and other molecules to the CNS, and as such have a unique advantage over other complimentary technologies and methods. This brief review introduces emerging work in this area and summarizes a number of example applications to CNS cancers, gene therapy, and analgesia.

  4. Do not judge a cell by its cover--diversity of CNS resident, adjoining and infiltrating myeloid cells in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brendecke, Stefanie M; Prinz, Marco

    2015-11-01

    Specialized populations of tissue-resident myeloid cells inhabit every organ of the body. While many of these populations appear similar morphologically and phenotypically, they exhibit great functional diversity. The central nervous system (CNS), as an immune privileged organ, possesses a unique tissue-resident macrophage population, the microglia, as well as numerous myeloid cell subsets at its boarders and barriers in CNS-adjoining tissues, namely the meninges, the perivascular space, and the choroid plexus. Recent research has added much to our knowledge about microglia, whereas the populations of CNS-surrounding phagocytes are just starting to be appreciated. As guardians of CNS homeostasis, these myeloid cells perform immune surveillance and immune modulatory tasks in health and disease. As such, microglia and CNS-surrounding antigen-presenting cells have been shown to be crucially involved not only in the initiation and progression but also resolution of multiple sclerosis (MS). MS and its rodent model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, are autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating CNS pathologies. While some crucial aspects of the disease pathogenesis have been solved, much of the complex involvement and interplay of the innate immune compartment remains yet to be clarified. Here, we will discuss the current understanding of the scope of phenotypes and functions of myeloid cells involved in CNS neuroinflammation.

  5. The movers and shapers in immune privilege of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Britta; Vajkoczy, Peter; Weller, Roy O

    2017-02-01

    Discoveries leading to an improved understanding of immune surveillance of the central nervous system (CNS) have repeatedly provoked dismissal of the existence of immune privilege of the CNS. Recent rediscoveries of lymphatic vessels within the dura mater surrounding the brain, made possible by modern live-cell imaging technologies, have revived this discussion. This review emphasizes the fact that understanding immune privilege of the CNS requires intimate knowledge of its unique anatomy. Endothelial, epithelial and glial brain barriers establish compartments in the CNS that differ strikingly with regard to their accessibility to immune-cell subsets. There is a unique system of lymphatic drainage from the CNS to the peripheral lymph nodes. We summarize current knowledge on the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in immune-cell trafficking and lymphatic drainage from the CNS, and we take into account differences in rodent and human CNS anatomy.

  6. Kid's Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, Susan L.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the use of fabric mesh knitting as canopies for children's playgrounds. Its benefits and drawbacks are addressed as are how innovative design and choice of materials can help eliminate function difficulties. (GR)

  7. Thymidine kinases share a conserved function for nucleotide salvage and play an essential role in Arabidopsis thaliana growth and development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Dong-Lei; Li, Qun; He, Zuhua

    2015-12-01

    Thymidine kinases (TKs) are important components in the nucleotide salvage pathway. However, knowledge about plant TKs is quite limited. In this study, the molecular function of TKs in Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated. Two TKs were identified and named AtTK1 and AtTK2. Expression of both genes was ubiquitous, but AtTK1 was strongly expressed in high-proliferation tissues. AtTK1 was localized to the cytosol, whereas AtTK2 was localized to the mitochondria. Mutant analysis indicated that the two genes function coordinately to sustain normal plant development. Enzymatic assays showed that the two TK proteins shared similar catalytic specificity for pyrimidine nucleosides. They were able to complement an Escherichia coli strain lacking TK activity. 5'-Fluorodeoxyuridine (FdU) resistance and 5-ethynyl 2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation assays confirmed their activity in vivo. Furthermore, the tk mutant phenotype could be alleviated by nucleotide feeding, establishing that the biosynthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides was disrupted by the TK deficiency. Finally, both human and rice (Oryza sativa) TKs were able to rescue the tk mutants, demonstrating the functional conservation of TKs across organisms. Taken together, our findings clarify the specialized function of two TKs in A. thaliana and establish that the salvage pathway mediated by the kinases is essential for plant growth and development.

  8. Mammalian Exo1 encodes both structural and catalytic functions that play distinct roles in essential biological processes.

    PubMed

    Schaetzlein, Sonja; Chahwan, Richard; Avdievich, Elena; Roa, Sergio; Wei, Kaichun; Eoff, Robert L; Sellers, Rani S; Clark, Alan B; Kunkel, Thomas A; Scharff, Matthew D; Edelmann, Winfried

    2013-07-02

    Mammalian Exonuclease 1 (EXO1) is an evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional exonuclease involved in DNA damage repair, replication, immunoglobulin diversity, meiosis, and telomere maintenance. It has been assumed that EXO1 participates in these processes primarily through its exonuclease activity, but recent studies also suggest that EXO1 has a structural function in the assembly of higher-order protein complexes. To dissect the enzymatic and nonenzymatic roles of EXO1 in the different biological processes in vivo, we generated an EXO1-E109K knockin (Exo1(EK)) mouse expressing a stable exonuclease-deficient protein and, for comparison, a fully EXO1-deficient (Exo1(null)) mouse. In contrast to Exo1(null/null) mice, Exo1(EK/EK) mice retained mismatch repair activity and displayed normal class switch recombination and meiosis. However, both Exo1-mutant lines showed defects in DNA damage response including DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) through DNA end resection, chromosomal stability, and tumor suppression, indicating that the enzymatic function is required for those processes. On a transformation-related protein 53 (Trp53)-null background, the DSBR defect caused by the E109K mutation altered the tumor spectrum but did not affect the overall survival as compared with p53-Exo1(null) mice, whose defects in both DSBR and mismatch repair also compromised survival. The separation of these functions demonstrates the differential requirement for the structural function and nuclease activity of mammalian EXO1 in distinct DNA repair processes and tumorigenesis in vivo.

  9. Identification of Ind transcription activation and repression domains required for dorsoventral patterning of the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Von Ohlen, Tonia L.; Moses, Cade

    2009-01-01

    Specification of cell fates across the dorsoventral axis of the central nervous system in Drosophila involves the subdivision of the neuroectoderm into three domains that give rise to three columns of neural precursor cells called neuroblasts. Ventral nervous system defective (Vnd), Intermediate neuroblasts defective (Ind) and Muscle segment homeobox (Msh) are expressed in the three columns from ventral to dorsal, respectively. The products of these genes play multiple important roles in formation and specification of the embryonic nervous system. Ind for example is known to play roles in two important processes. First, Ind is essential for formation of neuroblasts conjunction with SoxB class transcription factors. Sox class transcription factors are known to specify neural stem cells in vertebrates. Second, Ind plays an important role in patterning the CNS in conjunction with, vnd and msh, which is also similar to how vertebrates pattern their neural tube. This work focuses two important aspects of Ind function. First, we used multiple approaches to identify and characterize specific domains within the protein that confer repressor or activator ability. Currently, little is known about the presence of activation or repression domains within Ind. Here we show that transcriptional repression by Ind requires multiple conserved domains within the protein, and that Ind has a transcriptional activation domain. Specifically, we have identified a novel domain, the Pst domain, that has transcriptional repression ability and appears to act independent of interaction with the co-repressor Groucho. This domain is highly conserved among insect species, but is not found in vertebrate Gsh class homeodomain proteins. Second, we show that Ind can and does repress vnd expression, but does so in a stage specific manner. We conclude from this that the function of Ind in regulating vnd expression is one of refinement and maintenance of the dorsal border. PMID:19348939

  10. Expression of Arginine Vasotocin Receptors in the Developing Zebrafish CNS

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Kenichi; Taguchi, Meari; Bonkowsky, Joshua L.; Kuwada, John Y.

    2013-01-01

    Vasotocin/vasopressin is a neuropeptide that regulates social and reproductive behaviors in a variety of animals including fish. Arginine vasotocin (AVT) is expressed by cells in the ventral hypothalamic and preoptic areas in the diencephalon during embryogenesis in zebrafish suggesting that vasotocin might mediate other functions within the CNS prior to the development of social and reproductive behaviors. In order to examine potential early roles for vasotocin we cloned two zebrafish vasotocin receptors homologous to AVPR1a. The receptors are expressed primarily in the CNS in similar but generally non-overlapping patterns. Both receptors are expressed in the forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain by larval stage. Of note, AVTR1a-expressing neurons in the hindbrain appear to be contacted by the axons of preoptic neurons in the forebrain that include avt+ neurons and from sensory axons in the lateral longitudinal fasciculus (LLF). Furthermore, AVTR1a-expressing hindbrain neurons extend axons into the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) that contains axons of many neurons thought to be involved in locomotor responses to sensory stimulation. One hypothesis consistent with this anatomy is that AVT signaling mediates or gates sensory input to motor circuits in the hindbrain and spinal cord. PMID:23830982

  11. mTOR plays critical roles in pancreatic cancer stem cells through specific and stemness-related functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Shyuichiro; Ding, Qiang; Miyazaki, Yumi; Kuwahata, Taisaku; Tsukasa, Koichiro; Takao, Sonshin

    2013-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by near-universal mutations in KRAS. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which functions downstream of RAS, has divergent effects on stem cells. In the present study, we investigated the significance of the mTOR pathway in maintaining the properties of pancreatic cancer stem cells. The mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, reduced the viability of CD133+ pancreatic cancer cells and sphere formation which is an index of self-renewal of stem-like cells, indicating that the mTOR pathway functions to maintain cancer stem-like cells. Further, rapamycin had different effects on CD133+ cells compared to cyclopamine which is an inhibitor of the Hedgehog pathway. Thus, the mTOR pathway has a distinct role although both pathways maintain pancreatic cancer stem cells. Therefore, mTOR might be a promising target to eliminate pancreatic cancer stem cells.

  12. Overcoming the challenges in the effective delivery of chemotherapies to CNS solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Hemant

    2011-01-01

    Locoregional therapies, such as surgery and intratumoral chemotherapy, do not effectively treat infiltrative primary CNS solid tumors and multifocal metastatic solid tumor disease of the CNS. It also remains a challenge to treat such CNS malignant solid tumor disease with systemic chemotherapies, although these lipid-soluble small-molecule drugs demonstrate potent cytotoxicity in vitro. Even in the setting of a ‘normalized’ tumor microenvironment, small-molecule drugs do not accumulate to effective concentrations in the vast majority of tumor cells, which is due to the fact that small-molecule drugs have short blood half-lives. It has been recently shown that drug-conjugated spherical lipid-insoluble nanoparticles within the 7–10 nm size range can deliver therapeutic concentrations of drug fraction directly into individual tumor cells following systemic administration, since these functionalized particles maintain peak blood concentrations for several hours and are smaller than the physiologic upper limit of pore size in the VEGF-derived blood capillaries of solid tumors, which is approximately 12 nm. In this article, the physiologic and ultrastructural basis of this novel translational approach for the treatment of CNS, as well as non-CNS, solid cancers is reviewed. PMID:22163071

  13. From naturally-occurring neurotoxic agents to CNS shuttles for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Soddu, Elena; Rassu, Giovanna; Giunchedi, Paolo; Sarmento, Bruno; Gavini, Elisabetta

    2015-07-10

    Central nervous system (CNS) diseases are hard to diagnose and therapeutically target due to the blood brain barrier (BBB), which prevents most drugs from reaching their sites of action within the CNS. Brain drug delivery systems were conceived to bypass the BBB and were derived from anatomical and functional analysis of the BBB; this analysis led researchers to take advantage of brain endothelial membrane physiology to allow drug access across the BBB. Both receptors and carriers can be used to transport endogenous and exogenous substances into the CNS. Combining a drug with substances that take advantage of these internalization mechanisms is a widely exploited strategy for drug delivery because it is an indirect method that overcomes the BBB in a non-invasive way and is therefore less dangerous and costly than invasive methods. Neurotoxins, among other naturally-occurring substances, may be used as drug carriers to specifically target the CNS. This review covers the current delivery systems that take advantage of the non-toxic components of neurotoxins to overcome the BBB and reach the CNS. We hope to give insights to researchers toward developing new delivery systems that exploit the positive features of substances usually regarded as natural hazards.

  14. Incidence of CNS tumors in Appalachian children.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin; Luo, Alice; Durbin, Eric B; Lycan, Ellen; Tucker, Thomas; Chen, Quan; Horbinski, Craig; Villano, John L

    2017-03-11

    Determine whether the risk of astrocytomas in Appalachian children is higher than the national average. We compared the incidence of pediatric brain tumors in Appalachia versus non-Appalachia regions, covering years 2000-2011. The North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collects population-based data from 55 cancer registries throughout U.S. and Canada. All invasive primary (i.e. non-metastatic tumors), with age at diagnosis 0-19 years old, were included. Nearly 27,000 and 2200 central nervous system (CNS) tumors from non-Appalachia and Appalachia, respectively comprise the cohorts. Age-adjusted incidence rates of each main brain tumor subtype were compared. The incidence rate of pediatric CNS tumors was 8% higher in Appalachia, 3.31 [95% CI 3.17-3.45] versus non-Appalachia, 3.06, [95% CI 3.02-3.09] for the years 2001-2011, all rates are per 100,000 population. Astrocytomas accounted for the majority of this difference, with the rate being 16% higher in Appalachian children, 1.77, [95% CI 1.67-1.87] versus non-Appalachian children, 1.52, [95% CI 1.50-1.55]. Among astrocytomas, World Health Organization (WHO) grade I astrocytomas were 41% higher in Appalachia, 0.63 [95% CI 0.56-0.70] versus non-Appalachia 0.44 [95% CI 0.43-0.46] for the years 2004-2011. This is the first study to demonstrate that Appalachian children are at greater risk of CNS neoplasms, and that much of this difference is in WHO grade I astrocytomas, 41% more common. The cause of this increased incidence is unknown and we discuss the importance of this in relation to genetic and environmental findings in Appalachia.

  15. Role of Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of CNS inflammatory demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Abdolmohamad; Ciric, Bogoljub

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). The etiology of MS is not well understood, but it is believed that myelin-specific CD4+ T cells play a central role in initiating and orchestrating CNS inflammation. In this scenario, CD4+ T cells, activated in the periphery, infiltrate the CNS, where, by secreting cytokines and chemokines, they start an inflammatory cascade. Given the central role of CD4+ T cells in CNS autoimmunity, they have been studied extensively, principally by using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. In the late 1980s, CD4+ T cells, based on their cytokine production, were divided into two helper lineages, Th1 and Th2 cells. It was postulated that Th1 cells, which produce IFN-γ, mediate inflammation of the CNS in MS/EAE, while Th2 cells, which produce IL-4, have a beneficial effect in disease, because of their antagonistic effect on Th1 cells. The Th1/Th2 paradigm remained the prevailing view of MS/EAE pathogenesis until 2005, when a new lineage, Th17, was discovered. In a relatively short period of time it became apparent that Th17 cells, named after their hallmark cytokine, IL-17A, play a crucial role in many inflammatory diseases, including EAE, and likely in MS as well. The Th17 paradigm developed rapidly, initiating the debate whether Th1 cells contribute to EAE/MS pathogenesis at all, or if they might even have a protective role due to their antagonistic effects on Th17 cells. Numerous findings support the view that Th17 cells play an essential role in autoimmune CNS inflammation, perhaps mainly in the initial phases of disease. Th1 cells likely contribute to pathogenesis, with their role possibly more pronounced later in disease. Hence, the current view on the role of Th cells in MS/EAE pathogenesis can be called the Th17/Th1 paradigm. It is certain that Th17 cells will continue to be the focus of intense investigation aimed at elucidating the pathogenesis of

  16. Role of Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of CNS inflammatory demyelination.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Abdolmohamad; Ciric, Bogoljub

    2013-10-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). The etiology of MS is not well understood, but it is believed that myelin-specific CD4(+) T cells play a central role in initiating and orchestrating CNS inflammation. In this scenario, CD4(+) T cells, activated in the periphery, infiltrate the CNS, where, by secreting cytokines and chemokines, they start an inflammatory cascade. Given the central role of CD4(+) T cells in CNS autoimmunity, they have been studied extensively, principally by using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. In the late 1980s, CD4(+) T cells, based on their cytokine production, were divided into two helper lineages, Th1 and Th2 cells. It was postulated that Th1 cells, which produce IFN-γ, mediate inflammation of the CNS in MS/EAE, while Th2 cells, which produce IL-4, have a beneficial effect in disease, because of their antagonistic effect on Th1 cells. The Th1/Th2 paradigm remained the prevailing view of MS/EAE pathogenesis until 2005, when a new lineage, Th17, was discovered. In a relatively short period of time it became apparent that Th17 cells, named after their hallmark cytokine, IL-17A, play a crucial role in many inflammatory diseases, including EAE, and likely in MS as well. The Th17 paradigm developed rapidly, initiating the debate of whether Th1 cells contribute to EAE/MS pathogenesis at all, or if they might even have a protective role due to their antagonistic effects on Th17 cells. Numerous findings support the view that Th17 cells play an essential role in autoimmune CNS inflammation, perhaps mainly in the initial phases of disease. Th1 cells likely contribute to pathogenesis, with their role possibly more pronounced later in disease. Hence, the current view on the role of Th cells in MS/EAE pathogenesis can be called the Th17/Th1 paradigm. It is certain that Th17 cells will continue to be the focus of intense investigation aimed at elucidating the

  17. Kub5-Hera, the human Rtt103 homolog, plays dual functional roles in transcription termination and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Morales, Julio C; Richard, Patricia; Rommel, Amy; Fattah, Farjana J; Motea, Edward A; Patidar, Praveen L; Xiao, Ling; Leskov, Konstantin; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Hittelman, Walter N; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Manley, James L; Boothman, David A

    2014-04-01

    Functions of Kub5-Hera (In Greek Mythology Hera controlled Artemis) (K-H), the human homolog of the yeast transcription termination factor Rtt103, remain undefined. Here, we show that K-H has functions in both transcription termination and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. K-H forms distinct protein complexes with factors that repair DSBs (e.g. Ku70, Ku86, Artemis) and terminate transcription (e.g. RNA polymerase II). K-H loss resulted in increased basal R-loop levels, DSBs, activated DNA-damage responses and enhanced genomic instability. Significantly lowered Artemis protein levels were detected in K-H knockdown cells, which were restored with specific K-H cDNA re-expression. K-H deficient cells were hypersensitive to cytotoxic agents that induce DSBs, unable to reseal complex DSB ends, and showed significantly delayed γ-H2AX and 53BP1 repair-related foci regression. Artemis re-expression in K-H-deficient cells restored DNA-repair function and resistance to DSB-inducing agents. However, R loops persisted consistent with dual roles of K-H in transcription termination and DSB repair.

  18. Order in the classroom: graded responses to instructive Hh signaling in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Matise, Michael P

    2007-05-15

    In many animals, the secreted Hedgehog (Hh) signaling proteins play important roles during development and in adults. Studies in both flies and vertebrates indicate that Hh functions as a morphogen to elicit different responses at distinct concentration thresholds. In vertebrates, Gli proteins are the primary transcriptional mediators of Hh target genes. However, the mechanisms that implement specific genetic responses to graded Hh-Gli signaling are only just beginning to be understood. In particular, it is unclear whether target gene responses are determined solely by the ambient levels of pathway activity, or if other pathways or factors function to amplify or attenuate the response to this signal to provide an additional level of context that permits a more fine-tuned outcome. Here, I will review recent evidence suggesting that the response of some Hh-Gli target genes in the CNS is regulated by the activity of another important extracellular signal, the canonical Wnt pathway. The possibility that the Hh and Wnt pathways interact at the transcriptional level has broad significance for understanding normal embryogenesis and diagnosing and treating the numerous developmental disorders and cancers that involve these two pathways. Thus, while Hh-Gli signals provide important information, it is likely that they receive assistance from other "instructors".

  19. Human African trypanosomiasis, chemotherapy and CNS disease.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Jean

    2009-06-25

    Trypanosomes have been recognised as human pathogens for over a century. Human African trypanosomiasis is endemic in an area sustaining 60 million people and is fatal without chemotherapeutic intervention. Available trypanocidal drugs require parenteral administration and are associated with adverse reactions including the development of a severe post-treatment reactive encephalopathy (PTRE). Following infection the parasites proliferate in the systemic compartment before invading the CNS where a cascade of events results in neuroinflammation. This review summarises the clinical manifestations of the infection and chemotherapeutic regimens as well as the current research findings and hypotheses regarding the neuropathogenesis of the disease.

  20. Obstructive hydrocephalus due to CNS toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hwan; Cho, Jae-Wook; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Lee, Sang Weon; Kim, Hak-Jin; Choi, Kwang-Dong

    2013-06-15

    A 46-year-old man developed intermittent headache, diplopia, and visual obscuration for two months. Funduscopic examination showed optic disk swelling in both eyes. Brain MRI exhibited hydrocephalus and leptomeningeal enhancement at the prepontine cistern, left cerebellopontine angle cistern and bilateral cerebral hemisphere, and hemosiderin deposition along the cerebellar folia. CSF analysis revealed an elevated opening pressure with xanthochromic appearance and small amount of red blood cells. Antibody titer against Toxocariasis using ELISA was elevated both in blood and CSF. Obstructive hydrocephalus and hemosiderin deposition in this case may result from the active inflammatory process due to CNS toxocariasis within the subarachnoid space.

  1. Mesophyll conductance plays a central role in leaf functioning of Oleaceae species exposed to contrasting sunlight irradiance.

    PubMed

    Fini, Alessio; Loreto, Francesco; Tattini, Massimiliano; Giordano, Cristiana; Ferrini, Francesco; Brunetti, Cecilia; Centritto, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    The ability to modify mesophyll conductance (gm ) in response to changes in irradiance may be a component of the acclimation of plants to shade-sun transitions, thus influencing species-specific distributions along light-gradients, and the ecological niches for the different species. To test this hypothesis we grew three woody species of the Oleaceae family, the evergreen Phillyrea latifolia (sun-requiring), the deciduous Fraxinus ornus (facultative sun-requiring) and the hemi-deciduous Ligustrum vulgare (shade tolerant) at 30 or 100% sunlight irradiance. We show that neither mesophyll conductance calculated with combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence techniques (gm) nor CO2 assimilation significantly varied in F. ornus because of sunlight irradiance. This corroborates previous suggestions that species with high plasticity for light requirements, do not need to undertake extensive reorganization of leaf conductances to CO2 diffusion to adapt to different light environments. On the other hand, gm steeply declined in L. vulgare and increased in P. latifolia exposed to full-sun conditions. In these two species, leaf anatomical traits are in part responsible for light-driven changes in gm , as revealed by the correlation between gm and mesophyll conductance estimated by anatomical parameters (gmA). Nonetheless, gm was greatly overestimated by gmA when leaf metabolism was impaired because of severe light stress. We show that gm is maximum at the light intensity at which plant species have evolved and we conclude that gm actually plays a key role in the sun and shade adaptation of Mediterranean species. The limits of gmA in predicting mesophyll conductance are also highlighted.

  2. Engineering Therapies in the CNS: What works and what can be translated

    PubMed Central

    Shoffstall, Andrew J.; Taylor, Dawn M.; Lavik, Erin B.

    2012-01-01

    Engineering is the art of taking what we know and using it to solve problems. As engineers, we build tool chests of approaches; we attempt to learn as much as possible about the problem at hand, and then we design, build, and test our approaches to see how they impact the system. The challenge of applying this approach to the central nervous system (CNS) is that we often do not know the details of what is needed from the biological side. New therapeutic options for treating the CNS range from new biomaterials to make scaffolds, to novel drug-delivery techniques, to functional electrical stimulation. However, the reality is that translating these new therapies and making them widely available to patients requires collaborations between scientists, engineers, clinicians, and patients to have the greatest chance of success. Here we discuss a variety of new treatment strategies and explore the pragmatic challenges involved with engineering therapies in the CNS. PMID:22330751

  3. Optimizing early Go/No Go decisions in CNS drug development.

    PubMed

    Potter, William Z

    2015-03-01

    Go/No Go decisions concerning development of any single compound determine investment in increasingly costly studies from Phases I-III. Such decisions are problematic for CNS drug development where the variety of molecular targets in the brain have stimulated decades of studies without major therapeutic advances. Many costly studies do not even yield interpretable results as to whether the mechanism being pursued has therapeutic potential. Therefore, both industry and the public sector have implemented a decision making strategy based on whether a compound can test a molecular hypothesis of drug action. One requires, at a minimum, compelling evidence in humans that a compound both interacts with its presumed molecular targets in brain and ideally documents a CNS functional consequence of the interaction prior to efficacy studies. This strategy will much more quickly rule out ineffective mechanisms although it does not address the problem of poorly predictive models of novel CNS drug efficacy.

  4. Does the inferior frontal sulcus play a functional role in deception? A neuronavigated theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Verschuere, Bruno; Schuhmann, Teresa; Sack, Alexander T

    2012-01-01

    By definition, lying involves withholding the truth. Response inhibition may therefore be the cognitive function at the heart of deception. Neuroimaging research has shown that the same brain region that is activated during response inhibition tasks, namely the inferior frontal region, is also activated during deception paradigms. This led to the hypothesis that the inferior frontal region is the neural substrate critically involved in withholding the truth. In the present study, we critically examine the functional necessity of the inferior frontal region in withholding the truth during deception. We experimentally manipulated the neural activity level in right inferior frontal sulcus (IFS) by means of neuronavigated continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS). Individual structural magnetic resonance brain images (MRI) were used to allow precise stimulation in each participant. Twenty-six participants answered autobiographical questions truthfully or deceptively before and after sham and real cTBS. Deception was reliably associated with more errors, longer and more variable response times than truth telling. Despite the potential role of IFS in deception as suggested by neuroimaging data, the cTBS-induced disruption of right IFS did not affect response times or error rates, when compared to sham stimulation. The present findings do not support the hypothesis that the right IFS is critically involved in deception.

  5. Syntaxin 6-mediated Golgi translocation plays an important role in nuclear functions of EGFR through microtubule-dependent trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Du, Y; Shen, J; Hsu, JL; Han, Z; Hsu, M-C; Yang, C-C; Kuo, H-P; Wang, Y-N; Yamaguchi, H; Miller, SA; Hung, M-C

    2013-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are cell surface receptors that initiate signal cascades in response to ligand stimulation. Abnormal expression and dysregulated intracellular trafficking of RTKs have been shown to be involved in tumorigenesis. Recent evidence shows that these cell surface receptors translocate from cell surface to different cellular compartments, including the Golgi, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the nucleus, to regulate physiological and pathological functions. Although some trafficking mechanisms have been resolved, the mechanism of intracellular trafficking from cell surface to the Golgi is not yet completely understood. Here we report a mechanism of Golgi translocation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in which EGF-induced EGFR travels to the Golgi via microtubule-dependent movement by interacting with dynein and fuses with the Golgi through syntaxin 6-mediated membrane fusion. We also demonstrate that the microtubule- and syntaxin 6-mediated Golgi translocation of EGFR is necessary for its consequent nuclear translocation and nuclear functions. Thus, together with previous studies, the microtubule- and syntaxin 6-mediated trafficking pathway from cell surface to the Golgi, ER and the nucleus defines a comprehensive trafficking route for EGFR to travel from cell surface to the Golgi and the nucleus. PMID:23376851

  6. Syntaxin 6-mediated Golgi translocation plays an important role in nuclear functions of EGFR through microtubule-dependent trafficking.

    PubMed

    Du, Y; Shen, J; Hsu, J L; Han, Z; Hsu, M-C; Yang, C-C; Kuo, H-P; Wang, Y-N; Yamaguchi, H; Miller, S A; Hung, M-C

    2014-02-06

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are cell surface receptors that initiate signal cascades in response to ligand stimulation. Abnormal expression and dysregulated intracellular trafficking of RTKs have been shown to be involved in tumorigenesis. Recent evidence shows that these cell surface receptors translocate from cell surface to different cellular compartments, including the Golgi, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the nucleus, to regulate physiological and pathological functions. Although some trafficking mechanisms have been resolved, the mechanism of intracellular trafficking from cell surface to the Golgi is not yet completely understood. Here we report a mechanism of Golgi translocation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in which EGF-induced EGFR travels to the Golgi via microtubule-dependent movement by interacting with dynein and fuses with the Golgi through syntaxin 6-mediated membrane fusion. We also demonstrate that the microtubule- and syntaxin 6-mediated Golgi translocation of EGFR is necessary for its consequent nuclear translocation and nuclear functions. Thus, together with previous studies, the microtubule- and syntaxin 6-mediated trafficking pathway from cell surface to the Golgi, ER and the nucleus defines a comprehensive trafficking route for EGFR to travel from cell surface to the Golgi and the nucleus.

  7. T-cell receptor alpha chain plays a critical role in antigen-specific suppressor cell function.

    PubMed Central

    Kuchroo, V K; Byrne, M C; Atsumi, Y; Greenfield, E; Connolly, J B; Whitters, M J; O'Hara, R M; Collins, M; Dorf, M E

    1991-01-01

    Antigen-specific suppressor T-cell hybridomas release soluble suppressor factors (TsF) in the supernatant that modulate both in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity and in vitro plaque-forming cell responses in an antigen-specific manner. To study the relationship between the T-cell receptor (TcR) and TsF, we developed a series of TcR alpha- or TcR beta- expression variants from suppressor T-cell hybridomas that expressed the CD3-TcR alpha/beta complex. We demonstrate that loss of TcR alpha but not TcR beta mRNA was accompanied by the concomitant loss of suppressor bioactivity. Homologous transfection of TcR alpha cDNA into a TcR alpha- beta+ clone reconstituted both CD3-TcR expression and suppressor function. Furthermore, suppressor activity from TcR beta- variants was specifically absorbed by antigen and anti-TcR alpha antibodies, but not by anti-CD3 or anti-TcR beta affinity columns. These data directly establish a role for the TcR alpha chain in suppressor T-cell function and suggest that the TcR alpha chain is part of the antigen-specific TsF molecule. Images PMID:1833764

  8. Development of Novel In Vivo Chemical Probes to Address CNS Protein Kinase Involvement in Synaptic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, D. Martin; Grum-Tokars, Valerie L.; Roy, Saktimayee M.; Schavocky, James P.; Bradaric, Brinda Desai; Bachstetter, Adam D.; Xing, Bin; Dimayuga, Edgardo; Saeed, Faisal; Zhang, Hong; Staniszewski, Agnieszka; Pelletier, Jeffrey C.; Minasov, George; Anderson, Wayne F.; Arancio, Ottavio; Van Eldik, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    Serine-threonine protein kinases are critical to CNS function, yet there is a dearth of highly selective, CNS-active kinase inhibitors for in vivo investigations. Further, prevailing assumptions raise concerns about whether single kinase inhibitors can show in vivo efficacy for CNS pathologies, and debates over viable approaches to the development of safe and efficacious kinase inhibitors are unsettled. It is critical, therefore, that these scientific challenges be addressed in order to test hypotheses about protein kinases in neuropathology progression and the potential for in vivo modulation of their catalytic activity. Identification of molecular targets whose in vivo modulation can attenuate synaptic dysfunction would provide a foundation for future disease-modifying therapeutic development as well as insight into cellular mechanisms. Clinical and preclinical studies suggest a critical link between synaptic dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders and the activation of p38αMAPK mediated signaling cascades. Activation in both neurons and glia also offers the unusual potential to generate enhanced responses through targeting a single kinase in two distinct cell types involved in pathology progression. However, target validation has been limited by lack of highly selective inhibitors amenable to in vivo use in the CNS. Therefore, we employed high-resolution co-crystallography and pharmacoinformatics to design and develop a novel synthetic, active site targeted, CNS-active, p38αMAPK inhibitor (MW108). Selectivity was demonstrated by large-scale kinome screens, functional GPCR agonist and antagonist analyses of off-target potential, and evaluation of cellular target engagement. In vitro and in vivo assays demonstrated that MW108 ameliorates beta-amyloid induced synaptic and cognitive dysfunction. A serendipitous discovery during co-crystallographic analyses revised prevailing models about active site targeting of inhibitors, providing insights that will

  9. Members of the Penicillium chrysogenum velvet complex play functionally opposing roles in the regulation of penicillin biosynthesis and conidiation.

    PubMed

    Kopke, Katarina; Hoff, Birgit; Bloemendal, Sandra; Katschorowski, Alexandra; Kamerewerd, Jens; Kück, Ulrich

    2013-02-01

    A velvet multisubunit complex was recently detected in the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, the major industrial producer of the β-lactam antibiotic penicillin. Core components of this complex are P. chrysogenum VelA (PcVelA) and PcLaeA, which regulate secondary metabolite production, hyphal morphology, conidiation, and pellet formation. Here we describe the characterization of PcVelB, PcVelC, and PcVosA as novel subunits of this velvet complex. Using yeast two-hybrid analysis and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC), we demonstrate that all velvet proteins are part of an interaction network. Functional analyses using single- and double-knockout strains clearly indicate that velvet subunits have opposing roles in the regulation of penicillin biosynthesis and light-dependent conidiation. PcVelC, together with PcVelA and PcLaeA, activates penicillin biosynthesis, while PcVelB represses this process. In contrast, PcVelB and PcVosA promote conidiation, while PcVelC has an inhibitory effect. Our genetic analyses further show that light-dependent spore formation depends not only on PcVelA but also on PcVelB and PcVosA. The results provided here contribute to our fundamental understanding of the function of velvet subunits as part of a regulatory network mediating signals responsible for morphology and secondary metabolism and will be instrumental in generating mutants with newly derived properties that are relevant to strain improvement programs.

  10. Indications of success: Strategies for utilizing neuroimaging biomarkers in CNS drug discovery and development: CINP/JSNP working group report.

    PubMed

    Suhara, Tetsuya; Chaki, Shigeyuki; Kimura, Haruhide; Furusawa, Makoto; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki; Ogura, Hiroo; Negishi, Takaaki; Saijo, Takeaki; Higuchi, Makoto; Omura, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Rira; Miyoshi, Sosuke; Nakatani, Noriaki; Yamamoto, Noboru; Liou, Shyh-Yuh; Takado, Yuhei; Maeda, Jun; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Okubo, Yoshiaki; Yamada, Makiko; Ito, Hiroshi; Walton, Noah M; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2016-12-28

    Despite large unmet medical needs in the field for several decades, central nervous system (CNS) drug discovery and development has been largely unsuccessful. Biomarkers, particularly those utilizing neuroimaging, have played important roles in aiding CNS drug development, including dosing determination of investigational new drugs (INDs). The utility of biomarkers as tools to overcome issues of CNS drug development is the subject for this review.In this review aimed at employing biomarkers as tools to overcome issues surrounding CNS drug development, we first analyzed problems in utilizing biomarkers in processes of drug discovery and development for CNS disorders. Based on this analysis, we propose a new paradigm containing five distinct tiers to further clarify the use of biomarkers and establish new strategies for decision-making in the context of clinical drug development. Specifically, we discuss more rational ways to determine optimal dose for INDs with novel mechanisms and targets, and propose additional categorization criteria to further the use of biomarkers in patient stratification and efficacy prediction. Finally, we propose validation and development of new neuroimaging biomarkers through Public-Private-Partnerships to realize rational and successful drug discovery and development for CNS disorders.

  11. CD19 as a molecular target in CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Stüve, Olaf; Warnke, Clemens; Deason, Krystin; Stangel, Martin; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Hartung, Hans-Peter; von Büdingen, Hans-Christian; Centonze, Diego; Forsthuber, Thomas G.; Kappertz, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) are the most prevalent neuroinflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). The immunological cascade of these disorders is complex, and the exact spatial and temporal role of different immune cells is not fully understood. Although MS has been considered for many years to be primarily T cell driven, it is well established that B cells and the humoral immune response play an important role in its pathogenesis. This has long been evident from laboratory findings that include the presence of oligoclonal bands in the CSF. In NMO the importance of the humoral immune system appears even more obvious as evidenced by pathogenic antibodies against aquaporin 4 (AQP4). Besides their capacity to mature into antibody-producing plasma cells, B cells are potent antigen presenting cells to T lymphocytes and they can provide soluble factors for cell activation and differentiation to other immune-competent cells. In MS and NMO, there are substantial data from clinical trials that B cell depletion with CD20-directed agents is effective and relatively safe. Plasma cells, which produce antibodies against molecular targets expressed by the host, but which also provide humeral immune responses against pathogens, are not targeted by anti-CD20 therapies. Therefore the depletion of CD19-expressing cells would offer potential advantages with regard to efficacy, but potentially higher risks with regard to infectious complications. This review will outline the rationale for CD19 as a molecular target in CNS autoimmunity. The current stage of drug development is illustrated. Potential safety concerns will be discussed. PMID:24993505

  12. The Gut-Brain Axis, BDNF, NMDA and CNS Disorders.

    PubMed

    Maqsood, Raeesah; Stone, Trevor W

    2016-11-01

    Gastro-intestinal (GI) microbiota and the 'gut-brain axis' are proving to be increasingly relevant to early brain development and the emergence of psychiatric disorders. This review focuses on the influence of the GI tract on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and its relationship with receptors for N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDAR), as these are believed to be involved in synaptic plasticity and cognitive function. NMDAR may be associated with the development of schizophrenia and a range of other psychopathologies including neurodegenerative disorders, depression and dementias. An analysis of the routes and mechanisms by which the GI microbiota contribute to the pathophysiology of BDNF-induced NMDAR dysfunction could yield new insights relevant to developing novel therapeutics for schizophrenia and related disorders. In the absence of GI microbes, central BDNF levels are reduced and this inhibits the maintenance of NMDAR production. A reduction of NMDAR input onto GABA inhibitory interneurons causes disinhibition of glutamatergic output which disrupts the central signal-to-noise ratio and leads to aberrant synaptic behaviour and cognitive deficits. Gut microbiota can modulate BDNF function in the CNS, via changes in neurotransmitter function by affecting modulatory mechanisms such as the kynurenine pathway, or by changes in the availability and actions of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in the brain. Interrupting these cycles by inducing changes in the gut microbiota using probiotics, prebiotics or antimicrobial drugs has been found promising as a preventative or therapeutic measure to counteract behavioural deficits and these may be useful to supplement the actions of drugs in the treatment of CNS disorders.

  13. Autoinducer-2 Plays a Crucial Role in Gut Colonization and Probiotic Functionality of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003

    PubMed Central

    Bottacini, Francesca; Lanigan, Noreen; Casey, Pat G.; Huys, Geert; Nelis, Hans J.; van Sinderen, Douwe; Coenye, Tom

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we show that luxS of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 is involved in the production of the interspecies signaling molecule autoinducer-2 (AI-2), and that this gene is essential for gastrointestinal colonization of a murine host, while it is also involved in providing protection against Salmonella infection in Caenorhabditis elegans. We demonstrate that a B. breve luxS-insertion mutant is significantly more susceptible to iron chelators than the WT strain and that this sensitivity can be partially reverted in the presence of the AI-2 precursor DPD. Furthermore, we show that several genes of an iron starvation-induced gene cluster, which are downregulated in the luxS-insertion mutant and which encodes a presumed iron-uptake system, are transcriptionally upregulated under in vivo conditions. Mutation of two genes of this cluster in B. breve UCC2003 renders the derived mutant strains sensitive to iron chelators while deficient in their ability to confer gut pathogen protection to Salmonella-infected nematodes. Since a functional luxS gene is present in all tested members of the genus Bifidobacterium, we conclude that bifidobacteria operate a LuxS-mediated system for gut colonization and pathogen protection that is correlated with iron acquisition. PMID:24871429

  14. Autoinducer-2 plays a crucial role in gut colonization and probiotic functionality of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003.

    PubMed

    Christiaen, Steven E A; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; Bottacini, Francesca; Lanigan, Noreen; Casey, Pat G; Huys, Geert; Nelis, Hans J; van Sinderen, Douwe; Coenye, Tom

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we show that luxS of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 is involved in the production of the interspecies signaling molecule autoinducer-2 (AI-2), and that this gene is essential for gastrointestinal colonization of a murine host, while it is also involved in providing protection against Salmonella infection in Caenorhabditis elegans. We demonstrate that a B. breve luxS-insertion mutant is significantly more susceptible to iron chelators than the WT strain and that this sensitivity can be partially reverted in the presence of the AI-2 precursor DPD. Furthermore, we show that several genes of an iron starvation-induced gene cluster, which are downregulated in the luxS-insertion mutant and which encodes a presumed iron-uptake system, are transcriptionally upregulated under in vivo conditions. Mutation of two genes of this cluster in B. breve UCC2003 renders the derived mutant strains sensitive to iron chelators while deficient in their ability to confer gut pathogen protection to Salmonella-infected nematodes. Since a functional luxS gene is present in all tested members of the genus Bifidobacterium, we conclude that bifidobacteria operate a LuxS-mediated system for gut colonization and pathogen protection that is correlated with iron acquisition.

  15. Extra-CNS metastasis from glioblastoma: a rare clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Awan, Musaddiq; Liu, Stanley; Sahgal, Arjun; Das, Sunit; Chao, Samuel T; Chang, Eric L; Knisely, Jonathan P S; Redmond, Kristin; Sohn, Jason W; Machtay, Mitchell; Sloan, Andrew E; Mansur, David B; Rogers, Lisa R; Lo, Simon S

    2015-05-01

    Extra-CNS metastasis from glioblastoma (ECMGBM) is an emerging but little known clinical entity. We review pre-clinical and translational publications assessing the ability of GBM to spread locally and outside the CNS. Reported cases demonstrating ECMGBM are reviewed providing a summary of presentations for the entity. Special attention is placed on transmission of GBM through organ transplantation. Finally, predictions are made as to the future significance of ECMGBM, especially in the context of better outcomes in CNS GBM.

  16. Mapping the prion protein distribution in marsupials: insights from comparing opossum with mouse CNS.

    PubMed

    Poggiolini, Ilaria; Legname, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) is a sialoglycoprotein widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) of mammalian species during neurodevelopment and in adulthood. The location of the protein in the CNS may play a role in the susceptibility of a species to fatal prion diseases, which are also known as the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). To date, little is known about PrP(C) distribution in marsupial mammals, for which no naturally occurring prion diseases have been reported. To extend our understanding of varying PrP(C) expression profiles in different mammals we carried out a detailed expression analysis of PrP(C) distribution along the neurodevelopment of the metatherian South American short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica). We detected lower levels of PrP(C) in white matter fiber bundles of opossum CNS compared to mouse CNS. This result is consistent with a possible role for PrP(C) in the distinct neurodevelopment and neurocircuitry found in marsupials compared to other mammalian species.

  17. Plant sterols: Friend or foe in CNS disorders?

    PubMed

    Vanmierlo, Tim; Bogie, Jeroen F J; Mailleux, Jo; Vanmol, Jasmine; Lütjohann, Dieter; Mulder, Monique; Hendriks, Jerome J A

    2015-04-01

    In mammals, the central nervous system (CNS) is the most cholesterol rich organ by weight. Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated in the CNS and all cholesterol available is synthesized in situ. Deficits in cholesterol homeostasis at the level of synthesis, transport, or catabolism result in severe disorders featured by neurological disability. Recent studies indicate that a disturbed cholesterol metabolism is involved in CNS disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In contrast to circulating cholesterol, dietary plant sterols, can cross the blood-brain barrier and accumulate in the membranes of CNS cells. Plant sterols are well-known for their ability to lower circulating cholesterol levels. The finding that they gain access to the CNS has fueled research focusing on the physiological roles of plant sterols in the healthy and diseased CNS. To date, both beneficial and detrimental effects of plant sterols on CNS disorders are defined. In this review, we discuss recent findings regarding the impact of plant sterols on homeostatic and pathogenic processes in the CNS, and elaborate on the therapeutic potential of plant sterols in CNS disorders.

  18. Flipping the transcriptional switch from myelin inhibition to axon growth in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Carmel, Jason B.; Young, Wise; Hart, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Poor regeneration of severed axons in the central nervous system (CNS) limits functional recovery. Regeneration failure involves interplay of inhibitory environmental elements and the growth state of the neuron. To find internal changes in gene expression that might overcome inhibitory environmental cues, we compared several paradigms that allow growth in the inhibitory environment. Conditions that allow axon growth by axotomized and cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on CNS myelin include immaturity (the first few postnatal days), high levels of cyclic adenosine mono phosphate (cAMP), and conditioning with a peripheral nerve lesion before explant. This shift from inhibition to growth depends on transcription. Seeking to understand the transcriptome changes that allow axon growth in the CNS, we collaborated with the Marie Filbin laboratory to identify several mRNAs that are functionally relevant, as determined by gain- and loss-of-function studies. In this Perspective, we review evidence from these experiments and discuss the merits of comparing multiple regenerative paradigms to identify a core transcriptional program for CNS axon regeneration. PMID:26236189

  19. Cilia in the CNS: the Quiet Organelle Claims Center Stage

    PubMed Central

    Louvi, Angeliki; Grove, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The primary cilium is a cellular organelle that is almost ubiquitous in eukaryotes, yet its functions in vertebrates have been slow to emerge. The last fifteen years have been marked by accelerating insight into the biology of primary cilia, arising from the synergy of three major lines of research. These research programs describe a specialized mode of protein trafficking in cilia, reveal that genetic disruptions of primary cilia cause complex human disease syndromes, and establish that Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction requires the primary cilium. New lines of research have branched off to investigate the role of primary cilia in neuronal signaling, adult neurogenesis, and brain tumor formation. We review a fast expanding literature to determine what we now know about the primary cilium in the developing and adult CNS, and what new directions should lead to further clarity. PMID:21435552

  20. Development of the Contextual Assessment of Social Skills (CASS): a role play measure of social skill for individuals with high-functioning autism.

    PubMed

    Ratto, Allison B; Turner-Brown, Lauren; Rupp, Betty M; Mesibov, Gary B; Penn, David L

    2011-09-01

    This study piloted a role play assessment of conversational skills for adolescents and young adults with high-functioning autism/Asperger syndrome (HFA/AS). Participants completed two semi-structured role plays, in which social context was manipulated by changing the confederate's level of interest in the conversation. Participants' social behavior was rated via a behavioral coding system, and performance was compared across contexts and groups. An interaction effect was found for several items, whereby control participants showed significant change across context, while participants with HFA/AS showed little or no change. Total change across contexts was significantly correlated with related social constructs and significantly predicted ASD. The findings are discussed in terms of the potential utility of the CASS in the evaluation of social skill.

  1. Moving beyond Rules: The Development of a Central Nervous System Multiparameter Optimization (CNS MPO) Approach To Enable Alignment of Druglike Properties

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The interplay among commonly used physicochemical properties in drug design was examined and utilized to create a prospective design tool focused on the alignment of key druglike attributes. Using a set of six physicochemical parameters ((a) lipophilicity, calculated partition coefficient (ClogP); (b) calculated distribution coefficient at pH = 7.4 (ClogD); (c) molecular weight (MW); (d) topological polar surface area (TPSA); (e) number of hydrogen bond donors (HBD); (f) most basic center (pKa)), a druglikeness central nervous system multiparameter optimization (CNS MPO) algorithm was built and applied to a set of marketed CNS drugs (N = 119) and Pfizer CNS candidates (N = 108), as well as to a large diversity set of Pfizer proprietary compounds (N = 11 303). The novel CNS MPO algorithm showed that 74% of marketed CNS drugs displayed a high CNS MPO score (MPO desirability score ≥ 4, using a scale of 0−6), in comparison to 60% of the Pfizer CNS candidates. This analysis suggests that this algorithm could potentially be used to identify compounds with a higher probability of successfully testing hypotheses in the clinic. In addition, a relationship between an increasing CNS MPO score and alignment of key in vitro attributes of drug discovery (favorable permeability, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux, metabolic stability, and safety) was seen in the marketed CNS drug set, the Pfizer candidate set, and the Pfizer proprietary diversity set. The CNS MPO scoring function offers advantages over hard cutoffs or utilization of single parameters to optimize structure−activity relationships (SAR) by expanding medicinal chemistry design space through a holistic assessment approach. Based on six physicochemical properties commonly used by medicinal chemists, the CNS MPO function may be used prospectively at the design stage to accelerate the identification of compounds with increased probability of success. PMID:22778837

  2. Biomarkers for CNS involvement in pediatric lupus

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Tamar B; Putterman, Chaim; Goilav, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    CNS disease, or central neuropsychiatric lupus erythematosus (cNPSLE), occurs frequently in pediatric lupus, leading to significant morbidity and poor long-term outcomes. Diagnosing cNPSLE is especially difficult in pediatrics; many current diagnostic tools are invasive and/or costly, and there are no current accepted screening mechanisms. The most complicated aspect of diagnosis is differentiating primary disease from other etiologies; research to discover new biomarkers is attempting to address this dilemma. With many mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of cNPSLE, biomarker profiles across several modalities (molecular, psychometric and neuroimaging) will need to be used. For the care of children with lupus, the challenge will be to develop biomarkers that are accessible by noninvasive measures and reliable in a pediatric population. PMID:26079959

  3. ASPP2 Plays a Dual Role in gp120-Induced Autophagy and Apoptosis of Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiying; Qiao, Luxin; Zhang, Yulin; Zang, Yunjing; Shi, Ying; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Xin; Lu, Xiaofan; Yuan, Lin; Su, Bin; Zhang, Tong; Wu, Hao; Chen, Dexi

    2017-01-01

    HIV invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) in the majority of patients infected with HIV-1, leads to dysfunction and injury within the CNS, showing a variety of neurological symptoms which was broadly termed HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). But the molecular mechanisms are not completely understood. It has been suggested that apoptosis and autophagic dysfunction in neurons may play an important role in the development of HAND. Previous studies have indicated that p53 may be involved in the onset of neurological disorder in AIDS. Apoptosis-stimulating protein of p53-2 (ASPP2), a p53-binding protein with specific function of inducing p53, has been reported to modulate autophagy. In the present study, we observed that gp120 induces autophagy and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of ASPP2 significantly inhibited autophagy and apoptosis induced by low dose of gp120 protein (50 ng/mL), but induced autophagy and apoptosis when treated by high dose of gp120 protein (200 ng/mL). Further, ASPP2 knockdown attenuated autophagy and apoptosis induced by gp120. Conclusion: ASPP2 had different effects on the autophagy and apoptosis of neurons induced by different concentration of gp120 protein. It may be a potential therapeutic agent for HAND through modulating autophagy and apoptosis in CNS.

  4. ASPP2 Plays a Dual Role in gp120-Induced Autophagy and Apoptosis of Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiying; Qiao, Luxin; Zhang, Yulin; Zang, Yunjing; Shi, Ying; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Xin; Lu, Xiaofan; Yuan, Lin; Su, Bin; Zhang, Tong; Wu, Hao; Chen, Dexi

    2017-01-01

    HIV invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) in the majority of patients infected with HIV-1, leads to dysfunction and injury within the CNS, showing a variety of neurological symptoms which was broadly termed HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). But the molecular mechanisms are not completely understood. It has been suggested that apoptosis and autophagic dysfunction in neurons may play an important role in the development of HAND. Previous studies have indicated that p53 may be involved in the onset of neurological disorder in AIDS. Apoptosis-stimulating protein of p53-2 (ASPP2), a p53-binding protein with specific function of inducing p53, has been reported to modulate autophagy. In the present study, we observed that gp120 induces autophagy and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of ASPP2 significantly inhibited autophagy and apoptosis induced by low dose of gp120 protein (50 ng/mL), but induced autophagy and apoptosis when treated by high dose of gp120 protein (200 ng/mL). Further, ASPP2 knockdown attenuated autophagy and apoptosis induced by gp120. Conclusion: ASPP2 had different effects on the autophagy and apoptosis of neurons induced by different concentration of gp120 protein. It may be a potential therapeutic agent for HAND through modulating autophagy and apoptosis in CNS. PMID:28392757

  5. Blocking LINGO-1 as a therapy to promote CNS repair: from concept to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Mi, Sha; Pepinsky, R Blake; Cadavid, Diego

    2013-07-01

    LINGO-1 is a leucine-rich repeat and Ig domain-containing, Nogo receptor interacting protein, selectively expressed in the CNS on both oligodendrocytes and neurons. Its expression is developmentally regulated, and is upregulated in CNS diseases and injury. In animal models, LINGO-1 expression is upregulated in rat spinal cord injury, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, 6-hydroxydopamine neurotoxic lesions and glaucoma models. In humans, LINGO-1 expression is increased in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from demyelinated white matter of multiple sclerosis post-mortem samples, and in dopaminergic neurons from Parkinson's disease brains. LINGO-1 negatively regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination, neuronal survival and axonal regeneration by activating ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) and inhibiting protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation signalling pathways. Across diverse animal CNS disease models, targeted LINGO-1 inhibition promotes neuron and oligodendrocyte survival, axon regeneration, oligodendrocyte differentiation, remyelination and functional recovery. The targeted inhibition of LINGO-1 function presents a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of CNS diseases.

  6. Roles of AEG-1 in CNS neurons and astrocytes during noncancerous processes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiang; Feng, Honglin

    2017-03-30

    Since its initial identification, Astrocyte Elevated Gene-1 (AEG-1) has been recognized as a "star" gene detected in most of the analyzed cancers; AEG-1 can interact with signaling transduction molecules, such as PI3K/Akt and MAPK, to affect the function and viability of cells. Furthermore, its multiple other functions are also gradually being recognized. AEG-1 participates in several biological processes, including embryonic development, glutamate excitotoxicity, inflammation, and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Most of the noncancerous roles of the AEG-1 were identified in studies of the neurological disorders of the CNS. As an oncogene that promotes aberrant cellular processes within the CNS, AEG-1 may also represent an important therapeutic target for the treatment of neurological disease. However, the exact role of the AEG-1 in CNS under normal conditions is still unknown. This review will focus on the literature describing the role of this molecule in CNS neurons and astrocytes during noncancerous processes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Immunohistological localization of serotonin in the CNS and feeding system of the stable fly stomoxys calcitrans L. (Diptera: muscidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin, or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), plays critical roles as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator that control or modulate many behaviors in insects, such as feeding. Neurons immunoreactive (IR)to 5-HT were detected in the central nervous system (CNS) of the larval and adult stages of the stab...

  8. CNS Regulation of Energy Metabolism: Ghrelin versus Leptin

    PubMed Central

    Nogueiras, Ruben; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Zigman, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    In this brief review, we introduce some major themes in the regulation of energy, lipid and glucose metabolism by the central nervous system (CNS). Rather than comprehensively discussing the field, we instead will discuss some of the key findings made regarding the interaction of the hormones ghrelin and leptin with the CNS. PMID:18448790

  9. Mechanisms of Hypothermia, Delayed Hyperthermia and Fever Following CNS Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Central nervous system (CNS) damage is often associated with robust body temperature changes, such as hypothermia and delayed hyperthermia. Hypothermia is one of the most common body temperature changes to CNS insults in rodents and is often associated with improved outcome. Alth...

  10. Immune surveillance of the CNS following infection and injury

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Matthew; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) contains a sophisticated neural network that must be constantly surveyed in order to detect and mitigate a diverse array of challenges. The innate and adaptive immune systems actively participate in this surveillance, which is critical for the maintenance of CNS homeostasis and can facilitate the resolution of infections, degeneration, and tissue damage. Infections and sterile injuries represent two common challenges imposed on the CNS that require a prompt immune response. While the inducers of these two challenges differ in origin, the resultant responses orchestrated by the CNS share some overlapping features. Here, we review how the CNS immunologically discriminates between pathogens and sterile injuries, mobilizes an immune reaction, and, ultimately, regulates local and peripherally-derived immune cells to provide a supportive milieu for tissue repair. PMID:26431941

  11. Cognitive Impairment and Persistent CNS Injury in Treated HIV.

    PubMed

    Chan, Phillip; Hellmuth, Joanna; Spudich, Serena; Valcour, Victor

    2016-08-01

    The implementation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has changed HIV infection into a chronic illness, conveying extensive benefits, including greater longevity and advantages for the central nervous system (CNS). However, studies increasingly confirm that the CNS gains are incomplete, with reports of persistent immune activation affecting the CNS despite suppression of plasma HIV RNA. The rate of cognitive impairment is unchanged, although severity is generally milder than in the pre-cART era. In this review, we discuss cognitive outcomes from recently published clinical HIV studies, review observations on HIV biomarkers for cognitive change, and emphasize longitudinal imaging findings. Additionally, we summarize recent studies on CNS viral invasion, CD8 encephalitis, and how CNS involvement during the earliest stages of infection may set the stage for later cognitive manifestations.

  12. Acid-sensing ion channels: A new target for pain and CNS diseases.

    PubMed

    Sluka, Kathleen A; Winter, Olivia C; Wemmie, John A

    2009-09-01

    Low pH in tissue can evoke pain in animals and humans, and is an important factor in hyperalgesia. Research has also implicated acidosis in psychiatric and neurological diseases. One emerging class of pH-detecting receptors is that of the acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). Advances in ASIC research have improved the understanding of the role played by pH dynamics in physiological and pathophysiological processes. Increasing evidence suggests that targeting ASICs with pharmacological agents may offer an effective and novel approach for treating pain and diseases of the CNS. However, the development of pharmaceuticals that target ASICs and are suitable for clinical use remains an obstacle. This review provides an update on ASICs and their potential for therapeutic modification in pain and CNS diseases.

  13. Transporters at CNS Barrier Sites: Obstacles or Opportunities for Drug Delivery?

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Covarrubias, Lucy; Slosky, Lauren M.; Thompson, Brandon J.; Davis, Thomas P.; Ronaldson, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid (BCSF) barriers are critical determinants of CNS homeostasis. Additionally, the BBB and BCSF barriers are formidable obstacles to effective CNS drug delivery. These brain barrier sites express putative influx and efflux transporters that precisely control permeation of circulating solutes including drugs. The study of transporters has enabled a shift away from “brute force” approaches to delivering drugs by physically circumventing brain barriers towards chemical approaches that can target specific compounds of the BBB and/or BCSF barrier. However, our understanding of transporters at the BBB and BCSF barriers has primarily focused on understanding efflux transporters that efficiently prevent drugs from attaining therapeutic concentrations in the CNS. Recently, through the characterization of multiple endogenously expressed uptake transporters, this paradigm has shifted to the study of brain transporter targets that can facilitate drug delivery (i.e., influx transporters). Additionally, signaling pathways and trafficking mechanisms have been identified for several endogenous BBB/BCSF transporters, thereby offering even more opportunities to understand how transporters can be exploited for optimization of CNS drug delivery. This review presents an overview of the BBB and BCSF barrier as well as the many families of transporters functionally expressed at these barrier sites. Furthermore, we present an overview of various strategies that have been designed and utilized to deliver therapeutic agents to the brain with a particular emphasis on those approaches that directly target endogenous BBB/BCSF barrier transporters. PMID:23789948

  14. Transporters at CNS barrier sites: obstacles or opportunities for drug delivery?

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Covarrubias, Lucy; Slosky, Lauren M; Thompson, Brandon J; Davis, Thomas P; Ronaldson, Patrick T

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid (BCSF) barriers are critical determinants of CNS homeostasis. Additionally, the BBB and BCSF barriers are formidable obstacles to effective CNS drug delivery. These brain barrier sites express putative influx and efflux transporters that precisely control permeation of circulating solutes including drugs. The study of transporters has enabled a shift away from "brute force" approaches to delivering drugs by physically circumventing brain barriers towards chemical approaches that can target specific compounds of the BBB and/or BCSF barrier. However, our understanding of transporters at the BBB and BCSF barriers has primarily focused on understanding efflux transporters that efficiently prevent drugs from attaining therapeutic concentrations in the CNS. Recently, through the characterization of multiple endogenously expressed uptake transporters, this paradigm has shifted to the study of brain transporter targets that can facilitate drug delivery (i.e., influx transporters). Additionally, signaling pathways and trafficking mechanisms have been identified for several endogenous BBB/BCSF transporters, thereby offering even more opportunities to understand how transporters can be exploited for optimization of CNS drug delivery. This review presents an overview of the BBB and BCSF barrier as well as the many families of transporters functionally expressed at these barrier sites. Furthermore, we present an overview of various strategies that have been designed and utilized to deliver therapeutic agents to the brain with a particular emphasis on those approaches that directly target endogenous BBB/BCSF barrier transporters.

  15. `Sex' – It's not only Women's Work: A Case for Refocusing on the Functional Role that Sex Plays in Work for both Women and Men

    PubMed Central

    Uretsky, Elanah

    2014-01-01

    Mention of the term sex work often invokes images of marginalized women at risk for HIV infection. Such images, however, are counterintuitive to the functional role intended by the movement that spawned use of the terms `sex work' and `sex worker'. This article looks at the sexual practices of men in urban China to argue for a return to a functional definition of `sex work', which was originally meant to legitimize the role sex plays in work. The progenitors of this movement intended to use `sex work' as a means to legitimize sex as an income generating activity for women involved in prostitution. I show that sex can also serve a functional role in the work-related duties of men seeking economic and political success in contemporary urban China. Men in China utilize sex as one way for demonstrating the loyalty necessary to access state-owned and controlled resources in a market economy governed under a Leninist system. Overall the article demonstrates that reclaiming perception of sex work as a functional rather than behavioral category can expand its use for preventing HIV among the broad subset of people who engage in sex as part of their work. PMID:25642103

  16. Play's Importance in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Anette; Heden, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute knowledge on and gain an understanding of elementary school teachers' perspectives on the function of play in children's learning processes. The study is qualitative with a hermeneutical approach and has George Herbert Mead as a theoretical frame of reference. Interviews have been carried out with seven…

  17. ROCK in CNS: Different Roles of Isoforms and Therapeutic Target for Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Chong, Cheong-Meng; Ai, Nana; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen

    2017-01-01

    Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) is a serine-threonine kinase originally identified as a crucial regulator of actin cytoskeleton. Recent studies have defined new functions of ROCK as a critical component of diverse signaling pathways in neurons. In addition, inhibition of ROCK causes several biological events such as increase of neurite outgrowth, axonal regeneration, and activation of prosurvival Akt. Thus, it has attracted scientist's strong attentions and considered ROCK as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington';s disease, multiple sclerosis, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, ROCK has two highly homologous isoforms, ROCK1 and ROCK2. Accumulated evidences indicate that ROCK1 and ROCK2 might involve in distinct cellular functions in central nervous system (CNS) and neurodegenerative processes. This review summarizes recent updates regarding ROCK isoformspecific functions in CNS and the progress of ROCK inhibitors in preclinical studies for neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Mitochondrial fission and fusion in secondary brain damage after CNS insults.

    PubMed

    Balog, Justin; Mehta, Suresh L; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria are dynamically active organelles, regulated through fission and fusion events to continuously redistribute them across axons, dendrites, and synapses of neurons to meet bioenergetics requirements and to control various functions, including cell proliferation, calcium buffering, neurotransmission, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. However, following acute or chronic injury to CNS, altered expression and function of proteins that mediate fission and fusion lead to mitochondrial dynamic imbalance. Particularly, if the fission is abnormally increased through pro-fission mediators such as Drp1, mitochondrial function will be impaired and mitochondria will become susceptible to insertion of proapototic proteins. This leads to the formation of mitochondrial transition pore, which eventually triggers apoptosis. Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction is a major promoter of neuronal death and secondary brain damage after an insult. This review discusses the implications of mitochondrial dynamic imbalance in neuronal death after acute and chronic CNS insults.

  19. 3-D imaging of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Runge, V M; Gelblum, D Y; Wood, M L

    1990-01-01

    3-D gradient echo techniques, and in particular FLASH, represent a significant advance in MR imaging strategy allowing thin section, high resolution imaging through a large region of interest. Anatomical areas of application include the brain, spine, and extremities, although the majority of work to date has been performed in the brain. Superior T1 contrast and thus sensitivity to the presence of GdDTPA is achieved with 3-D FLASH when compared to 2-D spin echo technique. There is marked arterial and venous enhancement following Gd DTPA administration on 3-D FLASH, a less common finding with 2-D spin echo. Enhancement of the falx and tentorium is also more prominent. From a single data acquisition, requiring less than 11 min of scan time, high resolution reformatted sagittal, coronal, and axial images can obtained in addition to sections in any arbitrary plane. Tissue segmentation techniques can be applied and lesions displayed in three dimensions. These results may lead to the replacement of 2-D spin echo with 3-D FLASH for high resolution T1-weighted MR imaging of the CNS, particularly in the study of mass lesions and structural anomalies. The application of similar T2-weighted gradient echo techniques may follow, however the signal-to-noise ratio which can be achieved remains a potential limitation.

  20. The need for new approaches in CNS drug discovery: Why drugs have failed, and what can be done to improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gribkoff, Valentin K; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-03-12

    An important goal of biomedical research is to translate basic research findings into useful medical advances. In the field of neuropharmacology this requires understanding disease mechanisms as well as the effects of drugs and other compounds on neuronal function. Our hope is that this information will result in new or improved treatment for CNS disease. Despite great progress in our understanding of the structure and functions of the CNS, the discovery of new drugs and their clinical development for many CNS disorders has been problematic. As a result, CNS drug discovery and development programs have been subjected to significant cutbacks and eliminations over the last decade. While there has been recent resurgence of interest in CNS targets, these past changes in priority of the pharmaceutical and biotech industries reflect several well-documented realities. CNS drugs in general have higher failure rates than non-CNS drugs, both preclinically and clinically, and in some areas, such as the major neurodegenerative diseases, the clinical failure rate for disease-modifying treatments has been 100%. The development times for CNS drugs are significantly longer for those drugs that are approved, and post-development regulatory review is longer. In this introduction we review some of the reasons for failure, delineating both scientific and technical realities, some unique to the CNS, that have contributed to this. We will focus on major neurodegenerative disorders, which affect millions, attract most of the headlines, and yet have witnessed the fewest successes. We will suggest some changes that, when coupled with the approaches discussed in the rest of this special volume, may improve outcomes in future CNS-targeted drug discovery and development efforts.

  1. Target identification for CNS diseases by transcriptional profiling.

    PubMed

    Altar, C Anthony; Vawter, Marquis P; Ginsberg, Stephen D

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression changes in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, and gene responses to therapeutic drugs, provide new ways to identify central nervous system (CNS) targets for drug discovery. This review summarizes gene and pathway targets replicated in expression profiling of human postmortem brain, animal models, and cell culture studies. Analysis of isolated human neurons implicates targets for Alzheimer's disease and the cognitive decline associated with normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. In addition to tau, amyloid-beta precursor protein, and amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta), these targets include all three high-affinity neurotrophin receptors and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system, synapse markers, glutamate receptors (GluRs) and transporters, and dopamine (DA) receptors, particularly the D2 subtype. Gene-based candidates for Parkinson's disease (PD) include the ubiquitin-proteosome system, scavengers of reactive oxygen species, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its receptor, TrkB, and downstream target early growth response 1, Nurr-1, and signaling through protein kinase C and RAS pathways. Increasing variability and decreases in brain mRNA production from middle age to old age suggest that cognitive impairments during normal aging may be addressed by drugs that restore antioxidant, DNA repair, and synaptic functions including those of DA to levels of younger adults. Studies in schizophrenia identify robust decreases in genes for GABA function, including glutamic acid decarboxylase, HINT1, glutamate transport and GluRs, BDNF and TrkB, numerous 14-3-3 protein family members, and decreases in genes for CNS synaptic and metabolic functions, particularly glycolysis and ATP generation. Many of these metabolic genes are increased by insulin and muscarinic agonism, both of which are therapeutic in psychosis. Differential genomic signals are relatively sparse in bipolar disorder, but include deficiencies in the expression of 14

  2. Target Identification for CNS Diseases by Transcriptional Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Altar, C Anthony; Vawter, Marquis P; Ginsberg, Stephen D

    2008-01-01

    Gene expression changes in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, and gene responses to therapeutic drugs, provide new ways to identify central nervous system (CNS) targets for drug discovery. This review summarizes gene and pathway targets replicated in expression profiling of human postmortem brain, animal models, and cell culture studies. Analysis of isolated human neurons implicates targets for Alzheimer’s disease and the cognitive decline associated with normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. In addition to τ, amyloid-β precursor protein, and amyloid-β peptides (Aβ), these targets include all three high-affinity neurotrophin receptors and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system, synapse markers, glutamate receptors (GluRs) and transporters, and dopamine (DA) receptors, particularly the D2 subtype. Gene-based candidates for Parkinson’s disease (PD) include the ubiquitin–proteosome system, scavengers of reactive oxygen species, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its receptor, TrkB, and downstream target early growth response 1, Nurr-1, and signaling through protein kinase C and RAS pathways. Increasing variability and decreases in brain mRNA production from middle age to old age suggest that cognitive impairments during normal aging may be addressed by drugs that restore antioxidant, DNA repair, and synaptic functions including those of DA to levels of younger adults. Studies in schizophrenia identify robust decreases in genes for GABA function, including glutamic acid decarboxylase, HINT1, glutamate transport and GluRs, BDNF and TrkB, numerous 14-3-3 protein family members, and decreases in genes for CNS synaptic and metabolic functions, particularly glycolysis and ATP generation. Many of these metabolic genes are increased by insulin and muscarinic agonism, both of which are therapeutic in psychosis. Differential genomic signals are relatively sparse in bipolar disorder, but include deficiencies in the expression of 14

  3. IL-2 Suppression of IL-12p70 by a Recombinant HSV-1 Expressing IL-2 Induces T-Cell Auto-Reactivity and CNS Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Zandian, Mandana; Mott, Kevin R.; Allen, Sariah J.; Chen, Shuang; Arditi, Moshe; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the role of cellular infiltrates in CNS demyelination in immunocompetent mice, we have used a model of multiple sclerosis (MS) in which different strains of mice are infected with a recombinant HSV-1 expressing IL-2. Histologic examination of the mice infected with HSV-IL-2 demonstrates that natural killer cells, dendritic cells, B cells, and CD25 (IL-2rα) do not play any role in the HSV-IL-2-induced demyelination. T cell depletion, T cell knockout and T cell adoptive transfer experiments suggest that both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells contribute to HSV-IL-2-induced CNS demyelination with CD8+ T cells being the primary inducers. In the adoptive transfer studies, all of the transferred T cells irrespective of their CD25 status at the time of transfer were positive for expression of FoxP3 and depletion of FoxP3 blocked CNS demyelination by HSV-IL-2. The expression levels of IL-12p35 relative to IL-12p40 differed in BM-derived macrophages infected with HSV-IL-2 from those infected with wild-type HSV-1. HSV-IL-2-induced demyelination was blocked by injecting HSV-IL-2-infected mice with IL-12p70 DNA. This study demonstrates that suppression of the IL-12p70 function of macrophages by IL-2 causes T cells to become auto-aggressive. Interruption of this immunoregulatory axis results in demyelination of the optic nerve, the spinal cord and the brain by autoreactive T cells in the HSV-IL-2 mouse model of MS. PMID:21364747

  4. CNS Vasculitis Associated with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Riangwiwat, Tanawan; Wu, Chris Y; Santos-Ocampo, Alberto S; Liu, Randal J; McMurtray, Aaron M; Nakamoto, Beau K

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is an indolent B cell lymphoproliferative disorder with monoclonal IgM secretion. We present a patient with WM who presented with multifocal acute cortical ischemic strokes and was found to have central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis. Workup was negative for cryoglobulins and hyperviscosity syndrome. Immunosuppression with intravenous steroids and cyclophosphamide stabilized the patient's mental status and neurologic deficits. On followup over 7 years, patient gained independence from walking aids and experienced no recurrences of CNS vasculitis. To our knowledge, CNS vasculitis in a WM patient, in the absence of cryoglobulins, has not been reported. Immunosuppression is the preferred treatment.

  5. CNS Vasculitis Associated with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Riangwiwat, Tanawan; Wu, Chris Y.; Santos-Ocampo, Alberto S.; Liu, Randal J.

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is an indolent B cell lymphoproliferative disorder with monoclonal IgM secretion. We present a patient with WM who presented with multifocal acute cortical ischemic strokes and was found to have central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis. Workup was negative for cryoglobulins and hyperviscosity syndrome. Immunosuppression with intravenous steroids and cyclophosphamide stabilized the patient's mental status and neurologic deficits. On followup over 7 years, patient gained independence from walking aids and experienced no recurrences of CNS vasculitis. To our knowledge, CNS vasculitis in a WM patient, in the absence of cryoglobulins, has not been reported. Immunosuppression is the preferred treatment. PMID:27818812

  6. How Do Meningeal Lymphatic Vessels Drain the CNS?

    PubMed

    Raper, Daniel; Louveau, Antoine; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    The many interactions between the nervous and the immune systems, which are active in both physiological and pathological states, have recently become more clearly delineated with the discovery of a meningeal lymphatic system capable of carrying fluid, immune cells, and macromolecules from the central nervous system (CNS) to the draining deep cervical lymph nodes. However, the exact localization of the meningeal lymphatic vasculature and the path of drainage from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to the lymphatics remain poorly understood. Here, we discuss the potential differences between peripheral and CNS lymphatic vessels and examine the purported mechanisms of CNS lymphatic drainage, along with how these may fit into established patterns of CSF flow.

  7. Axon-glial interactions at the Drosophila CNS midline.

    PubMed

    Crews, Stephen T

    2010-01-01

    The glia that reside at the midline of the Drosophila CNS are an important embryonic signaling center and also wrap the axons that cross the CNS. The development of the midline glia (MG) is characterized by migration, ensheathment, subdivision of axon commissures, apoptosis, and the extension of glial processes. All of these events are characterized by cell-cell contact between MG and adjacent neurons. Cell adhesion and signaling proteins that mediate different aspects of MG development and MG-neuron interactions have been identified. This provides a foundation for ultimately obtaining an integrated picture of how the MG assemble into a characteristic axonal support structure in the CNS.

  8. Effect of a motor-based role-play intervention on the social behaviors of adolescents with high-functioning autism: multiple-baseline single-subject design.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Sharon A; Raphael-Greenfield, Emily I; Rao, Ashwini K

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We examined the effect of a motor-based role-play intervention on the social skills of adolescents with high-functioning autism. METHOD. An ABA multiple-baseline design with three 3-mo phases occurring over 12 mo was used with 7 participants. Frequency of targeted verbal and nonverbal behaviors was tallied in each phase. Frequency data were analyzed using repeated-measures analyses of variance with post hoc comparisons to examine differences in targeted behaviors over the three phases. RESULTS. Three participants completed all three study phases, 2 completed Phase 2, and 2 completed Phase 1. All participants (N = 7) demonstrated improved social skill use in Phase 1. Participants completing Phase 2 (n = 5) further improved social skill use. Additional improvements were observed among participants (n = 3) who completed Phase 3. CONCLUSION. The intervention helped participants improve targeted social skill use. Further testing with larger samples and intervention modifications is warranted.

  9. P-glycoprotein trafficking as a therapeutic target to optimize CNS drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Thomas P.; Sanchez-Covarubias, Lucy; Tome, Margaret E.

    2014-01-01

    The primary function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) /neurovascular unit is to protect the CNS from potentially harmful xenobiotic substances and maintain CNS homeostasis. Restricted access to the CNS is maintained via a combination of tight junction proteins as well as a variety of efflux and influx transporters that limits the transcellular and paracellular movement of solutes. Of the transporters identified at the BBB, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has emerged as the transporter that is the greatest obstacle to effective CNS drug delivery. In this chapter we provide data to support intracellular protein trafficking of P-gp within cerebral capillary microvessels as a potential target for improved drug delivery. We show that pain induced changes in P-gp trafficking are associated with changes in P-gp’s association with caveolin-1, a key scaffolding/trafficking protein that co-localizes with P-gp at the luminal membrane of brain microvessels. Changes in co-localization with the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of caveolin-1, by pain, are accompanied by dynamic changes in the distribution, relocalization and activation of P-gp “pools” between microvascular endothelial cell subcellular compartments. Since redox sensitive processes may be involved in signaling disassembly of higher order structures of P-gp, we feel that manipulating redox signaling, via specific protein targeting at the BBB, may protect disulfide bond integrity of P-gp reservoirs and control trafficking to the membrane surface providing improved CNS drug delivery. The advantage of therapeutic drug “relocalization” of a protein is that the physiological impact can be modified, temporarily or long term, despite pathology-induced changes in gene transcription. PMID:25307213

  10. CNS-derived glia ensheath peripheral nerves and mediate motor root development.

    PubMed

    Kucenas, Sarah; Takada, Norio; Park, Hae-Chul; Woodruff, Elvin; Broadie, Kendal; Appel, Bruce

    2008-02-01

    Motor function requires that motor axons extend from the spinal cord at regular intervals and that they are myelinated by Schwann cells. Little attention has been given to another cellular structure, the perineurium, which ensheaths the motor nerve, forming a flexible, protective barrier. Consequently, the origin of perineurial cells and their roles in motor nerve formation are poorly understood. Using time-lapse imaging in zebrafish, we show that perineurial cells are born in the CNS, arising as ventral spinal-cord glia before migrating into the periphery. In embryos lacking perineurial glia, motor neurons inappropriately migrated outside of the spinal cord and had aberrant axonal projections, indicating that perineurial glia carry out barrier and guidance functions at motor axon exit points. Additionally, reciprocal signaling between perineurial glia and Schwann cells was necessary for motor nerve ensheathment by both cell types. These insights reveal a new class of CNS-born glia that critically contributes to motor nerve development.

  11. Costorage and coexistence of neuropeptides in the mammalian CNS.

    PubMed

    Merighi, A

    2002-02-01

    The term neuropeptides commonly refers to a relatively large number of biologically active molecules that have been localized to discrete cell populations of central and peripheral neurons. I review here the most important histological and functional findings on neuropeptide distribution in the central nervous system (CNS), in relation to their role in the exchange of information between the nerve cells. Under this perspective, peptide costorage (presence of two or more peptides within the same subcellular compartment) and coexistence (concurrent presence of peptides and other messenger molecules within single nerve cells) are discussed in detail. In particular, the subcellular site(s) of storage and sorting mechanisms within neurons are thoroughly examined in the view of the mode of release and action of neuropeptides as neuronal messengers. Moreover, the relationship of neuropeptides and other molecules implicated in neural transmission is discussed in functional terms, also referring to the interactions with novel unconventional transmitters and trophic factors. Finally, a brief account is given on the presence of neuropeptides in glial cells.

  12. Role of galectin-3 in prion infections of the CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, Simon W.F.; Riemer, Constanze; Madela, Kazimierz; Hsu, Daniel K.; Liu, Fu-Tong; Gueltner, Sandra; Heise, Ines; Baier, Michael . E-mail: baierm@rki.de

    2007-08-03

    Galectin-3 is a multi-functional protein and participates in mediating inflammatory reactions. The pronounced overexpression of galectin-3 in prion-infected brain tissue prompted us to study the role of this protein in a murine prion model. Immunofluorescence double-labelling identified microglia as the major cell type expressing galectin-3. Ablation of galectin-3 did not affect PrP{sup Sc}-deposition and development of gliosis. However, galectin-3{sup -/-}-mice showed prolonged survival times upon intracerebral and peripheral scrapie infections. Moreover, protein levels of the lysosomal activation marker LAMP-2 were markedly reduced in prion-infected galectin-3{sup -/-}-mice suggesting a role of galectin-3 in regulation of lysosomal functions. Lower mRNA levels of Beclin-1 and Atg5 in prion-infected wild-type and galectin-3{sup -/-}-mice indicated an impairment of autophagy although autophagosome formation was unchanged. The results point towards a detrimental role of galectin-3 in prion infections of the CNS and suggest that endo-/lysosomal dysfunction in combination with reduced autophagy may contribute to disease development.

  13. Nanomaterial-mediated CNS Delivery of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Biddlestone-Thorpe, Laura; Marchi, Nicola; Guo, Kathy; Ghosh, Chaitali; Janigro, Damir; Valerie, Kristoffer; Yang, Hu

    2011-01-01

    Research into the diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases has been enhanced by rapid advances in nanotechnology and an expansion in the library of nanostructured carriers. This review discusses the latest applications of nanomaterials in the CNS with an emphasis on brain tumors. Novel administration routes and transport mechanisms for nanomaterial-mediated CNS delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to bypass or cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) are also discussed. These include temporary disruption of the BBB, use of impregnated polymers (polymer wafers), convection-enhanced delivery (CED), and intranasal delivery. Moreover, an in vitro BBB model capable of mimicking geometrical, cellular and rheological features of the human cerebrovasculature has been developed. This is a useful tool that can be used for screening CNS nanoparticles or therapeutics prior to in vivo and clinical investigation. A discussion of this novel model is included. PMID:22178615

  14. Contribution of CNS cells in NeuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ashish Swarup; Singh, Udai Pratap; Dwivedi, Premendra Dhar; Singh, Anchal

    2010-01-01

    NeuroAIDS is becoming a major health problem among AIDS patients and long-term HIV survivors. As per 2009 estimates of UNAIDS report, more than 34 million people have been infected with HIV out of which ≥ 50% show signs and symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders. These disorders affect central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous systems (PNS). CNS is one of the most protected organ systems in body which is protected by blood-brain barrier (BBB). Not only this, most of the cells of CNS are negative for receptors and co-receptors for HIV infections. Neurons have been found to be completely nonpermissive for HIV infection. These facts suggest that neurotoxicity could be an indirect mechanism responsible for neuropsychiatric complications. In this review, we will discuss the importance of different cell types of CNS and their contribution toward neurotoxicity. PMID:21180461

  15. B cells and Autoantibodies: Complex Roles in CNS Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ankeny, Daniel P.; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging data indicate that traumatic injury to the brain or spinal cord activates B lymphocytes, culminating in the production of antibodies specific for antigens found within and outside the central nervous system (CNS). In this article, we summarize what is known about the effects of CNS injury on B cells. We outline the potential mechanisms for CNS trauma-induced B cell activation and discuss the potential consequences of these injury-induced B cell responses. Based on recent data, we hypothesize that a subset of autoimmune B cell responses initiated by CNS injury are pathogenic and that targeted inhibition of B cells could improve recovery in brain and spinal cord injured patients. PMID:20691635

  16. The β and γ subunits play distinct functional roles in the α2βγ heterotetramer of human NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tengfei; Peng, Yingjie; Huang, Wei; Liu, Yabing; Ding, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    Human NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase existing as the α2βγ heterotetramer, catalyzes the decarboxylation of isocitrate into α-ketoglutarate in the Krebs cycle, and is allosterically regulated by citrate, ADP and ATP. To explore the functional roles of the regulatory β and γ subunits, we systematically characterized the enzymatic properties of the holoenzyme and the composing αβ and αγ heterodimers in the absence and presence of regulators. The biochemical and mutagenesis data show that αβ and αγ alone have considerable basal activity but the full activity of α2βγ requires the assembly and cooperative function of both heterodimers. α2βγ and αγ can be activated by citrate or/and ADP, whereas αβ cannot. The binding of citrate or/and ADP decreases the S0.5,isocitrate and thus enhances the catalytic efficiencies of the enzymes, and the two activators can act independently or synergistically. Moreover, ATP can activate α2βγ and αγ at low concentration and inhibit the enzymes at high concentration, but has only inhibitory effect on αβ. Furthermore, the allosteric activation of α2βγ is through the γ subunit not the β subunit. These results demonstrate that the γ subunit plays regulatory role to activate the holoenzyme, and the β subunit the structural role to facilitate the assembly of the holoenzyme.

  17. The β and γ subunits play distinct functional roles in the α2βγ heterotetramer of human NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tengfei; Peng, Yingjie; Huang, Wei; Liu, Yabing; Ding, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    Human NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase existing as the α2βγ heterotetramer, catalyzes the decarboxylation of isocitrate into α-ketoglutarate in the Krebs cycle, and is allosterically regulated by citrate, ADP and ATP. To explore the functional roles of the regulatory β and γ subunits, we systematically characterized the enzymatic properties of the holoenzyme and the composing αβ and αγ heterodimers in the absence and presence of regulators. The biochemical and mutagenesis data show that αβ and αγ alone have considerable basal activity but the full activity of α2βγ requires the assembly and cooperative function of both heterodimers. α2βγ and αγ can be activated by citrate or/and ADP, whereas αβ cannot. The binding of citrate or/and ADP decreases the S0.5,isocitrate and thus enhances the catalytic efficiencies of the enzymes, and the two activators can act independently or synergistically. Moreover, ATP can activate α2βγ and αγ at low concentration and inhibit the enzymes at high concentration, but has only inhibitory effect on αβ. Furthermore, the allosteric activation of α2βγ is through the γ subunit not the β subunit. These results demonstrate that the γ subunit plays regulatory role to activate the holoenzyme, and the β subunit the structural role to facilitate the assembly of the holoenzyme. PMID:28139779

  18. Human African trypanosomiasis of the CNS: current issues and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Peter G.E.

    2004-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in sub-Saharan Africa. Current therapy with melarsoprol for CNS HAT has unacceptable side-effects with an overall mortality of 5%. This review discusses the issues of diagnosis and staging of CNS disease, its neuropathogenesis, and the possibility of new therapies for treating late-stage disease. PMID:14966556

  19. Kif13b Regulates PNS and CNS Myelination through the Dlg1 Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Noseda, Roberta; Guerrero-Valero, Marta; Alberizzi, Valeria; Previtali, Stefano C.; Sherman, Diane L.; Palmisano, Marilena; Huganir, Richard L.; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Cuenda, Ana; Feltri, Maria Laura; Brophy, Peter J.; Bolino, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-based kinesin motors have many cellular functions, including the transport of a variety of cargos. However, unconventional roles have recently emerged, and kinesins have also been reported to act as scaffolding proteins and signaling molecules. In this work, we further extend the notion of unconventional functions for kinesin motor proteins, and we propose that Kif13b kinesin acts as a signaling molecule regulating peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS) myelination. In this process, positive and negative signals must be tightly coordinated in time and space to orchestrate myelin biogenesis. Here, we report that in Schwann cells Kif13b positively regulates myelination by promoting p38γ mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated phosphorylation and ubiquitination of Discs large 1 (Dlg1), a known brake on myelination, which downregulates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/v-AKT murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (AKT) pathway. Interestingly, Kif13b also negatively regulates Dlg1 stability in oligodendrocytes, in which Dlg1, in contrast to Schwann cells, enhances AKT activation and promotes myelination. Thus, our data indicate that Kif13b is a negative regulator of CNS myelination. In summary, we propose a novel function for the Kif13b kinesin in glial cells as a key component of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, which controls myelination in both PNS and CNS. PMID:27070899

  20. Recent Trends in Nanotechnology Toward CNS Diseases: Lipid-Based Nanoparticles and Exosomes for Targeted Therapeutic Delivery.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, A M; Guedes, J R; Cardoso, A L; Morais, C; Cunha, P; Viegas, A T; Costa, R; Jurado, A; Pedroso de Lima, M C

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) diseases constitute a set of challenging pathological conditions concerning diagnosis and therapeutics. For most of these disorders, there is a lack of early diagnosis, biomarkers to allow proper follow-up of disease progression and effective therapeutic strategies to allow a persistent cure. The poor prognosis of most CNS diseases is, therefore, a global concern, especially regarding chronic age-related neurodegenerative disorders, which are already considered problems of public health due to the increasing average of life expectancy. The difficulties associated with the treatment of CNS diseases are owed, at least in part, to very specific characteristics of the brain and spinal cord, when compared to peripheral organs. In this regard, the CNS is physically and chemically protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which, while maintaining essential brain homeostasis, significantly restricts the delivery of most therapeutic agents to the brain parenchyma. On the other hand, regenerative properties of the tissue are lacking, meaning that a CNS insult resulting in neuronal death is a permanent phenomenon. Approaches for transposing the BBB aiming to treat CNS diseases, relying on specific properties of nanosystems, have been reported for therapeutic delivery to CNS without interfering with the normal function of the brain. In this chapter, we address the latest advances concerning the principles of such approaches, employing lipid-based nanoparticles and cell-produced exosomes as drug and nucleic acid delivery systems, and summarize recent example of applications in the context of neurological diseases. Major achievements obtained in preclinical studies and the trends identified by these studies are emphasized to provide new prospects for further developments in this area, thus enabling us to move from the research realm to the clinical arena.

  1. The role of inflammation in CNS injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Sian-Marie; Rothwell, Nancy J; Gibson, Rosemary M

    2006-01-01

    For many years, the central nervous system (CNS) was considered to be 'immune privileged', neither susceptible to nor contributing to inflammation. It is now appreciated that the CNS does exhibit features of inflammation, and in response to injury, infection or disease, resident CNS cells generate inflammatory mediators, including proinflammatory cytokines, prostaglandins, free radicals and complement, which in turn induce chemokines and adhesion molecules, recruit immune cells, and activate glial cells. Much of the key evidence demonstrating that inflammation and inflammatory mediators contribute to acute, chronic and psychiatric CNS disorders is summarised in this review. However, inflammatory mediators may have dual roles, with detrimental acute effects but beneficial effects in long-term repair and recovery, leading to complications in their application as novel therapies. These may be avoided in acute diseases in which treatment administration might be relatively short-term. Targeting interleukin (IL)-1 is a promising novel therapy for stroke and traumatic brain injury, the naturally occurring antagonist (IL-1ra) being well tolerated by rheumatoid arthritis patients. Chronic disorders represent a greater therapeutic challenge, a problem highlighted in Alzheimer's disease (AD); significant data suggested that anti-inflammatory agents might reduce the probability of developing AD, or slow its progression, but prospective clinical trials of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or cyclooxygenase inhibitors have been disappointing. The complex interplay between inflammatory mediators, ageing, genetic background, and environmental factors may ultimately regulate the outcome of acute CNS injury and progression of chronic neurodegeneration, and be critical for development of effective therapies for CNS diseases.

  2. Slice Culture Modeling of Central Nervous System (CNS) Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Kalen R.; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of the central nervous system (CNS) is not recapitulated in cell culture models. Thin slicing and subsequent culture of CNS tissue has become a valued means to study neuronal and glial biology within the context of the physiologically relevant tissue milieu. Modern membrane-interface slice culturing methodology allows straightforward access to both CNS tissue and feeding medium, enabling experimental manipulations and analyses that would otherwise be impossible in vivo. CNS slices can be successfully maintained in culture for up to several weeks for investigation of evolving pathology and long-term intervention in models of chronic neurologic disease. Herein, membrane-interface slice culture models for studying viral encephalitis and myelitis are detailed, with emphasis on the use of these models for investigation of pathogenesis and evaluation of novel treatment strategies. We describe techniques to (1) generate brain and spinal cord slices from rodent donors, (2) virally infect slices, (3) monitor viral replication, (4) assess virally induced injury/apoptosis, (5) characterize “CNS-specific” cytokine production, and (6) treat slices with cytokines/pharmaceuticals. Although our focus is on CNS viral infection, we anticipate that the described methods can be adapted to address a wide range of investigations within the fields of neuropathology, neuroimmunology, and neuropharmacology. PMID:23975824

  3. Functional analysis of RNA structures present at the 3' extremity of the murine norovirus genome: the variable polypyrimidine tract plays a role in viral virulence.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Dalan; Karakasiliotis, Ioannis; Vashist, Surender; Chung, Liliane Man Wah; Rees, Jivan; Reese, Jivan; McFadden, Nora; Benson, Alicia; Yarovinsky, Felix; Simmonds, Peter; Goodfellow, Ian

    2010-03-01

    Interactions of host cell factors with RNA sequences and structures in the genomes of positive-strand RNA viruses play various roles in the life cycles of these viruses. Our understanding of the functional RNA elements present in norovirus genomes to date has been limited largely to in vitro analysis. However, we recently used reverse genetics to identify evolutionarily conserved RNA structures and sequences required for norovirus replication. We have now undertaken a more detailed analysis of RNA structures present at the 3' extremity of the murine norovirus (MNV) genome. Biochemical data indicate the presence of three stable stem-loops, including two in the untranslated region, and a single-stranded polypyrimidine tract [p(Y)] of variable length between MNV isolates, within the terminal stem-loop structure. The well-characterized host cell pyrimidine binding proteins PTB and PCBP bound the 3'-untranslated region via an interaction with this variable sequence. Viruses lacking the p(Y) tract were viable both in cell culture and upon mouse infection, demonstrating that this interaction was not essential for virus replication. However, competition analysis with wild-type MNV in cell culture indicated that the loss of the p(Y) tract was associated with a fitness cost. Furthermore, a p(Y)-deleted mutant showed a reduction in virulence in the STAT1(-/-) mouse model, highlighting the role of RNA structures in norovirus pathogenesis. This work highlights how, like with other positive-strand RNA viruses, RNA structures present at the termini of the norovirus genome play important roles in virus replication and virulence.

  4. [Opioid receptors of the CNS: function, structure and distribution].

    PubMed

    Slamberová, R

    2004-01-01

    Even though the alkaloids of opium, such as morphine and codeine, were isolated at the beginning of 19th century, the opioid receptors were not determined until 1970's. The discovery of endogenous opioid peptides, such as endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins, has helped to differentiate between the specific opioid receptor subtypes, mu, delta and kappa, that are used up to now. Opioid receptors are distributed in the central nervous system unevenly. Each receptor subtype has its own specific and nonspecific agonists and antagonists. Opioides, as exogenous opioid receptor agonists, are drugs that are often used in medicine for their analgesic effects, but they are also some of the most heavily abused drugs in the world. Opioides may also induce long-term changes in the numbers and binding activities of opioid receptors. Some of our studies in fact demonstrate that prenatal morphine exposure can alter opioid receptors of adult rats. This may begin to provide insight into the sources of some of the morphological and behavioral changes in the progeny of mothers that received or abused opioides during pregnancy.

  5. Nanomedicine in Central Nervous System (CNS) Disorders: A Present and Future Prospective

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Shringika; Ruhela, Rakesh Kumar; Medhi, Bikash

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: For the past few decades central nervous system disorders were considered as a major strike on human health and social system of developing countries. The natural therapeutic methods for CNS disorders limited for many patients. Moreover, nanotechnology-based drug delivery to the brain may an exciting and promising platform to overcome the problem of BBB crossing. In this review, first we focused on the role of the blood-brain barrier in drug delivery; and second, we summarized synthesis methods of nanomedicine and their role in different CNS disorder. Method: We reviewed the PubMed databases and extracted several kinds of literature on neuro nanomedicines using keywords, CNS disorders, nanomedicine, and nanotechnology. The inclusion criteria included chemical and green synthesis methods for synthesis of nanoparticles encapsulated drugs and, their in-vivo and in-vitro studies. We excluded nanomedicine gene therapy and nanomaterial in brain imaging. Results: In this review, we tried to identify a highly efficient method for nanomedicine synthesis and their efficacy in neuronal disorders. SLN and PNP encapsulated drugs reported highly efficient by easily crossing BBB. Although, these neuro-nanomedicine play significant role in therapeutics but some metallic nanoparticles reported the adverse effect on developing the brain. Conclusion: Although impressive advancement has made via innovative potential drug development, but their efficacy is still moderate due to limited brain permeability. To overcome this constraint,powerful tool in CNS therapeutic intervention provided by nanotechnology-based drug delivery methods. Due to its small and biofunctionalization characteristics, nanomedicine can easily penetrate and facilitate the drug through the barrier. But still, understanding of their toxicity level, optimization and standardization are a long way to go. PMID:27766216

  6. Role of Secretory Phospholipase A2 in CNS Inflammation: Implications in Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Titsworth, W. Lee; Liu, Nai-Kui; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2s) are a subfamily of lipolytic enzymes which hydrolyze the acyl bond at the sn-2 position of glycerophospholipids to produce free fatty acids and lysophospholipids. These products are precursors of bioactive eicosanoids and platelet-activating factor (PAF). The hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids by PLA2 is a rate-limiting step for generation of eicosanoids and PAF. To date, more than 10 isozymes of sPLA2 have been found in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Under physiological conditions, sPLA2s are involved in diverse cellular responses, including host defense, phospholipid digestion and metabolism. However, under pathological situations, increased sPLA2 activity and excessive production of free fatty acids and their metabolites may lead to inflammation, loss of membrane integrity, oxidative stress, and subsequent tissue injury. Emerging evidence suggests that sPLA2 plays a role in the secondary injury process after traumatic or ischemic injuries in the brain and spinal cord. Importantly, sPLA2 may act as a convergence molecule that mediates multiple key mechanisms involved in the secondary injury since it can be induced by multiple toxic factors such as inflammatory cytokines, free radicals, and excitatory amino acids, and its activation and metabolites can exacerbate the secondary injury. Blocking sPLA2 action may represent a novel and efficient strategy to block multiple injury pathways associated with the CNS secondary injury. This review outlines the current knowledge of sPLA2 in the CNS with emphasis placed on the possible roles of sPLA2 in mediating CNS injuries, particularly the traumatic and ischemic injuries in the brain and spinal cord. PMID:18673210

  7. The Afferent Visual Pathway: Designing a Structural-Functional Paradigm of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system (CNS) believed to arise from a dysfunctional immune-mediated response in a genetically susceptible host. The actual cause of MS is not known, and there is ongoing debate about whether this CNS disorder is predominantly an inflammatory versus a degenerative condition. The afferent visual pathway (AVP) is frequently involved in MS, such that one in every five individuals affected presents with acute optic neuritis (ON). As a functionally eloquent system, the AVP is amenable to interrogation with highly reliable and reproducible tests that can be used to define a structural-functional paradigm of CNS injury. The AVP has numerous unique advantages as a clinical model of MS. In this review, the parameters and merits of the AVP model are highlighted. Moreover, the roles the AVP model may play in elucidating mechanisms of brain injury and repair in MS are described. PMID:24288622

  8. Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 and synaptic function in the mammalian central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Randall, Andrew D; Kurihara, Mai; Brandon, Nicholas J; Brown, Jon T

    2014-04-01

    The disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene is found at the breakpoint of an inherited chromosomal translocation, and segregates with major mental illnesses. Its potential role in central nervous system (CNS) malfunction has triggered intensive investigation of the biological roles played by DISC1, with the hope that this may shed new light on the pathobiology of psychiatric disease. Such work has ranged from investigations of animal behavior to detailed molecular-level analysis of the assemblies that DISC1 forms with other proteins. Here, we discuss the evidence for a role of DISC1 in synaptic function in the mammalian CNS.

  9. Carbon monoxide inhalation increases microparticles causing vascular and CNS dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jiajun; Yang, Ming; Kosterin, Paul; Salzberg, Brian M.; Milovanova, Tatyana N.; Bhopale, Veena M.; Thom, Stephen R.

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that circulating microparticles (MPs) play a role in pro-inflammatory effects associated with carbon monoxide (CO) inhalation. Mice exposed for 1 h to 100 ppm CO or more exhibit increases in circulating MPs derived from a variety of vascular cells as well as neutrophil activation. Tissue injury was quantified as 2000 kDa dextran leakage from vessels and as neutrophil sequestration in the brain and skeletal muscle; and central nervous system nerve dysfunction was documented as broadening of the neurohypophysial action potential (AP). Indices of injury occurred following exposures to 1000 ppm for 1 h or to 1000 ppm for 40 min followed by 3000 ppm for 20 min. MPs were implicated in causing injuries because infusing the surfactant MP lytic agent, polyethylene glycol telomere B (PEGtB) abrogated elevations in MPs, vascular leak, neutrophil sequestration and AP prolongation. These manifestations of tissue injury also did not occur in mice lacking myeloperoxidase. Vascular leakage and AP prolongation were produced in naïve mice infused with MPs that had been obtained from CO poisoned mice, but this did not occur with MPs obtained from control mice. We conclude that CO poisoning triggers elevations of MPs that activate neutrophils which subsequently cause tissue injuries. - Highlights: • Circulating microparticles (MPs) increase in mice exposed to 100 ppm CO or more. • MPs are lysed by infusing the surfactant polyethylene glycol telomere B. • CO-induced MPs cause neutrophil activation, vascular leak and CNS dysfunction. • Similar tissue injuries do not arise with MPs obtained from air-exposed, control mice.

  10. Intrathecal anti-CD20 efficiently depletes meningeal B cells in CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Kinzel, Silke; Feldmann, Linda; Radelfahr, Florentine; Hemmer, Bernhard; Traffehn, Sarah; Bernard, Claude C A; Stadelmann, Christine; Brück, Wolfgang; Weber, Martin S

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials revealed that systemic administration of B-cell-depleting anti-CD20 antibodies can hold lesion formation in the early relapsing-remitting phase of multiple sclerosis (MS). Throughout the secondary-progressive (SP) course of MS, pathogenic B cells may, however, progressively replicate within the central nervous system (CNS) itself, which is largely inaccessible to systemic anti-CD20 treatment. Utilizing the murine MS model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we show that intrathecal (i.t.) administration of anti-CD20 alone very efficiently depletes meningeal B cells from established CNS lesions. In SP-MS patients, adding i.t. administration of anti-CD20 to its systemic use may be a valuable strategy to target pathogenic B-cell function. PMID:25356419

  11. Laminins containing the beta2 chain modulate the precise organization of CNS synapses.

    PubMed

    Egles, Christophe; Claudepierre, Thomas; Manglapus, Mary K; Champliaud, Marie-France; Brunken, William J; Hunter, Dale D

    2007-03-01

    Synapses are formed and stabilized by concerted interactions of pre-, intra-, and post-synaptic components; however, the precise nature of the intrasynaptic components in the CNS remains obscure. Potential intrasynaptic components include extracellular matrix molecules such as laminins; here, we isolate beta2-containing laminins, including perhaps laminins 13 (alpha3beta2gamma3) and 14 (alpha4beta2gamma3), from CNS synaptosomes suggesting a role for these molecules in synaptic organization. Indeed, hippocampal synapses that form in vivo in the absence of these laminins are malformed at the ultrastructural level and this malformation is replicated in synapses formed in vitro, where laminins are provided largely by the post-synaptic neuron. This recapitulation of the in vivo function of laminins in vitro suggests that the malformations are a direct consequence of the removal of laminins from the synapse. Together, these results support a role for neuronal laminins in the structural integrity of central synapses.

  12. Manganese toxicity in the CNS: the glutamine/glutamate-γ-aminobutyric acid cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Aschner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element that is required for maintaining proper function and regulation of numerous biochemical and cellular reactions. Despite its essentiality, at excessive levels Mn is toxic to the CNS. Increased accumulation of Mn in specific brain regions, such as the substantia nigra, globus pallidus and striatum, triggers neurotoxicity resulting in a neurological brain disorder, termed manganism. Mn has been also implicated in the pathophysiology of several other neurodegenerative diseases. Its toxicity is associated with disruption of the glutamine (Gln)/glutamate (Glu)-γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) cycle (GGC) between astrocytes and neurons, thus leading to changes in Glu-ergic and/or GABAergic transmission and Gln metabolism. Here we discuss the common mechanisms underlying Mn-induced neurotoxicity and their relationship to CNS pathology and GGC impairment. PMID:23360507

  13. A review of multifunctional nanoemulsion systems to overcome oral and CNS drug delivery barriers.

    PubMed

    Ganta, Srinivas; Deshpande, Dipti; Korde, Anisha; Amiji, Mansoor

    2010-10-01

    The oral and central nervous systems (CNS) present a unique set of barriers to the delivery of important diagnostic and therapeutic agents. Extensive research over the past few years has enabled a better understanding of these physical and biological barriers based on tight cellular junctions and expression of active transporters and metabolizing enzymes at the luminal surfaces of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This review focuses on the recent understanding of transport across the GI tract and BBB and the development of nanotechnology-based delivery strategies that can enhance bioavailability of drugs. Multifunctional lipid nanosystems, such as oil-in-water nanoemulsions, that integrate enhancement in permeability, tissue and cell targeting, imaging, and therapeutic functions are especially promising. Based on strategic choice of edible oils, surfactants and additional surface modifiers, and different types of payloads, rationale design of multifunctional nanoemulsions can serve as a safe and effective delivery vehicle across oral and CNS barriers.

  14. Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES), Concept Simulations using Communication, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS) System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubat, Greg; Vandrei, Don

    2006-01-01

    Project Objectives include: a) CNS Model Development; b Design/Integration of baseline set of CNS Models into ACES; c) Implement Enhanced Simulation Capabilities in ACES; d) Design and Integration of Enhanced (2nd set) CNS Models; and e) Continue with CNS Model Integration/Concept evaluations.

  15. Assessment of hindlimb gait as a powerful indicator of axonal loss in a murine model of progressive CNS demyelination

    PubMed Central

    McGavern, Dorian B.; Zoecklein, Laurie; Sathornsumetee, Sith; Rodriguez, Moses

    2017-01-01

    Identifying the role of axonal injury in the development of permanent, irreversible neurologic disability is important to the study of central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating diseases. Our understanding of neurologic dysfunction in demyelinating diseases and the ability to assess therapeutic interventions depends on the development of objective functional assays that can non-invasively measure axonal loss. In this study, we demonstrate in a murine model of progressive CNS demyelination that assessment of the hindlimb width of stride provides a powerful indicator of axonal loss and can dissociate between deficits induced by demyelination versus axonal loss. PMID:10986359

  16. CNS accumulation of regulatory B cells is VLA-4-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Sagan, Sharon A.; Winger, Ryan C.; Spencer, Collin M.; Bernard, Claude C.A.; Sobel, Raymond A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) on regulatory B cells (Breg) in CNS autoimmune disease. Methods: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in mice selectively deficient for VLA-4 on B cells (CD19cre/α4f/f) by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide (p)35–55 or recombinant human (rh) MOG protein. B-cell and T-cell populations were examined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Breg were evaluated by intracellular IL-10 staining of B cells and, secondly, by coexpression of CD1d and CD5. Results: As previously reported, EAE was less severe in B-cell VLA-4-deficient vs control CD19cre mice when induced by rhMOG, a model that is B-cell-dependent and leads to efficient B-cell activation and antibody production. Paradoxically, B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice developed more severe clinical disease than control mice when EAE was induced with MOG p35-55, a B-cell-independent encephalitogen that does not efficiently activate B cells. Peripheral T-cell and humoral immune responses were not altered in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice. In MOG p35-55-induced EAE, B-cell VLA-4 deficiency reduced CNS accumulation of B but not T cells. Breg were detected in the CNS of control mice with MOG p35-55-induced EAE. However, more severe EAE in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice was associated with virtual absence of CNS Breg. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that CNS accumulation of Breg is VLA-4-dependent and suggest that Breg may contribute to regulation of CNS autoimmunity in situ. These observations underscore the need to choose the appropriate encephalitogen when studying how B cells contribute to pathogenesis or regulation of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:27027096

  17. Behavioral and Genetic Evidence for GIRK Channels in the CNS: Role in Physiology, Pathophysiology, and Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, Jody; Blednov, Yuri A.; Harris, R. Adron

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels are widely expressed throughout the brain and mediate the inhibitory effects of many neurotransmitters. As a result, these channels are important for normal CNS function and have also been implicated in Down syndrome, Parkinson’s disease, psychiatric disorders, epilepsy, and drug addiction. Knockout mouse models have provided extensive insight into the significance of GIRK channels under these conditions. This review examines the behavioral and genetic evidence from animal models and genetic association studies in humans linking GIRK channels with CNS disorders. We further explore the possibility that subunit-selective modulators and other advanced research tools will be instrumental in establishing the role of individual GIRK subunits in drug addiction and other relevant CNS diseases and in potentially advancing treatment options for these disorders. PMID:26422988

  18. Behavioral and Genetic Evidence for GIRK Channels in the CNS: Role in Physiology, Pathophysiology, and Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Mayfield, Jody; Blednov, Yuri A; Harris, R Adron

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels are widely expressed throughout the brain and mediate the inhibitory effects of many neurotransmitters. As a result, these channels are important for normal CNS function and have also been implicated in Down syndrome, Parkinson's disease, psychiatric disorders, epilepsy, and drug addiction. Knockout mouse models have provided extensive insight into the significance of GIRK channels under these conditions. This review examines the behavioral and genetic evidence from animal models and genetic association studies in humans linking GIRK channels with CNS disorders. We further explore the possibility that subunit-selective modulators and other advanced research tools will be instrumental in establishing the role of individual GIRK subunits in drug addiction and other relevant CNS diseases and in potentially advancing treatment options for these disorders.

  19. Functional interleukin-17 receptor A is expressed in central nervous system glia and upregulated in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Jayasri Das; Ciric, Bogoljub; Marek, Ryan; Sadhukhan, Sanjoy; Caruso, Michael L; Shafagh, Jasmine; Fitzgerald, Denise C; Shindler, Kenneth S; Rostami, AM

    2009-01-01

    Background Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) is the founding member of a novel family of inflammatory cytokines that plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). IL-17A signals through its receptor, IL-17RA, which is expressed in many peripheral tissues; however, expression of IL-17RA in the central nervous system (CNS) and its role in CNS inflammation are not well understood. Methods EAE was induced in C57Bl/6 mice by immunization with myelin oligodendroglial glycoprotein. IL-17RA expression in the CNS was compared between control and EAE mice using RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. Cell-type specific expression was examined in isolated astrocytic and microglial cell cultures. Cytokine and chemokine production was measured in IL-17A treated cultures to evaluate the functional status of IL-17RA. Results Here we report increased IL-17RA expression in the CNS of mice with EAE, and constitutive expression of functional IL-17RA in mouse CNS tissue. Specifically, astrocytes and microglia express IL-17RA in vitro, and IL-17A treatment induces biological responses in these cells, including significant upregulation of MCP-1, MCP-5, MIP-2 and KC chemokine secretion. Exogenous IL-17A does not significantly alter the expression of IL-17RA in glial cells, suggesting that upregulation of chemokines by glial cells is due to IL-17A signaling through constitutively expressed IL-17RA. Conclusion IL-17RA expression is significantly increased in the CNS of mice with EAE compared to healthy mice, suggesting that IL-17RA signaling in glial cells can play an important role in autoimmune inflammation of the CNS and may be a potential pathway to target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:19400960

  20. Play Therapy: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Maggie L.; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Jessee, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the current issues in play therapy and its implications for play therapists. A brief history of play therapy is provided along with the current play therapy approaches and techniques. This article also touches on current issues or problems that play therapists may face, such as interpreting children's play, implementing…

  1. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference White Paper

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Victor A.; Tonge, Peter J.; Gallo, James M.; Birtwistle, Marc R.; Dar, Arvin C.; Iavarone, Antonio; Paddison, Patrick J.; Heffron, Timothy P.; Elmquist, William F.; Lachowicz, Jean E.; Johnson, Ted W.; White, Forest M.; Sul, Joohee; Smith, Quentin R.; Shen, Wang; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Samala, Ramakrishna; Wen, Patrick Y.; Berry, Donald A.; Petter, Russell C.

    2015-01-01

    Following the first CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference, the speakers from the first 4 sessions and organizers of the conference created this White Paper hoping to stimulate more and better CNS anticancer drug discovery and development. The first part of the White Paper reviews, comments, and, in some cases, expands on the 4 session areas critical to new drug development: pharmacological challenges, recent drug approaches, drug targets and discovery, and clinical paths. Following this concise review of the science and clinical aspects of new CNS anticancer drug discovery and development, we discuss, under the rubric “Accelerating Drug Discovery and Development for Brain Tumors,” further reasons why the pharmaceutical industry and academia have failed to develop new anticancer drugs for CNS malignancies and what it will take to change the current status quo and develop the drugs so desperately needed by our patients with malignant CNS tumors. While this White Paper is not a formal roadmap to that end, it should be an educational guide to clinicians and scientists to help move a stagnant field forward. PMID:26403167

  2. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference White Paper.

    PubMed

    Levin, Victor A; Tonge, Peter J; Gallo, James M; Birtwistle, Marc R; Dar, Arvin C; Iavarone, Antonio; Paddison, Patrick J; Heffron, Timothy P; Elmquist, William F; Lachowicz, Jean E; Johnson, Ted W; White, Forest M; Sul, Joohee; Smith, Quentin R; Shen, Wang; Sarkaria, Jann N; Samala, Ramakrishna; Wen, Patrick Y; Berry, Donald A; Petter, Russell C

    2015-11-01

    Following the first CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference, the speakers from the first 4 sessions and organizers of the conference created this White Paper hoping to stimulate more and better CNS anticancer drug discovery and development. The first part of the White Paper reviews, comments, and, in some cases, expands on the 4 session areas critical to new drug development: pharmacological challenges, recent drug approaches, drug targets and discovery, and clinical paths. Following this concise review of the science and clinical aspects of new CNS anticancer drug discovery and development, we discuss, under the rubric "Accelerating Drug Discovery and Development for Brain Tumors," further reasons why the pharmaceutical industry and academia have failed to develop new anticancer drugs for CNS malignancies and what it will take to change the current status quo and develop the drugs so desperately needed by our patients with malignant CNS tumors. While this White Paper is not a formal roadmap to that end, it should be an educational guide to clinicians and scientists to help move a stagnant field forward.

  3. Haemophilus ducreyi RpoE and CpxRA appear to play distinct yet complementary roles in regulation of envelope-related functions.

    PubMed

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Zhang, Xinjun; Baker, Beth; Fortney, Kate R; Liu, Yunlong; Munson, Robert S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2014-12-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted disease chancroid and a chronic limb ulceration syndrome in children. In humans, H. ducreyi is found in an abscess and overcomes a hostile environment to establish infection. To sense and respond to membrane stress, bacteria utilize two-component systems (TCSs) and extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors. We previously showed that activation of CpxRA, the only intact TCS in H. ducreyi, does not regulate homologues of envelope protein folding factors but does downregulate genes encoding envelope-localized proteins, including many virulence determinants. H. ducreyi also harbors a homologue of RpoE, which is the only ECF sigma factor in the organism. To potentially understand how H. ducreyi responds to membrane stress, here we defined RpoE-dependent genes using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 180 RpoE-dependent genes, of which 98% were upregulated; a major set of these genes encodes homologues of envelope maintenance and repair factors. We also identified and validated a putative RpoE promoter consensus sequence, which was enriched in the majority of RpoE-dependent targets. Comparison of RpoE-dependent genes to those controlled by CpxR showed that each transcription factor regulated a distinct set of genes. Given that RpoE activated a large number of genes encoding envelope maintenance and repair factors and that CpxRA represses genes encoding envelope-localized proteins, these data suggest that RpoE and CpxRA appear to play distinct yet complementary roles in regulating envelope homeostasis in H. ducreyi.

  4. Role of CSPG receptor LAR phosphatase in restricting axon regeneration after CNS injury

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Park, Dongsun; Ohtake, Yosuke; Li, Hui; Hayat, Umar; Li, Junjun; Selzer, Michael E.; Longo, Frank M.; Li, Shuxin

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix molecule chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are highly upregulated in scar tissues and form a potent chemical barrier for CNS axon regeneration. Recent studies support that the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase σ (PTPσ) and its subfamily member leukocyte common antigen related phosphatase (LAR) act as transmembrane receptors to mediate CSPG inhibition. PTPσ deficiency increased regrowth of ascending axons into scar tissues and descending corticospinal tract (CST) axons into the caudal spinal cord after spinal cord injury (SCI). Pharmacological LAR inhibition enhanced serotonergic axon growth in SCI mice. However, transgenic LAR deletion on axon growth in vivo and role of LAR in regulating regrowth of other fiber tracts have not been studied. Here, we studied role of LAR in restricting regrowth of injured descending CNS axons in deficient mice. LAR deletion increased regrowth of serotonergic axons into scar tissues and caudal spinal cord after dorsal overhemitransection. LAR deletion also stimulated regrowth of CST fibers into the caudal spinal cord. LAR protein was upregulated days to weeks after injury and co-localized to serotonergic and CST axons. Moreover, LAR deletion improved functional recovery by increasing BMS locomotor scores and stride length and reducing grid walk errors. This is the first transgenic study that demonstrates crucial role of LAR in restricting regrowth of injured CNS axons. PMID:25220840

  5. Blood-CNS Barrier Impairment in ALS patients versus an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Sanberg, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe neurodegenerative disease with a complicated and poorly understood pathogenesis. Recently, alterations in the blood–Central Nervous System barrier (B-CNS-B) have been recognized as a key factor possibly aggravating motor neuron damage. The majority of findings on ALS microvascular pathology have been determined in mutant superoxide dismutase (SOD1) rodent models, identifying barrier damage during disease development which might similarly occur in familial ALS patients carrying the SOD1 mutation. However, our knowledge of B-CNS-B competence in sporadic ALS (SALS) has been limited. We recently showed structural and functional impairment in postmortem gray and white matter microvessels of medulla and spinal cord tissue from SALS patients, suggesting pervasive barrier damage. Although numerous signs of barrier impairment (endothelial cell degeneration, capillary leakage, perivascular edema, downregulation of tight junction proteins, and microhemorrhages) are indicated in both mutant SOD1 animal models of ALS and SALS patients, other pathogenic barrier alterations have as yet only been identified in SALS patients. Pericyte degeneration, perivascular collagen IV expansion, and white matter capillary abnormalities in SALS patients are significant barrier related pathologies yet to be noted in ALS SOD1 animal models. In the current review, these important differences in blood–CNS barrier damage between ALS patients and animal models, which may signify altered barrier transport mechanisms, are discussed. Understanding discrepancies in barrier condition between ALS patients and animal models may be crucial for developing effective therapies. PMID:24550780

  6. CXCR4/CXCR7 molecular involvement in neuronal and neural progenitor migration: focus in CNS repair.

    PubMed

    Merino, José Joaquín; Bellver-Landete, Victor; Oset-Gasque, María Jesús; Cubelos, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    In the adult brain, neural progenitor cells (NPCs) reside in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles, the dentate gyrus and the olfactory bulb. Following CNS insult, NPCs from the SVZ can migrate along the rostral migratory stream (RMS), a migration of NPCs that is directed by proinflammatory cytokines. Cells expressing CXCR4 follow a homing signal that ultimately leads to neuronal integration and CNS repair, although such molecules can also promote NPC quiescence. The ligand, SDF1 alpha (or CXCL12) is one of the chemokines secreted at sites of injury that it is known to attract NSC-derived neuroblasts, cells that express CXCR4. In function of its concentration, CXCL12 can induce different responses, promoting NPC migration at low concentrations while favoring cell adhesion via EGF and the alpha 6 integrin at high CXCL12 concentrations. However, the preclinical effectiveness of chemokines and their relationship with NPC mobilization requires further study, particularly with respect to CNS repair. NPC migration may also be affected by the release of cytokines or chemokines induced by local inflammation, through autocrine or paracrine mechanisms, as well as through erythropoietin (EPO) or nitric oxide (NO) release. CXCL12 activity requires G-coupled proteins and the availability of its ligand may be modulated by its binding to CXCR7, for which it shows a stronger affinity than for CXCR4.

  7. Insect GDNF:TTC fusion protein improves delivery of GDNF to mouse CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianhong; Chian, Ru-Ju; Ay, Ilknur; Kashi, Brenda B.; Celia, Samuel A.; Tamrazian, Eric; Pepinsky, R. Blake; Fishman, Paul S.; Brown, Robert H.; Francis, Jonathan W.

    2009-12-18

    With a view toward improving delivery of exogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to CNS motor neurons in vivo, we evaluated the bioavailability and pharmacological activity of a recombinant GDNF:tetanus toxin C-fragment fusion protein in mouse CNS. Following intramuscular injection, GDNF:TTC but not recombinant GDNF (rGDNF) produced strong GDNF immunostaining within ventral horn cells of the spinal cord. Intrathecal infusion of GDNF:TTC resulted in tissue concentrations of GDNF in lumbar spinal cord that were at least 150-fold higher than those in mice treated with rGDNF. While levels of immunoreactive choline acetyltransferase and GFR{alpha}-1 in lumbar cord were not altered significantly by intrathecal infusion of rGNDF, GDNF:TTC, or TTC, only rGDNF and GDNF:TTC caused significant weight loss following intracerebroventricular infusion. These studies indicate that insect cell-derived GDNF:TTC retains its bi-functional activity in mammalian CNS in vivo and improves delivery of GDNF to spinal cord following intramuscular- or intrathecal administration.

  8. Silencing IFN-γ binding/signaling in astrocytes vs. microglia leads to opposite effects on CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoli; Yan, Yaping; Li, Xing; Li, Ke; Ciric, Bogoljub; Yang, Jingxian; Zhang, Yuan; Wu, Shuai; Xu, Hui; Chen, Wanjun; Lovett-Racke, Amy E.; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2015-01-01

    IFN-γ, the hallmark cytokine of Th1 cells, plays an important role in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Thus far, the role of IFN-γ in EAE has been largely studied through its effects on immune cells, while much less is known about its effects on central nervous system (CNS) cells, especially in vivo. In this study we dissected the in vivo effects and mechanisms of IFN-γ binding/signaling in astrocytes and microglia and found that IFN-γ signaling in these cell types has opposite effects in EAE pathogenesis. Silencing IFN-γ binding/signaling in astrocytes ameliorated EAE, while in microglia, and likely in some infiltrating macrophages, it increased disease severity. Silencing IFN-γ signaling in astrocytes resulted in diminished expression of chemokines and fewer inflammatory cells infiltrating into the CNS, while blocking IFN-γ binding/signaling in microglia, probably infiltrating macrophages as well, increased disease severity through augmented activation and proliferation of microglia. Further, blocking IFN-γ binding/signaling in astrocytes ameliorated both Th1- and Th17-mediated adoptive EAE, indicating an important role for IFN-γ signaling in astrocytes in autoimmune CNS inflammation. Thus, our study defines novel mechanisms of action of IFN-γ in EAE pathogenesis, and also highlights an opportunity for development of MS therapies directed at CNS cells. PMID:25795755

  9. A functional cyclic AMP response element plays a crucial role in neuroendocrine cell type-specific expression of the secretory granule protein chromogranin A.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H; Mahata, S K; Mahata, M; Webster, N J; Parmer, R J; O'Connor, D T

    1995-01-01

    specificity of the promoter. The functional activity of the CRE site was confirmed through studies of the endogenous chromogranin A gene. Northern mRNA analysis showed that expression of the endogenous chromogranin A gene was stimulated seven- to eightfold by cAMP in PC12 cells, whereas no induction occurred in the NIH3T3 cells. Similar cAMP induction was obtained with the transfected chromogranin A promoter in PC12 cells, and abolition of the CRE site (by deletion or point mutation) eliminated the induction. Thus, the CRE site in the chromogranin A proximal promoter is functional and plays a crucial, indeed indispensable, role in neuroendocrine-specific expression of the gene. These results also provide insight into transcriptional mechanisms governing acquisition of the neuroendocrine secretory phenotype. Images PMID:7615829

  10. Play Therapy: The Art of the Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landreth, Garry L.

    Play therapy, described as a dynamic approach to counseling with children which allows the therapist to fully experience the child's world, is discussed in this book. These topics are presented: (1) the meaning of play, including functions of play and symbolic play; (2) history and development of play therapy, including psychoanalytic, release,…

  11. In vivo imaging of axonal transport of mitochondria in the diseased and aged mammalian CNS.

    PubMed

    Takihara, Yuji; Inatani, Masaru; Eto, Kei; Inoue, Toshihiro; Kreymerman, Alexander; Miyake, Seiji; Ueno, Shinji; Nagaya, Masatoshi; Nakanishi, Ayami; Iwao, Keiichiro; Takamura, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Hirotaka; Satoh, Keita; Kondo, Mineo; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Goldberg, Jeffrey L; Nabekura, Junichi; Tanihara, Hidenobu

    2015-08-18

    The lack of intravital imaging of axonal transport of mitochondria in the mammalian CNS precludes characterization of the dynamics of axonal transport of mitochondria in the diseased and aged mammalian CNS. Glaucoma, the most common neurodegenerative eye disease, is characterized by axon degeneration and the death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and by an age-related increase in incidence. RGC death is hypothesized to result from disturbances in axonal transport and in mitochondrial function. Here we report minimally invasive intravital multiphoton imaging of anesthetized mouse RGCs through the sclera that provides sequential time-lapse images of mitochondria transported in a single axon with submicrometer resolution. Unlike findings from explants, we show that the axonal transport of mitochondria is highly dynamic in the mammalian CNS in vivo under physiological conditions. Furthermore, in the early stage of glaucoma modeled in adult (4-mo-old) mice, the number of transported mitochondria decreases before RGC death, although transport does not shorten. However, with increasing age up to 23-25 mo, mitochondrial transport (duration, distance, and duty cycle) shortens. In axons, mitochondria-free regions increase and lengths of transported mitochondria decrease with aging, although totally organized transport patterns are preserved in old (23- to 25-mo-old) mice. Moreover, axonal transport of mitochondria is more vulnerable to glaucomatous insults in old mice than in adult mice. These mitochondrial changes with aging may underlie the age-related increase in glaucoma incidence. Our method is useful for characterizing the dynamics of axonal transport of mitochondria and may be applied to other submicrometer structures in the diseased and aged mammalian CNS in vivo.

  12. CNS involvement in OFD1 syndrome: a clinical, molecular, and neuroimaging study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral-facial-digital type 1 syndrome (OFD1; OMIM 311200) belongs to the expanding group of disorders ascribed to ciliary dysfunction. With the aim of contributing to the understanding of the role of primary cilia in the central nervous system (CNS), we performed a thorough characterization of CNS involvement observed in this disorder. Methods A cohort of 117 molecularly diagnosed OFD type I patients was screened for the presence of neurological symptoms and/or cognitive/behavioral abnormalities on the basis of the available information supplied by the collaborating clinicians. Seventy-one cases showing CNS involvement were further investigated through neuroimaging studies and neuropsychological testing. Results Seventeen patients were molecularly diagnosed in the course of this study and five of these represent new mutations never reported before. Among patients displaying neurological symptoms and/or cognitive/behavioral abnormalities, we identified brain structural anomalies in 88.7%, cognitive impairment in 68%, and associated neurological disorders and signs in 53% of cases. The most frequently observed brain structural anomalies included agenesis of the corpus callosum and neuronal migration/organisation disorders as well as intracerebral cysts, porencephaly and cerebellar malformations. Conclusions Our results support recent published findings indicating that CNS involvement in this condition is found in more than 60% of cases. Our findings correlate well with the kind of brain developmental anomalies described in other ciliopathies. Interestingly, we also described specific neuropsychological aspects such as reduced ability in processing verbal information, slow thought process, difficulties in attention and concentration, and notably, long-term memory deficits which may indicate a specific role of OFD1 and/or primary cilia in higher brain functions. PMID:24884629

  13. Prospects for the development of epigenetic drugs for CNS conditions.

    PubMed

    Szyf, Moshe

    2015-07-01

    Advances in our understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms that control gene expression in the central nervous system (CNS) and their role in neuropsychiatric disorders are paving the way for a potential new therapeutic approach that is focused on reversing the epigenetic underpinnings of neuropsychiatric conditions. In this article, the complexity of epigenetic processes and the current level of proof for their involvement in CNS disorders are discussed. The preclinical evidence for efficacy of pharmacological approaches that target epigenetics in the CNS and the particular challenges of this approach are also examined. Finally, strategies to address these challenges through the development of improved evidence-based epigenetic therapeutics and through combining pharmacological and behavioural approaches are presented.

  14. NanoART, neuroAIDS and CNS drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nowacek, Ari; Gendelman, Howard E

    2009-01-01

    A broad range of nanomedicines is being developed to improve drug delivery for CNS disorders. The structure of the blood–brain barrier (BBB), the presence of efflux pumps and the expression of metabolic enzymes pose hurdles for drug-brain entry. Nanoformulations can circumvent the BBB to improve CNS-directed drug delivery by affecting such pumps and enzymes. Alternatively, they can be optimized to affect their size, shape, and protein and lipid coatings to facilitate drug uptake, release and ingress across the barrier. This is important as the brain is a sanctuary for a broad range of pathogens including HIV-1. Improved drug delivery to the CNS would affect pharmacokinetic and drug biodistribution properties. This article focuses on how nanotechnology can serve to improve the delivery of antiretroviral medicines, termed nanoART, across the BBB and affect the biodistribution and clinical benefit for HIV-1 disease. PMID:19572821

  15. Disruption of Microtubule Integrity Initiates Mitosis during CNS Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bossing, Torsten; Barros, Claudia S.; Fischer, Bettina; Russell, Steven; Shepherd, David

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mechanisms of CNS repair have vital medical implications. We show that traumatic injury to the ventral midline of the embryonic Drosophila CNS activates cell divisions to replace lost cells. A pilot screen analyzing transcriptomes of single cells during repair pointed to downregulation of the microtubule-stabilizing GTPase mitochondrial Rho (Miro) and upregulation of the Jun transcription factor Jun-related antigen (Jra). Ectopic Miro expression can prevent midline divisions after damage, whereas Miro depletion destabilizes cortical β-tubulin and increases divisions. Disruption of cortical microtubules, either by chemical depolymerization or by overexpression of monomeric tubulin, triggers ectopic mitosis in the midline and induces Jra expression. Conversely, loss of Jra renders midline cells unable to replace damaged siblings. Our data indicate that upon injury, the integrity of the microtubule cytoskeleton controls cell division in the CNS midline, triggering extra mitosis to replace lost cells. The conservation of the identified molecules suggests that similar mechanisms may operate in vertebrates. PMID:22841498

  16. Case report of unusual leukoencephalopathy preceding primary CNS lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Brecher, K.; Hochberg, F.; Louis, D.; de la Monte, S.; Riskind, P.

    1998-01-01

    A previously healthy 35 year old woman presented with bilateral uveitus associated with multiple, evolving, non-enhancing white matter lesions consistent with a progressive leukoencephalopathy such as multiple sclerosis. Thirty months after her initial presentation, she was diagnosed with primary CNS lymphoma and died 14 months later. The unusual clinical course preceding the diagnosis suggests that a demyelinating disease may have preceded, and possibly heralded, the development of primary CNS lymphoma. Cases of "sentinel lesions" heralding the diagnosis of primary CNS lymphoma have been reported, and this case further corroborates such instances and raises further issues regarding possible neoplastic transformation occurring in inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

 PMID:9854972

  17. Empowering Groups that Enable Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David Sloan; Marshall, Danielle; Iserhott, Hindi

    2011-01-01

    Creating play environments for children usually requires groups of adults working together. An extensive scientific literature describes how groups function to achieve shared goals in general terms, and groups attempting to empower play may find this literature useful. Design principles for managing natural resources, identified by Elinor Ostrom…

  18. The Fractal Self at Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author draws on contemporary science to illuminate the relationship between early play experiences, processes of self-development, and the later emergence of the fractal self. She argues that orientation within social space is a primary function of early play and developmentally a two-step process. With other people and with…

  19. Isolated CNS Hodgkin's lymphoma: implications for tissue diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Derek L; Gujrati, Meena; Geoffroy, Francois; Tsung, Andrew J

    2014-11-01

    CNS involvement in the setting of lymphoid neoplasia is a clinical situation that requires specific diagnosis due to the disparate treatment regimens recommended for neoplasms of specific lymphoid cell types. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sampling may provide sufficient information to determine the presence of abnormal lymphoid cells but may not be able to further specify the malignant cellular population. In cases where abnormal clinical or radiographic features are present, accurate tissue diagnosis is essential. In this report, we define a rare case of primary CNS intramedullary Hodgkin's lymphoma without leptomeningeal dissemination diagnosed via resectional biopsy of a conus medullaris lesion. The patient received post-resection radiation therapy and subsequently demonstrated radiographic and clinical improvement. Lymphoid neoplasia within the CNS comprises a diverse group with varying response and survival rates. Treatment hinges upon accurate diagnosis as chemotherapy varies widely among Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. While CSF sampling may yield a positive result with sufficiency to diagnose an abnormal lymphoid cell population, tissue is necessary for further defining cellular pathology. In this report, we define a rare case of primary CNS intramedullary Hodgkin's lymphoma without leptomeningeal dissemination via resectional biopsy of a conus medullaris lesion. In cases where abnormal enhancement is found in eloquent CNS regions and lymphoid neoplasia is suspected, management often entails either stereotactic biopsy or CSF sampling. While CSF analysis may differentiate malignancy at a low rate, tissue diagnosis via paraffin block immunohistochemistry is necessary to further classify malignancy as primary or peripheral, Hodgkin's or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, or other such as metastatic leptomeningeal dissemination and glioma. Within the subtypes of lymphoid neoplasms, treatment regimens vastly differ and thus accurate tissue diagnosis is paramount. We

  20. Risk of subsequent cancer following a primary CNS tumor.

    PubMed

    Strodtbeck, Kyle; Sloan, Andrew; Rogers, Lisa; Fisher, Paul Graham; Stearns, Duncan; Campbell, Laura; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill

    2013-04-01

    Improvements in survival among central nervous system (CNS) tumor patients has made the risk of developing a subsequent cancer an important survivorship issue. Such a risk is likely influenced by histological and treatment differences between CNS tumors. De-identified data for 41,159 patients with a primary CNS tumor diagnosis from 9 Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registries were used to calculate potential risk for subsequent cancer development. Relative risk (RR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI) of subsequent cancer was calculated using SEER*Stat 7.0.9, comparing observed number of subsequent cancers versus expected in the general United States population. For all CNS tumors studied, there were 830 subsequent cancers with a RR of 1.26 (95 % CI, 1.18-1.35). Subsequent cancers were observed in the CNS, digestive system, bones/joints, soft tissue, thyroid and leukemia. Radiotherapy was associated with an elevated risk, particularly in patients diagnosed with a medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (MPNET). MPNET patients who received radiotherapy were at a significant risk for development of cancers of the digestive system, leukemia, bone/joint and cranial nerves. Glioblastoma multiforme patients who received radiotherapy were at lower risks for female breast and prostate cancers, though at an elevated risk for cancers of the thyroid and brain. Radiotherapy is associated with subsequent cancer development, particularly for sites within the field of radiation, though host susceptibility and post-treatment status underlie this risk. Variation in subsequent cancer risk among different CNS tumor histological subtypes indicate a complex interplay between risk factors in subsequent cancer development.

  1. Selective induction of P-glycoprotein at the CNS barriers during symptomatic stage of an ALS animal model.

    PubMed

    Chan, Gary N Y; Evans, Rebecca A; Banks, David B; Mesev, Emily V; Miller, David S; Cannon, Ronald E

    2017-02-03

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) residing at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) are major obstacles for drug delivery to the Central Nervous System (CNS). Disease-induced changes of these xenobiotic transporters at the CNS barriers have been previously documented. Changes in the functional expression of these transporters at the CNS barriers would limit the clinical efficacy of therapeutic agents targeting the CNS. In this study, we characterized the changes in expression and efflux activity of P-gp, BCRP and MRP2 at the BBB and BSCB of an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) SOD1-G93A transgenic rat model across the three stages of disease progression: pre-onset, onset and symptomatic. Up-regulation of P-gp and BCRP at the BBB and BSCB during disease progression of ALS would reduce drug entry to the CNS, while any decreases in transport activity would increase drug entry. In SOD rats at the ALS symptomatic stage, we observed increases in both P-gp transport activity and expression compared to age-matched wildtypes. BCRP and MRP2 levels were unchanged in these animals. Immunohistochemical analysis in brain and spinal cord capillaries of SOD rats from all three ALS stages and age-matched wildtypes showed no differences in nuclear localization of a known P-gp regulator, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB). It suggests that NFκB may have a limited role during P-gp induction observed in our study and additional signaling pathways could be responsible for this response. Our observations imply that novel pharmacological approaches for treating ALS require selecting drugs that are not P-gp substrates in order to improve therapeutic efficacy in the CNS during ALS progression.

  2. BRAIN-SPECIFIC CARNITINE PALMITOYLTRANSFERASE-1C: ROLE IN CNS FATTY ACID METABOLISM, FOOD INTAKE AND BODY WEIGHT

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Michael J.; Cha, Seung Hun; Millington, David S.; Cline, Gary; Shulman, Gerald I; Suwa, Akira; Asaumi, Makoto; Kurama, Takeshi; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Lane, M. Daniel

    2014-01-01

    While the brain does not utilize fatty acids as a primary energy source, recent evidence shows that intermediates of fatty acid metabolism serve as hypothalamic sensors of energy status. Increased hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, an intermediate in fatty acid synthesis, is indicative of energy surplus and leads to the suppression of food intake and increased energy expenditure. Malonyl-CoA functions as an inhibitor of CPT1, a mitochondrial outer membrane enzyme that initiates translocation of fatty acids into mitochondria for oxidation. The mammalian brain expresses a unique homologous CPT1, CPT1c, that binds malonyl-CoA tightly but does not support fatty acid oxidation in vivo, in hypothalamic explants or in heterologous cell culture systems. CPT1c KO mice under fasted or refed conditions do not exhibit an altered CNS transcriptome of genes known to be involved in fatty acid metabolism. CPT1c KO mice exhibit normal levels of metabolites and of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA and fatty acyl-CoA levels either in the fasted or refed states. However, CPT1c KO mice exhibit decreased food intake and lower body weight than WT littermates. In contrast, CPT1c KO mice gain excessive body weight and body fat when fed a high-fat diet while maintaining lower or equivalent food intake. Heterozygous mice display an intermediate phenotype. These findings provide further evidence that CPT1c plays a role in maintaining energy homeostasis, but not through altered fatty acid oxidation. PMID:18248603

  3. The Denial of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Smith, Brian

    Well meaning parents and teachers often use children's play for the purposes of literacy and socialization. Yet, these attempts may deny play to children by subordinating play to some other concept. Evidence shows that even when parents play with their very young children they generally play games like shopping, cooking, and eating; whereas when…

  4. Children's Play and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Discusses adverse effects of FCC deregulation of children's television programming on children's play behavior. Discusses the difference between play and imitation, the role of high quality dramatic play in healthy child development, the popularity of war play, and use of toys to increase dramatic play. Considers ways to help children gain control…

  5. Impact of Increased Astrocyte Expression of IL-6, CCL2 or CXCL10 in Transgenic Mice on Hippocampal Synaptic Function

    PubMed Central

    Gruol, Donna L.

    2016-01-01

    An important aspect of CNS disease and injury is the elevated expression of neuroimmune factors. These factors are thought to contribute to processes ranging from recovery and repair to pathology. The complexity of the CNS and the multitude of neuroimmune factors that are expressed in the CNS during disease and injury is a challenge to an understanding of the consequences of the elevated expression relative to CNS function. One approach to address this issue is the use of transgenic mice that express elevated levels of a specific neuroimmune factor in the CNS by a cell type that normally produces it. This approach can provide basic information about the actions of specific neuroimmune factors and can contribute to an understanding of more complex conditions when multiple neuroimmune factors are expressed. This review summarizes studies using transgenic mice that express elevated levels of IL-6, CCL2 or CXCL10 through increased astrocyte expression. The studies focus on the effects of these neuroimmune factors on synaptic function at the Schaffer collateral to CA1 pyramidal neuron synapse of the hippocampus, a brain region that plays a key role in cognitive function. PMID:27322336

  6. The risk of CNS involvement in aggressive lymphomas in the rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Benevolo, Giulia; Chiappella, Annalisa; Vitolo, Umberto

    2013-12-01

    The risk of CNS dissemination and CNS prophylaxis strategies in aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is still debated. CNS dissemination is a rare but fatal event. A CNS prophylaxis is common for Burkitt and B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma; however, in other NHLs, prophylactic treatments are not systematically warranted. Current risk models showed low sensitivity in predicting CNS involvement, implying overtreatment in roughly 70% of high-risk patients. Risk models in the rituximab era were modulated for the detection of occult CNS disease at diagnosis using flow cytometry. The optimal regimen for CNS prophylaxis in aggressive lymphoma patients has not been established thus far and should be modulated at different levels of 'intensity' such as standard intrathecal chemotherapy, 'active' intrathecal chemotherapy with liposomal cytarabine or more aggressive systemic treatment with high doses of drugs having good CNS bioavailability reserved for patients who are truly at high risk of CNS dissemination.

  7. New Brain Tumor Entities Emerge from Molecular Classification of CNS-PNETs.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Dominik; Orr, Brent A; Toprak, Umut H; Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T W; Capper, David; Sill, Martin; Buchhalter, Ivo; Northcott, Paul A; Leis, Irina; Ryzhova, Marina; Koelsche, Christian; Pfaff, Elke; Allen, Sariah J; Balasubramanian, Gnanaprakash; Worst, Barbara C; Pajtler, Kristian W; Brabetz, Sebastian; Johann, Pascal D; Sahm, Felix; Reimand, Jüri; Mackay, Alan; Carvalho, Diana M; Remke, Marc; Phillips, Joanna J; Perry, Arie; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Drissi, Rachid; Fouladi, Maryam; Giangaspero, Felice; Łastowska, Maria; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Pietsch, Torsten; Hagel, Christian; Gojo, Johannes; Lötsch, Daniela; Berger, Walter; Slavc, Irene; Haberler, Christine; Jouvet, Anne; Holm, Stefan; Hofer, Silvia; Prinz, Marco; Keohane, Catherine; Fried, Iris; Mawrin, Christian; Scheie, David; Mobley, Bret C; Schniederjan, Matthew J; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna M; Dahiya, Sonika; Kramm, Christof M; von Bueren, André O; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Herold-Mende, Christel; Frühwald, Michael C; Milde, Till; Hasselblatt, Martin; Wesseling, Pieter; Rößler, Jochen; Schüller, Ulrich; Ebinger, Martin; Schittenhelm, Jens; Frank, Stephan; Grobholz, Rainer; Vajtai, Istvan; Hans, Volkmar; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Zitterbart, Karel; Collins, V Peter; Aronica, Eleonora; Varlet, Pascale; Puget, Stephanie; Dufour, Christelle; Grill, Jacques; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Wolter, Marietta; Schuhmann, Martin U; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; van Meter, Timothy; Monoranu, Camelia-Maria; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Snuderl, Matija; Forrester, Lynn Ann; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; van Sluis, Peter; Wolf, Stephan; Mikkelsen, Tom; Gajjar, Amar; Aldape, Kenneth; Moore, Andrew S; Taylor, Michael D; Jones, Chris; Jabado, Nada; Karajannis, Matthias A; Eils, Roland; Schlesner, Matthias; Lichter, Peter; von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M; Ellison, David W; Korshunov, Andrey; Kool, Marcel

    2016-02-25

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS-PNETs) are highly aggressive, poorly differentiated embryonal tumors occurring predominantly in young children but also affecting adolescents and adults. Herein, we demonstrate that a significant proportion of institutionally diagnosed CNS-PNETs display molecular profiles indistinguishable from those of various other well-defined CNS tumor entities, facilitating diagnosis and appropriate therapy for patients with these tumors. From the remaining fraction of CNS-PNETs, we identify four new CNS tumor entities, each associated with a recurrent genetic alteration and distinct histopathological and clinical features. These new molecular entities, designated "CNS neuroblastoma with FOXR2 activation (CNS NB-FOXR2)," "CNS Ewing sarcoma family tumor with CIC alteration (CNS EFT-CIC)," "CNS high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with MN1 alteration (CNS HGNET-MN1)," and "CNS high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with BCOR alteration (CNS HGNET-BCOR)," will enable meaningful clinical trials and the development of therapeutic strategies for patients affected by poorly differentiated CNS tumors.

  8. Emerging Roles for Glycogen in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Waitt, Alice E.; Reed, Liam; Ransom, Bruce R.; Brown, Angus M.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of glycogen, the depot into which excess glucose is stored in mammals, to act as a source of rapidly available energy substrate, has been exploited by several organs for both general and local advantage. The liver, expressing the highest concentration of glycogen maintains systemic normoglycemia ensuring the brain receives a supply of glucose in excess of demand. However the brain also contains glycogen, although its role is more specialized. Brain glycogen is located exclusively in astrocytes in the adult, with the exception of pathological conditions, thus in order to benefit neurons, and energy conduit (lactate) is trafficked inter-cellularly. Such a complex scheme requires cell type specific expression of a variety of metabolic enzymes and transporters. Glycogen supports neural elements during withdrawal of glucose, but once the limited buffer of glycogen is exhausted neural function fails and irreversible injury ensues. Under physiological conditions glycogen acts to provide supplemental substrates when ambient glucose is unable to support function during increased energy demand. Glycogen also supports learning and memory where it provides lactate to neurons during the conditioning phase of in vitro long-term potentiation (LTP), an experimental correlate of learning. Inhibiting the breakdown of glycogen or intercellular transport of lactate in in vivo rat models inhibits the retention of memory. Our current understanding of the importance of brain glycogen is expanding to encompass roles that are fundamental to higher brain function. PMID:28360839

  9. Delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Salameh, Therese S; Banks, William A

    2014-01-01

    Peptides and proteins have potent effects on the brain after their peripheral administration, suggesting that they may be good substrates for the development of CNS therapeutics. Major hurdles to such development include their relation to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and poor pharmacokinetics. Some peptides cross the BBB by transendothelial diffusion and others cross in the blood-to-brain direction by saturable transporters. Some regulatory proteins are also transported across the BBB and antibodies can enter the CNS via the extracellular pathways. Glycoproteins and some antibody fragments can be taken up and cross the BBB by mechanisms related to adsorptive endocytosis/transcytosis. Many peptides and proteins are transported out of the CNS by saturable efflux systems and enzymatic activity in the blood, CNS, or BBB are substantial barriers to others. Both influx and efflux transporters are altered by various substances and in disease states. Strategies that manipulate these interactions between the BBB and peptides and proteins provide many opportunities for the development of therapeutics. Such strategies include increasing transendothelial diffusion of small peptides, upregulation of saturable influx transporters with allosteric regulators and other posttranslational means, use of vectors and other Trojan horse strategies, inhibition of efflux transporters including with antisense molecules, and improvement in pharmacokinetic parameters to overcome short half-lives, tissue sequestration, and enzymatic degradation.

  10. HIV-associated opportunistic CNS infections: pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Lauren N; Smith, Bryan; Reich, Daniel; Quezado, Martha; Nath, Avindra

    2016-10-27

    Nearly 30 years after the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART), CNS opportunistic infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-positive individuals. Unknown HIV-positive disease status, antiretroviral drug resistance, poor drug compliance, and recreational drug abuse are factors that continue to influence the morbidity and mortality of infections. The clinical and radiographic pattern of CNS opportunistic infections is unique in the setting of HIV infection: opportunistic infections in HIV-positive patients often have characteristic clinical and radiological presentations that can differ from the presentation of opportunistic infections in immunocompetent patients and are often sufficient to establish the diagnosis. ART in the setting of these opportunistic infections can lead to a paradoxical worsening caused by an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). In this Review, we discuss several of the most common CNS opportunistic infections: cerebral toxoplasmosis, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), tuberculous meningitis, cryptococcal meningitis and cytomegalovirus infection, with an emphasis on clinical pearls, pathological findings, MRI findings and treatment. Moreover, we discuss the risk factors, pathophysiology and management of IRIS. We also summarize the challenges that remain in management of CNS opportunistic infections, which includes the lack of phase II and III clinical trials, absence of antimicrobials for infections such as PML, and controversy regarding the use of corticosteroids for treatment of IRIS.

  11. A treatment accessory for CNS irradiation in children.

    PubMed

    Bukovitz, A G; Timo, J

    1975-09-01

    A treatment accessory for use in CNS radiotherapy of small children enables the head and spinal fields to be treated while the child lies supine. Children are not moved during therapy which minimizes the problem of gaps between the head and spinal fields.

  12. Subacute CNS Demyelination after Treatment with Nivolumab for Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Catherine; Schneider, Raphael; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Bavi, Prashant; Roehrl, Michael H A; Mason, Warren P; Hogg, David

    2015-12-01

    Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) or programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) has improved the survival of patients with metastatic melanoma. These agents carry a certain risk of adverse immune-related events. We present a patient with widely metastatic melanoma who was initially treated with ipilimumab and subsequently with nivolumab. After four infusions of nivolumab, he developed subacute multifocal central nervous system (CNS) demyelination. Nivolumab was discontinued and, despite immunosuppressive therapy, the largest lesion progressed significantly, whereas another lesion showed radiographic improvement. After further progression, the patient succumbed to his CNS lesions 4 months later. Autopsy revealed extensive demyelination, a mild multifocal T-cell-rich perivascular lymphoid infiltrate, abundant macrophages, and necrosis. There was no metastatic melanoma in the brain. CNS demyelination has not been described in association with nivolumab. We hypothesize that the combination therapy of ipilimumab and subsequent nivolumab accounted for the severity of the demyelinating process in this patient. This case, with comprehensive clinical, molecular, and neuropathologic characterization, illustrates the need for awareness of these potential CNS complications with the use of multiple checkpoint inhibitors.

  13. CNS Control of Glucose Metabolism: Response to Environmental Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Arble, Deanna M.; Sandoval, Darleen A.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, considerable work has accumulated to support the role of the CNS in regulating postprandial glucose levels. As discussed in the first section of this review, the CNS receives and integrates information from afferent neurons, circulating hormones, and postprandially generated nutrients to subsequently direct changes in glucose output by the liver and glucose uptake by peripheral tissues. The second major component of this review focuses on the effects of external pressures, including high fat diet and changes to the light:dark cycle on CNS-regulating glucose homeostasis. We also discuss the interaction between these different pressures and how they contribute to the multifaceted mechanisms that we hypothesize contribute to the dysregulation of glucose in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We argue that while current peripheral therapies serve to delay the progression of T2DM, generating combined obesity and T2DM therapies targeted at the CNS, the primary site of dysfunction for both diseases, would lead to a more profound impact on the progression of both diseases. PMID:23550218

  14. CNS control of glucose metabolism: response to environmental challenges.

    PubMed

    Arble, Deanna M; Sandoval, Darleen A

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, considerable work has accumulated to support the role of the CNS in regulating postprandial glucose levels. As discussed in the first section of this review, the CNS receives and integrates information from afferent neurons, circulating hormones, and postprandially generated nutrients to subsequently direct changes in glucose output by the liver and glucose uptake by peripheral tissues. The second major component of this review focuses on the effects of external pressures, including high fat diet and changes to the light:dark cycle on CNS-regulating glucose homeostasis. We also discuss the interaction between these different pressures and how they contribute to the multifaceted mechanisms that we hypothesize contribute to the dysregulation of glucose in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We argue that while current peripheral therapies serve to delay the progression of T2DM, generating combined obesity and T2DM therapies targeted at the CNS, the primary site of dysfunction for both diseases, would lead to a more profound impact on the progression of both diseases.

  15. ELECTROSTATIC CHARGE STIMULATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CNS MICROGLIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can create oxidative stress (OS)-mediated inflammatory changes upon impact. The oxidative burst signals the activation of phage-lineage cells such as peripheral macrophages, Kupffer cells and CNS microgl...

  16. Developmental alterations in CNS stress-related gene expression following postnatal immune activation.

    PubMed

    Amath, A; Foster, J A; Sidor, M M

    2012-09-18

    Early-life adversity is associated with dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and increased susceptibility to later-life psychopathology. Specifically, there is mounting evidence suggesting that the immune system plays an important role in central nervous system (CNS) development and in the programing of behavior. The current study investigated how early-life immune challenge affects the development of CNS stress neurocircuitry by examining the gene expression profile of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), CRH receptors, and the major corticosteroid receptors within the limbic-hypothalamic circuit of the developing rodent brain. Mice were administered a 0.05 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection on postnatal day (P) 3 and 5 and gene expression was assessed using in situ hybridization from P14 to P28. Target genes investigated were CRH, CRH receptor-1 (CRHR1), CRH receptor-2, the mineralocorticoid receptor, and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Early LPS challenge resulted in a transient decrease in CRHR1 mRNA expression in the cornuammonis 1 (CA1) and CA3 regions of the hippocampus that were accompanied by increased hippocampal GR mRNA expression in the CA1 region between P14 and P21. This was followed by increased hypothalamic CRH expression in LPS-mice on P28. Our current findings suggest that early-life LPS challenge impacts the developmental trajectory of CNS stress neurocircuitry. These results lend insight into the molecular basis for the later development of stress-related behaviors as previously described in early immune challenge rodents.

  17. MyD88 signaling in the CNS is required for development of fatty acid induced leptin resistance and diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kleinridders, André; Schenten, Dominik; Könner, A. Christine; Belgardt, Bengt F.; Mauer, Jan; Okamura, Tomoo; Wunderlich, F. Thomas; Medzhitov, Ruslan; Brüning, Jens C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Obesity-associated activation of inflammatory pathways represents a key step in the development of insulin resistance in peripheral organs, partially via activation of TLR-4 signaling by fatty acids. Here we demonstrate that palmitate acting in the central nervous system (CNS) inhibits leptin-induced anorexia and Stat-3 activation. To determine the functional significance of TLR signaling in the CNS in the development of leptin resistance and diet-induced obesity in vivo, we have characterized mice deficient for the TLR adaptor molecule MyD88 in the CNS (MyD88ΔCNS). Compared to control mice, MyD88ΔCNS mice are protected from high-fat diet (HFD)-induced weight gain, from the development of HFD-induced leptin resistance and from the induction of leptin resistance by acute central application of palmitate. Moreover, CNS-restricted MyD88 deletion protects from HFD- and icv palmitate-induced impairment of peripheral glucose metabolism. Thus, we define neuronal MyD88-dependent signaling as a key regulator of diet-induced leptin and insulin resistance in vivo. PMID:19808018

  18. To What Extent Do Joint Attention, Imitation, and Object Play Behaviors in Infancy Predict Later Communication and Intellectual Functioning in ASD?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Kenneth K.; Watson, Linda R.; Baranek, Grace T.; Poe, Michele D.

    2012-01-01

    The extent to which early social communication behaviors predict later communication and intellectual outcomes was investigated via retrospective video analysis. Joint attention, imitation, and complex object play behaviors were coded from edited home videos featuring scenes of 29 children with ASD at 9-12 and/or 15-18 months. A quantitative…

  19. Two people playing together: some thoughts on play, playing, and playfulness in psychoanalytic work.

    PubMed

    Vliegen, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Children's play and the playfulness of adolescents and adults are important indicators of personal growth and development. When a child is not able to play, or an adolescent/adult is not able to be playful with thoughts and ideas, psychotherapy can help to find a more playful and creative stance. Elaborating Winnicott's (1968, p. 591) statement that "psychotherapy has to do with two people playing together," three perspectives on play in psychotherapy are discussed. In the first point of view, the child gets in touch with and can work through aspects of his or her inner world, while playing in the presence of the therapist. The power of play is then rooted in the playful communication with the self In a second perspective, in play the child is communicating aspects of his or her inner world to the therapist as a significant other. In a third view, in "playing together" child and therapist are coconstructing new meanings. These three perspectives on play are valid at different moments of a therapy process or for different children, depending on the complex vicissitudes of the child's constitution, life experiences, development, and psychic structure. Concerning these three perspectives, a parallel can be drawn between the therapist's attitude toward the child's play and the way the therapist responds to the verbal play of an adolescent or adult. We illustrate this with the case of Jacob, a late adolescent hardly able to play with ideas.

  20. The Play of Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2012-01-01

    The author reviews the role of play within psychotherapy. She does not discuss the formal play therapy especially popular for young children, nor play from the Jungian perspective that encourages the use of the sand tray with adults. Instead, she focuses on the informal use of play during psychotherapy as it is orchestrated intuitively. Because…

  1. CNS Remyelination and the Innate Immune System

    PubMed Central

    McMurran, Christopher E.; Jones, Clare A.; Fitzgerald, Denise C.; Franklin, Robin J. M.

    2016-01-01

    A misguided inflammatory response is frequently implicated in myelin damage. Particularly prominent among myelin diseases, multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune condition, with immune–mediated damage central to its etiology. Nevertheless, a robust inflammatory response is also essential for the efficient regeneration of myelin sheaths after such injury. Here, we discuss the functions of inflammation that promote remyelination, and how these have been experimentally disentangled from the pathological facets of the immune response. We focus on the contributions that resident microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages make to remyelination and compare the roles of these two populations of innate immune cells. Finally, the current literature is framed in the context of developing therapies that manipulate the innate immune response to promote remyelination in clinical myelin disease. PMID:27200350

  2. [COMPARATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF uNOS-POSITIVE STRUCTURES IN THE CNS OF SOME SPECIES OF CRUSTACEANS].

    PubMed

    Chertok, V M; Kotsyuba, E P

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a comparative study of NO-ergic system in the CNS of 10 species of crustaceans subclass Malacostraca, belonging to orders Stomatopoda and Decapoda, with a common habitat in Ussuri Bay (Sea of Japan). Both similar characteristics and differences in content and distribution of universal NO-synthase (uNOS) were revealed in homologous parts of the brain and ventral nerve cord of the investigated species of crustaceans. We discuss the involvement of nitric oxide in the regulation of physiological functions of decapod crustaceans and its role in the processes of adaptation to the environmental conditions.

  3. Foxp3⁺ Treg cells in the inflamed CNS are insensitive to IL-6-driven IL-17 production.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Richard A; Floess, Stefan; Huehn, Jochen; Jones, Simon A; Anderton, Stephen M

    2012-05-01

    Foxp3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells can be induced to produce interleukin (IL)-17 by in vitro exposure to proinflammatory cytokines, drawing into question their functional stability at sites of inflammation. Unlike their splenic counterparts, Treg cells from the inflamed central nervous system (CNS-Treg cells) during EAE resisted conversion to IL-17 production when exposed to IL-6. We show that the highly activated phenotype of CNS-Treg cells includes elevated expression of the Th1-associated molecules CXCR3 and T-bet, but reduced expression of the IL-6 receptor α chain (CD126) and the signaling chain gp130. We found a lack of IL-6 receptor on all CNS CD4(+) T cells, which was reflected by an absence of both classical and trans-IL-6 signaling in CNS CD4(+) cells, compared with their splenic counterparts. We propose that extinguished responsiveness to IL-6 (via down-regulation of CD126 and gp130) stabilizes the regulatory phenotype of activated Treg cells at sites of autoimmune inflammation.

  4. Play behaviours and play object preferences of young children with autistic disorder in a clinical play environment.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Anna; Ziviani, Jenny; Rodger, Sylvia

    2006-01-01

    Play is the primary occupation of childhood and provides a potentially powerful means of assessing and treating children with autistic disorder. This study utilized a cross-sectional comparison design to investigate the nature of play engagement in children with AD (n = 24), relative to typically developing children (n = 34) matched for chronological age. Play behaviours were recorded in a clinical play environment. Videotapes comprising 15 minutes of the children's spontaneous play behaviour were analysed using time-interval analysis. The particular play behaviours observed and play objects used were coded. Differences in play behaviours (p < 0.0001) and play object preferences (p < 0.0001) were identified between the groups. Findings regarding play behaviour contribute to contention in the literature surrounding functional and symbolic play. Explanations for play object preferences are postulated. Recommendations are made regarding clinical application of findings in terms of enhancing assessment and intervention by augmenting motivation.

  5. Strategies for Family Facilitation of Play Dates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Cynthia R.; Horn, Eva M.

    2010-01-01

    Play dates can serve several functions for young children, including children with social difficulties, such as developmental delays, behavioral disorders, autism spectrum disorders, and shyness. Play dates provide children with additional opportunities to be around peers and to practice skills associated with peer play interactions. Play dates…

  6. Abnormal measles-mumps-rubella antibodies and CNS autoimmunity in children with autism.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijendra K; Lin, Sheren X; Newell, Elizabeth; Nelson, Courtney

    2002-01-01

    Autoimmunity to the central nervous system (CNS), especially to myelin basic protein (MBP), may play a causal role in autism, a neurodevelopmental disorder. Because many autistic children harbor elevated levels of measles antibodies, we conducted a serological study of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) and MBP autoantibodies. Using serum samples of 125 autistic children and 92 control children, antibodies were assayed by ELISA or immunoblotting methods. ELISA analysis showed a significant increase in the level of MMR antibodies in autistic children. Immunoblotting analysis revealed the presence of an unusual MMR antibody in 75 of 125 (60%) autistic sera but not in control sera. This antibody specifically detected a protein of 73-75 kD of MMR. This protein band, as analyzed with monoclonal antibodies, was immunopositive for measles hemagglutinin (HA) protein but not for measles nucleoprotein and rubella or mumps viral proteins. Thus the MMR antibody in autistic sera detected measles HA protein, which is unique to the measles subunit of the vaccine. Furthermore, over 90% of MMR antibody-positive autistic sera were also positive for MBP autoantibodies, suggesting a strong association between MMR and CNS autoimmunity in autism. Stemming from this evidence, we suggest that an inappropriate antibody response to MMR, specifically the measles component thereof, might be related to pathogenesis of autism.

  7. Inhibitors of Glycine Transporter-1: Potential Therapeutics for the Treatment of CNS Disorders.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Christopher L; Guzzo, Peter R

    2016-01-01

    Glycine acts as an inhibitory neurotransmitter at glycine receptor (GlyR)-enriched synapses and as an obligatory co-agonist at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, where it facilitates neuronal excitation. Two high-affinity and substrate selective transporters, glycine transporter-1 and glycine transporter-2 (GlyT-1 and GlyT-2), regulate extracellular glycine concentrations within the CNS and as such, play critical roles in maintaining a balance between inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission. GlyT-1 inhibition has been extensively examined as a potential means by which to treat several CNS disorders that include schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and addiction. More recently, preclinical studies have emerged that indicate the approach may also promote neuroprotection, provide a pharmacotherapeutic strategy for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), and treat symptomology associated with pain, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy. This review examines the pharmacological aspects of GlyT-1 inhibition and describes drug discovery and development efforts toward the identification of novel inhibitors.

  8. Glial response during cuprizone-induced de- and remyelination in the CNS: lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Gudi, Viktoria; Gingele, Stefan; Skripuletz, Thomas; Stangel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Although astrogliosis and microglia activation are characteristic features of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other central nervous system (CNS) lesions the exact functions of these events are not fully understood. Animal models help to understand the complex interplay between the different cell types of the CNS and uncover general mechanisms of damage and repair of myelin sheaths. The so called cuprizone model is a toxic model of demyelination in the CNS white and gray matter, which lacks an autoimmune component. Cuprizone induces apoptosis of mature oligodendrocytes that leads to a robust demyelination and profound activation of both astrocytes and microglia with regional heterogeneity between different white and gray matter regions. Although not suitable to study autoimmune mediated demyelination, this model is extremely helpful to elucidate basic cellular and molecular mechanisms during de- and particularly remyelination independently of interactions with peripheral immune cells. Phagocytosis and removal of damaged myelin seems to be one of the major roles of microglia in this model and it is well known that removal of myelin debris is a prerequisite of successful remyelination. Furthermore, microglia provide several signals that support remyelination. The role of astrocytes during de- and remyelination is not well defined. Both supportive and destructive functions have been suggested. Using the cuprizone model we could demonstrate that there is an important crosstalk between astrocytes and microglia. In this review we focus on the role of glial reactions and interaction in the cuprizone model. Advantages and limitations of as well as its potential therapeutic relevance for the human disease MS are critically discussed in comparison to other animal models. PMID:24659953

  9. The role of astrocytes in CNS tumors: pre-clinical models and novel imaging approaches

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Emma R.; Howarth, Clare; Sibson, Nicola R.

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastasis is a significant clinical problem, yet the mechanisms governing tumor cell extravasation across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and CNS colonization are unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of brain metastasis but in vitro work suggests both tumoricidal and tumor-promoting roles for astrocyte-derived molecules. Also, the involvement of astrogliosis in primary brain tumor progression is under much investigation. However, translation of in vitro findings into in vivo and clinical settings has not been realized. Increasingly sophisticated resources, such as transgenic models and imaging technologies aimed at astrocyte-specific markers, will enable better characterization of astrocyte function in CNS tumors. Techniques such as bioluminescence and in vivo fluorescent cell labeling have potential for understanding the real-time responses of astrocytes to tumor burden. Transgenic models targeting signaling pathways involved in the astrocytic response also hold great promise, allowing translation of in vitro mechanistic findings into pre-clinical models. The challenging nature of in vivo CNS work has slowed progress in this area. Nonetheless, there has been a surge of interest in generating pre-clinical models, yielding insights into cell extravasation across the BBB, as well as immune cell recruitment to the parenchyma. While the function of astrocytes in the tumor microenvironment is still unknown, the relationship between astrogliosis and tumor growth is evident. Here, we review the role of astrogliosis in both primary and secondary brain tumors and outline the potential for the use of novel imaging modalities in research and clinical settings. These imaging approaches have the potential to enhance our understanding of the local host response to tumor progression in the brain, as well as providing new, more sensitive diagnostic imaging methods. PMID:23596394

  10. Playing It Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tooley, Kay

    1973-01-01

    Described is one technique, referred to as "playing it right," to aid the therapist in the treatment of borderline children. "Playing it right" is based on the introduction of reality rules into the fantasy world of the borderline child. (CS)

  11. Role-Playing Mitosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyn, Mark A.; Stegink, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a role playing activity that actively engages students in the learning process of mitosis. Students play either chromosomes carrying information, or cells in the cell membrane. (Contains 11 references.) (Author/YDS)

  12. Cytokines and effector T cell subsets causing autoimmune CNS disease.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Franziska; Korn, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Although experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is limited in its potency to reproduce the entirety of clinical and histopathologic features of multiple sclerosis (MS), this model has been successfully used to prove that MS like autoimmunity in the CNS is orchestrated by autoantigen specific T cells. EAE was also very useful to refute the idea that IFN-γ producing T helper type 1 (Th1) cells were the sole players within the pathogenic T cell response. Rather, "new" T cell lineages such as IL-17 producing Th17 cells or IL-9 producing Th9 cells have been first discovered in the context of EAE. Here, we will summarize new concepts of early and late T cell plasticity and the cytokine network that shapes T helper cell responses and lesion development in CNS specific autoimmunity.

  13. Apoptosis in the mammalian CNS: Lessons from animal models.

    PubMed

    Lossi, L; Cantile, C; Tamagno, I; Merighi, A

    2005-07-01

    It is generally assumed that about half of the neurons produced during neurogenesis die before completion of maturation of the central nervous system (CNS). Neural cell death is also relevant in aging and several neurodegenerative diseases. Among the modalities by which neurons die, apoptosis has very much attracted the interest of investigators because in this type of cell death neurons are actively responsible for their own demise by switching on a number of genes and activating a series of specific intracellular pathways. This review focuses on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of apoptosis in normal and transgenic animal models related to naturally occurring neuronal death within the CNS. We will also consider some examples of apoptotic cell death in canine neuropathologies. A thorough analysis of naturally occurring neuronal death in vivo will offer a basis for parallel and future studies involving secondary neuronal loss such as those in neurodegenerative disorders, trauma or ischaemia.

  14. Positron emission tomography in CNS drug discovery and drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Piel, Markus; Vernaleken, Ingo; Rösch, Frank

    2014-11-26

    Molecular imaging methods such as positron emission tomography (PET) are increasingly involved in the development of new drugs. Using radioactive tracers as imaging probes, PET allows the determination of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of a drug candidate, via recording target engagement, the pattern of distribution, and metabolism. Because of the noninvasive nature and quantitative end point obtainable by molecular imaging, it seems inherently suited for the examination of a pharmaceutical's behavior in the brain. Molecular imaging, most especially PET, can therefore be a valuable tool in CNS drug research. In this Perspective, we present the basic principles of PET, the importance of appropriate tracer selection, the impact of improved radiopharmaceutical chemistry in radiotracer development, and the different roles that PET can fulfill in CNS drug research.

  15. C.N.S. tumors in eastern Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, A W

    1992-01-01

    In Saudi Arabia, there were no attempts previously to describe a population based frequency or incidence, particularly so the age adjusted incidence of various CNS tumors. This paper presents the primary CNS tumors from a population based tumor registry over two years period, from January 1987 till December 1988. There was a total of 85 cases representing 5.4% of the total captured cases (1,568 cases of malignant tumors at all sites). The population of the Eastern Province is estimated to be 1.37 million, the Saudis forming 80% of the total population. Out of the 85 cases captured over two years, there were 64 cases diagnosed in indigenous Saudi population forming 75%. The remaining occurred in non-Saudi residents. The male/female ratio in Saudis was 1:1.1 with a slight predominance of the female, while the reverse is true in the non-Saudis (2:1). The total captured cases per annum is 43, making the incidence of primary CNS neoplasms in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia 3.1/100,000 of all the population and 2.9/100,000 in Saudi nationals. Comparing this incidence to the international figure, it was clear that it is far less than the incidence reported from North America and Europe, particularly in the Caucasian population, but similar to incidences reported in the Chinese, black Americans, Romanians and Yugoslavians, but certainly less than the Ashkenazi or Safari Jews, and slightly higher than the incidence reported in Japan and Southeast Asia. Malignant brain tumors of various types dominated the primary CNS neoplasms reported over these two years forming 69% of the cases and 52% of the primary brain tumors.

  16. Outdoor Creative Play Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peggy L.

    Guidelines are given for the development of outdoor play areas on school sites to provide children with natural areas and simple facilities for creative play. Site selection, analysis, and development are discussed. Natural, topographical features of the environment and natural play equipment are suggested. Illustrations are also presented to aid…

  17. The Excellence of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyles, Janet R., Ed.

    Recognizing that for young children, play is a tool for learning, this book compiles contributions by different authors, reflecting both up-to-date research and current classroom practice as they relate to children's play. Part 1 of the book explores the value of play as a cross-cultural concept as well as one rooted in the Western world. Gender…

  18. Play Is the Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Steve; Sanderson, Rebecca Cornelli

    2012-01-01

    Historically, play has been viewed as a frivolous break from important endeavors like working and learning when, in fact, a child's ability to fully and freely engage in play is essential to their learning, productivity, and overall development. A natural drive to play is universal across all young mammals. Children from every society on earth…

  19. Life! Through Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Anne, Nancy

    This speech presents a review of research concerning the nature of play. Some of the formal characteristics of play are: (a) it is distinct from ordinary life in its "temporariness" and its limitless location; (b) there is an element of tension in play that leads to uncertainty concerning the outcome but at the same time provides the opportunity…

  20. The Pedagogy of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesbrecht, Sheila

    2012-01-01

    Play is important. Environmental educators Sobel and Louv write about the relationship between children and outside play and suggest that early transcendental experiences within nature allow children to develop empathetic orientations towards the natural world. Children who play out-of-doors develop an appreciation for the environment and…

  1. Modulation of Kv3 subfamily potassium currents by the sea anemone toxin BDS: significance for CNS and biophysical studies.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Shuk Yin M; Thompson, Dawn; Wang, Zhuren; Fedida, David; Robertson, Brian

    2005-09-21

    Kv3 potassium channels, with their ultra-rapid gating and high activation threshold, are essential for high-frequency firing in many CNS neurons. Significantly, the Kv3.4 subunit has been implicated in the major CNS disorders Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, and it is claimed that selectively targeting this subunit will have therapeutic utility. Previous work suggested that BDS toxins ("blood depressing substance," from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata) were specific blockers for rapidly inactivating Kv3.4 channels, and consequently these toxins are increasingly used as diagnostic agents for Kv3.4 subunits in central neurons. However, precisely how selective are these toxins for this important CNS protein? We show that BDS is not selective for Kv3.4 but markedly inhibits current through Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channels. Inhibition comes about not by "pore block" but by striking modification of Kv3 gating kinetics and voltage dependence. Activation and inactivation kinetics are slowed by BDS-I and BDS-II, and V(1/2) for activation is shifted to more positive voltages. Alanine substitution mutagenesis around the S3b and S4 segments of Kv3.2 reveals that BDS acts via voltage-sensing domains, and, consistent with this, ON gating currents from nonconducting Kv3.2 are markedly inhibited. The altered kinetics and gating properties, combined with lack of subunit selectivity with Kv3 subunits, seriously affects the usefulness of BDS toxins in CNS studies. Furthermore, our results do not easily fit with the voltage sensor "paddle" structure proposed recently for Kv channels. Our data will be informative for experiments designed to dissect out the roles of Kv3 subunits in CNS function and dysfunction.

  2. Dual DNA methylation patterns in the CNS reveal developmentally poised chromatin and monoallelic expression of critical genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhui; Valo, Zuzana; Bowers, Chauncey W; Smith, David D; Liu, Zheng; Singer-Sam, Judith

    2010-11-04

    As a first step towards discovery of genes expressed from only one allele in the CNS, we used a tiling array assay for DNA sequences that are both methylated and unmethylated (the MAUD assay). We analyzed regulatory regions of the entire mouse brain transcriptome, and found that approximately 10% of the genes assayed showed dual DNA methylation patterns. They include a large subset of genes that display marks of both active and silent, i.e., poised, chromatin during development, consistent with a link between differential DNA methylation and lineage-specific differentiation within the CNS. Sixty-five of the MAUD hits and 57 other genes whose function is of relevance to CNS development and/or disorders were tested for allele-specific expression in F(1) hybrid clonal neural stem cell (NSC) lines. Eight MAUD hits and one additional gene showed such expression. They include Lgi1, which causes a subtype of inherited epilepsy that displays autosomal dominance with incomplete penetrance; Gfra2, a receptor for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor GDNF that has been linked to kindling epilepsy; Unc5a, a netrin-1 receptor important in neurodevelopment; and Cspg4, a membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan associated with malignant melanoma and astrocytoma in human. Three of the genes, Camk2a, Kcnc4, and Unc5a, show preferential expression of the same allele in all clonal NSC lines tested. The other six genes show a stochastic pattern of monoallelic expression in some NSC lines and bi-allelic expression in others. These results support the estimate that 1-2% of genes expressed in the CNS may be subject to allelic exclusion, and demonstrate that the group includes genes implicated in major disorders of the CNS as well as neurodevelopment.

  3. Modulation of Kv3 Subfamily Potassium Currents by the Sea Anemone Toxin BDS: Significance for CNS and Biophysical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Shuk Yin M.; Thompson, Dawn; Wang, Zhuren; Fedida, David; Robertson, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Kv3 potassium channels, with their ultra-rapid gating and high activation threshold, are essential for high-frequency firing in many CNS neurons. Significantly, the Kv3.4 subunit has been implicated in the major CNS disorders Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, and it is claimed that selectively targeting this subunit will have therapeutic utility. Previous work suggested that BDS toxins (“blood depressing substance,” from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata) were specific blockers for rapidly inactivating Kv3.4 channels, and consequently these toxins are increasingly used as diagnostic agents for Kv3.4 subunits in central neurons. However, precisely how selective are these toxins for this important CNS protein? We show that BDS is not selective for Kv3.4 but markedly inhibits current through Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channels. Inhibition comes about not by “pore block” but by striking modification of Kv3 gating kinetics and voltage dependence. Activation and inactivation kinetics are slowed by BDS-I and BDS-II, and V1/2 for activation is shifted to more positive voltages. Alanine substitution mutagenesis around the S3b and S4 segments of Kv3.2 reveals that BDS acts via voltage-sensing domains, and, consistent with this, ON gating currents from nonconducting Kv3.2 are markedly inhibited. The altered kinetics and gating properties, combined with lack of subunit selectivity with Kv3 subunits, seriously affects the usefulness of BDS toxins in CNS studies. Furthermore, our results do not easily fit with the voltage sensor “paddle” structure proposed recently for Kv channels. Our data will be informative for experiments designed to dissect out the roles of Kv3 subunits in CNS function and dysfunction. PMID:16177043

  4. Origin, fate and dynamics of macrophages at CNS interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Goldmann, Tobias; Jordão, Marta Joana Costa; Wieghofer, Peter; Prutek, Fabiola; Hagemeyer, Nora; Frenzel, Kathrin; Staszewski, Ori; Kierdorf, Katrin; Amann, Lukas; Krueger, Martin; Locatelli, Giuseppe; Hochgarner, Hannah; Zeiser, Robert; Epelman, Slava; Geissmann, Frederic; Priller, Josef; Rossi, Fabio; Bechmann, Ingo; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Linnarsson, Sten; Jung, Steffen; Prinz, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Perivascular, meningeal and choroid plexus macrophages are non-parenchymal macrophages that mediate immune responses at brain boundaries. Although the origin of parenchymal microglia has recently been elucidated, much less is known about the precursors, the underlying transcriptional program and the dynamics of the other macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS). It has been assumed that they have a high turnover with blood-borne monocytes. However, large scale single-cell RNA-sequencing reveals a striking molecular overlap between perivascular macrophages and microglia but not monocytes. Using several fate mapping approaches and parabiosis we demonstrate that CNS macrophages arise from yolk sac precursors during embryonic development and remain a stable population. Notably, the generation of CNS macrophages relies on the transcription factor Pu.1 whereas myb, Batf3 and Nr4a1 are not required. Upon autoimmune inflammation, macrophages undergo extensive self-renewal by local proliferation. Our data provide challenging new insights into brains innate immune system. PMID:27135602

  5. Mechanisms of CNS invasion and damage by parasites.

    PubMed

    Kristensson, Krister; Masocha, Willias; Bentivoglio, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) is a most devastating complication of a parasitic infection. Several physical and immunological barriers provide obstacles to such an invasion. In this broad overview focus is given to the physical barriers to neuroinvasion of parasites provided at the portal of entry of the parasites, i.e., the skin and epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract, and between the blood and the brain parenchyma, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A description is given on how human pathogenic parasites can reach the CNS via the bloodstream either as free-living or extracellular parasites, by embolization of eggs, or within red or white blood cells when adapted to intracellular life. Molecular mechanisms are discussed by which parasites can interact with or pass across the BBB. The possible targeting of the circumventricular organs by parasites, as well as the parasites' direct entry to the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory nerve pathway, is also highlighted. Finally, examples are given which illustrate different mechanisms by which parasites can cause dysfunction or damage in the CNS related to toxic effects of parasite-derived molecules or to immune responses to the infection.

  6. Primary CNS lymphoproliferative disease, mycophenolate and calcineurin inhibitor usage

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Genevieve M.; Powell, Helen; Kostadinov, Rumen; Rocafort, Patrick Tim; Rifkin, Dena E.; Burger, Peter C.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Swinnen, Lode J.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Duffield, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppression for solid organ transplantation increases lymphoproliferative disease risk. While central nervous system (CNS) involvement is more rare, we noticed an increase in primary CNS (PCNS) disease. To investigate a potential association with the immunosuppressive regimen we identified all post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) cases diagnosed over a 28-year period at our institution (174 total, 29 PCNS) and all similar cases recorded in a United Network for Organ Sharing-Organ Procurement and Transplant Network (UNOS-OPTN) data file. While no PCNS cases were diagnosed at our institution between 1986 and 1997, they comprised 37% of PTLD cases diagnosed from 2011–2014. PCNS disease was more often associated with renal vs. other organ transplant, Epstein-Barr virus, large B-cell morphology and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as compared to PTLD that did not involve the CNS. Calcineurin inhibitors were protective against PCNS disease when given alone or in combination with MMF. A multivariate analysis of a larger UNOS-OPTN dataset confirmed these findings, where both MMF and lack of calcineurin inhibitor usage were independently associated with risk for development of PCNS PTLD. These findings have significant implications for the transplant community, particularly given the introduction of new regimens lacking calcineurin inhibitors. Further investigation into these associations is warranted. PMID:26460822

  7. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 plays an essential role in the function of CD25(+)CD4(+) regulatory cells that control intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Read, S; Malmström, V; Powrie, F

    2000-07-17

    It is now clear that functionally specialized regulatory T (Treg) cells exist as part of the normal immune repertoire, preventing the development of pathogenic responses to both self- and intestinal antigens. Here, we report that the Treg cells that control intestinal inflammation express the same phenotype (CD25(+)CD45RB(low)CD4(+)) as those that control autoimmunity. Previous studies have failed to identify how CD25(+) Treg cells function in vivo. Our studies reveal that the immune-suppressive function of these cells in vivo is dependent on signaling via the negative regulator of T cell activation cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4), as well as secretion of the immune-suppressive cytokine transforming growth factor beta. Strikingly, constitutive expression of CTLA-4 among CD4(+) cells was restricted primarily to Treg cells, suggesting that CTLA-4 expression by these cells is involved in their immune-suppressive function. These findings raise the possibility that Treg cell function contributes to the immune suppression characteristic of CTLA-4 signaling. Identification of costimulatory molecules involved in the function of Treg cells may facilitate further characterization of these cells and development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  8. Effects of prenatal protein malnutrition and neonatal stress on CNS responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, P; Mallinson, K; Bronzino, J; McCormick, C M

    2001-12-14

    Maturation of the nervous system and consequent behavior depends in part on prenatal nutritional factors and postnatal environmental stimulation. In particular, the hypothalamus and the hippocampus are two important CNS areas that are vulnerable to such pre- and postnatal manipulations. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to explore the effects of both prenatal protein malnutrition and neonatal isolation stress on hypothalamic and hippocampal functioning in infant rats. Specifically, we assessed the levels of plasma corticosterone, as well as dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites in both the hypothalamus and hippocampus in rat pups that had been prenatally malnourished (6% casein diet) and isolated from nest, dam, and siblings for 1 h daily during postnatal days (PND) 2 through 8. We found that on PND 9 malnourished pups weighed less, had smaller hypothalami and a suppressed corticosterone response to acute and chronic isolation stress. However, their dopamine metabolism in the hypothalamus was increased following acute isolation on PND 9 as seen in isolated controls. Prenatal protein malnutrition also resulted in a significant elevation in serotonin in both brain areas, increased 5HIAA in the hypothalamus, and decreased dopamine in the hippocampus. Repeated isolation caused a reduction in 5HIAA in both brain parts, but only in control pups. These pre- and postnatal challenges may each cause a specific pattern of modifications in the CNS and, in combination, may be additive, particularly in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress response and the serotonergic functioning in both the hypothalamus and hippocampus, a finding with important clinical implications.

  9. Molecular basis of gap junctional communication in the CNS of the leech Hirudo medicinalis.

    PubMed

    Dykes, Iain M; Freeman, Fiona M; Bacon, Jonathan P; Davies, Jane A

    2004-01-28

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels that allow the passage of ions and small molecules between cells. In the nervous system, gap junctions mediate electrical coupling between neurons. Despite sharing a common topology and similar physiology, two unrelated gap junction protein families exist in the animal kingdom. Vertebrate gap junctions are formed by members of the connexin family, whereas invertebrate gap junctions are composed of innexin proteins. Here we report the cloning of two innexins from the leech Hirudo medicinalis. These innexins show a differential expression in the leech CNS: Hm-inx1 is expressed by every neuron in the CNS but not in glia, whereas Hm-inx2 is expressed in glia but not neurons. Heterologous expression in the paired Xenopus oocyte system demonstrated that both innexins are able to form functional homotypic gap junctions. Hm-inx1 forms channels that are not strongly gated. In contrast, Hm-inx2 forms channels that are highly voltage-dependent; these channels demonstrate properties resembling those of a double rectifier. In addition, Hm-inx1 and Hm-inx2 are able to cooperate to form heterotypic gap junctions in Xenopus oocytes. The behavior of these channels is primarily that predicted from the properties of the constituent hemichannels but also demonstrates evidence of an interaction between the two. This work represents the first demonstration of a functional gap junction protein from a Lophotrochozoan animal and supports the hypothesis that connexin-based communication is restricted to the deuterostome clade.

  10. Cell Therapy From Bench to Bedside Translation in CNS Neurorestoratology Era

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongyun; Chen, Lin; Sanberg, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in cell biology, neural injury and repair, and the progress towards development of neurorestorative interventions are the basis for increased optimism. Based on the complexity of the processes of demyelination and remyelination, degeneration and regeneration, damage and repair, functional loss and recovery, it would be expected that effective therapeutic approaches will require a combination of strategies encompassing neuroplasticity, immunomodulation, neuroprotection, neurorepair, neuroreplacement, and neuromodulation. Cell-based restorative treatment has become a new trend, and increasing data worldwide have strongly proven that it has a pivotal therapeutic value in CNS disease. Moreover, functional neurorestoration has been achieved to a certain extent in the CNS clinically. Up to now, the cells successfully used in preclinical experiments and/or clinical trial/treatment include fetal/embryonic brain and spinal cord tissue, stem cells (embryonic stem cells, neural stem/progenitor cells, hematopoietic stem cells, adipose-derived adult stem/precursor cells, skin-derived precursor, induced pluripotent stem cells), glial cells (Schwann cells, oligodendrocyte, olfactory ensheathing cells, astrocytes, microglia, tanycytes), neuronal cells (various phenotypic neurons and Purkinje cells), mesenchymal stromal cells originating from bone marrow, umbilical cord, and umbilical cord blood, epithelial cells derived from the layer of retina and amnion, menstrual blood-derived stem cells, Sertoli cells, and active macrophages, etc. Proof-of-concept indicates that we have now entered a new era in neurorestoratology. PMID:21359168

  11. Endogenous GLP1 and GLP1 analogue alter CNS responses to palatable food consumption.

    PubMed

    Ten Kulve, Jennifer S; Veltman, Dick J; van Bloemendaal, Liselotte; Groot, Paul F C; Ruhé, Henricus G; Barkhof, Frederik; Diamant, Michaela; Ijzerman, Richard G

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) affects appetite, supposedly mediated via the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we investigate whether modulation of CNS responses to palatable food consumption may be a mechanism by which GLP1 contributes to the central regulation of feeding. Using functional MRI, we determined the effects of endogenous GLP1 and treatment with the GLP1 analogue liraglutide on CNS activation to chocolate milk receipt. Study 1 included 20 healthy lean individuals and 20 obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Scans were performed on two occasions: during infusion of the GLP1 receptor antagonist exendin 9-39 (blocking actions of endogenous GLP1) and during placebo infusion. Study 2 was a randomised, cross-over intervention study carried out in 20 T2DM patients, comparing treatment with liraglutide to insulin, after 10 days and 12 weeks. Compared with lean individuals, T2DM patients showed reduced activation to chocolate milk in right insula (P = 0.04). In lean individuals, blockade of endogenous GLP1 effects inhibited activation in bilateral insula (P ≤ 0.03). Treatment in T2DM with liraglutide, vs insulin, increased activation to chocolate milk in right insula and caudate nucleus after 10 days (P ≤ 0.03); however, these effects ceased to be significant after 12 weeks. Our findings in healthy lean individuals indicate that endogenous GLP1 is involved in the central regulation of feeding by affecting central responsiveness to palatable food consumption. In obese T2DM, treatment with liraglutide may improve the observed deficit in responsiveness to palatable food, which may contribute to the induction of weight loss observed during treatment. However, no long-term effects of liraglutide were observed.

  12. RGS6 as a Novel Therapeutic Target in CNS Diseases and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, Katelin E; Chakravarti, Bandana; Fisher, Rory A

    2016-05-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins are gatekeepers regulating the cellular responses induced by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated activation of heterotrimeric G proteins. Specifically, RGS proteins determine the magnitude and duration of GPCR signaling by acting as a GTPase-activating protein for Gα subunits, an activity facilitated by their semiconserved RGS domain. The R7 subfamily of RGS proteins is distinguished by two unique domains, DEP/DHEX and GGL, which mediate membrane targeting and stability of these proteins. RGS6, a member of the R7 subfamily, has been shown to specifically modulate Gαi/o protein activity which is critically important in the central nervous system (CNS) for neuronal responses to a wide array of neurotransmitters. As such, RGS6 has been implicated in several CNS pathologies associated with altered neurotransmission, including the following: alcoholism, anxiety/depression, and Parkinson's disease. In addition, unlike other members of the R7 subfamily, RGS6 has been shown to regulate G protein-independent signaling mechanisms which appear to promote both apoptotic and growth-suppressive pathways that are important in its tumor suppressor function in breast and possibly other tissues. Further highlighting the importance of RGS6 as a target in cancer, RGS6 mediates the chemotherapeutic actions of doxorubicin and blocks reticular activating system (Ras)-induced cellular transformation by promoting degradation of DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) to prevent its silencing of pro-apoptotic and tumor suppressor genes. Together, these findings demonstrate the critical role of RGS6 in regulating both G protein-dependent CNS pathology and G protein-independent cancer pathology implicating RGS6 as a novel therapeutic target.

  13. Potential Role of Oxidative Stress in mediating the Effect of Hypergravity on the Developing CNS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Nguon, K.; Sulkowski, Z. L.; Lipinski, B.

    The present studies will explore the mechanisms through which altered gravity affects the developing CNS We have previously shown that exposure to hypergravity during the perinatal period adversely impacts cerebellar structure and function Pregnant rat dams were exposed to 1 65 G on a 24-ft centrifuge at NASA-ARC from gestational day G 5 through giving birth Both dams and their offspring remained at 1 65 G until pups reached postnatal day P 21 Control rats were raised under identical conditions in stationary cages On P21 motor behavior as determined by performance on a rotorod was more negatively impacted in hypergravity-exposed HG male 39 5 than in HG female pups 29 1 The total number of Purkinje cells determined stereologically in cerebella isolated from a subset of P21 rats was decreased in both HG males and HG female pups but the correlation between Purkinje cell number and rotorod performance was more consistent in male pups The level of 3-nitrosotyrosine 3-NT an index of oxidative damage to proteins was determined by ELISA in cerebellar tissue derived from a separate subset of P21 rats The level of 3-NT was increased by 127 in HG males but only 42 in HG females These results suggest that the effect of altered gravity on the developing brain may be mediated by oxidative stress These results also suggest that the developing male CNS may be more sensitive to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress than the developing female CNS Supported by NIEHS grant ES11946-01

  14. Effects of nitrogen and helium on CNS oxygen toxicity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Arieli, R; Ertracht, O; Oster, I; Vitenstein, A; Adir, Y

    2005-01-01

    The contribution of inert gases to the risk of central nervous system (CNS) oxygen toxicity is a matter of controversy. Therefore, diving regulations apply strict rules regarding permissible oxygen pressures (Po(2)). We studied the effects of nitrogen and helium (0, 15, 25, 40, 50, and 60%) and different levels of Po(2) (507, 557, 608, and 658 kPa) on the latency to the first electrical discharge (FED) in the EEG in rats, with repeated measurements in each animal. Latency as a function of the nitrogen pressure was not homogeneous for each rat. The prolongation of latency observed in some rats at certain nitrogen pressures, mostly in the range 100 to 500 kPa, was superimposed on the general trend for a reduction in latency as nitrogen pressure increased. This pattern was an individual trait. In contrast with nitrogen, no prolongation of latency to CNS oxygen toxicity was observed with helium, where an increase in helium pressure caused a reduction in latency. This bimodal response and the variation in the response between rats, together with a possible effect of ambient temperature on metabolic rate, may explain the conflicting findings reported in the literature. The difference between the two inert gases may be related to the difference in the narcotic effect of nitrogen. Proof through further research of a correlation between individual sensitivity to nitrogen narcosis and protection by N(2) against CNS oxygen toxicity in rat may lead to a personal O(2) limit in mixed-gas diving based on the diver sensitivity to N(2) narcosis.

  15. African oil plays

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The vast continent of Africa hosts over eight sedimentary basins, covering approximately half its total area. Of these basins, only 82% have entered a mature exploration phase, 9% have had little or no exploration at all. Since oil was first discovered in Africa during the mid-1950s, old play concepts continue to bear fruit, for example in Egypt and Nigeria, while new play concepts promise to become more important, such as in Algeria, Angola, Chad, Egypt, Gabon, and Sudan. The most exciting developments of recent years in African oil exploration are: (1) the Gamba/Dentale play, onshore Gabon; (2) the Pinda play, offshore Angola; (3) the Lucula/Toca play, offshore Cabinda; (4) the Metlaoui play, offshore Libya/Tunisia; (5) the mid-Cretaceous sand play, Chad/Sudan; and (6) the TAG-I/F6 play, onshore Algeria. Examples of these plays are illustrated along with some of the more traditional oil plays. Where are the future oil plays likely to develop No doubt, the Saharan basins of Algeria and Libya will feature strongly, also the presalt of Equatorial West Africa, the Central African Rift System and, more speculatively, offshore Ethiopia and Namibia, and onshore Madagascar, Mozambique, and Tanzania.

  16. Strain-dependent CNS dissemination in guinea pigs after Mycobacterium tuberculosis aerosol challenge.

    PubMed

    Be, Nicholas A; Klinkenberg, Lee G; Bishai, William R; Karakousis, Petros C; Jain, Sanjay K

    2011-09-01

    Clinical reports suggest an association of distinct Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains with CNS disease. We therefore examined CNS dissemination by different laboratory strains (two M. tuberculosis H37Rv, one CDC1551) in a guinea pig aerosol infection model. Although all strains grew exponentially in lungs, with similar bacterial burdens at the time of extrapulmonary dissemination, M. tuberculosis CDC1551 disseminated to the CNS significantly more than the H37Rv strains. No CNS lesions were observed throughout the study, with only a modest cytokine response. These data suggest that M. tuberculosis may have virulence factors that promote CNS dissemination, distinct from those required for pulmonary TB.

  17. Activity-Dependent Plasticity and Gene Expression Modifications in the Adult CNS

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Daniela; Foscarin, Simona; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2011-01-01

    Information processing, memory formation, or functional recovery after nervous system damage depend on the ability of neurons to modify their functional properties or their connections. At the cellular/molecular level, structural modifications of neural circuits are finely regulated by intrinsic neuronal properties and growth-regulatory cues in the extracellular milieu. Recently, it has become clear that stimuli coming from the external world, which comprise sensory inflow, motor activity, cognitive elaboration, or social interaction, not only provide the involved neurons with instructive information needed to shape connection patterns to sustain adaptive function, but also exert a powerful influence on intrinsic and extrinsic growth-related mechanisms, so to create permissive conditions for neuritic remodeling. Here, we present an overview of recent findings concerning the effects of experience on molecular mechanisms underlying CNS structural plasticity, both in physiological conditions and after damage, with particular focus on activity-dependent modulation of growth-regulatory genes and epigenetic modifications. PMID:22144945

  18. Activation of p44/42 MAPK plays a role in the TBT-induced loss of human natural killer (NK) cell function.

    PubMed

    Dudimah, Fred D; Griffey, Denisha; Wang, Xiaofei; Whalen, Margaret M

    2010-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells destroy (lyse) tumor cells, virally infected cells, and antibody-coated cells. Previous studies indicated that exposure to the environmental contaminant tributyltin (TBT) decreases the lytic function of NK cells and activates mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), including p44/42 (Aluoch and Whalen Toxicology 209:263-277, 2005). If activation of p44/42 is required for TBT-induced decreases of lytic function, then activation of p44/42 to similar extents by pharmacological agents such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) should mimic to some extent changes induced in NK cells with TBT exposures. NK cells were exposed to PMA concentrations between 0.25 and 10 nM for 10 min, 1 h, and 6 h before determining the lytic function ((51)Cr release assay) and phosphorylation state of MAPKs (Western blot). A 1-h exposure of NK cells to 5 nM PMA resulted in a loss of lytic function of 47%. Western blot analysis showed that a 1-h exposure to 5 nM PMA caused a sixfold increase in phospho-p44/42 levels. Previous studies showed a fivefold increase in phospho-p44/42 in response to a 1-h exposure to 300 nM TBT. Exposure to 300 nM TBT caused about a 40% decrease in lytic function. This study supports the hypothesis that p44/42 activation (as seen with TBT exposures) can cause a loss of NK-cell lytic function.

  19. Expression of ataxin-7 in CNS and non-CNS tissue of normal and SCA7 individuals.

    PubMed

    Jonasson, Jenni; Ström, Anna-Lena; Hart, Patricia; Brännström, Thomas; Forsgren, Lars; Holmberg, Monica

    2002-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is a neurodegenerative disorder primarily affecting the cerebellum, brain stem and retina. The disease is caused by an expanded polyglutamine tract in the protein ataxin-7. In this study we analyzed the expression pattern of ataxin-7 in CNS and non-CNS tissue from three SCA7 patients and age-matched controls. SCA7 is a rare autosomal dominant disorder, limiting the number of patients available for analysis. We therefore compiled data on ataxin-7 expression from all SCA7 patients (n=5) and controls (n=7) published to date, and compared with the results obtained in this study. Expression of ataxin-7 was found in neurons throughout the CNS and was highly abundant in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, in regions of the hippocampus and in cerebral cortex. Ataxin-7 expression was not restricted to regions of pathology, and there were no apparent regional differences in ataxin-7 expression patterns between patients and controls. The subcellular distribution of ataxin-7 was primarily nuclear in all brain regions studied. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, however, differences in subcellular distribution of ataxin-7 were observed between patients and controls of different ages. Here we provide an increased understanding of the distribution of ataxin-7, and the possible implication of subcellular localization of this protein on disease pathology is discussed.

  20. Participation bias in postal surveys among older adults: the role played by self-reported health, physical functional decline and frailty.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Philipe de Souto

    2012-01-01

    Postal survey is a simple and efficient way to collect information in large study samples. The purpose of this study was to find out differences between older adults who responded to a postal survey on health outcomes and those who did not, and to examine the importance of frailty, physical functional decline and poor self-reported health in determining non-response. We mailed out a questionnaire on general health twice at a year's interval to 1000 individuals ≥60 years, and members of the medical insurance scheme of the French national education system. At Year1, 535 persons responded to the questionnaire (65% women, 70.9 ± 8.4 years). A year later (Year2), we obtained 384 responses (63.3% women, 70.5 ± 7.8 years). Compared to respondents, non-respondents at Year2 were more frequently categorized as frail, reported more often to be in bad health, and had more physical functional declines. Frailty, physical functional decline and poor self-reported health increased the likelihood of not responding to Year2 questionnaire, with poor self-reported health weakening the association of physical functional decline and non-response. Respondents of this postal survey are fitter and healthier than non-respondents. This participation bias precludes the generalization of postal surveys results.

  1. Glycemic Control among U.S. Hispanics/Latinos with Diabetes from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study: Do Structural and Functional Social Support Play a Role?

    PubMed Central

    Fortmann, Addie L.; Roesch, Scott C.; Penedo, Frank J.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Corsino, Leonor; Schneiderman, Neil; Daviglus, Martha L.; Teng, Yanping; Giachello, Aida; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Gallo, Linda C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Social support is one potential source of health-related resiliency in Hispanics with diabetes. Purpose This study examined relationships of structural (i.e., social integration) and functional (i.e., perceived) social support with glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin; HbA1c) in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Hispanics (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Methods This study included 766 men and women representing multiple Hispanic ethnic backgrounds, aged 18-74 years, with diagnosed diabetes who completed fasting blood draw, medication review, and measures of sociodemographic factors, medical history, structural support (Cohen Social Network Index), and functional support (Interpersonal Support Evaluation List-12). Results After adjusting for sociodemographic covariates and medication, a one standard deviation increase in functional support was related to an 0.18 % higher HbA1c (p = 0.04). A similar trend was observed for structural support; however, this effect was non-significant in adjusted models. Conclusion Greater functional support was associated with poorer glycemic control in Hispanics. PMID:25107503

  2. Differences in beta-cell function and insulin secretion in Black vs. White obese adolescents: Do incretin hormones play a role?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black youth are at higher risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) than their White peers. Previously we demonstrated that for the same degree of insulin sensitivity, Black youth have an upregulated beta-cell function and insulin hypersecretion, in response to intravenous (IV) glucose, compared with Whites. T...

  3. FROM ACUTE ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURE TO RETURN TO PLAY – A CASE REPORT EVALUATING RECOVERY OF TENDON STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Zellers, Jennifer A.; Cortes, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Achilles tendon rupture results in significant functional deficits regardless of treatment strategy (surgical versus non-surgical intervention). Recovery post-rupture is highly variable, making comprehensive patient assessment critical. Assessment tools may change along the course of recovery as the patient progresses – for instance, moving from a seated heel-rise to standing heel-rise to jump testing. However, tools that serve as biomarkers for early recovery may be particularly useful in informing clinical decision-making. The purpose of this case report was to describe the progress of a young, athletic individual following Achilles tendon rupture managed non-surgically, using patient reported and functional performance outcome measures and comprehensively evaluating Achilles tendon structure and function incorporating a novel imaging technique (cSWE). Subject Description The subject is a 26 year-old, female basketball coach who sustained an Achilles tendon rupture and was managed non-surgically. Outcome The subject was able to steadily progress using a gradual tendon loading treatment approach well-supported by the literature. Multiple evaluative techniques including the addition of diagnostic ultrasound imaging and continuous shear wave elastography (cSWE) to standard clinical tests and measures were used to assess patient-reported symptoms, tendon structure, and tendon functional performance. Five assessments were performed over the course of 2-14 months post-rupture. By the 14-month follow-up, the subject had achieved full self-reported function. Tendon structural and mechanical properties showed similar shear modulus by 14 months, however, viscosity continued to be lower and tendon length longer on the ruptured side. Functional performance, evidenced by the heel-rise test and jump tests, also showed a positive trajectory, however, deficits of 12-28% remained between ruptured and non-ruptured sides at 14 months. Discussion This case report

  4. Direct control of peripheral lipid deposition by CNS GLP-1 receptor signaling is mediated by the sympathetic nervous system and blunted in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Nogueiras, Ruben; Pérez-Tilve, Diego; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Morgan, Donald A; Varela, Luis; Haynes, William G; Patterson, James T; Disse, Emmanuel; Pfluger, Paul T; López, Miguel; Woods, Stephen C; DiMarchi, Richard; Diéguez, Carlos; Rahmouni, Kamal; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2009-05-06

    We investigated a possible role of the central glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) receptor system as an essential brain circuit regulating adiposity through effects on nutrient partitioning and lipid metabolism independent from feeding behavior. Both lean and diet-induced obesity mice were used for our experiments. GLP-1 (7-36) amide was infused in the brain for 2 or 7 d. The expression of key enzymes involved in lipid metabolism was measured by real-time PCR or Western blot. To test the hypothesis that the sympathetic nervous system may be responsible for informing adipocytes about changes in CNS GLP-1 tone, we have performed direct recording of sympathetic nerve activity combined with experiments in genetically manipulated mice lacking beta-adrenergic receptors. Intracerebroventricular infusion of GLP-1 in mice directly and potently decreases lipid storage in white adipose tissue. These effects are independent from nutrient intake. Such CNS control of adipocyte metabolism was found to depend partially on a functional sympathetic nervous system. Furthermore, the effects of CNS GLP-1 on adipocyte metabolism were blunted in diet-induced obese mice. The CNS GLP-1 system decreases fat storage via direct modulation of adipocyte metabolism. This CNS GLP-1 control of adipocyte lipid metabolism appears to be mediated at least in part by the sympathetic nervous system and is independent of parallel changes in food intake and body weight. Importantly, the CNS GLP-1 system loses the capacity to modulate adipocyte metabolism in obese states, suggesting an obesity-induced adipocyte resistance to CNS GLP-1.

  5. Can Symbolic Play Prepare Children for Their Future?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak-Fabrytkowski, Krystyna

    1994-01-01

    Presents findings concerning the role of symbolic play. Assumes that symbolic play has seven functions in the child's development: cognitive, creative, ordering, stimulative, social, expressive, and substitutive. Considers play as a phenomenon that prepares children's abilities through symbolic play. (BAC)

  6. Obestatin plays an opposite role in the regulation of pituitary somatotrope and corticotrope function in female primates and male/female mice.

    PubMed

    Luque, Raúl M; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Gesmundo, Iacopo; Grande, Cristina; Gracia-Navarro, Francisco; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Ghigo, Ezio; Gahete, Manuel D; Granata, Riccarda; Kineman, Rhonda D; Castaño, Justo P

    2014-04-01

    Obestatin is a 23-amino-acid amidated peptide that is encoded by the ghrelin gene. Previous studies have shown obestatin can modulate the hypothalamic neuronal circuitry that regulates pituitary function, perhaps by modulating the actions of ghrelin. However, the direct actions of obestatin on pituitary function remain controversial. Here, primary pituitary cell cultures from a nonhuman primate (baboon) and mice were used to test the effects of obestatin on pituitary hormone expression and secretion. In pituitary cultures from both species, obestatin had no effect on prolactin, LH, FSH, or TSH expression/release. Conversely, obestatin stimulated proopiomelanocortin expression and ACTH release and inhibited GH expression/release in vitro, actions that were also observed in vivo in mice treated with obestatin. In vitro, obestatin inhibited the stimulatory actions of ghrelin on GH but not ACTH release. The inhibitory effect of obestatin on somatotrope function was associated with an overall reduction in pituitary transcription factor-1 and GHRH receptor mRNA levels in vitro and in vivo as well as a reduction in hypothalamic GHRH and ghrelin expression in vivo. The stimulatory effect of obestatin on ACTH was associated with an increase in pituitary CRF receptors. Obestatin also reduced the expression of pituitary somatostatin receptors (sst1/sst2), which could serve to modify its impact on hormone secretion. The in vitro actions of obestatin on both GH and ACTH release required the adenylyl cyclase and MAPK routes. Taken together, our results provide evidence that obestatin can act directly at the pituitary to control somatotrope and corticotrope function, and these effects are conserved across species.

  7. Expression patterns suggest that despite considerable functional redundancy, galectin-4 and -6 play distinct roles in normal and damaged mouse digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Houzelstein, Denis; Reyes-Gomez, Edouard; Maurer, Marie; Netter, Pierre; Higuet, Dominique

    2013-05-01

    The galectin-4 protein is mostly expressed in the digestive tract and is associated with lipid raft stabilization, protein apical trafficking, wound healing, and inflammation. While most mammalian species, including humans, have a single Lgals4 gene, some mice have two paralogues: Lgals4 and Lgals6. So far, their significant similarities have hindered the analysis of their respective expression and function. We took advantage of two antibodies that discriminate between the galectin-4 and galectin-6 proteins to document their patterns of expression in the normal and the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-damaged digestive tract in the mouse. In the normal digestive tract, their pattern of expression from tongue to colon is quite similar, which suggests functional redundancy. However, the presence of galectin-4, but not galectin-6, in the lamina propria of the DSS-damaged colon, its association with luminal colonic bacteria, and differences in subcellular localization of these proteins suggest that they also have distinct roles in the normal and the damaged mouse digestive tract. Our results provide a rare example of ancestral and derived functions evolving after tandem gene duplication.

  8. Expression Patterns Suggest that Despite Considerable Functional Redundancy, Galectin-4 and -6 Play Distinct Roles in Normal and Damaged Mouse Digestive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Gomez, Edouard; Maurer, Marie; Netter, Pierre; Higuet, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    The galectin-4 protein is mostly expressed in the digestive tract and is associated with lipid raft stabilization, protein apical trafficking, wound healing, and inflammation. While most mammalian species, including humans, have a single Lgals4 gene, some mice have two paralogues: Lgals4 and Lgals6. So far, their significant similarities have hindered the analysis of their respective expression and function. We took advantage of two antibodies that discriminate between the galectin-4 and galectin-6 proteins to document their patterns of expression in the normal and the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-damaged digestive tract in the mouse. In the normal digestive tract, their pattern of expression from tongue to colon is quite similar, which suggests functional redundancy. However, the presence of galectin-4, but not galectin-6, in the lamina propria of the DSS-damaged colon, its association with luminal colonic bacteria, and differences in subcellular localization of these proteins suggest that they also have distinct roles in the normal and the damaged mouse digestive tract. Our results provide a rare example of ancestral and derived functions evolving after tandem gene duplication. PMID:23360694

  9. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha regulation of the Id gene family in astrocytes and microglia during CNS inflammatory injury.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, S F; Kahn, M; Liva, S; De Vellis, J

    1999-04-01

    The inhibitors of DNA binding (Id) gene family is highly expressed during embryogenesis and throughout adulthood in the rat central nervous system (CNS). In vitro studies suggest that the Id gene family is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. Recently, Id gene expression was shown to be expressed in immature and mature astrocytes during development and upregulated in reactive astrocytes after spinal cord injury. These results suggest that the Id gene family may play an important role in regulating astrocyte development and reactivity; however, the factors regulating Id expression in astrocytes remain undefined. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), a proinflammatory cytokine, is thought to play a crucial role in astrocyte/microglia activation after injury to the CNS. To determine if TNF alpha plays a role in Id gene expression, we exogenously administered TNF alpha into developing postnatal rats. We report that TNF alpha injections resulted in a rapid and transient increase in both cell number and mRNA expression for Id2 and Id3 when compared to levels observed in noninjected or control-injected animals. Id1 mRNA levels were also upregulated after TNF alpha treatment, but to a lesser degree. Significant increases in TNF alpha-induced Id2 and Id3 mRNA were observed in the ventricular/subventricular zone, cingulum and corpus callosum. TNF alpha also increased Id2 mRNA expression in the caudate putamen and hippocampus at the injection site. Id2 and Id3 mRNA+ cells were identified as GFAP+ and S100 alpha + astrocytes as well as ED1+ microglia. This is the first report to show TNF-alpha-induced modulation of the Id gene family and suggests that Id may be involved in the formation of reactive astrocytes and activated microglia in the rodent brain. These results suggest a putative role for the Id family in the molecular mechanisms regulating cellular responsiveness to TNF alpha and CNS inflammation.

  10. Promoting axon regeneration in the adult CNS by modulation of the melanopsin/GPCR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songshan; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Li; Gao, Xin; Wang, Xuejie; Liu, Wen; Wang, Yuqi; Jiang, Songshan; Wong, Yung Hou; Zhang, Yifeng; Liu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Cell-type–specific G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling regulates distinct neuronal responses to various stimuli and is essential for axon guidance and targeting during development. However, its function in axonal regeneration in the mature CNS remains elusive. We found that subtypes of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) in mice maintained high mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) levels after axotomy and that the light-sensitive GPCR melanopsin mediated this sustained expression. Melanopsin overexpression in the RGCs stimulated axonal regeneration after optic nerve crush by up-regulating mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1). The extent of the regeneration was comparable to that observed after phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) knockdown. Both the axon regeneration and mTOR activity that were enhanced by melanopsin required light stimulation and Gq/11 signaling. Specifically, activating Gq in RGCs elevated mTOR activation and promoted axonal regeneration. Melanopsin overexpression in RGCs enhanced the amplitude and duration of their light response, and silencing them with Kir2.1 significantly suppressed the increased mTOR signaling and axon regeneration that were induced by melanopsin. Thus, our results provide a strategy to promote axon regeneration after CNS injury by modulating neuronal activity through GPCR signaling. PMID:26831088

  11. Control of CNS Neuronal Excitability by Estrogens via Membrane Initiated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Martin J.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that many of the actions of 17β-estradiol (E2) in the central nervous system (CNS) are mediated via intracellular receptor/transcription factors that interact with steroid response elements on target genes. However, there is compelling evidence for membrane-associated steroid receptors for E2 in hypothalamic and other brain neurons. Indeed, we are just beginning to understand how E2 signals via membrane receptors, and how these signals impact not only membrane excitability but also gene transcription in neurons. We know that E2 can rapidly alter neuronal activity within seconds, indicating that some cellular effects can occur via membrane delimited events. In addition, E2 can affect second messenger systems including calcium mobilization and a plethora of kinases to alter cell signaling. This review will concentrate on rapid membrane-initiated and intracellular signaling by E2 in the hypothalamus and hippocampus, the nature of receptors involved and how they contribute to CNS functions. PMID:19549588

  12. A patterned recombinant human IgM guides neurite outgrowth of CNS neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohua; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Jordan, Luke R.; Kumar, Shailabh; Watzlawik, Jens O.; Warrington, Arthur E.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Rodriguez, Moses

    2013-07-01

    Matrix molecules convey biochemical and physical guiding signals to neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) and shape the trajectory of neuronal fibers that constitute neural networks. We have developed recombinant human IgMs that bind to epitopes on neural cells, with the aim of treating neurological diseases. Here we test the hypothesis that recombinant human IgMs (rHIgM) can guide neurite outgrowth of CNS neurons. Microcontact printing was employed to pattern rHIgM12 and rHIgM22, antibodies that were bioengineered to have variable regions capable of binding to neurons or oligodendrocytes, respectively. rHIgM12 promoted neuronal attachment and guided outgrowth of neurites from hippocampal neurons. Processes from spinal neurons followed grid patterns of rHIgM12 and formed a physical network. Comparison between rHIgM12 and rHIgM22 suggested the biochemistry that facilitates anchoring the neuronal surfaces is a prerequisite for the function of IgM, and spatial properties cooperate in guiding the assembly of neuronal networks.

  13. Are there stable excited triplet states of NCS-/CNS- and NCO-/CNO-?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khiri, D.; Gritli, H.; Peterson, K. A.; Chambaud, G.

    2015-07-01

    Highly correlated ab initio wave functions within the UCCSD(T)-F12 approach have been used to map portions of the potential energy surfaces and to study the stability of the first excited triplet states of the NCS-/CNS- and NCO-/CNO- anions. These a3Π states for linear geometries, or their 3A‧ and 3A″ bent components, correlate with the lowest dissociation asymptote of NCX- (X = S and O) along the NC-X coordinates. The X1Σ+ linear ground states of these anions are known to be stable with respect to dissociation to the X2Π ground state of the corresponding neutral molecule with a rather large electron affinity. The a3Π state of the NCS- anion is positioned below the X state of the neutral at long NC-S distances and its minimum of energy is found for bent geometries. The stability of its two components in bent geometries has been investigated, and it is found that some anionic forms are stable with respect to the X state of the neutral. The linear CNS- and CNO- isomers present a minimum only at long CN-X distances, located below the minimum of their corresponding neutral CNX ground states.

  14. Cell death and proliferation in acute slices and organotypic cultures of mammalian CNS.

    PubMed

    Lossi, Laura; Alasia, Silvia; Salio, Chiara; Merighi, Adalberto

    2009-08-01

    Analysis of the interplay between cell proliferation and death has been greatly advantaged by the development of CNS slice preparations. In slices, interactions between neurons and neurons and the glial cells are fundamentally preserved in a fashion close to the in vivo situation. In parallel, these preparations offer the possibility of an easy experimental manipulation. Two main types of slices are currently in use: the acute slices, which are short living preparations where the major functions of the intact brain (including neurogenesis) are maintained, and the organotypic cultures, where the maturation and plasticity of neuronal circuitries in relation to naturally occurring neuronal death and/or experimental insults can be followed over several weeks in vitro. We will discuss here the main advantages/disadvantages linked to the use of CNS slices for histological analysis of neuronal proliferation and death, as well as the main findings obtained in the most popular types of preparations, i.e. the cortical, hippocampal, cerebellar and retinal slices.

  15. Extending Injury- and Disease-Resistant CNS Phenotypes by Repetitive Epigenetic Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Gidday, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Significant reductions in the extent of acute injury in the CNS can be achieved by exposure to different preconditioning stimuli, but the duration of the induced protective phenotype is typically short-lasting, and thus is deemed as limiting its clinical applicability. Extending the period over which such adaptive epigenetic changes persist – in effect, expanding conditioning’s “therapeutic window” – would significantly broaden the potential applications of such a treatment approach in patients. The frequency of the conditioning stimulus may hold the key. While transient (1–3 days) protection against CNS ischemic injury is well established preclinically following a single preconditioning stimulus, repetitively presenting preconditioning stimuli extends the duration of ischemic tolerance by many weeks. Moreover, repetitive intermittent postconditioning enhances post-ischemic recovery metrics and improves long-term survival. Intermittent conditioning is also efficacious for preventing or delaying injury in preclinical models of chronic neurodegenerative disease, and for promoting long-lasting functional improvements in a number of other pathologies as well. Although the detailed mechanisms underlying these protracted kinds of neuroplasticity remain largely unstudied, accumulating empirical evidence supports the contention that all of these adaptive phenotypes are epigenetically mediated. Going forward, additional preclinical demonstrations of the ability to induce sustained beneficial phenotypes that reduce the burden of acute and chronic neurodegeneration, and experimental interrogations of the regulatory constructs responsible for these epigenetic responses, will accelerate the identification of not only efficacious but also practical, adaptive epigenetics-based treatments for individuals with neurological disease. PMID:25784897

  16. Synaptogenesis in the CNS: An Odyssey from Wiring Together to Firing Together

    PubMed Central

    Munno, David W; Syed, Naweed I

    2003-01-01

    To acquire a better comprehension of nervous system function, it is imperative to understand how synapses are assembled during development and subsequently altered throughout life. Despite recent advances in the fields of neurodevelopment and synaptic plasticity, relatively little is known about the mechanisms that guide synapse formation in the central nervous system (CNS). Although many structural components of the synaptic machinery are pre-assembled prior to the arrival of growth cones at the site of their potential targets, innumerable changes, central to the proper wiring of the brain, must subsequently take place through contact-mediated cell-cell communications. Identification of such signalling molecules and a characterization of various events underlying synaptogenesis are pivotal to our understanding of how a brain cell completes its odyssey from ‘wiring together to firing together’. Here we attempt to provide a comprehensive overview that pertains directly to the cellular and molecular mechanisms of selection, formation and refinement of synapses during the development of the CNS in both vertebrates and invertebrates. PMID:12897180

  17. The role of glutamate and the immune system in organophosphate-induced CNS damage.

    PubMed

    Eisenkraft, Arik; Falk, Avshalom; Finkelstein, Arseny

    2013-08-01

    Organophosphate (OP) poisoning is associated with long-lasting neurological damage, which is attributed mainly to the excessive levels of glutamate caused by the intoxication. Glutamate toxicity, however, is not specific to OP poisoning, and is linked to propagation of damage in both acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions in the central nervous system (CNS). In addition to acute excitotoxic effects of glutamate, there is now a growing amount of evidence of its intricate immunomodulatory effects in the brain, involving both the innate and the adaptive immune systems. Moreover, it was demonstrated that immunomodulatory treatments, aimed at regulating the interaction between the resident immune cells of the brain (microglia) and the peripheral immune system, can support buffering of excessive levels of glutamate and restoration of the homeostasis. In this review, we will discuss the role of glutamate as an excitotoxic agent in the acute phase of OP poisoning, and the possible functions it may have as both a neuroprotectant and an immunomodulator in the sub-acute and chronic phases of OP poisoning. In addition, we will describe the novel immune-based neuroprotective strategies aimed at counteracting the long-term neurodegenerative effects of glutamate in the CNS.

  18. PET/SPECT molecular imaging in clinical neuroscience: recent advances in the investigation of CNS diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Feng-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an attractive technology widely used in clinical practice that greatly enhances our understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment in central nervous system (CNS) diseases. It is a novel multidisciplinary technique that can be defined as real-time visualization, in vivo characterization and qualification of biological processes at the molecular and cellular level. It involves the imaging modalities and the corresponding imaging agents. Nowadays, molecular imaging in neuroscience has provided tremendous insights into disturbed human brain function. Among all of the molecular imaging modalities, positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have occupied a particular position that visualize and measure the physiological processes using high-affinity and high-specificity molecular radioactive tracers as imaging probes in intact living brain. In this review, we will put emphasis on the PET/SPECT applications in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) as major CNS disorders. We will first give an overview of the main classical molecular neuroimaging modalities. Then, the major clinical applications of PET and SPECT along with molecular probes in the fields of psychiatry and neurology will be discussed. PMID:26029646

  19. Neuronal-glial networks as substrate for CNS integration

    PubMed Central

    Verkhratsky, A; Toescu, E C

    2006-01-01

    Astrocytes have been considered, for a long time, as the support and house-keeping cells of the nervous system. Indeed, the astrocytes play very important metabolic roles in the brain, but the catalogue of nervous system functions or activities that involve directly glial participation has extended dramatically in the last decade. In addition to the further refining of the signalling capacity of the neuroglial networks and the detailed reassessment of the interactions between glia and vascular bed in the brain, one of the important salient features of the increased glioscience activity in the last few years was the morphological and functional demonstration that protoplasmic astrocytes occupy well defined spatial territories, with only limited areas of morphological overlapping, but still able to communicate with adjacent neighbours through intercellular junctions. All these features form the basis for a possible reassessment of the nature of integration of activity in the central nervous system that could raise glia to a role of central integrator.

  20. Retinal Degeneration Slow (RDS) Glycosylation Plays a Role in Cone Function and in the Regulation of RDS·ROM-1 Protein Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Stuck, Michael W; Conley, Shannon M; Naash, Muna I

    2015-11-13

    The photoreceptor-specific glycoprotein retinal degeneration slow (RDS, also called PRPH2) is necessary for the formation of rod and cone outer segments. Mutations in RDS cause rod and cone-dominant retinal disease, and it is well established that both cell types have different requirements for RDS. However, the molecular mechanisms for this difference remain unclear. Although RDS glycosylation is highly conserved, previous studies have revealed no apparent function for the glycan in rods. In light of the highly conserved nature of RDS glycosylation, we hypothesized that it is important for RDS function in cones and could underlie part of the differential requirement for RDS in the two photoreceptor subtypes. We generated a knockin mouse expressing RDS without the N-glycosylation site (N229S). Normal levels of RDS and the unglycosylated RDS binding partner rod outer segment membrane protein 1 (ROM-1) were found in N229S retinas. However, cone electroretinogram responses were decreased by 40% at 6 months of age. Because cones make up only 3-5% of photoreceptors in the wild-type background, N229S mice were crossed into the nrl(-/-) background (in which all rods are converted to cone-like cells) for biochemical analysis. In N229S/nrl(-/-) retinas, RDS and ROM-1 levels were decreased by ~60% each. These data suggest that glycosylation of RDS is required for RDS function or stability in cones, a difference that may be due to extracellular versus intradiscal localization of the RDS glycan in cones versus rods.

  1. Return to Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Call it physical activity, call it games, or call it play. Whatever its name, it's a place we all need to return to. In the physical education, recreation, and dance professions, we need to redesign programs to address the need for and want of play that is inherent in all of us.

  2. The Fear of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almon, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Real play--play that is initiated and directed by children and that bubbles up from within the child rather than being imposed by adults--has largely disappeared from the landscape of childhood in the United States. There are many reasons for this, such as the long hours spent in front of screens each day or in activities organized by adults. In…

  3. Clinical Intuition at Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2014-01-01

    A clinical psychologist and consulting psychotherapist discusses how elements of play, inherent in the intuition required in analysis, can provide a cornerstone for serious therapeutic work. She argues that many aspects of play--its key roles in human development, individual growth, and personal creativity, among others--can help therapists and…

  4. Play, Policy & Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klugman, Edgar, Ed.

    In 1992, the U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF), in conjunction with Wheelock College (Boston), sponsored its second workshop on children's play, entitled "Play and Cognitive Ability: The Cultural Context." This volume reflects the presentations and discussions held at the workshop, offering perspectives on children's play…

  5. An Invitation to Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Jenny; Zieher, Connie

    The manual is intended to provide suggestions for play to parents of young children with exceptional educational needs. Nineteen types of activities are described and pictured, including make believe with boxes, dress-up activities, kitchen play, bubbles, small motor activities using beans and buttons, use of throw-away materials, painting,…

  6. Role Playing and Skits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letwin, Robert, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    Explores non-scripted role playing, dialogue role playing, sociodrama, and skits as variations of simulation techniques. Provides step-by-step guidelines for conducting such sessions. Successful Meetings, Bill Communications, Inc., 1422 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19102. Subscription Rates: yearly (US, Canada, Mexico) $14.00; elsewhere,…

  7. Growing Up with Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katch, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Many adults are afraid of boys' play today, believing that the aggression that is so common in boys' fantasies is dangerous and might make them become violent men. This personal reflection describes the importance of multiage play in showing little boys how to become big boys while encouraging empathy and emotional growth in older boys. The author…

  8. Theories of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peller, Lili E.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses several theories of play advanced before the development of psychoanalysis, including the theories of surplus energy, recreation, and practice. Examines the psychoanalytical view advanced by Freud and others, which focuses on the emotional release of play and its role in discovery and learning. (MDM)

  9. Play and Digital Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, James E.; Christie, James F.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines how play is affected by computers and digital toys. Research indicates that when computer software targeted at children is problem-solving oriented and open-ended, children tend to engage in creative play and interact with peers in a positive manner. On the other hand, drill-and-practice programs can be quite boring and limit…

  10. Let's Just Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Janet

    2003-01-01

    Children have a right to play. The idea is so simple it seems self-evident. But a stroll through any toy superstore, or any half-hour of so-called "children's" programming on commercial TV, makes it clear that violence, not play, dominates what's being sold. In this article, the author discusses how teachers and parents share the responsibility in…

  11. Play, Toys and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brougere, Gilles

    In Western societies, television has transformed the life, culture, and points of reference of the child. Its particular sphere of influence is the child's play culture. This play culture is not hermetic: it is very oriented toward manipulation; has a symbolic role as a representational medium; evolves along with the child; has a certain amount of…

  12. Brain-specific carnitine palmitoyl-transferase-1c: role in CNS fatty acid metabolism, food intake, and body weight.

    PubMed

    Wolfgang, Michael J; Cha, Seung Hun; Millington, David S; Cline, Gary; Shulman, Gerald I; Suwa, Akira; Asaumi, Makoto; Kurama, Takeshi; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Lane, M Daniel

    2008-05-01

    While the brain does not utilize fatty acids as a primary energy source, recent evidence shows that intermediates of fatty acid metabolism serve as hypothalamic sensors of energy status. Increased hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, an intermediate in fatty acid synthesis, is indicative of energy surplus and leads to the suppression of food intake and increased energy expenditure. Malonyl-CoA functions as an inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1 (CPT1), a mitochondrial outer membrane enzyme that initiates translocation of fatty acids into mitochondria for oxidation. The mammalian brain expresses a unique homologous CPT1, CPT1c, that binds malonyl-CoA tightly but does not support fatty acid oxidation in vivo, in hypothalamic explants or in heterologous cell culture systems. CPT1c knockout (KO) mice under fasted or refed conditions do not exhibit an altered CNS transcriptome of genes known to be involved in fatty acid metabolism. CPT1c KO mice exhibit normal levels of metabolites and of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA and fatty acyl-CoA levels either in the fasted or refed states. However, CPT1c KO mice exhibit decreased food intake and lower body weight than wild-type littermates. In contrast, CPT1c KO mice gain excessive body weight and body fat when fed a high-fat diet while maintaining lower or equivalent food intake. Heterozygous mice display an intermediate phenotype. These findings provide further evidence that CPT1c plays a role in maintaining energy homeostasis, but not through altered fatty acid oxidation.

  13. Upregulation of PDZK1 by Calculus Bovis Sativus May Play an Important Role in Restoring Biliary Transport Function in Intrahepatic Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Dong; Feng, Cheng-Yang; Li, Xi-Ping; Xu, Yan-Jiao; He, Wen-Xi; Lei, Kai; Cai, Hong-Jiao

    2017-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis is a main cause of hepatic accumulation of bile acids leading to liver injury, fibrosis, and liver failure. Our previous studies proved that Calculus Bovis Sativus (CBS) can restore biliary transport function through upregulating the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) in 17α-ethynylestradiol- (EE-) induced intrahepatic cholestasis rats. The regulation mechanism of CBS on these transporters, however, remains unclear. This study was designed to evaluate the possible relationship between the effect of CBS on transport activities and the regulation of CBS on the expression of PDZK1, a mainly scaffold protein which can regulate MRP2 and BCRP. Intrahepatic cholestasis model was induced in rats with injection of EE for five consecutive days and then the biliary excretion rates and cumulative biliary excretions were measured. The mRNA and protein expression levels of PDZK1 were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blot, and immunohistochemical analysis. When treated with CBS, cumulative biliary excretions and mRNA and protein expressions of PDZK1 were significantly increased in intrahepatic cholestasis rats. This study demonstrated that CBS exerted a beneficial effect on EE-induced intrahepatic cholestasis rats by restoring biliary transport function, which may result from the upregulation of PDZK1 expression. PMID:28133487

  14. Inducible targeting of CNS astrocytes in Aldh1l1-CreERT2 BAC transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Winchenbach, Jan; Düking, Tim; Berghoff, Stefan A.; Stumpf, Sina K.; Hülsmann, Swen; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Saher, Gesine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studying astrocytes in higher brain functions has been hampered by the lack of genetic tools for the efficient expression of inducible Cre recombinase throughout the CNS, including the neocortex. Methods: Therefore, we generated BAC transgenic mice, in which CreERT2 is expressed under control of the Aldh1l1 regulatory region. Results: When crossbred to Cre reporter mice, adult Aldh1l1-CreERT2 mice show efficient gene targeting in astrocytes. No such Cre-mediated recombination was detectable in CNS neurons, oligodendrocytes, and microglia. As expected, Aldh1l1-CreERT2 expression was evident in several peripheral organs, including liver and kidney. Conclusions: Taken together, Aldh1l1-CreERT2 mice are a useful tool for studying astrocytes in neurovascular coupling, brain metabolism, synaptic plasticity and other aspects of neuron-glia interactions. PMID:28149504

  15. Differential roles of NF-Y transcription factor in ER chaperone expression and neuronal maintenance in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Tomoyuki; Tosaki, Asako; Miyazaki, Haruko; Kurosawa, Masaru; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Maity, Sankar N.; Misawa, Hidemi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Shimogori, Tomomi; Hattori, Nobutaka; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) contains various types of neurons with different neuronal functions. In contrast to established roles of cell type-specific transcription factors on neuronal specification and maintenance, whether ubiquitous transcription factors have conserved or differential neuronal function remains uncertain. Here, we revealed that inactivation of a ubiquitous factor NF-Y in different sets of neurons resulted in cell type-specific neuropathologies and gene downregulation in mouse CNS. In striatal and cerebellar neurons, NF-Y inactivation led to ubiquitin/p62 pathologies with downregulation of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone Grp94, as we previously observed by NF-Y deletion in cortical neurons. In contrast, NF-Y inactivation in motor neurons induced neuronal loss without obvious protein deposition. Detailed analysis clarified downregulation of another ER chaperone Grp78 in addition to Grp94 in motor neurons, and knockdown of both ER chaperones in motor neurons recapitulated the pathology observed after NF-Y inactivation. Finally, additional downregulation of Grp78 in striatal neurons suppressed ubiquitin accumulation induced by NF-Y inactivation, implying that selective ER chaperone downregulation mediates different neuropathologies. Our data suggest distinct roles of NF-Y in protein homeostasis and neuronal maintenance in the CNS by differential regulation of ER chaperone expression. PMID:27687130

  16. A new type of microglia gene targeting shows TAK1 to be pivotal in CNS autoimmune inflammation.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Tobias; Wieghofer, Peter; Müller, Philippe F; Wolf, Yochai; Varol, Diana; Yona, Simon; Brendecke, Stefanie M; Kierdorf, Katrin; Staszewski, Ori; Datta, Moumita; Luedde, Tom; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Jung, Steffen; Prinz, Marco

    2013-11-01

    Microglia are brain macrophages and, as such, key immune-competent cells that can respond to environmental changes. Understanding the mechanisms of microglia-specific responses during pathologies is hence vital for reducing disease burden. The definition of microglial functions has so far been hampered by the lack of genetic in vivo approaches that allow discrimination of microglia from closely related peripheral macrophage populations in the body. Here we introduce a mouse experimental system that specifically targets microglia to examine the role of a mitogen-associated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), during autoimmune inflammation. Conditional depletion of TAK1 in microglia only, not in neuroectodermal cells, suppressed disease, significantly reduced CNS inflammation and diminished axonal and myelin damage by cell-autonomous inhibition of the NF-κB, JNK and ERK1/2 pathways. Thus, we found TAK1 to be pivotal in CNS autoimmunity, and we present a tool for future investigations of microglial function in the CNS.

  17. Kynurenines in CNS disease: regulation by inflammatory cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Brian M.; Charych, Erik; Lee, Anna W.; Möller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway (KP) metabolizes the essential amino acid tryptophan and generates a number of neuroactive metabolites collectively called the kynurenines. Segregated into at least two distinct branches, often termed the “neurotoxic” and “neuroprotective” arms of the KP, they are regulated by the two enzymes kynurenine 3-monooxygenase and kynurenine aminotransferase, respectively. Interestingly, several enzymes in the pathway are under tight control of inflammatory mediators. Recent years have seen a tremendous increase in our understanding of neuroinflammation in CNS disease. This review will focus on the regulation of the KP by inflammatory mediators as it pertains to neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. PMID:24567701

  18. Proton therapy for the treatment of children with CNS malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sreeraman, Radhika; Indelicato, Daniel J

    2014-03-01

    Proton therapy is a novel technique for treating pediatric malignancies. As a tool to reduce normal-tissue dose, it has the potential to decrease late toxicity. Although proton therapy has been used for over five decades, most pediatric dosimetry studies and clinical series have been published over the last 10 years. The purpose of this article is to review the physical, radiobiological and economic rationales for proton therapy in pediatric CNS malignancies, and provide an overview of the current challenges and future direction of research and utilization of this approach.

  19. Discovery and SAR of a novel series of potent, CNS penetrant M4 PAMs based on a non-enolizable ketone core: Challenges in disposition.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michael R; Noetzel, Meredith J; Tarr, James C; Rodriguez, Alice L; Lamsal, Atin; Chang, Sichen; Foster, Jarrett J; Smith, Emery; Chase, Peter; Hodder, Peter S; Engers, Darren W; Niswender, Colleen M; Brandon, Nicholas J; Wood, Michael W; Duggan, Mark E; Conn, P Jeffrey; Bridges, Thomas M; Lindsley, Craig W

    2016-09-01

    This Letter describes the chemical optimization of a novel series of M4 PAMs based on a non-enolizable ketone core, identified from an MLPCN functional high-throughput screen. The HTS hit was potent, selective and CNS penetrant; however, the compound was highly cleared in vitro and in vivo. SAR provided analogs for which M4 PAM potency and CNS exposure were maintained; yet, clearance remained high. Metabolite identification studies demonstrated that this series was subject to rapid, and near quantitative, reductive metabolism to the corresponding secondary alcohol metabolite that was devoid of M4 PAM activity.

  20. Xenopus U3 snoRNA GAC-Box A′ and Box A Sequences Play Distinct Functional Roles in rRNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Borovjagin, Anton V.; Gerbi, Susan A.

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in the 5′ portion of Xenopus U3 snoRNA were tested for function in oocytes. The results revealed a new cleavage site (A0) in the 3′ region of vertebrate external transcribed spacer sequences. In addition, U3 mutagenesis uncoupled cleavage at sites 1 and 2, flanking the 5′ and 3′ ends of 18S rRNA, and generated novel intermediates: 19S and 18.5S pre-rRNAs. Furthermore, specific nucleotides in Xenopus U3 snoRNA that are required for cleavages in pre-rRNA were identified: box A is essential for site A0 cleavage, the GAC-box A′ region is necessary for site 1 cleavage, and the 3′ end of box A′ and flanking nucleotides are required for site 2 cleavage. Differences between metazoan and yeast U3 snoRNA-mediated rRNA processing are enumerated. The data support a model where metazoan U3 snoRNA acts as a bridge to draw together the 5′ and 3′ ends of the 18S rRNA coding region within pre-rRNA to coordinate their cleavage. PMID:11509664

  1. pH might play a role in regulating the function of paired amphipathic helices domains of human Sin3B by altering structure and thermodynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Tauheed; Ali, Mashook; Saluja, Daman; Singh, Laishram Rajendrakumar

    2015-04-01

    Human Sin3B (hSin3B), a transcription regulator, is a scaffold protein that binds to different transcription factors and regulates transcription. It consists of six conserved domains that include four paired amphipathic helices (PAH 1-4), histone deacetylase interaction domain (HID), and highly conserved region (HCR). Interestingly, the PAH domains of hSin3B are significantly homologous to each other, yet each one interacts with a specific set of unique transcription factors. Though various partners interacting with hSin3B PAH domains have been characterized, there is no structural information available on the individual PAH domains of hSin3B. Here we characterize the structure and stability of different PAH domains of hSin3B at both nuclear and physiological pH values by using different optical probes. We found that the native state structure and stability of different PAH domains are different at nuclear pH where hSin3B performs its biological function. We also found that PAH2 and PAH3 behave differently at both nuclear and physiological pH in terms of native state structure and thermodynamic stability, while the structural identity of PAH1 remains unaltered at both pH values. The study indicates that the structural heterogeneity of different PAH domains might be responsible for having a unique set of interacting transcription factors.

  2. The Scottish Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheat, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Recounts an episode when, as young schoolboys, Prince Charles and classmates presented "Macbeth" as an end-of-term-play. Traces the events at school that took on different meanings when viewed from maturity. (NH)

  3. RecD Plays an Essential Function During Growth at Low Temperature in the Antarctic Bacterium Pseudomonas syringae Lz4W

    PubMed Central

    Regha, K.; Satapathy, Ajit K.; Ray, Malay K.

    2005-01-01

    The Antarctic psychrotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae Lz4W has been used as a model system to identify genes that are required for growth at low temperature. Transposon mutagenesis was carried out to isolate mutant(s) of the bacterium that are defective for growth at 4° but normal at 22°. In one such cold-sensitive mutant (CS1), the transposon-disrupted gene was identified to be a homolog of the recD gene of several bacteria. Trans-complementation and freshly targeted gene disruption studies reconfirmed that the inactivation of the recD gene leads to a cold-sensitive phenotype. We cloned, sequenced, and analyzed ∼11.2 kbp of DNA from recD and its flanking region from the bacterium. recD was the last gene of a putative recCBD operon. The RecD ORF was 694 amino acids long and 40% identical (52% similar) to the Escherichia coli protein, and it could complement the E. coli recD mutation. The recD gene of E. coli, however, could not complement the cold-sensitive phenotype of the CS1 mutant. Interestingly, the CS1 strain showed greater sensitivity toward the DNA-damaging agents, mitomycin C and UV. The inactivation of recD in P. syringae also led to cell death and accumulation of DNA fragments of ∼25–30 kbp in size at low temperature (4°). We propose that during growth at a very low temperature the Antarctic P. syringae is subjected to DNA damage, which requires direct participation of a unique RecD function. Additional results suggest that a truncated recD encoding the N-terminal segment of (1–576) amino acids is sufficient to support growth of P. syringae at low temperature. PMID:15956672

  4. Cooperative Interactions between Different Classes of Disordered Proteins Play a Functional Role in the Nuclear Pore Complex of Baker’s Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ando, David; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2017-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is highly selective, efficient, and is regulated by a poorly understood mechanism involving hundreds of disordered FG nucleoporin proteins (FG nups) lining the inside wall of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Previous research has concluded that FG nups in Baker’s yeast (S. cerevisiae) are present in a bimodal distribution, with the “Forest Model” classifying FG nups as either di-block polymer like “trees” or single-block polymer like “shrubs”. Using a combination of coarse-grained modeling and polymer brush modeling, the function of the di-block FG nups has previously been hypothesized in the Di-block Copolymer Brush Gate (DCBG) model to form a higher-order polymer brush architecture which can open and close to regulate transport across the NPC. In this manuscript we work to extend the original DCBG model by first performing coarse grained simulations of the single-block FG nups which confirm that they have a single block polymer structure rather than the di-block structure of tree nups. Our molecular simulations also demonstrate that these single-block FG nups are likely cohesive, compact, collapsed coil polymers, implying that these FG nups are generally localized to their grafting location within the NPC. We find that adding a layer of single-block FG nups to the DCBG model increases the range of cargo sizes which are able to translocate the pore through a cooperative effect involving single-block and di-block FG nups. This effect can explain the puzzling connection between single-block FG nup deletion mutants in S. cerevisiae and the resulting failure of certain large cargo transport through the NPC. Facilitation of large cargo transport via single-block and di-block FG nup cooperativity in the nuclear pore could provide a model mechanism for designing future biomimetic pores of greater applicability. PMID:28068389

  5. GPCR drug discovery: novel ligands for CNS receptors.

    PubMed

    Lim, William K

    2007-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest class of cell surface receptors in humans. They convey extracellular signals into the cell interior by activating intracellular processes such as heterotrimeric G protein-dependent signaling pathways. They are widely distributed in the nervous system, and mediate key physiological processes including cognition, mood, appetite, pain and synaptic transmission. With at least 30% of marketed drugs being GPCR modulators, they are a major therapeutic target in the pharmaceutical industry's drug discovery programs. This review will survey recently patented ligands for GPCRs implicated in CNS disorders, in particular the metabotropic glutamate, adenosine and cannabinoid receptors. Metabotropic glutamate receptors regulate signaling by glutamate, the major excitatory brain neurotransmitter, while adenosine is a ubiquitous neuromodulater mediating diverse physiological effects. Recent patents for ligands of these receptors include mGluR5 antagonists and adenosine A(1) receptor agonists. Cannabinoid receptors remain one of the most important GPCR drug discovery target due to the intense interest in CB(1) receptor antagonists for treating obesity and metabolic syndrome. Such small molecule ligands are the outcome of the continuing focus of many pharmaceutical companies to identify novel GPCR agonist, antagonist or allosteric modulators useful for CNS disorders, for which more effective drugs are eagerly awaited.

  6. Phytocannabinoids as novel therapeutic agents in CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Hill, Andrew J; Williams, Claire M; Whalley, Benjamin J; Stephens, Gary J

    2012-01-01

    The Cannabis sativa herb contains over 100 phytocannabinoid (pCB) compounds and has been used for thousands of years for both recreational and medicinal purposes. In the past two decades, characterisation of the body's endogenous cannabinoid (CB) (endocannabinoid, eCB) system (ECS) has highlighted activation of central CB(1) receptors by the major pCB, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) as the primary mediator of the psychoactive, hyperphagic and some of the potentially therapeutic properties of ingested cannabis. Whilst Δ(9)-THC is the most prevalent and widely studied pCB, it is also the predominant psychotropic component of cannabis, a property that likely limits its widespread therapeutic use as an isolated agent. In this regard, research focus has recently widened to include other pCBs including cannabidiol (CBD), cannabigerol (CBG), Δ(9)tetrahydrocannabivarin (Δ(9)-THCV) and cannabidivarin (CBDV), some of which show potential as therapeutic agents in preclinical models of CNS disease. Moreover, it is becoming evident that these non-Δ(9)-THC pCBs act at a wide range of pharmacological targets, not solely limited to CB receptors. Disorders that could be targeted include epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, affective disorders and the central modulation of feeding behaviour. Here, we review pCB effects in preclinical models of CNS disease and, where available, clinical trial data that support therapeutic effects. Such developments may soon yield the first non-Δ(9)-THC pCB-based medicines.

  7. Plant Derived Phytocompound, Embelin in CNS Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kundap, Uday P; Bhuvanendran, Saatheeyavaane; Kumari, Yatinesh; Othman, Iekhsan; Shaikh, Mohd Farooq

    2017-01-01

    A Central nervous system (CNS) disease is the one which affects either the spinal cord or brain and causing neurological or psychiatric complications. During the nineteenth century, modern medicines have occupied the therapy for many ailments and are widely used these days. Herbal medicines have often maintained popularity for historical and cultural reasons and also considered safer as they originate from natural sources. Embelin is a plant-based benzoquinone which is the major active constituent of the fruits of Embelia ribes Burm. It is an Indo-Malaysian species, extensively used in various traditional medicine systems for treating various diseases. Several natural products including quinone derivatives, which are considered to possess better safety and efficacy profile, are known for their CNS related activity. The bright orange hydroxybenzoquinone embelin-rich fruits of E. ribes have become popular in ethnomedicine. The present systematic review summarizes the effects of embelin on central nervous system and related diseases. A PRISMA model for systematic review was utilized for search. Various electronic databases such as Pubmed, Springer, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar were searched between January 2000 and February 2016. Based on the search criteria for the literature, 13 qualified articles were selected and discussed in this review. The results of the report showed that there is a lack of translational research and not a single study was found in human. This report gives embelin a further way to be explored in clinical trials for its safety and efficacy.

  8. Drug Delivery Systems, CNS Protection, and the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ravi Kant

    2014-01-01

    Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB) for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods. PMID:25136634

  9. Plant Derived Phytocompound, Embelin in CNS Disorders: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kundap, Uday P.; Bhuvanendran, Saatheeyavaane; Kumari, Yatinesh; Othman, Iekhsan; Shaikh, Mohd. Farooq

    2017-01-01

    A Central nervous system (CNS) disease is the one which affects either the spinal cord or brain and causing neurological or psychiatric complications. During the nineteenth century, modern medicines have occupied the therapy for many ailments and are widely used these days. Herbal medicines have often maintained popularity for historical and cultural reasons and also considered safer as they originate from natural sources. Embelin is a plant-based benzoquinone which is the major active constituent of the fruits of Embelia ribes Burm. It is an Indo-Malaysian species, extensively used in various traditional medicine systems for treating various diseases. Several natural products including quinone derivatives, which are considered to possess better safety and efficacy profile, are known for their CNS related activity. The bright orange hydroxybenzoquinone embelin-rich fruits of E. ribes have become popular in ethnomedicine. The present systematic review summarizes the effects of embelin on central nervous system and related diseases. A PRISMA model for systematic review was utilized for search. Various electronic databases such as Pubmed, Springer, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar were searched between January 2000 and February 2016. Based on the search criteria for the literature, 13 qualified articles were selected and discussed in this review. The results of the report showed that there is a lack of translational research and not a single study was found in human. This report gives embelin a further way to be explored in clinical trials for its safety and efficacy. PMID:28289385

  10. A Subpopulation of Neuronal M4 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Plays a Critical Role in Modulating Dopamine-Dependent Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jongrye; Dencker, Ditte; Wortwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P. D.; Cui, Yinghong; Davis, Albert A.; Levey, Allan I.; Schütz, Günther; Sager, Thomas; Mørk, Arne; Li, Cuiling; Deng, Chu-Xia; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Wess, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M1–M5 mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M4 mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M4 mAChRs are coexpressed with D1 dopamine receptors in a specific subset of striatal projection neurons. To investigate the physiological relevance of this M4 mAChR subpopulation in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors, we used Cre/loxP technology to generate mutant mice that lack M4 mAChRs only in D1 dopamine receptor-expressing cells. The newly generated mutant mice displayed several striking behavioral phenotypes including enhanced hyperlocomotor activity and increased behavioral sensitization following treatment with psychostimulants. These behavioral changes wereaccompanied by a lack of muscarinic inhibition of D1 dopamine receptor-mediated camp stimulation in the striatum and an increase in dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens. These novel findings demonstrate that a distinct subpopulation of neuronal M4 mAChRs plays a critical role in modulating several important dopamine-dependent behaviors. Since enhanced central dopaminergic neurotransmission is a hallmark of several severe disorders of the CNS, including schizophrenia and drug addiction, our findings have substantial clinical relevance. PMID:20147565

  11. Clinical features, outcomes, and cerebrospinal fluid findings in adult patients with central nervous system (CNS) infections caused by varicella-zoster virus: comparison with enterovirus CNS infections.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyo-Lim; Lee, Eun Mi; Sung, Heungsup; Kang, Joong Koo; Lee, Sang-Ahm; Choi, Sang-Ho

    2014-12-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is known to be associated with central nervous system (CNS) infections in adults. However, the clinical characteristics of VZV CNS infections are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical manifestations, outcomes, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings in patients with VZV CNS infections with those in patients with enterovirus (EV) CNS infections. This retrospective cohort study was performed at a 2,700-bed tertiary care hospital. Using a clinical microbiology computerized database, all adults with CSF PCR results positive for VZV or EV that were treated between January 1999 and February 2013 were identified. Thirty-eight patients with VZV CNS infection and 68 patients with EV CNS infection were included in the study. Compared with the EV group, the median age in the VZV group was higher (VZV, 35 years vs. EV, 31 years; P = 0.02), and showed a bimodal age distribution with peaks in the third and seventh decade. Encephalitis was more commonly encountered in the VZV group (VZV, 23.7% vs. EV, 4.4%; P = 0.01). The median lymphocyte percentage in the CSF (VZV, 81% vs. EV, 36%; P < 0.001) and the CSF protein level (VZV, 100 mg/dl vs. EV, 46 mg/dl; P < 0.001) were higher in the VZV group. Compared with patients with EV CNS infection, patients with VZV CNS infection developed encephalitis more often and exhibited more intense inflammatory reaction. Nevertheless, both VZV and EV CNS infections were associated with excellent long-term prognosis.

  12. RT-PCR-based analysis of microRNA (miR-1 and -124) expression in mouse CNS.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Takuya; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Takizawa, Takami; Takizawa, Toshihiro

    2007-02-02

    More than 700 microRNAs (miRNAs) have been cloned, and the functions of these molecules in developmental timing, cell proliferation, and cancer have been investigated widely. MiRNAs are analyzed with Northern blot and sequential colony evaluation; however, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based miRNA assay remains to be developed. In this report, we describe improved real-time RT-PCR methods using specific or non-specific RT primer for the semi-quantitative analysis of miRNA expression. The use of the new methods in a model study revealed differential expression of miRNA-1 (miR-1) and miR-124 in mouse organs. Specifically, our methods revealed that miR-124 concentrations in the mouse central nervous system (CNS; cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and spinal cord) were more than 100 times those in other organs. By contrast, miR-1 expression in the CNS was 100-1000 times lower than that in skeletal muscle and heart. Furthermore, we revealed anatomically regional differences in miR-124 expression within the CNS: expression ratios versus the cerebral cortex were 60.7% for the cerebellum and 35.4% for the spinal cord. These results suggest that our RT-PCR-based methods would be a powerful tool for studies of miRNA expression that is associated with various neural events.

  13. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Weismann, Cara M.; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M.; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A.; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal−/−) at 1 × 1011 or 3 × 1011 vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36–76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75–86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 1011 vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 1011 vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316–576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250–264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan. PMID:25964428

  14. Selective CB2 receptor activation ameliorates EAE by reducing Th17 differentiation and immune cell accumulation in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Weimin; Li, Hongbo; Tuma, Ronald F.; Ganea, Doina

    2013-01-01

    CB2, the cannabinoid receptor expressed primarily on hematopoietic cells and activated microglia, mediates the immunoregulatory functions of cannabinoids. The involvement of CB2 in EAE has been demonstrated by using both endogenous and exogenous ligands. We showed previously that CB2 selective agonists inhibit leukocyte rolling and adhesion to CNS microvasculature and ameliorate clinical symptom in both chronic and remitting-relapsing EAE models. Here we showed that Gp1a, a highly selective CB2 agonist, with a four log higher affinity for CB2 than CB1, reduced clinical scores and facilitated recovery in EAE in conjunction with long term reduction in demyelination and axonal loss. We also established that Gp1a affected EAE through at least two different mechanisms, i.e. an early effect on Th1/Th17 differentiation in peripheral immune organs, and a later effect on the accumulation of pathogenic immune cells in the CNS, associated with reductions in the expression of CNS and T cell chemokine receptors, chemokines and adhesion molecules. This is the first report on the in vivo CB2-mediated Gp1a inhibition of Th17/Th1 differentiation. We also confirmed the Gp1a-induced inhibition of Th17/Th1 differentiation in vitro, both in non-polarizing and polarizing conditions. The CB2-induced inhibition of Th17 differentiation is highly relevant in view of recent studies emphasizing the importance of pathogenic self-reactive Th17 cells in EAE/MS. In addition, the combined effect on Th17 differentiation and immune cell accumulation into the CNS, emphasize the relevance of CB2 selective ligands as potential therapeutic agents in neuroinflammation. PMID:24342422

  15. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan.

    PubMed

    Weismann, Cara M; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-08-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal(-/-)) at 1 × 10(11) or 3 × 10(11) vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36-76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75-86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 10(11) vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 10(11) vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316-576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250-264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan.

  16. B7-H1 shapes T-cell–mediated brain endothelial cell dysfunction and regional encephalitogenicity in spontaneous CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, Luisa; Kuzmanov, Ivan; Hucke, Stephanie; Gross, Catharina C.; Posevitz, Vilmos; Dreykluft, Angela; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Janoschka, Claudia; Lindner, Maren; Herold, Martin; Schwab, Nicholas; Ludwig-Portugall, Isis; Kurts, Christian; Meuth, Sven G.; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Wiendl, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms that determine lesion localization or phenotype variation in multiple sclerosis are mostly unidentified. Although transmigration of activated encephalitogenic T cells across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a crucial step in the disease pathogenesis of CNS autoimmunity, the consequences on brain endothelial barrier integrity upon interaction with such T cells and subsequent lesion formation and distribution are largely unknown. We made use of a transgenic spontaneous mouse model of CNS autoimmunity characterized by inflammatory demyelinating lesions confined to optic nerves and spinal cord (OSE mice). Genetic ablation of a single immune-regulatory molecule in this model [i.e., B7-homolog 1 (B7-H1, PD-L1)] not only significantly increased incidence of spontaneous CNS autoimmunity and aggravated disease course, especially in the later stages of disease, but also importantly resulted in encephalitogenic T-cell infiltration and lesion formation in normally unaffected brain regions, such as the cerebrum and cerebellum. Interestingly, B7-H1 ablation on myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific CD4+ T cells, but not on antigen-presenting cells, amplified T-cell effector functions, such as IFN-γ and granzyme B production. Therefore, these T cells were rendered more capable of eliciting cell contact-dependent brain endothelial cell dysfunction and increased barrier permeability in an in vitro model of the BBB. Our findings suggest that a single immune-regulatory molecule on T cells can be ultimately responsible for localized BBB breakdown, and thus substantial changes in lesion topography in the context of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:27671636

  17. Gene expression profiles uncover individual identities of gnathal neuroblasts and serial homologies in the embryonic CNS of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Urbach, Rolf; Jussen, David; Technau, Gerhard M.

    2016-01-01

    The numbers and types of progeny cells generated by neural stem cells in the developing CNS are adapted to its region-specific functional requirements. In Drosophila, segmental units of the CNS develop from well-defined patterns of neuroblasts. Here we constructed comprehensive neuroblast maps for the three gnathal head segments. Based on the spatiotemporal pattern of neuroblast formation and the expression profiles of 46 marker genes (41 transcription factors), each neuroblast can be uniquely identified. Compared with the thoracic ground state, neuroblast numbers are progressively reduced in labial, maxillary and mandibular segments due to smaller sizes of neuroectodermal anlagen and, partially, to suppression of neuroblast formation and induction of programmed cell death by the Hox gene Deformed. Neuroblast patterns are further influenced by segmental modifications in dorsoventral and proneural gene expression. With the previously published neuroblast maps and those presented here for the gnathal region, all neuroectodermal neuroblasts building the CNS of the fly (ventral nerve cord and brain, except optic lobes) are now individually identified (in total 2×567 neuroblasts). This allows, for the first time, a comparison of the characteristics of segmental populations of stem cells and to screen for serially homologous neuroblasts throughout the CNS. We show that approximately half of the deutocerebral and all of the tritocerebral (posterior brain) and gnathal neuroblasts, but none of the protocerebral (anterior brain) neuroblasts, display serial homology to neuroblasts in thoracic/abdominal neuromeres. Modifications in the molecular signature of serially homologous neuroblasts are likely to determine the segment-specific characteristics of their lineages. PMID:27095493

  18. Determining Immune System Suppression versus CNS Protection for Pharmacological Interventions in Autoimmune Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Evonuk, Kirsten S; Moseley, Carson E; Doyle, Ryan E; Weaver, Casey T; DeSilva, Tara M

    2016-09-12

    A major hallmark of the autoimmune demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS) is immune cell infiltration into the brain and spinal cord resulting in myelin destruction, which not only slows conduction of nerve impulses, but causes axonal injury resulting in motor and cognitive decline. Current treatments for MS focus on attenuating immune cell infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS). These treatments decrease the number of relapses, improving quality of life, but do not completely eliminate relapses so long-term disability is not improved. Therefore, therapeutic agents that protect the CNS are warranted. In both animal models as well as human patients with MS, T cell entry into the CNS is generally considered the initiating inflammatory event. In order to assess if a drug protects the CNS, any potential effects on immune cell infiltration or proliferation in the periphery must be ruled out. This protocol describes how to determine whether CNS protection observed after drug intervention is a consequence of attenuating CNS-infiltrating immune cells or blocking death of CNS cells during inflammatory insults. The ability to examine MS treatments that are protective to the CNS during inflammatory insults is highly critical for the advancement of therapeutic strategies since current treatments reduce, but do not completely eliminate, relapses (i.e., immune cell infiltration), leaving the CNS vulnerable to degeneration.

  19. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) in the tumors of central nervous system (CNS).

    PubMed

    Lukaszewicz-Zając, Marta; Mroczko, Barbara; Kornhuber, Johannes; Lewczuk, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    Malignant neoplasms of the central nervous system (CNS) account for about 1.3 % of all tumors and 2.2 % of all cancer-related deaths. CNS tumors consist of heterogeneous group of neoplasms, including different variants of primary brain tumors and metastatic neoplasms. Advanced imaging techniques improved the neuroradiological diagnostic accuracy, although these methods are not specific enough for differentiation of CNS tumors, thus new approaches of patients' diagnosis are critically needed. The best solution for the diagnosis of patients with CNS tumors could be easily available biomarkers, which could be useful for the management of CNS neoplasms. Biomarkers should facilitate the diagnosis, monitor of treatment response and assess the prognosis of patients' survival. Currently, except for rare germ cell tumors, there is a lack of knowledge on biochemical markers for CNS neoplasms. Therefore, in this paper we summarized and referred a number of comprehensive reviews concerning the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors in tumor progression, including CNS neoplasms as well as described the general biochemistry of MMPs and their tissue inhibitors. Moreover, we presented the wide variety of previous findings, where authors suggested the significance of selected MMPs and their tissue inhibitors as potential biomarkers of human tumors, including CNS tumors. However, future investigations are needed to be performed before some of these enzymes could finally be used as biomarkers of specific types of CNS neoplasms.

  20. Determining Immune System Suppression versus CNS Protection for Pharmacological Interventions in Autoimmune Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Ryan E.; Weaver, Casey T.; DeSilva, Tara M.

    2016-01-01

    A major hallmark of the autoimmune demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS) is immune cell infiltration into the brain and spinal cord resulting in myelin destruction, which not only slows conduction of nerve impulses, but causes axonal injury resulting in motor and cognitive decline. Current treatments for MS focus on attenuating immune cell infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS). These treatments decrease the number of relapses, improving quality of life, but do not completely eliminate relapses so long-term disability is not improved. Therefore, therapeutic agents that protect the CNS are warranted. In both animal models as well as human patients with MS, T cell entry into the CNS is generally considered the initiating inflammatory event. In order to assess if a drug protects the CNS, any potential effects on immune cell infiltration or proliferation in the periphery must be ruled out. This protocol describes how to determine whether CNS protection observed after drug intervention is a consequence of attenuating CNS-infiltrating immune cells or blocking death of CNS cells during inflammatory insults. The ability to examine MS treatments that are protective to the CNS during inflammatory insults is highly critical for the advancement of therapeutic strategies since current treatments reduce, but do not completely eliminate, relapses (i.e., immune cell infiltration), leaving the CNS vulnerable to degeneration. PMID:27685467

  1. Imaging Dynamic Molecular Signaling by the Cdc42 GTPase within the Developing CNS

    PubMed Central

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Deng, Tzyy-Chyn; Boulina, Maria; Chiba, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Protein interactions underlie the complexity of neuronal function. Potential interactions between specific proteins in the brain are predicted from assays based on genetic interaction and/or biochemistry. Genetic interaction reveals endogenous, but not necessarily direct, interactions between the proteins. Biochemistry-based assays, on the other hand, demonstrate direct interactions between proteins, but often outside their native environment or without a subcellular context. We aimed to achieve the best of both approaches by visualizing protein interaction directly within the brain of a live animal. Here, we show a proof-of-principle experiment in which the Cdc42 GTPase associates with its alleged partner WASp within neurons during the time and space that coincide with the newly developing CNS. PMID:24586421

  2. BMP signaling specifies the development of a large and fast CNS synapse.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Le; Michalski, Nicolas; Kronander, Elin; Gjoni, Enida; Genoud, Christel; Knott, Graham; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2013-07-01

    Large excitatory synapses with multiple active zones ensure reliable and fast information transfer at specific points in neuronal circuits. However, the mechanisms that determine synapse size in CNS circuits are largely unknown. Here we use the calyx of Held synapse, a major relay in the auditory system, to identify and study signaling pathways that specify large nerve terminal size and fast synaptic transmission. Using genome-wide screening, we identified bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) as candidate signaling molecules in the area of calyx synapses. Conditional deletion of BMP receptors in the auditory system of mice led to aberrations of synapse morphology and function specifically at the calyx of Held, with impaired nerve terminal growth, loss of monoinnervation and less mature transmitter release properties. Thus, BMP signaling specifies large and fast-transmitting synapses in the auditory system in a process that shares homologies with, but also extends beyond, retrograde BMP signaling at Drosophila neuromuscular synapses.

  3. Discovery and optimization of a novel series of highly CNS penetrant M4 PAMs based on a 5,6-dimethyl-4-(piperidin-1-yl)thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine core.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michael R; Noetzel, Meredith J; Engers, Julie L; Bollinger, Katrina A; Melancon, Bruce J; Tarr, James C; Han, Changho; West, Mary; Gregro, Alison R; Lamsal, Atin; Chang, Sichen; Ajmera, Sonia; Smith, Emery; Chase, Peter; Hodder, Peter S; Bubser, Michael; Jones, Carrie K; Hopkins, Corey R; Emmitte, Kyle A; Niswender, Colleen M; Wood, Michael W; Duggan, Mark E; Conn, P Jeffrey; Bridges, Thomas M; Lindsley, Craig W

    2016-07-01

    This Letter describes the chemical optimization of a novel series of M4 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) based on a 5,6-dimethyl-4-(piperidin-1-yl)thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine core, identified from an MLPCN functional high-throughput screen. The HTS hit was potent and selective, but not CNS penetrant. Potency was maintained, while CNS penetration was improved (rat brain:plasma Kp=0.74), within the original core after several rounds of optimization; however, the thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine core was subject to extensive oxidative metabolism. Ultimately, we identified a 6-fluoroquinazoline core replacement that afforded good M4 PAM potency, muscarinic receptor subtype selectivity and CNS penetration (rat brain:plasma Kp>10). Moreover, this campaign provided fundamentally distinct M4 PAM chemotypes, greatly expanding the available structural diversity for this exciting CNS target.

  4. Safety and regulatory requirements and challenge for CNS drug development.

    PubMed

    Gad, Shayne C

    2014-01-01

    As our recognition and understanding of diseases and disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) become more insightful, and society's concerns for the safety, efficacy, and use of such drugs become more acute, the regulatory requirements and expectations around assessing potential safety of the drug have continued to become more complex. Currently, these concerns and requirements are addressed in a time phased manner, attempting to match the advance of spending rate on assessing safety issues in alignment with advancing the moiety through development of the therapeutics. This article seeks to communicate all the critical but frequently overlooked aspects of current and pending regulatory requirements including the lesser known parts associated with impurities, active metabolites, and distribution of active components to (and subsequent clearance from) the population brain. While there are some exciting developments in treating CNS diseases with stem cells and some protein based therapies (Aboody et al., 2011), drugs meant to favorably effect, prevent, or cure a disease process within the central nervous system (CNS) are primarily small molecule and must meet a number of regulatory and scientifically mandated criteria to establish that their safety in clinical use is acceptable. This is initially done in in vivo animals or in in vitro preparations. The starting place for such nonclinical safety assessment requires some fundamental assumptions about the potential therapeutic (Ball et al., 2007; Gad, 2009; ICH S6, 2004; ICH M3 (R2), 2008). The first assumption is that the primary intended route of therapeutic administration is oral, as is indeed the case for the vast majority of both current and for most potential new drugs. Most aspects of nonclinical safety assessment do not depend on route, and we will consider the situations where the use of other routes influences requirements for nonclinical safety assessment, and why. A second general case assumption in the

  5. NLRP3 inflammasome induces chemotactic immune cell migration to the CNS in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Makoto; Williams, Kristi L.; Gunn, Michael D.; Shinohara, Mari L.

    2012-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is a multiprotein complex consisting of three kinds of proteins, NLRP3, ASC, and pro-caspase-1, and plays a role in sensing pathogens and danger signals in the innate immune system. The NLRP3 inflammasome is thought to be involved in the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the mechanism by which the NLRP3 inflammasome induces EAE is not clear. In this study, we found that the NLRP3 inflammasome played a critical role in inducing T-helper cell migration into the CNS. To gain migratory ability, CD4+ T cells need to be primed by NLRP3 inflammasome-sufficient antigen-presenting cells to up-regulate chemotaxis-related proteins, such as osteopontin, CCR2, and CXCR6. In the presence of the NLRP3 inflammasome, dendritic cells and macrophages also induce chemotactic ability and up-regulate chemotaxis-related proteins, such as α4β1 integrin, CCL7, CCL8, and CXCL16. On the other hand, reduced Th17 cell population size in immunized Nlrp3−/− and Asc−/− mice is not a determinative factor for their resistance to EAE. As currently applied in clinical interventions of MS, targeting immune cell migration molecules may be an effective approach in treating MS accompanied by NLRP3 inflammasome activation. PMID:22699511

  6. Progesterone neuroprotection in traumatic CNS injury and motoneuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Alejandro F; Labombarda, Florencia; Gonzalez Deniselle, Maria Claudia; Gonzalez, Susana L; Garay, Laura; Meyer, Maria; Gargiulo, Gisella; Guennoun, Rachida; Schumacher, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Studies on the neuroprotective and promyelinating effects of progesterone in the nervous system are of great interest due to their potential clinical connotations. In peripheral neuropathies, progesterone and reduced derivatives promote remyelination, axonal regeneration and the recovery of function. In traumatic brain injury (TBI), progesterone has the ability to reduce edema and inflammatory cytokines, prevent neuronal loss and improve functional outcomes. Clinical trials have shown that short-and long-term progesterone treatment induces a significant improvement in the level of disability among patients with brain injury. In experimental spinal cord injury (SCI), molecular markers of functional motoneurons become impaired, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA, Na,K-ATPase mRNA, microtubule-associated protein 2 and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). SCI also produces motoneuron chromatolysis. Progesterone treatment restores the expression of these molecules while chromatolysis subsided. SCI also causes oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination. In this case, a short progesterone treatment enhances proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitors into mature myelin-producing cells, whereas prolonged treatment increases a transcription factor (Olig1) needed to repair injury-induced demyelination. Progesterone neuroprotection has also been shown in motoneuron neurodegeneration. In Wobbler mice spinal cord, progesterone reverses the impaired expression of BDNF, ChAT and Na,K-ATPase, prevents vacuolar motoneuron degeneration and the development of mitochondrial abnormalities, while functionally increases muscle strength and the survival of Wobbler mice. Multiple mechanisms contribute to these progesterone effects, and the role played by classical nuclear receptors, extra nuclear receptors, membrane receptors, and the reduced metabolites of progesterone in neuroprotection and myelin formation remain an exciting field worth of exploration.

  7. Looking into Children's Play Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabry, Mark; Fucigna, Carolee

    2009-01-01

    Play, particularly children's sociodramatic play, is the cornerstone of early childhood classrooms in the United States. Early childhood educators learn and expound mantras of "the value of play," "play-based programs," "children learning through play," and "play as child's work." They strive to promote the importance of making a place for play in…

  8. Occupational risks for meningiomas of the CNS in Sweden.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, J K; Thomas, T L; Stone, B J; Blot, W J; Malker, H S; Wiener, J A; Ericsson, J L; Malker, B K

    1987-01-01

    Using the Cancer-Environment Registry of Sweden, which links cancer incidence (1961 to 1979) with census information (1960) for all employed individuals in Sweden, a systematic, population-based assessment was made of the occurrence of meningiomas of the CNS according to industrial and occupational classifications. Statistically significant standardized incidence ratios (SIR) between 5 and 6 for meningioma were observed among glass, porcelain, or ceramic workers of both sexes. SIRs of similar magnitude were also found for men employed in the headwear fabrication and book publishing industries. Significantly elevated two- to three-fold risks were observed for men employed in health care, railroad and trolley construction, sheet and plate metal fabrication, and as moving equipment operators. Some of the findings of this descriptive survey may have arisen as a result of multiple comparisons, but several are consistent with earlier observations for brain cancer from other countries and deserve further study.

  9. Autoimmune control of lesion growth in CNS with minimal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathankumar, R.; Mohan, T. R. Krishna

    2013-07-01

    Lesions in central nervous system (CNS) and their growth leads to debilitating diseases like Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's etc. We developed a model earlier [1, 2] which shows how the lesion growth can be arrested through a beneficial auto-immune mechanism. We compared some of the dynamical patterns in the model with different facets of MS. The success of the approach depends on a set of control parameters and their phase space was shown to have a smooth manifold separating the uncontrolled lesion growth region from the controlled. Here we show that an optimal set of parameter values exist in the model which minimizes system damage while, at once, achieving control of lesion growth.

  10. The Coordinated Noninvasive Studies (CNS) Project. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    Mitg qEUO EEG sat*dJ6 EEG syfls al EEG lores adj EEO Was sdj ABR III ampCs ABR I empCs ABRIII a mp ABR III amp JLM (38yr female; personal R, family R...nslt qu.O US& qmO ERG iId 11 110 s eb dj AflRflhauapCs ADR m ampCs ABIIIamp AIR R m= J.L. Lauter [CNS Project/AFOSR 88-0352] FINAL REPORT p. 55 HR (22yr...qUO n/ftes qtdO BEG0329 odi EEG s)13 SOi 11G 0i adpS EE 11ws ad ABR III ampCS ABR III emp~s AIR III amp AIR IIIm S3 (45yr female; personal L, family L

  11. Gene therapy for CNS diseases – Krabbe disease

    PubMed Central

    Rafi, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary This is a brief report of the 19th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy that took place from May 4th through May 7th, 2016 in Washington, DC, USA. While the meeting provided many symposiums, lectures, and scientific sessions this report mainly focuses on one of the sessions on the "Gene Therapy for central nervous system (CNS) Diseases" and specifically on the "Gene Therapy for the globoid cell leukodystrophy or Krabbe disease. Two presentations focused on this subject utilizing two animal models of this disease: mice and dog models. Different serotypes of adeno-associate viral vectors (AAV) alone or in combination with bone marrow transplantations were used in these research projects. The Meeting of the ASGCT reflected continuous growth in the fields of gene and cell therapy and brighter forecast for efficient treatment options for variety of human diseases. PMID:27525222

  12. Structural remodeling of astrocytes in the injured CNS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Daniel; Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2012-12-01

    Astrocytes respond to all forms of CNS insult and disease by becoming reactive, a nonspecific but highly characteristic response that involves various morphological and molecular changes. Probably the most recognized aspect of reactive astrocytes is the formation of a glial scar that impedes axon regeneration. Although the reactive phenotype was first suggested more than 100 years ago based on morphological changes, the remodeling process is not well understood. We know little about the actual structure of a reactive astrocyte, how an astrocyte remodels during the progression of an insult, and how populations of these cells reorganize to form the glial scar. New methods of labeling astrocytes, along with transgenic mice, allow the complete morphology of reactive astrocytes to be visualized. Recent studies show that reactivity can induce a remarkable change in the shape of a single astrocyte, that not all astrocytes react in the same way, and that there is plasticity in the reactive response.

  13. Resveratrol Neuroprotection in Stroke and Traumatic CNS injury

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Mary; Dempsey, Robert J; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a stilbene formed in many plants in response to various stressors, elicits multiple beneficial effects in vertebrates. Particularly, resveratrol was shown to have therapeutic properties in cancer, atherosclerosis and neurodegeneration. Resveratrol-induced benefits are modulated by multiple synergistic pathways that control oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death. Despite the lack of a definitive mechanism, both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that resveratrol can induce a neuroprotective state when administered acutely or prior to experimental injury to the CNS. In this review, we discuss the neuroprotective potential of resveratrol in stroke, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, with a focus on the molecular pathways responsible for this protection. PMID:26277384

  14. Disability, body image and sports/physical activity in adult survivors of childhood CNS tumors: population-based outcomes from a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Boman, Krister K; Hörnquist, Lina; De Graaff, Lisanne; Rickardsson, Jenny; Lannering, Birgitta; Gustafsson, Göran

    2013-03-01

    Childhood CNS tumor survivors risk health and functional impairments that threaten normal psychological development and self-perception. This study investigated the extent to which health and functional ability predict adult survivors' body image (BI) and self-confidence regarding sports and physical activity. The study cohort covered 708 eligible ≥ 18 year old CNS tumor survivors, and data from 528 (75 %) were analyzed. Disability was estimated using the Health Utilities Index™ Mark2/3, a multidimensional self-report instrument. Physical self-confidence in terms of BI and sports/physical activity-related self-confidence (SPAS) were assessed using the BI and the Sports/Athletics modules of a standardized self-report assessment scale. In adjusted regression models, global health and functional status (GHFS) predicted BI (B = 0.94, 95 % CI 0.69-1.19) and SPAS (B = 0.79, 95 % CI 0.55-1.04). Emotion and pain, and to a lesser degree cognition, speech and vision disability, were associated with poorer BI and SPAS. Gender, sub-diagnosis, and time since diagnosis influenced the relationship between health status and physical self-confidence outcomes. Females had poorer GHFS, BI and SPAS than males. Decreased health and functional ability following childhood CNS cancer intrudes on physical self-confidence, with females being at heightened risk for both disability and negative self-confidence. Identified disability and gender-related risk calls for a follow-up plan that integrates treatment of psychological sequelae in lifetime monitoring of childhood CNS tumor survivors to restore and protect self-image and self-confidence, essential mental health correlates. An expanded plan should recognize the need for such services, optimizing life-long quality of survival for CNS tumor survivors.

  15. Creative Outdoor Play Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peggy L.

    Considering the creation of proper play areas for children (school sites, municipal and mini parks, private homes and backyards, shopping centers, apartment complexes, recreational areas, roadside parks, nursery schools, churches, summer camps, and drive-in theaters) as one of today's major challenges, the author recommends that professional…

  16. Playing with Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieyra, Rebecca; Edwards, Teon; Rowe, Elizabeth; Asbell-Clarke, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    Gaming is becoming an effective form of learning and assessment and shouldn't be overlooked in an increasingly technological world. The games described in this article ("Impulse," "Quantum Spectre," and "Ravenous"), entertaining enough to be played by the general public, are also appropriate and useful in a classroom…

  17. "Playing" with Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Dave

    2012-01-01

    When faced with a multitude of tasks, any opportunity to "kill two birds with one stone" is welcome. Drama has always excited the author: as a child performing in plays, later as a student and now as a teacher directing performances and improvising within lessons. The author was lucky enough to have inspirational teachers during his…

  18. Integrated Play Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glovak, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    As an occupational therapist running social play groups with sensory integration for children on the autism spectrum, the author frequently doubted the wisdom of combining several children on the spectrum into a group. In fact, as the owner of a clinic she said, "No more!" The groups seemed like