Science.gov

Sample records for cns play functional

  1. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine alter monocyte, macrophage and T cell functions: implications for HAND

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Calderon, Tina M.; Coley, Jacqueline S.; Berman, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from HIV infection remain a major public health problem as individuals live longer due to the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). As many as 70% of HIV infected people have HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Many HIV infected individuals abuse drugs, such as cocaine, heroin or methamphetamine, that may be important cofactors in the development of HIV CNS disease. Despite different mechanisms of action, all drugs of abuse increase extracellular dopamine in the CNS. The effects of dopamine on HIV neuropathogenesis are not well understood, and drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which different types of drugs of abuse impact the development of HAND. Monocytes and macrophages are central to HIV infection of the CNS and to HAND. While T cells have not been shown to be a major factor in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis, studies indicate that T cells may play a larger role in the development of HAND in HIV infected drug abusers. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may dysregulate functions of, or increase HIV infection in, monocytes, macrophages and T cells in the brain. Thus, characterizing the effects of dopamine on these cells is important for understanding the mechanisms that mediate the development of HAND in drug abusers. PMID:23456305

  2. slc7a6os gene plays a critical role in defined areas of the developing CNS in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Benini, Anna; Cignarella, Francesca; Calvarini, Laura; Mantovanelli, Silvia; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Zizioli, Daniela; Borsani, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to shed light on the functional role of slc7a6os, a gene highly conserved in vertebrates. The Danio rerio slc7a6os gene encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with 46% identity to human SLC7A6OS and 14% to Saccharomyces cerevisiae polypeptide Iwr1. Yeast Iwr1 specifically binds RNA pol II, interacts with the basal transcription machinery and regulates the transcription of specific genes. In this study we investigated for the first time the biological role of SLC7A6OS in vertebrates. Zebrafish slc7a6os is a maternal gene that is expressed throughout development, with a prevalent localization in the developing central nervous system (CNS). The gene is also expressed, although at different levels, in various tissues of the adult fish. To determine the functional role of slc7a6os during zebrafish development, we knocked-down the gene by injecting a splice-blocking morpholino. At 24 hpf morphants show morphological defects in the CNS, particularly the interface between hindbrain and midbrain is not well-defined. At 28 hpf the morpholino injected embryos present an altered somite morphology and appear partially or completely immotile. At this stage the midbrain, hindbrain and cerebellum are compromised and not well defined compared with control embryos. The observed alterations persist at later developmental stages. Consistently, the expression pattern of two markers specifically expressed in the developing CNS, pax2a and neurod, is significantly altered in morphants. The co-injection of embryos with synthetic slc7a6os mRNA, rescues the morphant phenotype and restores the wild type expression pattern of pax2a and neurod. Our data suggest that slc7a6os might play a critical role in defined areas of the developing CNS in vertebrates, probably by regulating the expression of key genes.

  3. slc7a6os Gene Plays a Critical Role in Defined Areas of the Developing CNS in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Benini, Anna; Cignarella, Francesca; Calvarini, Laura; Mantovanelli, Silvia; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Zizioli, Daniela; Borsani, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to shed light on the functional role of slc7a6os, a gene highly conserved in vertebrates. The Danio rerio slc7a6os gene encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with 46% identity to human SLC7A6OS and 14% to Saccharomyces cerevisiae polypeptide Iwr1. Yeast Iwr1 specifically binds RNA pol II, interacts with the basal transcription machinery and regulates the transcription of specific genes. In this study we investigated for the first time the biological role of SLC7A6OS in vertebrates. Zebrafish slc7a6os is a maternal gene that is expressed throughout development, with a prevalent localization in the developing central nervous system (CNS). The gene is also expressed, although at different levels, in various tissues of the adult fish. To determine the functional role of slc7a6os during zebrafish development, we knocked-down the gene by injecting a splice-blocking morpholino. At 24 hpf morphants show morphological defects in the CNS, particularly the interface between hindbrain and midbrain is not well-defined. At 28 hpf the morpholino injected embryos present an altered somite morphology and appear partially or completely immotile. At this stage the midbrain, hindbrain and cerebellum are compromised and not well defined compared with control embryos. The observed alterations persist at later developmental stages. Consistently, the expression pattern of two markers specifically expressed in the developing CNS, pax2a and neurod, is significantly altered in morphants. The co-injection of embryos with synthetic slc7a6os mRNA, rescues the morphant phenotype and restores the wild type expression pattern of pax2a and neurod. Our data suggest that slc7a6os might play a critical role in defined areas of the developing CNS in vertebrates, probably by regulating the expression of key genes. PMID:25803583

  4. More Than Cholesterol Transporters: Lipoprotein Receptors in CNS Function and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lane-Donovan, Courtney E.; Philips, Gary T.; Herz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Members of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family have a diverse set of biological functions that transcend lipid metabolism. Lipoprotein receptors have broad effects in both the developing and adult brain and participate in synapse development, cargo trafficking, and signal transduction. In addition, several family members play key roles in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis and neurodegeneration. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role lipoprotein receptors play in CNS function and AD pathology, with a special emphasis on amyloid-independent roles in endocytosis and synaptic dysfunction. PMID:25144875

  5. Maternal stress, nutrition and physical activity: Impact on immune function, CNS development and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Teixeira, Antônio L; Silverman, Marni N

    2015-08-18

    Evidence suggests that maternal and fetal immune dysfunction may impact fetal brain development and could play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders, although the definitive pathophysiological mechanisms are still not completely understood. Stress, malnutrition and physical inactivity are three maternal behavioral lifestyle factors that can influence immune and central nervous system (CNS) functions in both the mother and fetus, and may therefore, increase risk for neurodevelopmental/psychiatric disorders. First, we will briefly review some aspects of maternal-fetal immune system interactions and development of immune tolerance. Second, we will discuss the bidirectional communication between the immune system and CNS and the pathways by which immune dysfunction could contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders. Third, we will discuss the effects of prenatal stress and malnutrition (over and undernutrition) on perinatal programming of the CNS and immune system, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. Finally, we will discuss the beneficial impact of physical fitness during pregnancy on the maternal-fetal unit and infant and how regular physical activity and exercise can be an effective buffer against stress- and inflammatory-related disorders. Although regular physical activity has been shown to promote neuroplasticity and an anti-inflammatory state in the adult, there is a paucity of studies evaluating its impact on CNS and immune function during pregnancy. Implementing stress reduction, proper nutrition and ample physical activity during pregnancy and the childbearing period may be an efficient strategy to counteract the impact of maternal stress and malnutrition/obesity on the developing fetus. Such behavioral interventions could have an impact on early development of the CNS and immune system and contribute to the prevention of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Further research is needed to elucidate this relationship and the underlying

  6. Hyperphagia and Increased Fat Accumulation in Two Models of Chronic CNS Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Loss of Function

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kenneth R.; Herman, James P.; D'Alessio, David A.; Woods, Stephen C.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2011-01-01

    Central administration of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) causes a dose-dependent reduction in food intake, but the role of endogenous CNS GLP-1 in the regulation of energy balance remains unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CNS GLP-1 activity is required for normal energy balance by using two independent methods to achieve chronic CNS GLP-1 loss of function in rats. Specifically, lentiviral-mediated expression of RNA interference was used to knock down nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) preproglucagon (PPG), and chronic intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1r) antagonist exendin (9-39) (Ex9) was used to block CNS GLP-1r. NTS PPG knockdown caused hyperphagia and exacerbated high-fat diet (HFD)-induced fat accumulation and glucose intolerance. Moreover, in control virus-treated rats fed the HFD, NTS PPG expression levels correlated positively with fat mass. Chronic ICV Ex9 also caused hyperphagia; however, increased fat accumulation and glucose intolerance occurred regardless of diet. Collectively, these data provide the strongest evidence to date that CNS GLP-1 plays a physiologic role in the long-term regulation of energy balance. Moreover, they suggest that this role is distinct from that of circulating GLP-1 as a short-term satiation signal. Therefore, it may be possible to tailor GLP-1-based therapies for the prevention and/or treatment of obesity. PMID:21389245

  7. Hyperphagia and increased fat accumulation in two models of chronic CNS glucagon-like peptide-1 loss of function.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Jason G; Jones, Kenneth R; Herman, James P; D'Alessio, David A; Woods, Stephen C; Seeley, Randy J

    2011-03-09

    Central administration of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) causes a dose-dependent reduction in food intake, but the role of endogenous CNS GLP-1 in the regulation of energy balance remains unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CNS GLP-1 activity is required for normal energy balance by using two independent methods to achieve chronic CNS GLP-1 loss of function in rats. Specifically, lentiviral-mediated expression of RNA interference was used to knock down nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) preproglucagon (PPG), and chronic intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1r) antagonist exendin (9-39) (Ex9) was used to block CNS GLP-1r. NTS PPG knockdown caused hyperphagia and exacerbated high-fat diet (HFD)-induced fat accumulation and glucose intolerance. Moreover, in control virus-treated rats fed the HFD, NTS PPG expression levels correlated positively with fat mass. Chronic ICV Ex9 also caused hyperphagia; however, increased fat accumulation and glucose intolerance occurred regardless of diet. Collectively, these data provide the strongest evidence to date that CNS GLP-1 plays a physiologic role in the long-term regulation of energy balance. Moreover, they suggest that this role is distinct from that of circulating GLP-1 as a short-term satiation signal. Therefore, it may be possible to tailor GLP-1-based therapies for the prevention and/or treatment of obesity.

  8. Alterations of CNS structure & function by charged particle radiation & resultant oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Gregory; Chang, Polly; Favre, Cecile; Fike, John; Komarova, Natalia; Limoli, Charles; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Obenaus, Andre; Raber, Jacob; Spigelman, Igor; Soltesz, Ivan; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Stampanoni, Marco; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Wodarz, Dominik

    were complex and suggested continuous remodeling of the brain for up to 6 months. Thus we demonstrated a suite of CNS structural and functional changes after proton and iron ion exposure in the low dose regime. Based on these findings we will now test whether oxidative stress mediates the reactions of CNS to radiation exposure and what role radiation quality and dose rate play in the responses. We will use cultured neural precursor cells (mouse human) to detect changes in oxidative status and differentiation as functions of charged particle charge and velocity. These results will inform the selection of particles for many in vivo measurements that will compare wild type mice to a transgenic strain that over-expresses a human catalase gene (which inactivates hydrogen peroxide) in the mitochondrial compartment. This will explicitly test the role of reactive oxygen species in mediating the mechanisms underlying the CNS endpoints that we will measure. We will extend the electrophysiological measurements on individual nerves in hippocampal slices to characterize both inhibitory and excitatory synapses. Further, multi-electrode arrays will be used to follow correlated electrical activity in different hippocampal regions in order to understand network-level function as well as synaptic efficacy and plasticity. Controlled oxidative stress on irradiated samples will explore whether response mechanisms are shared. To link alterations in neurogenesis to performance we will explore behavioral changes mediated by the hippocampus simultaneously with measures of expression of the Arc gene in newly-born neurons. This will test whether decrements in performance correlate with loss of new cells and whether behavior properly stimulates functional integration of the new cells; the behavioral paradigm will be contextual fear conditioning. We will develop mathematical frameworks for CNS responses to radiation in order to inform risk estimates. Finally, we will couple a high

  9. Unbiased transcriptomic analyses reveal distinct effects of immune deficiency in CNS function with and without injury.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dandan; Ge, Weihong; Hu, Xiao; Li, Chen; Lee, Chia-Ming; Zhou, Liqiang; Wu, Zhourui; Yu, Juehua; Lin, Sheng; Yu, Jing; Xu, Wei; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Chong; Jiang, Kun; Zhu, Xingfei; Li, Haotian; Gao, Xinpei; Geng, Yanan; Jing, Bo; Wang, Zhen; Zheng, Changhong; Zhu, Rongrong; Yan, Qiao; Lin, Quan; Ye, Keqiang; Sun, Yi E; Cheng, Liming

    2018-06-28

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is considered an immune privileged system as it is separated from the periphery by the blood brain barrier (BBB). Yet, immune functions have been postulated to heavily influence the functional state of the CNS, especially after injury or during neurodegeneration. There is controversy regarding whether adaptive immune responses are beneficial or detrimental to CNS injury repair. In this study, we utilized immunocompromised SCID mice and subjected them to spinal cord injury (SCI). We analyzed motor function, electrophysiology, histochemistry, and performed unbiased RNA-sequencing. SCID mice displayed improved CNS functional recovery compared to WT mice after SCI. Weighted gene-coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) of spinal cord transcriptomes revealed that SCID mice had reduced expression of immune function-related genes and heightened expression of neural transmission-related genes after SCI, which was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis and was consistent with better functional recovery. Transcriptomic analyses also indicated heightened expression of neurotransmission-related genes before injury in SCID mice, suggesting that a steady state of immune-deficiency potentially led to CNS hyper-connectivity. Consequently, SCID mice without injury demonstrated worse performance in Morris water maze test. Taken together, not only reduced inflammation after injury but also dampened steady-state immune function without injury heightened the neurotransmission program, resulting in better or worse behavioral outcomes respectively. This study revealed the intricate relationship between immune and nervous systems, raising the possibility for therapeutic manipulation of neural function via immune modulation.

  10. Solitary Play: Some Functional Reconsiderations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Nancy V.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Solitary play in six kindergarten children was observed and coded for frequency and type in order to resolve iscrepancies in a Sex Birth Order interaction. Several facts concerning solitary play as indicative of independence and maturity are noted. (Author/ED)

  11. Can Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Improve Success Rates in CNS Drug Discovery?

    PubMed Central

    Borsook, David; Hargreaves, Richard; Becerra, Lino

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The bar for developing new treatments for CNS disease is getting progressively higher and fewer novel mechanisms are being discovered, validated and developed. The high costs of drug discovery necessitate early decisions to ensure the best molecules and hypotheses are tested in expensive late stage clinical trials. The discovery of brain imaging biomarkers that can bridge preclinical to clinical CNS drug discovery and provide a ‘language of translation’ affords the opportunity to improve the objectivity of decision-making. Areas Covered This review discusses the benefits, challenges and potential issues of using a science based biomarker strategy to change the paradigm of CNS drug development and increase success rates in the discovery of new medicines. The authors have summarized PubMed and Google Scholar based publication searches to identify recent advances in functional, structural and chemical brain imaging and have discussed how these techniques may be useful in defining CNS disease state and drug effects during drug development. Expert opinion The use of novel brain imaging biomarkers holds the bold promise of making neuroscience drug discovery smarter by increasing the objectivity of decision making thereby improving the probability of success of identifying useful drugs to treat CNS diseases. Functional imaging holds the promise to: (1) define pharmacodynamic markers as an index of target engagement (2) improve translational medicine paradigms to predict efficacy; (3) evaluate CNS efficacy and safety based on brain activation; (4) determine brain activity drug dose-response relationships and (5) provide an objective evaluation of symptom response and disease modification. PMID:21765857

  12. The effects of gut microbiota on CNS function in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tillisch, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    The role of the gastrointestinal microbiota in human brain development and function is an area of increasing interest and research. Preclinical models suggest a role for the microbiota in broad aspects of human health, including mood, cognition, and chronic pain. Early human studies suggest that altering the microbiota with beneficial bacteria, or probiotics, can lead to changes in brain function, as well as subjective reports of mood. As the mechanisms of bidirectional communication between the brain and microbiota are better understood, it is expected that these pathways will be harnessed to provide novel methods to enhance health and treat disease. PMID:24838095

  13. New perspectives in cyclic nucleotide-mediated functions in the CNS: the emerging role of cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels.

    PubMed

    Podda, Maria Vittoria; Grassi, Claudio

    2014-07-01

    Cyclic nucleotides play fundamental roles in the central nervous system (CNS) under both physiological and pathological conditions. The impact of cAMP and cGMP signaling on neuronal and glial cell functions has been thoroughly characterized. Most of their effects have been related to cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase activity. However, cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels, first described as key mediators of sensory transduction in retinal and olfactory receptors, have been receiving increasing attention as possible targets of cyclic nucleotides in the CNS. In the last 15 years, consistent evidence has emerged for their expression in neurons and astrocytes of the rodent brain. Far less is known, however, about the functional role of CNG channels in these cells, although several of their features, such as Ca(2+) permeability and prolonged activation in the presence of cyclic nucleotides, make them ideal candidates for mediators of physiological functions in the CNS. Here, we review literature suggesting the involvement of CNG channels in a number of CNS cellular functions (e.g., regulation of membrane potential, neuronal excitability, and neurotransmitter release) as well as in more complex phenomena, like brain plasticity, adult neurogenesis, and pain sensitivity. The emerging picture is that functional and dysfunctional cyclic nucleotide signaling in the CNS has to be reconsidered including CNG channels among possible targets. However, concerted efforts and multidisciplinary approaches are still needed to get more in-depth knowledge in this field.

  14. Novel Functional Properties of Drosophila CNS Glutamate Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Dharkar, Poorva; Han, Tae-Hee

    Phylogenetic analysis reveals AMPA, kainate, and NMDA receptor families in insect genomes, suggesting conserved functional properties corresponding to their vertebrate counterparts. However, heterologous expression of the Drosophila kainate receptor DKaiR1D and the AMPA receptor DGluR1A revealed novel ligand selectivity at odds with the classification used for vertebrate glutamate receptor ion channels (iGluRs). DKaiR1D forms a rapidly activating and desensitizing receptor that is inhibited by both NMDA and the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5; crystallization of the KaiR1D ligand-binding domain reveals that these ligands stabilize open cleft conformations, explaining their action as antagonists. Surprisingly, the AMPA receptor DGluR1A shows weak activation bymore » its namesake agonist AMPA and also by quisqualate. Crystallization of the DGluR1A ligand-binding domain reveals amino acid exchanges that interfere with binding of these ligands. The unexpected ligand-binding profiles of insect iGluRs allows classical tools to be used in novel approaches for the study of synaptic regulation.« less

  15. Novel Functional Properties of Drosophila CNS Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Dharkar, Poorva; Han, Tae-Hee; Serpe, Mihaela; Lee, Chi-Hon; Mayer, Mark L

    2016-12-07

    Phylogenetic analysis reveals AMPA, kainate, and NMDA receptor families in insect genomes, suggesting conserved functional properties corresponding to their vertebrate counterparts. However, heterologous expression of the Drosophila kainate receptor DKaiR1D and the AMPA receptor DGluR1A revealed novel ligand selectivity at odds with the classification used for vertebrate glutamate receptor ion channels (iGluRs). DKaiR1D forms a rapidly activating and desensitizing receptor that is inhibited by both NMDA and the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5; crystallization of the KaiR1D ligand-binding domain reveals that these ligands stabilize open cleft conformations, explaining their action as antagonists. Surprisingly, the AMPA receptor DGluR1A shows weak activation by its namesake agonist AMPA and also by quisqualate. Crystallization of the DGluR1A ligand-binding domain reveals amino acid exchanges that interfere with binding of these ligands. The unexpected ligand-binding profiles of insect iGluRs allows classical tools to be used in novel approaches for the study of synaptic regulation. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Blood-brain barrier structure and function and the challenges for CNS drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Abbott, N Joan

    2013-05-01

    The neurons of the central nervous system (CNS) require precise control of their bathing microenvironment for optimal function, and an important element in this control is the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is formed by the endothelial cells lining the brain microvessels, under the inductive influence of neighbouring cell types within the 'neurovascular unit' (NVU) including astrocytes and pericytes. The endothelium forms the major interface between the blood and the CNS, and by a combination of low passive permeability and presence of specific transport systems, enzymes and receptors regulates molecular and cellular traffic across the barrier layer. A number of methods and models are available for examining BBB permeation in vivo and in vitro, and can give valuable information on the mechanisms by which therapeutic agents and constructs permeate, ways to optimize permeation, and implications for drug discovery, delivery and toxicity. For treating lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), models can be included that mimic aspects of the disease, including genetically-modified animals, and in vitro models can be used to examine the effects of cells of the NVU on the BBB under pathological conditions. For testing CNS drug delivery, several in vitro models now provide reliable prediction of penetration of drugs including large molecules and artificial constructs with promising potential in treating LSDs. For many of these diseases it is still not clear how best to deliver appropriate drugs to the CNS, and a concerted approach using a variety of models and methods can give critical insights and indicate practical solutions.

  17. The role of the NG2 proteoglycan in OPC and CNS network function.

    PubMed

    Sakry, Dominik; Trotter, Jacqueline

    2016-05-01

    In the normal mammalian CNS, the NG2 proteoglycan is expressed by oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) but not by any other neural cell-type. NG2 is a type-1 membrane protein, exerting multiple roles in the CNS including intracellular signaling within the OPC, with effects on migration, cytoskeleton interaction and target gene regulation. It has been recently shown that the extracellular region of NG2, in addition to an adhesive function, acts as a soluble ECM component with the capacity to alter defined neuronal network properties. This region of NG2 is thus endowed with neuromodulatory properties. In order to generate biologically active fragments yielding these properties, the sequential cleavage of the NG2 protein by α- and γ-secretases occurs. The basal level of constitutive cleavage is stimulated by neuronal network activity. This processing leads to 4 major NG2 fragments which all have been associated with distinct biological functions. Here we summarize these functions, focusing on recent discoveries and their implications for the CNS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:NG2-glia(Invited only). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Executive Functions Development and Playing Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, Ana Lucia; de Souza, Maria Thereza C. Coelho

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss executive functions and playing games, considering Piaget's work (1967) and the neuropsychological framework (Barkley, 1997, 2000; Cypel, 2007). Two questions guide the discussion: What are the intersections between playing games and the development of executive functions? Can we stimulate children with learning…

  19. [A review of the effects of lithium on cognitive functions: Effects on the neuropsychiatrically challenged CNS].

    PubMed

    Tsaltas, E; Kontis, D

    2009-04-01

    Recent data attribute neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions to lithium, leading to expectations of cognitive enhancement action. This hypothesis is at odds with the predominant view of clinical psychiatr y which, on the basis of older clinical data as well as on subjective reports of lithiumtreated patients, associates lithium with cognitive blurring and specific memory deficits. Review of the older data and their integration with more recent clinical and experimental work on the primary effects of lithium on cognitive functioning led us to two central conclusions: (a) Data on the primary cognitive effects of lithium, considered in their entirety, do not support a picture of serious or long-lasting cognitive decline. On the contrary, recent evidence suggests cognitive enhancement under certain conditions. (b) The conditions which appear to promote the emergence of cognitive enhancement under lithium are conditions of challenge to the cognitive systems, such as increased task difficulty resulting in deterioration in the performance of untreated controls. We are suggesting that alternative challenges to cognitive functioning, which therefore would facilitate the emergence of lithium's cognitive enhancement action, include biological insults to the central nervous system (CNS). This second part of our review of the cognitive effects of lithium therefore focuses on studies of its action on cognitive dysfunction associated with functional or biological challenge to the CNS, such as stress, trauma, neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders.

  20. Functional conservation of atonal and Math1 in the CNS and PNS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Arie, N.; Hassan, B. A.; Bermingham, N. A.; Malicki, D. M.; Armstrong, D.; Matzuk, M.; Bellen, H. J.; Zoghbi, H. Y.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the extent to which atonal and its mouse homolog Math1 exhibit functional conservation, we inserted (beta)-galactosidase (lacZ) into the Math1 locus and analyzed its expression, evaluated consequences of loss of Math1 function, and expressed Math1 in atonal mutant flies. lacZ under the control of Math1 regulatory elements duplicated the previously known expression pattern of Math1 in the CNS (i.e., the neural tube, dorsal spinal cord, brainstem, and cerebellar external granule neurons) but also revealed new sites of expression: PNS mechanoreceptors (inner ear hair cells and Merkel cells) and articular chondrocytes. Expressing Math1 induced ectopic chordotonal organs (CHOs) in wild-type flies and partially rescued CHO loss in atonal mutant embryos. These data demonstrate that both the mouse and fly homologs encode lineage identity information and, more interestingly, that some of the cells dependent on this information serve similar mechanoreceptor functions.

  1. Organic Functional Group Playing Card Deck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.

    2003-04-01

    The recognition and identification of organic functional groups, while essential for chemistry and biology majors, is also very useful for non-science majors in the study of molecules in art and life. In order to make this task more palatable for the non-science major (art and communications students), the images of a traditional playing deck of cards (heart, spade, diamond, and club) have been replaced with four representations of common organic functional groups. The hierarchy rules for naming two groups in a molecule is loosely incorporated to represent the sequence (King, Queen, Jack, ?, Ace) of the deck. Students practice recognizing and identifying organic groups by playing simple card games of "Old Maid" and "Go Fish". To play games like "Poker" or "Gin", a student must not only recognize the functional groups, but also master a naming hierarchy for the organic groups.

  2. Toll-6 and Toll-7 function as neurotrophin receptors in the Drosophila melanogaster CNS.

    PubMed

    McIlroy, Graham; Foldi, Istvan; Aurikko, Jukka; Wentzell, Jill S; Lim, Mei Ann; Fenton, Janine C; Gay, Nicholas J; Hidalgo, Alicia

    2013-09-01

    Neurotrophin receptors corresponding to vertebrate Trk, p75(NTR) or Sortilin have not been identified in Drosophila, thus it is unknown how neurotrophism may be implemented in insects. Two Drosophila neurotrophins, DNT1 and DNT2, have nervous system functions, but their receptors are unknown. The Toll receptor superfamily has ancient evolutionary origins and a universal function in innate immunity. Here we show that Toll paralogs unrelated to the mammalian neurotrophin receptors function as neurotrophin receptors in fruit flies. Toll-6 and Toll-7 are expressed in the CNS throughout development and regulate locomotion, motor axon targeting and neuronal survival. DNT1 (also known as NT1 and spz2) and DNT2 (also known as NT2 and spz5) interact genetically with Toll-6 and Toll-7, and DNT1 and DNT2 bind to Toll-6 and Toll-7 promiscuously and are distributed in vivo in domains complementary to or overlapping with those of Toll-6 and Toll-7. We conclude that in fruit flies, Tolls are not only involved in development and immunity but also in neurotrophism, revealing an unforeseen relationship between the neurotrophin and Toll protein families.

  3. Functional Chemical Groups that May Likely Become a Source for the Synthesis of Novel Central Nervous System (CNS) Acting Drugs.

    PubMed

    Saganuwan, Saganuwan A

    2017-01-01

    Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders are on increase perhaps due to genetic, enviromental, social and dietetic factors. Unfortunately, a large number of CNS drugs have adverse effects such as addiction, tolerance, psychological and physical dependence. In view of this, literature search was carried out with a view to identify functional chemical groups that may serve as lead molecules for synthesis of compounds that may have CNS activity. The search revealed that heterocycles that have heteroatoms such as nitrogen (N), sulphur (S) and oxygen (O) form the largest class of organic compounds. They replace carbon in a benzene ring to form pyridine. Compounds with furan, thiophene, pyrrole, pyridine, azole, imidazole, indole, purine, pyrimidine, esters, carboxylic acid, aldehyde, pyrylium, pyrone, pyrodine, barbituric acid, barbiturate, quinoline, quinolone, isoquinolone, coumarin, alkylpyridine, picoline, piperidine, diazine, carboxamide, flavonoid glycoside, oxindole, aminophenol, benzimidazole, benzoxazole, benzothiazole, and chromone chemical groups among others may have CNS effects ranging from depression passing through euphoria to convulsion. Examples of the compounds with the functional groups include but not limited to coal tar, pyridostigmine, pralidoxime, quinine, mefloquine, pyrilamine, pyronaridine, ciprofloxacin and piroxicam. A number of them can undergo keto-enol tautomerism. Chiral amines may be used for derivation of chiral carboxylic acids which are components of tautomers. Some tautomers may cause parkinsonism and Stevens Johnson syndrome. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Long-term cognitive function, neuroimaging, and quality of life in primary CNS lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, Nancy D; Korfel, Agnieszka; Lubow, Meredith A; Schorb, Elisabeth; Schlegel, Uwe; Rogowski, Sabine; Fu, Rongwei; Dósa, Edit; Illerhaus, Gerald; Kraemer, Dale F; Muldoon, Leslie L; Calabrese, Pasquale; Hedrick, Nancy; Tyson, Rose Marie; Jahnke, Kristoph; Maron, Leeza M; Butler, Robert W; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2013-07-02

    To describe and correlate neurotoxicity indicators in long-term primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) survivors who were treated with high-dose methotrexate-based regimens with or without whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Eighty PCNSL survivors from 4 treatment groups (1 with WBRT and 3 without WBRT) who were a minimum of 2 years after diagnosis and in complete remission underwent prospective neuropsychological, quality-of-life (QOL), and brain MRI evaluation. Clinical characteristics were compared among treatments by using the χ(2) test and analysis of variance. The association among neuroimaging, neuropsychological, and QOL outcomes was assessed by using the Pearson correlation coefficient. The median interval from diagnosis to evaluation was 5.5 years (minimum, 2 years; maximum, 26 years). Survivors treated with WBRT had lower mean scores in attention/executive function (p = 0.0011), motor skills (p = 0.0023), and neuropsychological composite score (p = 0.0051) compared with those treated without WBRT. Verbal memory was better in survivors with longer intervals from diagnosis to evaluation (p = 0.0045). On brain imaging, mean areas of total T2 abnormalities were different among treatments (p = 0.0006). Total T2 abnormalities after WBRT were more than twice the mean of any non-WBRT group and were associated with poorer neuropsychological and QOL outcomes. Our results suggest that in patients treated for PCNSL achieving complete remission and surviving at least 2 years, the addition of WBRT to methotrexate-based chemotherapy increases the risk of treatment-related neurotoxicity. Verbal memory may improve over time. This study provides Class III evidence that in patients treated for PCNSL achieving complete remission and surviving at least 2 years, the addition of WBRT to methotrexate-based chemotherapy increases the risk of treatment-related neurotoxicity.

  5. Imaginary Play Companions: Characteristics and Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyan-Masih, V.

    1986-01-01

    Investigates some of the following characteristics associated with young children playing with imaginary play companions (IPCs): intelligence, parental and socioeconomic and educational background, family size, and birth order. Compares these children to those without IPCs. (HOD)

  6. CNS development: an overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowakowski, R. S.; Hayes, N. L.

    1999-01-01

    The basic principles of the development of the central nervous system (CNS) are reviewed, and their implications for both normal and abnormal development of the brain are discussed. The goals of this review are (a) to provide a set of concepts to aid in understanding the variety of complex processes that occur during CNS development, (b) to illustrate how these concepts contribute to our knowledge of the normal anatomy of the adult brain, and (c) to provide a basis for understanding how modifications of normal developmental processes by traumatic injury, by environmental or experiential influences, or by genetic variations may lead to modifications in the resultant structure and function of the adult CNS.

  7. Preschoolers' Free Play--Connections with Emotional and Social Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veiga, Guida; Neto, Carlos; Rieffe, Carolien

    2016-01-01

    Play has an important role in various aspects of children's development. However, time for free play has declined substantially over the last decades. To date, few studies have focused on the relationship between opportunities for free play and children's social functioning. The aims of this study are to examine whether children´s free play is…

  8. A Functional Melanocortin System May Be Required for Chronic CNS-Mediated Antidiabetic and Cardiovascular Actions of Leptin

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Alexandre A.; do Carmo, Jussara M.; Freeman, J. Nathan; Tallam, Lakshmi S.; Hall, John E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We recently showed that leptin has powerful central nervous system (CNS)-mediated antidiabetic and cardiovascular actions. This study tested whether the CNS melanocortin system mediates these actions of leptin in diabetic rats. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A cannula was placed in the lateral ventricle of Sprague-Dawley rats for intracerebroventricular infusions, and arterial and venous catheters were implanted to measure mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate 24 h/day and for intravenous infusions. After recovery from surgery for 8 days, rats were injected with streptozotocin (STZ), and 5 days later, either saline or the melanocortin 3 and 4 receptor (MC3/4R) antagonist SHU-9119 (1 nmol/h) was infused intracerebroventricularly for 17 days. Seven days after starting the antagonist, leptin (0.62 μg/h) was added to the intracerebroventricular infusion for 10 days. Another group of diabetic rats was infused with the MC3/4R agonist MTII (10 ng/h i.c.v.) for 12 days, followed by 7 days at 50 ng/h. RESULTS Induction of diabetes caused hyperphagia, hyperglycemia, and decreases in heart rate (−76 bpm) and MAP (−7 mmHg). Leptin restored appetite, blood glucose, heart rate, and MAP back to pre-diabetic values in vehicle-treated rats, whereas it had no effect in SHU-9119–treated rats. MTII infusions transiently reduced blood glucose and raised heart rate and MAP, which returned to diabetic values 5–7 days after starting the infusion. CONCLUSIONS Although a functional melanocortin system is necessary for the CNS-mediated antidiabetic and cardiovascular actions of leptin, chronic MC3/4R activation is apparently not sufficient to mimic these actions of leptin that may involve interactions of multiple pathways. PMID:19491210

  9. [Non-structural abnormalities of CNS function resulting in coincidence of endocrinopathies, epilepsy and psychoneurologic disorders in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Starzyk, Jerzy; Pituch-Noworolska, Anna; Pietrzyk, Jacek A; Urbanik, Andrzej; Kroczka, Sławomir; Drozdz, Ryszard; Wójcik, Małgorzata

    2010-01-01

    chiasm glioma (2 patients), suprasellar germinal tumor (1 patient), ii) children with Hashimoto encephalopathy (2 patients), iii) children with Prader-Willi syndrome (20 patients), with Klinefelter syndrome (10 patients), with Albright syndrome (9 patients). Of the 49 patients, a group of 6 children representative for individual disorders was selected. In those patients, the etiology of both endocrine disorders, epilepsy and neuropsychiatric disorders was suspected to be common, and the diagnosis was usually delayed. 1. Cranial irradiation and chemotherapy, encephalopathy associated with Hashimoto disease and some of the syndromes with the chromosomal and genetic background are the causes of non-structural CNS abnormalities and coincidence of endocrinopathies, epilepsy and psychoneurologic disorders. 2. MR/CT CNS imaging should be performed in any case of central neurological disorders, disorders of behavior, epilepsy or seizures, but also in patients with delayed psycho-motor development, delayed or accelerated growth and pubertal development. All of the above-mentioned manifestations may be symptoms of structural CNS abnormalities and their early treatment determines the child's future. 3. Excluding structural CNS abnormalities allows for forming suspicions associated with diseases resulting in non-structural disorders of the CNS function, predisposing to coincidence of endocrine and neurological disorders. 4. In the diagnosis of Hashimoto's encephalopathy, a decisive factor is exclusion of structural, infectious, traumatic and metabolic causes, intoxications, epilepsy and presence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with high level of against TPO antibodies. In cases of steroids resistance, a good therapeutic effect may be achieved by plasmapheresis, Rituximab therapy and progestagene inhibition of the menstrual cycle.

  10. CNS role evolution.

    PubMed

    Payne, J L; Baumgartner, R G

    1996-01-01

    THE CNS ROLE has been actualized in a variety of ways. Flexibility-inherent in the role-and the revolution in health care consciousness tend to place the CNS at risk for criticism regarding value to the organization. At Vanderbilt University Medical Center, a CNS task force evaluated the current reality of CNS practice and recommended role changes to include the financial analysis of patient care. After incorporating a financial perspective into our present practice, we have embarked on an interesting journey of post-Master's degree study, that of the tertiary care nurse practitioner. This practice option could elevated the clinical and financial aspects of providing cost-effective health care to a more autonomous role form; however, the transition has been challenging. Since 1990, the American Nurses Association has recommended that nursing school curricula change to meet the needs of the health care environment and provide increased career flexibility through creating one advanced degree incorporating both CNS and NP functions. Swiftly moving past differences and toward similarities will bridge the gap for advanced practice nurses in the future.

  11. Scientific basis for learning transfer from movements to urinary bladder functions for bladder repair in human patients with CNS injury.

    PubMed

    Schalow, G

    2010-01-01

    Coordination Dynamics Therapy (CDT) has been shown to be able to partly repair CNS injury. The repair is based on a movement-based re-learning theory which requires at least three levels of description: the movement or pattern (and anamnesis) level, the collective variable level, and the neuron level. Upon CDT not only the actually performed movement pattern itself is repaired, but the entire dynamics of CNS organization is improved, which is the theoretical basis for (re-) learning transfer. The transfer of learning for repair from jumping on springboard and exercising on a special CDT and recording device to urinary bladder functions is investigated at the neuron level. At the movement or pattern level, the improvement of central nervous system (CNS) functioning in human patients can be seen (or partly measured) by the improvement of the performance of the pattern. At the collective variable level, coordination tendencies can be measured by the so-called 'coordination dynamics' before, during and after treatment. At the neuron level, re-learning can additionally be assessed by surface electromyography (sEMG) as alterations of single motor unit firings and motor programs. But to express the ongoing interaction between the numerous neural, muscular, and metabolic elements involved in perception and action, it is relevant to inquire how the individual afferent and efferent neurons adjust their phase and frequency coordination to other neurons to satisfy learning task requirements. With the single-nerve fibre action potential recording method it was possible to measure that distributed single neurons communicate by phase and frequency coordination. It is shown that this timed firing of neurons is getting impaired upon injury and has to be improved by learning The stability of phase and frequency coordination among afferent and efferent neuron firings can be related to pattern stability. The stability of phase and frequency coordination at the neuron level can

  12. Study of Functional Status of CNS in Human-Operator in Conditions of Imitation Deep Spase Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marina, Skedina; Michael, Potapov; Anna, Kovaleva

    Functional status (FS) of CNS may influence human’s behavior and his professional activity. The purpose of study - analysis of FS CNS of human-operator in conditions of long-term isolation. The studies were conducted within the framework of the project «Mars-500» which simulates of interplanetary flight isolation conditions of different durations. We examined nine people aged from 26 to 40 years. Synchronous registration of classical bioelectric activity of brain (EEG) and a cerebral power exchange (a level of constant brain potential (LCP)) was carried out for study of functional status of CNS using the hardware-software complex «Neuro-KM - Omega-Neyroanalizator» (Ltd. «Statokin», Russia). The synchronical registration was performed in seven unipolar leads on a «10-20» (Fp1, Fp2, T3, T4, O1, O2, Cz) combined with the placement of reference electrode on the earlobe and «biological zero» electrode - on the wrist. During 105-days isolation with 3 volunteers on day 52 the following was observed: simultaneous displacement of α-rhythm localization, increase of its frequency by 10% with a decrease in the index and disorganization of α-activity, emergence of asymmetry. Appearance of LCP asymmetry for more than 5 mV (in one case - with a strong dominance of the left hemisphere) was registered with the overall reduction of the amplitude, indicating a stress reaction in isolation. Before 520-days isolation (6 volunteers) 3 from them had signs of stress reaction in accordance to EEG with: displacement of α-rhythm localization, increase of its frequency by 1-2 Hz and increase level LCP. During isolation before «exit on a surface of Mars» individual fluctuations of EEG and LCP were observed depending on the specifics of the crew activities. Directly «exit on a surface of Mars» for 2 volunteers of «crew of Mars» the increase in power of α-rhythm was observed. Other members of crew showed decrease power of α-rhythm. At various stages of experiment in 35

  13. Solitary Active Videogame Play Improves Executive Functioning More Than Collaborative Play for Children with Special Needs.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Rachel M; Colon, Nirmaliz

    2016-12-01

    This pilot study examined the impact of playing an active videogame on executive functioning (EF) skills for children with special needs, who typically have lower EF skills. Acute EF change was measured in 36 children with a range of special needs, including mental health disorders and developmental disabilities. Participants were assigned to one of two active videogame conditions: playing alone and playing with a peer. Two different EF tasks were conducted pre- and postplay. Children who played alone increased their accuracy performance more than children in the paired-play condition on two measures of EF. The study explored potential covariates of prior videogame experience, age, and enjoyment, but none of these variables related to EF change. This study's findings support active videogame play as an activity that can boost EF skills for children with special needs when they play alone. Future research should continue to examine the relationships between EF and active videogame play with a peer to elucidate the contributions of social interactions.

  14. Intrinsic electrical properties of mammalian neurons and CNS function: a historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2014-01-01

    This brief review summarizes work done in mammalian neuroscience concerning the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of four neuronal types; Cerebellar Purkinje cells, inferior olivary cells, thalamic cells, and some cortical interneurons. It is a personal perspective addressing an interesting time in neuroscience when the reflex view of brain function, as the paradigm to understand global neuroscience, began to be modified toward one in which sensory input modulates rather than dictates brain function. The perspective of the paper is not a comprehensive description of the intrinsic electrical properties of all nerve cells but rather addresses a set of cell types that provide indicative examples of mechanisms that modulate brain function. PMID:25408634

  15. The structure and function of the dopamine transporter and its role in CNS diseases.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Patrick C; Buckley, David A

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we explore the basic science of the dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral component of a system that regulates dopamine homeostasis. Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter for several brain functions including locomotor control and reward systems. The transporter structure, function, mechanism of action, localization, and distribution, in addition to gene regulation, are discussed. Over many years, a wealth of information concerning the DAT has been accrued and has led to increased interest in the role of the DAT in a plethora of central nervous system diseases. These DAT characteristics are explored in relation to a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases, with a particular focus on the genetics of the DAT. In addition, we discuss the pharmacology of the DAT and how this relates to disease and addiction. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Use of Functional MRI to Study Appetite Control in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Akila; Salem, Victoria; Matthews, Paul M.; Dhillo, Waljit S.

    2012-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has provided the opportunity to safely investigate the workings of the human brain. This paper focuses on its use in the field of human appetitive behaviour and its impact in obesity research. In the present absence of any safe or effective centrally acting appetite suppressants, a better understanding of how appetite is controlled is vital for the development of new antiobesity pharmacotherapies. Early functional imaging techniques revealed an attenuation of brain reward area activity in response to visual food stimuli when humans are fed—in other words, the physiological state of hunger somehow increases the appeal value of food. Later studies have investigated the action of appetite modulating hormones on the fMRI signal, showing how the attenuation of brain reward region activity that follows feeding can be recreated in the fasted state by the administration of anorectic gut hormones. Furthermore, differences in brain activity between obese and lean individuals have provided clues about the possible aetiology of overeating. The hypothalamus acts as a central gateway modulating homeostatic and nonhomeostatic drives to eat. As fMRI techniques constantly improve, functional data regarding the role of this small but hugely important structure in appetite control is emerging. PMID:22719753

  17. Presynaptic LRP4 promotes synapse number and function of excitatory CNS neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Timothy J; Luginbuhl, David J; Wang, Irving E; Luo, Liqun

    2017-01-01

    Precise coordination of synaptic connections ensures proper information flow within circuits. The activity of presynaptic organizing molecules signaling to downstream pathways is essential for such coordination, though such entities remain incompletely known. We show that LRP4, a conserved transmembrane protein known for its postsynaptic roles, functions presynaptically as an organizing molecule. In the Drosophila brain, LRP4 localizes to the nerve terminals at or near active zones. Loss of presynaptic LRP4 reduces excitatory (not inhibitory) synapse number, impairs active zone architecture, and abolishes olfactory attraction - the latter of which can be suppressed by reducing presynaptic GABAB receptors. LRP4 overexpression increases synapse number in excitatory and inhibitory neurons, suggesting an instructive role and a common downstream synapse addition pathway. Mechanistically, LRP4 functions via the conserved kinase SRPK79D to ensure normal synapse number and behavior. This highlights a presynaptic function for LRP4, enabling deeper understanding of how synapse organization is coordinated. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.27347.001 PMID:28606304

  18. Fisetin Acts on Multiple Pathways to Reduce the Impact of Age and Disease on CNS Function

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Pamela

    2017-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that neurological diseases are multi-factorial involving disruptions in multiple cellular systems. Thus, while each disease has its own initiating mechanisms and pathologies, certain common pathways appear to be involved in most, if not all, neurological diseases described to date. Thus, it is unlikely that modulating only a single factor will be effective at either preventing disease development or slowing disease progression. A better approach is to identify small (< 900 daltons) molecules that have multiple biological activities relevant to the maintenance of brain function. Over the last few years, we have identified an orally active, novel neuroprotective and cognition-enhancing molecule, the flavonoid fisetin. Fisetin not only has direct antioxidant activity but it can also increase the intracellular levels of glutathione, the major intracellular antioxidant. Fisetin can also activate key neurotrophic factor signaling pathways. In addition, it has anti-inflammatory activity against microglial cells and inhibits the activity of lipoxygenases, thereby reducing the production of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids and their by-products. This wide range of actions suggests that fisetin has the ability to reduce the impact of age-related neurological diseases on brain function. PMID:25961687

  19. GLT-1-Dependent Disruption of CNS Glutamate Homeostasis and Neuronal Function by the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    David, Clément N.; Frias, Elma S.; Szu, Jenny I.; Vieira, Philip A.; Hubbard, Jacqueline A.; Lovelace, Jonathan; Michael, Marena; Worth, Danielle; McGovern, Kathryn E.; Ethell, Iryna M.; Stanley, B. Glenn; Korzus, Edward; Fiacco, Todd A.; Binder, Devin K.; Wilson, Emma H.

    2016-01-01

    The immune privileged nature of the CNS can make it vulnerable to chronic and latent infections. Little is known about the effects of lifelong brain infections, and thus inflammation, on the neurological health of the host. Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite that can infect any mammalian nucleated cell with average worldwide seroprevalence rates of 30%. Infection by Toxoplasma is characterized by the lifelong presence of parasitic cysts within neurons in the brain, requiring a competent immune system to prevent parasite reactivation and encephalitis. In the immunocompetent individual, Toxoplasma infection is largely asymptomatic, however many recent studies suggest a strong correlation with certain neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Here, we demonstrate a significant reduction in the primary astrocytic glutamate transporter, GLT-1, following infection with Toxoplasma. Using microdialysis of the murine frontal cortex over the course of infection, a significant increase in extracellular concentrations of glutamate is observed. Consistent with glutamate dysregulation, analysis of neurons reveal changes in morphology including a reduction in dendritic spines, VGlut1 and NeuN immunoreactivity. Furthermore, behavioral testing and EEG recordings point to significant changes in neuronal output. Finally, these changes in neuronal connectivity are dependent on infection-induced downregulation of GLT-1 as treatment with the ß-lactam antibiotic ceftriaxone, rescues extracellular glutamate concentrations, neuronal pathology and function. Altogether, these data demonstrate that following an infection with T. gondii, the delicate regulation of glutamate by astrocytes is disrupted and accounts for a range of deficits observed in chronic infection. PMID:27281462

  20. CNS Tumors in Neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Campian, Jian; Gutmann, David H

    2017-07-20

    Neurofibromatosis (NF) encompasses a group of distinct genetic disorders in which affected children and adults are prone to the development of benign and malignant tumors of the nervous system. The purpose of this review is to discuss the spectrum of CNS tumors arising in individuals with NF type 1 (NF1) and NF type 2 (NF2), their pathogenic etiologies, and the rational treatment options for people with these neoplasms. This article is a review of preclinical and clinical data focused on the treatment of the most common CNS tumors encountered in children and adults with NF1 and NF2. Although children with NF1 are at risk for developing low-grade gliomas of the optic pathway and brainstem, individuals with NF2 typically manifest low-grade tumors affecting the cranial nerves (vestibular schwannomas), meninges (meningiomas), and spinal cord (ependymomas). With the identification of the NF1 and NF2 genes, molecularly targeted therapies are beginning to emerge, as a result of a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying NF1 and NF2 protein function. As we enter into an era of precision oncology, a more comprehensive awareness of the factors that increase the risk of developing CNS cancers in affected individuals, coupled with a greater appreciation of the cellular and molecular determinants that maintain tumor growth, will undoubtedly yield more effective therapies for these cancer predisposition syndromes.

  1. Play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    Designing a game with a serious purpose involves considering the worlds of Reality and Meaning yet it is undeniably impossible to create a game without a third world, one that is specifically concerned with what makes a game a game: the play elements. This third world, the world of people like designers and artists, and disciplines as computer science and game design, I call the world of Play and this level is devoted to it. The level starts off with some of the misperceptions people have of play. Unlike some may think, we play all the time, even when we grow old—this was also very noticeable in designing the game Levee Patroller as the team exhibited very playful behavior at many occasions. From there, I go into the aspects that characterize this world. The first concerns the goal of the game. This relates to the objectives people have to achieve within the game. This is constituted by the second aspect: the gameplay. Taking actions and facing challenges is subsequently constituted by a gameworld, which concerns the third aspect. And all of it is not possible without the fourth and final aspect, the type of technology that creates and facilitates the game. The four aspects together make up a “game concept” and from this world such a concept can be judged on the basis of three closely interrelated criteria: engagement, immersion, and fun.

  2. Functional Expression of P-glycoprotein and Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides at the Blood-Brain Barrier: Understanding Transport Mechanisms for Improved CNS Drug Delivery?

    PubMed

    Abdullahi, Wazir; Davis, Thomas P; Ronaldson, Patrick T

    2017-07-01

    Drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) is greatly limited by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Physical and biochemical properties of the BBB have rendered treatment of CNS diseases, including those with a hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) component, extremely difficult. Targeting endogenous BBB transporters from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily (i.e., P-glycoprotein (P-gp)) or from the solute carrier (SLC) family (i.e., organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs in humans; Oatps in rodents)) has been suggested as a strategy that can improve delivery of drugs to the brain. With respect to P-gp, direct pharmacological inhibition using small molecules or selective regulation by targeting intracellular signaling pathways has been explored. These approaches have been largely unsuccessful due to toxicity issues and unpredictable pharmacokinetics. Therefore, our laboratory has proposed that optimization of CNS drug delivery, particularly for treatment of diseases with an H/R component, can be achieved by targeting Oatp isoforms at the BBB. As the major drug transporting Oatp isoform, Oatp1a4 has demonstrated blood-to-brain transport of substrate drugs with neuroprotective properties. Furthermore, our laboratory has shown that targeting Oatp1a4 regulation (i.e., TGF-β signaling mediated via the ALK-1 and ALK-5 transmembrane receptors) represents an opportunity to control Oatp1a4 functional expression for the purpose of delivering therapeutics to the CNS. In this review, we will discuss limitations of targeting P-gp-mediated transport activity and the advantages of targeting Oatp-mediated transport. Through this discussion, we will also provide critical information on novel approaches to improve CNS drug delivery by targeting endogenous uptake transporters expressed at the BBB.

  3. Physiological differences in professional basketball players as a function of playing position and level of play.

    PubMed

    Sallet, P; Perrier, D; Ferret, J M; Vitelli, V; Baverel, G

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this investigation is to evaluate the physical and physiological characteristics of different first (ProA) and second division (ProB) professional basketball players, and to relate them to playing position and level of play. A total of 58 players were divided into ProA and ProB groups and were assessed for physical characteristics, maximal treadmill test and a 30 s all-out test. The sample included 22 centers, 22 forwards and 14 guards. Centers were significantly taller and heavier (203.9+/-5.3 cm and 103.9+/-12.4 kg) than forwards (195.8+/-4.8 cm and 89.4+/-7.1 kg) and guards (185.7+/-6.9 and 82+/-8.8 kg) and also had higher body fat percentages than the other groups. Forwards were also significantly taller than guards. Centers presented a lower maximal aerobic velocity (kmxh-1) than guards (15.5+/-1.2 vs 16.8+/-1.5, P<0.05) on the maximal treadmill test and a lower maximal velocity (rpm) than forwards (156.5+/-18.4 vs 170.3+/-18.3, P<0.05) on the 30 s all-out test. VO2max (mlxmin-1xkg-1) was significantly lower for ProA (53.7+/-6.7) compared to ProB (56.5+/-7.7) players and the fatigue index on the 30 s all-out test was higher for the ProA group (P<0.05). Many physical differences, most notably size, exist between players as a function of their playing position. But these differences have no relationship to the level of play of professional players. General aerobic capacity is fairly homogeneous between playing position and level of play, even if there are observable VO2max differences due to inter-individual profiles. On the other hand, anaerobic capacity seems to be a better predictor of playing level even though it is not clear whether such capacity comes from specific training in ProA, or from an initial selection criteria.

  4. Nanomedicines for the Treatment of CNS Diseases.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jessica L; Mahato, Ram I

    2017-03-01

    Targeting and delivering macromolecular therapeutics to the central nervous system (CNS) has been a major challenge. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the main obstacle that must be overcome to allow compounds to reach their targets in the brain. Therefore, much effort has been channelled into improving transport of therapeutics across the BBB and into the CNS including the use of nanoparticles. In this thematic issue, several reviews and original research are presented that address "Nanomedicines for CNS Diseases." The articles in this issue are concentrated on either CNS-HIV disease or CNS tumors. In regards to CNS-HIV disease, there are two reviews that discuss the role of nanoparticles for improving the delivery of HIV therapeutics to the CNS. In addition, there are two original articles focusing on therapies for CNS-HIV, one of them uses nanoparticles for delivery of siRNA specific to a key protein in autophagy to microglia, and another discusses nanoparticle delivery of a soluble mediator to suppress neuroinflammation. Furthermore, a comprehensive review about gene therapy for CNS neurological diseases is also included. Finally, this issue also includes review articles on enhanced drug targeting to CNS tumors. These articles include a review on the use of nanoparticles for CNS tumors, a review on functionalization (ligands) of nanoparticles for drug targeting to the brain tumor by overcoming BBB, and the final review discusses the use of macrophages as a delivery vehicle to CNS tumors. This thematic issue provides a wealth of knowledge on using nanomedicines for CNS diseases.

  5. Oligodendrocyte Regeneration and CNS Remyelination Require TACE/ADAM17.

    PubMed

    Palazuelos, Javier; Klingener, Michael; Raines, Elaine W; Crawford, Howard C; Aguirre, Adan

    2015-09-02

    The identification of the molecular network that supports oligodendrocyte (OL) regeneration under demyelinating conditions has been a primary goal for regenerative medicine in demyelinating disorders. We recently described an essential function for TACE/ADAM17 in regulating oligodendrogenesis during postnatal myelination, but it is unknown whether this protein also plays a role in OL regeneration and remyelination under demyelinating conditions. By using genetic mouse models to achieve selective gain- or loss-of-function of TACE or EGFR in OL lineage cells in vivo, we found that TACE is critical for EGFR activation in OLs following demyelination, and therefore, for sustaining OL regeneration and CNS remyelination. TACE deficiency in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells following demyelination disturbs OL lineage cell expansion and survival, leading to a delay in the remyelination process. EGFR overexpression in TACE deficient OLs in vivo restores OL development and postnatal CNS myelination, but also OL regeneration and CNS remyelination following demyelination. Our study reveals an essential function of TACE in supporting OL regeneration and CNS remyelination that may contribute to the design of new strategies for therapeutic intervention in demyelinating disorders by promoting oligodendrocyte regeneration and myelin repair. Oligodendrocyte (OL) regeneration has emerged as a promising new approach for the treatment of demyelinating disorders. By using genetic mouse models to selectively delete TACE expression in oligodendrocyte progenitors cells (OPs), we found that TACE/ADAM17 is required for supporting OL regeneration following demyelination. TACE genetic depletion in OPs abrogates EGFR activation in OL lineage cells, and perturbs cell expansion and survival, blunting the process of CNS remyelination. Moreover, EGFR overexpression in TACE-deficient OPs in vivo overcomes the defects in OL development during postnatal development but also OL regeneration during CNS

  6. Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors & CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) are complex disease states that represent a major challenge for modern medicine. Although etiology is often unknown, it is established that multiple factors such as defects in genetics and/or epigenetics, the environment as well as imbalance in neurotransmitter receptor systems are all at play in determining an individual’s susceptibility to disease. Gene therapy is currently not available and therefore, most conditions are treated with pharmacological agents that modify neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Here, I provide a review of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) and the roles they fulfill in numerous CNS disorders. Specifically, I argue that our understanding of iGluRs has reached a critical turning point to permit, for the first time, a comprehensive re-evaluation of their role in the cause of disease. I illustrate this by highlighting how defects in AMPA receptor trafficking are important to Fragile X mental retardation and ectopic expression of kainate (KA) receptor synapses contributes to the pathology of temporal lobe epilepsy. Finally, I discuss how parallel advances in studies of other neurotransmitter systems may allow pharmacologists to work towards a cure for many CNS disorders rather than developing drugs to treat their symptoms. PMID:18537642

  7. Fantasy Play of Preschoolers as a Function of Toy Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einsiedler, Wolfgang

    Two studies are presented which investigate the influence of various toy structures on the frequency of individual fantasy play forms in 3- to 6-year-old children. In the first study, the effects of high-realistic/high-complexity and low-realistic/low-complexity toy structures were compared. There were significant main effects for the factor toy…

  8. Preschoolers' Cognitive and Emotional Self-Regulation in Pretend Play: Relations with Executive Functions and Quality of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slot, Pauline Louise; Mulder, Hanna; Verhagen, Josje; Leseman, Paul P. M.

    2017-01-01

    The preschool period is marked by rapid growth of children's self-regulation and related executive functions. Self-regulation is considered an important aspect of school readiness and is related to academic and social--emotional outcomes in childhood. Pretend play, as part of the early childhood curriculum, is hypothesized to support…

  9. The Extracellular Environment of the CNS: Influence on Plasticity, Sprouting, and Axonal Regeneration after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Lindsey H.

    2018-01-01

    The extracellular environment of the central nervous system (CNS) becomes highly structured and organized as the nervous system matures. The extracellular space of the CNS along with its subdomains plays a crucial role in the function and stability of the CNS. In this review, we have focused on two components of the neuronal extracellular environment, which are important in regulating CNS plasticity including the extracellular matrix (ECM) and myelin. The ECM consists of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and tenascins, which are organized into unique structures called perineuronal nets (PNNs). PNNs associate with the neuronal cell body and proximal dendrites of predominantly parvalbumin-positive interneurons, forming a robust lattice-like structure. These developmentally regulated structures are maintained in the adult CNS and enhance synaptic stability. After injury, however, CSPGs and tenascins contribute to the structure of the inhibitory glial scar, which actively prevents axonal regeneration. Myelin sheaths and mature adult oligodendrocytes, despite their important role in signal conduction in mature CNS axons, contribute to the inhibitory environment existing after injury. As such, unlike the peripheral nervous system, the CNS is unable to revert to a “developmental state” to aid neuronal repair. Modulation of these external factors, however, has been shown to promote growth, regeneration, and functional plasticity after injury. This review will highlight some of the factors that contribute to or prevent plasticity, sprouting, and axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury. PMID:29849554

  10. IGF-1 delivery to CNS attenuates motor neuron cell death but does not improve motor function in type III SMA mice.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Kai; Chen, Yi-Chun; Cheng, Wei-Cheng; Ting, Chen-Hung; Dodge, James C; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Cheng, Seng H; Passini, Marco A

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of administering a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding human IGF-1 (AAV2/1-hIGF-1) into the deep cerebellar nucleus (DCN) of a type III SMA mouse model was evaluated. High levels of IGF-1 transcripts and protein were detected in the spinal cord at 2 months post-injection demonstrating that axonal connections between the cerebellum and spinal cord were able to act as conduits for the viral vector and protein to the spinal cord. Mice treated with AAV2/1-hIGF-1 and analyzed 8 months later showed changes in endogenous Bax and Bcl-xl levels in spinal cord motor neurons that were consistent with IGF-1-mediated anti-apoptotic effects on motor neurons. However, although AAV2/1-hIGF-1 treatment reduced the extent of motor neuron cell death, the majority of rescued motor neurons were non-functional, as they lacked axons that innervated the muscles. Furthermore, treated SMA mice exhibited abnormal muscle fibers, aberrant neuromuscular junction structure, and impaired performance on motor function tests. These data indicate that although CNS-directed expression of IGF-1 could reduce motor neuron cell death, this did not translate to improvements in motor function in an adult mouse model of type III SMA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of high level play as a predictor social functioning in autism.

    PubMed

    Manning, Margaret M; Wainwright, Laurel D

    2010-05-01

    Play and social abilities of a group of children diagnosed with high functioning autism were compared to a second group diagnosed with a variety of developmental language disorders (DLD). The children with autism engaged in fewer acts of high level play. The children with autism also had significantly lower social functioning than the DLD group early in the play session; however, these differences were no longer apparent by the end of the play session. In addition, a significant association existed between play and social functioning regardless of diagnosis. This suggests that play may act as a current indicator of social ability while providing an arena for social skills practice.

  12. Transcriptional Regulation of CXCL5 in HIV-1-Infected Macrophages and Its Functional Consequences on CNS Pathology.

    PubMed

    Guha, Debjani; Klamar, Cynthia R; Reinhart, Todd; Ayyavoo, Velpandi

    2015-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected monocytes/macrophages and microglia release increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including ELR+ (containing glutamic acid-leucine-arginine motif) chemokines. To investigate the role of HIV-1 infection on chemokine regulation, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) from normal donors were infected with HIV-1 and the expression of chemokines and their downstream biological functions were evaluated. Among the tested chemokines, CXCL5 was upregulated significantly both at the mRNA and protein level in the HIV-1-infected MDMs compared with mock-infected cultures. Upregulation of CXCL5 in the HIV-1-infected MDMs is, in part, regulated by increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production and phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Functional analyses indicate that HIV-1-induced overexpression of CXCL5 has enhanced the ability to attract neutrophils, as observed by chemotaxis assay. However, exposure of NT2, SH-SY5Y cells, and primary neurons to HIV-1-infected MDM supernatants resulted in cell death that was not rescued by anti-CXCL5 antibody suggesting that CXCL5 does not have direct effect on neuronal death. Together, these results suggest that the increased level of CXCL5 in tissue compartments, including the central nervous system of HIV-1-infected individuals might alter the inflammatory response through the infiltration of neutrophils into tissue compartment, thus causing secondary effects on resident cells.

  13. [INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL FACTORS ON PERSONAL SOCIAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL ADAPTATION AND FUNCTIONAL STATE OF THE CNS IN NORTHERN CHILDREN].

    PubMed

    Iovleva, N N; Soroko, S I

    2015-06-01

    The results of the socio-psychological and psycho-physiological study of children and adolescents rural secondary school in a remote area of the Arkhangelsk region were studied. It was found that the poor situation of children in families at social risk leads to a decrease in their school performance, motivation to succeed and, in some cases, to reduce their personal social and psychological adaptation. However, in general, the level of personal social and psychological adaptation in the majority of surveyed students is high enough. As complementary social institutions, the family and the school, in some cases, can compensate for a number of adverse social and psychological factors. Pupils from social risk groups functional state of the central nervous system has been significantly reduced compared with children who are brought up in affluent families. In the North adverse social factors may increase the effects of the harsh climatic conditions and are an important risk factor for children's health.

  14. EMMPRIN, an upstream regulator of MMPs, in CNS biology.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Deepak Kumar; Hahn, Jennifer Nancy; Yong, V Wee

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are engaged in pathologies associated with infections, tumors, autoimmune disorders and neurological dysfunctions. With the identification of an upstream regulator of MMPs, EMMPRIN (Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, CD147), it is relevant to address if EMMPRIN plays a role in the pathology of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. This would enable the possibility of a more upstream and effective therapeutic target. Indeed, conditions including gliomas, Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS), and other insults such as hypoxia/ischemia show elevated levels of EMMPRIN which correlate with MMP production. In contrast, given EMMPRIN's role in CNS homeostasis with respect to regulation of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) and interactions with adhesion molecules including integrins, we need to consider that EMMPRIN may also serve important regulatory or protective functions. This review summarizes the current understanding of EMMPRIN's involvement in CNS homeostasis, its possible roles in escalating or reducing neural injury, and the mechanisms of EMMPRIN including and apart from MMP induction. Copyright © 2015 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Review of Interventions to Increase Functional and Symbolic Play in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Russell; Machalicek, Wendy; O'Reilly, Mark; Sigafoos, Jeff; Rispoli, Mandy; Shogren, Karrie; Regester, April

    2009-01-01

    Play is widely acknowledged to be an integral part of human development and children with autism often experience substantial delays in the development of play behaviors. This review updates older reviews by covering the last 10 years of research targeting functional and symbolic play in children with autism. The review differs from other reviews…

  16. Evolutionary Functions of Social Play: Life Histories, Sex Differences, and Emotion Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFreniere, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Many research findings about animal play apply to children's play, revealing structural and functional similarities with mammals in general and primates in particular. After an introduction to life-history theory, and before turning to humans, the author reviews research about the two mammals in which play has been studied the most extensively:…

  17. Brief Functional Analysis and Intervention Evaluation for Treatment of Saliva-Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luiselli, James K.; Ricciardi, Joseph N.; Schmidt, Sarah; Tarr, Melissa

    2004-01-01

    We conducted a brief (8 days) functional analysis to identify sources of control over persistent saliva-play displayed by a 6-year old child with autism in a school setting. The functional analysis suggested that saliva-play was maintained by automatic reinforcement, leading to an intervention evaluation (3 days) that compared two methods of…

  18. CNS Diseases and Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Allegri, Pia; Rissotto, Roberto; Herbort, Carl P.; Murialdo, Ugo

    2011-01-01

    A number of inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic and idiopathic disorders affect the eye and the central nervous system (CNS) concurrently or at different time frames. These conditions pose a diagnostic challenge to the clinician since they may present with similar ocular and neurological manifestations. The purpose of this review is to describe major neurological syndromes including multiple sclerosis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, other autoimmune syndromes, and several infectious diseases which may affect the eye. This article may serve as a guide for the diagnosis and treatment of such disorders. It should be noted that these conditions have been viewed from a neurologist’s perspective thereby neurologic involvement is stressed. PMID:22454751

  19. Engineering Play: Exploring Associations with Executive Function, Mathematical Ability, and Spatial Ability in Preschool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Zachary Samuel

    Engineering play is a new perspective on preschool education that views constructive play as an engineering design process that parallels the way engineers think and work when they develop engineered solutions to human problems (Bairaktarova, Evangelou, Bagiati, & Brophy, 2011). Early research from this perspective supports its use in framing play as a key learning context. However, no research to date has examined associations between engineering play and other factors linked with early school success, such as executive function, mathematical ability, and spatial ability. Additionally, more research is needed to further validate a new engineering play observational measure. This study had two main goals: (1) to gather early validity data on the engineering play measure as a potentially useful instrument for documenting the occurrence of children's engineering play behaviors in educational contexts, such as block play. This was done by testing the factor structure of the engineering play behaviors in this sample and their association with preschoolers' planning, a key aspect of the engineering design process; (2) to explore associations between preschoolers' engineering play and executive function, mathematical ability, and spatial ability. Participants included 110 preschoolers (62 girls; 48 boys; M = 58.47 months) from 10 classrooms in the Midwest United States coded for their frequency of engagement in each of the nine engineering play behaviors. A confirmatory factor analysis resulted in one engineering play factor including six of the engineering play behaviors. A series of marginal regression models revealed that the engineering play factor was significantly and positively associated with the spatial horizontal rotation transformation. However, engineering play was not significantly related to planning ability, executive function, informal mathematical abilities, or other spatial transformation skills. Follow-up analyses revealed significant positive

  20. Protective and pathological immunity during CNS infections

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Robyn S.; Hunter, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of immune privilege of the central nervous system (CNS) has dominated the study of inflammatory processes in the brain. However, clinically relevant models have highlighted the innate pathways that limit pathogen invasion of the CNS and that adaptive immunity mediates control of many neural infections. Because protective responses can result in bystander damage there are regulatory mechanisms that balance protective and pathological inflammation but which may also allow microbial persistence. The focus of this review is to consider the host-pathogen interactions that influence neurotropic infections and to highlight advances in understanding of innate and adaptive mechanisms of resistance as key determinants of the outcome of CNS infection. Advances in these areas have broadened our comprehension of how the immune system functions in the brain and can readily overcome immune privilege. PMID:28636958

  1. Fact or fiction? A longitudinal study of play and the development of reflective functioning.

    PubMed

    Tessier, V P; Normandin, L; Ensink, K; Fonagy, P

    2016-01-01

    In Fonagy and Target's (1996, 2000) developmental model of mentalization, play is theorized as a precursor of later mentalization and reflective function (RF); however, the relationship between play and later mentalization and RF has yet to be empirically tested. These processes are particularly important in the context of trauma, but an empirical model of the relationships among mentalization, play, and trauma is currently lacking. The aim of this longitudinal study was to examine whether children's capacity to engage in pretend play, to symbolize, and to make play narratives was associated with later RF in those children. Thirty-nine sexually abused children and 21 nonabused children (aged 3 to 8) participated in the study. The Children's Play Therapy Instrument was used to assess children's free play. Three years after the play assessment, children's RF was assessed using the Child Attachment Interview, coded with the Child and Adolescent Reflective Functioning Scale. Pretend play completion was associated with later other-understanding. Play was also found to mediate the relationship between sexual abuse and children's later mentalization regarding others. These findings are consistent with Fonagy and Target's emphasis on the role of pretend play in the development of a nuanced sense of the qualities of the mind and reality. In sum, the findings lend support to Fonagy and Target's account of playing with reality, and the development of mentalization suggests that it may be more than "fiction." Furthermore, these results suggest that children's ability to create meaningful and coherent play sequences after sexual abuse is associated with the development of a better understanding of their relationships with others. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed.

  2. Executive function predicts the development of play skills for verbal preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Faja, Susan; Dawson, Geraldine; Sullivan, Katherine; Meltzoff, Andrew N; Estes, Annette; Bernier, Raphael

    2016-12-01

    Executive function and play skills develop in early childhood and are linked to cognitive and language ability. The present study examined these abilities longitudinally in two groups with autism spectrum disorder-a group with higher initial language (n = 30) and a group with lower initial language ability (n = 36). Among the lower language group, concurrent nonverbal cognitive ability contributed most to individual differences in executive function and play skills. For the higher language group, executive function during preschool significantly predicted play ability at age 6 over and above intelligence, but early play did not predict later executive function. These results suggested that factors related to the development of play and executive function differ for subgroups of children with different language abilities and that early executive function skills may be critical in order for verbal children with autism to develop play. Autism Res 2016, 9: 1274-1284. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Microbial induction of vascular pathology in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Kang, Silvia S; McGavern, Dorian B

    2010-09-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is a finely tuned organ that participates in nearly every aspect of our day-to-day function. Neurons lie at the core of this functional unit and maintain an active dialogue with one another as well as their fellow CNS residents (e.g. astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia). Because of this complex dialogue, it is essential that the CNS milieu be tightly regulated in order to permit uninterrupted and efficient neural chemistry. This is accomplished in part by anatomical barriers that segregate vascular components from the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and brain parenchyma. These barriers impede entry of noxious materials and enable the CNS to maintain requisite protein and ionic balances for constant electrochemical signaling. Under homeostatic conditions, the CNS is protected by the presence of specialized endothelium/epithelium, the blood brain barrier (BBB), and the blood-CSF barrier. However, following CNS infection these protective barriers can be comprised, sometimes resulting in severe neurological complications triggered by an imbalance or blockage of neural chemistry. In some instances, these disruptions are severe enough to be fatal. This review focuses on a selection of microbes (both viruses and parasites) that compromise vascular barriers and induce neurological complications upon gaining access to the CNS. Emphasis is placed on CNS diseases that result from a pathogenic interplay between host immune defenses and the invading microbe.

  4. Microbial Induction of Vascular Pathology in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Silvia S.

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is a finely tuned organ that participates in nearly every aspect of our day-to-day function. Neurons lie at the core of this functional unit and maintain an active dialogue with one another as well as their fellow CNS residents (e.g. astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia). Because of this complex dialogue, it is essential that the CNS milieu be tightly regulated in order to permit uninterrupted and efficient neural chemistry. This is accomplished in part by anatomical barriers that segregate vascular components from the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and brain parenchyma. These barriers impede entry of noxious materials and enable the CNS to maintain requisite protein and ionic balances for constant electrochemical signaling. Under homeostatic conditions, the CNS is protected by the presence of specialized endothelium/epithelium, the blood brain barrier (BBB), and the blood-CSF barrier. However, following CNS infection these protective barriers can be comprised, sometimes resulting in severe neurological complications triggered by an imbalance or blockage of neural chemistry. In some instances, these disruptions are severe enough to be fatal. This review focuses on a selection of microbes (both viruses and parasites) that compromise vascular barriers and induce neurological complications upon gaining access to the CNS. Emphasis is placed on CNS diseases that result from a pathogenic interplay between host immune defenses and the invading microbe. PMID:20401700

  5. CNS angiogenesis and barriergenesis occur simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Umans, Robyn A; Henson, Hannah E; Mu, Fangzhou; Parupalli, Chaithanyarani; Ju, Bensheng; Peters, Jennifer L; Lanham, Kevin A; Plavicki, Jessica S; Taylor, Michael R

    2017-05-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a vital role in the central nervous system (CNS). A comprehensive understanding of BBB development has been hampered by difficulties in observing the differentiation of brain endothelial cells (BECs) in real-time. Here, we generated two transgenic zebrafish line, Tg(glut1b:mCherry) and Tg(plvap:EGFP), to serve as in vivo reporters of BBB development. We showed that barriergenesis (i.e. the induction of BEC differentiation) occurs immediately as endothelial tips cells migrate into the brain parenchyma. Using the Tg(glut1b:mCherry) transgenic line, we performed a genetic screen and identified a zebrafish mutant with a nonsense mutation in gpr124, a gene known to play a role in CNS angiogenesis and BBB development. We also showed that our transgenic plvap:EGFP line, a reporter of immature brain endothelium, is initially expressed in newly formed brain endothelial cells, but subsides during BBB maturation. Our results demonstrate the ability to visualize the in vivo differentiation of brain endothelial cells into the BBB phenotype and establish that CNS angiogenesis and barriergenesis occur simultaneously. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Relationships between electronic game play, obesity, and psychosocial functioning in young men.

    PubMed

    Wack, Elizabeth; Tantleff-Dunn, Stacey

    2009-04-01

    Most estimates suggest that American youth are spending a large amount of time playing video and computer games, spurring researchers to examine the impact this media has on various aspects of health and psychosocial functioning. The current study investigated relationships between frequency of electronic game play and obesity, the social/emotional context of electronic game play, and academic performance among 219 college-aged males. Current game players reported a weekly average of 9.73 hours of game play, with almost 10% of current players reporting an average of 35 hours of play per week. Results indicated that frequency of play was not significantly related to body mass index or grade point average. However, there was a significant positive correlation between frequency of play and self-reported frequency of playing when bored, lonely, or stressed. As opposed to the general conception of electronic gaming as detrimental to functioning, the results suggest that gaming among college-aged men may provide a healthy source of socialization, relaxation, and coping.

  7. Models of CNS radiation damage during space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopewell, J. W.

    1994-10-01

    The primary structural and functional arrangement of the different cell types within the CNS are reviewed. This was undertaken with a view to providing a better understanding of the complex interrelationships that may contribute to the pathogenesis of lesions in this tissue after exposure to ionizing radiation. The spectrum of possible CNS radiation-induced syndromes are discussed although not all have an immediate relevance to exposure during space flight. The specific characteristics of the lesions observed would appear to be dose related. Very high doses may produce an acute CNS syndrome that can cause death. Of the delayed lesions, selective coagulation necrosis of white matter and a later appearing vascular microangiopathy, have been reported in patients after cancer therapy doses. Lower doses, perhaps very low doses, may produce a delayed generalised CNS atrophy; this effect and the probability of the induction of CNS tumors could potentially have the greatest significance for space flight.

  8. The Association Between Video Game Play and Cognitive Function: Does Gaming Platform Matter?

    PubMed

    Huang, Vivian; Young, Michaelia; Fiocco, Alexandra J

    2017-11-01

    Despite consumer growth, few studies have evaluated the cognitive effects of gaming using mobile devices. This study examined the association between video game play platform and cognitive performance. Furthermore, the differential effect of video game genre (action versus nonaction) was explored. Sixty undergraduate students completed a video game experience questionnaire, and we divided them into three groups: mobile video game players (MVGPs), console/computer video game players (CVGPs), and nonvideo game players (NVGPs). Participants completed a cognitive battery to assess executive function, and learning and memory. Controlling for sex and ethnicity, analyses showed that frequent video game play is associated with enhanced executive function, but not learning and memory. MVGPs were significantly more accurate on working memory performances than NVGPs. Both MVGPs and CVGPs were similarly associated with enhanced cognitive function, suggesting that platform does not significantly determine the benefits of frequent video game play. Video game platform was found to differentially associate with preference for action video game genre and motivation for gaming. Exploratory analyses show that sex significantly effects frequent video game play, platform and genre preference, and cognitive function. This study represents a novel exploration of the relationship between mobile video game play and cognition and adds support to the cognitive benefits of frequent video game play.

  9. Eos is redundant for T regulatory cell function, but plays an important role in IL-2 and Th17 production by CD4+ T conventional cells

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Metidji, Amina; Glass, Deborah Dacek; Thornton, Angela M.; Ikeda, Tohru; Morgan, Bruce A.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Eos is a transcription factor that belongs to the Ikaros family of transcription factors. Eos has been reported to be a T regulatory cell (Treg) signature gene, to play a critical role in Treg suppressor functions, and to maintain Treg stability. We have utilized mice with a global deficiency of Eos to re-examine the role of Eos expression in both Treg and T conventional (Tconv) cells. Treg from Eos deficient (Eos−/−) mice developed normally, displayed a normal Treg phenotype, and exhibited normal suppressor function in vitro. Eos−/− Treg were as effective as Treg from wild type (WT) mice in suppression of inflammation in a model of inflammatory bowel disease. Bone marrow (BM) from Eos−/− mice was as effective as BM from WT mice in controlling T cell activation when used to reconstitute immunodeficient mice in the presence of Scurfy fetal liver cells. Surprisingly, Eos was expressed in activated Tconv cells and was required for IL-2 production, CD25 expression and proliferation in vitro by CD4+ Tconv cells. Eos−/− mice developed more severe Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis than WT mice, displayed increased numbers of effector T cells in the periphery and CNS, and amplified IL-17 production. In conclusion, our studies are not consistent with a role for Eos in Treg development and function, but demonstrate that Eos plays an important role in the activation and differentiation of Tconv cells. PMID:26062998

  10. The effects of fantastical pretend-play on the development of executive functions: An intervention study.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Rachel B; Gilpin, Ansley T; Brown, Melissa M; Meyer, Brooke A

    2016-05-01

    Although recent correlational studies have found a relationship between fantasy orientation (FO; i.e., a child's propensity to play in a fantastical realm) and higher order cognitive skills called executive functions (EFs), no work has addressed the causality and directionality of this relationship. The current study experimentally examined the directionality of the observed relationship between FO and EF development in preschool-aged children through an innovative play intervention employing a randomized controlled design. A sample of 110 children between the ages of 3 and 5years were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: fantastical pretend-play intervention, non-imaginative play intervention, or business-as-usual control. Results revealed that children who participated in a 5-week fantastical pretend-play intervention showed improvements in EFs, whereas children in the other two conditions did not. Within the fantastical pretend-play condition, children who were highly engaged in the play and those who were highly fantastical demonstrated the greatest gains in EFs. These data provide evidence for the equifinal relationship between fantasy-oriented play and EF development, such that engaging in fantasy-oriented play may be one of many ways to directly enhance EF development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional integrity of the habenula is necessary for social play behaviour in rats

    PubMed Central

    van Kerkhof, Linda W. M.; Damsteegt, Ruth; Trezza, Viviana; Voorn, Pieter; Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J.

    2013-01-01

    During post-weaning development, a marked increase in peer–peer interactions is observed in all mammals, including humans, which is signified by the abundance of social play behaviour. Social play is highly rewarding, and known to be modulated through monoaminergic neurotransmission. Recently, the habenula has received widespread attention because of its role in the regulation of monoaminergic neurotransmission as well as in a variety of emotional and cognitive functions. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the involvement of the habenula in social play behaviour. Using the neuronal activity maker c-fos, we showed that the habenula was activated after 24 h of social isolation in adolescent rats, and that a subsequent social play interaction reduced c-fos activity in the medial part of the lateral habenula. This suggested that habenula activity modulated the aversive properties of social isolation, which was alleviated by the positive effects of social play. Furthermore, after functional inactivation of the habenula, using a mixture of the GABA receptor agonists baclofen and muscimol, social play behaviour was markedly reduced, whereby responsiveness to play solicitation was more sensitive to habenula inactivation than play solicitation itself. Together, our data indicated an important role for the habenula in the processing of positive (i.e. social play behaviour) and negative (i.e. social isolation) social information in adolescent rats. Altered habenula function might therefore be related to the social impairments in childhood and adolescent psychiatric disorders such as autism, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and early-onset schizophrenia. PMID:24103016

  12. Functional integrity of the habenula is necessary for social play behaviour in rats.

    PubMed

    van Kerkhof, Linda W M; Damsteegt, Ruth; Trezza, Viviana; Voorn, Pieter; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2013-11-01

    During post-weaning development, a marked increase in peer-peer interactions is observed in mammals, including humans, which is signified by the abundance of social play behaviour. Social play is highly rewarding, and known to be modulated through monoaminergic neurotransmission. Recently, the habenula has received widespread attention because of its role in the regulation of monoaminergic neurotransmission as well as in a variety of emotional and cognitive functions. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the involvement of the habenula in social play behaviour. Using the neuronal activity maker c-fos, we showed that the habenula was activated after 24 h of social isolation in adolescent rats, and that a subsequent social play interaction reduced c-fos activity in the medial part of the lateral habenula. This suggested that habenula activity modulated the aversive properties of social isolation, which was alleviated by the positive effects of social play. Furthermore, after functional inactivation of the habenula, using a mixture of the GABA receptor agonists baclofen and muscimol, social play behaviour was markedly reduced, whereby responsiveness to play solicitation was more sensitive to habenula inactivation than play solicitation itself. Together, our data indicate an important role for the habenula in the processing of positive (i.e., social play behaviour) and negative (i.e., social isolation) social information in adolescent rats. Altered habenula function might therefore be related to the social impairments in childhood and adolescent psychiatric disorders such as autism, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and early-onset schizophrenia. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The Therapeutic Potential of Targeting Substance P/NK-1R Interactions in Inflammatory CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. Brittany; Young, Ada D.; Marriott, Ian

    2017-01-01

    The inflammatory responses of resident central nervous system (CNS) cells are now known to play a critical role in the initiation and progression of an array of infectious and sterile neuroinflammatory disorders such as meningitis, encephalitis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and multiple sclerosis (MS). Regulating glial inflammatory responses in a timely manner is therefore critical in preserving normal CNS functions. The neuropeptide substance P is produced at high levels within the CNS and its selective receptor, the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK-1R), is abundantly expressed by neurons and is present on glial cell types including microglia and astrocytes. In addition to its functions as a neurotransmitter in the perception of pain and its essential role in gut motility, this tachykinin is widely recognized to exacerbate inflammation at peripheral sites including the skin, gastrointestinal tract and the lungs. Recently, a number of studies have identified a role for substance P and NK-1R interactions in neuroinflammation and described the ability of this neuropeptide to alter the immune functions of activated microglia and astrocytes. In this review article, we describe the expression of substance P and its receptor by resident CNS cells, and we discuss the ability of this neuropeptide to exacerbate the inflammatory responses of glia and immune cells that are recruited to the brain during neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, we discuss the available data indicating that the NK-1R-mediated augmentation of such responses appears to be detrimental during microbial infection and some sterile neurodegenerative disorders, and propose the repurposed use of NK-1R antagonists, of a type that are currently approved as anti-emetic and anti-anxiolytic agents, as an adjunct therapy to ameliorate the inflammatory CNS damage in these conditions. PMID:28101005

  14. TACE/ADAM17 is essential for oligodendrocyte development and CNS myelination.

    PubMed

    Palazuelos, Javier; Crawford, Howard C; Klingener, Michael; Sun, Bingru; Karelis, Jason; Raines, Elaine W; Aguirre, Adan

    2014-09-03

    Several studies have elucidated the significance of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase proteins (ADAMs) in PNS myelination, but there is no evidence if they also play a role in oligodendrogenesis and CNS myelination. Our study identifies ADAM17, also called tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE), as a novel key modulator of oligodendrocyte (OL) development and CNS myelination. Genetic deletion of TACE in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPs) induces premature cell cycle exit and reduces OL cell survival during postnatal myelination of the subcortical white matter (SCWM). These cellular and molecular changes lead to deficits in SCWM myelination and motor behavior. Mechanistically, TACE regulates oligodendrogenesis by modulating the shedding of EGFR ligands TGFα and HB-EGF and, consequently, EGFR signaling activation in OL lineage cells. Constitutive TACE depletion in OPs in vivo leads to similar alterations in CNS myelination and motor behavior as to what is observed in the EGFR hypofunctional mouse line EgfrWa2. EGFR overexpression in TACE-deficient OPs restores OL survival and development. Our study reveals an essential function of TACE in oligodendrogenesis, and demonstrates how this molecule modulates EGFR signaling activation to regulate postnatal CNS myelination. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3411884-13$15.00/0.

  15. Everyday psychological functioning in children with unilateral cerebral palsy: does executive functioning play a role?

    PubMed

    Whittingham, Koa; Bodimeade, Harriet L; Lloyd, Owen; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2014-06-01

    To identify whether executive functioning mediates the effect of having unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) on executive functioning in everyday life, psychological functioning, and social functioning. A cross-sectional cohort of 46 children with unilateral CP (25 males, 21 females; mean age 11y 1mo, SD 2y 5mo; 24 right-sided, 22 left-sided) and 20 children with typical development (nine males, 11 females; mean age 10y 10mo, SD 2y 4mo). Cognitive executive functioning was tested using a neuropsychological battery. Executive functioning in everyday life was measured with the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF; teacher and parent reports) and psychological and social functioning by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Analysis included analysis of covariance and bootstrapping. Children with unilateral CP were found to have significantly decreased functioning, compared with children with typical development, on the BRIEF Behavioral Regulation Index, the BRIEF Metacognition Index, and on the SDQ emotion, conduct, hyperactivity, and peer problems subscales. Group differences were mediated by cognitive executive functioning for the BRIEF Metacognition Index (teacher and parent report), the BRIEF Behavioral Regulation Index (parent report only), the SDQ conduct subscale, and the SDQ hyperactivity subscale. This study suggests that the increased risk of children with unilateral CP experiencing executive functioning difficulties in everyday life, conduct problems, and hyperactivity can be partly explained by decreased cognitive executive functioning abilities relative to children with typical development. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  16. Solitary-Functional Play and Solitary-Pretend Play: Another Look at the Construct of Solitary-Active Behavior Using Playground Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Larry J.; Hart, Craig H.; Evans, Cortney A.

    2008-01-01

    Although the construct of solitary-active behavior calls for the aggregation of solitary-functional play and solitary-pretend play, there is little empirical support for combining them into one construct. Furthermore, little work has been done in early childhood to examine these behaviors on the playground. The purpose of this study was to observe…

  17. Antiretroviral therapy CNS penetration and HIV-1-associated CNS disease.

    PubMed

    Garvey, L; Winston, A; Walsh, J; Post, F; Porter, K; Gazzard, B; Fisher, M; Leen, C; Pillay, D; Hill, T; Johnson, M; Gilson, R; Anderson, J; Easterbrook, P; Bansi, L; Orkin, C; Ainsworth, J; Palfreeman, A; Gompels, M; Phillips, A N; Sabin, C A

    2011-02-22

    The impact of different antiretroviral agents on the risk of developing or surviving CNS disease remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether using antiretroviral regimens with higher CNS penetration effectiveness (CPE) scores was associated with reduced incidence of CNS disease and improved survival in the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (CHIC) Study. Adults without previous CNS disease, who commenced combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) between 1996 and 2008, were included (n = 22,356). Initial and most recent cART CPE scores were calculated. CNS diseases were HIV encephalopathy (HIVe), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), cerebral toxoplasmosis (TOXO), and cryptococcal meningitis (CRYPTO). Incidence rates and overall survival were stratified by CPE score. A multivariable Poisson regression model was used to identify independent associations. The median (interquartile range) CPE score for initial cART regimen increased from 7 (5-8) in 1996-1997 to 9 (8-10) in 2000-2001 and subsequently declined to 6 (7-8) in 2006-2008. Differences in gender, HIV acquisition risk group, and ethnicity existed between CPE score strata. A total of 251 subjects were diagnosed with a CNS disease (HIVe 80; TOXO 59; CRYPTO 56; PML 54). CNS diseases occurred more frequently in subjects prescribed regimens with CPE scores ≤ 4, and less frequently in those with scores ≥ 10; however, these differences were nonsignificant. Initial and most recent cART CPE scores ≤ 4 were independently associated with increased risk of death. Clinical status at time of commencing cART influences antiretroviral selection and CPE score. This information should be considered when utilizing CPE scores for retrospective analyses.

  18. Benefits of Simulation and Role-Playing to Teach Performance of Functional Assessments.

    PubMed

    Trail Ross, Mary Ellen; Otto, Dorothy A; Stewart Helton, Anne

    The use of simulation is an innovative teaching strategy that has proven to be valuable in nursing education. This article describes the benefits of a simulation lab involving faculty role-play to teach baccalaureate nursing students how to properly assess the functional status of older adults. Details about the simulation lab, which involved functional assessments of two elderly community-dwelling residents, are presented, along with student and faculty evaluations of this teaching modality.

  19. Species Pool Functional Diversity Plays a Hidden Role in Generating β-Diversity.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Christopher J; Brown, Bryan L

    2018-05-01

    Functional trait diversity is used as a way to infer mechanistic processes that drive community assembly. While functional diversity within communities is often viewed as a response variable, here we present and test a framework for how functional diversity among taxa in the regional species pool drives the assembly of communities among habitats. We predicted that species pool functional diversity should work with environmental heterogeneity to drive β-diversity. We tested these predictions by modeling empirical patterns in invertebrate communities from 570 streams in 52 watersheds. Our analysis of the field data provided strong support for the inclusion of both functional diversity and environmental heterogeneity in the models, and our predictions were supported when the community was analyzed all together. However, analyses within individual functional feeding guilds revealed strong context dependency in the relative importance of functional diversity, γ-richness, and environmental heterogeneity to β-diversity. We interpret the results to mean that functional diversity can play an important role in driving β-diversity; however, within guilds the nature of interspecific interactions and species pool size complicate the relationship. Future research should test this conceptual model across different ecosystems and in experimental settings using metacommunity mesocosms to enhance our understanding of the role that functional variation plays in generating spatial biodiversity patterns.

  20. The Coordinated Noninvasive Studies (CNS) Project. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    may reveal functional asymmetries that represent the influence of two factors: 1) the "contralateral effect ," based on the side -of-space source of...asymmetries, where processing on that side of the CNS opposite the side of input is favored, and 2) an effect based J.L. Lauter [CNS Project/AFOSR 88-0352...extent that these exist over and above sidedness bias as well as side -of-space asymmetries -- since in these experiments, contralateral effects are

  1. The Processing of Airspace Concept Evaluations Using FASTE-CNS as a Pre- or Post-Simulation CNS Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mainger, Steve

    2004-01-01

    As NASA speculates on and explores the future of aviation, the technological and physical aspects of our environment increasing become hurdles that must be overcome for success. Research into methods for overcoming some of these selected hurdles have been purposed by several NASA research partners as concepts. The task of establishing a common evaluation environment was placed on NASA's Virtual Airspace Simulation Technologies (VAST) project (sub-project of VAMS), and they responded with the development of the Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES). As one examines the ACES environment from a communication, navigation or surveillance (CNS) perspective, the simulation parameters are built with assumed perfection in the transactions associated with CNS. To truly evaluate these concepts in a realistic sense, the contributions/effects of CNS must be part of the ACES. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has supported the Virtual Airspace Modeling and Simulation (VAMS) project through the continued development of CNS models and analysis capabilities which supports the ACES environment. NASA GRC initiated the development a communications traffic loading analysis tool, called the Future Aeronautical Sub-network Traffic Emulator for Communications, Navigation and Surveillance (FASTE-CNS), as part of this support. This tool allows for forecasting of communications load with the understanding that, there is no single, common source for loading models used to evaluate the existing and planned communications channels; and that, consensus and accuracy in the traffic load models is a very important input to the decisions being made on the acceptability of communication techniques used to fulfill the aeronautical requirements. Leveraging off the existing capabilities of the FASTE-CNS tool, GRC has called for FASTE-CNS to have the functionality to pre- and post-process the simulation runs of ACES to report on instances when traffic density, frequency congestion or aircraft spacing

  2. Microbial functional diversity plays an important role in the degradation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) in soil.

    PubMed

    Dey, Samrat; Tribedi, Prosun

    2018-03-01

    Towards bioremediation of recalcitrant materials like synthetic polymer, soil has been recognized as a traditional site for disposal and subsequent degradation as some microorganisms in soil can degrade the polymer in a non-toxic, cost-effective, and environment friendly way. Microbial functional diversity is a constituent of biodiversity that includes wide range of metabolic activities that can influence numerous aspects of ecosystem functioning like ecosystem stability, nutrient availability, ecosystem dynamics, etc. Thus, in the current study, we assumed that microbial functional diversity could play an important role in polymer degradation in soil. To verify this hypothesis, we isolated soil from five different sites of landfill and examined several microbiological parameters wherein we observed a significant variation in heterotrophic microbial count as well as microbial activities among the soil microcosms tested. Multivariate analysis (principle component analysis) based on the carbon sources utilization pattern revealed that soil microcosms showed different metabolic patterns suggesting the variable distribution of microorganisms among the soil microcosms tested. Since microbial functional diversity depends on both microbial richness and evenness, Shannon diversity index was determined to measure microbial richness and Gini coefficient was determined to measure microbial evenness. The tested soil microcosms exhibited variation in both microbial richness and evenness suggesting the considerable difference in microbial functional diversity among the tested microcosms. We then measured polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) degradation in soil microcosms after desired period of incubation of PHB in soil wherein we found that soil microcosms having higher functional diversity showed enhanced PHB degradation and soil microcosms having lower functional diversity showed reduced PHB degradation. We also noticed that all the tested soil microcosms showed similar pattern in both

  3. Gestational cortisol and social play shape development of marmosets' HPA functioning and behavioral responses to stressors.

    PubMed

    Mustoe, Aaryn C; Taylor, Jack H; Birnie, Andrew K; Huffman, Michelle C; French, Jeffrey A

    2014-09-01

    Both gestational cortisol exposure (GCE) and variability in postnatal environments can shape the later-life behavioral and endocrine outcomes of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. We examined the influence of GCE and social play on HPA functioning in developing marmosets. Maternal urinary cortisol samples were collected across pregnancy to determine GCE for 28 marmoset offspring (19 litters). We administered a social separation stressor to offspring at 6, 12, and 18 months of age, during which we collected urinary cortisol samples and behavioral observations. Increased GCE was associated with increased basal cortisol levels and cortisol reactivity, but the strength of this relationship decreased across age. Increased social play was associated with decreased basal cortisol levels and a marginally greater reduction in cortisol reactivity as offspring aged, regardless of offspring GCE. Thus, GCE is associated with HPA functioning, but socially enriching postnatal environments can alter the effects associated with increased fetal exposure to glucocorticoids. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Investigating the Function of Play Bows in Dog and Wolf Puppies (Canis lupus familiaris, Canis lupus occidentalis).

    PubMed

    Byosiere, Sarah-Elizabeth; Espinosa, Julia; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Smuts, Barbara; Range, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Animals utilize behavioral signals across a range of different contexts in order to communicate with others and produce probable behavioral outcomes. During play animals frequently adopt action patterns used in other contexts. Researchers have therefore hypothesized that play signals have evolved to clarify communicative intent. One highly stereotyped play signal is the canid play bow, but its function remains contested. In order to clarify how canid puppies use play bows, we used data on play bows in immature wolves (ages 2.7-7.8 months) and dogs (ages 2 to 5 months) to test hypotheses evaluated in a previous study of adult dogs. We found that young dogs used play bows similarly to adult dogs; play bows most often occurred after a brief pause in play followed by complementary highly active play states. However, while the relative number of play bows and total observation time was similar between dog and wolf puppies, wolves did not follow this behavioral pattern, as play bows were unsuccessful in eliciting further play activity by the partner. While some similarities for the function of play bows in dog and wolf puppies were documented, it appears that play bows may function differently in wolf puppies in regards to re-initiating play.

  5. Measures of behavioral function predict duration of video game play: Utilization of the Video Game Functional Assessment - Revised.

    PubMed

    Buono, Frank D; Griffiths, Mark D; Sprong, Matthew E; Lloyd, Daniel P; Sullivan, Ryan M; Upton, Thomas D

    2017-12-01

    Background Internet gaming disorder (IGD) was introduced in the DSM-5 as a way of identifying and diagnosing problematic video game play. However, the use of the diagnosis is constrained, as it shares criteria with other addictive orders (e.g., pathological gambling). Aims Further work is required to better understand IGD. One potential avenue of investigation is IGD's relationship to the primary reinforcing behavioral functions. This study explores the relationship between duration of video game play and the reinforcing behavioral functions that may motivate or maintain video gaming. Methods A total of 499 video game players began the online survey, with complete data from 453 participants (85% white and 28% female), were analyzed. Individuals were placed into five groups based on self-reported hours of video gaming per week, and completed the Video Game Functional Assessment - Revised (VGFA-R). Results The results demonstrated the escape and social attention function were significant in predicting duration of video game play, whereas sensory and tangible were not significant. Conclusion Future implications of the VGFA-R and behaviorally based research are discussed.

  6. Basic Concepts of CNS Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowakowski, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of this review are to: (1) provide a set of concepts to aid in the understanding of complex processes which occur during central nervous system (CNS) development; (2) illustrate how they contribute to our knowlege of adult brain anatomy; and (3) delineate how modifications of normal developmental processes may affect the structure and…

  7. New experimental models of the blood-brain barrier for CNS drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kaisar, Mohammad A.; Sajja, Ravi K.; Prasad, Shikha; Abhyankar, Vinay V.; Liles, Taylor; Cucullo, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic biological interface which actively controls the passage of substances between the blood and the central nervous system (CNS). From a biological and functional standpoint, the BBB plays a crucial role in maintaining brain homeostasis inasmuch that deterioration of BBB functions are prodromal to many CNS disorders. Conversely, the BBB hinders the delivery of drugs targeting the brain to treat a variety of neurological diseases. Area covered This article reviews recent technological improvements and innovation in the field of BBB modeling including static and dynamic cell-based platforms, microfluidic systems and the use of stem cells and 3D printing technologies. Additionally, the authors laid out a roadmap for the integration of microfluidics and stem cell biology as a holistic approach for the development of novel in vitro BBB platforms. Expert opinion Development of effective CNS drugs has been hindered by the lack of reliable strategies to mimic the BBB and cerebrovascular impairments in vitro. Technological advancements in BBB modeling have fostered the development of highly integrative and quasi- physiological in vitro platforms to support the process of drug discovery. These advanced in vitro tools are likely to further current understanding of the cerebrovascular modulatory mechanisms. PMID:27782770

  8. The Efficacy of Exergames Played Proximally and over the Internet on Cognitive Functioning for Online Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kooiman, Brian J.; Sheehan, Dwayne P.

    2014-01-01

    Exergames (active video games that require kinesthetic movement) played in proximity to other players or against a gaming machine have been linked to positive increases in cognitive functioning. This study tested to see if remote exergame play over the Internet had an impact similar to exergames that are played in proximity. The study shows that…

  9. General Information about Primary CNS Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Primary CNS Lymphoma Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  10. Study protocol: effect of playful training on functional abilities of older adults - a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Jari Due; Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2017-01-19

    Loss of functional capabilities due to inactivity is one of the most common reasons for fall accidents, and it has been well established that loss of capabilities can be effectively reduced by physical activity. Pilot studies indicate a possible improvement in functional abilities of community dwelling elderly as a result of short-term playing with an exergame system in the form of interactive modular tiles. Such playful training may be motivational to perform and viewed by the subjects to offer life-fulfilling quality, while providing improvement in physical abilities, e.g. related to prevent fall accidents. The RCT will test for a variety of health parameters of community-dwelling elderly playing on interactive modular tiles. The study will be a single blinded, randomized controlled trial with 60 community-dwelling adults 70+ years. The trial will consist an intervention group of 30 participants training with the interactive modular tiles, and a control group of 30 participants that will receive the usual care provided to non-patient elderly. The intervention period will be 12 weeks. The intervention group will perform group training (4-5 individuals for 1 h training session with each participant receiving 13 min training) on the interactive tiles twice a week. Follow-up tests include 6-min Walk Test (6MWT), the 8-ft Timed Up & Go Test (TUG), and the Chair-Stand Test (CS) from the Senior Fitness Test, along with balancing tests (static test on Wii Board and Line Walk test). Secondary outcomes related to adherence, motivation and acceptability will be investigated through semi-structured interviews. Data will be collected from pre- and post-tests. Data will be analyzed for statistically significant differences by checking that there is a Gaussian distribution and then using paired t-test, otherwise using Wilcoxon signed-rank test. "Intention to treat" analysis will be done. The trial tests for increased mobility, agility, balancing and general fitness of

  11. The Function of Play in the Development of the Social Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellis, Sergio M.; Pellis, Vivien C.; Bell, Heather C.

    2010-01-01

    Rough-and-tumble play, or play fighting, is common in the young of many mammals. Research on play fighting among rats shows that there are many levels of neural control over this behavior: subcortical mechanisms mediate the motivation and behavior of such play, and the cortex provides mechanisms by which the play changes with age and context. The…

  12. MusicGlove: motivating and quantifying hand movement rehabilitation by using functional grips to play music.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Nizan; Chan, Vicky; Zondervan, Danny; Bachman, Mark; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2011-01-01

    People with stroke typically must perform much of their hand exercise at home without professional assistance as soon as two weeks after the stroke. Without feedback and encouragement, individuals often lose motivation to practice using the affected hand, and this disuse contributes to further declines in hand function. We developed the MusicGlove as a way to facilitate and motivate at home practice of hand movement. This low-cost device uses music as an interactive and motivating medium to guide hand exercise and to quantitatively assess hand movement recovery. It requires the user to practice functional movements, including pincer grip, key-pinch grip, and finger-thumb opposition, by using those movements to play different musical notes, played along to songs displayed by an interactive computer game. We report here the design of the glove and the results of a single-session experiment with 10 participants with chronic stroke. We found that the glove is well suited for use by people with an impairment level quantified by a Box and Blocks score of at least around 7; that the glove can be used to obtain a measure of hand dexterity (% of notes hit) that correlates strongly with the Box and Blocks score; and that the incorporation of music into training significantly improved both objective measures of hand motor performance and self-ratings of motivation for training in the single session.

  13. In vivo kinetic approach reveals slow SOD1 turnover in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Matthew J; Mawuenyega, Kwasi G; Patterson, Bruce W; Reddy, Naveen C; Chott, Robert; Self, Wade K; Weihl, Conrad C; Jockel-Balsarotti, Jennifer; Varadhachary, Arun S; Bucelli, Robert C; Yarasheski, Kevin E; Bateman, Randall J; Miller, Timothy M

    2015-07-01

    Therapeutic strategies that target disease-associated transcripts are being developed for a variety of neurodegenerative syndromes. Protein levels change as a function of their half-life, a property that critically influences the timing and application of therapeutics. In addition, both protein kinetics and concentration may play important roles in neurodegeneration; therefore, it is essential to understand in vivo protein kinetics, including half-life. Here, we applied a stable isotope-labeling technique in combination with mass spectrometric detection and determined the in vivo kinetics of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), mutation of which causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Application of this method to human SOD1-expressing rats demonstrated that SOD1 is a long-lived protein, with a similar half-life in both the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and the CNS. Additionally, in these animals, the half-life of SOD1 was longest in the CNS when compared with other tissues. Evaluation of this method in human subjects demonstrated successful incorporation of the isotope label in the CSF and confirmed that SOD1 is a long-lived protein in the CSF of healthy individuals. Together, the results of this study provide important insight into SOD1 kinetics and support application of this technique to the design and implementation of clinical trials that target long-lived CNS proteins.

  14. In vivo kinetic approach reveals slow SOD1 turnover in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Crisp, Matthew J.; Mawuenyega, Kwasi G.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Reddy, Naveen C.; Chott, Robert; Self, Wade K.; Weihl, Conrad C.; Jockel-Balsarotti, Jennifer; Varadhachary, Arun S.; Bucelli, Robert C.; Yarasheski, Kevin E.; Bateman, Randall J.; Miller, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies that target disease-associated transcripts are being developed for a variety of neurodegenerative syndromes. Protein levels change as a function of their half-life, a property that critically influences the timing and application of therapeutics. In addition, both protein kinetics and concentration may play important roles in neurodegeneration; therefore, it is essential to understand in vivo protein kinetics, including half-life. Here, we applied a stable isotope-labeling technique in combination with mass spectrometric detection and determined the in vivo kinetics of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), mutation of which causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Application of this method to human SOD1-expressing rats demonstrated that SOD1 is a long-lived protein, with a similar half-life in both the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and the CNS. Additionally, in these animals, the half-life of SOD1 was longest in the CNS when compared with other tissues. Evaluation of this method in human subjects demonstrated successful incorporation of the isotope label in the CSF and confirmed that SOD1 is a long-lived protein in the CSF of healthy individuals. Together, the results of this study provide important insight into SOD1 kinetics and support application of this technique to the design and implementation of clinical trials that target long-lived CNS proteins. PMID:26075819

  15. Playing piano can improve upper extremity function after stroke: case studies.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Myriam; Lamontagne, Anouk

    2013-01-01

    Music-supported therapy (MST) is an innovative approach that was shown to improve manual dexterity in acute stroke survivors. The feasibility of such intervention in chronic stroke survivors and its longer-term benefits, however, remain unknown. The objective of this pilot study was to estimate the short- and long-term effects of a 3-week piano training program on upper extremity function in persons with chronic stroke. A multiple pre-post sequential design was used, with measurements taken at baseline (week0, week3), prior to (week6) and after the intervention (week9), and at 3-week follow-up (week12). Three persons with stroke participated in the 3-week piano training program that combined structured piano lessons to home practice program. The songs, played on an electronic keyboard, involved all 5 digits of the affected hand and were displayed using a user-friendly MIDI program. After intervention, all the three participants showed improvements in their fine (nine hole peg test) and gross (box and block test) manual dexterity, as well as in the functional use of the upper extremity (Jebsen hand function test). Improvements were maintained at follow-up. These preliminary results support the feasibility of using an MST approach that combines structured lessons to home practice to improve upper extremity function in chronic stroke.

  16. Playing Piano Can Improve Upper Extremity Function after Stroke: Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Myriam; Lamontagne, Anouk

    2013-01-01

    Music-supported therapy (MST) is an innovative approach that was shown to improve manual dexterity in acute stroke survivors. The feasibility of such intervention in chronic stroke survivors and its longer-term benefits, however, remain unknown. The objective of this pilot study was to estimate the short- and long-term effects of a 3-week piano training program on upper extremity function in persons with chronic stroke. A multiple pre-post sequential design was used, with measurements taken at baseline (week0, week3), prior to (week6) and after the intervention (week9), and at 3-week follow-up (week12). Three persons with stroke participated in the 3-week piano training program that combined structured piano lessons to home practice program. The songs, played on an electronic keyboard, involved all 5 digits of the affected hand and were displayed using a user-friendly MIDI program. After intervention, all the three participants showed improvements in their fine (nine hole peg test) and gross (box and block test) manual dexterity, as well as in the functional use of the upper extremity (Jebsen hand function test). Improvements were maintained at follow-up. These preliminary results support the feasibility of using an MST approach that combines structured lessons to home practice to improve upper extremity function in chronic stroke. PMID:23533954

  17. The Biological Imperative of Play: Form and Function in Primates and Other Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piers, Maria W.

    This presentation underscores the importance of play and outlines a theory of play in terms of ego-psychology and a broadly defined concept of culture. Play is described as the royal road to the collective ego called "culture." At the same time play also enables aspects and parts of culture to be changed. While children should be encouraged to…

  18. Relationship between output from MIDI-keyboard playing and hand function assessments on affected hand after stroke.

    PubMed

    Chong, Hyun Ju; Han, Soo Jeong; Kim, Yong Jae; Park, Hye Young; Kim, Soo Ji

    2014-01-01

    While a number of studies have tested the therapeutic effectiveness of playing musical instruments, such as the electronic keyboard using Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI), it is still unclear whether outcomes of electronic keyboard playing are related to hand function tests. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between MIDI-keyboard playing and hand function tests, including grip strength, Box and Block test (BBT), and Jensen-Taylor Hand Function Test (JTHF). A total of 66 stroke patients were recruited from medical centers and were classified into acute (n = 21), subacute (n = 28), and chronic (n = 17) recovery stages. The participants' mean age was 60.5 years. The MIDI-keyboard playing protocol based on sequential key pressing was implemented. All hand function tests were performed by certified occupational therapists. MIDI scores from participants at all three recovery stages were significantly correlated with BBT and grip strength. Overall, MIDI-keyboard playing scores demonstrated moderate to high correlations with hand function tests except for participants at the chronic stage and the JTHF, which showed no correlation. These findings suggest that MIDI-keyboard playing has great potential as an assessment tool of hand function, especially hand dexterity in acute and subacute stroke patients. Further studies are needed to refine the specific keyboard playing tasks that increase responsiveness to traditional hand function tests.

  19. Teaching Functional Play Skills to a Young Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder through Video Self-Modeling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sharon Y; Lo, Ya-Yu; Lo, Yafen

    2017-08-01

    The researchers used a single-case, multiple probe design across three sets of toys (i.e., farm toy, doctor's clinic toy, and rescue toy) to examine the effects of video self-modeling (VSM) on the functional play skills of a 5-year-old child with autism spectrum disorder. The findings showed a functional relation between VSM and increased percentages of functional play actions across the toy sets. The participant's percentages of the targeted functional play skills for the intervention toys remained high 1 week and 2 weeks after the intervention ceased. Additionally, preliminary generalization results showed slight improvement in the percentages of functional play actions with the generalization toys that were not directly taught. Limitations, practical implications, and directions for future research are discussed.

  20. CNS Macrophages Control Neurovascular Development via CD95L.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Tisch, Nathalie; Kegel, Marcel; Yerbes, Rosario; Hermann, Robert; Hudalla, Hannes; Zuliani, Cecilia; Gülcüler, Gülce Sila; Zwadlo, Klara; von Engelhardt, Jakob; Ruiz de Almodóvar, Carmen; Martin-Villalba, Ana

    2017-05-16

    The development of neurons and vessels shares striking anatomical and molecular features, and it is presumably orchestrated by an overlapping repertoire of extracellular signals. CNS macrophages have been implicated in various developmental functions, including the morphogenesis of neurons and vessels. However, whether CNS macrophages can coordinately influence neurovascular development and the identity of the signals involved therein is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that activity of the cell surface receptor CD95 regulates neuronal and vascular morphogenesis in the post-natal brain and retina. Furthermore, we identify CNS macrophages as the main source of CD95L, and macrophage-specific deletion thereof reduces both neurovascular complexity and synaptic activity in the brain. CD95L-induced neuronal and vascular growth is mediated through src-family kinase (SFK) and PI3K signaling. Together, our study highlights a coordinated neurovascular development instructed by CNS macrophage-derived CD95L, and it underlines the importance of macrophages for the establishment of the neurovascular network during CNS development. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. In vivo imaging of the neurovascular unit in CNS disease

    PubMed Central

    Merlini, Mario; Davalos, Dimitrios; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    The neurovascular unit—comprised of glia, pericytes, neurons and cerebrovasculature—is a dynamic interface that ensures physiological central nervous system (CNS) functioning. In disease dynamic remodeling of the neurovascular interface triggers a cascade of responses that determine the extent of CNS degeneration and repair. The dynamics of these processes can be adequately captured by imaging in vivo, which allows the study of cellular responses to environmental stimuli and cell-cell interactions in the living brain in real time. This perspective focuses on intravital imaging studies of the neurovascular unit in stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer disease (AD) models and discusses their potential for identifying novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25197615

  2. Can injured adult CNS axons regenerate by recapitulating development?

    PubMed

    Hilton, Brett J; Bradke, Frank

    2017-10-01

    In the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS), neurons typically fail to regenerate their axons after injury. During development, by contrast, neurons extend axons effectively. A variety of intracellular mechanisms mediate this difference, including changes in gene expression, the ability to form a growth cone, differences in mitochondrial function/axonal transport and the efficacy of synaptic transmission. In turn, these intracellular processes are linked to extracellular differences between the developing and adult CNS. During development, the extracellular environment directs axon growth and circuit formation. In adulthood, by contrast, extracellular factors, such as myelin and the extracellular matrix, restrict axon growth. Here, we discuss whether the reactivation of developmental processes can elicit axon regeneration in the injured CNS. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Immunolocalization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and retinoid X receptors in the adult rat CNS.

    PubMed

    Moreno, S; Farioli-Vecchioli, S; Cerù, M P

    2004-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated and retinoid X receptors (PPARs and RXRs) are transcription factors belonging to the steroid hormone receptor superfamily. Upon activation by their ligands, PPARs and RXRs bind to their target genes as heterodimers. Ligands of these receptors include lipophylic molecules, such as retinoids, fatty acids and eicosanoids, the importance of which in the metabolism and functioning of the nervous tissue is well documented. The immunohistochemical distribution of PPARs and RXRs in the CNS of the adult rat was studied by means of a sensitive biotinyl-tyramide method. All PPAR (alpha, beta/delta and gamma) and RXR (alpha, beta and gamma) isotypes were detected and found to exhibit specific patterns of localization in the different areas of the brain and spinal cord. The presence of the nuclear receptors was observed in both neuronal and glial cells. While PPAR beta/delta and RXR beta showed a widespread distribution, alpha and gamma isotypes exhibited a more restricted pattern of expression. The frontal cortex, basal ganglia, reticular formation, some cranial nerve nuclei, deep cerebellar nuclei, and cerebellar Golgi cells appeared rather rich in all studied receptors. Based on our data, we suggest that in the adult CNS, PPARs and RXRs, besides playing roles common to many other tissues, may have specific functions in regulating the expression of genes involved in neurotransmission, and therefore play roles in complex processes, such as aging, neurodegeneration, learning and memory.

  4. CNS Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Regulate the Severity of Relapsing Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis1

    PubMed Central

    Bailey-Bucktrout, Samantha L.; Caulkins, Sarah C.; Goings, Gwendolyn; Fischer, Jens A. A.; Dzionek, Andrzej; Miller, Stephen D.

    2010-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) have both stimulatory and regulatory effects on T cells. pDCs are a major CNS-infiltrating DC population during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), but unlike myeloid DCs (mDC) have a minor role in T cell activation and epitope spreading. We show that depletion of pDCs during either the acute or relapse phases of EAE resulted in exacerbation of disease severity. pDC depletion significantly enhanced CNS but not peripheral CD4+ T cell activation, as well as IL-17 and IFN-γ production. Moreover, CNS pDCs suppressed CNS mDC-driven production of IL-17, IFN-γ and IL-10 in an IDO-independent manner. The data demonstrate that pDCs play a critical regulatory role in negatively regulating pathogenic CNS CD4+ T cell responses highlighting a new role for pDCs in inflammatory autoimmune disease. PMID:18453561

  5. Adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) play a critical role in osteoclast formation and function

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Firas M.; Chitu, Violeta; Sloane, Jennifer; Axelrod, Matthew; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Stanley, E. Richard; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine regulates a wide variety of physiological processes via interaction with one or more G-protein-coupled receptors (A1R, A2AR, A2BR, and A3R). Because A1R occupancy promotes fusion of human monocytes to form giant cells in vitro, we determined whether A1R occupancy similarly promotes osteoclast function and formation. Bone marrow cells (BMCs) were harvested from C57Bl/6 female mice or A1R-knockout mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates and differentiated into osteoclasts in the presence of colony stimulating factor-1 and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand in the presence or absence of the A1R antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentyl xanthine (DPCPX). Osteoclast morphology was analyzed in tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase or F-actin-stained samples, and bone resorption was evaluated by toluidine blue staining of dentin. BMCs from A1R-knockout mice form fewer osteoclasts than BMCs from WT mice, and the A1R antagonist DPCPX inhibits osteoclast formation (IC50=1 nM), with altered morphology and reduced ability to resorb bone. A1R blockade increased ubiquitination and degradation of TRAF6 in RAW264.7 cells induced to differentiate into osteoclasts. These studies suggest a critical role for adenosine in bone homeostasis via interaction with adenosine A1R and further suggest that A1R may be a novel pharmacologic target to prevent the bone loss associated with inflammatory diseases and menopause.—Kara, F. M., Chitu, V., Sloane, J., Axelrod, M., Fredholm, B. B., Stanley, R., Cronstein, B. N. Adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) play a critical role in osteoclast formation and function. PMID:20181934

  6. Does gender play a role in functional asymmetry of ventromedial prefrontal cortex?

    PubMed

    Tranel, Daniel; Damasio, Hanna; Denburg, Natalie L; Bechara, Antoine

    2005-12-01

    We found previously in a lesion study that the right-sided sector of the ventromedial prefrontal cortices (VMPCs) was critical for social/emotional functioning and decision-making, whereas the left side appeared to be less important. It so happened that all but one of the subjects in that study were men, and the one woman did not fit the pattern very well. This prompted a follow-up investigation, in which we explored the following question: Does gender play a role in the development of defects in social conduct, emotional functioning and decision-making, following unilateral VMPC damage? We culled from our Patient Registry same-sex pairs of men or women patients who had comparable unilateral VMPC damage in either the left or right hemisphere. Two male pairs and one female pair were formed, and we included two additional women with unilateral right VMPC damage (8 patients in all). The domains of measurement covered social conduct, emotional processing and personality, and decision-making. We found a systematic effect of gender on the pattern of left-right asymmetry in VMPC. In men, there were severe defects following unilateral right VMPC damage, but not following left-sided damage. In women, there were defects following unilateral left VMPC damage; following right-sided damage, however, defects were mild or absent. The findings suggest that men and women may use different strategies to solve similar problems--e.g. men may use a more holistic, gestalt-type strategy, and women may use a more analytic, verbally-mediated strategy. Such differences could reflect asymmetric, gender-related differences in the neurobiology of left and right VMPC sectors.

  7. Requirements for an Integrated UAS CNS Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templin, Fred L.; Jain, Raj; Sheffield, Greg; Taboso-Ballesteros, Pedro; Ponchak, Denise

    2017-01-01

    Communications, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS) requirements must be developed in order to establish a CNS architecture supporting Unmanned Air Systems integration in the National Air Space (UAS in the NAS). These requirements must address cybersecurity, future communications, satellite-based navigation and APNT, and scalable surveillance and situational awareness. CNS integration, consolidation and miniaturization requirements are also important to support the explosive growth in small UAS deployment. Air Traffic Management (ATM) must also be accommodated to support critical Command and Control (C2) for Air Traffic Controllers (ATC). This document therefore presents UAS CNS requirements that will guide the architecture.

  8. Thiazole containing Heterocycles with CNS activity.

    PubMed

    Kalal, Priyanka; Gandhi, Divyani; Prajapat, Prakash; Agarwal, Shikha

    2017-07-24

    Thiazoles are promising scaffolds in the area of medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry and have accounted to show different pharmacophoric properties. For the last years, thiazole derivatives have focused too much attention to develop different new CNS active agents. It has been broadly used to generate diverse therapeutic agents against various CNS targets. Histamine H3 receptors are seriously involved in the pathophysiology of numerous disorders of the central nervous system. The literature survey has been done using different database from peer-reviewed journals. The quality of repossessed papers was evaluated using standard tools. The details of important papers were described to focus on the potency of thiazole containing heterocycles with CNS activity. Eighty nine papers were included in the review indicating thiazole containing heterocycles with CNS activity. (1) to (30) papers included different thiazole derivatives impregnated withCNS activity. Different CNS agents have been shown in references (37) to (56). The remaining papers have been searched for anticonvulsant agents (57) to (78) and other miscellaneous activities from (79) to (89). A detailed investigation has been carried out on thiazoles and its derivatives to judge its efficacy to overcome several CNS disorders. This article covers the recent updates of thiazole and its derivative with CNS activity already present in literature and will definitely provide a better platform for the production and development of potent thiazole based CNS vigorous drugs in near future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Leptin and the CNS Control of Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Gregory J.; Schwartz, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of body fat stores and blood glucose levels is critical for survival. This review highlights growing evidence that leptin action in the central nervous system (CNS) plays a key role in both processes. Investigation into underlying mechanisms has begun to clarify the physiological role of leptin in the control of glucose metabolism and raises interesting new possibilities for the treatment of diabetes and related disorders. PMID:21527729

  10. Causes of CNS inflammation and potential targets for anticonvulsants.

    PubMed

    Falip, Mercé; Salas-Puig, Xavier; Cara, Carlos

    2013-08-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important endogenous defence mechanisms in an organism. It has been suggested that inflammation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of a number of human epilepsies and convulsive disorders, and there is clinical and experimental evidence to suggest that inflammatory processes within the CNS may either contribute to or be a consequence of epileptogenesis. This review discusses evidence from human studies on the role of inflammation in epilepsy and highlights potential new targets in the inflammatory cascade for antiepileptic drugs. A number of mechanisms have been shown to be involved in CNS inflammatory reactions. These include an inflammatory response at the level of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), immune-mediated damage to the CNS, stress-induced release of inflammatory mediators and direct neuronal dysfunction or damage as a result of inflammatory reactions. Mediators of inflammation in the CNS include interleukin (IL)-1β, tumour necrosis factor-α, nuclear factor-κB and toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). IL-1β, BBB and high-mobility group box-1-TLR4 signalling appear to be the most promising targets for anticonvulsant agents directed at inflammation. Such agents may provide effective therapy for drug-resistant epilepsies in the future.

  11. Microglia in CNS development: Shaping the brain for the future.

    PubMed

    Mosser, Coralie-Anne; Baptista, Sofia; Arnoux, Isabelle; Audinat, Etienne

    Microglial cells are the resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS) and are mainly known for their roles in neuropathologies. However, major recent developments have revealed that these immune cells actively interact with neurons in physiological conditions and can modulate the fate and functions of synapses. Originating from myeloid precursors born in the yolk sac, microglial cells invade the CNS during early embryonic development. As a consequence they can potentially influence neuronal proliferation, migration and differentiation as well as the formation and maturation of neuronal networks, thereby contributing to the entire shaping of the CNS. We review here recent evidence indicating that microglial cells are indeed involved in crucial steps of the CNS development, including neuronal survival and apoptosis, axonal growth, migration of neurons, pruning of supernumerary synapses and functional maturation of developing synapses. We also discuss current hypotheses proposing that diverting microglial cells of their physiological functions, by promoting the expression of an immune phenotype during development, may be central to neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism, schizophrenia and epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. On play and playing.

    PubMed

    Rudan, Dusko

    2013-12-01

    The paper offers a review of the development of the concept of play and playing. The true beginnings of the development of the theories of play are set as late as in the 19th century. It is difficult to define play as such; it may much more easily be defined through its antipode--work. In the beginning, play used to be connected with education; it was not before Freud's theory of psychoanalysis and Piaget's developmental psychology that the importance of play in a child's development began to be explained in more detail. The paper further tackles the role of play in the adult age. Detailed attention is paid to psychodynamic and psychoanalytic authors, in particular D. W. Winnicott and his understanding of playing in the intermediary (transitional) empirical or experiential space. In other words, playing occupies a space and time of its own. The neuroscientific concept of playing is also tackled, in the connection with development as well.

  13. Young Mothers' Play with Their Toddlers: Individual Variability as a Function of Psychosocial Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Joan Riley; Easterbrooks, M. Ann

    2007-01-01

    There is no one style of parenting which characterizes young mothers as a group. In addition, life circumstances play an important role in shaping maternal behaviour. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of maternal play behaviour and contextual (social and personal) factors associated with these different patterns. In this study, 107…

  14. Engineering Play: Exploring Associations with Executive Function, Mathematical Ability, and Spatial Ability in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Zachary Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Engineering play is a new perspective on preschool education that views constructive play as an engineering design process that parallels the way engineers think and work when they develop engineered solutions to human problems (Bairaktarova, Evangelou, Bagiati, & Brophy, 2011). Early research from this perspective supports its use in framing…

  15. Maternal immune activation and abnormal brain development across CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Knuesel, Irene; Chicha, Laurie; Britschgi, Markus; Schobel, Scott A; Bodmer, Michael; Hellings, Jessica A; Toovey, Stephen; Prinssen, Eric P

    2014-11-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a clear association between maternal infection and schizophrenia or autism in the progeny. Animal models have revealed maternal immune activation (mIA) to be a profound risk factor for neurochemical and behavioural abnormalities in the offspring. Microglial priming has been proposed as a major consequence of mIA, and represents a critical link in a causal chain that leads to the wide spectrum of neuronal dysfunctions and behavioural phenotypes observed in the juvenile, adult or aged offspring. Such diversity of phenotypic outcomes in the mIA model are mirrored by recent clinical evidence suggesting that infectious exposure during pregnancy is also associated with epilepsy and, to a lesser extent, cerebral palsy in children. Preclinical research also suggests that mIA might precipitate the development of Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. Here, we summarize and critically review the emerging evidence that mIA is a shared environmental risk factor across CNS disorders that varies as a function of interactions between genetic and additional environmental factors. We also review ongoing clinical trials targeting immune pathways affected by mIA that may play a part in disease manifestation. In addition, future directions and outstanding questions are discussed, including potential symptomatic, disease-modifying and preventive treatment strategies.

  16. Teaching Functional Play Skills to a Young Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder through Video Self-Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sharon Y.; Lo, Ya-yu; Lo, Yafen

    2017-01-01

    The researchers used a single-case, multiple probe design across three sets of toys (i.e., farm toy, doctor's clinic toy, and rescue toy) to examine the effects of video self-modeling (VSM) on the functional play skills of a 5-year-old child with autism spectrum disorder. The findings showed a functional relation between VSM and increased…

  17. Social Play Behavior in Adolescent Rats is Mediated by Functional Activity in Medial Prefrontal Cortex and Striatum

    PubMed Central

    van Kerkhof, Linda WM; Damsteegt, Ruth; Trezza, Viviana; Voorn, Pieter; Vanderschuren, Louk JMJ

    2013-01-01

    Social play behavior is a characteristic, vigorous form of social interaction in young mammals. It is highly rewarding and thought to be of major importance for social and cognitive development. The neural substrates of social play are incompletely understood, but there is evidence to support a role for the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum in this behavior. Using pharmacological inactivation methods, ie, infusions of GABA receptor agonists (baclofen and muscimol; B&M) or the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3(1H,4H)-dione (DNQX), we investigated the involvement of several subregions of the medial PFC and striatum in social play. Inactivation of the prelimbic cortex, infralimbic cortex, and medial/ventral orbitofrontal cortex using B&M markedly reduced frequency and duration of social play behavior. Local administration of DNQX into the dorsomedial striatum increased the frequency and duration of social play, whereas infusion of B&M tended to have the same effect. Inactivation of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) core using B&M increased duration but not frequency of social play, whereas B&M infusion into the NAcc shell did not influence social play behavior. Thus, functional integrity of the medial PFC is important for the expression of social play behavior. Glutamatergic inputs into the dorsomedial striatum exert an inhibitory influence on social play, and functional activity in the NAcc core acts to limit the length of playful interactions. These results highlight the importance of prefrontal and striatal circuits implicated in cognitive control, decision making, behavioral inhibition, and reward-associated processes in social play behavior. PMID:23568326

  18. Effects of tennis play on executive function in 6-11-year-old children: a 12-month longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Toru; Mizuno, Masao

    2018-06-01

    The present study aimed to assess the effects of 12 months of frequent tennis play on executive functions and the relationships of daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), physical competence, and enjoyment of playing tennis to executive functions in children. Thirty-two children (6-11 years old) who had regularly played tennis (once a week; mean = 3 years, range = 0-6 years) before the study were enrolled in a 12-month intervention. Participants were allocated into two groups: low-dose (maintain current frequency of tennis play, N = 19) or high-dose (increased frequency of tennis play to four times per week, N = 13). Participants' MVPA, physical competence, enjoyment of playing tennis, and executive functions (i.e. inhibitory control, working memory, and cognitive flexibility) were evaluated before and after this intervention. The high-dose group demonstrated a greater improvement in working memory than the low-dose group, while there was no group difference in MVPA, physical competence, and enjoyment of playing tennis. Changes in MVPA were associated with improvements in cognitive flexibility. Changes in physical competence were associated with improvements in working memory and cognitive flexibility. Changes in the enjoyment of playing tennis were associated with improvements in inhibitory control. The current findings suggest that replacement of MVPA with sports activity, such as tennis enhances executive functions development, and suggest that sports programmes that seek to build competence and enjoyment might help support the development of executive functions in children.

  19. Adult murine CNS stem cells express aquaporin channels.

    PubMed

    La Porta, Caterina A M; Gena, Patrizia; Gritti, Angela; Fascio, Umberto; Svelto, Maria; Calamita, Giuseppe

    2006-02-01

    Fluid homoeostasis is of critical importance in many functions of the CNS (central nervous system) as indicated by the fact that dysregulation of cell volume underlies clinical conditions such as brain oedema and hypoxia. Water balance is also important during neurogenesis as neural stem cells move considerable amounts of water into or out of the cell to rapidly change their volume during differentiation. Consistent with the relevance of water transport in CNS, multiple AQP (aquaporin) water channels have been recognized and partially characterized in brain cell function. However, the presence and distribution of AQPs in CNS stem cells has not yet been assessed. In the present study, we investigate the expression and subcellular localization of AQPs in murine ANSCs (adult neural stem cells). Considerable AQP8 mRNAs were found in ANSCs where, as expected, the transcript of two additional AQPs, AQP4 and AQP9, was also detected. Immunoblotting with subcellular membrane fractions of ANSCs showed predominant expression of AQP8 in the mitochondria-enriched fraction. This result was consistent with the spotted immunoreactivity profile encountered within the ANSCs by confocal immunofluorescence. AQP8 may have a role in mitochondrial volume regulation during ANSC differentiation. Recognition of AQPs in ANSCs is a step forward in our knowledge of water homoeostasis in the CNS and provides useful information for the purposes of stem cell technology.

  20. Palmitoylethanolamide in CNS health and disease.

    PubMed

    Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Russo, Roberto; Calignano, Antonio; Meli, Rosaria

    2014-08-01

    The existence of acylethanolamides (AEs) in the mammalian brain has been known for decades. Among AEs, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is abundant in the central nervous system (CNS) and conspicuously produced by neurons and glial cells. Antihyperalgesic and neuroprotective properties of PEA have been mainly related to the reduction of neuronal firing and to control of inflammation. Growing evidence suggest that PEA may be neuroprotective during CNS neurodegenerative diseases. Advances in the understanding of the physiology and pharmacology of PEA have potentiated its interest as useful biological tool for disease management. Several rapid non-genomic and delayed genomic mechanisms of action have been identified for PEA as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α dependent. First, an early molecular control, through Ca(+2)-activated intermediate- and/or big-conductance K(+) channels opening, drives to rapid neuronal hyperpolarization. This is reinforced by the increase of the inward Cl(-) currents due to the modulation of the gamma aminobutyric acid A receptor and by the desensitization of the transient receptor potential channel type V1. Moreover, the gene transcription-mediated mechanism sustains the long-term anti-inflammatory effects, by reducing pro-inflammatory enzyme expression and increasing neurosteroid synthesis. Overall, the integration of these different modes of action allows PEA to exert an immediate and prolonged efficacious control in neuron signaling either on inflammatory process or neuronal excitability, maintaining cellular homeostasis. In this review, we will discuss the effect of PEA on metabolism, behavior, inflammation and pain perception, related to the control of central functions and the emerging evidence demonstrating its therapeutic efficacy in several neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Myelin damage and repair in pathologic CNS: challenges and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Arsalan; Dyck, Scott M.; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) results in oligodendrocyte cell death and progressive demyelination. Demyelinated axons undergo considerable physiological changes and molecular reorganizations that collectively result in axonal dysfunction, degeneration and loss of sensory and motor functions. Endogenous adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells and neural stem/progenitor cells contribute to the replacement of oligodendrocytes, however, the extent and quality of endogenous remyelination is suboptimal. Emerging evidence indicates that optimal remyelination is restricted by multiple factors including (i) low levels of factors that promote oligodendrogenesis; (ii) cell death among newly generated oligodendrocytes, (iii) inhibitory factors in the post-injury milieu that impede remyelination, and (iv) deficient expression of key growth factors essential for proper re-construction of a highly organized myelin sheath. Considering these challenges, over the past several years, a number of cell-based strategies have been developed to optimize remyelination therapeutically. Outcomes of these basic and preclinical discoveries are promising and signify the importance of remyelination as a mechanism for improving functions in CNS injuries. In this review, we provide an overview on: (1) the precise organization of myelinated axons and the reciprocal axo-myelin interactions that warrant properly balanced physiological activities within the CNS; (2) underlying cause of demyelination and the structural and functional consequences of demyelination in axons following injury and disease; (3) the endogenous mechanisms of oligodendrocyte replacement; (4) the modulatory role of reactive astrocytes and inflammatory cells in remyelination; and (5) the current status of cell-based therapies for promoting remyelination. Careful elucidation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of demyelination in the pathologic CNS is a key to better understanding the impact of remyelination for

  2. Treatment-induced hearing loss and adult social outcomes in survivors of childhood CNS and non-CNS solid tumors: Results from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Tara M; Bass, Johnnie K; Li, Zhenghong; Ness, Kirsten K; Gajjar, Amar; Pappo, Alberto S; Armstrong, Gregory T; Merchant, Thomas E; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M; Gurney, James G

    2015-11-15

    Survivors of childhood cancer who are treated with platinum-based chemotherapy and/or cranial radiation are at risk of treatment-induced hearing loss. However, the effects of such hearing loss on adult social attainment have not been well elucidated. Adult survivors of pediatric central nervous system (CNS) solid tumors (180 survivors) and non-CNS solid tumors (226 survivors) who were treated with potentially ototoxic cancer therapy completed audiologic evaluations and questionnaires assessing their perception of social functioning and social attainment (ie, independent living, marriage, and employment). Audiograms were graded with the Chang ototoxicity grading scale. Analyses were stratified by tumor type (ie, CNS vs non-CNS). Multivariable logistic regression models were conducted with adjustment for age; sex; chronic health conditions; and, for the CNS group, IQ. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were reported. Serious hearing loss (that requiring a hearing aid or deafness) was detected in 36% of survivors of CNS tumors and 39% of survivors of non-CNS tumors. Serious hearing loss was associated with an increased risk of perceived negative impact in ≥1 areas of social functioning (survivors of non-CNS tumors: OR, 1.83 [95% CI, 1.00-3.34]). Among survivors of non-CNS tumors, serious hearing loss was associated with 2-fold increased risk of nonindependent living (OR, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.19-4.04) and unemployment or not graduating from high school (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.00-3.34). A substantial proportion of adult survivors of childhood cancer treated with potentially ototoxic therapy have serious hearing loss. Treatment-induced hearing loss was found to be associated with reduced social attainment, both perceived and actual, in this study sample. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  3. CNS Schwann cells display oligodendrocyte precursor-like potassium channel activation and antigenic expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kegler, Kristel; Imbschweiler, Ilka; Ulrich, Reiner; Kovermann, Peter; Fahlke, Christoph; Deschl, Ulrich; Kalkuhl, Arno; Baumgärnter, Wolfgang; Wewetzer, Konstantin

    2014-06-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) injury triggers production of myelinating Schwann cells from endogenous oligodendrocyte precursors (OLPs). These CNS Schwann cells may be attractive candidates for novel therapeutic strategies aiming to promote endogenous CNS repair. However, CNS Schwann cells have been so far mainly characterized in situ regarding morphology and marker expression, and it has remained enigmatic whether they display functional properties distinct from peripheral nervous system (PNS) Schwann cells. Potassium channels (K+) have been implicated in progenitor and glial cell proliferation after injury and may, therefore, represent a suitable pharmacological target. In the present study, we focused on the function and expression of voltage-gated K+ channels Kv(1-12) and accessory β-subunits in purified adult canine CNS and PNS Schwann cell cultures using electrophysiology and microarray analysis and characterized their antigenic phenotype. We show here that K+ channels differed significantly in both cell types. While CNS Schwann cells displayed prominent K D-mediated K+ currents, PNS Schwann cells elicited K(D-) and K(A-type) K+ currents. Inhibition of K+ currents by TEA and Ba2+ was more effective in CNS Schwann cells. These functional differences were not paralleled by differential mRNA expression of Kv(1-12) and accessory β-subunits. However, O4/A2B5 and GFAP expressions were significantly higher and lower, respectively, in CNS than in PNS Schwann cells. Taken together, this is the first evidence that CNS Schwann cells display specific properties not shared by their peripheral counterpart. Both Kv currents and increased O4/A2B5 expression were reminiscent of OLPs suggesting that CNS Schwann cells retain OLP features during maturation.

  4. On the complexity of classical guitar playing: functional adaptations to task constraints.

    PubMed

    Heijink, Hank; Meulenbroek, Ruud G J

    2002-12-01

    The authors performed a behavioral study of the complexity of left-hand finger movements in classical guitar playing. Six professional guitarists played movement sequences in a fixed tempo. Left-hand finger movements were recorded in 3 dimensions, and the guitar sound was recorded synchronously. Assuming that performers prefer to avoid extreme joint angles when moving, the authors hypothesized 3 complexity factors. The results showed differential effects of the complexity factors on the performance measures and on participants' judgments of complexity. The results demonstrated that keeping the joints in the middle of their range is an important principle in guitar playing, and players exploit the available tolerance in timing and placement of the left-hand fingers to control the acoustic output variability.

  5. Mothers’ Reports of Play Dates and Observation of School Playground Behavior of Children Having High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Frederick D.; Gorospe, Clarissa M.; Chang, Ya-Chih; Sugar, Catherine A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are generally included with typically developing peers at school. They have difficulties interacting with peers on the school play ground. Previous literature suggests that having play dates in the home may be related to better peer acceptance at school. Methods This study examines the relationship between mother-reported play date frequency and amount of conflict, and peer interaction observed on the school playground for a sample of 27 boys and 4 girls meeting structured interview and observation criteria for ASD. Measures of intellectual functioning, adaptive behavior, and social skills were included in a stepwise regression analysis to account for their impact on relationships between maternal play date reports, general peer acceptance at school (as rated by the child’s teacher) and observations of school playground behavior. Results Results revealed that children with autism spectrum disorders who had more play dates in their home tended to spend a greater amount of time engaged in behaviors such as mutual offering of objects, conversing and other turn taking activities with peers on the school playground. They also received more positive responses to their overtures from peers. These relationships remained highly significant even after accounting for other demographic, general social, and cognitive variables. Conclusions The present results suggest that play date frequency is strongly related to school playground behavior. Due to the design of this study, future research must assess whether play dates in the home promote better peer relationships on the playground or the reverse. In either case, the assessment of play dates, as well as observation of spontaneous unsupervised social interactions are important outcome measures to consider in social skills interventions for children with high functioning ASD. PMID:20860756

  6. Galectin-3 in M2 macrophages plays a protective role in resolution of neuropathology in brain parasitic infection by regulating neutrophil turnover.

    PubMed

    Quenum Zangbede, Fredice O; Chauhan, Arun; Sharma, Jyotika; Mishra, Bibhuti B

    2018-06-26

    Macrophages/microglia with M2- activation phenotype are thought to play an important anti-inflammatory and tissue reparative functions in the brain, yet the molecular basis of their functions in the central nervous system (CNS) remain to be clearly defined. In a preclinical model of neurocysticercosis using brain infection with a parasite Mesocestoides corti , we previously reported the presence of large numbers of M2 cells in the CNS. In this study using female mice, we report that M2 macrophages in the parasite-infected brain display abundant galectin-3 expression. Disease severity was increased in Galectin-3 -/- mice correlating with increased neurological defects, augmented cell death and, importantly, massive accumulation of neutrophils and M2 macrophages in the CNS of these mice. Because neutrophil clearance by efferocytosis is an important function of M2 macrophages, we investigated a possible role of galectin-3 in this process. Indeed, galectin-3 deficient M2 macrophages exhibited a defect in efferocytic clearance of neutrophils in-vitro. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of M2 macrophages from Galectin-3 sufficient WT mice reduced neutrophilia in the CNS and ameliorated disease severity in parasite-infected Galectin-3 -/- mice. Together, these results demonstrate for the first time a novel role of galectin-3 in M2 macrophage function in neutrophil turnover and resolution of inflammatory pathology in the CNS. This likely will have implications in neurocysticercosis and neuro-inflammatory diseases. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Macrophages/microglia with M1-activation phenotype are thought to promote CNS pathology, whereas M2-anti-inflammatory phenotype promote CNS repair. However, the mechanisms regulating M2 cell protective functions in the CNS microenvironment are undefined. Quenum Zangbede et. al., report that helminth infection of the brain induces an increased expression of galectin-3 in M2 macrophages accumulated in the CNS. Using multiple experimental models

  7. Kindergarten Scores, Storytelling, Executive Function, and Motivation Improved through Literacy-Rich Guided Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, Dena M.; Clemence, Kimberly J.; Teale, Mikaila M.; Rule, Audrey C.; Montgomery, Sarah E.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the effects of literacy-rich sociodramatic guided play on kindergarten student literacy performance and behavior. Kindergarten students of varying socioeconomic status attending two elementary schools in the same school district participated in this repeated measures, counterbalanced design study. Students received the mandated…

  8. Role Played Self-Disclosure as a Function of Liking and Knowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Critelli, Joseph W.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Examines the effects of liking and knowing on self-disclosure using both self-report and observational measures, obtains separate measures of personal and impersonal self-disclosure, and assesses the utility of the role-playing paradigm for revealing orderly relationships among self-disclosure variables. (Author/RK)

  9. Mothers' reports of play dates and observation of school playground behavior of children having high-functioning autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Frederick D; Gorospe, Clarissa M; Chang, Ya-Chih; Sugar, Catherine A

    2011-05-01

    Children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are generally included with typically developing peers at school. They have difficulties interacting with peers on the school playground. Previous literature suggests that having play dates in the home may be related to better peer acceptance at school. This study examines the relationship between mother-reported play date frequency and amount of conflict, and peer interaction observed on the school playground for a sample of 27 boys and 4 girls meeting structured interview and observation criteria for ASD. Measures of intellectual functioning, adaptive behavior, and social skills were included in a stepwise regression analysis to account for their impact on relationships between maternal play date reports, general peer acceptance at school (as rated by the child's teacher) and observations of school playground behavior. Results revealed that children with autism spectrum disorders who had more play dates in their home tended to spend a greater amount of time engaged in behaviors such as mutual offering of objects, conversing and other turn-taking activities with peers on the school playground. They also received more positive responses to their overtures from peers. These relationships remained highly significant even after accounting for other demographic, general social, and cognitive variables. The present results suggest that play date frequency is strongly related to school playground behavior. Owing to the design of this study, future research must assess whether play dates in the home promote better peer relationships on the playground or the reverse. In either case, the assessment of play dates, as well as observation of spontaneous unsupervised social interactions, are important outcome measures to consider in social skills interventions for children with high-functioning ASD. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry © 2010 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental

  10. Play with online virtual pets as a method to improve mirror neuron and real world functioning in autistic children.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, Eric Lewin

    2008-01-01

    Autism is a severe disease with no known cause and no cure or treatment. Recently, ourselves and subsequently others found that so-called "mirror neurons" - neurons that respond not only when a person moves, but upon observation of movement in another - are dysfunctional in autistic children. Here I suggest an easy, simple, inexpensive and fun method to improve mirror neuron functioning in autistic children, increase appreciation in autistic children for the theory of mind and thinking of others, and most importantly hopefully to improve real world functioning: play with virtual online pets that are the "embodiment" of a stuffed animal the child has. Adoption and then care and play with online pets forces, in a fun way, one to think about the world through the eyes and needs of the pet. A simple method to test this play with online virtual pet therapy is described.

  11. Microglia function in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Watters, Jyoti J; Schartner, Jill M; Badie, Behnam

    2005-08-01

    Microglia play an important role in inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). These cells have also been identified in brain neoplasms; however, as of yet their function largely remains unclear. More recent studies designed to characterize further tumor-associated microglia suggest that the immune effector function of these cells may be suppressed in CNS tumors. Furthermore, microglia and macrophages can secrete various cytokines and growth factors that may contribute to the successful immune evasion, growth, and invasion of brain neoplasms. A better understanding of microglia and macrophage function is essential for the development of immune-based treatment strategies against malignant brain tumors. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Two is Better than One, but Mine is Better than Ours: Preschoolers' Executive Function during Co-Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qu, Li

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated how playing with another individual may influence 3- and 4-year-olds' executive function in the Less-Is-More (LIM) task, where children point to the tray with the smaller amount of treats so as to obtain the larger amount of treats in the other tray. In Experiment 1, 35 Singaporean children were tested with a self…

  13. The Role of Make-Believe Play in the Development of Executive Function: Status of Research and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berk, Laura E.; Meyers, Adena B.

    2013-01-01

    The authors discuss the association between make-believe play and the development of executive-function (EF) skills in young children. Some forty years ago, Lev S. Vygotsky first proposed that make-believe fosters the development of symbolic thought and self-regulation. Since then, a small body of research has produced evidence of an association…

  14. Mothers' Reports of Play Dates and Observation of School Playground Behavior of Children Having High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Frederick D.; Gorospe, Clarissa M.; Chang, Ya-Chih; Sugar, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are generally included with typically developing peers at school. They have difficulties interacting with peers on the school playground. Previous literature suggests that having play dates in the home may be related to better peer acceptance at school. Methods: This study…

  15. Variable reporting of functional outcomes and return to play in superior labrum anterior and posterior tear.

    PubMed

    Steinhaus, Michael E; Makhni, Eric C; Lieber, Adam C; Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-11-01

    Outcomes assessments after superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) tear/repair are highly varied, making it difficult to draw comparisons across the literature. This study examined the inconsistency in outcomes reporting in the SLAP tear literature. We hypothesize that there is significant variability in outcomes reporting and that although most studies may report return to play, time to return reporting will be highly variable. The PubMed, Medline, Scopus, and Embase databases were systematically reviewed for studies from January 2000 to December 2014 reporting outcomes after SLAP tear/repair. Two reviewers assessed each study, and those meeting inclusion criteria were examined for pertinent data. Outcomes included objective (range of motion, strength, clinical examinations, and imaging) and subjective (patient-reported outcomes, satisfaction, activities of daily living, and return to play) measures. Of the 56 included studies, 43% documented range of motion, 14% reported strength, and 16% noted postoperative imaging. There was significant variation in use of patient-reported outcomes measures, with the 3 most commonly noted measures reported in 20% to 55% of studies. Return to play was noted in 75% of studies, and 23% reported time to return, with greater rates in elite athletes. Eleven studies (20%) did not report follow-up or noted data with <12 months of follow-up. The SLAP literature is characterized by substantial variability in outcomes reporting, with time to return to play noted in few studies. Efforts to standardize outcomes reporting would facilitate comparisons across the literature and improve our understanding of the prognosis of this injury. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nanotechnology—novel therapeutics for CNS disorders

    PubMed Central

    Srikanth, Maya; Kessler, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Research into treatments for diseases of the CNS has made impressive strides in the past few decades, but therapeutic options are limited for many patients with CNS disorders. Nanotechnology has emerged as an exciting and promising new means of treating neurological disease, with the potential to fundamentally change the way we approach CNS-targeted therapeutics. Molecules can be nanoengineered to cross the blood–brain barrier, target specific cell or signalling systems, respond to endogenous stimuli, or act as vehicles for gene delivery, or as a matrix to promote axon elongation and support cell survival. The wide variety of available nanotechnologies allows the selection of a nanoscale material with the characteristics best suited to the therapeutic challenges posed by an individual CNS disorder. In this Review, we describe recent advances in the development of nanotechnology for the treatment of neurological disorders—in particular, neurodegenerative disease and malignant brain tumours—and for the promotion of neuroregeneration. PMID:22526003

  17. CNS embryonal tumours: WHO 2016 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Pickles, J C; Hawkins, C; Pietsch, T; Jacques, T S

    2018-02-01

    Embryonal tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) present a significant clinical challenge. Many of these neoplasms affect young children, have a very high mortality and therapeutic strategies are often aggressive with poor long-term outcomes. There is a great need to accurately diagnose embryonal tumours, predict their outcome and adapt therapy to the individual patient's risk. For the first time in 2016, the WHO classification took into account molecular characteristics for the diagnosis of CNS tumours. This integration of histological features with genetic information has significantly changed the diagnostic work-up and reporting of tumours of the CNS. However, this remains challenging in embryonal tumours due to their previously unaccounted tumour heterogeneity. We describe the recent revisions made to the 4th edition of the WHO classification of CNS tumours and review the main changes, while highlighting some of the more common diagnostic testing strategies. © 2017 British Neuropathological Society.

  18. Clinical Applications Involving CNS Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Boris; McCown, Thomas; Leone, Paola; Gray, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) have traditionally been the most difficult to treat by traditional pharmacological methods, due mostly to the blood–brain barrier and the difficulties associated with repeated drug administration targeting the CNS. Viral vector gene transfer represents a way to permanently provide a therapeutic protein within the nervous system after a single administration, whether this be a gene replacement strategy for an inherited disorder or a disease-modifying protein for a disease such as Parkinson's. Gene therapy approaches for CNS disorders has evolved considerably over the last two decades. Although a breakthrough treatment has remained elusive, current strategies are now considerably safer and potentially much more effective. This chapter will explore the past, current, and future status of CNS gene therapy, focusing on clinical trials utilizing adeno-associated virus and lentiviral vectors. PMID:25311921

  19. Air Pollution: Mechanisms of Neuroinflammation & CNS Disease

    PubMed Central

    Block, Michelle L.; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian

    2009-01-01

    Emerging evidence implicates air pollution as a chronic source of neuroinflammation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and neuropathology instigating central nervous system (CNS) disease. Stroke incidence, and Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease pathology are linked to air pollution. Recent reports reveal that air pollution components reach the brain. Further, systemic effects known to impact lung and cardiovascular disease also impinge upon CNS health. While mechanisms driving air pollution-induced CNS pathology are poorly understood, new evidence suggests that activation of microglia and changes in the blood brain barrier may be key to this process. Here, we summarize recent findings detailing the mechanisms through which air pollution reaches the brain and activates the resident innate immune response to become a chronic source of pro-inflammatory factors and ROS culpable in CNS disease. PMID:19716187

  20. Real-time monitoring prefrontal activities during online video game playing by functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Zhang, Lei; Long, Kehong; Gong, Hui; Lei, Hao

    2018-02-16

    A growing body of literature has suggested that video game playing can induce functional and structural plasticity of the brain. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. In this study, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was used to record prefrontal activities in 24 experienced game players when they played a massively multiplayer online battle arena video game, League of Legends (LOL), under naturalistic conditions. It was observed that game onset was associated with significant activations in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) and concomitant deactivations in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and frontal pole area (FPA). Game events, such as slaying an enemy and being slain by an enemy evoked region-specific time-locked hemodynamic/oxygenation responses in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). It was proposed that the VLPFC activities during LOL playing are likely responses to visuo-motor task load of the game, while the DLPFC/FPA activities may be involved in the constant shifts of attentional states and allocation of cognitive resources required by game playing. The present study demonstrated that it is feasible to use fNIRS to monitor real-time prefrontal activity during online video game playing. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. [Teaching skills of functional assessment to medical students: why not playing games?].

    PubMed

    Huber, Philippe; Saber, Abdelmalek; Schnellmann, Yves; Gold, Gabriel

    2012-11-07

    Today, physicians take care of an aging population suffering from multiple chronic diseases and disabilities. Therefore, a good knowledge of functional assessment is required, and this topic should be addressed in the undergraduate medical curriculum. This article reports our experience with a seminar on functional assessment using an "aging game" as a pedagogic vector. This seminar is organized by geriatricians, occupational therapists and physical therapists. Medical students are exposed to situations where they experiment disabilities and try to elaborate compensatory strategies. Then, they reflect on a complex discharge project by analyzing a written clinical case. Finally, they are introduced to the use of validated functional assessment instruments. Evaluation indicated that this pedagogic approach is highly valued by students and fosters the acquisition of knowledge in functional assessment.

  2. Immune privilege as an intrinsic CNS property: astrocytes protect the CNS against T-cell-mediated neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Gimsa, Ulrike; Mitchison, N Avrion; Brunner-Weinzierl, Monika C

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes have many functions in the central nervous system (CNS). They support differentiation and homeostasis of neurons and influence synaptic activity. They are responsible for formation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and make up the glia limitans. Here, we review their contribution to neuroimmune interactions and in particular to those induced by the invasion of activated T cells. We discuss the mechanisms by which astrocytes regulate pro- and anti-inflammatory aspects of T-cell responses within the CNS. Depending on the microenvironment, they may become potent antigen-presenting cells for T cells and they may contribute to inflammatory processes. They are also able to abrogate or reprogram T-cell responses by inducing apoptosis or secreting inhibitory mediators. We consider apparently contradictory functions of astrocytes in health and disease, particularly in their interaction with lymphocytes, which may either aggravate or suppress neuroinflammation.

  3. Knowledge-Based, Central Nervous System (CNS) Lead Selection and Lead Optimization for CNS Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is the major area that is affected by aging. Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), brain cancer, and stroke are the CNS diseases that will cost trillions of dollars for their treatment. Achievement of appropriate blood–brain barrier (BBB) penetration is often considered a significant hurdle in the CNS drug discovery process. On the other hand, BBB penetration may be a liability for many of the non-CNS drug targets, and a clear understanding of the physicochemical and structural differences between CNS and non-CNS drugs may assist both research areas. Because of the numerous and challenging issues in CNS drug discovery and the low success rates, pharmaceutical companies are beginning to deprioritize their drug discovery efforts in the CNS arena. Prompted by these challenges and to aid in the design of high-quality, efficacious CNS compounds, we analyzed the physicochemical property and the chemical structural profiles of 317 CNS and 626 non-CNS oral drugs. The conclusions derived provide an ideal property profile for lead selection and the property modification strategy during the lead optimization process. A list of substructural units that may be useful for CNS drug design was also provided here. A classification tree was also developed to differentiate between CNS drugs and non-CNS oral drugs. The combined analysis provided the following guidelines for designing high-quality CNS drugs: (i) topological molecular polar surface area of <76 Å2 (25–60 Å2), (ii) at least one (one or two, including one aliphatic amine) nitrogen, (iii) fewer than seven (two to four) linear chains outside of rings, (iv) fewer than three (zero or one) polar hydrogen atoms, (v) volume of 740–970 Å3, (vi) solvent accessible surface area of 460–580 Å2, and (vii) positive QikProp parameter CNS. The ranges within parentheses may be used during lead optimization. One violation to this proposed profile may be acceptable. The

  4. Molecular stress response in the CNS of mice after systemic exposureto interferon-alpha, ionizing radiation and ketamine

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Xiu R.; Marchetti, Francesco; Lu, Xiaochen

    2009-03-03

    We previously showed that the expression of troponin T1 (Tnnt 1) was induced in the central nervous system (CNS) of adultmice 30 min after treatment with ketamine, a glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that Tnnt 1 expression may be an early molecular biomarker of stress response in the CNS of mice. To further evaluate this hypothesis, we investigated the regional expression of Tnnt 1 in the mouse brain using RNA in situ hybridization 4 h after systemic exposure to interferon-a (IFN-a) and gamma ionizing radiation, both of which have be associated with wide ranges of neuropsychiatric complications.more » Adult B6C3F1 male mice were treated with either human IFN-a (a single i.p. injection at 1 x 105 IU/kg) or whole body gamma-radiation (10 cGy or 2 Gy). Patterns of Tnnt 1 transcript expression were compared in various CNS regions after IFN-a, radiation and ketamine treatments (previous study). Tnnt 1 expression was consistently induced in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex and hippocampus after all treatment regimens including 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Regional expression of Tnnt 1 was induced in Purkinje cells of cerebellum after ionizing radiation and ketamine treatment; but not after IFN-a treatment. None of the three treatments induced Tnnt 1 expression in glial cells. The patterns of Tnnt 1 expression in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex andhippocampus, which are both known to play important roles in cognitive function, memory and emotion, suggest that the expression of Tnnt 1 may be an early molecular biomarker of induced CNS stress.« less

  5. A philosophy for CNS radiotracer design

    DOE PAGES

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C.; Ricq, Emily L.; Hooker, Jacob M.

    2014-10-01

    Decades after its discovery, positron emission tomography (PET) remains the premier tool for imaging neurochemistry in living humans. Technological improvements in radiolabeling methods, camera design, and image analysis have kept PET in the forefront. In addition, the use of PET imaging has expanded because researchers have developed new radiotracers that visualize receptors, transporters, enzymes, and other molecular targets within the human brain. However, of the thousands of proteins in the central nervous system (CNS), researchers have successfully imaged fewer than 40 human proteins. To address the critical need for new radiotracers, this Account expounds on the decisions, strategies, and pitfallsmore » of CNS radiotracer development based on our current experience in this area. We discuss the five key components of radiotracer development for human imaging: choosing a biomedical question, selection of a biological target, design of the radiotracer chemical structure, evaluation of candidate radiotracers, and analysis of preclinical imaging. It is particularly important to analyze the market of scientists or companies who might use a new radiotracer and carefully select a relevant biomedical question(s) for that audience. In the selection of a specific biological target, we emphasize how target localization and identity can constrain this process and discuss the optimal target density and affinity ratios needed for binding-based radiotracers. In addition, we discuss various PET test–retest variability requirements for monitoring changes in density, occupancy, or functionality for new radiotracers. In the synthesis of new radiotracer structures, high-throughput, modular syntheses have proved valuable, and these processes provide compounds with sites for late-stage radioisotope installation. As a result, researchers can manage the time constraints associated with the limited half-lives of isotopes. In order to evaluate brain uptake, a number of methods are

  6. A philosophy for CNS radiotracer design.

    PubMed

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C; Ricq, Emily L; Hooker, Jacob M

    2014-10-21

    Decades after its discovery, positron emission tomography (PET) remains the premier tool for imaging neurochemistry in living humans. Technological improvements in radiolabeling methods, camera design, and image analysis have kept PET in the forefront. In addition, the use of PET imaging has expanded because researchers have developed new radiotracers that visualize receptors, transporters, enzymes, and other molecular targets within the human brain. However, of the thousands of proteins in the central nervous system (CNS), researchers have successfully imaged fewer than 40 human proteins. To address the critical need for new radiotracers, this Account expounds on the decisions, strategies, and pitfalls of CNS radiotracer development based on our current experience in this area. We discuss the five key components of radiotracer development for human imaging: choosing a biomedical question, selection of a biological target, design of the radiotracer chemical structure, evaluation of candidate radiotracers, and analysis of preclinical imaging. It is particularly important to analyze the market of scientists or companies who might use a new radiotracer and carefully select a relevant biomedical question(s) for that audience. In the selection of a specific biological target, we emphasize how target localization and identity can constrain this process and discuss the optimal target density and affinity ratios needed for binding-based radiotracers. In addition, we discuss various PET test-retest variability requirements for monitoring changes in density, occupancy, or functionality for new radiotracers. In the synthesis of new radiotracer structures, high-throughput, modular syntheses have proved valuable, and these processes provide compounds with sites for late-stage radioisotope installation. As a result, researchers can manage the time constraints associated with the limited half-lives of isotopes. In order to evaluate brain uptake, a number of methods are available

  7. A Philosophy for CNS Radiotracer Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Decades after its discovery, positron emission tomography (PET) remains the premier tool for imaging neurochemistry in living humans. Technological improvements in radiolabeling methods, camera design, and image analysis have kept PET in the forefront. In addition, the use of PET imaging has expanded because researchers have developed new radiotracers that visualize receptors, transporters, enzymes, and other molecular targets within the human brain. However, of the thousands of proteins in the central nervous system (CNS), researchers have successfully imaged fewer than 40 human proteins. To address the critical need for new radiotracers, this Account expounds on the decisions, strategies, and pitfalls of CNS radiotracer development based on our current experience in this area. We discuss the five key components of radiotracer development for human imaging: choosing a biomedical question, selection of a biological target, design of the radiotracer chemical structure, evaluation of candidate radiotracers, and analysis of preclinical imaging. It is particularly important to analyze the market of scientists or companies who might use a new radiotracer and carefully select a relevant biomedical question(s) for that audience. In the selection of a specific biological target, we emphasize how target localization and identity can constrain this process and discuss the optimal target density and affinity ratios needed for binding-based radiotracers. In addition, we discuss various PET test–retest variability requirements for monitoring changes in density, occupancy, or functionality for new radiotracers. In the synthesis of new radiotracer structures, high-throughput, modular syntheses have proved valuable, and these processes provide compounds with sites for late-stage radioisotope installation. As a result, researchers can manage the time constraints associated with the limited half-lives of isotopes. In order to evaluate brain uptake, a number of methods

  8. Outfielders playing in the infield: functions of aging-associated "nuclear" proteins in the mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Czypiorski, P; Altschmied, J; Rabanter, L L; Goy, C; Jakob, S; Haendeler, J

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few years it has become clear that mitochondria are not merely the powerhouses of cells. Proteome-analyses of mitochondria from different organisms and organs revealed that more than 1000 proteins are localized in and/or on mitochondria. This by far exceeds the number of proteins required for classical mitochondrial functions, e.g. the respiratory chain, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid oxidation and apoptosis. This suggests that many of these proteins have other, as yet unknown functions. Several proteins with well-described nuclear functions, like the transcription factor FoxO3A or the Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, have recently been shown to be localized also within the mitochondria. This mini-review will focus on the description of the functions of these two proteins in the nucleus and in the mitochondria - as two examples of many more proteins, which are yet to be uncovered. It will give insights into the role of these proteins within different organelles of the cell and will reveal that the functions of the proteins are probably not the same in the nucleus and the mitochondria. Therefore, these differences have to be considered when targeting proteins for therapeutic approaches.

  9. Virally mediated gene manipulation in the adult CNS

    PubMed Central

    Edry, Efrat; Lamprecht, Raphael; Wagner, Shlomo; Rosenblum, Kobi

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how the CNS functions poses one of the greatest challenges in modern life science and medicine. Studying the brain is especially challenging because of its complexity, the heterogeneity of its cellular composition, and the substantial changes it undergoes throughout its life-span. The complexity of adult brain neural networks results also from the diversity of properties and functions of neuronal cells, governed, inter alia, by temporally and spatially differential expression of proteins in mammalian brain cell populations. Hence, research into the biology of CNS activity and its implications to human and animal behavior must use novel scientific tools. One source of such tools is the field of molecular genetics—recently utilized more and more frequently in neuroscience research. Transgenic approaches in general, and gene targeting in rodents have become fundamental tools for elucidating gene function in the CNS. Although spectacular progress has been achieved over recent decades by using these approaches, it is important to note that they face a number of restrictions. One of the main challenges is presented by the temporal and spatial regulation of introduced genetic manipulations. Viral vectors provide an alternative approach to temporally regulated, localized delivery of genetic modifications into neurons. In this review we describe available technologies for gene transfer into the adult mammalian CNS that use both viral and non-viral tools. We discuss viral vectors frequently used in neuroscience, with emphasis on lentiviral vector (LV) systems. We consider adverse effects of LVs, and the use of LVs for temporally and spatially controllable manipulations. Especially, we highlight the significance of viral vector-mediated genetic manipulations in studying learning and memory processes, and how they may be effectively used to separate out the various phases of learning: acquisition, consolidation, retrieval, and maintenance. PMID:22207836

  10. Collision avoidance behavior as a function of aging and tennis playing.

    PubMed

    Lobjois, Régis; Benguigui, Nicolas; Bertsch, Jean; Broderick, Michael P

    2008-02-01

    Daily living often requires pedestrians and drivers to adapt their behavior to the displacement of other objects in their environment in order to avoid collision. Yet little research has paid attention to the effect of age on the completion of such a challenging task. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between age and collision avoidance skill and whether a sporting activity affects this. Three age groups (20-30, 60-70, and 70-80 years) of tennis players and non-players launched a projectile toward a target in order to hit it before it was hit by another "object" (a stimulus represented by apparent motion of lights). If the participant judged that time-to-collision (TTC) of the moving stimulus was not long enough for him/her to launch the projectile in time to arrive before the stimulus, the participant had to inhibit the launching. Results showed that for the non-players the number of errors in the 70-80 year-old group was significantly higher than those of the 20-30 and 60-70 year-old groups, which did not differ from each other. However, this increase was not observed in the 70-80 year-old tennis players, demonstrating a beneficial effect of playing tennis on collision avoidance skill. Results also revealed that the older groups of both tennis players and non-players were subject to the typical age-related increase in response time. Additional analyses indicated that the 70-80 year-old non-players did not adjust their actions to these age-related changes in response time. The older tennis-playing participants, however, were more likely to adjust collision avoidance behavior to their diminished response times.

  11. Distinguishing Playing Status Through a Functionally Relevant Performance Measure in Female Division I Collegiate Soccer Athletes.

    PubMed

    Magrini, Mitchel A; Colquhoun, Ryan J; Sellers, John H; Conchola, Eric C; Hester, Garrett M; Thiele, Ryan M; Pope, Zach K; Smith, Doug B

    2017-06-08

    Although soccer is predominately an endurance sport, high velocity movements may be an important indicator of athletic success. The purpose of this investigation was to establish whether squat jumps (SJ) can differentiate starters from non-starters with a female collegiate division I soccer team. Eighteen female division I soccer athletes were separated into two groups: 9 starters (age: 19.5 ± 1.0; mass = 64.8 ± 11.5 kg; height = 167.5 ± 7.7 cm; games started = 18.2 ± 4.7; minutes played = 1633.8 ± 478.2 min) and 9 non-starters (age: 19.4 ± 1.4 years; mass = 63.3 ± 4.2 kg; height = 164.7 ± 6.8 cm; games started 0.7 ± 1.3; minutes played 158.2 ± 269.3). Each athlete performed 3 maximal SJs at a starting knee angle of 110° without arm swing. Each participant's SJ height, mean power (MP), peak power (PP), mean velocity (MV), and peak velocity (PV) were measured during each attempt by a linear position transducer (LPT). No statistically significant differences (p ≥ 0.05) in MP and PP between the starters and non-starters were observed. However, starters performed significantly better than non-starters in SJ height (p = 0.002), MV (p = 0.025), and PV (p = 0.015). Additionally, SJ height was strongly correlated with MV (r = 0.628) and PV (r = 0.647). These findings suggest that SJ height, MV and PV, may be important variables for discriminating differences between starters and non-starters in division I female soccer athletes and a strong indicator of explosive performance.

  12. Executive function plays a role in coordinating different perspectives, particularly when one's own perspective is involved.

    PubMed

    Fizke, Ella; Barthel, Dana; Peters, Thomas; Rakoczy, Hannes

    2014-03-01

    While developmental experiments with children and elderly subjects, work with neuropsychological patients and adult experimental studies have consistently found close relations between executive function and theory of mind, the foundation of this relation still remains somewhat unclear. One prominent account holds that executive function is specifically involved in ascribing such mental states, paradigmatically beliefs, that aim at representing the world truly because ascribing such states requires inhibition of normative defaults (beliefs being true) (e.g. Sabbagh, Moses, & Shiverick, 2006). The present studies systematically tested for the role of executive function in different forms of mental state ascription as a function of the type of state ascribed (beliefs or desires) and the first person involvement of the ascriber (whether she herself has an attitude conflicting with one to be ascribed to someone else) in young children. The results reveal that (i) executive function is related not only to belief ascription but equally to desire ascription when both are matched in terms of logical complexity (such that two subjective attitudes have to be ascribed to two agents that are incompatible with each other). (ii) Both for desires and for beliefs, these relations are strongest in such tasks where the ascriber herself is one of the two agents, i.e. has a belief or desire herself that stands in contrast to that to be ascribed to someone else. All in all, these findings suggest that executive function figures in coordinating perspectives more generally, not only epistemic ones, and in particular in coordinating others' and one's own conflicting perspectives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluating Treatments for Functionally Equivalent Problem Behavior Maintained by Adult Compliance with Mands during Interactive Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Jonathan D.; Bednar, Mary K.; Willse, Lena V.; Goetzel, Amanda L.; Concepcion, Anthony; Pincus, Shari M.; Hardesty, Samantha L.; Bowman, Lynn G.

    2017-01-01

    A primary goal of behavioral interventions is to reduce dangerous or inappropriate behavior and to generalize treatment effects across various settings. However, there is a lack of research evaluating generalization of treatment effects while individuals with functionally equivalent problem behavior interact with each other. For the current study,…

  14. Intermediate Filaments Play a Pivotal Role in Regulating Cell Architecture and Function*

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Jason; Kuczmarski, Edward R.; Herrmann, Harald; Goldman, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) are composed of one or more members of a large family of cytoskeletal proteins, whose expression is cell- and tissue type-specific. Their importance in regulating the physiological properties of cells is becoming widely recognized in functions ranging from cell motility to signal transduction. IF proteins assemble into nanoscale biopolymers with unique strain-hardening properties that are related to their roles in regulating the mechanical integrity of cells. Furthermore, mutations in the genes encoding IF proteins cause a wide range of human diseases. Due to the number of different types of IF proteins, we have limited this short review to cover structure and function topics mainly related to the simpler homopolymeric IF networks composed of vimentin, and specifically for diseases, the related muscle-specific desmin IF networks. PMID:25957409

  15. Intermediate Filaments Play a Pivotal Role in Regulating Cell Architecture and Function.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Jason; Kuczmarski, Edward R; Herrmann, Harald; Goldman, Robert D

    2015-07-10

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) are composed of one or more members of a large family of cytoskeletal proteins, whose expression is cell- and tissue type-specific. Their importance in regulating the physiological properties of cells is becoming widely recognized in functions ranging from cell motility to signal transduction. IF proteins assemble into nanoscale biopolymers with unique strain-hardening properties that are related to their roles in regulating the mechanical integrity of cells. Furthermore, mutations in the genes encoding IF proteins cause a wide range of human diseases. Due to the number of different types of IF proteins, we have limited this short review to cover structure and function topics mainly related to the simpler homopolymeric IF networks composed of vimentin, and specifically for diseases, the related muscle-specific desmin IF networks. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. In Vivo Reprogramming for CNS Repair: Regenerating Neurons from Endogenous Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hedong; Chen, Gong

    2017-01-01

    Neuroregeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) has proven to be difficult despite decades of research. The old dogma that CNS neurons cannot be regenerated in the adult mammalian brain has been overturned; however, endogenous adult neurogenesis appears to be insufficient for brain repair. Stem cell therapy once held promise for generating large quantities of neurons in the CNS, but immunorejection and long-term functional integration remain major hurdles. In this perspective, we discuss the use of in vivo reprogramming as an emerging technology to regenerate functional neurons from endogenous glial cells inside the brain and spinal cord. Besides the CNS, in vivo reprogramming has been demonstrated successfully in the pancreas, heart and liver, and may be adopted in other organs. Although challenges remain for translating this technology into clinical therapies, we anticipate that in vivo reprogramming may revolutionize regenerative medicine by using a patient’s own internal cells for tissue repair. PMID:27537482

  17. Adult oligodendrocyte progenitor cells - multifaceted regulators of the CNS in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Castaneda, Anthony; Gaultier, Alban

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are the often-overlooked fourth glial cell type in the central nervous system (CNS), comprising about 5% of the CNS. For a long time, our vision of OPC function was limited to the generation of mature oligodendrocytes. However, new studies have highlighted the multifaceted nature of the OPCs. During homeostatic and pathological conditions, OPCs are the most proliferative cell type in the CNS, a property not consistent with the need to generate new oligodendrocytes. Indeed, OPCs modulate neuronal activity and OPC depletion in the brain can trigger depressive-like behavior. More importantly, OPCs are actively recruited to injury sites, where they orchestrate glial scar formation and contribute to the immune response. The following is a comprehensive analysis of the literature on OPC function beyond myelination, in the context of the healthy and diseased adult CNS. PMID:26796621

  18. TLR4 plays a crucial role in MSC-induced inhibition of NK cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ying; Liu, Jin; Liu, Yang

    2015-08-21

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a kind of stromal cell within the tumor microenvironment. In our research, MSC derived from acute myeloid leukemia patients' bone marrow (AML-MSC) and lung cancer tissues (LC-MSC) as well as normal bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) cultured in conditioned medium of HeLa cells were found to have higher expressions of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) mRNA compared with BM-MSC. The sorted TLR4-positive MSC (TLR4+ MSC) differed in cytokine (interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) secretion from those of unsorted MSC. MSC was reported to inhibit natural killer (NK) cell proliferation and function. In this research, we confirmed thatmore » TLR4+ MSC aggravate this suppression. Furthermore, when TLR4 in the sorted cells were stimulated by LPS or following blocked by antibody, the suppression on NK cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were more intensive or recovered respectively. Compared to unsorted MSC, NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells were also inhibited by TLR4+ MSC. These findings suggest that activation of TLR4 pathway is important for TLR4+ MSC and MSC to obstruct anti-tumor immunity by inhibiting NK cell function, which may provide a potential stroma-targeted tumor therapy. - Highlights: • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NK cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NKG2D expression on NK cells and NK cell cytotoxicity. • The distinguished cytokine expression of TLR4+ MSC may contribute to the inhibition on NK cell function.« less

  19. Microtubule-Targeting Agents Enter the Central Nervous System (CNS): Double-edged Swords for Treating CNS Injury and Disease.

    PubMed

    Hur, Eun-Mi; Lee, Byoung Dae

    2014-12-01

    Microtubules have been among the most successful targets in anticancer therapy and a large number of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) are in various stages of clinical development for the treatment of several malignancies. Given that injury and diseases in the central nervous system (CNS) are accompanied by acute or chronic disruption of the structural integrity of neurons and that microtubules provide structural support for the nervous system at cellular and intracellular levels, microtubules are emerging as potential therapeutic targets for treating CNS disorders. It has been postulated that exogenous application of MTAs might prevent the breakdown or degradation of microtubules after injury or during neurodegeneration, which will thereby aid in preserving the structural integrity and function of the nervous system. Here we review recent evidence that supports this notion and also discuss potential risks of targeting microtubules as a therapy for treating nerve injury and neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. VEGF and VEGFB Play Balancing Roles in Adipose Differentiation, Gene Expression, and Function.

    PubMed

    Jin, Honghong; Li, Dan; Wang, Xutong; Jia, Jia; Chen, Yang; Yao, Yapeng; Zhao, Chunlan; Lu, Xiaodan; Zhang, Shujie; Togo, Jacques; Ji, Yan; Zhang, Luqing; Feng, Xuechao; Zheng, Yaowu

    2018-05-01

    Obesity is the result of abnormal adipose development and energy metabolism. Using vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) B-knockout and inducible VEGF downregulation mouse models, we have shown that VEGFB inactivation caused expansion of white adipose, whitening of brown adipose, an increase in fat accumulation, and a reduction in energy consumption. At the same time, expression of the white adipose-associated genes was increased and brown adipose-associated genes decreased. VEGF repression, in contrast, induced brown adipose expansion and brown adipocyte development in white adipose, increased energy expenditure, upregulated brown adipose-associated genes, and downregulated white adipose-associated genes. When VEGFB-knockout and VEGF-repressed mice are crossed together, VEGF and VEGFB can counteractively regulate large numbers of genes and efficiently reverse each other's roles. These genes, under counteractive VEGF and VEGFB regulations, include transcription factors, adhesion molecules, and metabolic enzymes. This balancing role is confirmed by morphologic and functional changes. This study reports that VEGF and VEGFB counteractively regulate adipose development and function in energy metabolism.

  1. Playing with Cardiac “Redox Switches”: The “HNO Way” to Modulate Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Tocchetti, Carlo G.; Stanley, Brian A.; Murray, Christopher I.; Sivakumaran, Vidhya; Donzelli, Sonia; Mancardi, Daniele; Pagliaro, Pasquale; Gao, Wei Dong; van Eyk, Jennifer; Kass, David A.; Wink, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The nitric oxide (NO•) sibling, nitroxyl or nitrosyl hydride (HNO), is emerging as a molecule whose pharmacological properties include providing functional support to failing hearts. HNO also preconditions myocardial tissue, protecting it against ischemia-reperfusion injury while exerting vascular antiproliferative actions. In this review, HNO's peculiar cardiovascular assets are discussed in light of its unique chemistry that distinguish HNO from NO• as well as from reactive oxygen and nitrogen species such as the hydroxyl radical and peroxynitrite. Included here is a discussion of the possible routes of HNO formation in the myocardium and its chemical targets in the heart. HNO has been shown to have positive inotropic/lusitropic effects under normal and congestive heart failure conditions in animal models. The mechanistic intricacies of the beneficial cardiac effects of HNO are examined in cellular models. In contrast to β-receptor/cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A-dependent enhancers of myocardial performance, HNO uses its “thiophylic” nature as a vehicle to interact with redox switches such as cysteines, which are located in key components of the cardiac electromechanical machinery ruling myocardial function. Here, we will briefly review new features of HNO's cardiovascular effects that when combined with its positive inotropic/lusitropic action may render HNO donors an attractive addition to the current therapeutic armamentarium for treating patients with acutely decompensated congestive heart failure. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1687–1698. PMID:21235349

  2. Shifts in reinforcement signalling while playing slot-machines as a function of prior experience and impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Shao, R; Read, J; Behrens, T E J; Rogers, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electronic gaming machines (EGMs) offer significant revenue streams for mercantile gambling. However, limited clinical and experimental evidence suggests that EGMs are associated with heightened risks of clinically problematic patterns of play. Little is known about the neural structures that might mediate the transition from exploratory EGM play to the ‘addictive' play seen in problem gamblers; neither is it known how personality traits associated with gambling activity (and gambling problems) influence reinforcement processing while playing EGMs. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in healthy participants, we show that a single episode of slot-machine play is subsequently associated with reduced amplitudes of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent signals within reinforcement-related structures, such as the ventral striatum and caudate nucleus, following winning game outcomes; but increased amplitudes of anticipatory signals within the ventral striatum and amygdala while watching the game reels spin. Trait impulsivity enhanced positive signals within the ventral striatum and amygdala following the delivery of winning outcomes but diminished positive signals following the experience of almost-winning ('near-misses'). These results indicate that a single episode of slot-machine play engages the well-characterised reinforcement-learning mechanisms mediated by ascending dopamine mesolimbic and mesostriatal pathways, to shift reward value of EGMs away from game outcomes towards anticipatory states. Impulsivity, itself linked to problem gambling and heightened vulnerability to other addictive disorders, is associated with divergent coding of winning outcomes and almost-winning experiences within the ventral striatum and amygdala, potentially enhancing the reward value of successful slot-machine game outcomes but, at the same time, modulating the aversive motivational consequences of near-miss outcomes. PMID:23321810

  3. Ceruloplasmin regulates iron levels in the CNS and prevents free radical injury.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bharatkumar N; Dunn, Robert J; Jeong, Suh Young; Zhu, Qinzhang; Julien, Jean-Pierre; David, Samuel

    2002-08-01

    Ceruloplasmin is a ferroxidase that oxidizes toxic ferrous iron to its nontoxic ferric form. We have previously reported that a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored form of ceruloplasmin is expressed in the mammalian CNS. To better understand the role of ceruloplasmin in iron homeostasis in the CNS, we generated a ceruloplasmin gene-deficient (Cp(-/-)) mouse. Adult Cp(-/-) mice showed increased iron deposition in several regions of the CNS such as the cerebellum and brainstem. Increased lipid peroxidation was also seen in some CNS regions. Cerebellar cells from neonatal Cp(-/-) mice were also more susceptible to oxidative stress in vitro. Cp(-/-) mice showed deficits in motor coordination that were associated with a loss of brainstem dopaminergic neurons. These results indicate that ceruloplasmin plays an important role in maintaining iron homeostasis in the CNS and in protecting the CNS from iron-mediated free radical injury. Therefore, the antioxidant effects of ceruloplasmin could have important implications for various neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease in which iron deposition is known to occur.

  4. Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin Infection in the CNS Suppresses Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Th17 Responses in an IFN-gamma-independent Manner1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, JangEun; Reinke, Emily K.; Zozulya, Alla L.; Sandor, Matyas; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and an animal model resembling MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), are inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) that are suppressed by systemic mycobacterial infection in mice and BCG vaccination in humans. Host defense responses against Mycobacterium in mice are influenced by T lymphocytes and their cytokine products, particularly IFN-γ, which plays a protective regulatory role in EAE. To analyze the counter-regulatory role of mycobacterial infection-induced IFN-γ in the CNS on the function of the pathological Th17 cells and the clinical outcome of EAE, we induced EAE in mice that were intracerebrally infected with Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG). Here we demonstrate that intracerebral (i.c.) BCG infection prevented inflammatory cell recruitment to the spinal cord and suppressed the development of EAE. Concomitantly, there was a significant decrease in the frequency of MOG-specific IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells in the CNS. IL-17+CD4+ T cell responses were significantly suppressed in i.c. BCG-infected mice following EAE induction regardless of T cell specificity. The frequency of Foxp3+CD4+ T cells in these mice was equivalent to that of control mice. The i.c. BCG infection-induced protection of EAE and suppression of MOG-specific IL-17+CD4+ T cell responses were similar in both wild type (WT) and IFN-γ deficient mice. These data show that live BCG infection in the brain suppresses CNS autoimmunity. These findings also reveal that the regulation of Th17-mediated autoimmunity in the CNS can be independent of IFN-γ-mediated mechanisms. PMID:18941210

  5. Macrophage IL-12p70 Signaling Prevents HSV-1–Induced CNS Autoimmunity Triggered by Autoaggressive CD4+ Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Kevin R.; Gate, David; Zandian, Mandana; Allen, Sariah J.; Rajasagi, Naveen Kumar; van Rooijen, Nico; Chen, Shuang; Arditi, Moshe; Rouse, Barry T.; Flavell, Richard A.; Town, Terrence; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain self-tolerance and function to suppress overly exuberant immune responses. However, it is unclear whether innate immune cells modulate Treg function. Here the authors examined the role of innate immunity in lymphomyeloid homeostasis. Methods. The involvement of B cells, dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages, natural killer (NK) cells, and T cells in central nervous system (CNS) demyelination in different strains of mice infected ocularly with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was investigated. Results. The authors found that depletion of macrophages, but not DCs, B cells, NK cells, CD4+ T cells, or CD8+ T cells, induced CNS demyelination irrespective of virus or mouse strain. As with macrophage depletion, mice deficient in interleukin (IL)-12p35 or IL-12p40 showed CNS demyelination after HSV-1 infection, whereas demyelination was undetectable in HSV-1–infected, IL-23p19–deficient, or Epstein-Barr virus–induced gene 3-deficient mice. Demyelination could be rescued in macrophage-depleted mice after the injection of IL-12p70 DNA and in IL-12p35−/− or IL-12p40−/− mice after injection with IL-12p35 or IL-12p40 DNA or with recombinant viruses expressing IL-12p35 or IL-12p40. Using FoxP3-, CD4-, CD8-, or CD25-depletion and gene-deficient mouse approaches, the authors demonstrated that HSV-1–induced demyelination was blocked in the absence of CD4, CD25, or FoxP3 in macrophage-depleted mice. Flow cytometry showed an elevation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells in the spleens of infected macrophage-depleted mice, and adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+ T cells to infected macrophage-depleted severe combined immunodeficient mice induced CNS demyelination. Conclusions. The authors demonstrated that macrophage IL-12p70 signaling plays an important role in maintaining immune homeostasis in the CNS by preventing the development of autoaggressive CD4+ Tregs. PMID:21220560

  6. Playing fair: the contribution of high-functioning recess to overall school climate in low-income elementary schools.

    PubMed

    London, Rebecca A; Westrich, Lisa; Stokes-Guinan, Katie; McLaughlin, Milbrey

    2015-01-01

    Recess is a part of the elementary school day with strong implications for school climate. Positive school climate has been linked to a host of favorable student outcomes, from attendance to achievement. We examine 6 low-income elementary schools' experiences implementing a recess-based program designed to provide safe, healthy, and inclusive play to study how improving recess functioning can affect school climate. Data from teacher, principal, and recess coach interviews; student focus groups; recess observations; and a teacher survey are triangulated to understand the ways that recess changed during implementation. Comparing schools that achieved higher- and lower-functioning recesses, we link recess functioning with school climate. Recess improved in all schools, but 4 of the 6 achieved a higher-functioning recess. In these schools, teachers and principals agreed that by the end of the year, recess offered opportunities for student engagement, conflict resolution, pro-social skill development, and emotional and physical safety. Respondents in these four schools linked these changes to improved overall school climate. Recess is an important part of the school day for contributing to school climate. Creating a positive recess climate helps students to be engaged in meaningful play and return to class ready to learn. © 2014, American School Health Association.

  7. PPAR agonists as therapeutics for CNS trauma and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mandrekar-Colucci, Shweta; Sauerbeck, Andrew; Popovich, Phillip G.; McTigue, Dana M.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury or disease of the spinal cord and brain elicits multiple cellular and biochemical reactions that together cause or are associated with neuropathology. Specifically, injury or disease elicits acute infiltration and activation of immune cells, death of neurons and glia, mitochondrial dysfunction, and the secretion of substrates that inhibit axon regeneration. In some diseases, inflammation is chronic or non-resolving. Ligands that target PPARs (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors), a group of ligand-activated transcription factors, are promising therapeutics for neurologic disease and CNS injury because their activation affects many, if not all, of these interrelated pathologic mechanisms. PPAR activation can simultaneously weaken or reprogram the immune response, stimulate metabolic and mitochondrial function, promote axon growth and induce progenitor cells to differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes. PPAR activation has beneficial effects in many pre-clinical models of neurodegenerative diseases and CNS injury; however, the mechanisms through which PPARs exert these effects have yet to be fully elucidated. In this review we discuss current literature supporting the role of PPAR activation as a therapeutic target for treating traumatic injury and degenerative diseases of the CNS. PMID:24215544

  8. Requirements for an Integrated UAS CNS Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templin, Fred; Jain, Raj; Sheffield, Greg; Taboso, Pedro; Ponchak, Denise

    2017-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is investigating revolutionary and advanced universal, reliable, always available, cyber secure and affordable Communication, Navigation, Surveillance (CNS) options for all altitudes of UAS operations. In Spring 2015, NASA issued a Call for Proposals under NASA Research Announcements (NRA) NNH15ZEA001N, Amendment 7 Subtopic 2.4. Boeing was selected to conduct a study with the objective to determine the most promising candidate technologies for Unmanned Air Systems (UAS) air-to-air and air-to-ground data exchange and analyze their suitability in a post-NextGen NAS environment. The overall objectives are to develop UAS CNS requirements and then develop architectures that satisfy the requirements for UAS in both controlled and uncontrolled air space. This contract is funded under NASAs Aeronautics Research Mission Directorates (ARMD) Aviation Operations and Safety Program (AOSP) Safe Autonomous Systems Operations (SASO) project and proposes technologies for the Unmanned Air Systems Traffic Management (UTM) service. Communications, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS) requirements must be developed in order to establish a CNS architecture supporting Unmanned Air Systems integration in the National Air Space (UAS in the NAS). These requirements must address cybersecurity, future communications, satellite-based navigation APNT, and scalable surveillance and situational awareness. CNS integration, consolidation and miniaturization requirements are also important to support the explosive growth in small UAS deployment. Air Traffic Management (ATM) must also be accommodated to support critical Command and Control (C2) for Air Traffic Controllers (ATC). This document therefore presents UAS CNS requirements that will guide the architecture.

  9. Does IGF-1 play a role in the etiopathogenesis of non-functioning adrenocortical adenoma?

    PubMed

    Bahadir, C T; Ecemis, G C; Atmaca, H

    2018-03-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) with the pathogenesis of non-functioning adrenocortical adenomas (NFAs). This study included 50 female patients (mean age 54 years) with NFAs, 55 patients (mean age 48 years; 20 male, 35 female) with acromegaly and 38 female control subjects (mean age 58 years). Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) of the subjects were recorded and blood samples for IGF-1 were taken. Insulin resistance was calculated using the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) score. Since most of the acromegaly patients had been using medicine that could have effected insulin resistance, HOMA scores were calculated only in patients with NFAs and the controls. Computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging was taken of the acromegalics and controls to detect adrenal mass frequency. The mean age was similar among the groups. As expected, the serum IGF-1 levels were significantly higher in patients with acromegaly than in patients with NFAs and the controls (p < 0.001). Although BMI, WC, and serum IGF-1 levels were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in patients with NFAs, the HOMA scores were similar between patients with NFAs and control groups. Although none of the control subjects had adrenal masses, NFAs were detected in 14 (25%) out of 55 acromegalic patients. Higher serum IGF-1 levels in patients with NFAs compared to the control group and an increased prevalence of NFAs in acromegaly patients compared to control subjects and the general population suggest an association of IGF-1 with the etiopathogenesis of NFA.

  10. Dispersion quality of amine functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes plays critical roles in polymerase chain reaction enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuce, Meral; Budak, Hikmet

    2014-12-01

    Impact of dispersion quality of NH2-MWCNTs (13-18 nm in diameter with a length between 1 and 12 µm, >99 % purity) in the amplification efficiency of a random DNA oligonucleotide library (96 bp) was investigated. Amplification yield in the presence of non-filtered NH2-MWCNT dispersion, filtered NH2-MWCNT dispersion and surface-attached NH2-MWCNTs was explored, and physical interactions between NH2-MWCNTs and major PCR reagents including DNA template, wild type Taq DNA polymerase enzyme and primers were determined using high resolution polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The results revealed that presence of NH2-MWCNT dispersion which was sonicated, centrifuged and filtered, enhanced the total PCR efficiency up to 70 % while the presence of NH2-MWCNT only centrifuged after sonication, inhibited the reaction significantly at similar concentrations. Furthermore, the NH2-MWCNTs coupled covalently onto magnetic microspheres, contributed for the specificity enhancement whilst decreasing the amplification efficiency by 30 % at the maximum concentration, which suggests a removable enhancement system for sensitive applications. On the other hand, the relative hydrodynamic size distribution measurements displayed a clear difference between the filtered NH2 and non-filtered NH2-MWCNT water dispersions, which justifies the inhibition of the amplification by the non-filtered NH2-MWCNTs containing big agglomerates and bundles. Finally, we demonstrated that major PCR components adsorb onto the NH2-MWCNTs with diverse affinities, and maintain their functions after adsorption, which provides a good framework to further develop tunable NH2-MWCNT-carriers to be utilized in various nanobiotechnology and material science applications.

  11. Ecrg4 expression and its product augurin in the choroid plexus: impact on fetal brain development, cerebrospinal fluid homeostasis and neuroprogenitor cell response to CNS injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    increased proliferation of GFAP-positive cells and induced a dose-dependent hydrocephalus-like phenotype that could be rescued by co-injection of antisense morpholinos with Ecrg4 mRNA. Conclusion An unusually elevated expression of the Ecrg4 gene in the CP implies that its product, augurin, plays a role in CP-CSF-CNS function. The results are all consistent with a model whereby an injury-induced decrease in augurin dysinhibits target cells at the ependymal-subependymal interface. We speculate that the ability of CP and ependymal epithelium to alter the progenitor cell response to CNS injury may be mediated, in part by Ecrg4. If so, the canonic control of its promoter by DNA methylation may implicate epigenetic mechanisms in neuroprogenitor fate and function in the CNS. PMID:21349154

  12. The therapeutic effects of Rho-ROCK inhibitors on CNS disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Takekazu; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Iwata, Nobuyoshi; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2008-01-01

    Rho-kinase (ROCK) is a serine/threonine kinase and one of the major downstream effectors of the small GTPase Rho. The Rho-ROCK pathway is involved in many aspects of neuronal functions including neurite outgrowth and retraction. The Rho-ROCK pathway becomes an attractive target for the development of drugs for treating central nervous system (CNS) disorders, since it has been recently revealed that this pathway is closely related to the pathogenesis of several CNS disorders such as spinal cord injuries, stroke, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In the adult CNS, injured axons regenerate poorly due to the presence of myelin-associated axonal growth inhibitors such as myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), Nogo, oligodendrocyte-myelin glycoprotein (OMgp), and the recently identified repulsive guidance molecule (RGM). The effects of these inhibitors are reversed by blockade of the Rho-ROCK pathway in vitro, and the inhibition of this pathway promotes axonal regeneration and functional recovery in the injured CNS in vivo. In addition, the therapeutic effects of the Rho-ROCK inhibitors have been demonstrated in animal models of stroke. In this review, we summarize the involvement of the Rho-ROCK pathway in CNS disorders such as spinal cord injuries, stroke, and AD and also discuss the potential of Rho-ROCK inhibitors in the treatment of human CNS disorders. PMID:18827856

  13. Natural Host Genetic Resistance to Lentiviral CNS Disease: A Neuroprotective MHC Class I Allele in SIV-Infected Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Mankowski, Joseph L.; Queen, Suzanne E.; Fernandez, Caroline S.; Tarwater, Patrick M.; Karper, Jami M.; Adams, Robert J.; Kent, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection frequently causes neurologic disease even with anti-retroviral treatment. Although associations between MHC class I alleles and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have been reported, the role MHC class I alleles play in restricting development of HIV-induced organ-specific diseases, including neurologic disease, has not been characterized. This study examined the relationship between expression of the MHC class I allele Mane-A*10 and development of lentiviral-induced central nervous system (CNS) disease using a well-characterized simian immunodeficiency (SIV)/pigtailed macaque model. The risk of developing CNS disease (SIV encephalitis) was 2.5 times higher for animals that did not express the MHC class I allele Mane-A*10 (P = 0.002; RR = 2.5). Animals expressing the Mane-A*10 allele had significantly lower amounts of activated macrophages, SIV RNA, and neuronal dysfunction in the CNS than Mane-A*10 negative animals (P<0.001). Mane-A*10 positive animals with the highest CNS viral burdens contained SIV gag escape mutants at the Mane-A*10-restricted KP9 epitope in the CNS whereas wild type KP9 sequences dominated in the brain of Mane-A*10 negative animals with comparable CNS viral burdens. These concordant findings demonstrate that particular MHC class I alleles play major neuroprotective roles in lentiviral-induced CNS disease. PMID:18978944

  14. Coordinated Noninvasive Studies (CNS) Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    It Is used to "label’ (e.g., glucose labelled with an isotope of carbon), autoradlography can used to study metabolism (e.g., uptake of dopamIne In...defined dysfunctions, Such as autism and dementia, and to obtain detailed Information regarding brain function even In subjects who cannot actively...man. Ann NY Acad Sc 508: 1-537. Courchesne E (In press) Cerebellar changes In autism . In J Swann and A Messer (Eds) Disorders of the developing

  15. CNS drug development: part III: future directions.

    PubMed

    Preskorn, Sheldon H

    2011-01-01

    This column, the third in a series on central nervous system (CNS) drug development, discusses advances during the first decade of the 21st century and directions the field may take in the next 10 years. By identifying many possible new drug targets, the human genome project has created the potential to develop novel central nervous system (CNS) drugs with new mechanisms of action. At the same time, this proliferation of possible new targets has complicated the drug development process, since research has not yet provided guidance as to which targets may be most fruitful. This and other factors (eg, increasing regulatory requirements) have increased the cost and complexity of the drug development process. In addition, as more is learned about the biology of psychiatric illnesses, syndromes may be subdivided into more specific entities that are better understood from a pathophysiological and pathoetiological perspective. This is likely to lead to development of more targeted treatments focused on underlying causes of illness as well as prevention. The development of drugs for Alzheimer's disease is discussed as a possible model for future CNS drug development. We are at the beginning of an era when it is likely that the way in which CNS drugs are developed will need to be rethought, which will call for flexibility and creativity on the part of both drug developers and clinical researchers.

  16. Cytokines in the central nervous system: regulatory roles in neuronal function, cell death and repair.

    PubMed

    Sei, Y; Vitković, L; Yokoyama, M M

    1995-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that neurons and glia can synthesize and secrete cytokines, which play critical roles in maintaining homeostasis in the central nervous system (CNS) by mediating the interaction between cells via autocrine or paracrine mechanisms. Circulating cytokines and soluble receptors also regulate neuronal function via endocrine mechanisms. Disturbance of the cytokine-mediated interaction between cells may lead to neuronal dysfunction and/or cell death and contribute to the pathogenesis of the CNS diseases (e.g., ischemia, Alzheimer's disease and HIV encephalopathy). Defining the molecular pathways of cytokine dysregulation and neurotoxicity may help to elucidate potential therapeutic interventions for many devastating CNS diseases.

  17. P2X and P2Y receptors as possible targets of therapeutic manipulations in CNS illnesses.

    PubMed

    Köles, Laszlo; Furst, Susanna; Illes, Peter

    2005-03-01

    Adenine and/or uridine nucleotide-sensitive receptors are classified into two types belonging to the ligand-gated ionotropic family (P2X) and the metabotropic, G-protein-coupled family (P2Y). In humans, seven different P2X receptors (P2X(1-7)) and eight different P2Y receptors (P2Y(1), P2Y(2), P2Y(4), P2Y(6), P2Y(11-14)) have been detected hitherto. All P2 receptors are expressed in the CNS, with the preferential expression of the P2X(2), P2X(4), P2X(6) and P2Y(1) receptors in neurons. In addition to the neurotransmitter and modulator functions, neurite outgrowth, proliferation of glial cells and the expression of transmitter receptors at target cells have also been suggested to be regulated by extracellular nucleotides in the nervous system. In spite of the expanding knowledge in the purinergic research field, the present therapeutic utilization of P2 receptor ligands is mostly related to peripheral diseases such as thromboembolic disorders and cystic fibrosis. In this review we provide some evidence that P2 receptors play an important role in the regulation of CNS functions related to hippocampal activity, the mesolimbic dopaminergic system and the nociceptive system. The role of purinergic receptors located on astrocytes/microglia and implications of these receptors for neurodegenerative/neuroinflammatory disorders, CNS injury and epilepsy will be highlighted as well. (c) 2005 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  18. MHCII-independent CD4+ T cells protect injured CNS neurons via IL-4

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, James T.; Hendrix, Sven; Boato, Francesco; Smirnov, Igor; Zheng, Jingjing; Lukens, John R.; Gadani, Sachin; Hechler, Daniel; Gölz, Greta; Rosenberger, Karen; Kammertöns, Thomas; Vogt, Johannes; Vogelaar, Christina; Siffrin, Volker; Radjavi, Ali; Fernandez-Castaneda, Anthony; Gaultier, Alban; Gold, Ralf; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Nitsch, Robert; Zipp, Frauke; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    A body of experimental evidence suggests that T cells mediate neuroprotection following CNS injury; however, the antigen specificity of these T cells and how they mediate neuroprotection are unknown. Here, we have provided evidence that T cell–mediated neuroprotection after CNS injury can occur independently of major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) signaling to T cell receptors (TCRs). Using two murine models of CNS injury, we determined that damage-associated molecular mediators that originate from injured CNS tissue induce a population of neuroprotective, IL-4–producing T cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Compared with wild-type mice, IL-4–deficient animals had decreased functional recovery following CNS injury; however, transfer of CD4+ T cells from wild-type mice, but not from IL-4–deficient mice, enhanced neuronal survival. Using a culture-based system, we determined that T cell–derived IL-4 protects and induces recovery of injured neurons by activation of neuronal IL-4 receptors, which potentiated neurotrophin signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways. Together, these findings demonstrate that damage-associated molecules from the injured CNS induce a neuroprotective T cell response that is independent of MHCII/TCR interactions and is MyD88 dependent. Moreover, our results indicate that IL-4 mediates neuroprotection and recovery of the injured CNS and suggest that strategies to enhance IL-4–producing CD4+ T cells have potential to attenuate axonal damage in the course of CNS injury in trauma, inflammation, or neurodegeneration. PMID:25607842

  19. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of fungal infections of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stefan; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Harrison, Thomas; Ruhnke, Markus

    2018-04-01

    Fungal infections of the CNS are challenging to treat and their optimal management requires knowledge of their epidemiology, host characteristics, diagnostic criteria, and therapeutic options. Aspergillus and Cryptococcus species predominate among fungal infections of the CNS. Most of these fungi are ubiquitous, but some have restricted geographical distribution. Fungal infections of the CNS usually originate from primary sites outside the CNS (eg, fungal pneumonia) or occur after inoculation (eg, invasive procedures). Most patients with these infections have immunodeficiencies, but immunocompetent individuals can also be infected through heavy exposure. The infecting fungi can be grouped into moulds, yeasts, and dimorphic fungi. Substantial progress has been made with new diagnostic approaches and the introduction of novel antifungal drugs, but fungal infections of the CNS are frequently lethal because of diagnostic delays, impaired drug penetration, resistance to antifungal treatments, and inadequate restoration of immune function. To improve outcomes, future research should advance diagnostic methods (eg, molecular detection and fungus identification), develop antifungal compounds with enhanced CNS-directed efficacy, and further investigate crucial host defence mechanisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Generation of Demyelination Models by Targeted Ablation of Oligodendrocytes in the Zebrafish CNS

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ah-Young; Kim, Pan-Soo; Kim, Suhyun; Kim, Eunmi; Kim, Dohyun; Jeong, Inyoung; Kim, Hwan-Ki; Ryu, Jae-Ho; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Choi, June; Seo, Jin-Ho; Park, Hae-Chul

    2013-01-01

    Demyelination is the pathological process by which myelin sheaths are lost from around axons, and is usually caused by a direct insult targeted at the oligodendrocytes in the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS). A demyelinated CNS is usually remyelinated by a population of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, which are widely distributed throughout the adult CNS. However, myelin disruption and remyelination failure affect the normal function of the nervous system, causing human diseases such as multiple sclerosis. In spite of numerous studies aimed at understanding the remyelination process, many questions still remain unanswered. Therefore, to study remyelination mechanisms in vivo, a demyelination animal model was generated using a transgenic zebrafish system in which oligodendrocytes are conditionally ablated in the larval and adult CNS. In this transgenic system, bacterial nitroreductase enzyme (NTR), which converts the prodrug metronidazole (Mtz) into a cytotoxic DNA cross-linking agent, is expressed in oligodendrocyte lineage cells under the control of the mbp and sox10 promoter. Exposure of transgenic zebrafish to Mtz-containing media resulted in rapid ablation of oligodendrocytes and CNS demyelination within 48 h, but removal of Mtz medium led to efficient remyelination of the demyelinated CNS within 7 days. In addition, the demyelination and remyelination processes could be easily observed in living transgenic zebrafish by detecting the fluorescent protein, mCherry, indicating that this transgenic system can be used as a valuable animal model to study the remyelination process in vivo, and to conduct high-throughput primary screens for new drugs that facilitate remyelination. PMID:23807048

  1. Ulk1-mediated autophagy plays an essential role in mitochondrial remodeling and functional regeneration of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Call, Jarrod A.; Wilson, Rebecca J.; Laker, Rhianna C.; Zhang, Mei; Kundu, Mondira

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular process for degrading aggregate proteins and dysfunctional organelle. It is still debatable if autophagy and mitophagy (a specific process of autophagy of mitochondria) play important roles in myogenic differentiation and functional regeneration of skeletal muscle. We tested the hypothesis that autophagy is critical for functional regeneration of skeletal muscle. We first observed time-dependent increases (3- to 6-fold) of autophagy-related proteins (Atgs), including Ulk1, Beclin1, and LC3, along with reduced p62 expression during C2C12 differentiation, suggesting increased autophagy capacity and flux during myogenic differentiation. We then used cardiotoxin (Ctx) or ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) to induce muscle injury and regeneration and observed increases in Atgs between days 2 and 7 in adult skeletal muscle followed by increased autophagy flux after day 7. Since Ulk1 has been shown to be essential for mitophagy, we asked if Ulk1 is critical for functional regeneration in skeletal muscle. We subjected skeletal muscle-specific Ulk1 knockout mice (MKO) to Ctx or I/R. MKO mice had significantly impaired recovery of muscle strength and mitochondrial protein content post-Ctx or I/R. Imaging analysis showed that MKO mice have significantly attenuated recovery of mitochondrial network at 7 and 14 days post-Ctx. These findings suggest that increased autophagy protein and flux occur during muscle regeneration and Ulk1-mediated mitophagy is critical for recovery for the mitochondrial network and hence functional regeneration. PMID:28356270

  2. Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma treatment options include radiation, chemotherapy, and corticosteroids. Get detailed information about the treatment of newly diagnosed and recurrent primary CNS lymphoma cancer in this clinician summary.

  3. GNSS real time performance monitoring and CNS/ATM implementation

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-07-01

    The global transition to communications, navigation, surveillance / air traffic management (CNS/ATM) technology is moving forward at an increasing pace. A critical part of the CNS/ATM concept is the ability to monitor, analyze, and distribute aeronau...

  4. Considerations for an Integrated UAS CNS Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templin, Fred L.; Jain, Raj; Sheffield, Greg; Taboso-Bellesteros, Pedro; Ponchak, Denise

    2017-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is investigating revolutionary and advanced universal, reliable, always available, cyber secure and affordable Communication, Navigation, Surveillance (CNS) options for all altitudes of UAS operations. In Spring 2015, NASA issued a Call for Proposals under NASA Research Announcements (NRA) NNH15ZEA001N, Amendment 7 Subtopic 2.4. Boeing was selected to conduct a study with the objective to determine the most promising candidate technologies for Unmanned Air Systems (UAS) air-to-air and air-to-ground data exchange and analyze their suitability in a post-NextGen NAS environment. The overall objectives are to develop UAS CNS requirements and then develop architectures that satisfy the requirements for UAS in both controlled and uncontrolled air space. This contract is funded under NASAs Aeronautics Research Mission Directorates (ARMD) Aviation Operations and Safety Program (AOSP) Safe Autonomous Systems Operations (SASO) project and proposes technologies for the Unmanned Air Systems Traffic Management (UTM) service.There is a need for accommodating large-scale populations of Unmanned Air Systems (UAS) in the national air space. Scale obviously impacts capacity planning for Communication, Navitation, and Surveillance (CNS) technologies. For example, can wireless communications data links provide the necessary capacity for accommodating millions of small UASs (sUAS) nationwide? Does the communications network provide sufficient Internet Protocol (IP) address space to allow air traffic control to securely address both UAS teams as a whole as well as individual UAS within each team? Can navigation and surveillance approaches assure safe route planning and safe separation of vehicles even in crowded skies?Our objective is to identify revolutionary and advanced CNS alternatives supporting UASs operating at all altitudes and in all airspace while accurately navigating in the absence of

  5. Considerations for an Integrated UAS CNS Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templin, Fred L.; Jain, Raj; Sheffield, Greg; Taboso-Bellesteros, Pedro; Ponchak, Denise

    2017-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is investigating revolutionary and advanced universal, reliable, always available, cyber secure and affordable Communication, Navigation, Surveillance (CNS) options for all altitudes of UAS operations. In Spring 2015, NASA issued a Call for Proposals under NASA Research Announcements (NRA) NNH15ZEA001N, Amendment 7 Subtopic 2.4. Boeing was selected to conduct a study with the objective to determine the most promising candidate technologies for Unmanned Air Systems (UAS) air-to-air and air-to-ground data exchange and analyze their suitability in a post-NextGen NAS environment. The overall objectives are to develop UAS CNS requirements and then develop architectures that satisfy the requirements for UAS in both controlled and uncontrolled air space. This contract is funded under NASAs Aeronautics Research Mission Directorates (ARMD) Aviation Operations and Safety Program (AOSP) Safe Autonomous Systems Operations (SASO) project and proposes technologies for the Unmanned Air Systems Traffic Management (UTM) service.There is a need for accommodating large-scale populations of Unmanned Air Systems (UAS) in the national air space. Scale obviously impacts capacity planning for Communication, Navigation, and Surveillance (CNS) technologies. For example, can wireless communications data links provide the necessary capacity for accommodating millions of small UASs (sUAS) nationwide? Does the communications network provide sufficient Internet Protocol (IP) address space to allow air traffic control to securely address both UAS teams as a whole as well as individual UAS within each team? Can navigation and surveillance approaches assure safe route planning and safe separation of vehicles even in crowded skies?Our objective is to identify revolutionary and advanced CNS alternatives supporting UASs operating at all altitudes and in all airspace while accurately navigating in the absence of

  6. N-Acetylaspartate in the CNS: From Neurodiagnostics to Neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, John R.; Ross, Brian; Arun, Peethambaran; Madhavarao, Chikkathur N.; Namboodiri, M. A. A.

    2007-01-01

    will be required to more fully understand the biochemical functions served by NAA in CNS development and activity, and additional functions are likely to be discovered. PMID:17275978

  7. Antiretroviral drug treatment of CNS HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Aylin; Price, Richard W; Gisslén, Magnus

    2012-02-01

    The advent of combination antiretroviral treatment has had a profound impact on CNS HIV infection and its clinical complications, but neurological impairment still occurs in patients on systemically effective combination therapy, and in some patients it may be important to consider antiretroviral drug entry and effects within the CNS. There are now data on the CNS exposure for most antiretroviral drugs. This review focuses on the CNS pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antiretroviral drugs in humans, and also discusses controversies in this field.

  8. Quercetin attenuates AZT-induced neuroinflammation in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Liu, Xiaokang; Wu, Ting; Zhang, Wenping; Shu, Jianhong; He, Yulong; Tang, Shao-Jun

    2018-04-18

    Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) is very effective in suppressing HIV-1 replication in patients. However, continuous HAART is required to prevent viral rebound, which may have detrimental effects in various tissues, including persistent neuroinflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we show that quercetin (3,5,7,3',4'-pentahydroxy flavones), a natural antioxidant used in Chinese traditional medicines, suppresses the neuroinflammation that is induced by chronic exposure to Zidovudine (azidothymidine, AZT), a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) that is commonly part of HAART regimens. We found that the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and microglial and astrocytic markers induced by AZT (100 mg/kg/day; 8 days) was significantly inhibited by co-administration of quercetin (50 mg/kg/day) in the mouse cortex, hippocampus and spinal cord. We further showed that quercetin attenuated AZT-induced up-regulation of Wnt5a, a key regulator of neuroinflammation. These results suggest that quercetin has an inhibitory effect on AZT-induced neuroinflammation in the CNS, and Wnt5a signaling may play an important role in this process. Our results may further our understanding of the mechanisms of HAART-related neurotoxicity and help in the development of effective adjuvant therapy.

  9. Evidence that a functional fertilin-like ADAM plays a role in human sperm-oolemmal interactions.

    PubMed

    Bronson, R A; Fusi, F M; Calzi, F; Doldi, N; Ferrari, A

    1999-05-01

    Fertilin is a protein initially identified in guinea pig spermatozoa; it is the prototype of a larger family of conserved, proteins designated as a disintegrin and a metalloproteinase (ADAM). These heterodimers which consist of alpha and beta subunits, containing metalloproteinase-like and disintegrin-like domains, appear to play a role in mammalian fertilization. Peptides derived from the disintegrin domains of two ADAMs, fertilin and cyritestin, interfere with gamete adhesion and sperm-egg membrane fusion in non-human species. It has been suggested that fertilin-beta binds to an oolemmal integrin, and it is proposed that the tripeptide FEE (Phe-Glu-Glu) is the integrin recognition sequence in human fertilin-beta. We evaluated whether fertilin beta plays a role in human fertilization by studying the effects of a linear octapeptide containing the FEE sequence, SFEECDLP, and a scrambled octapeptide with the same amino acids, SFPCEDEL, on the incorporation of human spermatozoa by human zona-free eggs. The effects of G4120, a potent RGD-containing (Arg-Gly-Asp) thioether-bridged cyclic peptide which blocks both fibronectin and vitronectin receptors, and the relationship between FEE- and RGD-receptor interactions on sperm-egg interactions were also studied. The FEE-containing peptide, but not the scrampled peptide, inhibited sperm adhesion to oocytes and their penetration, over the range 1-5 microM. The inhibition induced by SFEECDLP was reversible and occurred only in the presence of peptide itself. The G4120 peptide exhibited 10-fold less inhibitory effects on sperm adhesion and penetration than did SFEECDLP. When combined, SFEECDLP and G4120 exhibited strong inhibition of both adhesion and penetration at concentrations that individually had been ineffective, suggesting co-operation between the two receptor-ligand interactions during fertilization. We propose that a fertilin-like molecule is functionally active on human spermatozoa and that its interaction with an

  10. The influence of playing a non-reward game on motor ability and executive function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Araújo Lima, Alisson Menezes; Cordeiro Hirata, Fabiana de Campos; Sales de Bruin, Gabriela; Salani Mota, Rosa Maria; Bruin, Veralice Meireles Sales de

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the acute effect of playing games on executive function and motor ability in Parkinson's disease (PD). Consecutive cases with PD were studied with the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Mini-Mental State examination (MMSE), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Stroop test, finger tapping and 14-meter walk test. After randomization, patients performed a game of dominoes and were tested before and after experiment being further categorized as control, winners or non-winners. Forty patients, 27 male (67.5%), aged 48 to 84 years (63.2 ± 8.5), Hoehn & Yahr I to III were included. Twenty-eight (70%) presented depressive symptoms (BDI > 10). Groups (Control N = 13; Winners = 14 and Non-winners = 13) were not different regarding age, disease duration, age at onset, BMI, MMSE scores, depressive symptoms, levodopa dose, and previous practice of games. Winners presented significantly better results on executive function (Stroop test, p = 0.002) and on motor activity (Finger tapping, p = 0.01). Non-winners showed a trend of better performance in the 14-meter-walk test. This study shows that the practice of a non-reward game acutely improved memory and motor skills in PD. Our results suggest a role for the reward system in the modulation of the dopaminergic function of the basal ganglia in these patients.

  11. Dimer monomer transition and dimer re-formation play important role for ATM cellular function during DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Fengxia; Zhang, Minjie; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. • The PETPVFRLT box of ATM plays a key role in its dimer dissociation in DNA repair. • The dephosphorylation of ATM is critical for dimer re-formation after DNA repair. - Abstract: The ATM protein kinase, is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recruited and activated by DNA double-strand breaks, mediates responses to ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Here we show that ATM is held inactive in unirradiated cells as a dimer and phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage.more » Cellular irradiation induces rapid intermolecular autophosphorylation of serine 1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates cellular ATM kinase activity. ATM cannot phosphorylate the substrates when it could not undergo dimer monomer transition. After DNA repair, the active monomer will undergo dephosphorylation to form dimer again and dephosphorylation is critical for dimer re-formation. Our work reveals novel function of ATM dimer monomer transition and explains why ATM dimer monomer transition plays such important role for ATM cellular activity during DNA repair.« less

  12. VIIP: Central Nervous System (CNS) Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vera, Jerry; Mulugeta, Lealem; Nelson, Emily; Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross; Myers, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Current long-duration missions to the International Space Station and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit expose astronauts to increased risk of Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. It has been hypothesized that the headward shift of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood in microgravity may cause significant elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP), which in turn may then induce VIIP syndrome through interaction with various biomechanical pathways. However, there is insufficient evidence to confirm this hypothesis. In this light, we are developing lumped-parameter models of fluid transport in the central nervous system (CNS) as a means to simulate the influence of microgravity on ICP. The CNS models will also be used in concert with the lumped parameter and finite element models of the eye described in the related IWS works submitted by Nelson et al., Feola et al. and Ethier et al.

  13. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebralmore » ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery.« less

  14. Therapeutic potential of agmatine for CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Neis, Vivian B; Rosa, Priscila B; Olescowicz, Gislaine; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2017-09-01

    Agmatine is a neuromodulator that regulates multiple neurotransmitters and signaling pathways. Several studies have focused on elucidating the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of this molecule, which seems to be mediated by a reduction in oxidative damage, neuroinflammation, and proapoptotic signaling. Since these events are implicated in acute and chronic excitotoxicity-related disorders (ischemia, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, neurodegenerative, and psychiatric disorders) as well as in nociception, agmatine has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Agmatine also stimulates the expression of trophic factors and adult neurogenesis, contributing to its ability to induce endogenous repair mechanisms. Therefore, considering its wide range of biological effects, this review summarizes the current knowledge about its protective and regenerative properties in the CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Strategies for Utilizing Neuroimaging Biomarkers in CNS Drug Discovery and Development: CINP/JSNP Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Suhara, Tetsuya; Chaki, Shigeyuki; Kimura, Haruhide; Furusawa, Makoto; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki; Ogura, Hiroo; Negishi, Takaaki; Saijo, Takeaki; Higuchi, Makoto; Omura, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Rira; Miyoshi, Sosuke; Nakatani, Noriaki; Yamamoto, Noboru; Liou, Shyh-Yuh; Takado, Yuhei; Maeda, Jun; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Okubo, Yoshiaki; Yamada, Makiko; Ito, Hiroshi; Walton, Noah M; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2017-04-01

    Despite large unmet medical needs in the field for several decades, CNS drug discovery and development has been largely unsuccessful. Biomarkers, particularly those utilizing neuroimaging, have played important roles in aiding CNS drug development, including dosing determination of investigational new drugs (INDs). A recent working group was organized jointly by CINP and Japanese Society of Neuropsychopharmacology (JSNP) to discuss the utility of biomarkers as tools to overcome issues of CNS drug development.The consensus statement from the working group aimed at creating more nuanced criteria for employing biomarkers as tools to overcome issues surrounding CNS drug development. To accomplish this, a reverse engineering approach was adopted, in which criteria for the utilization of biomarkers were created in response to current challenges in the processes of drug discovery and development for CNS disorders. Based on this analysis, we propose a new paradigm containing 5 distinct tiers to further clarify the use of biomarkers and establish new strategies for decision-making in the context of CNS drug development. Specifically, we discuss more rational ways to incorporate biomarker data to determine optimal dosing for INDs with novel mechanisms and targets, and propose additional categorization criteria to further the use of biomarkers in patient stratification and clinical efficacy prediction. Finally, we propose validation and development of new neuroimaging biomarkers through public-private partnerships to further facilitate drug discovery and development for CNS disorders. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  16. Treatment options for Primary CNS Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Laghari, Altaf Ali; Ahmed, Syed Ijlal; Jabbar, Adnan; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2018-03-01

    Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare and aggressive brain tumour that is uniformly fatal. The rarity of the disease and the poor response to treatment makes it difficult to reach a consensus with regards to treatment options. In this review, the authors have discussed different treatment modalities used in the management of PCNSL including chemotherapy, surgery and radiation, as well as the results of recent clinical trials on treatment options for PCNSL.

  17. New Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lersten, Kenneth C.

    There have been many theories and hypotheses about play, one of which is the equation of play with "transcendence." Play may have the ingredients to allow us to transcend and, for a moment, remythologize life. There have been recent authors who have given play the status of theology, indicating that play contains elements also found in religion.…

  18. Antiretroviral therapy CNS penetration and HIV-1–associated CNS disease

    PubMed Central

    Winston, A.; Walsh, J.; Post, F.; Porter, K.; Gazzard, B.; Fisher, M.; Leen, C.; Pillay, D.; Hill, T.; Johnson, M.; Gilson, R.; Anderson, J.; Easterbrook, P.; Bansi, L.; Orkin, C.; Ainsworth, J.; Palfreeman, A.; Gompels, M.; Phillips, A.N.; Sabin, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The impact of different antiretroviral agents on the risk of developing or surviving CNS disease remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether using antiretroviral regimens with higher CNS penetration effectiveness (CPE) scores was associated with reduced incidence of CNS disease and improved survival in the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (CHIC) Study. Methods: Adults without previous CNS disease, who commenced combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) between 1996 and 2008, were included (n = 22,356). Initial and most recent cART CPE scores were calculated. CNS diseases were HIV encephalopathy (HIVe), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), cerebral toxoplasmosis (TOXO), and cryptococcal meningitis (CRYPTO). Incidence rates and overall survival were stratified by CPE score. A multivariable Poisson regression model was used to identify independent associations. Results: The median (interquartile range) CPE score for initial cART regimen increased from 7 (5–8) in 1996–1997 to 9 (8–10) in 2000–2001 and subsequently declined to 6 (7–8) in 2006–2008. Differences in gender, HIV acquisition risk group, and ethnicity existed between CPE score strata. A total of 251 subjects were diagnosed with a CNS disease (HIVe 80; TOXO 59; CRYPTO 56; PML 54). CNS diseases occurred more frequently in subjects prescribed regimens with CPE scores ≤4, and less frequently in those with scores ≥10; however, these differences were nonsignificant. Initial and most recent cART CPE scores ≤4 were independently associated with increased risk of death. Conclusion: Clinical status at time of commencing cART influences antiretroviral selection and CPE score. This information should be considered when utilizing CPE scores for retrospective analyses. PMID:21339496

  19. Agile Delivery of Protein Therapeutics to CNS

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiang; Manickam, Devika S.; Brynskikh, Anna; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    A variety of therapeutic proteins have shown potential to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Challenge to deliver these protein molecules to the brain is well known. Proteins administered through parenteral routes are often excluded from the brain because of their poor bioavailability and the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Barriers also exist to proteins administered through non-parenteral routes that bypass the BBB. Several strategies have shown promise in delivering proteins to the brain. This review, first, describes the physiology and pathology of the BBB that underscore the rationale and needs of each strategy to be applied. Second, major classes of protein therapeutics along with some key factors that affect their delivery outcomes are presented. Third, different routes of protein administration (parenteral, central intracerebroventricular and intraparenchymal, intranasal and intrathecal) are discussed along with key barriers to CNS delivery associated with each route. Finally, current delivery strategies involving chemical modification of proteins and use of particle-based carriers are overviewed using examples from literature and our own work. Whereas most of these studies are in the early stage, some provide proof of mechanism of increased protein delivery to the brain in relevant models of CNS diseases, while in few cases proof of concept had been attained in clinical studies. This review will be useful to broad audience of students, academicians and industry professionals who consider critical issues of protein delivery to the brain and aim developing and studying effective brain delivery systems for protein therapeutics. PMID:24956489

  20. Ulk1-mediated autophagy plays an essential role in mitochondrial remodeling and functional regeneration of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Call, Jarrod A; Wilson, Rebecca J; Laker, Rhianna C; Zhang, Mei; Kundu, Mondira; Yan, Zhen

    2017-06-01

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular process for degrading aggregate proteins and dysfunctional organelle. It is still debatable if autophagy and mitophagy (a specific process of autophagy of mitochondria) play important roles in myogenic differentiation and functional regeneration of skeletal muscle. We tested the hypothesis that autophagy is critical for functional regeneration of skeletal muscle. We first observed time-dependent increases (3- to 6-fold) of autophagy-related proteins (Atgs), including Ulk1, Beclin1, and LC3, along with reduced p62 expression during C2C12 differentiation, suggesting increased autophagy capacity and flux during myogenic differentiation. We then used cardiotoxin (Ctx) or ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) to induce muscle injury and regeneration and observed increases in Atgs between days 2 and 7 in adult skeletal muscle followed by increased autophagy flux after day 7 Since Ulk1 has been shown to be essential for mitophagy, we asked if Ulk1 is critical for functional regeneration in skeletal muscle. We subjected skeletal muscle-specific Ulk1 knockout mice (MKO) to Ctx or I/R. MKO mice had significantly impaired recovery of muscle strength and mitochondrial protein content post-Ctx or I/R. Imaging analysis showed that MKO mice have significantly attenuated recovery of mitochondrial network at 7 and 14 days post-Ctx. These findings suggest that increased autophagy protein and flux occur during muscle regeneration and Ulk1-mediated mitophagy is critical for recovery for the mitochondrial network and hence functional regeneration. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Nicotinic ACh receptors as therapeutic targets in CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Dineley, Kelly T; Pandya, Anshul A; Yakel, Jerrel L

    2015-02-01

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) can regulate neuronal excitability by acting on the cys-loop cation-conducting ligand-gated nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) channels. These receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS), being expressed on neurons and non-neuronal cells, where they participate in a variety of physiological responses such as anxiety, the central processing of pain, food intake, nicotine seeking behavior, and cognitive functions. In the mammalian brain, nine different subunits have been found thus far, which assemble into pentameric complexes with much subunit diversity; however, the α7 and α4β2 subtypes predominate in the CNS. Neuronal nAChR dysfunction is involved in the pathophysiology of many neurological disorders. Here we will briefly discuss the functional makeup and expression of the nAChRs in mammalian brain, and their role as targets in neurodegenerative diseases (in particular Alzheimer's disease, AD), neurodevelopmental disorders (in particular autism and schizophrenia), and neuropathic pain. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Two inwardly rectifying potassium channels, Irk1 and Irk2, play redundant roles in Drosophila renal tubule function

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yipin; Baum, Michel; Huang, Chou-Long

    2015-01-01

    Inwardly rectifying potassium channels play essential roles in renal physiology across phyla. Barium-sensitive K+ conductances are found on the basolateral membrane of a variety of insect Malpighian (renal) tubules, including Drosophila melanogaster. We found that barium decreases the lumen-positive transepithelial potential difference in isolated perfused Drosophila tubules and decreases fluid secretion and transepithelial K+ flux. In those insect species in which it has been studied, transcripts from multiple genes encoding inwardly rectifying K+ channels are expressed in the renal (Malpighian) tubule. In Drosophila melanogaster, this includes transcripts of the Irk1, Irk2, and Irk3 genes. The role of each of these gene products in renal tubule function is unknown. We found that simultaneous knockdown of Irk1 and Irk2 in the principal cell of the fly tubule decreases transepithelial K+ flux, with no additive effect of Irk3 knockdown, and decreases barium sensitivity of transepithelial K+ flux by ∼50%. Knockdown of any of the three inwardly rectifying K+ channels individually has no effect, nor does knocking down Irk3 simultaneously with Irk1 or Irk2. Irk1/Irk2 principal cell double-knockdown tubules remain sensitive to the kaliuretic effect of cAMP. Inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase with ouabain and Irk1/Irk2 double knockdown have additive effects on K+ flux, and 75% of transepithelial K+ transport is due to Irk1/Irk2 or ouabain-sensitive pathways. In conclusion, Irk1 and Irk2 play redundant roles in transepithelial ion transport in the Drosophila melanogaster renal tubule and are additive to Na+/K+-ATPase-dependent pathways. PMID:26224687

  3. Perspectives and new aspects of metalloproteinases' inhibitors in therapy of CNS disorders: from chemistry to medicine.

    PubMed

    Boguszewska-Czubara, Anna; Budzynska, Barbara; Skalicka-Wozniak, Krystyna; Kurzepa, Jacek

    2018-05-13

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a key role in remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and, at the same time, influence cell differentiation, migration, proliferation and survival. Their importance in variety of human diseases including cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, pulmonary emphysema and fibrotic disorders has been known for many years but special attention should be paid on the role of MMPs in the central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Till now, there are not many well documented physiological MMP target proteins in the brain and only some pathological ones. Numerous neurodegenerative diseases is a consequence or result in disturbed remodeling of brain ECM, therefore proper action of MMPs as well as control of their activity may play crucial roles in the development and the progress of these diseases. In present review we discuss the role of metalloproteinase inhibitors, from the well-known natural endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) through exogenous synthetic ones like (4-phenoxyphenylsulfonyl)methylthiirane (SB-3CT), tetracyclines, batimastat (BB-94) and FN-439. As the MMP-TIMP system has been well described in physiological development as well as in pathological conditions mainly in neoplasctic diseases, the knowledge about the enzymatic system in mammalian brain tissue remain still poorly understood in this context. Therefore, we focus on MMPs inhibition in the context of physiological function of adult brain as well as pathological conditions including neurodegenerative diseases, brain injuries and others. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Gpr124 controls CNS angiogenesis and blood-brain barrier integrity by promoting ligand-specific canonical wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yulian; Nathans, Jeremy

    2014-10-27

    Canonical Wnt signaling in endothelial cells (ECs) is required for vascularization of the central nervous system (CNS) and for formation and maintenance of barrier properties unique to CNS vasculature. Gpr124 is an orphan member of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor family that is expressed in ECs and is essential for CNS angiogenesis and barrier formation via an unknown mechanism. Using canonical Wnt signaling assays in cell culture and genetic loss- and gain-of-function experiments in mice, we show that Gpr124 functions as a coactivator of Wnt7a- and Wnt7b-stimulated canonical Wnt signaling via a Frizzled receptor and Lrp coreceptor and that Gpr124-stimulated signaling functions in concert with Norrin/Frizzled4 signaling to control CNS vascular development. These experiments identify Gpr124 as a ligand-specific coactivator of canonical Wnt signaling.

  5. Dimensions of Play Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansell, Maureen

    1980-01-01

    Draws the connection between childhood play and the unifying, actualizing effects of play in human experience. Examines the concept of play and its integrative function from multidisciplinary perspectives, giving a paradigm for looking at the play process in other expressive forms such as ritual, art, and aesthetic experience. (JMF)

  6. Development of the Contextual Assessment of Social Skills (CASS): A Role Play Measure of Social Skill for Individuals with High-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratto, Allison B.; Turner-Brown, Lauren; Rupp, Betty M.; Mesibov, Gary B.; Penn, David L.

    2011-01-01

    This study piloted a role play assessment of conversational skills for adolescents and young adults with high-functioning autism/Asperger syndrome (HFA/AS). Participants completed two semi-structured role plays, in which social context was manipulated by changing the confederate's level of interest in the conversation. Participants' social…

  7. Nitric oxide plays a role in the regulation of adrenal blood flow and adrenocorticomedullary functions in the llama fetus

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Raquel A; Sánchez, Gina; Liberona, Leonel; Sanhueza, Emilia M; Giussani, Dino A; Blanco, Carlos E; Hanson, Mark A; Llanos, Aníbal J

    2002-01-01

    The hypothesis that nitric oxide plays a key role in the regulation of adrenal blood flow and plasma concentrations of cortisol and catecholamines under basal and hypoxaemic conditions in the llama fetus was tested. At 0.6-0.8 of gestation, 11 llama fetuses were surgically prepared for long-term recording under anaesthesia with vascular and amniotic catheters. Following recovery all fetuses underwent an experimental protocol based on 1 h of normoxaemia, 1 h of hypoxaemia and 1 h of recovery. In nine fetuses, the protocol occurred during fetal i.v. infusion with saline and in five fetuses during fetal i.v. treatment with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor l-NAME. Adrenal blood flow was determined by the radiolabelled microsphere method during each of the experimental periods during saline infusion and treatment with l-NAME. Treatment with l-NAME during normoxaemia led to a marked fall in adrenal blood flow and a pronounced increase in plasma catecholamine concentrations, but it did not affect plasma ACTH or cortisol levels. In saline-infused fetuses, acute hypoxaemia elicited an increase in adrenal blood flow and in plasma ACTH, cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations. Treatment with l-NAME did not affect the increase in fetal plasma ACTH, but prevented the increments in adrenal blood flow and in plasma cortisol and adrenaline concentrations during hypoxaemia in the llama fetus. In contrast, l-NAME further enhanced the increase in fetal plasma noradrenaline. These data support the hypothesis that nitric oxide has important roles in the regulation of adrenal blood flow and adrenal corticomedullary functions during normoxaemia and hypoxaemia functions in the late gestation llama fetus. PMID:12356897

  8. Incidence of CNS tumors in Appalachian children

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Luo, Alice; Durbin, Eric B.; Lycan, Ellen; Tucker, Thomas; Chen, Quan; Horbinski, Craig; Villano, John L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Determine whether the risk of astrocytomas in Appalachian children is higher than the national average. Methods We compared the incidence of pediatric brain tumors in Appalachia versus non-Appalachia regions, covering years 2000–2011. The North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collects population-based data from 55 cancer registries throughout United States and Canada. All invasive primary (i.e. non-metastatic tumors), with age at diagnosis 0–19 years old, were included. Nearly 27,000 and 2,200 central nervous system (CNS) tumors from non-Appalachia and Appalachia, respectively comprise the cohorts. Age-adjusted incidence rates of each main brain tumor subtype were compared. Results The incidence rate of pediatric CNS tumors was 8% higher in Appalachia, 3.31 [95% CI, 3.17–3.45] versus non–Appalachia, 3.06, [95% CI, 3.02–3.09] for the years 2001–2011, all rates are per 100,000 population. Astrocytomas accounted for the majority of this difference, with the rate being 16% higher in Appalachian children, 1.77, [95% CI, 1.67–1.87] versus non-Appalachian children, 1.52, [95% CI, 1.50–1.55]. Among astrocytomas, World Health Organization (WHO) grade I astrocytomas were 41% higher in Appalachia, 0.63 [95% CI, 0.56–0.70] versus non-Appalachia 0.44 [95% CI, 0.43–0.46] for the years 2004–2011. Conclusions and Relevance This is the first study to demonstrate that Appalachian children are at greater risk of CNS neoplasms, and that much of this difference is in WHO grade I astrocytomas, 41% more common. The cause of this increased incidence is unknown and we discuss the importance of this in relation to genetic and environmental findings in Appalachia. PMID:28285334

  9. Agile delivery of protein therapeutics to CNS.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiang; Manickam, Devika S; Brynskikh, Anna; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2014-09-28

    A variety of therapeutic proteins have shown potential to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Challenge to deliver these protein molecules to the brain is well known. Proteins administered through parenteral routes are often excluded from the brain because of their poor bioavailability and the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Barriers also exist to proteins administered through non-parenteral routes that bypass the BBB. Several strategies have shown promise in delivering proteins to the brain. This review, first, describes the physiology and pathology of the BBB that underscore the rationale and needs of each strategy to be applied. Second, major classes of protein therapeutics along with some key factors that affect their delivery outcomes are presented. Third, different routes of protein administration (parenteral, central intracerebroventricular and intraparenchymal, intranasal and intrathecal) are discussed along with key barriers to CNS delivery associated with each route. Finally, current delivery strategies involving chemical modification of proteins and use of particle-based carriers are overviewed using examples from literature and our own work. Whereas most of these studies are in the early stage, some provide proof of mechanism of increased protein delivery to the brain in relevant models of CNS diseases, while in few cases proof of concept had been attained in clinical studies. This review will be useful to broad audience of students, academicians and industry professionals who consider critical issues of protein delivery to the brain and aim developing and studying effective brain delivery systems for protein therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. CD11c-expressing cells affect Treg behavior in the meninges during CNS infection1

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Carleigh A.; Overall, Christopher; Konradt, Christoph; O’Hara Hall, Aisling C.; Hayes, Nikolas W.; Wagage, Sagie; John, Beena; Christian, David A.; Hunter, Christopher A.; Harris, Tajie H.

    2017-01-01

    Treg cells play an important role in the CNS during multiple infections as well as autoimmune inflammation, but the behavior of this cell type in the CNS has not been explored. In mice, infection with Toxoplasma gondii leads to a Th1-polarized parasite-specific effector T cell response in the brain. Similarly, the Treg cells in the CNS during T. gondii infection are Th1-polarized, exemplified by T-bet, CXCR3, and IFN-γ expression. Unlike effector CD4+ T cells, an MHC Class II tetramer reagent specific for T. gondii did not recognize Treg cells isolated from the CNS. Likewise, TCR sequencing revealed minimal overlap in TCR sequence between effector and regulatory T cells in the CNS. Whereas effector T cells are found in the brain parenchyma where parasites are present, Treg cells were restricted to the meninges and perivascular spaces. The use of intravital imaging revealed that activated CD4+ T cells within the meninges were highly migratory, while Treg cells moved more slowly and were found in close association with CD11c+ cells. To test whether the behavior of Tregs in the meninges is influenced by interactions with CD11c+ cells, mice were treated with anti-LFA-1 antibodies to reduce the number of CD11c+ cells in this space. The anti-LFA-1 treatment led to fewer contacts between Tregs and the remaining CD11c+ cells and increased the speed of Treg cell migration. These data suggest that Treg cells are anatomically restricted within the CNS and the interaction with CD11c+ populations regulates their local behavior during T. gondii infection. PMID:28389591

  11. Sex Steroids, Adult Neurogenesis, and Inflammation in CNS Homeostasis, Degeneration, and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Tracy A.

    2018-01-01

    Sex steroidal hormones coordinate the development and maintenance of tissue architecture in many organs, including the central nervous systems (CNS). Within the CNS, sex steroids regulate the morphology, physiology, and behavior of a wide variety of neural cells including, but not limited to, neurons, glia, endothelial cells, and immune cells. Sex steroids spatially and temporally control distinct molecular networks, that, in turn modulate neural activity, synaptic plasticity, growth factor expression and function, nutrient exchange, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis. Over the last several decades, it has become increasingly evident that sex steroids, often in conjunction with neuroinflammation, have profound impact on the occurrence and severity of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Here, I review the foundational discoveries that established the regulatory role of sex steroids in the CNS and highlight recent advances toward elucidating the complex interaction between sex steroids, neuroinflammation, and CNS regeneration through adult neurogenesis. The majority of recent work has focused on neuroinflammatory responses following acute physical damage, chronic degeneration, or pharmacological insult. Few studies directly assess the role of immune cells in regulating adult neurogenesis under healthy, homeostatic conditions. As such, I also introduce tractable, non-traditional models for examining the role of neuroimmune cells in natural neuronal turnover, seasonal plasticity of neural circuits, and extreme CNS regeneration. PMID:29760681

  12. Identification of Ind transcription activation and repression domains required for dorsoventral patterning of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Von Ohlen, Tonia L; Moses, Cade

    2009-07-01

    Specification of cell fates across the dorsoventral axis of the central nervous system in Drosophila involves the subdivision of the neuroectoderm into three domains that give rise to three columns of neural precursor cells called neuroblasts. Ventral nervous system defective (Vnd), intermediate neuroblasts defective (Ind) and muscle segment homeobox (Msh) are expressed in the three columns from ventral to dorsal, respectively. The products of these genes play multiple important roles in formation and specification of the embryonic nervous system. Ind, for example, is known to play roles in two important processes. First, Ind is essential for formation of neuroblasts conjunction with SoxB class transcription factors. Sox class transcription factors are known to specify neural stem cells in vertebrates. Second, Ind plays an important role in patterning the CNS in conjunction with, vnd and msh, which is also similar to how vertebrates pattern their neural tube. This work focuses two important aspects of Ind function. First, we used multiple approaches to identify and characterize specific domains within the protein that confer repressor or activator ability. Currently, little is known about the presence of activation or repression domains within Ind. Here, we show that transcriptional repression by Ind requires multiple conserved domains within the protein, and that Ind has a transcriptional activation domain. Specifically, we have identified a novel domain, the Pst domain, that has transcriptional repression ability and appears to act independent of interaction with the co-repressor Groucho. This domain is highly conserved among insect species, but is not found in vertebrate Gsh class homeodomain proteins. Second, we show that Ind can and does repress vnd expression, but does so in a stage specific manner. We conclude from this that the function of Ind in regulating vnd expression is one of refinement and maintenance of the dorsal border.

  13. Play Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Ritesh

    2010-01-01

    Play therapy represents a unique form of treatment that is not only geared toward young children, but is translated into a language children can comprehend and utilize—the language of play. For the referring provider or practitioner, questions may remain regarding the nature, course, and efficacy of play therapy. This article reviews the theoretical underpinnings of play therapy, some practical considerations, and finally a summary of the current state of research in regard to play therapy. The authors present the practicing psychiatrist with a road map for referring a patient to play therapy or initiating it in appropriate cases. PMID:21103141

  14. Engineering Therapies in the CNS: What works and what can be translated

    PubMed Central

    Shoffstall, Andrew J.; Taylor, Dawn M.; Lavik, Erin B.

    2012-01-01

    Engineering is the art of taking what we know and using it to solve problems. As engineers, we build tool chests of approaches; we attempt to learn as much as possible about the problem at hand, and then we design, build, and test our approaches to see how they impact the system. The challenge of applying this approach to the central nervous system (CNS) is that we often do not know the details of what is needed from the biological side. New therapeutic options for treating the CNS range from new biomaterials to make scaffolds, to novel drug-delivery techniques, to functional electrical stimulation. However, the reality is that translating these new therapies and making them widely available to patients requires collaborations between scientists, engineers, clinicians, and patients to have the greatest chance of success. Here we discuss a variety of new treatment strategies and explore the pragmatic challenges involved with engineering therapies in the CNS. PMID:22330751

  15. Novel agents in CNS myeloma treatment.

    PubMed

    Gozzetti, Alessandro; Cerase, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system localization of multiple myeloma (CNS-MM) accounts for about 1% of all MM.Treatment is still unsatisfactory. Many treatments have been described in the literature: chemotherapy (CHT), intrathecal therapy (IT), and radiotherapy (RT), with survivals reported between one month and six months. Recent drugs such as the immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) and proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib) have changed the treatment of patients with MM, both younger and older, with a significant improvement in response and survival. The activity of new drugs in CNSMM has been reported but is still not well known. Bortezomib does not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB), and IMID’s seem to have only a minimal crossover. The role of novel agents in CNS MM management will be discussed as well as the potential role of other new immunomodulatory drugs (pomalidomide) and proteasome inhibitors that seem to cross the BBB and hold promise into the treatment of this rare and still incurable localization of the disease.

  16. Play Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lawver, Timothy; Blankenship, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Play therapy is a treatment modality in which the therapist engages in play with the child. Its use has been documented in a variety of settings and with a variety of diagnoses. Treating within the context of play brings the therapist and the therapy to the level of the child. By way of an introduction to this approach, a case is presented of a six-year-old boy with oppositional defiant disorder. The presentation focuses on the events and interactions of a typical session with an established patient. The primary issues of the session are aggression, self worth, and self efficacy. These themes manifest themselves through the content of the child’s play and narration of his actions. The therapist then reflects these back to the child while gently encouraging the child toward more positive play. Though the example is one of nondirective play therapy, a wide range of variation exists under the heading of play therapy. PMID:19724720

  17. Mast Cells and Innate Lymphoid Cells: Underappreciated Players in CNS Autoimmune Demyelinating Disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, Melissa A; Weinberg, Rebecca B

    2018-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and its mouse model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, are autoimmune CNS inflammatory diseases. As a result of a breakdown in the relatively impermeable blood-brain barrier (BBB) in affected individuals, myelin-specific CD4 + and CD8 + T cells gain entry into the immune privileged CNS and initiate myelin, oligodendrocyte, and nerve axon destruction. However, despite the absolute requirement for T cells, there is increasing evidence that innate immune cells also play critical amplifying roles in disease pathogenesis. By modulating the character and magnitude of the myelin-reactive T cell response and regulating BBB integrity, innate cells affect both disease initiation and progression. Two classes of innate cells, mast cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), have been best studied in models of allergic and gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases. Yet, there is emerging evidence that these cell types also exert a profound influence in CNS inflammatory disease. Both cell types are residents within the meninges and can be activated early in disease to express a wide variety of disease-modifying cytokines and chemokines. In this review, we discuss how mast cells and ILCs can have either disease-promoting or -protecting effects on MS and other CNS inflammatory diseases and how sex hormones may influence this outcome. These observations suggest that targeting these cells and their unique mediators can be exploited therapeutically.

  18. Biomarkers for CNS involvement in pediatric lupus

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Tamar B; Putterman, Chaim; Goilav, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    CNS disease, or central neuropsychiatric lupus erythematosus (cNPSLE), occurs frequently in pediatric lupus, leading to significant morbidity and poor long-term outcomes. Diagnosing cNPSLE is especially difficult in pediatrics; many current diagnostic tools are invasive and/or costly, and there are no current accepted screening mechanisms. The most complicated aspect of diagnosis is differentiating primary disease from other etiologies; research to discover new biomarkers is attempting to address this dilemma. With many mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of cNPSLE, biomarker profiles across several modalities (molecular, psychometric and neuroimaging) will need to be used. For the care of children with lupus, the challenge will be to develop biomarkers that are accessible by noninvasive measures and reliable in a pediatric population. PMID:26079959

  19. Pretend play.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Deena Skolnick

    2015-01-01

    Pretend play is a form of playful behavior that involves nonliteral action. Although on the surface this activity appears to be merely for fun, recent research has discovered that children's pretend play has connections to important cognitive and social skills, such as symbolic thinking, theory of mind, and counterfactual reasoning. The current article first defines pretend play and then reviews the arguments and evidence for these three connections. Pretend play has a nonliteral correspondence to reality, hence pretending may provide children with practice with navigating symbolic relationships, which may strengthen their language skills. Pretend play and theory of mind reasoning share a focus on others' mental states in order to correctly interpret their behavior, hence pretending and theory of mind may be mutually supportive in development. Pretend play and counterfactual reasoning both involve representing nonreal states of affairs, hence pretending may facilitate children's counterfactual abilities. These connections make pretend play an important phenomenon in cognitive science: Studying children's pretend play can provide insight into these other abilities and their developmental trajectories, and thereby into human cognitive architecture and its development. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. A Functional Return-to-Play Progression After Exertional Heat Stroke in a High School Football Player.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rebecca M; Tanner, Patrick; Irani, Sarah; Mularoni, P Patrick

    2018-03-01

      To present a functional return-to-play (RTP) progression after exertional heat stroke (EHS) in a 17-year-old high school football defensive end (height = 185 cm, mass = 145.5 kg).   The patient had no pertinent medical history but moved to a warm climate several days before the EHS occurred. After completing an off-season conditioning test (14- × 110-yd [12.6- × 99.0-m] sprints) on a warm afternoon (temperature = approximately 34°C [93°F], relative humidity = 53%), the patient collapsed. An athletic trainer (AT) was called to the field, where he found the patient conscious but exhibiting central nervous system dysfunction. Emergency medical services were summoned and immediately transported the patient to the hospital.   Exertional heat stroke, heat exhaustion, exertional sickling, rhabdomyolysis, and cardiac arrhythmia.   The patient was immediately transported to a hospital, where his oral temperature was 39.6°C (103.3°F). He was transferred to a children's hospital and treated for rhabdomyolysis, transaminitis, and renal failure. He was hospitalized for 11 days. After a physician's clearance once the laboratory results normalized, an RTP progression was completed. The protocol began with light activity and progressed over 3 weeks to full football practice. During activity, an AT monitored the patient's gastrointestinal temperature, heart rate, rating of perceived exertion, fluid consumption, and sweat losses.   Documentation of RTP guidelines for young athletes is lacking. We used a protocol intended for the football setting to ensure the athlete was heat tolerant, had adequate physical fitness, and could safely RTP. Despite his EHS, he recovered fully, with no lasting effects, and successfully returned to compete in the final 5 games of the season.   Using a gradual RTP progression and close monitoring, a high school defensive end successfully returned to football practice and games after EHS. This case demonstrates the feasibility of

  1. Synthesis and Evaluation of Orexin-1 Receptor Antagonists with Improved Solubility and CNS Permeability.

    PubMed

    Perrey, David A; Decker, Ann M; Zhang, Yanan

    2018-03-21

    Orexins are hypothalamic neuropeptides playing important roles in many functions including the motivation of addictive behaviors. Blockade of the orexin-1 receptor has been suggested as a potential strategy for the treatment of drug addiction. We have previously reported OX 1 receptor antagonists based on the tetrahydroisoquinoline scaffold with excellent OX 1 potency and selectivity; however, these compounds had high lipophilicity (clogP > 5) and low to moderate solubility. In an effort to improve their properties, we have designed and synthesized a series of analogues where the 7-position substituents known to favor OX 1 potency and selectivity were retained, and groups of different nature were introduced at the 1-position where substitution was generally tolerated as demonstrated in previous studies. Compound 44 with lower lipophilicity (clogP = 3.07) displayed excellent OX 1 potency ( K e = 5.7 nM) and selectivity (>1,760-fold over OX 2 ) in calcium mobilization assays. In preliminary ADME studies, 44 showed excellent kinetic solubility (>200 μM), good CNS permeability ( P app = 14.7 × 10 -6 cm/sec in MDCK assay), and low drug efflux (efflux ratio = 3.3).

  2. Playing Shakespeare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashian, Kathleen Ryniker

    1993-01-01

    Describes a yearlong project at 12 Catholic middle schools in the Diocese of Arlington, Virginia, to incorporate the plays of William Shakespeare into the curriculum. Teachers attended university lectures and directed students in performances of the plays. Concludes that Shakespeare can be understood and enjoyed by middle school students. (BCY)

  3. Shadow Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Hilson, Margilee P.

    2012-01-01

    A bunny rabbit playfully hops across the wall. Then hands realign and fingers shift to make a hawk soar toward the ceiling. Most children have enjoyed the delightful experience of playing with shadow puppets. The authors build on this natural curiosity to help students link shadows to complex astronomical concepts such as seasons. The…

  4. Mechanisms of Hypothermia, Delayed Hyperthermia and Fever Following CNS Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Central nervous system (CNS) damage is often associated with robust body temperature changes, such as hypothermia and delayed hyperthermia. Hypothermia is one of the most common body temperature changes to CNS insults in rodents and is often associated with improved outcome. Alth...

  5. Dynamic Testing of Gifted and Average-Ability Children's Analogy Problem Solving: Does Executive Functioning Play a Role?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogelaar, Bart; Bakker, Merel; Hoogeveen, Lianne; Resing, Wilma C. M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, dynamic testing principles were applied to examine progression of analogy problem solving, the roles that cognitive flexibility and metacognition play in children's progression as well as training benefits, and instructional needs of 7- to 8-year-old gifted and average-ability children. Utilizing a pretest training posttest control…

  6. Immunohistological localization of serotonin in the CNS and feeding system of the stable fly stomoxys calcitrans L. (Diptera: muscidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Serotonin, or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), plays critical roles as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator that control or modulate many behaviors in insects, such as feeding. Neurons immunoreactive (IR)to 5-HT were detected in the central nervous system (CNS) of the larval and adult stages of the stab...

  7. Play & Play Grounds. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Jeannette Galambos

    Using camera and tape recorder, a photographer and an early childhood specialist explored as a team the universe of children's outdoor play, seeking worthy and innovative ideas and stressing urban playground problems and solutions. The resulting photographs and text focus on (1) the characteristics of play, (2) the nature of playgrounds, and (3)…

  8. Competitive versus Cooperative Exergame Play for African American Adolescents' Executive Function Skills: Short-Term Effects in a Long-Term Training Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staiano, Amanda E.; Abraham, Anisha A.; Calvert, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Exergames are videogames that require gross motor activity, thereby combining gaming with physical activity. This study examined the role of competitive versus cooperative exergame play on short-term changes in executive function skills, following a 10-week exergame training intervention. Fifty-four low-income overweight and obese African American…

  9. Mining the topography and dynamics of the 4D Nucleome to identify novel CNS drug pathways.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Gerald A; Allyn-Feuer, Ari; Georgoff, Patrick; Nikolian, Vahagn; Alam, Hasan B; Athey, Brian D

    2017-07-01

    The pharmacoepigenome can be defined as the active, noncoding province of the genome including canonical spatial and temporal regulatory mechanisms of gene regulation that respond to xenobiotic stimuli. Many psychotropic drugs that have been in clinical use for decades have ill-defined mechanisms of action that are beginning to be resolved as we understand the transcriptional hierarchy and dynamics of the nucleus. In this review, we describe spatial, temporal and biomechanical mechanisms mediated by psychotropic medications. Focus is placed on a bioinformatics pipeline that can be used both for detection of pharmacoepigenomic variants that discretize drug response and adverse events to improve pharmacogenomic testing, and for the discovery of novel CNS therapeutics. This approach integrates the functional topology and dynamics of the transcriptional hierarchy of the pharmacoepigenome, gene variant-driven identification of pharmacogenomic regulatory domains, and mesoscale mapping for the discovery of novel CNS pharmacodynamic pathways in human brain. Examples of the application of this pipeline are provided, including the discovery of valproic acid (VPA) mediated transcriptional reprogramming of neuronal cell fate following injury, and mapping of a CNS pathway glutamatergic pathway for the mood stabilizer lithium. These examples in regulatory pharmacoepigenomics illustrate how ongoing research using the 4D nucleome provides a foundation to further insight into previously unrecognized psychotropic drug pharmacodynamic pathways in the human CNS. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Transporters at CNS Barrier Sites: Obstacles or Opportunities for Drug Delivery?

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Covarrubias, Lucy; Slosky, Lauren M.; Thompson, Brandon J.; Davis, Thomas P.; Ronaldson, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid (BCSF) barriers are critical determinants of CNS homeostasis. Additionally, the BBB and BCSF barriers are formidable obstacles to effective CNS drug delivery. These brain barrier sites express putative influx and efflux transporters that precisely control permeation of circulating solutes including drugs. The study of transporters has enabled a shift away from “brute force” approaches to delivering drugs by physically circumventing brain barriers towards chemical approaches that can target specific compounds of the BBB and/or BCSF barrier. However, our understanding of transporters at the BBB and BCSF barriers has primarily focused on understanding efflux transporters that efficiently prevent drugs from attaining therapeutic concentrations in the CNS. Recently, through the characterization of multiple endogenously expressed uptake transporters, this paradigm has shifted to the study of brain transporter targets that can facilitate drug delivery (i.e., influx transporters). Additionally, signaling pathways and trafficking mechanisms have been identified for several endogenous BBB/BCSF transporters, thereby offering even more opportunities to understand how transporters can be exploited for optimization of CNS drug delivery. This review presents an overview of the BBB and BCSF barrier as well as the many families of transporters functionally expressed at these barrier sites. Furthermore, we present an overview of various strategies that have been designed and utilized to deliver therapeutic agents to the brain with a particular emphasis on those approaches that directly target endogenous BBB/BCSF barrier transporters. PMID:23789948

  11. Potential roles of microglial cell progranulin in HIV-associated CNS pathologies and neurocognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Hyeon-Sook; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Lee, Sunhee C.

    2013-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a highly unusual molecule with both neuronal and microglial expression with two seemingly unrelated functions, i.e., as a neuronal growth factor and a modulator of neuroinflammation. Haploinsufficiency due to loss of function mutations lead to a fatal presenile dementing illness (frontotemporal lobar degeneration), indicating that adequate expression of PGRN is essential for successful aging. PGRN might be a particularly relevant factor in the pathogenesis of HIV encephalitis (HIVE) and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). We present emerging data and a review of the literature which show that cells of myeloid lineage such as macrophages and microglia are the primary sources of PGRN and that PGRN expression contributes to pathogenesis of CNS diseases. We also present evidence that PGRN is a macrophage antiviral cytokine. For example, PGRN mRNA and protein expression are significantly upregulated in brain specimens with HIVE, and in HIV-infected microglia in vitro. Paradoxically, our preliminary CHARTER data analyses indicate that lower PGRN levels in CSF trended towards an association with HAND, particularly in those without detectable virus. Based upon these findings, we introduce the hypothesis that PGRN plays dual roles in modulating antiviral immunity and neuronal dysfunction in the context of HIV infection. In the presence of active viral replication, PGRN expression is increased functioning as an anti-viral factor as well as a neuroprotectant. In the absence of active HIV replication, ongoing inflammation or other stressors suppress PGRN production from macrophages/microglia contributing to neurocognitive dysfunction. We propose CSF PGRN as a candidate surrogate marker for HAND. PMID:23959579

  12. Role of Hemichannels in CNS Inflammation and the Inflammasome Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeri; Davidson, Joanne O; Gunn, Katherine C; Phillips, Anthony R; Green, Colin R; Gunn, Alistair J

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, and metabolic disorders, once triggered, share a number of common features, including sustained inflammatory cell activation and vascular disruption. These shared pathways are induced independently of any genetic predisposition to the disease or the precise external stimulus. Glial cells respond to injury with an innate immune response that includes release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Vascular endothelial cells may also be affected, leading to opening of the blood-brain barrier that facilitates invasion by circulating inflammatory cells. Inflammation can trigger acute neural injury followed by chronic inflammation that plays a key role in neurodegenerative conditions. Gap junction channels normally allow direct cell-to-cell communication. They are formed by the docking of two hemichannels, one contributed by each of the neighboring cells. While the opening probability of these channels is tightly controlled under resting conditions, hemichannels can open in response to injury or inflammatory factors, forming a large, relatively nonselective membrane pore. In this review, we consider the CNS immune system from the perspective that modulating connexin hemichannel opening can prevent tissue damage arising from excessive and uncontrolled inflammation. We discuss connexin channel roles in microglia, astrocytes, and endothelial cells in both acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, and in particular describe the role of connexin hemichannels in the inflammasome pathway where they contribute to both its activation and its spread to neighboring cells. Finally, we describe the benefits of hemichannel block in animal models of brain injury. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Playing RNase P evolution: swapping the RNA catalyst for a protein reveals functional uniformity of highly divergent enzyme forms.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christoph; Hartig, Andreas; Hartmann, Roland K; Rossmanith, Walter

    2014-08-01

    The RNase P family is a diverse group of endonucleases responsible for the removal of 5' extensions from tRNA precursors. The diversity of enzyme forms finds its extremes in the eukaryal nucleus where RNA-based catalysis by complex ribonucleoproteins in some organisms contrasts with single-polypeptide enzymes in others. Such structural contrast suggests associated functional differences, and the complexity of the ribonucleoprotein was indeed proposed to broaden the enzyme's functionality beyond tRNA processing. To explore functional overlap and differences between most divergent forms of RNase P, we replaced the nuclear RNase P of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a 10-subunit ribonucleoprotein, with Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP3, a single monomeric protein. Surprisingly, the RNase P-swapped yeast strains were viable, displayed essentially unimpaired growth under a wide variety of conditions, and, in a certain genetic background, their fitness even slightly exceeded that of the wild type. The molecular analysis of the RNase P-swapped strains showed a minor disturbance in tRNA metabolism, but did not point to any RNase P substrates or functions beyond that. Altogether, these results indicate the full functional exchangeability of the highly dissimilar enzymes. Our study thereby establishes the RNase P family, with its combination of structural diversity and functional uniformity, as an extreme case of convergent evolution. It moreover suggests that the apparently gratuitous complexity of some RNase P forms is the result of constructive neutral evolution rather than reflecting increased functional versatility.

  14. Play as Regulation: Promoting Self-Regulation through Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Gilbert M.

    2017-01-01

    The nature of play and an overview of the stages of play in the first 5 years of childhood are discussed. The core features of sensorimotor, functional, and symbolic play are identified. Vignettes describing how play serves a regulatory function punctuate each section. A conceptual framework for the construct of regulation is presented and…

  15. Sweet Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Shuk-kwan S.; Lo, Jane-Jane

    2010-01-01

    This article features Sweet play math, a "math by the month" activity that involves decorating and making sugar cubes. Teachers may want to substitute straws, paper squares, alphabet blocks, or such commercially made manipulatives as Unifix[R] cubes for the real sweets. Given no allergy concerns, teachers and students alike would enjoy some sweet…

  16. Playing Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Juan E.

    The acceptance of animation technologies is increasing. Video games, such as Sony PlayStation (SONY, 2002), have become part of the culture for young people from kindergarten through undergraduate school. Animation technologies have been implemented into educational systems in the form of animated pedagogical agents (Johnson, 2000). The research…

  17. Water Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Jane E.; Smith, Brandy A.

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of activities to develop sensory awareness, spatial thinking, and physical dexterity, operationalized through hands-on science lessons such as water play, have long been part of early childhood education. This practical article addresses Next Generation Science Standards K-2 ETS1-3 and K-2 ETS1-2 by having four-year-old…

  18. Clay Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  19. Game playing.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Christopher D

    2014-03-01

    Game playing has been a core domain of artificial intelligence research since the beginnings of the field. Game playing provides clearly defined arenas within which computational approaches can be readily compared to human expertise through head-to-head competition and other benchmarks. Game playing research has identified several simple core algorithms that provide successful foundations, with development focused on the challenges of defeating human experts in specific games. Key developments include minimax search in chess, machine learning from self-play in backgammon, and Monte Carlo tree search in Go. These approaches have generalized successfully to additional games. While computers have surpassed human expertise in a wide variety of games, open challenges remain and research focuses on identifying and developing new successful algorithmic foundations. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:193-205. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1278 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The author has declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Integrated Stress Response as a Therapeutic Target for CNS Injuries.

    PubMed

    Romero-Ramírez, Lorenzo; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Barreda-Manso, M Asunción

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) injuries, caused by cerebrovascular pathologies or mechanical contusions (e.g., traumatic brain injury, TBI) comprise a diverse group of disorders that share the activation of the integrated stress response (ISR). This pathway is an innate protective mechanism, with encouraging potential as therapeutic target for CNS injury repair. In this review, we will focus on the progress in understanding the role of the ISR and we will discuss the effects of various small molecules that target the ISR on different animal models of CNS injury.

  1. PHOX2B Is A Reliable Immunomarker in Distinguishing Peripheral Neuroblastic Tumors From CNS Embryonal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Sanda; Paulson, Vera; Dubuc, Adrian; Ligon, Azra; Lidov, Hart G

    2018-05-14

    The PHOX2B gene regulates neuronal maturation in the brain stem nuclei associated with cardiorespiratory function, and in the autonomic sympathetic and enteric nervous system. PHOX2B expression is a reliable immunomarker for peripheral neuroblastic tumors, however no systematic evaluation of CNS embryonal tumors was included in the studies. We encountered two cases in which the differential diagnosis included neuroblastoma and CNS embryonal tumor, and we hypothesized that PHOX2B immunostain would be helpful establishing the diagnosis. PHOX2B immunostain was performed on 29 pediatric cases, with adequate controls: 1 retroperitoneal embryonal tumor in a child with retinoblastoma (index1), 1 posterior fossa embryonal tumor in a child with a neuroblastoma (index2), 7 medulloblastomas, 4 atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (ATRT), 4 retinoblastomas, 6 pineoblastomas, 4 embryonal tumors with multilayered rosettes (ETMR), and 2 CNS embryonal tumors, NEC. Cell lineage immunomarkers (GFAP, OLIG2, Synaptophysin, NeuN, CRX, PGP9.5), immunosurrogates for molecular alterations (beta-catenin, INI1, Lin28), array CGH and OncoPanel were performed as needed. Medulloblastomas, ATRTs, ETMRs, retinoblastomas and CNS embryonal tumors NOS were essentially negative for PHOX2B. Two (2) of 6 pineoblastomas had significant PHOX2B expression, while the rest were negative. Index1 was negative for PHOX2B and PGP 9.5, and positive for CRX, consistent with retinoblastoma. Index2 had diffuse PHOX2B expression, MYCN amplification and no copy number changes of medulloblastoma, in keeping with neuroblastoma. PHOX2B antibody is helpful in distinguishing between peripheral neuroblastic and CNS embryonal tumors, which are immunonegative, with the caveat that a subset of pineoblastomas has significant expression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. P-glycoprotein trafficking as a therapeutic target to optimize CNS drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Davis, Thomas P; Sanchez-Covarubias, Lucy; Tome, Margaret E

    2014-01-01

    The primary function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB)/neurovascular unit is to protect the central nervous system (CNS) from potentially harmful xenobiotic substances and maintain CNS homeostasis. Restricted access to the CNS is maintained via a combination of tight junction proteins as well as a variety of efflux and influx transporters that limits the transcellular and paracellular movement of solutes. Of the transporters identified at the BBB, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has emerged as the transporter that is the greatest obstacle to effective CNS drug delivery. In this chapter, we provide data to support intracellular protein trafficking of P-gp within cerebral capillary microvessels as a potential target for improved drug delivery. We show that pain-induced changes in P-gp trafficking are associated with changes in P-gp's association with caveolin-1, a key scaffolding/trafficking protein that colocalizes with P-gp at the luminal membrane of brain microvessels. Changes in colocalization with the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated forms of caveolin-1, by pain, are accompanied by dynamic changes in the distribution, relocalization, and activation of P-gp "pools" between microvascular endothelial cell subcellular compartments. Since redox-sensitive processes may be involved in signaling disassembly of higher-order structures of P-gp, we feel that manipulating redox signaling, via specific protein targeting at the BBB, may protect disulfide bond integrity of P-gp reservoirs and control trafficking to the membrane surface, providing improved CNS drug delivery. The advantage of therapeutic drug "relocalization" of a protein is that the physiological impact can be modified, temporarily or long term, despite pathology-induced changes in gene transcription. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional hoarseness in children: short-term play therapy with family dynamic counseling as therapy of choice.

    PubMed

    Kollbrunner, Jürg; Seifert, Eberhard

    2013-09-01

    Children with nonorganic voice disorders (NVDs) are treated mainly using direct voice therapy techniques such as the accent method or glottal attack changes and indirect methods such as vocal hygiene and voice education. However, both approaches tackle only the symptoms and not etiological factors in the family dynamics and therefore often enjoy little success. The aim of the "Bernese Brief Dynamic Intervention" (BBDI) for children with NVD was to extend the effectiveness of pediatric voice therapies with a psychosomatic concept combining short-term play therapy with the child and family dynamic counseling of the parents. This study compares the therapeutic changes in three groups where different procedures were used, before intervention and 1 year afterward: counseling of parents (one to two consultations; n = 24), Brief Dynamic Intervention on the lines of the BBDI (three to five play therapy sessions with the child plus two to four sessions with the parents; n = 20), and traditional voice therapy (n = 22). A Voice Questionnaire for Parents developed by us with 59 questions to be answered on a four-point Likert scale was used to measure the change. According to the parents' assessment, a significant improvement in voice quality was achieved in all three methods. Counseling of parents (A) appears to have led parents to give their child more latitude, for example, they stopped nagging the child or demanding that he/she should behave strictly by the rules. After BBDI (B), the mothers were more responsive to their children's wishes and the children were more relaxed and their speech became livelier. At home, they called out to them less often at a distance, which probably improved parent-child dialog. Traditional voice therapy (C) seems to have had a positive effect on the children's social competence. BBDI seems to have the deepest, widest, and therefore probably the most enduring therapeutic effect on children with NVD. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation

  4. The Role of Neurogenic Inflammation in Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Development of Cerebral Oedema Following Acute Central Nervous System (CNS) Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sorby-Adams, Annabel J.; Marcoionni, Amanda M.; Dempsey, Eden R.; Woenig, Joshua A.; Turner, Renée J.

    2017-01-01

    Acute central nervous system (CNS) injury, encompassing traumatic brain injury (TBI) and stroke, accounts for a significant burden of morbidity and mortality worldwide, largely attributable to the development of cerebral oedema and elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). Despite this, clinical treatments are limited and new therapies are urgently required to improve patient outcomes and survival. Originally characterised in peripheral tissues, such as the skin and lungs as a neurally-elicited inflammatory process that contributes to increased microvascular permeability and tissue swelling, neurogenic inflammation has now been described in acute injury to the brain where it may play a key role in the secondary injury cascades that evolve following both TBI and stroke. In particular, release of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) appear to be critically involved. In particular, increased SP expression is observed in perivascular tissue following acute CNS injury, with the magnitude of SP release being related to both the frequency and degree of the insult. SP release is associated with profound blood-brain barrier disruption and the subsequent development of vasogenic oedema, as well as neuronal injury and poor functional outcomes. Inhibition of SP through use of a neurokinin 1 (NK1) antagonist is highly beneficial following both TBI and ischaemic stroke in pre-clinical models. The role of CGRP is more unclear, especially with respect to TBI, with both elevations and reductions in CGRP levels reported following trauma. However, a beneficial role has been delineated in stroke, given its potent vasodilatory effects. Thus, modulating neuropeptides represents a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of cerebral oedema following acute CNS injury. PMID:28817088

  5. Nicotinic ACh Receptors as Therapeutic Targets in CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dineley, Kelly T.; Pandya, Anshul A.; Yakel, Jerrel L.

    2015-01-01

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) can regulate neuronal excitability by acting on the cys-loop cation-conducting ligand-gated nicotinic ACh receptor channels (nAChRs). These receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system, being expressed on neurons and non-neuronal cells, where they participate in a variety of physiological responses such as anxiety, the central processing of pain, food intake, nicotine seeking behavior, and cognitive functions. In the mammalian brain, nine different subunits have been found thus far, which assemble into pentameric complexes with much subunit diversity; however the α7 and α4β2 subtypes predominate in the CNS. Neuronal nAChR dysfunction is involved in the pathophysiology of many neurological disorders. Here we will briefly discuss the functional makeup and expression of the nAChRs in the mammalian brain, and their role as targets in neurodegenerative diseases (in particular Alzheimer’s disease), neurodevelopmental disorders (in particular autism and schizophrenia), and neuropathic pain. PMID:25639674

  6. Role-Playing and Problem-Based Learning: The Use of Cross-Functional Student Teams in Business Application Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Jacqueline C.; Spangler, William; Williams, Valerie; Kollar, Robert

    2017-01-01

    To create a learning experience which replicates the process by which consultants, systems developers and business end users collaborate to design and implement a business application, a cross-functional student team project was developed and is described. The overall learning experience was distinguished by specific components and characteristics…

  7. Thymidine kinases share a conserved function for nucleotide salvage and play an essential role in Arabidopsis thaliana growth and development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Dong-Lei; Li, Qun; He, Zuhua

    2015-12-01

    Thymidine kinases (TKs) are important components in the nucleotide salvage pathway. However, knowledge about plant TKs is quite limited. In this study, the molecular function of TKs in Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated. Two TKs were identified and named AtTK1 and AtTK2. Expression of both genes was ubiquitous, but AtTK1 was strongly expressed in high-proliferation tissues. AtTK1 was localized to the cytosol, whereas AtTK2 was localized to the mitochondria. Mutant analysis indicated that the two genes function coordinately to sustain normal plant development. Enzymatic assays showed that the two TK proteins shared similar catalytic specificity for pyrimidine nucleosides. They were able to complement an Escherichia coli strain lacking TK activity. 5'-Fluorodeoxyuridine (FdU) resistance and 5-ethynyl 2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation assays confirmed their activity in vivo. Furthermore, the tk mutant phenotype could be alleviated by nucleotide feeding, establishing that the biosynthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides was disrupted by the TK deficiency. Finally, both human and rice (Oryza sativa) TKs were able to rescue the tk mutants, demonstrating the functional conservation of TKs across organisms. Taken together, our findings clarify the specialized function of two TKs in A. thaliana and establish that the salvage pathway mediated by the kinases is essential for plant growth and development. © 2015 Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology, SIBS, CAS New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Effect of Play-based Therapy on Meta-cognitive and Behavioral Aspects of Executive Function: A Randomized, Controlled, Clinical Trial on the Students With Learning Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Karamali Esmaili, Samaneh; Shafaroodi, Narges; Hassani Mehraban, Afsoon; Parand, Akram; Zarei, Masoume; Akbari-Zardkhaneh, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Although the effect of educational methods on executive function (EF) is well known, training this function by a playful method is debatable. The current study aimed at investigating if a play-based intervention is effective on metacognitive and behavioral skills of EF in students with specific learning disabilities. In the current randomized, clinical trial, 49 subjects within the age range of 7 to 11 years with specific learning disabilities were randomly assigned into the intervention (25 subjects; mean age 8.5±1.33 years) and control (24 subjects; mean age 8.7±1.03 years) groups. Subjects in the intervention group received EF group training based on playing activities; subjects in the control group received no intervention. The behavior rating inventory of executive function (BRIEF) was administered to evaluate the behavioral and cognitive aspects of EF. The duration of the intervention was 6 hours per week for 9 weeks. Multivariate analysis of covariance was used to compare mean changes (before and after) in the BRIEF scores between the groups. The assumptions of multivariate analysis of covariance were examined. After controlling pre-test conditions, the intervention and control groups scored significantly differently on both the metacognition (P=0.002; effect size=0.20) and behavior regulation indices (P=0.01; effect size=0.12) of BRIEF. Play-based therapy is effective on the metacognitive and behavioral aspects of EF in students with specific learning disabilities. Professionals can use play-based therapy rather than educational approaches in clinical practice to enhance EF skills.

  9. Neurocognitive Status in Long-Term Survivors of Childhood CNS Malignancies: A Report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Ellenberg, Leah; Liu, Qi; Gioia, Gerard; Yasui, Yutaka; Packer, Roger J.; Mertens, Ann; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Stovall, Marilyn; Kadan-Lottick, Nina; Armstrong, Gregory; Robison, Leslie L.; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2009-01-01

    Background Among survivors of childhood cancer, those with Central Nervous System (CNS) malignancies have been found to be at greatest risk for neuropsychological dysfunction in the first few years following diagnosis and treatment. This study follows survivors to adulthood to assess the long term impact of childhood CNS malignancy and its treatment on neurocognitive functioning. Participants & Methods As part of the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS), 802 survivors of childhood CNS malignancy, 5937 survivors of non-CNS malignancy and 382 siblings without cancer completed a 25 item Neurocognitive Questionnaire (CCSS-NCQ) at least 16 years post cancer diagnosis assessing task efficiency, emotional regulation, organizational skills and memory. Neurocognitive functioning in survivors of CNS malignancy was compared to that of non-CNS malignancy survivors and a sibling cohort. Within the group of CNS malignancy survivors, multiple linear regression was used to assess the contribution of demographic, illness and treatment variables to reported neurocognitive functioning and the relationship of reported neurocognitive functioning to educational, employment and income status. Results Survivors of CNS malignancy reported significantly greater neurocognitive impairment on all factors assessed by the CCSS-NCQ than non-CNS cancer survivors or siblings (p<.01), with mean T scores of CNS malignancy survivors substantially more impaired that those of the sibling cohort (p<.001), with a large effect size for Task Efficiency (1.16) and a medium effect size for Memory (.68). Within the CNS malignancy group, medical complications, including hearing deficits, paralysis and cerebrovascular incidents resulted in a greater likelihood of reported deficits on all of the CCSS-NCQ factors, with generally small effect sizes (.22-.50). Total brain irradiation predicted greater impairment on Task Efficiency and Memory (Effect sizes: .65 and .63, respectively), as did partial brain

  10. Effects of short-term active video game play on community adults: under International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health consideration.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wei-Che; Hsieh, Ru-Lan

    2013-06-01

    The effects of active video game play on healthy individuals remain uncertain. A person's functional health status constitutes a dynamic interaction between components identified in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of active video game play on community adults using the ICF. Sixty community adults with an average age of 59.3 years and without physical disabilities were recruited. Over 2 weeks, each adult participated in six sessions of active video game play lasting 20 minutes each. Participants were assessed before and after the intervention. Variables were collected using sources related to the ICF components, including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, Biodex Stability System, chair- rising time, Frenchay Activity Index, Rivermead Mobility Index, Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire, Work Ability Index, and World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief Version. Compared to baseline data, significantly reduced risk of a fall measured by Biodex Stability System and improvements in disability scores measured by the Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire were noted. There was no significant change in the other variables measured. Short-term, active video game play reduces fall risks and ameliorates disabilities in community adults.

  11. Air pollution: mechanisms of neuroinflammation and CNS disease.

    PubMed

    Block, Michelle L; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian

    2009-09-01

    Air pollution has been implicated as a chronic source of neuroinflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that produce neuropathology and central nervous system (CNS) disease. Stroke incidence and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease pathology are linked to air pollution. Recent reports reveal that air pollution components reach the brain; systemic effects that impact lung and cardiovascular disease also impinge upon CNS health. While mechanisms driving air pollution-induced CNS pathology are poorly understood, new evidence suggests that microglial activation and changes in the blood-brain barrier are key components. Here we summarize recent findings detailing the mechanisms through which air pollution reaches the brain and activates the resident innate immune response to become a chronic source of pro-inflammatory factors and ROS, culminating in CNS disease.

  12. To what extent do joint attention, imitation, and object play behaviors in infancy predict later communication and intellectual functioning in ASD?

    PubMed

    Poon, Kenneth K; Watson, Linda R; Baranek, Grace T; Poe, Michele D

    2012-06-01

    The extent to which early social communication behaviors predict later communication and intellectual outcomes was investigated via retrospective video analysis. Joint attention, imitation, and complex object play behaviors were coded from edited home videos featuring scenes of 29 children with ASD at 9-12 and/or 15-18 months. A quantitative interval recording of behavior and a qualitative rating of the developmental level were applied. Social communication behaviors increased between 9-12 and 15-18 months. Their mean level during infancy, but not the rate of change, predicted both Vineland Communication scores and intellectual functioning at 3-7 years. The two methods of measurement yielded similar results. Thus, early social communicative behaviors may play pivotal roles in the development of subsequent communication and intellectual functioning.

  13. Incidence of CNS Oxygen Toxicity with Mild Hyperoxia: A Literature and Data Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    multi-depth profiles.16,17 One diver reported numbness, tingling, poor concentration and dizziness after only 5 minutes. One diver reported tinnitus ...function dives,22, 24, 26, 28 the symptoms considered to be CNS oxygen toxicity during the training dives--nausea, dizziness, tinnitus ...models accumulate risk from prior exposure but do not (and cannot) consider other possible changes caused by immediate history , e.g., sensitization or

  14. mTOR plays critical roles in pancreatic cancer stem cells through specific and stemness-related functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Shyuichiro; Ding, Qiang; Miyazaki, Yumi; Kuwahata, Taisaku; Tsukasa, Koichiro; Takao, Sonshin

    2013-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by near-universal mutations in KRAS. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which functions downstream of RAS, has divergent effects on stem cells. In the present study, we investigated the significance of the mTOR pathway in maintaining the properties of pancreatic cancer stem cells. The mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, reduced the viability of CD133+ pancreatic cancer cells and sphere formation which is an index of self-renewal of stem-like cells, indicating that the mTOR pathway functions to maintain cancer stem-like cells. Further, rapamycin had different effects on CD133+ cells compared to cyclopamine which is an inhibitor of the Hedgehog pathway. Thus, the mTOR pathway has a distinct role although both pathways maintain pancreatic cancer stem cells. Therefore, mTOR might be a promising target to eliminate pancreatic cancer stem cells.

  15. Mammalian Exo1 encodes both structural and catalytic functions that play distinct roles in essential biological processes

    PubMed Central

    Schaetzlein, Sonja; Chahwan, Richard; Avdievich, Elena; Roa, Sergio; Wei, Kaichun; Eoff, Robert L.; Sellers, Rani S.; Clark, Alan B.; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Scharff, Matthew D.; Edelmann, Winfried

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian Exonuclease 1 (EXO1) is an evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional exonuclease involved in DNA damage repair, replication, immunoglobulin diversity, meiosis, and telomere maintenance. It has been assumed that EXO1 participates in these processes primarily through its exonuclease activity, but recent studies also suggest that EXO1 has a structural function in the assembly of higher-order protein complexes. To dissect the enzymatic and nonenzymatic roles of EXO1 in the different biological processes in vivo, we generated an EXO1-E109K knockin (Exo1EK) mouse expressing a stable exonuclease-deficient protein and, for comparison, a fully EXO1-deficient (Exo1null) mouse. In contrast to Exo1null/null mice, Exo1EK/EK mice retained mismatch repair activity and displayed normal class switch recombination and meiosis. However, both Exo1-mutant lines showed defects in DNA damage response including DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) through DNA end resection, chromosomal stability, and tumor suppression, indicating that the enzymatic function is required for those processes. On a transformation-related protein 53 (Trp53)-null background, the DSBR defect caused by the E109K mutation altered the tumor spectrum but did not affect the overall survival as compared with p53-Exo1null mice, whose defects in both DSBR and mismatch repair also compromised survival. The separation of these functions demonstrates the differential requirement for the structural function and nuclease activity of mammalian EXO1 in distinct DNA repair processes and tumorigenesis in vivo. PMID:23754438

  16. Kub5-Hera, the human Rtt103 homolog, plays dual functional roles in transcription termination and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Julio C.; Richard, Patricia; Rommel, Amy; Fattah, Farjana J.; Motea, Edward A.; Patidar, Praveen L.; Xiao, Ling; Leskov, Konstantin; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Hittelman, Walter N.; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Manley, James L.; Boothman, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Functions of Kub5-Hera (In Greek Mythology Hera controlled Artemis) (K-H), the human homolog of the yeast transcription termination factor Rtt103, remain undefined. Here, we show that K-H has functions in both transcription termination and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. K-H forms distinct protein complexes with factors that repair DSBs (e.g. Ku70, Ku86, Artemis) and terminate transcription (e.g. RNA polymerase II). K-H loss resulted in increased basal R-loop levels, DSBs, activated DNA-damage responses and enhanced genomic instability. Significantly lowered Artemis protein levels were detected in K-H knockdown cells, which were restored with specific K-H cDNA re-expression. K-H deficient cells were hypersensitive to cytotoxic agents that induce DSBs, unable to reseal complex DSB ends, and showed significantly delayed γ-H2AX and 53BP1 repair-related foci regression. Artemis re-expression in K-H-deficient cells restored DNA-repair function and resistance to DSB-inducing agents. However, R loops persisted consistent with dual roles of K-H in transcription termination and DSB repair. PMID:24589584

  17. Kub5-Hera, the human Rtt103 homolog, plays dual functional roles in transcription termination and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Morales, Julio C; Richard, Patricia; Rommel, Amy; Fattah, Farjana J; Motea, Edward A; Patidar, Praveen L; Xiao, Ling; Leskov, Konstantin; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Hittelman, Walter N; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Manley, James L; Boothman, David A

    2014-04-01

    Functions of Kub5-Hera (In Greek Mythology Hera controlled Artemis) (K-H), the human homolog of the yeast transcription termination factor Rtt103, remain undefined. Here, we show that K-H has functions in both transcription termination and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. K-H forms distinct protein complexes with factors that repair DSBs (e.g. Ku70, Ku86, Artemis) and terminate transcription (e.g. RNA polymerase II). K-H loss resulted in increased basal R-loop levels, DSBs, activated DNA-damage responses and enhanced genomic instability. Significantly lowered Artemis protein levels were detected in K-H knockdown cells, which were restored with specific K-H cDNA re-expression. K-H deficient cells were hypersensitive to cytotoxic agents that induce DSBs, unable to reseal complex DSB ends, and showed significantly delayed γ-H2AX and 53BP1 repair-related foci regression. Artemis re-expression in K-H-deficient cells restored DNA-repair function and resistance to DSB-inducing agents. However, R loops persisted consistent with dual roles of K-H in transcription termination and DSB repair.

  18. The Effectiveness of Singing or Playing a Wind Instrument in Improving Respiratory Function in Patients with Long-Term Neurological Conditions: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ang, Kexin; Maddocks, Matthew; Xu, Huiying; Higginson, Irene J

    2017-03-01

    Many long-term neurological conditions adversely affect respiratory function. Singing and playing wind instruments are relatively inexpensive interventions with potential for improving respiratory function; however, synthesis of current evidence is needed to inform research and clinical use of music in respiratory care. To critically appraise, analyze, and synthesize published evidence on the effectiveness of singing or playing a wind instrument to improve respiratory function in people with long-term neurological conditions. Systematic review of published randomized controlled trials and observational studies examining singing or playing wind instruments to improve respiratory function in individuals with long-term neurological conditions. Articles meeting specified inclusion criteria were identified through a search of the Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Science, CAIRSS for Music, WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal, and AMED databases as early as 1806 through March 2015. Information on study design, clinical populations, interventions, and outcome measures was extracted and summarized using an electronic standardized coding form. Methodological quality was assessed and summarized across studies descriptively. From screening 584 references, 68 full texts were reviewed and five studies included. These concerned 109 participants. The studies were deemed of low quality, due to evidence of bias, in part due to intervention complexity. No adverse effects were reported. Overall, there was a trend toward improved respiratory function, but only one study on Parkinson's disease had significant between-group differences. The positive trend in respiratory function in people with long-term neurological conditions following singing or wind instrument therapy is of interest, and warrants further investigation. © the American Music Therapy Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  19. Mesophyll conductance plays a central role in leaf functioning of Oleaceae species exposed to contrasting sunlight irradiance.

    PubMed

    Fini, Alessio; Loreto, Francesco; Tattini, Massimiliano; Giordano, Cristiana; Ferrini, Francesco; Brunetti, Cecilia; Centritto, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    The ability to modify mesophyll conductance (gm ) in response to changes in irradiance may be a component of the acclimation of plants to shade-sun transitions, thus influencing species-specific distributions along light-gradients, and the ecological niches for the different species. To test this hypothesis we grew three woody species of the Oleaceae family, the evergreen Phillyrea latifolia (sun-requiring), the deciduous Fraxinus ornus (facultative sun-requiring) and the hemi-deciduous Ligustrum vulgare (shade tolerant) at 30 or 100% sunlight irradiance. We show that neither mesophyll conductance calculated with combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence techniques (gm) nor CO2 assimilation significantly varied in F. ornus because of sunlight irradiance. This corroborates previous suggestions that species with high plasticity for light requirements, do not need to undertake extensive reorganization of leaf conductances to CO2 diffusion to adapt to different light environments. On the other hand, gm steeply declined in L. vulgare and increased in P. latifolia exposed to full-sun conditions. In these two species, leaf anatomical traits are in part responsible for light-driven changes in gm , as revealed by the correlation between gm and mesophyll conductance estimated by anatomical parameters (gmA). Nonetheless, gm was greatly overestimated by gmA when leaf metabolism was impaired because of severe light stress. We show that gm is maximum at the light intensity at which plant species have evolved and we conclude that gm actually plays a key role in the sun and shade adaptation of Mediterranean species. The limits of gmA in predicting mesophyll conductance are also highlighted. © 2015 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  20. Kid's Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, Susan L.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the use of fabric mesh knitting as canopies for children's playgrounds. Its benefits and drawbacks are addressed as are how innovative design and choice of materials can help eliminate function difficulties. (GR)

  1. Nanomedicine in Central Nervous System (CNS) Disorders: A Present and Future Prospective

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Shringika; Ruhela, Rakesh Kumar; Medhi, Bikash

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: For the past few decades central nervous system disorders were considered as a major strike on human health and social system of developing countries. The natural therapeutic methods for CNS disorders limited for many patients. Moreover, nanotechnology-based drug delivery to the brain may an exciting and promising platform to overcome the problem of BBB crossing. In this review, first we focused on the role of the blood-brain barrier in drug delivery; and second, we summarized synthesis methods of nanomedicine and their role in different CNS disorder. Method: We reviewed the PubMed databases and extracted several kinds of literature on neuro nanomedicines using keywords, CNS disorders, nanomedicine, and nanotechnology. The inclusion criteria included chemical and green synthesis methods for synthesis of nanoparticles encapsulated drugs and, their in-vivo and in-vitro studies. We excluded nanomedicine gene therapy and nanomaterial in brain imaging. Results: In this review, we tried to identify a highly efficient method for nanomedicine synthesis and their efficacy in neuronal disorders. SLN and PNP encapsulated drugs reported highly efficient by easily crossing BBB. Although, these neuro-nanomedicine play significant role in therapeutics but some metallic nanoparticles reported the adverse effect on developing the brain. Conclusion: Although impressive advancement has made via innovative potential drug development, but their efficacy is still moderate due to limited brain permeability. To overcome this constraint,powerful tool in CNS therapeutic intervention provided by nanotechnology-based drug delivery methods. Due to its small and biofunctionalization characteristics, nanomedicine can easily penetrate and facilitate the drug through the barrier. But still, understanding of their toxicity level, optimization and standardization are a long way to go. PMID:27766216

  2. Microglial aging in the healthy CNS: phenotypes, drivers, and rejuvenation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wai T.

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), share two characteristics in common: (1) a disease prevalence that increases markedly with advancing age, and (2) neuroinflammatory changes in which microglia, the primary resident immune cell of the CNS, feature prominently. These characteristics have led to the hypothesis that pathogenic mechanisms underlying age-related neurodegenerative disease involve aging changes in microglia. If correct, targeting features of microglial senescence may constitute a feasible therapeutic strategy. This review explores this hypothesis and its implications by considering the current knowledge on how microglia undergo change during aging and how the emergence of these aging phenotypes relate to significant alterations in microglial function. Evidence and theories on cellular mechanisms implicated in driving senescence in microglia are reviewed, as are “rejuvenative” measures and strategies that aim to reverse or ameliorate the aging microglial phenotype. Understanding and controlling microglial aging may represent an opportunity for elucidating disease mechanisms and for formulating novel therapies. PMID:23493481

  3. Autoinducer-2 Plays a Crucial Role in Gut Colonization and Probiotic Functionality of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003

    PubMed Central

    Bottacini, Francesca; Lanigan, Noreen; Casey, Pat G.; Huys, Geert; Nelis, Hans J.; van Sinderen, Douwe; Coenye, Tom

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we show that luxS of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 is involved in the production of the interspecies signaling molecule autoinducer-2 (AI-2), and that this gene is essential for gastrointestinal colonization of a murine host, while it is also involved in providing protection against Salmonella infection in Caenorhabditis elegans. We demonstrate that a B. breve luxS-insertion mutant is significantly more susceptible to iron chelators than the WT strain and that this sensitivity can be partially reverted in the presence of the AI-2 precursor DPD. Furthermore, we show that several genes of an iron starvation-induced gene cluster, which are downregulated in the luxS-insertion mutant and which encodes a presumed iron-uptake system, are transcriptionally upregulated under in vivo conditions. Mutation of two genes of this cluster in B. breve UCC2003 renders the derived mutant strains sensitive to iron chelators while deficient in their ability to confer gut pathogen protection to Salmonella-infected nematodes. Since a functional luxS gene is present in all tested members of the genus Bifidobacterium, we conclude that bifidobacteria operate a LuxS-mediated system for gut colonization and pathogen protection that is correlated with iron acquisition. PMID:24871429

  4. Autoinducer-2 plays a crucial role in gut colonization and probiotic functionality of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003.

    PubMed

    Christiaen, Steven E A; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; Bottacini, Francesca; Lanigan, Noreen; Casey, Pat G; Huys, Geert; Nelis, Hans J; van Sinderen, Douwe; Coenye, Tom

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we show that luxS of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 is involved in the production of the interspecies signaling molecule autoinducer-2 (AI-2), and that this gene is essential for gastrointestinal colonization of a murine host, while it is also involved in providing protection against Salmonella infection in Caenorhabditis elegans. We demonstrate that a B. breve luxS-insertion mutant is significantly more susceptible to iron chelators than the WT strain and that this sensitivity can be partially reverted in the presence of the AI-2 precursor DPD. Furthermore, we show that several genes of an iron starvation-induced gene cluster, which are downregulated in the luxS-insertion mutant and which encodes a presumed iron-uptake system, are transcriptionally upregulated under in vivo conditions. Mutation of two genes of this cluster in B. breve UCC2003 renders the derived mutant strains sensitive to iron chelators while deficient in their ability to confer gut pathogen protection to Salmonella-infected nematodes. Since a functional luxS gene is present in all tested members of the genus Bifidobacterium, we conclude that bifidobacteria operate a LuxS-mediated system for gut colonization and pathogen protection that is correlated with iron acquisition.

  5. Carbon monoxide inhalation increases microparticles causing vascular and CNS dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jiajun; Yang, Ming; Kosterin, Paul

    We hypothesized that circulating microparticles (MPs) play a role in pro-inflammatory effects associated with carbon monoxide (CO) inhalation. Mice exposed for 1 h to 100 ppm CO or more exhibit increases in circulating MPs derived from a variety of vascular cells as well as neutrophil activation. Tissue injury was quantified as 2000 kDa dextran leakage from vessels and as neutrophil sequestration in the brain and skeletal muscle; and central nervous system nerve dysfunction was documented as broadening of the neurohypophysial action potential (AP). Indices of injury occurred following exposures to 1000 ppm for 1 h or to 1000 ppm formore » 40 min followed by 3000 ppm for 20 min. MPs were implicated in causing injuries because infusing the surfactant MP lytic agent, polyethylene glycol telomere B (PEGtB) abrogated elevations in MPs, vascular leak, neutrophil sequestration and AP prolongation. These manifestations of tissue injury also did not occur in mice lacking myeloperoxidase. Vascular leakage and AP prolongation were produced in naïve mice infused with MPs that had been obtained from CO poisoned mice, but this did not occur with MPs obtained from control mice. We conclude that CO poisoning triggers elevations of MPs that activate neutrophils which subsequently cause tissue injuries. - Highlights: • Circulating microparticles (MPs) increase in mice exposed to 100 ppm CO or more. • MPs are lysed by infusing the surfactant polyethylene glycol telomere B. • CO-induced MPs cause neutrophil activation, vascular leak and CNS dysfunction. • Similar tissue injuries do not arise with MPs obtained from air-exposed, control mice.« less

  6. The Effectiveness of Incorporating a Play-based Intervention to Improve Functional Mobility for a Child with Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Vercher, Paula; Hung, You-Jou; Ko, Mansoo

    2016-12-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is one of the most common forms of cancer seen in children, accounting for one-fourth of all childhood cancers. These children typically present with decreased functional mobility, weakened lower extremity muscle strength and reduced exercise endurance and interests because of disease progressions and chemotherapy treatments. The purpose of this case report was to examine the effectiveness of incorporating a play-based physical therapy (PT) intervention programme to improve functional mobility for an inpatient with relapsed ALL undergoing chemotherapy. The patient was a 3-year-old male admitted to the hospital for relapsed ALL. He was diagnosed approximately 1 year earlier for which he had undergone chemotherapy and was later considered in remission at that time. When the patient relapsed, he underwent another round of chemotherapy and was waiting for a bone marrow transplant during his treatment during the course of this case report. For PT intervention, therapeutic exercises were incorporated into play to strengthen his lower extremity strength and muscle endurance. Functional activities were also incorporated into play to improve his aerobic capacity and overall quality of life. Multi-attribute health status classification system (HUI3) utility scores, 6-minute walk test distance (6MWT), lower extremity (LE) strength, transfer and tolerated treatment time were assessed to identify the effect of a PT intervention. Despite experiencing fatigue, the patient completed most of the treatments incorporated into play. After 5 weeks of PT intervention, the participant improved on HUI3 (pre: 0.72 and post: 0.92), 6MWT (pre: 156 ft and post: 489 ft), LE strength (squat), transfer (sit to stand) and tolerated treatment time (pre: 16 minutes and post: 44 minutes). This case report suggests that incorporating a play-based PT intervention programme could be physically tolerable and functionally beneficial for a young child with

  7. The glymphatic system in CNS health and disease: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Plog, Benjamin A.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2018-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is unique in being the only organ system lacking lymphatic vessels to assist in the removal of interstitial metabolic waste products. Recent work has led to the discovery of the glymphatic system, a glial-dependent perivascular network that subserves a pseudo-lymphatic function in the brain. Within the glymphatic pathway, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) enters brain via periarterial spaces, passes into the interstitium via perivascular astrocytic aquaporin-4, and then drives the perivenous drainage of interstitial fluid (ISF) and its solute. Here we review the role of the glymphatic pathway in CNS physiology, factors known to regulate glymphatic flow, and pathologic processes where a breakdown of glymphatic CSF-ISF exchange has been implicated in disease initiation and progression. Important areas of future research, including manipulation of glymphatic activity aiming to improve waste clearance and therapeutic agent delivery, will also be discussed. PMID:29195051

  8. Intracerebral dendritic cells critically modulate encephalitogenic versus regulatory immune responses in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Zozulya, Alla L.; Ortler, Sonja; Lee, JangEun; Weidenfeller, Christian; Sandor, Matyas; Wiendl, Heinz; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) appear in higher numbers within the CNS as a consequence of inflammation associated with autoimmune disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), but the contribution of these cells to the outcome of disease is not yet clear. Here we show that stimulatory or tolerogenic functional states of intracerebral DCs regulate the systemic activation of neuroantigen-specific T cells, the recruitment of these cells into the CNS and the onset and progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Intracerebral microinjection of stimulatory DCs exacerbated the onset and clinical course of EAE, accompanied with an early T-cell infiltration and a decreased proportion of regulatory FoxP3-expressing cells in the brain. In contrast, the intracerebral microinjection of DCs modified by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) induced their tolerogenic functional state and delayed or prevented EAE onset. This triggered the generation of interleukin 10 (IL-10)-producing neuroantigen-specific lymphocytes in the periphery and restricted IL-17 production in the CNS. Our findings suggest that DCs are a rate-limiting factor for neuroinflammation. PMID:19129392

  9. Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES), Concept Simulations using Communication, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS) System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubat, Greg; Vandrei, Don

    2006-01-01

    Project Objectives include: a) CNS Model Development; b Design/Integration of baseline set of CNS Models into ACES; c) Implement Enhanced Simulation Capabilities in ACES; d) Design and Integration of Enhanced (2nd set) CNS Models; and e) Continue with CNS Model Integration/Concept evaluations.

  10. Development of the Contextual Assessment of Social Skills (CASS): a role play measure of social skill for individuals with high-functioning autism.

    PubMed

    Ratto, Allison B; Turner-Brown, Lauren; Rupp, Betty M; Mesibov, Gary B; Penn, David L

    2011-09-01

    This study piloted a role play assessment of conversational skills for adolescents and young adults with high-functioning autism/Asperger syndrome (HFA/AS). Participants completed two semi-structured role plays, in which social context was manipulated by changing the confederate's level of interest in the conversation. Participants' social behavior was rated via a behavioral coding system, and performance was compared across contexts and groups. An interaction effect was found for several items, whereby control participants showed significant change across context, while participants with HFA/AS showed little or no change. Total change across contexts was significantly correlated with related social constructs and significantly predicted ASD. The findings are discussed in terms of the potential utility of the CASS in the evaluation of social skill.

  11. Comparison of gait after Syme and transtibial amputation in children: factors that may play a role in function.

    PubMed

    Jeans, Kelly A; Karol, Lori A; Cummings, Donald; Singhal, Kunal

    2014-10-01

    Preservation of maximal limb length during amputation is often recommended to maximize the efficiency and symmetry of gait. The goals of this study were to determine (1) whether there are gait differences between children with a Syme (or Boyd) amputation and those with a transtibial-level amputation, and (2) whether the type of prosthetic foot affects gait and PODCI (Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument) outcomes. Sixty-four patients (age range, 4.7 to 19.2 years) with unilateral below-the-knee prosthesis use (forty-one in the Syme group and twenty-three in the transtibial group) underwent gait analysis and review of data for the involved limb. The twelve prosthetic foot types were categorized as designed for a high, medium, or low activity level (e.g., Flex foot, dynamic response foot, or SACH). Statistical analyses were conducted. Kinematic differences of <4° in total prosthetic ankle motion and 8° in external hip rotation were seen between the Syme and transtibial groups. Ankle power was greater in the transtibial group, whereas the Syme group had greater coronal-plane hip power (p < 0.05). Prosthetic ankle motion was significantly greater in the high compared with the medium and low-performance feet. However, the PODCI happiness score was higher in patients with low compared with medium-performance feet (p < 0.05). Small differences in prosthetic ankle motion and power were found between children with Syme and transtibial amputations. Ankle motion was greater in patients using high-performance feet (9% of the total cohort) compared with medium-performance (59%) and low-performance (31%) feet. Despite the increased ankle motion achieved with high-performance dynamic feet, this advantage was not reflected in peak power of the prosthetic ankle or the PODCI sports/physical functioning subscale. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery

  12. Behavioral and Genetic Evidence for GIRK Channels in the CNS: Role in Physiology, Pathophysiology, and Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Mayfield, Jody; Blednov, Yuri A; Harris, R Adron

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels are widely expressed throughout the brain and mediate the inhibitory effects of many neurotransmitters. As a result, these channels are important for normal CNS function and have also been implicated in Down syndrome, Parkinson's disease, psychiatric disorders, epilepsy, and drug addiction. Knockout mouse models have provided extensive insight into the significance of GIRK channels under these conditions. This review examines the behavioral and genetic evidence from animal models and genetic association studies in humans linking GIRK channels with CNS disorders. We further explore the possibility that subunit-selective modulators and other advanced research tools will be instrumental in establishing the role of individual GIRK subunits in drug addiction and other relevant CNS diseases and in potentially advancing treatment options for these disorders. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mutations in RNA Polymerase III genes and defective DNA sensing in adults with varicella-zoster virus CNS infection.

    PubMed

    Carter-Timofte, Madalina E; Hansen, Anders F; Christiansen, Mette; Paludan, Søren R; Mogensen, Trine H

    2018-05-01

    Recently, deficiency in the cytosolic DNA sensor RNA Polymerase III was described in children with severe primary varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection in the CNS and lungs. In the present study we examined adult patients with VZV CNS infection caused by viral reactivation. By whole exome sequencing we identified mutations in POL III genes in two of eight patients. These mutations were located in the coding regions of the subunits POLR3A and POLR3E. In functional assays, we found impaired expression of antiviral and inflammatory cytokines in response to the POL III agonist Poly(dA:dT) as well as increased viral replication in patient cells compared to controls. Altogether, this study provides significant extension on the current knowledge on susceptibility to VZV infection by demonstrating mutations in POL III genes associated with impaired immunological sensing of AT-rich DNA in adult patients with VZV CNS infection.

  14. Impulsive Internet Game Play Is Associated With Increased Functional Connectivity Between the Default Mode and Salience Networks in Depressed Patients With Short Allele of Serotonin Transporter Gene.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji Sun; Kim, Sun Mi; Bae, Sujin; Han, Doug Hyun

    2018-01-01

    Problematic Internet game play is often accompanied by major depressive disorder (MDD). Depression seems to be closely related to altered functional connectivity (FC) within (and between) the default mode network (DMN) and salience network. In addition, serotonergic neurotransmission may regulate the symptoms of depression, including impulsivity, potentially by modulating the DMN. We hypothesized that altered connectivity between the DMN and salience network could mediate an association between the 5HTTLPR genotype and impulsivity in patients with depression. A total of 54 participants with problematic Internet game play and MDD completed the research protocol. We genotyped for 5HTTLPR and assessed the DMN FC using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. The severity of Internet game play, depressive symptoms, anxiety, attention and impulsivity, and behavioral inhibition and activation were assessed using the Young Internet Addiction Scale (YIAS), Beck Depressive Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Korean Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder scale, and the Behavioral Inhibition and Activation Scales (BIS-BAS), respectively. The SS allele was associated with increased FC within the DMN, including the middle prefrontal cortex (MPFC) to the posterior cingulate cortex, and within the salience network, including the right supramarginal gyrus (SMG) to the right rostral prefrontal cortex (RPFC), right anterior insular (AInsular) to right SMG, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to left RPFC, and left AInsular to right RPFC, and between the DMN and salience network, including the MPFC to the ACC. In addition, the FC from the MPFC to ACC positively correlated with the BIS and YIAS scores in the SS allele group. The SS allele of 5HTTLPR might modulate the FC within and between the DMN and salience network, which may ultimately be a risk factor for impulsive Internet game play in patients with MDD.

  15. Amyloid-β efflux from the CNS into the plasma

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kaleigh Filisa; Elbert, Donald L.; Kasten, Tom P.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Sigurdson, Wendy C.; Connors, Rose E.; Ovod, Vitaliy; Munsell, Ling Y.; Mawuenyega, Kwasi G.; Miller-Thomas, Michelle M.; Moran, Christopher J.; Cross, Dewitte T.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Bateman, Randall J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to measure the flux of amyloid-β (Aβ) across the human cerebral capillary bed in order to determine if transport into the blood is a significant mechanism of clearance for Aβ produced in the central nervous system (CNS). Methods Time-matched blood samples were simultaneously collected from a cerebral vein (including the sigmoid sinus, inferior petrosal sinus, and the internal jugular vein), femoral vein, and radial artery of patients undergoing Inferior Petrosal Sinus Sampling (IPSS). For each plasma sample, Aβ concentration was assessed by three assays and the venous to arterial Aβ concentration ratios were determined. Results Aβ concentration was increased by ~7.5% in venous blood leaving the CNS capillary bed compared to arterial blood, indicating efflux from the CNS into the peripheral blood (p < 0.0001). There was no difference in peripheral venous Aβ concentration compared to arterial blood concentration. Interpretation Our results are consistent with clearance of CNS-derived Aβ into the venous blood supply with no increase from a peripheral capillary bed. Modeling these results suggests that direct transport of Aβ across the blood-brain barrier accounts for ~25% of Aβ clearance, and reabsorption of cerebrospinal fluid Aβ accounts for ~25% of the total CNS Aβ clearance in humans. PMID:25205593

  16. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference White Paper

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Victor A.; Tonge, Peter J.; Gallo, James M.; Birtwistle, Marc R.; Dar, Arvin C.; Iavarone, Antonio; Paddison, Patrick J.; Heffron, Timothy P.; Elmquist, William F.; Lachowicz, Jean E.; Johnson, Ted W.; White, Forest M.; Sul, Joohee; Smith, Quentin R.; Shen, Wang; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Samala, Ramakrishna; Wen, Patrick Y.; Berry, Donald A.; Petter, Russell C.

    2015-01-01

    Following the first CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference, the speakers from the first 4 sessions and organizers of the conference created this White Paper hoping to stimulate more and better CNS anticancer drug discovery and development. The first part of the White Paper reviews, comments, and, in some cases, expands on the 4 session areas critical to new drug development: pharmacological challenges, recent drug approaches, drug targets and discovery, and clinical paths. Following this concise review of the science and clinical aspects of new CNS anticancer drug discovery and development, we discuss, under the rubric “Accelerating Drug Discovery and Development for Brain Tumors,” further reasons why the pharmaceutical industry and academia have failed to develop new anticancer drugs for CNS malignancies and what it will take to change the current status quo and develop the drugs so desperately needed by our patients with malignant CNS tumors. While this White Paper is not a formal roadmap to that end, it should be an educational guide to clinicians and scientists to help move a stagnant field forward. PMID:26403167

  17. Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 and synaptic function in the mammalian central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Andrew D; Kurihara, Mai; Brandon, Nicholas J; Brown, Jon T

    2014-01-01

    The disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene is found at the breakpoint of an inherited chromosomal translocation, and segregates with major mental illnesses. Its potential role in central nervous system (CNS) malfunction has triggered intensive investigation of the biological roles played by DISC1, with the hope that this may shed new light on the pathobiology of psychiatric disease. Such work has ranged from investigations of animal behavior to detailed molecular-level analysis of the assemblies that DISC1 forms with other proteins. Here, we discuss the evidence for a role of DISC1 in synaptic function in the mammalian CNS. PMID:24712987

  18. Identification of novel host factors via conserved domain search: Cns1 cochaperone is a novel restriction factor of tombusvirus replication in yeast.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing-Yi; Nagy, Peter D

    2013-12-01

    A large number of host-encoded proteins affect the replication of plus-stranded RNA viruses by acting as susceptibility factors. Many other cellular proteins are known to function as restriction factors of viral infections. Previous studies with tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus (TBSV) in a yeast model host have revealed the inhibitory function of TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domain-containing cyclophilins, which are members of the large family of host prolyl isomerases, in TBSV replication. In this paper, we tested additional TPR-containing yeast proteins in a cell-free TBSV replication assay and identified the Cns1p cochaperone for heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and Hsp90 chaperones as a strong inhibitor of TBSV replication. Cns1p interacted with the viral replication proteins and inhibited the assembly of the viral replicase complex and viral RNA synthesis in vitro. Overexpression of Cns1p inhibited TBSV replication in yeast. The use of a temperature-sensitive (TS) mutant of Cns1p in yeast revealed that at a semipermissive temperature, TS Cns1p could not inhibit TBSV replication. Interestingly, Cns1p and the TPR-containing Cpr7p cyclophilin have similar inhibitory functions during TBSV replication, although some of the details of their viral restriction mechanisms are different. Our observations indicate that TPR-containing cellular proteins could act as virus restriction factors.

  19. Insect GDNF:TTC fusion protein improves delivery of GDNF to mouse CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianhong; Chian, Ru-Ju; Ay, Ilknur

    2009-12-18

    With a view toward improving delivery of exogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to CNS motor neurons in vivo, we evaluated the bioavailability and pharmacological activity of a recombinant GDNF:tetanus toxin C-fragment fusion protein in mouse CNS. Following intramuscular injection, GDNF:TTC but not recombinant GDNF (rGDNF) produced strong GDNF immunostaining within ventral horn cells of the spinal cord. Intrathecal infusion of GDNF:TTC resulted in tissue concentrations of GDNF in lumbar spinal cord that were at least 150-fold higher than those in mice treated with rGDNF. While levels of immunoreactive choline acetyltransferase and GFR{alpha}-1 in lumbar cord were not alteredmore » significantly by intrathecal infusion of rGNDF, GDNF:TTC, or TTC, only rGDNF and GDNF:TTC caused significant weight loss following intracerebroventricular infusion. These studies indicate that insect cell-derived GDNF:TTC retains its bi-functional activity in mammalian CNS in vivo and improves delivery of GDNF to spinal cord following intramuscular- or intrathecal administration.« less

  20. Engineering therapies in the CNS: what works and what can be translated.

    PubMed

    Shoffstall, Andrew J; Taylor, Dawn M; Lavik, Erin B

    2012-06-25

    Engineering is the art of taking what we know and using it to solve problems. As engineers, we build tool chests of approaches; we attempt to learn as much as possible about the problem at hand, and then we design, build, and test our approaches to see how they impact the system. The challenge of applying this approach to the central nervous system (CNS) is that we often do not know the details of what is needed from the biological side. New therapeutic options for treating the CNS range from new biomaterials to make scaffolds, to novel drug-delivery techniques, to functional electrical stimulation. However, the reality is that translating these new therapies and making them widely available to patients requires collaborations between scientists, engineers, clinicians, and patients to have the greatest chance of success. Here we discuss a variety of new treatment strategies and explore the pragmatic challenges involved with engineering therapies in the CNS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Survival Advantage of Neonatal CNS Gene Transfer for Late Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Sondhi, Dolan; Peterson, Daniel A.; Edelstein, Andrew M.; del Fierro, Katrina; Hackett, Neil R.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL), a fatal autosomal recessive neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder of childhood, is caused by mutations in the CLN2 gene, resulting in deficiency of the protein tripeptidyl peptidase I (TPP-I). We have previously shown that direct CNS administration of AAVrh.10hCLN2 to adult CLN2 knockout mice, a serotype rh.10 adeno-associated virus expressing the wild type CLN2 cDNA, will partially improve neurological function and survival. In this study, we explore the hypothesis that administration of AAVrh.10hCLN2 to the neonatal brain will significantly improve the results of AAVrh.10hCLN2 therapy. To assess this concept, AAVrh.10hCLN2 vector was administered directly to the CNS of CLN2 knockout mice at 2 days, 3 wk and 7 wk of age. While all treatment groups show a marked increase in total TPP-I activity over wild-type mice, neonatally treated mice displayed high levels of TPP-I activity in the CNS 1 yr after administration which was spread throughout the brain. Using behavioral markers, 2 day treated mice demonstrate marked improvement over 3 wk, 7 wk or untreated mice. Finally, neonatal administration of AAVrh.10hCLN2 was associated with markedly enhanced survival, with a median time of death 376 days for neonatal treated mice, 277 days for 3 wk treated mice, 168 days for 7 wk treated mice, and 121 days for untreated mice. These data suggest that neonatal treatment offers many unique advantages, and that early detection and treatment may be essential for maximal gene therapy for childhood lysosomal storage disorders affecting the CNS. PMID:18639872

  2. IL-10-producing B-cells limit CNS inflammation and infarct volume in experimental stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bodhankar, Sheetal; Chen, Yingxin; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Murphy, Stephanie J.; Offner, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Clinical stroke induces inflammatory processes leading to cerebral injury. IL-10 expression is elevated during major CNS diseases and limits inflammation in the brain. Recent evidence demonstrated that absence of B-cells led to larger infarct volumes and increased numbers of activated T-cells, monocytes and microglial cells in the brain, thus implicating a regulatory role of B-cell subpopulations in limiting CNS damage from stroke. The aim of this study was to determine whether the IL-10-producing regulatory B-cell subset can limit CNS inflammation and reduce infarct volume following ischemic stroke in B-cell deficient (µMT−/−) mice. Five million IL-10-producing B-cells were obtained from IL-10-GFP reporter mice and transferred i.v. to µMT−/− mice. After 24 h following this transfer, recipients were subjected to 60 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by 48 hours of reperfusion. Compared to vehicle-treated controls, the IL-10+ B-cell-replenished µMT−/− mice had reduced infarct volume and fewer infiltrating activated T-cells and monocytes in the affected brain hemisphere. These effects in CNS were accompanied by significant increases in regulatory T-cells and expression of the co-inhibitory receptor, PD-1, with a significant reduction in the proinflammatory milieu in the periphery. These novel observations provide the first proof of both immunoregulatory and protective functions of IL-10-secreting B-cells in MCAO that potentially could impart significant benefit for stroke patients in the clinic. PMID:23640015

  3. Gap junction-dependent homolog avoidance in the developing CNS.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael W; Yazdani, Neema; Macagno, Eduardo R

    2013-10-16

    Oppositely directed projections of some homologous neurons in the developing CNS of the medicinal leech (Hirudo verbana), such as the AP cells, undergo a form of contact-dependent homolog avoidance. Embryonic APs extend axons within the connective nerve toward adjacent ganglia, in which they meet and form gap junctions (GJs) with the oppositely directed axons of their segmental homologs, stop growing, and are later permanently retracted (Wolszon et al., 1994a,b). However, early deletion of an AP neuron leads to resumed growth and permanent maintenance of the projections of neighboring APs. Here we test the hypothesis that a GJ-based signaling mechanism is responsible for this instance of homolog avoidance. We demonstrate that selective knockdown of GJ gene Hve-inx1 expression in single embryonic APs, by expressing a short-hairpin interfering RNA, leads to continued growth of the projections of the cell toward, into, and beyond adjacent ganglia. Moreover, the projections of the APs in adjacent ganglia also resume growth, mimicking their responses to cell deletion. Continued growth was also observed when two different INX1 mutant transgenes that abolish dye coupling between APs were expressed. These include a mutant transgene that effectively downregulates all GJ plaques that include the INX1 protein and a closed channel INX1 mutant that retains the adhesive cellular binding characteristic of INX1 GJs but not the open channel pore function. Our results add GJ intercellular communication to the list of molecular signaling mechanisms that can act as mediators of growth-inhibiting cell-cell interactions that define the topography of neuronal arbors.

  4. `Sex' – It's not only Women's Work: A Case for Refocusing on the Functional Role that Sex Plays in Work for both Women and Men

    PubMed Central

    Uretsky, Elanah

    2014-01-01

    Mention of the term sex work often invokes images of marginalized women at risk for HIV infection. Such images, however, are counterintuitive to the functional role intended by the movement that spawned use of the terms `sex work' and `sex worker'. This article looks at the sexual practices of men in urban China to argue for a return to a functional definition of `sex work', which was originally meant to legitimize the role sex plays in work. The progenitors of this movement intended to use `sex work' as a means to legitimize sex as an income generating activity for women involved in prostitution. I show that sex can also serve a functional role in the work-related duties of men seeking economic and political success in contemporary urban China. Men in China utilize sex as one way for demonstrating the loyalty necessary to access state-owned and controlled resources in a market economy governed under a Leninist system. Overall the article demonstrates that reclaiming perception of sex work as a functional rather than behavioral category can expand its use for preventing HIV among the broad subset of people who engage in sex as part of their work. PMID:25642103

  5. `Sex' - It's not only Women's Work: A Case for Refocusing on the Functional Role that Sex Plays in Work for both Women and Men.

    PubMed

    Uretsky, Elanah

    2015-01-01

    Mention of the term sex work often invokes images of marginalized women at risk for HIV infection. Such images, however, are counterintuitive to the functional role intended by the movement that spawned use of the terms `sex work' and `sex worker'. This article looks at the sexual practices of men in urban China to argue for a return to a functional definition of `sex work', which was originally meant to legitimize the role sex plays in work. The progenitors of this movement intended to use `sex work' as a means to legitimize sex as an income generating activity for women involved in prostitution. I show that sex can also serve a functional role in the work-related duties of men seeking economic and political success in contemporary urban China. Men in China utilize sex as one way for demonstrating the loyalty necessary to access state-owned and controlled resources in a market economy governed under a Leninist system. Overall the article demonstrates that reclaiming perception of sex work as a functional rather than behavioral category can expand its use for preventing HIV among the broad subset of people who engage in sex as part of their work.

  6. New Brain Tumor Entities Emerge from Molecular Classification of CNS-PNETs.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Dominik; Orr, Brent A; Toprak, Umut H; Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T W; Capper, David; Sill, Martin; Buchhalter, Ivo; Northcott, Paul A; Leis, Irina; Ryzhova, Marina; Koelsche, Christian; Pfaff, Elke; Allen, Sariah J; Balasubramanian, Gnanaprakash; Worst, Barbara C; Pajtler, Kristian W; Brabetz, Sebastian; Johann, Pascal D; Sahm, Felix; Reimand, Jüri; Mackay, Alan; Carvalho, Diana M; Remke, Marc; Phillips, Joanna J; Perry, Arie; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Drissi, Rachid; Fouladi, Maryam; Giangaspero, Felice; Łastowska, Maria; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Pietsch, Torsten; Hagel, Christian; Gojo, Johannes; Lötsch, Daniela; Berger, Walter; Slavc, Irene; Haberler, Christine; Jouvet, Anne; Holm, Stefan; Hofer, Silvia; Prinz, Marco; Keohane, Catherine; Fried, Iris; Mawrin, Christian; Scheie, David; Mobley, Bret C; Schniederjan, Matthew J; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna M; Dahiya, Sonika; Kramm, Christof M; von Bueren, André O; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Herold-Mende, Christel; Frühwald, Michael C; Milde, Till; Hasselblatt, Martin; Wesseling, Pieter; Rößler, Jochen; Schüller, Ulrich; Ebinger, Martin; Schittenhelm, Jens; Frank, Stephan; Grobholz, Rainer; Vajtai, Istvan; Hans, Volkmar; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Zitterbart, Karel; Collins, V Peter; Aronica, Eleonora; Varlet, Pascale; Puget, Stephanie; Dufour, Christelle; Grill, Jacques; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Wolter, Marietta; Schuhmann, Martin U; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; van Meter, Timothy; Monoranu, Camelia-Maria; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Snuderl, Matija; Forrester, Lynn Ann; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; van Sluis, Peter; Wolf, Stephan; Mikkelsen, Tom; Gajjar, Amar; Aldape, Kenneth; Moore, Andrew S; Taylor, Michael D; Jones, Chris; Jabado, Nada; Karajannis, Matthias A; Eils, Roland; Schlesner, Matthias; Lichter, Peter; von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M; Ellison, David W; Korshunov, Andrey; Kool, Marcel

    2016-02-25

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS-PNETs) are highly aggressive, poorly differentiated embryonal tumors occurring predominantly in young children but also affecting adolescents and adults. Herein, we demonstrate that a significant proportion of institutionally diagnosed CNS-PNETs display molecular profiles indistinguishable from those of various other well-defined CNS tumor entities, facilitating diagnosis and appropriate therapy for patients with these tumors. From the remaining fraction of CNS-PNETs, we identify four new CNS tumor entities, each associated with a recurrent genetic alteration and distinct histopathological and clinical features. These new molecular entities, designated "CNS neuroblastoma with FOXR2 activation (CNS NB-FOXR2)," "CNS Ewing sarcoma family tumor with CIC alteration (CNS EFT-CIC)," "CNS high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with MN1 alteration (CNS HGNET-MN1)," and "CNS high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with BCOR alteration (CNS HGNET-BCOR)," will enable meaningful clinical trials and the development of therapeutic strategies for patients affected by poorly differentiated CNS tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evidence that multiple genetic variants of MC4R play a functional role in the regulation of energy expenditure and appetite in Hispanic children1234

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Shelley A; Voruganti, V Saroja; Cai, Guowen; Haack, Karin; Kent, Jack W; Blangero, John; Comuzzie, Anthony G; McPherson, John D; Gibbs, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    Background: Melanocortin-4-receptor (MC4R) haploinsufficiency is the most common form of monogenic obesity; however, the frequency of MC4R variants and their functional effects in general populations remain uncertain. Objective: The aim was to identify and characterize the effects of MC4R variants in Hispanic children. Design: MC4R was resequenced in 376 parents, and the identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 613 parents and 1016 children from the Viva la Familia cohort. Measured genotype analysis (MGA) tested associations between SNPs and phenotypes. Bayesian quantitative trait nucleotide (BQTN) analysis was used to infer the most likely functional polymorphisms influencing obesity-related traits. Results: Seven rare SNPs in coding and 18 SNPs in flanking regions of MC4R were identified. MGA showed suggestive associations between MC4R variants and body size, adiposity, glucose, insulin, leptin, ghrelin, energy expenditure, physical activity, and food intake. BQTN analysis identified SNP 1704 in a predicted micro-RNA target sequence in the downstream flanking region of MC4R as a strong, probable functional variant influencing total, sedentary, and moderate activities with posterior probabilities of 1.0. SNP 2132 was identified as a variant with a high probability (1.0) of exerting a functional effect on total energy expenditure and sleeping metabolic rate. SNP rs34114122 was selected as having likely functional effects on the appetite hormone ghrelin, with a posterior probability of 0.81. Conclusion: This comprehensive investigation provides strong evidence that MC4R genetic variants are likely to play a functional role in the regulation of weight, not only through energy intake but through energy expenditure. PMID:19889825

  8. Differential co-localisation of the P2X7 receptor subunit with vesicular glutamate transporters VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in rat CNS.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, L; Batten, T F C; Moores, T S; Varoqui, H; Erickson, J D; Deuchars, J

    2004-01-01

    Presynaptic P2X(7) receptors are thought to play a role in the modulation of transmitter release and have been localised to terminals with the location and morphology typical of excitatory boutons. To test the hypothesis that this receptor is preferentially associated with excitatory terminals we combined immunohistochemistry for the P2X(7) receptor subunit (P2X(7)R) with that for two vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1 and VGLUT2) in the rat CNS. This confirmed that P2X(7)R immunoreactivity (IR) is present in glutamatergic terminals; however, whether it was co-localised with VGLUT1-IR or VGLUT2-IR depended on the CNS region examined. In the spinal cord, P2X(7)R-IR co-localised with VGLUT2-IR. In the brainstem, co-localisation of P2X(7)R-IR with VGLUT2-IR was widespread, but co-localisation with VGLUT1-IR was seen only in the external cuneate nucleus and spinocerebellar tract region of the ventral medulla. In the cerebellum, P2X(7)R-IR co-localised with both VGLUT1 and VGLUT2-IR in the granular layer. In the hippocampus it was co-localised only with VGLUT1-IR, including in the polymorphic layer of the dentate gyrus and the substantia radiatum of the CA3 region. In other forebrain areas, P2X(7)R-IR co-localised with VGLUT1-IR throughout the amygdala, caudate putamen, striatum, reticular thalamic nucleus and cortex and with VGLUT2-IR in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus, amygdala and hypothalamus. Dual labelling studies performed using markers for cholinergic, monoaminergic, GABAergic and glycinergic terminals indicated that in certain brainstem and spinal cord nuclei the P2X(7)R is also expressed by subpopulations of cholinergic and GABAergic/glycinergic terminals. These data support our previous hypothesis that the P2X(7)R may play a role in modulating glutamate release in functionally different systems throughout the CNS but further suggest a role in modulating release of inhibitory transmitters in some regions.

  9. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development: 2016 conference insights

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Victor A; Abrey, Lauren E; Heffron, Timothy P; Tonge, Peter J; Dar, Arvin C; Weiss, William A; Gallo, James M

    2017-01-01

    CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development, 16-17 November 2016, Scottsdale, AZ, USA The 2016 second CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference addressed diverse viewpoints about why new drug discovery/development focused on CNS cancers has been sorely lacking. Despite more than 70,000 individuals in the USA being diagnosed with a primary brain malignancy and 151,669–286,486 suffering from metastatic CNS cancer, in 1999, temozolomide was the last drug approved by the US FDA as an anticancer agent for high-grade gliomas. Among the topics discussed were economic factors and pharmaceutical risk assessments, regulatory constraints and perceptions and the need for improved imaging surrogates of drug activity. Included were modeling tumor growth and drug effects in a medical environment in which direct tumor sampling for biological effects can be problematic, potential new drugs under investigation and targets for drug discovery and development. The long trajectory and diverse impediments to novel drug discovery, and expectation that more than one drug will be needed to adequately inhibit critical intracellular tumor pathways were viewed as major disincentives for most pharmaceutical/biotechnology companies. While there were a few unanimities, one consensus is the need for continued and focused discussion among academic and industry scientists and clinicians to address tumor targets, new drug chemistry, and more time- and cost-efficient clinical trials based on surrogate end points. PMID:28718326

  10. Delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Salameh, Therese S; Banks, William A

    2014-01-01

    Peptides and proteins have potent effects on the brain after their peripheral administration, suggesting that they may be good substrates for the development of CNS therapeutics. Major hurdles to such development include their relation to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and poor pharmacokinetics. Some peptides cross the BBB by transendothelial diffusion and others cross in the blood-to-brain direction by saturable transporters. Some regulatory proteins are also transported across the BBB and antibodies can enter the CNS via the extracellular pathways. Glycoproteins and some antibody fragments can be taken up and cross the BBB by mechanisms related to adsorptive endocytosis/transcytosis. Many peptides and proteins are transported out of the CNS by saturable efflux systems and enzymatic activity in the blood, CNS, or BBB are substantial barriers to others. Both influx and efflux transporters are altered by various substances and in disease states. Strategies that manipulate these interactions between the BBB and peptides and proteins provide many opportunities for the development of therapeutics. Such strategies include increasing transendothelial diffusion of small peptides, upregulation of saturable influx transporters with allosteric regulators and other posttranslational means, use of vectors and other Trojan horse strategies, inhibition of efflux transporters including with antisense molecules, and improvement in pharmacokinetic parameters to overcome short half-lives, tissue sequestration, and enzymatic degradation. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. ELECTROSTATIC CHARGE STIMULATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CNS MICROGLIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can create oxidative stress (OS)-mediated inflammatory changes upon impact. The oxidative burst signals the activation of phage-lineage cells such as peripheral macrophages, Kupffer cells and CNS microgl...

  12. Thyroid Hormone in the CNS: Contribution of Neuron-Glia Interaction.

    PubMed

    Noda, Mami

    2018-01-01

    The endocrine system and the central nervous system (CNS) are intimately linked. Among hormones closely related to the nervous system, thyroid hormones (THs) are critical for the regulation of development and differentiation of neurons and neuroglia and hence for development and function of the CNS. T3 (3,3',5-triiodothyronine), an active form of TH, is important not only for neuronal development but also for differentiation of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, and for microglial development. In adult brain, T3 affects glial morphology with sex- and age-dependent manner and therefore may affect their function, leading to influence on neuron-glia interaction. T3 is an important signaling factor that affects microglial functions such as migration and phagocytosis via complex mechanisms. Therefore, dysfunction of THs may impair glial function as well as neuronal function and thus disturb the brain, which may cause mental disorders. Investigations on molecular and cellular basis of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism will help us to understand changes in neuron-glia interaction and therefore consequent psychiatric symptoms. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Improving executive function deficits by playing interactive video-games: secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial for individuals with chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Rozental-Iluz, Clara; Zeilig, Gabi; Weingarden, Harold; Rand, Debbie

    2016-08-01

    Executive function deficits negatively impact independence and participation in everyday life of individuals with chronic stroke. Therefore, it is important to explore therapeutic interventions to improve executive functions. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a 3-month interactive video-game group intervention compared to a traditional motor group intervention for improving executive functions in individuals with chronic stroke. This study is a secondary analysis of a single-blind randomized controlled trial for improving factors related to physical activity of individuals with chronic stroke. Assessments were administered pre and post the intervention and at 3-month follow-up by assessors blind to treatment allocation. Thirty-nine individuals with chronic stroke with executive function deficits participated in an interactive video-game group intervention (N.=20) or a traditional group intervention (N.=19). The intervention included two 1-hour group sessions per week for three months, either playing video-games or performing traditional exercises/activities. Executive function deficits were assessed using The Trail Making Test (Parts A and B) and by two performance-based assessments; the Bill Paying Task from the Executive Function Performance Test (EFPT) and the Executive Function Route-Finding Task (EFRT). Following intervention, scores for the Bill Paying Task (EFPT) decreased by 27.5% and 36.6% for the participants in the video-game and traditional intervention, respectively (F=17.3, P<0.000) and continued to decrease in the video-game group with small effect sizes. Effect size was small to medium for the TMT-B (F=0.003, P=0.954) and EFRT (F=1.2, P=0.28), without any statistical significance difference. Interactive video-games provide combined cognitive-motor stimulation and therefore have potential to improve executive functioning of individuals with chronic stroke. Further research is needed. These findings highlight the potential of

  14. Feasibility, safety, acceptability, and functional outcomes of playing Nintendo Wii Fit Plus™ for frail elderly: study protocol for a feasibility trial.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Gisele Cristine Vieira; Bacha, Jéssica Maria Ribeiro; do Socorro Simões, Maria; Lin, Sumika Mori; Viveiro, Larissa Alamino Pereira; Varise, Eliana Maria; Filho, Wilson Jacob; Pompeu, José Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Frailty can be defined as a medical syndrome with multiple causes and contributors, characterized by diminished strength and endurance and reduced physiological function that increases the vulnerability to develop functional dependency and/or death. Studies have shown that the most commonly studied exercise protocol for frail older adults is the multimodal training. Interactive video games (IVGs) involve tasks in virtual environments that combine physical and cognitive demands in an attractive and challenging way. The aim of this study will be to evaluate the feasibility, safety, acceptability, and functional outcomes of playing Nintendo Wii Fit Plus TM (NWFP) for frail older adults. The study is a randomized controlled, parallel group, feasibility trial. Participants will be randomly assigned to the experimental group (EG) and control group (CG). The EG will participate in 14 training sessions, each lasting 50 min, twice a week. In each training session, the participants will play five games, with three attempts at each game. The first attempt will be performed with the assistance of a physical therapist to correct the movements and posture of the patients and subsequent attempts will be performed independently. Scores achieved in the games will be recorded. The participants will be evaluated by a blinded physical therapist at three moments: before and after intervention and 30 days after the end of the intervention (follow-up). We will assess the feasibility, acceptability, safety, and clinical outcomes (postural control, gait, cognition, quality of life, mood, and fear of falling). Due to the deficiencies in multiple systems, studies have shown that multimodal interventions including motor-cognitive stimulation can improve the mobility of frail elderly adults. IVGs, among them the NWFP, are considered as a multimodal motor-cognitive intervention that can potentially improve motor and cognitive functions in the frail elderly. However, there is still no evidence

  15. Play's Importance in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Anette; Heden, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute knowledge on and gain an understanding of elementary school teachers' perspectives on the function of play in children's learning processes. The study is qualitative with a hermeneutical approach and has George Herbert Mead as a theoretical frame of reference. Interviews have been carried out with seven…

  16. Applications of Genomic Sequencing in Pediatric CNS Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bavle, Abhishek A; Lin, Frank Y; Parsons, D Williams

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in genome-scale sequencing methods have resulted in a significant increase in our understanding of the biology of human cancers. When applied to pediatric central nervous system (CNS) tumors, these remarkable technological breakthroughs have facilitated the molecular characterization of multiple tumor types, provided new insights into the genetic basis of these cancers, and prompted innovative strategies that are changing the management paradigm in pediatric neuro-oncology. Genomic tests have begun to affect medical decision making in a number of ways, from delineating histopathologically similar tumor types into distinct molecular subgroups that correlate with clinical characteristics, to guiding the addition of novel therapeutic agents for patients with high-risk or poor-prognosis tumors, or alternatively, reducing treatment intensity for those with a favorable prognosis. Genomic sequencing has also had a significant impact on translational research strategies in pediatric CNS tumors, resulting in wide-ranging applications that have the potential to direct the rational preclinical screening of novel therapeutic agents, shed light on tumor heterogeneity and evolution, and highlight differences (or similarities) between pediatric and adult CNS tumors. Finally, in addition to allowing the identification of somatic (tumor-specific) mutations, the analysis of patient-matched constitutional (germline) DNA has facilitated the detection of pathogenic germline alterations in cancer genes in patients with CNS tumors, with critical implications for genetic counseling and tumor surveillance strategies for children with familial predisposition syndromes. As our understanding of the molecular landscape of pediatric CNS tumors continues to advance, innovative applications of genomic sequencing hold significant promise for further improving the care of children with these cancers.

  17. Disruption of motor behavior and injury to the CNS induced by 3-thienylboronic acid in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Farfán-García, E.D.; Pérez-Rodríguez, M.

    The scarcity of studies on boron containing compounds (BCC) in the medicinal field is gradually being remedied. Efforts have been made to explore the effects of BCCs due to the properties that boron confers to molecules. Research has shown that the safety of some BCCs is similar to that found for boron-free compounds (judging from the acute toxicological evaluation). However, it has been observed that the administration of 3-thienylboronic acid (3TB) induced motor disruption in CD1 mice. In the current contribution we studied in deeper form the disruption of motor performance produced by the intraperitoneal administration of 3TB in micemore » from two strains (CD1 and C57BL6). Disruption of motor activity was dependent not only on the dose of 3TB administered, but also on the DMSO concentration in the vehicle. The ability of 3TB to enter the Central Nervous System (CNS) was evidenced by Raman spectroscopy as well as morphological effects on the CNS, such as loss of neurons yielding biased injury to the substantia nigra and striatum at doses ≥ 200 mg/kg, and involving granular cell damage at doses of 400 mg/kg but less injury in the motor cortex. Our work acquaints about the use of this compound in drug design, but the interesting profile as neurotoxic agent invite us to study it regarding the damage on the motor system. - Highlights: • Intraperitoneal 3-thienylboronic acid (3TB) induces tremor in CD1 or C57BL6 mice. • Injury on CNS as well as motor disruption is dose-dependent. • Damage is greater in basal ganglia than in cerebellum or motor cortex. • The DMSO as vehicle plays a key role in the induced effect. • Motor disruption seems to involve basal ganglia and cerebellum damage.« less

  18. miR-181c-BRK1 axis plays a key role in actin cytoskeleton-dependent T cell function.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shok Ping; Ioannou, Nikolaos; Ramsay, Alan G; Darling, David; Gäken, Joop; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2018-05-01

    MicroRNAs are short endogenous noncoding RNAs that play pivotal roles in a diverse range of cellular processes. The miR-181 family is important in T cell development, proliferation, and activation. In this study, we have identified BRK1 as a potential target of miR-181c using a dual selection functional assay and have showed that miR-181c regulates BRK1 by translational inhibition. Given the importance of miR-181 in T cell function and the potential role of BRK1 in the involvement of WAVE2 complex and actin polymerization in T cells, we therefore investigated the influence of miR-181c-BRK1 axis in T cell function. Stimulation of PBMC derived CD3 + T cells resulted in reduced miR-181c expression and up-regulation of BRK1 protein expression, suggesting that miR-181c-BRK1 axis is important in T cell activation. We further showed that overexpression of miR-181c or suppression of BRK1 resulted in inhibition of T cell activation and actin polymerization coupled with defective lamellipodia generation and immunological synapse formation. Additionally, we found that BRK1 silencing led to reduced expressions of other proteins in the WAVE2 complex, suggesting that the impairment of T cell actin dynamics was a result of the instability of the WAVE2 complex following BRK1 depletion. Collectively, we demonstrated that miR-181c reduces BRK1 protein expression level and highlighted the important role of miR-181c-BRK1 axis in T cell activation and actin polymerization-mediated T cell functions. ©2018 Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  19. [COMPARATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF uNOS-POSITIVE STRUCTURES IN THE CNS OF SOME SPECIES OF CRUSTACEANS].

    PubMed

    Chertok, V M; Kotsyuba, E P

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a comparative study of NO-ergic system in the CNS of 10 species of crustaceans subclass Malacostraca, belonging to orders Stomatopoda and Decapoda, with a common habitat in Ussuri Bay (Sea of Japan). Both similar characteristics and differences in content and distribution of universal NO-synthase (uNOS) were revealed in homologous parts of the brain and ventral nerve cord of the investigated species of crustaceans. We discuss the involvement of nitric oxide in the regulation of physiological functions of decapod crustaceans and its role in the processes of adaptation to the environmental conditions.

  20. Cumulative incidence rates for CNS and non-CNS progression in two phase II studies of alectinib in ALK-positive NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Gadgeel, Shirish; Shaw, Alice T; Barlesi, Fabrice; Crinò, Lucio; Yang, James Chih-Hsin; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C; Kim, Dong-Wan; de Marinis, Filippo; Schulz, Mathias; Liu, Shiyao; Gupta, Ravindra; Kotb, Ahmed; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2018-01-01

    We evaluated the cumulative incidence rate (CIR) of central nervous system (CNS) and non-CNS progression in alectinib-treated patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to determine the extent to which alectinib may treat or control CNS disease. Patients with crizotinib-pretreated locally advanced or metastatic disease received alectinib 600 mg orally twice daily in two phase II trials. All patients underwent baseline imaging and regular centrally reviewed scans. At 24 months, the CIR for CNS progression was lower in patients without vs with baseline CNS metastases (8.0 vs 43.9%). Patients with baseline CNS disease and prior radiotherapy had a higher CIR of CNS progression than radiotherapy-naive patients (50.5 vs 27.4%) and a lower CIR of non-CNS progression (25.8 vs 42.5%). Adverse events leading to withdrawal occurred in 5.9% and 6.7% of patients with and without baseline CNS metastases, respectively. This analysis indicates a potential role for alectinib in controlling and preventing CNS metastases.

  1. pDC therapy induces recovery from EAE by recruiting endogenous pDC to sites of CNS inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Duraes, Fernanda V.; Lippens, Carla; Steinbach, Karin; Dubrot, Juan; Brighouse, Dale; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Merkler, Doron; Hugues, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) exhibit both innate and adaptive functions. In particular they are the main source of type I IFNs and directly impact T cell responses through antigen presentation. We have previously demonstrated that during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) initiation, myelin-antigen presentation by pDCs is associated with suppressive Treg development and results in attenuated EAE. Here, we show that pDCs transferred during acute disease phase confer recovery from EAE. Clinical improvement is associated with migration of injected pDCs into inflamed CNS and is dependent on the subsequent and selective chemerin-mediated recruitment of endogenous pDCs to the CNS. The protective effect requires pDC pre-loading with myelin antigen, and is associated with the modulation of CNS-infiltrating pDC phenotype and inhibition of CNS encephalitogenic T cells. This study may pave the way for novel pDC-based cell therapies in autoimmune diseases, aiming at specifically modulating pathogenic cells that induce and sustain autoimmune inflammation. PMID:26341385

  2. pDC therapy induces recovery from EAE by recruiting endogenous pDC to sites of CNS inflammation.

    PubMed

    Duraes, Fernanda V; Lippens, Carla; Steinbach, Karin; Dubrot, Juan; Brighouse, Dale; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Merkler, Doron; Hugues, Stephanie

    2016-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) exhibit both innate and adaptive functions. In particular they are the main source of type I IFNs and directly impact T cell responses through antigen presentation. We have previously demonstrated that during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) initiation, myelin-antigen presentation by pDCs is associated with suppressive Treg development and results in attenuated EAE. Here, we show that pDCs transferred during acute disease phase confer recovery from EAE. Clinical improvement is associated with migration of injected pDCs into inflamed CNS and is dependent on the subsequent and selective chemerin-mediated recruitment of endogenous pDCs to the CNS. The protective effect requires pDC pre-loading with myelin antigen, and is associated with the modulation of CNS-infiltrating pDC phenotype and inhibition of CNS encephalitogenic T cells. This study may pave the way for novel pDC-based cell therapies in autoimmune diseases, aiming at specifically modulating pathogenic cells that induce and sustain autoimmune inflammation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG) plays an agonist specific role in platelet function through RhoA activation

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Siying; Teixeira, Alexandra M.; Yin, Mingzhu; Xiang, Yaozu; Xavier-Ferruccio, Juliana; Zhang, Ping-xia; Hwa, John; Min, Wang; Krause, Diane S.

    2018-01-01

    Summary Leukemia-Associated RhoGEF (LARG) is highly expressed in platelets, which are essential for maintaining normal hemostasis. We studied the function of LARG in murine and human megakaryocytes and platelets with Larg knockout, shRNA-mediated knockdown and small molecule-mediated inhibition. We found that LARG is important for human, but not murine, megakaryocyte maturation. Larg KO mice exhibit macrothrombocytopenia, internal bleeding in the ovaries and prolonged bleeding times. KO platelets have impaired aggregation, α-granule release and integrin α2bβ3 activation in response to thrombin and thromboxane, but not to ADP. The same agonist-specific reductions in platelet aggregation occur in human platelets treated with a LARG inhibitor. Larg KO platelets have reduced RhoA activation and myosin light chain phosphorylation, suggesting that Larg plays an agonist-specific role in platelet signal transduction. Using 2 different in vivo assays, Larg KO mice are protected from in vivo thrombus formation. Together, these results establish that LARG regulates human megakaryocyte maturation, and is critical for platelet function in both humans and mice. PMID:27345948

  4. Leukaemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG) plays an agonist specific role in platelet function through RhoA activation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Siying; Teixeira, Alexandra M; Yin, Mingzhu; Xiang, Yaozu; Xavier-Ferrucio, Juliana; Zhang, Ping-Xia; Hwa, John; Min, Wang; Krause, Diane S

    2016-08-30

    Leukemia-Associated RhoGEF (LARG) is highly expressed in platelets, which are essential for maintaining normal haemostasis. We studied the function of LARG in murine and human megakaryocytes and platelets with Larg knockout (KO), shRNA-mediated knockdown and small molecule-mediated inhibition. We found that LARG is important for human, but not murine, megakaryocyte maturation. Larg KO mice exhibit macrothrombocytopenia, internal bleeding in the ovaries and prolonged bleeding times. KO platelets have impaired aggregation, α-granule release and integrin α2bβ3 activation in response to thrombin and thromboxane, but not to ADP. The same agonist-specific reductions in platelet aggregation occur in human platelets treated with a LARG inhibitor. Larg KO platelets have reduced RhoA activation and myosin light chain phosphorylation, suggesting that Larg plays an agonist-specific role in platelet signal transduction. Using two different in vivo assays, Larg KO mice are protected from in vivo thrombus formation. Together, these results establish that LARG regulates human megakaryocyte maturation, and is critical for platelet function in both humans and mice.

  5. The β and γ subunits play distinct functional roles in the α2βγ heterotetramer of human NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tengfei; Peng, Yingjie; Huang, Wei; Liu, Yabing; Ding, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    Human NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase existing as the α2βγ heterotetramer, catalyzes the decarboxylation of isocitrate into α-ketoglutarate in the Krebs cycle, and is allosterically regulated by citrate, ADP and ATP. To explore the functional roles of the regulatory β and γ subunits, we systematically characterized the enzymatic properties of the holoenzyme and the composing αβ and αγ heterodimers in the absence and presence of regulators. The biochemical and mutagenesis data show that αβ and αγ alone have considerable basal activity but the full activity of α2βγ requires the assembly and cooperative function of both heterodimers. α2βγ and αγ can be activated by citrate or/and ADP, whereas αβ cannot. The binding of citrate or/and ADP decreases the S0.5,isocitrate and thus enhances the catalytic efficiencies of the enzymes, and the two activators can act independently or synergistically. Moreover, ATP can activate α2βγ and αγ at low concentration and inhibit the enzymes at high concentration, but has only inhibitory effect on αβ. Furthermore, the allosteric activation of α2βγ is through the γ subunit not the β subunit. These results demonstrate that the γ subunit plays regulatory role to activate the holoenzyme, and the β subunit the structural role to facilitate the assembly of the holoenzyme.

  6. Relationship of Hip and Trunk Muscle Function with Single Leg Step-Down Performance: Implications for Return to Play Screening and Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Burnham, Jeremy M; Yonz, Michael C; Robertson, Kaley E; McKinley, Rachelle; Wilson, Benjamin R; Johnson, Darren L; Ireland, Mary Lloyd; Noehren, Brian

    2016-11-01

    Evaluate the relationship of hip and trunk muscle function with the Single Leg Step-Down test (SLSD). Laboratory study. Biomechanics Laboratory. 71 healthy participants with no history of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or lower extremity injury in the last 3 months completed this study (38 males, 33 females; mean 25.49 ± 0.62 years). Hip abduction (HABD), external rotation (HER), and extension (HEXT) peak isometric force were measured. Trunk endurance was measured with plank (PL) and side plank (SPL) tests. SLSD repetitions in 60-s and dynamic knee valgus (VAL) were recorded. PL, SPL, HABD, HER, and HEXT were positively correlated with SLSD repetitions. PL (r = 0.598, p < 0.001) was most correlated with SLSD repetitions, and regression demonstrated that PL (p = 0.001, R 2  = 0.469) was a predictor of SLSD repetitions. VAL trended toward negative correlation with PL and SPL. Sex-specific differences were present, with PL, SPL, HABD, and HER showing stronger relationships with SLSD in females. Hip and trunk muscle function were positively correlated with SLSD performance, and these relationships were strongest in females. PL predicted performance on the SLSD. Further research is needed to investigate the utility of SLSD as a screening or return-to-play test for lower extremity conditions such as ACL injury and patellofemoral pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Career Duration, Concussion History, and Playing Position on White Matter Microstructure and Functional Neural Recruitment in Former College and Professional Football Athletes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Michael D; Varangis, Eleanna M L; Champagne, Allen A; Giovanello, Kelly S; Shi, Feng; Kerr, Zachary Y; Smith, J Keith; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2018-03-01

    Purpose To better understand the relationship between exposure to concussive and subconcussive head impacts, white matter integrity, and functional task-related neural activity in former U.S. football athletes. Materials and Methods Between 2011 and 2013, 61 cognitively unimpaired former collegiate and professional football players (age range, 52-65 years) provided informed consent to participate in this cross-sectional study. Participants were stratified across three crossed factors: career duration, concussion history, and primary playing position. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) percent signal change (PSC) were measured with diffusion-weighted and task-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Analyses of variance of FA and BOLD PSC were used to determine main or interaction effects of the three factors. Results A significant interaction between career duration and concussion history was observed; former college players with more than three concussions had lower FA in a broadly distributed area of white matter compared with those with zero to one concussion (t29 = 2.774; adjusted P = .037), and the opposite was observed for former professional players (t29 = 3.883; adjusted P = .001). A separate interaction between concussion history and position was observed: Nonspeed players with more than three concussions had lower FA in frontal white matter compared with those with zero to one concussion (t25 = 3.861; adjusted P = .002). Analysis of working memory-task BOLD PSC revealed a similar interaction between concussion history and position (all adjusted P < .004). Overall, former players with lower FA tended to have lower BOLD PSC across three levels of a working memory task. Conclusion Career duration and primary playing position seem to modify the effects of concussion history on white matter structure and neural recruitment. The differences in brain structure and function were observed in the absence of

  8. The shifting landscape of metastatic breast cancer to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Matthew R; Fukui, Olivia; Chew, Brandon; Bhatia, Sanjay; Karlovits, Steven

    2013-07-01

    The improved survival following the diagnosis of breast cancer has potentially altered the characteristics and course of patients presenting with CNS involvement. We therefore sought to define our current cohort of breast cancer patients with metastatic disease to the CNS in regard to modern biomarkers and clinical outcome. Review of clinical and radiographic records of women presenting to a tertiary medical center with the new diagnosis of CNS metastatic disease from breast cancer. This was a retrospective review from patients identities obtained from two prospective databases. There were 88 women analyzed who were treated over the period of January 2003 to February 2010, average age 56.9 years. At the time of initial presentation of CNS disease, 68 % of patients had multiple brain metastases, 17 % had a solitary metastasis, and 15 % had only leptomeningeal disease (LMD). The median survival for all patients from the time of diagnosis of breast disease was 50.0 months, and 9.7 months from diagnosis of CNS involvement. The only factor related to overall survival was estrogen receptor-positive pathology (57.6 v. 38.2 months, p = .02 log-rank); those related to survival post CNS diagnosis were presentation with LMD (p = .004, HR = 3.1, Cox regression) and triple-negative hormonal/HER2 status (p = .02, HR = 2.3, Cox regression). Patients with either had a median survival of 3.1 months (no patients in common). Of the 75 patients who initially presented with metastatic brain lesions, 20 (26 %) subsequently developed LMD in the course of their disease (median 10.4 months), following which survival was grim (1.8 months median). Symptoms of LMD were most commonly lower extremity weakness (14/33), followed by cranial nerve deficits (11/33). The recently described Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) tumor index stratified median survival at 2.5, 5.9, 13.1, and 21.7 months, respectively, for indices of 1-4 (p = .004, log-rank), which

  9. Glial response during cuprizone-induced de- and remyelination in the CNS: lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Gudi, Viktoria; Gingele, Stefan; Skripuletz, Thomas; Stangel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Although astrogliosis and microglia activation are characteristic features of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other central nervous system (CNS) lesions the exact functions of these events are not fully understood. Animal models help to understand the complex interplay between the different cell types of the CNS and uncover general mechanisms of damage and repair of myelin sheaths. The so called cuprizone model is a toxic model of demyelination in the CNS white and gray matter, which lacks an autoimmune component. Cuprizone induces apoptosis of mature oligodendrocytes that leads to a robust demyelination and profound activation of both astrocytes and microglia with regional heterogeneity between different white and gray matter regions. Although not suitable to study autoimmune mediated demyelination, this model is extremely helpful to elucidate basic cellular and molecular mechanisms during de- and particularly remyelination independently of interactions with peripheral immune cells. Phagocytosis and removal of damaged myelin seems to be one of the major roles of microglia in this model and it is well known that removal of myelin debris is a prerequisite of successful remyelination. Furthermore, microglia provide several signals that support remyelination. The role of astrocytes during de- and remyelination is not well defined. Both supportive and destructive functions have been suggested. Using the cuprizone model we could demonstrate that there is an important crosstalk between astrocytes and microglia. In this review we focus on the role of glial reactions and interaction in the cuprizone model. Advantages and limitations of as well as its potential therapeutic relevance for the human disease MS are critically discussed in comparison to other animal models. PMID:24659953

  10. High interleukin-15 expression characterizes childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with involvement of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Cario, Gunnar; Izraeli, Shai; Teichert, Anja; Rhein, Peter; Skokowa, Julia; Möricke, Anja; Zimmermann, Martin; Schrauder, Andre; Karawajew, Leonid; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Welte, Karl; Schünemann, Holger J; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Schrappe, Martin; Stanulla, Martin

    2007-10-20

    Applying current diagnostic methods, overt CNS involvement is a rare event in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In contrast, CNS-directed therapy is essential for all patients with ALL because without it, the majority of patients eventually will experience relapse. To approach this discrepancy and to explore potential distinct biologic properties of leukemic cells that migrate into the CNS, we compared gene expression profiles of childhood ALL patients with initial CNS involvement with the profiles of CNS-negative patients. We evaluated leukemic gene expression profiles from the bone marrow of 17 CNS-positive patients and 26 CNS-negative patients who were frequency matched for risk factors associated with CNS involvement. Results were confirmed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and validated using independent patient samples. Interleukin-15 (IL-15) expression was consistently upregulated in leukemic cells of CNS-positive patients compared with CNS-negative patients. In multivariate analysis, IL-15 expression levels greater than the median were associated with CNS involvement compared with expression equal to or less than the median (odds ratio [OR] = 10.70; 95% CI, 2.95 to 38.81). Diagnostic likelihood ratios for CNS positivity were 0.09 (95% CI, 0.01 to 0.65) for the first and 6.93 (95% CI, 2.55 to 18.83) for the fourth IL-15 expression quartiles. In patients who were CNS negative at diagnosis, IL-15 levels greater than the median were associated with subsequent CNS relapse compared with expression equal to or less than the median (OR = 13.80; 95% CI, 3.38 to 56.31). Quantification of leukemic IL-15 expression at diagnosis predicts CNS status and could be a new tool to further tailor CNS-directed therapy in childhood ALL.

  11. PD-L1 mAb Treats Ischemic Stroke by Controlling CNS Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bodhankar, Sheetal; Chen, Yingxin; Lapato, Andrew; Dotson, Abby L.; Wang, Jianming; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Saugstad, Julie A.; Offner, Halina

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Both pathogenic and regulatory immune processes are involved in the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model of experimental stroke, including interactions involving the Programmed Death 1 (PD-1) receptor and its two ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2. Although PD-1 reduced stroke severity, PD-L1 and PD-L2 appeared to play pathogenic roles, suggesting use of anti-PD-L monoclonal Ab (mAb) therapy for MCAO. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with a single dose of anti-PD-L1 mAb 4 h after MCAO and evaluated for clinical, histological and immunological changes after 96 h reperfusion. Results Blockade of the PD-L1 checkpoint using a single injection of 200μg anti-PD-L1 mAb given i.v. 4 h after occlusion significantly reduced MCAO infarct volumes and improved neurological outcomes after 96 h reperfusion. Treatment partially reversed splenic atrophy and decreased CNS infiltrating immune cells concomitant with enhanced appearance of CD8+ regulatory T cells in the lesioned CNS hemisphere. Conclusions This study demonstrates for the first time the beneficial therapeutic effects of PD-L1 checkpoint blockade on MCAO, thus validating proposed mechanisms obtained in our previous studies using PD-1 and PD-L deficient mice. These results provide strong support for use of available humanized anti-PD-L1 antibodies for treatment of human stroke subjects. PMID:26306753

  12. ROCK in CNS: Different Roles of Isoforms and Therapeutic Target for Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Chong, Cheong-Meng; Ai, Nana; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen

    2017-01-01

    Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) is a serine-threonine kinase originally identified as a crucial regulator of actin cytoskeleton. Recent studies have defined new functions of ROCK as a critical component of diverse signaling pathways in neurons. In addition, inhibition of ROCK causes several biological events such as increase of neurite outgrowth, axonal regeneration, and activation of prosurvival Akt. Thus, it has attracted scientist's strong attentions and considered ROCK as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington';s disease, multiple sclerosis, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, ROCK has two highly homologous isoforms, ROCK1 and ROCK2. Accumulated evidences indicate that ROCK1 and ROCK2 might involve in distinct cellular functions in central nervous system (CNS) and neurodegenerative processes. This review summarizes recent updates regarding ROCK isoformspecific functions in CNS and the progress of ROCK inhibitors in preclinical studies for neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Effect of a High-Intensity, Intermittent-Exercise Protocol on Neurocognitive Function in Healthy Adults: Implications for Return-to-Play Management After Sport-Related Concussion.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Enda F; Gibbons, Nicola; Kerr, Grainne; Moran, Kieran A

    2015-12-03

    Determination of return to play (RTP) after sport-related concussion (SRC) is critical given the potential consequences of premature RTP. Current RTP guidelines may not identify persistent exercise-induced neurocognitive deficits in asymptomatic athletes after SRC. Therefore, postexercise neurocognitive testing has been recommended to further inform RTP determination. To implement this recommendation, the effect of exercise on neurocognitive function in healthy athletes should be understood. To examine the acute effects of a high-intensity intermittent-exercise protocol (HIIP) on neurocognitive function assessed by the Symbol Digits Modality Test (SDMT) and Stroop Interference Test. Cohort study. University laboratory. 40 healthy male athletes (age 21.25 ± 1.29 y, education 16.95 ± 1.37 y). Each participant completed the SDMT and Stroop Interference Test at baseline and after random allocation to a condition (HIIP vs control). A mixed between-within-subjects ANOVA assessed time- (pre- vs postcondition) -by-condition interaction effects. SDMT and Stroop Interference Test scores. There was a significant time-by-condition interaction effect (P < .001, η2 = .364) for the Stroop Interference Test scores, indicating that the HIIP group scored significantly lower (56.05 ± 9.34) postcondition than the control group (66.39 ± 19.6). There was no significant time-by-condition effect (P = .997, η2 < .001) for the SDMT, indicating that there was no difference between SDMT scores for the HIIP and control groups (59.95 ± 10.7 vs 58.56 ± 14.02). In healthy athletes, the HIIP results in a reduction in neurocognitive function as assessed by the Stroop Interference Test, with no effect on function as assessed by the SDMT. Testing should also be considered after high-intensity exercise in determining RTP decisions for athletes after SRC in conjunction with the existing recommended RTP protocol. These results may provide an initial reference point for future research

  14. CNS-targets in control of energy and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kleinridders, André; Könner, A Christine; Brüning, Jens C

    2009-12-01

    The exceeding efforts in understanding the signals initiated by nutrients and hormones in the central nervous system (CNS) to regulate glucose and energy homeostasis have largely revolutionized our understanding of the neurocircuitry in control of peripheral metabolism. The ability of neurons to sense nutrients and hormones and to adopt a coordinated response to these signals is of crucial importance in controlling food intake, energy expenditure, glucose and lipid metabolism. Anatomical lesion experiments, pharmacological inhibition of signaling pathways, and, more recently, the analysis of conditional mouse mutants with modifications of hormone and nutrient signaling in defined neuronal populations have broadened our understanding of these complex neurocircuits. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the role of the CNS in sensing and transmitting nutritional and hormonal signals to control energy and glucose homeostasis and aims to define them as potential novel drug targets for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's biomarker profiles in CNS infections.

    PubMed

    Krut, Jan Jessen; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Cinque, Paola; Hagberg, Lars; Price, Richard W; Studahl, Marie; Gisslén, Magnus

    2013-02-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker profile in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by decreased beta amyloid (Aβ(1-42)), increased total and hyperphosphorylated tau (t-tau and p-tau, respectively), which is a useful diagnostic tool and gives insight in the pathogenesis of AD. It is of importance to study how these biomarkers react in other CNS diseases; therefore, we decided to analyse amyloid and tau biomarkers in different CNS infections. We also included analysis of soluble amyloid precursor proteins (sAPPα and -β). CSF Aβ(1-42), sAPPα and -β, t-tau and p-tau were analysed in bacterial meningitis (n = 12), Lyme neuroborreliosis (n = 13), herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encephalitis (n = 10), HIV-associated dementia (HAD) (n = 21), AD (n = 21) and healthy controls (n = 42). Concurrent with AD, Aβ(1-42) was decreased in all groups except neuroborreliosis compared to controls. HSV-1 encephalitis, bacterial meningitis and HAD showed lower concentrations of sAPPα and -β compared to AD. T-tau was increased in AD and HSV-1 encephalitis compared to all other groups. P-tau was higher in AD and HSV-1 encephalitis compared to bacterial meningitis, HAD and control. Decreased CSF Aβ(1-42), sAPPα and -β in various CNS infections imply an effect of neuroinflammation on amyloid metabolism which is similar in regard to AD concerning Aβ(1-42), but differs concerning sAPPα and -β. These results clearly indicate different pathologic pathways in AD and infectious CNS disease and may provide help in the differential biomarker diagnostics. Increased p-tau in HSV-1 encephalitis probably reflect acute neuronal damage and necrosis.

  16. Adverse CNS-effects of beta-adrenoceptor blockers.

    PubMed

    Gleiter, C H; Deckert, J

    1996-11-01

    In 1962 propranolol, the first beta adrenoceptor antagonist (beta blocker), was brought on to the market. There is now a host of different beta blockers available, and these compounds are among the most commonly prescribed groups of drugs. The efficacy of beta blockers has been proven predominantly for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Beta blockers are also used for certain types of CNS disorders, such as anxiety disorders, essential tremor and migraine. While low toxicity means that they have a favorable risk-benefit ratio, given the high intensity of use, it is essential to have a comprehensive knowledge of adverse events. Adverse events of beta blockers that can be related to the CNS are quite often neglected, even in textbooks of clinical pharmacology or review articles, and thus often misdiagnosed. The following article, therefore, after summarizing the use of beta blockers for CNS indications, critically reviews the literature on centrally mediated adverse events. General pharmacological features of beta blockers and their molecular basis of action will briefly be addressed to the extent that they are or may become relevant for central nervous pharmacotherapy and side-effects.

  17. A Combination of Ontogeny and CNS Environment Establishes Microglial Identity.

    PubMed

    Bennett, F Chris; Bennett, Mariko L; Yaqoob, Fazeela; Mulinyawe, Sara B; Grant, Gerald A; Hayden Gephart, Melanie; Plowey, Edward D; Barres, Ben A

    2018-05-22

    Microglia, the brain's resident macrophages, are dynamic CNS custodians with surprising origins in the extra-embryonic yolk sac. The consequences of their distinct ontogeny are unknown but critical to understanding and treating brain diseases. We created a brain macrophage transplantation system to disentangle how environment and ontogeny specify microglial identity. We find that donor cells extensively engraft in the CNS of microglia-deficient mice, and even after exposure to a cell culture environment, microglia fully regain their identity when returned to the CNS. Though transplanted macrophages from multiple tissues can express microglial genes in the brain, only those of yolk-sac origin fully attain microglial identity. Transplanted macrophages of inappropriate origin, including primary human cells in a humanized host, express disease-associated genes and specific ontogeny markers. Through brain macrophage transplantation, we discover new principles of microglial identity that have broad applications to the study of disease and development of myeloid cell therapies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Central nervous system (CNS) neuroblastoma. A case-based update.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Federico; Tamburrini, Gianpiero; Gessi, Marco; Frassanito, Paolo; Massimi, Luca; Caldarelli, Massimo

    2018-05-01

    Primary central nervous system (CNS) neuroblastoma is a rare intracranial tumor affecting children mainly in the first years of life. It is usually a supratentorial tumor with a wide spectrum of clinical presentation, seizures, and focal neurological deficits being the most common presenting signs. A 2-year-old child was admitted to our ward after a generalized seizure. Neurological examination was normal. Radiological studies showed a small DWI hyperintense lesion of the right rectus gyrus. Follow-up brain MRI 8 months later showed a huge growth of the tumor (90 × 80 × 65 mm) with polycyclic and apparently defined margins, cystic components, and diffuse contrast enhancement. Complete tumor removal was performed in two planned surgical steps. Histological diagnosis was CNS neuroblastoma. At a follow-up of 8 months, the child is in good clinical and neurological condition and is completing chemotherapy treatment according to the SIOP PNET 4 protocol. A thorough review of the literature confirms that primary CNS neuroblastoma has to be considered a distinct entity. The disease related mortality is 12.5%, lower than the one usually reported for other previously described as PNETs tumors. The most relevant factors influencing prognosis are the possibility of obtaining a complete tumor removal and age more than 3 years, which allows to include radiotherapy among treatment options.

  19. Mechanisms of CNS invasion and damage by parasites.

    PubMed

    Kristensson, Krister; Masocha, Willias; Bentivoglio, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) is a most devastating complication of a parasitic infection. Several physical and immunological barriers provide obstacles to such an invasion. In this broad overview focus is given to the physical barriers to neuroinvasion of parasites provided at the portal of entry of the parasites, i.e., the skin and epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract, and between the blood and the brain parenchyma, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A description is given on how human pathogenic parasites can reach the CNS via the bloodstream either as free-living or extracellular parasites, by embolization of eggs, or within red or white blood cells when adapted to intracellular life. Molecular mechanisms are discussed by which parasites can interact with or pass across the BBB. The possible targeting of the circumventricular organs by parasites, as well as the parasites' direct entry to the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory nerve pathway, is also highlighted. Finally, examples are given which illustrate different mechanisms by which parasites can cause dysfunction or damage in the CNS related to toxic effects of parasite-derived molecules or to immune responses to the infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. In vivo loss of function study reveals the short stature homeobox-containing (shox) gene plays indispensable roles in early embryonic growth and bone formation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Rie; Kamei, Hiroyasu; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2015-02-01

    Congenital loss of the SHOX gene is considered to be a genetic cause of short stature phenotype in Turner syndrome and Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis patients. Though SHOX expression initiates during early fetal development, little is known about the embryonic roles of SHOX. The evolutionary conservation of the zebrafish shox gene and the convenience of the early developmental stages for analyses make zebrafish a preferred model. Here, we characterized structure, expression, and developmental roles of zebrafish shox through a loss-of-function approach. We found a previously undiscovered Shox protein that has both a homeodomain and an OAR-domain in zebrafish. The shox transcript emerged during the segmentation period and it increased in later stages. The predominant domains of shox expression were mandibular arch, pectoral fin, anterior notochord, rhombencephalon, and mesencephalon, suggesting that Shox is involved in bone and neural development. Translational blockade of Shox mRNA by an antisense morpholino oligo delayed embryonic growth, which was restored by the co-overexpression of morpholino-resistant Shox mRNA. At later stages, impaired Shox expression markedly delayed the calcification process in the anterior vertebral column and craniofacial bones. Our data demonstrate evolutionarily conserved Shox plays roles in early embryonic growth and in later bone formation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor plays a permissive role in the maintenance of cardiac contractile function under starvation through regulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xihui; Pacheco, Benjamin D; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Ren, Jun

    2013-08-01

    The cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) protects the heart through AMPK activation. Autophagy, a conserved pathway for bulk degradation of intracellular proteins and organelles, helps preserve and recycle energy and nutrients for cells to survive under starvation. This study was designed to examine the role of MIF in cardiac homeostasis and autophagy regulation following an acute starvation challenge. Wild-type (WT) and MIF knockout mice were starved for 48 h. Echocardiographic data revealed little effect of starvation on cardiac geometry, contractile and intracellular Ca²⁺ properties. MIF deficiency unmasked an increase in left ventricular end-systolic diameter, a drop in fractional shortening associated with cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca²⁺ anomalies following starvation. Interestingly, the unfavourable effect of MIF deficiency was associated with interruption of starvation-induced autophagy. Furthermore, restoration of autophagy using rapamycin partially protected against starvation-induced cardiomyocyte contractile defects. In our in vitro model of starvation, neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes from WT and MIF-/- mice and H9C2 cells were treated with serum free-glucose free DMEM for 2 h. MIF depletion dramatically attenuated starvation-induced autophagic vacuole formation in neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes and exacerbated starvation-induced cell death in H9C2 cells. In summary, these results indicate that MIF plays a permissive role in the maintenance of cardiac contractile function under starvation by regulation of autophagy.

  2. Local and long-range endogenous resting potential gradients antagonistically regulate apoptosis and proliferation in the embryonic CNS.

    PubMed

    Pai, Vaibhav P; Lemire, Joan M; Chen, Ying; Lin, Gufa; Levin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Bioelectric signals, particularly transmembrane voltage potentials (Vmem), play an important role in large-scale patterning during embryonic development. Endogenous bioelectric gradients across tissues function as instructive factors during eye, brain, and other morphogenetic processes. An important and still poorly-understood aspect is the control of cell behaviors by the voltage states of distant cell groups. Here, experimental alteration of endogenous Vmem was induced in Xenopus laevis embryos by misexpression of well-characterized ion channel mRNAs, a strategy often used to identify functional roles of Vmem gradients during embryonic development and regeneration. Immunofluorescence analysis (for activated caspase 3 and phosphor-histone H3P) on embryonic sections was used to characterize apoptosis and proliferation. Disrupting local bioelectric signals (within the developing neural tube region) increased caspase 3 and decreased H3P in the brain, resulting in brain mispatterning. Disrupting remote (ventral, non-neural region) bioelectric signals decreased caspase 3 and highly increased H3P within the brain, with normal brain patterning. Disrupting both the local and distant bioelectric signals produced antagonistic effects on caspase 3 and H3P. Thus, two components of bioelectric signals regulate apoptosis-proliferation balance within the developing brain and spinal cord: local (developing neural tube region) and distant (ventral non-neural region). Together, the local and long-range bioelectric signals create a binary control system capable of fine-tuning apoptosis and proliferation with the brain and spinal cord to achieve correct pattern and size control. Our data suggest a roadmap for utilizing bioelectric state as a diagnostic modality and convenient intervention parameter for birth defects and degenerative disease states of the CNS.

  3. Cell Therapy From Bench to Bedside Translation in CNS Neurorestoratology Era

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongyun; Chen, Lin; Sanberg, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in cell biology, neural injury and repair, and the progress towards development of neurorestorative interventions are the basis for increased optimism. Based on the complexity of the processes of demyelination and remyelination, degeneration and regeneration, damage and repair, functional loss and recovery, it would be expected that effective therapeutic approaches will require a combination of strategies encompassing neuroplasticity, immunomodulation, neuroprotection, neurorepair, neuroreplacement, and neuromodulation. Cell-based restorative treatment has become a new trend, and increasing data worldwide have strongly proven that it has a pivotal therapeutic value in CNS disease. Moreover, functional neurorestoration has been achieved to a certain extent in the CNS clinically. Up to now, the cells successfully used in preclinical experiments and/or clinical trial/treatment include fetal/embryonic brain and spinal cord tissue, stem cells (embryonic stem cells, neural stem/progenitor cells, hematopoietic stem cells, adipose-derived adult stem/precursor cells, skin-derived precursor, induced pluripotent stem cells), glial cells (Schwann cells, oligodendrocyte, olfactory ensheathing cells, astrocytes, microglia, tanycytes), neuronal cells (various phenotypic neurons and Purkinje cells), mesenchymal stromal cells originating from bone marrow, umbilical cord, and umbilical cord blood, epithelial cells derived from the layer of retina and amnion, menstrual blood-derived stem cells, Sertoli cells, and active macrophages, etc. Proof-of-concept indicates that we have now entered a new era in neurorestoratology. PMID:21359168

  4. The distribution of the orphan bombesin receptor subtype-3 in the rat CNS.

    PubMed

    Jennings, C A; Harrison, D C; Maycox, P R; Crook, B; Smart, D; Hervieu, G J

    2003-01-01

    Bombesin receptor subtype 3 (BRS-3) is an orphan G-protein coupled receptor that shares between 47 and 51% homology with other known bombesin receptors. The natural ligand for BRS-3 is currently unknown and little is known about the mechanisms regulating BRS-3 gene expression. Unlike other mammalian bombesin receptors that have been shown to be predominantly expressed in the CNS and gastrointestinal tract, expression of the BRS-3 receptor in the rat brain has previously not been observed. To gain further understanding of the biology of BRS-3, we have studied the distribution of BRS-3 mRNA and protein in the rat CNS. The mRNA expression pattern was studied using reverse transcription followed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Using immunohistological techniques, the distribution of BRS-3 protein in the rat brain was investigated using a rabbit affinity-purified polyclonal antiserum raised against an N-terminal peptide. The BRS-3 receptor was found to be widely expressed in the rat brain at both mRNA and protein levels. Particularly strong immunosignals were observed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampal formation, hypothalamus and thalamus. Other regions of the brain such as the basal ganglia, midbrain and reticular formation were also immunopositive for BRS-3. In conclusion, our neuroanatomical data provide evidence that BRS-3 is as widely expressed in the rat brain as other bombesin-like peptide receptors and suggest that this receptor may also have important roles in the CNS, mediating the functions of a so far unidentified ligand.

  5. Potential Role of Oxidative Stress in mediating the Effect of Hypergravity on the Developing CNS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Nguon, K.; Sulkowski, Z. L.; Lipinski, B.

    The present studies will explore the mechanisms through which altered gravity affects the developing CNS We have previously shown that exposure to hypergravity during the perinatal period adversely impacts cerebellar structure and function Pregnant rat dams were exposed to 1 65 G on a 24-ft centrifuge at NASA-ARC from gestational day G 5 through giving birth Both dams and their offspring remained at 1 65 G until pups reached postnatal day P 21 Control rats were raised under identical conditions in stationary cages On P21 motor behavior as determined by performance on a rotorod was more negatively impacted in hypergravity-exposed HG male 39 5 than in HG female pups 29 1 The total number of Purkinje cells determined stereologically in cerebella isolated from a subset of P21 rats was decreased in both HG males and HG female pups but the correlation between Purkinje cell number and rotorod performance was more consistent in male pups The level of 3-nitrosotyrosine 3-NT an index of oxidative damage to proteins was determined by ELISA in cerebellar tissue derived from a separate subset of P21 rats The level of 3-NT was increased by 127 in HG males but only 42 in HG females These results suggest that the effect of altered gravity on the developing brain may be mediated by oxidative stress These results also suggest that the developing male CNS may be more sensitive to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress than the developing female CNS Supported by NIEHS grant ES11946-01

  6. Designing Out the Play: Accessibility and Playfulness in Inclusive Play.

    PubMed

    Holt, Raymond; Beckett, Angharad

    2017-01-01

    Play is an important part of child development, yet disabled children are often excluded from the opportunity to play, either due to lack of accessible toys and games, or social pressures. This paper presents a case study reflecting on the development of Button Bash: a switch accessible game intended to encourage inclusive play between disabled and non-disabled children. In particular, the paper focuses on how changes intended to make the game more accessible tended to make it less playful, and reflects on the relationship between playfulness and accessibility.

  7. Role of gabra2, GABAA receptor alpha-2 subunit, in CNS development.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Nunez, Veronica

    2015-09-01

    gabra2 gene codes for the alpha-2 subunit of the GABA A receptor, one of the ionotropic receptors which has been related to anxiety, depression and other behavioural disorders, including drug dependence and schizophrenia. GABAergic signalling also plays a role during development, by promoting neural stem cell maintenance and renewal. To investigate the role of gabra2 in CNS development, gabra2 deficient zebrafish were generated. The pattern of proliferation during the embryonic development was disrupted in morphant embryos, which also displayed an increase in the number of apoptotic nuclei mainly at the mid- and hindbrain regions. The expression of several genes ( notch1, pax2, fgf8 and wnt1 ) known to contribute to the development of the central nervous system was also affected in gabra2 morpholino-injected embryos, although no changes were found for pax6a and shh a expression. The transcriptional activity of neuroD (a proneural gene involved in early neuronal determination) was down-regulated in gabra2 deficient embryos, and the expression pattern of gad1b (GABA-synthesising enzyme GAD67) was clearly reduced in injected fish. I propose that gabra2 might be interacting with those signalling pathways that regulate proliferation, differentiation and neurogenesis during the embryonic development; thus, gabra2 might be playing a role in the differentiation of the mesencephalon and cerebellum. Given that changes in GABAergic circuits during development have been related to several psychiatric disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia, this work might be helpful to understand the role of neurotransmitter systems during CNS development and to assess the developmental effects of several GABAergic drugs.

  8. Direct control of peripheral lipid deposition by CNS GLP-1 receptor signaling is mediated by the sympathetic nervous system and blunted in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Nogueiras, Ruben; Pérez-Tilve, Diego; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Morgan, Donald A; Varela, Luis; Haynes, William G; Patterson, James T; Disse, Emmanuel; Pfluger, Paul T; López, Miguel; Woods, Stephen C; DiMarchi, Richard; Diéguez, Carlos; Rahmouni, Kamal; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2009-05-06

    We investigated a possible role of the central glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) receptor system as an essential brain circuit regulating adiposity through effects on nutrient partitioning and lipid metabolism independent from feeding behavior. Both lean and diet-induced obesity mice were used for our experiments. GLP-1 (7-36) amide was infused in the brain for 2 or 7 d. The expression of key enzymes involved in lipid metabolism was measured by real-time PCR or Western blot. To test the hypothesis that the sympathetic nervous system may be responsible for informing adipocytes about changes in CNS GLP-1 tone, we have performed direct recording of sympathetic nerve activity combined with experiments in genetically manipulated mice lacking beta-adrenergic receptors. Intracerebroventricular infusion of GLP-1 in mice directly and potently decreases lipid storage in white adipose tissue. These effects are independent from nutrient intake. Such CNS control of adipocyte metabolism was found to depend partially on a functional sympathetic nervous system. Furthermore, the effects of CNS GLP-1 on adipocyte metabolism were blunted in diet-induced obese mice. The CNS GLP-1 system decreases fat storage via direct modulation of adipocyte metabolism. This CNS GLP-1 control of adipocyte lipid metabolism appears to be mediated at least in part by the sympathetic nervous system and is independent of parallel changes in food intake and body weight. Importantly, the CNS GLP-1 system loses the capacity to modulate adipocyte metabolism in obese states, suggesting an obesity-induced adipocyte resistance to CNS GLP-1.

  9. A patterned recombinant human IgM guides neurite outgrowth of CNS neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaohua; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Jordan, Luke R.; Kumar, Shailabh; Watzlawik, Jens O.; Warrington, Arthur E.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Rodriguez, Moses

    2013-01-01

    Matrix molecules convey biochemical and physical guiding signals to neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) and shape the trajectory of neuronal fibers that constitute neural networks. We have developed recombinant human IgMs that bind to epitopes on neural cells, with the aim of treating neurological diseases. Here we test the hypothesis that recombinant human IgMs (rHIgM) can guide neurite outgrowth of CNS neurons. Microcontact printing was employed to pattern rHIgM12 and rHIgM22, antibodies that were bioengineered to have variable regions capable of binding to neurons or oligodendrocytes, respectively. rHIgM12 promoted neuronal attachment and guided outgrowth of neurites from hippocampal neurons. Processes from spinal neurons followed grid patterns of rHIgM12 and formed a physical network. Comparison between rHIgM12 and rHIgM22 suggested the biochemistry that facilitates anchoring the neuronal surfaces is a prerequisite for the function of IgM, and spatial properties cooperate in guiding the assembly of neuronal networks. PMID:23881231

  10. Development of allosteric modulators of GPCRs for treatment of CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Nickols, Hilary Highfield; Conn, P Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of allosteric modulators of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) provides a promising new strategy with potential for developing novel treatments for a variety of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Traditional drug discovery efforts targeting GPCRs have focused on developing ligands for orthosteric sites which bind endogenous ligands. Allosteric modulators target a site separate from the orthosteric site to modulate receptor function. These allosteric agents can either potentiate (positive allosteric modulator, PAM) or inhibit (negative allosteric modulator, NAM) the receptor response and often provide much greater subtype selectivity than orthosteric ligands for the same receptors. Experimental evidence has revealed more nuanced pharmacological modes of action of allosteric modulators, with some PAMs showing allosteric agonism in combination with positive allosteric modulation in response to endogenous ligand (ago-potentiators) as well as "bitopic" ligands that interact with both the allosteric and orthosteric sites. Drugs targeting the allosteric site allow for increased drug selectivity and potentially decreased adverse side effects. Promising evidence has demonstrated potential utility of a number of allosteric modulators of GPCRs in multiple CNS disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease, as well as psychiatric or neurobehavioral diseases such as anxiety, schizophrenia, and addiction. © 2013.

  11. Sex-specific effects of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on glucose metabolism in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Marques, Claudia; Arbo, Bruno Dutra; Cozer, Aline Gonçalves; Hoefel, Ana Lúcia; Cecconello, Ana Lúcia; Zanini, Priscila; Niches, Gabriela; Kucharski, Luiz Carlos; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia M

    2017-07-01

    DHEA is a neuroactive steroid, due to its modulatory actions on the central nervous system (CNS). DHEA is able to regulate neurogenesis, neurotransmitter receptors and neuronal excitability, function, survival and metabolism. The levels of DHEA decrease gradually with advancing age, and this decline has been associated with age related neuronal dysfunction and degeneration, suggesting a neuroprotective effect of endogenous DHEA. There are significant sex differences in the pathophysiology, epidemiology and clinical manifestations of many neurological diseases. The aim of this study was to determine whether DHEA can alter glucose metabolism in different structures of the CNS from male and female rats, and if this effect is sex-specific. The results showed that DHEA decreased glucose uptake in some structures (cerebral cortex and olfactory bulb) in males, but did not affect glucose uptake in females. When compared, glucose uptake in males was higher than females. DHEA enhanced the glucose oxidation in both males (cerebral cortex, olfactory bulb, hippocampus and hypothalamus) and females (cerebral cortex and olfactory bulb), in a sex-dependent manner. In males, DHEA did not affect synthesis of glycogen, however, glycogen content was increased in the cerebral cortex and olfactory bulb. DHEA modulates glucose metabolism in a tissue-, dose- and sex-dependent manner to increase glucose oxidation, which could explain the previously described neuroprotective role of this hormone in some neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Development of allosteric modulators of GPCRs for treatment of CNS disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nickols, Hilary Highfield; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of allosteric modulators of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) provides a promising new strategy with potential for developing novel treatments for a variety of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Traditional drug discovery efforts targeting GPCRs have focused on developing ligands for orthosteric sites which bind endogenous ligands. Allosteric modulators target a site separate from the orthosteric site to modulate receptor function. These allosteric agents can either potentiate (positive allosteric modulator, PAM) or inhibit (negative allosteric modulator, NAM) the receptor response and often provide much greater subtype selectivity than do orthosteric ligands for the same receptors. Experimental evidence has revealed more nuanced pharmacological modes of action of allosteric modulators, with some PAMs showing allosteric agonism in combination with positive allosteric modulation in response to endogenous ligand (ago-potentiators) as well as “bitopic” ligands that interact with both the allosteric and orthosteric sites. Drugs targeting the allosteric site allow for increased drug selectivity and potentially decreased adverse side effects. Promising evidence has demonstrated potential utility of a number of allosteric modulators of GPCRs in multiple CNS disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease, as well as psychiatric or neurobehavioral diseases such as anxiety, schizophrenia, and addiction. PMID:24076101

  13. Synaptogenesis in the CNS: An Odyssey from Wiring Together to Firing Together

    PubMed Central

    Munno, David W; Syed, Naweed I

    2003-01-01

    To acquire a better comprehension of nervous system function, it is imperative to understand how synapses are assembled during development and subsequently altered throughout life. Despite recent advances in the fields of neurodevelopment and synaptic plasticity, relatively little is known about the mechanisms that guide synapse formation in the central nervous system (CNS). Although many structural components of the synaptic machinery are pre-assembled prior to the arrival of growth cones at the site of their potential targets, innumerable changes, central to the proper wiring of the brain, must subsequently take place through contact-mediated cell-cell communications. Identification of such signalling molecules and a characterization of various events underlying synaptogenesis are pivotal to our understanding of how a brain cell completes its odyssey from ‘wiring together to firing together’. Here we attempt to provide a comprehensive overview that pertains directly to the cellular and molecular mechanisms of selection, formation and refinement of synapses during the development of the CNS in both vertebrates and invertebrates. PMID:12897180

  14. Play to learn, teach by play.

    PubMed

    Palagi, Elisabetta; Stanyon, Roscoe; Demuru, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis provided by Kline in the target article is noteworthy, but ignores the inseparable role of play in the evolution of learning and teaching in both humans and other animals. Play is distinguished and advantaged by its positive feedback reinforcement through pleasure. Play, especially between adults and infants, is probably the platform from which human learning and teaching evolved.

  15. Kynurenines in CNS disease: regulation by inflammatory cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Brian M.; Charych, Erik; Lee, Anna W.; Möller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway (KP) metabolizes the essential amino acid tryptophan and generates a number of neuroactive metabolites collectively called the kynurenines. Segregated into at least two distinct branches, often termed the “neurotoxic” and “neuroprotective” arms of the KP, they are regulated by the two enzymes kynurenine 3-monooxygenase and kynurenine aminotransferase, respectively. Interestingly, several enzymes in the pathway are under tight control of inflammatory mediators. Recent years have seen a tremendous increase in our understanding of neuroinflammation in CNS disease. This review will focus on the regulation of the KP by inflammatory mediators as it pertains to neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. PMID:24567701

  16. Play Therapy: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Maggie L.; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Jessee, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the current issues in play therapy and its implications for play therapists. A brief history of play therapy is provided along with the current play therapy approaches and techniques. This article also touches on current issues or problems that play therapists may face, such as interpreting children's play, implementing…

  17. Inducible targeting of CNS astrocytes in Aldh1l1-CreERT2 BAC transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Winchenbach, Jan; Düking, Tim; Berghoff, Stefan A.; Stumpf, Sina K.; Hülsmann, Swen; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Saher, Gesine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studying astrocytes in higher brain functions has been hampered by the lack of genetic tools for the efficient expression of inducible Cre recombinase throughout the CNS, including the neocortex. Methods: Therefore, we generated BAC transgenic mice, in which CreERT2 is expressed under control of the Aldh1l1 regulatory region. Results: When crossbred to Cre reporter mice, adult Aldh1l1-CreERT2 mice show efficient gene targeting in astrocytes. No such Cre-mediated recombination was detectable in CNS neurons, oligodendrocytes, and microglia. As expected, Aldh1l1-CreERT2 expression was evident in several peripheral organs, including liver and kidney. Conclusions: Taken together, Aldh1l1-CreERT2 mice are a useful tool for studying astrocytes in neurovascular coupling, brain metabolism, synaptic plasticity and other aspects of neuron-glia interactions. PMID:28149504

  18. Inducible targeting of CNS astrocytes in Aldh1l1-CreERT2 BAC transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Winchenbach, Jan; Düking, Tim; Berghoff, Stefan A; Stumpf, Sina K; Hülsmann, Swen; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Saher, Gesine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studying astrocytes in higher brain functions has been hampered by the lack of genetic tools for the efficient expression of inducible Cre recombinase throughout the CNS, including the neocortex. Methods: Therefore, we generated BAC transgenic mice, in which CreERT2 is expressed under control of the Aldh1l1 regulatory region. Results: When crossbred to Cre reporter mice, adult Aldh1l1-CreERT2 mice show efficient gene targeting in astrocytes. No such Cre-mediated recombination was detectable in CNS neurons, oligodendrocytes, and microglia. As expected, Aldh1l1-CreERT2 expression was evident in several peripheral organs, including liver and kidney. Conclusions: Taken together, Aldh1l1-CreERT2 mice are a useful tool for studying astrocytes in neurovascular coupling, brain metabolism, synaptic plasticity and other aspects of neuron-glia interactions.

  19. The Fractal Self at Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author draws on contemporary science to illuminate the relationship between early play experiences, processes of self-development, and the later emergence of the fractal self. She argues that orientation within social space is a primary function of early play and developmentally a two-step process. With other people and with…

  20. Empowering Groups that Enable Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David Sloan; Marshall, Danielle; Iserhott, Hindi

    2011-01-01

    Creating play environments for children usually requires groups of adults working together. An extensive scientific literature describes how groups function to achieve shared goals in general terms, and groups attempting to empower play may find this literature useful. Design principles for managing natural resources, identified by Elinor Ostrom…

  1. Delayed grafting of fetal CNS tissue into chronic compression lesions of the adult cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D K; Reier, P J; Wirth Iii, E D; Theele, D P; Mareci, T; Brown, S A

    1991-01-01

    This review summarizes a series of experiments involving transplants of embryonic feline CNS tissue into chronic compression lesions of the adult cat spinal cord. Fetal spinal cord (FSC), caudal brainstem (BSt), neocortex (NCx) or a combination of either FSC/NCx or FSC/BSt was transplanted as solid pieces or as a suspension of dissociated cells into the developed cystic cavities produced by static-load compression trauma 2-10 weeks prior to grafting. All cats were immunosuppressed with cyclosporin A and their locomotor function was assessed for 6-30 weeks. Following the period of evaluation, all recipients were perfused with fixative and tissue specimens, taken at the transplantation site, were processed for general histological and/or immunocytochemical analysis. Viable graft tissue was found in all animals with the exception of two cats which showed active rejection of their transplants. All of the viable intraspinal grafts were extensively vascularized and did not show any signs of imminent or on-going tissue rejection. Fetal cat CNS grafts showed an extended maturational phase in that features of immature neural tissue (e.g. a paucity of myelination) were still seen even 6-9 weeks after transplantation. By 20-30 weeks, FSC and BSt grafts had attained a more advanced stage of maturation. Transplants in these chronic lesions were extensively blended with both the gray and white matter of the host spinal cord and could be visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI could also detect regions of cavitation at the graft-host interface, as well as within some transplants. While preliminary evidence from behavioral studies suggest that the FSC and BSt grafts may improve or spare locomotor function in some recipients, a more rigorous analysis of post-grafting locomotor function is required to determine conclusively the functionality of these transplants.

  2. Drug Delivery Systems, CNS Protection, and the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ravi Kant

    2014-01-01

    Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB) for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods. PMID:25136634

  3. Plant Derived Phytocompound, Embelin in CNS Disorders: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kundap, Uday P.; Bhuvanendran, Saatheeyavaane; Kumari, Yatinesh; Othman, Iekhsan; Shaikh, Mohd. Farooq

    2017-01-01

    A Central nervous system (CNS) disease is the one which affects either the spinal cord or brain and causing neurological or psychiatric complications. During the nineteenth century, modern medicines have occupied the therapy for many ailments and are widely used these days. Herbal medicines have often maintained popularity for historical and cultural reasons and also considered safer as they originate from natural sources. Embelin is a plant-based benzoquinone which is the major active constituent of the fruits of Embelia ribes Burm. It is an Indo-Malaysian species, extensively used in various traditional medicine systems for treating various diseases. Several natural products including quinone derivatives, which are considered to possess better safety and efficacy profile, are known for their CNS related activity. The bright orange hydroxybenzoquinone embelin-rich fruits of E. ribes have become popular in ethnomedicine. The present systematic review summarizes the effects of embelin on central nervous system and related diseases. A PRISMA model for systematic review was utilized for search. Various electronic databases such as Pubmed, Springer, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar were searched between January 2000 and February 2016. Based on the search criteria for the literature, 13 qualified articles were selected and discussed in this review. The results of the report showed that there is a lack of translational research and not a single study was found in human. This report gives embelin a further way to be explored in clinical trials for its safety and efficacy. PMID:28289385

  4. CNS syndromes associated with antibodies against metabotropic receptors.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Eric

    2017-06-01

    Autoantibodies to Central nervous system (CNS) metabotropic receptors are associated with a growing family of autoimmune brain diseases, including encephalitis, basal ganglia encephalitis, Ophelia syndrome, and cerebellitis. The purpose of this review is to summarize the state of knowledge regarding the target receptors, the neurological autoimmune disorders, and the pathogenic mechanisms. Antibodies to the γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor are associate with limbic encephalitis and severe seizures, often with small cell lung cancers. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) antibodies associate with Ophelia syndrome, a relatively mild form of encephalitis linked to Hodgkin lymphoma. mGluR1 antibodies associate with a form of cerebellar degeneration, and also Hodgkin lymphoma. Antibodies to Homer 3, a protein associated with mGluR1, have also been reported in two patients with cerebellar syndromes. Dopamine-2 receptor antibodies have been reported by one group in children with basal ganglia encephalitis and other disorders. CNS metabotropic receptor antibodies may exert direct inhibitory effects on their target receptors, but the evidence is more limited than with autoantibodies to ionotropic glutamate receptors. In the future, improved recognition of these patients may lead to better outcomes. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of the diseases may uncover novel treatment strategies.

  5. Array tomography of physiologically-characterized CNS synapses.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Ricardo A; Micheva, Kristina D; Kiraly, Marianna; Li, Dong; Madison, Daniel V

    2016-08-01

    The ability to correlate plastic changes in synaptic physiology with changes in synaptic anatomy has been very limited in the central nervous system because of shortcomings in existing methods for recording the activity of specific CNS synapses and then identifying and studying the same individual synapses on an anatomical level. We introduce here a novel approach that combines two existing methods: paired neuron electrophysiological recording and array tomography, allowing for the detailed molecular and anatomical study of synapses with known physiological properties. The complete mapping of a neuronal pair allows determining the exact number of synapses in the pair and their location. We have found that the majority of close appositions between the presynaptic axon and the postsynaptic dendrite in the pair contain synaptic specializations. The average release probability of the synapses between the two neurons in the pair is low, below 0.2, consistent with previous studies of these connections. Other questions, such as receptor distribution within synapses, can be addressed more efficiently by identifying only a subset of synapses using targeted partial reconstructions. In addition, time sensitive events can be captured with fast chemical fixation. Compared to existing methods, the present approach is the only one that can provide detailed molecular and anatomical information of electrophysiologically-characterized individual synapses. This method will allow for addressing specific questions about the properties of identified CNS synapses, even when they are buried within a cloud of millions of other brain circuit elements. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Primary CNS lymphoma as a cause of Korsakoff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Toth, Cory; Voll, Chris; Macaulay, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Korsakoff syndrome presents with memory dysfunction with retrograde amnesia, anterograde amnesia, limited insight into dysfunction, and confabulation. The most common etiology of Korsakoff syndrome is thiamine deficiency secondary to alcoholism. There are limited case reports of structural lesions causing Korsakoff syndrome. A 46-year-old male with a long history of alcoholism presented with a history of confusion, amnesia, and confabulation with no localizing features on neurological examination. The patient showed no clinical change with intravenous thiamine. Computed tomography of the brain revealed a heterogenous, enhancing mass lesion centered within the third ventricle, with other lesions found throughout cortical and subcortical regions. The patient was given dexamethasone i.v. without noticeable clinical improvement but with marked radiological improvement with mass reduction. Stereotactic biopsy revealed a diagnosis of primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma. Most patients presenting with Korsakoff syndrome have thiamine deficiency; however, mass lesions can produce an identical clinical picture. This is the first case report of a patient with primary CNS lymphoma presenting as Korsakoff syndrome.

  7. Training in Fantasy Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter K.

    1983-01-01

    Outcomes of fantasy play training were compared with those of nonfantasy/skills training in English nursery classes and play groups. Children receiving fantasy play training engaged in cooperative play more than did those receiving skills training, played more often in larger subgroups, and were more physically active. Most effects were present at…

  8. The CNS glucagon-like peptide-2 receptor in the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The gut-brain axis plays a key role in the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. In response to luminal stimulation of macronutrients and microbiota-derived metabolites (secondary bile acids and short chain fatty acids), glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1 and -2) are cosecreted from endocrine L cells in the gut and coreleased from preproglucagonergic neurons in the brain stem. Glucagon-like peptides are proposed as key mediators for bariatric surgery-improved glycemic control and energy balance. Little is known about the GLP-2 receptor (Glp2r)-mediated physiological roles in the control of food intake and glucose homeostasis, yet Glp1r has been studied extensively. This review will highlight the physiological relevance of the central nervous system (CNS) Glp2r in the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis and focuses on cellular mechanisms underlying the CNS Glp2r-mediated neural circuitry and intracellular PI3K signaling pathway. New evidence (obtained from Glp2r tissue-specific KO mice) indicates that the Glp2r in POMC neurons is essential for suppressing feeding behavior, gastrointestinal motility, and hepatic glucose production. Mice with Glp2r deletion selectively in POMC neurons exhibit hyperphagic behavior, accelerated gastric emptying, glucose intolerance, and hepatic insulin resistance. GLP-2 differentially modulates postsynaptic membrane excitability of hypothalamic POMC neurons in Glp2r- and PI3K-dependent manners. GLP-2 activates the PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling pathway in POMC neurons by Glp2r-p85α interaction. Intracerebroventricular GLP-2 augments glucose tolerance, suppresses glucose production, and enhances insulin sensitivity, which require PI3K (p110α) activation in POMC neurons. Thus, the CNS Glp2r plays a physiological role in the control of food intake and glucose homeostasis. This review will also discuss key questions for future studies. PMID:24990862

  9. The physiological functions of central nervous system pericytes and a potential role in pain

    PubMed Central

    Beazley-Long, Nicholas; Durrant, Alexandra M; Swift, Matthew N; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2018-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) pericytes regulate critical functions of the neurovascular unit in health and disease. CNS pericytes are an attractive pharmacological target for their position within the neurovasculature and for their role in neuroinflammation. Whether the function of CNS pericytes also affects pain states and nociceptive mechanisms is currently not understood. Could it be that pericytes hold the key to pain associated with CNS blood vessel dysfunction? This article reviews recent findings on the important physiological functions of CNS pericytes and highlights how these neurovascular functions could be linked to pain states. PMID:29623199

  10. Essentials and Perspectives of Computational Modelling Assistance for CNS-oriented Nanoparticle-based Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Kisała, Joanna; Heclik, Kinga I; Pogocki, Krzysztof; Pogocki, Dariusz

    2018-05-16

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a complex system controlling two-way substances traffic between circulatory (cardiovascular) system and central nervous system (CNS). It is almost perfectly crafted to regulate brain homeostasis and to permit selective transport of molecules that are essential for brain function. For potential drug candidates, the CNS-oriented neuropharmaceuticals as well as for those of primary targets in the periphery, the extent to which a substance in the circulation gains access to the CNS seems crucial. With the advent of nanopharmacology the problem of the BBB permeability for drug nano-carriers gains new significance. Compare to some other fields of medicinal chemistry, the computational science of nanodelivery is still prematured to offer the black-box type solutions, especially for the BBB-case. However, even its enormous complexity can be spell out the physical principles, and as such subjected to computation. Basic understanding of various physico-chemical parameters describing the brain uptake is required to take advantage of their usage for the BBB-nanodelivery. This mini-review provides a sketchy introduction into essential concepts allowing application of computational simulation to the BBB-nanodelivery design. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. In-depth characterization of the secretome of mouse CNS cell lines by LC-MS/MS without prefractionation.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jongmin; Han, Dohyun; Park, Joonho; Kim, Sang Jeong; Kim, Youngsoo

    2015-11-01

    Microglia, astrocytes, and neurons, which have important functions in the central nervous system (CNS), communicate mutually to generate a signal through secreted proteins or small molecules, but many of which have not been identified. Because establishing a reference for the secreted proteins from CNS cells could be invaluable in examining cell-to-cell communication in the brain, we analyzed the secretome of three murine CNS cell lines without prefractionation by high-resolution mass spectrometry. In this study, 2795 proteins were identified from conditioned media of the three cell lines, and 2125 proteins were annotated as secreted proteins by bioinformatics analysis. Further, approximately 500 secreted proteins were quantifiable as differentially expressed proteins by label-free quantitation. As a result, our secretome references are useful datasets for the future study of neuronal diseases. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001597 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001597). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. B7-H1 shapes T-cell-mediated brain endothelial cell dysfunction and regional encephalitogenicity in spontaneous CNS autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Luisa; Kuzmanov, Ivan; Hucke, Stephanie; Gross, Catharina C; Posevitz, Vilmos; Dreykluft, Angela; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Janoschka, Claudia; Lindner, Maren; Herold, Martin; Schwab, Nicholas; Ludwig-Portugall, Isis; Kurts, Christian; Meuth, Sven G; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Wiendl, Heinz

    2016-10-11

    Molecular mechanisms that determine lesion localization or phenotype variation in multiple sclerosis are mostly unidentified. Although transmigration of activated encephalitogenic T cells across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a crucial step in the disease pathogenesis of CNS autoimmunity, the consequences on brain endothelial barrier integrity upon interaction with such T cells and subsequent lesion formation and distribution are largely unknown. We made use of a transgenic spontaneous mouse model of CNS autoimmunity characterized by inflammatory demyelinating lesions confined to optic nerves and spinal cord (OSE mice). Genetic ablation of a single immune-regulatory molecule in this model [i.e., B7-homolog 1 (B7-H1, PD-L1)] not only significantly increased incidence of spontaneous CNS autoimmunity and aggravated disease course, especially in the later stages of disease, but also importantly resulted in encephalitogenic T-cell infiltration and lesion formation in normally unaffected brain regions, such as the cerebrum and cerebellum. Interestingly, B7-H1 ablation on myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific CD4 + T cells, but not on antigen-presenting cells, amplified T-cell effector functions, such as IFN-γ and granzyme B production. Therefore, these T cells were rendered more capable of eliciting cell contact-dependent brain endothelial cell dysfunction and increased barrier permeability in an in vitro model of the BBB. Our findings suggest that a single immune-regulatory molecule on T cells can be ultimately responsible for localized BBB breakdown, and thus substantial changes in lesion topography in the context of CNS autoimmunity.

  13. Fibrin Glue Used as an Adhesive Agent in CNS Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Henrich; Almström, Susanne; Olson, Lars

    1994-01-01

    One of the limitations of many bridging experiments in neural transplantation is that the CNS tissues cannot be sutured. Fibrin glue is a two-component system derived from whole blood which, when mixed, reproduces the final stage of blood coagulation and solidifies. Many experimental studies of humans and animals show that fibrin glue repair of peripheral nerves is almost equivalent to microsurgical sutures. In this study, we attempted to extend its use to CNS tissues and transplants. Two techniques were tried: (1) Bilateral parietal knife cuts were performed by stereotaxic technique in six rats. Fibrin glue was applied in the right-side cortical lesion. Immunohistochemistry using antisera to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), laminin and neurofilament (NF) was essentially similar between the control and treatment groups. The immunoreactivity of each marker revealed no significant differences between the two groups on days 1, 7 and 30. There was no difference in terms of gliosis or microvascular proliferation. (2) Embryonic day 16 fetal locus coeruleus was grafted together with E16 cortex to the anterior chamber of sympathectomized eyes. In the six eyes of the glue treatment group, the parietal cortical piece and the locus coeruleus piece were joined together before grafting by immersing them in the solution of fibrin glue. In the eight eyes of the control group, pieces of parietal cortex and locus coeruleus were introduced individually and approximated by gently pressing the cornea. The sizes of double grafts showed no significant difference between groups during six weeks postgrafting. The immunohistochemical pictures using antisera against TH, GFAP and laminin were similar in both groups. Catecholaminergic fibers from the grafted locus coeruleus were found bridging over into the parietal cortical piece in both the control and treatment groups. There was no significant difference in TH-positive nerve fiber density between tissue

  14. Aging Microglia—Phenotypes, Functions and Implications for Age-Related Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Spittau, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Aging of the central nervous system (CNS) is one of the major risk factors for the development of neurodegenerative pathologies such as Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of AD and especially PD are not well understood. However, neuroinflammatory responses mediated by microglia as the resident immune cells of the CNS have been reported for both diseases. The unique nature and developmental origin of microglia causing microglial self-renewal and telomere shortening led to the hypothesis that these CNS-specific innate immune cells become senescent. Age-dependent and senescence-driven impairments of microglia functions and responses have been suggested to play essential roles during onset and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. This review article summarizes the current knowledge of microglia phenotypes and functions in the aging CNS and further discusses the implications of these age-dependent microglia changes for the development and progression of AD and PD as the most common neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28659790

  15. Multiple Notch signaling events control Drosophila CNS midline neurogenesis, gliogenesis and neuronal identity

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Scott R.; Stagg, Stephanie B.; Crews, Stephen T.

    2009-01-01

    The study of how transcriptional control and cell signaling influence neurons and glia to acquire their differentiated properties is fundamental to understanding CNS development and function. The Drosophila CNS midline cells are an excellent system for studying these issues because they consist of a small population of diverse cells with well-defined gene expression profiles. In this paper, the origins and differentiation of midline neurons and glia were analyzed. Midline precursor (MP) cells each divide once giving rise to two neurons; here, we use a combination of single-cell gene expression mapping and time-lapse imaging to identify individual MPs, their locations, movements and stereotyped patterns of division. The role of Notch signaling was investigated by analyzing 37 midline-expressed genes in Notch pathway mutant and misexpression embryos. Notch signaling had opposing functions: it inhibited neurogenesis in MP1,3,4 and promoted neurogenesis in MP5,6. Notch signaling also promoted midline glial and median neuroblast cell fate. This latter result suggests that the median neuroblast resembles brain neuroblasts that require Notch signaling, rather than nerve cord neuroblasts, the formation of which is inhibited by Notch signaling. Asymmetric MP daughter cell fates also depend on Notch signaling. One member of each pair of MP3–6 daughter cells was responsive to Notch signaling. By contrast, the other daughter cell asymmetrically acquired Numb, which inhibited Notch signaling, leading to a different fate choice. In summary, this paper describes the formation and division of MPs and multiple roles for Notch signaling in midline cell development, providing a foundation for comprehensive molecular analyses. PMID:18701546

  16. Autoimmune control of lesion growth in CNS with minimal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathankumar, R.; Mohan, T. R. Krishna

    2013-07-01

    Lesions in central nervous system (CNS) and their growth leads to debilitating diseases like Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's etc. We developed a model earlier [1, 2] which shows how the lesion growth can be arrested through a beneficial auto-immune mechanism. We compared some of the dynamical patterns in the model with different facets of MS. The success of the approach depends on a set of control parameters and their phase space was shown to have a smooth manifold separating the uncontrolled lesion growth region from the controlled. Here we show that an optimal set of parameter values exist in the model which minimizes system damage while, at once, achieving control of lesion growth.

  17. CNS listeriosis: rhomboencephalitis in a healthy, immunocompetent person.

    PubMed

    Katz, R I; McGlamery, M E; Levy, R

    1979-08-01

    A previously healthy woman had a febrile illness resembling aseptic meningoencephalitis. With the exception of mild increase in both CSF pressure and protein concentration, initial findings were normal, including negative bacterial cultures. Bilateral pyramidal and cerebellar signs with multiple lower cranial nerve pareses developed over a 48-hour period beginning on the tenth hospital day. Repeated blood and CSF studies had previously been nondiagnostic, but at that time, cultures became positive for Listeria monocytogenes. No underlying systemic disease or immunodeficiency was discovered. With appropriate antibiotic and supportive therapy, she made slow but significant improvement and, by the time of discharge from the hospital, had only minimal residual neurologic deficit. Clinical aspects of CNS listeriosis including the rare pontomedullary involvement are discussed.

  18. Resveratrol Neuroprotection in Stroke and Traumatic CNS injury

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Mary; Dempsey, Robert J; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a stilbene formed in many plants in response to various stressors, elicits multiple beneficial effects in vertebrates. Particularly, resveratrol was shown to have therapeutic properties in cancer, atherosclerosis and neurodegeneration. Resveratrol-induced benefits are modulated by multiple synergistic pathways that control oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death. Despite the lack of a definitive mechanism, both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that resveratrol can induce a neuroprotective state when administered acutely or prior to experimental injury to the CNS. In this review, we discuss the neuroprotective potential of resveratrol in stroke, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, with a focus on the molecular pathways responsible for this protection. PMID:26277384

  19. Novel approaches and challenges to treatment of CNS viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Avindra; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Existing and emerging viral CNS infections are major sources of human morbidity and mortality. Treatments of proven efficacy are currently limited predominantly to herpesviruses and human immunodeficiency virus. Development of new therapies has been hampered by the lack of appropriate animal model systems for some important viruses and by the difficulty in conducting human clinical trials for diseases that may be rare, or in the case of arboviral infections, often have variable seasonal and geographic incidence. Nonetheless, many novel approaches to antiviral therapy are available including candidate thiazolide and purazinecarboxamide derivatives with potential broad-spectrum antiviral efficacy. New herpesvirus drugs include viral helicase-primase and terminase inhibitors. The use of antisense oligonucleotides and other strategies to interfere with viral RNA translation has shown efficacy in experimental models of CNS viral disease. Identifying specific molecular targets within viral replication cycles has led to many existing antivirals and will undoubtedly continue to be the basis of future drug design. A promising new area of research involves therapies based on enhanced understanding of host antiviral immune responses. Toll-like receptor agonists, and drugs that inhibit specific cytokines as well as interferon preparations have all shown potential therapeutic efficacy. Passive transfer of virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes have been used in humans and may provide an effective therapies for some herpesvirus infections and potentially for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Humanized monoclonal antibodies directed against specific viral proteins have been developed and in several cases evaluated in humans in settings including West Nile virus and HIV infection and in pre-exposure prophylaxis for rabies. PMID:23913580

  20. Drug Delivery to CNS: Challenges and Opportunities with Emphasis on Biomaterials Based Drug Delivery Strategies.

    PubMed

    Khambhla, Ekta; Shah, Viral; Baviskar, Kalpesh

    2016-01-01

    The current epoch has witnessed a lifestyle impregnated with stress, which is a major cause of several neurological disorders. High morbidity and mortality rate due to neurological diseases and disorders have generated a huge social impact. Despite voluminous research, patients suffering from fatal and/or debilitating CNS diseases such as brain tumors, HIV, encephalopathy, Alzheimer's, epilepsy, Parkinson's, migraine and multiple sclerosis outnumbered those suffering from systemic cancer or heart diseases. The brain being a highly sensitive neuronal organ, has evolved with vasculature barriers, which regulates the efflux and influx of substances to CNS. Treatment of CNS diseases/disorders is challenging because of physiologic, metabolic and biochemical obstacles created by these barriers which comprise mainly of BBB and BCFB. The inability of achieving therapeutically active concentration has become the bottleneck level difficulty, hampering the therapeutic efficiency of several promising drug candidates for CNS related disorders. Parallel maturation of an effective CNS drug delivery strategy with CNS drug discovery is the need of the hour. Recently, the focus of the pharmaceutical community has aggravated in the direction of developing novel and more efficient drug delivery systems, giving the potential of more effective and safer CNS therapies. The present review outlines several hurdles in drug delivery to the CNS along with ideal physicochemical properties desired in drug substance/formulation for CNS delivery. The review also focuses on different conventional and novel strategies for drug delivery to the CNS. The article also assesses and emphasizes on possible benefits of biomaterial based formulations for drug delivery to the CNS.

  1. Bortezomib-related neuropathy may mask CNS relapse in multiple myeloma: A call for diligence.

    PubMed

    Abid, Muhammad Bilal; De Mel, Sanjay; Abid, Muhammad Abbas; Tan, Kong Bing; Chng, Wee Joo

    2016-07-02

    Neuropathy is a common adverse effect of bortezomib. Isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse in MM remains exceedingly rare and carries a dismal prognosis. We present an unusual case of bortezomib related neuropathy masking a CNS relapse of MM. A 57-year-old female was diagnosed with standard-risk MM with clinical and cytogenetic features not typically associated with CNS involvement. She was treated with 4 cycles of bortezomib/cyclophosphamide/dexamethasone (VCD) and achieved a VGPR, after which she underwent an autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) followed by bortezomib maintenance. Six months after ASCT she developed symptoms suggestive of peripheral neuropathy which was attributed to bortezomib. However the symptoms persisted despite discontinuation of bortezomib. Imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis subsequently confirmed a CNS relapse. CNS involvement in MM (CNS-MM) is uncommon and is considered an aggressive disease. Recently published literature has reported biomarkers with prognostic potential. However, isolated CNS relapse is even less common; an event which carries a very poor prognosis. Given the heterogeneous neurologic manifestations associated with MM, clinical suspicion may be masked by confounding factors such as bortezomib-based therapy. The disease may further remain incognito if the patient does not exhibit any of the high risk features and biomarkers associated with CNS involvement. In the era of proteasome inhibitor (PtdIns)/immunomodulator (IMID)-based therapy for MM which carries neurologic adverse effects, it is prudent to consider CNS relapse early. This case further highlights the need for more robust biomarkers to predict CNS relapse and use of newer novel agents which demonstrate potential for CNS penetration.

  2. Bortezomib-related neuropathy may mask CNS relapse in multiple myeloma: A call for diligence

    PubMed Central

    Abid, Muhammad Bilal; De Mel, Sanjay; Abid, Muhammad Abbas; Tan, Kong Bing; Chng, Wee Joo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Neuropathy is a common adverse effect of bortezomib. Isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse in MM remains exceedingly rare and carries a dismal prognosis. We present an unusual case of bortezomib related neuropathy masking a CNS relapse of MM. Case presentation: A 57-year-old female was diagnosed with standard-risk MM with clinical and cytogenetic features not typically associated with CNS involvement. She was treated with 4 cycles of bortezomib/cyclophosphamide/dexamethasone (VCD) and achieved a VGPR, after which she underwent an autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) followed by bortezomib maintenance. Six months after ASCT she developed symptoms suggestive of peripheral neuropathy which was attributed to bortezomib. However the symptoms persisted despite discontinuation of bortezomib. Imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis subsequently confirmed a CNS relapse. Discussion: CNS involvement in MM (CNS-MM) is uncommon and is considered an aggressive disease. Recently published literature has reported biomarkers with prognostic potential. However, isolated CNS relapse is even less common; an event which carries a very poor prognosis. Given the heterogeneous neurologic manifestations associated with MM, clinical suspicion may be masked by confounding factors such as bortezomib-based therapy. The disease may further remain incognito if the patient does not exhibit any of the high risk features and biomarkers associated with CNS involvement. Conclusion: In the era of proteasome inhibitor (PtdIns)/immunomodulator (IMID)-based therapy for MM which carries neurologic adverse effects, it is prudent to consider CNS relapse early. This case further highlights the need for more robust biomarkers to predict CNS relapse and use of newer novel agents which demonstrate potential for CNS penetration. PMID:27105248

  3. The effectiveness of a CNS-led community-based COPD screening and intervention program.

    PubMed

    DeJong, Sandra R; Veltman, Rebecca H

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a screening program in identifying undiagnosed individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). THEORETICAL RATIONALE: Underdiagnosis of COPD is common. Symptoms do not usually become apparent until the disease is advanced. Consequently, by the time a diagnosis of COPD is made, based on symptoms, the individual has often lost up to 50% or more of their original lung capacity. Early diagnosis and intervention has been demonstrated to have an impact in slowing the progression of the disease. The study was based on the premise that when individuals become self-aware of their risk factors related to disease, they are more likely to change their behaviors. The Transtheoretical Model describes how individuals move through various stages of change and how they can be helped in transitioning from one stage to another. Subjects (n = 243) were recruited via letter, newspaper, and physician referral. The screening program consisted of (1) pulmonary function testing using a handheld spirometry device, (2) education about the test results and COPD, and (3) smoking cessation counseling. Current smokers and those found to have obstruction were contacted at 8 to 12 weeks after screening. Results indicated that 209 (86%) of participants were at risk for developing COPD as evidenced by current or past smoking status. Mild to moderate stage obstructive disease was found in 55 subjects (23%). Of 61 subjects contacted after the screening, 29 smokers (47%) indicated they had stopped smoking, were in the process of quitting, or were seriously considering quitting. Results support the use of a community-screening program to identify and help modify risk factors for COPD. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICES: This project provides an example of how a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) can exercise all the spheres of CNS influence: the patient/client sphere, the nursing personnel sphere, and the organization sphere. In

  4. Play Therapy. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landreth, Garry; Bratton, Sue

    Play therapy is based on developmental principles and, thus, provides, through play, developmentally appropriate means of expression and communication for children. Therefore, skill in using play therapy is an essential tool for mental health professionals who work with children. Therapeutic play allows children the opportunity to express…

  5. The Play of Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2012-01-01

    The author reviews the role of play within psychotherapy. She does not discuss the formal play therapy especially popular for young children, nor play from the Jungian perspective that encourages the use of the sand tray with adults. Instead, she focuses on the informal use of play during psychotherapy as it is orchestrated intuitively. Because…

  6. Children's Empowerment in Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canning, Natalie

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the level of empowerment and autonomy children can create in their play experiences. It examines the play discourses that children build and maintain and considers the importance of play contexts in supporting children's emotional and social development. These aspects of play are often unseen or misunderstood by the adult…

  7. Why Do the Children (Pretend) Play?

    PubMed

    Lillard, Angeline S

    2017-11-01

    Pretend play appears to be an evolved behavior because it is universal and appears on a set schedule. However, no specific functions have been determined for pretend play and empirical tests for its functions in humans are elusive. Yet animal play fighting can serve as an analog, as both activities involve as-if, metacommunicative signaling and symbolism. In the rat and some other animals, adaptive functions of play fighting include assisting social behavior and emotion regulation. Research is presented suggesting that pretend play might serve similar functions for humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Child's Play: Therapist's Narrative

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Rajakumari P.; Hirisave, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Play has been recognized as an essential component to children's healthy development. Schools of play therapy differ philosophically and technically, but they all embrace the therapeutic and developmental properties of play. This case report is an illustration of how a 6-year-old child with emotional disorder was facilitated to express concerns in child-centered play therapy. The paper discusses the therapist's narration of the child's play. PMID:24860228

  9. Play: early and eternal.

    PubMed Central

    Mears, C E; Harlow, H F

    1975-01-01

    A systematic 12-week investigation of development of play behavior was conducted with eight socially reared rhesus monkey infants. A new, basic and primary play form termed self-motion play or peragration was identified and examined. This behavior follows a human model which includes a wide range of pleasurable activities involving motion of the body through space, e.g., rocking, swinging, running, leaping, and water or snow skiing. It can be argued that self-motion play is the initial primate play form and because of its persistence constitutes a reinforcing agent for maintaining many complex patterns and even pastimes. Monkey self-motion play in the present study was divided into five separate patterns in order to compare the relative importance of social and individual peragration play, the role of apparatus and the overall developmental relationships between the different individual and social self-motion play patterns. The data showed that from 90 to 180 days of age self-motion play was independent of other forms of play, that individual self-motion play appeared earlier and with significantly greater increases in frequency than did social self-motion play, and that apparatus was a necessary component for significant increases in social self-motion play. Other findings were that self-motion play existed independent of locomotion and, though initiated by exploration, was separate from it. Therapeutic implications of self-motion play were discussed. Images PMID:1057178

  10. NCI-CONNECT - Comprehensive Oncology Network Evaluating Rare CNS Tumors | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    NCI-CONNECT:  Comprehensive Oncology Network Evaluating Rare CNS Tumors Purpose NCI-CONNECT aims to advance the understanding of rare adult central nervous system (CNS) cancers by establishing and fostering patient-advocacy-provider partnerships and networks to improve approaches to care and treatment.

  11. Apolipoprotein E modifies the CNS response to injury via a histamine-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Mace, Brian E; Wang, Haichen; Lynch, John R; Moss, Jason; Sullivan, Patrick; Colton, Heidi; Morgan, Kevin; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Laskowitz, Daniel T

    2007-04-01

    Recent evidence demonstrates that apolipoprotein E (apoE) influences the central nervous system (CNS) response to both acute and chronic injury. To address the mechanisms by which apoE influences neurological disease, we examined differential gene expression in the brains of apoE transgenic mice after closed head injury. Apart from confirming the knockout of apoE, the largest differential gene expression occurred for the interleukin-9 receptor (IL-9R), which was > 100-fold up-regulated in apoE-deficient versus wild-type mice. We observed a similar pattern of posttraumatic IL-9R up-regulation in APOE4 targeted replacement mice as compared with their APOE3 counterparts. This difference in gene expression was associated with increased neuronal protein expression of IL-9R in E4 animals compared with E3 as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. The consequence of IL-9R binding in mast cells is the induction of proliferation and differentiation. This indirectly favors degranulation and release of histamine and inflammatory mediators, which have previously been demonstrated to exacerbate secondary neuronal injury. We found that apoE-deficient animals had increased levels of systemic histamine after injury and that pre-treatment with antihistamines improved functional outcomes in apoE-deficient but not wild-type animals after head injury. These results suggest that apoE modifies secondary neuronal injury caused by histamine release and are consistent with previous observations that apoE affects the CNS inflammatory response in an isoform-specific manner.

  12. CNS β3-adrenergic receptor activation regulates feeding behavior, white fat browning, and body weight.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jennifer E; López-Ferreras, Lorena; Chanclón, Belén; Eerola, Kim; Micallef, Peter; Skibicka, Karolina P; Wernstedt Asterholm, Ingrid

    2017-09-01

    Pharmacological β 3 -adrenergic receptor (β 3 AR) activation leads to increased mitochondrial biogenesis and activity in white adipose tissue (WAT), a process commonly referred to as "browning", and transiently increased insulin release. These effects are associated with improved metabolic function and weight loss. It is assumed that this impact of β 3 AR agonists is mediated solely through activation of β 3 ARs in adipose tissue. However, β 3 ARs are also found in the brain, in areas such as the brain stem and the hypothalamus, which provide multisynaptic innervation to brown and white adipose depots. Thus, contrary to the current adipocentric view, the central nervous system (CNS) may also have the ability to regulate energy balance and metabolism through actions on central β 3 ARs. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate whether CNS β 3 ARs can regulate browning of WAT and other aspects of metabolic regulation, such as food intake control and insulin release. We found that acute central injection of β 3 AR agonist potently reduced food intake, body weight, and increased hypothalamic neuronal activity in rats. Acute central β 3 AR stimulation was also accompanied by a transient increase in circulating insulin levels. Moreover, subchronic central β 3 AR agonist treatment led to a browning response in both inguinal (IWAT) and gonadal WAT (GWAT), along with reduced GWAT and increased BAT mass. In high-fat, high-sugar-fed rats, subchronic central β 3 AR stimulation reduced body weight, chow, lard, and sucrose water intake, in addition to increasing browning of IWAT and GWAT. Collectively, our results identify the brain as a new site of action for the anorexic and browning impact of β 3 AR activation. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Alibis for Adult Play

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The social meanings of play sit at odds with norms of responsible and productive adult conduct. To be “caught” playing as an adult therefore risks embarrassment. Still, many designers want to create enjoyable, nonembarrassing play experiences for adults. To address this need, this article reads instances of spontaneous adult play through the lens of Erving Goffman’s theory of the interaction order to unpack conditions and strategies for nonembarrassing adult play. It identifies established frames, segregated audiences, scripts supporting smooth performance, managing audience awareness, role distancing, and, particularly, alibis for play: Adults routinely provide alternative, adult-appropriate motives to account for their play, such as child care, professional duties, creative expression, or health. Once legitimized, the norms and rules of play themselves then provide an alibi for behavior that would risk being embarrassing outside play. PMID:29706842

  14. Advances in understanding the pathogenesis of CNS acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and potential for therapy.

    PubMed

    Frishman-Levy, Liron; Izraeli, Shai

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (CNS-ALL) is a major clinical problem. CNS-directed 'prophylactic' chemo- or radio - therapy is associated with significant early and long-term toxicity. Moreover, greater than a third of the relapses occur in the CNS. To design specific, more effective and less toxic therapy and for personalized precise adjustment of prophylactic therapy there is a need for better understanding of the biology of this disease. Specifically, the precise neurotropic mechanisms of ALL are currently unclear, as is the pathogenesis of CNS relapse. Here we review and contrast the recent findings with earlier studies of pathogenesis of CNS leukaemia. We also describe the challenges in research of this devastating complication of ALL. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Origin, lineage and function of cerebellar glia.

    PubMed

    Buffo, Annalisa; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2013-10-01

    The glial cells of the cerebellum, and particularly astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, are characterized by a remarkable phenotypic variety, in which highly peculiar morphological features are associated with specific functional features, unique among the glial cells of the entire CNS. Here, we provide a critical report about the present knowledge of the development of cerebellar glia, including lineage relationships between cerebellar neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, the origins and the genesis of the repertoire of glial types, and the processes underlying their acquisition of mature morphological and functional traits. In parallel, we describe and discuss some fundamental roles played by specific categories of glial cells during cerebellar development. In particular, we propose that Bergmann glia exerts a crucial scaffolding activity that, together with the organizing function of Purkinje cells, is necessary to achieve the normal pattern of foliation and layering of the cerebellar cortex. Moreover, we discuss some of the functional tasks of cerebellar astrocytes and oligodendrocytes that are distinctive of cerebellar glia throughout the CNS. Notably, we report about the regulation of synaptic signalling in the molecular and granular layer mediated by Bergmann glia and parenchymal astrocytes, and the functional interaction between oligodendrocyte precursor cells and neurons. On the whole, this review provides an extensive overview of the available literature and some novel insights about the origin and differentiation of the variety of cerebellar glial cells and their function in the developing and mature cerebellum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Physiological and pathological functions of acid-sensing ion channels in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Xiang-Ping; Xiong, Zhi-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Protons are important signals for neuronal function. In the central nervous system (CNS), proton concentrations change locally when synaptic vesicles release their acidic contents into the synaptic cleft, and globally in ischemia, seizures, traumatic brain injury, and other neurological disorders due to lactic acid accumulation. The finding that protons gate a distinct family of ion channels, the acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), has shed new light on the mechanism of acid signaling and acidosis-associated neuronal injury. Accumulating evidence has suggested that ASICs play important roles in physiological processes such as synaptic plasticity, learning/memory, fear conditioning, and retinal integrity, and in pathological conditions such as brain ischemia, multiple sclerosis, epileptic seizures, and malignant glioma. Thus, targeting these channels may lead to novel therapeutic interventions for neurological disorders. The goal of this review is to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of the functions of ASICs in the CNS. PMID:22204324

  17. Activation of p44/42 MAPK plays a role in the TBT-induced loss of human natural killer (NK) cell function.

    PubMed

    Dudimah, Fred D; Griffey, Denisha; Wang, Xiaofei; Whalen, Margaret M

    2010-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells destroy (lyse) tumor cells, virally infected cells, and antibody-coated cells. Previous studies indicated that exposure to the environmental contaminant tributyltin (TBT) decreases the lytic function of NK cells and activates mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), including p44/42 (Aluoch and Whalen Toxicology 209:263-277, 2005). If activation of p44/42 is required for TBT-induced decreases of lytic function, then activation of p44/42 to similar extents by pharmacological agents such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) should mimic to some extent changes induced in NK cells with TBT exposures. NK cells were exposed to PMA concentrations between 0.25 and 10 nM for 10 min, 1 h, and 6 h before determining the lytic function ((51)Cr release assay) and phosphorylation state of MAPKs (Western blot). A 1-h exposure of NK cells to 5 nM PMA resulted in a loss of lytic function of 47%. Western blot analysis showed that a 1-h exposure to 5 nM PMA caused a sixfold increase in phospho-p44/42 levels. Previous studies showed a fivefold increase in phospho-p44/42 in response to a 1-h exposure to 300 nM TBT. Exposure to 300 nM TBT caused about a 40% decrease in lytic function. This study supports the hypothesis that p44/42 activation (as seen with TBT exposures) can cause a loss of NK-cell lytic function.

  18. Activation of p44/42 MAPK Plays a Role in the TBT-induced Loss of Human Natural Killer (NK) Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Dudimah, Fred D.; Griffey, Denisha; Wang, Xiaofei; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2009-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells destroy (lyse) tumor cells, virally infected cells and antibody-coated cells. Previous studies indicated that exposure to the environmental contaminant tributyltin (TBT) decreases the lytic function of NK cells and activates mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), including p44/42 (Aluoch and Whalen, 2005). If activation of p44/42 is required for TBT-induced decreases of lytic function, then activation of p44/42 to similar extents by pharmacological agents such as Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) should mimic to some extent changes induced in NK cells with TBT exposures. NK cells were exposed to PMA concentrations between 0.25 and 10 nM for 10 min, 1 h, and 6 h before determining the lytic function (51Cr release assay) and phosphorylation state of MAPKs (Western blot). A 1 h exposure of NK cells to 5 nM PMA resulted in a loss of lytic function of 47%. Western blot analysis showed that a 1 h exposure to 5 nM PMA caused a 6 fold increase in phospho-p44/42 levels. Previous studies showed a 5 fold increase in phospho-p44/42 in response to a 1 h exposure to 300 nM TBT. Exposure to 300 nM TBT caused about a 40% decrease in lytic function. This study supports the hypothesis that p44/42 activation (as seen with TBT exposures) can cause a loss of NK-cell lytic function. PMID:20213532

  19. Role-Playing Mitosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyn, Mark A.; Stegink, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a role playing activity that actively engages students in the learning process of mitosis. Students play either chromosomes carrying information, or cells in the cell membrane. (Contains 11 references.) (Author/YDS)

  20. [Play therapy in hospital].

    PubMed

    Gold, Katharina; Grothues, Dirk; Leitzmann, Michael; Gruber, Hans; Melter, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The following article presents an overview of current research studies on play therapy in the hospital. It highlights individual diagnoses for which play therapy has shown reasonable success. The aim of this review is to describe the current status of the scientific debate on play therapy for sick children in order to allow conclusions regarding the indications for which play therapy is or might be useful.

  1. Play Is the Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Steve; Sanderson, Rebecca Cornelli

    2012-01-01

    Historically, play has been viewed as a frivolous break from important endeavors like working and learning when, in fact, a child's ability to fully and freely engage in play is essential to their learning, productivity, and overall development. A natural drive to play is universal across all young mammals. Children from every society on earth…

  2. Playing against the Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remmele, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    The paper first outlines a differentiation of play/game-motivations that include "negative" attitudes against the play/game itself like cheating or spoilsporting. This problem is of particular importance in concern of learning games because they are not "played" for themselves--at least in the first place--but due to an…

  3. The Excellence of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyles, Janet R., Ed.

    Recognizing that for young children, play is a tool for learning, this book compiles contributions by different authors, reflecting both up-to-date research and current classroom practice as they relate to children's play. Part 1 of the book explores the value of play as a cross-cultural concept as well as one rooted in the Western world. Gender…

  4. Science as Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymo, Chester

    1973-01-01

    Analyzes the nature and characteristics of the scientific endeavor to compare with that of children's play. Describes science as a form of religious sacred play which creates a world of make-believe that one may enter if one chooses to play. (CC)

  5. The Pedagogy of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesbrecht, Sheila

    2012-01-01

    Play is important. Environmental educators Sobel and Louv write about the relationship between children and outside play and suggest that early transcendental experiences within nature allow children to develop empathetic orientations towards the natural world. Children who play out-of-doors develop an appreciation for the environment and…

  6. Evidence that multiple genetic variants of MC4R play a functional role in the regulation of energy expenditure and appetite in Hispanic children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Melanocortin-4-receptor (MC4R) haploinsufficiency is the most common form of monogenic obesity; however, the frequency of MC4R variants and their functional effects in general populations remain uncertain. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize the effects of MC4R variants in Hispani...

  7. Differences in beta-cell function and insulin secretion in Black vs. White obese adolescents: Do incretin hormones play a role?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Black youth are at higher risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) than their White peers. Previously we demonstrated that for the same degree of insulin sensitivity, Black youth have an upregulated beta-cell function and insulin hypersecretion, in response to intravenous (IV) glucose, compared with Whites. T...

  8. FROM ACUTE ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURE TO RETURN TO PLAY - A CASE REPORT EVALUATING RECOVERY OF TENDON STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES.

    PubMed

    Zellers, Jennifer A; Cortes, Daniel H; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2016-12-01

    Achilles tendon rupture results in significant functional deficits regardless of treatment strategy (surgical versus non-surgical intervention). Recovery post-rupture is highly variable, making comprehensive patient assessment critical. Assessment tools may change along the course of recovery as the patient progresses - for instance, moving from a seated heel-rise to standing heel-rise to jump testing. However, tools that serve as biomarkers for early recovery may be particularly useful in informing clinical decision-making. The purpose of this case report was to describe the progress of a young, athletic individual following Achilles tendon rupture managed non-surgically, using patient reported and functional performance outcome measures and comprehensively evaluating Achilles tendon structure and function incorporating a novel imaging technique (cSWE). The subject is a 26 year-old, female basketball coach who sustained an Achilles tendon rupture and was managed non-surgically. The subject was able to steadily progress using a gradual tendon loading treatment approach well-supported by the literature. Multiple evaluative techniques including the addition of diagnostic ultrasound imaging and continuous shear wave elastography (cSWE) to standard clinical tests and measures were used to assess patient-reported symptoms, tendon structure, and tendon functional performance. Five assessments were performed over the course of 2-14 months post-rupture. By the 14-month follow-up, the subject had achieved full self-reported function. Tendon structural and mechanical properties showed similar shear modulus by 14 months, however, viscosity continued to be lower and tendon length longer on the ruptured side. Functional performance, evidenced by the heel-rise test and jump tests, also showed a positive trajectory, however, deficits of 12-28% remained between ruptured and non-ruptured sides at 14 months. This case report outlines comprehensive outcomes assessment in an athletic

  9. Human abuse liability evaluation of CNS stimulant drugs.

    PubMed

    Romach, Myroslava K; Schoedel, Kerri A; Sellers, Edward M

    2014-12-01

    Psychoactive drugs that increase alertness, attention and concentration and energy, while also elevating mood, heart rate and blood pressure are referred to as stimulants. Despite some overlapping similarities, stimulants cannot be easily categorized by their chemical structure, mechanism of action, receptor binding profile, effects on monoamine uptake, behavioral pharmacology (e.g., effects on locomotion, temperature, and blood pressure), therapeutic indication or efficacy. Because of their abuse liability, a pre-market assessment of abuse potential is required for drugs that show stimulant properties; this review article focuses on the clinical aspects of this evaluation. This includes clinical trial adverse events, evidence of diversion or tampering, overdoses and the results of a human abuse potential study. While there are different types of human experimental studies that can be employed to evaluate stimulant abuse potential (e.g., drug discrimination, self-administration), only the human abuse potential study and clinical trial adverse event data are required for drug approval. The principal advances that have improved human abuse potential studies include using study enrichment strategies (pharmacologic qualification), larger sample sizes, better selection of endpoints and measurement strategies and more carefully considered interpretation of data. Because of the methodological advances, comparisons of newer studies with historical data is problematic and may contribute to a biased regulatory framework for the evaluation of newer stimulant-like drugs, such as A2 antagonists. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Electrophysiological CNS-processes related to associative learning in humans.

    PubMed

    Christoffersen, Gert R J; Schachtman, Todd R

    2016-01-01

    The neurophysiology of human associative memory has been studied with electroencephalographic techniques since the 1930s. This research has revealed that different types of electrophysiological processes in the human brain can be modified by conditioning: sensory evoked potentials, sensory induced gamma-band activity, periods of frequency-specific waves (alpha and beta waves, the sensorimotor rhythm and the mu-rhythm) and slow cortical potentials. Conditioning of these processes has been studied in experiments that either use operant conditioning or repeated contingent pairings of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli (classical conditioning). In operant conditioning, the appearance of a specific brain process is paired with an external stimulus (neurofeedback) and the feedback enables subjects to obtain varying degrees of control of the CNS-process. Such acquired self-regulation of brain activity has found practical uses for instance in the amelioration of epileptic seizures, Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). It has also provided communicative means of assistance for tetraplegic patients through the use of brain computer interfaces. Both extra and intracortically recorded signals have been coupled with contingent external feedback. It is the aim for this review to summarize essential results on all types of electromagnetic brain processes that have been modified by classical or operant conditioning. The results are organized according to type of conditioned EEG-process, type of conditioning, and sensory modalities of the conditioning stimuli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Growth of Malignant Non-CNS Tumors Alters Brain Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Nersisyan, Lilit; Mandal, Rupasri; Wishart, David; Mancini, Maria; Sidransky, David; Kolb, Bryan; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2018-01-01

    Cancer survivors experience numerous treatment side effects that negatively affect their quality of life. Cognitive side effects are especially insidious, as they affect memory, cognition, and learning. Neurocognitive deficits occur prior to cancer treatment, arising even before cancer diagnosis, and we refer to them as “tumor brain.” Metabolomics is a new area of research that focuses on metabolome profiles and provides important mechanistic insights into various human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and aging. Many neurological diseases and conditions affect metabolic processes in the brain. However, the tumor brain metabolome has never been analyzed. In our study we used direct flow injection/mass spectrometry (DI-MS) analysis to establish the effects of the growth of lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, and sarcoma on the brain metabolome of TumorGraft™ mice. We found that the growth of malignant non-CNS tumors impacted metabolic processes in the brain, affecting protein biosynthesis, and amino acid and sphingolipid metabolism. The observed metabolic changes were similar to those reported for neurodegenerative diseases and brain aging, and may have potential mechanistic value for future analysis of the tumor brain phenomenon. PMID:29515623

  12. The Detection of Surfactant Proteins A, B, C and D in the Human Brain and Their Regulation in Cerebral Infarction, Autoimmune Conditions and Infections of the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Schob, Stefan; Schicht, Martin; Sel, Saadettin; Stiller, Dankwart; Kekulé, Alexander; Paulsen, Friedrich; Maronde, Erik; Bräuer, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP) have been studied intensively in the respiratory system. Surfactant protein A and surfactant protein D are proteins belonging to the family of collectins each playing a major role in the innate immune system. The ability of surfactant protein A and surfactant protein D to bind various pathogens and facilitate their elimination has been described in a vast number of studies. Surfactant proteins are very important in modulating the host's inflammatory response and participate in the clearance of apoptotic cells. Surfactant protein B and surfactant protein C are proteins responsible for lowering the surface tension in the lungs. The aim of this study was an investigation of expression of surfactant proteins in the central nervous system to assess their specific distribution patterns. The second aim was to quantify surfactant proteins in cerebrospinal fluid of healthy subjects compared to patients suffering from different neuropathologies. The expression of mRNA for the surfactant proteins was analyzed with RT-PCR done with samples from different parts of the human brain. The production of the surfactant proteins in the brain was verified using immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The concentrations of the surfactant proteins in cerebrospinal fluid from healthy subjects and patients suffering from neuropathologic conditions were quantified using ELISA. Our results revealed that surfactant proteins are present in the central nervous system and that the concentrations of one or more surfactant proteins in healthy subjects differed significantly from those of patients affected by central autoimmune processes, CNS infections or cerebral infarction. Based on the localization of the surfactant proteins in the brain, their different levels in normal versus pathologic samples of cerebrospinal fluid and their well-known functions in the lungs, it appears that the surfactant proteins may play roles in host defense of the brain, facilitation of

  13. A potent and selective C-11 labeled PET tracer for imaging sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 in the CNS demonstrates sexually dimorphic expression

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Xuyi; Jin, Hongjun; Liu, Hui

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) plays an essential role in regulating blood–brain barrier (BBB) function during demyelinating central nervous system (CNS) disease. Increased expression of S1PR2 occurs in disease-susceptible CNS regions of female versus male SJL mice and in female multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Here we reported a novel sensitive and noninvasive method to quantitatively assess S1PR2 expression using a C-11 labeled positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand [ 11C]5a for in vivo imaging of S1PR2. Compound 5a exhibited promising binding potency with IC 50 value of 9.52 ± 0.70 nM for S1PR2 and high selectivity over S1PR1 and S1PR3 (both ICmore » 50 > 1000 nM). [ 11C]5a was synthesized in ~40 min with radiochemistry yield of 20 ± 5% (decayed to the end of bombardment (EOB), n > 10), specific activity of 222–370 GBq μmol –1 (decayed to EOB). The biodistribution study in female SJL mice showed the cerebellar uptake of radioactivity at 30 min of post-injection of [11C]5a was increased by Cyclosporin A (CsA) pretreatment (from 0.84 ± 0.04 ID% per g to 2.21 ± 0.21 ID% per g, n = 4, p < 0.01). MicroPET data revealed that naive female SJL mice exhibited higher cerebellar uptake compared with males following CsA pretreatment (standardized uptake values (SUV) 0.58 ± 0.16 vs. 0.48 ± 0.12 at 30 min of post-injection, n = 4, p < 0.05), which was consistent with the autoradiographic results. This data suggested that [ 11C]5a had the capability in assessing the sexual dimorphism of S1PR2 expression in the cerebellum of the SJL mice. Furthermore, the development of radioligands for S1PR2 to identify a clinical suitable S1PR2 PET radiotracer, may greatly contribute to investigating sex differences in S1PR2 expression that contribute to MS subtype and disease progression and it will be very useful for detecting MS in early state and differentiating MS with other patients with neuroinflammatory diseases, and monitoring the efficacy of

  14. A potent and selective C-11 labeled PET tracer for imaging sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 in the CNS demonstrates sexually dimorphic expression

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Xuyi; Jin, Hongjun; Liu, Hui; ...

    2015-06-09

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) plays an essential role in regulating blood–brain barrier (BBB) function during demyelinating central nervous system (CNS) disease. Increased expression of S1PR2 occurs in disease-susceptible CNS regions of female versus male SJL mice and in female multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Here we reported a novel sensitive and noninvasive method to quantitatively assess S1PR2 expression using a C-11 labeled positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand [ 11C]5a for in vivo imaging of S1PR2. Compound 5a exhibited promising binding potency with IC 50 value of 9.52 ± 0.70 nM for S1PR2 and high selectivity over S1PR1 and S1PR3 (both ICmore » 50 > 1000 nM). [ 11C]5a was synthesized in ~40 min with radiochemistry yield of 20 ± 5% (decayed to the end of bombardment (EOB), n > 10), specific activity of 222–370 GBq μmol –1 (decayed to EOB). The biodistribution study in female SJL mice showed the cerebellar uptake of radioactivity at 30 min of post-injection of [11C]5a was increased by Cyclosporin A (CsA) pretreatment (from 0.84 ± 0.04 ID% per g to 2.21 ± 0.21 ID% per g, n = 4, p < 0.01). MicroPET data revealed that naive female SJL mice exhibited higher cerebellar uptake compared with males following CsA pretreatment (standardized uptake values (SUV) 0.58 ± 0.16 vs. 0.48 ± 0.12 at 30 min of post-injection, n = 4, p < 0.05), which was consistent with the autoradiographic results. This data suggested that [ 11C]5a had the capability in assessing the sexual dimorphism of S1PR2 expression in the cerebellum of the SJL mice. Furthermore, the development of radioligands for S1PR2 to identify a clinical suitable S1PR2 PET radiotracer, may greatly contribute to investigating sex differences in S1PR2 expression that contribute to MS subtype and disease progression and it will be very useful for detecting MS in early state and differentiating MS with other patients with neuroinflammatory diseases, and monitoring the efficacy of

  15. Altered energy production, lowered antioxidant potential, and inflammatory processes mediate CNS damage associated with abuse of the psychostimulants MDMA and methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Luke A.; Loftis, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) damage associated with psychostimulant dependence may be an ongoing, degenerative process with adverse effects on neuropsychiatric function. However, the molecular mechanisms regarding how altered energy regulation affects immune response in the context of substance use disorders are not fully understood. This review summarizes the current evidence regarding the effects of psychostimulant [particularly 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine] exposure on brain energy regulation, immune response, and neuropsychiatric function. Importantly, the neuropsychiatric impairments (e.g., cognitive deficits, depression, and anxiety) that persist following abstinence are associated with poorer treatment outcomes – increased relapse rates, lower treatment retention rates, and reduced daily functioning. Qualifying the molecular changes within the CNS according to the exposure and use patterns of specifically abused substances should inform the development of new therapeutic approaches for addiction treatment. PMID:24485894

  16. Altered energy production, lowered antioxidant potential, and inflammatory processes mediate CNS damage associated with abuse of the psychostimulants MDMA and methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Downey, Luke A; Loftis, Jennifer M

    2014-03-15

    Central nervous system (CNS) damage associated with psychostimulant dependence may be an ongoing, degenerative process with adverse effects on neuropsychiatric function. However, the molecular mechanisms regarding how altered energy regulation affects immune response in the context of substance use disorders are not fully understood. This review summarizes the current evidence regarding the effects of psychostimulant [particularly 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine] exposure on brain energy regulation, immune response, and neuropsychiatric function. Importantly, the neuropsychiatric impairments (e.g., cognitive deficits, depression, and anxiety) that persist following abstinence are associated with poorer treatment outcomes - increased relapse rates, lower treatment retention rates, and reduced daily functioning. Qualifying the molecular changes within the CNS according to the exposure and use patterns of specifically abused substances should inform the development of new therapeutic approaches for addiction treatment. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Cytokine-mediated inflammation, tumorigenesis, and disease-associated JAK/STAT/SOCS signaling circuits in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Iain L

    2005-04-01

    Cytokines are plurifunctional mediators of cellular communication. The CNS biology of this family of molecules has been explored by transgenic approaches that targeted the expression of individual cytokine genes to specific cells in the CNS of mice. Such transgenic animals exhibit wide-ranging structural and functional alterations that are linked to the development of distinct neuroinflammatory responses and gene expression profiles specific for each cytokine. The unique actions of individual cytokines result from the activation of specific receptor-coupled cellular signal transduction pathways such as the JAK/STAT tyrosine kinase signaling cascade. The cerebral expression of various STATs, their activation, as well as that of the major physiological inhibitors of this pathway, SOCS1 and SOCS3, is highly regulated in a stimulus- and cell-specific fashion. The role of the key IFN signaling molecules STAT1 or STAT2 was studied in transgenic mice (termed GIFN) with astrocyte-production of IFN-alpha that were null or haploinsufficient for these STAT genes. Surprisingly, these animals developed either more severe and accelerated neurodegeneration with calcification and inflammation (GIFN/STAT1 deficient) or severe immunoinflammation and medulloblastoma (GIFN/STAT2 deficient). STAT dysregulation may result in a signal switch phenomenon in which one cytokine acquires the apparent function of an entirely different cytokine. Therefore, for cytokines such as the IFNs, the receptor-coupled signaling process is complex, involving the coexistence of multiple JAK/STAT as well as alternative pathways. The cellular compartmentalization and balance in the activity of these pathways ultimately determines the repertoire and nature of CNS cytokine actions.

  18. Hypoxia in CNS Pathologies: Emerging Role of miRNA-Based Neurotherapeutics and Yoga Based Alternative Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Minhas, Gillipsie; Mathur, Deepali; Ragavendrasamy, Balakrishnan; Sharma, Neel K.; Paanu, Viraaj; Anand, Akshay

    2017-01-01

    Cellular respiration is a vital process for the existence of life. Any condition that results in deprivation of oxygen (also termed as hypoxia) may eventually lead to deleterious effects on the functioning of tissues. Brain being the highest consumer of oxygen is prone to increased risk of hypoxia-induced neurological insults. This in turn has been associated with many diseases of central nervous system (CNS) such as stroke, Alzheimer's, encephalopathy etc. Although several studies have investigated the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying ischemic/hypoxic CNS diseases, the knowledge about protective therapeutic strategies to ameliorate the affected neuronal cells is meager. This has augmented the need to improve our understanding of the hypoxic and ischemic events occurring in the brain and identify novel and alternate treatment modalities for such insults. MicroRNA (miRNAs), small non-coding RNA molecules, have recently emerged as potential neuroprotective agents as well as targets, under hypoxic conditions. These 18–22 nucleotide long RNA molecules are profusely present in brain and other organs and function as gene regulators by cleaving and silencing the gene expression. In brain, these are known to be involved in neuronal differentiation and plasticity. Therefore, targeting miRNA expression represents a novel therapeutic approach to intercede against hypoxic and ischemic brain injury. In the first part of this review, we will discuss the neurophysiological changes caused as a result of hypoxia, followed by the contribution of hypoxia in the neurodegenerative diseases. Secondly, we will provide recent updates and insights into the roles of miRNA in the regulation of genes in oxygen and glucose deprived brain in association with circadian rhythms and how these can be targeted as neuroprotective agents for CNS injuries. Finally, we will emphasize on alternate breathing or yogic interventions to overcome the hypoxia associated anomalies that could

  19. Natural variation underlies alterations in Nramp aluminum transporter (NRAT1) expression and function that play a key role in rice aluminum tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Yong; Liu, Jiping; Dong, Dekun; Jia, Xiaomin; McCouch, Susan R.; Kochian, Leon V.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is a major constraint for crop production on acid soils which compose ∼40% of arable land in the tropics and subtropics. Rice is the most Al-tolerant cereal crop and offers a good model for identifying Al tolerance genes and mechanisms. Here we investigated natural variation in the rice Nramp aluminum transporter (NRAT1) gene encoding a root plasma membrane Al uptake transporter previously hypothesized to underlie a unique Al tolerance mechanism. DNA sequence variation in the NRAT1 coding and regulatory regions was associated with changes in NRAT1 expression and NRAT1 Al transport properties. These sequence changes resulted in significant differences in Al tolerance that were found to be associated with changes in the Al content of root cell wall and cell sap in 24 representative rice lines from a rice association panel. Expression of the tolerant OsNRAT1 allele in yeast resulted in higher Al uptake than did the sensitive allele and conferred greater Al tolerance when expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis. These findings indicate that NRAT1 plays an important role in rice Al tolerance by reducing the level of toxic Al in the root cell wall and transporting Al into the root cell, where it is ultimately sequestered in the vacuole. Given its ability to enhance Al tolerance in rice and Arabidopsis, this work suggests that the NRAT1 gene or its orthologs may be useful tools for enhancing Al tolerance in a wide range of plant species. PMID:24728832

  20. Automated conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) discovery reveals differences in gene content and promoter evolution among grasses

    PubMed Central

    Turco, Gina; Schnable, James C.; Pedersen, Brent; Freeling, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Conserved non-coding sequences (CNS) are islands of non-coding sequence that, like protein coding exons, show less divergence in sequence between related species than functionless DNA. Several CNSs have been demonstrated experimentally to function as cis-regulatory regions. However, the specific functions of most CNSs remain unknown. Previous searches for CNS in plants have either anchored on exons and only identified nearby sequences or required years of painstaking manual annotation. Here we present an open source tool that can accurately identify CNSs between any two related species with sequenced genomes, including both those immediately adjacent to exons and distal sequences separated by >12 kb of non-coding sequence. We have used this tool to characterize new motifs, associate CNSs with additional functions, and identify previously undetected genes encoding RNA and protein in the genomes of five grass species. We provide a list of 15,363 orthologous CNSs conserved across all grasses tested. We were also able to identify regulatory sequences present in the common ancestor of grasses that have been lost in one or more extant grass lineages. Lists of orthologous gene pairs and associated CNSs are provided for reference inbred lines of arabidopsis, Japonica rice, foxtail millet, sorghum, brachypodium, and maize. PMID:23874343

  1. The retina as a window to the brain-from eye research to CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    London, Anat; Benhar, Inbal; Schwartz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Philosophers defined the eye as a window to the soul long before scientists addressed this cliché to determine its scientific basis and clinical relevance. Anatomically and developmentally, the retina is known as an extension of the CNS; it consists of retinal ganglion cells, the axons of which form the optic nerve, whose fibres are, in effect, CNS axons. The eye has unique physical structures and a local array of surface molecules and cytokines, and is host to specialized immune responses similar to those in the brain and spinal cord. Several well-defined neurodegenerative conditions that affect the brain and spinal cord have manifestations in the eye, and ocular symptoms often precede conventional diagnosis of such CNS disorders. Furthermore, various eye-specific pathologies share characteristics of other CNS pathologies. In this Review, we summarize data that support examination of the eye as a noninvasive approach to the diagnosis of select CNS diseases, and the use of the eye as a valuable model to study the CNS. Translation of eye research to CNS disease, and deciphering the role of immune cells in these two systems, could improve our understanding and, potentially, the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. Zika Virus Selectively Kills Aggressive Human Embryonal CNS Tumor Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kaid, Carolini; Goulart, Ernesto; Caires-Júnior, Luiz C; Araujo, Bruno H S; Soares-Schanoski, Alessandra; Bueno, Heloisa M S; Telles-Silva, Kayque A; Astray, Renato M; Assoni, Amanda F; Júnior, Antônio F R; Ventini, Daniella C; Puglia, Ana L P; Gomes, Roselane P; Zatz, Mayana; Okamoto, Oswaldo K

    2018-06-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is largely known for causing brain abnormalities due to its ability to infect neural progenitor stem cells during early development. Here, we show that ZIKV is also capable of infecting and destroying stem-like cancer cells from aggressive human embryonal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS). When evaluating the oncolytic properties of Brazilian Zika virus strain (ZIKV BR ) against human breast, prostate, colorectal, and embryonal CNS tumor cell lines, we verified a selective infection of CNS tumor cells followed by massive tumor cell death. ZIKV BR was more efficient in destroying embryonal CNS tumorspheres than normal stem cell neurospheres. A single intracerebroventricular injection of ZIKV BR in BALB/c nude mice bearing orthotopic human embryonal CNS tumor xenografts resulted in a significantly longer survival, decreased tumor burden, fewer metastasis, and complete remission in some animals. Tumor cells closely resembling neural stem cells at the molecular level with activated Wnt signaling were more susceptible to the oncolytic effects of ZIKV BR Furthermore, modulation of Wnt signaling pathway significantly affected ZIKV BR -induced tumor cell death and viral shedding. Altogether, these preclinical findings indicate that ZIKV BR could be an efficient agent to treat aggressive forms of embryonal CNS tumors and could provide mechanistic insights regarding its oncolytic effects. Significance: Brazilian Zika virus strain kills aggressive metastatic forms of human CNS tumors and could be a potential oncolytic agent for cancer therapy. Cancer Res; 78(12); 3363-74. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. The p53-p21WAF1 checkpoint pathway plays a protective role in preventing DNA rereplication induced by abrogation of FOXF1 function

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Pang-Kuo; Lee, Ji Shin; Sukumar, Saraswati

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified FOXF1 as a potential tumor suppressor gene with an essential role in preventing DNA rereplication to maintain genomic stability, which is frequently inactivated in breast cancer through the epigenetic mechanism. Here we further addressed the role of the p53-p21WAF1 checkpoint pathway in DNA rereplication induced by silencing of FOXF1. Knockdown of FOXF1 by small interference RNA (siRNA) rendered colorectal p53-null and p21WAF1-null HCT116 cancer cells more susceptible to rereplication and apoptosis than the wild-type parental cells. In parental HCT116 cells with a functional p53 checkpoint, the p53-p21WAF1 checkpoint pathway was activated upon FOXF1 knockdown, which was concurrent with suppression of the CDK2-Rb cascade and induction of G1 arrest. In contrast, these events were not observed in FOXF1-depleted HCT116-p53−/− and HCT116-p21−/− cells, indicating the p53-dependent checkpoint function is vital for inhibiting CDK2 to induce G1 arrest and protect cells from rereplication. The pharmacologic inhibitor (caffeine) of Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related (ATR) protein kinases abolished activation of the p53-p21WAF1 pathway upon FOXF1 knockdown, suggesting that suppression of FOXF1 function triggered the ATM/ATR-mediated DNA damage response. Cosilencing of p53 by siRNA synergistically enhanced the effect of FOXF1 depletion on stimulation of DNA rereplication and apoptosis in wild-type HCT116. Finally, we show that FOXF1 expression is predominantly silenced in breast and colorectal cancer cell lines with inactive p53. Our study demonstrated that the p53-p21WAF1 checkpoint pathway is an intrinsically protective mechanism to prevent DNA rereplication induced by silencing of FOXF1. PMID:21964066

  4. Mapping the accumulation of co-infiltrating CNS dendritic cells and encephalitogenic T cells during EAE

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, Benjamin D; Walker, Alec; Harris, Melissa; Rayasam, Aditya; Sandor, Matyas; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) suggests that CNS-infiltrating dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial for restimulation of coinfiltrating T cells. Here we systematically quantified and visualized the distribution and interaction of CNS DCs and T cells during EAE. We report marked periventricular accumulation of DCs and myelin-specific T cells during EAE disease onset prior to accumulation in the spinal cord, indicating that the choroid plexus-CSF axis is a CNS entry portal. Moreover, despite emphasis on spinal cord inflammation in EAE and in correspondence with MS pathology, inflammatory lesions containing interacting DCs and T cells are present in specific brain regions. PMID:25288303

  5. Detaching reasons from aims: fair play and well-being in soccer as a function of pursuing performance-approach goals for autonomous or controlling reasons.

    PubMed

    Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Mouratidis, Athanasios; Lens, Willy

    2010-04-01

    In two cross-sectional studies we investigated whether soccer players' well-being (Study 1) and moral functioning (Studies 1 and 2) is related to performance-approach goals and to the autonomous and controlling reasons underlying their pursuit. In support of our hypotheses, we found in Study 1 that autonomous reasons were positively associated with vitality and positive affect, whereas controlling reasons were positively related to negative affect and mostly unrelated to indicators of morality. To investigate the lack of systematic association with moral outcomes, we explored in Study 2 whether performance-approach goals or their underlying reasons would yield an indirect relation to moral outcomes through their association with players' objectifying attitude-their tendency to depersonalize their opponents. Structural equation modeling showed that controlling reasons for performance-approach goals were positively associated with an objectifying attitude, which in turn was positively associated to unfair functioning. Results are discussed within the achievement goal perspective (Elliot, 2005) and self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000).

  6. Gut-derived factors promote neurogenesis of CNS-neural stem cells and nudge their differentiation to an enteric-like neuronal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Subhash; Zou, Bende; Hanson, Jesse; Micci, Maria-Adelaide; Tiwari, Gunjan; Becker, Laren; Kaiser, Martin; Xie, Xinmin Simon; Pasricha, Pankaj Jay

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies have explored the potential of central nervous system-derived neural stem cells (CNS-NSC) to repopulate the enteric nervous system. However, the exact phenotypic fate of gut-transplanted CNS-NSC has not been characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the gut microenvironment on phenotypic fate of CNS-NSC in vitro. With the use of Transwell culture, differentiation of mouse embryonic CNS-NSC was studied when cocultured without direct contact with mouse intestinal longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations (LM-MP) compared with control noncocultured cells, in a differentiating medium. Differentiated cells were analyzed by immunocytochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR to assess the expression of specific markers and by whole cell patch-clamp studies for functional characterization of their phenotype. We found that LM-MP cocultured cells had a significant increase in the numbers of cells that were immune reactive against the panneuronal marker β-tubulin, neurotransmitters neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), and neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and showed an increase in expression of these genes, compared with control cells. Whole cell patch-clamp analysis showed that coculture with LM-MP decreases cell excitability and reduces voltage-gated Na(+) currents but significantly enhances A-current and late afterhyperpolarization (AHP) and increases the expression of the four AHP-generating Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channel genes (KCNN), compared with control cells. In a separate experiment, differentiation of LM-MP cocultured CNS-NSC produced a significant increase in the numbers of cells that were immune reactive against the neurotransmitters nNOS, ChAT, and the neuropeptide VIP compared with CNS-NSC differentiated similarly in the presence of neonatal brain tissue. Our results show that the gut microenvironment induces CNS-NSC to produce neurons that share some of the

  7. Liraglutide Reduces CNS Activation in Response to Visual Food Cues Only After Short-term Treatment in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ten Kulve, Jennifer S; Veltman, Dick J; van Bloemendaal, Liselotte; Barkhof, Frederik; Drent, Madeleine L; Diamant, Michaela; IJzerman, Richard G

    2016-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) are associated with reduced appetite and body weight. We investigated whether these effects could be mediated by the central nervous system (CNS). We performed a randomized crossover study in obese patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 20, mean age 59.3 ± 4.1 years, mean BMI 32 ± 4.7 kg/m(2)), consisting of two periods of 12-week treatment with either liraglutide 1.8 mg or insulin glargine. Using functional MRI, we determined the effects of treatment on CNS responses to viewing food pictures in the fasted condition and 30 min after meal intake. After 12 weeks, the decrease in HbA1c was larger with liraglutide versus insulin glargine (Δ-0.7% vs. -0.2%, P < 0.001). Body weight decreased during liraglutide versus insulin glargine (Δ-3.3 kg vs. 0.8 kg, P < 0.001). After 10 days, patients treated with liraglutide, compared with insulin glargine, showed decreased responses to food pictures in insula and putamen (P ≤ 0.02). In addition, liraglutide enhanced the satiating effect of meal intake on responses in putamen and amygdala (P ≤ 0.05). Differences between liraglutide and insulin glargine were not observed after 12 weeks. Compared with insulin, liraglutide decreased CNS activation significantly only after short-term treatment, suggesting that these effects of GLP-1RA on the CNS may contribute to the induction of weight loss, but not necessarily to its maintenance, in view of the absence of an effect of liraglutide on CNS activation in response to food pictures after longer-term treatment. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  8. The MiRNA Journey from Theory to Practice as a CNS Biomarker.

    PubMed

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Du, Amy; Lakis, D Christie; Tipton, Courtney; Arias-Morales, Carlos E; Bergese, Sergio D

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small nucleotide sequences that control gene transcription, have the potential to serve an expanded function as indicators in the diagnosis and progression of neurological disorders. Studies involving debilitating neurological diseases such as, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injuries, Parkinson's disease and CNS tumors, already provide validation for their clinical diagnostic use. These small nucleotide sequences have several features, making them favorable candidates as biomarkers, including function in multiple tissues, stability in bodily fluids, a role in pathogenesis, and the ability to be detected early in the disease course. Cerebrospinal fluid, with its cell-free environment, collection process that minimizes tissue damage, and direct contact with the brain and spinal cord, is a promising source of miRNA in the diagnosis of many neurological disorders. Despite the advantages of miRNA analysis, current analytic technology is not yet affordable as a clinically viable diagnostic tool and requires standardization. The goal of this review is to explore the prospective use of CSF miRNA as a reliable and affordable biomarker for different neurological disorders.

  9. The MiRNA Journey from Theory to Practice as a CNS Biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Du, Amy; Lakis, D. Christie; Tipton, Courtney; Arias-Morales, Carlos E.; Bergese, Sergio D.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small nucleotide sequences that control gene transcription, have the potential to serve an expanded function as indicators in the diagnosis and progression of neurological disorders. Studies involving debilitating neurological diseases such as, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injuries, Parkinson's disease and CNS tumors, already provide validation for their clinical diagnostic use. These small nucleotide sequences have several features, making them favorable candidates as biomarkers, including function in multiple tissues, stability in bodily fluids, a role in pathogenesis, and the ability to be detected early in the disease course. Cerebrospinal fluid, with its cell-free environment, collection process that minimizes tissue damage, and direct contact with the brain and spinal cord, is a promising source of miRNA in the diagnosis of many neurological disorders. Despite the advantages of miRNA analysis, current analytic technology is not yet affordable as a clinically viable diagnostic tool and requires standardization. The goal of this review is to explore the prospective use of CSF miRNA as a reliable and affordable biomarker for different neurological disorders. PMID:26904099

  10. Combinatorial action of Grainyhead, Extradenticle and Notch in regulating Hox mediated apoptosis in Drosophila larval CNS

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Risha; Govinda Rajan, Sriivatsan; Kumar, Raviranjan

    2017-01-01

    Hox mediated neuroblast apoptosis is a prevalent way to pattern larval central nervous system (CNS) by different Hox genes, but the mechanism of this apoptosis is not understood. Our studies with Abdominal-A (Abd-A) mediated larval neuroblast (pNB) apoptosis suggests that AbdA, its cofactor Extradenticle (Exd), a helix-loop-helix transcription factor Grainyhead (Grh), and Notch signaling transcriptionally contribute to expression of RHG family of apoptotic genes. We find that Grh, AbdA, and Exd function together at multiple motifs on the apoptotic enhancer. In vivo mutagenesis of these motifs suggest that they are important for the maintenance of the activity of the enhancer rather than its initiation. We also find that Exd function is independent of its known partner homothorax in this apoptosis. We extend some of our findings to Deformed expressing region of sub-esophageal ganglia where pNBs undergo a similar Hox dependent apoptosis. We propose a mechanism where common players like Exd-Grh-Notch work with different Hox genes through region specific enhancers to pattern respective segments of larval central nervous system. PMID:29023471

  11. Combinatorial action of Grainyhead, Extradenticle and Notch in regulating Hox mediated apoptosis in Drosophila larval CNS.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Risha; Sipani, Rashmi; Govinda Rajan, Sriivatsan; Kumar, Raviranjan; Joshi, Rohit

    2017-10-01

    Hox mediated neuroblast apoptosis is a prevalent way to pattern larval central nervous system (CNS) by different Hox genes, but the mechanism of this apoptosis is not understood. Our studies with Abdominal-A (Abd-A) mediated larval neuroblast (pNB) apoptosis suggests that AbdA, its cofactor Extradenticle (Exd), a helix-loop-helix transcription factor Grainyhead (Grh), and Notch signaling transcriptionally contribute to expression of RHG family of apoptotic genes. We find that Grh, AbdA, and Exd function together at multiple motifs on the apoptotic enhancer. In vivo mutagenesis of these motifs suggest that they are important for the maintenance of the activity of the enhancer rather than its initiation. We also find that Exd function is independent of its known partner homothorax in this apoptosis. We extend some of our findings to Deformed expressing region of sub-esophageal ganglia where pNBs undergo a similar Hox dependent apoptosis. We propose a mechanism where common players like Exd-Grh-Notch work with different Hox genes through region specific enhancers to pattern respective segments of larval central nervous system.

  12. Is there a rational approach for increasing drug specificity? Considerations on CNS target choice and validation.

    PubMed

    Resende, Rodrigo R; Ulrich, Henning; Faria, Marcella

    2007-01-01

    The description of mental illness states brings into light a referential paradox on the absence of grounds for normality. Furthermore, the semiology itself poses a problem throughout the intricate consensual relations between psychiatrists. New molecules with activity on the CNS are ever more specific as to molecular cognitive capabilities, reaching limits of individual genetic variability. Cultural mechanisms of neuronal adaptation also contribute significantly to representations and its correlation with feelings. Neuropeptides increase excitability in various different brain regions, with networks underlying optimal behaviour patterns. Therefore, the sole specification of target molecules yet does not lead directly to specific results, as insights from a systematic approach should conceal. Current validation methods generate insufficient data for discriminating successful treatable candidates. Instead of regarding the heuristics of empirically classified disease models, a new tendency to compromise scientia rationale with technical capabilities should be regarded. Some of the drugs that have obtained patents recently will be discussed in the framework of their rational and actual specificity. The molecular basis underlining function will be contrasted with an alternative approach, namely: how functional organization constrains molecular action. The categories comprising neurogenarative pathologies at one hand and the mood disorders at the other hand will be analysed separately as the procedures guiding drug design in each case seem to be different.

  13. Microglial Priming and Enhanced Reactivity to Secondary Insult in Aging, and Traumatic CNS injury, and Neurodegenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Norden, Diana M.; Muccigrosso, Megan M.; Godbout, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Glia of the central nervous system (CNS) help to maintain homeostasis in the brain and support efficient neuronal function. Microglia are innate immune cells of the brain that mediate responses to pathogens and injury. They have key roles in phagocytic clearing, surveying the local microenvironment and propagating inflammatory signals. An interruption in homeostasis induces a cascade of conserved adaptive responses in glia. This response involves biochemical, physiological and morphological changes and is associated with the production of cytokines and secondary mediators that influence synaptic plasticity, cognition and behavior. This reorganization of host priorities represents a beneficial response that is normally adaptive but may become maladaptive when the profile of microglia is compromised. For instance, microglia can develop a primed or pro-inflammatory mRNA, protein and morphological profile with aging, traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative disease. As a result, primed microglia exhibit an exaggerated inflammatory response to secondary and sub-threshold challenges. Consequences of exaggerated inflammatory responses by microglia include the development of cognitive deficits, impaired synaptic plasticity and accelerated neurodegeneration. Moreover, impairments in regulatory systems in these circumstances may make microglia more resistant to negative feedback and important functions of glia can become compromised and dysfunctional. Overall, the purpose of this review is to discuss key concepts of microglial priming and immune-reactivity in the context of aging, traumatic CNS injury and neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25445485

  14. Locus Ceruleus Norepinephrine Release: A Central Regulator of CNS Spatio-Temporal Activation?

    PubMed

    Atzori, Marco; Cuevas-Olguin, Roberto; Esquivel-Rendon, Eric; Garcia-Oscos, Francisco; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto C; Saderi, Nadia; Miranda-Morales, Marcela; Treviño, Mario; Pineda, Juan C; Salgado, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) is synthesized in the Locus Coeruleus (LC) of the brainstem, from where it is released by axonal varicosities throughout the brain via volume transmission. A wealth of data from clinics and from animal models indicates that this catecholamine coordinates the activity of the central nervous system (CNS) and of the whole organism by modulating cell function in a vast number of brain areas in a coordinated manner. The ubiquity of NE receptors, the daunting number of cerebral areas regulated by the catecholamine, as well as the variety of cellular effects and of their timescales have contributed so far to defeat the attempts to integrate central adrenergic function into a unitary and coherent framework. Since three main families of NE receptors are represented-in order of decreasing affinity for the catecholamine-by: α2 adrenoceptors (α2Rs, high affinity), α1 adrenoceptors (α1Rs, intermediate affinity), and β adrenoceptors (βRs, low affinity), on a pharmacological basis, and on the ground of recent studies on cellular and systemic central noradrenergic effects, we propose that an increase in LC tonic activity promotes the emergence of four global states covering the whole spectrum of brain activation: (1) sleep: virtual absence of NE, (2) quiet wake: activation of α2Rs, (3) active wake/physiological stress: activation of α2- and α1-Rs, (4) distress: activation of α2-, α1-, and β-Rs. We postulate that excess intensity and/or duration of states (3) and (4) may lead to maladaptive plasticity, causing-in turn-a variety of neuropsychiatric illnesses including depression, schizophrenic psychoses, anxiety disorders, and attention deficit. The interplay between tonic and phasic LC activity identified in the LC in relationship with behavioral response is of critical importance in defining the short- and long-term biological mechanisms associated with the basic states postulated for the CNS. While the model has the potential to explain a large

  15. WWOX at the crossroads of cancer, metabolic syndrome related traits and CNS pathologies.

    PubMed

    Aldaz, C Marcelo; Ferguson, Brent W; Abba, Martin C

    2014-08-01

    germline loss of function WWOX mutations have been identified. These patients are characterized by severe CNS related pathology that includes epilepsy, ataxia and mental retardation. In summary, WWOX is a highly conserved and tightly regulated gene throughout evolution and when defective or deregulated the consequences are important and deleterious as demonstrated by its association not only with poor prognosis in cancer but also with other important human pathologies such as metabolic syndrome and CNS related pathologic conditions. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Live imaging of mitochondrial dynamics in CNS dopaminergic neurons in vivo demonstrates early reversal of mitochondrial transport following MPP+ exposure

    PubMed Central

    Dukes, April A.; Bai, Qing; Van Laar, Victor S.; Zhou, Yangzhong; Ilin, Vladimir; David, Christopher N.; Agim, Zeynep S.; Bonkowsky, Joshua L.; Cannon, Jason R.; Watkins, Simon C.; St. Croix, Claudette M.; Burton, Edward A.; Berman, Sarah B.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive convergent evidence collectively suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction is central to the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Recently, changes in the dynamic properties of mitochondria have been increasingly implicated as a key proximate mechanism underlying neurodegeneration. However, studies have been limited by the lack of a model in which mitochondria can be imaged directly and dynamically in dopaminergic neurons of the intact vertebrate CNS. We generated transgenic zebrafish in which mitochondria of dopaminergic neurons are labeled with a fluorescent reporter, and optimized methods allowing direct intravital imaging of CNS dopaminergic axons and measurement of mitochondrial transport in vivo. The proportion of mitochondria undergoing axonal transport in dopaminergic neurons decreased overall during development between 2 days post-fertilization (dpf) and 5dpf, at which point the major period of growth and synaptogenesis of the relevant axonal projections is complete. Exposure to 0.5 – 1.0mM MPP+ between 4 – 5 dpf did not compromise zebrafish viability or cause detectable changes in the number or morphology of dopaminergic neurons, motor function or monoaminergic neurochemistry. However, 0.5mM MPP+ caused a 300% increase in retrograde mitochondrial transport and a 30% decrease in anterograde transport. In contrast, exposure to higher concentrations of MPP+ caused an overall reduction in mitochondrial transport. This is the first time mitochondrial transport has been observed directly in CNS dopaminergic neurons of a living vertebrate and quantified in a PD model in vivo. Our findings are compatible with a model in which damage at presynaptic dopaminergic terminals causes an early compensatory increase in retrograde transport of compromised mitochondria for degradation in the cell body. These data are important because manipulation of early pathogenic mechanisms might be a valid therapeutic approach to PD. The novel transgenic lines and

  17. Live imaging of mitochondrial dynamics in CNS dopaminergic neurons in vivo demonstrates early reversal of mitochondrial transport following MPP(+) exposure.

    PubMed

    Dukes, April A; Bai, Qing; Van Laar, Victor S; Zhou, Yangzhong; Ilin, Vladimir; David, Christopher N; Agim, Zeynep S; Bonkowsky, Joshua L; Cannon, Jason R; Watkins, Simon C; Croix, Claudette M St; Burton, Edward A; Berman, Sarah B

    2016-11-01

    Extensive convergent evidence collectively suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction is central to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, changes in the dynamic properties of mitochondria have been increasingly implicated as a key proximate mechanism underlying neurodegeneration. However, studies have been limited by the lack of a model in which mitochondria can be imaged directly and dynamically in dopaminergic neurons of the intact vertebrate CNS. We generated transgenic zebrafish in which mitochondria of dopaminergic neurons are labeled with a fluorescent reporter, and optimized methods allowing direct intravital imaging of CNS dopaminergic axons and measurement of mitochondrial transport in vivo. The proportion of mitochondria undergoing axonal transport in dopaminergic neurons decreased overall during development between 2days post-fertilization (dpf) and 5dpf, at which point the major period of growth and synaptogenesis of the relevant axonal projections is complete. Exposure to 0.5-1.0mM MPP(+) between 4 and 5dpf did not compromise zebrafish viability or cause detectable changes in the number or morphology of dopaminergic neurons, motor function or monoaminergic neurochemistry. However, 0.5mM MPP(+) caused a 300% increase in retrograde mitochondrial transport and a 30% decrease in anterograde transport. In contrast, exposure to higher concentrations of MPP(+) caused an overall reduction in mitochondrial transport. This is the first time mitochondrial transport has been observed directly in CNS dopaminergic neurons of a living vertebrate and quantified in a PD model in vivo. Our findings are compatible with a model in which damage at presynaptic dopaminergic terminals causes an early compensatory increase in retrograde transport of compromised mitochondria for degradation in the cell body. These data are important because manipulation of early pathogenic mechanisms might be a valid therapeutic approach to PD. The novel transgenic lines and

  18. Auto Transplant for High Risk or Relapsed Solid or CNS Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-04-24

    Ewing's Family Tumors; Renal Tumors; Hepatoblastoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Primary Malignant Brain Neoplasms; Retinoblastoma; Medulloblastoma; Supra-tentorial Primative Neuro-Ectodermal Tumor (PNET); Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor (AT/RT); CNS Tumors; Germ Cell Tumors

  19. Intracerebral Mycobacterium bovis bacilli Calmette-Guerin infection-induced immune responses in the CNS 1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, JangEun; Ling, Changying; Kosmalski, Michelle M.; Hulseberg, Paul; Schreiber, Heidi A.; Sandor, Matyas; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2010-01-01

    To study whether cerebral mycobacterial infection induces granuloma and protective immunity similar to systemic infection, we intracerebrally infected mice with Mycobacterium bovis bacilli Calmette-Guerin. Granuloma and IFN-γ+CD4+ T cell responses are induced in the central nervous system (CNS) similar to periphery, but the presence of IFN-γIL-17 double-positive CD4+ T cells is unique to the CNS. The major CNS source of TNF-α is microglia, with modest production by CD4+ T cells and macrophage. Protective immunity is accompanied by accumulation of Foxp3+CD4+ T cells and PD-L2+ dendritic cells, suggesting that both inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses develop in the CNS following mycobacterial infection. PMID:19535154

  20. Kinase inhibitors for CNS diseases: an analysis of the recent patent literature.

    PubMed

    Amigoni, Federica; Legnaghi, Elena; Pevarello, Paolo

    2012-05-01

    Protein kinases (PKs), as members of an important target class in current pharmaceutical research, have been mostly exploited so far in therapeutic areas such as oncology and inflammation. However, basic research on some PKs as key components of molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and neuroprotection may translate into new medicines for CNS diseases in the next few years. This review is an account of recent patents dealing with kinase inhibitors primarily designed for CNS indications. CNS-directed patents on kinase modulators published after 2008 were surveyed using SciFinder(®) and public patent search engines. Some PK targets, such as GSK-3β, CDK5, ROCK and p38α MAPK, continue to attract interest even though a clinical proof-of-concept is yet to be attained in a CNS setting. Less established PKs such as LRRK2, MLK, PAK and DAPK-1 hold promise as valuable targets of the future.

  1. Gut-CNS-Axis as Possibility to Modulate Inflammatory Disease Activity-Implications for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Ann-Katrin; Schuppan, Detlef; Wiendl, Heinz; Klotz, Luisa

    2017-07-14

    In the last decade the role of environmental factors as modulators of disease activity and progression has received increasing attention. In contrast to classical environmental modulators such as exposure to sun-light or fine dust pollution, nutrition is an ideal tool for a personalized human intervention. Various studies demonstrate a key role of dietary factors in autoimmune diseases including Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), rheumatoid arthritis or inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). In this review we discuss the connection between diet and inflammatory processes via the gut-CNS-axis. This axis describes a bi-directional communication system and comprises neuronal signaling, neuroendocrine pathways and modulation of immune responses. Therefore, the gut-CNS-axis represents an emerging target to modify CNS inflammatory activity ultimately opening new avenues for complementary and adjunctive treatment of autoimmune diseases such as MS.

  2. Targeting blood–brain barrier changes during inflammatory pain: an opportunity for optimizing CNS drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ronaldson, Patrick T; Davis, Thomas P

    2012-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is the most significant obstacle to effective CNS drug delivery. It possesses structural and biochemical features (i.e., tight-junction protein complexes and, influx and efflux transporters) that restrict xenobiotic permeation. Pathophysiological stressors (i.e., peripheral inflammatory pain) can alter BBB tight junctions and transporters, which leads to drug-permeation changes. This is especially critical for opioids, which require precise CNS concentrations to be safe and effective analgesics. Recent studies have identified molecular targets (i.e., endogenous transporters and intracellular signaling systems) that can be exploited for optimization of CNS drug delivery. This article summarizes current knowledge in this area and emphasizes those targets that present the greatest opportunity for controlling drug permeation and/or drug transport across the BBB in an effort to achieve optimal CNS opioid delivery. PMID:22468221

  3. CNS Injury: Posttranslational Modification of the Tau Protein as a Biomarker.

    PubMed

    Caprelli, Mitchell T; Mothe, Andrea J; Tator, Charles H

    2017-11-01

    The ideal biomarker for central nervous system (CNS) trauma in patients would be a molecular marker specific for injured nervous tissue that would provide a consistent and reliable assessment of the presence and severity of injury and the prognosis for recovery. One candidate biomarker is the protein tau, a microtubule-associated protein abundant in the axonal compartment of CNS neurons. Following axonal injury, tau becomes modified primarily by hyperphosphorylation of its various amino acid residues and cleavage into smaller fragments. These posttrauma products can leak into the cerebrospinal fluid or bloodstream and become candidate biomarkers of CNS injury. This review examines the primary molecular changes that tau undergoes following traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, and reviews the current literature in traumatic CNS biomarker research with a focus on the potential for hyperphosphorylated and cleaved tau as sensitive biomarkers of injury.

  4. An Invitation to Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Jenny; Zieher, Connie

    The manual is intended to provide suggestions for play to parents of young children with exceptional educational needs. Nineteen types of activities are described and pictured, including make believe with boxes, dress-up activities, kitchen play, bubbles, small motor activities using beans and buttons, use of throw-away materials, painting,…

  5. Playing for Peace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarrella, Maureen

    1998-01-01

    Play for Peace brings children of conflicting cultures together through cooperative play. Partner organizations and volunteers in areas such as the Balkans and urban Chicago support the training of teenage facilitators, who learn through experience how to facilitate cooperative, noncompetitive games for children aged 6-10. (SV)

  6. Communication in Symbolic Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umek, Ljubica Marjanovic; Musek, Petra Lesnik; Kranjc, Simona

    2001-01-01

    Analyzed records of Slovene children's speech from a linguistic point of view and established differences in communication patterns with regard to the children's ages and the type of symbolic play. Found a shift in play from make-believe with regard to objects to roleplay related to social context. The older the child, the more language functions…

  7. Play and Digital Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, James E.; Christie, James F.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines how play is affected by computers and digital toys. Research indicates that when computer software targeted at children is problem-solving oriented and open-ended, children tend to engage in creative play and interact with peers in a positive manner. On the other hand, drill-and-practice programs can be quite boring and limit…

  8. Let's Just Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Janet

    2003-01-01

    Children have a right to play. The idea is so simple it seems self-evident. But a stroll through any toy superstore, or any half-hour of so-called "children's" programming on commercial TV, makes it clear that violence, not play, dominates what's being sold. In this article, the author discusses how teachers and parents share the responsibility in…

  9. Guidelines for Medical Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrenga, Mary Anne

    Medical play can be used as a tool to aid children in coping with stress related to hospitalization, surgery, medical care, and illness. Providing children with adequate guidance and appropriate supplies necessary for medical play, prepares children for medical experiences by enabling them to express their thoughts and feelings. Before attempting…

  10. Growing Up with Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katch, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Many adults are afraid of boys' play today, believing that the aggression that is so common in boys' fantasies is dangerous and might make them become violent men. This personal reflection describes the importance of multiage play in showing little boys how to become big boys while encouraging empathy and emotional growth in older boys. The author…

  11. The Play's the Thing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateman, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    The modern special education theater in the United States has hosted many plays, none with a larger or more diverse cast than the learning disabilities (LD) play. During the prologue, the children with LD were waiting in the wings, not yet identified as LD but there, nonetheless. With the advent of compulsory education in this country, awareness…

  12. Return to Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Call it physical activity, call it games, or call it play. Whatever its name, it's a place we all need to return to. In the physical education, recreation, and dance professions, we need to redesign programs to address the need for and want of play that is inherent in all of us.

  13. The Fear of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almon, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Real play--play that is initiated and directed by children and that bubbles up from within the child rather than being imposed by adults--has largely disappeared from the landscape of childhood in the United States. There are many reasons for this, such as the long hours spent in front of screens each day or in activities organized by adults. In…

  14. Family Play Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariel, Shlomo

    This paper examines a case study of family play therapy in Israel. The unique contributions of play therapy are evaluated including the therapy's accessibility to young children, its richness and flexibility, its exposure of covert patterns, its wealth of therapeutic means, and its therapeutic economy. The systematization of the therapy attempts…

  15. Computers and Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colker, Larry

    Viewing computers in various forms as developmentally appropriate objects for children, this discussion provides a framework for integrating conceptions of computers and conceptions of play. Several instances are cited from the literature in which explicit analogies have been made between computers and playthings or play environments.…

  16. The Therapeutic Play Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiffer, Mortimer

    A discussion of group play therapy includes chapters on the school as a setting for treating emotionally disturbed children and focuses on suggestions for group workers. A synopsis of the play group treatment process precedes a description of considerations in organizing groups and methods for working with the children. Recommendations are made…

  17. Play, Policy & Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klugman, Edgar, Ed.

    In 1992, the U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF), in conjunction with Wheelock College (Boston), sponsored its second workshop on children's play, entitled "Play and Cognitive Ability: The Cultural Context." This volume reflects the presentations and discussions held at the workshop, offering perspectives on children's play…

  18. Cooperative Interactions between Different Classes of Disordered Proteins Play a Functional Role in the Nuclear Pore Complex of Baker’s Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ando, David; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2017-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is highly selective, efficient, and is regulated by a poorly understood mechanism involving hundreds of disordered FG nucleoporin proteins (FG nups) lining the inside wall of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Previous research has concluded that FG nups in Baker’s yeast (S. cerevisiae) are present in a bimodal distribution, with the “Forest Model” classifying FG nups as either di-block polymer like “trees” or single-block polymer like “shrubs”. Using a combination of coarse-grained modeling and polymer brush modeling, the function of the di-block FG nups has previously been hypothesized in the Di-block Copolymer Brush Gate (DCBG) model to form a higher-order polymer brush architecture which can open and close to regulate transport across the NPC. In this manuscript we work to extend the original DCBG model by first performing coarse grained simulations of the single-block FG nups which confirm that they have a single block polymer structure rather than the di-block structure of tree nups. Our molecular simulations also demonstrate that these single-block FG nups are likely cohesive, compact, collapsed coil polymers, implying that these FG nups are generally localized to their grafting location within the NPC. We find that adding a layer of single-block FG nups to the DCBG model increases the range of cargo sizes which are able to translocate the pore through a cooperative effect involving single-block and di-block FG nups. This effect can explain the puzzling connection between single-block FG nup deletion mutants in S. cerevisiae and the resulting failure of certain large cargo transport through the NPC. Facilitation of large cargo transport via single-block and di-block FG nup cooperativity in the nuclear pore could provide a model mechanism for designing future biomimetic pores of greater applicability. PMID:28068389

  19. Targeting cFMS signaling to restore immune function and eradicate HIV reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerngross, Lindsey

    While combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) has improved the length and quality of life of individuals living with HIV-1 infection, the prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) has increased and remains a significant clinical concern. The neuropathogenesis of HAND is not completely understood, however, latent HIV infection in the central nervous system (CNS) and chronic neuroinflammation are believed to play a prominent role. CNS-associated macrophages and resident microglia are significant contributors to CNS inflammation and constitute the chief reservoir of HIV-1 infection in the CNS. Previous studies from our lab suggest monocyte/macrophage invasion of the CNS in HIV may be driven by altered monocyte/macrophage homeostasis. We have reported expansion of a monocyte subset (CD14+CD16 +CD163+) in peripheral blood of HIV+ patients that is phenotypically similar to macrophages/microglia that accumulate in the CNS as seen in post-mortem tissue. The factors driving the expansion of this monocyte subset are unknown, however, signaling through cFMS, a type III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), may play a role. Macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), a ligand of cFMS, has been shown to be elevated in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) of individuals with the most severe form of HAND, HIV-associated dementia (HAD). M-CSF promotes a Macrophage-2-like phenotype and increases CD16 and CD163 expression in cultured monocytes. M-CSF has also been shown to increase the susceptibility of macrophages to HIV infection and enhance virus production. These findings, in addition to the known function of M-CSF in promoting macrophage survival, supports a role for M-CSF in the development and maintenance of macrophage viral reservoirs in tissues where these cells accumulate, including the CNS. Interestingly, a second ligand for cFMS, IL-34, was recently identified and reported to share some functions with M-CSF, suggesting that both ligands may contribute to HIV

  20. IL-1β Signaling Promotes CNS-Intrinsic Immune Control of West Nile Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Hilario J.; Lanteri, Marion C.; Blahnik, Gabriele; Negash, Amina; Suthar, Mehul S.; Brassil, Margaret M.; Sodhi, Khushbu; Treuting, Piper M.; Busch, Michael P.; Norris, Philip J.; Gale, Michael

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an emerging flavivirus capable of infecting the central nervous system (CNS) and mediating neuronal cell death and tissue destruction. The processes that promote inflammation and encephalitis within the CNS are important for control of WNV disease but, how inflammatory signaling pathways operate to control CNS infection is not defined. Here, we identify IL-1β signaling and the NLRP3 inflammasome as key host restriction factors involved in viral control and CNS disease associated with WNV infection. Individuals presenting with acute WNV infection displayed elevated levels of IL-1β in their plasma over the course of infection, suggesting a role for IL-1β in WNV immunity. Indeed, we found that in a mouse model of infection, WNV induced the acute production of IL-1β in vivo, and that animals lacking the IL-1 receptor or components involved in inflammasome signaling complex exhibited increased susceptibility to WNV pathogenesis. This outcome associated with increased accumulation of virus within the CNS but not peripheral tissues and was further associated with altered kinetics and magnitude of inflammation, reduced quality of the effector CD8+ T cell response and reduced anti-viral activity within the CNS. Importantly, we found that WNV infection triggers production of IL-1β from cortical neurons. Furthermore, we found that IL-1β signaling synergizes with type I IFN to suppress WNV replication in neurons, thus implicating antiviral activity of IL-1β within neurons and control of virus replication within the CNS. Our studies thus define the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway and IL-1β signaling as key features controlling WNV infection and immunity in the CNS, and reveal a novel role for IL-1β in antiviral action that restricts virus replication in neurons. PMID:23209411

  1. Redox Abnormalities as a Vulnerability Phenotype for Autism and Related Alterations in CNS Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    the hypothesis that SJL mice would have impaired neuronal dendrite generation, as has been observed in autism . This was our prediction due to the...phenotype for Autism and related alterations in CNS development PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mark D. Noble, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE Redox abnormalities as a vulnerability phenotype for Autism 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER And related alterations in CNS development 5b. GRANT

  2. Role of Academic Drug Discovery in the Quest for New CNS Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yokley, Brian H; Hartman, Matthew; Slusher, Barbara S

    2017-03-15

    There was a greater than 50% decline in central nervous system (CNS) drug discovery and development programs by major pharmaceutical companies from 2009 to 2014. This decline was paralleled by a rise in the number of university led drug discovery centers, many in the CNS area, and a growth in the number of public-private drug discovery partnerships. Diverse operating models have emerged as the academic drug discovery centers adapt to this changing ecosystem.

  3. Primary CNS Lymphoma in Children and Adolescents: A Descriptive Analysis from the International Primary CNS Lymphoma Collaborative Group (IPCG)

    PubMed Central

    Abla, Oussama; Weitzman, Sheila; Blay, Jean-Yves; O’Neill, Brian Patrick; Abrey, Lauren E.; Neuwelt, Edward; Doolittle, Nancy D.; Baehring, Joachim; Pradhan, Kamnesh; Martin, S. Eric; Guerrera, Michael; Shah, Shafqat; Ghesquieres, Hervé; Silver, Michael; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Batchelor, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the demographic and clinical features and outcomes for children and adolescents with primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL). Experimental Design A retrospective series of children and adolescents with PCNSL was assembled from ten cancer centers in three countries. Results Twenty-nine patients with a median age of 14 years were identified. Sixteen (55%) had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) ≥ 1. Front line therapy consisted of chemotherapy (CT) only in twenty patients (69%), while 9 (31%) had CT plus cranial radiotherapy. Most patients received methotrexate (MTX)-based regimens. Overall response rate was 86% (CR 69%, PR 17%). The 2 year PFS and OS rates were 61% and 86%, respectively; the 3 year OS was 82%. Univariate analyses were conducted for age (≤ 14 vs > 14 years), PS (0 or 1 vs >1), deep brain lesions, MTX dose, primary treatment with CT alone, intrathecal chemotherapy and high-dose therapy. Primary treatment with CT alone was associated with better overall response rates with an OR of 0.125 (p=0.02). There was a marginally significant relationship between higher doses of MTX and response (OR =1.5, p = 0.06). ECOG-PS of 0–1 was the only factor associated with better outcome with hazard ratios of 0.136 (p = 0.017) and 0.073(p = 0.033) for PFS and OS, respectively. Conclusion This is the largest series collected of pediatric PCNSL. The outcome of children and adolescents appears to be better than in adults. PS of 0–1 is associated with better survival. PMID:21224370

  4. Changes in microtubule stability and density in myelin-deficient shiverer mouse CNS axons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, L. L.; Witt, A. S.; Payne, H. R.; Shine, H. D.; Brady, S. T.

    2001-01-01

    Altered axon-Schwann cell interactions in PNS myelin-deficient Trembler mice result in changed axonal transport rates, neurofilament and microtubule-associated protein phosphorylation, neurofilament density, and microtubule stability. To determine whether PNS and CNS myelination have equivalent effects on axons, neurofilaments, and microtubules in CNS, myelin-deficient shiverer axons were examined. The genetic defect in shiverer is a deletion in the myelin basic protein (MBP) gene, an essential component of CNS myelin. As a result, shiverer mice have little or no compact CNS myelin. Slow axonal transport rates in shiverer CNS axons were significantly increased, in contrast to the slowing in demyelinated PNS nerves. Even more striking were substantial changes in the composition and properties of microtubules in shiverer CNS axons. The density of axonal microtubules is increased, reflecting increased expression of tubulin in shiverer, and the stability of microtubules is drastically reduced in shiverer axons. Shiverer transgenic mice with two copies of a wild-type myelin basic protein transgene have an intermediate level of compact myelin, making it possible to determine whether the actual level of compact myelin is an important regulator of axonal microtubules. Both increased microtubule density and reduced microtubule stability were still observed in transgenic mouse nerves, indicating that signals beyond synaptogenesis and the mere presence of compact myelin are required for normal regulation of the axonal microtubule cytoskeleton.

  5. CNS infections in Greenland: A nationwide register-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nordholm, Anne Christine; Søborg, Bolette; Andersson, Mikael; Hoffmann, Steen; Skinhøj, Peter; Koch, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Background Indigenous Arctic people suffer from high rates of infectious diseases. However, the burden of central nervous system (CNS) infections is poorly documented. This study aimed to estimate incidence rates and mortality of CNS infections among Inuits and non-Inuits in Greenland and in Denmark. Methods We conducted a nationwide cohort study using the populations of Greenland and Denmark 1990–2012. Information on CNS infection hospitalizations and pathogens was retrieved from national registries and laboratories. Incidence rates were estimated as cases per 100,000 person-years. Incidence rate ratios were calculated using log-linear Poisson-regression. Mortality was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves and Log Rank test. Results The incidence rate of CNS infections was twice as high in Greenland (35.6 per 100,000 person years) as in Denmark (17.7 per 100,000 person years), but equally high among Inuits in Greenland and Denmark (38.2 and 35.4, respectively). Mortality from CNS infections was 2 fold higher among Inuits (10.5%) than among non-Inuits (4.8%) with a fivefold higher case fatality rate in Inuit toddlers. Conclusion Overall, Inuits living in Greenland and Denmark suffer from twice the rate of CNS infections compared with non-Inuits, and Inuit toddlers carried the highest risk of mortality. Further studies regarding risk factors such as genetic susceptibility, life style and socioeconomic factors are warranted. PMID:28158207

  6. High-molecular-weight tropomyosins localize to the contractile rings of dividing CNS cells but are absent from malignant pediatric and adult CNS tumors.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Julie A I; Cooke-Yarborough, Claire M; Chadwick, Nigel C; Schevzov, Galina; Arbuckle, Susan M; Gunning, Peter; Weinberger, Ron P

    2003-04-01

    Tropomyosin has been implicated in the control of actin filament dynamics during cell migration, morphogenesis, and cytokinesis. In order to gain insight into the role of tropomyosins in cell division, we examined their expression in developing and neoplastic brain tissue. We found that the high-molecular-weight tropomyosins are downregulated at birth, which correlates with glial cell differentiation and withdrawal of most cells from the cell cycle. Expression of these isoforms was restricted to proliferative areas in the embryonic brain and was absent from the adult, where the majority of cells are quiescent. However, they were induced under conditions where glial cells became proliferative in response to injury. During cytokinesis, these tropomyosin isoforms were associated with the contractile ring. We also investigated tropomyosin expression in neoplastic CNS tissues. Low-grade astrocytic tumors expressed high-molecular-weight tropomyosins, while highly malignant CNS tumors of diverse origin did not (P CNS tumors are still able to undergo cell division in their absence. Additionally, the correlation between high-molecular-weight tropomyosin expression and tumor grade suggests that tropomyosins are potentially useful as indicators of CNS tumor grade. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. The role of brain barriers in fluid movement in the CNS: is there a 'glymphatic' system?

    PubMed

    Abbott, N Joan; Pizzo, Michelle E; Preston, Jane E; Janigro, Damir; Thorne, Robert G

    2018-03-01

    Brain fluids are rigidly regulated to provide stable environments for neuronal function, e.g., low K + , Ca 2+ , and protein to optimise signalling and minimise neurotoxicity. At the same time, neuronal and astroglial waste must be promptly removed. The interstitial fluid (ISF) of the brain tissue and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) bathing the CNS are integral to this homeostasis and the idea of a glia-lymph or 'glymphatic' system for waste clearance from brain has developed over the last 5 years. This links bulk (convective) flow of CSF into brain along the outside of penetrating arteries, glia-mediated convective transport of fluid and solutes through the brain extracellular space (ECS) involving the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel, and finally delivery of fluid to venules for clearance along peri-venous spaces. However, recent evidence favours important amendments to the 'glymphatic' hypothesis, particularly concerning the role of glia and transfer of solutes within the ECS. This review discusses studies which question the role of AQP4 in ISF flow and the lack of evidence for its ability to transport solutes; summarizes attributes of brain ECS that strongly favour the diffusion of small and large molecules without ISF flow; discusses work on hydraulic conductivity and the nature of the extracellular matrix which may impede fluid movement; and reconsiders the roles of the perivascular space (PVS) in CSF-ISF exchange and drainage. We also consider the extent to which CSF-ISF exchange is possible and desirable, the impact of neuropathology on fluid drainage, and why using CSF as a proxy measure of brain components or drug delivery is problematic. We propose that new work and key historical studies both support the concept of a perivascular fluid system, whereby CSF enters the brain via PVS convective flow or dispersion along larger caliber arteries/arterioles, diffusion predominantly regulates CSF/ISF exchange at the level of the neurovascular unit associated with

  8. Glucocorticoid programming of neuroimmune function.

    PubMed

    Walker, David J; Spencer, Karen A

    2018-01-15

    Throughout life physiological systems strive to maintain homeostasis and these systems are susceptible to exposure to maternal or environmental perturbations, particularly during embryonic development. In some cases, these perturbations may influence genetic and physiological processes that permanently alter the functioning of these physiological systems; a process known as developmental programming. In recent years, the neuroimmune system has garnered attention for its fundamental interactions with key hormonal systems, such as the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. The ultimate product of this axis, the glucocorticoid hormones, play a key role in modulating immune responses within the periphery and the CNS as part of the physiological stress response. It is well-established that elevated glucocorticoids induced by developmental stress exert profound short and long-term physiological effects, yet there is relatively little information of how these effects are manifested within the neuroimmune system. Pre and post-natal periods are prime candidates for manipulation in order to uncover the physiological mechanisms that underlie glucocorticoid programming of neuroimmune responses. Understanding the potential programming role of glucocorticoids may be key in uncovering vulnerable windows of CNS susceptibility to stressful experiences during embryonic development and improve our use of glucocorticoids as therapeutics in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CD11c(hi) Dendritic Cells Regulate Ly-6C(hi) Monocyte Differentiation to Preserve Immune-privileged CNS in Lethal Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Seong Bum; Uyangaa, Erdenebelig; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Han, Young Woo; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John Hwa; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2015-12-02

    Although the roles of dendritic cells (DCs) in adaptive defense have been defined well, the contribution of DCs to T cell-independent innate defense and subsequent neuroimmunopathology in immune-privileged CNS upon infection with neurotropic viruses has not been completely defined. Notably, DC roles in regulating innate CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocyte functions during neuroinflammation have not yet been addressed. Using selective ablation of CD11c(hi)PDCA-1(int/lo) DCs without alteration in CD11c(int)PDCA-1(hi) plasmacytoid DC number, we found that CD11c(hi) DCs are essential to control neuroinflammation caused by infection with neurotropic Japanese encephalitis virus, through early and increased infiltration of CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes and higher expression of CC chemokines. More interestingly, selective CD11c(hi) DC ablation provided altered differentiation and function of infiltrated CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes in the CNS through Flt3-L and GM-CSF, which was closely associated with severely enhanced neuroinflammation. Furthermore, CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes generated in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated environment had a deleterious rather than protective role during neuroinflammation, and were more quickly recruited into inflamed CNS, depending on CCR2, thereby exacerbating neuroinflammation via enhanced supply of virus from the periphery. Therefore, our data demonstrate that CD11c(hi) DCs provide a critical and unexpected role to preserve the immune-privileged CNS in lethal neuroinflammation via regulating the differentiation, function, and trafficking of CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes.

  10. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier as the primary effect of CNS irradiation.

    PubMed

    Rubin, P; Gash, D M; Hansen, J T; Nelson, D F; Williams, J P

    1994-04-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is believed to be unique in organ microcirculation due to the 'tight junctions' which exist between endothelial cells and, some argue, the additional functional components represented by the perivascular boundary of neuroglial cells; these selectively exclude proteins and drugs from the brain parenchyma. This study was designed to examine the effects of irradiation on the BBB and determine the impact of the altered pathophysiology on the production of central nervous system (CNS) late effects such as demyelination, gliosis and necrosis. Rats, irradiated at 60 Gy, were serially sacrificed at 2, 6, 12 and 24 weeks. Magnetic resonance image analysis (MRI) was obtained prior to sacrifice with selected animals from each group. The remaining animals underwent horse-radish peroxidase (HRP) perfusion at the time of sacrifice. The serial studies showed a detectable disruption of the BBB at 2 weeks post-irradiation and this was manifested as discrete leakage; late injury seen at 24 weeks indicated diffuse vasculature leakage, severe loss of the capillary network, cortical atrophy and white matter necrosis. Reversal or repair of radiation injury was seen between 6 and 12 weeks, indicating a bimodal peak in events. Blood-brain barrier disruption is an early, readily recognizable pathophysiological event occurring after radiation injury, is detectable in vivo/in vitro by MRI and HRP studies, and appears to precede white matter necrosis. Dose response studies over a wide range of doses, utilizing both external and interstitial irradiation, are in progress along with correlative histopathologic and ultrastructural studies.

  11. Proteomic CNS profile of delayed cognitive impairment in mice exposed to Gulf War agents.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Laila; Crynen, Gogce; Reed, Jon; Bishop, Alex; Phillips, John; Ferguson, Scott; Mouzon, Benoit; Mullan, Myles; Mathura, Venkatarajan; Mullan, Michael; Ait-Ghezala, Ghania; Crawford, Fiona

    2011-12-01

    Gulf War Illness (GWI) is a chronic multisymptom condition with a central nervous system (CNS) component, for which there is no treatment available. It is now believed that the combined exposure to Gulf War (GW) agents, including pyridostigmine bromide (PB) and pesticides, such as permethrin (PER), was a key contributor to the etiology of GWI. In this study, a proteomic approach was used to characterize the biomolecular disturbances that accompany neurobehavioral and neuropathological changes associated with combined exposure to PB and PER. Mice acutely exposed to PB and PER over 10 days showed an increase in anxiety-like behavior, psychomotor problems and delayed cognitive impairment compared to control mice that received vehicle only. Proteomic analysis showed changes in proteins associated with lipid metabolism and molecular transport in the brains of GW agent-exposed mice compared to controls. Proteins associated with the endocrine and immune systems were also altered, and dysfunction of these systems is a prominent feature of GWI. The presence of astrogliosis in the GW agent-exposed mice compared to control mice further suggests an immune system imbalance, as is observed in GWI. These studies provide a broad perspective of the molecular disturbances driving the late pathology of this complex illness. Evaluation of the potential role of these biological functions in GWI will be useful in identifying molecular pathways that can be targeted for the development of novel therapeutics against GWI.

  12. Emerging Infections of CNS: Avian Influenza A Virus, Rift Valley Fever Virus and Human Parechovirus.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Clayton A; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Ross, Ted M; Bissel, Stephanie J

    2015-09-01

    History is replete with emergent pandemic infections that have decimated the human population. Given the shear mass of humans that now crowd the earth, there is every reason to suspect history will repeat itself. We describe three RNA viruses that have recently emerged in the human population to mediate severe neurological disease. These new diseases are results of new mutations in the infectious agents or new exposure pathways to the agents or both. To appreciate their pathogenesis, we summarize the essential virology and immune response to each agent. Infection is described in the context of known host defenses. Once the viruses evade immune defenses and enter central nervous system (CNS) cells, they rapidly co-opt host RNA processing to a cataclysmic extent. It is not clear why the brain is particularly susceptible to RNA viruses; but perhaps because of its tremendous dependence on RNA processing for physiological functioning, classical mechanisms of host defense (eg, interferon disruption of viral replication) are diminished or not available. Effectiveness of immunity, immunization and pharmacological therapies is reviewed to contextualize the scope of the public health challenge. Unfortunately, vaccines that confer protection from systemic disease do not necessarily confer protection for the brain after exposure through unconventional routes. © 2015 International Society of Neuropathology.

  13. Proteolipid Protein Is Required for Transport of Sirtuin 2 into CNS Myelin

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Hauke B.; Kuhlmann, Katja; Shen, Siming; Uecker, Marina; Schardt, Anke; Dimova, Kalina; Orfaniotou, Foteini; Dhaunchak, Ajit; Brinkmann, Bastian G.; Möbius, Wiebke; Guarente, Lenny; Casaccia-Bonnefil, Patrizia; Jahn, Olaf; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2009-01-01

    Mice lacking the expression of proteolipid protein (PLP)/DM20 in oligodendrocytes provide a genuine model for spastic paraplegia (SPG-2). Their axons are well myelinated but exhibit impaired axonal transport and progressive degeneration, which is difficult to attribute to the absence of a single myelin protein. We hypothesized that secondary molecular changes in PLPnull myelin contribute to the loss of PLP/DM20-dependent neuroprotection and provide more insight into glia-axonal interactions in this disease model. By gel-based proteome analysis, we identified >160 proteins in purified myelin membranes, which allowed us to systematically monitor the CNS myelin proteome of adult PLPnull mice, before the onset of disease. We identified three proteins of the septin family to be reduced in abundance, but the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) was virtually absent. SIRT2 is expressed throughout the oligodendrocyte lineage, and immunoelectron microscopy revealed its association with myelin. Loss of SIRT2 in PLPnull was posttranscriptional, suggesting that PLP/DM20 is required for its transport into the myelin compartment. Because normal SIRT2 activity is controlled by the NAD+/NADH ratio, its function may be coupled to the axo-glial metabolism and the long-term support of axons by oligodendrocytes. PMID:17634366

  14. Play Spaces in Denmark.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Edna; Anderson, Robert T.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the variety of play spaces found in urban areas in Denmark: in banks, stores and individual businesses, neighborhood parks and small pocket playgrounds, specialized adventure and traffic playgrounds with supervised activities, and commercial amusement parks. (CM)

  15. Possible involvement of TLRs and hemichannels in stress-induced CNS dysfunction via mastocytes, and glia activation.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Adam; Maturana, Carola J; Harcha, Paloma A; Sáez, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), mastocytes and glial cells (microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) function as sensors of neuroinflammatory conditions, responding to stress triggers or becoming sensitized to subsequent proinflammatory challenges. The corticotropin-releasing hormone and glucocorticoids are critical players in stress-induced mastocyte degranulation and potentiation of glial inflammatory responses, respectively. Mastocytes and glial cells express different toll-like receptor (TLR) family members, and their activation via proinflammatory molecules can increase the expression of connexin hemichannels and pannexin channels in glial cells. These membrane pores are oligohexamers of the corresponding protein subunits located in the cell surface. They allow ATP release and Ca(2+) influx, which are two important elements of inflammation. Consequently, activated microglia and astrocytes release ATP and glutamate, affecting myelinization, neuronal development, and survival. Binding of ligands to TLRs induces a cascade of intracellular events leading to activation of several transcription factors that regulate the expression of many genes involved in inflammation. During pregnancy, the previous responses promoted by viral infections and other proinflammatory conditions are common and might predispose the offspring to develop psychiatric disorders and neurological diseases. Such disorders could eventually be potentiated by stress and might be part of the etiopathogenesis of CNS dysfunctions including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia.

  16. Prediction of CNS occupancy of dopamine D2 receptor based on systemic exposure and in vitro experiments.

    PubMed

    Kanamitsu, Kayoko; Arakawa, Ryosuke; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Suhara, Tetsuya; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    The effect of drugs in the central nervous system (CNS) is closely related to occupancy of their target receptor. In this study, we integrated plasma concentrations, in vitro/in vivo data for receptor or protein binding, and in silico data, using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model, to examine the predictability of receptor occupancy in humans. The occupancy of the dopamine D2 receptor and the plasma concentrations of the antipsychotic drugs quetiapine and perospirone in humans were collected from the literature or produced experimentally. Association and dissociation rate constants and unbound fractions in the serum and brain were determined in vitro/in vivo using human D2 receptor-expressing membrane fractions, human serum and mouse brain. The permeability of drugs across the blood-brain barrier was estimated based on their physicochemical properties. The effect of a metabolite of perospirone, ID-15036, was also considered. The time profiles of D2 receptor occupancy following oral dose of quetiapine and perospirone predicted were similar to the observed values. This approach could assist in the design of clinical studies for drug development and the prediction of the impact of drug-drug interactions on CNS function in clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Coordinated temporal and spatial control of motor neuron and serotonergic neuron generation from a common pool of CNS progenitors.

    PubMed

    Pattyn, Alexandre; Vallstedt, Anna; Dias, José M; Samad, Omar Abdel; Krumlauf, Robb; Rijli, Filippo M; Brunet, Jean-Francois; Ericson, Johan

    2003-03-15

    Neural progenitor cells often produce distinct types of neurons in a specific order, but the determinants that control the sequential generation of distinct neuronal subclasses in the vertebrate CNS remain poorly defined. We examined the sequential generation of visceral motor neurons and serotonergic neurons from a common pool of neural progenitors located in the ventral hindbrain. We found that the temporal specification of these neurons varies along the anterior-posterior axis of the hindbrain, and that the timing of their generation critically depends on the integrated activities of Nkx- and Hox-class homeodomain proteins. A primary function of these proteins is to coordinate the spatial and temporal activation of the homeodomain protein Phox2b, which in turn acts as a binary switch in the selection of motor neuron or serotonergic neuronal fate. These findings assign new roles for Nkx, Hox, and Phox2 proteins in the control of temporal neuronal fate determination, and link spatial and temporal patterning of CNS neuronal fates.

  18. Coordinated temporal and spatial control of motor neuron and serotonergic neuron generation from a common pool of CNS progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Pattyn, Alexandre; Vallstedt, Anna; Dias, José M.; Samad, Omar Abdel; Krumlauf, Robb; Rijli, Filippo M.; Brunet, Jean-Francois; Ericson, Johan

    2003-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells often produce distinct types of neurons in a specific order, but the determinants that control the sequential generation of distinct neuronal subclasses in the vertebrate CNS remain poorly defined. We examined the sequential generation of visceral motor neurons and serotonergic neurons from a common pool of neural progenitors located in the ventral hindbrain. We found that the temporal specification of these neurons varies along the anterior-posterior axis of the hindbrain, and that the timing of their generation critically depends on the integrated activities of Nkx- and Hox-class homeodomain proteins. A primary function of these proteins is to coordinate the spatial and temporal activation of the homeodomain protein Phox2b, which in turn acts as a binary switch in the selection of motor neuron or serotonergic neuronal fate. These findings assign new roles for Nkx, Hox, and Phox2 proteins in the control of temporal neuronal fate determination, and link spatial and temporal patterning of CNS neuronal fates. PMID:12651891

  19. Validation of Flow Cytometry and Magnetic Bead-Based Methods to Enrich CNS Single Cell Suspensions for Quiescent Microglia.

    PubMed

    Volden, T A; Reyelts, C D; Hoke, T A; Arikkath, J; Bonasera, S J

    2015-12-01

    Microglia are resident mononuclear phagocytes within the CNS parenchyma that intimately interact with neurons and astrocytes to remodel synapses and extracellular matrix. We briefly review studies elucidating the molecular pathways that underlie microglial surveillance, activation, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis; we additionally place these studies in a clinical context. We describe and validate an inexpensive and simple approach to obtain enriched single cell suspensions of quiescent parenchymal and perivascular microglia from the mouse cerebellum and hypothalamus. Following preparation of regional CNS single cell suspensions, we remove myelin debris, and then perform two serial enrichment steps for cells expressing surface CD11b. Myelin depletion and CD11b enrichment are both accomplished using antigen-specific magnetic beads in an automated cell separation system. Flow cytometry of the resultant suspensions shows a significant enrichment for CD11b(+)/CD45(+) cells (perivascular microglia) and CD11b(+)/CD45(-) cells (parenchymal microglia) compared to starting suspensions. Of note, cells from these enriched suspensions minimally express Aif1 (aka Iba1), suggesting that the enrichment process does not evoke significant microglial activation. However, these cells readily respond to a functional challenge (LPS) with significant changes in the expression of molecules specifically associated with microglia. We conclude that methods employing a combination of magnetic-bead based sorting and flow cytometry produce suspensions highly enriched for microglia that are appropriate for a variety of molecular and cellular assays.

  20. The relative cost of children's physical play.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini; Horvat; Huberty

    1998-04-01

    There has been a long-standing debate regarding the functions of play during childhood. An important, but neglected, first step in this debate entails documenting the costs associated with play. In this study we analysed energetic costs (expressed in terms of caloric expenditure) associated with physical play in four field experiments of play in primary school children. Experiment 1 established the concurrent validity of an observational check list to estimate caloric expenditure of children's physical play. Experiment 2 compared caloric expenditure of the play (defined as all behaviour exhibited during play time) for two age groups of children during playtime outdoors and during indoor sedentary activity; caloric expenditure of outdoor activity was greater and was significantly correlated with ambient temperature. In experiment 3, children were observed during indoor play to control for the influence of ambient temperature. Outdoor physical play was more energetically costly than indoor physical play. In experiment 4, children's behaviour was observed outdoors and caloric expenditure for play, games and other activities was compared. Physical play was more costly than other forms of behaviour and games. Estimates of total energetic costs of play ranged from 6 to 15%. Results are discussed in terms of the relatively low caloric costs of play. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  1. Play and learn team building.

    PubMed

    Haas, R C; Martin, S

    1997-05-01

    In order to have a team function correctly, power must be distributed equally, with no team member having more perceived power than any other. It is this leveling of the playing field that allows the team to develop and to stimulate the creative juices of its members. This article discusses techniques that can help an organization break down the power barriers and permit its employees to become a cohesive unit--a team.

  2. Looking into Children's Play Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabry, Mark; Fucigna, Carolee

    2009-01-01

    Play, particularly children's sociodramatic play, is the cornerstone of early childhood classrooms in the United States. Early childhood educators learn and expound mantras of "the value of play," "play-based programs," "children learning through play," and "play as child's work." They strive to promote the importance of making a place for play in…

  3. TRPM2 Channel Aggravates CNS Inflammation and Cognitive Impairment via Activation of Microglia in Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Miyanohara, Jun; Kakae, Masashi; Nagayasu, Kazuki; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Mori, Yasuo; Arai, Ken; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Kaneko, Shuji

    2018-04-04

    and mental disorders that are accompanied by cognitive impairment; however, the underlying mechanisms require clarification. Here, we used a chronic cerebral hypoperfusion mouse model to investigate whether TRPM2, a Ca 2+ -permeable cation channel highly expressed in immune cells, plays a destructive role in the development of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-induced cognitive impairment, and propose a new hypothesis in which TRPM2-mediated activation of microglia, not macrophages, specifically contributes to the pathology through the aggravation of inflammatory responses. These findings shed light on the understanding of the mechanisms of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-related inflammation, and are expected to provide a novel therapeutic molecule for cognitive impairment in CNS diseases. Copyright © 2018 the authors 0270-6474/18/383521-14$15.00/0.

  4. Immune privilege of the CNS is not the consequence of limited antigen sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Melissa G.; Hulseberg, Paul; Ling, Changying; Karman, Jozsef; Clarkson, Benjamin D.; Harding, Jeffrey S.; Zhang, Mengxue; Sandor, Adam; Christensen, Kelsey; Nagy, Andras; Sandor, Matyas; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2014-03-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) immune privilege is complex, and it is still not understood how CNS antigens are sampled by the peripheral immune system under steady state conditions. To compare antigen sampling from immune-privileged or nonprivileged tissues, we created transgenic mice with oligodendrocyte or gut epithelial cell expression of an EGFP-tagged fusion protein containing ovalbumin (OVA) antigenic peptides and tested peripheral anti-OVA peptide-specific sentinel OT-I and OT-II T cell activation. We report that oligodendrocyte or gut antigens are sampled similarly, as determined by comparable levels of OT-I T cell activation. However, activated T cells do not access the CNS under steady state conditions. These data show that afferent immunity is normally intact as there is no barrier at the antigen sampling level, but that efferent immunity is restricted. To understand how this one-sided surveillance contributes to CNS immune privilege will help us define mechanisms of CNS autoimmune disease initiation.

  5. CNS infiltration of peripheral immune cells: D-Day for neurodegenerative disease?

    PubMed

    Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Gate, David; Town, Terrence

    2009-12-01

    While the central nervous system (CNS) was once thought to be excluded from surveillance by immune cells, a concept known as "immune privilege," it is now clear that immune responses do occur in the CNS-giving rise to the field of neuroimmunology. These CNS immune responses can be driven by endogenous (glial) and/or exogenous (peripheral leukocyte) sources and can serve either productive or pathological roles. Recent evidence from mouse models supports the notion that infiltration of peripheral monocytes/macrophages limits progression of Alzheimer's disease pathology and militates against West Nile virus encephalitis. In addition, infiltrating T lymphocytes may help spare neuronal loss in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. On the other hand, CNS leukocyte penetration drives experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (a mouse model for the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis) and may also be pathological in both Parkinson's disease and human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis. A critical understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for trafficking of immune cells from the periphery into the diseased CNS will be key to target these cells for therapeutic intervention in neurodegenerative diseases, thereby allowing neuroregenerative processes to ensue.

  6. Predicting Drug Concentration‐Time Profiles in Multiple CNS Compartments Using a Comprehensive Physiologically‐Based Pharmacokinetic Model

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Välitalo, Pyry A.; Huntjens, Dymphy R.; Proost, Johannes H.; Vermeulen, An; Krauwinkel, Walter; Beukers, Margot W.; van den Berg, Dirk‐Jan; Hartman, Robin; Wong, Yin Cheong; Danhof, Meindert; van Hasselt, John G. C.

    2017-01-01

    Drug development targeting the central nervous system (CNS) is challenging due to poor predictability of drug concentrations in various CNS compartments. We developed a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for prediction of drug concentrations in physiologically relevant CNS compartments. System‐specific and drug‐specific model parameters were derived from literature and in silico predictions. The model was validated using detailed concentration‐time profiles from 10 drugs in rat plasma, brain extracellular fluid, 2 cerebrospinal fluid sites, and total brain tissue. These drugs, all small molecules, were selected to cover a wide range of physicochemical properties. The concentration‐time profiles for these drugs were adequately predicted across the CNS compartments (symmetric mean absolute percentage error for the model prediction was <91%). In conclusion, the developed PBPK model can be used to predict temporal concentration profiles of drugs in multiple relevant CNS compartments, which we consider valuable information for efficient CNS drug development. PMID:28891201

  7. A bidirectional association between the gut microbiota and CNS disease in a biphasic murine model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Colpitts, Sara L; Kasper, Eli J; Keever, Abigail; Liljenberg, Caleb; Kirby, Trevor; Magori, Krisztian; Kasper, Lloyd H; Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier

    2017-11-02

    The gut microbiome plays an important role in the development of inflammatory disease as shown using experimental models of central nervous system (CNS) demyelination. Gut microbes influence the response of regulatory immune cell populations in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), which drive protection in acute and chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Recent observations suggest that communication between the host and the gut microbiome is bidirectional. We hypothesized that the gut microbiota differs between the acute inflammatory and chronic progressive stages of a murine model of secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis (SP-MS). This non-obese diabetic (NOD) model of EAE develops a biphasic pattern of disease that more closely resembles the human condition when transitioning from relapsing-remitting (RR)-MS to SP-MS. We compared the gut microbiome of NOD mice with either mild or severe disease to that of non-immunized control mice. We found that the mice which developed a severe secondary form of EAE harbored a dysbiotic gut microbiome when compared with the healthy control mice. Furthermore, we evaluated whether treatment with a cocktail of broad-spectrum antibiotics would modify the outcome of the progressive stage of EAE in the NOD model. Our results indicated reduced mortality and clinical disease severity in mice treated with antibiotics compared with untreated mice. Our findings support the hypothesis that there are reciprocal effects between experimental CNS inflammatory demyelination and modification of the microbiome providing a foundation for the establishment of early therapeutic interventions targeting the gut microbiome that could potentially limit disease progression.

  8. Playing To Learn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Dale; Shakeshaft, Charol; Kottkamp, Robert; Becker, Jonathan

    2000-01-01

    A study to determine effects of Lightspan Partnership Inc.'s interactive materials on student achievement in a Denver- area elementary school revealed higher reading and math test scores for Lightspan schools, compared to control schools. This serious play curriculum, assisted by parents, benefited neediest kids most. (MLH)

  9. Want to Play Geometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufmann, Matthew L.; Bomer, Megan A.; Powell, Nancy Norem

    2009-01-01

    Students enter the geometry classroom with a strong concept of fairness and a sense of what it means to "play by the rules," yet many students have difficulty understanding the postulates, or rules, of geometry and their implications. Although they may never have articulated the properties of an axiomatic system, they have gained a practical…

  10. The Games Children Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padak, Nancy; Rasinski, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    The games that children play are not just for fun-they often lead to important skill development. Likewise, word games are fun opportunities for parents and children to spend time together and for children to learn a lot about sounds and words. In this Family Involvement column, the authors describe 12 easy-to-implement word games that parents and…

  11. Abstraction through Game Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avraamidou, Antri; Monaghan, John; Walker, Aisha

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the computer game play of an 11-year-old boy. In the course of building a virtual house he developed and used, without assistance, an artefact and an accompanying strategy to ensure that his house was symmetric. We argue that the creation and use of this artefact-strategy is a mathematical abstraction. The discussion…

  12. "Playing" with Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Dave

    2012-01-01

    When faced with a multitude of tasks, any opportunity to "kill two birds with one stone" is welcome. Drama has always excited the author: as a child performing in plays, later as a student and now as a teacher directing performances and improvising within lessons. The author was lucky enough to have inspirational teachers during his…

  13. Playing with Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieyra, Rebecca; Edwards, Teon; Rowe, Elizabeth; Asbell-Clarke, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    Gaming is becoming an effective form of learning and assessment and shouldn't be overlooked in an increasingly technological world. The games described in this article ("Impulse," "Quantum Spectre," and "Ravenous"), entertaining enough to be played by the general public, are also appropriate and useful in a classroom…

  14. One Play a Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduate theater students rarely get the chance to work on a major world premiere, but this year hundreds of them will. Currently, more than 70 colleges and universities are participating in "365 Days/365 Plays," an ambitious project from Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks. Every week, as they mount their portion of this epic…

  15. Integrated Play Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glovak, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    As an occupational therapist running social play groups with sensory integration for children on the autism spectrum, the author frequently doubted the wisdom of combining several children on the spectrum into a group. In fact, as the owner of a clinic she said, "No more!" The groups seemed like a waste of parents' time and money, and she refused…

  16. The Paradoxes of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokosz, Francis M.

    1988-01-01

    The article makes a case against the structuring of intramural sports programs on the basis of the varsity athletics model, arguing that the latter model's components of competition and aggression mar the former's intrinsic rewards of play, creativity, and enhanced human relationships. (CB)

  17. Children as Playing Citizens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grindheim, Liv Torunn

    2017-01-01

    In this article, play is understood as activities of major importance for child-citizens and as activities that constitute various ways of participating. The researcher joined children in three early childhood education institutions in Norway in their activities and categorised their participation in their everyday life. The study depicts that, in…

  18. Statistics at Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Lyn D.

    2014-01-01

    An exciting event had occurred for the grade 3 classes at Woodlands State School. A new play space designated for the older grades had now been opened to the third graders. In sharing their excitement over this "real treat, real privilege," the teachers invited the children to find out more about playgrounds and, in particular, their new…

  19. Leisure Today--the Many Faces of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Susan D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This series of papers examines the role of play from various angles, discussing play as an essential human function and universal experience, the role of play in developing cultural values and awareness, a symbolic interactionist view of play, early therapeutic recreation specialists, and the direction of commercialized play. (SM)

  20. Cancers of the Brain and CNS: Global Patterns and Trends in Incidence.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, S M J; Mortazavi, S A R; Paknahad, M

    2018-03-01

    Miranda-Filho et al. in their recently published paper entitled "Cancers of the brain and CNS: global patterns and trends in incidence" provided a global status report of the geographic and temporal variations in the incidence of brain and CNS cancers in different countries across continents worldwide. While the authors confirm the role of genetic risk factors and ionizing radiation exposures, they claimed that no firm conclusion could be drawn about the role of exposure to non-ionizing radiation. The paper authored by Miranda-Filho et al. not only addresses a challenging issue, it can be considered as a good contribution in the field of brain and CNS cancers. However, our correspondence addresses a basic shortcoming of this paper about the role of electromagnetic fields and cancers and provides evidence showing that exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs), at least at high levels and long durations, can increases the risk of cancer.

  1. Awards, lectures, and fellowships sponsored by the AANS/CNS Section on Tumors.

    PubMed

    Lau, Darryl; Barker, Fred G; Aghi, Manish K

    2014-09-01

    A major goal of the Section on Tumors of the American Association of Neurological Surgery (AANS) and Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) since it was founded in 1984 has been to foster both education and research in the field of brain tumor treatment and development. In support of this goal, the Section sponsors a number of awards, named lectures, and fellowships at the annual meetings of the AANS and CNS. In this article, we describe the awards given by the AANS/CNS Section on Tumors since its foundation, the recipients of the awards, and their philanthropic donors. The subsequent history of awardees and their work is briefly examined. Specifically for the Preuss and Mahaley Awards, this article also examines the rates of publication among the award-winning abstracts and achievement of grant funding by awardees.

  2. Neonatal CNS infection and inflammation caused by Ureaplasma species: rare or relevant?

    PubMed

    Glaser, Kirsten; Speer, Christian P

    2015-02-01

    Colonization with Ureaplasma species has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcome, and perinatal transmission has been implicated in the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm neonates. Little is known about Ureaplasma-mediated infection and inflammation of the CNS in neonates. Controversy remains concerning its incidence and implication in the pathogenesis of neonatal brain injury. In vivo and in vitro data are limited. Despite improving care options for extremely immature preterm infants, relevant complications remain. Systematic knowledge of ureaplasmal infection may be of great benefit. This review aims to summarize pathogenic mechanisms, clinical data and diagnostic pitfalls. Studies in preterm and term neonates are critically discussed with regard to their limitations. Clinical questions concerning therapy or prophylaxis are posed. We conclude that ureaplasmas may be true pathogens, especially in preterm neonates, and may cause CNS inflammation in a complex interplay of host susceptibility, serovar pathogenicity and gestational age-dependent CNS vulnerability.

  3. Myotonic Dystrophies: State of the Art of New Therapeutic Developments for the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Gourdon, Genevieve; Meola, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophies are multisystemic diseases characterized not only by muscle and heart dysfunction but also by CNS alteration. They are now recognized as brain diseases affecting newborns and children for myotonic dystrophy type 1 and adults for both myotonic dystrophy type 1 and type 2. In the past two decades, much progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying the DM symptoms allowing development of new molecular therapeutic tools with the ultimate aim of curing the disease. This review describes the state of the art for the characterization of CNS related symptoms, the development of molecular strategies to target the CNS as well as the available tools for screening and testing new possible treatments. PMID:28473756

  4. T-bet promotes the accumulation of encephalitogenic Th17 cells in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Grifka-Walk, Heather M; Segal, Benjamin M

    2017-03-15

    T-bet enhances the encephalitogenicity of myelin-reactive CD4 + T cells, however its mechanism of action is unknown. In this study we show that T-bet confers a competitive advantage for the accumulation of IL-23 conditioned Th17 effector cells in the central nervous system (CNS). Impaired migration of T-bet deficient Th17 cells to the CNS is associated with altered expression of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors on their cell surface. Our data suggest that therapeutic targeting of T-bet in individuals with Th17-mediated autoimmune demyelinating disease may inhibit inflammatory infiltration of the CNS and, hence, clinical exacerbations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Systemic Central Nervous System (CNS)-targeted Delivery of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) Reduces Neurodegeneration and Increases Neural Precursor Cell Proliferation in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Brian; Potkar, Rewati; Metcalf, Jeff; Thrin, Ivy; Adame, Anthony; Rockenstein, Edward; Masliah, Eliezer

    2016-01-22

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant protein transmitters in the central nervous system with roles in a variety of biological functions including: food intake, cardiovascular regulation, cognition, seizure activity, circadian rhythms, and neurogenesis. Reduced NPY and NPY receptor expression is associated with numerous neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD). To determine whether replacement of NPY could ameliorate some of the neurodegenerative and behavioral pathology associated with AD, we generated a lentiviral vector expressing NPY fused to a brain transport peptide (apoB) for widespread CNS delivery in an APP-transgenic (tg) mouse model of AD. The recombinant NPY-apoB effectively reversed neurodegenerative pathology and behavioral deficits although it had no effect on accumulation of Aβ. The subgranular zone of the hippocampus showed a significant increase in proliferation of neural precursor cells without further differentiation into neurons. The neuroprotective and neurogenic effects of NPY-apoB appeared to involve signaling via ERK and Akt through the NPY R1 and NPY R2 receptors. Thus, widespread CNS-targeted delivery of NPY appears to be effective at reversing the neuronal and glial pathology associated with Aβ accumulation while also increasing NPC proliferation. Overall, increased delivery of NPY to the CNS for AD might be an effective therapy especially if combined with an anti-Aβ therapeutic. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Alectinib induced CNS radiation necrosis in an ALK+NSCLC patient with a remote (7 years) history of brain radiation.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Weitz, Michael; Jalas, John R; Kelly, Daniel F; Wong, Vanessa; Azada, Michele C; Quines, Oliver; Klempner, Samuel J

    2016-06-01

    Alectinib is a second generation ALK inhibitor that has significant clinical activity in central nervous system (CNS) metastases in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Pseudoprogression (PsP) due to radiation necrosis during alecitnib treatment of central nervous system (CNS) metastases from ALK-rearranged NSCLC as been reported. Hence, distinguishing radiation-related PsP from alectinib-induced radiographic changes is important to avoid erroneous early trial discontinuation and abandonment of an effective treatment. However, it remains difficult to assess casuality of radiation necrosis is related to recent direct radiation or induced by alectinib treatment or both. It is also unknown how long from previous radiation can alectinib still induce radiation necrosis. Here we reported a crizotinib-refractory ALK-positive NSCLC patient who develop radiation necrosis in one of his metastatic CNS lesions after approximately 12 months of alectinib treatment who otherwise had on-going CNS response on alectinib. His most recent radiation to his CNS metastases was 7 years prior to the start of alectinib. This case illustrates that in the setting of pror CNS radiation, given the significant clinical activity of alectinib in CNS metastases in ALK-positive NSCLC patients the risk of CNS radiation necrosis remains long after previous radiation to the CNS metastases has been completed and can occur after durable response of treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biocompatability of carbon nanotubes with stem cells to treat CNS injuries.

    PubMed

    Bokara, Kiran Kumar; Kim, Jong Youl; Lee, Young Il; Yun, Kyungeun; Webster, Tom J; Lee, Jong Eun

    2013-06-01

    Cases reporting traumatic injuries to the brain and spinal cord are extended range of disorders that affect a large percentage of the world's population. But, there are only few effective treatments available for central nervous system (CNS) injuries because the CNS is refractory to axonal regeneration and relatively inaccessible to many pharmacological treatments. The use of stem cell therapy in regenerative medicine has been extensively examined to replace lost cells during CNS injuries. But, given the complexity of CNS injuries oxidative stress, toxic byproducts, which prevails in the microenvironment during the diseased condition, may limit the survival of the transplanted stem cells affecting tissue regeneration and even longevity. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are a new class of nanomaterials, which have been shown to be promising in different areas of nanomedicine for the prevention, diagnosis and therapy of certain diseases, including CNS diseases. In particular, the use of CNTs as substrates/scaffolds for supporting the stem cell differentiation has been an area of active research. Single-walled and multi-walled CNT's have been increasingly used as scaffolds for neuronal growth and more recently for neural stem cell growth and differentiation. This review summarizes recent research on the application of CNT-based materials to direct the differentiation of progenitor and stem cells toward specific neurons and to enhance axon regeneration and synaptogenesis for the effective treatment of CNS injuries. Nonetheless, accumulating data support the use of CNTs as a biocompatible and permissive substrate/scaffold for neural cells and such application holds great potential in neurological research.

  8. Biocompatability of carbon nanotubes with stem cells to treat CNS injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bokara, Kiran Kumar; Kim, Jong Youl; Lee, Young Il; Yun, Kyungeun; Webster, Tom J

    2013-01-01

    Cases reporting traumatic injuries to the brain and spinal cord are extended range of disorders that affect a large percentage of the world's population. But, there are only few effective treatments available for central nervous system (CNS) injuries because the CNS is refractory to axonal regeneration and relatively inaccessible to many pharmacological treatments. The use of stem cell therapy in regenerative medicine has been extensively examined to replace lost cells during CNS injuries. But, given the complexity of CNS injuries oxidative stress, toxic byproducts, which prevails in the microenvironment during the diseased condition, may limit the survival of the transplanted stem cells affecting tissue regeneration and even longevity. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are a new class of nanomaterials, which have been shown to be promising in different areas of nanomedicine for the prevention, diagnosis and therapy of certain diseases, including CNS diseases. In particular, the use of CNTs as substrates/scaffolds for supporting the stem cell differentiation has been an area of active research. Single-walled and multi-walled CNT's have been increasingly used as scaffolds for neuronal growth and more recently for neural stem cell growth and differentiation. This review summarizes recent research on the application of CNT-based materials to direct the differentiation of progenitor and stem cells toward specific neurons and to enhance axon regeneration and synaptogenesis for the effective treatment of CNS injuries. Nonetheless, accumulating data support the use of CNTs as a biocompatible and permissive substrate/scaffold for neural cells and such application holds great potential in neurological research. PMID:23869255

  9. Playing tricks to ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibfried, Dietrich

    2017-01-01

    Ted Hänsch's career is defined by breaking new ground in experimental physics. Curiosity, vivid imagination, deep understanding, patience and tenacity are part of the winning formula, but perhaps an equally important ingredient may be Ted's favorite past-time of exploring new tricks in his "Spiellabor" (play-lab), that often resurfaced as key ingredients in rather serious experiments later. On the occasion of Ted's 75th birthday, a few past and potential future experiments with trapped ions are playfully surveyed here. Some of these tricks are already part of the trade, some are currently emerging and a few are mostly speculation today. Maybe some of the latter will be realized and even prove useful in the future.

  10. brother of cdo (umleitung) is cell-autonomously required for Hedgehog-mediated ventral CNS patterning in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Sadie A.; Tyurina, Oksana V.; Miller, Emily; Bagas, Andrea; Karlstrom, Rolf O.

    2011-01-01

    The transmembrane protein Brother of Cdo (Boc) has been implicated in Shh-mediated commissural axon guidance, and can both positively and negatively regulate Hedgehog (Hh) target gene transcription, however, little is known about in vivo requirements for Boc during vertebrate embryogenesis. The zebrafish umleitung (umlty54) mutant was identified by defects in retinotectal axon projections. Here, we show that the uml locus encodes Boc and that Boc function is cell-autonomously required for Hh-mediated neural patterning. Our phenotypic analysis suggests that Boc is required as a positive regulator of Hh signaling in the spinal cord, hypothalamus, pituitary, somites and upper jaw, but that Boc might negatively regulate Hh signals in the lower jaw. This study reveals a role for Boc in ventral CNS cells that receive high levels of Hh and uncovers previously unknown roles for Boc in vertebrate embryogenesis. PMID:21115611

  11. Dose and Chemical Modification Considerations for Continuous Cyclic AMP Analog Delivery to the Injured CNS

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Karim; Ghosh, Mousumi; Vavrek, Romana; Tse, Arthur D.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In this investigation, two cell-permeable synthetic analogs of cAMP, dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP) and 8-bromo-cAMP, which are widely used to elevate intracellular cAMP levels under experimental conditions, were investigated for their ability to dose-dependently improve histological and functional outcomes following continuous delivery in two models of incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). The cAMP analogs were delivered via osmotic minipumps at 1–250 mM through an indwelling cortical cannula or by intrathecal infusion for up to 4 weeks after either a T8 unilateral over-hemisection or a C2-3 dorsolateral quadrant lesion, respectively. In both SCI models, continuous db-cAMP delivery was associated with histopathological changes that included sporadic micro-hemorrhage formation and cavitation, enhanced macrophage infiltration and tissue damage at regions beyond the immediate application site; no deleterious or beneficial effect of agent delivery was observed at the spinal injury site. Furthermore, these changes were accompanied by pronounced behavioral deficits that included an absence of progressive locomotor recovery, increased extensor tone, paralysis, and sensory abnormalities. These deleterious effects were not observed in saline-treated animals, in animals in which the db-cAMP dose did not exceed 1 mM, or in those animals that received a high dose (250 mM) of the alternative cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP. These results demonstrate that, for continuous intraparenchymal or intrathecal administration of cAMP analogs for the study of biological or therapeutic effects within the central nervous system (CNS), consideration of the effective concentration applied as well as the potential toxicity of chemical moieties on the parent molecule and/or their activity needs to be taken into account. PMID:19397425

  12. Tailored central nervous system-directed treatment strategy for isolated CNS recurrence of adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Changcheng; Liu, Xin; Zhu, Weibo; Cai, Xiaoyan; Wu, Jingsheng; Sun, Zimin

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this report was to investigate the tailored treatment strategies for isolated central nervous system (CNS) recurrence in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Isolated CNS recurrence was documented in 34 patients: there were 18, 6, and 10 patients with meningeal involvement type (type A), cranial nerve palsy type (type B), and myeloid sarcoma type (type C), respectively. For patients with type A, intrathecal chemotherapy was the predominant strategy. For type B, systemic HD-Ara-C with four cycles was the main treatment. For type C, cranial irradiation or craniospinal irradiation was adopted and two cycles of HD-Ara-C were given after the irradiation. The 5-year cumulative incidence of CNS recurrence was 12.8%. There was a significantly higher WBC count (32.6∼60.8 × 10(9)/l) in patients at first diagnosis who developed CNS recurrence (all of the three types) compared with patients with no CNS recurrence (10.1 × 10(9)/l) (P = 0.005). We found that a significantly more patients with AML-M5 and 11q23 abnormalities developed CNS recurrence in type A (P < 0.001, 0.005). Twenty-four out of 34 patients (70.6%) with CNS recurrence achieved CNS complete remission at a median of 58 days (range, 30-120). The 3-year disease-free survival and overall survival estimates for all CNS recurrence patients were 21.6 and 25.3%, respectively. This report indicates that the tailored CNS-directed strategy is an effective modality to treat CNS recurrence in adult AML, but further studies are needed to improve the long-term survival.

  13. PlayStation purpura.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Susan J; Leonard, Jane; Chamberlain, Alex J

    2010-08-01

    A 16-year-old boy presented with a number of asymptomatic pigmented macules on the volar aspect of his index fingers. Dermoscopy of each macule revealed a parallel ridge pattern of homogenous reddish-brown pigment. We propose that these lesions were induced by repetitive trauma from a Sony PlayStation 3 (Sony Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) vibration feedback controller. The lesions completely resolved following abstinence from gaming over a number of weeks. Although the parallel ridge pattern is typically the hallmark for early acral lentiginous melanoma, it may be observed in a limited number of benign entities, including subcorneal haematoma.

  14. Acute Cerebrovascular Radiation Syndrome: Radiation Neurotoxicity , mechanisms of CNS radiation injury, advanced countermeasures for Radiation Protection of Central Nervous System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    Key words: Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome (Cv ARS), Radiation Neurotoxins (RNT), Neurotransmitters, Radiation Countermeasures, Antiradiation Vaccine (ArV), Antiradiation Blocking Antibodies, Antiradiation Antidote. Psychoneuroimmunology, Neurotoxicity. ABSTRACT: To review the role of Radiation Neurotoxins in triggering, developing of radiation induced central nervous system injury. Radiation Neurotoxins - rapidly acting blood toxic lethal agent, which activated after irradiation and concentrated, circulated in interstitial fluid, lymph, blood with interactions with cell membranes, receptors and cell compartments. Radiation Neurotoxins - biological molecules with high enzymatic activity and/or specific lipids and activated or modified after irradiation. The Radiation Neurotoxins induce increased permeability of blood vessels, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and developing severe disorder of blood macro- and micro-circulation. Principles of Radiation Psychoneuro-immunology and Psychoneuro-allergology were applied for determination of pathological processes developed after irradiation or selective administration of Radiation Neurotoxins to radiation naïve mammals. Effects of radiation and exposure to radiation can develop severe irreversible abnormalities of Central Nervous System, brain structures and functions. Antiradiation Vaccine - most effective, advanced methods of protection, prevention, mitigation and treatment and was used for of Acute Radiation Syndromes and elaboration of new technology for immune-prophylaxis and immune-protection against ϒ, Heavy Ion, Neutron irradiation. Results of experiments suggested that blocking, antitoxic, antiradiation antibodies can significantly reduce toxicity of Radiation Toxins. New advanced technology include active immune-prophylaxis with Antiradiation Vaccine and Antiradiation therapy that included specific blocking antibodies to Radiation Neurotoxins

  15. Whole-central nervous system functional imaging in larval Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, William C.; Pulver, Stefan R.; Höckendorf, Burkhard; McDole, Katie; Branson, Kristin; Freeman, Jeremy; Keller, Philipp J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how the brain works in tight concert with the rest of the central nervous system (CNS) hinges upon knowledge of coordinated activity patterns across the whole CNS. We present a method for measuring activity in an entire, non-transparent CNS with high spatiotemporal resolution. We combine a light-sheet microscope capable of simultaneous multi-view imaging at volumetric speeds 25-fold faster than the state-of-the-art, a whole-CNS imaging assay for the isolated Drosophila larval CNS and a computational framework for analysing multi-view, whole-CNS calcium imaging data. We image both brain and ventral nerve cord, covering the entire CNS at 2 or 5 Hz with two- or one-photon excitation, respectively. By mapping network activity during fictive behaviours and quantitatively comparing high-resolution whole-CNS activity maps across individuals, we predict functional connections between CNS regions and reveal neurons in the brain that identify type and temporal state of motor programs executed in the ventral nerve cord. PMID:26263051

  16. Mentorship: service, education, progress. The 2015 CNS Presidential Address.

    PubMed

    Selden, Nathan R

    2017-01-01

    The theme of the 65th Annual Meeting of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons and the title of this presidential address focus on mentorship as a valuable service owed to the profession of neurological surgery by its members, a crucial tool for the education of new neurosurgeons, and a fundamental contributor to the progress of the specialty. The author explores the origin of the term "mentor" in Homeric tradition and the impact of mentorship on the historical legacy of neurological surgery. He outlines the role mentorship played in his own professional development, as well as the changing face of mentorship today due to increasing numbers of women in neurosurgery. Many surgeons perceive modern educational approaches as threats to the tradition of personal mentorship in medicine. The author argues that intentional educational methods, such as the Society of Neurological Surgeons (SNS) "matrix" curriculum, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education "milestones," and the SNS "boot camp" courses, each focus, enhance, and empower, but do not replace, personal mentorship. The author further describes the important role of mentorship in the definition, growth, and health of the specialty of neurological surgery and in the personal well-being and fulfillment of its practitioners.

  17. A Novel Approach for Studying the Physiology and Pathophysiology of Myelinated and Non-Myelinated Axons in the CNS White Matter.

    PubMed

    Li, Lijun; Velumian, Alexander A; Samoilova, Marina; Fehlings, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    Advances in brain connectomics set the need for detailed knowledge of functional properties of myelinated and non-myelinated (if present) axons in specific white matter pathways. The corpus callosum (CC), a major white matter structure interconnecting brain hemispheres, is extensively used for studying CNS axonal function. Unlike another widely used CNS white matter preparation, the optic nerve where all axons are myelinated, the CC contains also a large population of non-myelinated axons, makin