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Sample records for co-infection genetic analyses

  1. Interactions among co-infecting parasite species: a mechanism maintaining genetic variation in parasites?

    PubMed

    Seppälä, Otto; Karvonen, Anssi; Valtonen, E Tellervo; Jokela, Jukka

    2009-02-22

    Individuals of free-living organisms are often infected simultaneously by a community of parasites. If the co-infecting parasites interact, then this can add significantly to the diversity of host genotypexparasite genotype interactions. However, interactions between parasite species are usually not examined considering potential variation in interactions between different strain combinations of co-infecting parasites. Here, we examined the importance of interactions between strains of fish eye flukes Diplostomum spathaceum and Diplostomum gasterostei on their infectivity in naive fish hosts. We assessed the infection success of strains of both species in single-strain exposures and in co-exposures with a random strain of the other species. Parasite infection success did not consistently increase or decrease in the co-exposure treatment, but depended on the combinations of co-infecting parasite strains. This disrupted the relative infectivity of D. spathaceum strains observed in single-strain exposures. The infection success of D. gasterostei strains was independent of exposure type. These results suggest that interactions among parasite species may be strain specific and potentially promote maintenance of genetic polymorphism in parasite populations.

  2. Zebra Alphaherpesviruses (EHV-1 and EHV-9): Genetic Diversity, Latency and Co-Infections

    PubMed Central

    Abdelgawad, Azza; Damiani, Armando; Ho, Simon Y. W.; Strauss, Günter; Szentiks, Claudia A.; East, Marion L.; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Greenwood, Alex D.

    2016-01-01

    Alphaherpesviruses are highly prevalent in equine populations and co-infections with more than one of these viruses’ strains frequently diagnosed. Lytic replication and latency with subsequent reactivation, along with new episodes of disease, can be influenced by genetic diversity generated by spontaneous mutation and recombination. Latency enhances virus survival by providing an epidemiological strategy for long-term maintenance of divergent strains in animal populations. The alphaherpesviruses equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) and 9 (EHV-9) have recently been shown to cross species barriers, including a recombinant EHV-1 observed in fatal infections of a polar bear and Asian rhinoceros. Little is known about the latency and genetic diversity of EHV-1 and EHV-9, especially among zoo and wild equids. Here, we report evidence of limited genetic diversity in EHV-9 in zebras, whereas there is substantial genetic variability in EHV-1. We demonstrate that zebras can be lytically and latently infected with both viruses concurrently. Such a co-occurrence of infection in zebras suggests that even relatively slow-evolving viruses such as equine herpesviruses have the potential to diversify rapidly by recombination. This has potential consequences for the diagnosis of these viruses and their management in wild and captive equid populations. PMID:27657113

  3. Zebra Alphaherpesviruses (EHV-1 and EHV-9): Genetic Diversity, Latency and Co-Infections.

    PubMed

    Abdelgawad, Azza; Damiani, Armando; Ho, Simon Y W; Strauss, Günter; Szentiks, Claudia A; East, Marion L; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Greenwood, Alex D

    2016-09-20

    Alphaherpesviruses are highly prevalent in equine populations and co-infections with more than one of these viruses' strains frequently diagnosed. Lytic replication and latency with subsequent reactivation, along with new episodes of disease, can be influenced by genetic diversity generated by spontaneous mutation and recombination. Latency enhances virus survival by providing an epidemiological strategy for long-term maintenance of divergent strains in animal populations. The alphaherpesviruses equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) and 9 (EHV-9) have recently been shown to cross species barriers, including a recombinant EHV-1 observed in fatal infections of a polar bear and Asian rhinoceros. Little is known about the latency and genetic diversity of EHV-1 and EHV-9, especially among zoo and wild equids. Here, we report evidence of limited genetic diversity in EHV-9 in zebras, whereas there is substantial genetic variability in EHV-1. We demonstrate that zebras can be lytically and latently infected with both viruses concurrently. Such a co-occurrence of infection in zebras suggests that even relatively slow-evolving viruses such as equine herpesviruses have the potential to diversify rapidly by recombination. This has potential consequences for the diagnosis of these viruses and their management in wild and captive equid populations.

  4. Co-Infection and Genetic Diversity of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Roe Deer from Poland

    PubMed Central

    Werszko, Joanna; Cydzik, Krystian; Bajer, Anna; Michalik, Jerzy; Behnke, Jerzy M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Wild species are essential hosts for maintaining Ixodes ticks and the tick-borne diseases. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence, the rate of co-infection with Babesia, Bartonella, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and the molecular diversity of tick-borne pathogens in roe deer in Poland. Almost half of the tested samples provided evidence of infection with at least 1 species. A. phagocytophilum (37.3%) was the most common and Bartonella (13.4%) the rarest infection. A total of 18.3% of all positive samples from roe deer were infected with at least 2 pathogens, and one-third of those were co-infected with A. phagocytophilum, Bartonella, and Babesia species. On the basis of multilocus molecular studies we conclude that: (1) Two different genetic variants of A. phagocytophilum, zoonotic and nonzoonotic, are widely distributed in Polish roe deer population; (2) the roe deer is the host for zoonotic Babesia (Bab. venatorum, Bab. divergens), closely related or identical with strains/species found in humans; (3) our Bab. capreoli and Bab. divergens isolates differed from reported genotypes at 2 conserved base positions, i.e., positions 631 and 663; and (4) this is the first description of Bart. schoenbuchensis infections in roe deer in Poland. We present 1 of the first complex epidemiological studies on the prevalence of Babesia, Bartonella, and A. phagocytophilum in naturally infected populations of roe deer. These game animals clearly have an important role as reservoir hosts of tick-borne pathogens, but the pathogenicity and zoonotic potential of the parasite genotypes hosted by roe deer requires further detailed investigation. PMID:23473225

  5. Zika and Chikungunya virus co-infection in a traveller returning from Colombia, 2016: virus isolation and genetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Iovine, Nicole M.; Shah, Kairav; White, Sarah K.; Paisie, Taylor; Salemi, Marco; Morris Jr, J. Glenn; Lednicky, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Zika virus (ZIKV) and Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) can share the same mosquito vector, and co-infections by these viruses can occur in humans. While infections with these viruses share commonalities, CHIKV is unique in causing arthritis and arthralgias that may persist for a year or more. These infections are commonly diagnosed by RT–PCR-based methods during the acute phase of infection. Even with the high specificity and sensitivity characteristic of PCR, false negatives can occur, highlighting the need for additional diagnostic methods for confirmation. Case presentation: On her return to the USA, a traveller to Colombia, South America developed an illness consistent with Zika, Chikungunya and/or Dengue. RT-PCR of her samples was positive only for ZIKV. However, arthralgias persisted for months, raising concerns about co-infection with CHIKV or Mayaro viruses. Cell cultures inoculated with her original clinical samples demonstrated two types of cytopathic effects, and both ZIKV and CHIKV were identified in the supernatants. On phylogenetic analyses, both viruses were found to be related to strains found in Colombia. Conclusion: These findings highlight the need to consider CHIKV co-infection in patients with prolonged rheumatological symptoms after diagnosis with ZIKV, and the usefulness of cell culture as an amplification step for low-viremia blood and other samples. PMID:28348794

  6. Phylogenetic and genome-wide deep-sequencing analyses of canine parvovirus reveal co-infection with field variants and emergence of a recent recombinant strain.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Ruben; Calleros, Lucía; Marandino, Ana; Sarute, Nicolás; Iraola, Gregorio; Grecco, Sofia; Blanc, Hervé; Vignuzzi, Marco; Isakov, Ofer; Shomron, Noam; Carrau, Lucía; Hernández, Martín; Francia, Lourdes; Sosa, Katia; Tomás, Gonzalo; Panzera, Yanina

    2014-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV), a fast-evolving single-stranded DNA virus, comprises three antigenic variants (2a, 2b, and 2c) with different frequencies and genetic variability among countries. The contribution of co-infection and recombination to the genetic variability of CPV is far from being fully elucidated. Here we took advantage of a natural CPV population, recently formed by the convergence of divergent CPV-2c and CPV-2a strains, to study co-infection and recombination. Complete sequences of the viral coding region of CPV-2a and CPV-2c strains from 40 samples were generated and analyzed using phylogenetic tools. Two samples showed co-infection and were further analyzed by deep sequencing. The sequence profile of one of the samples revealed the presence of CPV-2c and CPV-2a strains that differed at 29 nucleotides. The other sample included a minor CPV-2a strain (13.3% of the viral population) and a major recombinant strain (86.7%). The recombinant strain arose from inter-genotypic recombination between CPV-2c and CPV-2a strains within the VP1/VP2 gene boundary. Our findings highlight the importance of deep-sequencing analysis to provide a better understanding of CPV molecular diversity.

  7. Phylogenetic and Genome-Wide Deep-Sequencing Analyses of Canine Parvovirus Reveal Co-Infection with Field Variants and Emergence of a Recent Recombinant Strain

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Ruben; Calleros, Lucía; Marandino, Ana; Sarute, Nicolás; Iraola, Gregorio; Grecco, Sofia; Blanc, Hervé; Vignuzzi, Marco; Isakov, Ofer; Shomron, Noam; Carrau, Lucía; Hernández, Martín; Francia, Lourdes; Sosa, Katia; Tomás, Gonzalo; Panzera, Yanina

    2014-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV), a fast-evolving single-stranded DNA virus, comprises three antigenic variants (2a, 2b, and 2c) with different frequencies and genetic variability among countries. The contribution of co-infection and recombination to the genetic variability of CPV is far from being fully elucidated. Here we took advantage of a natural CPV population, recently formed by the convergence of divergent CPV-2c and CPV-2a strains, to study co-infection and recombination. Complete sequences of the viral coding region of CPV-2a and CPV-2c strains from 40 samples were generated and analyzed using phylogenetic tools. Two samples showed co-infection and were further analyzed by deep sequencing. The sequence profile of one of the samples revealed the presence of CPV-2c and CPV-2a strains that differed at 29 nucleotides. The other sample included a minor CPV-2a strain (13.3% of the viral population) and a major recombinant strain (86.7%). The recombinant strain arose from inter-genotypic recombination between CPV-2c and CPV-2a strains within the VP1/VP2 gene boundary. Our findings highlight the importance of deep-sequencing analysis to provide a better understanding of CPV molecular diversity. PMID:25365348

  8. Genetic diversity of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-co-infected patients from Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Jaspe, Rossana C; Sulbarán, Yoneira F; Loureiro, Carmen L; Martínez, Nahir; Devesa, Marisol; Rodríguez, Yesseima; Torres, Jaime R; Rangel, Héctor R; Pujol, Flor H

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and genetic diversity of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-co-infected Venezuelan patients. The prevalence of HBV and HCV markers of infection in HIV-1 patients was 14% for anti-hepatitis B core antigen, 3% for hepatitis B surface antigen and 0.7% for anti-HCV, respectively. HBV prevalence was higher than HCV, as expected for a country where sexual intercourse, not intravenous drug use, is the main mode of HIV-1 transmission. The HCV genotype distribution in HIV-1-co-infected patients was similar to that obtained in HCV-mono-infected patients, but genotype 1a was more frequent in HIV-1-infected patients. The HBV genotype distribution exhibited differences between mono-infected and HIV-1-co-infected individuals. HBV F3 was the most common subgenotype in both groups, followed by F1b in HIV-1 co-infection and F2 in HBV mono-infection. In addition, genotype G (single infection) was found in an HIV-1-co-infected individual. A high prevalence of occult HBV infection was detected in HIV-1-co-infected naïve patients (18%), with F2 being the most common genotype (75%). To the best of our knowledge, these results correspond to the first description of frequency and molecular characterization of HBV and HCV in HIV-1 Venezuelan patients. © 2014 The Authors.

  9. The rate of co-infection for piglet diarrhea viruses in China and the genetic characterization of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and porcine kobuvirus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z-P; Yang, Z; Lin, W-D; Wang, W-Y; Yang, J; Jin, W-J; Qin, A-J

    2016-03-01

    Piglet diarrhea epidemics result in major economic losses for the swine industry. Four viruses are closely linked to porcine diarrhea: porcine kobuvirus (PKV), porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), and porcine rotavirus (PRoV). We have conducted an epidemiology study to determine the frequency of infection and co-infection with these viruses in China, and characterized the genetic variation of the isolated PEDV and PKV strains. Stool and intestinal samples (n = 314) were collected from piglets with diarrhea in China from years 2012 to 2014. RT-PCR was used to detect PKV, PEDV, TGEV, and PRoV. Phylogenetic relationships between reference strains and the isolated PEDV and PKV strains were determined based on the M and 3D gene sequence. The rates of infection with PKV, PEDV, TGEV and PRoV were 29.9%, 24.2%, 1.91%, and 0.31%, respectively. Co-infections with PKV and the other three viruses were very common. Co-infection of PKV and PEDV was detected in 15.0% (47/314) of the samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the PKV 3D gene indicated that there were some phylogenetic differences in the PKV strains across regions within China. However, according to the PEDV M gene, strains clustered into three groups and the primary group was distinct from the vaccine strain CV777. This study provides insights in to the prevalence of diarrhea viruses and their prevention and control in China.

  10. Recall of intestinal helminthiasis by HIV-infected South Africans and avoidance of possible misinterpretation of egg excretion in worm/HIV co-infection analyses

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Vera J; Markus, Miles B; Kwitshana, Zilungile L; Dhansay, Muhammad A; van der Merwe, Lize; Walzl, Gerhard; Fincham, John E

    2006-01-01

    Background Ascariasis and HIV/AIDS are often co-endemic under conditions of poverty in South Africa; and discordant immune responses to the respective infections could theoretically be affecting the epidemic of HIV/AIDS in various ways. It is well-known that sensitisation to helminthic antigens can aggravate or ameliorate several non-helminthic diseases and impair immunisation against cholera, tetanus and tuberculosis. The human genotype can influence immune responses to Ascaris strongly. With these factors in mind, we have started to document the extent of long-term exposure to Ascaris and other helminths in a community where HIV/AIDS is highly prevalent. In more advanced studies, objectives are to analyse relevant immunological variables (e.g. cytokine activity and immunoglobulin levels). We postulate that when Ascaris is hyperendemic, analysis of possible consequences of co-infection by HIV cannot be based primarily on excretion vs non-excretion of eggs. Methods Recall of worms seen in faeces was documented in relation to the age of adult volunteers who were either seropositive (n = 170) or seronegative (n = 65) for HIV. Reasons for HIV testing, deworming treatments used or not used, date and place of birth, and duration of residence in Cape Town, were recorded. Confidence intervals were calculated both for group percentages and the inter-group differences, and were used to make statistical comparisons. Results In both groups, more than 70% of participants were aware of having passed worms, often both when a child and as an adult. Most of the descriptions fitted Ascaris. Evidence for significantly prolonged exposure to helminthic infection in HIV-positives was supported by more recall of deworming treatment in this group (p < 0.05). Over 90% of the participants had moved to the city from rural areas. Conclusion There was a long-term history of ascariasis (and probably other helminthic infections) in both of the groups that were studied. In women in the same

  11. Genetic Analyses of Integrin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wickström, Sara A.; Radovanac, Korana; Fässler, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    The development of multicellular organisms, as well as maintenance of organ architecture and function, requires robust regulation of cell fates. This is in part achieved by conserved signaling pathways through which cells process extracellular information and translate this information into changes in proliferation, differentiation, migration, and cell shape. Gene deletion studies in higher eukaryotes have assigned critical roles for components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and their cellular receptors in a vast number of developmental processes, indicating that a large proportion of this signaling is regulated by cell-ECM interactions. In addition, genetic alterations in components of this signaling axis play causative roles in several human diseases. This review will discuss what genetic analyses in mice and lower organisms have taught us about adhesion signaling in development and disease. PMID:21421914

  12. Effects of genetic similarity on the life-history strategy of co-infecting trematodes: are parasites capable of intrahost kin recognition?

    PubMed

    Joannes, A; Lagrue, C; Poulin, R; Beltran-Bech, S

    2014-08-01

    For conspecific parasites sharing the same host, kin recognition can be advantageous when the fitness of one individual depends on what another does; yet, evidence of kin recognition among parasites remains limited. Some trematodes, like Coitocaecum parvum, have plastic life cycles including two alternative life-history strategies. The parasite can wait for its intermediate host to be eaten by a fish definitive host, thus completing the classical three-host life cycle, or mature precociously and produce eggs while still inside its intermediate host as a facultative shortcut. Two different amphipod species are used as intermediate hosts by C. parvum, one small and highly mobile and the other larger, sedentary, and burrow dwelling. Amphipods often harbour two or more C. parvum individuals, all capable of using one or the other developmental strategy, thus creating potential conflicts or cooperation opportunities over transmission routes. This model was used to test the kin recognition hypothesis according to which cooperation between two conspecific individuals relies on the individuals' ability to evaluate their degree of genetic similarity. First, data showed that levels of intrahost genetic similarity between co-infecting C. parvum individuals differed between host species. Second, genetic similarity between parasites sharing the same host was strongly linked to their likelihood of adopting identical developmental strategies. Two nonexclusive hypotheses that could explain this pattern are discussed: kin recognition and cooperation between genetically similar parasites and/or matching genotypes involving parasite genotype-host compatibility filters.

  13. Co-circulation of two genetically distinct viruses in an outbreak of African swine fever in Mozambique: no evidence for individual co-infection.

    PubMed

    Bastos, A D S; Penrith, M-L; Macome, F; Pinto, F; Thomson, G R

    2004-11-15

    In 1998, domestic pigs originating from villages within a 40 km radius of Ulongwe in the northern Tete Province of Mozambique were held in a quarantine facility for a 3-month period prior to their importation into South Africa. Eight of a total of 25 pigs died within the first 3 weeks of quarantine of what appeared clinically and on post mortem examination to be African swine fever (ASF). Organs were collected and preserved in formol-glycerosaline and the presence of ASF virus in these specimens was confirmed by three independent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. Two gene regions were characterised, namely the C-terminus end of the major immunodominant protein VP72 and the central variable region (CVR) of the 9RL open reading frame (ORF). Results confirmed the presence of two genetically distinct viruses circulating simultaneously within a single outbreak focus. However, despite the pigs being housed within the same facility, no evidence of co-infection was observed within individual animals. Comparison of the two 1998 virus variants with viruses causing historical outbreaks of the disease in Mozambique revealed that these viruses belong to two distinct genotypes which are unrelated to viruses causing outbreaks between 1960 and 1994. In addition, the CVR and p72 gene regions of one of the 1998 Mozambique virus variants (variant-40) was shown to be identical to the virus recovered from an ASF outbreak in Madagascar in the same year, whilst the other (variant-92) was identical to a 1988 pig isolate from Zambia.

  14. Co-infection with Mycobacterium bovis does not alter the response to bovine leukemia virus in BoLA DRB3*0902, genetically resistant cattle.

    PubMed

    Lützelschwab, Claudia M; Forletti, Agustina; Cepeda, Rosana; Esteban, Eduardo N; Confalonieri, Omar; Gutiérrez, Silvina E

    2016-12-01

    High proviral load (HPL) profile in bovine leukemia virus infected animals poses increased risk of transmission, and development of HPL or low proviral load (LPL) profile may be attributed to host genetics. Genetic resistance and susceptibility has been mapped to the Major Histocompatibility Complex class II DRB3 gene (BoLA DRB3). The aim of this work was to determine the effect of Mycobacterium bovis infection on certain virological and host immunological parameters of BLV experimental infection. Twenty-six Argentinian Holstein calves carrying the resistance-associated marker allele BoLA DRB3*0902, susceptibility-associated marker allele BoLA DRB3*1501, or neutral BoLA DRB3 alleles, exposed to M. bovis were used. Twenty calves were inoculated with BLV, three were naturally infected and other three were BLV-negative. Seven from twenty six (27%) of the animals resulted positive to the PPD test. The proviral load, absolute leukocyte and lymphocyte counts, time to seroconversion, antibody titer against BLV, and viral antigen expression in vitro at various times post inoculation were determined and compared between PPD+ and PPD- animals. From a total of 23 BLV positive animals (naturally and experimentally infected), 13 (56.5%) developed HPL, and 10 (43.5%) developed LPL. None of the investigated parameters were affected by infection with M. bovis. We concluded that the ability of cattle carrying resistance-associated marker to control BLV and to progress towards a LPL phenotype was not altered by M. bovis co-infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased genetic diversity and prevalence of co-infection with Trypanosoma spp. in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) and their ticks identified using next-generation sequencing (NGS).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Amanda D; Gofton, Alexander W; Paparini, Andrea; Codello, Annachiara; Greay, Telleasha; Gillett, Amber; Warren, Kristin; Irwin, Peter; Ryan, Una

    2017-01-01

    Infections with Trypanosoma spp. have been associated with poor health and decreased survival of koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus), particularly in the presence of concurrent pathogens such as Chlamydia and koala retrovirus. The present study describes the application of a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based assay to characterise the prevalence and genetic diversity of trypanosome communities in koalas and two native species of ticks (Ixodes holocyclus and I. tasmani) removed from koala hosts. Among 168 koalas tested, 32.2% (95% CI: 25.2-39.8%) were positive for at least one Trypanosoma sp. Previously described Trypanosoma spp. from koalas were identified, including T. irwini (32.1%, 95% CI: 25.2-39.8%), T. gilletti (25%, 95% CI: 18.7-32.3%), T. copemani (27.4%, 95% CI: 20.8-34.8%) and T. vegrandis (10.1%, 95% CI: 6.0-15.7%). Trypanosoma noyesi was detected for the first time in koalas, although at a low prevalence (0.6% 95% CI: 0-3.3%), and a novel species (Trypanosoma sp. AB-2017) was identified at a prevalence of 4.8% (95% CI: 2.1-9.2%). Mixed infections with up to five species were present in 27.4% (95% CI: 21-35%) of the koalas, which was significantly higher than the prevalence of single infections 4.8% (95% CI: 2-9%). Overall, a considerably higher proportion (79.7%) of the Trypanosoma sequences isolated from koala blood samples were identified as T. irwini, suggesting this is the dominant species. Co-infections involving T. gilletti, T. irwini, T. copemani, T. vegrandis and Trypanosoma sp. AB-2017 were also detected in ticks, with T. gilletti and T. copemani being the dominant species within the invertebrate hosts. Direct Sanger sequencing of Trypanosoma 18S rRNA gene amplicons was also performed and results revealed that this method was only able to identify the genotypes with greater amount of reads (according to NGS) within koala samples, which highlights the advantages of NGS in detecting mixed infections. The present study provides new insights on the

  16. Increased genetic diversity and prevalence of co-infection with Trypanosoma spp. in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) and their ticks identified using next-generation sequencing (NGS)

    PubMed Central

    Gofton, Alexander W.; Paparini, Andrea; Codello, Annachiara; Greay, Telleasha; Gillett, Amber; Warren, Kristin; Irwin, Peter; Ryan, Una

    2017-01-01

    Infections with Trypanosoma spp. have been associated with poor health and decreased survival of koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus), particularly in the presence of concurrent pathogens such as Chlamydia and koala retrovirus. The present study describes the application of a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based assay to characterise the prevalence and genetic diversity of trypanosome communities in koalas and two native species of ticks (Ixodes holocyclus and I. tasmani) removed from koala hosts. Among 168 koalas tested, 32.2% (95% CI: 25.2–39.8%) were positive for at least one Trypanosoma sp. Previously described Trypanosoma spp. from koalas were identified, including T. irwini (32.1%, 95% CI: 25.2–39.8%), T. gilletti (25%, 95% CI: 18.7–32.3%), T. copemani (27.4%, 95% CI: 20.8–34.8%) and T. vegrandis (10.1%, 95% CI: 6.0–15.7%). Trypanosoma noyesi was detected for the first time in koalas, although at a low prevalence (0.6% 95% CI: 0–3.3%), and a novel species (Trypanosoma sp. AB-2017) was identified at a prevalence of 4.8% (95% CI: 2.1–9.2%). Mixed infections with up to five species were present in 27.4% (95% CI: 21–35%) of the koalas, which was significantly higher than the prevalence of single infections 4.8% (95% CI: 2–9%). Overall, a considerably higher proportion (79.7%) of the Trypanosoma sequences isolated from koala blood samples were identified as T. irwini, suggesting this is the dominant species. Co-infections involving T. gilletti, T. irwini, T. copemani, T. vegrandis and Trypanosoma sp. AB-2017 were also detected in ticks, with T. gilletti and T. copemani being the dominant species within the invertebrate hosts. Direct Sanger sequencing of Trypanosoma 18S rRNA gene amplicons was also performed and results revealed that this method was only able to identify the genotypes with greater amount of reads (according to NGS) within koala samples, which highlights the advantages of NGS in detecting mixed infections. The present study provides

  17. Fundamentals of fungal molecular population genetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianping

    2006-07-01

    The last two decades have seen tremendous growth in the development and application of molecular methods in the analyses of fungal species and populations. In this paper, I provide an overview of the molecular techniques and the basic analytical tools used to address various fundamental population and evolutionary genetic questions in fungi. With increasing availability and decreasing cost, DNA sequencing is becoming a mainstream data acquisition method in fungal evolutionary genetic studies. However, other methods, especially those based on the polymerase chain reaction, remain powerful in addressing specific questions for certain groups of taxa. These developments are bringing fungal population and evolutionary genetics into mainstream ecology and evolutionary biology.

  18. Evidence of susceptibility to lamivudine-based HAART and genetic stability of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in HIV co-infected patients: A South African longitudinal HBV whole genome study.

    PubMed

    Amponsah-Dacosta, Edina; Rakgole, J Nare; Gededzha, Maemu P; Lukhwareni, Azwidowi; Blackard, Jason T; Selabe, Selokela G; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    Reports on the concomitant impact of HIV co-infection and long term highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) on the genetic stability and molecular evolution of HBV are limited in sub-Saharan Africa. This retrospective study investigated the molecular evolution of chronic HBV in HIV co-infected patients on lamivudine (3TC)-based HAART over a 5year period. Four HIV co-infected patients, consecutively recruited and followed-up, were screened for hepatitis B serological markers, and their viral loads determined. The HBV genome was amplified from longitudinal samples and characterized by Bayesian inference, mutational analysis, and identification of immune selection pressure. All patients exhibited persistent chronic HBV infection at baseline, as well as over the course of follow-up despite exposure to 3TC-based HAART. The polymerase gene in all isolates was relatively variable prior to HAART initiation at baseline and during the course of follow-up, although primary drug resistance mutations were not detected. All but one patient were infected with HBV subgenotype A1. The divergence rates between baseline and the last follow-up sequences ranged from 0 to 2.0×10(-3) substitutions per site per year (s/s/y). Positive selection pressure was evident within the surface and core genes. Despite persistent HBV infection in the HIV co-infected patients exposed to long term 3TC-based HAART, the molecular evolution of HBV over a 5year period was unremarkable. In addition, HBV exhibited minimal genetic variability overtime. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Network analyses structure genetic diversity in independent genetic worlds

    PubMed Central

    Halary, Sébastien; Leigh, Jessica W.; Cheaib, Bachar; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2009-01-01

    DNA flows between chromosomes and mobile elements, following rules that are poorly understood. This limited knowledge is partly explained by the limits of current approaches to study the structure and evolution of genetic diversity. Network analyses of 119,381 homologous DNA families, sampled from 111 cellular genomes and from 165,529 phage, plasmid, and environmental virome sequences, offer challenging insights. Our results support a disconnected yet highly structured network of genetic diversity, revealing the existence of multiple “genetic worlds.” These divides define multiple isolated groups of DNA vehicles drawing on distinct gene pools. Mathematical studies of the centralities of these worlds’ subnetworks demonstrate that plasmids, not viruses, were key vectors of genetic exchange between bacterial chromosomes, both recently and in the past. Furthermore, network methodology introduces new ways of quantifying current sampling of genetic diversity. PMID:20007769

  20. Network analyses structure genetic diversity in independent genetic worlds.

    PubMed

    Halary, Sébastien; Leigh, Jessica W; Cheaib, Bachar; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2010-01-05

    DNA flows between chromosomes and mobile elements, following rules that are poorly understood. This limited knowledge is partly explained by the limits of current approaches to study the structure and evolution of genetic diversity. Network analyses of 119,381 homologous DNA families, sampled from 111 cellular genomes and from 165,529 phage, plasmid, and environmental virome sequences, offer challenging insights. Our results support a disconnected yet highly structured network of genetic diversity, revealing the existence of multiple "genetic worlds." These divides define multiple isolated groups of DNA vehicles drawing on distinct gene pools. Mathematical studies of the centralities of these worlds' subnetworks demonstrate that plasmids, not viruses, were key vectors of genetic exchange between bacterial chromosomes, both recently and in the past. Furthermore, network methodology introduces new ways of quantifying current sampling of genetic diversity.

  1. Genetic analyses of captive Alala (Corvus hawaiiensis) using AFLP analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarvi, Susan I.; Bianchi, Kiara R.

    2006-01-01

    affected by the mutation rate at microsatellite loci, thus introducing a bias. Also, the number of loci that can be studied is frequently limited to fewer than 10. This theoretically represents a maximum of one marker for each of 10 chromosomes. Dominant markers like AFLP allow a larger fraction of the genome to be screened. Large numbers of loci can be screened by AFLP to resolve very small individual differences that can be used for identification of individuals, estimates of pairwise relatedness and, in some cases, for parentage analyses. Since AFLP is a dominant marker (can not distinguish between +/+ homozygote versus +/- heterozygote), it has limitations for parentage analyses. Only when both parents are homozygous for the absence of alleles (-/-) and offspring show a presence (+/+ or +/-) can the parents be excluded. In this case, microsatellites become preferable as they have the potential to exclude individual parents when the other parent is unknown. Another limitation of AFLP is that the loci are generally less polymorphic (only two alleles/locus) than microsatellite loci (often >10 alleles/locus). While generally fewer than 10 highly polymorphic microsatellite loci are enough to exclude and assign parentage, it might require up to 100 or more AFLP loci. While there are pros and cons to different methodologies, the total number of loci evaluated by AFLP generally offsets the limitations imposed due to the dominant nature of this approach and end results between methods are generally comparable. Overall objectives of this study were to evaluate the level of genetic diversity in the captive population of Alala, to compare genetic data with currently available pedigree information, and to determine the extent of relatedness of mating pairs and among founding individuals.

  2. HIV and co-infections

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Christina C; Crane, Megan; Zhou, JingLing; Mina, Michael; Post, Jeffrey J; Cameron, Barbara A; Lloyd, Andrew R; Jaworowski, Anthony; French, Martyn A; Lewin, Sharon R

    2013-01-01

    Summary Despite significant reductions in morbidity and mortality secondary to availability of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection still accounts for 1.5 million deaths annually. The majority of deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa where rates of opportunistic co-infections are disproportionately high. In this review, we discuss the immunopathogenesis of five common infections that cause significant morbidity in HIV-infected patients globally. These include co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and Plasmodium falciparum. Specifically, we review the natural history of each co-infection in the setting of HIV, the specific immune defects induced by HIV, the effects of cART on the immune response to the co-infection, the pathogenesis of immune restoration disease (IRD) associated with each infection, and advances in the areas of prevention of each co-infection via vaccination. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and gaps for future research. PMID:23772618

  3. Genetic analyses of a seasonal interval timer.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Brian J; Renstrom, Randall A; Nelson, Randy J

    2004-08-01

    Seasonal clocks (e.g., circannual clocks, seasonal interval timers) permit anticipation of regularly occurring environmental events by timing the onset of seasonal transitions in reproduction, metabolism, and behavior. Implicit in the concept that seasonal clocks reflect adaptations to the local environment is the unexamined assumption that heritable genetic variance exists in the critical features of such clocks, namely, their temporal properties. These experiments quantified the intraspecific variance in, and heritability of, the photorefractoriness interval timer in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus), a seasonal clock that provides temporal information to mechanisms that regulate seasonal transitions in body weight. Twenty-seven families consisting of 54 parents and 109 offspring were raised in a long-day photoperiod and transferred as adults to an inhibitory photoperiod (continuous darkness; DD). Weekly body weight measurements permitted specification of the interval of responsiveness to DD, a reflection of the duration of the interval timer, in each individual. Body weights of males and females decreased after exposure to DD, but 3 to 5 months later, somatic recrudescence occurred, indicative of photorefractoriness to DD. The interval timer was approximately 5 weeks longer and twice as variable in females relative to males. Analyses of variance of full siblings revealed an overall intraclass correlation of 0.71 +/- 0.04 (0.51 +/- 0.10 for male offspring and 0.80 +/- 0.06 for female offspring), suggesting a significant family resemblance in the duration of interval timers. Parent-offspring regression analyses yielded an overall heritability estimate of 0.61 +/- 0.2; h(2) estimates from parent-offspring regression analyses were significant for female offspring (0.91 +/- 0.4) but not for male offspring (0.35 +/- 0.2), indicating strong additive genetic components for this trait, primarily in females. In nature, individual differences, both within and between

  4. Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi) and HIV co-infection in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Carolina; Cucunubá, Zulma; Parra, Edgar; Toro, German; Zambrano, Pilar; Ramírez, Juan David

    2014-09-01

    Chagas disease is a complex zoonotic pathology caused by the kinetoplastid Trypanosoma cruzi. This parasite presents remarkable genetic variability and has been grouped into six discrete typing units (DTUs). The association between the DTUs and clinical outcome remains unknown. Chagas disease and co-infection with HIV/AIDS has been reported widely in Brazil and Argentina. Herein, we present the molecular analyses from a Chagas disease patient with HIV/AIDS co-infection in Colombia who presented severe cardiomyopathy, pleural effusion, and central nervous system involvement. A mixed infection by T. cruzi genotypes was detected. We suggest including T. cruzi in the list of opportunistic pathogens for the management of HIV patients in Colombia. The epidemiological implications of this finding are discussed. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic diversity of infectious laryngotracheitis virus during in vivo co-infection parallels viral replication and arises from recombination 'hot-spots' within the genome.

    PubMed

    Loncoman, Carlos A; Hartley, Carol A; Coppo, Mauricio J C; Vaz, Paola K; Diaz-Méndez, Andrés; Browning, Glenn F; García, Maricarmen; Spatz, Stephen; Devlin, Joanne M

    2017-09-22

    Recombination is a feature of many alphaherpesviruses that infect people and animals. Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV - Gallid alphaherpesvirus 1), causes respiratory disease in chickens, resulting in significant production losses in poultry industries worldwide. Natural (field) ILTV recombination is widespread, particularly recombination between attenuated ILTV vaccine strains to create virulent viruses. These virulent recombinants have had a major impact on animal health. Recently, the development of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay for ILTV has helped to understand ILTV recombination under laboratory settings. In this study we applied this SNP genotyping assay to further examine ILTV recombination in the natural host. Following co-inoculation of specific pathogen free chickens, we examined the resultant progeny for evidence of viral recombination and characterised the diversity of the recombinants over time. The results showed that ILTV replication and recombination are closely related, and that the recombinant viral progeny are most diverse four days after co-inoculation, which is the peak of viral replication. Further, the location of recombination breakpoints in a selection of the recombinant progeny, and in field isolates of ILTV from different geographical regions, were examined following full genome sequencing and used to identify recombination hot-spots in the ILTV genome.Importance Alphaherpesviruses are common causes of disease in people and animals. Recombination enables genome diversification in many different species of alphaherpesviruses, which can lead to the evolution of higher levels of viral virulence. Using the alphaherpesvirus infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), we performed co-infections in the natural host (chickens) to demonstrate high levels of virus recombination. Higher levels of diversity in the recombinant progeny coincided with the highest levels of virus replication. In the recombinant progeny

  6. Molecular Analyses Reveal Unexpected Genetic Structure in Iberian Ibex Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Jesús M.; Soriguer, Ramón C.; Granados, José E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Genetic differentiation in historically connected populations could be the result of genetic drift or adaptation, two processes that imply a need for differing strategies in population management. The aim of our study was to use neutral genetic markers to characterize C. pyrenaica populations genetically and examine results in terms of (i) demographic history, (ii) subspecific classification and (iii) the implications for the management of Iberian ibex. Methodology/Principal Findings We used 30 neutral microsatellite markers from 333 Iberian ibex to explore genetic diversity in the three main Iberian ibex populations in Spain corresponding to the two persisting subspecies (victoria and hispanica). Our molecular analyses detected recent genetic bottlenecks in all the studied populations, a finding that coincides with the documented demographic decline in C. pyrenaica in recent decades. Genetic divergence between the two C. pyrenaica subspecies (hispanica and victoriae) was substantial (FST between 0.39 and 0.47). Unexpectedly, we found similarly high genetic differentiation between two populations (Sierra Nevada and Maestrazgo) belonging to the subspecies hispanica. The genetic pattern identified in our study could be the result of strong genetic drift due to the severe genetic bottlenecks in the studied populations, caused in turn by the progressive destruction of natural habitat, disease epidemics and/or uncontrolled hunting. Conclusions Previous Capra pyrenaica conservation decision-making was based on the clear distinction between the two subspecies (victoriae and hispanica); yet our paper raises questions about the usefulness for conservation plans of the distinction between these subspecies. PMID:28135293

  7. Molecular Analyses Reveal Unexpected Genetic Structure in Iberian Ibex Populations.

    PubMed

    Angelone-Alasaad, Samer; Biebach, Iris; Pérez, Jesús M; Soriguer, Ramón C; Granados, José E

    2017-01-01

    Genetic differentiation in historically connected populations could be the result of genetic drift or adaptation, two processes that imply a need for differing strategies in population management. The aim of our study was to use neutral genetic markers to characterize C. pyrenaica populations genetically and examine results in terms of (i) demographic history, (ii) subspecific classification and (iii) the implications for the management of Iberian ibex. We used 30 neutral microsatellite markers from 333 Iberian ibex to explore genetic diversity in the three main Iberian ibex populations in Spain corresponding to the two persisting subspecies (victoria and hispanica). Our molecular analyses detected recent genetic bottlenecks in all the studied populations, a finding that coincides with the documented demographic decline in C. pyrenaica in recent decades. Genetic divergence between the two C. pyrenaica subspecies (hispanica and victoriae) was substantial (FST between 0.39 and 0.47). Unexpectedly, we found similarly high genetic differentiation between two populations (Sierra Nevada and Maestrazgo) belonging to the subspecies hispanica. The genetic pattern identified in our study could be the result of strong genetic drift due to the severe genetic bottlenecks in the studied populations, caused in turn by the progressive destruction of natural habitat, disease epidemics and/or uncontrolled hunting. Previous Capra pyrenaica conservation decision-making was based on the clear distinction between the two subspecies (victoriae and hispanica); yet our paper raises questions about the usefulness for conservation plans of the distinction between these subspecies.

  8. Modeling malaria and typhoid fever co-infection dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mutua, Jones M; Wang, Feng-Bin; Vaidya, Naveen K

    2015-06-01

    Malaria and typhoid are among the most endemic diseases, and thus, of major public health concerns in tropical developing countries. In addition to true co-infection of malaria and typhoid, false diagnoses due to similar signs and symptoms and false positive results in testing methods, leading to improper controls, are the major challenges on managing these diseases. In this study, we develop novel mathematical models describing the co-infection dynamics of malaria and typhoid. Through mathematical analyses of our models, we identify distinct features of typhoid and malaria infection dynamics as well as relationships associated to their co-infection. The global dynamics of typhoid can be determined by a single threshold (the typhoid basic reproduction number, R0(T)) while two thresholds (the malaria basic reproduction number, R0(M), and the extinction index, R0(MM)) are needed to determine the global dynamics of malaria. We demonstrate that by using efficient simultaneous prevention programs, the co-infection basic reproduction number, R0, can be brought down to below one, thereby eradicating the diseases. Using our model, we present illustrative numerical results with a case study in the Eastern Province of Kenya to quantify the possible false diagnosis resulting from this co-infection. In Kenya, despite having higher prevalence of typhoid, malaria is more problematic in terms of new infections and disease deaths. We find that false diagnosis-with higher possible cases for typhoid than malaria-cause significant devastating impacts on Kenyan societies. Our results demonstrate that both diseases need to be simultaneously managed for successful control of co-epidemics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A weighted U statistic for association analyses considering genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Changshuai; Elston, Robert C; Lu, Qing

    2016-07-20

    Converging evidence suggests that common complex diseases with the same or similar clinical manifestations could have different underlying genetic etiologies. While current research interests have shifted toward uncovering rare variants and structural variations predisposing to human diseases, the impact of heterogeneity in genetic studies of complex diseases has been largely overlooked. Most of the existing statistical methods assume the disease under investigation has a homogeneous genetic effect and could, therefore, have low power if the disease undergoes heterogeneous pathophysiological and etiological processes. In this paper, we propose a heterogeneity-weighted U (HWU) method for association analyses considering genetic heterogeneity. HWU can be applied to various types of phenotypes (e.g., binary and continuous) and is computationally efficient for high-dimensional genetic data. Through simulations, we showed the advantage of HWU when the underlying genetic etiology of a disease was heterogeneous, as well as the robustness of HWU against different model assumptions (e.g., phenotype distributions). Using HWU, we conducted a genome-wide analysis of nicotine dependence from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environments dataset. The genome-wide analysis of nearly one million genetic markers took 7h, identifying heterogeneous effects of two new genes (i.e., CYP3A5 and IKBKB) on nicotine dependence. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. TEMPLE: analysing population genetic variation at transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Litovchenko, Maria; Laurent, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Genetic variation occurring at the level of regulatory sequences can affect phenotypes and fitness in natural populations. This variation can be analysed in a population genetic framework to study how genetic drift and selection affect the evolution of these functional elements. However, doing this requires a good understanding of the location and nature of regulatory regions and has long been a major hurdle. The current proliferation of genomewide profiling experiments of transcription factor occupancies greatly improves our ability to identify genomic regions involved in specific DNA-protein interactions. Although software exists for predicting transcription factor binding sites (TFBS), and the effects of genetic variants on TFBS specificity, there are no tools currently available for inferring this information jointly with the genetic variation at TFBS in natural populations. We developed the software Transcription Elements Mapping at the Population LEvel (TEMPLE), which predicts TFBS, evaluates the effects of genetic variants on TFBS specificity and summarizes the genetic variation occurring at TFBS in intraspecific sequence alignments. We demonstrate that TEMPLE's TFBS prediction algorithms gives identical results to PATSER, a software distribution commonly used in the field. We also illustrate the unique features of TEMPLE by analysing TFBS diversity for the TF Senseless (SENS) in one ancestral and one cosmopolitan population of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. TEMPLE can be used to localize TFBS that are characterized by strong genetic differentiation across natural populations. This will be particularly useful for studies aiming to identify adaptive mutations. TEMPLE is a java-based cross-platform software that easily maps the genetic diversity at predicted TFBSs using a graphical interface, or from the Unix command line.

  11. Using population genetic analyses to understand seed dispersal patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamrick, J. L.; Trapnell, Dorset W.

    2011-11-01

    Neutral genetic markers have been employed in several ways to understand seed dispersal patterns in natural and human modified landscapes. Genetic differentiation among spatially separated populations, using biparentally and maternally inherited genetic markers, allows determination of the relative historical effectiveness of pollen and seed dispersal. Genetic relatedness among individuals, estimated as a function of spatial separation between pairs of individuals, has also been used to indirectly infer seed dispersal distances. Patterns of genetic relatedness among plants in recently colonized populations provide insights into the role of seed dispersal in population colonization and expansion. High genetic relatedness within expanding populations indicates original colonization by a few individuals and population expansion by the recruitment of the original colonists' progeny; low relatedness should occur if population growth results primarily from continuous seed immigration from multiple sources. Parentage analysis procedures can identify maternal parents of dispersed fruits, seeds, or seedlings providing detailed descriptions of contemporary seed dispersal patterns. With standard parent-pair analyses of seeds or seedlings, problems can arise in distinguishing the maternal parent. However, the use of maternal DNA from dispersed fruits or seed coats allows direct identification of maternal individuals and, as a consequence, the distance and patterns of seed dispersal and deposition. Application of combinations of these approaches provides additional insights into the role seed dispersal plays in the genetic connectivity between populations in natural and disturbed landscapes.

  12. An integrated microfluidic device for influenza and other genetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Pal, R; Yang, M; Lin, R; Johnson, B N; Srivastava, N; Razzacki, S Z; Chomistek, K J; Heldsinger, D C; Haque, R M; Ugaz, V M; Thwar, P K; Chen, Z; Alfano, K; Yim, M B; Krishnan, M; Fuller, A O; Larson, R G; Burke, D T; Burns, M A

    2005-10-01

    An integrated microfluidic device capable of performing a variety of genetic assays has been developed as a step towards building systems for widespread dissemination. The device integrates fluidic and thermal components such as heaters, temperature sensors, and addressable valves to control two nanoliter reactors in series followed by an electrophoretic separation. This combination of components is suitable for a variety of genetic analyses. As an example, we have successfully identified sequence-specific hemagglutinin A subtype for the A/LA/1/87 strain of influenza virus. The device uses a compact design and mass production technologies, making it an attractive platform for a variety of widely disseminated applications.

  13. PGA: power calculator for case-control genetic association analyses

    PubMed Central

    Menashe, Idan; Rosenberg, Philip S; Chen, Bingshu E

    2008-01-01

    Background Statistical power calculations inform the design and interpretation of genetic association studies, but few programs are tailored to case-control studies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in unrelated subjects. Results We have developed the "Power for Genetic Association analyses" (PGA) package which comprises algorithms and graphical user interfaces for sample size and minimum detectable risk calculations using SNP or haplotype effects under different genetic models and study constrains. The software accounts for linkage disequilibrium and statistical multiple comparisons. The results are presented in graphs or tables and can be printed or exported in standard file formats. Conclusion PGA is user friendly software that can facilitate decision making for association studies of candidate genes, fine-mapping studies, and whole-genome scans. Stand-alone executable files and a Matlab toolbox are available for download at: PMID:18477402

  14. Genetic and Dynamic Analyses of Murine Peak Bone Density

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    4 vBMD loci shared with femurs (1, 4, 14, & 18) and 2 unique loci (Chr 7 & 9). Lastly, a new DEXA instrument for mice, the PIXhnus, has been...late 1999. The summarized results for the femoral total BMD analyses were: a) Genome wide scans for co-segregation of genetic marker data with high or...possible tools for drug discovery aimed at exogenous manipulation of bone density. New Instrumentation - PIXImus DEXA . We have been testing a dual energy

  15. Behavioral genetic analyses of prosocial behavior in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Alice M; Light-Häusermann, Jade H; Rijsdijk, Frühling; Eley, Thalia C

    2009-01-01

    Prosocial behavior is an important aspect of normal social and psychological development. Adult and child twin studies typically estimate the heritability of prosocial behavior to be between 30 and 50%, although relatively little is known about genetic and environmental influences upon prosocial behavior in adolescence. We therefore examined reports of prosocial behavior in a large longitudinal family study of 1160 adolescent twin pairs (aged between 13 and 19 years). Prosocial behavior was assessed at two time points by self-report and at the second time point by additional parent-ratings using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ; Goodman, 1997). Adolescent females were reported to be significantly more prosocial than males (p < .001). Univariate analyses primarily showed moderate heritability and large nonshared environmental influences. There was a moderate genetic correlation between self- and parent-reported prosocial behaviour, suggesting that both types of rater were tapping into genetically overlapping constructs. Longitudinal analyses revealed that continuity was largely explained by genes. Unique environmental influences were predominantly time-specific and were the major source of individual differences.

  16. Surprises From Genetic Analyses of Lipid Risk Factors for Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Musunuru, Kiran; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2016-02-19

    Observational epidemiological studies have associated plasma lipid concentrations with risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), but these studies cannot distinguish cause from mere correlation. Human genetic studies, when considered with the results of randomized controlled trials of medications, can potentially shed light on whether lipid biomarkers are causal for diseases. Genetic analyses and randomized trials suggest that low-density lipoprotein is causal for CHD, whereas high-density lipoprotein is not. Surprisingly, human genetic evidence suggests that lipoprotein(a) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins causally contribute to CHD. Gene variants leading to higher levels of plasma apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins [low-density lipoprotein, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, or lipoprotein(a)] consistently increase risk for CHD. For triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, the most compelling evidence revolves around lipoprotein lipase and its endogenous facilitator (APOA5 [apolipoprotein A-V]) and inhibitory proteins (APOC3 [apolipoprotein C-III], ANGPTL4 [angiopoietin like 4]). Combined, these genetic results anticipate that, beyond low-density lipoprotein, pharmacological lowering of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins or lipoprotein(a) will reduce risk for CHD, but this remains to be proven through randomized controlled trials. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis due to co-infection with Aspergillus fumigatus and Schizophyllum commune

    PubMed Central

    Seki, Masafumi; Ohno, Hideaki; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Iida, Tetsuya; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu; Tomono, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    A 61-year-old female presented with eosinophilic pneumonia accompanied by bronchial asthma. She was finally diagnosed with allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM) due to co-infection with Aspergillus fumigatus and Schizophyllum commune detected by genetic analysis of the plug and from cultures. PMID:26839766

  18. Allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis due to co-infection with Aspergillus fumigatus and Schizophyllum commune.

    PubMed

    Seki, Masafumi; Ohno, Hideaki; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Iida, Tetsuya; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu; Tomono, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    A 61-year-old female presented with eosinophilic pneumonia accompanied by bronchial asthma. She was finally diagnosed with allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM) due to co-infection with Aspergillus fumigatus and Schizophyllum commune detected by genetic analysis of the plug and from cultures.

  19. [Approach to depressogenic genes from genetic analyses of animal models].

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2004-01-01

    Human depression or mood disorder is defined as a complex disease, making positional cloning of susceptibility genes a formidable task. We have undertaken genetic analyses of three different animal models for depression, comparing our results with advanced database resources. We first performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis on two mouse models of "despair", namely, the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), and detected multiple chromosomal loci that control immobility time in these tests. Since one QTL detected on mouse chromosome 11 harbors the GABA A receptor subunit genes, we tested these genes for association in human mood disorder patients. We obtained significant associations of the alpha 1 and alpha 6 subunit genes with the disease, particularly in females. This result was striking, because we had previously detected an epistatic interaction between mouse chromosomes 11 and X that regulates immobility time in these animals. Next, we performed genome-wide expression analyses using a rat model of depression, learned helplessness (LH). We found that in the frontal cortex of LH rats, a disease implicated region, the LIM kinase 1 gene (Limk 1) showed greatest alteration, in this case down-regulation. By combining data from the QTL analysis of FST/TST and DNA microarray analysis of mouse frontal cortex, we identified adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP protein 1 (Cap 1) as another candidate gene for depression susceptibility. Both Limk 1 and Cap 1 are key players in the modulation of actin G-F conversion. In summary, our current study using animal models suggests disturbances of GABAergic neurotransmission and actin turnover as potential pathophysiologies for mood disorder.

  20. Colony image acquisition and genetic segmentation algorithm and colony analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. X.

    2012-01-01

    Colony anaysis is used in a large number of engineerings such as food, dairy, beverages, hygiene, environmental monitoring, water, toxicology, sterility testing. In order to reduce laboring and increase analysis acuracy, many researchers and developers have made efforts for image analysis systems. The main problems in the systems are image acquisition, image segmentation and image analysis. In this paper, to acquire colony images with good quality, an illumination box was constructed. In the box, the distances between lights and dishe, camra lens and lights, and camera lens and dishe are adjusted optimally. In image segmentation, It is based on a genetic approach that allow one to consider the segmentation problem as a global optimization,. After image pre-processing and image segmentation, the colony analyses are perfomed. The colony image analysis consists of (1) basic colony parameter measurements; (2) colony size analysis; (3) colony shape analysis; and (4) colony surface measurements. All the above visual colony parameters can be selected and combined together, used to make a new engineeing parameters. The colony analysis can be applied into different applications.

  1. Optimal control analysis of malaria-schistosomiasis co-infection dynamics.

    PubMed

    Okosun, Kazeem Oare; Smith, Robert

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for malaria--schistosomiasis co-infection in order to investigate their synergistic relationship in the presence of treatment. We first analyse the single infection steady states, then investigate the existence and stability of equilibria and then calculate the basic reproduction numbers. Both the single-infection models and the co-infection model exhibit backward bifurcations. We carrying out a sensitivity analysis of the co-infection model and show that schistosomiasis infection may not be associated with an increased risk of malaria. Conversely, malaria infection may be associated with an increased risk of schistosomiasis. Furthermore, we found that effective treatment and prevention of schistosomiasis infection would also assist in the effective control and eradication of malaria. Finally, we apply Pontryagin's Maximum Principle to the model in order to determine optimal strategies for control of both diseases.

  2. Genetic Associations with Hypertension: Meta-Analyses of Six Candidate Genetic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Lingyan; Liao, Qi; Zhang, Lina; Xu, Leiting; Chen, Cheng; Ye, Huadan; Xu, Xuting

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to perform combined analyses of six genetic variants for the risk of hypertension. Methods: After a comprehensive literature search for genetic variants involved with the association study of hypertension, we harvested a total of five genes (six variants) for the current meta-analyses. These genes consisted of CYP4A11 (T8590C), RGS2 (1891-1892del TC and G638A), HTR2A (T102C), GNAS (T393C), and HSD3B1 (T→C Leu338). Results: A total of 20 studies among 13,816 cases and 19,248 controls were retrieved for the meta-analyses of six genetic variants. It was shown that the RGS2 1891-1892del TC (OR=1.10, 95% CI=1.02–1.19, p=0.02) polymorphism and the CYP4A11 T8590C (OR=1.19, 95% CI=1.00–1.41, p=0.05) polymorphism were significantly associated with increased risk of hypertension. No association was found between the other four variants and the risk of hypertension. Conclusion: This meta-analysis revealed that the RGS2 1891-1892del TC polymorphism and CYP4A11 T8590C polymorphism were associated with hypertension risk. However, HSD3B1 T→C Leu338, HTR2A T102C, GNAS T393C, and RGS2 G638A polymorphisms were not associated with hypertension risk. PMID:23859711

  3. Review of Current Conservation Genetic Analyses of Northeast Pacific Sharks.

    PubMed

    Larson, Shawn E; Daly-Engel, Toby S; Phillips, Nicole M

    2017-01-01

    Conservation genetics is an applied science that utilizes molecular tools to help solve problems in species conservation and management. It is an interdisciplinary specialty in which scientists apply the study of genetics in conjunction with traditional ecological fieldwork and other techniques to explore molecular variation, population boundaries, and evolutionary relationships with the goal of enabling resource managers to better protect biodiversity and identify unique populations. Several shark species in the northeast Pacific (NEP) have been studied using conservation genetics techniques, which are discussed here. The primary methods employed to study population genetics of sharks have historically been nuclear microsatellites and mitochondrial (mt) DNA. These markers have been used to assess genetic diversity, mating systems, parentage, relatedness, and genetically distinct populations to inform management decisions. Novel approaches in conservation genetics, including next-generation DNA and RNA sequencing, environmental DNA (eDNA), and epigenetics are just beginning to be applied to elasmobranch evolution, physiology, and ecology. Here, we review the methods and results of past studies, explore future directions for shark conservation genetics, and discuss the implications of molecular research and techniques for the long-term management of shark populations in the NEP. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Visualizations for genetic assignment analyses using the saddlepoint approximation method.

    PubMed

    McMillan, L F; Fewster, R M

    2017-09-01

    We propose a method for visualizing genetic assignment data by characterizing the distribution of genetic profiles for each candidate source population. This method enhances the assignment method of Rannala and Mountain (1997) by calculating appropriate graph positions for individuals for which some genetic data are missing. An individual with missing data is positioned in the distributions of genetic profiles for a population according to its estimated quantile based on its available data. The quantiles of the genetic profile distribution for each population are calculated by approximating the cumulative distribution function (CDF) using the saddlepoint method, and then inverting the CDF to get the quantile function. The saddlepoint method also provides a way to visualize assignment results calculated using the leave-one-out procedure. This new method offers an advance upon assignment software such as geneclass2, which provides no visualization method, and is biologically more interpretable than the bar charts provided by the software structure. We show results from simulated data and apply the methods to microsatellite genotype data from ship rats (Rattus rattus) captured on the Great Barrier Island archipelago, New Zealand. The visualization method makes it straightforward to detect features of population structure and to judge the discriminative power of the genetic data for assigning individuals to source populations. © 2017, The International Biometric Society.

  5. Co-infections and environmental conditions drive the distributions of blood parasites in wild birds.

    PubMed

    Clark, Nicholas J; Wells, Konstans; Dimitrov, Dimitar; Clegg, Sonya M

    2016-11-01

    Experimental work increasingly suggests that non-random pathogen associations can affect the spread or severity of disease. Yet due to difficulties distinguishing and interpreting co-infections, evidence for the presence and directionality of pathogen co-occurrences in wildlife is rudimentary. We provide empirical evidence for pathogen co-occurrences by analysing infection matrices for avian malaria (Haemoproteus and Plasmodium spp.) and parasitic filarial nematodes (microfilariae) in wild birds (New Caledonian Zosterops spp.). Using visual and genus-specific molecular parasite screening, we identified high levels of co-infections that would have been missed using PCR alone. Avian malaria lineages were assigned to species level using morphological descriptions. We estimated parasite co-occurrence probabilities, while accounting for environmental predictors, in a hierarchical multivariate logistic regression. Co-infections occurred in 36% of infected birds. We identified both positively and negatively correlated parasite co-occurrence probabilities when accounting for host, habitat and island effects. Two of three pairwise avian malaria co-occurrences were strongly negative, despite each malaria parasite occurring across all islands and habitats. Birds with microfilariae had elevated heterophil to lymphocyte ratios and were all co-infected with avian malaria, consistent with evidence that host immune modulation by parasitic nematodes facilitates malaria co-infections. Importantly, co-occurrence patterns with microfilariae varied in direction among avian malaria species; two malaria parasites correlated positively but a third correlated negatively with microfilariae. We show that wildlife co-infections are frequent, possibly affecting infection rates through competition or facilitation. We argue that combining multiple diagnostic screening methods with multivariate logistic regression offers a platform to disentangle impacts of environmental factors and parasite co

  6. Baseline characteristics of HIV & hepatitis B virus (HIV/HBV) co-infected patients from Kolkata, India

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Jayeeta; Saha, Debraj; Bandyopadhyay, Bhaswati; Saha, Bibhuti; Kedia, Deepika; Guha Mazumder, D.N.; Chakravarty, Runu; Guha, Subhasish Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HIV co-infection has variable prevalence worldwide. In comparison to HBV mono-infection, the course of chronic HBV infection is accelerated in HIV/HBV co-infected patients. The present study was carried out to analyse the baseline characteristics (clinical, biochemical, serological and virological) of treatment naïve HIV/HBV co-infected and HIV mono-infected patients. Methods: Between July 2011 and January 2013, a total number of 1331 HIV-seropositive treatment naïve individuals, enrolled in the ART Centre of Calcutta School of Tropical Medicine, Kolkata, India, were screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). A total of 1253 HIV mono-infected and 78 HIV/HBV co-infected patients were characterized. The co-infected patients were evaluated for HBeAg and anti-HBe antibody by ELISA. HIV RNA was quantified for all co-infected patients. HBV DNA was detected and quantified by real time-PCR amplification followed by HBV genotype determination. Results: HIV/HBV co-infected patients had proportionately more advanced HIV disease (WHO clinical stage 3 and 4) than HIV mono-infected individuals (37.1 vs. 19.9%). The co-infected patients had significantly higher serum bilirubin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase and ALT/platelet ratio index (APRI). CD4 count was non-significantly lower in co-infected patients. Majority (61.5%) were HBeAg positive with higher HIV RNA (P<0.05), HBV DNA (P<0.001) and APRI (P<0.05) compared to those who were HBeAg negative. HBV/D was the predominant genotype (73.2%) and D2 (43.7%) was the commonest subgenotype. Interpretation & conclusions: HIV/HBV co-infected patients had significantly higher serum bilirubin, ALT, alkaline phosphatase and lower platelet count. HBeAg positive co-infected patients had higher HIV RNA and HBV DNA compared to HBeAg negative co-infected patients. Prior to initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) all patients should be screened for HBsAg to

  7. gPGA: GPU Accelerated Population Genetics Analyses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunbao; Lang, Xianyu; Wang, Yangang; Zhu, Chaodong

    2015-01-01

    The isolation with migration (IM) model is important for studies in population genetics and phylogeography. IM program applies the IM model to genetic data drawn from a pair of closely related populations or species based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations of gene genealogies. But computational burden of IM program has placed limits on its application. With strong computational power, Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) has been widely used in many fields. In this article, we present an effective implementation of IM program on one GPU based on Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), which we call gPGA. Compared with IM program, gPGA can achieve up to 52.30X speedup on one GPU. The evaluation results demonstrate that it allows datasets to be analyzed effectively and rapidly for research on divergence population genetics. The software is freely available with source code at https://github.com/chunbaozhou/gPGA.

  8. Co-infections with Chikungunya and Dengue Viruses, Guatemala, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Signor, Leticia del Carmen Castillo; Williams, Christopher; Donis, Evelin; Cuevas, Luis E.; Adams, Emily R.

    2016-01-01

    We screened serum samples referred to the national reference laboratory in Guatemala that were positive for chikungunya or dengue viruses in June 2015. Co-infection with both viruses was detected by reverse transcription PCR in 46 (32%) of 144 samples. Specimens should be tested for both arboviruses to detect co-infections. PMID:27767914

  9. Microsatellite markers for genetic analyses in southeastern Vaccinium species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)-Agricultural Research Service (ARS)-National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) in Corvallis, Oregon, USA, preserves genetic resources of many temperate fruit crops, including blueberry. This genebank contains more than 1,750 Vaccinium accessions fr...

  10. Genetic Analyses of Soluble Carbohydrate Concentrations in Onion Bulbs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fructans are the primary soluble carbohydrate in onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs and show significant correlations with dry weights and pungency. In this research, we estimated the genetic effects and interactions between two chromosome regions associated with higher amounts of soluble carbohydrates i...

  11. Multivariate Behavior Genetic Analyses of Aggressive Behavior Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Michelle T.; Coccaro, Emil F.; Jacobson, Kristen C.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the genetic and environmental architecture underlying aggressive behavior measured by the Life History of Aggression Questionnaire (LHA; Coccaro et al. 1997a). Following preliminary phenotypic factor analysis procedures, multivariate behavioral genetics models were fit to responses from 2,925 adult twins from the PennTwins cohort on five LHA items assessing lifetime frequency of temper tantrums, indirect aggression, verbal aggression, fighting, and physical assault. The best-fitting model was a 2-factor common pathway model, indicating that these five aggressive behaviors are underpinned by two distinct etiological factors with different genetic and nonshared environmental influences. Although there was evidence of significant sex differences, the structure of the two factors appeared to be quite similar in males and females, where General Aggression and Physical Aggression factors emerged. Heritability of these factors ranged from .37 to .57, and nonshared environmental effects ranged from .43 to .63. The results of this study highlight the heterogeneous nature of the aggression construct and the need to consider differences in genetic and environmental influences on individual aggressive behaviors in a multivariate context. PMID:20432061

  12. Behavioral Genetic Analyses of Prosocial Behavior in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Alice M.; Light-Hausermann, Jade H.; Rijsdijk, Fruhling; Eley, Thalia C.

    2009-01-01

    Prosocial behavior is an important aspect of normal social and psychological development. Adult and child twin studies typically estimate the heritability of prosocial behavior to be between 30 and 50%, although relatively little is known about genetic and environmental influences upon prosocial behavior in adolescence. We therefore examined…

  13. Genetic Analyses of Sorting of Paternally Transmitted Mitochondrial DNA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The organelles are maternally transmitted in the vast majority of eukaryotes. However paternal transmission of plastids and mitochondria occurs rarely in plants. Cucumber is a unique model plant for organellar genetics because its three genomes show differential transmission: maternal for chlorop...

  14. Behavioral Genetic Analyses of Prosocial Behavior in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Alice M.; Light-Hausermann, Jade H.; Rijsdijk, Fruhling; Eley, Thalia C.

    2009-01-01

    Prosocial behavior is an important aspect of normal social and psychological development. Adult and child twin studies typically estimate the heritability of prosocial behavior to be between 30 and 50%, although relatively little is known about genetic and environmental influences upon prosocial behavior in adolescence. We therefore examined…

  15. Genetic recombinational and physical linkage analyses on slash pine

    Treesearch

    Rob Doudrick

    1996-01-01

    Slash pine is native to the southeastern USA, but is commercially valuable world-wide as a timber-,fiber- and resin-producing species. Breeding objectives emphasize selection for fusiform rust disease resistance. Identification of markers linked to genetic factors conditioning specificity should expand our knowledge of disease development. Towards this end, random...

  16. Phytochemical and genetic analyses of ancient cannabis from Central Asia

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Ethan B.; Jiang, Hong-En; Li, Xiao; Sutton, Alan; Carboni, Andrea; del Bianco, Francesca; Mandolino, Giuseppe; Potter, David J.; Zhao, You-Xing; Bera, Subir; Zhang, Yong-Bing; Lü, En-Guo; Ferguson, David K.; Hueber, Francis; Zhao, Liang-Cheng; Liu, Chang-Jiang; Wang, Yu-Fei; Li, Cheng-Sen

    2008-01-01

    The Yanghai Tombs near Turpan, Xinjiang-Uighur Autonomous Region, China have recently been excavated to reveal the 2700-year-old grave of a Caucasoid shaman whose accoutrements included a large cache of cannabis, superbly preserved by climatic and burial conditions. A multidisciplinary international team demonstrated through botanical examination, phytochemical investigation, and genetic deoxyribonucleic acid analysis by polymerase chain reaction that this material contained tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive component of cannabis, its oxidative degradation product, cannabinol, other metabolites, and its synthetic enzyme, tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase, as well as a novel genetic variant with two single nucleotide polymorphisms. The cannabis was presumably employed by this culture as a medicinal or psychoactive agent, or an aid to divination. To our knowledge, these investigations provide the oldest documentation of cannabis as a pharmacologically active agent, and contribute to the medical and archaeological record of this pre-Silk Road culture. PMID:19036842

  17. Phytochemical and genetic analyses of ancient cannabis from Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Russo, Ethan B; Jiang, Hong-En; Li, Xiao; Sutton, Alan; Carboni, Andrea; del Bianco, Francesca; Mandolino, Giuseppe; Potter, David J; Zhao, You-Xing; Bera, Subir; Zhang, Yong-Bing; Lü, En-Guo; Ferguson, David K; Hueber, Francis; Zhao, Liang-Cheng; Liu, Chang-Jiang; Wang, Yu-Fei; Li, Cheng-Sen

    2008-01-01

    The Yanghai Tombs near Turpan, Xinjiang-Uighur Autonomous Region, China have recently been excavated to reveal the 2700-year-old grave of a Caucasoid shaman whose accoutrements included a large cache of cannabis, superbly preserved by climatic and burial conditions. A multidisciplinary international team demonstrated through botanical examination, phytochemical investigation, and genetic deoxyribonucleic acid analysis by polymerase chain reaction that this material contained tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive component of cannabis, its oxidative degradation product, cannabinol, other metabolites, and its synthetic enzyme, tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase, as well as a novel genetic variant with two single nucleotide polymorphisms. The cannabis was presumably employed by this culture as a medicinal or psychoactive agent, or an aid to divination. To our knowledge, these investigations provide the oldest documentation of cannabis as a pharmacologically active agent, and contribute to the medical and archaeological record of this pre-Silk Road culture.

  18. CGene: an R package for implementation of causal genetic analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lipman, Peter J; Lange, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The excitement over findings from Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWASs) has been tempered by the difficulty in finding the location of the true causal disease susceptibility loci (DSLs), rather than markers that are correlated with the causal variants. In addition, many recent GWASs have studied multiple phenotypes – often highly correlated – making it difficult to understand which associations are causal and which are seemingly causal, induced by phenotypic correlations. In order to identify DSLs, which are required to understand the genetic etiology of the observed associations, statistical methodology has been proposed that distinguishes between a direct effect of a genetic locus on the primary phenotype and an indirect effect induced by the association with the intermediate phenotype that is also correlated with the primary phenotype. However, so far, the application of this important methodology has been challenging, as no user-friendly software implementation exists. The lack of software implementation of this sophisticated methodology has prevented its large-scale use in the genetic community. We have now implemented this statistical approach in a user-friendly and robust R package that has been thoroughly tested. The R package ‘CGene' is available for download at http://cran.r-project.org/. The R code is also available at http://people.hsph.harvard.edu/~plipman. PMID:21731061

  19. Community-acquired respiratory viruses and co-infection among patients of Ontario sentinel practices, April 2009 to February 2010.

    PubMed

    Peci, Adriana; Winter, Anne-Luise; Gubbay, Jonathan B; Skowronski, Danuta M; Balogun, Elizabeth I; De Lima, Cedric; Crowcroft, Natasha S; Rebbapragada, Anu

    2013-07-01

    Respiratory viruses are known to cocirculate but this has not been described in detail during an influenza pandemic. To describe respiratory viruses, including co-infection and associated attributes such as age, sex or comorbidity, in patients presenting with influenza-like illness to a community sentinel network, during the pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 in Ontario, Canada. Respiratory samples and epidemiologic details were collected from 1018 patients with influenza-like illness as part of respiratory virus surveillance and a multiprovincial case-control study of influenza vaccine effectiveness. At least one virus was detected in 668 (65·6%) of 1018 samples; 512 (50·3%) had single infections and 156 (15·3%) co-infections. Of single infections, the most common viruses were influenza A in 304 (59·4%) samples of which 275 (90·5%) were influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, and enterovirus/rhinovirus in 149 (29·1%) samples. The most common co-infections were influenza A and respiratory syncytial virus B, and influenza A and enterovirus/rhinovirus. In multinomial logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, comorbidity, and timeliness of sample collection, single infection was less often detected in the elderly and co-infection more often in patients <30 years of age. Co-infection, but not single infection, was more likely detected in patients who had a sample collected within 2 days of symptom onset as compared to 3-7 days. Respiratory viral co-infections are commonly detected when using molecular techniques. Early sample collection increases likelihood of detection of co-infection. Further studies are needed to better understand the clinical significance of viral co-infection. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Repeatable Population Dynamics among Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Lineages Evolved under High Co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Elizabeth S. C. P.; Morales, Nadya M.; Wasik, Brian R.; Brusic, Vesna; Whelan, Sean P. J.; Turner, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Parasites and hosts can experience oscillatory cycles, where the densities of these interacting species dynamically fluctuate through time. Viruses with different replication strategies can also interact to produce cyclical dynamics. Frequent cellular co-infection can select for defective-interfering particles (DIPs): “cheater” viruses with shortened genomes that interfere with intracellular replication of full-length (ordinary) viruses. DIPs are positively selected when rare because they out-replicate ordinary viruses during co-infection, but DIPs are negatively selected when common because ordinary viruses become unavailable for intracellular exploitation via cheating. Here, we tested whether oscillatory dynamics of ordinary viruses were similar across independently evolved populations of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Results showed identical cyclical dynamics across populations in the first 10 experimental passages, which transitioned to repeatable dampened oscillations by passage 20. Genomic analyses revealed parallel molecular substitutions across populations, particularly novel mutations that became dominant by passage 10. Our study showed that oscillatory dynamics and molecular evolution of interacting viruses were highly repeatable in VSV populations passaged under frequent co-infection. Furthermore, our data suggested that frequent co-infection with DIPs caused lowered performance of full-length viruses, by reducing their population densities by orders of magnitude compared to reproduction of ordinary viruses during strictly clonal infections. PMID:27065953

  1. Hemosporidian parasites in forest birds from Venezuela: genetic lineage analyses.

    PubMed

    Mijares, Alfredo; Rosales, Romel; Silva-Iturriza, Adriana

    2012-09-01

    Avian hemosporidian parasites of the genera Haemoproteus, Plasmodium, and Leucocytozoon are transmitted by different dipteran vectors. In the present work, we looked for the presence of these parasites in 47 birds from 12 families, which were sampled in the migratory corridor Paso de Portachuelo, located at the Henri Pittier National Park, Venezuela. The presence of the parasites was evidenced by amplification of a region of 471 bp of their cytochrome b gene. This region of the marker presents enough polymorphism to identify most of the mitochondrial lineages. Therefore, the obtained amplicons were sequenced, not only to identify the genus of the parasites sampled, but also to analyze their genetic diversity in the study area. The overall parasite prevalence was low (11%). We reported, for the first time, Plasmodium in birds of the species Formicarius analis and Chamaeza campanisona (Formicariidae) and Haemoproteus in Geotrygon linearis (Columbidae). A phylogenetic tree was generated using the Haemoproteus, Plasmodium, and Leucocytozoon sequences obtained in this study, together with representative sequences from previous studies. The highest genetic diversities between the two Haemoproteus lineages (11.70%) and among the three Plasmodium lineages (7.86%) found in this study are also similar to those found when lineages reported in the literature were used. These results indicate that in the migratory corridor Paso de Portachuleo, representative parasite lineages are found, making this location an attractive location for future studies.

  2. Co-infection as a confounder for the role of Clostridium difficile infection in children with diarrhoea: a summary of the literature.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, H; Pai, S; Burns, D A; Karas, J A; Enoch, D A; Faust, S N

    2015-07-01

    Although Clostridium difficile is a major cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea in adults, the incidence and severity of C. difficile infection (CDI) in children is unclear. One complicating factor in assessing the role of CDI in children is the possibility of co-infection with other gastrointestinal pathogens. In this review, we summarise the literature concerning C. difficile co-infections in young children, in an attempt to discuss the rate of co-infections and their potential role in the severity of CDI clinical presentation. We identified 31 studies where co-infections were analysed, comprising 1,718 patients with positive C. difficile tests. The pooled percentage of reported co-infections was 20.7% (range 0-100%). Viral co-infections were most commonly reported (46%), with bacteria and parasites accounting for 14.9% and 0.01% of cases, respectively. However, the panel of co-infections tested for varied considerably among studies and 38% of stated co-infections did not have a pathogen reported. Substantial variation in how and when tests for gastrointestinal co-infections are carried out, small sample sizes and a lack of clear CDI case definitions preclude meaningful conclusions on the true rate of co-infections in this patient population. This review suggests that co-infections may be common in children with diarrhoea who tested positive for C. difficile. Given a lack of CDI case definitions, especially in young children under the age of 5 years, a broad panel of pathogens should be tested for to exclude other microbiological causes. However, the summarised poor quality of the available literature on this subject highlights a need for further studies.

  3. Analyses of glutathione reductase hypomorphic mice indicate a genetic knockout.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Lynette K; Tamura, Toshiya; Rogers, Bryan J; Welty, Stephen E; Hansen, Thomas N; Smith, Charles V

    2004-12-01

    A strain of mice (Gr1a1Neu) that exhibited tissue glutathione reductase (GR) activities that were substantially lower (less than 10% in liver) than the corresponding activities in control mice has been reported. The present report describes characterization of the mutation(s) in the GR gene of these mice. RT-PCR of mRNA from the Neu mice indicated a substantial deletion in the normal GR coding sequence. Southern blots revealed that the deletion involved a region spanning from intron 1 through intron 5. The exact breakpoints of the deletion were characterized by PCR and sequencing through the region encompassing the deletion. The deletion involves nucleotides 10840 through 23627 of the genomic GR gene and functionally deletes exons 2 through 5. In addition, the deletion produces a frame shift in exon 6 and introduces a stop codon in exon 7 that would prevent translation of the remainder of the protein. Consequently, the Neu mice are incapable of producing a functional GR protein and appear to be genetic knockouts for GR. The Neu mice offer live animal models with which to test hypotheses regarding oxidant mechanisms of tissue injury in vivo.

  4. Whole-genome analyses reveal genetic instability of Acetobacter pasteurianus

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Yoshinao; Hosoyama, Akira; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Furuya, Naoko; Horikawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Takeshi; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kuhara, Satoru; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Shirai, Mutsunori

    2009-01-01

    Acetobacter species have been used for brewing traditional vinegar and are known to have genetic instability. To clarify the mutability, Acetobacter pasteurianus NBRC 3283, which forms a multi-phenotype cell complex, was subjected to genome DNA sequencing. The genome analysis revealed that there are more than 280 transposons and five genes with hyper-mutable tandem repeats as common features in the genome consisting of a 2.9-Mb chromosome and six plasmids. There were three single nucleotide mutations and five transposon insertions in 32 isolates from the cell complex. The A. pasteurianus hyper-mutability was applied for breeding a temperature-resistant strain grown at an unviable high-temperature (42°C). The genomic DNA sequence of a heritable mutant showing temperature resistance was analyzed by mutation mapping, illustrating that a 92-kb deletion and three single nucleotide mutations occurred in the genome during the adaptation. Alpha-proteobacteria including A. pasteurianus consists of many intracellular symbionts and parasites, and their genomes show increased evolution rates and intensive genome reduction. However, A. pasteurianus is assumed to be a free-living bacterium, it may have the potentiality to evolve to fit in natural niches of seasonal fruits and flowers with other organisms, such as yeasts and lactic acid bacteria. PMID:19638423

  5. Genetic segregation analyses of serum IgG2 levels.

    PubMed Central

    Marazita, M. L.; Lu, H.; Cooper, M. E.; Quinn, S. M.; Zhang, J.; Burmeister, J. A.; Califano, J. V.; Pandey, J. P.; Schenkein, H. A.; Tew, J. G.

    1996-01-01

    Summary : The aim of this study was to determine whether there was evidence for a genetic component in the immune response as measured by IgG2 levels. The study was motivated by our studies of early-onset periodontitis (EOP), a group of disorders characterized by rapid destruction of the supporting tissues of the teeth in otherwise healthy individuals. EOP has two subforms, localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP) and a generalized form (G-EOP). IgG2 levels are elevated in LJP but not G-EOP individuals; and African-American IgG2 levels are higher than Caucasian levels regardless of EOP status. IgG2 levels were determined in 123 EOP families and in 508 unrelated non-EOP control individuals. Segregation analysis under the regressive model approach of Bonney was used to analyze IgG2 levels for evidence of major locus segregation. After adjusting for LJP status, race, sex, and age, the best fitting model was an autosomal codominant major locus model (accounting for approximately 62% of the variance in IgG2), plus residual parent/offspring and spousal correlations. Smoking and GM23 are also known to affect IgG2 levels. If additional adjustments are made for smoking and GM23, the best-fitting model is still a codominant major locus but with no significant residual correlations. PMID:8651265

  6. The epidemiological consequences of leprosy-tuberculosis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, N; Voss-Böhme, A

    2013-02-01

    While in antiquity both leprosy and tuberculosis were prevalent in Europe, leprosy declined thereafter and, simultaneously, tuberculosis prevalence increased. Since both diseases are caused by mycobacterial infections, it has been suggested that there might be a causal relationship between both epidemics. Chaussinand observed the inverse prevalence of leprosy and tuberculosis and suggested that individuals with a latent tuberculosis infection are protected from acquiring leprosy. His cross-immunity hypothesis has been countered more recently by a co-infection hypothesis. The latter suggestion, proposed by Donoghue, states that people being infected with multi-bacillary leprosy are more susceptible to tuberculosis, which leads to increased mortality from the disease. This study utilizes mathematical modeling to explore the epidemiological consequences of the co-infection hypothesis for realistically confined parameter values. While the co-infection hypothesis appears plausible at first glance, a second thought reveals that it comprises also substantial consequences for tuberculosis epidemics: if co-infection raises the mortality rate above that of purely tuberculosis infected persons, then tuberculosis might as well be eradicated by leprosy. It is the specific interplay of both increased susceptibility towards tuberculosis and increased death rate when co-infected that determines the epidemiological fate. As a result of this analysis, it is shown that there is a large parameter region where the eventual disappearance of leprosy could indeed be explained by co-infection. This parameter region is considerably larger than that predicted by the cross-immunity hypothesis. This shows that the co-infection hypothesis should be considered a significant alternative to the cross-immunity hypothesis. The time scales at which the effects of co-infection are observed depend critically on the spatial distribution of the individuals but reach epidemiologically realistic values for

  7. Genetic analyses reveal independent domestication origins of Eurasian reindeer

    PubMed Central

    Røed, Knut H; Flagstad, Øystein; Nieminen, Mauri; Holand, Øystein; Dwyer, Mark J; Røv, Nils; Vilà, Carles

    2008-01-01

    Although there is little doubt that the domestication of mammals was instrumental for the modernization of human societies, even basic features of the path towards domestication remain largely unresolved for many species. Reindeer are considered to be in the early phase of domestication with wild and domestic herds still coexisting widely across Eurasia. This provides a unique model system for understanding how the early domestication process may have taken place. We analysed mitochondrial sequences and nuclear microsatellites in domestic and wild herds throughout Eurasia to address the origin of reindeer herding and domestication history. Our data demonstrate independent origins of domestic reindeer in Russia and Fennoscandia. This implies that the Saami people of Fennoscandia domesticated their own reindeer independently of the indigenous cultures in western Russia. We also found that augmentation of local reindeer herds by crossing with wild animals has been common. However, some wild reindeer populations have not contributed to the domestic gene pool, suggesting variation in domestication potential among populations. These differences may explain why geographically isolated indigenous groups have been able to make the technological shift from mobile hunting to large-scale reindeer pastoralism independently. PMID:18460427

  8. Genetic analyses reveal independent domestication origins of Eurasian reindeer.

    PubMed

    Røed, Knut H; Flagstad, Oystein; Nieminen, Mauri; Holand, Oystein; Dwyer, Mark J; Røv, Nils; Vilà, Carles

    2008-08-22

    Although there is little doubt that the domestication of mammals was instrumental for the modernization of human societies, even basic features of the path towards domestication remain largely unresolved for many species. Reindeer are considered to be in the early phase of domestication with wild and domestic herds still coexisting widely across Eurasia. This provides a unique model system for understanding how the early domestication process may have taken place. We analysed mitochondrial sequences and nuclear microsatellites in domestic and wild herds throughout Eurasia to address the origin of reindeer herding and domestication history. Our data demonstrate independent origins of domestic reindeer in Russia and Fennoscandia. This implies that the Saami people of Fennoscandia domesticated their own reindeer independently of the indigenous cultures in western Russia. We also found that augmentation of local reindeer herds by crossing with wild animals has been common. However, some wild reindeer populations have not contributed to the domestic gene pool, suggesting variation in domestication potential among populations. These differences may explain why geographically isolated indigenous groups have been able to make the technological shift from mobile hunting to large-scale reindeer pastoralism independently.

  9. Toxoplasma gondii genotyping in a dog co-infected with distemper virus and ehrlichiosis rickettsia.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Leandro d'Arc; Da Silva, Aristeu Vieira; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Paes, Antonio Carlos; Langoni, Hélio

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports a toxoplasmosis, ehrlichiosis and distemper co-infection in a dog with an exuberant neuropathological clinical picture. Primary involvement was discussed based on information collected in the analysis of the clinical case, such as neurological impairment, epidemiological data, poor immunoprophylactic scheme of the dog affected and the role of these diseases on immunosuppression. Canine distemper and ehrlichiosis were diagnosed based on epidemiologic data, clinical signs, hematological and cytological evaluation. Toxoplasma gondii was isolated and genetically characterized as Type I using restriction analysis (RFLP) with SAG-2 genes. Immunosuppression features of both dogs and human beings are discussed, as well as implications on animal and public health. This is the first report on toxoplasmosis, ehrlichiosis and distemper co-infection in a dog in Brazil, associated with genotyping determination of the T. gondii strain involved.

  10. Choice of Reading Comprehension Test Influences the Outcomes of Genetic Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betjemann, Rebecca S.; Keenan, Janice M.; Olson, Richard K.; DeFries, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Does the choice of test for assessing reading comprehension influence the outcome of genetic analyses? A twin design compared two types of reading comprehension tests classified as primarily associated with word decoding (RC-D) or listening comprehension (RC-LC). For both types of tests, the overall genetic influence is high and nearly identical.…

  11. Predicting Avian Influenza Co-Infection with H5N1 and H9N2 in Northern Egypt.

    PubMed

    Young, Sean G; Carrel, Margaret; Malanson, George P; Ali, Mohamed A; Kayali, Ghazi

    2016-09-06

    Human outbreaks with avian influenza have been, so far, constrained by poor viral adaptation to non-avian hosts. This could be overcome via co-infection, whereby two strains share genetic material, allowing new hybrid strains to emerge. Identifying areas where co-infection is most likely can help target spaces for increased surveillance. Ecological niche modeling using remotely-sensed data can be used for this purpose. H5N1 and H9N2 influenza subtypes are endemic in Egyptian poultry. From 2006 to 2015, over 20,000 poultry and wild birds were tested at farms and live bird markets. Using ecological niche modeling we identified environmental, behavioral, and population characteristics of H5N1 and H9N2 niches within Egypt. Niches differed markedly by subtype. The subtype niches were combined to model co-infection potential with known occurrences used for validation. The distance to live bird markets was a strong predictor of co-infection. Using only single-subtype influenza outbreaks and publicly available ecological data, we identified areas of co-infection potential with high accuracy (area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) 0.991).

  12. Predicting Avian Influenza Co-Infection with H5N1 and H9N2 in Northern Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Young, Sean G.; Carrel, Margaret; Malanson, George P.; Ali, Mohamed A.; Kayali, Ghazi

    2016-01-01

    Human outbreaks with avian influenza have been, so far, constrained by poor viral adaptation to non-avian hosts. This could be overcome via co-infection, whereby two strains share genetic material, allowing new hybrid strains to emerge. Identifying areas where co-infection is most likely can help target spaces for increased surveillance. Ecological niche modeling using remotely-sensed data can be used for this purpose. H5N1 and H9N2 influenza subtypes are endemic in Egyptian poultry. From 2006 to 2015, over 20,000 poultry and wild birds were tested at farms and live bird markets. Using ecological niche modeling we identified environmental, behavioral, and population characteristics of H5N1 and H9N2 niches within Egypt. Niches differed markedly by subtype. The subtype niches were combined to model co-infection potential with known occurrences used for validation. The distance to live bird markets was a strong predictor of co-infection. Using only single-subtype influenza outbreaks and publicly available ecological data, we identified areas of co-infection potential with high accuracy (area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) 0.991). PMID:27608035

  13. HIV and tuberculosis co-infection among migrants in Europe: A systematic review on the prevalence, incidence and mortality.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Ana Maria; Fronteira, Inês; Couto, Isabel; Machado, Diana; Viveiros, Miguel; Abecasis, Ana B; Dias, Sónia

    2017-01-01

    International human migration has been rapidly growing. Migrants coming from low and middle income countries continue to be considerably vulnerable and at higher risk for infectious diseases, namely HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and tuberculosis (TB). In Europe, the number of patients with HIV-TB co-infection has been increasing and migration could be one of the potential driving forces. This systematic review aims to improve the understanding on the burden of HIV-TB co-infection among migrants in Europe and to assess whether these populations are particularly vulnerable to this co-infection compared to nationals. MEDLINE®, Web of Science® and Scopus® databases were searched from March to April 2016 using combinations of keywords. Titles and abstracts were screened and studies meeting the inclusion criteria proceeded for full-text revision. These articles were then selected for data extraction on the prevalence, incidence and mortality. The majority of HIV-TB prevalence data reported in the analysed studies, including extrapulmonary/disseminated TB forms, was higher among migrant vs. nationals, some of the studies even showing increasing trends over time. Additionally, while HIV-TB incidence rates have decreased among migrants and nationals, migrants are still at a higher risk for this co-infection. Migrants with HIV-TB co-infection were also more prone to unsuccessful treatment outcomes, death and drug resistant TB. However, contradicting results also showed lower mortality compared to nationals. Overall, a disproportionate vulnerability of migrants to acquire the HIV-TB co-infection was observed across studies. Such vulnerability has been associated to low socioeconomic status, poor living conditions and limited access to healthcare. Adequate social support, early detection, appropriate treatment, and adequate access to healthcare are key improvements to tackle HIV-TB co-infection among these populations.

  14. Fine-scale genetic structure analyses suggest further male than female dispersal in mountain gorillas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular studies in social mammals rarely compare the inferences gained from genetic analyses with field information, especially in the context of dispersal. In this study, we used genetic data to elucidate sex-specific dispersal dynamics in the Virunga Massif mountain gorilla population (Gorilla beringei beringei), a primate species characterized by routine male and female dispersal from stable mixed-sex social groups. Specifically, we conducted spatial genetic structure analyses for each sex and linked our genetically-based observations with some key demographic and behavioural data from this population. Results To investigate the spatial genetic structure of mountain gorillas, we analysed the genotypes of 193 mature individuals at 11 microsatellite loci by means of isolation-by-distance and spatial autocorrelation analyses. Although not all males and females disperse, female gorillas displayed an isolation-by-distance pattern among groups and a signal of dispersal at short distances from their natal group based on spatial autocorrelation analyses. In contrast, male genotypes were not correlated with spatial distance, thus suggesting a larger mean dispersal distance for males as compared to females. Both within sex and mixed-sex pairs were on average genetically more related within groups than among groups. Conclusions Our study provides evidence for an intersexual difference in dispersal distance in the mountain gorilla. Overall, it stresses the importance of investigating spatial genetic structure patterns on a sex-specific basis to better understand the dispersal dynamics of the species under investigation. It is currently poorly understood why some male and female gorillas disperse while others remain in the natal group. Our results on average relatedness within and across groups confirm that groups often contain close relatives. While inbreeding avoidance may play a role in driving female dispersal, we note that more detailed dyadic genetic

  15. Ascaris co-infection does not alter malaria-induced anaemia in a cohort of Nigerian preschool children.

    PubMed

    Abanyie, Francisca A; McCracken, Courtney; Kirwan, Patrick; Molloy, Síle F; Asaolu, Samuel O; Holland, Celia V; Gutman, Julie; Lamb, Tracey J

    2013-01-02

    Co-infection with malaria and intestinal parasites such as Ascaris lumbricoides is common. Malaria parasites induce a pro-inflammatory immune response that contributes to the pathogenic sequelae, such as malarial anaemia, that occur in malaria infection. Ascaris is known to create an anti-inflammatory immune environment which could, in theory, counteract the anti-malarial inflammatory immune response, minimizing the severity of malarial anaemia. This study examined whether Ascaris co-infection can minimize the severity of malarial anaemia. Data from a randomized controlled trial on the effect of antihelminthic treatment in Nigerian preschool-aged (6-59 months) children conducted in 2006-2007 were analysed to examine the effect of malaria and Ascaris co-infection on anaemia severity. Children were enrolled and tested for malaria, helminths and anaemia at baseline, four, and eight months. Six hundred and ninety subjects were analysed in this study. Generalized linear mixed models were used to assess the relationship between infection status and Ascaris and Plasmodium parasite intensity on severity of anaemia, defined as a haemoglobin less than 11 g/dL. Malaria prevalence ranged from 35-78% over the course of this study. Of the malaria-infected children, 55% were co-infected with Ascaris at baseline, 60% were co-infected four months later and 48% were co-infected eight months later, underlining the persistent prevalence of malaria-nematode co-infections in this population. Over the course of the study the percentage of anaemic subjects in the population ranged between 84% at baseline and 77% at the eight-month time point. The odds of being anaemic were four to five times higher in children infected with malaria compared to those without malaria. Ascaris infection alone did not increase the odds of being anaemic, indicating that malaria was the main cause of anaemia in this population. There was no significant difference in the severity of anaemia between children

  16. High Prevalence of Co-Infections by Invasive and Non-Invasive Chlamydia trachomatis Genotypes during the Lymphogranuloma Venereum Outbreak in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Dominguez, Mario; Gonzalez-Alba, Jose Maria; Puerta, Teresa; Menendez, Blanca; Sanchez-Diaz, Ana Maria; Canton, Rafael; del Romero, Jorge; Galan, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of Chlamydia trachomatis is mainly driven by recombination events. This fact can be fuelled by the coincidence in several European regions of the high prevalence of non-invasive urogenital genotypes and lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) outbreaks. This scenario could modify the local epidemiology and favor the selection of new C. trachomatis variants. Quantifying the prevalence of co-infection could help to predict the potential risk in the selection of new variants with unpredictable results in pathogenesis or transmissibility. In the 2009-2013 period, 287 clinical samples with demonstrated presence of C. trachomatis were selected. They were divided in two groups. The first group was constituted by 137 samples with C. trachomatis of the LGV genotypes, and the second by the remaining 150 samples in which the presence of LGV genotypes was previously excluded. They were analyzed to detect the simultaneous presence of non-LGV genotypes based on pmpH and ompA genes. In the first group, co-infections were detected in 10.9% of the cases whereas in the second group the prevalence was 14.6%, which is the highest percentage ever described among European countries. Moreover, bioinformatic analyses suggested the presence among men who have sex with men of a pmpH-recombinant variant, similar to strains described in Seattle in 2002. This variant was the result of genetic exchange between genotypes belonging to LGV and members of G-genotype. Sequencing of other genes, phylogenetically related to pathotype, confirmed that the putative recombinant found in Madrid could have a common origin with the strains described in Seattle. Countries with a high prevalence of co-infections and high migration flows should enhance surveillance programs in at least their vulnerable population. PMID:25965545

  17. High Prevalence of Co-Infections by Invasive and Non-Invasive Chlamydia trachomatis Genotypes during the Lymphogranuloma Venereum Outbreak in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Dominguez, Mario; Gonzalez-Alba, Jose Maria; Puerta, Teresa; Menendez, Blanca; Sanchez-Diaz, Ana Maria; Canton, Rafael; del Romero, Jorge; Galan, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of Chlamydia trachomatis is mainly driven by recombination events. This fact can be fuelled by the coincidence in several European regions of the high prevalence of non-invasive urogenital genotypes and lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) outbreaks. This scenario could modify the local epidemiology and favor the selection of new C. trachomatis variants. Quantifying the prevalence of co-infection could help to predict the potential risk in the selection of new variants with unpredictable results in pathogenesis or transmissibility. In the 2009-2013 period, 287 clinical samples with demonstrated presence of C. trachomatis were selected. They were divided in two groups. The first group was constituted by 137 samples with C. trachomatis of the LGV genotypes, and the second by the remaining 150 samples in which the presence of LGV genotypes was previously excluded. They were analyzed to detect the simultaneous presence of non-LGV genotypes based on pmpH and ompA genes. In the first group, co-infections were detected in 10.9% of the cases whereas in the second group the prevalence was 14.6%, which is the highest percentage ever described among European countries. Moreover, bioinformatic analyses suggested the presence among men who have sex with men of a pmpH-recombinant variant, similar to strains described in Seattle in 2002. This variant was the result of genetic exchange between genotypes belonging to LGV and members of G-genotype. Sequencing of other genes, phylogenetically related to pathotype, confirmed that the putative recombinant found in Madrid could have a common origin with the strains described in Seattle. Countries with a high prevalence of co-infections and high migration flows should enhance surveillance programs in at least their vulnerable population.

  18. The relative contribution of co-infection to focal infection risk in children.

    PubMed

    Lello, Joanne; Knopp, Stefanie; Mohammed, Khalfan A; Khamis, I Simba; Utzinger, Jürg; Viney, Mark E

    2013-03-07

    Co-infection is ubiquitous in people in the developing world but little is known regarding the potential for one parasite to act as a risk factor for another. Using generalized linear mixed modelling approaches applied to data from school-aged children from Zanzibar, Tanzania, we determined the strength of association between four focal infections (i.e. Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, hookworm and self-reported fever, the latter used as a proxy for viral, bacterial or protozoal infections) and the prevalence or intensity of each of the helminth infections. We compared these potential co-infections with additional risk factors, specifically, host sex and age, socioeconomic status and physical environment, and determined what the relative contribution of each risk factor was. We found that the risk of infection with all four focal infections was strongly associated with at least one other infection, and that this was frequently dependent on the intensity of that other infection. In comparison, no other incorporated risk factor was associated with all focal infections. Successful control of infectious diseases requires identification of infection risk factors. This study demonstrates that co-infection is likely to be one of these principal risk factors and should therefore be given greater consideration when designing disease-control strategies. Future work should also incorporate other potential risk factors, including host genetics which were not available in this study and, ideally, assess the risks via experimental manipulation.

  19. Substance Use Patterns of HIV-Infected Russian Women with and Without Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer L; DiClemente, Ralph J; Sales, Jessica M; Rose, Eve S; Safonova, Polina; Levina, Olga S; Belyakov, Nikolay; Rassokhin, Vadim V

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection may experience substance use related health complications. This study characterized substance use patterns between HIV/HCV co-infected and HIV mono-infected Russian women. HIV-infected women (N = 247; M age = 30.0) in St. Petersburg, Russia, completed a survey assessing substance use, problematic substance use, and the co-occurrence of substance use and sexual behaviors. Covariate adjusted logistic and linear regression analyses indicated that HIV/HCV co-infected participants (57.1 %) reported more lifetime drug use (e.g., heroin: AOR: 13.2, 95 % CI 4.9, 35.3, p < .001), problem drinking (β = 1.2, p = .05), substance use problems (β = 1.3, p = .009), and increased likelihood of past injection drug use (AOR: 26.4, 95 % CI 8.5, 81.9, p < .001) relative to HIV mono-infected individuals. HIV/HCV co-infection was prevalent and associated with increased substance use and problematic drug use. Findings highlight the need for ongoing substance use and HIV/HCV risk behavior assessment and treatment among HIV/HCV co-infected Russian women.

  20. Factors associated with HIV and syphilis co-infection among men who have sex with men in seven Chinese cities.

    PubMed

    Das, Aritra; Li, Jianjun; Zhong, Fei; Ouyang, Lin; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Tang, Weiming; Fu, Gengfeng; Zhao, Jinkou; Detels, Roger

    2015-03-01

    HIV-syphilis co-infection is often cited as a major reason behind recent resurgence in syphilis prevalence among men who have sex with men in China. Most published literatures explore factors associated with either HIV or syphilis, but not their co-infection. We analysed data from a cross-sectional survey on men who have sex with men in seven Chinese cities. Snowball sampling was used to recruit participants for the survey. Socio-demographic and behavioural predictors for HIV-syphilis mono/co-infection were examined using ordinal logistic regression. Factor scores were used to summarise (1) HIV-related knowledge and (2) access to HIV preventive services. Prevalence of HIV, syphilis, and their co-infection, among 2936 self-identified men who have sex with men, were 7.7%, 14.3%, and 2.6%, respectively. In the adjusted analysis, the significant positive correlates of poorer diagnoses (co-infection vs mono- and no infection or co- and mono-infection vs no infection) were: 30 to 39 years and ≥40 years age, education up to senior high school, unprotected anal intercourse, recent sexually transmitted infection symptoms, incorrect knowledge about routes of transmission, and access to preventive or counselling/testing services for HIV. For effective control of this dual epidemic, integrated HIV and syphilis surveillance and targeted intervention strategies for Chinese men who have sex with men are needed urgently.

  1. Treatment optimization for HIV/HCV co-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Jake A.; Chew, Kara W.

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections affect millions of persons around the globe and cause profound morbidity and mortality. A major intersection exists between these two epidemics, with HCV infection being more common in persons with HIV than in the general population, largely due to shared routes of transmission. HCV co-infection increases risk for liver- and non-liver-related morbidity and mortality, making HCV treatment a priority in HIV co-infected persons, but the treatment of HCV in co-infected patients has been daunting for multiple reasons. Until recently, HCV treatment has frequently been deferred due to the low rates of cure, significant adverse effects, burdensome duration of therapy and drug–drug interactions with HIV antiretroviral medications. Untreated HCV has resulted in significant health consequences for the millions of those infected and has led to multiple downstream impacts on our healthcare systems around the world. The development of a remarkable number of new HCV direct-acting agents (DAAs) that are significantly more efficacious and tolerable than the previous interferon-based regimens has transformed this important field of medicine, with the potential to dramatically reduce the burden of infection and improve health outcomes in this population. This review will summarize the epidemiology and clinical impact of HIV/HCV co-infection and current approaches to the treatment of HCV in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. PMID:28357062

  2. Prevalence and resistance pattern of genotype G and H in chronic hepatitis B and HIV co-infected patients in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mata Marín, José Antonio; Arroyo Anduiza, Carla Ileana; Calderón, Gloria María; Cazares Rodríguez, Sergio; Fuentes Allen, José Luis; Arias Flores, Rafael; Gaytán Martínez, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    We estimated the prevalence and identified the resistance pattern of HBV genotypes H and G in HBV monoinfected and HIV co-infected patients. A cross-sectional prevalence and analytic study were performed in chronic hepatitis B patients at the Hospital de Infectología, La Raza National Medical Center in Mexico City. Chronic HBV monoinfected and HIV co-infected patients were included. HBeAg, HBV viral load and genetic analysis of mutations were collected; CD4+ cells count from HIV co-infected patients and HIV RNA were measured. We calculated the prevalence and exact 95% binomial confidence interval and the Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals to assess the relationship between the presence of risk factors and HBV genotypes H or G. We enrolled 77 patients, 67 men and 10 women with 37 HIV co-infected patients. The distribution of HBV genotypes was: HBV genotype H 55 (71% [95% CI 60% to 80%]), HBV genotype G 16 (20.7%), HBV genotype F 4 (5.1%) and HBV genotype A 2 (2.6%). The most frequent mutations presented in 8 HIV co-infected patients and one mono-infected patient with antiretroviral therapy (ART) experience were rtM204V and six of them showed genotype G (6/9). Mono-infected HBV patients exposed more probability to HBV genotype H than co-infected HIV patients OR 13.0 (CI 95% 3.40-49.79), p = 0.0001. In contrast co-infected patients presented less possibility to have genotype H, 0.56 (CI 95% 0.42-0.75). This study confirms the high prevalence of HBV genotype H in Mexico; furthermore, our results suggest that HBV genotype G predominates in co-infected patients. As well, rtM204V and rtL180M mutations are common in HBV-HIV co-infected patients with genotype G and ART experience.

  3. Systems genetics of obesity in an F2 pig model by genome-wide association, genetic network, and pathway analyses

    PubMed Central

    Kogelman, Lisette J. A.; Pant, Sameer D.; Fredholm, Merete; Kadarmideen, Haja N.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex condition with world-wide exponentially rising prevalence rates, linked with severe diseases like Type 2 Diabetes. Economic and welfare consequences have led to a raised interest in a better understanding of the biological and genetic background. To date, whole genome investigations focusing on single genetic variants have achieved limited success, and the importance of including genetic interactions is becoming evident. Here, the aim was to perform an integrative genomic analysis in an F2 pig resource population that was constructed with an aim to maximize genetic variation of obesity-related phenotypes and genotyped using the 60K SNP chip. Firstly, Genome Wide Association (GWA) analysis was performed on the Obesity Index to locate candidate genomic regions that were further validated using combined Linkage Disequilibrium Linkage Analysis and investigated by evaluation of haplotype blocks. We built Weighted Interaction SNP Hub (WISH) and differentially wired (DW) networks using genotypic correlations amongst obesity-associated SNPs resulting from GWA analysis. GWA results and SNP modules detected by WISH and DW analyses were further investigated by functional enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of SNPs revealed several genes associated with obesity, e.g., NPC2 and OR4D10. Moreover, gene enrichment analyses identified several significantly associated pathways, over and above the GWA study results, that may influence obesity and obesity related diseases, e.g., metabolic processes. WISH networks based on genotypic correlations allowed further identification of various gene ontology terms and pathways related to obesity and related traits, which were not identified by the GWA study. In conclusion, this is the first study to develop a (genetic) obesity index and employ systems genetics in a porcine model to provide important insights into the complex genetic architecture associated with obesity and many biological pathways that underlie

  4. Systems genetics of obesity in an F2 pig model by genome-wide association, genetic network, and pathway analyses.

    PubMed

    Kogelman, Lisette J A; Pant, Sameer D; Fredholm, Merete; Kadarmideen, Haja N

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex condition with world-wide exponentially rising prevalence rates, linked with severe diseases like Type 2 Diabetes. Economic and welfare consequences have led to a raised interest in a better understanding of the biological and genetic background. To date, whole genome investigations focusing on single genetic variants have achieved limited success, and the importance of including genetic interactions is becoming evident. Here, the aim was to perform an integrative genomic analysis in an F2 pig resource population that was constructed with an aim to maximize genetic variation of obesity-related phenotypes and genotyped using the 60K SNP chip. Firstly, Genome Wide Association (GWA) analysis was performed on the Obesity Index to locate candidate genomic regions that were further validated using combined Linkage Disequilibrium Linkage Analysis and investigated by evaluation of haplotype blocks. We built Weighted Interaction SNP Hub (WISH) and differentially wired (DW) networks using genotypic correlations amongst obesity-associated SNPs resulting from GWA analysis. GWA results and SNP modules detected by WISH and DW analyses were further investigated by functional enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of SNPs revealed several genes associated with obesity, e.g., NPC2 and OR4D10. Moreover, gene enrichment analyses identified several significantly associated pathways, over and above the GWA study results, that may influence obesity and obesity related diseases, e.g., metabolic processes. WISH networks based on genotypic correlations allowed further identification of various gene ontology terms and pathways related to obesity and related traits, which were not identified by the GWA study. In conclusion, this is the first study to develop a (genetic) obesity index and employ systems genetics in a porcine model to provide important insights into the complex genetic architecture associated with obesity and many biological pathways that underlie

  5. Hepatitis Aand E Co-Infection with Worst Outcome.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Anjum; Cheema, Huma Arshad; Assiri, Asaad

    2016-06-01

    Infections are still a major problem in the developing countries like Pakistan because of poor sewage disposal and economic restraints. Acute viral hepatitis like Aand E are not uncommon in pediatric age group because of unhygienic food handling and poor sewage disposal, but majority recovers well without any complications. Co-infections are rare occurrences and physicians need to be well aware while managing such conditions to avoid worst outcome. Co-infection with hepatitis Aand E is reported occasionally in the literature, however, other concurrent infections such as hepatitis A with Salmonellaand hepatotropic viruses like viral hepatitis B and C are present in the literature. Co-infections should be kept in consideration when someone presents with atypical symptoms or unusual disease course like this presented case. We report here a girl child who had acute hepatitis A and E concurrent infections and presented with hepatic encephalopathy and had worst outcome, despite all the supportive measures being taken.

  6. Management of BU-HIV co-infection.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, D P; Ford, N; Vitoria, M; Christinet, V; Comte, E; Calmy, A; Stienstra, Y; Eholie, S; Asiedu, K

    2014-09-01

    Buruli Ulcer (BU)-HIV co-infection is an important emerging management challenge for BU disease. Limited by paucity of scientific studies, guidance for management of this co-infection has been lacking. Initiated by WHO, a panel of experts in BU and HIV management developed guidance principles for the management of BU-HIV co-infection based on review of available scientific evidence, current treatment experience, and global recommendations established for management of HIV infection and tuberculosis. The expert panel agreed that all BU patients should be offered quality provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling. In areas with high prevalence of malaria and/or bacterial infections, all patients with HIV co-infection should be started on cotrimoxazole preventative therapy. Combination antibiotic treatment for BU should be commenced before starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) and provided for 8 weeks duration. The suggested combination is rifampicin (10 mg/kg daily up to a maximum of 600 mg/day) plus streptomycin (15 mg/kg daily). An alternative regimen is rifampicin plus clarithromycin (7.5 mg/kg twice daily up to a maximum of 1000 mg daily) although due to drug interactions with antiretroviral drugs this regimen should be used with caution. ART should be initiated in all BU-HIV co-infected patients with symptomatic HIV disease (WHO clinical stage 3 or 4) regardless of CD4 cell count and in asymptomatic individuals with CD4 count ≤500 cells/mm(3) . If CD4 count is not available, BU-HIV co-infected individuals with category 2 or 3 BU disease should be offered ART. For eligible individuals, ART should be commenced as soon as possible within 8 weeks after commencing BU treatment, and as a priority in those with advanced HIV disease (CD4 ≤ 350 cells/mm(3) or WHO stage 3 or 4 disease). All co-infected patients should be actively screened for tuberculosis before commencing BU treatment and before starting ART. Programmes should implement a monitoring and reporting

  7. Impact of HIV co-infection on the evolution and transmission of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Eldholm, Vegard; Rieux, Adrien; Monteserin, Johana; Lopez, Julia Montana; Palmero, Domingo; Lopez, Beatriz; Ritacco, Viviana; Didelot, Xavier; Balloux, Francois

    2016-01-01

    The tuberculosis (TB) epidemic is fueled by a parallel Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) epidemic, but it remains unclear to what extent the HIV epidemic has been a driver for drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Here we assess the impact of HIV co-infection on the emergence of resistance and transmission of Mtb in the largest outbreak of multidrug-resistant TB in South America to date. By combining Bayesian evolutionary analyses and the reconstruction of transmission networks utilizing a new model optimized for TB, we find that HIV co-infection does not significantly affect the transmissibility or the mutation rate of Mtb within patients and was not associated with increased emergence of resistance within patients. Our results indicate that the HIV epidemic serves as an amplifier of TB outbreaks by providing a reservoir of susceptible hosts, but that HIV co-infection is not a direct driver for the emergence and transmission of resistant strains. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16644.001 PMID:27502557

  8. Choice of Reading Comprehension Test Influences the Outcomes of Genetic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Betjemann, Rebecca S.; Keenan, Janice M.; Olson, Richard K.; DeFries, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Does the choice of test for assessing reading comprehension influence the outcome of genetic analyses? A twin design compared two types of reading comprehension tests classified as primarily associated with word decoding (RC-D) or listening comprehension (RC-LC). For both types of tests, the overall genetic influence is high and nearly identical. However, the tests differed significantly in how they covary with the genes associated with decoding and listening comprehension. Although Cholesky decomposition showed that both types of comprehension tests shared significant genetic influence with both decoding and listening comprehension, RC-D tests shared most genetic variance with decoding, and RC-LC tests shared most with listening comprehension. Thus, different tests used to measure the same construct may manifest very different patterns of genetic covariation. These results suggest that the apparent discrepancies among the findings of previous twin studies of reading comprehension could be due at least in part to test differences. PMID:21804757

  9. Population Genetic and Admixture Analyses of Culex pipiens Complex (Diptera: Culicidae) Populations in California, United States

    PubMed Central

    Kothera, Linda; Nelms, Brittany M.; Reisen, William K.; Savage, Harry M.

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellite markers were used to genetically characterize 19 Culex pipiens complex populations from California. Two populations showed characteristics of earlier genetic bottlenecks. The overall FST value and a neighbor-joining tree suggested moderate amounts of genetic differentiation. Analyses using Structure indicated K = 4 genetic clusters: Cx. pipiens form pipiens L., Cx. quinquefasciatus Say, Cx. pipiens form molestus Forskäl, and a group of genetically similar individuals of hybrid origin. A Discriminant Analysis of Principal Components indicated that the latter group is a mixture of the other three taxa, with form pipiens and form molestus contributing somewhat more ancestry than Cx. quinquefasciatus. Characterization of 56 morphologically autogenous individuals classified most as Cx. pipiens form molestus, and none as Cx. pipiens form pipiens or Cx. quinquefasciatus. Comparison of California microsatellite data with those of Cx. pipiens pallens Coquillett from Japan indicated the latter does not contribute significantly to genotypes in California. PMID:23958909

  10. Hepatitis B and Schistosoma co-infection in a non-endemic area.

    PubMed

    Cuenca-Gómez, J Á; Salas-Coronas, J; Lozano-Serrano, A B; Vázquez-Villegas, J; Soriano-Pérez, M J; Estévez-Escobar, M; Villarejo-Ordóñez, A; Cabezas-Fernández, M T

    2016-09-01

    Schistosomiasis is related to the development of liver fibrosis and portal hypertension. Chronic co-infection with HBV and Schistosoma has been associated in endemic areas with a higher risk for a more severe liver disease. However, no studies have assessed the real importance of this co-infection in non-endemic regions. This is a retrospective observational study of Sub-Saharan immigrants attending between October 2004 and February 2014. Patients with chronic HBV infection with and without evidence of schistosomal infection were compared. Epidemiological, analytical, and microbiological data were analysed. Likelihood of liver fibrosis based on APRI and FIB-4 indexes was established. A total of 507 patients were included in the study, 170 (33.5 %) of them harbouring evidence of schistosome infection. No differences were found in transaminase, GGT, and ALP levels. In fibrosis tests, a higher proportion of patients with HVB and S. mansoni detection reached possible fibrosis scores (F > 2) when compared to patients without schistosomiasis: 17.4 vs 14.2 % and 4.3 % vs 4.2 % (using high sensitivity and high specificity cut-offs respectively), although differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.69, p = 0.96). For possible cirrhosis (F4) score, similar results were observed: 4.3 % of co-infected patients vs 2.1 % of mono-infected ones, p = 0.46. According to these datas, in non-endemic regions the degree of hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B is not substantially modified by schistosome co-infection.

  11. Application of resistance gene analog markers to analyses of genetic structure and diversity in rice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Juansheng; Yu, Yuchao; Gao, Fangyuan; Zeng, Lihua; Lu, Xianjun; Wu, Xianting; Yan, Wengui; Ren, Guangjun

    2013-07-01

    Plant disease resistance gene analog (RGA) markers were designed according to the conserved sequence of known RGAs and used to map resistance genes. We used genome-wide RGA markers for genetic analyses of structure and diversity in a global rice germplasm collection. Of the 472 RGA markers, 138 were polymorphic and these were applied to 178 entries selected from the USDA rice core collection. Results from the RGA markers were similar between two methods, UPGMA and STRUCTURE. Additionally, the results from RGA markers in our study were agreeable with those previously reported from SSR markers, including cluster of ancestral classification, genetic diversity estimates, genetic relatedness, and cluster of geographic origins. These results suggest that RGA markers are applicable for analyses of genetic structure and diversity in rice. However, unlike SSR markers, the RGA markers failed to differentiate temperate japonica, tropical japonica, and aromatic subgroups. The restricted way for developing RGA markers from the cDNA sequence might limit the polymorphism of RGA markers in the genome, thus limiting the discriminatory power in comparison with SSR markers. Genetic differentiation obtained using RGA markers may be useful for defining genetic diversity of a suite of random R genes in plants, as many studies show a differentiation of resistance to a wide array of pathogens. They could also help to characterize the genetic structure and geographic distribution in crops, including rice, wheat, barley, and banana.

  12. Molecular ecology of social behaviour: analyses of breeding systems and genetic structure.

    PubMed

    Ross, K G

    2001-02-01

    Molecular genetic studies of group kin composition and local genetic structure in social organisms are becoming increasingly common. A conceptual and mathematical framework that links attributes of the breeding system to group composition and genetic structure is presented here, and recent empirical studies are reviewed in the context of this framework. Breeding system properties, including the number of breeders in a social group, their genetic relatedness, and skew in their parentage, determine group composition and the distribution of genetic variation within and between social units. This group genetic structure in turn influences the opportunities for conflict and cooperation to evolve within groups and for selection to occur among groups or clusters of groups. Thus, molecular studies of social groups provide the starting point for analyses of the selective forces involved in social evolution, as well as for analyses of other fundamental evolutionary problems related to sex allocation, reproductive skew, life history evolution, and the nature of selection in hierarchically structured populations. The framework presented here provides a standard system for interpreting and integrating genetic and natural history data from social organisms for application to a broad range of evolutionary questions.

  13. Genetic analyses reveal unusually high diversity of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus in rainbow trout aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Troyer, R M; LaPatra, S E; Kurath, G

    2000-12-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is the most significant virus pathogen of salmon and trout in North America. Previous studies have shown relatively low genetic diversity of IHNV within large geographical regions. In this study, the genetic heterogeneity of 84 IHNV isolates sampled from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) over a 20 year period at four aquaculture facilities within a 12 mile stretch of the Snake River in Idaho, USA was investigated. The virus isolates were characterized using an RNase protection assay (RPA) and nucleotide sequence analyses. Among the 84 isolates analysed, 46 RPA haplotypes were found and analyses revealed a high level of genetic heterogeneity relative to that detected in other regions. Sequence analyses revealed up to 7.6% nucleotide divergence, which is the highest level of diversity reported for IHNV to date. Phylogenetic analyses identified four distinct monophyletic clades representing four virus lineages. These lineages were distributed across facilities, and individual facilities contained multiple lineages. These results suggest that co-circulating IHNV lineages of relatively high genetic diversity are present in the IHNV populations in this rainbow trout culture study site. Three of the four lineages exhibited temporal trends consistent with rapid evolution.

  14. Genetic analyses reveal unusually high diversity of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus in rainbow trout aquaculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troyer, Ryan M.; LaPatra, Scott E.; Kurath, Gael

    2000-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is the most significant virus pathogen of salmon and trout in North America. Previous studies have shown relatively low genetic diversity of IHNV within large geographical regions. In this study, the genetic heterogeneity of 84 IHNV isolates sampled from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) over a 20 year period at four aquaculture facilities within a 12 mile stretch of the Snake River in Idaho, USA was investigated. The virus isolates were characterized using an RNase protection assay (RPA) and nucleotide sequence analyses. Among the 84 isolates analysed, 46 RPA haplotypes were found and analyses revealed a high level of genetic heterogeneity relative to that detected in other regions. Sequence analyses revealed up to 7·6% nucleotide divergence, which is the highest level of diversity reported for IHNV to date. Phylogenetic analyses identified four distinct monophyletic clades representing four virus lineages. These lineages were distributed across facilities, and individual facilities contained multiple lineages. These results suggest that co-circulating IHNV lineages of relatively high genetic diversity are present in the IHNV populations in this rainbow trout culture study site. Three of the four lineages exhibited temporal trends consistent with rapid evolution.

  15. Symbiodinium population genetics: testing for species boundaries and analysing samples with mixed genotypes.

    PubMed

    Wham, Drew C; LaJeunesse, Todd C

    2016-06-01

    Population genetic markers are increasingly being used to study the diversity, ecology and evolution of Symbiodinium, a group of eukaryotic microbes that are often mutualistic with reef-building corals. Population genetic markers can resolve individual clones, or strains, from samples of host tissue; however, samples may comprise different species that may confound interpretations of gene flow and genetic structure. Here, we propose a method for resolving species from population genetic data using tests for genetic recombination. Assigning individuals to genetically recombining populations prior to further analyses avoids critical errors in the interpretation of gene flow and dispersal. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach, we first apply this method to a simulated data set. We then use the method to resolve two species of host generalist Symbiodinium that commonly co-occur in reef-building corals collected from Indo-West Pacific reefs. We demonstrate that the method is robust even when some hosts contain genotypes from two distinct species. Finally, we examine population genetic data sets from two recently published papers in Molecular Ecology. We show that each strongly supports a two species interpretation, which significantly changes the original conclusions presented in these studies. When combined with available phylogenetic and ecological evidence, the use of population genetic data offers a robust method for unambiguously delimiting morphologically cryptic species. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Association between hepatitis B co-infection and elevated liver stiffness among HIV-infected adults in Lusaka, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Vinikoor, Michael J; Mulenga, Lloyd; Siyunda, Alice; Musukuma, Kalo; Chilengi, Roma; Moore, Carolyn Bolton; Chi, Benjamin H; Davies, Mary-Ann; Egger, Matthias; Wandeler, Gilles

    2016-11-01

    To describe liver disease epidemiology among HIV-infected individuals in Zambia. We recruited HIV-infected adults (≥18 years) at antiretroviral therapy initiation at two facilities in Lusaka. Using vibration controlled transient elastography, we assessed liver stiffness, a surrogate for fibrosis/cirrhosis, and analysed liver stiffness measurements (LSM) according to established thresholds (>7.0 kPa for significant fibrosis and >11.0 kPa for cirrhosis). All participants underwent standardised screening for potential causes of liver disease including chronic hepatitis B (HBV) and C virus co-infection, herbal medicine, and alcohol use. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with elevated liver stiffness. Among 798 HIV-infected patients, 651 had a valid LSM (median age, 34 years; 53% female). HBV co-infection (12%) and alcohol use disorders (41%) were common and hepatitis C virus co-infection (<1%) was rare. According to LSM, 75 (12%) had significant fibrosis and 13 (2%) had cirrhosis. In multivariable analysis, HBV co-infection as well as male sex, increased age and WHO clinical stage 3 or 4 were independently associated with LSM >7.0 kPa (all P < 0.05). HBV co-infection was the only independent risk factor for LSM >11.0 kPa. Among HIV-HBV patients, those with elevated ALT and HBV viral load were more likely to have significant liver fibrosis than patients with normal markers of HBV activity. HBV co-infection was the most important risk factor for liver fibrosis and cirrhosis and should be diagnosed early in HIV care to optimise treatment outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection: screening and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Kartik K; Swaminathan, Soumya; Andrews, Jason R; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2011-06-18

    Globally, tuberculosis (TB) and HIV interact in deadly synergy. The high burden of TB among HIV-infected individuals underlies the importance of TB diagnosis, treatment and prevention for clinicians involved in HIV care. Despite expanding access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) to treat HIV infection in resource-limited settings, many individuals in need of therapy initiate ART too late and have already developed clinically significant TB by the time they present for care. Many co-infected individuals are in need of concurrent ART and anti-TB therapy, which dramatically improves survival, but also raises several management challenges, including drug interactions, shared drug toxicities and TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Due to the survival benefits of promptly initiating ART among all HIV-infected individuals, including those with TB, it is recommended that co-infected individuals receive treatment for both diseases, regardless of CD4+ cell count. We review current screening and treatment strategies for TB and HIV co-infection. Recent findings and ongoing studies will assist clinicians in managing the prevention and treatment of TB and HIV co-infection, which remains a major global health challenge.

  18. Influence of HIV co-infection on hepatitis C immunopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Koziel, Margaret James

    2006-01-01

    The role of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is unclear. People with chronic infection have weak responses against HCV in the blood, but HCV-specific responses are present within liver. The prevailing hypothesis of liver injury in HCV is that CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses mediate HCV-related liver damage but are ineffectual at clearing the chronic infection. However, we recently reported that vigorous CD4(+) responses that produce interferon gamma (IFNgamma) early in infection are correlated with slower rates of disease progression, and compartmentalize to the liver. People with chronic HIV and HCV co-infection, particularly those with CD4(+) <200 cells/mm(3), have a higher rate of fibrosis development and severe liver disease. Co-infected people have variable degrees of immunosuppression that may provide insight into the relationship between cellular immune functions and the degree of liver damage as assessed by liver biopsy. People with co-infection may have quantitative or qualitative differences in the immune responses. We recently found a relationship between CD4(+) immune responses and liver histology. There are qualitative differences in the CD4(+) responses found in the liver in co-infected people compared to those with HCV alone, whereas no such differences are found when CD8(+) responses are measured. Neither CD4(+) nor CD8(+) responses correlate with the peripheral CD4 count.

  19. Co-infections of Adenovirus Species in Previously Vaccinated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Gary J.; Lin, Baochuan; Gratwick, Kevin; Meador, Carolyn; Hansen, Christian; Tibbetts, Clark; Stenger, David A.; Irvine, Marina; Seto, Donald; Purkayastha, Anjan; Freed, Nikki E.; Gibson, Marylou G.; Russell, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Despite the success of the adenovirus vaccine administered to US military trainees, acute respiratory disease (ARD) surveillance still detected breakthrough infections (respiratory illnesses associated with the adenovirus serotypes specifically targeted by the vaccine). To explore the role of adenoviral co-infection (simultaneous infection by multiple pathogenic adenovirus species) in breakthrough disease, we examined specimens from patients with ARD by using 3 methods to detect multiple adenoviral species: a DNA microarray, a polymerase chain reaction­ (PCR)–enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and a multiplex PCR assay. Analysis of 52 samples (21 vaccinated, 31 unvaccinated) collected from 1996 to 2000 showed that all vaccinated samples had co-infections. Most of these co-infections were community-acquired serotypes of species B1 and E. Unvaccinated samples primarily contained only 1 species (species E) associated with adult respiratory illness. This study highlights the rarely reported phenomenon of adenoviral co-infections in a clinically relevant environment suitable for the generation of new recombinational variants. PMID:16707047

  20. The importance of molecular analyses for understanding the genetic diversity of Histoplasma capsulatum: an overview.

    PubMed

    Vite-Garín, Tania; Estrada-Bárcenas, Daniel Alfonso; Cifuentes, Joaquín; Taylor, Maria Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the classification of the human pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum (H. capsulatum) (ascomycete) are sustained by the results of several genetic analyses that support the high diversity of this dimorphic fungus. The present mini-review highlights the great genetic plasticity of H. capsulatum. Important records with different molecular tools, mainly single- or multi-locus sequence analyses developed with this fungus, are discussed. Recent phylogenetic data with a multi-locus sequence analysis using 5 polymorphic loci support a new clade and/or phylogenetic species of H. capsulatum for the Americas, which was associated with fungal isolates obtained from the migratory bat Tadarida brasiliensis. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Chronic Lyme Disease and Co-infections: Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Berghoff, Walter

    2012-01-01

    In Lyme disease concurrent infections frequently occur. The clinical and pathological impact of co-infections was first recognized in the 1990th, i.e. approximately ten years after the discovery of Lyme disease. Their pathological synergism can exacerbate Lyme disease or induce similar disease manifestations. Co-infecting agents can be transmitted together with Borrelia burgdorferi by tick bite resulting in multiple infections but a fraction of co-infections occur independently of tick bite. Clinically relevant co-infections are caused by Bartonella species, Yersinia enterocolitica, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. In contrast to the USA, human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) and babesiosis are not of major importance in Europe. Infections caused by these pathogens in patients not infected by Borrelia burgdorferi can result in clinical symptoms similar to those occurring in Lyme disease. This applies particularly to infections caused by Bartonella henselae, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Chlamydia trachomatis primarily causes polyarthritis. Chlamydophila pneumoniae not only causes arthritis but also affects the nervous system and the heart, which renders the differential diagnosis difficult. The diagnosis is even more complex when co-infections occur in association with Lyme disease. Treatment recommendations are based on individual expert opinions. In antibiotic therapy, the use of third generation cephalosporins should only be considered in cases of Lyme disease. The same applies to carbapenems, which however are used occasionally in infections caused by Yersinia enterocolitica. For the remaining infections predominantly tetracyclines and macrolides are used. Quinolones are for alternative treatment, particularly gemifloxacin. For Bartonella henselae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Chlamydophila pneumoniae the combination with rifampicin is recommended. Erythromycin is the drug of choice for

  2. Chronic Lyme Disease and Co-infections: Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Berghoff, Walter

    2012-01-01

    In Lyme disease concurrent infections frequently occur. The clinical and pathological impact of co-infections was first recognized in the 1990th, i.e. approximately ten years after the discovery of Lyme disease. Their pathological synergism can exacerbate Lyme disease or induce similar disease manifestations. Co-infecting agents can be transmitted together with Borrelia burgdorferi by tick bite resulting in multiple infections but a fraction of co-infections occur independently of tick bite. Clinically relevant co-infections are caused by Bartonella species, Yersinia enterocolitica, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. In contrast to the USA, human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) and babesiosis are not of major importance in Europe. Infections caused by these pathogens in patients not infected by Borrelia burgdorferi can result in clinical symptoms similar to those occurring in Lyme disease. This applies particularly to infections caused by Bartonella henselae, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Chlamydia trachomatis primarily causes polyarthritis. Chlamydophila pneumoniae not only causes arthritis but also affects the nervous system and the heart, which renders the differential diagnosis difficult. The diagnosis is even more complex when co-infections occur in association with Lyme disease. Treatment recommendations are based on individual expert opinions. In antibiotic therapy, the use of third generation cephalosporins should only be considered in cases of Lyme disease. The same applies to carbapenems, which however are used occasionally in infections caused by Yersinia enterocolitica. For the remaining infections predominantly tetracyclines and macrolides are used. Quinolones are for alternative treatment, particularly gemifloxacin. For Bartonella henselae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Chlamydophila pneumoniae the combination with rifampicin is recommended. Erythromycin is the drug of choice for

  3. The entry of cucumber mosaic virus into cucumber xylem is facilitated by co-infection with zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Nobuhara, Shinya; Nishimura, Miho; Ryang, Bo-Song; Naoe, Masaki; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Kosaka, Yoshitaka; Ohki, Satoshi T

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the synergistic effects of co-infection by zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) and cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on viral distribution in the vascular tissues of cucumber. Immunohistochemical observations indicated that ZYMV was present in both the phloem and xylem tissues. ZYMV-RNA was detected in both the xylem wash and guttation fluid of ZYMV-inoculated cucumber. Steam treatment at a stem internode indicated that ZYMV enters the xylem vessels and moves through them but does not cause systemic infection in the plant. CMV distribution in singly infected cucumbers was restricted to phloem tissue. By contrast, CMV was detected in the xylem tissue of cotyledons in plants co-infected with CMV and ZYMV. Although both ZYMV-RNA and CMV-RNA were detected in the xylem wash and upper internodes of steam-treated, co-infected cucumbers grown at 24 °C, neither virus was detected in the upper leaves using an ELISA assay. Genetically modified CMV harboring the ZYMV HC-Pro gene was distributed in the xylem and phloem tissues of singly inoculated cucumber cotyledons. These results indicate that the ZYMV HC-Pro gene facilitates CMV entry into the xylem vessels of co-infected cucumbers.

  4. Phylogeographic analyses and genetic structure illustrate the complex evolutionary history of Phragmites australis in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Colin, Ricardo; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2016-05-01

    Genetic data suggest that three lineages of Phragmites australis are found in North America: the Native North American lineage, the Gulf Coast lineage, and the Invasive lineage. In Mexico, P. australis is a common species, but nothing is known about the distribution or ecology of these lineages. We examined the phylogeography of P. australis to analyze the current geographic distribution of genetic variation, demographic history, and dispersal patterns to better understand its evolutionary history in Mexico. We sampled 427 individuals from 28 populations. We used two noncoding regions of chloroplast DNA to estimate the levels of genetic variation and identified the genetic groups across the species' geographical range in Mexico. We compared the genealogical relationships among haplotypes with those previously reported. A hypothesis of demographic expansion was also tested for the Mexican P. australis lineages. We found 13 new haplotypes native to Mexico that might be undergoing an active process of expansion and diversification. Genealogical analyses provided evidence that two independent lineages of P. australis are present in Mexico. The invasive lineage was not detected with our sampling. Our estimates of population expansions in Mexico ranged from 0.202 to 0.726 mya. Phragmites australis is a native species that has been in Mexico for thousands of years. Genetic data suggest that climatic changes during the Pleistocene played an important role in the demographic expansion of the populations that constitute the different genetic groups of P. australis in Mexico. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  5. Mutation@A Glance: An Integrative Web Application for Analysing Mutations from Human Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hijikata, Atsushi; Raju, Rajesh; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Ramabadran, Subhashri; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Ramadoss, Suresh Kumar; Pandey, Akhilesh; Mohan, Sujatha; Ohara, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    Although mutation analysis serves as a key part in making a definitive diagnosis about a genetic disease, it still remains a time-consuming step to interpret their biological implications through integration of various lines of archived information about genes in question. To expedite this evaluation step of disease-causing genetic variations, here we developed Mutation@A Glance (http://rapid.rcai.riken.jp/mutation/), a highly integrated web-based analysis tool for analysing human disease mutations; it implements a user-friendly graphical interface to visualize about 40 000 known disease-associated mutations and genetic polymorphisms from more than 2600 protein-coding human disease-causing genes. Mutation@A Glance locates already known genetic variation data individually on the nucleotide and the amino acid sequences and makes it possible to cross-reference them with tertiary and/or quaternary protein structures and various functional features associated with specific amino acid residues in the proteins. We showed that the disease-associated missense mutations had a stronger tendency to reside in positions relevant to the structure/function of proteins than neutral genetic variations. From a practical viewpoint, Mutation@A Glance could certainly function as a ‘one-stop’ analysis platform for newly determined DNA sequences, which enables us to readily identify and evaluate new genetic variations by integrating multiple lines of information about the disease-causing candidate genes. PMID:20360267

  6. Increased Severity and Mortality in Adults Co-Infected with Malaria and HIV in Maputo, Mozambique: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Aase; Patel, Sam; Aukrust, Pål; David, Catarina; Gonca, Miguel; Berg, Einar S.; Dalen, Ingvild; Langeland, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Background Co-infection with falciparum malaria and HIV-1 increases the severity and mortality of both infections in unstable malaria-transmission areas. In contrast, in stable transmission areas, HIV co-infection increases the severity of both infections but has not been found to influence malaria mortality. Methods In a prospective cross-sectional study, clinical and laboratory data were consecutively collected for all adults admitted with fever and/or suspected malaria to the medical department of the Central Hospital of Maputo, Mozambique, during two malaria seasons from January 2011. Malaria and HIV PCRs were performed, and risk factors for fatal outcomes were analysed. The impact of HIV on the clinical presentation and mortality of malaria was assessed. Findings A total of 212 non-pregnant adults with fever and/or suspected malaria and 56 healthy controls were included in the study. Of the 131 patients with confirmed falciparum malaria, 70 were co-infected with HIV-1. The in-hospital mortality of the co-infected patients was 13.0% (9/69) compared with 1.7% (1/59) in the patients without HIV (p = 0.018). Malaria severity (p = 0.016) and co-infection with HIV (p = 0.064) were independent risk factors for death although the association with HIV did not reach statistical significance. The co-infected patients had significantly more frequent respiratory distress, bleeding disturbances, hypoglycaemia, liver and renal failure and high malaria parasitemia compared with the patients with malaria alone. Interpretations HIV co-infection is associated with increased disease severity in and mortality from malaria in an area of stable malaria transmission. This finding was not observed earlier and should motivate doctors working in malaria-endemic areas to consider early HIV testing and a closer follow-up of patients with malaria and HIV co-infection. PMID:24505451

  7. Septic arthritis due to tubercular and Aspergillus co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mukesh; Thilak, Jai; Zahoor, Adnan; Jyothi, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus septic arthritis is a rare and serious medical and surgical problem. It occurs mainly in immunocompromised patients. Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common causative organism followed by Aspergillus flavus. The most common site affected is knee followed by shoulder, ankle, wrist, hip and sacroiliac joint. Debridement and voriconazole are primary treatment of articular aspergilosis. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of co-infection of tuberculosis (TB) and Aspergillus infecting joints. We report a case of co-infection of TB and A. flavus of hip and knee of a 60-year-old male, with type 2 diabetes mellitus. He was treated with debridement, intravenous voriconazole, and antitubercular drugs. PMID:27293296

  8. Development, genetic and cytogenetic analyses of genetic sexing strains of the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens Loew (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anastrepha ludens is among the pests that have a major impact on México's economy because it attacks fruits as citrus and mangoes. The Mexican Federal government uses integrated pest management to control A. ludens through the Programa Nacional Moscas de la Fruta [National Fruit Fly Program, SAGARPA-SENASICA]. One of the main components of this program is the sterile insect technique (SIT), which is used to control field populations of the pest by releasing sterile flies. Results To increase the efficiency of this technique, we have developed a genetic sexing strain (GSS) in which the sexing mechanism is based on a pupal colour dimorphism (brown-black) and is the result of a reciprocal translocation between the Y chromosome and the autosome bearing the black pupae (bp) locus. Ten strains producing wild-type (brown pupae) males and mutant (black pupae) females were isolated. Subsequent evaluations for several generations were performed in most of these strains. The translocation strain named Tapachula-7 showed minimal effect on survival and the best genetic stability of all ten strains. Genetic and cytogenetic analyses were performed using mitotic and polytene chromosomes and we succeeded to characterize the chromosomal structure of this reciprocal translocation and map the autosome breakpoint, despite the fact that the Y chromosome is not visible in polytene nuclei following standard staining. Conclusions We show that mitotic and polytene chromosomes can be used in cytogenetic analyses towards the development of genetic control methods in this pest species. The present work is the first report of the construction of GSS of Anastrepha ludens, with potential use in a future Moscafrut operational program. PMID:25472896

  9. Development, genetic and cytogenetic analyses of genetic sexing strains of the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens Loew (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Zepeda-Cisneros, Cristina Silvia; Meza Hernández, José Salvador; García-Martínez, Víctor; Ibañez-Palacios, Jorge; Zacharopoulou, Antigone; Franz, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Anastrepha ludens is among the pests that have a major impact on México's economy because it attacks fruits as citrus and mangoes. The Mexican Federal government uses integrated pest management to control A. ludens through the Programa Nacional Moscas de la Fruta [National Fruit Fly Program, SAGARPA-SENASICA]. One of the main components of this program is the sterile insect technique (SIT), which is used to control field populations of the pest by releasing sterile flies. To increase the efficiency of this technique, we have developed a genetic sexing strain (GSS) in which the sexing mechanism is based on a pupal colour dimorphism (brown-black) and is the result of a reciprocal translocation between the Y chromosome and the autosome bearing the black pupae (bp) locus. Ten strains producing wild-type (brown pupae) males and mutant (black pupae) females were isolated. Subsequent evaluations for several generations were performed in most of these strains. The translocation strain named Tapachula-7 showed minimal effect on survival and the best genetic stability of all ten strains. Genetic and cytogenetic analyses were performed using mitotic and polytene chromosomes and we succeeded to characterize the chromosomal structure of this reciprocal translocation and map the autosome breakpoint, despite the fact that the Y chromosome is not visible in polytene nuclei following standard staining. We show that mitotic and polytene chromosomes can be used in cytogenetic analyses towards the development of genetic control methods in this pest species. The present work is the first report of the construction of GSS of Anastrepha ludens, with potential use in a future Moscafrut operational program.

  10. Diagnosis & treatment of tuberculosis in HIV co-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Padmapriyadarsini, C.; Narendran, G.; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global public health challenge, with an estimated 1.4 million patients worldwide. Co-infection with HIV leads to challenges in both the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis. Further, there has been an increase in rates of drug resistant tuberculosis, including multi-drug (MDR-TB) and extensively drug resistant TB (XDRTB), which are difficult to treat and contribute to increased mortality. Because of the poor performance of sputum smear microscopy in HIV-infected patients, newer diagnostic tests are urgently required that are not only sensitive and specific but easy to use in remote and resource-constrained settings. The treatment of co-infected patients requires antituberculosis and antiretroviral drugs to be administered concomitantly; challenges include pill burden and patient compliance, drug interactions, overlapping toxic effects, and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Also important questions about the duration and schedule of anti-TB drug regimens and timing of antiretroviral therapy remain unanswered. From a programmatic point of view, screening of all HIV-infected persons for TB and vice-versa requires good co-ordination and communication between the TB and AIDS control programmes. Linkage of co-infected patients to antiretroviral treatment centres is critical if early mortality is to be prevented. We present here an overview of existing diagnostic strategies, new tests in the pipeline and recommendations for treatment of patients with HIV-TB dual infection. PMID:22310818

  11. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Complicated by Co-infection with Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae, China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing-Bin; Li, Hao; Zhang, Pan-He; Cui, Ning; Yang, Zhen-Dong; Fan, Ya-Di; Cui, Xiao-Ming; Hu, Jian-Gong; Guo, Chen-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2016-01-01

    During 2013–2015 in central China, co-infection with spotted fever group rickettsiae was identified in 77 of 823 patients infected with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus. Co-infection resulted in delayed recovery and increased risk for death, prompting clinical practices in the region to consider co-infection in patients with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome. PMID:27767921

  12. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Complicated by Co-infection with Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing-Bin; Li, Hao; Zhang, Pan-He; Cui, Ning; Yang, Zhen-Dong; Fan, Ya-Di; Cui, Xiao-Ming; Hu, Jian-Gong; Guo, Chen-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Liu, Wei; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2016-11-01

    During 2013-2015 in central China, co-infection with spotted fever group rickettsiae was identified in 77 of 823 patients infected with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus. Co-infection resulted in delayed recovery and increased risk for death, prompting clinical practices in the region to consider co-infection in patients with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome.

  13. Molecular responses of genetically modified maize to abiotic stresses as determined through proteomic and metabolomic analyses

    PubMed Central

    Benevenuto, Rafael Fonseca; Agapito-Tenfen, Sarah Zanon; Vilperte, Vinicius; Wikmark, Odd-Gunnar; van Rensburg, Peet Jansen; Nodari, Rubens Onofre

    2017-01-01

    Some genetically modified (GM) plants have transgenes that confer tolerance to abiotic stressors. Meanwhile, other transgenes may interact with abiotic stressors, causing pleiotropic effects that will affect the plant physiology. Thus, physiological alteration might have an impact on the product safety. However, routine risk assessment (RA) analyses do not evaluate the response of GM plants exposed to different environmental conditions. Therefore, we here present a proteome profile of herbicide-tolerant maize, including the levels of phytohormones and related compounds, compared to its near-isogenic non-GM variety under drought and herbicide stresses. Twenty differentially abundant proteins were detected between GM and non-GM hybrids under different water deficiency conditions and herbicide sprays. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that most of these proteins are assigned to energetic/carbohydrate metabolic processes. Among phytohormones and related compounds, different levels of ABA, CA, JA, MeJA and SA were detected in the maize varieties and stress conditions analysed. In pathway and proteome analyses, environment was found to be the major source of variation followed by the genetic transformation factor. Nonetheless, differences were detected in the levels of JA, MeJA and CA and in the abundance of 11 proteins when comparing the GM plant and its non-GM near-isogenic variety under the same environmental conditions. Thus, these findings do support molecular studies in GM plants Risk Assessment analyses. PMID:28245233

  14. Molecular responses of genetically modified maize to abiotic stresses as determined through proteomic and metabolomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Benevenuto, Rafael Fonseca; Agapito-Tenfen, Sarah Zanon; Vilperte, Vinicius; Wikmark, Odd-Gunnar; van Rensburg, Peet Jansen; Nodari, Rubens Onofre

    2017-01-01

    Some genetically modified (GM) plants have transgenes that confer tolerance to abiotic stressors. Meanwhile, other transgenes may interact with abiotic stressors, causing pleiotropic effects that will affect the plant physiology. Thus, physiological alteration might have an impact on the product safety. However, routine risk assessment (RA) analyses do not evaluate the response of GM plants exposed to different environmental conditions. Therefore, we here present a proteome profile of herbicide-tolerant maize, including the levels of phytohormones and related compounds, compared to its near-isogenic non-GM variety under drought and herbicide stresses. Twenty differentially abundant proteins were detected between GM and non-GM hybrids under different water deficiency conditions and herbicide sprays. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that most of these proteins are assigned to energetic/carbohydrate metabolic processes. Among phytohormones and related compounds, different levels of ABA, CA, JA, MeJA and SA were detected in the maize varieties and stress conditions analysed. In pathway and proteome analyses, environment was found to be the major source of variation followed by the genetic transformation factor. Nonetheless, differences were detected in the levels of JA, MeJA and CA and in the abundance of 11 proteins when comparing the GM plant and its non-GM near-isogenic variety under the same environmental conditions. Thus, these findings do support molecular studies in GM plants Risk Assessment analyses.

  15. Mobile Genome Express (MGE): A comprehensive automatic genetic analyses pipeline with a mobile device.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jun-Hee; Kim, Thomas W; Mendez, Pedro; Jablons, David M; Kim, Il-Jin

    2017-01-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology allows to sequence whole exomes or genome. However, data analysis is still the biggest bottleneck for its wide implementation. Most laboratories still depend on manual procedures for data handling and analyses, which translates into a delay and decreased efficiency in the delivery of NGS results to doctors and patients. Thus, there is high demand for developing an automatic and an easy-to-use NGS data analyses system. We developed comprehensive, automatic genetic analyses controller named Mobile Genome Express (MGE) that works in smartphones or other mobile devices. MGE can handle all the steps for genetic analyses, such as: sample information submission, sequencing run quality check from the sequencer, secured data transfer and results review. We sequenced an Actrometrix control DNA containing multiple proven human mutations using a targeted sequencing panel, and the whole analysis was managed by MGE, and its data reviewing program called ELECTRO. All steps were processed automatically except for the final sequencing review procedure with ELECTRO to confirm mutations. The data analysis process was completed within several hours. We confirmed the mutations that we have identified were consistent with our previous results obtained by using multi-step, manual pipelines.

  16. HIV/TB Co-Infection in Mainland China: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lei; Zhou, Feng; Li, XiangWei; Jin, Qi

    2010-01-01

    Background TB and HIV co-epidemic is a major public health problem in many parts of the world, particularly in developing counties. We aimed to summarize the prevalence of TB and HIV co-infection in mainland China, using meta-analysis based on systematic review of published articles. Methods We systematically reviewed published studies, from the MEDLINE and Chinese BioMedical Literature Databases, on the prevalence of HIV infection among TB patients and on the prevalence of TB among HIV/AIDS population until 15 April 2010, and quantitatively summarized the estimates using meta-analysis. Results In total, 29 studies were included in this review, with consistently homogeneous results. TB patients, for whom the summary prevalence of HIV infection was 0.9% (0.6%–1.4%) in mainland China, were found to be a potential target population for HIV screening. The prevalence of TB among HIV/AIDS population was 7.2% (4.2%–12.3%), but this was much higher when the analyses were restricted to AIDS patients (22.8%). Significantly higher prevalence was observed for males and hospital-based studies. Conclusions Our analyses indicated that the prevalence of HIV/TB co-infection in China deserves special attention, screening of TB among HIV/AIDS populations should be attached more importance, which would be much more helpful for treatment of both diseases. PMID:20505769

  17. Genetic analyses of chromosome 12 loci in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lesage, S; Zouali, H; Colombel, J; Belaiche, J; Cezard, J; Tysk, C; Almer, S; Gassull, M; Binder, V; Chamaillard, M; Le Gall, I; Thomas, G; Hugot, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, both of which are multifactorial diseases involving the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. A region on chromosome 12 centred around the marker locus D12S83 has previously been associated with IBD predisposition. The aim of the study was to investigate this genetic region in an independent panel of European families affected by Crohn's disease.
METHODS—A sample of 95 families with two or more affected relatives and 75 simplex nuclear families were genotyped for 19 microsatellite loci located on chromosome 12. A search for linkage and linkage disequilibrium was performed using non-parametric two point and multipoint analyses with the Analyze and Genehunter packages.
RESULTS—No evidence of linkage or linkage disequilibrium was observed for any of the marker loci, including D12S83 (p=0.35 for the two point linkage test). Multipoint linkage analysis also failed to reveal positive linkage on chromosome 12. Power calculations allowed us to reject the hypothesis that the genetic region of chromosome 12 centred on D12S83 contains a susceptibility locus with a relative risk (λs) equal to or greater than 2.0 in these families.
CONCLUSION—Failure to detect linkage or linkage disequilibrium in these families suggests that the chromosome 12 locus previously reported to be associated with genetic predisposition to IBD does not play a role in all European family samples. This observation is compatible with heterogeneity in the genetic basis of susceptibility to the disease and/or exposure to various environmental factors among Caucasian families.


Keywords: chromosome 12; inflammatory bowel disease; Crohn's disease; linkage analyses; replication study PMID:11076876

  18. [Monoinfections caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia burgdorferi / Anaplasma phagocytophilum co-infections in forestry workers and farmers].

    PubMed

    Tokarska-Rodak, Małgorzata; Pańczuk, Anna; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria; Plewik, Dorota; Szepeluk, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The presence of co-infections induced by tick-borne pathogens in humans is an important epidemiological phenomenon. This issue has attracted growing attention of doctors and people working under conditions of an increased risk of being exposed to tick bites. The research group consisted of 93 individuals with current anti-immunoglobulin M/G (IgM/ IgG) Borrelia burgdorferi or IgG anti-Anaplasma phagocytophilum. The respondents were identified during the screening survey in a group of farmers and foresters occupationally exposed to tick bites. The aim of the work was to analyse the frequency of antibodies to specific antigens of B. burgdorferi and the levels of cytokines in forestry workers and farmers with B. burgdorferi monoinfections and B. burgdorferi / A. phagocytophilum co-infections. Statistical analysis was performed using the Chi2, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests. There is a stronger generation of IgG antibodies to B. burgdorferi antigens in patients with B. burgdorferi / A. phagocytophilum co-infections, such as variable major protein-like sequence expressed (VlsE) (p < 0.05), p19 (p < 0.02), p17 (p < 0.05) and complement regulator-acquiring surface protein 3 (CRASP3) (p < 0.02) compared to persons with B. burgdorferi monoinfections. The discrepancies in the synthesis of cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) have not been found in persons with B. burgdorferi monoinfections and B. burgdorferi / A. phagocytophilum co-infection. The immune response directed against B. burgdorferi is stronger in patients co-infected with B. burgdorferi and A. phagocytophilum than in those with monoinfection. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA analyses reveal low genetic diversity in Culex quinquefasciatus from residential areas in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Low, V L; Lim, P E; Chen, C D; Lim, Y A L; Tan, T K; Norma-Rashid, Y; Lee, H L; Sofian-Azirun, M

    2014-06-01

    The present study explored the intraspecific genetic diversity, dispersal patterns and phylogeographic relationships of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) in Malaysia using reference data available in GenBank in order to reveal this species' phylogenetic relationships. A statistical parsimony network of 70 taxa aligned as 624 characters of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene and 685 characters of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene revealed three haplotypes (A1-A3) and four haplotypes (B1-B4), respectively. The concatenated sequences of both COI and COII genes with a total of 1309 characters revealed seven haplotypes (AB1-AB7). Analysis using tcs indicated that haplotype AB1 was the common ancestor and the most widespread haplotype in Malaysia. The genetic distance based on concatenated sequences of both COI and COII genes ranged from 0.00076 to 0.00229. Sequence alignment of Cx. quinquefasciatus from Malaysia and other countries revealed four haplotypes (AA1-AA4) by the COI gene and nine haplotypes (BB1-BB9) by the COII gene. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that Malaysian Cx. quinquefasciatus share the same genetic lineage as East African and Asian Cx. quinquefasciatus. This study has inferred the genetic lineages, dispersal patterns and hypothetical ancestral genotypes of Cx. quinquefasciatus. © 2013 The Royal Entomological Society.

  20. New Genetic and Linguistic Analyses Show Ancient Human Influence on Baobab Evolution and Distribution in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Rangan, Haripriya; Bell, Karen L.; Baum, David A.; Fowler, Rachael; McConvell, Patrick; Saunders, Thomas; Spronck, Stef; Kull, Christian A.; Murphy, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the role of human agency in the gene flow and geographical distribution of the Australian baobab, Adansonia gregorii. The genus Adansonia is a charismatic tree endemic to Africa, Madagascar, and northwest Australia that has long been valued by humans for its multiple uses. The distribution of genetic variation in baobabs in Africa has been partially attributed to human-mediated dispersal over millennia, but this relationship has never been investigated for the Australian species. We combined genetic and linguistic data to analyse geographic patterns of gene flow and movement of word-forms for A. gregorii in the Aboriginal languages of northwest Australia. Comprehensive assessment of genetic diversity showed weak geographic structure and high gene flow. Of potential dispersal vectors, humans were identified as most likely to have enabled gene flow across biogeographic barriers in northwest Australia. Genetic-linguistic analysis demonstrated congruence of gene flow patterns and directional movement of Aboriginal loanwords for A. gregorii. These findings, along with previous archaeobotanical evidence from the Late Pleistocene and Holocene, suggest that ancient humans significantly influenced the geographic distribution of Adansonia in northwest Australia. PMID:25830225

  1. New genetic and linguistic analyses show ancient human influence on baobab evolution and distribution in Australia.

    PubMed

    Rangan, Haripriya; Bell, Karen L; Baum, David A; Fowler, Rachael; McConvell, Patrick; Saunders, Thomas; Spronck, Stef; Kull, Christian A; Murphy, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the role of human agency in the gene flow and geographical distribution of the Australian baobab, Adansonia gregorii. The genus Adansonia is a charismatic tree endemic to Africa, Madagascar, and northwest Australia that has long been valued by humans for its multiple uses. The distribution of genetic variation in baobabs in Africa has been partially attributed to human-mediated dispersal over millennia, but this relationship has never been investigated for the Australian species. We combined genetic and linguistic data to analyse geographic patterns of gene flow and movement of word-forms for A. gregorii in the Aboriginal languages of northwest Australia. Comprehensive assessment of genetic diversity showed weak geographic structure and high gene flow. Of potential dispersal vectors, humans were identified as most likely to have enabled gene flow across biogeographic barriers in northwest Australia. Genetic-linguistic analysis demonstrated congruence of gene flow patterns and directional movement of Aboriginal loanwords for A. gregorii. These findings, along with previous archaeobotanical evidence from the Late Pleistocene and Holocene, suggest that ancient humans significantly influenced the geographic distribution of Adansonia in northwest Australia.

  2. Clinical Indicators for Bacterial Co-Infection in Ghanaian Children with P. falciparum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Maja Verena; Amemasor, Solomon; Agyekum, Alex; Loag, Wibke; Marks, Florian; Sarpong, Nimako; Dekker, Denise; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; May, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of infectious causes in severely ill children is essential but challenging in sub- Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to determine clinical indicators that are able to identify bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children in rural Ghana. In total, 1,915 severely ill children below the age of 15 years were recruited at Agogo Presbyterian Hospital in Ghana between May 2007 and February 2011. In 771 (40%) of the children malaria parasites were detected. This group was analyzed for indicators of bacterial co-infections using bivariate and multivariate regression analyses with 24 socio-economic variables, 16 terms describing medical history and anthropometrical information and 68 variables describing clinical symptoms. The variables were tested for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. In 46 (6.0%) of the children with malaria infection, bacterial co-infection was detected. The most frequent pathogens were non-typhoid salmonellae (45.7%), followed by Streptococcus spp. (13.0%). Coughing, dehydration, splenomegaly, severe anemia and leukocytosis were positively associated with bacteremia. Domestic hygiene and exclusive breastfeeding is negatively associated with bacteremia. In cases of high parasitemia (>10,000/μl), a significant association with bacteremia was found for splenomegaly (OR 8.8; CI 1.6–48.9), dehydration (OR 18.2; CI 2.0–166.0) and coughing (OR 9.0; CI 0.7–118.6). In children with low parasitemia, associations with bacteremia were found for vomiting (OR 4.7; CI 1.4–15.8), severe anemia (OR 3.3; CI 1.0–11.1) and leukocytosis (OR 6.8 CI 1.9–24.2). Clinical signs of impaired microcirculation were negatively associated with bacteremia. Ceftriaxone achieved best coverage of isolated pathogens. The results demonstrate the limitation of clinical symptoms to determine bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children. Best clinical indicators are dependent on the

  3. Wolbachia, Sodalis and trypanosome co-infections in natural populations of Glossina austeni and Glossina pallidipes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tsetse flies harbor at least three bacterial symbionts: Wigglesworthia glossinidia, Wolbachia pipientis and Sodalis glossinidius. Wigglesworthia and Sodalis reside in the gut in close association with trypanosomes and may influence establishment and development of midgut parasite infections. Wolbachia has been shown to induce reproductive effects in infected tsetse. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of these endosymbionts in natural populations of G. austeni and G. pallidipes and to assess the degree of concurrent infections with trypanosomes. Methods Fly samples analyzed originated from Kenyan coastal forests (trapped in 2009–2011) and South African G. austeni collected in 2008. The age structure was estimated by standard methods. G. austeni (n=298) and G. pallidipes (n= 302) were analyzed for infection with Wolbachia and Sodalis using PCR. Trypanosome infection was determined either by microscopic examination of dissected organs or by PCR amplification. Results Overall we observed that G. pallidipes females had a longer lifespan (70 d) than G. austeni (54 d) in natural populations. Wolbachia infections were present in all G. austeni flies analysed, while in contrast, this symbiont was absent from G. pallidipes. The density of Wolbachia infections in the Kenyan G. austeni population was higher than that observed in South African flies. The infection prevalence of Sodalis ranged from 3.7% in G. austeni to about 16% in G. pallidipes. Microscopic examination of midguts revealed an overall trypanosome infection prevalence of 6% (n = 235) and 5% (n = 552), while evaluation with ITS1 primers indicated a prevalence of about 13% (n = 296) and 10% (n = 302) in G. austeni and G. pallidipes, respectively. The majority of infections (46%) were with T. congolense. Co-infection with all three organisms was observed at 1% and 3.3% in G. austeni and G. pallidipes, respectively. Eleven out of the thirteen (85%) co-infected flies

  4. Complete genome of a European hepatitis C virus subtype 1g isolate: phylogenetic and genetic analyses

    PubMed Central

    Bracho, Maria A; Saludes, Verónica; Martró, Elisa; Bargalló, Ana; González-Candelas, Fernando; Ausina, Vicent

    2008-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus isolates have been classified into six main genotypes and a variable number of subtypes within each genotype, mainly based on phylogenetic analysis. Analyses of the genetic relationship among genotypes and subtypes are more reliable when complete genome sequences (or at least the full coding region) are used; however, so far 31 of 80 confirmed or proposed subtypes have at least one complete genome available. Of these, 20 correspond to confirmed subtypes of epidemic interest. Results We present and analyse the first complete genome sequence of a HCV subtype 1g isolate. Phylogenetic and genetic distance analyses reveal that HCV-1g is the most divergent subtype among the HCV-1 confirmed subtypes. Potential genomic recombination events between genotypes or subtype 1 genomes were ruled out. We demonstrate phylogenetic congruence of previously deposited partial sequences of HCV-1g with respect to our sequence. Conclusion In light of this, we propose changing the current status of its subtype-specific designation from provisional to confirmed. PMID:18533988

  5. SNP ascertainment bias in population genetic analyses: Why it is important, and how to correct it

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Whole genome sequencing and SNP genotyping arrays can paint strikingly different pictures of demographic history and natural selection. This is because genotyping arrays contain biased sets of pre-ascertained SNPs. In this short review, we use comparisons between high-coverage whole genome sequences of African hunter-gatherers and data from genotyping arrays to highlight how SNP ascertainment bias distorts population genetic inferences. Sample sizes and the populations in which SNPs are discovered affect the characteristics of observed variants. We find that SNPs on genotyping arrays tend to be older and present in multiple populations. In addition, genotyping arrays cause allele frequency distributions to be shifted towards intermediate frequency alleles, and estimates of linkage disequilibrium are modified. Since population genetic analyses depend on allele frequencies it is imperative that researchers are aware of the effects of SNP ascertainment bias. With this in mind we describe multiple ways to correct for SNP ascertainment bias. PMID:23836388

  6. Electron microscopic, genetic and protein expression analyses of Helicobacter acinonychis strains from a Bengal tiger.

    PubMed

    Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Rivas Traverso, Francisco; Rohde, Manfred; Oyarzabal, Omar A; Lehn, Norbert; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Ferrero, Richard L; Fox, James G; Berg, Douglas E; Backert, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Colonization by Helicobacter species is commonly noted in many mammals. These infections often remain unrecognized, but can cause severe health complications or more subtle host immune perturbations. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize putative novel Helicobacter spp. from Bengal tigers in Thailand. Morphological investigation (Gram-staining and electron microscopy) and genetic studies (16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, flagellin, urease and prophage gene analyses, RAPD DNA fingerprinting and restriction fragment polymorphisms) as well as Western blotting were used to characterize the isolated Helicobacters. Electron microscopy revealed spiral-shaped bacteria, which varied in length (2.5-6 µm) and contained up to four monopolar sheathed flagella. The 16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, sequencing and protein expression analyses identified novel H. acinonychis isolates closely related to H. pylori. These Asian isolates are genetically very similar to H. acinonychis strains of other big cats (cheetahs, lions, lion-tiger hybrid and other tigers) from North America and Europe, which is remarkable in the context of the great genetic diversity among worldwide H. pylori strains. We also found by immunoblotting that the Bengal tiger isolates express UreaseA/B, flagellin, BabA adhesin, neutrophil-activating protein NapA, HtrA protease, γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase GGT, Slt lytic transglycosylase and two DNA transfer relaxase orthologs that were known from H. pylori, but not the cag pathogenicity island, nor CagA, VacA, SabA, DupA or OipA proteins. These results give fresh insights into H. acinonychis genetics and the expression of potential pathogenicity-associated factors and their possible pathophysiological relevance in related gastric infections.

  7. Electron Microscopic, Genetic and Protein Expression Analyses of Helicobacter acinonychis Strains from a Bengal Tiger

    PubMed Central

    Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Rivas Traverso, Francisco; Rohde, Manfred; Oyarzabal, Omar A.; Lehn, Norbert; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Ferrero, Richard L.; Fox, James G.; Berg, Douglas E.; Backert, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Colonization by Helicobacter species is commonly noted in many mammals. These infections often remain unrecognized, but can cause severe health complications or more subtle host immune perturbations. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize putative novel Helicobacter spp. from Bengal tigers in Thailand. Morphological investigation (Gram-staining and electron microscopy) and genetic studies (16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, flagellin, urease and prophage gene analyses, RAPD DNA fingerprinting and restriction fragment polymorphisms) as well as Western blotting were used to characterize the isolated Helicobacters. Electron microscopy revealed spiral-shaped bacteria, which varied in length (2.5–6 µm) and contained up to four monopolar sheathed flagella. The 16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, sequencing and protein expression analyses identified novel H. acinonychis isolates closely related to H. pylori. These Asian isolates are genetically very similar to H. acinonychis strains of other big cats (cheetahs, lions, lion-tiger hybrid and other tigers) from North America and Europe, which is remarkable in the context of the great genetic diversity among worldwide H. pylori strains. We also found by immunoblotting that the Bengal tiger isolates express UreaseA/B, flagellin, BabA adhesin, neutrophil-activating protein NapA, HtrA protease, γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase GGT, Slt lytic transglycosylase and two DNA transfer relaxase orthologs that were known from H. pylori, but not the cag pathogenicity island, nor CagA, VacA, SabA, DupA or OipA proteins. These results give fresh insights into H. acinonychis genetics and the expression of potential pathogenicity-associated factors and their possible pathophysiological relevance in related gastric infections. PMID:23940723

  8. [A meningitis case of Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection].

    PubMed

    Karsen, Hasan; Karahocagil, Mustafa Kasim; Irmak, Hasan; Demiröz, Ali Pekcan

    2008-10-01

    Turkey is located at an endemic area for brusellosis and tuberculosis which are both important public health problems. Meningitis caused by Brucella and Mycobacterium spp. may be confused since the clinical and laboratory findings are similar. In this report, a meningitis case with Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection has been presented. A 19-years-old woman was admitted to our clinic with severe headache, fever, vomiting, meningeal irritation symptoms, confusion and diplopia. The patient was initially diagnosed as Brucella meningitis based on her history (stockbreeding, consuming raw milk products, clinical symptoms concordant to brucellosis lasting for 4-5 months), physical examination and laboratory findings of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Standard tube agglutination test for brucellosis was positive at 1/80 titer in CSF and at 1/640 titer in serum, whereas no growth of Brucella spp. was detected in CSF and blood cultures. Antibiotic therapy with ceftriaxone, rifampicin and doxycyclin was started, however, there was no clinical improvement and agitation and confusion of the patient continued by the end of second day of treatment. Repeated CSF examination yielded acid-fast bacteria. The patient was then diagnosed as meningitis with double etiology and the therapy was changed to ceftriaxone, streptomycin, morphozinamide, rifampicin and isoniazid for thirty days. Tuberculosis meningitis was confirmed with the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on the 14th day of cultivation (BACTEC, Becton Dickinson, USA) of the CSF sample. On the 30th day of treatment she was discharged on anti-tuberculous treatment with isoniazid and rifampicin for 12 months. The follow-up of the patient on the first and third months of treatment revealed clinical and laboratory improvement. Since this was a rare case of Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection, this report emphasizes that such co-infections should be kept in mind especially in the endemic areas for tuberculosis and brucellosis.

  9. Diagnosis of opportunistic infections: HIV co-infections - tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley; da Silva, Pedro; Boehme, Catharina C; Stevens, Wendy; Gilpin, Christopher M

    2017-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) incidence has declined ∼1.5% annually since 2000, but continued to affect 10.4 million individuals in 2015, with 1/3 remaining undiagnosed or underreported. The diagnosis of TB among those co-infected with HIV is challenging as TB remains the leading cause of death in such individuals. Accurate and rapid diagnosis of active TB will avert mortality in both adults and children, reduce transmission, and assist in timeous decisions for antiretroviral therapy initiation. This review describes advances in diagnosing TB, especially among HIV co-infected individuals, highlights national program's uptake, and impact on patient care. The TB diagnostic landscape has been transformed over the last 5 years. Molecular diagnostics such as Xpert MTB/RIF, which simultaneously detects Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) resistance to rifampicin, has revolutionized TB control programs. WHO endorsed the use of Xpert MTB/RIF in 2010 for use in HIV/TB co-infected patients, and later in 2013 for use as the initial diagnostic test for all adults and children with signs and symptoms of pulmonary TB. Line probe assays (LPAs) are recommended for the detection of rifampicin and isoniazid resistance in sputum smear-positive specimens and mycobacterial cultures. A second-line line probe assay has been recommended for the diagnosis of extensively drug-resistant (XDR)-TB Assays such as the urine lateral flow (LF)-lipoarabinomannan (LAM), can be used at the point of care (POC) and have a niche role to supplement the diagnosis of TB in seriously ill HIV-infected, hospitalized patients with low CD4 cell counts of less than 100 cells/μl. Polyvalent platforms such as the m2000 (Abbott Molecular) and GeneXpert (Cepheid) offer potential for integration of HIV and TB testing services. While the Research and Development (R&D) pipeline appears to be rich at first glance, there are actually few leads for true POC tests that would allow for earlier TB diagnosis or rapid, comprehensive

  10. Genetic structure of the European Charolais and Limousin cattle metapopulations using pedigree analyses.

    PubMed

    Bouquet, A; Venot, E; Laloë, D; Forabosco, F; Fogh, A; Pabiou, T; Moore, K; Eriksson, J-Å; Renand, G; Phocas, F

    2011-06-01

    Pedigree collected by the Interbeef service allowed genetic diversity to be assessed by using pedigree analyses for the European Charolais (CHA) and Limousin (LIM) cattle populations registered in national herdbooks in Denmark (DNK), France (FRA), Ireland (IRL), Sweden (SWE), and, solely for the LIM breed, the United Kingdom (UK). The CHA data set included 2,563,189 calves with weaning performance, of which 96.1% were recorded in FRA, 3.0% in SWE, 0.5% in IRL, and 0.4% in DNK. The LIM data set included 1,652,734 calves with weaning performance, of which 91.9% were recorded in FRA, 4.9% in UK, 1.8% in DNK, 0.9% SWE, and 0.5% in IRL. Pedigree files included 3,191,132 CHA and 2,409,659 LIM animals. Gene flows were rather limited between populations, except from FRA toward other countries. Pedigree completeness was good in all subpopulations for both breeds and allowed the pedigree to be traced back to the French population. A relatively high level of genetic diversity was assessed in each CHA and LIM subpopulation by estimating either effective population sizes (N(e) >244 and N(e) >345 in the CHA and LIM subpopulations, respectively), relationship coefficients within subpopulations (<1.3% in both breeds), or probability of gene origins. However, in each subpopulation, it was shown that founders and also ancestors had unbalanced genetic contributions, leading to a moderate but continuous reduction in genetic diversity. Analyses between populations suggested that all European CHA and LIM populations were differentiated very little. The Swedish CHA population was assessed as genetically more distant from the other CHA populations because of fewer gene flows from other countries and because of the use of North American sires to introgress the polled phenotype. In each European subpopulation, most of the main ancestors, which explained 50% of gene origin, were born in FRA. However, those main ancestors were different between countries. Moreover, in both breeds, the main

  11. The Nature of Genetic Variation for Complex Traits Revealed by GWAS and Regional Heritability Mapping Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Armando; Tenesa, Albert; Keightley, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    We use computer simulations to investigate the amount of genetic variation for complex traits that can be revealed by single-SNP genome-wide association studies (GWAS) or regional heritability mapping (RHM) analyses based on full genome sequence data or SNP chips. We model a large population subject to mutation, recombination, selection, and drift, assuming a pleiotropic model of mutations sampled from a bivariate distribution of effects of mutations on a quantitative trait and fitness. The pleiotropic model investigated, in contrast to previous models, implies that common mutations of large effect are responsible for most of the genetic variation for quantitative traits, except when the trait is fitness itself. We show that GWAS applied to the full sequence increases the number of QTL detected by as much as 50% compared to the number found with SNP chips but only modestly increases the amount of additive genetic variance explained. Even with full sequence data, the total amount of additive variance explained is generally below 50%. Using RHM on the full sequence data, a slightly larger number of QTL are detected than by GWAS if the same probability threshold is assumed, but these QTL explain a slightly smaller amount of genetic variance. Our results also suggest that most of the missing heritability is due to the inability to detect variants of moderate effect (∼0.03–0.3 phenotypic SDs) segregating at substantial frequencies. Very rare variants, which are more difficult to detect by GWAS, are expected to contribute little genetic variation, so their eventual detection is less relevant for resolving the missing heritability problem. PMID:26482794

  12. Co-circulation and co-infections of all dengue virus serotypes in Hyderabad, India 2014.

    PubMed

    Vaddadi, K; Gandikota, C; Jain, P K; Prasad, V S V; Venkataramana, M

    2017-09-01

    The burden of dengue virus infections increased globally during recent years. Though India is considered as dengue hyper-endemic country, limited data are available on disease epidemiology. The present study includes molecular characterization of dengue virus strains occurred in Hyderabad, India, during the year 2014. A total of 120 febrile cases were recruited for this study, which includes only children and 41 were serologically confirmed for dengue positive infections using non-structural (NS1) and/or IgG/IgM ELISA tests. RT-PCR, nucleotide sequencing and evolutionary analyses were carried out to identify the circulating serotypes/genotypes. The data indicated a high percent of severe dengue (63%) in primary infections. Simultaneous circulation of all four serotypes and co-infections were observed for the first time in Hyderabad, India. In total, 15 patients were co-infected with more than one dengue serotype and 12 (80%) of them had severe dengue. One of the striking findings of the present study is the identification of serotype Den-1 as the first report from this region and this strain showed close relatedness to the Thailand 1980 strains but not to any of the strains reported from India until now. Phylogenetically, all four strains of the present study showed close relatedness to the strains, which are reported to be high virulent.

  13. Co-infections in Visceral Pentastomiasis, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    PubMed

    Tappe, Dennis; Sulyok, Mihály; Riu, Therese; Rózsa, Lajos; Bodó, Imre; Schoen, Christoph; Muntau, Birgit; Babocsay, Gergely; Hardi, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Snakeborne Armillifer pentastomiasis is an emerging human parasitic infection in rural tropical areas where snake meat is eaten. After a series of severe ocular A. grandis larval infections and anecdotal abdominal infection in Sankuru District, Democratic Republic of the Congo, during 2014-2015, we systematically investigated possible pentastomid etiology in patients who underwent surgery in the region. Histologic and molecular analyses by established pentastomid 18S rDNA- and newly developed Armillifer-specific cytochrome oxidase PCRs revealed larval pentastomid lesions in 3.7% of patients. Some persons had A. armillatus and A. grandis co-infections. Another pentastomid larva, Raillietiella sp., was molecularly detected in 1 patient who had concomitant A. grandis and A. armillatus infection. The PCRs used were suitable for detecting pentastomid species even in highly necrotic tissues. Phylogenetic analyses of Armillifer cytochrome oxidase genes detected multiple local strains.

  14. Co-infections in Visceral Pentastomiasis, Democratic Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Sulyok, Mihály; Riu, Therese; Rózsa, Lajos; Bodó, Imre; Schoen, Christoph; Muntau, Birgit; Babocsay, Gergely; Hardi, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Snakeborne Armillifer pentastomiasis is an emerging human parasitic infection in rural tropical areas where snake meat is eaten. After a series of severe ocular A. grandis larval infections and anecdotal abdominal infection in Sankuru District, Democratic Republic of the Congo, during 2014–2015, we systematically investigated possible pentastomid etiology in patients who underwent surgery in the region. Histologic and molecular analyses by established pentastomid 18S rDNA- and newly developed Armillifer-specific cytochrome oxidase PCRs revealed larval pentastomid lesions in 3.7% of patients. Some persons had A. armillatus and A. grandis co-infections. Another pentastomid larva, Raillietiella sp., was molecularly detected in 1 patient who had concomitant A. grandis and A. armillatus infection. The PCRs used were suitable for detecting pentastomid species even in highly necrotic tissues. Phylogenetic analyses of Armillifer cytochrome oxidase genes detected multiple local strains. PMID:27434739

  15. Co-infection of classic swine H1N1 influenza virus in pigs persistently infected with porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; De la Luz-Armendáriz, Jazmín; Saavedra-Montañez, Manuel; Jasso-Escutia, Miguel Ángel; Sánchez-Betancourt, Ivan; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Hernández, Jesús; Martínez-Lara, Atalo; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2016-02-29

    Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) and swine influenza virus infection causes respiratory disease in pigs. PorPV persistent infection could facilitate the establishment of secondary infections. The aim of this study was to analyse the pathogenicity of classic swine H1N1 influenza virus (swH1N1) in growing pigs persistently infected with porcine rubulavirus. Conventional six-week-old pigs were intranasally inoculated with PorPV, swH1N1, or PorPV/swH1N1. A mock-infected group was included. The co-infection with swH1N1 was at 44 days post-infection (DPI), right after clinical signs of PorPV infection had stopped. The pigs of the co-infection group presented an increase of clinical signs compared to the simple infection groups. In all infected groups, the most recurrent lung lesion was hyperplasia of the bronchiolar-associated lymphoid tissue and interstitial pneumonia. By means of immunohistochemical evaluation it was possible to demonstrate the presence of the two viral agents infecting simultaneously the bronchiolar epithelium. Viral excretion of PorPV in nasal and oral fluid was recorded at 28 and 52 DPI, respectively. PorPV persisted in several samples from respiratory tissues (RT), secondary lymphoid organs (SLO), and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). For swH1N1, the viral excretion in nasal fluids was significantly higher in single-infected swH1N1 pigs than in the co-infected group. However, the co-infection group exhibited an increase in the presence of swH1N1 in RT, SLO, and BALF at two days after co-infection. In conclusion, the results obtained confirm an increase in the clinical signs of infection, and PorPV was observed to impact the spread of swH1N1 in analysed tissues in the early stage of co-infection, although viral shedding was not enhanced. In the present study, the interaction of swH1N1 infection is demonstrated in pigs persistently infected with PorPV.

  16. Comprehensive Field Synopsis and Systematic Meta-analyses of Genetic Association Studies in Cutaneous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Chatzinasiou, Foteini; Lill, Christina M.; Kypreou, Katerina; Stefanaki, Irene; Nicolaou, Vasiliki; Spyrou, George; Evangelou, Evangelos; Roehr, Johannes T.; Kodela, Elizabeth; Katsambas, Andreas; Tsao, Hensin; Ioannidis, John P.A.; Bertram, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Background Although genetic studies have reported a number of loci associated with cutaneous melanoma (CM) risk, a comprehensive synopsis of genetic association studies published in the field and systematic meta-analysis for all eligible polymorphisms have not been reported. Methods We systematically annotated data from all genetic association studies published in the CM field (n = 145), including data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and performed random-effects meta-analyses across all eligible polymorphisms on the basis of four or more independent case–control datasets in the main analyses. Supplementary analyses of three available datasets derived from GWAS and GWAS-replication studies were also done. Nominally statistically significant associations between polymorphisms and CM were graded for the strength of epidemiological evidence on the basis of the Human Genome Epidemiology Network Venice criteria. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Forty-two polymorphisms across 18 independent loci evaluated in four or more datasets including candidate gene studies and available GWAS data were subjected to meta-analysis. Eight loci were identified in the main meta-analyses as being associated with a risk of CM (P < .05) of which four loci showed a genome-wide statistically significant association (P < 1 × 10−7), including 16q24.3 (MC1R), 20q11.22 (MYH7B/PIGU/ASIP), 11q14.3 (TYR), and 5p13.2 (SLC45A2). Grading of the cumulative evidence by the Venice criteria suggested strong epidemiological credibility for all four loci with genome-wide statistical significance and one additional gene at 9p23 (TYRP1). In the supplementary meta-analyses, a locus at 9p21.3 (CDKN2A/MTAP) reached genome-wide statistical significance with CM and had strong epidemiological credibility. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive field synopsis and systematic meta-analysis to identify genes associated with an increased susceptibility to

  17. Effects of sampling close relatives on some elementary population genetics analyses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinliang

    2017-08-04

    Many molecular ecology analyses assume the genotyped individuals are sampled at random from a population and thus are representative of the population. Realistically, however, a sample may contain excessive close relatives (ECR) because, for example, localized juveniles are drawn from fecund species. Our knowledge is limited about how ECR affect the routinely conducted elementary genetics analyses, and how ECR are best dealt with to yield unbiased and accurate parameter estimates. This study quantifies the effects of ECR on some popular population genetics analyses of marker data, including the estimation of allele frequencies, F-statistics, expected heterozygosity (He ), effective and observed numbers of alleles, and the tests of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) and linkage equilibrium (LE). It also investigates several strategies for handling ECR to mitigate their impact and to yield accurate parameter estimates. My analytical work, assisted by simulations, shows that ECR have large and global effects on all of the above marker analyses. The naïve approach of simply ignoring ECR could yield low-precision and often biased parameter estimates, and could cause too many false rejections of HWE and LE. The bold approach, which simply identifies and removes ECR, and the cautious approach, which estimates target parameters (e.g., He ) by accounting for ECR and using naïve allele frequency estimates, eliminate the bias and the false HWE and LE rejections, but could reduce estimation precision substantially. The likelihood approach, which accounts for ECR in estimating allele frequencies and thus target parameters relying on allele frequencies, usually yields unbiased and the most accurate parameter estimates. Which of the four approaches is the most effective and efficient may depend on the particular marker analysis to be conducted. The results are discussed in the context of using marker data for understanding population properties and marker properties. © 2017 John

  18. Why is co-infection with influenza virus and bacteria so difficult to control?

    PubMed Central

    Cauley, Linda S.; Vella, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza viruses are genetically labile pathogens which avoid immune detection by constantly changing their coat proteins. Most human infections are caused by mildly pathogenic viruses which rarely cause life-threatening disease in healthy people, but some individuals with a weakened immune system can experience severe complications. Widespread infections with highly pathogenic strains of influenza virus are less common, but have the potential to cause enormous death tolls among healthy adults if infection rates reach pandemic proportions. Increased virulence has been attributed to a variety of factors, including enhanced susceptibility to co-infection with common strains of bacteria. The mechanisms that facilitate dual infection are a major focus of current research, as preventative measures are needed to avert future pandemics PMID:25636959

  19. Will an "island" population of voles be recolonized if eradicated? Insights from molecular genetic analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, M.P.; Haig, S.M.; Ledig, D.B.; Vander Heyden, M. F.; Bennett, G.

    2011-01-01

    We performed genetic analyses of Microtus longicaudus populations within the Crook Point Unit of the Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge. A M. longicaudus population at Saddle Rock (located approx. 65 m off-shore from the Crook Point mainland) is suspected to be partially responsible for declines of a Leach's storm-petrel colony at this important nesting site. Using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism markers and mitochondrial DNA, we illustrate that Saddle Rock and Crook Point function as separate island and mainland populations despite their close proximity. In addition to genetic structure, we also observed reduced genetic diversity at Saddle Rock, suggesting that little individual movement occurs between populations. If local resource managers decide to perform an eradication at Saddle Rock, we conclude that immediate recolonization of the island by M. longicaudus would be unlikely. Because M. longicaudus is native to Oregon, we also consider the degree with which the differentiation of Saddle Rock signifies the presence of a unique entity that warrants conservation rather than eradication. ?? The Wildlife Society, 2011.

  20. Diversity Array Technology Markers: Genetic Diversity Analyses and Linkage Map Construction in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Nelson, Matthew N.; Aslam, M.N.; Rajasekaran, Ravikesavan; Wratten, Neil; Cowling, Wallace A.; Kilian, A.; Sharpe, Andrew G.; Schondelmaier, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    We developed Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers for application in genetic studies of Brassica napus and other Brassica species with A or C genomes. Genomic representation from 107 diverse genotypes of B. napus L. var. oleifera (rapeseed, AACC genomes) and B. rapa (AA genome) was used to develop a DArT array comprising 11 520 clones generated using PstI/BanII and PstI/BstN1 complexity reduction methods. In total, 1547 polymorphic DArT markers of high technical quality were identified and used to assess molecular diversity among 89 accessions of B. napus, B. rapa, B. juncea, and B. carinata collected from different parts of the world. Hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses based on genetic distance matrices identified distinct populations clustering mainly according to their origin/pedigrees. DArT markers were also mapped in a new doubled haploid population comprising 131 lines from a cross between spring rapeseed lines ‘Lynx-037DH’ and ‘Monty-028DH’. Linkage groups were assigned on the basis of previously mapped simple sequence repeat (SSRs), intron polymorphism (IP), and gene-based markers. The map consisted of 437 DArT, 135 SSR, 6 IP, and 6 gene-based markers and spanned 2288 cM. Our results demonstrate that DArT markers are suitable for genetic diversity analysis and linkage map construction in rapeseed. PMID:22193366

  1. Diversity array technology markers: genetic diversity analyses and linkage map construction in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Nelson, Matthew N; Aslam, M N; Rajasekaran, Ravikesavan; Wratten, Neil; Cowling, Wallace A; Kilian, A; Sharpe, Andrew G; Schondelmaier, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    We developed Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers for application in genetic studies of Brassica napus and other Brassica species with A or C genomes. Genomic representation from 107 diverse genotypes of B. napus L. var. oleifera (rapeseed, AACC genomes) and B. rapa (AA genome) was used to develop a DArT array comprising 11 520 clones generated using PstI/BanII and PstI/BstN1 complexity reduction methods. In total, 1547 polymorphic DArT markers of high technical quality were identified and used to assess molecular diversity among 89 accessions of B. napus, B. rapa, B. juncea, and B. carinata collected from different parts of the world. Hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses based on genetic distance matrices identified distinct populations clustering mainly according to their origin/pedigrees. DArT markers were also mapped in a new doubled haploid population comprising 131 lines from a cross between spring rapeseed lines 'Lynx-037DH' and 'Monty-028DH'. Linkage groups were assigned on the basis of previously mapped simple sequence repeat (SSRs), intron polymorphism (IP), and gene-based markers. The map consisted of 437 DArT, 135 SSR, 6 IP, and 6 gene-based markers and spanned 2288 cM. Our results demonstrate that DArT markers are suitable for genetic diversity analysis and linkage map construction in rapeseed.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA analyses revealed low genetic diversity in the endangered Indian wild ass Equus hemionus khur.

    PubMed

    Khaire, Devendra; Atkulwar, Ashwin; Farah, Sameera; Baig, Mumtaz

    2017-09-01

    The Indian wild ass Equus hemionus khur, belonging to ass-like equid branch, inhabits the dry and arid desert of the Little Rann of Kutch, Gujarat. The E. h. khur is the sole survivor of Asiatic wild ass species/subspecies in South Asia. To provide first ever insights into the genetic diversity, phylogeny, and demography of the endangered Indian wild ass, we sampled 52 free-ranging individuals from the Little Rann of Kutch by using a non-invasive methodology. The sequencing of 230 bp in cytochrome b (Cyt b) and displacement loop (D-loop) region revealed that current ∼4000 extant population of Indian wild ass harbours low genetic diversity. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed that E. h. khur, E. h. onager, and E. h. kulan belong to a single strict monophyletic clade. Therefore, we suggest the delimitation of the five E. hemionus subspecies in vogue to a single species E. hemionus. The application of molecular clock confirmed that the Asiatic wild ass had undergone diversification 0.65 Million years ago. Demographic measurements assessed using a Bayesian skyline plot demonstrated decline in the maternal effective population size of the Indian wild ass during different periods; these periods coincided with the origin and rise of the Indus civilization in the northwest of the Indian subcontinent during the Neolithic. In conclusion, maintaining high genetic diversity in the existing isolated population of 4000 Indian wild asses inhabiting the wild ass sanctuary is important compared with subspecies preservation alone.

  3. Genetic analyses of floating Ulva prolifera in the Yellow Sea suggest a unique ecotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jin; Jiang, Peng; Qin, Song; Liu, Xiaojie; Liu, Zhengyi; Lin, Hanzhi; Li, Fuchao; Chen, Huaxin; Wu, Chunhui

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale green tides caused by the green algae Ulva prolifera have occurred in the Yellow Sea every summer since 2007. The genetic variation and relationships at the intra-species level among floating and attached samples of U. prolifera collected from 2007 to 2011 were analysed using ISSR (inter-simple sequence repeat) markers. The results showed that all of the floating samples collected from the Yellow Sea during the past five years formed a single genetic entity that was different from the attached samples in intertidal zone. A SCAR (sequence characterized amplified region) marker highly specific to the floating samples of U. prolifera was identified and it showed that the same population dominated in the blooms from 2007 to 2013. In combination with the morphology and physiological features, the genetic analysis results suggested that a unique ecotype of U. prolifera was responsible for the largest green tides in the world. These findings indicated that attached U. prolifera along the coast does not seem to be the originator of the green tide in the Yellow Sea and gene flow between attached and floating populations does not readily take place.

  4. Systematic meta-analyses of gene-specific genetic association studies in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qiang; Wei, Dong; Zhang, Yaoguang; Chen, Xin; Yang, Fan; Yang, Ze; Zhu, Xiaoquan; Wang, Jianye

    2016-01-01

    In the past twenty-five years, over 700 case-control association studies on the risk of prostate cancer have been published worldwide, but their results were largely inconsistent. To facilitate following and explaining these findings, we performed a systematic meta-analysis using allelic contrasts for gene-specific SNVs from at least three independent population-based case-control studies, which were published in the field of prostate cancer between August 1, 1990 and August 1, 2015. Across 66 meta-analyses, a total of 20 genetic variants involving 584,100 subjects in 19 different genes (KLK3, IGFBP3, ESR1, SOD2, CAT, CYP1B1, VDR, RFX6, HNF1B, SRD5A2, FGFR4, LEP, HOXB13, FAS, FOXP4, SLC22A3, LMTK2, EHBP1 and MSMB) exhibited significant association with prostate cancer. The average summary OR was 1.33 (ranging from: 1.016–3.788) for risk alleles and 0.838 (ranging from: 0.757–0.896) for protective alleles. Of these positive variants, FOXP4 rs1983891, LMTK2 rs6465657 and RFX6 rs339331 had not been previously meta-analyzed. Further analyses with sufficient power design and investigations of the potential biological roles of these genetic variants in prostate cancer should be conducted. PMID:26967244

  5. Meta-analyses between 18 candidate genetic markers and overweight/obesity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aims The goal of our study is to investigate the associations between 18 candidate genetic markers and overweight/obesity. Methods A total of 72 eligible articles were retrieved from literature databases including PubMed, Embase, SpingerLink, Web of Science, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Wanfang. Meta-analyses of 18 genetic markers among 56,738 controls and 48,148 overweight/obese persons were done by Review Manager 5.0. Results Our results showed that SH2B1 rs7498665 polymorphism was significantly associated with the risk of overweight/obesity (overall odds ratio (OR) = 1.21, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.09-1.34, P = 0.0004). Increased risk of overweight/obesity was also observed in FAIM2 rs7138803 polymorphism (overall OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.01-1.22, P = 0.04). Conclusion Our meta-analyses have shown the important role of 2 polymorphisms (SH2B1 rs7498665 and FAIM2 rs7138803) in the development of overweight/obesity. This study highlighted the importance of above two candidate genes (SH2B1 and FAIM2) in the risk of overweight/obesity. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2785487401176182. PMID:24621099

  6. Can novel genetic analyses help to identify low-dispersal marine invasive species?

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Peter R; Sandoval-Castillo, Jonathan; Waters, Jonathan M; Beheregaray, Luciano B

    2014-01-01

    Genetic methods can be a powerful tool to resolve the native versus introduced status of populations whose taxonomy and biogeography are poorly understood. The genetic study of introduced species is presently dominated by analyses that identify signatures of recent colonization by means of summary statistics. Unfortunately, such approaches cannot be used in low-dispersal species, in which recently established populations originating from elsewhere in the species' native range also experience periods of low population size because they are founded by few individuals. We tested whether coalescent-based molecular analyses that provide detailed information about demographic history supported the hypothesis that a sea squirt whose distribution is centered on Tasmania was recently introduced to mainland Australia and New Zealand through human activities. Methods comparing trends in population size (Bayesian Skyline Plots and Approximate Bayesian Computation) were no more informative than summary statistics, likely because of recent intra-Tasmanian dispersal. However, IMa2 estimates of divergence between putatively native and introduced populations provided information at a temporal scale suitable to differentiate between recent (potentially anthropogenic) introductions and ancient divergence, and indicated that all three non-Tasmanian populations were founded during the period of European settlement. While this approach can be affected by inaccurate molecular dating, it has considerable (albeit largely unexplored) potential to corroborate nongenetic information in species with limited dispersal capabilities. PMID:25165524

  7. Genetic variability and evolutionary analyses of the coat protein gene of Tomato mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Rangel, E A; Alfaro-Fernández, A; Font-San-Ambrosio, M I; Luis-Arteaga, M; Rubio, L

    2011-12-01

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), a member of the genus Tobamovirus, infects several ornamental and horticultural crops worldwide. In this study, the nucleotide sequences of the coat protein gene of worldwide ToMV isolates were analyzed to estimate the genetic structure and diversity of this virus and the involved evolutionary forces. The phylogenetic analysis showed three clades with high bootstrap support: Clade I contained three ToMV isolates from Brazil collected from pepper, Clade II comprised one Brazilian ToMV isolate from pepper, and Clade III was composed of ToMV isolates collected from different plant hosts (pepper, tomato, eggplant, lilac, camellia, dogwood, red spruce, etc.) and water (from melting ice, lakes and streams) from different countries: USA, Brazil, Korea, Germany, Spain, Denmark (Greenland), China, Taiwan, Malaysia, Iran, and Kazakhstan. With the exception of Brazil, nucleotide diversity within and between different geographic regions was very low, although statistical analyses suggested some gene flow between most of these regions. Our analyses also suggested a strong negative selection which could have contributed to the genetic stability of ToMV.

  8. Can novel genetic analyses help to identify low-dispersal marine invasive species?

    PubMed

    Teske, Peter R; Sandoval-Castillo, Jonathan; Waters, Jonathan M; Beheregaray, Luciano B

    2014-07-01

    Genetic methods can be a powerful tool to resolve the native versus introduced status of populations whose taxonomy and biogeography are poorly understood. The genetic study of introduced species is presently dominated by analyses that identify signatures of recent colonization by means of summary statistics. Unfortunately, such approaches cannot be used in low-dispersal species, in which recently established populations originating from elsewhere in the species' native range also experience periods of low population size because they are founded by few individuals. We tested whether coalescent-based molecular analyses that provide detailed information about demographic history supported the hypothesis that a sea squirt whose distribution is centered on Tasmania was recently introduced to mainland Australia and New Zealand through human activities. Methods comparing trends in population size (Bayesian Skyline Plots and Approximate Bayesian Computation) were no more informative than summary statistics, likely because of recent intra-Tasmanian dispersal. However, IMa2 estimates of divergence between putatively native and introduced populations provided information at a temporal scale suitable to differentiate between recent (potentially anthropogenic) introductions and ancient divergence, and indicated that all three non-Tasmanian populations were founded during the period of European settlement. While this approach can be affected by inaccurate molecular dating, it has considerable (albeit largely unexplored) potential to corroborate nongenetic information in species with limited dispersal capabilities.

  9. More comprehensive forensic genetic marker analyses for accurate human remains identification using massively parallel DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ambers, Angie D; Churchill, Jennifer D; King, Jonathan L; Stoljarova, Monika; Gill-King, Harrell; Assidi, Mourad; Abu-Elmagd, Muhammad; Buhmeida, Abdelbaset; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-10-17

    Although the primary objective of forensic DNA analyses of unidentified human remains is positive identification, cases involving historical or archaeological skeletal remains often lack reference samples for comparison. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) offers an opportunity to provide biometric data in such cases, and these cases provide valuable data on the feasibility of applying MPS for characterization of modern forensic casework samples. In this study, MPS was used to characterize 140-year-old human skeletal remains discovered at a historical site in Deadwood, South Dakota, United States. The remains were in an unmarked grave and there were no records or other metadata available regarding the identity of the individual. Due to the high throughput of MPS, a variety of biometric markers could be typed using a single sample. Using MPS and suitable forensic genetic markers, more relevant information could be obtained from a limited quantity and quality sample. Results were obtained for 25/26 Y-STRs, 34/34 Y SNPs, 166/166 ancestry-informative SNPs, 24/24 phenotype-informative SNPs, 102/102 human identity SNPs, 27/29 autosomal STRs (plus amelogenin), and 4/8 X-STRs (as well as ten regions of mtDNA). The Y-chromosome (Y-STR, Y-SNP) and mtDNA profiles of the unidentified skeletal remains are consistent with the R1b and H1 haplogroups, respectively. Both of these haplogroups are the most common haplogroups in Western Europe. Ancestry-informative SNP analysis also supported European ancestry. The genetic results are consistent with anthropological findings that the remains belong to a male of European ancestry (Caucasian). Phenotype-informative SNP data provided strong support that the individual had light red hair and brown eyes. This study is among the first to genetically characterize historical human remains with forensic genetic marker kits specifically designed for MPS. The outcome demonstrates that substantially more genetic information can be obtained from

  10. Comprehensive Research Synopsis and Systematic Meta-Analyses in Parkinson's Disease Genetics: The PDGene Database

    PubMed Central

    Lill, Christina M.; Roehr, Johannes T.; McQueen, Matthew B.; Kavvoura, Fotini K.; Bagade, Sachin; Schjeide, Brit-Maren M.; Schjeide, Leif M.; Meissner, Esther; Zauft, Ute; Allen, Nicole C.; Liu, Tian; Schilling, Marcel; Anderson, Kari J.; Beecham, Gary; Berg, Daniela; Biernacka, Joanna M.; Brice, Alexis; DeStefano, Anita L.; Do, Chuong B.; Eriksson, Nicholas; Factor, Stewart A.; Farrer, Matthew J.; Foroud, Tatiana; Gasser, Thomas; Hamza, Taye; Hardy, John A.; Heutink, Peter; Hill-Burns, Erin M.; Klein, Christine; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Maraganore, Demetrius M.; Martin, Eden R.; Martinez, Maria; Myers, Richard H.; Nalls, Michael A.; Pankratz, Nathan; Payami, Haydeh; Satake, Wataru; Scott, William K.; Sharma, Manu; Singleton, Andrew B.; Stefansson, Kari; Toda, Tatsushi; Tung, Joyce Y.; Vance, Jeffery; Wood, Nick W.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Young, Peter; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Khoury, Muin J.; Zipp, Frauke; Lehrach, Hans; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Bertram, Lars

    2012-01-01

    More than 800 published genetic association studies have implicated dozens of potential risk loci in Parkinson's disease (PD). To facilitate the interpretation of these findings, we have created a dedicated online resource, PDGene, that comprehensively collects and meta-analyzes all published studies in the field. A systematic literature screen of ∼27,000 articles yielded 828 eligible articles from which relevant data were extracted. In addition, individual-level data from three publicly available genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were obtained and subjected to genotype imputation and analysis. Overall, we performed meta-analyses on more than seven million polymorphisms originating either from GWAS datasets and/or from smaller scale PD association studies. Meta-analyses on 147 SNPs were supplemented by unpublished GWAS data from up to 16,452 PD cases and 48,810 controls. Eleven loci showed genome-wide significant (P<5×10−8) association with disease risk: BST1, CCDC62/HIP1R, DGKQ/GAK, GBA, LRRK2, MAPT, MCCC1/LAMP3, PARK16, SNCA, STK39, and SYT11/RAB25. In addition, we identified novel evidence for genome-wide significant association with a polymorphism in ITGA8 (rs7077361, OR 0.88, P = 1.3×10−8). All meta-analysis results are freely available on a dedicated online database (www.pdgene.org), which is cross-linked with a customized track on the UCSC Genome Browser. Our study provides an exhaustive and up-to-date summary of the status of PD genetics research that can be readily scaled to include the results of future large-scale genetics projects, including next-generation sequencing studies. PMID:22438815

  11. Incorporating the human gene annotations in different databases significantly improved transcriptomic and genetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Geng; Wang, Charles; Shi, Leming; Qu, Xiongfei; Chen, Jiwei; Yang, Jianmin; Shi, Caiping; Chen, Long; Zhou, Peiying; Ning, Baitang; Tong, Weida; Shi, Tieliu

    2013-04-01

    Human gene annotation is crucial for conducting transcriptomic and genetic studies; however, the impacts of human gene annotations in diverse databases on related studies have been less evaluated. To enable full use of various human annotation resources and better understand the human transcriptome, here we systematically compare the human annotations present in RefSeq, Ensembl (GENCODE), and AceView on diverse transcriptomic and genetic analyses. We found that the human gene annotations in the three databases are far from complete. Although Ensembl and AceView annotated more genes than RefSeq, more than 15,800 genes from Ensembl (or AceView) are within the intergenic and intronic regions of AceView (or Ensembl) annotation. The human transcriptome annotations in RefSeq, Ensembl, and AceView had distinct effects on short-read mapping, gene and isoform expression profiling, and differential expression calling. Furthermore, our findings indicate that the integrated annotation of these databases can obtain a more complete gene set and significantly enhance those transcriptomic analyses. We also observed that many more known SNPs were located within genes annotated in Ensembl and AceView than in RefSeq. In particular, 1033 of 3041 trait/disease-associated SNPs involved in about 200 human traits/diseases that were previously reported to be in RefSeq intergenic regions could be relocated within Ensembl and AceView genes. Our findings illustrate that a more complete transcriptome generated by incorporating human gene annotations in diverse databases can strikingly improve the overall results of transcriptomic and genetic studies.

  12. Comparative analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear genetic markers for the molecular identification of Rhipicephalus spp.

    PubMed

    Latrofa, Maria S; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Annoscia, Giada; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Otranto, Domenico

    2013-12-01

    The genus Rhipicephalus (Acari: Ixodidae) comprises a large number of vectors of pathogens of substantial medical and veterinary concern; however, species identification based solely on morphological features is often challenging. In the present study, genetic distance within selected Rhipicephalus species (i.e., Rhipicephalus bursa, Rhipicephalus guilhoni, Rhipicephalus muhsamae, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato and Rhipicephalus turanicus), were investigated based on molecular and phylogenetic analyses of fragments of the mitochondrial 16S, 12S and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) genes, as well as of the whole sequences of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-2 (ITS-2) region. Mean values of inter-specific genetic distance (e.g., up to 12.6%, 11.1% and 15.2%), as well as of intra-specific genetic distance (e.g., 0.9%, 0.9% and 1%), calculated using the Kimura-2 parameter substitution model with uniform rates among sites for 16S, 12S and cox1 genes, respectively, confirmed the differentiation of the rhipicephaline species herein examined. The molecular identification was also supported by the distinct separation of species-specific clades inferred from the phylogenetic analyses of all mitochondrial sequences. Conversely, little interspecific divergence was detected amongst ribosomal ITS-2 sequences (i.e., up to 2.8%) for species belonging to the R. sanguineus complex, which resulted in the ambiguous placement of selected R. sanguineus s.l. and R. turanicus sequences in the corresponding phylogenetic tree. Results from this study confirm the suitability of mtDNA markers for the reliable identification of ticks within the Rhipicephalus genus and provide a framework for future studies of taxonomy, speciation history and evolution of this group of ticks.

  13. Linking Genetic Kinship and Demographic Analyses to Characterize Dispersal: Methods and Application to Blanding's Turtle.

    PubMed

    Reid, Brendan N; Thiel, Richard P; Palsbøll, Per J; Peery, M Zachariah

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing how frequently, and at what life stages and spatial scales, dispersal occurs can be difficult, especially for species with cryptic juvenile periods and long reproductive life spans. Using a combination of mark-recapture information, microsatellite genetic data, and demographic simulations, we characterize natal and breeding dispersal patterns in the long-lived, slow-maturing, and endangered Blanding's turtle (Emydoidea blandingii), focusing on nesting females. We captured and genotyped 310 individual Blanding's turtles (including 220 nesting females) in a central Wisconsin population from 2010 to 2013, with additional information on movements among 3 focal nesting areas within this population available from carapace-marking conducted from 2001 to 2009. Mark-recapture analyses indicated that dispersal among the 3 focal nesting areas was infrequent (<0.03 annual probability). Dyads of females with inferred first-order relationships were more likely to be found within the same nesting area than split between areas, and the proportion of related dyads declined with increasing distance among nesting areas. The observed distribution of related dyads for nesting females was consistent with a probability of natal dispersal at first breeding between nearby nesting areas of approximately 0.1 based on demographic simulations. Our simulation-based estimates of infrequent female dispersal were corroborated by significant spatial genetic autocorrelation among nesting females at scales of <500 m. Nevertheless, a lack of spatial genetic autocorrelation among non-nesting turtles (males and females) suggested extensive local connectivity, possibly mediated by male movements or long-distance movements made by females between terrestrial nesting areas and aquatic habitats. We show here that coupling genetic and demographic information with simulations of individual-based population models can be an effective approach for untangling the contributions of natal and

  14. Linkage and Association Analyses of Schizophrenia with Genetic Variations on Chromosome 22q11 in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Se Chang; Jang, Yong Lee; Kim, Jong-Won; Cho, Eun-Young; Park, Dong Yeon; Hong, Kyung Sue

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chromosome 22q11 has been implicated as a susceptibility locus of schizophrenia. It also contains various candidate genes for which evidence of association with schizophrenia has been reported. To determine whether genetic variations in chromosome 22q11 are associated with schizophrenia in Koreans, we performed a linkage analysis and case-control association study. Methods Three microsatellite markers within a region of 4.35 Mb on 22q11 were genotyped for 47 multiplex schizophrenia families, and a non-parametric linkage analysis was applied. The association analysis was done with 227 unrelated patients and 292 normal controls. For 39 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning a 1.4 Mb region (33 kb interval) containing four candidate schizophrenia genes (DGCR, COMT, PRODH and ZDHHC8), allele frequencies were estimated in pooled DNA samples. Results No significant linkage was found at any of the three microsatellite markers in single and multi-point analyses. Five SNPs showed suggestive evidence of association (p<0.05) and two more SNPs showed a trend for association (p<0.1) in pooled DNA association analysis. Individual genotyping was performed for those seven SNPs and four more intragenic SNPs. In this second analysis, all of the 11 SNPs individually genotyped did not show significant association. Conclusion The present study suggests that genetic variations on chromosome 22q11 may not play a major role in Korean schizophrenia patients. Inadequate sample size, densities of genetic markers and differences between location of genetic markers of linkage and association can contribute to an explanation of the negative results of this study. PMID:27909454

  15. Intra-specific genetic relationship analyses of Elaeagnus angustifolia based on RP-HPLC biochemical markers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Ruan, Xiao; Huang, Jun-hua; Xu, Ning-yi; Yan, Qi-chuan

    2006-04-01

    Elaeagnus angustifolia Linn. has various ecological, medicinal and economical uses. An approach was established using RP-HPLC (reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography) to classify and analyse the intra-specific genetic relationships of seventeen populations of E. angustifolia, collected from the Xinjiang areas of China. Chromatograms of alcohol-soluble proteins produced by seventeen populations of E. angustifolia, were compared. Each chromatogram of alcohol-soluble proteins came from a single seed of one wild plant only. The results showed that when using a Waters Delta Pak. C18, 5 microm particle size reversed phase column (150 mm x 3.9 mm), a linear gradient of 25%-60% solvent B with flow rate of 1 ml/min and run time of 67 min, the chromatography yielded optimum separation of E. angustifolia alcohol-soluble proteins. Representative peaks in each population were chosen according to peak area and occurrence in every seed. The converted data on the elution peaks of each population were different and could be used to represent those populations. GSC (genetic similarity coefficients) of 41% to 62% showed a medium degree of genetic diversity among the populations in these eco-areas. Cluster analysis showed that the seventeen populations of E. angustifolia could be divided into six clusters at the GSC=0.535 level and indicated the general and unique biochemical markers of these clusters. We suggest that E. angustifolia distribution in these eco-areas could be classified into six variable species. RP-HPLC was shown to be a rapid, repeatable and reliable method for E. angustifolia classification and identification and for analysis of genetic diversity.

  16. Landscape features and helminth co-infection shape bank vole immunoheterogeneity, with consequences for Puumala virus epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Guivier, E; Galan, M; Henttonen, H; Cosson, J-F; Charbonnel, N

    2014-03-01

    Heterogeneity in environmental conditions helps to maintain genetic and phenotypic diversity in ecosystems. As such, it may explain why the capacity of animals to mount immune responses is highly variable. The quality of habitat patches, in terms of resources, parasitism, predation and habitat fragmentation may, for example, trigger trade-offs ultimately affecting the investment of individuals in various immunological pathways. We described spatial immunoheterogeneity in bank vole populations with respect to landscape features and co-infection. We focused on the consequences of this heterogeneity for the risk of Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) infection. We assessed the expression of the Tnf-α and Mx2 genes and demonstrated a negative correlation between PUUV load and the expression of these immune genes in bank voles. Habitat heterogeneity was partly associated with differences in the expression of these genes. Levels of Mx2 were lower in large forests than in fragmented forests, possibly due to differences in parasite communities. We previously highlighted the positive association between infection with Heligmosomum mixtum and infection with PUUV. We found that Tnf-α was more strongly expressed in voles infected with PUUV than in uninfected voles or in voles co-infected with the nematode H. mixtum and PUUV. H. mixtum may limit the capacity of the vole to develop proinflammatory responses. This effect may increase the risk of PUUV infection and replication in host cells. Overall, our results suggest that close interactions between landscape features, co-infection and immune gene expression may shape PUUV epidemiology.

  17. Landscape features and helminth co-infection shape bank vole immunoheterogeneity, with consequences for Puumala virus epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Guivier, E; Galan, M; Henttonen, H; Cosson, J-F; Charbonnel, N

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity in environmental conditions helps to maintain genetic and phenotypic diversity in ecosystems. As such, it may explain why the capacity of animals to mount immune responses is highly variable. The quality of habitat patches, in terms of resources, parasitism, predation and habitat fragmentation may, for example, trigger trade-offs ultimately affecting the investment of individuals in various immunological pathways. We described spatial immunoheterogeneity in bank vole populations with respect to landscape features and co-infection. We focused on the consequences of this heterogeneity for the risk of Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) infection. We assessed the expression of the Tnf-α and Mx2 genes and demonstrated a negative correlation between PUUV load and the expression of these immune genes in bank voles. Habitat heterogeneity was partly associated with differences in the expression of these genes. Levels of Mx2 were lower in large forests than in fragmented forests, possibly due to differences in parasite communities. We previously highlighted the positive association between infection with Heligmosomum mixtum and infection with PUUV. We found that Tnf-α was more strongly expressed in voles infected with PUUV than in uninfected voles or in voles co-infected with the nematode H. mixtum and PUUV. H. mixtum may limit the capacity of the vole to develop proinflammatory responses. This effect may increase the risk of PUUV infection and replication in host cells. Overall, our results suggest that close interactions between landscape features, co-infection and immune gene expression may shape PUUV epidemiology. PMID:24149655

  18. Voices of decision makers on evidence-based policy: A case of evolving TB/HIV co-infection policy in India.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Srikanth; Sahay, Seema

    2016-01-01

    This study explores decision makers' perspectives on evidence-based policy (EBP) development using the case of TB/HIV co-infection in India. Twelve in-depth interviews were conducted with purposively selected key national and international policy decision makers in India. Verbatim transcripts were processed and analysed thematically using QSR (NUD*IST 6). The decision makers were unequivocal in recognizing the TB/HIV co-infection as an important public health issue in India and stated the problem to be different than Africa. The need of having a "third programme" for co-infection was not felt. According to them, the public health management of this co-infection must be within the realm of these two programmes. The study also emphasized on decision makers' perspectives on evidence and the process of utilization of evidence for decision-making for co-infection. Study findings showed global evidence was not always accepted by the decision makers and study shows several examples of decision makers demanding local evidence for policy decisions. Decision makers did make interim policies based on global evidence but most of the time their mandate was to get local evidence. Thus, operations research/implementation science especially multi-centric studies emerge as important strategy for EBP development. Researcher-policy maker interface was a gap where role of researcher as aggressive communicator of research findings was expected.

  19. HIV/HBV co-infection is a significant risk factor for liver fibrosis in Tanzanian HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Claudia; Christian, Beatrice; Fabian, Emanuel; Macha, Irene; Gawile, Cecilia; Mpangala, Shida; Ulenga, Nzovu; Thio, Chloe L; Rose Ammerman, Lauren; Mugusi, Ferdinand; Fawzi, Wafaie; Green, Richard; Murphy, Robert

    2017-06-22

    In sub-Saharan Africa, the burden of liver disease associated with chronic hepatitis B (HBV) and HIV is unknown. We characterized liver disease using aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) and FIB-4 in patients with HIV, HBV, and HIV/HBV co-infection in Tanzania. Using a cross sectional design, we compared the prevalence of liver fibrosis in treatment-naive HIV mono-infected, HBV mono-infected, and HIV/HBV co-infected adults enrolled at Management and Development for Health (MDH)-supported HIV treatment clinics in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Risk factors associated with significant fibrosis (APRI>0.5 and FIB-4 >1.45) were examined. 267 HIV-infected, 165 HBV-infected and 63 HIV/HBV co-infected patients were analyzed [44% male, median age 37 (IQR 14), BMI 23 (7)]. APRI and FIB-4 were strongly correlated (r = 0.78, p = < .001, R2 0.61). Overall median APRI scores were low [HIV/HBV [0.36 (IQR 0.4)], HIV [0.23 (0.17)], HBV [0.29 (0.15)] (p <0.01)]. In multivariate analyses, HIV/HBV co-infection was associated with APRI >0.5 [HIV/HBV vs. HIV: OR 3.78 (95% CI 1.91, 7.50)], [HIV/HBV vs. HBV: OR 2.61 (1.26, 5.44)]. HIV RNA per 1 log10 copies/ml increase [OR 1.53 (95% CI 1.04, 2.26)] and HBV DNA per 1 log10 copies/ml increase [OR 1.36 (1.15, 1.62)] were independently associated with APRI >0.5 in HIV-infected and HBV-infected patients, respectively. HIV/HBV co-infection is an important risk factor for significant fibrosis. Higher levels of circulating HIV and HBV virus may play a direct role in liver fibrogenesis. Prompt diagnosis and aggressive monitoring of liver disease in HIV/HBV co-infection is warranted.

  20. Genetic variation and phylogeographic analyses of two species of Carpobrotus and their hybrids in California.

    PubMed

    Schierenbeck, Kristina A; Symonds, V Vaughan; Gallagher, Kelly G; Bell, Jeffrey

    2005-02-01

    Despite the commonality and study of hybridization in plants, there are few studies between invasive and noninvasive species that examine the genetic variability and gene flow of cytoplasmic DNA. We describe the phylogeographical structure of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) variation within and among several interspecific populations of the putative native, Carpobrotus chilensis and the introduced, Carpobrotus edulis (Aizoaceae). These species co-occur throughout much of coastal California and form several 'geographical hybrid populations'. Two hundred and thirty-seven individuals were analysed for variation in an approximate 7.0 kb region of the chloroplast genome using PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction - restriction fragment length polymorphism) data. Phylogenetic analyses and cpDNA population differentiation were conducted for all morphotypes. Historic geographical dispersion and the coefficient of ancestry of the haplotypes were determined using nested clade analyses. Two haplotypic groupings (I and II) were represented in C. chilensis and C. edulis, respectively. The variation in cpDNA data is in agreement with the previously reported allozyme and morphological data; this supports relatively limited variation and high population differentiation among C. chilensis and hybrids and more wide-ranging variation in C. edulis and C. edulis populations backcrossed with C. chilensis. C. chilensis disproportionately contributes to the creation of hybrids with the direction of gene flow from C. chilensis into C. edulis. The cpDNA data support C. chilensis as the maternal contributor to the hybrid populations.

  1. The link between genetic variation and variability in vaccine responses: systematic review and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Posteraro, Brunella; Pastorino, Roberta; Di Giannantonio, Paolo; Ianuale, Carolina; Amore, Rosarita; Ricciardi, Walter; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-03-26

    Although immune response to vaccines can be influenced by several parameters, human genetic variations are thought to strongly influence the variability in vaccine responsiveness. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are needed to clarify the genetic contribution to this variability, which may affect the efficacy of existing vaccines. We performed a systematic literature search to identify all studies describing the associations of allelic variants or single nucleotide polymorphisms in immune response genes with vaccine responses until July 2013. The studies fulfilling inclusion criteria were meta-analyzed. Thirteen studies (11,686 subjects) evaluated the associations of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and other immunity gene variations with the responses to single vaccines, including MMR-II (measles and rubella virus), HepB (hepatitis virus), influenza virus, and MenC (serogroup C meningococcus) vaccines. Seven HLA genetic variants were included in the meta-analyses. The pooled ORs showed that DRB1*07 (2.46 [95% CI=1.60-3.77]; P for heterogeneity=0.117; I(2)=49.1%), DQA1*02:01 (2.21 [95% CI=1.22-4.00]; P for heterogeneity=0.995; I(2)=0.0%), DQB1*02:01 (2.03 [95% CI=1.35-3.07]; P for heterogeneity=0.449; I(2)=0.0%), and DQB1*03:03 (3.31 [95% CI=1.12-9.78]; P for heterogeneity=0.188; I(2)=42.4%) were associated with a significant decrease of antibody responses to MMR-II, HepB, and influenza vaccines. The pooled ORs showed that DRB1*13 (0.52 [95% CI=0.32-0.84]; P for heterogeneity=0.001; I(2)=85.1%) and DRB1*13:01 (0.19 [95% CI=0.06-0.58]; P for heterogeneity=0.367; I(2)=0.0%) were associated with a significant increase of antibody responses to the above vaccines. While our findings reinforce the concept that individuals with a particular HLA allelic composition are more likely to respond efficiently to vaccines, future studies should be encouraged to further elucidate the link between genetic variation and variability of the human immune response to vaccines

  2. Bayesian analyses of genetic parameters for growth traits in Nellore cattle raised on pasture.

    PubMed

    Lopes, F B; Ferreira, J L; Lobo, R B; Rosa, G J M

    2017-07-06

    This study was carried out to investigate (co)variance components and genetic parameters for growth traits in beef cattle using a multi-trait model by Bayesian methods. Genetic and residual (co)variances and parameters were estimated for weights at standard ages of 120 (W120), 210 (W210), 365 (W365), and 450 days (W450), and for pre- and post-weaning daily weight gain (preWWG and postWWG) in Nellore cattle. Data were collected over 16 years (1993-2009), and all animals were raised on pasture in eight farms in the North of Brazil that participate in the National Association of Breeders and Researchers. Analyses were run by the Bayesian approach using Gibbs sampler. Additive direct heritabilities for W120, W210, W365, and W450 and for preWWG and postWWG were 0.28 ± 0.013, 0.32 ± 0.002, 0.31 ± 0.002, 0.50 ± 0.026, 0.61 ± 0.047, and 0.79 ± 0.055, respectively. The estimates of maternal heritability were 0.32 ± 0.012, 0.29 ± 0.004, 0.30 ± 0.005, 0.25 ± 0.015, 0.23 ± 0.017, and 0.22 ± 0.016, respectively, for W120, W210, W365, and W450 and for preWWG and postWWG. The estimates of genetic direct additive correlation among all traits were positive and ranged from 0.25 ± 0.03 (preWWG and postWWG) to 0.99 ± 0.00 (W210 and preWWG). The moderate to high estimates of heritability and genetic correlation for weights and daily weight gains at different ages is suggestive of genetic improvement in these traits by selection at an appropriate age. Maternal genetic effects seemed to be significant across the traits. When the focus is on direct and maternal effects, W210 seems to be a good criterium for the selection of Nellore cattle considering the importance of this breed as a major breed of beef cattle not only in Northern Brazil but all regions covered by tropical pastures. As in this study the genetic correlations among all traits were high, the selection based on weaning weight might be a good choice because at this age there are two important effects (maternal

  3. Prediction Formulas for Individual Opioid Analgesic Requirements Based on Genetic Polymorphism Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kaori; Nishizawa, Daisuke; Ichinomiya, Takashi; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Hayashida, Masakazu; Fukuda, Ken-ichi; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    Background The analgesic efficacy of opioids is well known to vary widely among individuals, and various factors related to individual differences in opioid sensitivity have been identified. However, a prediction model to calculate appropriate opioid analgesic requirements has not yet been established. The present study sought to construct prediction formulas for individual opioid analgesic requirements based on genetic polymorphisms and clinical data from patients who underwent cosmetic orthognathic surgery and validate the utility of the prediction formulas in patients who underwent major open abdominal surgery. Methods To construct the prediction formulas, we performed multiple linear regression analyses using data from subjects who underwent cosmetic orthognathic surgery. The dependent variable was 24-h postoperative or perioperative fentanyl use, and the independent variables were age, gender, height, weight, pain perception latencies (PPL), and genotype data of five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To examine the utility of the prediction formulas, we performed simple linear regression analyses using subjects who underwent major open abdominal surgery. Actual 24-h postoperative or perioperative analgesic use and the predicted values that were calculated using the multiple regression equations were incorporated as dependent and independent variables, respectively. Results Multiple linear regression analyses showed that the four SNPs, PPL, and weight were retained as independent predictors of 24-h postoperative fentanyl use (R2 = 0.145, P = 5.66 × 10-10) and the two SNPs and weight were retained as independent predictors of perioperative fentanyl use (R2 = 0.185, P = 1.99 × 10-15). Simple linear regression analyses showed that the predicted values were retained as an independent predictor of actual 24-h postoperative analgesic use (R2 = 0.033, P = 0.030) and perioperative analgesic use (R2 = 0.100, P = 1.09 × 10-4), respectively. Conclusions We

  4. Genetic susceptibility and gastric cancer risk: the importance of meta-analyses as a statistical tool.

    PubMed

    García-González, María Asunción; Lanas, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a complex disease and a worldwide health burden due to its high prevalence and poor prognosis. A deeper knowledge of the factors involved in the development and progression of GC could help to identify subpopulations at risk that therefore require surveillance or early treatment strategies. Current research is based on the study of genetic variants that confer a higher risk of GC and their interactions with environmental exposure. Recently, meta-analysis has emerged as an important statistical method involving pooling of data from individual association studies to increase statistical power and obtain more conclusive results. Given the importance of chronic inflammation in the process of gastric carcinogenesis, the present article reviews the most recent meta-analyses of the contribution of cytokine gene polymorphisms to GC risk.

  5. Genetic Markers Analyses and Bioinformatic Approaches to Distinguish Between Olive Tree (Olea europaea L.) Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Ben Ayed, Rayda; Ben Hassen, Hanen; Ennouri, Karim; Rebai, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    The genetic diversity of 22 olive tree cultivars (Olea europaea L.) sampled from different Mediterranean countries was assessed using 5 SNP markers (FAD2.1; FAD2.3; CALC; SOD and ANTHO3) located in four different genes. The genotyping analysis of the 22 cultivars with 5 SNP loci revealed 11 alleles (average 2.2 per allele). The dendrogram based on cultivar genotypes revealed three clusters consistent with the cultivars classification. Besides, the results obtained with the five SNPs were compared to those obtained with the SSR markers using bioinformatic analyses and by computing a cophenetic correlation coefficient, indicating the usefulness of the UPGMA method for clustering plant genotypes. Based on principal coordinate analysis using a similarity matrix, the first two coordinates, revealed 54.94 % of the total variance. This work provides a more comprehensive explanation of the diversity available in Tunisia olive cultivars, and an important contribution for olive breeding and olive oil authenticity.

  6. Forensic genetic analyses in isolated populations with examples of central European Valachs and Roma.

    PubMed

    Ehler, Edvard; Vanek, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Isolated populations present a constant threat to the correctness of forensic genetic casework. In this review article we present several examples of how analyzing samples from isolated populations can bias the results of the forensic statistics and analyses. We select our examples from isolated populations from central and southeastern Europe, namely the Valachs and the European Roma. We also provide the reader with general strategies and principles to improve the laboratory practice (best practice) and reporting of samples from supposedly isolated populations. These include reporting the precise population data used for computing the forensic statistics, using the appropriate θ correction factor for calculating allele frequencies, typing ancestry informative markers in samples of unknown or uncertain ethnicity and establishing ethnic-specific forensic databases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  7. A genetic algorithm for slope stability analyses with concave slip surfaces using custom operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado-Piña, Rafael; Jimenez, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    Heuristic methods are popular tools to find critical slip surfaces in slope stability analyses. A new genetic algorithm (GA) is proposed in this work that has a standard structure but a novel encoding and generation of individuals with custom-designed operators for mutation and crossover that produce kinematically feasible slip surfaces with a high probability. In addition, new indices to assess the efficiency of operators in their search for the minimum factor of safety (FS) are proposed. The proposed GA is applied to traditional benchmark examples from the literature, as well as to a new practical example. Results show that the proposed GA is reliable, flexible and robust: it provides good minimum FS estimates that are not very sensitive to the number of nodes and that are very similar for different replications.

  8. Genome sequencing elucidates Sardinian genetic architecture and augments association analyses for lipid and blood inflammatory markers

    PubMed Central

    Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Mulas, Antonella; Pistis, Giorgio; Steri, Maristella; Danjou, Fabrice; Kwong, Alan; Ortega del Vecchyo, Vicente Diego; Chiang, Charleston W. K.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer; Pitzalis, Maristella; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Tarrier, Brendan; Brennan, Christine; Uzzau, Sergio; Fuchsberger, Christian; Atzeni, Rossano; Reinier, Frederic; Berutti, Riccardo; Huang, Jie; Timpson, Nicholas J; Toniolo, Daniela; Gasparini, Paolo; Malerba, Giovanni; Dedoussis, George; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Soranzo, Nicole; Jones, Chris; Lyons, Robert; Angius, Andrea; Kang, Hyun M.; Novembre, John; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Cucca, Francesco; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2015-01-01

    We report ~17.6M genetic variants from whole-genome sequencing of 2,120 Sardinians; 22% are absent from prior sequencing-based compilations and enriched for predicted functional consequence. Furthermore, ~76K variants common in our sample (frequency >5%) are rare elsewhere (<0.5% in the 1000 Genomes Project). We assessed the impact of these variants on circulating lipid levels and five inflammatory biomarkers. Fourteen signals, including two major new loci, were observed for lipid levels, and 19, including two novel loci, for inflammatory markers. New associations would be missed in analyses based on 1000 Genomes data, underlining the advantages of large-scale sequencing in this founder population. PMID:26366554

  9. Comparative sequence and genetic analyses of asparagus BACs reveal no microsynteny with onion or rice.

    PubMed

    Jakse, Jernej; Telgmann, Alexa; Jung, Christian; Khar, Anil; Melgar, Sergio; Cheung, Foo; Town, Christopher D; Havey, Michael J

    2006-12-01

    The Poales (includes the grasses) and Asparagales [includes onion (Allium cepa L.) and asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.)] are the two most economically important monocot orders. The Poales are a member of the commelinoid monocots, a group of orders sister to the Asparagales. Comparative genomic analyses have revealed a high degree of synteny among the grasses; however, it is not known if this synteny extends to other major monocot groups such as the Asparagales. Although we previously reported no evidence for synteny at the recombinational level between onion and rice, microsynteny may exist across shorter genomic regions in the grasses and Asparagales. We sequenced nine asparagus BACs to reveal physically linked genic-like sequences and determined their most similar positions in the onion and rice genomes. Four of the asparagus BACs were selected using molecular markers tightly linked to the sex-determining M locus on chromosome 5 of asparagus. These BACs possessed only two putative coding regions and had long tracts of degenerated retroviral elements and transposons. Five asparagus BACs were selected after hybridization of three onion cDNAs that mapped to three different onion chromosomes. Genic-like sequences that were physically linked on the cDNA-selected BACs or genetically linked on the M-linked BACs showed significant similarities (e < -20) to expressed sequences on different rice chromosomes, revealing no evidence for microsynteny between asparagus and rice across these regions. Genic-like sequences that were linked in asparagus were used to identify highly similar (e < -20) expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of onion. These onion ESTs mapped to different onion chromosomes and no relationship was observed between physical or genetic linkages in asparagus and genetic linkages in onion. These results further indicate that synteny among grass genomes does not extend to a sister order in the monocots and that asparagus may not be an appropriate smaller genome

  10. HCV Genome-Wide Genetic Analyses in Context of Disease Progression and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Donlin, Maureen J.; Lomonosova, Elena; Kiss, Alexi; Cheng, Xiaohong; Cao, Feng; Curto, Teresa M.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian; Tavis, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) world-wide. Most HCV patients have relatively stable disease, but approximately 25% have progressive disease that often terminates in liver failure or HCC. HCV is highly variable genetically, with seven genotypes and multiple subtypes per genotype. This variation affects HCV’s sensitivity to antiviral therapy and has been implicated to contribute to differences in disease. We sequenced the complete viral coding capacity for 107 HCV genotype 1 isolates to determine whether genetic variation between independent HCV isolates is associated with the rate of disease progression or development of HCC. Consensus sequences were determined by sequencing RT-PCR products from serum or plasma. Positions of amino acid conservation, amino acid diversity patterns, selection pressures, and genome-wide patterns of amino acid covariance were assessed in context of the clinical phenotypes. A few positions were found where the amino acid distributions or degree of positive selection differed between in the HCC and cirrhotic sequences. All other assessments of viral genetic variation and HCC failed to yield significant associations. Sequences from patients with slow disease progression were under a greater degree of positive selection than sequences from rapid progressors, but all other analyses comparing HCV from rapid and slow disease progressors were statistically insignificant. The failure to observe distinct sequence differences associated with disease progression or HCC employing methods that previously revealed strong associations with the outcome of interferon α-based therapy implies that variable ability of HCV to modulate interferon responses is not a dominant cause for differential pathology among HCV patients. This lack of significant associations also implies that host and/or environmental factors are the major causes of differential disease presentation in HCV patients. PMID

  11. Genetic association analyses of PDYN polymorphisms with heroin and cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Clarke, T-K; Ambrose-Lanci, L; Ferraro, T N; Berrettini, W H; Kampman, K M; Dackis, C A; Pettinati, H M; O'Brien, C P; Oslin, D W; Lohoff, F W

    2012-06-01

    Genetic factors are believed to account for 30-50% of the risk for cocaine and heroin addiction. Dynorphin peptides, derived from the prodynorphin (PDYN) precursor, bind to opioid receptors, preferentially the kappa-opioid receptor, and may mediate the aversive effects of drugs of abuse. Dynorphin peptides produce place aversion in animals and produce dysphoria in humans. Cocaine and heroin have both been shown to increase expression of PDYN in brain regions relevant for drug reward and use. Polymorphisms in PDYN are therefore hypothesized to increase risk for addiction to drugs of abuse. In this study, 3 polymorphisms in PDYN (rs1022563, rs910080 and rs1997794) were genotyped in opioid-addicted [248 African Americans (AAs) and 1040 European Americans (EAs)], cocaine-addicted (1248 AAs and 336 EAs) and control individuals (674 AAs and 656 EAs). Sex-specific analyses were also performed as a previous study identified PDYN polymorphisms to be more significantly associated with female opioid addicts. We found rs1022563 to be significantly associated with opioid addiction in EAs [P = 0.03, odds ratio (OR) = 1.31; false discovery rate (FDR) corrected q-value]; however, when we performed female-specific association analyses, the OR increased from 1.31 to 1.51. Increased ORs were observed for rs910080 and rs199774 in female opioid addicts also in EAs. No statistically significant associations were observed with cocaine or opioid addiction in AAs. These data show that polymorphisms in PDYN are associated with opioid addiction in EAs and provide further evidence that these risk variants may be more relevant in females. © 2012 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  12. Genetic mapping and transcription analyses of resistance gene loci in potato using NBS profiling.

    PubMed

    Brugmans, Bart; Wouters, Doret; van Os, Hans; Hutten, Ronald; van der Linden, Gerard; Visser, Richard G F; van Eck, Herman J; van der Vossen, Edwin A G

    2008-11-01

    NBS profiling is a method for the identification of resistance gene analog (RGA) derived fragments. Here we report the use of NBS profiling for the genome wide mapping of RGA loci in potato. NBS profiling analyses on a minimal set of F1 genotypes of the diploid mapping population previously used to generate the ultra dense (UHD) genetic map of potato, allowed us to efficiently map polymorphic RGA fragments relative to 10,000 existing AFLP markers. In total, 34 RGA loci were mapped, of which only 13 contained RGA sequences homologous to RGAs genetically positioned at approximately similar positions in potato or tomato. The remaining RGA loci mapped either at approximate chromosomal regions previously shown to contain RGAs in potato or tomato without sharing homology to these RGAs, or mapped at positions not yet identified as RGA-containing regions. In addition to markers representing RGAs with unknown functions, segregating markers were detected that were closely linked to four functional R genes that segregate in the UHD mapping population. To explore the potential of NBS profiling in RGA transcription analyses, RNA isolated from different tissues was used as template for NBS profiling. Of all the fragments amplified approximately 15% showed putative intensity or absent/present differences between different tissues suggesting putative tissue specific RGA or R gene transcription. Putative absent/present differences between individuals were also found. In addition to being a powerful tool for generating candidate gene markers linked to R gene loci, NBS profiling, when applied to cDNA, can be instrumental in identifying those members of an R gene cluster that are transcribed, and thus putatively functional.

  13. Correlation of Klebsiella pneumoniae Comparative Genetic Analyses with Virulence Profiles in a Murine Respiratory Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Hok-Hei; Yan, Pearlly; Pfeffer, Tia L.; Bundschuh, Ralf; Warawa, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a bacterial pathogen of worldwide importance and a significant contributor to multiple disease presentations associated with both nosocomial and community acquired disease. ATCC 43816 is a well-studied K. pneumoniae strain which is capable of causing an acute respiratory disease in surrogate animal models. In this study, we performed sequencing of the ATCC 43816 genome to support future efforts characterizing genetic elements required for disease. Furthermore, we performed comparative genetic analyses to the previously sequenced genomes from NTUH-K2044 and MGH 78578 to gain an understanding of the conservation of known virulence determinants amongst the three strains. We found that ATCC 43816 and NTUH-K2044 both possess the known virulence determinant for yersiniabactin, as well as a Type 4 secretion system (T4SS), CRISPR system, and an acetonin catabolism locus, all absent from MGH 78578. While both NTUH-K2044 and MGH 78578 are clinical isolates, little is known about the disease potential of these strains in cell culture and animal models. Thus, we also performed functional analyses in the murine macrophage cell lines RAW264.7 and J774A.1 and found that MGH 78578 (K52 serotype) was internalized at higher levels than ATCC 43816 (K2) and NTUH-K2044 (K1), consistent with previous characterization of the antiphagocytic properties of K1 and K2 serotype capsules. We also examined the three K. pneumoniae strains in a novel BALB/c respiratory disease model and found that ATCC 43816 and NTUH-K2044 are highly virulent (LD50<100 CFU) while MGH 78578 is relatively avirulent. PMID:25203254

  14. Modelling Co-Infection with Malaria and Lymphatic Filariasis

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Hannah C.; Gambhir, Manoj; Parham, Paul E.; Michael, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    Malaria and lymphatic filariasis (LF) continue to cause a considerable public health burden globally and are co-endemic in many regions of sub-Saharan Africa. These infections are transmitted by the same mosquito species which raises important questions about optimal vector control strategies in co-endemic regions, as well as the effect of the presence of each infection on endemicity of the other; there is currently little consensus on the latter. The need for comprehensive modelling studies to address such questions is therefore significant, yet very few have been undertaken to date despite the recognised explanatory power of reliable dynamic mathematical models. Here, we develop a malaria-LF co-infection modelling framework that accounts for two key interactions between these infections, namely the increase in vector mortality as LF mosquito prevalence increases and the antagonistic Th1/Th2 immune response that occurs in co-infected hosts. We consider the crucial interplay between these interactions on the resulting endemic prevalence when introducing each infection in regions where the other is already endemic (e.g. due to regional environmental change), and the associated timescale for such changes, as well as effects on the basic reproduction number R0 of each disease. We also highlight potential perverse effects of vector controls on human infection prevalence in co-endemic regions, noting that understanding such effects is critical in designing optimal integrated control programmes. Hence, as well as highlighting where better data are required to more reliably address such questions, we provide an important framework that will form the basis of future scenario analysis tools used to plan and inform policy decisions on intervention measures in different transmission settings. PMID:23785271

  15. Modelling co-infection with malaria and lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Slater, Hannah C; Gambhir, Manoj; Parham, Paul E; Michael, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    Malaria and lymphatic filariasis (LF) continue to cause a considerable public health burden globally and are co-endemic in many regions of sub-Saharan Africa. These infections are transmitted by the same mosquito species which raises important questions about optimal vector control strategies in co-endemic regions, as well as the effect of the presence of each infection on endemicity of the other; there is currently little consensus on the latter. The need for comprehensive modelling studies to address such questions is therefore significant, yet very few have been undertaken to date despite the recognised explanatory power of reliable dynamic mathematical models. Here, we develop a malaria-LF co-infection modelling framework that accounts for two key interactions between these infections, namely the increase in vector mortality as LF mosquito prevalence increases and the antagonistic Th1/Th2 immune response that occurs in co-infected hosts. We consider the crucial interplay between these interactions on the resulting endemic prevalence when introducing each infection in regions where the other is already endemic (e.g. due to regional environmental change), and the associated timescale for such changes, as well as effects on the basic reproduction number R₀ of each disease. We also highlight potential perverse effects of vector controls on human infection prevalence in co-endemic regions, noting that understanding such effects is critical in designing optimal integrated control programmes. Hence, as well as highlighting where better data are required to more reliably address such questions, we provide an important framework that will form the basis of future scenario analysis tools used to plan and inform policy decisions on intervention measures in different transmission settings.

  16. A weighted U-statistic for genetic association analyses of sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Wei, Changshuai; Li, Ming; He, Zihuai; Vsevolozhskaya, Olga; Schaid, Daniel J; Lu, Qing

    2014-12-01

    With advancements in next-generation sequencing technology, a massive amount of sequencing data is generated, which offers a great opportunity to comprehensively investigate the role of rare variants in the genetic etiology of complex diseases. Nevertheless, the high-dimensional sequencing data poses a great challenge for statistical analysis. The association analyses based on traditional statistical methods suffer substantial power loss because of the low frequency of genetic variants and the extremely high dimensionality of the data. We developed a Weighted U Sequencing test, referred to as WU-SEQ, for the high-dimensional association analysis of sequencing data. Based on a nonparametric U-statistic, WU-SEQ makes no assumption of the underlying disease model and phenotype distribution, and can be applied to a variety of phenotypes. Through simulation studies and an empirical study, we showed that WU-SEQ outperformed a commonly used sequence kernel association test (SKAT) method when the underlying assumptions were violated (e.g., the phenotype followed a heavy-tailed distribution). Even when the assumptions were satisfied, WU-SEQ still attained comparable performance to SKAT. Finally, we applied WU-SEQ to sequencing data from the Dallas Heart Study (DHS), and detected an association between ANGPTL 4 and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol.

  17. Comparative analyses of different genetic markers for the detection of Acanthamoeba spp. isolates.

    PubMed

    Derda, Monika; Wojtkowiak-Giera, Agnieszka; Hadaś, Edward

    2014-09-01

    Acanthamoeba are widespread free-living amoebae which may cause granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE), keratitis, skin ulcerations and disseminated tissue infection. An important diagnostic and prognostic factor for the treatment of infection is a quick and correct diagnosis of amoebae strains. The aim of our study was to develop a rapid method for detection and identification of pathogenic Acanthamoeba spp. strains from diagnostic material collected from water. In this study we analysed five amplification-based genetic markers (Aca 16S, Ac6/210, GP, JDP, Nelson) used for identification of pathogenic Acanthamoeba spp. strains isolated in water sources in Poland, Iceland and Sweden. Our results demonstrated the presence of pathogenic Acanthamoeba strains in tap water. PCR assay appeared to be a more rapid and sensitive method to detect the presence of amoebae than the limited conventional techniques. Based on our observations, we can confirm that the use of four out of five genetic markers (Aca 16S, Ac 6/210, JDP, GP, Nelson) may be helpful in identification of Acanthamoeba spp. strains, but only one Aca 16S primer pair is a highly specific marker that distinguishes between pathogenic strains of Acanthamoeba and other free-living amoeba families.

  18. Phylogeographic and population genetic analyses reveal multiple species of Boa and independent origins of insular dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Card, Daren C; Schield, Drew R; Adams, Richard H; Corbin, Andrew B; Perry, Blair W; Andrew, Audra L; Pasquesi, Giulia I M; Smith, Eric N; Jezkova, Tereza; Boback, Scott M; Booth, Warren; Castoe, Todd A

    2016-09-01

    Boa is a Neotropical genus of snakes historically recognized as monotypic despite its expansive distribution. The distinct morphological traits and color patterns exhibited by these snakes, together with the wide diversity of ecosystems they inhabit, collectively suggest that the genus may represent multiple species. Morphological variation within Boa also includes instances of dwarfism observed in multiple offshore island populations. Despite this substantial diversity, the systematics of the genus Boa has received little attention until very recently. In this study we examined the genetic structure and phylogenetic relationships of Boa populations using mitochondrial sequences and genome-wide SNP data obtained from RADseq. We analyzed these data at multiple geographic scales using a combination of phylogenetic inference (including coalescent-based species delimitation) and population genetic analyses. We identified extensive population structure across the range of the genus Boa and multiple lines of evidence for three widely-distributed clades roughly corresponding with the three primary land masses of the Western Hemisphere. We also find both mitochondrial and nuclear support for independent origins and parallel evolution of dwarfism on offshore island clusters in Belize and Cayos Cochinos Menor, Honduras. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sample richness and genetic diversity as drivers of chimera formation in nSSU metagenetic analyses

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, V. G.; Nichols, B.; Lallias, D.; Quince, C.; Carvalho, G. R.; Power, D. M.; Creer, S.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic diversity in environmental samples is often assessed via PCR-based amplification of nSSU genes. However, estimates of diversity derived from pyrosequencing environmental data sets are often inflated, mainly because of the formation of chimeric sequences during PCR amplification. Chimeras are hybrid products composed of distinct parental sequences that can lead to the misinterpretation of diversity estimates. We have analyzed the effect of sample richness, evenness and phylogenetic diversity on the formation of chimeras using a nSSU data set derived from 454 Roche pyrosequencing of replicated, large control pools of closely and distantly related nematode mock communities, of known intragenomic identity and richness. To further investigate how chimeric molecules are formed, the nSSU gene secondary structure was analyzed in several individuals. For the first time in eukaryotes, chimera formation proved to be higher in both richer and more genetically diverse samples, thus providing a novel perspective of chimera formation in pyrosequenced environmental data sets. Findings contribute to a better understanding of the nature and mechanisms involved in chimera formation during PCR amplification of environmentally derived DNA. Moreover, given the similarities between biodiversity analyses using amplicon sequencing and those used to assess genomic variation, our findings have potential broad application for identifying genetic variation in homologous loci or multigene families in general. PMID:22278883

  20. Genetic relationships in the peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) analysed by microsatellite DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Nesje, M; Røed, K H; Lifjeld, J T; Lindberg, P; Steen, O F

    2000-01-01

    Microsatellite DNA markers were developed from a peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) and genetic relationships among peregrine falcons in southern Norway were analysed using the markers. The genomic DNA library was screened for the presence of dinucleotide microsatellite repeats. Twelve loci revealed polymorphism through the initial analysis of 24 unrelated peregrine falcons, and Mendelian inheritance was confirmed in two peregrine falcon families bred in captivity. The estimated mean probability of identical genotypes in two unrelated individuals was 3 x 10-8, and the combined exclusion probability for parentage testing was 0.99 and 0.94 for one or both parents unknown, respectively. The markers were used to investigate the parentage of peregrine broods from the same nest site from different breeding seasons, and subsequently the nest-site fidelity of the breeding peregrines. High nest-site fidelity was found by studying pairwise comparisons of relatedness (rxy) estimates among chicks at six nest sites from three different breeding seasons. Cross-species amplifications showed that most loci also appeared to amplify polymorphic products in the gyrfalcon (F. rusticolus), merlin (F. columbarius), hobby (F. subbuteo) and kestrel (F. tinnunculus), demonstrating that the loci will provide powerful genetic markers in these falcons too.

  1. Genetic and molecular analyses of resistance to a variant of Puccinia striiformis in barley.

    PubMed

    Golegaonkar, Prashant G; Wellings, Colin R; Singh, Davinder; Park, Robert F

    2013-02-01

    Seedlings of 62 Australian barley cultivars and two exotic barley genotypes were assessed for resistance to a variant of Puccinia striiformis, referred to as "Barley Grass Stripe Rust" (BGYR), first detected in Australia in 1998, which is capable of infecting wild Hordeum species and some genotypes of cultivated barley. Fifty-three out of 62 cultivated barley cultivars tested were resistant to the pathogen. Genetic analyses of seedling resistance to BGYR in six Australian barley cultivars and one Algerian barley landrace indicated that they carried either one or two major resistance genes to the pathogen. A single recessive seedling resistance gene, rpsSa3771, identified in Sahara 3771, was located on the long arm of chromosome 1 (7 H), flanked by the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers Xwg420 and Xcdo347 at genetic distances of 12.8 and 21.9 cM, respectively. Mapping resistance to BGYR at adult plant growth stages using the doubled haploid (DH) population Clipper × Sahara 3771 identified two major quantitative trait loci (QTL), one on the long arm of chromosome 3 (3 H) and the second on the long arm of chromosome 1 (7 H), accounting for 26 % and 18 % of the total phenotypic variation, respectively. The QTL located on chromosome 7HL corresponded to seedling resistance gene rpsSa3771 and the second QTL was concluded to correspond to a single APR gene, designated rpsCl, contributed by cultivar Clipper.

  2. Antigenic and genetic analyses of H1N1 influenza A viruses from European pigs.

    PubMed

    Brown, I H; Ludwig, S; Olsen, C W; Hannoun, C; Scholtissek, C; Hinshaw, V S; Harris, P A; McCauley, J W; Strong, I; Alexander, D J

    1997-03-01

    H1N1 influenza A viruses isolated from pigs in Europe since 1981 were examined both antigenically and genetically and compared with H1N1 viruses from other sources. H1N1 viruses from pigs and birds could be divided into three groups: avian, classical swine and 'avian-like' swine viruses. Low or no reactivity of 'avian-like' swine viruses in HI tests with monoclonal antibodies raised against classical swine viruses was associated with amino acid substitutions within antigenic sites of the haemagglutinin (HA). Phylogenetic analysis of the HA gene revealed that classical swine viruses from European pigs are most similar to each other and are closely related to North American swine strains, whilst the 'avian-like' swine viruses cluster with avian viruses. 'Avian-like' viruses introduced into pigs in the UK in 1992 apparently originated directly from strains in pigs in continental Europe at that time. The HA genes of the swine viruses examined had undergone limited variation in antigenic sites and also contained fewer potential glycosylation sites compared to human H1N1 viruses. The HA exhibited antigenic drift which was more marked in 'avian-like' swine viruses than in classical swine strains. Genetic analyses of two recent 'avian-like' swine viruses indicated that all the RNA segments are related most closely to those of avian influenza A viruses.

  3. Molecular genetic analyses of five Vietnamese patients with spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Khanh, Tran Van; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Harada, Yosuke; Nishio, Hisahide; Dao, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Hoan, Nguyen Thi; Thao, Bui Phuong; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2002-12-01

    Most patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) have been reported to show homozygous deletion of the gene responsible for SMA, SMN1. However, whether SMA patients homozygous for the SMN1 deletion exist in Southeast Asian countries, including Vietnam, remains to be determined, because molecular genetic analyses of SMA patients from these countries have not been reported. In this preliminary study, we analyzed five Vietnamese SMA patients and found that SMN1 gene exons 7 and 8 were completely absent in one of them, a 6-month-old girl with hypotonic muscles. Thus, SMN1 deletion can be a cause of SMA in Vietnam, although other genetic abnormalities should be considered as etiological factors in many cases. In conclusion, we identified a homozygous deletion of the SMN1 gene in a Vietnamese SMA patient. Since the number of the patients analyzed in this study was very limited, it is too early to determine whether SMN1 deletion is not a main cause of SMA in Vietnam.

  4. High prevalence of co-infection between human papillomavirus (HPV) 51 and 52 in Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Gallegos-Bolaños, Jazbet; Rivera-Domínguez, Jessica Alejandra; Presno-Bernal, José Miguel; Cervantes-Villagrana, Rodolfo Daniel

    2017-08-08

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with the genesis of cervical carcinoma. The co-infection among HPV genotypes is frequent, but the clinical significance is controversial; in Mexico, the prevalence and pattern of co-infection differ depending on the geographic area of study. We analyzed the mono- and co-infection prevalence of multiple HPV genotypes, as well as preferential interactions among them in a Mexico City sample population. This study was designed as a retrospective cohort study. Cervical cytology samples from 1163 women and 166 urethral scraping samples of men were analyzed between 2010 and 2012. The detection of HPV infection was performed using the hybrid capture and the genotyping was by PCR (HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 30, 31, 33, 35, 45, 51, and 52). 36% of women were HPV-positive and the most prevalent genotypes were HPV 51, 52, 16, and 33 (42, 38, 37, and 34%, respectively). The prevalence of co-infection was higher (75.37%) than mono-infection in women HPV positives. All genotypes were co-infected with HPV 16, but the co-infection with 51-52 genotypes was the most frequent combination in all cases. The co-infection was very common; each HPV genotype showed different preferences for co-infection with other genotypes, HPV 51-52 co-infection was the most frequent. The HPV 16, 33, 51 and 52 were the most prevalent and are a public health concern to the Mexican population.

  5. Pathology of dogs in Campo Grande, MS, Brazil naturally co-infected with Leishmania infantum and Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Gisele Braziliano; Barreto, Wanessa Teixeira Gomes; Santos, Luciana Ladislau dos; Ribeiro, Laura Raquel Rios; Macedo, Gabriel Carvalho de; Sousa, Keyla Carstens Marques de; André, Marcos Rogério; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia

    2014-01-01

    Different parasites that commonly occur concomitantly can influence one another, sometimes with unpredictable effects. We evaluated pathological aspects of dogs naturally co-infected with Leishmania infantum and Ehrlichia canis. The health status of the dogs was investigated based on histopathological, hematological and biochemical analyses of 21 animals infected solely with L. infantum and 22 dogs co- infected with L. infantum and E. canis. The skin of both groups showed chronic, predominantly lymphohistioplasmacytic inflammatory reaction. The plasmacytosis in the lymphoid tissues was likely related with the hypergammaglobulinemia detected in all the dogs. The disorganization of extracellular matrix found in the reticular dermis of the inguinal region and ear, characterized by the substitution of thick collagen fibers for thin fibers, was attributed to the degree of inflammatory reaction, irrespective of the presence of parasites. In addition, the histopathological analysis revealed that twice as many dogs in the co-infected group presented Leishmania amastigotes in the ear skin than those infected solely with Leishmania, increasing the possibility of becoming infected through sand fly vectors. Our findings highlight the fact that the health of dogs infected concomitantly with L. infantum and E. canis is severely compromised due to their high levels of total plasma protein, globulins, alkaline phosphatase and creatine kinase, and severe anemia.

  6. Lost in translation or deliberate falsification? Genetic analyses reveal erroneous museum data for historic penguin specimens

    PubMed Central

    Boessenkool, Sanne; Star, Bastiaan; Scofield, R. Paul; Seddon, Philip J.; Waters, Jonathan M.

    2010-01-01

    Historic museum specimens are increasingly used to answer a wide variety of questions in scientific research. Nevertheless, the scientific value of these specimens depends on the authenticity of the data associated with them. Here we use individual-based genetic analyses to demonstrate erroneous locality information for archive specimens from the late nineteenth century. Specifically, using 10 microsatellite markers, we analysed 350 contemporary and 43 historic yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes) specimens from New Zealand's South Island and sub-Antarctic regions. Factorial correspondence analysis and an assignment test strongly suggest that eight of the historic specimens purportedly of sub-Antarctic origin were in fact collected from the South Island. Interestingly, all eight specimens were obtained by the same collector, and all are currently held in the same museum collection. Further inspection of the specimen labels and evaluation of sub-Antarctic voyages did not reveal whether the erroneous data are caused by incorrect labelling or whether deliberate falsification was at play. This study highlights a promising extension to the well-known applications of assignment tests in molecular ecology, which can complement methods that are currently being applied for error detection in specimen data. Our results also serve as a warning to all who use archive specimens to invest time in the verification of collection information. PMID:20007185

  7. Mitochondrial genetic analyses suggest selection against maternal lineages in bipolar affective disorder.

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, R; Furlong, R A; Amos, W; Cooper, G; Rubinsztein, J S; Walsh, C; Paykel, E S; Rubinsztein, D C

    1999-01-01

    Previous reports of preferential transmission of bipolar affective disorder (BP) from the maternal versus the paternal lines in families suggested that this disorder may be caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations. We have sequenced the mitochondrial genome in 25 BP patients with family histories of psychiatric disorder that suggest matrilineal inheritance. No polymorphism identified more than once in this sequencing showed any significant association with BP in association studies using 94 cases and 94 controls. To determine whether our BP sample showed evidence of selection against the maternal lineage, we determined genetic distances between all possible pairwise comparisons within the BP and control groups, based on multilocus mitochondrial polymorphism haplotypes. These analyses revealed fewer closely related haplotypes in the BP group than in the matched control group, suggesting selection against maternal lineages in this disease. Such selection is compatible with recurrent mitochondrial mutations, which are associated with slightly decreased fitness. Although such mismatch distribution comparisons have been used previously for analyses of population histories, this is, as far as we are aware, the first report of this method being used to study disease. PMID:10417293

  8. Spatial genetic structure in two congeneric epiphytes with different dispersal strategies analysed by three different methods.

    PubMed

    Snall, T; Fogelqvist, J; Ribeiro, P J; Lascoux, M

    2004-08-01

    Three different approaches were used to assess the kinship structure of two epiphytic bryophytes, Orthotrichum speciosum and O. obtusifolium, that have different dispersal strategies. The two species were sampled in a 200 ha landscape where species occurrence and host trees had been mapped previously. Local environmental conditions at sampled trees were recorded and kinship between individuals was calculated based on amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)-marker data. We did not detect any association between AFLP-markers and investigated environmental conditions. In both species, significant kinship coefficients were found between individuals up to 300-350 m apart which shows that both species have a restricted dispersal range. The spatial kinship structure was detected with both autocorrelation analysis and generalized additive models (GAMs), but linear regression failed to detect any structure in O. speciosum. Although the dioecious O. obtusifolium is currently the more common species it may, none the less, due to its restricted dispersal range and reproduction mode, become threatened in the future by current silvicultural practices which enhance the distance between host trees and decrease their life span. Finally, GAMs seem most appropriate for analysing spatial genetic structure because the effects of local environmental conditions and spatial structure can be analysed simultaneously, no assumption of a parametric form between kinship coefficient and distance is required, and spatial data resolution is not lost in the arbitrary choice of distance classes characterizing autocorrelation analysis.

  9. Origins and genetic diversity of British cattle breeds in Brazil assessed by pedigree analyses.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, M L; Braccini Neto, J; Brito, F V; Campos, L T; Bértoli, C D; Campos, G S; Cobuci, J A; McManus, C M; Barcellos, J O J; Gama, L T

    2014-05-01

    Pedigree information available for Angus (ANG), Devon (DEV), Hereford (HER), and Shorthorn (SHO) cattle in Brazil was analyzed to appraise the genetic diversity and population structure of these breeds. Pedigree records collected from the beginning of the 20th century until 2010 were used in the analyses. Over time, the number of herdbook registrations declined in HER after a peak in the 1970s, remained low in DEV and SHO, and increased steadily in ANG since the 1990s, such that it the latter is now the leading British cattle breed in Brazil. The average number of offspring registered per sire ranged from about 12 (SHO) to 20 (DEV) and the mean generation interval ranged from about 6.0 (HER and SHO) to 6.4 (ANG) years. In the reference population (calves born in 2009 and 2010, plus those born in 2008 for SHO) the mean equivalent number of generations known ranged from about 7 (SHO) to 9 (HER). In the 4 breeds studied, nearly all animals born over the last few years are inbred, even though the mean level of inbreeding in the reference population is below 4% in all breeds. The rate of inbreeding per generation, computed from the individual increase in inbreeding, ranged from about 0.2 (ANG) to 0.5% (DEV), with a corresponding effective population size of 245 and 92, respectively, which is above the recommended minimum critical threshold. The number of founders/ancestors contributing with 50% of the reference population gene pool was 211/26 for ANG, 41/14 for DEV, 164/25 for HER, and 79/10 for SHO, with effective number of founders/ancestors/founder genomes of 470/68/36, 89/33/16, 289/59/30, and 200/28/18 for ANG, DEV, HER, and SHO, respectively. The genetic contribution of different countries to the gene pool of each breed indicated that, throughout the period studied, DEV genes originated predominantly from the United Kingdom, while for the other breeds there was a changing pattern over time. Until the 1970s Argentina was the major supplier of ANG, while HER and SHO

  10. Hepatitis C virus/human T lymphotropic virus 1/2 co-infection: Regional burden and virological outcomes in people who inject drugs

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Erika; Roger, Elena

    2016-01-01

    This review analyses current data concerning co-infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-1/2 in people who inject drugs (PWID), with a particular focus on disease burden and global implications for virological outcome. In addition, the available treatment options for HTLV-1/2 are summarized and the ongoing and likely future research challenges are discussed. The data in this review was obtained from 34 articles on HCV/HTLV-1/2 co-infection in PWID retrieved from the PubMed literature database and published between 1997 and 2015. Despite unavailable estimates of the burden of HCV/HTLV-1/2 co-infection in general, the epidemiologic constellation of HTLV-1/2 shows high incidence in PWID with history of migration, incarceration, and other blood-borne infectious diseases such as HCV or human immunodeficiency virus. The most recent research data strongly suggest that HTLV-1 co-infection can influence HCV viral load, HCV sustained virological response to α-interferon treatment, and HCV-related liver disease progression. In short, outcome of HCV infection is worse in the context of HTLV-1 co-infection, yet more studies are needed to gain accurate estimations of the burden of HCV/HTLV-1/2 co-infections. Moreover, in the current era of new direct-acting antiviral treatments for HCV and proven HTLV-1/2 treatment options, prospective clinical and treatment studies should be carried out, with particular focus on the PWID patient population, with the aim of improving virological outcomes. PMID:27175351

  11. Calicophoron daubneyi and Fasciola hepatica: characteristics of natural and experimental co-infections of these digeneans in the snail Lymnaea glabra.

    PubMed

    Vignoles, P; Titi, A; Mekroud, A; Rondelaud, D; Dreyfuss, G

    2017-01-01

    A retrospective study on different Lymnaea glabra samples collected from central France between 1993 and 2010 was carried out to determine the prevalence of natural co-infections with Calicophoron daubneyi and Fasciola hepatica, and to specify the composition of redial burdens. Experimental infections of L. glabra performed during the same period of time were also analysed to study metacercarial production of each digenean in co-infected snails. Controls were naturally or experimentally co-infected Galba truncatula. In natural co-infections, prevalence was 0.7% in L. glabra (186/25,128) and 0.4% in G. truncatula (137/31,345). Low redial burdens were found in these snails, with F. hepatica rediae significantly more numerous in L. glabra than in G. truncatula (7.5 per snail instead of 5.2). In contrast, the total numbers of C. daubneyi rediae in both lymnaeids were close to each other (4.3 and 3.0 rediae, respectively). In experimentally co-infected groups, prevalence was greater in G. truncatula than in the other lymnaeid (6.3% instead of 3.0%). Significantly shorter patent periods and lower metacercarial production for each digenean were noted in L. glabra than in G. truncatula. However, in both lymnaeids, the two types of cercariae were released during the same shedding waves and several peaks during the patent period were synchronous. In spite of a greater shell height for L. glabra, metacercarial production of both digeneans in co-infected snails was lower than that in G. truncatula, thus indicating a still incomplete adaptation between these French L. glabra and both parasites.

  12. Glutamate taste and appetite in laboratory mice: physiologic and genetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Bachmanov, Alexander A; Inoue, Masashi; Ji, Hong; Murata, Yuko; Tordoff, Michael G; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2009-09-01

    This article provides an overview of our studies of variation in voluntary glutamate consumption in mice. In 2-bottle preference tests, mice from the C57BL/6ByJ (B6) strain consume more monosodium l-glutamate (MSG) than do mice from the 129P3/J (129) strain. We used these mice to study physiologic and genetic mechanisms that underlie the strain differences in glutamate intake. Our genetic analyses showed that differences between B6 mice and 129 mice in MSG consumption are unrelated to strain variation in consumption of sodium or sweeteners and therefore are attributed to mechanisms specific for glutamate. These strain differences could be due to variation in responses to either taste or postingestive effects of glutamate. To examine the role of taste responsiveness, we measured MSG-evoked activity in gustatory nerves and showed that it is similar in B6 and 129 mice. On the other hand, strain-specific postingestive effects of glutamate were evident from our finding that exposure to MSG increases its consumption in B6 mice and decreases its consumption in 129 mice. We therefore examined whether B6 mice and 129 mice differ in postingestive metabolism of glutamate. We showed that, after intragastric administration of MSG, the MSG is preferentially metabolized through gluconeogenesis in B6 mice, whereas thermogenesis is the predominant process for 129 mice. We hypothesize that a process related to gluconeogenesis of the ingested glutamate generates the rewarding stimulus, which probably occurs in the liver before glucose enters the general circulation, and that the glutamate-induced postingestive thermogenesis generates an aversive stimulus. Our animal model studies raise the question of whether humans also vary in glutamate metabolism in a manner that influences their glutamate preference, consumption, and postingestive processing.

  13. Genetic analyses reveal hybridization but no hybrid swarm in one of the world's rarest birds.

    PubMed

    Steeves, Tammy E; Maloney, Richard F; Hale, Marie L; Tylianakis, Jason M; Gemmell, Neil J

    2010-12-01

    Hybridization facilitated by human activities has dramatically altered the evolutionary trajectories of threatened taxa around the globe. Whereas introduced mammalian predators and widespread habitat loss and degradation clearly imperil the recovery and survival of the New Zealand endemic black stilt or kakī (Himantopus novaezelandiae), the risk associated with hybridization between this critically endangered endemic and its self-introduced congener, the pied stilt or poaka (Himantopus himantopus leucocephalus) is less clear. Here, we combine Bayesian admixture analyses of microsatellite data with mitochondrial DNA sequence data to assess the levels of hybridization and introgression between kakī and poaka. We show that birds classified as hybrids on the basis of adult plumage are indeed of hybrid origin and that hybridization between kakī and poaka is both extensive and bidirectional. Despite this, we found almost no evidence for introgression from poaka to kakī, thus negating the popular belief that kakī represent a hybrid swarm. To our knowledge, ours represents the first comprehensive study to document a lack of widespread introgression for a species at risk despite a recent history of extensive bidirectional human-induced hybridization. We attribute this rather surprising result, in part, to reduced reproductive success in female hybrids combined with a transient male-biased kakī sex ratio. To maximize the evolutionary potential of kakī, we use these data to recommend conservation management activities aimed to maintain the genetic integrity and to maximize the genetic diversity of this iconic rare bird. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Genetic Analyses of a Three Generation Family Segregating Hirschsprung Disease and Iris Heterochromia.

    PubMed

    Cui, Long; Wong, Emily Hoi-Man; Cheng, Guo; Firmato de Almeida, Manoel; So, Man-Ting; Sham, Pak-Chung; Cherny, Stacey S; Tam, Paul Kwong-Hang; Garcia-Barceló, Maria-Mercè

    2013-01-01

    We present the genetic analyses conducted on a three-generation family (14 individuals) with three members affected with isolated-Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) and one with HSCR and heterochromia iridum (syndromic-HSCR), a phenotype reminiscent of Waardenburg-Shah syndrome (WS4). WS4 is characterized by pigmentary abnormalities of the skin, eyes and/or hair, sensorineural deafness and HSCR. None of the members had sensorineural deafness. The family was screened for copy number variations (CNVs) using Illumina-HumanOmni2.5-Beadchip and for coding sequence mutations in WS4 genes (EDN3, EDNRB, or SOX10) and in the main HSCR gene (RET). Confocal microscopy and immunoblotting were used to assess the functional impact of the mutations. A heterozygous A/G transition in EDNRB was identified in 4 affected and 3 unaffected individuals. While in EDNRB isoforms 1 and 2 (cellular receptor) the transition results in the abolishment of translation initiation (M1V), in isoform 3 (only in the cytosol) the replacement occurs at Met91 (M91V) and is predicted benign. Another heterozygous transition (c.-248G/A; -predicted to affect translation efficiency-) in the 5'-untranslated region of EDN3 (EDNRB ligand) was detected in all affected individuals but not in healthy carriers of the EDNRB mutation. Also, a de novo CNVs encompassing DACH1 was identified in the patient with heterochromia iridum and HSCR Since the EDNRB and EDN3 variants only coexist in affected individuals, HSCR could be due to the joint effect of mutations in genes of the same pathway. Iris heterochromia could be due to an independent genetic event and would account for the additional phenotype within the family.

  15. Genetic Analyses of a Three Generation Family Segregating Hirschsprung Disease and Iris Heterochromia

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guo; Firmato de Almeida, Manoel; So, Man-Ting; Sham, Pak-Chung; Cherny, Stacey S.; Tam, Paul Kwong-Hang; Garcia-Barceló, Maria-Mercè

    2013-01-01

    We present the genetic analyses conducted on a three-generation family (14 individuals) with three members affected with isolated-Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) and one with HSCR and heterochromia iridum (syndromic-HSCR), a phenotype reminiscent of Waardenburg-Shah syndrome (WS4). WS4 is characterized by pigmentary abnormalities of the skin, eyes and/or hair, sensorineural deafness and HSCR. None of the members had sensorineural deafness. The family was screened for copy number variations (CNVs) using Illumina-HumanOmni2.5-Beadchip and for coding sequence mutations in WS4 genes (EDN3, EDNRB, or SOX10) and in the main HSCR gene (RET). Confocal microscopy and immunoblotting were used to assess the functional impact of the mutations. A heterozygous A/G transition in EDNRB was identified in 4 affected and 3 unaffected individuals. While in EDNRB isoforms 1 and 2 (cellular receptor) the transition results in the abolishment of translation initiation (M1V), in isoform 3 (only in the cytosol) the replacement occurs at Met91 (M91V) and is predicted benign. Another heterozygous transition (c.-248G/A; -predicted to affect translation efficiency-) in the 5′-untranslated region of EDN3 (EDNRB ligand) was detected in all affected individuals but not in healthy carriers of the EDNRB mutation. Also, a de novo CNVs encompassing DACH1 was identified in the patient with heterochromia iridum and HSCR Since the EDNRB and EDN3 variants only coexist in affected individuals, HSCR could be due to the joint effect of mutations in genes of the same pathway. Iris heterochromia could be due to an independent genetic event and would account for the additional phenotype within the family. PMID:23840513

  16. Estimation of genetic diversity in Gute sheep: pedigree and microsatellite analyses of an ancient Swedish breed.

    PubMed

    Rochus, Christina M; Johansson, Anna M

    2017-01-01

    Breeds with small population size are in danger of an increased inbreeding rate and loss of genetic diversity, which puts them at risk for extinction. In Sweden there are a number of local breeds, native breeds which have adapted to specific areas in Sweden, for which efforts are being made to keep them pure and healthy over time. One example of such a breed is the Swedish Gute sheep. The objective of this study was to estimate inbreeding and genetic diversity of Swedish Gute sheep. Three datasets were analysed: pedigree information of the whole population, pedigree information for 100 animals of the population, and microsatellite genotypes for 94 of the 100 animals. The average inbreeding coefficient for lambs born during a six year time period (2007-2012) did not increase during that time period. The inbreeding calculated from the entire pedigree (0.038) and for a sample of the population (0.018) was very low. Sheep were more heterozygous at the microsatellite markers than expected (average multilocus heterozygosity and Ritland inbreeding estimates 1.01845 and -0.03931) and five of seven microsatellite markers were not in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium due to heterozygosity excess. The total effective population size estimated from the pedigree information was 155.4 and the average harmonic mean effective population size estimated from microsatellites was 88.3. Pedigree and microsatellite genotype estimations of inbreeding were consistent with a breeding program with the purpose of reducing inbreeding. Our results showed that current breeding programs of the Swedish Gute sheep are consistent with efforts of keeping this breed viable and these breeding programs are an example for other small local breeds in conserving breeds for the future.

  17. Occurrence of co-infection with dengue viruses during 2014 in New Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Tazeen, A; Afreen, N; Abdullah, M; Deeba, F; Haider, S H; Kazim, S N; Ali, S; Naqvi, I H; Broor, S; Ahmed, A; Parveen, S

    2017-01-01

    Dengue fever is an arthropod-borne viral infection that has become endemic in several parts of India including Delhi. We studied occurrence of co-infection with dengue viruses during an outbreak in New Delhi, India in 2014. For the present study, blood samples collected from symptomatic patients were analysed by RT-PCR. Eighty percent of the samples were positive for dengue virus. The result showed that DENV-1 (77%) was the predominant serotype followed by DENV-2 (60%). Concurrent infection with more than one serotype was identified in 43% of the positive samples. Phylogenetic analysis clustered DENV-1 strains with the American African and DENV-2 strains in Cosmopolitan genotypes. Four common amino-acid mutations were identified in the envelope gene of DENV-1 sequences (F337I, A369T, V380I and L402F) and one common mutation (N390S) in the DENV-2 sequences. Further analysis revealed purifying selection in both the serotypes. A significant number of patients were co-infected with DENV-1 and DENV-2 serotypes. Although we do not have direct evidence to demonstrate co-evolution of these two stereotypes, nonetheless their simultaneous occurrence does indicate that they are favoured by evolutionary forces. An ongoing surveillance and careful analysis of future outbreaks will strengthen the concept of co-evolution or otherwise. Whether the concurrent dengue viral infection is correlated with disease severity in a given population is another aspect to be pursued. This study is envisaged to be useful for future reference in the context of overall epidemiology.

  18. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in a Child with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Pradeep Kumar; Thakkar, Mayur Deepak; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Thacker, Anup Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a fatal infectious disease of childhood caused by persistence of the measles virus in the brain. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection on subacute sclerosing panencephalitis remains elusive and rare. We report a child who developed subacute sclerosing panencephalitis following a short latency period and a rapidly progressive course with HIV co-infection. PMID:27777245

  19. Malaria-Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Co-infection: Influence on Disease Outcomes and Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Pinna, Raquel A.; Silva-dos-Santos, Danielle; Perce-da-Silva, Daiana S.; Oliveira-Ferreira, Joseli; Villa-Verde, Dea M. S.; De Luca, Paula M.; Banic, Dalma M.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria and Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) are co-endemic throughout large regions in tropical countries and co-infection may impact the evolution of host-parasite interactions. In the present study, we evaluate Malaria/Leishmaniasis disease outcome, Th1/Th2 cytokine levels and the CD4 and CD8 T-cell profiles in a co-infection murine model (BALB/c) of Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL (Py) and Leishmania amazonensis (La) or L. braziliensis (Lb). Malaria parasitaemia was assessed through blood strains stained with Giemsa. Leishmania lesions were monitored with a digital caliper and parasite loads determined by limiting-dilution assay. Serum levels of IFN-γ, TNF, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-17 were determined using multiplexed bead assay and expression of CD3, CD4, and CD8 T-cells markers were determined by Flow Cytometry in the thymus, spleens and lymph nodes. Parasitaemia in Lb+Py co-infected group was lower than in Py single-infected group, suggesting a protective effect of Lb co-infection in Malaria progression. In contrast, La+Py co-infection increased parasitaemia, patent infection and induced mortality in non-lethal Malaria infection. Regarding Leishmaniasis, Lb+Py co-infected group presented smaller lesions and less ulceration than Lb single-infected animals. In contrast, La+Py co-infected group presented only a transitory delay on the development of lesions when compared to La single-infected mice. Decreased levels of IFN-γ, TNF, IL-6, and IL-10 were observed in the serum of co-infected groups, demonstrating a modulation of Malaria immune response by Leishmania co-infections. We observed an intense thymic atrophy in Py single-infected and co-infected groups, which recovered earlier in co-infected animals. The CD4 and CD8 T cell profiles in thymus, spleens and lymph nodes did not differ between Py single and co-infected groups, except for a decrease in CD4+CD8+ T cells which also increased faster in co-infected mice. Our results suggest that Py and Leishmania co-infection

  20. Malaria-Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Co-infection: Influence on Disease Outcomes and Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Raquel A; Silva-Dos-Santos, Danielle; Perce-da-Silva, Daiana S; Oliveira-Ferreira, Joseli; Villa-Verde, Dea M S; De Luca, Paula M; Banic, Dalma M

    2016-01-01

    Malaria and Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) are co-endemic throughout large regions in tropical countries and co-infection may impact the evolution of host-parasite interactions. In the present study, we evaluate Malaria/Leishmaniasis disease outcome, Th1/Th2 cytokine levels and the CD4 and CD8 T-cell profiles in a co-infection murine model (BALB/c) of Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL (Py) and Leishmania amazonensis (La) or L. braziliensis (Lb). Malaria parasitaemia was assessed through blood strains stained with Giemsa. Leishmania lesions were monitored with a digital caliper and parasite loads determined by limiting-dilution assay. Serum levels of IFN-γ, TNF, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-17 were determined using multiplexed bead assay and expression of CD3, CD4, and CD8 T-cells markers were determined by Flow Cytometry in the thymus, spleens and lymph nodes. Parasitaemia in Lb+Py co-infected group was lower than in Py single-infected group, suggesting a protective effect of Lb co-infection in Malaria progression. In contrast, La+Py co-infection increased parasitaemia, patent infection and induced mortality in non-lethal Malaria infection. Regarding Leishmaniasis, Lb+Py co-infected group presented smaller lesions and less ulceration than Lb single-infected animals. In contrast, La+Py co-infected group presented only a transitory delay on the development of lesions when compared to La single-infected mice. Decreased levels of IFN-γ, TNF, IL-6, and IL-10 were observed in the serum of co-infected groups, demonstrating a modulation of Malaria immune response by Leishmania co-infections. We observed an intense thymic atrophy in Py single-infected and co-infected groups, which recovered earlier in co-infected animals. The CD4 and CD8 T cell profiles in thymus, spleens and lymph nodes did not differ between Py single and co-infected groups, except for a decrease in CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells which also increased faster in co-infected mice. Our results suggest that Py and Leishmania

  1. The role of co-infections in HIV epidemic trajectory and positive prevention: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Emily L.; Weiss, Helen A.; Wasserheit, Judith N.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Recurrent or persistent co-infections may increase HIV viral load (VL) and, consequently, risk of HIV transmission, thus increasing HIV incidence. We evaluated the association between malaria, HSV-2 and TB co-infections and their treatment on HIV VL. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of the association of malaria, HSV-2 and tuberculosis co-infections and their treatment on HIV VL. Methods PunMed and Embase databases were searched to February 10th 2010 for studies in adults that reported HIV plasma and/or genital VL by co-infection status or treatment. Meta-analyses were conducted using random-effects models. Results Forty-five eligible articles were identified (6 malaria, 20 HSV-2 and 19 tuberculosis). There was strong evidence of increased HIV VL with acute malaria (0.67 log10 copies/mL, 95% CI: 0.15, 1.19) and decreased VL following treatment (−0.37 log10 copies/mL, 95% CI: −0.70, −0.04). Similarly, HSV-2 infection was associated with increased HIV VL (0.18 log10 copies/mL, 95% CI: 0.01, 0.34), which decreased with HSV suppressive therapy (−0.28 log10 copies/mL, 95% CI: −0.36, − 0.19). Active tuberculosis was associated with increased HIV VL (log10 copies/mL 0.40, 95% CI: 0.13–0.67), but there was no association between tuberculosis treatment and VL reduction (log10 copies/mL −0.02, 95% CI −0.19, 0.15). Conclusions Co-infections may increase HIV VL in populations where they are prevalent, thereby facilitating HIV transmission. These effects may be reversed with treatment. However, to limit HIV trajectory and optimize positive prevention for HIV-infected individuals pre-ART, we must better understand the mechanisms responsible for augmented VL and the magnitude of VL reduction required, and retune treatment regimens accordingly PMID:21633287

  2. Serum adiponectin in HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus mono- and co-infected Kenyan injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Ndombi, Eric M; Budambula, Valentine; Webale, Mark K; Musumba, Francis O; Wesongah, Jesca O; Mibei, Erick; Ahmed, Aabid A; Lihana, Raphael; Were, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin is an important marker of anthropometric profiles of adipose tissue. However, association of adiponectin and adiposity in HIV mono- and co-infected and hepatitis (HCV) injection drug users (IDUs) has not been elucidated. Therefore, the relationship of total adiponectin levels with anthropometric indices of adiposity was examined in HIV mono-infected (anti-retroviral treatment, ART-naive, n=16 and -experienced, n=34); HCV mono-infected, n=36; HIV and HCV co-infected (ART-naive, n=5 and -experienced, n=13); uninfected, n=19 IDUs; and healthy controls, n=16 from coastal Kenya. Anthropometric indices of adiposity were recorded and total circulating adiponectin levels were measured in serum samples using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Adiponectin levels differed significantly amongst the study groups (P<0.0001). Post-hoc analyses revealed decreased levels in HIV mono-infected ART-naive IDUs in comparison to uninfected IDUs (P<0.05) and healthy controls (P<0.05). However, adiponectin levels were elevated in HCV mono-infected IDUs relative to HIV mono-infected ART-naive (P<0.001) and -experienced (P<0.001) as well as HIV and HCV co-infected ART-naive (P<0.05) IDUs. Furthermore, adiponectin correlated with weight (ρ=0.687; P=0.003) and BMI (ρ=0.598; P=0.014) in HIV mono-infected ART-naive IDUs; waist circumference (ρ=−0.626; P<0.0001), hip (ρ=−0.561; P=0.001) circumference, and bust-to-waist ratio (ρ=0.561; P=0.001) in HIV mono-infected ART-experienced IDUs; waist girth (ρ=0.375; P=0.024) in HCV mono-infected IDUs; and waist-to-hip ratio (ρ=−0.872; P=0.048) in HIV and HCV co-infected ART-naive IDUs. Altogether, these results suggest suppression of adiponectin production in treatment-naive HIV mono-infected IDUs and that circulating adiponectin is a useful surrogate marker of altered adiposity in treatment-naive and -experienced HIV and HCV mono- and co-infected IDUs. PMID:26306727

  3. Genetic diversity at the Dhn3 locus in Turkish Hordeum spontaneum populations with comparative structural analyses.

    PubMed

    Uçarlı, Cüneyt; McGuffin, Liam J; Çaputlu, Süleyman; Aravena, Andres; Gürel, Filiz

    2016-02-12

    We analysed Hordeum spontaneum accessions from 21 different locations to understand the genetic diversity of HsDhn3 alleles and effects of single base mutations on the intrinsically disordered structure of the resulting polypeptide (HsDHN3). HsDHN3 was found to be YSK2-type with a low-frequency 6-aa deletion in the beginning of Exon 1. There is relatively high diversity in the intron region of HsDhn3 compared to the two exon regions. We have found subtle differences in K segments led to changes in amino acids chemical properties. Predictions for protein interaction profiles suggest the presence of a protein-binding site in HsDHN3 that coincides with the K1 segment. Comparison of DHN3 to closely related cereals showed that all of them contain a nuclear localization signal sequence flanking to the K1 segment and a novel conserved region located between the S and K1 segments [E(D/T)DGMGGR]. We found that H. vulgare, H. spontaneum, and Triticum urartu DHN3s have a greater number of phosphorylation sites for protein kinase C than other cereal species, which may be related to stress adaptation. Our results show that the nature and extent of mutations in the conserved segments of K1 and K2 are likely to be key factors in protection of cells.

  4. Genetic characterization and transcription analyses of the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) isg15 gene.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Patricia; Garcia-Rosado, Esther; Borrego, Juan J; Alonso, M Carmen

    2016-08-01

    Fish interferons are cytokines involved in its resistance to viral infections by inducing the transcription of several interferon-induced genes, such as isg15. The aim of the present study was the genetic characterization of the European sea bass isg15 gene, describing the regulatory motifs found in its sequence. In addition, an in vivo analysis of transcription in response to betanodavirus (RGNNV genotype) and poly I:C has been performed. The analysis of the resulting sequences showed that sea bass isg15 gene is composed of two exons and a single 276-bp intron located at the 5'-UTR region. The full length cDNA is 1143-bp, including a 102-bp 5'-UTR region, a 474-bp ORF, and a 291-bp 3'-UTR region. Several mRNA-regulatory elements, including three unusual ATTTA instability motifs in the intron, and four ATTTA motifs along with a cytoplasmic polyadenylation element in the 3'-UTR region, have been found in this sequence. The in vivo analyses revealed a similar kinetics and level of transcription in fish brain and head kidney after poly I:C inoculation; however, the induction caused by RGNNV started earlier in brain, where the upregulation of isg15 gene transcription was high. The present study contributes to further characterize the European sea bass IFN I response against RGNNV infections.

  5. Comparative and Genetic Analyses of the Putative Vibrio cholerae Lipopolysaccharide Core Oligosaccharide Biosynthesis (wav) Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Nesper, Jutta; Kraiß, Anita; Schild, Stefan; Blaβ, Julia; Klose, Karl E.; Bockemühl, Jochen; Reidl, Joachim

    2002-01-01

    We identified five different putative wav gene cluster types, which are responsible for the synthesis of the core oligosaccharide (OS) region of Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide. Preliminary evidence that the genes encoded by this cluster are involved in core OS biosynthesis came from analysis of the recently released O1 El Tor V. cholerae genome sequence and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of O1 El Tor mutant strains defective in three genes (waaF, waaL, and wavB). Investigations of 38 different V. cholerae strains by Southern blotting, PCR, and sequencing analyses showed that the O1 El Tor wav gene cluster type is prevalent among clinical isolates of different serogroups associated with cholera and environmental O1 strains. In contrast, we found differences in the wav gene contents of 19 unrelated non-O1, non-O139 environmental and human isolates not associated with cholera. These strains contained four new wav gene cluster types that differ from each other in distinct gene loci, providing evidence for horizontal transfer of wav genes and for limited structural diversity of the core OS among V. cholerae isolates. Our results show genetic diversity in the core OS biosynthesis gene cluster and predominance of the type 1 wav gene locus in strains associated with clinical cholera, suggesting that a specific core OS structure could contribute to V. cholerae virulence. PMID:11953379

  6. Temporal and spatial analyses disclose consequences of habitat fragmentation on the genetic diversity in capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus).

    PubMed

    Segelbacher, Gernot; Manel, Stéphanie; Tomiuk, Jürgen

    2008-05-01

    As a result of habitat fragmentation, the capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus) population in the Black Forest mountain range in southwestern Germany has declined rapidly during the last decades and now persists in patchy isolated fragments. To study the effects of fragmentation, we quantified dispersal patterns by genotyping 213 individuals in four subpopulations. We used a landscape genetics approach to analyse individual genetic variation, and despite overall low genetic structure, we found strong indications for a major boundary separating the northern part of the Black Forest area from the other subpopulations. Males and females display different gene flow patterns across the landscape. Females tend to disperse across longer distances than do males. We additionally studied the effects of the population decline on genetic diversity during the last hundred years. Although the population has dramatically declined from over 4000 to 250 males over a few decades, genetic diversity was not affected in the same way. We found two haplotypes that were present only in historic samples but microsatellite markers revealed no significant reduction in genetic diversity. Among historic samples, genetic differentiation was very low, indicating that the current genetic structure is caused by recent habitat fragmentation. We argue that inferences about reduced genetic diversity are drawn cautiously and recommend sampling over different temporal scales.

  7. From sexless to sexy: Why it is time for human genetics to consider and report analyses of sex.

    PubMed

    Powers, Matthew S; Smith, Phillip H; McKee, Sherry A; Ehringer, Marissa A

    2017-01-01

    Science has come a long way with regard to the consideration of sex differences in clinical and preclinical research, but one field remains behind the curve: human statistical genetics. The goal of this commentary is to raise awareness and discussion about how to best consider and evaluate possible sex effects in the context of large-scale human genetic studies. Over the course of this commentary, we reinforce the importance of interpreting genetic results in the context of biological sex, establish evidence that sex differences are not being considered in human statistical genetics, and discuss how best to conduct and report such analyses. Our recommendation is to run stratified analyses by sex no matter the sample size or the result and report the findings. Summary statistics from stratified analyses are helpful for meta-analyses, and patterns of sex-dependent associations may be hidden in a combined dataset. In the age of declining sequencing costs, large consortia efforts, and a number of useful control samples, it is now time for the field of human genetics to appropriately include sex in the design, analysis, and reporting of results.

  8. Co-infection of Acipenserid herpesvirus 2 (AciHV-2) and Streptococcus iniae in cultured white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus.

    PubMed

    Soto, Esteban; Richey, Christine; Stevens, Brittany; Yun, Susan; Kenelty, Kirsten; Reichley, Stephen; Griffin, Matt; Kurobe, Tomofumi; Camus, Al

    2017-03-30

    A mortality event in cultured white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (Richardson, 1836) sub-adults was investigated. After transfer between farms, high mortality was observed in fish, associated with back arching, abnormal swimming, and ulcerative skin lesions. Necropsy of moribund individuals revealed hemorrhagic ascites and petechial hemorrhages in the coelomic peritoneum and serosa of internal organs. Acipenserid herpesvirus 2 (AciHV-2) was isolated from external tissue samples, then identified and genotyped by sequencing of the terminase and polymerase genes. In addition, Streptococcus iniae was recovered from internal organs of affected fish. Histologic changes were limited to interstitial hematopoietic areas of the kidney and consisted of small foci of necrosis accompanied by fibrin deposition, minimal inflammatory response, and small numbers of bacterial cocci compatible with streptococci. Identity was confirmed by partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, and gyrB genes. Genetic fingerprinting demonstrated a genetic profile distinct from S. iniae isolates recovered from previous outbreaks in wild and cultured fish in North America, South America, and the Caribbean. Although the isolates were resistant to white sturgeon complement in serum killing assays, in vivo challenges failed to fulfill Koch's postulates. However, the clinical presentation, coupled with consistent recovery of S. iniae and AciHV-2 from moribund fish, suggests viral and bacterial co-infection were the proximate cause of death. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of AciHV-2 and S. iniae co-infection in cultured white sturgeon.

  9. Genetic structure of wild boar (Sus scrofa) populations from East Asia based on microsatellite loci analyses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wild boar, Sus scrofa, is an extant wild ancestor of the domestic pig as an agro-economically important mammal. Wild boar has a worldwide distribution with its geographic origin in Southeast Asia, but genetic diversity and genetic structure of wild boar in East Asia are poorly understood. To characterize the pattern and amount of genetic variation and population structure of wild boar in East Asia, we genotyped and analyzed microsatellite loci for a total of 238 wild boar specimens from ten locations across six countries in East and Southeast Asia. Results Our data indicated that wild boar populations in East Asia are genetically diverse and structured, showing a significant correlation of genetic distance with geographic distance and implying a low level of gene flow at a regional scale. Bayesian-based clustering analysis was indicative of seven inferred genetic clusters in which wild boars in East Asia are geographically structured. The level of genetic diversity was relatively high in wild boars from Southeast Asia, compared with those from Northeast Asia. This gradient pattern of genetic diversity is consistent with an assumed ancestral population of wild boar in Southeast Asia. Genetic evidences from a relationship tree and structure analysis suggest that wild boar in Jeju Island, South Korea have a distinct genetic background from those in mainland Korea. Conclusions Our results reveal a diverse pattern of genetic diversity and the existence of genetic differentiation among wild boar populations inhabiting East Asia. This study highlights the potential contribution of genetic variation of wild boar to the high genetic diversity of local domestic pigs during domestication in East Asia. PMID:25034725

  10. The Autism Simplex Collection: an international, expertly phenotyped autism sample for genetic and phenotypic analyses.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, Joseph D; Bolshakova, Nadia; Brownfeld, Jessica M; Anney, Richard Jl; Bender, Patrick; Bernier, Raphael; Cook, Edwin H; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael; Freitag, Christine M; Hallmayer, Joachim; Geschwind, Daniel; Klauck, Sabine M; Nurnberger, John I; Oliveira, Guiomar; Pinto, Dalila; Poustka, Fritz; Scherer, Stephen W; Shih, Andy; Sutcliffe, James S; Szatmari, Peter; Vicente, Astrid M; Vieland, Veronica; Gallagher, Louise

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need for expanding and enhancing autism spectrum disorder (ASD) samples, in order to better understand causes of ASD. In a unique public-private partnership, 13 sites with extensive experience in both the assessment and diagnosis of ASD embarked on an ambitious, 2-year program to collect samples for genetic and phenotypic research and begin analyses on these samples. The program was called The Autism Simplex Collection (TASC). TASC sample collection began in 2008 and was completed in 2010, and included nine sites from North America and four sites from Western Europe, as well as a centralized Data Coordinating Center. Over 1,700 trios are part of this collection, with DNA from transformed cells now available through the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic (ADOS-G) measures are available for all probands, as are standardized IQ measures, Vineland Adaptive Behavioral Scales (VABS), the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT), and physical measures (height, weight, and head circumference). At almost every site, additional phenotypic measures were collected, including the Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire (BAPQ) and Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised (RBS-R), as well as the non-word repetition scale, Communication Checklist (Children's or Adult), and Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC). Moreover, for nearly 1,000 trios, the Autism Genome Project Consortium (AGP) has carried out Illumina 1 M SNP genotyping and called copy number variation (CNV) in the samples, with data being made available through the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Whole exome sequencing (WES) has been carried out in over 500 probands, together with ancestry matched controls, and this data is also available through the NIH. Additional WES is being carried out by the Autism Sequencing Consortium (ASC), where the focus is on sequencing complete

  11. The Autism Simplex Collection: an international, expertly phenotyped autism sample for genetic and phenotypic analyses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need for expanding and enhancing autism spectrum disorder (ASD) samples, in order to better understand causes of ASD. Methods In a unique public-private partnership, 13 sites with extensive experience in both the assessment and diagnosis of ASD embarked on an ambitious, 2-year program to collect samples for genetic and phenotypic research and begin analyses on these samples. The program was called The Autism Simplex Collection (TASC). TASC sample collection began in 2008 and was completed in 2010, and included nine sites from North America and four sites from Western Europe, as well as a centralized Data Coordinating Center. Results Over 1,700 trios are part of this collection, with DNA from transformed cells now available through the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic (ADOS-G) measures are available for all probands, as are standardized IQ measures, Vineland Adaptive Behavioral Scales (VABS), the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT), and physical measures (height, weight, and head circumference). At almost every site, additional phenotypic measures were collected, including the Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire (BAPQ) and Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised (RBS-R), as well as the non-word repetition scale, Communication Checklist (Children’s or Adult), and Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC). Moreover, for nearly 1,000 trios, the Autism Genome Project Consortium (AGP) has carried out Illumina 1 M SNP genotyping and called copy number variation (CNV) in the samples, with data being made available through the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Whole exome sequencing (WES) has been carried out in over 500 probands, together with ancestry matched controls, and this data is also available through the NIH. Additional WES is being carried out by the Autism Sequencing Consortium (ASC), where the

  12. Co-infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1): does immune activation lead to a faster progression to AIDS?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent data have shown that HTLV-1 is prevalent among HIV positive patients in Mozambique, although the impact of HTLV-1 infection on HIV disease progression remains controversial. Our aim was to determine the phenotypic profile of T lymphocytes subsets among Mozambican patients co-infected by HIV and HTLV-1. Methods We enrolled 29 patients co-infected by HTLV-1 and HIV (co-infected), 59 patients mono-infected by HIV (HIV) and 16 healthy controls (HC), respectively. For phenotypic analysis, cells were stained with the following fluorochrome-labeled anti-human monoclonal antibodies CD4-APC, CD8-PerCP, CD25-PE, CD62L-FITC, CD45RA-FITC. CD45RO-PE, CD38-PE; being analysed by four-colour flow cytometry. Results We initially found that CD4+ T cell counts were significantly higher in co-infected, as compared to HIV groups. Moreover, CD4+ T Lymphocytes from co-infected patients presented significantly higher levels of CD45RO and CD25, but lower levels of CD45RA and CD62L, strongly indicating that CD4+ T cells are more activated under HTLV-1 plus HIV co-infection. Conclusion Our data indicate that HTLV-1/HIV co-infected patients progress with higher CD4+ T cell counts and higher levels of activation markers. In this context, it is conceivable that in co-infected individuals, these higher levels of activation may account for a faster progression to AIDS. PMID:20028500

  13. Mutational analyses of molecularly cloned satellite tobacco mosaic virus during serial passage in plants: Evidence for hotspots of genetic change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.; Dodds, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The high level of genetic diversity and rapid evolution of viral RNA genomes are well documented, but few studies have characterized the rate and nature of ongoing genetic change over time under controlled experimental conditions, especially in plant hosts. The RNA genome of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) was used as an effective model for such studies because of advantageous features of its genome structure and because the extant genetic heterogeneity of STMV has been characterized previously. In the present study, the process of genetic change over time was studied by monitoring multiple serial passage lines of STMV populations for changes in their consensus sequences. A total of 42 passage lines were initiated by inoculation of tobacco plants with a helper tobamovirus and one of four STMV RNA inocula that were transcribed from full-length infectious STMV clones or extracted from purified STMV type strain virions. Ten serial passages were carried out for each line and the consensus genotypes of progeny STMV populations were assessed for genetic change by RNase protection analyses of the entire 1,059-nt STMV genome. Three different types of genetic change were observed, including the fixation of novel mutations in 9 of 42 lines, mutation at the major heterogeneity site near nt 751 in 5 of the 19 lines inoculated with a single genotype, and selection of a single major genotype in 6 of the 23 lines inoculated with mixed genotypes. Sequence analyses showed that the majority of mutations were single base substitutions. The distribution of mutation sites included three clusters in which mutations occurred at or very near the same site, suggesting hot spots of genetic change in the STMV genome. The diversity of genetic changes in sibling lines is clear evidence for the important role of chance and random sampling events in the process of genetic diversification of STMV virus populations.

  14. Mutation analyses of molecularly cloned satellite tobacco mosaic virus during serial passage in plants: evidence for hotspots of genetic change.

    PubMed

    Kurath, G; Dodds, J A

    1995-07-01

    The high level of genetic diversity and rapid evolution of viral RNA genomes are well documented, but few studies have characterized the rate and nature of ongoing genetic change over time under controlled experimental conditions, especially in plant hosts. The RNA genome of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) was used as an effective model for such studies because of advantageous features of its genome structure and because the extant genetic heterogeneity of STMV has been characterized previously. In the present study, the process of genetic change over time was studied by monitoring multiple serial passage lines of STMV populations for changes in their consensus sequences. A total of 42 passage lines were initiated by inoculation of tobacco plants with a helper tobamovirus and one of four STMV RNA inocula that were transcribed from full-length infectious STMV clones or extracted from purified STMV type strain virions. Ten serial passages were carried out for each line and the consensus genotypes of progeny STMV populations were assessed for genetic change by RNase protection analyses of the entire 1,059-nt STMV genome. Three different types of genetic change were observed, including the fixation of novel mutations in 9 of 42 lines, mutation at the major heterogeneity site near nt 751 in 5 of the 19 lines inoculated with a single genotype, and selection of a single major genotype in 6 of the 23 lines inoculated with mixed genotypes. Sequence analyses showed that the majority of mutations were single base substitutions. The distribution of mutation sites included three clusters in which mutations occurred at or very near the same site, suggesting hot spots of genetic change in the STMV genome. The diversity of genetic changes in sibling lines is clear evidence for the important role of chance and random sampling events in the process of genetic diversification of STMV virus populations.

  15. NGS population genetics analyses reveal divergent evolution of a Lyme Borreliosis agent in Europe and Asia.

    PubMed

    Gatzmann, Fanny; Metzler, Dirk; Krebs, Stefan; Blum, Helmut; Sing, Andreas; Takano, Ai; Kawabata, Hiroki; Fingerle, Volker; Margos, Gabriele; Becker, Noémie S

    2015-04-01

    Borrelia bavariensis is a recently described agent of Lyme disease within the B. burgdorferi sensu lato species complex and exhibits a strong capacity for human pathogenicity. B. bavariensis strains are widely distributed in Eurasia spanning the distribution range of the tick vectors Ixodes persulcatus and I. ricinus. It has been suggested that B. bavariensis forms two populations, one of which arose through vector adaptation and geographic expansion. We have performed phylogenetic and population genetic analyses with next-generation sequencing data of 26 strains of B. bavariensis targeting the main linear chromosome and two plasmids (lp54, cp26). A very low number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was found in the European population and a deep branching pattern between European and Asian B. bavariensis was observed in all phylogenies. The results confirm the population structure of B. bavariensis and strongly support the hypothesis of clonal expansion of the European population of B. bavariensis. In addition, signals of positive selection identified in the populations further support the hypothesis that the European population of B. bavariensis likely underwent vector adaptation in its recent evolutionary history. Identified genes represent promising candidates for experimental vector adaptation studies. Thus, this species forms a very good model to study vector adaptation, which is known to play an important role in the geographic distribution of B. burgdorferi. Analysis of well known virulence determinants that are attributed to severity of clinical manifestation in B. burgdorferi s.s. revealed no variation within the European population of B. bavariensis, underlining the importance of including various Borrelia species into investigations that aim to understand the pathogenesis of Lyme disease agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic Association and Gene-Gene Interaction Analyses in African American Dialysis Patients With Nondiabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bostrom, Meredith A.; Kao, W.H. Linda; Li, Man; Abboud, Hanna E.; Adler, Sharon G.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Hanson, Robert L.; Nicholas, Susanne B.; Rasooly, Rebekah S.; Sedor, John R.; Coresh, Josef; Kohn, Orly F.; Leehey, David J.; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Lipkowitz, Michael S.; Meoni, Lucy A.; Klag, Michael J.; Lu, Lingyi; Hicks, Pamela J.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Parekh, Rulan S.; Bowden, Donald W.; Freedman, Barry I.

    2011-01-01

    Background African Americans (AAs) have increased susceptibility to non-diabetic nephropathy relative to European Americans. Study Design Follow-up of a pooled genome-wide association study (GWAS) in AA dialysis patients with nondiabetic nephropathy; novel gene-gene interaction analyses. Setting & Participants Wake Forest sample: 962 AA nondiabetic nephropathy cases; 931 non-nephropathy controls. Replication sample: 668 Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND) AA nondiabetic nephropathy cases; 804 non-nephropathy controls. Predictors Individual genotyping of top 1420 pooled GWAS-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 54 SNPs in six nephropathy susceptibility genes. Outcomes APOL1 genetic association and additional candidate susceptibility loci interacting with, or independently from, APOL1. Results The strongest GWAS associations included two non-coding APOL1 SNPs, rs2239785 (odds ratio [OR], 0.33; dominant; p = 5.9 × 10−24) and rs136148 (OR, 0.54; additive; p = 1.1 × 10−7) with replication in FIND (p = 5.0 × 10−21 and 1.9 × 10−05, respectively). Rs2239785 remained significantly associated after controlling for the APOL1 G1 and G2 coding variants. Additional top hits included a CFH SNP(OR from meta-analysis in above 3367 AA cases and controls, 0.81; additive; p = 6.8 × 10−4). The 1420 SNPs were tested for interaction with APOL1 G1 and G2 variants. Several interactive SNPs were detected, the most significant was rs16854341 in the podocin gene (NPHS2) (p = 0.0001). Limitations Non-pooled GWAS have not been performed in AA nondiabetic nephropathy. Conclusions This follow-up of a pooled GWAS provides additional and independent evidence that APOL1 variants contribute to nondiabetic nephropathy in AAs and identified additional associated and interactive non-diabetic nephropathy susceptibility genes. PMID:22119407

  17. Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) experimentally infected with B19V and hepatitis A virus: no evidence of the co-infection as a cause of acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Luciane Almeida Amado; Marchevsky, Renato Sergio; Gaspar, Ana Maria Coimbra; Garcia, Rita de Cassia Nasser Cubel; de Almeida, Adilson José; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo; de Castro, Tatiana Xavier; do Nascimento, Jussara Pereira; Brown, Kevin E; Pinto, Marcelo Alves

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to analyse the course and the outcome of the liver disease in the co-infected animals in order to evaluate a possible synergic effect of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) co-infection. Nine adult cynomolgus monkeys were inoculated with serum obtained from a fatal case of B19V infection and/or a faecal suspension of acute HAV. The presence of specific antibodies to HAV and B19V, liver enzyme levels, viraemia, haematological changes, and necroinflammatory liver lesions were used for monitoring the infections. Seroconversion was confirmed in all infected groups. A similar pattern of B19V infection to human disease was observed, which was characterised by high and persistent viraemia in association with reticulocytopenia and mild to moderate anaemia during the period of investigation (59 days). Additionally, the intranuclear inclusion bodies were observed in pro-erythroblast cell from an infected cynomolgus and B19V Ag in hepatocytes. The erythroid hypoplasia and decrease in lymphocyte counts were more evident in the co-infected group. The present results demonstrated, for the first time, the susceptibility of cynomolgus to B19V infection, but it did not show a worsening of liver histopathology in the co-infected group. PMID:27074255

  18. Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) experimentally infected with B19V and hepatitis A virus: no evidence of the co-infection as a cause of acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Leon, Luciane Almeida Amado; Marchevsky, Renato Sergio; Gaspar, Ana Maria Coimbra; Garcia, Rita de Cassia Nasser Cubel; Almeida, Adilson José de; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo; Castro, Tatiana Xavier de; Nascimento, Jussara Pereira do; Brown, Kevin E; Pinto, Marcelo Alves

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to analyse the course and the outcome of the liver disease in the co-infected animals in order to evaluate a possible synergic effect of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) co-infection. Nine adult cynomolgus monkeys were inoculated with serum obtained from a fatal case of B19V infection and/or a faecal suspension of acute HAV. The presence of specific antibodies to HAV and B19V, liver enzyme levels, viraemia, haematological changes, and necroinflammatory liver lesions were used for monitoring the infections. Seroconversion was confirmed in all infected groups. A similar pattern of B19V infection to human disease was observed, which was characterised by high and persistent viraemia in association with reticulocytopenia and mild to moderate anaemia during the period of investigation (59 days). Additionally, the intranuclear inclusion bodies were observed in pro-erythroblast cell from an infected cynomolgus and B19V Ag in hepatocytes. The erythroid hypoplasia and decrease in lymphocyte counts were more evident in the co-infected group. The present results demonstrated, for the first time, the susceptibility of cynomolgus to B19V infection, but it did not show a worsening of liver histopathology in the co-infected group.

  19. Mega2: data-handling for facilitating genetic linkage and association analyses.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Nandita; Almasy, Lee; Schroeder, Mark; Mulvihill, William P; Weeks, Daniel E

    2005-05-15

    Mega2, the manipulation environment for genetic analysis, transparently allows users to process genetic data for family-based or case/control studies accurately and efficiently. In addition to data validation checks, Mega2 provides analysis setup capabilities for a broad choice of commonly used genetic analysis programs, including SimWalk2, ASPEX, GeneHunter, SLINK, SIMULATE, S.A.G.E., SOLAR, Vitesse, Allegro, PREST, PAP, Loki, Merlin and MENDEL. http://watson.hgen.pitt.edu/register/

  20. Alternative models in genetic analyses of carcass traits measured by ultrasonography in Guzerá cattle: A Bayesian approach

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective was to study alternative models for genetic analyses of carcass traits assessed by ultrasonography in Guzerá cattle. Data from 947 measurements (655 animals) of Rib-eye area (REA), rump fat thickness (RFT) and backfat thickness (BFT) were used. Finite polygenic models (FPM), infinitesi...

  1. Recombinant interferon-γ lentivirus co-infection inhibits adenovirus replication ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Yin, Sen; Tan, Wanlong; Xiao, Dong; Weng, Yunceng; Wang, Wenjing; Li, Tingting; Shi, Junwen; Shuai, Lifang; Li, Hongwei; Zhou, Jianhua; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant interferon-γ (IFNγ) production in cultured lentivirus (LV) was explored for inhibition of target virus in cells co-infected with adenovirus type 5 (Ad5). The ability of three different promoters of CMV, EF1α and Ubiquitin initiating the enhanced green fluorescence protein (GFP) activities within lentiviruses was systematically assessed in various cell lines, which showed that certain cell lines selected the most favorable promoter driving a high level of transgenic expression. Recombinant IFNγ lentivirus carrying CMV promoter (LV-CMV-IFNγ) was generated to co-infect 293A cells with a viral surrogate of recombinant GFP Ad5 in parallel with LV-CMV-GFP control. The best morphologic conditions were observed from the two lentiviruses co-infected cells, while single adenovirus infected cells underwent clear pathologic changes. Viral load of adenoviruses from LV-CMV-IFNγ or LV-CMV-GFP co-infected cell cultures was significantly lower than that from adenovirus alone infected cells (P=0.005-0.041), and the reduction of adenoviral load in the co-infected cells was 86% and 61%, respectively. Ad5 viral load from LV-CMV-IFNγ co-infected cells was significantly lower than that from LV-CMV-GFP co-infection (P=0.032), which suggested that IFNγ rather than GFP could further enhance the inhibition of Ad5 replication in the recombinant lentivirus co-infected cells. The results suggest that LV-CMV-IFNγ co-infection could significantly inhibit the target virus replication and might be a potential approach for alternative therapy of severe viral diseases.

  2. Recombinant Interferon-γ Lentivirus Co-Infection Inhibits Adenovirus Replication Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Yin, Sen; Tan, Wanlong; Xiao, Dong; Weng, Yunceng; Wang, Wenjing; Li, Tingting; Shi, Junwen; Shuai, Lifang; Li, Hongwei; Zhou, Jianhua; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant interferon-γ (IFNγ) production in cultured lentivirus (LV) was explored for inhibition of target virus in cells co-infected with adenovirus type 5 (Ad5). The ability of three different promoters of CMV, EF1α and Ubiquitin initiating the enhanced green fluorescence protein (GFP) activities within lentiviruses was systematically assessed in various cell lines, which showed that certain cell lines selected the most favorable promoter driving a high level of transgenic expression. Recombinant IFNγ lentivirus carrying CMV promoter (LV-CMV-IFNγ) was generated to co-infect 293A cells with a viral surrogate of recombinant GFP Ad5 in parallel with LV-CMV-GFP control. The best morphologic conditions were observed from the two lentiviruses co-infected cells, while single adenovirus infected cells underwent clear pathologic changes. Viral load of adenoviruses from LV-CMV-IFNγ or LV-CMV-GFP co-infected cell cultures was significantly lower than that from adenovirus alone infected cells (P = 0.005–0.041), and the reduction of adenoviral load in the co-infected cells was 86% and 61%, respectively. Ad5 viral load from LV-CMV-IFNγ co-infected cells was significantly lower than that from LV-CMV-GFP co-infection (P = 0.032), which suggested that IFNγ rather than GFP could further enhance the inhibition of Ad5 replication in the recombinant lentivirus co-infected cells. The results suggest that LV-CMV-IFNγ co-infection could significantly inhibit the target virus replication and might be a potential approach for alternative therapy of severe viral diseases. PMID:22916129

  3. Co-infection of Long-Term Carriers of Plasmodium falciparum with Schistosoma haematobium Enhances Protection from Febrile Malaria: A Prospective Cohort Study in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Sangala, Jules; Li, Shanping; Doumtabe, Didier; Kone, Younoussou; Traoré, Abdrahamane; Bathily, Aboudramane; Sogoba, Nafomon; Coulibaly, Michel E.; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Ongoiba, Aissata; Kayentao, Kassoum; Diallo, Mouctar; Dramane, Zongo; Nutman, Thomas B.; Crompton, Peter D.; Doumbo, Ogobara; Traore, Boubacar

    2014-01-01

    needed to determine whether co-infection induces immunomodulatory mechanisms that protect against febrile malaria or whether genetic, behavioral, or environmental factors not accounted for here explain these findings. PMID:25210876

  4. Integrating phylogenetic and population genetic analyses of multiple loci to test species divergence hypotheses in Passerina buntings.

    PubMed

    Carling, Matt D; Brumfield, Robb T

    2008-01-01

    Phylogenetic and population genetic analyses of DNA sequence data from 10 nuclear loci were used to test species divergence hypotheses within Passerina buntings, with special focus on a strongly supported, but controversial, sister relationship between Passerina amoena and P. caerulea inferred from a previous mitochondrial study. Here, a maximum-likelihood analysis of a concatenated 10-locus data set, as well as minimize-deep-coalescences and maximum-likelihood analyses of the locus-specific gene trees, recovered the traditional sister relationship between P. amoena and P. cyanea. In addition, a more recent divergence time estimate between P. amoena and P. cyanea than between P. amoena and P. caerulea provided evidence for the traditional sister relationship. These results provide a compelling example of how lineage sorting stochasticity can lead to incongruence between gene trees and species trees, and illustrate how phylogenetic and population genetic analyses can be integrated to investigate evolutionary relationships between recently diverged taxa.

  5. Analyses of genetic diversity in five Canadian dairy breeds using pedigree data.

    PubMed

    Melka, M G; Stachowicz, K; Miglior, F; Schenkel, F S

    2013-12-01

    The issue of loss of animal genetic diversity, worldwide in general and in Canada in particular, has become noteworthy. The objective of this study was to analyze the trend in within-breed genetic diversity and identify the major causes of loss of genetic diversity in five Canadian dairy breeds. Pedigrees were analyzed using the software EVA (evolutionary algorithm) and CFC (contribution, inbreeding, coancestry), and a FORTRAN package for pedigree analysis suited for large populations (PEDIG). The average rate of inbreeding in the last generation analyzed (2003 to 2007) was 0.93, 1.07, 1.26, 1.09 and 0.80% for Ayrshire, Brown Swiss, Canadienne, Guernsey and Milking Shorthorn, respectively, and the corresponding estimated effective population sizes were 54, 47, 40, 46 and 66, respectively. Based on coancestry coefficients, the estimated effective population sizes in the last generation were 62, 76, 43, 61 and 76, respectively. The estimated percentage of genetic diversity lost within each breed over the last four decades was 6, 7, 11, 8 and 5%, respectively. The relative proportion of genetic diversity lost due to random genetic drift in the five breeds ranged between 59.3% and 89.7%. The results indicate that each breed has lost genetic diversity over time and that the loss is gaining momentum due to increasing rates of inbreeding and reduced effective population sizes. Therefore, strategies to decrease rate of inbreeding and increase the effective population size are advised.

  6. Genetic analyses of Acanthamoeba isolates from contact lens storage cases of students in Seoul, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hak-Sun; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Hyo-Kyung; Kong, Hyun-Hee

    2001-01-01

    We conducted both the small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and mitochondrial (mt) DNA RFLP analyses for a genetic characterization of Acanthamoeba isolates from contact lens storage cases of students in Seoul, Korea. Twenty-three strains of Acanthamoeba from the American Type Culture Collection and twelve clinical isolates from Korean patients were used as reference strains. Thirty-nine isolates from contact lens storage cases were classified into seven types (KA/LS1, KA/LS2, KA/LS4, KA/LS5, KA/LS7, KA/LS18, KA/LS31). Four types (KA/LS1, KA/LS2, KA/LS5, KA/LS18) including 33 isolates were regarded as A. castellanii complex by riboprints. KA/LS1 type was the most predominant (51.3%) in the present survey area, followed by KA/LS2 (20.9%), and KA/LS5 (7.7%) types. Amoebae of KA/LS1 type had the same mtDNA RFLP and riboprint patterns as KA/E2 and KA/E12 strains, clinical isolates from Korean keratitis patients. Amoebae of KA/LS2 type had the identical mtDNA RFLP patterns with A. castellanii Ma strain, a corneal isolate from an American patient as amoebae of KA/LS5 type, with KA/E3 and KA/E8 strains from other Korean keratitis patients. Amoebae of KA/LS18 type had identical patterns with JAC/E1, an ocular isolate from a Japanese patient. Three types, which remain unidentified at species level, were not corresponded with any clinical isolate in their mtDNA RFLP and riboprint patterns. Out of 39 isolates analyzed in this study, mtDNA RFLP and riboprint patterns of 33 isolates (84.6%) were identical to already known clinical isolates, and therefore, they may be regarded as potentially keratopathogenic. These results suggest that contact lens wearers in Seoul should pay more attention to hygienic maintenance of contact lens storage cases for the prevention of Acanthamoeba keratitis. PMID:11441503

  7. Genetic analyses of Acanthamoeba isolates from contact lens storage cases of students in Seoul, Korea.

    PubMed

    Yu, H S; Choi, K H; Kim, H K; Kong, H H; Chung, D I

    2001-06-01

    We conducted both the small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and mitochondrial (mt) DNA RFLP analyses for a genetic characterization of Acanthamoeba isolates from contact lens storage cases of students in Seoul, Korea. Twenty-three strains of Acanthamoeba from the American Type Culture Collection and twelve clinical isolates from Korean patients were used as reference strains. Thirty-nine isolates from contact lens storage cases were classified into seven types (KA/LS1, KA/LS2, KA/LS4, KA/LS5, KA/LS7, KA/LS18, KA/LS31). Four types (KA/LS1, KA/LS2, KA/LS5, KA/LS18) including 33 isolates were regarded as A. castellanii complex by riboprints. KA/LS1 type was the most predominant (51.3%) in the present survey area, followed by KA/LS2 (20.9%), and KA/LS5 (7.7%) types. Amoebae of KA/LS1 type had the same mtDNA RFLP and riboprint patterns as KA/E2 and KA/E12 strains, clinical isolates from Korean keratitis patients. Amoebae of KA/LS2 type had the identical mtDNA RFLP patterns with A. castellanii Ma strain, a corneal isolate from an American patient as amoebae of KA/LS5 type, with KA/E3 and KA/E8 strains from other Korean keratitis patients. Amoebae of KA/LS18 type had identical patterns with JAC/E1, an ocular isolate from a Japanese patient. Three types, which remain unidentified at species level, were not corresponded with any clinical isolate in their mtDNA RFLP and riboprint patterns. Out of 39 isolates analyzed in this study, mtDNA RFLP and riboprint patterns of 33 isolates (84.6%) were identical to already known clinical isolates, and therefore, they may be regarded as potentially keratopathogenic. These results suggest that contact lens wearers in Seoul should pay more attention to hygienic maintenance of contact lens storage cases for the prevention of Acanthamoeba keratitis.

  8. Functional connectivity analyses in imaging genetics: considerations on methods and data interpretation.

    PubMed

    Bedenbender, Johannes; Paulus, Frieder M; Krach, Sören; Pyka, Martin; Sommer, Jens; Krug, Axel; Witt, Stephanie H; Rietschel, Marcella; Laneri, Davide; Kircher, Tilo; Jansen, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be combined with genotype assessment to identify brain systems that mediate genetic vulnerability to mental disorders ("imaging genetics"). A data analysis approach that is widely applied is "functional connectivity". In this approach, the temporal correlation between the fMRI signal from a pre-defined brain region (the so-called "seed point") and other brain voxels is determined. In this technical note, we show how the choice of freely selectable data analysis parameters strongly influences the assessment of the genetic modulation of connectivity features. In our data analysis we exemplarily focus on three methodological parameters: (i) seed voxel selection, (ii) noise reduction algorithms, and (iii) use of additional second level covariates. Our results show that even small variations in the implementation of a functional connectivity analysis can have an impact on the connectivity pattern that is as strong as the potential modulation by genetic allele variants. Some effects of genetic variation can only be found for one specific implementation of the connectivity analysis. A reoccurring difficulty in the field of psychiatric genetics is the non-replication of initially promising findings, partly caused by the small effects of single genes. The replication of imaging genetic results is therefore crucial for the long-term assessment of genetic effects on neural connectivity parameters. For a meaningful comparison of imaging genetics studies however, it is therefore necessary to provide more details on specific methodological parameters (e.g., seed voxel distribution) and to give information how robust effects are across the choice of methodological parameters.

  9. The effects of co-infection with human parvovirus B19 and Plasmodium falciparum on type and degree of anaemia in Ghanaian children.

    PubMed

    Duedu, Kwabena Obeng; Sagoe, Kwamena William Coleman; Ayeh-Kumi, Patrick Ferdinand; Affrim, Raymond Bedu; Adiku, Theophilus

    2013-02-01

    To determin the extent to which parvovirus B19 (B19V) and co-infection of B19V and malaria contribute to risk of anaemia in children. B19V DNA and malaria parasites were screened for 234 children at the PML Children's Hospital in Accra. The role of B19V and co-infection with B19V and malaria in anaemia was evaluated by analysing full blood cell counts, malaria and B19V DNA results from these children. The prevalence of B19V, malaria and co-infection with B19V and malaria was 4.7%, 41.9% and 2.6%, respectively. Malaria posed a greater risk in the development of mild anaemia compared to severe anaemia (OR=5.28 vrs 3.15) whereas B19V posed a higher risk in the development of severe anaemia compared to mild anaemia (OR=4.07 vrs 1.00) from a non-anaemic child. Persons with co-infection with B19V and malaria had 2.23 times the risk (95% CI=0.40-12.54) of developing severe anaemia should they already have a mild anaemia. The degree of anaemia was about three times affected by co-infection (Pillai's trace=0.551, P=0.001) as was affected by malaria alone (Pillai's trace=0.185, P=0.001). B19V alone did not significantly affect the development of anaemia in a non-anaemic child. Microcytic anaemia was associated with B19V and co-infection with B19V and malaria more than normocytic normochromic anaemia. B19V was associated with malaria in cases of severe anaemia. The association posed a significant risk for exacerbation of anaemia in mild anaemic children. B19V and co-infection with B19V and malaria may be associated with microcytic anaemia rather than normocytic normochromic anaemia as seen in cases of B19V infection among persons with red cell abnormalities.

  10. The effects of co-infection with human parvovirus B19 and Plasmodium falciparum on type and degree of anaemia in Ghanaian children

    PubMed Central

    Duedu, Kwabena Obeng; Sagoe, Kwamena William Coleman; Ayeh-Kumi, Patrick Ferdinand; Affrim, Raymond Bedu; Adiku, Theophilus

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determin the extent to which parvovirus B19 (B19V) and co-infection of B19V and malaria contribute to risk of anaemia in children. Methods B19V DNA and malaria parasites were screened for 234 children at the PML Children's Hospital in Accra. The role of B19V and co-infection with B19V and malaria in anaemia was evaluated by analysing full blood cell counts, malaria and B19V DNA results from these children. Results The prevalence of B19V, malaria and co-infection with B19V and malaria was 4.7%, 41.9% and 2.6%, respectively. Malaria posed a greater risk in the development of mild anaemia compared to severe anaemia (OR=5.28 vrs 3.15) whereas B19V posed a higher risk in the development of severe anaemia compared to mild anaemia (OR=4.07 vrs 1.00) from a non-anaemic child. Persons with co-infection with B19V and malaria had 2.23 times the risk (95% CI=0.40-12.54) of developing severe anaemia should they already have a mild anaemia. The degree of anaemia was about three times affected by co-infection (Pillai's trace=0.551, P=0.001) as was affected by malaria alone (Pillai's trace=0.185, P=0.001). B19V alone did not significantly affect the development of anaemia in a non-anaemic child. Microcytic anaemia was associated with B19V and co-infection with B19V and malaria more than normocytic normochromic anaemia. Conclusions B19V was associated with malaria in cases of severe anaemia. The association posed a significant risk for exacerbation of anaemia in mild anaemic children. B19V and co-infection with B19V and malaria may be associated with microcytic anaemia rather than normocytic normochromic anaemia as seen in cases of B19V infection among persons with red cell abnormalities. PMID:23593592

  11. Non-genetic risk factors for cutaneous melanoma and keratinocyte skin cancers: An umbrella review of meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Belbasis, Lazaros; Stefanaki, Irene; Stratigos, Alexander J; Evangelou, Evangelos

    2016-12-01

    Skin cancers have a complex disease mechanism, involving both genetic and non-genetic risk factors. Numerous meta-analyses have been published claiming statistically significant associations between non-genetic risk factors and skin cancers without applying a thorough methodological assessment. The present study maps the literature on the non-genetic risk factors of skin cancers, assesses the presence of statistical biases and identifies the associations with robust evidence. We searched PubMed up to January 20, 2016 to identify systematic reviews and meta-analyses of observational studies that examined associations between non-genetic factors and skin cancers. For each meta-analysis, we estimated the summary effect size by random-effects and fixed-effects models, the 95% confidence interval and the 95% prediction interval. We also assessed the between-study heterogeneity (I(2) metric), evidence for small-study effects and excess significance bias. Forty-four eligible papers were identified and included a total of 85 associations. Twenty-one associations were significant at P<10(-6). Fifty-two associations had large or very large heterogeneity. Evidence for small-study effects and excess significance bias was found in fifteen and thirteen associations, respectively. Overall, thirteen associations (actinic keratosis, serum vitamin D, sunburns, and hair color for basal cell carcinoma and density of freckles, eye color, hair color, history of melanoma, skin type, sunburns, premalignant skin lesions, common and atypical nevi for melanoma) presented high level of credibility. The majority of meta-analyses on non-genetic risk factors for skin cancers suffered from large between-study heterogeneity and small-study effects or excess significance bias. The associations with convincing and highly suggestive evidence were mainly focused on skin photosensitivity and phenotypic characteristics. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by

  12. The Impact of Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection on HIV-Related Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Malvestutto, Carlos; Coca, Steven G.; Klotman, Paul E.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2009-01-01

    In the era of antiretroviral therapy, non-AIDS complications such as kidney disease are important contributors to morbidity and mortality. Objective To estimate the impact of hepatitis C co-infection on the risk of kidney disease in HIV patients. Design/ Methods Two investigators identified English-language citations in MEDLINE and Web of Science from 1989 through July 1, 2007. References of selected articles were reviewed. Observational studies and clinical trials of HIV-related kidney disease and antiretroviral nephrotoxicity were eligible if they included at least 50 participants and reported hepatitis C status. Data on study characteristics, population, and kidney disease outcomes were abstracted by two independent reviewers. Results After screening 2,516 articles, twenty-seven studies were eligible and 24 authors confirmed or provided data. Separate meta-analyses were performed for chronic kidney disease outcomes (n=10), proteinuria (n=4), acute renal failure (n=2), and indinavir toxicity (n=5). The pooled incidence of chronic kidney disease was higher in patients with hepatitis C co-infection (6.2% versus 4.0%; RR 1.49, 95% CI 1.08–2.06). In meta-regression, prevalence of black race and the proportion of patients with documented hepatitis C status were independently associated with the risk of chronic kidney disease. The relative risk associated with hepatitis C co-infection was significantly increased for proteinuria (1.15; 95% CI 1.02–1.30) and acute renal failure (1.64; 95% CI 1.21–2.23), with no significant statistical heterogeneity. The relative risk of indinavir toxicity was 1.59 (95% CI 0.99–2.54) with Hepatitis C co-infection. Conclusions Hepatitis C co-infection is associated with a significant increase in the risk of HIV-related kidney disease. PMID:18753863

  13. TB/HIV Co-Infection Care in Conflict-Affected Settings: A Mapping of Health Facilities in the Goma Area, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Kaboru, Berthollet Bwira; Ogwang, Brenda. A.; Namegabe, Edmond Ntabe; Mbasa, Ndemo; Kabunga, Deka Kambale; Karafuli, Kambale

    2013-01-01

    Background: HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis (TB) are major contributors to the burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa. The two diseases have been described as a harmful synergy as they are biologically and epidemiologically linked. Control of TB/HIV co-infection is an integral and most challenging part of both national TB and national HIV control programmes, especially in contexts of instability where health systems are suffering from political and social strife. This study aimed at assessing the provision of HIV/TB co-infection services in health facilities in the conflict-ridden region of Goma in Democratic Republic of Congo. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of health facilities that provide either HIV or TB services or both was carried out. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect the data which was analysed using descriptive statistics. Results: Eighty facilities were identified, of which 64 facilities were publicly owned. TB care was more available than HIV care (in 61% vs. 9% of facilities). Twenty-three facilities (29%) offered services to co-infected patients. TB/HIV co-infection rates among patients were unknown in 82% of the facilities. Only 19 facilities (24%) reported some coordination with and support from concerned diseases’ control programmes. HIV and TB services are largely fragmented, indicating imbalances and poor coordination by disease control programmes. Conclusion: HIV and TB control appear not to be the focus of health interventions in this crisis affected region, despite the high risks of TB and HIV infection in the setting. Comprehensive public health response to this setting calls for reforms that promote joint TB/HIV co-infection control, including improved leadership by the HIV programmes that accuse weaknesses in this conflict-ridden region. PMID:24596866

  14. Molecular epidemiology of co-infection with hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among adult patients in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Baudi, Ian; Iijima, Sayuki; Chin'ombe, Nyasha; Mtapuri-Zinyowera, Sekesai; Murakami, Shuko; Isogawa, Masanori; Hachiya, Atsuko; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the genetic characteristics of both viruses among pre-HIV-treatment patients in Harare, Zimbabwe. This cross-sectional survey involved 176 remnant plasma samples collected from consenting HIV patients (median age 35 [18-74]) between June and September 2014. HBV seromarkers were determined by high-sensitivity chemiluminescence assays. Molecular evolutionary analyses were conducted on the basal core promoter/precore (BCP/PC) and S regions of HBV, as well as part of the HIV pol region. Of the 176 participants (65.7% female), 19 (10.8%) were positive for HBsAg (median 0.033 IU/ml (IQR 0.01-415). The HBsAg incidence was higher in men than women (P = 0.009). HBsAg-positive subjects had lower median CD4 counts (P = 0.016). HBV DNA was detectable in 12 HBsAg-positive samples (median 3.36 log cp/ml (2.86-4.51), seven being amplified and sequenced. All isolates were subgenotype A1 without HBV drug resistance mutations but each had at least one BCP/PC mutation. PreS deletion mutants and small S antigen variants M133I/T and D144G were identified. Of the 164 HIV isolates successfully genotyped, 163 (99.4%) were HIV-1 subtype C and only one was HIV-1 subtype F1. Sixteen (9.8%) had at least one drug resistance mutation, predominantly non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-related mutations, observed mostly among female participants. This study shows that co-infection with HBV is present among HIV patients enrolling into HIV care in Zimbabwe, suggesting that HBV screening and monitoring programmes be strengthened in this context. J. Med. Virol. 89:257-266, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Mechanisms of Severe Mortality-Associated Bacterial Co-infections Following Influenza Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Jia, Leili; Xie, Jing; Zhao, Jiangyun; Cao, Dekang; Liang, Yuan; Hou, Xuexin; Wang, Ligui; Li, Zhenjun

    2017-01-01

    Influenza virus infection remains one of the largest disease burdens on humans. Influenza-associated bacterial co-infections contribute to severe disease and mortality during pandemic and seasonal influenza episodes. The mechanisms of severe morbidity following influenza-bacteria co-infections mainly include failure of an antibacterial immune response and pathogen synergy. Moreover, failure to resume function and tolerance might be one of the main reasons for excessive mortality. In this review, recent advances in the study of mechanisms of severe disease, caused by bacterial co-infections following influenza virus pathogenesis, are summarized. Therefore, understanding the synergy between viruses and bacteria will facilitate the design of novel therapeutic approaches to prevent mortality associated with bacterial co-infections.

  16. The Role of Co-Infections in Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV§

    PubMed Central

    King, Caroline C.; Ellington, Sascha R.; Kourtis, Athena P.

    2015-01-01

    In HIV-infected women, co-infections that target the placenta, fetal membranes, genital tract, and breast tissue, as well as systemic maternal and infant infections, have been shown to increase the risk for mother-to-child transmission of HIV (MTCT). Active co-infection stimulates the release of cytokines and inflammatory agents that enhance HIV replication locally or systemically and increase tissue permeability, which weakens natural defenses to MTCT. Many maternal or infant co-infections can affect MTCT of HIV, and particular ones, such as genital tract infection with herpes simplex virus, or systemic infections such as hepatitis B, can have substantial epidemiologic impact on MTCT. Screening and treatment for co-infections that can make infants susceptible to MTCT in utero, peripartum, or postpartum can help reduce the incidence of HIV infection among infants and improve the health of mothers and infants worldwide. PMID:23305198

  17. Imbalanced oxidative stress causes chlamydial persistence during non-productive human herpes virus co-infection.

    PubMed

    Prusty, Bhupesh K; Böhme, Linda; Bergmann, Birgit; Siegl, Christine; Krause, Eva; Mehlitz, Adrian; Rudel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Both human herpes viruses and Chlamydia are highly prevalent in the human population and are detected together in different human disorders. Here, we demonstrate that co-infection with human herpes virus 6 (HHV6) interferes with the developmental cycle of C. trachomatis and induces persistence. Induction of chlamydial persistence by HHV6 is independent of productive virus infection, but requires the interaction and uptake of the virus by the host cell. On the other hand, viral uptake is strongly promoted under co-infection conditions. Host cell glutathione reductase activity was suppressed by HHV6 causing NADPH accumulation, decreased formation of reduced glutathione and increased oxidative stress. Prevention of oxidative stress restored infectivity of Chlamydia after HHV6-induced persistence. We show that co-infection with Herpes simplex virus 1 or human Cytomegalovirus also induces chlamydial persistence by a similar mechanism suggesting that Chlamydia -human herpes virus co-infections are evolutionary shaped interactions with a thus far unrecognized broad significance.

  18. Seroprevalence, isolation and co-infection of multiple Toxoplasma gondii strains in individual bobcats (Lynx rufus) from Mississippi, USA.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shiv K; Sweeny, Amy R; Lovallo, Matthew J; Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Kwok, Oliver C; Jiang, Tiantian; Su, Chunlei; Grigg, Michael E; Dubey, Jitender P

    2017-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii causes lifelong chronic infection in both feline definitive hosts and intermediate hosts. Multiple exposures to the parasite are likely to occur in nature due to high environmental contamination. Here, we present data of high seroprevalence and multiple T. gondii strain co-infections in individual bobcats (Lynx rufus). Unfrozen samples (blood, heart, tongue and faeces) were collected from 35 free ranging wild bobcats from Mississippi, USA. Toxoplasma gondii antibodies were detected in serum by the modified agglutination test (1:≥200) in all 35 bobcats. Hearts from all bobcats were bioassayed in mice and viable T. gondii was isolated from 21; these strains were further propagated in cell culture. Additionally, DNA was extracted from digests of tongues and hearts of all 35 bobcats; T. gondii DNA was detected in tissues of all 35 bobcats. Genetic characterisation of DNA from cell culture-derived isolates was performed by multiplex PCR using 10 PCR-RFLP markers. Results showed that ToxoDB genotype #5 predominated (in 18 isolates) with a few other types (#24 in two isolates, and #2 in one isolate). PCR-DNA sequencing at two polymorphic markers, GRA6 and GRA7, detected multiple recombinant strains co-infecting the tissues of bobcats; most possessing Type II alleles at GRA7 versus Type X (HG-12) alleles at GRA6. Our results suggest that individual bobcats have been exposed to more than one parasite strain during their life time. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Genetic and environmental influences on temperament in middle childhood: analyses of teacher and tester ratings.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, S; Saudino, K J; Plomin, R; Fulker, D W; DeFries, J C

    1996-04-01

    Parent ratings of temperament in infancy and childhood yield evidence for genetic influence in twin studies but not in adoption studies. The present study used the sibling adoption design to investigate teacher and tester ratings of temperament in middle childhood. When each child was 7 years old, ratings on the Colorado Childhood Temperament Inventory were obtained from a teacher and tester for more than 50 pairs each of adoptive and nonadoptive siblings in the Colorado Adoption Project. Significant genetic influence emerged for both teacher and tester ratings of Activity, for tester ratings of Sociability, and for teacher ratings of Emotionality. Results obtained from bivariate genetic analysis suggest that the modest covariance between teacher and tester ratings of Activity is entirely mediated genetically. Except for teacher ratings of Attention Span, evidence of shared family environment was nonsignificant, despite the power of the sibling adoption design to detect it.

  20. Efficacy and safety of grazoprevir (MK-5172) and elbasvir (MK-8742) in patients with hepatitis C virus and HIV co-infection (C-EDGE CO-INFECTION): a non-randomised, open-label trial.

    PubMed

    Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Nelson, Mark; Katlama, Christine; Lalezari, Jay; Mallolas, Josep; Bloch, Mark; Matthews, Gail V; Saag, Michael S; Zamor, Philippe J; Orkin, Chloe; Gress, Jacqueline; Klopfer, Stephanie; Shaughnessy, Melissa; Wahl, Janice; Nguyen, Bach-Yen T; Barr, Eliav; Platt, Heather L; Robertson, Michael N; Sulkowski, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV-1. The C-EDGE CO-INFECTION study assessed the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of grazoprevir (MK-5172) plus elbasvir (MK-8742) in patients with HCV and HIV co-infection. In this uncontrolled, non-randomised, phase 3, open-label, single-arm study, treatment-naive patients with chronic HCV genotype 1, 4, or 6 infection and HIV co-infection, with or without cirrhosis, were enrolled from 37 centres in nine countries across Europe, the USA, and Australia. Patients were either naive to treatment with any antiretroviral therapy (ART) or stable on ART for at least 8 weeks. All patients received grazoprevir 100 mg plus elbasvir 50 mg in a fixed-dose combination tablet once daily for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was sustained virological response (HCV RNA <15 IU/mL) 12 weeks after the end of therapy (SVR12). The primary population for efficacy analyses was all patients who received at least one dose of study treatment. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02105662. Between June 11, 2014, and Aug 29, 2014, 218 patients were enrolled and received grazoprevir plus elbasvir for 12 weeks, all of whom completed follow-up at week 12. SVR12 was achieved by 210 (96%) of 218 patients (95% CI 92·9-98·4). One patient did not achieve SVR12 because of a non-virological reason, and seven patients without cirrhosis relapsed (two subsequently confirmed as reinfections). All 35 patients with cirrhosis achieved SVR12. The most common adverse events were fatigue (29; 13%), headache (27; 12%), and nausea (20; 9%). No patient discontinued treatment because of an adverse event. Two patients receiving ART had transient HIV viraemia. This HCV treatment regimen seems to be effective and well tolerated for patients co-infected with HIV with or without cirrhosis. These data are consistent with previous trials of this regimen in the monoinfected population. This regimen

  1. Phylogeographic analyses of submesophotic snappers Etelis coruscans and Etelis "marshi" (family Lutjanidae) reveal concordant genetic structure across the Hawaiian Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Kimberly R; Moriwake, Virginia N; Wilcox, Christie; Grau, E Gordon; Kelley, Christopher; Pyle, Richard L; Bowen, Brian W

    2014-01-01

    The Hawaiian Archipelago has become a natural laboratory for understanding genetic connectivity in marine organisms as a result of the large number of population genetics studies that have been conducted across this island chain for a wide taxonomic range of organisms. However, population genetic studies have been conducted for only two species occurring in the mesophotic or submesophotic zones (30+m) in this archipelago. To gain a greater understanding of genetic connectivity in these deepwater habitats, we investigated the genetic structure of two submesophotic fish species (occurring ∼200-360 m) in this archipelago. We surveyed 16 locations across the archipelago for submesophotic snappers Etelis coruscans (N = 787) and E. "marshi" (formerly E. carbunculus; N = 770) with 436-490 bp of mtDNA cytochrome b and 10-11 microsatellite loci. Phylogeographic analyses reveal no geographic structuring of mtDNA lineages and recent coalescence times that are typical of shallow reef fauna. Population genetic analyses reveal no overall structure across most of the archipelago, a pattern also typical of dispersive shallow fishes. However some sites in the mid-archipelago (Raita Bank to French Frigate Shoals) had significant population differentiation. This pattern of no structure between ends of the Hawaiian range, and significant structure in the middle, was previously observed in a submesophotic snapper (Pristipomoides filamentosus) and a submesophotic grouper (Hyporthodus quernus). Three of these four species also have elevated genetic diversity in the mid-archipelago. Biophysical larval dispersal models from previous studies indicate that this elevated diversity may result from larval supplement from Johnston Atoll, ∼800 km southwest of Hawaii. In this case the boundaries of stocks for fishery management cannot be defined simply in terms of geography, and fishery management in Hawaii may need to incorporate external larval supply into management plans.

  2. Integrated analyses for genetic markers of polycystic ovary syndrome with 9 case-control studies of gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chenqi; Liu, Xiaoqin; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Ning; Yu, Jun; Zhao, Xiaobo; Hu, Hairong; Zheng, Saihua; Li, Xuelian; Wang, Guiying

    2017-01-10

    Due to genetic heterogeneity and variable diagnostic criteria, genetic studies of polycystic ovary syndrome are particularly challenging. Furthermore, lack of sufficiently large cohorts limits the identification of susceptibility genes contributing to polycystic ovary syndrome. Here, we carried out a systematic search of studies deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus database through August 31, 2016. The present analyses included studies with: 1) patients with polycystic ovary syndrome and normal controls, 2) gene expression profiling of messenger RNA, and 3) sufficient data for our analysis. Ultimately, a total of 9 studies with 13 datasets met the inclusion criteria and were performed for the subsequent integrated analyses. Through comprehensive analyses, there were 13 genetic factors overlapped in all datasets and identified as significant specific genes for polycystic ovary syndrome. After quality control assessment, there were six datasets remained. Further gene ontology enrichment and pathway analyses suggested that differentially expressed genes mainly enriched in oocyte pathways. These findings provide potential molecular markers for diagnosis and prognosis of polycystic ovary syndrome, and need in-depth studies on the exact function and mechanism in polycystic ovary syndrome.

  3. Genetic susceptibility of lung cancer in Chinese population: An overview of systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Taiqiang; Xu, Chengjie; Huang, Jiang; Yu, Hua

    2017-08-01

    Genetic susceptibility of lung cancer has been widely studied for Chinese population, and meta-analysis of candidate gene association studies has also been performed for those genes. However, the overall evidence has not been well recognized. To investigate genetic association for the risk of lung cancer in Chinese. An overview of systematic reviews and meta-analyses of candidate gene association studies for lung cancer in Chinese was performed up to August 10(th) , 2016. The AMSTAR tool was used to assess the quality of the included systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Bibliometric analysis was performed to analyze the characteristics of reviews. A total of 21 variants in 17 genes from 20 meta-analyses were included in this study. All 20 meta-analyses were published from 2011 to 2016. The quality scores of AMSTAR ranged from 3 to 7. All included genes were in the pathogenesis of lung cancer, such as the CYPs genes, GSTs genes, and base excision repair genes. Three polymorphisms were found to be associated with decreased risk of lung cancer for Chinese, 15 polymorphisms were found to be associated with increased risk of lung cancer for Chinese, but three polymorphisms were found to be not associated with lung cancer risk for Chinese. The current study supports the genetic risk factors of lung cancer for Chinese are more likely to be variants from genes that contribute to the etiology of lung cancer. © 2017 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. The Effect of Malaria and HIV Co-Infection on Anemia: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Naing, Cho; Sandhu, Nisha Kaur; Wai, Victor Nyunt

    2016-04-01

    Malaria and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are globally important public health concerns. The objectives of this study were (i) to determine the prevalence of malaria and HIV co-infections in people living in endemic countries, and (ii) to assess the effect of co-infection on anemia.Studies were searched on electronic databases including PubMed, Embase, Medline, Google Scholar, and African Journals Online. Observational studies, assessing the prevalence of co-infection and reporting its association with anemia, were included. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using a tool called the risk of bias assessment for non-randomized studies. Heterogeneity among studies was investigated with the I-square test. Pooled prevalence of the co-infection and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using the random-effect model, reflected on heterogeneity among studies. Summary odds ratio (OR), summary standardized mean difference (SMD), and their corresponding 95% CIs were estimated, as appropriate. Subgroup analysis and meta-regression were performed for robustness of results. Publication bias was assessed by visualization of a funnel plot.Twenty-three studies were included in the present study. Overall, the pooled prevalence of co-infection was 19% (95% CI: 15-23%, I: 98.1%), showing 26% (95% CI: 20-32%, I: 98.7%) in adults, 12% (95% CI: 7-17%, I: 95.0) in pregnant women, and 9% (95% CI: 6-11%, I: 68.6%) in children. Anemia was comparable between the monoinfected and co-infected adults (summary OR: 1.49, 95% CI: 0.93-2.37) and increased by 49% in co-infected pregnant women (summary OR: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.14-1.94). The mean hemoglobin concentration was significantly lower in the co-infected group than the monoinfected group (summary SMD: -0.47, 95% CI: -0.61 to -0.33). The results of meta-regression on the prevalence of co-infection using the publication year and total population as covariates showed the I value remained high implying

  5. The consequences of co-infections for parasite transmission in the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Alison B; Agnew, Philip; Noel, Valérie; Michalakis, Yannis

    2015-03-01

    Co-infections may modify parasite transmission opportunities directly as a consequence of interactions in the within-host environment, but also indirectly through changes in host life history. Furthermore, host and parasite traits are sensitive to the abiotic environment with variable consequences for parasite transmission in co-infections. We investigate how co-infection of the mosquito Aedes aegypti with two microsporidian parasites (Vavraia culicis and Edhazardia aedis) at two levels of larval food availability affects parasite transmission directly, and indirectly through effects on host traits. In a laboratory infection experiment, we compared how co-infection, at low and high larval food availability, affected the probability of infection, within-host growth and the transmission potential of each parasite, compared to single infections. Horizontal transmission was deemed possible for both parasites when infected hosts died harbouring horizontally transmitting spores. Vertical transmission was judged possible for E. aedis when infected females emerged as adults. We also compared the total input number of spores used to seed infections with output number, in single and co-infections for each parasite. The effects of co-infection on parasite fitness were complex, especially for V. culicis. In low larval food conditions, co-infection increased the chances of mosquitoes dying as larvae or pupae, thus increasing opportunities for V. culicis' horizontal transmission. However, co-infection reduced larval longevity and hence time available for V. culicis spore production. Overall, there was a negative net effect of co-infection on V. culicis, whereby the number of spores produced was less than the number used to seed infection. Co-infections also negatively affected horizontal transmission of the more virulent parasite, E. aedis, through reduced longevity of pre-adult hosts. However, its potential transmission suffered less relative to V. culicis. Our results

  6. Lack of Genetic Variation of Bursaphelenchus xylophilus in Portugal Revealed by RAPD-PCR Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Paulo; Burgermeister, Wolfgang; Mota, Manuel; Metge, Kai; Silva, Gonçalo

    2007-01-01

    Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR) technique was used to assess the level of genetic variability and genetic relationships among 24 Portuguese isolates of pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. The isolates represent the main infested areas of Portugal. Two additional isolates of B. xylophilus representing North America and East Asia were included, and B. mucronatus was used as out-group. Twenty-eight random primers generated a total of 640 DNA fragments. The Nei and Li similarity index revealed a high genetic similarity among the Portuguese isolates (above 90%). Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed to illustrate the relatedness among the isolates. No indication for separate groups among the Portuguese isolates was obtained, and the low level of genetic diversity strongly suggests that they were dispersed recently from a single introduction. The lack of apparent relationship between the genetic and the geographic matrices of the Portuguese isolates limits the use of this technique for following recent pathways of distribution. Genetic distance of the Portuguese isolates towards an isolate from China was much lower as compared to an isolate from the USA. This confirmed previous results suggesting an East Asian origin of the Portuguese B. xylophilus. PMID:19259480

  7. Association between HPV/EBV co-infection and oral carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ru; Ekshyyan, Oleksandr; Moore-Medlin, Tara; Rong, Xiaohua; Nathan, Sean; Gu, Xin; Abreo, Fleurette; Rosenthal, Eben L.; Shi, Mingxia; Guidry, Joseph T.; Scott, Rona S.; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M.; Nathan, Cherie-Ann O.

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent epidemic of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) associated with human papilloma virus (HPV) has not addressed its association with lymphoid tissue in the oropharynx or the potential role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)/HPV co-infection. Methods The prevalence of HPV and EBV infection/co-infection and CD21 mRNA expression were determined in normal and cancerous tissues from the oropharynx using in situ hybridization (ISH), p16 and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). The effects of co-infection on tumorigenicity were evaluated using proliferation and invasion assays. Results Normal oropharynx, tonsil, non-cancer base of tongue (BOT) and BOT from sleep apnea patients, demonstrated EBV positivity ranging from 7-36% depending on the site and methods of detection used (qRT-PCR or ISH). Among non-malignant BOT samples HPV positivity was noted only in 20%. The percent of tonsil and BOT cancers positive for HPV (up to 63% and 80%, respectively) or co-infected with HPV/EBV (up to 25% and 70%, respectively) were both significantly associated with cancer status. Notably HPV/EBV co-infection was observed only in malignant tissue originating in lymphoid-rich oropharynx sites (tonsil, BOT). CD21 mRNA (the major EBV attachment receptor) was detected in tonsil and BOT epithelium, but not in soft palate epithelium. Co-infected cell lines showed a significant increase in invasiveness (p<0.01). Conclusions There is a high prevalence of HPV/EBV infection and co-infection in BOT and tonsil cancers, possibly reflecting their origins in lymphoid-rich tissue. In vitro, cells modeling co-infection have an increased invasive potential. PMID:25040496

  8. Predictors of Pneumococcal Co-infection for Patients with Pandemic (H1N1) 2009

    PubMed Central

    Masiá, Mar; Padilla, Sergio; Antequera, Pedro; Ramos, José Manuel; Ruiz, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a systematic investigation of pneumococcal co-infection in patients with a diagnosis of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and any risk factor for complications or with severity criteria. We found 14% prevalence, with one third of patients having nonpneumonic infections. A severity assessment score >1 and high C-reactive protein levels were predictors of pneumococcal co-infection. PMID:21801627

  9. Genetic Diversity among Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. Trifolii Strains Revealed by Allozyme and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Demezas, David H.; Reardon, Terry B.; Watson, John M.; Gibson, Alan H.

    1991-01-01

    Allozyme electrophoresis and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses were used to examine the genetic diversity of a collection of 18 Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii, 1 R. leguminosarum bv. viciae, and 2 R. meliloti strains. Allozyme analysis at 28 loci revealed 16 electrophoretic types. The mean genetic distance between electrophoretic types of R. leguminosarum and R. meliloti was 0.83. Within R. leguminosarum, the single strain of bv. viciae differed at an average of 0.65 from strains of bv. trifolii, while electrophoretic types of bv. trifolii differed at a range of 0.23 to 0.62. Analysis of RFLPs around two chromosomal DNA probes also delineated 16 unique RFLP patterns and yielded genetic diversity similar to that revealed by the allozyme data. Analysis of RFLPs around three Sym (symbiotic) plasmid-derived probes demonstrated that the Sym plasmids reflect genetic divergence similar to that of their bacterial hosts. The large genetic distances between many strains precluded reliable estimates of their genetic relationships. PMID:16348600

  10. Insights into human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis B virus co-infection in India

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Runu; Pal, Ananya

    2015-01-01

    Shared routes of transmission lead to frequent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis B virus (HBV) co-infection in a host which results in about 10% of HIV positive individuals to have chronic hepatitis B infection worldwide. In post-antiretroviral therapy era, liver diseases have emerged as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected individuals and HBV co-infection have become the major health issue among this population particularly from the regions with endemic HBV infection. In setting of HIV-HBV co-infection, HIV significantly impacts the natural history of HBV infection, its disease profile and the treatment outcome in negative manner. Moreover, the epidemiological pattern of HBV infection and the diversity in HBV genome (genotypic and phenotypic) are also varied in HIV co-infected subjects as compared to HBV mono-infected individuals. Several reports on the abovementioned issues are available from developed parts of the world as well as from sub-Saharan African countries. In contrast, most of these research areas remained unexplored in India despite having considerable burden of HIV and HBV infections. This review discusses present knowledge from the studies on HIV-HBV co-infection in India and relevant reports from different parts of the world. Issues needed for the future research relevant to HIV-HBV co-infection in India are also highlighted here, including a call for further investigations on this field of study. PMID:26279986

  11. Insights into human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis B virus co-infection in India.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Runu; Pal, Ananya

    2015-08-12

    Shared routes of transmission lead to frequent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis B virus (HBV) co-infection in a host which results in about 10% of HIV positive individuals to have chronic hepatitis B infection worldwide. In post-antiretroviral therapy era, liver diseases have emerged as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected individuals and HBV co-infection have become the major health issue among this population particularly from the regions with endemic HBV infection. In setting of HIV-HBV co-infection, HIV significantly impacts the natural history of HBV infection, its disease profile and the treatment outcome in negative manner. Moreover, the epidemiological pattern of HBV infection and the diversity in HBV genome (genotypic and phenotypic) are also varied in HIV co-infected subjects as compared to HBV mono-infected individuals. Several reports on the abovementioned issues are available from developed parts of the world as well as from sub-Saharan African countries. In contrast, most of these research areas remained unexplored in India despite having considerable burden of HIV and HBV infections. This review discusses present knowledge from the studies on HIV-HBV co-infection in India and relevant reports from different parts of the world. Issues needed for the future research relevant to HIV-HBV co-infection in India are also highlighted here, including a call for further investigations on this field of study.

  12. Is the treatment of Enterobius vermicularis co-infection necessary to eradicate Dientamoeba fragilis infection?

    PubMed

    Boga, José A; Rojo, Susana; Fernández, Jonathan; Rodríguez, Mercedes; Iglesias, Carmen; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Vázquez, Fernando; Rodríguez-Guardado, Azucena

    2016-08-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a pathogenic protozoan of the human gastrointestinal tract with a worldwide distribution, which has emerged as an important and misdiagnosed cause of chronic gastrointestinal illnesses such as diarrhea and 'irritable-bowel-like' gastrointestinal disease. Very little research has been conducted on the use of suitable antimicrobial compounds. Furthermore, higher rates of co-infection with Enterobius vermicularis have been described, suggesting that E. vermicularis could influence the treatment of D. fragilis-infected patients. To study this, the treatment of E. vermicularis and D. fragilis co-infected patients was evaluated. Forty-nine patients with a D. fragilis infection, including 25 (51.0%) patients co-infected with E. vermicularis, were studied. All of them were treated with metronidazole. Patients with E. vermicularis co-infection and/or an E. vermicularis-positive case in the family were treated with mebendazole. Metronidazole treatment failure was significantly more frequent in patients with E. vermicularis co-infection and in patients with children in the family. Co-infection with E. vermicularis may act as a factor favoring D. fragilis infection by preventing eradication measures. This suggests that both parasites should be treated simultaneously. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic heterogeneity in psoriasis vulgaris based on linkage analyses of a large family material

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlstroem, J.; Swanbeck, G.; Inerot, A.

    1994-09-01

    Information on psoriasis among parents and siblings in 14,008 families has been collected. On the basis of this material, evidence for monogenetic autosomal recessive inheritance of psoriasis has recently been presented. Indications from more than one type of non-pustular psoriasis has been obtained from the population genetic data. Molecular genetic linkage analysis of psoriasis to a number of polymorphic genetic markers for a large number of families has been made. It is apparent that there is genetic heterogeneity in a psoriasis population with regard to psoriasis genes. Using the computer program Linkage 5.0 and a formula for heterogeneity, a lodscore over 3.0 for one locus has been obtained. This locus has further been confirmed by several other markers in the vicinity. The locus found is linked to slightly over half of the families, indicating that there are more genetically independent types of psoriasis. The age at onset of those families that are apparently linked to this locus have a slightly higher age at onset than those not linked to that locus but with a considerable overlap. In spite of close coverage of the whole chromosomes number 6 and 17, no linkage has been found in this regions. This indicates that neither the HLA region nor the region earlier found to be involved in one family with psoriasis are primarily involved in our families.

  14. Phred-Phrap package to analyses tools: a pipeline to facilitate population genetics re-sequencing studies.

    PubMed

    Machado, Moara; Magalhães, Wagner Cs; Sene, Allan; Araújo, Bruno; Faria-Campos, Alessandra C; Chanock, Stephen J; Scott, Leandro; Oliveira, Guilherme; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo; Rodrigues, Maira R

    2011-02-01

    Targeted re-sequencing is one of the most powerful and widely used strategies for population genetics studies because it allows an unbiased screening for variation that is suitable for a wide variety of organisms. Examples of studies that require re-sequencing data are evolutionary inferences, epidemiological studies designed to capture rare polymorphisms responsible for complex traits and screenings for mutations in families and small populations with high incidences of specific genetic diseases. Despite the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies, Sanger sequencing is still the most popular approach in population genetics studies because of the widespread availability of automatic sequencers based on capillary electrophoresis and because it is still less prone to sequencing errors, which is critical in population genetics studies. Two popular software applications for re-sequencing studies are Phred-Phrap-Consed-Polyphred, which performs base calling, alignment, graphical edition and genotype calling and DNAsp, which performs a set of population genetics analyses. These independent tools are the start and end points of basic analyses. In between the use of these tools, there is a set of basic but error-prone tasks to be performed with re-sequencing data. In order to assist with these intermediate tasks, we developed a pipeline that facilitates data handling typical of re-sequencing studies. Our pipeline: (1) consolidates different outputs produced by distinct Phred-Phrap-Consed contigs sharing a reference sequence; (2) checks for genotyping inconsistencies; (3) reformats genotyping data produced by Polyphred into a matrix of genotypes with individuals as rows and segregating sites as columns; (4) prepares input files for haplotype inferences using the popular software PHASE; and (5) handles PHASE output files that contain only polymorphic sites to reconstruct the inferred haplotypes including polymorphic and monomorphic sites as required by population

  15. Genetic and genomic analyses as a basis for new diagnostic nosologies.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Elliot S; Grennan, Kay S

    2015-03-01

    For schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism, clinical descriptions are precise and reliable, but there is great overlap among diagnoses in associated genetic polymorphisms and rare variants, treatment response, and other phenomenological findings such as brain imaging. It is widely hoped that new diagnostic categories can be developed which are more precise and predictive of important features of illness, particularly response to pharmacological agents. It is the intent of this paper to describe the diagnostic implications of some current genetic findings, and to describe how the genetic associations with diagnosis may be teased apart into new associations with biologically coherent diagnostic entities and scales, based on the various functional aspects of the associated genes and functional genomic data.

  16. Integrated analyses of gene expression and genetic association studies in a founder population

    PubMed Central

    Cusanovich, Darren A.; Caliskan, Minal; Billstrand, Christine; Michelini, Katelyn; Chavarria, Claudia; De Leon, Sherryl; Mitrano, Amy; Lewellyn, Noah; Elias, Jack A.; Chupp, Geoffrey L.; Lang, Roberto M.; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Decara, Jeanne M.; Gilad, Yoav; Ober, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have become a standard tool for dissecting genetic contributions to disease risk. However, these studies typically require extraordinarily large sample sizes to be adequately powered. Strategies that incorporate functional information alongside genetic associations have proved successful in increasing GWAS power. Following this paradigm, we present the results of 20 different genetic association studies for quantitative traits related to complex diseases, conducted in the Hutterites of South Dakota. To boost the power of these association studies, we collected RNA-sequencing data from lymphoblastoid cell lines for 431 Hutterite individuals. We then used Sherlock, a tool that integrates GWAS and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data, to identify weak GWAS signals that are also supported by eQTL data. Using this approach, we found novel associations with quantitative phenotypes related to cardiovascular disease, including carotid intima-media thickness, left atrial volume index, monocyte count and serum YKL-40 levels. PMID:26931462

  17. Genetic Discoveries Drive Molecular Analyses and Targeted Therapeutic Options in the Epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Dhindsa, Ryan S; Goldstein, David B

    2015-10-01

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological disease with substantial genetic contribution. We have recently made major advances in understanding the genetics and etiology of the epilepsies. However, current antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in nearly one third of patients. Most of these drugs were developed without knowledge of the underlying causes of the epilepsy to be treated; thus, it seems reasonable to assume that further improvements require a deeper understanding of epilepsy pathophysiology. Although once the rate-limiting step, gene discovery is now occurring at an unprecedented rapid rate, especially in the epileptic encephalopathies. However, to place these genetic findings in a biological context and discover treatment options for patients, we must focus on developing an efficient framework for functional evaluation of the mutations that cause epilepsy. In this review, we discuss guidelines for gene discovery, emerging functional assays and models, and novel therapeutics to highlight the developing framework of precision medicine in the epilepsies.

  18. Bi- and multivariate analyses of diallel crosses: a tool for the genetic dissection of neurobehavioral phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Crusio, W E

    1993-01-01

    The genetic-correlational approach provides a very powerful tool for the analysis of causal relationships between phenotypes. It appears to be particularly appropriate for investigating the functional organization of behavior and/or causal relationships between brain and behavior. A method for the bivariate analysis of diallel crosses that permits the estimation of correlations due to environmental effects, additive-genetic effects, and/or dominance deviations is described, together with a worked-out example stemming from a five times replicated 4 x 4 diallel cross between inbred mouse strains. The phenotypes chosen to illustrate the analysis were locomotor activity and rearing frequency in an open field. Large, positive additive-genetic and dominance correlations between these two phenotypes were obtained. This finding was replicated in another, independently executed, diallel cross.

  19. Genetics of Central Valley O. mykiss populations: drainage and watershed scale analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Pavey, Scott A.; Wiacek, Talia; Williams, Ian S.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic variation at 11 microsatellite loci described population genetic structure for Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Central Valley, California. Spatial and temporal variation was examined as well as relationships between hatchery and putative natural spawning anadromous stocks. Genetic diversity was analyzed at two distinct spatial scales: fine-scale within drainage for five populations on Clear Creek; between and among drainage diversity for 23 populations. Significant regional spatial structure was apparent, both within Clear Creek and among rainbow trout populations throughout the Central Valley. Significant differences in allelic frequencies were found among most river or drainage systems. Less than 1% of the molecular variance could be attributed to differences found between drainages. Hatchery populations were shown to carry similar genetic diversity to geographically proximate wild populations. Central Valley M = 0.626 (below the M < 0.68 threshold) supported recent population reductions within the Central Valley. However, average estimated effective population size was relatively high (Ne = 5066). Significant allelic differences were found in rainbow trout collected above and below impassable dams on the American, Yuba, Stanislaus and Tuolumne rivers. Rainbow trout sampled in Spring Creek were extremely bottlenecked with allelic variation at only two loci and an estimated effective population size of 62, suggesting some local freshwater O. mykiss stocks may be declining rapidly. These data support significant genetic population structure for steelhead and rainbow trout populations within the Central Valley across multiple scales. Careful consideration of this genetic diversity and its distribution across the landscape should be part of future conservation and restoration efforts. 

  20. Cluster and meta-analyses of genetic parameters for feed intake traits in growing beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Diaz, I D P S; Crews, D H; Enns, R M

    2014-06-01

    A data set based on 50 studies including feed intake and utilization traits was used to perform a meta-analysis to obtain pooled estimates using the variance between studies of genetic parameters for average daily gain (ADG); residual feed intake (RFI); metabolic body weight (MBW); feed conversion ratio (FCR); and daily dry matter intake (DMI) in beef cattle. The total data set included 128 heritability and 122 genetic correlation estimates published in the literature from 1961 to 2012. The meta-analysis was performed using a random effects model where the restricted maximum likelihood estimator was used to evaluate variances among clusters. Also, a meta-analysis using the method of cluster analysis was used to group the heritability estimates. Two clusters were obtained for each trait by different variables. It was observed, for all traits, that the heterogeneity of variance was significant between clusters and studies for genetic correlation estimates. The pooled estimates, adding the variance between clusters, for direct heritability estimates for ADG, DMI, RFI, MBW and FCR were 0.32 ± 0.04, 0.39 ± 0.03, 0.31 ± 0.02, 0.31 ± 0.03 and 0.26 ± 0.03, respectively. Pooled genetic correlation estimates ranged from -0.15 to 0.67 among ADG, DMI, RFI, MBW and FCR. These pooled estimates of genetic parameters could be used to solve genetic prediction equations in populations where data is insufficient for variance component estimation. Cluster analysis is recommended as a statistical procedure to combine results from different studies to account for heterogeneity.

  1. Neuroinformatic analyses of common and distinct genetic components associated with major neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Lotan, Amit; Fenckova, Michaela; Bralten, Janita; Alttoa, Aet; Dixson, Luanna; Williams, Robert W; van der Voet, Monique

    2014-01-01

    Major neuropsychiatric disorders are highly heritable, with mounting evidence suggesting that these disorders share overlapping sets of molecular and cellular underpinnings. In the current article we systematically test the degree of genetic commonality across six major neuropsychiatric disorders-attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety disorders (Anx), autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and schizophrenia (SCZ). We curated a well-vetted list of genes based on large-scale human genetic studies based on the NHGRI catalog of published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). A total of 180 genes were accepted into the analysis on the basis of low but liberal GWAS p-values (<10(-5)). 22% of genes overlapped two or more disorders. The most widely shared subset of genes-common to five of six disorders-included ANK3, AS3MT, CACNA1C, CACNB2, CNNM2, CSMD1, DPCR1, ITIH3, NT5C2, PPP1R11, SYNE1, TCF4, TENM4, TRIM26, and ZNRD1. Using a suite of neuroinformatic resources, we showed that many of the shared genes are implicated in the postsynaptic density (PSD), expressed in immune tissues and co-expressed in developing human brain. Using a translational cross-species approach, we detected two distinct genetic components that were both shared by each of the six disorders; the 1st component is involved in CNS development, neural projections and synaptic transmission, while the 2nd is implicated in various cytoplasmic organelles and cellular processes. Combined, these genetic components account for 20-30% of the genetic load. The remaining risk is conferred by distinct, disorder-specific variants. Our systematic comparative analysis of shared and unique genetic factors highlights key gene sets and molecular processes that may ultimately translate into improved diagnosis and treatment of these debilitating disorders.

  2. Neuroinformatic analyses of common and distinct genetic components associated with major neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lotan, Amit; Fenckova, Michaela; Bralten, Janita; Alttoa, Aet; Dixson, Luanna; Williams, Robert W.; van der Voet, Monique

    2014-01-01

    Major neuropsychiatric disorders are highly heritable, with mounting evidence suggesting that these disorders share overlapping sets of molecular and cellular underpinnings. In the current article we systematically test the degree of genetic commonality across six major neuropsychiatric disorders—attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety disorders (Anx), autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and schizophrenia (SCZ). We curated a well-vetted list of genes based on large-scale human genetic studies based on the NHGRI catalog of published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). A total of 180 genes were accepted into the analysis on the basis of low but liberal GWAS p-values (<10−5). 22% of genes overlapped two or more disorders. The most widely shared subset of genes—common to five of six disorders–included ANK3, AS3MT, CACNA1C, CACNB2, CNNM2, CSMD1, DPCR1, ITIH3, NT5C2, PPP1R11, SYNE1, TCF4, TENM4, TRIM26, and ZNRD1. Using a suite of neuroinformatic resources, we showed that many of the shared genes are implicated in the postsynaptic density (PSD), expressed in immune tissues and co-expressed in developing human brain. Using a translational cross-species approach, we detected two distinct genetic components that were both shared by each of the six disorders; the 1st component is involved in CNS development, neural projections and synaptic transmission, while the 2nd is implicated in various cytoplasmic organelles and cellular processes. Combined, these genetic components account for 20–30% of the genetic load. The remaining risk is conferred by distinct, disorder-specific variants. Our systematic comparative analysis of shared and unique genetic factors highlights key gene sets and molecular processes that may ultimately translate into improved diagnosis and treatment of these debilitating disorders. PMID:25414627

  3. Microarray-based genetic analyses for studying susceptibility to arterial and venous thrombotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Pollak, E S; Feng, L; Ahadian, H; Fortina, P

    2001-08-01

    We describe the potential of microarray technology for parallel, high-throughput approaches to molecular detection of DNA variations associated with progression to arterial and venous thrombotic diseases. The use of the newly commercialized NanoChip platform and a framework for genetic screening with a list of potential genetic targets useful to the evaluation of cardiovascular risk are presented. Implementation in clinical setting of analytical silicon and glass microarrays will facilitate early diagnosis, help direct specific advice to high-risk individuals and evaluate treatment strategies.

  4. Human Helminth Co-Infection: Analysis of Spatial Patterns and Risk Factors in a Brazilian Community

    PubMed Central

    Pullan, Rachel L.; Bethony, Jeffrey M.; Geiger, Stefan M.; Cundill, Bonnie; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Quinnell, Rupert J.; Brooker, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Background Individuals living in areas endemic for helminths are commonly infected with multiple species. Despite increasing emphasis given to the potential health impacts of polyparasitism, few studies have investigated the relative importance of household and environmental factors on the risk of helminth co-infection. Here, we present an investigation of exposure-related risk factors as sources of heterogeneity in the distribution of co-infection with Necator americanus and Schistosoma mansoni in a region of southeastern Brazil. Methodology Cross-sectional parasitological and socio-economic data from a community-based household survey were combined with remotely sensed environmental data using a geographical information system. Geo-statistical methods were used to explore patterns of mono- and co-infection with N. americanus and S. mansoni in the region. Bayesian hierarchical models were then developed to identify risk factors for mono- and co-infection in relation to community-based survey data to assess their roles in explaining observed heterogeneity in mono and co-infection with these two helminth species. Principal Findings The majority of individuals had N. americanus (71.1%) and/or S. mansoni (50.3%) infection; 41.0% of individuals were co-infected with both helminths. Prevalence of co-infection with these two species varied substantially across the study area, and there was strong evidence of household clustering. Hierarchical multinomial models demonstrated that relative socio-economic status, household crowding, living in the eastern watershed and high Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) were significantly associated with N. americanus and S. mansoni co-infection. These risk factors could, however, only account for an estimated 32% of variability between households. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that variability in risk of N. americanus and S. mansoni co-infection between households cannot be entirely explained by exposure-related risk

  5. Common mental disorders in TB/HIV co-infected patients in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background- The relationship between TB/HIV co-infection and common mental disorders (CMD) has been scarcely investigated. In this study, we compared the occurrence of CMD in TB/HIV co-infected and non-co-infected HIV patients in Ethiopia. Methods- We conducted a cross sectional study in three hospitals in Ethiopia from February to April, 2009. The study population consisted of 155 TB/HIV co-infected and 465 non-co-infected HIV patients. CMD was assessed through face to face interviews by trained clinical nurses using the Kessler 10 scale. Several risk factors for CMD were assessed using a structured questionnaire. Results- TB/HIV co-infected patients had significantly (p = 0.001) greater risk of CMD (63.7%) than the non-co-infected patients (46.7%). When adjusted for the effect of potential confounding variables, the odds of having CMD for TB/HIV co-infected individuals was 1.7 times the odds for non-co-infected patients [OR = 1.7, (95%CI: 1.0, 2.9)]. Individuals who had no source of income [OR = 1.7, (95%CI: 1.1, 2.8)], and day labourers [OR = 2.4, 95%CI: 1.2, 5.1)] were more likely to have CMD as compared to individuals who had a source of income and government employees respectively. Patients who perceived stigma [OR = 2.2, 95%CI: 1.5, 3.2)] and who rate their general health as "poor" [OR = 10.0, 95%CI: 2.8, 35.1)] had significantly greater risk of CMD than individual who did not perceive stigma or who perceived their general health to be "good". Conclusion- TB/HIV control programs should develop guidelines to screen and treat CMD among TB/HIV co-infected patients. Screening programs should focus on individuals with no source of income, jobless people and day labourers. PMID:20618942

  6. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and co-infections with Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Rickettsia spp. in Ixodes ricinus in Hamburg, Germany.

    PubMed

    May, K; Jordan, D; Fingerle, V; Strube, C

    2015-12-01

    To obtain initial data on Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae) in Ixodes ricinus (Ixodida: Ixodidae) ticks in Hamburg, Germany, 1400 questing ticks were collected by flagging at 10 different public recreation areas in 2011 and analysed using probe-based quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The overall rate of infection with B. burgdorferi s.l. was 34.1%; 30.0% of adults were infected (36.7% of females and 26.0% of males), as were 34.5% of nymphs. Significant differences in tick infection rates were observed between the spring and summer/autumn months, as well as among sampling locations. Borrelia genospecies identification by reverse line blotting was successful in 43.6% of positive tick samples. The most frequent genospecies was Borrelia garinii/Borrelia bavariensis, followed by Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia valaisiana, B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia spielmanii, Borrelia bissettii and Borrelia lusitaniae. Based on previously published data, co-infection of Borrelia and Rickettsiales spp. was determined in 25.8% of ticks. Overall, 22.9% of ticks were co-infected with Rickettsia spp. (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae), 1.7% with Anaplasma phagocytophilum (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae), and 1.2% with both pathogens. Study results show a high prevalence of Borrelia-positive ticks in recreation areas in the northern German city of Hamburg and the potential health risk to humans in these areas should not be underestimated.

  7. Epidemic dispersion of HIV and HCV in a population of co-infected Romanian injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Paraschiv, Simona; Banica, Leontina; Nicolae, Ionelia; Niculescu, Iulia; Abagiu, Adrian; Jipa, Raluca; Pineda-Peña, Andrea-Clemencia; Pingarilho, Marta; Neaga, Emil; Theys, Kristof; Libin, Pieter; Otelea, Dan; Abecasis, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Co-infections with HIV and HCV are very frequent among people who inject drugs (PWID). However, very few studies comparatively reconstructed the transmission patterns of both viruses in the same population. We have recruited 117 co-infected PWID during a recent HIV outbreak in Romania. Phylogenetic analyses were performed on HIV and HCV sequences in order to characterize and compare transmission dynamics of the two viruses. Three large HIV clusters (2 subtype F1 and one CRF14_BG) and thirteen smaller HCV transmission networks (genotypes 1a, 1b, 3a, 4a and 4d) were identified. Eighty (65%) patients were both in HIV and HCV transmission chains and 70 of those shared the same HIV and HCV cluster with at least one other patient. Molecular clock analysis indicated that all identified HIV clusters originated around 2006, while the origin of the different HCV clusters ranged between 1980 (genotype 1b) and 2011 (genotypes 3a and 4d). HCV infection preceded HIV infection in 80.3% of cases. Coincidental transmission of HIV and HCV was estimated to be rather low (19.65%) and associated with an outbreak among PWID during detention in the same penitentiary. This study has reconstructed and compared the dispersion of these two viruses in a PWID population.

  8. HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infection among voluntary counselling and testing subjects at a regional hospital in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Nsagha, D S; Njunda, A L; Kamga, H L F; Assob, J C N; Bongkem, E A

    2012-09-01

    HIV/AIDS is a major public health problem in Cameroon which had a prevalence of 5.1% in 2010 with 141 new infections per day. The fear of voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) is an obstacle to HIV prevention. To determine the prevalence of HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infection among people attending a health facility for VCT. Venous blood was collected from participants using aseptic techniques in a descriptive observational cross-sectional study. DETERMINE HIV-1/2 and SD BIOLINE HIV-1/2 3.0 qualitative tests were used for the detection of HIV-1 and HIV-2 in their sera. Range and consistency checks were carried out on the data and analysed using Epi-Info. Of 290 individuals tested, 78(26.9%) were positive for HIV-1 and HIV-2. Among the 78 HIV positive individuals, 62 (79.5%) had HIV-1, 1(1.3%) had HIV-2 and 15(19.2%) had concurrent HIV-1/ HIV-2. Among those infected, 57(73.1%) were females including 21(26.9%) males. HIV-1 is the major cause of AIDS and VCT is well accepted. Co-infection with HIV-1/HIV-2 may lead to anti-retroviral drug resistance. VCT should be encouraged so that positive cases can initiate therapy on time to stay ahead of anti-retroviral drug resistance.

  9. MicroRNAs, hepatitis C virus, and HCV/HIV-1 co-infection: new insights in pathogenesis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Archana; Swaminathan, Gokul; Martin-Garcia, Julio; Navas-Martin, Sonia

    2012-10-26

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can exert a profound effect on Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. The interaction of HCV with the highly liver-enriched miRNA, miR-122 represents one such unique example of viruses having evolved mechanism(s) to usurp the host miRNA machinery to support viral life cycle. Furthermore, HCV infection can also trigger changes in the cellular miRNA profile, which may ultimately contribute to the outcome of viral infection. Accumulating knowledge on HCV-host miRNA interactions has ultimately influenced the design of therapeutic interventions against chronic HCV infection. The importance of microRNA modulation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) replication has been reported, albeit only in the context of HIV-1 mono-infection. The development of HCV infection is dramatically influenced during co-infection with HIV-1. Here, we review the current knowledge on miRNAs in HCV mono-infection. In addition, we discuss the potential role of some miRNAs, identified from the analyses of public data, in HCV/HIV-1 co-infection.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa co-infection is associated with cystic fibrosis-related diabetes and poor clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Limoli, D H; Yang, J; Khansaheb, M K; Helfman, B; Peng, L; Stecenko, A A; Goldberg, J B

    2016-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) patients suffer from accelerated rates of pulmonary decline compared to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). However, the mechanisms underlying this difference are unknown. While CFRD is associated with increased respiratory infections, a link between infection and enhanced pulmonary dysfunction remains unclear. The development of glucose intolerance is spectral, resulting in impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) prior to the diagnosis of CFRD. Inclusion of IGT patients within the NGT group may diminish the ability to identify correlations with CFRD. With this in mind, this study aimed to determine if the association between CFRD and respiratory infections is correlated with pulmonary decline. Respiratory cultures from 234 CF patients with confirmed diagnosis of NGT or CFRD were analyzed to measure rates of infection, focusing on the two most prevalent bacteria in CF, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Infection status was correlated with pulmonary function and confounding clinical variables including age, gender, blood glucose levels, and CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) phenotype were considered in multivariate analyses. CFRD patients, particularly those with extremely high blood glucose levels, were more likely than NGT patients to be co-infected with S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, compared to infection with only one pathogen. Co-infection was associated with decreased lung function and increased frequency of pulmonary exacerbations, even after adjustment for confounding variables. Alterations in the microbial community composition, as opposed to the presence of a single pathogen, may account for greater pulmonary decline in CFRD patients.

  11. Clinical and genetic analyses reveal novel pathogenic ABCA4 mutations in Stargardt disease families

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bing; Cai, Xue-Bi; Zheng, Zhi-Li; Huang, Xiu-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Qu, Jia; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD1) is a juvenile macular degeneration predominantly inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, characterized by decreased central vision in the first 2 decades of life. The condition has a genetic basis due to mutation in the ABCA4 gene, and arises from the deposition of lipofuscin-like substance in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) with secondary photoreceptor cell death. In this study, we describe the clinical and genetic features of Stargardt patients from four unrelated Chinese cohorts. The targeted exome sequencing (TES) was carried out in four clinically confirmed patients and their family members using a gene panel comprising 164 known causative inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD) genes. Genetic analysis revealed eight ABCA4 mutations in all of the four pedigrees, including six mutations in coding exons and two mutations in adjacent intronic areas. All the affected individuals showed typical manifestations consistent with the disease phenotype. We disclose two novel ABCA4 mutations in Chinese patients with STGD disease, which will expand the existing spectrum of disease-causing variants and will further aid in the future mutation screening and genetic counseling, as well as in the understanding of phenotypic and genotypic correlations. PMID:27739528

  12. High acceptance of an early dyslexia screening test involving genetic analyses in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Wilcke, Arndt; Müller, Bent; Schaadt, Gesa; Kirsten, Holger; Boltze, Johannes; Angela, h c; Friederici, D; Emmrich, Frank; Brauer, Jens; Wilcke, Arndt; Neef, Nicole; Boltze, Johannes; Skeide, Michael; Kirsten, Holger; Schaadt, Gesa; Müller, Bent; Kraft, Indra; Czepezauer, Ivonne; Bobovnikov, Nadin

    2016-01-01

    Dyslexia is a developmental disorder characterized by severe problems in the acquisition of reading and writing skills. It has a strong neurobiological basis. Genetic influence is estimated at 50–70%. One of the central problems with dyslexia is its late diagnosis, normally not before the end of the 2nd grade, resulting in the loss of several years for early therapy. Currently, research is focusing on the development of early tests for dyslexia, which may be based on EEG and genetics. Our aim was to determine the acceptance of such a future test among parents. We conducted a representative survey in Germany with 1000 parents of children aged 3–7 years, with and without experience of dyslexia. 88.7% of the parents supported the introduction of an early test for dyslexia based on EEG and genetics; 82.8% would have their own children tested, and 57.9% were willing to pay for the test if health insurance did not cover the costs. Test acceptance was significantly higher if parents had prior experience with dyslexia. The perceived benefits of such a test were early recognition and remediation and, preventing deficits. Concerns regarded the precision of the test, its potentially stigmatizing effect and its costs. The high overall support for the test leads to the conclusion that parents would accept a test for dyslexia based on EEG and genetics. PMID:26036858

  13. High acceptance of an early dyslexia screening test involving genetic analyses in Germany.

    PubMed

    Wilcke, Arndt; Müller, Bent; Schaadt, Gesa; Kirsten, Holger; Boltze, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    Dyslexia is a developmental disorder characterized by severe problems in the acquisition of reading and writing skills. It has a strong neurobiological basis. Genetic influence is estimated at 50-70%. One of the central problems with dyslexia is its late diagnosis, normally not before the end of the 2nd grade, resulting in the loss of several years for early therapy. Currently, research is focusing on the development of early tests for dyslexia, which may be based on EEG and genetics. Our aim was to determine the acceptance of such a future test among parents. We conducted a representative survey in Germany with 1000 parents of children aged 3-7 years, with and without experience of dyslexia. 88.7% of the parents supported the introduction of an early test for dyslexia based on EEG and genetics; 82.8% would have their own children tested, and 57.9% were willing to pay for the test if health insurance did not cover the costs. Test acceptance was significantly higher if parents had prior experience with dyslexia. The perceived benefits of such a test were early recognition and remediation and, preventing deficits. Concerns regarded the precision of the test, its potentially stigmatizing effect and its costs. The high overall support for the test leads to the conclusion that parents would accept a test for dyslexia based on EEG and genetics.

  14. Production of WTC.ZI-zi rat congenic strain and its pathological and genetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, T; Yamasaki, K; Kondo, A; Nakajima, K; Yamada, M; Serikawa, T

    1998-04-01

    A new rat congenic strain, WTC.ZI-zi, was produced after eleven generations of backcrossing between ZI strain as a donor strain and WTC strain as an inbred partner. WTC.ZI-zi/zi homozygous rats generally exhibit more conspicuous body tremor and much earlier occurrence of flaccid paresis than the original ZI strain. The average life span of the congenic strain is approximately nine months, which is also much shorter than that of the original ZI strain. Pathological analysis of the central nervous system of the congenic strain revealed more aggravated vacuolation and hypomyelination than in the original ZI strain. Establishment of the genetic profile with microsatellite markers showed that the congenic strain was genetically almost identical to the WTC strain except for a small chromosome segment bearing the zitter gene. Analysis of markers in this region implied that the length of the donor segment was approximately 13.4 centimorgans which corresponded to 0.65% of the total genome. Thus, these results suggested that expressional alterations of zitter gene were due to replacement of the genetic background from the original ZI strain to the WTC strain. Furthermore, the WTC.ZI-zi congenic strain could provide a refined tool for the analysis of zitter mutation, because the congenic strain has a strict control strain, WTC, and the length of the donor chromosome is genetically defined.

  15. Genetic diversity analyses reveal first insights into breed-specific selection signatures within Swiss goat breeds.

    PubMed

    Burren, A; Neuditschko, M; Signer-Hasler, H; Frischknecht, M; Reber, I; Menzi, F; Drögemüller, C; Flury, C

    2016-12-01

    We used genotype data from the caprine 50k Illumina BeadChip for the assessment of genetic diversity within and between 10 local Swiss goat breeds. Three different cluster methods allowed the goat samples to be assigned to the respective breed groups, whilst the samples of Nera Verzasca and Tessin Grey goats could not be differentiated from each other. The results of the different genetic diversity measures show that Appenzell, Toggenburg, Valais and Booted goats should be prioritized in future conservation activities. Furthermore, we examined runs of homozygosity (ROH) and compared genomic inbreeding coefficients based on ROH (FROH ) with pedigree-based inbreeding coefficients (FPED ). The linear relationship between FROH and FPED was confirmed for goats by including samples from the three main breeds (Saanen, Chamois and Toggenburg goats). FROH appears to be a suitable measure for describing levels of inbreeding in goat breeds with missing pedigree information. Finally, we derived selection signatures between the breeds. We report a total of 384 putative selection signals. The 25 most significant windows contained genes known for traits such as: coat color variation (MITF, KIT, ASIP), growth (IGF2, IGF2R, HRAS, FGFR3) and milk composition (PITX2). Several other putative genes involved in the formation of populations, which might have been selected for adaptation to the alpine environment, are highlighted. The results provide a contemporary background for the management of genetic diversity in local Swiss goat breeds. © 2016 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  16. Quantitative Genetic Analyses of Gender Differences in Educational and Occupational Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischbein, Siv; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Influences of heredity and environment on educational and occupational choice in mid-life and elderly cohorts were studied using longitudinal twin data (413 pairs). For both education and occupation there is a trend toward increasing genetic variance for females in comparison to males in the younger cohort. (SLD)

  17. The application and performance of single nucleotide polymorphism markers for population genetic analyses of Lepidoptera

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are nucleotide substitution mutations that tend to be at high densities within eukaryotic genomes. The development of assays that detect allelic variation at SNP loci is attractive for genome mapping, population genetics, and phylogeographic applications. A p...

  18. High-throughput, quantitative analyses of genetic interactions in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Typas, Athanasios; Nichols, Robert J; Siegele, Deborah A; Shales, Michael; Collins, Sean R; Lim, Bentley; Braberg, Hannes; Yamamoto, Natsuko; Takeuchi, Rikiya; Wanner, Barry L; Mori, Hirotada; Weissman, Jonathan S; Krogan, Nevan J; Gross, Carol A

    2008-09-01

    Large-scale genetic interaction studies provide the basis for defining gene function and pathway architecture. Recent advances in the ability to generate double mutants en masse in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have dramatically accelerated the acquisition of genetic interaction information and the biological inferences that follow. Here we describe a method based on F factor-driven conjugation, which allows for high-throughput generation of double mutants in Escherichia coli. This method, termed genetic interaction analysis technology for E. coli (GIANT-coli), permits us to systematically generate and array double-mutant cells on solid media in high-density arrays. We show that colony size provides a robust and quantitative output of cellular fitness and that GIANT-coli can recapitulate known synthetic interactions and identify previously unidentified negative (synthetic sickness or lethality) and positive (suppressive or epistatic) relationships. Finally, we describe a complementary strategy for genome-wide suppressor-mutant identification. Together, these methods permit rapid, large-scale genetic interaction studies in E. coli.

  19. Genetic regulation of plasma and red blood cell magnesium concentrations in man. I. Univariate and bivariate path analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Darlu, P; Rao, D C; Henrotte, J G; Lalouel, J M

    1982-01-01

    This paper concerns an analysis of family resemblance for magnesium concentrations, based on data from nuclear families and twins. Neither red blood cell magnesium nor plasma magnesium varies with age in children (under 20 years of age). Whereas adult plasma magnesium varies linearly with age, the red cell magnesium clearly showed a nonlinear trend: quadratic for males and a fifth-degree polynomial for females. Transformed magnesium concentrations generated six correlations in nuclear families and twins for each of the two traits. Separate univariate analyses, using a simple linear model with four parameters, strongly suggested that genetic factors are primarily responsible for the observed family resemblance. Both traits were then analyzed simultaneously using a simple bivariate model. We found that one common genetic factor alone could not explain all the 24 correlations generated for the bivariate analysis. The most parsimonious model involved only three parameters: genetic heritability for red blood cell magnesium (.922 +/- .014), genetic heritability for plasma magnesium (.721 +/- .040), and the genetic correlation between the two traits (.233 +/- .040). PMID:6891178

  20. Progression of liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV genotype 1 co-infected patients is related to the T allele of the rsI2979860 polymorphism of the IL28B gene

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective HIV/HCV co-infection is characterised by accelerated progression of liver disease. Recently, the rsl2979860 C/T polymorphism in the IL28B gene has been linked to progression towards cirrhosis in HCV mono-infected patients and to treatment response of HCV-infection in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. Our aim was to clarify by non-invasive techniques if this polymorphism affects fibrosis progression in HIV/HCV co-infection. Methods In a cross-sectional design, liver stiffness (transient elastography), surrogate markers of liver fibrosis (APRI and FIB-4 scores) and rsl2979860 genotypes were analysed in 84 HCV/H1V co-infected patients. IL28B genotypes were determined by real-time PCR using a light cycler. In 56 HIV/HCV co-infected patients we also studied progression of fibrosis in relation to rsl2979860 C/T genotypes over two years. Results 82% of the patients were on HAART (74% without detectable HI viremia) and 67% were haemophiliacs, respectively. HCV genotype 1 was present in 62%. Cross-sectional median liver stiffness was 7.4 kPa and correlated with APRI and FIB-4 scores (r = 0.6 each, p < 0.001). Frequencies of IL28B genotypes were: CC 50%, CT 43% and TT 7%. In the cross-sectional analysis liver stiffness values were not different between the various IL28B-genotypes. Upon follow-up under HAART carriers of a C allele did not show further progression, while liver stiffness significantly increased in HIV/HCV co-infected patients with the T allele (p = 0.047). Conclusion Although progression of liver fibrosis was low under HAART in our cohort, progression was more pronounced in HIV/HCV genotype 1 co-infected patients with the T allele. PMID:21813376

  1. Genetic diversity in populations of Slovak Spotted cattle based on single nucleotide polymorphisms analyses.

    PubMed

    Moravčíková, Nina; Trakovická, Anna; Navrátilová, Alica

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify SNPs in leptin (LEP), leptin receptor (LEPR) and growth hormone (GH) genes in order to analyze genetic diversity of Slovak Spotted cattle. The total numbers of blood samples were taken from 353 Slovak Spotted cows originating from four farms. Genomic DNA was isolated by phenol-chloroform extraction method and analyzed by PCR-RFLP method. After digestion with restriction, enzymes were detected in whole population of cow's alleles with frequency: LEP/Sau3AI A 0.84 and B 0.16 (±0.0152); LEPR/BseGI C 0.95 and T 0.05 (±0.0089) and GH/AluI L 0.70 and V 0.30 (±0.0188). Based on the observed vs. expected genotypes frequencies populations across loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P\\>0.05). Predominant for SNP LEP/Sau3AI was AA genotype (0.70), for SNP LEPR/T945M CC genotype (0.91), and LL genotype (0.48) was most frequent for SNP GH/AluI. The observed heterozygosity of SNPs across populations was also transferred to the low or median polymorphic information content 0.24 (He 0.28), 0.08 (He 0.09) and 0.33 (He 0.47) for LEP, LEPR and GH genes, respectively. Within genetic variability estimating negative values of fixation indexes FIS (-0.09-0.05) and FIT (-0.07-0.03) indicating heterozygote excess were observed. The value of FST indexes (0.018-0.023) shows very low levels of genetic differentiation in allele frequencies of loci among evaluated subpopulations. The low values of genetic distances (0.0018-0.0159) indicated high genetic relatedness among animals in subpopulations caused probably by common ancestry used in breeding program at farms.

  2. Marshes as "Mountain Tops": Genetic Analyses of the Critically Endangered São Paulo Marsh Antwren (Aves: Thamnophilidae).

    PubMed

    de Camargo, Crisley; Gibbs, H Lisle; Costa, Mariellen C; Del-Rio, Glaucia; Silveira, Luís F; Wasko, Adriane P; Francisco, Mercival R

    2015-01-01

    Small populations of endangered species can be impacted by genetic processes such as drift and inbreeding that reduce population viability. As such, conservation genetic analyses that assess population levels of genetic variation and levels of gene flow can provide important information for managing threatened species. The São Paulo Marsh Antwren (Formicivora paludicola) is a recently-described and critically endangered bird from São Paulo State (Brazil) whose total estimated population is around 250-300 individuals, distributed in only 15 isolated marshes around São Paulo metropolitan region. We used microsatellite DNA markers to estimate the population genetic characteristics of the three largest remaining populations of this species all within 60 km of each other. We detected a high and significant genetic structure between all populations (overall FST = 0.103) which is comparable to the highest levels of differentiation ever documented for birds, (e.g., endangered birds found in isolated populations on the tops of African mountains), but also evidence for first-generation immigrants, likely from small local unsampled populations. Effective population sizes were small (between 28.8-99.9 individuals) yet there are high levels of genetic variability within populations and no evidence for inbreeding. Conservation implications of this work are that the high levels of genetic structure suggests that translocations between populations need to be carefully considered in light of possible local adaptation and that remaining populations of these birds should be managed as conservation units that contain both main populations studied here but also small outlying populations which may be a source of immigrants.

  3. Marshes as “Mountain Tops”: Genetic Analyses of the Critically Endangered São Paulo Marsh Antwren (Aves: Thamnophilidae)

    PubMed Central

    de Camargo, Crisley; Gibbs, H. Lisle; Costa, Mariellen C.; Del-Rio, Glaucia; Silveira, Luís F.

    2015-01-01

    Small populations of endangered species can be impacted by genetic processes such as drift and inbreeding that reduce population viability. As such, conservation genetic analyses that assess population levels of genetic variation and levels of gene flow can provide important information for managing threatened species. The São Paulo Marsh Antwren (Formicivora paludicola) is a recently-described and critically endangered bird from São Paulo State (Brazil) whose total estimated population is around 250–300 individuals, distributed in only 15 isolated marshes around São Paulo metropolitan region. We used microsatellite DNA markers to estimate the population genetic characteristics of the three largest remaining populations of this species all within 60 km of each other. We detected a high and significant genetic structure between all populations (overall FST = 0.103) which is comparable to the highest levels of differentiation ever documented for birds, (e.g., endangered birds found in isolated populations on the tops of African mountains), but also evidence for first-generation immigrants, likely from small local unsampled populations. Effective population sizes were small (between 28.8–99.9 individuals) yet there are high levels of genetic variability within populations and no evidence for inbreeding. Conservation implications of this work are that the high levels of genetic structure suggests that translocations between populations need to be carefully considered in light of possible local adaptation and that remaining populations of these birds should be managed as conservation units that contain both main populations studied here but also small outlying populations which may be a source of immigrants. PMID:26447791

  4. ToRCH "co-infections" are associated with increased risk of abortion in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Rasti, Sima; Ghasemi, Fatemeh Sadat; Abdoli, Amir; Piroozmand, Ahmad; Mousavi, Seyed Gholam Abbas; Fakhrie-Kashan, Zohreh

    2016-03-01

    ToRCH infections (toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus and Herpes simplex virus) have long been known to be associated with bad obstetric outcomes. However, little information is available about the impact of ToRCH co-infections on the outcome of pregnancy. Hence, we tested the IgG and IgM antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii, Rubella, Cytomegalovirus and Herpes Simplex Virus among 81 pregnant women with abortion (case group) and 98 pregnant women with normal delivery (control group). In the single-infection model, only CMV-IgM seropositivity was significantly increased in case than control group (25.9% in case and 12.2 % in control, OR = 2.5, P = 0.019). In the co-infection model, 14 patterns were recognized, but two patterns were significantly increased in the case than the control group. Co-infection of T. gondii IgG + CMV IgM was 9.1-fold increased in the case than the control group (8.6% in the case and 1% in control, OR = 9.1; P = 0.024). Also, co-infection of T. gondii IgG + HSV IgG + CMV IgM was 7.7-fold increased in case than the control group (7.4% in case and 1 % in control, OR = 7.7; P = 0.04). Although the OR of other co-infections was higher in the case than the control group, the difference was not statistically significant. These findings indicate that ToRCH co-infections are associated with increased risk of abortion than single infection. Hence, the rates of co-infections should be considered in prenatal screening of ToRCH infections.

  5. Molecular assessment of trematode co-infection and intraspecific competition in molluscan intermediate hosts.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Elizabeth A; Minchella, Dennis J

    2013-01-01

    In natural populations of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni, parasite distribution among snail intermediate hosts is generally overdispersed, such that a small proportion of hosts harbor the majority of parasite genotypes. Within these few infected snails, researchers have found that it can be common for hosts to harbor multiple parasite genotypes, creating circumstances in which co-infecting parasites are faced with potential competition over limited host resources. Much theoretical modeling has focused on parasite competition, especially regarding the influence of co-infection on parasite exploitation strategy evolution. However, particularly in the case of intra-molluscan intermediate stages, empirical investigations of parasite-parasite competition have often hinged on the untested assumption that co-exposure produces co-infection. That is, infected hosts exposed to multiple strains have been assumed to harbor multiple strains, regardless of the true nature of the infection outcome. Here we describe a real-time quantitative PCR method to distinguish the conditions of multiple- versus single-strain infection, as well as quantify the relative larval output of co-infecting strains. We applied the method to an empirical investigation of intraspecific parasite competition between S. mansoni strains within the intermediate snail host Biomphalaria glabrata, assessing co-exposure's effects on parasite infectivity and productivity and the concomitant effects on host fitness. Overall, there was no effect of parasite co-infection on snail life history traits relative to single-strain infection. Parasite infectivity significantly increased as a result of increasing overall miracidial dose, rather than co-exposure, though strain-specific productivity was significantly reduced in co-infections in manner consistent with resource competition. Moreover, we show that less than half of infected, co-exposed hosts had patent co-infections and demonstrate the utility of this

  6. Clonorchis sinensis Co-infection Could Affect the Disease State and Treatment Response of HBV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Chen, Tingjin; Kong, Xiangzhan; Sun, Hengchang; Yu, Xinbing; Xu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) is considered to be an important parasitic zoonosis because it infects approximately 35 million people, while approximately 15 million were distributed in China. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major public health issue. Two types of pathogens have the potential to cause human liver disease and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma. Concurrent infection with HBV and C. sinensis is often observed in some areas where C. sinensis is endemic. However, whether C. sinensis could impact HBV infection or vice versa remains unknown. Principal Findings Co-infection with C. sinensis and HBV develops predominantly in males. Co-infected C. sinensis and HBV patients presented weaker liver function and higher HBV DNA titers. Combination treatment with antiviral and anti-C. sinensis drugs in co-infected patients could contribute to a reduction in viral load and help with liver function recovery. Excretory-secretory products (ESPs) may, in some ways, increase HBV viral replication in vitro. A mixture of ESP and HBV positive sera could induce peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to produce higher level of Th2 cytokines including IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 compared to HBV alone, it seems that due to presence of ESP, the cytokine production shift towards Th2. C. sinensis/HBV co-infected patients showed higher serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels and lower serum IFN-γ levels. Conclusions/Significance Patients with concomitant C. sinensis and HBV infection presented weaker liver function and higher HBV DNA copies. In co-infected patients, the efficacy of anti-viral treatment was better in patients who were prescribed with entecavir and praziquantel than entecavir alone. One possible reason for the weaker response to antiviral therapies in co-infected patients was the shift in cytokine production from Th1 to Th2 that may inhibit viral clearance. C. sinensis/HBV co-infection could exacerbate the imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokine. PMID:27348302

  7. Viral hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus co-infections in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Utsumi, Takako; Lusida, Maria I

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) affect many people in Asian countries, although there are geographic differences. Both HBV and HIV (HBV/HIV) and HCV/HIV co-infections are highly prevalent in Asia. Hetero- and homosexual, injection drug use, and geographic area are strong predictors of HBV, HCV, and HIV serostatus. In HBV endemic regions, the prevalence and genotype distribution of HBV/HIV co-infection is almost comparable with that in the general population. In Japan, where HBV has low endemicity, the prevalence of HBV/HIV co-infection is approximately 10-fold higher than that in the general population, and HBV Ae is the most common subgenotype among HIV infected individuals. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is an effective treatment for HIV/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. Lamivudine, a component of HAART, is an effective treatment for HBV, HIV, and HBV/HIV co-infection; however, cost, emerging drug resistance, antiretroviral-associated liver toxicity and liver-related morbidity due to HCV progression are particular concerns. HCV/HIV co-infection may accelerate the clinical progression of both HCV and HIV. The high prevalence of HBV/HIV and HCV/HIV co-infections in Asia underscores the need to improve prevention and control measures, as fewer evidence-based prevention strategies are available (compared with Western countries). In this review, the most recent publications on the prevalence of HBV/HIV and HCV/HIV co-infections and related issues, such as therapy and problems in Asia, are updated and summarized. PMID:25964874

  8. Viral hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus co-infections in Asia.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Takako; Lusida, Maria I

    2015-05-12

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) affect many people in Asian countries, although there are geographic differences. Both HBV and HIV (HBV/HIV) and HCV/HIV co-infections are highly prevalent in Asia. Hetero- and homosexual, injection drug use, and geographic area are strong predictors of HBV, HCV, and HIV serostatus. In HBV endemic regions, the prevalence and genotype distribution of HBV/HIV co-infection is almost comparable with that in the general population. In Japan, where HBV has low endemicity, the prevalence of HBV/HIV co-infection is approximately 10-fold higher than that in the general population, and HBV Ae is the most common subgenotype among HIV infected individuals. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is an effective treatment for HIV/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. Lamivudine, a component of HAART, is an effective treatment for HBV, HIV, and HBV/HIV co-infection; however, cost, emerging drug resistance, antiretroviral-associated liver toxicity and liver-related morbidity due to HCV progression are particular concerns. HCV/HIV co-infection may accelerate the clinical progression of both HCV and HIV. The high prevalence of HBV/HIV and HCV/HIV co-infections in Asia underscores the need to improve prevention and control measures, as fewer evidence-based prevention strategies are available (compared with Western countries). In this review, the most recent publications on the prevalence of HBV/HIV and HCV/HIV co-infections and related issues, such as therapy and problems in Asia, are updated and summarized.

  9. Genetic diversity, inbreeding and breeding practices in dogs: results from pedigree analyses.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Grégoire

    2011-08-01

    Pedigree analysis constitutes a classical approach for the study of the evolution of genetic diversity, genetic structure, history and breeding practices within a given breed. As a consequence of selection pressure, management in closed populations and historical bottlenecks, many dog breeds have experienced considerable inbreeding and show (on the basis of a pedigree approach) comparable diversity loss compared to other domestic species. This evolution is linked to breeding practices such as the overuse of popular sires or mating between related animals. The popular sire phenomenon is the most problematic breeding practice, since it has also led to the dissemination of a large number of inherited defects. The practice should be limited by taking measures such as restricting the number of litters (or offspring) per breeding animal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative Genetic Analyses of Human Rhinovirus C (HRV-C) Complete Genome from Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Khaw, Yam Sim; Chan, Yoke Fun; Jafar, Faizatul Lela; Othman, Norlijah; Chee, Hui Yee

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus-C (HRV-C) has been implicated in more severe illnesses than HRV-A and HRV-B, however, the limited number of HRV-C complete genomes (complete 5′ and 3′ non-coding region and open reading frame sequences) has hindered the in-depth genetic study of this virus. This study aimed to sequence seven complete HRV-C genomes from Malaysia and compare their genetic characteristics with the 18 published HRV-Cs. Seven Malaysian HRV-C complete genomes were obtained with newly redesigned primers. The seven genomes were classified as HRV-C6, C12, C22, C23, C26, C42, and pat16 based on the VP4/VP2 and VP1 pairwise distance threshold classification. Five of the seven Malaysian isolates, namely, 3430-MY-10/C22, 8713-MY-10/C23, 8097-MY-11/C26, 1570-MY-10/C42, and 7383-MY-10/pat16 are the first newly sequenced complete HRV-C genomes. All seven Malaysian isolates genomes displayed nucleotide similarity of 63–81% among themselves and 63–96% with other HRV-Cs. Malaysian HRV-Cs had similar putative immunogenic sites, putative receptor utilization and potential antiviral sites as other HRV-Cs. The genomic features of Malaysian isolates were similar to those of other HRV-Cs. Negative selections were frequently detected in HRV-Cs complete coding sequences indicating that these sequences were under functional constraint. The present study showed that HRV-Cs from Malaysia have diverse genetic sequences but share conserved genomic features with other HRV-Cs. This genetic information could provide further aid in the understanding of HRV-C infection. PMID:27199901

  11. Comparative Genetic Analyses of Human Rhinovirus C (HRV-C) Complete Genome from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Khaw, Yam Sim; Chan, Yoke Fun; Jafar, Faizatul Lela; Othman, Norlijah; Chee, Hui Yee

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus-C (HRV-C) has been implicated in more severe illnesses than HRV-A and HRV-B, however, the limited number of HRV-C complete genomes (complete 5' and 3' non-coding region and open reading frame sequences) has hindered the in-depth genetic study of this virus. This study aimed to sequence seven complete HRV-C genomes from Malaysia and compare their genetic characteristics with the 18 published HRV-Cs. Seven Malaysian HRV-C complete genomes were obtained with newly redesigned primers. The seven genomes were classified as HRV-C6, C12, C22, C23, C26, C42, and pat16 based on the VP4/VP2 and VP1 pairwise distance threshold classification. Five of the seven Malaysian isolates, namely, 3430-MY-10/C22, 8713-MY-10/C23, 8097-MY-11/C26, 1570-MY-10/C42, and 7383-MY-10/pat16 are the first newly sequenced complete HRV-C genomes. All seven Malaysian isolates genomes displayed nucleotide similarity of 63-81% among themselves and 63-96% with other HRV-Cs. Malaysian HRV-Cs had similar putative immunogenic sites, putative receptor utilization and potential antiviral sites as other HRV-Cs. The genomic features of Malaysian isolates were similar to those of other HRV-Cs. Negative selections were frequently detected in HRV-Cs complete coding sequences indicating that these sequences were under functional constraint. The present study showed that HRV-Cs from Malaysia have diverse genetic sequences but share conserved genomic features with other HRV-Cs. This genetic information could provide further aid in the understanding of HRV-C infection.

  12. Development of microsatellites for population genetic analyses of Tabanus nigrovittatus (Diptera: Tabanidae).

    PubMed

    Husseneder, Claudia; Delatte, Jennifer R; Krumholt, Jeremy; Foil, Lane D

    2014-01-01

    The greenhead horse fly, Tabanus nigrovittatus Macquart (Diptera: Tabanidae), is frequently found in coastal marshes of the Eastern United States. The females are autogenous (i.e., able to develop eggs without a bloodmeal),but they become a considerable pest to both humans and animals when they pursue a source of blood protein to produce additional eggs. In this study, we identified microsatellite markers to provide first insight into the population genetic structure of this notorious pest species. Because no prior genomic information was available for T. nigrovittatus, we used direct shotgun pyrosequencing technology to characterize microsatellite loci. Approximately 10% of the 105,634 short sequence reads generated from random genome sampling contained microsatellites with at least four repeats ofdi-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexamers. Primers were designed for 36 different microsatellite loci with di-, tri-, and tetramer repeat units. After optimization, 20 primer pairs yielded consistent PCR products and were validated for population genetic application in six populations in Western Louisiana Ten loci were polymorphic with 2-9 alleles per locus and an average observed heterozygosity of 0.20 across populations. The horse fly populations from different trap sites (distance 50-144 km) or years of collection (2010 vs 2011) were genetically distinct from each other (FST = 0.05-0.39) and genetically diverse (gene diversity: 0.24-0.37) but considerably inbred (FIS: 0.22-0.47), with high mean relatedness among individuals (r = 0.27), suggesting the capture of a high percentage of sisters at the same trap location who were progeny of incest.

  13. Developing genetic tools to exploit Chaetomium thermophilum for biochemical analyses of eukaryotic macromolecular assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Nikola; Schwarz, Johannes; Sturm, Miriam; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Griesel, Sabine; Zhang, Wenzhu; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.; Kück, Ulrich; Hurt, Ed

    2016-01-01

    We describe a method to genetically manipulate Chaetomium thermophilum, a eukaryotic thermophile, along with various biochemical applications. The transformation method depends on a thermostable endogenous selection marker operating at high temperatures combined with chromosomal integration of target genes. Our technique allows exploiting eukaryotic thermophiles as source for purifying thermostable native macromolecular complexes with an emphasis on the nuclear pore complex, holding great potential for applications in basic science and biotechnology. PMID:26864114

  14. Development of Microsatellites for Population Genetic Analyses of the Granulate Ambrosia Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Husseneder, Claudia; Park, Jong-Seok; Werle, Christopher T; Adamczyk, John J

    2017-06-01

    Limited male dispersal and local mating in ambrosia beetles are expected to result in extreme inbreeding and highly structured populations. In this study, we developed microsatellite markers for the granulate ambrosia beetle, Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky), for use in future studies into population and family structure of this invasive pest species. We employed de novo next-generation sequencing to generate whole genome shotgun sequences for the characterization of microsatellite loci. Approximately 6% of the 84,024 contigs generated from Hi-Seq Illumina 2x250bp sequencing contained microsatellites with at least four repeats of di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexamers. Primers were synthesized for 40 microsatellite loci with trimer repeat units. Twenty-four primer pairs yielded consistent PCR products of unique loci and were validated for population genetic application using three sample groups each containing 20 X. crassiusculus individuals from Mississippi. Thirteen loci were found to be polymorphic with up to five alleles per population. The two beetle sample groups from Pearl River County (Poplarville and McNeill) belonged genetically to the same population. The population from Lamar County (Purvis) was genetically distinct, separated by a moderate genetic distance (FST = 0.11) and five unique alleles (with >5% frequency). Consistent with the perceived mating structure (incest of females with flightless males), the populations showed homozygote excess at most loci, as indicated by the coefficients of inbreeding (FIT = 0.45 and FIS = 0.37) and high mean relatedness among individuals (r = 0.15). © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Segregation and genetic linkage analyses of river catfish, Mystus nemurus, based on microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Hoh, B P; Siraj, S S; Tan, S G; Yusoff, K

    2013-02-28

    The river catfish Mystus nemurus is an important fresh water species for aquaculture in Malaysia. We report the first genetic linkage map of M. nemurus based on segregation analysis and a linkage map using newly developed microsatellite markers of M. nemurus. A total of 70 of the newly developed polymorphic DNA microsatellite markers were analyzed on pedigrees generated using a pseudo-testcross strategy from 2 mapping families. In the first mapping family, 100 offspring were produced from randomly selected dams of the same populations; dams of the second family were selected from 2 different populations, and this family had 50 offspring. Thirty-one of the 70 markers segregated according to the Mendelian segregation ratio. Linkage analysis revealed that 17 microsatellite markers belonging to 7 linkage groups were obtained at a logarithm of the odds score of 1.2 spanning 584 cM by the Kosambi mapping function, whereas the other 14 remained unlinked. The results from this study will act as primer to a more extensive genetic mapping study aimed towards identifying genetic loci involved in determining economically important traits.

  16. Accommodating Linkage Disequilibrium in Genetic-Association Analyses via Ridge Regression

    PubMed Central

    Malo, Nathalie; Libiger, Ondrej; Schork, Nicholas J.

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale genetic-association studies that take advantage of an extremely dense set of genetic markers have begun to produce very compelling statistical associations between multiple makers exhibiting strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) in a single genomic region and a phenotype of interest. However, the ultimate biological or “functional” significance of these multiple associations has been difficult to discern. In fact, the LD relationships between not only the markers found to be associated with the phenotype but also potential functionally or causally relevant genetic variations that reside near those markers have been exploited in such studies. Unfortunately, LD, especially strong LD, between variations at neighboring loci can make it difficult to distinguish the functionally relevant variations from nonfunctional variations. Although there are (rare) situations in which it is impossible to determine the independent phenotypic effects of variations in LD, there are strategies for accommodating LD between variations at different loci, and they can be used to tease out their independent effects on a phenotype. These strategies make it possible to differentiate potentially causative from noncausative variations. We describe one such approach involving ridge regression. We showcase the method by using both simulated and real data. Our results suggest that ridge regression and related techniques have the potential to distinguish causative from noncausative variations in association studies. PMID:18252218

  17. Development of Microsatellites for Genetic Analyses and Population Assignment of the Cat Flea (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Husseneder, Claudia; Garner, Susan P.; Foil, Lane D.; MaCaluso, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Cat fleas, Ctenocephalides felis (Bouché) (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), are common ectoparasites of companion animals that negatively impact their hosts directly by causing dermatitis and blood loss during feeding and indirectly through the potential transmission of disease causing agents. We isolated and characterized seven novel microsatellite loci from a partial genomic library of the cat flea enriched for di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats. We screened these loci in cat fleas from two laboratory colonies and one wild-caught population collected at a temporary animal shelter (Parker coliseum) in Baton Rouge, LA. Six loci were polymorphic, with two to 15 alleles per locus and an average observed heterozygosity of 0.21 across populations. Although the two laboratory cat flea colonies were isolated from each other for many years, they did not significantly differ in their genotypic composition. The cat flea population from Parker coliseum was genetically different from the laboratory colonies, but also showed high degrees of inbreeding. Multilocus genotypes of the polymorphic loci were sufficient to assign over 85% of cat fleas to their population of origin. Genetic markers for flea population identity will allow further studies to examine the origins and movement of cat fleas with important genetic traits such as insecticide resistance or pathogen susceptibility. The use of microsatellites also could determine if there are host-specific strains of cat fleas and add insight into the development of the different subspecies of C. felis. PMID:21175050

  18. Development of microsatellites for genetic analyses and population assignment of the cat flea (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae).

    PubMed

    Husseneder, Claudia; Garner, Susan P; Foil, Lane D; Macaluso, Kevin R

    2010-11-01

    Cat fleas, Ctenocephalidesfelis (Bouché) (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), are common ectoparasites of companion animals that negatively impact their hosts directly by causing dermatitis and blood loss during feeding and indirectly through the potential transmission of disease causing agents. We isolated and characterized seven novel microsatellite loci from a partial genomic library of the cat flea enriched for di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats. We screened these loci in cat fleas from two laboratory colonies and one wild-caught population collected at a temporary animal shelter (Parker coliseum) in Baton Rouge, LA. Six loci were polymorphic, with two to 15 alleles per locus and an average observed heterozygosity of 0.21 across populations. Although the two laboratory cat flea colonies were isolated from each other for many years, they did not significantly differ in their genotypic composition. The cat flea population from Parker coliseum was genetically different from the laboratory colonies, but also showed high degrees of inbreeding. Multilocus genotypes of the polymorphic loci were sufficient to assign over 85% of cat fleas to their population of origin. Genetic markers for flea population identity will allow further studies to examine the origins and movement of cat fleas with important genetic traits such as insecticide resistance or pathogen susceptibility. The use of microsatellites also could determine if there are host-specific strains of cat fleas and add insight into the development of the different subspecies of C. felis.

  19. The ENIGMA Consortium: large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Paul M; Stein, Jason L; Medland, Sarah E; Hibar, Derrek P; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Renteria, Miguel E; Toro, Roberto; Jahanshad, Neda; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J; Martin, Nicholas G; Agartz, Ingrid; Alda, Martin; Alhusaini, Saud; Almasy, Laura; Almeida, Jorge; Alpert, Kathryn; Andreasen, Nancy C; Andreassen, Ole A; Apostolova, Liana G; Appel, Katja; Armstrong, Nicola J; Aribisala, Benjamin; Bastin, Mark E; Bauer, Michael; Bearden, Carrie E; Bergmann, Orjan; Binder, Elisabeth B; Blangero, John; Bockholt, Henry J; Bøen, Erlend; Bois, Catherine; Boomsma, Dorret I; Booth, Tom; Bowman, Ian J; Bralten, Janita; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brunner, Han G; Brohawn, David G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan; Bulayeva, Kazima; Bustillo, Juan R; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cantor, Rita M; Carless, Melanie A; Caseras, Xavier; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chang, Kiki D; Ching, Christopher R K; Christoforou, Andrea; Cichon, Sven; Clark, Vincent P; Conrod, Patricia; Coppola, Giovanni; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Deary, Ian J; de Geus, Eco J C; den Braber, Anouk; Delvecchio, Giuseppe; Depondt, Chantal; de Haan, Lieuwe; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dima, Danai; Dimitrova, Rali; Djurovic, Srdjan; Dong, Hongwei; Donohoe, Gary; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Dyer, Thomas D; Ehrlich, Stefan; Ekman, Carl Johan; Elvsåshagen, Torbjørn; Emsell, Louise; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fagerness, Jesen; Fears, Scott; Fedko, Iryna; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Foroud, Tatiana; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Frangou, Sophia; Frey, Eva Maria; Frodl, Thomas; Frouin, Vincent; Garavan, Hugh; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Glahn, David C; Godlewska, Beata; Goldstein, Rita Z; Gollub, Randy L; Grabe, Hans J; Grimm, Oliver; Gruber, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Göring, Harald H H; Hagenaars, Saskia; Hajek, Tomas; Hall, Geoffrey B; Hall, Jeremy; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hass, Johanna; Hatton, Sean N; Haukvik, Unn K; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hickie, Ian B; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoehn, David; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hollinshead, Marisa; Holmes, Avram J; Homuth, Georg; Hoogman, Martine; Hong, L Elliot; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Hwang, Kristy S; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnston, Caroline; Jönsson, Erik G; Kahn, René S; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kelly, Sinead; Kim, Sungeun; Kochunov, Peter; Koenders, Laura; Krämer, Bernd; Kwok, John B J; Lagopoulos, Jim; Laje, Gonzalo; Landen, Mikael; Landman, Bennett A; Lauriello, John; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lee, Phil H; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Lemaître, Herve; Leonardo, Cassandra D; Li, Chiang-Shan; Liberg, Benny; Liewald, David C; Liu, Xinmin; Lopez, Lorna M; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Luciano, Michelle; Macciardi, Fabio; Machielsen, Marise W J; Macqueen, Glenda M; Malt, Ulrik F; Mandl, René; Manoach, Dara S; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Derek W; Moses, Eric K; Mueller, Bryon A; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Mwangi, Benson; Nauck, Matthias; Nho, Kwangsik; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars-Göran; Nugent, Allison C; Nyberg, Lars; Olvera, Rene L; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Ophoff, Roel A; Pandolfo, Massimo; Papalampropoulou-Tsiridou, Melina; Papmeyer, Martina; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Penninx, Brenda W; Peterson, Charles P; Pfennig, Andrea; Phillips, Mary; Pike, G Bruce; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Potkin, Steven G; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Rasmussen, Jerod; Rietschel, Marcella; Rijpkema, Mark; Risacher, Shannon L; Roffman, Joshua L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rujescu, Dan; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Salami, Alireza; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Savitz, Jonathan; Saykin, Andrew J; Scanlon, Cathy; Schmaal, Lianne; Schnack, Hugo G; Schork, Andrew J; Schulz, S Charles; Schür, Remmelt; Seidman, Larry; Shen, Li; Shoemaker, Jody M; Simmons, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W; Soares, Jair C; Sponheim, Scott R; Sprooten, Emma; Starr, John M; Steen, Vidar M; Strakowski, Stephen; Strike, Lachlan; Sussmann, Jessika; Sämann, Philipp G; Teumer, Alexander; Toga, Arthur W; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trost, Sarah; Turner, Jessica; Van den Heuvel, Martijn; van der Wee, Nic J; van Eijk, Kristel; van Erp, Theo G M; van Haren, Neeltje E M; van 't Ent, Dennis; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Veltman, Dick J; Versace, Amelia; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Robert; Walter, Henrik; Wang, Lei; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; Westlye, Lars T; Whalley, Heather C; Whelan, Christopher D; White, Tonya; Winkler, Anderson M; Wittfeld, Katharina; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Zilles, David; Zwiers, Marcel P; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Schofield, Peter R; Freimer, Nelson B; Lawrence, Natalia S; Drevets, Wayne

    2014-06-01

    The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics, and medicine, ENIGMA studies have analyzed neuroimaging data from over 12,826 subjects. In addition, data from 12,171 individuals were provided by the CHARGE consortium for replication of findings, in a total of 24,997 subjects. By meta-analyzing results from many sites, ENIGMA has detected factors that affect the brain that no individual site could detect on its own, and that require larger numbers of subjects than any individual neuroimaging study has currently collected. ENIGMA's first project was a genome-wide association study identifying common variants in the genome associated with hippocampal volume or intracranial volume. Continuing work is exploring genetic associations with subcortical volumes (ENIGMA2) and white matter microstructure (ENIGMA-DTI). Working groups also focus on understanding how schizophrenia, bipolar illness, major depression and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affect the brain. We review the current progress of the ENIGMA Consortium, along with challenges and unexpected discoveries made on the way.

  20. Analyses of mitochondrial genes reveal two sympatric but genetically divergent lineages of Rhipicephalus appendiculatus in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kanduma, Esther G; Mwacharo, Joram M; Githaka, Naftaly W; Kinyanjui, Peter W; Njuguna, Joyce N; Kamau, Lucy M; Kariuki, Edward; Mwaura, Stephen; Skilton, Robert A; Bishop, Richard P

    2016-06-22

    The ixodid tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus transmits the apicomplexan protozoan parasite Theileria parva, which causes East coast fever (ECF), the most economically important cattle disease in eastern and southern Africa. Recent analysis of micro- and minisatellite markers showed an absence of geographical and host-associated genetic sub-structuring amongst field populations of R. appendiculatus in Kenya. To assess further the phylogenetic relationships between field and laboratory R. appendiculatus tick isolates, this study examined sequence variations at two mitochondrial genes, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 12S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and the nuclear encoded ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of the rRNA gene, respectively. The analysis of 332 COI sequences revealed 30 polymorphic sites, which defined 28 haplotypes that were separated into two distinct haplogroups (A and B). Inclusion of previously published haplotypes in our analysis revealed a high degree of phylogenetic complexity never reported before in haplogroup A. Neither haplogroup however, showed any clustering pattern related to either the geographical sampling location, the type of tick sampled (laboratory stocks vs field populations) or the mammalian host species. This finding was supported by the results obtained from the analysis of 12S rDNA sequences. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) indicated that 90.8 % of the total genetic variation was explained by the two haplogroups, providing further support for their genetic divergence. These results were, however, not replicated by the nuclear transcribed ITS2 sequences likely because of recombination between the nuclear genomes maintaining a high level of genetic sequence conservation. COI and 12S rDNA are better markers than ITS2 for studying intraspecific diversity. Based on these genes, two major genetic groups of R. appendiculatus that have gone through a demographic expansion exist in Kenya. The two groups show no

  1. Genetic polymorphism analyses of 30 InDels in Chinese Xibe ethnic group and its population genetic differentiations with other groups.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hao-Tian; Zhang, Yu-Dang; Shen, Chun-Mei; Yuan, Guo-Lian; Yang, Chun-Hua; Jin, Rui; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Wang, Hong-Dan; Liu, Wen-Juan; Jing, Hang; Zhu, Bo-Feng

    2015-02-05

    In the present study, we obtained population genetic data and forensic parameters of 30 InDel loci in Chinese Xibe ethnic group from northwestern China and studied the genetic relationships between the studied Xibe group and other reference groups. The observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.1704 at HLD118 locus to 0.5247 at HLD92 locus while the expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.1559 at HLD118 locus to 0.4997 at HLD101 locus. The cumulative power of exclusion and total probability of discrimination power in the studied group were 0.9867 and 0.9999999999902 for the 30 loci, respectively. Analyses of structure, PCA, interpopulation differentiations and phylogenetic tree revealed that the Xibe group had close genetic relationships with South Korean, Beijing Han and Guangdong Han groups. The results indicated that these 30 loci should only be used as a complement for autosomal STRs in paternity cases but could provide an acceptable level of discrimination in forensic identification cases in the studied Xibe group. Further studies should be conducted for better understanding of the Xibe genetic background.

  2. Prisoners co-infected with tuberculosis and HIV: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Edge, Chantal L; King, Emma J; Dolan, Kate; McKee, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Almost from the beginning of the HIV epidemic in 1981, an association with tuberculosis (TB) was recognized. This association between HIV and TB co-infection has been particularly evident amongst prisoners. However, despite this, few studies of TB in prisons have stratified results by HIV status. Given the high prevalence of HIV-positive persons and TB-infected persons in prisons and the documented risk of TB in those infected with HIV, it is of interest to determine how co-infection varies amongst prison populations worldwide. For this reason we have undertaken a systematic review of studies of co-infected prisoners to determine the incidence and/or prevalence of HIV/TB co-infection in prisons, as well as outcomes in this group, measured as treatment success or death. Methods A literature search was undertaken using the online databases PubMed, Embase, IBSS, Scopus, Web of Science, Global Health and CINAHL Plus. No restrictions were set on language or publication date for article retrieval, with articles included if indexed up to 18 October 2015. A total of 1975 non-duplicate papers were identified. For treatment and outcome data all eligible papers were appraised for inclusion; for incidence/prevalence estimates papers published prior to 2000 were excluded from full text review. After full text appraisal, 46 papers were selected for inclusion in the review, 41 for incidence/prevalence estimates and nine for outcomes data, with four papers providing evidence for both outcomes and prevalence/incidence. Results Very few studies estimated the incidence of TB in HIV positive prisoners, with most simply reporting prevalence of co-infection. Co-infection is rarely explicitly measured, with studies simply reporting HIV status in prisoners with TB, or a cross-sectional survey of TB prevalence amongst prisoners with HIV. Estimates of co-infection prevalence ranged from 2.4 to 73.1% and relative risks for one, given the other, ranged from 2.0 to 10.75, although

  3. HIV/STI co-infection among men who have sex with men in Spain.

    PubMed

    Diaz, A; Junquera, M L; Esteban, V; Martínez, B; Pueyo, I; Suarez, J; Ureña, J M; Varela, J A; Vall, M; del Romero, J; Sanz, I; Belda, J; Boronat, J; Gomez, P; Gual, F; Colomo, C; López de Munain, J; Balaguer, J; Landa, M C; Lezaun, M E; Cámara, M C; Fernández, E; Bru, F J; Alastrue, I; Ordoñana, J R; de Armas, C; Azpiri, M A; Gomez, L; Trullén, J; Diez, M

    2009-12-03

    In Spain, neither the HIV nor the STI national surveillance systems collect information on HIV/STI co-infection. However, there are two networks based on HIV/STI clinics which gather this data. We describe HIV prevalence in men who have sex with men (MSM) diagnosed with infectious syphilis and/or gonorrhoea in 15 STI clinics; and concurrent diagnoses of STI in MSM newly diagnosed with HIV in 19 HIV/STI clinics. In total, 572 MSM were diagnosed with infectious syphilis and 580 with gonorrhoea during 2005-2007. HIV prevalence among syphilis and gonorrhoea cases was 29.8% and 15.2% respectively. In the multivariate analysis, HIV/syphilis co-infection was associated with being Latin American; having a history of STI; reporting exclusively anal intercourse; and having sex with casual or several types of partners. HIV and gonorrhoea co-infection was associated with age older than 45 years; having no education or only primary education completed; and having a history of STI. In total, 1,462 HIV infections were newly diagnosed among MSM during 2003-2007. Of these, 31.0% were diagnosed with other STI at the same time. Factors associated with STI co-infection among new HIV cases in MSM were being Latin American; and having sex with casual partners or with both steady and casual partners. In Spain, a considerable proportion of MSM are co-infected with HIV and STI.

  4. Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2013-03-22

    Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans is an important public problem in co-endemic areas in developing countries. However, there is a paucity of studies on co-infection and even fewer reviews. This review examines 44 appropriate papers by PRISMA from 289 papers searched in PubMed via the NCBI Entrez system (no grey literature) up to December 2012 in order to analyze the factors that influence epidemic and host's immunity of co-infection. The limited evidence in this review indicates that most common parasite species are concurrent with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in multiple organs; socio-demographics such as gender and age, special populations with susceptibility such as renal transplant recipients, patients on maintenance haemodialysis, HIV positive patients and migrants, and living in or coming from co-endemic areas are all likely to have an impact on co-infection. Pulmonary tuberculosis and parasitic diseases were shown to be risk factors for each other. Co-infection may significantly inhibit the host's immune system, increase antibacterial therapy intolerance and be detrimental to the prognosis of the disease; in addition, infection with parasitic diseases can alter the protective immune response to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  5. HBV and HIV co-infection: Impact on liver pathobiology and therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Parvez, Mohammad Khalid

    2015-01-27

    The consequences of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection on progression of severe liver diseases is a serious public health issue, worldwide. In the co-infection cases, about 90% of HIV-infected population is seropositive for HBV where approximately 5%-40% individuals are chronically infected. In HIV co-infected individuals, liver-related mortality is estimated over 17 times higher than those with HBV mono-infection. The spectrum of HIV-induced liver diseases includes hepatitis, steatohepatitis, endothelialitis, necrosis, granulomatosis, cirrhosis and carcinoma. Moreover, HIV co-infection significantly alters the natural history of hepatitis B, and therefore complicates the disease management. Though several studies have demonstrated impact of HIV proteins on hepatocyte biology, only a few data is available on interactions between HBV and HIV proteins. Thus, the clinical spectrum as well as the complexity of the co-infection offers challenging fronts to study the underlying molecular mechanisms, and to design effective therapeutic strategies.

  6. Clinical implications of HIV and hepatitis B co-infection in Asia and Africa.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Christopher J; Thio, Chloe L

    2007-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the leading cause of chronic liver disease and liver-related death worldwide, with the majority of these cases occurring in areas of Africa and Asia where HBV prevalence is high. Many of the countries that are affected by hepatitis B are also affected by a high HIV burden, leading to frequent HIV/HBV co-infection. The consequences of co-infection, including increased liver-related morbidity and mortality, increased hepatitis B viral replication, immune reconstitution to HBV in the setting of antiretroviral therapy, and hepatotoxicity from antiretroviral drugs, are especially important in regions with expanding antiretroviral programmes. Little data, however, are available on HIV/HBV co-infection from regions with high chronic hepatitis B prevalence. This Review discusses the epidemiology, natural history, pathogenesis, and management of HIV/HBV co-infection from these areas. Topics for future research relevant to HIV/HBV co-infection in Africa and Asia are also highlighted.

  7. Modulation of HCV replication after combination antiretroviral therapy in HCV/HIV co-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Kenneth E; Guedj, Jeremie; Shata, Mohamed Tarek; Blackard, Jason T; Rouster, Susan D; Castro, Mario; Feinberg, Judith; Sterling, Richard K; Goodman, Zachary; Aronow, Bruce J; Perelson, Alan S

    2014-07-23

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important contributor to morbidity and mortality in patients co-infected with HIV. Co-infection results in increased HCV replication and more rapid rates of liver disease progression. The effect of HIV combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on HCV replication has not been studied in depth. To address this issue, we enrolled a small cohort of HCV/HIV co-infected patients into a cART initiation trial and used dynamic modeling combined with evaluation of immune responses and microarray profiles to determine how effective treatment of HIV affects HCV. Treatment with cART resulted in increased HCV replication and increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in a subset of patients. Subjects with evidence of hepatic injury (increased ALT) were more likely to have HCV-specific immune responses directed against HCV epitopes. Over time, HCV viral loads declined. Reproducible and biologically important gene expression changes occurred in co-infected patients who underwent successful cART. The effective suppression of HIV by cART initiated a cascade of early and late events in treated patients. Early events involving down-regulation of interferon-stimulated genes may have led to transiently increased viral replication and hepatic injury. At later time points, HCV viral load declined to levels comparable to those seen in the setting of HCV monoinfection. These findings support early antiretroviral therapy in those with HCV/HIV co-infection.

  8. Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans is an important public problem in co-endemic areas in developing countries. However, there is a paucity of studies on co-infection and even fewer reviews. This review examines 44 appropriate papers by PRISMA from 289 papers searched in PubMed via the NCBI Entrez system (no grey literature) up to December 2012 in order to analyze the factors that influence epidemic and host’s immunity of co-infection. The limited evidence in this review indicates that most common parasite species are concurrent with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in multiple organs; socio-demographics such as gender and age, special populations with susceptibility such as renal transplant recipients, patients on maintenance haemodialysis, HIV positive patients and migrants, and living in or coming from co-endemic areas are all likely to have an impact on co-infection. Pulmonary tuberculosis and parasitic diseases were shown to be risk factors for each other. Co-infection may significantly inhibit the host’s immune system, increase antibacterial therapy intolerance and be detrimental to the prognosis of the disease; in addition, infection with parasitic diseases can alter the protective immune response to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:23522098

  9. Simeprevir for the treatment of hepatitis C and HIV/hepatitis C co-infection.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Stuart; Crawford-Jones, Andrew; Orkin, Chloe

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic hepatitis in 170 million people worldwide and can progress to fibrosis, cirrhosis, liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma, a disease process accelerated in HIV co-infection. Approximately 25% of HIV infected people are co-infected with HCV (worldwide prevalence 4-5 million) and up to 16.7% of deaths in this population are attributable to HCV co-infection. Previous treatment options for HCV were limited to pegylated interferon and ribavirin (PEG-IFN/RBV), a combination that demonstrated lower successful cure rates in genotype 1 HCV mono-infection and HIV/HCV co-infection, and is also associated with a considerable adverse side-effect profile. The development of directly acting antivirals (DAAs) offers the first class of drug to achieve good viral suppression in previously hard-to-treat patient groups. We review the benefits, tolerability and drug interactions with concomitant drugs of the DAA simeprevir for patients who have HCV mono-infection and hep C/HIV co-infection.

  10. HBV and HIV co-infection: Impact on liver pathobiology and therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Parvez, Mohammad Khalid

    2015-01-01

    The consequences of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection on progression of severe liver diseases is a serious public health issue, worldwide. In the co-infection cases, about 90% of HIV-infected population is seropositive for HBV where approximately 5%-40% individuals are chronically infected. In HIV co-infected individuals, liver-related mortality is estimated over 17 times higher than those with HBV mono-infection. The spectrum of HIV-induced liver diseases includes hepatitis, steatohepatitis, endothelialitis, necrosis, granulomatosis, cirrhosis and carcinoma. Moreover, HIV co-infection significantly alters the natural history of hepatitis B, and therefore complicates the disease management. Though several studies have demonstrated impact of HIV proteins on hepatocyte biology, only a few data is available on interactions between HBV and HIV proteins. Thus, the clinical spectrum as well as the complexity of the co-infection offers challenging fronts to study the underlying molecular mechanisms, and to design effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:25625003

  11. Distribution, diversity and drivers of blood-borne parasite co-infections in Alaskan bird populations.

    PubMed

    Oakgrove, Khouanchy S; Harrigan, Ryan J; Loiseau, Claire; Guers, Sue; Seppi, Bruce; Sehgal, Ravinder N M

    2014-09-01

    Avian species are commonly infected by multiple parasites, however few studies have investigated the environmental determinants of the prevalence of co-infection over a large scale. Here we believe that we report the first, detailed ecological study of the prevalence, diversity and co-infections of four avian blood-borne parasite genera: Plasmodium spp., Haemoproteus spp., Leucocytozoon spp. and Trypanosoma spp. We collected blood samples from 47 resident and migratory bird species across a latitudinal gradient in Alaska. From the patterns observed at collection sites, random forest models were used to provide evidence of associations between bioclimatic conditions and the prevalence of parasite co-infection distribution. Molecular screening revealed a higher prevalence of haematozoa (53%) in Alaska than previously reported. Leucocytozoons had the highest diversity, prevalence and prevalence of co-infection. Leucocytozoon prevalence (35%) positively correlated with Trypanosoma prevalence (11%), negatively correlated with Haemoproteus prevalence (14%) and had no correlation with Plasmodium prevalence (7%). We found temperature, precipitation and tree cover to be the primary environmental drivers that show a relationship with the prevalence of co-infection. The results provide insight into the impacts of bioclimatic drivers on parasite ecology and intra-host interactions, and have implications for the study of infectious diseases in rapidly changing environments. Copyright © 2014 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Population dynamics and genetic changes of Picea abies in the South Carpathians revealed by pollen and ancient DNA analyses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies on allele length polymorphism designate several glacial refugia for Norway spruce (Picea abies) in the South Carpathian Mountains, but infer only limited expansion from these refugia after the last glaciation. To better understand the genetic dynamics of a South Carpathian spruce lineage, we compared ancient DNA from 10,700 and 11,000-year-old spruce pollen and macrofossils retrieved from Holocene lake sediment in the Retezat Mountains with DNA extracted from extant material from the same site. We used eight primer pairs that amplified short and variable regions of the spruce cpDNA. In addition, from the same lake sediment we obtained a 15,000-years-long pollen accumulation rate (PAR) record for spruce that helped us to infer changes in population size at this site. Results We obtained successful amplifications for Norway spruce from 17 out of 462 pollen grains tested, while the macrofossil material provided 22 DNA sequences. Two fossil sequences were found to be unique to the ancient material. Population genetic statistics showed higher genetic diversity in the ancient individuals compared to the extant ones. Similarly, statistically significant Ks and Kst values showed a considerable level of differentiation between extant and ancient populations at the same loci. Lateglacial and Holocene PAR values suggested that population size of the ancient population was small, in the range of 1/10 or 1/5 of the extant population. PAR analysis also detected two periods of rapid population growths (from ca. 11,100 and 3900 calibrated years before present (cal yr BP)) and three bottlenecks (around 9180, 7200 and 2200 cal yr BP), likely triggered by climatic change and human impact. Conclusion Our results suggest that the paternal lineages observed today in the Retezat Mountains persisted at this site at least since the early Holocene. Combination of the results from the genetic and the PAR analyses furthermore suggests that the higher level of genetic

  13. Epidemiological and clinical correlates of malaria-helminth co-infections in southern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In many areas of the world, including Ethiopia, malaria and helminths are co-endemic, therefore, co-infections are common. However, little is known how concurrent infections affect the epidemiology and/or pathogenesis of each other. Therefore, this study was conducted to assess the effects of intestinal helminth infections on the epidemiology and clinical patterns of malaria in southern Ethiopia where both infections are prevalent. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2006 at Wondo Genet Health Center and Bussa Clinic, southern Ethiopia. Consecutive blood film positive malaria patients (N=230) and malaria negative asymptomatic individuals (N=233) were recruited. Malaria parasite detection and quantification was diagnosed using Giemsa-stained thick and thin blood films, respectively. Helminths were detected using direct microscopy and formol-ether concentration techniques. Coarse quantification of helminths ova was made using Kato Katz method. Results The over all magnitude of intestinal parasitic infection was high irrespective of malaria infection (67% among malaria positive patients versus 53.1% among malaria non-infected asymptomatic individuals). Trichuris trichiura infection was associated with increased malaria prevalence while increased worm burden of helminths as expressed by egg intensity was associated with increased malaria parasitaemia which could be a potential factor for development of severe malarial infection with the course of the disease. Majority (77%) of the subjects had multiple helminths infection. T. trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, Schistosoma mansoni, and hookworm infestation accounted for 64.5, 57.7 %, 28.4%, and 12.2% of the infections, respectively. Conclusions Populations in malaria-endemic areas of southern Ethiopia are multi-parasitized with up to four helminths. Mass deworming may be a simple practical approach in endemic areas in reducing the risk of severe malarial attack particularly for those at high risk

  14. Genomic analyses provide new insights into apple evolution, domestication and genetic diversity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Human selection has reshaped crop genomes. Here we report an apple genome variation map generated through genome sequencing of 117 diverse accessions. A comprehensive model of apple speciation and domestication along the Silk Road was proposed based on evidence from diverse genomic analyses. Cultiva...

  15. Population Genetic Analyses of the Fungal Pathogen Colletotrichum fructicola on Tea-Oil Trees in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, He; Zhou, Guo-Ying; Liu, Jun-Ang; Xu, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Colletotrichum fructicola is found in all five continents and is capable of causing severe diseases in a number of economically important plants such as avocado, fig, cocoa, pear, and tea-oil trees. However, almost nothing is known about its patterns of genetic variation and epidemiology on any of its host plant species. Here we analyzed 167 isolates of C. fructicola obtained from the leaves of tea-oil tree Camellia oleifera at 15 plantations in seven Chinese provinces. Multilocus sequence typing was conducted for all isolates based on DNA sequences at fragments of four genes: the internal transcribed spacers of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster (539 bp), calmodulin (633 bp), glutamine synthetase (711 bp), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (190 bp), yielding 3.52%, 0.63%, 8.44%, and 7.89% of single nucleotide polymorphic sites and resulting in 15, 5, 12 and 11 alleles respectively at the four gene fragments in the total sample. The combined allelic information from all four loci identified 53 multilocus genotypes with the most frequent represented by 21 isolates distributed in eight tea-oil plantations in three provinces, consistent with long-distance clonal dispersal. However, despite evidence for clonal dispersal, statistically significant genetic differentiation among geographic populations was detected. In addition, while no evidence of recombination was found within any of the four gene fragments, signatures of recombination were found among the four gene fragments in most geographic populations, consistent with sexual mating of this species in nature. Our study provides the first insights into the population genetics and epidemiology of the important plant fungal pathogen C. fructicola. PMID:27299731

  16. Selection of Genetic Markers for Association Analyses, Using Linkage Disequilibrium and Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhaoling; Zaykin, Dmitri V.; Xu, Chun-Fang; Wagner, Michael; Ehm, Margaret G.

    2003-01-01

    The genotyping of closely spaced single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers frequently yields highly correlated data, owing to extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD) between markers. The extent of LD varies widely across the genome and drives the number of frequent haplotypes observed in small regions. Several studies have illustrated the possibility that LD or haplotype data could be used to select a subset of SNPs that optimize the information retained in a genomic region while reducing the genotyping effort and simplifying the analysis. We propose a method based on the spectral decomposition of the matrices of pairwise LD between markers, and we select markers on the basis of their contributions to the total genetic variation. We also modify Clayton’s “haplotype tagging SNP” selection method, which utilizes haplotype information. For both methods, we propose sliding window–based algorithms that allow the methods to be applied to large chromosomal regions. Our procedures require genotype information about a small number of individuals for an initial set of SNPs and selection of an optimum subset of SNPs that could be efficiently genotyped on larger numbers of samples while retaining most of the genetic variation in samples. We identify suitable parameter combinations for the procedures, and we show that a sample size of 50–100 individuals achieves consistent results in studies of simulated data sets in linkage equilibrium and LD. When applied to experimental data sets, both procedures were similarly effective at reducing the genotyping requirement while maintaining the genetic information content throughout the regions. We also show that haplotype-association results that Hosking et al. obtained near CYP2D6 were almost identical before and after marker selection. PMID:12796855

  17. Genetic association analyses of nitric oxide synthase genes and neural tube defects vary by phenotype.

    PubMed

    Soldano, Karen L; Garrett, Melanie E; Cope, Heidi L; Rusnak, J Michael; Ellis, Nathen J; Dunlap, Kaitlyn L; Speer, Marcy C; Gregory, Simon G; Ashley-Koch, Allison E

    2013-10-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are caused by improper neural tube closure during the early stages of embryonic development. NTDs are hypothesized to have a complex genetic origin and numerous candidate genes have been proposed. The nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) G594T polymorphism has been implicated in risk for spina bifida, and interactions between that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism have also been observed. To evaluate other genetic variation in the NO pathway in the development of NTDs, we examined all three NOS genes: NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3. Using 3109 Caucasian samples in 745 families, we evaluated association in the overall dataset and within specific phenotypic subsets. Haplotype tagging SNPs in the NOS genes were tested for genetic association with NTD subtypes, both for main effects as well as for the presence of interactions with the MTHFR C677T polymorphism. Nominal main effect associations were found with all subtypes, across all three NOS genes, and interactions were observed between SNPs in all three NOS genes and MTHFR C677T. Unlike the previous report, the most significant associations in our dataset were with cranial subtypes and the AG genotype of rs4795067 in NOS2 (p = 0.0014) and the interaction between the rs9658490 G allele in NOS1 and MTHFR 677TT genotype (p = 0.0014). Our data extend the previous findings by implicating a role for all three NOS genes, independently and through interactions with MTHFR, in risk not only for spina bifida, but all NTD subtypes.

  18. Breeding patterns and cultivated beets origins by genetic diversity and linkage disequilibrium analyses.

    PubMed

    Mangin, Brigitte; Sandron, Florian; Henry, Karine; Devaux, Brigitte; Willems, Glenda; Devaux, Pierre; Goudemand, Ellen

    2015-11-01

    Genetic diversity in worldwide population of beets is strongly affected by the domestication history, and the comparison of linkage disequilibrium in worldwide and elite populations highlights strong selection pressure. Genetic relationships and linkage disequilibrium (LD) were evaluated in a set of 2035 worldwide beet accessions and in another of 1338 elite sugar beet lines, using 320 and 769 single nucleotide polymorphisms, respectively. The structures of the populations were analyzed using four different approaches. Within the worldwide population, three of the methods gave a very coherent picture of the population structure. Fodder beet and sugar beet accessions were grouped together, separated from garden beets and sea beets, reflecting well the origins of beet domestication. The structure of the elite panel, however, was less stable between clustering methods, which was probably because of the high level of genetic mixing in breeding programs. For the linkage disequilibrium analysis, the usual measure (r (2)) was used, and compared with others that correct for population structure and relatedness (r S (2) , r V (2) , r VS (2)). The LD as measured by r (2) persisted beyond 10 cM within the elite panel and fell below 0.1 after less than 2 cM in the worldwide population, for almost all chromosomes. With correction for relatedness, LD decreased under 0.1 by 1 cM for almost all chromosomes in both populations, except for chromosomes 3 and 9 within the elite panel. In these regions, the larger extent of LD could be explained by strong selection pressure.

  19. Population Genetic Analyses of the Fungal Pathogen Colletotrichum fructicola on Tea-Oil Trees in China.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Zhou, Guo-Ying; Liu, Jun-Ang; Xu, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Colletotrichum fructicola is found in all five continents and is capable of causing severe diseases in a number of economically important plants such as avocado, fig, cocoa, pear, and tea-oil trees. However, almost nothing is known about its patterns of genetic variation and epidemiology on any of its host plant species. Here we analyzed 167 isolates of C. fructicola obtained from the leaves of tea-oil tree Camellia oleifera at 15 plantations in seven Chinese provinces. Multilocus sequence typing was conducted for all isolates based on DNA sequences at fragments of four genes: the internal transcribed spacers of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster (539 bp), calmodulin (633 bp), glutamine synthetase (711 bp), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (190 bp), yielding 3.52%, 0.63%, 8.44%, and 7.89% of single nucleotide polymorphic sites and resulting in 15, 5, 12 and 11 alleles respectively at the four gene fragments in the total sample. The combined allelic information from all four loci identified 53 multilocus genotypes with the most frequent represented by 21 isolates distributed in eight tea-oil plantations in three provinces, consistent with long-distance clonal dispersal. However, despite evidence for clonal dispersal, statistically significant genetic differentiation among geographic populations was detected. In addition, while no evidence of recombination was found within any of the four gene fragments, signatures of recombination were found among the four gene fragments in most geographic populations, consistent with sexual mating of this species in nature. Our study provides the first insights into the population genetics and epidemiology of the important plant fungal pathogen C. fructicola.

  20. [Differential response to pegylated interferon plus ribavirin combination therapy in chronic hepatitis C and HIV/HCV co-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Cai, Wei-ping; Hu, Feng-yu; Xu, Min; Lan, Yun; Tang, Xiao-ping

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the potential differences in response to pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV) combination therapy in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) mono-infection and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV co-infection. Seventy HIV/HCV patients and sixty HCV patients, were administered a 48-week course of Peg-IFN + RBV. The HCV load was tested by the COBAS automatic viral load analysis system (lower limit of quantification = 15 IU/ml) at treatment weeks 0 (baseline), 4, 12, 24, and 48 and at week 24 after drug withdrawal. The patients were also genotyped by sequencing for the host-encoded interleukin (IL)-28B single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to HCV Peg-IFN + RBV therapy outcome: rs8099917, rs12979860 and rs12980275. In addition, the HCV-encoded NS5B gene region was genotyped by nested-PCR and sequencing followed by BLAST searching of the Los Alamos National Laboratory HCV database. The significance of between-group differences in response to therapy and roles of SNPs were evaluated by statistical analyses. The ratio of sustained virological response (SVR) was significantly lower in the HIV/HCV co-infected patients than the HCV mono-infected patients (32.9% vs. 71.7%; P less than 0.001). While the HIV/HCV co-infected patients did not show a significant difference in SVR ratio achieved between individuals infected with the HCV-1 genotype and the non-HCV-1 genotype (30.8% vs. 33.3%; P = 1.000), the HCV mono-infected patients did (86.1% vs. non 50.0%, P = 0.002). Moreover, the SVR ratio was higher in the HCV-1 genotype HCV mono-infected patients than in the HIV/HCV-1 genotype co-infected patents (30.8% vs. 86.1%; P less than 0.001). The different IL-28B genotypes were not significantly correlated to the PEG-IFN+RBV therapy response of either HCV mono-infected patients or HIV/HCV co-infected patients (P more than 0.05). HCV mono-infected patients respond better to Peg-IFN + RBV therapy than HIV/HCV co-infected patients. The HCV-1

  1. Comparative proteomic and genetic analyses reveal unidentified mutations in Escherichia coli XL1-Blue and DH5α.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Xia; Qian, Zhi-Gang; Lee, Sang Yup

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli has been used widely in laboratory and the biotech industry. However, the genetic and metabolic characteristics remain inadequately studied, particularly for those strains with extensive genetic manipulations that might have resulted in unknown mutations. Here, we demonstrate a comparative proteomics and genetics approach to identify unknown mutations in E. coli K-12 derivatives. The comparative proteomic and genetic analyses revealed an IS5 disruption of the kdgR gene in two commonly used derivative strains of E. coli K-12, XL1-Blue and DH5α, compared with K-12 wild-type strain W3110. In addition, a controversial deoR mutation was clarified as a wild type in E. coli DH5α using the same approach. This approach should be useful in characterizing the unknown mutations in various mutant strains developed. At the same time, comparative proteomic analysis also revealed the distinct metabolic characteristic of the two derivatives: higher biosynthetic flux to purine nucleotides. This is potentially beneficial for the synthesis of plasmid DNA. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic variation in Opisthorchis viverrini (Trematoda: Opisthorchiidae) from northeast Thailand and Laos PDR based on random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses

    PubMed Central

    Chilton, Neil B.; Andrews, Ross H.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic variation in Opisthorchis viverrini adults originating from different locations in northeast Thailand and Laos, People’s Democratic Republic (PDR), was examined using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses. In an initial analysis, the genomic DNA of one fluke from each of ten localities was amplified using 15 random primers (10-mers); however, genetic variation among O. viverrini specimens was detected reliably for only four primers. A more detailed RAPD analysis using these four primers was conducted on ten individuals from nine localities. Considerable genetic variation was detected among O. viverrini from different geographical areas and among some individuals from the same collecting locality. Comparison of the RAPD profiles revealed that O. viverrini adults from Laos PDR were genetically distinct from those from northeast Thailand. The taxonomic significance of this finding needs to be explored in more detail. The RAPD markers established in the present study provide opportunities to examine the biology and epidemiology of O. viverrini and fish-borne trematodes within the region. Additionally, application of these markers in such studies could have important implications in relation to the prevalence of cholangiocarcinoma in different regions of Asia. PMID:17016722

  3. Pronounced genetic differentiation and recent secondary contact in the mangrove tree Lumnitzera racemosa revealed by population genomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfang; Yang, Yuchen; Chen, Qipian; Fang, Lu; He, Ziwen; Guo, Wuxia; Qiao, Sitan; Wang, Zhengzhen; Guo, Miaomiao; Zhong, Cairong; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2016-07-06

    Systematically investigating the impacts of Pleistocene sea-level fluctuations on mangrove plants may provide a better understanding of their demographic history and useful information for their conservation. Therefore, we conducted population genomic analyses of 88 nuclear genes to explore the population dynamics of a mangrove tree Lumnitzera racemosa across the Indo-West Pacific region. Our results revealed pronounced genetic differentiation in this species between the populations from the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, which may be attributable to the long-term isolation between the western and eastern coasts of the Malay Peninsula during sea-level drops in the Pleistocene glacial periods. The mixing of haplotypes from the two highly divergent groups was identified in a Cambodian population at almost all 88 nuclear genes, suggesting genetic admixture of the two lineages at the boundary region. Similar genetic admixture was also found in other populations from Southeast Asia based on the Bayesian clustering analysis of six nuclear genes, which suggests extensive and recent secondary contact of the two divergent lineages in Southeast Asia. Computer simulations indicated substantial migration from the Indian Ocean towards the South China Sea, which likely results in the genetic admixture in Southeast Asia.

  4. Pronounced genetic differentiation and recent secondary contact in the mangrove tree Lumnitzera racemosa revealed by population genomic analyses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianfang; Yang, Yuchen; Chen, Qipian; Fang, Lu; He, Ziwen; Guo, Wuxia; Qiao, Sitan; Wang, Zhengzhen; Guo, Miaomiao; Zhong, Cairong; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2016-01-01

    Systematically investigating the impacts of Pleistocene sea-level fluctuations on mangrove plants may provide a better understanding of their demographic history and useful information for their conservation. Therefore, we conducted population genomic analyses of 88 nuclear genes to explore the population dynamics of a mangrove tree Lumnitzera racemosa across the Indo-West Pacific region. Our results revealed pronounced genetic differentiation in this species between the populations from the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, which may be attributable to the long-term isolation between the western and eastern coasts of the Malay Peninsula during sea-level drops in the Pleistocene glacial periods. The mixing of haplotypes from the two highly divergent groups was identified in a Cambodian population at almost all 88 nuclear genes, suggesting genetic admixture of the two lineages at the boundary region. Similar genetic admixture was also found in other populations from Southeast Asia based on the Bayesian clustering analysis of six nuclear genes, which suggests extensive and recent secondary contact of the two divergent lineages in Southeast Asia. Computer simulations indicated substantial migration from the Indian Ocean towards the South China Sea, which likely results in the genetic admixture in Southeast Asia. PMID:27380895

  5. Genetic and genomic analyses for economically important traits and their applications in molecular breeding of cultured fish.

    PubMed

    Tong, JinGou; Sun, XiaoWen

    2015-02-01

    The traits of cultured fish must continually be genetically improved to supply high-quality animal protein for human consumption. Economically important fish traits are controlled by multiple gene quantitative trait loci (QTL), most of which have minor effects, but a few genes may have major effects useful for molecular breeding. In this review, we chose relevant studies on some of the most intensively cultured fish and concisely summarize progress on identifying and verifying QTLs for such traits as growth, disease and stress resistance and sex in recent decades. The potential applications of these major-effect genes and their associated markers in marker-assisted selection and molecular breeding, as well as future research directions are also discussed. These genetic and genomic analyses will be valuable for elucidating the mechanisms modulating economically important traits and to establish more effective molecular breeding techniques in fish.

  6. Genetic analyses of endoreduplication in Zea mays endosperm: evidence of sporophytic and zygotic maternal control.

    PubMed Central

    Dilkes, Brian P; Dante, Ricardo A; Coelho, Cintia; Larkins, Brian A

    2002-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to assess the variability of endoreduplication in endosperms of maize inbred lines. Little variation was found between midwestern dent types, and high levels of endoreduplication were observed in popcorns. Endoreduplication is different between inbred lines by 13-18 days after pollination, and flow cytometric analysis of ploidy level was feasible until 20 DAP. To study the genetic regulation of endoreduplication, four inbreds were crossed to B73 and developing endosperms from both parental, reciprocal F(1), and backcross generations were subjected to flow cytometric analysis. Three measurements of endoreduplication were calculated from these data and analyzed as quantitative genetic traits. Multiple models of trait inheritance were considered including triploid, diploid, sporophytic maternal, and maternal and paternal zygotic nuclear inheritance. Maternal zygotic effects, often considered a form of parental imprinting, and maternal sporophytic effects were detected. To test the feasibility of introgressing a high endoreduplication phenotype into a midwestern dent inbred line, a backcross population was generated from B73 x Sg18. Parental and progeny endoreduplication levels were compared and heritabilities assessed. The heritabilities calculated from these data generally agree with the values calculated in the larger crossing experiments. PMID:11901131

  7. Genetic analyses, phenotypic adaptability and stability in sugarcane genotypes for commercial cultivation in Pernambuco.

    PubMed

    Dutra Filho, J A; Junior, T C; Simões Neto, D E

    2015-10-05

    In the present study, we assessed the agro-industrial performance of 22 sugarcane genotypes adaptable to edaphoclimatic conditions in production microregions in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, and we recommended the commercial cultivation of select genotypes. The variables analyzed were as follows: sucrose percentage in cane juice, tonnage of saccharose per hectare (TPH), sugarcane tonnage per hectare (TCH), fiber, solid soluble contents, total recoverable sugar tonnage (ATR), and total recoverable sugar tonnage per hectare (ATR t/ha). A randomized block design with 4 repeats was used. Combined variance of the experiments, genetic parameter estimates, and environment stratification were analyzed. Phenotypic adaptability and stability were analyzed using the Annicchiarico and Wricke methods and analysis of variance. Genetic gain was estimated using the classic index and sum of ranks. Genotype selection was efficient for TPH, TCH, and ATR t/ha. Genotypes presented a great potential for improvement and a similar response pattern in Litoral Norte and Mata Sul microregions for TPH and TCH and Litoral Norte and Litoral Sul microregions for ATR t/ha. Genotypes SP78-4764, RB813804, and SP79-101 showed better productivity and phenotypic adaptability and stability, according to the Wricke and Annicchiarico methods. These genotypes can be recommended for cultivation in the sugarcane belt in the State of Pernambuco.

  8. What risk assessments of genetically modified organisms can learn from institutional analyses of public health risks.

    PubMed

    Rajan, S Ravi; Letourneau, Deborah K

    2012-01-01

    The risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are evaluated traditionally by combining hazard identification and exposure estimates to provide decision support for regulatory agencies. We question the utility of the classical risk paradigm and discuss its evolution in GMO risk assessment. First, we consider the problem of uncertainty, by comparing risk assessment for environmental toxins in the public health domain with genetically modified organisms in the environment; we use the specific comparison of an insecticide to a transgenic, insecticidal food crop. Next, we examine normal accident theory (NAT) as a heuristic to consider runaway effects of GMOs, such as negative community level consequences of gene flow from transgenic, insecticidal crops. These examples illustrate how risk assessments are made more complex and contentious by both their inherent uncertainty and the inevitability of failure beyond expectation in complex systems. We emphasize the value of conducting decision-support research, embracing uncertainty, increasing transparency, and building interdisciplinary institutions that can address the complex interactions between ecosystems and society. In particular, we argue against black boxing risk analysis, and for a program to educate policy makers about uncertainty and complexity, so that eventually, decision making is not the burden that falls upon scientists but is assumed by the public at large.

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure of the synthetic Pannon White rabbit revealed by pedigree analyses.

    PubMed

    Nagy, I; Curik, I; Radnai, I; Cervantes, I; Gyovai, P; Baumung, R; Farkas, J; Szendro, Z

    2010-04-01

    Demographic history, current status, and efficiency of the mating strategy were analyzed using the pedigree of Pannon White (PW) rabbits born between 1992 and 2007. Potential accumulation of detrimental effects and loss of genetic diversity were also considered. Calculations and estimates were done most often for rabbits born in 2007, whereas other reference populations (REFPOPXXXX) were specified explicitly. The pedigree contained 4,749 individuals and 580 founders, and its completeness was 82.1% up to 10 and 94.5% up to 5 generations, respectively. Generation intervals through different pathways averaged 1.2 yr. When adjusted to the pedigree completeness, the amount of inbreeding (F(i)) of rabbits was comparable (5.54%) with that of other livestock populations, whereas the 10 (30) founders contributing the most to inbreeding explained a large part of the population inbreeding [i.e., 42.24% (73.18%)]. The ancestral inbreeding coefficient of REFPOP2004 (10.67%) was one-half that of REFPOP2007 (20.66%), showing its strong dependence on pedigree length. Family variance, inbreeding, and realized effective population size were 84.18 (REFPOP2006; this variable could not be calculated for the last year examined), 37.19, and 91.08, respectively. The effective numbers of ancestors, founders, and founder genomes were 48, 26, and 7.33, respectively. Although the circular mating scheme applied was generally effective, the large accumulated reduction in genetic variability indicates the need to revise and improve the current breeding strategy.

  10. Genetic analyses of agronomic traits in Tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum (L.) Gaertn.).

    PubMed

    Li, Chunhua; Kobayashi, Kiwa; Yoshida, Yasuko; Ohsawa, Ryo

    2012-12-01

    The consumption of products made from Tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum (L.) Gaertn.) has increased in recent years in Japan. Increased consumer demand has led to recognition of the need for early varieties of this crop with high and stable yields. In order to accomplish this, more information is needed on the genetic mechanisms affecting earliness and yield. We conducted genetic analysis of 3 agronomic traits (days to flowering, plant height and total seed weight per plant) to segregate F(2) and F(3) populations derived from a cross between Tartary buckwheat cultivars 'Hokuriku No. 4' and 'Ishisoba'. Broad-sense heritability estimates for days to flowering, plant height and total seed weight were 0.70, 0.62 and 0.75, respectively, in F(3) population. Narrow-sense heritability for total seed weight (0.51) was highest, followed by heritability for days to flowering (0.37), with heritability for plant height (0.26) lowest. Later flowering was associated with increased plant height and higher yields. From the F(4) generation, we identified twelve candidate plants with earlier maturity and reduced plant height compared to 'Hokuriku No. 4', but almost the same total seed weight. These results suggest that hybridization breeding using the single seed descent (SSD) method is an effective approach for improving agronomic characteristics of Tartary buckwheat.

  11. What Risk Assessments of Genetically Modified Organisms Can Learn from Institutional Analyses of Public Health Risks

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, S. Ravi; Letourneau, Deborah K.

    2012-01-01

    The risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are evaluated traditionally by combining hazard identification and exposure estimates to provide decision support for regulatory agencies. We question the utility of the classical risk paradigm and discuss its evolution in GMO risk assessment. First, we consider the problem of uncertainty, by comparing risk assessment for environmental toxins in the public health domain with genetically modified organisms in the environment; we use the specific comparison of an insecticide to a transgenic, insecticidal food crop. Next, we examine normal accident theory (NAT) as a heuristic to consider runaway effects of GMOs, such as negative community level consequences of gene flow from transgenic, insecticidal crops. These examples illustrate how risk assessments are made more complex and contentious by both their inherent uncertainty and the inevitability of failure beyond expectation in complex systems. We emphasize the value of conducting decision-support research, embracing uncertainty, increasing transparency, and building interdisciplinary institutions that can address the complex interactions between ecosystems and society. In particular, we argue against black boxing risk analysis, and for a program to educate policy makers about uncertainty and complexity, so that eventually, decision making is not the burden that falls upon scientists but is assumed by the public at large. PMID:23193357

  12. Exploring the Genetic Etiology of Trust in Adolescents: Combined Twin and DNA Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, Robyn E.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Mottershaw, Abigail L.; Wang, R. Adele H.; Haworth, Claire M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Behavioral traits generally show moderate to strong genetic influence, with heritability estimates of around 50%. Some recent research has suggested that trust may be an exception because it is more strongly influenced by social interactions. In a sample of over 7,000 adolescent twins from the United Kingdom’s Twins Early Development Study, we found broad sense heritability estimates of 57% for generalized trust and 51% for trust in friends. Genomic-relatedness-matrix restricted maximum likelihood (GREML) estimates in the same sample indicate that 21% of the narrow sense genetic variance can be explained by common single nucleotide polymorphisms for generalized trust and 43% for trust in friends. As expected, this implies a large amount of unexplained heritability, although power is low for estimating DNA-based heritability. The missing heritability may be accounted for by interactions between DNA and the social environment during development or via gene–environment correlations with rare variants. How these genes and environments correlate seem especially important for the development of trust. PMID:27852354

  13. Clear Genetic Distinctiveness between Human- and Pig-Derived Trichuris Based on Analyses of Mitochondrial Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Hua; Gasser, Robin B.; Su, Ang; Nejsum, Peter; Peng, Lifei; Lin, Rui-Qing; Li, Ming-Wei; Xu, Min-Jun; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-01-01

    The whipworm, Trichuris trichiura, causes trichuriasis in ∼600 million people worldwide, mainly in developing countries. Whipworms also infect other animal hosts, including pigs (T. suis), dogs (T. vulpis) and non-human primates, and cause disease in these hosts, which is similar to trichuriasis of humans. Although Trichuris species are considered to be host specific, there has been considerable controversy, over the years, as to whether T. trichiura and T. suis are the same or distinct species. Here, we characterised the entire mitochondrial genomes of human-derived Trichuris and pig-derived Trichuris, compared them and then tested the hypothesis that the parasites from these two host species are genetically distinct in a phylogenetic analysis of the sequence data. Taken together, the findings support the proposal that T. trichiura and T. suis are separate species, consistent with previous data for nuclear ribosomal DNA. Using molecular analytical tools, employing genetic markers defined herein, future work should conduct large-scale studies to establish whether T. trichiura is found in pigs and T. suis in humans in endemic regions. PMID:22363831

  14. Clear genetic distinctiveness between human- and pig-derived Trichuris based on analyses of mitochondrial datasets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Hua; Gasser, Robin B; Su, Ang; Nejsum, Peter; Peng, Lifei; Lin, Rui-Qing; Li, Ming-Wei; Xu, Min-Jun; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-01-01

    The whipworm, Trichuris trichiura, causes trichuriasis in ∼600 million people worldwide, mainly in developing countries. Whipworms also infect other animal hosts, including pigs (T. suis), dogs (T. vulpis) and non-human primates, and cause disease in these hosts, which is similar to trichuriasis of humans. Although Trichuris species are considered to be host specific, there has been considerable controversy, over the years, as to whether T. trichiura and T. suis are the same or distinct species. Here, we characterised the entire mitochondrial genomes of human-derived Trichuris and pig-derived Trichuris, compared them and then tested the hypothesis that the parasites from these two host species are genetically distinct in a phylogenetic analysis of the sequence data. Taken together, the findings support the proposal that T. trichiura and T. suis are separate species, consistent with previous data for nuclear ribosomal DNA. Using molecular analytical tools, employing genetic markers defined herein, future work should conduct large-scale studies to establish whether T. trichiura is found in pigs and T. suis in humans in endemic regions.

  15. Curve-based multivariate distance matrix regression analysis: application to genetic association analyses involving repeated measures

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Rany M.; O'Connor, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    Most, if not all, human phenotypes exhibit a temporal, dosage-dependent, or age effect. Despite this fact, it is rare that data are collected over time or in sequence in relevant studies of the determinants of these phenotypes. The costs and organizational sophistication necessary to collect repeated measurements or longitudinal data for a given phenotype are clearly impediments to this, but greater efforts in this area are needed if insights into human phenotypic expression are to be obtained. Appropriate data analysis methods for genetic association studies involving repeated or longitudinal measures are also needed. We consider the use of longitudinal profiles obtained from fitted functions on repeated data collections from a set of individuals whose similarities are contrasted between sets of individuals with different genotypes to test hypotheses about genetic influences on time-dependent phenotype expression. The proposed approach can accommodate uncertainty of the fitted functions, as well as weighting factors across the time points, and is easily extended to a wide variety of complex analysis settings. We showcase the proposed approach with data from a clinical study investigating human blood vessel response to tyramine. We also compare the proposed approach with standard analytic procedures and investigate its robustness and power via simulation studies. The proposed approach is found to be quite flexible and performs either as well or better than traditional statistical methods. PMID:20423962

  16. Genetic analyses of agronomic traits in Tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum (L.) Gaertn.)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunhua; Kobayashi, Kiwa; Yoshida, Yasuko; Ohsawa, Ryo

    2012-01-01

    The consumption of products made from Tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum (L.) Gaertn.) has increased in recent years in Japan. Increased consumer demand has led to recognition of the need for early varieties of this crop with high and stable yields. In order to accomplish this, more information is needed on the genetic mechanisms affecting earliness and yield. We conducted genetic analysis of 3 agronomic traits (days to flowering, plant height and total seed weight per plant) to segregate F2 and F3 populations derived from a cross between Tartary buckwheat cultivars ‘Hokuriku No. 4’ and ‘Ishisoba’. Broad-sense heritability estimates for days to flowering, plant height and total seed weight were 0.70, 0.62 and 0.75, respectively, in F3 population. Narrow-sense heritability for total seed weight (0.51) was highest, followed by heritability for days to flowering (0.37), with heritability for plant height (0.26) lowest. Later flowering was associated with increased plant height and higher yields. From the F4 generation, we identified twelve candidate plants with earlier maturity and reduced plant height compared to ‘Hokuriku No. 4’, but almost the same total seed weight. These results suggest that hybridization breeding using the single seed descent (SSD) method is an effective approach for improving agronomic characteristics of Tartary buckwheat. PMID:23341743

  17. Evaluation of kalman filters and genetic algorithms for delayed neutron nondestructive assay data analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Aumeier, S. E.; Forsmann, J. H.; Engineering Division

    1998-04-01

    The ability to nondestructively determine the presence and quantity of fissile/fertile nuclei in various matrices is important in several areas of nuclear applications, including international and domestic safeguards, radioactive waste characterization, and nuclear facility operations. An analysis was performed to determine the feasibility of identifying the masses of individual fissionable isotopes from a cumulative delayed-neutron signal resulting from the neutron irradiation of several uranium and plutonium isotopes. The feasibility of two separate data-processing techniques was studied: Kalman filtering and genetic algorithms. The basis of each technique is reviewed, and the structure of the algorithms as applied to the delayed-neutron analysis problem is presented. The results of parametric studies performed using several variants of the algorithms are presented. The effect of including additional constraining information such as additional measurements and known relative isotopic concentration is discussed. The parametric studies were conducted using simulated delayed-neutron data representative of the cumulative delayed-neutron response following irradiation of a sample containing {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 240}Pu. The results show that by processing delayed-neutron data representative of two significantly different fissile/fertile fission ratios, both Kalman filters and genetic algorithms are capable of yielding reasonably accurate estimates of the mass of individual isotopes contained in a given assay sample.

  18. Evaluation of Kalman filters and genetic algorithms for delayed-neutron nondestructive assay data analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Aumeier, S.E.; Forsmann, J.H.

    1998-04-01

    The ability to nondestructively determine the presence and quantity of fissile/fertile nuclei in various matrices is important in several areas of nuclear applications, including international and domestic safeguards, radioactive waste characterization, and nuclear facility operations. An analysis was performed to determine the feasibility of identifying the masses of individual fissionable isotopes from a cumulative delayed-neutron signal resulting form the neutron irradiation of several uranium and plutonium isotopes. The feasibility of two separate data-processing techniques was studied: Kalman filtering and genetic algorithms. The basis of each technique is reviewed, and the structure of the algorithms as applied to the delayed-neutron analysis problem is presented. The results of parametric studies performed using several variants of the algorithms are presented. The effect of including additional constraining information such as additional measurements and known relative isotopic concentration is discussed. The parametric studies were conducted using simulated delayed-neutron data representative of the cumulative delayed-neutron response following irradiation of a sample containing {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 240}Pu. The results show that by processing delayed-neutron data representative of two significantly different fissile/fertile fission ratios, both Kalman filters and genetic algorithms are capable of yielding reasonably accurate estimates of the mass of individual isotopes contained in a given assay sample.

  19. Multilocus genetic analyses differentiate between widespread and spatially restricted cryptic species in a model ascidian.

    PubMed

    Bock, Dan G; MacIsaac, Hugh J; Cristescu, Melania E

    2012-06-22

    Elucidating the factors that shape species distributions has long been a fundamental goal in ecology and evolutionary biology. In spite of significant theoretical advancements, empirical studies of range limits have lagged behind. Specifically, little is known about how the attributes that allow species to expand their ranges and become widespread vary across phylogenies. Here, we studied the ascidian Botryllus schlosseri, a worldwide invasive species that is also characterized by marked genetic subdivision. Our study includes phylogenetic and population genetic data based on mitochondrial and nuclear genes, as well as polymorphic microsatellites for B. schlosseri colonies sampled from the southern and northern coasts of Europe and the eastern and western coasts of North America. We demonstrate that this well-known model organism comprises three highly divergent and probably reproductively isolated cryptic species (A, D and E), with two more (B and C) being suggested by data retrieved from GenBank. Among these, species A, recovered in all of the surveyed regions, is by far the most common and widespread. By contrast, species B-E, occurring mostly in sites from northern Europe, are considerably more geographically restricted. These findings, along with inferences made on transport opportunity, suggest that divergent evolutionary histories promoted differences in invasive potential between B. schlosseri sibling species, indicating that attributes that facilitate dramatic shifts in range limits can evolve more easily and frequently than previously thought. We propose environmental disturbance as a selective force that could have shaped the evolution of invasiveness in the B. schlosseri complex.

  20. Meta-Analyses of Genome-Wide Association Data Hold New Promise for Addiction Genetics.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Arpana; Edenberg, Howard J; Gelernter, Joel

    2016-09-01

    Meta-analyses of genome-wide association study data have begun to lead to promising new discoveries for behavioral and psychiatrically relevant phenotypes (e.g., schizophrenia, educational attainment). We outline how this methodology can similarly lead to novel discoveries in genomic studies of substance use disorders, and discuss challenges that will need to be overcome to accomplish this goal. We illustrate our approach with the work of the newly established Substance Use Disorders workgroup of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium.

  1. Direct radiocarbon dating and genetic analyses on the purported Neanderthal mandible from the Monti Lessini (Italy)

    PubMed Central

    Talamo, Sahra; Hajdinjak, Mateja; Mannino, Marcello A.; Fasani, Leone; Welker, Frido; Martini, Fabio; Romagnoli, Francesca; Zorzin, Roberto; Meyer, Matthias; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Anatomically modern humans replaced Neanderthals in Europe around 40,000 years ago. The demise of the Neanderthals and the nature of the possible relationship with anatomically modern humans has captured our imagination and stimulated research for more than a century now. Recent chronological studies suggest a possible overlap between Neanderthals and anatomically modern humans of more than 5,000 years. Analyses of ancient genome sequences from both groups have shown that they interbred multiple times, including in Europe. A potential place of interbreeding is the notable Palaeolithic site of Riparo Mezzena in Northern Italy. In order to improve our understanding of prehistoric occupation at Mezzena, we analysed the human mandible and several cranial fragments from the site using radiocarbon dating, ancient DNA, ZooMS and isotope analyses. We also performed a more detailed investigation of the lithic assemblage of layer I. Surprisingly we found that the Riparo Mezzena mandible is not from a Neanderthal but belonged to an anatomically modern human. Furthermore, we found no evidence for the presence of Neanderthal remains among 11 of the 13 cranial and post-cranial fragments re-investigated in this study. PMID:27389305

  2. University Students' Knowledge Structures and Informal Reasoning on the Use of Genetically Modified Foods: Multidimensional Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying-Tien

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to provide insights into the role of learners' knowledge structures about a socio-scientific issue (SSI) in their informal reasoning on the issue. A total of 42 non-science major university students' knowledge structures and informal reasoning were assessed with multidimensional analyses. With both qualitative and quantitative analyses, this study revealed that those students with more extended and better-organized knowledge structures, as well as those who more frequently used higher-order information processing modes, were more oriented towards achieving a higher-level informal reasoning quality. The regression analyses further showed that the "richness" of the students' knowledge structures explained 25 % of the variation in their rebuttal construction, an important indicator of reasoning quality, indicating the significance of the role of students' sophisticated knowledge structure in SSI reasoning. Besides, this study also provides some initial evidence for the significant role of the "core" concept within one's knowledge structure in one's SSI reasoning. The findings in this study suggest that, in SSI-based instruction, science instructors should try to identify students' core concepts within their prior knowledge regarding the SSI, and then they should try to guide students to construct and structure relevant concepts or ideas regarding the SSI based on their core concepts. Thus, students could obtain extended and well-organized knowledge structures, which would then help them achieve better learning transfer in dealing with SSIs.

  3. Direct radiocarbon dating and genetic analyses on the purported Neanderthal mandible from the Monti Lessini (Italy).

    PubMed

    Talamo, Sahra; Hajdinjak, Mateja; Mannino, Marcello A; Fasani, Leone; Welker, Frido; Martini, Fabio; Romagnoli, Francesca; Zorzin, Roberto; Meyer, Matthias; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2016-07-08

    Anatomically modern humans replaced Neanderthals in Europe around 40,000 years ago. The demise of the Neanderthals and the nature of the possible relationship with anatomically modern humans has captured our imagination and stimulated research for more than a century now. Recent chronological studies suggest a possible overlap between Neanderthals and anatomically modern humans of more than 5,000 years. Analyses of ancient genome sequences from both groups have shown that they interbred multiple times, including in Europe. A potential place of interbreeding is the notable Palaeolithic site of Riparo Mezzena in Northern Italy. In order to improve our understanding of prehistoric occupation at Mezzena, we analysed the human mandible and several cranial fragments from the site using radiocarbon dating, ancient DNA, ZooMS and isotope analyses. We also performed a more detailed investigation of the lithic assemblage of layer I. Surprisingly we found that the Riparo Mezzena mandible is not from a Neanderthal but belonged to an anatomically modern human. Furthermore, we found no evidence for the presence of Neanderthal remains among 11 of the 13 cranial and post-cranial fragments re-investigated in this study.

  4. Biochemical, mechanical, and spectroscopic analyses of genetically engineered flax fibers producing bioplastic (poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate).

    PubMed

    Wróbel-Kwiatkowska, Magdalena; Skórkowska-Telichowska, Katarzyna; Dymińska, Lucyna; Maczka, Mirosław; Hanuza, Jerzy; Szopa, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The interest in biofibers has grown in recent years due to their expanding range of applications in fields as diverse as biomedical science and the automotive industry. Their low production costs, biodegradability, physical properties, and perceived eco-friendliness allow for their extensive use as composite components, a role in which they could replace petroleum-based synthetic polymers. We performed biochemical, mechanical, and structural analyses of flax stems and fibers derived from field-grown transgenic flax enriched with PHB (poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate). The analyses of the plant stems revealed an increase in the cellulose content and a decrease in the lignin and pectin contents relative to the control plants. However, the contents of the fibers' major components (cellulose, lignin, pectin) remain unchanged. An FT-IR study confirmed the results of the biochemical analyses of the flax fibers. However, the arrangement of the cellulose polymer in the transgenic fibers differed from that in the control, and a significant increase in the number of hydrogen bonds was detected. The mechanical properties of the transgenic flax stems were significantly improved, reflecting the cellulose content increase. However, the mechanical properties of the fibers did not change in comparison with the control, with the exception of the fibers from transgenic line M13. The generated transgenic flax plants, which produce both components of the flax/PHB composites (i.e., fibers and thermoplastic matrix in the same plant organ) are a source of an attractive and ecologically safe material for industry and medicine.

  5. Insights into the mating habits of the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum) as revealed by genetic parentage analyses.

    PubMed

    Gopurenko, David; Williams, Rod N; McCormick, Cory R; DeWoody, J Andrew

    2006-06-01

    Among urodeles, ambystomatid salamanders are particularly amenable to genetic parentage analyses because they are explosive aggregate breeders that typically have large progeny arrays. Such analyses can lead to direct inferences about otherwise cryptic aspects of salamander natural history, including the rate of multiple mating, individual reproductive success, and the spatial distribution of clutches. In 2002, we collected eastern tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum) egg masses (> 1000 embryos) from a approximately 80 m linear transect in Indiana, USA. Embryos were genotyped at four variable microsatellite loci and the resulting progeny array data were used to reconstruct multilocus genotypes of the parental dams and sires for each egg mass. UPGMA analysis of genetic distances among embryos resolved four instances of egg mass admixture, where two or more females had oviposited at exactly the same site resulting in the mixing of independent cohorts. In total, 41 discrete egg masses were available for parentage analyses. Twenty-three egg masses (56%) consisted exclusively of full-siblings (i.e. were singly sired) and 18 (44%) were multiply sired (mean 2.6 males/clutch). Parentage could be genetically assigned to one of 17 distinct parent pairs involving at least 15 females and 14 different males. Reproductive skew was evident among males who sired multiply sired clutches. Additional evidence of the effects of sexual selection on male reproductive success was apparent via significant positive correlations between male mating and reproductive success. Females frequently partitioned their clutches into multiple discrete egg masses that were separated from one another by as many as 43 m. Collectively, these data provide the first direct evidence for polygynandry in a wild population of tiger salamanders.

  6. Viral bacterial co-infection of the respiratory tract during early childhood.

    PubMed

    Brealey, Jaelle C; Sly, Peter D; Young, Paul R; Chappell, Keith J

    2015-05-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is an important cause of morbidity in children. Mixed aetiology is frequent, with pathogenic viruses and bacteria co-detected in respiratory secretions. However, the clinical significance of these viral/bacterial co-infections has long been a controversial topic. While severe bacterial pneumonia following influenza infection has been well described, associations are less clear among infections caused by viruses that are more common in young children, such as respiratory syncytial virus. Although assessing the overall contribution of bacteria to disease severity is complicated by the presence of many confounding factors in clinical studies, understanding the role of viral/bacterial co-infections in defining the outcome of paediatric ARI will potentially reveal novel treatment and prevention strategies, improving patient outcomes. This review summarizes current evidence for the clinical significance of respiratory viral/bacterial co-infections in young children, discusses possible mechanisms of cooperative interaction between these pathogens and highlights areas that require further investigation.

  7. Recurrent paratyphoid fever A co-infected with hepatitis A reactivated chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanling; Xiong, Yujiao; Huang, Wenxiang; Jia, Bei

    2014-05-12

    We report here a case of recurrent paratyphoid fever A with hepatitis A co-infection in a patient with chronic hepatitis B. A 26-year-old male patient, who was a hepatitis B virus carrier, was co-infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A and hepatitis A virus. The recurrence of the paratyphoid fever may be ascribed to the coexistence of hepatitis B, a course of ceftriaxone plus levofloxacin that was too short and the insensitivity of paratyphoid fever A to levofloxacin. We find that an adequate course and dose of ceftriaxone is a better strategy for treating paratyphoid fever. Furthermore, the co-infection of paratyphoid fever with hepatitis A may stimulate cellular immunity and break immunotolerance. Thus, the administration of the anti-viral agent entecavir may greatly improve the prognosis of this patient with chronic hepatitis B, and the episodes of paratyphoid fever and hepatitis A infection prompt the use of timely antiviral therapy.

  8. Impact of Hepatitis Co-Infection on Healthcare Utilization among Persons Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Trevor A.; Berry, Stephen A.; Fleishman, John A.; LaRue, Richard W.; Korthuis, P. Todd; Nijhawan, Ank E.; Moore, Richard D.; Gebo, Kelly A.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) co-infection are increasingly important sources of morbidity among HIV-infected persons. We determined associations between hepatitis co-infection and healthcare utilization among HIV-infected adults at four U.S. sites during 2006–2011. Outpatient HIV visits did not differ by hepatitis serostatus and decreased over time. Mental health visits were more common among HIV/HCV co-infected persons than among HIV mono-infected (IRR 1.27 [1.08–1.50]). Hospitalization rates were higher among all hepatitis-infected groups than among HIV mono-infected (HIV/HBV IRR 1.23 [1.05–1.44], HIV/HCV 1.22 [1.10–1.36], HIV/HBV/HCV 1.31 [1.02–1.68]). These findings may inform the design of clinical services and allocation of resources. PMID:25559601

  9. Sofosbuvir and Ledipasvir for HIV/HCV Co-infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Elana S.; Kottilil, Shyam; Polis, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a chronic infection that disproportionately impacts people living with HIV. In the past, HCV therapy was less effective in individuals with HIV co-infection. However, the advent of direct-acting antivirals has revolutionized HCV treatment with high rates of success in patients both with and without HIV. Areas covered In this paper, we review the evidence supporting the use of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir (LDV/SOF) for the treatment of HCV in patients with HIV co-infection. Articles searchable on MEDLINE/PubMed were reviewed to provide context for use of LDV/SOF in individuals with HCV and HIV co-infection. Expert opinion This treatment is highly effective in achieving HCV cure or sustained virologic response, however further studies need to done to address efficacy of treatment in people with uncontrolled HIV, concerns regarding drug-interactions with antiretroviral therapy, and potential for shorter duration treatment. PMID:26898158

  10. Sofosbuvir and ledipasvir for HIV/HCV co-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Elana S; Kottilil, Shyam; Polis, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a chronic infection that disproportionately impacts people living with HIV. In the past, HCV therapy was less effective in individuals with HIV co-infection. However, the advent of direct-acting antivirals has revolutionized HCV treatment with high rates of success in patients both with and without HIV. In this paper, we review the evidence supporting the use of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir (LDV/SOF) for the treatment of HCV in patients with HIV co-infection. Articles searchable on MEDLINE/PubMed were reviewed to provide context for use of LDV/SOF in individuals with HCV and HIV co-infection. This treatment is highly effective in achieving HCV cure or sustained virologic response, however further studies need to done to address efficacy of treatment in people with uncontrolled HIV, concerns regarding drug-interactions with antiretroviral therapy, and potential for shorter duration treatment.

  11. Mechanistic insights on immunosenescence and chronic immune activation in HIV-tuberculosis co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Esaki M; Velu, Vijayakumar; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Larsson, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Immunosenescence is marked by accelerated degradation of host immune responses leading to the onset of opportunistic infections, where senescent T cells show remarkably higher ontogenic defects as compared to healthy T cells. The mechanistic association between T-cell immunosenescence and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression, and functional T-cell responses in HIV-tuberculosis (HIV-TB) co-infection remains to be elaborately discussed. Here, we discussed the association of immunosenescence and chronic immune activation in HIV-TB co-infection and reviewed the role played by mediators of immune deterioration in HIV-TB co-infection necessitating the importance of designing therapeutic strategies against HIV disease progression and pathogenesis. PMID:25674514

  12. A review of association and linkage studies for genetical analyses of learning disorders.

    PubMed

    Caylak, Emrah

    2007-10-05

    Learning disorders (LD) commonly comprise of a heterogeneous group of disorders manifested by unexpected problems in some children's experiences in the academic performance arena. These problems especially comprise of a variety of disorders which may be subclassified to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), reading disability (RD), specific language impairment (SLI), speech-sound disorder (SSD), and dyspraxia. The aim of this review is to summarize the current molecular studies and some of the most exciting recent developments in molecular genetic research on LD. The findings for the association and linkage of LD with candidate genes will help to set the research agendas for future studies to follow. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Cervical Cancer Genetic Susceptibility: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses of Recent Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Nava, Gabriela A.; Fernández-Niño, Julián A.; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cervical cancer (CC) has one of the highest mortality rates among women worldwide. Several efforts have been made to identify the genetic susceptibility factors underlying CC development. However, only a few polymorphisms have shown consistency among studies. Materials and Methods We conducted a systematic review of all recent case-control studies focused on the evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and CC risk, stringently following the “PRISMA” statement recommendations. The MEDLINE data base was used for the search. A total of 100 case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. Polymorphisms that had more than two reports were meta-analyzed by fixed or random models according to the heterogeneity presented among studies. Results We found significant negative association between the dominant inheritance model of p21 rs1801270 polymorphism (C/A+A/A) and CC (pooled OR = 0.76; 95%CI: 0.63–0.91; p<0.01). We also found a negative association with the rs2048718 BRIP1 polymorphism dominant inheritance model (T/C+C/C) and CC (pooled OR = 0.83; 95%CI: 0.70–0.98; p = 0.03), as well as with the rs11079454 BRIP1 polymorphism recessive inheritance model and CC (pooled OR = 0.79; 95%CI: 0.63–0.99; p = 0.04). Interestingly, we observed a strong tendency of the meta-analyzed studies to be of Asiatic origin (67%). We also found a significant low representation of African populations (4%). Conclusions Our results provide evidence of the negative association of p21 rs1801270 polymorphism, as well as BRIP1 rs2048718 and rs11079454 polymorphisms, with CC risk. This study suggests the urgent need for more replication studies focused on GWAS identified CC susceptibility variants, in order to reveal the most informative genetic susceptibility markers for CC across different populations. PMID:27415837

  14. Genetic and antigenic analyses of a Puumala virus isolate as a potential vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Abu Daude, Nur Hardy; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Tkachenko, Evgeniy; Dzagurnova, Tamara; Medvedkina, Olga; Tkachenko, Petr; Ishizuka, Mariko; Seto, Takahiro; Miyashita, Daisuke; Sanada, Takahiro; Nakauchi, Mina; Yoshii, Kentaro; Maeda, Akihiko; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro; Takashima, Ikuo

    2008-11-01

    Puumala virus (PUUV), a causative agent of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), is prevalent in Europe and European Russia. No vaccine has been developed for PUUV-associated HFRS, primarily because of the low viral yield in cultured cells. A PUUV strain known as DTK/Ufa-97 was isolated in Russia and adapted for growth in Vero E6 cells maintained in serum-free medium. The DTK/Ufa-97 strain produced a higher viral titer in serum-free medium, suggesting that it may prove useful in the development of an HFRS vaccine. When PUUV-infected Vero E6 cells were grown in serum-free medium, the DTK/Ufa-97 strain yielded more copies of intracellular viral RNA and a higher viral titer in the culture fluid than did the Sotkamo strain. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PUUVs can be classified into multiple lineages according to geographical origin, and that the DTK/Ufa-97 strain is a member of the Bashkiria-Saratov lineage. The deduced amino acid sequences of the small, medium, and large segments of the DTK/Ufa-97 strain were 99.2% to 100%, 99.3% to 99.8%, and 99.8% identical, respectively, to those of the Bashkirian PUUV strains and 96.9%, 92.6%, and 97.4% identical, respectively, to those of the Sotkamo strain, indicating that the PUUVs are genetically diverse. However, DTK/Ufa-97 and other strains of PUUV exhibited similar patterns of binding to a panel of monoclonal antibodies against Hantaan virus. In addition, diluted antisera (i.e., ranging from 1:160 to 1:640) specific to three strains of PUUV neutralized both homologous and heterologous viruses. These results suggest that the DTK/Ufa-97 strain is capable of extensive growth and is antigenically similar to genetically distant strains of PUUV.

  15. Genetic variation and association analyses of NEDD4 gene in Kazak Chinese patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Li, Nanfang; Guo, Yanying; Zhou, Ling; Wang, Hongmei; Yao, Xiaoguang; Luo, Wenli; Chang, Jianhang

    2010-06-20

    To analyze the association between the genetic variations of neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated 4 gene (NEDD4) and hypertension in Kazakh Chinese. The sequences of NEDD4 gene exons were sequenced in 96 Kazakh Chinese with hypertension to identify representative variations. A case-control study was conducted by genotyping the representative variations in 287 Kazakh hypertensives and 411 normotensives. Replication population was 343 Uygur hypertensives and 724 normotensives. All subjects were selected from population-based cross-sectional studies of metabolic disease. Thirteen novel and 15 known single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) or mutations, including 6 missense mutations, were identified. Of the four representative SNPs geno-typed, only rs2303580 was association with hypertension in Kazakh (additive P/Pc=0.020/0.160) without Bonferroni's correction. The result was replicated in Uygur (additive/dominant P=0.089/0.028, Pc=0.174/0.056). By adjusting for age and BMI, the observed association would no longer be statistically significant in Kazakh (additive OR (95%CI) 1.035(0.802-1.336), but remained statistically significant in Uygur ( additive/dominant ORs (95%CI) 1.323 (1.069-1.637), 1.521(1.146-2.020)). The rs2303580 genotypes were not association with blood pressure levels in Kazakh. Although by multiple linear regression analysis and by applying Bonferroni's correction, the genotypes were significant association with diastolic blood pressure levels (AA>AG>GG) in Uygur normotensive controls (P/Pc=0.003/0.018), the direction of difference was not in accordance with the association between the qualitative hypertension phenotype and the genotype shown (G risk allele). Our data indicates that the association between the NEDD4 genetic polymorphisms and hypertension phenotype should be replicated in further studies using larger and racially diverse populations.

  16. Genetic Kinship Analyses Reveal That Gray's Beaked Whales Strand in Unrelated Groups.

    PubMed

    Patel, Selina; Thompson, Kirsten F; Santure, Anna W; Constantine, Rochelle; Millar, Craig D

    2017-06-01

    Some marine mammals are so rarely seen that their life history and social structure remain a mystery. Around New Zealand, Gray's beaked whales (Mesoplodon grayi) are almost never seen alive, yet they are a commonly stranded species. Gray's are unique among the beaked whales in that they frequently strand in groups, providing an opportunity to investigate their social organization. We examined group composition and genetic kinship in 113 Gray's beaked whales with samples collected over a 20-year period. Fifty-six individuals stranded in 19 groups (2 or more individuals), and 57 whales stranded individually. Mitochondrial control region haplotypes and microsatellite genotypes (16 loci) were obtained for 103 whales. We estimated pairwise relatedness between all pairs of individuals and average relatedness within, and between, groups. We identified 6 mother-calf pairs and 2 half-siblings, including 2 whales in different strandings 17 years and 1500 km apart. Surprisingly, none of the adults stranding together were related suggesting that groups are not formed through the retention of kin. These data suggest that both sexes may disperse from their mothers, and groups consisting of unrelated subadults are common. We also found no instances of paternity within the groups. Our results provide the first insights into dispersal, social organization, and the mating system in this rarely sighted species. Why whales strand is still unknown but, in Gray's beaked whales, the dead can tell us much about the living. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Landscape genetic analyses reveal fine-scale effects of forest fragmentation in an insular tropical bird.

    PubMed

    Khimoun, Aurélie; Peterman, William; Eraud, Cyril; Faivre, Bruno; Navarro, Nicolas; Garnier, Stéphane

    2017-07-20

    Within the framework of landscape genetics, resistance surface modelling is particularly relevant to explicitly test competing hypotheses about landscape effects on gene flow. To investigate how fragmentation of tropical forest affects population connectivity in a forest specialist bird species, we optimized resistance surfaces without a priori specification, using least-cost (LCP) or resistance (IBR) distances. We implemented a two-step procedure in order (i) to objectively define the landscape thematic resolution (level of detail in classification scheme to describe landscape variables) and spatial extent (area within the landscape boundaries) and then (ii) to test the relative role of several landscape features (elevation, roads, land cover) in genetic differentiation in the Plumbeous Warbler (Setophaga plumbea). We detected a small-scale reduction of gene flow mainly driven by land cover, with a negative impact of the nonforest matrix on landscape functional connectivity. However, matrix components did not equally constrain gene flow, as their conductivity increased with increasing structural similarity with forest habitat: urban areas and meadows had the highest resistance values whereas agricultural areas had intermediate resistance values. Our results revealed a higher performance of IBR compared to LCP in explaining gene flow, reflecting suboptimal movements across this human-modified landscape, challenging the common use of LCP to design habitat corridors and advocating for a broader use of circuit theory modelling. Finally, our results emphasize the need for an objective definition of landscape scales (landscape extent and thematic resolution) and highlight potential pitfalls associated with parameterization of resistance surfaces. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Modulation of the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis during malaria/M. tuberculosis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Chukwuanukwu, R C; Onyenekwe, C C; Martinez-Pomares, L; Flynn, R; Singh, S; Amilo, G I; Agbakoba, N R; Okoye, J O

    2017-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) causes significant morbidity and mortality on a global scale. The African region has 24% of the world's TB cases. TB overlaps with other infectious diseases such as malaria and HIV, which are also highly prevalent in the African region. TB is a leading cause of death among HIV-positive patients and co-infection with HIV and TB has been described as a syndemic. In view of the overlapping epidemiology of these diseases, it is important to understand the dynamics of the immune response to TB in the context of co-infection. We investigated the cytokine response to purified protein derivative (PPD) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from TB patients co-infected with HIV or malaria and compared it to that of malaria- and HIV-free TB patients. A total of 231 subjects were recruited for this study and classified into six groups; untreated TB-positive, TB positive subjects on TB drugs, TB- and HIV-positive, TB- and malaria-positive, latent TB and apparently healthy control subjects. Our results demonstrate maintenance of interferon (IFN)-γ production in HIV and malaria co-infected TB patients in spite of lower CD4 counts in the HIV-infected cohort. Malaria co-infection caused an increase in the production of the T helper type 2 (Th2)-associated cytokine interleukin (IL)-4 and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in PPD-stimulated cultures. These results suggest that malaria co-infection diverts immune response against M. tuberculosis towards a Th-2/anti-inflammatory response which might have important consequences for disease progression.

  19. Mapping Helminth Co-Infection and Co-Intensity: Geostatistical Prediction in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Soares Magalhães, Ricardo J.; Biritwum, Nana-Kwadwo; Gyapong, John O.; Brooker, Simon; Zhang, Yaobi; Blair, Lynsey; Fenwick, Alan; Clements, Archie C. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Morbidity due to Schistosoma haematobium and hookworm infections is marked in those with intense co-infections by these parasites. The development of a spatial predictive decision-support tool is crucial for targeting the delivery of integrated mass drug administration (MDA) to those most in need. We investigated the co-distribution of S. haematobium and hookworm infection, plus the spatial overlap of infection intensity of both parasites, in Ghana. The aim was to produce maps to assist the planning and evaluation of national parasitic disease control programs. Methodology/Principal Findings A national cross-sectional school-based parasitological survey was conducted in Ghana in 2008, using standardized sampling and parasitological methods. Bayesian geostatistical models were built, including a multinomial regression model for S. haematobium and hookworm mono- and co-infections and zero-inflated Poisson regression models for S. haematobium and hookworm infection intensity as measured by egg counts in urine and stool respectively. The resulting infection intensity maps were overlaid to determine the extent of geographical overlap of S. haematobium and hookworm infection intensity. In Ghana, prevalence of S. haematobium mono-infection was 14.4%, hookworm mono-infection was 3.2%, and S. haematobium and hookworm co-infection was 0.7%. Distance to water bodies was negatively associated with S. haematobium and hookworm co-infections, hookworm mono-infections and S. haematobium infection intensity. Land surface temperature was positively associated with hookworm mono-infections and S. haematobium infection intensity. While high-risk (prevalence >10–20%) of co-infection was predicted in an area around Lake Volta, co-intensity was predicted to be highest in foci within that area. Conclusions/Significance Our approach, based on the combination of co-infection and co-intensity maps allows the identification of communities at increased risk of severe morbidity and

  20. Subtypes of Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Japan Based on Genetic and Functional Analyses of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Kozo; Yamamoto, Ken; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; An, Jun; Ochi, Toshiki; Suemori, Koichiro; Yasumi, Takahiro; Tauchi, Hisamichi; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Sato, Maho; Morimoto, Akira; Heike, Toshio; Ishii, Eiichi; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    Background Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is a rare disease of infancy or early childhood. To clarify the incidence and subtypes of FHL in Japan, we performed genetic and functional analyses of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in Japanese patients with FHL. Design and Methods Among the Japanese children with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) registered at our laboratory, those with more than one of the following findings were eligible for study entry under a diagnosis of FHL: positive for known genetic mutations, a family history of HLH, and impaired CTL-mediated cytotoxicity. Mutations of the newly identified causative gene for FHL5, STXBP2, and the cytotoxicity and degranulation activity of CTLs in FHL patients, were analyzed. Results Among 31 FHL patients who satisfied the above criteria, PRF1 mutation was detected in 17 (FHL2) and UNC13D mutation was in 10 (FHL3). In 2 other patients, 3 novel mutations of STXBP2 gene were confirmed (FHL5). Finally, the remaining 2 were classified as having FHL with unknown genetic mutations. In all FHL patients, CTL-mediated cytotoxicity was low or deficient, and degranulation activity was also low or absent except FHL2 patients. In 2 patients with unknown genetic mutations, the cytotoxicity and degranulation activity of CTLs appeared to be deficient in one patient and moderately impaired in the other. Conclusions FHL can be diagnosed and classified on the basis of CTL-mediated cytotoxicity, degranulation activity, and genetic analysis. Based on the data obtained from functional analysis of CTLs, other unknown gene(s) responsible for FHL remain to be identified. PMID:21152410

  1. Subtypes of familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in Japan based on genetic and functional analyses of cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Kozo; Yamamoto, Ken; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; An, Jun; Ochi, Toshiki; Suemori, Koichiro; Yasumi, Takahiro; Tauchi, Hisamichi; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Sato, Maho; Morimoto, Akira; Heike, Toshio; Ishii, Eiichi; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2010-11-30

    Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is a rare disease of infancy or early childhood. To clarify the incidence and subtypes of FHL in Japan, we performed genetic and functional analyses of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in Japanese patients with FHL. Among the Japanese children with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) registered at our laboratory, those with more than one of the following findings were eligible for study entry under a diagnosis of FHL: positive for known genetic mutations, a family history of HLH, and impaired CTL-mediated cytotoxicity. Mutations of the newly identified causative gene for FHL5, STXBP2, and the cytotoxicity and degranulation activity of CTLs in FHL patients, were analyzed. Among 31 FHL patients who satisfied the above criteria, PRF1 mutation was detected in 17 (FHL2) and UNC13D mutation was in 10 (FHL3). In 2 other patients, 3 novel mutations of STXBP2 gene were confirmed (FHL5). Finally, the remaining 2 were classified as having FHL with unknown genetic mutations. In all FHL patients, CTL-mediated cytotoxicity was low or deficient, and degranulation activity was also low or absent except FHL2 patients. In 2 patients with unknown genetic mutations, the cytotoxicity and degranulation activity of CTLs appeared to be deficient in one patient and moderately impaired in the other. FHL can be diagnosed and classified on the basis of CTL-mediated cytotoxicity, degranulation activity, and genetic analysis. Based on the data obtained from functional analysis of CTLs, other unknown gene(s) responsible for FHL remain to be identified.

  2. Diagnostic value of FASH ultrasound and chest X-ray in HIV-co-infected patients with abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Heller, T; Goblirsch, S; Bahlas, S; Ahmed, M; Giordani, M-T; Wallrauch, C; Brunetti, E

    2013-03-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected tuberculosis (TB) patients with negative acid-fast bacilli smears, chest radiography (CXR) is usually the first imaging step in the diagnostic work-up. Ultrasound, also in the form of focused assessment with sonography for TB-HIV (FASH), is an additional imaging modality used to diagnose extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB). Findings from 82 patients with abdominal TB diagnosed by ultrasound were analysed and compared with CXR results. Enlarged abdominal lymph nodes were seen in 75.6% of the patients, spleen abscesses in 41.2% and liver lesions in 30.6%. CXR showed a miliary pattern in 21.9% of the patients; 26.8% of the CXR had no radiological changes suggestive of pulmonary TB. This patient group would benefit from ultrasound in diagnostic algorithms for HIV-associated EPTB.

  3. First molecular detection of co-infection of honey bee viruses in asymptomatic Bombus atratus in South America.

    PubMed

    Reynaldi, F J; Sguazza, G H; Albicoro, F J; Pecoraro, M R; Galosi, C M

    2013-11-01

    Pollination is critical for food production and has the particularity of linking natural ecosystems with agricultural production systems. Recently, losses of bumblebee species have been reported worldwide. In this study, samples from a commercial exploitation of bumblebees of Argentina with a recent history of deaths were studied using a multiplex PCR for the detection of the honey bee viruses most frequently detected in South America. All samples analysed were positive for co-infections with Deformed wing virus, Black queen cell virus and Sacbrood virus. This is the first report of infection of Bombus atratus with honey bee viruses. A better understanding of viral infections in bumblebees and of the epidemiology of viruses could be of great importance as bumblebees can serve as possible viral reservoirs, resulting in pathogen spillover towards honey bees and native bumblebees.

  4. High Prevalence of Co-Infection with Multiple Torque Teno Sus Virus Species in Italian Pig Herds

    PubMed Central

    Blois, Sylvain; Mallus, Francesca; Liciardi, Manuele; Pilo, Cristian; Camboni, Tania; Macera, Lisa; Maggi, Fabrizio; Manzin, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    Torque teno viruses (TTVs) are a large group of vertebrate-infecting small viruses with circular single-stranded DNA, classified in the Anelloviridae family. In swine, two genetically distinct species, Torque teno sus virus 1a (TTSuV1a) and 1b (TTSuV1b) are currently grouped into the genus Iotatorquevirus. More recently, a novel Torque teno sus virus species, named Torque teno sus virus k2b (TTSuVk2b), has been included with Torque teno sus virus k2a (TTSuVk2a) into the genus Kappatorquevirus. In the present study, TTSuV1 (TTSuV1a and TTSuV1b), TTSuVk2a and TTSuVk2b prevalence was evaluated in 721 serum samples of healthy pigs from Sardinian farms, insular Italy. This is the largest study to date on the presence of TTSuV in healthy pigs in Italy. The global prevalence of infection was 83.2% (600/721), being 62.3% (449/721), 60.6% (437/721), and 11.5% (83/721) the prevalence of TTSuV1, TTSuVk2a and TTSuVk2b, respectively. The rate of co-infection with two and/or three species was also calculated, and data show that co-infections were significantly more frequent than infections with single species, and that TTSuV1+TTSuVk2a double infection was the prevalent combination (35.4%). Quantitative results obtained using species-specific real time-qPCR evidenced the highest mean levels of viremia in the TTSuV1 subgroup, and the lowest in the TTSuVk2b subgroup. Interestingly, multiple infections with distinct TTSuV species seemed to significantly affect the DNA load and specifically, data highlighted that double infection with TTSuVk2a increased the viral titers of TTSuV1, likewise the co-infection with TTSuVk2b increased the titers of TTSuVk2a. PMID:25411972

  5. Characterizing Genetic Diversity of Contemporary Pacific Chickens Using Mitochondrial DNA Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Dancause, Kelsey Needham; Vilar, Miguel G.; Steffy, Rlene; Lum, J. Koji

    2011-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable region (HVR) sequences of prehistoric Polynesian chicken samples reflect dispersal of two haplogroups—D and E—by the settlers of the Pacific. The distribution of these chicken haplogroups has been used as an indicator of human movement. Recent analyses suggested similarities between prehistoric Pacific and South American chicken samples, perhaps reflecting prehistoric Polynesian introduction of the chicken into South America. These analyses have been heavily debated. The current distribution of the D and E lineages among contemporary chicken populations in the Western Pacific is unclear, but might ultimately help to inform debates about the movements of humans that carried them. Objectives We sought to characterize contemporary mtDNA diversity among chickens in two of the earliest settled archipelagoes of Remote Oceania, the Marianas and Vanuatu. Methods We generated HVR sequences for 43 chickens from four islands in Vanuatu, and for 5 chickens from Guam in the Marianas. Results Forty samples from Vanuatu and three from Guam were assigned to haplogroup D, supporting this as a Pacific chicken haplogroup that persists in the Western Pacific. Two haplogroup E lineages were observed in Guam and two in Vanuatu. Of the E lineages in Vanuatu, one was identical to prehistoric Vanuatu and Polynesian samples and the other differed by one polymorphism. Contrary to our expectations, we observed few globally distributed domesticate lineages not associated with Pacific chicken dispersal. This might suggest less European introgression of chickens into Vanuatu than expected. If so, the E lineages might represent lineages maintained from ancient Pacific chicken introductions. The Vanuatu sample might thus provide an opportunity to distinguish between maintained ancestral Pacific chicken lineages and replacement by global domesticates through genomic analyses, which could resolve questions of contemporary haplogroup E chicken

  6. L. (L.) chagasi in AIDS and visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar) co-infection.

    PubMed

    Roselino, Ana Maria; Chociay, Maria Fernanda; Costa, Roberto Silva; Machado, Alcyone Artioli; Figueiredo, José Fernando de Castro

    2008-01-01

    Concomitant skin lesions in visceral leishmaniasis (VL) or kala-azar are rare, being more common the description of post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis occurring post treatment of kala-azar. Skin lesions caused by Leishmania donovani are frequently seen in the aids-VL co-infection. In Brazil cutaneous or mucosal forms of tegumentary leishmaniasis concomitant with aids are more commonly registered. Here we present a case of aids-VL co-infection, with unusual cutaneous and digestive compromising attributed to L. (L.) chagasi, with special attention to ecthymatous aspect of the lesion, allied to the absence of parasite on the histological skin biopsy.

  7. Hip bone geometry in HIV/HCV-co-infected men and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, C. G.; Araujo, A. B.; Chiu, G. R.; Travison, T. G.; Mehta, S.; Sulkowski, M. S.; Higgins, Y.; Thomas, D. L.; Dobs, A. S.; Beck, T. J.; Brown, T. T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary People with both HIV and hepatitis C are more likely than those with HIV alone to have wrist, hip, and spine fractures. We compared hip strength between HIV/HCV-co-infected men and healthy men and found that HIV/HCV-co-infected men had decreased hip strength due to lower lean body mass. Introduction Hepatitis C co-infection is a risk factor for fragility fracture among HIV-infected populations. Whether bone strength is compromised in HIV/HCV-co-infected patients is unknown. Methods We compared dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-derived hip geometry, a measure of bone strength, in 88 HIV/HCV-co-infected men from the Johns Hopkins HIV Clinic to 289 men of similar age and race and without HIV or HCV from the Boston Area Community Health Survey/Bone Survey. Hip geometry was assessed at the narrow neck, intertrochanter, and shaft using hip structural analysis. Lean body mass (LBM), total fat mass (FM), and fat mass ratio (FMR) were measured by whole-body DXA. Linear regression was used to identify body composition parameters that accounted for differences in bone strength between cohorts. Results HIV/HCV-co-infected men had lower BMI, LBM, and FM and higher FMR compared to controls (all p<0.05). At the narrow neck, significant differences were observed between HIV/HCV-co-infected men and controls in bone mineral density, cross-sectional area, section modulus, buckling ratio, and centroid position. After adjustment for race, age, smoking status, height, and weight, only buckling ratio and centroid position remained significantly different between cohorts (all p<0.05). Substituting LBM, FM, and FMR for weight in the multivariate model revealed that differences in LBM, but not FM or FMR, accounted for differences in all narrow neck parameters between cohorts, except buckling ratio and centroid position. Conclusion HIV/HCV-co-infected men have compromised hip strength at the narrow neck compared to uninfected controls, which is attributable in large part to

  8. Culture proven Salmonella typhi co-infection in a child with Dengue fever: a case report.

    PubMed

    Srinivasaraghavan, Rangan; Narayanan, Parameswaran; Kanimozhi, Thandapani

    2015-09-27

    Infectious diseases are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Sometimes concurrent infections with multiple infectious agents may occur in one patient, which make the diagnosis and management a challenging task. The authors here present a case of co-infection of typhoid fever with dengue fever in a ten-year-old child and discuss the pertinent issues. The authors emphasize that the risk factors predicting the presence of such co-infections, if developed, will be immensely useful in areas where dengue outbreak occurs in the background of high transmission of endemic infections.

  9. Bacterial Co-infection in Hospitalized Children with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Song, Qing; Xu, Bao-Ping; Shen, Kun-Ling

    2016-10-08

    To describe the frequency and impact of bacterial co-infections in children hospitalized with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. Retrospective, descriptive study. Tertiary-care hospital in Beijing, China. 8612 children admitted to Beijing Childrens Hospital from June 2006 to June 2014. According to the testing results of etiology we divided the cases into pure M. pneumoniae infection group and mixed bacterial infection group. We analyzed clinical features, hospital expenses and differences between these two groups. 173 (2%) of included children had bacterial coinfection. 56.2% of bacterial pathogens were identified as Streptococcus pneumoniae. The most common bacterium causing co-infection in children with M. pneumoniae pneumonia was S. pneumoniae.

  10. Co-Infection Dynamics of a Major Food-Borne Zoonotic Pathogen in Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Skånseng, Beate; Trosvik, Pål; Zimonja, Monika; Johnsen, Gro; Bjerrum, Lotte; Pedersen, Karl; Wallin, Nina; Rudi, Knut

    2007-01-01

    A major bottleneck in understanding zoonotic pathogens has been the analysis of pathogen co-infection dynamics. We have addressed this challenge using a novel direct sequencing approach for pathogen quantification in mixed infections. The major zoonotic food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, with an important reservoir in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of chickens, was used as a model. We investigated the co-colonisation dynamics of seven C. jejuni strains in a chicken GI infection trial. The seven strains were isolated from an epidemiological study showing multiple strain infections at the farm level. We analysed time-series data, following the Campylobacter colonisation, as well as the dominant background flora of chickens. Data were collected from the infection at day 16 until the last sampling point at day 36. Chickens with two different background floras were studied, mature (treated with Broilact, which is a product consisting of bacteria from the intestinal flora of healthy hens) and spontaneous. The two treatments resulted in completely different background floras, yet similar Campylobacter colonisation patterns were detected in both groups. This suggests that it is the chicken host and not the background flora that is important in determining the Campylobacter colonisation pattern. Our results showed that mainly two of the seven C. jejuni strains dominated the Campylobacter flora in the chickens, with a shift of the dominating strain during the infection period. We propose a model in which multiple C. jejuni strains can colonise a single host, with the dominant strains being replaced as a consequence of strain-specific immune responses. This model represents a new understanding of C. jejuni epidemiology, with future implications for the development of novel intervention strategies. PMID:18020703

  11. Climate extremes promote fatal co-infections during canine distemper epidemics in African lions.

    PubMed

    Munson, Linda; Terio, Karen A; Kock, Richard; Mlengeya, Titus; Roelke, Melody E; Dubovi, Edward; Summers, Brian; Sinclair, Anthony R E; Packer, Craig

    2008-06-25

    Extreme climatic conditions may alter historic host-pathogen relationships and synchronize the temporal and spatial convergence of multiple infectious agents, triggering epidemics with far greater mortality than those due to single pathogens. Here we present the first data to clearly illustrate how climate extremes can promote a complex interplay between epidemic and endemic pathogens that are normally tolerated in isolation, but with co-infection, result in catastrophic mortality. A 1994 canine distemper virus (CDV) epidemic in Serengeti lions (Panthera leo) coincided with the death of a third of the population, and a second high-mortality CDV epidemic struck the nearby Ngorongoro Crater lion population in 2001. The extent of adult mortalities was unusual for CDV and prompted an investigation into contributing factors. Serological analyses indicated that at least five "silent" CDV epidemics swept through the same two lion populations between 1976 and 2006 without clinical signs or measurable mortality, indicating that CDV was not necessarily fatal. Clinical and pathology findings suggested that hemoparsitism was a major contributing factor during fatal epidemics. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we measured the magnitude of hemoparasite infections in these populations over 22 years and demonstrated significantly higher levels of Babesia during the 1994 and 2001 epidemics. Babesia levels correlated with mortalities and extent of CDV exposure within prides. The common event preceding the two high mortality CDV outbreaks was extreme drought conditions with wide-spread herbivore die-offs, most notably of Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer). As a consequence of high tick numbers after the resumption of rains and heavy tick infestations of starving buffalo, the lions were infected by unusually high numbers of Babesia, infections that were magnified by the immunosuppressive effects of coincident CDV, leading to unprecedented mortality. Such mass mortality events may become

  12. Influenza and dengue virus co-infection impairs monocyte recruitment to the lung, increases dengue virus titers, and exacerbates pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Michael A; González, Karla N; Shah, Sanjana; Peña, José; Mack, Matthias; Talarico, Laura B; Polack, Fernando P; Harris, Eva

    2017-03-01

    Co-infections of influenza virus and bacteria are known to cause severe disease, but little information exists on co-infections with other acute viruses. Seasonal influenza and dengue viruses (DENV) regularly co-circulate in tropical regions. The pandemic spread of influenza virus H1N1 (hereafter H1N1) in 2009 led to additional severe disease cases that were co-infected with DENV. Here, we investigated the impact of co-infection on immune responses and pathogenesis in a new mouse model. Co-infection of otherwise sublethal doses of a Nicaraguan clinical H1N1 isolate and two days later with a virulent DENV2 strain increased systemic DENV titers and caused 90% lethality. Lungs of co-infected mice carried both viruses, developed severe pneumonia, and expressed a unique pattern of host mRNAs, resembling only partial responses against infection with either virus alone. A large number of monocytes were recruited to DENV-infected but not to co-infected lungs, and depletion and adoptive transfer experiments revealed a beneficial role of monocytes. Our study shows that co-infection with influenza and DENV impairs host responses, which fail to control DENV titers and instead, induce severe lung damage. Further, our findings identify key inflammatory pathways and monocyte function as targets for future therapies that may limit immunopathology in co-infected patients.

  13. Patients co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus recover genotype cross-reactive neutralising antibodies to HCV during antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Silvia; Saraswati, Henny; Yunihastuti, Evy; Gani, Rino; Price, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    When severely immunodeficient HIV/HCV co-infected patients are treated with antiretroviral therapy, it is important to know whether HCV-specific antibody responses recover and whether antibody profiles predict the occurrence of HCV-associated immune restoration disease (IRD). In 50 HIV/HCV co-infected patients, we found that antibody reactivity and titres of neutralising antibodies (nAb) to JFH-1 (HCV genotype 2a virus) increased over 48 weeks of therapy. Development of HCV IRD was associated with elevated reactivity to JFH-1 before and during the first 12 weeks of therapy. Individual analyses of HCV IRD and non-HCV IRD patients revealed a lack of an association between nAb responses and HCV viral loads. These results showed that increased HCV-specific antibody levels during therapy were associated with CD4(+) T-cell recovery. Whilst genotype cross-reactive antibody responses may identify co-infected patients at risk of developing HCV IRD, neutralising antibodies to JFH-1 were not involved in suppression of HCV replication during therapy.

  14. Effect of abacavir on sustained virologic response to HCV treatment in HIV/HCV co-infected patients, Cohere in Eurocoord.

    PubMed

    Smit, Colette; Arends, Joop; Peters, Lars; Montforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Dabis, Francois; Zangerle, Robert; Daikos, George; Mussini, Christina; Mallolas, Josep; de Wit, Stephane; Zinkernagel, Annelies; Cosin, Jaime; Chene, Genevieve; Raben, Dorthe; Rockstroh, Jürgen

    2015-11-04

    Contradicting results on the effect of abacavir (ABC) on hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment responses in HIV/HCV co-infected patients have been reported. We evaluated the influence of ABC on the response to pegylated interferon (pegIFN) and ribavirin (RBV)-containing HCV treatment in HIV/HCV co-infected patients in a large European cohort collaboration, including data from different European countries. HIV/HCV co-infected patients were included if they were aged ≥16 years, received pegIFN alfa-2a or 2b and RBV combination treatment and were enrolled in the COHERE cohort collaboration. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the impact of abacavir on achieving a sustained virologic response (SVR) to HCV treatment. In total 1309 HIV/HCV co-infected patients who had received HCV therapy were included, of whom 490 (37 %) had achieved an SVR. No statistically significant difference was seen for patients using ABC-containing regimens compared to patients using an emtricitabine + tenofovir (FTC + TDF)-containing backbone, which was the most frequently used backbone. In the multivariate analyses, patients using a protease inhibitor (PI)-boosted regimen were less likely to achieve an SVR compared to patients using a non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimen (OR: 0.61, 95 % CI: 0.41-0.91). The backbone combinations zidovudine&lamivudine (AZT + 3TC) and stavudine&lamivudine (d4t + 3TC) were associated with lower SRV rates (0.45 (0.24-0.82) and 0.46 (0.22-0.96), respectively). The results of this large European cohort study validate that SVR rates are generally not affected by ABC. Use of d4T or AZT as part of the HIV treatment regimen was associated with a lower likelihood of achieving an SVR.

  15. Genetic and functional analyses demonstrate a role for abnormal glycinergic signaling in autism

    PubMed Central

    Pilorge, Marion; Fassier, Coralie; Le Corronc, Hervé; Potey, Anaïs; Bai, Jing; De Gois, Stéphanie; Delaby, Elsa; Assouline, Brigitte; Guinchat, Vincent; Devillard, Françoise; Delorme, Richard; Nygren, Gudrun; Råstam, Maria; Meier, Jochen; Otani, Satoru; Cheval, Hélène; James, Victoria; Topf, Maya; Dear, Neil; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion; Giros, Bruno; Gautron, Sophie; Hazan, Jamilé; Harvey, Robert; Legendre, Pascal; Betancur, Catalina

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a common neurodevelopmental condition characterized by marked genetic heterogeneity. Recent studies of rare structural and sequence variants have identified hundreds of loci involved in ASD, but our knowledge of the overall genetic architecture and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remains incomplete. Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are ligand-gated chloride channels that mediate inhibitory neurotransmission in the adult nervous system but exert an excitatory action in immature neurons. GlyRs containing the α2 subunit are highly expressed in the embryonic brain, where they promote cortical interneuron migration and the generation of excitatory projection neurons. We previously identified a rare microdeletion of the X-linked gene GLRA2, encoding the GlyR α2 subunit, in a boy with autism. The microdeletion removes the terminal exons of the gene (GLRA2Δex8-9). Here, we sequenced 400 males with ASD and identified one de novo missense mutation, p.R153Q, absent from controls. In vitro functional analysis demonstrated that the GLRA2Δex8-9 protein failed to localize to the cell membrane, while the R153Q mutation impaired surface expression and dramatically reduced sensitivity to glycine. Very recently, an additional de novo missense mutation (p.N136S) was reported in a boy with ASD, and we show that this mutation also reduced cell surface expression and glycine sensitivity. Targeted glra2 knockdown in zebrafish induced severe axon branching defects, rescued by injection of wild-type but not GLRA2Δex8-9 or R153Q transcripts, providing further evidence for their loss-of-function effect. Glra2 knockout mice exhibited deficits in object recognition memory and impaired long-term potentiation in the prefrontal cortex. Taken together, these results implicate GLRA2 in non-syndromic ASD, unveil a novel role for GLRA2 in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory, and link altered glycinergic signaling to social and cognitive impairments

  16. Molecular genetic analyses of historical lake sediments from the East African Rift Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epp, L. S.; Stoof, K.; Trauth, M. H.; Tiedemann, R.

    2009-04-01

    Ancient DNA research, especially that of environmental samples, has to date focussed mainly on samples obtained from colder regions, owing to better DNA preservation. We explored the potential of using ancient DNA from sediments and sediment cores of shallow lakes in Kenya. These lakes, located in the eastern branch of the East African Rift Valley, are in close proximity, yet display strikingly different hydrological and geological features. Present day lakes range in alkalinity from pH 11 (Lake Elmenteita) to pH 8 (Lake Naivasha), and in depth from less than one meter to 15 meters. Historically they have undergone a number of drastic changes in lake level and environmental conditions, both on geological timescales and during the last centuries. Within this setting we employed molecular genetic methods to study DNA from recent and historic lake sediments, focussing on rotifers and diatoms. We analyzed population and species succession in the alkaline-saline crater lake Sonachi since the beginning of the 19th century, as well as distributions in recent and historic sediments of other lakes of the East African Rift System. To specifically detect diatoms, we developed a protocol using taxon-specific polymerase chain reactions and separation of products by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). Employing this protocol we retrieved "ancient" DNA from a number of taxonomically diverse organisms, but found diatoms only in sediments younger than approximately 90 years. Using higly specific reactions for rotifers of the genus Brachionus, we tracked species and population succession in Lake Sonachi during the last 200 years. Populations were dominated by a single mitochondrial haplotype for a period of 150 years, and two putatively intraspecific turnovers in dominance occurred. They were both correlated to major environmental changes documented by profound visible changes in sediment composition of the core: the deposition of a volcanic ash and a

  17. Behavioral and neuroanatomical analyses in a genetic mouse model of 2q13 duplication.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Keiko; Nomura, Jun; Ellegood, Jacob; Fukumoto, Keita; Lerch, Jason P; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Bourgeron, Thomas; Tamada, Kota; Takumi, Toru

    2017-03-29

    Duplications of human chromosome 2q13 have been reported in patients with neurodevelopmental disorder including autism spectrum disorder. Nephronophthisis-1 (NPHP1) was identified as a causative gene in the minimal deletion on chromosome 2q13 for familial juvenile type 1 nephronophthisis and Joubert syndrome, an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a cerebellar and brain stem malformation, hypotonia, developmental delay, ataxia, and sometimes associated with cognitive impairment. NPHP1 encodes a ciliary protein, nephrocystin-1, which is expressed in the brain, yet its function in the brain remains largely unknown. In this study, we generated bacterial artificial chromosome-based transgenic mice, called 2q13 dup, that recapitulate human chromosome 2q13 duplication and contain one extra copy of the Nphp1 transgene. To analyze any behavioral alterations in 2q13 dup mice, we conducted a battery of behavioral tests. Although 2q13 dup mice show no significant differences in social behavior, they show deficits in spontaneous alternation behavior and fear memory. We also carried out magnetic resonance imaging to confirm whether copy number gain in this locus affects the neuroanatomy. There was a trend toward a decrease in the cerebellar paraflocculus of 2q13 dup mice. This is the first report of a genetic mouse model for human 2q13 duplication.

  18. Copper response of Proteus hauseri based on proteomic and genetic expression and cell morphology analyses.

    PubMed

    Ng, I-Son; Zheng, Xuesong; Wang, Nan; Chen, Bor-Yann; Zhang, Xia; Lu, Yinghua

    2014-07-01

    The copper response of Proteus hauseri ZMd44 was determined using one-dimensional (1D) gel electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry for a similarity analysis of proteins isolated from P. hauseri ZMd44 cultured in CuSO4-bearing LB medium. Candidate proteins identified as a copper-transporting P-type ATPase (CTPP), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), flagellin (Fla), and outer membrane proteins (Omps) were the major copper-associated proteins in P. hauseri. In a comparative analysis of subcellular (i.e., periplasmic, intracellular, and inner membranes) and cellular debris, proteomics analysis revealed a distinct differential expression of proteins in P. hauseri with and without copper ion exposure. These findings were consistent with the transcription level dynamics determined using quantitative real-time PCR. Based on a genetic cluster analysis of copper-associated proteins from P. hauseri, Fla and one of the Omps showed greater diversity in their protein sequences compared to those of other Proteus species. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the observed growth on LB agar plates showed that the swarming motility of cells was significantly suppressed and inhibited upon Cu(II) exposure. Thus, copper stress could have important therapeutic significance due to the loss of swarming motility capacity in P. hauseri, which causes urinary tract infections.

  19. Comparison of morphological and genetic analyses reveals cryptic divergence and morphological plasticity in Stylophora (Cnidaria, Scleractinia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, Fabrizio; Benzoni, F.; Yang, S.-Y.; Pichon, M.; Galli, P.; Chen, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    A combined morphological and genetic study of the coral genus Stylophora investigated species boundaries in the Gulf of Aden, Yemen. Two mitochondrial regions, including the hypervariable IGS9 spacer and the control region, and a fragment of rDNA were used for phylogenetic analysis. Results were compared by multivariate analysis on the basis of branch morphology and corallite morphometry. Two species were clearly discriminated by both approaches. The first species was characterised by small corallites and a low morphological variability and was ascribed to a new geographical record of Stylophora madagascarensis on the basis of its phylogenetic distinction and its morphological similarity to the type material. The second species was characterised by larger corallite size and greater morphological variability and was ascribed to Stylophora pistillata. The analysis was extended to the intrageneric level for other S. pistillata populations from the Red Sea and the Pacific Ocean. Strong internal divergence was evident in the genus Sty lophora. S. pistillata populations were split into two highly divergent Red Sea/Gulf of Aden and western Pacific lineages with significant morphological overlap, which suggests they represent two distinct cryptic species. The combined use of morphological and molecular approaches, so far proved to be a powerful tool for the re-delineation of species boundaries in corals, provided novel evidence of cryptic divergence in this group of marine metazoans.

  20. Evaluation of the botanical origin of black cohosh products by genetic and chemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Masada-Atsumi, Sayaka; Kumeta, Yukie; Takahashi, Yutaka; Hakamatsuka, Takashi; Goda, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    Despite the increasing sales of black cohosh (the dried rhizome and root of Cimicifuga racemosa L.) in the world herbal market, these products have continuous adulteration issues. The botanical authenticity of the black cohosh products is the first important step for ensuring their quality, safety and efficacy. In this study, we genetically identified the botanical sources of 10 black cohosh products and 5 Cimicifuga Rhizome crude drugs of Japanese Pharmacopoeia grade, and analyzed the metabolic profiling of 25 black cohosh products using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Consequently, we found that C. dahurica and possibly C. foetida are misused as sources of the black cohosh products and in some cases, the extracts of black cohosh were adulterated with the plant materials of C. dahurica. We demonstrated that these three species can be distinguished by three marker compounds in a specific mass range. These results must be helpful in establishing regulations for the safe use of the black cohosh products.

  1. Genetic and Structural Analyses of RRNPP Intercellular Peptide Signaling of Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Neiditch, Matthew B; Capodagli, Glenn C; Prehna, Gerd; Federle, Michael J

    2017-09-06

    Bacteria use diffusible chemical messengers, termed pheromones, to coordinate gene expression and behavior among cells in a community by a process known as quorum sensing. Pheromones of many gram-positive bac, such as Bacillus and Streptococcus, are small, linear peptides secreted from cells and subsequently detected by sensory receptors such as those belonging to the large family ofRRNPP proteins. These proteins are cytoplasmic pheromone receptors sharing a structurally similar pheromone-binding domain that functions allosterically to regulate receptor activity. X-ray crystal structures of prototypical RRNPP members have provided atomic-level insights into their mechanism and regulation by pheromones. This review provides an overview of RRNPP prototype signaling; describes the structure-function of this protein family, which is spread widely among gram-positive bacteria; and suggests approaches to target RRNPP systems in order to manipulate beneficial and harmful bacterial behaviors. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Genetics Volume 51 is November 23, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  2. A reduced representation approach to population genetic analyses and applications to human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Francesca; Hudson, Richard R.; Witonsky, David B.; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Second-generation sequencing technologies allow surveys of sequence variation on an unprecedented scale. However, despite the rapid decrease in sequencing costs, collecting whole-genome sequence data on a population scale is still prohibitive for many laboratories. We have implemented an inexpensive, reduced representation protocol for preparing resequencing targets, and we have developed the analytical tools necessary for making population genetic inferences. This approach can be applied to any species for which a draft or complete reference genome sequence is available. The new tools we have developed include methods for aligning reads, calling genotypes, and incorporating sample-specific sequencing error rates in the estimate of evolutionary parameters. When applied to 19 individuals from a total of 18 human populations, our approach allowed sampling regions that are largely overlapping across individuals and that are representative of the entire genome. The resequencing data were used to test the serial founder model of human dispersal and to estimate the time of the Out of Africa migration. Our results also represent the first attempt to provide a time frame for the colonization of Australia based on large-scale resequencing data. PMID:21628451

  3. The Effect of Malaria and HIV Co-Infection on Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Naing, Cho; Sandhu, Nisha Kaur; Wai, Victor Nyunt

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Malaria and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are globally important public health concerns. The objectives of this study were (i) to determine the prevalence of malaria and HIV co-infections in people living in endemic countries, and (ii) to assess the effect of co-infection on anemia. Studies were searched on electronic databases including PubMed, Embase, Medline, Google Scholar, and African Journals Online. Observational studies, assessing the prevalence of co-infection and reporting its association with anemia, were included. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using a tool called the risk of bias assessment for non-randomized studies. Heterogeneity among studies was investigated with the I-square test. Pooled prevalence of the co-infection and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using the random-effect model, reflected on heterogeneity among studies. Summary odds ratio (OR), summary standardized mean difference (SMD), and their corresponding 95% CIs were estimated, as appropriate. Subgroup analysis and meta-regression were performed for robustness of results. Publication bias was assessed by visualization of a funnel plot. Twenty-three studies were included in the present study. Overall, the pooled prevalence of co-infection was 19% (95% CI: 15–23%, I2: 98.1%), showing 26% (95% CI: 20–32%, I2: 98.7%) in adults, 12% (95% CI: 7–17%, I2: 95.0) in pregnant women, and 9% (95% CI: 6–11%, I2: 68.6%) in children. Anemia was comparable between the monoinfected and co-infected adults (summary OR: 1.49, 95% CI: 0.93–2.37) and increased by 49% in co-infected pregnant women (summary OR: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.14–1.94). The mean hemoglobin concentration was significantly lower in the co-infected group than the monoinfected group (summary SMD: −0.47, 95% CI: −0.61 to −0.33). The results of meta-regression on the prevalence of co-infection using the publication year and total population as covariates showed

  4. EDENetworks: a user-friendly software to build and analyse networks in biogeography, ecology and population genetics.

    PubMed

    Kivelä, Mikko; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Saramäki, Jari

    2015-01-01

    The recent application of graph-based network theory analysis to biogeography, community ecology and population genetics has created a need for user-friendly software, which would allow a wider accessibility to and adaptation of these methods. EDENetworks aims to fill this void by providing an easy-to-use interface for the whole analysis pipeline of ecological and evolutionary networks starting from matrices of species distributions, genotypes, bacterial OTUs or populations characterized genetically. The user can choose between several different ecological distance metrics, such as Bray-Curtis or Sorensen distance, or population genetic metrics such as FST or Goldstein distances, to turn the raw data into a distance/dissimilarity matrix. This matrix is then transformed into a network by manual or automatic thresholding based on percolation theory or by building the minimum spanning tree. The networks can be visualized along with auxiliary data and analysed with various metrics such as degree, clustering coefficient, assortativity and betweenness centrality. The statistical significance of the results can be estimated either by resampling the original biological data or by null models based on permutations of the data. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Genetic relationship between lodging and lodging components in barley (Hordeum vulgare) based on unconditional and conditional quantitative trait locus analyses.

    PubMed

    Chen, W Y; Liu, Z M; Deng, G B; Pan, Z F; Liang, J J; Zeng, X Q; Tashi, N M; Long, H; Yu, M Q

    2014-03-17

    Lodging (LD) is a major constraint limiting the yield and forage quality of barley. Detailed analyses of LD component (LDC) traits were conducted using 246 F2 plants generated from a cross between cultivars ZQ320 and 1277. Genetic relationships between LD and LDC were evaluated by unconditional and conditional quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping with 117 simple sequence repeat markers. Ultimately, 53 unconditional QTL related to LD were identified on seven barley chromosomes. Up to 15 QTL accounted for over 10% of the phenotypic variation, and up to 20 QTL for culm strength were detected. Six QTL with pleiotropic effects showing significant negative correlations with LD were found between markers Bmag353 and GBM1482 on chromosome 4H. These alleles and alleles of QTL for wall thickness, culm strength, plant height, and plant weight originated from ZQ320. Conditional mapping identified 96 additional QTL for LD. Conditional QTL analysis demonstrated that plant height, plant height center of gravity, and length of the sixth internode had the greatest contribution to LD, whereas culm strength and length of the fourth internode, and culm strength of the second internode were the key factors for LD-resistant. Therefore, lodging resistance in barley can be improved based on selection of alleles affecting culm strength, wall thickness, plant height, and plant weight. The conditional QTL mapping method can be used to evaluate possible genetic relationships between LD and LDC while efficiently and precisely determining counteracting QTL, which will help in understanding the genetic basis of LD in barley.

  6. Isotopic and genetic analyses of a mass grave in central California: Implications for precontact hunter-gatherer warfare.

    PubMed

    Eerkens, Jelmer W; Carlson, Traci; Malhi, Ripan S; Blake, Jennifer; Bartelink, Eric J; Barfod, Gry H; Estes, Alan; Garibay, Ramona; Glessner, Justin; Greenwald, Alexandra M; Lentz, Kari; Li, Hongjie; Marshall, Charla K

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of a mass burial of seven males at CA-ALA-554, a prehistoric site in the Amador Valley, CA, was undertaken to determine if the individuals were "locals" or "non-locals," and how they were genetically related to one another. The study includes osteological, genetic (mtDNA), and stable (C, N, O, S) and radiogenic (Sr) isotope analyses of bone and tooth (first and third molars) samples. Isotopes in first molars, third molars, and bone show they spent the majority of their lives living together. They are not locals to the Amador Valley, but were recently living to the east in the San Joaquin Valley, suggesting intergroup warfare as the cause of death. The men were not maternally related, but represent at least four different matrilines. The men also changed residence as a group between age 16 and adult years. Isotope data suggest intergroup warfare accounts for the mass burial. Genetic data suggest the raiding party included sets of unrelated men, perhaps from different households. Generalizing from this case and others like it, we hypothesize that competition over territory was a major factor behind ancient warfare in Central California. We present a testable model of demographic expansion, wherein villages in high-population-density areas frequently fissioned, with groups of individuals moving to lower-population-density areas to establish new villages. This model is consistent with previous models of linguistic expansion. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Systematic meta-analyses and field synopsis of genetic and epigenetic studies in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Song, Peige; Timofeeva, Maria; Meng, Xiangrui; Rudan, Igor; Little, Julian; Satsangi, Jack; Campbell, Harry; Theodoratou, Evropi

    2016-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive field synopsis of genetic and epigenetic associations for paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). A systematic review was performed and included 84 genetic association studies reporting data for 183 polymorphisms in 71 genes. Meta-analyses were conducted for 20 SNPs in 10 genes of paediatric Crohn’s disease (CD) and for 8 SNPs in 5 genes of paediatric ulcerative colitis (UC). Five epigenetic studies were also included, but formal meta-analysis was not possible. Venice criteria and Bayesian false discovery probability test were applied to assess the credibility of associations. Nine SNPs in 4 genes were considered to have highly credible associations with paediatric CD, of which four variants (rs2066847, rs12521868, rs26313667, rs1800629) were not previously identified in paediatric GWAS. Differential DNA methylation in NOD2 and TNF-α, dysregulated expression in let-7 and miR-124 were associated with paediatric IBD, but not as yet replicated. Highly credible SNPs associated with paediatric IBD have also been implicated in adult IBD, with similar magnitudes of associations. Early onset and distinct phenotypic features of paediatric IBD might be due to distinct epigenetic changes, but these findings need to be replicated. Further progress identifying genetic and epigenetic susceptibility of paediatric IBD will require international collaboration, population diversity and harmonization of protocols. PMID:27670835

  8. Genetically Predicted Body Mass Index and Alzheimer’s Disease Related Phenotypes in Three Large Samples: Mendelian Randomization Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Walter, Stefan; Kauwe, John S.K.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Bennett, David A.; Larson, Eric B.; Crane, Paul K.; Glymour, M. Maria

    2015-01-01

    Observational research shows that higher body mass index (BMI) increases Alzheimer’s disease (AD) risk, but it is unclear whether this association is causal. We applied genetic variants that predict BMI in Mendelian Randomization analyses, an approach that is not biased by reverse causation or confounding, to evaluate whether higher BMI increases AD risk. We evaluated individual level data from the AD Genetics Consortium (ADGC: 10,079 AD cases and 9,613 controls), the Health and Retirement Study (HRS: 8,403 participants with algorithm-predicted dementia status) and published associations from the Genetic and Environmental Risk for AD consortium (GERAD1: 3,177 AD cases and 7,277 controls). No evidence from individual SNPs or polygenic scores indicated BMI increased AD risk. Mendelian Randomization effect estimates per BMI point (95% confidence intervals) were: ADGC OR=0.95 (0.90, 1.01); HRS OR=1.00 (0.75, 1.32); GERAD1 OR=0.96 (0.87, 1.07). One subscore (cellular processes not otherwise specified) unexpectedly predicted lower AD risk. PMID:26079416

  9. Clinical and genetic analyses of a Chinese female with 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mengte; Chen, Xiaojun; Zhou, Qi; Shen, Feixia

    2014-01-01

    17α-Hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency (17OHD) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by CYP17 gene mutations. This disease is clinically characterised by hypertension, hypokalaemia, sexual infantilism in females or pseudohermaphroditism in males, and adrenal hyperplasia. This study aims to investigate a rare case of 17OHD accompanied by both cystic ovaries and massive adrenal mass. This study performed clinical, hormonal, radiological and genetic analyses. Blood samples were collected from the patient for the genetic test. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, and the coding sequence abnormalities of CYP17 were assessed using polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing analysis. The genetic analysis of CYP17 revealed compound heterozygous mutations in the individual. One was a mis-sense mutation of c.1226 C > G, which changes codon 409 in exon 7 from proline (CCG) to arginine (CGG). Another was a mutation of p.Val311Asp,fs,330X, which was first reported in a compound heterozygote mutation of Y329fs and V311fs from a Chinese patient. This study presented a rare case of 17OHD accompanied by both cystic ovaries and massive adrenal mass. This study obtained significant information on the genotype-phenotype correlation of 17OHD.

  10. Genetically predicted body mass index and Alzheimer's disease-related phenotypes in three large samples: Mendelian randomization analyses.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Walter, Stefan; Kauwe, John S K; Saykin, Andrew J; Bennett, David A; Larson, Eric B; Crane, Paul K; Glymour, M Maria

    2015-12-01

    Observational research shows that higher body mass index (BMI) increases Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk, but it is unclear whether this association is causal. We applied genetic variants that predict BMI in Mendelian randomization analyses, an approach that is not biased by reverse causation or confounding, to evaluate whether higher BMI increases AD risk. We evaluated individual-level data from the AD Genetics Consortium (ADGC: 10,079 AD cases and 9613 controls), the Health and Retirement Study (HRS: 8403 participants with algorithm-predicted dementia status), and published associations from the Genetic and Environmental Risk for AD consortium (GERAD1: 3177 AD cases and 7277 controls). No evidence from individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms or polygenic scores indicated BMI increased AD risk. Mendelian randomization effect estimates per BMI point (95% confidence intervals) were as follows: ADGC, odds ratio (OR) = 0.95 (0.90-1.01); HRS, OR = 1.00 (0.75-1.32); GERAD1, OR = 0.96 (0.87-1.07). One subscore (cellular processes not otherwise specified) unexpectedly predicted lower AD risk.

  11. Demographic and random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses reveal high levels of genetic diversity in a clonal violet.

    PubMed

    Auge, H; Neuffer, B; Erlinghagen, F; Grupe, R; Brandl, R

    2001-07-01

    We performed demographic and molecular investigations on woodland populations of the clonal herb Viola riviniana in central Germany. We investigated the pattern of seedling recruitment, the amount of genotypic (clonal) variation and the partitioning of genetic variation among and within populations. Our demographic study was carried out in six violet populations of different ages and habitat conditions. It revealed that repeated seedling recruitment takes place in all of these populations, and that clonal propagation is accompanied by high ramet mortality. Our molecular investigations were performed on a subset of three of these six violet populations. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses using six primers yielded 45 scorable bands that were used to identify multilocus genotypes, i.e. putative clones. Consistent with our demographic results and independent of population age, we found a large genotypic diversity with a mean proportion of distinguishable genotypes of 0.93 and a mean Simpson's diversity index of 0.99. Using AMOVA we found a strong genetic differentiation among these violet populations with a PhiST value of 0.41. We suggest that a high selfing rate, limited gene flow due to short seed dispersal distances and drift due to founder effects are responsible for this pattern. Although Viola riviniana is a clonal plant, traits associated with sexual reproduction rather than clonality per se are moulding the pattern of genetic variation in this species.

  12. Genome-wide association and longitudinal analyses reveal genetic loci linking pubertal height growth, pubertal timing and childhood adiposity.

    PubMed

    Cousminer, Diana L; Berry, Diane J; Timpson, Nicholas J; Ang, Wei; Thiering, Elisabeth; Byrne, Enda M; Taal, H Rob; Huikari, Ville; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Kerkhof, Marjan; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Marinelli, Marcella; Holst, Claus; Leinonen, Jaakko T; Perry, John R B; Surakka, Ida; Pietiläinen, Olli; Kettunen, Johannes; Anttila, Verneri; Kaakinen, Marika; Sovio, Ulla; Pouta, Anneli; Das, Shikta; Lagou, Vasiliki; Power, Chris; Prokopenko, Inga; Evans, David M; Kemp, John P; St Pourcain, Beate; Ring, Susan; Palotie, Aarno; Kajantie, Eero; Osmond, Clive; Lehtimäki, Terho; Viikari, Jorma S; Kähönen, Mika; Warrington, Nicole M; Lye, Stephen J; Palmer, Lyle J; Tiesler, Carla M T; Flexeder, Claudia; Montgomery, Grant W; Medland, Sarah E; Hofman, Albert; Hakonarson, Hakon; Guxens, Mònica; Bartels, Meike; Salomaa, Veikko; Murabito, Joanne M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Ballester, Ferran; Bisgaard, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Koppelman, Gerard H; Grant, Struan F A; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Martin, Nicholas G; Heinrich, Joachim; Pennell, Craig E; Raitakari, Olli T; Eriksson, Johan G; Smith, George Davey; Hyppönen, Elina; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; McCarthy, Mark I; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth

    2013-07-01

    The pubertal height growth spurt is a distinctive feature of childhood growth reflecting both the central onset of puberty and local growth factors. Although little is known about the underlying genetics, growth variability during puberty correlates with adult risks for hormone-dependent cancer and adverse cardiometabolic health. The only gene so far associated with pubertal height growth, LIN28B, pleiotropically influences childhood growth, puberty and cancer progression, pointing to shared underlying mechanisms. To discover genetic loci influencing pubertal height and growth and to place them in context of overall growth and maturation, we performed genome-wide association meta-analyses in 18 737 European samples utilizing longitudinally collected height measurements. We found significant associations (P < 1.67 × 10(-8)) at 10 loci, including LIN28B. Five loci associated with pubertal timing, all impacting multiple aspects of growth. In particular, a novel variant correlated with expression of MAPK3, and associated both with increased prepubertal growth and earlier menarche. Another variant near ADCY3-POMC associated with increased body mass index, reduced pubertal growth and earlier puberty. Whereas epidemiological correlations suggest that early puberty marks a pathway from rapid prepubertal growth to reduced final height and adult obesity, our study shows that individual loci associating with pubertal growth have variable longitudinal growth patterns that may differ from epidemiological observations. Overall, this study uncovers part of the complex genetic architecture linking pubertal height growth, the timing of puberty and childhood obesity and provides new information to pinpoint processes linking these traits.

  13. Genetic and economic analyses of sow replacement rates in the commercial tier of a hierarchical swine breeding structure.

    PubMed

    Faust, M A; Robison, O W; Tess, M W

    1993-06-01

    Commercial-level sow replacement rates were investigated for a 10-yr planning horizon using a stochastic life-cycle swine production model. A three-tiered breeding structure was modeled for the production of market hogs in a three-breed static crossing scheme. Growth and reproductive traits of individual pigs were simulated using genetic, environmental, and economic parameters. Culling was after a maximum of 1, 5, or 10 parities in commercial levels within 1- and 5-parity nucleus and 1-, 5-, and 10-parity multiplier combinations. Yearly changes and average phenotypic levels were computed for pig and sow performance and economic measures. For growth traits, greater commercial level response was for systems with higher sow replacement rates, 110 to 115% of lowest response. Phenotypic changes in net returns ranged from $.85 to 1.01 x pig-1 x yr-1. Average growth performances were highest for systems with greatest genetic trend. Highest kilograms.sow-1 x year-1 finished was for 10-parity commercial alternatives. System differences in total costs and returns per pig resulted primarily from differences in replacement costs. Removal of the gilt system from analyses often reduced ranges among systems for economic measures by more than 70%. Systems with the lowest commercial replacement rates were most profitable. Within these systems, those with higher genetic change had highest net returns. For high replacement rates, no more than 175% of market value could be paid for gilts, but with lower sow replacement rates commercial units could justify as much as 450%.

  14. Pleiotropic Meta-Analyses of Longitudinal Studies Discover Novel Genetic Variants Associated with Age-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    He, Liang; Kernogitski, Yelena; Kulminskaya, Irina; Loika, Yury; Arbeev, Konstantin G.; Loiko, Elena; Bagley, Olivia; Duan, Matt; Yashkin, Arseniy; Ukraintseva, Svetlana V.; Kovtun, Mikhail; Yashin, Anatoliy I.; Kulminski, Alexander M.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related diseases may result from shared biological mechanisms in intrinsic processes of aging. Genetic effects on age-related diseases are often modulated by environmental factors due to their little contribution to fitness or are mediated through certain endophenotypes. Identification of genetic variants with pleiotropic effects on both common complex diseases and endophenotypes may reveal potential conflicting evolutionary pressures and deliver new insights into shared genetic contribution to healthspan and lifespan. Here, we performed pleiotropic meta-analyses of genetic variants using five NIH-funded datasets by integrating univariate summary statistics for age-related diseases and endophenotypes. We investigated three groups of traits: (1) endophenotypes such as blood glucose, blood pressure, lipids, hematocrit, and body mass index, (2) time-to-event outcomes such as the age-at-onset of diabetes mellitus (DM), cancer, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and neurodegenerative diseases (NDs), and (3) both combined. In addition to replicating previous findings, we identify seven novel genome-wide significant loci (< 5e-08), out of which five are low-frequency variants. Specifically, from Group 2, we find rs7632505 on 3q21.1 in SEMA5B, rs460976 on 21q22.3 (1 kb from TMPRSS2) and rs12420422 on 11q24.1 predominantly associated with a variety of CVDs, rs4905014 in ITPK1 associated with stroke and heart failure, rs7081476 on 10p12.1 in ANKRD26 associated with multiple diseases including DM, CVDs, and NDs. From Group 3, we find rs8082812 on 18p11.22 and rs1869717 on 4q31.3 associated with both endophenotypes and CVDs. Our follow-up analyses show that rs7632505, rs4905014, and rs8082812 have age-dependent effects on coronary heart disease or stroke. Functional annotation suggests that most of these SNPs are within regulatory regions or DNase clusters and in linkage disequilibrium with expression quantitative trait loci, implying their potential regulatory influence on

  15. Cross-disorder genome-wide analyses suggest a complex genetic relationship between Tourette's syndrome and OCD.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dongmei; Mathews, Carol A; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Neale, Benjamin M; Davis, Lea K; Gamazon, Eric R; Derks, Eske M; Evans, Patrick; Edlund, Christopher K; Crane, Jacquelyn; Fagerness, Jesen A; Osiecki, Lisa; Gallagher, Patience; Gerber, Gloria; Haddad, Stephen; Illmann, Cornelia; McGrath, Lauren M; Mayerfeld, Catherine; Arepalli, Sampath; Barlassina, Cristina; Barr, Cathy L; Bellodi, Laura; Benarroch, Fortu; Berrió, Gabriel Bedoya; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Black, Donald W; Bloch, Michael H; Brentani, Helena; Bruun, Ruth D; Budman, Cathy L; Camarena, Beatriz; Campbell, Desmond D; Cappi, Carolina; Silgado, Julio C Cardona; Cavallini, Maria C; Chavira, Denise A; Chouinard, Sylvain; Cook, Edwin H; Cookson, M R; Coric, Vladimir; Cullen, Bernadette; Cusi, Daniele; Delorme, Richard; Denys, Damiaan; Dion, Yves; Eapen, Valsama; Egberts, Karin; Falkai, Peter; Fernandez, Thomas; Fournier, Eduardo; Garrido, Helena; Geller, Daniel; Gilbert, Donald L; Girard, Simon L; Grabe, Hans J; Grados, Marco A; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Grünblatt, Edna; Hardy, John; Heiman, Gary A; Hemmings, Sian M J; Herrera, Luis D; Hezel, Dianne M; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Jankovic, Joseph; Kennedy, James L; King, Robert A; Konkashbaev, Anuar I; Kremeyer, Barbara; Kurlan, Roger; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Leboyer, Marion; Leckman, James F; Lennertz, Leonhard; Liu, Chunyu; Lochner, Christine; Lowe, Thomas L; Lupoli, Sara; Macciardi, Fabio; Maier, Wolfgang; Manunta, Paolo; Marconi, Maurizio; McCracken, James T; Mesa Restrepo, Sandra C; Moessner, Rainald; Moorjani, Priya; Morgan, Jubel; Muller, Heike; Murphy, Dennis L; Naarden, Allan L; Nurmi, Erika; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Ophoff, Roel A; Pakstis, Andrew J; Pato, Michele T; Pato, Carlos N; Piacentini, John; Pittenger, Christopher; Pollak, Yehuda; Rauch, Scott L; Renner, Tobias; Reus, Victor I; Richter, Margaret A; Riddle, Mark A; Robertson, Mary M; Romero, Roxana; Rosário, Maria C; Rosenberg, David; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Sabatti, Chiara; Salvi, Erika; Sampaio, Aline S; Samuels, Jack; Sandor, Paul; Service, Susan K; Sheppard, Brooke; Singer, Harvey S; Smit, Jan H; Stein, Dan J; Strengman, Eric; Tischfield, Jay A; Turiel, Maurizio; Valencia Duarte, Ana V; Vallada, Homero; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Walitza, Susanne; Wang, Ying; Weale, Mike; Weiss, Robert; Wendland, Jens R; Westenberg, Herman G M; Shugart, Yin Yao; Hounie, Ana G; Miguel, Euripedes C; Nicolini, Humberto; Wagner, Michael; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Cath, Danielle C; McMahon, William; Posthuma, Danielle; Oostra, Ben A; Nestadt, Gerald; Rouleau, Guy A; Purcell, Shaun; Jenike, Michael A; Heutink, Peter; Hanna, Gregory L; Conti, David V; Arnold, Paul D; Freimer, Nelson B; Stewart, S Evelyn; Knowles, James A; Cox, Nancy J; Pauls, David L

    2015-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette's syndrome are highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorders that are thought to share genetic risk factors. However, the identification of definitive susceptibility genes for these etiologically complex disorders remains elusive. The authors report a combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) of Tourette's syndrome and OCD. The authors conducted a GWAS in 2,723 cases (1,310 with OCD, 834 with Tourette's syndrome, 579 with OCD plus Tourette's syndrome/chronic tics), 5,667 ancestry-matched controls, and 290 OCD parent-child trios. GWAS summary statistics were examined for enrichment of functional variants associated with gene expression levels in brain regions. Polygenic score analyses were conducted to investigate the genetic architecture within and across the two disorders. Although no individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) achieved genome-wide significance, the GWAS signals were enriched for SNPs strongly associated with variations in brain gene expression levels (expression quantitative loci, or eQTLs), suggesting the presence of true functional variants that contribute to risk of these disorders. Polygenic score analyses identified a significant polygenic component for OCD (p=2×10(-4)), predicting 3.2% of the phenotypic variance in an independent data set. In contrast, Tourette's syndrome had a smaller, nonsignificant polygenic component, predicting only 0.6% of the phenotypic variance (p=0.06). No significant polygenic signal was detected across the two disorders, although the sample is likely underpowered to detect a modest shared signal. Furthermore, the OCD polygenic signal was significantly attenuated when cases with both OCD and co-occurring Tourette's syndrome/chronic tics were included in the analysis (p=0.01). Previous work has shown that Tourette's syndrome and OCD have some degree of shared genetic variation. However, the data from this study suggest that there are also distinct

  16. Spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus in a patient co-infected with hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kaung, Aung; Sundaram, Vinay; Tran, Tram T

    2014-09-01

    The effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains unclear. Spontaneous HCV clearance with initiation of HAART in non-cirrhotic HCV patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been reported. We describe an HIV/HCV patient with decompensated cirrhosis, who had spontaneous HCV clearance after an episode of elevated liver enzymes and a change in HAART regimen. His HCV RNA level remained undetectable for six months by quantitative and qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. The disappearance of HCV RNA may be due to a combination of host immune recovery, genetic polymorphism and direct effect of HAART against HCV.

  17. Virulence Structure of Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici and Its Genetic Diversity by ISSR and SRAP Profiling Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Liu, Z. Lewis; Gong, Guoshu; Zhang, Min; Wang, Xu; Zhou, You; Qi, Xiaobo; Chen, Huabao; Yang, Jizhi; Luo, Peigao; Yang, Chunping

    2015-01-01

    Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, which causes wheat powdery mildew, is an obligate biotrophic pathogen that can easily genetically adapt to its host plant. Understanding the virulence structure of and genetic variations in this pathogen is essential for disease control and for breeding resistance to wheat powdery mildew. This study investigated 17 pathogenic populations in Sichuan, China and classified 109 isolates into two distinct groups based on pathogenicity analysis: high virulence (HV, 92 isolates) and low virulence (LV, 17 isolates). Populations from Yibin (Southern region), Xichang (Western region), and Meishan (Middle region) showed lower virulence frequencies than populations from other regions. Many of the previously known resistance genes did not confer resistance in this study. The resistance gene Pm21 displayed an immune response to pathogenic challenge with all populations in Sichuan, and Pm13, Pm5b, Pm2+6, and PmXBD maintained resistance. AMOVA revealed significantly higher levels of variation within populations and lower levels of variation among populations within regions. High levels of gene flow were detected among populations in the four regions. Closely related populations within each region were distinguished by cluster analyses using ISSR and SRAP alleles. Both ISSR and SRAP allele profiling analyses revealed high levels of genetic diversity among pathogenic populations in Sichuan. Although ISSR and SRAP profiling analysis showed similar resolutions, the SRAP alleles appeared to be more informative. We did not detect any significant association between these alleles and the virulence or pathogenicity of the pathogen. Our results suggest that ISSR and SRAP alleles are more efficient for the characterization of small or closely related populations versus distantly related populations. PMID:26098844

  18. A genetic tool kit for cellular and behavioral analyses of insect sugar receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Ahmet; Jagge, Christopher; Slone, Jesse; Amrein, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Arthropods employ a large family of up to 100 putative taste or gustatory receptors (Grs) for the recognition of a wide range of non-volatile chemicals. In Drosophila melanogaster, a small subfamily of 8 Gr genes is thought to mediate the detection of sugars, the fly's major nutritional source. However, the specific roles for most sugar Gr genes are not known. Here, we report the generation of a series of mutant sugar Gr knock-in alleles and several composite sugar Gr mutant strains, including a sugar blind strain, which will facilitate the characterization of this gene family. Using Ca2+ imaging experiments, we show that most gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs) of sugar blind flies (lacking all 8 sugar Gr genes) fail to respond to any sugar tested. Moreover, expression of single sugar Gr genes in most sweet GRNs of sugar-blind flies does not restore sugar responses. However, when pair-wise combinations of sugar Gr genes are introduced to sweet GRNs, responses to select sugars are restored. We also examined the cellular phenotype of flies homozygous mutant for Gr64a, a Gr gene previously reported to be a major contributor for the detection of many sugars. In contrast to these claims, we find that sweet GRNs of Gr64a homozygous mutant flies show normal responses to most sugars, and only modestly reduced responses to maltose and maltotriose. Thus, the precisely engineered genetic mutations of single Gr genes and construction of a sugar-blind strain provide powerful analytical tools for examining the roles of Drosophila and other insect sugar Gr genes in sweet taste. PMID:25984594

  19. A genetic tool kit for cellular and behavioral analyses of insect sugar receptors.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Ahmet; Jagge, Christopher; Slone, Jesse; Amrein, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Arthropods employ a large family of up to 100 putative taste or gustatory receptors (Grs) for the recognition of a wide range of non-volatile chemicals. In Drosophila melanogaster, a small subfamily of 8 Gr genes is thought to mediate the detection of sugars, the fly's major nutritional source. However, the specific roles for most sugar Gr genes are not known. Here, we report the generation of a series of mutant sugar Gr knock-in alleles and several composite sugar Gr mutant strains, including a sugar blind strain, which will facilitate the characterization of this gene family. Using Ca(2+) imaging experiments, we show that most gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs) of sugar blind flies (lacking all 8 sugar Gr genes) fail to respond to any sugar tested. Moreover, expression of single sugar Gr genes in most sweet GRNs of sugar-blind flies does not restore sugar responses. However, when pair-wise combinations of sugar Gr genes are introduced to sweet GRNs, responses to select sugars are restored. We also examined the cellular phenotype of flies homozygous mutant for Gr64a, a Gr gene previously reported to be a major contributor for the detection of many sugars. In contrast to these claims, we find that sweet GRNs of Gr64a homozygous mutant flies show normal responses to most sugars, and only modestly reduced responses to maltose and maltotriose. Thus, the precisely engineered genetic mutations of single Gr genes and construction of a sugar-blind strain provide powerful analytical tools for examining the roles of Drosophila and other insect sugar Gr genes in sweet taste.

  20. Human Infections with Spirometra decipiens Plerocercoids Identified by Morphologic and Genetic Analyses in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyeong-Kyu; Park, Hansol; Lee, Dongmin; Choe, Seongjun; Kim, Kyu-Heon; Huh, Sun; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Chai, Jong-Yil; Eom, Keeseon S

    2015-06-01

    Tapeworms of the genus Spirometra are pseudophyllidean cestodes endemic in Korea. At present, it is unclear which Spirometra species are responsible for causing human infections, and little information is available on the epidemiological profiles of Spirometra species infecting humans in Korea. Between 1979 and 2009, a total of 50 spargana from human patients and 2 adult specimens obtained from experimentally infected carnivorous animals were analyzed according to genetic and taxonomic criteria and classified as Spirometra erinaceieuropaei or Spirometra decipiens depending on the morphology. Morphologically, S. erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens are different in that the spirally coiled uterus in S. erinaceieuropaei has 5-7 complete coils, while in S. decipiens it has only 4.5 coils. In addition, there is a 9.3% (146/1,566) sequence different between S. erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens in the cox1 gene. Partial cox1 sequences (390 bp) from 35 Korean isolates showed 99.4% (388/390) similarity with the reference sequence of S. erinaceieuropaei from Korea (G1724; GenBank KJ599680) and an additional 15 Korean isolates revealed 99.2% (387/390) similarity with the reference sequences of S. decipiens from Korea (G1657; GenBank KJ599679). Based on morphologic and molecular databases, the estimated population ratio of S. erinaceieuropaei to S. decipiens was 35: 15. Our results indicate that both S. erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens found in Korea infect humans, with S. erinaceieuropaei being 2 times more prevalent than S. decipiens. This study is the first to report human sparganosis caused by S. decipiens in humans in Korea.

  1. A whole genome analyses of genetic variants in two Kelantan Malay individuals.

    PubMed

    Wan Juhari, Wan Khairunnisa; Md Tamrin, Nur Aida; Mat Daud, Mohd Hanif Ridzuan; Isa, Hatin Wan; Mohd Nasir, Nurfazreen; Maran, Sathiya; Abdul Rajab, Nur Shafawati; Ahmad Amin Noordin, Khairul Bariah; Nik Hassan, Nik Norliza; Tearle, Rick; Razali, Rozaimi; Merican, Amir Feisal; Zilfalil, Bin Alwi

    2014-12-01

    The sequencing of two members of the Royal Kelantan Malay family genomes will provide insights on the Kelantan Malay whole genome sequences. The two Kelantan Malay genomes were analyzed for the SNP markers associated with thalassemia and Helicobacter pylori infection. Helicobacter pylori infection was reported to be low prevalence in the north-east as compared to the west coast of the Peninsular Malaysia and beta-thalassemia was known to be one of the most common inherited and genetic disorder in Malaysia. By combining SNP information from literatures, GWAS study and NCBI ClinVar, 18 unique SNPs were selected for further analysis. From these 18 SNPs, 10 SNPs came from previous study of Helicobacter pylori infection among Malay patients, 6 SNPs were from NCBI ClinVar and 2 SNPs from GWAS studies. The analysis reveals that both Royal Kelantan Malay genomes shared all the 10 SNPs identified by Maran (Single Nucleotide Polymorphims (SNPs) genotypic profiling of Malay patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection in Kelantan, 2011) and one SNP from GWAS study. In addition, the analysis also reveals that both Royal Kelantan Malay genomes shared 3 SNP markers; HBG1 (rs1061234), HBB (rs1609812) and BCL11A (rs766432) where all three markers were associated with beta-thalassemia. Our findings suggest that the Royal Kelantan Malays carry the SNPs which are associated with protection to Helicobacter pylori infection. In addition they also carry SNPs which are associated with beta-thalassemia. These findings are in line with the findings by other researchers who conducted studies on thalassemia and Helicobacter pylori infection in the non-royal Malay population.

  2. Multilevel genetic analyses of two European supercolonies of the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile.

    PubMed

    Jaquiéry, J; Vogel, V; Keller, L

    2005-02-01

    Some ants have an extraordinary unicolonial social organization, whereby individuals mix freely among physically separated nests. Recently, it was shown that the European population of Linepithema humile consisted of two enormous unicolonial supercolonies. Workers of the same supercolony are never aggressive to each other. In contrast, aggressiveness is invariably high between workers from different supercolonies. Here we investigated whether gene flow occurs between two supercolonies. We identified a contact zone in which we sampled 46 nests. For each nest, aggression tests were conducted against workers from reference nests from both supercolonies. Workers were always very aggressive towards workers of one of the supercolonies but not to workers of the other. Thus, all nests could be clearly assigned to one of the two supercolonies. For 22 of the 46 nests, we genotyped 15-16 workers at five microsatellite loci. A four-level hierarchical analysis of variance revealed very strong genetic differentiation between the two supercolonies (F(SUPERCOLONY-TOTAL) = 0.541) and low differentiation between sectors (i.e. group of nests connected together with trails) within supercolonies (F(SECTOR-SUPERCOLONY) = 0.064). The very high differentiation between the two supercolonies indicates a lack of ongoing gene flow, a conclusion further bolstered by the finding that the two supercolonies share no common alleles at two of the five microsatellite loci. A Bayesian clustering method also revealed the occurrence of two distinct clusters. These clusters exactly match the grouping obtained by aggression tests. None of the 332 genotyped individuals were admixed despite the fact that some nests of the two supercolonies were separated by less than 30 m. These results demonstrate that the two supercolonies have completely separate gene pools.

  3. Imputing observed blood pressure for antihypertensive treatment: impact on population and genetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Rana, Brinda K; Dhamija, Anish; Panizzon, Matthew S; Spoon, Kelly M; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Franz, Carol E; Grant, Michael D; Jacobson, Kristen C; Kim, Kathleen; Lyons, Michael J; McCaffery, Jeanne M; Stein, Phyllis K; Xian, Hong; O'Connor, Daniel T; Kremen, William S

    2014-06-01

    Elevated blood pressure (BP), a heritable risk factor for many age-related disorders, is commonly investigated in population and genetic studies, but antihypertensive use can confound study results. Routine methods to adjust for antihypertensives may not sufficiently account for newer treatment protocols (i.e., combination or multiple drug therapy) found in contemporary cohorts. We refined an existing method to impute unmedicated BP in individuals on antihypertensives by incorporating new treatment trends. We assessed BP and antihypertensive use in male twins (n = 1,237) from the Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging: 36% reported antihypertensive use; 52% of those treated were on multiple drugs. Estimated heritability was 0.43 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.20-0.50) and 0.44 (95% CI = 0.22-0.61) for measured systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP), respectively. We imputed BP for antihypertensives by 3 approaches: (i) addition of a fixed value of 10/5mm Hg to measured SBP/DBP; (ii) incremented addition of mm Hg to BP based on number of medications; and (iii) a refined approach adding mm Hg based on antihypertensive drug class and ethnicity. The imputations did not significantly affect estimated heritability of BP. However, use of our most refined imputation method and other methods resulted in significantly increased phenotypic correlations between BP and body mass index, a trait known to be correlated with BP. This study highlights the potential usefulness of applying a representative adjustment for medication use, such as by considering drug class, ethnicity, and the combination of drugs when assessing the relationship between BP and risk factors.

  4. Unsuccessful TB treatment outcomes with a focus on HIV co-infected cases: a cross-sectional retrospective record review in a high-burdened province of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, M C; Kigozi, N G; Chikobvu, P; Botha, S; van Rensburg, H C J

    2017-07-10

    South Africa did not meet the MDG targets to reduce TB prevalence and mortality by 50% by 2015, and the TB cure rate remains below the WHO target of 85%. TB incidence in the country is largely fuelled by the HIV epidemic, and co-infected patients are more likely to have unsuccessful TB treatment outcomes. This paper analyses the demographic and clinical characteristics of new TB patients with unsuccessful treatment outcomes, as well as factors associated with unsuccessful treatment outcomes for HIV co-infected patients. A cross-sectional retrospective record review of routinely collected data for new TB cases registered in the Free State provincial electronic TB database between 2009 and 2012. The outcome variable, unsuccessful treatment, was defined as cases ≥15 years that 'died', 'failed' or 'defaulted' as the recorded treatment outcome. The data were subjected to descriptive and logistic regression analyses. From 2009 to 2012 there were 66,940 new TB cases among persons ≥15 years (with a recorded TB treatment outcome), of these 61% were co-infected with HIV. Unsuccessful TB treatment outcomes were recorded for 24.5% of co-infected cases and 15.3% of HIV-negative cases. In 2009, co-infected cases were 2.35 times more at risk for an unsuccessful TB treatment outcome (OR: 2.35; CI: 2.06-2.69); this figure decreased to 1.8 times by 2012 (OR: 1.80; CI: 1.63-1.99). Among the co-infected cases, main risk factors for unsuccessful treatment outcomes were: ≥ 65 years (AOR: 1.71; CI: 1.25-2.35); receiving treatment in healthcare facilities in District D (AOR: 1.15; CI 1.05-1.28); and taking CPT (and not ART) (AOR: 1.28; CI: 1.05-1.57). Females (AOR: 0.93; CI: 0.88-0.99) and cases with a CD4 count >350 (AOR: 0.40; CI: 0.36-0.44) were less likely to have an unsuccessful treatment outcome. The importance of TB-HIV/AIDS treatment integration is evident as co-infected patients on both ART and CPT, and those who have a higher CD4 count are less likely to have an

  5. Cross-Disorder Genome-Wide Analyses Suggest a Complex Genetic Relationship Between Tourette Syndrome and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongmei; Mathews, Carol A.; Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Davis, Lea K.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Derks, Eske M.; Evans, Patrick; Edlund, Christopher K.; Crane, Jacquelyn; Fagerness, Jesen A.; Osiecki, Lisa; Gallagher, Patience; Gerber, Gloria; Haddad, Stephen; Illmann, Cornelia; McGrath, Lauren M.; Mayerfeld, Catherine; Arepalli, Sampath; Barlassina, Cristina; Barr, Cathy L.; Bellodi, Laura; Benarroch, Fortu; Berrió, Gabriel Bedoya; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Black, Donald; Bloch, Michael H.; Brentani, Helena; Bruun, Ruth D.; Budman, Cathy L.; Camarena, Beatriz; Campbell, Desmond D.; Cappi, Carolina; Cardona Silgado, Julio C.; Cavallini, Maria C.; Chavira, Denise A.; Chouinard, Sylvain; Cook, Edwin H.; Cookson, M. R.; Coric, Vladimir; Cullen, Bernadette; Cusi, Daniele; Delorme, Richard; Denys, Damiaan; Dion, Yves; Eapen, Valsama; Egberts, Karin; Falkai, Peter; Fernandez, Thomas; Fournier, Eduardo; Garrido, Helena; Geller, Daniel; Gilbert, Donald; Girard, Simon L.; Grabe, Hans J.; Grados, Marco A.; Greenberg, Benjamin D.; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Grünblatt, Edna; Hardy, John; Heiman, Gary A.; Hemmings, Sian M.J.; Herrera, Luis D.; Hezel, Dianne M.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Jankovic, Joseph; Kennedy, James L.; King, Robert A.; Konkashbaev, Anuar I.; Kremeyer, Barbara; Kurlan, Roger; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Leboyer, Marion; Leckman, James F.; Lennertz, Leonhard; Liu, Chunyu; Lochner, Christine; Lowe, Thomas L.; Lupoli, Sara; Macciardi, Fabio; Maier, Wolfgang; Manunta, Paolo; Marconi, Maurizio; McCracken, James T.; Mesa Restrepo, Sandra C.; Moessner, Rainald; Moorjani, Priya; Morgan, Jubel; Muller, Heike; Murphy, Dennis L.; Naarden, Allan L.; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Ophoff, Roel A.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Pato, Michele T.; Pato, Carlos N.; Piacentini, John; Pittenger, Christopher; Pollak, Yehuda; Rauch, Scott L.; Renner, Tobias; Reus, Victor I.; Richter, Margaret A.; Riddle, Mark A.; Robertson, Mary M.; Romero, Roxana; Rosário, Maria C.; Rosenberg, David; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Sabatti, Chiara; Salvi, Erika; Sampaio, Aline S.; Samuels, Jack; Sandor, Paul; Service, Susan K.; Sheppard, Brooke; Singer, Harvey S.; Smit, Jan H.; Stein, Dan J.; Strengman, Eric; Tischfield, Jay A.; Turiel, Maurizio; Valencia Duarte, Ana V.; Vallada, Homero; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Walitza, Susanne; Walkup, John; Wang, Ying; Weale, Mike; Weiss, Robert; Wendland, Jens R.; Westenberg, Herman G.M.; Yao, Yin; Hounie, Ana G.; Miguel, Euripedes C.; Nicolini, Humberto; Wagner, Michael; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Cath, Danielle C.; McMahon, William; Posthuma, Danielle; Oostra, Ben A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Rouleau, Guy A.; Purcell, Shaun; Jenike, Michael A.; Heutink, Peter; Hanna, Gregory L.; Conti, David V.; Arnold, Paul D.; Freimer, Nelson; Stewart, S. Evelyn; Knowles, James A.; Cox, Nancy J.; Pauls, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette Syndrome (TS) are highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorders that are thought to share genetic risk factors. However, the identification of definitive susceptibility genes for these etiologically complex disorders remains elusive. Here, we report a combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TS and OCD in 2723 cases (1310 with OCD, 834 with TS, 579 with OCD plus TS/chronic tics (CT)), 5667 ancestry-matched controls, and 290 OCD parent-child trios. Although no individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) achieved genome-wide significance, the GWAS signals were enriched for SNPs strongly associated with variations in brain gene expression levels, i.e. expression quantitative loci (eQTLs), suggesting the presence of true functional variants that contribute to risk of these disorders. Polygenic score analyses identified a significant polygenic component for OCD (p=2×10−4), predicting 3.2% of the phenotypic variance in an independent data set. In contrast, TS had a smaller, non-significant polygenic component, predicting only 0.6% of the phenotypic variance (p=0.06). No significant polygenic signal was detected across the two disorders, although the sample is likely underpowered to detect a modest shared signal. Furthermore, the OCD polygenic signal was significantly attenuated when cases with both OCD and TS/CT were included in the analysis (p=0.01). Previous work has shown that TS and OCD have some degree of shared genetic variation. However, the data from this study suggest that there are also distinct components to the genetic architectures of TS and OCD. Furthermore, OCD with co-occurring TS/CT may have different underlying genetic susceptibility compared to OCD alone. PMID:25158072

  6. Genetic and morphological analyses of Gracilaria firma and G. changii (Gracilariaceae, Rhodophyta), the commercially important agarophytes in western Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Poh-Kheng; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Hurtado, Anicia Q.; Phang, Siew-Moi; Yow, Yoon-Yen; Sun, Zhongmin

    2017-01-01

    Many studies classifying Gracilaria species for the exploitation of agarophytes and the development of the agar industry were conducted before the prevalence of molecular tools, resulting in the description of many species based solely on their morphology. Gracilaria firma and G. changii are among the commercially important agarophytes from the western Pacific; both feature branches with basal constrictions that taper toward acute apices. In this study, we contrasted the morpho-anatomical circumscriptions of the two traditionally described species with molecular data from samples that included representatives of G. changii collected from its type locality. Concerted molecular analyses using the rbcL and cox1 gene sequences, coupled with morphological observations of the collections from the western Pacific, revealed no inherent differences to support the treatment of the two entities as distinct taxa. We propose merging G. changii (a later synonym) into G. firma and recognize G. firma based on thallus branches with abrupt basal constrictions that gradually taper toward acute (or sometimes broken) apices, cystocarps consisting of small gonimoblast cells and inconspicuous multinucleate tubular nutritive cells issuing from gonimoblasts extending into the inner pericarp at the cystocarp floor, as well as deep spermatangial conceptacles of the verrucosa-type. The validation of specimens under different names as a single genetic species is useful to allow communication and knowledge transfer among groups from different fields. This study also revealed considerably low number of haplotypes and nucleotide diversity with apparent phylogeographic patterns for G. firma in the region. Populations from the Philippines and Taiwan were divergent from each other as well as from the populations from Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore and Vietnam. Establishment of baseline data on the genetic diversity of this commercially important agarophyte is relevant in the context of cultivation

  7. Genetic and phenotypic analyses of sequential vpu alleles from HIV-infected IFN-treated patients.

    PubMed

    Vanwalscappel, Bénédicte; Rato, Sylvie; Perez-Olmeda, Mayte; Díez Fuertes, Francisco; Casartelli, Nicoletta; Alcami, José; Mammano, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of HIV-infected patients with IFN-α results in significant, but clinically insufficient, reductions of viremia. IFN induces the expression of several antiviral proteins including BST-2, which inhibits HIV by multiple mechanisms. The viral protein Vpu counteracts different effects of BST-2. We thus asked if Vpu proteins from IFN-treated patients displayed improved anti-BST-2 activities as compared to Vpu from baseline. Deep-sequencing analyses revealed that in five of seven patients treated by IFN-α for a concomitant HCV infection in the absence of antiretroviral drugs, the dominant Vpu sequences differed before and during treatment. In three patients, vpu alleles that emerged during treatment improved virus replication in the presence of IFN-α, and two of them conferred improved virus budding from cells expressing BST-2. Differences were observed for the ability to down-regulate CD4, while all Vpu variants potently down-modulated BST-2 from the cell surface. This report discloses relevant consequences of IFN-treatment on HIV properties.

  8. Genetic Analyses Suggest Separate Introductions of the Pine Pathogen Lecanosticta acicola Into Europe.

    PubMed

    Janoušek, Josef; Wingfield, Michael J; Monsivais, José G Marmolejo; Jankovský, Libor; Stauffer, Christian; Konečný, Adam; Barnes, Irene

    2016-11-01

    Lecanosticta acicola is a heterothallic ascomycete that causes brown spot needle blight on native and nonnative Pinus spp. in many regions of the world. In this study we investigated the origin of European L. acicola populations and estimated the level of random mating of the pathogen in affected areas. Part of the elongation factor 1-α gene was sequenced, 11 microsatellite regions were screened, and the mating type idiomorphs were determined for 201 isolates of L. acicola collected from three continents and 17 host species. The isolates from Mexico and Guatemala were unique, highly diverse and could represent cryptic species of Lecanosticta. The isolates from East Asia formed a uniform and discrete group. Two distinct populations were identified in both North America and Europe. Approximate Bayesian computation analyses strongly suggest independent introductions of two populations from North America into Europe. Microsatellite data and mating type distributions indicated random recombination in the populations of North America and Europe. Its intercontinental introduction can most likely be explained as a consequence of the movement of infected plant material. In contrast, the spread of L. acicola within Europe appears to be primarily due to conidial dispersion and probably also ascospore dissemination.

  9. The Salmonella typhimurium mar locus: molecular and genetic analyses and assessment of its role in virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Sulavik, M C; Dazer, M; Miller, P F

    1997-01-01

    The marRAB operon is a regulatory locus that controls multiple drug resistance in Escherichia coli. marA encodes a positive regulator of the antibiotic resistance response, acting by altering the expression of unlinked genes. marR encodes a repressor of marRAB transcription and controls the production of MarA in response to environmental signals. A molecular and genetic study of the homologous operon in Salmonella typhimurium was undertaken, and the role of marA in virulence in a murine model was assessed. Expression of E. coli marA (marAEC) present on a multicopy plasmid in S. typhimurium resulted in a multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) phenotype, suggesting that a similar regulon exists in this organism. A genomic plasmid library containing S. typhimurium chromosomal sequences was introduced into an E. coli strain that was deleted for the mar locus and contained a single-copy marR'-'lacZ translational fusion. Plasmid clones that contained both S. typhimurium marR (marRSt) and marA (marASt) genes were identified as those that were capable of repressing expression of the fusion and which resulted in a Mar phenotype. The predicted amino acid sequences of MarRSt, MarASt, and MarBSt were 91, 86, and 42% identical, respectively, to the same genes from E. coli, while the operator/promoter region of the operon was 86% identical to the same 98-nucleotide-upstream region in E. coli. The marRAB transcriptional start sites for both organisms were determined by primer extension, and a marRABSt transcript of approximately 1.1 kb was identified by Northern blot analysis. Its accumulation was shown to be inducible by sodium salicylate. Open reading frames flanking the marRAB operon were also conserved. An S. typhimurium marA disruption strain was constructed by an allelic exchange method and compared to the wild-type strain for virulence in a murine BALB/c infection model. No effect on virulence was noted. The endogenous S. typhimurium plasmid that is associated with virulence

  10. Replicated landscape genetic and network analyses reveal wide variation in functional connectivity for American pikas.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Jessica A; Epps, Clinton W; Jeffress, Mackenzie R; Ray, Chris; Rodhouse, Thomas J; Schwalm, Donelle

    2016-09-01

    Landscape connectivity is essential for maintaining viable populations, particularly for species restricted to fragmented habitats or naturally arrayed in metapopulations and facing rapid climate change. The importance of assessing both structural connectivity (physical distribution of favorable habitat patches) and functional connectivity (how species move among habitat patches) for managing such species is well understood. However, the degree to which functional connectivity for a species varies among landscapes, and the resulting implications for conservation, have rarely been assessed. We used a landscape genetics approach to evaluate resistance to gene flow and, thus, to determine how landscape and climate-related variables influence gene flow for American pikas (Ochotona princeps) in eight federally managed sites in the western United States. We used empirically derived, individual-based landscape resistance models in conjunction with predictive occupancy models to generate patch-based network models describing functional landscape connectivity. Metareplication across landscapes enabled identification of limiting factors for dispersal that would not otherwise have been apparent. Despite the cool microclimates characteristic of pika habitat, south-facing aspects consistently represented higher resistance to movement, supporting the previous hypothesis that exposure to relatively high temperatures may limit dispersal in American pikas. We found that other barriers to dispersal included areas with a high degree of topographic relief, such as cliffs and ravines, as well as streams and distances greater than 1-4 km depending on the site. Using the empirically derived network models of habitat patch connectivity, we identified habitat patches that were likely disproportionately important for maintaining functional connectivity, areas in which habitat appeared fragmented, and locations that could be targeted for management actions to improve functional connectivity

  11. Genetic analyses of the human eye colours using a novel objective method for eye colour classification.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jeppe D; Johansen, Peter; Harder, Stine; Christoffersen, Susanne R; Delgado, Mikaela C; Henriksen, Sarah T; Nielsen, Mette M; Sørensen, Erik; Ullum, Henrik; Hansen, Thomas; Dahl, Anders L; Paulsen, Rasmus R; Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we present a new objective method for measuring the eye colour on a continuous scale that allows researchers to associate genetic markers with different shades of eye colour. With the use of the custom designed software Digital Iris Analysis Tool (DIAT), the iris was automatically identified and extracted from high resolution digital images. DIAT was made user friendly with a graphical user interface. The software counted the number of blue and brown pixels in the iris image and calculated a Pixel Index of the Eye (PIE-score) that described the eye colour quantitatively. The PIE-score ranged from -1 to 1 (brown to blue). The software eliminated the need for user based interpretation and qualitative eye colour categories. In 94% (570) of 605 analyzed eye images, the iris region was successfully extracted and a PIE-score was calculated. A very high correlation between the PIE-score and the human perception of eye colour was observed. The correlations between the PIE-scores and the six IrisPlex SNPs (HERC2 rs12913832, OCA2 rs1800407, SLC24A4 rs12896399, TYR rs1393350, SLC45A2 rs16891982 and IRF4 rs12203592) were analyzed in 570 individuals. Significant differences (p<10(-6)) in the PIE-scores of the individuals typed as HERC2 rs12913832 G (PIE=0.99) and rs12913832 GA (PIE=-0.71) or A (PIE=-0.87) were observed. We adjusted for the effect of HERC2 rs12913832 and showed that the quantitative PIE-scores were significantly associated with SNPs with minor effects (OCA2 rs1800407, SLC24A4 rs12896399 and TYR rs1393350) on the eye colour. We evaluated the two published prediction models for eye colour (IrisPlex [1] and Snipper[2]) and compared the predictions with the PIE-scores. We found good concordance with the prediction from individuals typed as HERC2 rs12913832 G. However, both methods had difficulties in categorizing individuals typed as HERC2 rs12913832 GA because of the large variation in eye colour in HERC2 rs12913832 GA individuals. With the use of

  12. Greater decline in memory and global neurocognitive function in HIV/hepatitis C co-infected than in hepatitis C mono-infected patients treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Miller, Theodore R; Weiss, Jeffrey J; Bräu, Norbert; Dieterich, Douglas T; Stivala, Alicia; Rivera-Mindt, Monica

    2017-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and the treatment of HCV with pegylated interferon and ribavirin (IFN/RBV) have been associated with neurocognitive and psychiatric abnormalities. The goal of this research was to prospectively evaluate neurocognitive functioning among a group of HCV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected patients during the first 24 weeks of IFN/RBV treatment while accounting for practice effects, normal variations in change over time, and variations in IFN/RBV treatment exposure. Forty-four HCV mono-infected and 30 HIV/HCV co-infected patients were enrolled in a prospective study of patients beginning on IFN/RBV for chronic HCV infection. Patients were administered a depression inventory, a measure of fatigue, a structured psychiatric interview, and a neurocognitive battery at baseline and 24 weeks after initiation of treatment. Analyses were conducted to explore possible associations between neurocognitive functioning and the following: HIV/HCV co-infection vs. HCV mono-infection, IFN and RBV treatment exposure, psychiatric status, liver disease stage, and other medical characteristics. At baseline, there were no significant differences between the two groups' neuropsychiatric or neurocognitive function other than the mono-infected group had significantly higher reports of fatigue (p = 0.033). Over the course of 24 weeks of treatment after controlling for practice effects, the HIV/HCV co-infected patients experienced significantly greater declines in memory (t(56) = 2.14, p = 0.037) and global neurocognitive functioning (t(53) = 2.28, p = 0.027). In a well-characterized sample of mono-infected and co-infected patients, it appears that persons with HIV/HCV co-infection are potentially more vulnerable to neurocognitive sequalae during HCV treatment.

  13. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis secondary to Epstein Barr virus and Leishmania co-infection in a toddler

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Pinilla, N; Baro-Fernández, M; González-Granado, LI

    2015-01-01

    This is the report of an EBV + Leishmanial co-infection. The patient developed hemophagocytic syndrome (HLH) and was treated with the standard HLH-2004 protocol. However, PCR in bone marrow discovered this secondary cause for HLH. In endemic countries, visceral leishmaniasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis even in EBV-related HLH, as chemotherapy toxicity may be avoided. PMID:25511219

  14. Infection-related hemolysis and susceptibility to Gram-negative bacterial co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Orf, Katharine; Cunnington, Aubrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Increased susceptibility to co-infection with enteric Gram-negative bacteria, particularly non-typhoidal Salmonella, is reported in malaria and Oroya fever (Bartonella bacilliformis infection), and can lead to increased mortality. Accumulating epidemiological evidence indicates a causal association with risk of bacterial co-infection, rather than just co-incidence of common risk factors. Both malaria and Oroya fever are characterized by hemolysis, and observations in humans and animal models suggest that hemolysis causes the susceptibility to bacterial co-infection. Evidence from animal models implicates hemolysis in the impairment of a variety of host defense mechanisms, including macrophage dysfunction, neutrophil dysfunction, and impairment of adaptive immune responses. One mechanism supported by evidence from animal models and human data, is the induction of heme oxygenase-1 in bone marrow, which impairs the ability of developing neutrophils to mount a competent oxidative burst. As a result, dysfunctional neutrophils become a new niche for replication of intracellular bacteria. Here we critically appraise and summarize the key evidence for mechanisms which may contribute to these very specific combinations of co-infections, and propose interventions to ameliorate this risk. PMID:26175727

  15. Imbalanced Oxidative Stress Causes Chlamydial Persistence during Non-Productive Human Herpes Virus Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Prusty, Bhupesh K.; Böhme, Linda; Bergmann, Birgit; Siegl, Christine; Krause, Eva; Mehlitz, Adrian; Rudel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Both human herpes viruses and Chlamydia are highly prevalent in the human population and are detected together in different human disorders. Here, we demonstrate that co-infection with human herpes virus 6 (HHV6) interferes with the developmental cycle of C. trachomatis and induces persistence. Induction of chlamydial persistence by HHV6 is independent of productive virus infection, but requires the interaction and uptake of the virus by the host cell. On the other hand, viral uptake is strongly promoted under co-infection conditions. Host cell glutathione reductase activity was suppressed by HHV6 causing NADPH accumulation, decreased formation of reduced glutathione and increased oxidative stress. Prevention of oxidative stress restored infectivity of Chlamydia after HHV6-induced persistence. We show that co-infection with Herpes simplex virus 1 or human Cytomegalovirus also induces chlamydial persistence by a similar mechanism suggesting that Chlamydia -human herpes virus co-infections are evolutionary shaped interactions with a thus far unrecognized broad significance. PMID:23077614

  16. Association of Patients’ Geographic Origins with Viral Hepatitis Co-infection Patterns, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Caro-Murillo, Ana María; Berenguer, Juan; Segura, Ferran; Gutiérrez, Felix; Vidal, Francesc; Martínez-Pérez, Maria Ángeles; Sola, Julio; Muga, Roberto; Moreno, Santiago; Del Amo, Julia

    2011-01-01

    To determine if hepatitis C virus seropositivity and active hepatitis B virus infection in HIV-positive patients vary with patients’ geographic origins, we studied co-infections in HIV-seropositive adults. Active hepatitis B infection was more prevalent in persons from Africa, and hepatitis C seropositivity was more common in persons from eastern Europe. PMID:21749785

  17. Zika, dengue, and chikungunya co-infection in a pregnant woman from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Villamil-Gómez, Wilmer E; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J; Uribe-García, Ana María; González-Arismendy, Edgardo; Castellanos, Jaime E; Calvo, Eliana P; Álvarez-Mon, Melchor; Musso, Didier

    2016-10-01

    The clinical findings of a pregnant woman from Colombia with a triple co-infection caused by dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses are described. Weekly obstetric ultrasounds from 14.6 to 29 weeks of gestation were normal. She remains under follow-up and management according to the standard guidelines for the management of Zika virus-infected pregnant women.

  18. First dengue co-infection in a Belgian traveler returning from Thailand, July 2013.

    PubMed

    Cnops, Lieselotte; Domingo, Cristina; Van den Bossche, Dorien; Vekens, Evilien; Brigou, Evelien; Van Esbroeck, Marjan

    2014-12-01

    We report a dengue virus (DENV) co-infection in a Belgian traveler after a three-weeks holiday to Thailand. The patient recovered well without any complication. The infection was diagnosed by NS1 antigen testing and the concurrent presence of serotype DENV1 and DENV2 was demonstrated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in acute phase serum sampled three days after symptoms onset. The predominant DENV1 serotype was identified as genotype I, lineage Asia-3 by sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a dengue co-infection is reported in a European traveler. The co-infection accounts for 1.0% of the total number of RT-PCR-positive samples (n=105) diagnosed in the reference laboratory of Belgium between 2008 and 2013. We expect that the number of reports on acute co-infections will increase in the coming years considering the increasing number of regions that are progressively becoming hyperendemic, especially in Southeast Asia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Co-infection of dengue fever and hepatitis A in a Russian traveler.

    PubMed

    Volchkova, Elena; Umbetova, Karina; Belaia, Olga; Sviridova, Maria; Dmitrieva, Ludmila; Arutyunova, Daria; Chernishov, Dmitriy; Karan, Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    We report a hepatitis A (HAV) and dengue virus (DENV) co-infection in Russian man who had been traveling to Dominican Republic. At admission to the hospital hemorrhagic and jaundice symptoms were observed in patient. PCR tests of blood serum and urine revealed RNA dengue virus type 3, HAV RNA, anti-HAV-IgM.

  20. Presentation of severe combined immunodeficiency with respiratory syncytial virus and pneumocystis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Pinilla, Nerea; Allende-Martínez, Luis; Corral Sánchez, María Dolores; Arocena, Jaime de Inocencio; González-Granado, Luis Ignacio

    2015-04-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency can cause severe, life-threatening viral, bacterial and fungal infections at an early age. We report a case of a 4-month-old boy with co-infection by respiratory syncytial virus and Pneumocystis jiroveci infection that led to recognition of severe combined immunodeficiency.

  1. Pulmonary tuberculosis and mucormycosis co-infection in a diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Deepak; Chander, Jagdish; Janmeja, Ashok K.; Katyal, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled diabetes mellitus is associated with a variety of infections which pose management difficulties. Herein, we report a case of diabetic patient who developed combined pulmonary tuberculosis and mucormycosis. The case illustrates management of this rare co-infection which despite being potentially fatal was treated successfully. PMID:25624598

  2. Pulmonary tuberculosis and mucormycosis co-infection in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Deepak; Chander, Jagdish; Janmeja, Ashok K; Katyal, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled diabetes mellitus is associated with a variety of infections which pose management difficulties. Herein, we report a case of diabetic patient who developed combined pulmonary tuberculosis and mucormycosis. The case illustrates management of this rare co-infection which despite being potentially fatal was treated successfully.

  3. A Bayesian Approach to Analyse Genetic Variation within RNA Viral Populations

    PubMed Central

    McKinley, Trevelyan J.; Murcia, Pablo R.; Gog, Julia R.; Varela, Mariana; Wood, James L. N.

    2011-01-01

    The development of modern and affordable sequencing technologies has allowed the study of viral populations to an unprecedented depth. This is of particular interest for the study of within-host RNA viral populations, where variation due to error-prone polymerases can lead to immune escape, antiviral resistance and adaptation to new host species. Methods to sequence RNA virus genomes include reverse transcription (RT) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RT-PCR is a molecular biology technique widely used to amplify DNA from an RNA template. The method itself relies on the in vitro synthesis of copy DNA from RNA followed by multiple cycles of DNA amplification. However, this method introduces artefactual errors that can act as confounding factors when the sequence data are analysed. Although there are a growing number of published studies exploring the intra- and inter-host evolutionary dynamics of RNA viruses, the complexity of the methods used to generate sequences makes it difficult to produce probabilistic statements about the likely sources of observed sequence variants. This complexity is further compounded as both the depth of sequencing and the length of the genome segment of interest increase. Here we develop a Bayesian method to characterise and differentiate between likely structures for the background viral population. This approach can then be used to identify nucleotide sites that show evidence of change in the within-host viral population structure, either over time or relative to a reference sequence (e.g. an inoculum or another source of infection), or both, without having to build complex evolutionary models. Identification of these sites can help to inform the design of more focussed experiments using molecular biology tools, such as site-directed mutagenesis, to assess the function of specific amino acids. We illustrate the method by applying to datasets from experimental transmission of equine influenza, and a pre-clinical vaccine trial for HIV

  4. A Bayesian approach to analyse genetic variation within RNA viral populations.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Trevelyan J; Murcia, Pablo R; Gog, Julia R; Varela, Mariana; Wood, James L N

    2011-03-01

    The development of modern and affordable sequencing technologies has allowed the study of viral populations to an unprecedented depth. This is of particular interest for the study of within-host RNA viral populations, where variation due to error-prone polymerases can lead to immune escape, antiviral resistance and adaptation to new host species. Methods to sequence RNA virus genomes include reverse transcription (RT) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RT-PCR is a molecular biology technique widely used to amplify DNA from an RNA template. The method itself relies on the in vitro synthesis of copy DNA from RNA followed by multiple cycles of DNA amplification. However, this method introduces artefactual errors that can act as confounding factors when the sequence data are analysed. Although there are a growing number of published studies exploring the intra- and inter-host evolutionary dynamics of RNA viruses, the complexity of the methods used to generate sequences makes it difficult to produce probabilistic statements about the likely sources of observed sequence variants. This complexity is further compounded as both the depth of sequencing and the length of the genome segment of interest increase. Here we develop a bayesian method to characterise and differentiate between likely structures for the background viral population. This approach can then be used to identify nucleotide sites that show evidence of change in the within-host viral population structure, either over time or relative to a reference sequence (e.g. an inoculum or another source of infection), or both, without having to build complex evolutionary models. Identification of these sites can help to inform the design of more focussed experiments using molecular biology tools, such as site-directed mutagenesis, to assess the function of specific amino acids. We illustrate the method by applying to datasets from experimental transmission of equine influenza, and a pre-clinical vaccine trial for HIV

  5. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of capsid protein gene in feline calicivirus isolates from Rio Grande do Sul in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Henzel, A; Sá e Silva, M; Luo, S; Lovato, L T; Weiblen, R

    2012-02-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is an important pathogen that affects domestic cats, inducing acute oral and upper respiratory tract clinical signs. The aim of this study was to analyze the variability of the capsid protein in different FCV isolates from southern Brazil. The sequencing analyses of thirteen Brazilian FCV samples, phylogenetic analyses and assessments of ten previously published sequences were conducted by examining the open reading frame 2 (ORF2, regions B-F). Comparisons of the predicted amino acid sequences of the ORF2 in Brazilian FCV isolates with those of the FCV-F9 strain indicated that the main differences are located within the regions C and hypervariable E (HVR_E). Epitopes that were mapped to the regions D, 5'HVR_E and conserved E also presented with some variability when compared to the strain F9. This is the first study describing sequence analyses and the phylogenetic relationships among FCV isolates from Brazil. The results presented here may expand upon current knowledge regarding aspects of FCV biology, epidemiology and genetic diversity and provide insights into improving the efficacies of current FCV vaccines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular genetic analyses of mating pheromones reveal intervariety mating or hybridization in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Vishnu; Fan, Jinjiang; Stein, Birgit; Behr, Melissa J; Samsonoff, William A; Wickes, Brian L; Chaturvedi, Sudha

    2002-09-01

    The sexual mating of the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans is important for pathogenesis studies because the fungal virulence is linked to the alpha mating type (MAT(alpha)). We characterized C. neoformans mating pheromones (MF(alpha) 1 and MFa1) from 122 strains to understand intervariety hybridization or mating and intervariety virulence. MF(alpha) 1 in three C. neoformans varieties showed (a) specific nucleotide polymorphisms, (b) different copy numbers and chromosomal localizations, and (c) unique deduced amino acids in two geographic populations of C. neoformans var. gattii. MF(alpha) 1 of different varieties cross-hybridized in Southern hybridizations. Their phylogenetic analyses showed purifying selection (neutral evolution). These observations suggested that MAT(alpha) strains from any of the three C. neoformans varieties could mate or hybridize in nature with MATa strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans. A few serotype A/D diploid strains provided evidence for mating or hybridization, while a majority of A/D strains tested positive for haploid MF(alpha) 1 identical to that of C. neoformans var. grubii. MF(alpha) 1 sequence and copy numbers in diploids were identical to those of C. neoformans var. grubii, while their MFa1 sequences were identical to those of C. neoformans var. neoformans; thus, these strains were hybrids. The mice survival curves and histological lesions revealed A/D diploids to be highly pathogenic, with pathogenicity levels similar to that of the C. neoformans var. grubii type strain and unlike the low pathogenicity levels of C. neoformans var. neoformans strains. In contrast to MF(alpha) 1 in three varieties, MFa1 amplicons and hybridization signals could be obtained only from two C. neoformans var. neoformans reference strains and eight A/D diploids. This suggested that a yet undiscovered MFa pheromone(s) in C. neoformans var. gattii and C. neoformans var. grubii is unrelated to, highly divergent from, or rarer than that in C

  7. Incidence and persistence of carcinogenic genital human papillomavirus infections in young women with or without Chlamydia trachomatis co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Vriend, Henrike J; Bogaards, Johannes A; van Bergen, Jan E A M; Brink, Antoinette A T P; van den Broek, Ingrid V F; Hoebe, Christian J P A; King, Audrey J; van der Sande, Marianne A B; Wolffs, Petra F G; de Melker, Hester E

    2015-01-01

    We assessed whether infection with chlamydia increases the incidence of carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and if HPV persistence is affected by chlamydia co-infection. For 1982 women (16–29 years-old) participating in two consecutive rounds of a chlamydia screening implementation trial, swabs were polymerase chain reaction tested to detect chlamydia and 14 carcinogenic HPV genotypes. HPV type-specific incidence and persistence rates were stratified for chlamydia positivity at follow-up. Associations were assessed by multilevel logistic regression analyses with correction for sexual risk factors. HPV type-specific incidence ranged from 1.4% to 8.9% and persistence from 22.7% to 59.4% after a median follow-up of 11 months (interquartile range: 11–12). Differences in 1-year HPV persistence rates between chlamydia -infected and noninfected women were less distinct than differences in HPV incidence rates (pooled adjusted odds ratios of 1.17 [95% CI: 0.69–1.96] and 1.84 [95% CI: 1.36–2.47], respectively). The effect of chlamydia co-infection on HPV-infection risk did not significantly differ by HPV genotype. In conclusion, infection with chlamydia increases the risk of infection by carcinogenic HPV types and may enhance persistence of some HPV types. Although these findings could reflect residual confounding through unobserved risk factors, our results do give reason to explore more fully the association between chlamydia and HPV type-specific acquisition and persistence. PMID:26194784

  8. HIV-1 and GBV-C co-infection in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Anny Karely; Garzaro, Domingo José; Loureiro, Carmen Luisa; Gutiérrez, Cristina R; Ameli, Gladys; Jaspe, Rossana Celeste; Porto, Leticia; Monsalve, Francisca; Pozada, Ángela; Vázquez, Luzmary; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E; Pujol, Flor Helene; Rangel, Héctor Rafael

    2014-07-14

    Co-infection with GB virus C (GBV-C) in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) has been associated with prolonged survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of GBV-C infection among HIV-1-infected patients in Venezuela, and to determine the effects of the co-infection on the levels of relevant cytokines. Plasma samples were collected from 270 HIV-1-seronegative and 255 HIV-1-seropositive individuals. GBV-C infection was determined by RT-PCR of the NS5 region and genotyped by sequence analysis of the 5´UTR region. HIV-1 strains were characterized by sequence analysis of pol, vif, env, and nef genes. Selected cytokines were evaluated by ELISA. Ninety-seven of 525 (18.5%) plasma samples tested positive for GBV-C RNA. A significantly higher prevalence of GBV-C was found among HIV-1 patients compared to HIV-1-seronegative individuals (67/255, 26% versus 30/270, 11%; p < 0.001). Statistical difference was observed in the viral load between HIV-1+GBV-C+ and HIV-1+GBV-C- (p = 0.014), although no differences in CD4+ cell counts were found between both groups. TNFα concentration was higher in HIV-1+GBV-C- than in HIV-1+GBV-C+ patients (25.9 pg/mL versus 17.3 pg/mL; p = 0.02); RANTES expression levels were more variable in GBV-C co-infected patients and more frequently elevated in HIV-1 mono-infected patients compared to patients co-infected with GBV-C. The previously observed beneficial effect of co-infection with HIV-1 and GBV-C on disease progression is complex and might be due in part to a change in the cytokine environment. More studies are required to understand the interaction between both viruses.

  9. Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection: its impact on quality of life

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background- Very little is known about the quality of life of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV co-infected patients. In this study in Ethiopia, we compared the quality of life HIV positive patients with and without TB. Methods- A cross sectional study was conducted from February to April, 2009 in selected hospitals in Oromiya Regional state, Ethiopia. The study population consisted of 467 HIV patients and 124 TB/HIV co-infected patients. Data on quality of life was collected by trained nurses through face to face interviews using the short Amharic version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument for HIV clients (WHOQOL HIV). Depression was assessed using a validated version of the Kessler scale. Data was collected by trained nurses and analyzed using SPSS 15.0 statistical software. Results TB/HIV co-infected patients had a lower quality of life in all domains as compared to HIV infected patients without active TB. Depression, having a source of income and family support were strongly associated with most of the Quality of life domains. In co-infected patients, individuals who had depression were 8.8 times more likely to have poor physical health as compared to individuals who had no depression, OR = 8.8(95%CI: 3.2, 23). Self-stigma was associated with a poor quality of life in the psychological domain. Conclusion- The TB control program should design strategies to improve the quality of life of TB/HIV co-infected patients. Depression and self-stigma should be targeted for intervention to improve the quality of life of patients. PMID:20040090

  10. Identification of swine influenza A virus and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia co-infection in Chinese pigs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Influenza virus virulence can be exacerbated by bacterial co-infections. Swine influenza virus (SIV) infection together with some bacteria is found to enhance pathogenicity. Methods SIV-positive samples suspected of containing bacteria were used for bacterial isolation and identification. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by disc diffusion methods. To investigate the interaction of SIV and the bacteria in vitro, guinea pigs were used as mammalian hosts to determine the effect on viral susceptibility and transmissibility. Differences in viral titers between groups were compared using Student’s t-test. Results During surveillance for SIV in China from 2006 to 2009, seven isolates (24.14%) of 29 influenza A viruses were co-isolated with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia from nasal and tracheal swab samples of pigs. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that the bacteria possessed a high level of resistance towards clinically used antibiotics. To investigate the interaction between these two microorganisms in influencing viral susceptibility and transmission in humans, guinea pigs were used as an infection model. Animals were inoculated with SIV or S. maltophilia alone or co-infected with SIV and S. maltophilia. The results showed that although no transmission among guinea pigs was observed, virus–bacteria co-infections resulted in higher virus titers in nasal washes and trachea and a longer virus shedding period. Conclusions This is the first report of influenza virus co-infection with S. maltophilia in the Chinese swine population. Increased replication of virus by co-infection with multidrug resistant bacteria might increase the infection rate of SIV in humans. The control of S. maltophilia in clinics will contribute to reducing the spread of SIV in pigs and humans. PMID:22913775

  11. Identification of swine influenza A virus and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia co-infection in Chinese pigs.