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Sample records for co-morbid chronic illness

  1. The Perspectives of Patients on Health-Care for Co-Morbid Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Clement; Ilic, Dragan; Teede, Helena; Cass, Alan; Fulcher, Greg; Gallagher, Martin; Johnson, Greg; Kerr, Peter G.; Mathew, Tim; Murphy, Kerry; Polkinghorne, Kevan; Walker, Rowan; Zoungas, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Background Multi-morbidity due to diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains challenging for current health-systems, which focus on single diseases. As a first step toward health-care improvement, we explored the perspectives of patients and their carers on factors influencing the health-care of those with co-morbid diabetes and CKD. Methods In this qualitative study participants with co-morbid diabetes and CKD were purposively recruited using maximal variation sampling from 4 major tertiary health-services from 2 of Australia’s largest cities. Separate focus groups were conducted for patients with CKD stages 3, 4 and 5. Findings were triangulated with semi-structured interviews of carers of patients. Discussions were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Results Twelve focus groups with 58 participants and 8 semi-structured interviews of carers were conducted. Factors influencing health-care of co-morbid diabetes and CKD grouped into patient and health service level factors. Key patient level factors identified were patient self-management, socio-economic situation, and adverse experiences related to co-morbid diabetes and CKD and its treatment. Key health service level factors were prevention and awareness of co-morbid diabetes and CKD, poor continuity and coordination of care, patient and carer empowerment, access and poor recognition of psychological co-morbidity. Health-service level factors varied according to CKD stage with poor continuity and coordination of care and patient and carer empowerment emphasized by participants with CKD stage 4 and 5, and access and poor recognition of psychological co-morbidity emphasised by participants with CKD stage 5 and carers. Conclusions According to patients and their carers the health-care of co-morbid diabetes and CKD may be improved via a preventive, patient-centred health-care model which promotes self-management and that has good access, continuity and coordination of care and identifies and

  2. The association between co-morbidities and physical performance in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Li, Lok Sze Katrina; Caughey, Gillian E; Johnston, Kylie N

    2014-02-01

    A systematic review was conducted to examine the association between co-morbidity and physical performance in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SCOPUS and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from inception to end-February 2013, using keywords 'COPD', 'exercise', 'physical activity', 'rehabilitation', 'co-morbidity' and individual co-morbid conditions. Studies reporting associations of co-morbidities in COPD with at least one objective measure of physical performance were included. Study quality was appraised using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist. Nine studies met inclusion criteria. Mean (standard deviation (SD)) STROBE score was 16 (3) (maximum score = 21). Four studies examined anxiety as a co-morbid condition; three examined depression; two examined obesity and two examined a range of conditions. Reduced physical performance was associated with higher Charlson score (odds ratio (OR) = 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.54-0.98), metabolic disease (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.49-0.67), anxiety (OR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.23-0.59) and osteoporosis (OR = 0.28, 95% CI = 0.11-0.70). Depression had minimal association with physical performance but was associated with higher dropout rates from pulmonary rehabilitation programmes. Obesity was negatively associated with baseline physical performance but not with change from an exercise intervention. The presence of co-morbid conditions in people with COPD may negatively affect physical performance and should be identified and accounted for analysis of interventions.

  3. Integrating co-morbid depression and chronic physical disease management: identifying and resolving failures in self-regulation.

    PubMed

    Detweiler-Bedell, Jerusha B; Friedman, Michael A; Leventhal, Howard; Miller, Ivan W; Leventhal, Elaine A

    2008-12-01

    Research suggests that treatments for depression among individuals with chronic physical disease do not improve disease outcomes significantly, and chronic disease management programs do not necessarily improve mood. For individuals experiencing co-morbid depression and chronic physical disease, demands on the self-regulation system are compounded, leading to a rapid depletion of self-regulatory resources. Because disease and depression management are not integrated, patients lack the understanding needed to prioritize self-regulatory goals in a way that makes disease and depression management synergistic. A framework in which the management of co-morbidity is considered alongside the management of either condition alone offers benefits to researchers and practitioners and may help improve clinical outcomes.

  4. Integrating Co-Morbid Depression and Chronic Physical Disease Management: Identifying and Resolving Failures in Self-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Detweiler-Bedell, Jerusha B.; Friedman, Michael A.; Leventhal, Howard; Miller, Ivan W.; Leventhal, Elaine A.

    2008-01-01

    Research suggests that treatments for depression among individuals with chronic physical disease do not improve disease outcomes significantly, and chronic disease management programs do not necessarily improve mood. For individuals experiencing co-morbid depression and chronic physical disease, demands on the self-regulation system are compounded, leading to a rapid depletion of self-regulatory resources. Because disease and depression management are not integrated, patients lack the understanding needed to prioritize self-regulatory goals in a way that makes disease and depression management synergistic. A framework in which the management of co-morbidity is considered alongside the management of either condition alone offers benefits to researchers and practitioners and may help improve clinical outcomes. PMID:18848740

  5. How co-morbidities magnify the effect of arthritis on labour force participation and economic status: a costs of illness study in Australia.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Deborah J; Callander, Emily J; Shrestha, Rupendra N; Passey, Megan E; Percival, Richard; Kelly, Simon J

    2014-04-01

    Few studies have assessed the impact of co-morbid conditions amongst patients with arthritis. This study will quantify the impact co-morbid health conditions have on the labour force status and economic circumstances of people with arthritis. This study uses a microsimulation model, Health&WealthMOD, to quantify the impact of co-morbidities on the labour force participation and economic circumstances of 45- to 64-year-old Australians with arthritis. The results show that the probability of being out of the labour force increases with increasing number of co-morbidities. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the amount of weekly private income received by people with arthritis and no co-morbidities, and people with arthritis and one or two co-morbidities. However, those with arthritis and three or more co-morbidities received a weekly private income 72 % lower than people with arthritis alone (95 % CI -82, -57). People with arthritis and co-morbidities paid less in tax and received more in government transfer payments. As such, it is important to consider the co-morbid conditions an individual has when assessing the impact of arthritis on labour force participation and economic circumstances. People with arthritis that have multiple co-morbid conditions are likely to have their labour force participation and economic circumstances interrupted much more than those with arthritis only.

  6. Coping with Chronic Illness

    MedlinePlus

    Having a long-term, or chronic, illness can disrupt your life in many ways. You may often be tired and in pain. Your illness might affect your ... able to work, causing financial problems. For children, chronic illnesses can be frightening, because they may not ...

  7. Concordance between self-reported and physician-reported chronic co-morbidity among disabled older adults.

    PubMed

    Iecovich, Esther; Biderman, Aya

    2013-09-01

    Discordance between self-reports and medical records reflects patient and provider factors that have implications for management and research. This study investigated discordance and socio-demographic factors that explain concordance. A purposive sample of 402 disabled older persons was interviewed using a structured questionnaire. The highest concordances were found for diabetes, cardiovascular accident (CVA), and cancer while the lowest were evident for arthritis, and renal and gastrointestinal conditions. Significant explanatory factors included (a) age for explaining concordance in hypertension; (b) ethnicity in explaining concordance in arthritis and cancer; (c) marital status in explaining concordance in thyroid diseases; (d) education in explaining concordance in gastrointestinal conditions; and (e) functional status in explaining concordance in respiratory, gastrointestinal, and thyroid diseases. Co-morbidity increased concordance for all health conditions and decreased concordance for hypertension. Further investigation is needed to examine the reasons for the disparities between the two sources of information.

  8. Chronic Illness & Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... is present. For More Information Share Chronic Illness & Mental Health Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... For more information, see the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) booklet on Depression at http://www.nimh. ...

  9. Co-Morbidity of Conditions among Prisoners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinkfield, Alison J.; Graffam, J.; Meneilly, Sharn

    2009-01-01

    Eighty seven adult prisoners (58 males, 29 females) completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and a questionnaire on current health in order to examine both the prevalence of co-morbid conditions and the relation of depression and anxiety to ill-health and prior substance use. High prevalence rates of…

  10. Ondansetron attenuates depression co-morbid with obesity in obese mice subjected to chronic unpredictable mild stress; an approach using behavioral battery tests.

    PubMed

    Kurhe, Yeshwant; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh; Gupta, Deepali

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the role of ondansetron on the high fat diet (HFD) induced obese mice for behavioral and biochemical alterations using chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) model of depression. Animals were fed with high fat diet for 14 weeks and subjected to different stress procedures for 4 weeks. Treatment with ondansetron was started on day 15. After day 28 behavioral assays and biochemical estimations were performed. Behavioral paradigms viz. sucrose preference test, locomotor score, forced swim test (FST) and elevated plus maze (EPM), whereas biochemical parameters like plasma glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and total proteins were estimated. Results examines that in behavioral assays, ondansetron significantly (P < 0.05) increased sucrose consumption, reduced immobility time in FST, increased the percent entries and time in open arm in EPM. In biochemical assessments elevated plasma glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and total proteins were significantly (P < 0.05) reversed by ondansetron treatment in HFD obese animals subjected to CUMS. The study indicates that the obese mice subjected to CUMS exhibited severe depressive-like symptoms and ondansetron significantly reversed the behavioral and biochemical alterations. In the present study the plasma glucose level indicates that, it could be "altered glucose level" playing an important role in depression co-morbid with obesity. Ondansetron through allosteric modulation of serotonergic system elevates the serotonin level and thereby regulates the insulin secretion and hence, reversing the "altered glucose level", could be the possible antidepressive-like mechanism against depression co-morbid with obesity.

  11. Mechanisms in Chronic Multisymptom Illnesses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    difficulties commonly seen in patients with Chronic Multisymptom Illnesses (CMI) (i.e., fibromyalgia , chronic fatigue syndrome, Gulf War Illnesses, etc.); to...Avera Research Institute, Sioux Falls, SD. 15. SUBJECT TERMS chronic multisymptom illnesses, fibromyalgia , Gulf War Illness, chronic pain 16. SECURITY...16 2.4.6 Internet and Telehealth Enhanced CBT for the Management of  Fibromyalgia

  12. Predictors of Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Co-Morbid Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Clement; Ranasinha, Sanjeeva; Gallagher, Martin; Fulcher, Gregory; Kerr, Peter G.; Russell, Grant; Teede, Helena; Usherwood, Tim; Walker, Rowan; Zoungas, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Background People living with diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience compromised quality of life. Consequently, it is critical to identify and understand factors influencing their health-related quality of life (HRQoL). This study examined factors associated with HRQoL among patients with diabetes and CKD. Methods A cross sectional study among adults with comorbid diabetes and CKD (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2) recruited from renal and diabetes clinics of four large tertiary referral hospitals in Australia was performed. Each participant completed the Kidney Disease Quality of Life (KDQoL ™ -36) questionnaire, which is comprised of two composite measures of physical and mental health and 3 kidney disease specific subscales with possible scores ranging from 0 to 100 with higher values indicating better HRQoL. Demographic and clinical data were also collected. Regression analyses were performed to determine the relationship between HRQoL and potential predictor factors. Results A total of 308 patients were studied with a mean age of 66.9 (SD = 11.0) years and 70% were males. Mean scores for the physical composite summary, mental composite summary, symptom/problem list, effects of kidney disease and burden of kidney disease scales were 35.2, 47.0, 73.8, 72.5 and 59.8 respectively. Younger age was associated with lower scores in all subscales except for the physical composite summary. Female gender, obese or normal weight rather than overweight, and smoking were all associated with lower scores in one or more subscales. Scores were progressively lower with more advanced stage of CKD (p<0.05) in all subscales except for the mental composite summary. Conclusion In patients with diabetes and CKD, younger age was associated with lower scores in all HRQoL subscales except the physical composite summary and female gender, obese or normal weight and more advanced stages of CKD were associated with lower scores in one or more subscales. Identifying these factors will

  13. Children Coping with Chronic Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Lissette M.

    Children who live with chronic illness are confronted with challenges that frequently force them to cope in myriad ways. The ways in which children face chronic illness are summarized in this literature review. Also covered, are how the effects of family can influence coping strategies and how family members, especially parents, cope with their…

  14. Delayed puberty in chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Jesús; Argente, Jesús

    2002-03-01

    Delayed puberty can be defined as the lack of pubertal development at an age of 2 SD above the mean, which corresponds to an age of approximately 14 years for males and 13 years for females, taking both sex and ethnic origin into consideration. Its incidence associated with chronic illnesses is unknown; however, its clinical importance is relevant due to the larger percentage of patients with chronic disorders surviving until the age of puberty. Virtually every child with any chronic disease could present with delayed puberty (due to recurrent infections, immunodeficiency, gastrointestinal disease, renal disturbances, respiratory illnesses, chronic anaemia, endocrine disease, eating disorders, exercise and a number of miscellaneous abnormalities). Pubertal delay associated with chronic illness is accompanied by a delay in growth and the pubertal growth spurt. The degree to which growth and pubertal development are affected in chronic illness depends upon the type of disease and individual factors, as well as on the age at illness onset, its duration and severity. The earlier its onset and the longer and more severe the illness, the greater the repercussions on growth and pubertal development. The mechanism that trigger the start of physiological puberty remain unknown. Although malnutrition is probably the most important mechanism responsible for delayed puberty, emotional deprivation, toxic substances, stress and the side effects of chronic therapy, among others, have been implicated in the pathophysiology of delayed puberty. Therefore, early diagnosis is essential and appropriate and specific therapy fundamental.

  15. The Ubiquity of Chronic Illness.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Claudia; Fleischer, Soraya; Rui, Taniele

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of five different books dealing with some aspect of what might be termed a "chronic illness" - Alzheimer's disease, lupus, addiction, erectile dysfunction, and leprosy. The array of different subjects examined in these books points to the negotiable limits of this hugely open category. What exactly constitutes an "illness"? Why not use a less biomedical term instead: "disturbance", "problem", or simply "condition"? And how are we to understand "chronic" - simply as the flipside of "acute" or "curable"?

  16. Program for the Chronically Ill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenherr, Arline; Schnarr, Barbara

    The program for chronically ill students in the Detroit public schools is described. Forms are presented listing needed information and implications for teachers of the following conditions: diabetes, sickle cell anemia, chronic renal failure, congenital heart disease, hemophilia, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, leukemia, and cystic fibrosis. The…

  17. 'Chronic' identities in mental illness.

    PubMed

    von Peter, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The term 'chronicity' is still widely used in psychiatric discourse and practice. A category employed in political, administrative and therapeutic contexts, it guides practitioners' beliefs and actions. This paper attempts a review of the attitudes and procedures that result as a consequence of identifying 'chronically' disturbed identities in clinical practice. An essentially social, relational and materialist understanding of mental illness is used to highlight the kind of thinking underlying the notion of 'chronic' identities in day-to-day psychiatric routines. Problematising the notions of singularity and expressiveness, as well as mind/body- and self/other-distinctions, it claims the category itself is responsible for creating a 'chronic' kind of being. A spatial metaphor is presented in the conclusion, illustrating a mental strategy by which we can re-shape our thinking about 'chronic' identities. It attempts to describe how the shift from an epistemological to a praxeographic approach could build a more complete understanding of mental illness.

  18. Chronic Critical Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... ICU) on a breathing machine (mechanical ventilator or respirator) for many days, this information about chronic critical ... a Tracheotomy? A breathing machine (mechanical ventilator or respirator) helps the lungs breathe and provides oxygen. When ...

  19. [Diabetic co-morbidities: prevalences in Germany].

    PubMed

    Heller, T; Blum, M; Spraul, M; Wolf, G; Müller, U A

    2014-04-01

    In some patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) chronic hyperglycemia leads to microvascular complications in retina, kidney and nerves. Concerning missing data from Germany cited prevalence in German educational books and guidelines arise from other countries. This review demonstrates the prevalence of diabetic comorbidities in Germany. The largest investigation in Germany is the Disease-Management-Programm Nordrhein with more than 450.000 surveyed DM  patients. These researches show good comparability with most analyses respective to the prevalence of diabetic comorbidities in Germany. Patients with DM2 have a mean Hba1c of 7 % and patients with DM1 of 7.9 %. In patients with DM2 the prevalence of retinopathy is 11 %, nephropathy 10 % and neuropathy 20 %. Co-morbidities are more commonin patients with long diabetes duration and high HbA1c. In patients with DM1 the prevalence of retinopathy is 25 %, of nephropathy 15 % and neuropathy 27 %. The prevalence of diabetic co-morbidities in primary care in Germany is considerably lower as mentioned in educational books or guidelines. This positive development is reasonable through a better quality of care, nationwide early detection examinations and training programmes.

  20. Co-Morbid Disorders in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mol Debes, Nanette M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is often accompanied by other symptoms and syndromes. The two best-known co-morbidities are Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), but also other conditions like rage-attacks, depression, and sleeping disturbances are frequent in persons with TS. Both in clinical cohorts and in population-based cohorts the prevalence of co-morbidities is high. The presence of co-morbid ADHD and/or OCD has an impact on psychosocial, educational, and neuropsychological consequences of TS and it is associated with higher rates of other co-morbid disorders, like rage, anxiety, and conduct disorders. The symptoms of a co-morbid disorder might appear prior to the time that tics reach clinical attention. The TS phenotype probably changes during the course of the disease. The exact aetiology of the co-occurrence of co-morbid disorders and TS is not known, but they probably all are neurotransmitter disorders. European guidelines recommend first-choice pharmacological treatment, but randomised double-blinded trials are needed. Professionals need to be aware of the close relationship between TS and co-morbidities in order to give the patients the right treatment and support. PMID:23187139

  1. Chronic Illness and the Academic Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Stephanie A.; Morgan, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the hidden epidemic in higher education. They describe the stigma of chronic illness and argue that the invisibility of chronic illness may elicit particularly problematic responses from others, especially when faculty work in a context where people are expected to be highly productive and have unlimited…

  2. Chronic illness in adolescents: a sociological perspective.

    PubMed

    Silber, T J

    1983-01-01

    This article relates chronic illness in adolescents to a sociological model of deviance. This is an area of controversy: the views of Freidson, Lorber and Robinson are presented as being representative of the dispute. Four situations are discussed in which the issues of prognosis, responsibility and stigma elicit societal response. The usefulness of a sociological model consists in making vague societal perception and rules explicit. The concept of the chronically ill adolescent as deviant is descriptive and devoid of value judgment. Only through such rigorous assessment is it possible to gain a realistic understanding of the societal role in the life of the chronically ill adolescent.

  3. Resilience in the Chronic Illness Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralik, Debbie; van Loon, Antonia; Visentin, Kate

    2006-01-01

    This article advances the consideration of resilience as an important concept in the transitional process of learning to adapt to life with chronic illness, by utilising interactional processes inherent in participatory action research (PAR) that may strengthen a person's capacity to live well with long-term illness. Sharing experiences and…

  4. Co-morbid pain conditions and feelings of invalidation and isolation among women with vulvodynia.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ruby H N; Ecklund, Ali M; Maclehose, Richard F; Veasley, Christin; Harlow, Bernard L

    2012-01-01

    Many women with vulvodynia also suffer from other chronic co-morbid pain conditions. Alone, these pain conditions are associated with feeling invalidated by others and feeling socially isolated. It is unclear, however, how the presence of additional pain co-morbidities are associated with the psychosocial wellbeing of women with vulvodynia. We used data from a survey administered by the National Vulvodynia Association. Women reported clinician-diagnosed vulvodynia, presence of co-morbid pain, and how often they felt that they felt no one believed their pain existed (invalidated) and isolated. Analyses determined prevalence of feeling invalidated or isolated, and the difference in prevalence when co-morbidities existed. Forty-five percent of these 1847 women with vulvodynia reported having at least one of the following five chronic pain conditions, chronic fatigue syndrome, endometriosis, fibromyalgia, interstitial cystitis, or irritable bowel syndrome. Adjusted baseline prevalence among all women of feeling invalidated was 9% and of feeling isolated was 14%. Having a co-morbid condition with vulvodynia, as well as having an increasing number of co-morbid conditions with vulvodynia, was significantly associated with the presence of feeling both invalidated and isolated. Chronic fatigue syndrome was the co-morbidity most strongly associated with feelings invalidation and isolation. One or more co-morbid pain conditions in addition to vulvodynia were significantly associated with psychosocial wellbeing. However, the temporality of the association could not be elucidated and therefore we cannot conclude that these pain conditions cause poor psychosocial wellbeing. Despite this, future studies should explore the utility of promoting validation of women's pain conditions and reducing social isolation for women with chronic pain.

  5. The Chronic Illness Initiative: Supporting College Students with Chronic Illness Needs at DePaul University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royster, Lynn; Marshall, Olena

    2008-01-01

    College students with chronic illness find it difficult to succeed in traditional degree programs due to disruptions caused by relapses and unpredictable waxing and waning symptoms. College disability offices are often unable to help, both because their standard supports are not appropriate and because students with chronic illness frequently do…

  6. Adaptive Leadership Framework for Chronic Illness

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ruth A.; Bailey, Donald E.; Wu, Bei; Corazzini, Kirsten; McConnell, Eleanor S.; Thygeson, N. Marcus; Docherty, Sharron L.

    2015-01-01

    We propose the Adaptive Leadership Framework for Chronic Illness as a novel framework for conceptualizing, studying, and providing care. This framework is an application of the Adaptive Leadership Framework developed by Heifetz and colleagues for business. Our framework views health care as a complex adaptive system and addresses the intersection at which people with chronic illness interface with the care system. We shift focus from symptoms to symptoms and the challenges they pose for patients/families. We describe how providers and patients/families might collaborate to create shared meaning of symptoms and challenges to coproduce appropriate approaches to care. PMID:25647829

  7. [Family and chronic paediatric illness].

    PubMed

    Grau Rubio, Claudia; Fernández Hawrylak, M

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric illnesses are always a family problem. Hospitalization, treatments and their long term consequences constitute a challenge for the family. In this paper, we describe the structural, procedural and emotional alterations that affect the family dynamic. We argue that the child should be treated within the family context and propose a multi-dimensional intervention model centered on the family's singularities and specific needs, the support available in their environment, the development of capacities and resilience, and also the organization of user-centered services that are coordinated with all the services provided by the community.

  8. Managing Chronic Illness in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wishnietsky, Dorothy Botsch; Wishnietsky, Dan H.

    An important but often overlooked member of a student's health care team is the teacher. This text covers ways to help teachers and administrators understand the special needs of students suffering from a chronic illness, how to recognize health events that may interfere with learning, and suggestions for appropriate interventions. The book opens…

  9. Chronic Illness in Adolescents: A Sociological Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silber, Tomas J.

    1983-01-01

    Relates chronic illness in adolescents to a sociological model of deviance. Four situations are discussed in which the issues of prognosis, responsibility, and stigma elicit societal response. The usefulness of a sociological model consists in making vague societal perceptions and rules explicit. (JAC)

  10. Psychological and Spiritual Factors in Chronic Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leifer, Ron

    1996-01-01

    Asserts the importance of psychological and spiritual factors in the treatment of chronic illness. Discusses the inevitably of sickness, old age, and death, as well as the presence of the physician, patience, pain, and hope. Maintains that reflection on these qualities can benefit both the physician and patient. (MJP)

  11. Self Report Co-Morbidity and Health Related Quality of Life -- A Comparison with Record Based Co-Morbidity Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voaklander, Donald C.; Kelly, Karen D.; Jones, C. Allyson; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare three hospital-based measures of co-morbidity to patient self-report co-morbidity and to determine the relative proportion of outcome predicted by each of the co-morbidity measures in a population of individuals receiving major joint arthroplasty. Baseline measures using the SF-36 general health…

  12. Mechanisms influencing bone metabolism in chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Daci, E; van Cromphaut, S; Bouillon, R

    2002-01-01

    Bone is permanently renewed by the coordinated actions of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts, which model and remodel bone structure during growth and adult life. The origin of osteoblastic cells (osteoblasts, osteocytes and bone-lining cells) differs from that of osteoclasts, but both cell groups communicate with each other using cytokines and cell-cell contact as to optimally maintain bone homeostasis. This communication in many ways uses the same players as the communication between cells in the immune system. During acute life-threatening illness massive bone resorption is the rule, while bone formation is suppressed. During chronic illness, the balance between bone formation and bone resorption also shifts, frequently resulting in decreased bone mass and density. Several factors may contribute to the osteopenia that accompanies chronic illness, the most important being undernutrition and low body weight, inflammatory cytokines, disorders of the neuroendocrine axis (growth hormone/IGF-1 disturbances, thyroid and gonadal deficiency), immobilization, and the long-term use of glucocorticoids. Their combined effects not only influence the generation and activity of all bone cells involved, but probably also regulate their life span by apoptotic mechanisms. Osteopenia or even osteoporosis and bone fragility, and before puberty also decreased linear growth and lower peak bone mass are therefore frequent consequences of chronic illnesses.

  13. Chronically Ill Children in America: Background and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Nicholas; And Others

    The report examines chronic illness in children and considers issues and recommendations for change in public policies and programs affecting chronically ill children and their families. The background chapter notes the significance of the problem, reviews 11 diseases that are representative of the severe chronic illnesses of childhood: juvenile…

  14. The chronic illness problem inventory: problem-oriented psychosocial assessment of patients with chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Kames, L D; Naliboff, B D; Heinrich, R L; Schag, C C

    1984-01-01

    Two studies are presented which describe the development of a problem-oriented psychosocial screening instrument for use in health care settings. Reliability and validity data are presented on the Chronic Illness Problem Inventory (CIPI) which demonstrate its ability to document accurately patient's specific problems in areas of physical limitations, psychosocial functioning, health care behaviors and marital adjustment. A study is also presented which compares the problems of patients with three distinct chronic illnesses: pain, obesity, and respiratory ailments. Results indicate a significantly greater severity of problems for pain patients and especially patients with multiple pain complaints. Problem areas common to all three illness groups are discussed in the context of providing better comprehensive treatment for chronically ill patients.

  15. Association between co-morbidities and labour force participation amongst persons with back problems.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Deborah J; Callander, Emily J; Shrestha, Rupendra N; Passey, Megan E; Percival, Richard; Kelly, Simon J

    2012-10-01

    There are few studies that have looked at the occurrence of co-morbid conditions amongst patients with back problems. This study assesses the association between of a range of co-morbidities and the labour force participation rates of 45- to 64-year-old Australians with back problems. Logistic regression models were applied to the 2003 Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers (SDAC) data to look at the relationship between chronic back problems, labour force participation and comorbidities. For some conditions, there is a significant increase in the chance of an individual being out of the labour force, relative to those with back problems alone. For example, an individual with back problems and heart disease is more than 10 times more likely to be out of the labour force than those with back problems alone (OR=10.90, 95% CI=2.91-40.79, P=.0004). Amongst conditions that have a significant impact on labour force participation rates, back problems and multiple co-morbidities are significantly more likely to cause persons with these conditions to be out of the labour force than those with back problems alone or those with no chronic health condition. It is important to consider which co-morbidities an individual has when assessing the impact of back problems on labour force participation, as co-morbid conditions vary in their association with labour force participation.

  16. Self-Concepts of Chronically Ill Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, William J.; Zweig, April R.

    1980-01-01

    The performance on the Draw-A-Face Test of fifty-four 3 1/2- to 12-year-old girls and boys, chronically ill with blood disease, were compared with the performance of 115 healthy girls and boys. While sex and age differences were obtained for both groups, few differences were found between the groups. Results were interpreted in terms of coping…

  17. "Abnormal" illness behaviour in chronic fatigue syndrome and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Trigwell, P.; Hatcher, S.; Johnson, M.; Stanley, P.; House, A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the presence of abnormal illness behaviour in patients with a diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome. DESIGN--A cross sectional descriptive study using the illness behaviour questionnaire to compare illness behaviour scores and illness behaviour profiles of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and patients with multiple sclerosis. SETTING--A multidisciplinary fatigue clinic and a teaching hospital neurology outpatient clinic. SUBJECTS--98 patients satisfying the Oxford criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome and 78 patients with a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Responses to the 62 item illness behaviour questionnaire. RESULTS--90 (92%) patients in the chronic fatigue syndrome group and 70 (90%) in the multiple sclerosis group completed the illness behaviour questionnaire. Both groups had significantly high scores on the general hypochondriasis and disease conviction subscales and significantly low scores on the psychological versus somatic concern subscale, as measured in relation to normative data. There were, however, no significant differences in the subscale scores between the two groups and the two groups had identical illness behaviour profiles. CONCLUSION--Scores on the illness behaviour questionnaire cannot be taken as evidence that chronic fatigue syndrome is a variety of abnormal illness behaviour, because the same profile occurs in multiple sclerosis. Neither can they be taken as evidence that chronic fatigue and multiple sclerosis share an aetiology. More needs to be known about the origins of illness beliefs in chronic fatigue syndrome, especially as they are important in determining outcome. PMID:7613314

  18. Reclaiming a Positive Identity in Chronic Illness through Artistic Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Frances

    2003-01-01

    A study of 10 chronically ill women showed how they positively reconstructed self and identity through engaging in textile artwork. Findings suggest that meaningful artistic occupation may provide a source of positive identity for people with chronic illness. (Contains 24 references.) (JOW)

  19. Medical co-morbidities of patients with haemophilia: pain, obesity and hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Witkop, M L; Peerlinck, K; Luxon, B A

    2016-07-01

    Clinical care of patients with haemophilia (PWH) has progressed rapidly over the past decade. Current therapy has allowed patients with haemophilia to live longer and many patients are now experiencing the co-morbidities of the general population. In this review article, we focus on three common diseases states that affect PWH: chronic pain, obesity and hepatitis C. Pain has been a co-morbidity for many years and PWH often have unusual needs for chronic pain relief compared to the general population. Obesity is not only increasing in the general population but also in patients with hereditary bleeding disorders. The co-morbidity of obesity not only causes increased pain progression and joint damage but also affects the dosing of factor concentrates. Finally, hepatitis C is known to have infected the majority of patients who received non-virally inactivated pooled factor concentrates in the past. New treatment regimens have been developed that allow the nearly uniform cure of chronic hepatitis C with a short course of oral medications.

  20. Telehomecare for patients with multiple chronic illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Liddy, Clare; Dusseault, Joanne J.; Dahrouge, Simone; Hogg, William; Lemelin, Jacques; Humber, Jennie

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the feasibility and efficacy of integrating home health monitoring into a primary care setting. DESIGN A mixed method was used for this pilot study. It included in-depth interviews, focus groups, and surveys. SETTING A semirural family health network in eastern Ontario comprising 8 physicians and 5 nurses caring for approximately 10 000 patients. PARTICIPANTS Purposeful sample of 22 patients chosen from the experimental group of 120 patients 50 years old or older in a larger randomized controlled trial (N = 240). These patients had chronic illnesses and were identified as being at risk based on objective criteria and physician assessment. INTERVENTIONS Between November 2004 and March 2006, 3 nurse practitioners and a pharmacist installed telehomecare units with 1 or more peripheral devices (eg, blood-pressure monitor, weight scale, glucometer) in patients’ homes. The nurse practitioners incorporated individualized instructions for using the unit into each patient’s care plan. Patients used the units every morning for collecting data, entering values into the system either manually or directly through supplied peripherals. The information was transferred to a secure server and was then uploaded to a secure Web-based application that allowed care providers to access and review it from any location with Internet access. The devices were monitored in the office on weekdays by the nurse practitioners. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Acceptance and use of the units, patients’ and care providers’ satisfaction with the system, and patients’ demographic and health characteristics. RESULTS All 22 patients, 12 men and 10 women with an average age of 73 years (range 60 to 88 years), agreed to participate. Most were retired, and a few were receiving community services. Common diagnoses included hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. All patients had blood pressure monitors installed, 11 had wired weight

  1. [Modern tendencies in co-morbid conditions].

    PubMed

    Ischeykin, K; Potyazhenko, M; Lyulka, N; Sokolyuk, N; Khaymenova, G

    2014-10-01

    The present manuscript reviews frequency of the concomitance of Ischaemic Heart Disease (IHD) with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The conclusion has been drawn, that quite a large group of patients (25.9%) suffers from pulmonary pathology concomitant with disorders of cardio-coronary system. 97 patients (84 male and 13 female) with concomitant IHD and COPD (steady cardiac angina FK II st.) have been admitted with acute pulmonary condition, and examined at the Department of Pulmonology at N.V. Sklifasovskiy Regional Teaching Hospital in Poltava. The patients were divided into 2 groups: patients in Group I (n=51) were receiving the basic therapy, according to the case management protocol for this type of disorders (β2-agonists, anticholinergic drugs, methylxantines, inhaler glucocorticoids, phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors). Patients in the Group II (n=46), in addition to the basic protocol treatment were prescribed 4.2% L-Arginine (Tivortin) venous infusion therapy (100 ml QD for 6 days) with consequent change onto PO administration of 5-10 ml of the solution TID for 4 weeks. As a result, positive dynamics of regressing of clinical signs of COPD was apparent in both Groups after 10-12 days of the treatment. Clinical parameters, pulmonary, cardiac and indurance functions in patients of the Group II, who in addition to the basic treatment, were reciving L-Arginine were much better improved (p>0.05) than in Group I. The conducted study has allowed us to draw a conclusion, that including L-Arginine in the treatment protocol of COPD with concomitant IHD improves cardiohaemodynamics and allows for the better efficacy of respiratory pathology therapy. Addition of L-Arginine (Tivortin, "Yuriya-Farm", Kiev) to the complex therapy of COPD with concomitant IHD results in statistically significant improvement of clinical and instrumental test results, due to the drug's intihypoxic, antiagregational, membrane-stabilizing, antioxydant and vasodilating effect.

  2. From spirituality to coping strategy: making sense of chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Greenstreet, Wendy

    This article explores how individuals might make sense of chronic illness. The spiritual aspect of self is described both as being central to finding meaning in suffering with a chronic illness and also the source of hope in meeting the challenges faced. Culture as the template for interpreting the significance of chronic ill health at a personal, familial and societal level is also considered. A conceptual model for understanding life transitions is modified to incorporate the spiritual and cultural perspectives of making sense of chronic illness in relation to coping skills. In understanding how patients make sense of their circumstances nurses are more likely to be able to offer appropriate support to effect coping.

  3. Living with a chronic illness - dealing with feelings

    MedlinePlus

    ... art class, play an instrument, or listen to music. Call or spend time with a friend. Finding ... Larsen PD, ed. Lubkin's Chronic Illness: Impact and Intervention . 9th ed. Burlington, MA: Jones and Bartlett Learning; ...

  4. Co-morbid anxiety and depression among pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Aamir, Siddiqua; Aisha

    2010-10-01

    The need to recognize and manage psychiatric co-morbidity in tuberculosis (TB) patients in primary care settings in order to improve adherence to the treatment is now well documented. Pulmonary TB patients at the District TB Control Office and TB Centre in Haripur from December 2007 to March 2008 were evalute in order to assess the frequency of anxiety and depression and continuation of treatment. Forty seven out of 65 (72%) TB patients had severe/moderate level of anxiety and depression according to Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Fourteen (22%) TB patients with co-morbid anxiety and depression showed multi drug-resistance (MDR-TB).

  5. Mothers' Attributions Regarding the Behavior of Chronically Ill Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Lynn S.

    Parents of chronically ill children are faced with the difficult task of being vigilant and yet not overprotective of their children. The literature suggests that parents hold a positive bias toward their ill children. Attribution theory gives a framework in which to study parents' ideas about their children's behavior. A study was conducted to…

  6. Are We Leaving Children with Chronic Illness Behind?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Mary Kay; Elam, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Novel treatments are improving the prognosis for many illnesses, making it possible to survive diseases that were once considered fatal. With these advancements comes great responsibility to ensure quality of life for those living with chronic illness. Educators are among the group of professionals accountable for ensuring quality of life…

  7. [The possibilities for the correction of the co-morbid anxiety and depressive disorders in the patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by the methods of climatic therapy].

    PubMed

    Yusupalieva, M M

    2016-01-01

    The present study included 142 patients presenting with grade I-III chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) treated based at a spa and health resort (SHR) facility located on the southern coast of the Crimea. The psycho-diagnostic testing was performed with the use of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HDRS) and the Ch.D. Spielberger - Yu.L. Khanin scale for reactive (situational) and personal anxiety. The anxiety-depressive disorders were diagnosed in 59,2% of the patients; their intensity correlated with the severity of COPD. The questionnaire study based at the Spilberger-Khanin made it possible to document the presence of moderate and severe anxiety in 68,3% of the patients. It was shown that a course of the spa and health resort-based treatment produced beneficial effect on the psycho-functional status of the patients with COPD that was especially well apparent in those with the mild form of COPD.

  8. Illness perception in Polish patients with chronic diseases: Psychometric properties of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Nowicka-Sauer, Katarzyna; Banaszkiewicz, Dorota; Staśkiewicz, Izabela; Kopczyński, Piotr; Hajduk, Adam; Czuszyńska, Zenobia; Ejdys, Mariola; Szostakiewicz, Małgorzata; Sablińska, Agnieszka; Kałużna, Anna; Tomaszewska, Magda; Siebert, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    The study evaluates the psychometric properties of a Polish translation of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. A total of 276 patients with chronic conditions (58.7% women) completed the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The internal consistency of the Polish Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire measured with Cronbach's alpha was satisfactory (α = 0.74). Structural validity was demonstrated by significant inter-correlations between the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire components. Discriminant validity was supported by the fact that the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire enables patients with various conditions to be differentiated. Significant correlations were found between Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and depression and anxiety levels. The Polish Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire thus evaluated is a reliable and valid tool.

  9. Incidence of Post-Operative Sepsis and Role of Charlson Co-Morbidity Score for Predicting Postoperative Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hassan; Mohammadi, Atefeh; Alibakhshi, Abbas; Jalali, Mehdi; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa

    2016-05-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are among mortality causes following major surgeries. The Charlson co-morbidity index consists of 19 weighted categories related to chronic health which measures the burden of co-morbidity. The goal of this study was to determine the incidence of postoperative sepsis in patients underwent gynecological and gastrointestinal cancer surgeries and predictive role of Charlson index for this situation. Two hundred and twenty-two patients who underwent gynecological and gastrointestinal cancer surgeries were evaluated. Sixty-four (28.6%) patients developed SIRS postoperatively. Forty-four (19.7%) patients developed sepsis postoperatively. Mean age, duration of hospitalization and surgery, the Charlson score were significantly higher in patients who developed sepsis than other cases. Blood transfusion and Charlson score were independent predictors of sepsis occurrence. Charlson co-morbidity index is a predictive factor for developing postoperative sepsis.

  10. Mind-Body Approaches and Chronic Illness: Status of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riccio, Cynthia A.; Pliego, Jessica; Rae, William A.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of children experience chronic health issues that affect their academic and behavioral functioning, as well as psychological well-being. At the same time, psychological stress can exacerbate the chronic illness. The first line of treatment most often is medical (e.g., pharmacology, surgery, radiation). Even when the medical…

  11. Prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in chronically ill children.

    PubMed

    Munns, C F; Cowell, C T

    2005-01-01

    Osteoporosis secondary to chronic disease in children has emerged as a major health issue. As the severity of a child's illness increases, so too does the number of factors affecting their bone health. Determinants of bone health in children include level of mobility, exposure to osteotoxic medication, nutritional status, calcium and vitamin D intake, chronic inflammation and pubertal development.

  12. Sexual function of women with chronic illness and cancer.

    PubMed

    Basson, Rosemary

    2010-05-01

    Addressing the sexual sequelae of chronic disease and its treatment is now accepted as a fundamental part of healthcare. Most of the sexual effects of chronic disease are negative, and ongoing illness continues to modulate a woman's sexual self-image, energy and interest in sexual activity, as well as her ability to respond to sexual stimuli with pleasurable sensations, excitement, orgasm and freedom from pain with genital stimulation or intercourse. Nevertheless, for many women with chronic illness, sexuality remains extremely important despite the commonly associated fatigue and acquired sexual dysfunctions; sexual resilience can be substantial. Following recovery from cancer surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, prognosis can be excellent and a return to full health can often be expected, and yet, there may have been devastating changes to sexual function owing to the cancer treatment. Women with metastatic disease may still treasure sexual intimacy. Assessment and management of sexual dysfunction is therefore necessary in all women with chronic illness or past or present cancer.

  13. Examining the Education Gradient in Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterji, Pinka; Joo, Heesoo; Lahiri, Kajal

    2015-01-01

    We examine the education gradient in diabetes, hypertension, and high cholesterol. We take into account diagnosed as well as undiagnosed cases and use methods accounting for the possibility of unmeasured factors that are correlated with education and drive both the likelihood of having illness and the propensity to be diagnosed. Data come from the…

  14. Chronic illness: trauma, language, and writing: breaking the silence.

    PubMed

    Penn, P

    2001-01-01

    In our work with families that struggle with a chronic illness, we have relied on three ideas. First, we regard illness as a relationally traumatizing experience, not just for the person with the illness, but for other members of the family as well. We use the phrase "relational trauma" because of its effects on members of a wider system who also show signs of physical stress, isolation, and helplessness (Sheinberg & Fraenkel, 2000). Our second concern is how the conversation that leads to new stories is expanded through the development of voice and the use of writing. Looking at language, we are particularly attentive to the social prevalence of negative metaphors that surround and engulf the ill person and her family: dependence, poor genes, repressed personalities, weak constitutions, et cetera (Sontag, 1984). These negative metaphors, or outside voices, join with the inner voices of the ill person and result in a silence that disconnects people at a time when connections must be relied on and above question. Our third emphasis is on the use of writing as the means to create new voices, metaphors, and multiple descriptions that can reinvigorate the conversations silenced by the illness. Once the family's voices are reconstituted through writing, the emotions that have been displaced by the illness are restored to their conversation. I have included new research from JAMA detailing the treatment of patients with chronic illness through their use of writing.

  15. Problematizing health coaching for chronic illness self-management.

    PubMed

    Howard, Lisa M; Ceci, Christine

    2013-09-01

    To address the growing costs associated with chronic illness care, many countries, both developed and developing, identify increased patient self-management or self-care as a focus of healthcare reform. Health coaching, an implementation strategy to support the shift to self-management, encourages patients to make lifestyle changes to improve the management of chronic illness. This practice differs from traditional models of health education because of the interactional dynamics between nurse and patient, and an orientation to care that ostensibly centres and empowers patients. The theoretical underpinnings of coaching reflect these differences, however in its application, the practices arranged around health coaching for chronic illness self-management reveal the social regulation and professional management of everyday life. This becomes especially problematic in contexts defined by economic constraint and government withdrawal from activities related to the 'care' of citizens. In this paper, we trace the development of health coaching as part of nursing practice and consider the implications of this practice as an emerging element of chronic illness self-management. Our purpose is to highlight health coaching as an approach intended to support patients with chronic illness and at the same time, problematize the tensions contained in (and by) this practice.

  16. Bipolar disorder and co-occurring cannabis use disorders: characteristics, co-morbidities and clinical correlates.

    PubMed

    Lev-Ran, Shaul; Le Foll, Bernard; McKenzie, Kwame; George, Tony P; Rehm, Jürgen

    2013-10-30

    This study examines rates of co-morbid mental disorders and indicators of the course of illness among individuals with bipolar disorder and cannabis use disorders (CUD). Data were drawn from the National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC Wave 1, 2001-2002), a nationally representative sample of adults living in the United States. Among individuals with lifetime prevalence of bipolar disorder (N=1905) rates of CUD in the past 12 months were 7.2%, compared to 1.2% in the general population. Logistic regression models adjusting for sociodemographic variables indicated that individuals with bipolar disorder and co-occurring CUD were at increased risk for nicotine dependence (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=3.8), alcohol (AOR=6.6) and drug (AOR=11.9) use disorders, as well as antisocial personality disorder (AOR=2.8) compared to those without CUD. Among individuals with co-occurring CUD, age of onset of bipolar disorder was significantly lower and median number of manic, hypomanic and depressive episodes per year was significantly greater compared to individuals without CUD. Co-occurring CUD is associated with significant co-morbidities and a more severe course of illness among individuals with bipolar disorder. Comprehensive evaluation of patients with bipolar disorder should include a systematic assessment of CUD.

  17. The Role of Co-morbidities in Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Michael; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Cardioprotective strategies such as pre and postconditioning result in a robust reduction in infarct size in young, healthy male animals. However there are data suggesting that the protection is diminished in animals with co-morbidities such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes. It is important to understand at a mechanistic level the reasons for these differences. The effects of sex and diseases need to be considered in design of cardioprotective interventions in animal studies and clinical trials. PMID:21821527

  18. Understanding the impact of chronic childhood illness on families.

    PubMed

    Sabbeth, B

    1984-02-01

    A great deal has been written about mothers and their relationships with their ill children. Fathers, however, have been relatively excluded from the research, as they have been from many pediatrician-mother-child interactions. Although it has been noted that some fathers tend to withdraw from the family, in fact very little is known about the impact of childhood illness on their lives. In general, studies of mothers, fathers, siblings, marriage, and families emphasize psychopathology and other psychosocial problems. Yet, there is a growing awareness in the social sciences that we have much to learn from the capacity to adjust. How is it that some families of chronically ill children survive so well? This question has not been addressed. Most studies focus on individual constituents of the family. Minuchin and others have taught us about aberrant family systems that sometimes develop around chronically ill children. Such systems are characterized by high cohesion and conformity, and the absence of apparent friction. How frequently do such systems develop? How can they be prevented? Finally, understanding the impact of chronic childhood illness on families is a difficult task. Parents have reasons for obscuring the impact, and particularly their distress, from the view of their pediatrician. Physicians are often uncertain how much understanding they ought to offer. Careful attention to the parent-pediatrician relationship is essential to a thorough understanding of the impact of childhood illness on the family.

  19. INSTRUMENT TO ASSESS BURDEN ON CAREGIVERS OF CHRONIC MENTALLY ILL

    PubMed Central

    Thara, R.; Padmavati, R.; Kumar, Shuba; Srinivasan, Latha

    1998-01-01

    The family is a major source of support for the mentally ill in India. Although Indian families show tremendous resilience in caring for their ill relatives, they experience a lot of physical and emotional distress. The burden assessment schedule (BAS) aims to assess both objective and subjective burden experienced by the primary care givers of chronic mentally ill patients. Stepwise ethnographic exploration has been used in the development of this 40 item instrument. Reliability exercises have been carried out throughout the development of this schedule. Criterion validity has been established by comparing with another standardized instrument to assess burden, which has been developed in India. PMID:21494438

  20. Psychological Co-morbidity in Children with Specific Learning Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Manoj K.; Biswas, Haritha; Padhy, Susanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Children under 19 years of age constitute over 40% of India's population and information about their mental health needs is a national imperative. Children with specific learning disorders (SLDs) exhibit academic difficulties disproportionate to their intellectual capacities. Prevalence of SLD ranges from 2% to 10%. Dyslexia (developmental reading disorder) is the most common type, affecting 80% of all SLD. About 30% of learning disabled children have behavioral and emotional problems, which range from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (most common) to depression, anxiety, suicide etc., to substance abuse (least common). Co-occurrence of such problems with SLD further adds to the academic difficulty. In such instances, diagnosis is difficult and tricky; improvement in academics demands comprehensive holistic treatment approach. SLD remains a large public health problem because of under-recognition, inadequate treatment and therefore merits greater effort to understand the co-morbidities, especially in the Indian population. As the literature is scarce regarding co-morbid conditions in learning disability in Indian scenario, the present study has tried to focus on Indian population. The educational concessions (recent most) given to such children by Central Board of Secondary Education, New Delhi are referred to. The issues to be addressed by the family physicians are: Low level of awareness among families and teachers, improper dissemination of accurate information about psychological problems, available help seeking avenues, need to develop service delivery models in rural and urban areas and focus on the integration of mental health and primary care keeping such co-morbidity in mind. PMID:25810984

  1. Emerging co-morbidities of obstructive sleep apnea: cognition, kidney disease, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gildeh, Nadia; Drakatos, Panagis; Higgins, Sean; Rosenzweig, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) causes daytime fatigue and sleepiness, and has an established relationship with cardiovascular and metabolic disease. Recent years have seen the emergence of an evidence base linking OSA with an increased risk of degenerative neurological disease and associated cognitive impairment, an accelerated rate of decline in kidney function with an increased risk of clinically significant chronic kidney disease (CKD), and with a significantly higher rate of cancer incidence and death. This review evaluates the evidence base linking OSA with these seemingly unrelated co-morbidities, and explores potential mechanistic links underpinning their development in patients with OSA, including intermittent hypoxia (IH), sleep fragmentation, sympathetic excitation, and immune dysregulation. PMID:27747026

  2. Voting preferences of outpatients with chronic mental illness in Germany.

    PubMed

    Bullenkamp, Jens; Voges, Burkhard

    2004-12-01

    Outpatients with chronic mental illness living in therapeutic residential facilities in Mannheim, Germany (N=110) responded to an opinion poll to determine their voting preferences for the 2002 federal election to the Bundestag. The poll found that the outpatients were significantly more likely than the general population in Mannheim to prefer left-wing parties (78 percent compared with 56 percent). This finding is in contrast to earlier reports; however, it seems to better reflect common beliefs about the political preferences of this population. In conclusion, persons with chronic mental illness seem to prefer political parties that they believe will best serve their perceived specific interests.

  3. Florence Nightingale: her Crimean fever and chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Dossey, Barbara M

    2010-03-01

    Florence Nightingale's Crimean fever and chronic illness have intrigued historians for more than a century and a half. The purpose of this article is threefold: (a) to discuss the facts that point to the cause of Nightingale's Crimean fever as brucellosis, (b) to show that her debilitating illness for 32 years (1855-1887) was compatible with the specific form of chronic brucellosis, and (c) to present new evidence that she was still having severe symptoms in December 1887, when it was previously felt that she had no severe symptoms after 1870.

  4. Dental disease in children with chronic illness

    PubMed Central

    Foster, H; Fitzgerald, J

    2005-01-01

    We focus on the role of the general paediatrician in promoting the importance of good dental health for all children and in particular those children "at risk". We present preventive measures, evidence based where available, that may improve dental care and promote the role of paediatric dental services in the multidisciplinary management of chronic disease. PMID:15970611

  5. Smoking Cessation in Chronically Ill Medical Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirota, Alan D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Followed eight male smokers with chronic pulmonary or cardiac disease through a smoking cessation program of gradual nicotine withdrawal, self-management, and relapse prevention. At one year, half remained abstinent, while relapsers smoked substantially less than before treatment. Reductions in carbon monoxide and thiocyanate levels were…

  6. Supporting the Learning of Children with Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    A'Bear, David

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the challenges that chronically ill students face in their learning as a result of prolonged and intermittent absences from school. It shows how the use of iPod technology as a communicative link minimized the impact of absences and allowed the student to experience true inclusion in their classroom, enabling the…

  7. Chronically Ill Children: A Psychologically and Emotionally Deviant Population?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavormina, J. B.; And Others

    To investigate vulnerability to psychological and emotional stress among chronically ill children, a battery of personality tests was selectively administered to 144 children (5- to 19-years-old) afflicted with one of the following conditions: diabetes, asthma, cystic fibrosis, or hearing impairment. Analyses centered on comparisons of norms…

  8. Smoking cessation and reduction in people with chronic mental illness.

    PubMed

    Tidey, Jennifer W; Miller, Mollie E

    2015-09-21

    The high prevalence of cigarette smoking and tobacco related morbidity and mortality in people with chronic mental illness is well documented. This review summarizes results from studies of smoking cessation treatments in people with schizophrenia, depression, anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder. It also summarizes experimental studies aimed at identifying biopsychosocial mechanisms that underlie the high smoking rates seen in people with these disorders. Research indicates that smokers with chronic mental illness can quit with standard cessation approaches with minimal effects on psychiatric symptoms. Although some studies have noted high relapse rates, longer maintenance on pharmacotherapy reduces rates of relapse without untoward effects on psychiatric symptoms. Similar biopsychosocial mechanisms are thought to be involved in the initiation and persistence of smoking in patients with different disorders. An appreciation of these common factors may aid the development of novel tobacco treatments for people with chronic mental illness. Novel nicotine and tobacco products such as electronic cigarettes and very low nicotine content cigarettes may also be used to improve smoking cessation rates in people with chronic mental illness.

  9. Alleviating Pain and Distress in Childhood Chronic Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuttner, Leora

    1987-01-01

    Describes psychological techniques, such as distraction and hypnotic imaginative involvement techniques, which have been found effective among chronically ill children and their parents in reducing anxiety and distress, and increasing the ability to cope with taxing medical procedures. Cases from research conducted in Vancouver, British Columbia…

  10. Students Living with Chronic Illness: The School Counselor's Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlet, Helen S.; Gergar, Patricia G.; Schaefer, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the current practices of schools and school counselors working with students with chronic illness and the protocols for providing these services, the authors conducted a mixed design, grounded theory study, with an eye toward pinpointing any trends or patterns in service provision. They identified a collaborative, developmental,…

  11. What's Eating Gilbert Grape?: A Case Study of Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Matthew; Waxman, Dael; White, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Cinemeducation refers to the use of movies or movie clips to educate learners about the psychosocial aspects of health care. This paper describes the use of a clip from the movie, "What's Eating Gilbert Grape?" to teach medical students about chronic illness. The clip is used to set up a case study based on the lead character, Gilbert…

  12. School Psychologists' Role Concerning Children with Chronic Illnesses in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barraclough, Camille; Machek, Greg

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the role of school psychologists in working with children with chronic illnesses in the schools. A total of 300 practicing school psychologists in public schools, drawn from the National Association of School Psychologists membership directory, completed a standard mail survey. The survey solicited information on (a) graduate…

  13. MAPP: A Multimedia Instructional Program for Youths with Chronic Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Peggy O'Hara; McClure, Christopher; Lage, Onelia G.; Sarkar, Dilip; Shaw, Kimberly

    The Multimedia Approach to Pregnancy Prevention (MAPP) is an expert intelligence multimedia program administered in outpatient and inpatient clinics in the University of Miami/Jackson Children's Hospital (Florida). The target population for the MAPP program is youths aged 9-14 years, diagnosed with chronic illnesses (asthma, diabetes, and sickle…

  14. Ineffective chronic illness behaviour in a patient with long-term non-psychotic psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Koekkoek, Bauke; van Tilburg, Willem

    2010-11-29

    This case report offers a different perspective on a patient with a long-term non-psychotic psychiatric disorder that was difficult to specify. The patient, a man in his 50s, was unable to profit from outpatient treatment and became increasingly dependent on mental healthcare - which could not be understood based on his history and psychiatric symptoms alone. By separating symptoms from illness behaviour, the negative course of this patient's treatment is analysed. Focusing on ineffective chronic illness behaviour by the patient, and mutual ineffective treatment behaviour by the clinicians, it becomes clear that basic requirements of effective treatment were unmet. By making a proper diagnosis, clarifying expectations and offering a suitable therapy, ineffective illness behaviour was diminished and this 'difficult' case became much easier for both patient and clinicians. The illness behaviour framework offers a useful, systematic tool to analyse difficulties between patients and clinicians beyond psychiatric symptoms or explanations.

  15. Aging in Sickle Cell Disease: Co-morbidities and New Issues in Management.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Manpreet K; Cohen, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Availability of hydroxyurea (HU) coupled with early therapeutic interventions has increased the life expectancy of patients with sickle cell disease. Hence, the sickle cell community needs to be aware of common diseases of aging that survivors are predisposed to. We chose to investigate the sickle cell disease-related complications as well as non sickle cell disease-related medical problems of aging in 45 sickle cell patients over the age of 40 years. The most frequent chronic complications of sickle cell disease were elevated tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity on echocardiogram, chronic renal disease, iron overload and leg ulcers. Medical co-morbidities in this patient group included hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), hypercholesterolemia and symptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD). In our cohort, only 38.0% had a primary care doctor. Only 11.0% over age 50 had a screening colonoscopy, and of the women, 42.0% had a screening mammography. Medical co-morbidities and lack of health maintenance in older sickle cell patients are likely to impact overall health and mortality. Aging patients with sickle cell disease may benefit from a primary medical home for age appropriate comprehensive health care.

  16. The Special Educational Needs of Adolescents Living with Chronic Illness: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Rates of chronic illness are increasing around the world and, accordingly, numbers of adolescent students living with chronic illness are also increasing. The challenges faced by these students and their teachers are complex. One of these challenges is the need of the adolescent with chronic illness to achieve some level of social conformity.…

  17. "My Child Is Not an Illness": Mothers as Advocates for Pedagogy and Policies for Chronically Ill Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzman, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    On a national level, there is no answer in the law about identifying and servicing chronically ill students. Because the national definitions and requirements are ambiguous, the local policies are also unclear. The purpose of this study was to analyze the stories told by mothers about their children who suffer from chronic illness in order to help…

  18. Perceived Stress in Chronic Illness: A Comparative Analysis of Four Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revenson, Tracey A.; Felton, Barbara J.

    Most studies of stress and coping processes among patients with serious illnesses have focused on acute illness states. Far less research has involved systematic examination of the types and frequency of illness-related stresses experienced by individuals living with chronic illness. To compare the nature and degree of illness-related stress posed…

  19. Rural women, technology, and self-management of chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Clarann; Cudney, Shirley; Hill, Wade G

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the differences in the psychosocial status of 3 groups of chronically ill rural women participating in a computer intervention. The 3 groups were: intense intervention, less-intense intervention, and control. At baseline and following the intervention, measures were taken for social support, self-esteem, empowerment, self-efficacy, depression, stress, and loneliness. ANCOVA results showed group differences for social support and self-efficacy among the overall group. The findings differed for a vulnerable subgroup, with significant between-group differences for social support and loneliness. It was concluded that a computer-delivered intervention can improve social support and self-efficacy and reduce loneliness in rural women, enhancing their ability to self-manage and adapt to chronic illness.

  20. Nonprofessional Care in Chronic Critically Ill Patient: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Dehkordi, Leila Mardanian; Babashahi, Monireh; Irajpour, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Decision-making about patients with critical condition transfer from Intensive Care Unit to the general wards be delegated to their families. The aim of the study was explaining the experiences of family caregiver's about care of chronic critically ill patient. Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative content analysis using unstructured interview. Participants were selected purposively from May 2014 to May 2015 and data collection continued until data saturation. Analysis was based on conventional content analysis. Results: Participants’ experiences classified into three main categories as following: nonprofessional care, enhancing factors of care, and inhibiting factors of care. Conclusions: Finding of the current study showed different aspects of care. Care of chronic critically ill patients is a long-term process that affected by different factors. It seems that the exploration of caregivers needs and planning supportive interventions based on their needs improve the quality of care. PMID:28028426

  1. Profiling leucocyte subsets in tuberculosis-diabetes co-morbidity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Moideen, Kadar; Dhakshinraj, Sharmila D; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nair, Dina; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Babu, Subash

    2015-10-01

    The immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis-type 2 diabetes mellitus (PTB-DM) co-morbidity. However, the phenotypic profile of leucocyte subsets at homeostasis in individuals with active or latent tuberculosis (LTB) with coincident diabetes is not known. To characterize the influence of diabetes on leucocyte phenotypes in PTB or LTB, we examined the frequency (Fo ) of leucocyte subsets in individuals with TB with (PTB-DM) or without (PTB) diabetes; individuals with latent TB with (LTB-DM) or without (LTB) diabetes and non-TB-infected individuals with (NTB-DM) or without (NTB) diabetes. Coincident DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD4(+) T cells in LTB individuals. In contrast, DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD8(+) T cells and significantly higher Fo of central memory CD8(+) T cells in PTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly higher Fo of classical memory B cells in PTB and significantly higher Fo of activated memory and atypical B cells in LTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of classical and intermediate monocytes in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Finally, DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Our data reveal that coincident diabetes alters the cellular subset distribution of T cells, B cells, dendritic cells and monocytes in both individuals with active TB and those with latent TB, thus potentially impacting the pathogenesis of this co-morbid condition.

  2. Systematic review of character development and childhood chronic illness

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, Gary R; Hill, Sherika N

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review empirical evidence on character development among youth with chronic illnesses. METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted using PubMed and PSYCHINFO from inception until November 2013 to find quantitative studies that measured character strengths among youth with chronic illnesses. Inclusion criteria were limited to English language studies examining constructs of character development among adolescents or young adults aged 13-24 years with a childhood-onset chronic medical condition. A librarian at Duke University Medical Center Library assisted with the development of the mesh search term. Two researchers independently reviewed relevant titles (n = 549), then abstracts (n = 45), and finally manuscripts (n = 3). RESULTS: There is a lack of empirical research on character development and childhood-onset chronic medical conditions. Three studies were identified that used different measures of character based on moral themes. One study examined moral reasoning among deaf adolescents using Kohlberg’s Moral Judgement Instrument; another, investigated moral values of adolescent cancer survivors with the Values In Action Classification of Strengths. A third study evaluated moral behavior among young adult survivors of burn injury utilizing the Tennessee Self-Concept, 2nd edition. The studies observed that youth with chronic conditions reasoned at less advanced stages and had a lower moral self-concept compared to referent populations, but that they did differ on character virtues and strengths when matched with healthy peers for age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Yet, generalizations could not be drawn regarding character development of youth with chronic medical conditions because the studies were too divergent from each other and biased from study design limitations. CONCLUSION: Future empirical studies should learn from the strengths and weaknesses of the existing literature on character development among youth with chronic medical conditions

  3. End of life, chronic illness, and trans-identities.

    PubMed

    Witten, Tarynn M

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the experiences and needs of a sample of 1,963 current, global, English-speaking, transgender-identified adults responding to the Transgender MetLife Survey (TMLS) as related to a number of later-life and end-of-life (EOL) preparations and concerns were examined. EOL concerns are integrated with concerns and challenges around chronic illness and disability. Overall, this population was significantly ill-prepared for the major legalities and events that occur in the later to EOL time periods. The population was found to harbor significant fears around the future. Drawing on the author's decades of survey research in transgender aging and case data along with current scientific and online literature, illustrative quotations and case examples are provided.

  4. Positive Interventions for Children with Chronic Illness: Parents' and Teachers' Concerns and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiu, Shiona

    2004-01-01

    Schools today are faced with increasing numbers of students with chronic illness. Medical advances, which improve health and prolong life, and increased incidence levels among some illnesses have led to this increase. Children with a chronic illness are more likely to encounter academic, social and emotional difficulties. The challenge facing…

  5. The Impact of Chronic Illness on Psychosocial Stages of Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapham, E. Virginia, Ed.; Shevlin, Kathleen M., Ed.

    This book addresses critical issues regarding the impact of chronic illness and disability on human development. It was written for health care professionals who help chronically ill and disabled persons deal with the psychological and social as well as the biological aspects of their illness or disability. An expanded version of Erik Erikson's…

  6. Quality of life for chronic psychiatric illnesses and home care

    PubMed Central

    Molu, Nesibe Gunay; Ozkan, Birgul; Icel, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, mental illnesses are gradually increasing and so does chronic psychiatric patients. As a result of this increase, chronic psychiatric disorders lead the burden of patients and their families. To reduce the burden of mental illnesses on individuals and their families, treatment and care are given including psychosocial, physiological and medical support and social services. To begin with, home care enables both the patient and his or her family to stay at their own houses and not to be bothered with residents or long-term, institutional-based nursing homes. In addition, the home care providers deliver services to the patient’s at their own house. The other advantages of taking care at home is that it eases financial issues in terms of reducing the cost, reduces the patient’s symptoms and improve the individual’s quality of life (QoL). In addition to these, home care also minimizes the burden on outpatient services and provides help for the patient and the family in order to solve their problems and give support. Home care services help patients to get their freedom back and enhance the quality of their lives. Thus, it is necessary to procure and implement these services and supply both the patient and his or her family a high-quality life. Sources of data/ study selection: Literature review was done by using the keywords “home care, patient with chronic mental illness, quality of life, home care nursing” from the sources including PsychINFO, PsychARTICLES, MEDLINE, PubMED, EBSCOHOST and The COCHRANE LIBRARY in the time period of 2005- 2015. PMID:27182272

  7. Health Vlogger-Viewer Interaction in Chronic Illness Management

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Leslie S.; Huh, Jina; Neogi, Tina; Inkpen, Kori; Pratt, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Health video blogs (vlogs) allow individuals with chronic illnesses to share their stories, experiences, and knowledge with the general public. Furthermore, health vlogs help in creating a connection between the vlogger and the viewers. In this work, we present a qualitative study examining the various methods that health vloggers use to establish a connection with their viewers. We found that vloggers used genres to express specific messages to their viewers while using the uniqueness of video to establish a deeper connection with their viewers. Health vloggers also explicitly sought interaction with their viewers. Based on these results, we present design implications to help facilitate and build sustainable communities for vloggers. PMID:24634895

  8. Paper versus electronic documentation in complex chronic illness: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Smith, Catherine Arnott; Haque, Saira N

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports an analysis and comparison of the electronic and paper medical records of 5 clinically complex persons with spina bifida, who were seen as in- and outpatients at a small Northeastern urban hospital. The combination of chronic illness, multiple medical and allied health specialties, and longer lifespan in this population ensures both a quantitative volume and qualitative complexity of medical event documentation. This ensures a rich field for research into the content and the nature of the fragmented data presently locked in the paper record.

  9. Chronic fatigue syndrome: illness severity, sedentary lifestyle, blood volume and evidence of diminished cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Barry E; Coryell, Virginia T; Parker, Meela; Martin, Pedro; Laperriere, Arthur; Klimas, Nancy G; Sfakianakis, George N; Bilsker, Martin S

    2009-10-19

    The study examined whether deficits in cardiac output and blood volume in a CFS (chronic fatigue syndrome) cohort were present and linked to illness severity and sedentary lifestyle. Follow-up analyses assessed whether differences in cardiac output levels between CFS and control groups were corrected by controlling for cardiac contractility and TBV (total blood volume). The 146 participants were subdivided into two CFS groups based on symptom severity data, severe (n=30) and non-severe (n=26), and two healthy non-CFS control groups based on physical activity, sedentary (n=58) and non-sedentary (n=32). Controls were matched to CFS participants using age, gender, ethnicity and body mass. Echocardiographic measures indicated that the severe CFS participants had 10.2% lower cardiac volume (i.e. stroke index and end-diastolic volume) and 25.1% lower contractility (velocity of circumferential shortening corrected by heart rate) than the control groups. Dual tag blood volume assessments indicated that the CFS groups had lower TBV, PV (plasma volume) and RBCV (red blood cell volume) than control groups. Of the CFS subjects with a TBV deficit (i.e. > or = 8% below ideal levels), the mean+/-S.D. percentage deficit in TBV, PV and RBCV were -15.4+/-4.0, -13.2+/-5.0 and -19.1+/-6.3% respectively. Lower cardiac volume levels in CFS were substantially corrected by controlling for prevailing TBV deficits, but were not affected by controlling for cardiac contractility levels. Analyses indicated that the TBV deficit explained 91-94% of the group differences in cardiac volume indices. Group differences in cardiac structure were offsetting and, hence, no differences emerged for left ventricular mass index. Therefore the findings indicate that lower cardiac volume levels, displayed primarily by subjects with severe CFS, were not linked to diminished cardiac contractility levels, but were probably a consequence of a co-morbid hypovolaemic condition. Further study is needed to address

  10. Two weeks of predatory stress induces anxiety-like behavior with co-morbid depressive-like behavior in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Burgado, Jillybeth; Harrell, Constance S; Eacret, Darrell; Reddy, Renuka; Barnum, Christopher J; Tansey, Malú G; Miller, Andrew H; Wang, Huichen; Neigh, Gretchen N

    2014-12-15

    Psychological stress can have devastating and lasting effects on a variety of behaviors, especially those associated with mental illnesses such as anxiety and depression. Animal models of chronic stress are frequently used to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the relationship between stress and mental health disorders and to develop improved treatment options. The current study expands upon a novel chronic stress paradigm for mice: predatory stress. The predatory stress model incorporates the natural predator-prey relationship that exists among rats and mice and allows for greater interaction between the animals, in turn increasing the extent of the stressful experience. In this study, we evaluated the behavioral effects of exposure to 15 days of predatory stress on an array of behavioral indices. Up to 2 weeks after the end of stress, adult male mice showed an increase of anxiety-like behaviors as measured by the open field and social interaction tests. Animals also expressed an increase in depressive-like behavior in the sucrose preference test. Notably, performance on the novel object recognition task, a memory test, improved after predatory stress. Taken as a whole, our results indicate that 15 exposures to this innovative predatory stress paradigm are sufficient to elicit robust anxiety-like behaviors with evidence of co-morbid depressive-like behavior, as well as changes in cognitive behavior in male mice.

  11. An exploration of the experience of lesbians with chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Walden, Elizabeth L

    2009-01-01

    An exploration of the challenges facing lesbians with chronic conditions and their coping strategies was investigated by examining the experiences of participants who were clients of a volunteer organization serving chronically ill lesbians. This article reports the results associated with those challenges, with its ultimate goal being and to assess the effectiveness of current services. Using the participant observation method, as employed by O'Toole (2000), the analysis was based on multiple data sources and 10 years experience within the volunteer organization, including 3 years in direct client support. A qualitative method served as the primary focus for the study. The quantitative method preceded the qualitative method and provided limited supporting data. The total number of participants included all past and current clients, but the number participating in each data source varied. Qualitative sources included archival structured interviews (n = 69), taped interviews (n = 5-6), and extensive comments written in response to the quantitative surveys (n = 14). The quantitative measures (n = 14) included the researcher-developed Chronic Conditions Challenges Checklist (C4) and the Short Form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire ([SF-MPQ]; Melzack, 1998). A content analysis of all data sources found a number of challenges that met the criteria of being identified in at least two data sources and across multiple participants. Challenges included those related to the disease process (i.e., pain, fatigue, and decreases in mobility) to impacts of the condition (financial security, ability to participate, support from family of origin and independence, loneliness, and issues related to mental health). Challenges were discussed in terms of those that are similar to and different from other women suffering from chronic illness, as well as their relevance to related literature.

  12. The 'co-morbidity roundabout': a framework to guide assessment and intervention strategies and engineer change among people with co-morbid problems.

    PubMed

    Kay-Lambkin, Frances J; Baker, Amanda L; Lewin, Terry J

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the nature and consequences of co-morbidity, as applied to co-occurring mental health and alcohol/other drug (AOD) use problems. The 'co-morbidity roundabout' is introduced as a useful metaphor for conceptualizing the current experiences of people with co-occurring mental health and AOD use problems. In order to successfully negotiate the 'roundabout', the 'drivers' (people with co-morbid mental health and AOD use problems) must consider a range of internal and external conditions (knowledge about services, support from family, friends, health providers, motivation to change, etc.), account for their vehicle's characteristics (other conditions and demands, including social/legal/financial issues), keep their travel itinerary in mind (plans for change including treatment) and navigate through the many detours and dead-ends that they may confront (eligibility for services, accessibility of treatments, etc.). Co-morbidity is a major contributing factor in 'drivers' failing to successfully negotiate, or even becoming 'stuck' on, the 'roundabout'. A summary of relevant treatment research is also presented, including descriptions of brief interventions and more intensive treatment approaches. Finally, the 'co-morbidity roundabout' metaphor is expanded to assist clinicians to translate the findings from this treatment research into clinical practice. Further suggestions are made for improved navigation through and exit from the 'roundabout', including recommendations for the use of a stepped-care approach to the assessment and treatment of clients with co-morbid mental health and AOD use problems.

  13. Parental Involvement of Mothers with Chronic Illness and Children's Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yung-Chi; Fish, Marian C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how maternal chronic illnesses may affect children's academic achievement through parental involvement. A total of 189 mothers diagnosed with chronic illnesses, such as multiple sclerosis, diabetes, cancer, HIV/AIDS, chronic pain, asthma, myelodysplasic syndrome, and fibromyalgia, and with a child in middle school or high…

  14. Illness perception in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Borge, Christine Råheim; Moum, Torbjørn; Puline Lein, Martha; Austegard, Elise Lynn; Wahl, Astrid Klopstad

    2014-10-01

    Illness perception (IP) concerns how patients evaluate living with a disease. To get a broader understanding of IP in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we investigated whether breathlessness is an important precursor of IP and whether IP in its turn is related to mental health, physical health and global quality of life (QOL). One hundred and fifty-four patients with COPD participated in a cross-sectional survey. Participants underwent pulmonary function testing, provided socio-demographic and clinical information, and completed the following standardized instruments: Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, Respiratory Quality of Life Questionnaire, Short-Form 12 Health Survey and the Quality of Life Scale. Multiple regression analyses were performed. A high IP score indicates that a patient believes that his/her illness represents a threat. Participants with a high score on the IP dimensions consequences, identity, concern and emotional representation, experienced more breathlessness. High scores on the IP dimensions consequences, identity and concern were associated with impaired physical health and high scores on the IP dimensions consequences, identity and emotional representation were associated with impaired mental health. Impaired global QOL was associated with high scores on the IP dimensions consequences, identity, concern, coherence and emotional representation. The strength of the associations between breathlessness and physical/mental health and global QOL decreased when certain dimensions of IP were included as predictors, indicating that IP to some extent acts as a mediating factor. These findings may have practical implications of patient counselling by helping COPD patients to cope with their disease by restructuring their personal models of illness.

  15. Attributions about Cause of Illness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoth, Karin F.; Wamboldt, Frederick S.; Bowler, Russell; Make, Barry; Holm, Kristen

    2010-01-01

    Objective Patients’ beliefs about the causes of their illness have been associated with emotional adjustment and behavioral outcomes in several medical conditions; however, few studies have examined illness attributions among patients with COPD. In the current study, patterns of patients’ causal attributions for COPD were identified and examined in relation to health behaviors and symptoms. Method Three-hundred and ninety-four patients with COPD and ≥10 pack year history of smoking completed a self-report questionnaire that included the Illness Perception Questionnaire- Revised (IPQ-R). Results A factor analysis of the IPQ-R cause items using principal axis factoring yielded four individual items (i.e., smoking, heredity, pollution, and personal behavior) and one large factor that was primarily driven by psychological attributions. Ninety-three percent of patients agreed or strongly agreed that smoking was a cause of their COPD. Higher scores on the large IPQ-R factor were associated with reduced quality of life (r=.25, p<.001) and symptoms of anxiety (r=.33, p<.001) and depression (r=.31, p<.001), indicating that patients who attributed their COPD to psychological factors were more likely to have poorer emotional adjustment and quality of life. Conclusions Our finding of one large factor with several stand-alone items is in contrast with previous research that has derived a multi-factor structure for the cause items of the IPQ-R in other chronic illness populations. This difference may be due to the importance of smoking, environmental exposures, and heredity in the development of COPD. Future research should expand upon these specific attributions in COPD‥ PMID:21511077

  16. Health Co-Morbidities in Ageing Persons with Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarron, M.; Gill, M.; McCallion, P.; Begley, C.

    2005-01-01

    Consideration of the relationship between physical and mental health co-morbidities in ageing persons with Down syndrome (DS) and Alzheimer's dementia (AD) is of clinical importance both from a care and resource perspective. To investigate and measure health co-morbidities in ageing persons with Down syndrome with and without AD. Recorded physical…

  17. Methamphetamine exposure and chronic illness in police officers

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Gerald H; Sternquist, Marie C

    2012-01-01

    Background: The medical literature reports health hazards for law enforcement personnel from repeated exposure to methamphetamine and related chemical compounds. Most effects appear transitory, but some Utah police officers with employment-related methamphetamine exposures developed chronic symptoms, some leading to disability. This report is of an uncontrolled retrospective medical chart evaluation of symptomatic officers treated with a sauna detoxification protocol designed to reduce the chronic symptoms and improve the quality of life. Methods: Sixty-nine officers consecutively entering the Utah Meth Cops Project were assessed before and after a treatment program involving gradual exercise, comprehensive nutritional support and physical sauna therapy. Evaluations included pre- and post-treatment scores of the Research and Development Corporation (RAND) 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) in comparison with RAND population norms, pre- and post-treatment symptom score intensities, neurotoxicity scores, Mini-Mental Status Examination, presenting symptom frequencies and a structured evaluation of treatment program safety. Results: Statistically significant health improvements were seen in the SF-36 evaluations, symptom scores and neurotoxicity scores. The detoxification protocol was well tolerated, with a 92.8% completion rate. Conclusions: This investigation strongly suggests that utilizing sauna and nutritional therapy may alleviate chronic symptoms appearing after chemical exposures associated with methamphetamine-related law enforcement activities. This report also has relevance to addressing the apparent ill effects of other complex chemical exposures. In view of the positive clinical outcomes in this group, broader investigation of this sauna-based treatment regimen appears warranted. PMID:22089658

  18. Health Vlogs as Social Support for Chronic Illness Management

    PubMed Central

    HUH, JINA; LIU, LESLIE S.; NEOGI, TINA; INKPEN, KORI; PRATT, WANDA

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown positive impact of video blogs (vlogs) on patient education. However, we know little on how patient-initiated vlogs shape the relationships among vloggers and viewers. We qualitatively analyzed 72 vlogs on YouTube by users diagnosed with HIV, diabetes, or cancer and 1,274 comments posted to the vlogs to understand viewers’ perspectives on the vlogs. We found that the unique video medium allowed intense and enriched personal and contextual disclosure to the viewers, leading to strong community-building activities and social support among vloggers and commenters, both informationally and emotionally. Furthermore, the unique communication structure of the vlogs allowed ad hoc small groups to form, which showed different group behavior than typical text-based social media, such as online communities. We provide implications to the Health Care Industry (HCI) community on how future technologies for health vlogs could be designed to further support chronic illness management. PMID:26146474

  19. Associations between perceived chronic care quality, perceived patient centeredness, and illness representations among persons with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joseph; Iyer, Neeraj N; Collins, William B

    2014-01-01

    Patient beliefs about their illness can motivate behaviors consistent with good disease management. Perceived high-quality chronic care would be expected to increase likelihood of having such beliefs. Associations between perceived quality of chronic care and illness representations, and associations between patient centeredness and illness representations were assessed among persons with diabetes. A mail survey of diabetic patients visiting a multispecialty physician network serving urban and suburban populations in a large midwestern city was conducted. The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care-5A questionnaire was used to assess perceived chronic care quality and patient centeredness. The Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire was used to assess illness representations. Of 500 mailed surveys, 89 completed surveys were returned. The sample consisted mostly of retirees (61%), Whites (81%), and women (60%). Higher perceived chronic care quality was associated with better disease understanding of diabetes (0.24, p = .05). Patients reporting higher patient centeredness (or lower patient-centeredness scores) indicated better disease understanding (-0.26, p = .04) and those reporting higher patient centeredness (or lower patient-centeredness scores) perceived less impact of illness (0.29, p = .02). Chronic care quality as defined in the Chronic Care Model and consistency of chronic care with patient expectations (patient centeredness) was associated with illness representations favorable for good self-care management.

  20. Life after the Shock! The Impact on Families of Caring for Young Children with Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Jean

    2004-01-01

    The stresses experienced by most families include limitations on time, conditions of employment, financial burdens and sibling rivalry. For the families of a child with a chronic illness, these stresses are often compounded, making family functioning problematic. Chronic illness is marked by permanency and the need for ongoing vigilance with…

  1. Identifying the Links between Chronic Illness and Depression: Cognitive-Behavioral Mediators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Dennis C.; And Others

    All chronic illnesses represent assaults on multiple areas of functioning, not just the body. To examine the association between painful chronic illnesses and depression from a cognitive-behavioral perspective, 100 patients of the Pain Management Program at the West Haven, Connecticut Veterans Administration Hospital (78% males) completed a…

  2. Emotionally Focused Interventions for Couples with Chronically Ill Children: A 2-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloutier, Paula F.; Manion, Ian G.; Walker, Jan Gordon; Johnson, Susan M.

    2002-01-01

    Couples with chronically ill children are particularly at risk for experiencing marital distress. The study presented here is a 2-year follow-up of a randomized control trial that assessed the efficacy of Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) in decreasing marital distress in a sample of couples with a chronically ill child. Thirteen couples with…

  3. Outcomes of On-Line Financial Education for Chronically Ill Rural Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Deborah C.; Haynes, George W.; Weinert, Clarann

    2011-01-01

    This research was part of a larger longitudinal study of chronically ill rural women to determine if computer technology could be effective in allowing the women to take control of their own well-being, including finances. The current study examined whether chronically ill rural women can effectively use on-line personal finance educational…

  4. The duality of health technology in chronic illness: how designers envision our future.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Pascale

    2008-06-01

    This essay critically explores the role of technological innovation in the constitution of chronic states and illness. Drawing on the co-construction of technology and society perspective, it focuses more specifically on the way in which innovation designers envisage the enhancement of the chronically ill and build certain kinds of socio-technical configuration to deal with chronic illness. Using the case of ;intelligent distance patient monitoring' as an illustration, the paper argues that technology creates as much as it solves the problem of chronic illness. Technology is recursively embedded in chronic illness and it generates dual effects: it constrains and sustains users' daily practices. Only by recognizing technology's duality and eventually transcending it will research and policy initiatives be able to deal creatively and responsibly with the design of our future health experiences.

  5. Multimorbidity in a Mexican Community: Secondary Analysis of Chronic Illness and Depression Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Kathleen; Vizcaino, Maricarmen; Ibarra, Jorge M.; Balcazar, Hector; Perez, Eduardo; Flores, Luis; Anders, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this article are: 1) to examine the associations between health provider-diagnosed depression and multimorbidity, the condition of suffering from more than two chronic illnesses; 2) to assess the unique contribution of chronic illness in the prediction of depression; and 3) to suggest practice changes that would address risk of depression among individuals with chronic illnesses. Data collected in a cross-sectional community health study among adult Mexicans (n= 274) living in a low income neighborhood (colonia) in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico, were examined. We tested the hypotheses that individuals who reported suffering chronic illnesses would also report higher rates of depression than healthy individuals; and having that two or more chronic illnesses further increased the risk of depression. PMID:26640817

  6. Evaluation of a family systems intervention for managing pediatric chronic illness: Mastering Each New Direction (MEND).

    PubMed

    Distelberg, Brian; Williams-Reade, Jackie; Tapanes, Daniel; Montgomery, Susanne; Pandit, Mayuri

    2014-06-01

    Family systems play a crucial, albeit complex, role in pediatric chronic illness. Unfortunately, very few psychosocial interventions are available to help these stressed families navigate the developmental steps of chronic illness. A new intervention (MEND) addresses the needs of these families and applies to a broad range of chronic illnesses. This article presents this family systems intervention as well as includes preliminary program evaluation data on 22 families that graduated from the program. Results show consistently strong effects across an array of psychosocial measures. Conclusions from this preliminary study suggest that families entering MEND present with high levels of stress due to the child's chronic illness, but after MEND, the level of stress and other functioning measures are comparable to those seen in healthy families, suggesting that the program offers a significant benefit to families with pediatric chronic illness.

  7. Othering the Chronically Ill: A Discourse Analysis of New Zealand Health Policy Documents.

    PubMed

    Walton, Jo Ann; Lazzaro-Salazar, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    It is widely recognized that chronic illnesses pose significant challenges for health care systems around the world. In response, most governments have set health policies in order to manage (or better, reduce) demand and improve the health of their populations. A discourse analysis of four policy documents that shape these strategies in New Zealand reveals that the policies construct the chronically ill as "others," that is, as deviant or different from the "normal" population. The discourse further serves to blame the chronically ill both for being sick, and for placing a serious financial burden on society. We identify problems that arise from this discourse. They relate to (a) the fact that chronic illnesses are so prevalent, (b) the fallacy of categorizing all chronic illnesses as the same,

  8. Multimorbidity in a Mexican Community: Secondary Analysis of Chronic Illness and Depression Outcomes.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Kathleen; Vizcaino, Maricarmen; Ibarra, Jorge M; Balcazar, Hector; Perez, Eduardo; Flores, Luis; Anders, Robert L

    2015-06-01

    The aims of this article are: 1) to examine the associations between health provider-diagnosed depression and multimorbidity, the condition of suffering from more than two chronic illnesses; 2) to assess the unique contribution of chronic illness in the prediction of depression; and 3) to suggest practice changes that would address risk of depression among individuals with chronic illnesses. Data collected in a cross-sectional community health study among adult Mexicans (n= 274) living in a low income neighborhood (colonia) in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico, were examined. We tested the hypotheses that individuals who reported suffering chronic illnesses would also report higher rates of depression than healthy individuals; and having that two or more chronic illnesses further increased the risk of depression.

  9. The relationships of sociodemographic factors, medical, psychiatric, and substance-misuse co-morbidities to neurocognition in short-term abstinent alcohol-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Durazzo, Timothy C; Rothlind, Johannes C; Gazdzinski, Stefan; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2008-09-01

    Co-morbidities that commonly accompany those afflicted with an alcohol use disorder (AUD) may promote variability in the pattern and magnitude of neurocognitive abnormalities demonstrated. The goal of this study was to investigate the influence of several common co-morbid medical conditions (primarily hypertension and hepatitis C), psychiatric (primarily unipolar mood and anxiety disorders), and substance use (primarily psychostimulant and cannabis) disorders, and chronic cigarette smoking on the neurocognitive functioning in short-term abstinent, treatment-seeking individuals with AUD. Seventy-five alcohol-dependent participants (ALC; 51+/-9 years of age; three females) completed comprehensive neurocognitive testing after approximately 1 month of abstinence. Multivariate multiple linear regression evaluated the relationships among neurocognitive variables and medical conditions, psychiatric, and substance-use disorders, controlling for sociodemographic factors. Sixty-four percent of ALC had at least one medical, psychiatric, or substance-abuse co-morbidity (excluding smoking). Smoking status (smoker or nonsmoker) and age were significant independent predictors of cognitive efficiency, general intelligence, postural stability, processing speed, and visuospatial memory after age-normed adjustment and control for estimated pre-morbid verbal intelligence, education, alcohol consumption, and medical, psychiatric, and substance-misuse co-morbidities. Results indicated that chronic smoking accounted for a significant portion of the variance in the neurocognitive performance of this middle-aged AUD cohort. The age-related findings for ALC suggest that alcohol dependence, per se, was associated with diminished neurocognitive functioning with increasing age. The study of participants who demonstrate common co-morbidities observed in AUD is necessary to fully understand how AUD, as a clinical syndrome, affects neurocognition, brain neurobiology, and their changes with

  10. A Role for Homeostatic Drive in the Perpetuation of Complex Chronic Illness: Gulf War Illness and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, Travis J. A.; Fritsch, Paul; Rice, Mark A.; del Rosario, Ryan M.; Miller, Diane B.; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Klimas, Nancy G.; Broderick, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    A key component in the body's stress response, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis orchestrates changes across a broad range of major biological systems. Its dysfunction has been associated with numerous chronic diseases including Gulf War Illness (GWI) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Though tightly coupled with other components of endocrine and immune function, few models of HPA function account for these interactions. Here we extend conventional models of HPA function by including feed-forward and feedback interaction with sex hormone regulation and immune response. We use this multi-axis model to explore the role of homeostatic regulation in perpetuating chronic conditions, specifically GWI and CFS. An important obstacle in building these models across regulatory systems remains the scarcity of detailed human in vivo kinetic data as its collection can present significant health risks to subjects. We circumvented this using a discrete logic representation based solely on literature of physiological and biochemical connectivity to provide a qualitative description of system behavior. This connectivity model linked molecular variables across the HPA axis, hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in men and women, as well as a simple immune network. Inclusion of these interactions produced multiple alternate homeostatic states and sexually dimorphic responses. Experimental data for endocrine-immune markers measured in male GWI subjects showed the greatest alignment with predictions of a naturally occurring alternate steady state presenting with hypercortisolism, low testosterone and a shift towards a Th1 immune response. In female CFS subjects, expression of these markers aligned with an alternate homeostatic state displaying hypocortisolism, high estradiol, and a shift towards an anti-inflammatory Th2 activation. These results support a role for homeostatic drive in perpetuating dysfunctional cortisol levels through persistent interaction with the

  11. The contribution of chronic illness to acceptance of death in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Joyce; Riegel, Barbara

    2002-02-01

    This pilot study explored acceptance of death in the chronically ill. It was hypothesized that chronic illness would be a positive predictor of premature acceptance of death. Acceptance of death, if premature, may lead to untimely acquiescence to death, making people less likely to seek medical care and practice preventive health behaviors. A correlational design was used to explore the relationship between chronic illness and acceptance of death, controlling for age. Data were collected on death acceptance using the revised version of the Life Attitude Profile. Number of chronic illnesses was obtained from self-report and a review of the medical record in a sample of 76 hospitalized individuals. The number of chronic illnesses was significantly and positively associated with death acceptance, but age was not. The model explained only 5.2% of the variance in death acceptance, however. Chronic illness is clearly only one of many factors stimulating individuals to ponder death earlier than expected. Nurses need to be alert to the possibility that individuals with multiple chronic illnesses may be prematurely acquiescing to death. If acquiescence causes failure to participate in care, it could potentially exacerbate chronic conditions unnecessarily.

  12. The pre-travel medical evaluation: the traveler with chronic illness and the geriatric traveler.

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    The pre-travel medical evaluation of elderly patients and patients with chronic illness requires special assessment and advice. Screening and special precautions are reviewed for traveling patients with respiratory disease, cardiac disease, sinusitis, diabetes mellitus, HIV infection, and other chronic medical conditions. Current guidelines for empiric therapy and prophylaxis of travelers' diarrhea are reviewed, with emphasis on concerns in geriatric or chronically ill travelers. Special considerations such as potential drug-drug interactions and insurance coverage are also discussed. PMID:1290273

  13. Quality of Life in Carotid Atherosclerosis: The Role of Co-morbid Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lecca, Maria; Saba, Luca; Sanfilippo, Roberto; Pintus, Elisa; Cadoni, Michela; Sancassiani, Federica; Francesca Moro, Maria; Craboledda, Davide; Lo Giudice, Chiara; Montisci, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction/Objective: To study in severe carotid atherosclerosis (CA): the frequency of mood disorders (MD); the impairment of quality of life (QoL); the role of co-morbid MD in such impairment. Methods: Case-control study. Cases: consecutive in-patients with CA (stenosis ≥ 50%). Controls: subjects with no diagnosis of CA randomized from a database of a community survey. Psychiatric diagnosis according to DSM-IV made by clinicians and semi-structured interview, QoL measured by the Short Form Health Survey (SF-12). Results: This is the first study on comorbidity on CA disease and MD in which psychiatric diagnoses are conducted by clinicians according to DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) (17.4% vs 2.72%, P <0.0001) but not Bipolar Disorders (BD) (4.3% vs 0.5%, P = 0.99) was higher in cases (N=46) than in controls (N= 184). SF-12 scores in cases were lower than in controls (30.56±8.12 vs 36.81±6:40; p <0.001) with QoL comparable to serious chronic diseases of the central nervous system. The burden of a concomitant MDD or BD amplifies QoL impairment. Conclusion: Comorbid MD aggravates the impairment of QoL in CA. Unlike autoimmune diseases or degenerative diseases of the Central Nervous System, CA shows a strong risk of MDD than BD. PMID:27346995

  14. The indirect economic impacts of co-morbidities on people with depression.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Deborah J; Callander, Emily J; Shrestha, Rupendra N; Passey, Megan E; Percival, Richard; Kelly, Simon J

    2013-06-01

    It is known that people with depression often have other co-morbid conditions; however this is rarely acknowledged in studies that access the economic impacts of depression. This paper aims to quantify the association between co-morbid health conditions and labour force status and economic circumstances of people with depression. This study undertakes cross-sectional analysis using a dataset that is representative of the 45-64 year old Australian population with depression. The probability of being out of the labour force increases with increasing number of co-morbidities, and the amount of weekly income received by people with depression decreased with increasing numbers of co-morbidities. Those with depression and three or more co-morbidities were 4.31 times more likely to be out of the labour force (95% CI: 1.74-10.68), and received a weekly private income 88% lower (95% CI: -94%, -75%) than people with depression alone. It is important to consider the co-morbid conditions an individual has when assessing the impact of depression on labour force participation and economic circumstances.

  15. Coping with Chronic Illness: A Study of Illness Controllability and the Influence of Coping Strategies on Psychological Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felton, Barbara J.; Revenson, Tracey A.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluated the emotional consequences of using wish-fulfilling fantasy (palliative) and information-seeking (instrumental) coping strategies among patients (N=151) faced with chronic illness. Results showed information-seeking to have positive effects on adjustment and wish-fulfilling fantasy to have deleterious consequences. (LLL)

  16. The Use of Self-Care Agency To Meet the Need for Solitude and Social Interaction by Chronically Ill Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Margaret A.

    This study examined the effect of chronic illness on the individual's ability to meet his or her need for solitude and for social interaction by exploring how chronically ill individuals used their own ability (self-care agency) to meet these needs. Subjects were 90 chronically ill older persons, 30 of whom were living at home, 30 who lived in a…

  17. Loneliness and Quality of Life in Chronically Ill Rural Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Theeke, Laurie A.; Mallow, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Background Loneliness is a contributing factor to various health problems in older adults, including complex chronic illness, functional decline, and increased risk of mortality. Objectives A pilot study was conducted to learn more about the prevalence of loneliness in rural older adults with chronic illness and how it affects their quality of life. The purposes of the data analysis reported here were twofold: to describe loneliness, chronic illness diagnoses, chronic illness control measures, prescription medication use, and quality of life in a sample of rural older adults; and to examine the relationships among these elements. Methods A convenience sample of 60 chronically ill older adults who were community dwelling and living in Appalachia was assessed during face-to-face interviews for loneliness and quality of life, using the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Loneliness Scale (version 3) and the CASP-12 quality of life scale. Chronic illness diagnoses, chronic illness control measures, and medication use data were collected through review of participants’ electronic medical records. Results Overall mean loneliness scores indicated significant loneliness. Participants with a mood disorder such as anxiety or depression had the highest mean loneliness scores, followed by those with lung disease and those with heart disease. Furthermore, participants with mood disorders, lung disease, or heart disease had significantly higher loneliness scores than those without these conditions. Loneliness was significantly related to total number of chronic illnesses and use of benzodiazepines. Use of benzodiazepines, diuretics, nitrates, and bronchodilators were each associated with a lower quality of life. Conclusions Nurses should assess for loneliness as part of their comprehensive assessment of patients with chronic illness. Further research is needed to design and test interventions for loneliness. PMID:23958674

  18. An application of the transactional model to the analysis of chronic illness narratives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrea M; Poole, Gary

    2005-03-01

    The authors' aim in this study was to describe the chronic illness experience and its relationship to the concept to finding meaning. They conducted interviews using a narrative approach with 15 adults experiencing various chronic illnesses and analyzed narrative data using a combination of holistic-content and categorical-content approaches. The three major categories were the context of the chronic illness experience, personal reactions, and coping efforts. These categories were best interpreted in terms of a transactional model. The authors categorized finding meaning under cognitive coping strategies and described it as a strategy that was part of a larger coping repertoire.

  19. Self-esteem of children and adolescents with chronic illness: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pinquart, M

    2013-03-01

    Chronic illness may be a risk factor for low self-esteem; however, previous meta-analyses are inconclusive whether children with a chronic illness have lower self-esteem than their healthy peers. The goal of the present study was to summarize available research in order to compare the self-esteem of children and adolescents with a chronic illness with that of healthy children. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to integrate the results of 621 empirical studies that compare levels of self-esteem of children with a chronic physical illness with healthy peers or general test norms. Studies were identified via the electronic databases Adolesc, Embase, Google Scholar, MEDLINE, PSNYDEX, PSYCINFO, and cross-referencing. Children with chronic illnesses have lower self-esteem than healthy peers or test norms (g = -0.18 standard deviation units). The lowest levels of self-esteem were observed in children with chronic fatigue syndrome and chronic headaches. Lower levels of self-esteem in children with a chronic illness were found in girls than in boys, in adolescents than in children, in children from developing or threshold countries, when results were collected from observer ratings rather than child reports, in studies published in the 1990s, and when children with chronic illnesses were directly compared with healthy children instead of test norms. Paediatricians, parents, and teachers should promote experiences of success and positive peer-relations, which are important sources of self-esteem. In addition, psychosocial interventions for children with chronic illnesses should be offered for children with reduced self-esteem.

  20. Risk of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in relation to maternal co-morbid mood and migraine disorders during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cripe, Swee May; Frederick, Ihunnaya O; Qiu, Chunfang; Williams, Michelle A

    2011-03-01

    We evaluated the risks of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy among pregnant women with mood and migraine disorders, using a cohort study of 3432 pregnant women. Maternal pre-pregnancy or early pregnancy (<20 weeks gestation) mood disorder and pre-pregnancy migraine diagnoses were ascertained from interview and medical record review. We fitted generalised linear models to derive risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy for women with isolated mood, isolated migraine and co-morbid mood-migraine disorders, respectively. Reported RR were adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, marital status, parity, smoking status, chronic hypertension or pre-existing diabetes mellitus, and pre-pregnancy body mass index. Women without mood or migraine disorders were defined as the reference group. The risks for preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy were more consistently elevated among women with co-morbid mood-migraine disorders than among women with isolated mood or migraine disorder. Women with co-morbid disorders were almost twice as likely to deliver preterm (adjusted RR=1.87, 95% CI 1.05, 3.34) compared with the reference group. There was no clear evidence of increased risks of preterm delivery and its subtypes with isolated migraine disorder. Women with mood disorder had elevated risks of pre-eclampsia (adjusted RR=3.57, 95% CI 1.83, 6.99). Our results suggest an association between isolated migraine disorder and pregnancy-induced hypertension (adjusted RR=1.42, 95% CI 1.00, 2.01). This is the first study examining perinatal outcomes in women with co-morbid mood-migraine disorders. Pregnant women with a history of migraine may benefit from screening for depression during prenatal care and vigilant monitoring, especially for women with co-morbid mood and migraine disorders.

  1. Blood Biomarkers of Chronic Inflammation in Gulf War Illness

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Gerhard J.; Slater, Billie C. S.; Leis, Linda A.; Rector, Thomas S.; Bach, Ronald R.

    2016-01-01

    Background More than twenty years following the end of the 1990–1991 Gulf War it is estimated that approximately 300,000 veterans of this conflict suffer from an unexplained chronic, multi-system disorder known as Gulf War Illness (GWI). The etiology of GWI may be exposure to chemical toxins, but it remains only partially defined, and its case definition is based only on symptoms. Objective criteria for the diagnosis of GWI are urgently needed for diagnosis and therapeutic research. Objective This study was designed to determine if blood biomarkers could provide objective criteria to assist diagnosis of GWI. Design A surveillance study of 85 Gulf War Veteran volunteers identified from the Department of Veterans Affairs Minnesota Gulf War registry was performed. All subjects were deployed to the Gulf War. Fifty seven subjects had GWI defined by CDC criteria, and 28 did not have symptomatic criteria for a diagnosis of GWI. Statistical analyses were performed on peripheral blood counts and assays of 61 plasma proteins using the Mann-Whitney rank sum test to compare biomarker distributions and stepwise logistic regression to formulate a diagnostic model. Results Lymphocyte, monocyte, neutrophil, and platelet counts were higher in GWI subjects. Six serum proteins associated with inflammation were significantly different in GWI subjects. A diagnostic model of three biomarkers—lymphocytes, monocytes, and C reactive protein—had a predicted probability of 90% (CI 76–90%) for diagnosing GWI when the probability of having GWI was above 70%. Significance The results of the current study indicate that inflammation is a component of the pathobiology of GWI. Analysis of the data resulted in a model utilizing three readily measurable biomarkers that appears to significantly augment the symptom-based case definition of GWI. These new observations are highly relevant to the diagnosis of GWI, and to therapeutic trials. PMID:27352030

  2. 77 FR 64597 - Proposed Information Collection (Survey of Chronic Gastrointestinal Illness in Persian Gulf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... gastrointestinal illness in Persian Gulf Veterans was caused by the presence of bacteria in the intestines and whether eradication of these bacteria reduces symptoms of chronic diarrhea. Affected Public:...

  3. 78 FR 6404 - Agency Information Collection (Survey of Chronic Gastrointestinal Illness in Persian Gulf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... gastrointestinal illness in Persian Gulf Veterans was caused by ] the presence of bacteria in the intestines and whether eradication of these bacteria reduces symptoms of chronic diarrhea. An agency may not conduct...

  4. Defining Pediatric Chronic Critical Illness for Clinical Care, Research, and Policy.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Miriam C; Henderson, Carrie M; Hutton, Nancy; Boss, Renee D

    2017-04-01

    Chronically critically ill pediatric patients represent an emerging population in NICUs and PICUs. Chronic critical illness has been recognized and defined in the adult population, but the same attention has not been systematically applied to pediatrics. This article reviews what is currently known about pediatric chronic critical illness, highlighting the unique aspects of chronic critical illness in infants and children, including specific considerations of prognosis, outcomes, and decision-making. We propose a definition that incorporates NICU versus PICU stays, recurrent ICU admissions, dependence on life-sustaining technology, multiorgan dysfunction, underlying medical complexity, and the developmental implications of congenital versus acquired conditions. We propose a research agenda, highlighting existing knowledge gaps and targeting areas of improvement in clinical care, research, and policy.

  5. Including Young Children With "New" Chronic Illnesses in an Early Childhood Education Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauvre, Mary

    1988-01-01

    Presents suggestions for successfully including young children with "new" life-threatening, chronic illnesses -- various types of cancer, heart, liver, and kidney diseases -- in early childhood education classes. (BB)

  6. Gender Differences in Compulsive Buying Disorder: Assessment of Demographic and Psychiatric Co-Morbidities

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoun S.; Requião, Marinalva G.; Marasaldi, Renata F.; Filomensky, Tatiana Z.; Hodgins, David C.; Tavares, Hermano

    2016-01-01

    Compulsive buying is a common disorder found worldwide. Although recent research has shed light into the prevalence, etiology and clinical correlates of compulsive buying disorder, less is known about gender differences. To address this empirical gap, we assessed potential gender differences in demographic and psychiatric co-morbidities in a sample of 171 compulsive buyers (20 men and 151 women) voluntarily seeking treatment in São Paulo, Brazil. A structured clinical interview confirmed the diagnosis of compulsive buying. Of the 171 participants, 95.9% (n = 164) met criteria for at least one co-morbid psychiatric disorder. The results found that male and female compulsive buyers did not differ in problem severity as assessed by the Compulsive Buying Scale. However, several significant demographic and psychiatric differences were found in a multivariate binary logistic regression. Specifically, male compulsive buyers were more likely to report being non-heterosexual, and reported fewer years of formal education. In regards to psychiatric co-morbidities, male compulsive buyers were more likely to be diagnosed with sexual addiction, and intermittent explosive disorder. Conversely, men had lower scores on the shopping subscale of the Shorter PROMIS Questionnaire. The results suggest that male compulsive buyers are more likely to present with co-morbid psychiatric disorders. Treatment planning for compulsive buying disorder would do well to take gender into account to address for potential psychiatric co-morbidities. PMID:27907082

  7. Gender Differences in Compulsive Buying Disorder: Assessment of Demographic and Psychiatric Co-Morbidities.

    PubMed

    Nicoli de Mattos, Cristiana; Kim, Hyoun S; Requião, Marinalva G; Marasaldi, Renata F; Filomensky, Tatiana Z; Hodgins, David C; Tavares, Hermano

    2016-01-01

    Compulsive buying is a common disorder found worldwide. Although recent research has shed light into the prevalence, etiology and clinical correlates of compulsive buying disorder, less is known about gender differences. To address this empirical gap, we assessed potential gender differences in demographic and psychiatric co-morbidities in a sample of 171 compulsive buyers (20 men and 151 women) voluntarily seeking treatment in São Paulo, Brazil. A structured clinical interview confirmed the diagnosis of compulsive buying. Of the 171 participants, 95.9% (n = 164) met criteria for at least one co-morbid psychiatric disorder. The results found that male and female compulsive buyers did not differ in problem severity as assessed by the Compulsive Buying Scale. However, several significant demographic and psychiatric differences were found in a multivariate binary logistic regression. Specifically, male compulsive buyers were more likely to report being non-heterosexual, and reported fewer years of formal education. In regards to psychiatric co-morbidities, male compulsive buyers were more likely to be diagnosed with sexual addiction, and intermittent explosive disorder. Conversely, men had lower scores on the shopping subscale of the Shorter PROMIS Questionnaire. The results suggest that male compulsive buyers are more likely to present with co-morbid psychiatric disorders. Treatment planning for compulsive buying disorder would do well to take gender into account to address for potential psychiatric co-morbidities.

  8. Sense Making Process in Defining Health for People with Chronic Illness and Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Youngkhill; McCormick, Bryan P.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a sense-making process in defining health, particularly as related to people with chronic illness and disabilities, reviewing existing concepts of health, examining how people make sense of their disability and illness from an existential perspective, offering two concepts (life story and sense of coherence) relevant to this existential…

  9. Illness Perception and Information Behaviour of Patients with Rare Chronic Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katavic, Snježana Stanarevic; Tanackovic, Sanjica Faletar; Badurina, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study examined possible correlations between health information behaviour and illness perception among patients with rare chronic diseases. Illness perception is related to coping strategies used by patients, and some health information behaviour practices may be associated with better coping and more positive perception of…

  10. Profiles of Chronic Illness Knowledge in a Community Sample of American Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Todd

    2009-01-01

    The author identified profiles of chronic illness knowledge (i.e., heart disease, cancer, diabetes) in a community sample of American adults and examined the effect of sociodemographic influences on relations of illness knowledge to health practices and well-being. Participants were 181 women and 120 men who completed measures of illness…

  11. A Dyadic Approach: Applying a Developmental-Conceptual Model to Couples Coping with Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Checton, Maria G.; Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Venetis, Maria K.; Greene, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to apply Berg and Upchurch's developmental-conceptual model toward a better understanding of how couples cope with chronic illness. Specifically, a model was hypothesized in which proximal factors (relational quality), dyadic appraisal (illness interference), and dyadic coping (partner support) influence…

  12. The College Experience for Students with Chronic Illness: Implications for Academic Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houman, Katie M.; Stapley, Janice C.

    2013-01-01

    A purposive sample (2 males, 3 females) of students (aged 18-29 years) with chronic illness completed standardized measures and a semi-structured interview. Content analysis of the interview data revealed two themes: stress exacerbating symptoms of illness and a desire for a support group on campus. Viewed through the theory of emerging adulthood,…

  13. [Biography-oriented diagnostics in counselling of patients with chronic illness].

    PubMed

    Darmann-Finck, Ingrid; Sahm, Martina

    2006-10-01

    The article examines two concepts of counselling of patients by nurses that are popular in the German-speaking area with regard to their underlying scientific standpoint and ideals and their implications on counselling-process and -result. The authors determine that both concepts disregard the biographic construction processes which are so important for coping with and tackling chronic illness. The article concludes with a discussion of prospective use of biographic diagnostics in counselling of patients with chronic illness.

  14. The Relationship between Age and Illness Duration in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Elizabeth; Brown, Abigail; McManimen, Stephanie; Jason, Leonard A.; Newton, Julia L.; Strand, Elin Bolle

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating illness, but it is unclear if patient age and illness duration might affect symptoms and functioning of patients. In the current study, participants were categorized into four groups based upon age (under or over age 55) and illness duration (more or less than 10 years). The groups were compared on functioning and symptoms. Findings indicated that those who were older with a longer illness duration had significantly higher levels of mental health functioning than those who were younger with a shorter or longer illness duration and the older group with a shorter illness duration. The results suggest that older patients with an illness duration of over 10 years have significantly higher levels of mental health functioning than the three other groups. For symptoms, the younger/longer illness duration group had significantly worse immune and autonomic domains than the older/longer illness group. In addition, the younger patients with a longer illness duration displayed greater autonomic and immune symptoms in comparison to the older group with a longer illness duration. These findings suggest that both age and illness duration need to be considered when trying to understand the influence of these factors on patients. PMID:27110826

  15. Psoriasis: Epidemiology, clinical features, co-morbidities, and clinical scoring

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Sunil; Mahajan, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of current evidence derived from hospital-based studies, mostly from North India, the prevalence of psoriasis in adults varies from 0.44 to 2.8%, with a much lower prevalence in children. The peak age at onset in adults is in the third and fourth decade of life, with a slight male preponderance. It is recommended that population-based large epidemiologic studies should be undertaken in different parts of the country for estimating the correct prevalence of psoriasis in general population. Chronic plaque-type psoriasis is the most common morphologic presentation of psoriasis, accounting for more than 90% of all cases. Other morphologic variants that deserve special mention include palmoplantar psoriasis, pustular psoriasis, and recalcitrant psoriasis. For epidemiologic purposes, psoriasis can be classified into early and late onset psoriasis. Psoriasis can be classified on the basis of morphology and extent of involvement into localized and widespread disease. For the purpose of clinical trials, psoriasis may be classified as mild psoriasis, moderate psoriasis, and severe psoriasis. The literature shows that there is a significant risk of psoriatic arthritis (7–48%) in patients with plaque-type psoriasis. Hence, it is recommended to evaluate for its presence by detailed history taking and clinical examination, and if necessary, by appropriate radiological investigations. Evidence on the association between plaque-type psoriasis and cardiovascular disease risk factors and ischemic heart disease isinconsistent. On the basis ofavailable evidence, it is prudent to proactively look for metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, and obesity, especially in patientswith severe psoriasis (Level 1+ evidence based on systematic reviews and meta-analysis). Based on the current evidence, the psoriasis area severity index appears to be the most valid and reproducible clinical severity score in the management of adult patients with plaque-type psoriasis. PMID:27990381

  16. Cardiovascular and musculskeletal co-morbidities in patients with alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Determining the presence and extent of co-morbidities is fundamental in assessing patients with chronic respiratory disease, where increased cardiovascular risk, presence of osteoporosis and low muscle mass have been recognised in several disease states. We hypothesised that the systemic consequences are evident in a further group of subjects with COPD due to Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (A1ATD), yet are currently under-recognised. Methods We studied 19 patients with PiZZ A1ATD COPD and 20 age, sex and smoking matched controls, all subjects free from known cardiovascular disease. They underwent spirometry, haemodynamic measurements including aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), an independent predictor or cardiovascular risk, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry to determine body composition and bone mineral density. Results The aPWV was greater in patients: 9.9(2.1) m/s than controls: 8.5(1.6) m/s, p = 0.03, despite similar mean arterial pressure (MAP). The strongest predictors of aPWV were age, FEV1% predicted and MAP (all p < 0.01). Osteoporosis was present in 8/19 patients (2/20 controls) and was previously unsuspected in 7 patients. The fat free mass and bone mineral density were lower in patients than controls (p < 0.001). Conclusions Patients with A1ATD related COPD have increased aortic stiffness suggesting increased risk of cardiovascular disease and evidence of occult musculoskeletal changes, all likely to contribute hugely to overall morbidity and mortality. PMID:21138571

  17. Genetic susceptibility to lung cancer and co-morbidities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ian A; Holloway, John W; Fong, Kwun M

    2013-10-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer death and disease burden in many countries. Understanding of the biological pathways involved in lung cancer aetiology is required to identify key biomolecules that could be of significant clinical value, either as predictive, prognostic or diagnostic markers, or as targets for the development of novel therapies to treat this disease, in addition to smoking avoidance strategies. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have enabled significant progress in the past 5 years in investigating genetic susceptibility to lung cancer. Large scale, multi-cohort GWAS of mainly Caucasian, smoking, populations have identified strong associations for lung cancer mapped to chromosomal regions 15q [nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits: CHRNA3, CHRNA5], 5p (TERT-CLPTM1L locus) and 6p (BAT3-MSH5). Some studies in Asian populations of smokers have found similar risk loci, whereas GWAS in never smoking Asian females have identified associations in other chromosomal regions, e.g., 3q (TP63), that are distinct from smoking-related lung cancer risk loci. GWAS of smoking behaviour have identified risk loci for smoking quantity at 15q (similar genes to lung cancer susceptibility: CHRNA3, CHRNA5) and 19q (CYP2A6). Other genes have been mapped for smoking initiation and smoking cessation. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is a known risk factor for lung cancer, GWAS in large cohorts have also found CHRNA3 and CHRNA5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mapping at 15q as risk loci, as well as other regions at 4q31 (HHIP), 4q24 (FAM13A) and 5q (HTR4). The overlap in risk loci between lung cancer, smoking behaviour and COPD may be due to the effects of nicotine addiction; however, more work needs to be undertaken to explore the potential direct effects of nicotine and its metabolites in gene-environment interaction in these phenotypes. Goals of future genetic susceptibility studies of lung cancer should focus on

  18. The Role of Adult Learning in Coping with Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly half the U.S. population copes with a chronic disease or condition. A chronic disease is "one lasting three months or more that generally cannot be prevented by vaccines or cured by medication." Heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and obesity are the most common chronic diseases in developed countries. By 2030, it is estimated that…

  19. Beyond pharmacotherapy: understanding the links between obesity and chronic mental illness.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Valerie H; McIntyre, Roger S; Remington, Gary; Levitan, Robert D; Stonehocker, Brian; Sharma, Arya M

    2012-01-01

    While differences in weight-gain potential exist, both between and within classes of psychiatry medications, most commonly used atypical antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants result in some degree of weight gain. This is not new information and it requires an understanding of the tolerability profiles of different treatments and their goodness of fit with specific patient phenotypes. However, this iatrogenic association represents only a piece of this obesity-mental illness dyad. The complex interplay between psychiatric illness and weight involves neurobiology, psychology, and sociological factors. Parsing the salient variables in people with mental illness is an urgent need insofar as mortality from physical health causes is the most common cause of premature mortality in people with chronic mental illness. Our review examines issues associated with common chronic mental illnesses that may underlie this association and warrant further study if we hope to clinically intervene to control this life-threatening comorbidity.

  20. Comorbidity Factors and Brain Mechanisms Linking Chronic Stress and Systemic Illness

    PubMed Central

    Duric, Vanja; Clayton, Sarah; Leong, Mai Lan; Yuan, Li-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms and mental illness are commonly present in patients with chronic systemic diseases. Mood disorders, such as depression, are present in up to 50% of these patients, resulting in impaired physical recovery and more intricate treatment regimen. Stress associated with both physical and emotional aspects of systemic illness is thought to elicit detrimental effects to initiate comorbid mental disorders. However, clinical reports also indicate that the relationship between systemic and psychiatric illnesses is bidirectional, further increasing the complexity of the underlying pathophysiological processes. In this review, we discuss the recent evidence linking chronic stress and systemic illness, such as activation of the immune response system and release of common proinflammatory mediators. Altogether, discovery of new targets is needed for development of better treatments for stress-related psychiatric illnesses as well as improvement of mental health aspects of different systemic diseases. PMID:26977323

  1. Within the web: the family-practitioner relationship in the context of chronic childhood illness.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Annette R; Smythe, Elizabeth; Spence, Deb

    2006-12-01

    This hermeneutic phenomenological study explores the relationship between health professionals and families who have a child with a chronic illness. Study participants included 10 family groups who had a child with a chronic illness and 12 practitioners from the disciplines of nursing, medicine, dietetics, physiotherapy and speech therapy. Data were collected by narrative audiotaped interviewing. The results of this study revealed that chronic childhood illness 'throws' families and practitioners together into a web of relationships, which must work for the sake of the child. However, children are usually excluded from the relationship. To understand and manage the child's illness, practitioners and families 'go around' and act 'in-between' relationships. While the quality of the relationship from the family perspective is not essential, relationships are more successful when practitioners recognize the uniqueness of each family web. The nature of the relationship is often simple, yet it coexists with complexity.

  2. Antibodies to squalene in US Navy Persian Gulf War veterans with chronic multisymptom illness.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christopher J; Matyas, Gary R; Hansen, Christian J; Alving, Carl R; Smith, Tyler C; Ryan, Margaret A K

    2009-06-12

    Since the end of the 1991 Gulf War, there have been reports of unexplained, multisymptom illnesses afflicting veterans who consistently report more symptoms than do nondeployed veterans. One of the many possible exposures suspected of causing chronic multisymptom illnesses Gulf War veterans is squalene, thought to be present in anthrax vaccine. We examined the relationship between squalene antibodies and chronic symptoms reported by Navy construction workers (Seabees), n=579. 30.2% were deployers, 7.4% were defined as ill, and 43.5% were positive for squalene antibodies. We found no association between squalene antibody status and chronic multisymptom illness (p=0.465). The etiology of Gulf War syndrome remains unknown, but should not include squalene antibody status.

  3. A meta-ethnographic synthesis on phenomenographic studies of patients’ experiences of chronic illness

    PubMed Central

    Röing, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Phenomenography is a qualitative research approach developed within an educational framework, focusing on the qualitative experience of learning. It is also being used, to a lesser degree, in healthcare research. In the present study, we conducted a meta-ethnographic synthesis of phenomenographic studies on chronic illness, in order to give a broader perspective of how chronic illness can be experienced. Our aim was not to describe patients’ various individual experiences of illness, but instead to identify the different ways chronic illness can be experienced by patients. Our synthesis and phenomenographic interpretation of 12 selected articles found that patients’ experiences of chronic illness can be described in terms of a different lived body, a struggle with threat to identity and self-esteem, a diminished lifeworld, and a challenging reality. These experiences relate to each other in a process of recurring loops, where the different ways of experiencing continue to influence each other over time. According to these findings, the use of phenomenography as a research approach has the potential to add to the understanding of how chronic illness can be experienced. Patients may benefit from seeing that their illness can be experienced in many different ways and that it has many aspects, which then can lead to a better understanding and coping with their illness. We suggest that it may be worthwhile to expand the scope of phenomenography outside pedagogics. This presupposes a revision of the application to include a wider and more comprehensive description, for instance, of the different ways illness and healthcare phenomena can be experienced, and how these different ways are related to each other, with less focus on hierarchical relations. PMID:25690674

  4. College Freshmen with Chronic Illness: A Comparison with Healthy First-Year Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herts, Kate L.; Wallis, Elizabeth; Maslow, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Over the past four decades, advances in medicine have decreased the mortality rates of many previously fatal chronic diseases. Children who would have died early in life are now living well into adulthood, and many are matriculating as college students. Data regarding the prevalence of chronic illness among college students, the college experience…

  5. An Evaluation of Collaborative Interventions to Improve Chronic Illness Care: Framework and Study Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cretin, Shan; Shortell, Stephen M.; Keeler, Emmett B.

    2004-01-01

    The authors' dual-purpose evaluation assesses the effectiveness of formal collaboratives in stimulating organizational changes to improve chronic illness care (the chronic care model or CCM). Intervention and comparison sites are compared before and after introduction of the CCM. Multiple data sources are used to measure the degree of…

  6. Symptoms of Depression in a Hispanic Primary Care Population With and Without Chronic Medical Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Reinschmidt, Kerstin M.; Moreno, Francisco A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To describe somatic and psychiatric symptoms reported by Hispanic primary care patients with and without depression and/or chronic medical illnesses. Method: Adult Hispanic patients (n = 104) in a Mobile Health Program in underserved southern Arizona participated in a survey conducted between September 2006 and February 2007 to obtain information about the somatic and psychiatric symptoms that they were experiencing. They were asked to rate the severity of their symptoms listed in the depression screen Personal Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R), and 5 new symptoms described by patients in focus groups conducted in the first phase of the project. Patients were categorized as depressed if their PHQ-9 scores were 10 or above, and they were further categorized as having or not having chronic illnesses based on self-report. Analyses of variance were conducted for each SCL-90-R symptom dimension to compare across the 4 groups (group 1: not depressed and not medically ill; group 2: medically ill but not depressed; group 3: depressed but not medically ill; and group 4: depressed and medically ill). Results: Patients with chronic medical illnesses comorbid with depression were found to report significantly more somatic symptoms than those with only chronic medical illnesses or depression alone (P ≤ .001). They also reported significantly more psychopathology than patients with depression alone (P ≤ .05 or better). Conclusions: Patients with medical illnesses comorbid with depression are more likely to exhibit psychopathology than patients with medical illnesses or depression alone. PMID:20944771

  7. Effects of being uninsured on ethnic minorities' management of chronic illness

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Gay

    2001-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness with which insured and uninsured persons with chronic illnesses managed their health care. Design Recruited volunteers diagnosed with a variety of chronic illnesses who underwent 3 semistructured interviews in a 1-year period. Setting Volunteers were recruited through referrals, flyers, and face-to-face contacts from community health clinics, senior centers, acute care hospitals, and home care services in 2 urban counties in California between December 1997 and December 2000. Participants A total of 297 persons between the ages of 23 and 97 years (35% African American, 33% Latino, and 32% Filipino American), of whom 42 (14%) had no health insurance. Main outcome measures Qualitative analysis of interview data compared insured and uninsured respondents on a series of components of chronic illness management, including control over illness, frequency of health crises, procuring medication, use of medication, understanding of the illness, knowledge of self-care measures, and awareness of risk factors. Whether respondents were under the care of a regular physician was also assessed. Results Compared with insured respondents, uninsured respondents were much less effective at managing their illnesses. The uninsured had poorly controlled illnesses, frequent health crises, difficulty procuring medication, used medication incorrectly, demonstrated poor understanding of their illness, and displayed little knowledge of self-care measures or risk awareness. They rarely had a regular physician or attended a specific health clinic. Conclusions The findings suggest that not only did uninsured persons with chronic health conditions lack adequate health care, their illnesses were also poorly controlled. Inadequately educated about their health, uninsured persons lacked the information, insight, and tools that would have allowed them to manage their illnesses more effectively. PMID:11431394

  8. Say 'trouble's gone': chronic illness and employability in job training programmes.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Emma K

    2013-01-01

    The concept of biographical disruption has unique relevance for socioeconomically disadvantaged groups who participate in entry-level job training programmes. In these programmes trainees often suffer from various forms of chronic illness and must arrange these illnesses into a picture of employability. In this article I use ethnographic data and narrative analysis to examine closely two trainees' illness-related experiences, expressions and talk, and find that their ability to present their illnesses in ways that are consistent with programmatic goals is strongly influenced by family support, responsibilities and roles, as well as particular aspects of illness, like the interpretability of symptoms. I also find that the concept of biographical disruption has a curious traction in the world of job training, particularly among job training programme staff who would like to see trainees mobilise a variety of resources to help manage their illness. However, for trainees, many of whom have lived with chronic illness for years, the concept of biographical disruption may be more limited as a tool for understanding the experiences of illness. A more meaningful disruptive force in the lives of trainees appears to be the programme itself and the strategies for dealing with illness that programme staff may extend.

  9. Neighbourly support of people with chronic illness; is it related to neighbourhood social capital?

    PubMed

    Waverijn, Geeke; Heijmans, Monique; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2017-01-01

    The neighbourhood may provide resources for health. It is to date unknown whether people who live in neighbourhoods with more social capital have more access to practical and emotional support by neighbours, or whether this is a resource only available to those who are personally connected to people in their neighbourhood. We investigated whether support by neighbours of people with chronic illness was related to neighbourhood social capital and to individual neighbourhood connections. Furthermore, we investigated whether support received from neighbours by people with chronic illness differed according to demographic and disease characteristics. We collected data on support by neighbours and individual connections to neighbours among 2272 people with chronic illness in 2015. Data on neighbourhood social capital were collected among 69,336 people in 3425 neighbourhoods between May 2011 and September 2012. Neighbourhood social capital was estimated with ecometric measurements. We conducted multilevel regression analyses. People with chronic illness were more likely to receive practical and emotional support from neighbours if they had more individual connections to people in their neighbourhood. People with chronic illness were not more likely to receive practical and emotional support from neighbours if they lived in a neighbourhood with more social capital. People with chronic illness with moderate physical disabilities or with comorbidity, and people with chronic illness who lived together with their partner or children, were more likely to receive support from neighbours. To gain more insight into the benefits of neighbourhood social capital, it is necessary to differentiate between the resources only accessible through individual connections to people in the neighbourhood and resources provided through social capital on the neighbourhood level.

  10. Are Fortune 100 companies responsive to chronically ill workers?

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Torres, B F; Engelhardt, T; Thamer, M; Anderson, G

    2001-01-01

    We conducted a survey of Fortune 100 companies to determine their response to the growing number of employees with chronic conditions. We found that although all companies cover some services that are particularly beneficial to persons with chronic conditions, gaps in coverage remain. We also found large variations in cost-sharing mechanisms, number of covered visits, and lifetime maximum benefit provisions, which are especially important to persons with chronic conditions. In general, for persons with chronic conditions the benefits offered by these Fortune 100 companies are superior to those offered by Medicare.

  11. Psoriasis beyond the skin: a review of the literature on cardiometabolic and psychological co-morbidities of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Puig, Lluis; Kirby, Brian; Mallbris, Lotus; Strohal, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is increasingly associated with a range of co-morbid diseases and risk factors. Patients with co-morbidities are more likely to need hospitalisation for non-dermatological conditions, and incur greater total costs than those without co-morbidities. A literature review was conducted on two of the most common co-morbidities of psoriasis (cardiovascular (CV) and psychological co-morbidities), to establish their incidence and impact and to raise awareness of unanswered questions and highlight knowledge gaps. A large number of small controlled or cross-sectional studies report increased prevalence of cardiometabolic and psychological co-morbidities in psoriasis patients. A number of large cohort studies documented the incidence of various cardiometabolic co-morbidities. Severe psoriasis is associated with increased mortality, and the most common cause of death is CV disease. Studies on the management of co-morbidities and their impact on psoriasis treatment are scarce. Many questions on the co-morbidities of psoriasis remain to be answered.

  12. A Review of Co-Morbid Disorders of Asperger's Disorder and the Transition to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Stephanie; Curwen, Tracey; Ryan, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    This review includes empirical peer-reviewed articles which support the examination of Asperger's Disorder and co-morbid disorders, as well as an analysis of how adolescents with Asperger's Disorder transition to adulthood. Although the focus was on Asperger's Disorder, some studies include Autism Spectrum Disorder samples. It was found that…

  13. Recreational Substance Use Patterns and Co-Morbid Psychopathology in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Eddie; Gilvarry, Catherine; Tsakanikos, Elias

    2011-01-01

    There is very limited evidence on the patterns of recreational substance use among adults with Intellectual Disabilities (ID) who have co-morbid mental health problems. In this study we collected clinical and socio-demographic information as well as data on substance use patterns for consecutive new referrals (N = 115) to specialist mental health…

  14. Social Skills: Differences among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities, Co-Morbid Autism Spectrum Disorders and Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kimberly R. M.; Matson, Johnny L.

    2010-01-01

    Assessing social skills is one of the most complex and challenging areas to study because behavioral repertoires vary depending on an individual's culture and context. However, researchers have conclusively demonstrated that individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) have impaired social skills as well as those with co-morbid autism spectrum…

  15. Gender Differences in Co-Morbid Psychopathology and Clinical Management in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsakanikos, Elias; Underwood, Lisa; Kravariti, Eugenia; Bouras, Nick; McCarthy, Jane

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined rates of co-morbid psychopathology and clinical management/care pathways in adult females (N = 50) and males (N = 100) with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID) living in community settings. We also compared a sub-sample (N = 60) with ASD to an age-, gender- and ID-matched control group (N =…

  16. High Rates of Psychiatric Co-Morbidity in PDD-NOS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bruin, Esther I.; Ferdinand, Robert F.; Meester, Sjifra; de Nijs, Pieter F. A.; Verheij, Fop

    2007-01-01

    Rates of co-morbid psychiatric conditions in children with Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS) are hardly available, although these conditions are often considered as more responsive to treatment than the core symptoms of PDD-NOS. Ninety-four children with PDD-NOS, aged 6-12 years were included. The DISC-IV-P was…

  17. Epilepsy and Intellectual Disability: Does Epilepsy Increase the Likelihood of Co-Morbid Psychopathology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arshad, Saadia; Winterhalder, Robert; Underwood, Lisa; Kelesidi, Katerina; Chaplin, Eddie; Kravariti, Eugenia; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Bouras, Nick; McCarthy, Jane; Tsakanikos, Elias

    2011-01-01

    Although epilepsy is particularly common among people with intellectual disability (ID) it remains unclear whether it is associated with an increased likelihood of co-morbid psychopathology. We therefore investigated rates of mental health problems and other clinical characteristics in patients with ID and epilepsy (N=156) as compared to patients…

  18. American Indian and Alaska Native Substance Abuse: Co-Morbidity and Cultural Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Norma; Nye, Patricia S.

    2001-01-01

    The devastating impact of substance abuse on American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) is reviewed with an emphasis on psychological and physical effects. Co-morbidity of substance abuse, trans-generational trauma, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and depression among AI/ANs is also discussed since each condition may cause, impact, and/or…

  19. Counseling Families with Chronic Illness. Family Psychology and Counseling Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Susan H., Ed.

    Regardless of whether a patient's health-care provider works from a traditional biomedical or a new biopsychosocial model, therapists and counselors need to work with patients and their families challenged by the onset of a serious illness. This book addresses this need and outlines the five goals of medical family therapy: (1) help the family…

  20. Noninvasive ventilation during the weaning process in chronically critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Jesus; Servera, Emilio; Jara-Palomares, Luis; Barrot, Emilia; Sanchez-Oro-Gómez, Raquel; Gómez de Terreros, F Javier; Martín-Vicente, M Jesús; Utrabo, Isabel; Núñez, M Belen; Binimelis, Alicia; Sala, Ernest; Zamora, Enrique; Segrelles, Gonzalo; Ortega-Gonzalez, Angel; Masa, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Chronically critically ill patients often undergo prolonged mechanical ventilation. The role of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) during weaning of these patients remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the value of NIV and whether a parameter can predict the need for NIV in chronically critically ill patients during the weaning process. We conducted a prospective study that included chronically critically ill patients admitted to Spanish respiratory care units. The weaning method used consisted of progressive periods of spontaneous breathing trials. Patients were transferred to NIV when it proved impossible to increase the duration of spontaneous breathing trials beyond 18 h. 231 chronically critically ill patients were included in the study. 198 (85.71%) patients achieved weaning success (mean weaning time 25.45±16.71 days), of whom 40 (21.4%) needed NIV during the weaning process. The variable which predicted the need for NIV was arterial carbon dioxide tension at respiratory care unit admission (OR 1.08 (95% CI 1.01-1.15), p=0.013), with a cut-off point of 45.5 mmHg (sensitivity 0.76, specificity 0.67, positive predictive value 0.76, negative predictive value 0.97). NIV is a useful tool during weaning in chronically critically ill patients. Hypercapnia despite mechanical ventilation at respiratory care unit admission is the main predictor of the need for NIV during weaning.

  1. Noninvasive ventilation during the weaning process in chronically critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Servera, Emilio; Barrot, Emilia; Sanchez-Oro-Gómez, Raquel; Gómez de Terreros, F. Javier; Martín-Vicente, M. Jesús; Utrabo, Isabel; Núñez, M. Belen; Binimelis, Alicia; Sala, Ernest; Zamora, Enrique; Segrelles, Gonzalo; Ortega-Gonzalez, Angel; Masa, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Chronically critically ill patients often undergo prolonged mechanical ventilation. The role of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) during weaning of these patients remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the value of NIV and whether a parameter can predict the need for NIV in chronically critically ill patients during the weaning process. We conducted a prospective study that included chronically critically ill patients admitted to Spanish respiratory care units. The weaning method used consisted of progressive periods of spontaneous breathing trials. Patients were transferred to NIV when it proved impossible to increase the duration of spontaneous breathing trials beyond 18 h. 231 chronically critically ill patients were included in the study. 198 (85.71%) patients achieved weaning success (mean weaning time 25.45±16.71 days), of whom 40 (21.4%) needed NIV during the weaning process. The variable which predicted the need for NIV was arterial carbon dioxide tension at respiratory care unit admission (OR 1.08 (95% CI 1.01–1.15), p=0.013), with a cut-off point of 45.5 mmHg (sensitivity 0.76, specificity 0.67, positive predictive value 0.76, negative predictive value 0.97). NIV is a useful tool during weaning in chronically critically ill patients. Hypercapnia despite mechanical ventilation at respiratory care unit admission is the main predictor of the need for NIV during weaning. PMID:28053973

  2. Vitamin D metabolism and deficiency in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul

    2011-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent and has been associated with a diverse range of chronic medical conditions in the general population. In contrast, the prevalence, pathogenesis and significance of vitamin D deficiency have received little attention in acute medicine. Vitamin D deficiency is seldom considered and rarely corrected adequately, if at all, in critically ill patients. Recent recognition of the extra-skeletal, pleiotropic actions of vitamin D in immunity, epithelial function and metabolic regulation may underlie the previously under-recognized contribution of vitamin D deficiency to typical co-morbidities in critically ill patients, including sepsis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome and metabolic dysfunction. Improved understanding of vitamin D metabolism and regulation in critical illness may allow therapeutic exploitation of vitamin D to improve outcome in critically ill patients.

  3. Integration of Biosensors and Drug Delivery Technologies for Early Detection and Chronic Management of Illness

    PubMed Central

    Ngoepe, Mpho; Choonara, Yahya E.; Tyagi, Charu; Tomar, Lomas Kumar; du Toit, Lisa C.; Kumar, Pradeep; Ndesendo, Valence M. K.; Pillay, Viness

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in biosensor design and sensing efficacy need to be amalgamated with research in responsive drug delivery systems for building superior health or illness regimes and ensuring good patient compliance. A variety of illnesses require continuous monitoring in order to have efficient illness intervention. Physicochemical changes in the body can signify the occurrence of an illness before it manifests. Even with the usage of sensors that allow diagnosis and prognosis of the illness, medical intervention still has its downfalls. Late detection of illness can reduce the efficacy of therapeutics. Furthermore, the conventional modes of treatment can cause side-effects such as tissue damage (chemotherapy and rhabdomyolysis) and induce other forms of illness (hepatotoxicity). The use of drug delivery systems enables the lowering of side-effects with subsequent improvement in patient compliance. Chronic illnesses require continuous monitoring and medical intervention for efficient treatment to be achieved. Therefore, designing a responsive system that will reciprocate to the physicochemical changes may offer superior therapeutic activity. In this respect, integration of biosensors and drug delivery is a proficient approach and requires designing an implantable system that has a closed loop system. This offers regulation of the changes by means of releasing a therapeutic agent whenever illness biomarkers prevail. Proper selection of biomarkers is vital as this is key for diagnosis and a stimulation factor for responsive drug delivery. By detecting an illness before it manifests by means of biomarkers levels, therapeutic dosing would relate to the severity of such changes. In this review various biosensors and drug delivery systems are discussed in order to assess the challenges and future perspectives of integrating biosensors and drug delivery systems for detection and management of chronic illness. PMID:23771157

  4. Mind's response to the body's betrayal: Gestalt/Existential therapy for clients with chronic or life-threatening illnesses.

    PubMed

    Imes, Suzanne A; Clance, Pauline Rose; Gailis, Andra T; Atkeson, Ellen

    2002-11-01

    In the literature on chronic or life-threatening illness, there is an overriding emphasis on clients' psychological coping styles and how they relate to psychological functioning. By contrast, in our approach, we look at the subjective mind/body experiences that clients have of their illness and how their lives are impacted by their illness. As psychotherapists, we address their existential distress, pain, body experience, thoughts, and feelings, as well as their efforts to cope or find meaning in their illness. We summarize Gestalt/Existential therapy for chronic illness, illustrate the approach with three case-vignettes, and stress the importance of attending to each client's unique responses to illness.

  5. Ondansetron attenuates co-morbid depression and anxiety associated with obesity by inhibiting the biochemical alterations and improving serotonergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Kurhe, Yeshwant; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan

    2015-09-01

    In our earlier study we reported the antidepressant activity of ondansetron in obese mice. The present study investigates the effect of ondansetron on depression and anxiety associated with obesity in experimental mice with biochemical evidences. Male Swiss albino mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD) for 14weeks to induce obesity. Then the subsequent treatment with ondansetron (0.5 and 1mg/kg, p.o.), classical antidepressant escitalopram (ESC) (10mg/kg, p.o.) and vehicle (distilled water 10ml/kg, p.o.) was given once daily for 28days. Behavioral assay for depression including sucrose preference test, forced swim test (FST) and anxiety such as light dark test (LDT) and hole board test (HBT) were performed in obese mice. Furthermore, in biochemical estimations oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), plasma leptin, insulin, corticosterone, brain oxidative stress marker malonaldehyde (MDA), antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) and serotonin assays were performed. Results indicated that HFD fed obese mice showed severe depressive and anxiety-like behaviors. Chronic treatment with ondansetron inhibited the co-morbid depression and anxiety in obese mice by increasing sucrose consumption in sucrose preference test and reducing the immobility time in FST, increasing time and transitions of light chamber in LDT, improving head dip and crossing scores in HBT compared to HFD control mice. Ondansetron in obese mice inhibited glucose sensitivity in OGTT, improved plasma leptin and insulin sensitivity, reversed hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity by reducing the corticosterone concentration, restored brain pro-oxidant/anti-oxidant balance by inhibiting MDA and elevating GSH concentrations and facilitated serotonergic neurotransmission. In conclusion, ondansetron reversed the co-morbid depression and anxiety associated with obesity in experimental mice by attenuating the behavioral and biochemical abnormalities.

  6. Quality of life, treatment adherence, and locus of control: multiple family groups for chronic medical illnesses.

    PubMed

    López-Larrosa, Silvia

    2013-12-01

    The Multiple Family Groups (MFGs) approach for patients with a chronic medical illness and their families is a structured psychoeducational program that unfolds in six weekly 90-minute sessions. In the MFGs, patients and family members explore new ways to balance illness and nonillness priorities in family life (Steinglass, 1998; Steinglass, 2000 Cuadernos de Terapia Familiar, 44-45, 11; Steinglass, Ostroff, & Steinglass, 2011 Family Process, 50, 393).

  7. Perceptions of chronically ill and healthy consumers about electronic personal health records: a comparative empirical investigation

    PubMed Central

    Cocosila, Mihail; Archer, Norm

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a model of consumer perceptions of electronic personal health records (PHRs) and validate it in a comparative study between consumers who report having a chronic illness and those who report being well. Materials and methods A model of PHR use motivators and barriers was built and tested through a national survey across Canada. Data were collected from 800 individuals, 18 years or older. Half reported having a chronic illness or disability and half reported being well. Analyses were performed with structural equation modelling techniques. Results A total of 389 answers from chronically ill and 383 from well participants were collected. Perceived usefulness was the key explanation of the intention to use PHRs for both ill and well people (total effect of 0.601 and 0.565, respectively) followed by security, privacy and trust in PHRs (total effect of 0.377 and 0.479, respectively). Conversely, computer anxiety was perceived as a significant barrier (total effect of −0.327 for ill individuals and −0.212 for well individuals). Discussion The model proposed was appropriate in explaining key consumer positive and negative perceptions on electronic PHR use. We found little difference in perceptions of electronic PHRs between chronically ill and well individuals, although self-reporting their health status might have influenced the results. Conclusions To increase the adoption rate of electronic PHRs among both chronically ill and well consumers it is necessary to reinforce consumer perceptions of the usefulness of and trust in these eHealth technologies while mitigating their anxieties about computer use in general. PMID:25056975

  8. The economic impact of the insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses: a qualitative approach

    PubMed Central

    Aji, Budi; Yamamoto, Shelby Suzanne; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Background Little research has focused on the economic hardship among the insured with severe illnesses and high treatment costs, in particular, the consequence of poorer insurance coverage for high-cost illnesses. Therefore, we presented the case for identifying the experiences of insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses. This study identified a qualitative understanding of the economic impact of severe chronic and acute illnesses and household strategies to deal with high treatment costs. Design Interviews were conducted with 19 insured households of three different health insurance programs with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic or acute illnesses in either Banyumas or Margono Sukarjo hospitals in Banyumas, Central Java, Indonesia. A thematic analysis was applied to guide the interpretation of the data. Results Insured households with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic and acute illnesses were greatly affected by the high treatment costs. Four major issues emerged from this qualitative study: insured patients are still burdened with high out-of-pocket payments, households adopt various strategies to cope with the high cost of treatments, households experience financial hardships, and positive and negative perceptions of the insured regarding their health insurance coverage for acute and chronic illnesses. Conclusions Askes and Jamsostek patients faced financial burdens from high cost sharing for hospital amenities, non-covered drugs, and treatments and other indirect costs. Meanwhile, Jamkesmas beneficiaries faced no financial burden for related medical services but were rather burdened with indirect costs for the carers. Households relied on internal resources to cover hospital bills as the first strategy, which included the mobilization of savings, sale of assets, and borrowing of money. External support was tapped secondarily and included financial support from extended family members

  9. Self-Care Among Chronically Ill African Americans: Culture, Health Disparities, and Health Insurance Status

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Gay; Gates, Rahima Jan; Newsom, Edwina

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the self-care practices of chronically ill African Americans or how lack of access to health care affects self-care. Results from a qualitative interview study of 167 African Americans who had one or more chronic illnesses found that self-care practices were culturally based, and the insured reported more extensive programs of self-care. Those who had some form of health insurance much more frequently reported the influence of physicians and health education programs in self-care regimens than did those who were uninsured. It is concluded that the cultural components of self-care have been underemphasized, and further, that the potential to maximize chronic illness management through self-care strategies is not realized for those who lack access to health care. PMID:15569953

  10. Alagille Syndrome: A Case Report Highlighting Dysmorphic Facies, Chronic Illness, and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Winthrop, Zachary A.; Salman, Rabia; Majeed, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Alagille syndrome is a rare multisystem disorder affecting the liver, heart, vertebrae, eyes, and face. Alagille syndrome shares multiple phenotypic variants of other congenital or chronic childhood illnesses such as DiGeorge syndrome, Down syndrome, spina bifida, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and cystic fibrosis. All of these chronic illnesses have well-established links to psychiatric conditions. There are few community resources for Alagille patients, as it is an extremely rare condition. Despite the overlap with other chronic childhood illnesses, the psychiatric manifestations of Alagille syndrome have not been previously discussed in literature. The current study is a case report of a twelve-year-old female hospitalized in our pediatric psychiatric hospital for suicidal ideation with intent and plan. The patient had major depressive disorder, anxiety, other specified feeding and eating disorder, and attention-deficit/hyperactive disorder. PMID:28018696

  11. The role of parental and adolescent attributions in adjustment of adolescents with chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Guion, Kimberly; Mrug, Sylvie

    2012-09-01

    Previous literature has demonstrated the separate contributions of parental attributions and adolescent attributions to psychosocial adjustment of adolescents with chronic illness. However, it is unknown whether parental attributions affect adolescents' mental health directly or indirectly by influencing the youths' attributional style. This study evaluated the direct and indirect (through adolescent attributions) effects of parental attributions on internalizing and externalizing problems of adolescents with chronic illness. Adolescents (N = 128; M = 14.7 years) diagnosed with cystic fibrosis or diabetes and their caregivers completed measures of attributional style and adolescent adjustment. Parents' optimistic attributions were associated with fewer adolescent internalizing and externalizing problems. These effects were partly mediated by adolescent attributions. These results suggest that targeting both adolescent and parent attributions may be important for improving adolescents' adjustment to a chronic illness.

  12. Women's perspectives on chronic illness: ethnicity, ideology and restructuring of life.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J M; Blue, C; Lau, A

    1991-01-01

    This inquiry into the lives of women living with a chronic illness brings to attention the complex processes that frame the existential meanings of illness. Data from immigrant Chinese and Anglo-Canadian women with diabetes are used to show that illness is constructed in a complex social, political and economic nexus. When the circumstances of women's lives are examined, styles of managing illness that could be attributed to ethnicity, become recognizable as pragmatic ways of dealing with the harsh realities of material existence. It is argued that the trends toward individualizing social problems, and shifting the responsibility for caretaking from the state to the individual, obfuscate the social context of illness, and exclude the socially disadvantaged from adequate health care.

  13. Chronic diarrhoeal illness in US Peace Corps volunteers.

    PubMed

    Addiss, D G; Tauxe, R V; Bernard, K W

    1990-03-01

    Chronic diarrhoea of unknown aetiology is increasingly recognized as a problem in international travellers, and has been reported in US Peace Corps volunteers. In December 1987, we surveyed all Peace Corps medical officers to determine the magnitude of this problem and obtain preliminary data on potential risk factors. A rate of nine cases of chronic diarrhoea per 1000 volunteers per year was reported by medical officers representing 4607 volunteers in 43 countries. The highest rates were reported in Haiti, where one-third of the volunteers reportedly developed chronic diarrhoea during their two-year stay, as well as in Central and West Africa and Nepal. Volunteers were reported to drink unpasteurized milk routinely in eight (42%) of 19 countries with greater than or equal to one case of chronic diarrhoea during the previous two years, but in only two (11%) of 19 countries where none of the volunteers had chronic diarrhoea (odds ratio = 6.2, p = 0.06, Fisher exact test). Intensive prospective studies in areas of high incidence are needed to define this syndrome further.

  14. Chronic illness associated with mold and mycotoxins: is naso-sinus fungal biofilm the culprit?

    PubMed

    Brewer, Joseph H; Thrasher, Jack D; Hooper, Dennis

    2013-12-24

    It has recently been demonstrated that patients who develop chronic illness after prior exposure to water damaged buildings (WDB) and mold have the presence of mycotoxins, which can be detected in the urine. We hypothesized that the mold may be harbored internally and continue to release and/or produce mycotoxins which contribute to ongoing chronic illness. The sinuses are the most likely candidate as a site for the internal mold and mycotoxin production. In this paper, we review the literature supporting this concept.

  15. [Ways of maintaining oral hygiene in disabled and chronically ill patients--review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Gerreth, Karolina

    2013-01-01

    Disabled and chronically ill patients face many obstacles in maintaining oral hygiene at an appropriate level. Such a situation is caused, inter alia, by the fact that those people are less predisposed manually, but also by a lack of understanding of the need for carrying out systematic hygienic measures by disabled themselves as well as their parents or caregivers. Technical difficulties during the procedure of teeth cleaning are also a problem. Currently, specialized products designed to help disabled and chronically ill patients and their caregivers to perform daily preventive treatments are available on the market.

  16. Collaborative Chronic Care Networks (C3Ns) to transform chronic illness care.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Peter A; Peterson, Laura E; Seid, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Despite significant gains by pediatric collaborative improvement networks, the overall US system of chronic illness care does not work well. A new paradigm is needed: a Collaborative Chronic Care Network (C3N). A C3N is a network-based production system that harnesses the collective intelligence of patients, clinicians, and researchers and distributes the production of knowledge, information, and know-how over large groups of people, dramatically accelerating the discovery process. A C3N is a platform of "operating systems" on which interconnected processes and interventions are designed, tested, and implemented. The social operating system is facilitated by community building, engaging all stakeholders and their expertise, and providing multiple ways to participate. Standard progress measures and a robust information technology infrastructure enable the technical operating system to reduce unwanted variation and adopt advances more rapidly. A structured approach to innovation design provides a scientific operating system or "laboratory" for what works and how to make it work. Data support testing and research on multiple levels: comparative effectiveness research for populations, evaluating care delivery processes at the care center level, and N-of-1 trials and other methods to select the best treatment of individual patient circumstances. Methods to reduce transactional costs to participate include a Federated IRB Model in which centers rely on a protocol approved at 1 central institutional review board and a "commons framework" for organizational copyright and intellectual property concerns. A fully realized C3N represents a discontinuous leap to a self-developing learning health system capable of producing a qualitatively different approach to improving health.

  17. Facilitating job retention for chronically ill employees: perspectives of line managers and human resource managers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases are a leading contributor to work disability and job loss in Europe. Recent EU policies aim to improve job retention among chronically ill employees. Disability and occupational health researchers argue that this requires a coordinated and pro-active approach at the workplace by occupational health professionals, line managers (LMs) and human resource managers (HRM). Little is known about the perspectives of LMs an HRM on what is needed to facilitate job retention among chronically ill employees. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore and compare the perspectives of Dutch LMs and HRM on this issue. Methods Concept mapping methodology was used to elicit and map statements (ideas) from 10 LMs and 17 HRM about what is needed to ensure continued employment for chronically ill employees. Study participants were recruited through a higher education and an occupational health services organization. Results Participants generated 35 statements. Each group (LMs and HRM) sorted these statements into six thematic clusters. LMs and HRM identified four similar clusters: LMs and HRM must be knowledgeable about the impact of chronic disease on the employee; employees must accept responsibility for work retention; work adaptations must be implemented; and clear company policy. Thematic clusters identified only by LMs were: good manager/employee cooperation and knowledge transfer within the company. Unique clusters identified by HRM were: company culture and organizational support. Conclusions There were both similarities and differences between the views of LMs and HRM on what may facilitate job retention for chronically ill employees. LMs perceived manager/employee cooperation as the most important mechanism for enabling continued employment for these employees. HRM perceived organizational policy and culture as the most important mechanism. The findings provide information about topics that occupational health researchers and planners should

  18. An online approach to providing chronic illness self-management information.

    PubMed

    Cudney, Shirley; Weinert, Clarann

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe an online approach to providing chronic illness self-management information to rural women with chronic illness. To self-manage chronic illness, individuals require information about their conditions. For those in rural areas who have limited access to health services, computer-based interventions are a means of providing this information. Participants were randomly assigned either to an 11-week computer intervention in which they completed nine online self-study health teaching units related to self-management, or to a control group. The health teaching units were positively rated as being helpful in managing their chronic illnesses, with scores ranging from 4.09 to 4.84 on a six-point scale. Perceptions of computer skills increased significantly for the intervention group, with no increase in the control group. Computer-based programs can be an effective approach to providing health information to rural women with chronic conditions that will assist them in their self-management efforts.

  19. Common elements in self-management of HIV and other chronic illnesses: an integrative framework.

    PubMed

    Swendeman, Dallas; Ingram, Barbara L; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2009-10-01

    HIV/AIDS is widely recognized as a chronic illness within HIV care, but is often excluded from chronic disease lists outside the field. Similar to other chronic diseases, HIV requires lifetime changes in physical health, psychological functioning, social relations, and adoption of disease-specific regimens. The shift from acute to chronic illness requires a self-management model in which patients assume an active and informed role in healthcare decision making to change behaviors and social relations to optimize health and proactively address predictable challenges of chronic diseases generally and HIV specifically. This article reviews literature on chronic disease self-management to identify factors common across chronic diseases, highlight HIV-specific challenges, and review recent developments in self-management interventions for people living with HIV (PLH) and other chronic diseases. An integrated framework of common elements or tasks in chronic disease self-management is presented that outlines 14 elements in three broad categories: physical health; psychological functioning; and social relationships. Common elements for physical health include: a framework for understanding illness and wellness; health promoting behaviors; treatment adherence; self-monitoring of physical status; accessing appropriate treatment and services; and preventing transmission. Elements related to psychological functioning include: self-efficacy and empowerment; cognitive skills; reducing negative emotional states; and managing identity shifts. Social relationship elements include: collaborative relationships with healthcare providers; social support; disclosure and stigma management; and positive social and family relationships. There is a global need to scale up chronic disease self-management services, including for HIV, but there are significant challenges related to healthcare system and provider capacities, and stigma is a significant barrier to HIV-identified service

  20. Frequency of MMPI Profile Types in Three Chronic Illness Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naliboff, Bruce D.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Developed sorting rules to identify Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory configurations and applied these to patients with chronic low back pain, migraine headaches, hypertension, and diabetes (N=157). Results showed that profile types did not differ in frequency among the groups but were more elevated in the back pain patients. (LLL)

  1. Chronotope Disruption as a Sensitizing Concept for Understanding Chronic Illness Narratives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This article aims to elaborate chronotope disruption —a changed relation to time and space— as a sensitizing concept for understanding chronic illness narratives. Methods: Sixteen men and 16 women with Type 2 diabetes were purposefully sampled. Each was interviewed about his or her experience of diabetes self-management using the biographical-narrative interview method. Transcripts were inspected for key moments defined as emotionally laden stories relevant to the purpose of the research. We present dialogically inflected discursive analysis of exemplar extracts. Results: The analysis demonstrates how the concept of chronotope disruption helps identify, and understand, important aspects of patients’ chronic illness narratives. First, we investigate how medical advice can conflict with embodied experience and how progressive bodily deterioration can provoke a reevaluation of past illness (self-mis)management. Second, the increasing temporal and spatial intrusion of chronic illness into participants’ lives is examined. Finally, we focus on the masquerade of health as an attempt to manage, hide, or deny that one is physically challenged. Conclusions: Chronotope disruption offers a useful sensitizing concept for approaching chronic illness narratives and around which to organize analytical insights and to develop practice. Chronotope analysis fills an important gap in the science through compensating current health sciences’ focus on rationality, cognition, and prospective time (prediction) with a patient-oriented focus on emotionality, embodiment, and retrospective time (nostalgia). Chronotope disruption could be used to develop practice by gaining empathic understanding of patients’ life-worlds and provides a tool to examine how new technologies change the way in which the chronically ill have “being” in the world. PMID:25197985

  2. Could the improvement of obesity-related co-morbidities depend on modified gut hormones secretion?

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, Carmine; Padula, Maria Carmela; Martelli, Giuseppe; Tarantino, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and its associated diseases are a worldwide epidemic disease. Usual weight loss cures - as diets, physical activity, behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy - have been continuously implemented but still have relatively poor long-term success and mainly scarce adherence. Bariatric surgery is to date the most effective long term treatment for morbid obesity and it has been proven to reduce obesity-related co-morbidities, among them nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and mortality. This article summarizes such variations in gut hormones following the current metabolic surgery procedures. The profile of gut hormonal changes after bariatric surgery represents a strategy for the individuation of the most performing surgical procedures to achieve clinical results. About this topic, experts suggest that the individuation of the crosslink among the gut hormones, microbiome, the obesity and the bariatric surgery could lead to new and more specific therapeutic interventions for severe obesity and its co-morbidities, also non surgical. PMID:25469034

  3. The experience of chronic illness in women: a comparison between women with endometriosis and women with chronic migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Barnack, Jessica L; Chrisler, Joan C

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of a chronic illness is a life changing event that affects the biological, psychological, and sociological aspects of a person's life. The purpose of the present study was to compare the experiences of pain, physical and psychological well-being, stress, patient satisfaction, social support, and attitudes toward menstruation of women who suffer from endometriosis and women who suffer from chronic migraine headaches. It was hypothesized that women with endometriosis would have more negative scores than women who have migraines on all measures because endometriosis is not understood by society to be a valid source of pain. Participants were 41 women with endometriosis and 32 women with migraines who were recruited from support groups and online listservs. Women with endometriosis reported significantly more pain, stress, and negative attitudes toward menstruation than did women with migraines. Implications for the differential treatment of women with chronic illnesses related to the menstrual cycle are discussed.

  4. The role of co-morbidity in the selection of antidiabetic pharmacotherapy in type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tschöpe, Diethelm; Hanefeld, Markolf; Meier, Juris J; Gitt, Anselm K; Halle, Martin; Bramlage, Peter; Schumm-Draeger, Petra-Maria

    2013-04-10

    Metformin is, if not contraindicated and if tolerated, usually preferred over other antidiabetic drugs for the first line treatment of type-2 diabetes. The particular decision on which antidiabetic agent to use is based on variables such as efficacy, cost, potential side effects, effects on weight, comorbidities, hypoglycemia, risk, and patient preferences. However, there is no guidance how to consider these in the selection of antidiabetic drug treatment. In this work, we aimed to summarize available evidence and tried to give pragmatic treatment recommendations from a clinical practice perspective.There are clear contraindications for some drugs in those with impaired renal and liver function and precautions in those with heart failure for the use of metformin (NYHA III-IV) and glitazones. On the other hand, GLP-1 analogs, DPP-4 inhibitors and acarbose are generally less critical and can be used in the majority of patients. We identified the following gaps with respect to the selection of antidiabetic drug treatment in patients with co-morbid disease conditions: 1) Guidelines fail to give advice on the use of specific antidiabetic drugs in patients with co-morbidity. 2) The literature is deficient in studies documenting antidiabetic drug use in patients with severely impaired renal function, diabetic retinopathy, cerebrovascular disease and systolic heart failure. 3) Further there are no specific data on patients with multiple of these co-morbid disease conditions. We postulate that differential use of antidiabetic drugs in patients with co-morbid disease constellations will help to reduce treatment related complications and might improve prognosis.

  5. Pathogenic conjunctival bacteria associated with systemic co-morbidities of patients undergoing cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Rubio, M-E; Cuesta-Rodríguez, T; Urcelay-Segura, J-L; Cortés-Valdés, C

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify the risk of patients undergoing cataract surgery of having pathogenic conjunctival bacteria associated with their systemic co-morbidities. Methods Retrospective study of consecutive patients undergoing their first cataract operation from July 2005 to April 2010. Their preoperative conjunctival bacteria were cultured, identified, and classified in bacterial groups. Their co-morbidities were defined from their clinical data and the answers to systematic questions asked in the anaesthetic evaluation. The Microsoft Access databases of the two data sets were merged for carrying out the statistical analysis. Univariate association of each bacterial group with each co-morbidity was studied by using χ2-test for categorical data and Student's t-test for continuous variables. Also, logistic regression models were used adjusting for age and sex. SPSS statistic programme, version 18 was used for all these analyses. Endophthalmitis cases in this surgical series were searched. Results In the 8333 selected patients, age was associated with increased conjunctival bacteria in all groups except for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Propionibacteriae. However, male sex was associated with these two groups and also with coagulase-negative Staphylococci, Corynebacterium xerosis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Gram-negative rods. After adjusting for age and sex, S. aureus was associated with diabetes, lung diseases, and renal and heart insufficiency; Gram-negative rods with smoking habit; Enterococci with diabetes; Streptococcus pneumoniae with kyphoscoliosis; and other Streptococci with diabetes and handicapped patients. Conclusion The more pathogenic conjunctival bacteria were more likely associated with patients' co-morbidities, such as diabetes, lung diseases, renal and heart insufficiency, kyphoscoliosis, and smoking habit, than the less pathogenic ones. PMID:23703631

  6. Poly-pharmacy among the elderly: analyzing the co-morbidity of hypertension and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Michela; Pieroni, Stefania; Fortunato, Loredana; Molinaro, Sabrina; Liebman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Clinical medicine faces many challenges, e.g. applying personalized medicine and genomics in daily practice; utilizing highly specialized diagnostic technologies; prescribing costly therapeutics. Today's population is aging and patients are diagnosed with more co-morbid conditions than in the past. Co-morbidity makes management of the elderly difficult also in terms of pharmacotherapy. The high prevalence of hypertension and diabetes as co-morbidities is indicative of the complexities that can impact accuracy in diagnosis and treatment, with poly-pharmacy being a significant component. It is essential to apply analytic methods to evaluate retrospective data to understand real world patients and medical practice. This study applies social network analysis, a novel method, to administrative data to evaluate the scope and impact of poly-pharmacy and reveal potential problems in management of elderly patients with diabetes and hypertension. Social Network Analysis (SNA) enables the examination of large patient data sets to identify complex relationships that may exist and go undetected either because of infrequent observation or complexity of the interactions. The application of SNA identifies critical aspects derived from over-connected portions of the network. These criticalities mainly involve the high rate of poly-pharmacy that results from the observation of additional co-morbid conditions in the study population. The analysis identifies crucial factors for consideration in developing clinical guidelines to deal with real-world patient observations. The analysis of routine health data, as analyzed using SNA, can be further compared with the inclusion/exclusion criteria presented in the current guidelines and can additionally provide the basis for further enhancement of such criteria.

  7. The role of co-morbidity in the selection of antidiabetic pharmacotherapy in type-2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metformin is, if not contraindicated and if tolerated, usually preferred over other antidiabetic drugs for the first line treatment of type-2 diabetes. The particular decision on which antidiabetic agent to use is based on variables such as efficacy, cost, potential side effects, effects on weight, comorbidities, hypoglycemia, risk, and patient preferences. However, there is no guidance how to consider these in the selection of antidiabetic drug treatment. In this work, we aimed to summarize available evidence and tried to give pragmatic treatment recommendations from a clinical practice perspective. There are clear contraindications for some drugs in those with impaired renal and liver function and precautions in those with heart failure for the use of metformin (NYHA III-IV) and glitazones. On the other hand, GLP-1 analogs, DPP-4 inhibitors and acarbose are generally less critical and can be used in the majority of patients. We identified the following gaps with respect to the selection of antidiabetic drug treatment in patients with co-morbid disease conditions: 1) Guidelines fail to give advice on the use of specific antidiabetic drugs in patients with co-morbidity. 2) The literature is deficient in studies documenting antidiabetic drug use in patients with severely impaired renal function, diabetic retinopathy, cerebrovascular disease and systolic heart failure. 3) Further there are no specific data on patients with multiple of these co-morbid disease conditions. We postulate that differential use of antidiabetic drugs in patients with co-morbid disease constellations will help to reduce treatment related complications and might improve prognosis. PMID:23574917

  8. Socio-economic status and co-morbidity as risk factors for trauma.

    PubMed

    Brattström, Olof; Eriksson, Mikael; Larsson, Emma; Oldner, Anders

    2015-02-01

    Clinical experience and previous studies indicate that low socioeconomic positions are overrepresented in trauma populations. The reason for this social variation in injury risk is likely to be multifactorial. Both individual and environmental sources of explanation are plausible to contribute. We investigated the impact of the influence of socioeconomic factors and co-morbidity on the risk of becoming a trauma victim in a case-control study including 7,382 trauma patients matched in a one to five ratio with controls matched by age-, gender- and municipality from a level 1 trauma centre. Data from the trauma cohort were linked to national registries. Associations between socioeconomic factors and co-morbidity were estimated by conditional logistic regression. The trauma patients had been treated for psychiatric, substance abuse and somatic diagnoses to a higher extent than the controls. In the conditional logistic regression analysis a low level of education and income as well as co-morbidity (divided into psychiatric, substance abuse and somatic diagnoses) were all independent risk factors for trauma. Analysing patients with an injury severity score >15 separately did not alter the results, except for somatic diagnoses not being a risk factor. Recent treatment for substance abuse significantly increased the risk for trauma. Low level of education and income as well as psychiatric, substance abuse and somatic co-morbidity were all independent risk factors for trauma. Active substance abuse strongly influenced the risk for trauma and had a time dependent pattern. These insights can facilitate future implementation of injury prevention strategies tailored to specific risk groups.

  9. [Physical exercise and bone development in chronically ill children].

    PubMed

    Farpour-Lambert, Nathalie J; Keller-Marchand, Laetitia; Rizzoli, René; Schwitzgebel, Valérie; Dubuis, Jean-Michel; Hans, Didier; Hofer, Michael F; Suter, Susanne

    2004-02-01

    Children with chronic diseases are at increased risk of sub-optimal bone mineral acquisition and osteoporosis, especially those who have a growth and pubertal delay, reduced physical activity, inadequate nutrition, malabsorption or take medications which may influence bone development. Weight-bearing physical activity has a beneficial effect on bone development of healthy children but little is known in children with chronic diseases. Preliminary results of our cross-sectional study in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) suggest that hip bone mineral density is positively related with physical fitness and muscle strength and is reduced at the more affected side. We have initiated two randomized controlled trials to determine the effects of a moderate impact exercise training program on bone mineral density of children with JIA and type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  10. Discriminability of personality profiles in isolated and Co-morbid marijuana and nicotine users.

    PubMed

    Ketcherside, Ariel; Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung; Baine, Jessica L; Filbey, Francesca M

    2016-04-30

    Specific personality traits have been linked with substance use disorders (SUDs), genetic mechanisms, and brain systems. Thus, determining the specificity of personality traits to types of SUD can advance the field towards defining SUD endophenotypes as well as understanding the brain systems involved for the development of novel treatments. Disentangling these factors is particularly important in highly co morbid SUDs, such as marijuana and nicotine use, so treatment can occur effectively for both. This study evaluated personality traits that distinguish isolated and co-morbid use of marijuana and nicotine. To that end, we collected the NEO Five Factor Inventory in participants who used marijuana-only (n=59), nicotine-only (n=27), both marijuana and nicotine (n=28), and in non-using controls (n=28). We used factor analyses to identify personality profiles, which are linear combinations of the five NEO Factors. We then conducted Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve analysis to test accuracy of the personality factors in discriminating isolated and co-morbid marijuana and nicotine users from each other. ROC curve analysis distinguished the four groups based on their NEO personality patterns. Results showed that NEO Factor 2 (openness, extraversion, agreeableness) discriminated marijuana and marijuana+nicotine users from controls and nicotine-only users with high predictability. Additional ANOVA results showed that the openness dimension discriminated marijuana users from nicotine users. These findings suggest that personality dimensions distinguish marijuana users from nicotine users and should be considered in prevention strategies.

  11. Return Migration among Elderly, Chronically Ill Bosnian Refugees: Does Health Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Handlos, Line Neerup; Olwig, Karen Fog; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Kristiansen, Maria; Norredam, Marie Louise

    2015-01-01

    Elderly migrants constitute a considerable share of global return migration; nevertheless, literature on the health aspects of the return migration among these migrants is still scarce. This study explores the significance of return migration among elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees from Denmark and the role of health issues in their decision to return. It is based on semi-structured interviews with 33 elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees who have moved back to Bosnia and Herzegovina, and 10 elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees who have remained in Denmark. The interviews show that physical health, in the sense of the absence of illness and easy access to necessary health-care services and medicines, was not highly prioritized when the decision was made whether or not to return. However, if health is regarded more broadly as involving more than mere physical health and the absence of illness, health did matter. Viewed as physical, social and mental well-being in line with WHO’s definition of health, health was indeed one of the most important factors when the decision to return was made. PMID:26473899

  12. Psychosocial well-being in young adults with chronic illness since childhood: the role of illness cognitions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background More and more pediatric patients reach adulthood. Some of them are successfully integrating in adult life, but many others are not. Possibly Illness cognitions (IC) - the way people give meaning to their illness/disability – may play a role in individual differences on long-term adjustment. This study explored the association of IC with disease–characteristics and Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL), anxiety and depression in young adults with a disability benefit due to childhood-onset chronic condition. Methods In a cross-sectional study, young adults (22–31 years, N = 377) who claimed a disability benefit because of a somatic condition since childhood, completed the Illness Cognition Questionnaire (acceptance-helplessness-benefits), RAND-36 (HRQoL) and HADS (anxiety and depression) online. Besides descriptive statistics, linear regression analyses were conducted to predict (1) illness cognitions by age, gender and disease-characteristics, and (2) HRQoL (Mental and Physical Component Scale), Anxiety and Depression by illness cognitions, controlling for disease-characteristics, age and gender. Results Respectively 90.2%, 83.8% and 53.3% of the young adults with a disability benefit experienced feelings of acceptance, benefits and helplessness. Several disease-characteristics were associated with IC. More acceptance and less helplessness were associated with better mental (β = 0.31; β = −0.32) and physical (β = 0.16; β = −0.15) HRQoL and with less anxiety (β = −0.27; β = 0.28) and depression (β = −0.29; β = 0.31). Conclusions IC of young adult beneficiaries were associated with their HRQoL and feelings of anxiety and depression. Early recognition of psychological distress and negative IC might be a key to the identification of pediatric patients at risk for long-term dysfunction. Identification of maladaptive illness cognitions enables the development of psychosocial interventions to optimise

  13. Development of disaster pamphlets based on health needs of patients with chronic illnesses.

    PubMed

    Motoki, Emi; Mori, Kikuko; Kaji, Hidesuke; Nonami, Yoko; Fukano, Chika; Kayano, Tomonori; Kawada, Terue; Kimura, Yukari; Yasui, Kumiko; Ueki, Hiroko; Ugai, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a pamphlet that would enable patients with diabetes, rheumatic diseases, chronic respiratory disease, and dialysis treatment to be aware of changes in their physical conditions at an early stage of a disaster, cope with these changes, maintain self-care measures, and recover their health. Illness-specific pamphlets were produced based on disaster-related literature, news articles, surveys of victims of the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake Disaster and Typhoon Tokage, and other sources. Each pamphlet consisted of seven sections-each section includes items common to all illnesses as well as items specific to each illness. The first section, "Physical Self-Care", contains a checklist of 18 common physical symptoms as well as symptoms specific to each illness, and goes on to explain what the symptoms may indicate and what should be done about them. The main aim of the "Changes in Mental Health Conditions" section is to detect posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at an early stage. The section "Preventing the Deterioration of Chronic Illnesses" is designed to prevent the worsening of each illness through the provision of information on cold prevention, adjustment to the living environment, and ways of coping with stress. In the sections, "Medication Control" and "Importance of Having Medical Examinations", spaces are provided to list medications currently being used and details of the hospital address, in order to ensure the continued use of medications. The section, "Preparing for Evacuations" gives a list of everyday items and medical items needed to be prepared for a disaster. Finally, the "Methods of Contact in an Emergency" section provides details of how to use the voicemail service. The following content-specific to each illness also was explained in detail: (1) for diabetes, complications arising from the deterioration of the illness, attention to nutrition, and insulin management; (2) for rheumatic diseases, a checklist of

  14. School Nurse Case Management for Children with Chronic Illness: Health, Academic, and Quality of Life Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelke, Martha Keehner; Guttu, Martha; Warren, Michelle B.; Swanson, Melvin

    2008-01-01

    More children with chronic illnesses are attending school, and some of them struggle academically because of issues related to their health. School-based case management has been suggested as one strategy to improve the academic success of these children. This study tracked the academic, health, and quality of life outcomes for 114 children with…

  15. Legal Issues for Adolescents with Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities and Their Families. CYDLINE Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. National Center for Youth with Disabilities.

    This collection of annotated bibliographies focuses on a broad spectrum of legal issues, and is drawn from a national database of current programs and literature regarding adolescents with chronic illnesses and other disabilities. Bibliographic materials listed include documents and articles concerning the following: consent and confidentiality…

  16. Recreation and Leisure: Issues for Adolescents with Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities. CYDLINE Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. National Center for Youth with Disabilities.

    This bibliography presents 162 annotated references (including bibliographic materials, training and educational materials, and programs) about issues of recreation and leisure for adolescents and young adults with chronic illnesses and disabilities. Each reference usually contains a full bibliographic citation, a brief descriptive abstract, and…

  17. Educational Functioning of Children of Parents with Chronic Physical Illness: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Cliff Yung-Chi

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature was performed to answer the question: What are the effects of parental chronic physical illness on children's educational functioning? Thirteen studies that met the inclusion criteria for the purpose of this review were identified, indicating the paucity of research on the topic. The results found that…

  18. Sports and Athletics: Issues for Adolescents with Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities. CYDLINE Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. National Center for Youth with Disabilities.

    This annotated bibliography focuses on issues in sports and athletics for adolescents and young adults with chronic illnesses and disabilities. The listings are drawn from the National Resource Library of the National Center for Youth with Disabilities, which includes journals, books, and non-published materials. The section on bibliographic…

  19. "Getting on with Life": Resilience and Normalcy in Adolescents Living with Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Peter; Walker, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the ways in which "resilience" operates with adolescents whose lives have been marked by a significant health condition. It is based on a qualitative study that followed 31 adolescents, dealing with chronic illness, across 3 years of their lives. The study placed the adolescents at the centre of the research process,…

  20. Quality of Life and School Absenteeism in Children with Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Natacha D.; Distelberg, Brian; Morrell, Holly E. R.; Williams-Reade, Jackie; Tapanes, Daniel; Montgomery, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Children and adolescents with a chronic illness (CI) tend to demonstrate diminished physical and social functioning, which contribute to school attendance issues. We investigated the role of social and physical functioning in reducing school absenteeism in children participating in Mastering Each New Direction (MEND), a family-based…

  1. Problem Behavior in Children of Chronically Ill Parents: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieh, D. S.; Meijer, A. M.; Oort, F. J.; Visser-Meily, J. M. A.; Van der Leij, D. A. V.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis is to examine whether children of chronically ill parents differ from norm groups in problem behavior. We report moderator effects and overall effect sizes for internalizing, externalizing and total problem behavior assessed by children and parents. In fixed effect models, we found a significant overall effect size…

  2. Rethinking ‘risk' and self-management for chronic illness

    PubMed Central

    Morden, Andrew; Jinks, Clare; Ong, Bie Nio

    2012-01-01

    Self-management for chronic illness is a current high profile UK healthcare policy. Policy and clinical recommendations relating to chronic illnesses are framed within a language of lifestyle risk management. This article argues the enactment of risk within current UK self-management policy is intimately related to neo-liberal ideology and is geared towards population governance. The approach that dominates policy perspectives to ‘risk' management is critiqued for positioning people as rational subjects who calculate risk probabilities and act upon them. Furthermore this perspective fails to understand the lay person's construction and enactment of risk, their agenda and contextual needs when living with chronic illness. Of everyday relevance to lay people is the management of risk and uncertainty relating to social roles and obligations, the emotions involved when encountering the risk and uncertainty in chronic illness, and the challenges posed by social structural factors and social environments that have to be managed. Thus, clinical enactments of self-management policy would benefit from taking a more holistic view to patient need and seek to avoid solely communicating lifestyle risk factors to be self-managed. PMID:23226974

  3. Issues in Nutrition for Adolescents with Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities. CYDLINE Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. National Center for Youth with Disabilities.

    This annotated bibliography lists print materials, training and educational materials, and programs concerned with nutrition for youth with chronic illnesses and disabilities. Basic bibliographic information and a brief abstract are provided for each of the 87 bibliographic citations which date from 1980 through 1991. Citations are organized into…

  4. Issues in Sexuality for Adolescents with Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities. CYDLINE Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. National Center for Youth with Disabilities.

    This annotated bibliography focuses on sexuality issues regarding adolescents and young adults with disabilities and chronic illnesses. The resources are grouped into the following categories: psychosocial development (23 references); attitudes and knowledge (11 references); sex education (34 references); sexual abuse (four references);…

  5. Home Care for Children with Chronic Illnesses and Severe Disabilities: A Bibliography and Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Alice; And Others

    The bibliography and resource guide summarizes relevant research and information on home care for children with disabilities and chronic illnesses, including those with such diagnoses as spina bifida, cerebral palsy, severe mental retardation, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), hemophilia, sickle cell anemia, autism, or failure-to-thrive…

  6. Race and Ethnicity: Issues for Adolescents with Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities. Cydline Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. National Center for Youth with Disabilities.

    This abstract bibliography lists selected resources for addressing race and ethnicity issues with adolescents who have chronic illnesses and disabilities. References are dated from 1980 to 1991. First, 18 references provide general information about the issues of cultural competence and cultural diversity for health care professionals, educators,…

  7. A Multi-Modal Digital Game-Based Learning Environment for Hospitalized Children with Chronic Illnesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Jui-Chih; Tsuei, Mengping

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the digital game-based learning for children with chronic illnesses in the hospital settings. The design-based research and qualitative methods were applied. Three eight-year-old children with leukemia participated in this study. In the first phase, the multi-user game-based learning system was developed and…

  8. Developing Social Skills: Issues for Adolescents with Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities. CYDLINE Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. National Center for Youth with Disabilities.

    This collection of annotated bibliographies focuses on the social skills of adolescents, and is drawn from a national database of current programs and literature regarding adolescents with chronic illnesses and other disabilities. Bibliographic materials listed include documents and articles selected from the database of the National Center for…

  9. Self-Esteem: Issues for Adolescents with Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities. CYDLINE Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. National Center for Youth with Disabilities.

    This annotated bibliography focuses on issues of self-esteem in adolescents with disabilities, which is seen as closely related to development of critical social skills. References have been drawn from the National Center for Youth with Disabilities' National Resource Library, a database about youth with chronic illnesses and disabilities. The…

  10. Perceived Value of Academic and Physical Tasks: A Comparison of Healthy and Chronically Ill Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Christy L.

    Questionnaires were completed by parents and fifth- and sixth-grade children (1,180 healthy, 151 chronically ill, 54 hyperactive, and 54 with severe vision or hearing impairments). The instruments were designed to measure three types of value: utility value (how important success at a task is for achieving future goals); attainment value (the…

  11. Expanding Transition to Address the Needs of Students with Invisible Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetto, Jeanne B.; Horky, Susan Chauncey; Miney, Angela; Reiss, John; Saidi, Arwa; Wolcott, Lisa; Saldana, Pablo; Jaress, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    Many children with invisible chronic illnesses (ICIs) are living to adulthood, necessitating that they prepare for their future. Health care and education systems have different meanings and processes for transition, although both systems are designed to help young adults prepare for independence. As health care and educational services support…

  12. Protective Connections and Educational Attainment among Young Adults with Childhood-Onset Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslow, Gary; Haydon, Abigail A.; McRee, Annie-Laurie; Halpern, Carolyn T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Youth with childhood-onset chronic illness (COCI) are at risk of poor educational attainment. Specific protective factors that promote college graduation in this population have not been studied previously. In this study, we examine the role protective factors during adolescence play in promoting college graduation among young adults…

  13. Adults Living with Limited Literacy and Chronic Illness: Patient Education Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Judy; Taylor, Maurice C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how Canadian adults living with limited literacy and chronic illness made meaning of their patient education experiences. The study used a hermeneutic phenomenological research design and employed three data sources over a nine-month period. Data was interpreted and analyzed as it was collected,…

  14. Introduction to Health Promotion for People with Chronic Illness and Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Fong; Chiu, Chung-Yi; Bezyak, Jill L.; Keegan, John

    2012-01-01

    Health promotion has received increasing attention in rehabilitation counseling research. Health promotion research contributes to theory building and provides the foundation for empirically supported interventions that can improve the health-related quality of life and employment outcomes of people with chronic illness and disability. In this…

  15. Loneliness, depression, social support, and quality of life in older chronically ill Appalachians.

    PubMed

    Theeke, Laurie A; Goins, R Turner; Moore, Julia; Campbell, Heather

    2012-01-01

    This study's purpose was to describe loneliness and to examine the relationships between loneliness, depression, social support, and QOL in chronically ill, older Appalachians. In-person interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 60 older, chronically ill, community-dwelling, and rural adults. Those with dementia or active grief were excluded. The UCLA Loneliness Scale (Russell, Peplau, & Cutrona, 1985), Geriatric Depression Scale (Shiekh & Yesavage, 1986), Katz ADL scale (Katz, Down, & Cash, 1970), MOS Social Support Scale (Sherbourne & Stewart, 1991), and a visual analog scale for Quality of Life (Spitzer et al., 1981) scale were used. Diagnoses were obtained through chart reviews. SPSS was used for data analyses. The majority of the 65% female sample (M age = 75 years) were married and impoverished. Participants' number of chronic illnesses averaged more than 3. Over 88% of participants reported at least 1 area of functional impairment. Loneliness was prevalent with UCLA loneliness scores indicating moderate to high loneliness, ranging from 39 to 62 (possible scores were 20-80). Higher loneliness scores correlated with depression, lower Qol, and lower social support, particularly lower emotional support. This study provides evidence that loneliness is a significant problem for older chronically ill Appalachian adults and that it may be related to low emotional support. Further, it provides evidence that this population may be significantly lonely and may not self-identify as lonely. Screening for loneliness and designing interventions that target the emotional aspects of loneliness could be important in this population.

  16. Chronic Illness and Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Older Adults: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Kee-Lee; Chi, Iris

    2002-01-01

    Depression is quite common among the elderly members of Hong Kong Chinese society. This study examined the impact of a series of chronic illnesses on change in depressive symptoms among the older people. The respondents were 260 people aged 70 years or older from a longitudinal study of a representative community sample of the elderly population…

  17. Living with a Chronic Disabling Illness and Then Some: Data from the 1998 Ice Storm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gignac, Monique A. M.; Cott, Cheryl A.; Badley, Elizabeth M.

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the impact of the 1998 Canadian ice storm on the physical and psychological health of older adults (age greater than 55 years) living with a chronic physical illness, namely osteoarthritis and/or osteoporosis. Although disasters are relatively rare, they are a useful means of examining the impact of a single stressor on a group…

  18. Attitudes toward Life and Death in Suicidal, Normal, and Chronically Ill Children: An Extended Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orbach, Israel; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Evaluated attitudes toward life and death held by suicidal, chronically ill, and normal children (N=84) by obtaining answers to questions about fairy tales representing attraction or repulsion by life or death. Each group had a unique response profile that differentiated it from the others. (BH)

  19. Gamifying Self-Management of Chronic Illnesses: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Wills, Gary; Ranchhod, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-management of chronic illnesses is an ongoing issue in health care research. Gamification is a concept that arose in the field of computer science and has been borrowed by many other disciplines. It is perceived by many that gamification can improve the self-management experience of people with chronic illnesses. This paper discusses the validation of a framework (called The Wheel of Sukr) that was introduced to achieve this goal. Objective This research aims to (1) discuss a gamification framework targeting the self-management of chronic illnesses and (2) validate the framework by diabetic patients, medical professionals, and game experts. Methods A mixed-method approach was used to validate the framework. Expert interviews (N=8) were conducted in order to validate the themes of the framework. Additionally, diabetic participants completed a questionnaire (N=42) in order to measure their attitudes toward the themes of the framework. Results The results provide a validation of the framework. This indicates that gamification might improve the self-management of chronic illnesses, such as diabetes. Namely, the eight themes in the Wheel of Sukr (fun, esteem, socializing, self-management, self-representation, motivation, growth, sustainability) were perceived positively by 71% (30/42) of the participants with P value <.001. Conclusions In this research, both the interviews and the questionnaire yielded positive results that validate the framework (The Wheel of Sukr). Generally, this study indicates an overall acceptance of the notion of gamification in the self-management of diabetes. PMID:27612632

  20. School nurse case management for children with chronic illness: health, academic, and quality of life outcomes.

    PubMed

    Keehner Engelke, Martha; Guttu, Martha; Warren, Michelle B; Swanson, Melvin

    2008-08-01

    More children with chronic illnesses are attending school, and some of them struggle academically because of issues related to their health. School-based case management has been suggested as one strategy to improve the academic success of these children. This study tracked the academic, health, and quality of life outcomes for 114 children with asthma, diabetes, severe allergies, seizures, or sickle-cell anemia in 5 different school districts who were provided case management by school nurses. The children ranged in age from 5 to 19 years. At the end of the school year, children experienced an improvement in quality of life and gained skills and knowledge to manage their illness more effectively. Classroom participation, grades, and participation in extracurricular activities also increased for many children. The study provides evidence of the positive impact school nurses have on children with chronic illness and suggests ways they can measure the outcomes of their interventions.

  1. Psychosocial Experiences of Chronic Illness in Individuals with an Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Samantha; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas; Hulbert-Williams, Lee; Bramwell, Ros

    2015-01-01

    Background: Increased life expectancy has led to an increase in diagnoses of chronic illness in people with an intellectual disability; despite this increase, research about the psychological impact is rare. This review explored the psychosocial experiences of chronic illness in adults with an intellectual disability, revealing potential…

  2. Effect of Co-Morbid Conditions on Persistent Neuropathic Pain after Brachial Plexus Injury in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudakshetrin, Pongparadee; Chotisukarat, Haruthai; Mandee, Sahatsa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Neuropathic pain (NeuP) associated with traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI) can be severe, persistent, and resistant to treatment. Moreover, comorbidity associated with NeuP may worsen the pain and quality of life. This study compared persistent NeuP after BPI between patients with and without co-morbid conditions (psychiatric dysfunction and other painful conditions) and tramadol usage as a second-line agent in combination with an antiepileptic and/or antidepressant during a 2-year follow-up. Methods The medical records of patients diagnosed with BPI referred to a pain center between 2006 and 2010 were reviewed for 2 years retrospectively. Data regarding patient demographics, injury and surgical profiles, characteristics of NeuP and its severity, and treatment received were compared between patients with and without manifesting co-morbid conditions. The NeuP and pain intensity assessments were based on the DN4 questionnaire and a numerical rating scale, respectively. Results Of the 45 patients studied, 24 patients presented with one of the following co-morbid conditions: myofascial pain (21%), psychiatric disorder (17%), phantom limb pain (4%), complex regional pain syndrome (21%), and insomnia (37%). Tramadol was required by 20 patients with co-morbidity and, 9 patients without co-morbidity (p<0.001). The mean pain score after 2 years was higher in patients with co-morbidity than in those without co-morbidity (p<0.05). Conclusions Persistent pain following BPI was more common in patients manifesting other painful conditions or psychiatric co-morbidity. A higher proportion of the patients in the co-morbid group required tramadol as a second-line of agent for pain relief. PMID:27819420

  3. Application of Orem's Self-Care Deficit Theory to the pediatric chronically ill population.

    PubMed

    Haas, D L

    1990-01-01

    The conditions under which children with long-term chronic health problems are cared for have changed dramatically in the past decade. These children are more often living longer and being cared for at home by their families and nursing supports. An effective tool allowing nurses to systematically assess, plan, implement, and evaluate the care needs of these children is a nursing theory. Orem's (1985) self- or dependent-care deficit theory is a useful basis from which the care of the chronically ill pediatric population can be planned. Attention is given to a caring relationship in which there is a dependent person in need of care and an individual who serves as that dependent person's agent of care. This article discusses several of the major concepts of the self- or dependent-care deficit theory and how it can be applied to guide clinical nursing practice aimed at meeting the care demands of the pediatric chronically ill population and their families.

  4. Antibody deficiency in chronic rhinosinusitis: Epidemiology and burden of illness

    PubMed Central

    Ocampo, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: A subset of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) has refractory disease. The risk factors for refractory CRS include atopy, a disrupted mucociliary transport system, medical conditions affecting the sinonasal tract mucosa, and immunodeficiency. Methods: We review four primary immunodeficiencies reported in individuals with CRS: common variable immune deficiency (CVID), selective IgA deficiency, IgG subclass deficiency, and specific antibody deficiency. We also review treatment options for individuals with both CRS and a concomitant immune defect. Results: There is a high prevalence of CRS in individuals with CVID and selective IgA deficiency. While many reports describe IgG subclass deficiency in individuals with CRS, the clinical relevance of this is unclear. Specific antibody deficiency may play a more significant role in the pathogenesis of refractory CRS. Conclusion: Screening for a primary immunodeficiency should be part of the diagnostic workup of refractory CRS, as its identification may allow for more effective long-term therapeutic options. PMID:23406598

  5. Treatment compliance in chronic illness: Current situation and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Conthe, P; Márquez Contreras, E; Aliaga Pérez, A; Barragán García, B; Fernández de Cano Martín, M N; González Jurado, M; Ollero Baturone, M; Pinto, J L

    2014-01-01

    Long-term chronic diseases have a high mortality rate around the world, affecting both genders equally. Despite improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of various health problems, lack of treatment compliance remains an obstacle to improving health and patient quality of life, and it carries a high associated socio-healthcare cost. The objectives of this study were to develop the concept of «therapeutic adherence», which includes both pharmacological compliance as well as non-pharmacological (level of agreement and patient involvement, lifestyle changes, etc.) treatments. The study also aimed to establish the clinical and socio-health impact of non-compliance, the reasons for non-compliance, and methods and strategies to improve compliance. The results of this study support therapeutic adherence as an essential goal of the healthcare system that encompasses all stakeholders involved in patient health.

  6. Complementary and alternative medical therapy utilization by people with chronic fatiguing illnesses in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Jones, James F; Maloney, Elizabeth M; Boneva, Roumiana S; Jones, Ann-Britt; Reeves, William C

    2007-01-01

    Background Chronic fatiguing illnesses, including chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), pose a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Previous clinical reports addressed the utilization of health care provided to patients with CFS by a variety of practitioners with other than allopathic training, but did not examine the spectrum of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies used. This study was designed to measure CAM therapy use by persons with fatiguing illnesses in the United States population. Methods During a random-digit dialing survey to estimate the prevalence of CFS-like illness in urban and rural populations from different geographic regions of the United States, we queried the utilization of CAM including manipulation or body-based therapies, alternative medical systems, mind-body, biologically-based, and energy modalities. Results Four hundred forty fatigued and 444 non-fatigued persons from 2,728 households completed screening. Fatigued subjects included 53 persons with prolonged fatigue, 338 with chronic fatigue, and 49 with CFS-like illness. Mind-body therapy (primarily personal prayer and prayer by others) was the most frequently used CAM across all groups. Among women, there was a significant trend of increasing overall CAM use across all subgroups (p-trend = 0.003). All categories of CAM use were associated with significantly poorer physical health scores, and all but one (alternative medicine systems) were associated with significantly poorer mental health scores. People with CFS-like illness were significantly more likely to use body-based therapy (chiropractic and massage) than non-fatigued participants (OR = 2.52, CI = 1.32, 4.82). Use of body-based therapies increased significantly in a linear trend across subgroups of non-fatigued, prolonged fatigued, chronic fatigued, and CFS-like subjects (p-trend = 0.002). People with chronic fatigue were also significantly more likely to use body-based therapy (OR = 1.52, CI = 1.07, 2.16) and mind

  7. Does trust in health care influence the use of complementary and alternative medicine by chronically ill people?

    PubMed Central

    van den Brink-Muinen, A; Rijken, PM

    2006-01-01

    Background People's trust in health care and health care professionals is essential for the effectiveness of health care, especially for chronically ill people, since chronic diseases are by definition (partly) incurable. Therefore, it may be understandable that chronically ill people turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), often in addition to regular care. Chronically ill people use CAM two to five times more often than non-chronically ill people. The trust of chronically ill people in health care and health care professionals and the relationship of this with CAM use have not been reported until now. In this study, we examine the influence of chronically ill people's trust in health care and health care professionals on CAM use. Methods The present sample comprises respondents of the 'Panel of Patients with Chronic Diseases' (PPCD). Patients (≥25 years) were selected by GPs. A total of 1,625 chronically ill people were included. Trust and CAM use was measured by a written questionnaire. Statistical analyses were t tests for independent samples, Chi-square and one-way analysis of variance, and logistic regression analysis. Results Chronically ill people have a relatively low level of trust in future health care. They trust certified alternative practitioners less than regular health care professionals, and non-certified alternative practitioners less still. The less trust patients have in future health care, the more they will be inclined to use CAM, when controlling for socio-demographic and disease characteristics. Conclusion Trust in future health care is a significant predictor of CAM use. Chronically ill people's use of CAM may increase in the near future. Health policy makers should, therefore, be alert to the quality of practising alternative practitioners, for example by insisting on professional certification. Equally, good quality may increase people's trust in public health care. PMID:16848897

  8. Epidemiology and treatment of depression in patients with chronic medical illness

    PubMed Central

    J. Katon, Wayne.

    2011-01-01

    There is a bidirectional relationship between depression and chronic medical disorders. The adverse health risk behaviors and psychobiological changes associated with depression increase the risk for chronic medical disorders, and biological changes and complications associated with chronic medical disorders may precipitate depressive episodes. Comorbid depression is associated with increased medical symptom burden, functional impairment, medical costs, poor adherence to self-care regimens, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic medical disorders. Depression may worsen the course of medical disorders because of its effect on proinflammatory factors, hypothalamic-pituitary axis, autonomic nervous system, and metabolic factors, in addition to being associated with a higher risk of obesity, sedentary lifestyle, smoking, and poor adherence to medical regimens. Both evidence-based psychotherapies and antidepressant medication are efficacious treatments for depression. Collaborative depression care has been shown to be an effective way to deliver these treatments to large primary care populations with depression and chronic medical illness. PMID:21485743

  9. Anemia of chronic disease: illness or adaptive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Županić-Krmek; Sučić, Mirna; Bekić, Dinko

    2014-09-01

    The anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is the most prevalent anemia after iron deficiency anemia. It is associated with infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic disease. ACD is a medical condition caused by the release of cytokines which mediate inflammatory and immune response (tumor necrosis factor, interleukins 1 and 6, and interferon). Abnormal iron metabolism with iron trapping in reticuloendothelial cells is primarily the cause of this condition, making iron unavailable for erythropoiesis although iron tissue reserves are elevated. Disorder in erythropoietin secretion and shortening of red cell life span also play a role in the pathogenesis of ACD. The main therapy is treatment of the underlying disorder and red cell transfusions in severe anemia. In more severe (protracted) anemias that lead to impaired quality of life and have an impact on the mortality and survival rate, erythropoiesis stimulating agents are used. Recently, new possibilities are being evaluated in terms of therapy for ACD in defined conditions, such as chelating agents, as well as hepcidin antagonist and other erythropoiesis stimulating agents.

  10. Anticipated stigma in chronic illness patients in Cambodia, Myanmar and Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and relationship of anticipated chronic illness stigma among patients diagnosed with a variety of chronic diseases in three Southeast Asian countries (Cambodia, Myanmar and Vietnam). A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 4,803 adult chronic disease patients (mean age 49.3 years; SD=16.5) recruited systematically from health facilities. Overall, the results indicate that 20.7% of patients reported that for any of the 12 stigma items, they anticipated they were likely or very likely to experience chronic disease stigma. A multivariate analysis of sociodemographics revealed the following were associated with anticipated chronic disease stigma: older versus younger age, OR (odds ratio) = 0.71; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) [0.58, 0.87]; higher versus lower education, OR = 2.23; 95% CI [1.81, 2.75]; origin from Myanmar or Vietnam, being single, divorced or widowed, rural residence, and health status (having three or more chronic conditions versus having one chronic condition), OR = 1.93; 95% CI [1.58, 2.35]; lower versus higher quality of life, OR = 0.73; 95% CI [0.63, 0.85]); health risk behavior (physical inactivity, poor diet, current smoking, and problem drinking) and low versus medium or high medication adherence (OR = 0.69; 95% CI [0.55,0.86]). This study demonstrated the possible consequences of anticipated stigma on the health and behavior of people living with chronic diseases, and several factors for chronic disease stigma were identified that can help guide interventions to reduce chronic illness stigma in this population. PMID:28008198

  11. Anticipated stigma in chronic illness patients in Cambodia, Myanmar and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and relationship of anticipated chronic illness stigma among patients diagnosed with a variety of chronic diseases in three Southeast Asian countries (Cambodia, Myanmar and Vietnam). A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 4,803 adult chronic disease patients (mean age 49.3 years; SD=16.5) recruited systematically from health facilities. Overall, the results indicate that 20.7% of patients reported that for any of the 12 stigma items, they anticipated they were likely or very likely to experience chronic disease stigma. A multivariate analysis of sociodemographics revealed the following were associated with anticipated chronic disease stigma: older versus younger age, OR (odds ratio) = 0.71; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) [0.58, 0.87]; higher versus lower education, OR = 2.23; 95% CI [1.81, 2.75]; origin from Myanmar or Vietnam, being single, divorced or widowed, rural residence, and health status (having three or more chronic conditions versus having one chronic condition), OR = 1.93; 95% CI [1.58, 2.35]; lower versus higher quality of life, OR = 0.73; 95% CI [0.63, 0.85]); health risk behavior (physical inactivity, poor diet, current smoking, and problem drinking) and low versus medium or high medication adherence (OR = 0.69; 95% CI [0.55,0.86]). This study demonstrated the possible consequences of anticipated stigma on the health and behavior of people living with chronic diseases, and several factors for chronic disease stigma were identified that can help guide interventions to reduce chronic illness stigma in this population.

  12. Achieving Effective Universal Health Coverage And Diagonal Approaches To Care For Chronic Illnesses.

    PubMed

    Knaul, Felicia Marie; Bhadelia, Afsan; Atun, Rifat; Frenk, Julio

    2015-09-01

    Health systems in low- and middle-income countries were designed to provide episodic care for acute conditions. However, the burden of disease has shifted to be overwhelmingly dominated by chronic conditions and illnesses that require health systems to function in an integrated manner across a spectrum of disease stages from prevention to palliation. Low- and middle-income countries are also aiming to ensure health care access for all through universal health coverage. This article proposes a framework of effective universal health coverage intended to meet the challenge of chronic illnesses. It outlines strategies to strengthen health systems through a "diagonal approach." We argue that the core challenge to health systems is chronicity of illness that requires ongoing and long-term health care. The example of breast cancer within the broader context of health system reform in Mexico is presented to illustrate effective universal health coverage along the chronic disease continuum and across health systems functions. The article concludes with recommendations to strengthen health systems in order to achieve effective universal health coverage.

  13. Self-Management: Enabling and empowering patients living with cancer as a chronic illness

    PubMed Central

    McCorkle, Ruth; Ercolano, Elizabeth; Lazenby, Mark; Schulman-Green, Dena; Schilling, Lynne S.; Lorig, Kate; Wagner, Edward H.

    2010-01-01

    With recent improvements in early detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer, people with cancer are living longer, and their cancer may be managed as a chronic illness. Cancer as a chronic illness places new demands on patients and families to manage their own care, and it challenges old paradigms that oncology's work is done after treatment. As a chronic illness, however, cancer care occurs on a continuum that stretches from prevention to the end of life, with early detection, diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship in between. In this paper, we review self-management interventions that enable patients and families to participate in managing their care along this continuum. We review randomized controlled trials of self-management interventions with cancer patients and families in the treatment, survivorship, and end-of-life phases of the cancer-care continuum. We also present the Chronic Care Model as a model of care that oncology practices can use to enable and empower patients and families to engage in self-management. We conclude that, the need for a common language by which to speak about self-management and a common set of self-management actions for cancer care notwithstanding, oncology practices can now build strong relationships with their patients and formulate mutually-agreed upon care plans that enable and empower patients to care for themselves in the way they prefer. PMID:21205833

  14. The association between internet addiction and psychiatric co-morbidity: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study evaluates the association between Internal Addiction (IA) and psychiatric co-morbidity in the literature. Methods Meta-analyses were conducted on cross-sectional, case–control and cohort studies which examined the relationship between IA and psychiatric co-morbidity. Selected studies were extracted from major online databases. The inclusion criteria are as follows: 1) studies conducted on human subjects; 2) IA and psychiatric co-morbidity were assessed by standardised questionnaires; and 3) availability of adequate information to calculate the effect size. Random-effects models were used to calculate the aggregate prevalence and the pooled odds ratios (OR). Results Eight studies comprising 1641 patients suffering from IA and 11210 controls were included. Our analyses demonstrated a significant and positive association between IA and alcohol abuse (OR = 3.05, 95% CI = 2.14-4.37, z = 6.12, P < 0.001), attention deficit and hyperactivity (OR = 2.85, 95% CI = 2.15-3.77, z = 7.27, P < 0.001), depression (OR = 2.77, 95% CI = 2.04-3.75, z = 6.55, P < 0.001) and anxiety (OR = 2.70, 95% CI = 1.46-4.97, z = 3.18, P = 0.001). Conclusions IA is significantly associated with alcohol abuse, attention deficit and hyperactivity, depression and anxiety. PMID:24947851

  15. Social skills: differences among adults with intellectual disabilities, co-morbid autism spectrum disorders and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kimberly R M; Matson, Johnny L

    2010-01-01

    Assessing social skills is one of the most complex and challenging areas to study because behavioral repertoires vary depending on an individual's culture and context. However, researchers have conclusively demonstrated that individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) have impaired social skills as well as those with co-morbid autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and epilepsy. However, it is unknown how these groups differ. Assessment of social skills was made with the Matson Evaluation of Social Skills for Individuals with Severe Retardation. One hundred participants with ID were matched and compared across four equal groups comprising 25 participants with ID, 25 participants with epilepsy, 25 participants with ASD, and 25 participants with combined ASD and epilepsy. When controlling for age, gender, race, level of ID, and hearing and visual impairments, significant differences were found among the four groups on the MESSIER, Wilks's Λ=.58, F(18, 257)=3.05, p<.01. The multivariate η(2) based on Wilks's Λ was .17. Significant differences were found on the Positive Verbal subscale, F(3, 96)=3.70, p<.01, η(2)=.10, Positive Non-verbal subscale, F(3, 96)=8.95, p<.01, η(2)=.22, General Positive subscale, F(3, 96)=7.30, p<.01, η(2)=.19, Negative Non-verbal subscale, F(3, 96)=5.30, p<.01, η(2)=.14, and General Negative subscale, F(3, 96)=3.16, p<.05, η(2)=.09. Based on these results, individuals with ID expressing combined co-morbid ASD and epilepsy had significantly more impaired social skills than the ID only or groups containing only a single co-morbid factor with ID (ASD or epilepsy only). Implications of these findings are discussed.

  16. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jansson-Fröjmark, Markus; Linton, Steven J; Flink, Ida K; Granberg, Sarah; Danermark, Berth; Norell-Clarke, Annika

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT-I) for insomnia on patients with insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment. A randomized controlled design was used with a 3-month follow-up. Thirty-two patients with insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment were randomized to either CBT-I or a waitlist condition (WLC). The primary outcome was insomnia severity. Secondary outcomes were sleep diary parameters, dysfunction, anxiety, and depression. Compared to WLC, CBT-I resulted in lower insomnia severity at post-treatment and at follow-up (d = 1.18-1.56). Relative to WLC, CBT-I also led, at both assessment points, to reduced total wake time (d = 1.39) and increased sleep restoration (d = 1.03-1.07) and sleep quality (d = 0.91-1.16). Both groups increased their total sleep time, but no significant group difference emerged. Compared to WLC, CBT-I resulted in higher function (d = 0.81-0.96) and lower anxiety (d = 1.29-1.30) at both assessment points. Neither CBT-I nor WLC led to improvement on depression. Based on the Insomnia Severity Index, more CBT-I (53-77%) than WLC participants (0-7%) were treatment responders. Also, more CBT-I (24%) than WLC participants (0%) remitted. In patients with insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment, CBT-I was effective in decreasing insomnia severity, subjective sleep parameters, dysfunction, and anxiety. These findings are in line with previous results on the effects of CBT-I in other medical conditions.

  17. Child attention deficit hyperactive disorder co morbidities on family stress: effect of medication.

    PubMed

    Silva, Desiree; Houghton, Stephen; Hagemann, Erika; Jacoby, Peter; Jongeling, Brad; Bower, Carol

    2015-04-01

    We examined the degree of parental and child mental health in a community sample of children diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder and the effect on family stress prior to and during treatment using a community retrospective questionnaire study. In total 358 questionnaires were returned for analysis where 92 % of children had at least one co-morbid condition and mental health conditions in parents was common. Overall, the Family Strain Index was significantly reduced after commencement of medication (p < 0.0001), but remained higher in families where the children had either externalizing disorders or autism spectrum disorder.

  18. Prevalence, Severity, and Co-occurrence of Chronic Physical Health Problems of Persons With Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Danson R.; Macias, Cathaleene; Barreira, Paul J.; Fisher, William H.; Hargreaves, William A.; Harding, Courtenay M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined Medicaid claims forms to determine the prevalence, severity, and co-occurrence of physical illness within a representative sample of persons with serious mental illness (N=147). Methods: Representativeness of health problems in the study sample was established through comparison with a larger sample of persons with serious mental illness enrolled in Medicaid within the same state. Standardized annual costs were then assigned to Medicaid claims diagnoses, and individual health problem severity was measured as the sum of estimated treatment costs for diagnosed conditions. Results: Seventy-four percent of the study sample (N=109) had been given a diagnosis of at least one chronic health problem, and 50 percent (N=73) had been given a diagnosis of two or more chronic health problems. Of the 14 chronic health conditions surveyed, chronic pulmonary illness was the most prevalent (31 percent incidence) and the most comorbid. Persons with chronic pulmonary illness were second only to those with infectious diseases in average annual cost of treatment ($8,277). Also, 50 percent or more of participants in eight other diagnostic categories had chronic pulmonary illness. A regression analysis identified age, obesity, and substance use disorders as significant predictors of individual health problem severity. Conclusions: Risk adjustment for physical health is essential when setting performance standards or cost expectations for mental health treatment. Excluding persons with chronic health problems from mental health service evaluations restricts generalizability of research findings and may promote interventions that are inappropriate for many persons with serious mental illness. PMID:15534013

  19. Integrating paid work and chronic illness in daily life: A space-time approach to understanding the challenges.

    PubMed

    McQuoid, Julia; Welsh, Jennifer; Strazdins, Lyndall; Griffin, Amy L; Banwell, Cathy

    2015-07-01

    The upward trend of chronic illness in working age populations calls for better understanding of the difficulties chronically ill people face with workforce participation. Existing research focuses primarily on physical limitations and employer attitudes about chronic illness. Here we use a space-time approach to illuminate the importance of negotiating logistical challenges and embodied rhythms when balancing work and chronic illness. We draw from time geography and rhythmanalysis in analysing interviews from a qualitative case study of 26 individuals living with chronic kidney disease in Australia. Difficulties with paid work arise from: (1) competition for space-time resources by employers and health services; (2) arrhythmias between the body, work and health services; and (3) the absence of workplace rhythms on which to 'hook' health activities. Implications for workplaces and health services design are discussed.

  20. A qualitative content analysis of peer mentoring video calls in adolescents with chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Ahola Kohut, Sara; Stinson, Jennifer; Forgeron, Paula; van Wyk, Margaret; Harris, Lauren; Luca, Stephanie

    2016-09-28

    This article endeavored to determine the topics of discussion during open-ended peer mentoring between adolescents and young adults living with chronic illness. This study occurred alongside a study of the iPeer2Peer Program. Fifty-two calls (7 mentor-mentee pairings) were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using inductive coding with an additional 30 calls (21 mentor-mentee pairings) coded to ensure representativeness of the data. Three categories emerged: (1) illness impact (e.g., relationships, school/work, self-identity, personal stories), (2) self-management (e.g., treatment adherence, transition to adult care, coping strategies), and (3) non-illness-related adolescent issues (e.g., post-secondary goals, hobbies, social environments). Differences in discussed topics were noted between sexes and by diagnosis. Peer mentors provided informational, appraisal, and emotional support to adolescents.

  1. Evaluating the Effects of an Interdisciplinary Practice Model with Pharmacist Collaboration on HIV Patient Co-Morbidities.

    PubMed

    Cope, Rebecca; Berkowitz, Leonard; Arcebido, Rebecca; Yeh, Jun-Yen; Trustman, Nathan; Cha, Agnes

    2015-08-01

    Treatment of HIV now occurs largely within the primary care setting, and the principal focus of most visits has become the management of chronic disease states. The clinical pharmacist's potential role in improving chronic disease outcomes for HIV patients is unknown. A retrospective cohort study was performed for HIV-positive patients also diagnosed with diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia. Characteristics and outcomes in 96 patients treated by an interdisciplinary team that included a clinical pharmacist (i.e., the intervention group) were compared to those in 50 patients treated by an individual healthcare provider (i.e., the control group). Primary outcomes were changes from baseline over 18 months of HbA1c, low density lipoprotein (LDL), and blood pressure, respectively. Secondary outcomes included number of drug-drug interactions, HIV viral load, CD4 count, percent change in smoking status, and percent of patients treated to cardiovascular guideline recommendations. The interdisciplinary team had a significant improvement in lipid management over the control group (LDL: -8.8 vs. +8.4 mg/dL; p=0.014), and the smoking cessation rate over the study period was doubled in the interdisciplinary group (20.4% vs. 11.8%). Among those with an indication for aspirin, a significantly higher percentage of patients were prescribed the medication in the interdisciplinary group compared to the control group (85.5% vs. 64.9%; p=0.014). An informal cost analysis estimated savings of more than $3000 per patient treated by the interdisciplinary team. Based on these results, pharmacist involvement in an HIV primary care clinic appears to lead to more appropriate management of chronic co-morbidities in a cost-effective manner.

  2. [Self-management support in chronic illness: history, concept and challenges].

    PubMed

    Haslbeck, Jörg W; Schaeffer, Doris

    2007-04-01

    Self-management in chronic illness has been discussed internationally for some time now. It has become increasingly important in German speaking countries as well. During the last years programs for self-management support have been developed with good progress. At the same time self-management has turned into a collective term. This article aims at clarifying terms and discussing aspects of definitions and concepts of self-management. Furthermore, it presents the tasks of self-management support and discusses needs for further discussion and action. The main focus of this article is on the importance of self-management support in dealing with chronic illness--one of the most important areas of its application.

  3. Revisionist or simply wrong? A response to Armstrong's article on chronic illness

    PubMed Central

    Gilleard, Chris; Higgs, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This article is a response to David Armstrong's recent, revisionist account of the epidemiological transition which he claims replaced earlier discourses of ageing with new discourses of chronic disease. We argue (i) that he misrepresents a key element in Omran's account of the epidemiological transition, namely the decline in infant, child and maternal mortality; (ii) that he fails to acknowledge debates going back centuries in Western medicine over the distinctions between natural and accidental death and between endogenous and extrinsic causes of ageing and (iii) that he misrepresents the growth of medical interest in the everyday illnesses of old age over the course of the 20th century as a discourse of suppression rather than a process of inclusion. While we would acknowledge that the chronic illnesses of today are different from those of the past, this amounts to something more than the changing semantics of senility. PMID:25155775

  4. When should managed care firms terminate private benefits for chronically mentally ill patients?

    PubMed

    Gerson, S N

    1994-01-01

    Corporate America's healthcare cost crisis and the country's budget deficit are forcing limits on the resources used to finance healthcare, including mental healthcare. At the same time, the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act bars discrimination against patients with chronic illnesses, including chronic mental illness. Therefore, corporate benefits managers need guidance on how to ethically and rationally allocate scarce clinical resources to those high-morbidity insureds who utilize disproportionate amounts of these resources. In particular, how should we define the public/private interface: When do patients who repeatedly fail to respond to treatment fall out of the private sector's responsibility? The author, medical director for a leading behavioral healthcare utilization management company, offers the following guidelines recommending reasonable and practical limitations on trials of treatment for seven common categories of difficult psychiatric patients.

  5. A COST–BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A FAMILY SYSTEMS INTERVENTION FOR MANAGING PEDIATRIC CHRONIC ILLNESS

    PubMed Central

    Distelberg, Brian J.; Emerson, Natacha D.; Gavaza, Paul; Tapanes, Daniel; Brown, Whitney N.; Shah, Huma; Williams-Reade, Jacqueline; Montgomery, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent increases of psychosocial programs for pediatric chronic illness, few studies have explored their economic benefits. This study investigated the costs–benefits of a family systems-based, psychosocial intervention for pediatric chronic illness (MEND: Mastering Each New Direction). A quasi-prospective study compared the 12-month pre–post direct and indirect costs of 20 families. The total cost for program was estimated to $5,320. Families incurred $15,249 less in direct and $15,627 less in indirect costs after MEND. On average, medical expenses reduced by 86% in direct and indirect costs, for a cost–benefit ratio of 0.17. Therefore, for every dollar spent on the program, families and their third payers saved approximately $5.74. Implications for healthcare policy and reimbursements are discussed. PMID:27282311

  6. [More consideration to dietary protein in the nutrition of chronically ill adults with tendency to weight loss].

    PubMed

    Sauerwein, H P; Romijn, J A

    1999-04-24

    Weight loss is an independent risk factor for mortality in chronically ill weight-losing patients. Hunger strikers and chronically ill patients die after a weight loss of about 40%; weight loss is strongly correlated with loss of lean body mass. Lean body mass is determined by protein synthesis and protein breakdown. Increased supply of amino acids diminishes loss of lean body mass. It is advisable to increase the protein content of the diet of chronically ill weight-losing patients to the level that maximally stimulates protein synthesis, i.e. 1.5 g protein/kg/day.

  7. Chronic illness and functional limitation in Ontario children: findings of the Ontario Child Health Study.

    PubMed Central

    Cadman, D; Boyle, M H; Offord, D R; Szatmari, P; Rae-Grant, N I; Crawford, J; Byles, J

    1986-01-01

    The Ontario Child Health Study (OCHS) was based on interviews of 1869 Ontario families who were selected by means of a stratified, multistaged sampling method from the 1981 census of Canada. Its primary purpose was to determine the prevalence and distribution of mental health problems in Ontario children aged 4 to 16 years and their families, but it also allowed an estimate of other significant medical conditions and provided an overview of these children's use of health care, education and social services. Our results are based on questionnaire responses concerning 3294 children. Limitation of function without a chronic illness or medical condition was reported in 1.9%, the converse in 14.0%, and a chronic illness or medical condition with limitation of function in 3.7%. When the three groups are considered together, 19.6% of Ontario children had a chronic health problem. Children of lower socioeconomic status were much more likely to have chronic health problems. Overall, children with chronic health problems were more likely to use physician, special education, social and mental health services. These findings have implications for those who provide services for children, plan community programs or train professionals in caring for children. PMID:3756702

  8. Co-construction of chronic illness narratives by older stroke survivors and their spouses.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, Eloise; Lowton, Karen; Morgan, Myfanwy

    2013-09-01

    Illness narratives have mainly focused on individual patients' accounts, and particularly those of people experiencing the onset of chronic illness in mid-life. However, a growing number of older people are spending their later life with their partner, with both experiencing complex morbidities. We examine the shared creation of meanings among older stroke survivors and their spouses and the implications for individual and couple identity. Joint biographical narrative interviews were held with 13 stroke survivors aged 75-85 and their spouses. The analysis examined both narrative content and narrative style. Three main types of co-presentation of identity were identified. The 'united couple' described couples who pulled together and emphasised their accommodation of the stroke and normality as a couple, despite often considerable disability, and was strongly underpinned by collaborative interaction in interviews. Caring relationships were distinguished as 'positive', involving self-reliant couples who took pride in how they managed and 'frustrated' in couples who emphasised the difficulties of caring and hardships experienced and were characterised by a conflictual style of narrative. We argue that joint interviews provide new forms of data that extend notions of how illness is lived and demonstrates how the marital relationship can mediate the experience of chronic illness and disability and its impact on identity.

  9. Adaptation of children to a chronically ill or mentally handicapped sibling.

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, M

    1987-01-01

    The presence of a chronically ill or mentally handicapped child in a family can be a stress for the child's siblings, who often are ill informed about the nature and prognosis of the illness, may be uncertain what is expected of them in the caregiving role, may feel their own identities threatened, and may experience ostracism by their friends and misunderstanding at school. Although individual reactions vary widely, feelings of anger, guilt, resentment and shame are commonly reported. Excessive responsibility and concern about one's identity may add to these feelings and culminate in psychologic problems in the sibling. The physician caring for the family must be alert for symptoms of emotional disturbance or social maladjustment among the siblings of chronically ill or mentally handicapped children and should be prepared to counsel the family or refer them to a counsellor experienced in this area. In general, the first step is to be sure that the sibling is fully informed about the condition and to encourage frank discussion between the parents and the handicapped child's siblings. PMID:3555760

  10. Building a measure of fatigue: the functional assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Fatigue Scale.

    PubMed

    Smith, Eleanor; Lai, Jin-Shei; Cella, David

    2010-05-01

    The shared goal of all clinical disciplines is to optimize the well-being of people who become patients and find themselves diminished by illness and recovery. This goal relies on sound tools to evaluate both real and perceived deficits in a way that can be used for a particular patient over time and also across medical disciplines and patient populations. Fatigue is a critical and notoriously subjective aspect of many illnesses. Although the soundness of research is often correlated with the objectivity of data, certain clinical measures must, by definition, be patient centered, with all the complexities and challenges of patient-reported evaluations. Measurement of fatigue has been an important and evolving component of symptom management in the field of oncology. The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Fatigue Scale is a self-administered fatigue-assessment tool that has found wide application across diverse medical fields and that has demonstrated validity and utility across a broad range of populations. The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Fatigue Scale has become one in a repository of tools in the item banks that are accumulating under the auspices of The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System, a National Institutes of Health initiative to deploy the most clinically relevant and technologically agile tools that we have to advance research in medicine and patient care. As much as with any other discipline, physical medicine and rehabilitation stands to gain from the collective knowledge and creative horizons in the assessment and treatment of fatigue.

  11. The meaningfulness of time; Narratives of cancer among chronically ill older adults

    PubMed Central

    Hannum, Susan M.; Rubinstein, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    This study, using ethnographically-based interviews, sought to describe how chronically ill older adults experience a new cancer diagnosis and the effects of this on their interpretations of personal health, aging, and the future. Three semi-structured interviews were conducted with each of the fifteen informants. We asked questions that explored the individual's life history, chronic illness occurrence, and direct experiences with cancer. Interviews were structured to provide social and historical contexts to enhance our understanding of the informants’ illness narratives. Interview transcripts were analyzed thematically to describe how individuals described the cancer experience, its meaning, and its consequences. One of the major findings of our study was the role of cancer in disrupting individual biography, an interruption that fragmented time into three distinct segments: the Recalled Past, the Existent Present, and the Imagined Future. We highlight three main themes around the experience of illness-related time: (a) disruption found in individual biographical accounts as a result of fragmented time dimensions; (b) altered projections of a continuous sense of self into the future; and (c) modified treatment decisions resulting from a perceived altered life course and the finitude of advancing age. We further introduce the concept of Anomalous Time as a permutation of time central to individual experiences of cancer. Implications for how older adults understood their cancer and individual reactions relevant to seeking care are discussed. PMID:26880601

  12. The Family Challenge of Caring for the Chronically Mentally Ill: A Phenomenological Study

    PubMed Central

    Shamsaei, Farshid; Cheraghi, Fatemeh; Esmaeilli, Ravanbakhsh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Family caregiving for patients with chronic mental illness is influenced by various factors such as political, socioeconomic, and cultural contexts as well as related policies and health services. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the challenges with which the family caregivers of patients with chronic mental illness have to contend. Materials and Methods: The research design was qualitative with a phenomenological approach. The research population consisted of 16 long-term carers expressing interest in participating in the project. The carers were the family members of mentally ill relatives who collected their monthly medications at Farshchian Psychiatry Hospital in Hamadan in 2012. Purposive sampling was used to draw the sample. Data were collected by individual in-depth semi-structured interviews, which were tape-recorded and analyzed via Colaizzi’s phenomenological method. Rigor was assessed regarding credibility, dependability, conformability, and transferability. Results: Our findings highlighted 4 main themes, namely stress and emotional distress, need for education and information, socioeconomic effects and support, and physical strain. Conclusions: Families experience frustrations when providing support and care to their mentally ill relatives. They, therefore, need appropriate support and intervention by mental health services. PMID:26576169

  13. Correlates of Problem Resolution during Parent-Child Discussions about Chronic Illness Management

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Elizabeth; Jawad, Abbas F.; Miller, Victoria A.

    2016-01-01

    Families impacted by pediatric chronic illness must navigate treatment regimens that can present multiple problems and decisions to be addressed on a daily basis. The extent to which parents and children are able to solve such problems is likely to have implications for health behaviors and outcomes. The aims of this study were to examine correlates of problem resolution in families of children with a chronic illness. Participants were 167 children (ages 8-16) with type 1 diabetes or cystic fibrosis and a parent. Parent-child dyads recounted a recent discussion they had related to illness management and completed questionnaires. The research team coded the discussions for topic and outcome (i.e., did the dyad come up with a plan to address the problem). The results indicated that the majority of dyads in both illness groups came up with a plan during their discussions. Lack of problem resolution during the discussion was associated with higher parent coercion, more child resistance to the regimen, and worse adherence. Parent coercion and child resistance could be the targets of interventions to enhance problem solving and improve adherence. PMID:28133408

  14. The over time development of chronic illness self-management patterns: a longitudinal qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There currently exists a vast amount of literature concerning chronic illness self-management, however the developmental patterns and sustainability of self-management over time remain largely unknown. This paper aims to describe the patterns by which different chronic illness self-management behaviors develop and are maintained over time. Method Twenty-one individuals newly diagnosed with chronic illnesses (e.g., diabetes, rheumatism, ischemic heart disease, multiple sclerosis, chronic renal disease, inflammatory bowel disease) were repeatedly interviewed over two-and-a-half years. The interviews were conducted in Sweden from 2006 to 2008. A total of 81 narrative interviews were analyzed with an interpretive description approach. Results The participants’ self-management behaviors could be described in four different developmental patterns: consistent, episodic, on demand, and transitional. The developmental patterns were related to specific self-management behaviors. Most participants took long-term medications in a consistent pattern, whereas exercise was often performed according to an episodic pattern. Participants managed health crises (e.g., angina, pain episodes) according to an on demand pattern and everyday changes due to illness (e.g., adaptation of work and household activities) according to a transitional pattern. All of the participants used more than one self-management pattern. Conclusion The findings show that self-management does not develop as one uniform pattern. Instead different self-management behaviors are enacted in different patterns. Therefore, it is likely that self-management activities require support strategies tailored to each behavior’s developmental pattern. PMID:23647658

  15. The impact of co-morbid factors on the psychological outcome of tinnitus patients.

    PubMed

    Pajor, Anna Maria; Ormezowska, Elżbieta Agata; Jozefowicz-Korczynska, Magdalena

    2013-03-01

    The study was carried out to determine the impact of some co-morbid otological symptoms and demographic factors on the emotional distress and cognitive functioning in patients with tinnitus. One hundred consecutive patients, complaining of constant idiopathic tinnitus, were enrolled into the study. Four tests were administered: Beck Depression Inventory, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS, A--anxiety, D--depression), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Trail Making Test (TMT). A multivariate stepwise linear regression analysis was performed to estimate the relationship between the results of each of the tests and following co-morbid factors: age, sex, tinnitus duration, tinnitus laterality, hearing status (normal hearing, unilateral hearing loss and bilateral hearing loss) and vertigo/dizziness. It was found that the scores of MMSE and TMT were negatively correlated with age and with hearing status and the scores of HADS-A were slightly correlated with sex. In regression analysis, in HADS-A, sex and to a lesser extent tinnitus duration, in MMSE and TMT age and to a lesser extent tinnitus laterality were the variables that were comprised in the final model. Demographic factors had contributed more than overlapping otological symptoms to the psychological outcome in tinnitus patients.

  16. Does Co-Morbid Depression Alter the Inverse Relationship between Obesity and Substance Use Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Gearhardt, Ashley N.; Harrison, Emily L. R.; McKee, Sherry A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Substance use disorders and obesity are often inversely related to one another, hypothetically due to competition over shared neurobiological reward circuitry. However, obesity and substance use disorders share common risk factors, such as other psychiatric disorders. It is unknown whether the inverse relationship between obesity and substance use disorders continues to exist in the presence of shared risk factors. Methods For the current study, we examined the associations between major depression, alcohol and drug use disorders, and overweight/obesity status in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults (n=40,715). Results Our findings demonstrated that adults with major depression were more likely to be obese, whereas adults with alcohol or drug use disorders were less likely to be obese. However, the inverse relationship between substance use and obesity continued to exist in adults with co-morbid depression. Adults with depression disorders co-morbid with alcohol (Relative Risk [RR]=0.63, 95%CI=0.47-0.84) or drug (RR=0.54, 95%CI=0.36-0.81) use disorders were less likely to be obese vs. normal weight. Conclusions Our findings provide support for the proposal that excess food consumption and excess drug use appear to compete over shared neurobiology even when the motivation to self-medicate with either food or substances might be elevated. PMID:22285319

  17. Heart failure in primary care: co-morbidity and utilization of health care resources

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Montserrat; García-Olmos, Luis M; García-Sagredo, Pilar; Alberquilla, Ángel; López-Rodríguez, Fernando; Pascual, Mario; Muñoz, Adolfo; Salvador, Carlos H; Monteagudo, José L; Otero-Puime, Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Background. In order to ensure proper management of primary care (PC) services, the efficiency of the health professionals tasked with such services must be known. Patients with heart failure (HF) are characterized by advanced age, high co-morbidity and high resource utilization. Objective. To ascertain PC resource utilization by HF patients and variability in the management of such patients by GPs. Methods. Descriptive, cross-sectional study targeting a population attended by 129 GPs over the course of 1 year. All patients with diagnosis of HF in their clinical histories were included, classified using the Adjusted Clinical Group system and then grouped into six resource utilization bands (RUBs). Resource utilization and Efficiency Index were both calculated. Results. One hundred per cent of patients with HF were ranked in RUBs 3, 4 and 5. The highest GP visit rate was 20 and the lowest in excess of 10 visits per year. Prescription drug costs for these patients ranged from €885 to €1422 per patient per year. Health professional efficiency varied notably, even after adjustment for co-morbidity (Efficiency Index Variation Ratio of 28.27 for visits and 404.29 for prescription drug cost). Conclusions. Patients with HF register a high utilization of resources, and there is great variability in the management of such patients by health professionals, which cannot be accounted for by the degree of case complexity. PMID:23776041

  18. Psychological interventions for parents of children and adolescents with chronic illness

    PubMed Central

    Eccleston, Christopher; Palermo, Tonya M; Fisher, Emma; Law, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Background Psychological therapies have been developed for parents of children and adolescents with a chronic illness. Such therapies include parent only or parent and child/adolescent, and are designed to treat parent behaviour, parent mental health, child behaviour/disability, child mental health, child symptoms and/or family functioning. No comprehensive, meta-analytic reviews have been published in this area. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of psychological therapies that include coping strategies for parents of children/adolescents with chronic illnesses (painful conditions, cancer, diabetes mellitus, asthma, traumatic brain injury, inflammatory bowel diseases, skin diseases or gynaecological disorders). The therapy will aim to improve parent behaviour, parent mental health, child behaviour/disability, child mental health, child symptoms and family functioning. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsyclNFO for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of psychological interventions that included parents of children and adolescents with a chronic illness. The initial search was from inception of these databases to June 2011 and we conducted a follow-up search from June 2011 to March 2012. We identified additional studies from the reference list of retrieved papers and from discussion with investigators. Selection criteria Included studies were RCTs of psychological interventions that delivered treatment to parents of children and adolescents (under 19 years of age) with a chronic illness compared to active control, wait list control or treatment as usual. We excluded studies if the parent component was a coaching intervention, the aim of the intervention was health prevention/promotion, the comparator was a pharmacological treatment, the child/adolescent had an illness not listed above or the study included children with more than one type of chronic illness. Further to this, we excluded studies when the sample size of either comparator

  19. Online Peer-to-Peer Communities in the Daily Lives of People With Chronic Illness: A Qualitative Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kingod, Natasja; Cleal, Bryan; Wahlberg, Ayo; Husted, Gitte R

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative systematic review investigated how individuals with chronic illness experience online peer-to-peer support and how their experiences influence daily life with illness. Selected studies were appraised by quality criteria focused upon research questions and study design, participant selection, methods of data collection, and methods of analysis. Four themes were identified: (a) illness-associated identity work, (b) social support and connectivity, (c) experiential knowledge sharing, and (d) collective voice and mobilization. Findings indicate that online peer-to-peer communities provide a supportive space for daily self-care related to chronic illness. Online communities provided a valued space to strengthen social ties and exchange knowledge that supported offline ties and patient-doctor relationships. Individuals used online communities to exchange experiential knowledge about everyday life with illness. This type of knowledge was perceived as extending far beyond medical care. Online communities were also used to mobilize and raise collective awareness about illness-specific concerns.

  20. Body image of children and adolescents with chronic illness: a meta-analytic comparison with healthy peers.

    PubMed

    Pinquart, M

    2013-03-01

    This meta-analysis integrates results from 330 studies on differences between body image of children and adolescents with and without chronic physical illness. Young people with a chronic illness had a less positive body image than their healthy peers although the average size of differences was small (g=-.30 standard deviation units). A comparison of diseases showed that young people with obesity (g=-.79), cystic fibrosis (g=-.50), scoliosis (g=-.41), asthma (g=-.37), growth hormone deficits (g=-.35), spina bifida (g=-.23), cancer (g=-.20), and diabetes (g=-.17) evaluated their body less positively than their healthy peers. Furthermore, levels of body dissatisfaction varied by age at onset of the disease, method for assessing body image, ethnicity, year of publication, and comparison group. Recommendations are stated for reducing effects of chronic illness on the body image of people with chronic illness.

  1. Giving patients responsibility or fostering mutual response-ability: family physicians' constructions of effective chronic illness management.

    PubMed

    Thille, Patricia H; Russell, Grant M

    2010-10-01

    Current visions of family medicine and models of chronic illness management integrate evidence-based medicine with collaborative, patient-centered care, despite critiques that these constructs conflict with each other. With this potential conflict in mind, we applied a critical discursive psychology methodology to present discursive patterns articulated by 13 family physicians in Ontario, Canada, regarding care of patients living with multiple chronic illnesses. Physicians constructed competing versions of the terms "effective chronic illness management" and "patient involvement." One construction integrated individual responsibility for health with primacy of "evidence," resulting in a conceptualization consistent with paternalistic care. The second constructed effective care as involving active partnership of physician and patient, implying a need to foster the ability of both practitioners and patients to respond to complex challenges as they arose. The former pattern is inconsistent with visions of family medicine and chronic illness management, whereas the latter embodies it.

  2. Naturalistic follow-up of co-morbid substance use in schizophrenia: the West London first-episode study

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, I.; Joyce, E. M.; Mutsatsa, S. H.; Hutton, S. B.; Huddy, V.; Kapasi, M.; Barnes, T. R. E.

    2008-01-01

    Background The impact of co-morbid substance use in first-episode schizophrenia has not been fully explored. Method This naturalistic follow-up of a cohort of 152 people with first-episode schizophrenia examined substance use and clinical outcome in terms of symptoms and social and neuropsychological function. Results Data were collected on 85 (56%) of the patient cohort after a median period of 14 months. Over the follow-up period, the proportion of smokers rose from 60% at baseline to 64%. While 30% reported lifetime problem drinking of alcohol at baseline, only 15% had problem drinking at follow-up. Furthermore, while at baseline 63% reported lifetime cannabis use and 32% were currently using the drug, by the follow-up assessment the latter figure had fallen to 18.5%. At follow-up, persistent substance users had significantly more severe positive and depressive symptoms and greater overall severity of illness. A report of no lifetime substance use at baseline was associated with greater improvement in spatial working memory (SWM) at follow-up. Conclusions Past substance use may impede recovery of SWM performance in people with schizophrenia in the year or so following first presentation to psychiatric services. The prevalence of substance use other than tobacco tends to diminish over this period, in the absence of specific interventions. Persistent substance use in first-episode schizophrenia is associated with more severe positive and depressive symptoms but not negative symptoms, and should be a target for specific treatment intervention. PMID:17532864

  3. The Influence of Chronic Illness and Lifestyle Behaviors on Quality of Life among Older Thais

    PubMed Central

    Wongtongkam, Nualnong

    2016-01-01

    Chronic conditions and lifestyle behaviors have a detrimental influence on the quality of life for seniors because of physical disability and emotional concerns. This study aimed to assess the influence of chronic illness, smoking, and alcohol use on quality of life among Thai seniors. A cross-sectional study was conducted in three communities, selected purposively from the North, Northeast, and Central regions, and 1278 senior participants were recruited. Binary logistic regression was used to predict the influence of factors on quality of life with adjusted covariates. Most participants were aged 60–70 years and married, earned 500–1,000 Baht/month (US $17–$35), had one chronic illness, and were nonsmokers and nondrinkers. Surprisingly, there appeared to be no link between chronic conditions and quality of life. Current drinkers were more likely to have a high quality of life, with Odds Ratios of 2.16 for men and 2.73 for women. Seniors of both genders who were current drinkers were more likely to accept death and dying and this improved their quality of life. Social participation in alcohol consumption may encourage seniors to share their concerns about death and dying and eventually accept this as a foundation of life. PMID:27022604

  4. [Social and organizational innovation to tackle the challenge of integrated care of the chronically ill].

    PubMed

    Nuño-Solinís, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The increase in life expectancy, coupled with other factors, has led to an increase in the prevalence of chronic diseases and multiple morbidity. This has led to the need to develop new health and social care models, which will allow managing these efficiently and in a sustainable manner. In particular, there seems to be consensus on the need to move towards integrated, patient-centered, and more proactive care. Thus, in recent years, chronic care models have been developed at international, national and regional level, as well as introducing strategies to tackle the challenge of chronic illness. However, the implementation of actions facilitating the change towards this new model of care does not seem to be an easy task. This paper presents some of the strategic lines and initiatives carried out by the Department of Health of the Basque Government. These actions can be described within a social and organizational innovation framework, as a means for effective implementation of interventions and strategies that shape the model required for the improved care of chronic illnesses within a universal and tax-funded health system.

  5. Anxiety and depression in mothers and fathers of a chronically ill child.

    PubMed

    van Oers, H A; Haverman, L; Limperg, P F; van Dijk-Lokkart, E M; Maurice-Stam, H; Grootenhuis, M A

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to determine the levels of anxiety and depression in mothers and fathers of a chronically ill child (0-18 years) and to study which parental and child variables are associated with anxiety and depression. In a cross-sectional design, anxiety and depression were assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Scores were compared to a Dutch reference group by analysis of variance and logistic regression analysis. Linear regression analyses were performed to examine which variables were associated with anxiety and depression. Mothers of a chronically ill child (n = 566) scored significantly higher than the reference group (p < .001) on anxiety (Mean 5.9 vs 4.8) and depression (Mean 4.5 vs 3.1). Fathers (n = 123) had higher depression scores (Mean 4.5 vs 3.6; p < .05), but fathers' anxiety scores were comparable to the reference group. The percentages of mothers in the clinical range of anxiety (31.8 vs 20.7 %, OR 2.03, 95 % CI 1.46-2.83) and depression (23.0 vs 12.0 %, OR 2.76, 95 % CI 1.84-4.13) were higher (p < .001) than in the reference group. No differences were found for fathers in the clinical range for anxiety and depression. Practical problems in daily life (a: β = .33, d: β = .25) and parenting stress (a: β = .30, d: β = .32) showed the strongest association with anxiety and depression for parents as a group. Illness-related characteristics of the child were not related. Parents of a chronically ill child, especially mothers, reported high levels of anxiety and depression. Awareness about parental anxiety and depression in pediatrics is important as well as targeted interventions.

  6. From Controlling to Letting Go: What Are the Psychosocial Needs of Parents of Adolescents with a Chronic Illness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akre, Christina; Suris, Joan-Carles

    2014-01-01

    While one of the main objectives of adolescence is to achieve autonomy, for the specific population of adolescents with a chronic illness (CI), the struggle for autonomy is accentuated by the limits implied by their illness. However, little is known concerning the way their parents manage and cope with their children's autonomy acquisition.…

  7. Communication and cybercoping: coping with chronic illness through communicative action in online support networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Nam; Lee, Seungyoon

    2014-01-01

    Computer-mediated communication, specifically blogs, has expanded the range of the communicative action of patients with chronic disease from information seeking to information forwarding. The authors examine the effects of these 2 types of communicative action on perceived affective and physical coping outcomes. Using a survey dataset of 254 chronic disease patients, the authors tested 2 models using structural equation modeling: first, the effects of communicative action about chronic illness on coping outcomes; and second, the mediating role of emotion-focused and problem-focused coping processes. Findings indicate overall positive effects of communicative action on coping processes and outcomes, yet with different magnitudes of effects depending on the dimensions of communication behavior, the coping process, and outcome. Implications for patients and health care providers are discussed.

  8. Chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and related illnesses: a clinical model of assessment and intervention.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Fred

    2010-06-01

    A clinically informative behavioral literature on chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia (FM) has emerged over the past decade. The purpose of this article is to (a) define these conditions and their less severe counterparts, i.e., unexplained chronic fatigue (UCF) and chronic widespread pain; (b) briefly review the behavioral theory and intervention literature on CFS and FM; and (c) describe a user-friendly clinical model of assessment and intervention for these illnesses. The assessments described will facilitate understanding of the somewhat unusual and puzzling somatic presentations that characterize these patients. Using an individualized cognitive-behavioral approach the mental health clinician can offer significant help to these often stigmatized and medically underserved patients.

  9. A Study of Medication Compliance in Geriatric Patients with Chronic Illnesses at a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Shruthi, R.; Pundarikaksha, H.P.; Nagesh, G.N.; Tushar, T.J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Geriatric population is more prone for various chronic and recurrent illnesses like diabetes mellitus, hypertension, IHD, arthritic, neurodegenerative, gastrointestinal, ocular, genitourinary, respiratory disorders etc., which may require chronic medication with multiple drugs. Poor compliance in this age group accounts for medication wastage with increased cost of healthcare and substantial worsening of the disease with disability or death. Most of the human and economic costs associated with non adherence can be avoided by improving medication adherence. Aim To assess the level of medication compliance in elderly patients with chronic illnesses and to analyse the factors influencing medication compliance. Materials and Methods The study subjects were assessed by using twenty item structured questionnaires as per modified Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS). Results A total of 251 subjects of geriatric age group with chronic illnesses were assessed for the level of compliance for long term medications. The average number of medications 2.96±1.42 per subject and most of the subjects were receiving FDCs. The compliance level was assessed by way of interview using a twenty item structured pretested questionnaire as per modified MMAS. The level of compliance was good in 45.41%, moderate in 35.45% and poor in 19.12% of the study subjects. Conclusion The level of compliance positively correlated with the educational status of the study subjects and their awareness about the diseases and prescribed medications. The overall level of compliance was higher in subjects living with spouse or families, subjects without any functional impairment, subjects who were regular for the follow-up visits and also in subjects who did not experience any adverse events. PMID:28208878

  10. A family nursing approach to the care of a child with a chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Whyte, D A

    1992-03-01

    Chronic illness in childhood affects family functioning, and professional support is required when the child is being cared for at home. The focus of concern for this study is the nursing contribution to the support of the family. A longitudinal ethnographic study of the experience of four families caring for a child with cystic fibrosis provided data. Analysis of the four case studies provides insight to the effect of cystic fibrosis on family interaction. The genetic aspects and the life-threatening nature of the illness are seen to have a profound effect on the parents' lives. The experience of crisis and the chronic burden of care are described. The context of long-term care requires the nurse to share the illness trajectory with the families and to help family members to travel it together. This is seen to require a high level of interpersonal skill and considerable emotional investment. The issues for nursing are examined. The research arose from practice, and it contributes to theoretical explanation of nursing interaction, and the relationship of systems thinking to understanding of the nursing situation. The case for the development of family nursing practice to meet contemporary health care needs is argued.

  11. Mathematical difficulties in nonverbal learning disability or co-morbid dyscalculia and dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Mammarella, Irene C; Bomba, Monica; Caviola, Sara; Broggi, Fiorenza; Neri, Francesca; Lucangeli, Daniela; Nacinovich, Renata

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of the present study was to shed further light on the weaknesses of children with different profiles of mathematical difficulties, testing children with nonverbal learning disability (NLD), co-morbid dyscalculia and dyslexia (D&D), or typical development (TD). Sixteen children with NLD, 15 with D&D, and 16 with TD completed tasks derived from Butterworth (2003 ) and divided into: a capacity subscale (i.e., a number-dots comparison task, a number comparison task, and a dots comparison task); and an achievement subscale (i.e., mental calculations and arithmetical fact retrieval). Children with NLD were impaired in the dots comparison task, children with D&D in the mental calculation and arithmetical facts.

  12. The articulation of neoliberalism: narratives of experience of chronic illness management in Bulgaria and the UK.

    PubMed

    Vassilev, Ivaylo; Rogers, Anne; Todorova, Elka; Kennedy, Anne; Roukova, Poli

    2017-03-01

    The shift from social democratic to a neoliberal consensus in modern welfare capitalist states is characterised by an emphasis on individual responsibility, consumer choice, market rationality and growing social inequalities. There has been little exploration of how neoliberalism has shaped the environment within which chronic illness is experienced and managed. This article explores the different articulations of neoliberalism manifest in the arena of personal illness management in Bulgaria and the UK. People with type 2 diabetes discussed their experiences in terms of struggling with diet, diabetes as a personal failure, integrating illness management and valued activities, and the trustworthiness of the healthcare system. The UK narratives were framed within an individual responsibility discourse while in Bulgaria lack of resources dominated discussions, which were framed as structurally generated and unrelated to individual capabilities and choices. Respondents faced personal management challenges related to consumer and healthcare market failures in both countries. Differences in market regulation and emerging stakeholder and interest coalitions influenced users' expectations and their navigation and adaption to market failures in managing their everyday illnesses. The UK and Bulgarian articulations of neoliberalism can be described differently: the first as a logic of managed choice and the second as a logic of unmanaged consumerism.

  13. Therapeutic chorale for persons with chronic mental illness: a descriptive survey of participant experiences.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Lillian

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to assess the relationship between participation in a bilingual therapeutic performance choir and the reported quality of life for persons living with a chronic psychiatric illness. The participants were 16 volunteers who ranged in age from 32-65, had a diagnosis of a major mental illness, and were members of an existing choir within a psychiatric outpatient department of a large urban general hospital. Participants completed a self-reported quality of life questionnaire designed by the researcher using Likert scales, a check list, and qualitative questions. Results demonstrated that aspects of participants' lives that they perceived were most positively affected by choir membership included self-esteem, emotional expression, mood alteration, coping with stress, comfort level within in the group, and the establishment of a regular routine. Implications for the use of choirs as a therapeutic medium and limitations of the study were discussed.

  14. Use of social comparisons in interviews about young adults' experiences of chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Janet

    2015-03-01

    In this article I examine how young adults used social comparisons in research interviews about their experiences of chronic illness. The interviews were originally conducted not only to provide data for academic analysis but also to generate experiential accounts for publication online as part of an Internet-based health information resource for patients, professionals, and the public wanting to learn about people's real-life experiences of illness in the United Kingdom. Through secondary analysis of these data, I show how the young adults used various social comparisons to represent themselves and their experiences to the target audience. Two new concepts-analogues and foils-are introduced to describe how the young adults likened themselves to, and contrasted themselves with, different reference groups in their accounts. Through these and related strategies, they created positive renditions of their experiences for the audience, helping to inform and support others in the process.

  15. Use of Social Comparisons in Interviews About Young Adults’ Experiences of Chronic Illness

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this article I examine how young adults used social comparisons in research interviews about their experiences of chronic illness. The interviews were originally conducted not only to provide data for academic analysis but also to generate experiential accounts for publication online as part of an Internet-based health information resource for patients, professionals, and the public wanting to learn about people’s real-life experiences of illness in the United Kingdom. Through secondary analysis of these data, I show how the young adults used various social comparisons to represent themselves and their experiences to the target audience. Two new concepts—analogues and foils—are introduced to describe how the young adults likened themselves to, and contrasted themselves with, different reference groups in their accounts. Through these and related strategies, they created positive renditions of their experiences for the audience, helping to inform and support others in the process. PMID:25281241

  16. An update for the controversies and hypotheses of regulating nonthyroidal illness syndrome in chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gaosi; Yan, Wenjun; Li, Jingzhen

    2014-12-01

    Nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is widely found in the patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or critical illness. However, the exact pathogenesis and reasonable treatment remain unclear. To identify suitable studies for inclusion in present review, a search for articles using PubMed search engine with combined terms: (thyroid OR hypothyroidism OR hyperthyroidism OR triiodothyronine) AND (glomerulonephritis OR chronic kidney disease OR chronic renal failure OR end stage renal disease OR hemodialysis OR peritoneal dialysis OR kidney transplantation OR renal transplantation) was performed. The bibliographies of relevant articles were also hand searched. The search was updated on November 8, 2013. Mechanisms for the alternations of thyroid hormone concentrations in NTIS are complicated. Inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress may play pivotal roles in the pathogenesis of NTIS in patients with CKD. It was controversial whether CKD patients with NTIS should be treated with thyroid hormone replacement. N-Acetyl cysteine or sodium bicarbonate may negatively regulate the progress of micro-inflammation in CKD. Large-scale, multi-centered randomized controlled trials should be conducted to verify the NTIS hypothesis in CKD patients.

  17. Health-Related Financial Catastrophe, Inequality and Chronic Illness in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Mizanur; Gilmour, Stuart; Saito, Eiko; Sultana, Papia; Shibuya, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Background Bangladesh has a high proportion of households incurring catastrophic health expenditure, and very limited risk sharing mechanisms. Identifying determinants of out-of-pocket (OOP) payments and catastrophic health expenditure may reveal opportunities to reduce costs and protect households from financial risk. Objective This study investigates the determinants of high healthcare expenditure and healthcare- related financial catastrophe. Methods A cross-sectional household survey was conducted in Rajshahi city, Bangladesh, in 2011. Catastrophic health expenditure was estimated separately based on capacity to pay and proportion of non-food expenditure. Determinants of OOP payments and financial catastrophe were estimated using double hurdle and Poisson regression models respectively. Results On average households spent 11% of their total budgets on health, half the residents spent 7% of the monthly per capita consumption expenditure for one illness, and nearly 9% of households faced financial catastrophe. The poorest households spent less on health but had a four times higher risk of catastrophe than the richest households. The risk of financial catastrophe and the level of OOP payments were higher for users of inpatient, outpatient public and private facilities respectively compared to using self-medication or traditional healers. Other determinants of OOP payments and catastrophic expenses were economic status, presence of chronic illness in the household, and illness among children and adults. Conclusion Households that received inpatient or outpatient private care experienced the highest burden of health expenditure. The poorest members of the community also face large, often catastrophic expenses. Chronic illness management is crucial to reducing the total burden of disease in a household and its associated increased risk of level of OOP payments and catastrophic expenses. Households can only be protected from these situations by reducing the health

  18. Daily interpersonal events in pain patients: applying action theory to chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mary C; Affleck, Glenn; Zautra, Alex J; Tennen, Howard

    2006-09-01

    Action theory proposes that individuals actively shape and then respond to their environments, highlighting the role of stable person characteristics in the development and maintenance of life's interpersonal difficulties. In this study, the authors adopt the action perspective in their examination of predictors of daily interpersonal events among chronic pain patients with rheumatoid arthritis. They probe the extent to which stable symptoms of illness explained between-person variation, and fluctuating symptoms explain day-to-day variation in both positive and negative events. Their evaluation of patients' daily diary reports indicate that between-person differences accounted for more variance in the occurrence of positive events relative to negative events (48% vs. 31%, respectively). Likewise, between-person factors accounted for more variance in appraisals of positive compared to negative events across relationship domains. Both intractable illness symptoms and disability, and daily fluctuations in pain and fatigue, were only weakly related to patients' reports of their interpersonal experiences. Consistent with action theory, these results suggest that stable person characteristics are strongly related to daily stressors and particularly daily positive events in pain patients, but still account for less than 50% of the variance in events and their appraisals. In contrast, elevations in illness-related features, both between individuals and within individuals from day-to-day, are not robust predictors of positive or negative social exchanges. These findings point to the value of capturing the experiences of individuals intensively over time, an approach that can help to elaborate the contributions of both stable factors and circumstance in shaping social contexts in chronic illness.

  19. Illness experiences of persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: self-perceived efficacy of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Juliana Maria de Sousa; Martín-Nogueras, Ana; Nations, Marilyn

    2014-06-01

    This qualitative study explores the illness experiences, the efficacy of pulmonary rehabilitation as perceived by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and their rationale for improvements in health. 23 patients participated in a daily, three-month home-based pulmonary rehabilitation. A pre-post self-perceived assessment of efficacy was conducted. Semi-structured interviews, illness narratives and participant-observation provided a "dense description" of patients' lived-experience before and after the program. Interviews and narratives were tape-recorded, transcribed and coded. Qualitative data was subjected to "thematic content analysis" and "contextualized semantic interpretation". Patients compare functional status before and after falling ill, experience loss, stigma and depression, describe health improvements and judge the pulmonary rehabilitation's efficacy. Giving voice to chronically-ill patients, as individuals, is needed. To reduce clinical conflicts, health professionals should encourage illness narratives and value their patients' lived-experience.

  20. Retention in a computer-based outreach intervention for chronically ill rural women.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Clarann; Cudney, Shirley; Hill, Wade

    2008-02-01

    The study's purpose was to examine retention factors in a computer intervention with 158 chronically ill rural women. After a 22-week intervention, 18.9% of the women had dropped out. A Cox regression survival analysis was performed to assess the effects of selected covariates on retention. Reasons for dropping out were tallied and categorized. Major reasons for dropping out were as follows: lack of time, decline in health status, and nonparticipation in study activities. Four covariates predicted survival time: level of computer skills, marital status, work outside the home, and impact of social events on participants' lives. Retention-enhancing strategies are suggested for implementation.

  1. Hope and fatigue in chronic illness: The role of perceived stress.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Jameson K; Sirois, Fuschia M

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue is a debilitating symptom of chronic illness that is deleteriously affected by perceived stress, a process particularly relevant to inflammatory disease. Hopefulness, a goal-based motivational construct, may beneficially influence stress and fatigue, yet little research has examined these associations. We assessed the relation between hope and fatigue, and the mediating effect of stress, in individuals with fibromyalgia, arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Covarying age, sex, and pain, stress partially mediated the association between hope and fatigue; those with greater hope reported less stress and consequent fatigue. Therapeutically, bolstering hope may allow proactive management of stressors, resulting in less fatigue.

  2. The Pursuit of Preventive Care for Chronic Illness: Turning Healthy People into Chronic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kreiner, Meta J.; Hunt, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    Preventive health care has become prominent in clinical medicine in the United States, emphasizing risk assessment and control, rather than addressing the signs and symptoms of pathology. Current clinical guidelines, reinforced by evidence-based decision aids and quality of care assessment, encourage clinicians to focus on maintaining rigid test thresholds which are based on population norms. While achieving these goals may benefit the total population, this may be of no benefit or even harmful to individual patients. In order to explore how this phenomenon is manifest in clinical care, and consider some factors that promote and sustain this trend, we analyze observations of over 100 clinical consultations, and open-ended interviews with 58 primary care clinicians and 70 of their patients. Both clinicians and patients equated at-risk states with illness, and viewed the associated interventions not as prevention, but as treatment. This conflation of risk and disease redefines clinical success such that reducing the threat of anticipated future illness requires acceptance of aggressive treatments and any associated adverse effects in the present. While the expanding emphasis on preventive medicine may improve the health profile of the total population, the implications of these innovations for the well-being of individual patients merits careful reconsideration. PMID:24372285

  3. The treatment outcomes and the use of adjuvant therapies in breast cancer patients with severe co-morbidities

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jaihong; Lee, Han-Byoel; Lee, Eun-Shin; Kang, Young Joon; Kim, Yumi; Choi, Jihye; Rhu, Jiyoung; Shin, Hee-Chul; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Studies have suggested a potential role of patient’s co-morbidity in determining the survival outcomes of breast cancer. In this study, we examined the long-term oncologic outcomes in breast cancer patients who underwent curative surgery according to their pre-existing comorbid conditions and analyzed the association between the co-morbidity and the use of adjuvant therapies. Methods The medical records of 2,501 patients who underwent surgery for primary breast cancer from June 2006 to June 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. The patients were classified into three groups according to preoperative ASA status determined by the anesthesiologists. Clinico-pathologic characteristics and survival outcomes of the patients were compared among the different co-morbidity groups. Results There were 1,792 (71.6%), 665 (26.6%), and 44 (1.8%) patients in ASA I, II, and III, respectively. Total 95 (3.8%) deaths and 269 (10.8%) recurrences (loco-regional and distant) occurred during the median follow-up period of 71 months. Patients with high comorbidity showed significantly higher rate of deaths (51 (2.8%), 38 (5.7%) and 6 (13.6%) deaths in ASA I, II and III group, respectively, p<0.001). The ASA 3 patients also showed significantly higher rate of breast cancer recurrence when compared to other groups (180 (10.0%), 80 (12.0%) and 9 (20.5%) in ASA I, II, and III, respectively, p = 0.041). Significantly fewer patients in the high co-morbidity group received adjuvant therapies (77 (4.3%), 44 (6.6%) and 8 (18.2%) in ASA I, II, and III, respectively, p<0.001). The increased recurrence of breast cancer in the high morbidity group was mostly seen in patients who did not receive adjuvant therapies. The incidence of serious adverse effect during the adjuvant therapy did not differ according to the co-morbidity conditions. Conclusions In this study, high comorbidity was related to increased risk of death and recurrence in breast cancer. The increased risk of recurrence in high

  4. Psychiatric co-morbidity and substance use disorders: treatment in parallel systems or in one integrated system?

    PubMed

    Torrens, Marta; Rossi, Paola C; Martinez-Riera, Roser; Martinez-Sanvisens, Diana; Bulbena, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    Psychiatric co-morbidity among substance users refers to the simultaneous presence of at least another psychiatric disorder in a person diagnosed with a substance use disorder. Co-morbid patients represent a substantial number of people in treatment and present greater disorder severity from both the clinical and social perspectives than those people diagnosed with only one type of disorder. We present an overview of the current state of the art concerning the choice of site of treatment, the kind of intervention, the length of such treatment, and future goals, aiming to establish a more effective intervention, and finally so as to further improve clinical outcomes.

  5. Untangling practice redesign from disease management: how do we best care for the chronically ill?

    PubMed

    Coleman, Katie; Mattke, Soeren; Perrault, Patrick J; Wagner, Edward H

    2009-01-01

    In the past 10 years, a wide spectrum of chronic care improvement interventions has been tried and evaluated to improve health outcomes and reduce costs for chronically ill individuals. On one end of the spectrum are disease-management interventions--often organized by commercial vendors--that work with patients but do little to engage medical practice. On the other end are quality-improvement efforts aimed at redesigning the organization and delivery of primary care and better supporting patient self-management. This qualitative review finds that carve-out disease management interventions that target only patients may be less effective than those that also work to redesign care delivery. Imprecise nomenclature and poor study design methodology limit quantitative analysis. More innovation and research are needed to understand how disease-management components can be more meaningfully embedded within practice to improve patient care.

  6. Exciting but exhausting: experiences with participatory research with chronically ill adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Van Staa, AnneLoes; Jedeloo, Susan; Latour, Jos M; Trappenburg, Margo J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background  Adolescents with chronic conditions are major users of paediatric hospitals, but seldom participate in the evaluation of services or in research. Little is known about the usefulness of the participatory approach in adolescent health research. Objective  To evaluate the feasibility, benefits and limitations of a participatory research (PR) project involving chronically ill adolescents as co‐researchers. Design, setting and participants  Nine adolescents, aged 15–17 years, acted as co‐researchers in a hospital‐based PR project. They co‐developed an interview protocol and during a disco party held for this purpose interviewed each other and 25 fellow patients (12–19 years). They provided advice on the draft report and participated in the dissemination of the results, but were not involved in the design of the project or analysis of results. Results  Involving adolescents in participatory health research was feasible and appreciated by researchers and youth alike, but had its drawbacks too. The peer‐research attracted few participants, the interviews lacked depth and did not yield substantial new insights. Maintaining a high level of participation of the chronically ill co‐researchers also proved difficult. Conclusions  Adolescents with chronic conditions like to have a say in the design and evaluation of hospital services. But their participation as co‐researchers demands ample resources from all parties involved without automatically improving research quality. PR does not seem the most effective and efficient way to make services more responsive. We therefore recommend further exploration of other creative and sustainable ways for involving youth in health‐care service development and innovation. PMID:19682098

  7. A patient-centred approach to health service delivery: improving health outcomes for people with chronic illness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Wagner Model provides a framework that can help to facilitate health system transition towards a chronic care oriented model. Drawing on elements of this framework as well as health policy related to patient centred care, we describe the health needs of patients with chronic illness and compare these with services which should ideally be provided by a patient-centred health system. This paper aims to increase understanding of the challenges faced by chronically ill patients and family carers in relation to their experiences with the health care system and health service providers. Method We interviewed patients, carers and health care professionals (HCPs) about the challenges faced by people living with complicated diabetes, chronic heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Results Patients indicated that they had a range of concerns related to the quality of health care encounters with health care professionals (HCPs), with these concerns being expressed as needs or wants. These included: 1) the need for improved communication and information delivery on the part of HCPs; 2) well organised health services and reduced waiting times to see HCPs; 3) help with self care; 4) greater recognition among professionals of the need for holistic and continuing care; and 5) inclusion of patients and carers in the decision making processes. Conclusions In order to address the challenges faced by people with chronic illness, health policy must be more closely aligned with the identified needs and wants of people affected by chronic illness than is currently the case. PMID:23819721

  8. Living a secret: Disclosure among adolescents and young adults with chronic illnesses.

    PubMed

    Kaushansky, Daniel; Cox, Jarad; Dodson, Chaka; McNeeley, Miles; Kumar, Sinthu; Iverson, Ellen

    2017-03-01

    Objectives This qualitative study examines how and why adolescents living with visible and invisible chronic illnesses choose to share their condition with individuals within their social environments. Methods A sample of 25 adolescents were recruited from five subspecialty services: Spina bifida, rheumatology, cardiology, cystic fibrosis, and renal transplant/dialysis. Recruits completed a semi-structured interview designed to explore: (1) to whom adolescents disclose their conditions, (2) motivation and conditions under which they disclose, (3) content of disclosure, and (4) barriers to disclosure. Results Family members closely connected to treatment or management are most likely to be primary targets of disclosure. Regardless of social network size, respondents disclosed their illness to few peers. Common reasons for disclosure were perceived trust and shared experience with illness and disability. Reasons for withholding disclosure include perceived fear of rejection, pity, and perceptions of being seen as vulnerable or different. Discussion Disclosure was found to be influenced by (a) the visibility of a condition, (b) the anticipated response from the recipient, (c) practical needs, and (d) a decision that disclosure is justified. These findings inform clinical practice, warrant the need for further study, and insinuate practical solutions to combat the socio-emotional impact of nondisclosure among adolescents.

  9. Bangladesh national guidelines on the management of tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus co-morbidity (summary)

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad Delwar; Ahmed, Jamal Uddin; Rahim, Muhammad Abdur; Musa, A. K. M.; Latif, Zafar Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes mellitus (DM) have synergetic relationship. People with diabetes are 2–3 times at higher risk of getting active TB disease. On the other hand, TB or anti-TB treatment may cause glucose intolerance. The dual disease of DM and TB is more likely to be associated with atypical disease presentation, higher probability of treatment failure and complications. In most of the health-care delivery systems of the world, DM and TB are managed separately by two vertical health-care delivery programs in spite of clear interaction between the two diseases. Thus, there should be a uniform management service for TB-DM co-morbidity. Realizing this situation, Bangladesh Diabetic Samity (BADAS), a nonprofit, nongovernment organization for the management of diabetes in Bangladesh, with the patronization of TB CARE II Project funded by U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), launched a project in 2013 titled BADAS-USAID TB Care II, Bangladesh with the goal of “Integrated approach to increase access to TB services for diabetic patients.” One of the project objective and activity was to develop a national guideline for the management of TB-DM comorbidity. Thus, under the guidance of National Tuberculosis Control Program, of the Directorate General of Health Services, Government of the People's Republic of Bangladesh and World Health Organization (WHO), this guideline was developed in 2014. It is based on the existing “National Guidelines and Operational Manual for TB Control” (5th edition) and guidelines for management of DM as per WHO and International Diabetes Federations. Along with that, expert opinions from public health experts and clinicians and “Medline”-searched literature were used to develop the guidelines. These guidelines illustrate the atypical presentation of the TB-DM co-morbidity, recommendations for screening, treatment, and follow-up of these patients and also recommendations in case of management of TB in patients

  10. Bangladesh national guidelines on the management of tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus co-morbidity (summary).

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad Delwar; Ahmed, Jamal Uddin; Rahim, Muhammad Abdur; Musa, A K M; Latif, Zafar Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes mellitus (DM) have synergetic relationship. People with diabetes are 2-3 times at higher risk of getting active TB disease. On the other hand, TB or anti-TB treatment may cause glucose intolerance. The dual disease of DM and TB is more likely to be associated with atypical disease presentation, higher probability of treatment failure and complications. In most of the health-care delivery systems of the world, DM and TB are managed separately by two vertical health-care delivery programs in spite of clear interaction between the two diseases. Thus, there should be a uniform management service for TB-DM co-morbidity. Realizing this situation, Bangladesh Diabetic Samity (BADAS), a nonprofit, nongovernment organization for the management of diabetes in Bangladesh, with the patronization of TB CARE II Project funded by U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), launched a project in 2013 titled BADAS-USAID TB Care II, Bangladesh with the goal of "Integrated approach to increase access to TB services for diabetic patients." One of the project objective and activity was to develop a national guideline for the management of TB-DM comorbidity. Thus, under the guidance of National Tuberculosis Control Program, of the Directorate General of Health Services, Government of the People's Republic of Bangladesh and World Health Organization (WHO), this guideline was developed in 2014. It is based on the existing "National Guidelines and Operational Manual for TB Control" (5(th) edition) and guidelines for management of DM as per WHO and International Diabetes Federations. Along with that, expert opinions from public health experts and clinicians and "Medline"-searched literature were used to develop the guidelines. These guidelines illustrate the atypical presentation of the TB-DM co-morbidity, recommendations for screening, treatment, and follow-up of these patients and also recommendations in case of management of TB in patients with kidney

  11. Godly play: an intervention for improving physical, emotional, and spiritual responses of chronically ill hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Joan; Cope, Scott Brooks; Cooper, James H; Mathias, Leigh

    2008-01-01

    An experimental two-group comparison pilot study of forty chronically ill hospitalized children was carried out at Wolfson Children's Hospital in Jacksonville, Florida. Three Godly Play interventions were given to participants in the experimental group. Children in the control group did not participate but received a fairy tale book as a control. The sample was evenly distributed with twenty (20) males and twenty (20) females. Ages ranged from six (6) to fifteen (15) years and all participants were chronically ill. Five (5) variables were studied. Of the five (5), three (3) showed significant differences before and after Godly Play: the Staic-Trait Anxiety Scale (p = .049), the Children's Depression Inventory (p = .011), and the McBride Spirituality Assessment (p = .033). A marginal difference in parent satisfaction with hospital care of children in the experimental and control groups was also determined (p = .058). Findings suggest that Godly Play had a significant effect on anxiety, depression, and spirituality of children and support the idea that the parents of children who participated in Godly Play were more satisfied with hospital care than those parents whose children did not engage in Godly Play.

  12. Macroergonomic factors in the patient work system: examining the context of patients with chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Holden, Richard J; Valdez, Rupa S; Schubert, Christiane C; Thompson, Morgan J; Hundt, Ann S

    2017-01-01

    Human factors/ergonomics recognises work as embedded in and shaped by levels of social, physical and organisational context. This study investigates the contextual or macroergonomic factors present in the health-related work performed by patients. We performed a secondary content analysis of findings from three studies of the work of chronically ill patients and their informal caregivers. Our resulting consolidated macroergonomic patient work system model identified 17 factors across physical, social and organisational domains and household and community levels. These factors are illustrated with examples from the three studies and discussed as having positive, negative or varying effects on health and health behaviour. We present three brief case studies to illustrate how macroergonomic factors combine across domains and levels to shape performance in expected and unexpected ways. Findings demonstrate not only the importance of context for patients' health-related activities but also specific factors to consider in future research, design and policy efforts. Practitioner Summary: Health-related activities of patients are embedded in and shaped by levels of social, physical and organisational context. This paper combined findings from three studies to specify 17 contextual or macroergonomic factors in home- and community-based work systems of chronically ill patients. These factors have research, design and policy implications.

  13. [Family dynamics and chronic illness: children with diabetes in the context of their families].

    PubMed

    Wirlach-Bartosik, S; Schubert, M T; Freilinger, M; Schober, E

    2005-01-01

    The present study is based on the assumption of an interaction between family functioning and chronic illness. Using a systemic approach, the intra-familial situation of families with a diabetes-affected child is examined. 44 families were evaluated using a family diagnostic instrument ("Familienbögen") and compared with 31 control families with a healthy child. Furthermore, the study looked at the influence of the level of family functioning on glycemic control, as measured by HbA1c values, and vice versa. Families with a child affected by diabetes showed significantly more dysfunctional domains and higher discrepancies of the ratings in the family diagnostic instrument (p < 0.05). Unexpectedly, no significant interaction between family functioning and glycemic control was found. Poor glycemic control therefore did not have any negative effects on the family dynamics, in fact, the opposite was often the case. Also, the relationship between siblings was judged more positively when one of the siblings was chronically ill (p < 0.05). The results show that despite the fact that diabetes in children may lead to an increase in impairment of intra-familial dynamics, it may, at the same time, offer opportunities for an improvement of family relationships. However, if physiological parameters deteriorate in the child (poor glycemic control), family problems seem to become less important. Success in the treatment of diabetes patients should therefore not only be measured by the quality of glycemic control, but also by considering psychological factors and aspects of family dynamics.

  14. Theory of planned behavior and adherence in chronic illness: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rich, Antonia; Brandes, Kim; Mullan, Barbara; Hagger, Martin S

    2015-08-01

    Social-cognitive models such as the theory of planned behavior have demonstrated efficacy in predicting behavior, but few studies have examined the theory as a predictor of treatment adherence in chronic illness. We tested the efficacy of the theory for predicting adherence to treatment in chronic illness across multiple studies. A database search identified 27 studies, meeting inclusion criteria. Averaged intercorrelations among theory variables were computed corrected for sampling error using random-effects meta-analysis. Path-analysis using the meta-analytically derived correlations was used to test theory hypotheses and effects of moderators. The theory explained 33 and 9 % of the variance in intention and adherence behavior respectively. Theoretically consistent patterns of effects among the attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, intention and behavior constructs were found with small-to-medium effect sizes. Effect sizes were invariant across behavior and measurement type. Although results support theory predictions, effect sizes were small, particularly for the intention-behavior relationship.

  15. A shared respite—The meaning of place for family well-being in families living with chronic illness

    PubMed Central

    Årestedt, Liselott; Benzein, Eva; Persson, Carina; Rämgård, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Living with chronic illness is a family affair that involves ongoing changes and challenges in everyday life. When life changes, the environment is important for family health and well-being. The relation between a place and a family is rarely described, and therefore the aim of this study was to explore the meaning of place for family well-being in families living with chronic illness. A qualitative design was chosen. Data were collected by photovoice combined with narrative family research interviews with 10 families living with chronic illness. A phenomenological hermeneutic analysis was used to interpret the data. The results showed that the meaning of place for family well-being in families living with chronic illness can be described as “a shared respite.” This main theme included three subthemes: “a place for relief,” “a place for reflection,” and “a place for re-creation.” These results were further understood by means of the concept place security. Feeling well means having place security in these families. Through knowledge about the meaning of place for family well-being, health care personnel can stimulate families living with chronic illness to find respite in places that contribute to well-being, both in familiar and new places. PMID:26956097

  16. A shared respite--The meaning of place for family well-being in families living with chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Årestedt, Liselott; Benzein, Eva; Persson, Carina; Rämgård, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Living with chronic illness is a family affair that involves ongoing changes and challenges in everyday life. When life changes, the environment is important for family health and well-being. The relation between a place and a family is rarely described, and therefore the aim of this study was to explore the meaning of place for family well-being in families living with chronic illness. A qualitative design was chosen. Data were collected by photovoice combined with narrative family research interviews with 10 families living with chronic illness. A phenomenological hermeneutic analysis was used to interpret the data. The results showed that the meaning of place for family well-being in families living with chronic illness can be described as "a shared respite." This main theme included three subthemes: "a place for relief," "a place for reflection," and "a place for re-creation." These results were further understood by means of the concept place security. Feeling well means having place security in these families. Through knowledge about the meaning of place for family well-being, health care personnel can stimulate families living with chronic illness to find respite in places that contribute to well-being, both in familiar and new places.

  17. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Illness and Medication Beliefs are Associated with Medication Adherence.

    PubMed

    Krauskopf, Katherine; Federman, Alex D; Kale, Minal S; Sigel, Keith M; Martynenko, Melissa; O'Conor, Rachel; Wolf, Michael S; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P

    2015-04-01

    Almost half of patients with COPD do not adhere to their medications. Illness and medication beliefs are important determinants of adherence in other chronic diseases. Using the framework of the Common Sense Model of Self-Regulation (CSM), we determined associations between potentially modifiable beliefs and adherence to COPD medications in a cohort of English- and Spanish-speaking adults with COPD from New York and Chicago. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Adherence Report Scale. Illness and medication beliefs along CSM domains were evaluated using the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) and the Beliefs about Medications Questionnaire (BMQ). Unadjusted analysis (with Cohen's d effect sizes) and multiple logistic regression were used to assess the relationship between illness and medication beliefs with adherence. The study included 188 participants (47% Black, 13% Hispanics); 109 (58%) were non-adherent. Non-adherent participants were younger (p < 0.001), more likely to be Black or Hispanic (p = 0.001), to have reported low income (p = 0.02), and had fewer years of formal education (p = 0.002). In unadjusted comparisons, non-adherent participants reported being more concerned about their COPD (p = 0.011; Cohen's d = 0.43), more emotionally affected by the disease (p = 0.001; Cohen's d = 0.54), and had greater concerns about COPD medications (p < 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.81). In adjusted analyses, concerns about COPD medications independently predicted non-adherence (odds ratio: 0.52, 95% confidence interval: 0.36-0.75). In this cohort of urban minority adults, concerns about medications were associated with non-adherence. Future work should explore interventions to influence patient adherence by addressing concerns about the safety profile and long-term effects of COPD medications.

  18. Chronic biotoxin-associated illness: multiple-system symptoms, a vision deficit, and effective treatment.

    PubMed

    Hudnell, H Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    Blooms of toxigenic organisms have increased in spatial and temporal extent due to human activities and natural forces that alter ecologic habitats and pollute the environment. In aquatic environments, harmful algal blooms pose a risk for human health, the viability of organisms, and the sustainability of ecosystems. The estuarine dinoflagellate, Pfiesteria piscicida, was discovered in the late 1980s at North Carolina State University as a contaminant in fish cultures. P. piscicida was associated with fish death in laboratory aquaria, and illness among laboratory workers who inhaled the mist above aquaria. Both the fish and humans exhibited signs of toxicity. During the 1990s, large-scale mortality among fish and other aquatic organisms was associated with high concentrations of Pfiesteria sp. in estuaries on the eastern seaboard of North America from New York to Texas. Illness among humans was associated with direct exposure to estuaries and exposures to estuarine aerosols around the time of Pfiesteria-related fish kills. This review of the scientific literature on associations between Pfiesteria and human illness identified some of the possible mechanisms of action by which putative Pfiesteria toxins may have caused morbidity. Particular attention was given to the Pfiesteria-associated, human-illness syndrome known as Possible Estuary Associated Syndrome (PEAS). PEAS was characterized by multiple-system symptoms, deficits in neuropsychological tests of cognitive function, and rapid and severe decrements in visual contrast sensitivity (VCS), an indicator of neurologic function in the visual system. PEAS was diagnosed in acute and chronic illness cases, and was reacquired during re-exposure. Rapid normalization of PEAS signs and symptoms was achieved through the use of cholestyramine therapy. Cholestyramine, a non-absorbable polymer, has been used by humans to lower cholesterol levels since it was approved for that use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in

  19. The Northern Ireland Early Onset Psychosis Study: Phenomenology and Co-Morbidity in the First 25 Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Karen; Short, Mary; Harvey-Smith, Diane; Rushe, Teresa M.; Mulholland, Ciaran

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosing psychotic disorders in young people is difficult. High rates of co-morbidity may be one reason for this difficulty, but it may also be the case that current diagnostic categories are not the most useful when approaching the care of young people with psychotic symptoms. The Northern Ireland Early Onset Psychosis Study is the first study…

  20. Reparative effects of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in young and aged/co-morbid rodents after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Pradillo, Jesus M; Murray, Katie N; Coutts, Graham A; Moraga, Ana; Oroz-Gonjar, Fernando; Boutin, Herve; Moro, Maria A; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Rothwell, Nancy J; Allan, Stuart M

    2017-03-01

    Neuroprotective strategies for ischemic stroke have failed to translate from bench to bedside, possibly due to the lack of consideration of key clinical co-morbidities. Stroke and co-morbidities are associated with raised levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1). Inhibition of IL-1 by the administration of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) has shown to be neuroprotective after experimental cerebral ischemia. Stroke can also trigger a robust neuroreparative response following injury, yet many of these new born neurons fail to survive or integrate into pre-existing circuits. Thus, we explore here effects of IL-1Ra on post-stroke neurogenesis in young and aged/co-morbid rats. Aged lean, aged Corpulent (a model of atherosclerosis, obesity and insulin resistance) and young Wistar male rats were exposed to transient cerebral ischemia, received subcutaneous IL-1Ra 3 and 6h during reperfusion, and effects on stroke outcome and neurogenesis were analyzed. Our results show that administration of IL-1Ra improves stroke outcome in both young and aged/co-morbid rats. Furthermore, IL-1Ra not only increases stem cell proliferation, but also significantly enhances neuroblast migration and the number of newly born neurons after cerebral ischemia. Overall, our data demonstrate that systemic administration of IL-1Ra improves outcome and promotes neurogenesis after experimental stroke, further highlighting the therapeutic potential of this clinically approved drug.

  1. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Stress-Related Psychiatric Co-morbidities: Focus on Early Life Stress.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Siobhain M; Clarke, Gerard; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2017-02-24

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional gastrointestinal disorder, with stress playing a major role in onset and exacerbation of symptoms such as abdominal pain and altered bowel movements. Stress-related disorders including anxiety and depression often precede the development of irritable bowel syndrome and vice versa. Stressor exposure during early life has the potential to increase an individual's susceptibility to both irritable bowel syndrome and psychiatric disease indicating that there may be a common origin for these disorders. Moreover, adverse early life events significantly impact upon many of the communication pathways within the brain-gut-microbiota axis, which allows bidirectional interaction between the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. This axis is proposed to be perturbed in irritable bowel syndrome and studies now indicate that dysfunction of this axis is also seen in psychiatric disease. Here we review the co-morbidity of irritable bowel syndrome and psychiatric disease with their common origin in mind in relation to the impact of early life stress on the developing brain-gut-microbiota axis. We also discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting this axis in these diseases.

  2. Patterns of prescription opioid abuse and co-morbidity in an aging treatment population

    PubMed Central

    Cicero, Theodore J.; Surratt, Hilary L.; Kurtz, Steven; Ellis, M.S.; Inciardi, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Very little is known about the impact of age and gender on drug abuse treatment needs. To examine this, we recruited 2,573 opioid-dependent patients entering treatment across the country from 2008 to 2010 aged from 18 to 75 to complete a self-administered survey examining drug use histories and the extent of co-morbid psychiatric and physical disorders. Moderate to very severe pain and psychiatric disorders, including poly-substance abuse, were present in a significant fraction of 18–24 year olds, but their severity grew exponentially as a function of age: 75% of those over 45 had debilitating pain and psychiatric problems. Women had more pain than men and much worse psychiatric issues in all age groups. Our results indicate that a “one size fits all” approach to prevention, intervention and treatment of opioid abuse that ignores the shifting needs of men and women opioid abusers as they age is destined to fail. PMID:21831562

  3. Headache and co-morbid pains associated with TMD pain in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, I-M; List, T; Drangsholt, M

    2013-09-01

    This case-control study evaluated the association of headache and other co-morbid pain with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain in adolescents and explored the temporal co-variance of headache and TMD pain. In a population-based sample of 12- to 19-year-olds, 350 patients with self-reported TMD pain and 350 healthy age- and sex-matched individuals were mailed questionnaires. Descriptive statistics, 95% CI, and OR analyses--logistic regression models with TMD pain as the outcome variable and adjusted for age and gender--were used for the analysis of individuals' responses. Headache, whether defined as once a week or more (OR = 6.6) or as moderate or severe (categorical), was significantly related to TMD pain. Severe headache (vs. mild) showed stronger associations with TMD (OR = 10.1) than between moderate and mild headache (OR = 5.5). Neck (OR = 4.0) and back (OR = 2.6) pain was also significantly related to TMD pain. When participants were grouped according to headache onset and TMD pain, the highest association between headache and TMD pain was found in the subgroup "Headache onset before TMD pain" (OR 9.4). In conclusion, headache appears to be independently and highly associated with TMD pain in adolescents. Neck pain and somatic complaints were also significantly associated with TMD pain. Headache seems to precede TMD pain in many adolescents with pain.

  4. Treating rheumatological diseases and co-morbidities with interleukin-1 blocking therapies

    PubMed Central

    Dinarello, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and IL-1β orchestrate local and systemic inflammatory responses underlying a broad spectrum of diseases. Three agents for reducing IL-1 activities are currently available. Anakinra is a recombinant form of the naturally occurring IL-1 receptor antagonist. Anakinra binds to the IL-1 receptor and prevents the activity of IL-1α and IL-1β. The soluble decoy receptor rilonacept and the neutralizing mAb canakinumab block IL-1β. A mAb directed against the IL-1 receptor and a neutralizing anti-human IL-1α are in clinical trials. The availability of therapies specifically targeting IL-1 unveiled the pathological role of IL-1-mediated inflammation in a broadening list of diseases. Conditions effectively treated with agents blocking IL-1 range from classic rheumatic diseases, such as RA and gout, to autoinflammatory syndromes, such as systemic JIA and FMF. However, IL-1 antagonism is also effective against highly prevalent inflammatory diseases, namely cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes, conditions that are frequently encountered as co-morbidities in patients with rheumatic diseases. Thereby, IL-1 inhibition has the potential to lift the burden of disease for patients with rheumatic conditions, but also to provide clinical benefits beyond the efficacy on osteoarticular manifestations. PMID:26209330

  5. Two patients with co-morbid myasthenia gravis in a Brazilian cohort of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Gondim, Francisco de A A; de Oliveira, Gisele R; Araújo, Davi F; Souza, Marcellus Henrique Loiola Ponte; Braga, Lúcia Libanez Bessa Campelo; Thomas, Florian P

    2014-11-01

    Co-morbid auto-immune disorders may affect 0.2% of the population. We present the clinical and electrodiagnostic findings of 2 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and myasthenia gravis from a Brazilian cohort of 218 inflammatory bowel disease patients. Patient 1: A 40year-old man was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis at age 37 and underwent total colectomy 3years later. After prednisone was tapered, he experienced a clinical relapse and was diagnosed with Crohn's disease. He then developed quadriparesis, bilateral ptosis, dysphagia and dysarthria. Patient 2: A 41year-old woman (diagnosed with ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis at age 35) developed speech impairment and ptosis. On both patients, symptoms quickly progressed over few weeks. Myasthenia gravis was diagnosed and confirmed by abnormal repetitive nerve stimulation and elevated anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody titers. Pyridostigmine and prednisone successfully treated both patients. Myasthenia gravis prevalence over 9years was 0.9%. Myasthenia gravis clinical course was not significantly modified by inflammatory bowel disease relapses and should be suspected with new onset weakness.

  6. Diagnosis in chronic illness: disabling or enabling--the case of chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, R V; Broom, D H; Legge, D G

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines doctors' and patients' views on the consequences of an increasingly common symptomatic diagnosis, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Two studies were conducted: the first comprised interviews with 20 general practitioners; the second was a longitudinal study, comprising three interviews over a period of 2 years with 50 people diagnosed with CFS. Contrasts were apparent between doctors' practical and ethical concerns about articulating a diagnosis of CFS and patients' experiences with and without such a diagnosis. Seventy per cent of the doctors were reluctant to articulate a diagnosis of CFS. They felt constrained by the scientific uncertainty regarding its aetiology and by a concern that diagnosis might become a disabling self-fulfilling prophecy. Patients, by contrast, highlighted the enabling aspects of a singular coherent diagnosis and emphasized the negative effects of having no explanation for their problems. PMID:7629762

  7. Plasma profile of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in cocaine users under outpatient treatment: influence of cocaine symptom severity and psychiatric co-morbidity.

    PubMed

    Araos, Pedro; Pedraz, María; Serrano, Antonia; Lucena, Miguel; Barrios, Vicente; García-Marchena, Nuria; Campos-Cloute, Rafael; Ruiz, Juan J; Romero, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Baixeras, Elena; de la Torre, Rafael; Montesinos, Jorge; Guerri, Consuelo; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, José; Martínez-Riera, Roser; Torrens, Marta; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús; Mason, Barbara J; Pavón, Francisco J; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    The treatment for cocaine use constitutes a clinical challenge because of the lack of appropriate therapies and the high rate of relapse. Recent evidence indicates that the immune system might be involved in the pathogenesis of cocaine addiction and its co-morbid psychiatric disorders. This work examined the plasma pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine profile in abstinent cocaine users (n = 82) who sought outpatient cocaine treatment and age/sex/body mass-matched controls (n = 65). Participants were assessed with the diagnostic interview Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Diseases according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12)/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) were decreased in cocaine users, although all cytokines were identified as predictors of a lifetime pathological use of cocaine. Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), chemokine (C-X3-C motif) ligand 1 (CX3CL1)/fractalkine and CXCL12/SDF-1 positively correlated with the cocaine symptom severity when using the DSM-IV-TR criteria for cocaine abuse/dependence. These cytokines allowed the categorization of the outpatients into subgroups according to severity, identifying a subgroup of severe cocaine users (9-11 criteria) with increased prevalence of co-morbid psychiatric disorders [mood (54%), anxiety (32%), psychotic (30%) and personality (60%) disorders]. IL-1β was observed to be increased in users with such psychiatric disorders relative to those users with no diagnosis. In addition to these clinical data, studies in mice demonstrated that plasma IL-1β, CX3CL1 and CXCL12 were also affected after acute and chronic cocaine administration, providing a preclinical model for further research. In conclusion, cocaine exposure modifies the circulating levels of pro-inflammatory mediators. Plasma

  8. Quality of life and illness perception in working and sick-listed chronic RSI patients

    PubMed Central

    Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study differences between working and sick-listed chronic repetitive strain injury (RSI) patients in the Netherlands with respect to indices of quality of life and illness perception. Methods In a cross-sectional design, one questionnaire was sent to all 3,250 members of the national RSI patient association. For descriptive purposes, demographics, work status and complaint-related variables such as severity, type, duration, and extent of complaints were asked for. Indices of quality of life were assessed through seven SF-36 subscales (physical (role) functioning, emotional role functioning, social functioning, pain, mental health and vitality). A work-ability estimate and VAS scales were used to assess complaint-related decrease in quality of life. Illness perception was assessed through the brief illness perception questionnaire (IPQ-B). Working patients and sick-listed patients were identified. Tests between the two independent groups were performed and P-values < 0.01 were considered significant. Results Data from 1,121 questionnaires were used. Two-thirds of the respondents worked and one-third were sick-listed. Average duration of complaints was over 5 years in both groups. The sick-listed patients reported significantly more severe and extensive complaints than did the working patients. In addition, sick-listed patients reported significantly poorer mental health, physical (role) functioning, emotional role functioning, pain, vitality, and work-ability. With respect to illness perception, both groups showed the same concerns about their complaints, but sick-listed patients had significantly more distorted perceptions in their emotional response, identity, treatment control, personal control, timeline, and life consequences. Complaint-related decrease in quality of life was 31% in the working patients and 49% in the sick-listed patients. Conclusion The study found a greater number and severe complaints among sick-listed chronic RSI patients and

  9. Quality of life of Australian chronically-ill adults: patient and practice characteristics matter

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Upali W; Proudfoot, Judith; Barton, Christopher A; Amoroso, Cheryl; Holton, Chris; Davies, Gawaine Powell; Beilby, Justin; Harris, Mark F

    2009-01-01

    Background To study health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in a large sample of Australian chronically-ill patients and investigate the impact of characteristics of patients and their general practices on their HRQOL and to assess the construct validity of SF-12 in Australia. Methods Cross sectional study with 96 general practices and 7606 chronically-ill patients aged 18 years or more using standard SF-12 version 2. Factor analysis was used to confirm the hypothesized component structure of the SF-12 items. SF-12 physical component score (PCS-12) and mental component score (MCS-12) were derived using the standard US algorithm. Multilevel regression analysis (patients at level 1 and practices at level 2) was applied to relate PCS-12 and MCS-12 to patient and practice characteristics. Results There were significant associations between lower PCS-12 or MCS-12 score and poorer general health (10.8 (regression coefficient) lower for PCS-12 and 7.3 lower for MCS-12), low socio-economic status (5.1 lower PCS-12 and 2.9 lower MCS-12 for unemployed, 0.8 lower PCS-12 and 1.7 lower MCS-12 for non-owner-occupiers, 1.0 lower PCS-12 for less well-educated) and having two or more chronic conditions (up to 2.7 lower PCS-12 and up to 1.5 lower MCS-12 than those having a single disease). Younger age was associated with lower MCS-12 (2.2 and 6.0 lower than middle age and older age respectively) but higher PCS-12 (4.7 and 7.6 higher than middle age and older age respectively). Satisfaction with quality of care (regression coefficient = 1.2) and patients who were married or cohabiting (regression coefficient = 0.6) was positively associated with MCS-12. Patients born in non-English-speaking countries were more likely to have a lower MCS-12 (1.5 lower) than those born in Australia. Employment had a stronger association with the quality of life of males than that of females. Those attending smaller practices had lower PCS-12 (1.0 lower) and MCS-12 (0.6 lower) than those attending larger

  10. Implementation of a Chronic Illness Model for Diabetes Care in a Family Medicine Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Beresford, Robin

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION While the Chronic Care Model (CCM) has been shown to improve the care of patients with chronic illnesses, primary care physicians have been unprepared in its use, and residencies have encountered challenges in introducing it into the academic environment. AIM Our residency program has implemented a diabetes management program modeled on the CCM to evaluate its impact on health outcomes of diabetic patients and educational outcomes of residents. SETTING University-affiliated, community-based family medicine residency program. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Six residents, two faculty clinicians, and clinic staff formed a diabetes management team. We redesigned the outpatient experience for diabetic patients by incorporating elements of the CCM: multidisciplinary team care through planned and group visits; creation of a diabetes registry; use of guidelines-based flow sheets; and incorporation of self-management goal-setting. Residents received extensive instruction in diabetes management, quality improvement, and patient self-management. PROGRAM EVALUATION We achieved overall improvement in all metabolic and process measures for patients, with the percentage achieving HbA1c, LDL, and BP goals simultaneously increasing from 5.7% to 17.1%. Educational outcomes for residents, as measured by compliance with review of provider performance reports and self-management goal-setting with patients, also significantly improved. DISCUSSION Through a learning collaborative experience, residency programs can successfully incorporate chronic care training for residents while addressing gaps in care for patients with diabetes. PMID:20737237

  11. Respecting the autonomy of chronic mentally ill women in decisions about contraception.

    PubMed

    Coverdale, J H; Bayer, T L; McCullough, L B; Chervenak, F A

    1993-07-01

    Treatment of women patients with chronic mental illness who are at risk of unwanted pregnancies presents ethical challenges to the clinician who wishes to respect the patient's autonomy while also helping her avert the potential adverse consequences of unwanted pregnancy. The clinician who simply allows the patient to continue at risk or coerces her into using contraception may not have adequately considered the variable nature of the patient's autonomy. The authors suggest that the clinician should assess and treat conditions underlying the patient's variable impairment of autonomy to maximize her ability to participate in family planning decisions. Case examples are used to illustrate assessment of patients' decision-making capacity, development of family planning approaches that respect patients' autonomy, and use of a newly available contraceptive implant.

  12. A role for communities in primary prevention of chronic illness? Case studies in regional Australia.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Judy; Braunack-Mayer, Annette; Cargo, Margaret; Larkins, Sarah; Preston, Robyn

    2013-08-01

    In regional Australia "communities of place," defined as bounded geographic locations with a local society, undertake community-wide primary prevention programs. In helping to prevent chronic illness, communities provide valuable resources to the health system. To understand the role of community-health sector partnerships for primary prevention and the community contextual factors that affect them, we studied eight partnerships. We used an embedded multiple case study design and collected data through interviews, nonparticipant observation, and document analysis. These data were analyzed using a typology of community-health sector partnerships and community interaction theory to frame the key community contextual factors that affected partnerships. The dominant factor affecting all partnerships was the presence of a collective commitment that communities brought to making the community a better place through developing health. We call this a communitarian approach. Additional research to investigate factors influencing a communitarian approach and the role it plays in partnerships is required.

  13. Co-Morbid Erectile Dysfunction (Ed) and Antidepressant Treatment in a Patient - A Management Challenge?

    PubMed

    Zainol, Maszaidi; Sidi, Hatta; Kumar, Jaya; Das, Srijit; Ismail, Shaiful; Hatta, Muhammad Hizri; Baharudin, Najwa; Ravindran, Arun

    2017-03-15

    Across the globe, antidepressants (AD) and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE-5i) are commonly prescribed psychopharmacological agents for patients with co-morbid mental-health problem and sexual dysfunction (SD). The serotonergic and/or noradrenergic ADs, although is an effective agent are not without SD side-effects, especially erectile dysfunction (ED). ED is an inability to achieve, or maintain an erection for satisfactory sexual intercourse during the phases of male's sexual arousal. It is recognized as an important reason why non-adherence to treatment was observed in patients who are on AD. AD intervention caused remission to some of the pre-treatment psychopathology of ED, but to many patients, AD potentially magnified the unwanted sexual side-effects. This made this situation a challenging task for the mental health professional. These challenges are based on the complexity of ED - its etiology, and the associated risk factors, which further compounded with AD side-effect. The neuro-psychopharmacological basis for AD treatment selection used was deliberated. Biopsychosocial interventions are recommended at a two pivotal stage. First, a step should be taken for proper assessment (e.g. detailed history, psychosocial and laboratory investigations); and identifying some modifiable risk factors for ED and associated mental health issue. Secondly, with guidance of an algorithm pathway, a practical intervention should include steps like dose reduction, augmentation or changing to an AD with lesser/ no sexual side-effects like bupropion and mirtazepine. Some achievable suggestions, e.g. revising sexual scripts and improving sexual techniques, life-style modifications, psychotherapy and other non-pharmacological approaches will be beneficial for both patients and his partner.

  14. Advance care planning for fatal chronic illness: avoiding commonplace errors and unwarranted suffering.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Joanne; Goldstein, Nathan E

    2003-05-20

    Patients with eventually fatal illnesses often receive routine treatments in response to health problems rather than treatments arising from planning that incorporates the patient's situation and preferences. This paper considers the case of an elderly man with advanced lung disease who had mechanical ventilation and aggressive intensive care, in part because his nursing home clinicians did not complete an advance care plan and his do-not-resuscitate order did not accompany him to the hospital. The errors that led to his hospitalization and his unwanted treatment there demonstrate how the ordinary lack of advance care planning is deleterious for patients who are nearing the end of life. We discuss serious, recurring, and generally unnoticed errors in planning for care near the end of life and possible steps toward improvement. Repairing these shortcomings will require quality improvement and system redesign efforts, methods familiar from patient safety initiatives. Reliable improvement will also require making it unacceptable for clinicians to fail to plan ahead for care during fatal chronic illness.

  15. Social networks, the 'work' and work force of chronic illness self-management: a survey analysis of personal communities.

    PubMed

    Vassilev, Ivaylo; Rogers, Anne; Blickem, Christian; Brooks, Helen; Kapadia, Dharmi; Kennedy, Anne; Sanders, Caroline; Kirk, Sue; Reeves, David

    2013-01-01

    Self-management support forms a central aspect of chronic Illness management nationally and globally. Evidence for the success of self-management support has mainly focussed on individually-centred outcomes of behavioural change. While it is recognised that social network members play an important role there is currently a gap in knowledge regarding who provides what type of support and under what circumstances. This is relevant for understanding the division of labour and the meeting of needs for those living with a long-term condition. We therefore took a network approach to explore self-management support conceptualising it as types of illness 'work' undertaken within peoples' social networks. 300 people from deprived areas and with chronic illnesses took part in a survey conducted in 2010 in the North West of England. A concentric circles diagram was used as a research tool with which participants identified 2,544 network members who contributed to illness management. The results provide an articulation of how social network members are substantially involved in illness management. Whilst partners and close family make the highest contributions there is evidence of inputs from a wide range of relationships. Network member characteristics (type of relationship, proximity, frequency of contact) impact on the amount of illness work undertaken in peoples' networks. In networks with 'no partner' other people tend to contribute more in the way of illness related work than in networks with a partner. This indicates a degree of substitutability between differently constituted networks, and that the level and type of input by different members of a network might change according to circumstances. A network perspective offers an opportunity to redress the balance of an exclusively individual focus on self-management because it addresses the broader set of contributions and resources available to people in need of chronic illness management and support.

  16. Brief Report: Children with ADHD without Co-Morbid Autism Do Not Have Impaired Motor Proficiency on the Movement Assessment Battery for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadopoulos, Nicole; Rinehart, Nicole; Bradshaw, John L.; McGinley, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Motor proficiency was investigated in a sample of children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder-Combined type (ADHD-CT) without autism. Accounting for the influence of co-morbid autistic symptoms in ADHD motor studies is vital given that motor impairment has been linked to social-communication symptoms in children who have co-morbid ADHD…

  17. Maintaining health: proactive client-oriented community day treatment centres for the chronic mentally ill.

    PubMed

    Yurkovich, E; Smyer, T; Dean, L

    1999-02-01

    This grounded theory study compared the definition of health by clients of two rural mental health day treatment centres, Big Sky Centre and Montana Centre. Based on an original grounded theory study of seven chronic mentally ill/disabled clients in Big Sky Centre (Yurkovich et al. 1997), the core variable, 'preventing loss of control' and related properties, were validated with nine residents of Montana Centre. While establishing a 'fit' with previous research findings, differences emerged between these two centres. These differences related to the staffs' philosophical approaches in providing treatment to the chronic mentally ill. Big Sky Centre care providers empowered their clients to learn new behaviours from their peers and assume new roles such as newcomer, member and leader. They also encouraged a prosocial attitude, and created a sense of belonging through valued involvement in their treatment. Montana Centre clients were not empowered to try out new behaviours in the treatment environment, or seek social support networks among their peers at the centre, which would foster a sense of belonging. The result was that clients from Montana Centre relied on the formal healthcare system more often than clients from the Big Sky Centre. The competing forces in healthcare today--family members, mental health providers, and insurance or managed care providers--make it easy to lose sight of or fail to gain the client's perspective about their health status and maintenance, particularly as it concerns day treatment centres. The importance of the day treatment centre as a therapeutic community which requires educational processes, innovative nursing practice, and client-centred interventions will be discussed.

  18. Psychological interventions for parents of children and adolescents with chronic illness

    PubMed Central

    Eccleston, Christopher; Fisher, Emma; Law, Emily; Bartlett, Jess; Palermo, Tonya M

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychological therapies have been developed for parents of children and adolescents with a chronic illness. Such therapies include interventions directed at the parent only or at parent and child/adolescent, and are designed to improve parent, child, and family outcomes. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 8, 2012, (Psychological interventions for parents of children and adolescents with chronic illness). Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of psychological therapies that include parents of children and adolescents with chronic illnesses including painful conditions, cancer, diabetes mellitus, asthma, traumatic brain injury (TBI), inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), skin diseases, or gynaecological disorders. We also aimed to evaluate the adverse events related to implementation of psychological therapies for this population. Secondly, we aimed to evaluate the risk of bias of included studies and the quality of outcomes using the GRADE assessment. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of psychological interventions that included parents of children and adolescents with a chronic illness. Databases were searched to July 2014. Selection criteria Included studies were RCTs of psychological interventions that delivered treatment to parents of children and adolescents with a chronic illness compared to an active control, waiting list, or treatment as usual control group. Data collection and analysis Study characteristics and outcomes were extracted from included studies. We analysed data using two categories. First, we analysed data by each individual medical condition collapsing across all treatment classes at two time points. Second, we analysed data by each individual treatment class; cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), family therapy (FT), problem solving therapy (PST) and multisystemic therapy

  19. Chronic Multisymptom Illness: A Comparison of Iraq and Afghanistan Deployers with Veterans of the 1991 Gulf War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-02

    based on the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition criteria. Chronic Multisymptom...PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition criteria. Chronic Multisymptom Illness...were evaluated based on the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition criteria. 1184

  20. Models of care for late-life depression of the medically ill: examples from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and stroke.

    PubMed

    Avari, Jimmy N; Alexopoulos, George S

    2015-05-01

    Depression worsens most treatment outcomes in medically ill older adults. Chronic medical illnesses weaken and demoralize patients and compromise their ability to adhere to treatments requiring consistency and effort. Acute medical illnesses create a psychosocial storm that finds patients and their ecosystem unprepared. We describe two intervention models that can be used to target and personalize treatment in depressed, chronically, or acutely medically ill older adults. The Personalized Adherence Intervention for Depression and COPD (PID-C) is a model intervention for depressed patients with chronic medical illnesses. It targets patient-specific barriers to treatment engagement and aims to shift the balance in favor of treatment participation. PID-C led to higher remission rates of depression, reduction in depressive symptoms, and reduction in dyspnea-related disability. The addition of problem-solving training enables patients to use resources available to them and hopefully improve their outcomes. Ecosystem-focused therapy (EFT) is a model intervention for depression developing in the context of an acute medical event. It was developed for patients with poststroke depression (PSD) and targets five areas, part of the "psychosocial storm" originating from the patient's sudden disability and the resulting change in the patient's needs and family's life. A preliminary study suggests that EFT is feasible and efficacious in reducing depressive symptoms and signs and disability in PSD.

  1. The painless brain: lobotomy, psychiatry, and the treatment of chronic pain and terminal illness.

    PubMed

    Raz, Mical

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the use of lobotomy as a treatment for chronic intractable pain and reconstructs then-common perceptions of pain and of the patients who suffered from it. It delineates the social expectations and judgments implicit in physicians' descriptions of the patients, analyzing what was expected from such patients and how the medical establishment responded to non-normative expressions of suffering. I argue that the medicalized response to an expectation for normativity demonstrates the convergence between psychiatric and palliative interventions. Based on a historically informed perspective of psychiatric interventions in the field of pain medicine, I examine the use of psychiatric medications for pain syndromes today and evaluate the interface between depression, chronic pain, and terminal illness. While not detracting from the medical imperative to alleviate pain, I question the usage of social criteria and normative judgments in the clinical decision of how to treat pain. What normalizing social function does the use of psychiatric interventions in pain treatment fulfill? This approach leads to a reexamination of perceptions of dualism in pain medicine.

  2. The use of central venous lines in the treatment of chronically ill children.

    PubMed

    Barczykowska, Ewa; Szwed-Kolińska, Marzena; Wróbel-Bania, Agnieszka; Ślusarz, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of chronic diseases in children is a special medical problem. Maintaining constant access to the central vascular system is necessary for long-term hemato-oncological and nephrological therapies as well as parenteral nutrition. Providing such access enables chemotherapic treatment, complete parenteral nutrition, long-term antibiotic therapy, hemodialysis, treatment of intensive care unit patients, monitoring blood pressure in the pulmonary artery and stimulation of heart rate in emergency situations as well as treatment of patients suffering from complications, especially when chances of access into peripheral veins are exhausted. Continuous access to the central vascular system is desirable in the treatment of chronically ill children. Insertion of a central venous catheter line eliminates the unnecessary pain and stress to a child patient accompanying injection into peripheral vessels. In order to gain long-term and secure access to the central venous system, respecting the guidelines of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention contained in the updated 'Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections' is necessary.

  3. Prescribing Antidepressants and Benzodiazepines in the Netherlands: Is Chronic Physical Illness Involved?

    PubMed Central

    van Eijk, Jacques Th. M.; Bosma, Hans; Jonkers, Catharina C. M.; Lamers, Femke; Muijrers, Paul E. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we assessed differences in new and repeat prescriptions of psycho-tropics between patients receiving prescriptions for drugs to treat a common chronic disease and people without such prescriptions. The study used the databases of two Dutch health insurance companies (3 million people). We selected all Dutch men and women aged 45 and older who were registered for six consecutive years (1999–2004). Our analyses both found a consistent relation between psycho-tropics on the one hand and physical illness on the other. People with multi-morbidity were prescribed these drugs most often, especially men and those younger than 65. Epidemiological studies showed a prevalence of depression among people with multi-morbidity to be twice as high as among people without such conditions. According to recent guidelines non-drug treatment may be the first therapy option for patients with non severe depression. If prescribed for a long time, benzodiazepine prescriptions are especially known to be addictive. Our data raise the question to what extent patients with a chronic physical disease suffering from co-occurring mental problems are prescribed psycho-tropics in accord with the guidelines that also advise mental support in case of non severe mental problems. Further research can answer this important question. PMID:21152218

  4. Complementary and alternative medicine: A survey of its use in children with chronic respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Ellison; Adams, Denise; Dagenais, Simon; Clifford, Tammy; Baydala, Lola; King, W James; Vohra, Sunita

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has increased in recent years, with especially high prevalence in individuals with chronic illnesses. In the United States, the prevalence of CAM use in pediatric asthma patients is as high as 89%. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the epidemiology of pediatric CAM use in respiratory subspecialty clinics. METHODS: A survey was conducted at two hospital-based respiratory clinics in Edmonton (Alberta) and Ottawa (Ontario). Caregivers (most often parents) of children <18 years of age were asked questions regarding child and caregiver use of CAM, including products and practices used, beliefs about CAM, trust in information sources about CAM and characteristics of the respondents themselves. RESULTS: A total of 202 survey questionnaires were completed (151 from Edmonton and 51 from Ottawa). Pediatric CAM use in Edmonton was 68% compared with 45% in Ottawa, and was associated with caregiver CAM use, poorer health and health insurance coverage for CAM. The majority (67%) of children using CAM had taken prescription drugs concurrently and 58% of caregivers had discussed this with their doctor. DISCUSSION: Lifetime use of CAM at these pediatric clinics was higher than reported for children who do not have chronic diseases. CAM practices that are popular may be worthy of further research to evaluate their effectiveness and safety profile with regard to drug interactions. Health care providers should be encouraged to discuss CAM use at every visit, and explore their patient’s health-related beliefs, behaviours and treatment preferences. PMID:26078607

  5. Extracting principal diagnosis, co-morbidity and smoking status for asthma research: evaluation of a natural language processing system

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qing T; Goryachev, Sergey; Weiss, Scott; Sordo, Margarita; Murphy, Shawn N; Lazarus, Ross

    2006-01-01

    Background The text descriptions in electronic medical records are a rich source of information. We have developed a Health Information Text Extraction (HITEx) tool and used it to extract key findings for a research study on airways disease. Methods The principal diagnosis, co-morbidity and smoking status extracted by HITEx from a set of 150 discharge summaries were compared to an expert-generated gold standard. Results The accuracy of HITEx was 82% for principal diagnosis, 87% for co-morbidity, and 90% for smoking status extraction, when cases labeled "Insufficient Data" by the gold standard were excluded. Conclusion We consider the results promising, given the complexity of the discharge summaries and the extraction tasks. PMID:16872495

  6. Solving Developmental Tasks in Adolescents with a Chronic Physical Illness or Physical/Sensory Disability: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinquart, Martin; Pfeiffer, Jens P.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic illnesses and disabilities may impair the attainment of age-typical developmental tasks, such as forming relationships with peers and gaining autonomy. Based on a systematic search in electronic databases and cross-referencing, 447 quantitative empirical studies were included which compared the attainment of developmental tasks of…

  7. Mental turmoil, suicide risk, illness perception, and temperament, and their impact on quality of life in chronic daily headache.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Sergio; Erbuto, Denise; Gentili, Federica; Innamorati, Marco; Lester, David; Tatarelli, Roberto; Martelletti, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the relationship among quality of life, temperament, illness perception, and mental turmoil in patients affected by chronic daily headache with concomitant medication overuse headache. Participants were 116 consecutive adult outpatients admitted to the Department of General Medicine of the Sant'Andrea Hospital in Rome, between January 2007 and December 2007 with a diagnosis of chronic daily headache (illness duration >5 years). Patients were administered the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego-autoquestionnaire version (TEMPS-A), the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ), the Suicide Score Scale (SSS), and the Quality of Life Index (QL-Index). Twenty-eight percent of the patients evidenced moderate to severe depression, and 35% evidenced severe hopelessness. Analyses also indicated that quality of life, temperament, illness perception, and psychological turmoil are associated. However, a hierarchical multivariate regression analysis with quality of life as dependent variable indicated that only a model with mental turmoil variables may fit data; further, only the MINI suicidal intent resulted associated with quality of life (standardized regression coefficient = -0.55; t = -3.06; P < 0.01). Suicide risk may play a central role in affecting the quality of life of patients with chronic headache. The investigation of the interplay of factors that precipitate suicide risk should include assessment of chronic headache and its effects on wellbeing.

  8. Curriculum Guide for the Chronic Mentally Ill in the Pre-Discharge Program at East Mississippi State Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cagle, Allyson; Shannon, Cheryl

    The paper describes the pre-discharge program for chronically mentally ill patients at East Mississippi State Hospital and outlines program curriculum units. The program's requirements for admission, enrollment capacity, length of stay, program standards (on such matters as referral, assessment, and case records) and the typical activity schedule…

  9. Physical Activity on Medical Prescription: A Qualitative Study of Factors Influencing Take-Up and Adherence in Chronically Ill Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasparini, William; Knobé, Sandrine; Didierjean, Romaine

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to determine the effects of an innovative public health programme offering physical and sports activities on medical prescription to chronically ill patients. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with programme participants at two time points: at the start of their activity (n?=?33) and 3?months after the…

  10. Suicide Risk in Adolescents with Chronic Illness: Implications for Primary Care and Specialty Pediatric Practice--A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greydanus, Donald; Patel, Dilip; Pratt, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Suicide in adolescents is a global tragedy. Research-identified correlates of suicide in youth include depression, academic failure, loss of friends, social isolation, and substance abuse, among others. This review focuses on the potential link between chronic illness in adolescents and increased suicide risk. Research suggests that chronic…

  11. Playing with Moon Sand: A Narrative Inquiry into a Teacher's Experiences Teaching Alongside a Student with a Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Beth; Murphy, M. Shaun

    2016-01-01

    This paper inquires into the experiences of an early childhood educator named Claire who taught a young girl with a chronic illness at East Willows Elementary School, a western Canadian elementary school. Using narrative inquiry as the methodology, Claire's experiences in her curriculum making alongside Madeline a young girl with Turner syndrome…

  12. Guide to National Data on Maternal and Child Health with Special Emphasis on Financing Services for Chronically Ill Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, Margaret A.; And Others

    The major purposes of this guide are to: (1) identify available national data on maternal and child health, with emphasis on costs of care and insurance coverage for chronically ill children; (2) explain to the reader how to use such data; and (3) offer recommendations for improving future collection and analysis of national data. The guide is…

  13. The use of information and communication technology to meet chronically ill patients' needs when living at home.

    PubMed

    Skär, Lisa; Söderberg, Siv

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe influences, benefits, and limitations in using information and communication technology to meet chronically ill patients' needs when living at home. The study is a descriptive, exploratory designed pilot study and the intervention was performed using an electronic communication program enabling communication between ill persons and the district nurse in real time by web cam pictures and sound. The participant used the programme once or twice a week from February to August 2008. Data were collected by means of repeated interviews and logbook notes, and were subjected to qualitative content analysis. The results showed that all participants appreciated being able to communicate regardless of time and place and their experiences of using information and communication technology revealed that it created feelings of safety and security. The information and communication technology became a tool in their communication and improved nursing care among seriously chronically ill persons living at home.

  14. Nutritional Needs of the Child with a Handicap or Chronic Illness. Manual II: Clinical Nutrition. Presentations from a National Interdisciplinary Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekvall, Shirley M.; Wheby, Elizabeth A.

    The following papers were presented at a symposium on clinical nutrition for the child who is chronically ill or handicapped: (1) "Food Allergy"; (2) "Anemia and the Chronically Ill or Handicapped Child"; (3) "Nutrition and Neurotransmitters--Clinical Implications"; (4) "The Importance of Lipid Type in the Diet after Burn Injury"; (5) "Advances of…

  15. Using Goal-Directed Design to Create a Novel System for Improving Chronic Illness Care

    PubMed Central

    Fore, David; Goldenhar, Linda M; Margolis, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Background A learning health system enables patients, clinicians, and researchers to work together to choose care based on the best evidence, drive discovery as a natural outgrowth of patient care, and ensure innovation, quality, safety, and value in health care; all in a more real-time fashion. Objective Our paper describes how goal-directed design (GDD) methods were employed to understand the context and goals of potential participants in such a system as part of a design process to translate the concept of a learning health system into a prototype collaborative chronic care network (C3N), specifically for pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. Methods Thirty-six one-on-one in-depth interviews and observations were conducted with patients (10/36, 28%), caregivers (10/36, 28%), physicians/researchers (10/36, 28%), and nurses (6/36, 17%) from a pediatric gastroenterology center participating in the ImproveCareNow network. GDD methods were used to determine the context and goals of participants. These same methods were used in conjunction with idealized design process techniques to help determine characteristics of a learning health system for this pediatric health care ecology. Research was conducted in a clinic and, in the case of some patients and caregivers, at home. Results Thematic analysis revealed 3 parent-child dyad personas (ie, representations of interviewees’ behavior patterns, goals, skills, attitudes, and contextual information) that represented adaptation to a chronic illness over time. These were used as part of a design process to generate scenarios (potential interactions between personas and the learning health system under design) from which system requirements were derived. These scenarios in turn helped guide generation, prioritization, design, measurement, and implementation of approximately 100 prototype interventions consistent with the aim of C3N becoming a learning health network. Conclusions GDD methods help ensure human goals and

  16. Developmental Coordination Disorder in Children with Specific Language Impairment: Co-Morbidity and Impact on Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flapper, Boudien C. T.; Schoemaker, Marina M.

    2013-01-01

    Co-morbidity of Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and the impact of DCD on quality-of-life (QOL) was investigated in 65 5-8 year old children with SLI (43 boys, age 6.8 [plus or minus] 0.8; 22 girls, age 6.6 [plus or minus] 0.8). The prevalence of DCD was assessed using DSM-IV-TR criteria…

  17. Exploring the interrelationship between alexithymia, defense style, emotional suppression, homicide-related posttraumatic stress disorder and psychiatric co-morbidity.

    PubMed

    Chung, Man Cheung; Di, Xiaohu; Wan, King Hung

    2016-09-30

    This study investigated the interrelationship between alexithymia, defense style, emotional suppression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following homicide and psychiatric co-morbidity. One hundred and fifty male homicide perpetrators and 156 male perpetrators of non-violent crime completed the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale (except for non-violent perpetrators), the General Health Questionnaire-28, the Defense Styles Questionnaire, the Courtauld Emotional Control Scale and the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20. The results showed that 44% of homicide perpetrators met the criteria for PTSD. No significant differences were found between groups in alexithymia, defense style and psychiatric co-morbidity. Homicide perpetrators suppressed depression significantly more than the non-violent group. PLS analyses showed that alexithymia was significantly correlated with defense style. Defense styles were significantly correlated with emotional suppression which, in turn, was associated with homicide-related PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity. To conclude, perpetrators can experience PTSD reactions following the act of homicide. The severity of these reactions and other psychological problems were related to difficulty getting in touch with distressing emotions, the defenses they used to protect themselves psychologically and the way they suppressed their emotion.

  18. Conscious knowledge influences decision-making differently in substance abusers with and without co-morbid antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Mellentin, Angelina I; Skøt, Lotte; Teasdale, Thomas W; Habekost, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Decision-making impairment, as measured by the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), is a consistent finding among individuals with substance use disorder (SUD). We studied how this impairment is influenced by co-morbid antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and conscious knowledge of the task. Three groups were investigated: SUD individuals without co-morbid ASPD (n = 30), SUD individuals with co-morbid ASPD (n = 16), and healthy controls (n = 17). Both SUD and SUD+ASPD participants had poor overall IGT performance. A block-by-block analysis revealed that SUD participants exhibited slow but steady improvement across the IGT, whereas SUD+ASPD participants exhibited initial normal improvement, but dropped off during the last 40 trials. Conscious knowledge of the task was significantly correlated to performance for controls and SUD participants, but not for SUD+ASPD participants. Our findings suggest that decision-making proceeds differently in SUD and SUD+ASPD individuals due to differences in acquisition and application of conscious knowledge.

  19. The Co-Morbidity Burden of Children and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kohane, Isaac S.; McMurry, Andrew; Weber, Griffin; MacFadden, Douglas; Rappaport, Leonard; Kunkel, Louis; Bickel, Jonathan; Wattanasin, Nich; Spence, Sarah; Murphy, Shawn; Churchill, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Use electronic health records Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to assess the comorbidity burden of ASD in children and young adults. Study Design A retrospective prevalence study was performed using a distributed query system across three general hospitals and one pediatric hospital. Over 14,000 individuals under age 35 with ASD were characterized by their co-morbidities and conversely, the prevalence of ASD within these comorbidities was measured. The comorbidity prevalence of the younger (Age<18 years) and older (Age 18–34 years) individuals with ASD was compared. Results 19.44% of ASD patients had epilepsy as compared to 2.19% in the overall hospital population (95% confidence interval for difference in percentages 13.58–14.69%), 2.43% of ASD with schizophrenia vs. 0.24% in the hospital population (95% CI 1.89–2.39%), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) 0.83% vs. 0.54% (95% CI 0.13–0.43%), bowel disorders (without IBD) 11.74% vs. 4.5% (95% CI 5.72–6.68%), CNS/cranial anomalies 12.45% vs. 1.19% (95% CI 9.41–10.38%), diabetes mellitus type I (DM1) 0.79% vs. 0.34% (95% CI 0.3–0.6%), muscular dystrophy 0.47% vs 0.05% (95% CI 0.26–0.49%), sleep disorders 1.12% vs. 0.14% (95% CI 0.79–1.14%). Autoimmune disorders (excluding DM1 and IBD) were not significantly different at 0.67% vs. 0.68% (95% CI −0.14-0.13%). Three of the studied comorbidities increased significantly when comparing ages 0–17 vs 18–34 with p<0.001: Schizophrenia (1.43% vs. 8.76%), diabetes mellitus type I (0.67% vs. 2.08%), IBD (0.68% vs. 1.99%) whereas sleeping disorders, bowel disorders (without IBD) and epilepsy did not change significantly. Conclusions The comorbidities of ASD encompass disease states that are significantly overrepresented in ASD with respect to even the patient populations of tertiary health centers. This burden of comorbidities goes well beyond those routinely managed in developmental medicine centers and requires broad multidisciplinary management

  20. Family functioning in families of first-episode psychosis patients as compared to chronic mentally ill patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Koutra, Katerina; Triliva, Sofia; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Stefanakis, Zacharias; Basta, Maria; Lionis, Christos; Vgontzas, Alexandros N

    2014-11-30

    The present study aimed to investigate possible differences in family environment among patients experiencing their First Episode of Psychosis (FEP), chronic patients and controls. Family cohesion and flexibility (FACES-IV) and psychological distress (GHQ-28) were evaluated in families of 50 FEP and 50 chronic patients, as well as 50 controls, whereas expressed emotion (FQ) and family burden (FBS) were assessed in families of FEP and chronic patients. Multivariable linear regression analysis, adjusted for confounders, indicated impaired cohesion and flexibility for families of FEP patients compared to controls, and lower scores for families of chronic patients compared to those of FEP patients. Caregivers of chronic patients scored significantly higher in criticism, and reported higher burden and psychological distress than those of FEP patients. Our findings suggest that unbalanced levels of cohesion and flexibility, high criticism and burden appeared to be the outcome of psychosis and not risk factors triggering the onset of the illness. Furthermore, emotional over-involvement both in terms of positive (i.e. concern) and negative behaviors (i.e. overprotection) is prevalent in Greek families. Psychoeducational interventions from the early stages of the illness should be considered to promote caregivers' awareness regarding the patients' illness, which in turn, may ameliorate dysfunctional family interactions.

  1. Chronic physical illness in early life and risk of chronic widespread and regional pain at age 68: evidence from the 1946 British birth cohort

    PubMed Central

    Muthuri, Stella G.; Kuh, Diana; Bendayan, Rebecca; Macfarlane, Gary J.; Cooper, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to examine the associations between serious illness in earlier life and risk of pain in old age using data from a large nationally representative British birth cohort, the Medical Research Council (MRC) National Survey of Health and Development (NSHD). Serious illness was defined as any experience of illness before age 25 requiring hospital admission of ≥28 days. Pain was self-reported at age 68, with chronic widespread pain (CWP) defined according to American College of Rheumatology criteria. Multinomial logistic regression was used to test associations of serious illness in early life with CWP, chronic regional pain (CRP), and other pain, with no pain as the referent category. Adjustment was made for sex, socioeconomic position, adult health status, health behaviours, and psychosocial factors. Of 2401 NSHD participants with complete data, 10.5% reported CWP (13.2% of women and 7.7% of men), 30.2% reported CRP, and 14.8% other pain. Compared with those with no history of serious illness, those who experienced serious illness in early life had a higher likelihood of CWP (relative risk ratio [RRR] = 1.62 [95% CI: 1.21-2.17]) and of CRP (RRR = 1.25 [95% CI: 1.01-1.54]) after adjusting for sex. In fully adjusted models, serious illness in early life remained associated with CWP (RRR = 1.43 [95% CI: 1.05-1.95]), but associations with CRP were attenuated (RRR = 1.19 [95% CI: 0.96-1.48]). There were no associations with other pain. These findings suggest that those who have experienced serious illness in earlier life may require more support than others to minimise their risk of CWP in later life. PMID:27547897

  2. Chronic physical illness in early life and risk of chronic widespread and regional pain at age 68: evidence from the 1946 British birth cohort.

    PubMed

    Muthuri, Stella G; Kuh, Diana; Bendayan, Rebecca; Macfarlane, Gary J; Cooper, Rachel

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the associations between serious illness in earlier life and risk of pain in old age using data from a large nationally representative British birth cohort, the Medical Research Council (MRC) National Survey of Health and Development (NSHD). Serious illness was defined as any experience of illness before age 25 requiring hospital admission of ≥28 days. Pain was self-reported at age 68, with chronic widespread pain (CWP) defined according to American College of Rheumatology criteria. Multinomial logistic regression was used to test associations of serious illness in early life with CWP, chronic regional pain (CRP), and other pain, with no pain as the referent category. Adjustment was made for sex, socioeconomic position, adult health status, health behaviours, and psychosocial factors. Of 2401 NSHD participants with complete data, 10.5% reported CWP (13.2% of women and 7.7% of men), 30.2% reported CRP, and 14.8% other pain. Compared with those with no history of serious illness, those who experienced serious illness in early life had a higher likelihood of CWP (relative risk ratio [RRR] = 1.62 [95% CI: 1.21-2.17]) and of CRP (RRR = 1.25 [95% CI: 1.01-1.54]) after adjusting for sex. In fully adjusted models, serious illness in early life remained associated with CWP (RRR = 1.43 [95% CI: 1.05-1.95]), but associations with CRP were attenuated (RRR = 1.19 [95% CI: 0.96-1.48]). There were no associations with other pain. These findings suggest that those who have experienced serious illness in earlier life may require more support than others to minimise their risk of CWP in later life.

  3. Divorce and Childhood Chronic Illness: A Grounded Theory of Trust, Gender, and Third-Party Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Russell, Luke T; Coleman, Marilyn; Ganong, Lawrence H; Gayer, Debra

    2016-05-01

    Divorced parents face distinct challenges in providing care for chronically ill children. Children's residence in two households necessitates the development of family-specific strategies to ensure coparents' supervision of regimen adherence and the management of children's health care. Utilizing a risk and resilience perspective, a grounded theory study was conducted with 14 divorced parents of children with chronic illnesses. The importance of trust, gender, and relationships with third-party care providers emerged as key themes related to the development of effective coparenting relationships for maintaining children's health. Divorced parents were best able to support the management of their children's chronic conditions when care providers operated as neutral third parties and intermediaries. Collaborative family care may require health care practitioners to avoid being drawn into contentious inter-parental conflicts.

  4. A comparison of sex-specific immune signatures in Gulf War illness and chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Though potentially linked to the basic physiology of stress response we still have no clear understanding of Gulf War Illness (GWI), a debilitating condition presenting complex immune, endocrine and neurological symptoms. Here we compared male (n = 20) and female (n = 10) veterans with GWI separately against their healthy counterparts (n = 21 male, n = 9 female) as well as subjects with chronic fatigue syndrome/ myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) (n = 12 male, n = 10 female). Methods Subjects were assessed using a Graded eXercise Test (GXT) with blood drawn prior to exercise, at peak effort (VO2 max) and 4-hours post exercise. Using chemiluminescent imaging we measured the concentrations of IL-1a, 1b, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12 (p70), 13, 15, 17 and 23, IFNγ, TNFα and TNFβ in plasma samples from each phase of exercise. Linear classification models were constructed using stepwise variable selection to identify cytokine co-expression patterns characteristic of each subject group. Results Classification accuracies in excess of 80% were obtained using between 2 and 5 cytokine markers. Common to both GWI and CFS, IL-10 and IL-23 expression contributed in an illness and time-dependent manner, accompanied in male subjects by NK and Th1 markers IL-12, IL-15, IL-2 and IFNγ. In female GWI and CFS subjects IL-10 was again identified as a delineator but this time in the context of IL-17 and Th2 markers IL-4 and IL-5. Exercise response also differed between sexes: male GWI subjects presented characteristic cytokine signatures at rest but not at peak effort whereas the opposite was true for female subjects. Conclusions Though individual markers varied, results collectively supported involvement of the IL-23/Th17/IL-17 axis in the delineation of GWI and CFS in a sex-specific way. PMID:23800166

  5. Co-morbidities in persons infected with HIV: increased burden with older age and negative effects on health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Penney, Alan T; Iudicello, Jennifer E; Riggs, Patricia K; Doyle, Katie; Ellis, Ronald J; Letendre, Scott L; Grant, Igor; Woods, Steven Paul

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to determine the synergistic effects of age and HIV infection on medical co-morbidity burden, along with its clinical correlates and impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) across the lifespan in HIV. Participants included 262 individuals across four groups stratified by age (≤40 and ≥50 years) and HIV serostatus. Medical co-morbidity burden was assessed using a modified version of the Charlson Co-morbidity Index (CCI). Multiple regression accounting for potentially confounding demographic, psychiatric, and medical factors revealed an interaction between age and HIV infection on the CCI, with the highest medical co-morbidity burden in the older HIV+cohort. Nearly half of the older HIV+group had at least one major medical co-morbidity, with the most prevalent being diabetes (17.8%), syndromic neurocognitive impairment (15.4%), and malignancy (12.2%). Affective distress and detectable plasma viral load were significantly associated with the CCI in the younger and older HIV-infected groups, respectively. Greater co-morbidity burden was uniquely associated with lower physical HRQoL across the lifespan. These findings highlight the prevalence and clinical impact of co-morbidities in older HIV-infected adults and underscore the importance of early detection and treatment efforts that might enhance HIV disease outcomes.

  6. Use of an Electronic Patient Portal Among the Chronically Ill: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Linna, Miika; Rönkkö, Ilona; Kröger, Virpi

    2014-01-01

    Background Electronic patient portals may enhance effective interaction between the patient and the health care provider. To grasp the full potential of patient portals, health care providers need more knowledge on which patient groups prefer electronic services and how patients should be served through this channel. Objective The objective of this study was to assess how chronically ill patients’ state of health, comorbidities, and previous care are associated with their adoption and use of a patient portal. Methods A total of 222 chronically ill patients, who were offered access to a patient portal with their health records and secure messaging with care professionals, were included in the study. Differences in the characteristics of non-users, viewers, and interactive users of the patient portal were analyzed before access to the portal. Patients’ age, gender, diagnoses, levels of the relevant physiological measurements, health care contacts, and received physiological measurements were collected from the care provider’s electronic health record. In addition, patient-reported health and patient activation were assessed by a survey. Results Despite the broad range of measures used to indicate the patients’ state of health, the portal user groups differed only in their recorded diagnosis for hypertension, which was most common in the non-user group. However, there were significant differences in the amount of care received during the year before access to the portal. The non-user group had more nurse visits and more measurements of relevant physiological outcomes than viewers and interactive users. They also had fewer referrals to specialized care during the year before access to the portal than the two other groups. The viewers and the interactive users differed from each other significantly in the number of nurse calls received, the interactive users having more calls than the viewers. No significant differences in age, gender, or patient activation were

  7. Socioeconomic variation in the financial consequences of ill health for older people with chronic diseases: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Valtorta, Nicole K; Hanratty, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    Chronic disease has financial consequences for older adults, but it is unclear how this varies between conditions with different disease trajectories. The aim of this study was to review evidence on the financial burden associated with cancer, heart failure or stroke in older people, to identify those most at risk of financial adversity. We systematically searched nine databases for studies with data on the illness-related financial burden (objective), or on the perception of financial hardship (subjective), of older patients and/or their informal caregivers in high-income countries. We identified thirty-eight papers published in English between 1984 and 2012. Studies fell into three categories: those reporting direct, out of pocket, costs (medical and/or non-medical); studies of the indirect costs associated with illness (such as wage or income loss); and papers reporting general financial or economic burdens secondary to illness. Three out of four studies focused on people with cancer. More affluent people had greater out of pocket costs, but were less financially burdened by illness, compared with older adults from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. Disadvantaged patients and families were more likely to report experiences of financial hardship, and spend a higher proportion of their income on all expenses related to their diagnoses. This review illustrates how little is known about the financial adversity experienced by patients with some common chronic conditions. It raises the possibility that higher expenditure by more affluent older people may be creating inequalities in how chronic illness is experienced. The development of effective strategies for financial protection at older ages will require more information on who is affected and at which point in their illness trajectory.

  8. A Multimodal Evaluation of the Comparative Efficacy of Yoga Versus a Patient-Centered Support Group for Treating Chronic Pain in Gulf War Illness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Treating Chronic Pain in Gulf War Illness PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Peter Bayley, PhD RECIPIENT: PALO ALTO VETERANS INSTITUTE FOR RESEARCH Palo Alto...Patient-Centered Support Group for Treating Chronic Pain in Gulf War Illness 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0615 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The primary objective is to investigate yoga for the treatment of chronic pain in veterans with Gulf War

  9. The Population Burden of Chronic Symptoms that Substantially Predate the Diagnosis of a Life-Limiting Illness.

    PubMed

    Currow, David C; Clark, Katherine; Kamal, Arif; Collier, Aileen; Agar, Meera R; Lovell, Melanie R; Phillips, Jane L; Ritchie, Christine

    2015-06-01

    Many people in our communities live with symptoms for years or decades, something of relevance to hospice/palliative care clinicians and researchers. The proportion of people in the community at large who have a chronic symptom is likely to approximate the proportion of people referred to hospice/palliative care services with that same chronic symptom that pre-dates their life-limiting illness. Such patients may have different responsiveness to, and expectations from, symptomatic therapies, thus requiring more advanced approaches to symptom control. For researchers evaluating the impact of hospice/palliative care services, failing to account for people with long-term refractory symptoms pre-dating their life-limiting illness may systematically underestimate services' benefits. Observational symptom prevalence studies reported in hospice/palliative care to date have not accounted for people with long-term refractory symptoms, potentially systematically overestimating symptoms attributed to life-limiting illnesses. Cross-sectional community prevalence rates of key chronic refractory symptoms largely unrelated to their life-limiting illness reflect the likely prevalence on referral to hospice/palliative care: fatigue (up to 35%); pain (12%-31%); pain with neuropathic characteristics (9%); constipation (2%-29%); dyspnea (4%-9%); cognitive impairment (>10% of people >65 years old; >30% of people >85 years old); anxiety (4%); and depression (lifetime incidence 2%-15%; one year prevalence 3%). Prospective research is needed to establish (1) the prevalence and severity of chronic symptoms that pre-date the diagnosis of a life-limiting illness in people referred to hospice/palliative care services, comparing this to whole-of-population estimates; and (2) whether this group is disproportionately represented in people with refractory symptoms.

  10. Managing chronic illness: physician practices increased the use of care management and medical home processes.

    PubMed

    Wiley, James A; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Shortell, Stephen M; Casalino, Lawrence P; Ramsay, Patricia P; Bibi, Salma; Ryan, Andrew M; Copeland, Kennon R; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    The effective management of patients with chronic illnesses is critical to bending the curve of health care spending in the United States and is a crucial test for health care reform. In this article we used data from three national surveys of physician practices between 2006 and 2013 to determine the extent to which practices of all sizes have increased their use of evidence-based care management processes associated with patient-centered medical homes for patients with asthma, congestive heart failure, depression, and diabetes. We found relatively large increases over time in the overall use of these processes for small and medium-size practices as well as for large practices. However, the large practices used fewer than half of the recommended processes, on average. We also identified the individual processes whose use increased the most and show that greater use of care management processes is positively associated with public reporting of patient experience and clinical quality and with pay-for-performance.

  11. Towards a wireless patient: chronic illness, scarce care and technological innovation in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    May, Carl; Finch, Tracy; Mair, Frances; Mort, Maggie

    2005-10-01

    'Modernization' is a key health policy objective in the UK. It extends across a range of public service delivery and organizational contexts, and also means there are radical changes in perspective on professional behaviour and practice. New information and communications technologies have been seen as one of the key mechanisms by which these changes can be engendered. In particular, massive investment in information technologies promises the rapid distribution and deployment of patient-centred information across internal organizational boundaries. While the National Health Service (NHS) sits on the edge of a pound sterling 6 billion investment in electronic patient records, other technologies find their status as innovative vehicles for professional behaviour change and service delivery in question. In this paper, we consider the ways that telemedicine and telehealthcare systems have been constructed first as a field of technological innovation, and more recently, as management solutions to problems around the distribution of health care. We use NHS responses to chronic illness as a medium for understanding these shifts. In particular, we draw attention to the shifting definitions of 'innovation' and to the ways that these shifts define a move away from notions of technological advance towards management control.

  12. Pediatric Solid Organ Transplant Recipients: Transition to Home and Chronic Illness Care

    PubMed Central

    Lerret, Stacee M; Weiss, Marianne; Stendahl, Gail; Chapman, Shelley; Menendez, Jerome; Williams, Laurel; Nadler, Michelle; Neighbors, Katie; Amsden, Katie; Cao, Yumei; Nugent, Melodee; Alonso, Estella; Simpson, Pippa

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric solid organ transplant recipients are medically fragile and present with complex care issues requiring high-level management at home. Parents of hospitalized children have reported inadequate preparation for discharge, resulting in problems transitioning from hospital to home and independently self-managing their child’s complex care needs. The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with the transition from hospital to home and chronic illness care for parents of heart, kidney, liver, lung, or multivisceral recipients. Fifty-one parents from five pediatric transplant centers completed questionnaires on the day of hospital discharge and telephone interviews at 3-week, 3-month, and 6-months following discharge from the hospital. Care coordination (p = .02) and quality of discharge teaching (p < .01) was significantly associated with parent readiness for discharge. Readiness for hospital discharge was subsequently significantly associated with post-discharge coping difficulty (p = .02) at 3-weeks, adherence with medication administration (p = .03) at 3-months, and post-discharge coping difficulty (p = .04) and family management (p = .02) at 6-months post-discharge. The results underscore the important aspect of education and care coordination in preparing patients and families to successfully self-manage after hospital discharge. Assessing parental readiness for hospital discharge is another critical component for identifying risk of difficulties in managing post-discharge care. PMID:25425201

  13. Drug Insight: testosterone and selective androgen receptor modulators as anabolic therapies for chronic illness and aging

    PubMed Central

    Bhasin, Shalender; Calof, Olga M; Storer, Thomas W; Lee, Martin L; Mazer, Norman A; Jasuja, Ravi; Montori, Victor M; Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Several regulatory concerns have hindered development of androgens as anabolic therapies, despite unequivocal evidence that testosterone supplementation increases muscle mass and strength in men; it induces hypertrophy of type I and II muscle fibers, and increases myonuclear and satellite cell number. Androgens promote differentiation of mesenchymal multipotent cells into the myogenic lineage and inhibit their adipogenic differentiation, by facilitating association of androgen receptors with β-catenin and activating T-cell factor 4. Meta-analyses indicate that testosterone supplementation increases fat-free mass and muscle strength in HIV-positive men with weight loss, glucocorticoid-treated men, and older men with low or low-normal testosterone levels. The effects of testosterone on physical function and outcomes important to patients have not, however, been studied. In older men, increased hematocrit and increased risk of prostate biopsy and detection of prostate events are the most frequent, testosterone-related adverse events. Concerns about long-term risks have restrained enthusiasm for testosterone use as anabolic therapy. Selective androgen-receptor modulators that are preferentially anabolic and that spare the prostate hold promise as anabolic therapies. We need more studies to determine whether testosterone or selective androgen-receptor modulators can induce meaningful improvements in physical function and patient-important outcomes in patients with physical dysfunction associated with chronic illness or aging. PMID:16932274

  14. Hidden decay of impact after education for self-management of chronic illnesses: hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Park, M J; Green, Joseph; Ishikawa, Hirono; Kiuchi, Takahiro

    2013-03-01

    People with chronic illnesses can benefit from self-management education. However, those benefits are said to decay over time (there is some evidence that this 'decay of impact' does occur), and the reinforcements used to prevent that decay appear to be ineffective. We hypothesize that the reinforcements appear to be ineffective because decay of impact occurs only in a subgroup of these programs' participants, so any benefits of reinforcements in that subgroup are concealed by whole-group summary statistics. We also hypothesize that reinforcements can benefit those who need them - those who would otherwise have decay. One approach to testing these hypotheses requires analysis of individual-level data, which is uncommon in this field. Some useful data could come from studies that have already been completed, but the strongest evidence will require prospectively designed tests in future trials. If the hypotheses are false, then time and resources spent on reinforcements can be saved or redirected. If the hypotheses are true, then reinforcements can be implemented with less waste and they can be made more effective. These programs can also be improved to better fit their users' needs, and there can be a new basis for evaluating the programs' effectiveness.

  15. Empowering the chronically ill? Patient collectives in the new Dutch health insurance system.

    PubMed

    Bartholomée, Yvette; Maarse, Hans

    2007-12-01

    On January 1, 2006, the Dutch government instituted major reforms to the country's health insurance scheme. One of the features of the new system is the opportunity for groups to form collectives that may negotiate and enter into group contracts with health insurers. This article discusses one particular type of collective, namely patient collectives. The purpose of this paper is to investigate if, and to what extent, patient collectives empower chronically ill patients. The results of the study show that some patient groups were able to contract collective agreements with health insurers, whereas others were not. The eligibility of a group's disease for compensation through the risk equalisation fund (which subsidises the costs for many but not all disorders) seems to determine whether or not a patient organisation is able to successfully negotiate a collective contract for its members. Another key factor for success is the presence of a large membership whose constituents have similar healthcare needs. If both of these factors are present, insurers are more likely to develop specific products for particular groups of patients, as is the case for people with diabetes. Furthermore, the presence of patient collectives accords patient associations with a new role. It may be possible for them to become powerful players in the health insurance market. However, this new role may also lead to tensions, both within and between associations.

  16. Transitional care interventions prevent hospital readmissions for adults with chronic illnesses.

    PubMed

    Verhaegh, Kim J; MacNeil-Vroomen, Janet L; Eslami, Saeid; Geerlings, Suzanne E; de Rooij, Sophia E; Buurman, Bianca M

    2014-09-01

    Transitional care interventions aim to improve care transitions from hospital to home and to reduce hospital readmissions for chronically ill patients. The objective of our study was to examine if these interventions were associated with a reduction of readmission rates in the short (30 days or less), intermediate (31-180 days), and long terms (181-365 days). We systematically reviewed twenty-six randomized controlled trials conducted in a variety of countries whose results were published in the period January 1, 1980-May 29, 2013. Our analysis showed that transitional care was effective in reducing all-cause intermediate-term and long-term readmissions. Only high-intensity interventions seemed to be effective in reducing short-term readmissions. Our findings suggest that to reduce short-term readmissions, transitional care should consist of high-intensity interventions that include care coordination by a nurse, communication between the primary care provider and the hospital, and a home visit within three days after discharge.

  17. “What we want”: chronically ill adolescents’ preferences and priorities for improving health care

    PubMed Central

    van Staa, AnneLoes; Jedeloo, Susan; van der Stege, Heleen

    2011-01-01

    Background: As important users of health care, adolescents with chronic conditions deserve to be consulted about their experiences and expectations. This study aimed to explore chronically ill adolescents’ preferences regarding providers’ qualities, and outpatient and inpatient care. Furthermore, suggestions for improvement of service delivery were collected. Methods: This research was a sequential mixed methods study in adolescents aged 12–19 years with various chronic conditions treated in a university children’s hospital. Methods comprised 31 face-to-face interviews at home, a hospital-based peer research project in which nine adolescents interviewed 34 fellow patients, and a web-based questionnaire (n = 990). Emerging qualitative themes were transformed into questionnaire items. Results: Having “a feeling of trust” and “voice and choice” in the hospital were central to these adolescents. Regarding providers’ qualities, “being an expert” and “being trustworthy and honest” were ranked highest, followed by “being caring and understanding”, “listening and showing respect”, and “being focused on me”. Regarding outpatient consultations, preferences were ranked as follows: “answering all questions”; “attending to my and my parents’ needs”; and “clear communication”, while “limited waiting times” and “attractive outpatient surroundings” scored lowest. Regarding hospitalization, adolescents most preferred to “avoid pain and discomfort”, “keep in touch with home”, and “be entertained”, while “being hospitalized with peers” and “being heard” were least important. Regarding priorities for improvement, 52% of the respondents felt that more attention should be paid to older children, followed by enabling more contact with family and friends (45%), shorter waiting times (43%), and more activities to meet fellow patients (35%). Conclusion: Adolescents prefer technically competent providers, who are

  18. Affordability, availability and acceptability barriers to health care for the chronically ill: Longitudinal case studies from South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Goudge, Jane; Gilson, Lucy; Russell, Steven; Gumede, Tebogo; Mills, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Background There is an increasing burden of chronic illness in low and middle income countries, driven by TB/HIV, as well as non-communicable diseases. Few health systems are organized to meet the needs of chronically ill patients, and patients' perspectives on the difficulties of accessing care need to be better understood, particularly in poor resourced settings, to achieve this end. This paper describes the experience of poor households attempting to access chronic care in a rural area of South Africa. Methods A household survey (n = 1446 individuals) was combined with qualitative longitudinal research that followed 30 case study households over 10 months. Illness narratives and diaries provided descriptive textual data of household interactions with the health system. Results In the survey 74% of reported health problems were 'chronic', 48% of which had no treatment action taken in the previous month. Amongst the case study households, of the 34 cases of chronic illness, only 21 (62%) cases had an allopathic diagnosis and only 12 (35%) were receiving regular treatment. Livelihoods exhausted from previous illness and death, low income, and limited social networks, prevented consultation with monthly expenditure for repeated consultations as high as 60% of income. Interrupted drug supplies, insufficient clinical services at the clinic level necessitating referral, and a lack of ambulances further hampered access to care. Poor provider-patient interaction led to inadequate understanding of illness, inappropriate treatment action, 'healer shopping', and at times a break down in cooperation, with the patient 'giving up' on the public health system. However, productive patient-provider interactions not only facilitated appropriate treatment action but enabled patients to justify their need for financial assistance to family and neighbours, and so access care. In addition, patients and their families with understanding of a disease became a community resource drawn on

  19. Energetics and transformation: insights on the paradoxical opportunity presented by chronic illness and pain--Part IV.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, M

    1999-01-01

    Following the author's own experiences with chronic pain due to a motorcycle accident during medical school, and the pain's unresponsiveness to conventional medicine, he sought other solutions. His journey led him to a new understanding of health and illness. With these insights and through the use of acupuncture, bodywork and various breathing techniques, he began to see phenomena--emotional release, myoclonic shaking, and regression--and healing that could not be explained in terms of a rational or structural framework. He posits that such phenomena represent different forms of de-stressing which together serve to release "blocked feeling," which he suggests is the "energy block" described by acupuncture theory as "stagnant Qi." The fourth in a series, this installment explores the role of repressed anger and its relationship to chronic illness.

  20. The influence of frailty syndrome on acceptance of illness in elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Jankowska-Polanska, Beata; Chabowski, Mariusz; Uchmanowicz, Bartosz; Fal, Andrzej M

    2016-01-01

    COPD is one of the most debilitating diseases. Frailty syndrome and advanced age may decrease the acceptance of illness, quality of life, and worsen health conditions in these patients, as well as lead to an increase in health care expenses. The aim of the study was to assess how the level of frailty affects the acceptance of illness in elderly patients with COPD. We also aimed to evaluate the associations between sociodemographic and clinical factors and the level of acceptance of illness, anxiety, and frailty in this group of patients. The study included 102 COPD patients with a mean age of 63.2 (standard deviation =6.5) years and grades I (3%), II (37%), III (52%), and IV (8%) by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease. The Polish versions of the Acceptance of Illness Scale and Tilburg frailty indicator were used. Frailty syndrome was found in 77 (75.5%) patients, with an average score of 7.42 (standard deviation =2.24). Coexisting diseases such as hypertension (46.07%), coronary artery disease (32.35%), heart failure (28.43%), diabetes (18.63%), and heart arrhythmia (9.8%) were found among the subjects. The overall level of acceptance of illness was 20.6 (standard deviation =7.62). A lower level of acceptance of illness was associated with a higher level of frailty, especially in the physical and social domain. Elderly patients with severe COPD are more prone to frailty and decreased acceptance of their disease in comparison to patients with other chronic diseases. Assessment and management of frailty in the care of older COPD patients are likely to improve risk stratification significantly and help personalize management, leading to better patient outcomes. PMID:27729781

  1. A pilot registry of unexplained fatiguing illnesses and chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) has no diagnostic clinical signs or biomarkers, so diagnosis requires ruling out conditions with similar signs and symptoms. We conducted a pilot registry of unexplained fatiguing illnesses and CFS to determine the feasibility of establishing and operating a registry and implementing an education outreach initiative. The pilot registry was conducted in Bibb County, Georgia. Patient referrals were obtained from healthcare providers who were identified by using various education outreach initiatives. These referrals were later supplemented with self-referrals by members of a local CFS support group. All patients meeting referral criteria were invited to participate in a screening interview to determine eligibility. If patients met registry criteria, they were invited to a one-day clinic for physical and laboratory evaluations. We classified patients based on the 1994 case definition. Results We registered 827 healthcare providers. Forty-two providers referred 88 patients, and 58 patients (66%) completed clinical evaluation. Of the 188 CFS support group members, 53 were self-referred and 46 (87%) completed the clinical evaluation. Of the 104 participants completing evaluation, 36% (n = 37) met the criteria for CFS, 17% (n = 18) had insufficient fatigue or symptoms (ISF), and 47% (n = 49) were found to have exclusionary medical or psychiatric illnesses. Classification varied significantly by type of referral but not by previous history of CFS diagnosis. Healthcare providers referred more patients who were classified as CFS as compared to support group referrals in which more exclusionary conditions were identified. Family practice and internal medicine specialties made the most referrals and had the highest number of CFS cases. We conducted three CME events, held three “Meet and Greet” sessions, visited four large clinical health practices and health departments, mailed five registry newsletters, and conducted

  2. The impact of poverty, chronic illnesses, and health insurance status on out-of-pocket health care expenditures in later life.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinhyun; Richardson, Virginia

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to examine poverty, chronic illnesses, health insurance, and health care expenditures, within the context of a political economy of aging perspective. Subsamples of 1,773 older adults from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey were selected for analyses. The results showed that chronic illnesses influenced out-of-pocket health care costs. Older persons with more than one health insurance spent less on out-of-pocket health care costs. The results have implications for health care social workers concerned with the growing costs of chronic illnesses, implementing integrated care, and advocating for extending public health insurance coverage especially for our most impoverished older adults.

  3. The effects of camp on health-related quality of life in children with chronic illnesses: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Iris; Stinson, Jennifer; Stevens, Bonnie

    2005-01-01

    Chronic illness in children may negatively affect aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQL). Over many years, camps have been organized to address the physical and psychosocial needs of children with various chronic illnesses, while providing a "normal" as possible camp experience. The aim of this study was to critically review all research examining the effect of camps on HRQL in children with chronic illnesses. The literature review yielded no randomized, controlled clinical trials; 8 pretest-posttest study designs with repeated measures; 9 pre-post studies; and 1 survey design. A total of 1270 children, ranging in age from 6 to 25 years, participated in the studies.

  4. Impact of musculoskeletal co-morbidity of neck and upper extremities on healthcare utilisation and sickness absence for low back pain

    PubMed Central

    IJzelenberg, W; Burdorf, A

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To describe the presence of musculoskeletal co-morbidity of the neck and upper extremities among industrial workers with low back pain, and to examine whether it has an impact on healthcare utilisation and sickness absence for low back pain. Methods: A self administered questionnaire was used to collect data from 505 industrial workers (response 86%). Results: The 12 month prevalence of low back pain was 50%. Among subjects with low back pain the 12 month prevalence of musculoskeletal co-morbidity of the neck and upper extremities was 68%. Among workers with low back pain, subjects with high pain intensity or disabling low back pain were more likely to have musculoskeletal co-morbidity. In comparison to the subjects who report back pain only, subjects with co-morbidity showed worse general health and health related quality of life. No impact of upper extremity co-morbidity was found on healthcare utilisation, and sickness absence due to low back pain. Conclusions: This study provides no evidence that musculoskeletal co-morbidity of the neck and upper extremities influences the choice to seek care or take sick leave due to low back pain among industrial manual workers. For occupational health practitioners the finding of a high co-morbidity is important to consider when implementing workplace interventions aimed at the reduction of specific musculoskeletal complaints, since the controls for one musculoskeletal complaint may impact adversely on another musculoskeletal complaint. Researchers who perform low back pain intervention studies using generic health measures, should take into account the impact of musculoskeletal co-morbidity on these measures. PMID:15377765

  5. Access to Mobile Communication Technology and Willingness to Participate in Automated Telemedicine Calls Among Chronically Ill Patients in Honduras

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Avelares, Milton O.; Milton, Evan C.; Lange, Ilta; Fajardo, Roosevelt

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Patients in underdeveloped countries may be left behind by advances in telehealthcare. We surveyed chronically ill patients with low incomes in Honduras to measure their use of mobile technologies and willingness to participate in mobile disease management support. Materials and Methods: 624 chronically ill primary care patients in Honduras were surveyed. We examined variation in telephone access across groups defined by patients' sociodemographic characteristics, diagnoses, and access to care. Logistic regression was used to identify independent correlates of patients' interest in automated telephonic support for disease management. Results: Participants had limited education (mean 4.8 years), and 65% were unemployed. Eighty-four percent had telephone access, and 78% had cell phones. Most respondents had voicemail (61%) and text messaging (58%). Mobile technologies were particularly common among patients who had to forego clinic visits and medications due to cost concerns (each p < 0.05). Most patients (>80%) reported that they would be willing to receive automated calls focused on appointment reminders, medication adherence, health status monitoring, and self-care education. Patients were more likely to be willing to participate in automated telemedicine services if they had to cancel a clinic appointment due to transportation problems or forego medication due to cost pressures. Conclusions: Even in this poor region of Honduras, most chronically ill patients have access to mobile technology, and most are willing to participate in automated telephone disease management support. Given barriers to in-person care, new models of mobile healthcare should be developed for chronically ill patients in developing countries. PMID:21062234

  6. Association of comorbid mood disorders and chronic illness with disability and quality of life in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Gadalla, T

    2008-01-01

    Mood disorders are more prevalent in individuals with chronic physical illness compared to individuals with no such illness. These disorders amplify the disability associated with the physical condition and adversely affect its course, thus contributing to occupational impairment, disruption in interpersonal and family relationships, poor health and suicide. This study used data collected in the Canadian Community Health Survey, cycle 3.1 (2005) to examine factors associated with comorbid mood disorders and to assess their association with the quality of life of individuals living in Ontario. Results indicate that individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, bowel disorder or stomach or intestinal ulcers had the highest rates of mood disorders. The odds of having a comorbid mood disorder were higher among women, the single, those living in poverty, the Canadian born and those between 30 and 69 years of age. The presence of comorbid mood disorders was significantly associated with short-term disability, requiring help with instrumental daily activities and suicidal ideation. Health care providers are urged to proactively screen chronically ill patients for mood disorders, particularly among the subgroups found to have elevated risk for these disorders.

  7. Associations Between Neighborhood Social Capital, Health Literacy, and Self-Rated Health Among People With Chronic Illness.

    PubMed

    Waverijn, Geeke; Heijmans, Monique; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy skills are important for health and self-management for people with chronic illness. Neighborhood social capital can provide resources, such as access to information and informal social control over unhealthy behavior. The benefit of these resources, and the access people have to these resources, might depend on levels of health literacy. We investigated whether neighborhood social capital is differentially related to the health of people with chronic illness according to health literacy skills. This study focused on health literacy skills in 4 domains related to the ability to access and understand health information and to the ability to perform self-management. We found a significant positive interaction between social capital and health literacy skills for accessing and understanding health information. This suggests that health literacy enhances people's ability to gain access to and use neighborhood resources to benefit health. There was no interaction effect between social capital and health literacy skills in the other 2 domains. More research is needed to investigate how people with chronic illness can benefit from knowledge, support, and other social resources for health and self-management also whether they have limited health literacy skills.

  8. Report on Honduras: ripples in the pond--the financial crisis and remittances to chronically ill patients in Honduras.

    PubMed

    Piette, John D; Mendoza-Avelares, Milton O; Chess, Laura; Milton, Evan C; Matiz Reyes, Armando; Rodriguez-Saldaña, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. financial crisis has affected employment opportunities for Latino immigrants, and this could affect their ability to send financial assistance, or "remittances", to chronically ill family members in their home country. In a cross-sectional survey of 624 chronically ill adults conducted in Honduras between June and August 2009, respondents reported their receipt of remittances, health service use, and cost-related access barriers. Fifty-four percent of respondents reported relatives living outside the country, and of this group, 66 percent (37% of the overall sample) received remittances. Seventy-four percent of respondents receiving remittances reported a decrease over the prior year, mostly due to job losses among their relatives abroad. Respondents reporting reductions in remittances received significantly less per month, on average, than those without a reduction (US $170 vs. $234; p = 0.01). In multivariate models, respondents experiencing a reduction in remittances used fewer health services and medications due to cost concerns. Remittance payments from relatives resident in the United States are a major source of income for chronically ill individuals in Latin America. Most recipients of remittances reported a reduction during the financial downturn that affected their access to care.

  9. Low co-morbidity, low levels of malnutrition, and low risk of falls in a community-dwelling sample of 85-year-olds are associated with successful aging: the Octabaix study.

    PubMed

    Formiga, Francesc; Ferrer, Assumpta; Megido, Maria Jesus; Chivite, David; Badia, Teresa; Pujol, Ramón

    2011-06-01

    The population is aging throughout the world. Preserving physical and cognitive functions is crucial to successful aging. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of 85-year-old community-dwelling subjects aging successfully, applying a quantitative approach, and assessing the association of successful aging with sociodemographic data, global geriatric assessment, and co-morbidity. This was a community-based survey of inhabitants aged 85 years, with 328 out of 487 subjects born in 1924 assigned to seven primary health-care teams, representing a participation rate of 67.5%. Sociodemographic variables, Barthel index (BI), the Spanish version of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MEC), Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Charlson Index, Gait Rating Scale, social risk, quality of life (QoL), and prevalent chronic diseases were assessed. Subjects scoring higher than 90 on the BI and higher than 24 on the MEC were compared with the rest. Multiple regression analysis was performed. Using these criteria, successful aging status was defined in 162 (49.3%) subjects. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, successful agers had significantly lower co-morbidity scores (p < 0.02, odds ratio [OR] = 0.791, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.657-0.952), higher scores on the Gait Rating Scale identifying lower risk of falls (p < 0.0001, OR = 1.753, 95% CI 1.501-2.046), and higher scores on the MNA, indicating lower risk of malnutrition (p < 0.0001, OR = 1.190, 95% CI 1.090-01.299). Regarding QoL, successful agers had significantly higher values than their unsuccessful aging counterparts (p > 0.0001). Almost half of the individuals presented successful aging. Successful agers had less co-morbidity and a lower risk of falls or malnutrition, and they had higher scores on the QoL scale.

  10. QCM-4, a serotonergic type 3 receptor modulator attenuates depression co-morbid with obesity in mice: an approach based on behavioral and biochemical investigations.

    PubMed

    Kurhe, Yeshwant; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Gupta, Deepali; Devadoss, Thangaraj

    2014-10-05

    Previous studies in our laboratory examined the antidepressant potential of 3-methoxy-N-p-tolylquinoxalin-2-carboxamide (QCM-4), a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist in acute and chronic rodent models of depression. The aim of present study was to investigate the effect of QCM-4 on chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) induced depression in obese mice using behavioral based battery tests and biochemical assessments. Depressive behavior was induced in obese mice by subjecting to different stress procedures for 28 days. The results indicated that the CUMS induced severe depressive behavior in obese mice as demonstrated by a significant decreased sucrose consumption, increased immobility time in forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), decreased percent entries and time in open arm in elevated plus maze (EPM). Moreover, CUMS significantly increased the plasma glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and total proteins in obese mice. Chronic treatment with QCM-4 (2 mg/kg po) and standard drug escitalopram (10 mg/kg po) significantly reversed the depressive behavioral changes (increased sucrose consumption, decreased immobility time in FST and TST, and increased the percent entries and time in open arm in EPM) and biochemical alterations (reversed the raised levels of plasma glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and total proteins) in obese mice subjected to CUMS. No alteration was observed in the locomotor score in obese mice. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that QCM-4 attenuated the depression co-morbid with obesity in mice subjected to CUMS which to some extent is mediated by reversing the "insulin resistance" or "altered plasma glucose" in obese mice.

  11. Towards Precision Addiction Treatment: New Findings in Co-morbid Substance Use and Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorders.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sean X; Levin, Frances R

    2017-03-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and substance use disorders (SUDs) may have common etiologies. ADHD is more prevalent in patients with substance use disorders, and this pattern is consistent across different substances of abuse. Individuals with SUDs and ADHD exhibit significant variations in their clinical presentations. The developmental trajectory of ADHD to SUDs is complex: ADHD symptoms appear first in some patients but not in others. Many patients present with a heterogeneous collection of psychiatric and substance use co-morbidities, and these symptoms change over time. ADHD symptom severity is also highly variable, and more severe ADHD symptoms worsen co-morbid SUDs and complicate treatment. New longitudinal studies with innovative methods in high-risk populations and in community-based samples may clarify issues related to patient-treatment matching. When closely monitored, psychostimulant and other adjunct medications can be safely used to treat ADHD in this population, and such treatment may also improve outcome of SUDs. In particular, emerging evidence suggests individual-level tailoring ("precision medicine") approaches may represent a key pathway to improve clinical outcome.

  12. Pharmacological and clinical dilemmas of prescribing in co-morbid adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and addiction

    PubMed Central

    Pérez de los Cobos, José; Siñol, Núria; Pérez, Víctor; Trujols, Joan

    2014-01-01

    The present article reviews whether available efficacy and safety data support the pharmacological treatment of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in patients with concurrent substance use disorders (SUD). Arguments for and against treating adult ADHD with active SUD are discussed. Findings from 19 large open studies and controlled clinical trials show that the use of atomoxetine or extended-release methylphenidate formulations, together with psychological therapy, yield promising though inconclusive results about short term efficacy of these drugs in the treatment of adult ADHD in patients with SUD and no other severe mental disorders. However, the efficacy of these drugs is scant or lacking for treating concurrent SUD. No serious safety issues have been associated with these drugs in patients with co-morbid SUD-ADHD, given their low risk of abuse and favourable side effect and drug–drug interaction profile. The decision to treat adult ADHD in the context of active SUD depends on various factors, some directly related to SUD-ADHD co-morbidity (e.g. degree of diagnostic uncertainty for ADHD) and other factors related to the clinical expertise of the medical staff and availability of adequate resources (e.g. the means to monitor compliance with pharmacological treatment). Our recommendation is that clinical decisions be individualized and based on a careful analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of pharmacological treatment for ADHD on a case-by-case basis in the context of active SUD. PMID:23216449

  13. Serum metabolite profile associates with the development of metabolic co-morbidities in first-episode psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Suvitaival, T; Mantere, O; Kieseppä, T; Mattila, I; Pöhö, P; Hyötyläinen, T; Suvisaari, J; Orešič, M

    2016-01-01

    Psychotic patients are at high risk for developing obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. These metabolic co-morbidities are hypothesized to be related to both treatment side effects as well as to metabolic changes occurring during the psychosis. Earlier metabolomics studies have shown that blood metabolite levels are predictive of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in the general population as well as sensitive to the effects of antipsychotics. In this study, we aimed to identify the metabolite profiles predicting future weight gain and other metabolic abnormalities in psychotic patients. We applied comprehensive metabolomics to investigate serum metabolite profiles in a prospective study setting in 36 first-episode psychosis patients during the first year of the antipsychotic treatment and 19 controls. While corroborating several earlier findings when comparing cases and controls and the effects of the antipsychotic medication, we also found that prospective weight gain in psychotic patients was associated with increased levels of triacylglycerols with low carbon number and double-bond count at baseline, that is, lipids known to be associated with increased liver fat. Our study suggests that metabolite profiles may be used to identify the psychotic patients most vulnerable to develop metabolic co-morbidities, and may point to a pharmacological approach to counteract the antipsychotic-induced weight gain. PMID:27845774

  14. Effects of Culturally Relevant Psychoeducation for Korean American Families of Persons with Chronic Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Sun-Kyung

    2004-01-01

    This study is to identify culturally relevant treatment methods and to assess the effects of family psychoeducational intervention for Korean Americans who had a family member with mental illness. 48 Korean Americans with children with mental illness were randomly assigned to either an experimental group program that provided culturally sensitive…

  15. Loving your child to death: Considerations of the care of chronically ill children and euthanasia in Emil Sher’s Mourning Dove

    PubMed Central

    Mukhida, Karim

    2007-01-01

    How do parents cope when their child is ill or dying, and when he or she is experiencing constant pain or suffering? What do parents think of the contributions that medical professionals make to the care of their chronically or terminally ill child? Is it possible for a parent to love a child so much that they wish their child to be dead? The purpose of the present paper is to explore these questions and aspects of the care of chronically or terminally ill children using Mourning Dove’s portrayal of one family’s attempt to care for their ill daughter. Mourning Dove, a play written by Canadian playwright Emil Sher, was inspired by the case of Saskatchewan wheat farmer Robert Latimer who killed his 12-year-old daughter, Tracy, who suffered with cerebral palsy and had begun to experience tremendous pain. Rather than focusing on the medical or legal aspects of the care of a chronically ill child, the play offers a glimpse into how a family copes with the care of such a child and the effect the child’s illness has on the family. The reading and examination of nonmedical literature, such as Mourning Dove, serves as a useful means for medical professionals to better understand how illness affects and is responded to by patients and their families. This understanding is a prerequisite for them to be able to provide complete care of children with chronic or terminal illnesses and their families. PMID:19043501

  16. A clinically relevant animal model of TMD and IBS co-morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Traub, Richard J.; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Karpowicz, Jane; Pandya, Sangeeta; Ji, Yaping; Dorsey, Susan G.; Dessem, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are comorbid functional chronic pain disorders of unknown etiology that are triggered/exacerbated by stress. Here we present baseline phenotypic characterization of a novel animal model to gain insight into the underlying mechanisms that contribute to such comorbid pain conditions. In this model, chronic visceral hypersensitivity, a defining symptom of IBS, is dependent upon on three factors: estradiol, existing chronic somatic pain, and stress. In ovariectomized rats, estradiol replacement followed by craniofacial muscle injury and stress induced visceral hypersensitivity that persisted for months. Omission of any one factor resulted in a transient (1 week) visceral hypersensitivity from stress alone, or no hypersensitivity (no inflammation or estradiol). Maintenance of visceral hypersensitivity was estradiol dependent; resolving when estradiol replacement ceased. Referred cutaneous hypersensitivity was concurrent with visceral hypersensitivity. Increased spinal Fos expression suggests induction of central sensitization. These data demonstrate the development and maintenance of visceral hypersensitivity in estradiol-replaced animals following distal somatic injury and stress that mimics some characteristics reported in patients with TMD and comorbid IBS. This new animal model is a powerful experimental tool which can be employed to gain further mechanistic insight into overlapping pain conditions. PMID:24981128

  17. In the shadow of terror: posttraumatic stress and psychiatric co-morbidity following bombing in Iraq: the role of shattered world assumptions and altered self-capacities.

    PubMed

    Freh, Fuaad Mohammed; Chung, Man Cheung; Dallos, Rudi

    2013-02-01

    Whilst research has looked at posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and psychiatric co-morbidity among civilians exposed to bombing, there is a lack of longitudinal data on the development of these outcomes and the psychological factors associated with them, particularly among Iraqi civilians. This study aimed to: investigate 1) the trajectory of PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity following bombing among civilians in Iraq and 2) the link between shattered world assumptions, altered self-capacities and identified health outcomes. One hundred and eighty (F = 90, M = 90) Iraqi civilians exposed to first time bombing were recruited approximately one month (time 1) after the bombing and five months (time 2) after the baseline assessment. A control group data (178, F = 91, M = 87) from people who were not exposed to bombing was also collected. They completed the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale, the General Health Questionnaire-28, the World Assumptions Questionnaire and the Inventory of Altered Self-Capacities. The results showed that there was a significant decline in the proportion of people meeting the screening criteria for PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity symptoms over time. For the cross-sectional analysis, controlling for demographic variables, regression analysis showed that severity of the bombing (β = .16), controllability of events (β = -.21), safety and vulnerability (β=.31) and affect dysregulation (β = .37) significantly predicted PTSD time 1. Controllability of events (β = -.20) and affect dysregulation (β = .37) also predicted psychiatric co-morbidity at time 1. For the prospective analysis, controlling for PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity at time 1, none of these dimensions predicted PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity at time 2. Findings are discussed in terms of individual resilience. It can be concluded that following bombing, civilians developed PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity which declined over time. Civilians' perceptions of their

  18. An investigation of objective and subjective types of binge eating episodes in a clinical sample of people with co-morbid obesity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Objective binge eating episodes (OBEs) refer to binge eating on an unusually large amount of food and are the core symptom in current definitions of bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED). Subjective binge eating episodes (SBEs) refer to eating on a small or moderate amount of food (that is perceived as large) and like OBEs are associated with loss of control (LOC). Reaching consensus on what is considered a large amount of food can however be problematic and it remains unclear if the size of a binge is an essential component for defining a binge eating episode. The aim of this study was to compare the eating disorder features and general psychopathology of subjects reporting OBEs with those reporting only SBEs. Methods This is a retrospective secondary analysis of data from 70 obese participants at the recruitment phase of a multicentre trial for BED. Individuals who answered positively to the presence of binge eating and LOC over eating had their binge eating episodes further explored by interview and self-report. Two groups, those who reported current OBEs (with or without SBEs) and those who reported current SBEs only were compared for age, gender, marital status, body mass index (BMI), indicators of LOC over eating, severity of binge-eating and associated psychopathology. Results The majority of participants in both the OBE and SBE groups endorsed the experience of at least four indicators of LOC. There were no significant differences between the groups. Both groups had high levels of binge-eating severity, moderate severity of associated depressive symptoms and frequent psychiatric co-morbidity. Conclusion Treatment seeking participants with obesity who reported SBEs alone were similar to those who reported OBEs in terms of eating disorder features and general psychopathology. These findings suggest that classificatory systems of mental illnesses should consider introducing SBEs as a feature of the diagnostic criteria for binge eating

  19. Integrated healthcare for chronically ill. Reflections on the gap between science and practice and how to bridge the gap.

    PubMed

    van der Vlegel-Brouwer, Wilma

    2013-04-01

    Integrated care offers an opportunity to address healthcare efficiency and effectiveness concerns and is especially relevant for elderly patients with different chronic illnesses. In current care standards for chronic care focus is often on one disease. The chronic care model (CCM) is used as the basis of integrated care programs. It identifies essential components that encourage high-quality chronic disease care, involving the community and health system and including self-management support, delivery system design, decision support, and clinical information systems. Improvements in those interrelated components can produce system reform in which informed, activated patients interact with prepared, proactive practice teams. There is however a lack of research evidence for the impact of the chronic care model as a full model. Integrated care programs have widely varying definitions and components and failure to recognize these variations leads to inappropriate conclusions about the effectiveness of these programs and to inappropriate application of research results. It seems important to carefully consider the type and amount of data that are collected within the disease management programs for several purposes, as well as the methods of data collection. Understanding and changing the behavior of complex dynamic chronic care system requires an appreciation of its key patterns, leverage points and constraints. A different theoretical framework, that embraces complexity, is required. Research should be design-based, context bound and address relationships among agents in order to provide solutions that address locally defined demands and circumstances.

  20. Determinants of access to chronic illness care: a mixed-methods evaluation of a national multifaceted chronic disease package for Indigenous Australians

    PubMed Central

    Bailie, Jodie; Schierhout, Gill; Laycock, Alison; Kelaher, Margaret; Percival, Nikki; O'Donoghue, Lynette; McNeair, Tracy; Bailie, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Indigenous Australians have a disproportionately high burden of chronic illness, and relatively poor access to healthcare. This paper examines how a national multicomponent programme aimed at improving prevention and management of chronic disease among Australian Indigenous people addressed various dimensions of access. Design Data from a place-based, mixed-methods formative evaluation were analysed against a framework that defines supply and demand-side dimensions to access. The evaluation included 24 geographically bounded ‘sentinel sites’ that included a range of primary care service organisations. It drew on administrative data on service utilisation, focus group and interview data on community members’ and service providers’ perceptions of chronic illness care between 2010 and 2013. Setting Urban, regional and remote areas of Australia that have relatively large Indigenous populations. Participants 670 community members participated in focus groups; 374 practitioners and representatives of regional primary care support organisations participated in in-depth interviews. Results The programme largely addressed supply-side dimensions of access with less focus or impact on demand-side dimensions. Application of the access framework highlighted the complex inter-relationships between dimensions of access. Key ongoing challenges are achieving population coverage through a national programme, reaching high-need groups and ensuring provision of ongoing care. Conclusions Strategies to improve access to chronic illness care for this population need to be tailored to local circumstances and address the range of dimensions of access on both the demand and supply sides. These findings highlight the importance of flexibility in national programme guidelines to support locally determined strategies. PMID:26614617

  1. Altered Food-Cue Processing in Chronically Ill and Recovered Women with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Nicole; Smeets, Paul A. M.; van Elburg, Annemarie A.; Danner, Unna N.; van Meer, Floor; Hoek, Hans W.; Adan, Roger A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe mental disorder characterized by food restriction and weight loss. This study aimed to test the model posed by Brooks et al. (2012a,b) that women suffering from chronic AN show decreased food-cue processing activity in brain regions associated with energy balance and food reward (bottom-up; BU) and increased activity in brain regions associated with cognitive control (top-down; TD) when compared with long-term recovered AN (REC) and healthy controls (HC). Three groups of women, 15 AN (mean illness duration 7.8 ± 4.1 years), 14 REC (mean duration of recovery 4.7 ± 2.7 years) and 15 HC viewed alternating blocks of food and non-food images preceded by a short instruction during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), after fasting overnight. Functional region of interests (fROIs) were defined in BU (e.g., striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, hypothalamus, and cerebellum), TD (e.g., medial and lateral prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulate), the insula, and visual processing areas (VPA). Food-cue processing activation was extracted from all fROIs and compared between the groups. In addition, functional connectivity between the fROIs was examined by modular partitioning of the correlation matrix of all fROIs. We could not confirm the hypothesis that BU areas are activated to a lesser extent in AN upon visual processing of food images. Among the BU areas the caudate showed higher activation in both patient groups compared to HC. In accordance with Brooks et al.’s model, we did find evidence for increased TD control in AN and REC. The functional connectivity analysis yielded two clusters in HC and REC, but three clusters in AN. In HC, fROIs across BU, TD, and VPA areas clustered; in AN, one cluster span across BU, TD, and insula; one across BU, TD, and VPA areas; and one was confined to the VPA network. In REC, BU, TD, and VPA or VPA and insula clustered. In conclusion, despite weight recovery, neural processing of food

  2. The relationship between bipolar disorder and type 2 diabetes: more than just co-morbid disorders.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Cynthia V; Gardner, David M; Ransom, Thomas; Alda, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rates are three times higher in patients with bipolar disorder (BD), compared to the general population. This is a major contributing factor to the elevated risk of cardiovascular mortality, the leading cause of death in bipolar patients. There may be shared pathophysiology linking the two disorders, including hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and mitochondrial dysfunction, common genetic links, and epigenetic interactions. Life-style, phenomenology of bipolar symptoms, and adverse effects of pharmacotherapy may be contributing factors. Patients with BD and T2DM have a more severe course of illness and are more refractory to treatment. Control of their diabetes is poorer when compared to diabetics without BD, and an existing disparity in medical care may be partly responsible. Glucose abnormalities in bipolar patients need to be screened for and treated. Metformin appears to have the best benefit/risk ratio, and the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and analogues also appear promising, although these agents have not been specifically studied in populations with mood disorders. Physicians need to be aware of the increased risk for T2DM and cardiovascular disease in bipolar patients, and appropriate prevention, screening, case finding, and treatment is recommended.

  3. A clinical approach to the assessment and management of co-morbid eating disorders and substance use disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Research has shown that eating disorder (ED) patients who abuse substances demonstrate worse ED symptomatology and poorer outcomes than those with EDs alone, including increased general medical complications and psychopathology, longer recovery times, poorer functional outcomes and higher relapse rates. This article provides a broad overview of the prevalence, aetiology, assessment and management of co-morbid EDs and substance use disorders (SUDs). Review The co-occurrence of EDs and SUDs is high. The functional relationship between EDs and SUDs vary within and across ED subtypes, depends on the class of substance, and needs to be carefully assessed for each patient. Substances such as caffeine, tobacco, insulin, thyroid medications, stimulants or over the counter medications (laxatives, diuretics) may be used to aid weight loss and/or provide energy, and alcohol or psychoactive substances could be used for emotional regulation or as part of a pattern of impulsive behaviour. A key message conveyed in the current literature is the importance of screening and assessment for co-morbid SUDs and EDs in patients presenting with either disorder. There is a paucity of treatment studies on the management of co-occurring EDs and SUDs. Overall, the literature indicates that the ED and SUD should be addressed simultaneously using a multi-disciplinary approach. The need for medical stabilization, hospitalization or inpatient treatment needs to be assessed based on general medical and psychiatric considerations. Common features across therapeutic interventions include psycho-education about the aetiological commonalities, risks and sequelae of concurrent ED behaviours and substance abuse, dietary education and planning, cognitive challenging of eating disordered attitudes and beliefs, building of skills and coping mechanisms, addressing obstacles to improvement and the prevention of relapse. Emphasis should be placed on building a collaborative therapeutic

  4. Developmental Coordination Disorder, An Umbrella Term for Motor Impairments in Children: Nature and Co-Morbid Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vaivre-Douret, Laurence; Lalanne, Christophe; Golse, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) defines a heterogeneous class of children exhibiting marked impairment in motor coordination as a general group of deficits in fine and gross motricity (subtype mixed group) common to all research studies, and with a variety of other motor disorders that have been little investigated. No consensus about symptoms and etiology has been established. Methods: Data from 58 children aged 6 to 13 years with DCD were collected on DSM-IV criteria, similar to DSM-5 criteria. They had no other medical condition and inclusion criteria were strict (born full-term, no medication, no occupational/physical therapy). Multivariate statistical methods were used to evidence relevant interactions between discriminant features in a general DCD subtype group and to highlight specific co-morbidities. The study examined age-calibrated standardized scores from completed assessments of psychological, neuropsychological, and neuropsychomotor functions, and more specifically the presence of minor neurological dysfunctions (MND) including neurological soft signs (NSS), without evidence of focal neurological brain involvement. These were not considered in most previous studies. Results: Findings show the salient DCD markers for the mixed subtype (imitation of gestures, digital perception, digital praxia, manual dexterity, upper, and lower limb coordination), vs. surprising co-morbidities, with 33% of MND with mild spasticity from phasic stretch reflex (PSR), not associated with the above impairments but rather with sitting tone (p = 0.004) and dysdiadochokinesia (p = 0.011). PSR was not specific to a DCD subtype but was related to increased impairment of coordination between upper and lower limbs and manual dexterity. Our results highlight the major contribution of an extensive neuro-developmental assessment (mental and physical). Discussion: The present study provides important new evidence in favor of a complete physical neuropsychomotor

  5. Food safety for the solid organ transplant patient: preventing foodborne illness while on chronic immunosuppressive drugs.

    PubMed

    Obayashi, Patricia A C

    2012-12-01

    Issues regarding food safety are seen increasingly in the news; outbreaks of foodborne illness have been associated with public health concerns ranging from mild illness to death. For the solid organ transplant patient, immunosuppressive and antibacterial drugs, which maintain transplant organ function, can expose the transplant patient to increased risk of foodborne illness from bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. This review article describes the clinical consequences, sources of foodborne illness, and food safety practices needed to minimize risks to the solid organ transplant patient who must take lifelong immunosuppressive drugs. All members of the transplant team share responsibility for education of the solid organ transplant patient in preventing infections. The registered dietitian, as part of the transplant team, is the recognized expert in providing food safety education in the context of medical nutrition therapy to solid organ transplant patients, the patients' caregivers, and other healthcare providers.

  6. First report of co-morbidity of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and three types of chronic hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Talaat, Iman M.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; El Melegy, Ebtessam H.K.; Alghamdi, Hamed A.; Aljabri, Mohammed F.; Abdallah, Enas A.A.; Sarar, Mohammed; Alshahrani, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), sickle cell anemia, and thalassemia are autosomal recessive disorders that can cause iron deposition in tissues during childhood. PKAN is characterized by accumulation of iron in the basal ganglia causing progressive extrapyramidal manifestations. Thalassemia and sickle cell disease can cause iron overload and deposition in tissues, including central nervous system. Presentation of case we herein report the first report of comorbidity of PKAN, β-thalassemia-major, sickle cell and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) anemias in a 9 years old Saudi female patient who presented with gait disturbance, speech difficulty, and progressive movement disorders of the neck, upper and lower limbs. Conclusion Although extremely rare, β-thalassemia-major, sickle cell and G6PD anemias can be associated with PKAN. It is unknown whether this association is random or due to an unknown factor that may have caused several mutations. PMID:26740874

  7. The determinants of coping with pain in chronically ill geriatric patients – the role of a sense of coherence

    PubMed Central

    Andruszkiewicz, Anna; Basińska, Małgorzata Anna; Felsmann, Mirosława; Banaszkiewicz, Mariola; Marzec, Alicja; Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia

    2017-01-01

    Background Given the rising population of the elderly in modern societies, the concern for their good functioning poses a challenge for the 21st century medicine and social services. Senior citizens are at an increased risk of developing chronic conditions, which in turn increase discomfort associated with physiological processes of aging. Sensations of pain have a particular influence on the mentioned discomfort, and pain is prevalent among older people. Therefore, from the perspective of an elderly person and senior care, it is crucial to identify determinants of effective coping with chronic pain. Objectives The aim of the research was to assess the relationship between a sense of coherence (SOC) and pain-coping strategies in chronically ill seniors. A total number of 188 individuals were included in the study, of whom 117 were female subjects and 71 were male subjects, with a mean age of 68.38 (standard deviation [SD] =6.35) years in the studied group. Subjects were sampled based on a diagnosis of a chronic medical illness with chronic pain as one of the major symptoms. Methods The Polish adaptation of the Orientation to Life Questionnaire (SOC-29) to assess an SOC, the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) to assess pain-coping strategies, and the visual analog scale (VAS) to assess pain intensity were used in the study. Results and conclusion The mean score of respondents’ SOC was 133.44 (SD =24.35). Among most common pain-coping strategies used by the respondents were prayer and hope, and the declaration of coping with pain while redefining pain was the least often used coping strategy in the studied group. Individuals with stronger SOC were less prone to catastrophizing and more often declared that they were coping with and could control and reduce pain. PMID:28223789

  8. Sexually transmitted infections among pregnant heroin- or cocaine-addicted women in treatment: the significance of psychiatric co-morbidity and sex trade.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, C E; Hedden, S L; Latimer, W W

    2010-02-01

    Psychiatric co-morbidity and sex trade were tested as correlates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among 76 pregnant heroin- or cocaine-dependent women. Participants were recruited from a drug treatment programme and attended a clinician-administered assessment including the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-IV-TR) and self-report questionnaires about lifetime histories of sex trade and STIs (i.e. gonorrhoea, syphilis, chlamydia, herpes, genital warts or trichomonas). Lifetime and six month rates of STIs were 53.9% and 18.4%, respectively. The majority of women also had lifetime histories of psychiatric co-morbidity (61.8%) and/or sex trade (60.5%). Participants with psychiatric co-morbidity (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-11.6) and/or sex trade (AOR 3.2; 95% CI 1.1-9.5) were more likely to report STIs during their lifetime compared with those without such histories while controlling for age, education and race/ethnicity. Results suggest that as many as one-in-five pregnant heroin- or cocaine-dependent women in treatment have one or more STIs that are concurrent with their pregnancy and may contribute to risk for contracting HIV and pregnancy complications; psychiatric co-morbidity and/or sex trade were associated with greater STI risk. Findings underscore the importance of identifying and addressing co-morbid psychiatric disorders and sex trade behaviour in this population.

  9. Prevalence of psychiatric co-morbidity in treatment-seeking problem gamblers: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cowlishaw, Sean; Jackson, Alun C; Merkouris, Stephanie S; Francis, Kate L; Christensen, Darren R

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this paper was to systematically review and meta-analyse the prevalence of co-morbid psychiatric disorders (DSM-IV Axis I disorders) among treatment-seeking problem gamblers. Methods: A systematic search was conducted for peer-reviewed studies that provided prevalence estimates of Axis I psychiatric disorders in individuals seeking psychological or pharmacological treatment for problem gambling (including pathological gambling). Meta-analytic techniques were performed to estimate the weighted mean effect size and heterogeneity across studies. Results: Results from 36 studies identified high rates of co-morbid current (74.8%, 95% CI 36.5–93.9) and lifetime (75.5%, 95% CI 46.5–91.8) Axis I disorders. There were high rates of current mood disorders (23.1%, 95% CI 14.9–34.0), alcohol use disorders (21.2%, 95% CI 15.6–28.1), anxiety disorders (17.6%, 95% CI 10.8–27.3) and substance (non-alcohol) use disorders (7.0%, 95% CI 1.7–24.9). Specifically, the highest mean prevalence of current psychiatric disorders was for nicotine dependence (56.4%, 95% CI 35.7–75.2) and major depressive disorder (29.9%, 95% CI 20.5–41.3), with smaller estimates for alcohol abuse (18.2%, 95% CI 13.4–24.2), alcohol dependence (15.2%, 95% CI 10.2–22.0), social phobia (14.9%, 95% CI 2.0–59.8), generalised anxiety disorder (14.4%, 95% CI 3.9–40.8), panic disorder (13.7%, 95% CI 6.7–26.0), post-traumatic stress disorder (12.3%, 95% CI 3.4–35.7), cannabis use disorder (11.5%, 95% CI 4.8–25.0), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (9.3%, 95% CI 4.1–19.6), adjustment disorder (9.2%, 95% CI 4.8–17.2), bipolar disorder (8.8%, 95% CI 4.4–17.1) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (8.2%, 95% CI 3.4–18.6). There were no consistent patterns according to gambling problem severity, type of treatment facility and study jurisdiction. Although these estimates were robust to the inclusion of studies with non-representative sampling biases, they should

  10. Sex differences in obesity: X chromosome dosage as a risk factor for increased food intake, adiposity and co-morbidities.

    PubMed

    Reue, Karen

    2017-03-08

    Obesity is a world-wide problem, and a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and other diseases. It is well established that sex differences influence fat storage. Males and females exhibit differences in anatomical fat distribution, utilization of fat stores, levels of adipose tissue-derived hormones, and obesity co-morbidities. The basis for these sex differences may be parsed into the effects of male vs. female gonadal hormones and the effects of XX vs. XY chromosome complement. Studies employing mouse models that allow the distinction of gonadal from chromosomal effects have revealed that X chromosome dosage influences food intake, which in turn affects adiposity and the occurrence of adverse metabolic conditions such as hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, and fatty liver. The identification of X chromosome dosage as a player in the behavior and physiology related to obesity suggests novel molecular mechanisms that may underlie sex differences in obesity and metabolism.

  11. Co-Morbidity, Mortality, Quality of Life and the Healthcare/Welfare/Social Costs of Disordered Sleep: A Rapid Review

    PubMed Central

    Garbarino, Sergio; Lanteri, Paola; Durando, Paolo; Magnavita, Nicola; Sannita, Walter G.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disorders are frequent (18%–23%) and constitute a major risk factor for psychiatric, cardiovascular, metabolic or hormonal co-morbidity and mortality. Low social status or income, unemployment, life events such as divorce, negative lifestyle habits, and professional requirements (e.g., shift work) are often associated with sleep problems. Sleep disorders affect the quality of life and impair both professional and non-professional activities. Excessive daytime drowsiness resulting from sleep disorders impairs efficiency and safety at work or on the road, and increases the risk of accidents. Poor sleep (either professional or voluntary) has detrimental effects comparable to those of major sleep disorders, but is often neglected. The high incidence and direct/indirect healthcare and welfare costs of sleep disorders and poor sleep currently constitute a major medical problem. Investigation, monitoring and strategies are needed in order to prevent/reduce the effects of these disorders. PMID:27548196

  12. Paraquat and psychological stressor interactions as pertains to Parkinsonian co-morbidity.

    PubMed

    Rudyk, Chris; Litteljohn, Darcy; Syed, Shuaib; Dwyer, Zach; Hayley, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    A number of epidemiological and experimental studies have implicated the non-selective herbicide, paraquat, in the development of sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). While preclinical research has focused mainly on elucidating the nigrostriatal effects of paraquat, relatively little data are available concerning non-motor brain systems and inflammatory immune processes (which have been implicated in PD). Hence, in the present study, we sought to take a multi-system approach to characterize the influence of paraquat upon extra-nigrostriatal brain regions, as well ascertain whether the impact of the pesticide might be enhanced in the context of chronic intermittent stressor exposure. Our findings support the contention that paraquat itself acted as a systemic stressor, with the pesticide increasing plasma corticosterone, as well as altering neurochemical activity in the locus coeruleus, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, dorsal striatum, and central amygdala. However, with the important exception striatal dopamine turnover, the stressor treatment did not further augment these effects. Additionally, paraquat altered inter-cytokine correlations and, to a lesser extent, circulating cytokine levels, and concomitant stress exposure modulated some of these effects. Finally, paraquat provoked significant (albeit modest) reductions of sucrose preference and weight gain, hinting at possible anhendonic-like or sickness responses. These data suggest that, in addition to being a well known oxidative stress generator, paraquat can act as a systemic stressor affecting hormonal and neurochemical activity, but largely not interacting with a concomitant stressor regimen.

  13. Prevalence and clinical impact of cachexia in chronic illness in Europe, USA, and Japan: facts and numbers update 2016

    PubMed Central

    von Haehling, Stephan; Anker, Markus S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cachexia is a serious clinical consequence of almost all chronic diseases when reaching advanced stages. Its prevalence ranges from 5–15% in end‐stage chronic heart failure to 50–80% in advanced malignant cancer. Cachexia is also frequently occurring in patients with chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or neurological diseases, and rheumatoid arthritis. Mortality rates of patients with cachexia range from 15–25% per year in severe COPD through 20–40% per year in patients with chronic heart failure or chronic kidney disease to 20–80% in cancer cachexia. In the industrialized world (North America, Europe, and Japan) where epidemiological data are to some degree available, the overall prevalence of cachexia (due to any disease and not necessarily associated with hospital admission) is growing with the growth of the chronic illness prevalence, and it currently affects around 0.5–1.0% of the population, i.e. around 6–12 million people. From this, one can estimate that 1.5–2 million deaths are occurring in patients with cachexia per year. It is also a very significant health problem in other parts of the globe, but epidemiological data are scarce. The multifactorial nature of cachexia is now much better understood, and particularly, the role of inflammatory mediators and the imbalance of anabolism and catabolism are considered important therapeutic targets. Several approaches to develop cachexia and muscle wasting treatments have failed to be successful in phase III clinical trials, but new approaches are in development. Given the high prevalence and very high mortality associated with cachexia, advances are urgently needed for patients worldwide. PMID:27891294

  14. Prevalence and clinical impact of cachexia in chronic illness in Europe, USA, and Japan: facts and numbers update 2016.

    PubMed

    von Haehling, Stephan; Anker, Markus S; Anker, Stefan D

    2016-12-01

    Cachexia is a serious clinical consequence of almost all chronic diseases when reaching advanced stages. Its prevalence ranges from 5-15% in end-stage chronic heart failure to 50-80% in advanced malignant cancer. Cachexia is also frequently occurring in patients with chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or neurological diseases, and rheumatoid arthritis. Mortality rates of patients with cachexia range from 15-25% per year in severe COPD through 20-40% per year in patients with chronic heart failure or chronic kidney disease to 20-80% in cancer cachexia. In the industrialized world (North America, Europe, and Japan) where epidemiological data are to some degree available, the overall prevalence of cachexia (due to any disease and not necessarily associated with hospital admission) is growing with the growth of the chronic illness prevalence, and it currently affects around 0.5-1.0% of the population, i.e. around 6-12 million people. From this, one can estimate that 1.5-2 million deaths are occurring in patients with cachexia per year. It is also a very significant health problem in other parts of the globe, but epidemiological data are scarce. The multifactorial nature of cachexia is now much better understood, and particularly, the role of inflammatory mediators and the imbalance of anabolism and catabolism are considered important therapeutic targets. Several approaches to develop cachexia and muscle wasting treatments have failed to be successful in phase III clinical trials, but new approaches are in development. Given the high prevalence and very high mortality associated with cachexia, advances are urgently needed for patients worldwide.

  15. 'Everything's from the inside out with PCOS': Exploring women's experiences of living with polycystic ovary syndrome and co-morbidities through Skype™ interviews.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sophie; Sheffield, David; Knibb, Rebecca C

    2015-07-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is an endocrine disorder affecting 1 in 10 women. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome can experience co-morbidities, including depressive symptoms. This research explores the experience of living with polycystic ovary syndrome and co-morbidities. Totally, 10 participants with polycystic ovary syndrome took part in Skype™ interviews and analysed using thematic analysis. Four themes emerged from the data: change (to life plans and changing nature of condition); support (healthcare professionals, education and relationships); co-morbidities (living with other conditions and depression, self-harm and suicidal ideation) and identity (feminine identity and us and them). The findings highlight the need for screening of women with polycystic ovary syndrome for depressive disorders.

  16. ‘Everything’s from the inside out with PCOS’: Exploring women’s experiences of living with polycystic ovary syndrome and co-morbidities through Skype™ interviews

    PubMed Central

    Sheffield, David; Knibb, Rebecca C

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is an endocrine disorder affecting 1 in 10 women. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome can experience co-morbidities, including depressive symptoms. This research explores the experience of living with polycystic ovary syndrome and co-morbidities. Totally, 10 participants with polycystic ovary syndrome took part in Skype™ interviews and analysed using thematic analysis. Four themes emerged from the data: change (to life plans and changing nature of condition); support (healthcare professionals, education and relationships); co-morbidities (living with other conditions and depression, self-harm and suicidal ideation) and identity (feminine identity and us and them). The findings highlight the need for screening of women with polycystic ovary syndrome for depressive disorders. PMID:28070371

  17. Impact of Growing Up with a Chronically Ill Sibling on Well Siblings' Late Adolescent Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Fleary, Sasha A.; Heffer, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the continuing impact of growing up with an ill sibling on well siblings' late adolescent functioning. Forty late adolescents (Mage = 18.78, SD = 0.83), who identified themselves as growing up with an ill sibling, completed a semistructured interview, demographic questionnaire, Personality Assessment Screener, and My Feelings and Concerns Sibling Questionnaire. Participants reported clinically significant problems on some PAS scales, and gender differences were found for acting out and alienation. Significant relationships were reported for communication and social withdrawal and alienation. Both positive and negative themes about the experience were elicited from the responses in the semistructured interview. This study provides evidence for some lingering negative effects of growing up with an ill sibling on well siblings' late adolescent functioning. Additionally, evidence for siblings' development of positive characteristics that may act as protective variables as they face the stressors of late adolescence was also highlighted. PMID:24959574

  18. [Medical diagnosis of pain between myth and reality--chronic lower back pain, as an illness of upright walking].

    PubMed

    Albrecht, H

    2001-10-01

    Chronic therapy-resistant low back pain is a major problem in medical care. In Germany there are many millions concerned, and the treatment expenses range at the top. Many of these patients underwent non-successful operations at the vertebral column and suffered a long-lasting odyssey of therapies before they are treated psychosomatically for the first time. Chronic low back pain is a disease including social, psychological as well as physiological aspects, and not only a problem of bones, muscles, or intervertebral disks. The problem is similar to that of fibromyalgia. On the basis of 9,000 case reports obtained during psychosomatic orthopedic treatment, character structures, unsolved problems of life and repressed emotional disturbances such as anger, jealousy, fear, and mourning could be identified as major psychosomatic risk factors for chronic low back pain. There is a high coincidence with other psychosomatically influenced diseases such as gastric and duodenal ulcera, asthma bronchiale, migraine with depressions, anxiety disorders, character neuroses, and narcissistic and other structural disturbances of the self. Exclusively somatic treatments without considering the existential situation and psychological methods hold the danger of a symptom shifting. The inpatient treatment from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ('Tagesklinik') with a combination of medical, physiotherapeutic and psychotherapeutic methods promotes a social training that counteracts the increasing constrictions in the accustomed life surroundings caused by low back pain. Chronic low back pain is an 'illness of the upright walk' in an anthropological, ethical sense. Considering low back pain as a strictly somatic disease is a modern myth of a medical treatment without existential understanding of human illness. It provokes failure of treatment and an enhancement of treatment cost.

  19. Content and quality of websites supporting self-management of chronic breathlessness in advanced illness: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Luckett, Tim; Disler, Rebecca; Hosie, Annmarie; Johnson, Miriam; Davidson, Patricia; Currow, David; Sumah, Anthony; Phillips, Jane

    2016-05-26

    Chronic breathlessness is a common, burdensome and distressing symptom in many advanced chronic illnesses. Self-management strategies are essential to optimise treatment, daily functioning and emotional coping. People with chronic illness commonly search the internet for advice on self-management. A review was undertaken in June 2015 to describe the content and quality of online advice on breathlessness self-management, to highlight under-served areas and to identify any unsafe content. Google was searched from Sydney, Australia, using the five most common search terms for breathlessness identified by Google Trends. We also hand-searched the websites of national associations. Websites were included if they were freely available in English and provided practical advice on self-management. Website quality was assessed using the American Medical Association Benchmarks. Readability was assessed using the Flesch-Kincaid grades, with grade 8 considered the maximum acceptable for enabling access. Ninety-one web pages from 44 websites met the inclusion criteria, including 14 national association websites not returned by Google searches. Most websites were generated in the USA (n=28, 64%) and focused on breathing techniques (n=38, 86%) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=27, 61%). No websites were found to offer unsafe advice. Adherence to quality benchmarks ranged from 9% for disclosure to 77% for currency. Fifteen (54%) of 28 written websites required grade ⩾9 reading level. Future development should focus on advice and tools to support goal setting, problem solving and monitoring of breathlessness. National associations are encouraged to improve website visibility and comply with standards for quality and readability.

  20. Religiously Integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A New Method of Treatment for Major Depression in Patients With Chronic Medical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Michelle J.; Koenig, Harold G.; Robins, Clive J.; Nelson, Bruce; Shaw, Sally F.; Cohen, Harvey J.; King, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Intervention studies have found that psychotherapeutic interventions that explicitly integrate clients’ spiritual and religious beliefs in therapy are as effective, if not more so, in reducing depression than those that do not for religious clients. However, few empirical studies have examined the effectiveness of religiously (vs. spiritually) integrated psychotherapy, and no manualized mental health intervention had been developed for the medically ill with religious beliefs. To address this gap, we developed and implemented a novel religiously integrated adaptation of cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of depression in individuals with chronic medical illness. This article describes the development and implementation of the intervention. First, we provide a brief overview of CBT. Next, we describe how religious beliefs and behaviors can be integrated into a CBT framework. Finally, we describe Religiously Integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (RCBT), a manualized therapeutic approach designed to assist depressed individuals to develop depression-reducing thoughts and behaviors informed by their own religious beliefs, practices, and resources. This treatment approach has been developed for 5 major world religions (Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism), increasing its potential to aid the depressed medically ill from a variety of religious backgrounds. PMID:25365155

  1. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  2. A Multidimensional Conceptual Framework for Understanding HIV/AIDS as a Chronic Long-Term Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Christopher G.; Linsk, Nathan L.

    2004-01-01

    New treatment advances have radically altered the course of HIV illness and created new challenges for HIV-affected individuals, families, and communities. This article provides a conceptual framework for understanding HIV in the multiple contexts of the client's culture, strengths, life course, and biomedical progression. The article concludes…

  3. Personality Variables in Coping with the Stress of a Spouse's Chronic Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoeneman, Sandra Z.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Identified wives (N=56) of hemodialysis patients at risk for problems adapting to their husband's illness, and explored personality variables that might enhance coping. Results showed greater external locus of control was related to poorer adjustment, but greater internal locus of control was not related to better adjustment. (Author/JAC)

  4. The Effect of Home Caregiving Program for Family Members Providing Care for Chronically Ill Relative Client

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Hussein Jassim; Kamel, Andaleeb Abu

    2015-01-01

    Health care systems in many countries are moving towards outpatient care in which family members are central in providing care for patients with life-threatening illness. Family members and friends haven't knowledge and skills to become caregivers as many studies found that, the need to involve in such program to enhance their ability to be…

  5. Relation between Severity of Chronic Illness and Adjustment in Children and Adolescents with Sickle Cell Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtig, Anita Landau; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The study with 70 children and adolescents with sickle cell disease did not support the hypothesis that illness severity (measured by frequency of hospitalization) would affect adjustment (measured by IQ, self-esteem, social and personal adjustment, behavioral problems, school performance, and peer relations). (Author/DB)

  6. Burden and quality of life of mothers of children and adolescents with chronic illnesses: an integrative review 1

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Eliza Cristina; da Silva, Leila Rangel; Paiva, Mirian Santos; Ramos, Maria Natália Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify and analyze the evidence available regarding evaluation of burden and quality of life of mothers who are caregivers for children and adolescents with chronic illnesses. Method: an integrative review, undertaken in the electronic sources MEDLINE; Academic Search Premier; CINAHL; LILACS; SciELO and PubMed, between 2010 and 2014. Results: among the 22 documents selected, there was a predominance of convenience samples and non-experimental transversal designs, at the levels IV and III2. The caregiver burden scales used were the Zarit Burden Interview and Montgomery-Borgatta Caregiver Burden Scale-Revised along with the following instruments for evaluating quality of life: The World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF Scale; Self-report questionnaires; The Ulm Quality of Life Inventory for Parents of chronically ill children; Asthma Caregiver Quality of Life Questionnaire; and the Nottingham Health Profile. Quality-of-life appears to be influenced in a complex and interrelated way by the physical and mental health of the mothers who are caregivers, in accordance with their level of independence, social relationships, environment, and the extent to which they see themselves as burdened. Conclusion: the revealing of the results for the evaluation of burden and quality of life of mothers who are caregivers has implications for the planning and implementation of effective interventions, by the multidisciplinary team, if they are to relieve the burden. PMID:26444180

  7. Marital status and gender differences in managing a chronic illness: the function of health-related social control.

    PubMed

    August, Kristin J; Sorkin, Dara H

    2010-11-01

    The attempts of social network members to regulate individuals' health behaviors, or health-related social control, is one mechanism by which social relationships influence health. Little is known, however, about whether this process varies in married versus unmarried individuals managing a chronic illness in which health behaviors are a key component. Researchers have proposed that social control attempts may have dual effects on recipients' well-being, such that improved health behaviors may occur at the cost of increased emotional distress. The current study accordingly sought to examine marital status differences in the sources, frequency, and responses to health-related social control in an ethnically diverse sample of 1477 patients with type 2 diabetes from southern California, USA. Results from two-way ANCOVAs revealed that married individuals reported their spouses most frequently as sources of social control, with unmarried women naming children and unmarried men naming friends/neighbors most frequently as sources of social control. Married men reported receiving social control most often, whereas unmarried men reported receiving social control least often. Regression analyses that examined behavioral and emotional responses to social control revealed that social control using persuasion was associated with better dietary behavior among married patients. Results also revealed a complex pattern of emotional responses, such that social control was associated with both appreciation and hostility, with the effect for appreciation most pronounced among women. Findings from this study highlight the importance of marital status and gender differences in social network members' involvement in the management of a chronic illness.

  8. A tool to measure whether business management capacity in general practice impacts on the quality of chronic illness care.

    PubMed

    Holton, Christine H; Proudfoot, Judith G; Jayasinghe, Upali W; Grimm, Jane; Bubner, Tanya K; Winstanley, Julie; Harris, Mark F; Beilby, Justin J

    2010-11-01

    Our aim was to develop a tool to identify specific features of the business and financial management of practices that facilitate better quality care for chronic illness in primary care. Domains of management were identified, resulting in the development of a structured interview tool that was administered in 97 primary care practices in Australia. Interview items were screened and subjected to factor analysis, subscales identified and the overall model fit determined. The instrument's validity was assessed against another measure of quality of care. Analysis provided a four-factor solution containing 21 items, which explained 42.5% of the variance in the total scores. The factors related to administrative processes, human resources, marketing analysis and business development. All scores increased significantly with practice size. The business development subscale and total score were higher for rural practices. There was a significant correlation between the business development subscale and quality of care. The indicators of business and financial management in the final tool appear to be useful predictors of the quality of care. The instrument may help inform policy regarding the structure of general practice and implementation of a systems approach to chronic illness care. It can provide information to practices about areas for further development.

  9. Chronic multisymptom illness: a comparison of Iraq and Afghanistan deployers with veterans of the 1991 Gulf War.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tyler C; Powell, Teresa M; Jacobson, Isabel G; Smith, Besa; Hooper, Tomoko I; Boyko, Edward J; Gackstetter, Gary D

    2014-12-15

    Symptoms and illnesses reported by veterans of the 1991 Gulf War era are a cause of potential concern for those military members who have deployed to the Gulf region in support of more recent contingency operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. In the present study, we quantified self-reported symptoms from participants in the Millennium Cohort Study, a prospective study representing all US service branches, including both active duty and Reserve/National Guard components (2001-2008). Self-reported symptoms were uniquely compared with those in a cohort of subjects from the 1991 Gulf War to gain context for the present report. Symptoms were then aggregated to identify cases of chronic multisymptom illness (CMI) based on the case definition from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The prevalence of self-reported CMI symptoms was compared with that collected in 1997-1999 from a study population of US Seabees from the 1991 Gulf War, as well as from deployed and nondeployed subgroups. Although overall symptom reporting was much less in the Millennium Cohort than in the 1991 Gulf War cohort, a higher prevalence of reported CMI was noted among deployed compared with nondeployed contemporary cohort members. An increased understanding of coping skills and resilience and development of well-designed screening instruments, along with appropriate clinical and psychological follow-up for returning veterans, might help to focus resources on early identification of potential long-term chronic disease manifestations.

  10. The impact of chronic physical illness, maternal depressive symptoms, family functioning, and self-esteem on symptoms of anxiety and depression in children.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Mark A; Boyle, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    The present study extends earlier research identifying an increased risk of anxiety among children with chronic physical illness (CwCPI) by examining a more complete model that explains how physical illness leads to increased symptoms of anxiety and depression. We tested a stress-generation model linking chronic physical illness to symptoms of anxiety and depression in a population-based sample of children aged 10 to 15 years. We hypothesized that having a chronic physical illness would be associated with more symptoms of anxiety and depression, increased levels of maternal depressive symptoms, more family dysfunction, and lower self-esteem; and, that maternal depressive symptoms, family dysfunction, and child self-esteem would mediate the influence of chronic physical illness on symptoms of anxiety and depression. Data came from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (N = 10,646). Mediating processes were analyzed using latent growth curve modeling. Childhood chronic physical illness was associated with increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression, β = 0.20, p < 0.001. Mediating effects were also observed such that chronic physical illness resulted in increases in symptoms of maternal depression and family dysfunction, leading to declines in child self-esteem, and in turn, increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression. CwCPI are at-risk for symptoms of anxiety and depression. Some of this elevated risk appears to work through family processes and child self-esteem. This study supports the use of family-centered care approaches among CwCPI to minimize burden on families and promote healthy psychological development for children.

  11. Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Differential Relationships of the Two Subdomains of Negative Symptoms in Chronically Ill Psychotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stiekema, Annemarie P. M.; Liemburg, Edith J.; van der Meer, Lisette; Castelein, Stynke; Stewart, Roy; van Weeghel, Jaap; Aleman, André; Bruggeman, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests a two factor structure for negative symptoms in patients with psychotic disorders: social amotivation (SA) and expressive deficits (ED). Applying this two-factor structure in clinical settings may provide valuable information with regard to outcomes and to target treatments. We aimed to investigate 1) whether the factor structure is also supported in chronically ill patients with a psychotic disorder and 2) what the relationship is between these factors and functioning (overall functioning and living situation), depressive symptoms and quality of life. 1157 Patients with a psychotic disorder and a duration of illness of 5 years or more were included in the analysis (data selected from the Pharmacotherapy Monitoring Outcome Survey; PHAMOUS). A confirmatory factor analysis was performed using items of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale that were previously identified to reflect negative symptoms (N1-4, N6, G5, G7, G13, G16). Subsequently, regression analysis was performed on outcomes. The results confirmed the distinction between SA (N2, N4, G16) and ED (N1, N3, N6, G5, G7, G13) in chronically ill patients. Both factors were related to worse overall functioning as measured with the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales, ED was uniquely associated with residential living status. Higher scores for SA were associated with more depressive symptoms and worse quality of life. Thus, SA is most strongly related to level of social-emotional functioning, while ED are more related to living situation and thereby are indicative of level of everyday functioning. This subdivision may be useful for research purposes and be a valuable additional tool in clinical practice and treatment development. PMID:26895203

  12. Albumin concentration significantly impacts on free teicoplanin plasma concentrations in non-critically ill patients with chronic bone sepsis.

    PubMed

    Brink, A J; Richards, G A; Lautenbach, E E G; Rapeport, N; Schillack, V; van Niekerk, L; Lipman, J; Roberts, J A

    2015-06-01

    The impact of decreased serum albumin concentrations on free antibiotic concentrations in non-critically ill patients is poorly described. This study aimed to describe the pharmacokinetics of a high-dose regimen of teicoplanin, a highly protein-bound antibiotic, in non-critically ill patients with hypoalbuminaemia. Ten patients with chronic bone sepsis and decreased serum albumin concentrations (<35 g/L) receiving teicoplanin 12 mg/kg 12-hourly intravenously for 48 h followed by 12 mg/kg once daily were enrolled. Surgical debridement was performed on Day 3. Samples of venous blood were collected pre-infusion and post-infusion during the first 4 days of therapy. Total and free teicoplanin concentrations were assayed using validated chromatographic methods. The median serum albumin concentration for the cohort was 18 (IQR 15-24) g/L. After 48 h, the median (IQR) free trough (fC(min)) and total trough (tC(min)) concentrations were 2.90 (2.67-3.47) mg/L and 15.54 (10.28-19.12) mg/L, respectively, although trough concentrations declined thereafter. Clearance of the free concentrations was significantly high relative to the total fraction at 38.6 (IQR 29.9-47.8) L/h and 7.0 (IQR 6.8-9.8) L/h, respectively (P<0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that whereas total teicoplanin concentration did not impact on free concentrations (P=0.174), albumin concentration did (P<0.001). This study confirms the significant impact of hypoalbuminaemia on free concentrations of teicoplanin in non-critically ill patients, similar to that in critically ill patients. Furthermore, the poor correlation with total teicoplanin concentration suggests that therapeutic drug monitoring of free concentrations should be used in these patients.

  13. Acceptable Care? Illness Constructions, Healthworlds, and Accessible Chronic Treatment in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Bronwyn; Eyles, John; Moshabela, Mosa

    2015-01-01

    Achieving equitable access to health care is an important policy goal, with access influenced by affordability, availability, and acceptability of specific services. We explore patient narratives from a 5-year program of research on health care access to examine relationships between social constructions of illness and the acceptability of health services in the context of tuberculosis treatment and antiretroviral therapy in South Africa. Acceptability of services seems particularly important to the meanings patients attach to illness and care, whereas—conversely—these constructions appear to influence what constitutes acceptability and hence affect access to care. We highlight the underestimated role of individually, socially, and politically constructed healthworlds; traditional and biomedical beliefs; and social support networks. Suggested policy implications for improving acceptability and hence overall health care access include abandoning patronizing approaches to care and refocusing from treating “disease” to responding to “illness” by acknowledging and incorporating patients’ healthworlds in patient–provider interactions. PMID:25829509

  14. Social inequalities in 'sickness': European welfare states and non-employment among the chronically ill.

    PubMed

    van der Wel, Kjetil A; Dahl, Espen; Thielen, Karsten

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine educational inequalities in the risk of non-employment among people with illnesses and how they vary between European countries with different welfare state characteristics. In doing so, the paper adds to the growing literature on welfare states and social inequalities in health by studying the often overlooked 'sickness'-dimension of health, namely employment behaviour among people with illnesses. We use European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) data from 2005 covering 26 European countries linked to country characteristics derived from Eurostat and OECD that include spending on active labour market policies, benefit generosity, income inequality, and employment protection. Using multilevel techniques we find that comprehensive welfare states have lower absolute and relative social inequalities in sickness, as well as more favourable general rates of non-employment. Hence, regarding sickness, welfare resources appear to trump welfare disincentives.

  15. Therapeutic recreation camps: an effective intervention for children and young people with chronic illness?

    PubMed

    Walker, D A; Pearman, D

    2009-05-01

    Since the 1930s, therapeutic recreation (TR) has been used in the UK to help young people cope with severe illness. This article surveys four systematic reviews and poses five questions that a paediatrician might ask: (1) How to select a TR experience and for which patient?; (2) Does TR augment brain injury rehabilitation?; (3) How do TR camps benefit children?; (4) Is TR cost-effective?; (5) What additional research is needed? Methodological weaknesses in research impair the strength of conclusions. There is little research about matching of TR experiences to individuals, disease groups or age groups, or about the effect of TR camps in brain injury rehabilitation. TR interventions enhance self-esteem, disease knowledge, emotional well-being, adaptation to illness and symptom control. Educationalists suggest that self-esteem is helped most in mid to late adolescence. Where studied, TR camps are safe, which reassures parents. There have been few studies on cost-effectiveness. We conclude that young people benefit from TR. However, better-quality research would help select and further develop these experiences for young people with ill health.

  16. Social class, non-employment, and chronic illness: continuing the inequalities in health debate.

    PubMed Central

    Arber, S

    1987-01-01

    The 1981-2 General Household Survey showed steep class gradients in limiting longstanding illness for men and women aged 20-59 that were very similar to the class gradients in mortality in the 1979-83 decennial supplement. The class gradient for women classified by their husband's occupation was stronger than that when they were classified by their own occupation. Men and women who lacked paid employment reported poorer health than the employed and were concentrated in the lower social classes. Inequalities in ill health due to class were partly caused by the higher proportion in the lower social classes who were without work. Class differences in ill health still existed, however, among the currently employed, with unskilled men reporting particularly poor health and women manual workers reporting poorer health than women in non-manual jobs. Class differences were greater for the occupationless than for the currently employed. Thus class remains an important indicator of health inequalities despite the current high level of unemployment. PMID:3107698

  17. The role of lipids in the pathogenesis and treatment of type 2 diabetes and associated co-morbidities

    PubMed Central

    Erion, Derek M.; Park, Hyun-Jun; Lee, Hui-Young

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has rapidly increased, along with the associated cardiovascular complications. Therefore, understanding the pathophysiology underlying T2D, the associated complications and the impact of therapeutics on the T2D development has critical importance for current and future therapeutics. The prevailing feature of T2D is hyperglycemia due to excessive hepatic glucose production, insulin resistance, and insufficient secretion of insulin by the pancreas. These contribute to increased fatty acid influx into the liver and muscle causing accumulation of lipid metabolites. These lipid metabolites cause dyslipidemia and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which ultimately contributes to the increased cardiovascular risk in T2D. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of hepatic insulin resistance and the specific role of liver lipids is critical in selecting and designing the most effective therapeutics for T2D and the associated co-morbidities, including dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. Herein, we review the effects and molecular mechanisms of conventional anti-hyperglycemic and lipid-lowering drugs on glucose and lipid metabolism. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(3): 139-148] PMID:26728273

  18. Association of Functional Impairments and Co-Morbid Conditions with Driving Performance among Cognitively Normal Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Barco, Peggy P.; Babulal, Ganesh M.; Stout, Sarah H.; Johnson, Anne M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Morris, John C.; Roe, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between key functional impairments, co-morbid conditions and driving performance in a sample of cognitively normal older adults. Design Prospective observational study Setting The Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, Washington University at St. Louis Participants Individuals with normal cognition, 64.9 to 88.2 years old (N = 129), with a valid driver’s license, who were currently driving at least once per week, and who had participated in longitudinal studies at the Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center Measurements Static visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, physical frailty measures, motor skills, total medical conditions, and the modified Washington University Road Test. Results When controlling for age, race, gender, APOE, and education the total number of medical conditions was unassociated with both road test scores (pass vs. marginal + fail) and the total driver error count. There were marginal associations of our measure of physical frailty (p = 0.06) and contrast sensitivity score (p = 0.06) with total driving error count. Conclusion Future research that focuses on older adults and driving should consider adopting measures of physical frailty and contrast sensitivity, especially in samples that may have a propensity for disease impacting visual and/or physical function (e.g. osteoarthritis, Parkinson’s, eye disorders, advanced age >80 years, etc.). PMID:28005921

  19. Is Dysregulation of the HPA-Axis a Core Pathophysiology Mediating Co-Morbid Depression in Neurodegenerative Diseases?

    PubMed

    Du, Xin; Pang, Terence Y

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of prodromal manifestation of neuropsychiatric symptoms in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). These affective symptoms may be observed many years before the core diagnostic symptoms of the neurological condition. It is becoming more apparent that depression is a significant modifying factor of the trajectory of disease progression and even treatment outcomes. It is therefore crucial that we understand the potential pathophysiologies related to the primary condition, which could contribute to the development of depression. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis is a key neuroendocrine signaling system involved in physiological homeostasis and stress response. Disturbances of this system lead to severe hormonal imbalances, and the majority of such patients also present with behavioral deficits and/or mood disorders. Dysregulation of the HPA-axis is also strongly implicated in the pathology of major depressive disorder. Consistent with this, antidepressant drugs, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been shown to alter HPA-axis activity. In this review, we will summarize the current state of knowledge regarding HPA-axis pathology in Alzheimer's, PD and HD, differentiating between prodromal and later stages of disease progression when evidence is available. Both clinical and preclinical evidence will be examined, but we highlight animal model studies as being particularly useful for uncovering novel mechanisms of pathology related to co-morbid mood disorders. Finally, we purpose utilizing the preclinical evidence to better inform prospective, intervention studies.

  20. Pitx3 deficient mice as a genetic animal model of co-morbid depressive disorder and parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Kang, Young-Mi; Kang, Young; Park, Tae-Shin; Park, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Yoon-Jung; Han, Baek-Soo; Kim, Chun-Hyung; Lee, Chul-Ho; Ardayfio, Paul A; Han, Pyung-Lim; Jung, Bong-Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2014-03-13

    Approximately 40-50% of all patients with Parkinson׳s disease (PD) show symptoms and signs of depressive disorders, for which neither pathogenic understanding nor rational treatment are available. Using Pit3x-deficient mice, a model for selective nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration, we tested depression-related behaviors and acute stress responses to better understand how a nigrostriatal dopaminergic deficit increases the prevalence of depressive disorders in PD patients. Pitx3-deficient mice showed decreased sucrose consumption and preference in the two-bottle free-choice test of anhedonia. Acute restraint stress increased c-Fos (known as a neuronal activity marker) expression levels in various brain regions, including the prefrontal cortex, striatum, nucleus accumbens, and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), in both Pitx3+/+ and -/- mice. However, the stress-induced increases in c-Fos levels in the cortex, dorsal striatum, and PVN were significantly greater in Pitx3-/- than +/+ mice, suggesting that signs of depressive disorders in parkinsonism are related to altered stress vulnerability. Based on these results, we propose that Pitx3-/- mice may serve as a useful genetic animal model for co-morbid depressive disorder and parkinsonism.

  1. Co-sensitivity to the incentive properties of palatable food and cocaine in rats; implications for co-morbid addictions.

    PubMed

    Levy, AnneMarie; Salamon, Avi; Tucci, Mark; Limebeer, Cheryl L; Parker, Linda A; Leri, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that there may be a shared vulnerability to acquire behaviors motivated by strong incentive stimuli. Non-food restricted male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 78) underwent place conditioning with Oreos, and were subsequently tested on cocaine self-administration (SA) on fixed and progressive ratios, as well as extinction and reinstatement by cocaine primes and by consumption of Oreos. Although there was a group preference for the Oreo-paired compartment, at the individual level some rats (69%) displayed a preference and others did not. In cocaine SA, 'preference' rats achieved higher break points on a progressive ratio, and displayed greater responding during extinction and cocaine-induced reinstatement. Within the context of this study, Oreo-cocaine cross-reinstatement was not observed. In a control study, rats (n = 29) conditioned with a less palatable food (rice cakes) also displayed individual differences in place preference, but not on subsequent cocaine tests. These findings indicate that there is a relationship between incentive learning promoted by palatable foods and by cocaine. This supports the hypothesis that co-morbid food-drug addictions may result from a shared vulnerability to acquire behaviors motivated by strong incentives.

  2. Type 2 diabetes - Tuberculosis co-morbidity is associated with diminished circulating levels of IL-20 subfamily of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nair, Dina; Kumaran, Paul; Dolla, Chandra Kumar; Babu, Subash

    2015-12-01

    IL-20 subfamily of cytokines play an important role in both host defense mechanisms and glucose metabolism. Since, the interaction between tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes (DM) involves both of the above processes, we examined the association of IL-20 subfamily of cytokines in TB-DM co-morbidity. We examined circulating plasma cytokine levels in individuals with active TB with (PTB-DM) or without (PTB) diabetes and also those with latent TB with (LTB-DM) or without (LTB) diabetes. PTB-DM is characterized by diminished circulating levels of IL-19, IL-20, IL-22 and IL-24 but increased levels of IL-10. Similarly, LTB-DM was also characterized by diminished circulating levels of IL-10, IL-19, IL-20 and IL-24 but increased levels of IL-22. Moreover, there was a significant negative correlation of IL-10, IL-19, IL-20, IL-22 and IL-24 levels with hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) levels in both PTB and/or LTB individuals. Finally, PTB is characterized by diminished levels of IL-19, IL-20, IL-22 and IL-24 in comparison to LTB individuals. Our data reveal that coincident diabetes in either PTB or LTB is characterized by decreased production of the IL-20 subfamily of cytokines and suggest that these cytokines might play an important role in pathogenesis or protection.

  3. Postpartum depression and infant-mother attachment security at one year: The impact of co-morbid maternal personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Smith-Nielsen, Johanne; Tharner, Anne; Steele, Howard; Cordes, Katharina; Mehlhase, Heike; Vaever, Mette Skovgaard

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies on effects of postpartum depression (PPD) on infant-mother attachment have been divergent. This may be due to not taking into account the effects of stable difficulties not specific for depression, such as maternal personality disorder (PD). Mothers (N=80) were recruited for a longitudinal study either during pregnancy (comparison group) or eight weeks postpartum (clinical group). Infants of mothers with depressive symptoms only or in combination with a PD diagnosis were compared with infants of mothers with no psychopathology. Depression and PD were assessed using self-report and clinical interviews. Infant-mother attachment was assessed when infants were 13 months using Strange Situation Procedure (SSP). Attachment (in)security was calculated as a continuous score based on the four interactive behavioral scales of the SSP, and the conventional scale for attachment disorganization was used. PPD was associated with attachment insecurity only if the mother also had a PD diagnosis. Infants of PPD mothers without co-morbid PD did not differ from infants of mothers with no psychopathology. These results suggest that co-existing PD may be crucial in understanding how PPD impacts on parenting and infant social-emotional development. Stable underlying factors may magnify or buffer effects of PPD on parenting and child outcomes.

  4. Integrated intervention for mental health co-morbidity in HIV-positive individuals: A public health assessment.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Monika; Wolvaardt, Gustaaf

    2016-12-01

    In South Africa, where it is estimated that more people have HIV than anywhere else in the world, HIV/AIDS and psychological disorder co-morbidity have been shown both to exacerbate the late diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders and to affect adherence to ARVs. Targeted, affordable and evidence-based strategies to reach these populations are essential. Against this backdrop, a pilot project and situational assessment aimed at determining the context of psychological care and HIV treatment services in South Africa was undertaken. The situational analysis consisted of individual interviews, a patient survey, and a retrospective medical record data review. Training and mentorship were conducted from 2011 to 2013 by the Foundation for Professional Development (FPD) in five anti-retroviral therapy (ART) clinics in the Tshwane-Metsweding area. Data were both descriptively and inferentially analysed. Outcomes indicate that the general structure of HIV services is well organised and well run in the sampled clinics. However, mental healthcare and HIV services need to be integrated further. There is also a need to develop and pilot-test appropriate materials and models for the delivery of mental healthcare within the parameters of affordability, acceptability and availability further, and to advocate the advancement of mental health and HIV treatment and policy integration.

  5. Chronically ill Canadians’ experiences of being unattached to a family doctor: a qualitative study of marginalized patients in British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Unattached patients do not have a regular primary care provider. Initiatives are being developed to increase attachment rates across Canada. Most existing attention paid to patient unattachment has focused on quantifying the problem and health system costs. Our purpose is to qualitatively identify the implications of chronically ill patients’ experiences of unattachment for health policy and planning to provide policy-relevant insights for Canadian attachment initiatives. Methods Three focus groups were conducted with marginalized chronically ill individuals residing in a mid-sized city in British Columbia who are unattached to a family doctor. We use the term marginalized as a descriptor to acknowledge that by virtue of their low socio-economic status and lack of attachment the participants are marginalized in Canada’s health care system Focus groups were structured as an open conversation organized around a series of probing questions. They were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was employed. Results Twenty-six individuals participated in the focus groups. The most common chronic illnesses reported were active drug addiction or recovery (and their associated symptoms), depression, arthritis, and hepatitis C. Participants identified life transitions as being the root cause for not having a family doctor. There was a strong sense that unsuccessful attempts to get a family doctor reflected that they were undesirable patients. Participants wanted to experience having a trusting relationship with a regular family doctor as they believed it would encourage greater honesty and transparency. One of the main health concerns regarding lack of access to a regular family doctor is that participants lacked access to preventative care. Participants were also concerned about having a discontinuous medical record due to unattachment. Conclusions Participants perceived that there are many benefits to be had by having attachment to a

  6. Metabolic co-morbidities revealed in patients with childhood-onset adult GH deficiency after cessation of GH replacement therapy for short stature.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Izumi; Hizuka, Naomi; Yasumoto, Kumiko; Morita, Junko; Kurimoto, Makiko; Takano, Kazue

    2008-12-01

    GH therapy was approved in 2006 for treatment of adult growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in Japan. Until then, GH was used only to treat short stature in children with GHD and the treatment was stopped when the final height was reached. In the present study, we investigated metabolic co-morbidities experienced by adults with childhood-onset (CO) GHD after the cessation of GH. Forty-two patients with COGHD (M/F 22/20, age at follow up when the retrospective analysis was carried out: 18-52 yr) treated with GH in childhood were studied. We reviewed the medical records of these patients to determine the metabolic co-morbidities that developed after cessation of GH. The median age was 19 yrs (range: 14-38) at cessation of GH, and the following co-morbidities were observed: hypertriglyceridemia in 15 (41%) patients, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in 11 (29%) patients, hypercholesterolemia in 10 (26%) patients, diabetes mellitus (DM) in 4 (10%) patients, and hypertension in 1 (2.4%) patient. The median BMI when these complications became overt was 23.5 kg/m(2) for those with hypertriglyceridemia, 26.0 kg/m(2) for those with NAFLD, 20.9 kg/m(2) for those with hypercholesterolemia, and 27.2 kg/m(2 ) for those with DM. More than two co-morbidities were experienced by 32% of men and 30% of women. In conclusion, adults with COGHD after the cessation of GH have multiple metabolic co-morbidities. Lifelong GH replacement might be important for improving the overall metabolic profiles in these patients.

  7. Day Care vs Overnight Stay after Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy even with Co-morbidity and a Possible Second Surgery: A Patient’s Choice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy (LC) has become the gold standard for symptomatic gall stone disease. It is being practiced as a day care procedure in healthy individuals in American Society of Anaesthesialogists (ASA) grade I and II. It is not yet established in presence of co-morbidity and when a second surgery is added. In most of the study, patient’s choice and the psycho-social factors were not considered in deciding the day care procedure. Aim To find the safety of LC and a second surgery as day care in presence of compensated co-morbidity. To study the choice of the patient whether to stay in hospital or go home after declaring them fit for day care. Materials and Methods All the patients of symptomatic cholelithiasis with co-morbidity and associations were evaluated and made uncompromising for elective surgery. All the LC were done at 8mmHg CO2 peumo-peritoneal pressure using harmonic scalpel as the energy source for dissection of gall bladder from the liver bed. Cases with conversion and placement of drain were excluded. Results A total of 1029 out of 1042 patients was included from Jan 2005 to Jan 2015. The age range was 38 to 91years (mean 44.65, SD 14.15). There were 634 females and 395 males. A total of 121(11.7%) of them had co-morbidity and associations. A total of 72(7%) had undergone a second surgery. Only 0.8% had real day care. A total of 95.7% had overnight stay even after fulfilling all the criteria. Only 0.2% needed re-admission in 30 days and one required intervention. Conclusion Patients like to stay over night in the hospital even if found fit for day care after LC. Overnight stay makes them happy, psycho-socially confident in developing nation and best suited for all patients including co-morbidity. PMID:27891393

  8. Caring for Individuals with Chronic Illness and Minor Depression: Latino Perceptions of Caregiver Burden.

    PubMed

    Corvin, Jaime; Chan, Isabella; Tezak, Ann; Carpenter, Kelly; Aguado Loi, Claudia; Gonzales, Junius; Hoare, Ismael

    2017-01-01

    Informal caregiving can be fundamental to disease management. Yet, the psychosocial, physical, and financial burden experienced by caregivers can be significant. In the US, Latinos experience increasing rates of chronic conditions, the highest uninsured rates in the country, and a growing dependence on informal caregivers. This article explores the impact of caregiving on caregivers of individuals with comorbid chronic disease and depression. Findings highlight the impact of caregiving on financial insecurity, balancing competing demands, increased emotional distress, and community supports. Findings support the inclusion of caregivers in disease management programs to enhance psychosocial outcomes for both caregivers and their patients.

  9. Discipline and the Chronically Ill Child: What Are the Management Strategies To Promote Positive Patient Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Rita C.

    This paper reviews various discipline models and applies them to obtaining cooperation and compliance with medical treatment of children with chronic and acute medical conditions, especially End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). The definition of Other Health Impairments in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act is cited and related to the…

  10. Subscales to the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale in Three Chronically Ill Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Peter N.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examines factors of anxiety in the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale in 150 asthma, tuberculosis, and chronic pain patients. Key cluster analysis revealed five clusters: restlessness, embarrassment, sensitivity, physiological anxiety, and self-confidence. Embarrassment is fairly dependent on the other factors. (JAC)

  11. Boundary Ambiguity in Parents with Chronically Ill Children: Integrating Theory and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berge, Jerica M.; Holm, Kristen E.

    2007-01-01

    This article integrates theory and research related to boundary ambiguity in parents of children with a chronic health condition. We propose that boundary ambiguity is a risk factor for psychological distress in these parents. Clinical applications and a case example highlight how boundary ambiguity can be assessed and managed in clinical settings…

  12. A classroom mind/body wellness intervention for older adults with chronic illness: comparing immediate and 1-year benefits.

    PubMed

    Rybarczyk, B; DeMarco, G; DeLaCruz, M; Lapidos, S; Fortner, B

    2001-01-01

    The authors tested the efficacy of a mind/body wellness intervention for older adults with chronic illness. They randomly assigned 243 physician-referred patients from an urban HMO to a classroom intervention or a wait-list control group. The intervention provided instruction on mind/body relationships; relaxation training; cognitive restructuring; problem-solving; communication; and behavioral treatment for insomnia, nutrition, and exercise. At posttreatment, the intervention group had significant decreases in self-reported sleep difficulties, pain, anxiety, and depression symptoms compared with controls. The intervention also led to a significant decrease in "chance" and "powerful others" health locus of control beliefs. At 1-year follow-up, the intervention group maintained benefits in sleep and health locus of control and also reported a significant increase in health behaviors compared with controls. Pain, anxiety, and depression benefits were not maintained. This type of classroom intervention appears to have some lasting effects on health behaviors and beliefs.

  13. Information and communication technology in supporting people with serious chronic illness living at home - an intervention study.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Carina; Ohman, Marja; Söderberg, Siv

    2006-01-01

    We studied the experiences of two people with serious chronic illness who used information and communication technology (ICT) to communicate with their district nurse. The study was a qualitative case study. The intervention was performed using an electronic messaging program. The program was accessible to any computer with an Internet connection. The programme consisted of different virtual rooms, where people could communicate using text messages. The participants used the program 2-4 times each week from the beginning of November 2003 to February 2004. Semistructured interviews were performed before, during and after the intervention and were analysed using thematic content analysis. The results showed that the participants' communication with the district nurse was improved because of easy accessibility and that they felt increased security. They also felt there were fewer limitations and that their everyday life was improved, which can also be seen as an improvement in care.

  14. Recent intimate partner violence among people with chronic mental illness: findings from a national cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Khalifeh, Hind; Oram, Sian; Trevillion, Kylee; Johnson, Sonia; Howard, Louise M.

    2015-01-01

    Background People with mental illness are at increased risk of intimate partner violence (IPV) victimisation, but little is known about their risk for different forms of IPV, related health impact and help-seeking. Aims To estimate the odds for past-year IPV, related impact and disclosure among people with and without pre-existing chronic mental illness (CMI). Method We analysed data from 23 222 adult participants in the 2010/2011 British Crime Survey using multivariate logistic regression. Results Past-year IPV was reported by 21% and 10% of women and men with CMI, respectively. The adjusted relative odds for emotional, physical and sexual IPV among women with versus without CMI were 2.8 (CI = 1.9–4.0), 2.6 (CI = 1.6–4.3) and 5.4 (CI = 2.4–11.9), respectively. People with CMI were more likely to attempt suicide as result of IPV (aOR = 5.4, CI = 2.3–12.9), less likely to seek help from informal networks (aOR = 0.5, CI = 0.3–0.8) and more likely to seek help exclusively from health professionals (aOR = 6.9, CI = 2.6–18.3) Conclusions People with CMI are not only at increased risk of all forms of IPV, but they are more likely to suffer subsequent ill health and to disclose exclusively to health professionals. Therefore, health professionals play a key role in addressing IPV in this population. PMID:26045349

  15. Adiponectin Potentially Contributes to the Antidepressive Effects of Baduanjin Qigong Exercise in Women With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Like Illness.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jessie S M; Li, Ang; Ng, Siu-Man; Ho, Rainbow T H; Xu, Aimin; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Wang, Xiao-Min; So, Kwok-Fai; Chan, Cecilia L W

    2017-03-13

    Our recent study demonstrates that adiponectin signaling plays a significant role in mediating physical exercise-exerted effects on hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepression in mice. Whether the findings can be translated to humans remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Baduanjin Qigong exercise on adiponectin and to evaluate whether adiponectin is involved in the antidepressive effects of Qigong exercise on chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)-like illness. This is a randomized, waitlist-controlled trial. One hundred eight female participants were randomly assigned to either Qigong exercise or waitlist groups. Sixteen 1.5-h Qigong lessons were conducted. Outcome measures were taken at three time points. Baseline adiponectin levels were negatively associated with body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist/hip ratio in women with CFS-like illness. Compared with the waitlist control, Qigong exercise significantly reduced anxiety and depression symptoms and significantly raised plasma adiponectin levels (median = 0.8 vs. -0.1, p < 0.05). More interestingly, increases in adiponectin levels following Qigong exercise were associated with decreases in depression scores for the Qigong group (r = -0.38, p = 0.04). Moreover, adjusted linear regression analysis further identified Qigong exercise and change in adiponectin levels as the significant factors accounting for reduction of depression symptoms. Baduanjin Qigong significantly increased adiponectin levels in females with CFS-like illness. Decreases in depression symptoms were associated with increases in adiponectin levels following Qigong exercise, indicating that the potential contribution of adiponectin to Qigong exercise elicited antidepressive effects in human subjects.

  16. Narcissistic rage: The Achilles' heel of the patient with chronic physical illness.

    PubMed

    Hyphantis, Thomas; Almyroudi, Augustina; Paika, Vassiliki; Goulia, Panagiota; Arvanitakis, Konstantinos

    2009-11-03

    Based on the psychoanalytic reading of Homer's Iliad whose principal theme is "Achilles' rage" (the semi-mortal hero invulnerable in all of his body except for his heel, hence "Achilles' heel" has come to mean a person's principal weakness), we aimed to assess whether "narcissistic rage" has an impact on several psychosocial variables in patients with severe physical illness across time. In 878 patients with cancer, rheumatological diseases, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and glaucoma, we assessed psychological distress (SCL-90 and GHQ-28), quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), interpersonal difficulties (IIP-40), hostility (HDHQ), and defense styles (DSQ). Narcissistic rage comprised DSQ "omnipotence" and HDHQ "extraverted hostility". Hierarchical multiple regressions analyses were performed. We showed that, in patients with disease duration less than one year, narcissistic rage had a minor impact on psychosocial variables studied, indicating that the rage was rather part of a "normal" mourning process. On the contrary, in patients with longer disease duration, increased rates of narcissistic rage had a great impact on all outcome variables, and the opposite was true for patients with low rates of narcissistic rage, indicating that narcissistic rage constitutes actually an "Achilles' Heel" for patients with long-term physical illness. These findings may have important clinical implications.

  17. Narcissistic rage: The Achilles’ heel of the patient with chronic physical illness

    PubMed Central

    Hyphantis, Thomas; Almyroudi, Augustina; Paika, Vassiliki; Goulia, Panagiota; Arvanitakis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    Based on the psychoanalytic reading of Homer’s Iliad whose principal theme is “Achilles’ rage” (the semi-mortal hero invulnerable in all of his body except for his heel, hence “Achilles’ heel” has come to mean a person’s principal weakness), we aimed to assess whether “narcissistic rage” has an impact on several psychosocial variables in patients with severe physical illness across time. In 878 patients with cancer, rheumatological diseases, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and glaucoma, we assessed psychological distress (SCL-90 and GHQ-28), quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), interpersonal difficulties (IIP-40), hostility (HDHQ), and defense styles (DSQ). Narcissistic rage comprised DSQ “omnipotence” and HDHQ “extraverted hostility”. Hierarchical multiple regressions analyses were performed. We showed that, in patients with disease duration less than one year, narcissistic rage had a minor impact on psychosocial variables studied, indicating that the rage was rather part of a “normal” mourning process. On the contrary, in patients with longer disease duration, increased rates of narcissistic rage had a great impact on all outcome variables, and the opposite was true for patients with low rates of narcissistic rage, indicating that narcissistic rage constitutes actually an “Achilles’ Heel” for patients with long-term physical illness. These findings may have important clinical implications. PMID:19936167

  18. The Australian Prevention Partnership Centre: systems thinking to prevent lifestyle-related chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew; Wutzke, Sonia; Overs, Marge

    2014-11-28

    Chronic diseases are the major cause of death in Australia and the biggest contributor to premature death and disability. Although prevention of chronic disease can be effective and cost-effective, it has proven difficult to systematically implement interventions that target important lifestyle-related risk factors for chronic disease such as poor nutrition, physical inactivity and harmful alcohol use. Prevention efforts targeting these lifestyle-related risk factors have had mixed success due to issues around designing and implementing effective interventions that address the complexity of risk factors, and incorporating evidence and implementing interventions at a scale, duration, intensity and quality required to achieve population effects. There is increasing recognition that multilevel, multisector approaches are required for the effective and sustained prevention of complex chronic disease. The Australian Prevention Partnership Centre, one of two National Health and Medical Research Council Partnership Centres established in 2013, is researching and developing systems perspectives to prevent lifestyle-related chronic disease in Australia. The Centre's collaborative approach is providing opportunities for researchers to work with policy makers and practitioners to develop research questions, conduct research, and analyse, interpret and disseminate the findings. As such, it is the model of interaction that is being tested as much as the specific projects. With its funding partners, the Centre has developed plans for more than 30 projects. It has also established four capacity units that will improve the gathering, sharing and use of evidence to build a prevention system in Australia. The Centre is exploring new ways to advance prevention by bringing together researchers, policy makers and practitioners to determine the information and actions needed for an effective prevention system for Australia.

  19. Exposure-response relationships between occupational exposures and chronic respiratory illness: a community-based study.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Christiani, D C; Dockery, D W; Wang, L

    1992-08-01

    Data from a random sample of 3,606 adults 40 to 69 yr of age residing in Beijing, China, were analyzed to investigate the association of reported occupational exposures to dusts and gases/fumes with the prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms and level of pulmonary function. The prevalence of occupational dust exposure was 32%, and gas or fume exposure, 19%. After we adjusted for age, sex, area of residence, smoking status, coal stove heating, and education, an increased prevalence of chronic phlegm and breathlessness was significantly related to both types of exposures. Chronic cough was significantly related only to dust exposure, and persistent wheeze only to fume exposure. The global estimates of the relative odds of the four symptoms were 1.30 (95% CI [confidence interval] 1.09 to 1.48) and 1.27 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.48), respectively, for dusts and for gases/fumes. These two occupational exposures are associated with chronic respiratory symptoms independent of smoking, gender, and each other. There was an increasing prevalence of each symptom with increasing dust and fume exposure, represented by the index of cumulative exposure duration and exposure intensity. Linear trends for increased prevalence of chronic bronchitis and breathlessness were significant for both exposures, while the linear trend for wheeze was only significant for gases/fumes. Among subjects who did not report using coal stove heating, dust exposure was a significant predictor for FEV1, FEV1/FVC, FEF25-75, and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR). There was also a significant decrease for FEV1 and FVC with increase of gas/fume exposure levels. Both current and former smokers appeared to be more susceptible to the effect of dusts than the never smokers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Social Networks, the ‘Work’ and Work Force of Chronic Illness Self-Management: A Survey Analysis of Personal Communities

    PubMed Central

    Vassilev, Ivaylo; Rogers, Anne; Blickem, Christian; Brooks, Helen; Kapadia, Dharmi; Kennedy, Anne; Sanders, Caroline; Kirk, Sue; Reeves, David

    2013-01-01

    Self-management support forms a central aspect of chronic Illness management nationally and globally. Evidence for the success of self-management support has mainly focussed on individually-centred outcomes of behavioural change. While it is recognised that social network members play an important role there is currently a gap in knowledge regarding who provides what type of support and under what circumstances. This is relevant for understanding the division of labour and the meeting of needs for those living with a long-term condition. We therefore took a network approach to explore self-management support conceptualising it as types of illness ‘work’ undertaken within peoples’ social networks. 300 people from deprived areas and with chronic illnesses took part in a survey conducted in 2010 in the North West of England. A concentric circles diagram was used as a research tool with which participants identified 2,544 network members who contributed to illness management. The results provide an articulation of how social network members are substantially involved in illness management. Whilst partners and close family make the highest contributions there is evidence of inputs from a wide range of relationships. Network member characteristics (type of relationship, proximity, frequency of contact) impact on the amount of illness work undertaken in peoples’ networks. In networks with ‘no partner’ other people tend to contribute more in the way of illness related work than in networks with a partner. This indicates a degree of substitutability between differently constituted networks, and that the level and type of input by different members of a network might change according to circumstances. A network perspective offers an opportunity to redress the balance of an exclusively individual focus on self-management because it addresses the broader set of contributions and resources available to people in need of chronic illness management and support. PMID

  1. Ethically justified guidelines for family planning interventions to prevent pregnancy in female patients with chronic mental illness.

    PubMed

    McCullough, L B; Coverdale, J; Bayer, T; Chervenak, F A

    1992-07-01

    On the basis of a review of the literature, ethical clinical guidelines for the prevention of pregnancy in women with chronic mental illness have been developed. Such women are characterized as having chronically and variably impaired autonomy in terms of their ability to make decisions about health care, including family planning. The overall strategy should be to restore impaired autonomy in health care decision making. The decision-making process involves 6 steps: 1) attending to information provided by the physician; 2) absorbing, retaining, and recalling this information; 3) cognitive understanding of the significance of the information for the woman and any potential offspring; 4) evaluation of these consequences; 5) expression of both cognitive and evaluative understanding; and 6) communication of a decision based on such understanding. Patients who can negotiate this process are capable of informed consent; those who cannot should be provided with interventions aimed at improving impaired aspects of decision making. Patients who are irreversibly near the thresholds for autonomous decision making can at least assent to medical care and should be presented with alternatives that are consistent with their values. More complex is the management of patients who are irreversibly below thresholds of autonomy in their decision-making abilities. In such cases, consideration must be given to the patient's interests (e.g.., whether pregnancy is likely to pose significant mental health and physical benefits or risks), risks to possible future children (genetic and social), and the social costs. In no case is it ethically justifiable to force the most impaired mentally ill woman to accept surgical sterilization.

  2. [Care of the chronically ill: strategic challenge, macro-management and health policies].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Picard, Patricia; Fuster-Culebras, Juli

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic diseases is increasing, with the patients who suffer from them having greater need for healthcare. This fact forces a redirection in the health system, currently focused on the acute diseases, to achieve an efficient care. For this reason, it is necessary to work at all levels, starting with political decisions. These decisions should be based on the technical and scientific evidence available. Health planning is essential to establish care strategies, defining the actions to ensure the coordination and continuity of care, and also the redefinition of professional roles, where primary care nurses assume more competencies, becoming key professionals in the care of the chronic patient. The new model should include the professionalization of the management of health services. Information and communication technologies will play an important role in the development of strategies, but considering them as the tools that they are, allowing for the patient to be the focus of attention, and ensuring the privacy and the confidentiality.

  3. An 'overwhelming illness': women's experiences of learning to live with chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Catherine R; Thompson, Andrew R; Blair, Alan

    2007-03-01

    The processes through which people learn to live with CFS/ME are poorly understood and have not been rigorously explored within the literature. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight women and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Participants initially described being 'overwhelmed' by CFS/ME. Attempts at seeking help were unsatisfactory and participants described feeling let down and disbelieved. Participants reacted to this by identifying types of 'self-help' and assertively taking more responsibility for their illness and its treatment. Acquiring social support and greater knowledge were key mediating factors in the emergence of control and acceptance. The relevance of the themes to existing research and the implications for clinical practice are considered.

  4. The Impact of Intragastric Balloons on Obesity-Related Co-Morbidities: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Popov, Violeta B; Ou, Amy; Schulman, Allison R; Thompson, Christopher C

    2017-03-01

    ObjectivesTherapies less invasive than surgery and more effective than lifestyle and pharmacotherapy are needed to contend with the obesity epidemic. Intragastric balloons (IGBs) are a minimally invasive endoscopic weight loss method recently approved for use in the US. The purpose of the study is to assess the effect of IGBs on metabolic outcomes associated with obesity.MethodsMEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Database were searched through July 2016. Dual extraction and quality assessment of studies using Cochrane risk of bias tool were performed independently by two authors. Primary outcomes included the change from baseline in metabolic parameters. Secondary outcomes included resolution and/or improvement in metabolic co-morbidities and association with baseline parameters.Results10 randomized controlled trials (RCT) and 30 observational studies including 5,668 subjects were analyzed. There was moderate-quality evidence for improvement in most metabolic parameters in subjects assigned to IGB therapy as compared to conventional non-surgical therapy in RCTs: mean difference (MD) in fasting glucose change: -12.7 mg/dl (95% confidence interval (CI) -21.5, -4); MD in triglycerides: -19 mg/dl (95% CI -42, 3.5); MD in waist circumference: -4.1 cm (95% CI -6.9, -1.4); MD in diastolic blood pressure: -2.9 mm Hg (95% CI -4.1, -1.8). The odds ratio for diabetes resolution after IGB therapy was 1.4 (95% CI 1.3, 1.6). The rate of serious adverse events was 1.3%.ConclusionsIGBs are more effective than diet in improving obesity-related metabolic risk factors with a low rate of adverse effects, however the strength of the evidence is limited given the small number of participants and lack of long-term follow-up.

  5. Is Dysregulation of the HPA-Axis a Core Pathophysiology Mediating Co-Morbid Depression in Neurodegenerative Diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xin; Pang, Terence Y.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of prodromal manifestation of neuropsychiatric symptoms in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD). These affective symptoms may be observed many years before the core diagnostic symptoms of the neurological condition. It is becoming more apparent that depression is a significant modifying factor of the trajectory of disease progression and even treatment outcomes. It is therefore crucial that we understand the potential pathophysiologies related to the primary condition, which could contribute to the development of depression. The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA)-axis is a key neuroendocrine signaling system involved in physiological homeostasis and stress response. Disturbances of this system lead to severe hormonal imbalances, and the majority of such patients also present with behavioral deficits and/or mood disorders. Dysregulation of the HPA-axis is also strongly implicated in the pathology of major depressive disorder. Consistent with this, antidepressant drugs, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been shown to alter HPA-axis activity. In this review, we will summarize the current state of knowledge regarding HPA-axis pathology in Alzheimer’s, PD and HD, differentiating between prodromal and later stages of disease progression when evidence is available. Both clinical and preclinical evidence will be examined, but we highlight animal model studies as being particularly useful for uncovering novel mechanisms of pathology related to co-morbid mood disorders. Finally, we purpose utilizing the preclinical evidence to better inform prospective, intervention studies. PMID:25806005

  6. Effects of qigong exercise on fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome-like illness: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jessie S M; Ho, Rainbow T H; Wang, Chong-Wen; Yuen, Lai Ping; Sham, Jonathan S T; Chan, Cecilia L W

    2013-01-01

    Background. Anxiety/depressive symptoms are common in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome- (CFS-) like illness. Qigong as a modality of complementary and alternative therapy has been increasingly applied by patients with chronic illnesses, but little is known about the effect of Qigong on anxiety/depressive symptoms of the patients with CFS-like illness. Purpose. To investigate the effects of Qigong on fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in patients with CFS-illness. Methods. One hundred and thirty-seven participants who met the diagnostic criteria for CFS-like illness were randomly assigned to either an intervention group or a waitlist control group. Participants in the intervention group received 10 sessions of Qigong training twice a week for 5 consecutive weeks, followed by home-based practice for 12 weeks. Fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms were assessed at baseline and postintervention. Results. Total fatigue score [F(1,135) = 13.888, P < 0.001], physical fatigue score [F(1,135) = 20.852, P < 0.001] and depression score [F(1,135) = 9.918, P = 0.002] were significantly improved and mental fatigue score [F(1,135) = 3.902, P = 0.050] was marginally significantly improved in the Qigong group compared to controls. The anxiety score was not significantly improved in the Qigong group. Conclusion. Qigong may not only reduce the fatigue symptoms, but also has antidepressive effect for patients with CFS-like illness. Trial registration HKCTR-1200.

  7. Is non-thyroidal illness syndrome a predictor for prolonged weaning in intubated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients?

    PubMed Central

    Yasar, Zehra; Kirakli, Cenk; Cimen, Pınar; Ucar, Zeynep Zeren; Talay, Fahrettin; Tibet, Gultekin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is considered to be associated with adverse outcomes in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. In this study, we evaluated the association between NTIS and prolonged weaning in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients admitted to the ICU. Materials and methods: In total, 125 patients with COPD admitted to our ICU who underwent invasive mechanical ventilation (MV) were enrolled. We collected each patient’s baseline characteristics including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, body mass index (BMI), and thyroid hormones 24 h after ICU admission. The presence of pulmonary infection was also recorded. The primary outcome was prolonged weaning, defined as patients who failed at least three weaning attempts or required > 7 days of weaning after the first spontaneous breathing trial. Results: Of the 127 patients studied, 64 had normal thyroid function tests and 61 had NTIS. Patients with NTIS had significantly higher APACHE II scores, prolonged weaning, and pulmonary infection. Patients with NTIS had a higher risk for prolonged weaning (odds ratio, OR = 3.21; 95% CI = 1.31-7.83).The presence of pulmonary infection was also an independent risk factors for prolonged weaning. Conclusions: NTIS may be an independent predictor for prolonged weaning in intubated COPD patients. PMID:26309710

  8. Better Health, Less Spending: Redesigning the Transition From Pediatric to Adult Healthcare for Youth with Chronic Illness

    PubMed Central

    Vaks, Yana; Bensen, Rachel; Steidtmann, Dana; Wang, Thomas D.; Platchek, Terry S.; Zulman, Donna M.; Malcolm, Elizabeth; Milstein, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with serious chronic illnesses face costly and dangerous gaps in care as they transition from pediatric to adult health systems. New, financially sustainable approaches to transition are needed to close these gaps. We designed a new transition model for adolescents and young adults with a variety of serious chronic conditions. Our explicit goal was to build a model that would improve the value of care for youth 15–25 years of age undergoing this transition. The design process incorporated a review, analysis, and synthesis of relevant clinical and health services research; stakeholder interviews; and observations of high-performing healthcare systems. We identified three major categories of solutions for a safer and lower cost transition to adult care: (1) Building and supporting self-management during the critical transition; (2) Engaging receiving care; and (3) Providing checklist-driven guide services during the transition. We propose that implementation of a program with these interventions would have a positive impact on all three domains of the triple aim – improving health, improving the experience of care, and reducing per capita healthcare cost. The transition model provides a general framework as well as suggestions for specific interventions. Pilot tests to assess the model’s ease of implementation, clinical effects, and financial impact are currently underway. PMID:27001100

  9. Community Care of the Chronically Mentally Ill. Proceedings of the Robert Lee Sutherland Seminar in Mental Health (6th, Austin, TX, September 30-October 1, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonjean, Charles M., Ed.; And Others

    This volume presents the proceedings of a seminar concerned with community care for the chronically mentally ill. After an introductory overview by Ira Iscoe, the first section consists of the following major addresses, presentations, and commissioned papers: (1) "The Community as the Primary Locus of Care for Persons with Serious Long-Term…

  10. A Virtual Learning Environment for the Continuation of Education and Its Relationship with the Mental Well-Being of Chronically Ill Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Chang; Van Winkel, Lies

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that the continuation of education by chronically ill adolescents is an important way to avoid social isolation, psychosocial problems and the accumulation of learning difficulties. In this light, virtual learning environments (VLEs), which connect sick adolescents to their schools, play an important role in ensuring that the…

  11. National Respite Guidelines: Respite Services for Families of Children with Disabilities, Chronic and Terminal Illnesses, and Children at Risk of Abuse or Neglect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, Maggie; Uhl, Monica

    These guidelines are intended to assist states and local communities in developing quality respite services that meet the diverse needs of families and children with disabilities, with chronic and terminal illnesses, or at risk of abuse or neglect. The guidelines support the philosophy that all families can benefit from temporary intervals of rest…

  12. Modern Models of Psychosocial Adaptation to Chronic Illness and Disability as Viewed through the Prism of Lewin's Field Theory: A Comparative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livneh, Hanoch; Bishop, Malachy; Anctil, Tina M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we describe how four recent models of psychosocial adaptation to chronic illness and disability (CID) could be fruitfully conceptualized and compared by resorting to the general framework of Lewin's field theory--a theory frequently regarded as a precursor and the primary impetus to the development of the field of…

  13. Assessment of Chronic Illness Care with the German version of the ACIC in different primary care settings in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Switzerland the extent to which patients with chronic illnesses receive care congruent with the Chronic Care Model (CCM) is unknown. Methods According to guidelines we translated the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (ACIC) into German (G-ACIC). We tested the instrument in different primary care settings and compared subscales with the original testing. Results Difficulties encountered during the translation process consisted in the difference of health care settings in Switzerland and USA. However initial testing showed the G-ACIC to be a suitable instrument. The average ACIC subscale scores in Swiss managed care (MC)-, group (GP)- and single handed practices (SP) were higher for MC practices than for group- and single handed practices: Organization of the healthcare delivery system: MC mean (m) = 6.80 (SD 1.55), GP m = 5.42 (SD 0.99), SP m = 4.60 (SD 2.07); community linkages: MC m = 4.19 (SD 1.47), GP m = 4.83 (SD 1.81), SP m = 3.10 (SD 2.12); self-management support: MC m = 4.96 (SD 1.13), GP m = 4.73 (SD 1.40), SP m = 4.43 (SD 1.34); decision support: MC m = 4.75 (SD 1.06); GP m = 4.20 (SD 0.87), SP m = 3.25 (SD 1.59); delivery system design: MC m = 5.98 (SD 1.61), GP m = 5.05 (SD 2.05), SP m = 3.86 (SD 1.51) and clinical information systems: MC m = 4.34 (SD = 2.49), GP m = 2.06 (SD 1.35), SP m = 3.20 (SD 1.57). Conclusions The G-ACIC is applicable and useful for comparing different health care settings in German speaking countries. Managed care organizations seem to implement the different components of the CCM in a greater extend than group and single handed practices. However, much room exists for further improvement. PMID:20979632

  14. Chronic Illness and Disordered Eating: A Discussion of the Literature12

    PubMed Central

    Quick, Virginia M.; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the prevalence of eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors, the reasons why these practices are endorsed, and the potential consequences in youths and young adults with selected diet-related chronic health conditions (DRCHCs) and provides recommendations for eating disorder prevention interventions and research efforts. Although it remains unclear whether the prevalence of eating disorders is higher in those with DRCHCs compared with the general population, overall findings suggest that young people with DRCHCs may be at risk of endorsing disordered eating behaviors that may lead to diagnosis of an eating disorder and other health problems over the course of their treatment. Thus, health care providers should be aware that young people with DRCHCs may be at risk of eating disorders and carefully monitor psychological changes and the use of unhealthy weight control methods. It is also important to develop and evaluate theory-based interventions and disease-specific eating disorder risk screening tools that are effective in halting the progression of eating disorders and negative health outcomes in young people with chronic health conditions. PMID:23674793

  15. Effect of a computer-based intervention on social support for chronically ill rural women.

    PubMed

    Hill, Wade; Schillo, Leah; Weinert, Clarann

    2004-01-01

    Social support is a key factor in illness management. Despite the positive effects of support groups, there are barriers to participation by rural dwellers in face-to-face groups. To address these barriers, a computer-based support group intervention, the Women to Women Project, was designed to provide peer support and health information through a computer-based intervention. Data from three groups (intervention, information, comparison) of woman who participated in the program were analyzed. The pattern of improvement in social support was in the anticipated direction, but not significant in the main analysis. Exploratory analysis was conducted on a vulnerable subsample of women reporting low social support and high psychosocial distress. Results suggest that improvement in social support, based on the intervention, was greater for the vulnerable subsample as compared with the sample as a whole. An effective and efficient means of providing social support and facilitating the mobilization of this support is through self-help groups; this study demonstrates that virtual support groups can increase perceived social support.

  16. Interferon-gamma deficiency modifies the motor and co-morbid behavioral pathology and neurochemical changes provoked by the pesticide paraquat.

    PubMed

    Litteljohn, D; Mangano, E; Shukla, N; Hayley, S

    2009-12-29

    In addition to nigrostriatal pathology and corresponding motor disturbances, Parkinson's disease (PD) is often characterized by co-morbid neuropsychiatric symptoms, most notably anxiety and depression. Separate lines of evidence indicate that inflammatory processes associated with microglial activation and cytokine release may be fundamental to the progression of both PD and its co-morbid psychiatric pathology. Accordingly, we assessed the contribution of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), to a range of PD-like pathology provoked by the ecologically relevant herbicide and dopamine (DA) toxin, paraquat. To this end, paraquat provoked overt motor impairment (reduced home-cage activity and impaired vertical climbing) and signs of anxiety-like behavior (reduced open field exploration) in wild-type but not IFN-gamma-deficient mice. Correspondingly, paraquat promoted somewhat divergent variations in neurochemical activity among wild-type and IFN-gamma null mice at brain sites important for both motor (striatum) and co-morbid affective pathologies (dorsal hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, and locus coeruleus). Specifically, the herbicide provoked a dosing regimen-dependent reduction in striatal DA levels that was prevented by IFN-gamma deficiency. In addition, the herbicide influenced serotonergic and noradrenergic activity within the dorsal hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex; and elevated noradrenergic activity within the locus coeruleus. Although genetic ablation of IFN-gamma had relatively few effects on monoamine variations within the locus coeruleus and prefrontal cortex, loss of the pro-inflammatory cytokine did normalize the paraquat-induced noradrenergic alterations within the hippocampus. These findings further elucidate the functional implications of paraquat intoxication and suggest an important role for IFN-gamma in the striatal and motor pathology, as well as the co-morbid behavioral and hippocampal changes induced by

  17. A system of evidenced-based techniques and collaborative clinical interventions with a chronically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Fallon, Patricia; Wisniewski, Lucene

    2013-07-01

    Although evidence-based treatments (EBTs) exist for both bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder, there is far less evidence underpinning the treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN). Furthermore, there is no clearly defined standardized approach to patients who have not responded to treatment over an extended period of time. Chronic eating disorder patients in particular might need long-term engagement with treatment providers offering a wide range of interventions. This case study highlights how an experienced private practitioner systematically employed a variety of EBT techniques for a patient with a severe, long-term eating disorder and its comorbidities, within a model of attachment and collaboration. The practice of utilizing a wide variety of EBT techniques in a systematic manner guided by clinical expertise and supported by a therapy relationship of collaboration and attachment may prove to be a fruitful avenue for future research.

  18. Social living mitigates the costs of a chronic illness in a cooperative carnivore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almberg, Emily S.; Cross, Paul C.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Smith, Douglas W.; Metz, Matthew C; Stahler, Daniel R.; Hudson, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Infection risk is assumed to increase with social group size, and thus be a cost of group living. We assess infection risk and costs with respect to group size using data from an epidemic of sarcoptic mange (Sarcoptes scabiei) among grey wolves (Canis lupus). We demonstrate that group size does not predict infection risk and that individual costs of infection, in terms of reduced survival, can be entirely offset by having sufficient numbers of pack-mates. Infected individuals experience increased mortality hazards with increasing proportions of infected pack-mates, but healthy individuals remain unaffected. The social support of group hunting and territory defence are two possible mechanisms mediating infection costs. This is likely a common phenomenon among other social species and chronic infections, but difficult to detect in systems where infection status cannot be measured continuously over time.

  19. Social living mitigates the costs of a chronic illness in a cooperative carnivore.

    PubMed

    Almberg, E S; Cross, P C; Dobson, A P; Smith, D W; Metz, M C; Stahler, D R; Hudson, P J

    2015-07-01

    Infection risk is assumed to increase with social group size, and thus be a cost of group living. We assess infection risk and costs with respect to group size using data from an epidemic of sarcoptic mange (Sarcoptes scabiei) among grey wolves (Canis lupus). We demonstrate that group size does not predict infection risk and that individual costs of infection, in terms of reduced survival, can be entirely offset by having sufficient numbers of pack-mates. Infected individuals experience increased mortality hazards with increasing proportions of infected pack-mates, but healthy individuals remain unaffected. The social support of group hunting and territory defence are two possible mechanisms mediating infection costs. This is likely a common phenomenon among other social species and chronic infections, but difficult to detect in systems where infection status cannot be measured continuously over time.

  20. Social living mitigates the costs of a chronic illness in a cooperative carnivore

    PubMed Central

    Almberg, E S; Cross, P C; Dobson, A P; Smith, D W; Metz, M C; Stahler, D R; Hudson, P J; Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Infection risk is assumed to increase with social group size, and thus be a cost of group living. We assess infection risk and costs with respect to group size using data from an epidemic of sarcoptic mange (Sarcoptes scabiei) among grey wolves (Canis lupus). We demonstrate that group size does not predict infection risk and that individual costs of infection, in terms of reduced survival, can be entirely offset by having sufficient numbers of pack-mates. Infected individuals experience increased mortality hazards with increasing proportions of infected pack-mates, but healthy individuals remain unaffected. The social support of group hunting and territory defence are two possible mechanisms mediating infection costs. This is likely a common phenomenon among other social species and chronic infections, but difficult to detect in systems where infection status cannot be measured continuously over time. PMID:25983011

  1. Improving care planning and coordination for service users with medical co-morbidity transitioning between tertiary medical and primary care services.

    PubMed

    Cranwell, K; Polacsek, M; McCann, T V

    2016-08-08

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Mental health service users with medical co-morbidity frequently experience difficulties accessing and receiving appropriate treatment in emergency departments. Service users frequently experience fragmented care planning and coordinating between tertiary medical and primary care services. Little is known about mental health nurses' perspectives about how to address these problems. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Emergency department clinicians' poor communication and negative attitudes have adverse effects on service users and the quality of care they receive. The findings contribute to the international evidence about mental health nurses' perspectives of service users feeling confused and frustrated in this situation, and improving coordination and continuity of care, facilitating transitions and increasing family and caregiver participation. Intervention studies are needed to evaluate if adoption of these measures leads to sustainable improvements in care planning and coordination, and how service users with medical co-morbidity are treated in emergency departments in particular. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Effective planning and coordination of care are essential to enable smooth transitions between tertiary medical (emergency departments in particular) and primary care services for service users with medical co-morbidity. Ongoing professional development education and support is needed for emergency department clinicians. There is also a need to develop an organized and systemic approach to improving service users' experience in emergency departments.

  2. Impact of co-morbid attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder on cognitive function in male children with Tourette syndrome: A controlled study.

    PubMed

    Termine, Cristiano; Luoni, Chiara; Fontolan, Stefania; Selvini, Claudia; Perego, Livia; Pavone, Francesca; Rossi, Giorgio; Balottin, Umberto; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2016-09-30

    Tourette syndrome (TS) and attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are co-morbid neurodevelopmental conditions affecting more commonly male patients. We set out to determine the impact of co-morbid ADHD on cognitive function in male children with TS by conducting a controlled study. Participants included four matched groups of unmedicated children (age range 6-15 years): TS (n=13), TS+ADHD (n=8), ADHD (n=39), healthy controls (n=66). Following clinical assessment, each participant completed a battery of tests from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III, the Italian Battery for ADHD, the Tower of London test, the Corsi test, and the Digit Span test. All patient groups reported significantly lower scores than healthy controls across the neuropsychological tests involving executive functions. The TS+ADHD group was the most severely affected, followed by the ADHD group and the TS group, particularly in the tests assessing planning ability, inhibitory function, working memory and visual attention, but not auditory attention. Problems in executive functions are more common in patients with neurodevelopmental disorders than controls. Deficits in planning ability, inhibitory function, working memory and visual attention reported by children with TS appear to be more strongly related to the presence of co-morbid ADHD symptoms than core TS symptoms.

  3. The Cost-Effectiveness of Independent Housing for the Chronically Mentally Ill: Do Housing and Neighborhood Features Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, Joseph; Newman, Sandra J; Salkever, David

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of housing and neighborhood features on residential instability and the costs of mental health services for individuals with chronic mental illness (CMI). Data Sources Medicaid and service provider data on the mental health service utilization of 670 individuals with CMI between 1988 and 1993 were combined with primary data on housing attributes and costs, as well as census data on neighborhood characteristics. Study participants were living in independent housing units developed under the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Program on Chronic Mental Illness in four of nine demonstration cities between 1988 and 1993. Study Design Participants were assigned on a first-come, first-served basis to housing units as they became available for occupancy after renovation by the housing providers. Multivariate statistical models are used to examine the relationship between features of the residential environment and three outcomes that were measured during the participant's occupancy in a study property: residential instability, community-based service costs, and hospital-based service costs. To assess cost-effectiveness, the mental health care cost savings associated with some residential features are compared with the cost of providing housing with these features. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Health service utilization data were obtained from Medicaid and from state and local departments of mental health. Non-mental-health services, substance abuse services, and pharmaceuticals were screened out. Principal Findings Study participants living in newer and properly maintained buildings had lower mental health care costs and residential instability. Buildings with a richer set of amenity features, neighborhoods with no outward signs of physical deterioration, and neighborhoods with newer housing stock were also associated with reduced mental health care costs. Study participants were more residentially stable in buildings with fewer units

  4. Chronic Diseases, Health Behaviors, and Demographic Characteristics as Predictors of Ill Health Retirement: Findings from the Korea Health Panel Survey (2008–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Young Joong; Kang, Mo-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The research aim was to identify demographic characteristics, chronic diseases, and unhealthy behaviors predicting ill health retirement in South Korea. Methods Data were collected from 15,407 individuals enrolled in the first through the fifth phases of the Korea Health Panel Survey (2008–2012) using structured questionnaires examining retirement, morbidities, and health-related behaviors. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to examine demographic and clinical characteristics’ effects on ill health retirement. Lost years of working life expectancy were calculated for demographic and clinical characteristics. Results Older, female, and manual workers were more likely to experience ill health retirement, as were respondents reporting poor health-related habits (e.g., heavy drinking, irregular meals, less sleep hours, obesity, and no regular exercise). The chronic diseases most closely associated with ill health retirement were, in order, psychiatric disease, ophthalmologic disease, neurologic disease, infectious disease, and musculoskeletal diseases. The average reduction in working life expectancy was 9.73 years. Conclusions Our study results can help contribute to the development of strategies for reducing the risk of ill health retirement and promoting sustainable labor force participation in an aging society. PMID:27930661

  5. A course on the transition to adult care of patients with childhood-onset chronic illnesses.

    PubMed

    Hagood, James S; Lenker, Claire V; Thrasher, Staci

    2005-04-01

    Children with special health care needs born today have a 90% chance of surviving into adulthood, making their transition to adult systems of care an issue that will affect almost all physicians. However, many adult generalists and specialists are not familiar with the management of chronic diseases that begin in childhood. While the public health system has made transition to appropriate adult care a priority, and many specialty organizations have endorsed this concept, there are no published studies addressing how the concept of transition can be taught to medical students or residents. The authors describe a one-week course for medical students, begun in 2001 at their institution, that addresses the transition for youth with special health care needs, emphasizing patient and family-centered care, cultural competence, and decision making in end-of-life issues. Cystic fibrosis, a common genetic disease with increasing life expectancy, is used as the model for the course. Involvement of interdisciplinary faculty, interviews with youth with special health care needs and family caregivers, readings from academic and nonacademic literature, and group discussions are presented as teaching methods. Key insights based on experience with the course are the need to include the voices of patients and families, the use of faculty from various professions and specialties to model interdisciplinary care, and the insight that problems specific to transition offer into contemporary health care financing. Future studies should measure the impact of such courses on students' knowledge of transition issues, and determine essential information required for physicians in practice.

  6. Functional assessment of chronic illness therapy—the fatigue scale exhibits stronger associations with clinical parameters in chronic dialysis patients compared to other fatigue-assessing instruments

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Huang, Jenq-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have a high symptom burden, among which fatigue is highly prevalent. Many fatigue-assessing instruments exist, but comparisons among instruments in this patient population have yet to be investigated. Methods. ESRD patients under chronic hemodialysis were prospectively enrolled and seven types of fatigue instruments were administered: Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Fatigue (FACIT-F), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), Lee Fatigue Scale (LFS), Fatigue Questionnaire (FQ), Fatigue Symptom Inventory (FSI), and Short-Form 36-Vitality (SF36-V). Using these instruments, we investigated the correlation between fatigue severity and clinical/biochemical parameters, including demographic/comorbidity profile, dialysis-related complications, and frailty severity. We used regression analysis with serum albumin and frailty severity as the dependent variables to investigate the independent correlations. Results. A total of 46 ESRD patients were enrolled (average age of 67 ± 11.6 years), and 50% of them had type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results from the seven tested instruments showed high correlation with each other. We found that the fatigue severity by FACIT-F was significantly associated with age (p = 0.03), serum albumin (p = 0.003) and creatinine (p = 0.02) levels, while SF36-V scores were also significantly associated with age (p = 0.02) and serum creatinine levels (p = 0.04). However, the fatigue severity measured by the FSS, FSI, FQ, BFI, and LFS did not exhibit these associations. Moreover, regression analysis showed that only FACIT-F scores were independently associated with serum albumin levels and frailty severity in ESRD patients. Conclusion. Among the seven fatigue-assessing instruments, only the FACIT-F yielded results that demonstrated significant and independent associations with important outcome-related features in ESRD patients. PMID:26998414

  7. Occupational history, self reported chronic illness, and mortality: a follow up of 25,586 Swedish men and women.

    PubMed Central

    Ostlin, P

    1990-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim of the study was to analyse the extent to which mortality can be predicted from data on self assessed chronic illness. DESIGN--The study used data obtained from ongoing surveys of living conditions conducted by Statistics Sweden using annual interviews of cohorts of about 8000 people. SETTING--The study was a population based survey of the whole of Sweden. PARTICIPANTS--The analysis involved a group of 25,586 respondents (males 12,812, females 12,774), aged 25-74 years, interviewed in 1977 and 1979-81. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS--Mortality and occupational health selection were analysed in different occupational categories. The association between mortality and self reported morbidity was assessed. Level of physical strain at work was associated with mortality in men. Occupational health selection could be detected for men but not for women when mortality from all causes was investigated. Self assessment of health predicted mortality. CONCLUSIONS--Subjective assessments of health through surveys are valuable as predictors of mortality for both men and women. PMID:2348141

  8. Health-related quality of life in adolescents with chronic physical illness in northern Russia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health related quality of life (HRQoL) is an important subjectively evaluated outcome of adolescents physical, mental, and social functioning. It gives us the possibility to assess the disease impact on life of adolescents, and to sort out target groups of adolescents for future psychological interventions. The objective of this cross-sectional survey was to study HRQoL in 173 adolescents with chronic physical illness (CPI - diabetes, asthma, and epilepsy), and to find HRQoL predictors in each disease group. Methods Disease-specific questionnaires were completed by each adolescent recruited from the local outpatient clinic; mothers answered the questions on socioeconomic status (SES); and the patients’ clinicians evaluated the severity of the disease. Results A high proportion of adolescents in each disease specific sample reported moderate to high levels of HRQoL. Gender was the most prominent predictor of HRQoL in all three studied groups, while disease severity predicted HRQoL in the diabetic group and to some extent in the asthma group. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that adolescents with diabetes, asthma, and epilepsy in northern Russia maintain relatively moderate to high levels of HRQoL. The domains affecting HRQoL were related to both disease-specific (severity) and non-disease factors (gender and SES). Our study suggests that future psychosocial interventions should focus on aspects of CPI impacting adolescents in gendered ways, furthermore taking into account disease specific factors. PMID:24460738

  9. Retinal imaging as a source of biomarkers for diagnosis, characterization and prognosis of chronic illness or long-term conditions

    PubMed Central

    Trucco, E; Cameron, J R; Dhillon, B; Houston, J G; van Beek, E J R

    2014-01-01

    The black void behind the pupil was optically impenetrable before the invention of the ophthalmoscope by von Helmholtz over 150 years ago. Advances in retinal imaging and image processing, especially over the past decade, have opened a route to another unexplored landscape, the retinal neurovascular architecture and the retinal ganglion pathways linking to the central nervous system beyond. Exploiting these research opportunities requires multidisciplinary teams to explore the interface sitting at the border between ophthalmology, neurology and computing science. It is from the detail and depth of retinal phenotyping that novel metrics and candidate biomarkers are likely to emerge. Confirmation that in vivo retinal neurovascular measures are predictive of microvascular change in the brain and other organs is likely to be a major area of research activity over the next decade. Unlocking this hidden potential within the retina requires integration of structural and functional data sets, that is, multimodal mapping and longitudinal studies spanning the natural history of the disease process. And with further advances in imaging, it is likely that this area of retinal research will remain active and clinically relevant for many years to come. Accordingly, this review looks at state-of-the-art retinal imaging and its application to diagnosis, characterization and prognosis of chronic illness or long-term conditions. PMID:24936979

  10. Technologically-assisted behaviour change: a systematic review of studies of novel technologies for the management of chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Rosser, Benjamin A; Vowles, Kevin E; Keogh, Edmund; Eccleston, Christopher; Mountain, Gail A

    2009-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to investigate the use of technology in achieving behaviour change in chronic illness. The areas reviewed were: (1) methods employed to adapt traditional therapy from a face-to-face medium to a computer-assisted platform; (2) targets of behaviour change; and (3) level of human (e.g. therapist) involvement. The initial literature search produced 2032 articles. A total of 45 articles reporting 33 separate interventions met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were reviewed in detail. The majority of interventions reported a theoretical basis, with many arising from a cognitive-behavioural framework. There was a wide range of therapy content. Therapist involvement was reported in 73% of the interventions. A common problem was high participant attrition, which may have been related to reduced levels of human interaction. Instigating successful behaviour change through technological interventions poses many difficulties. However, there are potential benefits of delivering therapy in this way. For people with long-term health conditions, technological self-management systems could provide a practical method of understanding and monitoring their condition, as well as therapeutic guidance to alter maladaptive behaviour.

  11. [Empowerment and power: their relationship in the proces of caring for the chronically ill in primary care].

    PubMed

    Riba Bellera, Lydia; Boixadera Vendrell, Mireia; Buendía Surroca, Carmen; Martorell Poveda, Maria Antònia; Piñeiro Méndez, Pilar; Zamora Sánchez, Juan José

    2014-06-01

    The concepts of "power" and "empowerment" are used in various disciplines, both political and social. Now are these terms frequently in the field of health. Our goal is to know its meaning as a synonym of expressions: "energy", "force", "domain", "vigour", "power", "capacity", "authority" and "control", which have been always within our practice nurse's own lexicon. Semantically analyzing them will help us in the understanding of its nuance. The literature review facilitates their understanding and allows us to link these words within the management of care. In this way we can propose diagnoses, interventions and outcomes specifically related to these concepts, which will help us optimize the efficiency in the management of care plans. The purpose of various collective nurses from different institutions is that the person is able to not generate dependencies and have the option of choosing your own lifestyle according to their culture and environment, independently or with the help. Generate knowledge is to generate power. The person should be educated and informed, to be expert and active and taking action to help control and minimize the progression of your health problem chronic and its possible complications. We are in the process of reformulation of the health system, whether it is private or public, and is necessary to know the power of the various actors involved in the management of the care to us. Each of these main actors--person ill, family/caregiver or nurse--has to know what is his role in this process.

  12. Improving Communication About Serious Illness

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-07

    Critical Illness; Chronic Disease; Terminal Care; Palliative Care; Communication; Advance Care Planning; Neoplasm Metastasis; Lung Neoplasms; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive; Heart Failure; End Stage Liver Disease; Kidney Failure, Chronic

  13. Implementation and effectiveness of 'care navigation', coordinated management for people with complex chronic illness: rationale and methods of a randomised controlled

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic illness is a significant driver of the global burden of disease and associated health care costs. People living with severe chronic illness are heavy users of acute hospital services; better coordination of their care could potentially improve health outcomes while reducing hospital use. The Care Navigation trial will evaluate an in-hospital coordinated care intervention on health service use and quality of life in chronically ill patients. Methods/Design A randomised controlled trial in 500 chronically ill patients presenting to the emergency department of a hospital in Western Sydney, Australia. Participants have three or more hospital admissions within a previous 12 month period and either aged ≥70 years; or aged ≥45 years and of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent; or aged ≥ 16 with a diagnosis of a respiratory or cardiology related illness. Patients are randomised to either the coordinated care program (Care Navigation), or to usual care. The Care Navigation program consists of dedicated nurses who conduct patient risk assessments, oversee patient nursing while in hospital, and guide development of a care plan for the management of chronic illness after being discharged from hospital. These nurses also book community appointments and liaise with general practitioners. The main outcome variables are the number of emergency department re-presentations and hospital readmissions, and quality of life during a 24 month follow-up. Secondary outcomes are length of hospital stay, mortality, time to first hospital re-admission, time to first emergency department re-presentation, patient satisfaction, adherence to prescribed medications, amount and type of in-hospital referrals made for consultations and diagnostic testing, and the number and type of community health referrals. A process evaluation and economic analysis will be conducted alongside the randomised trial. Discussion A trial of in-hospital care coordination may

  14. Effects of chronic illness on daily life and barriers to self-care for older women: A mixed-methods exploration.

    PubMed

    Restorick Roberts, Amy; Betts Adams, Kathryn; Beckette Warner, Camille

    2017-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined the subjective experience of living with chronic illness and identified barriers to self-care. Community-dwelling older women with chronic illness completed an initial (N = 138) and follow-up mailed survey 6 months later (N = 130). On average, participants reported four comorbid health conditions and the corresponding physical pain, activities curtailed or relinquished, and time and energy focused on managing health. Only 34% of participants practiced all 10 key self-care behaviors. Reported barriers to self-management included pain, lack of financial resources, and worry. In the regression analysis, having more depressive symptoms was a significant predictor of challenges with self-care behaviors.

  15. The illness narratives of men involved in the criminal justice system: A study of health behaviors, chronic conditions and HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Pamela; Kratz, Molly

    2014-01-01

    Summary Former inmates encounter a variety of challenges when returning to their community, including poor health status and limited access to healthcare services. This qualitative study examined how former male inmates with chronic conditions perceived, understood, managed, and coped with their illnesses. Findings: The participants were Black and Puerto Rican, with a mean age of 47 years, who were interviewed within three years of their release. Participants reported at least one chronic condition, with 21 HIV-negative men using chaos narratives to depict their approach to disease management. Nine HIV-positive men used quest narratives to present their illnesses and were immediately linked to supportive services, enabling them to overcome the barriers to community reintegration. Applications: Health interventions in the area of forensic social work ought to focus on conducting Medicaid outreach and enrollment efforts prior to correctional facility discharge. PMID:25419175

  16. The Shared Decision Making Frontier: a Feasibility and Usability Study for Managing Non-Critical Chronic Illness by Combining Behavioural & Decision Theory with Online Technology.

    PubMed

    Russell, Amina; Van Woensel, William; Abidi, Samina Raza

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine if shared decisions for managing non-critical chronic illness, made through an online biomedical technology intervention, us feasible and usable. The technology intervention incorporates behavioural and decision theories to increase patient engagement, and ultimately long term adherence to health behaviour change. We devised the iheart web intervention as a "proof of concept" in five phases. The implementation incorporates the Vaadin web application framework, Drools, EclipseLink and a MySQL database. Two-thirds of the study participants favoured the technology intervention, based on Likert-scale questions from a post-study questionnaire. Qualitative analysis of think aloud feedback, video screen captures and open-ended questions from the post-study questionnaire uncovered six main areas or themes for improvement. We conclude that online shared decisions for managing a non-critical chronic illness are feasible and usable through the iheart web intervention.

  17. Swedish District Nurses' experiences on the use of information and communication technology for supporting people with serious chronic illness living at home--a case study.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Carina; Skär, Lisa; Söderberg, Siv

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this case study was to describe two District Nurses' (DN) experiences of using information and communication technology (ICT) to communicate with chronically ill people in their homes. An electronic messaging program via computers and mobile phones with an Internet connection was used, enabling DNs and the ill people to exchange messages to and from anywhere. The program comprised different virtual rooms, and communication was via text messages. The DNs in this study used the program two to four times each week from November 2003 to March 2004. Semi-structured interviews were performed before, during and after the implementation of the new technology and were analysed using thematic content analysis. The results showed that the DNs felt that the technology increased accessibility to nursing care through a more direct communication with the ill person meaning that a more trusting relationship could be created. The DNs also experienced that the use of ICT saved working time. This study indicates that the use of ICT for communication allowed the DN to better support a chronically ill person at home leading to improved home nursing care. This method of communication cannot replace physical presence, but can be seen as a complement to nursing care at home.

  18. A predictive model of Health Related Quality of life of parents of chronically ill children: the importance of care-dependency of their child and their support system

    PubMed Central

    Hatzmann, Janneke; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Heymans, Hugo SA; Grootenhuis, Martha A

    2009-01-01

    Background Parents of chronically ill children are at risk for a lower Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). Insight in the dynamics of factors influencing parental HRQoL is necessary for development of interventions. Aim of the present study was to explore the influence of demographic and disease related factors on parental HRQoL, mediated by employment, income, leisure time, holiday and emotional support in a comprehensive model. Methods In a cross-sectional design, 543 parents of chronically ill children completed questionnaires. A conceptual model of parental HRQoL was developed. Structural equation modeling was performed to explore the relations in the conceptual model, and to test if the model fitted the data. Results The model fitted the data closely (CHISQ(14) = 11.37, p = 0.66; RMSEA = 0.0, 90%CI [0.00;0.034]. The effect of socio-demographic and medical data on HRQoL was mediated by days on holiday (MCS: β = .21) and emotional support (PCS: β = .14; MCS: β = .28). Also, female gender (β = -.10), age (β = .10), being chronically ill as a parent (β = -.34), and care dependency of the child (β = -.14; β = -.15) were directly related to parental HRQoL. Conclusion The final model was slightly different from the conceptual model. Main factors explaining parental HRQoL seemed to be emotional support, care dependency, days on holiday and being chronically ill as a parent. Holiday and emotional support mediated the effect of demographic and disease-related factors on HRQoL. Hours of employment, leisure time and household income did not mediate between background characteristics and HRQoL, contrasting the hypotheses. PMID:19638197

  19. Life memories and the ability to act: the meaning of autonomy and participation for older people when living with chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Maria; Pöder, Ulrika; Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Nilsson, Annika; Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena; Häggström, Elisabeth

    2015-12-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about how older people living with chronic illness describe the meaning of autonomy and participation, indicating a risk for reduced autonomy and participation in their everyday life. The purpose of this study was to describe the meaning of autonomy and participation among older people living with chronic illness in accordance with their lived experience. The design was descriptive with a phenomenological approach guided by Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological psychological method. Purposive sampling was used, and 16 older people living with chronic illness who lived in an ordinary home participated in individual interviews. The findings showed that the meaning of autonomy and participation among the older people emerged when it was challenged and evoked emotional considerations of the lived experience of having a chronic illness. It involved living a life apart, yet still being someone who is able, trustworthy and given responsibility--still being seen and acknowledged. The meaning of autonomy and participation was derived through life memories and used by the older people in everyday life for adjustment or adaption to the present life and the future. Our conclusion is that autonomy and participation were considered in relation to older people's life memories in the past, in their present situation and also their future wishes. Ability or disability is of less importance than the meaning of everyday life among older people. We suggest using fewer labels for limitations in everyday life when caring for older people and more use of the phrase 'ability to act' in different ways, based on older people's descriptions of the meaning of autonomy and participation.

  20. Rapid Screening of Psychological Well-Being of Patients with Chronic Illness: Reliability and Validity Test on WHO-5 and PHQ-9 Scales.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Fang Vivienne

    2014-01-01

    This study intended to test the reliability and validity of two simple psychological screening scales, the World Health Organization Well-being Index (WHO-5) and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), in patients with chronic illness in Taiwan and to understand the psychological well-being of patients with chronic illness (e.g., metabolic syndrome) in Taiwan and the incidences of psychological problems that follow. The research design of this study was a descriptive cross-sectional study. The sample comprised 310 patients with metabolic syndrome (MS), aged 20 years or more, from the outpatient clinic of a municipal hospital in Taiwan. This study used questionnaires to collect basic information, including physiological indices, WHO-5 and PHQ-9 that were used. "Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS)," and "World Health Organization Quality of Life-Short-form Version for Taiwan (WHOQOL)". Results are as follows: (1) compared to PHQ-9, the reliability and validity of WHO-5 are better for screening the psychological well-being of patients with chronic illness. (2) The features of WHO-5 are high sensitivity, briefness, and ease-of-use. The incidence of depression in patients with metabolic syndrome was approximately 1.0-6.5%, which is significantly lower than that of western countries.

  1. The Stigma Scale for Chronic Illnesses 8-item version (SSCI-8): Development, validation, and use across neurological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Yamile; Choi, Seung W.; Cella, David; Rao, Deepa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although the impact of stigma has been highlighted for epileptic populations, the experiences of people living with other neurological conditions have been less studied. In order to promote research on stigma among people with neurological conditions, we sought to develop and psychometrically validate an 8-item questionnaire measuring internalised and enacted stigma experienced by people with epilepsy, multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson’s disease (PD), stroke, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods We used Item Response Theory (IRT) methodologies to select items and field-tested our items with 587 participants from 8 academic medical centres across the United States. Results We conducted Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis as well as examined scale the reliability and validity. In addition, we conducted an analysis of variance (ANOVA) test to examine mean total score differences across the 5 neurological conditions. Data from people across conditions revealed that the shortened instrument conformed to an essentially unidimensional model of multi-faceted stigma as a 1-factor questionnaire with correlated residuals on a pair of items that distinctly measured internalised stigma. Conclusions Preliminary evidence suggests that the Stigma Scale for Chronic Illness 8-item version (SSCI-8) fits a unidimensional model, which assesses enacted and internalised stigma, and has adequate internal consistency/reliability and validity in relation to psychological distress and patient performance. Our results suggest fairly low stigma for neurological populations. In addition, our results suggest that stigma may be more severe for patients with ALS relative to those with MS and PD. Our results suggest that the scale could be used practically in the clinic setting to examine stigma without the patient burden associated with lengthier scales. PMID:22639392

  2. Reliability and validity of the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Palliative care (FACIT-Pal) scale.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Bakitas, Marie; Hegel, Mark T; Hanscom, Brett; Hull, Jay; Ahles, Tim A

    2009-01-01

    The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) system provides a general, multidimensional measure of health-related quality of life (FACT-G) that can be augmented with disease or symptom-specific subscales. The 19-item palliative care subscale of the FACIT system has undergone little psychometric evaluation to date. The aim of this paper is to report the internal consistency, factor structure, and construct validity of the instrument using the palliative care subscale (FACIT-Pal). Two hundred fifty-six persons with advanced cancer in a randomized trial testing a palliative care psychoeducational intervention completed the 46-item FACIT-Pal at baseline. Internal consistency was greater than 0.74 for all subscales and the total score. Seventeen of the 19 palliative care subscale items loaded onto the four-factor solution of the established core measure (FACT-G). As hypothesized, total scores were correlated with measures of symptom intensity (r=-0.73, P<0.001) and depression (r=-0.75, P<0.001). The FACIT-Pal was able to discriminate between participants who died within three months of completing the baseline and participants who lived for at least one year after completing the baseline assessment (t=-4.05, P<0.001). The functional well-being subscale discriminated between participants who had a Karnofsky performance score of 70 and below and participants with a Karnofsky performance score of 80 and above (t=3.40, P<0.001). The findings support the internal consistency reliability and validity of the FACIT-Pal as a measure of health-related quality of life for persons with advanced cancer.

  3. [The Technology Acceptance Model and Its Application in a Telehealth Program for the Elderly With Chronic Illnesses].

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Ping

    2015-06-01

    Many technology developments hold the potential to improve the quality of life of people and make life easier and more comfortable. New technologies have been well accepted by most people. Information sharing in particular is a major catalyst of change in our current technology-based society. Technology has widely innovated life and drastically changed lifestyles. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), a model developed to address the rapid advances in computer technology, is used to explain and predict user acceptance of new information technology. In the past, businesses have used the TAM as an assessment tool to predict user acceptance when introducing new technology products. They have also used external factors in the model to influence user perceptions and beliefs and to ensure the successful spread of new technologies. Informatization plays a critical role in healthcare services. Due to the rapid aging of populations and upward trends in the incidence of chronic illness, requirements for long-term care have increased in both quality and quantity. Therefore, there has been an increased emphasis on integrating healthcare and information technology. However, most elderly are significantly less adept at technology use than the general population. Therefore, we reexamined the effect that the essential concepts in a TAM exerted on technology acceptance. In the present study, the technology acceptance experience with regard to telehealth of the elderly was used as an example to explain how the revised technology acceptance model (TAM 2) may be effectively applied to enhance the understanding of technology care among nurses. The results may serve as a reference for future research on healthcare-technology use in long-term care or in elderly populations.

  4. Evaluation of plasma-free endocannabinoids and their congeners in abstinent cocaine addicts seeking outpatient treatment: impact of psychiatric co-morbidity.

    PubMed

    Pavón, Francisco Javier; Araos, Pedro; Pastor, Antoni; Calado, Montserrat; Pedraz, María; Campos-Cloute, Rafael; Ruiz, Juan Jesús; Serrano, Antonia; Blanco, Eduardo; Rivera, Patricia; Suárez, Juan; Romero-Cuevas, Miguel; Pujadas, Mitona; Vergara-Moragues, Esperanza; Gornemann, Isolde; Torrens, Marta; de la Torre, Rafael; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    Cocaine is associated with serious health problems including psychiatric co-morbidity. There is a need for the identification of biomarkers for the stratification of cocaine-addicted subjects. Several studies have evaluated circulating endocannabinoid-related lipids as biomarkers of inflammatory, metabolic and mental disorders. However, little is known in substance use disorders. This study characterizes both free N-acyl-ethanolamines (NAEs) and 2-acyl-glycerols in abstinent cocaine addicts from outpatient treatment programs who were diagnosed with cocaine use disorder (CUD; n = 88), and age-/gender-/body mass-matched healthy control volunteers (n = 46). Substance and mental disorders that commonly occur with substance abuse were assessed by the semi-structured interview 'Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Diseases' according to the 'Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision' (DSM-IV-TR) and plasma-free acyl derivatives were quantified by a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry system. The results indicate that plasma acyl derivatives are altered in abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects with CUD (CUD subjects). While NAEs were found to be increased, 2-acyl-glycerols were decreased in CUD subjects compared with controls. Multivariate predictive models based on these lipids as explanatory variables were developed to distinguish CUD subjects from controls providing high discriminatory power. However, these alterations were not influenced by the DSM-IV-TR criteria for cocaine abuse and dependence as cocaine trait severity measure. In contrast, we observed that some free acyl derivatives in CUD subjects were found to be affected by the diagnosis of some co-morbid psychiatric disorders. Thus, we found that the monounsaturated NAEs were significantly elevated in CUD subjects diagnosed with mood [N-oleoyl-ethanolamine and N-palmitoleoyl-ethanolamine (POEA)] and anxiety (POEA) disorders compared

  5. New perspectives of nanoneuroprotection, nanoneuropharmacology and nanoneurotoxicity: modulatory role of amino acid neurotransmitters, stress, trauma, and co-morbidity factors in nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari S; Sharma, Aruna

    2013-11-01

    Recent advancement in nanomedicine suggests that nanodrug delivery using nanoformulation of drugs or use of nanoparticles for neurodiagnostic and/or neurotherapeutic purposes results in superior effects than the conventional drugs or parent compounds. This indicates a bright future for nanomedicine in treating neurological diseases in clinics. However, the effects of nanoparticles per se in inducing neurotoxicology by altering amino acid neurotransmitters, if any, are still being largely ignored. The main aim of nanomedicine is to enhance the drug availability within the central nervous system (CNS) for greater therapeutic successes. However, once the drug together with nanoparticles enters into the CNS compartments, the fate of nanomaterial within the brain microenvironment is largely remained unknown. Thus, to achieve greater success in nanomedicine, our knowledge in understanding nanoneurotoxicology in detail is utmost important. In addition, how co-morbidity factors associated with neurological disease, e.g., stress, trauma, hypertension or diabetes, may influence the neurotherapeutic potentials of nanomedicine are also necessary to explore the details. Recent research in our laboratory demonstrated that engineered nanoparticles from metals or titanium nanowires used for nanodrug delivery in laboratory animals markedly influenced the CNS functions and alter amino acid neurotransmitters in healthy animals. These adverse reactions of nanoparticles within the CNS are further aggravated in animals with different co-morbidity factors viz., stress, diabetes, trauma or hypertension. This effect, however, depends on the composition and dose of the nanomaterials used. On the other hand, nanodrug delivery by TiO2 nanowires enhanced the neurotherapeutic potential of the parent compounds in CNS injuries in healthy animals and do not alter amino acids balance. However, in animals with any of the above co-morbidity factors, high dose of nanodrug delivery is needed to achieve

  6. [The German National Disease Management Guideline "Chronic Heart Failure"].

    PubMed

    Weinbrenner, S; Langer, T; Scherer, M; Störk, S; Ertl, G; Muth, Ch; Hoppe, U C; Kopp, I; Ollenschläger, G

    2012-02-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is an illness mostly affecting elderly people. In Germany CHF is one of the most common causes of death and at the same time one of the most common diagnosis in inpatient care. Due to the expected increase in life expectancy in the next few years experts predict a further step-up of the incidence. Against this background development of a national guideline on chronic heart failure was prioritised and accordingly the National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure was developed by a multi- and interdisciplinary group. The guideline group comprised experts from all relevant scientific medical societies as well as a patient expert. The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) on Chronic Heart Failure aims at supporting patients and health care providers with respect to decisions on a specific health care problem by giving recommendations for actions. Recommendations are informed by the best available scientific evidence on this topic.Patients with CHF often suffer from multiple conditions. Due to this fact and the old age patients do have very complex and demanding health care needs. Thus accounting for co-morbidities is paramount in planning and providing health care for theses patients and communication between doctor and patient but also between all health care providers is crucial.Basic treatment strategies in chronic heart failure comprise management of risk factors and prognostic factors as well as appropriate consideration of co-morbidities accompanied by measures empowering patients in establishing a healthy life style and a self-dependant management of their illness.Psycho-social aspects have a very strong influence on patients' acceptance of the disease and their self-management. In addition they have a strong influence on therapy management of the treating physician thus they have to be addressed adequately during the consultation.The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure (CHF

  7. The Role of Parental and Extrafamilial Social Support in the Psychosocial Adjustment of Children with a Chronically Ill Father.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotchick, Beth A.; Summers, Peter; Forehand, Rex; Steele, Ric G.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the relation between social support and psychosocial adjustment in children of men with hemophilia. Results, based on 53 families, indicate that the impact of illness, not the severity of illness itself, related to children's psychosocial adjustment. Main effects were observed for parental support on child- and parent-reported…

  8. How do macro-level contexts and policies affect the employment chances of chronically ill and disabled people? Part II: The impact of active and passive labor market policies.

    PubMed

    Holland, Paula; Nylén, Lotta; Thielen, Karsten; van der Wel, Kjetil A; Chen, Wen-Hao; Barr, Ben; Burström, Bo; Diderichsen, Finn; Andersen, Per Kragh; Dahl, Espen; Uppal, Sharanjit; Clayton, Stephen; Whitehead, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigate three hypotheses on the influence of labor market deregulation, decommodification, and investment in active labor market policies on the employment of chronically ill and disabled people. The study explores the interaction between employment, chronic illness, and educational level for men and women in Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom, countries with advanced social welfare systems and universal health care but with varying types of active and passive labor market policies. People with chronic illness were found to fare better in employment terms in the Nordic countries than in Canada or the United Kingdom. Their employment chances also varied by educational level and country. The employment impact of having both chronic illness and low education was not just additive but synergistic. This amplification was strongest for British men and women, Norwegian men, and Danish women. Hypotheses on the disincentive effects of tighter employment regulation or more generous welfare benefits were not supported. The hypothesis that greater investments in active labor market policies may improve the employment of chronically ill people was partially supported. Attention must be paid to the differential impact of macro-level policies on the labor market participation of chronically ill and disabled people with low education, a group facing multiple barriers to gaining employment.

  9. A 1-year follow-up study exploring the associations between perception of illness and health-related quality of life in persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bonsaksen, Tore; Haukeland-Parker, Stacey; Lerdal, Anners; Fagermoen, May Solveig

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive respiratory disease with an increasing prevalence worldwide. Its potential consequences, including reduced function and reduced social participation, are likely to be associated with decreased health-related quality of life (HRQoL). However, illness perceptions and self-efficacy beliefs may also play a part in determining HRQoL in persons with COPD. The aim of this study was to explore the relationships between illness perceptions, self-efficacy, and HRQoL in a sample of persons with COPD in a longitudinal perspective. The context of the study was a patient education course from which the participants were recruited. Data concerning sociodemographic variables, social support, physical activity, illness perceptions, general self-efficacy, and HRQoL were collected before the course started and 1 year after completion. Linear regression was used in the analyses. The results showed that less consequences and less symptoms (identity) were associated with higher physical HRQoL (PCS) at baseline and at 1-year follow-up. Less emotional response was similarly associated with higher mental HRQoL (MCS) at both time points. Lower self-efficacy showed a borderline significant association with higher PCS at baseline, but was unrelated to MCS at both time points. Self-efficacy showed no influence on the associations between illness perceptions and HRQoL. In conclusion, the study showed that specific illness perceptions had a stable ability to predict HRQoL in persons with COPD, whereas self-efficacy did not. The associations between illness perceptions and HRQoL were not mediated by self-efficacy.

  10. Assessment of universal health coverage for adults aged 50 years or older with chronic illness in six middle-income countries

    PubMed Central

    Frenz, Patricia; Grabenhenrich, Linus; Keil, Thomas; Tinnemann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess universal health coverage for adults aged 50 years or older with chronic illness in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, the Russian Federation and South Africa. Methods We obtained data on 16 631 participants aged 50 years or older who had at least one diagnosed chronic condition from the World Health Organization Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health. Access to basic chronic care and financial hardship were assessed and the influence of health insurance and rural or urban residence was determined by logistic regression analysis. Findings The weighted proportion of participants with access to basic chronic care ranged from 20.6% in Mexico to 47.6% in South Africa. Access rates were unequally distributed and disadvantaged poor people, except in South Africa where primary health care is free to all. Rural residence did not affect access. The proportion with catastrophic out-of-pocket expenditure for the last outpatient visit ranged from 14.5% in China to 54.8% in Ghana. Financial hardship was more common among the poor in most countries but affected all income groups. Health insurance generally increased access to care but gave insufficient protection against financial hardship. Conclusion No country provided access to basic chronic care for more than half of the participants with chronic illness. The poor were less likely to receive care and more likely to face financial hardship in most countries. However, inequity of access was not fully determined by the level of economic development or insurance coverage. Future health reforms should aim to improve service quality and increase democratic oversight of health care. PMID:27034521

  11. A time-series study of sick building syndrome: chronic, biotoxin-associated illness from exposure to water-damaged buildings.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Ritchie C; House, Dennis E

    2005-01-01

    The human health risk for chronic illnesses involving multiple body systems following inhalation exposure to the indoor environments of water-damaged buildings (WDBs) has remained poorly characterized and the subject of intense controversy. The current study assessed the hypothesis that exposure to the indoor environments of WDBs with visible microbial colonization was associated with illness. The study used a cross-sectional design with assessments at five time points, and the interventions of cholestyramine (CSM) therapy, exposure avoidance following therapy, and reexposure to the buildings after illness resolution. The methodological approach included oral administration of questionnaires, medical examinations, laboratory analyses, pulmonary function testing, and measurements of visual function. Of the 21 study volunteers, 19 completed assessment at each of the five time points. Data at Time Point 1 indicated multiple symptoms involving at least four organ systems in all study participants, a restrictive respiratory condition in four participants, and abnormally low visual contrast sensitivity (VCS) in 18 participants. Serum leptin levels were abnormally high and alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) levels were abnormally low. Assessments at Time Point 2, following 2 weeks of CSM therapy, indicated a highly significant improvement in health status. Improvement was maintained at Time Point 3, which followed exposure avoidance without therapy. Reexposure to the WDBs resulted in illness reacquisition in all participants within 1 to 7 days. Following another round of CSM therapy, assessments at Time Point 5 indicated a highly significant improvement in health status. The group-mean number of symptoms decreased from 14.9+/-0.8 S.E.M. at Time Point 1 to 1.2+/-0.3 S.E.M., and the VCS deficit of approximately 50% at Time Point 1 was fully resolved. Leptin and MSH levels showed statistically significant improvement. The results indicated that CSM was an effective

  12. Effectiveness of moving on: an Australian designed generic self-management program for people with a chronic illness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper presents the evaluation of “Moving On”, a generic self-management program for people with a chronic illness developed by Arthritis NSW. The program aims to help participants identify their need for behaviour change and acquire the knowledge and skills to implement changes that promote their health and quality of life. Method A prospective pragmatic randomised controlled trial involving two group programs in community settings: the intervention program (Moving On) and a control program (light physical activity). Participants were recruited by primary health care providers across the north-west region of metropolitan Sydney, Australia between June 2009 and October 2010. Patient outcomes were self-reported via pre- and post-program surveys completed at the time of enrolment and sixteen weeks after program commencement. Primary outcomes were change in self-efficacy (Self-efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease 6-Item Scale), self-management knowledge and behaviour and perceived health status (Self-Rated Health Scale and the Health Distress Scale). Results A total of 388 patient referrals were received, of whom 250 (64.4%) enrolled in the study. Three patients withdrew prior to allocation. 25 block randomisations were performed by a statistician external to the research team: 123 patients were allocated to the intervention program and 124 were allocated to the control program. 97 (78.9%) of the intervention participants commenced their program. The overall attrition rate of 40.5% included withdrawals from the study and both programs. 24.4% of participants withdrew from the intervention program but not the study and 22.6% withdrew from the control program but not the study. A total of 62 patients completed the intervention program and follow-up evaluation survey and 77 patients completed the control program and follow-up evaluation survey. At 16 weeks follow-up there was no significant difference between intervention and control groups in self

  13. Help for Mental Illnesses

    MedlinePlus

    ... call, or go the website of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255). Trained crisis ... improving the quality of life for people with chronic illnesses. Learn more about clinical trials on the ...

  14. Population management, systems-based practice, and planned chronic illness care: integrating disease management competencies into primary care to improve composite diabetes quality measures.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Joe; DaSilva, Karen; Marshall, Richard

    2008-02-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic illnesses in the United States requires a fundamental redesign of the primary care delivery system's structure and processes in order to meet the changing needs and expectations of patients. Population management, systems-based practice, and planned chronic illness care are 3 potential processes that can be integrated into primary care and are compatible with the Chronic Care Model. In 2003, Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates, a multispecialty ambulatory physician group practice based in Boston, Massachusetts, began implementing all 3 processes across its primary care practices. From 2004 to 2006, the overall diabetes composite quality measures improved from 51% to 58% for screening (HgA1c x 2, low-density lipoprotein, blood pressure in 12 months) and from 13% to 17% for intermediate outcomes (HgA1c

  15. Labor Supply of Poor Residents in Metropolitan Miami, Florida: The Role of Depression and the Co-Morbid Effects of Substance Use.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Pierre K.; French, Michael T.

    2001-12-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression represents one of the most common behavioral health problems among the workforce in the United States, with about 1 in every 20 employees experiencing this condition. A recent study estimated that in 1990 the economic costs of depressive disorders in the American workplace amounted to as much as $43 billion, with absenteeism alone accounting for $12 billion. Recently, economists have been focusing attention on the relationship between mental health and labor supply, but a lack of quality data sets containing detailed information on mental health and labor market variables represents a significant barrier to rigorous research. AIMS OF THE STUDY: The primary aims of the present study were to (i) examine the relationship between depression and employment, (ii) conditional on being employed, estimate the effect of depression on annual weeks worked, and (iii) examine the stability of the model estimates to the co-morbid effects of substance use (illicit drugs and alcohol), which has been consistently found to be a correlate of depression. DATA: The study used a unique set of survey data collected between 1996 and 1997 in crime-ridden and low-income neighborhoods of Miami-Dade County, Florida. A targeted sampling strategy was used to recruit chronic drug users (including injection drug users) and non-drug users to examine local health care delivery system characteristics in relation to the population of substance users. The final analysis sample for the present study included 1,274 adults, aged 18 to 65. Depression status was measured from the 20-item Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) that classified 384 individuals as depressed and 890 as non-depressed. According to the definition developed by the U.S. Office of National Drug Control Policy for chronic drug use (CDU), about 46 percent of the depressed individuals were found to be CDUs compared to 30 percent of the non-depressed sample. The survey instrument collected information on alcohol

  16. Management and postoperative outcome in primary lung cancer and heart disease co-morbidity: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Analitis, Antonis; Michaelides, Stylianos A.; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos A.; Tzonou, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    Background Co-morbidity of primary lung cancer (LC) and heart disease (HD), both requiring surgical therapy, characterizes a high risk group of patients necessitating prompt diagnosis and treatment. The aim of this study is the review of available evidence guiding the management of these patients. Methods Postoperative outcome of patients operated for primary LC (first meta-analysis) and for both primary LC and HD co-morbidity (second meta-analysis), were studied. Parameters examined in both meta-analyses were thirty-day postoperative mortality, postoperative complications, three- and five-year survival probabilities. The last 36 years were reviewed by using the PubMed data base. Thirty-seven studies were qualified for both meta-analyses. Results The pooled 30-day mortality percentages (%) were 4.16% [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.68–5.95] (first meta-analysis) and 5.26% (95% CI: 3.47–7.62) (second meta-analysis). Higher percentages of squamous histology and lobectomy, were significantly associated with increased (P=0.001) and decreased (P<0.001) thirty-day postoperative mortality, respectively (first meta-analysis). The pooled percentages for postoperative complications were 34.32% (95% CI: 24.59–44.75) (first meta-analysis) and 45.59% (95% CI: 35.62–55.74) (second meta-analysis). Higher percentages of squamous histology (P=0.001), lobectomy (P=0.002) and p-T1 or p-T2 (P=0.034) were associated with higher proportions of postoperative complications (second meta-analysis). The pooled three- and five- year survival probabilities were 68.25% (95% CI: 45.93–86.86) and 52.03% (95% CI: 34.71–69.11), respectively. Higher mean age (P=0.046) and percentage lobectomy (P=0.009) significantly reduced the five-year survival probability. Conclusions Lobectomy and age were both accompanied by reduced five-year survival rate. Also, combined aorto-coronary bypass grafting (CABG) with lobectomy for squamous pT1 or pT2 LC displayed a higher risk of postoperative

  17. Implementation of chronic illness care in German primary care practices – how do multimorbid older patients view routine care? A cross-sectional study using multilevel hierarchical modeling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In primary care, patients with multiple chronic conditions are the rule rather than the exception. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is an evidence-based framework for improving chronic illness care, but little is known about the extent to which it has been implemented in routine primary care. The aim of this study was to describe how multimorbid older patients assess the routine chronic care they receive in primary care practices in Germany, and to explore the extent to which factors at both the practice and patient level determine their views. Methods This cross-sectional study used baseline data from an observational cohort study involving 158 general practitioners (GP) and 3189 multimorbid patients. Standardized questionnaires were employed to collect data, and the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) questionnaire used to assess the quality of care received. Multilevel hierarchical modeling was used to identify any existing association between the dependent variable, PACIC, and independent variables at the patient level (socio-economic factors, weighted count of chronic conditions, instrumental activities of daily living, health-related quality of life, graded chronic pain, no. of contacts with GP, existence of a disease management program (DMP) disease, self-efficacy, and social support) and the practice level (age and sex of GP, years in current practice, size and type of practice). Results The overall mean PACIC score was 2.4 (SD 0.8), with the mean subscale scores ranging from 2.0 (SD 1.0, subscale goal setting/tailoring) to 3.5 (SD 0.7, delivery system design). At the patient level, higher PACIC scores were associated with a DMP disease, more frequent GP contacts, higher social support, and higher autonomy of past occupation. At the practice level, solo practices were associated with higher PACIC values than other types of practice. Conclusions This study shows that from the perspective of multimorbid patients receiving care in German

  18. Acceptance of Commercially Available Wearable Activity Trackers Among Adults Aged Over 50 and With Chronic Illness: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Kathryn; Giangregorio, Lora; Schneider, Eric; Chilana, Parmit; Li, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity and sedentary behavior increase the risk of chronic illness and death. The newest generation of “wearable” activity trackers offers potential as a multifaceted intervention to help people become more active. Objective To examine the usability and usefulness of wearable activity trackers for older adults living with chronic illness. Methods We recruited a purposive sample of 32 participants over the age of 50, who had been previously diagnosed with a chronic illness, including vascular disease, diabetes, arthritis, and osteoporosis. Participants were between 52 and 84 years of age (mean 64); among the study participants, 23 (72%) were women and the mean body mass index was 31 kg/m2. Participants tested 5 trackers, including a simple pedometer (Sportline or Mio) followed by 4 wearable activity trackers (Fitbit Zip, Misfit Shine, Jawbone Up 24, and Withings Pulse) in random order. Selected devices represented the range of wearable products and features available on the Canadian market in 2014. Participants wore each device for at least 3 days and evaluated it using a questionnaire developed from the Technology Acceptance Model. We used focus groups to explore participant experiences and a thematic analysis approach to data collection and analysis. Results Our study resulted in 4 themes: (1) adoption within a comfort zone; (2) self-awareness and goal setting; (3) purposes of data tracking; and (4) future of wearable activity trackers as health care devices. Prior to enrolling, few participants were aware of wearable activity trackers. Most also had been asked by a physician to exercise more and cited this as a motivation for testing the devices. None of the participants planned to purchase the simple pedometer after the study, citing poor accuracy and data loss, whereas 73% (N=32) planned to purchase a wearable activity tracker. Preferences varied but 50% felt they would buy a Fitbit and 42% felt they would buy a Misfit, Jawbone, or

  19. Acceptability of a team-based mobile health (mHealth) application for lifestyle self-management in individuals with chronic illnesses.

    PubMed

    Hartzler, Andrea L; Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Mohan, Shiwali; Silva, Michael; Lozano, Paula; Ralston, James D; Ludman, Evette; Rosenberg, Dori; Newton, Katherine M; Nelson, Lester; Pirolli, Peter

    2016-08-01

    With increased incidence of chronic illnesses arising due to unhealthy lifestyle habits, it is increasingly important to leverage technology applications to promote and sustain health behavior change. We developed a smartphone-based application, NutriWalking (NW), which recommends personalized daily exercise goals and promotes healthy nutritional habits in small peer teams. Here, we demonstrate an early study of usability and acceptability of this app in patients with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Depression. Our goal was to evaluate the potential of NW as a self-management support tool. Findings point to design considerations for team-based self-management tools delivered via mHealth platforms.

  20. Real-World Executive Functions in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Profiles of Impairment and Associations with Adaptive Functioning and Co-morbid Anxiety and Depression.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Gregory L; Kenworthy, Lauren; Pugliese, Cara E; Popal, Haroon S; White, Emily I; Brodsky, Emily; Martin, Alex

    2016-03-01

    Although executive functioning (EF) difficulties are well documented among children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), little is known about real-world measures of EF among adults with ASD. Therefore, this study examined parent-reported real-world EF problems among 35 adults with ASD without intellectual disability and their correlations with adaptive functioning and co-morbid anxiety and depression symptomatology. A variable EF profile was found with prominent deficits occurring in flexibility and metacognition. Flexibility problems were associated with anxiety-related symptoms while metacognition difficulties were associated with depression symptoms and impaired adaptive functioning (though the metacognition-adaptive functioning relationship was moderated by ADHD symptoms). These persistent EF problems are predictors of broader functioning and therefore remain an important treatment target among adults with ASD.