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Sample records for co-registered pet-ct fusion

  1. PET/CT fusion viewing software for use with picture archiving and communication systems.

    PubMed

    Im, Ki Chun; Choi, Ik Soo; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Eo, Gi Seoung; Kim, Jae Seung; Moon, Dae Hyuk

    2010-12-01

    We developed positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) viewing software (PETviewer) that can display co-registered PET and CT images obtained by PET/CT and stored on picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). PETviewer has tools for presetting windows for CT display; control bars for PET window level; zoom, pan, and pseudo-color functions; and allows the user to draw a rectangular region of interest (ROI) for standardized uptake value (SUV) measurement. SUV was calculated using PET DICOM header information and the pixel intensity in PETviewer. Reconstructed datasets of PET/CT and maximum intensity projection (MIP) of the PET images were transferred and archived in PACS. Phantom experiments were performed to evaluate the validity of image fusion. PET/CT images were displayed on an independent window in PACS. Transaxial PET images were reformatted as sagittal and coronal PET images, which were displayed with the corresponding CT and PET/CT fusion images with adjustable color and transparency. Transaxial, sagittal, and coronal PET images corresponding to the location of the cursor were shown using cine display of MIP images. All images were displayed in PETviewer within 20 s on a personal computer for PACS, which was equipped with a P4, 1.3-GHz CPU, and 512 Mb of RAM. We could measure maximum and mean SUV in a ROI using PETviewer. Transaxial fused images of patients and phantoms showed excellent registration and fusion of PET and CT images in the X and Y directions. PETviewer provided very useful clinical tools for assessing PET/CT images on PACS and should assist in maximizing the benefits derived from PET/CT imaging.

  2. Pixel-feature hybrid fusion for PET/CT images.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yang-Ming; Nortmann, Charles A

    2011-02-01

    Color blending is a popular display method for functional and anatomic image fusion. The underlay image is typically displayed in grayscale, and the overlay image is displayed in pseudo colors. This pixel-level fusion provides too much information for reviewers to analyze quickly and effectively and clutters the display. To improve the fusion image reviewing speed and reduce the information clutter, a pixel-feature hybrid fusion method is proposed and tested for PET/CT images. Segments of the colormap are selectively masked to have a few discrete colors, and pixels displayed in the masked colors are made transparent. The colormap thus creates a false contouring effect on overlay images and allows the underlay to show through to give contours an anatomic context. The PET standardized uptake value (SUV) is used to control where colormap segments are masked. Examples show that SUV features can be extracted and blended with CT image instantaneously for viewing and diagnosis, and the non-feature part of the PET image is transparent. The proposed pixel-feature hybrid fusion highlights PET SUV features on CT images and reduces display clutters. It is easy to implement and can be used as complementarily to existing pixel-level fusion methods.

  3. Useful diagnostic biometabolic data obtained by PET/CT and MR fusion imaging using open source software.

    PubMed

    Antonica, Filippo; Asabella, Artor Niccoli; Ferrari, Cristina; Rubini, Domenico; Notaristefano, Antonio; Nicoletti, Adriano; Altini, Corinna; Merenda, Nunzio; Mossa, Emilio; Guarini, Attilio; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade numerous attempts were considered to co-register and integrate different imaging data. Like PET/CT the integration of PET to MR showed great interest. PET/MR scanners are recently tested on different distrectual or systemic pathologies. Unfortunately PET/MR scanners are expensive and diagnostic protocols are still under studies and investigations. Nuclear Medicine imaging highlights functional and biometabolic information but has poor anatomic details. The aim of this study is to integrate MR and PET data to produce distrectual or whole body fused images acquired from different scanners even in different days. We propose an offline method to fuse PET with MR data using an open-source software that has to be inexpensive, reproducible and capable to exchange data over the network. We also evaluate global quality, alignment quality, and diagnostic confidence of fused PET-MR images. We selected PET/CT studies performed in our Nuclear Medicine unit, MR studies provided by patients on DICOM CD media or network received. We used Osirix 5.7 open source version. We aligned CT slices with the first MR slice, pointed and marked for co-registration using MR-T1 sequence and CT as reference and fused with PET to produce a PET-MR image. A total of 100 PET/CT studies were fused with the following MR studies: 20 head, 15 thorax, 24 abdomen, 31 pelvis, 10 whole body. An interval of no more than 15 days between PET and MR was the inclusion criteria. PET/CT, MR and fused studies were evaluated by two experienced radiologist and two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Each one filled a five point based evaluation scoring scheme based on image quality, image artifacts, segmentation errors, fusion misalignment and diagnostic confidence. Our fusion method showed best results for head, thorax and pelvic districts in terms of global quality, alignment quality and diagnostic confidence,while for the abdomen and pelvis alignement quality and global quality resulted

  4. Utility of 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of postoperative pain following surgical spine fusion.

    PubMed

    Pouldar, D; Bakshian, S; Matthews, R; Rao, V; Manzano, M; Dardashti, S

    2017-08-01

    A retrospective case review of patients who underwent 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging of the spine with postoperative pain following vertebral fusion. To determine the benefit of 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging in the diagnosis of persistent pain in the postoperative spine. The diagnosis of pain generators in the postoperative spine has proven to be a diagnostic challenge. The conventional radiologic evaluation of persistent pain after spine surgery with the use of plain radiographs, MRI, and CT can often fall short of diagnosis in the complex patient. 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging is an alternative tool to accurately identify a patient's source of pain in the difficult patient. This retrospective study looked at 25 adult patients who had undergone 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging. All patients had persistent or recurrent back pain over the course of a 15-month period after having undergone spinal fusion surgery. All patients had inconclusive dedicated MRI. The clinical accuracy of PET/CT in identifying the pain generator and contribution to altering the decision making process was compared to the use of CT scan alone. Of the 25 patients studied, 17 patients had increased uptake on the 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT fusion images. There was a high-level correlation of radiotracer uptake to the patients' pain generator. Overall 88% of the studies were considered beneficial with either PET/CT altering the clinical diagnosis and treatment plan of the patient or confirming unnecessary surgery. 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT proves to be a useful tool in the diagnosis of complex spine pathology of the postoperative patients. In varied cases, a high correlation of metabolic activity to the source of the patient's pain was observed.

  5. 18F-FDG PET/CT evaluation of children and young adults with suspected spinal fusion hardware infection.

    PubMed

    Bagrosky, Brian M; Hayes, Kari L; Koo, Phillip J; Fenton, Laura Z

    2013-08-01

    Evaluation of the child with spinal fusion hardware and concern for infection is challenging because of hardware artifact with standard imaging (CT and MRI) and difficult physical examination. Studies using (18)F-FDG PET/CT combine the benefit of functional imaging with anatomical localization. To discuss a case series of children and young adults with spinal fusion hardware and clinical concern for hardware infection. These people underwent FDG PET/CT imaging to determine the site of infection. We performed a retrospective review of whole-body FDG PET/CT scans at a tertiary children's hospital from December 2009 to January 2012 in children and young adults with spinal hardware and suspected hardware infection. The PET/CT scan findings were correlated with pertinent clinical information including laboratory values of inflammatory markers, postoperative notes and pathology results to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT. An exempt status for this retrospective review was approved by the Institution Review Board. Twenty-five FDG PET/CT scans were performed in 20 patients. Spinal fusion hardware infection was confirmed surgically and pathologically in six patients. The most common FDG PET/CT finding in patients with hardware infection was increased FDG uptake in the soft tissue and bone immediately adjacent to the posterior spinal fusion rods at multiple contiguous vertebral levels. Noninfectious hardware complications were diagnosed in ten patients and proved surgically in four. Alternative sources of infection were diagnosed by FDG PET/CT in seven patients (five with pneumonia, one with pyonephrosis and one with superficial wound infections). FDG PET/CT is helpful in evaluation of children and young adults with concern for spinal hardware infection. Noninfectious hardware complications and alternative sources of infection, including pneumonia and pyonephrosis, can be diagnosed. FDG PET/CT should be the first-line cross-sectional imaging study in patients

  6. Clinical significance of creative 3D-image fusion across multimodalities [PET+CT+MR] based on characteristic coregistration.

    PubMed

    Peng, Matthew Jian-qiao; Ju, Xiangyang; Khambay, Balvinder S; Ayoub, Ashraf F; Chen, Chin-Tu; Bai, Bo

    2012-03-01

    To investigate a registration approach for 2-dimension (2D) based on characteristic localization to achieve 3-dimension (3D) fusion from images of PET, CT and MR one by one. A cubic oriented scheme of"9-point & 3-plane" for co-registration design was verified to be geometrically practical. After acquisiting DICOM data of PET/CT/MR (directed by radiotracer 18F-FDG etc.), through 3D reconstruction and virtual dissection, human internal feature points were sorted to combine with preselected external feature points for matching process. By following the procedure of feature extraction and image mapping, "picking points to form planes" and "picking planes for segmentation" were executed. Eventually, image fusion was implemented at real-time workstation mimics based on auto-fuse techniques so called "information exchange" and "signal overlay". The 2D and 3D images fused across modalities of [CT+MR], [PET+MR], [PET+CT] and [PET+CT+MR] were tested on data of patients suffered from tumors. Complementary 2D/3D images simultaneously presenting metabolic activities and anatomic structures were created with detectable-rate of 70%, 56%, 54% (or 98%) and 44% with no significant difference for each in statistics. Currently, based on the condition that there is no complete hybrid detector integrated of triple-module [PET+CT+MR] internationally, this sort of multiple modality fusion is doubtlessly an essential complement for the existing function of single modality imaging. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. PET/CT Fusion Scan prevents futile laparotomy in early pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Richard; Prithviraj, Gopi; Kothari, Nishi; Springett, Greg; Malafa, Mokenge; Hodul, Pamela; Kim, Jongphil; Yue, Binglin; Morse, Brian; Mahipal, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Background In pancreatic cancer, early detection and complete surgical resection with negative margins offers the only cure for the disease. Work up to evaluate resectability includes triple phase helical scan CT of the pancreas and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). A paucity of data exists in using PET/CT scan as staging work up in early resectable pancreatic cancer. The objective of our study was to determine if PET/CT prevents futile laparotomy by detecting occult metastatic disease in patients with resectable/borderline pancreatic cancer. Methods We looked at our institutional PET/CT data base incorporating National Oncologic PET Registry with diagnosis of resectable or borderline resectable pancreatic cancer from 2005 to 2012. Clinical, radiographic, and pathologic follow-up was evaluated, including age, gender, evidence of metastatic disease, and initial CA 19–9 levels. The impact of PET/CT on patient management was estimated by calculating the percentage of patients whose treatment plan was altered due to PET/CT. The confidence interval was computed using the exact binomial distribution. The effect on the change was evaluated by the multiple logistic regression model. The final model was selected using the backward elimination method. Results We identified 285 patients with early stage (resectable or borderline) pancreatic cancer who received PET/CT as part of initial staging workup. Upon initial work up (CT + EUS), 62% of patients were considered resectable and 38% were borderline resectable. Addition of PET/CT scan changed the management in 10.9% (n=31) of patients (95% CI: 7.5%–15.1%). Median time from EUS to PET/CT was 5 days. Metastatic lesions were confirmed with biopsy in 19 (61%) patients. The proportion in the change in treatment plan is significantly higher in patients who were initially considered to have borderline resectable compared to resectable malignancy (16.5% vs. 7.4%). In 199 patients who were taken to surgery, 18.1% (n=36) were found to

  8. PET-CT Fusion in Radiation Management of Patients with Anorectal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Cynthia; Koshy, Mary; Staley, Charles; Esiashvili, Natia; Ghavidel, Sharam; Fowler, Zach; Fox, Tim; Esteves, Fabio; Landry, Jerome Godette, Karen

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To compare computed tomography (CT) with positron emission tomography-CT (PET-CT) scans with respect to anorectal tumor volumes, correlation in overlap, and influence on radiation treatment fields and patient care. Patients and Methods: From March to November 2003, 20 patients with rectal cancer and 3 patients with anal cancer were treated with preoperative or definitive chemoradiation, respectively. Computed tomography simulation data generated a CT gross tumor volume (CT-GTV) and CT planning target volume (CT-PTV) and {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose PET (FDG-PET) created a PET-GTV and PET-PTV. The PET-CT and CT images were fused using manual coregistration. Patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal therapy to traditional doses. The PET, CT, and overlap volumes (OVs) were measured in cubic centimeters. Results: Mean PET-GTV was smaller than the mean CT-GTV (91.7 vs. 99.6 cm{sup 3}). The mean OV was 46.7%. As tumor volume increased, PET and CT OV correlated significantly (p < 0.001). In 17% of patients PET-CT altered the PTV, and in 26% it changed the radiation treatment plan. For 25% of patients with rectal cancer, PET detected distant metastases and changed overall management. Ten rectal cancer patients underwent surgery. When the pretreatment PET standardized uptake value was >10 and the posttreatment PET standardized uptake value was <6, 100% achieved pathologic downstaging (p = 0.047). Conclusions: Variation in volume was significant, with 17% and 26% of patients requiring a change in treatment fields and patient management, respectively. Positron emission tomography can change the management for anorectal tumors by early detection of metastatic disease or disease outside standard radiation fields.

  9. Variability of Gross Tumor Volume Delineation in Head-and-Neck Cancer Using PET/CT Fusion, Part II: The Impact of a Contouring Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Berson, Anthony M. Stein, Nicholas F.; Riegel, Adam C.; Destian, Sylvie; Ng, Tracy; Tena, Lawrence B.; Mitnick, Robin J.; Heiba, Sherif

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a gross tumor volume (GTV) contouring protocol on interobserver variability between 4 physicians in positron emission therapy/computed tomography (PET/CT) treatment planning of head-and-neck cancer. A GTV contouring protocol for PET/CT treatment planning was developed utilizing 4 stages: Preliminary contouring on CT alone, determination of appropriate PET windowing, accurate image registration, and modification of CT contouring with correctly formatted PET/CT display and rules for modality disagreement. Two neuroradiologists and 2 radiation oncologists (designated as A, B, C, and D, respectively) were given a tutorial of PET/CT coregistered imaging individualized to their skill level, which included a step-by-step explanation of the protocol with clinical examples. Opportunities for questions and hands-on practice were given. The physicians were asked to re-contour 16 head-and-neck patients from Part I on PET/CT fusion imaging. Differences in volume magnitude were analyzed for statistical significance by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t-tests ({alpha} < 0.05). Volume overlap was analyzed for statistical significance using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests ({alpha} < 0.05). Volume overlap increased significantly from Part I to Part II (p < 0.05). One previously significant difference between physicians disappeared with the protocol in place. The mean fusion volume of Physician C, however, remained significantly larger than that of Physician D (p < 0.01). This result is unchanged from Part I. The multidisciplinary contouring protocol significantly improved the coincidence of GTVs contoured by multiple physicians. The magnitudes of the volumes showed marginal improvement in consistency. Developing an institutional contouring protocol for PET/CT treatment planning is highly recommended to reduce interobserver variability.

  10. 18F-FDG PET/CT/MRI Fusion Images Showing Cranial and Peripheral Nerve Involvement in Neurolymphomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Ana Carolina; Ribeiro, Fernanda Borges; Itikawa, Emerson Nobuyuki; Alexandre, Leonardo Santos; Pitella, Felipe Arriva; Santos, Antonio Carlos; Simões, Belinda Pinto; Wichert-Ana, Lauro

    2017-01-01

    We report a 56-year-old female patient with non-Hodgkin's diffuse large B cell lymphoma (NHL) who, on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a T1 weighted and gadolinium-enhanced imaging, was found to have thickening and infiltration in 75% of peripheral nerves of the patient and enlargements of cranial nerves, possibly related to lymphomatous infiltration. Subsequent positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using 18F-labeled 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG) showed widespread active involvement of the cervical plexus, bilateral peripheral nerves, right femoral nerve, the parasellar region of the skull, and marked hypermetabolism in the left trigeminal ganglia. This case re-emphasizes that while CT and MRI provide anatomical details, 18F-FDG PET/CT images better delineate the metabolic activity of neurolymphomatosis (NL) in the peripheral and central nervous system. PMID:28242998

  11. A phase II comparative study of gross tumor volume definition with or without PET/CT fusion in dosimetric planning for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC): primary analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Jeffrey; Bae, Kyounghwa; Choi, Noah; Forster, Ken; Siegel, Barry A; Brunetti, Jacqueline; Purdy, James; Faria, Sergio; Vu, Toni; Thorstad, Wade; Choy, Hak

    2012-01-01

    Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (≥ 60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7-22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  12. A Phase II Comparative Study of Gross Tumor Volume Definition With or Without PET/CT Fusion in Dosimetric Planning for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Primary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Jeffrey; Bae, Kyounghwa; Choi, Noah; Forster, Ken; Siegel, Barry A.; Brunetti, Jacqueline; Purdy, James; Faria, Sergio; Vu, Toni; Thorstad, Wade; Choy, Hak

    2012-01-01

    Background: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Methods: Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer ({>=}60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. Results: RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7-22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. Conclusions: PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes.

  13. Although Non-diagnostic Between Necrosis and Recurrence, FDG PET/CT Assists Management of Brain Tumours After Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Torrens, Michael; Malamitsi, Julia; Karaiskos, Pantelis; Valotassiou, Varvara; Laspas, Fotis; Andreou, John; Stergiou, Christos; Prassopoulos, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    To re-evaluate the role of (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/ computer assisted tomography (PET/CT) co-registered with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in differentiating adverse radiation effect (ARE) from tumour recurrence after Gamma Knife radiosurgery of brain tumours. Twenty-seven PET/CT studies co-registered with MRI were performed on 16 patients after radiosurgery, with 12/16 patients having multiple radiosurgery treatments. Long term follow-up was used for evaluation, with 3/16 patients being histopathologically confirmed. PET/CT was positive in all studies in 6/16 patients, negative in all studies in 6/16 and changed from negative to positive in one. In 2/16 patients, PET/CT was both positive and negative in separate tumour foci. In 9/16 cases with a positive PET/CT, tumour was confirmed. In 6/16 patients with a negative PET/CT, 3/6 had recurrence and 3/6 ARE. In 1/16, equivocal results became negative after retreatment. PET/CT/MRI identified tumour within ARE. Sensitivity of PET/CT/MRI proved to be 64.7%, and specificity 100%. PET/CT/MRI assists management, by revealing metabolism rather than histology. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Integrated PET/CT in differentiated thyroid cancer: diagnostic accuracy and impact on patient management.

    PubMed

    Palmedo, Holger; Bucerius, Jan; Joe, Alexius; Strunk, Holger; Hortling, Niclas; Meyka, Susanne; Roedel, Roland; Wolff, Martin; Wardelmann, Eva; Biersack, Hans-Juergen; Jaeger, Ursula

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy and impact on patient management of the new integrated PET/CT modality in patients with suspected iodine-negative, differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). Forty patients with DTC and a suggestion of iodine-negative tumor tissue underwent PET/CT examination (370 MBq (18)F-FDG, coregistered PET/CT whole-body images). As the first step of analysis, PET and CT images were scored blindly and independently by 2 nuclear medicine physicians and 2 radiologists. A 5-point scale was used. The second step consisted of a consensus reading, during which a virtual side-by-side fusion of PET and CT images was initially evaluated and afterward the "real" fusion (i.e., coregistered) PET/CT images were also scored with the same 5-point scale. The imaging results were compared with histopathologic findings and the course of disease during further follow-up examinations. One hundred twenty-seven lesions in 40 patients were evaluated. Diagnostic accuracy was 93% and 78% for PET/CT and PET, respectively (P = 0.049, per-patient analysis). In 17 (74%) of 23 patients with suspicious (18)F-FDG foci, integrated PET/CT added relevant information to the side-by-side interpretation of PET and CT images by precisely localizing the lesion(s). In tumor-positive PET patients, PET/CT fusion by coregistration led to a change of therapy in 10 (48%) patients. Futile surgery was prevented in an additional 3 patients. Integrated PET/CT is able to improve diagnostic accuracy in a therapeutically relevant way in patients with iodine-negative DTC. By precisely localizing tumor tissue, image fusion by integrated PET/CT is clearly superior to side-by-side interpretation of PET and CT images.

  15. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopharmaceutical in PET for imaging the glucose uptake in tissues, correlated with an increased rate of glycolysis in many tumor cells. New molecular targeted agents are being developed to improve the accuracy of targeting different disease states and assessing therapeutic response. Over 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) in the course of their disease treatment. Clinical data have demonstrated that the information provided by PET/CT often changes patient management of the patient and/or modifies the RT plan from conventional CT simulation. The application of PET/CT in RT is growing and will become increasingly important. Continuing improvement of PET/CT instrumentation will also make it easier for radiation oncologists to integrate PET/CT in RT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current PET/CT technology, to project the future development of PET and CT for PET/CT, and to discuss some issues in adopting PET/CT in RT and potential improvements in PET/CT simulation of the thorax in radiation therapy.

  16. Hybrid registration of PET/CT in thoracic region with pre-filtering PET sinogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokri, S. S.; Saripan, M. I.; Marhaban, M. H.; Nordin, A. J.; Hashim, S.

    2015-11-01

    The integration of physiological (PET) and anatomical (CT) images in cancer delineation requires an accurate spatial registration technique. Although hybrid PET/CT scanner is used to co-register these images, significant misregistrations exist due to patient and respiratory/cardiac motions. This paper proposes a hybrid feature-intensity based registration technique for hybrid PET/CT scanner. First, simulated PET sinogram was filtered with a 3D hybrid mean-median before reconstructing the image. The features were then derived from the segmented structures (lung, heart and tumor) from both images. The registration was performed based on modified multi-modality demon registration with multiresolution scheme. Apart from visual observations improvements, the proposed registration technique increased the normalized mutual information index (NMI) between the PET/CT images after registration. All nine tested datasets show marked improvements in mutual information (MI) index than free form deformation (FFD) registration technique with the highest MI increase is 25%.

  17. Combined PET/CT with iodine-124 in diagnosis of spread metastatic thyroid carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Freudenberg, L S; Antoch, G; Görges, R; Knust, J; Pink, R; Jentzen, W; Debatin, J F; Brandau, W; Bockisch, A; Stattaus, J

    2003-12-01

    Iodine-124 positron emission tomography (PET) is a useful 3D imaging technique for diagnosis and management of thyroid diseases. The difficulty in interpretation of the PET scans with highly selective tracers, such as iodine-124, is the lack of identifiable anatomical structures, so an accurate anatomical localization of foci presenting abnormal uptake is problematic. Consequently, a combined PET/CT scanner can resolve these difficulties by co-registering PET and CT data in a single session allowing a correlation of functional and morphologic imaging. A case is presented where iodine-124 produced by a clinical cyclotron and FDG were used to acquire images with a combined PET/CT scanner for clinical staging. On the basis of the PET/CT exams the treatment of the patient was modified.

  18. Integration of FDG-PET/CT into external beam radiation therapy planning: technical aspects and recommendations on methodological approaches.

    PubMed

    Thorwarth, D; Beyer, T; Boellaard, R; de Ruysscher, D; Grgic, A; Lee, J A; Pietrzyk, U; Sattler, B; Schaefer, A; van Elmpt, W; Vogel, W; Oyen, W J G; Nestle, U

    2012-01-01

    This work addresses the clinical adoption of FDG-PET/CT for image-guided radiation therapy planning (RTP). As such, important technical and methodological aspects of PET/CT-based RTP are reviewed and practical recommendations are given for routine patient management and clinical studies. First, recent developments in PET/CT hardware that are relevant to RTP are reviewed in the context of quality control and system calibration procedures that are mandatory for a reproducible adoption of PET/CT in RTP. Second, recommendations are provided on image acquisition and reconstruction to support the standardization of imaging protocols. A major prerequisite for routine RTP is a complete and secure data transfer to the actual planning system. Third, state-of-the-art tools for image fusion and co-registration are discussed briefly in the context of PET/CT imaging pre- and post-RTP. This includes a brief review of state-of-the-art image contouring algorithms relevant to PET/CT-guided RTP. Finally, practical aspects of clinical workflow and patient management, such as patient setup and requirements for staff training are emphasized. PET/CT-guided RTP mandates attention to logistical aspects, patient set-up and acquisition parameters as well as an in-depth appreciation of quality control and protocol standardization. Upon fulfilling the requirements to perform PET/CT for RTP, a new dimension of molecular imaging can be added to traditional morphological imaging. As a consequence, PET/CT imaging will support improved RTP and better patient care. This document serves as a guidance on practical and clinically validated instructions that are deemed useful to the staff involved in PET/CT-guided RTP.

  19. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT and post hoc PET/MRI in a case of primary meningeal melanomatosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Je; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Hwang, Seong Wook; Cho, Suk Kyong; Kim, Hae Won; Lee, Sang-Woo; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Lee, Jaetae

    2013-01-01

    Primary meningeal melanomatosis is a rare, aggressive variant of primary malignant melanoma of the central nervous system, which arises from melanocytes within the leptomeninges and carries a poor prognosis. We report a case of primary meningeal melanomatosis in a 17-year-old man, which was diagnosed with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) PET/CT, and post hoc F-18 FDG PET/MRI fusion images. Whole-body F-18 FDG PET/CT was helpful in ruling out the extracranial origin of melanoma lesions, and in assessing the therapeutic response. Post hoc PET/MRI fusion images facilitated the correlation between PET and MRI images and demonstrated the hypermetabolic lesions more accurately than the unenhanced PET/CT images. Whole body F-18 FDG PET/CT and post hoc PET/MRI images might help clinicians determine the best therapeutic strategy for patients with primary meningeal melanomatosis.

  20. FDG PET/CT in bone sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Grozdic Milojevic, Isidora; Sobic-Saranovic, Dragana; Videnovic-Ivanov, Jelica; Saranovic, Djordjije; Odalovic, Strahinja; Artiko, Vera

    2016-03-29

    Bone sarcoidosis is rare manifestation of disease usually accompanied with pulmonary involvement. Until today, exact prevalence of bone sarcoidosis is not known, since reported prevalence varies widely depending on the studied population and the used diagnostic techniques. To determine the prevalence of bone involvement and distribution pattern in active chronic sarcoidosis by using FDG PET/CT. Between January 2010 and December 2011, 98 patients with chronic sarcoidosis and presence of prolonged symptoms or other findings suggestive of active disease were referred to FDG PET/CT examination. Active disease was found in 82 patients, and they all were screened for presence of bone sarcoidosis on FDG PET/CT. All patients also underwent MDCT and assessment of serum ACE level. Bone sarcoidosis was present in 18/82 patients with active sarcoidosis. FDG uptake in bones was focal in 8 (44.4%), diffuse in 6 (33.3%) and both diffuse and focal in 4 (22.2%) patients. CT indicated bone abnormalities only in 5% patients. Osseous involvement was present in: pelvis (61.1%), vertebrae (44.4%), ribs (27.8%) and bone marrow (16.7%). Some patients had two or more locations of disease. Follow-up FDG PET/CT showed normal findings in two patients, same localization of active disease in four patients and progression of disease in one. In patients with active chronic sarcoidosis 22% of patients had osseous abnormalities on FDG PET/CT that mostly were not detected on CT.

  1. Thoracic cavity definition for 3D PET/CT analysis and visualization.

    PubMed

    Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Bascom, Rebecca; Allen, Thomas W; Higgins, William E

    2015-07-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) serve as the standard imaging modalities for lung-cancer management. CT gives anatomical details on diagnostic regions of interest (ROIs), while PET gives highly specific functional information. During the lung-cancer management process, a patient receives a co-registered whole-body PET/CT scan pair and a dedicated high-resolution chest CT scan. With these data, multimodal PET/CT ROI information can be gleaned to facilitate disease management. Effective image segmentation of the thoracic cavity, however, is needed to focus attention on the central chest. We present an automatic method for thoracic cavity segmentation from 3D CT scans. We then demonstrate how the method facilitates 3D ROI localization and visualization in patient multimodal imaging studies. Our segmentation method draws upon digital topological and morphological operations, active-contour analysis, and key organ landmarks. Using a large patient database, the method showed high agreement to ground-truth regions, with a mean coverage=99.2% and leakage=0.52%. Furthermore, it enabled extremely fast computation. For PET/CT lesion analysis, the segmentation method reduced ROI search space by 97.7% for a whole-body scan, or nearly 3 times greater than that achieved by a lung mask. Despite this reduction, we achieved 100% true-positive ROI detection, while also reducing the false-positive (FP) detection rate by >5 times over that achieved with a lung mask. Finally, the method greatly improved PET/CT visualization by eliminating false PET-avid obscurations arising from the heart, bones, and liver. In particular, PET MIP views and fused PET/CT renderings depicted unprecedented clarity of the lesions and neighboring anatomical structures truly relevant to lung-cancer assessment.

  2. Thoracic Cavity Definition for 3D PET/CT Analysis and Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Bascom, Rebecca; Allen, Thomas W.; Higgins, William E.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) serve as the standard imaging modalities for lung-cancer management. CT gives anatomical detail on diagnostic regions of interest (ROIs), while PET gives highly specific functional information. During the lung-cancer management process, a patient receives a co-registered whole-body PET/CT scan pair and a dedicated high-resolution chest CT scan. With these data, multimodal PET/CT ROI information can be gleaned to facilitate disease management. Effective image segmentation of the thoracic cavity, however, is needed to focus attention on the central chest. We present an automatic method for thoracic cavity segmentation from 3D CT scans. We then demonstrate how the method facilitates 3D ROI localization and visualization in patient multimodal imaging studies. Our segmentation method draws upon digital topological and morphological operations, active-contour analysis, and key organ landmarks. Using a large patient database, the method showed high agreement to ground-truth regions, with a mean coverage = 99.2% and leakage = 0.52%. Furthermore, it enabled extremely fast computation. For PET/CT lesion analysis, the segmentation method reduced ROI search space by 97.7% for a whole-body scan, or nearly 3 times greater than that achieved by a lung mask. Despite this reduction, we achieved 100% true-positive ROI detection, while also reducing the false-positive (FP) detection rate by >5 times over that achieved with a lung mask. Finally, the method greatly improved PET/CT visualization by eliminating false PET-avid obscurations arising from the heart, bones, and liver. In particular, PET MIP views and fused PET/CT renderings depicted unprecedented clarity of the lesions and neighboring anatomical structures truly relevant to lung-cancer assessment. PMID:25957746

  3. A combined PET/CT scanner for clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Beyer, T; Townsend, D W; Brun, T; Kinahan, P E; Charron, M; Roddy, R; Jerin, J; Young, J; Byars, L; Nutt, R

    2000-08-01

    The availability of accurately aligned, whole-body anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) images could have a significant impact on diagnosing and staging malignant disease and on identifying and localizing metastases. Computer algorithms to align CT and PET images acquired on different scanners are generally successful for the brain, whereas image alignment in other regions of the body is more problematic. A combined PET/CT tomograph with the unique capability of acquiring accurately aligned functional and anatomical images for any part of the human body has been designed and built. The PET/CT scanner was developed as a combination of a Siemens Somatom AR.SP spiral CT and a partial-ring, rotating ECAT ART PET scanner. All components are mounted on a common rotational support within a single gantry. The PET and CT components can be operated either separately, or in combined mode. In combined mode, the CT images are used to correct the PET data for scatter and attenuation. Fully quantitative whole-body images are obtained for an axial extent of 100 cm in an imaging time of less than 1 h. When operated in PET mode alone, transmission scans are acquired with dual 137Cs sources. The scanner is fully operational and the combined device has been operated successfully in a clinical environment. Over 110 patients have been imaged, covering a range of different cancers, including lung, esophageal, head and neck, melanoma, lymphoma, pancreas, and renal cell. The aligned PET and CT images are used both for diagnosing and staging disease and for evaluating response to therapy. We report the first performance measurements from the scanner and present some illustrative clinical studies acquired in cancer patients. A combined PET and CT scanner is a practical and effective approach to acquiring co-registered anatomical and functional images in a single scanning session.

  4. FDG-PET/CT in lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    D'souza, Maria M; Jaimini, Abhinav; Bansal, Abhishek; Tripathi, Madhavi; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Tripathi, Rajendra Prashad

    2013-01-01

    Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases that arise from the constituent cells of the immune system or from their precursors. 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) is now the cornerstone of staging procedures in the state-of-the-art management of Hodgkin's disease and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. It plays an important role in staging, restaging, prognostication, planning appropriate treatment strategies, monitoring therapy, and detecting recurrence. However, its role in indolent lymphomas is still unclear and calls for further investigational trials. The protean PET/CT manifestations of lymphoma necessitate a familiarity with the spectrum of imaging findings to enable accurate diagnosis. A meticulous evaluation of PET/CT findings, an understanding of its role in the management of lymphomas, and knowledge of its limitations are mandatory for the optimal utilization of this technique. PMID:24604942

  5. Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Positron emission tomography (PET) uses small amounts of ... CT)? What is Positron Emission Tomography – Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Scanning? Positron emission tomography, also called PET imaging ...

  6. PET/CT in the thorax: pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Truong, Mylene T; Viswanathan, Chitra; Carter, Brett W; Mawlawi, Osama; Marom, Edith M

    2014-01-01

    PET/CT is widely used in the staging and assessment of therapeutic response in patients with malignancies. Accurate interpretation of PET/CT requires knowledge of the normal physiologic distribution of [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose, artifacts due to the use of CT for attenuation correction of the PET scan and potential pitfalls due to malignancies that are PET negative and benign conditions that are PET positive. Awareness of these artifacts and potential pitfalls is important in preventing misinterpretation that can alter patient management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Respiratory-gated (4D) contrast-enhanced FDG PET-CT for radiotherapy planning of lower oesophageal carcinoma: feasibility and impact on planning target volume.

    PubMed

    Scarsbrook, Andrew; Ward, Gillian; Murray, Patrick; Goody, Rebecca; Marshall, Karen; McDermott, Garry; Prestwich, Robin; Radhakrishna, Ganesh

    2017-10-04

    To assess the feasibility and potential impact on target delineation of respiratory-gated (4D) contrast-enhanced (18)Fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography - computed tomography (PET-CT), in the treatment planning position, for a prospective cohort of patients with lower third oesophageal cancer. Fifteen patients were recruited into the study. Imaging included 4D PET-CT, 3D PET-CT, endoscopic ultrasound and planning 4D CT. Target volume delineation was performed on 4D CT, 4D CT with co-registered 3D PET and 4D PET-CT. Planning target volumes (PTV) generated with 4D CT (PTV4DCT), 4D CT co-registered with 3D PET-CT (PTV3DPET4DCT) and 4D PET-CT (PTV4DPETCT) were compared with multiple positional metrics. Mean PTV4DCT, PTV3DPET4DCT and PTV4DPETCT were 582.4 ± 275.1 cm(3), 472.5 ± 193.1 cm(3) and 480.6 ± 236.9 cm(3) respectively (no significant difference). Median DICE similarity coefficients comparing PTV4DCT with PTV3DPET4DCT, PTV4DCT with PTV4DPETCT and PTV3DPET4DCT with PTV4DPETCT were 0.85 (range 0.65-0.9), 0.85 (range 0.69-0.9) and 0.88 (range 0.79-0.9) respectively. The median sensitivity index for overlap comparing PTV4DCT with PTV3DPET4DCT, PTV4DCT with PTV4DPETCT and PTV3DPET4DCT with PTV4DPETCT were 0.78 (range 0.65-0.9), 0.79 (range 0.65-0.9) and 0.89 (range 0.68-0.94) respectively. Planning 4D PET-CT is feasible with careful patient selection. PTV generated using 4D CT, 3D PET-CT and 4D PET-CT were of similar volume, however, overlap analysis demonstrated that approximately 20% of PTV3DPETCT and PTV4DPETCT are not included in PTV4DCT, leading to under-coverage of target volume and a potential geometric miss. Additionally, differences between PTV3DPET4DCT and PTV4DPETCT suggest a potential benefit for 4D PET-CT. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier - NCT02285660 (Registered 21/10/2014).

  8. Initial experience of Fag-PET/CT guided Imr of head-and-neck carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dian . E-mail: dwang@radonc.mcw.edu; Schultz, Christopher J.; Jursinic, Paul A.; Bialkowski, Mirek; Zhu, X. Ronald; Brown, W. Douglas; Rand, Scott D.; Michel, Michelle A.; Campbell, Bruce H.; Wong, Stuart; Li, X. Allen; Wilson, J. Frank

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (Fag-PET) fused with planning computed tomography (CT) on tumor localization, which guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (Imr) of patients with head-and-neck carcinoma. Methods and Materials: From October 2002 through April 2005, we performed Fag-PET/CT guided Imr for 28 patients with head-and-neck carcinoma. Patients were immobilized with face masks that were attached with five fiducial markers. Fag-PET and planning CT scans were performed on the same flattop table in one session and were then fused. Target volumes and critical organs were contoured, and Imr plans were generated based on the fused images. Results: All 28 patients had abnormal increased uptake in Fag-PET/CT scans. PET/CT resulted in CT-based staging changes in 16 of 28 (57%) patients. PET/CT fusions were successfully performed and were found to be accurate with the use of the two commercial planning systems. Volume analysis revealed that the PET/CT-based gross target volumes (GTVs) were significantly different from those contoured from the CT scans alone in 14 of 16 patients. In addition, 16 of 28 patients who were followed for more than 6 months did not have any evidence of locoregional recurrence in the median time of 17 months. Conclusion: Fused images were found to be useful to delineate GTV required in IMRT planning. PET/CT should be considered for both initial staging and treatment planning in patients with head-and-neck carcinoma.

  9. PET/CT alignment calibration with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of PET detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Liu, Yaqiang; Gu, Yu; Dai, Tiantian

    2016-11-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool for clinical studies and pre-clinical researches which provides both functional and anatomical images. To achieve high quality co-registered PET/CT images, alignment calibration of PET and CT scanner is a critical procedure. The existing methods reported use positron source phantoms imaged both by PET and CT scanner and then derive the transformation matrix from the reconstructed images of the two modalities. In this paper, a novel PET/CT alignment calibration method with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of the PET detector was developed. Firstly, a multi-tungsten-alloy-sphere phantom without positron source was designed and imaged by CT and the PET scanner using intrinsic 176Lu radiation included in LYSO. Secondly, the centroids of the spheres were derived and matched by an automatic program. Lastly, the rotation matrix and the translation vector were calculated by least-square fitting of the centroid data. The proposed method was employed in an animal PET/CT system (InliView-3000) developed in our lab. Experimental results showed that the proposed method achieves high accuracy and is feasible to replace the conventional positron source based methods.

  10. Cross-modality PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT imaging for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Zuo, Chang-Jing; Jia, Ning-Yang; Wang, Jian-Hua; Hu, Sheng-Ping; Yu, Zhong-Fei; Zheng, Yuan; Zhang, An-Yu; Feng, Xiao-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the diagnostic value of the cross-modality fusion images provided by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for pancreatic cancer (PC). METHODS: Data from 70 patients with pancreatic lesions who underwent CECT and PET/CT examinations at our hospital from August 2010 to October 2012 were analyzed. PET/CECT for the cross-modality image fusion was obtained using TureD software. The diagnostic efficiencies of PET/CT, CECT and PET/CECT were calculated and compared with each other using a χ2 test. P < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. RESULTS: Of the total 70 patients, 50 had PC and 20 had benign lesions. The differences in the sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy between CECT and PET/CECT in detecting PC were statistically significant (P < 0.05 for each). In 15 of the 31 patients with PC who underwent a surgical operation, peripancreatic vessel invasion was verified. The differences in the sensitivity, positive predictive value, NPV, and accuracy of CECT vs PET/CT and PET/CECT vs PET/CT in diagnosing peripancreatic vessel invasion were statistically significant (P < 0.05 for each). In 19 of the 31 patients with PC who underwent a surgical operation, regional lymph node metastasis was verified by postsurgical histology. There was no statistically significant difference among the three methods in detecting regional lymph node metastasis (P > 0.05 for each). In 17 of the 50 patients with PC confirmed by histology or clinical follow-up, distant metastasis was confirmed. The differences in the sensitivity and NPV between CECT and PET/CECT in detecting distant metastasis were statistically significant (P < 0.05 for each). CONCLUSION: Cross-modality image fusion of PET/CT and CECT is a convenient and effective method that can be used to diagnose and stage PC, compensating for the defects of PET/CT and CECT when they are conducted individually. PMID:25780297

  11. MULTIMODALITY IMAGING: BEYOND PET/CT AND SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Simon R.

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality imaging with PET/CT and SPECT/CT has become commonplace in clinical practice and in preclinical and basic medical research. Do other combinations of imaging modalities have a similar potential to impact medical science and clinical medicine? The combination of PET or SPECT with MRI is an area of active research at the present time, while other, perhaps less obvious combinations, including CT/MR and PET/optical also are being studied. In addition to the integration of the instrumentation, there are parallel developments in synthesizing imaging agents that can be viewed by multiple imaging modalities. Is the fusion of PET and SPECT with CT the ultimate answer in multimodality imaging, or is it just the first example of a more general trend towards harnessing the complementary nature of the different modalities on integrated imaging platforms? PMID:19646559

  12. Applications of PET CT in clinical practice: Present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Durval Campos

    2007-02-01

    Radionuclide imaging and specially positron emission tomography (PET) has already demonstrated its benefits in three major medical subjects, i.e. neurology, cardiology and particularly clinical oncology. More recently the combination of PET and X-ray computed tomography (CT) as PET-CT led to a significant increment of the already large number of clinical applications of this imaging modality. This "anatomy-metabolic fusion" also known as Metabolic Imaging has its future assured if we can: (1) improve resolution reducing partial volume effect, (2) achieve very fast whole body imaging, (3) obtain accurate quantification of specific functions with higher contrast resolution and, if possible, (4) reduce exposure rates due to the unavoidable use of ionizing radiation.

  13. [Clinical evaluation of 18F-FDE PET-CT in detecting malignant liver tumors].

    PubMed

    Yao, Shu-zhan; Zhang, Cheng-qi; Chen, Jing; Liu, Qing-wei; Li, Qing-guo

    2003-11-01

    To evaluate the clinical value of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) combined with computer tomography (PET-CT) in the diagnosis and clinical staging of liver cancer. (18)F-FDG PET-CT was performed preoperatively in 16 cases of primary and 8 metastatic liver cancers. The imaging features of the primary foci were analyzed, followed by measurement of standardized (18)F-FDG uptake. For the metastatic foci, the abnormal metabolism of (18)F-FDG was observed and CT, PET and PET-CT fusion images were obtained for accurate localization of these foci. (18)F-FDG uptake occurred in the supraclavicular region in 6 (37.5%) of the 16 patients with primary liver cancer, but was detected in the 8 patients with metastatic liver cancer. Fourteen metastatic nodules were found in 5 of the 16 patients with primary liver cancer, located in the lungs (2 cases) or the abdominal cavity (3 cases). Negative results of (18)F-FDG PET-CT imaging should be carefully evaluated for diagnosing primary liver cancers, considering the very low sensitivity (37.5%) of this imaging modality in this study. But in the cases of metastatic liver cancers this imaging modality may exhibit high sensitivity, and can also be of great value in clinical staging of the primary liver cancers.

  14. Appropriateness criteria of FDG PET/CT in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Archi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    18Fluorine-2-fluoro-2-Deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) is a well-established functional imaging method widely used in oncology. In this article, we have incorporated the various indications for 18FDG PET/CT in oncology based on available evidence and current guidelines. Growing body of evidence for use of 18FDG PET/CT in select tumors is also discussed. This article attempts to give the reader an overview of the appropriateness of using 18F-FDG PET/CT in various malignancies. PMID:25969632

  15. Neurosarcoidosis on FET and FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mico; Hsiao, Edward

    2017-03-01

    O-(2-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) PET/CT is a promising imaging modality for brain tumor imaging because of its reported high sensitivity for biologically active tumor tissue. We present a case of biopsy-proven neurosarcoidosis showing FET uptake. It is an important cause of false-positive uptake on FET PET/CT.

  16. Radionecrosis versus disease progression in brain metastasis. Value of (18)F-DOPA PET/CT/MRI.

    PubMed

    Hernández Pinzón, J; Mena, D; Aguilar, M; Biafore, F; Recondo, G; Bastianello, M

    2016-01-01

    The use of (18)F-DOPA PET/CT with magnetic resonance imaging fusion and the use of visual methods and quantitative analysis helps to differentiate between changes post-radiosurgery vs. suspicion of disease progression in a patient with brain metastases from melanoma, thus facilitating taking early surgical action.

  17. Clinical application of FDG-PET/CT in metastatic infections.

    PubMed

    Kouijzer, Ilse J; Vos, Fidel J; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P; Oyen, Wim J

    2017-06-01

    FDG-PET/CT has proven its clinical value and cost-effectiveness in diagnosing metastatic infections in patients with Gram-positive bacteremia. In identification of metastatic foci, FDG-PET/CT is useful as a screening method when localizing symptoms are absent because it provides whole-body coverage. FDG-PET/CT detects early metabolic activity rather than the late anatomical changes as visualized by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. FDG-PET/CT allows more precise localization of infection within a shorter time span between injection and diagnosis as compared to conventional nuclear imaging. This review focuses on the clinical application of imaging of metastatic infectious diseases, with an emphasis on FDG-PET/CT putting it in perspective with other imaging modalities.

  18. Thoracic cancer imaging with PET/CT in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Pai-Chun Melinda

    Significance. Respiratory motion has been shown to cause artifacts in PET/CT imaging. This breathing artifact can have a significant impact on PET quantification and it can lead to large uncertainties when using PET for radiation therapy planning. We have demonstrated a promising solution to resolve the breathing artifact by acquiring respiration-averaged CT (ACT) for PET/CT. The purpose of this work was to optimize the ACT acquisition for clinical implementation and to evaluate the impact of ACT on PET/CT quantification. The hypothesis was that ACT is an effective method in removing the breathing artifact when compared to our current clinical protocol. Methods. Phase and cine approaches for acquiring ACT were investigated and the results of these two approaches were compared to the ACT generated from clinical 4DCT data sets (abbreviated as ACT10phs ). In the phase approach, ACT was generated based on combinations of selected respiratory phases; in the cine approach, ACT was generated based on cine images acquired over a fixed cine duration. The phase combination and cine duration that best approximated the ACT10phs were determined to be the optimized scanning parameters. 216 thoracic PET/CT patients were scanned with both current clinical and the ACT protocols. The effects of ACT on PET/CT quantification were assessed by comparing clinical PET/CT and ACT PET/CT using 3 metrics: PET/CT image alignment, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), and threshold segmented gross tumor volume (GTV). Results. ACT10phs can be best approximated to within 2% of SUV variation by phase averaging based on 4 representative phases, and to within 3% by cine image averaging based on >3s of cine duration. We implemented the cine approach on the PET/CT scanners and acquired 216 patient data sets. 68% of patients had breathing artifacts in their clinical PET/CT and the artifacts were removed/reduced in all corresponding ACT PET/CT. PET/CT quantification for lesions <50 cm3 and

  19. A combined micro-PET/CT scanner for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Meei-Ling; Ni, Yu-Ching; Chen, Kuo-Wei; Liang, Hsing-Ching; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Fu, Ying-Kai

    2006-12-01

    A micro-PET/CT system was developed by combination of an in-house micro-CT and a microPET ® R4 scanner. The cone-beam micro-CT consists of a rotational gantry that fits an X-ray tube, a CCD-based X-ray detector, and motor-driven linear stages. The gantry was designed to be coaxial with the scanner of microPET ® R4. It can be moved for the convenience of mounting the Ge-68 point-source holder for PET's calibration. The image volumes obtained from two modalities is registered by a pre-determined, inherent spatial transformation function. This hardware-approach fusion, which provides accurate and no labor-intensive alignment, is suitable for mass scanning. The micro-PET/CT system has been operated successfully. Merging the anatomical and functional images benefit studies of the small animal imaging.

  20. Impact of FDG-PET/CT on Radiotherapy Volume Delineation in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Correlation of Imaging Stage With Pathologic Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, Sergio L. Menard, Sonia; Devic, Slobodan; Sirois, Christian; Souhami, Luis; Lisbona, Robert; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) is more accurate than CT in determining the extent of non-small-cell lung cancer. We performed a study to evaluate the impact of FDG-PET/CT on the radiotherapy volume delineation compared with CT without using any mathematical algorithm and to correlate the findings with the pathologic examination findings. Methods and Materials: A total of 32 patients with proven non-small-cell lung cancer, pathologic specimens from the mediastinum and lung primary, and pretreatment chest CT and FDG-PET/CT scans were studied. For each patient, two data sets of theoretical gross tumor volumes were contoured. One set was determined using the chest CT only, and the second, done separately, was based on the co-registered FDG-PET/CT data. The disease stage of each patient was determined using the TNM staging system for three data sets: the CT scan only, FDG-PET/CT scan, and pathologic findings. Results: Pathologic examination altered the CT-determined stage in 22 (69%) of 32 patients and the PET-determined stage in 16 (50%) of 32 patients. The most significant alterations were related to the N stage. PET altered the TNM stage in 15 (44%) of 32 patients compared with CT alone, but only 7 of these 15 alterations were confirmed by the pathologic findings. With respect to contouring the tumor volume for radiotherapy, PET altered the contour in 18 (56%) of 32 cases compared with CT alone. Conclusion: The contour of the tumor volume of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with co-registered FDG-PET/CT resulted in >50% alterations compared with CT targeting, findings similar to those of other publications. However, the significance of this change is unknown. Furthermore, pathologic examination showed that PET is not always accurate and histologic examination should be obtained to confirm the findings of PET whenever possible.

  1. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Fritscher, Carlos Cezar; Fritscher, Leandro Genehr; Concatto, Natália Henz; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer. PMID:26176525

  2. [Utility of the PET/CT in vulvar cancer management].

    PubMed

    Peiró, V; Chiva, L; González, A; Bratos, R; Alonso, S; Márquez, R; Carballo, N; Alonso-Farto, J C

    2014-01-01

    To describe the clinical impact of PET/CT in the management of patients with vulvar cancer. Retrospective analysis of 13 PET/CT studies with (18)F-FDG (6 staging and 7 suspected recurrence) corresponding to 10 patients diagnosed with vulvar cancer by biopsy, with a mean age of 64.5 years. The preoperative PET/CT study was analyzed qualitatively according to the lesion region. Surgical excision was carried out, covering all the suspected areas according to the PET/CT study. This was compared with the histopathologic analysis. Abnormal vulvar PET/CT uptake was found in 9 out of the 13 studies and invasion of adjacent structures in 5 of them (urethra, perineal, vagina). The inguinal-femoral lymph nodes were considered as affected in 3 studies and one pelvic lymph node was also affected. Four of the studies had extralymphatic involvement: 3 in lung and 1 in ischiorectal fossa. The PET/CT showed a 100% sensitivity for the detection of the vulvar lesion in squamous cell carcinomas and 60% in non-squamous cell ones. There was a false positive result for local invasion due to urine contamination. One of the studies with lung metastases was related to a synchronous breast tumor. All the pathological lymph node levels detected in the PET/CT study were confirmed in the histopathology study. No new lesions were identified by surgery. PET/CT changed the therapeutic management in 8/13 studies (61.5%). PET/CT is postulated as a useful imaging test for the management of vulvar cancer, mainly in the identification of nodal metastases. It may affect both surgical planning and clinical management. Larger series are needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  3. FDG PET/CT findings in rare sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Ergül, N; Aydın, M

    2013-01-01

    The role of FDG PET/CT in management of soft tissue and bone sarcomas has been described in many studies up-to-date. However, contribution of PET/CT to diagnosis and treatment in some types of sarcomas that are seen with low incidence has not been identified properly yet. Clear cell sarcoma, synovial sarcoma of chest and myxoid lyposarcoma are rare types of sarcomas. We aimed to describe the FDG uptake patterns of these rare tumors and find out the role of FDG PET/CT in management of disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  4. How we read FCH-PET/CT for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Beaulieu, Alexis

    2016-12-06

    Over the last decade, (18)F-fluorocholine positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FCH-PET/CT) has gained in popularity for the staging and restaging of patients with prostate cancer (PCa). However, despite abundant literature on the topic, there is a lack of publications on how to actually interpret FCH-PET/CT in a clinical setting. Here we propose a practical, TNM-oriented approach to read FCH-PET/CT, with notes on procedure technique, image display, review sequence and report structure. The purpose of this article is to provide guidance to radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and residents who are new to FCH-PET/CT, as well as to propose an alternate approach to more experienced physicians.

  5. [68Ga]-DOTATOC-PET/CT for meningioma IMRT treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The observation that human meningioma cells strongly express somatostatin receptor (SSTR 2) was the rationale to analyze retrospectively in how far DOTATOC PET/CT is helpful to improve target volume delineation for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Patients and Methods In 26 consecutive patients with preferentially skull base meningioma, diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and planning-computed tomography (CT) was complemented with data from [68Ga]-DOTA-D Phe1-Tyr3-Octreotide (DOTATOC)-PET/CT. Image fusion of PET/CT, diagnostic computed tomography, MRI and radiotherapy planning CT as well as target volume delineation was performed with OTP-Masterplan®. Initial gross tumor volume (GTV) definition was based on MRI data only and was secondarily complemented with DOTATOC-PET information. Irradiation was performed as EUD based IMRT, using the Hyperion Software package. Results The integration of the DOTATOC data led to additional information concerning tumor extension in 17 of 26 patients (65%). There were major changes of the clinical target volume (CTV) which modify the PTV in 14 patients, minor changes were realized in 3 patients. Overall the GTV-MRI/CT was larger than the GTV-PET in 10 patients (38%), smaller in 13 patients (50%) and almost the same in 3 patients (12%). Most of the adaptations were performed in close vicinity to bony skull base structures or after complex surgery. Median GTV based on MRI was 18.1 cc, based on PET 25.3 cc and subsequently the CTV was 37.4 cc. Radiation planning and treatment of the DOTATOC-adapted volumes was feasible. Conclusion DOTATOC-PET/CT information may strongly complement patho-anatomical data from MRI and CT in cases with complex meningioma and is thus helpful for improved target volume delineation especially for skull base manifestations and recurrent disease after surgery. PMID:19922642

  6. Staging recurrent ovarian cancer with 18FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    DRAGOSAVAC, SANJA; DERCHAIN, SOPHIE; CASERTA, NELSON M.G.; DE SOUZA, GUSTAVO

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of 2-deoxy-2-(18F)-fluoro-D-glucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in patients with suspected ovarian cancer recurrence and describe the distribution of metastasis. A total of 45 female patients who underwent PET/CT scan due to raised CA-125 levels, clinical suspicion of ovarian cancer recurrence or alterations detected on ultrasound (US), CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were included in this retrospective study. PET/CT results were compared with histological findings (n=15) or clinical, laboratory and repeated imaging techniques during subsequent follow-up for at least six months (n=30). CA-125 was elevated in 34 patients, 14 patients had clinical symptoms of disease and 23 presented with alterations on US, CT and MRI. A total of 42 patients were confirmed to have ovarian cancer recurrence, all with abnormal findings on PET/CT. Three patients remained free of disease during clinical follow-up, all with normal PET/CT findings. There were 11 patients with raised CA-125 levels and normal conventional imaging, all with positive PET/CT. Among the 11 patients with normal CA-125 levels, eight presented with positive PET/CT scan. Lymph nodes were the most frequent site of relapse of disease, followed by peritoneal implants. Distant sites of metastasis included the liver, spleen, pleura, lung and bone. PET/CT detected unsuspected lesions in 20/45 patients (44.4%). 18FDG PET/CT was a useful tool for evaluating the extent of ovarian cancer recurrence. In the current series, lymph nodes were the most frequent site of relapse of disease, with supradiaphragmatic lymph node metastasis in a large number of cases. PMID:23420711

  7. PET/CT for radiotherapy: image acquisition and data processing.

    PubMed

    Bettinardi, V; Picchio, M; Di Muzio, N; Gianolli, L; Messa, C; Gilardi, M C

    2010-10-01

    This paper focuses on acquisition and processing methods in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for radiotherapy (RT) applications. The recent technological evolutions of PET/CT systems are described. Particular emphasis is dedicated to the tools needed for the patient positioning and immobilization, to be used in PET/CT studies as well as during RT treatment sessions. The effect of organ and lesion motion due to patient's respiration on PET/CT imaging is discussed. Breathing protocols proposed to minimize PET/CT spatial mismatches in relation to respiratory movements are illustrated. The respiratory gated (RG) 4D-PET/CT techniques, developed to measure and compensate for organ and lesion motion, are then introduced. Finally a description is provided of different acquisition and data processing techniques, implemented with the aim at improving: i) image quality and quantitative accuracy of PET images, and ii) target volume definition and treatment planning in RT, by using specific and personalised motion information.

  8. Operational and Dosimetric Aspects of Pediatric PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Frederic H; Goodkind, Alison; MacDougall, Robert D; Oberg, Leah; Ziniel, Sonja I; Cappock, Richard; Callahan, Michael J; Kwatra, Neha; Treves, S Ted; Voss, Stephan D

    2017-09-01

    No consistent guidelines exist for the acquisition of a CT scan as part of pediatric PET/CT. Given that children may be more vulnerable to the effects of ionizing radiation, it is necessary to develop methods that provide diagnostic-quality imaging when needed, in the shortest time and with the lowest patient radiation exposure. This article describes the basics of CT dosimetry and PET/CT acquisition in children. We describe the variability in pediatric PET/CT techniques, based on a survey of 19 PET/CT pediatric institutions in North America. The results of the survey demonstrated that, although most institutions used automatic tube current modulation, there remained a large variation of practice, on the order of a factor of 2-3, across sites, pointing to the need for guidelines. We introduce the approach developed at our institution for using a multiseries PET/CT acquisition technique that combines diagnostic-quality CT in the essential portion of the field of view and a low-dose technique to image the remainder of the body. This approach leads to a reduction in radiation dose to the patient while combining the PET and the diagnostic CT into a single acquisition. The standardization of pediatric PET/CT provides an opportunity for a reduction in the radiation dose to these patients while maintaining an appropriate level of diagnostic image quality. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  9. [PET/CT in breast cancer: an update].

    PubMed

    Groheux, D; Moretti, J-L; Giacchetti, S; Hindié, E; Teyton, P; Cuvier, C; Bousquet, G; Misset, J-L; Boin, C; Espié, M

    2009-11-01

    The authors discuss the various roles of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the management of breast cancer. Roles of new tracers such as F-18 fluoro-L-thymidine (a marker of cell proliferation), 18-fluoro-17-B-estradiol (marker of estrogen receptor) and sodium fluoride (marker of bone matrix) are also mentioned. There is little justification for the use of FDG-PET/CT in patient with clinically T1 (< or = 2 cm) N0 tumours. Notably, it cannot be used as a substitute to SLNB "sentinel lymph node biopsy" for axillary staging due to limited sensitivity for the detection of small metastases. The case is different in higher risk patients, and especially so in patients with locally advanced disease. FDG-PET/CT in these patients might depict lymph node involvement in the level III of Berg or in supraclavicular or internal mammary basins. It might also uncover occult distant metastases, notably, early osteomedullary infiltration. Thus, for these tumors, initial PET/CT can enable better intramodality treatment planning or a change in treatment. PET/CT as a whole-body examination is also very efficient in case of suspicion of recurrence. On the other hand, many studies show that this functional imaging could be used to assess early response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy or to chemotherapy of metastatic disease. 18FDG-PET/CT could thus become an unavoidable modality to answer various clinical situations.

  10. Real-time volume rendering visualization of dual-modality PET/CT images with interactive fuzzy thresholding segmentation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinman; Cai, Weidong; Eberl, Stefan; Feng, Dagan

    2007-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization has become an essential part for imaging applications, including image-guided surgery, radiotherapy planning, and computer-aided diagnosis. In the visualization of dual-modality positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT), 3-D volume rendering is often limited to rendering of a single image volume and by high computational demand. Furthermore, incorporation of segmentation in volume rendering is usually restricted to visualizing the presegmented volumes of interest. In this paper, we investigated the integration of interactive segmentation into real-time volume rendering of dual-modality PET/CT images. We present and validate a fuzzy thresholding segmentation technique based on fuzzy cluster analysis, which allows interactive and real-time optimization of the segmentation results. This technique is then incorporated into a real-time multi-volume rendering of PET/CT images. Our method allows a real-time fusion and interchangeability of segmentation volume with PET or CT volumes, as well as the usual fusion of PET/CT volumes. Volume manipulations such as window level adjustments and lookup table can be applied to individual volumes, which are then fused together in real time as adjustments are made. We demonstrate the benefit of our method in integrating segmentation with volume rendering in its application to PET/CT images. Responsive frame rates are achieved by utilizing a texture-based volume rendering algorithm and the rapid transfer capability of the high-memory bandwidth available in low-cost graphic hardware.

  11. Localization of medullary thyroid carcinoma after surgery using (11)C-methionine PET/CT: comparison with (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hye Won; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Ji In; Kim, Hee Kyung; Shin, Hyun Won; Shin, Jung Hee; Kim, Sun Wook; Chung, Jae Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Tumor localization is difficult in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) that have persistent hypercalcitoninemia after thyroidectomy. In this study, the (11)C-methionine positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was compared with the (18)F-FDG PET/CT for diagnostic sensitivity in detecting residual or metastatic disease. (11)C-methionine PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/CT were performed on 16 consecutive patients with MTC that had persistent hypercalcitoninemia after surgery in this prospective, single-center study. Patient- and lesion-based analyses were performed using a composite reference standard which was the sum of the lesions confirmed by all combined modalities, including neck ultrasonography (US) with or without fine needle aspiration cytology, CT, bone scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and surgery. By patient-based analysis, the sensitivities of (11)C-methionine PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/CT were both 63%. By lesion-based analysis, the sensitivity of (11)C-methionine PET/CT was similar to (18)F-FDG PET/CT (73% vs. 80%). Excluding hepatic lesions, which could not be detected because of physiological uptake of methionine by the liver, the sensitivity of (11)C-methionine PET/CT was better than (18)F-FDG PET/CT especially for detecting cervical lymph node lesions; however, it was not superior to US. All patients with serum calcitonin levels ≥370 pg/mL showed uptake by (11)C-methionine PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/CT. This preliminary data showed that despite its similar sensitivity to (18)F-FDG PET/CT for detecting residual or metastatic MTC, (11)C-methionine PET/CT provided minimal additional information compared to combined (18)F-FDG PET/CT and neck US.

  12. FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of anal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cotter, Shane E.; Grigsby, Perry W. . E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu; Siegel, Barry A.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: Surgical staging and treatment of anal carcinoma has been replaced by noninvasive staging studies and combined modality therapy. In this study, we compare computed tomography (CT) and physical examination to [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in the staging of carcinoma of the anal canal, with special emphasis on determination of spread to inguinal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Between July 2003 and July 2005, 41 consecutive patients with biopsy-proved anal carcinoma underwent a complete staging evaluation including physical examination, CT, and 2-FDG-PET/CT. Patients ranged in age from 30 to 89 years. Nine men were HIV-positive. Treatment was with standard Nigro regimen. Results: [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) detected 91% of nonexcised primary tumors, whereas CT visualized 59%. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal uptake in pelvic nodes of 5 patients with normal pelvic CT scans. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal nodes in 20% of groins that were normal by CT, and in 23% without abnormality on physical examination. Furthermore, 17% of groins negative by both CT and physical examination showed abnormal uptake on FDG-PET/CT. HIV-positive patients had an increased frequency of PET-positive lymph nodes. Conclusion: [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography detects the primary tumor more often than CT. FDG-PET/CT detects substantially more abnormal inguinal lymph nodes than are identified by standard clinical staging with CT and physical examination.

  13. Targeted Prostate Biopsy Using (68)Gallium PSMA-PET/CT for Image Guidance.

    PubMed

    Simopoulos, Demetrios N; Natarajan, Shyam; Jones, Tonye A; Fendler, Wolfgang P; Sisk, Anthony E; Marks, Leonard S

    2017-09-01

    Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) scanning is a sensitive method of prostate cancer detection. In a 71 y.o. man with a PSA of 49 (6%F), 4 negative MRI studies and 6 negative biopsies over an 8 year interval, a (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT scan showed a PSMA-avid spot in the prostate. Using image fusion technology, the lesion was target-biopsied and Gleason 3 + 4 = 7 (cancer core length of 12 mm) was identified. This case may herald a new application for PSMA scanning and prostate cancer imaging.

  14. The role of PET/CT in evaluation of Facet and Disc abnormalities in patients with low back pain using (18)F-Fluoride.

    PubMed

    Gamie, Sherief; El-Maghraby, Tarek

    2008-01-01

    Bone scintigraphy including Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is known for its role in the diagnosis of low back pain disorders. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with (18)F (Flouride-18) as a tracer can be used to carry out bone scans with improved image quality. With the addition of CT, simultaneous PET/CT fused images provide more accurate anatomical details. The objectives of this work are to assess the use of (18)F-PET/CT in patients with back pain and suspected facetogenic pain, and to find the frequency of facet arthropathy versus disc disease abnormalities. 67 patients who presented with back pain underwent routine X-ray, CT and/or MRI, which failed to identify a clear cause, were referred to (18)F-PET/CT. Among the main group, a subset of 25 patients had previous spine surgery consisting of laminectomy or discectomy (17 patients) and lumbar fusion (8 patients). The PET/CT scan was acquired on a GE VCT 64-Slice combined scanner. Imaging started 45-60 minutes after administration of 12-15 mCi (444-555 MBq) of (18)F-Fluoride. The PET scan was acquired from the skull base through the inguinal region in 3D mode at 2 minutes/bed. A lowresolution, non-contrast CT scan was also acquired for anatomic localization and attenuation correction. The (18)F-PET/CT showed abnormal uptake in the spine in 56 patients, with an overall detection ability of 84%. Facet joints as a cause of back pain was much more frequent (25 with abnormal scans). One-third (36%) of the patients showed multiple positive uptake in both facet joints and disc areas (20/56). The patients were further divided into two groups. Group A consisted of 42 patients (63%) with back pain and no previous operative procedures, and the (18)F-PET/CT showed a high sensitivity (88%) in identifying the source of pain in 37/42 patients. Group B included 25 patients (37%) with prior lumbar fusion or laminectomy, in which the PET/CT showed positive uptake in 76% (19/25 patients). (18)F-PET/CT showed

  15. Virtual hybrid bronchoscopy using PET/CT data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Seemann, Marcus D.

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the possibilities, advantages and limitations of virtual bronchoscopy using data sets from positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT). Eight consecutive patients with lung cancer underwent PET/CT. PET was performed with F-18-labelled 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D: -glucose ((18)F-FDG). The tracheobronchial system was segmented with a volume-growing algorithm, using the CT data sets, and visualized with a shaded-surface rendering method. The primary tumours and the lymph node metastases were segmented for virtual CT-bronchoscopy using the CT data set and for virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy using the PET/CT data set. Virtual CT-bronchoscopy using the low-dose or diagnostic CT facilitates the detection of anatomical/morphological structure changes of the tracheobronchial system. Virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy was superior to virtual CT-bronchoscopy in the detection of lymph node metastases (P=0.001), because it uses the CT information and the molecular/metabolic information from PET. Virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy with a transparent colour-coded shaded-surface rendering model is expected to improve the diagnostic accuracy of identification and characterization of malignancies, assessment of tumour staging, differentiation of viable tumour tissue from atelectases and scars, verification of infections, evaluation of therapeutic response and detection of an early stage of recurrence that is not detectable or is misjudged in comparison with virtual CT-bronchoscopy.

  16. An atypical sarcoidosis involvement in FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Philippe; Benigni, Paolo; Feger, Benoit; Salaun, Pierre-Yves; Abgral, Ronan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Sarcoidosis is an idiopathic systemic inflammatory granulomatous disorder comprised of epithelioid and multinucleated giant cells with little necrosis which involve various organs. Laryngeal involvement is extremely rare, with a prevalence of about 0.5 to 1%. Diagnoses: Here we present a case of laryngeal involvement of sarcoidosis demonstrated on 18F-Fluorodesoxyglucose Positron-Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (FDG PET/CT). Patient concerns: A 63 year-old man suffering from dysphonia was referred to our department for characterization of laryngeal lesion suspicious for cancer with non-informative biopsy, the sample was not sufficient for diagnosis. Interventions: FDG PET/CT showed a pathological uptake on the right vocal cord, but also highlighted a bilateral uptake in intrathoracic hilar lymphadenopathy areas, typically found in several inflammatory diseases. Outcomes: New laryngeal targeted biopsies revealed non-caseating epithelioid granulomas suggesting sarcoidosis involvement. After 6 months of systemic steroid treatment, FDG PET/CT showed a significant decrease of the laryngeal uptake. Lessons: This case shows the usefulness of FDG PET/CT to accurately assess inflammatory activity in rare extra-pulmonary sarcoidosis involvement. Moreover, this case emphasizes that FDG PET/CT is an interesting tool for assessing therapeutic efficacy of inflammatory diseases such as sarcoidosis. PMID:28033265

  17. The contribution of PET/CT to improved patient management.

    PubMed

    Ell, P J

    2006-01-01

    With the introduction of both SPET/CT and PET/CT, multimodality imaging has truly entered routine clinical practice. Multiple slice spiral CT scanners have been incorporated with multiple detector gamma cameras or PET systems, such that the benefit of these modalities can be achieved in one patient sitting. The subject of this manuscript is PET/CT and its impact on patient management. Applications of PET/CT span the whole field of medical and surgical oncology since very few cancers do not take up the labelled glucose tracer, (18)F-FDG. Given the contrast achieved, high-quality data can be obtained with FDG PET/CT. This technology has now spread worldwide and has been the subject of intense interest, as witnessed by the vast body of published evidence. In this short overview, only a brief discussion of the main clinical applications is possible. Novel applications of PET/CT outside the field of oncology are expected in the near future.

  18. High-resolution 18F-FDG PET/CT for assessing disease activity in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis: findings of a prospective pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Andrea; Godinez, Felipe; Yang, Kai; Shelton, David K; Hunter, John C; Naguwa, Stanley M; Boone, John M; Raychaudhuri, Siba P; Badawi, Ramsey D

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) commonly affect the small joints of the wrist and hand. We evaluated the performance of a new, high-resolution extremity positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scanner for characterizing and quantifying pathologies associated with the two arthritides in the wrist and hand joints. Methods: Patients with RA or PsA underwent fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT wrist and hand imaging, respectively, on the high-resolution scanner. Calibrated CT images and co-registered PET images were reconstructed. PET/CT was derived for the radiocarpal and pisiform–triquetral compartments, joints with erosive changes, sites of synovitis or tenosynovitis and the nail bed and were correlated with clinical and MRI findings. Results: Significantly elevated 18F-FDG uptake was measured for the radiocarpal and pisiform–triquetral compartments and at sites of bone erosion, synovitis, pannus and oedema, compared with unaffected joints (p < 0.05) in patients with RA, consistent with their clinical findings. In patients with PsA, significantly elevated 18F-FDG uptake was measured for joints with synovitis compared with unaffected joints (p < 0.05), with patterns of 18F-FDG uptake along the tendons, at the enthesis and in the nail bed, consistent with tenosynovitis, enthesitis and nail dystrophy, respectively. Conclusion: High-resolution 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging of the wrist and hand is feasible in an RA or PsA patient cohort and is capable of providing quantifiable measures of disease activity (synovitis, enthesitis, oedema and bone destruction). Advances in knowledge: High-resolution PET/CT imaging shows promise as a tool for understanding the pathogenesis of the arthritic process and for non-invasive, objective assessment of RA or PsA severity and therapy selection. PMID:27109738

  19. PET/CT in paediatric malignancies - An update

    PubMed Central

    Padma, Subramanyam; Sundaram, Palaniswamy Shanmuga; Tewari, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a well-established imaging modality in adult oncological practice. Its role in childhood malignancies needs to be discussed as paediatric malignancies differ from adults in tumor subtypes and they have different tumor biology and FDG uptake patterns. This is also compounded by smaller body mass, dosimetric restrictions, and physiological factors that can affect the FDG uptake. It calls for careful planning of the PET study, preparing the child, the parents, and expertise of nuclear physicians in reporting pediatric positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) studies. In a broad perspective, FDG-PET/CT has been used in staging, assessment of therapy response, identifying metastases and as a follow-up tool in a wide variety of pediatric malignancies. This review outlines the role of PET/CT in childhood malignancies other than hematological malignancies such as lymphoma and leukemia. PMID:27688605

  20. 18F-FDG PET/CT in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tagliabue, Luca; Russo, Giovanna; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    Urinary clearance of F-FDG and variability in bladder wall FDG uptake may hamper the interpretation and limit the use of FDG-PET/CT for imaging bladder tumors. Nevertheless, careful combined evaluation of both CT and FDG-PET images of the urinary tract can provide useful findings. We present 2 cases of bladder cancer detected by FDG-PET/CT. These cases suggest that FDG uptake can be indicative of malignancy in bladder cancer when viewed in conjunction with CT scans and that whole-body FDG-PET/CT scans should always be reviewed with particular attention to the urinary tract because abnormalities suggestive of bladder cancer can be found unexpectedly.

  1. PET/CT and radiotherapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    De Jong, I J; De Haan, T D; Wiegman, E M; Van Den Bergh, A C M; Pruim, J; Breeuwsma, A J

    2010-10-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the corner stone treatments for patients with prostate cancer. Especially for locally advanced tumors radiotherapy +/- adjuvant androgen deprivation treatment is standard of care. This brings up the need for accurate assessment of extra prostatic tumor growth and/or the presence of nodal metastases for selection of the optimal radiation dose and treatment volume. Morphological imaging like transrectal ultra sound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are routinely used but are limited in their accuracy in detecting extra prostatic extension and nodal metastases. In this article we present a structured review of the literature on positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and radiotherapy in prostate cancer patients with emphasis on: 1) the pretreatment assessment of extra prostatic tumor extension, nodal and distant metastases; 2) the intraprostatic tumor characterization and radiotherapy treatment planning; and 3) treatment evaluation and the use of PET/CT in guidance of salvage treatment. PET/CT is not an appropriate imaging technique for accurate T-staging of prostate cancer prior to radiotherapy. Although macroscopic disease beyond the prostatic capsule and into the periprostatic fat or in seminal vesicle is often accurately detected, the microscopic extension of prostate cancer remains undetected. Choline PET/CT holds a great potential as a single step diagnostic procedure of lymph nodes and skeleton, which could facilitate radiotherapy treatment planning. At present the use of PET/CT for treatment planning in radiotherapy is still experimental. Choline PET based tumor delineation is not yet standardized and different segmentation-algorithms are under study. However, dose escalation using dose-painting is feasible with only limited increases of the doses to the bladder and rectum wall. PET/CT using either acetate or choline is able to detect recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy but stratification of patients

  2. PET/CT in renal, bladder and testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Physician, Chief; Choyke, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Hybrid imaging with PET/CT is having a broad impact in oncology, and in recent years PET/CT is beginning to have an impact in uro-oncology as well. In both bladder and renal cancer there is a need to study the efficacy of other tracers than F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), particularly tracers with only limited renal excretion. Thus, new tracers are being introduced in these malignancies. This review focuses on the clinical role of FDG and other PET agents in renal, bladder and testicular cancer. PMID:26099672

  3. Quantification with a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Spencer L.; Ferrero, Andrea; Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Dedicated breast PET/CT is expected to have utility in local staging, surgical planning, monitoring of therapy response, and detection of residual disease for breast cancer. Quantitative metrics will be integral to several such applications. The authors present a validation of fully 3D data correction schemes for a custom built dedicated breast PET/CT (DbPET/CT) scanner via 18F-FDG phantom scans. Methods: A component-based normalization was implemented, live-time was estimated with a multicomponent model, and a variance reduced randoms estimate was computed from delayed coincidences. Attenuation factors were calculated by using a CT based segmentation scheme while scatter was computed using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method. As no performance standard currently exists for breast PET systems, custom performance tests were created based on prior patient imaging results. Count-rate linearity for live-time and randoms corrections was measured with a decay experiment for a solid polyethylene cylinder phantom with an offset line source. A MC simulation was used to validate attenuation correction, a multicompartment phantom with asymmetric activity distribution provided an assessment of scatter correction, and image uniformity after geometric and detector normalization was measured from a high count scan of a uniform cylinder phantom. Raw data were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) after Fourier rebinning. To quantify performance absolute activity concentrations, contrast recovery coefficients and image uniformity were calculated through region of interest analysis. Results: The most significant source of error was attributed to mispositioning of events due to pile-up, presenting in count-related axial and transaxial nonuniformities that were not corrected for with the normalization method used here. Within the range of singles counts observed during clinical trials residual error after applying all corrections was comparable to that of a

  4. Body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Zhao, Liming; Torigian, Drew A.

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid growth of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-based medical applications, body-wide anatomy recognition on whole-body PET/CT images becomes crucial for quantifying body-wide disease burden. This, however, is a challenging problem and seldom studied due to unclear anatomy reference frame and low spatial resolution of PET images as well as low contrast and spatial resolution of the associated low-dose CT images. We previously developed an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system [15] whose applicability was demonstrated on diagnostic computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images in different body regions on 35 objects. The aim of the present work is to investigate strategies for adapting the previous AAR system to low-dose CT and PET images toward automated body-wide disease quantification. Our adaptation of the previous AAR methodology to PET/CT images in this paper focuses on 16 objects in three body regions - thorax, abdomen, and pelvis - and consists of the following steps: collecting whole-body PET/CT images from existing patient image databases, delineating all objects in these images, modifying the previous hierarchical models built from diagnostic CT images to account for differences in appearance in low-dose CT and PET images, automatically locating objects in these images following object hierarchy, and evaluating performance. Our preliminary evaluations indicate that the performance of the AAR approach on low-dose CT images achieves object localization accuracy within about 2 voxels, which is comparable to the accuracies achieved on diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT images. Object recognition on low-dose CT images from PET/CT examinations without requiring diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT seems feasible.

  5. PET/CT imaging and radioimmunotherapy of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Tagawa, Scott T.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Turkbey, Baris; Capala, Jacek; Choyke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in oncology is emerging as an important imaging tool. The most common radiotracer for PET/CT in oncology, 18F- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), is not very useful in prostate cancer. However, in recent years other PET tracers have improved the accuracy of PET/CT imaging of prostate cancer. Among these, choline, labelled with 18F or 11C, 11C-acetate and 18F- fluoride have demonstrated promising results, and other new radiopharmaceuticals are currently under development and evaluation in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Large prospective clinical PET/CT trials are needed to establish the role of PET/CT in prostate cancer patients. Because there are only limited available therapeutic options for advanced metastatic prostate cancer, there is an urgent need for the development of more effective treatment modalities that could improve outcome. Prostate cancer represents an attractive target for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for several reasons, including pattern of metastatic spread (lymph nodes and bone marrow, sites with good access to circulating antibodies), and small volume disease (ideal for antigen access and antibody delivery). Furthermore, prostate cancer is also radiation sensitive. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed by virtually all prostate cancers, and represents an attractive target for RIT. Anti PSMA RIT demonstrates antitumor activity and is well tolerated. Clinical trials are underway to further improve upon treatment efficacy and patient selection. This review focuses on the recent advances of clinical PET/CT imaging and RIT of prostate

  6. PET/CT: underlying physics, instrumentation, and advances.

    PubMed

    Torres Espallardo, I

    2017-01-12

    Since it was first introduced, the main goal of PET/CT has been to provide both PET and CT images with high clinical quality and to present them to radiologists and specialists in nuclear medicine as a fused, perfectly aligned image. The use of fused PET and CT images quickly became routine in clinical practice, showing the great potential of these hybrid scanners. Thanks to this success, manufacturers have gone beyond considering CT as a mere attenuation corrector for PET, concentrating instead on design high performance PET and CT scanners with more interesting features. Since the first commercial PET/CT scanner became available in 2001, both the PET component and the CT component have improved immensely. In the case of PET, faster scintillation crystals with high stopping power such as LYSO crystals have enabled more sensitive devices to be built, making it possible to reduce the number of undesired coincidence events and to use time of flight (TOF) techniques. All these advances have improved lesion detection, especially in situations with very noisy backgrounds. Iterative reconstruction methods, together with the corrections carried out during the reconstruction and the use of the point-spread function, have improved image quality. In parallel, CT instrumentation has also improved significantly, and 64- and 128-row detectors have been incorporated into the most modern PET/CT scanners. This makes it possible to obtain high quality diagnostic anatomic images in a few seconds that both enable the correction of PET attenuation and provide information for diagnosis. Furthermore, nowadays nearly all PET/CT scanners have a system that modulates the dose of radiation that the patient is exposed to in the CT study in function of the region scanned. This article reviews the underlying physics of PET and CT imaging separately, describes the changes in the instrumentation and standard protocols in a combined PET/CT system, and finally points out the most important

  7. Molecular imaging for prostate cancer: Performance analysis of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT versus choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Michaud, L; Touijer, K A

    2017-06-01

    There is a need for a precise and reliable imaging to improve the management of prostate cancer. In recent years the PET/CT with choline has changed the handling of prostate cancer in Europe, and it is commonly used for initial stratification or for the diagnosis of a biochemical recurrence, although it does not lack limitations. Other markers are being tested, including the ligand of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), that seems to offer encouraging prospects. The goal of this piece of work was to critically review the role of choline and PSMA PET/CT in prostate cancer. A systematic literature review of databases PUBMED/MEDLINE and EMBASE was conducted searching for articles fully published in English on the PET marker in prostate cancer and its clinical application. It seems as 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT is better than PET/CT in prostate cancer to detect primary prostate lesions, initial metastases in the lymph nodes and recurrence. However, further research is required to obtain high-level tests. Also, other PET markers are studied. Moreover, the emergence of a new PET/MR camera could change the performance of PET imaging. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. 18F-FDG PET/CT in Detecting Metastatic Infection in Children.

    PubMed

    Kouijzer, Ilse J E; Blokhuis, Gijsbert J; Draaisma, Jos M T; Oyen, Wim J G; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P

    2016-04-01

    Metastatic infection is a severe complication of bacteremia with high morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET combined with CT (FDG PET/CT) in children suspected of having metastatic infection. The results of FDG PET/CT scans performed in children because of suspected metastatic infection from September 2003 to June 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. The results were compared with the final clinical diagnosis. FDG PET/CT was performed in 13 children with suspected metastatic infection. Of the total number of FDG PET/CT scans, 38% were clinically helpful. Positive predictive value of FDG PET/CT was 71%, and negative predictive value was 100%. FDG PET/CT appears to be a valuable diagnostic technique in children with suspected metastatic infection. Prospective studies of FDG PET/CT as part of a structured diagnostic protocol are needed to assess the exact additional diagnostic value.

  9. Automatic Segmentation and Quantification of White and Brown Adipose Tissues from PET/CT Scans.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Sarfaraz; Green, Aileen; Watane, Arjun; Reiter, David; Chen, Xinjian; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Wood, Bradford; Cypess, Aaron; Osman, Medhat; Bagci, Ulas

    2016-12-06

    In this paper, we investigate the automatic detection of white and brown adipose tissues using Positron Emission Tomography/ Computed Tomography (PET/CT) scans, and develop methods for the quantification of these tissues at the whole-body and body-region levels. We propose a patient-specific automatic adiposity analysis system with two modules. In the first module, we detect white adipose tissue (WAT) and its two sub-types from CT scans: Visceral Adipose Tissue (VAT) and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue (SAT). This process relies conventionally on manual or semi-automated segmentation, leading to inefficient solutions. Our novel framework addresses this challenge by proposing an unsupervised learning method to separate VAT from SAT in the abdominal region for the clinical quantification of central obesity. This step is followed by a context driven label fusion algorithm through sparse 3D Conditional Random Fields (CRF) for volumetric adiposity analysis. In the second module, we automatically detect, segment, and quantify brown adipose tissue (BAT) using PET scans because unlike WAT, BAT is metabolically active. After identifying BAT regions using PET, we perform a co-segmentation procedure utilizing asymmetric complementary information from PET and CT. Finally, we present a new probabilistic distance metric for differentiating BAT from non-BAT regions. Both modules are integrated via an automatic body-region detection unit based on one-shot learning. Experimental evaluations conducted on 151 PET/CT scans achieve state-of-the-art performances in both central obesity as well as brown adiposity quantification.

  10. Opto-acoustic breast imaging with co-registered ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalev, Jason; Clingman, Bryan; Herzog, Don; Miller, Tom; Stavros, A. Thomas; Oraevsky, Alexander; Kist, Kenneth; Dornbluth, N. Carol; Otto, Pamela

    2014-03-01

    We present results from a recent study involving the ImagioTM breast imaging system, which produces fused real-time two-dimensional color-coded opto-acoustic (OA) images that are co-registered and temporally inter- leaved with real-time gray scale ultrasound using a specialized duplex handheld probe. The use of dual optical wavelengths provides functional blood map images of breast tissue and tumors displayed with high contrast based on total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation of the blood. This provides functional diagnostic information pertaining to tumor metabolism. OA also shows morphologic information about tumor neo-vascularity that is complementary to the morphological information obtained with conventional gray scale ultrasound. This fusion technology conveniently enables real-time analysis of the functional opto-acoustic features of lesions detected by readers familiar with anatomical gray scale ultrasound. We demonstrate co-registered opto-acoustic and ultrasonic images of malignant and benign tumors from a recent clinical study that provide new insight into the function of tumors in-vivo. Results from the Feasibility Study show preliminary evidence that the technology may have the capability to improve characterization of benign and malignant breast masses over conventional diagnostic breast ultrasound alone and to improve overall accuracy of breast mass diagnosis. In particular, OA improved speci city over that of conventional diagnostic ultrasound, which could potentially reduce the number of negative biopsies performed without missing cancers.

  11. 18F-FDG silicon photomultiplier PET/CT: A pilot study comparing semi-quantitative measurements with standard PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sonya Young; Hatami, Negin; Davidzon, Guido; Srinivas, Shyam; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Iagaru, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate if the new Discovery Molecular Insights (DMI) PET/CT scanner provides equivalent results compared to the standard of care PET/CT scanners (GE Discovery 600 or GE Discovery 690) used in our clinic and to explore any possible differences in semi-quantitative measurements. Methods The local Institutional Review Board approved the protocol and written informed consent was obtained from each patient. Between September and November 2016, 50 patients underwent a single 18F-FDG injection and two scans: the clinical standard PET/CT followed immediately by the DMI PET/CT scan. We measured SUVmax and SUVmean of different background organs and up to four lesions per patient from data acquired using both scanners. Results DMI PET/CT identified all the 107 lesions detected by standard PET/CT scanners, as well as additional 37 areas of focal increased 18F-FDG uptake. The SUVmax values for all 107 lesions ranged 1.2 to 14.6 (mean ± SD: 2.8 ± 2.8), higher on DMI PET/CT compared with standard of care PET/CT. The mean lesion:aortic arch SUVmax ratio and mean lesion:liver SUVmax ratio were 0.2–15.2 (mean ± SD: 3.2 ± 2.6) and 0.2–8.5 (mean ± SD: 1.9 ± 1.4) respectively, higher on DMI PET/CT than standard PET/CT. These differences were statistically significant (P value < 0.0001) and not correlated to the delay in acquisition of DMI PET data (P < 0.0001). Conclusions Our study shows high performance of the new DMI PET/CT scanner. This may have a significant role in diagnosing and staging disease, as well as for assessing and monitoring responses to therapies. PMID:28582472

  12. 18F-FDG silicon photomultiplier PET/CT: A pilot study comparing semi-quantitative measurements with standard PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Baratto, Lucia; Park, Sonya Young; Hatami, Negin; Davidzon, Guido; Srinivas, Shyam; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Iagaru, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate if the new Discovery Molecular Insights (DMI) PET/CT scanner provides equivalent results compared to the standard of care PET/CT scanners (GE Discovery 600 or GE Discovery 690) used in our clinic and to explore any possible differences in semi-quantitative measurements. The local Institutional Review Board approved the protocol and written informed consent was obtained from each patient. Between September and November 2016, 50 patients underwent a single 18F-FDG injection and two scans: the clinical standard PET/CT followed immediately by the DMI PET/CT scan. We measured SUVmax and SUVmean of different background organs and up to four lesions per patient from data acquired using both scanners. DMI PET/CT identified all the 107 lesions detected by standard PET/CT scanners, as well as additional 37 areas of focal increased 18F-FDG uptake. The SUVmax values for all 107 lesions ranged 1.2 to 14.6 (mean ± SD: 2.8 ± 2.8), higher on DMI PET/CT compared with standard of care PET/CT. The mean lesion:aortic arch SUVmax ratio and mean lesion:liver SUVmax ratio were 0.2-15.2 (mean ± SD: 3.2 ± 2.6) and 0.2-8.5 (mean ± SD: 1.9 ± 1.4) respectively, higher on DMI PET/CT than standard PET/CT. These differences were statistically significant (P value < 0.0001) and not correlated to the delay in acquisition of DMI PET data (P < 0.0001). Our study shows high performance of the new DMI PET/CT scanner. This may have a significant role in diagnosing and staging disease, as well as for assessing and monitoring responses to therapies.

  13. {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT Simulation for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Effect in Patients Already Staged by PET-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Gerard G.; McAleese, Jonathan; Carson, Kathryn J.; Stewart, David P.; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Eakin, Ruth L.; Zatari, Ashraf; Lynch, Tom; Jarritt, Peter H.; Young, V.A. Linda D.C.R.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET), in addition to computed tomography (CT), has an effect in target volume definition for radical radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In previously PET-CT staged patients with NSCLC, we assessed the effect of using an additional planning PET-CT scan for gross tumor volume (GTV) definition. Methods and Materials: A total of 28 patients with Stage IA-IIIB NSCLC were enrolled. All patients had undergone staging PET-CT to ensure suitability for radical RT. Of the 28 patients, 14 received induction chemotherapy. In place of a RT planning CT scan, patients underwent scanning on a PET-CT scanner. In a virtual planning study, four oncologists independently delineated the GTV on the CT scan alone and then on the PET-CT scan. Intraobserver and interobserver variability were assessed using the concordance index (CI), and the results were compared using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: PET-CT improved the CI between observers when defining the GTV using the PET-CT images compared with using CT alone for matched cases (median CI, 0.57 for CT and 0.64 for PET-CT, p = .032). The median of the mean percentage of volume change from GTV{sub CT} to GTV{sub FUSED} was -5.21% for the induction chemotherapy group and 18.88% for the RT-alone group. Using the Mann-Whitney U test, this was significantly different (p = .001). Conclusion: PET-CT RT planning scan, in addition to a staging PET-CT scan, reduces interobserver variability in GTV definition for NSCLC. The GTV size with PET-CT compared with CT in the RT-alone group increased and was reduced in the induction chemotherapy group.

  14. Use of subsequent PET/CT in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients in complete remission following primary therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Fan, Wei; Xia, Zhong-Jun; Hu, Ying-Ying; Lin, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Ya-Rui; Li, Zhi-Ming; Liang, Pei-Yan; Li, Yuan-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Interim 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (I-PET/CT) is a powerful tool for monitoring the response to therapy in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). This retrospective study aimed to determine when and how to use I-PET/CT in DLBCL. A total of 197 patients treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) were enrolled between October 2005 and July 2011; PET/CT was performed at the time of diagnosis (PET/CT0), after 2 and 4 cycles of chemotherapy (PET/CT2 and PET/CT4, respectively), and at the end of treatment (F-PET/CT). According to the International Harmonization Project for Response Criteria in Lymphoma, 110 patients had negative PET/CT2 scans, and 87 had positive PET/CT2 scans. The PET/CT2-negative patients had significantly higher 3-year progression-free survival rate (75.8% vs. 38.2%) and 3-year overall survival rate (93.5% vs. 55.6%) than PET/CT2-positive patients. All PET/CT2-negative patients remained negative at PET/CT4, but 3 were positive at F-PET/CT. Among the 87 PET/CT2-positive patients, 57 remained positive at F-PET/CT, and 32 progressed during chemotherapy (15 at PET/CT4 and 17 at F-PET/CT). Comparing PET/CT4 with PET/CT0, 7 patients exhibited progression, and 8 achieved partial remission. Comparing F-PET/CT with PET/CT0, 10 patients exhibited progression, and 7 achieved partial remission. In conclusion, our results indicate that I-PET/CT should be performed after 2 rather than 4 cycles of immunochemotherapy in DLBCL patients. There is a limited role for subsequent PET/CT in the detection of relapse in PET/CT2-negative patients, but repeat PET/CT is required if the PET/CT2 findings are positive.

  15. Transient Osteoporosis of the Hip on FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Ulaner, Gary A; Sawan, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH) is characterized by bone pain, osteopenia, and bone marrow edema in the absence of trauma. We present a 59-year-old man with chronic lymphocytic leukemia who underwent F-FDG PET/CT. F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated mildly FDG-avid lymph nodes consistent for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, as well as FDG-avidity in the right femoral head with corresponding osteopenia, rather than a focal lytic lesion. MR demonstrated bone marrow edema consistent with TOH. TOH is benign and self-limiting. Corresponding imaging may prevent misdiagnosis of benign FDG-avid TOH as other more severe hip processes such as tumors or infection.

  16. Systemic Immune Response to Vaccination on FDG-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Mingos, Mark; Howard, Stephanie; Giacalone, Nicholas; Kozono, David; Jacene, Heather

    2016-12-01

    A patient with newly diagnosed right lung cancer had transient (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-avid left axillary lymph nodes and intense splenic FDG uptake on positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). History revealed that the patient received a left-sided influenza vaccine 2-3 days before the examination. Although inflammatory FDG uptake in ipsilateral axillary nodes is reported, to our knowledge, this is the first report of visualization of the systemic immune response in the spleen related to the influenza vaccination on FDG-PET/CT. The history, splenic uptake and time course on serial FDG-PET/CT helped to avoid a false-positive interpretation for progressing lung cancer and alteration of the radiation therapy plan.

  17. Uterine Epithelioid Angiosarcoma on F-18 FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Pil; Lim, Sang Moo

    2013-06-01

    Uterine epithelioid angiosarcoma can have conventional imaging characteristics similar to those of other uterine tumors, such as leiomyoma, leiomyosarcomas or hemangioendothelioma. Uterine epithelioid angiosarcoma exhibiting increased fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) activity can be misdiagnosed. A 61-year-old woman who was diagnosed with uterine epithelioid angiosarcoma underwent F-18 FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) as a part of the pretreatment work up for surgery. F-18 FDG PET/CT showed an intense F-18 FDG uptake in the uterus in addition to increased F-18 FDG uptake at the paraaortic and aortocaval lymph nodes. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of intense F-18 FDG uptake in uterine epithelioid angiosarcoma in Korea.

  18. PET/CT-guided Interventions: Personnel Radiation Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, E. Ronan Thornton, Raymond; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Hsu, Meier; Quinn, Brian; Dauer, Lawrence T.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo quantify radiation exposure to the primary operator and staff during PET/CT-guided interventional procedures.MethodsIn this prospective study, 12 patients underwent PET/CT-guided interventions over a 6 month period. Radiation exposure was measured for the primary operator, the radiology technologist, and the nurse anesthetist by means of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. Radiation exposure was correlated with the procedure time and the use of in-room image guidance (CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound).ResultsThe median effective dose was 0.02 (range 0-0.13) mSv for the primary operator, 0.01 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the nurse anesthetist, and 0.02 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the radiology technologist. The median extremity dose equivalent for the operator was 0.05 (range 0-0.62) mSv. Radiation exposure correlated with procedure duration and with the use of in-room image guidance. The median operator effective dose for the procedure was 0.015 mSv when conventional biopsy mode CT was used, compared to 0.06 mSv for in-room image guidance, although this did not achieve statistical significance as a result of the small sample size (p = 0.06).ConclusionThe operator dose from PET/CT-guided procedures is not significantly different than typical doses from fluoroscopically guided procedures. The major determinant of radiation exposure to the operator from PET/CT-guided interventional procedures is time spent in close proximity to the patient.

  19. Disease quantification on PET/CT images without object delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Wu, Caiyun; Fitzpatrick, Danielle; Winchell, Nicole; Schuster, Stephen J.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2017-03-01

    The derivation of quantitative information from images to make quantitative radiology (QR) clinically practical continues to face a major image analysis hurdle because of image segmentation challenges. This paper presents a novel approach to disease quantification (DQ) via positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images that explores how to decouple DQ methods from explicit dependence on object segmentation through the use of only object recognition results to quantify disease burden. The concept of an object-dependent disease map is introduced to express disease severity without performing explicit delineation and partial volume correction of either objects or lesions. The parameters of the disease map are estimated from a set of training image data sets. The idea is illustrated on 20 lung lesions and 20 liver lesions derived from 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-PET/CT scans of patients with various types of cancers and also on 20 NEMA PET/CT phantom data sets. Our preliminary results show that, on phantom data sets, "disease burden" can be estimated to within 2% of known absolute true activity. Notwithstanding the difficulty in establishing true quantification on patient PET images, our results achieve 8% deviation from "true" estimates, with slightly larger deviations for small and diffuse lesions where establishing ground truth becomes really questionable, and smaller deviations for larger lesions where ground truth set up becomes more reliable. We are currently exploring extensions of the approach to include fully automated body-wide DQ, extensions to just CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alone, to PET/CT performed with radiotracers other than FDG, and other functional forms of disease maps.

  20. PET/CT-guided interventions: personnel radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Ryan, E Ronan; Thornton, Raymond; Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Erinjeri, Joseph P; Hsu, Meier; Quinn, Brian; Dauer, Lawrence T; Solomon, Stephen B

    2013-08-01

    To quantify radiation exposure to the primary operator and staff during PET/CT-guided interventional procedures. In this prospective study, 12 patients underwent PET/CT-guided interventions over a 6 month period. Radiation exposure was measured for the primary operator, the radiology technologist, and the nurse anesthetist by means of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. Radiation exposure was correlated with the procedure time and the use of in-room image guidance (CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound). The median effective dose was 0.02 (range 0-0.13) mSv for the primary operator, 0.01 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the nurse anesthetist, and 0.02 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the radiology technologist. The median extremity dose equivalent for the operator was 0.05 (range 0-0.62) mSv. Radiation exposure correlated with procedure duration and with the use of in-room image guidance. The median operator effective dose for the procedure was 0.015 mSv when conventional biopsy mode CT was used, compared to 0.06 mSv for in-room image guidance, although this did not achieve statistical significance as a result of the small sample size (p = 0.06). The operator dose from PET/CT-guided procedures is not significantly different than typical doses from fluoroscopically guided procedures. The major determinant of radiation exposure to the operator from PET/CT-guided interventional procedures is time spent in close proximity to the patient.

  1. Purulent lupus panniculitis unmasked by FDG-PET/CT scan

    PubMed Central

    van der Geest, Kornelis S.M.; Moerman, Rada V.; Koopmans, Klaas P.; Holman, Nicole D.; Janssen, Wilbert M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Lupus panniculitis (LP) is a unique variant of cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Clinical manifestations are typically mild and include erythema, nodules, and small ulcers. In certain cases, diagnosing LP may be challenging. Skin overlying the typical subcutaneous inflammation may appear normal, and bacterial superinfections of the skin sometimes mask the underlying LP. It has been suggested that a computed tomography (CT) scan may help to identify obscure LP lesions. Here, we report a case of a 54-year-old woman with an unusually severe form of LP, in which the full disease extent was only revealed by a fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT scan. Patient concerns/Diagnoses/Interventions/Outcomes: Our patient initially presented with a bacterial infection of the skin. After initial improvement with antibiotic treatment, new erythematous lesions and sterile subcutaneous pus collections developed. An FDG-PET/CT scan revealed extensive subcutaneous inflammation at sites that had appeared normal during physical examination and on CT scan. As the subcutaneous lesions showed a remarkably linear pattern on FDG-PET/CT scan, the patient was suspected of having LP. After confirmation of this diagnosis by a deep-skin biopsy, our patient was treated with systemic glucocorticoids. Eventually, our patient succumbed to complications of LP and its treatment. Lessons: Our case demonstrates that clinical manifestations of LP are not always mild and that timely diagnosis is needed. Furthermore, we show that obscure LP lesions are more readily identified on an FDG-PET/CT scan than CT scan. PMID:27902603

  2. 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT in Patients With Biochemical Prostate Cancer Recurrence and Negative 18F-Choline-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Bluemel, Christina; Krebs, Markus; Polat, Bülent; Linke, Fränze; Eiber, Matthias; Samnick, Samuel; Lapa, Constantin; Lassmann, Michael; Riedmiller, Hubertus; Czernin, Johannes; Rubello, Domenico; Bley, Thorsten; Kropf, Saskia; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Buck, Andreas K.; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Investigating the value of 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT in biochemically recurring prostate cancer patients with negative 18F-choline-PET/CT. Patients and Methods One hundred thirty-nine consecutive patients with biochemical recurrence after curative (surgery and/or radiotherapy) therapy were offered participation in this sequential clinical imaging approach. Patients first underwent an 18F-choline-PET/CT. If negative, an additional 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CTwas offered. One hundred twenty-five of 139 eligible patients were included in the study; 32 patients underwent additional 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT. Patients with equivocal findings (n = 5) on 18F-choline-PET/CT and those who declined the additional 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT (n = 9) were excluded. Images were analyzed visually for the presence of suspicious lesions. Findings on PET/CT were correlated with PSA level, PSA doubling time (dt), and PSA velocity (vel). Results The overall detection rates were 85.6% (107/125) for the sequential imaging approach and 74.4% (93/125) for 18F-choline-PET/CT alone. 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT detected sites of recurrence in 43.8% (14/32) of the choline-negative patients. Detection rates of the sequential imaging approach and 18F-choline-PET/CT alone increased with higher serum PSA levels and PSA vel. Subgroup analysis of 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT in 18F-choline negative patients revealed detection rates of 28.6%, 45.5%, and 71.4% for PSA levels of 0.2 or greater to less than 1 ng/mL, 1 to 2 ng/mL, and greater than 2 ng/mL, respectively. Conclusions The sequential imaging approach designed to limit 68Ga-PSMA imaging to patients with negative choline scans resulted in high detection rates. 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT identified sites of recurrent disease in 43.8% of the patients with negative 18F-choline PET/CT scans. PMID:26975008

  3. Increased (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in benign, nonphysiologic lesions found on whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT): accumulated data from four years of experience with PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Metser, Ur; Even-Sapir, Einat

    2007-05-01

    The use of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET) in the field of oncology is rapidly evolving; however, (18)F-FDG is not tumor specific. Aside from physiological uptake (18)F-FDG also may accumulate in benign processes. Knowledge of these (18)F-FDG-avid nonmalignant lesions is essential for accurate PET interpretation in oncologic patients to avoid a false-positive interpretation. Through the systematic review of the reports of PET/computed tomography (CT) studies performed in oncologic patients during a 6-month period, we found benign nonphysiological uptake of (18)F-FDG in more than 25% of studies. In half of these, (18)F-FDG uptake was moderate or marked in intensity, similar to that of malignant sites. A total of 73% of benign lesions were inflammatory in nature, with post-traumatic bone and soft-tissue abnormalities (including iatrogenic injury) and benign tumors accounting for the remainder. The differentiation of benign from malignant uptake of (18)F-FDG on PET alone may be particularly challenging as a result of the low anatomical resolution of PET and paucity of anatomical landmarks. Fusion imaging, namely PET/CT, has been shown to improve not only the sensitivity of PET interpretation but also its specificity. Aside from better anatomical localization of lesions on PET/CT, morphological characterization of lesions on CT often may improve the diagnostic accuracy of nonspecific (18)F-FDG uptake. Correlation with CT on fused PET/CT data may obviate the need for further evaluation or biopsy in more than one-third of scintigraphic equivocal lesions. Familiarity with (18)F-FDG-avid nonmalignant lesions also may extend the use of (18)F-FDG-PET imaging beyond the field of oncology. We have tabulated our experience with benign entities associated with increased (18)F-FDG uptake on whole-body PET/CT from 12,000 whole-body (18)F-FDG-PET/CT studies performed during a 4-year period.

  4. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Showing Intense Tracer Uptake on PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Noto, Benjamin; Weckesser, Matthias; Buerke, Boris; Pixberg, Michaela; Avramovic, Nemanja

    2017-03-01

    A 70-year-old man with suspected prostate cancer was referred for Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT (short PSMA PET/CT) for staging of tumor extent. Apart from vivid tracer uptake in the prostate gland and osseous metastasis, PSMA PET/CT revealed a large soft tissue mass with calcifications in the left upper abdomen showing intense tracer uptake. Histologic examination revealed the mass to be a gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

  5. Nonrigid Image Registration for Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning With PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ireland, Rob H. . E-mail: r.ireland@sheffield.ac.uk; Dyker, Karen E.; Barber, David C.; Wood, Steven M.; Hanney, Michael B.; Tindale, Wendy B.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Conway, John; Robinson, Martin H.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Head and neck radiotherapy planning with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) requires the images to be reliably registered with treatment planning CT. Acquiring PET/CT in treatment position is problematic, and in practice for some patients it may be beneficial to use diagnostic PET/CT for radiotherapy planning. Therefore, the aim of this study was first to quantify the image registration accuracy of PET/CT to radiotherapy CT and, second, to assess whether PET/CT acquired in diagnostic position can be registered to planning CT. Methods and Materials: Positron emission tomography/CT acquired in diagnostic and treatment position for five patients with head and neck cancer was registered to radiotherapy planning CT using both rigid and nonrigid image registration. The root mean squared error for each method was calculated from a set of anatomic landmarks marked by four independent observers. Results: Nonrigid and rigid registration errors for treatment position PET/CT to planning CT were 2.77 {+-} 0.80 mm and 4.96 {+-} 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.001. Applying the nonrigid registration to diagnostic position PET/CT produced a more accurate match to the planning CT than rigid registration of treatment position PET/CT (3.20 {+-} 1.22 mm and 4.96 {+-} 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.012). Conclusions: Nonrigid registration provides a more accurate registration of head and neck PET/CT to treatment planning CT than rigid registration. In addition, nonrigid registration of PET/CT acquired with patients in a standardized, diagnostic position can provide images registered to planning CT with greater accuracy than a rigid registration of PET/CT images acquired in treatment position. This may allow greater flexibility in the timing of PET/CT for head and neck cancer patients due to undergo radiotherapy.

  6. Impact of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography on computed tomography defined target volumes in radiation treatment planning of esophageal cancer: reduction in geographic misses with equal inter-observer variability: PET/CT improves esophageal target definition.

    PubMed

    Schreurs, L M A; Busz, D M; Paardekooper, G M R M; Beukema, J C; Jager, P L; Van der Jagt, E J; van Dam, G M; Groen, H; Plukker, J Th M; Langendijk, J A

    2010-08-01

    Target volume definition in modern radiotherapy is based on planning computed tomography (CT). So far, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has not been included in planning modality in volume definition of esophageal cancer. This study evaluates fusion of FDG-PET and CT in patients with esophageal cancer in terms of geographic misses and inter-observer variability in volume definition. In 28 esophageal cancer patients, gross, clinical and planning tumor volumes (GTV; CTV; PTV) were defined on planning CT by three radiation oncologists. After software-based emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) fusion, tumor delineations were redefined by the same radiation-oncologists. Concordance indexes (CCI's) for CT and PET/CT based GTV, CTV and PTV were calculated for each pair of observers. Incorporation of PET/CT modified tumor delineation in 17/28 subjects (61%) in cranial and/or caudal direction. Mean concordance indexes for CT-based CTV and PTV were 72 (55-86)% and 77 (61-88)%, respectively, vs. 72 (47-99)% and 76 (54-87)% for PET/CT-based CTV and PTV. Paired analyses showed no significant difference in CCI between CT and PET/CT. Combining FDG-PET and CT may improve target volume definition with less geographic misses, but without significant effects on inter-observer variability in esophageal cancer.

  7. Dual-modality PET/CT instrumentation-today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, Markus Nowak; Beyer, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has proven to be a clinically valuable imaging modality, particularly for oncology staging and therapy follow-up. The introduction of combined PET/CT imaging has helped address challenging imaging situations when anatomical information on PET-only was inadequate for accurate lesion localization. After a decade of PET/CT these combined systems have matured technically. Today, whole-body oncology staging is available with PET/CT in 15 min, or less. This review details recent developments in combined PET/CT instrumentation and points to implications for major applications in clinical oncology. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Specificity of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT for Prostate Cancer - Myths and Reality.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun

    2017-01-01

    68Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT for imaging prostate cancer is a novel imaging technique, which is rapidly gaining popularity. Sufficient evidence has been accumulated in literature regarding the usefulness of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT in prostate cancer. Recently literature regarding the localization of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging in non-prostatic malignancies is also published, thus questioning the specificity of the tracer with regards to prostate cancer. This commentary tries to address the issue of specificity of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT and its relevance in imaging prostate cancer.

  9. Specificity of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT for Prostate Cancer - Myths and Reality

    PubMed Central

    Sasikumar, Arun

    2017-01-01

    68Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT for imaging prostate cancer is a novel imaging technique, which is rapidly gaining popularity. Sufficient evidence has been accumulated in literature regarding the usefulness of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in prostate cancer. Recently literature regarding the localization of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging in non-prostatic malignancies is also published, thus questioning the specificity of the tracer with regards to prostate cancer. This commentary tries to address the issue of specificity of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT and its relevance in imaging prostate cancer. PMID:28242976

  10. Diffuse hepatic amebiasis detected by FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiyan; Zhao, Jinhua; Xing, Yan; Chen, Xiang; Song, Jianhua

    2015-02-01

    A 39-year-old man presented with sudden decreased visual acuity in his left eye. Orbital CT and MRI revealed a soft tissue lesion in his left orbital apex. FDG PET/CT showed increased FDG uptake by the left orbital lesion, abnormal focal FDG uptake in the soft tissues of the external ears, and abnormal heterogeneous FDG activity throughout the liver. Percutaneous liver biopsy, external auditory canal discharge, and stool specimens revealed amebiasis. The patient responded to antiamebic therapy, and his lesions improved. The case demonstrates that during its early stage, hepatic amebiasis may be associated with a relatively heterogeneous pattern of FDG uptake.

  11. FDG PET/CT findings of common bile duct tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Wang, Yang; Gong, Jing; Zuo, Changjing

    2014-01-01

    Common bile duct (CBD) tuberculosis is rare. A 39-year-old woman was referred because of a 5-month history of abdominal pain. Abdominal enhanced MRI and CT showed dilatation of the distal CBD with irregularly thickened wall. Enhanced CT revealed enlarged retroperitoneal lymph nodes. FDG PET/CT showed increased FDG uptake of the CBD lesion and several retroperitoneal lymph nodes with slight FDG uptake. CBD cholangiocarcinoma with retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis was suspected. CBD tuberculosis was confirmed by endoluminal biopsy. Tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of abnormal biliary FDG accumulation, particularly in tuberculosis endemic areas.

  12. Clinical significance of FDG-PET/CT at the postoperative surveillance in the breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jung, Na Young; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Sung Hun; Chae, Byung Joo; Seo, Ye Young

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical role of [(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) compared with conventional imaging (CI) to detect locoregional recurrence or distant metastasis during postoperative surveillance of patients with breast cancer. We included 1,819 examinations of 1,161 patients, who underwent FDG-PET/CT and CI, including mammography, breast ultrasound, whole-body bone scintigraphy, and chest radiography for postoperative surveillance. All patients had a history of surgery with or without adjuvant treatment due to more than stage II breast cancer between November 2003 and November 2009. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of CI, FDG-PET/CT, and combined CI and FDG-PET/CT for detecting locoregional recurrence, distant metastasis, and incidental cancer. We also analyzed false-positive and false-negative results in both FDG-PET/CT and CI. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CI were 75.4, 98.7, 93.4, and 94.3 %. Those of FDG-PET/CT were 97.5, 98.8, 95.4, and 99.4 %. Those of the combined results were 98.6, 98.2, 96.7, and 99.7 %. Sensitivity of FDG-PET/CT was significantly higher than that of CI (P < 0.05). Sensitivity of combined CI and FDG-PET/CT results improved, but they were not significantly different from those of FDG-PET/CT alone (P = 0.43). Seventeen false-positive and nine false-negative cases were detected with FDG-PET/CT, and 19 false-positive and 88 false-negative cases were detected with CI. FDG-PET/CT is considered as an acceptable diagnostic imaging modality for postoperative surveillance of patients with breast cancer.

  13. TU-AB-BRA-06: Texture Feature Reproducibility Between PET/CT and PET/MR Imaging Modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Galavis, P; Friedman, K; Chandarana, H; Jackson, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Radiomics involves the extraction of texture features from different imaging modalities with the purpose of developing models to predict patient treatment outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate texture feature reproducibility across [18F]FDG PET/CT and [18F]FDG PET/MR imaging in patients with primary malignancies. Methods: Twenty five prospective patients with solid tumors underwent clinical [18F]FDG PET/CT scan followed by [18F]FDG PET/MR scans. In all patients the lesions were identified using nuclear medicine reports. The images were co-registered and segmented using an in-house auto-segmentation method. Fifty features, based on the intensity histogram, second and high order matrices, were extracted from the segmented regions from both image data sets. One-way random-effects ANOVA model of the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to establish texture feature correlations between both data sets. Results: Fifty features were classified based on their ICC values, which were found in the range from 0.1 to 0.86, in three categories: high, intermediate, and low. Ten features extracted from second and high-order matrices showed large ICC ≥ 0.70. Seventeen features presented intermediate 0.5 ≤ ICC ≤ 0.65 and the remaining twenty three presented low ICC ≤ 0.45. Conclusion: Features with large ICC values could be reliable candidates for quantification as they lead to similar results from both imaging modalities. Features with small ICC indicates a lack of correlation. Therefore, the use of these features as a quantitative measure will lead to different assessments of the same lesion depending on the imaging modality from where they are extracted. This study shows the importance of the need for further investigation and standardization of features across multiple imaging modalities.

  14. Advances in image-guided radiation therapy-the role of PET-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Heron, Dwight E. . E-mail: heronD2@upmc.edu; Smith, Ryan P.; Andrade, Regiane S.

    2006-04-01

    In the era of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), the greatest challenge remains target delineation, as the opportunity to maximize cures while simultaneously decreasing radiation dose to the surrounding normal tissues is to be realized. Over the last 2 decades, technological advances in radiographic imaging, biochemistry, and molecular biology have played an increasing role in radiation treatment planning, delivery, and evaluation of response. Previously, fluoroscopy formed the basis of radiation treatment planning. Beginning in the late 1980s, computed tomography (CT) has become the basis for modern radiation treatment planning and delivery, coincident with the rise of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). Additionally, multi-modality anatomic imaging registration was the solution pursued to augment delineation of tumors and surrounding structures on CT-based treatment planning. Although these imaging modalities provide the customary anatomic details necessary for radiation treatment planning, they have limitations, including difficulty with identification of small tumor deposits, tumor extension, and distinction from scar tissues. To overcome these limitations, PET and, more recently, PET-CT have been innovative regarding the extent of disease appraisal, target delineation in the treatment planning, and assessment of therapy response. We review the role of functional imaging in IGRT as it reassures transformations on the field of radiation oncology. As we move toward the era of IGRT, the use of multi-modality imaging fusion, and the introduction of more sensitive and specific PET-CT tracers may further assist target definition. Furthermore, the potential to predict early outcome or even detect early recurrence of tumor, may allow for the tailoring of intervention in cancer patients. The convergence of a biological target volume, and perhaps multi-tracer tumor, molecular, and genetic profile tumors will probably be vital in cancer treatment

  15. Lymph Node Metastasis from Tall-Cell Thyroid Cancer Negative on 18F-FDG PET/CT and Detected by 18F-Choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, Arnoldo; Massollo, Michela; Bandelloni, Roberto; Arlandini, Anselmo; Foppiani, Luca

    2015-08-01

    A 77-year-old woman underwent thyroidectomy and (131)I remnant ablation for tall-cell differentiated cancer (DTC) of the left lobe. Detectable Tg levels (4.1 μg/L) under TSH suppression, with undetectable serum Tg-antibody levels, prompted neck ultrasonography, which revealed a lymph node in the left laterocervical region and in the right retroclavicular region. (18)F-FDG PET/CT showed uptake by the left lymph node. (18)F-choline PET/CT showed increased uptake by both lymph nodes. Histopathology revealed DTC solid metastasis in the left lymph node and solid and cystic metastasis in the right one. (18)F-choline PET/CT can locate virulent DTC recurrence, thereby increasing (18)F-FDG PET/CT information.

  16. 18F-DOPA PET/CT but not 68Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT revealed the underlying cause of ectopic Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; Ahonen, Aapo; Seppänen, Marko

    2012-09-01

    F-DOPA PET/CT but not Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT revealed the cause of ectopic Cushing syndrome in a 61-year-old man. The patient presented with rapid weight gain, swollen legs, and sleep disturbances. Plasma potassium level was 2.7 mM (reference range, 3.3-4.9 mM), 24-hour urinary cortisol level was 13,124 nmol (reference range, 30-144 nmol), and plasma adrenocorticotropin level was 61 ng/L (reference range, <48 g/L). CT demonstrated prominent lymph nodes in the left lung hilus and hyperplastic adrenals but no primary tumor. Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, which is recommended as the first-line PET imaging, was performed, but it was not diagnostic. Imaging with F-DOPA PET/CT revealed the underlying cause.

  17. Cerebellar Metastases From Prostate Cancer on 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mico; Hsiao, Edward; Turner, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen PET/CT is increasingly used to evaluate extent of disease in prostate carcinoma. Parenchymal brain metastases originating from prostate cancer have highly variable imaging appearance. We present a 77-year-old man with cerebellar metastasis from prostate cancer showing focal uptake on prostate-specific membrane antigen PET/CT.

  18. [Ga-68-PSMA PET/CT for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Hellwig, D; Moosbauer, J; Eilles, C

    2014-11-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed as a cell surface protein physiologically in the prostate and can be found in all stages of prostate cancer. Even in castration-resistant prostate cancers, this overexpression of PSMA occurs. Due to the enzymatic activity of PSMA it was possible develop specific inhibitors from which "small molecule" radiopharmaceuticals were derived. By coupling the specific binding motif glutamate-urea-lysine with the chelator HBED-CC, which complexes Ga-68 very effectively, a new radiopharmaceutical is available for Ga-68-PSMA-PET/CT. According to the first results in patients with prostate carcinoma, this new diagnostic tool exhibited advantages in image quality compared to choline-PET/CT. An initial study demonstrated the higher contrast of the PET signal and an improved diagnostic accuracy. The properties of even further new PSMA PET radiopharmaceuticals can be of increasing importance for the diagnostic work-up of prostate cancer in all stages. In conjunction with therapeutic PSMA radiopharmaceuticals, a new field of theragnostics is opened. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. [PET-CT for nuclear medicine diagnostics of multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A

    2014-06-01

    Functional or morphofunctional imaging modalities are used in myeloma patients for the diagnosis and therapy management within research protocols. Despite new staging criteria, which take into account the viability of a myeloma lesion, positron emission tomography (PET) is not used routinely. The impact of PET is therefore open. The role of PET and PET computed tomography (PET-CT) for the diagnosis and therapy management is discussed. The use of PET with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) allows the measurement of viable myeloma lesions and correlates with the stage of disease. A negative FDG examination correlates with a better prognosis. Furthermore, the number of focal lesions as well as the whole functional volume of myeloma lesions in FDG have a prognostic impact. Several studies have demonstrated the impact of FDG for the assessment of therapy monitoring and show that FDG is an earlier indicator for therapy response as compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The CT component of the new hybrid systems allows the assessment of osteolytic lesions in CT and their viability in FDG. The combination of PET with an MRT scanner allows the simultaneous measurement of bone marrow infiltration, focal lesions and their viability. The use of modern hybrid scanners, such as PET-CT and PET-MRT facilitates the simultaneous measurement of viable myeloma lesions, osteolytic lesions and bone marrow infiltration in the whole body; therefore, it is expected that these imaging modalities will play a greater role both in diagnosis and therapy management.

  20. Designing of High-Volume PET/CT Facility with Optimal Reduction of Radiation Exposure to the Staff: Implementation and Optimization in a Tertiary Health Care Facility in India

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Ashish Kumar; Singh, Abhijith Mohan; Mithun, Sneha; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu C.; Shetye, Bhakti; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been in use for a few decades but with its fusion with computed tomography (CT) in 2001, the new PET/CT integrated system has become very popular and is now a key influential modality for patient management in oncology. However, along with its growing popularity, a growing concern of radiation safety among the radiation professionals has become evident. We have judiciously developed a PET/CT facility with optimal shielding, along with an efficient workflow to perform high volume procedures and minimize the radiation exposure to the staff and the general public by reducing unnecessary patient proximity to the staff and general public. PMID:26420990

  1. [Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the interim PET/CT in lymphoma treatment in the prediction of complete metabolic response].

    PubMed

    Pilkington Woll, J P; García Vicente, A M; Talavera Rubio, M P; Palomar Muñoz, A M; Jiménez Londoño, G; León Martín, A; Calle Primo, C; Soriano Castejón, A M

    2013-03-01

    To compare two different methods for the interpretation of interim PET/CT (PET/CT-i) in lymphomas, and to establish which one best predicts a complete metabolic response (CMR) in the PET/CT study at the end of treatment (PET/CT-et). Retrospective longitudinal analysis of the PET/CT studies for staging (PET/CT-s), PET/CT-i and PET/CT-et of 65 patients, 35 Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and 30 Non-HL. The PET/CT-i was performed between the second and fourth chemotherapy cycle. It was interpreted using two different criteria: qualitative criteria (5 point visual scale), semiquantitative criteria (percentage difference between the lesion with more SUVmax in the PET/CT-s and PET/CT-i). We analyzed the likelihood of obtaining a CMR in the PET/CT-et according to the results obtained on the PET/CT-i with these two criteria. We obtained sensitivity (S), specificity (Sp), positive predictive values (PPV), negative predictive values (NPV) and likelihood ratio (LR) for the qualitative/semiquantitative method of 91%/80%, 76.2%/67%, 88.9%/83.3%, 80%/60.9% and 32%/7.8%, respectively, to predict a CMR in the PET/CT-et. There were no statistically significant differences between the LR of both methods (p=0.1942). We found clear differences in S, Sp, PPV and NPV between both interpretation criteria for the PET/CT-i to predict a CMR in the PET/CT-et. Nevertheless, we cannot confirm the superiority of the qualitative method over the semiqualitative method for this purpose as no statistically significance differences were found in their LR in our study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  2. Accuracy of FDG-PET/CT and paraneoplastic antibodies in diagnosing cancer in paraneoplastic neurological syndromes.

    PubMed

    Vatankulu, B; Yilmaz Aksoy, S; Asa, S; Sager, S; Sayman, H B; Halac, M; Sonmezoglu, K

    2016-01-01

    There is still no consensus about whether to perform PET/CT to detect carcinoma in paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) in patients with or without antibodies. The aim of this study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of PET/CT and antibodies in patients with PNS. A retrospective study was conducted on patients with clinically suspected PNS between 2008 and 2013. The association between histopathological findings, paraneoplastic antibodies, and PET/CT findings were evaluated. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of underlying malignancy were calculated for PET/CT and paraneoplastic antibodies. A total of 42 patients were analyzed. Of these 42 patients, 32 (75%) had a classical PNS, 6 (14%) had positive PET/CT findings, and 34 were tested for the presence of antibodies (anti-Hu Ab, anti-Yo Ab, and anti-Ri Ab). Twenty one of 34 patients had positive antibodies. Of the 6 patients with positive PET/CT findings, 6 had positive histopathological results. Among 21 patients with positive biomarkers, carcinoma was confirmed only in 5 patients. One patient with negative antibodies, but positive PET/CT findings, was diagnosed with a tumor. Gastric carcinoma was detected in 1 patient with negative PET/CT findings and antibodies during follow-up. Based on the results, PET/CT was found to have 85.71% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive and 97.22% negative predictive values in the detection of tumors. PET/CT has a certain diagnostic accuracy for detecting underlying malignancy in patients with PNS, regardless of the presence of paraneoplastic antibodies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  3. FDG PET/CT appearance of local osteosarcoma recurrences in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Susan E; Shulkin, Barry L; Gelfand, Michael J; McCarville, M Beth

    2017-09-08

    Osteosarcoma is the most common pediatric malignant bone tumor, frequently surgically managed with limb salvage rather than amputation. Local recurrences are seen in up to 9% of osteosarcoma patients, with CT and MRI imaging often limited by metal artifacts. To describe the [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT appearance of local osteosarcoma recurrences with correlation to findings on other imaging modalities. A retrospective review of pediatric osteosarcoma patients imaged with FDG PET/CT was performed in patients with pathologically proven local recurrences. FDG PET/CT findings were reviewed and correlated with available comparison imaging studies. Ten local osteosarcoma recurrences in eight pediatric osteosarcoma patients were imaged with FDG PET/CT. All eight patients had a local recurrence after limb salvage; two patients had a second local recurrence after amputation. All local recurrences were seen with FDG PET/CT, demonstrating solid (n=5) or peripheral/nodular (n=5) FDG uptake patterns. Maximum standard uptake values (SUVs) ranged from 3.0 to 15.7. In five recurrences imaged with FDG PET/CT and MRI, MRI was limited or nondiagnostic in three. In four recurrences imaged with FDG PET/CT and bone scan, the bone scan was negative in three. Local osteosarcoma recurrences are well visualized by FDG PET/CT, demonstrating either solid or peripheral/nodular FDG uptake with a wide range of maximum SUVs. FDG PET/CT demonstrates the full extent of local recurrences, while MRI can be limited by artifact from metallic hardware. PET/CT appears to be more sensitive than bone scan in detecting local osteosarcoma recurrences.

  4. PET-CT changes the management and improves outcome in patients with recurrent colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tural, Deniz; Selçukbiricik, Fatih; Sager, Sait; Akar, Emre; Yildiz, Ozcan; Serdengeçti, S Heyla

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to analyze the impact of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) on management change in patients with suspected or proven colorectal cancer recurrence, and to assess the effect of this management change on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). We retrospectively evaluated 122 patients with suspected potentially resectable recurrent colorectal cancer who underwent PET/CT scan. We determined management plans for these patients before and after the PET/CT examination. While previous conventional imaging studies had revealed solitary metastases, additional sites of disease were determined by PET/CT scan in 52/122 (42%) patients. PET/CT examination results changed the treatment plan to curative intent in 35 (37%) patients. While the median PFS was 22 months (95% CI, 11.2-32.6 months) among the patients planned to receive curative treatment after the PET/CT scan, it was 11 months (95% CI, 8.1-13.9 months) in patients planned to receive curative treatment before the PET/CT examination, and the difference between median PFS durations was statistically significant (HR, 0.51 [95% CI, 0.32 - 0.88], P = 0.004). Furthermore, OS was significantly longer in patients planned to receive curative treatment after the PET/CT scan (27 months [95% CI, 22.1-31.9]) compared with those who received curative treatment before the PET/CT scan (21 months [95% CI, 15.6 - 26.4]), and the difference was statistically significant (HR, 0.63 [95% CI, 0.42 - 0.89], P = 0.045). The present study demonstrates the significant impact of PET/CT on the management and outcome in patients with recurrent colorectal cancer.

  5. Posttreatment PET/CT Rather Than Interim PET/CT Using Deauville Criteria Predicts Outcome in Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Prospective Study Comparing PET/CT with Conventional Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Sameer; Bhethanabhotla, Sainath; Kumar, Rakesh; Agarwal, Krishankant; Sharma, Punit; Thulkar, Sanjay; Malhotra, Arun; Dhawan, Deepa; Vishnubhatla, Sreenivas

    2017-04-01

    Data about the significance of (18)F-FDG PET at interim assessment and end of treatment in pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) are limited. Methods: Patients (≤18 y) with HL were prospectively evaluated with contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) and PET combined with low-dose CT (PET/CT) at baseline, after 2 cycles of chemotherapy, and after completion of treatment. Revised International Working Group (RIW) criteria and Deauville 5 point-scale for response assessment by PET/CT were used. All patients received doxorubicin (Adriamycin), bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine chemotherapy along with involved-field radiotherapy (25 Gy) for early stage (IA, IB, and IIA) and advanced stage (IIB-IV) with bulky disease. Results: Of the 57 enrolled patients, median follow-up was 81.6 mo (range, 11-97.5 mo). Treatment decisions were based on CECT. At baseline, PET/CT versus CECT identified 67 more disease sites; 23 patients (40.3%) were upstaged and of them in 9 patients (39%) upstaging would have affected treatment decision; notably none of these patients relapsed. The specificity of interim PET/CT based on RIW criteria (61.5%) and Deauville criteria (91.4%) for predicting relapse was higher than CECT (40.3%) (P = 0.03 and P < 0.0001, respectively). Event-free survival based on interim PET/CT (RIW) response was 93.3 ± 4.1 versus 89.6 ± 3.8 (positive vs. negative scan, respectively; P = 0.44). The specificity of posttreatment PET/CT (Deauville) was 95.7% versus 76.4% by CECT (P = 0.006). Posttreatment PET/CT (Deauville) showed significantly inferior overall survival in patients with positive scan versus negative scan results (66.4 ± 22.5 vs. 94.5 ± 2.0, P = 0.029). Conclusion: Interim PET/CT has better specificity, and use of Deauville criteria further improves it. Escalation of therapy based on interim PET in pediatric HL needs further conclusive evidence to justify its use. Posttreatment PET/CT (Deauville) predicts overall survival and has better specificity in comparison to

  6. (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    García Garzón, J R; de Arcocha Torres, M; Delgado-Bolton, R; Ceci, F; Alvarez Ruiz, S; Orcajo Rincón, J; Caresia Aróztegui, A P; García Velloso, M J; García Vicente, A M

    2017-09-20

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with (68)Ga-PSMA is a non-invasive diagnostic technique to image prostate cancer with increased prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression. PSMA is a transmembrane protein present in all prostatic tissues. Increased PSMA expression is seen in several malignancies, although prostate cancer is the tumour where it presents higher concentrations. Almost all prostate adenocarcinomas show PSMA expression in most of lesions, primary and metastatic. Immunohistochemistry has demonstrated that the expression of PSMA increases in patients with de-differentiated, metastatic or hormone-refractory tumours. Moreover, the expression level of PSMA has a prognostic value for disease outcome. PET measures the three-dimensional distribution of (68)Ga-PSMA, producing semi-quantitative images that allow for non-invasive assessment of PSMA expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  7. [Extension study and evaluation of the therapeutic response in a patient with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma using sequential study with ¹⁸F-FDG PET-CT and ¹⁸F-fluoride PET-CT].

    PubMed

    Moragas, M; Soler, M; Riera, E; García, J R

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a patient with lung adenocarcinoma and bone and extraosseus metastases studied with (18)F-FDG PET-CT, (99m)Tc-HMDP and (18)F-fluoride PET-CT. It assesses the usefulness of (18)F-FDG PET-CT for initial staging of the disease and monitoring response to therapy. For the study of the sclerotic bone metastases it shows the superiority of 99mTc-HMDP bone scintigraphy and (18)F-fluoride PET-CT over (18)F-FDG PET-CT, and (18)F-fluoride PET-CT over bone scintigraphy. It also shows the usefulness of (18)F-fluoride PET-CT for monitoring the bone metastases.

  8. The role of 18F–NaF PET/CT in metastatic bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Araz, Mine; Aras, Gülseren; Küçük, Özlem N.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate the role of 18F–NaF PET/CT and compare it with 99m Tc-MDP whole body bone scintigraphy and 18F-FDG PET/CT in detecting the extent of metastatic bone disease and to present our first experience with 18F–NaF PET/CT in our country. Materials and methods A total of 37 histopathologically proven cancer patients (22 male, 15 female) with bone metastasis detected on Tc-99m MDP whole body bone scan were prospectively enrolled Cebeci, following ethics committee approval. 18F–NaF PET/CT was performed to the participants in Ankara University Medical Faculty Nuclear Medicine Department for evaluation of symptomatic skeletal sites which were negative on Tc-99m MDP whole body bone scan. A lesion based comparison was made between 18F–NaF PET/CT and Tc-99m MDP whole body bone scan for each patient and between 18F–NaF PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT in 12/37 patients. Results The number of lesions demonstrated by 99m Tc-MDP bone scan and 18F–NaF PET/CT was equal in 4/37 (%11) of the cases. 18F–NaF PET/CT showed a greater number of pathological foci in 89% of participants. 18F–NaF PET/CT was able to show both lytic and blastic lesions and small lesions were better visualized due to the advantage of sectional imaging with much better resolution and higher target/background ratio. 18F–NaF PET/CT demonstrated a greater number of metastases in 10/12 (83%) of the patients when compared to 18F-FDG PET/CT. In the other two patients, bone metastasis could be demonstrated only by 18F–NaF PET/CT. The uptake of 18F-FDG was variable in blastic lesions and cranial bone involvement was missed by 18F-FDG PET/CT in some cases due to physiological brain metabolism. Conclusion Although further prospective clinical studies in specific cancer populations are indicated to set the place of 18F–NaF PET/CT in diagnostic scheme, the results of this pilot study from our country support the superiority of 18F–NaF PET/CT in investigation of bone metastasis over 99m

  9. Fourier-wavelet restoration in PET/CT brain studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knešaurek, Karin

    2012-10-01

    Our goal is to improve brain PET imaging through the application of a novel, hybrid Fourier-wavelet (WFT) restoration technique. The major limitation of PET studies is a relatively poor resolution in comparison with MRI and CT imaging and there is a need for improved PET imaging. A GE DLS PET/CT 16 slice system was used to acquire the studies. In order to create restoration filters the point source study was performed. The 6-fillable spheres and 3D Hoffman brain phantom studies were acquired and used to test and optimize the restoration approach. The patient data used in the study were acquired in a 3D PET mode, using the standard clinical protocol. Here, we have implemented Fourier-wavelet regularized restoration. In the Fourier domain, the inverse of modulation transfer function was multiplied by a Butterworth low-pass filter, order n=6 and cut-off frequency f=0.35 cycles/pixel. In addition, wavelet (Daubechies, order 2) noise suppression was applied by “hard threshold”. Hot spheres and 3D Hoffman brain studies showed that the restoration process not only improves resolution and contrast but also improves quantification in 3D PET/CT imaging. The average contrast increase was 19% and the quantification improved in the range 8-20% depending on sphere size. In the restored images, there was no significant increase in noise when compared with the original images. The clinical studies followed brain phantom findings, i.e., the restored images had better contrast and resolution properties, when compared with the original images. The results of the study demonstrate that the quality and quantification of 3D brain 18F FDG PET images can be significantly improved by Fourier-wavelet (WFT) restoration filtering.

  10. Strategies to reduce radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tung Hsin; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Wu, Jay; S. P. Mok, Greta; Yang, Ching-Ching; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2011-08-01

    Our aim was to investigate CT dose reduction strategies on a hybrid PET/CT scanner for cardiac applications.MaterialsImage quality and dose estimation of different CT scanning protocols for CT coronary angiography (CTCA), and CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging were investigated. Fifteen patients underwent CTCA, perfusion PET imaging at rest and under stress, and FDG PET for myocardial viability. These patients were divided into three groups based on the CTCA technique performed: retrospectively gated helical (RGH), ECG tube current modulation (ETCM), and prospective gated axial (PGA) acquisitions. All emission images were corrected for photon attenuation using CT images obtained by default setting and an ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) scan.ResultsRadiation dose in RGH technique was 22.2±4.0 mSv. It was reduced to 10.95±0.82 and 4.13±0.31 mSv using ETCM and PGA techniques, respectively. Radiation dose in CT transmission scan was reduced by 96.5% (from 4.53±0.5 to 0.16±0.01 mSv) when applying ULDCT as compared to the default CT. No significant difference in terms of image quality was found among various protocols.ConclusionThe proposed CT scanning strategies, i.e. ETCM or PGA for CTCA and ULDCT for PET attenuation correction, could reduce radiation dose up to 47% without degrading imaging quality in an integrated cardiac PET/CT coronary artery examination.

  11. Gallium-68 EDTA PET/CT for Renal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear medicine renal imaging provides important functional data to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with a variety of renal disorders. Physiologically stable metal chelates like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (DTPA) are excreted by glomerular filtration and have been radiolabelled with a variety of isotopes for imaging glomerular filtration and quantitative assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) EDTA PET usage predates Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) renal imaging, but virtually disappeared with the widespread adoption of gamma camera technology that was not optimal for imaging positron decay. There is now a reemergence of interest in (68)Ga owing to the greater availability of PET technology and use of (68)Ga to label other radiotracers. (68)Ga EDTA can be used a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA for wide variety of clinical indications. A key advantage of PET for renal imaging over conventional scintigraphy is 3-dimensional dynamic imaging, which is particularly helpful in patients with complex anatomy in whom planar imaging may be nondiagnostic or difficult to interpret owing to overlying structures containing radioactive urine that cannot be differentiated. Other advantages include accurate and absolute (rather than relative) camera-based quantification, superior spatial and temporal resolution and integrated multislice CT providing anatomical correlation. Furthermore, the (68)Ga generator enables on-demand production at low cost, with no additional patient radiation exposure compared with conventional scintigraphy. Over the past decade, we have employed (68)Ga EDTA PET/CT primarily to answer difficult clinical questions in patients in whom other modalities have failed, particularly when it was envisaged that dynamic 3D imaging would be of assistance. We have also used it as a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA if unavailable owing to supply issues, and have additionally examined the role of

  12. Impact of PET-CT scan on management in upper gastrointestinal malignancy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aditya; Young, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Curative treatments of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) cancers carry significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, accurate pre-treatment staging is important. PET-CT scan is an expensive modality, and not readily available in New Zealand. The aim of this study was to describe how PET-CT scan influences management in UGI cancer. This retrospective descriptive study included patients with UGI cancer with no evidence of metastatic disease on IV contrast CT scan, and those medically fit for curative treatment. Patients then underwent PET-CT scan. We defined influence or change in management if PET-CT showed metastatic disease or other lesions requiring further investigation. Seventy-nine patients were identified for the purposes of this study. Fifty-nine (74.7%) had CT scan showing no evidence of metastatic disease. Of these, PET-CT scan influenced management in 14 patients (23.7%) and found distant metastasis in eight patients (13.6%). The remaining 20 of 79 patients (25.3%) had CT scan showing indeterminate lesions. Of these, PET-CT scan influenced management in eight patients (40%), with metastatic disease seen in seven patients (35%). Our study confirms the value of PET-CT scan in pre-operative staging of UGI cancer. It had a greater impact on patients with intermediate lesions on staging CT.

  13. 18F-DG PET/CT in detection of recurrence and metastasis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long-Bang; Tong, Jin-Long; Song, Hai-Zhu; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Yu-Cai

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the value of 18F-DG PET/CT in detecting recurrence and/or metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS: Combined visual analysis with semiquantitative analysis, the 18F-DG PET/CT whole-body imaging results and the corresponding clinical data of 68 postoperative CRC patients including 48 male and 20 female with average age of 58.1 were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: Recurrence and/or metastasis were confirmed in 56 patients in the clinical follow-up after the PET/CT imaging. The sensitivity of PET/CT diagnosis of CRC recurrence and/or metastasis was 94.6%, and the specificity was 83.3%. The positive predictive value (PPV) was 96.4% and the negative predictive value (NPV) was 76.9%. PET/CT imaging detected one or more occult malignant lesions in 8 cases where abdominal/pelvic CT and/or ultrasonography showed negative findings, and also detected more lesions than CT or ultrasonography did in 30.4% (17/56) cases. Recurrence and/or metastasis was detected in 91.7% (22/24) cases with elevated serum CEA levels by 18F-DG PET/CT imaging. CONCLUSION: 18F-DG PET/CT could detect the recurrence and/or metastasis of CRC with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:17854148

  14. Definition of vascular territories on myocardial perfusion images by integration with true coronary anatomy: a hybrid PET/CT analysis.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Mehrbod S; Lautamäki, Riikka; Merrill, Jennifer; Voicu, Corina; Epley, William; McBride, Gerald; Bengel, Frank M

    2010-02-01

    For interpretation of myocardial perfusion studies, tissue segments are usually assigned to coronary vascular territories based on general assumptions about the most frequent vascular distribution pattern. These assumptions may be inaccurate because of interindividual variability of coronary anatomy. This limitation may be overcome by hybrid imaging through the individual integration of coronary anatomy with myocardial tissue regions. We studied 71 consecutive patients who underwent (82)Rb perfusion PET/CT, including CT angiography, for work-up of coronary artery disease on a 64-slice PET/CT scanner. Coronary vessels as defined by CT were assigned to each of 17 myocardial segments for PET analysis using fusion images. Reassigned segmental maps were compared with standard assignment as proposed by the American Heart Association model, without knowledge of individual anatomy. The validity of segmental assignment was tested in 6 dogs by comparison of PET/CT with ex vivo dye staining of coronary territories. Dog studies showed excellent agreement between PET/CT-defined segments and ex vivo-stained territories (kappa, 0.80). In patients, 72% (51/71) demonstrated differences from the standard assignment in at least 1 myocardial segment; 112 of 1,207 segments were reassigned to nonstandard vascular territories. Most frequently, standard right coronary segments were reassigned to the left circumflex territory (39% of reassigned segments), standard circumflex segments were reassigned to the left anterior descending territory (30%), and standard left anterior descending segments were reassigned to either circumflex or right coronary (12% and 11%, respectively). In 27 studies with a myocardial perfusion defect, relative uptake in the vascular territory with the defect was significantly lower after CT-based reassignment and was higher in remote territories, resulting in better separation (ratio of defect to remote, 0.75 +/- 0.13 vs. 0.81 +/- 0.12 before reassignment; P = 0

  15. An emerging evidence base for PET-CT in the management of childhood rhabdomyosarcoma: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Gill; Fayter, Debra; Lewis-Light, Kate; Chisholm, Julia; McHugh, Kieran; Levine, Daniel; Jenney, Meriel; Mandeville, Henry; Gatz, Suzanne; Phillips, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) management depends on risk stratification at diagnosis and treatment response. Assessment methods include CT, MRI, bone scintigraphy, histological analysis and bone marrow biopsy. Advanced functional imaging (FI) has potential to improve staging accuracy and management strategies. Methods and analysis We conducted a systematic review (PROSPERO 2013:CRD42013006128) of diagnostic accuracy and clinical effectiveness of FI in histologically proven paediatric RMS. PRISMA guidance was followed. We searched 10 databases to November 2013. Studies with ≥10 patients with RMS which compared positron emission tomography (PET), PET-CT or diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) MRI to conventional imaging at any treatment stage were included. Study quality was assessed. Limited, heterogeneous effectiveness data required narrative synthesis, illustrated by plotting sensitivity and specificity in receiver operating curve (ROC) space. Results Eight studies (six PET-CT, two PET) with 272 RMS patients in total were included. No DWI-MRI studies met inclusion criteria. Pooled estimates were not calculated due to sparseness of data. Limited evidence indicated initial PET-CT results were predictive of survival. PET-CT changed management of 7/40 patients. Nodal involvement PET-CT: sensitivity ranged from 80% to 100%; specificity from 89% to 100%. Distant metastatic involvement: PET-CT sensitivity ranged from 95% to 100%; specificity from 80% to100%. Data on metastases in different sites were sparse. Limited data were found on outcome prediction by PET-CT response. Dissemination and ethics PET/PET-CT may increase initial staging accuracy in paediatric RMS, specifically in the detection of nodal involvement and distant metastatic spread. There is a need to further assess PET-CT for this population, ideally in a representative, unbiased and transparently selected cohort of patients. PMID:25573522

  16. Comparison of dosimetry between PET/CT and PET alone using (11)C-ITMM.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kimiteru; Sakata, Muneyuki; Oda, Keiichi; Wagatsuma, Kei; Toyohara, Jun; Ishibashi, Kenji; Ishii, Kenji; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2016-03-01

    We used a new tracer, N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino) pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-4-(11)C-methoxy-N-methylbenzamide ((11)C-ITMM), to compare radiation doses from positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) with previously published doses from PET alone. Twelve healthy volunteers [six males (mean age ± SD, 27.7 ± 6.7 years) and six females (31.8 ± 14.5 years)] in 12 examinations were recruited. Dose estimations from PET/CT were compared with those from PET alone. Regions of interest (ROIs) in PET/CT were delineated on the basis of low-dose CT (LD-CT) images acquired during PET/CT. Internal and external radiation doses were estimated using OLINDA/EXM 1.0 and CT-Expo software. The effective dose (ED) for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT was estimated to be 4.7 ± 0.5 μSv/MBq for the male subjects and 4.1 ± 0.7 μSv/MBq for the female subjects. The mean ED for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET alone in a previous report was estimated to be 4.6 ± 0.3 μSv/MBq (males, n = 3). The ED values for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT in the male subjects were almost identical to those from PET alone. The absorbed doses (ADs) of the gallbladder, stomach, red bone marrow, and spleen calculated from PET/CT were significantly different from those calculated from PET alone. The EDs of (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT were almost identical to those calculated from PET alone. The ADs in several organs calculated from PET/CT differed from those from PET alone. LD-CT images acquired during PET/CT may facilitate organ identification.

  17. 18F-DCFBC Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen-Targeted PET/CT Imaging in Localized Prostate Cancer: Correlation With Multiparametric MRI and Histopathology.

    PubMed

    Turkbey, Baris; Mena, Esther; Lindenberg, Liza; Adler, Stephen; Bednarova, Sandra; Berman, Rose; Ton, Anita T; McKinney, Yolanda; Eclarinal, Philip; Hill, Craig; Afari, George; Bhattacharyya, Sibaprasad; Mease, Ronnie C; Merino, Maria J; Jacobs, Paula M; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A; Pomper, Martin G; Choyke, Peter L

    2017-10-01

    To assess the ability of (N-[N-[(S)-1,3-dicarboxypropyl]carbamoyl]-4-F-fluorobenzyl-L-cysteine) (F-DCFBC), a prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted PET agent, to detect localized prostate cancer lesions in correlation with multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) and histopathology. This Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996-compliant, prospective, institutional review board-approved study included 13 evaluable patients with localized prostate cancer (median age, 62.8 years [range, 51-74 years]; median prostate-specific antigen, 37.5 ng/dL [range, 3.26-216 ng/dL]). Patients underwent mpMRI and F-DCFBC PET/CT within a 3 months' window. Lesions seen on mpMRI were biopsied under transrectal ultrasound/MRI fusion-guided biopsy, or a radical prostatectomy was performed. F-DCFBC PET/CT and mpMRI were evaluated blinded and separately for tumor detection on a lesion basis. For PET image analysis, MRI and F-DCFBC PET images were fused by using software registration; imaging findings were correlated with histology, and uptake of F-DCFBC in tumors was compared with uptake in benign prostatic hyperplasia nodules and normal peripheral zone tissue using the 80% threshold SUVmax. A total of 25 tumor foci (mean size, 1.8 cm; median size, 1.5 cm; range, 0.6-4.7 cm) were histopathologically identified in 13 patients. Sensitivity rates of F-DCFBC PET/CT and mpMRI were 36% and 96%, respectively, for all tumors. For index lesions, the largest tumor with highest Gleason score, sensitivity rates of F-DCFBC PET/CT and mpMRI were 61.5% and 92%, respectively. The average SUVmax for primary prostate cancer was higher (5.8 ± 4.4) than that of benign prostatic hyperplasia nodules (2.1 ± 0.3) or that of normal prostate tissue (2.1 ± 0.4) at 1 hour postinjection (P = 0.0033). The majority of index prostate cancers are detected with F-DCFBC PET/CT, and this may be a prognostic indicator based on uptake and staging. However, for detecting prostate cancer with high sensitivity, it

  18. Subacute Cortical Infarct Showing Uptake on 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mico; Hsiao, Edward

    2017-02-01

    Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT is increasingly used to evaluate extent of disease in prostate carcinoma. We present a case of subacute cortical cerebral infarct showing focal uptake on PSMA PET/CT. It is an important potential cause of false-positive uptake in this imaging cohort. The patient is an 85-year-old man with a background of nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis and previous cerebrovascular events. He was referred for PSMA PET/CT for staging of high-risk prostate cancer.

  19. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT Imaging in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Pillai, M R A; Nanabala, Raviteja; Thomas, Boben

    2017-02-01

    The potential applications of Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT in the imaging of prostate cancer are now well established. A few case reports regarding the potential use of Ga-PSMA PET/CT in nonprostate cancer malignancies are also published. Apparently, the tumor neoangiogenesis is the mechanism attributed to increased Ga-PSMA uptake in the tumor sites in nonprostatic malignancies. We describe the use of Ga-PSMA PET/CT in imaging multiple myeloma. The intense Ga-PSMA avidity of the lesions also opens up the possibility of theranostics with Lu-PSMA.

  20. Abdomen: normal variations and benign conditions resulting in uptake on FDG-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Zukotynski, Katherine; Kim, Chun K

    2014-04-01

    The increasing use of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in oncology has led to: improved sensitivity and specificity in detecting localized and metastatic disease, increased ability to target biopsies to the site of most aggressive disease, and development of a noninvasive biomarker to assess prognosis and effects of therapy. However, for correct interpretation of FDG-PET/CT studies, an understanding of both normal and abnormal imaging appearances commonly encountered in oncology patients is important. This article discusses commonly seen normal variations and benign findings on FDG-PET/CT of the abdomen.

  1. Cat-Scratch Disease: A Pitfall for Lymphoma Evaluation by FDG-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Dubreuil, Julien; Dony, Arthur; Salles, Gilles; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Giammarile, Francesco; Skanjeti, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    FDG-PET/CT is a standard of care in staging and response assessment of Hodgkin lymphoma. Hence, it is important to recognize pitfalls owing to the potential therapeutic impact. We report a case of a 29-year-old woman affected by stage III bulky Hodgkin lymphoma. The interim FDG-PET/CT showed a complete metabolic response. After three new cycles of chemotherapy, the patient showed fever and lymphadenopathy at clinic examination, PET/CT revealed several FDG uptakes at lymph nodes in inguinal and iliac region. Pathologic analyses, after biopsy and serologic examinations, led to the diagnosis of cat-scratch disease.

  2. Beyond the lymph nodes: FDG-PET/CT in primary extranodal lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sin, Kin Man; Ho, Stanton King Dat; Wong, Brian Yung Kong; Gill, Harry; Khong, Pek-Lan; Lee, Elaine Yuen Phin

    Extranodal lymphoma can be the primary presentation or secondary to systemic involvement of lymphoma. 2-(fluorine-18) fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography with computer tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is useful in detecting extranodal sites during staging, treatment response assessment or recurrence detection in patients with lymphoma. In this article, we reviewed the imaging features and FDG avidity of primary extranodal lymphoma of various organs and systems on FDG-PET/CT, demonstrating the pearls and pitfalls of FDG-PET/CT in evaluating this disease entity and cross-referencing to other imaging modalities that aid in diagnosis and management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [The role of PSMA PET-CT in patients with metastatic prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    von Hardenberg, J; Büsing, K-A; Nuhn, P; Ritter, M

    2017-10-04

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) imaging for the localization of prostate cancer is increasingly available in Germany. The advances and limitations in different disease stages are reviewed. As the clinical relevance of oligometastatic disease in primary cancer detected by PSMA PET-CT imaging is not yet completely understood, it should only be used in clinical trials. In recurrent prostate cancer after therapy with curative intent, PSMA PET-CT shows encouraging potential for the planning of salvage therapy. In metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer evidence for its use is not available.

  4. Use of PET/CT scanning in cancer patients: technical and practical considerations

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This overview of the oncologic applications of positron emission tomography (PET) focuses on the technical aspects and clinical applications of a newer technique: the combination of a PET scanner and a computed tomography (CT) scanner in a single (PET/CT) device. Examples illustrate how PET/CT contributes to patient care and improves upon the previous state-of-the-art method of comparing a PET scan with a separate CT scan. Finally, the author presents some of the results from studies of PET/CT imaging that are beginning to appear in the literature. PMID:16252023

  5. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in Osteosarcoma in Fibrous Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Pillai, M R A; Alex, Tony M; Narayanan, Geetha

    2017-03-24

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a benign bone lesion with a rare but potential for malignant transformation. Neither Tc-MDP nor F-FDG PET/CT can differentiate between FD and areas of malignant transformation in FD. We described a case of osteosarcoma developing in FD with selective uptake of tracer in malignant transformation areas demonstrated on a Ga-PSMA PET/CT scan. Our case highlights the ability of Ga-PSMA PET/CT to map tumor neoangiogenesis in osteosarcoma arising in FD, which can have potential implications in prognostication, possibility of antiangiogenesis-based therapeutic options, and in response assessment following chemotherapy.

  6. FDG PET/CT detection of intussusception caused by lymphoma in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hye Jin; Beylergil, Volkan; Price, Anita P; Abramson, Sara J; Carrasquillo, Jorge A

    2014-01-01

    A previously healthy 9-year-old boy presented to an outside hospital with a history of abdominal pain and vomiting. An abdominal x-ray was unremarkable. A CT of the abdomen and pelvis performed to evaluate possible obstruction after weight loss and vomiting over a 3-week period demonstrated a large retroperitoneal mass. Laparoscopic biopsy showed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. FDG PET/CT was performed for staging. An ileocolic intussusception was identified on the PET/CT. The intussusception was successfully managed with medical treatment. We present FDG PET/CT findings in intussusception with non-Hodgkin lymphoma as the lead point in a pediatric patient.

  7. Prognostic value of interim and restaging PET/CT in Hodgkin lymphoma. Results of the CHEAP (Chemotherapy Effectiveness Assessment by PET/CT) study - long term observation.

    PubMed

    Miltenyi, Z; Barna, S; Garai, I; Simon, Z; Jona, A; Magyari, F; Gergely, M; Nagy, Z; Keresztes, K; Pettendi, P; Illes, A

    2015-01-01

    Very few studies have determined the prognostic value of interim and restaging PET/CT in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma using current standard of care therapy outside clinical trials. We analyzed the effect of the results of interim and restaging PET/CT on the survival (overall- and relapse-free) in patients who received standard first-line treatment based on the stage of disease and risk factors. We investigated the differences between the relapse and non-relapse groups based on the clinical pathological characteristics of patients who had positive interim PET/CT results.Between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2011, the staging, interim and restaging PET/CT scans of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma were analyzed. The Deauville criteria were used for the evaluation of interim PET/CT scans. One hundred and thirteen Hodgkin lymphoma patients underwent staging, interim and restaging PET/CT scans. None of the therapy was modified based on the interim PET/CT results. The median follow-up time was 43.5 months. A total of 62 early stage patients and 51 advanced stage patients were identified. The five-year overall survival rates were 93.4% in the interim PET negative group and 58% in the interim PET positive group (p<0.001). The five-year relapse-free survival rates for the negative and positive groups were 92.7% and 40.8%, respectively (p<0.001). The negative predictive value was 100% in the early stage group and 82.35% in the advanced stage group. By comparison, the positive predictive values were 53.8% and 58.8%, respectively, in these two groups. In the interim PET positive group, patients over 40 years of age had a significantly higher probability of relapse (p=0.057).The routine clinical use of interim PET/CT is highly recommended based on our investigation. However, patients with positive interim PET/CT results required frequent additional evaluations.

  8. Regularized ML reconstruction for time/dose reduction in 18F-fluoride PET/CT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bernardi, Elisabetta; Magnani, Patrizia; Gianolli, Luigi; Carla Gilardi, Maria; Bettinardi, Valentino

    2015-01-01

    We are proposing a regularized reconstruction strategy for the detection of bone lesions in 18F-fluoride whole body PET images obtained with 1 min/bed using the anatomical information provided by co-registered CT images. Bones are recognized on CT images and then transposed into the PET volume framework. During PET reconstruction, two different priors are used for bone and non-bone voxels: the relative difference prior in bone and the P-Gaussian prior in non-bone. After a tuning of the priors’ parameters, the reconstruction strategy has been tested on 6 18F-fluoride PET/CT studies, on a total of 67 lesions. Regularized images provided results comparable to the standard 3 min/bed images, in terms image quality, lesion activity, noise level and noise correlation. The proposed strategy therefore appears to be a useful tool to reduce the acquisition time or the injected dose in 18F-fluoride PET studies.

  9. Broad-spectrum multi-modality image registration: from PET, CT, and MRI to autoradiography, microscopy, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Zanzonico, P B

    2006-01-01

    Image registration and fusion are increasingly important components of both clinical and small-animal imaging and have lead to the development of a variety of pertinent hardware and software tools, including multi-modality, e.g. PET-CT, devices. At the same time, advances in microscopic imaging, including phosphor-plate digital autoradiography and immunohistochemistry, now allow ultra-high (sub-100 microm)-resolution molecular characterization of tissue sections. To date, however, in vivo imaging of intact subjects and ex vivo imaging of harvested tissues sections have remained separate and distinct, making it difficult to reliably inter-compare the former and the latter. The Department of Medical Physics and the Radiation Biophysics Laboratory at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, under the direction of Dr. Clifton Ling, has now designed, fabricated, and tested a stereotactic imaging system for so-called "broad-spectrum" image registration, from coarser-resolution in vivo imaging modalities such as PET, CT, and MRI to ultra-high-resolution ex vivo imaging techniques such as histology, autoradiography, and immunohistochemistry.

  10. FDG-PET/CT Imaging for Staging and Target Volume Delineation in Preoperative Conformal Radiotherapy of Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, Maria Chiara; Turri, Lucia; Sacchetti, Gianmauro; Loi, Gianfranco; Cannillo, Barbara; La Mattina, Pierdaniele; Brambilla, Marco; Inglese, Eugenio; Krengli, Marco

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential impact of using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) on staging and target volume delineation for patients affected by rectal cancer and candidates for preoperative conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients diagnosed with rectal cancer T3-4 N0-1 M0-1 and candidates for preoperative radiotherapy underwent PET/CT simulation after injection of 5.18 MBq/kg of FDG. Clinical stage was reassessed on the basis of FDG-PET/CT findings. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and the clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated first on CT and then on PET/CT images. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were analyzed and compared with CT-GTV and CT-CTV, respectively. Results: In 4 of 25 cases (24%), PET/CT affected tumor staging or the treatment purpose. In 3 of 25 cases (12%) staged N0 M0, PET/CT showed FDG uptake in regional lymph nodes and in a case also in the liver. In a patient with a single liver metastasis PET/CT detected multiple lesions, changing the treatment intent from curative to palliative. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were significantly greater than the CT-GTV (p = 0.00013) and CT-CTV (p = 0.00002), respectively. The mean difference between PET/CT-GTV and CT-GTV was 25.4% and between PET/CT-CTV and CT-CTV was 4.1%. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT for preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer may lead to a change in staging and target volume delineation. Stage variation was observed in 12% of cases and a change of treatment intent in 4%. The GTV and CTV changed significantly, with a mean increase in size of 25% and 4%, respectively.

  11. Liver lesion detection and characterization in patients with colorectal cancer: a comparison of low radiation dose non-enhanced PET/CT, contrast-enhanced PET/CT, and liver MRI.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, Colin Patrick; Setty, Bindu N; Holalkere, Nagaraj; Sahani, Dushyant V; Fischman, Alan J; Blake, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    To compare low-radiation dose non-enhanced fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (NE-PET/CT), contrast-enhanced fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT (CE-PET/CT), and gadolinium-enhanced liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection and characterization of liver lesions in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). In this retrospective review of imaging database of CRC patients with suspected liver metastases, 33 patients (22 men, 11 women; mean age, 63 years) evaluated with low-radiation dose NE-PET/CT, CE-PET/CT, and liver MRI were studied. The final diagnosis was established either by pathological examination or follow-up imaging over a period of at least 6 months for lesion stability or growth. The liver lesions were characterized on an ordinal scale of 0 to 6 (0 = absent, 1 = definitely benign, and 6 = definitely malignant). Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to compare performance of the 3 imaging methods. A total of 110 lesions were present on follow-up. The detection rate on low-radiation dose NE-PET/CT, CE-PET/CT, and MRI was 73.6%, 90.9%, and 95.4%, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging (P < 0.001) and CE-PET/CT (P < 0.001) had a higher detection rate than low-radiation dose NE-PET/CT. There was no significant statistical difference in lesion detection between MRI and CE-PET/CT (P = 0.11). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for characterization of detected liver lesions on low-radiation dose NE-PET/CT were 67%, 60%, and 66%, respectively; those on CE-PET/CT were 85%, 100%, and 86%, respectively; and those on MRI were 98%, 100%, and 98%, respectively. Comparative receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under curve of 0.74 for low-radiation dose NE-PET/CT, 0.86 for CE-PET/CT, and 0.97 for MRI. There were statistically significant differences in the accuracy of MRI, low-radiation dose NE-PET/CT, and CE-PET/CT for lesion characterization

  12. Clinical utility of (18)F-fluoride PET/CT in benign and malignant bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuxin; Schiepers, Christiaan; Lake, Ralph; Dadparvar, Simin; Berenji, Gholam R

    2012-01-01

    (18)F labeled sodium fluoride is a positron-emitting, bone seeking agent with more favorable skeletal kinetics than conventional phosphate and diphosphonate compounds. With the expanding clinical usage of PET/CT, there is renewed interest in using (18)F-fluoride PET/CT for imaging bone diseases. Growing evidence indicates that (18)F fluoride PET/CT offers increased sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy in evaluating metastatic bone disease compared to (99m)Tc based bone scintigraphy. National Oncologic PET Registry (NOPR) has expanded coverage for (18)F sodium fluoride PET scans since February 2011 for the evaluation of osseous metastatic disease. In this article, we reviewed the pharmacological characteristics of sodium fluoride, as well as the clinical utility of PET/CT using (18)F-fluoride in both benign and malignant bone disorders.

  13. Unusual Horner's Syndrome in Recurrent Breast Cancer: Evaluation Using (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Park, Sohyun; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Seok-Ki

    2017-03-01

    (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is a widely used imaging modality in the initial diagnosis of cancer, treatment response evaluation and detection of recurrence. Herein, we present the case of a 39-year-old female who presented right ptosis on the follow-up of breast cancer after surgery. Clinicians suspected Horner's syndrome, and the patient underwent FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of recurrence that could cause Horner's syndrome. FDG PET/CT demonstrated a focal hypermetabolic lesion in the right cervicothoracic junction area, corresponding to the preganglionic cervical sympathetic trunk. A subsequent needle biopsy was done, and the lesion was confirmed as metastatic ductal carcinoma. In this case, we could detect the exact location of the recurring lesion that caused Horner's syndrome using FDG PET/CT.

  14. Training of staff for the delivery of PET/CT services in the UK.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Alan C; Gordon, Isky; Read, James; Ellis, Beverly; Allen, R; Clarke, S E M; Garner, C; Hilson, A J; Frank, J W; McCool, D; Nicol, A; Prescott, M C; Ryan, P J; Shields, R A; Tindale, W B

    2006-12-01

    Evidence for the cost effectiveness of PET/CT imaging is now driving the widespread introduction of PET/CT services throughout the UK. The provision of PET/CT facilities will require a workforce of medical, scientific, technical and engineering staff who are adequately trained and fit for purpose. Suitably trained staff in this speciality are scarce. The development and accreditation of training courses and other educational resources for training programmes in all disciplines will therefore be required at a national and regional level. The implementation of PET/CT training can be achieved more cost-effectively by developing multi-professional learning resources whenever possible. It is intended that the recommendations would be implemented by close co-operation of both public and private healthcare providers together with educational establishments.

  15. Spectrum of the Breast Lesions With Increased 18F-FDG Uptake on PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Aisheng; Wang, Yang; Lu, Jianping; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Interpretation of 18F-FDG PET/CT studies in breast is challenging owing to nonspecific FDG uptake in various benign and malignant conditions. Benign conditions include breast changes in pregnancy and lactation, gynecomastia, mastitis, fat necrosis, fibroadenoma, intraductal papilloma, and atypical ductal hyperplasia. Among malignancies, invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma are common histological types of breast carcinoma. Rarely, other unusual histological types of breast carcinomas (eg, intraductal papillary carcinoma, invasive micropapillary carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, and metaplastic carcinoma), lymphoma, and metastasis can be the causes. Knowledge of a wide spectrum of hypermetabolic breast lesions on FDG PET/CT is essential in accurate reading of FDG PET/CT. The purpose of this atlas article is to demonstrate features of various breast lesions encountered at our institution, both benign and malignant, which can result in hypermetabolism on FDG PET/CT imaging. PMID:26975010

  16. (64)CuCl2 PET/CT in prostate cancer relapse.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, Arnoldo; Paparo, Francesco; Puntoni, Matteo; Righi, Sergio; Bottoni, Gianluca; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Zanardi, Silvia; DeCensi, Andrea; Ferrarazzo, Giulia; Gambaro, Monica; Grillo Ruggieri, Filippo; Campodonico, Fabio; Tomasello, Laura; Timossi, Luca; Sola, Simona; Lopci, Egesta; Cabria, Manlio

    2017-09-08

    To evaluate the biodistribution, kinetics and radiation dosimetry of (64)CuCl2 in humans and to assess the ability of (64)CuCl2-PoPET/CT to detect prostate cancer (PCa) recurrence in patients with biochemical relapse. Methods: we prospectively evaluated 50 PCa patients with biochemical relapse after surgery or external-beam radiation therapy. All patients underwent (64)CuCl2-PET/CT, (18)F-Choline-PET/CT and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) within 15 days of each other. Experienced readers interpreted the images, and the detection rate (DR) of each imaging modality was calculated. Histopathology, when available, clinical or laboratory response and multidisciplinary follow-up were used to confirm the site of disease. In parallel, biodistribution, kinetics of the lesions and radiation dosimetry of (64)CuCl2 were evaluated. Results: From a dosimetric point-of view, an administered dose of 200 MBq for (64)CuCl2 translates into 5.7mSv of effective dose. Unlike (18)F-Choline, (64)CuCl2 is not excreted nor accumulated in the urinary tract, thus allowing thorough pelvic exploration. The maximum (64)CuCl2 uptake at the sites of PCa relapse was observed one hour after tracer injection. In our cohort, (64)CuCl2-PET/CT proved positive in 41 of 50 patients, with an overall DR of 82%. The DRs of (18)F-Choline-PET/CT and mpMRI were 56% and 74% respectively. The difference between the DRs of (64)CuCl2-PET/CT and (18)F-Choline-PET/CT was statistically significant (p<0.001). Interestingly, on considering PSA value, (64)CuCl2-PET/CT had a higher DR than (18)F-Choline-PET/CT in patients with PSA <1 ng/ml . Conclusion: The biodistribution of (64)CuCl2 is more suitable than that of (18)F-Choline for exploring the pelvis and prostatic bed. The (64)CuCl2 effective dose is similar to those of other established PET tracers. In patients with biochemical relapse and a low PSA level, (64)CuCl2-PET/CT shows a significantly higher DR than (18)F-Choline-PET/CT. Copyright © 2017

  17. FDG PET/CT Evidence of Effective Treatment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis With Adalimumab.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christina T; Sweiss, Nadera J; Lu, Yang

    2016-05-01

    A 53-year-old man with mediastinal lymph node biopsy and cardiac MRI-proven cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) received treatment with pacemaker and steroids. FDG PET/CT showed active CS despite treatment with prednisone and methotrexate. Addition of weekly adalimumab (Humira) injections was introduced for 3 months. Follow-up FDG PET/CT showed complete resolution of CS as well as improvement of other sarcoid lesions in the thoracic lymph nodes.

  18. False-positive hypermetabolic lesions on post-treatment PET-CT after influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Dae Ho; Kim, Sang-We; Suh, Cheolwon; Lee, Jung-Shin

    2011-06-01

    We report a case of a 59-year-old man with testicular germ cell tumor who showed new hypermetabolic lesions at the left axillary lymph nodes on a post-treatment positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan. The hypermetabolic lesions were found to be caused by an influenza vaccination 10 days prior to the PET-CT scan and disappeared without additional treatment. To date, he is alive with complete remission.

  19. Bone Windows for Distinguishing Malignant from Benign Primary Bone Tumors on FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Costelloe, Colleen M.; Chuang, Hubert H.; Chasen, Beth A.; Pan, Tinsu; Fox, Patricia S.; Bassett, Roland L.; Madewell, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The default window setting on PET/CT workstations is soft tissue. This study investigates whether bone windowing and hybrid FDG PET/CT can help differentiate between malignant and benign primary bone tumors. Materials and methods. A database review included 98 patients with malignant (n=64) or benign primary bone (n=34) tumors. The reference standard was biopsy for malignancies and biopsy or >1 year imaging follow-up of benign tumors. Three radiologists and/or nuclear medicine physicians blinded to diagnosis and other imaging viewed the lesions on CT with bone windows (CT-BW) without and then with PET (PET/CT-BW), and separate PET-only images for malignancy or benignity. Three weeks later the tumors were viewed on CT with soft tissue windows (CT-STW) without and then with PET (PET/CT-STW). Results. Mean sensitivity and specificity for identifying malignancies included: CT-BW: 96%, 90%; CT-STW: 90%, 90%; PET/CT-BW: 95%, 85%, PET/CT-STW: 95%, 86% and PET-only: 96%, 75%, respectively. CT-BW demonstrated higher specificity than PET-only and PET/CT-BW (p=0.0005 and p=0.0103, respectively) and trended toward higher sensitivity than CT-STW (p=0.0759). Malignant primary bone tumors were more avid than benign lesions overall (p<0.0001) but the avidity of benign aggressive lesions (giant cell tumors and Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis) trended higher than the malignancies (p=0.08). Conclusion. Bone windows provided high specificity for distinguishing between malignant and benign primary bone tumors and are recommended when viewing FDG PET/CT. PMID:23983816

  20. [The impact on diagnostic quality of using contrast media in PET-CT studies].

    PubMed

    García García-Esquinas, M; Ortega Candil, A; Lapeña Gutierrez, L; Mucientes Rasilla, J; Carreras Delgado, J L; Arrazola García, J

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of using radiologic contrast media on the quality of PET-CT studies at our center. This is a retrospective observational study to evaluate the quality of the PET-CT studies carried out with radiologic contrast media and the presence of artifacts due to these contrast agents. Oncologic patients in whom PET was indicated according to the manufacturer's specifications for FDG ((18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose) underwent PET-CT study on a PET-CT system with a six-detector-row CT scanner. Between February 2009 and June 2009, we performed 612 PET-CT examinations in 369 male patients and 243 female patients. Iodinated contrast media were administered intravenously in 48% and orally in 18%. Diagnostic quality was considered high in 93.5% of the studies, intermediate in 4.3%, and low in 2.2%. In the CT studies performed using intravenous contrast agents, artifacts were identified in 8% and resulted in diagnostic uncertainty in the PET study in 1.4%. We found no diagnostic problems caused by oral contrast agents in any case. The use of radiologic contrast agents in PET-CT studies does not negatively affect diagnostic quality or workflow. Given that we can improve the ability of PET-CT to detect lesions by enhancing the diagnostic quality of the CT study, we consider it appropriate to include the administration of contrast agents in protocols for PET-CT studies. Copyright © 2009 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Bone Windows for Distinguishing Malignant from Benign Primary Bone Tumors on FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Costelloe, Colleen M; Chuang, Hubert H; Chasen, Beth A; Pan, Tinsu; Fox, Patricia S; Bassett, Roland L; Madewell, John E

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The default window setting on PET/CT workstations is soft tissue. This study investigates whether bone windowing and hybrid FDG PET/CT can help differentiate between malignant and benign primary bone tumors. Materials and methods. A database review included 98 patients with malignant (n=64) or benign primary bone (n=34) tumors. The reference standard was biopsy for malignancies and biopsy or >1 year imaging follow-up of benign tumors. Three radiologists and/or nuclear medicine physicians blinded to diagnosis and other imaging viewed the lesions on CT with bone windows (CT-BW) without and then with PET (PET/CT-BW), and separate PET-only images for malignancy or benignity. Three weeks later the tumors were viewed on CT with soft tissue windows (CT-STW) without and then with PET (PET/CT-STW). Results. Mean sensitivity and specificity for identifying malignancies included: CT-BW: 96%, 90%; CT-STW: 90%, 90%; PET/CT-BW: 95%, 85%, PET/CT-STW: 95%, 86% and PET-only: 96%, 75%, respectively. CT-BW demonstrated higher specificity than PET-only and PET/CT-BW (p=0.0005 and p=0.0103, respectively) and trended toward higher sensitivity than CT-STW (p=0.0759). Malignant primary bone tumors were more avid than benign lesions overall (p<0.0001) but the avidity of benign aggressive lesions (giant cell tumors and Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis) trended higher than the malignancies (p=0.08). Conclusion. Bone windows provided high specificity for distinguishing between malignant and benign primary bone tumors and are recommended when viewing FDG PET/CT.

  2. 68Gallium-DOTATATE PET/CT Scanning Results in Patients with MEN1

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Samira M; Millo, Corina; Cottle-Delisle, Candice; Merkel, Roxanne; Yang, Lily A; Herscovitch, Peter; Pacak, Karel; Simonds, William F; Marx, Stephen J; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    Background Screening for neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is recommended to detect primary and metastatic tumors, which can result in significant morbidity and mortality. The utility of somatostatin receptor imaging 68Gallium-DOTATATE PET/CT in patients with MEN1 is not known. The aim of this study was to prospectively determine the accuracy of 68Gallium-DOTATATE PET/CT versus 111In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT and anatomic imaging in patients with MEN1. Study design Prospective study comparing 68Gallium-DOTATATE PET/CT, 111In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT, and triphasic CT scan to clinical, biochemical and pathological data in 26 patients with MEN1. Results 68Gallium-DOTATATE PET/CT detected 107 lesions; 111In- pentetreotide SPECT/CT detected 33 lesions; and CT scan detected 48 lesions. Lesions detected on 68Gallium-DOTATATE PET/CT had high SUVmax (median SUVmax = 72.8 [range 19–191]). In 7 of the 26 patients (27%), 68Gallium-DOTATATE PET/CT was positive with a negative 111In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT, and in 10 patients (38.5%), additional metastases were detected (range 0.3 cm to 1.5 cm). In 8 of the 26 patients (31%), there was a change in management recommendations as a result of the findings on 68Gallium-DOTATATE PET/CT that were not seen on 111In- pentetreotide SPECT/CT and CT scan. Conclusions 68Gallium-DOTATATE PET/CT is more sensitive for detecting NETs than 111In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT and CT scan in patients with MEN1. This imaging technique should be integrated into radiologic screening and surveillance of patients with MEN1, as it can significantly alter management recommendations. PMID:26206648

  3. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET-CT for extranodal staging of non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ömür, Özgür; Baran, Yusuf; Oral, Aylin; Ceylan, Yeşim

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the role of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18F-FDG PET-CT) involving care-dose unenhanced CT to detect extranodal involvement in patients with non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma. Lymphoma patients (35 Hodgkin lymphoma, 75 non-Hodgkin lymphoma) who were referred for 18F-FDG PET-CT imaging, following a diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) performed within the last month, were included in our study. A total of 129 PET-CT images, and all radiologic, clinical, and pathological records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed. In total, 137 hypermetabolic extranodal infiltration sites were detected by 18F-FDG PET-CT in 62 of 110 patients. There were no positive findings by CE-CT that reflected organ involvement in 40 of 137 18F-FDG-positive sites. The κ statistics revealed fair agreement between PET-CT and CE-CT for the detection of extranodal involvement (κ=0.60). The organs showing a disagreement between the two modalities were the spleen, bone marrow, bone, and thyroid and prostate glands. In all lesions that were negative at CE-CT, there was a diffuse 18F-FDG uptake pattern in the PET-CT images. The frequency of extranodal involvement was 51% and 58% in Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients, respectively. There was a high positive correlation between the maximum standardized uptake values of the highest 18F-FDG-accumulating lymph nodes and extranodal sites (r=0.67) in patients with nodal and extranodal involvement. 18F-FDG PET-CT is a more effective technique than CE-CT for the evaluation of extranodal involvement in Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients. PET-CT has a significant advantage for the diagnosis of diffusely infiltrating organs without mass lesions or contrast enhancement compared to CE-CT.

  4. (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT for restaging recurrent prostate cancer: which factors are associated with PET/CT detection rate?

    PubMed

    Ceci, Francesco; Uprimny, Christian; Nilica, Bernhard; Geraldo, Llanos; Kendler, Dorota; Kroiss, Alexander; Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang; Lukas, Peter; Decristoforo, Clemens; Castellucci, Paolo; Fanti, Stefano; Virgolini, Irene J

    2015-07-01

    To assess the association between PSA levels, PSA kinetics and other factors and a pathological (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT scan in patients with recurrent prostate cancer (rPCa) with biochemical relapse (BR) after radical therapy. Seventy consecutive rPCA patients referred for (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT, matching all the following criteria, were retrospectively evaluated: (a) previous radical prostatectomy or primary radiotherapy with curative intent; (b) BR or persisting high PSA levels after primary treatment; and (c) complete clinical and imaging information. The mean ± SD PSA level was 3.5 ± 5.3 ng/mL (median 1.7, range 0.2 - 32.2 ng/mL), the mean ± SD PSA doubling time (PSAdt) was 6.5 ± 5.5 months (median 5.5, range 1.3 - 31.6 months), and the mean ± SD PSA velocity was 7.9 ± 20.5 (median 2.1, range 0.2 - 147.5 ng/mL/year). Statistical analysis was performed to assess which factors were associated with the detection of rPCa on (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT. (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT was positive in 52 of 70 patients (74.2%). In 30 patients (42.8%) lesions limited to the pelvis were detected. Distant lesions were observed in 8 of patients (11.4%). Local plus systemic lesions were detected in 14 patients (20%). PSA level (p = 0.017) and PSAdt (p = 0.0001) were significantly different between PET-positive patients (higher PSA level, shorter PSAdt) and PET-negative patients (lower PSA, longer PSAdt). ROC analysis showed that PSAdt 6.5 months and PSA 0.83 ng/mL were optimal cut-off values. In multivariate analysis PSAdt was associated with (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT positivity. (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT was positive in 17 of 20 patients (85%) with PSA <2 ng/mL and PSAdt <6.5 months, and in 3 of 16 patients (18.7%) with PSA <2 ng/mL and PSAdt ≥6.5 months. The great potential of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT in patients with rPCa and BR was confirmed. PSA and PSAdt were valuable predictors of pathological (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT findings.

  5. Correlation of PET/CT and Image-Guided Biopsies of Pediatric Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Nihayah, Saeed; Shammas, Amer; Vali, Reza; Parra, Dimitri; Alexander, Sarah; Amaral, Joao; Connolly, Bairbre

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate an early experience with correlation of PET/CT findings and image-guided biopsy results in pediatric patients. In a single-center retrospective case series, the inclusion criterion was performance of image-guided biopsy within 6 weeks of PET/CT, either before or after the biopsy. Forty-five patients (23 boys, 22 girls; age range, 4-17 years; median, 10.5 years; weight range, 14.6-86.2 kg; median, 48 kg) underwent 47 PET/CT examinations and biopsies. Nineteen patients (20 biopsies) had known malignancy, and 26 patients had suspected malignancy. The results were malignant in 24 cases, benign in 16, and inadequate or normal in 7 cases. Thirty-nine of 47 PET/CT examinations had positive results, and eight had negative results. Final analysis of 37 of the 47 cases (confounders excluded) showed concordant results between biopsy and PET in 36 cases and discordant results in one case. PET/CT can be used for disease staging and follow-up. In the future PET/CT can play a valuable role in directing image-guided biopsies of children.

  6. FDG PET/CT dataset for navigation on femoral bone: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Militz, Matthias; Uhde, Jörg; Christian, Georg; Linke, Rainer; Morgenstern, Mario; Hungerer, Sven

    2015-12-01

    FDG PET/CT has become a valuable tool in the diagnosis of the activity of chronic osteomyelitis. The surgical strategy in the treatment of chronic osteomyelitis is the identification of the bone focus and radical debridement of sequesters. The aim of the current study was the registration and use of the FDG PET/CT imaging datasets on a navigation system to provide diagnostic imaging based feedback during surgical procedures. For the present study, FDG PET/CT scans were acquired from artificial bones and cadaver bones with a local focus of activity. The DICOM data sets were merged using a navigation system. The referenced regions of interest were matched with fluoroscopic pictures to register the PET/CT DICOM datasets to the bone and direct visual control. Navigated targeting led to accurate results when verified with fluoroscopic images by targeting previously inserted reference points in artificial and cadaver bone. FDG PET/CT datasets are suitable for navigation and compatible with conventional planning and navigation software. The combination of diagnostic FDG PET/CT imaging with surgical navigation techniques could be a valuable tool for the accurate treatment of chronic osteomyelitis.

  7. The role of PET-CT in radiotherapy planning of solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jelercic, Stasa; Rajer, Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    Background PET-CT is becoming more and more important in various aspects of oncology. Until recently it was used mainly as part of diagnostic procedures and for evaluation of treatment results. With development of personalized radiotherapy, volumetric and radiobiological characteristics of individual tumour have become integrated in the multistep radiotherapy (RT) planning process. Standard anatomical imaging used to select and delineate RT target volumes can be enriched by the information on tumour biology gained by PET-CT. In this review we explore the current and possible future role of PET-CT in radiotherapy treatment planning. After general explanation, we assess its role in radiotherapy of those solid tumours for which PET-CT is being used most. Conclusions In the nearby future PET-CT will be an integral part of the most radiotherapy treatment planning procedures in an every-day clinical practice. Apart from a clear role in radiation planning of lung cancer, with forthcoming clinical trials, we will get more evidence of the optimal use of PET-CT in radiotherapy planning of other solid tumours. PMID:25810695

  8. Extensive invasive extramammary Paget disease evaluated by F-18 FDG PET/CT: a case report.

    PubMed

    Li, Zu-Gui; Qin, Xiao-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) is a rare cutaneous, intraepithelial adenocarcinoma. Because of its rarity, little is known about the value of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in evaluating this disease. Our case report aims to increase current knowledge of FDG PET/CT in EMPD as a noninvasive imaging tool for assessing the extension of the disease and detecting distant metastases.We reported a 64-year-old Chinese man who presented with a slowly progressive, ill-margined erythematous lesion with a crusted, eroded, and scaly surface involving multiple sites of penis, scrotum, left pelvic wall, hip, groin, and thigh for >4 years, which became extensive in the past 1 year. He was referred for an FDG PET/CT examination to further evaluate the lesions. A following skin biopsy was performed to obtain a definitive histological diagnosis.FDG PET/CT imaging revealed mild FDG uptake at the extensive cutaneous lesion with subcutaneous invasion, involvement of lymph nodes, and multiple intense FDG-avid of skeletal metastases. According to the appearance of FDG PET/CT, a provisional diagnosis of advanced cutaneous malignancy was made. Histopathology findings indicated characteristic of EMPD. The patient was treated with radiation therapy and died from complications 2 months after the last dose of radiotherapy.Our case highlighted that a whole-body FDG PET/CT should be incorporated into the diagnostic algorithm of EMPD to give a comprehensive assessment of this disease.

  9. PET/CT detects abdominal wall and port site metastases of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Goshen, E; Davidson, T; Aderka, D; Zwas, S T

    2006-07-01

    Abdominal wall metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) may be resected with curative results. Such lesions, often indicators of additional intra-abdominal lesions, may appear in surgical scars, stomas and port site metastases after laparoscope-assisted surgery (LAS). Post-operative changes, primarily surgical scars, alter local physical findings making early detection of small lesions challenging. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the contribution of PET/CT to the diagnosis of recurrent colorectal cancer in the post-operative abdominal wall. 120 patients were referred for PET/CT with suspected recurrent CRC based on clinical, radiological or laboratory findings. All underwent whole body PET/CT imaging. 12 of these 120 (10%), were found to have abdominal wall lesions. A total of 16 abdominal wall lesions were detected, located to surgical scars, stomas, drain and laparoscope ports. Additional findings on PET/CT in this group included liver metastases, intra-abdominal lesions and retroperitoneal lymph node involvement. In general, the patients in this small group were young with high grade tumours presenting in advanced stages. In conclusion, PET/CT appears to be a sensitive tool for the diagnosis of abdominal wall recurrence of CRC. The accuracy of localization afforded by the fused functional and anatomic images makes PET/CT a likely tool for diagnosing abdominal wall lesions, including port site metastases of other aetiologies.

  10. PET-CT in Staging, Response Evaluation, and Surveillance of Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Thanarajasingam, Gita; Bennani-Baiti, Nabila; Thompson, Carrie A

    2016-05-01

    Lymphoma represents a broad spectrum of diseases with diverse biology, clinical behavior, and imaging features. Functional imaging with 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET-CT) is widely recognized as the most sensitive and specific imaging modality for patients with lymphoma and is used as part of staging, response evaluation, and surveillance in patients with Hodgkin (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Recent efforts at standardizing the conduct and consensus interpretation of PET-CT have facilitated its use in patients on clinical studies and beyond. The role of PET-CT has been affirmed in some clinical situations, such as staging and end-of-treatment evaluation in Hodgkin lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and in the evaluation of aggressive transformation of an indolent lymphoma. However, the role of functional imaging in other histologies and clinical settings is not as clear given the higher rate of false positive results and the costs inherent to PET-CT. There is little evidence to suggest its utility or impact on outcome in most indolent lymphomas, or in the setting of post-treatment surveillance. In addition, there remains controversy about the value of PET-CT in early response assessment during active therapy, particularly in DLBCL. This review will evaluate the evidence surrounding the role of PET-CT in staging, response evaluation and surveillance of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  11. Parametric dynamic F-18-FDG PET/CT breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Alphonso; Feiglin, David; Lipson, Edward; Mandel, James; McGraw, Wendy; Lee, Wei; Krol, Andrzej

    2008-03-01

    This study was undertaken to estimate metabolic tissue properties from dynamic breast F-18-FDG PET/CT image series and to display them as 3D parametric images. Each temporal PET series was obtained immediately after injection of 10 mCi of F-18-FDG and consisted of fifty 1- minute frames. Each consecutive frame was nonrigidly registered to the first frame using a finite element method (FEM) based model and fiducial skin markers. Nonlinear curve fitting of activity vs. time based on a realistic two-compartment model was performed for each voxel of the volume. Curve fitting was accomplished by application of the Levenburg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) that minimized X2. We evaluated which parameters are most suitable to determine the spatial extent and malignancy in suspicious lesions. In addition, Patlak modeling was applied to the data. A mixture model was constructed and provided a classification system for the breast tissue. It produced unbiased estimation of the spatial extent of the lesions. We conclude that nonrigid registration followed by voxel-by-voxel based nonlinear fitting to a realistic two-compartment model yields better quality parametric images, as compared to unprocessed dynamic breast PET time series. By comparison with the mixture model, we established that the total cumulated activity and maximum activity parametric images provide the best delineation of suspicious breast tissue lesions and hyperactive subregions within the lesion that cannot be discerned in unprocessed images.

  12. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C. M. Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G.; Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E.; Hartill, C. E.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide specific experience-based guidance and recommendations for centers wishing to develop, validate, and implement an accurate and efficient process for directly using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) for the radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer patients. Methods: A PET-CT system was modified with hard-top couch, external lasers and radiotherapy immobilization and indexing devices and was subject to a commissioning and quality assurance program. PET-CT imaging protocols were developed specifically for radiotherapy planning and the image quality and pathway tested using phantoms and five patients recruited into an in-house study. Security and accuracy of data transfer was tested throughout the whole data pathway. The patient pathway was fully established and tested ready for implementation in a PET-guided dose-escalation trial for head and neck cancer patients. Results: Couch deflection was greater than for departmental CT simulator machines. An area of high attenuation in the couch generated image artifacts and adjustments were made accordingly. Using newly developed protocols CT image quality was suitable to maintain delineation and treatment accuracy. Upon transfer of data to the treatment planning system a half pixel offset between PET and CT was observed and corrected. By taking this into account, PET to CT alignment accuracy was maintained below 1 mm in all systems in the data pathway. Transfer of structures delineated in the PET fusion software to the radiotherapy treatment planning system was validated. Conclusions: A method to perform direct PET-guided radiotherapy planning was successfully validated and specific recommendations were developed to assist other centers. Of major concern is ensuring that the quality of PET and CT data is appropriate for radiotherapy treatment planning and on-treatment verification. Couch movements can be compromised, bore-size can be a limitation for certain immobilization

  13. Treatment response evaluation with (18)F-FDG PET/CT and (18)F-NaF PET/CT in multiple myeloma patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Hillengass, J; Goldschmidt, H; Wagner, B; Haberkorn, U; Kopka, K; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the combined use of the radiotracers (18)F-FDG and (18)F-NaF in treatment response evaluation of a group of multiple myeloma (MM) patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy (HDT) followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) by means of static (whole-body) and dynamic PET/CT (dPET/CT). Thirty-four patients with primary, previously untreated MM scheduled for treatment with HDT followed by ASCT were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent PET/CT scanning with (18)F-FDG and (18)F-NaF before and after therapy. Treatment response by means of PET/CT was assessed according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 1999 criteria. The evaluation of dPET/CT studies was based on qualitative evaluation, semi-quantitative (SUV) calculation, and quantitative analysis based on two-tissue compartment modelling and a non-compartmental approach leading to the extraction of fractal dimension (FD). An analysis was possible in 29 patients: three with clinical complete response (CR) and 26 with non-CR (13 patients near complete response-nCR, four patients very good partial response-VGPR, nine patients partial response-PR). After treatment, (18)F-FDG PET/CT was negative in 14/29 patients and positive in 15/29 patients, showing a sensitivity of 57.5 % and a specificity of 100 %. According to the EORTC 1999 criteria, (18)F-FDG PET/CT-based treatment response revealed CR in 14 patients ((18)F-FDG PET/CT CR), PR in 11 patients ((18)F-FDG PET/CT PR) and progressive disease in four patients ((18)F-FDG PET/CT PD). In terms of (18)F-NaF PET/CT, 4/29 patients (13.8 %) had a negative baseline scan, thus failed to depict MM. Regarding the patients for which a direct lesion-to-lesion comparison was feasible, (18)F-NaF PET/CT depicted 56 of the 129 (18)F-FDG positive lesions (43 %). Follow-up (18)F-NaF PET/CT showed persistence of 81.5 % of the baseline (18)F-NaF positive MM lesions after treatment, despite the

  14. Recommendations of the Spanish Societies of Radiation Oncology (SEOR), Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging (SEMNiM), and Medical Physics (SEFM) on 18F-FDG PET-CT for radiotherapy treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    Caballero Perea, Begoña; Villegas, Antonio Cabrera; Rodríguez, José Miguel Delgado; Velloso, María José García; Vicente, Ana María García; Cabrerizo, Carlos Huerga; López, Rosa Morera; Romasanta, Luis Alberto Pérez; Beltrán, Moisés Sáez

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is a valuable tool for diagnosing and staging malignant lesions. The fusion of PET and computed tomography (CT) yields images that contain both metabolic and morphological information, which, taken together, have improved the diagnostic precision of PET in oncology. The main imaging modality for planning radiotherapy treatment is CT. However, PET-CT is an emerging modality for use in planning treatments because it allows for more accurate treatment volume definition. The use of PET-CT for treatment planning is highly complex, and protocols and standards for its use are still being developed. It seems probable that PET-CT will eventually replace current CT-based planning methods, but this will require a full understanding of the relevant technical aspects of PET-CT planning. The aim of the present document is to review these technical aspects and to provide recommendations for clinical use of this imaging modality in the radiotherapy planning process. PMID:24377032

  15. Recommendations of the Spanish Societies of Radiation Oncology (SEOR), Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging (SEMNiM), and Medical Physics (SEFM) on (18)F-FDG PET-CT for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Caballero Perea, Begoña; Villegas, Antonio Cabrera; Rodríguez, José Miguel Delgado; Velloso, María José García; Vicente, Ana María García; Cabrerizo, Carlos Huerga; López, Rosa Morera; Romasanta, Luis Alberto Pérez; Beltrán, Moisés Sáez

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is a valuable tool for diagnosing and staging malignant lesions. The fusion of PET and computed tomography (CT) yields images that contain both metabolic and morphological information, which, taken together, have improved the diagnostic precision of PET in oncology. The main imaging modality for planning radiotherapy treatment is CT. However, PET-CT is an emerging modality for use in planning treatments because it allows for more accurate treatment volume definition. The use of PET-CT for treatment planning is highly complex, and protocols and standards for its use are still being developed. It seems probable that PET-CT will eventually replace current CT-based planning methods, but this will require a full understanding of the relevant technical aspects of PET-CT planning. The aim of the present document is to review these technical aspects and to provide recommendations for clinical use of this imaging modality in the radiotherapy planning process.

  16. Preliminary experience on the use of PET/CT in the management of pediatric post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Guerra-García, Pilar; Hirsch, Steffen; Levine, Daniel S; Taj, Mary M

    2017-06-14

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a well-known complication following prolonged immunosuppression. Contrary to other lymphomas, there is no standardized imaging approach to assess PTLD either at staging or for response to therapy. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an imaging modality that has proven to be useful in lymphoma. However, there is still limited data concerning its use in pediatric PTLD. Our study evaluates the use of PET/CT in pediatric PTLD at our institution. To assess the role of PET/CT in pediatric PTLD, we reviewed the pediatric patients with PTLD who had undergone PET/CT at our institution between 2000 and 2016. Nine patients were identified. Six had PET/CT at diagnosis. All lesions seen on CT were identified with PET/CT. Fourteen PET/CTs were done during treatment. Eight PET/CTs were negative, including three where CT showed areas of uncertain significance. In these cases, PET/CT helped us to stop treatment and the patients remain in remission after a long follow-up (mean 74.3 months; range 12.4-180.9 months). PET/CT revealed additional disease in two cases, therefore treatment was intensified. Six biopsies and close follow-up was done to confirm PET/CT results. In one case, PET/CT did not identify central nervous system involvement demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging. PET/CT may have an important role in the staging and follow-up of pediatric PTLD. In our cohort, PET/CT was helpful in staging and assessing treatment response and in clarifying equivocal findings on other imaging modalities. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Conspicuity of Malignant Lesions on PET/CT and Simultaneous Time-Of-Flight PET/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Iagaru, Andrei; Jamali, Mehran; Holley, Dawn; Barkhodari, Amir; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the conspicuity of malignant lesions between FDG PET/CT and a new simultaneous, time-of-flight (TOF) enabled PET/MRI scanner. Methods All patients underwent a single-injection of FDG, followed by a dual imaging protocol consisting of PET/CT followed by TOF PET/MRI. PET/CT and PET/MRI images were evaluated by two readers independently for areas of FDG uptake compatible with malignancy, and then categorized into 5 groups (1: PET/MRI and PET/CT positive; 2: PET/MRI positive, PET/CT positive in retrospect; 3: PET/CT positive, PET/MRI positive in retrospect; 4: PET/MRI positive, PET/CT negative; 5: PET/MRI negative, PET/CT positive) by consensus. Patients with no lesions on either study or greater than 10 lesions based on either modality were excluded from the study. Results Fifty-two patients (mean±SD age: 58±14 years) underwent the dual imaging protocol; of these, 29 patients with a total of 93 FDG-avid lesions met the inclusion criteria. The majority of lesions (56%) were recorded prospectively in the same location on PET/CT and PET/MRI. About an equal small fraction of lesions were seen on PET/CT but only retrospectively on PET/MRI (9%) and vice versa (12%). More lesions were identified only on PET/MRI but not on PET/CT, even in retrospect (96% vs. 81%, respectively; p = 0.003). Discrepant lesions had lower maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) than concordant lesions on both modalities (p<0.001). Conclusions While most lesions were identified prospectively on both modalities, significantly more lesions were identified with PET/MRI than with PET/CT. PMID:28103230

  18. Role of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in patients affected by Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Albano, Domenico; Bosio, Giovanni; Giubbini, Raffaele; Bertagna, Francesco

    2017-07-26

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare hematological disorder for which the utility of(18)F-FDG PET/CT is unclear. Our aim was to explore the metabolic features of LCH and the possible role of(18)F-FDG PET/CT in LCH evaluation. We found 17 patients with histologically proven LCH who underwent 17(18)F-FDG PET/CT scans for staging and 42 scans for restaging/follow-up purposes. PET/CT results were compared with those obtained from other conventional imaging modalities (bone scintigraphy, plain radiogram, computed tomography, magnetic resonance). (18)F-FDG PET/CT was positive in 15/17 patients, and it detected 36/37 lesions; all bone and extraskeletal lesions, except for a cecal lesion, were(18)F-FDG-avid. Only 1/4 of the patients with lung LCH had hypermetabolic lesions. The average SUVmax of the FDG-avid lesions was 7.3 ± 6.7, the average lesion-to-liver SUVmax ratio was 3.4 ± 2.5, and the average lesion-to-blood pool SUVmax ratio was 4 ± 3.2. In comparison to other imaging methods,(18)F-FDG PET/CT detected additional lesions or was able to evaluate treatment response earlier in 33/74 cases; it was confirmatory in 38/74 and detected fewer lesions in 3/74 (all three with lung LCH). (18)F-FDG PET/CT seems to be useful for evaluating LCH when compared to conventional imaging, except in pulmonary cases. It can be used both for staging and restaging purposes.

  19. Is FDG-PET/CT useful for managing malignant pleural mesothelioma?

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Hideki; Terazawa, Kaori; Morita, Naomi; Otomi, Yoichi; Yamashita, Kyo; Nishitani, Hiromu

    2009-02-01

    Imaging techniques such as CT, MRI and PET/CT have essential pre- and post-treatment roles in detecting tumors and evaluating the extension of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). We sough to evaluate the advantages and limitations on FDG-PET/CT findings. We performed 13 FDG-PET/CT studies in 9 patients with MPM (8 males, 1 female, aged 51 to 84 years, 9 at the initial diagnosis, 4 follow up studies). We reviewed FDG-PET/CT findings of primary tumors, recurrent tumors, lymph nodes, metastasis. All primary and recurrent tumors were FDG positive. The uptake patterns at initial diagnosis were; diffuse+multi-nodular uptake pattern in 5, diffuse irregular thickened uptake pattern in 2, some focal thickened pattern in one, and a slight diffuse uptake pattern in one. Two of the 3 patients diagnosed as N0 by PET and operated on had negative lymph nodes confirmed pathologically. The other patient diagnosed as N0 by PET, who had one month of time lag between PET/CT examination and surgery, was confirmed as N2 by extrapleural pneumonectomy. In 3 patients, hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes were difficult to distinguish from irregular pleural thickening. One patient had a FDG positive lymph node in the ipsilateral supraclavicular region confirmed as metastasis (N3). One patient had a FDG positive lymph node in the para-aortic region. Lung metastasis was seen in one patient (M1). In another patient, two focal nodular uptakes in the colon were detected and confirmed as colon polyps (pathologically Group 3-4). At restaging, 3 of 4 patients showed diffuse+multi-nodular uptake and one patient showed multi-nodular uptake. The utility of FDG-PET/CT is limited for evaluation of primary tumor extension and nodal status. FDG-PET/CT is useful for detecting distant metastasis and for evaluating activity in supraclavicular or abdominal lymph nodes. It is also useful for identifying unsuspected diseases.

  20. Detection of Internal Mammary Adenopathy in Patients With Breast Cancer by PET/CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Jochelson, Maxine S.; Lebron, Lizza; Jacobs, Stefanie S.; Zheng, Junting; Moskowitz, Chaya S.; Powell, Simon N.; Sacchini, Virgilio; Ulaner, Gary A.; Morris, Elizabeth A.; Dershaw, D. David

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of internal mammary node (IMN) adenopathy in patients with breast cancer and compare breast MRI and PET/CT for detection of IMN adenopathy. MATERIALS AND METHODS This retrospective study included 90 women who underwent MRI and PET/CT before neoadjuvant chemotherapy for clinical stage IIA through IIIA disease. MRI and PET/CT examinations were read independently by two readers trained in breast imaging and nuclear medicine. All patients underwent follow-up MRI at the end of chemotherapy, and 10 with hypermetabolic IMNs underwent follow-up PET/CT. Histology was not obtained. Women were considered to have IMN adenopathy when nodes seen on MRI or having standardized uptake value (SUV) greater than mediastinal blood pool decreased in either size or SUV (or both) after treatment. Features including lymphovascular invasion, tumor quadrant(s), and axillary adenopathy were compared between presence and absence of IMN adenopathy using Fisher’s exact test. Prevalence was determined on the basis of the percentage of patients with IMN adenopathy by either modality. The McNemar test compared the prevalence of IMN adenopathy on MRI to its prevalence on PET/CT. RESULTS Prevalence of IMN adenopathy was 16% (14/90) by MRI and 14% (13/90) by PET/CT (p = 0.317). After chemotherapy, IMN adenopathy resolved in 12 of 14 patients (86%). In two patients with poor responses in primary tumors, IMN adenopathy persisted, and both patients developed metastatic disease within 6 months. At 3 years, survival was significantly worse in patients with IMN adenopathy than in those without (85.7% vs 53.3%, respectively; p = 0.009). CONCLUSION In women with advanced breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy, prevalence of IMN adenopathy was 16%, equally detected by breast MRI and PET/CT. Identification of IMN adenopathy may affect treatment and provides prognostic information. PMID:26397342

  1. Detection of Internal Mammary Adenopathy in Patients With Breast Cancer by PET/CT and MRI.

    PubMed

    Jochelson, Maxine S; Lebron, Lizza; Jacobs, Stefanie S; Zheng, Junting; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Powell, Simon N; Sacchini, Virgilio; Ulaner, Gary A; Morris, Elizabeth A; Dershaw, D David

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of internal mammary node (IMN) adenopathy in patients with breast cancer and compare breast MRI and PET/CT for detection of IMN adenopathy. This retrospective study included 90 women who underwent MRI and PET/CT before neoadjuvant chemotherapy for clinical stage IIA through IIIA disease. MRI and PET/CT examinations were read independently by two readers trained in breast imaging and nuclear medicine. All patients underwent follow-up MRI at the end of chemotherapy, and 10 with hypermetabolic IMNs underwent follow-up PET/CT. Histology was not obtained. Women were considered to have IMN adenopathy when nodes seen on MRI or having standardized uptake value (SUV) greater than mediastinal blood pool decreased in either size or SUV (or both) after treatment. Features including lymphovascular invasion, tumor quadrant(s), and axillary adenopathy were compared between presence and absence of IMN adenopathy using Fisher's exact test. Prevalence was determined on the basis of the percentage of patients with IMN adenopathy by either modality. The McNemar test compared the prevalence of IMN adenopathy on MRI to its prevalence on PET/CT. Prevalence of IMN adenopathy was 16% (14/90) by MRI and 14% (13/90) by PET/CT (p = 0.317). After chemotherapy, IMN adenopathy resolved in 12 of 14 patients (86%). In two patients with poor responses in primary tumors, IMN adenopathy persisted, and both patients developed metastatic disease within 6 months. At 3 years, survival was significantly worse in patients with IMN adenopathy than in those without (85.7% vs 53.3%, respectively; p = 0.009). In women with advanced breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemo-therapy, prevalence of IMN adenopathy was 16%, equally detected by breast MRI and PET/CT. Identification of IMN adenopathy may affect treatment and provides prognostic information.

  2. [Preliminary evaluation of PET-CT and DWI for the detection of lymphoma bone marrow infiltration].

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Su, L P; Yang, X T; Zhang, J X; Zhao, M; Zhang, Z; Guan, T; Liu, X L; Zheng, Y P; Han, W E

    2016-11-23

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of PET-CT and DWI for the detection of bone marrow infiltration of lymphoma. Methods: The bone marrow samples of 93 untreated patients with pathologically diagnosed lymphoma were retrospectively analyzed. 61 patients underwent PET-CT examination, and other 32 underwent DWI examination. With bone marrow biopsy results as "gold standard" , the rates and sites of bone marrow infiltration of various lymphoma subtypes were analyzed, and the detection rates of the two imaging techniques were compared according to different lymphoma subtypes. Results: 39 patients were diagnosed as bone marrow infiltration based on pathological examination of bone marrow biopsies from routine sampling sites and bone marrow pathological examination of biopsies guided by PET-CT and DWI. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values of PET-CT for lymphoma bone marrow infiltration were 80.8%, 88.6%, 85.3%, 84.0% and 86.1%, respectively; for DWI examination, these rates were 84.6%, 89.5%, 87.5%, 84.6% and 89.5%, respectively. The detection rates of the two imaging techniques for aggressive lymphoma were 37.5% (18/48) and 38.1% (8/21), respectively, which were slightly higher than those for the indolent lymphoma [23.1% (3/13) and 27.3% (3/11)], although the differences were not statistically significant (P=0.521, P=0.660). For both aggressive lymphoma and indolent lymphoma, the detection rates of DWI were numerically slightly higher than those of PET-CT(P=0.963, P=1.000). Conclusions: PET-CT and DWI have important and similar diagnostic value for bone marrow infiltration of lymphoma. None of PET-CT and DWI can replace bone marrow biopsy (BMB). However, image-guided bone marrow biopsies can improve the detection rate of bone marrow infiltration of lymphoma.

  3. Clinical implication of F-18 FDG PET/CT in patients with secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jahae; Yoo, Su Woong; Kang, Sae-Ryung; Bom, Hee-Seung; Song, Ho-Chun; Min, Jung-Joon

    2014-04-01

    The contribution that F-18 fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG) PET/CT makes to the diagnosis of malignancy in patients with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of F-18 FDG PET/CT for the detection of underlying malignancy, to investigate the correlation between PET and laboratory parameters, and to identify prognosis-related factors in patients with secondary HLH. We enrolled 14 patients who were diagnosed with HLH and referred for F-18 FDG PET/CT to exclude malignancy. The diagnostic performance of F-18 FDG PET/CT for malignancy detection was assessed. The correlations between PET and laboratory parameters were determined. The prognostic significance of the following factors was evaluated: PET and laboratory parameters, age in years, presence of underlying malignancy, and fever and splenomegaly. Six of the 14 patients had malignancies (four with lymphoma, one with multiple myeloma, and one with colonic malignancy). Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of F-18 FDG PET/CT for malignancy detection were 83, 62.5, and 71.4 %, respectively. F-18 FDG uptake in the bone marrow and spleen was positively correlated with neutrophil count and C-reactive protein. All of the PET parameters, but none of the clinical or laboratory parameters, were significantly associated with patient outcome, as determined by univariate analysis. Given the small sample size, F-18 FDG PET/CT was useful for detecting underlying malignancy, and PET parameters correlated with laboratory parameters that reflected inflammatory status. F-18 FDG PET/CT might provide prognostic information for the management of patients with secondary HLH.

  4. Askin tumor: CT and FDG-PET/CT imaging findings and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tingting; Guan, Yubao; Chen, Yongxin; Li, Jingxu

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the imaging findings of Askin tumors on computed tomography (CT) and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET/CT).Seventeen cases of Askin tumors confirmed by histopathology were retrospectively analyzed in terms of CT (17 cases) and FDG-PET/CT data (6 cases).Fifteen of the tumors were located in the chest wall and the other 2 were in the anterior middle mediastinum. Of the 15 chest wall cases, 13 demonstrated irregular, heterogeneous soft tissue masses with cystic degeneration and necrosis, and 2 demonstrated homogeneous soft tissue masses on unenhanced CT scans. Two mediastinal tumors demonstrated the irregular, heterogeneous soft tissue masses. Calcifications were found in 2 tumors. The tumors demonstrated heterogeneously enhancement in 16 cases and homogeneous enhancement in 1 case on contrast-enhanced scans. FDG-PET/CT images revealed increased metabolic activity in all 6 cases undergone FDG-PET/CT scan, and the lesion SUVmax ranged from 4.0 to 18.6. At initial diagnosis, CT and FDG-PET/CT scans revealed rib destruction in 9 cases, pleural effusion in 9 cases, and lung metastasis in 1 case. At follow-up, 12 cases showed recurrence and/or metastases, 4 cases showed improvement or remained stable, and 1 was lost to follow-up.In summary, CT and FDG-PET/CT images of Askin tumors showed heterogeneous soft tissue masses in the chest wall and the mediastinum, accompanied by rib destruction, pleural effusion, and increased FDG uptake. CT and FDG-PET/CT imaging play important roles in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with Askin tumors.

  5. A dual tracer (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/CT pilot study for detection of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Gormsen, Lars C; Haraldsen, Ate; Kramer, Stine; Dias, Andre H; Kim, Won Yong; Borghammer, Per

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is a potentially fatal condition lacking a single test with acceptable diagnostic accuracy. (18)F-FDG PET/CT has emerged as a promising imaging modality, but is challenged by physiological myocardial glucose uptake. An alternative tracer, (68)Ga-DOTANOC, binds to somatostatin receptors on inflammatory cells in sarcoid granulomas. We therefore aimed to conduct a proof-of-concept study using (68)Ga-DOTANOC to diagnose CS. In addition, we compared diagnostic accuracy and inter-observer variability of (68)Ga-DOTANOC vs. (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Nineteen patients (seven female) with suspected CS were prospectively recruited and dual tracer scanned within 7 days. PET images were reviewed by four expert readers for signs of CS and compared to the reference standard (Japanese ministry of Health and Welfare CS criteria). CS was diagnosed in 3/19 patients. By consensus, 11/19 (18)F-FDG scans and 0/19 (68)Ga-DOTANOC scans were rated as inconclusive. The sensitivity of (18)F-FDG PET for diagnosing CS was 33 %, specificity was 88 %, PPV was 33 %, NPV was 88 %, and diagnostic accuracy was 79 %. For (68)Ga-DOTANOC, accuracy was 100 %. Inter-observer agreement was poor for (18)F-FDG PET (Fleiss' combined kappa 0.27, NS) and significantly better for (68)Ga-DOTANOC (Fleiss' combined kappa 0.46, p = 0.001). Despite prolonged pre-scan fasting, a large proportion of (18)F-FDG PET/CT images were rated as inconclusive, resulting in low agreement among reviewers and correspondingly poor diagnostic accuracy. By contrast, (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT had excellent diagnostic accuracy with the caveat that inter-observer variability was still significant. Nevertheless, (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT looks very promising as an alternative CS PET tracer. Current Controlled Trials NCT01729169 .

  6. Preoperative FDG-PET/CT Is an Important Tool in the Management of Patients with Thick (T4) Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Arrangoiz, Rodrigo; Papavasiliou, Pavlos; Stransky, Carrie A.; Yu, Jian Q.; Tianyu, Li; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Berger, Adam C.; Farma, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    The yield of preoperative PET/CT (PET/CT) for regional and distant metastases for thin/intermediate thickness melanoma is low. Objective of this study is to determine if PET/CT performed for T4 melanomas helps guide management and alter treatment plans. Methods. Retrospective cohort of 216 patients with T4 melanomas treated at two tertiary institutions. Fifty-six patients met our inclusion criteria (T4 lesion, PET/CT and no clinical evidence of metastatic disease). Results. Fifty-six patients (M: 32, F: 24) with median tumor thickness of 6 mm were identified. PET/CT recognized twelve with regional and four patients with metastatic disease. Melanoma-related treatment plan was altered in 11% of the cases based on PET/CT findings. PET/CT was negative 60% of the time, in 35% of the cases; it identified incidental findings that required further evaluation. Conclusion. Patients with T4 lesions, PET/CT changed the treatment plan 18% of the time. Regional findings changed the surgical treatment plan in 11% and the adjuvant plan in 7% of our cases due to the finding of metastatic disease. Additionally 20 patients had incidental findings that required further workup. In this subset of patients, we feel there is a benefit to PET/CT, and further studies should be performed to validate our findings. PMID:22654898

  7. Poor predictive value of positive interim FDG-PET/CT in primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lazarovici, Julien; Terroir, Marie; Arfi-Rouche, Julia; Michot, Jean-Marie; Mussot, Sacha; Florea, Valentina; Ghigna, Maria-Rosa; Dartigues, Peggy; Petrovanu, Cynthia; Danu, Alina; Fermé, Christophe; Ribrag, Vincent; Ghez, David

    2017-06-21

    Though commonly used to assess response to therapy, the prognostic value of interim FDG-PET/CT in Primary Mediastinal Large B-cell Lymphoma (PMBCL) is unclear. We conducted a retrospective study on 36 consecutive patients treated at our institution for a PMBCL between 2006 and 2014. All patients with a positive interim FDG-PET/CT had undergone histological restaging consisting either in a surgical debulking of the residual lesion (15 patients) or a CT-guided core needle biopsy (two patients). All FDG-PET/CT were secondarily reviewed according to the more recent Deauville criteria. Interim FDG-PET/CT was considered positive in 17/36 patients using visual evaluation. Among these patients, 14 had a Deauville score of 4. Histological restaging was negative in all but one case, showing inflammation and/or fibrosis. After a median follow-up of 48.5 months, a total of five patients have relapsed, two patients in the positive FDG-PET/CT group, and three patients in the negative FDG-PET/CT group, respectively. These data indicate that a positive interim FDG-PET/CT does not reflect persistence of active disease in the vast majority of PMBCL cases. The relapse rate appears similar regardless of interim FDG-PET/CT results and interpretation criteria. This suggests that interim FDG-PET/CT has a poor positive predictive value, thus kt should be used with caution in PMBCL.

  8. The Value of FDG PET/CT in Treatment Response Assessment, Follow-Up, and Surveillance of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Mena, Esther; Yanamadala, Anusha; Reddy, Siddaling; Solnes, Lilja B; Wachsmann, Jason; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to summarize the evidence regarding the role of FDG PET/CT in treatment response assessment and surveillance of lung cancer and to provide suggested best practices. FDG PET/CT is a valuable imaging tool for assessing treatment response for patients with lung cancer, though evidence for its comparative effectiveness with chest CT is still evolving. FDG PET/CT is most useful when there is clinical suspicion or other evidence for disease recurrence or metastases. The sequencing, cost analysis, and comparative effectiveness of FDG PET/CT and conventional imaging modalities in the follow-up setting need to be investigated.

  9. [Role of PET-CT in the follow-up of treated tumors of the head and neck].

    PubMed

    Mabille, L

    2008-01-01

    F-18 FDG PET-CT is a well established medical imaging technique used routinely for the follow-up of treated head and neck tumors. Currently, PET-CT is performed 4 months after the end of therapy to assess its efficacy. More recently it has been suggested that this delay could be reduced to one month with major therapeutic implications. During follow-up, PET-CT could improve sensitivity and specificity compared to other imaging techniques. Moreover, since PET-CT is a "whole body technique", it allows restaging in a single procedure.

  10. Clinical applications of choline PET/CT in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Elisabetta; Lazzeri, Patrizia; Milano, Amalia; Gaeta, Maria Chiara; Ciarmiello, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas and metastatic tumors are the most common forms of brain tumors. From a clinical perspective, neuroimaging plays a significant role, in diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. To date MRI is considered the current clinical gold standard for imaging, however, despite providing superior structural detail it features poor specificity in identifying viable tumors in brain treated with surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. In the last years functional neuroimaging has become largely widespread thanks to the use of molecular tracers employed in cellular metabolism which has significantly improved the management of patients with brain tumors, especially in the post-treatment phase. Despite the considerable progress of molecular imaging in oncology its use in the diagnosis of brain tumors is still limited by a few wellknown technical problems. Because 18F-FDG, the most common radiotracer used in oncology, is avidly accumulated by normal cortex, the low tumor/background signal ratio makes it difficult to distinguish the tumor from normal surrounding tissues. By contrast, radiotracers with higher specificity for the tumor are labeled with a short half-life isotopes which restricts their use to those centers equipped with a cyclotron and radiopharmacy facility. 11C-choline has been reported as a suitable tracer for neuroimaging application. The recent availability of choline labeled with a long half-life radioisotope as 18F increases the possibility of studying this tracer's potential role in the staging of brain tumors. The present review focuses on the possible clinical applications of PET/CT with choline tracers in malignant brain tumors and brain metastases, with a special focus on malignant gliomas.

  11. Comparison of CT and PET/CT for biopsy guidance in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Cerci, Juliano J; Tabacchi, Elena; Bogoni, Mateos; Delbeke, Dominique; Pereira, Carlos Cunha; Cerci, Rodrigo J; Krauzer, Cassiano; Sakamoto, Danielle Giacometti; Fanti, Stefano; Vitola, João Vicente

    2017-08-01

    To compare FDG PET/CT and CT for the guidance of percutaneous biopsies with histological confirmation of lesions. We prospectively evaluated 323 patients of whom 181 underwent FDG PET/CT-guided biopsy (total 188 biopsies) and 142 underwent CT-guided biopsy (total 146 biopsies). Biopsies were performed using the same PET/CT scanner with a fluoroscopic imaging system. Technical feasibility, clinical success and complication rates in the two groups were evaluated. Of the 188 biopsies with PET/CT guidance, 182 (96.8%) were successful with conclusive tissue samples obtained and of the 146 biopsies with CT guidance, 137 (93.8%) were successful. Therefore, 6 of 188 biopsies (3.1%) with PET/CT guidance and 9 of 146 (6.1%) with CT guidance were inconclusive (p = 0.19). Due to inconclusive histological results, 4 of the 188 lesions (2.1%) were rebiopsied with PET/CT guidance and 3 of 146 lesions (2.0%) were rebiopsied with CT guidance. Histology demonstrated that 142 of 188 lesions (75.5%) were malignant, and 40 (21.2%) were benign in the PET/CT-guided group, while 89 of 146 lesions (60.9%) were malignant and 48 (32.8%) were benign in the CT-guided group (p = 0.004 and 0.01, respectively). Patients with a histological diagnosis of benign lesion had no recurrence of disease with a minimum of 6 months follow-up. Of the 188 PET/CT-guided biopsies, 6 (3.1%) were repeat biopsies due to a previous nondiagnostic CT-guided biopsy performed in a different diagnostic centre. The interval between the two biopsies was less than a month in all cases. Histology revealed five malignant lesions and one benign lesion among these. The complication rate in the PET/CT-guided biopsy group was 12.7% (24 of 188), while in the CT-guided group, was 9.5% (14 of 146, p = 0.26). Therefore, there was no significant difference in complication rates between PET/CT and CT guidance. PET/CT-guided biopsy is already known to be a feasible and accurate method in the diagnostic work-up of suspected

  12. The role of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of osteosarcoma recurrence.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Andrea; Ceci, Francesco; Castellucci, Paolo; Graziani, Tiziano; Polverari, Giulia; Trovarelli, Giulia; Palmerini, Emanuela; Ferrari, Stefano; Fanti, Stefano; Ruggieri, Pietro

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT in osteosarcoma patients suspicious for disease recurrence after adequate surgical therapy. Inclusion criteria were: a) adequate surgical treatment for proven osteosarcoma and documented complete remission after therapy; b) (18)F-FDG-PET/CT performed during follow-up for clinical/diagnostic suspicion of relapse; c) new surgical treatment with excision of the suspected lesions; d) histological validation of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT findings. Thirty-seven patients matching all inclusion criteria were retrospectively enrolled (20 men and 17 female). Primary surgical treatment consists of resection (31 cases) or amputation (six cases). (18)F-FDG-PET/CT performance was assessed with a per-patient and per-site evaluation of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predicting value (PPV), and negative predicting value (NPV). The sites of relapse were classified as local, lung, lymphnodes (LNs), and distant (other skeletal segments and/or distant soft tissue). The disease-free survival (DFS) and the overall survival (OS) after 18F-FDG PET/CT were evaluated. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT was positive in 89.2% (33/37) of patients. Local uptake only was observed in 35.1% patients (13/37); lung uptake only in 18.9% (7/37); distant uptake only in 2.7% (1/37) case; multiple sites of uptake in 32.4% (12/37). Histology resulted positive in 92% (34/37) of patients. A total of 51 pathologic lesions were evaluated (22 local relapse, 11 lung metastasis, 10 metastatic LNs, eight distant metastatic lesions). On a per-patient analysis (18)F-FDG-PET/CT showed a sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV, and NPV of 91%, 75%, 89%, 97%, 50%. On a per-site analysis the performance for local relapse was 96%, 100%, 97%, 100%, 93%, while for lung relapse detection was 80%, 100%, 92%, 100%, 88%. The mean follow-up after (18)F-FDG-PET/CT was 21.5 months. At the last follow-up, 19% (7/37) of patients were death with disease, 38% (14

  13. Higher breast cancer conspicuity on dbPET compared to WB-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Nishimatsu, Kayo; Nakamoto, Yuji; Miyake, Kanae K; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Kanao, Shotaro; Toi, Masakazu; Togashi, Kaori

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate lesion detectability of a dedicated breast positron-emission tomography (dbPET) scanner for breast cancers with an updated reconstruction mode, comparing it to whole-body positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (WB-PET/CT). A total of 179 histologically-proven breast cancer lesions in 150 females who underwent both WB-PET/CT and dbPET with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose were retrospectively analyzed. The patient/breast/lesion-based sensitivities based on visual analysis were compared between dbPET and WB-PET/CT. For lesions visible on both PET images, SUVmax values of the tumors were measured, and tumor-to-background ratios (T/B ratios) of SUVmax were compared between the two scans. Subgroup analyses according to clinical tumor stage, histopathology and histological grade were also performed. Patient/breast/lesion-based sensitivities were 95%, 95%, and 92%, respectively, for dbPET, and 95%, 94%, and 88%, respectively, for WB-PET/CT. Mean±standard deviation SUVmax values of FDG-avid tumors were 13.0±9.7 on dbPET and 6.4±4.8 on WB-PET. T/B ratios were also significantly higher in dbPET than in WB-PET/CT (8.1±7.1 vs. 5.1±4.5). In the subgroup analysis, no significant differences in sensitivities between dbPET and WB-PET/CT were found. However, T/B ratios of dbPET were significantly higher than those of WB-PET/CT in cT1c, cT2, cT3, invasive cancer, invasive carcinoma of no special type, mucinous carcinoma and Grades 1-3. No significant differences in sensitivities were identified between dbPET using an updated reconstruction mode and WB-PET/CT; however, T/B ratios of dbPET were significantly higher than those of WB-PET/CT, indicating higher tumor conspicuity on dbPET. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of PET/CT and PET/MR imaging in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Al-Nabhani, Khalsa Z; Syed, Rizwan; Michopoulou, Sofia; Alkalbani, Jokha; Afaq, Asim; Panagiotidis, Emmanouil; O'Meara, Celia; Groves, Ashley; Ell, Peter; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively compare whole-body PET/MR imaging and PET/CT, qualitatively and quantitatively, in oncologic patients and assess the confidence and degree of inter- and intraobserver agreement in anatomic lesion localization. Fifty patients referred for staging with known cancers underwent PET/CT with low-dose CT for attenuation correction immediately followed by PET/MR imaging with 2-point Dixon attenuation correction. PET/CT scans were obtained according to standard protocols (56 ± 20 min after injection of an average 367 MBq of (18)F-FDG, 150 MBq of (68)Ga-DOTATATE, or 333.8 MBq of (18)F-fluoro-ethyl-choline; 2.5 min/bed position). PET/MR was performed with 5 min/bed position. Three dual-accredited nuclear medicine physicians/radiologists identified the lesions and assigned each to an exact anatomic location. The image quality, alignment, and confidence in anatomic localization of lesions were scored on a scale of 1-3 for PET/CT and PET/MR imaging. Quantitative analysis was performed by comparing the standardized uptake values. Intraclass correlation coefficients and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to assess intra- and interobserver agreement in image quality, alignment, and confidence in lesion localization for the 2 modalities. Two hundred twenty-seven tracer-avid lesions were identified in 50 patients. Of these, 225 were correctly identified on PET/CT and 227 on PET/MR imaging by all 3 observers. The confidence in anatomic localization improved by 5.1% when using PET/MR imaging, compared with PET/CT. The mean percentage interobserver agreement was 96% for PET/CT and 99% for PET/MR imaging, and intraobserver agreement in lesion localization across the 2 modalities was 93%. There was 10% (5/50 patients) improvement in local staging with PET/MR imaging, compared with PET/CT. In this first study, we show the effectiveness of whole-body PET/MR imaging in oncology. There is no statistically significant difference between PET

  15. Bone marrow trephine biopsy in Hodgkin's lymphoma. Comparison with PET-CT scan in 65 patients.

    PubMed

    Lakhwani, Sunil; Cabello-García, Dolores; Allende-Riera, Ana; Cárdenas-Negro, Carlos; Raya, José María; Hernández-Garcia, Miguel T

    2017-08-29

    To compare bone marrow biopsy (BMB) and PET/CT in detecting bone marrow involvement in Hodgkin's lymphoma MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 65 patients with both tests in the initial staging or in relapse with special attention to the PET/CT uptake pattern. In 3 patients (4.6%), the BMB showed bone marrow involvement with the PET/CT being positive in them all: 2 with diffuse+multifocal pattern and one diffuse only. In 11 additional patients (total 14/65, 21%), bone marrow involvement was diagnosed by PET/CT because bone marrow uptake was above hepatic one. The pattern was focal only in 2 cases, multifocal in 5, diffuse in 3 and diffuse+multifocal in one. In these last 4 cases the BMB showed an unspecific myelopathy. PET/CT detects all cases with BMB affected and many that escape to biopsy, however when the uptake pattern is diffuse it could be by involvement or reactive hyperplasia and in those cases the BMB should be done. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. [Study of patients with prolonged fever with (18)F-FDG PET/CT].

    PubMed

    Moragas, M; Cozar, M Puig; Buxeda, M; Soler, M; Riera, E; García, J R

    2015-01-01

    To review the findings on (18)F-FDG PET-CT in patients with fever of unknown origin lasting more than 7 days. This retrospective descriptive observational study included 93 (18)F-FDG PET-CT studies to detect a fever-causing focus done at three nuclear medicine centers from October 2006 through February 2014. A nuclear medicine specialist and a radiologist reviewed the images for foci of pathological uptake; another specialist's opinion resolved discrepancies. The findings on (18)F-FDG PET-CT studies were checked against clinical and/or histological findings. Abnormal (18)F-FDG uptake on PET-CT that could explain the cause of the fever was found in 52 (56%) of the 93 studies, and the cause of the fever was confirmed in 50 of these 52 studies. In the 50 cases in which the cause of the fever was confirmed, infection was the most common cause (54%), followed by noninfectious inflammatory disease (28%) and tumors (18%). (18)F-FDG PET-CT is useful in diagnosing the cause of prolonged febrile illness, so it might be practical to use it earlier in the diagnostic process. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. An update on the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Khiewvan, Benjapa; Torigian, Drew A; Emamzadehfard, Sahra; Paydary, Koosha; Salavati, Ali; Houshmand, Sina; Werner, Thomas J; Alavi, Abass

    2017-06-01

    This review article summarizes the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in ovarian cancer. With regard to the diagnosis of ovarian cancer, the presence of FDG uptake within the ovary of a postmenopausal woman raises the concern for ovarian cancer. Multiple studies show that FDG PET/CT can detect lymph node and distant metastasis in ovarian cancer with high accuracy and may, therefore, alter the management to obtain better clinical outcomes. Although PET/CT staging is superior for N and M staging of ovarian cancer, its role is limited for T staging. Additionally, FDG PET/CT is of great benefit in evaluating treatment response and has prognostic value in patients with ovarian cancer. FDG PET/CT also has value to detect recurrent disease, particularly in patients with elevated serum CA-125 levels and negative or inconclusive conventional imaging test results. PET/MRI may beneficial for tumor staging because MRI has higher soft tissue contrast and no ionizing radiation exposure compared to CT. Some non-FDG PET radiotracers such as (18)F-fluorothymidine (FLT) or (11)C-methionine (MET) have been studied in preclinical and clinical studies as well and may play a role in the evaluation of patients with ovarian cancer.

  18. Clinical Practice in PET/CT for the Management of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer.

    PubMed

    Goel, Reema; Moore, William; Sumer, Baran; Khan, Saad; Sher, David; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to summarize the evidence for the value of PET/CT for the management of patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer and suggest best clinical practices. FDG PET/CT is a valuable imaging tool for identifying unknown primary tumors in patients with known cervical node metastases leading to management change and is the standard of care for the initial staging of stage III and IV head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), for assessing therapy response when performed at least 12 weeks after chemoradiation therapy, and for avoiding unnecessary planned neck dissection. Neck dissection is avoided if PET/CT findings are negative-regardless of the size of the residual neck nodes-because survival outcomes are not compromised. FDG PET/CT is valuable in detecting recurrences and metastases during follow-up when suspected because of clinical symptoms and serves as a prognostic marker for patient survival outcomes, for 5 years. Using FDG PET/CT for routine surveillance of HNSCC after 6 months of treatment without any clinical suspicion should be discouraged.

  19. 18F-FDG PET/CT in Neurolymphomatosis: Report of 3 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Canh, Nguyen Xuan; Tan, Ngo Van; Tung, Tran Thanh; Son, Nguyen Truong; Maurea, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis is a rare manifestation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by infiltration of peripheral nerves, nerve roots, plexus and cranial nerves by malignant lymphocytes. This report presents positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)imaging with 2-deoxy-2-18F-fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) in 3 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma with nerve infiltration, including one newly diagnosed lymphoma, one recurrent lymphoma in previous nerve lesions and one newly recurrent lymphoma. PET/CT could reveal the affected neural structures including cranial nerves, spinal nerve roots, brachial plexus, cervicothoracic ganglion, intercostal nerves, branches of the vagus nerve, lumbosacral plexus and sciatic nerves. There was relative concordance between PET/CT and MRI in detection of affected cranial nerves. PET/CT seemed to be better than MRI in detection of affected peripheral nerves. 18F-FDG PET/CT was a whole-body imaging technique with the ability to reveal the affected cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots and plexus in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. A thorough understanding of disease and use of advanced imaging modalities will increasingly detect neurolymphomatosis. PMID:27408859

  20. CT and PET-CT of a Dog with Multiple Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Jisun; KWON, Seong Young; CENA, Rohani; PARK, Seungjo; OH, Juyeon; OUI, Heejin; CHO, Kyoung-Oh; MIN, Jung-Joon; CHOI, Jihye

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 10-year-old, intact female Yorkshire terrier had multiple pulmonary nodules on thoracic radiography and ultrasonography with no lesions elsewhere. Computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) were performed to identify metastasis and undetected primary tumors. On CT examination, pulmonary nodules had a hypoattenuating center with thin peripheral enhancement, suggesting ischemic or necrotizing lesion. In PET-CT at 47 min after intravenous injection of 11.1 MBq/kg of FDG, the maximum standardized uptake value of each pulmonary nodule was about from 3.8 to 6.4. There were no abnormal lesions except for four pulmonary nodules on the CT and PET-CT. Primary lung tumor was tentatively diagnosed, and palliative therapy using 2 mg/kg tramadol and 2.2 mg/kg carprofen twice per day was applied. After the dog’s euthanasia due to deteriorated clinical signs and poor prognosis, undifferentiated pulmonary adenocarcinoma was diagnosed through histopathologic and immunochemistry examination. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study of CT and PET-CT features of canine pulmonary adenocarcinoma. In this case, multiple pulmonary adenocarcinoma could be determined on the basis of FDG PET-CT through screening the obvious distant metastasis and/or lymph node invasions and excluding unknown primary tumors. PMID:24389742

  1. Ability of FDG-PET/CT in the detection of gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Font, Carlos; Gómez-Rio, Manuel; Rodríguez-Fernández, Antonio; Jiménez-Heffernan, Amelia; Sánchez Sánchez, Rocío; Llamas-Elvira, Jose Manuel

    2014-03-01

    To assess the value of FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of gallbladder carcinomas (GBC). A prospective cohort of patients with suspicion of or confirmed GBC was studied with FDG-PET/CT. Diagnostic accuracy parameters were calculated in comparison with pathology and/or the clinical course of patients. Clinical impact of PET/CT imaging was estimated. Forty-nine patients were enrolled (34 malignant tumors, 15 benign lesions; 37 staging, 12 restaging). Overall diagnostic accuracy was 95.9% for the diagnosis of the primary lesion, 85.7% for lymph node involvement and 95.9% for metastatic disease. Mean SUVmax in malignant gallbladder lesions was 7.92 ± 6.25 Analysis of ROC curves showed a SUVmax cut-off value of 3.62 for malignancy (S: 78.1%; Sp: 88.2%). Diagnostic accuracy in the restaging group reached 100%. FDG-PET/CT changed the management of 22.4% of the population. Diagnosis of malignancy or benignity of suspicious gallbladder lesions is accurately made with FDG PET/CT, allowing a precise staging of GBC due to its ability to identify unsuspected metastatic disease. SUVmax has a complementary role in addition to visual analysis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. 18F-FDG-PET/CT in fever of unknown origin: clinical value.

    PubMed

    Buch-Olsen, Karen M; Andersen, Rikke V; Hess, Søren; Braad, Poul-Erik; Schifter, Søren

    2014-09-01

    Fever of unknown origin continues to be a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The aim of this study was to confirm whether (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG)-PET/computed tomography (CT) is a helpful tool in patients suffering from this condition. Fifty-seven patients with fever of unknown origin were examined with (18)F-FDG-PET/CT as part of their diagnostic workup at the clinicians' discretion. The medical records were read retrospectively to establish the final diagnosis and evaluate the degree to which PET/CT contributed to the diagnosis. The examination was considered helpful if it corresponded to the final diagnosis by showing uptake in an organ considered responsible for the condition, or if it was without focal findings, thereby excluding the patient from having focal infection or malignancy. It was perceived false positive if it pointed towards an organ not regarded by the clinicians as being related to the final diagnosis. It was perceived not helpful if the cause of fever was not visible on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT. We found (18)F-FDG-PET/CT helpful in 75% of patients, not helpful in 4%, and false positive in 21% of patients. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT is a useful tool in the investigation of fever of unknown origin; it can reduce patient inconvenience and possibly costs to society if used earlier in the diagnostic process.

  3. CT and PET-CT of a dog with multiple pulmonary adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jisun; Kwon, Seong Young; Cena, Rohani; Park, Seungjo; Oh, Juyeon; Oui, Heejin; Cho, Kyoung-Oh; Min, Jung-Joon; Choi, Jihye

    2014-04-01

    A 10-year-old, intact female Yorkshire terrier had multiple pulmonary nodules on thoracic radiography and ultrasonography with no lesions elsewhere. Computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) were performed to identify metastasis and undetected primary tumors. On CT examination, pulmonary nodules had a hypoattenuating center with thin peripheral enhancement, suggesting ischemic or necrotizing lesion. In PET-CT at 47 min after intravenous injection of 11.1 MBq/kg of FDG, the maximum standardized uptake value of each pulmonary nodule was about from 3.8 to 6.4. There were no abnormal lesions except for four pulmonary nodules on the CT and PET-CT. Primary lung tumor was tentatively diagnosed, and palliative therapy using 2 mg/kg tramadol and 2.2 mg/kg carprofen twice per day was applied. After the dog's euthanasia due to deteriorated clinical signs and poor prognosis, undifferentiated pulmonary adenocarcinoma was diagnosed through histopathologic and immunochemistry examination. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first study of CT and PET-CT features of canine pulmonary adenocarcinoma. In this case, multiple pulmonary adenocarcinoma could be determined on the basis of FDG PET-CT through screening the obvious distant metastasis and/or lymph node invasions and excluding unknown primary tumors.

  4. Pulmonary artery involvement in Takayasu arteritis. PET/CT versus CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Addimanda, O; Spaggiari, L; Pipitone, N; Versari, A; Pattacini, P; Salvarani, C

    2013-01-01

    To report a patient with Takayasu arteritis in whom 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computerised tomography (CT) failed to demonstrate pulmonary artery involvement. A patient with Takayasu arteritis underwent PET/CT and CT angiography before and one year after immunosuppressive treatment. Before treatment, PET/CT showed increased FDG uptake in the aortic arch and epiaortic arteries; pulmonary arteries were not visualised. Follow-up PET/CT one year later demonstrated resolution of abnormal vascular FDG uptake. CT angiography of the chest/abdomen prior to treatment revealed circumferential thickening of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, supra-aortic branches, and left inferior intralobar pulmonary artery with normal lumen diameter (27 mm). After therapy, CT angiography revealed decreased aortic wall thickening with complete resolution of intralobar wall thickening. However, the lumen of the central pulmonary artery was increased (32 mm). PET/CT is very sensitive in depicting active vasculitis, but cannot visualise the pulmonary arteries, presumably because their diameter is below the power of detection of PET/CT. CT angiography or magnetic resonance angiography is required to evaluate pulmonary artery abnormalities.

  5. [Utility of 11C-methionine PET/CT in neuro-oncology].

    PubMed

    Casas Parera, Ignacio; Igirio Gamero, Jorge L; Blumenkrantz, Yamila; Bruno, Gabriel; Báez, Alejandra; Tafur Canabal, José G; Báez, Mariana; Kuchkaryan, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with 11C-methionine (11C-methionine PET/CT) is a new technique used to evaluate primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors. We describe our experience regarding the first 4 patients with glial tumors and 11C-methionine PET/CT. This is a descriptive, observational and prospective study of 4 patients between 38-50 years of age, with different gliomas (WHO classification). MRI and 11C-methionine PET/CT were performed in all cases. Case 1, gliomatosis cerebri grade II post-radiotherapy. Case 2, oligodendroglioma grade II diagnosed and treated with radiotherapy in 1993. Case 3, glioblastoma grade IV post-radiotherapy + temozolomide. Case 4, anaplastic oligoastrocytoma grade III post-radiotherapy + temozolomide. The pattern of 11C-methionine uptake compared with MRI showed tumor progression in cases 1, 3 and 4, and in case 2 showed uptake although the final diagnosis was pseudoprogression. Unlike 18fluordeoxiglucose PET/TC, 11C-methionine uptake in normal brain tissue and pseudoprogression is low, and gliomas are displayed as metabolically active areas. The 11C-methionine PET/CT provided valuable information on the tumoral behavior and extension, although in one case presented did not differentiate tumor progression from pseudoprogression. 11C-methionine PET/CT could be a useful tool in the study and follow-up to patients with gliomas.

  6. Simultaneous PET/MRI vs PET/CT in oncology. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Riola-Parada, C; García-Cañamaque, L; Pérez-Dueñas, V; Garcerant-Tafur, M; Carreras-Delgado, J L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of simultaneous PET/MRI in oncology compared with that of PET/CT, based upon the available evidence. A systematic search was performed in the Medline and Embase databases to identify original clinical articles published up to 21 January 2016, in order to compare simultaneous PET/MRI and PET/CT in oncology patients. A total of 57 articles were obtained that included various diseases: head and neck cancer (5), lung cancer and lung nodules (13), colorectal cancer (1), liver lesions (2), abdominal incidentalomas (1), neuroendocrine tumours (2), thyroid carcinoma (2), breast cancer (3), gynaecological cancer (2), prostate cancer (4), lymphoma (2), multiple myeloma (1), bone metastases (3), intracranial tumours (2), paediatric oncology (1) and various tumours (13). Diagnostic performance of simultaneous PET/MRI was similar or even better to that of PET/CT in most oncological diseases. However, PET/CT was superior for small lung nodule detection. Simultaneous PET/MRI in oncology is feasible, performing at least equally as well as PET/CT, with lower radiation exposure. However, available evidence is still limited. Studies including more patients and tumours are needed to establish PET/MRI indications and to identify appropriate protocols for each disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  7. [PET/CT for diagnostics and therapy stratification of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Kratochwil, C; Haberkorn, U; Giesel, F L

    2010-08-01

    With the introduction of positron emission tomography (PET) and more recently the hybrid systems PET/CT, the management of cancer patients in the treatment strategy has changed tremendously. The combination of PET with multidetector CT scanning enables the integration of metabolic and high resolution morphological image information. PET/CT is nowadays an established modality for tumor detection, characterization, staging and response monitoring. The increased installation of PET/CT systems worldwide and also the increased scientific publications underline the importance of this imaging modality. PET/CT is particular the imaging modality of choice in lung cancer staging and re-staging (T, N and M staging). The possible increased success of surgery in lung cancer patients and also the expected reduction in additional invasive diagnostics lead to benefits for both the individual patient and the healthcare system. In this review article PET and PET/CT is presented for diagnostic and therapeutic stratification in lung cancer. The fundamentals of glucose metabolism, staging, tumor recurrence and therapeutic monitoring are presented.

  8. Current concepts in F18 FDG PET/CT-based radiation therapy planning for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Percy; Kupelian, Patrick; Czernin, Johannes; Ghosh, Partha

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important component of cancer therapy for early stage as well as locally advanced lung cancer. The use of F18 FDG PET/CT has come to the forefront of lung cancer staging and overall treatment decision-making. FDG PET/CT parameters such as standard uptake value and metabolic tumor volume provide important prognostic and predictive information in lung cancer. Importantly, FDG PET/CT for radiation planning has added biological information in defining the gross tumor volume as well as involved nodal disease. For example, accurate target delineation between tumor and atelectasis is facilitated by utilizing PET and CT imaging. Furthermore, there has been meaningful progress in incorporating metabolic information from FDG PET/CT imaging in radiation treatment planning strategies such as radiation dose escalation based on standard uptake value thresholds as well as using respiratory-gated PET and CT planning for improved target delineation of moving targets. In addition, PET/CT-based follow-up after radiation therapy has provided the possibility of early detection of local as well as distant recurrences after treatment. More research is needed to incorporate other biomarkers such as proliferative and hypoxia biomarkers in PET as well as integrating metabolic information in adaptive, patient-centered, tailored radiation therapy.

  9. Feasibility study of small animal imaging using clinical PET/CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wen-Lin; Chen, Chia-Lin; Wang, Ze-Jing; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Liu, Dai-Wei; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2007-02-01

    The feasibility of small animal imaging using a clinical positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy- D-glucose (FDG) was evaluated. Two protocols in PET/CT system, single-mouse high-resolution mode (SHR) and multi-mouse high throughput mode (MHT) protocol were employed to investigate the ability of the scanner and also explored the performance differences between microPET and clinical PET/CT. In this study, we have found that even the clinical PET/CT scanner could not compete with the microPET scanner, especially in spatial resolution; the high-resolution CT image could advance the anatomical information to sub-millimeter level. Besides, CT-based attenuation correction can improve the image uniformity characteristics and quantification accuracy, and the large bore of a human whole-body scanner broadens the possibility of high throughput studies. Considering all the benefits, clinical PET/CT imaging might be a potential alternative for small animal study.

  10. [The clinical value of F-18 FDG PET/CT in patients with secondary hemophagocytic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-Bing; Zhu, Yun-Xia; Liu, Xin; Pan, Bo; Zhang, Liang; Han, Yong-Sheng; Cai, Xiao-Yan; Zhu, Wei-Bo; Wu, Jing-Sheng; Sun, Zi-Min

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of F-18 fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) in diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of secondary hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS). A total of 11 secondary HPS patients examined with 18F-FDG-PET/CT were retrospectively analyzed. The diagnostic value of F-18 FDG PET/CT for malignancy detection was assessed. The values of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(max)) in spleen (SUVS(p)) and in bone marrow (SUVBM) were measured to analyze their relationship with various laboratorial parameters and clinical outcome of secondary HPS patients. The results showed that 4 out of the 11 patients had malignancies, the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of F-18 FDG PET/CT for malignancy detection were 100%, 66.7% and 75% respectively, the SUV(max) of spleen and bone marrow showed no significant correlation with laboratorial parameters, a maximum SUVS(p) of 3.10 and a maximum SUVBM of 3.47 were the optimal cutoffs for predicting patients' outcome, the increased uptake of F-18 FDG in the BM and spleen were significantly associated with shorter survival time according to univariate analysis. It is concluded that 18F-FDG PET/CT may especially play an important role in diagnosis and predicting outcome of secondary HPS for the small sample size.

  11. Multimodal target correction by local bone registration: a PET/CT evaluation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Santos, Thiago; Weitzel, Thilo; Klaeser, Bernd; Krause, Thomas; Nolte, Lutz-Peter; Weber, Stefan; Reyes, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    PET/CT guidance for percutaneous interventions allows biopsy of suspicious metabolically active bone lesions even when no morphological correlation is delineable in the CT images. Clinical use of PET/CT guidance with conventional step-by-step technique is time consuming and complicated especially in cases in which the target lesion is not shown in the CT image. Our recently developed multimodal instrument guidance system (IGS) for PET/CT improved this situation. Nevertheless, bone biopsies even with IGS have a trade-off between precision and intervention duration which is proportional to patient and personnel exposure to radiation. As image acquisition and reconstruction of PET may take up to 10 minutes, preferably only one time consuming combined PET/CT acquisition should be needed during an intervention. In case of required additional control images in order to check for possible patient movements/deformations, or to verify the final needle position in the target, only fast CT acquisitions should be performed. However, for precise instrument guidance accounting for patient movement and/or deformation without having a control PET image, it is essential to be able to transfer the position of the target as identified in the original PET/CT to a changed situation as shown in the control CT.

  12. Usefulness of PET/CT in the diagnosis of recurrent or metastasized differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LU, CUN-ZHI; CAO, SU-SHENG; WANG, WEI; LIU, JUN; FU, NING; LU, FENG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the usefulness of the positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in the detection of recurrence or metastasization of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) in patients with abnormal thyroglobulin levels and negative findings on the 131I-diagnostic whole-body scanning (dWBS). Fifteen patients with DTC, abnormal thyroglobulin levels, and negative 131I-dWBS findings were scanned using the 18F-FDG PET/CT. Positive diagnosis was based on postoperative histologic findings, and clinical and imaging follow-up results obtained in the subsequent 6 months. In addition, preoperative and postoperative thyroglobulin levels were compared. Using the findings of 18F-FDG PET/CT and data on confirmed positive diagnosis, sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) were calculated. Sensitivity and PPV of PET/CT in detecting recurrence or metastasisization of DTC were 93.30 and 91.40%, respectively. Furthermore, postoperative thyroglobulin levels were markedly lower compared to the preoperative levels (respectively, 4.67±1.71 vs. 58.53±18.34 ng/ml; p<0.05). PET/CT scan with 18F-FDG is an informative technique for the detection of recurrent or metastasized DTC in patients with abnormal thyroglobulin levels and negative 131I-dWBS findings. PMID:27073490

  13. Prediction of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) positivity in patients with high-risk primary melanoma.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Maria; Kjaer, Andreas; Wu, Max; Martineau, Lea; Nosrati, Mehdi; Leong, Stanley Pl; Sagebiel, Richard W; Iii, James R Miller; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool to identify occult melanoma metastasis. To date, it is controversial which patients with primary cutaneous melanoma should have staging PET/CT. In this retrospective analysis of more than 800 consecutive patients with cutaneous melanoma, we sought to identify factors predictive of PET/CT positivity in the setting of newly-diagnosed high-risk primary melanoma to determine those patients most appropriate to undergo a PET/CT scan as part of their diagnostic work up. 167 patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk primary cutaneous melanoma underwent a PET/CT scan performed as part of their initial staging. Clinical and histologic factors were evaluated as possible predictors of melanoma metastasis identified on PET/CT scanning using both univariate and multivariate logistic regression. In all, 32 patients (19.2%) had a positive PET/CT finding of metastatic melanoma. In more than half of these patients (56.3%), PET/CT scanning identified disease that was not detectable on clinical examination. Mitotic rate, tumor thickness, lymphadenopathy, and bleeding were significantly predictive of PET/CT positivity. A combinatorial index constructed from these factors revealed a significant association between number of high-risk factors observed and prevalence of PET/CT positivity, which increased from 5.8% (with the presence of 0-2 factors) to 100.0%, when all four factors were present. These results indicate that combining clinical and histologic prognostic factors enables the identification of patients with a higher likelihood of a positive PET/CT scan.

  14. Non traumatic vertebral lesions: incremental utility of PET-CT over MRI and FNAC in a suggested diagnostic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Meena, Rajesh; Aggarwal, Ashish; Bhattacharya, Anish; Gupta, Vivek; Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Chhabra, Rajesh

    2017-03-10

    To prospectively compare positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FNAC for diagnosis of non- traumatic vertebral lesions fracture in countries like India where tuberculosis is endemic. Fifty four patients with non-traumatic spontaneous vertebral lesions were prospectively studied. All patients underwent CEMRI focusing on the spinal lesions, whole-body PET-CT and FNAC.Results were then analysed and compared with final diagnosis obtained either by FNAC or clinical follow up. Out of total 54 patients, FNAC from the spinal lesion could establish diagnosis in 36 patients (26 TB, 1 Fungal and 9 tumors). Of the remaining 18 patients, diagnosis could be established in 7 utilizing FNAC from other sites as dictated by PET-CT. In the remanining11 patients, the diagnosis and management was decided on the concordance of MRI and PET-CT. All three investigations have their own advantages and pitfalls and they complement each other in reaching the final diagnosis. MRI has a better pick up rate (than PET-CT) for inflammatory lesions. PET-CT on the other hand has better sensitivity for malignant vertebral disease. Diagnosis was established if FNAC was conclusive. In cases where FNAC was inconclusive, an additional 38.9% patients' diagnosis could be established by FNAC from other sites of involvement as dictated by PET-CT. This was an incremental utility of PET-CT. When even this fails, there were two possible scenarios-MRI and PET-CT in concordance with each other. In such a scenario, the combined report of MRI and PET-CT was relied upon. The last sub group (where MRI and PET-CT were discordant and FNAC was inconclusive) still remains achilles' heel. Wide bore biopsy may help in establishing diagnosis in such group.

  15. Prediction of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) positivity in patients with high-risk primary melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, Maria; Kjaer, Andreas; Wu, Max; Martineau, Lea; Nosrati, Mehdi; Leong, Stanley PL; Sagebiel, Richard W; III, James R Miller; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool to identify occult melanoma metastasis. To date, it is controversial which patients with primary cutaneous melanoma should have staging PET/CT. In this retrospective analysis of more than 800 consecutive patients with cutaneous melanoma, we sought to identify factors predictive of PET/CT positivity in the setting of newly-diagnosed high-risk primary melanoma to determine those patients most appropriate to undergo a PET/CT scan as part of their diagnostic work up. 167 patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk primary cutaneous melanoma underwent a PET/CT scan performed as part of their initial staging. Clinical and histologic factors were evaluated as possible predictors of melanoma metastasis identified on PET/CT scanning using both univariate and multivariate logistic regression. In all, 32 patients (19.2%) had a positive PET/CT finding of metastatic melanoma. In more than half of these patients (56.3%), PET/CT scanning identified disease that was not detectable on clinical examination. Mitotic rate, tumor thickness, lymphadenopathy, and bleeding were significantly predictive of PET/CT positivity. A combinatorial index constructed from these factors revealed a significant association between number of high-risk factors observed and prevalence of PET/CT positivity, which increased from 5.8% (with the presence of 0-2 factors) to 100.0%, when all four factors were present. These results indicate that combining clinical and histologic prognostic factors enables the identification of patients with a higher likelihood of a positive PET/CT scan. PMID:27766186

  16. Diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with TENIS syndrome: correlation with thyroglobulin levels.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Elif; Yildirim Poyraz, Nilufer; Polat, Sefika Burcak; Turkolmez, Seyda; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to disclose the place of (18)F-FDG PET/CT to predict recurrent disease in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), negative radioiodine whole-body scan (WBS) and high serum thyroglobulin (Tg). Seventy-one patients who underwent total thyroidectomy followed by radioactive iodine ablation and had negative radioiodine WBS but elevated Tg levels underwent PET/CT. They were followed up for 6-50 months (median 23) for the occurence of recurrent disease as detected by either clinical findings, other imaging modalities or histopathological examination. The place of PET/CT findings at baseline to predict the presence of recurrent disease was evaluated. Correlation between PET/CT findings and Tg levels was examined and a threshold for Tg level above which the predictive value of PET/CT was highest was determined. PET/CT was positive for recurrent disease in 38 (53.5%) patients. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and diagnostic accuracy of PET/CT to predict the occurence of recurrent disease at follow-up were 68.8, 78.3, 86.8, 54.5 and 71.9%, respectively. The sensitivity, accuracy and PPV of PET/CT increased with increasing Tg levels. The highest diagnostic accuracy of PET/CT, with a sensitivity of 76.2% and a specificity of 100% to detect recurrent disease appeared to be at a Tg level greater than 29 ng/mL. Our findings suggest that (18)F-FDG-PET/CT is a valuable tool to predict the occurence of recurrent disease in patients with DTC, negative WBS and elevated Tg levels. PET/CT positivity has been shown to be strongly and positively correlated with Tg levels in this patient subset.

  17. Effectiveness of [(124)I]-PET/CT and [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT for localizing recurrence in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jandee; Nah, Kuk Young; Kim, Ra Mi; Oh, Yeon-Ju; An, Young-Sil; Yoon, Joon-Kee; An, Gwang Il; Choi, Tae Hyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Soh, Euy-Young; Chung, Woong Youn

    2012-09-01

    Although the prognosis of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is generally encouraging, a diagnostic dilemma is posed when an increasing level of serum thyroglobulin (Tg) is noted, without detection of a recurrent tumor using conventional imaging tools such as the iodine-131 whole-body scanning (the [(131)I] scan) or neck ultrasonography (US). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of [(124)I]-PET/CT and [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT in terms of accurate detection of both iodine- and non-iodine-avid recurrence, compared with that of conventional imaging such as the [(131)I] scan or neck ultrasonography (US). Between July 2009 and June 2010, we prospectively studied 19 DTC patients with elevated thyroglobulin levels but who do not show pathological lesions when conventional imaging modalities are used. All involved patients had undergone total thyroidectomy and radioiodine (RI) treatment, and who had been followed-up for a mean of 13 months (range, 6-21 months) after the last RI session. Combined [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT and [(124)I]-PET/CT data were evaluated for detecting recurrent DTC lesions in study patients and compared with those of other radiological and/or cytological investigations. Nine of 19 patients (47.4%) showed pathological [(18)F]-FDG (5/19, 26.3%) or [(124)I]-PET (4/19, 21.1%) uptake, and were classed as true-positives. Among such patients, disease management was modified in six (66.7%) and disease was restaged in seven (77.8%). In particular, the use of the described imaging combination optimized planning of surgical resection to deal with locoregional recurrence in 21.1% (4/19) of patients, who were shown to be disease-free during follow-up after surgery. Our results indicate that combination of [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT and [(124)I]-PET/CT affords a valuable diagnostic method that can be used to make therapeutic decisions in patients with DTC who are tumor-free on conventional imaging studies but who have high Tg levels.

  18. Quantitative FDG PET/CT in the community: experience from interpretation of outside oncologic PET/CT exams in referred cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tahari, Abdel K; Wahl, Richard L

    2014-04-01

    Tertiary care institutions often deal with patients who have had a baseline positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scan performed elsewhere. Little data exist regarding the quality of these PET/CT scans and whether they are fully suitable for qualitative or quantitative interpretation. We evaluated outside PET/CT scans from cancer patients referred to our institution and compared them with PET/CT scans acquired locally. This Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board. Informed consent requirements were waived. One hundred seventy recent whole-body outside PET/CT exams from many sites were digitally imported into our radiology imaging system and reviewed for key quality metrics including time from injection until imaging, availability of patient height and weight information, serum glucose level and [(18) F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) dose. The standardised uptake value (SUV) and SUV based on lean body mass (SUL) in the liver were measured whenever possible. These were compared with 170 internal studies performed at our centre during the same period. Missing data were common in outside scans with height in 62%, weight 35%, uptake time 25%, FDG dose 28% and glucose levels in 64% of cases. In quantitatively evaluable cases, mean liver SUL, SUV, FDG dose and uptake time were much more variable in outside than in internal studies. Approximately one-third of the outside PET/CT studies submitted digitally for analysis lacked key information required to secure any quantitative imaging data. Only about a third of these studies had all necessary information available for accurate SUL determination and had acceptable quality that was comparable with locally acquired scans. This suggests that many of PET studies performed in the community cannot be relied upon to provide quantitative image data that can be applied in a different centre. Greater standardisation of

  19. Sodium 18F-Fluoride PET/CT of Bone, Joint and Other Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein; Desai, Bhushan; Conti, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    The use of 18F-sodium fluoride (18F-NaF) with positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is increasing. This resurgence of an old tracer has been fueled by several factors including superior diagnostic performance over standard 99mTc-based bone scintigraphy, growth in the availability of PET/CT imaging systems, increase in the number of regional commercial distribution centers for PET radiotracers, the recent concerns about potential chronic shortages with 99mTc based radiotracers, and the recent decision by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to reimburse for 18F-NaF PET/CT for evaluation of patients with known or suspected bone metastases through the National Oncologic PET Registry. The major goal of this article is to review the current evidence on the diagnostic utility of 18F-NaF in the imaging assessment of bone and joint in a variety of clinical conditions. PMID:25475379

  20. The importance of PET/CT in the evaluation of patients with Ewing tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Júlio Brandão; Rigo, Letícia; Lewin, Fabio; Emerick, André

    2015-01-01

    The effective evaluation for the treatment of patients with Ewing tumors depends on the accuracy in the determination of the primary tumor extent and the presence of metastatic disease. Currently, no universally accepted staging system is available to assess Ewing tumors. The present study aimed at discussing the use of PET/CT as a tool for staging, restaging and assessment of therapeutic response in patients with Ewing tumors. In spite of some limitations of PET/CT as compared with anatomical imaging methods, its relevance in the assessment of these patients is related to the capacity of the method to provide further physiological information, which often generates important clinical implications. Currently, the assessment of patients with Ewing tumor should comprise a study with PET/CT combined with other anatomical imaging modalities, such as radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26185344

  1. Follicular Thyroid Adenoma Showing Avid Uptake on 68Ga PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kanthan, Gowri L; Drummond, James; Schembri, Geoff Paul; Izard, Michael A; Hsiao, Edward

    2016-04-01

    68Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT imaging is a relatively new imaging technique used to evaluate the extent of disease in prostate carcinoma. Various other neoplasms may also express PSMA and show uptake on PSMA PET/CT scan. We report a case of a 62-year-old man who had a PSMA PET/CT scan for restaging of prostate carcinoma. A PSMA-avid thyroid lesion was identified, and subsequent tissue sampling confirmed the diagnosis of follicular thyroid adenoma. It is important to be aware of this possibility to avoid scan misinterpretation. Tissue biopsy of PSMA-avid thyroid lesions should be considered to exclude a primary thyroid neoplasm.

  2. Growing applications of FDG PET-CT imaging in non-oncologic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Hongming; Codreanu, Ion

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As the number of clinical applications of 2-[fluorine 18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) grows, familiarity with the conditions that can be diagnosed by this modality and when relevant pieces of additional information can be obtained becomes increasingly important for both requesting physicians and nuclear medicine physicians or radiologists who interpret the findings. Apart from its heavy use in clinical oncology, FDG PET-CT is widely used in a variety of non-oncologic conditions interconnecting to such disciplines as general internal medicine, infectious diseases, cardiology, neurology, surgery, traumatology, orthopedics, pediatrics, endocrinology, rheumatology, psychiatry, neuropsychology, and cognitive neuroscience. The aim of this review was to summarize the current evidence of FDG PET-CT applications in evaluating non-oncologic pathologies and the relevant information it can add to achieve a final diagnosis. PMID:26060443

  3. Combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Paolo; Larobina, Michele; Di Lillo, Francesca; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Mettivier, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    In the field of nuclear medicine imaging, breast imaging for cancer diagnosis is still mainly based on 2D imaging techniques. Three-dimensional tomographic imaging with whole-body PET or SPECT scanners, when used for imaging the breast, has performance limits in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which can be overcome only with a dedicated instrumentation. However, only few hybrid imaging systems for PET/CT or SPECT/CT dedicated to the breast have been developed in the last decade, providing complementary functional and anatomical information on normal breast tissue and lesions. These systems are still under development and clinical trials on just few patients have been reported; no commercial dedicated breast PET/CT or SPECT/CT is available. This paper reviews combined dedicated breast PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners described in the recent literature, with focus on their technological aspects.

  4. Integrated PET/CT in lung cancer imaging: history and technical aspects.

    PubMed

    De Wever, W; Stroobants, S; Verschakelen, J A

    2007-01-01

    Integrated PET/CT is a new anatomo-metabolic imaging modality combining two different techniques: Computed Tomography (CT) that provides very detailed anatomic information and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) that provides metabolic information. Integrated PET/CT has several advantages. One of the advantages is the use of CT data for attenuation correction that is significantly faster compared to that in conventional PET systems. Due to the use of CT data for attenuation correction, artefacts can be generated on PET images related to the use of intravenous or oral CT contrast agents, CT beam-hardening artefacts due to metallic implants and motion artefacts (respiratory motion, physical bowel motion, cardiac motion). The purpose of this review is to discuss some technical considerations concerning the CT protocol that can be used for PET/CT in lung cancer imaging and to give a short overview of the initial results of staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  5. Muscular Sarcoidosis Detected by F-18 FDG PET/CT in a Hypercalcemic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Han, Eun Ji; Jang, Yi Sun; Lee, In Suk; Lee, Jong Min; Kang, Siwon

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown etiology that involves many organs, occasionally mimicking malignancy. We herein report a 50-yr-old woman of muscular sarcoidosis of chronic myopathic type, manifested by hypercalcemia and muscle wasting. Besides insignificant hilar lymphadenopathy, her sarcoidosis was confined to generalized atrophic muscles and therefore, F-18 FDG PET/CT alone among conventional imaging studies provided diagnostic clues for the non-parathyroid-related hypercalcemia. On follow-up PET/CT during low-dose steroid treatment, FDG uptake in the muscles disappeared whereas that in the hilar lymph nodes remained. PET/CT may be useful in the evaluation of unexpected disease extent and monitoring treatment response in suspected or known sarcoidosis patients. PMID:24015050

  6. Diagnosing neuroleukemiosis: Is there a role for (18)F-FDG-PET/CT?

    PubMed

    Sabaté-Llobera, A; Cortés-Romera, M; Gamundí-Grimalt, E; Sánchez-Fernández, J J; Rodríguez-Bel, L; Gámez-Cenzano, C

    2017-05-04

    An imaging case is presented on a patient referred to our department for an (18)F-FDG-PET/CT, as a paraneoplastic syndrome was suspected due to his clinical situation. He had a history of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treated two years earlier, with sustained complete remission to date. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT findings revealed hypermetabolism in almost all nerve roots, suggesting meningeal spread, consistent with the subsequent MRI findings. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings confirmed a leptomeningeal reactivation of AML. Although not many studies have evaluated the role of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT in leukemia, it is a noninvasive tool for detecting extramedullary sites of disease and a good imaging alternative for those patients on whom an MRI cannot be performed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  7. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT Uptake in Intramuscular Myxoma Imitates Prostate Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zacho, Helle D; Nielsen, Julie B; Dettmann, Katja; Hjulskov, Sonja H; Petersen, Lars J

    2017-03-31

    Ga-PSMA PET/CT is becoming the most promising imaging modality for detecting recurrent prostate cancer. The modality has the advantage of being able to detect recurrent disease, even at very low prostate-specific antigen levels. However, several studies report Ga-PSMA uptake in tissue unrelated to prostate cancer. We present a 74-year-old man who underwent Ga-PSMA PET/CT for recurrent prostate cancer 5 years after radical prostatectomy. The Ga-PSMA PET/CT showed an intramuscular lesion with increased PSMA uptake in the left vastus medialis muscle. The lesion was surgically removed, and histopathology found it to be an intramuscular myxoma that showed immunohistochemical PSMA expression.

  8. Brain tissue segmentation in PET-CT images using probabilistic atlas and variational Bayes inference.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong; Wang, Jiabin; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, David Dagan

    2011-01-01

    PET-CT provides aligned anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) images in a single scan, and has the potential to improve brain PET image segmentation, which can in turn improve quantitative clinical analyses. We propose a statistical segmentation algorithm that incorporates the prior anatomical knowledge represented by probabilistic brain atlas into the variational Bayes inference to delineate gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in brain PET-CT images. Our approach adds an additional novel aspect by allowing voxels to have variable and adaptive prior probabilities of belonging to each class. We compared our algorithm to the segmentation approaches implemented in the expectation maximization segmentation (EMS) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM8) packages in 26 clinical cases. The results show that our algorithm improves the accuracy of brain PET-CT image segmentation.

  9. Cine CT for Attenuation Correction in Cardiac PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Alessio, Adam M.; Kohlmyer, Steve; Branch, Kelley; Chen, Grace; Caldwell, James; Kinahan, Paul

    2008-01-01

    In dual-modality PET/CT systems, the CT scan provides the attenuation map for PET attenuation correction. The current clinical practice of obtaining a single helical CT scan provides only a snapshot of the respiratory cycle, whereas PET occurs over multiple respiratory cycles. Misalignment of the attenuation map and emission image because of respiratory motion causes errors in the attenuation correction factors and artifacts in the attenuation-corrected PET image. To rectify this problem, we evaluated the use of cine CT, which acquires multiple low-dose CT images during a respiratory cycle. We evaluated the average and the intensity-maximum image of cine CT for cardiac PET attenuation correction. Methods Cine CT data and cardiac PET data were acquired from a cardiac phantom and from multiple patient studies. The conventional helical CT, cine CT, and PET data of an axially translating phantom were evaluated with and without respiratory motion. For the patient studies, we acquired 2 cine CT studies for each PET acquisition in a rest–stress 13N-ammonia protocol. Three readers visually evaluated the alignment of 74 attenuation image sets versus the corresponding emission image and determined whether the alignment provided acceptable or unacceptable attenuation-corrected PET images. Results In the phantom study, the attenuation correction from helical CT caused a major artifactual defect in the lateral wall on the PET image. The attenuation correction from the average and from the intensity-maximum cine CT images reduced the defect by 20% and 60%, respectively. In the patient studies, 77% of the cases using the average of the cine CT images had acceptable alignment and 88% of the cases using the intensity maximum of the cine CT images had acceptable alignment. Conclusion Cine CT offers an alternative to helical CT for compensating for respiratory motion in the attenuation correction of cardiac PET studies. Phantom studies suggest that the average and the intensity

  10. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Prospective Multicenter Comparison of Early Interim FLT PET/CT versus FDG PET/CT with IHP, EORTC, Deauville, and PERCIST Criteria for Early Therapeutic Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Fayad, Luis; Advani, Ranjana; Vose, Julie; Macapinlac, Homer; Meza, Jane; Hankins, Jordan; Mottaghy, Felix; Juweid, Malik; Quon, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To compare the performance characteristics of interim fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (after two cycles of chemotherapy) by using the most prominent standardized interpretive criteria (including International Harmonization Project [IHP] criteria, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC] criteria, and PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) versus those of interim (18)F fluorothymidine (FLT) PET/CT and simple visual interpretation. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant prospective study was approved by the institutional review boards, and written informed consent was obtained. Patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) underwent both FLT and FDG PET/CT 18-24 days after two cycles of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone or rituximab, etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin. For FDG PET/CT interpretation, IHP criteria, EORTC criteria, PERCIST, Deauville criteria, standardized uptake value, total lesion glycolysis, and metabolic tumor volume were used. FLT PET/CT images were interpreted with visual assessment by two reviewers in consensus. The interim (after cycle 2) FDG and FLT PET/CT studies were then compared with the end-of-treatment FDG PET/CT studies to determine which interim examination and/or criteria best predicted the result after six cycles of chemotherapy. Results From November 2011 to May 2014, there were 60 potential patients for inclusion, of whom 46 patients (24 men [mean age, 60.9 years ± 13.7; range, 28-78 years] and 22 women [mean age, 57.2 years ± 13.4; range, 25-76 years]) fulfilled the criteria. Thirty-four patients had complete response, and 12 had residual disease at the end of treatment. FLT PET/CT had a significantly higher positive predictive value (PPV) (91%) in predicting residual disease than did any FDG PET/CT interpretation method

  11. Fluorine-18-fluoroethylcholine PET/CT in the detection of prostate cancer: a South African experience.

    PubMed

    Vorster, Mariza; Modiselle, Moshe; Ebenhan, Thomas; Wagener, Carl; Sello, That; Zeevaart, Jan Rijn; Moshokwa, Evelyn; Sathekge, Mike Machaba

    2015-01-01

    Imaging with fluorine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) has, until recently provided disappointing results with low sensitivity ranging from 31%-64% in patients with well-differentiated prostate cancer (PC) at all prostatic specific antigen (PSA) levels while fluorine-18-fluoroethylcholine ((18)F-FECh) PET/CT showed about 85% sensitivity in restaging patients after relapse. We present our experience of the sensitivity of (18)F-FECh PET/CT in the early stages of PC. Fifty patients were prospectively recruited and imaged, of which 40 fulfilled all inclusion criteria. Our patients had an average age of 65.5 years. Fifteen patients were referred for initial staging, with the remaining 25 referred for restaging and all patients had histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma. Patients were imaged by (18)F-FECh PET/CT. Findings were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively and compared to the results of histology, PSA, Gleason score and bone scintigraphy. The prostate SUVmax was also used. Thirty-one patients demonstrated abnormal pelvic- and or extra- pelvic findings on (18)F-FECh PET/CT, which was consistent with malignant or metastatic involvement. The prostate SUVmax could not be used to predict the presence or absence of metastatic disease. Findings of this paper suggest that (18)F-FECh PET/CT in 30/40 cases (estimated as 75%) was helpful in the initial staging, restaging and lymph node detection of patients with PC. The SUVmax was not helpful. We diagnosed more PC cases in our African-American patients as compared to the Caucasian patients.

  12. FDG-PET/CT for differentiating between aseptic and septic delayed union in the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Kirsten E; de Jong, Vincent M; Termaat, M Frank; Schepers, Tim; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L F; Goslings, J Carel; Schep, Niels W L

    2017-09-27

    (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has proven to have a high diagnostic accuracy for the detection of bone infections. In patients with delayed union it may be clinically important to differentiate between aseptic and septic delayed union. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and to assess the optimal diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET/CT in differentiating between aseptic and septic delayed union in the lower extremity. This is a retrospective study of consecutive patients who underwent FDG-PET/CT scanning for suspicion of septic delayed union of the lower extremity. Diagnosis of aseptic delayed union or septic delayed union was made based on surgical deep cultures following PET/CT scanning and information on clinical follow-up. FDG-uptake values were measured at the fractured site by use of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax). Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET/CT were calculated at various SUVmax cut-off points. A total of 30 patients were included; 13 patients with aseptic delayed unions and 17 patients with septic delayed unions. Mean SUVmax in aseptic delayed union patients was 3.23 (SD ± 1.21). Mean SUVmax in septic delayed union patients was 4.77 (SD ± 1.87). A cut-off SUVmax set at 4.0 showed sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET/CT were 65, 77 and 70% to differentiate between aseptic and septic delayed union, respectively. Using a semi-quantitative measure (SUVmax) for interpretation of FDG-PET/CT imaging seems to be a promising tool for the discrimination between aseptic and septic delayed union.

  13. Imaging features of Paget's disease on (11)C choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Cameron E; Goenka, Ajit H; Howe, Benjamin M; Broski, Stephen M

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the appearance of Paget's disease (PD) on (11)C choline PET/CT and correlate these findings to serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level and skeletal scintigraphy. With IRB approval, our institutional (11)C choline PET/CT database (9/2005-6/2015) was searched for patients with PD. Site of osseous involvement, CT appearance, and multiple semi-quantitative measures were measured and correlated with ALP and degree of uptake on bone scan. Our search identified 10 males (mean age 79.6 ± 7.8 years). Four had polyostotic disease and seven had more than one (11)C choline PET/CT. In total, 58 affected bones were evaluated on 25 PET/CTs. Mean lesion SUVmax was 2.6 ± 0.89 (range 1.0-4.4), SUVmax/Liver SUVmean 0.33 ± 0.13 (0.12-0.61), SUVmax/Liver SUVmax 0.29 ± 0.11 (0.10-0.52), SUVmax/BP SUVmean 2.47 ± 0.86 (0.91-4.22), and SUVmax/BP SUVmax 1.92 ± 0.71 (0.68-3.45). There was no correlation between ALP and any semiquantitative measure. Bone scan uptake was marked in 41 bones, moderate in nine, and mild in six. There was no correlation between lesion SUVmax and bone scan uptake (P = 0.26). Paget's disease on (11)C choline PET/CT demonstrates mild to moderate activity, which does not correlate with bone scan uptake or ALP level. It is important to recognize Paget's disease as a potential pitfall on (11)C choline PET/CT. However, the characteristic appearance on the CT portion of PET/CT examinations should allow confident diagnosis and differentiation from prostate cancer osseous metastases.

  14. (18)F-FDG PET/CT delayed images with forced diuresis for revaluating abdominopelvic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Chun; Wang, Zhi-Min; Wang, Yu-Bin; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Cui, Lan-Lan

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the role of delayed images after forced diuresis coupled with oral hydration in abdominopelvic (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Forty-six patients consisting of 17 urological diseases, 9 gynecological tumors, 18 colorectal malignancies, and 2 cancers of unknown primary site were retrospectively analyzed. All patients who presented with indeterminate or equivocal abdominopelvic foci on standard (18)F-FDG PET/CT underwent a delayed abdominopelvic imaging after administration of 20 mg furosemide intravenously and extra water intake of 500 mL. PET/CT images before and after furosemide were compared with each other and their findings correlated with pathology or clinical follow-up (>6 months). On initial PET/CT, the glucose metabolism characters of lesions were disguised by radioactive urine, or some undetermined (18)F-FDG accumulating foci near the urinary tract appeared. While postdiuretic PET/CT demonstrated an excellent urinary tracer washout, and hypermetabolic lesions could be clearly detected and precisely localized in all cases. On the other hand, the suspected active foci caused by potential stagnation of excreted (18)F-FDG in urinary tract were eliminated. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 94.4% (34/36), 8/10, 91.3% (42/46), respectively. Furthermore, the additional lesions with surrounding invasion or locoregional metastasis were discovered in 8 of 46 (17.4%) patients only by the delayed images, including 2 gynecological and 6 rectal malignancies. Detection of abdominopelvic malignancies can be improved using delayed (18)F-FDG PET/CT images after a diuretic and oral hydration.

  15. (18)FDG PET/CT in Routine Surveillance of Asymptomatic Patients following Treatment of Sinonasal Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Workman, Alan D; Glicksman, Jordan T; Parasher, Arjun K; Carey, Ryan M; Brooks, Steven G; Kennedy, David W; Nabavizadeh, Seyed A; Learned, Kim O; Palmer, James N; Adappa, Nithin D

    2017-08-01

    Objective Sinonasal neoplasms have a high rate of recurrence following treatment, and current guidelines support the use of a variety of surveillance techniques. Recent work demonstrates that performance parameters of surveillance modalities may differ with sinonasal tumors in particular when compared with head and neck tumors overall. This study aims to characterize the value of (18)fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) as a screening tool in asymptomatic patients. Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Pennsylvania hospital. Methods Records of asymptomatic patients without suspicious endoscopy or suspicious imaging other than PET during the first 3 years following definitive treatment for sinonasal malignancy were screened and analyzed for inclusion in the cohort. Disease recurrence was determined by biopsy following suspicious PET evaluation. Results PET/CT scans (n = 111) were performed for 45 disease-free asymptomatic patients with no evidence of disease on endoscopy, and 6.3% were suspicious and prompted biopsy during this period, revealing 3 cases of disease recurrence. Overall specificity for PET/CT alone was 96.3% (95% CI, 90.7%-99.0%), with a negative predictive value of 99% (95% CI, 94.8%-100%). All recurrences were detected between 7 and 12 months, and all patients with true recurrence diagnosed by PET/CT had extrasinonasal involvement of tumor at the time of surgery. Conclusion We examined performance parameters of (18)FDG PET/CT in asymptomatic patients with no evidence of disease on endoscopy during the posttreatment period for sinonasal malignancy. The ability of PET/CT to detect recurrences that may be missed by structural imaging or endoscopy makes it a valuable tool for clinicians.

  16. Role of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in primary brain lymphoma.

    PubMed

    de-Bonilla-Damiá, Á; Fernández-López, R; Capote-Huelva, F J; de la Cruz-Vicente, F; Egea-Guerrero, J J; Borrego-Dorado, I

    To study the usefulness of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the initial evaluation and in the response assessment in primary brain lymphoma. A retrospective analysis was carried out on 18 patients diagnosed with primary brain lymphoma, a histological subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, on whom an initial (18)F-FDG PET/CT and MRI was performed, with 7 of the cases being analysed after the completion of treatment in order to assess response and clinical follow up. Initial (18)F-FDG PET/CT showed 26 hypermetabolic foci, whereas 46 lesions were detected by MRI. The average SUV maximum of the lesions was 17.56 with T/N 3.55. The concordance of both tests for identifying the same number of lesions was moderate, obtaining a kappa index of 0.395 (P<.001). In the evaluation of treatment, MRI identified 16 lesions compared to 7 pathological accumulations observed by (18)F-FDG PET/CT. The concordance of both tests to assess type of response to treatment was moderate (kappa index 0.41) (P=.04). In both the initial evaluation and the assessment of the response to treatment, PET/CT led to a change strategy in 22% of patients who had lesions outside the cerebral parenchyma. MRI appears to be the method of choice for detecting brain disease in patients with primary brain lymphoma, whereas (18)F-FDG PET/CT seems to play a relevant role in the assessment of extra-cerebral disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  17. Oncologic 18F-FDG PET/CT: referring physicians' point of view.

    PubMed

    Karantanis, Dimitrios; Kalkanis, Dimitrios; Allen-Auerbach, Martin; Bogsrud, Trond Velde; Subramaniam, Rathan M; Danielson, Adam; Lowe, Val J; Czernin, Johannes

    2012-10-01

    Oncologic (18)F-FDG PET/CT is rapidly gaining acceptance in clinical practice. However, the referring physician's attitude toward the usefulness of this diagnostic modality is unknown. This survey was undertaken to collect information regarding the current perspective of referring physicians on oncologic PET/CT. We conducted a prospective worldwide, Web-based survey of physicians who manage cancer patients. A total of 963 referring physicians completed a 20-question survey focused on their experience with oncologic (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Attention was directed toward their confidence about indications, their satisfaction with related educational resources, the quality of interaction with interpreting physicians, and practical problems encountered. The respondents included oncologists (38.5%, n = 371), hematologists (16.4%, n = 158), radiation oncologists (9.0%, n = 87), surgeons (30.3%, n = 292), and other physicians (5.7%, n = 55). Only 25.2% of respondents considered the oncologic (18)F-FDG PET/CT indications to be well established and defined. Frequent uncertainty about the need for a PET scan was indicated by 62.3% of the respondents. High cost and overinterpretation of findings were the most commonly reported concerns (47.0% and 40.9%, respectively). The experience and skill level of the interpreting physician was considered very important by 96.8% of the surveyed physicians. Referring physicians expressed considerable uncertainty about the appropriate use of oncologic PET/CT. Additional major concerns are procedure costs and quality of interpretation. The responses suggest a strong need for efforts to educate referring and interpreting physicians about the appropriate use of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in oncology.

  18. The role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the evaluation of pediatric transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jigang; Zhuang, Hongming

    2015-01-01

    Intensive immunosuppressive regimens effectively reduce acute or chronic rejection in transplant patients, while these regimens can result in long term side-effects such as viral infection, fever, secondary tumor(s) etc. Our aim was to evaluate the role of 18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) in pediatric transplant patients. Forty one (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans in 18 patients before or after transplantation were analyzed retrospectively. One patient had PET/CT scan prior to transplantation. Seventeen patients had PET/CT scan(s) following transplantation. The PET/CT scan was used to evaluate the therapy response of post transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in 11 patients, establish the cause of fever of unknown origin (FUO) in 5 patients, and restage in 2 patients. PET/CT scan showed development in 3 PTLD patients, improvement in 4 PTLD patients, development and improvement in 1 PTLD patient, new lesions in 1 PTLD patient, and no lesions in 2 PTLD patients. The scan demonstrated the cause of FUO in 2 patients but did not demonstrate the cause of FUO in 2 patients. The PET/CT was false positive in 1 FUO patient and did not show any new lesion(s) in 2 restaging patients. PET/CT may have an important role in follow-up of pediatric transplant patients. Further investigations with more patients are necessary to assess the validity of our findings.

  19. Rare Sites of Metastases in Prostate Cancer Detected on Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT Scan—A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Dureja, Sugandha; Thakral, Parul; Pant, Vineet; Sen, Ishita

    2017-01-01

    Ga-68 labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) whole body PET/CT scan is a novel upcoming modality for the evaluation of prostate cancer. We present three cases of prostate cancer showing rare sites of metastases like brain, penis, and liver detected on Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT scan thus emphasizing its role in lesion detection and staging. PMID:28242977

  20. Economical aspect of PET/CT-guided diagnosis of suspected infective endocarditis in a patient with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Farkowski, Michal M; Milkowski, Maciej; Dziuk, Mirosław; Pytkowski, Mariusz; Marciniak, Marta; Kraska, Alicja; Szwed, Hanna; Sterlinski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    We present a case report of potential reduction of hospitalization costs due to utilization of PET/CT in a diagnostic work-up of a patient with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and suspicion of infective endocarditis. The PET/CT scan would have shorten hospital stay, prevented clinical complications and reduced the cost of hospitalization by 45%.

  1. The valuation of using FDG PET-CT in detecting osteoid osteoma of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jinhai; Xiao, Hui; Liu, Tielong; Yan, Wangjun; Qian, Ming; Song, Dian Wen; Yang, Xinghai; Wang, Ting; Sun, Zhengwang; Xiao, Jianru

    2015-03-01

    Osteoid osteomas (OOs) are bone tumors that rarely occur in the cervical spine. The current study is a retrospective analysis on 10 patients who were diagnosed with this rare spinal bone tumor. We have excised OOs of the cervical spine with the use of FDG Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) for preoperative diagnosis. With the help of the FDG PET-CT, we can confidently remove the nidus of the OOs, while minimize iatrogenic injury of the surrounding normal bone elements, and preserve the stability of the cervical spine. OO of the cervical spine is frequently located at the nerve root adjacent to the vertebral artery, spinal cord. PET-CT is a sensitive tool with applications in the detection of bone lesions, especially in patients with difficult diagnosis or continuing misdiagnosis of tumors. Ten patients (8 male and 2 female patients) underwent surgery for tumor removal using PET-CT in our department. Various diagnostic imaging modalities including x-ray, magnetic resonance imaging, CT, bone scintigraphy, and PET-CT were used. PET-CT scan results were measured using standard uptake value. (The size of the cases series was from 4×5 mm to 12×15 mm.) Pain was evaluated using the visual analogue score. Clinical outcome was evaluated immediately postoperatively and at a mean follow-up of 49.8±0.2 months (range, 7-92 mo). All tumors were successfully diagnosed with the use of PET-CT. The average standard uptake value was 2.7±0.1 (range, 2.0-3.4). The nidus of the OO was detected and removed, and the peripheral elements were preserved. The visual analogue score was 8.1±0.1 preoperation, and it significantly decreased to 2.5±0.3 (P<0.01) postoperation and 0.2±0.1 (P<0.01) at the final visit. Immediately after surgery, the patients were relieved of their pain symptoms. There was no injury of the vertebral artery, leakage of cerebrospinal fluid, infectious complications, and neurological injury during the procedure. It is valuable of using of PET-CT

  2. Value of FDG PET/CT in staging of oral cancer: four simultaneous primary malignancies.

    PubMed

    Linz, Christian; Müller-Richter, Urs D A; Kircher, Stefan; Lapa, Constantin; Bluemel, Christina

    2015-05-01

    Patients with squamous cell cancer (SCC) of the head and neck are at increased risk for second primary malignancies (SPMs). We report on a 53-year-old patient with primary diagnosis of SCC in the anterior floor of the mouth. Panendoscopy suspected an SPM of the right vocal cord. FDG PET/CT, as a whole-body imaging method, confirmed this suspicion and raised concern for further SPM of both esophagus and colon. All malignancies were confirmed by biopsy. Subsequently, the patient underwent radiochemotherapy. In summary, FDG PET/CT revealed unexpected multiple SPMs, prevented unnecessary resection of the oral SCC, and enabled individualized therapeutic management.

  3. Diagnostic contribution of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT in fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Tokmak, Handan; Ergonul, Onder; Demirkol, Onur; Cetiner, Mustafa; Ferhanoglu, Burhan

    2014-02-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) remains one of the most compelling diagnostic issues in medicine. We aimed to evaluate the potential clinical contribution of 18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET/CT) in the identification of the underlying cause of FUO. Fifty consecutive patients (27 men and 23 women; age range 16-88 years) with FUO based on the revised definition criteria were included in the study. A diagnostic protocol including biochemistry, histopathology, and microbiological tests was performed and the patients were followed up. FDG-PET was performed in 25 of the 50 patients (12 males and 13 females; age range 16-88 years) in order to determine the etiology of the patient's fever. PET-CT images were obtained with the Gemini Philips TF (18)F-FDG-PET/CT camera after a 60-min 'standard uptake' period following an injection of a mean 330 MBq (range 290-370 MBq) intravenous (18)F-FDG. A total of 21 patients were available for analysis of the diagnostic contribution of PET/CT (two patients were undiagnosed and two had non-contributory PET/CT findings). (18)F-FDG-PET/CT was able to precisely detect the cause of fever in 60% of the cases (n=15). The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of this imaging modality were 90.5%, 93.8%, and 80%, respectively. Among the cases with a true-positive (18)F-FDG-PET/CT finding (i.e., 15 cases), the identified underlying causes of FUO included localized infection (n=7), non-infective inflammatory process (n=5), and malignancy (n=3). Further studies to confirm the high diagnostic yield of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT observed in the present study would lend support to the inclusion of this imaging modality in the initial diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected FUO. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. 18F-FDG PET/CT diagnosis of vagus nerve neurolymphomatosis.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Hailey Hoi Ching; Lee, Elaine Yuen Phin; Anthony, Marina-Portia; Khong, Pek-Lan

    2012-09-01

    A 62-year-old woman was in remission from previously treated stage IV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with cranial involvement. She presented with new-onset hoarseness of voice and choking; MRI of the brain showed disease recurrence in the left cavernous sinus. She was subsequently referred for F-FDG PET/CT with contrast for further evaluation of lymphomatous recurrence. F-FDG PET/CT not only revealed hypermetabolic activity in the left cavernous sinus correlating to the MRI findings but also showed an interesting manifestation explaining the patient's hoarseness of voice, being neurolymphomatosis along the left vagus nerve.

  5. Fever of Unknown Origin: The Roles of FDG PET or PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jigang; Zhuang, Hongming; Servaes, Sabah

    2012-04-01

    Despite advances in medicine in the past decades, fever of unknown origin (FUO) remains a challenging and common clinical problem. There are many different etiologies for FUO. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is a powerful technique that has been proven to be useful in elucidating processes that may present as FUO. This article reviews the utility of PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of FUO, with attention to the pediatric population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Monitoring the Therapy of Extensive Osseous Sarcoidosis With FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Numani, Shah; Liu, Shuang

    2017-02-24

    FDG PET/CT was performed in a 47-year-old man to evaluate possible malignancy of the spine revealed by MRI. The PET images revealed numerous focal FDG activity throughout the skeletal system. In addition, multiple foci of the increased activity in the mediastinal and hilar nodes were noted, suggestive of sarcoidosis, which was proven following biopsy. Therapy for sarcoidosis was initiated. In the subsequent 4 follow-up FDG PET/CT scans, the activity in both the bones and mediastinal/hilar regions fluctuated. However, anatomical abnormality in the bones on the CT images was never visualized during the entire clinical course.

  7. Early detection of encephalitis with (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Gaeta, M C; Godani, M; Nunziata, R; Capellini, C; Ciarmiello, A

    2015-01-01

    Encephalitis is a relatively rare condition for which making an accurate diagnosis can be challenging. In fact, clinical features are not specific and structural imaging can be normal in a considerable number of cases. However, an early diagnosis is important as many forms of treatment are effective if started promptly. Even though recent guidelines do not recommend (18)F-FDG PET/CT for patients with suspected encephalitis, the case presented suggests that (18)F-FDG PET/CT may play a relevant role for the early diagnosis of this clinical condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  8. Abdominal aortitis on PET CT: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Foley, J.; Mullan, D.; Mohan, H.; Schmidt, K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Aortitis often occurs in patients with systemic vasculitis. Presentation of case We reported a 73 year old man with giant cell arteritis who was presented with abdominal pain and weight loss. Discussion Aortitis was diagnosed on PET-CT scan performed because initial investigations raised the possibility of pancreatic pathology. Conclusion This case highlights the utility of PET-CT in the diagnosis of abdominal aortitis and the need to consider aortitis as a differential in patients with abdominal pain with a history of vasculitis. PMID:25827296

  9. PET/CT and MRI Imaging of a Eumycetoma of the Right Thigh.

    PubMed

    Besson, Florent L; Blanc-Durand, Paul; Meyer, Céline; Grimon, Gilles; Durand, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Eumycetoma is a chronic tropical fungal disease that infiltrates subcutaneous tissues, mainly in the feet and legs. Standard antifungal drugs are ineffective, and mutilating surgery is common. Morphological imaging is useful for assessing the local extent of the disease before surgery. FDG PET/CT may be of potential interest for the general extent, but PET descriptions remain scarce and mostly relate to the feet. Here, the authors present FDG PET/CT and MRI study of a very rare case of an extensive, biopsy-proven eumycetoma of the right thigh that was performed to guide potential surgery.

  10. False-Positive PET/CT After Cyanoacrylate Sealing of a Pancreaticojejunostomy.

    PubMed

    Belyaev, Orlin; Munding, Johanna; Tannapfel, Andrea; Uhl, Waldemar

    2015-05-01

    In 2013, a 68-year-old male had a pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer. The pancreaticojejunostomy was sealed with cyanoacrylate (Dermabond) to prevent postoperative pancreatic fistula. Local recurrence of malignancy at the anastomosis was suspected 18 months later in PET/CT. Surgical revision was performed and anastomosis resected. However, histology showed no tumor recurrence, but strong inflammation and foreign-body reaction towards Dermabond. The sealant caused false-positive PET/CT findings, so its use in oncologic surgery should be abandoned.

  11. Conjunctival Melanoma on 18F-FDG PET/CT as a Second Primary Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Szu-Ying; Shiau, Yu-Chien; Wang, Shan-Ying; Wu, Yen-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Herein we present the F-FDG PET/CT findings in conjunctival melanoma as a second primary cancer in a 56-year-old Taiwanese man with a history of small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia and nasal cavity carcinoma under remission. The right eye lesion slowly progressed since noted by the patient himself 2 years ago, but he refused biopsy and further treatment including surgery. Either small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia or conjunctival melanoma is extremely rare in Asians, left alone in combination with a third malignancy of nasal cavity carcinoma. FDG PET/CT could effectively evaluate malignancies with multiple primary origins.

  12. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma Detected on 18F-FDG PET/CT With Unusual Findings.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuehong; Wang, Tie; Yang, Minfu

    2015-11-01

    A 32-year-old woman, who presented with "sharp pain" in the right chest for more than 1 month and worsening dyspnea and fever for 10 days, was initially thought to have a pulmonary embolism. Cardiac ultrasound showed an ill-defined echogenic mass within the pulmonary trunk. F-FDG PET/CT was performed for further evaluation. PET/CT showed an intense hypermetabolism in the main, bilateral proximal, and the right main pulmonary arteries, suggesting the presence of a malignant lesion. Biopsy confirmed the lesion as a primary pulmonary artery sarcoma.

  13. Vertebral Myeloma Mimicking Prostatic Carcinoma Metastasis in 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Merrild, Esben Hoej; Baerentzen, Steen; Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Buus, Simon

    2017-10-01

    Ga-PSMA PET/CT was performed in a 75-year-old man with newly diagnosed prostate cancer because of an equivocal lesion in the spine both on Tc-bone-SPECT/CT and MRI. Because of increased PSMA activity on PET/CT, the bone lesion was interpreted as metastasis from prostate cancer. Later, the patient was diagnosed as having monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance. A biopsy was performed, and histological examination revealed multiple myeloma with PSMA expression in the neovessels but no metastatic prostate cancer cells. The patient was downstaged, and the treatment was changed accordingly. This case illustrates the importance of biopsies from PSMA PET-positive lesions.

  14. 18F-FDG PET/CT for Early Postradiotherapy Assessment in Solitary Bone Plasmacytomas.

    PubMed

    Alongi, Pierpaolo; Zanoni, Lucia; Incerti, Elena; Fallanca, Federico; Mapelli, Paola; Papathanasiou, Nikolaos; Gianolli, Luigi; Picchio, Maria; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance and possible prognostic value of early (18)F-FDG PET/CT (FDG PET/CT) assessment after radiotherapy (RT) in patients with solitary bone plasmacytoma (SBP). Twenty-one patients affected by SBP who underwent FDG PET/CT scan for early restaging (≤6 months) postradiotherapy assessment were selected from the PET databases of University College London Hospital of London and San Raffaele Hospital of Milan. Patients with no abnormal uptake were classified as having no pathologic uptake (NPU). A SUV(max) cutoff value of 4 was chosen to discriminate minimal residual uptake (MRU; SUV(max) ≤ 4) from pathologic uptake (PU, SUV(max) >4). Progression-free survival (PFS) rate was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression analysis. In 10 of 21 patients restaged by FDG PET/CT, further previous baseline scan was available also at staging, and results showed positive findings at the level of all biopsy-proven disease areas.Considering MRU as PU, FDG PET/CT showed a sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 29%, respectively. Using SUV(max) >4 as the cutoff, sensitivity and specificity were 86% and 93%, respectively. Kaplan-Meier curves revealed a significant difference in PFS probability between patients classified as positive on FDG PET/CT using a cutoff of SUV(max) >4 (PU) and those classified as negative (NPU + MRU) (log-rank, Mantel-Cox, P = 0.009; χ(2) = 6.85). Cox regression analysis of PFS using SUV(max) >4 as cutoff revealed an interesting relation in prediction of progression (HR, 9.458). (18)F-FDG PET/CT for early restaging after RT in patients with SBP should be considered carefully in view of the lack of specificity of a low SUV(max) value. The good correlation between a high SUV(max) value and follow-up suggests a possible prognostic role for FDG PET/CT in disease progression at early restaging after RT.

  15. PET-CT scanner characterization for PET raw data use in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Gianoli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Kurz, Christopher; De Bernardi, Elisabetta; Bauer, Julia; Fontana, Giulia; Ciocca, Mario; Parodi, Katia; Baroni, Guido

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the experiments and methods that led to the geometrical interpretation of new-generation commercial PET-CT scanners, finalized to off-line PET-based treatment verification in ion beam therapy. Typically, the geometrical correspondence between the image domain (i.e., the dicom PET) and the sinogram domain (i.e., the PET raw data) is not explicitly described by scanner vendors. Hence, the proposed characterization can be applied to commercial PET-CT scanners used in biomedical research, for the development of technologies and methods requiring the use of PET raw data, without having access to confidential information from the vendors.

  16. Pitfalls and artifacts in the interpretation of oncologic PET/CT of the chest

    PubMed Central

    Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Capobianco, Julia; de Oliveira, Marco Antônio Condé

    2017-01-01

    PET/CT is widely used for the evaluation of patients with thoracic malignancies. Although the levels of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake are usually high in neoplastic diseases, they can also be physiological, due to artifacts. In addition, FDG uptake can occur in benign conditions such as infectious, inflammatory, and iatrogenic lesions. Furthermore, some malignant tumors, such as adenocarcinoma in situ (formerly known as bronchoalveolar carcinoma) and carcinoid tumors, may not show FDG uptake. Here, we illustrate the main pitfalls and artifacts in the interpretation of the results of oncologic PET/CT of the chest, outlining strategies for avoiding misinterpretation. PMID:28298733

  17. PET/CT: First-Line Examination to Assess Disease Extent of Disseminated Coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Foerter, Jason; Sundell, John; Vroman, Penny

    2016-09-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is an infection caused by inhalation of the Coccidioides fungus. Most infections remain subclinical or are confined to the pulmonary system. Disseminated disease is rare. Traditionally, a combination of imaging modalities has been used to determine disease extent. We suggest (18)F-FDG PET/CT as a single first-line imaging examination to assess disease extent. We present a case of disseminated coccidioidomycosis to the lung, mediastinum, soft tissues, and skeletal system. To our knowledge, no prior case reports demonstrate such widespread disease using PET/CT. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  18. FDG PET/CT Demonstration of Pancreatic Metastasis from Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Bhushan; Elatre, Wafaa; Quinn, David I.; Jadvar, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    We report the hybrid FDG PET/CT appearance of a biopsy-proven pancreatic metastasis from prostate cancer in a man with castrate-resistant metastatic disease. The common sites of metastases from prostate cancer are bone and locoregional lymph nodes. Pancreas is an atypical location of metastasis from prostate cancer. PET/CT in this case helped with the targeted pathologic confirmation to differentiate primary pancreatic tumor from an unusual metastasis from prostate cancer which in turn impacted the clinical management. PMID:21892064

  19. Incidental Detection of Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma in 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sager, Sait; Vatankulu, Betül; Uslu, Lebriz; Sönmezoglu, Kerim

    2016-09-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a type II transmembrane protein. It has been shown to be expressed in various solid malignant neoplasms. We report a case of a prostate cancer patient who underwent (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging. There is a large thyroid nodule in the right thyroid gland, which had intense PSMA accumulation. Follicular thyroid lesions can be seen on (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  20. (18)F-NaF PET/CT: EANM procedure guidelines for bone imaging.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, M; Mottaghy, F M; Payche, F; Behrendt, F F F; Van den Wyngaert, T; Fogelman, I; Strobel, K; Celli, M; Fanti, S; Giammarile, F; Krause, B; Langsteger, W

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide minimum standards for the performance and interpretation of (18)F-NaF PET/CT scans. Standard acquisition and interpretation of nuclear imaging modalities will help to provide consistent data acquisition and numeric values between different platforms and institutes and to promote the use of PET/CT modality as an established diagnostic modality in routine clinical practice. This will also improve the value of scientific work and its contribution to evidence-based medicine.

  1. False Positive Uptake in Bilateral Gynecomastia on 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT Scan.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Nair, Bindu P; Pillai, M R A; Madhavan, Jayaprakash

    2017-09-01

    A 66-year-old man on hormonal therapy with prostate cancer was referred for Ga-PSMA PET/CT scan for biochemical recurrence. Ga-PSMA PET/CT scan detected moderate heterogeneous tracer concentration in bilateral breast parenchyma, in addition to the abnormal tracer concentration in enlarged prostate gland, right external iliac lymph node, and sclerotic lesion in L4 vertebra. On clinical examination, he was found to have bilateral gynecomastia. Abnormal concentration of Ga-PSMA in breast cancer is now well known, and in this context, it is important to know that tracer localization can occur in gynecomastia as well, as evidenced in this case.

  2. IgG4-Related Tubulointerstitial Nephritis Pattern in 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Bélissant, Ophélie; Guernou, Mohamed; Rouvier, Philippe; Compain, Caroline; Bonardel, Gérald

    2015-10-01

    A 17-year-old adolescent girl was admitted with chronic arthralgia, Raynaud phenomenon, pericarditis, and evidences of chronic diffuse inflammation. F-FDG PET/CT scan was performed to search systemic vasculitis and showed diffuse moderate uptake in the kidneys. We suggested the existence of a nephritis, but the ultrasonography result was normal, and no treatment was introduced. Another F-FDG PET/CT scan was performed 7 months later to explore abdominal pain. It showed again diffuse intense uptake in both kidneys. A proteinuria was highlighted, and renal biopsy allowed to diagnose IgG4-related disease.

  3. Normal variations and benign findings in pediatric 18F-FDG-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Grant, Frederick D

    2014-04-01

    (18)F-FDG PET and PET/CT have a wide variety of indications in children and young adults. Oncologic indications are the most common, but others include neurology, sports medicine, cardiology, and infection imaging. Accurate interpretation of pediatric (18)F-FDG PET and PET/CT requires a technically adequate study and knowledgeable interpretation of the images. A successful pediatric (18)F-FDG PET requires age-appropriate patient preparation and consideration of patient age and developmental stage. Accurate interpretation of the study requires familiarity with normal patterns of physiologic (18)F-FDG uptake in children at all stages of development.

  4. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET/CT: Uptake in Lymph Nodes With Active Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Dias, André Henrique; Holm Vendelbo, Mikkel; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    2017-03-01

    We describe 2 cases of Ga-PSMA PET/CT in prostate cancer patients. Both cases demonstrated symmetrical bilateral involvement of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes besides findings in relation with prostatic disease. In both cases, endobronchial ultrasound-guided biopsy showed that the involvement of the thoracic lymph nodes was caused by nonnecrotic granulomas compatible with sarcoidosis. The cases demonstrated that increased Ga-PSMA uptake can be seen in lymph nodes with active sarcoidosis, with images mimicking those well known from FDG PET/CT. Because of these findings, granulomatous disease has to be included in the differential diagnostic evaluation of patients with Ga-PSMA-positive lymph nodes.

  5. Rheumatic fever: a forgotten but still existing cause of fever of unknown origin detected on FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Sathekge, Mike; Stoltz, Anton; Gheysens, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    We present a case of heterogeneous and strongly increased myocardial and valvular 18F-FDG uptake on 18F-FDG PET/CT in an HIV-positive patient with productive cough, fever, weight loss, and progressive dyspnea for 6 months. Contrast-enhanced CT did not reveal the cause of fever, but hyperechogenic valvular lesions on echocardiography in combination with PET/CT findings are suggestive of endocarditis/myocarditis. Postmortem histology 3 weeks after PET/CT showed Aschoff bodies with Anitschkow cells, pathognomonic for rheumatic carditis. This case illustrates that rheumatic heart disease can be detected on 18F-FDG PET/CT and demonstrates the value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with fever of unknown origin.

  6. Potential Applications of Using 68Ga-Evans Blue PET/CT in the Evaluation of Lymphatic Disorder: Preliminary Observations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Peilin; Li, Fang; Tong, Guansheng; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zhu, Zhaohui

    2016-04-01

    Potentials of 68Ga-NEB as a PET tracer in the evaluation of a variety of lymphatic drainage disorders were analyzed. 68Ga-NEB was injected subcutaneously, and the PET/CT images were acquired in 13 patients with different suspected lymphatic drainage abnormality. The 68Ga-NEB PET/CT findings were compared with Tc-SC lymphoscintigraphy. 68Ga-NEB activity could be clearly observed in the lymphatic route on the PET/CT images from all the patients. In 5 (38.5%) of 13 patients tested, 68Ga-NEB PET/CT provided more information than the Tc-SC lymphoscintigraphy. 68Ga-NEB PET/CT can be used as an alternative of Tc-SC lymphoscintigraphy in the evaluation of lymphatic disorders, which enables fast results and might be more accurate than the conventional Tc-SC lymphoscintigraphy.

  7. Joint Segmentation of Anatomical and Functional Images: Applications in Quantification of Lesions from PET, PET-CT, MRI-PET, and MRI-PET-CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Bagci, Ulas; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Mendhiratta, Neil; Foster, Brent; Xu, Ziyue; Yao, Jianhua; Chen, Xinjian; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel method for the joint segmentation of anatomical and functional images. Our proposed methodology unifies the domains of anatomical and functional images, represents them in a product lattice, and performs simultaneous delineation of regions based on random walk image segmentation. Furthermore, we also propose a simple yet effective object/background seed localization method to make the proposed segmentation process fully automatic. Our study uses PET, PET-CT, MRI-PET, and fused MRI-PET-CT scans (77 studies in all) from 56 patients who had various lesions in different body regions. We validated the effectiveness of the proposed method on different PET phantoms as well as on clinical images with respect to the ground truth segmentation provided by clinicians. Experimental results indicate that the presented method is superior to threshold and Bayesian methods commonly used in PET image segmentation, is more accurate and robust compared to the other PET-CT segmentation methods recently published in the literature, and also it is general in the sense of simultaneously segmenting multiple scans in real-time with high accuracy needed in routine clinical use. PMID:23837967

  8. Does Choline PET/CT Change the Management of Prostate Cancer Patients With Biochemical Failure?

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Jeffrey; Even-Sapir, Einat; Ben-Haim, Simona; Saad, Akram; Spieler, Benjamin; Davidson, Tima; Berger, Raanan; Weiss, Ilana; Appel, Sarit; Lawrence, Yaacov R; Symon, Zvi

    2017-06-01

    The FDA approved C-11 choline PET/computed tomography (CT) for imaging patients with recurrent prostate cancer in 2012. Subsequently, the 2014 NCCN guidelines have introduced labeled choline PET/CT in the imaging algorithm of patients with suspected recurrent disease. However, there is only scarce data on the impact of labeled choline PET/CT findings on disease management. We hypothesized that labeled-choline PET/CT studies showing local or regional recurrence or distant metastases will have a direct role in selection of appropriate patient management and improve radiation planning in patients with disease that can be controlled using this mode of therapy. This retrospective study was approved by the Tel Aviv Sourasky and Sheba Medical Center's Helsinki ethical review committees. Patient characteristics including age, PSA, stage, prior treatments, and pre-PET choline treatment recommendations based on NCCN guidelines were recorded. Patients with biochemical failure and without evidence of recurrence on physical examination or standard imaging were offered the option of additional imaging with labeled choline PET/CT. Treatment recommendations post-PET/CT were compared with pre-PET/CT ones. Pathologic confirmation was obtained before prostate retreatment. A nonparametric χ test was used to compare the initial and final treatment recommendations following choline PET/CT. Between June 2010 and January 2014, 34 labeled-choline PET/CT studies were performed on 33 patients with biochemical failure following radical prostatectomy (RP) (n=6), radiation therapy (RT) (n=6), brachytherapy (n=2), RP+salvage prostate fossa RT (n=14), and RP+salvage prostate fossa/lymph node RT (n=6). Median PSA level before imaging was 2 ng/mL (range, 0.16 to 79). Labeled choline PET/CT showed prostate, prostate fossa, or pelvic lymph node increased uptake in 17 studies, remote metastatic disease in 9 studies, and failed to identify the cause for biochemical failure in 7 scans.PET/CT altered

  9. (18) F-FDG PET/CT for planning external beam radiotherapy alters therapy in 11% of 581 patients.

    PubMed

    Birk Christensen, Charlotte; Loft-Jakobsen, Annika; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per; Højgaard, Liselotte; Roed, Henrik; Berthelsen, Anne K

    2017-02-06

    (18) F-FDG PET/CT (FDG PET/CT) used in radiotherapy planning for extra-cerebral malignancy may reveal metastases to distant sites that may affect the choice of therapy. To investigate the role of FDG PET/CT on treatment strategy changes induced by the use of PET/CT as part of the radiotherapy planning. 'A major change of treatment strategy' was defined as either including more lesions in the gross tumour volume (GTV) distant from the primary tumour or a change in treatment modalities. The study includes 581 consecutive patients who underwent an FDG PET/CT scan for radiotherapy planning in our institution in the year 2008. All PET/CT scans were performed with the patient in treatment position with the use of immobilization devices according to the intended radiotherapy treatment. All scans were evaluated by a nuclear medicine physician together with a radiologist to delineate PET-positive GTV (GTV-PET). For 63 of the patients (11%), the PET/CT simulation scans resulted in a major change in treatment strategy because of the additional diagnostic information. Changes were most frequently observed in patients with lung cancer (20%) or upper gastrointestinal cancer (12%). In 65% of the patients for whom the PET/CT simulation scan revealed unexpected dissemination, radiotherapy was given - changed (n = 38) or unchanged (n = 13) according to the findings on the FDG PET/CT. Unexpected dissemination on the FDG PET/CT scanning performed for radiotherapy planning caused a change in treatment strategy in 11% of 581 patients. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The clinical utility of FDG PET/CT among solid organ transplant recipients suspected of malignancy or infection.

    PubMed

    Wareham, Neval E; Lundgren, J D; Da Cunha-Bang, C; Gustafsson, F; Iversen, M; Johannesen, H H; Kjær, A; Rasmussen, A; Sengeløv, H; Sørensen, S S; Fischer, B M

    2017-03-01

    Solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are at high risk of developing infections and malignancies. (18)F-FDG PET/CT may enable timely detection of these diseases and help to ensure early intervention. We aimed to describe the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in consecutive, diagnostic unresolved SOT recipients transplanted from January 2004 to May 2015. Recipients with a post-transplant FDG PET/CT performed as part of diagnostic work-up were included. Detailed chart reviews were done to extract relevant clinical information and determine the final diagnosis related to the FDG PET/CT. Based on á priori defined criteria and the final diagnosis, results from each scan were classified as true or false, and diagnostic values determined. Among the 1,814 recipients in the cohort, 145 had an FDG PET/CT performed; 122 under the indication of diagnostically unresolved symptoms with a suspicion of malignancy or infection. The remaining (N = 23) had an FDG PET/CT to follow-up on a known disease or to stage a known malignancy. The 122 recipients underwent a total of 133 FDG PET/CT scans performed for a suspected malignancy (66 %) or an infection (34 %). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the FDG PET/CT in diagnosing these conditions were 97, 84, 87, and 96 %, respectively. FDG PET/CT is an accurate diagnostic tool for the work-up of diagnostic unresolved SOT recipients suspected of malignancy or infection. The high sensitivity and NPV underlines the potential usefulness of PET/CT for excluding malignancy or focal infections in this often complex clinical situation.

  11. The role of FDG-PET-CT in pediatric cardiac patients and patients with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Zora; Fischer, M; Koerfer, J; Laser, K T; Kececioglu, D; Burchert, W; Ulrich, S; Preuss, R; Haas, N A

    2016-10-01

    Medical imaging by using FDG-PET/CT (PET-CT) can detect, confirm or eliminate with high sensitivity areas of suspected infections in case of persistent fever of unknown origin in combination with other bacteriological examinations. The aim of this study was to assess the potential role of PET-CT in detecting or excluding infections or other inflammatory processes in patients with congenital heart defects (CHD). In addition we wanted to evaluate the practical impact of PET-CT on the subsequent clinical management. In this retrospective study we analyzed the data of all CHD patients who underwent PET-CT over a 5year period in our institution. The results were then evaluated with regard to the potential impact on clinical decision making. Between 2010 and 2015 PET-CT was performed in 30 patients. The mean age was 26years (SD 15years, range 1 to 66years). The diagnoses covered a large field of CHD. 11 patients (4/11 with assist device) were assessed before heart transplantation; suspected malignancies or infections were excluded and transplant listing was possible. In another 5/6 patients suspected assist device infection could be confirmed with PET/CT. Endocarditis was suspected in 13 patients, 2 of whom underwent previous MRI without confirmation and ECHO was inconclusive. Endocarditis was finally excluded in 5/13 patients but confirmed in 8/13 patients by PET-CT. In this study we could show a high sensitivity of PET-CT for specific localization of infections and with high impact on subsequent therapy. Based on this results clinical management could be targeted and adapted. We could demonstrate that PET-CT has a high impact on the subsequent clinical therapy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Are contrast media required for (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in patients with neuroendocrine tumours of the abdomen?

    PubMed

    Mayerhoefer, Marius E; Schuetz, Matthias; Magnaldi, Silvia; Weber, Michael; Trattnig, Siegfried; Karanikas, Georgios

    2012-04-01

    To determine the value of intravenous contrast medium in (68)Ga-DOTA-Phe(1)-Tyr(3)-octreotide - (68)Ga-DOTATOC - PET/CT for the detection of abdominal neuroendocrine tumours (NET). In fifty-five patients with known or suspected NETs of the abdomen PET/CT was performed on a 64-row multi-detector hybrid system. For PET, 150 MBq of (68)Ga-DOTATOC were injected intravenously. Full-dose unenhanced, and arterial- and venous-phase contrast-enhanced CT images were obtained. Unenhanced and contrast-enhanced PET/CT images were evaluated separately for the presence of NETs on a per-region basis, by two separate teams with different experience levels. On unenhanced PET/CT, sensitivity and specificity ranged from 89.3% (junior team) to 92% (senior team), and 99.1% (junior team) to 99.2% (senior team), respectively. On contrast-enhanced PET/CT, sensitivity and specificity ranged from 92.3% (junior team) to 98.5% (senior team), and 99.4% (junior team) to 99.5% (senior team), respectively. These increases in sensitivity and specificity, due to the use of contrast-enhanced images, were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Intravenous contrast medium only moderately, aleit significantly, improves the sensitivity of (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT for the detection of abdominal NETs, and hardly affects specificity. Thus, while contrast enhancement is justified to achieve maximum sensitivity, unenhanced images may be sufficient for routine PET/CT in NET patients. Contrast media moderately improve the sensitivity of (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT for neuroendocrine tumours. Contrast media hardly affect the specificity of (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT for neuroendocrine tumours. Unenhanced PET/CT is sufficient for routine imaging of patients with neuroendocrine tumours.

  13. Dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET/CT versus dynamic breast MRI of suspicious breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Imbriaco, Massimo; Caprio, Maria Grazia; Limite, Gennaro; Pace, Leonardo; De Falco, Teresa; Capuano, Ermanno; Salvatore, Marco

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare dual-time-point (18)F-FDG PET/CT, performed with the patient in the prone position, and contrast-enhanced MRI in patients with suspected breast malignancy. Forty-four patients with 55 breast lesions underwent two PET/CT scans (dual-time-point imaging) in the prone position and breast MRI. Sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy were calculated. In addition, the average percentage of change in standard uptake values (Delta%SUV(max)) between time point 1 and time point 2 was calculated for PET/CT. A final histopathologic diagnosis was available for all patients. MRI showed an overall accuracy of 95%, with sensitivity and specificity of 98% and 80%. Conversely, dual-time-point PET/CT showed an accuracy of 84% for lesions with an SUV(max) > or = 2.5 or with a positive Delta%SUV(max), with sensitivity and specificity of 80% and 100% versus 69% accuracy, 62% sensitivity (both, p < 0.001), and 100% specificity (p not significant) for single-time-point PET/CT. On PET/CT, malignant lesions showed an increase in FDG between time points 1 and 2, with a Delta%SUV(max) of 11 +/- 24. Benign lesions showed either no change or a decrease in SUV(max) between time points 1 and 2, with a Delta%SUV(max) of -21 +/- 7. A dual time point improves PET/CT accuracy in patients with a suspected breast malignancy over single-time-point PET/CT. On PET/CT, FDG is increasingly taken up over time in breast tumors; conversely, benign lesions show a decrease in FDG uptake over time. These changes in SUV might represent a reliable parameter that can be used to differentiate benign from malignant lesions of the breast on PET/CT examination.

  14. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Prospective Multicenter Comparison of Early Interim FLT PET/CT versus FDG PET/CT with IHP, EORTC, Deauville, and PERCIST Criteria for Early Therapeutic Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Fayad, Luis; Advani, Ranjana; Vose, Julie; Macapinlac, Homer; Meza, Jane; Hankins, Jordan; Mottaghy, Felix; Juweid, Malik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the performance characteristics of interim fluorine 18 (18F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (after two cycles of chemotherapy) by using the most prominent standardized interpretive criteria (including International Harmonization Project [IHP] criteria, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC] criteria, and PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) versus those of interim 18F fluorothymidine (FLT) PET/CT and simple visual interpretation. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant prospective study was approved by the institutional review boards, and written informed consent was obtained. Patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) underwent both FLT and FDG PET/CT 18–24 days after two cycles of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone or rituximab, etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin. For FDG PET/CT interpretation, IHP criteria, EORTC criteria, PERCIST, Deauville criteria, standardized uptake value, total lesion glycolysis, and metabolic tumor volume were used. FLT PET/CT images were interpreted with visual assessment by two reviewers in consensus. The interim (after cycle 2) FDG and FLT PET/CT studies were then compared with the end-of-treatment FDG PET/CT studies to determine which interim examination and/or criteria best predicted the result after six cycles of chemotherapy. Results From November 2011 to May 2014, there were 60 potential patients for inclusion, of whom 46 patients (24 men [mean age, 60.9 years ± 13.7; range, 28–78 years] and 22 women [mean age, 57.2 years ± 13.4; range, 25–76 years]) fulfilled the criteria. Thirty-four patients had complete response, and 12 had residual disease at the end of treatment. FLT PET/CT had a significantly higher positive predictive value (PPV) (91%) in predicting residual disease than did any FDG PET/CT interpretation

  15. Dual energy CT for attenuation correction with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the energy dependent noise and bias properties of monoenergetic images synthesized from dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisitions. These monoenergetic images can be used to estimate attenuation coefficients at energies suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This is becoming more relevant with the increased use of quantitative imaging by PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners. There are, however, potential variations in the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images as a function of energy. Methods: The authors used analytic approximations and simulations to estimate the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images of water-filled cylinders with different shapes and the NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom from 40 to 520 keV, the range of SPECT and PET energies. The dual-kVp spectra were based on the GE Lightspeed VCT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp with added filtration of 0.5 mm Cu. The authors evaluated strategies of noise suppression with sinogram smoothing and dose minimization with reduction of tube currents at the two kVp settings. The authors compared the impact of DECT-based attenuation correction with single-kVp CT-based attenuation correction on PET quantitation for the NCAT phantom for soft tissue and high-Z materials of bone and iodine contrast enhancement. Results: Both analytic calculations and simulations displayed the expected minimum noise value for a synthesized monoenergetic image at an energy between the mean energies of the two spectra. In addition the authors found that the normalized coefficient of variation in the synthesized attenuation map increased with energy but reached a plateau near 160 keV, and then remained constant with increasing energy up to 511 keV and beyond. The bias was minimal, as the linear attenuation coefficients of the synthesized monoenergetic images were within 2.4% of the known true values across the entire energy range

  16. Dual energy CT for attenuation correction with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the energy dependent noise and bias properties of monoenergetic images synthesized from dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisitions. These monoenergetic images can be used to estimate attenuation coefficients at energies suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This is becoming more relevant with the increased use of quantitative imaging by PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners. There are, however, potential variations in the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images as a function of energy. Methods: The authors used analytic approximations and simulations to estimate the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images of water-filled cylinders with different shapes and the NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom from 40 to 520 keV, the range of SPECT and PET energies. The dual-kVp spectra were based on the GE Lightspeed VCT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp with added filtration of 0.5 mm Cu. The authors evaluated strategies of noise suppression with sinogram smoothing and dose minimization with reduction of tube currents at the two kVp settings. The authors compared the impact of DECT-based attenuation correction with single-kVp CT-based attenuation correction on PET quantitation for the NCAT phantom for soft tissue and high-Z materials of bone and iodine contrast enhancement. Results: Both analytic calculations and simulations displayed the expected minimum noise value for a synthesized monoenergetic image at an energy between the mean energies of the two spectra. In addition the authors found that the normalized coefficient of variation in the synthesized attenuation map increased with energy but reached a plateau near 160 keV, and then remained constant with increasing energy up to 511 keV and beyond. The bias was minimal, as the linear attenuation coefficients of the synthesized monoenergetic images were within 2.4% of the known true values across the entire energy range

  17. Value of Combined PET/CT for Radiation Planning in CT-Guided Percutaneous Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Single-Fraction Brachytherapy for Colorectal Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Ingo G.; Wust, Peter; Ruehl, Ricarda

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the additional value of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) for clinical target volume definition in the planning of computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial brachytherapy for liver metastases. Patients and Methods: A total of 19 patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer treated in 25 sessions were included in the present study. All patients had undergone fluorodeoxyglucose-PET for patient evaluation before interstitial CT-guided brachytherapy. A contrast-enhanced CT scan of the upper abdomen was obtained for radiation planning. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined by a radiation oncologist and radiologist. After registration of the CT scan with the PET data set, the target volume was defined again using the fusion images. Results: PET revealed one additional liver lesion that was not visible on CT. The median CT-CTV (defined using CT and magnetic resonance imaging) was 68 cm{sup 3} (range 4-260). The PET/CT-CTV (median, 78 cm{sup 3}; range, 4-273) was significantly larger, with a median gain of 24.5% (interquartile range, 2.1-71.5%; p = .022). An increased CTV was observed in 15 cases and a decrease in 6; in 4 cases, the CT-CTV and PET/CT-CTV were equal. Incomplete dose coverage of PET/CT-CTVs was indicative of early local progression (p = .004); however, CT-based radiation plans did not show significant differences in the local control rates when stratified by dose coverage. Conclusion: Retrospective implementation of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET for CTV specification for CT-guided brachytherapy for colorectal liver metastases revealed a significant change in the CTVs. Additional PET-positive tumor regions with incomplete dose coverage could explain unexpected early local progression.

  18. [18F]FHBG PET/CT Imaging of CD34-TK75 Transduced Donor T Cells in Relapsed Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Patients: Safety and Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Eissenberg, Linda G; Rettig, Michael P; Ritchey, Julie K; Prior, Julie L; Schwarz, Sally W; Frye, Jennifer; White, Brian S; Fulton, Robert S; Ghobadi, Armin; Cooper, Matthew L; Couriel, Daniel R; Seegulam, Muhammad Esa; Piwnica-Worms, David; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Cornetta, Kenneth; DiPersio, John F

    2015-01-01

    Described herein is a first-in-man attempt to both genetically modify T cells with an imagable suicide gene and track these transduced donor T cells in allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients using noninvasive positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) imaging. A suicide gene encoding a human CD34-Herpes Simplex Virus-1-thymidine kinase (CD34-TK75) fusion enabled enrichment of retrovirally transduced T cells (TdT), control of graft-versus-host disease and imaging of TdT migration and expansion in vivo in mice and man. Analysis confirmed that CD34-TK75-enriched TdT contained no replication competent γ-retrovirus, were sensitive to ganciclovir, and displayed characteristic retroviral insertion sites (by targeted sequencing). Affinity-purified CD34-TK75+-selected donor T cells (1.0–13 × 105)/kg were infused into eight patients who relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Six patients also were administered 9-[4-(18F)fluoro-3-hydroxymethyl-butyl]guanine ([18F]FHBG) to specifically track the genetically modified donor T cells by PET/CT at several time points after infusion. All patients were assessed for graft-versus-host disease, response to ganciclovir, circulating TdT cells (using both quantitative polymerase chain reaction and [18F]FHBG PET/CT imaging), TdT cell clonal expansion, and immune response to the TdT. This phase 1 trial demonstrated that genetically modified T cells and [18F]FHBG can be safely infused in patients with relapsed hematologic malignancies after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25807290

  19. Association between textural and morphological tumor indices on baseline PET-CT and early metabolic response on interim PET-CT in bulky malignant lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Ben Bouallègue, Fayçal; Tabaa, Yassine Al; Kafrouni, Marilyne; Cartron, Guillaume; Vauchot, Fabien; Mariano-Goulart, Denis

    2017-09-01

    We investigated whether metabolic, textural, and morphological tumoral indices evaluated on baseline PET-CT were predictive of early metabolic response on interim PET-CT in a cohort of patients with bulky Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin malignant lymphomas. This retrospective study included 57 patients referred for initial PET-CT examination. In-house dedicated software was used to delineate tumor contours using a fixed 30% threshold of SUV max and then to compute tumoral metabolic parameters (SUV max, mean, peak, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis, metabolic tumoral volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis, and area under the curve of the cumulative histogram), textural parameters (Moran's and Geary's indices, energy, entropy, contrast, correlation derived from the gray-level co-occurrence matrix, area under the curve of the power spectral density, auto-correlation distance, and granularity), and shape parameters (surface, asphericity, convexity, surfacic extension, and 2D and 3D fractal dimensions). Early metabolic response was assessed on interim PET-CT using the Deauville 5-point scale and patients were ranked according to the Lugano classification as complete or not complete metabolic responders. The impact of the segmentation method (alternate threshold at 41%) and image resolution (Gaussian postsmoothing of 3, 5, and 7 mm) was investigated. The association of the proposed parameters with early response was assessed in univariate and multivariate analyses. Their added predictive value was explored using supervised classification by support vector machines (SVM). We evaluated in leave-one-out cross-validation three SVMs admitting as input features (a) MTV, (b) MTV + histological type, and (c) MTV + histology + relevant texture/shape indices. Features associated with complete metabolic response were low MTV (P = 0.01), low TLG (P = 0.003), high power spectral density AUC (P = 0.007), high surfacic extension (P = 0.006), low 2D fractal dimension (P

  20. Accuracy of 3D volumetric image registration based on CT, MR and PET/CT phantom experiments.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Xie, Huchen; Ning, Holly; Citrin, Deborah; Capala, Jacek; Maass-Moreno, Roberto; Guion, Peter; Arora, Barbara; Coleman, Norman; Camphausen, Kevin; Miller, Robert W

    2008-07-09

    Registration is critical for image-based treatment planning and image-guided treatment delivery. Although automatic registration is available, manual, visual-based image fusion using three orthogonal planar views (3P) is always employed clinically to verify and adjust an automatic registration result. However, the 3P fusion can be time consuming, observer dependent, as well as prone to errors, owing to the incomplete 3-dimensional (3D) volumetric image representations. It is also limited to single-pixel precision (the screen resolution). The 3D volumetric image registration (3DVIR) technique was developed to overcome these shortcomings. This technique introduces a 4th dimension in the registration criteria beyond the image volume, offering both visual and quantitative correlation of corresponding anatomic landmarks within the two registration images, facilitating a volumetric image alignment, and minimizing potential registration errors. The 3DVIR combines image classification in real-time to select and visualize a reliable anatomic landmark, rather than using all voxels for alignment. To determine the detection limit of the visual and quantitative 3DVIR criteria, slightly misaligned images were simulated and presented to eight clinical personnel for interpretation. Both of the criteria produce a detection limit of 0.1 mm and 0.1 degree. To determine the accuracy of the 3DVIR method, three imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET/CT) were used to acquire multiple phantom images with known spatial shifts. Lateral shifts were applied to these phantoms with displacement intervals of 5.0+/-0.1 mm. The accuracy of the 3DVIR technique was determined by comparing the image shifts determined through registration to the physical shifts made experimentally. The registration accuracy, together with precision, was found to be: 0.02+/-0.09 mm for CT/CT images, 0.03+/-0.07 mm for MR/MR images, and 0.03+/-0.35 mm for PET/CT images. This accuracy is consistent with the detection limit

  1. Granulocytic sarcoma of the pancreas on 18F-FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Akira; Kondo, Tadakazu; Oka, Tomomi; Nakamoto, Yuji; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Granulocytic sarcoma (GS) is defined as leukemia infiltration in any organ other than the bone marrow. GS rarely occurs in the pancreas. Here, we present the first report of GS in the pancreas on 18F-fluorodexyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT). Patient concerns: A 19-year-old male patient with acute myeloid leukemia received a human leukocyte antigen-haploidentical stem cell transplant as a second transplant while in second complete remission. Interventions: After a second stem cell transplant, obstructive pancreatitis accompanied by a mass in the pancreatic head was observed. FDG-PET/CT revealed abnormal activity in the head of the pancreas and the skin in the patient's left breast area. Diagnoses: Pathological examination demonstrated relapsed acute myeloid leukemia in both the lesions. Outcomes: This is the first report showing the 18F-FDG PET/CT findings of GS in the pancreas. Lessons: 18F-FDG PET/CT may help determine the stage of GS. PMID:27930567

  2. Optimization of the protocols for the use of contrast agents in PET/CT studies.

    PubMed

    Pelegrí Martínez, L; Kohan, A A; Vercher Conejero, J L

    The introduction of PET/CT scanners in clinical practice in 1998 has improved care for oncologic patients throughout the clinical pathway, from the initial diagnosis of disease through the evaluation of the response to treatment to screening for possible recurrence. The CT component of a PET/CT study is used to correct the attenuation of PET studies; CT also provides anatomic information about the distribution of the radiotracer. CT is especially useful in situations where PET alone can lead to false positives and false negatives, and CT thereby improves the diagnostic performance of PET. The use of intravenous or oral contrast agents and optimal CT protocols have improved the detection and characterization of lesions. However, there are circumstances in which the systematic use of contrast agents is not justified. The standard acquisition in PET/CT scanners is the whole body protocol, but this can lead to artifacts due to the position of patients and respiratory movements between the CT and PET acquisitions. This article discusses these aspects from a constructive perspective with the aim of maximizing the diagnostic potential of PET/CT and providing better care for patients.

  3. A new cubic phantom for PET/CT dosimetry: Experimental and Monte Carlo characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Belinato, Walmir; Silva, Rogerio M.V.; Souza, Divanizia N.; Santos, William S.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, positron emission tomography (PET) associated with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has become a diagnostic technique widely disseminated to evaluate various malignant tumors and other diseases. However, during PET/CT examinations, the doses of ionizing radiation experienced by the internal organs of patients may be substantial. To study the doses involved in PET/CT procedures, a new cubic phantom of overlapping acrylic plates was developed and characterized. This phantom has a deposit for the placement of the fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) solution. There are also small holes near the faces for the insertion of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD). The holes for OSLD are positioned at different distances from the {sup 18}F-FDG deposit. The experimental results were obtained in two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. Differences in the absorbed doses were observed in OSLD measurements due to the non-orthogonal positioning of the detectors inside the phantom. This phantom was also evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations, with the MCNPX code. The phantom and the geometrical characteristics of the equipment were carefully modeled in the MCNPX code, in order to develop a new methodology form comparison of experimental and simulated results, as well as to allow the characterization of PET/CT equipments in Monte Carlo simulations. All results showed good agreement, proving that this new phantom may be applied for these experiments. (authors)

  4. (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT impact on prostate cancer management.

    PubMed

    Afaq, Asim; Alahmed, Suliman; Chen, Shih-Hsin; Lengana, Thabo; Haroon, Athar; Payne, Heather; Ahmed, Hashim; Punwani, Shonit; Sathekge, Mike; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2017-07-26

    Aim: To assess the impact of (68)Ga-Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Positron Emission Tomography/ Computed Tomography (PET/CT) on management of prostate cancer in patients with biochemical recurrence (BCR). Methods: Documented management plans were retrospectively reviewed before and after (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT in 100 patients with BCR and change in plans recorded. Results: Management changed after (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT in 39 patients (39%). These occurred in 23/68 (33.8%) of patients with radical prostatectomy (RP) and 16/32 (50%) of patients previously treated with radical radiotherapy. Positive scan (P < 0.001) and higher Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) (P = 0.024) were associated with management changes. No significant association with management change was found with Gleason grade, stage, presence of metastatic disease, PSA velocity or doubling time. Conclusion:(68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT altered management in 39% of patients with BCR, and occurred more often in patients with radical radiotherapy treatment, a positive (68)Ga-PSMA scan and higher PSA level. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  5. Advantages of (18)F FDG-PET/CT over Conventional Staging for Sarcoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Németh, Zsuzsanna; Boér, Katalin; Borbély, Katalin

    2017-10-09

    The effective management of patients with sarcomas requires accurate diagnosis and staging. Imaging, such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most freqently used methods for the detection of the lesion location, size, morphology and structural changes to adjacent tissues; however, these modalities provide little information about tumour biology. MRI is a robust and useful modality in tumour staging of sarcomas, however metabolic-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/ computer tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) provides greater accuracy to overall staging in combination with MRI [1]. The advantages of (18)F-FDG PET/CT method compared with CT and MRI is that it provides a whole body imaging, maps the viability of the tumour or the metabolic activity of the tissue. Additionally, PET detects the most agressive part of the tumour, demonstrates the biological behaviour of the tumour and therefore has a predictive value. Little data ara available on the role of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the management of sarcomas. The present manuscript aims to provide a review of the major indications of (18)F-FDG PET/CT for diagnosis, staging, restaging and monitoring response to therapy and to compare its usefulness with the conventional imaging modalities in the management of patients with sarcomas.

  6. Fluorine-18 labeled amino acids for tumor PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yiqiang; Liu, Xiaohui; Li, Jun; Yao, Huiqian; Yuan, Shuanghu

    2017-09-01

    Tumor glucose metabolism and amino acid metabolism are usually enhanced, (18)F-FDG for tumor glucose metabolism PET imaging has been clinically well known, but tumor amino acid metabolism PET imaging is not clinically familiar. Radiolabeled amino acids (AAs) are an important class of PET/CT tracers that target the upregulated amino acid transporters to show elevated amino acid metabolism in tumor cells. Radiolabeled amino acids were observed to have high uptake in tumor cells but low in normal tissues and inflammatory tissues. The radionuclides used in labeling amino acids include (15)O, (13)N, (11)C, (123)I, (18)F and (68)Ga, among which the most commonly used is (18)F [1]. Available data support the use of certain (18)F-labeled AAs for PET/CT imaging of gliomas, neuroendocrine tumors, prostate cancer and breast cancer [2, 3]. With the progress of the method of (18)F labeling AAs [4-6], (18)F-labeled AAs are well established for tumor PET/CT imaging. This review focuses on the current status of key clinical applications of 18F-labeled AAs in tumor PET/CT imaging.

  7. Candida Esophagitis Incidentally Detected by 18F-FDG PET/CT in Metastatic Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Amador, N; Martínez-Rodríguez, I; Quirce, R; Jiménez-Bonilla, J; Banzo, I

    2017-01-01

    The diagnostic significance of esophageal 18F-FDG uptake in oncologic patient is challenging. It may represent normal physiological uptake, inflammation, infection, or neoplasia. We present a patient with a recent diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer stage IV and esophageal mild uptake on 18F-FDG PET/CT scan. Biopsy of esophageal mucosa demonstrated Candida esophagitis.

  8. Brain metastasis in carcinoma breast demonstrated on (68)Ga NOTA-bisphosphonate PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Passah, Averilicia; Tripathi, Madhavi; Kumar, Rajeev; Das, Chandan J; Goyal, Ankur; Bal, Chandrasekhar S

    2014-07-01

    Ga NOTA-bisphosphonate is a new bone-seeking PET radiotracer undergoing clinical evaluation. We report a case of a carcinoma breast who underwent Ga NOTA-bisphosphonate PET/CT for detection of skeletal metastasis. In addition to skeletal metastasis, a focal area of abnormal radiotracer uptake was noted in the brain, which was confirmed as brain metastasis on MRI.

  9. 18F-DOPA PET/CT and MRI Findings in a Patient With Multiple Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando F; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Calabria, Eros N; Grillea, Giovanni; Schillaci, Orazio

    2016-08-01

    A 56-year-old man was referred to our Department for a 2-year story of upper limb tremor, severe headache, and episodes of confusion. Brain F-DOPA PET/CT showed multiple areas of tracer uptake in the two hemispheres of the brain. Subsequent MRI displayed demyelinating foci with high contrast enhancement. Histological specimen confirmed the diagnosis of multiple meningiomas.

  10. A case of colon cancer incidentally detected by 18F-choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando F; Crusco, Sonia; Cicciò, Carmelo; Schillaci, Orazio

    2013-12-01

    A 65-year-old man had restaging of prostate cancer with an 18F-choline PET/CT, which revealed focal uptake in a thickened posterior wall of sigmoid colon. Biopsy demonstrated colon cancer. Incidental colorectal 18F-choline uptake should be further investigated with histological analysis.

  11. An unusual orbital localization of wegener granulomatosis detected by 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Bertagna, Francesco; Treglia, Giorgio; Rossini, Pierluigi; Giubbini, Raffaele

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old male patient affected by Wegener granulomatosis and left exophthalmos who underwent F-FDG PET/CT during follow-up for rectal cancer. The study was negative for secondary lesions but revealed high uptake at the left orbital mass consistent with Wegener granulomatosis.

  12. A Pilot Study of 18F-FLT PET/CT in Pediatric Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Danny L; Vali, Reza; McQuattie, Susan; Chan, Jeffrey; Punnett, Angela; Weitzman, Shiela; Shammas, Amer; Charron, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We performed an observational pilot study of 18F-FLT PET/CT in pediatric lymphoma. Eight patients with equivocal 18F-FDG PET/CT underwent imaging with 18F-FLT PET/CT. No immediate adverse reactions to 18F-FLT were observed. Compared to 18F-FDG, 18F-FLT uptake was significantly higher in bone marrow and liver (18F-FLT SUV 8.6 ± 0.6 and 5.0 ± 0.3, versus 18F-FDG SUV 1.9 ± 0.1 and 3.4 ± 0.7, resp., p < 0.05). In total, 15 lesions were evaluated with average 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT SUVs of 2.6 ± 0.1 and 2.0 ± 0.4, respectively. Nonspecific uptake in reactive lymph nodes and thymus was observed. Future studies to assess the clinical utility of 18F-FLT PET/CT in pediatric lymphoma are planned.

  13. Moving Beyond "Lumpology": PET/CT Imaging of Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J

    2015-09-01

    High somatostatin receptor expression on the cell membrane of succinate dehydrogenase mutation-related pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma provides a potential target for imaging and therapy. (68)Ga-DOTATATE positron emission PET/CT may represent a new gold standard for staging pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma and have future therapeutic implications.

  14. Pigmented villous nodular synovitis mimicking metastatic melanoma on PET-CT

    PubMed Central

    Selby, Luke; Kukar, Moshim; Wang, John; Beg, Mansoor; Sullivan, James

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Positron Emission Tomography – Computed Tomography (PET-CT) is routinely utilized in the management of melanoma, either as a part of staging workup or during surveillance. Since melanomas have a high metastatic potential, any FDG avid lesion is considered suspicious for recurrence. We report a case of a FDG avid lesion, diagnosed during melanoma surveillance, its management and review of literature. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 58 year-old-male underwent wide local excision for melanoma of the left cheek, and one year post-operatively a PET-CT that revealed a hypermetabolic focus in his right subscapularis muscle, which upon resection was diagnosed as Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis (PVNS). DISCUSSION PVNS is a rare benign giant cell tumor that requires no additional treatment in asymptomatic individuals. PET-CT is used for staging and surveillance of numerous malignancies, including melanoma. A hypermetabolic lesion on a PET-CT scan in the setting of malignancy is always suspicious for recurrence. CONCLUSION The surgeon is reminded of a uncommon benign FDG avid lesion. Typical location, nonspecific symptoms and characteristic imaging findings help cue in the diagnosis of PVNS and a tissue diagnosis will establish the diagnosis, thus avoiding unnecessarily aggressive surgical management. PMID:24705190

  15. Rare Endobronchial Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor in Pediatric Patient Detected on PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kara, Pelin Ozcan; Koc, Zehra Pinar; Citak, Elvan Caglar; Nayci, Ali; Bahadir, Gokhan Berktug; Kara, Taylan

    2017-09-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) can be seen in all age groups, although it is more common in children and adolescents. We report the FDG PET/CT findings in an 8-year-old boy with endobronchial IMT. Endobronchial IMT is more commonly seen in young adults.

  16. Algorithm for lung cancer detection based on PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saita, Shinsuke; Ishimatsu, Keita; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Ohtsuka, Hideki; Nishitani, Hiromu; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2009-02-01

    The five year survival rate of the lung cancer is low with about twenty-five percent. In addition it is an obstinate lung cancer wherein three out of four people die within five years. Then, the early stage detection and treatment of the lung cancer are important. Recently, we can obtain CT and PET image at the same time because PET/CT device has been developed. PET/CT is possible for a highly accurate cancer diagnosis because it analyzes quantitative shape information from CT image and FDG distribution from PET image. However, neither benign-malignant classification nor staging intended for lung cancer have been established still enough by using PET/CT images. In this study, we detect lung nodules based on internal organs extracted from CT image, and we also develop algorithm which classifies benignmalignant and metastatic or non metastatic lung cancer using lung structure and FDG distribution(one and two hour after administering FDG). We apply the algorithm to 59 PET/CT images (malignant 43 cases [Ad:31, Sq:9, sm:3], benign 16 cases) and show the effectiveness of this algorithm.

  17. Imaging carotid body chemodectomas with 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT

    PubMed Central

    Naswa, N; Kumar, A; Sharma, P; Bal, C; Malhotra, A; Kumar, R

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the role of 68-gallium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-1-Nal3-octreotide (68Ga-DOTA-NOC) positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) in carotid body chemodectomas (CBCs). Methods : 5 patients with known CBCs (conventional imaging and angiography) were evaluated retrospectively (3 males, 2 females; mean age 36.6 years). All underwent PET-CT after injection of 148 MBq (4 mCi) of 68Ga-DOTA-NOC. Results : At baseline there were four bilateral CBCs and one unilateral CBC with an additional glomus tympanicum and bilateral glomus jugulare tumour in these five patients. All these lesions showed intense uptake on 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT. Apart from these known lesions, additional tumours were detected in three patients; glomus jugulare in one, aortic body tumour and multiple abdominal paragangliomas in another and unsuspected vertebral metastasis in the last. Overall it led to a change in management in 3 of the 5 patients (60%). Conclusion : 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT is a promising non-invasive imaging modality in the detection and characterisation of CBCs. PMID:22096221

  18. Solitary sternal metastasis from hepatocellular carcinoma detected by F-18 FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Kashyap, Raghava; Bhattacharya, Anish; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine-18 fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (F-18 FDG PET) is not sensitive modality for the diagnosis of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, FDG-PET imaging may be useful in the identification of extrahepatic metastases. We report an interesting image of HCC with solitary metastasis to sternum detected by F-18 FDG PET/CT.

  19. Renal Cell Carcinoma with Paraneoplastic Manifestations: Imaging with CT and F-18 FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ba D; Roarke, Michael C

    2007-01-01

    We present a case of renal cell carcinoma with prominent inflammatory and paraneoplastic manifestations. The initial CT detection of renal malignancy and subsequent post-therapeutic F-18 FDG PET/CT diagnosis of occult osseous metastasis were based on the patient's anemia, thrombocytosis and abnormally increased levels of serum C-reactive protein.

  20. Automatic determination of cardiovascular risk by CT attenuation correction maps in Rb-82 PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Išgum, Ivana; de Vos, Bob D; Wolterink, Jelmer M; Dey, Damini; Berman, Daniel S; Rubeaux, Mathieu; Leiner, Tim; Slomka, Piotr J

    2017-04-04

    We investigated fully automatic coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk categorization from CT attenuation correction (CTAC) acquired at rest and stress during cardiac PET/CT and compared it with manual annotations in CTAC and with dedicated calcium scoring CT (CSCT). We included 133 consecutive patients undergoing myocardial perfusion (82)Rb PET/CT with the acquisition of low-dose CTAC at rest and stress. Additionally, a dedicated CSCT was performed for all patients. Manual CAC annotations in CTAC and CSCT provided the reference standard. In CTAC, CAC was scored automatically using a previously developed machine learning algorithm. Patients were assigned to a CVD risk category based on their Agatston score (0, 1-10, 11-100, 101-400, >400). Agreement in CVD risk categorization between manual and automatic scoring in CTAC at rest and stress resulted in Cohen's linearly weighted κ of 0.85 and 0.89, respectively. The agreement between CSCT and CTAC at rest resulted in κ of 0.82 and 0.74, using manual and automatic scoring, respectively. For CTAC at stress, these were 0.79 and 0.70, respectively. Automatic CAC scoring from CTAC PET/CT may allow routine CVD risk assessment from the CTAC component of PET/CT without any additional radiation dose or scan time.

  1. Five Years of Cyclotron Radioisotope Production Experiences at the First PET-CT in Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Colmenter, L.; Coelho, D.; Esteves, L. M.; Ruiz, N.; Morales, L.; Lugo, I.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Liendo, J. A.; Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Castillo, J.

    2007-10-26

    Five years operation of a compact cyclotron installed at PET-CT facility in Caracas, Venezuela is given. Production rate of {sup 18}F labeled FDG, operation and radiation monitoring experience are included. We conclude that {sup 18}FDG CT-PET is the most effective technique for patient diagnosis.

  2. The effective dose result of 18F-FDG PET-CT paediatric patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussin, D.; Said, M. A.; Ali, N. S.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Zainon, R.

    2017-05-01

    Paediatric patient received high exposure from both CT and PET examination. Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) is important in CT dose reduction. This study aimed to compare the effective dose obtained from PET-CT scanner with and without the use of AEC function. In this study, 68 patients underwent PET-CT examination without the use of AEC function, while 25 patients used the AEC function during the examination. Patients involved in this study were between 2 to 15 years old with varies of malignancies and epilepsy diseases. The effective dose obtained from PET and CT examinations was calculated based on recommendation from International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106 and ICRP publication 102. The outcome of this study shows that the radiation dose was reduced up to 20% with the use of AEC function. The mean average of effective dose result obtained from PET and CT examinations without the use of AEC and AEC function were found to be as 6.67 mSv, 6.77 mSv, 6.03mSv and 4.96 mSv respectively. Where total effective dose result of PET-CT with non-AEC and AEC were found to be 13.44 mSv and 10.99 mSv respectively. Conclusion of this study is, the installation of AEC function in PET-CT machine does play important role in CT dose reduction especially for paediatric patient.

  3. Thyroid lymphoma on a background of Hashimoto's thyroiditis: PET/CT appearances.

    PubMed

    Mane, Mayuresh; O'Neill, Ailbhe C; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Shi, Min; Shinagare, Atul B; Fisher, David C

    2014-01-01

    Primary thyroid lymphoma is a rare thyroid tumor accounting for only 5% of all thyroid malignancies. It is more common in patients with a background history of chronic thyroiditis. PET/CT is helpful in the initial staging and for follow up to assess treatment response.

  4. 64CuCl2 PET/CT imaging of mouse muscular injury induced by electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fang; Cai, Huawei; Peng, Fangyu

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injury is common in body injuries suffered in sports and car accidents. Development of new tracers is significant for assessing muscular injury with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and monitoring repair of muscle injury in response to treatment. Copper is required for wound healing and increased copper ions were detected in the soft tissue of wound in rodents and human. Based on the recent finding of increased 64Cu uptake in the traumatic brain injury, this study aimed to explore use of 64CuCl2 as a radiotracer for molecular imaging of muscular injury using PET/CT. Focally increased 64Cu uptake by the injured muscular tissue (5.4 ± 1.2% ID/g) was detected in the C57BL/6 mice with electroporation-induced skeletal muscle injury by PET/CT after intravenous injection of 64CuCl2 as a tracer, compared to low 64Cu uptake associated with muscular inflammation induced by intramuscular injection of lipopolysaccharides (0.82 ± 0.26% ID/g, P < 0.01) or physiological 64Cu uptake of the non-injured muscular tissues (0.78 ± 0.20% ID/g, P < 0.01). The findings support further investigation of 64CuCl2 as a new radiotracer for molecular imaging of skeletal muscle injury using PET/CT. PMID:28123866

  5. Plasmacytoma of the ovary: additional role of 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Raveendran, Ainharan; Jain, Vanita; Nijhawan, Raje; Kumar, Ritesh; Bhattacharya, Anish; Sharma, Suresh C

    2013-05-01

    We report a case of ovarian plasmacytomas where 18F-FDG PET/CT helped in staging by demonstrating increased FDG uptake limited to the ovary, and hence, surgical treatment was carried out as the disease was localized to the ovary.

  6. ⁶⁸Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT detects heart metastases from ileal neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Calissendorff, Jan; Sundin, Anders; Falhammar, Henrik

    2014-09-01

    Metastases from ileal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) to the myocardium are rare and generally seen in patients with widespread metastatic NET disease. The objectives of this investigation were to describe the frequency of intracardiac metastases in ileal NET patients examined by (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT and to describe the cases in detail. All (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT examinations performed at the Karolinska University Hospital since 2010 until April 2012 were reviewed. In all, 128 out of 337 examinations were in patients with ileal NETs. Four patients had seven myocardiac metastases, yielding a frequency of 4.3 % in patients with ileal NETs. One patient had cardiac surgery while three were treated with somatostatin analogs. The cardiac metastases did not affect the patients' activity of daily life. (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT is an established imaging modality in identifying cardiac metastases in ileal NETs. Prospective studies are needed to confirm the true clinical value of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT in detecting cardiac metastases in both ileal and non-ileal NETs.

  7. Evaluation of 18F-FDG uptake and arterial wall calcifications using 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Ben-Haim, Simona; Kupzov, Ela; Tamir, Ada; Israel, Ora

    2004-11-01

    Glucose metabolic activity expressed as (18)F-FDG uptake may be increased in active atherosclerotic plaque. Calcium depositions are often increased in mature atherosclerotic plaque. The purpose of the present study was to assess the patterns of vascular-wall (18)F-FDG uptake and CT calcifications using combined PET/CT. One hundred twenty-two consecutive patients over the age of 50 (47 women and 75 men; mean age, 66 +/- 9 y) undergoing whole-body (18)F-FDG PET/CT for tumor assessment were retrospectively evaluated. PET, CT, and PET/CT slices were generated for review. Abnormal vascular findings in major arteries in the chest and abdomen were categorized as PET positive (PET+), PET negative (PET-), CT positive (CT+), or CT negative (CT-). The topographic relationship between increased vascular-wall (18)F-FDG uptake on PET and the presence of calcifications on CT was assessed on PET/CT fused images, with abnormal sites further classified as PET+/CT+, PET+/CT-, or PET-/CT+. The presence of CT calcifications and increased vascular-wall (18)F-FDG uptake was correlated with age, sex, presence of cardiovascular risk factors, and cardiovascular disease. Abnormal findings were identified at 349 sites. CT calcifications (CT+) were observed at 320 sites (92%) of 100 patients (82%), more commonly in men (P < 0.03), in older patients (P < 0.0001), in patients with hypertension (P < 0.003) or hyperlipidemia (P < 0.04), and in smokers (P < 0.008). Increased vascular-wall (18)F-FDG uptake (PET+) was observed at 52 sites (15%) of 38 patients (31%), more commonly in men (P < 0.02), in older patients (P < 0.0001), and in patients with hypertension (P < 0.02), and was borderline in patients with cardiovascular disease (P = 0.057). PET+ and CT+ findings correlated in 12 patients, a PET+/CT- pattern was found in 18 patients, and 8 patients had increased vascular-wall (18)F-FDG uptake in sites with and without calcifications (PET+/CT+, CT-). Twenty-two patients (18%) had a PET-/CT

  8. Prognostic Value of Quantitative Metabolic Metrics on Baseline Pre-Sunitinib FDG PET/CT in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Barkhodari, Amir; Harshman, Lauren; Srinivas, Sandy; Quon, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate various quantitative metrics on FDG PET/CT for monitoring sunitinib therapy and predicting prognosis in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC). Methods Seventeen patients (mean age: 59.0 ± 11.6) prospectively underwent a baseline FDG PET/CT and interim PET/CT after 2 cycles (12 weeks) of sunitinib therapy. We measured the highest maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of all identified lesions (highest SUVmax), sum of SUVmax with maximum six lesions (sum of SUVmax), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) from baseline PET/CT and interim PET/CT, and the % decrease in highest SUVmax of lesion (%Δ highest SUVmax), the % decrease in sum of SUVmax, the % decrease in TLG (%ΔTLG) and the % decrease in MTV (%ΔMTV) between baseline and interim PET/CT, and the imaging results were validated by clinical follow-up at 12 months after completion of therapy for progression free survival (PFS). Results At 12 month follow-up, 6/17 (35.3%) patients achieved PFS, while 11/17 (64.7%) patients were deemed to have progression of disease or recurrence within the previous 12 months. At baseline, PET/CT demonstrated metabolically active cancer in all cases. Using baseline PET/CT alone, all of the quantitative imaging metrics were predictive of PFS. Using interim PET/CT, the %Δ highest SUVmax, %Δ sum of SUVmax, and %ΔTLG were also predictive of PFS. Otherwise, interim PET/CT showed no significant difference between the two survival groups regardless of the quantitative metric utilized including MTV and TLG. Conclusions Quantitative metabolic measurements on baseline PET/CT appears to be predictive of PFS at 12 months post-therapy in patients scheduled to undergo sunitinib therapy for mRCC. Change between baseline and interim PET/CT also appeared to have prognostic value but otherwise interim PET/CT after 12 weeks of sunitinib did not appear to be predictive of PFS. PMID:27123976

  9. Metal artifact reduction of CT scans to improve PET/CT.

    PubMed

    van der Vos, Charlotte S; Arens, Anne Ij; Hamill, Jim; Hofmann, Christian; Panin, Vladimir Y; Meeuwis, Antoi Pw; Visser, Eric P; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee

    2017-05-10

    In recent years different metal artifact reduction (MAR) methods have been developed for computed tomography (CT). These methods have only recently been introduced for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) even though they could be beneficial for interpretation, segmentation and quantification of the PET/CT images. In this study, phantom and patient scans were analyzed visually and quantitatively to measure the effect on PET images of iterative metal artifact reduction (iMAR) of CT data. Methods The phantom consisted of two types of hip prostheses in a solution of (18)F-flurodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) and water. (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans of 14 patients with metal implants (either dental implants, hip prostheses, shoulder prostheses or pedicle screws) and (68)Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen ((68)Ga-PSMA) PET/CT scans of 7 patients with hip prostheses were scored by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians to analyze clinical relevance. For all patients a lesion was located in the field of view of the metal implant. Phantom and patients were scanned in an mCT PET/CT scanner (Siemens Healthcare). The standard low-dose CTs were processed with the iMAR algorithm. The PET data were reconstructed using attenuation correction provided by both standard CT and iMAR-processed CT. Results For the phantom scans cold artifacts were visible on the PET image. There was a 30% deficit in (18)F-FDG concentration, which was restored by iMAR processing, indicating that metal artifacts on CT images induce quantification errors in PET data. The iMAR algorithm was useful for most patients. When iMAR was used the confidence in interpretation increased or stayed the same, with an average improvement of 28±20% (scored on a scale of 0-100% confidence). The standardized uptake value (SUV) increase or decrease depended on the type of metal artifact. The mean difference in absolute values of SUVmean of the lesions was 3.5±3.3%. Conclusion The iMAR algorithm

  10. 68Ga-PSMA-11 Dynamic PET/CT Imaging in Primary Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Kopka, Klaus; Eder, Matthias; Hadaschik, Boris A; Freitag, Martin T; Pan, Leyun; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2016-11-01

    The aim of our study is to assess the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of Ga-PSMA-11 in patients suffering from primary prostate cancer (PC) by means of dynamic and whole-body PET/CT. Twenty-four patients with primary, previously untreated PC were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent dynamic PET/CT (dPET/CT) scanning of the pelvis and whole-body PET/CT studies with Ga-PSMA-11. The evaluation of dPET/CT studies was based on qualitative evaluation, SUV calculation, and quantitative analysis based on two-tissue compartment modeling and a noncompartmental approach leading to the extraction of fractal dimension (FD). A total of 23/24 patients (95.8%) were Ga-PSMA-11 positive. In 9/24 patients (37.5%), metastatic lesions were detected. PC-associated lesions demonstrated the following mean values: SUVaverage = 14.3, SUVmax = 23.4, K1 = 0.24 (1/min), k3 = 0.34 (1/min), influx = 0.15 (1/min), and FD = 1.27. The parameters SUVaverage, SUVmax, k3, influx, and FD derived from PC-associated lesions were significantly higher than respective values derived from reference prostate tissue. Time-activity curves derived from PC-associated lesions revealed an increasing Ga-PSMA-11 accumulation during dynamic PET acquisition. Correlation analysis revealed a moderate but significant correlation between PSA levels and SUVaverage (r = 0.60) and SUVmax (r = 0.57), and a weak but significant correlation between Gleason score and SUVaverage (r = 0.33) and SUVmax (r = 0.28). Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT confirmed its capacity in detecting primary PC with a detection rate of 95.8%. Dynamic PET/CT studies of the pelvis revealed an increase in tracer uptake in PC-associated lesions during the 60 minutes of dynamic PET acquisition, a finding with potential applications in anti-PSMA approaches.

  11. Screening for occult malignancy with FDG-PET/CT in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Ana; Redondo, Margarita; Rubio, Tomás; Del Olmo, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Wilhelmi, Pablo; García-Velloso, María J; Richter, José A; Páramo, José A; Lecumberri, Ramón

    2013-11-01

    Extensive screening strategies to detect occult cancer in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE) are complex and no benefit in terms of survival has been reported. FDG-PET/CT (2-[F-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography), a noninvasive technique for the diagnosis and staging of malignancies, could be useful in this setting. Consecutive patients ≥ 50 years with a first unprovoked VTE episode were prospectively included. Screening with FDG-PET/CT was performed 3-4 weeks after the index event. If positive, appropriate diagnostic work-up was programmed. Clinical follow-up continued for 2 years. Blood samples were collected to assess coagulation biomarkers. FDG-PET/CT was negative in 68/99 patients (68.7%), while suspicious FDG uptake was detected in 31/99 patients (31.3%). Additional diagnostic work-up confirmed a malignancy in 7/31 patients (22.6%), with six of them at early stage. During follow-up, two patients with negative FDG-PET/CT were diagnosed with cancer. Sensitivity (S), positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) of FDG-PET/CT as single tool for the detection of occult malignancy were 77.8% (95% CI: 0.51-1), 22.6% (95% CI: 0.08-0.37) and 97.1% (95% CI: 0.93-1), respectively. Median tissue factor (TF) activity in patients with occult cancer was 5.38 pM vs. 2.40 pM in those without cancer (p = 0.03). Limitation of FDG-PET/CT screening to patients with TF activity > 2.8 pM would improve the PPV to 37.5% and reduce the costs of a single cancer diagnosis from 20,711€ to 11,670€. FDG-PET/CT is feasible for the screening of occult cancer in patients with unprovoked VTE, showing high S and NPV. The addition of TF activity determination may be useful for patient selection. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  12. Automated movement correction for dynamic PET/CT images: evaluation with phantom and patient data.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hu; Wong, Koon-Pong; Wardak, Mirwais; Dahlbom, Magnus; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R; Nelson, Linda D; Small, Gary W; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed the PET frames with CT-based attenuation correction, and finally re-aligned all the PET frames to the same position. We evaluated the MC method's performance on the Hoffman phantom and dynamic FDDNP and FDG PET/CT images of patients with neurodegenerative disease or with poor compliance. Dynamic FDDNP PET/CT images (65 min) were obtained from 12 patients and dynamic FDG PET/CT images (60 min) were obtained from 6 patients. Logan analysis with cerebellum as the reference region was used to generate regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) for FDDNP scan before and after MC. For FDG studies, the image derived input function was used to generate parametric image of FDG uptake constant (Ki) before and after MC. Phantom study showed high accuracy of registration between PET and CT and improved PET images after MC. In patient study, head movement was observed in all subjects, especially in late PET frames with an average displacement of 6.92 mm. The z-direction translation (average maximum = 5.32 mm) and x-axis rotation (average maximum = 5.19 degrees) occurred most frequently. Image artifacts were significantly diminished after MC. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the FDDNP DVR and FDG Ki values in the parietal and temporal regions after MC. In conclusion, MC applied to dynamic brain FDDNP and FDG PET/CT scans could improve the qualitative and quantitative aspects of images of both tracers.

  13. (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of asymptomatic malignant melanoma recurrence.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Ismaheel; Lengana, Thabo; Ololade, Kehinde; Boshomane, Tebatso; Reyneke, Florette; Modiselle, Moshe; Vorster, Mariza; Sathekge, Mike

    2017-06-12

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT in the detection of asymptomatic recurrence in patients with malignant melanoma who have had resection of their primary lesion. We also aimed to determine the pattern and factors predisposing to disease recurrence. Patients with malignant melanoma who have had surgical resection of their disease and without any clinical evidence of disease recurrence were followed-up with FDG PET/CT. The diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT, pattern of recurrence and factors predictive of disease recurrence were determined. A total of 144 patients were followed-up for a median period of 50.50 months. Asymptomatic recurrence was seen in 37 patients (25.7 %) with a median time to recurrence of 20 months. Lymph node was the commonest site of asymptomatic recurrence. Sex, tumour depth, histology type and presence of nodal metastasis were significant predictors of tumour recurrence. Age, race, site of primary lesion, type of lymph node resection were not significant predictors of disease recurrence. Race has a significant effect on the histological subtype of tumour (nodular maligna was more common in Caucasian while acral lentiginous was more prevalent in the Blacks) and the site of the primary lesion (lower limb in Blacks and trunk in Caucasians). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of FDG PET/CT for the detection of disease recurrence were 94.5 %, 87.6 % and 89.6 % respectively. FDG PET/CT is a suitable modality for early detection of asymptomatic recurrence of malignant melanoma. Asymptomatic recurrence most commonly occurs in lymph nodes. Sex, nodal metastasis and tumour pathologic features are predictors of recurrence.

  14. Segmentation of brain PET-CT images based on adaptive use of complementary information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yong; Wen, Lingfeng; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2009-02-01

    Dual modality PET-CT imaging provides aligned anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) images in a single scanning session, which can potentially be used to improve image segmentation of PET-CT data. The ability to distinguish structures for segmentation is a function of structure and modality and varies across voxels. Thus optimal contribution of a particular modality to segmentation is spatially variant. Existing segmentation algorithms, however, seldom account for this characteristic of PET-CT data and the results using these algorithms are not optimal. In this study, we propose a relative discrimination index (RDI) to characterize the relative abilities of PET and CT to correctly classify each voxel into the correct structure for segmentation. The definition of RDI is based on the information entropy of the probability distribution of the voxel's class label. If the class label derived from CT data for a particular voxel has more certainty than that derived from PET data, the corresponding RDI will have a higher value. We applied the RDI matrix to balance adaptively the contributions of PET and CT data to segmentation of brain PET-CT images on a voxel-by-voxel basis, with the aim to give the modality with higher discriminatory power a larger weight. The resultant segmentation approach is distinguished from traditional approaches by its innovative and adaptive use of the dual-modality information. We compared our approach to the non-RDI version and two commonly used PET-only based segmentation algorithms for simulation and clinical data. Our results show that the RDI matrix markedly improved PET-CT image segmentation.

  15. [Interpretation of thyroid incidentalomas in (18)F-FDG PET/CT studies].

    PubMed

    Achury, C; Estorch, M; Domènech, A; Camacho, V; Flotats, A; Jaller, R; Geraldo, L; Deportós, J; Montes, A; Carrió, I

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid findings or incidentalomas in (18)F-FDG PET/CT studies are relatively frequent, being its clinical significance subject of controversy. The aim of this study was to show our experience in the detection of thyroid incidentalomas by PET/CT studies as well as its follow up. A retrospective and descriptive review was conducted on patients who had thyroid incidentalomas detected in (18)F-FDG PET/CT studies between June 2010 and March 2013. Patient's medical records were reviewed for age, genre, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), thyroid diseases, TSH and antithyroid antibodies levels, ultrasound, fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and cytology. 4085 PET/CT studies for several purposes were performed. Eighty-three of these studies (2.03%) showed thyroid incidentalomas. Thirty-seven patients showed a diffuse increase of glucose metabolism in the thyroid gland and 46 showed a focal increase of glucose metabolism. Five out of 46 patients with focal uptake were diagnosed of a neoplastic disease by cytology (11%). The SUVmax of malignant pathology did not differ from that of benign thyroid diseases (Mean: 10,26 and 5,92 respectively). In our experience, focal thyroid incidentalomas detected in (18)F-FDG PET/CT studies are related to a significant risk of malignancy (11%). Therefore, in these situations, an ultrasound study with fine needle biopsy should be recommended. Moreover, a diffuse increase of glucose metabolism in the thyroid gland is often associated with benign thyroid pathology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical significance of incidental FDG uptake in the prostate gland detected by PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ertan; Elboga, Umut; Kalender, Ebuzer; Basıbuyuk, Mustafa; Demir, Hasan Deniz; Celen, Yusuf Zeki

    2015-01-01

    The value of FDG-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for detecting prostate cancer is unknown. We aimed to investigate the clinical value of incidental prostate FDG uptake on PET/CT scans. We reviewed 6128 male patients who underwent FDG-PET/CT scans and selected cases that reported hypermetabolic lesion in the prostate. The patients who have prior history of prostate carcinoma or prostate surgery were excluded from the study. We have analyzed the correlation between PET/CT findings and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, imaging (USG), urological examinations and biopsy. Incidental 18F-FDG uptake of the prostate gland was observed in 79 patients (1.3%). While sixteen of them were excluded due to inadequate clinical data, the remaining 63 patients were included for further analysis. The patients were divided into two groups; 8 patients (12.7%) in the malignant group and 55 patients (87.3%) in the benign group. The SUVmax values were not significantly different between the two groups. In 6 (75%) patients with prostate cancer, FDG uptake was observed focally in the peripheral zone of the prostate glands. There was no significant correlation between the SUVmax and the PSA levels. Incidental 18F-FDG uptake in the prostate gland is a rare condition, but a substantial portion of it is associated with the cancer. Benign and malignant lesions of the prostate gland in FDG-PET/CT imaging could not be reliably distinguished. The peripheral focally FDG uptake of prostate glands should be further examined with the clinical and labaratory evaluations. PMID:26379847

  17. Focal Colonic FDG Activity with PET/CT: Guidelines for Recommendation of Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianye; Behr, Spencer; Khan, Sana; Osterhoff, Robert; Aparici, Carina Mari

    2015-01-01

    Focal 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) colonic activity can be incidentally seen in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans. Its clinical significance is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to assess the significance of focal FDG activity in PET/CT scans by correlating the imaging findings to colonoscopy results, and come up with some guidelines for recommendation of follow-up colonoscopy. A total of 133 patients who underwent both 18F-FDG PET/CT for different oncological indications and colonoscopy within 3 months were retrospectively studied. Imaging, colonoscopy and pathology results were analyzed. Of the 133 FDG-PET/CT scans, 109/133 (82%) did not show focal colonic FDG activity, and 24/133 (18%) did. Of the 109/133 PET/CTs without focal colonic FDG activity, 109/109 (100%) did not have evidence of colon cancer after colonoscopy and histology. Of the 24/133 PET/CTs with focal colonic FDG activity, 10/24 (42%) had pathologic confirmation of colon cancer and 14/24 (58%) did not have evidence of colon cancer after colonoscopy and histological analysis. Sensitivity was 10/10 (100%), specificity 109/123 (89%), positive predictive value (PPV) 10/24 (42%) and negative predictive value (NPV) 109/109 (100%). Incidental focal 18FDG activity in PET/CT imaging shows a high sensitivity, specificity and NPV for malignancy, with a not so high PPV of 42%. Although some people would argue that a 42% chance of malignancy justifies colonoscopy, this maybe is not possible in all cases. However, the high sensitivity of the test does not allow these studies to be overlooked. We provide our recommendations as per when to send patients with focal FDG colonic activity to have further characterization with colonoscopy. PMID:25709541

  18. Automated Movement Correction for Dynamic PET/CT Images: Evaluation with Phantom and Patient Data

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hu; Wong, Koon-Pong; Wardak, Mirwais; Dahlbom, Magnus; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R.; Nelson, Linda D.; Small, Gary W.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed the PET frames with CT-based attenuation correction, and finally re-aligned all the PET frames to the same position. We evaluated the MC method's performance on the Hoffman phantom and dynamic FDDNP and FDG PET/CT images of patients with neurodegenerative disease or with poor compliance. Dynamic FDDNP PET/CT images (65 min) were obtained from 12 patients and dynamic FDG PET/CT images (60 min) were obtained from 6 patients. Logan analysis with cerebellum as the reference region was used to generate regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) for FDDNP scan before and after MC. For FDG studies, the image derived input function was used to generate parametric image of FDG uptake constant (Ki) before and after MC. Phantom study showed high accuracy of registration between PET and CT and improved PET images after MC. In patient study, head movement was observed in all subjects, especially in late PET frames with an average displacement of 6.92 mm. The z-direction translation (average maximum = 5.32 mm) and x-axis rotation (average maximum = 5.19 degrees) occurred most frequently. Image artifacts were significantly diminished after MC. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the FDDNP DVR and FDG Ki values in the parietal and temporal regions after MC. In conclusion, MC applied to dynamic brain FDDNP and FDG PET/CT scans could improve the qualitative and quantitative aspects of images of both tracers. PMID:25111700

  19. Oncological Patient Anxiety in Imaging Studies: the PET/CT Example.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Carla; Grilo, Ana; Lucena, Filipa; Carolino, Elisabete

    2016-07-02

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the subjective perception of anxiety pre- and post-procedure, and explore the relationship between demographic, clinical variables and cancer patients' anxiety during a positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan. Two hundred and thirty-two oncological out patients, with clinical indication for performing an (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET/CT scan and attending a nuclear medicine (NM) department, participated in the study. Patients' anxiety and subjective experience of PET/CT were examined using two self-report questionnaires. The pre-procedure questionnaire focused on demographic information, level of knowledge regarding the scan and subjective perception of anxiety before the procedure. The post-procedure questionnaire included the subjective perception anxiety after the procedure, information adequacy and satisfaction with the NM department. The self-reported data indicate that patients were anxious during PET/CT. Furthermore, our data revealed a significant difference between the anxiety pre-procedure and post-procedure (z = -3909, p < 0.05), in which the anxiety pre-procedure has significantly higher values. No significant correlation was found between anxiety and age of the patients, education levels, adequacy of information or satisfaction with the NM Department. Perception of anxiety post-procedure differs between gender (U = 5641, p = 0.033). In conclusion, PET/CT generated anxiety levels in oncological patients, especially before the procedure. Although patients seemed to be satisfied with information delivered by staff and with the NM Department, attention has to be focused on effective interventions strategies that help patients to reduce anxiety.

  20. The role of 18FDG PET/CT in the management of colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Engledow, Alec H; Skipworth, James RA; Pakzad, Farrokh; Imber, Charles; Ell, Peter J; Groves, Ashley M

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment for colorectal liver metastases (CLM). However, involvement of both the hepatic lobes or extrahepatic disease (EHD) can be a contra-indication for resection. The aim of the present study was to examine the addition of combined positron emission and computed tomography (PET/CT) to CLM staging to assess the effects upon staging and management. Methods All CLM patients referred to a single centre between January 2005 and January 2009 were prospectively included. All underwent routine staging (clinical examination and computed tomography), followed by a whole body 18fluoro-deoxy-glucose (18FDG)-PET/CT scan and Fong clinical risk score calculation. Results Sixty-four patients were included [63% male with a median age of 63 years (age range 32–79 years)]. The addition of PET/CT led to disease upstaging in 20 patients (31%) and downstaging in two patients (3%). EHD was found in 24% of low-risk patients (Fong score 0–2) as compared with 44% of high-risk patients (Fong score 3–5) (P = 0.133). There was a trend towards a greater influence upon management in patients with a low score (44% vs. 17%; P = 0.080). Conclusion The addition of PET/CT led to management changes in over one-third of patients but there was no correlation between alterations in staging or management and the Fong clinical risk score; suggesting that PET/CT should be utilized, where available, in the pre-operative staging of CLM patients. PMID:22151447

  1. The value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosing infectious endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kouijzer, Ilse J E; Vos, Fidel J; Janssen, Marcel J R; van Dijk, Arie P J; Oyen, Wim J G; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P

    2013-07-01

    Early detection of infectious endocarditis is challenging. For diagnosing infectious endocarditis, the revised Duke criteria are the gold standard. Evidence of endocardial involvement on echocardiography is a major criterion, but sensitivity and specificity of echocardiography are not optimal. Here we investigated the utility of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) to diagnose infectious endocarditis in patients with gram-positive bacteraemia. Seventy-two patients with gram-positive bacteraemia were prospectively included. Patients with a positive blood culture growing Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus species or Enterococcus species were eligible when a risk factor for developing metastatic infectious foci was present. Infectious endocarditis was defined according to the revised Duke criteria. All patients underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT and echocardiography. (18)F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was evaluated independently by two nuclear medicine physicians. Sensitivity for diagnosing infectious endocarditis with (18)F-FDG PET/CT was 39% and specificity was 93%. The positive predictive value was 64% and negative predictive value was 82%. The mortality rate in patients without infectious endocarditis and without increased (18)F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was 18%, and in patients without infectious endocarditis but with high (18)F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves the mortality rate was 50% (p = 0.181). (18)F-FDG PET/CT is currently not sufficiently adequate for the diagnosis of infectious endocarditis because of its low sensitivity. Improvements such as patient preparation with low carbohydrate-fat allowed diet and technical advances in the newest PET/CT scanners may increase sensitivity in future studies.

  2. 68Ga-PRGD2 PET/CT in the Evaluation of Glioma: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Integrin αvβ3 is overexpressed in both neovasculature and glioma cells. We aimed to evaluate 68gallium-BNOTA-PRGD2 (68Ga-PRGD2) as a new reagent for noninvasive integrin αvβ3 imaging in glioma patients. With informed consent, 12 patients with suspicious brain glioma, as diagnosed by enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning, were enrolled to undergo 68Ga-PRGD2 PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans before surgery. The preoperative images were compared and correlated with the pathologically determined WHO grade. Next, the expression of integrin αvβ3, CD34, and Ki-67 were determined by immunohistochemical staining of the resected brain tumor tissue. Our findings demonstrated that 68Ga-PRGD2 specifically accumulated in the brain tumors that were rich of integrin αvβ3 and other neovasculature markers, but not in the brain parenchyma other than the choroid plexus. Therefore, 68Ga-PRGD2 PET/CT was able to evaluate the glioma demarcation more specifically than 18F-FDG PET/CT. The maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of 68Ga-PRGD2, rather than those of 18F-FDG, were significantly correlated with the glioma grading. The maximum tumor-to-brain ratios (TBRmax) of both tracers were significantly correlated with glioma grading, whereas 68Ga-PRGD2 seemed to be more superior to 18F-FDG in differentiating high-grade glioma (HGG) from low-grade glioma (LGG). Moreover, 68Ga-PRGD2 PET/CT showed different accumulation patterns for HGG of WHO grades III and IV. This is the first noninvasive integrin imaging study, to the best of our knowledge, conducted in preoperative patients with different grades of glioma, and it preliminarily indicated the effectiveness of this novel method for evaluating glioma grading and demarcation. PMID:25093246

  3. Role of FDG PET/CT in Diagnostic Evaluation of Granulocytic Sarcomas: A Series of 12 Patients.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Piyush; Dhake, Sanket; Purandare, Nilendu; Agrawal, Archi; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma (GS) is a rare extramedullary manifestation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which can precede the diagnosis or occur in the posttreatment setting. Unlike its established role in other hematological malignancies like Hodgkin's on non-Hodgkin's disease, the exact role of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in AML with or without GS remains to be defined. We retrospectively reviewed PET/CT scans of 12 patients with histologically proven GS. Marrow examination of these patients identified nine patients with isolated GS (without existent leukemia) and three patients with coexistent leukemia. PET/CT accurately identified all clinically evident GS in all 12 patients at initial staging and at follow-up with tumors, showing moderate to high 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose uptake. Coexistent marrow disease was seen on PET/CT in three patients, which was confirmed on histopathology. In the same patients, PET/CT also detected additional sites of extramedullary disease in 66.6% (n = 8), which was either clinically occult or not evident on routine CT. PET/CT appears to be a highly sensitive imaging modality in diagnostic evaluation of GS. The most important indication of using PET/CT in these cases is to identify additional sites of clinically occult extramedullary disease, which can potentially impact treatment decisions and outcomes.

  4. Evaluation of Prostate Cancer with 11C- and 18F-Choline PET/CT: Diagnosis and Initial Staging.

    PubMed

    Nitsch, Sascha; Hakenberg, Oliver W; Heuschkel, Martin; Dräger, Desiree; Hildebrandt, Guido; Krause, Bernd J; Schwarzenböck, Sarah M

    2016-10-01

    Early diagnosis and adequate staging are crucial for the choice of adequate treatment in prostate cancer (PC). Morphologic and functional imaging modalities, such as CT and MRI, have had limited accuracy in the diagnosis and nodal staging of PC. Molecular PET/CT imaging with (11)C- or (18)F-choline-labeled derivatives is increasingly being used, but its role in the diagnosis and initial staging of PC is controversial because of limitations in sensitivity and specificity for the detection of primary PC. For T staging, functional MRI is superior to (11)C- or (18)F-choline PET/CT. For N staging, (11)C- or (18)F-choline PET/CT can provide potentially useful information that may influence treatment planning. For the detection of bone metastases, (11)C- or (18)F-choline PET/CT has had promising results; however, in terms of cost-effectiveness, the routine use of (11)C- or (18)F-choline PET/CT is still debatable. (11)C- or (18)F-choline PET/CT might be used in high-risk PC before radiation treatment planning, potentially affecting this planning (e.g., regarding dose escalation). This review provides an overview of the diagnostic accuracy and limitations of (11)C- or (18)F-choline PET/CT in the diagnosis and staging of PC.

  5. Impact of initial FDG PET/CT in the management plan of patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Arias, F; Chicata, V; García-Velloso, M J; Asín, G; Uzcanga, M; Eito, C; Quilez, I; Viudez, A; Saenz, J; Hernández, I; Caicedo, C; Errasti, M; Barrado, M; García-Bragado, F

    2015-02-01

    To determine the impact of initial FDG PET/CT staging on clinical stage and the management plan in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). We retrospectively reviewed the records of 72 consecutive patients (2007-2010) staged with PET/CT and conventional CT with tumours of hypopharynx/larynx (26 patients, 36 %), oral cavity (17 patients, 24 %), oropharynx (16 patients, 22 %), nasopharynx (12 patients, 17 %), and others (2 %). The impact of PET/CT on management plans was considered high when PET/CT changed the planned treatment modality or treatment intent, and intramodality changes were considered as minor changes with low impact. FDG PET/CT changed the stage in 27 patients and had high impact on the management plan in 12 % of patients (detection of distant metastases in 6 patients and stage II in 2 patients). Intramodality changes were more frequent: FDG PET/CT altered the TNM stage in 18/72 (25 %) of patients, upstaging N stage in 90 % of patients with low impact. Initial FDG PET/CT staging not only improves stage but also affects the management plan in LAHNC patients.

  6. Asymptomatic Mesenchymal Hamartoma of the Chest Wall in Child With Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake on PET/CT-Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kentaro; Tani, Yukiko; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Ogino, Kei; Tsuchioka, Takashi; Nakajima, Masanobu; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Sasaki, Kinro; Kato, Hiroyuki; Ohya, Toshiki

    2015-05-01

    We had experience with a case of mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall (MHCW) with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). We reported the first case of asymptomatic MHCW in a child with preoperative PET/CT. Mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall is a rare benign tumor that usually presents as a visible chest wall mass or respiratory problems secondary to compression of the lung in early infancy. It is often reported that malignant transformation is extraordinarily rare. Positron emission tomography/CT is useful for diagnosis of malignancy. There is no report of MHCW in a child with preoperative PET/CT before. We examined an asymptomatic 1-year-old girl with an incidental finding on a chest x-ray. Scans of CT and PET/CT were performed before surgical resection. After surgery, the resected tumor was examined histologically. Chest x-ray and CT scan of the chest confirmed a 25- × 20-mm round shaped intrapleural mass containing calcification and destructing the rib, arising from the third rib. Scan of PET/CT demonstrated the mass with light FDG accumulation. Histologically, the mass was homogenous, with thick funicular of hyaline cartilage interdigitating with scattered fiber. There were no malignant cells. No malignant MHCW was demonstrated in the mass, with light FDG accumulation by PET/CT. PET/CT might be a useful tool to distinguish malignant MHCW in children.

  7. Repetitive (18)F-FDG-PET/CT in patients with large-vessel giant-cell arteritis and controlled disease.

    PubMed

    de Boysson, Hubert; Aide, Nicolas; Liozon, Eric; Lambert, Marc; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Monteil, Jacques; Huglo, Damien; Bienvenu, Boris; Manrique, Alain; Aouba, Achille

    2017-08-30

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT can detect large-vessel involvement in giant-cell arteritis (GCA) with a good sensitivity. In patients with clinically and biologically controlled disease, we aimed to assess how vascular uptakes evolve on repetitive FDG-PET/CT. All included patients had to satisfy the 4 following criteria: 1) diagnosis of GCA was retained according to the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology or based on the satisfaction of 2 criteria associated with the demonstration of large-vessel involvement on FDG-PET/CT; 2) all patients had a positive PET/CT that was performed at diagnosis before treatment or within the first 10days of treatment; 3) another FDG-PET/CT was performed after at least 3months of controlled disease without any relapse; 4) patients were followed-up at least for 12months. Twenty-five patients (17 [68%] women, median age: 69 [65-78]) with large-vessel inflammation on a baseline FDG-PET/CT and with repetitive imaging during the period with controlled disease were included and followed-up for 62 [25-95] months. Four repeated procedures revealed total extinction of vascular uptakes at 11.5 [8-12] months after the first FDG-PET/CT. Eight PET/CT revealed decreased numbers of vascular uptakes, and 10 procedures revealed no changes. The 3 remaining procedures indicated worsening of the numbers of vascular uptakes in the absence of relapse. Our study revealed long-term persistent vascular uptake on repeated FDG-PET/CT in >80% of our GCA patients with large-vessel inflammation and clinical-biological controlled disease. Prospective studies are required to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of 18F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Hillengass, Jens; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Mosebach, Jennifer; Pan, Leyun; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    PET/MRI represents a promising hybrid imaging modality with several potential clinical applications. Although PET/MRI seems highly attractive in the diagnostic approach of multiple myeloma (MM), its role has not yet been evaluated. The aims of this prospective study are to evaluate the feasibility of 18F-FDG PET/MRI in detection of MM lesions, and to investigate the reproducibility of bone marrow lesions detection and quantitative data of 18F-FDG uptake between the functional (PET) component of PET/CT and PET/MRI in MM patients. The study includes 30 MM patients. All patients initially underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT (60 min p.i.), followed by PET/MRI (120 min p.i.). PET/CT and PET/MRI data were assessed and compared based on qualitative (lesion detection) and quantitative (SUV) evaluation. The hybrid PET/MRI system provided good image quality in all cases without artefacts. PET/MRI identified 65 of the 69 lesions, which were detectable with PET/CT (94.2%). Quantitative PET evaluations showed the following mean values in MM lesions: SUVaverage=5.5 and SUVmax=7.9 for PET/CT; SUVaverage=3.9 and SUVmax=5.8 for PET/MRI. Both SUVaverage and SUVmax were significantly higher on PET/CT than on PET/MRI. Spearman correlation analysis demonstrated a strong correlation between both lesional SUVaverage (r=0.744) and lesional SUVmax (r=0.855) values derived from PET/CT and PET/MRI. Regarding detection of myeloma skeletal lesions, PET/MRI exhibited equivalent performance to PET/CT. In terms of tracer uptake quantitation, a significant correlation between the two techniques was demonstrated, despite the statistically significant differences in lesional SUVs between PET/CT and PET/MRI. PMID:26550538

  9. PET/CT versus bone marrow biopsy in the initial evaluation of bone marrow infiltration in various pediatric malignancies.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Claudia P; Cuglievan, Branko; Zapata, Catalina M; Olavarrieta, Raquel; Raskin, Scott; Desai, Kavita; De Angulo, Guillermo

    2017-09-13

    Accurate staging is essential in the prognosis and management of pediatric malignancies. Current protocols require screening for marrow infiltration with bone marrow biopsy (BMB) as the gold standard. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is commonly used to complete the staging process and can also be used to evaluate marrow infiltration. To compare PET-CT and BMB in the initial evaluation of bone marrow infiltration in pediatric cancers. We retrospectively reviewed new cases of EWS, rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma, and lymphoma diagnosed between January 2009 and October 2014. Each case had undergone both PET-CT and BMB within 4 weeks without treatment in the interval between screening modalities. We reviewed 69 cases. Bone marrow infiltration was demonstrated in 34 cases by PET-CT and in 18 cases by BMB. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of PET-CT were both 100%. Interestingly, the cases in which infiltration was not detected on BMB had an abnormal marrow signal on PET-CT focal or distant to iliac crest. PET-CT has a high sensitivity when assessing marrow infiltration in pediatric malignancies. Advances in radiologic modalities may obviate the use of invasive, painful, and costly procedures like BMB. Furthermore, biopsy results are limited by insufficient tissue or the degree of marrow infiltration (diffuse vs. focal disease). PET-CT can improve the precision of biopsy when used as a guiding tool. This study proposes the use of PET-CT as first-line screening for bone marrow infiltration to improve the accuracy of staging in new diagnoses. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The impact of FDG-PET/CT in the management of patients with vulvar and vaginal cancer.

    PubMed

    Robertson, N L; Hricak, H; Sonoda, Y; Sosa, R E; Benz, M; Lyons, G; Abu-Rustum, N R; Sala, E; Vargas, H A

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the changes in prognostic impression and patient management following PET/CT in patients with vulvar and vaginal carcinoma; and to compare PET/CT findings with those of conventional imaging modalities. We summarized prospectively and retrospectively collected data for 50 consecutive patients from our institution that enrolled in the National Oncologic PET Registry and underwent FDG-PET/CT for a suspected or known primary or recurrent vulvar/vaginal cancer. 54/83 (65%) studies included had a diagnosis of vulvar cancer, and the remaining 29/83 (35%), a diagnosis of vaginal cancer. Following FDG-PET/CT, the physician's prognostic impression changed in 51% of cases. A change in patient management, defined as a change to/from a non-interventional strategy (observation or additional imaging), to/from an interventional strategy (biopsy or treatment), was documented in 36% of studies. The electronic records demonstrated that 95% of the management strategies recorded in the physician questionnaires were implemented as planned. MRI and/or CT were performed within one month of the FDG-PET/CT in 20/83 (24%) and 28/83 (34%) cases, respectively. FDG-PET/CT detected nodes suspicious for metastases on 29/83 (35%) studies performed. MRI and CT detected positive nodes on 6 and 11 studies respectively. Distant metastases were identified in 10 cases imaged with FDG-PET and 5 cases that had additional conventional CT imaging. All suspicious lesions seen on CT were positively identified on PET/CT. In 4 cases, an abnormality identified on PET/CT, was not seen on diagnostic CT. FDG-PET/CT may play an important role in the management of vulvar and vaginal carcinoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Safety and Efficacy of 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT for Diagnosis, Staging, and Treatment Management of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Deppen, Stephen A.; Liu, Eric; Blume, Jeffrey D.; Clanton, Jeffrey; Shi, Chanjuan; Jones-Jackson, Laurie B.; Lakhani, Vipul; Baum, Richard P.; Berlin, Jordan; Smith, Gary T.; Graham, Michael; Sandler, Martin P.; Delbeke, Dominique; Walker, Ronald C.

    2017-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate safety and efficacy of 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT compared with 111In-pentetreotide imaging for diagnosis, staging, and restaging of pulmonary and gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Methods 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT and 111In-pentetreotide scans were obtained for 78 of 97 consecutively enrolled patients with known or suspected pulmonary or gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Safety and toxicity were measured by comparing vital signs, serum chemistry values, or acquisition-related medical complications before and after 68Ga-DOTATATE injection. Added value was determined by changes in treatment plan when 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT results were added to all prior imaging, including 111In-pentetreotide. Interobserver reproducibility of 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT scan interpretation was measured between blinded and nonblinded interpreters. Results 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT and 111In-pentetreotide scans were significantly different in impact on treatment (P < 0.001). 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT combined with CT or liver MRI changed care in 28 of 78 (36%) patients. Interobserver agreement between blinded and nonblinded interpreters was high. No participant had a trial-related event requiring treatment. Mild, transient events were tachycardia in 1, alanine transaminase elevation in 1, and hyperglycemia in 2 participants. No clinically significant arrhythmias occurred. 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT correctly identified 3 patients for peptide-receptor radiotherapy incorrectly classified by 111In-pentetreotide. Conclusion 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT was equivalent or superior to 111In-pentetreotide imaging in all 78 patients. No adverse events requiring treatment were observed. 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT changed treatment in 36% of participants. Given the lack of significant toxicity, lower radiation exposure, and improved accuracy compared with 111In-pentetreotide, 68Ga-DOTATATE imaging should be used instead of 111In-pentetreotide imaging where available. PMID:26769865

  12. Combination of FDG PET/CT and contrast-enhanced MSCT in detecting lymph node metastasis of esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ru; Yao, Shu-Zhan; Huang, Zhao-Qin; Li, Jun; Li, Xin; Tan, Hai-Hua; Liu, Qing-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Lymph node metastasis is believed to be a dependent negative prognostic factor of esophageal cancer. To explore detection methods with high sensitivity and accuracy for metastases to regional and distant lymph nodes in the clinic is of great significance. This study focused on clinical application of FDG PET/CT and contrast-enhanced multiple-slice helical computed tomography (MSCT) in lymph node staging of esophageal cancer. One hundred and fifteen cases were examined with enhanced 64-slice-MSCT scan, and FDG PET/CT imaging was conducted for neck, chest and upper abdomen within one week. The primary lesion, location and numbers of metastatic lymph nodes were observed. Surgery was performed within one week after FDG PET/CT detection. All resected lesions were confirmed histopathologically as the gold standard. Comparative analysis of the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy based on FDG PET/CT and MSCT was conducted. There were 946 lymph node groups resected during surgery from 115 patients, and 221 were confirmed to have metastasis pathologically. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy of FDG PET/CT in detecting lymph node metastasis were 74.7%, 97.2% and 92.0%, while with MSCT they were 64.7%, 96.4%, and 89.0%, respectively. A significance difference was observed in sensitivity (p=0.030), but not the others (p>0.05). The accuracy of FDG PET/CT in detecting regional lymph node with or without metastasis were 91.9%, as compared to 89.4% for MSCT, while FDG PET/CT and MSCT values for detecting distant lymph node with or without metastasis were 94.4% and 94.7%. No significant difference was observed for either regional or distant lymph node metastasis. Additionally, for detecting para-esophageal lymph nodes metastasis, the sensitivity of FDG PET/CT was 72%, compared with 54.7% for MSCT (p=0.029). FDG PET/CT is more sensitive than MSCT in detecting lymph node metastasis, especially for para-esophageal lymph nodes in esophageal cancer cases, although no significant

  13. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin injections for melanoma immunotherapy: potential for a false-positive PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Sogge, Steven M; Fotos, Joseph S; Tulchinsky, Mark

    2015-04-01

    An 82-year-old woman presented for routine follow-up PET/CT after undergoing local melanoma resection in the left lower leg, isolated limb infusion chemotherapy, and immunomodulation therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. Symmetric, bilateral, moderately intense FDG avid axillary and inguinal cutaneous nodules were observed that were new from the prior PET-CT. The patient had developed skin lesions at the BCG injection sites several months before the study. The case raises awareness to PET/CT appearance of local inflammatory response to BCG injection, which could be mistaken by an unaware reader for recurrent melanoma.

  14. (18)F-FDG PET/CT Optimizes Treatment in Staphylococcus Aureus Bacteremia and Is Associated with Reduced Mortality.

    PubMed

    Berrevoets, Marvin A H; Kouijzer, Ilse J E; Aarntzen, Erik H J G; Janssen, Marcel J R; De Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Wertheim, Heiman F L; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Oever, Jaap Ten; Oyen, Wim J G; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P

    2017-09-01

    Metastatic infection is an important complication of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). Early diagnosis of metastatic infection is crucial, because specific treatment is required. However, metastatic infection can be asymptomatic and difficult to detect. In this study, we investigated the role of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in patients with SAB for detection of metastatic infection and its consequences for treatment and outcome. Methods: All patients with SAB at Radboud University Medical Center were included between January 2013 and April 2016. Clinical data and results of (18)F-FDG PET/CT and other imaging techniques, including echocardiography, were collected. Primary outcomes were newly diagnosed metastatic infection by (18)F-FDG PET/CT, subsequent treatment modifications, and patient outcome. Results: A total of 184 patients were included, and (18)F-FDG PET/CT was performed in 105 patients, of whom 99 had a high-risk bacteremia. (18)F-FDG PET/CT detected metastatic infectious foci in 73.7% of these high-risk patients. In 71.2% of patients with metastatic infection, no signs and symptoms suggesting metastatic complications were present before (18)F-FDG PET/CT was performed. (18)F-FDG PET/CT led to a total of 104 treatment modifications in 74 patients. Three-month mortality was higher in high-risk bacteremia patients without (18)F-FDG PET/CT performed than in those in whom (18)F-FDG PET/CT was performed (32.7% vs. 12.4%, P = 0.003). In multivariate analysis, (18)F-FDG PET/CT was the only factor independently associated with reduced mortality (P = 0.005; odds ratio, 0.204; 95% confidence interval, 0.066-0.624). A higher comorbidity score was independently associated with increased mortality (P = 0.003; odds ratio, 1.254; 95% confidence interval, 1.078-1.457). Conclusion:(18)F-FDG PET/CT is a valuable technique for early detection of metastatic infectious foci, often leading to treatment modification. Performing (18)F-FDG PET/CT is associated with significantly reduced

  15. FLT-PET/CT as a Biomarker of Therapeutic Response in Pemetrexed Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    1 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0197 TITLE: FLT- PET / CT as a Biomarker of Therapeutic Response in Pemetrexed Therapy for Non...NUMBER LC130313 FLT- PET / CT as a Biomarker of Therapeutic Response in Pemetrexed Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1...data for 1st restaging 14-17 0% 9-11 Subtask 2: Calculate tumor FLT avidity from FLT- PET / CT scans. Performed on available UPENN clinical

  16. 68Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 PET/CT for Integrin Imaging in Patients with Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kun; Liang, Naixin; Zhang, Jingjing; Lang, Lixin; Zhang, Wei; Li, Shanqing; Zhao, Jun; Niu, Gang; Li, Fang; Zhu, Zhaohui; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to assess the diagnostic value of (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 (NOTA-PRGD2 is NOTA-PEG4-E[c(RGDfK)]2) PET/CT in lung cancer. Ninety-one patients (48 men and 43 women; age, 22-82 y) with suspected lung lesions on CT were enrolled with informed consent. Immediately after intravenous injection of 117.7 ± 37.7 MBq of (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2, 15 patients underwent dynamic whole-body PET/CT scans for 1-2 h, and the remaining 76 patients underwent whole-body PET/CT scans at 30 ± 10 min after bolus injection. Each patient also underwent standard (18)F-FDG PET/CT for comparison. No side effect was found after (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 injection. (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 was rapidly cleared from the blood pool and primarily excreted through the urinary system. The standardized uptake values of proven malignancies were significantly higher than those of the benign ones. With an average standardized uptake value of greater than 1.3 being considered malignant, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 PET/CT in diagnosing lung cancer were 83.8% (57/68), 91.3% (21/23), and 85.7% (78/91), respectively. The diagnostic value of (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 for lung cancer is comparable to that of (18)F-FDG PET/CT. However, (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 PET/CT is more specific than (18)F-FDG PET/CT in assessing lymph node metastasis, with positive and negative predictive values of 90.0% (27/30) and 93.8% (121/129), respectively, whereas those of (18)F-FDG PET/CT were 30.2% (29/96) and 90.5% (57/63), respectively. This study indicates the efficacy of (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 PET/CT in lung cancer diagnosis. (68)Ga-NOTA-PRGD2 PET/CT shows significant advantage over (18)F-FDG PET/CT in judging metastatic lymph nodes with higher specificity. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  17. Calcified metastases from ovarian carcinoma highlighted by F-18 FDG PET/CT: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Hu, Si-Long; Zhou, Zheng-Rong; Zhang, Ying-Jian

    2012-08-01

    Two cases of postoperative female patients with ovarian serous papillary carcinoma were referred for F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) PET/CT to evaluate suspicious recurrence and/or metastasis. One patient presented with multiple extensive calcified lesions with increased FDG uptake in the abdominopelvic cavity and the series of PET/CT scans showed progression of disease after chemotherapy. The other patient presented with three calcified masses with intensive uptake of FDG located in the left pelvis, the right subphrenic region, and the right supradiaphragmatic area, respectively. These suggest that F-18 FDG PET/CT can be useful in identifying malignant calcification and assessing therapeutic response of calcified malignancy.

  18. Corticosteroid Responsive Sarcoidosis with Multisystemic Involvement Years after Initial Diagnosis: A Lymphoma Mimicker on 18-FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Turker; Savas, Recep; Kocacelebi, Kenan; Ucan, Eyup Sabri

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic multisystemic inflammatory disease characterized by noncaseating epithelioid cell granulomas. 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computer tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is increasingly used in routine clinical practice to assess active sarcoidosis because it can detect active inflammatory granulomatous disease. However, active sarcoidosis lesions are observed to be hypermetabolic on FDG-PET/CT much like malignancies, which may lead to misinterpretation on imaging. In this case report, we present a rare case of sarcoidosis with multisystem involvement including lung, lymph nodes, bone, pleura, and soft tissue that mimicked lymphoma on FDG-PET/CT and responded to corticosteroid treatment. PMID:26312138

  19. Atypical mycobacteriosis caused by Mycobacterium haemophilum in an immunocompromised patient: diagnosis by (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Münster, Silvia; Zustin, Jozef; Derlin, Thorsten

    2013-04-01

    We report a rare case of atypical mycobacteriosis diagnosed by F-FDG PET/CT. A 28-year-old man with a history of kidney transplantation presented with fever, painful nodular skin lesions, and elevated inflammatory markers. FDG PET/CT demonstrated multiple subcutaneous, cutaneous, and osseous areas of increased tracer uptake. Histopathologic and microbiological evaluation revealed disseminated infection with Mycobacterium haemophilum. FDG PET/CT is a valuable tool for early and correct diagnosis of occult sources of infection in immunocompromised patients.

  20. A Rare Case of Omentum Invasive Prostate Cancer: Staging With PSMA PET/CT Imaging and Response to Systemic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ladwa, Rahul; Gustafson, Sonja; McCaffrey, Elizabeth; Miles, Kenneth; O'Byrne, Kenneth

    2017-02-24

    The omentum is a rare metastatic site for prostatic adenocarcinoma. We present a case of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer, with progressive omentum invasive prostate cancer identified on prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT scan. Omental biopsy revealed metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma, and cabazitaxel chemotherapy was instituted with a prostate-specific antigen biochemical response. Repeat PSMA PET/CT imaging revealed increased avidity in omental metastasis. Despite prostate-specific antigen response, PSMA PET/CT did not correlate with a therapeutic response.

  1. The role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in pediatric lymph-node acute lymphoblastic leukemia involvement.

    PubMed

    Cistaro, Angelina; Saglio, Francesco; Asaftei, Sebastian; Fania, Piercarlo; Berger, Massimo; Fagioli, Franca

    2011-01-01

    In pediatric oncology, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is emerging as an essential diagnostic tool in characterizing suspicious neoplastic lesions and staging malignant diseases. Most studies regarding the possible role of FDG-PET/CT in the management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients are limited to adults. Here we report a pediatric patient with recurrent ALL, in which FDG-PET/CT was used both to define more precisely the cause of lymphadenopathy and to assess the effect of the second-line therapy.

  2. Lymphoma and tuberculosis: temporal evolution of dual pathology on sequential 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Sharma, Punit; Karunanithi, Sellam; Dhull, Varun Singh; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-08-01

    Tuberculosis can often be seen in patients undergoing chemotherapy for lymphoma, especially in endemic countries. As both tuberculosis and lymphoma can lead to hypermetabolic lesions of F-FDG PET/CT, a diagnostic dilemma often ensues. We present the sequential F-FDG PET/CT images of a 22-year-old female patient with Hodgkin lymphoma who developed tuberculosis and later relapse of lymphoma. These images present the temporal evaluation of the dual pathology on F-FDG PET/CT.

  3. Isotope independent determination of PET/CT modulation transfer functions from phantom measurements on spheres.

    PubMed

    Prenosil, George A; Klaeser, Bernd; Hentschel, Michael; Fürstner, Markus; Berndt, Michael; Krause, Thomas; Weitzel, Thilo

    2016-10-01

    A PET/CT system's imaging capabilities are best described by its point spread function (PSF) in the spatial domain or equivalently by its modulation transfer function (MTF) in the spatial frequency domain. Knowing PSFs or MTFs is a prerequisite for many numerical methods attempting to improve resolution and to reduce the partial volume effect. In PET/CT, the observed PSF is a convolution of the system's intrinsic imaging capabilities including image reconstruction (PSF0) and the positron range function (PRF) of the imaged β(+) emitting isotope. A PRF describes the non-Gaussian distribution of β(+) annihilation events around a hypothetical point source. The main aim was to introduce a new method for determining a PET/CT system's intrinsic MTF (MTF0) from phantom measurements of hot spheres independently of the β(+) emitting isotope used for image acquisition. Secondary aim was to examine non-Gaussian and nonlinear MTFs of a modern iterative reconstruction algorithm. PET/CT images of seven phantom spheres with volumes ranging from 0.25 to 16 ml and filled either with (18)F or with (68)Ga were acquired and reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP). MTFs were modeled with linear splines. The spline fit iteratively minimized the mean squared error between the acquired PET/CT image and a convolution of the thereof derived PSF with a numerical representation of the imaged hot phantom sphere. For determining MTF0, the numerical sphere representations were convolved with a PRF, simulating a fill with either (18)F or (68)Ga. The MTFs determined by this so-called MTF fit method were compared with MTFs derived from point source measurements and also compared with MTFs derived with a previously published PSF fit method. The MTF fit method was additionally applied to images reconstructed by a vendor iterative algorithm with PSF recovery (Siemens TrueX). The MTF fit method was able to determine (18)F and (68)Ga dependent MTFs and MTF0 from FBP reconstructed images

  4. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT Detects the Location and Extent of Primary Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fendler, Wolfgang P; Schmidt, Dorothea F; Wenter, Vera; Thierfelder, Kolja M; Zach, Christian; Stief, Christian; Bartenstein, Peter; Kirchner, Thomas; Gildehaus, Franz J; Gratzke, Christian; Faber, Claudius

    2016-11-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of PET/CT with (68)Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC-a (68)Ga-conjugated ligand of human prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-to localize cancer in the prostate and surrounding tissue at initial diagnosis. Twenty-one patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer underwent (68)Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC ((68)Ga-PSMA) PET/CT at a median of 4 d (range, 0-47 d) before radical prostatectomy. Based on a 6-segment model, the Gleason score and proportion of tumor tissue within each segment (segmental tumor burden, or STB) as determined by histopathology (STBHP) were correlated with SUVmax and STB as determined by different SUV cutoffs for (68)Ga-PSMA PET (STBPET1-6). Furthermore, the involvement of seminal vesicles and other extracapsular extension were assessed by histopathology and PET/CT. Histopathology-positive segments (n = 100 of 126; 79%) demonstrated a significantly higher mean ± SD SUVmax (11.8 ± 7.6) than histopathology-negative segments (4.9 ± 2.9; P < 0.001). Receiver-operating-characteristic analysis revealed an optimal SUVmax cutoff of 6.5 for discrimination of histopathology-positive segments from histopathology-negative segments (area under the curve, 0.84; P < 0.001), which gave 67% sensitivity, 92% specificity, a 97% positive predictive value, a 42% negative predictive value, and 72% accuracy. STBPET3 as determined by (2 × blood SUV) + (2 × SD) correlated best with STBHP (Pearson ρ = 0.68; P < 0.001; mean difference ± SD, 19% ± 15%). PET/CT correctly detected invasion of seminal vesicles (n = 11 of 21 patients; 52%) with 86% accuracy and tumor spread through the capsule (n = 12; 57%) with 71% accuracy. (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT accurately detected the location and extent of primary prostate cancer. Our preliminary findings warrant further investigation of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT in conjunction with needle biopsy. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  5. Incidental diagnosis of tumor thrombosis on FDG PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Erhamamci, S; Reyhan, M; Nursal, G N; Torun, N; Yapar, A F

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data are presented on patients with tumor thrombosis (TT) incidentally detected on FDG PET/CT imaging, as well as determining its prevalence and metabolic characteristics. Out of 12,500 consecutive PET/CT examinations of patients with malignancy, the PET/CT images of 15 patients with TT as an incidental finding were retrospectively investigated. A visual and semiquantitative analyses was performed on the PET/CT scans. An evaluation was made of the pattern of FDG uptake in the involved vessel as linear or focal via visual analyses. For the semiquantitative analyses, the metabolic activity was measured using SUVmax by drawing the region of interest at the site of the thrombosis and tumor (if any). The prevalence of occult TT was 0.12%. A total of 15 patients had various malignancies including renal (1 patient), liver (4), pancreas (2), stomach (1), colon (1), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (1), leiomyosarcoma (1), endometrial (1), ovarian (1), malign melanoma (1) and parotid (1). Nineteen vessels with TT were identified in 15 patients; three patients had more than one vessel. Various vessels were affected; the most common was the inferior vena cava (n=7) followed by the portal (n=5), renal (n=3), splenic (n=1), jugular (n=1), common iliac (n=1) and ovarian vein (n=1). The FDG uptake pattern was linear in 12 and focal in 3 patients. The mean SUVmax values in the TT and primary tumors were 8.40±4.56 and 13.77±6.80, respectively. Occult TT from various malignancies and locations was found incidentally in 0.12% of patients. Interesting cases with malign melanoma and parotid carcinoma and with TT in ovarian vein were first described by FDG PET/CT. Based on the linear FDG uptake pattern and high SUVmax value, PET/CT may accurately detect occult TT, help with the assessment of treatment response, contribute to correct tumor staging, and provide additional information on the survival rates of oncology patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All

  6. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for Imaging of Chemokine Receptor 4 Expression in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lapa, Constantin; Lückerath, Katharina; Kleinlein, Irene; Monoranu, Camelia Maria; Linsenmann, Thomas; Kessler, Almuth F; Rudelius, Martina; Kropf, Saskia; Buck, Andreas K; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Löhr, Mario; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) has been reported to be overexpressed in glioblastoma (GBM) and to be associated with poor survival. This study investigated the feasibility of non-invasive CXCR4-directed imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using the radiolabelled chemokine receptor ligand (68)Ga-Pentixafor. 15 patients with clinical suspicion on primary or recurrent glioblastoma (13 primary, 2 recurrent tumors) underwent (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for assessment of CXCR4 expression prior to surgery. O-(2-(18)F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ((18)F-FET) PET/CT images were available in 11/15 cases and were compared visually and semi-quantitatively (SUVmax, SUVmean). Tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated for both PET probes. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT results were also compared to histological CXCR4 expression on neuronavigated surgical samples. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT was visually positive in 13/15 cases with SUVmean and SUVmax of 3.0±1.5 and 3.9±2.0 respectively. Respective values for (18)F-FET were 4.4±2.0 (SUVmean) and 5.3±2.3 (SUVmax). TBR for SUVmean and SUVmax were higher for (68)Ga-Pentixafor than for (18)F-FET (SUVmean 154.0±90.7 vs. 4.1±1.3; SUVmax 70.3±44.0 and 3.8±1.2, p<0.01), respectively. Histological analysis confirmed CXCR4 expression in tumor areas with high (68)Ga-Pentixafor uptake; regions of the same tumor without apparent (68)Ga-Pentixafor uptake showed no or low receptor expression. In this pilot study, (68)Ga-Pentixafor retention has been observed in the vast majority of glioblastoma lesions and served as readout for non-invasive determination of CXCR4 expression. Given the paramount importance of the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis in tumor biology, (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT might prove a useful tool for sensitive, non-invasive in-vivo quantification of CXCR4 as well as selection of patients who might benefit from CXCR4-directed therapy.

  7. ACR-SPR-STR Practice Parameter for the Performance of Cardiac Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Imaging.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Rathan M; Janowitz, Warren R; Johnson, Geoffrey B; Lodge, Martin A; Parisi, Marguerite T; Ferguson, Mark R; Hellinger, Jeffrey C; Gladish, Gregory W; Gupta, Narainder K

    2017-09-15

    This clinical practice parameter has been developed collaboratively by the American College of Radiology (ACR), the Society for Pediatric Radiology (SPR), and the Society of Thoracic Radiology (STR). This document is intended to act as a guide for physicians performing and interpreting positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) of cardiac diseases in adults and children. The primary value of cardiac PET/CT imaging include evaluation of perfusion, function, viability, inflammation, anatomy, and risk stratification for cardiac-related events such as myocardial infarction and death. Optimum utility of cardiac PET/CT is achieved when images are interpreted in conjunction with clinical information and laboratory data. Measurement of myocardial blood flow, coronary flow reserve and detection of balanced ischemia are significant advantages of cardiac PET perfusion studies. Increasingly cardiac PET/CT is used in diagnosis and treatment response assessment for cardiac sarcoidosis.

  8. Clinical experience with WBC-PET/CT in ADPKD patients with suspected cyst infection: A prospective case series.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsuk; Oh, Yun Kyu; Park, Hayne Cho; Park, Seokwoo; Lee, Soojin; Lee, Ho-Young; Hwang, Young-Hwan; Ahn, Curie

    2017-05-31

    Cyst infection (CI) is a common problem in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Localization is of great importance in CI. We describe the clinical experience with [18F] FDG-labeled white-blood cell (WBC) PET/CT in detecting CI in ADPKD. 19 ADPKD patients (M:F = 7:12) suspected of having CI were enrolled in this prospective study. All underwent WBC-PET/CT and MRI or CT. The degree of their WBC accumulation was evaluated from the maximal standardized uptake value of cystic wall. CI was diagnosed in 14 cases [definite (n = 6), probable (n = 1), or possible (n = 7); kidney (n=11), or liver (n=3)]. There was no difference in fever or laboratory findings (White blood cell count, C-reactive protein, culture results, and eGFR). The blood culture was positive only in a subset of CI patients (n=4). Cyst fluid culture yielded bacterial growth in 80% of aspirates. WBC-PET/CT detected 64% of CI cases, whereas conventional imaging, 50%. WBC-PET/CT showed false-positive results in 2 of 5 cases with no CI. The reasons for false negatives with WBC-PET/CT were poor host immune reaction, low virulence, or prior antibiotic therapy. Hemorrhagic cysts were the most common cause of false positivity in WBC-PET/CT. However, WBC-PET/CT detected CI in 3 cases, in which the conventional imaging failed to find CI. Clinical information may play little role in the diagnosis of CI. WBC-PET/CT can be used to detect CI with better sensitivity in ADPKD patients, circumventing the exposure to contrast media. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in acute complicated pyelonephritis-results from an observational study.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chih-Hsing; Tseng, Jing-Ren; Lee, Ming-Hsun; Yang, Lan-Yan; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2017-09-26

    Acute complicated pyelonephritis (ACP) is an upper urinary tract infection associated with coexisting urinary tract abnormalities or medical conditions that could predispose to serious outcomes or treatment failures. Although CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are frequently used in patients with ACP, the clinical value of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) has not been systematically investigated. This single-center retrospective study was designed to evaluate the potential usefulness of FDG PET/CT in patients with ACP. Thirty-one adult patients with ACP who underwent FDG PET/CT were examined. FDG PET/CT imaging characteristics, including tracer uptake patterns, kidney volumes, and extrarenal imaging findings, were reviewed in combination with clinical data and conventional imaging results. Of the 31 patients, 19 (61%) showed focal FDG uptake. The remaining 12 study participants showed a diffuse FDG uptake pattern. After volumetric approximation, the affected kidneys were found to be significantly enlarged. Patients who showed a focal uptake pattern had a higher frequency of abscess formation requiring drainage. ACP patients showing diffuse tracer uptake patterns had a more benign clinical course. Seven patients had suspected extrarenal coinfections, and FDG PET/CT successfully confirmed the clinical suspicion in five cases. FDG PET/CT was as sensitive as CT in identifying the six patients (19%) who developed abscesses. Notably, FDG PET/CT findings caused a modification to the initial antibiotic regimen in nine patients (29%). FDG PET/CT may be clinically useful in the assessment of patients with ACP who have a progressive disease course.

  10. SU-E-J-222: Evaluation of Deformable Registration of PET/CT Images for Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Y; Turian, J; Templeton, A; Kiel, K; Chu, J; Kadir, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: PET/CT provides important functional information for radiotherapy targeting of cervical cancer. However, repeated PET/CT procedures for external beam and subsequent brachytherapy expose patients to additional radiation and are not cost effective. Our goal is to investigate the possibility of propagating PET-active volumes for brachytherapy procedures through deformable image registration (DIR) of earlier PET/CT and ultimately to minimize the number of PET/CT image sessions required. Methods: Nine cervical cancer patients each received their brachytherapy preplanning PET/CT at the end of EBRT with a Syed template in place. The planning PET/CT was acquired on the day of brachytherapy treatment with the actual applicator (Syed or Tandem and Ring) and rigidly registered. The PET/CT images were then deformably registered creating a third (deformed) image set for target prediction. Regions of interest with standardized uptake values (SUV) greater than 65% of maximum SUV were contoured as target volumes in all three sets of PET images. The predictive value of the registered images was evaluated by comparing the preplanning and deformed PET volumes with the planning PET volume using Dice's coefficient (DC) and center-of-mass (COM) displacement. Results: The average DCs were 0.12±0.14 and 0.19±0.16 for rigid and deformable predicted target volumes, respectively. The average COM displacements were 1.9±0.9 cm and 1.7±0.7 cm for rigid and deformable registration, respectively. The DCs were improved by deformable registration, however, both were lower than published data for DIR in other modalities and clinical sites. Anatomical changes caused by different brachytherapy applicators could have posed a challenge to the DIR algorithm. The physiological change from interstitial needle placement may also contribute to lower DC. Conclusion: The clinical use of DIR in PET/CT for cervical cancer brachytherapy appears to be limited by applicator choice and requires further

  11. Clinical outcomes of IMRT planned with or without PET/CT simulation for patients with pharyngeal cancers.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Nakamatsu, Kiyoshi; Kanamori, Shuichi; Ishikawa, Kazuki; Tachibana, Izumi; Hosono, Makoto; Shibata, Toru

    2017-02-01

    Clinical results of computed tomography (CT) simulations and [(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT simulations were compared retrospectively. Between 2006 and 2011, [(18)F]-FDG PET/CT simulation was performed on 68 consecutive patients with pharyngeal cancers (PET/CT group). As an historical control, conventional CT simulation was performed on 56 consecutive patients with pharyngeal cancer between 2000 and 2006 (CT group). In the PET/CT group, the primary sites were nasopharynx (NPC), oropharynx (OPC), and hypopharynx (HPC) in 35, 20, and 13 patients, respectively; in the CT group, the primary sites were NPC, OPC, and HPC in 21, 17, and 18 patients, respectively. All but five patients in the PET/CT group were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In the PET/CT group, TNM and clinical stages changed in 11 (16 %) and eight (12 %) patients, respectively. Although the 5-year overall survival (OS) rates for the PET/CT and the CT groups were 80 and 64 %, respectively (p = 0.0420), this result may be attributable to the background difference between the two groups. Similarly, the 5-year locoregional control rates of the two groups were 82 and 70 %, respectively (p = 0.0501). Notably, marginal recurrences around the planning target volume (PTV) were only noted in four CT group patients. PET/CT simulation was useful for delineating an accurate clinical target volume (CTV) of pharyngeal cancer, and its clinical results were satisfactory.

  12. Primary Cutaneous Angiosarcoma Mimicking Metastasis on 18F-FDG PET/CT in Woman With Cervix Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Pil

    2017-09-01

    Primary cutaneous angiosarcoma is a rare vascular tumor usually affecting the whole body, and its hypermetabolic features on F-FDG PET/CT may be confused with those of infection, metastasis, or primary malignancy. This is a case report of a cutaneous angiosarcoma of the lower anterior abdomen showing increased FDG uptake on F-FDG PET/CT mimicking a cutaneous metastasis in an 84-year-old woman with cervical cancer.

  13. Diagnostic Value of 68Ga PSMA-11 PET/CT Imaging of Brain Tumors-Preliminary Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Pillai, M R A; Nanabala, Raviteja; Anees K, Muhammed; Jayaprakash, P G; Madhavan, Jayaprakash; Nair, Suresh

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using Ga PSMA-11 PET/CT for imaging brain lesions and its comparison with F-FDG. Ten patients with brain lesions were included in the study. Five patients were treated cases of glioblastoma with suspected recurrence. F-FDG and Ga PSMA-11 brain scans were done for these patients. Five patients were sent for assessing the nature (primary lesion/metastasis) of space occupying lesion in brain. They underwent whole body F-FDG PET/CT scan and a primary site elsewhere in the body was ruled out. Subsequently they underwent Ga PSMA-11 brain PET/CT imaging. Target to background ratios (TBR) for the brain lesions were calculated using contralateral cerebellar uptake as background. In five treated cases of glioblastoma with suspected recurrence the findings of Ga PSMA-11 PET/CT showed good correlation with that of F-FDG PET/CT scan. Compared to the F-FDG, Ga PSMA-11 PET/CT showed better visualization of the recurrent lesion (presence/absence) owing to its significantly high TBR. Among the five cases evaluated for lesion characterization glioma and atypical meningioma patients showed higher SUVmax in the lesion with Ga PSMA-11 than with F-FDG and converse in cases of lymphoma. TBR was better with Ga PSMA PET/CT in all cases. Ga PSMA-11 PET/CT brain imaging is a potentially useful imaging tool in the evaluation of brain lesions. Absence of physiological uptake of Ga PSMA-11 in the normal brain parenchyma results in high TBR values and consequently better visualization of metabolically active disease in brain.

  14. PSMA-PET/CT-Positive Paget Disease in a Patient with Newly Diagnosed Prostate Cancer: Imaging and Bone Biopsy Findings

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Marieta; Zöphel, Klaus; Novotny, Vladimir; Laniado, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A 67-year-old man diagnosed with Gleason score 4 + 5 = 9 clinically localized prostate cancer with 68Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted ligand positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PSMA-PET/CT) positive Paget bone disease is described. Immunohistochemical staining revealed weak PSMA positivity of the bone lesion supporting the hypothesis that neovasculature might explain positive PSMA-PET/CT findings in Paget disease. PMID:28396816

  15. Diagnostic value of FDG-PET/(CT) in children with fever of unknown origin and unexplained fever during immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Blokhuis, Gijsbert J; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P; Diender, Marije G; Oyen, Wim J G; Draaisma, Jos M Th; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee

    2014-10-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) and unexplained fever during immune suppression in children are challenging medical problems. The aim of this study is to investigate the diagnostic value of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and FDG-PET combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in children with FUO and in children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. All FDG-PET/(CT) scans performed in the Radboud university medical center for the evaluation of FUO or unexplained fever during immune suppression in the last 10 years were reviewed. Results were compared with the final clinical diagnosis. FDG-PET/(CT) scans were performed in 31 children with FUO. A final diagnosis was established in 16 cases (52 %). Of the total number of scans, 32 % were clinically helpful. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT in these patients was 80 % and 78 %, respectively. FDG-PET/(CT) scans were performed in 12 children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. A final diagnosis was established in nine patients (75 %). Of the total number of these scans, 58 % were clinically helpful. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT in children with unexplained fever during immune suppression was 78 % and 67 %, respectively. FDG-PET/CT appears a valuable imaging technique in the evaluation of children with FUO and in the diagnostic process of children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. Prospective studies of FDG-PET/CT as part of a structured diagnostic protocol are warranted to assess the additional diagnostic value.

  16. [(18)F-FDG PET/CT in the evaluation of patients suspected of paraneoplastic neurological syndrome].

    PubMed

    García Vicente, A M; Vega Caicedo, C H; Mondéjar Solís, R; de Ayala Fernández, J Á; Garrido Robles, J A; Pena Pardo, F J; Muñoz Pasadas, M; Del Saz Saucedo, P; Jiménez Londoño, G A; León Martín, A; Soriano Castrejón, Á

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the diagnostic impact of (18)F-FDG PET/CT based on the clinical features of paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS). Multicenter retrospective and longitudinal study of patients with suspicion of PNS. The clinical picture was classified into classic (CS) and non-classic syndrome (NCS). After the follow-up, the definitive or possible diagnosis of PNS was established. The pictures that did not match any of the previous criteria were categorized as non-classifiable. The state of the onco-neural antibodies was studied. The PET/CT was classified as positive or negative for the detection of malignancy. The relationship between PET/CT findings and the final diagnosis was determined. The differences between variables (Pearson test X(2)) and the relationship between the results of the PET/CT and the final diagnosis were analyzed. A total of 64 patients were analyzed, classifying 30% as CS and 42% as NCS. After the follow-up, 20% and 16% of subjects were diagnosed as possible and definitive PNS, respectively. Positive onco-neural antibodies were found in 13% of the patients. A definitive diagnosis of PNS was associated with a positive PET/CT (P=.08). A significant relation between antibodies expression and final diagnosis of neoplasia (P=.04) was demonstrated. The PET/CT correctly localized malignancy in 5/7 cases of invasive cancer. The PET/CT showed a higher percentage of positive results in patients with definitive diagnosis of PNS. Despite the low prevalence of malignancy in our series, the PET/CT detected malignancy in a significant proportion of patients with invasive cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  17. 18F-Fluoride PET/CT allows detection of hyperostosis and osseous involvement in meningioma: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, Ukihide; Tateishi, Kensuke; Shizukuishi, Kazuya; Shishikura, Ayako; Murata, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Tomio; Kawahara, Nobutaka

    2013-03-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the diagnostic performance of (18)F-fluoride PET/CT in evaluating hyperostosis and osseous involvement in patients with meningioma. Thirty-four patients with meningioma (mean age, 61 years) underwent (18)F-fluoride PET/CT before surgery. In 24 patients (71%), (18)F-FDG PET/CT was also given before surgery, and the results were compared. The images were reviewed by 2 board-certified nuclear medicine specialists who were unaware of any clinical information and a consensus was reached. Uptake patterns and measurements of tracers were compared with pathological findings from resected specimens, with hyperostosis and osseous involvement as the reference standard. There were 27 grade I tumors (79%) and 7 grade II tumors (21%). The primary tumor focus was identified in each patient using both (18)`F-fluoride PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/CT, but there were no significant correlations in the degree of uptake between the 2 tracers. The SUV(max), SUV(max) corrected for lean body mass (SUL(max)), and tumor metabolic volume (TMV) for (18)F-fluoride and (18)F-FDG were greater in grade II tumors than in grade I tumors. Hyperostosis and osseous involvement was identified in 12 tumors (38%). The SUV(max), SUL(max), and TMV of tumors visualized with (18)F-fluoride PET/CT were greater in tumors with hyperostosis and osseous involvement than in those without (P = 0.005, P = 0.003, and P = 0.006, respectively). In contrast, the SUV(max), SUL(max), and TMV of tumors visualized with (18)F-FDG PET/CT were similar regardless of hyperostosis or osseous involvement. (18)F-fluoride PET/CT may improve detection of hyperostosis and osseous involvement in patients with meningioma.

  18. PSMA-PET/CT-Positive Paget Disease in a Patient with Newly Diagnosed Prostate Cancer: Imaging and Bone Biopsy Findings.

    PubMed

    Froehner, Michael; Toma, Marieta; Zöphel, Klaus; Novotny, Vladimir; Laniado, Michael; Wirth, Manfred P

    2017-01-01

    A 67-year-old man diagnosed with Gleason score 4 + 5 = 9 clinically localized prostate cancer with (68)Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted ligand positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PSMA-PET/CT) positive Paget bone disease is described. Immunohistochemical staining revealed weak PSMA positivity of the bone lesion supporting the hypothesis that neovasculature might explain positive PSMA-PET/CT findings in Paget disease.

  19. PET/CT Improves the Definition of Complete Response and Allows to Detect Otherwise Unidentifiable Skeletal Progression in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Zamagni, Elena; Nanni, Cristina; Mancuso, Katia; Tacchetti, Paola; Pezzi, Annalisa; Pantani, Lucia; Zannetti, Beatrice; Rambaldi, Ilaria; Brioli, Annamaria; Rocchi, Serena; Terragna, Carolina; Martello, Marina; Marzocchi, Giulia; Borsi, Enrica; Rizzello, Ilaria; Fanti, Stefano; Cavo, Michele

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in 282 symptomatic multiple myeloma patients treated up-front between 2002 and 2012. All patients were studied by PET/CT at baseline, during posttreatment follow-up, and at the time of relapse. Their median duration of follow-up was 67 months. Forty-two percent of the patients at diagnosis had >3 focal lesions, and in 50% SUVmax was >4.2; extramedullary disease was present in 5%. On multivariate analysis, ISS stage 3, SUVmax >4.2, and failure to achieve best complete response (CR) were the leading factors independently associated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). These 3 variables were used to construct a prognostic scoring system based on the number of risk factors. After treatment, PET/CT negativity (PET-neg) was observed in 70% of patients, whereas conventionally defined CR was achieved in 53%. Attainment of PET-neg favorably influenced PFS and OS. PET-neg was an independent predictor of prolonged PFS and OS for patients with conventionally defined CR. Sixty-three percent of patients experienced relapse or progression; in 12%, skeletal progression was exclusively detected by systematic PET/CT performed during follow-up. A multivariate analysis revealed that persistence of SUVmax >4.2 following first-line treatment was independently associated with exclusive PET/CT progression. PET/CT combined with ISS stage and achievement or not of CR on first-line therapy sorted patients into different prognostic groups. PET/CT led to a more careful evaluation of CR. Finally, in patients with persistent high glucose metabolism after first-line treatment, PET/CT can be recommended during follow-up, to screen for otherwise unidentifiable progression. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. PET-CT for staging and early response: results from the Response-Adapted Therapy in Advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma study.

    PubMed

    Barrington, Sally F; Kirkwood, Amy A; Franceschetto, Antonella; Fulham, Michael J; Roberts, Thomas H; Almquist, Helén; Brun, Eva; Hjorthaug, Karin; Viney, Zaid N; Pike, Lucy C; Federico, Massimo; Luminari, Stefano; Radford, John; Trotman, Judith; Fosså, Alexander; Berkahn, Leanne; Molin, Daniel; D'Amore, Francesco; Sinclair, Donald A; Smith, Paul; O'Doherty, Michael J; Stevens, Lindsey; Johnson, Peter W

    2016-03-24

    International guidelines recommend that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) should replace CT in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). The aims of this study were to compare PET-CT with CT for staging and measure agreement between expert and local readers, using a 5-point scale (Deauville criteria), to adapt treatment in a clinical trial: Response-Adapted Therapy in Advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma (RATHL). Patients were staged using clinical assessment, CT, and bone marrow biopsy (RATHL stage). PET-CT was performed at baseline (PET0) and after 2 chemotherapy cycles (PET2) in a response-adapted design. PET-CT was reported centrally by experts at 5 national core laboratories. Local readers optionally scored PET2 scans. The RATHL and PET-CT stages were compared. Agreement among experts and between expert and local readers was measured. RATHL and PET0 stage were concordant in 938 (80%) patients. PET-CT upstaged 159 (14%) and downstaged 74 (6%) patients. Upstaging by extranodal disease in bone marrow (92), lung (11), or multiple sites (12) on PET-CT accounted for most discrepancies. Follow-up of discrepant findings confirmed the PET characterization of lesions in the vast majority. Five patients were upstaged by marrow biopsy and 7 by contrast-enhanced CT in the bowel and/or liver or spleen. PET2 agreement among experts (140 scans) with a κ (95% confidence interval) of 0.84 (0.76-0.91) was very good and between experts and local readers (300 scans) at 0.77 (0.68-0.86) was good. These results confirm PET-CT as the modern standard for staging HL and that response assessment using Deauville criteria is robust, enabling translation of RATHL results into clinical practice.

  1. Dosimetry of patients submitted to cerebral PET/CT for the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; Mourão, Arnaldo Prata; de Oliveira, Paulo Márcio Campos; Bernardes, Felipe Dias; Mamede, Marcelo; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the effective radiation dose in patients submitted to PET/CT for the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. TLD-100 detectors inserted into an Alderson Rando® anthropomorphic phantom were utilized to measure the absorbed dose coming from the CT imaging modality. The anthropomorphic phantoms (male and female adult versions) were submitted to the same technical protocols for patients' images acquisition. The absorbed dose resulting from the radiopharmaceutical injection was estimated by means of the model proposed by the ICRP publication 106. The effective dose in patients submitted to this diagnostic technique was approximately (5.34 ± 1.99) mSv. Optimized protocols for calculation of radioactive activity injected into patients submitted to this diagnostic technique might contribute to reduce the effective radiation dose resulting from PET/CT in the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment.

  2. Ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging center

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; de Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos; Mamede, Marcelo; Silveira, Mariana de Castro; Aguiar, Polyanna; Real, Raphaela Vila; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the level of ambient radiation in a PET/CT center. Materials and Methods Previously selected and calibrated TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters were utilized to measure room radiation levels. During 32 days, the detectors were placed in several strategically selected points inside the PET/CT center and in adjacent buildings. After the exposure period the dosimeters were collected and processed to determine the radiation level. Results In none of the points selected for measurements the values exceeded the radiation dose threshold for controlled area (5 mSv/year) or free area (0.5 mSv/year) as recommended by the Brazilian regulations. Conclusion In the present study the authors demonstrated that the whole shielding system is appropriate and, consequently, the workers are exposed to doses below the threshold established by Brazilian standards, provided the radiation protection standards are followed. PMID:25798004

  3. Dosimetry of patients submitted to cerebral PET/CT for the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; Mourão, Arnaldo Prata; de Oliveira, Paulo Márcio Campos; Bernardes, Felipe Dias; Mamede, Marcelo; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Objective The present study was aimed at evaluating the effective radiation dose in patients submitted to PET/CT for the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. Materials and Methods TLD-100 detectors inserted into an Alderson Rando® anthropomorphic phantom were utilized to measure the absorbed dose coming from the CT imaging modality. The anthropomorphic phantoms (male and female adult versions) were submitted to the same technical protocols for patients’ images acquisition. The absorbed dose resulting from the radiopharmaceutical injection was estimated by means of the model proposed by the ICRP publication 106. Results The effective dose in patients submitted to this diagnostic technique was approximately (5.34 ± 1.99) mSv. Conclusion Optimized protocols for calculation of radioactive activity injected into patients submitted to this diagnostic technique might contribute to reduce the effective radiation dose resulting from PET/CT in the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. PMID:25741117

  4. Automatic anatomy recognition in whole-body PET/CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K. Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Torigian, Drew A.; Zhao, Liming

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become a standard method of imaging patients with various disease conditions, especially cancer. Body-wide accurate quantification of disease burden in PET/CT images is important for characterizing lesions, staging disease, prognosticating patient outcome, planning treatment, and evaluating disease response to therapeutic interventions. However, body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT is a critical first step for accurately and automatically quantifying disease body-wide, body-region-wise, and organwise. This latter process, however, has remained a challenge due to the lower quality of the anatomic information portrayed in the CT component of this imaging modality and the paucity of anatomic details in the PET component. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the adaptation of a recently developed automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) methodology [Udupa et al., “Body-wide hierarchical fuzzy modeling, recognition, and delineation of anatomy in medical images,” Med. Image Anal. 18, 752–771 (2014)] to PET/CT images. Their goal was to test what level of object localization accuracy can be achieved on PET/CT compared to that achieved on diagnostic CT images. Methods: The authors advance the AAR approach in this work in three fronts: (i) from body-region-wise treatment in the work of Udupa et al. to whole body; (ii) from the use of image intensity in optimal object recognition in the work of Udupa et al. to intensity plus object-specific texture properties, and (iii) from the intramodality model-building-recognition strategy to the intermodality approach. The whole-body approach allows consideration of relationships among objects in different body regions, which was previously not possible. Consideration of object texture allows generalizing the previous optimal threshold-based fuzzy model recognition method from intensity images to any derived fuzzy membership image, and in the process

  5. A computational framework for cancer response assessment based on oncological PET-CT scans.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, Frederic; Escalera, Sergio; Domenech, Anna; Carrio, Ignasi

    2014-12-01

    In this work we present a comprehensive computational framework to help in the clinical assessment of cancer response from a pair of time consecutive oncological PET-CT scans. In this scenario, the design and implementation of a supervised machine learning system to predict and quantify cancer progression or response conditions by introducing a novel feature set that models the underlying clinical context is described. Performance results in 100 clinical cases (corresponding to 200 whole body PET-CT scans) in comparing expert-based visual analysis and classifier decision making show up to 70% accuracy within a completely automatic pipeline and 90% accuracy when providing the system with expert-guided PET tumor segmentation masks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Utility of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in Poorly Differentiated Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Demirkol, Mehmet Onur; Kiremit, Murat Can; Acar, Omer; Ucar, Burcu; Saglican, Yesim

    2017-05-01

    We aimed to emphasize how useful PSMA PET/CT findings can be while trying to restage prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy in the presence of low prostate-specific antigen values. A 64-year-old man with pT3b N1 M0 Gleason 7 adenocarcinoma of the prostate presented 5 years postoperatively with a palpable axillary mass, whereas his prostate-specific antigen was 0.08 ng/mL. Conventional imaging studies and histopathologic findings of the axillary mass biopsy revealed inconclusive results. Ga-PSMA PET/CT demonstrated PSMA-positive metastatic lesions, the largest one being located in the right axilla. This finding confirmed metastatic poorly differentiated prostate cancer, and androgen deprivation therapy was initiated.

  7. Applications of PET/CT in Pediatric Patients with Fever of Unknown Origin.

    PubMed

    Houseni, Mohamed; Chamroonrat, Wichana; Servaes, Sabah; Alavi, Abass; Zhuang, Hongming

    2008-10-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) is a challenging problem. In children, FUO is critical, as it may hide a life threatening disease. One of the main difficulties in managing patients with FUO is the absence of a universal diagnostic approach. There are many impending causes for FUO. Most cases are attributable to atypical presentations of common diseases. The key to establishing the diagnosis is through comprehensive clinical data and targeted investigations. Despite all efforts, the underlying cause remains undiagnosed in many cases. PET/CT is a powerful modality that has been proven to be useful in many common causes that could emerge as FUO. This article reviews the utility of PET/CT imaging in children with FUO. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 18F-DOPA PET/CT Physiological Distribution and Pitfalls: Experience in 215 Patients.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando F; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Jaffrain-Rea, Marielise L; Zinzi, Maddalena; Sannino, Pasqualina; Minniti, Giuseppe; Rubello, Domenico; Schillaci, Orazio

    2016-10-01

    F-DOPA PET/CT is potentially helpful in the management of patients with low-grade brain tumors, movement disorders, and somatic neuroendocrine tumors. We describe the whole-body physiological distribution of F-DOPA uptake. We examined 215 patients with F-DOPA PET/CT. Among these, 161 had brain scans and 54 had whole-body scans. Physiological distribution was negligible in the brain, with the exception of basal ganglia, whereas greatest activity was noted in the liver, pancreas, other exocrine glands, and the urinary system. Incidental tracer uptake sites were identified in 5.5% of patients. Some of these findings were due to inflammation, whereas in most cases, uptake was seen in benign tumors of the brain or in the endocrine or exocrine glands. F-DOPA uptake may be seen in inflammatory tissue or benign tumors. Correlations with history, physical examination, laboratory examination, CT, MRI, and histology are necessary for optimal diagnosis.

  9. Uterine leiomyosarcoma metastatic to thyroid shown by (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Gauthé, M; Testart Dardel, N; Nascimento, C; Trassard, M; Banal, A; Alberini, J-L

    About one third of focal thyroid uptakes in a fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) study are malignant, the most frequent histological type being papillary carcinoma. Metastases to the thyroid account for approximately 7.5% of thyroid malignancies and come mainly from kidney, lung, head and neck, and breast cancers. We report the case of a 64-year-old woman presenting a fast growing thyroid nodule whose primitive or metastatic origin was not obvious, for which (18)F-FDG PET/CT helped in the diagnostic process and in the later management of the patient. Histopathologic findings finally revealed a metastasis of uterine leiomyosarcoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  10. 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT of Synchronous Meningioma and Prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Ranade, Rohit; Hazarika, Suman

    2016-03-01

    Ga DOTATATE PET/CT in noninvasive characterization of synchronous pituitary neoplasm and meningioma in a 38-year-old man is illustrated. The patient presented with an MRI-detected lobulated enhancing sellar-suprasellar mass with erosion of bony sella measuring 4.5 × 3.5 × 3.4 cm (with differential diagnosis with germ cell tumor) and a right parafalcine mass (2.7 × 2.6 cm) suggesting meningioma. Ga DOTATATE PET/CT demonstrated intense uptake in both lesions, suggesting the sellar mass to be pituitary macroadenoma. The finding of high serum prolactin and normal LH, FSH, cortisol, and testosterone levels suggested diagnosis of prolactinoma, and the patient was started on cabergoline.

  11. Multiple values of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in idiopathic inflammatory myopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Zhou, Yunshan; Wang, Qian

    2017-08-22

    This study aimed to investigate the multiple values of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in detecting malignant tumors, evaluating myopathy, and determining interstitial lung disease in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM). We retrospectively analyzed the data of 38 patients who were examined by (18)F-FDG PET/CT and eventually diagnosed as IIM. We also collected the data of another 22 cases with negative PET/CT as the control. Pulmonary HRCT images were acquired simultaneously with regular (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging for each patient. Image analysis included the presence of malignant lesions, muscular FDG uptake, and interstitial lung disease and its imaging features. IIM was classified into polymyositis (PM), classic dermatomyositis (CDM), and clinical amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM). All suspected malignant lesions were confirmed by histopathological examination. Interstitial lung disease was diagnosed by HRCT. Rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (RP-ILD) was determined according to clinical follow-ups. The significance of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of malignancy, observation of activity of myopathy, and determination of interstitial lung disease in IIM patients was explored based on the final clinical diagnosis. In the 38 patients with IIM, 3 cases were classified as PM, 18 as CDM, and 17 as CADM. PET/CT correctly detected 7 cases (18.4%) of malignant tumors, and all of which were found in CDM and PM patients. The muscular FDG uptake in IIM patients was higher than the control population, and it was higher in patients with myopathy (including PM and CDM) than in patients with CADM. The muscular FDG uptake in IIM patients was correlated with elevated serum creatine kinase level (r = 0.332, P = 0.042) and impaired muscle strength (r = -0.605, P < 0.001). Interstitial lung disease was detected by HRCT in 30 patients (78.9%), and 7 of them were eventually confirmed as RP-ILD, according to the clinical outcome. The FDG uptake in lung lesions of

  12. (18)F-FDG PET/CT findings in a case with HIV (-) Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, E; Poyraz, N Y; Keskin, M; Kandemir, Z; Turkolmez, S

    2014-01-01

    Although mucocutaneous sites are the most frequently encountered sites of involvement, Kaposi Sarcoma (KS) may also occasionally involve the breast and the skeletal, endocrine, urinary and nervous systems.. Various imaging modalities may be used to delineate the extent of the disease by detecting unexpected sites of involvement. Herein, we report a case of classical type KS, in whom staging with (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging disclosed widespread disease and unexpected findings of bone and salivary gland involvement.

  13. Thyroid Incidentalomas on (18)F-FDG PET/CT: Clinical Significance and Controversies.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; Ciarallo, Anthony

    2017-10-03

    The purpose of the current study is to examine the incidence and clinical significance of unexpected focal uptake of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the thyroid gland of oncology patients, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of benign and malignant thyroid incidentalomas in these patients, and review the literature. Seven thousand two hundred fifty-two (18)F-FDG PET/CT studies performed over four years, were retrospectively reviewed. Studies with incidental focal (18)F-FDG uptake in the thyroid gland were further analyzed. Incidental focal thyroid (18)F-FDG uptake was identified in 157 of 7252 patients (2.2%). Sufficient follow-up data (≥12 months) were available in 128 patients, of whom 57 (45%) had a biopsy performed and 71 had clinical follow-up. Malignancy was diagnosed in 14 of 128 patients (10.9%). There was a statistically significant difference between the median SUVmax of benign thyroid incidentalomas (SUVmax 4.8) vs malignant (SUVmax 6.3), but the wide range of overlap between the two groups yielded no clinically useful SUVmax threshold value to determine malignancy. (18)F-FDG positive focal thyroid incidentalomas occurred in 2.2% of oncologic PET/CT scans, and were malignant in 10.9% of 128 patients. This is the lowest reported malignancy rate in a North American study to date, and significantly lower than the average malignancy rate (35%) reported in the literature. Invasive biopsy of all (18)F-FDG positive thyroid incidentalomas, as recommended by some studies, is unwarranted and further research to determine optimal management is needed. There was no clinically useful SUVmax cut-off value to determine malignancy and PET/CT may not be a useful imaging modality to follow these patients conservatively.

  14. Subcutaneous Lobular Capillary Hemangioma on 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Jochumsen, Mads Ryø; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Høyer, Søren; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    2017-04-01

    We present a case of a subcutaneous process in the abdominal wall with high prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) activity on Ga-PSMA PET/CT. Histology demonstrated a benign lobular capillary hemangioma with a high vascular density, with highly PSMA-positive endothelial cells. It is well known that PSMA is expressed in different tissue, including neovasculature in various malignant tumors, and the knowledge is rapidly evolving as new discoveries appear.

  15. Incidentally Detected Agenesis of Dorsal Pancreas on PET/CT: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kabnurkar, Rasika; Rokade, M L; Bandekar, Kalashree; Kamat, Nikhil

    2017-01-01

    Agenesis of Dorsal Pancreas (ADP) is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by the absence of body and tail of pancreas. We report a case of incidentally detected ADP on Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography (CECT) component of Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG PET/CT) in a treated case of carcinoma (Ca) tongue with suspected local recurrence. Dependent Intestine Sign, hallmark of ADP on CECT imaging was noted in our patient. PMID:28242982

  16. Pathophysiologic correlates of 82Rb biodistribution in cardiac PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tracy Lynnette Yarbrough; Voicu, Corina; Merrill, Jennifer; Bengel, Frank M

    2011-03-01

    PET perfusion imaging with (82)Rb is a powerful tool for evaluating coronary artery disease (CAD). Little is known about normal patterns or significance of (82)Rb lung distribution in the setting of heart disease. Herein, PET/CT hybrid imaging was used to obtain insights into the frequency and potential radiomorphologic correlates of altered (82)Rb distribution. Myocardial perfusion PET/CT studies of 58 patients referred for workup of CAD were analyzed [28 normal and 30 patients with low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)]. Organ regions of interest were placed on PET images, and (82)Rb uptake was measured and compared under resting and stress conditions. Qualitatively increased lung uptake was observed in 13 patients-5 with normal LVEF(R) and 8 with reduced LVEF(R); 12 of 13 had lung infiltrates/atelectasis on CT. Lung to heart ratios in the normal and low EF groups were (mean ± SD) 0.168 ± 0.047 and 0.171 ± 0.075 at rest, and 0.128 ± 0.035 and 0.147 ± 0.067 during stress (p = 0.87 and 0.18, respectively). Lung to liver ratios were not significantly different between the two groups under stress or rest conditions. Increased lung uptake of (82)Rb occurs in a subset of patients referred for workup of CAD by PET/CT and may be influenced by primary parenchymal abnormalities and LV dysfunction. Thus, the relevance of pulmonary (82)Rb uptake as a marker of cardiac outcome may be limited. Larger studies are needed to determine how non-cardiac (82)Rb uptake and CT findings may be integrated to increase the diagnostic and prognostic value of cardiac PET/CT.

  17. FDG PET/CT in infection and inflammation--current and emerging clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, S; Patel, C N; Scarsbrook, A F; Chowdhury, F U

    2015-07-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with the glucose analogue, 2-[(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG), is an evolving hybrid imaging technique in the evaluation of an important and diverse group of pathological conditions, which are characterised by infection and aseptic inflammation. With a rapidly expanding body of evidence, it is being increasingly recognised that, in addition to its established role in oncological imaging, FDG PET/CT also has clinical utility in suspected infection and inflammation. The technique can identify the source of infection or inflammation in a timely fashion ahead of morphological changes on conventional anatomical imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), map the extent and severity of disease, identify sites for tissue sampling, and assess therapy response. FDG PET/CT exhibits distinct advantages over traditional radionuclide imaging techniques in terms of shorter duration of examination, higher spatial resolution, non-invasive nature of acquisition, ability to perform quantitative analyses, and the provision of a synergistic combination of functional and anatomical imaging. With the use of illustrative clinico-radiological cases, this article discusses the current and emerging evidence for the use of FDG PET/CT in a broad spectrum of disorders, such as fever of unknown origin, sarcoidosis, large vessel vasculitis, musculoskeletal infections, joint prosthesis or implant-related complications, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related infections, and miscellaneous indications, such as IgG4-related systemic disease. It will also briefly summarise the role of more novel tracers such as FDG-labelled leukocytes and gallium-68 PET tracers in this arena. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the clinical management of patients with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, P; Martín, A; Díaz, L; Cabrero, M; García, R; García-Talavera, P; Caballero, D

    The aim of this work was to review the current recommendations for staging and response assessment of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in routine clinical practice after chemotherapy and/or stem cell transplantation. A five-point scale (5-PS) from the First International Workshop on PET in Lymphoma in Deauville, France, in 2009, was recommended as the standard tool to score imaging to assess treatment response in patients with lymphoma using (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT. Following the recommendations of the 11th and 12th International Conferences on Malignant Lymphoma held in Lugano (Switzerland), in 2011 and 2013, respectively, a consensus (the so-called Lugano Classification) was reached regarding the use of PET/CT for staging and response assessment in FDG-avid lymphomas. As a result, (18)F-FDG PET/CT was formally incorporated into standard staging for FDG-avid lymphomas. A bone marrow biopsy is no longer indicated for the routine staging of HL and most diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. PET/CT will be used to assess response in FDG-avid histologies using the 5-point scale. The recent introduction of biological agents with immune mechanisms requires flexibility in interpretations of the Lugano criteria due to tumour flare or a pseudo-progression effect produced by these agents. Provisional criteria have been proposed (Lymphoma Response to Immunomodulatory Therapy Criteria) with the introduction of the term 'Indeterminate Response' in order to identify this phenomenon until confirmed as flare/pseudoprogression or true progression. All these recommendations will improve evaluations of patients with lymphoma, and allow comparison of results from clinical practice and trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E

    2012-01-21

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  20. 18-FDG PET/CT assessment of basal cell carcinoma with vismodegib.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Curtis A; Weiss, Glen J; Tibes, Raoul; Blaydorn, Lisa; Downhour, Molly; White, Erica; Baldwin, Jason; Hoff, Daniel D; Korn, Ronald L

    2012-10-01

    The use of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT) in subjects with advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has not been fully explored due to the rarity of disease presentation. This study evaluated PET/CTs from subjects with advanced BCC participating in a phase I dose-escalation clinical trial of vismodegib. Fourteen subjects with BCC were imaged with 18-FDG PET/CT for lesion identification and response categorizing (European Organisation for Research and Treatment for Cancer [EORTC] and PET response criteria in solid tumors [PERCIST] 1.0). Several parameters including metabolic activity of target lesions, site of disease presentation and spread, treatment response, and prognostic significance of metabolic activity following therapy were evaluated. All subjects exhibited at least one hypermetabolic lesion. Most subjects had only four organ systems involved at study enrollment: skin-muscle (93%), lung (57%), lymph nodes (29%), and bone (21%). SUVmax measured across all lesions decreased (median 33%, SD ± 45%) following therapy with metabolic activity normalizing or disappearing in 42% of lesions. No significant difference was observed between EORTC and PERCIST 1.0. Subjects that demonstrated at least a 33% reduction in SUVmax from baseline had a significantly longer progression-free survival (PFS) (median 17 months, 95% confidence interval [CI] ±4 months vs. 9 months, 95% CI ±5 months, P = 0.038) and overall survival (OS) (median 24 months, 95% CI ±4 months vs. 17 months, 95% CI ±13 months, P = 0.019). BCC lesions are hypermetabolic on 18-FDG PET/CT. A decrease in SUVmax was associated with improved PFS and OS. These results further support the incorporation of 18-FDG PET/CT scans in advanced BCC management.

  1. Ultrasound and PET-CT Correlation in Shoulder Pathology: A 5-Year Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Burke, Christopher J; Walter, William R; Adler, Ronald S; Babb, James S; Sanger, Joseph; Ponzo, Fabio

    2017-10-01

    To correlate shoulder ultrasound and radiography with F-FDG PET-CT to establish FDG uptake and therefore range of metabolic activity, as defined by SUV analysis, in various symptomatic shoulder pathologies. Retrospective database query was performed for shoulder ultrasound and PET-CT scans between January 2012 and January 2017. Patients who had both studies within 1 year were included. Age- and sex-matched control patients with PET-CT scans only were also included. Retrospective image review determined shoulder pathology, and F-FDG SUVmax was measured using regions of interest placed at the glenohumeral joint, rotator cuff/bursa, and bicipital groove. Glenohumeral and acromioclavicular osteoarthrosis was assessed by radiography using the Kellgren-Lawrence classification system. Thirty-three patients had both imaging studies within 1 year. Ten patients (11 cases) were included, ranging in age from 56 to 90 years (mean, 67.9 years). Control subjects were selected among patients receiving PET-CT within 1 week of symptomatic patients. Glenohumeral osteoarthrosis was mild in 3 (27%), moderate in 2 (18%), and severe in 2 (18%). Six full-thickness rotator cuff tears (55%) were identified. SUVmax means were compared between the pathologic and control groups and were significantly higher in the former: glenohumeral joint (1.96 vs 1.32; P = 0.016), rotator cuff/bursa (2.80 vs 2.0; P = 0.005), and bicipital groove (2.19 vs 1.48; P = 0.007). The highest values were seen in full-thickness rotator cuff tear and severe biceps tenosynovitis. Increased metabolic activity about the shoulder is associated with a spectrum of rotator cuff, glenohumeral joint, and other soft tissue pathology that can be correlated with diagnostic ultrasound findings.

  2. Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis: Potential Pitfall on Oncologic 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Broski, Stephen M; Murdoch, Nathan M; Skinner, John A; Wenger, Doris E

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the semiquantitative and qualitative appearance of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) and giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) on 18F-FDG PET/CT. An institutional review board-approved retrospective review was performed for patients diagnosed with GCTTS, focal PVNS, or diffuse PVNS who underwent PET/CT from 2003 to 2013. SUVmax and SUVmax/SUVmean of the liver (SUVr) were determined for each lesion on all available PET/CTs. Relevant conventional imaging and patient records were reviewed. Fourteen patients (mean [SD] age, 52.8 [14.0] years; range, 26-74 years) were identified, 6 with 2 or more PET/CT examinations. The mean (SD) SUVmax and SUVr of all lesions were 8.7 (3.4; range, 4.0-14.5) and 3.9 (1.7; range, 2.0-7.1), respectively. There was no difference of the mean (SD) SUVmax (P = 0.10) or SUVr (P = 0.11) between focal PVNS (6.8 [3.0], 3.3 [1.9]), GCTTS (9.1 [3.0], 4.0 [1.2]), or diffuse PVNS (14.5, 7.1) subtypes. Of 29 comparison PET/CTs in 6 patients, 17 were performed after nontargeted chemotherapy and 12 without antecedent therapy. Significant SUVr fluctuations (>25%) occurred in 11 cases; no correlation existed between SUVr change and presence or absence of chemotherapy. Pigmented villonodular synovitis and GCTTS can be intensely hypermetabolic, mimicking musculoskeletal metastases on 18F-FDG PET/CT. They may have significant SUV fluctuations, both during nontargeted chemotherapy and between treatments. The diagnosis of PVNS/GCTTS should be considered for focal intra-articular or juxta-articular FDG-avid lesions, and MRI is useful in further evaluation given the often diagnostic imaging features with this modality.

  3. Incidental Detection of Femoral Pseudoaneurysm at 18F-FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Nougaret, Stephanie; Ragucci, Monica; Bach, Ariadne M.; Carollo, Gabriella; Mannelli, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    A 72-year-old man with history of lung cancer and melanoma was referred for routine follow-up with 18F-FDG PET/CT. CT images showed a new mass in the right groin associated with mild FDG activity on 18F-FDG PET images. Subsequent ultrasound obtained the same day demonstrated flow within the lesion to be a pseudoaneurysm of the right femoral artery. PMID:26462043

  4. Capillary Hemangioma of Thoracic Spinal Cord: PET/CT and MR Findings.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guohua; Su, Minggang; Zhao, Junyi; Liu, Bin; Kuang, Anren

    2017-02-13

    Capillary hemangiomas are frequently encountered superficially in the cutaneous, subcutaneous, or mucosal tissues during the childhood and early adulthood, but the occurrence of spinal intradural capillary hemangioma is relatively rare. Herein, we report a case with capillary hemangioma of the thoracic spine. MR and PET/CT features of this lesion are presented, and awareness of this entity may help differentiate it from other spinal intradural tumors.

  5. (18)F-FDG PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT findings of pulmonary cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si-Yun; Chen, Gang; Luo, Dong-Lan; Shao, Dan; Liu, En-Tao; Sun, Taotao; Wang, Shu-Xia

    2017-04-01

    Pulmonary cryptococcosis is an uncommon cause of pulmonary nodules in non-AIDS patients. This study reports the (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) findings of 42 patients with pulmonary cryptococcosis. A retrospective review of the (18)F-FDG PET/CT and CE-CT findings of 42 patients with histologically proven pulmonary cryptococcosis was conducted. All patients underwent PET/CT and CE-CT in the same session. The CT diagnosis was based on the location, morphological features, and enhancement of lesions. The PET/CT findings were recorded, and clinical data and surgical and histopathological findings were collected. The results of the PET scans revealed that 37 (88%) of 42 patients showed higher FDG uptake, and 5 (12%) patients demonstrated lower FDG uptake than the mediastinal blood pool. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) of pulmonary cryptococcosis ranged from 1.4 to 13.0 (average: 5.7±3.3, median 4.9). A single nodular pattern was the most prevalent pattern observed and was found in 29 (69%) patients. This pattern was followed by scattered nodular (n=4, 10%), clustered nodular (n=3, 7%), mass-like (n=3, 7%), and bronchopneumonic (n=3, 7%) patterns. The most frequent pattern of immunocompetent patients was the single nodular pattern (29 of 33, 88%). Immunocompromised patients most frequently pattern exhibited mass-like (3 of 9, 33%) and bronchopneumonic (3 of 9, 33%) patterns. Pulmonary cryptococcosis most commonly appears as single nodules in immunocompetent patients. Mass-like and bronchopneumonic patterns were common in immunocompromised patients. In 88% of patients, lung lesions showed high FDG uptake, thus mimicking a possible malignant condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. "Bottle Brush Sign"-Spinal Meningeal Disease on 18F-FDG PET-CT Scan.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Saima; Naz, Fozia; Bashir, Humayun; Niazi, Imran Khalid

    2016-09-01

    A 30-year-old man with a history of stage IV AE diffuse large cell lymphoma of left proximal humerus presented with new onset lower limb weakness at completion of chemotherapy. The F-FDG PET-CT scan showed increased intraspinal uptake from T12 to S1 vertebrae with unique "bottle brush" appearance in keeping with spinal meningeal disease. The leptomeningeal disease was further confirmed on correlative MRI scan.

  7. Rifaximin suppresses background intestinal 18F-FDG uptake on PET/CT scans.

    PubMed

    Franquet, Elisa; Palmer, Mathew R; Gifford, Anne E; Selen, Daryl J; Chen, Yih-Chieh S; Sedora-Roman, Neda; Joyce, Robin M; Kolodny, Gerald M; Moss, Alan C

    2014-10-01

    Identification of cancer or inflammatory bowel disease in the intestinal tract by PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging can be hampered by physiological uptake of F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) in the normal colon. Previous work has localized this F-FDG uptake to the intestinal lumen, predominantly occupied by bacteria. We sought to determine whether pretreatment with an antibiotic could reduce F-FDG uptake in the healthy colon. Thirty patients undergoing restaging PET/CT for nongastrointestinal lymphoma were randomly selected to receive rifaximin 550 mg twice daily for 2 days before their scan (post-rifaximin). Their PET/CT images were compared with those from their prior study (pre-rifaximin). Cecal maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) and overall colonic F-FDG uptake were compared between scans. All PET/CT images were blindly scored by a radiologist. The same comparison of sequential scans was also undertaken in 30 patients who did not receive antibiotics. Thirty post-rifaximin scans were compared with 30 pre-rifaximin scans in the same patients. SUVmax in the cecum was significantly lower in the patient's post-rifaximin scans than in their pre-rifaximin scans (P=0.002). The percentage of scans with greater than grade 1 colonic F-FDG uptake was significantly lower in the post-rifaximin scans than in the pre-rifaximin scans (P<0.05). In contrast, there was no significant difference in the paired sequential scans from control patients, nor a reduction in the percentage of scans with greater than grade 1 colonic F-FDG uptake. This pilot study shows that treatment with rifaximin for 2 days before PET/CT scanning can significantly reduce physiological F-FDG uptake in the normal colonic lumen.

  8. Particle Disease on Fluoride-18 (NaF) PET/CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Jonathan; Foster, Cameron; Shelton, David

    2011-01-01

    Particle disease is a loss of bone that commonly occurs about five years after arthroplasty. The cause is secondary to microabrasive wear and shedding of any portion of the prosthesis, and the microscopic foreign bodies activate inflammation which can lead to pain. This report describes the imaging findings of an 80-year-old female with particle disease detected with 18F-fluoride PET/CT. PMID:22470793

  9. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for PET/CT quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently-available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration CINE CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. Methods We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. Results CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. Conclusion When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging. PMID:22156174

  10. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  11. Motion correction using anatomical information in PET/CT and PET/MR hybrid imaging.

    PubMed

    Fayad, Hadi; Lamare, Frederic; Merlin, Thibaut; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2016-03-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion causes qualitative and quantitative inaccuracies in whole body multi-modality imaging such as positron emission tomography coupled with computed tomography (PET/CT) and positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI). Solutions presented to date include motion synchronized PET and corresponding anatomical acquisitions (four dimensional [4D] PET/CT, 4D PET/MR), frequently referred to as the gating approach. This method is based on the acquisition of an external surrogate using an external device (pressure belt, optical monitoring system, spirometer etc.), subsequently used to bin PET and CT or MR anatomical data into a number of gates. A first limitation of this method is the low signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the resulting motion synchronized PET frames, given that every reconstructed frame contains only part of the count statistics available throughout a motion average PET acquisition. Another limitation is that the complex motion of internal organs cannot be fully estimated, characterized and modelled using a mono-dimensional motion signal. In order to resolve such issues, many advanced techniques have been proposed which include three consecutive major steps. These are based on firstly acquiring an external or internal motion surrogate, estimating or modelling the internal motion using anatomical information extracted from 4D anatomical images (CT and/or MR) and finally correcting for motion either in the PET raw data space, the image space or incorporate it within the PET image reconstruction which is the most optimal based motion correction method in PET/CT and in PET/MR imaging. Current research efforts are concentrating on combining the last two steps within a joint motion estimation/motion correction approach, the exploitation of MRI specific motion characterization sequences and the combination of both respiratory and cardiac motion corrections. The goal of this review is to present and discuss the different

  12. 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT in a rare coexistence of pituitary macroadenoma and multiple paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Parghane, Rahul Vithalrao; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Shukla, Jaya; Bhattacharya, Anish; Mukherjee, Kanchan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The coexistence of a pituitary neoplasm and pheochromocytoma is a rare condition, which may be another undefined variant of Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndrome. Moreover, the coexistence of pituitary macroadenoma and multiple paragangliomas is more uncommon and only few authors have reported these findings. We are reporting the use of Ga DOTATATE PET/CT in a rare case of coexisting pituitary macroadenoma and multiple paragangliomas.

  13. Semiquantitative Assessment of (18)F-FDG Uptake in the Normal Skeleton: Comparison Between PET/CT and Time-of-Flight Simultaneous PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Xu, Guofan; Jamali, Mehran; Holley, Dawn; Barkhodari, Amir; Zaharchuk, Greg; Iagaru, Andrei

    2017-08-04

    Differences in the attenuation correction methods used in PET/CT scanners versus the newly introduced whole-body simultaneous PET/MRI reportedly result in differences in standardized uptake values (SUVs) in the normal skeleton. The aim of the study was to compare the semiquantitative FDG uptake in the normal skeleton using time-of-flight (TOF) PET/MRI versus PET/CT with and without TOF. Participants received a single FDG injection and underwent non-TOF and TOF PET/CT (n = 23) or non-TOF PET/CT and TOF PET/MRI (n = 50). Mean SUV (SUVmean) and maximum SUV (SUVmax) were measured from all PET scans for nine normal regions of the skeleton. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) were used to evaluate the SUVmax and SUVmean of normal skeleton between non-TOF and TOF PET/CT, as well as between non-TOF PET/CT and TOF PET/MRI. In addition, percentage differences in SUVmax and SUVmean of the normal skeleton between non-TOF and TOF PET/CT and between non-TOF PET/CT and TOF PET/MRI were evaluated. The SUVmax and SUVmean in the normal skeleton significantly increased between non-TOF and TOF PET/CT, but they significantly decreased between non-TOF PET/CT and TOF PET/MRI. The SUVmax and SUVmean in normal skeleton showed good correlation between non-TOF PET/CT and TOF PET/MRI (SUVmax, r = 0.88; SUVmean, r = 0.91) and showed a similar trend between non-TOF and TOF PET/CT (SUVmax, r = 0.88; SUVmean, r = 0.94). In the normal skeleton, SUVmax and SUVmean showed high correlations between PET/MRI and PET/CT. The MRI attenuation correction used in TOF PET/MRI provides reliable semiquantitative measurements in the normal skeleton.

  14. Positive and Negative Predictive Value of PET-CT in Skull Base Lesions: Case Series and Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hines, John Peyton; Howard, Brittany E; Hoxworth, Joseph M; Lal, Devyani

    2016-03-01

    Objectives To study positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET-CT) scans in determining malignancy in skull base lesions and perform a systematic literature review for optimal PET-CT interpretation. Design Retrospective case series and systematic literature review of the current English literature. Setting Tertiary referral academic medical center. Participants All patients with skull base lesions that underwent PET-CT and tissue biopsy from 2010 to 2013. Main Outcome Measures PPV and NPV of radiologist's report and standardized uptake value (SUV) cutoff of 2.5 and 3, biopsy with pathologic interpretation, clinical follow-up. Results A total of 31 PET-CT scans of 16 patients were studied; 10 PET-CT were performed upfront for diagnostic purposes and 21 were post-treatment surveillance scans. The PPV of radiologist's interpretation, SUV cutoff of 2.5, and SUV cutoff of 3.0 was 80%, 60%, and 68.4%, with a NPV of 100%, 83.3%, and 75%, respectively. Literature search yielded 500 abstracts; 7 studies met inclusion criteria for detailed review. No consensus or guidelines for optimal SUV cutoff value was found. Conclusions PET-CT based on SUV cutoff criteria alone has high NPV but low PPV in determining malignancy in skull base lesions. Interpretation by a radiologist experienced in nuclear medicine and neuroradiology, synthesizing clinical, SUV, and radiologic data are of superior value.

  15. State of the art imaging of multiple myeloma: comparative review of FDG PET/CT imaging in various clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Mesguich, Charles; Fardanesh, Reza; Tanenbaum, Lawrence; Chari, Ajai; Jagannath, Sundar; Kostakoglu, Lale

    2014-12-01

    18-Flurodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography with computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have higher sensitivity and specificity than whole-body X-ray (WBXR) survey in evaluating disease extent in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Both modalities are now recommended by the Durie-Salmon Plus classification although the emphasis is more on MRI than PET/CT. The presence of extra-medullary disease (EMD) as evaluated by PET/CT imaging, initial SUVmax and number of focal lesions (FL) are deemed to be strong prognostic parameters at staging. MRI remains the most sensitive technique for the detection of diffuse bone marrow involvement in both the pre and post-therapy setting. Compression fractures are best characterized with MRI signal changes, for determining vertebroplasty candidates. While PET/CT allows for earlier and more specific evaluation of therapeutic efficacy compared to MRI, when signal abnormalities persist years after treatment. PET/CT interpretation, however, can be challenging in the vertebral column and pelvis as well as in cases with post-therapy changes. Hence, a reading approach combining the high sensitivity of MRI and superior specificity of FDG PET/CT would be preferred to increase the diagnostic accuracy. In summary, the established management methods in MM, mainly relying on biological tumor parameters should be complemented with functional imaging data, both at staging and restaging for optimal management of MM.

  16. 18F-FDG PET-CT Findings Before and After Laparoscopic Cryoablation of Small Renal Mass: An Initial Report

    PubMed Central

    Sivro, Ferida; van der Zee, Johan A.; Baars, Phillippe C.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of positron emission tomography (PET) molecular imaging combined with low-dose computed tomography (CT) in small renal mass (SRM) treated with cryoablation (CA). Currently, treatment success is defined by the absence of contrast enhancement at CT. However, the use of contrast is relatively contraindicated in patients with renal function impairment, mandating alternative follow-up strategies. Several reasons were identified as criteria for performing PET-CT before and/or after SRM-CA in 9 patients, and the results were retrospectively studied. The histology revealed renal cell carcinoma in 7 patients and oncocytoma in 2 patients. In 6 patients, a PET-CT was performed before and after CA. In one patient, the PET-CT was performed only before CA and in 2 patients only after CA. Before CA, clearly there was metabolic uptake of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) in the SRM in all patients. Following CA, the absence of 18F-FDG uptakes in the SRM could clearly be noticed. However, the tracer cannot always be distinguished from focal recurrence or reactive inflammatory tissue. In one patient, asymptomatic metastatic bone lesions were noticed when performing PET-CT at follow-up. This pilot study with 18F-FDG PET-CT for the follow-up of SRM cryosurgery showed that 18F-FDG PET-CT imaging could be used to characterize cryoablative tissue injury at different times after CA. PMID:28326272

  17. TH-E-202-01: Pitfalls and Remedies in PET/CT Imaging for RT Planning.

    PubMed

    Pan, T

    2016-06-01

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: 1. Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning 2. The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy 3. PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment.

  18. Utility of FDG-PET/CT in follow-up of children treated for Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Melissa M; Delbeke, Dominique; Whitlock, James A; Martin, William; Kuttesch, John F; Frangoul, Haydar A; Shankar, Sadhna

    2006-05-01

    Positron emission tomography using F-flurodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) is considered an excellent tool for staging and monitoring disease status in adults with lymphoma. We retrospectively reviewed results of PET/CT and diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scans performed during follow-up after completion of therapy in 41 children <18 years of age with Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PET/CT scan with uptake greater than that of the liver was considered positive. Uptake that increased over the background but less than in the liver was equivocal. Clinical outcomes were obtained from medical records. Thirteen (32%) had a positive PET/CT scan and an equal number had equivocal scans in a median follow-up of 2.3 years. Diagnostic CT scans revealed new findings in 13 (32%) and persistent abnormalities in 21 (51%) of the children. Five children developed recurrent disease, and one developed a second cancer. No children with equivocal positivity developed recurrent disease. PET/CT scan was 95% sensitive, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 53%. Diagnostic CT was 79% sensitive, with a PPV of 52%. We conclude that a negative PET/CT scan during routine follow-up for lymphoma in children strongly suggests absence of recurrence but a positive PET/CT and diagnostic CT scans have low PPV and should be interpreted with caution in this setting.

  19. Automated cardiac motion compensation in PET/CT for accurate reconstruction of PET myocardial perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Khawar; McGough, Robert J.; Berger, Kevin

    2008-10-01

    Error-free reconstruction of PET data with a registered CT attenuation map is essential for accurate quantification and interpretation of cardiac perfusion. Misalignment of the CT and PET data can produce an erroneous attenuation map that projects lung attenuation parameters onto the heart wall, thereby underestimating the attenuation and creating artifactual areas of hypoperfusion that can be misinterpreted as myocardial ischemia or infarction. The major causes of misregistration between CT and PET images are the respiratory motion, cardiac motion and gross physical motion of the patient. The misalignment artifact problem is overcome with automated cardiac registration software that minimizes the alignment error between the two modalities. Results show that the automated registration process works equally well for any respiratory phase in which the CT scan is acquired. Further evaluation of this procedure on 50 patients demonstrates that the automated registration software consistently aligns the two modalities, eliminating artifactual hypoperfusion in reconstructed PET images due to PET/CT misregistration. With this registration software, only one CT scan is required for PET/CT imaging, which reduces the radiation dose required for CT-based attenuation correction and improves the clinical workflow for PET/CT.

  20. Diagnostic imaging in dermatology: utility of PET-CT in cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, R; Serrano-Falcón, C; Rebollo Aguirre, A C

    2015-01-01

    Malignant melanoma accounts for 5% of all malignant skin tumors and its incidence is increasing. In the natural course of melanoma, tumors grow locally and can spread via the lymph system or the blood. Because survival is directly related to the stage of the disease at diagnosis, early detection (secondary prevention) has an impact on prognosis. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine technique that generates images using molecules labeled with positron-emitting isotopes. The most widely used molecule is fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Because of the elevated glycolytic rate in tumor cells, which results in increased FDG uptake, greater quantities of FDG become trapped in tumor cells, enabling external detection. Today, most PET scanners are multimodal PET-computed tomography (CT) scanners, which provide more detailed information by combining morphological information with functional PET findings. The possible utility of PET-CT in patients with malignant melanoma is a subject of debate. Various questions have been raised: when the scan should be performed, whether PET-CT has advantages over conventional diagnostic methods, and whether PET-CT provides a real benefit to patients. In this review of the literature, we will analyze each of these questions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  1. Metal artifact reduction strategies for improved attenuation correction in hybrid PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Abdoli, Mehrsima; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-06-15

    Metallic implants are known to generate bright and dark streaking artifacts in x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, which in turn propagate to corresponding functional positron emission tomography (PET) images during the CT-based attenuation correction procedure commonly used on hybrid clinical PET/CT scanners. Therefore, visual artifacts and overestimation and/or underestimation of the tracer uptake in regions adjacent to metallic implants are likely to occur and as such, inaccurate quantification of the tracer uptake and potential erroneous clinical interpretation of PET images is expected. Accurate quantification of PET data requires metal artifact reduction (MAR) of the CT images prior to the application of the CT-based attenuation correction procedure. In this review, the origins of metallic artifacts and their impact on clinical PET/CT imaging are discussed. Moreover, a brief overview of proposed MAR methods and their advantages and drawbacks is presented. Although most of the presented MAR methods are mainly developed for diagnostic CT imaging, their potential application in PET/CT imaging is highlighted. The challenges associated with comparative evaluation of these methods in a clinical environment in the absence of a gold standard are also discussed.

  2. Radiation assessment to paediatric with F-18-FDG undergo whole-body PET/CT examination

    SciTech Connect

    Dhalisa, H. Rafidah, Z.; Mohamad, A. S.

    2016-01-22

    This study was carried out on wholebody radiation dose assessment to paediatrics patient who undergo PET/CT scanner at Institut Kanser Negara. Consist of 68 patients with varies of malignancies and epilepsy disease case covering age between 2 years to 12 years old. This is a retrospective study from 2010-2014. The use of PET/CT scanner as an advanced tool has been proven to give an extra radiation dose to the patient. It is because of the radiation exposure from the combination of both CT and PET scans rather than a single CT or PET scan. Furthermore, a study on radiation dose to paediatric patient undergoing PET/CT is rare in Malaysia. So, the aim of this study is to estimate the wholebody effective dose to paediatric patient in Malaysia. Effective dose from PET scan was calculated based on the activity of F18 FDG and dose coefficient reported in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106. Effective dose from CT was determined using k coefficient as reported in ICRP publication 102 and Dose Length Product (DLP) value. The average effective dose from PET and CT were found to be 7.05mSv and 5.77mSv respectively. The mean wholebody effective dose received by a patient with combined PETCT examination was 12.78mSv. These results could be used as reference for dosimetry of a patient undergoing PETCT examination in Malaysia.

  3. Imaging of prostate cancer with PET/CT using 18F-Fluorocholine

    PubMed Central

    Vali, Reza; Loidl, Wolfgang; Pirich, Christian; Langesteger, Werner; Beheshti, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    While 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) Positron-Emission Tomography (PET) has limited value in prostate cancer (PCa), it may be useful for specific subgroups of PCa patients with hormone-resistant poorly differentiated cell types. 18F-Fluorocholine (18F-FCH) PET/CT has been increasingly used in primary and recurrent PCa and has been shown to add valuable information. Although there is a correlation between the foci of activity and the areas of malignancy in the prostate gland, the clinical value of 18F-FCH is still controversial for detection of the malignant focus in the prostate. For the T-staging of PCa at diagnosis the value of 18F-FCH is limited. This is probably due to limited resolution of PET system and positive findings in benign prostate diseases. Conversely, 18F-FCH PET/CT is a promising imaging modality for the delineation of local and distant nodal recurrence and bone metastases and is poised to have an impact on therapy management. In this review, recent studies of 18F-FCH PET/CT in PCa are summarized. PMID:25973332

  4. Intestinal Glycolysis Visualized by FDG PET/CT Correlates With Glucose Decrement After Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Ku, Cheol Ryong; Lee, Narae; Hong, Jae Won; Kwon, In Gyu; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon; Lee, Eun Jig; Yun, Mijin; Cho, Arthur

    2017-02-01

    Gastrectomy method is known to influence glucose homeostasis. (18)F-fluoro-2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images acquired after gastrectomy often reveals newly developed physiological small bowel uptake. We correlated newly developed small bowel FDG uptake and glucose homeostasis in postgastrectomy gastric cancer patients. We retrospectively analyzed 239 patients without diabetes who underwent staging and follow-up FDG PET/CT scanning before and after gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Postoperative small bowel glycolysis was quantified by recording intestinal total lesion glycolysis (TLG). TLG was assessed with regard to surgical method (Billroth I, Billroth II [BII], Roux-en-Y [RY]), fasting glucose decrement (≥10 mg/dL), and other clinical factors. Patients' weight, fasting glucose, cholesterol, TLG, and body fat levels significantly decreased after surgery. The glucose decrement was significantly associated with fasting glucose, surgical methods, total cholesterol, TLG, and total body fat on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis showed that BII surgery (odds ratio 6.51) and TLG (odds ratio 3.17) were significantly correlated with glucose decrement. High small bowel glycolysis (TLG >42.0 g) correlated with glucose decrement in RY patients. Newly developed small bowel glycolysis on postgastrectomy FDG PET/CT scanning is correlated with a glucose decrement. These findings suggest a potential role of FDG PET/CT scanning in the evaluation of small bowel glycolysis and glucose control. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  5. PET/CT adapted therapy in Hodgkin disease: current state of the art and future directions.

    PubMed

    Dann, Eldad J

    2012-10-01

    Current therapy of Hodgkin disease (HD) is based on risk assessment, taking into consideration both staging and risk factors. Interim positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) has proven to distinguish between patients with advanced disease who have early response and good prognosis and those with interim positive response who have inferior progression free survival (PFS) with current therapy. Several issues need to be elucidated: (1) Which interim study should be defined as positive? (2) Should the same cutoff value be used for decision-making about escalation vs de-escalation of therapy? (3) Should it apply to different chemotherapy protocols? Currently, there are several ongoing studies where treatment is modified based on interim PET/CT. These studies may enable the medical community to establish whether bleomycin or radiation therapy could be omitted in early responders, whether chemotherapy could be shortened in these patients, and whether therapy escalation for patients with interim positive PET/CT could decrease disease progression rate.

  6. Feasibility of 18F-sodium fluoride PET/CT for imaging of atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Derlin, Thorsten; Richter, Ulrich; Bannas, Peter; Begemann, Philipp; Buchert, Ralph; Mester, Janos; Klutmann, Susanne

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence, distribution, and topographic relationship of vascular (18)F-sodium fluoride uptake and arterial calcification in major arteries. Image data obtained from 75 patients undergoing whole-body (18)F-sodium fluoride PET/CT were evaluated retrospectively. Arterial radiotracer uptake and calcification were analyzed qualitatively and semiquantitatively. (18)F-sodium fluoride uptake was observed at 254 sites in 57 (76%) of the 75 study patients, and calcification was observed at 1,930 sites in 63 (84%) of the patients. Colocalization of radiotracer accumulation and calcification could be observed in 223 areas of uptake (88%). However, only 12% of all arterial calcification sites showed increased radiotracer uptake. Our data indicate the feasibility of (18)F-sodium fluoride PET/CT for the imaging of mineral deposition in arterial wall alterations. (18)F-sodium fluoride PET/CT may provide relevant information about the morphologic and functional properties of calcified plaque.

  7. Breast cancer therapy: the role of PET-CT in decision making.

    PubMed

    Pons, F; Duch, J; Fuster, D

    2009-04-01

    This paper describes the role of positron emission tomography (PET) and PET-computed tomography (CT) in breast cancer patients. Fluorine-18-Fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) has limited diagnostic value in detecting small noninvasive primary tumors, in staging the axillary region in early stages and in the detection of osteoblastic metastases. Better results have been shown in the detection and staging of primary invasive tumors. Significant clinical data are available in the monitoring of primary chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer where [(18)F]FDG PET-CT allows prediction of the response even shortly after the onset of therapy. Quantitative evaluation of tumor uptake is necessary. Therapy-induced changes in tumor metabolism may be helpful in making decisions about continuation, modification or cessation of therapy. Therefore, [(18)F]FDG PET-CT appears to be a promising tool for the personalization of breast cancer treatment by its early identification of nonresponders. It offers improved patient care, avoiding ineffective chemotherapy and the side effects while reducing the cost. An area generating high expectations for PET-TC in breast cancer is in monitoring in order to tailor therapy to the tumor characteristics of individual patients who may require tracers other than [(18)F]FDG. The introduction of new PET tracers and the development of new instruments will offer opportunities to improve the role of PET-CT in decision making of therapy in these patients.

  8. Design and performance of a respiratory amplitude gating device for PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Guoping; Chang Tingting; Clark, John W. Jr.; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Recently, the authors proposed a free-breathing amplitude gating (FBAG) technique for PET/CT scanners. The implementation of this technique required specialized hardware and software components that were specifically designed to interface with commercial respiratory gating devices to generate the necessary triggers required for the FBAG technique. The objective of this technical note is to introduce an in-house device that integrates all the necessary hardware and software components as well as tracks the patient's respiratory motion to realize amplitude gating on PET/CT scanners. Methods: The in-house device is composed of a piezoelectric transducer coupled to a data-acquisition system in order to monitor the respiratory waveform. A LABVIEW program was designed to control the data-acquisition device and inject triggers into the PET list stream whenever the detected respiratory amplitude crossed a predetermined amplitude range. A timer was also programmed to stop the scan when the accumulated time within the selected amplitude range reached a user-set interval. This device was tested using a volunteer and a phantom study. Results: The results from the volunteer and phantom studies showed that the in-house device can detect similar respiratory signals as commercially available respiratory gating systems and is able to generate the necessary triggers to suppress respiratory motion artifacts. Conclusions: The proposed in-house device can be used to implement the FBAG technique in current PET/CT scanners.

  9. A rib-specific multimodal registration algorithm for fused unfolded rib visualization using PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaftan, Jens N.; Kopaczka, Marcin; Wimmer, Andreas; Platsch, Günther; Declerck, Jérôme

    2014-03-01

    Respiratory motion affects the alignment of PET and CT volumes from PET/CT examinations in a non-rigid manner. This becomes particularly apparent if reviewing fine anatomical structures such as ribs when assessing bone metastases, which frequently occur in many advanced cancers. To make this routine diagnostic task more efficient, a fused unfolded rib visualization for 18F-NaF PET/CT is presented. It allows to review the whole rib cage in a single image. This advanced visualization is enabled by a novel rib-specific registration algorithm that rigidly optimizes the local alignment of each individual rib in both modalities based on a matched filter response function. More specifically, rib centerlines are automatically extracted from CT and subsequently individually aligned to the corresponding bone-specific PET rib uptake pattern. The proposed method has been validated on 20 PET/CT scans acquired at different clinical sites. It has been demonstrated that the presented rib- specific registration method significantly improves the rib alignment without having to run complex deformable registration algorithms. At the same time, it guarantees that rib lesions are not further deformed, which may otherwise affect quantitative measurements such as SUVs. Considering clinically relevant distance thresholds, the centerline portion with good alignment compared to the ground truth improved from 60:6% to 86:7% after registration while approximately 98% can be still considered as acceptably aligned.

  10. Radiation assessment to paediatric with F-18-FDG undergo whole-body PET/CT examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhalisa, H.; Mohamad, A. S.; Rafidah, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out on wholebody radiation dose assessment to paediatrics patient who undergo PET/CT scanner at Institut Kanser Negara. Consist of 68 patients with varies of malignancies and epilepsy disease case covering age between 2 years to 12 years old. This is a retrospective study from 2010-2014. The use of PET/CT scanner as an advanced tool has been proven to give an extra radiation dose to the patient. It is because of the radiation exposure from the combination of both CT and PET scans rather than a single CT or PET scan. Furthermore, a study on radiation dose to paediatric patient undergoing PET/CT is rare in Malaysia. So, the aim of this study is to estimate the wholebody effective dose to paediatric patient in Malaysia. Effective dose from PET scan was calculated based on the activity of F18 FDG and dose coefficient reported in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106. Effective dose from CT was determined using k coefficient as reported in ICRP publication 102 and Dose Length Product (DLP) value. The average effective dose from PET and CT were found to be 7.05mSv and 5.77mSv respectively. The mean wholebody effective dose received by a patient with combined PETCT examination was 12.78mSv. These results could be used as reference for dosimetry of a patient undergoing PETCT examination in Malaysia.

  11. Effective dose estimation for oncological and neurological PET/CT procedures.

    PubMed

    Martí-Climent, Josep M; Prieto, Elena; Morán, Verónica; Sancho, Lidia; Rodríguez-Fraile, Macarena; Arbizu, Javier; García-Velloso, María J; Richter, José A

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the patient effective dose (ED) for different PET/CT procedures performed with a variety of PET radiopharmaceutical compounds. PET/CT studies of 210 patients were reviewed including Torso (n = 123), Whole body (WB) (n = 36), Head and Neck Tumor (HNT) (n = 10), and Brain (n = 41) protocols with (18)FDG (n = 170), (11)C-CHOL (n = 10), (18)FDOPA (n = 10), (11)C-MET (n = 10), and (18)F-florbetapir (n = 10). ED was calculated using conversion factors applied to the radiotracer activity and to the CT dose-length product. Total ED (mean ± SD) for Torso-(11)C-CHOL, Torso-(18)FDG, WB-(18)FDG, and HNT-(18)FDG protocols were 13.5 ± 2.2, 16.5 ± 4.5, 20.0 ± 5.6, and 15.4 ± 2.8 mSv, respectively, where CT represented 77, 62, 69, and 63% of the protocol ED, respectively. For (18)FDG, (18)FDOPA, (11)C-MET, and (18)F-florbetapir brain PET/CT studies, ED values (mean ± SD) were 6.4 ± 0.6, 4.6 ± 0.4, 5.2 ± 0.5, and 9.1 ± 0.4 mSv, respectively, and the corresponding CT contributions were 11, 14, 23, and 26%, respectively. In (18)FDG PET/CT, variations in scan length and arm position produced significant differences in CT ED (p < 0.01). For dual-time-point imaging, the CT ED (mean ± SD) for the delayed scan was 3.8 ± 1.5 mSv. The mean ED for body and brain PET/CT protocols with different radiopharmaceuticals ranged between 4.6 and 20.0 mSv. The major contributor to total ED for body protocols is CT, whereas for brain studies, it is the PET radiopharmaceutical.

  12. A framework based on hidden Markov trees for multimodal PET/CT image co-segmentation.

    PubMed

    Hanzouli-Ben Salah, Houda; Lapuyade-Lahorgue, Jerome; Bert, Julien; Benoit, Didier; Lambin, Philippe; Van Baardwijk, Angela; Monfrini, Emmanuel; Pieczynski, Wojciech; Visvikis, Dimitris; Hatt, Mathieu

    2017-08-24

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of a probabilistic quad-tree graph (hidden Markov tree, HMT) to provide fast computation, robustness and an interpretational framework for multimodality image processing and to evaluate this framework for single gross tumor target (GTV) delineation from both positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) images. We exploited joint statistical dependencies between hidden states to handle the data stack using multi-observation, multi-resolution of HMT and Bayesian inference. This framework was applied to segmentation of lung tumors in PET/CT datasets taking into consideration simultaneously the CT and the PET image information. PET and CT images were considered using either the original voxels intensities, or after wavelet/contourlet enhancement. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), sensitivity (SE), positive predictive value (PPV) were used to assess the performance of the proposed approach on one simulated and 15 clinical PET/CT datasets of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. The surrogate of truth was a statistical consensus (obtained with the Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation algorithm) of three manual delineations performed by experts on fused PET/CT images. The proposed framework was applied to PET-only, CT-only and PET/CT datasets, and were compared to standard and improved fuzzy c-means (FCM) multimodal implementations. A high agreement with the consensus of manual delineations was observed when using both PET and CT images. Contourlet-based HMT led to the best results with a DSC of 0.92 ± 0.11 compared to 0.89 ± 0.13 and 0.90 ± 0.12 for Intensity-based HMT and Wavelet-based HMT, respectively. Considering PET or CT only in the HMT led to much lower accuracy. Standard and improved FCM led to comparatively lower accuracy than HMT, even when considering multimodal implementations. We evaluated the accuracy of the proposed HMT-based framework for PET/CT image

  13. Natural history of atherosclerotic disease progression as assessed by (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Hetterich, Holger; Rominger, Axel; Walter, Lisa; Habs, Maximilian; Volpers, Sarah; Hacker, Marcus; Reiser, Maximilian F; Bartenstein, Peter; Saam, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of cardiovascular risk factors and plaque inflammation on the progression of atherosclerosis as assessed by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging with (18)F-radiolabled fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). This study was designed as a retrospective cohort study. Patients who received a (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan and follow-up scan 9-24 months later without systemic inflammation or steroid medication were eligible for the study. (18)F-FDG PET/CT included a full diagnostic contrast enhanced CT scan. Cardiovascular risk factors and medication were documented. Calcified plaque volume, lumen area and (18)F-FDG uptake, quantified by the target-to-background ratio (TBR), were measured in the carotid arteries, aorta and iliac arteries. Influence of cardiovascular risk factors and vessel wall inflammation on atherosclerotic disease progression was analyzed. Ninety-four patients underwent baseline and follow-up whole body (18)F-FDG PET/CT (mean follow-up time 14.5 ± 3.5 months). Annualized calcified plaque volume increased by 15.4 % (p < 0.0001), carotid and aortic lumen area decreased by 10.5 % (p < 0.0001) and 1.7 % (p = 0.045). There was no significant difference in (18)F-FDG uptake at baseline and follow-up (mean TBR 1.44 ± 0.18 vs. 1.42 ± 0.19, p = 0.18). Multiple linear regression analysis identified hypertension as an independent predictor for total, aortic and iliac calcified plaque volume progression (all p < 0.04). Carotid lumen reduction was predicted by hypercholesterolemia (p = 0.008) while aortic lumen reduction was associated with BMI and mean (18)F-FDG uptake (p ≤ 0.005). Furthermore we observed a dose response relationship between the number of cardiovascular risk factors and calcified plaque volume progression in the aorta (p = 0.03). Findings from this study provide data on the natural history of atherosclerotic disease burden in multiple vascular beds and emphasize the value of

  14. Orbital positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging findings in graves ophthalmopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We aimed to describe orbital positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging findings, both structural and metabolic, in different clinical stages of Graves ophthalmopathy (GO). This prospective, observational, cross-sectional study examined 32 eyes of 16 patients with GO. Methods Patients were assessed with a complete ophthalmological evaluation and assigned a VISA classification for GO. All patients underwent serum thyroid hormone measurement, antibody profile, and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18-FDG PET/CT) of the orbits. The 18-FDG uptake on PET images was expressed in terms of maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax). CT images were analyzed, and orbital structures were measured in millimeters. Vision, inflammation, strabismus, and overall appearance were assessed according to the VISA classification system, thyroid hormone levels, antibody values, 18-FDG uptake, and thickness of orbital structures. Results Altogether, 32 eyes of 16 patients (10 women, 6 men; mean age 44.31 ± 13 years, range 20–71 years) were included. Three patients were hypothyroid, seven were euthyroid, and six were hyperthyroid. CT measurements of extraocular muscle diameter were elevated (P < 0.05), and muscle 18-FDG uptake values were increased. Eyes with a clinical VISA inflammation score of ≤ 4 had an average extraocular muscle SUVmax of 3.09, and those with a score of ≥ 5 had an average SUVmax of 3.92 (P = 0.09), showing no clear correlation between clinically observed inflammation and 18-FDG uptake. 18-FDG uptake values also did not show a correlation with extraocular muscle diameter as measured by CT (R2 = 0.0755, P > 0.05). Conclusions We demonstrated a lack of correlation between 18-FDG extraocular muscle uptake and either clinical inflammation score or muscle diameter. Although 18-FDG uptake has been used as an inflammation marker in other pathologies, inflammation in GO may

  15. 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT imaging of indeterminate pulmonary nodules and lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ronald; Deppen, Stephen; Smith, Gary; Shi, Chanjuan; Lehman, Jonathan; Clanton, Jeff; Moore, Brandon; Burns, Rena; Grogan, Eric L.; Massion, Pierre P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose 18F-FDG PET/CT is widely used to evaluate indeterminate pulmonary nodules (IPNs). False positive results occur, especially from active granulomatous nodules. A PET-based imaging agent with superior specificity to 18F-FDG for IPNs, is badly needed, especially in areas of endemic granulomatous nodules. Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are expressed in many malignant cells including small cell and non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). 68Ga-DOTATATE, a positron emitter labeled somatostatin analog, combined with PET/CT imaging, may improve the diagnosis of IPNs over 18F-FDG by reducing false positives. Our study purpose was to test this hypothesis in our region with high endemic granulomatous IPNs. Methods We prospectively performed 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans in the same 30 patients with newly diagnosed, treatment-naïve lung cancer (N = 14) or IPNs (N = 15) and one metastatic nodule. 68Ga-DOTATATE SUVmax levels at or above 1.5 were considered likely malignant. We analyzed the scan results, correlating with ultimate diagnosis via biopsy or 2-year chest CT follow-up. We also correlated 68Ga-DOTATATE uptake with immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for SSTR subtype 2A (SSTR2A) in pathological specimens. Results We analyzed 31 lesions in 30 individuals, with 14 (45%) being non-neuroendocrine lung cancers and 1 (3%) being metastatic disease. McNemar’s result comparing the two radiopharmaceuticals (p = 0.65) indicates that their accuracy of diagnosis in this indication are equivalent. 68Ga-DOTATATE was more specific (94% compared to 81%) and less sensitive 73% compared to 93%) than 18F-FDG. 68Ga-DOTATATE uptake correlated with SSTR2A expression in tumor stroma determined by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining in 5 of 9 (55%) NSCLCs. Conclusion 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG PET/CT had equivalent accuracy in the diagnosis of non-neuroendocrine lung cancer and 68Ga-DOTATATE was more specific than 18F-FDG for the diagnosis of IPNs. IHC staining for SSTR2A

  16. Impact of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT on surgical management in patients with advanced melanoma: an outcome based analysis.

    PubMed

    Forschner, Andrea; Olthof, Susann-Cathrin; Gückel, Brigitte; Martus, Peter; Vach, Werner; la Fougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Keim, Ulrike; Eigentler, Thomas Kurt; Garbe, Claus; Pfannenberg, Christina

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the influence of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT on clinical decision making and outcome in advanced melanoma patients planned for radical metastasectomy. A cohort of 333 patients with mainly stage III/IV melanoma having a PET/CT for clinical reasons was prospectively enrolled in our oncologic PET/CT registry between 2013 and 2015. Referring physicians completed questionnaires regarding their intended management for each patient before and after PET/CT. Management changes after PET/CT were classified as major and minor changes. A subgroup of 107 patients (stage I, N = 5; stage II, N = 3; stage III, N = 42; stage IV, N = 57) was planned for complete metastasectomy initially, based on conventional imaging. Management changes and outcome were evaluated by linkage with the information obtained from patients' medical records. In 28 of 107 patients (26%), the surgical treatment plan remained unchanged after PET/CT. In 24 patients (22%), minor changes were performed, such as enlargement or reduction of the surgical field. In 55 patients (51%, 95% CI 42%-61%) major changes of the intended treatment plan occurred; of those, 20 patients (19%) were classified to be tumor-free with PET/CT, 32 patients (30%) were found to have multiple previously unrecognized metastases and had to be treated by systemic therapy, three patients (3%) had to be changed to palliative radiotherapy or isolated extremity perfusion. The 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) in patients with complete metastasectomy (N = 52) was 90% and 79%, respectively. Systemically treated patients (N = 32) resulted in 1-year OS of 72% and 2-year OS of 61%. Eleven of 32 patients (34%) with systemic therapy experienced a complete response. Until December 2016, all 20 patients classified as tumor-free by PET/CT were alive. The study confirms the high impact of PET/CT on clinical management in patients with advanced melanoma planned for radical metastasectomy. PET/CT resulted in frequent management

  17. Value of PET/CT and MR Lymphography in Treatment of Prostate Cancer Patients With Lymph Node Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Fortuin, Ansje S.; Deserno, Willem M.L.L.G.; Meijer, Hanneke J.M.; Jager, Gerrit J.; Takahashi, Satoru; Debats, Oscar A.; Reske, Sven N.; Schick, Christian; Krause, Bernd J.; Oort, Inge van; Witjes, Alfred J.; Hoogeveen, Yvonne L.; Lin, Emile N.J.Th. van; Barentsz, Jelle O.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the clinical value of two novel molecular imaging techniques: {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and ferumoxtran-10 enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (magnetic resonance lymphography [MRL]) for lymph node (LN) treatment in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of PET/CT and MRL to assess the number, size, and location of LN metastases in patients with primary or recurrent PCa. Methods and Materials: A total of 29 patients underwent MRL and PET/CT for LN evaluation. The MRL and PET/CT data were analyzed independently. The number, size, and location of the LN metastases were determined. The location was described as within or outside the standard clinical target volume for elective pelvic irradiation as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Subsequently, the results from MRL and PET/CT were compared. Results: Of the 738 LNs visible on MRL, 151 were positive in 23 of 29 patients. Of the 132 LNs visible on PET/CT, 34 were positive in 13 of 29 patients. MRL detected significantly more positive LNs (p < 0.001) in more patients than PET/CT (p = 0.002). The mean diameter of the detected suspicious LNs on MRL was significantly smaller than those detected by PET/CT, 4.9 mm and 8.4 mm, respectively (p < 0.0001). In 14 (61%) of 23 patients, suspicious LNs were found outside the clinical target volume with MRL and in 4 (31%) of 13 patients with PET/CT. Conclusion: In patients with PCa, both molecular imaging techniques, MRL and {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT, can detect LNs suspicious for metastasis, irrespective of the existing size and shape criteria for CT and conventional magnetic resonance imaging. On MRL and PET/CT, 61% and 31% of the suspicious LNs were located outside the conventional clinical target volume. Therefore, these techniques could help to individualize treatment selection and enable image-guided radiotherapy for patients with PCa LN metastases.

  18. The Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the Evaluation of Gastric Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Cayvarlı, Hakan; Bekiş, Recep; Akman, Tülay; Altun, Deniz

    2014-01-01

    Objective: F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) has been widely used for staging, re-staging and for monitoring therapy-induced changes and response to therapy in patients with various types of cancer, but its utilization for gastric cancer has been limited. This study aimed to assess the diagnostic performance of 18F-FDG PET/CT for detecting recurrence in gastric cancer patients with radiologic or clinical suspicion of recurrence and its clinical impact on making decision. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of 130 consecutive patients who underwent PET/CT scans for post-treatment surveillance of gastric cancer between January 2008 and March 2012. The mean time between the initial diagnosis of gastric cancer and PET/CT studies was 44 weeks with a median of 18 weeks. The number and site of positive FDG uptake were analyzed and correlated with the final diagnosis by calculating the diagnostic values. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of PET/CT for detecting the recurrence in terms of whether or not histology had been SRC/musinous adenocarcinoma. The changes in the clinical management of patients were also evaluated according to the results of PET/CT. Results: Of all 130 patients, 91 patients were confirmed to have true recurrence. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and the accuracy of PET/CT for diagnosing true recurrence on a per-person basis were 91.2%, 61.5%, 84.6%, 75.0% and 82.3% respectively. Final diagnoses were confirmed histopathologically in 59 (45.4%) of 130 patients and by clinical and radiological follow-up in the remaining 71 (54.6%) patients. In the subgroup with SRC/mucinous adenocarcinoma differentiation of the primary tumor, there was no statistically significant difference in terms of diagnostic accuracy of PET/CT on a per-person basis. In addition, PET/CT results changed the patients’ management in 20 (15%) cases. Conclusions: 18F

  19. FDG-PET/CT during concomitant chemo radiotherapy for esophageal cancer: Reducing target volumes to deliver higher radiotherapy doses.

    PubMed

    Nkhali, Lamyaa; Thureau, Sébastien; Edet-Sanson, Agathe; Doyeux, Kaya; Benyoucef, Ahmed; Gardin, Isabelle; Michel, Pierre; Vera, Pierre; Dubray, Bernard

    2015-06-01

    A planning study investigated whether reduced target volumes defined on FDG-PET/CT during radiotherapy allow total dose escalation without compromising normal tissue tolerance in patients with esophageal cancer. Ten patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), candidate to curative-intent concomitant chemo-radiotherapy (CRT), had FDG-PET/CT performed in treatment position, before and during (Day 21) radiotherapy (RT). Four planning scenarios were investigated: 1) 50 Gy total dose with target volumes defined on pre-RT FDG-PET/CT; 2) 50 Gy with boost target volume defined on FDG-PET/CT during RT; 3) 66 Gy with target volumes from pre-RT FDG-PET/CT; and 4) 66 Gy with boost target volume from during-RT FDG-PET/CT. The median metabolic target volume decreased from 12.9 cm3 (minimum 3.7-maximum 44.8) to 5.0 cm3 (1.7-13.5) (p=0.01) between pre- and during-RCT FDG-PET/CT. The median PTV66 was smaller on during-RT than on baseline FDG-PET/CT [108 cm3 (62.5-194) vs. 156 cm3 (68.8-251), p=0.02]. When total dose was set to 50 Gy, planning on during-RT FDG-PET/CT was associated with a marginal reduction in normal tissues irradiation. When total dose was increased to 66 Gy, planning on during-RT PET yielded significantly lower doses to the spinal cord [Dmax=44.1Gy (40.8-44.9) vs. 44.7Gy (41.5-45.0), p=0.007] and reduced lung exposure [V20Gy=23.2% (17.3-27) vs. 26.8% (19.7-30.2), p=0.006]. This planning study suggests that adaptive RT based on target volume reduction assessed on FDG-PET/CT during treatment could facilitate dose escalation up to 66 Gy in patients with esophageal SCC.

  20. Role of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the management of marginal zone B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Cruz, Estrella; Marín-Oyaga, Victor A; de la Cruz Vicente, Fátima; Borrego-Dorado, Isabel; Ruiz Mercado, Marta; Acevedo Báñez, Irene; Solé Rodríguez, Maria; Fernández López, Rosa; Pérez Vega, Herminia; Calderón-Cabrera, Cristina; Espigado Tocino, Ildefonso; Pérez-Simón, Jose A; Vázquez-Albertino, Ricardo

    2015-12-01

    The use of PET in patients with marginal zone B cell lymphoma (MZL) is controversial because of variability of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) avidity. We analyzed 40 PET/CT in 25 consecutive patients to compare its performance with CT at staging and as a first-line response assessment. Sensitivity of PET/CT and CT was 96 and 76%. Mean standard uptake value was 6.1, 6.9 and 3.4 (p = 0.3) in nodal, extranodal and splenic subtypes, respectively. Of 17 patients (extranodal: n = 9; nodal: n = 6; splenic subtype: n = 2) with both imaging tests available at diagnosis, 8 (47%) had more involved areas with PET/CT than with CT, 75% of which were extranodal lesions. PET/CT resulted in upstaging of five patients although treatment of only two of them was changed. Responses of 15 patients with post-treatment PET/CT were the following: 9 negative and 6 positive of which 3 were isolated residual lesions. Progression was documented in two of these three patients. Response was also assessed by CT in 11 patients. Discrepancies were found in three: Two were in complete remission by CT while PET/CT detected localized residual disease; another patient was in partial remission by CT, whereas PET/CT showed only one positive lesion. Two of these three patients relapsed. Patients with negative post-treatment PET/CT did not relapse. With a median follow-up of 50 months (10-152 months), 3-year overall survival was 100 and 80% for patients with negative and positive post-treatment PET/CT (p = 0.2). Three-year disease-free survival was 86%; the negative predictive value (NPV) was 100%, and the positive predictive value (PPV) was 83.3%. Although a larger number of patients will be required to further confirm these data, we can conclude that PET/CT is a useful imaging tool for both staging and response assessment in patients with nodal and extranodal MZL as a result of its high sensitivity, NPV and PPV.

  1. Functional imaging in differentiating bronchial masses: an initial experience with a combination of (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Jindal, Tarun; Dutta, Roman; Kumar, Rakesh

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the role of combination of (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan in differentiating bronchial tumors observed in contrast enhanced computed tomography scan of chest. Prospective observational study. Place of study: All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. 7 patients with bronchial mass detected in computed tomography scan of the chest were included in this study. All patients underwent (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan, (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan and fiberoptic bronchoscope guided biopsy followed by definitive surgical excision. The results of functional imaging studies were analyzed and the results are correlated with the final histopathology of the tumor. Histopathological examination of 7 bronchial masses revealed carcinoid tumors (2 typical, 1 atypical), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (1), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (1), hamartoma (1), and synovial cell sarcoma (1). The typical carcinoids had mild (18)F-FDG uptake and high (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. Atypical carcinoid had moderate uptake of (18)F-FDG and high (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor showed high uptake of (18)F-FDG and no uptake of (68)Ga DOTA-TOC. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma showed mild (18)F-FDG uptake and no (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. Hamartoma showed no uptake on either scans. Synovial cell sarcoma showed moderate (18)F-FDG uptake and mild focal (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. This initial experience with the combined use of (18)F-FDG and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan reveals different uptake patterns in various bronchial tumors. Bronchoscopic biopsy will continue to be the gold standard; however, the interesting observations made in this study merits further evaluation of the utility of the combination of (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan in larger number of patients with bronchial masses.

  2. [Is ceCT necessary beyond FDG-PET/CT for primary staging in Hodgkin lymphoma?].

    PubMed

    Kajáry, Kornélia; Molnár, Zsuzsa; Szakáll, Szabolcs; Molnár, Péter; Lengyel, Zsolt

    2014-02-09

    Bevezetés: Nemzetközi tanulmányok igazolták, hogy Hodgkin-lymphoma kezelés előtti stádiummeghatározásában a natív, alacsony dózisú komputertomográfiával (CT) végzett, 18-F-fluorodeoxiglükóz (FDG) alkalmazásával készült pozitronemissziós tomográfia/komputertomográfia (standard PET/CT) pontosabb, mint az intravénás kontrasztanyag adásával végzett, normáldózisú CT-vizsgálat (konvencionális CT). Célkitűzés: A szerzők összehasonlították saját beteganyagukban a fenti indikációban külön-külön a két vizsgálat pontosságát, valamint megvizsgálták, hogy szükséges-e a standard PET/CT mellett konvencionális CT-vizsgálat elvégzése is. Módszer: Huszonnyolc beteg stádiumbesorolását végezték el a konvencionális CT-vizsgálat, majd a standard PET/CT vizsgálat alapján, végül a két vizsgálatot együttesen értékelték. Eredmények: Mindhárom módszerrel azonos stádiumot találtak 24 betegben. Négy betegnél a standard PET/CT-vel magasabb stádiumot észleltek, mint a konvencionális CT-vel. A csak standard PET/CT-vel meghatározott stádiumon nem változtatott a vizsgálatok együttes értékelése. Következtetések: A Hodgkin-lymphoma kezelés előtti stádiummeghatározásában a standard PET/CT vizsgálat pontosabb, mint az önállóan végzett konvencionális CT-vizsgálat. Emellett megállapítható, hogy ebben az indikációban nem indokolható a standard PET/CT konvencionális CT-vel való kiegészítése. Orv. Hetil., 2014, 155(6), 226–230.

  3. Impact of PET/CT system, reconstruction protocol, data analysis method and repositioning on PET/CT precision: an experimental evaluation using an oncology and brain phantom.

    PubMed

    Mansor, Syahir; Pfaehler, Elisabeth; Heijtel, Dennis; Lodge, Martin A; Boellaard, Ronald; Yaqub, Maqsood

    2017-10-10

    In longitudinal oncological and brain PET/CT studies it is important to understand the repeatability of quantitative PET metrics in order to assess change in tracer uptake. The present studies were performed in order to assess precision as function of PET/CT system, reconstruction protocol, analysis method, scan duration (or image noise) and repositioning in the field of view. Multiple (repeated) scans have been performed using a NEMA image quality (IQ) phantom and a 3D Hoffman brain phantom filled with (18) F solutions on two systems. Studies were performed with and without randomly (<2 cm) repositioning the phantom and all scans (12 replicates for IQ phantom and 10 replicates for Hoffman brain phantom) were performed at equal count statistics. For the NEMA IQ phantom, we studied the recovery coefficients (RC) of the maximum (SUVmax ), peak (SUVpeak ) and mean (SUVmean ) uptake in each sphere as a function of experimental conditions (noise level, reconstruction settings and phantom repositioning). For the 3D Hoffman phantom, the mean activity concentration was determined within several volumes of interest and activity recovery and its precision was studied as function of experimental conditions. The impact of phantom repositioning on RC precision was mainly seen on the Philips Ingenuity PET/CT, especially in the case of smaller spheres (<17mm diameter, P<0.05). This effect was much smaller for the Siemens Biograph system. When exploring SUVmax , SUVpeak or SUVmean of the spheres in the NEMA IQ phantom, it was observed that precision depended on phantom repositioning, reconstruction algorithm and scan duration, with SUVmax being most and SUVpeak least sensitive to phantom repositioning. For the brain phantom, regional averaged SUVs were only minimally affected by phantom repositioning (<2 cm). The precision of quantitative PET metrics depends on the combination of reconstruction protocol, data analysis methods and scan duration (scan statistics). Moreover

  4. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT for systemic staging of newly diagnosed triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ulaner, Gary A; Castillo, Raychel; Goldman, Debra A; Wills, Jonathan; Riedl, Christopher C; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Jochelson, Maxine S; Gönen, Mithat

    2016-10-01

    National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend (18)F-FDG-PET/CT, in addition to standard staging procedures, for systemic staging of newly diagnosed stage III breast cancer patients. However, factors in addition to stage may influence PET/CT utility. As breast cancers that are negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor (triple-negative breast cancer, or TNBC) are more aggressive and metastasize earlier than other breast cancers, we hypothesized that receptor expression may be one such factor. This study assesses (18)F-FDG-PET/CT for systemic staging of newly diagnosed TNBC. In this Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective study, our Healthcare Information System was screened for patients with TNBC who underwent (18)F-FDG-PET/CT in 2007-2013 prior to systemic or radiation therapy. Initial stage was determined from mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and/or surgery, if performed prior to (18)F-FDG-PET/CT. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT was evaluated to identify unsuspected extra-axillary regional nodal and distant metastases, as well as unsuspected synchronous malignancies. Kaplan Meier survival estimates were calculated for initial stage IIB patients stratified by whether or not stage 4 disease was detected by (18)F-FDG-PET/CT. A total of 232 patients with TNBC met inclusion criteria. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT revealed unsuspected distant metastases in 30 (13 %): 0/23 initial stage I, 4/82 (5 %) stage IIA, 13/87 (15 %) stage IIB, 4/23 (17 %) stage IIIA, 8/14 (57 %) stage IIIB, and 1/3 (33 %) stage IIIC. Twenty-six of 30 patients upstaged to IV by (18)F-FDG-PET/CT were confirmed by pathology, with the remaining four patients confirmed by follow-up imaging. In addition, seven unsuspected synchronous malignancies were identified in six patients. Initial stage 2B patients who were upstaged to 4 by (18)F-FDG-PET/CT had significantly shorter survival compared to initial stage 2B patients who were

  5. What Data to Co-register for Computing Atlases

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, B.T. Thomas; Sabuncu, Mert; Mohlberg, Hartmut; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl; Golland, Polina; Fischl, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    We argue that registration should be thought of as a means to an end, and not as a goal by itself. In particular, we consider the problem of predicting the locations of hidden labels of a test image using observable features, given a training set with both the hidden labels and observable features. For example, the hidden labels could be segmentation labels or activation regions in fMRI, while the observable features could be sulcal geometry or MR intensity. We analyze a probabilistic framework for computing an optimal atlas, and the subsequent registration of a new subject using only the observable features to optimize the hidden label alignment to the training set. We compare two approaches for co-registering training images for the atlas construction: the traditional approach of only using observable features and a novel approach of only using hidden labels. We argue that the alternative approach is superior particularly when the relationship between the hidden labels and observable features is complex and unknown. As an application, we consider the task of registering cortical folds to optimize Brodmann area localization. We show that the alignment of the Brodmann areas improves by up to 25% when using the alternative atlas compared with the traditional atlas. To the best of our knowledge, these are the most accurate Brodmann area localization results (achieved via cortical fold registration) reported to date. PMID:26082678

  6. Interim (18)F-FGD PET/CT may not predict the outcome in primary central nervous system lymphoma patients treated with sequential treatment with methotrexate and cytarabine.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jae-Cheol; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Kim, Shin; Lee, Kyoungmin; Kang, Eun Hee; Park, Jung Sun; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Huh, Jooryung; Park, Chan-Sik; Kim, Jong Hoon; Lee, Sang Wook; Suh, Cheolwon

    2017-09-01

    (18)F-fluoro-2-dexoy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is a useful imaging technique for monitoring the treatment response in lymphoma cases. We investigated the value of interim brain PET/CT (I-PET/CT) for monitoring the response to intensive methotrexate-based chemotherapy in primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Of the 76 PCNSL patients treated with intensive methotrexate and cytarabine chemotherapy between September 2006 and December 2012, 66 patients with DLBCL were included in this study. The patient cohort of 66 individuals comprised 43 men and 23 women with a median age of 59 years (range, 17-75 years). During chemotherapy, 36 patients (54.5%) showed a negative metabolism on I-PET/CT, and 47 (71.2%) were negative on final (F) PET/CT. The baseline characteristics were similar between I-PET/CT-negative (n = 36) and I-PET/CT-positive patients (n = 30) except ECOG performance status. After a median follow-up of 27.5 months, there was no difference in the progression-free survival (PFS; P = 0.701) or overall survival (OS; P = 0.620) between the I-PET/CT-negative and I-PET/CT-positive groups. However, PFS in the F-PET/CT-negative group was significantly longer than that in the F-PET/CT-positive group (P < 0.001) without a significant difference in OS (P = 0.892). I-PET/CT may not predict the survival outcome of PCNSL patients with DLBCL treated with intensive methotrexate and cytarabine chemotherapy. Prospective trials are required to fully evaluate the role of I-PET/CT.

  7. [(18) F]-FDG PET/CT in the staging and management of indolent lymphoma: A prospective multicenter PET registry study.

    PubMed

    Metser, Ur; Dudebout, Jill; Baetz, Tara; Hodgson, David C; Langer, Deanna L; MacCrostie, Pamela; Mak, Victor; Tau, Noam

    2017-08-01

    To measure the clinical impact of pretreatment fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) on the staging and management of apparent limited stage indolent lymphoma being considered for curative radiation therapy. We conducted a prospective multicenter registry study that included 197 patients accrued between May 1, 2012, and December 31, 2015. Pre-PET/CT stage, determined by clinical and CT data, was documented. If pre-PET/CT stage was indeterminate, a stage was assigned to the patient by the referring oncologist according to best clinical judgment and treatment intent. After PET/CT, revised stage and planned management were recorded and compared with data on actual treatment received available through provincial databases (n = 155). PET/CT resulted in the upstaging of 47 (23.9%) patients with presumed limited stage disease (stage I-II) to advanced stage disease (stage III-IV) (P < .0001). Ten (5.1%) patients were downstaged by PET/CT, 4 of whom migrated from advanced to limited stage disease. Twenty-eight (14.2%) patients with a specific pre-PET/CT stage had equivocal PET/CT findings that required further evaluation to confirm disease extent. After PET/CT, 95 (61.3%) patients were planned to receive active treatment. Of the 59 patients planned for radiotherapy alone post-PET/CT, 34 (57.6%) received this treatment (P = .002), and nearly 80% of them (n = 27) had confirmed limited stage disease. PET/CT has a significant impact on staging and management in patients with apparent limited stage indolent lymphoma who are being considered for curative radiotherapy. PET/CT should be routinely incorporated into the workup of these patients. Cancer 2017;123:2860-66. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  8. Unit Cost Analysis of PET-CT at an Apex Public Sector Health Care Institute in India.

    PubMed

    Gajuryal, S H; Daga, A; Siddharth, V; Bal, C S; Satpathy, S

    2017-01-01

    PET/CT scan service is one of the capital intensive and revenue-generating centres of a tertiary care hospital. The cost associated with the provisioning of PET services is dependent upon the unit costs of the resources consumed. The study aims to determine the cost of providing PET/CT Scan services in a hospital. This descriptive and observational study was conducted in the Department of Nuclear Medicine at a tertiary apex teaching hospital in New Delhi, India in the year 2014-15. Traditional costing methodology was used for calculating the unit cost of PET/CT scan service. The cost was calculated under two heads that is capital and operating cost. Annualized cost of capital assets was calculated using methodology prescribed by WHO and operating costs was taken on an actual basis. Average number of PET/CT scan performed in a day is 30. The annual cost of providing PET/CT scan services was calculated to be 65,311,719 Indian Rupees (INR) (US$ 1,020,496), while the unit cost of PET scan was calculated to be 9625.92 INR (US$ 150). 3/4th cost was spent on machinery and equipment (75.3%) followed by healthcare personnel (11.37%), electricity (5%), consumables and supplies (4%) engineering maintenance (3.24%), building, furniture and HVAC capital cost (0.76%), and manifold cost (0.05%). Of the total cost, 76% was capital cost while the remaining was operating cost. Total cost for establishing PET/CT scan facility with cyclotron and chemistry module and PET/CT scan without cyclotron and chemistry module was calculated to be INR 610,873,517 (US$9944899) and 226,745,158 (US$3542893), respectively. (US$ 1=INR 64).

  9. FDG-PET/CT lymph node staging after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophageal-gastric junction.

    PubMed

    Fencl, Pavel; Belohlavek, Otakar; Harustiak, Tomas; Zemanova, Milada

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the analysis was to assess the accuracy of various FDG-PET/CT parameters in staging lymph nodes after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In this prospective study, 74 patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophageal-gastric junction were examined by FDG-PET/CT in the course of their neoadjuvant chemotherapy given before surgical treatment. Data from the final FDG-PET/CT examinations were compared with the histology from the surgical specimens (gold standard). The accuracy was calculated for four FDG-PET/CT parameters: (1) hypermetabolic nodes, (2) large nodes, (3) large-and-medium large nodes, and (4) hypermetabolic or large nodes. In 74 patients, a total of 1540 lymph nodes were obtained by surgery, and these were grouped into 287 regions according to topographic origin. Five hundred and two nodes were imaged by FDG-PET/CT and were grouped into these same regions for comparison. In the analysis, (1) hypermetabolic nodes, (2) large nodes, (3) large-and-medium large nodes, and (4) hypermetabolic or large nodes identified metastases in particular regions with sensitivities of 11.6%, 2.9%, 21.7%, and 13.0%, respectively; specificity was 98.6%, 94.5%, 74.8%, and 93.6%, respectively. The best accuracy of 77.7% reached the parameter of hypermetabolic nodes. Accuracy decreased to 62.0% when also smaller nodes (medium-large) were taken for the parameter of metastases. FDG-PET/CT proved low sensitivity and high specificity. Low sensitivity was based on low detection rate (32.6%) when compared nodes imaged by FDG-PET/CT to nodes found by surgery, and in inability to detect micrometastases. Sensitivity increased when also medium-large LNs were taken for positive, but specificity and accuracy decreased.

  10. Triage of Limited Versus Extensive Disease on (18)F-FDG PET/CT Scan in Small Cell lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Saima, Riaz; Humayun, Bashir; Khalid, Niazi Imran

    2017-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma, which accounts for 10-15% of pulmonary cancers and exhibits early metastatic spread. This study aimed to determine the added value of (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging in tumor, node, and metastasis (TNM) staging of SCLC, compared to the conventional computed tomography (CT) scan and its potential role as a prognosticator. This retrospective review was conducted on 23 patients, who were histopathologically diagnosed to have SCLC and referred for undergoing (18)F-FDG PET/CT scanning during October 2009-December 2015. The rate of agreement between the CT and (18)F-FDG PET/CT findings for TNM staging was calculated using the Cohen's kappa (κ). The median follow-up time was eight months, ranging 27-3 months). The overall and disease-free survival rates were calculated based on the extent of disease. 19 cases were male and four female with the mean age of 58±9 years. The (18)F-FDG PET/CT identified limited and extensive diseases in 2 (8.7%) and 21 (91.3%) patients, respectively. In addition, the results of the Cohen's kappa demonstrated a strong (κ=0.82), fair (κ=0.24), and poor (κ=0.12) agreement between the PET/CT and CT findings for determining tumor, node, and metastasis stages, respectively. The (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans upstaged disease in 47% of the cases with visceral and osseous metastasis. The disease-free survival rates for the limited and extensive diseases were 100% and 23% within the 12-month follow-up. In addition, 8 (35%) patients expired during the follow-up period. Improved nodal and metastatic disease identification highlights the role of (18)F-FDG PET/CT scanning in initial staging of SCLC with prognostic implications.

  11. Application of PET/CT in treatment response evaluation and recurrence prediction in patients with newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Liu, Junru; Huang, Beihui; Chen, Meilan; Diao, Xiangwen; Li, Juan

    2017-04-11

    Multiple myeloma (MM) causes osteolytic lesions which can be detected by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/Computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT). We prospectively involve 96 Newly diagnosed MM to take PET/CT scan at scheduled treatment time (figure 1), and 18F-FDG uptake of lesion was measured by SUVmax and T/Mmax. All MM patients took bortezomib based chemotherapy as induction and received ASCT and maintenance. All clinical features were analyzed with the PET/CT image changes, and some relationships between treatment response and FDG uptakes changes were found: Osteolytic lesions of MM uptakes higher FDG than healthy volunteers, and this trend is more obvious in extramedullary lesions. Compared to X-ray, PET/CT was more sensitive both in discoering bone as well as extramedullary lesions. In newly diagnosed MM, several adverse clinical factors were related to high FDG uptakes of bone lesions. Bone lesion FDG uptakes of MM with P53 mutation or with hypodiploidy and complex karyotype were also higher than those without such changes. In treatment response, PET/CT showed higher sensitivity in detecting tumor residual disease than immunofixation electrophoresis. But in relapse prediction, it might show false positive disease recurrences and the imaging changes might be influenced by infections and hemoglobulin levels. PET/CT is sensitive in discovering meduallary and extrameduallary lesions of MM, and the 18F-FDG uptake of lesions are related with clinical indictors and biological features of plasma cells. In evaluating treatment response and survival, PET/CT showed its superiority. But in predicting relapse or refractory, it may show false positive results.

  12. PET/CT for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Should We Routinely Include the Head and Abdomen?

    PubMed

    Yankevich, Uliyana; Hughes, Marion A; Rath, Tanya J; Fakhran, Saeed; Alhilahi, Lea M; Seungwon, Kim W; Branstetter, Barton F

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the diagnostic and therapeutic yield of the head and abdomen portions of PET/CT scans of patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) to determine whether these areas should be routinely included with PET/CT of the neck and chest. Patients with pathologically proven HNSCC who underwent full-body PET/CT were evaluated for metastases to the head, chest, and abdomen. Medical records were reviewed to determine whether the head and abdominal findings changed the clinical management, beyond the findings in the neck and chest. Five hundred ninety-eight patients who underwent 1625 PET/CT scans were included. All studies included the head, neck, and chest. For 542 of 598 patients (91%), the PET/CT scans included the abdomen. Two of 598 patients (0.3%) had distant calvarial metastases. Neither of the calvarial metastases changed patient management. Twelve of 542 patients (2.2%) had abdominal metastases. For 10 of 542 patients (1.8%), the abdominal findings changed patient management. Thoracic metastases were found in 82 of 598 patients (13.7%). The total rate of distant metastases to the head and abdomen in patients with thoracic metastatic disease was 12.2% (10/82), whereas in patients without thoracic metastases, it was 0.8% (4/460). Routine extension of PET/CT scans to include the head and abdomen in patients with HNSCC is not indicated. For patients without evidence of thoracic metastases, routine PET/CT examinations should include the neck and chest only.

  13. Utility of PET/CT After Cryoablation for Early Identification of Local Tumor Progression in Osseous Metastatic Disease.

    PubMed

    Packard, Ann T; Broski, Stephen M; Callstrom, Matthew R; Atwell, Thomas D; Schmit, Grant D; Schmitz, John J; Morris, Jonathan M; Hunt, Christopher H; Kurup, A Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the utility of combined PET/CT for the detection of early local tumor progression after cryoablation of bone metastases. A retrospective single-institution review revealed 61 consecutive patients with 80 separate bone metastases treated with cryoablation who were evaluated with a preablation PET/CT and at least two postablation PET/CT examinations between September 2007 and July 2015. Patients were excluded if they had local therapy or pathologic fracture after ablation. The patients were grouped according to postcryoablation disease status (i.e., local tumor progression or not) and PET radiotracer (i.e., (11)C-choline or (18)F-FDG) used. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) ratio (i.e., ratio of SUVmax to blood pool) was calculated within each osseous metastasis before and after cryoablation, and these were then compared between groups. Of the 61 patients and 80 ablations performed, 32 patients were imaged with FDG PET/CT and 29 were imaged with (11)C-choline PET/CT. Twenty-three patients imaged with FDG and 13 patients imaged with (11)C-choline had evidence of local tumor progression on all postablation PET/CT examinations. The SUVmax ratio was significantly higher in patients with local tumor progression on the first and most remote postcryoablation PET/CT examinations for both FDG and (11)C-choline (p < 0.001 in all cases). There was no significant difference in the postablation systemic therapy between the groups with and without local tumor progression. Increased SUVmax ratio in patients after cryoablation for osseous metastatic disease should raise concern about local tumor progression independently of time after ablation.

  14. Clinical impact of PET/CT imaging after adjuvant therapy in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huan-Chun; Kang, Chung-Jan; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Lin, Chien-Yu; Lee, Li-Yu; Liao, Chun-Ta; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2017-09-01

    This single-center retrospective study of prospectively collected data was aimed at comparing the clinical outcomes of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) with symptomatic recurrences identified by PET/CT imaging following adjuvant therapy (Group A) versus those of cases with asymptomatic recurrences diagnosed through periodic post-adjuvant therapy PET/CT surveillance (Group B). We also sought to establish the priority of salvage therapy in the two study groups. We identified 111 patients with advanced resected OSCC who developed recurrences following adjuvant therapy (51 in Group A and 60 in Group B). Histopathology served as the gold standard for recurrent lesions. The impact of post-adjuvant therapy PET/CT surveillance was examined with Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards regression models. The 2-year DSS and OS rates were marginally or significantly higher in Group B than in Group A (P = 0.073 and P = 0.025, respectively). Time-dependent ROC curve analysis demonstrated that the optimal cutoff values for time to positive PET/CT findings in relation to OS were 12 months for Group A and 9 months for Group B, respectively. Independent risk factors identified in multivariate analyses were used to devise two prognostic scoring systems for 2-year DSS and OS in each study group (all P < 0.001). Scheduled periodic PET/CT surveillance is a valuable tool for early detection of recurrent lesion(s) in asymptomatic OSCC patients who bear risk factors for disease recurrence. The presence of clinical symptoms and a short time to positive PET/CT findings were adverse prognostic factors for clinical outcome in patients with advanced OSCC. The priority of salvage therapy is discussed in each patient subgroup according to the devised prognostic scoring systems.

  15. Comparison between CT Net enhancement and PET/CT SUV for N staging of gastric cancer: A case series.

    PubMed

    Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Telegrafo, Michele; Lucarelli, Nicola Maria; Lorusso, Valentina; Scardapane, Arnaldo; Niccoli Asabella, Artor; Moschetta, Marco

    2017-09-01

    The therapeutic approach of gastric cancer strictly depends on TNM staging mainly provided by CT and PET/CT. However, the lymph node size criterion as detected by MDCT causes a poor differential diagnosis between reactive and metastatic enlarged lymph nodes with low specificity values. Our study aims to compare 320-row CT Net enhancement and fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-FDG PET/CT) SUV for N staging of gastric cancer. 45 patients with histologically proven gastric cancer underwent CT and F-FDG PET/CT. Two radiologists in consensus evaluated all images and calculated the CT Net enhancement and F-FDG PET/CT SUV for N staging, having the histological findings as the reference standard. CT and F-FDG PET/CT sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were evaluated and compared by using the Mc Nemar test. The histological examination revealed nodal metastases in 29/45 cases (64%). CT Net enhancement obtained sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV of 90%, 81%, 87%, 90% and 81%, respectively. F-FDG PET/CT SUV obtained sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV of 66%, 88%, 73%, 90% and 58%, respectively. No statistically significant difference between the two imaging modalities was found (p = 0.1). CT Net enhancement represents an accurate tool for N staging of gastric cancer and could be considered as the CT corresponding quantitative parameter of F-FDG PET/CT SUV. It could be applied in the clinical practice for differentiating reactive lymph nodes from metastatic ones improving accuracy and specificity of CT.

  16. Determinants of diagnostic performance of 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ashoka M V; Husmann, Lars; Sah, Bert-Ram; Battegay, Edouard; Franzen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    There is uncertainty about patient selection and the adequate timing at which fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) PET/computed tomography (CT) is indicated in the diagnostic work-up of fever of unknown origin (FUO). The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic performance of F-FDG PET/CT in patients with FUO. All consecutive patients who underwent F-FDG PET/CT at the University Hospital Zurich because of FUO between 2006 and 2012 were included in this retrospective, observational study. A total of 76 patients [70% men, median (interquartile range) age 60 (47-67) years] were included. F-FDG PET/CT showed characteristically increased F-FDG activity in 56 patients (74%), leading to confirmation of or change in the suspected cause of FUO in 57 and 17%, respectively. The final diagnosis after F-FDG PET/CT included infection (21%), malignancy (22%), noninfectious inflammatory disease (12%), others (5%), or an unknown cause (40%). The success rate, sensitivity, and specificity of F-FDG PET/CT were 60, 77, and 31%, respectively. Sensitivity was highest in patients with suspected malignancy (100%, 95% confidence interval 79-100%). Diagnostic performance was independent of the investigated variables other than suspected infection as a cause of FUO (odds ratio 0.1, 95% confidence interval 0.01-0.8, P=0.033). The diagnostic performance of F-FDG PET/CT was significantly higher in patients with suspected malignancy causing a FUO compared with suspected infection or noninfectious inflammatory disease. However, it was independent of the baseline characteristics and duration of fever. This supports the recommendation to perform F-FDG PET/CT early in the diagnostic work-up of FUO, which may shorten disease duration and lower health costs, particularly when infection or malignancy is suspected.

  17. Early postoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT in high-risk stage III colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wasserberg, Nir; Purim, Ofer; Bard, Vyacheslav; Kundel, Yulia; Gordon, Noa; Groshar, David; Goldberg, Natalia; Kashtan, Hanoch; Sulkes, Aaron; Brenner, Baruch

    2015-04-01

    PET/CT may contribute to staging modification in different phases of colorectal cancer (CRC) management. However, it is not routinely indicated for stage III CRC. This study sought to determine the role of early postoperative PET/CT in patients with high-risk stage III CRC. The tumor registry of a tertiary medical center was searched (2004-2011) for all patients with stage III CRC who underwent early postoperative PET/CT because of the presence of high-risk factors for systemic disease. Demographic and clinicopathological characteristics were compared between patients found/not found to have metastatic disease. The cohort included 91 patients with a median age of 67 years (range, 29-90 years). Pathological FDG uptake was observed in 38 (41%). Of these, 14 (15% of the whole cohort) were upstaged with alteration of their treatment protocol, 10 (11%) had local postoperative changes, and 14 (15%) had false-positive findings. The sensitivity and specificity of PET/CT for detecting metastatic disease were 100% and 69%, respectively. Elevated postoperative carcinoembryonic antigen and CA-19.9 levels correlated with a positive PET/CT (P = 0.05 and P = 0.03, respectively). The median follow-up time was 34 months (range, 4-85 months). The estimated 5-year survival rate was significantly higher in patients with a negative than a positive scan (70% vs 42%, P < 0.0006). Findings on early postoperative PET/CT may influence staging and treatment in 15% of selected patients with high-risk stage III CRC. Postoperative levels of carcinoembryonic antigen and CA-19.9 may serve as indications for PET/CT scanning in this setting. Prospective validation is warranted.

  18. Unit Cost Analysis of PET-CT at an Apex Public Sector Health Care Institute in India

    PubMed Central

    Gajuryal, SH; Daga, A; Siddharth, V; Bal, CS; Satpathy, S

    2017-01-01

    Context: PET/CT scan service is one of the capital intensive and revenue-generating centres of a tertiary care hospital. The cost associated with the provisioning of PET services is dependent upon the unit costs of the resources consumed. Aims: The study aims to determine the cost of providing PET/CT Scan services in a hospital. Methods and Material: This descriptive and observational study was conducted in the Department of Nuclear Medicine at a tertiary apex teaching hospital in New Delhi, India in the year 2014-15. Traditional costing methodology was used for calculating the unit cost of PET/CT scan service. The cost was calculated under two heads that is capital and operating cost. Annualized cost of capital assets was calculated using methodology prescribed by WHO and operating costs was taken on an actual basis. Results: Average number of PET/CT scan performed in a day is 30. The annual cost of providing PET/CT scan services was calculated to be 65,311,719 Indian Rupees (INR) (US$ 1,020,496), while the unit cost of PET scan was calculated to be 9625.92 INR (US$ 150). 3/4th cost was spent on machinery and equipment (75.3%) followed by healthcare personnel (11.37%), electricity (5%), consumables and supplies (4%) engineering maintenance (3.24%), building, furniture and HVAC capital cost (0.76%), and manifold cost (0.05%). Of the total cost, 76% was capital cost while the remaining was operating cost. Conclusions: Total cost for establishing PET/CT scan facility with cyclotron and chemistry module and PET/CT scan without cyclotron and chemistry module was calculated to be INR 610,873,517 (US$9944899) and 226,745,158 (US$3542893), respectively. (US$ 1=INR 64) PMID:28242974

  19. Effectiveness of FDG-PET/CT for evaluating early response to induction chemotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    dos Anjos, Renata Fockink; dos Anjos, Dalton Alexandre; Vieira, Danielle Leal; Leite, André Ferreira; Figueiredo, Paulo Tadeu de Souza; de Melo, Nilce Santos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: 18F-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography with Computed Tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) may be a powerful tool to predict treatment outcome. We aimed to review the effectiveness of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the assessment of early response to induction chemotherapy (IC) in patients with advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer (HNSCC) without previous treatment. Methods: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Science Direct and Web of Science were searched to May 2016. Reference lists of the included articles and additional studies identified by one nuclear medicine expert were screened for potential relevant studies that investigated the effectiveness of 18F-FDG PET/CT performed before and after IC. Three authors independently screened all retrieved articles, selected studies that met inclusion criteria and extracted data. The methodology of the selected studies was evaluated by using the risk of bias checklist of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Results: Seven out of 170 eligible studies met our inclusion criteria. A total of 207 advanced HNSCC patients were evaluated with 18F-FDG PET/CT at baseline and after IC in the selected articles. Six from seven studies concluded that 18F-FDG PET/CT allowed early evaluation response to IC and predicted survival outcomes. Conclusion: The present systematic review confirms the potential value of 18F-FDG PET/CT as a diagnostic tool for early IV response assessment in HNSCC patients. However, the lack of standard definitions for response criteria and heterogeneous IC protocols indicate the need to further studies in order to better define the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in these patients. PMID:27512861

  20. SU-E-I-98: PET/CT's Most-Cited 50 Articles since 2000: A Bibliometric Analysis of Classics.

    PubMed

    Sayed, G

    2012-06-01

    Despite its relatively recent introduction to clinical practice, PET/CT has gained wide acceptance both in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Scientific publication in PET/CT has also experienced significant development since its introduction. Bibliometric analyses allow an understanding of how this publication trend has developed at an aggregated level. Citation analysis is one of the most widely used bibliometric tools of scientometrics. Analysis of classics, defined as an articles with 100 or more citations, is common in the biomedical sciences as it reflects an article's influence in its professional and scientific community. Our objective was to identify the 50 most frequently cited classic articles in PET/CT in the past 10 years. The 50 most-cited PET/CT articles were identified by searching ISI's Web of Knowledge and Pubmed databases for all related publications from 2000 through 2010. Articles were evaluated for several characteristics such as author(s), institution, country of origin, publication year, type, and number of citations. An unadjusted categorical analysis was performed to compare all articles published in the search period. The search yielded a cumulative total of 22,554 entries for the publication period, of which 15,943 were original research articles. The 50 most-cited articles were identified from the latter sum and selected out of 73 classics. The number of citations for the top 50 classics ranged from 114 to 700. PET/CT classics appeared in three general and 12 core journals. The majority of the classics were in oncologic applications of PET/CT (62%). Articles related to diagnostic topics were 6%. The rest were focused on physics and instrumentation 24% and other basic sciences 16%. Despite its relatively short history PET/CT accumulated 73 classic articles in a decade. Such information is of importance to researchers and those who wish to study the scientific development in the field. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in

  1. Role of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1).

    PubMed

    Lastoria, Secondo; Marciello, Francesca; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Aloj, Luigi; Caracò, Corradina; Aurilio, Michela; D'Ambrosio, Laura; Di Gennaro, Francesca; Ramundo, Valeria; Camera, Luigi; De Luca, Leonardo; Fonti, Rosa; Napolitano, Vincenzo; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-06-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a hereditary syndrome predisposing to many endocrine and neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Conventional imaging (CI) cannot provide satisfactory results for all the different types of MEN1-related tumors. Objective of this prospective observational study was to evaluate the role of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in MEN1 compared to CI. Diagnostic performance of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT for the detection of NET was evaluated as well as the prognostic role of SUVmax. Eighteen patients with genetically confirmed MEN1 were evaluated by (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, endoscopic ultrasounds, multidetector-row computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and hormone/markers serum measurements. Four MEN1-related tumor sites (pancreas, pituitary, parathyroids, adrenals) were considered. Sensitivity and specificity of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT for the detection of NET were calculated. There was (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT uptake in 11/11 patients with pancreatic lesions, in 9/12 with pituitary adenoma, in 5/15 with parathyroid enlargements, and in 5/7 with adrenal lesions. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT showed sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 100 % in pancreas, 75 and 83 % in pituitary, 28 and 100 % in parathyroids, and 62.5 and 100 % in adrenals, respectively. Compared with CI, no significant difference in sensitivity for pancreas, pituitary, and adrenals was found, while CI had a better sensitivity for parathyroids (p = 0.002). On the ROC analysis, progression of pancreatic lesions was significantly associated to SUVmax <12.3 (p < 0.05). (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is greatly helpful in the work-up of MEN1 providing a panoramic view of MEN1-related lesions. There is also a prognostic role of (68)Ga-PET in patients with MEN1-pancreatic lesions.

  2. Value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosing chronic Q fever in patients with central vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hagenaars, J C J P; Wever, P C; Vlake, A W; Renders, N H M; van Petersen, A S; Hilbink, M; de Jager-Leclercq, M G L; Moll, F L; Koning, O H J; Hoekstra, C J

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the value of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in diagnosing chronic Q fever in patients with central vascular disease and the added value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnostic combination strategy as described in the Dutch consensus guideline for diagnosing chronic Q fever. 18F-FDG PET/CT was performed in patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm or aorto-iliac reconstruction and chronic Q fever, diagnosed by serology and positive PCR for Coxiella burnetii DNA in blood and/or tissue (PCR-positive study group). Patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm or aorto-iliac reconstruction without clinical and serological findings indicating Q fever infection served as a control group. Patients with a serological profile of chronic Q fever and a negative PCR in blood were included in additional analyses (PCR-negative study group). Thirteen patients were evaluated in the PCR-positive study group and 22 patients in the control group. 18F-FDG PET/CT indicated vascular infection in 6/13 patients in the PCR-positive study group and 2/22 patients in the control group. 18F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated a sensitivity of 46% (95% CI: 23-71%), specificity of 91% (95% CI: 71-99%), positive predictive value of 75% (95% CI:41-93%) and negative predictive value of 74% (95% CI: 55-87%). In the PCR-negative study group, 18F-FDG PET/CT was positive in 10/20 patients (50%). The combination of 18F-FDG PET/CT, as an imaging tool for identifying a focus of infection, and Q fever serology is a valid diagnostic strategy for diagnosing chronic Q fever in patients with central vascular disease.

  3. High (18)F-FDG uptake in urinary calculi on PET/CT: An unrecognized non-malignant accumulation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhanli; Li, Ziao; Huang, Jia; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Meng; Li, Qian; Li, Yi

    2016-08-01

    To assess the high (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake in urinary calculi on positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). In this study, (18)F-FDG PET/CT examinations were retrospectively reviewed from November 2013 to February 2016 in a single center, and patients with high (18)F-FDG uptake in urinary calculi were identified. The following data were collected from each patient, including age, sex, primary disease, method to verify the urinary calculus, and imaging characteristics of the calculus. A total of 2758 PET/CT studies (2567 patients) were reviewed, and 52 patients with urinary calculi were identified, in which 6 (11.5%, 6/52) patients (5 males, 1 female, age 34-73 years, median age 60.5 years) demonstrated high (18)F-FDG uptake in the urinary calculi. Among the 6 patients, 3 patients had bladder calculi, 2 patients had renal calculi, and 1 patient had both bladder and renal calculi. The size of the urinary calculi varied from sandy to 19mm on CT. The maximal Hounsfield units of the calculi ranged from 153 to 1078. The SUVmax of the calculi on the routine PET/CT scan ranged from 11.7 to 143.0. Delayed PET/CT scans were performed on 4 patients, which showed the calculi SUVmax increasing in 2 patients, while decreasing in the other 2 patients. One patient with bladder calculus underwent a follow-up PET/CT, which showed enlargement of the calculus as well as the increased SUVmax. This study shows an uncommon high (18)F-FDG uptake in urinary calculi. Recognition of this non-malignant accumulation in urinary calculi is essential for correct interpretation of PET/CT findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Does antibiotic treatment affect the diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT studies in patients with suspected infectious processes?

    PubMed

    Kagna, Olga; Kurash, Marina; Ghanem-Zouabi, Nesrin; Keidar, Zohar; Israel, Ora

    2017-05-04

    Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emmission tomography combined with computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) plays a significant role in the assessment of various infectious processes. Patients with suspected or known sites of infection are often referred for FDG imaging while already receiving antibiotic treatment. Current study assesses whether antibiotic therapy affects the detectability rate of infectious processes by FDG PET/CT. Methods: A 5-year retrospective study of all adult patients who underwent FDG PET/CT in search of a focal source of infection was performed. The presence, duration and appropriateness of antibiotic treatment prior to FDG imaging were recorded. Diagnosis of an infectious process was based on microbiological and/or pathological data as well as on clinical and radiological follow-up. Results: Two hundred seventeen patients underwent 243 PET/CT studies in search of a focal source of infection and were included in the study. Sixty seven studies were excluded from further analysis because of a final non-infectious etiology or lack of further follow up or details regarding the antibiotic treatment. The final study population included 176 FDG PET/CT studies in 153 patients (M 107, age 18-86 years). One hundred nineteen studies (68%) were performed in patients receiving antibiotic therapy for a range of 1 to 73 days. Diagnosis of infection was made in 107 true positive cases (61%) including 63 studies (59%) in patients receiving appropriate antibiotic therapy started before the performance of the FDG PET/CT study. There were 52 true negative (29%) and 17 false positive (10%) FDG PET/CT studies. No false negative results were found. Conclusion: FDG PET/CT correctly identified foci of increased uptake compatible with infection in the majority of patients including all patients receiving appropriate antimicrobial therapy, with no false negative cases. Based on current study results administration of antibiotics appears to have no clinically significant impact

  5. Preliminary results on the role of PET/CT in initial staging, restaging, and management of lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamitsi, J.; Valotassiou, B.; Iliadis, K.; Kosmidis, P.; Laspas, F.; Vasilaki, M.; Pipini, E.; Petounis, A.; Gogou, L.; Pagou, M.; Dalianis, K.; Efthimiadou, R.; Andreou, J.

    2006-12-01

    AimTo determine true-positive and true-negative rates of PET/CT studies in the staging of lung cancer as compared with conventional imaging (CT and bone scan and occasionally MRI) and the impact of PET/CT on the treatment strategy in patients with lung cancer. Materials and methodTwenty patients (21 studies) with known or suspected lung cancer (14 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), three patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), three patients with solitary pulmonary nodule underwent initial staging (seven studies) or restaging (14 studies) with combined FDG PET and CT scans on a PET/CT tomograph. PET/CT images were evaluated separately by two nuclear medicine physicians and two radiologists specialized on PET, CT, and MRI. Histology results and a more than 6 months follow-up served as the reference standards. ResultsAccurate diagnosis was achieved on 16 studies. Site-by-site analysis gave the following results: 16 true-positive sites (seven on histology, nine on >6 months follow-up), six true-negative sites (two on histology, four on >6 months follow-up). On PET/CT, six patients were correctly down-staged, three patients were correctly upstaged and seven patients were diagnosed correctly as being on the same stage (2/7 with increase of extent of disease, 5/7 with the same extent of disease). One patient was falsely upstaged and three patients were falsely down-staged. On the basis of PET/CT results, change of management was induced in six patients, while in 14 patients there was no change induced. In five cases PET/CT was partially accurate: on site-by-site analysis, four sites proved true positive (on histology), one site false positive (on histology), and four sites false negative (one on histology, three on >6 months follow-up). ConclusionIn our early experience, PET/CT contributed significantly to correct staging and management of patients with lung cancer.

  6. Use of PET/CT and Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Osteosarcoma Metastases.

    PubMed

    Selmic, Laura Elizabeth; Griffin, Lynn R; Nolan, Michael W; Custis, James; Randall, Elissa; Withrow, Stephen J

    This case report describes the use of two new concepts in the diagnosis and treatment of metastatic osteosarcoma (OSA) in one dog. The dog was initially presented for positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) as full-body staging following amputation and adjuvant chemotherapy for treatment of OSA of the proximal tibia. The initial PET/CT did not show evidence of metastatic disease. Six mo after OSA, diagnosis pulmonary metastatic nodules were identified and oral toceranib phosphate was initiated. Twelve mo postdiagnosis the dog developed neck pain and non-ambulatory tetraparesis and was diagnosed with a C7 vertebral metastatic lesion based on magnetic resonance imaging. A second PET/CT was performed to screen for further metastatic lesions, and a nodule within the right ischium was identified. The C7 and ischial lesions were treated with stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT). Sixteen mo postdiagnosis, a third PET/CT was performed due to increasing size of the pulmonary nodules and a right-sided liver metastasis was detected. The liver mass was treated with SRT. The PET/CT scans facilitated identification of gross metastatic lesions that were subsequently treated with SRT, which resulted in clinical improvement of the dog's neurological signs.

  7. A Rationale for the Use of F18-FDG PET/CT in Fever and Inflammation of Unknown Origin

    PubMed Central

    Balink, H.; Verberne, H. J.; Bennink, R. J.; van Eck-Smit, B. L. F.

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on the diagnostic value of hybrid F18-FDG Positron Emission Tomography/Computerized tomography (PET/CT) in fever of unknown origin (FUO) and inflammation of unknown origin (IUO). Due to the wide range of possible causes both FUO and IUO remain a clinical challenge for both patients and physicians. In addition, the aetiology of IUO shows the same variation in diseases as the FUO spectrum and probably requires the same diagnostic approach as FUO. There are numerous historically used diagnostic approaches incorporating invasive and non-invasive, and imaging techniques, all with relative high specificity but limited sensitivity. This hampers the generalization of these diagnostic approaches. However, recently published reports show that F18-FDG PET/CT in FUO and IUO has a high sensitivity and a relative non-specificity for malignancy, infection and inflammation. This makes F18-FDG PET/CT an ideal diagnostic tool to start the diagnostic process and to guide subsequent focused diagnostic approaches with higher specificity. In addition, F18-FDG PET/CT has a relative high negative predictive value. Therefore F18 FDG PET/CT should be incorporated in the routine diagnostic work-up of patients with FUO and IUO, preferably at an early stage in the diagnostic process. PMID:23316356

  8. High-resolution dynamic imaging and quantitative analysis of lung cancer xenografts in nude mice using clinical PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying Yi; Wang, Kai; Xu, Zuo Yu; Song, Yan; Wang, Chu Nan; Zhang, Chong Qing; Sun, Xi Lin; Shen, Bao Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Considering the general application of dedicated small-animal positron emission tomography/computed tomography is limited, an acceptable alternative in many situations might be clinical PET/CT. To estimate the feasibility of using clinical PET/CT with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose for high-resolution dynamic imaging and quantitative analysis of cancer xenografts in nude mice. Dynamic clinical PET/CT scans were performed on xenografts for 60 min after injection with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Scans were reconstructed with or without SharpIR method in two phases. And mice were sacrificed to extracting major organs and tumors, using ex vivo γ-counting as a reference. Strikingly, we observed that the image quality and the correlation between the all quantitive data from clinical PET/CT and the ex vivo counting was better with the SharpIR reconstructions than without. Our data demonstrate that clinical PET/CT scanner with SharpIR reconstruction is a valuable tool for imaging small animals in preclinical cancer research, offering dynamic imaging parameters, good image quality and accurate data quatification. PMID:28881772

  9. High-resolution dynamic imaging and quantitative analysis of lung cancer xenografts in nude mice using clinical PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying Yi; Wang, Kai; Xu, Zuo Yu; Song, Yan; Wang, Chu Nan; Zhang, Chong Qing; Sun, Xi Lin; Shen, Bao Zhong

    2017-08-08

    Considering the general application of dedicated small-animal positron emission tomography/computed tomography is limited, an acceptable alternative in many situations might be clinical PET/CT. To estimate the feasibility of using clinical PET/CT with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose for high-resolution dynamic imaging and quantitative analysis of cancer xenografts in nude mice. Dynamic clinical PET/CT scans were performed on xenografts for 60 min after injection with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Scans were reconstructed with or without SharpIR method in two phases. And mice were sacrificed to extracting major organs and tumors, using ex vivo γ-counting as a reference. Strikingly, we observed that the image quality and the correlation between the all quantitive data from clinical PET/CT and the ex vivo counting was better with the SharpIR reconstructions than without. Our data demonstrate that clinical PET/CT scanner with SharpIR reconstruction is a valuable tool for imaging small animals in preclinical cancer research, offering dynamic imaging parameters, good image quality and accurate data quatification.

  10. Cervix carcinoma and incidental finding of medullary thyroid carcinoma by 18F-FDG PET/CT--clinical case.

    PubMed

    Chaushev, Borislav; Bochev, Pavel; Klisarova, Anelia; Yordanov, Kaloyan; Encheva, Elitsa; Dancheva, Jivka; Yordanova, Cvetelina; Hristozov, Kiril; Krasnaliev, Ivan; Radev, Radoslav; Nenkov, Rumen

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid nodules are encountered in clinical practice during the diagnostic procedures or patients' follow-up due to other diseases quite far from the thyroid gland with prevalence 4-50% in general population, depending on age, diagnostic method and race. The prevalence of thyroid nodules increases with age and their clarification should be done for their adequate treatment. An 18F-FDG PET/CT was done with a PET/CT scanner (Philips Gemini TF), consisting of dedicated lutetium orthosilicate full ring PET scanner and 16 slice CT. The PET/CT scan of the whole-body revealed on the CT portion a hypodense nodular lesion in the left lobe of the thyroid gland with increased uptake of 18F-FDG on the PET with SUVmax 10.3 and demonstrated a complete response to the induction therapy of the main oncological disease of the patient--squamous cell carcinoma. This clinical case demonstrates that whole-body 18F-FDG-PET/CT has an increasingly important role in the early evaluation of thyroid cancer as a second independent malignant localization. Focal thyroid lesion with high risk of thyroid malignancy was incidentally found on 18F-FDG PET/CT.

  11. Impact of Manual and Automated Interpretation of Fused PET/CT Data on Esophageal Target Definitions in Radiation Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S. Killoran, Joseph H.; Mamede, Marcelo; Mamon, Harvey J.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: We compare CT-only based esophageal tumor definition with two PET/CT based methods: (1) manual contouring and (2) a semiautomated method based on specific thresholds. Methods and Materials: Patients with esophageal cancer treated at Brigham and Women's Hospital from 2003 to 2006 were identified. CT-based tumor volumes were compared with manual PET/CT-based volumes and semiautomated PET-based tumor volumes. Differences were scored as (1) minor if the superior or inferior extent of the primary tumor (or both) differed by 1-2 cm and (2) major if the difference was > 2 cm or if different noncontiguous nodal regions were identified as being grossly involved. Results: Comparing CT-based gross tumor volumes (GTVs) to manually defined PET/CT-based GTVs, use of PET changed volumes for 21 of 25 (84%) patients: 12 patients (48%) exhibited minor differences, whereas for 9 patients (36%), the differences were major. For 4 (16%) patients, the major difference was due to discrepancy in celiac or distant mediastinal lymph node involvement. Use of automated PET volumes changed the manual PET length in 14 patients (56%): 8 minor and 6 major. Conclusions: The use of PET/CT in treatment planning for esophageal cancer can affect target definition. Two PET-based techniques can also produce significantly different tumor volumes in a large percentage of patients. Further investigations to clarify the optimal use of PET/CT data in treatment planning are warranted.

  12. Correlation of immunohistopathological expression of somatostatin receptor 2 with standardised uptake values in 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Miederer, Matthias; Seidl, Stefan; Buck, Andreas; Scheidhauer, Klemens; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Perren, Aurel

    2009-01-01

    In clinical routine somatostatin analogue positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) such as (68)Ga-DOTA-Tyr-octreotide (DOTATOC)-PET/CT could substitute conventional (111)In-Octreotide scintigraphy. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) might be a tool to predict positivity of (68)Ga-DOTATOC in patients where initial staging was not performed, e.g., in incidental findings. We therefore compared a score of SSTR2-IHC with the in vivo standard uptake value (SUV) of preoperative or prebiopsy (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT. In 18 patients, (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT scans were quantified with SUV calculations and correlated to a cell membrane-based SSTR2-IHC score (ranging from 0 to 3). Negative IHC scores were consistent with SUV values below 10. Furthermore, all score 2 and 3 specimens corresponded with high SUV values (above 15). SSTR2-IHC scores correlated well with SUV values and we propose to use SSTR2 immunohistochemistry in patients missing a preoperative PET scan to indicate (68)Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT as method for restaging and follow-up in individual patients.

  13. Evaluation of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastases with 18F-NaF and 18F-Fluorocholine PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, Mohsen; Rezaee, Alireza; Geinitz, Hans; Loidl, Wolfgang; Pirich, Christian; Langsteger, Werner

    2016-10-01

    (18)F-fluorocholine is a specific promising agent for imaging tumor cell proliferation, particularly in prostate cancer, using PET/CT. It is a beneficial tool in the early detection of marrow-based metastases because it excludes distant metastases and evaluates the response to hormone therapy. In addition, (18)F-fluorocholine has the potential to differentiate between degenerative and malignant osseous abnormalities because degenerative changes are not choline-avid; however, the agent may accumulate in recent traumatic bony lesions. On the other hand, (18)F-NaF PET/CT can indicate increased bone turnover and is generally used in the assessment of primary and secondary osseous malignancies, the evaluation of response to treatment, and the clarification of abnormalities on other imaging modalities or clinical data. (18)F-NaF PET/CT is a highly sensitive method in the evaluation of bone metastases from prostate cancer, but it has problematic specificity, mainly because of tracer accumulation in degenerative and inflammatory bone diseases. In summary, (18)F-NaF PET/CT is a highly sensitive method, but (18)F-fluorocholine PET/CT can detect early bone marrow metastases and provide greater specificity in the detection of bone metastases in patients with prostate cancer. However, the difference seems not to be significant.

  14. Positron emission tomography (PET) attenuation correction artefacts in PET/CT and PET/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hartung-Knemeyer, V; Forsting, M; Antoch, G; Heusner, T A

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effect of implanted medical materials on 18F-fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI using a Dixon-based segmentation method for MRI-based attenuation correction (MRAC), PET/CT and CT-based attenuation-corrected PET (PETCTAC). Methods: 12 patients (8 males and 4 females; age 58±11 years) with implanted medical materials prospectively underwent whole-body 18F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI. CT, MRI and MRAC maps as well as PETCTAC and PETMRAC images were reviewed for the presence of artefacts. Their morphology and effect on the estimation of the 18F-FDG uptake (no effect, underestimation, overestimation compared with non-corrected images) were compared. In PETMRAC images, a volume of interest was drawn in the area of the artefact and in a reference site (contralateral body part); the mean and maximum standardised uptake values (SUVmean; SUVmax) were measured. Results: Of 27 implanted materials (20 dental fillings, 3 injection ports, 3 hip prostheses and 1 sternal cerclage), 27 (100%) caused artefacts in CT, 19 (70%) in T1 weighted MRI and 17 (63%) in MRAC maps. 20 (74%) caused a visual overestimation of the 18F-FDG uptake in PETCTAC, 2 (7%) caused an underestimation and 5 (19%) had no effect. In PETMRAC, 19 (70%) caused spherical extinctions and 8 (30%) had no effect. Mean values for SUVmean and SUVmax were significantly decreased in artefact-harbouring sites (p<0.001). Conclusion: Contrary to PET attenuation correction artefacts in PET/CT, which often show an overestimation of the 18F-FDG uptake, MRAC artefacts owing to implanted medical materials in most cases cause an underestimation. Advances in knowledge: Being aware of the morphology of artefacts owing to implanted medical materials avoids interpretation errors when reading PET/MRI. PMID:23580397

  15. Correlative Imaging in a Patient with Cystic Thymoma: CT, MR and PET/CT Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Valeria; Esposito, Alfredo; Maurea, Simone; Camera, Luigi; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Palmieri, Giovannella; Buonerba, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cystic thymoma is a rare variant of thymic neoplasm characterized by almost complete cystic degeneration with mixed internal structure. We describe a case of a 60 year-old woman with a cystic thymoma studied with advanced tomographic imaging stydies. CT, MRI and PET/CT with 18F-FDG were performed; volumetric CT and MRI images provided better anatomic evaluation for pre-operative assessment, while PET/CT was helpful for lesion characterization based on 18F-FDG uptake. Although imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative evaluation of cystic thymoma, final diagnosis still remains surgical. Case Report A 60-year-old woman with recent chest pain and no history of previous disease was admitted to our departement to investigate the result of a previous chest X-ray that showed bilateral mediastinal enlargement; for this purpose, enhanced chest CT scan was performed using a 64-rows scanner (Toshiba, Aquilion 64, Japan) before and after intravenous bolus administration of iodinated non ionic contrast agent; CT images demonstrated the presence of a large mediastinal mass (11×8 cm) located in the anterior mediastinum who extended from the anonymous vein to the cardio-phrenic space, compressing the left atrium and causing medium lobe atelectasis; bilateral pleural effusion was also present. Conclusions In conclusion, correlative imaging plays a foundamental role for the diagnostic evaluation of patient with cystic thymoma. In particular, volumetric CT and MRI studies can provide better anatomic informations regarding internal structure and local tumor spread for pre-operative assessment. Conversely, metabolic imaging using 18F-FDG PET/CT is helpful for lesion characterization differentiating benign from malignant lesion on the basis of intense tracer uptake. The role of PET/MRI is still under investigation. However, final diagnosis still remains surgical even though imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative patient management. PMID:25593635

  16. Head and neck PET/CT therapy response interpretation criteria (Hopkins criteria) - external validation study.

    PubMed

    Kendi, Ayse Tuba; Brandon, David; Switchenko, Jeffrey; Wadsworth, Jeffery Trad; El-Deiry, Mark W; Saba, Nabil F; Schuster, David M; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2017-01-01

    Qualitative assessment of PET/CT results in post therapy is very important to provide a reproducible and systemic reporting. A recently introduced response criteria, known as the Hopkins criteria showed promising results. Our aim is to externally validate the Hopkins interpretation system to assess therapy response in head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). The study included 69 biopsy proven HNSCC patients who underwent post therapy PET/CT between 5-24 weeks after completion of therapy. PET/CT images were interpreted by one nuclear medicine physician and one nuclear radiologist, independently. The studies were scored according to the Hopkins criteria for right neck, left neck, primary tumor site, and overall assessment. Scores 1, 2, 3 were considered as negative and scores 4 and 5 were considered as positive for tumors. Inter-reader variability was assessed using percent agreement and Kappa statistics. Progression-free survival (PFS) was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Of the 69 patients, 59 (85.5%) were males, with a mean age of 62.8 years. The percent agreement between readers for overall, right neck, left neck, and primary tumor site were 91.3%, 97.6%, 97.6%, 91.3% respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the overall therapy assessment were 66.7%, 87.3%, 33%, 96.5% respectively. Cox univariate regression analysis showed positive primary tumor site scores and overall scores were associated with a higher risk of progression (p<0.05). External validation of Hopkins criteria showed excellent inter-reader agreement and prediction of PFS in HNSCC patients.

  17. ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ PET/CT imaging of musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Withofs, Nadia; Charlier, Edith; Simoni, Paolo; Alvarez-Miezentseva, Victoria; Mievis, Frédéric; Giacomelli, Fabrice; Mella, Christine; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Malaise, Olivier; de Seny, Dominique; Malaise, Michel; Hustinx, Roland

    2015-12-01

    This work reports on musculoskeletal uptake of ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂, targeting the integrin αvβ3, in patients who had undergone ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) for oncologic purposes. Whole-body ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ PET/CT images of 62 cancer patients were retrospectively reviewed to detect foci of musculoskeletal ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ uptake. For 37 patients, a FDG PET/CT performed in clinical settings was available. In each joint with an abnormal uptake, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was estimated. A total of 260 musculoskeletal foci of ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ uptake were detected. Most common sites of uptake were joints and discs (n = 160; 61.5%), entheses (osteotendinous and osteoligamentous junctions; n = 55; 21.2%) and recent fractures (n = 18; 6.9%). In addition, 27 (10.4%) miscellaneous foci were detected. Out of the 146 lesions for which a FDG PET was available, 63% showed both ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ and FDG uptake, 33.6% did not show FDG avidity and 3.4% showed only FDG uptake. The uptake intensity of the 92 lesions positive with ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ and FDG was similar with both radiopharmaceuticals, but the target-to-background (blood pool or muscle) ratios were significantly higher with ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ than with FDG (p < 0.0001). The ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ uptake in joints, spine degenerative diseases and tendons was highly prevalent in our population. Up to one-third of ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ foci showed no FDG uptake suggesting that ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ signal may not be related to inflammatory angiogenesis only.

  18. PET CT Identifies Reactivation Risk in Cynomolgus Macaques with Latent M. tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Philana Ling; Maiello, Pauline; Gideon, Hannah P.; Cadena, Anthony M.; Rodgers, Mark A.; Gregg, Robert; O’Malley, Melanie; Fillmore, Daniel; Frye, L. James; Rutledge, Tara; DiFazio, Robert M.; Janssen, Christopher; Klein, Edwin; Andersen, Peter L.; Fortune, Sarah M.; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection presents across a spectrum in humans, from latent infection to active tuberculosis. Among those with latent tuberculosis, it is now recognized that there is also a spectrum of infection and this likely contributes to the variable risk of reactivation tuberculosis. Here, functional imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxygluose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET CT) of cynomolgus macaques with latent M. tuberculosis infection was used to characterize the features of reactivation after tumor necrosis factor (TNF) neutralization and determine which imaging characteristics before TNF neutralization distinguish reactivation risk. PET CT was performed on latently infected macaques (n = 26) before and during the course of TNF neutralization and a separate set of latently infected controls (n = 25). Reactivation occurred in 50% of the latently infected animals receiving TNF neutralizing antibody defined as development of at least one new granuloma in adjacent or distant locations including extrapulmonary sites. Increased lung inflammation measured by PET and the presence of extrapulmonary involvement before TNF neutralization predicted reactivation with 92% sensitivity and specificity. To define the biologic features associated with risk of reactivation, we used these PET CT parameters to identify latently infected animals at high risk for reactivation. High risk animals had higher cumulative lung bacterial burden and higher maximum lesional bacterial burdens, and more T cells producing IL-2, IL-10 and IL-17 in lung granulomas as compared to low risk macaques. In total, these data support that risk of reactivation is associated with lung inflammation and higher bacterial burden in macaques with latent Mtb infection. PMID:27379816

  19. Gallium-68 DOTATOC PET/CT in vivo characterization of somatostatin receptor expression in the prostate.

    PubMed

    Todorović-Tirnanić, Mila V; Gajić, Milan M; Obradović, Vladimir B; Baum, Richard P

    2014-04-01

    The aim was to investigate somatostatin receptor (sstr) expression in normal prostate by determining the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in neuroendocrine tumor (NET) patients, without NET involvement of the prostate gland, for establishing the reference standard. Sixty-four NET patients underwent (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT. SUVmax of the prostate gland, normal liver, testes, and gluteus muscles were evaluated. The prostate gland size was measured. Statistical analysis was performed using dedicated software (SPSS13). Mean/median (68)Ga-DOTATOC SUVmax values were as follows: normal prostate 2.6 ± 0.0, slightly enlarged prostate 4.2 ± 1.6, prostatic hypertrophy 4.9 ± 1.6, prostatic hyperplasia 5.0 ± 1.5, prostate cancer 9.5 ± 2.1, normal liver 7.3 ± 1.8, testes 1.8 ± 0.5, and gluteus 1.0 ± 0.2. The normal prostate gland had three times less sstr expression than normal liver tissue. Strong correlation was found between patient age and sstr expression in prostate/prostate size. No significant difference existed in sstr expression between prostatic hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Much higher sstr expression was found in prostatic cancer compared with normal prostate. (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT defines the baseline sstr uptake in prostate not affected by NET (significantly lower than in the liver). Higher values were established in prostatic hyperplasia and hypertrophy. Only concomitant prostate cancer was associated with higher SUVmax in comparison with non-neoplastic liver.

  20. Gallium-68 DOTATOC PET/CT In Vivo Characterization of Somatostatin Receptor Expression in the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Gajić, Milan M.; Obradović, Vladimir B.; Baum, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim: The aim was to investigate somatostatin receptor (sstr) expression in normal prostate by determining the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in neuroendocrine tumor (NET) patients, without NET involvement of the prostate gland, for establishing the reference standard. Methods: Sixty-four NET patients underwent 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT. SUVmax of the prostate gland, normal liver, testes, and gluteus muscles were evaluated. The prostate gland size was measured. Statistical analysis was performed using dedicated software (SPSS13). Results: Mean/median 68Ga-DOTATOC SUVmax values were as follows: normal prostate 2.6±0.0, slightly enlarged prostate 4.2±1.6, prostatic hypertrophy 4.9±1.6, prostatic hyperplasia 5.0±1.5, prostate cancer 9.5±2.1, normal liver 7.3±1.8, testes 1.8±0.5, and gluteus 1.0±0.2. The normal prostate gland had three times less sstr expression than normal liver tissue. Strong correlation was found between patient age and sstr expression in prostate/prostate size. No significant difference existed in sstr expression between prostatic hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Much higher sstr expression was found in prostatic cancer compared with normal prostate. Conclusion: 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT defines the baseline sstr uptake in prostate not affected by NET (significantly lower than in the liver). Higher values were established in prostatic hyperplasia and hypertrophy. Only concomitant prostate cancer was associated with higher SUVmax in comparison with non-neoplastic liver. PMID:24450327

  1. Radiation dose to radiosensitive organs in PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination using versatile optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salasiah, M.; Nordin, A. J.; Fathinul Fikri, A. S.; Hishar, H.; Tamchek, N.; Taiman, K.; Ahmad Bazli, A. K.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Mizanur, R.; Noor, Noramaliza M.

    2013-05-01

    Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) provides a precise method in order to diagnose obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), compared to single photon emission tomography (SPECT). PET is suitable for obese and patients who underwent pharmacologic stress procedures. It has the ability to evaluate multivessel coronary artery disease by recording changes in left ventricular function from rest to peak stress and quantifying myocardial perfusion (in mL/min/g of tissue). However, the radiation dose to the radiosensitive organs has become crucial issues in the Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography(PET/CT) scanning procedure. The objective of this study was to estimate radiation dose to radiosensitive organs of patients who underwent PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination at Centre for Diagnostic Nuclear Imaging, Universiti Putra Malaysia in one month period using versatile optical fibres (Ge-B-doped Flat Fibre) and LiF (TLD-100 chips). All stress and rest paired myocardial perfusion PET/CT scans will be performed with the use of Rubidium-82 (82Rb). The optic fibres were loaded into plastic capsules and attached to patient's eyes, thyroid and breasts prior to the infusion of 82Rb, to accommodate the ten cases for the rest and stress PET scans. The results were compared with established thermoluminescence material, TLD-100 chips. The result shows that radiation dose given by TLD-100 and Germanium-Boron-doped Flat Fiber (Ge-B-doped Flat Fiber) for these five organs were comparable to each other where the p>0.05. For CT scans,thyroid received the highest dose compared to other organs. Meanwhile, for PET scans, breasts received the highest dose.

  2. Injectable facial fillers: imaging features, complications, and diagnostic pitfalls at MRI and PET CT.

    PubMed

    Mundada, Pravin; Kohler, Romain; Boudabbous, Sana; Toutous Trellu, Laurence; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Minerva

    2017-10-04

    Injectable fillers are widely used for facial rejuvenation, correction of disabling volumetric fat loss in HIV-associated facial lipoatrophy, Romberg disease, and post-traumatic facial disfiguring. The purpose of this article is to acquaint the reader with the anatomy of facial fat compartments, as well as with the properties and key imaging features of commonly used facial fillers, filler-related complications, interpretation pitfalls, and dermatologic conditions mimicking filler-related complications. The distribution of facial fillers is characteristic and depends on the anatomy of the superficial fat compartments. Silicone has signature MRI features, calcium hydroxyapatite has characteristic calcifications, whereas other injectable fillers have overlapping imaging features. Most fillers (hyaluronic acid, collagen, and polyalkylimide-polyacrylamide hydrogels) have signal intensity patterns compatible with high water content. On PET-CT, most fillers show physiologic high FDG uptake, which should not be confounded with pathology. Abscess, cellulitis, non-inflammatory nodules, and foreign body granulomas are the most common filler-related complications, and imaging can help in the differential diagnosis. Diffusion weighted imaging helps in detecting a malignant lesion masked by injected facial fillers. Awareness of imaging features of facial fillers and their complications helps to avoid misinterpretation of MRI, and PET-CT scans and facilitates therapeutic decisions in unclear clinical cases. • Facial fillers are common incidental findings on MRI and PET-CT scans. • They have a characteristic appearance and typical anatomic distribution • Although considered as safe, facial filler injections are associated with several complications • As they may mask malignancy, knowledge of typical imaging features is mandatory. • MRI is a problem-solving tool for unclear cases.

  3. Pre and post PET-CT impact on oesophageal cancer management: a retrospective analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, NA; Razak, HRA; Vinjamuri, S.

    2017-05-01

    Assessment of the retrospective cancer incidence, prevalence and crude survival rates of oesophageal cancer to allow comparison between pre and post PET-CT introduction are part of 4 phase cost effectiveness research. It will provide baseline data for to assess PET or PET-CT cost effective potential for staging. A total of 849 patient’s data received from NWCIS databases with various stages of oesophageal cancer between 2001 and 2008. The fundamental activities are retrospective analysis of patient data. In most cases where appropriate, results are presented with 95 percent confidence intervals (CI). Variances between patient groups and variables are assessed using chi-square test. In cases where it deems vital, multiple logistic regression are used to modify for potential confounder such as age and sex. All p-values are two-sided and any value lower than 0.05 were considered to suggest a statistically significant result. Retrospective analysis were categorised into two categories, patients from 2001-2003 considered as pre PET and post PET for 2004-2008. This categorisation allows better comparison of patients’ survival trend to be made between both groups. Rates are presented in percentages and being grouped by tumour characteristics and other variables associated with demographic profile, diagnosis, staging and treatment. Results allowed comparison of oesophageal cancer trends between the pre and post PET-CT introduction such as changes in incidence rate or changes in survival. These data were used to normalise the decision tree model so that cost-effectiveness analysis can be performed across the whole population.

  4. Computer-assisted quantitative evaluation of therapeutic responses for lymphoma using serial PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Xue, Zhong; Xing, Jiong; Lee, Daniel Y; Gottschalk, Stephen M; Heslop, Helen E; Bollard, Catherine M; Wong, Stephen T C

    2010-04-01

    Molecular imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) have emerged as an essential diagnostic tool for monitoring treatment response in lymphoma patients. However, quantitative assessment of treatment outcomes from serial scans is often difficult, laborious, and time consuming. Automatic quantization of longitudinal PET/CT scans provides more efficient and comprehensive quantitative evaluation of cancer therapeutic responses. This study develops and validates a Longitudinal Image Navigation and Analysis (LINA) system for this quantitative imaging application. LINA is designed to automatically construct longitudinal correspondence along serial images of individual patients for changes in tumor volume and metabolic activity via regions of interest (ROI) segmented from a given time point image and propagated into the space of all follow-up PET/CT images. We applied LINA retrospectively to nine lymphoma patients enrolled in an immunotherapy clinical trial conducted at the Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Baylor College of Medicine. This methodology was compared to the readout by a diagnostic radiologist, who manually measured the ROI metabolic activity as defined by the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax). Quantitative results showed that the measured SUVs obtained from automatic mapping are as accurate as semiautomatic segmentation and consistent with clinical examination findings. The average of relative squared differences of SUVmax between automatic and semiautomatic segmentation was found to be 0.02. These data support a role for LINA in facilitating quantitative analysis of serial PET/CT images to efficiently assess cancer treatment responses in a comprehensive and intuitive software platform. Copyright 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. (18) F-FDG-PET/CT as adjunctive diagnostic modalities in canine fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Grobman, Megan; Cohn, Leah; Knapp, Stephanie; Bryan, Jeffrey N; Reinero, Carol

    2017-09-18

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) is a persistent or recurrent fever for which the underlying source has not been identified despite diagnostic investigation. In people, (18) F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18) F-FDG-PET) alone or in combination with computed tomography (CT) is often beneficial in detecting the source of fever when other diagnostics have failed. Veterinary reports describing use of these modalities in animals with fever of unknown origin are currently lacking. Aims of this retrospective case series were to describe (18) F-FDG-PET or (18) F-FDG-PET/CT findings in a group of dogs with fever of unknown origin. Dogs presenting to a single center between April 2012 and August 2015 were included. A total of four dogs met inclusion criteria and underwent either positron emission tomography (n = 2) or positron emission tomography/CT (n = 2) as a part of their diagnostic investigation. All subjects underwent extensive diagnostic testing prior to (18) F-FDG-PET/CT. Initial diagnostic evaluation failed to identify either a cause of fever or an anatomic location of disease in these four dogs. In each dog, positron emission tomography or positron emission tomography/CT was either able to localize or rule out the presence of focal lesion thereby allowing for directed sampling and/or informed disease treatment. Follow up (18) F-FDG-PET/CT scans performed in two patients showed improvement of observed abnormalities (n = 1) or detected recurrence of disease allowing for repeated treatment before clinical signs recurred (n = 1). Fever resolved after specific treatment in each dog. Findings from the current study supported the use of positron emission tomography or positron emission tomography/CT as adjunctive imaging modalities for diagnosis and gauging response to therapy in dogs with fever of unknown origin. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  6. Quantifying the effect of IV contrast media on integrated PET/CT: clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mawlawi, Osama; Erasmus, Jeremy J; Munden, Reginald F; Pan, Tinsu; Knight, Amy E; Macapinlac, Homer A; Podoloff, Donald A; Chasen, Marvin

    2006-02-01

    The use of IV contrast media in PET/CT can result in an overestimation of PET attenuation factors that potentially can affect interpretation. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of IV contrast media in PET/CT and assess its impact on patients with intrathoracic malignancies. Nine patients had CTs performed with and without IV contrast media followed by (18)F-FDG PET. PET images were reconstructed using contrast-enhanced and unenhanced CT. To quantify the effect of contrast media on standardized uptake values (SUV), similar regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on the subclavian vein, heart, liver, spleen, and site of malignancy on both CT and corresponding reconstructed PET images, and the mean and maximum values were compared. In addition, two physicians blinded to the imaging parameters that were used evaluated the reconstructed PET images to assess whether IV contrast media had an effect on clinical interpretation. For all patient studies, the subclavian vein region on the ipsilateral side of contrast media administration had the highest increase in CT numbers with a corresponding average SUV(max) increase of 27.1%. Similarly, ROIs of the heart and at the site of malignancy showed an increase in the maximum attenuation value with a corresponding average SUV(max) increase of 16.7% and 8.4%, respectively. Other locations had relatively small attenuation value differences with a correspondingly negligible SUV variation. Although there is a significant increase in SUV in regions of high-contrast concentration when contrast-enhanced CT is used for attenuation correction, this increase is clinically insignificant. Accordingly, in PET/CT, IV contrast-enhanced CT can be used in combination with the PET to evaluate patients with cancer.

  7. MicroPET/CT Colonoscopy in long-lived Min mouse using NM404

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Matthew B.; Halberg, Richard B.; Schutten, Melissa M.; Weichert, Jamey P.

    2009-02-01

    Colon cancer is a leading cause of death in the US, even though many cases are preventable if tumors are detected early. One technique to promote screening is Computed Tomography Colonography (CTC). NM404 is a second generation phospholipid ether analogue which has demonstrated selective uptake and prolonged retention in 43/43 types of malignant tumors but not inflammatory sites or premalignant lesions. The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate (SWR x B6 )F1.Min mice as a preclinical model to test MicroPET/CT dual modality virtual colonoscopy. Each animal was given an IV injection of 124I-NM404 (100 uCi) 24, 48 and 96 hours prior to scanning on a dedicated microPET/CT system. Forty million counts were histogrammed in 3D and reconstructed using an OSEM 2D algorithm. Immediately after PET acquisition, a 93 m volumetric CT was acquired at 80 kVp, 800 uA and 350 ms exposures. Following CT, the mouse was sacrificed. The entire intestinal tract was excised, washed, insufflated, and scanned ex vivo A total of eight tissue samples from the small intestine were harvested: 5 were benign adenomas, 2 were malignant adenocarcinomas, and 1 was a Peyer's patch (lymph tissue) . The sites of these samples were positioned on CT and PET images based on morphological cues and the distance from the anus. Only 1/8 samples showed tracer uptake. several hot spots in the microPET image were not chosen for histology. (SWR x B6)F1.Min mice develop benign and malignant tumors, making this animal model a strong candidate for future dual modality microPET/CT virtual colonography studies.

  8. Lymph node detection in IASLC-defined zones on PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yihua; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-03-01

    Lymph node detection is challenging due to the low contrast between lymph nodes as well as surrounding soft tissues and the variation in nodal size and shape. In this paper, we propose several novel ideas which are combined into a system to operate on positron emission tomography/ computed tomography (PET/CT) images to detect abnormal thoracic nodes. First, our previous Automatic Anatomy Recognition (AAR) approach is modified where lymph node zones predominantly following International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) specifications are modeled as objects arranged in a hierarchy along with key anatomic anchor objects. This fuzzy anatomy model built from diagnostic CT images is then deployed on PET/CT images for automatically recognizing the zones. A novel globular filter (g-filter) to detect blob-like objects over a specified range of sizes is designed to detect the most likely locations and sizes of diseased nodes. Abnormal nodes within each automatically localized zone are subsequently detected via combined use of different items of information at various scales: lymph node zone model poses found at recognition indicating the geographic layout at the global level of node clusters, g-filter response which hones in on and carefully selects node-like globular objects at the node level, and CT and PET gray value but within only the most plausible nodal regions for node presence at the voxel level. The models are built from 25 diagnostic CT scans and refined for an object hierarchy based on a separate set of 20 diagnostic CT scans. Node detection is tested on an additional set of 20 PET/CT scans. Our preliminary results indicate node detection sensitivity and specificity at around 90% and 85%, respectively.

  9. (18)F-FDG PET/CT in lung cancer. The added value of quantification.

    PubMed

    Lapa, P; Marques, M; Isidoro, J; Barata, F; Costa, G; de Lima, J P

    2017-05-26

    To test a software application for the quantification of metabolic heterogeneity and to evaluate its superiority in relation to visual interpretation. To investigate if a quantitative analysis adds information to the interpretation of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT. The study analyzed 215 patients with a (18)F-FDG-PET/CT done for the initial staging of lung cancer between March 2011 and December 2015. The study included 57 (26.5%) women and 158 (73.5%) men, with ages ranging from 34 to 88 years (mean±SD: 67.23±10.04). There were 82 surgical stages (I, II, IIIA), and 133 non-surgical stages (IIIB, IV). The primary tumour was analyzed quantitatively by obtaining the following parameters: SUVmax, metabolic active tumour volume (MATV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and the entropy heterogeneity index (ET). Heterogeneity was assessed visually. Death dates and/or the follow-up time were registered, ranging from 0.70 to 67.60 months (mean±SD: 23.20±17.68). In multivariate analysis, ET emerged as a better predictor of survival than visual analysis of heterogeneity that was not statistically significant. The C-index determination demonstrated that all quantitative parameters were statistically-significant predictors of survival. Cut-offs were obtained in order to compare survival times. A multivariate analysis was performed. In the total population, the best predictor was the TNM stage, but MATV, ET, and male gender were statistically significant and independent predictors of survival. In stages without surgical indication, the best predictor was the TNM stage, but the MATV and male gender were statistically significant and independent predictors of survival. In the surgical stages, ET was the only statistically significant and independent predictor of survival. Quantification adds prognostic information to the visual analysis of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  10. Intraindividual homogeneity of (18)F-FDG PET/CT parameters in HPV-positive OPSCC.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shachi Jenny; Wittekindt, Claus; Knuth, Jennifer; Steiner, Dagmar; Wuerdemann, Nora; Laur, Maren; Kroll, Tobias; Wagner, Steffen; Klussmann, Jens Peter

    2017-10-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT is widely used in clinical oncology. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) represents an emerging disease that differs from HPV-negative OPSCC in clinical behavior and tumour biology. In these tumours, HPV-oncogenes might lead to distinct alterations in metabolic pathways. Therefore, we compared metabolic parameters using (18)F-FDG PET/CT in HPV-positive and HPV-negative OPSCC in relation to histopathological findings. Eighty-six patients with OPSCC received pre-therapeutic (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Standardised uptake volume (SUV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and metabolic tumour volume (MTV) were analysed for the primary tumour. SUVmax was determined for neck lymph nodes. HPV-status was determined; overall survival rates (OS) were estimated. 32/86 patients (37.2%) had HPV-related OPSCC. Overall, PET-parameters in primary tumours of both groups did not differ significantly. Comparing early with locally advanced primary tumours, there was a significant increase in (18)F-FDG uptake in HPV-negative patients (p<0.001). Positive nodes of HPV-related OPSCC showed significantly higher SUVmax values (p=0.039) compared to HPV-negative OPSCC. Strikingly, there was a higher intraindividual homogeneity of (18)F-FDG uptake between primary and respective positive nodes in HPV-related primary OPSCC (p=0.001). SUV-max and -mean values did not correlate with OS in HPV-related OPSCC. The intraindividual homogeneity of 18F-FDG uptake in HPV-related OPSCC could reflect the more homogenously, HPV-triggered carcinogenesis compared to the mutation-driven carcinogenesis in the HPV-negative OPSCC with heterogenic (18)F-FDG uptake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET/CT: False-Positive Results due to Sarcoidosis?

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Robert M.; Djannatian, Manoutschehr; Czech, Norbert; Nitsche, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 72-year-old male patient who developed sarcoidosis of the mediastinal lymph nodes, the liver, and the prostate 11 years ago. Seven years later, he underwent transurethral resection of the prostate by laser due to hematuria. Pathology of the resected chips showed a ‘granulomatous prostatitis with epitheloid cells’. Malignancy was histologically excluded at that time. Four years later, he was diagnosed with an undifferentiated prostate carcinoma, with a Gleason score of 5 + 4 = 9. After initiation of antihormonal therapy, he underwent radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy, which revealed a pT3b pN1 carcinoma with infiltrated resection margins. Three months later, the prostate-specific antigen level was 1.4 ng/ml, and a local recurrence was suspected by ultrasound; consequently, a 68Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT was performed. This examination seemed to confirm the local recurrence, a right pelvic lymph node metastasis, and a hepatic metastasis. However, ultrasound with contrast medium could not confirm the metastatic spread to the liver. In palliative intention, radiotherapy of the pelvis was done. After 50 Gy, the supposed recurrence had markedly shrunk, and an additional boost dose with 16.2 Gy was applied. Two years later, the patient is still free of disease. Due to this clinical development, we doubt the diagnosis of a fulminant progression of the prostate cancer as suspected by PSMA-PET/CT. Instead, we suspect a recurrence of the previously proven sarcoidosis leading to false-positive results. Our focus in this report is on the interaction between PSMA-PET/CT and sarcoidosis. Another report on a case of sarcoidosis of the spleen seems to confirm this possibility [Kobe et al: Clin Nucl Med 2015;40: 897–898]. PMID:27721768

  12. PET/CT for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning in Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Karam, Irene; Devic, Slobodan; Hickeson, Marc; Roberge, David; Turcotte, Robert E.; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To study the possibility of incorporating positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) information into radiotherapy treatment planning in patients with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Methods and Materials: We studied 17 patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy at our institution from 2005 to 2007. All patients had a high-grade STS and had had a staging PET/CT scan. For each patient, an MRI-based gross tumor volume (GTV), considered to be the contemporary standard for radiotherapy treatment planning, was outlined on a T1-gadolinium enhanced axial MRI (GTV{sub MRI}), and a second set of GTVs were outlined using different threshold values on PET images (GTV{sub PET}). PET-based target volumes were compared with the MRI-based GTV. Threshold values for target contouring were determined as a multiple (from 2 to 10 times) of the background soft tissue uptake values (B) sampled over healthy tissue. Results: PET-based GTVs contoured using a threshold value of 2 or 2.5 most closely resembled the GTV{sub MRI} volumes. Higher threshold values lead to PET volumes much smaller than the GTV{sub MRI}. The standard deviations between the average volumes of GTV{sub PET} and GTV{sub MRI} ratios for all thresholds were large, ranging from 36% for 2 xB up to 93% for 10 xB. Maximum uptake-to-background ratio correlated poorly with the maximum standardized uptake values. Conclusions: It is unlikely that PET/CT will make a significant contribution in GTV definition for radiotherapy treatment planning in patients with STS using threshold methods on PET images. Future studies will focus on molecular imaging and tumor physiology.

  13. Incidental focal colonic uptake in studies (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Servente, L; Gigirey, V; García Fontes, M; Alonso, O

    2017-07-24

    To assess the frequency of focal colonic uptake as an incidental observation in (18)F-FDG PET/CT studies, and to correlate this finding with histopathological results. Out of a total of 3,176 PET/CT studies with (18)F-FDG systematic analysis was carried out on 30 studies in which colonic focal uptake was observed. Patients with known colorectal neoplasia were excluded. The maximum standardised uptake values (SUVm) and the morphological findings provided by the CT were recorded. The studies were reported by a radiologist and a nuclear medicine doctor. The findings were compared with endoscopy and pathology findings. Of the 30 patients with focal hypermetabolic lesions of the colon (0.94%), 15 were men and 15 were women with ages between 27 and 73 (mean 55 years). The reasons for PET/CT were bronchopulmonary cancer (4), breast cancer (4), tumour of unknown origin (4), melanoma (3), renal carcinoma (3), cervical neoplasia (2), adenocarcinoma of ovary (2), and others (8). Of the 23 colonoscopies performed, 10 patients (43.4%) had malignant lesions, 6 (26.1%) had pre-malignant lesions, and in 7 patients (30.4%) no lesion was identified or was benign. No endoscopy was performed on 7 patients for various reasons (patient refusal to perform the study, advanced oncological disease). An analysis was performed with the SUVm, with no statistically significant differences being found between malignant-premalignant lesions and benign lesions. Focal uptake in the colon of (18)F-FDG has clinical relevance, and is mainly associated with morphological lesions in CT. It should be evaluated, as it may be a second tumour or a pre-malignant lesion. It is recommended that all focal uptakes of the colon be evaluated with endoscopy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  14. Diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer with PET/CT imaging using the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor antagonist (68)Ga-RM2: Preliminary results in patients with negative or inconclusive [(18)F]Fluoroethylcholine-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Gesche; Popp, Ilinca; Christian Rischke, H; Drendel, Vanessa; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Bartholomä, Mark; Weber, Wolfgang A; Mansi, Rosalba; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Schultze-Seemann, Wolfgang; Meyer, Philipp T; Jilg, Cordula Annette

    2017-08-01

    [(18)F]fluoroethylcholine ((18)FECH) has been shown to be a valuable PET-tracer in recurrent prostate cancer (PCa), but still has limited accuracy. RM2 is a gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPr) antagonist that binds to GRPr on PCa cells. Recent studies suggest that GRPr imaging with PET/CT is a promising technique for staging and restaging of PCa. We explore the value of GRPr-PET using the (68)Ga-labeled GRPr antagonist RM2 in a selected population of patients with biochemically recurrent PCa and a negative/inconclusive (18)FECH-PET/CT. In this retrospective study 16 men with biochemical PCa relapse and negative (n = 14) or inconclusive (n = 2) (18)FECH-PET/CT underwent whole-body (68)Ga-RM2-PET/CT. Mean time from (18)FECH-PET/CT to (68)Ga-RM2-PET/CT was 6.1 ± 6.8 months. Primary therapies in these patients were radical prostatectomy (n = 13; 81.3%) or radiotherapy (n = 3; 18.7%). 14/16 patients (87.5%) had already undergone salvage therapies because of biochemical relapse prior to