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Sample records for coach program continuity

  1. Coaching the Coach: A Program for Development of Faculty Portfolio Coaches.

    PubMed

    Kopechek, Jack; Bardales, Cheryl; Lash, A Todd; Walker, Curtis; Pfeil, Sheryl; Ledford, Cynthia H

    2017-01-01

    Faculty coaching is recognized as an essential element for effective use of portfolios in undergraduate medical education, yet best practices for training these coaches are uncertain. New portfolio coaches participated in a multifaceted training program that included orienting modules, a 7.5-hr training workshop featuring analysis of reflective writing, an Observed Structured Teaching Exercise (OSTE), and subsequent longitudinal coaches' meetings for timely task training. Four desired coaching skills were emphasized in the initial training: creating a safe environment, explicitly using performance data, asking questions that elicit reflection, and guiding the student to develop future goals and plans. We collected and analyzed several outcomes: (a) coaches' self-assessment at key intervals, (b) open-ended written responses to three coaching vignettes, (c) video recordings of the OSTE, and (d) subsequent student evaluation of the coach. In an attempt to capture learning from the workshop, both the responses to written vignettes and the video-recorded encounters were coded for presence or absence of the four desired skills. Our portfolio and coaching program was instituted as part of a major undergraduate medical education reform. A new cohort of 25 coaches is enrolled with each matriculating student class, and each coach is assigned to work individually with 8-10 students, forming a coaching relationship that continues over 4 years. Coaches are compensated at 5% full-time equivalent. On coach self-assessment, the majority of coaches reported significant improvement in their perceived ability to assess a student's level of reflection, enhance reflection, use performance data, and guide a student to develop goals and plans. After two semesters, coach perception of improved abilities persisted. Students rated coaches as excellent (82%), reporting that coaches created safe environments (99%), promoted insight (92%), and aided in goal setting (97%). Written responses to

  2. Coaches' Preferences for Continuing Coaching Education in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kubayi, Alliance; Coopoo, Yoga; Morris-Eyton, Heather

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine coaches' preferences for continuing coaching education. The sample consisted of 122 male and 102 female coaches from the Gauteng Province of South Africa who were purposively recruited to participate in this study. The results of this study showed that the coaches wanted to learn more about motivational techniques, advanced instructional drills, advanced first aid, goal setting, character building and conditioning drills. The results further indicated that sport coaches would be more likely to continue their coaching education if they had a desire to coach at a high level, if topics were relevant and if courses were in line with league requirements and were available online. The practical implications of the findings for the development of coaching education programmes in South Africa were discussed.

  3. Coach Education and Continuing Professional Development: Experience and Learning to Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushion, Christopher J.; Armour, Kathy M.; Jones, Robyn L.

    2003-01-01

    Research over the last decade has demonstrated that it is experience and the observation of other coaches that remain the primary sources of knowledge for coaches. Despite this, coach education and continuing professional development fail to draw effectively on this experience. Using the work of Pierre Bourdieu, this paper attempts to understand…

  4. An Overview of Youth Coaching Certification Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quain, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    Describes basic reasons why training programs for youth sport coaches are necessary and provides information germane to several of such certification programs. Notes that it is important to understand that opportunities exist to enhance professionalism entailed in coaching youth sports. Explains how private sector has seized opportunity to provide…

  5. Peer Coaching and Technology Integration: An Evaluation of the Microsoft Peer Coaching Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Ann E.; Dawson, Kara; Yendol-Hoppey, Diane

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on an evaluation of the Microsoft Peer Coaching (MPC) program in Florida, USA. First, the design of the MPC materials was analyzed using characteristics of exemplary peer coaching and technology integration models. Second, facilitators (n = 14) and coaches (n = 46) who attended the MPC workshops in Florida were surveyed…

  6. Becoming an Executive Coach. Executive Coaching of a Major Defense Acquisition Program Leader

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    Defense AT&L: November-December 2010 42 Becoming an Executive Coach Executive Coaching of a Major Defense Acquisition Program Leader Lois Harper...2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Becoming an Executive Coach. Executive Coaching of a Major...the coachees were strategic: increased customer satisfac- tion, increased resources, increased workgroup productiv - ity, reduced cycle time

  7. Building Successful Leadership Coaching Relationships: Examining Impact of Matching Criteria in a Leadership Coaching Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Executive College Press. Baron, L. & Morin, L. (2001). The Coach-Coachee Relationship in Executive Coaching: A Field Study. Human Resource Development...coaching: A conceptual framework from an integrative review of practice and research. Human Resource Development Review, 4(4), 462-488. Kampa... Human Resources Program-Evaluation Handbook (pp. 262-282). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Peterson, D. B., & Miller, J. (2005). The alchemy of coaching

  8. A Scrutiny of the Coaching Education Program Scholarship since 1995

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullick, Bryan; Schempp, Paul; Mason, Ilse; Foo, Cornell; Vickers, Brad; Connolly, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    The authors sought to identify and categorize completed coaching education program (CEP) scholarship published in a recent 13-year period to provide a framework regarding the process of how coaches are prepared and certified. Scholarship was defined as data-based investigations, reviews, and position papers focused on CEPs, coaching training, and…

  9. Program Orientation for High School Sport Coaches. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) believes that prior to the start of each season, all high school head coaches, assistant coaches, and volunteer coaches should be required to participate in a comprehensive orientation to the sport program. This orientation should be planned and conducted by the athletic director or…

  10. A Scrutiny of the Coaching Education Program Scholarship since 1995

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullick, Bryan; Schempp, Paul; Mason, Ilse; Foo, Cornell; Vickers, Brad; Connolly, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    The authors sought to identify and categorize completed coaching education program (CEP) scholarship published in a recent 13-year period to provide a framework regarding the process of how coaches are prepared and certified. Scholarship was defined as data-based investigations, reviews, and position papers focused on CEPs, coaching training, and…

  11. Leadership for Literacy Coaching: The Principal's Role in Launching a New Coaching Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumura, Lindsay Clare; Sartoris, Mary; Bickel, Donna DiPrima; Garnier, Helen E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the relationship between principal leadership and variation in teachers' participation in a new literacy coaching program: Content-Focused Coaching[R] (CFC). Research design: Twenty-nine schools were randomly assigned to participate in the CFC program or to serve as a comparison. Interviews were conducted with…

  12. Leadership for Literacy Coaching: The Principal's Role in Launching a New Coaching Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumura, Lindsay Clare; Sartoris, Mary; Bickel, Donna DiPrima; Garnier, Helen E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the relationship between principal leadership and variation in teachers' participation in a new literacy coaching program: Content-Focused Coaching[R] (CFC). Research design: Twenty-nine schools were randomly assigned to participate in the CFC program or to serve as a comparison. Interviews were conducted with…

  13. Supporting Universal Prevention Programs: A Two-Phased Coaching Model

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Kimberly D.; Darney, Dana; Domitrovich, Celene; Keperling, Jennifer Pitchford; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Schools are adopting evidence-based programs designed to enhance students’ emotional and behavioral competencies at increasing rates (Hemmeter, Snyder, & Artman, 2011). At the same time, teachers express the need for increased support surrounding implementation of these evidence-based programs (Carter & Van Norman, 2010). Ongoing professional development in the form of coaching may enhance teacher skills and implementation (Noell et al., 2005; Stormont, Reinke, Newcomer, Darney, & Lewis, 2012). There exists a need for a coaching model that can be applied to a variety of teacher skill levels and one that guides coach decision-making about how best to support teachers. This article provides a detailed account of a two-phased coaching model with empirical support developed and tested with coaches and teachers in urban schools (Becker, Bradshaw, Domitrovich, & Ialongo, 2013). In the initial universal coaching phase, all teachers receive the same coaching elements regardless of their skill level. Then, in the tailored coaching phase, coaching varies according to the strengths and needs of each teacher. Specifically, more intensive coaching strategies are used only with teachers who need additional coaching supports whereas other teachers receive just enough support to consolidate and maintain their strong implementation. Examples of how coaches used the two-phased coaching model when working with teachers who were implementing two universal prevention programs (i.e., the PATHS® curriculum and PAX Good Behavior Game [PAX GBG]) provide illustrations of the application of this model. The potential reach of this coaching model extends to other school-based programs as well as other settings in which coaches partner with interventionists to implement evidence-based programs. PMID:23660973

  14. Supporting universal prevention programs: a two-phased coaching model.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kimberly D; Darney, Dana; Domitrovich, Celene; Keperling, Jennifer Pitchford; Ialongo, Nicholas S

    2013-06-01

    Schools are adopting evidence-based programs designed to enhance students' emotional and behavioral competencies at increasing rates (Hemmeter et al. in Early Child Res Q 26:96-109, 2011). At the same time, teachers express the need for increased support surrounding implementation of these evidence-based programs (Carter and Van Norman in Early Child Educ 38:279-288, 2010). Ongoing professional development in the form of coaching may enhance teacher skills and implementation (Noell et al. in School Psychol Rev 34:87-106, 2005; Stormont et al. 2012). There exists a need for a coaching model that can be applied to a variety of teacher skill levels and one that guides coach decision-making about how best to support teachers. This article provides a detailed account of a two-phased coaching model with empirical support developed and tested with coaches and teachers in urban schools (Becker et al. 2013). In the initial universal coaching phase, all teachers receive the same coaching elements regardless of their skill level. Then, in the tailored coaching phase, coaching varies according to the strengths and needs of each teacher. Specifically, more intensive coaching strategies are used only with teachers who need additional coaching supports, whereas other teachers receive just enough support to consolidate and maintain their strong implementation. Examples of how coaches used the two-phased coaching model when working with teachers who were implementing two universal prevention programs (i.e., the PATHS curriculum and PAX Good Behavior Game [PAX GBG]) provide illustrations of the application of this model. The potential reach of this coaching model extends to other school-based programs as well as other settings in which coaches partner with interventionists to implement evidence-based programs.

  15. Peer coaching: building collegial support for using innovative health programs.

    PubMed

    Gingiss, P L

    1993-02-01

    To ensure students achieve intended benefits from effective health programs, it is necessary to maximize program implementation and maintenance. Peer coaching provides a post-inservice staff development approach for health educators to strengthen teacher use of new health programs during implementation trials. While peer coaching positively influences teacher behavior and student outcomes, previous coaching programs have been limited in scope, have not been theoretically derived or adequately evaluated, and have not been systematically applied to health programs. This paper addresses teacher needs during trials, reviews peer coaching program features, and proposes a model to guide future planning, evaluation, and research. In this model, critical components of the coaching program include classroom assessments, coaching team cluster meetings, and administrative support. Strategies based on Social Learning Theory and Diffusion Theory are incorporated into the peer coaching program to influence teacher perceptions of their work roles, capability to implement a program, and commitment to the new instructional program. Interrelations among components are discussed and directions for future research and practice are suggested.

  16. Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program

    SciTech Connect

    Konzen, K.K.; Langsted, J.M.

    1998-02-01

    The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets.

  17. Primary Physical Education, Coaches and Continuing Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Richard; Capel, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Physical education (PE) in primary schools has traditionally been taught by qualified primary teachers. More recently, some teaching of PE in primary schools has been undertaken by coaches (mostly football coaches). These coaches hold national governing body awards but do not hold teaching qualifications. Thus, coaches may not be adequately…

  18. Primary Physical Education, Coaches and Continuing Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Richard; Capel, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Physical education (PE) in primary schools has traditionally been taught by qualified primary teachers. More recently, some teaching of PE in primary schools has been undertaken by coaches (mostly football coaches). These coaches hold national governing body awards but do not hold teaching qualifications. Thus, coaches may not be adequately…

  19. Promoting Success: A Professional Development Coaching Program for Interns in Medicine.

    PubMed

    Palamara, Kerri; Kauffman, Carol; Stone, Valerie E; Bazari, Hasan; Donelan, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Residency is an intense period. Challenges, including burnout, arise as new physicians develop their professional identities. Residency programs provide remediation, but emotional support for interns is often limited. Professional development coaching of interns, regardless of their performance, has not been reported. Design, implement, and evaluate a program to support intern professional development through positive psychology coaching. We implemented a professional development coaching program in a large residency program. The program included curriculum development, coach-intern interactions, and evaluative metrics. A total of 72 internal medicine interns and 26 internal medicine faculty participated in the first year. Interns and coaches were expected to meet quarterly; expected time commitments per year were 9 hours (per individual coached) for coaches, 5 1/2 hours for each individual coachee, and 70 hours for the director of the coaching program. Coaches and interns were asked to complete 2 surveys in the first year and to participate in qualitative interviews. Eighty-two percent of interns met with their coaches 3 or more times. Coaches and their interns assessed the program in multiple dimensions (participation, program and professional activities, burnout, coping, and coach-intern communication). Most of the interns (94%) rated the coaching program as good or excellent, and 96% would recommend this program to other residency programs. The experience of burnout was lower in this cohort compared with a prior cohort. There is early evidence that a coaching program of interactions with faculty trained in positive psychology may advance intern development and partially address burnout.

  20. A Program for Improving Toddler Communication through Parent Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Heather W.; Barton, Erin E.; Chironis, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript was to describe a community-based program, Language and Play Everyday (LAPE), aimed at evaluating effective practices for enhancing parents' capacity to increase their toddlers' communication skills. LAPE was a parent education program focused on coaching parents to embed naturalistic language-enhancing…

  1. 41 CFR 301-10.124 - What are coach-class Seating Upgrade Programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ALLOWABLE TRAVEL EXPENSES 10... Seating Upgrade Programs? Sometimes these programs are called “Coach Elite,” “Coach Plus,” “Preferred...

  2. Preparation and Ongoing Support for Early Childhood Instructional Coaches: A Case Study Exploration of an Instructional Coaching Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allard Agnamba, Lindsey Tara

    2012-01-01

    This study gathers current information about the preparation and ongoing support of instructional coaches who provide professional development to early childhood educators. The case study of one large, urban District early childhood instructional coaching program will be explored with two objectives: to identify strengths and areas of need in the…

  3. Preparation and Ongoing Support for Early Childhood Instructional Coaches: A Case Study Exploration of an Instructional Coaching Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allard Agnamba, Lindsey Tara

    2012-01-01

    This study gathers current information about the preparation and ongoing support of instructional coaches who provide professional development to early childhood educators. The case study of one large, urban District early childhood instructional coaching program will be explored with two objectives: to identify strengths and areas of need in the…

  4. 41 CFR 301-10.124 - What are coach-class Seating Upgrade Programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Seating Upgrade Programs? 301-10.124 Section 301-10.124 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... Seating Upgrade Programs? Sometimes these programs are called “Coach Elite,” “Coach Plus,” “Preferred... desirable seat choice within the coach-class cabin. These airline upgrade or preferred seat choices are...

  5. Coaching without a Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinbacher-Reed, Christina; Powers, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Ironically, at a time when coaching seems to have come into its own as a way to improve teacher practice, school districts across the United States are experiencing funding cuts and eliminating coaching positions. The threats that budget woes pose to established school coaching programs led the authors to ask themselves what practices schools and…

  6. Coaching Conversations in Early Childhood Programs: The Contributions of Coach and Coachee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayaraman, Gayatri; Marvin, Christine; Knoche, Lisa; Bainter, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Studies to date have linked early childhood (EC) coaching to child, family, and teacher outcomes but have not investigated "what" is happening in a coaching conversation. This exploratory study specifically unpacks nuances associated with the coaching conversation process and associations between the EC coaches' behaviors and coachees'…

  7. Coaching Conversations in Early Childhood Programs: The Contributions of Coach and Coachee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayaraman, Gayatri; Marvin, Christine; Knoche, Lisa; Bainter, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Studies to date have linked early childhood (EC) coaching to child, family, and teacher outcomes but have not investigated "what" is happening in a coaching conversation. This exploratory study specifically unpacks nuances associated with the coaching conversation process and associations between the EC coaches' behaviors and coachees'…

  8. Implementation of a Coaching Program for School Principals: Evaluating Coaches' Strategies and the Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huff, Jason; Preston, Courtney; Goldring, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-phase coaching model that was implemented to help principals improve their instructional leadership practices. We then discuss a rubric based on this coaching model that we used to evaluate coaches' implementation of key model phases and to identify principals' responses to the coaching. After presenting the…

  9. Implementation of a Coaching Program for School Principals: Evaluating Coaches' Strategies and the Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huff, Jason; Preston, Courtney; Goldring, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-phase coaching model that was implemented to help principals improve their instructional leadership practices. We then discuss a rubric based on this coaching model that we used to evaluate coaches' implementation of key model phases and to identify principals' responses to the coaching. After presenting the…

  10. Promoting Success: A Professional Development Coaching Program for Interns in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Palamara, Kerri; Kauffman, Carol; Stone, Valerie E.; Bazari, Hasan; Donelan, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Background Residency is an intense period. Challenges, including burnout, arise as new physicians develop their professional identities. Residency programs provide remediation, but emotional support for interns is often limited. Professional development coaching of interns, regardless of their performance, has not been reported. Objective Design, implement, and evaluate a program to support intern professional development through positive psychology coaching. Methods We implemented a professional development coaching program in a large residency program. The program included curriculum development, coach-intern interactions, and evaluative metrics. A total of 72 internal medicine interns and 26 internal medicine faculty participated in the first year. Interns and coaches were expected to meet quarterly; expected time commitments per year were 9 hours (per individual coached) for coaches, 5 1/2 hours for each individual coachee, and 70 hours for the director of the coaching program. Coaches and interns were asked to complete 2 surveys in the first year and to participate in qualitative interviews. Results Eighty-two percent of interns met with their coaches 3 or more times. Coaches and their interns assessed the program in multiple dimensions (participation, program and professional activities, burnout, coping, and coach-intern communication). Most of the interns (94%) rated the coaching program as good or excellent, and 96% would recommend this program to other residency programs. The experience of burnout was lower in this cohort compared with a prior cohort. Conclusions There is early evidence that a coaching program of interactions with faculty trained in positive psychology may advance intern development and partially address burnout. PMID:26692977

  11. How Does Formal Leadership Influence a District Content Coaching Program?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    The titles of professional books on the topic of coaching are numerous, coaching professional development offerings are widespread and schools across the country are hiring teachers to serve in coaching roles. There is great interest around the topic of coaching and much is being written about the support that is needed for coaches as well.…

  12. How Does Formal Leadership Influence a District Content Coaching Program?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    The titles of professional books on the topic of coaching are numerous, coaching professional development offerings are widespread and schools across the country are hiring teachers to serve in coaching roles. There is great interest around the topic of coaching and much is being written about the support that is needed for coaches as well.…

  13. Leadership Coaching in an Induction Program for Novice Principals: A 3-Year Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochmiller, Chad R.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents results from a study of leadership coaches who worked with novice principals in a university-based induction program for a 3-year period. The qualitative case study describes how the support the coaches provided to the novice principals changed over time. The study reveals that coaches adapted their leadership coaching…

  14. Implementing Literacy Coaching: The Role of School Social Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumura, Lindsay Clare; Garnier, Helen E.; Resnick, Lauren B.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of a school's pre-existing social resources on the implementation of a comprehensive literacy-coaching program (Content-Focused Coaching [CFC]). Elementary schools were randomly assigned to receive a CFC-trained coach (n = 15 schools) or to continue with the literacy coaching resources that are standard for…

  15. Implementing Literacy Coaching: The Role of School Social Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumura, Lindsay Clare; Garnier, Helen E.; Resnick, Lauren B.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of a school's pre-existing social resources on the implementation of a comprehensive literacy-coaching program (Content-Focused Coaching [CFC]). Elementary schools were randomly assigned to receive a CFC-trained coach (n = 15 schools) or to continue with the literacy coaching resources that are standard for…

  16. Family Coaching as a delivery modality for evidence-based prevention programs.

    PubMed

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Swendeman, Dallas; Rotheram-Fuller, Erin; Youssef, Maryann K

    2017-08-01

    Family Coaching is proposed as a new delivery format for evidence-based prevention programs (EBPPs). Three recent developments in health promotion support the potential efficacy of Family Coaching: (1) renewed interest in integrated prevention programs for multiple risk factors and behavior changes, (2) broad and long-term impacts of family-based interventions, and (3) popular acceptance of "coaching" as a nonstigmatizing, goal-focused intervention strategy. Family coaches are community members and paraprofessionals trained in common elements of EBPP. Family Coaching has specific goals, is short term, and has definable outcomes. Coaches frame the program's goals to be consistent with the family's values, normalize the family's experience, assess their strengths, and help the family set goals and develop skills and routines to problem solve challenging situations. Broad dissemination of EBPP will be facilitated with delivery formats that are flexible to meet families' priorities and providers' desires and capacities to tailor programs to local contexts.

  17. Improving patient's home cooking - A case series of participation in a remote culinary coaching program.

    PubMed

    Polak, Rani; Pober, David M; Budd, Maggi A; Silver, Julie K; Phillips, Edward M; Abrahamson, Martin J

    2017-04-04

    This case series describes and examines the outcomes of a remote culinary coaching program, aimed at improving nutrition through home cooking. Participants (n=4) improved attitudes about the perceived ease of home cooking (p<0.01) and self-efficacy to perform various culinary skills (p=0.02); and also in confidence to continue e-learning culinary skills and consume healthier food. We believe this program might be a viable response to the need for effective and scalable health related culinary interventions.

  18. The Effects of Peer Coaching on the Evaluation Knowledge, Skills, and Concerns of Gifted Program Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotabish, Alicia; Robinson, Ann

    2012-01-01

    To increase knowledge and skills in program evaluation, a peer-coaching intervention provided one-on-one professional development to gifted program administrators. This randomized field study examined the effects of peer coaching on evaluation knowledge and skills and on administrators' concerns about implementing more rigorous program…

  19. Investigating the Effectiveness of a Comprehensive Literacy Coaching Program in Schools with High Teacher Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumura, Lindsay Clare; Garnier, Helen E.; Correnti, Richard; Junker, Brian; Bickel, Donna DiPrima

    2010-01-01

    Teacher mobility is a factor that impacts schoolwide implementation of professional development programs. In this article, we present interim results of a longitudinal randomized field trial of a comprehensive literacy coaching program (Content-Focused Coaching, CFC) for improving instruction and learning in schools with high teacher mobility. We…

  20. Applying Coaching Strategies to Support Youth- and Family-Focused Extension Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Jonathan R.; Hawkey, Kyle R.; Smith, Burgess; Perkins, Daniel F.; Borden, Lynne M.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we describe how a peer-coaching model has been applied to support community-based Extension programming through the Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (CYFAR) initiative. We describe the general approaches to coaching that have been used to help with CYFAR program implementation, evaluation, and sustainability efforts; we…

  1. Applying Coaching Strategies to Support Youth- and Family-Focused Extension Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Jonathan R.; Hawkey, Kyle R.; Smith, Burgess; Perkins, Daniel F.; Borden, Lynne M.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we describe how a peer-coaching model has been applied to support community-based Extension programming through the Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (CYFAR) initiative. We describe the general approaches to coaching that have been used to help with CYFAR program implementation, evaluation, and sustainability efforts; we…

  2. Instructional Technologist as a Coach: Impact of a Situated Professional Development Program on Teachers' Technology Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugar, William

    2005-01-01

    This article details a study that sought an alternative method to instruct public school teachers on how to integrate technology in their classrooms. Paired with a technology coach, nine teachers participated in this situated professional development technology program. Results from this technology coach program detail successful technology…

  3. Investigating the Effectiveness of a Comprehensive Literacy Coaching Program in Schools with High Teacher Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumura, Lindsay Clare; Garnier, Helen E.; Correnti, Richard; Junker, Brian; Bickel, Donna DiPrima

    2010-01-01

    Teacher mobility is a factor that impacts schoolwide implementation of professional development programs. In this article, we present interim results of a longitudinal randomized field trial of a comprehensive literacy coaching program (Content-Focused Coaching, CFC) for improving instruction and learning in schools with high teacher mobility. We…

  4. Five Key Points to Building a Coaching Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Hundreds of instructional coaches are being hired by schools to improve professional practice. Since coaches provide on-site professional learning, they can adapt their approach to meet the unique needs of the teachers and students in the schools where they work. Since coaches can provide professional development that addresses teachers' concerns…

  5. Promoting Continuing Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Gayle A.

    This handbook is intended for use by institutions in marketing their continuing education programs. A section on "Devising Your Strategy" looks at identifying a target audience, determining the marketing approach, and developing a marketing plan and promotional techniques. A discussion of media options looks at the advantages and…

  6. Strategies for Building Peer Surgical Coaching Relationships.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Heather L; Ghousseini, Hala N; Wiegmann, Douglas A; Brys, Nicole A; Pavuluri Quamme, Sudha R; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2017-04-19

    Peer surgical coaching is a promising approach for continuing professional development. However, scant guidance is available for surgeons seeking to develop peer-coaching skills. Executive coaching research suggests that effective coaches first establish a positive relationship with their coachees by aligning role and process expectations, establishing rapport, and cultivating mutual trust. To identify the strategies used by peer surgical coaches to develop effective peer-coaching relationships with their coachees. Drawing on executive coaching literature, a 3-part framework was developed to examine the strategies peer surgical coaches (n = 8) used to initially cultivate a relationship with their coachees (n = 11). Eleven introductory 1-hour meetings between coaching pairs participating in a statewide surgical coaching program were audiorecorded, transcribed, and coded on the basis of 3 relationship-building components. Once coded, thematic analysis was used to organize coded strategies into thematic categories and subcategories. Data were collected from October 10, 2014, to March 20, 2015. Data analysis took place from May 26, 2015, to July 20, 2016. Strategies and potentially counterproductive activities for building peer-coaching relationships in the surgical context to inform the future training of surgical coaches. Coaches used concrete strategies to align role and process expectations about the coaching process, to establish rapport, and to cultivate mutual trust with their coachees during introductory meetings. Potential coaching pitfalls are identified that could interfere with each of the 3 relationship-building components. Peer-nominated surgical coaches were provided with training on abstract concepts that underlie effective coaching practices in other fields. By identifying the strategies used by peer surgical coaches to operationalize these concepts, empirically based strategies to inform other surgical coaching programs are provided.

  7. Patterns of Use of an Automated Interactive Personalized Coaching Program for Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Borland, Ron; Benda, Peter

    2008-01-01

    to return was largely unrelated to user characteristics or cessation outcome. Conclusions Internet-based programs have considerable potential to reach large numbers of smokers at low cost. The QuitCoach is attracting considerable use, with most using it to make a quit attempt and, for those who continue to use the QuitCoach, to help them stay quit. Nonetheless, most users only visited the site once, suggesting improved strategies are needed for encouraging repeated use. PMID:19097975

  8. Executive Coaching: Study of the Evolution of the Program at a Top European Business School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyun Jung

    2011-01-01

    To understand how tensions caused by the multidisciplinary nature of executive coaching are perceived and overcome, this modified ethnographic study was conducted at an executive coaching program and leadership center at a prestigious European business school. This study is built on prolonged discussions on the role of psychology in executive…

  9. Executive Coaching: Study of the Evolution of the Program at a Top European Business School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyun Jung

    2011-01-01

    To understand how tensions caused by the multidisciplinary nature of executive coaching are perceived and overcome, this modified ethnographic study was conducted at an executive coaching program and leadership center at a prestigious European business school. This study is built on prolonged discussions on the role of psychology in executive…

  10. Coach-led preventive training program in youth soccer players improves movement technique.

    PubMed

    Pryor, J Luke; Root, Hayley J; Vandermark, Lesley W; Pryor, Riana R; Martinez, Jessica C; Trojian, Thomas H; Denegar, Craig R; DiStefano, Lindsay J

    2017-01-24

    Long-term implementation of preventive training programs (PTP) in youth sport requires coach involvement. However, the optimal training of coaches to effectively implement a PTP remains unknown. It is also unknown if the benefits of PTP can be enhanced with multiple sport seasons of exposure.

  11. Post Game Analysis: Using Video-Based Coaching for Continuous Professional Development

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yue-Yung; Peyre, Sarah E.; Arriaga, Alexander F.; Osteen, Robert T.; Corso, Katherine A.; Weiser, Thomas G.; Swanson, Richard S.; Ashley, Stanley W.; Raut, Chandrajit P.; Zinner, Michael J.; Gawande, Atul A.; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2011-01-01

    Background The surgical learning curve persists for years after training, yet existing CME efforts targeting this are limited. We describe a pilot study of a scalable video-based intervention, providing individualized feedback on intra-operative performance. Study Design Four complex operations performed by surgeons of varying experience – a chief resident accompanied by the operating senior surgeon, a surgeon with <10 years in practice, another with 20–30 years, and a surgeon with >30 years of experience – were video-recorded. Video playback formed the basis of 1-hour coaching sessions with a peer-judged surgical expert. These sessions were audio-recorded, transcribed, and thematically coded. Results The sessions focused on operative technique, both technical aspects and decision-making. With increasing seniority, more discussion was devoted to the optimization of teaching and facilitation of the resident’s technical performance. Coaching sessions with senior surgeons were peer-to-peer interactions, with each discussing his preferred approach. The coach alternated between directing the session (asking probing questions) and responding to specific questions brought by the surgeons, depending on learning style. At all experience levels, video review proved valuable in identifying episodes of failure-to-progress and troubleshooting alternative approaches. All agreed this tool is a powerful one. Inclusion of trainees seems most appropriate when coaching senior surgeons; it may restrict the dialogue of more junior attendings. Conclusions Video-based coaching is an educational modality that targets intra-operative judgment, technique, and teaching. Surgeons of all levels found it highly instructive. This may provide a practical, much needed approach for continuous professional development. PMID:22192924

  12. The survive and thrive program: encouraging coaching, mentoring, and peer learning among new local health officials.

    PubMed

    Henry, Vonna; Sarpy, Sue Ann; Green, Rachel; Kaplan, Seth; Bonzon, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    There is a need for programs tailored to train the approximately 300 new local health officials (LHOs) who emerge each year with the knowledge and skills needed to build, maintain, and enhance public health capacity and infrastructure. The Survive and Thrive program incorporates a curriculum that is designed to address the challenges faced by a new LHO. The Survive and Thrive program seeks to address these issues by leveraging the expertise of the current generation of local public health leadership by incorporating experienced LHOs as coaches. Coaching, mentoring, and peer assistance by seasoned LHOs is critical to these new learning opportunities. This article highlights aspects of the coaching component of Survive and Thrive program. Actual examples of its relevance to the professional growth and development of new LHOs and the coaches themselves are presented. The article also describes the novel approach of including coaches in evaluating program effectiveness. The Survive and Thrive program's coaching component can serve as a template for other public health leadership programs and related workforce development initiatives as well as a model to help facilitate lifelong learning of LHOs.

  13. A culturally specific health coaching program targeting cardiovascular disease risk in South Asians: rationale, design, and baseline data.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Anita; Flowers, Elena; Mathur, Avantika; Garcia, Donna Malhotra; Kotrys, Jeannette; Gandhi, Rupal; Molina, César; Mathur, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    Health coaching is an effective strategy for improving cardiovascular disease risk factors. Coaching interventions have primarily been studied in Caucasians, and the effectiveness in other ethnic groups is not known. Further, adaptation of coaching to include culturally specific components has not been studied. Our aim is to describe a culturally specific coaching program targeted at reducing cardiovascular disease risk in South Asians. Participants initially underwent comprehensive cardiovascular disease risk screening, then received individualized risk assessment and behavioral recommendations. A health coach then contacted participants regularly for one year to provide encouragement with behavior change, troubleshoot challenges, and assess adherence. In the first five years of the program, 3,180 people underwent risk assessment, 3,132 were candidates for coaching, 2,726 indicated a desire to participate in coaching, 1,359 received coaching, and 1,051 completed coaching for at least one year. Culturally specific health coaching is an appealing and feasible intervention for reducing cardiovascular disease risk in South Asians, with very low attrition. Coaching strategies for risk reduction are proven to be effective, but further longitudinal research is needed to determine whether the impact of incorporating cultural specificity improves the effectiveness. This program utilizes non-medically trained personnel as coaches and is relatively inexpensive, with potential for great cost savings in prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  14. Implementing a Communication Coaching Program for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Postsecondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Amy L.; Rohland, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the operation of a Communication Coaching Program, which was designed to provide supports for students with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) attending the University of Rhode Island. To succeed in college programs, many students with ASDs need access to specialized programming and personnel who are able to foster their…

  15. Implementing a Communication Coaching Program for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Postsecondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Amy L.; Rohland, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the operation of a Communication Coaching Program, which was designed to provide supports for students with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) attending the University of Rhode Island. To succeed in college programs, many students with ASDs need access to specialized programming and personnel who are able to foster their…

  16. Team Software Process (TSP) Coach Mentoring Program Guidebook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    DACUM Research Chart for Team Software ProcessSM (TSPSM) Coach DACUM ...Software Engineering Institute SEI Coordinators: Jefferson Welch Mary Ellen Rich Valerie Chilson DACUM Facilitator Robert E...Norton CETE/OSU Sponsored by Produced by June 1-2, 2006 DRAFT DACUM

  17. Supporting Student Development through a Cooperative Education Coaching Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Lisa; Waite, Nancy; Rosenthal, Meagan

    2015-01-01

    Uptake of new scopes of practice by pharmacists has been slow and inconsistent, which the literature suggests may be related to disconnects between pharmacists' established professional identities and the identities needed to adopt these new practices. This study evaluated the use of coaches to help pharmacy students during their cooperative…

  18. Reach for the Stars: Visions for Literacy Coaching Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFord, Diane

    2012-01-01

    This brief by the Literacy Coaching Clearinghouse is about reaching for the stars--stories of vision and commitment from educators in small and large schools. Everyone knows of people who are held up as "visionaries" throughout history: Leonardo Da Vinci, Mahatma Gandhi, Jules Verne, Thomas Edison, Susan Anthony, or John Dewey, to name a few. The…

  19. Assessing the Impact of a Remote Digital Coaching Engagement Program on Patient Reported Outcomes in Asthma.

    PubMed

    Rasulnia, Mazi; Burton, Billy Stephen; Ginter, Robert P; Wang, Tracy Y; Pleasants, Roy Alton; Green, Cynthia L; Lugogo, Njira

    2017-08-11

    Low adherence and poor outcomes provide opportunity for digital coaching to engage patients with uncontrolled asthma in their care to improve outcomes. To examine the impact of a remote digital coaching program on asthma control and patient experience. We recruited 51 adults with uncontrolled asthma, denoted by albuterol use of > 2 times per week and/or exacerbations requiring corticosteroids, and applied a 12-week patient-centered remote digital coaching program using a combination of educational pamphlets, symptom trackers, best peak flow establishment, physical activity, and dietary counseling, as well as coaches who implemented emotional enforcement  to motivate disease self-management through telephone, text, and email. Baseline and post-intervention measures were quality of life (QOL), spirometry, Asthma Control Test (ACT), Asthma Symptom Utility Index (ASUI), rescue albuterol use, and exacerbation history. Among 51 patients recruited, 40 completed the study. Eight subjects required assistance reading medical materials. Significant improvements from baseline were observed for PROMIS mental status (p = 0.010), body weight and outpatient exacerbation frequency (p = 0.028). The changes from baseline in ACT (p = 0.005) was statistically significant but did not achieve the pre-specified minimum clinically important difference (MCID). Whereas for ASUI, the MCID and statistical significance were achieved. Spirometry and rescue albuterol use were no different. A patient-oriented, remote digital coaching program that utilized trained health coaches and digital materials led to statistically significant improvement in mental status, outpatient exacerbations, body weight, and ASUI. Digital coaching programs may improve some outcomes in adults with uncontrolled asthma.

  20. Understanding Teachers' Perceptions of Academic Coaching Quality in an On-Site Professional Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Phillip R.

    2013-01-01

    Quality teacher training and continued learning is essential to providing the high quality education that yields adequate levels of student success. Though called by many different names, academic coaches appear to be the answer to the continuing problem of creating a positive learning environment that meets the challenges of educating students…

  1. Regenerating the Adult Learner: The Use of Peer Coaches in a Counselor Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markert, Louis F.; Papa-Lewis, Rosemary

    1988-01-01

    Models of counseling and training that are sensitive to adult developmental needs are necessary. Peer coaching is being implemented within a traditional counselor training program at California State University. This program integrates the concepts of mentoring and developmental career counseling to promote the career and educational development…

  2. Program Orientation for High School Sport Coaches. Coaches Council and the National Council for Secondary School Athletic Directors, 2005. A Position Paper from the National Association for Sport and Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (NJ1), 2005

    2005-01-01

    The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) believes that prior to the start of each season, all high school head coaches, assistant coaches, and volunteer coaches should be required to participate in a comprehensive orientation to the sport program. This orientation should be planned and conducted by the athletic director or…

  3. Coaches' Implementation of the USA Football "Heads Up Football" Educational Program.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Zachary Y; Kroshus, Emily; Lee, Joseph G L; Yeargin, Susan W; Dompier, Thomas P

    2017-03-01

    An integral part of the Heads Up Football (HUF) educational program is the Player Safety Coach (PSC), who is responsible for teaching other coaches within a youth football league about safer blocking/tackling and injury prevention. This study examines the association between youth football coaches' interactions with the PSC (i.e., attending the PSC clinic at the beginning of the season and seeing the PSC on-field during practices) and their subsequent implementation of the HUF educational program. Data were collected via online questionnaire completed by 1,316 youth football coaches from HUF leagues. Data were analyzed with frequencies and logistic regression. Nearly half of coaches (44.8%) did not attend the PSC clinic; 25.9% reported not seeing their league's PSC on the field on a regular basis. The lack of PSC on-site presence was significantly associated with worse implementation for "concussion recognition and response," "heat preparedness and hydration," and "sudden cardiac event preparedness." PSC clinic attendance was not associated with implementation. Opportunities exist for improvement in the HUF educational program as there appears to be inconsistent implementation. Further research is warranted to understand how to optimize the role of the PSC in the youth sports context.

  4. The Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program: Using Coaching to Support Generalization to Real-World Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinke, Wendy M.; Stormont, Melissa; Webster-Stratton, Carolyn; Newcomer, Lori L.; Herman, Keith C.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Training (IY TCM) intervention as an example of an evidence-based program that embeds coaching within its design. First, the core features of the IY TCM program are described. Second, the IY TCM coaching model and processes utilized to facilitate high fidelity of…

  5. Student Perceptions of Stressors and the Value of Coaching in a Baccalaureate Nursing Articulation Program.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Mary

    Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses (RIBN) is a unique articulation program in North Carolina. The fourth year of RIBN is challenging; students are enrolled as full-time university students while starting part-time employment as new graduate nurses. The aim of this descriptive pilot study was to explore the anticipated and actual stressors related to the fourth year experience and evaluate the impact of monthly coaching sessions. Key stressors identified were academic workload, professional awareness/role transition/workforce adjustment, time management, and obligations to support individuals. The monthly coaching sessions were beneficial in providing a means of debriefing and reframing life events.

  6. Peer Coaching as Part of a Professional Development Program for Science Teachers in Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thijs, Annette; van den Berg, Ellen

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the findings of a study into the potentials of peer coaching as part of a professional development program, consisting of an in-service course and exemplary curriculum materials, in supporting the implementation of learner-centred teaching in senior secondary science and mathematics education in Botswana. Teachers in the study…

  7. Wyoming's Instructional Facilitator Program: Teachers' Beliefs about the Impact of Coaching on Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, Leslie S.; Young, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the Wyoming state government allocated monies for the Department of Education to fund the work of Instructional Facilitators, or coaches, in schools across the state (Wyoming Department of Education, 2008). In Spring 2009, after the program had been in place for two years, an ex-post facto study was designed to examine the impact of the…

  8. Continuous Progress Program Inservice Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago Board of Education, IL.

    The Continuous Progress Program of the Board of Education for the City of Chicago focuses on the improvement of education for the individual child and the upgrading of educational practices and techniques. The philosophy of the program is based on the individualized rate of teaching and learning of the pupil. Its planning and organization is…

  9. Brief Report: Coaching Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder in a School-Based Multi-Sport Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosso, Edoardo G.

    2016-01-01

    While physical activity (PA) is often overwhelming for people with ASD, appropriate engagement strategies can result in increased motivation to participate and associated physical and psychosocial benefits. In this framework, the multi-sport Supporting Success program aims to inform good-practice coaching strategies for community coaches to engage…

  10. Brief Report: Coaching Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder in a School-Based Multi-Sport Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosso, Edoardo G.

    2016-01-01

    While physical activity (PA) is often overwhelming for people with ASD, appropriate engagement strategies can result in increased motivation to participate and associated physical and psychosocial benefits. In this framework, the multi-sport Supporting Success program aims to inform good-practice coaching strategies for community coaches to engage…

  11. Weight-Related Goal Setting in a Telephone-Based Preventive Health-Coaching Program: Demonstration of Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Blythe J; Gale, Joanne; McGill, Bronwyn; Bauman, Adrian; Hebden, Lana; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret; Maxwell, Michelle; Phongsavan, Philayrath

    2016-08-02

    This study investigated whether participants in a 6-month telephone-based coaching program, who set physical activity, nutrition, and weight loss goals had better outcomes in these domains. Quasi-experimental design. The Australian Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service (GHS), a free population-wide telephone health-coaching service that includes goal setting as a key component of its coaching program. Consenting GHS coaching participants who had completed coaching between February 2009 and December 2012 (n = 4108). At baseline, participants select a goal for the coaching program, and sociodemographic variables are collected. Self-reported weight, height, waist circumference, physical activity, and nutrition-related behaviors are assessed at baseline and 6 months. Descriptive analysis was performed on key sociodemographic variables, and the relationship between goal type and change in health outcomes was assessed using a series of linear mixed models that modeled change from baseline to 6 months. Participants who set goals in relation to weight management and physical activity achieved better results in these areas than those who set alternate goals, losing more than those who set alternate goals (1.5 kg and 0.9 cm in waist circumference) and increasing walking per week (40 minutes), respectively. There was no difference in food-related outcomes for those that set nutrition-related goals. Goal setting for weight management and increasing physical activity in the overweight and obese population, undertaken in a telephone-based coaching program, can be effective. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Coaching Behavior of Girls Youth Softball Coaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupnow, Allan; Stotlar, David

    A study examined coaches' behavior and classified the types and rates of coaches' behavior by time of athletic season (early or late), win/loss record, and throughout the time frame within a single contest. Subjects included all the volunteer coaches in a 13 team, softball program for 10-12 year old girls. The season consisted of a double…

  13. Put Me in Coach: A Transcendental Phenomenological Study Examining School Wide Positive Behavior Support Coaches' Experience with Program Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieffannacht, Kimberlie Beth

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this transcendental phenomenological study was to describe lived experience during School Wide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS) implementation for School Wide Positive Behavior coaches in Pennsylvania public schools. Participants, identified as co-researchers throughout this study, included 11 SWPBS coaches selected from seven…

  14. Coaching patients in the use of decision and communication aids: RE-AIM evaluation of a patient support program.

    PubMed

    Belkora, Jeff; Volz, Shelley; Loth, Meredith; Teng, Alexandra; Zarin-Pass, Margot; Moore, Dan; Esserman, Laura

    2015-05-28

    Decision aids educate patients about treatment options and outcomes. Communication aids include question lists, consultation summaries, and audio-recordings. In efficacy studies, decision aids increased patient knowledge, while communication aids increased patient question-asking and information recall. Starting in 2004, we trained successive cohorts of post-baccalaureate, pre-medical interns to coach patients in the use of decision and communication aids at our university-based breast cancer clinic. From July 2005 through June 2012, we used the RE-AIM framework to measure Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance of our interventions. 1. Reach: Over the study period, our program sent a total of 5,153 decision aids and directly administered 2,004 communication aids. In the most recent program year (2012), out of 1,524 eligible patient appointments, we successfully contacted 1,212 (80%); coached 1,110 (73%) in the self-administered use of decision and communication aids; sent 958 (63%) decision aids; and directly administered communication aids for 419 (27%) patients. In a 2010 survey, coached patients reported self-administering one or more communication aids in 81% of visits 2. Effectiveness: In our pre-post comparisons, decision aids were associated with increased patient knowledge and decreased decisional conflict. Communication aids were associated with increased self-efficacy and number of questions; and with high ratings of patient preparedness and satisfaction 3. Adoption: Among visitors sent decision aids, 82% of survey respondents reviewed some or all; among those administered communication aids, 86% reviewed one or more after the visit 4. Through continuous quality adaptations, we increased the proportion of available staff time used for patient support (i.e. exploitation of workforce capacity) from 29% in 2005 to 84% in 2012 5. Maintenance: The main barrier to sustainability was the cost of paid intern labor. We addressed this by

  15. Telephone-Based Coaching.

    PubMed

    Boccio, Mindy; Sanna, Rashel S; Adams, Sara R; Goler, Nancy C; Brown, Susan D; Neugebauer, Romain S; Ferrara, Assiamira; Wiley, Deanne M; Bellamy, David J; Schmittdiel, Julie A

    2017-03-01

    Many Americans continue to smoke, increasing their risk of disease and premature death. Both telephone-based counseling and in-person tobacco cessation classes may improve access for smokers seeking convenient support to quit. Little research has assessed whether such programs are effective in real-world clinical populations. Retrospective cohort study comparing wellness coaching participants with two groups of controls. Kaiser Permanente Northern California, a large integrated health care delivery system. Two hundred forty-one patients who participated in telephonic tobacco cessation coaching from January 1, 2011, to March 31, 2012, and two control groups: propensity-score-matched controls, and controls who participated in a tobacco cessation class during the same period. Wellness coaching participants received an average of two motivational interviewing-based coaching sessions that engaged the patient, evoked their reason to consider quitting, and helped them establish a quit plan. Self-reported quitting of tobacco and fills of tobacco cessation medications within 12 months of follow-up. Logistic regressions adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, and primary language. After adjusting for confounders, tobacco quit rates were higher among coaching participants vs. matched controls (31% vs. 23%, p < .001) and comparable to those of class attendees (31% vs. 29%, p = .28). Coaching participants and class attendees filled tobacco-cessation prescriptions at a higher rate (47% for both) than matched controls (6%, p < .001). Telephonic wellness coaching was as effective as in-person classes and was associated with higher rates of quitting compared to no treatment. The telephonic modality may increase convenience and scalability for health care systems looking to reduce tobacco use and improve health.

  16. "Tuning into Kids": reducing young children's behavior problems using an emotion coaching parenting program.

    PubMed

    Havighurst, Sophie S; Wilson, Katherine R; Harley, Ann E; Kehoe, Christiane; Efron, Daryl; Prior, Margot R

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluated a 6-session group parenting program, Tuning into Kids (TIK), as treatment for young children (aged 4.0-5.11 years) with behavior problems. TIK targets parent emotion socialization (parent emotion awareness, regulation and emotion coaching skills). Fifty-four parents, recruited via a child behavior clinic, were randomized into intervention (TIK) or waitlist (clinical treatment as usual). Parents reported emotion awareness/regulation, emotion coaching, empathy and child behavior (pre-intervention, post-intervention, 6-month follow-up); teachers reported child behavior and observers rated parent-child emotion coaching and child emotion knowledge (pre-intervention, follow-up). Data were analyzed using growth curve modeling and ANCOVA. Parents in both conditions reported less emotional dismissiveness and reduced child behavior problems; in the intervention group, parents also reported greater empathy and had improved observed emotion coaching skills; their children had greater emotion knowledge and reduced teacher-reported behavior problems. TIK appears to be a promising addition to treatment for child behavior problems.

  17. Linking High Risk Postpartum Women with a Technology Enabled Health Coaching Program to Reduce Diabetes Risk and Improve Wellbeing: Program Description, Case Studies, and Recommendations for Community Health Coaching Programs

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Melanie; Delgadillo-Duenas, Adriana T.; Leong, Karen; Najmabadi, Adriana; Harleman, Elizabeth; Rios, Christina; Quan, Judy; Soria, Catalina; Handley, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Low-income minority women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (pGDM) or high BMIs have increased risk for chronic illnesses postpartum. Although the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) provides an evidence-based model for reducing diabetes risk, few community-based interventions have adapted this program for pGDM women. Methods. STAR MAMA is an ongoing randomized control trial (RCT) evaluating a hybrid HIT/Health Coaching DPP-based 20-week postpartum program for diabetes prevention compared with education from written materials at baseline. Eligibility includes women 18–39 years old, ≥32 weeks pregnant, and GDM or BMI > 25. Clinic- and community-based recruitment in San Francisco and Sonoma Counties targets 180 women. Sociodemographic and health coaching data from a preliminary sample are presented. Results. Most of the 86 women included to date (88%) have GDM, 80% were identified as Hispanic/Latina, 78% have migrant status, and most are Spanish-speaking. Women receiving the intervention indicate high engagement, with 86% answering 1+ calls. Health coaching callbacks last an average of 9 minutes with range of topics discussed. Case studies presented convey a range of emotional, instrumental, and health literacy-related supports offered by health coaches. Discussion. The DPP-adapted HIT/health coaching model highlights the possibility and challenge of delivering DPP content to postpartum women in community settings. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02240420. PMID:27830157

  18. Linking High Risk Postpartum Women with a Technology Enabled Health Coaching Program to Reduce Diabetes Risk and Improve Wellbeing: Program Description, Case Studies, and Recommendations for Community Health Coaching Programs.

    PubMed

    Athavale, Priyanka; Thomas, Melanie; Delgadillo-Duenas, Adriana T; Leong, Karen; Najmabadi, Adriana; Harleman, Elizabeth; Rios, Christina; Quan, Judy; Soria, Catalina; Handley, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Low-income minority women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (pGDM) or high BMIs have increased risk for chronic illnesses postpartum. Although the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) provides an evidence-based model for reducing diabetes risk, few community-based interventions have adapted this program for pGDM women. Methods. STAR MAMA is an ongoing randomized control trial (RCT) evaluating a hybrid HIT/Health Coaching DPP-based 20-week postpartum program for diabetes prevention compared with education from written materials at baseline. Eligibility includes women 18-39 years old, ≥32 weeks pregnant, and GDM or BMI > 25. Clinic- and community-based recruitment in San Francisco and Sonoma Counties targets 180 women. Sociodemographic and health coaching data from a preliminary sample are presented. Results. Most of the 86 women included to date (88%) have GDM, 80% were identified as Hispanic/Latina, 78% have migrant status, and most are Spanish-speaking. Women receiving the intervention indicate high engagement, with 86% answering 1+ calls. Health coaching callbacks last an average of 9 minutes with range of topics discussed. Case studies presented convey a range of emotional, instrumental, and health literacy-related supports offered by health coaches. Discussion. The DPP-adapted HIT/health coaching model highlights the possibility and challenge of delivering DPP content to postpartum women in community settings. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02240420.

  19. The Colorado Asthma Toolkit Program: a practice coaching intervention from the High Plains Research Network.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G; Dickinson, Perry; Rankin, Allison; Wamboldt, Frederick S; Zittleman, Linda; Westfall, John M

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is often under-diagnosed and under-treated in primary care. The Colorado Asthma Toolkit Program was initiated to establish a method for improving asthma care by providing to primary care practices coaching, training, and support for (1) evidence-based asthma diagnosis and treatment, and (2) education and activation of patients toward effective self-management of their illness. A collaborative program was initiated involving 2 academic medical institutions and the High Plains Research Network, a primary care practice-based research network in eastern Colorado. Focus groups were conducted with rural Colorado patients and health care clinicians to assess need and determine the most effective intervention strategies. Two intertwined training programs, or "toolkits," were subsequently developed, one each for health care clinicians and patients. Clinicians received 3 coaching sessions conducted by 2 nurses in the practice that included training in guideline-based methods for evaluation and treatment of asthma, coaching to assist practices in implementing these methods, and training in communication techniques to promote asthma self-management. Practices were also given a spirometer and trained in its use and interpretation. Patient self-management toolkits were provided to clinicians, who were trained to use the materials to educate patients and increase treatment adherence. Evaluations were based on practice interviews 1 to 3 months after coaching. Coaching occurred in 57 of the 58 primary care offices in eastern rural and semirural Colorado. Practices reported changes in their asthma management behaviors: (1) 40.4% of practices increased their use of inhaled corticosteroids, with the median percent of patients taking inhaled corticosteroids rising from 25% to 50%; (2) 53.2% of practices increased their use of asthma action plans, with the median percent of patients with action plans rising from 0% to 20%; and (3) 78.7% of practices initiated or increased their

  20. Implementation evaluation of the Telephone Lifestyle Coaching (TLC) program: organizational factors associated with successful implementation.

    PubMed

    Damschroder, Laura J; Reardon, Caitlin M; Sperber, Nina; Robinson, Claire H; Fickel, Jacqueline J; Oddone, Eugene Z

    2016-09-29

    The Telephone Lifestyle Coaching (TLC) program provided telephone-based coaching for six lifestyle behaviors to 5321 Veterans at 24 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical facilities. The purpose of the study was to conduct an evaluation of the TLC program to identify factors associated with successful implementation. A mixed-methods study design was used. Quantitative measures of organizational readiness for implementation and facility complexity were used to purposively select a subset of facilities for in-depth evaluation. Context assessments were conducted using interview transcripts. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) was used to guide qualitative data collection and analysis. Factors most strongly correlated with referral rates included having a skilled implementation leader who used effective multi-component strategies to engage primary care clinicians as well as general clinic structures that supported implementation. Evaluation findings pointed to recommendations for local and national leaders to help anticipate and mitigate potential barriers to successful implementation.

  1. Development of a Chronic Disease Management Program for Stroke Survivors Using Intervention Mapping: The Stroke Coach.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Brodie M; Lear, Scott A; Barr, Susan I; Benavente, Oscar; Goldsmith, Charlie H; Silverberg, Noah D; Yao, Jennifer; Eng, Janice J

    2017-06-01

    To describe the systematic development of the Stroke Coach, a theory- and evidence-based intervention to improve control of lifestyle behavior risk factors in patients with stroke. Intervention development. Community. Individuals who have had a stroke. We used intervention mapping to guide the development of the Stroke Coach. Intervention mapping is a systematic process used for intervention development and composed of steps that progress from the integration of theory and evidence to the organization of realistic strategies to facilitate the development of a practical intervention supported by empirical evidence. Social cognitive theory was the underlying premise for behavior change, whereas control theory methods were directed toward sustaining the changes to ensure long-term health benefits. Practical evidence-based strategies were linked to behavioral determinants to improve stroke risk factor control. Not applicable. The Stroke Coach is a patient-centered, community-based, telehealth intervention to promote healthy lifestyles after stroke. Over 6 months, participants receive seven 30- to 60-minute telephone sessions with a lifestyle coach who provides education, facilitates motivation for lifestyle modification, and empowers participants to self-management their stroke risk factors. Participants also receive a self-management manual and a self-monitoring kit. Through the use of intervention mapping, we developed a theoretically sound and evidence-grounded intervention to improve risk factor control in patients with stroke. If empirical evaluation of the Stroke Coach produces positive results, the next step will be to develop an implementation intervention to ensure successful uptake and delivery of the program in community and outpatient settings. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. All rights reserved.

  2. An individualized coaching program for patients with acute ischemic stroke: Feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Vanacker, P; Standaert, D; Libbrecht, N; Vansteenkiste, I; Bernard, D; Yperzeele, L; Vanhooren, G

    2017-03-01

    An individualized stroke care program was developed to match patients' education with their needs regarding stroke knowledge, secondary prevention and rehabilitation. Our purpose was to assess feasibility of in-hospital and post-discharge, personalized stroke coaching service. Acute ischemic stroke patients enrolled in ASTRAL-B stroke registry (Sint-Lucashospital, Bruges Belgium) with: (a) hospitalization between 12/2014-12/2015, (b) hospital-to-home discharge, and (c) without cognitive decline, were selected. The stroke coach contacted patients individually twice during hospitalization (2×20min) and post-discharge via phone calls using the standardized WSO Post-Strokechecklist. Risk factor management, review of therapy and clinical evolution were discussed. Participants were contacted at 2 weeks, followed by repeat calls if necessary and ambulatory with the vascular neurologist at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. Of all 255 patients meeting the inclusion criteria, 152 (59.7%) received individualized education during hospitalization by the stroke coach. Median age of our population was 74 years and median NIHSS 5. Majority of patients had at least two cardiovascular risk factors. Patients were not coached because of palliative care/decease (10%), unfavorable life expectancy (2%), dementia (8.5%) and lack of time due to short hospitalization (22%). A quarter of all patients were contacted at least once by phone, 12% were contacted at least twice after discharge. At three months, low stroke recurrence (5%) and mortality rates (4%) were identified, probably linked to improved adherence. We demonstrated feasibility of an individualized coaching service executed by well-trained stroke nurse. Future research will focus on developing an online portal delivering post-discharge services to patients and caregivers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Instant Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birch, Paul

    This book is intended to help managers coach individuals and groups; assess current performance; develop a coaching plan; keep track of whether their coaching is having the right effect; and learn how to motivate and communicate effectively. Chapters 1-3 establish what coaching is; who can coach; and who can be coached. Chapter 4 lays coaching out…

  4. The feasibility of a telephone coaching program on heart failure home management for family caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Smith, Carol E.; Russell, Christy; Werkowitch, Marilyn; Elyachar, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To test the feasibility of delivery and evaluate the helpfulness of a coaching heart failure (HF) home management program for family caregivers. Background The few available studies on providing instruction for family caregivers are limited in content for managing HF home care and guidance for program implementation. Method This pilot study employed a mixed methods design. The measures of caregiver burden, confidence, and preparedness were compared at baseline and 3 months post-intervention. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize program costs and demographic data. Content analysis research methods were used to evaluate program feasibility and helpfulness. Results Caregiver (n=10) burden scores were significantly reduced and raw scores of confidence and preparedness for HF home management improved 3 months after the intervention. Content analyses of nurse and caregiver post-intervention data found caregivers rated the program as helpful and described how they initiated HF management skills based on the program. Conclusion The program was feasible to implement. These results suggest the coaching program should be further tested with a larger sample size to evaluate its efficacy. PMID:23116654

  5. Supporting Universal Prevention Programs: A Two-Phased Coaching Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Kimberly D.; Darney, Dana; Domitrovich, Celene; Keperling, Jennifer Pitchford; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Schools are adopting evidence-based programs designed to enhance students' emotional and behavioral competencies at increasing rates (Hemmeter et al. in "Early Child Res Q" 26:96-109, 2011). At the same time, teachers express the need for increased support surrounding implementation of these evidence-based programs (Carter and Van Norman in "Early…

  6. Supporting Universal Prevention Programs: A Two-Phased Coaching Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Kimberly D.; Darney, Dana; Domitrovich, Celene; Keperling, Jennifer Pitchford; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Schools are adopting evidence-based programs designed to enhance students' emotional and behavioral competencies at increasing rates (Hemmeter et al. in "Early Child Res Q" 26:96-109, 2011). At the same time, teachers express the need for increased support surrounding implementation of these evidence-based programs (Carter and Van Norman in "Early…

  7. Innovation in diabetes care: improving consumption of healthy food through a "chef coaching" program: a case report.

    PubMed

    Polak, Rani; Dill, Diana; Abrahamson, Martin J; Pojednic, Rachele M; Phillips, Edward M

    2014-11-01

    Nutrition therapy as part of lifestyle care is recommended for people with type 2 diabetes. However, most people with diabetes do not follow this guideline. Changing eating habits involves obtaining knowledge and building practical skills such as shopping, meal preparation, and food storage. Just as fitness coaches use their specific knowledge base in fitness to enhance the effectiveness of their coaching, credentialed chefs trained as health coaches might combine their culinary expertise with coaching in order to improve clients' food choices and lifestyles. This report documents the case of a 55-year-old white male physician, single and living alone, who was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and reported chronic stress, sedentary behavior, and unhealthy eating habits. He participated in a chef coaching program of 8 weekly one-on-one 30-minute coaching sessions via Skype delivered by a chef trained as a health coach. During the first five meetings, the patient's goals were primarily culinary; however, with his success in accomplishing these goals, the patient progressed and expanded his goals to include other lifestyle domains, specifically exercise and work-life balance. At the end of the program, the patient had improved both his nutritional and exercise habits, his confidence in further self-care improvement, and his health parameters such as HgA1c (8.8% to 6.7%; normal <6.5%). We conclude that chef coaching has the potential to help people with diabetes improve their practical culinary skills and implement them so that they eat better and, further, has the potential to help them improve their overall self-care. We intend to further develop chef coaching and assess its potential as we learn from its implementation.

  8. Tools for a Formal Mentoring Program: A Guide Every Mentee in Coaching Can Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Vincent; Pastore, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Mentoring is crucial for the development of competent coaches (Jones, Harris, & Miles, 2009), and athletic departments and sport organizations are encouraged to use this process that links an inexperienced coach with a veteran mentor coach (Megginson & Clutterbuck, 1995). Mentored coaches benefit from gaining insight and wisdom into their…

  9. Tools for a Formal Mentoring Program: A Guide Every Mentee in Coaching Can Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Vincent; Pastore, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Mentoring is crucial for the development of competent coaches (Jones, Harris, & Miles, 2009), and athletic departments and sport organizations are encouraged to use this process that links an inexperienced coach with a veteran mentor coach (Megginson & Clutterbuck, 1995). Mentored coaches benefit from gaining insight and wisdom into their…

  10. A ward-based writing coach program to improve the quality of nursing documentation.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, Diana; Johnson, Maree; Nicholls, Daniel; Lad, Shushila

    2012-08-01

    A ward-based writing coach program was piloted at a metropolitan hospital in Australia to produce a quality improvement in nursing documentation. This paper describes the education program, which consisted of two writing workshops, each of one-hour duration followed by one-to-one coaching of nurses. This program could be carried out in any clinical area as a part of the regular education program. Nurses are encouraged to view their documentation practices in a critical light to ensure that the documentation is meaningful to readers within or outside the profession. The importance of nursing documentation as a communication tool for all health care professionals is emphasised. Barriers to meaning, such as fragmentary language or the use of unofficial abbreviations, are discussed. Nurses are also encouraged to document the patient's condition, care and response to care using defined principles for nursing documentation. This program would be transferrable to any clinical setting looking for a ward-based education program for nursing documentation.

  11. The influence of worksite and employee variables on employee engagement in telephonic health coaching programs: a retrospective multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Grossmeier, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed 11 determinants of health coaching program participation. A cross-sectional study design used secondary data to assess the role of six employee-level and five worksite-level variables on telephone-based coaching enrollment, active participation, and completion. Data was provided by a national provider of worksite health promotion program services for employers. A random sample of 34,291 employees from 52 companies was selected for inclusion in the study. Survey-based measures included age, gender, job type, health risk status, tobacco risk, social support, financial incentives, comprehensive communications, senior leadership support, cultural support, and comprehensive program design. Gender-stratified multivariate logistic regression models were applied using backwards elimination procedures to yield parsimonious prediction models for each of the dependent variables. Employees were more likely to enroll in coaching programs if they were older, female, and in poorer health, and if they were at worksites with fewer environmental supports for health, clear financial incentives for participation in coaching, more comprehensive communications, and more comprehensive programs. Once employees were enrolled, program completion was greater among those who were older, did not use tobacco, worked at a company with strong communications, and had fewer environmental supports for health. Both worksite-level and employee-level factors have significant influences on health coaching engagement, and there are gender differences in the strength of these predictors.

  12. The Challenge of Continuation: Schools' Continuation of the Respect Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertesvag, Sigrun K.; Roland, Pal; Vaaland, Grete Sorensen; Storksen, Svein; Veland, Jarmund

    2010-01-01

    The Respect program is a whole school approach to prevent and reduce problem behavior. The purpose of this study was to investigate which conditions in schools helped them to continue the program successfully after the end of the 1-year implementation period. The study also looked at the actual continuation after the program end. Especially, we…

  13. The Effect of Graduation Coaches and Credit Recovery Programs on the Dropout Rate of At-Risk Grade 9 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowling, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the characteristics of effective graduation coaches (GCs) and credit recovery programs and explain the influence of a GC and a credit recovery program on Grade 9 students at risk of dropping out. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a high school GC and enrollment in a credit recovery…

  14. The Effect of Graduation Coaches and Credit Recovery Programs on the Dropout Rate of At-Risk Grade 9 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowling, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the characteristics of effective graduation coaches (GCs) and credit recovery programs and explain the influence of a GC and a credit recovery program on Grade 9 students at risk of dropping out. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a high school GC and enrollment in a credit recovery…

  15. 41 CFR 301-10.124 - What are coach-class Seating Upgrade Programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-TRANSPORTATION EXPENSES Common Carrier Transportation Airline Accommodations § 301-10.124 What are coach-class... generally available for an annual fee, at an airport kiosk or gate or as a frequent flier perk. These coach...

  16. Combating Obesity at Community Health Centers (COACH): a quality improvement collaborative for weight management programs.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Abigail E; John, Priya M; Vable, Anusha M; Campbell, Amanda; Heuer, Loretta; Schaefer, Cynthia; Vinci, Lisa; Drum, Melinda L; Chin, Marshall H; Quinn, Michael T; Burnet, Deborah L

    2013-01-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) seek effective strategies to address obesity. MidWest Clinicians' Network partnered with [an academic medical center] to test feasibility of a weight management quality improvement (QI) collaborative. MidWest Clinicians' Network members expressed interest in an obesity QI program. This pilot study aimed to determine whether the QI model can be feasibly implemented with limited resources at CHCs to improve weight management programs. Five health centers with weight management programs enrolled with CHC staff as primary study participants; this study did not attempt to measure patient outcomes. Participants attended learning sessions and monthly conference calls to build QI skills and share best practices. Tailored coaching addressed local needs. Topics rated most valuable were patient recruitment/retention strategies, QI techniques, evidence-based weight management, motivational interviewing. Challenges included garnering provider support, high staff turnover, and difficulty tracking patient-level data. This paper reports practical lessons about implementing a weight management QI collaborative in CHCs.

  17. Fitness Changes After an 8-Week Fitness Coaching Program at a Regional Youth Detention Facility.

    PubMed

    Amtmann, John; Kukay, Jake

    2016-01-01

    A Surgeon General's report states that there is a favorable relationship between exercise and chronic disease. Research suggests that exercise programs for elderly inmates may have a positive effect on the number of infirmary visits, which in turn may have a long-term effect on inmate health care costs. This exploratory descriptive double case study sought to add to the minimal information in peer-reviewed research journals by examining the effects of fitness coaching on two juveniles at a youth detention facility in Southwest Montana. The results showed that both participants made fitness improvements following the 8-week program and both perceived positive effects on self-concept and overall sense of well-being from participating in this program. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Increasing the Registered Nursing Workforce Through a Second-Degree BSN Program Coaching Model.

    PubMed

    Wise, Tiffani; Gautam, Bibha; Harris, Rebbecca; Casida, Deborah; Chapman, Rachel; Hammond, Lori

    The coach model is an innovative approach to clinical education in which registered nurses facilitate clinical instruction. The nursing students are assigned with a specific coach throughout the 12-month accelerated baccalaureate nursing curriculum. The purpose of this article is to share our experience using the coach model for students' clinical education including the benefits, challenges, and outcomes.

  19. The added value of a brief self-efficacy coaching on the effectiveness of a 12-week physical activity program.

    PubMed

    Seghers, Jan; Van Hoecke, Ann-Sophie; Schotte, Astrid; Opdenacker, Joke; Boen, Filip

    2014-01-01

    Self-efficacy has been found to be an important precondition for behavioral change in sedentary people. The current study examined the effectiveness and added value of including a 15-minute self-efficacy coaching at the start of a 12-week lifestyle physical activity (PA) program. Participants were randomly assigned to a standard-intervention group (without additional self-efficacy coaching, N = 116) or extra-intervention group (with additional self-efficacy coaching, N = 111). Body mass index (BMI), cardiovascular fitness, self-reported PA, and self-efficacy beliefs were assessed at baseline and immediately after the intervention period. Perceived adherence to the PA program was assessed postintervention. At posttest, a significant increase in cardiovascular fitness and decrease in BMI were found in both groups. Significant intervention effects emerged on PA behavior, self-efficacy, and program adherence, in favor of the extra-intervention group. Self-efficacy mediated the intervention effect on program adherence whereas no evidence was found for its role as mediator of PA change. Adding a 15-minute self-efficacy coaching at the start of a lifestyle PA program is a promising strategy to enhance the intervention effects on PA behavior, self-efficacy beliefs, and program adherence. However, the role of self-efficacy as mediator of the intervention effect on in PA was not fully supported.

  20. Peer Coaching: Teachers Supporting Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donegan, Mary M.; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Fowler, Susan A.

    2000-01-01

    This article describes peer coaching as a method for teacher improvement and offers guidelines for establishing a peer coaching program for early childhood and early childhood special education teachers and related services professionals. It also identifies common problems and possible solutions of peer coaching programs. Sample forms for use in…

  1. Identification of Patients With Diabetes Who Benefit Most From a Health Coaching Program in Chronic Disease Management, Sydney, Australia, 2013.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Grace; Newlyn, Neroli; Pamplona, Elline; Hocking, Samantha L; Glastras, Sarah J; McGrath, Rachel T; Fulcher, Gregory R

    2017-03-02

    Chronic disease management programs (CDMPs) that include health coaching can facilitate and coordinate diabetes management. The aim of this study was to assess changes in patients' general knowledge of diabetes, self-reported health status, diabetes distress, body mass index (BMI), and glycemic control after enrollment in a face-to-face CDMP group health coaching session (with telephone follow-up) compared with participation in telephone-only health coaching, during a 12-month period. Patients with diabetes were enrolled in a health coaching program at Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia, in 2013. Questionnaires were administered at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months, and the results were compared with baseline. Glycemic control, measured with glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and BMI, were measured at baseline and 12 months. Overall, 238 patients attended a face-to-face CDMP session with telephone follow-up (n = 178) or participated in telephone-only health coaching (n = 60). We found no change in BMI in either group; however, HbA1c levels in patients with baseline above the current recommended target (>7%) decreased significantly from 8.5% (standard deviation [SD], 1.0%) to 7.9% (SD, 1.0%) (P = .03). Patients with the lowest self-reported health status at baseline improved from 4.4 (SD, 0.5) to 3.7 (SD, 0.9) (P = .001). Diabetes knowledge improved in all patients (24.4 [SD, 2.4] to 25.2 [SD, 2.4]; P < .001), and diabetes distress decreased among those with the highest levels of distress at baseline (3.0 [SD, 0.4] vs 3.8 [SD, 0.6]; P = .003). Diabetes health coaching programs can improve glycemic control and reduce diabetes distress in patients with high levels of these at baseline.

  2. Identification of Patients With Diabetes Who Benefit Most From a Health Coaching Program in Chronic Disease Management, Sydney, Australia, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Grace; Newlyn, Neroli; Pamplona, Elline; Hocking, Samantha L.; Glastras, Sarah J.; Fulcher, Gregory R.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Chronic disease management programs (CDMPs) that include health coaching can facilitate and coordinate diabetes management. The aim of this study was to assess changes in patients’ general knowledge of diabetes, self-reported health status, diabetes distress, body mass index (BMI), and glycemic control after enrollment in a face-to-face CDMP group health coaching session (with telephone follow-up) compared with participation in telephone-only health coaching, during a 12-month period. Methods Patients with diabetes were enrolled in a health coaching program at Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia, in 2013. Questionnaires were administered at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months, and the results were compared with baseline. Glycemic control, measured with glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and BMI, were measured at baseline and 12 months. Results Overall, 238 patients attended a face-to-face CDMP session with telephone follow-up (n = 178) or participated in telephone-only health coaching (n = 60). We found no change in BMI in either group; however, HbA1c levels in patients with baseline above the current recommended target (>7%) decreased significantly from 8.5% (standard deviation [SD], 1.0%) to 7.9% (SD, 1.0%) (P = .03). Patients with the lowest self-reported health status at baseline improved from 4.4 (SD, 0.5) to 3.7 (SD, 0.9) (P = .001). Diabetes knowledge improved in all patients (24.4 [SD, 2.4] to 25.2 [SD, 2.4]; P < .001), and diabetes distress decreased among those with the highest levels of distress at baseline (3.0 [SD, 0.4] vs 3.8 [SD, 0.6]; P = .003). Conclusion Diabetes health coaching programs can improve glycemic control and reduce diabetes distress in patients with high levels of these at baseline. PMID:28253473

  3. Learning How to Coach: The Different Learning Situations Reported by Youth Ice Hockey Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Trevor; Trudel, Pierre; Culver, Diane

    2007-01-01

    Background: Large-scale coach education programs have been developed in many countries around the world to help prepare coaches for their important role. Coaches have said that they also learn to coach from experience, starting from when they were young athletes until their current coaching positions. Finally, in the last decade, Internet…

  4. Learning How to Coach: The Different Learning Situations Reported by Youth Ice Hockey Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Trevor; Trudel, Pierre; Culver, Diane

    2007-01-01

    Background: Large-scale coach education programs have been developed in many countries around the world to help prepare coaches for their important role. Coaches have said that they also learn to coach from experience, starting from when they were young athletes until their current coaching positions. Finally, in the last decade, Internet…

  5. 3 Steps to Great Coaching: A Simple but Powerful Instructional Coaching Cycle Nets Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim; Elford, Marti; Hock, Michael; Dunekack, Devona; Bradley, Barbara; Deshler, Donald D.; Knight, David

    2015-01-01

    In this article the authors describe a three-step instructional coaching cycle that can helps coaches become more effective. The article provides the steps and related components to: (1) Identify; (2) Learn; and (3) Improve. While the instructional coaching cycle is only one effective coaching program, coaches also need professional learning that…

  6. 3 Steps to Great Coaching: A Simple but Powerful Instructional Coaching Cycle Nets Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim; Elford, Marti; Hock, Michael; Dunekack, Devona; Bradley, Barbara; Deshler, Donald D.; Knight, David

    2015-01-01

    In this article the authors describe a three-step instructional coaching cycle that can helps coaches become more effective. The article provides the steps and related components to: (1) Identify; (2) Learn; and (3) Improve. While the instructional coaching cycle is only one effective coaching program, coaches also need professional learning that…

  7. Coaching Parents of Young Children with Autism in Rural Areas Using Internet-Based Technologies: A Pilot Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadan, Hedda; Meyer, Lori E.; Snodgrass, Melinda R.; Halle, James W.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a pilot program (i.e., Internet-Based Parent-Implemented Communication Strategies [i-PiCS] program) that provides long-distance training and coaching via the Internet to parents of young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The i-PiCS program is designed to teach parents how to use evidence-based…

  8. Telephone Coaching to Enhance a Home-Based Physical Activity Program for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Bennell, Kim L; Campbell, Penny K; Egerton, Thorlene; Metcalf, Ben; Kasza, Jessica; Forbes, Andrew; Bills, Caroline; Gale, Janette; Harris, Anthony; Kolt, Gregory S; Bunker, Stephen J; Hunter, David J; Brand, Caroline A; Hinman, Rana S

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether simultaneous telephone coaching improves the clinical effectiveness of a physiotherapist-prescribed home-based physical activity program for knee osteoarthritis (OA). A total of 168 inactive adults ages ≥50 years with knee pain on a numeric rating scale ≥4 (NRS; range 0-10) and knee OA were recruited from the community and randomly assigned to a physiotherapy (PT) and coaching group (n = 84) or PT-only (n = 84) group. All participants received five 30-minute consultations with a physiotherapist over 6 months for education, home exercise, and physical activity advice. PT+coaching participants also received 6-12 telephone coaching sessions by clinicians trained in behavioral-change support for exercise and physical activity. Primary outcomes were pain (NRS) and physical function (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index [WOMAC; score range 0-68]) at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were these same measures at 12 and 18 months, as well as physical activity, exercise adherence, other pain and function measures, and quality of life. Analyses were intent-to-treat with multiple imputation for missing data. A total of 142 (85%), 136 (81%), and 128 (76%) participants completed 6-, 12-, and 18-month measurements, respectively. The change in NRS pain (mean difference 0.4 unit [95% confidence interval (95% CI) -0.4, 1.3]) and in WOMAC function (1.8 [95% CI -1.9, 5.5]) did not differ between groups at 6 months, with both groups showing clinically relevant improvements. Some secondary outcomes related to physical activity and exercise behavior favored PT+coaching at 6 months but generally not at 12 or 18 months. There were no between-group differences in most other outcomes. The addition of simultaneous telephone coaching did not augment the pain and function benefits of a physiotherapist-prescribed home-based physical activity program. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Physiotherapists supporting self-management through health coaching: a mixed methods program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Sinéad Patricia; Graham, Shane; Friesen, Josh; Rosenblat, Michael; Rous, Colin; Richardson, Julie

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate a program in support of chronic disease self-management (CDSM) that is founded on a health coaching (HC) approach, includes supervised exercise and mindfulness-based stress reduction components and is delivered within a private practice physiotherapy setting. An explanatory mixed method design, framed by theory-based program evaluation, was employed to evaluate an eight-week group-based program. Standardized self-rated and performance measures were evaluated pre- and post intervention. Additionally, participant focus groups were conducted following the intervention period. An inductive thematic approach was undertaken to analyze the qualitative data. Seventeen participants (N = 17) completed the study. Improvements were seen in both self-report and performance outcomes. Participants explained how and why they felt the program was beneficial. Six themes were generated: (1) group dynamic; (2) learning versus doing; (3) holism and comprehensive care; (4) self-efficacy and empowerment; (5) previous solutions versus new management strategies; and (6) healthcare provider support. This study established that a group program in support of CDSM founded on a HC approach demonstrated potential value from participants as well as favorable outcomes. A pragmatic randomized control trial is required to determine efficacy of this intervention.

  10. Team Software Process (TSP) Coach Mentoring Program Guidebook Version 1.1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    complete C NO YES Document how the provisional coach performed in comparison to the DACUM Mentoring artifacts, to be submitted to the SEI during...016 Appendix B TSP Coach Job Analysis Report B-2 | CMU/SEI-2010-SR-016 B-3 | CMU/SEI-2010-SR-016 DACUM Research Chart for Team Software...ProcessSM (TSPSM) Coach DACUM Panel Dan Burton Software Engineering Institute Robert Cannon Software Engineering Institute Noopur

  11. [Development and Effects of an Instructional Coaching Program Regarding Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder for Elementary School Teachers].

    PubMed

    Park, Shin Jeong; Park, Wan Ju

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the effects of a newly developed instructional coaching program regarding Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) for teachers. Seventy teachers participated in this study involving a nonequivalent control group and a pretest-posttest design. The instructional coaching program consisted of eight 60-minute sessions. The program was developed through a theoretical development program involving six steps. To evaluate the effects of the program, data were collected through self-report questionnaires including the Knowledge Scale of Attention Deficit Disorder, Attitude Scale of Primary School Teachers Experiencing Students with ADHD, Practice Scale of Educational Intervention Activity, and the Korean ADHD Rating Scale. Data were analyzed with an independent t test, a chi-square test, and an ANCOVA using SPSS WIN version 20. The intervention program consisted of 3 sectors, 8 subjects, and 24 content items. The experimental group showed a significant improvement in attitudes toward ADHD (F=22.83, p<.001). In addition, teacher's knowledge regarding ADHD (F=7.16, p=.010) and the implementation of instructional interventions (F=4.29, p=.043) improved. Further, teachers reported a reduction in children's ADHD-related behavior (F=4.34, p=.041). Results showed that the coaching program made a positive contribution to teaching skills and understanding of school-age children with ADHD. The instructional coaching program was well structured and significantly improved not only teachers'attitudes, knowledge, and teaching skills but also the behavior of children with ADHD in class. Therefore, the program is recommended as a means of facilitating teaching and managing children with ADHD in class.

  12. Instructional Coaching. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowal, Julie; Steiner, Lucy

    2007-01-01

    Schools and districts invest a great deal of time and money in professional development for teachers through instructional coaching. With this effort comes the responsibility to design coaching programs that have the greatest potential to improve classroom instruction and, in turn, increase student learning. What research is available to help…

  13. Coaching: The Key to Translating Research into Practice Lies in Continuous, Job-Embedded Learning with Ongoing Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, interest in the form of professional learning loosely described as coaching has exploded. This growing interest in coaching is likely fueled by educators' recognition that traditional one-shot approaches to professional development--where teachers hear about practices but do not receive follow-up support--are ineffective at…

  14. Cost-effectiveness analysis for a tele-based health coaching program for chronic disease in primary care.

    PubMed

    Oksman, Erja; Linna, Miika; Hörhammer, Iiris; Lammintakanen, Johanna; Talja, Martti

    2017-02-15

    T2D and CAD patients with moderate costs. However, the results are grounded on a short follow-up period, and more evidence is needed to evaluate the long-term outcomes of health-coaching programs. NCT00552903 [Prospectively registered, registration date 1(st) November 2007, last updated 3(rd) February 2009].

  15. Does an on-road motorcycle coaching program reduce crashes in novice riders? A randomised control trial.

    PubMed

    Ivers, Rebecca Q; Sakashita, Chika; Senserrick, Teresa; Elkington, Jane; Lo, Serigne; Boufous, Soufiane; de Rome, Liz

    2016-01-01

    Motorcycle riding is increasing globally and confers a high risk of crash-related injury and death. There is community demand for investment in rider training programs but no high-quality evidence about its effectiveness in preventing crashes. This randomised trial of an on-road rider coaching program aimed to determine its effectiveness in reducing crashes in novice motorcycle riders. Between May 2010 and October 2012, 2399 newly-licensed provisional riders were recruited in Victoria, Australia and completed a telephone interview before randomisation to intervention or control groups. Riders in the intervention group were offered an on-road motorcycle rider coaching program which involved pre-program activities, 4h riding and facilitated discussion in small groups with a riding coach. Outcome measures were collected for all participants via telephone interviews at 3 and 12 months after program delivery (or equivalent for controls), and via linkage to police-recorded crash and offence data. The primary outcome was a composite measure of police-recorded and self-reported crashes; secondary outcomes included traffic offences, near crashes, riding exposure, and riding behaviours and motivations. Follow-up was 89% at 3 months and 88% at 12 months; 60% of the intervention group completed the program. Intention-to-treat analyses conducted in 2014 indicated no effect on crash risk at 3 months (adjusted OR 0.90, 95% CI: 0.65-1.27) or 12 months (adjusted OR 1.00, 95% CI: 0.78-1.29). Riders in the intervention group reported increased riding exposure, speeding behaviours and rider confidence. There was no evidence that this on-road motorcycle rider coaching program reduced the risk of crash, and we found an increase in crash-related risk factors. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Principal as Instructional Leader: Designing a Coaching Program That Fits. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Lucy; Kowal, Julie

    2007-01-01

    The research evidence suggests that strong instructional leaders greatly can impact teaching and learning. There also is increasing recognition that instructional coaches can play an effective role in improving classroom-level practices. A natural way for school leaders to take on the role of instructional leader is to serve as a "chief" coach for…

  17. Science and Practice of Coaching a Strength Training Program for Novice and Intermediate-Level Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Addresses various aspects of the athletic coaching process in strength training, including: teaching and coaching exercises to novice and intermediate level athletes (typical high school and younger college aged athletes); technical analysis and modification of student technique; student motivation; goal setting; reinforcement; and the overall…

  18. Science and Practice of Coaching a Strength Training Program for Novice and Intermediate-Level Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Addresses various aspects of the athletic coaching process in strength training, including: teaching and coaching exercises to novice and intermediate level athletes (typical high school and younger college aged athletes); technical analysis and modification of student technique; student motivation; goal setting; reinforcement; and the overall…

  19. The Technology Coach: Implementing Instructional Technology in Kean University's ESL Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Sharon C.; Best, Linda; Griffith, Ruth P.; Nelson, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Faculty involved in implementing a grant to incorporate technology into post-secondary ESL teaching and learning describe the coaching model they used to do this. The authors explain how they drew from principles of literacy coaching to develop and implement their model; describe their experiences in working with coachees; discuss technology…

  20. Group Coaching on Pre-School Teachers' Implementation of Pyramid Model Strategies: A Program Description

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fettig, Angel; Artman-Meeker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a group coaching model and present preliminary evidence of its impact on teachers' implementation of Pyramid Model practices. In particular, we described coaching strategies used to support teachers in reflecting and problem solving on the implementation of the evidence-based strategies. Preliminary…

  1. Group Coaching on Pre-School Teachers' Implementation of Pyramid Model Strategies: A Program Description

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fettig, Angel; Artman-Meeker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a group coaching model and present preliminary evidence of its impact on teachers' implementation of Pyramid Model practices. In particular, we described coaching strategies used to support teachers in reflecting and problem solving on the implementation of the evidence-based strategies. Preliminary…

  2. Continuous Improvement in State Funded Preschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    State funded preschool programs were constantly faced with the need to change in order to address internal and external demands. As programs engaged in efforts towards change, minimal research was available on how to support continuous improvement efforts within the context unique to state funded preschool programs. Guidance available had…

  3. A Coach's Code of Conduct. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Linda; Ewing, Marty; Martino, Nan

    2009-01-01

    Coaches exert a profound impact on our youths; therefore, society sets high expectations for them. As such, whether coaches are compensated or work solely as volunteers, they are responsible for executing coaching as a professional. If we are to continue to enhance the cultural perceptions of coaching, we must strive to develop and master the…

  4. Outcomes of a Digital Health Program With Human Coaching for Diabetes Risk Reduction in a Medicare Population.

    PubMed

    Castro Sweet, Cynthia M; Chiguluri, Vinay; Gumpina, Rajiv; Abbott, Paul; Madero, Erica N; Payne, Mike; Happe, Laura; Matanich, Roger; Renda, Andrew; Prewitt, Todd

    2017-01-01

    To examine the outcomes of a Medicare population who participated in a program combining digital health with human coaching for diabetes risk reduction. People at risk for diabetes enrolled in a program combining digital health with human coaching. Participation and health outcomes were examined at 16 weeks and 6 and 12 months. A total of 501 participants enrolled; 92% completed at least nine of 16 core lessons. Participants averaged 19 of 31 possible opportunities for weekly program engagement. At 12 months, participants lost 7.5% ( SD = 7.8%) of initial body weight; among participants with clinical data, glucose control improved (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] change = -0.14%, p = .001) and total cholesterol decreased (-7.08 mg/dL, p = .008). Self-reported well-being, depression, and self-care improved ( p < .0001). This Medicare population demonstrated sustained program engagement and improved weight, health, and well-being. The findings support digital programs with human coaching for reducing chronic disease risk among older adults.

  5. Supporting Professional Growth through Mentoring and Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutilek, Linda M.; Earnest, Garee W.

    2001-01-01

    Compares peer mentoring, peer coaching, and executive coaching. Presents an evaluation of extension professionals with peer coaches, indicating that it increased their skills in program planning and implementation. Suggests that peer coaching is more successful over a shorter time frame and requires follow-up. (SK)

  6. Coaching in Community Settings: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nettles, Saundra Murray

    Coaching is a means of instruction that combines elements of mentoring and tutoring in natural community environments. Coach and student characteristics, processes of coaching, and outcomes of coaching in varied community settings and across different developmental levels are examined. Programs utilizing adults and peers from the community in…

  7. Heterarchical Coaching for Continuing Teacher Professional Learning and Development: A Transversal Analysis of Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charteris, Jennifer; Smardon, Dianne; Foulkes, Ruth; Bewley, Sue

    2017-01-01

    Aligned with the development of human capital, in-service teacher education is globally conceived as a key lever in economic development. However, teacher education is also a critically important process to leverage teacher political awareness and social justice. This article provides a socio-materialist account of continuous professional…

  8. Advancing the Practice of Health Coaching: Differentiation From Wellness Coaching.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Melinda H

    2016-09-01

    The increasing demand for health coaches and wellness coaches in worksite health promotion and the marketplace has resulted in a plethora of training programs with wide variations in coaching definitions, content, attributes, and eligibility of those who may train. It is in the interest of public awareness and safety that those in clinical practice take the lead in this discussion and offer a reasonable contrast and comparison focusing on the risks and responsibilities of health coaching in particular. With the endorsement of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (AAOHN), the National Society of Health Coaches, whose membership is primarily nurses, discusses the issue and states its position here.

  9. The effect of a telephone-based health coaching disease management program on Medicaid members with chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Chieh; Chien, Hung-Lun; Willis, Georgianna; O'Connell, Elizabeth; Rennie, Kate Staunton; Bottella, Heather M; Ferris, Timothy G

    2012-01-01

    Despite the growing popularity of disease management programs for chronic conditions, evidence regarding the effect of these programs has been mixed. In addition, few peer-reviewed studies have examined the effect of these programs on publicly insured populations. To examine the effect of a telephone-based health coaching disease management program on healthcare utilization and expenditures in Medicaid members with chronic conditions. Using a difference-in-differences analysis, we examined changes in hospitalizations, emergency department (ED) visits, ambulatory care visits, and Medicaid expenditures among program members for 1 year before and 2 years after their enrollment compared with a matched comparison group. Medicaid members aged 18 to 64 with a diagnosis of qualifying chronic conditions and 2 acute health service events of hospitalizations and/or ED visits within a 12-month period. Changes in acute hospitalizations, ambulatory care visits, and Medicaid expenditures before and after program enrollment were similar between the 2 study groups. However, during the second year after enrollment, program members had a significantly smaller decrease in ED visits than the comparisons (8% in program members and 23% in comparisons, P value=0.03). Compared with a matched comparison group, the telephone-based health coaching disease management program did not demonstrate significant effects on healthcare utilization and expenditures in Medicaid members with chronic conditions.

  10. Evaluation of a social interaction coaching program in an integrated day-care setting.

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, J M; Gardner, N; Kaiser, A; Riley, A

    1993-01-01

    We used a multiple baseline design across teachers (with a reversal phase for 1 teacher) to evaluate the direct and indirect effects of a structured coaching procedure on the teaching behaviors of 3 day-care teachers. Structured coaching preceding daily caregiver routines resulted in (a) substantial increases in adult delivery of behavioral support of social interaction during group activities with 2- and 4-year-old children and (b) marked collateral increases in positive interactions of socially withdrawn children. Long-term maintenance effects were demonstrated by both the teachers and target children, and social validity measures indicated that the teachers rated coaching very positively on several dimensions. The results are discussed in relation to in-service training of day-care staff, the concept of coaching as a setting event, and the dissemination of teaching technology related to social interaction of young children. PMID:8331018

  11. Managerial Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bommelje, Rick

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explores how coaching equips managers and supervisors to be successful in the 21st-century workplace. Coaching has benefited these professionals by providing them with viable tools to enhance the leadership and managerial tools they already possess.

  12. Managerial Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bommelje, Rick

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explores how coaching equips managers and supervisors to be successful in the 21st-century workplace. Coaching has benefited these professionals by providing them with viable tools to enhance the leadership and managerial tools they already possess.

  13. A Critical Examination of the Use of Trained Health Coaches to Decrease the Metabolic Syndrome for Participants of a Community-Based Diabetes Prevention and Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Shawley, Samantha; Ingels, John Spencer; Stewart, Jonathan; Misra, Ranjita

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic of obesity and diabetes in the United States poses major challenge to the prevention and management of chronic diseases. Furthermore, when this is viewed in other components of the metabolic syndrome (i.e., the burden of high cholesterol and hypertension), the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome continues to rise in the USA continued challenge is how to deal with this epidemic from a medical and public health standpoint. Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) is a unique approach and offers a novel perspective for answering this challenge. A critical set of goals for CBPR is to address health disparities and social inequalities while getting community members engaged in all aspects of the research process. Utilizing the West Virginia Diabetes Prevention and Management Program and trained Health Coaches as a model, we discuss topics of consideration related to CBPR, involving trained health coaches, optimizing early adoption of healthy lifestyle behaviors, and enhancing participation. Through careful project planning and design, questions regarding disparities increasing susceptibility and preventive efforts within the community can be addressed successfully. These topics are part of a broader integration of theories such as participatory research, community engagement, and outcomes measurement. The understanding of the pathophysiology and epidemiology of the metabolic syndrome can help frame an appropriate strategy for establishing long-term community-wide changes that promote health. In order to continue to improve investigations for preventing the metabolic syndrome, it will be necessary to have aggressive efforts at the individual and population level for developing culturally sensitive programs that start early and are sustainable in practical environments such as the workplace. In this comprehensive review, we will discuss practical considerations related to project design, implementation, and how to measure effectiveness in regards to

  14. A Critical Examination of the Use of Trained Health Coaches to Decrease the Metabolic Syndrome for Participants of a Community-Based Diabetes Prevention and Management Program.

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Shawley, Samantha; Ingels, John Spencer; Stewart, Jonathan; Misra, Ranjita

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic of obesity and diabetes in the United States poses major challenge to the prevention and management of chronic diseases. Furthermore, when this is viewed in other components of the metabolic syndrome (i.e., the burden of high cholesterol and hypertension), the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome continues to rise in the USA continued challenge is how to deal with this epidemic from a medical and public health standpoint. Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) is a unique approach and offers a novel perspective for answering this challenge. A critical set of goals for CBPR is to address health disparities and social inequalities while getting community members engaged in all aspects of the research process. Utilizing the West Virginia Diabetes Prevention and Management Program and trained Health Coaches as a model, we discuss topics of consideration related to CBPR, involving trained health coaches, optimizing early adoption of healthy lifestyle behaviors, and enhancing participation. Through careful project planning and design, questions regarding disparities increasing susceptibility and preventive efforts within the community can be addressed successfully. These topics are part of a broader integration of theories such as participatory research, community engagement, and outcomes measurement. The understanding of the pathophysiology and epidemiology of the metabolic syndrome can help frame an appropriate strategy for establishing long-term community-wide changes that promote health. In order to continue to improve investigations for preventing the metabolic syndrome, it will be necessary to have aggressive efforts at the individual and population level for developing culturally sensitive programs that start early and are sustainable in practical environments such as the workplace. In this comprehensive review, we will discuss practical considerations related to project design, implementation, and how to measure effectiveness in regards to

  15. Employee engagement factors that affect enrollment compared with retention in two coaching programs--the ACTIVATE study.

    PubMed

    Terry, Paul E; Fowles, Jinnet B; Harvey, Lisa

    2010-06-01

    This article describes enrollment and retention results from a randomized controlled trial that tested differences between a traditional worksite health promotion program and an activated consumer program on health behaviors and health status. A control arm was included. Baseline survey and clinical data were collected from 631 of 1628 eligible employees (39% response rate) between March and June of 2005. Retention data were collected in March 2007-12 months into an 18-month program. At baseline, participants in the 6 groups (3 arms in each of 2 companies) were comparable in health status but not in patient activation status. Enrollment of high-risk employees into the 2 individualized coaching programs (one focused on traditional health promotion, the other focused on activated consumer navigation) varied significantly by industry type, smoking status, and patient activation. In contrast, retention in the coaching programs was related to sex, age, and industry type. Our findings suggest that one set of strategies may be needed to encourage program enrollment while a distinctly different set of strategies may be needed to sustain participation.

  16. Current Status: Requirements for Interscholastic Coaches. Results of NAGWS/NASPE Coaching Certification Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisley, Becky L.; Wiese, Diane M.

    1987-01-01

    A survey was made during 1986-87 of three agencies in each state to gain information on required coach certification programs, voluntary programs, and minimum requirements for coaches. Results are discussed, and state requirements are presented. (MT)

  17. Developing Reflection and Teaching through Peer Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlin, Rebecca P.

    2000-01-01

    This newsletter highlights the development of reflection and teaching skills in preservice teachers via peer coaching. Peer coaching in preservice programs can serve as an induction program, while with experienced teachers it can serve as professional development. Research suggests that peer coaching contributes to the development of effective…

  18. Effect of a health coaching self-management program for older adults with multimorbidity in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yeon-Hwan; Chang, HeeKyung

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Although a growing number of older people are suffering from multimorbidity, most of the health problems related to multimorbidity can be improved by self-management. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a health coaching self-management program for older adults with multimorbidity in nursing homes. Methods Older adults with multimorbidity from one nursing home in Korea were randomly allocated to either an intervention group (n=22) or conventional group (n=21). Participants in the intervention group met face to face with the researchers twice a week for 8 weeks, during which time the researchers engaged them in goal setting and goal performance using the strategies in the health coaching self-management program. Regular care was provided to the other participants in the conventional group. Results Participants in the intervention group had significantly better outcomes in exercise behaviors (P=0.015), cognitive symptom management (P=0.004), mental stress management/relaxation (P=0.023), self-rated health (P=0.002), reduced illness intrusiveness (P<0.001), depression (P<0.001), and social/role activities limitations (P<0.001). In addition, there was a significant time-by-group interaction in self-efficacy (P=0.036). According to the goal attainment scales, their individual goals of oral health and stress reduction were achieved. Conclusion The health coaching self-management program was successfully implemented in older adults with multimorbidity in a nursing home. Further research is needed to develop and evaluate the long-term effects of an intervention to enhance adherence to self-management and quality of life for older adults with multimorbidity. PMID:25045253

  19. Neuro-Linguistic Programming: Improving Rapport between Track/Cross Country Coaches and Significant Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helm, David Jay

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the background information and the components of N.L.P., being eye movements, use of predicates, and posturing, as they apply to improving rapport and empathy between track/cross country coaches and their significant others in the arena of competition to help alleviate the inherent stressors.

  20. Coach-led prevention programs are effective in reducing anterior cruciate ligament injury risk in female athletes: A number-needed-to-treat analysis.

    PubMed

    Pfile, K R; Curioz, B

    2017-03-08

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the effectiveness of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) prevention program is impacted by the individual(s) directing the program. A number-needed-to-treat analysis compared the effectiveness of injury prevention measures when either directed by a coach or a mixed leadership group consisting of coach and healthcare providers. Eleven studies were included for analysis. Number-needed-to-treat and relative risk reduction (RRR) were calculated for each study and data sets were pooled based on the intervention leader. Quality of evidence was determined by assessing individual studies (PEDro score x¯=4.55±1.97, range=2-7), applying the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence (CEBM=2a), and the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT=Level B). The mixed leadership group studies' RRR=48.2% (95% confidence interval (CI)=22-65) and a number-needed-to-benefit of 120 (CI=73-303) while the coach-led group's RRR=58.4% (CI=40-71) and a number-needed-to-benefit=133 (CI=96-217). These results demonstrate that a coach-led ACL injury prevention program approach is as effective as a mixed group leadership approach. Coach-led prevention programs can be more widely implemented; however, it is imperative to ensure adequate training is in place prior to implementation of such intervention.

  1. Nutritional Knowledge of UK Coaches

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, Emma; Fortune, Alistair; Briggs, Marc; Rumbold, Penny

    2014-01-01

    Athletes obtain nutritional information from their coaches, yet their competency in this area is lacking. Currently, no research exists in the UK which has a different coach education system to many other countries. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the sports nutrition knowledge of UK coaching certificate (UKCC) level 2 and 3, hockey and netball qualified coaches. All coaches (n = 163) completed a sports nutrition questionnaire to identify: (a) if they provided nutritional advice; (b) their level of sport nutrition knowledge; and (c) factors that may have contributed to their level of knowledge. Over half the coaches provided advice to their athletes (n = 93, 57.1%), even though they were not competent to do so. Coaches responded correctly to 60.3 ± 10.5% of all knowledge questions with no differences between those providing advice and those who did not (p > 0.05). Those coaches who had undertaken formal nutrition training achieved higher scores than those who had not (p < 0.05). In conclusion, UK sports coaches would benefit from continued professional development in sports nutrition to enhance their coaching practice. PMID:24727434

  2. Nutritional knowledge of UK coaches.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Emma; Fortune, Alistair; Briggs, Marc; Rumbold, Penny

    2014-04-10

    Athletes obtain nutritional information from their coaches, yet their competency in this area is lacking. Currently, no research exists in the UK which has a different coach education system to many other countries. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the sports nutrition knowledge of UK coaching certificate (UKCC) level 2 and 3, hockey and netball qualified coaches. All coaches (n = 163) completed a sports nutrition questionnaire to identify: (a) if they provided nutritional advice; (b) their level of sport nutrition knowledge; and (c) factors that may have contributed to their level of knowledge. Over half the coaches provided advice to their athletes (n = 93, 57.1%), even though they were not competent to do so. Coaches responded correctly to 60.3 ± 10.5% of all knowledge questions with no differences between those providing advice and those who did not (p > 0.05). Those coaches who had undertaken formal nutrition training achieved higher scores than those who had not (p < 0.05). In conclusion, UK sports coaches would benefit from continued professional development in sports nutrition to enhance their coaching practice.

  3. Doctor coach: a deliberate practice approach to teaching and learning clinical skills.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Kimberly A; Fall, Leslie H

    2014-02-01

    The rapidly evolving medical education landscape requires restructuring the approach to teaching and learning across the continuum of medical education. The deliberate practice strategies used to coach learners in disciplines beyond medicine can also be used to train medical learners. However, these deliberate practice strategies are not explicitly taught in most medical schools or residencies. The authors designed the Doctor Coach framework and competencies in 2007-2008 to serve as the foundation for new faculty development and resident-as-teacher programs. In addition to teaching deliberate practice strategies, the programs model a deliberate practice approach that promotes the continuous integration of newly developed coaching competencies by participants into their daily teaching practice. Early evaluation demonstrated the feasibility and efficacy of implementing the Doctor Coach framework across the continuum of medical education. Additionally, the Doctor Coach framework has been disseminated through national workshops, which have resulted in additional institutions applying the framework and competencies to develop their own coaching programs. Design of a multisource evaluation tool based on the coaching competencies will enable more rigorous study of the Doctor Coach framework and training programs and provide a richer feedback mechanism for participants. The framework will also facilitate the faculty development needed to implement the milestones and entrustable professional activities in medical education.

  4. Instructional Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The number of school districts using instructional coaches is growing at a staggering rate. Coaching is becoming popular, in part, because many educational leaders recognize the old form of professional development, built around traditional in-service sessions for teachers, simply does not affect student achievement. By offering support, feedback,…

  5. Effects of Group-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Coaching Program on Depressive Symptoms in a Sample of Inmates in a Nigerian Prison.

    PubMed

    Eseadi, Chiedu; Obidoa, Mabel A; Ogbuabor, Shulamite E; Ikechukwu-Ilomuanya, Amaka B

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects that a group-focused cognitive-behavioral coaching program had on depressive symptoms of a sample of inmates from Nsukka Prisons, Enugu State, Nigeria. The design of the study was pretest-posttest control group . The participants were 30 male inmates, experiencing high levels of depressive symptoms, and randomly assigned to treatment and control groups. The primary outcome measure was depression symptoms as measured using Beck's Depression Inventory. Repeated-measures ANOVA and the Mann-Whitney U Test were used for data analysis. Results show that exposing inmates to the group-focused cognitive-behavioral coaching program significantly reduced the depressive symptoms of inmates in the treatment group compared with those in the control group. Our results support the use of cognitive-behavioral coaching interventions designed to assist the severely depressed inmates in Nigeria. Further studies should be conducted both in other states of Nigeria and in other countries.

  6. Peer Coaching for Better Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Michael E.; Welch, Frances C.

    1996-01-01

    College faculty peer coaching encourages better teaching while addressing the unique nature of college instruction. It is non-evaluative, based on classroom observation or instructional materials review, and targets specific instructional techniques. Programs should have clear purposes and procedures, provide formal coaching training, provide…

  7. What Can Physical Educators Learn from Coaches?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferies, Stephen C.

    2005-01-01

    Nearly 20 year ago, Daryl Siedentop wrote that in good high school physical education programs, PE teachers rarely coached. His point was not that coaching developed bad teaching habits, but rather that it was difficult to successfully combine both jobs. The planning and preparation needed to effectively teach or successfully coach takes time.…

  8. Coach Education Online: The Montana Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Craig

    2006-01-01

    Coach education is important, but expensive--both in cost and time to public and private athletic programs. To provide basic coach education to coaches, new, innovative, inexpensive approaches must be developed. Joint efforts between state high school associations and colleges and universities can meet those needs. The "Montana approach"…

  9. Coach Education Online: The Montana Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Craig

    2006-01-01

    Coach education is important, but expensive--both in cost and time to public and private athletic programs. To provide basic coach education to coaches, new, innovative, inexpensive approaches must be developed. Joint efforts between state high school associations and colleges and universities can meet those needs. The "Montana approach"…

  10. Assessing the Cost of Instructional Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, David S.

    2012-01-01

    School-based instructional coaching is an increasingly popular approach to professional development used to support in-service learning for teachers. However, little is known about the cost of coaching. The following study aims to fill this gap. First, the study describes a framework for measuring the cost of an instructional coaching program;…

  11. The benefits of a leadership program and executive coaching for new nursing academic administrators: one college's experience.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, Mary Ellen Smith; Weinstock, Beth; Lachman, Vicki; Suplee, Patricia Dunphy; Dreher, H Michael

    2009-01-01

    Despite attention given to the nursing shortage and now the nursing faculty shortage, what is perhaps less visible but equally critical are the pending retirements of most of the current cadre of academic nursing administrators in the next decade. With only 2.1% of current deans, directors, and department chairs in 2006 aged 45 years or younger, there may be a pending crisis in leadership development and succession planning in our nursing schools and colleges. This article describes an innovative leadership development program for largely new nursing academic administrators, which combined a formal campus-based leadership symposia and executive coaching. This article is particularly useful and practical in that actual case studies are described (albeit modified slightly to protect the identity of the individual administrator), providing a real-life narrative that rarely makes its way into the nursing academic administration literature. The executive coaching focus is very sparsely used in nursing academia, and this college's success using this professional development strategy is likely to become a template for other institutions to follow.

  12. E-Coaching Systems: Convenient, Anytime, Anywhere, and Nonhuman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Teri

    2012-01-01

    Technologies continue to evolve to provide more compelling and interactive learning opportunities. Coaching has traditionally been face-to-face or by email. By combining the new technologies with coaching, learning developers now have the opportunity to develop an asynchronous, online, nonhuman coaching system, or e-coaching system. An e-coaching…

  13. E-Coaching Systems: Convenient, Anytime, Anywhere, and Nonhuman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Teri

    2012-01-01

    Technologies continue to evolve to provide more compelling and interactive learning opportunities. Coaching has traditionally been face-to-face or by email. By combining the new technologies with coaching, learning developers now have the opportunity to develop an asynchronous, online, nonhuman coaching system, or e-coaching system. An e-coaching…

  14. Volunteer youth sport coaches' perspectives of coaching education/certification and parental codes of conduct.

    PubMed

    Wiersma, Lenny D; Sherman, Clay P

    2005-09-01

    The vast majority of youth sport programs in the United States relies primarily on parent volunteers to serve as coaches. Unfortunately, most of these volunteer coaches have not received formal training to prepare them adequately for the role of youth sport coach. To exacerbate the issue, according to the popular media, parents and other adults can commit belligerent and even violent acts around, and often resulting from, poorly managed youth sport events. Although some efforts have been made to standardize curricula, provide training for coaches, and contain or prevent inappropriate parent behaviors, few efforts have been directed at investigating the self-described needs and concerns of the coaches from their perspectives. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the concerns and issues of youth sport coaches related to coaching and parental education. Five focus group interviews with 25 volunteer youth sport coaches were conducted to investigate these issues. Results were organized around four higher order themes that emerged from inductive content analyses: (a) coaching education content areas of need, (b) barriers and problems of offering coaching education, (c) coaching education format recommendations, and (d) efficacy of parental codes of conduct. Results were discussed in terms of the potential impact administrators, coaches, and parents could have in implementing formal coaching education programs and developing their coaching education practices.

  15. 31 CFR 10.9 - Continuing education providers and continuing education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. 10.9 Section 10.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the... Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. (a) Continuing education providers—(1) In...

  16. 31 CFR 10.9 - Continuing education providers and continuing education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. 10.9 Section 10.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the... Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. (a) Continuing education providers—(1) In...

  17. 31 CFR 10.9 - Continuing education providers and continuing education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. 10.9 Section 10.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the... Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. (a) Continuing education providers—(1) In...

  18. 31 CFR 10.9 - Continuing education providers and continuing education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. 10.9 Section 10.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the... Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. (a) Continuing education providers—(1)...

  19. Learning from the Legends: Leadership Tips for Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docheff, Dennis M.

    2013-01-01

    Leadership is a quality that aspiring and current coaches strive to develop. Sadly, there are too few programs that assist in the preparation of coaches. One avenue for learning is to seek advice and guidance from coaches of the past. The purpose of this article is to provide leadership tips from some of the elite coaches in history, such as…

  20. Learning from the Legends: Leadership Tips for Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docheff, Dennis M.

    2013-01-01

    Leadership is a quality that aspiring and current coaches strive to develop. Sadly, there are too few programs that assist in the preparation of coaches. One avenue for learning is to seek advice and guidance from coaches of the past. The purpose of this article is to provide leadership tips from some of the elite coaches in history, such as…

  1. Anti-Hazing Strategies for Coaches and Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Brian; Ammon, Robin, Jr.; Phillips, Dennis R.

    2004-01-01

    Despite recent public attention and nationwide media coverage, hazing by members of sport teams in high schools and colleges continues at an alarming rate. Coaches and administrators who naively think hazing does not occur (or worse, overlook team initiations) are often surprised when a hazing problem is uncovered in their program. Hazing is…

  2. Anti-Hazing Strategies for Coaches and Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Brian; Ammon, Robin, Jr.; Phillips, Dennis R.

    2004-01-01

    Despite recent public attention and nationwide media coverage, hazing by members of sport teams in high schools and colleges continues at an alarming rate. Coaches and administrators who naively think hazing does not occur (or worse, overlook team initiations) are often surprised when a hazing problem is uncovered in their program. Hazing is…

  3. Behavioral Coaching

    PubMed Central

    Seniuk, Holly A.; Witts, Benjamin N.; Williams, W. Larry.; Ghezzi, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    The term behavioral coaching has been used inconsistently in and outside the field of behavior analysis. In the sports literature, the term has been used to describe various intervention strategies, and in the organizational behavior management literature it has been used to describe an approach to training management personnel and staff. This inconsistency is problematic in terms of the replication of behavioral coaching across studies and aligning with Baer, Wolf, and Risley's (1968) technological dimension of applied behavior analysis. The current paper will outline and critique the discrepancies in the use of the term and suggest how Martin and Hrycaiko's (1983) characteristics of behavioral coaching in sports may be used to bring us closer to establishing a consistent definition of the term. In addition, we will suggest how these characteristics can also be applicable to the use of the term behavioral coaching in other domains of behavior analysis. PMID:25729141

  4. Behavioral coaching.

    PubMed

    Seniuk, Holly A; Witts, Benjamin N; Williams, W Larry; Ghezzi, Patrick M

    2013-01-01

    The term behavioral coaching has been used inconsistently in and outside the field of behavior analysis. In the sports literature, the term has been used to describe various intervention strategies, and in the organizational behavior management literature it has been used to describe an approach to training management personnel and staff. This inconsistency is problematic in terms of the replication of behavioral coaching across studies and aligning with Baer, Wolf, and Risley's (1968) technological dimension of applied behavior analysis. The current paper will outline and critique the discrepancies in the use of the term and suggest how Martin and Hrycaiko's (1983) characteristics of behavioral coaching in sports may be used to bring us closer to establishing a consistent definition of the term. In addition, we will suggest how these characteristics can also be applicable to the use of the term behavioral coaching in other domains of behavior analysis.

  5. Coaches. A missing link in the health care system.

    PubMed

    Brown, B R; Butterfield, S A

    1992-02-01

    The number of children and adolescents who participate in interscholastic athletics demands attention to the quality of the coaching they receive and to the opportunities that the athlete-coach relationship provides for modification of high-risk behaviors, social skills training, and character formation. Although the need for coaches has increased due to the advent of girls' athletic programs, which was mandated by Title IX legislation, only a minority of states require certification for coaches who work in school systems. Four coaching curricula are summarized and contrasted: the American Coaching Effectiveness Program, the curriculum of the National Youth Sports Coaches Association, the Athletic Health Care System, and the Coach Effectiveness Training Program. Recommendations for coach certification by states, physician advocacy for coaching standards, and improved sports medicine services are discussed.

  6. How Three Schools View the Success of Literacy Coaching: Teachers', Principals' and Literacy Coaches' Perceived Indicators of Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates how the participants in literacy coaching (teachers, literacy coaches, and principals) perceive the success of their literacy coaching programs. This qualitative study uses data from interviews and observations of literacy coaching from three schools in Ontario, Canada. Four perceived indicators of success were found:…

  7. One-year follow-up of a coach-delivered dating violence prevention program: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Miller, Elizabeth; Tancredi, Daniel J; McCauley, Heather L; Decker, Michele R; Virata, Maria Catrina D; Anderson, Heather A; O'Connor, Brian; Silverman, Jay G

    2013-07-01

    Perpetration of physical, sexual, and psychological abuse is prevalent in adolescent relationships. One strategy for reducing such violence is to increase the likelihood that youth will intervene when they see peers engaging in disrespectful and abusive behaviors. This 12-month follow-up of a cluster RCT examined the longer-term effectiveness of Coaching Boys Into Men, a dating violence prevention program targeting high school male athletes. This cluster RCT was conducted from 2009 to 2011. The unit of randomization was the school, and the unit of analysis was the athlete. Data were analyzed in 2012. Participants were male athletes in Grades 9-11 (N=1513) participating in athletics in 16 high schools. The intervention consisted of training athletic coaches to integrate violence prevention messages into coaching activities through brief, weekly, scripted discussions with athletes. Primary outcomes were intentions to intervene, recognition of abusive behaviors, and gender-equitable attitudes. Secondary outcomes included bystander behaviors and abuse perpetration. Intervention effects were expressed as adjusted mean between-arm differences in changes in outcomes over time, estimated via regression models for clustered, longitudinal data. Perpetration of dating violence in the past 3 months was less prevalent among intervention athletes relative to control athletes, resulting in an estimated intervention effect of -0.15 (95% CI=-0.27, -0.03). Intervention athletes also reported lower levels of negative bystander behaviors (i.e., laughing and going along with peers' abusive behaviors) compared to controls (-0.41, 95% CI=-0.72, -0.10). No differences were observed in intentions to intervene (0.04, 95% CI=-0.07, 0.16); gender-equitable attitudes (-0.04, 95% CI=-0.11, 0.04); recognition of abusive behaviors (-0.03, 95% CI=-0.15, 0.09); or positive bystander behaviors (0.04, 95% CI=-0.11, 0.19). This school athletics-based dating violence prevention program is a promising

  8. The BetterBirth Program: Pursuing Effective Adoption and Sustained Use of the WHO Safe Childbirth Checklist Through Coaching-Based Implementation in Uttar Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Nabihah; Firestone, Rebecca; Kalita, Tapan; Gawande, Atul A; Kumar, Vishwajeet; Kodkany, Bhala; Saurastri, Rajiv; Pratap Singh, Vinay; Maji, Pinki; Karlage, Ami; Hirschhorn, Lisa R; Semrau, Katherine EA

    2017-01-01

    Shifting childbirth into facilities has not improved health outcomes for mothers and newborns as significantly as hoped. Improving the quality and safety of care provided during facility-based childbirth requires helping providers to adhere to essential birth practices—evidence-based behaviors that reduce harm to and save lives of mothers and newborns. To achieve this goal, we developed the BetterBirth Program, which we tested in a matched-pair, cluster-randomized controlled trial in Uttar Pradesh, India. The goal of this intervention was to improve adoption and sustained use of the World Health Organization Safe Childbirth Checklist (SCC), an organized collection of 28 essential birth practices that are known to improve the quality of facility-based childbirth care. Here, we describe the BetterBirth Program in detail, including its 4 main features: implementation tools, an implementation strategy of coaching, an implementation pathway (Engage-Launch-Support), and a sustainability plan. This coaching-based implementation of the SCC motivates and empowers care providers to identify, understand, and resolve the barriers they face in using the SCC with the resources already available. We describe important lessons learned from our experience with the BetterBirth Program as it was tested in the BetterBirth Trial. For example, the emphasis on relationship building and respect led to trust between coaches and birth attendants and helped influence change. In addition, the cloud-based data collection and feedback system proved a valuable asset in the coaching process. More research on coaching-based interventions is required to refine our understanding of what works best to improve quality and safety of care in various settings. Note: At the time of publication of this article, the results of evaluation of the impact of the BetterBirth Program were pending publication in another journal. After the impact findings have been published, we will update this article with a

  9. Sports Nutrition Knowledge Among Collegiate Athletes, Coaches, Athletic Trainers, and Strength and Conditioning Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Torres-McGehee, Toni M.; Pritchett, Kelly L.; Zippel, Deborah; Minton, Dawn M.; Cellamare, Adam; Sibilia, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Context: Coaches, athletic trainers (ATs), strength and conditioning specialists (SCSs), and registered dietitians are common nutrition resources for athletes, but coaches, ATs, and SCSs might offer only limited nutrition information. Little research exists about sports nutrition knowledge and current available resources for nutrition information for athletes, coaches, ATs, and SCSs. Objective: To identify resources of nutrition information that athletes, coaches, ATs, and SCSs use; to examine nutrition knowledge among athletes, coaches, ATs, and SCSs; and to determine confidence levels in the correctness of nutrition knowledge questions within all groups. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I, II, and III institutions across the United States. Patients and Other Participants: The 579 participants consisted of athletes (n = 185), coaches (n = 131), ATs (n = 192), and SCSs (n = 71). Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants answered questions about nutrition resources and domains regarding basic nutrition, supplements and performance, weight management, and hydration. Adequate sports nutrition knowledge was defined as an overall score of 75% in all domains (highest achievable score was 100%). Results: Participants averaged 68.5% in all domains. The ATs (77.8%) and SCSs (81.6%) had the highest average scores. Adequate knowledge was found in 35.9% of coaches, 71.4% of ATs, 83.1% of SCSs, and only 9% of athletes. The most used nutrition resources for coaches, ATs, and SCSs were registered dietitians. Conclusions: Overall, we demonstrated that ATs and SCSs have adequate sports nutrition knowledge, whereas most coaches and athletes have inadequate knowledge. Athletes have frequent contact with ATs and SCSs; therefore, proper nutrition education among these staff members is critical. We suggest that proper nutrition programming should be provided for athletes, coaches, ATs, and SCSs. However, a separate nutrition program

  10. Defining the Constructs of Expert Coaching: A Q-Methodological Study of Olympic Sport Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWeese, Brad Heath

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance the development of coaches for participation at International level competition through the improvement of coaching education programming. Although many studies have alluded to the benefit of various coaching education tactics, no study to date had set out to determine the constructs that define an expert…

  11. Volunteer Youth Sport Coaches' Perspectives of Coaching Education/Certification and Parental Codes of Conduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiersma, Lenny D.; Sherman, Clay P.

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of youth sport programs in the United States relies primarily on parent volunteers to serve as coaches. Unfortunately, most of these volunteer coaches have not received formal training to prepare them adequately for the role of youth sport coach. To exacerbate the issue, according to the popular media, parents and other adults…

  12. Defining the Constructs of Expert Coaching: A Q-Methodological Study of Olympic Sport Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWeese, Brad Heath

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance the development of coaches for participation at International level competition through the improvement of coaching education programming. Although many studies have alluded to the benefit of various coaching education tactics, no study to date had set out to determine the constructs that define an expert…

  13. The Coach-of-Coaches Model for Preparing Rural Special Education Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cegelka, Patricia Thomas; Fitch, Suzanne; Alvarado, Jose Luis

    San Diego State University (California) has developed a coach-of-coaches model of providing support, assistance, and supervision to intern-teachers in its rural special education alternative credential program. Coaches, who are fully credentialed teachers with supervisory skills, make a minimum of nine direct and indirect (video analysis)…

  14. Athletic coaches as violence prevention advocates.

    PubMed

    Jaime, Maria Catrina D; McCauley, Heather L; Tancredi, Daniel J; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Decker, Michele R; Silverman, Jay G; O'Connor, Brian; Stetkevich, Nicholas; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    Adolescent relationship abuse (ARA) is a significant public health problem. Coaching Boys Into Men (CBIM) is an evidence-based ARA prevention program that trains coaches to deliver violence prevention messages to male athletes. Assessing acceptability and impact of CBIM on coaches may inform prevention efforts that involve these important adults in health promotion among youth. As part of a two-armed cluster-randomized controlled trial of CBIM in 16 high schools in Northern California, coaches completed baseline and postseason surveys (n = 176) to assess their attitudes and confidence delivering the program. Coaches in the intervention arm also participated in interviews (n = 36) that explored program acceptability, feasibility, and impact. Relative to controls, intervention coaches showed increases in confidence intervening when witnessing abusive behaviors among their athletes, greater bystander intervention, and greater frequency of violence-related discussions with athletes and other coaches. Coaches reported the program was easy to implement and valuable for their athletes. Findings illustrate the value of exploring attitudinal and behavioral changes among ARA prevention implementers, and suggest that coaches can gain confidence and enact behaviors to discourage ARA among male athletes. Coaches found the program to be feasible and valuable, which suggests potential for long-term uptake and sustainability.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of a one-year coaching program for healthy physical activity in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Brodin, Nina; Lohela-Karlsson, Malin; Swärdh, Emma; Opava, Christina H

    2015-01-01

    To describe cost-effectiveness of the Physical Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis (PARA) study intervention. Costs were collected and estimated retrospectively. Cost-effectiveness was calculated based on the intervention cost per patient with respect to change in health status (EuroQol global visual analog scale--EQ-VAS and EuroQol--EQ-5D) and activity limitation (Health assessment questionnaire - HAQ) using cost-effectiveness- and cost-minimization analyses. Total cost of the one-year intervention program was estimated to be €67 317 or €716 per participant. Estimated difference in total societal cost between the intervention (IG) and control (CG) was €580 per participant. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for one point (1/100) of improvement in EQ-VAS was estimated to be €116. By offering the intervention to more affected participants in the IG compared to less affected participants, 15.5 extra points of improvement in EQ-VAS and 0.13 points of improvement on HAQ were gained at the same cost. "Ordinary physiotherapy" was most cost-effective with regard to EQ-5D. The intervention resulted in improved effect in health status for the IG with a cost of €116 per extra point in VAS. The intervention was cost-effective if targeted towards a subgroup of more affected patients when evaluating the effect using VAS and HAQ. The physical activity coaching intervention resulted in an improved effect on VAS for the intervention group, to a higher cost. In order to maximize cost-effectiveness, this type of physical activity coaching intervention should be targeted towards patients largely affected by their RA. The intervention is cost-effective from the patients' point of view, but not from that of the general population.

  16. A Preliminary Investigation of Using School-Based Coaches to Support Intervention Fidelity of a Classwide Behavior Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmour, Allison F.; Wehby, Joseph H.; McGuire, Terrell M.

    2017-01-01

    Many schools are beginning to implement universal behavior management interventions as part of multitiered systems of support. Past research suggests that teachers need support to implement new practices with fidelity. Coaching is one method for supporting implementation, but little is understood about how coaching takes place when relying on…

  17. Use of Sports Science Knowledge by Turkish Coaches.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Koray; Ince, Mustafa Levent

    The purpose of this study is to examine the following research questions in Turkish coaching context: a) What are coaches' perceptions on the application of sport science research to their coaching methods? b) What sources do coaches utilize to obtain the knowledge they need? c) What barriers do coaches encounter when trying to access and apply the knowledge they need for their sport? In addition, differences in research questions responses were examined based on gender, years of coaching experience, academic educational level, coaching certificate level, coaching team or individual sports, and being paid or unpaid for coaching. The participants were 321 coaches (255 men, 66 women) from diverse sports and coaching levels working in Ankara. The questionnaire "New Ideas for Coaches" by Reade, Rodgers and Hall (2008) was translated, adapted into Turkish, and validated for the current study. According to our findings among Turkish coaches, there is a high prevalence of beliefs that sport science contributes to sport (79.8%);however, there are gaps between what coaches are looking for and the research that is being conducted. Coaches are most likely to attend seminars or consult other coaches to get new information. Scientific publications were ranked very low by the coaches in getting current information. The barriers to coaches' access to sport science research are finding out the sources of information, being able to implement the sport science knowledge into the field of coaching, lack of monetary support in acquiring knowledge, and language barriers. Also, differences in perceptions and preferences for obtaining new information were identified based on coaches' gender, coaching contexts (i.e., professional-amateur), coaching settings (i.e., team/individual), and their other demographic characteristics (i.e., coaching experience, coaching educational level, and coaching certificate level). Future coach education programs should emphasize the development of coaches

  18. Engaging adolescents in a computer-based weight management program: avatars and virtual coaches could help.

    PubMed

    LeRouge, Cynthia; Dickhut, Kathryn; Lisetti, Christine; Sangameswaran, Savitha; Malasanos, Toree

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the potential ability of animated avatars (a digital representation of the user) and virtual agents (a digital representation of a coach, buddy, or teacher) to deliver computer-based interventions for adolescents' chronic weight management. An exploration of the acceptance and desire of teens to interact with avatars and virtual agents for self-management and behavioral modification was undertaken. The utilized approach was inspired by community-based participatory research. Data was collected from 2 phases: Phase 1) focus groups with teens, provider interviews, parent interviews; and Phase 2) mid-range prototype assessment by teens and providers. Data from all stakeholder groups expressed great interest in avatars and virtual agents assisting self-management efforts. Adolescents felt the avatars and virtual agents could: 1) reinforce guidance and support, 2) fit within their lifestyle, and 3) help set future goals, particularly after witnessing the effect of their current behavior(s) on the projected physical appearance (external and internal organs) of avatars. Teens wanted 2 virtual characters: a virtual agent to act as a coach or teacher and an avatar (extension of themselves) to serve as a "buddy" for empathic support and guidance and as a surrogate for rewards. Preferred modalities for use include both mobile devices to accommodate access and desktop to accommodate preferences for maximum screen real estate to support virtualization of functions that are more contemplative and complex (e.g., goal setting). Adolescents expressed a desire for limited co-user access, which they could regulate. Data revealed certain barriers and facilitators that could affect adoption and use. The current study extends the support of teens, parents, and providers for adding avatars or virtual agents to traditional computer-based interactions. Data supports the desire for a personal relationship with a virtual character in support of previous studies. The

  19. Requirements To Obtain a Pupil Activity Validation To Direct, Supervise, or Coach a Pupil Activity Program (3301-27-01). Guidelines for School Administration and First Aid Program Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus.

    Administrative Code 3301-27-01, revised in June 1995, replaces what was previously known as the sports medicine certification program. The revision changes requirements for individuals who supervise, direct, or coach a pupil activity program that involves athletes, routine/regular physical activity, or health and safety consideration as determined…

  20. The Wild West of executive coaching.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Stratford; Freas, Alyssa

    2004-11-01

    Annual spending on executive coaching in the United States is estimated at 1 billion dollars. Yet information about coaching's effectiveness is scarce and unreliable. No one has yet demonstrated conclusively what qualifies an executive coach or what makes one approach to executive coaching better than another. Barriers to entry are nonexistent--many executive coaches know little about business, and some know little about coaching. The coaching certifications offered by various self-appointed bodies are difficult to assess, and methods of measuring return on investment are questionable. But strategic coaching can provide critical help both to individuals and to organizations. In this article, Stratford Sherman, a senior vice president of Executive Coaching Network, and Alyssa Freas, the founder and CEO, explore the popularity of executive coaching and investigate ways to make the most of the experience. They argue that coaching is inevitably a triangular relationship between the client, the "coachee," and the coach. Its purpose is to produce behavioral change and growth in the coachee for the economic benefit of the client. The best way to maximize the likelihood of good results is to qualify all the people involved. Even so, many triangular relationships continue to generate conflict among all three parties. At the most basic level, coaches serve as suppliers of candor, providing leaders with the objective feedback they need to nourish their growth. Coaching gets executives to slow down, gain awareness, and notice the effects of their words and actions. On a larger scale, the best coaching fosters cultural change for the benefit of the entire organization. It provides a disciplined way for businesses to deepen relationships with their most valued employees while also increasing their effectiveness.

  1. Coaching for College Students with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Prevatt, Frances

    2016-12-01

    Evidence suggests that ADHD can impair academic achievement in college students and throughout the life span. College students with ADHD are an at-risk population who might benefit from interventions. An offshoot of CBT-oriented therapy that has grown significantly and gained popularity in recent years is ADHD coaching. ADHD coaching is a psychosocial intervention that helps individuals develop skills, strategies, and behaviors to cope with the core impairments associated with ADHD. Most coaching programs are primarily based on a CBT approach and target planning, time management, goal setting, organization, and problem solving. This paper describes ADHD coaching for college students and discusses how coaching is different from standard CBT treatment. This is followed by a review of empirical studies of the effectiveness of ADHD coaching for college students. Finally, some specific considerations and procedures used in coaching are described.

  2. Who Needs Coaches' Education? US Coaches Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimiecik, Jay C.

    1988-01-01

    Fewer than 20 percent of coaches have received any formal training in coaching. The situation is particularly serious in youth sports. Although several states and professional organizations have implemented training and certification standards, no national standard exists for certifying coaches or coaching education. (IAH)

  3. Softball Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopiano, Donna; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A collection of articles provides current instructional information to softball players and coaches. Topics discussed in the series include practice, basic skills, defense, pitching, catching, offense, and warm-up exercises to be used in conjunction with other conditioning drills. (JN)

  4. 76 FR 57637 - TRICARE; Continued Health Care Benefit Program Expansion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 199 RIN 0720-AB30 TRICARE; Continued Health Care Benefit Program..., some MHS beneficiaries would not be eligible to purchase Continued Health Care Benefit Program (CHCBP... continued health care coverage for eligible beneficiaries who lose their MHS eligibility. It was initially...

  5. Continuation and Enhancement of the MPOWIR Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lozier, Susan

    2014-10-21

    MPOWIR is a community-based program that provides mentoring to physical oceanographers from late graduate school through early careers. The overall goal of MPOWIR is to make mentoring opportunities for junior physical oceanographers universally available and of higher quality by expanding the reach of mentoring opportunities beyond individual home institutions. The aim is to reduce the barriers to career development for all junior scientists in the field, with a particular focus on improving the retention of junior women. Over the past five years MPOWIR has expanded significantly. This funding cycle saw the development and enhancement of MPOWIR’s programs and outreach opportunities. MPOWIR’s main programmatic offerings are: mentor groups, a biannual conference, a website and blog, and town hall meetings at national events. Since 2009, MPOWIR has hosted 15 mentor groups, three Pattullo conferences, and created a website that has attracted over 50,000 visitors. MPOWIR’s mentoring groups and Pattullo conferences have reached more than 130 unique participants. Mentor Groups Mentor groups were established in the fall of 2008, and continue to gain momentum after 5 years. Since 2009, 11 groups have formed, with participants mainly, but not exclusively, drawn from Pattullo attendees. To gauge the impact of mentor groups, participants are surveyed approximately annually. Based on an extensive 2011 survey, 100% of mentoring group participants reported that they made progress on their stated scientific, professional, and personal goals. As part of these surveys, participants are asked what they value about their mentoring group, what the benefit of the mentoring group is to their current position, and they are asked questions about the logistics and setup of the groups. Based on the survey conducted in 2012, all participants rated participation in these groups a valuable experience, with particular value placed on feedback on professional development (100% Excellent to

  6. What Good Coaches Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Instructional coaching guru Jim Knight suggests that how we think about coaching can enhance or interfere with our success as a coach. He suggests that coaches take a partnership approach to collaboration and adopt seven principles that define how coaches interact with collaborating teachers: equality, choice, voice, reflection, dialogue, praxis,…

  7. The Heart of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  8. The Heart of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  9. What Good Coaches Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Instructional coaching guru Jim Knight suggests that how we think about coaching can enhance or interfere with our success as a coach. He suggests that coaches take a partnership approach to collaboration and adopt seven principles that define how coaches interact with collaborating teachers: equality, choice, voice, reflection, dialogue, praxis,…

  10. Does "Word Coach" Coach Words?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Tom; Horst, Marlise

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on the design and testing of an integrated suite of vocabulary training games for Nintendo[TM] collectively designated "My Word Coach" (Ubisoft, 2008). The games' design is based on a wide range of learning research, from classic studies on recycling patterns to frequency studies of modern corpora. Its general usage…

  11. Does "Word Coach" Coach Words?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Tom; Horst, Marlise

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on the design and testing of an integrated suite of vocabulary training games for Nintendo[TM] collectively designated "My Word Coach" (Ubisoft, 2008). The games' design is based on a wide range of learning research, from classic studies on recycling patterns to frequency studies of modern corpora. Its general usage…

  12. A nurse-coached exercise program to increase muscle strength, improve quality of life, and increase self-efficacy in people with tetraplegic spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, Susan Budassi

    2013-08-01

    A nurse-coached exercise intervention for 10 people with tetraplegic spinal cord injuries was conducted over a period of 2 years at an accessible, community-based YMCA using an equipment especially designed for people with mobility issues and neurological deficits. In this single-subject design study, each participant completed three 3-hour exercise sessions a week for over 6 months. The purpose of the study was to determine what effects the program would have on increasing muscle strength, improving quality of life, and increasing self-efficacy after traditional outpatient therapy sessions were no longer available or affordable. The Sheehy Spinal Cord Injury Functional Improvement via Exercise Model was constructed at the conclusion of an unpublished pilot study and was tested in this study. Expectations of the model were that, if a person with a tetraplegic spinal cord injury participated in a coached program of exercise, muscle strength would increase and functional ability would improve, resulting in greater independence, a higher sense of self-efficacy, and a higher quality of life. Study results using a single-subject design of graph-trend analysis showed upward trajectories in muscle strength, quality of life, and self-efficacy in all study participants regardless of the length of time since his or her original injury. The results support the efficacy of this nurse-coached program for people with tetraplegic spinal cord injuries and validate the Sheehy Spinal Cord Injury Functional Improvement via Exercise Model.

  13. Coaching Development: Methods for Youth Sport Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickers, Brad; Schoenstedt, Linda

    2011-01-01

    There are increasing demands and requirements in the coaching profession, and as a result, coaching education programs worldwide have seen an increase in overall participation. In addition, many schools and sport programs in the United States have begun to require a minimum standard of certification. This, in turn, has created sport-specific…

  14. Selecting Continuing Higher Education Programs for Impact Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giuliani, Betty

    1979-01-01

    Some noncredit university continuing education programs are more readily subject to impact evaluation than most. Impact studies are reported for two such programs, one on governmental accounting and one on criminal justice. (CT)

  15. Positioning Continuing Education Computer Programs for the Corporate Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilney, Ceil

    1993-01-01

    Summarizes the findings of the market assessment phase of Bellevue Community College's evaluation of its continuing education computer training program. Indicates that marketing efforts must stress program quality and software training to help overcome strong antiacademic client sentiment. (MGB)

  16. Selecting Continuing Higher Education Programs for Impact Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giuliani, Betty

    1979-01-01

    Some noncredit university continuing education programs are more readily subject to impact evaluation than most. Impact studies are reported for two such programs, one on governmental accounting and one on criminal justice. (CT)

  17. Pay Equity for Coaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Debra E.

    1994-01-01

    Some colleges are giving substantial raises to women's athletic team coaches, sometimes reducing mens' team coaches' salaries to provide equity. Court litigation, activism by several national coaches' organizations, and debate over federal laws keep the issue in high profile. (MSE)

  18. Collegiate Coaches' Knowledge of Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Joanne C.; Prentice, William E.; Chappell, Susan; Shields, Edgar W.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To assess, through exploratory research, 1) collegiate coaches' knowledge of eating disorders, 2) the confidence of collegiate coaches in their response correctness to questions about eating disorders among athletes, and 3) demographic data related to prior education about eating disorders and the role of the athletic department in providing such educational experiences. Design and Setting: We distributed a 2-part questionnaire to 258 NCAA Division I-A coaches from 5 universities selected by sampling convenience. Subjects: One hundred thirty-eight collegiate coaches responded to the questionnaire for a response rate of 53.5%. Measurements: Our survey consisted of 30 true-false questions that tested knowledge of eating disorders overall and in 5 domains. These domains included etiology, identifying signs and symptoms, management and treatment, risk factors, and education and prevention of eating disorders. Coaches indicated their level of certainty in their responses by rating their confidence level on a 4-item Likert-type scale. Demographic data focused on educational programs attended by coaches and teams. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze all data. Results: Our results suggest a need for coaches to achieve a greater knowledge of eating disorders in all domains. Evidence showed that educational programs about eating disorders were not often sponsored by the athletic department for coaches or athletes. There seemed to be poor communication between athletic departments and coaches regarding the availability of eating disorder educational resources. Conclusions: Data suggested coaches could benefit from comprehensive education in all domains of eating disorders; however, further study is needed to validate these findings, to determine the actual effectiveness of education in the prevention of eating disorders, and to differentiate coaches' knowledge specific to sport coached and to coach and team sex. PMID:16558542

  19. For aerospace programs, the crises continue.

    PubMed

    Looney, Paul; Beavin, Michael

    2003-05-01

    The Legislative Update column reports on President Bush's supplemental budget request for the war in Iraq, the formation of a defense caucus in the House of Representatives, stabilized funding for airport security, the Department of Homeland Security budget, NASA's budget request, funding for NASA's aeronautics program, and NASA's new authorization. NASA's FY04 budget request is $15.47 billion, less than 1% more than FY03. The aeronautics program budget request for FY04 is $959 million, a decrease of 8.5% from FY03. Congress is working to introduce a multiyear authorization for NASA during the 108th session.

  20. Continuation of a Postdoctoral Research Associateship Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-01

    to complete this human research protocol. We will continue to analyze the sleep (electroencephalogram, wrist actigraphy , sleep diary), circadian...8217 ACTIVITIES Associates who ended tenure during the report period were on tenure for an average of 27 months, with a high of 39 months and a low of 8 months...In their termination reports, the associates indicated their amount of scholarly activity while on tenure as an associate. Associates reported the

  1. Peer coaching: the next step in staff development.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Donna L; Dunn, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    A common problem in continuing nursing education and staff development is the transfer of learning to clinical practice. Peer coaching offers a solution to this problem. Initiated by educators, peer coaching has been researched in educational settings and found to be effective in facilitating the transfer of newly acquired knowledge and skill into classroom teaching strategies. This article describes the background, components, process, characteristics, and benefits of peer coaching. A specific example of using peer coaching to teach clinical breast examination skills is used to illustrate the application of peer coaching to the staff development of healthcare professionals. Peer coaching is the next step in nursing staff development.

  2. Continuous Risk Management: A NASA Program Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Theodore F.; Rosenberg, Linda

    1999-01-01

    NPG 7120.5A, "NASA Program and Project Management Processes and Requirements" enacted in April, 1998, requires that "The program or project manager shall apply risk management principles..." The Software Assurance Technology Center (SATC) at NASA GSFC has been tasked with the responsibility for developing and teaching a systems level course for risk management that provides information on how to comply with this edict. The course was developed in conjunction with the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, then tailored to the NASA systems community. This presentation will briefly discuss the six functions for risk management: (1) Identify the risks in a specific format; (2) Analyze the risk probability, impact/severity, and timeframe; (3) Plan the approach; (4) Track the risk through data compilation and analysis; (5) Control and monitor the risk; (6) Communicate and document the process and decisions.

  3. Innovations in Continuing Education. Award-Winning New Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Univ. Extension Association, Washington, DC.

    This document is a compilation of manuscripts describing seven programs which received the 1976 American College Testing Program and the National University Extension Association Innovative Awards in Continuing Education for making innovative contributions to the improvement of continuing education. Entry manuscripts for each of the following…

  4. Budgeting and Control of Pharmacy Continuing Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Jean Paul

    1978-01-01

    Cash budgeting concepts employed in businesses are discussed, the results of a survey of pharmacy school continuing education directors regarding their budgeting procedures are described, and suggestions on how a pharmacy school's continuing education program could be budgeted are offered. A control form for program revenues is appended. (JMD)

  5. Innovations. Award Winning Programs in Continuing Education, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University Continuing Education Association, Washington, DC.

    This publication profiles four award-winning programs honored in 1997 by the University Continuing Education Association. The four programs have instituted imaginative continuing higher education responses to important community needs. In all four cases, the focus is on developing human resources to support local employment and enhance the…

  6. Innovations. Award Winning Programs in Continuing Education, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University Continuing Education Association, Washington, DC.

    This publication profiles four award-winning programs honored in 1997 by the University Continuing Education Association. The four programs have instituted imaginative continuing higher education responses to important community needs. In all four cases, the focus is on developing human resources to support local employment and enhance the…

  7. Preliminary Data from the Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) Program: A Care Coordination Program for Home-Based Dementia Care and Caregiver Support in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Maria F; Davagnino, Judith; Hastings, S Nicole; Sloane, Richard; Kamholz, Barbara; Twersky, Jack

    2015-06-01

    Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) is an innovative care coordination program of the Durham Veteran's Affairs Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, that provides home-based dementia care and caregiver support for individuals with dementia and their family caregivers, including attention to behavioral symptoms, functional impairment, and home safety, on a consultation basis. The objectives of this study were to describe the COACH program in its first 2 years of operation, assess alignment of program components with quality measures, report characteristics of program participants, and compare rates of placement outside the home with those of a nontreatment comparison group using a retrospective cohort design. Participants were community-dwelling individuals with dementia aged 65 and older who received primary care in the medical center's outpatient clinics and their family caregivers, who were enrolled as dyads (n = 133), and a control group of dyads who were referred to the program and met clinical eligibility criteria but did not enroll (n = 29). Measures included alignment with Dementia Management Quality Measures and time to placement outside the home during 12 months of follow-up after referral to COACH. Results of the evaluation demonstrated that COACH aligns with nine of 10 clinical process measures identified using quality measures and that COACH delivers several other valuable services to enhance care. Mean time to placement outside the home was 29.6 ± 14.3 weeks for both groups (P = .99). The present study demonstrates the successful implementation of a home-based care coordination intervention for persons with dementia and their family caregivers that is strongly aligned with quality measures. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  8. The nurse manager: change agent, change coach?

    PubMed

    Stefancyk, Amanda; Hancock, Beverly; Meadows, Mary T

    2013-01-01

    Change in today's health care landscape is a daily, if not hourly, reality. The nurse manager must have strong leadership skills to navigate through change with a focus on the patient and the provision of safe and reliable care. The historical term for those leading change is "change agent." In this article, the authors introduce the idea of a change coach, building on the nurse manager foundational skill of coaching and weaving this concept into the manager's role in change. A change coach uses the coaching behaviors including guidance, facilitation, and inspiration to inspire others toward change, altering human capabilities, and supporting and influencing others toward change. An exemplar of the nurse manager's role as a change coach in practice is provided using American Organization of Nurse Executives' Care Innovation and Transformation initiative. It is the agile manager that is able to successfully move between the roles of change agent and change coach to continuously transform the environment and how care is delivered.

  9. Coaching Teachers on Instruction: Developing Instructional Leadership Capacity within a Principal Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franey, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last several decades, the role of the school site principal has shifted from a focus on school management to one on school leadership. Integral to this new focus is the ability of the principal to be an instructional leader, tasked with improving the instructional practices of teachers. Many principal preparation programs have adopted new…

  10. Coaching Teachers on Instruction: Developing Instructional Leadership Capacity within a Principal Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franey, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last several decades, the role of the school site principal has shifted from a focus on school management to one on school leadership. Integral to this new focus is the ability of the principal to be an instructional leader, tasked with improving the instructional practices of teachers. Many principal preparation programs have adopted new…

  11. Continuous Assessment Program: A Mechanism for Inmate Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Patricia

    1978-01-01

    The Garden State School District, the agency responsible for correctional education programs in New Jersey, has attempted to eliminate the urban-prison syndrome through implementation of the Continuous Assessment Programs. This program is designed to ameliorate negative effects of urban life by giving each inmate an individuality and purpose.…

  12. Task familiarity and task efficacy: a study of sports coaches.

    PubMed

    Fung, Lena

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish a profile of coaching efficacy with Hong Kong community coaches who differ in knowledge and hours spent in coaching. Coaching efficacy can be described in four dimensions, namely, Motivation, Strategy, Technique, and Character Building. It was hypothesized that coaches who had spent more time coaching and were more knowledgeable about the sport and coaching would score higher on those four dimensions of a Coaching Efficacy Scale. The scale was administered to 252 coaches working with beginning and district-level athletes in a variety of sports. Analysis suggested that their self-reported efficacy on Strategy was least strong. This means that the coaches were not confident in analyzing the strengths and weaknesses of opposing teams, making decisions on the type of game strategy to employ, and maximizing athletes' strength in competitions. Coaches with less coaching experience were also less confident about motivating athletes. This information on coaching efficacy may be useful in deciding content for a program of education for coaching.

  13. Leadership Coaching: Coaching Competencies and Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Donald; Hammack, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Leadership coaching is now seen as a valuable tool to assist school leaders. Through a survey of school principals, this study identified specific coaching competencies used by leadership coaches that were perceived by principals to influence key best practices for schools. These best practices have in turn been correlated to increased student…

  14. Courage to Love: Coaching Dialogically toward Teacher Empowerment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Heather; Palmer, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Instructional coaches continue to be an important part of school reform and professional development, and yet few studies have examined the impact of the language coaches use when working with teachers. The authors work to contribute towards filling this gap by describing a self-study examining their own language as instructional coaches and its…

  15. Courage to Love: Coaching Dialogically toward Teacher Empowerment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Heather; Palmer, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Instructional coaches continue to be an important part of school reform and professional development, and yet few studies have examined the impact of the language coaches use when working with teachers. The authors work to contribute towards filling this gap by describing a self-study examining their own language as instructional coaches and its…

  16. Transpersonal Coaching.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Bonney Gulino; White, Mary Beth

    2015-08-01

    These are just a few of many stories shared by patients who have benefited from transpersonal coaching. This practice blends well with holistic nursing and can be easily applied to a variety of situations and healthcare settings. When a holistic nurse works from the assumption that the transpersonal aspect of human nature is an objective fact, it is possible to help patients gain access to their transpersonal nature and thereby experience new feelings and insights. The insights usually come in the form of images and energies and provide the personality with a greater sense of wholeness and courage.

  17. A comparison of the cost-effectiveness of two pedometer-based telephone coaching programs for people with cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Sangster, Janice; Church, Jody; Haas, Marion; Furber, Susan; Bauman, Adrian

    2015-05-01

    Following a cardiac event it is recommended that cardiac patients participate in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs. However, little is known about the relative cost-effectiveness of lifestyle-related interventions for cardiac patients. This study aimed to compare the cost-effectiveness of a telephone-delivered Healthy Weight intervention to a telephone-delivered Physical Activity intervention for patients referred to CR in urban and rural Australia. A cost-utility analysis was conducted alongside a randomised controlled trial of the two interventions. Outcomes were measured as Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) gained. The estimated cost of delivering the interventions was $201.48 per Healthy Weight participant and $138.00 per Physical Activity participant. The average total cost (cost of health care utilisation plus patient costs) was $1,260 per Healthy Weight participant and $2,112 per Physical Activity participant, a difference of $852 in favour of the Healthy Weight intervention. Healthy Weight participants gained an average of 0.007 additional QALYs than did Physical Activity participants. Thus, overall the Healthy Weight intervention dominated the Physical Activity intervention (Healthy Weight intervention was less costly and more effective than the Physical Activity intervention). Subgroup analyses showed the Healthy Weight intervention also dominated the Physical Activity intervention for rural participants and for participants who did not attend CR. The low-contact pedometer-based telephone coaching Healthy Weight intervention is overall both less costly and more effective compared to the Physical Activity intervention, including for rural cardiac patients and patients that do not attend CR. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhancing "OJT" Internships with Interactive Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoho, Alan R.; Barnett, Bruce G.; Martinez, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The intent of this article is to examine how the best type of internship, i.e., the full-time, job-embedded model can be enhanced using coaching. Before illustrating an exemplary internship program with coaching, this paper describes what an exemplary full-time, job-embedded internship experiences looks like and expounds on the importance of…

  19. Administrative Coaching Practices: Content, Personalization, and Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayashi, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    This study surveys educators who have completed, or are in their second year of, an administrative coaching program that results in a California Clear Administrative Credential, also known as Tier II. The purpose of the study is to determine the perceptions of these educators regarding whether current practices in administrative coaching programs…

  20. Al Roy: The First Modern Strength Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Terry

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a historical perspective through the story of Alvin Roy, the first modern strength coach. Roy went against the common belief in the 1950s that weight lifting made athletes slow and bulky. When the football coaches at Istrouma High School in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, allowed him to set up and supervise a weight-training program,…

  1. Shattering the Glass Ceiling: Blacks in Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Fitzgerald

    2004-01-01

    During the 2003 football season, African Americans were employed as head coaches at five of the 117 NCAA Division I-A colleges and universities. At the conclusion of the 2003 season, there were 13 head coaching vacancies at Division I-A football programs; one African American was hired. Today, five African Americans have the responsibility of…

  2. Shattering the Glass Ceiling: Blacks in Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Fitzgerald

    2004-01-01

    During the 2003 football season, African Americans were employed as head coaches at five of the 117 NCAA Division I-A colleges and universities. At the conclusion of the 2003 season, there were 13 head coaching vacancies at Division I-A football programs; one African American was hired. Today, five African Americans have the responsibility of…

  3. Al Roy: The First Modern Strength Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Terry

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a historical perspective through the story of Alvin Roy, the first modern strength coach. Roy went against the common belief in the 1950s that weight lifting made athletes slow and bulky. When the football coaches at Istrouma High School in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, allowed him to set up and supervise a weight-training program,…

  4. Enhancing "OJT" Internships with Interactive Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoho, Alan R.; Barnett, Bruce G.; Martinez, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The intent of this article is to examine how the best type of internship, i.e., the full-time, job-embedded model can be enhanced using coaching. Before illustrating an exemplary internship program with coaching, this paper describes what an exemplary full-time, job-embedded internship experiences looks like and expounds on the importance of…

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Health Coaching: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Hale, Rachel; Giese, Jeannie

    The purpose of this review was to evaluate published literature to distinguish how health coaching influences the cost of chronic disease management in insured adults with chronic conditions. An integrated literature review was conducted. MEDLINE, Business Source Complete, and OneSearch were searched for the years 2001-2016 utilizing the following key words: health coaching, health coaching AND insurance companies, health coaching AND cost, health coaching AND health insurance, and health coaching AND insurance cost. A total of 67 articles met inclusion criteria and were assessed for applicability. Of those, 27 articles were found to be relevant to the research question. The practice settings of these articles are mostly primary care and wellness programs. Throughout the literature, health coaching has been found effective in chronic disease management such as hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia. Studies evaluating the cost-effectiveness of health coaching are limited. The current literature does not clearly demonstrate that health coaching lowers expenditures and patient copayments in the short term but projects future savings. Health coaching has the potential to improve chronic disease management and lower health care expenditures. Further long-term research is needed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of health coaching. It has been projected that the cost-effectiveness of health coaching will be long-term or over 12 months after initiating the health coaching program.

  6. Exploring the potential for changing gender norms among cricket coaches and athletes in India.

    PubMed

    Miller, Elizabeth; Das, Madhumita; Verma, Ravi; O'Connor, Brian; Ghosh, Sancheeta; Jaime, Maria Catrina D; McCauley, Heather L

    2015-02-01

    This study explored gender norms with cricket coaches and athletes in India to adapt a coach-delivered gender violence prevention program from the United States for the urban Indian context. Interviews and focus groups conducted among coaches and adolescent cricketers highlight the extent to which coaches and athletes articulate prevailing inequitable notions about gender and recognition of the power coaches wield. Adapting a violence prevention program that emphasizes gender norms change may be feasible with Indian cricket coaches but is likely to require attention to defining gender equity and challenging cultural assumptions with coaches prior to implementing the program with athletes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Addition of telephone coaching to a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity program in people with knee osteoarthritis: A randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common and costly chronic musculoskeletal conditions world-wide and is associated with substantial pain and disability. Many people with knee OA also experience co-morbidities that further add to the OA burden. Uptake of and adherence to physical activity recommendations is suboptimal in this patient population, leading to poorer OA outcomes and greater impact of associated co-morbidities. This pragmatic randomised controlled trial will investigate the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of adding telephone coaching to a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity intervention for people with knee OA. Methods/Design 168 people with clinically diagnosed knee OA will be recruited from the community in metropolitan and regional areas and randomly allocated to physiotherapy only, or physiotherapy plus nurse-delivered telephone coaching. Physiotherapy involves five treatment sessions over 6 months, incorporating a home exercise program of 4–6 exercises (targeting knee extensor and hip abductor strength) and advice to increase daily physical activity. Telephone coaching comprises 6–12 telephone calls over 6 months by health practitioners trained in applying the Health Change Australia (HCA) Model of Health Change to provide behaviour change support. The telephone coaching intervention aims to maximise adherence to the physiotherapy program, as well as facilitate increased levels of participation in general physical activity. The primary outcomes are pain measured by an 11-point numeric rating scale and self-reported physical function measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index subscale after 6 months. Secondary outcomes include physical activity levels, quality-of-life, and potential moderators and mediators of outcomes including self-efficacy, pain coping and depression. Relative cost-effectiveness will be determined from health service usage and outcome data. Follow

  8. Coaching to Enhance Quality of Implementation in Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dusenbury, Linda; Hansen, William B.; Jackson-Newsom, Julia; Pittman, Donna S.; Wilson, Cicely V.; Nelson-Simley, Kathleen; Ringwalt, Chris; Pankratz, Melinda; Giles, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the topics covered by coaches assisting teachers implementing a research-based drug prevention program and explore how coaching affects student outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: The All Stars drug prevention curriculum is implemented by 16 urban teachers who received four coaching sessions.…

  9. Effects of Coaching on SAT I: Reasoning Test Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Donald E.; Rock, Donald A.

    1999-01-01

    Used several alternative analytic methods to estimate the effects of coaching on Scholastic Assessment Test I scores in a sample of more than 4,000 examinees, approximately 500 of whom had attended formal coaching programs. All estimates suggest that the effects of coaching are far less than claimed by major commercial test-preparation companies.…

  10. Coaching to Enhance Quality of Implementation in Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dusenbury, Linda; Hansen, William B.; Jackson-Newsom, Julia; Pittman, Donna S.; Wilson, Cicely V.; Nelson-Simley, Kathleen; Ringwalt, Chris; Pankratz, Melinda; Giles, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the topics covered by coaches assisting teachers implementing a research-based drug prevention program and explore how coaching affects student outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: The All Stars drug prevention curriculum is implemented by 16 urban teachers who received four coaching sessions.…

  11. Exploring Student Perceptions of Academic Mentoring and Coaching Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    While there is an abundant amount of research relative to coaching and mentoring programs, there is little understanding about the interaction between coaches/mentors and students. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate student perceptions of their academic coaching and mentoring experiences at two Southern California community…

  12. Exploring Student Perceptions of Academic Mentoring and Coaching Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    While there is an abundant amount of research relative to coaching and mentoring programs, there is little understanding about the interaction between coaches/mentors and students. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate student perceptions of their academic coaching and mentoring experiences at two Southern California community…

  13. Development and Testing of the Baseball Coaching Technical Questionnaire (BCTQ).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Carolyn; And Others

    A model and method for developing a valid and reliable paper-and-pencil test for evaluating the technical knowledge of baseball coaches in the National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP) in Canada are discussed. Development of a general theoretical and operational model for the evaluation of NCCP coaches in all sports are also studied. The…

  14. Understanding and Promoting Fun in Youth Sport: Coaches' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bengoechea, Enrique Garcia; Strean, William B.; Williams, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    Despite the importance of fun in initiating and sustaining sport involvement, and despite the critical role that coaches play in the success of youth sport programs, few attempts have been made at exploring coaches' perceptions of fun in youth sport. Eighteen youth sport coaches participated in semi-structured interviews. The purposes of this…

  15. Coaching for ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Kevin; Ratey, Nancy; Maynard, Sandy; Sussman, Susan; Wright, Sarah D.

    2010-01-01

    Despite limited scientific study on ADHD coaching as an intervention for adults with ADHD, the field of ADHD coaching has grown significantly and gained popularity in recent years. ADHD coaching is becoming a bona fide profession where one must advance through a rigorous training process, in order to be certified as a professional ADHD coach.…

  16. Considering Student Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keen, James P.

    2014-01-01

    What does student coaching involve and what considerations make sense in deciding to engage an outside contractor to provide personal coaching? The author explores coaching in light of his own professional experience and uses this reflection as a platform from which to consider the pros and cons of student coaching when deciding whether to choose…

  17. Considering Student Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keen, James P.

    2014-01-01

    What does student coaching involve and what considerations make sense in deciding to engage an outside contractor to provide personal coaching? The author explores coaching in light of his own professional experience and uses this reflection as a platform from which to consider the pros and cons of student coaching when deciding whether to choose…

  18. Becoming a "Good Coach"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Frank; Claringbould, Inge; Knoppers, Annelies

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to gain insight into how coaches problematized their coaching practices and the process in which they engaged to become what they perceived to be better coaches using a course based on critical reflective practice. We assumed that constant critical self-reflection would enable coaches to move closer to their…

  19. Wellness coaching for obesity: a case report.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Julie

    2013-07-01

    D.S. presented to a medical and surgical weight-loss program to initiate bariatric surgery. He had made numerous attempts at weight loss to no avail and was taking steps toward bariatric surgery as a last viable option. D.S.'s health insurance provider required 3 months of supervised weight loss prior to approval for surgery, and this was initiated with a board-certified bariatrician (MD) and a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN)/wellness coach. D.S. presented with a body mass index (BMI) >40 and was classified as morbidly obese with comorbidities of high cholesterol and hyperglycemia and degenerative joint disease (DJD) of the knees. D.S. began the process outlined by his insurance company, meeting with the MD and RDN/wellness coach monthly. A plan was developed by D.S. and his RDN/wellness coach that alligned with his wellness vision, values, and lifestyle. D.S. ate meals and snacks at regular intervals throughout the day, consumed little to no red meat, increased his consumption of fruits and vegetables, and spent 1 hour daily in a swimming pool-walking, swimming, or both. By the end of the 3-month period required by the insurance provider, D.S. had lost more than 30 lbs, improved his exercise capacity, no longer used a cane, and chose to continue with coaching rather than undergo bariatric surgery. D.S. continued to meet with the MD and RDN monthly for 1 year and averaged a 10-lb weight loss per month for a total of 120 lbs, normalizing his blood panels and improving his joint mobility. D.S. continued to meet with the RDN/wellness coach for a total of 10 visits during year 2 and quarterly visits through year 3. D.S. lost a total of 240 lbs, maintained the weight loss over the 3-year period, and achieved these results solely through lifestyle interventions. Although bariatric surgery is a viable treatment option for class 2 and 3 obesity, many patients pursue this treatment option without the help of medical and commercial weight loss personnel to improve

  20. Computer Problem-Solving Coaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Leon; Heller, Kenneth

    2005-09-01

    Computers might be able to play an important role in physics instruction by coaching students to develop good problem-solving skills. Building on previous research on student problem solving and on designing computer programs to teach cognitive skills, we are developing a prototype computer coach to provide students with guided practice in solving problems. In addition to helping students become better problem solvers, such programs can be useful in studying how students learn to solve problems and how and if problem-solving skills can be transferred from a computer to a pencil-and-paper environment.

  1. 14 CFR 91.1411 - Continuous airworthiness maintenance program use by fractional ownership program manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... airworthiness maintenance program use by fractional ownership program manager. Fractional ownership program aircraft may be maintained under a continuous airworthiness maintenance program (CAMP) under §§ 91.1413... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Continuous airworthiness maintenance...

  2. 14 CFR 91.1411 - Continuous airworthiness maintenance program use by fractional ownership program manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... airworthiness maintenance program use by fractional ownership program manager. Fractional ownership program aircraft may be maintained under a continuous airworthiness maintenance program (CAMP) under §§ 91.1413... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Continuous airworthiness maintenance...

  3. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 263 - History of Program and Project Limitations Continuing Authorities Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false History of Program and Project Limitations Continuing Authorities Program A Appendix A to Part 263 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF... Appendix A to Part 263—History of Program and Project Limitations Continuing Authorities Program...

  4. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 263 - History of Program and Project Limitations Continuing Authorities Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false History of Program and Project Limitations Continuing Authorities Program A Appendix A to Part 263 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF... Appendix A to Part 263—History of Program and Project Limitations Continuing Authorities Program...

  5. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 263 - History of Program and Project Limitations Continuing Authorities Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false History of Program and Project Limitations Continuing Authorities Program A Appendix A to Part 263 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF... Appendix A to Part 263—History of Program and Project Limitations Continuing Authorities Program Section...

  6. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 263 - History of Program and Project Limitations Continuing Authorities Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false History of Program and Project Limitations Continuing Authorities Program A Appendix A to Part 263 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF... Appendix A to Part 263—History of Program and Project Limitations Continuing Authorities Program Section...

  7. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 263 - History of Program and Project Limitations Continuing Authorities Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false History of Program and Project Limitations Continuing Authorities Program A Appendix A to Part 263 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF... Appendix A to Part 263—History of Program and Project Limitations Continuing Authorities Program Section...

  8. Assessing and Evaluating Continuing Education Programs: Why and How?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Michael K.

    2003-01-01

    Outlines factors to consider in assessing and evaluating continuing education programs and elaborates on seven questions to guide the process: purpose, audience, who should evaluate, what to evaluate, evaluation criteria, methods, and reporting of results. (Contains 15 references.) (SK)

  9. Intensive weight loss combining flexible dialysis with a personalized, ad libitum, coach-assisted diet program. A "pilot" case series.

    PubMed

    Vigotti, Federica Neve; Teta, Luigi; Pia, Anna; Mirasole, Sara; Guzzo, Gabriella; Giuffrida, Domenica; Capizzi, Irene; Avagnina, Paolo; Ippolito, Davide; Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is a growing problem on dialysis. The best approach to weight loss has not been established. The risks of malnutrition may offset the advantages of weight loss. Personalized hemodialysis schedules, with an incremental approach, are gaining interest; to date, no studies have explored its potential in allowing weight loss. This case series reports on combining flexible, incremental hemodialysis, and intensive weight loss. a small Dialysis Unit, following incremental personalized schedules (2-6 sessions/week, depending on residual function), tailored to an equivalent renal clearance >12 mL/min. Four obese and two overweigh patients (5 male, 1 female; age: 40-63 years; body mass index [BMI] 31.1 kg/m(2)) were enrolled in a coach-assisted weight loss program, with an "ad libitum" approach (3-6 foods/day chosen on the basis of their glycemic index and glycemic load). The diet consists of 8 weeks of rapid weight loss followed by 8-12 weeks of maintenance; both phases can be repeated. This study measures weight loss, side effects, and patients' opinions. Over 12-30 months, all patients lost weight (median -10.3 kg [5.7-20], median ΔBMI-3.2). Serum albumin (pre-diet 3.78; post-diet 3.83 g/dL), hemoglobin (pre-diet 11; post-diet 11.2 g/dL), and acid-base balance (HCO(3) pre-diet: 23.3; post-diet: 23.4 mmol/L) remained stable, with decreasing needs for erythropoietin and citrate or bicarbonate supplements. Calcium-phosphate-parathyroid hormone (PTH) balance improved (PTH-pre 576; post 286 pg/mL). Three out of 4 hypertensive patients discontinued, 1 decreased antihypertensives. None experienced severe side effects. Patient satisfaction was high (9 on a 0-10 analog scale). Personalized, incremental hemodialysis schedules allow patient enrollment in intensive personalized weight loss programs, with promising results. © 2014 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  10. Willingness to pay for continued delivery of a lifestyle-based weight loss program: The Hopkins POWER trial.

    PubMed

    Jerome, Gerald J; Alavi, Reza; Daumit, Gail L; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Durkin, Nowella; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Clark, Jeanne M; Dalcin, Arlene; Coughlin, Janelle W; Charleston, Jeanne; Louis, Thomas A; Appel, Lawrence J

    2015-02-01

    In behavioral studies of weight loss programs, participants typically receive interventions free of charge. Understanding an individual's willingness to pay (WTP) for weight loss programs could be helpful when evaluating potential funding models. This study assessed WTP for the continuation of a weight loss program at the end of a weight loss study. WTP was assessed with monthly coaching contacts at the end of the two-year Hopkins POWER trial. Interview-administered questionnaires determined the amount participants were willing to pay for continued intervention. Estimated maximum payment was calculated among those willing to pay and was based on quantile regression adjusted for age, body mass index, race, sex, household income, treatment condition, and weight change at 24 months. Among the participants (N=234), 95% were willing to pay for continued weight loss intervention; the adjusted median payment was $45 per month. Blacks had a higher adjusted median WTP ($65/month) compared to Non-Blacks ($45/month), P=0.021. A majority of participants were willing to pay for a continued weight loss intervention with a median monthly amount that was similar to the cost of commercial weight loss programs. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  11. Cigarette continuity programs and social support for smoking.

    PubMed

    Sumner, W; Dunaway, M; Dillman, D G

    1998-01-01

    To describe smokers' participation in cigarette continuity programs and the prevalence and structure of cooperative teams of smokers. Cross-sectional survey of smoking histories and continuity-program participation by individuals and their family members in a convenience sample of 176 current smokers at the University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center, Lexington. Fisher exact test or chi2 tests were used to compare proportions. One of 3 smokers collected coupons for a continuity program. Three quarters of the collectors redeemed their own coupons, and one quarter gave coupons to another collector. Coupon collectors reported an average team size of more than 2 members. One fifth of collectors were teammates with another generation of family members, and one quarter of collectors aged 24 to 35 years were teammates with their children. Smokers were often aware of their relatives' coupon-collecting habits. Continuity programs have been a popular means of reinforcing smoking, especially within families and groups of friends. Continuity programs are novel in encouraging smoking and brand loyalty between generations. Continuity-program participants need to be aware of the risk of promoting smoking initiation by their children. Health advocates could use similar strategies to promote smoking cessation and prevention within families and other social groups.

  12. Use of Sports Science Knowledge by Turkish Coaches

    PubMed Central

    KILIC, KORAY; INCE, MUSTAFA LEVENT

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the following research questions in Turkish coaching context: a) What are coaches’ perceptions on the application of sport science research to their coaching methods? b) What sources do coaches utilize to obtain the knowledge they need? c) What barriers do coaches encounter when trying to access and apply the knowledge they need for their sport? In addition, differences in research questions responses were examined based on gender, years of coaching experience, academic educational level, coaching certificate level, coaching team or individual sports, and being paid or unpaid for coaching. The participants were 321 coaches (255 men, 66 women) from diverse sports and coaching levels working in Ankara. The questionnaire “New Ideas for Coaches” by Reade, Rodgers and Hall (2008) was translated, adapted into Turkish, and validated for the current study. According to our findings among Turkish coaches, there is a high prevalence of beliefs that sport science contributes to sport (79.8%);however, there are gaps between what coaches are looking for and the research that is being conducted. Coaches are most likely to attend seminars or consult other coaches to get new information. Scientific publications were ranked very low by the coaches in getting current information. The barriers to coaches’ access to sport science research are finding out the sources of information, being able to implement the sport science knowledge into the field of coaching, lack of monetary support in acquiring knowledge, and language barriers. Also, differences in perceptions and preferences for obtaining new information were identified based on coaches’ gender, coaching contexts (i.e., professional-amateur), coaching settings (i.e., team/individual), and their other demographic characteristics (i.e., coaching experience, coaching educational level, and coaching certificate level). Future coach education programs should emphasize the development of

  13. Innovations in Continuing Education. 1983 Award-Winning New Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Univ. Continuing Education Association, Washington, DC.

    Presented are four award-winning projects from the 1983 American College Testing Program (ACT)/National University Continuing Education Association (NUCEA) competition for innovations in continuing education. The projects are categorized according to educational audience. In the category of instruction "Seminars, Courses, and Workshops for…

  14. Innovations in Continuing Education. 1982 Award-Winning New Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Univ. Continuing Education Association, Washington, DC.

    Descriptions are provided of the eight programs selected as award-winning innovations on the basis of universal application and potential for greatest impact for the improvement of continuing education. Each description contains this information: program name, name of principal person, name and institution to whom award would be made, source of…

  15. Indian Education - Post School Highlights: Regional Continuing Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Toronto (Ontario). Education Div.

    Summarizing Canada's Regional Continuing Education Programs for the 1972-74 fiscal years, this document indicates support for solid education programs for the development of Indians in their communities. Brief summations are presented for the following regions: Maritime Region (1972-73 was a peak year for on-the-job training placements with…

  16. Indian Education - Post School Highlights: Regional Continuing Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Toronto (Ontario). Education Div.

    Summarizing Canada's Regional Continuing Education Programs for the 1972-74 fiscal years, this document indicates support for solid education programs for the development of Indians in their communities. Brief summations are presented for the following regions: Maritime Region (1972-73 was a peak year for on-the-job training placements with…

  17. Coaches' assessment of their coaching efficacy compared to athletes' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Short, Sandra E; Short, Martin W

    2004-10-01

    This study compared coaches' assessments of their own coaching efficacy with their athletes' perceptions of the coaches' efficacy. Coaching efficacy was measured with the Coaching Efficacy Scale. Participants were 9 football coaches and 76 football players from the same team. Analysis indicated coaches were confident in their coaching abilities (range 6.5 to 9.0 on a 9-point scale). For 7 of the 9 coaches the coaches' ratings of themselves were higher than the athletes' ratings. For the other 2 coaches, athletes' ratings of coaches' efficacy were higher than the coaches' ratings of themselves. All coaches' ratings fell within the 95% confidence interval based on the athletes' ratings of the coaches' efficacy. Results are discussed in terms of the interplay between athletes and coaches efficacy beliefs and its influence on behavior.

  18. Literacy Coaching: The Role of Reflective Thought in Teacher Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Patricia Jane

    2010-01-01

    Qualitative studies of classroom teachers involved in literacy coaching are crucial to provide direction for future literacy coaching practice and research. Using a grounded theory design, this study examined the experience of four elementary level classroom teachers and one coach as they engaged in a year-long literacy coaching program. Teachers…

  19. Perspectives on Agile Coaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Steven; Lundh, Erik; Davies, Rachel; Eckstein, Jutta; Larsen, Diana; Vilkki, Kati

    There are many perspectives to agile coaching including: growing coaching expertise, selecting the appropriate coach for your context; and eva luating value. A coach is often an itinerant who may observe, mentor, negotiate, influence, lead, and/or architect everything from team organization to system architecture. With roots in diverse fields ranging from technology to sociology coaches have differing motivations and experience bases. This panel will bring together coaches to debate and discuss various perspectives on agile coaching. Some of the questions to be addressed will include: What are the skills required for effective coaching? What should be the expectations for teams or individu als being coached? Should coaches be: a corporate resource (internal team of consultants working with multiple internal teams); an integral part of a specific team; or external contractors? How should coaches exercise influence and au thority? How should management assess the value of a coaching engagement? Do you have what it takes to be a coach? - This panel will bring together sea soned agile coaches to offer their experience and advice on how to be the best you can be!

  20. Team Dynamics. Implications for Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freishlag, Jerry

    1985-01-01

    A recent survey of coaches ranks team cohesion as the most critical problem coaches face. Optimal interpersonal relationships among athletes and their coaches can maximize collective performance. Team dynamics are discussed and coaching tips are provided. (MT)

  1. Integrating a Career Planning and Development Program into the Baccalaureate Nursing Curriculum: Part III. Impact on Faculty's Career Satisfaction and Confidence in Providing Student Career Coaching.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Janice; Spalding, Karen; Navarro, Justine; Gaitana, Gianina

    2015-11-25

    As career satisfaction has been identified as a predictor of retention of nurses across all sectors, it is important that career satisfaction of both new and experienced nursing faculty is recognized in academic settings. A study of a curriculum-based career planning and development (CPD) program was conducted to determine the program's effects on participating students, new graduate nurses, and faculty. This third in a series of three papers reports on how the CPD intervention affected faculty participants' sense of career satisfaction and confidence in their role as career educators and coaches. Faculty who participated in the intervention CPD intervention group reported an increase in confidence in their ability to provide career coaching and education to students. They further indicated that their own career development served to enhance career satisfaction; an outcome identified as a predictor of faculty career satisfaction. Study results suggest that interventions such as the one described in this paper can have a potentially positive impact in other settings as well.

  2. Longer term impact of the mass media campaign to promote the Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service®: increasing the saliency of a new public health program.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Blythe J; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Gebel, Klaus; Banovic, Debbie; Buffett, Kym M; Bauman, Adrian E

    2014-11-01

    The Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service® (GHS) was introduced in New South Wales in February 2009. It used mass reach media advertising and direct mail and/or proactive marketing to recruit participants. This article reports on the long-term impact of the campaign on GHS participation from July 2011 to June 2012. A stand-alone population survey collected awareness, knowledge, and behavioral variables before the first advertising phase, (n = 1,544, August-September 2010), during the advertising period (n = 1,500, February-March 2011; n = 1,500, June-July 2011; n = 1,500, February 2012), and after the advertising period (n = 1,500, June-July 2012). GHS usage data (n = 6,095) were collated during July 2011-June 2012. Unprompted and prompted awareness of GHS mass media significantly increased (0% to 8.0%, p < .001; and 14.1% to 43.9%, p < .001, respectively) as well as knowledge and perceived effectiveness of the GHS. Those from the lowest three quintiles of socioeconomic disadvantage and respondents who were overweight or obese were significantly more likely to report prompted campaign awareness. The majority (84.4%) of new GHS calls occurred when television advertising was present. Participants who cited mass media as their referral source were significantly more likely to enroll in the intensive coaching program. Mass media campaigns remain an effective method of promoting a telephone-based statewide lifestyle program. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  3. Satisfaction with a distance continuing education program for health professionals.

    PubMed

    Bynum, Ann B; Irwin, Cathy A; Cohen, Betty

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed differences in program satisfaction among health professionals participating in a distance continuing education program by gender, ethnicity, discipline, and community size. A one-group posttest design was used with a sample of 45,996 participants in the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Rural Hospital, Distance Continuing Medical Education Program during 1995-2007. This program provided 2,219 continuing education programs for physicians (n = 7,047), nurses (n = 21,264), allied health (n = 3,230) and dental (n = 305) professionals, pharmacists (n = 4,088), administrators (n = 1,211), and marketing/finance/human resources professionals (n = 343). These programs were provided in Arkansas hospitals, clinics, and area health education centers. Interactive video technology and the Internet were used to deliver these programs. The program satisfaction instrument demonstrated adequate internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.91) and construct validity. Participants had high levels of satisfaction regarding knowledge and skills, use of information to enhance patient care, program quality, and convenience of the technology (mean total satisfaction score = 4.44, range: 1-5). Results from the t-test for independent samples and one-way analysis of variance indicated that men (p = 0.01), African-Americans and Hispanics (p < 0.01), dental professionals (p < 0.01), and participants in larger urban communities (population of 75,001-185,000) (p < 0.01) had significantly greater satisfaction. Nurses and physicians had significantly greater satisfaction regarding the use of information in practice to enhance patient care (p < 0.01). Results suggest that socioeconomic and demographic factors can affect satisfaction with distance continuing education programs.

  4. Improving college science teaching through peer coaching and classroom assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Sode, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    Peer coaching involves the observation of one teacher by another. This observation is accompanied by open and honest reflective discussion. The three main components of peer coaching are pre conference (for setting observation guidelines and building trust), observation (the sytematic collection of classroom data), and post conference (a non evaluative examination and discussion of the classroom). The non-evaluative post conference involves an examination of the teaching/learning process that occurred during the observation phase. In effective assessment, information on what and how well students are learning is used to make decisions about overall program improvement and to implement continuous classroom improvement. During peer coaching and assessment neither the instructor nor the students are formally evaluated. This session presents a sequential process in which the peer coaching steps of pre conference, observation, and post conference are combined with assessment to provide instructional guidance. An actual cast study, using the student complaint, {open_quotes}Lectures are boring and useless,{close_quotes} is used to demonstrate the process.

  5. Development of a career coaching model for medical students

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Yera

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Deciding on a future career path or choosing a career specialty is an important academic decision for medical students. The purpose of this study is to develop a career coaching model for medical students. Methods: This research was carried out in three steps. The first step was systematic review of previous studies. The second step was a need assessment of medical students. The third step was a career coaching model using the results acquired from the researched literature and the survey. Results: The career coaching stages were defined as three big phases: The career coaching stages were defined as the “crystallization” period (Pre-medical year 1 and 2), “specification” period (medical year 1 and 2), and “implementation” period (medical year 3 and 4). Conclusion: The career coaching model for medical students can be used in programming career coaching contents and also in identifying the outcomes of career coaching programs at an institutional level. PMID:26867586

  6. Development of a career coaching model for medical students.

    PubMed

    Hur, Yera

    2016-03-01

    Deciding on a future career path or choosing a career specialty is an important academic decision for medical students. The purpose of this study is to develop a career coaching model for medical students. This research was carried out in three steps. The first step was systematic review of previous studies. The second step was a need assessment of medical students. The third step was a career coaching model using the results acquired from the researched literature and the survey. The career coaching stages were defined as three big phases: The career coaching stages were defined as the "crystallization" period (Pre-medical year 1 and 2), "specification" period (medical year 1 and 2), and "implementation" period (medical year 3 and 4). The career coaching model for medical students can be used in programming career coaching contents and also in identifying the outcomes of career coaching programs at an institutional level.

  7. SPED 590 Peer Coaching Seminar: An Online Course about Peer Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askvig, Brent A.; Garnes, Lori

    This manual presents an online course about peer coaching derived from the Interactive Peer Coaching/Mentoring (IPCM) Project, a program designed to prepare teachers of students with severe behavioral disorders residing in a rural, remote area in North Dakota. The IPCM project was conducted from July 1997 through July 2000 and developed an…

  8. Using an executive coach to increase leadership effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Ponte, Patricia Reid; Gross, Anne Harvey; Galante, Andrea; Glazer, Greer

    2006-06-01

    Senior executive nursing roles demand excellence and rigor in both the technical and interpersonal domains of leadership. Many nurse leaders have begun seeking innovative self-development programs and practices to assist them as they strive to improve their effectiveness as leaders in complex organizations. One practice that has gained in popularity is that of engaging a leadership "coach." To understand this relatively new trend in healthcare leadership, the authors interviewed 4 coaches and 4 nurse leaders who had been coached. In this article, they present their overall findings about the effectiveness of coaching as a leadership development tool and offer recommendations for leaders who are interested in engaging a coach.

  9. Characteristics of Managerial Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilley, Ann; Gilley, Jerry W.; Kouider, Elies

    2010-01-01

    Coaching has become ubiquitous in organizations. Despite its growth in popularity, the concept remains largely untested through empirical inquiry. This study examined the skills and behaviors associated with managerial coaching. Results indicate a link between specific managerial skills, behaviors, and coaching. (Contains 4 tables.)

  10. Leadership Coaching That Transforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Leading a school can be a lonely, challenging job, Elena Aguilar has found in her years coaching principals. Aguilar describes how coaching approach she's developed--transformational coaching--helps principals get three things most of them need: a neutral person they can talk with confidentially, job-embedded professional development, and a safe…

  11. The Anatomy of Coaching: Coaching through Storytelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackstone, Phyllis A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author posits that storytelling can be used as a method for developing positive interpersonal relationships between coaches and classroom teachers. The author argues that developing interpersonal relationships is a necessary but challenging aspect of successful coaching, and that storytelling offers a mechanism for greater…

  12. Voluntary Professional Credentialing Programs. A Resource Handbook for Continuing Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanniford, Barbara, Ed.

    This handbook describes 77 voluntary programs offering professional credentialing for people in a wide range of professional and occupational fields. Each description lists credentials, organization offering credentials, initial credentialing requirements, credential renewal requirements (if any), continuing education approval process, and other…

  13. Why Do Nurses Come to Continuing Education Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolphin, Nancy Wentworth

    1983-01-01

    This study was conducted to measure the variations and intensities of attendance motivations of registered nurses in continuing education programs with a nursing focus. Data analysis revealed that there were multiple attendance motivation factors and that most participants ranked more than one factor as being of highest importance to them.…

  14. A Continuing Education Program on Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeve, Ron; And Others

    This manual and accompanying videotape are intended to be used as a continuing education program to enhance the skills of special and general educators in serving children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The video can also be used alone to provide a general overview of issues related to children with attention deficit…

  15. Community Service and Continuing Education. Program Abstracts. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lorna M., Ed.

    This comprehensive volume of innovative continuing education programs contains complete descriptions of some 750 cross-indexed projects in four general areas--human resource development, natural resource development, economic development, and community development--directed at community problems that can benefit from adult education. It brings…

  16. Closing the Loop on a Continuous Program Improvement Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Vickie; Booth, Larry

    2010-01-01

    The WebBSIT, a Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, is a fully online degree offered through a consortium of five University System of Georgia institutions. This paper begins by summarizing the change management system developed for continuous program improvement. Analysis of data should drive improvement, closing the loop. The balance…

  17. Closing the Loop on a Continuous Program Improvement Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Vickie; Booth, Larry

    2010-01-01

    The WebBSIT, a Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, is a fully online degree offered through a consortium of five University System of Georgia institutions. This paper begins by summarizing the change management system developed for continuous program improvement. Analysis of data should drive improvement, closing the loop. The balance…

  18. A Gerontology Practitioner Continuing Education Certificate Program: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englehardt, Jacqueline; Hash, Kristina M.; Mankowski, Mariann; Harper-Dorton, Karen V.; Pilarte, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the results of a school of social work survey assessing the geriatric training needs of social workers and other professionals in aging and the need for a gerontology practitioner's continuing education (CE) certificate program. A total of 391 professionals, the majority of whom were social workers, participated in an online…

  19. Continuing Professional Education Programs of Voluntary Health Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Medical Association, Chicago, IL.

    Organizational objectives and professional continuing education programs of ten voluntary health agencies--Allergy Foundation of America, American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, Arthritis Foundation, National Association for Mental Health, National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, National Society for the Prevention of Blindness,…

  20. Managing Adult and Continuing Education Programs and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langerman, Philip D., Ed.; Smith, Douglas H., Ed.

    Developed to assist managers of adult and continuing education programs, this management guide contains thirteen chapters written by several authors selected for their expertise in their respective areas. These chapters are divided into three major sections. The first section includes three introductory chapters providing (1) an overview of this…

  1. A Gerontology Practitioner Continuing Education Certificate Program: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englehardt, Jacqueline; Hash, Kristina M.; Mankowski, Mariann; Harper-Dorton, Karen V.; Pilarte, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the results of a school of social work survey assessing the geriatric training needs of social workers and other professionals in aging and the need for a gerontology practitioner's continuing education (CE) certificate program. A total of 391 professionals, the majority of whom were social workers, participated in an online…

  2. Community Service and Continuing Education. Program Abstracts. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lorna M., Ed.

    This comprehensive volume of innovative continuing education programs contains complete descriptions of some 750 cross-indexed projects in four general areas--human resource development, natural resource development, economic development, and community development--directed at community problems that can benefit from adult education. It brings…

  3. Why Do Nurses Come to Continuing Education Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolphin, Nancy Wentworth

    1983-01-01

    This study was conducted to measure the variations and intensities of attendance motivations of registered nurses in continuing education programs with a nursing focus. Data analysis revealed that there were multiple attendance motivation factors and that most participants ranked more than one factor as being of highest importance to them.…

  4. A Survey of Continuing Education Programs in Nevada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Burnell; Bunten, John W.

    The survey of adult education in Nevada contains data on comparative enrollments, 1963-70, for the state, counties, and participating institutions; enrollment by school districts; and a statewide summary of public school continuing education programs in 1970. The comparative enrollment and statewide summary data are further divided into enrollment…

  5. Collegiate coaches' knowledge of the female athlete triad in relation to sport type.

    PubMed

    Frideres, Jillian E; Mottinger, Sue G; Palao, José M

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what coaches of female athletes know about the three components of the female athlete triad with regard to type of sport coached and the characteristics of the coach. The sample consisted of 309 NCAA Division I coaches of female athletes in the sports of: sports with subjective scoring of performance (gymnastics and diving), low body weight sports (cross country and rowing), revealing or fitted clothing (volleyball and swimming), and other (soccer and basketball). An original, self-report questionnaire, and a 4-point Likert scale to measure confidence in answer was used. The variables were: knowledge, confidence, and coach's characteristics (coach's gender, degree held, years of experience in coaching females, continuing education participation specific to the triad and triad components, and type of sport coached). Coaches of low body weight sports scored significantly higher than both coaches of sports requiring fitted clothing and "other" sports in the overall score. They further had significantly more confidence in their answers than coaches of "other" sports. No significant differences in the overall score in any of the types of sport or total values were found regarding gender, experience, and degree. Coaches who had received training about the triad or its components scored significantly higher than coaches who did not receive training. The results demonstrated a lack of information among coaches and that participating in formative training can help to reduce this problem. The results found can help in the design of continuing education for coaches.

  6. Coaching as Professional Learning: Guidance for Implementing Effective Coaching Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermont Agency of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    To build collective capacity within organizations, schools and districts across the world have implemented coaching as an effective method for systemic reform. Vermont in particular has a wide variety of coaches, including instructional coaches and systems coaches, as well as a variety of interpretations of the coaching practice. Many schools…

  7. Perspectives on Effective Coaching by Those Who Have Been Coached

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Alison; Blackman, Anna; Hicks, Ben; Williams, Matthew; Hay, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Studies on coaching have largely explored effectiveness from the perspective of a coach or employing organization rather than that of the employee or coachee. There has also been a focus on "successful" coaching, but little is known about unsuccessful coaching or the hindrances to achieving coaching success. Many empirical studies on…

  8. Behavioral Characteristics of "Favorite" Coaches: Implications for Coach Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Craig; Owens, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to use athletes' and former athletes' memories of their favorite coach to improve coach education curriculum. Player preferences of coaching behavior can affect both their attitudes toward their sport experiences and team performance. By identifying positive coaching behaviors as recalled by athletes, coach educators…

  9. Integrating interprofessional education into continuing education: a planning process for continuing interprofessional education programs.

    PubMed

    Owen, John A; Schmitt, Madeline H

    2013-01-01

    Informal continuing interprofessional education (CIPE) can be traced back decades in the United States; however, interest in formal CIPE is recent. Interprofessional education (IPE) now is recognized as an important component of new approaches to continuing education (CE) that are needed to increase health professionals' ability to improve outcomes of care. Although there are examples of CIPE programs that are being successfully implemented, a clearly articulated, step-by-step planning process to help guide educators in providing effective CIPE programs is lacking. This lack of guidance poses a significant barrier to increasing the number of CIPE programs in the United States. In this article, we describe a process for developing, implementing, and evaluating CIPE programs using the familiar systematic CE planning process. Limitations of traditional CE also are addressed, and the relationship between CIPE and other new approaches to CE is clarified. Four examples of CIPE programs are provided to illustrate how the planning process can be adapted to include IPE, while implementing recommended changes in traditional CE offerings. The article is concluded with a discussion of some of the challenges that will face CE educators in moving toward a new vision of CE integrated with IPE.

  10. SimCoach Evaluation: A Virtual Human Intervention to Encourage Service-Member Help-Seeking for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression.

    PubMed

    Meeker, Daniella; Cerully, Jennifer L; Johnson, Megan; Iyer, Neema; Kurz, Jeremy; Scharf, Deborah M

    2016-01-29

    This article describes RAND Corporation researchers' assessment of SimCoach, a computer program featuring a virtual human that speaks and gestures in a video game-like interface, designed to encourage service members, especially those with signs or symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or depression, to seek help to improve their psychological health. The assessment included a formative component assessing SimCoach's design, development, and implementation approaches and a summative component assessing outcomes among participants in a user experience survey and a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Results of the formative evaluation identified both strengths and opportunities for improvement. For example, although SimCoach development processes were well-aligned with best practices for software engineering, SimCoach content development and evaluation processes could have been more tightly coupled to best practices in psychological health. The summative evaluation RCT did not show any SimCoach-related benefit in intent to seek help compared with that of control users not exposed to any intervention. However, secondary outcomes indicated that SimCoach users had satisfying experiences without distress. If SimCoach development is continued, greater attention to clinical processes and outcomes is needed so that the program can have its intended impact on help-seeking for PTSD and depression.

  11. Coaching: a new model for academic and career achievement.

    PubMed

    Deiorio, Nicole M; Carney, Patricia A; Kahl, Leslie E; Bonura, Erin M; Juve, Amy Miller

    2016-01-01

    Background Individualized education is emerging as an innovative model for physician training. This requires faculty coaching to guide learners' achievements in academic performance, competency development, and career progression. In addition, coaching can foster self-reflection and self-monitoring using a data-guided approach to support lifelong learning. Context Coaching differs from mentoring or advising, and its application in medical education is novel. Because of this, definitions of the concept and the constructs of coaching as applied to medical education are needed to accurately assess the coaching relationship and coaching processes. These can then be linked to learner outcomes to inform how coaching serves as a modifier of academic and competency achievement and career satisfaction. Innovation We developed definitions and constructs for academic coaching in medical education based on review of existing education and non-education coaching literature. These constructs focus on 1) establishing relationship principles, 2) conducting learner assessments, 3) developing and implementing an action plan, and 4) assessing results and revising plans accordingly. Implication Coaching is emerging as an important construct in the context of medical education. This article lays the vital groundwork needed for evaluation of coaching programs aimed at producing outstanding physicians.

  12. Coaching: a new model for academic and career achievement.

    PubMed

    Deiorio, Nicole M; Carney, Patricia A; Kahl, Leslie E; Bonura, Erin M; Juve, Amy Miller

    2016-01-01

    Individualized education is emerging as an innovative model for physician training. This requires faculty coaching to guide learners' achievements in academic performance, competency development, and career progression. In addition, coaching can foster self-reflection and self-monitoring using a data-guided approach to support lifelong learning. Coaching differs from mentoring or advising, and its application in medical education is novel. Because of this, definitions of the concept and the constructs of coaching as applied to medical education are needed to accurately assess the coaching relationship and coaching processes. These can then be linked to learner outcomes to inform how coaching serves as a modifier of academic and competency achievement and career satisfaction. We developed definitions and constructs for academic coaching in medical education based on review of existing education and non-education coaching literature. These constructs focus on 1) establishing relationship principles, 2) conducting learner assessments, 3) developing and implementing an action plan, and 4) assessing results and revising plans accordingly. Coaching is emerging as an important construct in the context of medical education. This article lays the vital groundwork needed for evaluation of coaching programs aimed at producing outstanding physicians.

  13. Coaching: a new model for academic and career achievement

    PubMed Central

    Deiorio, Nicole M.; Carney, Patricia A.; Kahl, Leslie E.; Bonura, Erin M.; Juve, Amy Miller

    2016-01-01

    Background Individualized education is emerging as an innovative model for physician training. This requires faculty coaching to guide learners’ achievements in academic performance, competency development, and career progression. In addition, coaching can foster self-reflection and self-monitoring using a data-guided approach to support lifelong learning. Context Coaching differs from mentoring or advising, and its application in medical education is novel. Because of this, definitions of the concept and the constructs of coaching as applied to medical education are needed to accurately assess the coaching relationship and coaching processes. These can then be linked to learner outcomes to inform how coaching serves as a modifier of academic and competency achievement and career satisfaction. Innovation We developed definitions and constructs for academic coaching in medical education based on review of existing education and non-education coaching literature. These constructs focus on 1) establishing relationship principles, 2) conducting learner assessments, 3) developing and implementing an action plan, and 4) assessing results and revising plans accordingly. Implication Coaching is emerging as an important construct in the context of medical education. This article lays the vital groundwork needed for evaluation of coaching programs aimed at producing outstanding physicians. PMID:27914193

  14. [Development of the program evaluation measurement of continuing nursing education programs].

    PubMed

    Jho, Mi Young; Kim, Miyoung

    2013-04-01

    This study was done to develop a measurement tool for evaluation of continuing nursing education programs and to verify its validity for effective management and quality of education programs. The draft of the evaluation measurement was developed from consultation with professionals, focus group interviews targeting groups of nurses, and individual interviews with education program planners. After 6 professionals examined content validity, 46 items were retained. A pilot-survey was conducted to confirm the time required to complete the questionnaire and the level of understanding of general content and each item in the questionnaire. Construct validity was verified through exploratory factor analysis of data from a survey with 44 items completed by 452 nurses and 59 education program planners. The final evaluation measurement for continuing nursing education programs consisted of 6 evaluation factors and 36 evaluation items. The 6 evaluation factors included identifying program goals and target groups, program planning, performance, operation and management, program outcomes, and program effectiveness. The evaluation measurement for continuing nursing education programs developed in this study is considered suitable to utilize as an evaluation measurement of the quality of continuing education programs for nurses.

  15. The Coach and the Evaluator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschannen-Moran, Bob; Tschannen-Moran, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation and coaching should not be linked, these authors argue. Although it's tempting for evaluators to identify deficiencies and then specify coaching as a remediation strategy, doing so turns coaching into a consequence of a poor evaluation and termination into a consequence of failed coaching. Another mistake is to use coaching as a data…

  16. The Coach and the Evaluator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschannen-Moran, Bob; Tschannen-Moran, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation and coaching should not be linked, these authors argue. Although it's tempting for evaluators to identify deficiencies and then specify coaching as a remediation strategy, doing so turns coaching into a consequence of a poor evaluation and termination into a consequence of failed coaching. Another mistake is to use coaching as a data…

  17. Classroom Coaching: An Emerging Method of Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Joanne Rossi

    This project investigated the efficacy of classroom coaching in improving instruction in elementary mathematics classrooms. The coaches involved in this study were participants in a professional development program. The program includes three major aspects: (1) an intensive 3-week summer institute focusing on mathematics content, pedagogical…

  18. Evaluation of an Assertive Continuing Care Program for Hispanic Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Strunz, Eric; Jungerman, Joanna; Kinyua, Juliet; Frew, Paula M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated an Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach (A-CRA) and Assertive Continuing Care (ACC) program targeting Hispanic adolescents at risk for substance abuse. Method: The Clinic for Education, Treatment, and Prevention of Addiction (CETPA, Inc.), a behavioral health provider offering culturally appropriate substance use and mental health services, carried out the intervention. We examined longitudinal substance use data in relation to time spent in the program and possible confounders. Results: We analyzed data from 72 adolescent clients collected between 2010 and 2012. Self-reported data were evaluated to determine if time spent in the program was associated with substance use reduction. The data were correlated, zero-inflated, and overdispersed; consequently, we employed a mixed-effects zero-inflated negative-binomial model. Time spent in CETPA’s program was significantly associated with reductions in the number of days of substance use (p = .039), but not with the likelihood of fully abstaining from use (p = .290). For non-abstinent participants who spend a year in the program, our models revealed an average decline of 46% in reported days of substance use. Conclusions: A culturally tailored and age-appropriate substance abuse program for Hispanic adolescents resulted in a significant reduction of the numbers of days using alcohol, drugs, or other illicit substances. The A-CRA/ACC approach can yield successful results in culturally diverse settings. PMID:26156933

  19. My Teaching Partner-Secondary: A Video-Based Coaching Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, A.; Ruzek, E.; Hafen, C. A.; Mikami, A. Y.; Allen, J. P.; Pianta, R. C.

    2017-01-01

    In the My Teaching Partner (MTP) program, coaches engage teachers in 6 to 9 coaching cycles across a school year. Guided by the program's theory, coaches help teachers reflect on the emotional, organizational, and instructional features of classrooms. MTP was originally developed for pre-K and early elementary classrooms (MTP Pre-K), but this…

  20. Using Cognitive Coaching to Build School Leadership Capacity: A Case Study in Alberta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, W. Todd; Hauserman, Cal P.; Skytt, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The impact of Cognitive Coaching? included as part of the Leader2Leader (L2L) Leadership Pilot Program for beginning principals in Alberta, Canada, was evaluated in the present study. Fifteen qualified principals (coaches) and 23 new principals completed the L2L Pilot Program that took place over 18 months. Questionnaires for coaches and new…

  1. Enhancing Teacher Quality: Peer Coaching as a Professional Development Strategy. A Preliminary Synthesis of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Kenneth; Nicotera, Anna

    The use of effective professional development strategies to improve the quality of teaching has become a critical aspect of school improvement across states. This report covers many aspects of this idea including: (1) Types of Peer Coaching Programs, (2) Effective Peer Coaching Strategies, (3) Necessary Support for a Peer Coaching Program, and (4)…

  2. My Teaching Partner-Secondary: A Video-Based Coaching Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, A.; Ruzek, E.; Hafen, C. A.; Mikami, A. Y.; Allen, J. P.; Pianta, R. C.

    2017-01-01

    In the My Teaching Partner (MTP) program, coaches engage teachers in 6 to 9 coaching cycles across a school year. Guided by the program's theory, coaches help teachers reflect on the emotional, organizational, and instructional features of classrooms. MTP was originally developed for pre-K and early elementary classrooms (MTP Pre-K), but this…

  3. Using Cognitive Coaching to Build School Leadership Capacity: A Case Study in Alberta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, W. Todd; Hauserman, Cal P.; Skytt, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The impact of Cognitive Coaching? included as part of the Leader2Leader (L2L) Leadership Pilot Program for beginning principals in Alberta, Canada, was evaluated in the present study. Fifteen qualified principals (coaches) and 23 new principals completed the L2L Pilot Program that took place over 18 months. Questionnaires for coaches and new…

  4. Talent development of high performance coaches in team sports in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, Ian; Campbell, Mark J; Macintyre, Tadhg Eoghan

    2017-04-01

    Coaches are central to the development of the expert performer and similarly to continued lifelong participation in sport. Coaches are uniquely positioned to deliver specific technical and tactical instruction and mentoring programmes that support the psychological and social development of athletes in a challenging, goal-oriented and motivational environment. The current study aimed to qualitatively investigate current coach learning sources and coaches' educational backgrounds in team sports in Ireland. Coaches from five team sports in Ireland were asked to complete an online questionnaire. Subsequently male coaches (n = 19) from five team sports who completed the questionnaire and met the inclusion criteria were invited to attend a follow-up semi-structured interview. Inclusion criteria for coaches were that they possess at least 10 years' experience coaching their sport and were coaching more than 4 hours per week. Formal coach education does not meet the needs of high performance coaches who rely more on self-directed learning and coaching experience as their main sources of CPD. Although prior playing experience at a high level is both valuable and desirable, there are concerns about fast-tracking of ex-players into high performance coaching roles. Preferred sources of education and the best learning environment for coaches of team sports in Ireland are more informal than formal. Further research is needed to examine how this learning is applied in a practical manner by examining coaching behaviours and the impact it has on the athlete development process.

  5. Literacy Coaches' Perspectives of Themselves as Literacy Leaders: Results from a National Study of K-12 Literacy Coaching and Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calo, Kristine M.; Sturtevant, Elizabeth G.; Kopfman, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    As the face of education and the demands on teachers continues to change in the 21st century, so does the role of the literacy coach in schools across the country. This article explores the changing roles and responsibilities of literacy coaches by sharing the results of a study of 270 literacy coaches around the country. In this article, we share…

  6. Credentialed Chefs as Certified Wellness Coaches: Call for Action.

    PubMed

    Polak, Rani; Sforzo, Gary A; Dill, Diana; Phillips, Edward M; Moore, Margaret

    2015-12-01

    Beneficial relationships exist between food preparation skills and improved dietary quality, and between times spent preparing food and mortality. Food shopping, meal planning, preparation and cooking skills are valuable in supporting good health. Thus experts are proposing nutritional counseling be expanded to include these beneficial behavioral skills. Educational programs delivered by chefs have recently emerged as a way to improve engagement with nutritional guidelines. It is reasonable to assume that a chef with behavior change knowledge and skills, such as coaching, may be more effective in facilitating behavior change. We encourage chefs who wish to be involved in promoting health-related behavior change to consider continuing education in coaching knowledge and skills. We also recommend culinary schools to consider offering these courses, to aspiring chefs. Such programming will not only benefit future clients but also offers a career- enriching professional opportunity to chefs. Credentialed chefs can make a positive health impact and should be included as professionals who are eligible for the impending national certification of health and wellness coaches.

  7. Are Low-Income Peer Health Coaches Able to Master and Utilize Evidence-Based Health Coaching?

    PubMed

    Goldman, Matthew L; Ghorob, Amireh; Hessler, Danielle; Yamamoto, Russell; Thom, David H; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    A randomized controlled trial found that patients with diabetes had lower HbA1c levels after 6 months of peer health coaching than patients who did not receive coaching. This paper explores whether the peer coaches in that trial, all low-income patients with diabetes, mastered and utilized an evidence-based health coaching training curriculum. The curriculum included 5 core features: ask-tell-ask, closing the loop, know your numbers, behavior-change action plans, and medication adherence counseling. This paper includes the results of exams administered to trainees, exit surveys performed with peer coaches who completed the study and those who dropped out, observations of peer coaches meeting with patients, and analysis of in-depth interviews with peer coaches who completed the study. Of the 32 peer coach trainees who completed the training, 71.9% lacked a college degree; 25.0% did not graduate from high school. The 26 trainees who passed the exams attended 92.7% of training sessions compared with 80.6% for the 6 trainees who did not pass. Peer coaches who completed the study wanted to continue peer coaching work and had confidence in their abilities despite their not consistently employing the coaching techniques with their patients. Quotations describe coaches' perceptions of the training. Of low-income patients with diabetes who completed the evidenced-based health coaching training, 81% passed written and oral exams and became effective peer health coaches, although they did not consistently use the techniques taught. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  8. Peer coaching: an overlooked resource.

    PubMed

    McQuiston, Linda Smith; Hanna, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    The authors present an innovative pedagogical approach to peer coaching using senior leadership and junior medical/surgical nursing students within the acute care clinical setting. The collaboration among faculty, staff, and students developed awareness of thinking critically, reasoning, and using effective clinical judgment. Through the use of Lasater's Clinical Judgment Rubric, student reflections provided insight to the program's effectiveness and use of alternative clinical experiences.

  9. Evaluation of a continuous quality improvement program in anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, Ariane; Lahaie, Alexandre; Odobasic, Bojan; Tremblay, Marie-Philip; Wazzan, Dana; Caron, Stéphanie; Leblanc, Caroline; Martineau, Josée; Lalonde, Lyne

    2016-01-01

    Background: The ACO Program (Programme ACO), a continuous quality improvement program (CQIP) in anticoagulation therapy, was offered in community pharmacies as a pilot project. Objective: To evaluate the participants’ appreciation for the various activities of the program. Methods: Participants had access to training activities, including an audit with feedback, online training activities (OTA), clinical tools and support from facilitators. Cognitive behavioural learning determinants were evaluated before and 5 months after the beginning of the program. Participants’ satisfaction and perception were documented via online questionnaires and a semistructured interview. Results: Of the 52 pharmacists in the ACO Program, 47 participated in this evaluation. Seventy-seven percent of the participants completed at least 1 OTA and 6% published on the forum. The feeling of personal effectiveness rose from 8.01 (7.67-8.35) to 8.62 (8.24-8.99). The audit and feedback, as well as the high-quality OTA and their lecturers, were the most appreciated elements. Discussion: There was a high OTA participation rate. The facilitators seemed to play a key role in the CQIP. The low level of participation in the forum reflects the known phenomenon of social loafing. Technical difficulties affecting the platform and data collection for the audit with feedback constituted limitations. Conclusion: The CQIP in anticoagulation therapy is appreciated by community pharmacists and is associated with an improved feeling of personal effectiveness. PMID:27829859

  10. Understanding Coach-Based Professional Development in "Reading First": How Do Coaches Spend Their Time and How Do Teachers Perceive Coaches' Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Sarah E.; Cortina, Kai S.; Carlisle, Joanne F.

    2012-01-01

    The "Reading First" ("RF") program placed emphasis on professional development as a means of improving early elementary reading instruction. For many states literacy coaching was an important component of the professional development provided for teachers. The purpose of this article is to examine coaching in the early years of…

  11. Reflections on quagmires for clinicians and coaches: Comment on Gebhardt (2016).

    PubMed

    Grant, Anthony M

    2017-01-01

    Professional coaching can be considered an example of a postprofessional discipline-a discipline that transcends the traditional boundaries between professional clinical psychology and business consulting and coaching. Not surprisingly, a number of potential quagmires in relation to ethical, educational, and credentialing issues have arisen. However, such tensions present an opportunity to build more solid foundations for the delivery of professional coaching services. A way forward is to more broadly engage with university-level theoretically grounded, coaching-specific educational programs. Psychology as a profession needs to more actively engage with coaching so that we bring our scientific training, our professional experience, and evidence-based approaches to a broader audience. Raising the standard of coach education and practice through university education, and forming clear and coaching-specific guidelines for psychologists who coach, should be a priority for both the American Psychological Association and the International Coach Federation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. The keys to successful online continuing education programs for nurses.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Nancy M; Saarmann, Lembi; Flagg, Joan; Seidman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Asynchronous online tutorials that award continuing education units without cost and provide knowledge about computers and nursing informatics were made available to registered nurses in Southern California. Four hundred seventy-three nurses enrolled; 52% (246) completed tutorials. Nonsignificant differences in the number of tutorials completed were found across characteristics of participants, meaning that nurses were similarly disposed to participate regardless of age, educational preparation, experience, practice setting, or ethnicity. They tended to overestimate their computer capabilities at the time of enrollment and abandoned the tutorials when they encountered technical problems. Nurses need live workshops teaching computer basics, Internet skills, and how to enroll in and run asynchronous programs. Marketing of online programs should be multifaceted, including live and electronic strategies.

  13. Dynamic Programming for Structured Continuous Markov Decision Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dearden, Richard; Meuleau, Nicholas; Washington, Richard; Feng, Zhengzhu

    2004-01-01

    We describe an approach for exploiting structure in Markov Decision Processes with continuous state variables. At each step of the dynamic programming, the state space is dynamically partitioned into regions where the value function is the same throughout the region. We first describe the algorithm for piecewise constant representations. We then extend it to piecewise linear representations, using techniques from POMDPs to represent and reason about linear surfaces efficiently. We show that for complex, structured problems, our approach exploits the natural structure so that optimal solutions can be computed efficiently.

  14. Epidural Analgesia for Labor: Continuous Infusion Versus Programmed Intermittent Bolus.

    PubMed

    Onuoha, Onyi C

    2017-03-01

    Despite the traditional practice to maintain labor analgesia with a combination of continuous epidural infusion and patient-controlled epidural analgesia using an automated epidural pump; compelling data now shows that bolus injection through the epidural catheter may result in better distribution of anesthetic solution in the epidural space. The programmed intermittent epidural bolus technique is proposed as a better maintenance mode and may represent a more effective mode of maintaining epidural analgesia for labor, especially prolonged labor. Additional prospective and adequately powered studies are needed to confirm findings and determine the optimal combination of volume, rate, time, and drug concentration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Innovations in Continuing Education. 1979 Award-Winning New Programs. NUEA-ACT Series on Continuing Education. No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Univ. Extension Association, Washington, DC.

    Seven 1979 innovative programs in continuing education are described which won awards from the American College Testing Program and the National University Extension Association. Awards were granted according to programs' transferability, innovativeness, workability, and impact in one of four categories: instructional programs, student services…

  16. Coaching and mentoring new graduates entering perinatal nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Hom, Evelyn M

    2003-01-01

    The challenges of the nursing shortage have and continue to impact all aspects of health care today. Specialty areas and critical care areas have created job opportunities and are now providing education programs for both experienced as well as new graduate nurses. Orientation is a critical time for new graduate nurses of differing ages who come from varied personal, educational, and work backgrounds with varied life and job experiences. For the successful completion of orientation, coaching and mentoring are key components in the retention and recruitment of nurses into the profession.

  17. Learning Developmental Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, James M.; Weintraub, Joseph R.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes an educational intervention designed to promote the ability and willingness of MBA students to lead through coaching. MBA leadership students are trained to serve as coaches for undergraduate business students in a developmental assessment center. In this compelling context, their main source of influence is the ability to…

  18. The Coaching Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rackham, Neil

    1979-01-01

    Knowledge can be taught effectively in the classroom, but skills can best be learned by on-the-job coaching. Coaching is a cost-effective way to reinforce new behaviors and skills until the skill feels more natural and begins to result in better performance. (SK)

  19. Soccer Coaching Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Bill

    The basic principles and techniques of soccer are explained and illustrated with photographs and diagrams to aid teachers who are introducing soccer into the physical education curriculum. In addition, it is designed to guide youth soccer coaches who wish to improve their presentations. The book discusses: (1) coaching methods; (2) passing and…

  20. Coaching for Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Bonnie

    2001-01-01

    Discusses coaching for balance the integration of the whole self: physical (body), intellectual (mind), spiritual (soul), and emotional (heart). Offers four ways to identify problems and tell whether someone is out of balance and four coaching techniques for creating balance. (Contains 11 references.) (JOW)

  1. Quality Coaching Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Scholastic sport is a double-edged sword that can have positive or negative effects. Whether those effects are positive or negative depends on those who wield that sword--chiefly, the school's sports coach. While it is clear that coaches make a difference in ensuring that educational athletics lead to beneficial outcomes for student-athletes, a…

  2. Quality Coaching Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Scholastic sport is a double-edged sword that can have positive or negative effects. Whether those effects are positive or negative depends on those who wield that sword--chiefly, the school's sports coach. While it is clear that coaches make a difference in ensuring that educational athletics lead to beneficial outcomes for student-athletes, a…

  3. Lesson Study: Beyond Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine; Perry, Rebecca; Foster, David; Hurd, Jacqueline; Fisher, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The authors assert that lesson study--a collaborative, teacher-led approach to learning from practice--offers a deeper, broader, more sustainable method of improving teacher practice than one-on-one coaching does. In lesson study, teachers and coaches of all levels of experience can work together, each bringing his or her own professional…

  4. Lesson Study: Beyond Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine; Perry, Rebecca; Foster, David; Hurd, Jacqueline; Fisher, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The authors assert that lesson study--a collaborative, teacher-led approach to learning from practice--offers a deeper, broader, more sustainable method of improving teacher practice than one-on-one coaching does. In lesson study, teachers and coaches of all levels of experience can work together, each bringing his or her own professional…

  5. Learning Developmental Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, James M.; Weintraub, Joseph R.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes an educational intervention designed to promote the ability and willingness of MBA students to lead through coaching. MBA leadership students are trained to serve as coaches for undergraduate business students in a developmental assessment center. In this compelling context, their main source of influence is the ability to…

  6. A Coaching Psychology Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    In "Psychology in its place" (2008), John Radford considers "what is or should be the "place" of Psychology in education, more particularly Higher Education". In this article, the author looks at the possible inclusion of coaching psychology within undergraduate psychology programmes. Coaching psychology as an applied…

  7. Are Low-Income Peer Health Coaches Able to Master and Utilize Evidence-Based Health Coaching?

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Matthew L.; Ghorob, Amireh; Hessler, Danielle; Yamamoto, Russell; Thom, David H.; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE A randomized controlled trial found that patients with diabetes had lower HbA1c levels after 6 months of peer health coaching than patients who did not receive coaching. This paper explores whether the peer coaches in that trial, all low-income patients with diabetes, mastered and utilized an evidence-based health coaching training curriculum. The curriculum included 5 core features: ask-tell-ask, closing the loop, know your numbers, behavior-change action plans, and medication adherence counseling. METHODS This paper includes the results of exams administered to trainees, exit surveys performed with peer coaches who completed the study and those who dropped out, observations of peer coaches meeting with patients, and analysis of in-depth interviews with peer coaches who completed the study. RESULTS Of the 32 peer coach trainees who completed the training, 71.9% lacked a college degree; 25.0% did not graduate from high school. The 26 trainees who passed the exams attended 92.7% of training sessions compared with 80.6% for the 6 trainees who did not pass. Peer coaches who completed the study wanted to continue peer coaching work and had confidence in their abilities despite their not consistently employing the coaching techniques with their patients. Quotations describe coaches’ perceptions of the training. CONCLUSIONS Of low-income patients with diabetes who completed the evidenced-based health coaching training, 81% passed written and oral exams and became effective peer health coaches, although they did not consistently use the techniques taught. PMID:26304970

  8. Teaching Better, Together: Literacy Coaching as Collaborative Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mraz, Maryann; Salas, Spencer; Mercado, Leonardo; Dikotla, Masennya

    2016-01-01

    This article draws from the combined experiences of the authors as teacher educators in very different parts of the world to describe the stance literacy coaching represents for English language teaching (ELT) contexts. They begin by defining how literacy coaching is portrayed in the research literature. They continue with a model of four broad…

  9. Planning Your Journey in Coaching: Building a Network for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Mullem, Pete; Croft, Chris

    2015-01-01

    A coach develops his or her craft by reflecting on previous playing experiences (Erickson, Côté, & Fraser-Thomas, 2007) and continuing to seek learning opportunities through a variety of informal and non-formal learning methods (e.g. discussion with other coaches, trial and error, observation, advice of a mentor, clinics, web sites, books and…

  10. Planning Your Journey in Coaching: Building a Network for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Mullem, Pete; Croft, Chris

    2015-01-01

    A coach develops his or her craft by reflecting on previous playing experiences (Erickson, Côté, & Fraser-Thomas, 2007) and continuing to seek learning opportunities through a variety of informal and non-formal learning methods (e.g. discussion with other coaches, trial and error, observation, advice of a mentor, clinics, web sites, books and…

  11. Examining the Process of Coaching the Oral Interpretation of Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Carolyn

    A study examined the question of what sequence patterns, if any, of covering oral interpretation topics emerge from forensic coaching sessions. To answer the question it was first necessary to analyze the process used by the coaches. Process was defined as the action of passing through continuing development from a beginning to a contemplated end.…

  12. Developing Coaching Pedagogy: Seeking a Better Integration of Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robyn; Morgan, Kevin; Harris, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    Despite evidence that experience within practical coaching contexts serves as the principal knowledge source for coaches, academic (and professional) coach education programmes continue to be heavily taught along didactic lines. Such courses are often considered as fine in theory but divorced from the gritty realities of practice. The aim of this…

  13. Development of a Virtual Technology Coach to Support Technology Integration for K-12 Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugar, William; van Tryon, Patricia J. Slagter

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to develop a virtual technology coach for K-12 educators, this article analyzed survey results from sixty teachers with regards to specific resources that a technology coach could provide within a virtual environment. A virtual technology coach was proposed as a possible solution to provide continual professional development for…

  14. Recommendations on Coaching Strategies for Implementing Lean (Defense Acquisition Review Journal, August-November 2004)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    value stream analysis, Kaizen , formal Lean training and alignment/assessments. Select and Certify internal coaches to an organizational standard. This... motivate key strategic outcomes.” The following example is a powerful communication tool, from a worldwide defense industry leader, that highlights...promotion of coaches. Tailor Lean coach measurements to motivate key strategic outcomes. Measurements should be continually reviewed and updated to

  15. Developing Coaching Pedagogy: Seeking a Better Integration of Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robyn; Morgan, Kevin; Harris, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    Despite evidence that experience within practical coaching contexts serves as the principal knowledge source for coaches, academic (and professional) coach education programmes continue to be heavily taught along didactic lines. Such courses are often considered as fine in theory but divorced from the gritty realities of practice. The aim of this…

  16. Application of a contextual instructional framework in a continuing professional development training program for physiotherapists in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Dunleavy, Kim; Chevan, Julia; Sander, Antoinette P; Gasherebuka, Jean Damascene; Mann, Monika

    2017-03-22

    Continuing professional development is an important component of capacity building in low resource countries. The purpose of this case study is to describe the use of a contextual instructional framework to guide the processes and instructional design choices for a series of continuing professional development courses for physiotherapists in Rwanda. Four phases of the project are described: (1) program proposal, needs assessment and planning, (2) organization of the program and instructional design, (3) instructional delivery and (4) evaluation. Contextual facilitating factors and needs informed choices in each phase. The model resulted in delivery of continuing professional development to the majority of physiotherapists in Rwanda (n = 168, 0.48 rural/0.52 urban) with participants reporting improvement in skills and perceived benefit for their patients. Environmental and healthcare system factors resulted in offering the courses in rural and urban areas. Content was developed and delivered in partnership with Rwandan coinstructors. Based on the domestic needs identified in early courses, the program included advocacy and leadership activities, in addition to practical and clinical instruction. The contextual factors (environment, healthcare service organization, need for rehabilitation and status and history of the physiotherapy profession) were essential for project and instructional choices. Facilitating factors included the established professional degree and association, continuing professional development requirements, a core group of active professionals and an existing foundation from other projects. The processes and contextual considerations may be useful in countries with established professional-level education but without established postentry-level training. Implications for Rehabilitation Organizations planning continuing professional development programs may benefit from considering the context surrounding training when planning, designing and

  17. Building successful student-athlete coach relationships: examining coaching practices and commitment to the coach.

    PubMed

    Rezania, Davar; Gurney, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this study we utilized the concept of commitment to explain the impact of coaching practices on student-athlete's behaviour. We examined the impact of commitment to the coach on the coaching outcome of in-role behaviour, and the influence of coaching practices, of information sharing, training, and encouraging teamwork, on the formation of relationships. We adopted measures from the organizational behaviour literature and surveyed student-athletes at two universities in Canada. The sample included data from 165 student-athletes from two universities. Results from structural equation modeling indicate support for the effect of coaching practices on commitment to the coach. Results also support the effect of commitment to the coach on the student-athletes' role behaviour and performance. By showing that coaching practices impact commitment to the coach, and that commitment to the coach impacts student-athlete role behaviour and performance, the findings have important implications for a better understanding of the determinants of coaches' and athletes' performance. The managerial significance of this research rests in the insight provided into how coaching practices influence athlete's behaviour through commitment to the coach. This study contributes to the literature on coach-athlete relationship within universities and colleges by applying the concept of commitment to the coach. This helps diversity research approaches to understanding coach-athlete relationships and extends prior research on commitment by looking at the context of the relationship between the student-athlete and their coach.

  18. Peer Coaching: The Learning Team Approach. K-College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbknecht, Arnold; Kieffer, Connie W.

    This book provides information for teachers and administrators about peer coaching, and it centers on classroom observation by other team members. The book describes stages of the observation process, explaining how a peer coaching program can make teachers more effective and co-learners with colleagues. Each chapter includes scenarios describing…

  19. USA Track & Field Coaching Manual. USA Track & Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Track and Field, Inc., Indianapolis, IN.

    This book presents comprehensive, ready-to-apply information from 33 world-class coaches and experts about major track and field events for high school and college coaches. The volume features proven predictive testing procedures; detailed event-specific technique instruction; carefully crafted training programs; and preparation and performance…

  20. Working as a Learning Coach Team in Action Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Judy A.; Lamm, Sharon L.

    2000-01-01

    A team of learning coaches facilitated an action learning group in a public utility. The coaches' diversity raised interpersonal issues but added a wealth of perspectives and experience. Important components were team formation, a balance of program and individual needs, and group diversity. (SK)

  1. The Coaching of Teachers: Results of Five Training Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veenman, Simon; Denessen, Eddie

    2001-01-01

    Conducted 5 studies evaluating the effects of a teacher coaching program for use in Dutch primary or secondary schools. Studies involved 18 counselors, 30 principals, 15 beginning teacher mentors, 20 pre-service teacher mentors, and 10 secondary school teachers. A significant treatment effect was found for the coaching skills concerned with the…

  2. USA Track & Field Coaching Manual. USA Track & Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Track and Field, Inc., Indianapolis, IN.

    This book presents comprehensive, ready-to-apply information from 33 world-class coaches and experts about major track and field events for high school and college coaches. The volume features proven predictive testing procedures; detailed event-specific technique instruction; carefully crafted training programs; and preparation and performance…

  3. A Worry-Free Retirement in Korea: Effectiveness of Retirement Coaching Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Hyejin; Suh, Wookyung; Lee, Jiyoung; Jang, Younju; Kim, Minjung

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated a retirement coaching educational program using the mixed method research design. A structured survey was distributed to 48 financial planners who had undergone 50-hour retirement education including retirement coaching. The coaching was conducted in two sessions in 2015. Results revealed that first, the retirement coaching…

  4. Leadership Coaching for Educators:Bringing Out the Best in School Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiss, Karla

    2006-01-01

    In this resource, educational coach Karla Reiss helps superintendents, principals, and teachers understand the fundamentals of effective leadership coaching programs that result in long-lasting educational change. Using a balance of theory and practice, Reiss offers 11 core competencies adopted by the rapidly growing coaching profession including…

  5. Effects of Peer Coaching on Teachers' Collaborative Interactions and Students' Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Sarah; Ma, Xin; Mazur, Joan

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined peer coaching in the context of the Mentored Implementation Program developed in the Appalachian Mathematics and Science Partnership. The experimental design contained 6 teachers receiving peer coaching with their 202 students and 5 teachers in the control group with their 105 students. Teachers considered peer coaching a…

  6. Florida's Middle School Reading Coaches: What Do They Do? Are They Effective? Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Julie A.; McCombs, Jennifer Sloan; Lockwood, J.R.; Martorell, Francisco; Gershwin, Daniel; Naftel, Scott; Le, Vi-Nhuan; Shea, Molly; Barney, Heather; Crego, Al

    2008-01-01

    This research brief reports the results of a study examining the implementation and effectiveness of a middle school reading coach program in Florida. The study found that districts tended to establish similar policies and supports for coaches regarding hiring, compensation, evaluation, and training. School-based reading coaches in Florida divided…

  7. Executive Coaching as a Transfer of Training Tool: Effects on Productivity in a Public Agency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivero, Gerald; Bane, K. Denise; Kopelman, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    An action research study examined the effects of executive coaching in a public municipal agency. A conventional training program followed by one-on-one executive coaching had 31 participants. Training increased productivity by 22.4%, whereas coaching produced a productivity gain of 88%. (JOW)

  8. The Use of between Session Assignments in ADHD Coaching with College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevatt, Frances; Lampropoulos, Georgios K.; Bowles, Vernessa; Garrett, Lori

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To provide an analysis of the use of between session assignments (BSA) in ADHD coaching with college students. The article provides a description of the structure and process of using BSA in an academic setting. Method: A brief survey of ADHD coaches is used to evaluate 13 coaching clients engaged in an 8-week structured program. A case…

  9. Minority Coaches Are Still Scarce in Big-Time College Football

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Libby

    2007-01-01

    The number of minority coaches leading the nation's largest collegiate football programs remains low, with 13 of the 241 head-coaching positions in Divisions I-A and I-AA held by members of minority racial or ethnic groups, a report on hiring practices released last week by the organization Black Coaches & Administrators (BCA) says. Only two…

  10. Exploring Mechanisms of Effective Teacher Coaching: A Tale of Two Cohorts From a Randomized Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazar, David; Kraft, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Although previous research has shown that teacher coaching can improve teaching practices and student achievement, little is known about specific features of effective coaching programs. We estimate the impact of MATCH Teacher Coaching (MTC) on a range of teacher practices using a blocked randomized trial and explore how changes in the coaching…

  11. Integrating Professional Development Content and Formative Assessment with the Coaching Process: The Texas School Ready Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, April; Zucker, Tricia; Van Horne, Bethanie; Landry, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Instructional coaching is becoming common in early childhood programs to provide individualized, job-embedded professional development. Yet relatively few studies have tried to "unpack" the coaching process and delineate the specific features of coaching that contribute to teacher change. In this article, we describe an evidence-based…

  12. A Worry-Free Retirement in Korea: Effectiveness of Retirement Coaching Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Hyejin; Suh, Wookyung; Lee, Jiyoung; Jang, Younju; Kim, Minjung

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated a retirement coaching educational program using the mixed method research design. A structured survey was distributed to 48 financial planners who had undergone 50-hour retirement education including retirement coaching. The coaching was conducted in two sessions in 2015. Results revealed that first, the retirement coaching…

  13. Changes in Coaching Study Design Shed Light on How Features Impact Teacher Practice. Lessons from Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killion, Joellen

    2016-01-01

    Teacher coaching is a powerful form of professional learning that improves teaching practices and student achievement, yet little is known about the specific aspects of coaching programs that are more effective. Researchers used a blocked randomized experiment to study the effects of one-to-one coaching on teacher practice. When pooled across all…

  14. Integrating Professional Development Content and Formative Assessment with the Coaching Process: The Texas School Ready Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, April; Zucker, Tricia; Van Horne, Bethanie; Landry, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Instructional coaching is becoming common in early childhood programs to provide individualized, job-embedded professional development. Yet relatively few studies have tried to "unpack" the coaching process and delineate the specific features of coaching that contribute to teacher change. In this article, we describe an evidence-based…

  15. Promoting Student-Teacher Interactions: Exploring a Peer Coaching Model for Teachers in a Preschool Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Stacy R.; Finlon, Kristy J.; Kobak, Roger; Izard, Carroll E.

    2017-01-01

    Peer coaching provides an attractive alternative to traditional professional development for promoting classroom quality in a sustainable, cost-effective manner by creating a collaborative teaching community. This exploratory study describes the development and evaluation of the Colleague Observation And CoacHing (COACH) program, a peer coaching…

  16. Exploring Mechanisms of Effective Teacher Coaching: A Tale of Two Cohorts From a Randomized Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazar, David; Kraft, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Although previous research has shown that teacher coaching can improve teaching practices and student achievement, little is known about specific features of effective coaching programs. We estimate the impact of MATCH Teacher Coaching (MTC) on a range of teacher practices using a blocked randomized trial and explore how changes in the coaching…

  17. Changes in Coaching Study Design Shed Light on How Features Impact Teacher Practice. Lessons from Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killion, Joellen

    2016-01-01

    Teacher coaching is a powerful form of professional learning that improves teaching practices and student achievement, yet little is known about the specific aspects of coaching programs that are more effective. Researchers used a blocked randomized experiment to study the effects of one-to-one coaching on teacher practice. When pooled across all…

  18. Minority Coaches Are Still Scarce in Big-Time College Football

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Libby

    2007-01-01

    The number of minority coaches leading the nation's largest collegiate football programs remains low, with 13 of the 241 head-coaching positions in Divisions I-A and I-AA held by members of minority racial or ethnic groups, a report on hiring practices released last week by the organization Black Coaches & Administrators (BCA) says. Only two…

  19. Effects of Peer Coaching on Teachers' Collaborative Interactions and Students' Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Sarah; Ma, Xin; Mazur, Joan

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined peer coaching in the context of the Mentored Implementation Program developed in the Appalachian Mathematics and Science Partnership. The experimental design contained 6 teachers receiving peer coaching with their 202 students and 5 teachers in the control group with their 105 students. Teachers considered peer coaching a…

  20. The Essential Components of Coach Training for Mental Health Professionals: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarity, Marlene Therese

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to discover how coach training experts define coaching and what they would identify to be the essential components of a coach training program for mental health professionals. Methods. A panel of nine experts, through an iterative Delphi process of responding to three rounds of questionnaires, provided…

  1. Capacity Building and Districts' Decision to Implement Coaching Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangin, Melinda M.

    2014-01-01

    The United States has experienced tremendous growth in the development of coaching initiatives including professional training programs, state endorsements and resources for coaches. These developments bring attention to the potential for coaching to improve education. They also raise the question of how best to facilitate implementation in local…

  2. Coaching Conversations: Enacting Instructional Scaffolding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Sharan A.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed coaching conversations and interviews of four coach/teacher partnerships for specific ways in which kindergarten and first-grade teachers, and coaches, conceptualized instructional scaffolding for guided reading. Interview transcripts were coded for coaches' and teachers' specific hypotheses/ ideas regarding instructional…

  3. Coaching to Enhance Quality of Implementation in Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Dusenbury, Linda; Hansen, William B.; Jackson-Newsom, Julia; Pittman, Donna; Wilson, Cicely; Simley, Kathleen; Ringwalt, Christopher; Pankratz, Melinda; Giles, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This study describes topics covered by coaches assisting teachers implementing a research-based drug prevention program and explores how coaching affected student outcomes. Design The All Stars drug prevention curriculum was implemented by 16 urban teachers who received four coaching sessions. Two coaches participated. Coaches were interviewed by investigators to assess topics covered. Students completed pretest-posttest measures of mediators and substance use behaviors. Findings The average teacher was coached on 11.7 different topics, out of a total of 23 topics. Coaching topics most heavily emphasized included: introduction and wrap up; time management; general classroom management; teacher's movement around the class; asking open-ended questions; using students' questions, comments and examples to make desired points; general preparation; engaging high-risk youth; reading from the curriculum; implementing activities correctly; focusing on objectives and goals; maintaining a focus on the task; and improving depth of understanding. Seven coaching topics were found to relate to changes in student mediators and behavior. Research Limitations/Implications The current study was exploratory. Future research should explore how teachers develop the particular skills required by prevention programs and how coaches can assist them. Practical Implications We postulate five levels of skill development which coaches may address: (1) fundamental teaching skills, (2) mechanics of program delivery, (3) development of an interactive teaching style, (4) effective response to student input, and (5) effective tailoring and adaptation. Originality/Value This represents one of a very few studies that explores how coaching impacts outcomes in substance abuse prevention. PMID:22022672

  4. Online Coaching of Emotion-Regulation Strategies for Parents: Efficacy of the Online Rational Positive Parenting Program and Attention Bias Modification Procedures.

    PubMed

    David, Oana A; Capris, David; Jarda, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Parenting programs are currently treatment of choice for behavioral disorders in children and one of their main components is reducing the negativity bias in the child-parent dyad. The Rational Positive Parenting Program (rPPP) is a program with a special focus on parent emotion-regulation functional reappraisal strategies, which has recently received consistent support for reducing child externalizing and internalizing disorders. In the last years, online interventions were proliferated and the Attention Bias Modification (ABM) becoming a promising implicit therapeutic intervention based on attention deployment emotion-regulation strategy, or adjunctive module to usual treatments, with results in multiple domains, varying from pain to self-esteem and emotional disorders (e.g., anxiety). We conducted two studies to investigate (1) the efficacy of the ABM procedures applied to parents and (2) the efficacy of the online version of the rPPP augmented with an ABM module. A total of 42 parents of children aged 2-12 years old participated in the first study, being allocated either to the ABM training or wait-list. Positive results were reported by the parents participating in the ABM group for own distress, satisfaction, positive interactions with the child, and child's strengths. In the second study, 53 parents and their children were allocated either in the rPPP group or in the rPPP + ABM group. Results show that ABM training can boost the effects of the rPPP on the strengths of children reported by the parents after the intervention. Findings are discussed in the light of limited research on using online tools for coaching effective emotion-regulation strategies for parents.

  5. Online Coaching of Emotion-Regulation Strategies for Parents: Efficacy of the Online Rational Positive Parenting Program and Attention Bias Modification Procedures

    PubMed Central

    David, Oana A.; Capris, David; Jarda, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Parenting programs are currently treatment of choice for behavioral disorders in children and one of their main components is reducing the negativity bias in the child–parent dyad. The Rational Positive Parenting Program (rPPP) is a program with a special focus on parent emotion-regulation functional reappraisal strategies, which has recently received consistent support for reducing child externalizing and internalizing disorders. In the last years, online interventions were proliferated and the Attention Bias Modification (ABM) becoming a promising implicit therapeutic intervention based on attention deployment emotion-regulation strategy, or adjunctive module to usual treatments, with results in multiple domains, varying from pain to self-esteem and emotional disorders (e.g., anxiety). We conducted two studies to investigate (1) the efficacy of the ABM procedures applied to parents and (2) the efficacy of the online version of the rPPP augmented with an ABM module. A total of 42 parents of children aged 2–12 years old participated in the first study, being allocated either to the ABM training or wait-list. Positive results were reported by the parents participating in the ABM group for own distress, satisfaction, positive interactions with the child, and child’s strengths. In the second study, 53 parents and their children were allocated either in the rPPP group or in the rPPP + ABM group. Results show that ABM training can boost the effects of the rPPP on the strengths of children reported by the parents after the intervention. Findings are discussed in the light of limited research on using online tools for coaching effective emotion-regulation strategies for parents. PMID:28421016

  6. Virtual coach technology for supporting self-care.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dan; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Cooper, Rosemarie; Cooper, Rory A; Smailagic, Asim; Siewiorek, Dan

    2010-02-01

    "Virtual Coach" refers to a coaching program or device aiming to guide users through tasks for the purpose of prompting positive behavior or assisting with learning new skills. This article reviews virtual coach interventions with the purpose of guiding rehabilitation professionals to comprehend more effectively the essential components of such interventions, the underlying technologies and their integration, and example applications. A design space of virtual coach interventions including self-monitoring, context awareness, interface modality, and coaching strategies were identified and discussed to address when, how, and what coaching messages to deliver in an automated and intelligent way. Example applications that address various health-related issues also are provided to illustrate how a virtual coach intervention is developed and evaluated. Finally, the article provides some insight into addressing key challenges and opportunities in designing and implementing virtual coach interventions. It is expected that more virtual coach interventions will be developed in the field of rehabilitation to support self-care and prevent secondary conditions in individuals with disabilities.

  7. A Comparison of Players' and Coaches' Perceptions of the Coach-Created Motivational Climate within Youth Soccer Teams.

    PubMed

    Møllerløkken, Nina Elise; Lorås, Håvard; Pedersen, Arve Vorland

    2017-01-01

    The coach-created motivational climate within youth sports teams has been shown to be of great importance for the quality of youths' sports experiences as well as their motivation for continuing or discontinuing sport participation. While the player's perspective on motivational climates has been studied extensively, the coach's perspective has received considerably less attention. Thus, little is known about the concordance of perceptions of the motivational climate between coaches and their players, or the lack thereof. The purpose of the present study was to directly compare players' and coaches' perceptions of the motivational climate within their respective teams. To this end, 256 male and female soccer players (15-17 years of age) from 17 different teams and their coaches (n = 29) responded to the Perceived Motivational Climate in Sports Questionnaire-2 (PMCSQ-2). The study design included responses from both coaches and players to the same questionnaire, and both groups were aware of the other part's participation. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences between players' and coaches' perceptions of the motivational climate. Specifically, players of both sexes perceived the motivational climate to be significantly more performance-oriented and significantly less mastery-oriented compared with the coaches. These findings may advance our understanding of the coach-athlete relationship, and may be of importance for understanding players' motivation for persistence or discontinuation of the sport.

  8. Coach Mid-Season Replacement and Team Performance in Professional Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Lago-Peñas, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The coaching carousel or turnover is an extreme but frequently occurring phenomenon in soccer. Among the reasons for firing a coach, the most common is the existence of a shock-effect: a new coach would be able to motivate the players better and therefore to improve results. Using data from the Spanish Soccer League during the seasons from 1997–1998 to 2006–2007, this paper investigates the relationship between team performance and coach change over time. The empirical analysis shows that the shock effect of a turnover has a positive impact on team performance in the short term. Results reveal no impact of coach turnover in the long term. The favourable short-term impact on team performance of a coach turnover is followed by continued gradual worsening of results. The turnover effect is nonexistent when the comparison between the new coach and the old coach is done over 10, 15 or 20 matches before and after termination. PMID:23487177

  9. Coaching effectiveness: the coach-athlete relationship at its heart.

    PubMed

    Jowett, Sophia

    2017-08-01

    Coaching has been often viewed as a context within which coaches operate to largely bring about changes in athlete's performance and wellbeing. One key factor to successful outcomes in coaching is the quality of the relationship between coaches and athletes. In this article, I propose that the coach-athlete relationship is at the heart of coaching. Moreover, the aim is to describe and explain how the quality of the relationship coaches and athletes develop and maintain over the course of their sporting partnership alongside coaches and athletes' knowledge and outcomes, form a system that is capable of defining coaching effectiveness and success. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. La Hague Continuous Improvement Program: Enhancement of the Vitrification Throughput

    SciTech Connect

    Petitjean, V.; De Vera, R.; Hollebecque, J.F.; Tronche, E.; Flament, T.; Pereira Mendes, F.; Prod'homme, A.

    2006-07-01

    The vitrification of high-level liquid waste produced from nuclear fuel reprocessing has been carried out industrially for over 25 years by AREVA/COGEMA, with two main objectives: containment of the long lived fission products and reduction of the final volume of waste. At the 'La Hague' plant, in the 'R7' and 'T7' facilities, vitrified waste is obtained by first evaporating and calcining the nitric acid feed solution-containing fission products in calciners. The product-named calcinate- is then fed together with glass frit into induction-heated metallic melters to produce the so-called R7/T7 glass, well known for its excellent containment properties. Both facilities are equipped with three processing lines. In the near future the increase of the fuel burn-up will influence the amount of fission product solutions to be processed at R7/T7. As a consequence, in order to prepare these changes, it is necessary to feed the calciner at higher flow-rates. Consistent and medium-term R and D programs led by CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission, the AREVA/COGEMA's R and D and R and T provider), AREVA/COGEMA (Industrial Operator) and AREVA/SGN (AREVA/COGEMA's Engineering), and associated to the industrial feed back of AREVA/COGEMA operations, have allowed continuous improvement of the process since 1998: - The efficiency and limitation of the equipment have been studied and solutions for technological improvements have been proposed whenever necessary, - The increase of the feeding flow-rate has been implemented on the improved CEA test rig (so called PEV, Evolutional Prototype of Vitrification) and adapted by AREVA/SGN for the La Hague plant using their modeling studies; the results obtained during this test confirmed the technological and industrial feasibility of the improvements achieved, - After all necessary improved equipments have been implemented in R7/T7 facilities, and a specific campaign has been performed on the R7 facility by AREVA/COGEMA. The flow-rate to the

  11. Behavior Modification in Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Annette Rutt; Stillman, Stephen M.

    1979-01-01

    An example of behavior modification used in athletic coaching is presented. The case study involves a member of a women's basketball team and details the use of behavior modification for both weight reduction and skill improvement. (JMF)

  12. Tips for labor coaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... some tips for getting prepared. Before the big day Arrives Labor coaches should go to childbirth classes ... get through her labor and delivery. When the day Arrives You might be at the hospital for ...

  13. 34 CFR 389.1 - What is the Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true What is the Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program...) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION REHABILITATION CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAMS General § 389.1 What is the Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program? This...

  14. Transference of Responsibility Model Goals to the School Environment: Exploring the Impact of a Coaching Club Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, David S.; Ozaeta, Jimmy; Wright, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility Model (TPSR) has been used throughout the USA and in several other countries to integrate systematically life skill development within physical activity-based programs. While TPSR is widely used in practice and has a growing empirical base, few studies have examined the degree of…

  15. Use of Coaching and Behavior Support Planning for Students with Disruptive Behavior within a Universal Classroom Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinke, Wendy M.; Stormont, Melissa; Herman, Keith C.; Wang, Ze; Newcomer, Lori; King, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Even with the use of effective universal classroom management practices, some students will need additional behavioral supports. However, to translate implementation of new strategies into the classroom, professional development programs need to be adaptive to the complexities teachers face in providing instruction and managing classroom behaviors…

  16. Transference of Responsibility Model Goals to the School Environment: Exploring the Impact of a Coaching Club Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, David S.; Ozaeta, Jimmy; Wright, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility Model (TPSR) has been used throughout the USA and in several other countries to integrate systematically life skill development within physical activity-based programs. While TPSR is widely used in practice and has a growing empirical base, few studies have examined the degree of…

  17. Implementation of a Values Training Program in Physical Education and Sport: Perspectives from Teachers, Coaches, Students, and Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Koon Teck; Ong, Shu Wen; Camiré, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Past research has shown that under the right conditions, youth can learn values through physical education and sport (PES). Although some programs have been developed using PES as a means to foster positive development, a limited amount of research has specifically addressed how stakeholders believe this type of material can be…

  18. Use of Coaching and Behavior Support Planning for Students with Disruptive Behavior within a Universal Classroom Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinke, Wendy M.; Stormont, Melissa; Herman, Keith C.; Wang, Ze; Newcomer, Lori; King, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Even with the use of effective universal classroom management practices, some students will need additional behavioral supports. However, to translate implementation of new strategies into the classroom, professional development programs need to be adaptive to the complexities teachers face in providing instruction and managing classroom behaviors…

  19. Implementation of a Values Training Program in Physical Education and Sport: Perspectives from Teachers, Coaches, Students, and Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Koon Teck; Ong, Shu Wen; Camiré, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Past research has shown that under the right conditions, youth can learn values through physical education and sport (PES). Although some programs have been developed using PES as a means to foster positive development, a limited amount of research has specifically addressed how stakeholders believe this type of material can be…

  20. An Evaluation of Management Training and Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Morten Emil; Karlsen, Jan Terje

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The focus of this paper is on management training and development. The purpose has been to address how coaching can be applied to learn about leadership tools and what effect this has on management behaviour and development. Design/methodology/approach: This is a qualitative case study of a management development program. The empirical…

  1. An Evaluation of Management Training and Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Morten Emil; Karlsen, Jan Terje

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The focus of this paper is on management training and development. The purpose has been to address how coaching can be applied to learn about leadership tools and what effect this has on management behaviour and development. Design/methodology/approach: This is a qualitative case study of a management development program. The empirical…

  2. Enhancing the get healthy information and coaching service for Aboriginal adults: evaluation of the process and impact of the program.

    PubMed

    Quinn, E; O'Hara, B J; Ahmed, N; Winch, S; McGill, B; Banovic, D; Maxwell, M; Rissel, C

    2017-09-06

    Non-communicable chronic diseases in Australia contribute to approximately 85% of the total burden of disease; this proportion is greater for Aboriginal communities. The Get Healthy Service (GHS) is effective at reducing lifestyle-based chronic disease risk factors among adults and was enhanced to facilitate accessibility and ensure Aboriginal cultural appropriateness. The purpose of this study is to detail how formative research with Aboriginal communities was applied to guide the development and refinement of the GHS and referral pathways; and to assess the reach and impact of the GHS (and the Aboriginal specific program) on the lifestyle risk factors of Aboriginal participants. Formative research included interviews with Aboriginal participants, leaders and community members, healthcare professionals and service providers to examine acceptability of the GHS; and contributed to the redesign of the GHS Aboriginal program. A quantitative analysis employing a pre-post evaluation design examined anthropometric measures, physical activity and fruit and vegetable consumption of Aboriginal participants using descriptive and chi square analyses, t-tests and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Whilst feedback from the formative research was positive, Aboriginal people identified areas for service enhancement, including improving program content, delivery and service promotion as well as ensuring culturally appropriate referral pathways. Once these changes were implemented, the proportion of Aboriginal participants increased significantly (3.2 to 6.4%). There were significant improvements across a number of risk factors assessed after six months (average weight loss: 3.3 kg and waist circumference reduction: 6.2 cm) for Aboriginal participants completing the program. Working in partnership with Aboriginal people, Elders, communities and peak bodies to enhance the GHS for Aboriginal people resulted in an enhanced culturally acceptable and tailored program which significantly

  3. The study of health coaching: the ithaca coaching project, research design, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Sforzo, Gary A

    2013-05-01

    Health coaching (HC) is a process holding tremendous potential as a complementary medical intervention to shape healthy behavior change and affect rates of chronic lifestyle diseases. Empirical knowledge of effectiveness for the HC process, however, is lacking. The purposes of this paper are to present the study protocol for the Ithaca Coaching Project while also addressing research design, methodological issues, and directions for HC research. This is one of the first large-scale, randomized control trials of HC for primary prevention examining impact on physical and emotional health status in an employee population. An additional intent for the project is to investigate self-determination theory as a theoretical framework for the coaching process. Participants (n=300) are recruited as part of a campus-wide wellness initiative and randomly assigned to one of three levels of client-centered HC or a control with standard wellness program care. Repeated measures analyses of covariance will be used to examine coaching effectiveness while path analyses will be used to examine relationships between coaching processes, self-determination variables, and health outcomes. There is a great need for well-designed HC studies that define coaching best practices, examine intervention effectiveness, provide cost:benefit analysis, and address scope of practice. This information will allow a clearer definition of HC to emerge and determination of if, and how, HC fits in modern-day healthcare. This is an exciting but critical time for HC research and for the practice of HC.

  4. The Study of Health Coaching: The Ithaca Coaching Project, Research Design, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Health coaching (HC) is a process holding tremendous potential as a complementary medical intervention to shape healthy behavior change and affect rates of chronic lifestyle diseases. Empirical knowledge of effectiveness for the HC process, however, is lacking. The purposes of this paper are to present the study protocol for the Ithaca Coaching Project while also addressing research design, methodological issues, and directions for HC research. This is one of the first large-scale, randomized control trials of HC for primary prevention examining impact on physical and emotional health status in an employee population. An additional intent for the project is to investigate self-determination theory as a theoretical framework for the coaching process. Participants (n=300) are recruited as part of a campus-wide wellness initiative and randomly assigned to one of three levels of client-centered HC or a control with standard wellness program care. Repeated measures analyses of covariance will be used to examine coaching effectiveness while path analyses will be used to examine relationships between coaching processes, self-determination variables, and health outcomes. There is a great need for well-designed HC studies that define coaching best practices, examine intervention effectiveness, provide cost:benefit analysis, and address scope of practice. This information will allow a clearer definition of HC to emerge and determination of if, and how, HC fits in modern-day healthcare. This is an exciting but critical time for HC research and for the practice of HC. PMID:24416673

  5. Developing a Coaching Portfolio: Enhancing Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubball, Harry; Robertson, Scott

    2004-01-01

    A portfolio is a well-organized document containing critical analyses and evidence related to a coach's background, context(s) of coaching, approach to coaching, coaching accomplishments, and goals for further development. Here, the authors describe different types of coaching portfolios as well as strategies for developing a coaching portfolio.…

  6. The Neighborhood Continuing Education Program Of Savannah, Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Leonard A.

    1972-01-01

    Several institutions of higher learning combined their efforts and resources to develop a Neighborhood Program that would reach the disadvantaged people in the Savannah Model Cities. Discusses program design, problems, and results of taking the program to the people under conditions and situations to which they could easily identify or relate. (RB)

  7. Coaching Considerations: FAQs Useful in the Development of Literacy Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The National Advisory Board for the Literacy Coaching Clearinghouse have identified a number of considerations that it believed needed further discussion as schools, districts, and states embrace literacy coaching. It negotiated and discussed a number of issues surrounding coaching and agreed on 10 key ideas that should be part of the discussions…

  8. Virtual training and coaching of health behavior: example from mindfulness meditation training.

    PubMed

    Hudlicka, Eva

    2013-08-01

    Computer-based virtual coaches are increasingly being explored for patient education, counseling, and health behavior training and coaching. The objective of this research was to develop and evaluate a Virtual Mindfulness Coach for training and coaching in mindfulness meditation. The coach was implemented as an embodied conversational character, providing mindfulness training and coaching via mixed initiative, text-based, natural language dialog with the student, and emphasizing affect-adaptive interaction. (The term 'mixed initiative dialog' refers to a human-machine dialog where either can initiate a conversation or a change in the conversation topic.) Findings from a pilot evaluation study indicate that the coach-based training is more effective in helping students establish a regular practice than self-administered training using written and audio materials. The coached group also appeared to be in more advanced stages of change in terms of the transtheoretical model, and have a higher sense of self-efficacy regarding establishment of a regular mindfulness practice. These results suggest that virtual coach-based training of mindfulness is both feasible, and potentially more effective, than a self-administered program. Of particular interest is the identification of the specific coach features that contribute to its effectiveness. Virtual coaches could provide easily accessible and cost-effective customized training for a range of health behaviors. The affect-adaptive aspect of these coaches is particularly relevant for helping patients establish long-term behavior changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Virtual Training and Coaching of Health Behavior: Example from Mindfulness Meditation Training

    PubMed Central

    Hudlicka, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Objective Computer-based virtual coaches are increasingly being explored for patient education, counseling, and health behavior training and coaching. The objective of this research was to develop and evaluate a Virtual Mindfulness Coach for training and coaching in mindfulness meditation. Method The coach was implemented as an embodied conversational character, providing mindfulness training and coaching via mixed initiative, text-based, natural language dialogue with the student, and emphasizing affect-adaptive interaction. (The term ‘mixed initiative dialog’ refers to a human-machine dialogue where either can initiate a conversation or a change in the conversation topic.) Results Findings from a pilot evaluation study indicate that the coach-based training is more effective in helping students establish a regular practice than self-administered training using written and audio materials. The coached group also appeared to be in more advanced stages of change in terms of the transtheoretical model, and have a higher sense of self-efficacy regarding establishment of a regular mindfulness practice. Conclusion These results suggest that virtual coach-based training of mindfulness is both feasible, and potentially more effective, than a self-administered program. Of particular interest is the identification of the specific coach features that contribute to its effectiveness. Practice Implications Virtual coaches could provide easily-accessible and cost-effective customized training for a range of health behaviors. The affect-adaptive aspect of these coaches is particularly relevant for helping patients establish long-term behavior changes. PMID:23809167

  10. Coaches' perceptions of competence and acknowledgement of training needs related to professional competences.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sofia; Mesquita, Isabel; Graça, Amândio; Rosado, António

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine coaches' perceptions of competence and acknowledgement of training needs related to professional competences according to the professional experience and academic education. The participants were 343 coaches from several sports, who answered to a questionnaire that includes a scale focused on perceptions of competence and another scale on acknowledgment of training needs. An exploratory factor analysis with Maximum Likelihood Factoring was used with Oblimin rotation for the identification of emergent factors. Comparison on coaches' perceptions in function of coaching experience and coaches' academic background were made applying One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparisons. Factor analysis on coaches' perceptions of competence and acknowledgement of training needs made apparent three main areas of competences, i.e. competences related to annual and multi-annual planning; competences related to orientation towards practice and competition; and personal and coaching education competences. Coaches' perceptions were influenced by their experience, as low experienced coaches rated themselves at lower levels of competence and with more training needs; also coaches with high education, in Physical Education or others, perceived themselves as more competent than coaches with no higher education. Finally, the majority of the coaches perceived themselves to be competent but, nevertheless, they indicated to have training needs, which brings an important feedback to coach education. This suggests that coaches are interested in increasing their knowledge and competence in a broad range of areas which should be considered in future coach education programs. Key pointsCoaches' perceptions of competence and acknowledgement of training needs resulted in three main areas: competences related to annual and multi-annual planning, competences related to practice and competition orientation and, finally, personal and coaching

  11. Preliminary comparison of continuous versus noncontinuous programming and attitude toward and recall of advertisements.

    PubMed

    Akyamaç, Orkide; Oner-Ozkan, Bengi

    2006-04-01

    Need for continuity of a television program was assessed with attitude toward and recall of advertisements. The program continuity was manipulated experimentally by presenting one music video program as Top 10 (continuous) or as Regular (discontinuous) format. General attitude toward commercials and the belief in advertisement-product realism were investigated through the commercials with continuous and discontinuous formats of the same program. Data were gathered from undergraduates (23 men and 68 women) whose mean age was 20.2 yr. (SD=2.5). Analyses indicated continuity was not related to their attitude towards embedded commercials but was associated with their recall. Implications were discussed.

  12. Evaluation Models for Continuing Education Program Efficacy: How Does Athletic Training Continuing Education Measure up?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty-Restrepo, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Brian J.; Del Rossi, Gianluca; Pitney, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Although continuing education is required for athletic trainers (AT) to maintain their Board of Certification credential, little is known regarding its efficacy for advancing knowledge and improving patient care. Continuing professional education (CPE) is designed to provide professionals with important practical learning opportunities.…

  13. Integrating Interprofessional Education into Continuing Education: A Planning Process for Continuing Interprofessional Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, John A.; Schmitt, Madeline H.

    2013-01-01

    Informal continuing interprofessional education (CIPE) can be traced back decades in the United States; however, interest in formal CIPE is recent. Interprofessional education (IPE) now is recognized as an important component of new approaches to continuing education (CE) that are needed to increase health professionals' ability to improve…

  14. Evaluation Models for Continuing Education Program Efficacy: How Does Athletic Training Continuing Education Measure up?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty-Restrepo, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Brian J.; Del Rossi, Gianluca; Pitney, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Although continuing education is required for athletic trainers (AT) to maintain their Board of Certification credential, little is known regarding its efficacy for advancing knowledge and improving patient care. Continuing professional education (CPE) is designed to provide professionals with important practical learning opportunities.…

  15. Integrating Interprofessional Education into Continuing Education: A Planning Process for Continuing Interprofessional Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, John A.; Schmitt, Madeline H.

    2013-01-01

    Informal continuing interprofessional education (CIPE) can be traced back decades in the United States; however, interest in formal CIPE is recent. Interprofessional education (IPE) now is recognized as an important component of new approaches to continuing education (CE) that are needed to increase health professionals' ability to improve…

  16. 49 CFR 452.9 - Elements of a continuous examination program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Elements of a continuous examination program. 452.9 Section 452.9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) COAST GUARD... Elements of a continuous examination program. (a) Examinations required by § 452.7 must conform to the...

  17. 49 CFR 452.9 - Elements of a continuous examination program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Elements of a continuous examination program. 452.9 Section 452.9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) COAST GUARD... Elements of a continuous examination program. (a) Examinations required by § 452.7 must conform to the...

  18. 49 CFR 452.9 - Elements of a continuous examination program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Elements of a continuous examination program. 452.9 Section 452.9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) COAST GUARD... Elements of a continuous examination program. (a) Examinations required by § 452.7 must conform to the...

  19. 78 FR 58291 - TRICARE; Fiscal Year 2014 Continued Health Care Benefit Program Premium Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... of the Secretary TRICARE; Fiscal Year 2014 Continued Health Care Benefit Program Premium Update AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, DoD. ACTION: Notice of Updated Continued Health Care Benefit Program Premiums for Fiscal Year 2014. SUMMARY: This notice provides the updated Continued Health Care Benefit...

  20. Imagining a Continuing Interprofessional Education Program (CIPE) within Surgical Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitto, Simon C.; Gruen, Russell L.; Smith, Julian A.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years increasing attention has been paid to issues of professionalism in surgery and the content and structure of continuing professional development for surgeons; however, little attention has been paid to interprofessional education (IPE) in surgical training. Imagining the form(s) of IPE and/or continuing interprofessional education…

  1. Imagining a Continuing Interprofessional Education Program (CIPE) within Surgical Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitto, Simon C.; Gruen, Russell L.; Smith, Julian A.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years increasing attention has been paid to issues of professionalism in surgery and the content and structure of continuing professional development for surgeons; however, little attention has been paid to interprofessional education (IPE) in surgical training. Imagining the form(s) of IPE and/or continuing interprofessional education…

  2. The Power of Virtual Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Marcia L.; Zigmond, Naomi P.; Gregg, Madeleine; Gable, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Amid budget cuts in U.S. public schools, the spotlight is on how to make less effective teachers more effective--fast. The authors describe virtual coaching--in which a coach interacts electronically with a teacher as a lesson unfolds--as a promising way to help teachers with weak teaching skills. Virtual coaching uses online and mobile technology…

  3. The Principal as Formative Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nidus, Gabrielle; Sadder, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Formative coaching, an approach that uses student work as the foundation for mentoring and professional development, can help principals become more effective instructional leaders. In formative coaching, teaches and coaches analyze student work to determine next steps for instruction. This article shows how a principal can use the steps of the…

  4. Handbook for Youth Sports Coaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seefeldt, Vern, Ed.

    This handbook was generated by a survey of the specific needs of the coaching community serving young children as athletic coaches. The survey revealed a need for information that addresses the needs of beginning level volunteer coaches. The first section discusses the benefits of competitive sports for children and youth and the role of the youth…

  5. The Power of Virtual Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Marcia L.; Zigmond, Naomi P.; Gregg, Madeleine; Gable, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Amid budget cuts in U.S. public schools, the spotlight is on how to make less effective teachers more effective--fast. The authors describe virtual coaching--in which a coach interacts electronically with a teacher as a lesson unfolds--as a promising way to help teachers with weak teaching skills. Virtual coaching uses online and mobile technology…

  6. My Teaching Partner-Secondary: A video-based coaching model.

    PubMed

    Gregory, A; Ruzek, E; Hafen, C A; Yee Mikami, A; Allen, J P; Pianta, R C

    2017-01-01

    In the My Teaching Partner (MTP) program, coaches engage teachers in six to nine coaching cycles across a school year. Guided by the program's theory, coaches help teachers reflect on the emotional, organizational, and instructional features of classrooms. MTP was originally developed for Pre-K and early elementary classrooms (MTP Pre-K), but the current paper focuses on the secondary school version of this program, MTP-Secondary (MTP-S), given the need for coaching models with middle and high school teachers. The paper presents the guiding theory of MTP-S and how it relates to key components of the coaching cycle. We then offer a brief synthesis of research demonstrating its effectiveness in raising achievement, promoting positive peer interactions, and reducing racial disparities in teachers' discipline practices. We provide ideas for future research that would help advance theory on the essential components of effective coaching programs in secondary schools.

  7. Division I athletes' attitudes toward and preferences for male and female strength and conditioning coaches.

    PubMed

    Magnusen, Marshall J; Rhea, Deborah J

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether male and female Division I team sport athletes prefer same-sex or opposite-sex strength and conditioning coaches. Participants included 476 (male = 275, female = 201) National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate football, soccer, and volleyball athletes; the men were from football programs and the women were from soccer and volleyball programs. The Attitudes of Athletes toward Male versus Female Coaches Questionnaire was used to assess the attitudes and feelings of male and female athletes toward the gender of their strength coach (29). The results of a 2 x 2 multivariate analysis of variance (athlete gender x coach gender) revealed that the male athletes (all football players) were less comfortable with a female strength coach in all regards and preferred to have a male strength coach (p < 0.05). Female athletes did not have a gender preference, nor did they have any negative attitudes toward a strength coach. The women would be productive training with any qualified strength coach, whereas the men would prefer working with a male strength coach no matter how qualified the female coach might be. As a result of this study, one suggestion is for male athletes to be exposed to female strength coaches much earlier in their sport experience. This might help reduce gender bias later in their athletic careers.

  8. Selecting a Graduate Program in Adult and Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean

    1999-01-01

    A survey of adult education graduate students identified how they chose their university and program of study. Questions prospective students should consider were formulated in these areas: goals, location, cost, admission criteria, part-time/full-time study, faculty quality and commitment, philosophy, curriculum, degrees, program design,…

  9. Urban Education Studies: Assimilation of Programs into Continuing District Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwandt, David R.; Cummings, Jay R.

    The Urban Education Studies focuses its efforts on the study of promising educational programs in urban school districts. Experience has confirmed the basic assumption that many programs and strategies of demonstrated or potential excellence are to be found in the urban setting. The generalizations gleaned from the data and on-site visits…

  10. Redesigning a Principal Preparation Program: A Continuous Improvement Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Rosalinda; Roberts, Maria; Menchaca Velma

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes a mixed methods approach to the process of redesigning a principal preparation program. A qualitative approach was used to gather data from superintendents within the geographic area using a focused group approach, whereas, quantitative data, were gathered through a survey of program graduates with questions aligned to the…

  11. Developing a coaching mechanism for practicing surgeons.

    PubMed

    Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Anderson-Montoya, Brittany; Higgins, Robert V; Pimentel, Manuel E; Rowland, Patrick; Scarborough, Madison O; Higgins, Danelle

    2016-09-01

    While performance feedback and assessment are hallmarks of surgical training, they abruptly cease after training is completed. In their absence, performance may stagnate and poor habits persist. Our aim was to develop a coaching mechanism for practicing surgeons with feedback provision based on objective performance assessment. Technical and nontechnical intraoperative video recordings from laparoscopic or robotic cholecystectomies, colectomies, and hysterectomies were assessed by a blinded surgeon and a human factors expert, respectively. Aspects of performance in need of improvement were noted, and a coaching session was developed for feedback provision to participating surgeons. This 4-hour coaching session consisted of a didactic lecture with video review and hands-on practice using procedural and mannequin-based simulation. Thirty-two practicing surgeons (18 general; 14 gynecologists) from 6 different hospitals were assessed, and 9 of them participated in coaching. Technical aspects identified for performance improvement included suboptimal trocar placement, inadequate critical view achievement during laparoscopic cholecystectomies, poor visualization of the operating field, bimanual dexterity, and dissection techniques, while nontechnical aspects included inappropriate handling of distractions and interruptions, poor ergonomic positioning and situational awareness, and inadequate mitigation of delays. Most surgeons appropriately accomplished some of the objectives of the distraction scenario, but none was able to achieve expert levels on Fundamentals of Laparoscopy tasks. Participants perceived the coaching sessions as highly valuable. Our study identified several technical and nontechnical skill sets of practicing surgeons in need of improvement and provided support for the implementation of coaching programs for surgeons on an ongoing basis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Athletes' assessment of the coach--the coach evaluation questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Rushall, B S; Wiznuk, K

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide an assessment tool to judge coaching performance that was appropriate for completion by athletes. The questionnaire underwent a variety of developmental stages. In its final form, it contained 36 items. The tool was shown to be a valid, reliable, and standardized questionnaire. It demonstrated discriminability and provoked honest, accurate responding in subjects. The test was capable of providing immediate feedback to coaches seeking information about athletes' perceptions of their coaching performance. Responses on the developed scale were weighted to reflect the desirability of the coaching characteristics of a good coach. The questionnaire provides a total score which can be interpreted by the coach as a measure of how much of an "ideal" coach exists in him/her.

  13. Improving awareness, accountability, and access through health coaching

    PubMed Central

    Liddy, Clare; Johnston, Sharon; Irving, Hannah; Nash, Kate; Ward, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess patients’ experiences with and perceptions of health coaching as part of their ongoing care. Design A qualitative research design using semistructured interviews that were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Setting Ottawa, Ont. Participants Eleven patients (> 18 years of age) enrolled in a health coaching pilot program who were at risk of or diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Methods Patients’ perspectives were assessed with semistructured interviews. Interviews were conducted with 11 patients at the end of the pilot program, using a stratified sampling approach to ensure maximum variation. Main findings All patients found the overall experience with the health coaching program to be positive. Patients believed the health coaching program was effective in increasing awareness of how diabetes affected their bodies and health, in building accountability for their health-related actions, and in improving access to care and other health resources. Conclusion Patients perceive one-on-one health coaching as an acceptable intervention in their ongoing care. Patients enrolled in the health coaching pilot program believed that there was an improvement in access to care, health literacy, and accountability, all factors considered to be precursors to behavioural change. PMID:25932483

  14. Applying the COM-B model to creation of an IT-enabled health coaching and resource linkage program for low-income Latina moms with recent gestational diabetes: the STAR MAMA program.

    PubMed

    Handley, Margaret A; Harleman, Elizabeth; Gonzalez-Mendez, Enrique; Stotland, Naomi E; Althavale, Priyanka; Fisher, Lawrence; Martinez, Diana; Ko, Jocelyn; Sausjord, Isabel; Rios, Christina

    2016-05-18

    One of the fastest growing risk groups for early onset of diabetes is women with a recent pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes, and for this group, Latinas are the largest at-risk group in the USA. Although evidence-based interventions, such as the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), which focuses on low-cost changes in eating, physical activity and weight management can lower diabetes risk and delay onset, these programs have yet to be tailored to postpartum Latina women. This study aims to tailor a IT-enabled health communication program to promote DPP-concordant behavior change among postpartum Latina women with recent gestational diabetes. The COM-B model (incorporating Capability, Opportunity, and Motivational behavioral barriers and enablers) and the Behavior Change Wheel (BCW) framework, convey a theoretically based approach for intervention development. We combined a health literacy-tailored health IT tool for reaching ethnic minority patients with diabetes with a BCW-based approach to develop a health coaching intervention targeted to postpartum Latina women with recent gestational diabetes. Current evidence, four focus groups (n = 22 participants), and input from a Regional Consortium of health care providers, diabetes experts, and health literacy practitioners informed the intervention development. Thematic analysis of focus group data used the COM-B model to determine content. Relevant cultural, theoretical, and technological components that underpin the design and development of the intervention were selected using the BCW framework. STAR MAMA delivers DPP content in Spanish and English using health communication strategies to: (1) validate the emotions and experiences postpartum women struggle with; (2) encourage integration of prevention strategies into family life through mothers becoming intergenerational custodians of health; and (3) increase social and material supports through referral to social networks, health coaches, and

  15. How Instructional Coaches Support Data-Driven Decision Making: Policy Implementation and Effects in Florida Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Julie A.; McCombs, Jennifer Sloan; Martorell, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the convergence of two popular school improvement policies: instructional coaching and data-driven decision making (DDDM). Drawing on a mixed methods study of a statewide reading coach program in Florida middle schools, the article examines how coaches support DDDM and how this support relates to student and teacher outcomes.…

  16. Creating a Supportive Environment among Youth Football Players: A Qualitative Study of French and Norwegian Youth Grassroots Football Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Torill; Van Hoye, Aurelie; Tjomsland, Hege Eikeland; Holsen, Ingrid; Wold, Bente; Heuzé, Jean-Philippe; Samdal, Oddrun; Sarrazin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The health promoting benefits of sport participation are under-utilized and should be further developed, particularly at the grassroots level. The purpose of this paper is to examine how grassroots coaches in youth football perceive their coaching practices after participating in a community-based coach education program aimed at…

  17. Creating a Supportive Environment among Youth Football Players: A Qualitative Study of French and Norwegian Youth Grassroots Football Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Torill; Van Hoye, Aurelie; Tjomsland, Hege Eikeland; Holsen, Ingrid; Wold, Bente; Heuzé, Jean-Philippe; Samdal, Oddrun; Sarrazin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The health promoting benefits of sport participation are under-utilized and should be further developed, particularly at the grassroots level. The purpose of this paper is to examine how grassroots coaches in youth football perceive their coaching practices after participating in a community-based coach education program aimed at…

  18. The effectiveness of the use of a digital activity coaching system in addition to a two-week home-based exercise program in patients after total knee arthroplasty: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Harmelink, Karen E M; Zeegers, A V C M; Tönis, Thijs M; Hullegie, Wim; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Staal, J Bart

    2017-07-05

    There is consistent evidence that supervised programs are not superior to home-based programs after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), especially in patients without complications. Home-based exercise programs are effective, but we hypothesize that their effectiveness can be improved by increasing the adherence to physical therapy advice to reach an adequate exercise level during the program and thereafter. Our hypothesis is that an activity coaching system (accelerometer-based activity sensor), alongside a home-based exercise program, will increase adherence to exercises and the activity level, thereby improving physical functioning and recovery. The objective of this study is to determine the effectiveness of an activity coaching system in addition to a home-based exercise program after a TKA compared to only the home-based exercise program with physical functioning as outcome. This study is a single-blind randomized controlled trial. Both the intervention (n = 55) and the control group (n = 55) receive a two-week home-based exercise program, and the intervention group receives an additional activity coaching system. This is a hand-held electronic device together with an app on a smartphone providing information and advice on exercise behavior during the day. The primary outcome is physical functioning, measured with the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) after two weeks, six weeks and three months. Secondary outcomes are 1) adherence to the activity level (activity diary); 2) physical functioning, measured with the 2-Minute Walk Test (2MWT) and the Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score; 3) quality of life (SF-36); 4) healthcare use up to one year postoperatively and 5) cost-effectiveness. Data are collected preoperatively, three days, two and six weeks, three months and one year postoperatively. The strengths of the study are the use of both performance-based tests and self-reported questionnaires and the personalized tailored program after TKA given by specialized physical

  19. Coaching: the art of creating exceptional results.

    PubMed

    Schack, M L

    1997-01-01

    Functioning as a Coach is a key role for a manager and, in fact, distinguishes the manager as a leader. Coaching focuses on two distinct areas: 1) coaching to orient employees to new situations, and 2) coaching for performance with employees who are showing marginal performance, who are meeting expectations, or who are showing high performance. This article describes coaching for orientation and for performance, identifies coaching skills, and provides a coaching self-assessment.

  20. 78 FR 71619 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Continued Approval of American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... standards to include staff qualification requirements for rehabilitation therapy services. To meet the... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Continued... Hospital Accreditation Program AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, HHS. ACTION: Final notice...

  1. Evaluating Leadership Coaching: A Review and Integrated Framework

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    www.coachfederation.org/NR/rdonlyres/16C73602-871A-43B8-9703- 2C4D4D79BDAB/7720/053metrixglobal_coaching_roi_briefing.pdf * Ballinger , M. S. (2000). Participants...Coaching. In S. Ting & P. Scisco (Eds.) The Center for Creative Leadership Handbook of Coaching (pp. 347-378). San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons. *Prom...program. The World Bank 46 Institute. Accessed March 12, 2008 from http://info.worldbank.org/etools/docs/ library /80352/EG03-57.pdf Quick, J. C

  2. Research in Adult and Continuing Education: Master of Adult and Continuing Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Univ., Pullman. Coll. of Education.

    The document presents an annotated bibliography of Master's degree theses in Adult and Continuing Education, Washington State University, 1974-76. Abstracts for the following 12 theses are presented: (1) Agrarian Reform in Chile: A Case Study; (2) An Analysis of the Activities and the Needs of the Senior Citizens in Garfield, Washington and the…

  3. Research in Adult and Continuing Education: Master of Adult and Continuing Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Univ., Pullman. Coll. of Education.

    The document presents an annotated bibliography of Master's degree theses in Adult and Continuing Education, Washington State University, 1974-76. Abstracts for the following 12 theses are presented: (1) Agrarian Reform in Chile: A Case Study; (2) An Analysis of the Activities and the Needs of the Senior Citizens in Garfield, Washington and the…

  4. Coaching preferences of athletes.

    PubMed

    Terry, P C; Howe, B L

    1984-12-01

    The study examined the coaching preferences of 80 male and 80 female athletes, as measured by the Leadership Scale for Sports (Chelladurai and Saleh, 1978, 1980). In addition, it attempted to assess the applicability to sport of the Life-cycle and Path-goal theories of leadership. Comparisons between groups were made on the basis of sex, age, and type of sport. A MANOVA indicated that athletes in independent sports preferred more democratic behaviour (p less than .001) and less autocratic behaviour (p = .028) than athletes in interdependent sports. No differences in coaching preferences were found which could be attributed to the age or sex of the athlete, or the variability of the sports task. These results partially supported the Path-goal theory, but did not support the Life-cycle theory. Athletes of all groups tended to favour coaches who displayed training behaviour and rewarding behaviour "often", democratic behaviour and social support behaviour "occasionally", and autocratic behaviour "seldom". This consistency may be a useful finding for those organizations and institutions interested in preparing coaches.

  5. Coaching the Vegetarian Athlete

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandali, Swarna L.

    2011-01-01

    Good nutrition is important for optimal athletic performance. Adolescent athletes often depend on their coaches for nutritional information on weight management, dietary supplements, and dietary practices. Some dietary practices, such as vegetarianism, have the potential to be harmful to the adolescent athlete if not followed with careful…

  6. From Teaching to Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuspan, Tara

    2013-01-01

    In the course of transitioning from classroom teacher to math instructional coach, Tara Zuspan identified critical themes and lessons she had learned. She focused her efforts on building relationships, partnering with the principal, understanding the process of change, and providing teachers with opportunities to collaborate. These intentional…

  7. Coaching the Vegetarian Athlete

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandali, Swarna L.

    2011-01-01

    Good nutrition is important for optimal athletic performance. Adolescent athletes often depend on their coaches for nutritional information on weight management, dietary supplements, and dietary practices. Some dietary practices, such as vegetarianism, have the potential to be harmful to the adolescent athlete if not followed with careful…

  8. The Crucial Coaching Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scales, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most powerful ways to boost the payoff from school sports lays in helping coaches build developmental relationships with student-athletes. Developmental relationships are close connections through which young people develop character skills to discover who they are, gain the ability to shape their own lives, and learn how to interact…

  9. The Crucial Coaching Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scales, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most powerful ways to boost the payoff from school sports lays in helping coaches build developmental relationships with student-athletes. Developmental relationships are close connections through which young people develop character skills to discover who they are, gain the ability to shape their own lives, and learn how to interact…

  10. Interviewing Coaches and Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosier, Joel

    1990-01-01

    Offers advice to student sports reporters on how to get the best interviews with coaches and athletes. States that good sports interviewing should start before the game, and follow up with an in-depth interview as soon as possible once the game is over. (MG)

  11. Drugs and the Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Kenneth S., Ed.

    This volume is based on the premise that professional preparation for coaching should include viable experiences in drug education, with particular reference to coping with drug-related problems. The first section provides general information on the purposes and effects of drugs, controls, and concepts of doping. The second section deals with four…

  12. Continuing Education Program Administration: A Study of Competent Performance Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cookson, Peter S.; English, John

    1997-01-01

    A study had two parts: (1) construction of behaviorally anchored rating scales for continuing education administrative positions, using the DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process and (2) professional development needs assessment of 11 directors and 22 area representatives. The utility of the scales for administrator self-assessment of…

  13. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) Program: Gaseous Nitridation

    SciTech Connect

    R. Suplinskas G. DiBona; W. Grant

    2001-10-29

    Textron has developed a mature process for the fabrication of continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) tubes for application in the aluminum processing and casting industry. The major milestones in this project are System Composition; Matrix Formulation; Preform Fabrication; Nitridation; Material Characterization; Component Evaluation

  14. Continuing Education Programs within the American Heart Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lembright, Katherine A.

    1970-01-01

    Because it believes the nurse can and must be a participant in the co-professional health team (doctor, nurse), the American Heart Association has become increasingly concerned with planning and carrying out activities that contribute to the continuing education of nurses. (PT)

  15. [Transformations and continuities in Canadian social welfare programs].

    PubMed

    Lessa, Iara

    2007-01-01

    Poor mothers and their families constitute a core dilemma for a social welfare system that aims primarily to encourage and keep workers in the labor force. Public income transfers to these and other marginalized groups may be viewed as disincentives to seek paid work and have been characterized in Canada by stinginess and contradictions since the beginning of the XX century. This paper discusses recent transformations in these programs and their effects on families and individuals. Focusing specifically on poor mothers raising children alone, it argues that many gradual cuts and reshaping these programs have changed the character of the social welfare state in Canada, blocking escape routes from poverty for marginalized groups.

  16. Peer coaching as a technique to foster professional development in clinical ambulatory settings.

    PubMed

    Sekerka, Leslie E; Chao, Jason

    2003-01-01

    Few studies have examined how peer coaching is an effective educational and development technique in contexts outside the classroom. This research focused on peer coaching as a platform to study the process of professional development for physicians. The purpose was to identify perceived benefits coaches received from a coaching encounter and how this relates to their own process of professional development. Critical incident interviews with 13 physician coaches were conducted and tape recorded. Themes were identified using a thematic analysis technique. Themes emerged clustering around two distinct benefit orientations. Group 1, reflection and teaching coaches, tended to focus on others and discuss how positively they experienced the encounter. Group 2, personal learning and change coaches, expressed benefits along more personal lines. Peer coaching contributes to physicians' professional development by encouraging reflection time and learning. Peer coaching affords positive impact to those who coach in addition to those who receive the coaching. The two clusters of benefits support the performance, learning, and development theory in that there are multiple modes to describe adult growth and development. Programs of this type should be considered in medical faculty development activities associated with medical education.

  17. A Continuing Engineering Education Program Utilizing Video Tape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biedenbach, Joseph M.

    1970-01-01

    Radio Corporation of America has developed a series of courses on video tape for use with their engineering staffs at locations throughout the country. The courses include such topics as FORTRAN Programming, Engineering Mathematics, and Holography. Thirty-six course topics are proposed to date. (MF)

  18. Continued Effort and Success: An Urban Professional School Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Diane G.; Weber, Edward J.; Francis, Kiffany

    2013-01-01

    The PDS partnership between the Cleveland State University Master of Urban Secondary Teaching (MUST) program and the Cleveland School of Science and Medicine (CSSM) has an established history of preparing educators to teach in urban schools. Recently awarded the NAPDS Award for Exemplary Professional Development School Achievement, this…

  19. Breaking Down Potential Barriers to Continued Program Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serido, Joyce; Borden, Lynne M.; Wiggs, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    Participation in youth programming fosters positive developmental outcomes for youth, yet recruitment and retention are ongoing challenges. Given the imbalance in rates of participation of ethnic minority youth, compared with White youth, it is important to gain a greater understanding of the contextual factors that promote or inhibit…

  20. UHF Television Program Performance: Continuing Questions on Spectrum Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wollert, James A.; Wirth, Michael O.

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes the UHF television service; concludes that technically and economically UHF is still not equal to VHF and may never be, and that commercial affiliated UHF stations are far from achieving parity with VHF stations in the areas of news, public affairs, and nonentertainment programing in the public interest. (GT)

  1. Breaking Down Potential Barriers to Continued Program Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serido, Joyce; Borden, Lynne M.; Wiggs, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    Participation in youth programming fosters positive developmental outcomes for youth, yet recruitment and retention are ongoing challenges. Given the imbalance in rates of participation of ethnic minority youth, compared with White youth, it is important to gain a greater understanding of the contextual factors that promote or inhibit…

  2. Mental Health Counselor's Clinical Practice Companion: A Continuing Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullard, Bonnie; Lawless, Linda; Williams, Midge; Bergstrom, Deborah

    Lifelong learning is a major challenge for today's professionals. This home-study learning program offers a cost-effective means that allows learners to pace themselves in learning a body of knowledge in relation to their individual needs. A self-assessment questionnaire allows readers to assess their strengths and weaknesses in relation to the…

  3. Mental Health Counselor's Clinical Practice Companion: A Continuing Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullard, Bonnie; Lawless, Linda; Williams, Midge; Bergstrom, Deborah

    Lifelong learning is a major challenge for today's professionals. This home-study learning program offers a cost-effective means that allows learners to pace themselves in learning a body of knowledge in relation to their individual needs. A self-assessment questionnaire allows readers to assess their strengths and weaknesses in relation to the…

  4. Continued Effort and Success: An Urban Professional School Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Diane G.; Weber, Edward J.; Francis, Kiffany

    2013-01-01

    The PDS partnership between the Cleveland State University Master of Urban Secondary Teaching (MUST) program and the Cleveland School of Science and Medicine (CSSM) has an established history of preparing educators to teach in urban schools. Recently awarded the NAPDS Award for Exemplary Professional Development School Achievement, this…

  5. The Value of Continued Followup in a Preventive Medicine Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villafana, C.; Mockbee, J.

    1970-01-01

    Continued monitoring of hypertension and cholesterol levels in NASA employees by regularly scheduled medical examinations prevents an increase in employee disability and cardiovascular mortality rates. Adequate therapeutic control for younger hypertensive employees is demonstrated by records on mortality and heart diseases over a period of 28 months. It confirmed the importance of systolic blood pressure as diagnostic tool for the inherent risk factor. The prevalence of additional coronary risk factors among employees with hypercholesterolemia is considerably less than in employees with hypertension.

  6. The Value of Continued Followup in a Preventive Medicine Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villafana, C.; Mockbee, J.

    1970-01-01

    Continued monitoring of hypertension and cholesterol levels in NASA employees by regularly scheduled medical examinations prevents an increase in employee disability and cardiovascular mortality rates. Adequate therapeutic control for younger hypertensive employees is demonstrated by records on mortality and heart diseases over a period of 28 months. It confirmed the importance of systolic blood pressure as diagnostic tool for the inherent risk factor. The prevalence of additional coronary risk factors among employees with hypercholesterolemia is considerably less than in employees with hypertension.

  7. Coaching Discourse: Supporting Teachers' Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineke, Sally F.

    2013-01-01

    Although coaching is used in many schools to facilitate teachers' professional learning, few studies look closely at coaching discourse. Exploring how coaching facilitates teachers' professional development, this study used tape-recorded coaching sessions and individual post-interviews to examine the one-on-one coaching interactions of 4…

  8. Coaching Discourse: Supporting Teachers' Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineke, Sally F.

    2013-01-01

    Although coaching is used in many schools to facilitate teachers' professional learning, few studies look closely at coaching discourse. Exploring how coaching facilitates teachers' professional development, this study used tape-recorded coaching sessions and individual post-interviews to examine the one-on-one coaching interactions of 4…

  9. The Development of an Automated Data Base for Program Research and Evaluation in Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, William H.

    The System for Program Information in Continuing Education (SPICE), an information system being implemented at The University of Calgary (Alberta, Canada), was designed to facilitate the collection, manipulation, and reporting of evaluative data from continuing education program participants. The objectives of the system include the following: to…

  10. Cablevision for Continuing Education and Community Programs, Conference Presentations (Regina, November 28-29, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saskatchewan Association for Lifelong Learning.

    The Conference on Cablevision for Continuing Education and Community Programs was held to present the present situation of the development of cablevision in Canada and to indicate some of the future possibilities for its use in continuing education and community programming in Saskatchewan. Following the keynote address, three panels presented…

  11. The Development of an Automated Data Base for Program Research and Evaluation in Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, William H.

    The System for Program Information in Continuing Education (SPICE), an information system being implemented at The University of Calgary (Alberta, Canada), was designed to facilitate the collection, manipulation, and reporting of evaluative data from continuing education program participants. The objectives of the system include the following: to…

  12. 49 CFR 452.9 - Elements of a continuous examination program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Elements of a continuous examination program. 452... Elements of a continuous examination program. (a) Examinations required by § 452.7 must conform to the... established or industry accepted pass/fail criteria to determine whether a container has any deficiency...

  13. Continuing Medical Education in Community Hospitals: A Manual for Program Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stearns, Norman S.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    This manual provides guidelines for: (1) developing community hospital-based programs of continuing medical education; and (2) delivering education consultation to community hospitals. Chapters I and II outline principles of continuing medical education, present a model for education program development, and provide specific how-to techniques and…

  14. WAC for the New Millennium: Strategies for Continuing Writing-Across-the-Curriculum Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Susan H., Ed.; Miraglia, Eric, Ed.; Soven, Margot, Ed.; Thaiss, Christopher, Ed.

    Celebrating the achievements of Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) by highlighting the promise of its future, this book presents 12 essays that describe how WAC programs have adapted and continue to adapt to meet new challenges. Essays in the book explain strategies for continuing WAC programs in an atmosphere of change; explore new avenues of…

  15. 46 CFR 71.50-31 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Continued participation in the Alternative Hull... the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program. (a) To continue to participate in the AHE Program, vessel operators must conduct an annual hull condition assessment. At a minimum, vessel operators must...

  16. Operating a Noncredit Self-Supporting Continuing Education Program: The UTD Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Janet

    1985-01-01

    Describes the Center for Continuing Education at the University of Texas at Dallas, which offers a noncredit, self-supporting continuing education program, and the factors contributing to its success. Focuses on internal characteristics, administrative support, and positive program outcomes. (DMM)

  17. A continuing program for technology transfer to the apparel industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clingman, W. H.

    1971-01-01

    A six month program has been carried out to investigate various mechanisms for transferring technology to industry. This program has focused on transfer to the apparel industry through the Apparel Research Foundation. The procedure was to analyze the problem, obtain potentially relevant aerospace technology, and then transfer this technology to the industry organization. This was done in a specific case. Technology was identified relevant to stitchless joining, and this technology was transferred to the Apparel Research Foundation. The feasibility and ground rules for carrying out such activities on a broader scale were established. A specific objective was to transfer new technology from the industry organization to the industry itself. This required the establishment of an application engineering program. Another transfer mechanism tested was publication of solutions to industry problems in a format familiar to the industry. This is to be distinguished from circulating descriptions of new technology. Focus is on the industry problem and the manager is given a formula for solving it that he can follow. It was concluded that this mechanism can complement the problem statement approach to technology transfer. It is useful in achieving transfer when a large amount of application engineering is not necessary. A wide audience is immediately exposed to the technology. On the other hand, the major manufacturing problems which require a sophisticated technical solution integrating many innovations are less likely to be helped.

  18. Brazil continues the rapid development of its alcohol program

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, A.V.D. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    To increase energy independence, one of Brazil's energy options is to increase development of biomass fuel programs, including ethanol, methanol, vegetable oil, and direct burning of wood. The ethanol fuel program is more developed than any other biomass fuel program. Ethanol is widely used as a commercial motor fuel, either in a 20% mixture of anhydrous ethanol with 80% gasoline, or as pure (neat) ethanol (96% ethanol, 4% water). In 1978, about 1.5 million cubic meters of ethanol were blended with gasoline, displacing 11% of the total gasoline consumption in the country. In 1979, about 14% of total gasoline demand in the country was displaced by anhydrous ethanol added to gasoline, and about 4,000 vehicles were running on neat ethanol. Today, ethanol is primarily produced from sugarcane in molasses distilleries. If, in the future, Brazil should depend entirely on sugarcane, it would have to displace pasture or crop lands. Therefore, it is developing other feedstocks such as mandioca (cassava), sweet sorghum, and wood.

  19. Safety coaches in radiology: decreasing human error and minimizing patient harm.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Julie M; Koch, Bernadette L; Adams, Janet M; Goodfriend, Martha A; Donnelly, Lane F

    2010-09-01

    Successful programs to improve patient safety require a component aimed at improving safety culture and environment, resulting in a reduced number of human errors that could lead to patient harm. Safety coaching provides peer accountability. It involves observing for safety behaviors and use of error prevention techniques and provides immediate feedback. For more than a decade, behavior-based safety coaching has been a successful strategy for reducing error within the context of occupational safety in industry. We describe the use of safety coaches in radiology. Safety coaches are an important component of our comprehensive patient safety program.

  20. Principals' Sensemaking of Coaching for Ambitious Reading Instruction in a High-Stakes Accountability Policy Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsummura, Lindsay Clare; Wang, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    In the present exploratory qualitative study we examine the contextual factors that influenced the implementation of a multi-year comprehensive literacy-coaching program (Content-Focused Coaching, CFC). We argue that principals' sensemaking of the dialogic instructional strategies promoted by the program in light of high-stakes accountability…

  1. Development of a P.A.C.E.-approved continuing education program for the community hospital.

    PubMed

    Chrest, C B; Bresnahan, J L; Dubesa, E P; Wahlgren, E A

    1978-08-01

    A Professional Acknowledgment for Continuing Education (P.A.C.E.) approved continuing education program was developed for laboratory technologists at Sherman Hospital, Elgin, Illinois, on an in-service basis. The results of a needs analysis of staff technologists provided the basis for selection of program content. The program was presented as four one-hour monthly sessions and videotaped for showing at later dates. This methodology proved extremely effective in providing a maximum number of technologists with a P.A.C.E.-approved and documented continuing education program while keeping disruption of the work schedule in the laboratory to a minimum.

  2. Continuing U.S. Participation in the LHC Accelerator Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syphers, M. J.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) was established to enable U.S. accelerator specialists to take on active and important roles in the LHC accelerator project during its commissioning and early operations, and to be a major collaborator in future LHC performance upgrades. It is hoped that this follow-on effort to the U.S. contributions to the LHC accelerator project will improve the capabilities of the U.S. accelerator community in accelerator science and technology in order to more effectively use, develop, and preserve unique U.S. resources and capabilities during the LHC era.

  3. Computer problem-solving coaches for introductory physics: Design and usability studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Qing X.; Frodermann, Evan; Heller, Kenneth; Hsu, Leonardo; Mason, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    The combination of modern computing power, the interactivity of web applications, and the flexibility of object-oriented programming may finally be sufficient to create computer coaches that can help students develop metacognitive problem-solving skills, an important competence in our rapidly changing technological society. However, no matter how effective such coaches might be, they will only be useful if they are attractive to students. We describe the design and testing of a set of web-based computer programs that act as personal coaches to students while they practice solving problems from introductory physics. The coaches are designed to supplement regular human instruction, giving students access to effective forms of practice outside class. We present results from large-scale usability tests of the computer coaches and discuss their implications for future versions of the coaches.

  4. 46 CFR 115.660 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Continued participation in the Alternative Hull... MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 115.660 Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program. (a) To continue to participate in...

  5. 42 CFR 457.1170 - Program specific review process: Continuation of enrollment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program specific review process: Continuation of... review process: Continuation of enrollment. A State must ensure the opportunity for continuation of... decision to disenroll for failure to pay cost sharing....

  6. 78 FR 40625 - National School Lunch Program: Direct Certification Continuous Improvement Plans Required by the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... Certification Continuous Improvement Plans Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010; Approval of... ``National School Lunch Program: Direct Certification Continuous Improvement Plans Required by the Healthy... meet certain direct certification performance benchmarks and to develop and implement continuous...

  7. Critical Care Nurses' Reasons for Poor Attendance at a Continuous Professional Development Program.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, Myra; Coetzee, Isabel; Heyns, Tanya

    2016-12-01

    Society demands competent and safe health care, which obligates professionals to deliver quality patient care using current knowledge and skills. Participation in continuous professional development programs is a way to ensure quality nursing care. Despite the importance of continuous professional development, however, critical care nurse practitioners' attendance rates at these programs is low. To explore critical care nurses' reasons for their unsatisfactory attendance at a continuous professional development program. A nominal group technique was used as a consensus method to involve the critical care nurses and provide them the opportunity to reflect on their experiences and challenges related to the current continuous professional development program for the critical care units. Participants were 14 critical care nurses from 3 critical care units in 1 private hospital. The consensus was that the central theme relating to the unsatisfactory attendance at the continuous professional development program was attitude. In order of importance, the 4 contributing priorities influencing attitude were communication, continuous professional development, time constraints, and financial implications. Attitude relating to attending a continuous professional development program can be changed if critical care nurses are aware of the program's importance and are involved in the planning and implementation of a program that focuses on the nurses' individual learning needs. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  8. [Diet counseling through "Shoku-dietary Coaching"].

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Naoko

    2005-11-01

    "Shoku-dietary Coaching" is a skill under development by Kageyama, who applies "coaching," widely used in the business field, to diet counseling. This counseling aims at improving conventional "nutritional guidance-type diet counseling" and promoting self-motivation so that healthy clients eagerly improve their own health, and clients with obesity or lifestyle-related diseases can learn self-control. In Shoku-dietary Coaching, the basis for the differentiation between healthy and unhealthy conditions is not only the parameters measured by medical devices. In Shoku-dietary Coaching, attention is directed to clients' assessment of their own lifestyle, dietary goals they have, and actions they will take to achieve them. To increase the health level of clients, we are developing techniques to enhance their motivation by showing sympathy with and support for their dietary behavior and health awareness. In addition, we give guidance through both theory and the practice of such things as having three meals a day at regular hours, knowing the kinds and daily amounts of foods appropriate for each client, and clarifying the percentages of seasonings necessary for cooking. The habit of having meals at regular hours alleviates stress, promotes communication with people sitting at the same table, and increases the health level of both the client and the others. These are important elements in the theory of Shoku-dietary Coaching. Putting the above into practice should not be limited to clients, but should include the clinic staff so as to deepen their own understanding and communication. Enhanced communication reinforces team medical care in the clinic. Communication skills which involve respect for others, continuous motivation of individuals, and achievement of purposes that may even require a long time may be useful for all people.

  9. Opening Doors. An Introduction to Peer Coaching. Facilitator's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, VA.

    This manual supplies the written materials that accompany or supplement a video program on developing and implementing peer coaching among inservice teachers. The video program consists of two tapes, the first, or main program tape, explaining the process and giving examples, and the second supplementing the first by providing an in-depth look at…

  10. Coaching the toxic leader.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Manfred F R Kets

    2014-04-01

    In his work as an executive coach, psychotherapist Kets de Vries sometimes comes across bosses with mental demons. The four kinds he encounters most frequently are pathological narcissists, who are selfish and entitled, have grandiose fantasies, and pursue power at all costs; manic-depressives, who can leave a trail of emotional blazes behind them; passive-aggressives, who shy away from confrontation but are obstructive and under-handed; and the emotionally disconnected--literal-minded people who cannot describe or even recognize their feelings. Left unchecked, these personalities can warp the interactions, plans, and systems of entire organizations. But with appropriate coaching, toxic bosses can learn to manage their conditions and become effective mentors and leaders. This article describes how to recognize each pathology and, step by step, guide people who suffer from it toward healthier and more-productive interactions.

  11. 42 CFR 417.106 - Quality assurance program; Availability, accessibility, and continuity of basic and supplemental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Qualified Health Maintenance Organizations: Services § 417.106 Quality assurance program; Availability, accessibility, and continuity of basic and supplemental health services. (a) Quality assurance program. Each HMO or CMP must have an ongoing quality assurance program for its health services that meets the...

  12. An Evaluation Approach for Continuing Education Programs in the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friss, Lois; Lass, Sandra

    1982-01-01

    Gopoler's seven criteria for planning and evaluating continuing education programs are illustrated and then applied to the evaluation of a short-term program for managers of ambulatory care services. Modifications of the criteria are suggested, based upon the nature of the program. (SK)

  13. Beyond the Numbers: Data Use for Continuous Improvement of Programs Serving Disconnected Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Austin; Lerner, Jennifer Brown; Browning, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This publication is a series of in-depth case studies to examine how three programs which serve a disconnected youth population are utilizing data as a tool for continuous program improvement and ongoing accountability. The report features the following programs: (1) Roca, an organization in Massachusetts which engages the highest-risk youth in…

  14. Beyond the Numbers: Data Use for Continuous Improvement of Programs Serving Disconnected Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Austin; Lerner, Jennifer Brown; Browning, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This publication is a series of in-depth case studies to examine how three programs which serve a disconnected youth population are utilizing data as a tool for continuous program improvement and ongoing accountability. The report features the following programs: (1) Roca, an organization in Massachusetts which engages the highest-risk youth in…

  15. Executive Coaching Practices in the Adult Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campone, Francine

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of key principles and practices in executive coaching. Coaching is discussed as a reflective learning opportunity and offers the theoretical grounding, strategies, and case studies for each of four key elements of a coaching engagement.

  16. Executive Coaching Practices in the Adult Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campone, Francine

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of key principles and practices in executive coaching. Coaching is discussed as a reflective learning opportunity and offers the theoretical grounding, strategies, and case studies for each of four key elements of a coaching engagement.

  17. Coaching the alpha male.

    PubMed

    Ludeman, Kate; Erlandson, Eddie

    2004-05-01

    Highly intelligent, confident, and successful, alpha males represent about 70% of all senior executives. Natural leaders, they willingly take on levels of responsibility most rational people would find overwhelming. But many of their quintessential strengths can also make alphas difficult to work with. Their self-confidence can appear domineering. Their high expectations can make them excessively critical. Their unemotional style can keep them from inspiring their teams. That's why alphas need coaching to broaden their interpersonal tool kits while preserving their strengths. Drawing from their experience coaching more than 1,000 senior executives, the authors outline an approach tailored specifically for the alpha. Coaches get the alpha's attention by inundating him with data from 360-degree feedback presented in ways he will find compelling--both hard-boiled metrics and vivid verbatim comments from colleagues about his strengths and weaknesses. A 360-degree assessment is a wake-up call for most alphas, providing undeniable proof that their behavior doesn't work nearly as well as they think it does. That paves the way for a genuine commitment to change. In order to change, the alpha must venture into unfamiliar--and often uncomfortable--psychological territory. He must admit vulnerability, accept accountability not just for his own work for others', connect with his underlying emotions, learn to motivate through a balance of criticism and validation, and become aware of unproductive behavior patterns. The goal of executive coaching is not simply to treat the alpha as an individual problem but to improve the entire team dynamic. Initial success creates an incentive to persevere, and the virtuous cycle reverberates throughout the entire organization.

  18. A Temporal Map of Coaching

    PubMed Central

    Theeboom, Tim; Van Vianen, Annelies E. M.; Beersma, Bianca

    2017-01-01

    Economic pressures on companies, technological developments, and less stable career paths pose potential threats to the well-being of employees (e.g., stress, burn-out) and require constant adaptation. In the light of these challenges, it is not surprising that employees often seek the support of a coach. The role of a coach is to foster change by facilitating a coachees’ movement through a self-regulatory cycle with the ultimate aim of stimulating sustained well-being and functioning. While meta-analytic research indicates that coaching interventions can be effectively applied to assist employees in dealing with change, the current literature on coaching lacks solid theoretical frameworks that are needed to build a cumulative knowledge-base and to inspire evidence-based practice. In this conceptual analysis, we examine the coaching process through a temporal lens. By doing so, we provide an integrated theoretical framework: a temporal map of coaching. In this framework, we link seminal concepts in psychology to the coaching process, and describe which competencies of coachees are crucial in the different stages of change that coaching aims to bring about. During the preparatory contemplation stage, targeting coachees’ awareness by enhancing their mindfulness and environmental receptiveness is important. During the contemplation stage, coachees’ willingness and perceived ability to change are central competencies. We propose that coaches should therefore foster intrinsic goal orientation and self-efficacy during this stage. During the planning stage, coaches should focus on goal-setting and implementation intentions. Finally, during the maintenance/termination stage, stimulating coachees’ reflection is especially important in order to help them to integrate their learning experiences. The framework delineated in this paper contributes to the understanding of coaching as a tool to assist employees in dealing with the challenges of an increasingly dynamic

  19. THE CHALLENGING ROLE OF A READING COACH, A CAUTIONARY TALE

    PubMed Central

    AL OTAIBA, STEPHANIE; HOSP, JOHN L.; SMARTT, SUSAN; DOLE, JANICE A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to describe the challenges one coach faced during the initial implementation of a coaching initiative involving 33 teachers in an urban, high-poverty elementary school. Reading coaches are increasingly expected to play a key role in the professional development efforts to improve reading instruction in order to improve reading achievement for struggling readers. Data sources included initial reading scores for kindergarten and first-graders, pretest and posttest scores of teachers’ knowledge, a teacher survey, focus group interviews, project documents, and field notes. Data were analyzed using a mixed methods approach. Findings revealed several challenges that have important implications for research and practice: that teachers encountered new information about teaching early reading that conflicted with their current knowledge, this new information conflicted with their core reading program, teachers had differing perceptions of the role of the reading coach that affected their feelings about the project, and reform efforts are time-intensive. PMID:23794791

  20. THE CHALLENGING ROLE OF A READING COACH, A CAUTIONARY TALE.

    PubMed

    Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Hosp, John L; Smartt, Susan; Dole, Janice A

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this case study is to describe the challenges one coach faced during the initial implementation of a coaching initiative involving 33 teachers in an urban, high-poverty elementary school. Reading coaches are increasingly expected to play a key role in the professional development efforts to improve reading instruction in order to improve reading achievement for struggling readers. Data sources included initial reading scores for kindergarten and first-graders, pretest and posttest scores of teachers' knowledge, a teacher survey, focus group interviews, project documents, and field notes. Data were analyzed using a mixed methods approach. Findings revealed several challenges that have important implications for research and practice: that teachers encountered new information about teaching early reading that conflicted with their current knowledge, this new information conflicted with their core reading program, teachers had differing perceptions of the role of the reading coach that affected their feelings about the project, and reform efforts are time-intensive.

  1. Managerial coaching: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Batson, Vicki D; Yoder, Linda H

    2012-07-01

    This article presents a report of a concept analysis of managerial coaching. Managerial coaching has been identified as a means for managers to give support to staff nurses, however, no clear delineation of what behaviours and attributes constitute managerial coaching or differentiate it from other career development relationships is provided in the current nursing literature. The CINAHL, ProQuest, Business Source Complete and PscyhIFNO databases were searched for articles published between 1980-2009 using the keywords coaching, managerial coaching, nurse manager support, nursing leadership, self-efficacy, work environment and empowerment. A hybrid approach was used, incorporating both Walker and Avant's method of concept analysis and King's conceptual system and Theory of Goal Attainment to explore the meaning of managerial coaching. Inclusive years of search ranged from 1980-2009. Managerial coaching is a specific dyadic relationship between the nurse manager and staff nurse intended to improve skills and knowledge as they relate to expected job performance. Antecedents and consequences are categorized at the individual and organizational level. Defining attributes, empirical referents and a model case are presented. The theoretical definition for this concept helps to differentiate it from other types of career development relationships and will give a basis for nurse managers to understand what skills and attributes are necessary to establish an effective managerial coaching relationship with staff nurses. Conceptualization will also assist in developing empirical studies examining managerial coaching behaviours in the work environment. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Elements of an Art - Agile Coaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundh, Erik

    This tutorial gives you a lead on becoming or redefining yourself as an Agile Coach. Introduction to elements and dimensions of state-of-the-art Agile Coaching. How to position the agile coach to be effective in a larger setting. Making the agile transition - from a single team to thousands of people. How to support multiple teams as a coach. How to build a coaches network in your company. Challenges when the agile coach is a consultant and the organization is large.

  3. Evaluating Continuing Education Needs and Program Effectiveness Using a Survey of Virginia's SHARP Logger Program Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Scott M.; Bolding, M. Chad; Munsell, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Virginia's SHARP logger program is a Cooperative Extension program currently providing training to over 1,500 loggers, foresters, and others. We conducted a mail survey of SHARP loggers to characterize program participants, assess programming needs, and evaluate program effectiveness. Results indicate a diverse group of participants in terms of…

  4. Evaluating Continuing Education Needs and Program Effectiveness Using a Survey of Virginia's SHARP Logger Program Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Scott M.; Bolding, M. Chad; Munsell, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Virginia's SHARP logger program is a Cooperative Extension program currently providing training to over 1,500 loggers, foresters, and others. We conducted a mail survey of SHARP loggers to characterize program participants, assess programming needs, and evaluate program effectiveness. Results indicate a diverse group of participants in terms of…

  5. Effective Tobacco Cessation via Health Coaching: An Institutional Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Miranda; Ayers, Gale D.; Talbert, Betina; Hill, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tobacco abuse is a well-recognized scourge on health and healthcare costs. Attempts to facilitate tobacco cessation are rarely better than marginally effective. Primary Objective: To describe an observational trial of an existing and highly successful tobacco cessation program featuring health coaching as the primary intervention. Core components of program design and data are presented and may serve as a model for other public health settings. Methods: Health coaching and three complementary program components (auriculotherapy, alpha-electrical stimulation, and relaxation techniques) are presented. Quit rates at 6 months for 161 patients over 3 years are provided featuring 30-day point prevalence smoke free and intent-to-treat values. Comparisons for telephonic vs in-clinic health coaching, free choice vs mandated participation, and program costs are provided. Results: Point prevalence quit rate was 88.7% while the more conservative intent-to-treat quit rate was 51.6%. Telephonic and in-clinic health coaching were not significantly different at any time point. Smoke-free rates at 6 and 12 months were 76.9% and 63.2%, respectively. Conclusions: Two cost-effective smoking cessation models featuring health coaching are presented. Point prevalence (30-day) above 80% and an enduring effect was seen. Personal and societal burdens (health and financial) of tobacco use might be greatly impacted if such programs were successfully implemented on a larger scale. PMID:25568823

  6. Pharmacist-based health coaching: A new model of pharmacist-patient care.

    PubMed

    Lonie, John M; Austin, Zubin; Nguyen, Rosalie; Gill, Imninder; Tsingos-Lucas, Cherie

    2016-07-15

    This paper describes a provider-patient communication process, which although not new to health care in general, is new to the pharmacy profession. Health coaching is a technique that empowers patients to make lasting health behavior changes that improve overall well-being. It provides patients with health care implementation options that better suit their lifestyle and abilities. Health coaching programs have the potential to foster better health outcomes, especially with patients who are chronically ill or represent an at risk population for medication non-adherence (e.g. elderly, patients on psychotropic medications). Other health professions (e.g. nursing and medicine) have had success with the implementation of health coaching models. For example, nurse coaching is recognized by the American Nurse Association and recent statistics show 3.1 million nurses in the U.S.A are also trained in nurse coaching. The pharmacy profession has yet to tap the patient-related benefits of health coaching. This commentary will discuss (i) The theoretical foundations of health coaching (ii) Distinctions between health coaching, motivational interviewing and traditional medication therapy counseling (iii) Training necessary for health coaching; and (iv) How pharmacists can use health coaching in practice.

  7. Athletes' Evaluations of Their Head Coach's Coaching Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Maier, Kimberly S.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Reckase, Mark D.

    2006-01-01

    This study provided initial validity evidence for multidimensional measures of coaching competency derived from the Coaching Competency Scale (CCS). Data were collected from intercollegiate men's (n = 8) and women's (n = 13) soccer and women's ice hockey teams (n = 11). The total number of athletes was 585. Within teams, a multidimensional…

  8. How Coaching Forensics Made Me a Better Writing Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Lynette

    2007-01-01

    The author, a high school teacher and forensics coach, describes ways to teach writing--including on-demand essays--that draw on successful practices she developed in coaching. Students learn the importance of using personal conviction and qualified thesis statements to build arguments, as well as learning "The Debater Four-Step," an effective…

  9. How Coaching Forensics Made Me a Better Writing Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Lynette

    2007-01-01

    The author, a high school teacher and forensics coach, describes ways to teach writing--including on-demand essays--that draw on successful practices she developed in coaching. Students learn the importance of using personal conviction and qualified thesis statements to build arguments, as well as learning "The Debater Four-Step," an effective…

  10. Athletes' Evaluations of Their Head Coach's Coaching Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Maier, Kimberly S.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Reckase, Mark D.

    2006-01-01

    This study provided initial validity evidence for multidimensional measures of coaching competency derived from the Coaching Competency Scale (CCS). Data were collected from intercollegiate men's (n = 8) and women's (n = 13) soccer and women's ice hockey teams (n = 11). The total number of athletes was 585. Within teams, a multidimensional…

  11. Bearing the burden of doubt: female coaches' experiences of gender relations.

    PubMed

    Norman, Leanne

    2010-12-01

    Based on interview research, this study examined how master female coaches based in the United Kingdom experienced relations with men within their profession. Using a feminist cultural studies approach to examine how sport promotes and maintains a gender order unfavorable to women, we found that female coaches felt the need to continually prove themselves and often experienced coaching as a hostile and intimidating culture. Participants reported a gradual reduction in such unwelcoming behavior from men, seemingly because they had proved to be no threat to the existing patriarchal structure. A critical exploration of coaching is needed to understand how masculine hegemony leads to women's relative powerlessness as coaches. Furthermore, the findings present a case for a greater emphasis on sociocultural education within the UK coaching curricula.

  12. Sports Psychology and the Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Greta L., Ed.

    This monograph documents the speeches presented at the 1988 Symposium on Sports Psychology and the Coach. Presentations ranged from empirical research studies to anecdotal methodologies for coping with problems of anxiety. The following presentations are included: (1) "The Coach as Psychologist: When and How" (Robert Rotella); (2) "Psychology for…

  13. Coaches, Sexual Harassment and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasting, Kari; Brackenridge, Celia

    2009-01-01

    Sexual harassment in sport has become an active research field within the past decade yet we know relatively little about the characteristics of the harassing coach. How are harassing coaches characterised by their victims, that is, the athletes themselves? Do they demonstrate specific kinds of behaviours? One purpose of this article is to address…

  14. Embracing Coaching as Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Mark J.

    2008-01-01

    Because the author and his colleagues at the Center for Leadership and Learning Communities believe that instructional coaching is one of the most exciting developments in education in a long time, they have examined the questions this new strategy has raised for education leaders: Should coaching replace some traditional forms of teacher…

  15. Instructional Coaching and Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avant, Rue Celia

    2012-01-01

    School site-based instructional coaching is a form of job-embedded professional development for teachers and an element of school reform. Coaches are hired based upon their pedagogical knowledge, content expertise, prior teaching experience, and "people skills." They are adept at handling a variety of social interactions at school sites,…

  16. Instructional Coaching and Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avant, Rue Celia

    2012-01-01

    School site-based instructional coaching is a form of job-embedded professional development for teachers and an element of school reform. Coaches are hired based upon their pedagogical knowledge, content expertise, prior teaching experience, and "people skills." They are adept at handling a variety of social interactions at school sites,…

  17. Coaches Guide to Sport Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nygaard, Gary; Boone, Thomas H.

    This guide focuses on the legal responsibilities of coaches and physical educators, but much of the content is equally applicable to those who teach sports skills in other recreational settings. The guide presents the legal duties of the coach or teacher. The content is drawn from a review of sport lawsuits (or sports injury litigation) over the…

  18. The Early Childhood Coaching Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, Dathan D.; Shelden, M'Lisa L.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based and highly effective, "coaching" helps early childhood practitioners support other professionals and families as they enhance existing knowledge, develop new skills, and promote healthy development of young children. This hands-on guide shows professionals how to conduct skillful coaching in any setting--home, school, or community.…

  19. Coaches, Sexual Harassment and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasting, Kari; Brackenridge, Celia

    2009-01-01

    Sexual harassment in sport has become an active research field within the past decade yet we know relatively little about the characteristics of the harassing coach. How are harassing coaches characterised by their victims, that is, the athletes themselves? Do they demonstrate specific kinds of behaviours? One purpose of this article is to address…

  20. Experiencing Leadership Like a Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    This note is a reflection on experiences as an educational leader, as well as provides a perspective on educational leadership, based on professional reading. It offers the metaphor of the coach, initiating a case for using a coaching philosophy as a model for a sustained form of leadership. It invites the reader to consider that with a game plan…