Science.gov

Sample records for coarse pm bioassay

  1. Lung response to coarse PM: Bioassay in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wegesser, Teresa C.; Last, Jerold A.

    2008-07-15

    Particulate matter (PM) elicits inflammatory and toxic responses in the lung specific to its constituents, which can vary by region, time, and particle size. To identify the mechanism of toxicity in PM collected in a rural area in the San Joaquin Valley of Central California, we studied coarse particles of 2.5-10 {mu}m diameter (PM{sub 2.5}-PM{sub 10}). Potential pro-inflammatory and toxic effects of PM{sub 2.5}-PM{sub 10} in the lung were investigated using intratracheally instilled mice. We determined total and differential cell profiles and inflammatory chemokines in lung lavage fluid, and biomarkers of toxicity resulting from coarse PM exposure. Responses of the mice were readily observed with total doses of 25-50 {mu}g of PM per mouse. Changes in pro-inflammatory cellular profiles and chemokines showed both dose and time responses; peak responses were observed 24 h after PM instillation, with recovery as early as 48 h. Furthermore, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-2) profiles following PM exposures were correlated to levels of measured macrophages and neutrophils recovered from lung lavage fluid of PM-treated animals. Our data suggest that pro-inflammatory effects observed from coarse PM collected during the summer months from California's hot and dry Central Valley are driven largely by the insoluble components of the PM mixture, and are not caused by endotoxin.

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A CONTINUOUS COARSE (PM10-PM2.5) PARTICLE MONITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper, we describe the development and laboratory and field evaluation of a continuous coarse (2.5-10 um) particle mass (PM) monitor that can provide reliable measurements of the coarse mass (CM) concentrations in time intervals as short as 5-10 min. The operating princ...

  3. FIELD EVALUATION OF A SAMPLING APPROACH FOR PM-COARSE AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Subsequent to a 1997 revision of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter (PM), the US Environmental Protection Agency is investigating the development of sampling methodology for a possible new coarse particle standard. When developed, this me...

  4. The weekly cycle of ambient concentrations and traffic emissions of coarse (PM 10-PM 2.5) atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmpadimos, I.; Nufer, M.; Oderbolz, D. C.; Keller, J.; Aksoyoglu, S.; Hueglin, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the existence of a weekly cycle of coarse mode (PM 10-PM 2.5) atmospheric particles, to compare this weekly cycle to the weekly cycle of PM 2.5 and to compare the strength of the coarse mode weekly cycle in different seasons and different wind speed, wind direction and precipitation conditions. In addition, an estimate of the contribution of traffic to the total ambient coarse mode particulate matter in Zurich, Switzerland is provided by estimating the weekly cycle of coarse mode traffic emissions and by comparing it to the weekly cycle of ambient concentrations. The coarse mode data used in the study are the result of simultaneous daily measurements of PM 10 and PM 2.5 at seven sites located in Switzerland. The measurements cover a period of 7-12 years for six stations and 3 years for one station. It is found that a coarse mode weekly cycle is present in various types of urban and rural stations. Ambient concentrations on weekdays are higher than on Sundays by a factor of 1.53 on average over all urban and suburban sites and by a factor of 1.32 on average over all rural sites. Moreover, the relative increase of coarse mode ambient concentrations on weekdays compared to Sundays was larger than the relative increase of PM 2.5 concentrations by a factor of 2.7 on average over all urban and suburban sites, whereas no considerable difference was found at the rural sites. A calculation of coarse mode traffic emissions for an urban scenario was carried out using traffic-induced dust resuspension and brake wear emission factors for light and heavy duty vehicles and traffic counts from Zurich, Switzerland. It is shown that coarse mode emissions on weekdays are greater than on Sundays by a factor of 2.0. The contribution of traffic to coarse mode urban ambient concentrations was estimated to be 53% (34%-78%) on Sundays and 70% (57%-86%) on weekdays. It is deemed however that these numbers are somewhat overestimating the traffic

  5. SEASONAL EFFECTS OF ULTRAFINE, FINE, AND COARSE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) ON HUMAN PRIMARY AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SEASONAL EFFECTS OF ULTRAFINE, FINE, AND COARSE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) ON HUMAN PRIMARY AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Exposure of humans to PM results in increased mortality and morbidity. Recent toxicology studies have shown a number of pathophysiological pulmonary and car...

  6. SEM/EDS of Submicron and Coarse PM Using Modified Passive Aerosol Sampler Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.; Wang, Z.; Willis, B.; Casuccio, G.

    2008-12-01

    Deployment of multiple UNC Passive Aerosol Samplers is an inexpensive and unobtrusive technique for assessing airborne particulate matter (PM) exposure and spatial variability. Computer-controlled SEM/EDS (Scanning Electron Microscopy / Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) is used to measure the deposited particle mass and chemistry. A deposition velocity model is used to obtain ambient PM and elemental size distributions. Previous results have correlated well with active sampler results in environments dominated by coarse mineral dusts. To accurately measure submicron and carbonaceous aerosols, an improved collection substrate is needed. Previous studies used a double-sided carbon adhesive tab, which was ideal for coarse PM but under-detected submicron PM. One promising alternative is polycarbonate (PC) filter substrates. Another is transmission electron microscope (TEM) grids with formvar films mounted over holes drilled in the samplers. Preliminary tests of PC filters and TEM grid substrates, including tests in areas with smoke aerosols, exhibited substantial submicron aerosol and differing elemental size distributions. Detailed qualitative and quantitative evidence shows that the PC filters retained coarse PM well and yielded improved submicron PM imaging. TEM grids yield the best imaging and chemistry of submicron carbonaceous PM, but potentially the poorest retention of coarse PM. PM and elemental size distributions are presented for collocated passive samplers using the three substrate types, in both indoor and outdoor environments. Several methods are proposed to further optimize passive sampling of both submicron and coarse PM. Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.

  7. Identification of fine (PM1) and coarse (PM10-1) sources of particulate matter in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, G.; Lyamani, H.; Pandolfi, M.; Alastuey, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2014-06-01

    PM10 and PM1 samples were collected at an urban site in southeastern Spain during 2006-2010. The chemical composition of all samples has been determined and analyzed by Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) technique for fine and coarse source identification. The PMF results have been analyzed for working and non-working days in order to evaluate the change in PM sources contribution and possible future abatement strategies. A decreasing trend in PM10 levels and in its constituents has been observed, being partly associated to a reduction in anthropogenic activities due to the economic crisis. The use of fine and coarse PM in the PMF analysis allowed us for the identification of additional sources that could not be identified using only one size fraction. The mineral dust source was identified in both fractions and comprised 36 and 22% of the total mass in the coarse and fine fractions, respectively. This high contribution of the mineral source to the fine fraction may be ascribed to contamination of the source profile. The regional re-circulation source was traced by secondary sulfate, V and Ni. It was the most important source concerning PM1 mass concentration (41% of the total mass in this fraction). Although V and Ni are commonly associated to fuel oil combustion the seasonality of this source with higher concentrations in summer compared with winter suggest that the most important part of this source can be ascribed to regional pollution episodes. A traffic exhaust source was identified but only in the fine fraction, comprising 29% of the fine mass. The celestite mines source associated with nearby open-pit mines was typified by strontium, sulfate and mineral matter. PM10-1 levels were higher in working days, whereas PM1 levels remained fairly constant throughout the whole week. As a conclusion, traffic seems to be the main source to target in Granada.

  8. (PRESENTED NAQC SAN FRANCISCO, CA) COARSE PM METHODS STUDY: STUDY DESIGN AND RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comprehensive field studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of sampling methods for measuring the coarse fraction of PM10 in ambient air. Five separate sampling approaches were evaluated at each of three sampling sites. As the primary basis of comparison, a discrete ...

  9. Comparison of particle lung doses from the fine and coarse fractions of urban PM-10 aerosols.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, C; Kao, A S

    1999-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently revised the national ambient air quality standards to include a new PM-2.5 particulate standard. We examine the contributions of fine (PM-2.5) and coarse (PM-2.5 to -10) fraction of typical urban aerosols to particle doses in different lung airways resulting from 24-h exposure to the standard concentration of 150 microg m-3. The aerosol is assumed to have a bimodal lognormal mass distribution with mass median diameters of 0.2 and 5 microm, and geometric standard deviation of 1.7 and 57% of the mass in the fine (PM-2.5) mode. The daily mass dose from exposure to 150 microg m-3 of PM-10 in the nasopharyngeal (NPL) region is 20-51 microg day-1 (1.5% of inhaled fines) and 377-687 microg day-1 (30% of inhaled coarse), respectively, of fine and coarse mass filtered in the nose. Similar daily mass doses from fine and coarse fractions, respectively, to the tracheobronchial (TBL) region are 28-38 (1.5%) and 40-52 (4%) microg day-1 and to the pulmonary (PUL) region are 18-194 (6%) and 32-55 microg day-1 (2%). The daily number dose in the NPL region is 5-15 x 10(8) (0.06% of inhaled fines) and 5-10 x 10(6) day-1 (13% of inhaled coarse) respectively, of fine and coarse particles. Similar number doses to the TBL region are 2.2-3.1 x 10(10) (2%) and 7.1-11. 1 x 10(5) (2%) day-1 and to the PUL region are 1.6-16.7 x 10(10) (9%) and 2.9-17.0 x 10(5) (3%) day-1. The daily surface mass dose (microg cm-2 day-1) from coarse fraction particles is large in generations 3-5. The daily number dose (particles day-1) and surface number dose (particles cm-2 day-1) are higher from the fine than the coarse fraction, by about 10(3) to 10(5) times in all lung airways. Fine fraction particles result in 10,000 times greater particle number dose per macrophage than coarse fraction particles. Particle number doses do not follow trends in mass doses, are much larger from fine than coarse fraction, and must be considered in assessing PM health

  10. Endotoxin in fine (PM 2.5) and coarse (PM 2.5-10) particle mass of ambient aerosols. A temporo-spatial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Joachim; Pitz, Mike; Bischof, Wolfgang; Krug, Norbert; Borm, Paul J. A.

    Objectives: We collected fine (PM 2.5) and coarse (PM 2.5-10) particulate matter fractions in two areas ˜80 km apart and measured soluble endotoxin concentrations in both particle fractions. Here we report on temporo-spatial variation of endotoxin content in the collected particles. Methods: Dichotomous Anderson samplers were used to collect 21 weekly samples of PM 2.5 and PM 2.5-10 in both towns from January to June 2002. Each Teflon filter was water extracted and endotoxin was measured by a chromogenic Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate method. Endotoxin concentrations were expressed per mg of fine or mg of coarse mass and per sampled air volume (m 3). Results: For both cities, the mean endotoxin content in PM 2.5 was 1.2 EU mg -1; however the endotoxin content in the coarse fraction was ˜10 times higher compared to the fine mass fractions. Although endotoxin content is highly variable over time, a good correlation was observed between the two town sites for both fine ( r=0.85) and coarse PM ( r=0.88). The fluctuations of weekly endotoxin means were high in both areas suggesting a strong temporal dependence on particle source and composition. The endotoxin content in particles collected during May and June were two to four times higher than concentrations measured during the winter and early spring weeks. Conclusions: Ambient airborne endotoxin concentrations were detected in coarse and fine particle fraction, but 10-fold higher in the coarse PM. The strong seasonality and the week to week fluctuation of endotoxin content in PM indicate different biologic PM properties which might affect results of time series studies on short-term effects as well as in vitro studies and human exposure studies.

  11. INCREASED AIRWAYS INFLAMMATION AND MODIFIED BAL CELL SURFACE PHENOTYPES IN ASTHMATICS EXPOSED TO COARSE SIZE (PM2.5-10) CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICLES (CAPS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although associations between inhalation of PM10 and disease morbidity and mortality appear stronger for fine (PM2.5) vs coarse (PM2.5-10) or ultrafine/UF (PM<0.1) PM. In vitro studies suggest that PM2.5-10 are more potent in inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine responses from alve...

  12. Fine (PM2.5), coarse (PM2.5-10), and metallic elements of suspended particulates for incense burning at Tzu Yun Yen temple in central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Chang, Cheng-Nan; Chu, Chia-Chium; Wu, Yuh-Shen; Pi-Cheng Fu, Peter; Chang, Shyh-Chyi; Yang, I-Lin

    2003-06-01

    Ambient suspended particulate concentrations were measured at Tzu Yun Yen temple (120 degrees, 34('), 10(") E; 24 degrees, 16('), 12(") N) in this study. This is representative of incense burning and semi-open sampling sites. The Universal-sampler collected fine and coarse particle material was used to measure suspended particulate concentrations, and sampling periods were from 16/08/2001 to 2/1/2002 at Tzu Yun Yen temple. In addition, metallic element concentrations, compositions of PM(2.5) and PM(2.5-10) for incense burning at Tzu Yun Yen temple were also analyzed in this study. The PM(2.5)/PM(10) ratios ranged between 31% and 87% and averaged 70+/-11% during incense the burning period, respectively. The median metallic element concentration order for these elements is Fe>Zn>Cr>Cd>Pb>Mn>Ni>Cu in fine particles (PM(2.5)) at the Tzu Yun Yen temple sampling site. The median metallic element concentration order for these elements is Fe>Zn>Cr>Pb>Cd>Ni>Mn>Cu in coarse particle (PM(2.5-10)) at the Tzu Yun Yen temple sampling site. Fine particulates (PM(2.5)) are the main portion of PM(10) at Tzu Yun Yen temple in this study. From the point of view of PM(10), these data reflect that the elements Fe, Zn, and Cr were the major elements distributed at Tzu Yun Yen temple in this study.

  13. Levels, sources and seasonality of coarse particles (PM10-PM2.5) in three European capitals - Implications for particulate pollution control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassomenos, P.; Vardoulakis, S.; Chaloulakou, A.; Grivas, G.; Borge, R.; Lumbreras, J.

    2012-07-01

    Coarse particles of aerodynamic diameter between 2.5 and 10 μm (PMc) are produced by a range of natural (windblown dust and sea sprays) and anthropogenic processes (non-exhaust vehicle emissions, industrial, agriculture, construction and quarrying activities). Although current ambient air quality regulations focus on PM2.5 and PM10, coarse particles are of interest from a public health point of view as they have been associated with certain mortality and morbidity outcomes. In this paper, an analysis of coarse particle levels in three European capitals (London, Madrid and Athens) is presented and discussed. For all three cities we analysed data from both traffic and urban background monitoring sites. The results showed that the levels of coarse particles present significant seasonal, weekly and daily variability. Their wind driven and non-wind driven resuspension as well as their roadside increment due to traffic were estimated. Both the local meteorological conditions and the air mass history indicating long-range atmospheric transport of particles of natural origin are significant parameters that influence the levels of coarse particles in the three cities especially during episodic events.

  14. 40 CFR Appendix O to Part 50 - Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere O Appendix O to Part 50 Protection of... Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere 1.0Applicability and Definition 1.1This...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix O to Part 50 - Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere O Appendix O to Part 50 Protection of... Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere 1.0Applicability and Definition 1.1This...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix O to Part 50 - Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere O Appendix O to Part 50 Protection of... Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere 1.0Applicability and Definition 1.1This...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix O to Part 50 - Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere O Appendix O to Part 50 Protection of... Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere 1.0Applicability and Definition 1.1This...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix O to Part 50 - Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere O Appendix O to Part 50 Protection of... Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere 1.0Applicability and Definition 1.1This...

  19. Fine and coarse PM composition and sources in rural and urban sites in Switzerland: local or regional pollution?

    PubMed

    Minguillón, M C; Querol, X; Baltensperger, U; Prévôt, A S H

    2012-06-15

    The chemical composition and sources of ambient particulate matter (PM) in Switzerland were studied. PM(1) and PM(10) samples were collected in winter and summer at an urban background site in Zurich and a rural background site in Payerne. Concentrations of major and trace elements, NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), NH(4)(+), organic and elemental carbon were determined. A subsequent Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis was performed. PM(10) and PM(1) concentrations varied similarly at both sites, with average PM(10) concentrations 24-25 μg/m(3) and 13-14 μg/m(3) in winter and summer, respectively, and average PM(1) concentrations 12-17 μg/m(3) and 6-7 μg/m(3). The influence of local sources was found to be higher in winter. PM was dominated by nitrate and organic matter in winter, and by mineral matter and organic matter in summer. Trace element concentrations related to road traffic (Zn, Cu, Sb, Sn) were higher at Zurich. Concentrations of Tl and Cs, attributed to the influence of a glass industry, were higher at Payerne. The elements mainly present in the coarse fraction were those related to mineral matter and brake and tyre abrasion (Cu, Mn, Ti, Sb, Sr, Bi, Li, La, Nd), and those in the fine fraction were related to high temperature anthropogenic processes (Pb, As, Cd, Tl, Cs). Common PM(1) and PM(1-10) sources identified by PMF were: ammonium nitrate, present in winter, negligible in summer; ammonium sulfate+K(biomass burning)+road traffic; and road traffic itself, related to exhaust emissions in PM(1) and to road dust resuspension in PM(1-10). Size-fraction specific sources were: a PM(1) glass industry source characterized by Cs, Tl, Rb, Li and Na, only present in Payerne; a PM(1) background source characterized by V, Ni, sulfate and Fe; two PM(1-10) mineral-related sources, with higher contribution in summer; a PM(1-10) salt source; and a PM(1-10) organic source, with higher contribution in summer, attributed to bioaerosols. PMID:22572211

  20. Wintertime vertical variations in particulate matter (PM) and precursor concentrations in the San Joaquin Valley during the California Regional Coarse PM/Fine PM Air Quality Study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven G; Roberts, Paul T; McCarthy, Michael C; Lurmann, Frederick W; Hyslop, Nicole P

    2006-09-01

    Air quality monitoring was conducted at a rural site with a tower in the middle of California's San Joaquin Valley (SJV) and at elevated sites in the foothills and mountains surrounding the SJV for the California Regional PM10/ PM2.5 Air Quality Study. Measurements at the surface and n a tower at 90 m were collected in Angiola, CA, from December 2000 through February 2001 and included hourly black carbon (BC), particle counts from optical particle counters, nitric oxide, ozone, temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and direction. Boundary site measurements were made primarily using 24-hr integrated particulate matter (PM) samples. These measurements were used to understand the vertical variations of PM and PM precursors, the effect of stratification in the winter on concentrations and chemistry aloft and at the surface, and the impact of aloft-versus-surface transport on PM concentrations. Vertical variations of concentrations differed among individual species. The stratification may be important to atmospheric chemistry processes, particularly nighttime nitrate formation aloft, because NO2 appeared to be oxidized by ozone in the stratified aloft layer. Additionally, increases in accumulation-mode particle concentrations in the aloft layer during a fine PM (PM2.5) episode corresponded with increases in aloft nitrate, demonstrating the likelihood of an aloft nighttime nitrate formation mechanism. Evidence of local transport at the surface and regional transport aloft was found; transport processes also varied among the species. The distribution of BC appeared to be regional, and BC was often uniformly mixed vertically. Overall, the combination of time-resolved tower and surface measurements provided important insight into PM stratification, formation, and transport.

  1. MULTI-SITE FIELD EVALUATION OF CANDIDATE SAMPLERS FOR MEASURING COARSE-MODE PM

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to expected changes to the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for particulate matter, comprehensive field studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of sampling methods for measuring coarse mode aerosols (i.e. PMc). Five separate PMc sampling approaches w...

  2. MULTI-SITE EVALUATIONS OF CANDIDATE METHODOLOGIES FOR DETERMINING COARSE PARTICULATE (PM 10-2.5) CONCENTRATIONS: AUGUST 2005 UPDATED REPORT REGARDING SECOND-GENERATION AND NEW PM 10-2.5 SAMPLERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-site field studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of sampling methods for measuring the coarse fraction of PM10 (PM10 2.5) in ambient air. The field studies involved the use of both time-integrated filter-based and direct continuous methods. Despite operationa...

  3. GUIDELINES FOR THE APPLICATION OF SEM/EDX ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES FOR FINE AND COARSE PM SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) coupled with Energy-Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) is a powerful tool in the characterization and source apportionment of environmental particulate matter (PM), providing size, chemistry, and morphology of particles as small as a few tenths ...

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a bioassay-fractionated extract of PM 10 collected in São Paulo, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Martinis, Bruno S.; Okamoto, Robert A.; Kado, Norman Y.; Gundel, Lara A.; Carvalho, Lilian R. F.

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in airborne particles (PM 10) collected in an urban site of São Paulo City, Brazil. Samples were Soxhlet extracted sequentially with dichloromethane and acetone, followed by solid phase fractionation. Increasing polar fractions (A-K) of dichloromethane and acetone extracts were obtained. Fractionated extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and Salmonella microsuspension bioassay. Sixteen PAH compounds were quantified in dichloromethane B and C fractions, nevertheless the D and E fractions presented higher mutagenic activities. Concentrations of the individual PAHs ranged from 0.8 ng m -3 (perylene) to 12.8 ng m -3 (benzofluranthene), reaching a total concentration of 95.5 ng m -3. BaP/BgP and Pyr/BaP ratios indicated the presence of vehicular emissions and BghiP/Ind and Chr/BeP ratios suggested a contribution of wood combustion emissions. Further investigation is still necessary for a better understanding of the PAH sources in the urban atmosphere of São Paulo City.

  5. 40 CFR Table F-4 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution F Table F-4 to Subpart F of Part 53... Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-4 Table F-4 to Subpart F of Part 53—Estimated...

  6. 40 CFR Table F-5 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized âTypicalâ Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution F Table F-5 to Subpart F of Part... of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-5 Table F-5 to Subpart F of...

  7. 40 CFR Table F-5 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... 53—Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size... Concentration (µg/m3) Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement (µg/m3) Ideal Sampler Fractional...

  8. 40 CFR Table F-4 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution Particle Aerodynamic Diameter (µm) Test Sampler Fractional Sampling Effectiveness Interval Mass Concentration (µg/m3) Estimated...

  9. 40 CFR Table F-4 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution Particle Aerodynamic Diameter (µm) Test Sampler Fractional Sampling Effectiveness Interval Mass Concentration (µg/m3) Estimated...

  10. 40 CFR Table F-5 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... 53—Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size... Concentration (µg/m3) Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement (µg/m3) Ideal Sampler Fractional...

  11. 40 CFR Table F-5 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... 53—Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size... Concentration (µg/m 3) Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement (µg/m 3) Ideal Sampler Fractional...

  12. 40 CFR Table F-4 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution Particle Aerodynamic Diameter (µm) Test Sampler Fractional Sampling Effectiveness Interval Mass Concentration (µg/m 3)...

  13. 40 CFR Table F-5 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... 53—Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution Particle Aerodynamic Diameter (µm) Test Sampler Fractional Sampling Effectiveness Interval...

  14. Combining AOT, Angstrom Exponent and PM concentration data, with PSCF model, to distinguish fine and coarse aerosol intrusions in Southern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, Konstantinos; Kassomenos, Pavlos

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a cluster analysis of backward air mass trajectories, arriving in Avignon (Southern France), was combined with a Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) model on a 0.5° × 0.5° resolution grid, in order to indicate possible aerosol intrusions. A strict triple criterion was constructed from Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT), Angstrom Exponent (AE), and PM (PM10 and PM2.5) concentration measurements, aiming to distinguish more effectively Episodes of Fine, Coarse and Overall Aerosols (FAE, CAE and OAE respectively). Large fractions of FAE (60.0%) and CAE (40.6%) were strongly attributed to the prevalence of Eastern and South-Southwest (S-SW) airflows respectively, whereas these distinct trajectory clusters also gathered large fractions of OAE (90.2% cumulatively). According to PSCF results, FAE events were strongly associated with the influence of air masses traveling over North Italy and Southern Germany, hence the impact of urban and industrial combustion was emerged. Main sources of coarse aerosols were principally isolated over the Mediterranean, thus the import of sea spray and dust from the Sahara desert is presumed. Satellite AOT observations were used for a more detailed identification of an intense 5-day intrusion of coarse aerosols. Short range slow moving air mass trajectories, were proven to be a clear marker of atmospheric stagnation, based on a wind speed analysis, triggering the accumulation of locally emitted anthropogenic aerosols (mainly PM2.5) and lack of city ventilation.

  15. Eco-toxicological bioassay of atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5) with Photobacterium Phosphoreum T3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenxin; Shi, Chanzhen; Yan, Yan; Yang, Yunfei; Zhou, Bin

    2016-11-01

    A bioluminescent bacterium, Photobacterium phosphoreum T3 (PPT3), was used as a bio-indicator for the atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5) to determine the eco-toxicity of PM2.5. The PM2.5 contains toxic chemicals, which reduce light output. The PM2.5 samples were collected in the period from March 2014 to January 2015 in Nanjing and analyzed for the chemical composition versus their eco-toxicity. The eco-toxicological responses of each toxicant were detected in PM2.5 samples with PPT3. The dose-response curves obtained were verified using the Weibull fitting function. According to the measured EC50 values (EC50, the concentration of a toxicant that inhibits 50% of the bioluminescence), the toxicity sequence was: B[a]P>hexa-PCB>tetra-PCB>tri-PCB>Pb(2+)>DEHP>Cu(2+)>DBP>BDE209>Zn(2+)>DMP>DEP, where B[a]P is benzo(a)pyrene, PCB is polychlorinated biphenyl, DEHP is diethylhexyl phthalate, DBP is dibutyl phthalate, BDE209 is decabromodiphenyl ether, DMP is dimethyl phthalate, and DEP is diethyl phthalate. All the PM2.5 samples analyzed proved to be weak toxic for PPT3. The toxicity of PM2.5 was assessed by the dose-addition of organic species and heavy metallic elements existing in PM2.5 with PPT3. The bioluminescence test showed that the metals and organics detected in PM2.5 promoted PM2.5 toxicity. The total detectable organics (denoted by ΣOrs) exhibited slightly higher toxicity than the total metals (denoted by ΣMs). In contrast, the sum of water-soluble ions (denoted by ΣIons) was beneficial to PPT3. The PM2.5 toxicity increased as the PM2.5 trapped more organics or metallic elements from the industrial or densely populated urban areas, where the PM2.5 had a high inhibition rate of bioluminescence for PPT3 in contrast to the residential PM2.5 samples, where the minimum inhibition rate was observed. The toxicity of PM2.5 samples varied with the mass concentrations, chemical constituents, and sampling locations. The chemicals in PM2.5, especially organic

  16. Characterizing Spatial Patterns of Airborne Coarse Particulate (PM10–2.5) Mass and Chemical Components in Three Cities: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Timothy V.; Gassett, Amanda; Szpiro, Adam A.; Daviglus, Martha; Burke, Gregory L.; Kaufman, Joel D.; Adar, Sara D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The long-term health effects of coarse particular matter (PM10–2.5) are challenging to assess because of a limited understanding of the spatial variation in PM10–2.5 mass and its chemical components. Objectives: We conducted a spatially intensive field study and developed spatial prediction models for PM10–2.5 mass and four selected species (copper, zinc, phosphorus, and silicon) in three American cities. Methods: PM10–2.5 snapshot campaigns were conducted in Chicago, Illinois; St. Paul, Minnesota; and Winston-Salem, North Carolina, in 2009 for the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Coarse Airborne Particulate Matter (MESA Coarse). In each city, samples were collected simultaneously outside the homes of approximately 40 participants over 2 weeks in the winter and/or summer. City-specific and combined prediction models were developed using land use regression (LUR) and universal kriging (UK). Model performance was evaluated by cross-validation (CV). Results: PM10–2.5 mass and species varied within and between cities in a manner that was predictable by geographic covariates. City-specific LUR models generally performed well for total mass (CV R2, 0.41–0.68), copper (CV R2, 0.51–0.86), phosphorus (CV R2, 0.50–0.76), silicon (CV R2, 0.48–0.93), and zinc (CV R2, 0.36–0.73). Models pooled across all cities inconsistently captured within-city variability. Little difference was observed between the performance of LUR and UK models in predicting concentrations. Conclusions: Characterization of fine-scale spatial variability of these often heterogeneous pollutants using geographic covariates should reduce exposure misclassification and increase the power of epidemiological studies investigating the long-term health impacts of PM10–2.5. Citation: Zhang K, Larson TV, Gassett A, Szpiro AA, Daviglus M, Burke GL, Kaufman JD, Adar SD. 2014. Characterizing spatial patterns of airborne coarse particulate (PM10–2.5) mass and chemical

  17. Chemical Characterization of Outdoor and Subway Fine (PM2.5–1.0) and Coarse (PM10–2.5) Particulate Matter in Seoul (Korea) by Computer-Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM)

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Sang-Hoon; Willis, Robert; Peters, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor and indoor (subway) samples were collected by passive sampling in urban Seoul (Korea) and analyzed with computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM-EDX). Soil/road dust particles accounted for 42%–60% (by weight) of fine particulate matter larger than 1 µm (PM2.5–1.0) in outdoor samples and 18% of PM2.5–1.0 in subway samples. Iron-containing particles accounted for only 3%–6% in outdoor samples but 69% in subway samples. Qualitatively similar results were found for coarse particulate matter (PM10–2.5) with soil/road dust particles dominating outdoor samples (66%–83%) and iron-containing particles contributing most to subway PM10–2.5 (44%). As expected, soil/road dust particles comprised a greater mass fraction of PM10–2.5 than PM2.5–1.0. Also as expected, the mass fraction of iron-containing particles was substantially less in PM10–2.5 than in PM2.5–1.0. Results of this study are consistent with known emission sources in the area and with previous studies, which showed high concentrations of iron-containing particles in the subway compared to outdoor sites. Thus, passive sampling with CCSEM-EDX offers an inexpensive means to assess PM2.5–1.0 and PM10-2.5 simultaneously and by composition at multiple locations. PMID:25689348

  18. Temporal-spatial analysis of U.S.-Mexico border environmental fine and coarse PM air sample extract activity in human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lauer, Fredine T.; Mitchell, Leah A.; Bedrick, Edward; McDonald, Jacob D.; Lee, Wen-Yee; Li, Wen-Whai; Olvera, Hector; Amaya, Maria A.; Berwick, Marianne; Gonzales, Melissa; Currey, Robert; Pingitore, Nicholas E.

    2009-07-01

    Particulate matter less than 10 {mu}m (PM10) has been shown to be associated with aggravation of asthma and respiratory and cardiopulmonary morbidity. There is also great interest in the potential health effects of PM2.5. Particulate matter (PM) varies in composition both spatially and temporally depending on the source, location and seasonal condition. El Paso County which lies in the Paso del Norte airshed is a unique location to study ambient air pollution due to three major points: the geological land formation, the relatively large population and the various sources of PM. In this study, dichotomous filters were collected from various sites in El Paso County every 7 days for a period of 1 year. The sampling sites were both distant and near border crossings, which are near heavily populated areas with high traffic volume. Fine (PM2.5) and Coarse (PM10-2.5) PM filter samples were extracted using dichloromethane and were assessed for biologic activity and polycyclic aromatic (PAH) content. Three sets of marker genes human BEAS2B bronchial epithelial cells were utilized to assess the effects of airborne PAHs on biologic activities associated with specific biological pathways associated with airway diseases. These pathways included in inflammatory cytokine production (IL-6, IL-8), oxidative stress (HMOX-1, NQO-1, ALDH3A1, AKR1C1), and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent signaling (CYP1A1). Results demonstrated interesting temporal and spatial patterns of gene induction for all pathways, particularly those associated with oxidative stress, and significant differences in the PAHs detected in the PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 fractions. Temporally, the greatest effects on gene induction were observed in winter months, which appeared to correlate with inversions that are common in the air basin. Spatially, the greatest gene expression increases were seen in extracts collected from the central most areas of El Paso which are also closest to highways and border crossings.

  19. Comparison of physicochemical properties between fine (PM2.5) and coarse airborne particles at cold season in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choung, Sungwook; Oh, Jungsun; Han, Weon Shik; Chon, Chul-Min; Kwon, Youngsang; Kim, Do Yeon; Shin, Woosik

    2016-01-15

    Although it has been well-known that atmospheric aerosols affect negatively the local air quality, human health, and climate changes, the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric aerosols are not fully understood yet. This study experimentally measured the physiochemical characteristics of fine and coarse aerosol particles at the suburban area to evaluate relative contribution to environmental pollution in consecutive seasons of autumn and winter, 2014-2015, using XRD, SEM-EDX, XNI, ICP-MS, and TOF-SIMS. For these experimental works, the fine and coarse aerosols were collected by the high volume air sampler for 7 days each season. The fine particles contain approximately 10 μg m(-3) of carbonaceous aerosols consisting of 90% organic and 10% elemental carbon. The spherical-shape carbonaceous particles were observed for the coarse samples as well. Interestingly, the coarse particles in winter showed the increased frequency of carbon-rich particles with high contents of heavy metals. These results suggest that, for the cold season, the coarse particles could contribute relatively more to the conveyance of toxic contaminants compared to the fine particles in the study area. However, the fine particles showed acidic properties so that their deposition to surface may cause facilitate the increase of mobility for toxic heavy metals in soil and groundwater environments. The fine and coarse particulate matters, therefore, should be monitored separately with temporal variation to evaluate the impact of atmospheric aerosols to environmental pollution and human health. PMID:26476059

  20. TEMPORAL-SPATIAL ANALYSIS OF U.S.- MEXICO BORDER ENVIRONMENTAL FINE AND COARSE PM AIR SAMPLE EXTRACT ACTIVITY IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Fredine T.; Mitchell, Leah A.; Bedrick, Edward; McDonald, Jacob D.; Lee, Wen-Yee; Li, Wen-Whai; Olvera, Hector; Amaya, Maria A.; Berwick, Marianne; Gonzales, Melissa; Currey, Robert; Pingitore, Nicholas E.; Burchiel, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    Particulate matter less than 10 μm (PM10) has been shown to be associated with aggravation of asthma and respiratory and cardiopulmonary morbidity. There is also great interest in the potential health effects of PM 2.5. Particulate matter (PM) varies in composition both spatially and temporally depending on the source, location and seasonal condition. El Paso County which lies in the Paso del Norte airshed is a unique location to study ambient air pollution due to three major points: the geological land formation, the relatively large population and the various sources of PM. In this study, dichotomous filters were collected from various sites in El Paso County every seven days for a period of one year. The sampling sites were both distant and near border crossings, which are near heavily populated areas with high traffic volume. Fine (PM2.5) and Coarse (PM10-2.5) PM filter samples were extracted using dichloromethane and were assessed for biologic activity and polycyclic aromatic (PAH) content. Three sets of marker genes human BEAS2B bronchial epithelial cells were utilized to assess the effects of airborne PAHs on biologic activities associated with specific biological pathways associated with airway diseases. These pathways included in inflammatory cytokine production (IL-6, IL-8), oxidative stress (HMOX-1, NQO-1, ALDH3A1, AKR1C1), and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent signaling (CYP1A1). Results demonstrated interesting temporal and spatial patterns of gene induction for all pathways, particularly those associated with oxidative stress, and significant differences in the PAHs detected in the PM10-2.5 and PM 2.5 fractions. Temporally, the greatest effects on gene induction were observed in winter months, which appeared to correlate with inversions that are common in the air basin. Spatially, the greatest gene expression increases were seen in extracts collected from the central most areas of El Paso which are also closest to highways and border

  1. EVALUATION OF THE SMPS-APS SYSTEM AS A CONTINUOUS MONITOR FOR MEASURING PM2.5, PM10 AND COARSE (PM2.5-10) CONCENTRATIONS. (R827352C011)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Respirable particulate matter (PM) has been linked to mortality and morbidity by a variety of epidemiological studies. This research has led to the creation of a new PM standard for particles with diameters <2.5 μm (PM2.5). Since the conclusion of these studie...

  2. 40 CFR Table F-4 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-4 Table F-4 to Subpart F of Part 53—Estimated Mass... (µm) Test Sampler Fractional Sampling Effectiveness Interval Mass Concentration (µg/m3) Estimated...

  3. Oxidative potential of coarse particulate matter (PM(10-2.5)) and its relation to water solubility and sources of trace elements and metals in the Los Angeles Basin.

    PubMed

    Shirmohammadi, Farimah; Hasheminassab, Sina; Wang, Dongbin; Saffari, Arian; Schauer, James J; Shafer, Martin M; Delfino, Ralph J; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2015-12-01

    In this study, potential sources of water-soluble (WS) and water-insoluble (WI) fractions of metals and trace elements in coarse particulate matter (CPM) (PM(10-2.5), 2.5 < dp < 10 μm) were identified and their association with the redox properties of CPM, measured by means of reactive oxygen species (ROS), was explored. CPM was collected during 2012-2013 in Central Los Angeles (LA) and 2013-2014 in Anaheim, CA. Generally, WI components contributed to a larger fraction of CPM ROS activity (as much as 64% and 54% at Central LA and Anaheim, respectively). Two major source factors were identified by principal component analysis for both the WS and WI fractions: vehicular abrasion and re-suspended road dust. Univariate analysis indicated that several species were correlated with CPM ROS activity: in WS fraction, metals such as Mn, Fe, Cd and Zn were associated with WS ROS, while in WI fraction Ti, Fe, Ni, Pb and Cr had the highest correlations with WI ROS activity. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that both vehicular abrasion and re-suspension of road dust were associated with WS ROS activity, while only vehicular abrasion contributed significantly to the WI ROS activity. Moreover, comparison with previous studies indicated that the ROS activity of CPM has increased in the past 5 years in Central LA. We attribute this increase mainly to the elevated levels of re-suspension of road dust caused by the increase in vehicle speed and number of trucks in recent years in this area, reaffirming the growing importance of non-tailpipe traffic emissions on CPM toxicity.

  4. Oxidative potential of coarse particulate matter (PM(10-2.5)) and its relation to water solubility and sources of trace elements and metals in the Los Angeles Basin.

    PubMed

    Shirmohammadi, Farimah; Hasheminassab, Sina; Wang, Dongbin; Saffari, Arian; Schauer, James J; Shafer, Martin M; Delfino, Ralph J; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2015-12-01

    In this study, potential sources of water-soluble (WS) and water-insoluble (WI) fractions of metals and trace elements in coarse particulate matter (CPM) (PM(10-2.5), 2.5 < dp < 10 μm) were identified and their association with the redox properties of CPM, measured by means of reactive oxygen species (ROS), was explored. CPM was collected during 2012-2013 in Central Los Angeles (LA) and 2013-2014 in Anaheim, CA. Generally, WI components contributed to a larger fraction of CPM ROS activity (as much as 64% and 54% at Central LA and Anaheim, respectively). Two major source factors were identified by principal component analysis for both the WS and WI fractions: vehicular abrasion and re-suspended road dust. Univariate analysis indicated that several species were correlated with CPM ROS activity: in WS fraction, metals such as Mn, Fe, Cd and Zn were associated with WS ROS, while in WI fraction Ti, Fe, Ni, Pb and Cr had the highest correlations with WI ROS activity. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that both vehicular abrasion and re-suspension of road dust were associated with WS ROS activity, while only vehicular abrasion contributed significantly to the WI ROS activity. Moreover, comparison with previous studies indicated that the ROS activity of CPM has increased in the past 5 years in Central LA. We attribute this increase mainly to the elevated levels of re-suspension of road dust caused by the increase in vehicle speed and number of trucks in recent years in this area, reaffirming the growing importance of non-tailpipe traffic emissions on CPM toxicity. PMID:26560404

  5. EFFECTIVENESS OF THE PM 2.5 FEDERAL REFERENCE METHOD TO DIFFERENTIATE FINE AND COARSE MODE AEROSOL (A RESPONSE TO SECTION 6102(E) OF THE TRANSPORTATION EQUITY ACT FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is submitted in response to Section 6102(e) of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century, which states:

    "The Administrator shall conduct a field study of the ability of the PM2.5 Federal Reference Method to differentiate those particles that ...

  6. Personal Coarse Particulate Matter Exposures in an Adult Cohort

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volunteers associated with the North Carolina Adult Asthma and Environment Study (NCAAES) participated in an investigation of personal daily exposures to coarse and fine particulate matter size fractions (PM10-2.5, PM2.5). Data from these personal measuremen...

  7. Characterization of coarse particulate matter in school gyms

    SciTech Connect

    Branis, Martin; Safranek, Jiri

    2011-05-15

    We investigated the mass concentration, mineral composition and morphology of particles resuspended by children during scheduled physical education in urban, suburban and rural elementary school gyms in Prague (Czech Republic). Cascade impactors were deployed to sample the particulate matter. Two fractions of coarse particulate matter (PM{sub 10-2.5} and PM{sub 2.5-1.0}) were characterized by gravimetry, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. Two indicators of human activity, the number of exercising children and the number of physical education hours, were also recorded. Lower mass concentrations of coarse particulate matter were recorded outdoors (average PM{sub 10-2.5} 4.1-7.4 {mu}g m{sup -3} and PM{sub 2.5-1.0} 2.0-3.3 {mu}g m{sup -3}) than indoors (average PM{sub 10-2.5} 13.6-26.7 {mu}g m{sup -3} and PM{sub 2.5-1.0} 3.7-7.4 {mu}g m{sup -3}). The indoor concentrations of coarse aerosol were elevated during days with scheduled physical education with an average indoor-outdoor (I/O) ratio of 2.5-16.3 for the PM{sub 10-2.5} and 1.4-4.8 for the PM{sub 2.5-1.0} values. Under extreme conditions, the I/O ratios reached 180 (PM{sub 10-2.5}) and 19.1 (PM{sub 2.5-1.0}). The multiple regression analysis based on the number of students and outdoor coarse PM as independent variables showed that the main predictor of the indoor coarse PM concentrations is the number of students in the gym. The effect of outdoor coarse PM was weak and inconsistent. The regression models for the three schools explained 60-70% of the particular dataset variability. X-ray spectrometry revealed 6 main groups of minerals contributing to resuspended indoor dust. The most abundant particles were those of crustal origin composed of Si, Al, O and Ca. Scanning electron microscopy showed that, in addition to numerous inorganic particles, various types of fibers and particularly skin scales make up the main part of the resuspended dust in the gyms. In conclusion, school

  8. Cytotoxicity of PM(2.5) and PM(2.5--10) ambient air pollutants assessed by the MTT and the Comet assays.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, W L; Mo, Z Y; Fang, M; Shi, X M; Wang, F

    2000-11-20

    Ambient air particulate matters are classified into two distinct modes in size distribution, namely the coarse and fine particles. Correlation between high particulate concentration and adverse effects on human populations has long been recognized, however, the toxicology of these adverse effects has not been clarified. In the current report, the cytotoxic effects of the solvent-extractable organic compounds (SEOC) from fine particles smaller than 2.5 microm (PM(2.5)) and from coarse particles between 2.5-10 microm (PM(2.5-10)) were studied. Nine 24h consecutive monthly samples were tested to determine the correlation between cytotoxicity and total SEOC in two size fractions of particulate air pollution. Cytotoxicity of SEOC was measured by two micro-scale mammalian cells-based bioassays: the MTT cell proliferation assay, and the Comet assay for the detection of DNA damage. A well-defined mammalian cell line - Rat 6 rodent fibroblast was employed in the study. The SEOC extracts of air particulate matters were sub divided into two equal parts. One part was dissolved in DMSO, the other in KOH/hexane and then conjugated with bovine serum albumin to produce a lipid-soluble fraction for testing. The DMSO fraction would contain mainly the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), alkanes and alkanols, while the lipid-soluble fraction would be enriched with fatty acids. The results from MTT assay showed that cytotoxicity of the PM(2.5) was much more severe than the PM(2.5-10), suggesting that toxic SEOC were confined to the fine particles. By and large, the DMSO solubles were much more toxic than the lipid solubles. The degree of cytotoxicity of the DMSO soluble samples is positively correlated to the amount of particulates present in the ambient air. For the PM(2.5), the winter samples were significantly more toxic than the summer samples in terms of cell killing, which seemed to be a direct reflection of the total loading of organic matter in the samples. Results from

  9. Coarse particulate matter emissions from cattle feedlots in Australia.

    PubMed

    McGinn, S M; Flesch, T K; Chen, D; Crenna, B; Denmead, O T; Naylor, T; Rowell, D

    2010-01-01

    Open cattle feedlots are a source of air pollutants that include particular matter (PM). Over 24 h, exposure to ambient concentrations of 50 microg m(-3) of the coarse-sized fraction PM (aerodynamic diameter <10 microm [PM(10)]) is recognized as a health concern for humans. The objective of our study was to document PM(10) concentration and emissions at two cattle feedlots in Australia over several days in summer. Two automated samplers were used to monitor the background and in-feedlot PM(10) concentrations. At the in-feedlot location, the PM(10) emission was calculated using a dispersion model. Our measurements revealed that the 24-h PM(10) concentrations on some of the days approached or exceeded the health criteria threshold of 50 microg m(-3) used in Australia. A key factor responsible for the generation of PM(10) was the increased activity of cattle in the evening that coincided with peak concentrations of PM(10) (maximum, 792 microg m(-3)) between 1930 and 2000 h. Rain coincided with a severe decline in PM(10) concentration and emission. A dispersion model used in our study estimated the emission of PM(10) between 31 and 60 g animal(-1) d(-1). These data contribute to needed information on PM(10) associated with livestock to develop results-based environmental policy.

  10. Bioassay for assessing marine contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Lapota, D.; Copeland, H.; Mastny, G.; Rosenberger, D.; Duckworth, D.

    1996-03-01

    The Qwiklite bioassay, developed by the laboratory at NCCOSC, is used as a biological tool to gauge the extent of environmental contamination. Some species of marine phytoplankton produce bioluminescence. The Qwiklite bioassay determines acute response and chronic effects of a wide variety of toxicants upon bioluminescent dinotlagellates by measuring their light output after exposure.

  11. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  12. Cell-specific oxidative stress and cytotoxicity after wildfire coarse particulate matter instillation into mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Williams, Keisha M; Franzi, Lisa M; Last, Jerold A

    2013-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that coarse particulate matter (PM(10-2.5)) from wildfire smoke is more toxic to lung macrophages on an equal dose (by mass) basis than coarse PM isolated from normal ambient air, as evidenced by decreased numbers of macrophages in lung lavage fluid 6 and 24hours after PM instillation into mouse lungs in vivo and by cytotoxicity to a macrophage cell line observed directly in vitro. We hypothesized that pulmonary macrophages from mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM would undergo more cytotoxicity than macrophages from controls, and that there would be an increase in oxidative stress in their lungs. Cytotoxicity was quantified as decreased viable macrophages and increased percentages of dead macrophages in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM. At 1hour after PM instillation, we observed both decreased numbers of viable macrophages and increased dead macrophage percentages as compared to controls. An increase in free isoprostanes, an indicator of oxidative stress, from control values of 28.1±3.2pg/mL to 83.9±12.2pg/mL was observed a half-hour after PM instillation. By 1hour after PM instillation, isoprostane values had returned to 30.4±7.6pg/mL, not significantly different from control concentrations. Lung sections from mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM showed rapid Clara cell responses, with decreased intracellular staining for the Clara cell secretory protein CCSP 1hour after wildfire PM instillation. In conclusion, very rapid cytotoxicity occurs in pulmonary macrophages and oxidative stress responses are seen 0.5-1hour after wildfire coarse PM instillation. These results define early cellular and biochemical events occurring in vivo and support the hypothesis that oxidative stress-mediated macrophage toxicity plays a key role in the initial response of the mouse lung to wildfire PM exposure.

  13. Residential indoor and outdoor coarse particles and associated endotoxin exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Amanda J.; Dobbin, Nina A.; Lyrette, Ninon; Wallace, Lance; Foto, Mark; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Kearney, Jill; Van Ryswyk, Keith; Gilbert, Nicolas L.; Harrison, Ian; Rispler, Kathleen; Héroux, Marie-Eve

    2011-12-01

    There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that coarse particles (PM 10-2.5) have detrimental impacts upon health, especially for respiratory effects. There are limited data available for indoor residential exposures. Some data exist regarding the composition of this PM size fraction with emphasis on crustal elements and biological components. This study includes data from 146 homes sampled in Regina, Saskatchewan (SK) where 5-day integrated concurrent monitoring of indoor and outdoor coarse particles was conducted during the winter and summer of 2007. The coarse particle filters were subsequently analysed for endotoxin content to determine the contribution of this compound. Winter indoor geometric mean concentrations of coarse particles exceeded outdoor concentrations (3.73 μg m -3 vs 2.49 μg m -3; paired t-test p < 0.0001); however the reverse was found in summer (4.34 μg m -3 vs 8.82 μg m -3; paired t-test p < 0.0001). Linear regression indicated that winter predictors of indoor coarse particles were outdoor coarse particles, ventilation and presence of at least two or more occupants. During the summer, increased use of central air conditioning was associated with reduced coarse particles, while smoking and the presence of two or more occupants resulted in increased coarse particles. Endotoxin concentrations (EU μg -1) were lower indoors than outdoors in both seasons. Spatial variability of ambient coarse particles was assessed to determine the suitability of using a single monitoring station within a city to estimate exposure. The coefficients of variation between homes sampled simultaneously and the central monitoring station were calculated (median COV in summer = 15% and winter = 24%) and showed significant variability by week, especially during the summer months, suggesting a single site may be insufficient for characterizing exposure. Future studies should consider daily measurements per home to understand shorter term exposures and day to day

  14. Comparison of gene expression profiles induced by coarse, fine, and ultrafile particulate matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coarse, fine, and ultrafine particulate matter (PM) fractions possess different physical properties and chemical compositions and may produce different adverse health effects. Studies were undertaken to determine whether or not gene expression patterns may be used to discriminate...

  15. Prostaglandins, bioassay and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Flower, R J

    2006-01-01

    The formation of the British Pharmacological Society coincided almost exactly with a series of ground-breaking studies that ushered in an entirely new field of research – that of lipid mediator pharmacology. For many years following their chemical characterisation, lipids were considered only to be of dietary or structural importance. From the 1930s, all this changed – slowly at first and then more dramatically in the 1970s and 1980s with the emergence of the prostaglandins (PGs), the first intercellular mediators to be clearly derived from lipids, in a dynamic on-demand system. The PGs exhibit a wide range of biological activities that are still being evaluated and their properties underlie the action of one of the world's all-time favourite medicines, aspirin, as well as its more modern congeners. This paper traces the development of the PG field, with particular emphasis on the skilful utilisation of the twin techniques of bioassay and analytical chemistry by U.K. and Swedish scientists, and the intellectual interplay between them that led to the award of a joint Nobel Prize to the principal researchers in the PG field, half a century after the first discovery of these astonishingly versatile mediators. PMID:16402103

  16. Development of a continuous monitoring system for PM10 and components of PM2.5.

    PubMed

    Lippmann, M; Xiong, J Q; Li, W

    2000-01-01

    While particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters below 10 and 2.5 microns (PM10 and PM2.5) correlate with excess mortality and morbidity, there is evidence for still closer epidemiological associations with sulfate ion, and experimental exposure-response studies suggest that the hydrogen ion and ultrafine (PM0.15) concentrations may be important risk factors. Also, there are measurement artifacts in current methods used to measure ambient PM10 and PM2.5, including negative artifacts because of losses of sampled semivolatile components (ammonium nitrate and some organics) and positive artifacts due to particle-bound water. To study such issues, we are developing a semi-continuous monitoring system for PM10, PM2.5, semivolatiles (organic compounds and NH4NO3), particle-bound water, and other PM2.5 constituents that may be causal factors. PM10 is aerodynamically sorted into three size-fractions: (1) coarse (PM10-PM2.5); (2) accumulation mode (PM2.5-PM0.15); and (3) ultrafine (PM0.15). The mass concentration of each fraction is measured in terms of the linear relation between accumulated mass and pressure drop on polycarbonate pore filters. The PM0.15 mass, being highly correlated with the ultrafine number concentration, provides a good index of the total number concentration in ambient air. For the accumulation mode (PM2.5-PM0.15), which contains nearly all of the semivolatiles and particle-bound water by mass, aliquots of the aerosol stream flow into system components that continuously monitor sulfur (by flame photometry), ammonium and nitrate (by chemiluminescence following catalytic transformations to NO), organics (by thermal-optical analysis) and particle-bound water (by electrolytic hygrometer after vacuum evaporation of sampled particles). The concentration of H+ can be calculated (by ion balance using the monitoring data on NO3-, NH4+, and SO4=).

  17. Chemical characterization and mass closure of PM10 and PM2.5 at an urban site in Karachi - Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Imran; Kistler, Magdalena; Mukhtar, Azam; Ghauri, Badar M.; Ramirez-Santa Cruz, Carlos; Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans

    2016-03-01

    A mass balance method is applied to assess main source contributions to PM2.5 and PM10 levels in Karachi. Carbonaceous species (elemental carbon, organic carbon, carbonate carbon), soluble ions (Ca++, Mg++, Na+, K+, NH4+, Cl-, NO3-, SO4-), saccharides (levoglucosan, galactosan, mannosan, sucrose, fructose, glucose, arabitol and mannitol) were determined in atmospheric fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM10) aerosol samples collected under pre-monsoon conditions (March-April 2009) at an urban site in Karachi (Pakistan). The concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 were found to be 75 μg/m3 and 437 μg/m3 respectively. The large difference between PM10 and PM2.5 originated predominantly from mineral dust. "Calcareous dust" and "siliceous dust" were the over all dominating material in PM, with 46% contribution to PM2.5 and 78% to PM10-2.5. Combustion particles and secondary organics (EC + OM) comprised 23% of PM2.5 and 6% of PM10-2.5. EC, as well as OC ambient levels were higher (59% and 56%) in PM10-2.5 than in PM2.5. Biomass burning contributed about 3% to PM2.5, and had a share of about 13% of "EC + OM" in PM2.5. The impact of bioaerosol (fungal spores) was minor and had a share of 1 and 2% of the OC in the PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 size fractions. In case of secondary inorganic aerosols, ammonium sulphate (NH4)2SO4 contributes 4.4% to PM2.5 and no detectable quantity were found in fraction PM10-2.5. The sea salt contribution is about 2% both to PM2.5 and PM10-2.5.

  18. Chemical characterization and mass closure of PM10 and PM2.5 at an urban site in Karachi - Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Imran; Kistler, Magdalena; Mukhtar, Azam; Ghauri, Badar M.; Ramirez-Santa Cruz, Carlos; Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans

    2016-03-01

    A mass balance method is applied to assess main source contributions to PM2.5 and PM10 levels in Karachi. Carbonaceous species (elemental carbon, organic carbon, carbonate carbon), soluble ions (Ca++, Mg++, Na+, K+, NH4+, Cl‑, NO3‑, SO4‑), saccharides (levoglucosan, galactosan, mannosan, sucrose, fructose, glucose, arabitol and mannitol) were determined in atmospheric fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM10) aerosol samples collected under pre-monsoon conditions (March-April 2009) at an urban site in Karachi (Pakistan). The concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 were found to be 75 μg/m3 and 437 μg/m3 respectively. The large difference between PM10 and PM2.5 originated predominantly from mineral dust. "Calcareous dust" and "siliceous dust" were the over all dominating material in PM, with 46% contribution to PM2.5 and 78% to PM10-2.5. Combustion particles and secondary organics (EC + OM) comprised 23% of PM2.5 and 6% of PM10-2.5. EC, as well as OC ambient levels were higher (59% and 56%) in PM10-2.5 than in PM2.5. Biomass burning contributed about 3% to PM2.5, and had a share of about 13% of "EC + OM" in PM2.5. The impact of bioaerosol (fungal spores) was minor and had a share of 1 and 2% of the OC in the PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 size fractions. In case of secondary inorganic aerosols, ammonium sulphate (NH4)2SO4 contributes 4.4% to PM2.5 and no detectable quantity were found in fraction PM10-2.5. The sea salt contribution is about 2% both to PM2.5 and PM10-2.5.

  19. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A HIGH-VOLUME DICHOTOMOUS SAMPLER FOR CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF COARSE AND FINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the development and field evaluation of a compact high-volume dichotomous sampler (HVDS) that collects coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter. In its primary configuration as tested, the sampler size-fractionates PM10 into...

  20. Cell-specific oxidative stress and cytotoxicity after wildfire coarse particulate matter instillation into mouse lung

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Keisha M.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Last, Jerold A.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that coarse particulate matter (PM{sub 10-2.5}) from wildfire smoke is more toxic to lung macrophages on an equal dose (by mass) basis than coarse PM isolated from normal ambient air, as evidenced by decreased numbers of macrophages in lung lavage fluid 6 and 24 hours after PM instillation into mouse lungs in vivo and by cytotoxicity to a macrophage cell line observed directly in vitro. We hypothesized that pulmonary macrophages from mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM would undergo more cytotoxicity than macrophages from controls, and that there would be an increase in oxidative stress in their lungs. Cytotoxicity was quantified as decreased viable macrophages and increased percentages of dead macrophages in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM. At 1 hour after PM instillation, we observed both decreased numbers of viable macrophages and increased dead macrophage percentages as compared to controls. An increase in free isoprostanes, an indicator of oxidative stress, from control values of 28.1 ± 3.2 pg/mL to 83.9 ± 12.2 pg/mL was observed a half-hour after PM instillation. By 1 hour after PM instillation, isoprostane values had returned to 30.4 ± 7.6 pg/mL, not significantly different from control concentrations. Lung sections from mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM showed rapid Clara cell responses, with decreased intracellular staining for the Clara cell secretory protein CCSP 1 hour after wildfire PM instillation. In conclusion, very rapid cytotoxicity occurs in pulmonary macrophages and oxidative stress responses are seen 0.5–1 hour after wildfire coarse PM instillation. These results define early cellular and biochemical events occurring in vivo and support the hypothesis that oxidative stress-mediated macrophage toxicity plays a key role in the initial response of the mouse lung to wildfire PM exposure. -- Highlights: ► We studied very early events (0.5–1 hour) after

  1. Personal coarse particulate matter exposures in an adult cohort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ron; Case, Martin; Yeatts, Karin; Chen, Fu-Lin; Scott, James; Svendsen, Erik; Devlin, Robert

    Volunteers associated with the North Carolina Adult Asthma and Environment Study (NCAAES) participated in an investigation of personal daily exposures to coarse and fine particulate matter size fractions (PM 10-2.5, PM 2.5). Data from these personal measurements were then compared to community-based measures that might typically represent surrogate measurements of exposure often used in epidemiological assessments. To determine personal exposures to various particulate matter (PM) size fractions, a recently evaluated personal PM monitor capable of direct PM 10-2.5 size fraction collection was used. Participants living in the central region of North Carolina and enrolled in the NCAAES were asked to wear the monitor attached to a supporting backpack for 24-h collection periods. These volunteers were monitored for 2 to 4 days with subsequent gravimetric analysis of their PM samples. Personal PM 10-2.5 mass concentrations were observed to be highly variable and ranged from 7.6 to 40.2 μg/m 3 over an 8-month period. The median for this measurement from all participants (50th percentile) was 13.7 μg/m 3. A coefficient of determination ( r2) of 0.02 was established for community-based PM 10-2.5 mass concentrations versus personal exposures. Similar coefficients established for PM 2.5 mass revealed only a modest improvement in agreement ( r2 = 0.12). Data from the exposure findings are reported here.

  2. AMBIENT COARSE PARTICULATE MATTER ASSOCIATED WITH PLASMINOGEN AND FIBRIOGEN LEVELS IN ADULT ASTHMATICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Recent reports indicate that the elderly and those with cardiovascular disease are susceptible to fine and coarse particulate matter (PM 2.5, PM 2.5-10) exposures. Asthmatics are thought to be primarily affected via airway inflammation. We investigated whether mark...

  3. Sediment bioassays with oyster larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, P.M.; Morgan, J.D.

    1983-10-01

    Tests with naturally-occurring sediments are rare and sediment testing methodology is not standardized. The authors present a simple methodology for undertaking sediment bioassays with oyster larvae, and present data from a recent study to prove the utility of this method.

  4. Variability of aerosols and chemical composition of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 on a platform of the Prague underground metro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusack, M.; Talbot, N.; Ondráček, J.; Minguillón, M. C.; Martins, V.; Klouda, K.; Schwarz, J.; Ždímal, V.

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 and particle number concentration and size distribution were measured for 24 h on a platform of the Prague underground metro in October 2013. The three PM fractions were analysed for major and minor elements, secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA) and total carbon (TC). Measurements were performed both when the metro was inoperative and closed to the public (referred to as background), and when the metro was in operation and open to passengers. PM concentrations were elevated during both periods, but were substantially increased in the coarse fraction during hours when the metro was in operation. Average PM concentrations were 214.8, 93.9 and 44.8 μg m-3 for PM10, PM2.5 and PM1, respectively (determined gravimetrically). Average particle number concentrations were 8.5 × 103 cm-3 for background hours and 11.5 × 103 cm-3 during operational hours. Particle number concentrations were found to not vary as significantly as PM concentrations throughout the day. Variations in PM were strongly governed by passing trains, with highest concentrations recorded during rush hour. When trains were less frequent, PM concentrations were shown to fluctuate in unison with the entrance and exit of trains (as shown by wind velocity measured on the platform). PM was found to be highly enriched with iron, especially in the coarse fraction, comprising 46% of PM10 (98.9 μg m-3). This reduces to 6.7 μg m-3 during background hours, proving that the trains themselves were the main source of iron, most probably from wheel-rail mechanical abrasion. Other enriched elements relative to background hours included Ba, Cu, Mn, Cr, Mo, Ni and Co, among others. Many of these elements exhibited a similar size distribution, further indicating their sources were common and were attributed to train operations.

  5. Composition and Sources of Fine and Coarse Particles Collected during 2002–2010 in Boston, MA

    PubMed Central

    Masri, Shahir; Kang, Choong-Min; Koutrakis, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the sources, composition, and temporal variability of fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM2.5-10) particles is a crucial component in understanding PM toxicity and establishing proper PM regulations. In this study, a Harvard Impactor was used to collect daily integrated fine and coarse particle samples every third day for nine years at a single site in Boston, MA. A total of 1,960 filters were analyzed for elements, black carbon (BC), and total PM mass. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was used to identify source types and quantify their contributions to ambient PM2.5 and PM2.5-10. BC and 17 elements were identified as the main constituents in our samples. Results showed that BC, S, and Pb were associated exclusively with the fine particle mode, while 84% of V and 79% of Ni were associated with this mode. Elements mostly found in the coarse mode, over 80%, included Ca, Mn (road dust), and Cl (sea salt). PMF identified six source types for PM2.5 and three source types for PM2.5-10. Source types for PM2.5 included regional pollution, motor vehicles, sea salt, crustal/road dust, oil combustion, and wood burning. Regional pollution contributed the most, accounting for 48% of total PM2.5 mass, followed by motor vehicles (21%) and wood burning (19%). Source types for PM2.5-10 included crustal/road dust (62%), motor vehicles (22%), and sea salt (16%). A linear decrease in PM concentrations with time was observed for both fine (−5.2%/yr) and coarse (−3.6%/yr) particles. The fine-mode trend was mostly related to oil combustion and regional pollution contributions. Average PM2.5 concentrations peaked in summer (10.4 μg/m3) while PM2.5-10 concentrations were lower and demonstrated little seasonal variability. The findings of this study show that PM25 is decreasing more sharply than PM2.5-10 over time. This suggests the increasing importance of PM2.5-10 and traffic-related sources for PM exposure and future policies. PMID:25947125

  6. 77 FR 14837 - Bioassay at Uranium Mills

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... COMMISSION Bioassay at Uranium Mills AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft regulatory guide... for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-8051, ``Bioassay at Uranium Mills.'' This guide describes a bioassay program acceptable to the NRC staff for uranium mills and applicable portions...

  7. TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 emissions from a beef cattle feedlot using the flux-gradient technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, Henry F.; Maghirang, Ronaldo G.; Trabue, Steven L.; McConnell, Laura L.; Prueger, John H.; Bonifacio, Edna R.

    2015-01-01

    Emissions data on air pollutants from large open-lot beef cattle feedlots are limited. This research was conducted to determine emissions of total suspended particulates (TSP) and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) from a commercial beef cattle feedlot in Kansas (USA). Vertical particulate concentration profiles at the feedlot were measured using gravimetric samplers, and micrometeorological parameters were monitored with eddy covariance instrumentation during the nine 4- to 5-day intensive sampling campaigns from May 2010 through September 2011. Emission fluxes were determined from the measured concentration gradients and meteorological parameters using the flux-gradient technique. PM ratios based on calculated emission fluxes were 0.28 for PM2.5/PM10, 0.12 for PM2.5/TSP, and 0.24 for PM10/TSP, indicating that a large fraction of the PM emitted at the studied feedlot was in the coarse range of aerodynamic diameter, >10 μm. Median daily emission factors were 57, 21, and 11 kg 1000-head (hd)-1 d-1 for TSP (n = 20 days), PM10 (n = 19 days), and PM2.5 (n = 11 days), respectively. Cattle pen surface moisture contents of at least 20-30% significantly reduced both TSP and PM10 emissions, but moisture's effect on PM2.5 emissions was not established due to difficulty in measuring PM2.5 concentrations under low-PM conditions.

  8. Predictors of coarse particulate matter and associated endotoxin concentrations in residential environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, Md. Aynul; MacNeill, Morgan; Kindzierski, Warren B.; Wallace, Lance; Héroux, Marie-Ève; Wheeler, Amanda J.

    2014-08-01

    Exposure to coarse particulate matter (PM), i.e., particles with an aerodynamic diameter between 2.5 and 10 μm (PM10-2.5), is of increasing interest due to the potential for health effects including asthma, allergy and respiratory symptoms. Limited information is available on indoor and outdoor coarse PM and associated endotoxin exposures. Seven consecutive 24-h samples of indoor and outdoor coarse PM were collected during winter and summer 2010 using Harvard Coarse Impactors in a total of 74 Edmonton homes where no reported smoking took place. Coarse PM filters were subsequently analyzed for endotoxin content. Data were also collected on indoor and outdoor temperature, relative humidity, air exchange rate, housing characteristics and occupants' activities. During winter, outdoor concentrations of coarse PM (median = 6.7 μg/m3, interquartile range, IQR = 3.4-12 μg/m3) were found to be higher than indoor concentrations (median 3.4 μg/m3, IQR = 1.6-5.7 μg/m3); while summer levels of indoor and outdoor concentrations were similar (median 4.5 μg/m3, IQR = 2.3-6.8 μg/m3, and median 4.7 μg/m3, IQR = 2.1-7.9 μg/m3, respectively). Similar predictors were identified for indoor coarse PM in both seasons and included corresponding outdoor coarse PM concentrations, whether vacuuming, sweeping or dusting was performed during the sampling period, and number of occupants in the home. Winter indoor coarse PM predictors also included the number of dogs and indoor endotoxin concentrations. Summer median endotoxin concentrations (indoor: 0.41 EU/m3, outdoor: 0.64 EU/m3) were 4-fold higher than winter concentrations (indoor: 0.12 EU/m3, outdoor: 0.16 EU/m3). Other than outdoor endotoxin concentrations, indoor endotoxin concentration predictors for both seasons were different. Winter endotoxin predictors also included presence of furry pets and whether the vacuum had a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. Summer endotoxin predictors were problems with mice in the

  9. Characterization and Cytotoxicity of PM<0.2, PM0.2–2.5 and PM2.5–10 around MSWI in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lingling; Zeng, Jianrong; Liu, Ke; Bao, Liangman; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The potential impact of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI), which is an anthropogenic source of aerosol emissions, is of great public health concern. This study investigated the characterization and cytotoxic effects of ambient ultrafine particles (PM<0.2), fine particles (PM0.2–2.5) and coarse particles (PM2.5–10) collected around a municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plant in the Pudong district of Shanghai. Methods: Mass concentrations of trace elements in particulate matter (PM) samples were determined using ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry). The cytotoxicity of sampled atmospheric PM was evaluated by cell viability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in A549 cells. Result: The mass percentage of PM0.2–2.5 accounted for 72.91% of the total mass of PM. Crustal metals (Mg, Al, and Ti) were abundant in the coarse particles, while the anthropogenic elements (V, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) were dominant in the fine particles. The enrichment factors of Zn, Cd and Pb in the fine and ultrafine particles were extremely high (>100). The cytotoxicity of the size-resolved particles was in the order of coarse particles < fine particles < ultrafine particles. Conclusions: Fine particles dominated the MSWI ambient particles. Emissions from the MSWI could bring contamination of anthropogenic elements (Zn, Cd and Pb) into ambient environment. The PM around the MSWI plant displayed an additive toxic effect, and the ultrafine and fine particles possessed higher biological toxicity than the coarse particles. PMID:25985309

  10. The characteristics of coarse particulate matter air pollution associated with alterations in blood pressure and heart rate during controlled exposures

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Masako; Bard, Robert L.; Wang, Lu; Das, Ritabrata; Dvonch, J. Timothy; Spino, Catherine; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Sun, Qinghua; Harkema, Jack R.; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Brook, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Although fine particulate matter (PM) air pollution <2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) is a leading cause of global morbidity and mortality, the potential health effects of coarse PM (2.5–10 μm in aerodynamic diameter; PM10–2.5) remain less clearly understood. We aimed to elucidate the components within coarse PM most likely responsible for mediating these hemodynamic alterations. Thirty-two healthy adults (25.9 ± 6.6 years) were exposed to concentrated ambient coarse PM (CAP) (76.2 ± 51.5 μg/m3) and filtered air (FA) for 2 h in a rural location in a randomized double-blind crossover study. The particle constituents (24 individual elements, organic and elemental carbon) were analyzed from filter samples and associated with the blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) changes occurring throughout CAP and FA exposures in mixed model analyses. Total coarse PM mass along with most of the measured elements were positively associated with similar degrees of elevations in both systolic BP and HR. Conversely, total PM mass was unrelated, whereas only two elements (Cu and Mo) were positively associated with and Zn was inversely related to diastolic BP changes during exposures. Inhalation of coarse PM from a rural location rapidly elevates systolic BP and HR in a concentration-responsive manner, whereas the particulate composition does not appear to be an important determinant of these responses. Conversely, exposure to certain PM elements may be necessary to trigger a concomitant increase in diastolic BP. These findings suggest that particulate mass may be an adequate metric of exposure to predict some, but not all, hemodynamic alterations induced by coarse PM mass. PMID:25227729

  11. The rural carbonaceous aerosols in coarse, fine, and ultrafine particles during haze pollution in northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chong-Shu; Cao, Jun-Ji; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn; Shen, Zhen-Xing; Liu, Sui-Xin; Huang, Ru-Jin; Zhang, Ning-ning; Wang, Ping

    2016-03-01

    The carbonaceous aerosol concentrations in coarse particle (PM10: Dp ≤ 10 μm, particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm), fine particle (PM2.5: Dp ≤ 2.5 μm), and ultrafine particle (PM0.133: Dp ≤ 0.133 μm) carbon fractions in a rural area were investigated during haze events in northwestern China. The results indicated that PM2.5 contributed a large fraction in PM10. OC (organic carbon) accounted for 33, 41, and 62 % of PM10, PM2.5, and PM0.133, and those were 2, 2.4, and 0.4 % for EC (elemental carbon) in a rural area, respectively. OC3 was more abundant than other organic carbon fractions in three PMs, and char dominated EC in PM10 and PM2.5 while soot dominated EC in PM0.133. The present study inferred that K(+), OP, and OC3 are good biomass burning tracers for rural PM10 and PM2.5, but not for PM0.133 during haze pollution. Our results suggest that biomass burning is likely to be an important contributor to rural PMs in northwestern China. It is necessary to establish biomass burning control policies for the mitigation of severe haze pollution in a rural area.

  12. Coarse particles and respiratory emergency department visits in California.

    PubMed

    Malig, Brian J; Green, Shelley; Basu, Rupa; Broadwin, Rachel

    2013-07-01

    Although respiratory disease has been strongly connected to fine particulate air pollution (particulate matter <2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5)), evidence has been mixed regarding the effects of coarse particles (particulate matter from 2.5 to 10 μm in diameter), possibly because of the greater spatial heterogeneity of coarse particles. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between coarse particles and respiratory emergency department visits, including common subdiagnoses, from 2005 to 2008 in 35 California counties. A time-stratified case-crossover design was used to help control for time-invariant confounders and seasonal influences, and the study population was limited to those residing within 20 km of pollution monitors to mitigate the influence of spatial heterogeneity. Significant associations between respiratory emergency department visits and coarse particle levels were observed. Asthma visits showed associations (for 2-day lag, excess risk per 10 μg/m³ = 3.3%, 95% confidence interval: 2.0, 4.6) that were robust to adjustment by other common air pollutants (particles <2.5 μm in diameter, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide). Pneumonia and acute respiratory infection visits were not associated, although some suggestion of a relationship with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease visits was present. Our results indicate that coarse particle exposure may trigger asthma exacerbations requiring emergency care, and reducing exposures among asthmatic persons may provide benefits.

  13. Temporal and Spatial Variations in PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 in the Seoul Metropolitan Area between 2002 and 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghim, Y.; Jung, K.; Kang, M.

    2010-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM; PM10 and PM2.5) concentrations at ambient air monitoring stations located in Seoul between 2002 and 2008 were analyzed. In Korea, PM10 is regulated as a criteria pollutant and thus is monitored as a part of the urban ambient air pollution monitoring network. PM2.5 is currently not a criteria pollutant but will be soon designated as a criteria pollutant. The hourly-average PM10 and PM2.5 samples were collected using the beta-ray absorption method. In this study, data from 14 stations with consistent measurements during the study period were used. As in other major cities, primary factors determining the PM concentrations in Seoul are vehicle emissions (including emissions from other combustion sources) and secondary formation. However, in Seoul, fugitive dust comprising crustal elements accounts for a large proportion of total PM, especially coarse particles (PM10-2.5). During the past several years, the Korean Government as well as the City Government has strived to lessen the PM pollution in Seoul and its satellite cities. Temporal and spatial variations in fine particles (PM2.5) and coarse particles (PM10-2.5) were analyzed to discern behaviors according to the particle size of fugitive dust. Variations in annual averages were examined to assess the effects of policy on PM levels. The influence of fugitive dust was found to be high in the springtime due to low relative humidity and high wind speed, even excluding the Asian dust events. In contrast, PM levels are affected primarily by combustion-related emissions in winter and active secondary formation in later spring and fall. Typical seasonal characteristics and diurnal variations were also explored based on data for high PM2.5 days only. Spatial variability of PM and PM10-2.5 were examined on both all and high PM2.5 days and compared with those of other pollutants.

  14. Acute exposure to fine and coarse particulate matter and infant mortality in Tokyo, Japan (2002-2013).

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Kashima, Saori; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have evaluated the effect of short-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) less than 2.5μm in diameter (PM2.5) or to coarse particles on infant mortality. We evaluated the association between short-term exposure to PM and infant mortality in Japan and assessed whether adverse health effects were observable at PM concentrations below Japanese air quality guidelines. We used a time-stratified, case-crossover design. The participants included 2086 infants who died in the 23 urbanized wards of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government between January 2002 and December 2013. We obtained measures of PM2.5 and suspended particulate matter (SPM; PM<7μm in diameter) from one general monitoring station. As a measure of coarse particles, we calculated PM7-2.5 by subtracting PM2.5 from SPM. We then used conditional logistic regression to analyze the data. Same-day PM2.5 was associated with increased risks of infant and postneonatal mortality, especially for mortality related to respiratory causes. For a 10μg/m(3) increase in PM2.5, the odds ratios were 1.06 (95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.12) for infant mortality and 1.10 (1.02-1.19) for postneonatal mortality. PM7-2.5 was also associated with an increased risk of postneonatal mortality, independent of PM2.5. Even when PM2.5 and SPM concentrations were below Japanese air quality guidelines, we observed adverse health effects. This study provides further evidence that acute exposure to PM2.5 and coarse particles (PM7-2.5) is associated with an increased risk of infant mortality. Further, rigorous evaluation of air quality guidelines for daily average PM2.5 and larger particles is needed.

  15. Wintertime PM 2.5 and PM 10 carbonaceous and inorganic constituents from urban site in western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengarajan, R.; Sudheer, A. K.; Sarin, M. M.

    2011-12-01

    Daily variability in the chemical composition of atmospheric PM 2.5 and PM 10 has been studied from an urban site (Ahmedabad) in western India over a span of 30 days during winter. The PM 2.5 and PM 10 mass concentrations ranged from 32 to 106 μg m - 3 and 121 to 327 μg m - 3 , respectively. On average, PM 2.5 constitutes ~ 33% of PM 10, indicating dominance of coarse mode aerosols in the urban atmosphere. The particulate EC and OC show higher abundances in PM 2.5 (average: 3.0 ± 0.9 and 18.3 ± 5.9 μg m - 3 respectively) whereas those in PM 10 are 4.4 ± 2.4 and 29.8 ± 11.2 μg m - 3 respectively. A linear increasing trend and representative OC/EC ratio of 6.2 indicate their primary source from biomass burning emissions. The water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC: 4.0-14.7 μg m - 3 ) and its linear relationship with K + (0.6-1.7 μg m - 3 ) in PM 2.5 further support biomass burning emissions as a dominant source for carbonaceous aerosol. Among water-soluble inorganic species, SO 42- is the most abundant (range: 3.2-22.5 μg m - 3 ); almost all of it occurs in fine mode (PM 2.5) and exhibits near-quantitative neutralization with NH 4+ (r = 0.98, slope: 1.3). The water-soluble Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ mainly abundant in the coarse mode, suggest significant contribution from mineral dust. Documenting large temporal variability in the chemical composition of coarse and fine mode aerosol is essential in order to assess the changing regional emission scenario over mega-cities and their down-wind transport.

  16. Analysis of PM10, PM2.5, and PM2 5-10 concentrations in Santiago, Chile, from 1989 to 2001.

    PubMed

    Koutrakis, Petros; Sax, Sonja N; Sarnat, Jeremy A; Coull, Brent; Demokritou, Phil; Oyola, Pedro; Garcia, Javier; Gramsch, Ernesto

    2005-03-01

    Daily particle samples were collected in Santiago, Chile, at four urban locations from January 1, 1989, through December 31, 2001. Both fine PM with da < 2.5 microm (PM2.5) and coarse PM with 2.5 < da < 10 microm (PM2.5-10) were collected using dichotomous samplers. The inhalable particle fraction, PM10, was determined as the sum of fine and coarse concentrations. Wind speed, temperature and relative humidity (RH) were also measured continuously. Average concentrations of PM2.5 for the 1989-2001 period ranged from 38.5 microg/m3 to 53 microg/m3. For PM2.5-10 levels ranged from 35.8-48.2 microg/m3 and for PM10 results were 74.4-101.2 microg/m3 across the four sites. Both annual and daily PM2.5 and PM10 concentration levels exceeded the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards and the European Union concentration limits. Mean PM2.5 levels during the cold season (April through September) were more than twice as high as those observed in the warm season (October through March); whereas coarse particle levels were similar in both seasons. PM concentration trends were investigated using regression models, controlling for site, weekday, month, wind speed, temperature, and RH. Results showed that PM2.5 concentrations decreased substantially, 52% over the 12-year period (1989-2000), whereas PM2.5-10 concentrations increased by approximately 50% in the first 5 years and then decreased by a similar percentage over the following 7 years. These decreases were evident even after controlling for significant climatic effects. These results suggest that the pollution reduction programs developed and implemented by the Comisión Nacional del Medio Ambiente (CONAMA) have been effective in reducing particle levels in the Santiago Metropolitan region. However, particle levels remain high and it is thus imperative that efforts to improve air quality continue.

  17. Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Biosensors and Bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Mao, Xun; Gurung, Anant; Baloda, Meenu; Lin, Yuehe; He, Yuqing

    2010-08-31

    This book chapter summarizes the recent advance in nanomaterials for electrochemical biosensors and bioassays. Biofunctionalization of nanomaterials for biosensors fabrication and their biomedical applications are discussed.

  18. Chemical mass balance source apportionment of fine and PM10 in the Desert Southwest, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Desert Southwest Coarse Particulate Matter Study was undertaken in Pinal County, Arizona, to better understand the origin and impact of sources of fine and coarse particulate matter (PM) in rural, arid regions of the U.S. southwestern desert. The desert southwest experiences ...

  19. Characterizing and predicting coarse and fine particulates in classrooms located close to an urban roadway.

    PubMed

    Chithra, V S; Nagendra, S M Shiva

    2014-08-01

    The PM10, PM2.5, and PM1 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters < 10, < 2.5, and < 1 microm, respectively) concentrations were monitored over a 90-day period in a naturally ventilated school building located at roadside in Chennai City. The 24-hr average PM10, PM2.5, and PM1 concentrations at indoor and outdoor environments were found to be 136 +/- 60, 36 +/- 15, and 20 +/- 12 and 76 +/- 42, 33 +/- 16, and 23 +/- 14 microg/m3, respectively. The size distribution of PM in the classroom indicated that coarse mode was dominant during working hours (08:00 a.m. to 04:00 p.m.), whereas fine mode was dominant during nonworking hours (04:00 p.m. to 08:00 a.m.). The increase in coarser particles coincided with occupant activities in the classrooms and finer particles were correlated with outdoor traffic. Analysis of indoor PM10, PM2.5, and PM1 concentrations monitored at another school, which is located at urban reserved forest area (background site) indicated 3-4 times lower PM10 concentration than the school located at roadside. Also, the indoor PM1 and PM2.5 concentrations were 1.3-1.5 times lower at background site. Further, a mass balance indoor air quality (IAQ) model was modified to predict the indoor PM concentration in the classroom. Results indicated good agreement between the predicted and measured indoor PM2.5 (R2 = 0.72-0.81) and PM1 (R2 = 0.81-0.87) concentrations. But, the measured and predicted PM10 concentrations showed poor correlation (R2 = 0.17-0.23), which may be because the IAQ model could not take into account the sudden increase in PM10 concentration (resuspension of large size particles) due to human activities. Implications: The present study discusses characteristics of the indoor coarse and fine PM concentrations of a naturally ventilated school building located close to an urban roadway and at a background site in Chennai City, India. The study results will be useful to engineers and policymakers to prepare strategies for improving the

  20. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Outdoor Coarse Particulate Matter Mass Concentrations Measured with a New Coarse Particulate Sampler during the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) provided data to compare outdoor residential coarse particulate matter (PM10-2.5) concentrations in six different areas of Detroit with data from a central monitoring site. Daily and seasonal influences on the spa...

  1. The Effect of Fine and Coarse Particulate Air Pollution on Mortality: A National Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zanobetti, Antonella; Schwartz, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Background Although many studies have examined the effects of air pollution on mortality, data limitations have resulted in fewer studies of both particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5; fine particles) and of coarse particles (particles with an aerodynamic diameter > 2.5 and < 10 μm; PM coarse). We conducted a national, multicity time-series study of the acute effect of PM2.5 and PM coarse on the increased risk of death for all causes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and respiratory mortality for the years 1999–2005. Method We applied a city- and season-specific Poisson regression in 112 U.S. cities to examine the association of mean (day of death and previous day) PM2.5 and PM coarse with daily deaths. We combined the city-specific estimates using a random effects approach, in total, by season and by region. Results We found a 0.98% increase [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.75–1.22] in total mortality, a 0.85% increase (95% CI, 0.46–1.24) in CVD, a 1.18% increase (95% CI, 0.48–1.89) in MI, a 1.78% increase (95% CI, 0.96–2.62) in stroke, and a 1.68% increase (95% CI, 1.04–2.33) in respiratory deaths for a 10-μg/m3 increase in 2-day averaged PM2.5. The effects were higher in spring. For PM coarse, we found significant but smaller increases for all causes analyzed. Conclusions We conclude that our analysis showed an increased risk of mortality for all and specific causes associated with PM2.5, and the risks are higher than what was previously observed for PM10. In addition, coarse particles are also associated with more deaths. PMID:19590680

  2. Bioassays Based on Molecular Nanomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Arun

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that when specific biomolecular interactions are confined to one surface of a microcantilever beam, changes in intermolecular nanomechanical forces provide sufficient differential torque to bend the cantilever beam. This has been used to detect single base pair mismatches during DNA hybridization, as well as prostate specific antigen (PSA) at concentrations and conditions that are clinically relevant for prostate cancer diagnosis. Since cantilever motion originates from free energy change induced by specific biomolecular binding, this technique is now offering a common platform for label-free quantitative analysis of protein-protein binding, DNA hybridization DNA-protein interactions, and in general receptor-ligand interactions. Current work is focused on developing “universal microarrays” of microcantilever beams for high-throughput multiplexed bioassays. PMID:12590170

  3. Bioassays Based on Molecular Nanomechanics

    DOE PAGES

    Majumdar, Arun

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that when specific biomolecular interactions are confined to one surface of a microcantilever beam, changes in intermolecular nanomechanical forces provide sufficient differential torque to bend the cantilever beam. This has been used to detect single base pair mismatches during DNA hybridization, as well as prostate specific antigen (PSA) at concentrations and conditions that are clinically relevant for prostate cancer diagnosis. Since cantilever motion originates from free energy change induced by specific biomolecular binding, this technique is now offering a common platform for label-free quantitative analysis of protein-protein binding, DNA hybridization DNA-protein interactions, and in general receptor-ligandmore » interactions. Current work is focused on developing “universal microarrays” of microcantilever beams for high-throughput multiplexed bioassays.« less

  4. Associations of acute exposure to fine and coarse particulate matter and mortality among older people in Tokyo, Japan.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Kashima, Saori; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-15

    Recent studies have reported adverse health effects of short-term exposure to coarse particles independent of particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5), but evidence in Asian countries is limited. We therefore evaluated associations between short-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) and mortality among older people in Tokyo, Japan. We used a time-stratified, case-crossover design. Study participants included 664,509 older people (≥65 years old) in the 23 urbanized wards of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government, who died between January 2002 and December 2013. We obtained PM2.5 and suspended particulate matter (SPM; PM<7 μm in diameter) from one general monitoring station. We calculated PM7-2.5 by subtracting PM2.5 from SPM to account for coarse particles. We then used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 confidence intervals (CIs). Same-day PM2.5 and PM7-2.5 were independently associated with all-cause and cause-specific mortality related to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases; for example, both pollutants were positively associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality even after simultaneous adjustment for each pollutant: OR of 1.006 (95% CI: 1.003, 1.009) for PM2.5 and 1.016 (95% CI: 1.011, 1.022) for PM7-2.5. Even below concentrations stipulated by the Japanese air quality guidelines for PM2.5 and SPM (PM7), we observed adverse health effects. This study provides further evidence that acute exposure to PM2.5 and coarse particles is associated with increased risk of mortality among older people. Rigorous evaluation of air quality guidelines for daily average PM2.5 and larger particles should be continued.

  5. Retrospective prediction of intraurban spatiotemporal distribution of PM2.5 in Taipei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwa-Lung, Yu; Chih-Hsin, Wang

    2010-08-01

    Numerous studies have shown that fine airborne particulate matter particles (PM2.5) are more dangerous to human health than coarse particles, e.g. PM10. The assessment of the impacts to human health or ecological effects by long-term PM2.5 exposure is often limited by lack of PM2.5 measurements. In Taipei, PM2.5 was not systematically observed until August, 2005. Taipei is the largest metropolitan area in Taiwan, where a variety of industrial and traffic emissions are continuously generated and distributed across space and time. PM-related data, i.e., PM10 and Total Suspended Particles (TSP) are independently systematically collected by different central and local government institutes. In this study, the retrospective prediction of spatiotemporal distribution of monthly PM2.5 over Taipei will be performed by using Bayesian Maximum Entropy method (BME) to integrate (a) the spatiotemporal dependence among PM measurements (i.e. PM10, TSP, and PM2.5), (b) the site-specific information of PM measurements which can be certain or uncertain information, and (c) empirical evidence about the PM2.5/PM10 and PM10/TSP ratios. The performance assessment of the retrospective prediction for the spatiotemporal distribution of PM2.5 was performed over space and time during 2003-2004 by comparing the posterior pdf of PM2.5 with the observations. Results show that the incorporation of PM10 and TSP observations by BME method can effectively improve the spatiotemporal PM2.5 estimation in the sense of lower mean and standard deviation of estimation errors. Moreover, the spatiotemporal retrospective prediction with PM2.5/PM10 and PM2.5/TSP ratios can provide good estimations of the range of PM2.5 levels over space and time during 2003-2004 in Taipei.

  6. Concentration dynamics of coarse and fine particulate matter at and around signalised traffic intersections.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Goel, Anju

    2016-09-14

    The understanding of rapidly evolving concentrations of particulate matter (PMC) at signalised traffic intersections (TIs) is limited, but it is important for accurate exposure assessment. We performed "mobile" and "fixed-site" monitoring of size-resolved PMCs in the 0.25-34 μm range at TIs. On-road mobile measurements were made inside a car under five different ventilation settings on a 6 km long round route, passing through 10 different TIs. Fixed-site measurements were conducted at two types (3- and 4-way) of TIs. The aims were to assess the effects of different ventilation settings on in-vehicle PMCs and their comparison during delay conditions at the TIs with those experienced by pedestrians while crossing these TIs. We also estimated the zone of influence (ZoI) for PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 under different driving conditions and fitted the probability distribution functions to fixed-site data to understand the concentration and exposure dynamics of coarse and fine particles around the studied (3- and 4-way) TIs. The fine particles (PM2.5) showed a strong positive exponential correlation with the air exchange rates under different ventilation settings compared with coarse particles (PM2.5-10) showing an opposite trend. This suggested that the ventilation system of the car was relatively more efficient in removing coarse particles from the incoming outside air. On-road median PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 during delays at the TIs were ∼40%, 16% and 17% higher, respectively, compared with free-flow conditions on the rest of the route. About 7% of the average commuting time spent during delay conditions over all the runs at the TIs corresponded to 10, 7 and 8% of the total respiratory deposition dose (RDD) for PM10, PM2.5 and PM1, respectively. The maximum length of the ZoI for PM2.5 and PM1 was highest at the 4-way TI and the maximum length of the ZoI for PM10 was highest at the 3-way TI. The on-road average RDD rate of PM10 inside the cabin when windows were fully open was

  7. Concentration dynamics of coarse and fine particulate matter at and around signalised traffic intersections.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Goel, Anju

    2016-09-14

    The understanding of rapidly evolving concentrations of particulate matter (PMC) at signalised traffic intersections (TIs) is limited, but it is important for accurate exposure assessment. We performed "mobile" and "fixed-site" monitoring of size-resolved PMCs in the 0.25-34 μm range at TIs. On-road mobile measurements were made inside a car under five different ventilation settings on a 6 km long round route, passing through 10 different TIs. Fixed-site measurements were conducted at two types (3- and 4-way) of TIs. The aims were to assess the effects of different ventilation settings on in-vehicle PMCs and their comparison during delay conditions at the TIs with those experienced by pedestrians while crossing these TIs. We also estimated the zone of influence (ZoI) for PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 under different driving conditions and fitted the probability distribution functions to fixed-site data to understand the concentration and exposure dynamics of coarse and fine particles around the studied (3- and 4-way) TIs. The fine particles (PM2.5) showed a strong positive exponential correlation with the air exchange rates under different ventilation settings compared with coarse particles (PM2.5-10) showing an opposite trend. This suggested that the ventilation system of the car was relatively more efficient in removing coarse particles from the incoming outside air. On-road median PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 during delays at the TIs were ∼40%, 16% and 17% higher, respectively, compared with free-flow conditions on the rest of the route. About 7% of the average commuting time spent during delay conditions over all the runs at the TIs corresponded to 10, 7 and 8% of the total respiratory deposition dose (RDD) for PM10, PM2.5 and PM1, respectively. The maximum length of the ZoI for PM2.5 and PM1 was highest at the 4-way TI and the maximum length of the ZoI for PM10 was highest at the 3-way TI. The on-road average RDD rate of PM10 inside the cabin when windows were fully open was

  8. Passive Sampling to Capture the Spatial Variability of Coarse Particles by Composition in Cleveland, OH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive samplers deployed at 25 sites for three week-long intervals were used to characterize spatial variability in the mass and composition of coarse particulate matter (PM10-2.5) in Cleveland, OH in summer 2008. The size and composition of individual particles deter...

  9. DIRECT PERSONAL COARSE PARTICULATE MATTER CONCENTRATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH THE NORTH CAROLINA ADULT ASTHMA AND ENVIRONMENT STUDY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype coarse particulate matter PM(10-2.5) monitor was field evaluated as part of the North Carolina Adult Asthma and Environment Study (NCAAES). The NCAAES was designed to evaluate if airway and blood inflammatory markers in moderate asthmatic adults vary with changes in ...

  10. MULTI-SITE PERFORMANCE EVALUATIONS OF CANDIDATE METHODOLOGIES FOR DETERMINING COARSE PARTICULATE MATTER (PMC) CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comprehensive field studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of sampling methods for measuring the coarse fraction of PM10 in ambient air. Five separate sampling approaches were evaluated at each of three sampling sites. As the primary basis of comparison, a discret...

  11. MULTI-SITE EVALUATIONS OF CANDIDATE METHODOLOGIES FOR DETERMINING COARSE PARTICULATE MATTER (PMC) CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comprehensive field studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of sampling methods for measuring the coarse fraction of PM10 in ambient air. Five separate sampling approaches were evaluated at each of three sampling sites. As the primary basis of comparison, a discrete ...

  12. MULTI-SITE EVALUATIONS OF CANDIDATE METHODOLOGIES FOR DETERMINING COARSE PARTICULATE MATTER (PMC) CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comprehensive field studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of sampling methods for measuring the coarse fraction of PM10 in ambient air. Five separate sampling approaches were evaluated at each of three sampling sites. As the primary basis of comparison, a discret...

  13. Lung antioxidant and cytokine responses to coarse and fine particulate matter from the great California wildfires of 2008.

    PubMed

    Wegesser, Teresa C; Franzi, Lisa M; Mitloehner, Frank M; Eiguren-Fernandez, Arantza; Last, Jerold A

    2010-06-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated that wildfire-derived coarse or fine particulate matter (PM) intratracheally instilled into lungs of mice induce a strong inflammatory response. In the current study, the authors demonstrate that wildfire PM simultaneously cause major increases in oxidative stress in the mouse lungs as measured by decreased antioxidant content of the lung lavage supernatant fluid 6 and 24 h after PM administration. Concentrations of neutrophil chemokines/cytokines and of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were elevated in the lung lavage fluid obtained 6 and 24 h after PM instillation, consistent with the strong neutrophilic inflammatory response observed in the lungs 24 h after PM administration, suggesting a relationship between the proinflammatory activity of the PM and the measured level of antioxidant capacity in the lung lavage fluid. Chemical analysis shows relatively low levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons compared to published results from typical urban PM. Coarse PM fraction is more active (proinflammatory activity and oxidative stress) on an equal-dose basis than the fine PM despite its lower content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. There does not seem to be any correlation between the content of any specific polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (or of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content) in the PM fraction and its toxicity. However, the concentrations of the oxidation products of phenanthrene and anthracene, phenanthraquinone and anthraquinone, were several-fold higher in the coarse PM than the fine fraction, suggesting a significant role for atmospheric photochemistry in the formation of secondary pollutants in the wildfire PM and the possibility that such secondary pollutants could be significant sources of toxicity in the wildfire PM.

  14. A bioaccumulation bioassay for freshwater sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mac, Michael J.; Noguchi, George E.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; Edsall, Carol C.; Shoesmith, John A.; Bowker, James D.

    1990-01-01

    A laboratory bioassay is described for determining the bioavailability of contaminants from freshwater sediments. The bioassay consists of 10-d exposures to whole sediments under flow-through conditions. After testing five species, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the earthworm (Lubricus terrestris) were recommended for use in the test. When the availability of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), Hg and Zn from Great Lakes sediments was examined in laboratory exposures, only the PCBs were accumulated. A field validation study demonstrated that the magnitude of accumulation in laboratory exposures was similar to that in organisms caged in the field. A protocol is recommended for using the test as a standardized bioaccumulation bioassay.

  15. Evaluation of coarse and fine particulate sources using a portable aerosol monitor in a desert community.

    PubMed

    Phalen, Robert N; Coleman, Ted

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a portable aerosol monitor as a preliminary screening tool to identify local sources of coarse (PM(10-2.5)) and fine (PM(2.5)) particulate matter within the Coachella Valley, a low-elevation desert community. The portable aerosol monitor proved to be useful in identifying particle sources unique to the region, namely, sand dunes with sparse ground cover (vegetation), a river wash, and diesel truck and freight train traffic. The general limitations relate to discrepancies in the fraction of PM(10-2.5) when compared to regional air quality data and a lack of accurate mass-based data.

  16. Effects of coarse chalk dust particles (2.5-10 μm) on respiratory burst and oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuexia; Yang, Zhenhua; Feng, Yan; Li, Ruijin; Zhang, Quanxi; Geng, Hong; Dong, Chuan

    2015-08-01

    The main aim of the present study was to examine in vitro responses of rat alveolar macrophages (AMs) exposed to coarse chalk dust particles (particulate matter in the size range 2.5-10 μm, PM(coarse)) by respiratory burst and oxidative stress. Chalk PM(coarse)-induced respiratory burst in AMs was measured by using a luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) method. Also, the cell viability; lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release; levels of cellular superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and acid phosphatase (ACP); plasma membrane ATPase; and extracellular nitric oxide (NO) level were determined 4 h following the treatment with the different dosages of chalk PM(coarse). The results showed that chalk PM(coarse) initiated the respiratory burst of AMs as indicated by strong CL, which was inhibited by diphenyleneiodonium chloride and L-N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride. It suggested that chalk PM(coarse) induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in AMs. This hypothesis was confirmed by the fact that chalk PM(coarse) resulted in a significant decrease of intracellular SOD, GSH, ACP, and ATPase levels and a notable increase of intracellular CAT, MDA content, and extracellular NO level, consequently leading to a decrease of the cell viability and a increase of LDH release. It was concluded that AMs exposed to chalk PM(coarse) can suffer from cytotoxicity which may be mediated by generation of excessive ROS/RNS. Graphical Abstract The possible mechanism of coarse chalk particles-induced adverse effects in AMs.

  17. Continuous coarse ash depressurization system

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Guohai; Peng, Wan Wang; Vimalchand, Pannalal

    2012-11-13

    A system for depressurizing and cooling a high pressure, high temperature dense phase solids stream having coarse solid particles with entrained gas therein. In one aspect, the system has an apparatus for at least partially depressurizing and cooling the high pressure, high temperature dense phase solids stream having gas entrained therein and a pressure letdown device for further depressurization and separating cooled coarse solid particles from a portion of the entrained gas, resulting in a lower temperature, lower pressure outlet of solid particles for downstream processing or discharge to a storage silo for future use and/or disposal. There are no moving parts in the flow path of the solids stream in the system.

  18. Partitioning of magnetic particles in PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 aerosols in the urban atmosphere of Barcelona (Spain).

    PubMed

    Revuelta, María Aránzazu; McIntosh, Gregg; Pey, Jorge; Pérez, Noemi; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés

    2014-05-01

    A combined magnetic-chemical study of 15 daily, simultaneous PM10-PM2.5-PM1 urban background aerosol samples has been carried out. The magnetic properties are dominated by non-stoichiometric magnetite, with highest concentrations seen in PM10. Low temperature magnetic analyses showed that the superparamagnetic fraction is more abundant when coarse, multidomain particles are present, confirming that they may occur as an oxidized outer shell around coarser grains. A strong association of the magnetic parameters with a vehicular PM10 source has been identified. Strong correlations found with Cu and Sb suggests that this association is related to brake abrasion emissions rather than exhaust emissions. For PM1 the magnetic remanence parameters are more strongly associated with crustal sources. Two crustal sources are identified in PM1, one of which is of North African origin. The magnetic particles are related to this source and so may be used to distinguish North African dust from other sources in PM1.

  19. Two-generation saccharin bioassays.

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, D L

    1983-01-01

    The controversy regarding the safety of saccharin for human consumption started shortly after its discovery over 100 years ago and has yet to subside appreciably. The consumption of saccharin, particularly in North America, began to escalate when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration set new standards of identity which allowed foods containing artificial sweeteners to be promoted as "nonnutritive" or "noncaloric" sweeteners for use by the general public. In 1969, when cyclamates were banned, at least 10 single-generation feeding studies were undertaken with saccharin to more accurately assess the potential toxicological consequences resulting from the anticipated increase in its consumption. None of these studies resulted in any overt regulatory action. Subsequently, the introduction of the two-generation chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity bioassay added a new tool to the toxicologist's arsenal. Three two-generation studies using saccharin have since been conducted. The results from these studies clearly show that when rats were exposed to diets containing 5 or 7.5% sodium saccharin from the time of conception to death, an increased frequency of urinary bladder cancers was found, predominantly in the males. While some study results suggested that impurities in commercial saccharin or the presence of urinary tract calculi may have been responsible for the observed bladder tumors, it now appears that these possibilities are highly unlikely. The mechanism by which saccharin elicited the bladder tumors using the two-generation experiment has not been ascertained. PMID:6347682

  20. Bioassays for Monitoring Insecticide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Audra L.E.; Tindall, Kelly; Leonard, B. Rogers

    2010-01-01

    Pest resistance to pesticides is an increasing problem because pesticides are an integral part of high-yielding production agriculture. When few products are labeled for an individual pest within a particular crop system, chemical control options are limited. Therefore, the same product(s) are used repeatedly and continual selection pressure is placed on the target pest. There are both financial and environmental costs associated with the development of resistant populations. The cost of pesticide resistance has been estimated at approximately $ 1.5 billion annually in the United States. This paper will describe protocols, currently used to monitor arthropod (specifically insects) populations for the development of resistance. The adult vial test is used to measure the toxicity to contact insecticides and a modification of this test is used for plant-systemic insecticides. In these bioassays, insects are exposed to technical grade insecticide and responses (mortality) recorded at a specific post-exposure interval. The mortality data are subjected to Log Dose probit analysis to generate estimates of a lethal concentration that provides mortality to 50% (LC50) of the target populations and a series of confidence limits (CL's) as estimates of data variability. When these data are collected for a range of insecticide-susceptible populations, the LC50 can be used as baseline data for future monitoring purposes. After populations have been exposed to products, the results can be compared to a previously determined LC50 using the same methodology. PMID:21248689

  1. How coarse is too coarse for salmon spawning substrates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooster, J. K.; Riebe, C. S.; Ligon, F. K.; Overstreet, B. T.

    2009-12-01

    Populations of Pacific salmon species have declined sharply in many rivers of the western US. Reversing these declines is a top priority and expense of many river restoration projects. To help restore salmon populations, managers often inject gravel into rivers, to supplement spawning habitat that has been depleted by gravel mining and the effects of dams—which block sediment and thus impair habitat downstream by coarsening the bed where salmon historically spawned. However, there is little quantitative understanding nor a methodology for determining when a river bed has become too coarse for salmon spawning. Hence there is little scientific basis for selecting sites that would optimize the restoration benefits of gravel injection (e.g., sites where flow velocities are suitable but bed materials are too coarse for spawning). To develop a quantitative understanding of what makes river beds too coarse for salmon spawning, we studied redds and spawning use in a series of California and Washington rivers where salmon spawning ability appears to be affected by coarse bed material. Our working hypothesis is that for a given flow condition, there is a maximum “threshold” particle size that a salmon of a given size is able to excavate and/or move as she builds her redd. A second, related hypothesis is that spawning use should decrease and eventually become impossible with increasing percent coverage by immovable particles. To test these hypotheses, we quantified the sizes and spatial distributions of immovably coarse particles in a series of salmon redds in each river during the peak of spawning. We also quantified spawning use and how it relates to percent coverage by immovable particles. Results from our studies of fall-run chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha) in the Feather River suggest that immovable particle size varies as a function of flow velocity over the redd, implying that faster water helps fish move bigger particles. Our Feather River study also

  2. Bioassay criteria for environmental restoration workers

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental restoration (ER) work at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford Site posed questions concerning when to perform bioassay monitoring of workers for potential intakes of radioactivity. Application of criteria originally developed for use inside radionuclide processing facilities to ER work resulted in overly restrictive bioassay requirements. ER work typically involves site characterization or, excavating large quantities of potentially contaminated soil, rather than working with concentrated quantities of radioactivity as in a processing facility. An improved approach, tailored to ER work, provided soil contamination concentrations above which worker bioassay would be required. Soil concentrations were derived assuming acute or chronic intakes of 2% of an Annual Limit on Intake (ALI), or a potential committed effective dose equivalent of 100 mrem, and conservative dust loading of air from the work. When planning ER work, the anticipated soil concentration and corresponding need for bioassay could be estimated from work-site historical records. Once site work commenced, soil sampling and work-place surveys could be used to determine bioassay needs. This approach substantially reduced the required number of bioassay samples with corresponding reductions in analytical costs, schedules, and more flexible work-force management. (Work supported by the US Department of Energy under contract DOE-AC06-76RLO 1830.)

  3. Ambient exposure to coarse and fine particle emissions from building demolition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarmi, Farhad; Kumar, Prashant

    2016-07-01

    Demolition of buildings produce large quantities of particulate matter (PM) that could be inhaled by on-site workers and people living in the neighbourhood, but studies assessing ambient exposure at the real-world demolition sites are limited. We measured concentrations of PM10 (≤10 μm), PM2.5 (≤2.5 μm) and PM1 (≤1 μm) along with local meteorology for 54 working hours over the demolition period. The measurements were carried out at (i) a fixed-site in the downwind of demolished building, (ii) around the site during demolition operation through mobile monitoring, (iii) different distances away from the demolition site through sequential monitoring, and (iv) inside an excavator vehicle cabin and on-site temporary office for engineers. Position of the PM instrument was continuously recorded using a Global Positioning System on a second basis during mobile measurements. Fraction of coarse particles (PM2.5-10) contributed 89 (with mean particle mass concentration, PMC ≈ 133 ± 17 μg m-3), 83 (100 ± 29 μg m-3), and 70% (59 ± 12 μg m-3) of total PMC during the fixed-site, mobile monitoring and sequential measurements, respectively, compared with only 50% (mean 12 ± 6 μg m-3) during the background measurements. The corresponding values for fine particles (PM2.5) were 11, 17 and 30% compared with 50% during background, showing a much greater release of coarse particles during demolition. The openair package in R and map source software (ArcGIS) were used to assess spatial variation of PMCs in downwind and upwind of the demolition site. A modified box model was developed to determine the emission factors, which were 210, 73 and 24 μg m-2 s-1 for PM10, PM2.5 and PM1, respectively. The average respiratory deposited doses to coarse (and fine) particles inside the excavator cabin and on-site temporary office increased by 57- (and 5-) and 13- (and 2-) times compared with the local background level, respectively. The monitoring stations in downwind direction

  4. Concentrations and source insights for trace elements in fine and coarse particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Nicholas; Eav, Jenny; Xie, Mingjie; Hannigan, Michael P.; Miller, Shelly L.; Navidi, William; Peel, Jennifer L.; Schauer, James J.; Shafer, Martin M.; Milford, Jana B.

    2014-06-01

    The Colorado Coarse Rural-Urban Sources and Health (CCRUSH) study is a multi-year study focused on characterizing the mass, composition and sources of coarse particulate matter (PM10-2.5) in Denver and Greeley, CO. Between the two cities, Denver is expected to have greater influence of industry and motor vehicles as sources of PM10-2.5. Greeley is a smaller city with greater expected influence of agricultural activity. As part of the CCRUSH study, we collected integrated 24-h samples of PM from four sites in Denver and Greeley at six day intervals from February 2010 to March 2011. Dichotomous samplers with Teflon filters were used to obtain samples for gravimetric and elemental analysis. Magnetic Sector Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (SF-ICP-MS) was used to analyze digests of monthly composited filter samples for 49 elements. Thirty-nine elements were retained for statistical analysis after excluding those with low signal-to-noise ratios. The elements Sb, Cd, Zn, Mo, As, B, Cu, Pb, and W had crustal enrichment factors greater than 10 in the PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 size ranges in both Denver and Greeley. Using positive matrix factorization (PMF) with bootstrap uncertainty estimation, we identified five factors influencing the element concentrations: a crustal factor contributing to both PM2.5 and PM10-2.5; a sodium-dominated PM10-2.5 factor likely associated with road salt; a vehicle abrasion factor contributing in both size ranges; a regional sulfur factor contributing mainly to PM2.5 and likely associated with coal combustion; and a local catalyst factor identified with high Ce and La enrichment in PM2.5 at one of the sites in Denver.

  5. A new P. putida instrumental toxicity bioassay.

    PubMed

    Figueredo, Federico; Abrevaya, Ximena C; Cortón, Eduardo

    2015-05-01

    Here, we present a new toxicity bioassay (CO2-TOX), able to detect toxic or inhibitory compounds in water samples, based on the quantification of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 CO2 production. The metabolically produced CO2 was measured continuously and directly in the liquid assay media, with a potentiometric gas electrode. The optimization studies were performed using as a model toxicant 3,5-DCP (3,5-dichlorophenol); later, heavy metals (Pb(2+), Cu(2+), or Zn(2+)) and a metalloid (As(5+)) were assayed. The response to toxics was evident after 15 min of incubation and at relatively low concentrations (e.g., 1.1 mg/L of 3,5-DCP), showing that the CO2-TOX bioassay is fast and sensitive. The EC50 values obtained were 4.93, 0.12, 6.05, 32.17, and 37.81 mg/L for 3,5-DCP, Cu(2+), Zn(2+), As(5+), and Pb(2+), respectively, at neutral pH. Additionally, the effect of the pH of the sample and the use of lyophilized bacteria were also analyzed showing that the bioassay can be implemented in different conditions. Moreover, highly turbid samples and samples with very low oxygen levels were measured successfully with the new instrumental bioassay described here. Finally, simulated samples containing 3,5-DCP or a heavy metal mixture were tested using the proposed bioassay and a standard ISO bioassay, showing that our test is more sensible to the phenol but less sensible to the metal mixtures. Therefore, we propose CO2-TOX as a rapid, sensitive, low-cost, and robust instrumental bioassay that could perform as an industrial wastewater-process monitor among other applications.

  6. Effects of wind direction on coarse and fine particulate matter concentrations in southeast Kansas.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Sergio A; Lane, Dennis D; Marotz, Glen A; Carter, Ray E; Hohl, Carrie M; Baldauf, Richard W

    2006-11-01

    Field data for coarse particulate matter ([PM] PM10) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) were collected at selected sites in Southeast Kansas from March 1999 to October 2000, using portable MiniVol particulate samplers. The purpose was to assess the influence on air quality of four industrial facilities that burn hazardous waste in the area located in the communities of Chanute, Independence, Fredonia, and Coffeyville. Both spatial and temporal variation were observed in the data. Variation because of sampling site was found to be statistically significant for PM10 but not for PM2.5. PM10 concentrations were typically slightly higher at sites located within the four study communities than at background sites. Sampling sites were located north and south of the four targeted sources to provide upwind and downwind monitoring pairs. No statistically significant differences were found between upwind and downwind samples for either PM10 or PM2.5, indicating that the targeted sources did not contribute significantly to PM concentrations. Wind direction can frequently contribute to temporal variation in air pollutant concentrations and was investigated in this study. Sampling days were divided into four classifications: predominantly south winds, predominantly north winds, calm/variable winds, and winds from other directions. The effect of wind direction was found to be statistically significant for both PM10 and PM2.5. For both size ranges, PM concentrations were typically highest on days with predominantly south winds; days with calm/variable winds generally produced higher concentrations than did those with predominantly north winds or those with winds from "other" directions. The significant effect of wind direction suggests that regional sources may exert a large influence on PM concentrations in the area.

  7. Comparisons of urban and rural PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 mass concentrations and semi-volatile fractions in northeastern Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Nicholas; Hannigan, Michael P.; Miller, Shelly L.; Peel, Jennifer L.; Milford, Jana B.

    2016-06-01

    Coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter in the atmosphere adversely affect human health and influence climate. While PM2.5 is relatively well studied, less is known about the sources and fate of PM10-2.5. The Colorado Coarse Rural-Urban Sources and Health (CCRUSH) study measured PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 mass concentrations, as well as the fraction of semi-volatile material (SVM) in each size regime (SVM2.5, SVM10-2.5), from 2009 to early 2012 in Denver and comparatively rural Greeley, Colorado. Agricultural operations east of Greeley appear to have contributed to the peak PM10-2.5 concentrations there, but concentrations were generally lower in Greeley than in Denver. Traffic-influenced sites in Denver had PM10-2.5 concentrations that averaged from 14.6 to 19.7 µg m-3 and mean PM10-2.5 / PM10 ratios of 0.56 to 0.70, higher than at residential sites in Denver or Greeley. PM10-2.5 concentrations were more temporally variable than PM2.5 concentrations. Concentrations of the two pollutants were not correlated. Spatial correlations of daily averaged PM10-2.5 concentrations ranged from 0.59 to 0.62 for pairs of sites in Denver and from 0.47 to 0.70 between Denver and Greeley. Compared to PM10-2.5, concentrations of PM2.5 were more correlated across sites within Denver and less correlated between Denver and Greeley. PM10-2.5 concentrations were highest during the summer and early fall, while PM2.5 and SVM2.5 concentrations peaked in winter during periodic multi-day inversions. SVM10-2.5 concentrations were low at all sites. Diurnal peaks in PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 concentrations corresponded to morning and afternoon peaks of traffic activity, and were enhanced by boundary layer dynamics. SVM2.5 concentrations peaked around noon on both weekdays and weekends. PM10-2.5 concentrations at sites located near highways generally increased with wind speeds above about 3 m s-1. Little wind speed dependence was observed for the residential sites in Denver and Greeley. The mass

  8. An in vitro rainbow trout cell bioassay for aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, C.A.; Tieber, V.L.; Giesy, J.P.; Denison, M.S.

    1997-03-01

    Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) and other chemicals that act as aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor (AhR) agonists cause a variety of toxicity effects. In sac fry of many fish species, these effects include blue-sac disease and mortality. Because HAHs occur in complex mixtures, their toxicity in the environment is difficult to predict. A bioassay useful in predicting AhR-mediated toxicity to fish was developed using the RTH-149 rainbow trout hepatoma cell line. Stable transfection of this cell line with the pGudLuc 1.1 plasmid, which contains a firefly luciferase reporter gene under the transcriptional regulation of dioxin responsive enhancers, has produced a recombinant cell line designated Remodulated Lightning Trout (RLT 2.0). The RLT 2.0 bioassay method detection limit for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is 4 pM. The responses of the RLT 2.0 bioassay to TCDD and several HAH congeners closely matched the responses observed in vivo in fish. The RLT 2.0 bioassay can provide an integrative measure of the total AhR-mediated toxic activity of complex mixtures to fish. The assay will be useful in screening environmental extracts, guiding chemical analysis, and interpreting the AhR-mediated mechanism of toxicity.

  9. A dual site study of PM 2.5 and PM 10 aerosol chemistry in the larger region of Vienna, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puxbaum, H.; Gomiscek, B.; Kalina, M.; Bauer, H.; Salam, A.; Stopper, S.; Preining, O.; Hauck, H.

    The measurements of PM 2.5 and PM 10 at two sites—an urban site in Vienna (AUPHEP-1) and a rural site considered local background (AUPHEP-2)—indicated only low aerosol generation activity in the city on an annual basis. Defining the term "urban impact" as the difference between observations at the urban and the local background site we find an annually averaged urban impact for PM 2.5 of 3.4 μg m -3 and for PM C of 3.3 μg m -3 (the coarse fraction PM C=PM 10-PM 2.5). The relative increase of the particulate matter (PM) concentration at the urban site compared to the background site (AUPHEP-2) is annually averaged only 19% for PM 2.5, but 60% for PM C. The chemical main constituents of the PM 2.5 urban impact are black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and sulfate; the main constituents of the PM C urban impact are OC and indicators for mineralic aerosol (Fe, Ca, Mg, Na, K). The BC/TC ratio of the PM 2.5 urban impact is typical as for combustion sources, e.g. automotive traffic, oil or coal combustion. Urban coarse OC is considered to originate from non-pyrogenic sources. From the trace metals investigated (As, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, Zn) only Cd, Ni, Pb, and Zn exhibited a slight cold season enrichment in the urban airshed. From the weak signal of a seasonality of oil or coal combustion indicators we conclude that local domestic heating sources are using "clean fuels".

  10. Spatial variability of fine and coarse particle composition and sources in Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achilleos, Souzana; Wolfson, Jack M.; Ferguson, Stephen T.; Kang, Choong-Min; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Hadjicharalambous, Marios; Achilleos, Constantia; Christodoulou, Andri; Nisanzti, Argyro; Papoutsa, Christiana; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Athanasatos, Spyros; Perdikou, Skevi; Koutrakis, Petros

    2016-03-01

    Southern and Eastern European countries exceed WHO and EU air quality standards very often, and are influenced by both local and external sources from Europe, Asia and Africa. However, there are limited data on particle composition and source profiles. We collected PM2.5 and PM10 samples (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 and 10 μm, respectively) in four cities in Cyprus using Harvard Impactors. Measurements were conducted between January 2012 and January 2013. We analyzed these samples for mass concentration and chemical composition, and conducted a source apportionment analysis using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). All sites complied with PM2.5 and PM10 WHO daily standards for most of the days. As in other Eastern European countries, we found higher sulfate contribution and less organic carbon than in the Western and central Europe. For PM2.5, seven source types were identified including regional sulfur, traffic emissions, biomass, re-suspended soil, oil combustion, road dust, and sea salt. In all four sites, regional sulfur was the predominant source (> 30%). High inter-site correlations were observed for both PM2.5 component concentrations and source contributions, may be because a large fraction of PM2.5 is transported. Finally, for PM10 -2.5 (coarse particles with aerodynamic diameter between 2.5 and 10 μm) three sources were identified, which include road dust, soil, and sea salt. Significant inter-site correlations were also observed for coarse particles. All dust storm samples, except one, had PM levels below the daily standard. However, mineral dust, defined as the total mass of crustal metal oxides, increased up to ten times during the dust events.

  11. Chemical and morphological properties of particulate matter (PM 10, PM 2.5) in school classrooms and outdoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, H.; Diemer, J.; Dietrich, S.; Cyrys, J.; Heinrich, J.; Lang, W.; Kiranoglu, M.; Twardella, D.

    Studies have shown high concentrations of particulate matter (PM) in schools. Further insights into the sources and the composition of these particles are needed. During school hours for a period of 6 weeks, outdoor air and the air in two classrooms were sampled. PM was measured gravimetrically, and PM filters were used for the determination of the elemental and organic carbon, light absorbance, and 10 water-soluble ions. Some filters were further analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive microanalysis (EDX). The median PM 10 concentrations were 118.2 μg m -3 indoors and 24.2 μg m -3 outdoors; corresponding results for PM 2.5 were 37.4 μg m -3 indoors and 17.0 μg m -3 outdoors. Using PM 10 and PM 2.5 data, we calculated the following indoor/outdoor ratios: 0.3 and 0.4 (sulfate), 0.1 and 0.2 (nitrate), 0.1 and 0.3 (ammonium), and 1.4 and 1.6 (calcium). Using the measured sulfate content on PM filters as an indicator for ambient PM sources, we estimated that 43% of PM 2.5 and 24% of PM 10, respectively, were of ambient origin. The composition of the classrooms' PM (e.g., high calcium concentrations) and the findings from SEM/EDX suggest that the indoor PM consists mainly of earth crustal materials, detrition of the building materials and chalk. Physical activity of the pupils leads to resuspension of mainly indoor coarse particles and greatly contributes to increased PM 10 in classrooms. The concentration of fine particles caused by combustion processes indoors and outdoors is comparable. We conclude that PM measured in classrooms has major sources other than outdoor particles. Assuming that combustion-related particles and crustal materials vary in toxicity, our results support the hypothesis that indoor-generated PM may be less toxic compared to PM in ambient air.

  12. Correlating bioaerosol load with PM2.5 and PM10cf concentrations: a comparison between natural desert and urban-fringe aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreson, Justin; Dillner, Ann M.; Peccia, Jordan

    2004-11-01

    Seasonal allergies and microbial mediated respiratory diseases, can coincide with elevated particulate matter concentrations, often when dry desert soils are disturbed. In addition to effects from the allergens, allergic and asthmatic responses may be enhanced when chemical and biological constituents of particulate matter (PM) are combined together. Because of these associations and also the recent regulatory and health-related interests of monitoring PM2.5, separately from total PM10, the biological loading between the fine (dp<2.5 μm) and coarse (2.5 μmPM was studied. To investigate spatial and seasonal differences of biological loading within PM, 24-h fine and coarse PM fractions were collected at a natural desert area and an urban fringe site located in the expanding Phoenix, Arizona metropolitan area during winter, spring, and summer seasons. Elemental carbon and inorganic ions were measured to determine the relative influence that anthropogenic sources, such as traffic, had on the aerosol composition. Total protein concentration was used as a surrogate measure of total biological concentration within the PM2.5 and PM10cf (coarse fraction) size ranges. In all seasons, coarse protein at the urban fringe was consistently higher than the natural desert. When high-anthropogenic PM events were separated from the data set, a positive significant correlation (p<0.05) was found between protein and coarse PM fraction, but not in the fine fraction. An 18S rDNA clone library was developed from PM10 aerosol samples to characterize the type and phylogenetic diversity of airborne eukaryotic (non-bacterial) microorganisms existing in ambient PM for the urban fringe and natural desert. Both sites contained allergenic organisms. Some groups of eukaryotic species were exclusive to only one of the sites. The natural desert contained more species of Basidiomycota fungi and the urban fringe contained more species of green plants, suggesting that the

  13. Poultry litter toxicity comparison from various bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G.; Kelly, P. )

    1992-01-01

    Poultry litter contains many toxic chemicals including Cu, As, Pb, Cd, Hg, Se and PCBs. Poultry litter leachate has been shown to be more toxic to marine luminescent organisms (Photobacterium phosphoreum) than other farm animal manures. A comparison of toxicity of the poultry litter leachate was undertaken using various bioassays. The EC{sub 50} (or LC{sub 50}) value for the leachate with the Microtox and Daphnia bioassays was 2.9 g/L/ Nitrobacter and Pseudomonas bioassays were not useful in determining the leachate toxicity because of the nutritional properties of the litter. Poultry litter leachate was found to be mutagenic to strains TA 97, TA 98, TA 100 and TA 102 using the Ames Test.

  14. Effects of metals in in vitro bioassays.

    PubMed Central

    Sirover, M A

    1981-01-01

    The capacity of in vitro bioassays to detect the potential carcinogenicity of metal compounds is reviewed. The in vitro bioassays discussed include: bacterial reversion analysis to determine the capacity of metal salts to revert Salmonella typhimurium histidine auxotrophs or to revert Escherichia coli WP 2 tryp- to tryptophan prototrophy; examination of the ability of metal salts to preferentially inhibit cell growth in Bacillus subtilis cells deficient in DNA repair pathways; determination of the ability of metal salts to induce resistance to base analogs in mammalian cells; the capacity of metal salts to enhance viral transformation of mammalian cells or to transform cells in the absence of virus; and the ability of metal salts to induce chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells. Using each of these in vitro bioassays, diverse metal compounds have been identified as potential carcinogens. Furthermore, the use of different compounds of a specific metal may allow a determination of the valence which may be required for carcinogenesis. PMID:7023930

  15. The effects on bronchial epithelial mucociliary cultures of coarse, fine, and ultrafine particulate matter from an underground railway station.

    PubMed

    Loxham, Matthew; Morgan-Walsh, Rebecca J; Cooper, Matthew J; Blume, Cornelia; Swindle, Emily J; Dennison, Patrick W; Howarth, Peter H; Cassee, Flemming R; Teagle, Damon A H; Palmer, Martin R; Davies, Donna E

    2015-05-01

    We have previously shown that underground railway particulate matter (PM) is rich in iron and other transition metals across coarse (PM10-2.5), fine (PM2.5), and quasi-ultrafine (PM0.18) fractions and is able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, there is little knowledge of whether the metal-rich nature of such particles exerts toxic effects in mucus-covered airway epithelial cell cultures or whether there is an increased risk posed by the ultrafine fraction. Monolayer and mucociliary air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures of primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs) were exposed to size-fractionated underground railway PM (1.1-11.1 µg/cm(2)) and release of lactate dehydrogenase and IL-8 was assayed. ROS generation was measured, and the mechanism of generation studied using desferrioxamine (DFX) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was determined by RT-qPCR. Particle uptake was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Underground PM increased IL-8 release from PBECs, but this was diminished in mucus-secreting ALI cultures. Fine and ultrafine PM generated a greater level of ROS than coarse PM. ROS generation by ultrafine PM was ameliorated by DFX and NAC, suggesting an iron-dependent mechanism. Despite the presence of mucus, ALI cultures displayed increased HO-1 expression. Intracellular PM was observed within vesicles, mitochondria, and free in the cytosol. The results indicate that, although the mucous layer appears to confer some protection against underground PM, ALI PBECs nonetheless detect PM and mount an antioxidant response. The combination of increased ROS-generating ability of the metal-rich ultrafine fraction and ability of PM to penetrate the mucous layer merits further research. PMID:25673499

  16. The Effects on Bronchial Epithelial Mucociliary Cultures of Coarse, Fine, and Ultrafine Particulate Matter From an Underground Railway Station

    PubMed Central

    Loxham, Matthew; Morgan-Walsh, Rebecca J.; Cooper, Matthew J.; Blume, Cornelia; Swindle, Emily J.; Dennison, Patrick W.; Howarth, Peter H.; Cassee, Flemming R.; Teagle, Damon A. H.; Palmer, Martin R.; Davies, Donna E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that underground railway particulate matter (PM) is rich in iron and other transition metals across coarse (PM10–2.5), fine (PM2.5), and quasi-ultrafine (PM0.18) fractions and is able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, there is little knowledge of whether the metal-rich nature of such particles exerts toxic effects in mucus-covered airway epithelial cell cultures or whether there is an increased risk posed by the ultrafine fraction. Monolayer and mucociliary air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures of primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs) were exposed to size-fractionated underground railway PM (1.1–11.1 µg/cm2) and release of lactate dehydrogenase and IL-8 was assayed. ROS generation was measured, and the mechanism of generation studied using desferrioxamine (DFX) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was determined by RT-qPCR. Particle uptake was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Underground PM increased IL-8 release from PBECs, but this was diminished in mucus-secreting ALI cultures. Fine and ultrafine PM generated a greater level of ROS than coarse PM. ROS generation by ultrafine PM was ameliorated by DFX and NAC, suggesting an iron-dependent mechanism. Despite the presence of mucus, ALI cultures displayed increased HO-1 expression. Intracellular PM was observed within vesicles, mitochondria, and free in the cytosol. The results indicate that, although the mucous layer appears to confer some protection against underground PM, ALI PBECs nonetheless detect PM and mount an antioxidant response. The combination of increased ROS-generating ability of the metal-rich ultrafine fraction and ability of PM to penetrate the mucous layer merits further research. PMID:25673499

  17. The effects on bronchial epithelial mucociliary cultures of coarse, fine, and ultrafine particulate matter from an underground railway station.

    PubMed

    Loxham, Matthew; Morgan-Walsh, Rebecca J; Cooper, Matthew J; Blume, Cornelia; Swindle, Emily J; Dennison, Patrick W; Howarth, Peter H; Cassee, Flemming R; Teagle, Damon A H; Palmer, Martin R; Davies, Donna E

    2015-05-01

    We have previously shown that underground railway particulate matter (PM) is rich in iron and other transition metals across coarse (PM10-2.5), fine (PM2.5), and quasi-ultrafine (PM0.18) fractions and is able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, there is little knowledge of whether the metal-rich nature of such particles exerts toxic effects in mucus-covered airway epithelial cell cultures or whether there is an increased risk posed by the ultrafine fraction. Monolayer and mucociliary air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures of primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs) were exposed to size-fractionated underground railway PM (1.1-11.1 µg/cm(2)) and release of lactate dehydrogenase and IL-8 was assayed. ROS generation was measured, and the mechanism of generation studied using desferrioxamine (DFX) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was determined by RT-qPCR. Particle uptake was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Underground PM increased IL-8 release from PBECs, but this was diminished in mucus-secreting ALI cultures. Fine and ultrafine PM generated a greater level of ROS than coarse PM. ROS generation by ultrafine PM was ameliorated by DFX and NAC, suggesting an iron-dependent mechanism. Despite the presence of mucus, ALI cultures displayed increased HO-1 expression. Intracellular PM was observed within vesicles, mitochondria, and free in the cytosol. The results indicate that, although the mucous layer appears to confer some protection against underground PM, ALI PBECs nonetheless detect PM and mount an antioxidant response. The combination of increased ROS-generating ability of the metal-rich ultrafine fraction and ability of PM to penetrate the mucous layer merits further research.

  18. PM10 and PM2.5 composition over the Central Black Sea: origin and seasonal variability.

    PubMed

    Koçak, M; Mihalopoulos, N; Tutsak, E; Theodosi, C; Zarmpas, P; Kalegeri, P

    2015-11-01

    Daily PM10 and PM2.5 samples were collected between April 2009 and July 2010 at a rural site (Sinop) situated on the coast of the Central Black Sea. The concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were 23.2 ± 16.7 and 9.8 ± 6.9 μg m(-3), respectively. Coarse and fine filters were analyzed for Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), C2O4(2-), PO4(3-), Na(+), NH4(+), K(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+) by using ion chromatography. Elemental and organic carbon content in bulk quartz filters were also analyzed. The highest PM2.5 contribution to PM10 was found in summer with a value of 0.54 due to enhanced secondary aerosols in relation to photochemistry. Cl(-), Na(+), and Mg(2+) illustrated their higher concentrations and variability during winter. Chlorine depletion was chiefly attributed to nitrate. Higher nssCa(2+) concentrations were ascribed to episodic mineral dust intrusions from North Africa into the region. Crustal material (31%) and sea salt (13%) were found to be accounted for the majority of the PM10. The ionic mass (IM), particulate organic matter (POM), and elemental carbon (EC) explained 13, 20, and 3% of the PM10 mass, correspondingly. The IM, POM, and EC dominated the PM2.5 (~74%) mass. Regarding EU legislation, the exceeded PM2.5 values were found to be associated with secondary aerosols, with a particular dominance of POM. For the exceeded PM10 values, six of the events were dominated by dust while two and four of these exceedances were caused by sea salt and mix events, respectively. PMID:26174981

  19. Bioassay and dose measurement in UV disinfection.

    PubMed Central

    Qualls, R G; Johnson, J D

    1983-01-01

    A bioassay method was developed to measure the average intensity within a UV disinfection reactor. The survival of spores of Bacillus subtilis was determined as a function of UV dose to prepare a standard curve. Spores were added to unknown systems, and the survival rate was used to determine the average intensity. A modification was used for flow-through reactors by which spores were injected as a spike and collected at a known time after injection. A point source summation method for calculating intensity was verified by bioassay measurements in a simple cylinder. This calculation method was also applied to multiple-lamp reactors. PMID:6405690

  20. Mass and chemical composition of size-segregated aerosols (PM1, PM2.5, PM10) over Athens, Greece: local versus regional sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodosi, C.; Grivas, G.; Zarmpas, P.; Chaloulakou, A.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2011-03-01

    To identify the relative contribution of local versus regional sources of particulate matter (PM) in the Greater Athens Area (GAA), simultaneous mass and chemical composition measurements of size segregated particulate matter (PM: PM1, PM2.5 and PM10) were carried out from September 2005 to August 2006 at three locations: one urban (Goudi, Central Athens) and one suburban (Lykovrissi, Athens) in GAA and the third in a regional background site (Finokalia, Crete). The two stations in GAA exceeded the EU-legislated PM10 limit values, both in terms of annual average (59.0 and 53.6 μg m-3 for Lykovrissi and Goudi, respectively) and of 24-h value, while the concentration levels at the remote site of Finokalia indicated an elevated background. High levels of PM2.5 and PM1 were also found at all locations (23.5 and 18.6 for Lykovrissi, while 29.4 and 20.2 μg m-3 for Goudi, respectively). Significant correlations were observed between same PM fractions at both GAA sites indicating important spatial homogeneity within GAA. During the warm season, the PM1 ratio between the GAA and the background site ranged from 1.1 to 1.3. On the other hand this ratio was significantly higher (1.6-1.7) during the cold season highlighting the role of long-range transport and local sources during the warm and cold seasons respectively. Similar seasonal and geographical patterns were observed for nss-SO42-, a secondary compound characteristic of regional sources, confirming the above hypothesis. Regarding the coarse fraction no such seasonal trend was observed for both GAA sites with their ratio (GAA site/Finokalia) being higher than 2 indicating significant contribution from local sources such as road dust and/or constructions as confirmed by Ca2+ measurements. Chemical speciation data showed that on a yearly basis, ionic and crustal mass represent up to 78% of the gravimetrically determined mass for PM10 samples in GAA. The unidentified mass might be attributed to organic carbon (OC) and

  1. Seasonal variation of source contributions to atmospheric fine and coarse particles at suburban area in Istanbul, Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Karaca, F.; Alagha, O.; Erturk, F.; Yilmaz, Y.Z.; Ozkara, T.

    2008-06-15

    Daily samples of fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM2.5-10) particles were collected from July 2002 to July 2003 to provide a better understanding of the elemental concentration and source contribution to both PM fractions. Sampling location represents suburban part of Istanbul metropolitan city. Samples were collected on Teflon filters using a 'Dichotomous Sampler.' Concentrations of Al, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn were measured by GFAAS, FAAS, and FAES techniques. Elemental variations of heating and nonheating seasons were discussed. Fossil fuel-related atmospheric metals dramatically increased during the heating season, while natural originated atmospheric metals increased during the nonheating season. Seasonal variations of source contributions were evaluated using factor analysis, which was separately applied to the collected fine and coarse particles data sets during heating and nonheating seasons (four data sets: PM2.5 heating, PM2.5 nonheating, PM2.5-10 heating, and PM2.5-10 nonheating). Significant seasonal differences in source contributions were observed. Four factor groups were extracted for PM2.5 dataset during the nonheating season, while five factor groups were extracted for all the other cases. Mineral dust transportation, traffic, and industry-related activities were classified as different factor groups in all the cases.

  2. Characterization, sources and redox activity of fine and coarse particulate matter in Milan, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daher, Nancy; Ruprecht, Ario; Invernizzi, Giovanni; De Marco, Cinzia; Miller-Schulze, Justin; Heo, Jong Bae; Shafer, Martin M.; Shelton, Brandon R.; Schauer, James J.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2012-03-01

    The correlation between health effects and exposure to particulate matter (PM) has been of primary concern to public health organizations. An emerging hypothesis is that many of the biological effects derive from the ability of PM to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) within affected cells. Milan, one of the largest and most polluted urban areas in Europe, is afflicted with high particle levels. To characterize its ambient PM, fine and coarse PM (PM2.5 and PM2.5-10, respectively) samples were collected on a weekly basis for a year-long period. Samples were analyzed for their chemical properties and ROS-activity. A molecular marker chemical mass balance (MM-CMB) model was also applied to apportion primary and secondary sources to fine organic carbon (OC) and PM. Findings revealed that PM2.5 is a major contributor to ambient particle levels in Milan, averaging 34.5 ± 19.4 μg m-3 throughout the year. Specifically, secondary inorganic ions and organic matter were the most dominant fine PM species contributing to 36 ± 7.1% and 34 ± 6.3% of its mass on a yearly-based average, respectively. Highest PM2.5 concentrations occurred during December-February and were mainly attributed to poor atmospheric dispersion. On the other hand, PM2.5-10 exhibited an annual average of 6.79 ± 1.67 μg m-3, with crustal elements prevailing. Source apportionment results showed that wood-smoke and secondary organic aerosol sources contribute to 4.6 ± 2.6% and 9.8 ± 11% of fine OC on a yearly-based average, respectively. The remaining OC is likely associated with petroleum-derived material that is not adequately represented by existing source profiles used in this study. Lastly, ROS-activity measurements indicated that PM2.5-induced redox activity expressed per m3 of air volume is greatest during January (837 μg Zymosan equivalents m-3) and February (920 μg Zymosan equivalents m-3). Conversely, intrinsic (per PM mass) ROS-activity peaked in July (22,587 μg Zymosan equivalents mg

  3. Estimated Short-Term Effects of Coarse Particles on Daily Mortality in Stockholm, Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Christer; Forsberg, Bertil

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although serious health effects associated with particulate matter (PM) with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10) and ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5; fine fraction) are documented in many studies, the effects of coarse PM (PM2.5–10) are still under debate. Objective: In this study, we estimated the effects of short-term exposure of PM2.5–10 on daily mortality in Stockholm, Sweden. Method: We collected data on daily mortality for the years 2000 through 2008. Concentrations of PM10, PM2.5, ozone, and carbon monoxide were measured simultaneously in central Stockholm. We used additive Poisson regression models to examine the association between daily mortality and PM2.5–10 on the day of death and the day before. Effect estimates were adjusted for other pollutants (two-pollutant models) during different seasons. Results: We estimated a 1.68% increase [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.20%, 3.15%] in daily mortality per 10-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5–10 (single-pollutant model). The association with PM2.5–10 was stronger for November through May, when road dust is most important (1.69% increase; 95% CI: 0.21%, 3.17%), compared with the rest of the year (1.31% increase; 95% CI: –2.08%, 4.70%), although the difference was not statistically significant. When adjusted for other pollutants, particularly PM2.5, the effect estimates per 10 μg/m3 for PM2.5–10 decreased slightly but were still higher than corresponding effect estimates for PM2.5. Conclusions: Our analysis shows an increase in daily mortality associated with elevated urban background levels of PM2.5–10. Regulation of PM2.5–10 should be considered, along with actions to specifically reduce PM2.5–10 emissions, especially road dust suspension, in cities. PMID:22182596

  4. Buffers in daphnid culture and bioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, K.I.; Caffrey, P.B.; Dagbusan, B.C.

    1996-03-01

    When an algal diet is employed, or precipitation of dissolved inorganics during autoclaving is likely, or test circumstances introduce pH changes, addition of a buffer to daphnid culture or bioassay media is appropriate. Glycylglycine, employed in this research for 20 years, is unsuitable for general use because it required microbe-free cultures. In contrast, n-hydroxyethyl piperazine-n-2-propane sulfonic acid (HEPPSO) and N-2-hydroxyethyl piperazine-N{prime}-2-ethane sulfonic acid (HEPES) offer safe and effective pH control at 300 ppm for animals, 400 ppm for algae (weight excludes Na), with no requirement for microbe-free cultures. No negative effects on fecundity, monitored in both single and multigeneration tests, or on vigor, measured by acute bioassay performance, were observed. The 48-h LC50 for glycylglycine is approximately 4,500 ppm. No deaths occur at or below 10,000 ppm of either HEPES or HEPPSO. When bioassayed against zinc (as chloride), animals reared in cultures buffered by HEPES, HEPPSO, or glycylglycine and tested in unfed acute bioassays performed similarly, allowing 100% survival in 1,000 ppb in 48 h with an CL50 of approximately 1,750 ppb.

  5. Micro-organism distribution sampling for bioassays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, B. A.

    1975-01-01

    Purpose of sampling distribution is to characterize sample-to-sample variation so statistical tests may be applied, to estimate error due to sampling (confidence limits) and to evaluate observed differences between samples. Distribution could be used for bioassays taken in hospitals, breweries, food-processing plants, and pharmaceutical plants.

  6. Coarse graining of polystyrene sulfonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perahia, Dvora; Agrawal, Anupriya; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-03-01

    Capturing large length scales in soft matter while retaining atomistic properties is imperative to computational studies. Here we develop a new coarse-grained model for polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) that often serves as a model system because of its narrow molecular weight distribution and defined degree of sulfonation. Four beads are used to represent polymer where the backbone, the phenyl group, and the sulfonated group are each represented by a different bead and the fourth one represents counterion, which is sodium in our case. Initial atomistic simulations of PSS melt with sulfonation levels of 2-10%, with a dielectric constant ɛ = 1 revealed a ``locked'' phase where motion of the polymer is limited. Dielectric constant of ɛ = 5 was used to accelerate the dynamics. Bonded interactions were obtained using Boltzmann inversion on the bonded distributions extracted from atomistic simulation. Non-bonded interaction of polystyrene monomer was taken from our previous work and potential of mean force was used as the initial guess for interaction of the ionic beads. This set of potential was subsequently iterated to get a good match with radial distribution functions. This potential and its transferability across dielectric constants and temperatures will be presented. Grant DE-SC007908.

  7. Brine Shrimp Bioassays: A Useful Technique in Biological Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Stanley A.; Maness, Ian B.

    2004-01-01

    A technique to measure the potency of leaf compounds against herbivores with the use of a bioassay is described. Bioassays are useful in classes where students have career plans like medicine in which bioassays can be used as tools for screening plants for possible medicinal potency.

  8. Ion concentrations of PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 aerosols over the eastern Mediterranean region: seasonal variation and source identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouyoumdjian, H.; Saliba, N. A.

    2005-12-01

    The annual averages of particulate matters (PM10, PM10-2.5 (coarse) and PM2.5 (fine)) in a densely populated area of Beirut were measured and found to be 84±27, 53±20 and 31±9 μg m-3, respectively. Ion Chromatography (IC) analysis of the collected PM Teflon filters showed that NaCl, CaSO4 and Ca(NO3)2 were predominant in the coarse particles, while (NH4)2SO4 was the main salt in the fine particles. Using the non destructive Fourier Transform Infra Red-Attenuated Total Reflection (FTIR-ATR) technique, CaCO3 was determined in the coarse filter. In addition, ATR measurements showed that inorganic salts present in the coarse particles are mostly water insoluble while salts found in fine particles are soluble. Concentrations of nitrates and calcium higher than the ones reported in neighboring Mediterranean countries were good indication of high traffic density and crustal dust abundance in Beirut, respectively. The study of the seasonal variation showed that long-range transport of SO2 from Eastern and Central Europe, sandy storms coming from Africa and marine aerosols are considered major sources of the determined inorganic ions. Considering the importance of the health and climate impacts of aerosols locally and regionally, this study constitutes a point of reference for eastern Mediterranean transport modeling studies and local regulatory and policy makers.

  9. High-resolution determination of 147Pm in urine using dynamic ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Elchuk, S; Lucy, C A; Burns, K I

    1992-10-15

    A procedure has been developed for measuring 147Pm in bioassay samples, based on the separation and preconcentration of 147Pm from the urine matrix by adsorption onto a conventional cation-exchange column with final separation and purification by HPLC using dynamic ion-exchange chromatography. The concentration of 147Pm is determined by collecting the appropriate HPLC fraction and measuring the 147Pm by liquid scintillation counting. The limit of detection is 0.1 Bq (3 fg) 147Pm based on a 500-mL sample of urine and a counting time of 30 min with a background of 100 cpm. Ten samples can be processed in 1.5-2 days.

  10. Coarse particles and heart rate variability among older adults with coronary artery disease in the Coachella Valley, California.

    PubMed

    Lipsett, Michael J; Tsai, Feng C; Roger, Linda; Woo, Mary; Ostro, Bart D

    2006-08-01

    Alterations in cardiac autonomic control, assessed by changes in heart rate variability (HRV), provide one plausible mechanistic explanation for consistent associations between exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) and increased risks of cardiovascular mortality. Decreased HRV has been linked with exposures to PM10 (PM with aerodynamic diameterPM with aerodynamic diametercoarse particles [PM with aerodynamic diameter 10-2.5 microm (PM10-2.5)], which typically result from entrainment of dust and soil or from mechanical abrasive processes in industry and transportation. We measured several HRV variables in 19 nonsmoking older adults with coronary artery disease residing in the Coachella Valley, California, a desert resort and retirement area in which ambient PM10 consists predominantly of PM10-2.5. Study subjects wore Holter monitors for 24 hr once per week for up to 12 weeks during spring 2000. Pollutant concentrations were assessed at nearby fixed-site monitors. We used mixed models that controlled for individual-specific effects to examine relationships between air pollutants and several HRV metrics. Decrements in several measures of HRV were consistently associated with both PM10 and PM10-2.5; however, there was little relationship of HRV variables with PM2.5 concentrations. The magnitude of the associations (approximately 1-4% decrease in HRV per 10-microg/m3 increase in PM10 or PM10-2.5) was comparable with those observed in several other studies of PM. Elevated levels of ambient PM10-2.5 may adversely affect HRV in older subjects with coronary artery disease.

  11. The CCRUSH study: Characterization of coarse and fine particulate matter in northeastern Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Nicholas Steven

    Particulate matter in the troposphere adversely impacts human health when inhaled and alters climate through cloud formation processes and by absorbing/scattering light. Particles smaller than 2.5 mum in diameter (fine particulate matter; PM2.5), are typically emitted from combustion-related sources and can form and grow through secondary processing in the atmosphere. Coarse particles (PM10-2.5), ranging 2.5 to 10 mum, are typically generated through abrasive processes, such as erosion of road surfaces, entrained via resuspension, and settle quickly out of the atmosphere due to their large size. After deciding against regulating PM10-2.5 in 2006 citing, among other reasons, mixed results from epidemiological studies of the pollutant and lack of knowledge on health impacts in rural areas, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) funded a series of studies that investigated the ambient composition, toxicology, and epidemiology of PM10-2.5. One such study, The Colorado Coarse Rural-Urban Sources and Health (CCRUSH) study, aimed to characterize the composition, sources, and health effects of PM10-2.5 in semi-arid northeastern Colorado and consisted of two field campaigns and an epidemiological study. Summarized here are the results from the two field campaigns, the first of which included over three years of continuous PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 mass concentration monitoring at multiple sites in urban-Denver and rural-Greeley, Colorado. This data set was used to characterize the spatiotemporal variability of PM10-2.5 and PM2.5. During the second year of continuous monitoring, PM 10-2.5 and PM2.5 filter samples were collected for compositional analyses that included: elemental composition, bulk elemental and organic carbon concentrations, water-soluble organic carbon concentrations, UV-vis absorbance, fluorescence spectroscopy, and endotoxin content. Elemental composition was used to understand enrichment of trace elements in atmospheric particles and to

  12. EPA's proposal to revise the PM standards

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Page

    2006-06-15

    Over the next few months, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will be finalizing its proposal to revise the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for fine and coarse particulate matter (PM). Since issuing the proposal in December 2005, the agency has sought comments from all interested parties, and will base its final decision on the record that was established through the comment period, which ended on April 17. In this issue articles present perspectives from some of the many non-EPA stakeholders who have played an important role in this review process. This article summarizes EPA's proposal, as well as the extensive process EPA goes through when setting air quality standards. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. Characteristics and potential applications of coarse clay fractions from Puolanka, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiviskä, Tiina; Gehör, Seppo; Eijärvi, Erkki; Sarpola, Arja; Tanskanen, Juha

    2012-06-01

    Characterization of coarse fractions of kaolin clay from two locations in Puolanka (Pihlajavaara and Poskimäki) was performed in order to find potential applications for these materials in water and wastewater treatment as low-cost adsorbents or as a raw material for other uses. The effects of wet and dry fractionation methods and the annealing of the sample on the properties of the coarse fractions were studied. The coarse fractions contained mainly quartz, while the kaolinite content was considered low. The Poskimäki (PM) clay had a higher specific surface area (SSA) and cation exchange capacities (CEC) than the Pihlajavaara (PV) clay due to a higher amount of iron. Annealing (800°C) decreased the SSA and CEC. The fractionation method had only a minor effect on particle size distribution. PV and PM colloidal suspensions had a negative zeta potential at natural pH values. Very small amounts of contained elements (Al, Si, Ca, Mg, K, Cd, Co, Fe, Mn, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ba) were dissolved from samples at natural pH values. PM clay could be utilized in water treatment for example as a raw material in iron oxide-coated sands. For this purpose, the wet fractionated samples had a higher content of iron than the dry fractionated samples.

  14. Differential effects of fine and coarse particles on daily emergency cardiovascular hospitalizations in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Hong; Yu, Ignatius Tak-sun; Wang, Xiaorong; Tian, Linwei; Tse, Lap Ah; Wong, Tze Wai

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the relationship of hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases with fine (PM2.5: particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) and coarse particles (PMc: particles with an aerodynamic diameter between 2.5 and 10 μm) simultaneously. We aimed to estimate the differential effects of PM2.5 and PMc on emergency hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases, after controlling for the gaseous pollutants. We conducted a time series analysis in Hong Kong using daily emergency hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases, PM2.5 and PMc concentrations from January 2000 to December 2005. PMc concentrations were estimated by subtracting PM2.5 from PM10 measurements. Generalized additive Poisson models allowing overdispersion and autocorrelation were used to examine the effects of PM2.5 and PMc simultaneously, adjusting for time trends, weather conditions, influenza outbreaks, and gaseous pollutants. In two-pollutant model, an interquartile range (IQR) increase in the 2-day moving average (lag01) concentration of PM2.5 and PMc corresponded to 1.86% (95% CI: 0.85%, 2.88%) and -0.16% (95% CI: -1.07%, 0.76%) change of emergency hospital admissions for total circulatory diseases respectively. Results were sensitive to further inclusion of nitrogen dioxide but not of ozone and sulfur dioxide. We did not find any effects of PMc on circulatory hospitalizations independent of PM2.5. In conclusion, we confirmed the stronger and significant adverse effects of PM2.5, but no independent effect of PMc on emergency cardiovascular hospitalizations. The biological mechanisms underlying the differential effects of PM2.5 and PMc on cardiovascular diseases were discussed.

  15. Mass concentration, composition and sources of fine and coarse particulate matter in Tijuana, Mexico, during Cal-Mex campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguillón, María Cruz; Campos, Arturo Alberto; Cárdenas, Beatriz; Blanco, Salvador; Molina, Luisa T.; Querol, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    This work was carried out in the framework of the Cal-Mex project, which focuses on investigating the atmosphere along Mexico-California border region. Sampling was carried out at two sites located in Tijuana urban area: Parque Morelos and Metales y Derivados. PM2.5 and PM10 24 h samples were collected every three days from 17th May 2010 to 27th June 2010, and were used for gravimetric and chemical analyses (major and minor elements, inorganic ions, organic and elemental carbon) of PM. A subsequent Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis was performed. PM2.5 and PM10 average concentrations during Cal-Mex were relatively lower compared to usual annual averages. Trace elements concentrations recorded in the present study were lower than those recorded in Mexico City in 2006, with the exception of Pb at Metales y Derivados, attributed to the influence of a specific industrial source, which also includes As, Cd and Tl. Apart from this industrial source, both urban sites were found to be affected by similar sources with respect to bulk PM. Fine PM (PM2.5) was mainly apportioned by fueloil and biomass combustion and secondary aerosols, and road traffic. Coarse PM (PM2.5-10) was mainly apportioned by a mineral source (sum of road dust resuspension, construction emissions and natural soil) and fresh and aged sea salt. The road traffic was responsible for more than 60% of the fine elemental carbon and almost 40% of the fine organic matter.

  16. Bioassaying for ozone with pollen systems

    SciTech Connect

    Feder, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Sensitivity to ozone of pollen germinating in vitro is closely correlated with ozone sensitivity of the pollen parent. Ozone-sensitive and tolerant pollen populations have been identified in tobacco, petunia, and tomato cultivars. The rate of tube elongation can be reversibly slowed or stopped by exposure to low concentrations of ozone. The performance of selected pollen populations can then be used to bioassay ozone in ambient air by introducing the air sample into a growth chamber where ozone-sensitive pollen in growing. Year-round pollen producion can be achieved in the greenhouse. Harvested pollen can be tested, packaged, and transported to user facilities without loss of vigor. Pollen populations are inexpensive to produce, respond reliably, and are simple to use as a bioassay for air quality.

  17. Opticam PM machine design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedes, Jyrki T.

    1992-12-01

    Rank Pneumo has worked with the Center for Optics Manufacturing and the Center's Manufacturing Advisory Board to design a multi-axis prism grinding machine. The Opticam PM is a three axis, high precision CNC reciprocating grinder. It is designed for the automated manufacturing of glass prisms. Unique features of the design incorporate electrolytic in- process dressing of the finishing wheel, nested grinding wheels and machine resident metrology to provide RQM (Real-time Quality Management).

  18. The variability in iron speciation in size fractionated residual oil fly ash particulate matter (ROFA PM).

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Sidhartha; Huggins, Frank E; Huffman, Gerald P

    2016-08-15

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) containing iron can catalyze Fenton reaction leading to the production of reactive oxygen species in cells. It can also catalyze atmospheric redox reaction. These reactions are governed by the physicochemical characteristics of iron in ambient PM. As a surrogate for ambient PM, we prepared residual oil fly ash PM (ROFA PM) in a practical fire tube boiler firing residual oils with varying sulfur and ash contents. The ROFA particles were resolved into fine PM or PM2.5 (aerodynamic diameter (AD)<2.5μm) and coarse PM or PM2.5+ (AD between 2.5μm and 50μm). The iron speciation in PM2.5+ was ascertained using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and leaching method while that in PM2.5 was reported earlier. The results of both studies are compared to get an insight into the variability in the iron speciation in different size fractions. The results show the predominance of ferric sulfate, with a minor spinal ferrite in both PM (i.e. ZnxNi1-xFe2O4 in PM2.5, ZnFe2O4 in PM2.5+). The iron solubility in ROFA PM depends on its speciation, mode of incorporation of iron into particle's carbonaceous matrix, the grade and composition of oils, and pH of the medium. The soluble fraction of iron in PM is critical in assessing its interaction with the biological systems and its toxic potential.

  19. The variability in iron speciation in size fractionated residual oil fly ash particulate matter (ROFA PM).

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Sidhartha; Huggins, Frank E; Huffman, Gerald P

    2016-08-15

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) containing iron can catalyze Fenton reaction leading to the production of reactive oxygen species in cells. It can also catalyze atmospheric redox reaction. These reactions are governed by the physicochemical characteristics of iron in ambient PM. As a surrogate for ambient PM, we prepared residual oil fly ash PM (ROFA PM) in a practical fire tube boiler firing residual oils with varying sulfur and ash contents. The ROFA particles were resolved into fine PM or PM2.5 (aerodynamic diameter (AD)<2.5μm) and coarse PM or PM2.5+ (AD between 2.5μm and 50μm). The iron speciation in PM2.5+ was ascertained using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and leaching method while that in PM2.5 was reported earlier. The results of both studies are compared to get an insight into the variability in the iron speciation in different size fractions. The results show the predominance of ferric sulfate, with a minor spinal ferrite in both PM (i.e. ZnxNi1-xFe2O4 in PM2.5, ZnFe2O4 in PM2.5+). The iron solubility in ROFA PM depends on its speciation, mode of incorporation of iron into particle's carbonaceous matrix, the grade and composition of oils, and pH of the medium. The soluble fraction of iron in PM is critical in assessing its interaction with the biological systems and its toxic potential. PMID:27125683

  20. The fine and coarse particulate matter at four major Mediterranean cities: local and regional sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, Konstantinos; Kassomenos, Pavlos

    2013-11-01

    Particulate air pollution is associated with adverse health effects to the population exposed. The aim of this paper is the identification of local and regional sources, affecting PM10 and PM2.5 levels in four large cities of southern Europe, namely: Lisbon, Madrid, Marseille, and Rome. Air pollution data from seven sampling sites of the European Union network were used. These stations were selected due to their ability of monitoring PM2.5 concentrations and providing reliable series of data. Each station's background was also taken into account. Pearson correlation coefficients and primal component analysis components were extracted separately for cold and warm periods in order to define the relationships among particle matters (PMs) and gaseous pollutants (CO, NO2, SO2, and O3) and evaluate the contributions of local sources. Possible seasonal variations of PM2.5/PM10 ratio daily values were also used as markers of PM sources, influencing particulate size distribution. Particle emissions were primarily attributed to traffic and secondarily to natural sources. Minimum daily values of PM2.5/PM10 ratio were observed during warm periods, particularly at suburban stations with rural background, due to dust resuspension and also due to the increase of biogenic coarse PM (pollen, dust, etc.). Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model trajectory model was used in order to compute the 4-day backward trajectories of the air masses that affected the four cities which are under study during days with recorded PM10 exceedances, within a 5-year period (2003-2007), at 300, 750, and 1,500 m above ground level (AGL). The trajectories were then divided to clusters with a K-means analysis. In all four cities, the influence of slow-moving air masses was associated with a large fraction of PM10 exceedances and with high average and maximum daily mean PM10 concentrations, principally at the 300 m AGL analysis. As far the issue of the increased PM10 concentrations

  1. Perspectives in avoidance-preference bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, C.W.; Taylor, D.H.; Strickler-Shaw, S.

    1996-12-31

    Although behavioral endpoints are used in hazard assessment, establishment of water quality criteria and assessment of a contaminant`s hazard to aquatic life rely primarily on standard acute and chronic toxicity tests. Sublethal effects of pollutants should, however, be of major concern because more organisms experience sublethal rather than acutely or chronically lethal exposures of contaminants. The avoidance-preference approach to behavioral bioassays is very useful in screening pollutants for which the mechanisms of perception or response are largely unknown. The underlying philosophy of these studies is that an animal which perceives a chemical can be attracted or repulsed by it. No response is frequently assumed to indicate lack of perception. All three responses have broad ecological implications. The authors discuss the conditions required for performing avoidance-preference bioassays, as well as their sensitivities, advantages, and limitations. In this regard, a comparative approach is used in examining the results of avoidance-preference bioassays with zebrafish in two different apparatuses. Finally, they compare the results of avoidance-preference studies with other measures of the behavioral toxicity of lead to tadpoles.

  2. Comparison of how ambient PMc and PM2.5 influence the inflammatory potential

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Matthew D.; Migliaccio, Chris; Ward, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) is one of six criteria air pollutants currently regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), with existing ambient standards for PM2.5 and PM10. Currently there are no health-based regulations for the size fraction between 2.5 and 10 μm, commonly known as the coarse fraction (PMc). The present study investigates current gaps in knowledge for PMc including exposure toxicity and PM ratios (PMc:PM2.5) in PM10. Throughout the world, all three PM size fractions have been shown to be associated with adverse impacts. Recent studies have shown that PMc can be more detrimental to susceptible populations when directly compared to PM2.5, and that the PMc fraction in PM10 can account for the majority of the inflammatory response from PM10 exposure. In our studies we utilized a bone marrow-derived mouse macrophage in vitro system to compare the inflammatory potential of PMc, PM2.5, and mixtures of the two. The result was a linear increase in interleukin(IL) −1β with increasing levels of exposure to winter and summer PMc, as compared to PM2.5, which exhibited logarithmic growth. Also, exposure to PM10 as a function of PM2.5 and PMc mass ratios showed that IL-1β and TNF-α levels increased synergistically with a greater burden of PMc. Endotoxin content in the PM did not correlate with these results, suggesting that other activators in PMc are likely responsible for activating the NF-κB pathway and the inflammasome. PMID:24304303

  3. Weekly cycle of magnetic characteristics of the daily PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Meinan; Wu, Huaichun; Zhang, Shihong; Li, Haiyan; Yang, Tianshui; Liu, Wei; Liu, He

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, Beijing has been shown to suffer one of the most serious air pollution problems of any major world city. The concentrations of particulate matter (PM) pollutants, PM2.5-10 and PM2.5, are commonly used as air pollution indexes. We conducted a detailed environmental magnetism study to investigate possible sources of air pollution in Beijing, China, using 283 pairs of the PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 samples collected daily from July 2010 to June 2011. Rock magnetic measurements, including magnetic susceptibility, anhysteretic remanent magnetization, isothermal remanent magnetization, saturation isothermal remanent magnetization, hysteresis loops, first-order reversal curves (FORCs), and thermomagnetism, indicate that the main magnetic mineral is low-coercivity pseudo-single domain (PSD) magnetite. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses on the PM indicate that the major magnetic phase is coarse-grained magnetite, which is most likely from automobile exhausts and braking system debris. Magnetic parameters of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 show significant seasonal patterns that may be attributed to domestic heating enhancing magnetization of the PM during late autumn to early spring. Power spectral analyses and box-whisker plots indicate that the magnetic parameters have strong weekly variations that may be due to traffic emissions. These results indicate that magnetic parameters can be used as efficient proxies for monitoring Beijing's air pollution, and that the atmospheric environment may be improved by controlling vehicle emissions.

  4. USE OF THE AERODYNAMIC PARTICLE SIZER TO MEASURE PM-COARSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aerodynamic particle sizer (APS 3321, TSI, Inc.) measures particle size distributions from 0.5 µm to 20 µm by determining the time-of-flight of individual particles in an accelerating flow field. A complete particle size distribution may be determined in a matter of ...

  5. USE OF THE AERODYNAMIC PARTICLE SIZER TO MEASURE PM-COARSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aerodynamic particle sizer (APS 3321, TSI, Inc.) measures particle size distributions from 0.5 µm to 20 µm by determining the time-of-flight of individual particles in an accelerating flow field. A complete particle size distribution may be determined in a matter of s...

  6. In-situ bioassays using caged bivalves

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.H.; Salazar, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    It is important to make the distinction between chemical measurements to assess bioaccumulation potential versus biological measurements to assess potential bioeffects because bioaccumulation is not a bioeffect. Caging provides a unique opportunity to make synoptic measurements of each and facilitates making these measurements over space and time. Measuring bioaccumulation in resident and transplanted bivalves has probably been the most frequently used form of an in-situ bioassay because bivalves concentrate chemicals in their tissues. They are also easy to collect, cage, and measure. The authors have refined bivalve bioassay methods by minimizing the size range of test animals, making repetitive measurements of the same individuals, and standardizing test protocols for a variety of applications. They are now attempting to standardize criteria for accepting and interpreting data in the same way that laboratory bioassays have been standardized. Growth measurements can serve two purposes in this assessment strategy: (1) An integrated biological response endpoint that is easily quantifiable and with significance to the population, and (2) A means of calibrating bioaccumulation by assessing the relative health and physiological state of tissues that have accumulated the chemicals. In general, the authors have found the highest bioconcentration factors associated with the highest growth rates, the highest concentrations ({micro}g/g) of chemicals in juvenile mussels, and the highest chemical content ({micro}g/animal) in adult mussels. Without accounting for possible dilution of chemical concentrations by tissue growth or magnification through degrowth, contaminant concentrations can be misleading. Examples are provided for the Sudbury River in Massachusetts (Elliptio complanata), San Diego Bay (Mytilus galloprovincialis), and the Harbor Island Superfund Site in Puget Sound (Mytilus trossulus).

  7. Aspartame bioassay findings portend human cancer hazards.

    PubMed

    Huff, James; LaDou, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) should reevaluate its position on aspartame as being safe under all conditions. Animal bioassay results predict human cancer risks, and a recent animal study confirms that there is a potential aspartame risk to humans. Aspartame is produced and packaged in China for domestic use and global distribution. Japan, France, and the United States are also major producers. No study of long-term adverse occupational health effects on aspartame workers have been conducted. The FDA should consider sponsoring a prospective epidemiologic study of aspartame workers.

  8. A Multichannel Bioluminescence Determination Platform for Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Naganawa, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol introduces a multichannel bioluminescence determination platform allowing a high sample throughput determination of weak bioluminescence with reduced standard deviations. The platform is designed to carry a multichannel conveyer, an optical filter, and a mirror cap. The platform enables us to near-simultaneously determine ligands in multiple samples without the replacement of the sample tubes. Furthermore, the optical filters beneath the multichannel conveyer are designed to easily discriminate colors during assays. This optical system provides excellent time- and labor-efficiency to users during bioassays. PMID:27424912

  9. A Multichannel Bioluminescence Determination Platform for Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Naganawa, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol introduces a multichannel bioluminescence determination platform allowing a high sample throughput determination of weak bioluminescence with reduced standard deviations. The platform is designed to carry a multichannel conveyer, an optical filter, and a mirror cap. The platform enables us to near-simultaneously determine ligands in multiple samples without the replacement of the sample tubes. Furthermore, the optical filters beneath the multichannel conveyer are designed to easily discriminate colors during assays. This optical system provides excellent time- and labor-efficiency to users during bioassays.

  10. Two-photon excitation fluorescence bioassays.

    PubMed

    Hänninen, Pekka; Soukka, Jori; Soini, Juhani T

    2008-01-01

    Application of two-photon excitation of fluorescence in microscopy is one of the major discoveries of the "renaissance" of light microscopy that started in the 1980s. The technique derives its advantages from the biologically "smooth" wavelength of the excitation light and the confinement of the excitation. Difficult, and seemingly nontransparent, samples may be imaged with the technique with good resolution. Although the bioresearch has been concentrating mostly on the positive properties of the technique for imaging, the same properties may be applied successfully to nonimaging bioassays. This article focuses on the development path of two-photon excitation-based assay system. PMID:18596366

  11. Pulmonary function response in smokers and patients with chronic obstructive lung diseae (COPD) following exposure to concentrated fine (PM2.5) particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population-based studies strongly suggest that smokers and patients with COPD may be susceptible to particulate matter (PM). The reported associations were stronger with fine than coarse PM .These findings, however, have not been supported by laboratory or clinical data. We stu...

  12. Residential indoor PM 10 and PM 2.5 in Hong Kong and the elemental composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Christopher Y.; Wong, Kelvin K.

    Indoor air particulate samples were collected in 34 homes and their adjacent outdoor environments in Hong Kong during the fall and winter seasons. It was found that the mean indoor PM 2.5 and PM 10 concentrations were 45.0 and 63.3 μg m -3, respectively. The corresponding mean outdoor levels were 47.0 and 69.5 μg m -3, respectively. The indoor particulate levels were found to be about 2-4 times higher than those in the homes in western countries where most are located in suburb areas with a much better ambient air quality. Pearson paired t-tests were conducted on the data and it was found that poor correlation was seen in the indoor and the outdoor particulate concentrations. This was probably due to the fact that windows were closed more often in the fall and winter seasons keeping the ventilation rate low, plus the factor that window type air conditioners were used commonly in Hong Kong, which again, constituted to a low air change rate. Both the indoor and the outdoor elemental compositions of the particulate samples collected in these 34 homes were identified by proton-induced X-ray emission analysis. Seventeen elements were identified. The mean inorganic elemental compositions in the indoor PM 2.5 and PM 10 samples were 6.4 and 10.2 μg m -3, respectively while those in the outdoor samples were 7.9 and 14.1 μg m -3, respectively. Enrichment factor analysis was performed and it was noted that those species existing in fine mode were highly enriched (bromine, lead, nickel, potassium, sulfur, vanadium and zinc) while those species existing in the coarse mode had their enrichment factors close to 1 (aluminum, calcium, iron, magnesium, silicon, sodium and titanium).

  13. Development of a chronic sublethal sediment bioassay using the estuarine amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus (Shoemaker)

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.L. Jr.; Moore, D.W.; Gibson, A.B.; Gray, B.R.; Duke, B.M.; Wright, R.B.; Farrar, J.D.

    1997-09-01

    Based on the need for a test to evaluate chronic sublethal toxicity in estuarine sediments, a 28-d sediment bioassay with the estuarine amphipod, Leptocheirus plumulosus (Shoemaker) was developed. The test was initiated with animals less than 2 weeks old. Test endpoints included survival, growth, and reproduction. Factors with the potential to influence test animal performance such as artificial sea salts, salinity, food ration, size at test initiation, intraspecific density, sediment grain size, and diet were evaluated. For example, intraspecific densities between 10 and 60 animals/beaker did not affect survival, growth, or reproduction. Similarly, L. plumulosus were tolerant of a wide range of sediment grain sizes with only extremely fine grained or coarse grained material significantly affecting survival, growth, and reproduction. Test performance criteria included control survival (> 80%) and reproduction and response to a reference toxicant test with cadmium chloride in a control chart format.

  14. Quasiclassical coarse graining and thermodynamic entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Gell-Mann, Murray; Hartle, James B.

    2007-08-15

    Our everyday descriptions of the universe are highly coarse grained, following only a tiny fraction of the variables necessary for a perfectly fine-grained description. Coarse graining in classical physics is made natural by our limited powers of observation and computation. But in the modern quantum mechanics of closed systems, some measure of coarse graining is inescapable because there are no nontrivial, probabilistic, fine-grained descriptions. This essay explores the consequences of that fact. Quantum theory allows for various coarse-grained descriptions, some of which are mutually incompatible. For most purposes, however, we are interested in the small subset of 'quasiclassical descriptions' defined by ranges of values of averages over small volumes of densities of conserved quantities such as energy and momentum and approximately conserved quantities such as baryon number. The near-conservation of these quasiclassical quantities results in approximate decoherence, predictability, and local equilibrium, leading to closed sets of equations of motion. In any description, information is sacrificed through the coarse graining that yields decoherence and gives rise to probabilities for histories. In quasiclassical descriptions, further information is sacrificed in exhibiting the emergent regularities summarized by classical equations of motion. An appropriate entropy measures the loss of information. For a 'quasiclassical realm' this is connected with the usual thermodynamic entropy as obtained from statistical mechanics. It was low for the initial state of our universe and has been increasing since.

  15. Convergent Coarseness Regulation for Segmented Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D W

    2004-05-27

    In segmentation of remotely sensed images, the number of pixel classes and their spectral representations are often unknown a priori. Even with prior knowledge, pixels with spectral components from multiple classes lead to classification errors and undesired small region artifacts. Coarseness regulation for segmented images is proposed as an efficient novel technique for handling these problems. Beginning with an over-segmented image, perceptually similar connected regions are iteratively merged using a method reminiscent of region growing, except the primitives are regions, not pixels. Interactive coarseness regulation is achieved by specifying the area {alpha} of the largest region eligible for merging. A region with area less than {alpha} is merged with the most spectrally similar connected region, unless the regions are perceived as spectrally dissimilar. In convergent coarseness regulation, which requires no user interaction, {alpha} is specified as the total number of pixels in the image, and the coarseness regulation output converges to a steady-state segmentation that remains unchanged as {alpha} is further increased. By applying convergent coarseness regulation to AVIRIS, IKONOS and DigitalGlobe images, and quantitatively comparing computer-generated segmentations to segmentations generated manually by a human analyst, it was found that the quality of the input segmentations was consistently and dramatically improved.

  16. Bioassaying for ozone with pollen systems.

    PubMed Central

    Feder, W A

    1981-01-01

    Sensitivity to ozone of pollen germinating in vitro is closely correlated with ozone sensitivity of the pollen parent. Ozone-sensitive and tolerant pollen populations have been identified in tobacco, petunia, and tomato cultivars. The rate of tube elongation can be reversibly slowed or stopped by exposure to low concentrations of ozone. Tube growth rates in the presence of a range of ozone dosages, of pollen populations exhibiting differing ozone sensitivity can be measured and different growth rates can be correlated with ozone dosages. The performance of selected pollen populations can then be used to bioassay ozone in ambient air by introducing the air sample into a growth chamber where ozone-sensitive pollen in growing. Petunia and tobacco pollen are especially useful because they store well at ordinary freezer temperatures and do not require special preparation prior to storage. Modified Brewbacker's growth medium is suitable for growth of both these pollen types. Four useful cultivars are Bel W-3, ozone-sensitive and Bel B, ozone-tolerant tobacco, and White Bountiful, ozone-sensitive and Blue Lagoon, ozone-tolerant petunia. Observations can be made directly by using a TV scanner, or by time lapse or interval photography. Year-round pollen production can be achieved in the greenhouse. Harvested pollen can be tested, packaged, and transported to user facilities without loss of vigor. Pollen populations are inexpensive to produce, respond reliably, and are simple to use as a bioassay for air quality. Images FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. PMID:7460876

  17. Urine sample collection protocols for bioassay samples

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, J.A.; McFadden, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    In vitro radiobioassay analyses are used to measure the amount of radioactive material excreted by personnel exposed to the potential intake of radioactive material. The analytical results are then used with various metabolic models to estimate the amount of radioactive material in the subject's body and the original intake of radioactive material. Proper application of these metabolic models requires knowledge of the excretion period. It is normal practice to design the bioassay program based on a 24-hour excretion sample. The Hanford bioassay program simulates a total 24-hour urine excretion sample with urine collection periods lasting from one-half hour before retiring to one-half hour after rising on two consecutive days. Urine passed during the specified periods is collected in three 1-L bottles. Because the daily excretion volume given in Publication 23 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1975, p. 354) for Reference Man is 1.4 L, it was proposed to use only two 1-L bottles as a cost-saving measure. This raised the broader question of what should be the design capacity of a 24-hour urine sample kit.

  18. Urine sample collection protocols for bioassay samples

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, J.A.; McFadden, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    In vitro radiobioassay analyses are used to measure the amount of radioactive material excreted by personnel exposed to the potential intake of radioactive material. The analytical results are then used with various metabolic models to estimate the amount of radioactive material in the subject`s body and the original intake of radioactive material. Proper application of these metabolic models requires knowledge of the excretion period. It is normal practice to design the bioassay program based on a 24-hour excretion sample. The Hanford bioassay program simulates a total 24-hour urine excretion sample with urine collection periods lasting from one-half hour before retiring to one-half hour after rising on two consecutive days. Urine passed during the specified periods is collected in three 1-L bottles. Because the daily excretion volume given in Publication 23 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1975, p. 354) for Reference Man is 1.4 L, it was proposed to use only two 1-L bottles as a cost-saving measure. This raised the broader question of what should be the design capacity of a 24-hour urine sample kit.

  19. Coarse and fine particles and daily mortality in the Coachella Valley, California: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Ostro, B D; Broadwin, R; Lipsett, M J

    2000-01-01

    Many epidemiological studies provide evidence of an association between ambient particles, measured as PM10, and daily mortality. Most of these studies have been conducted in urban areas where PM10 is highly correlated with and dominated by fine particles less than 2.5 microm in diameter (PM2.5). Fewer studies have investigated impacts associated with the fraction of coarse mode particles (between 2.5 and 10 microm in diameter). In a previous study using data from 1989 through 1992 in the Coachella Valley, a desert resort and retirement area east of Los Angeles, we reported associations between PM10 and several different measures of mortality [Ostro B.D., Hurley S., and Lipsett M.J. Air pollution and daily mortality in the Coachella Valley, California: a study of PM10 dominated by coarse particles. Environ. Res. 1999: 81: 231-238]. In this arid environment, coarse particles of geologic origin are highly correlated with and comprise approximately 60% of PM10, increasing to >90% during wind events. This study was intended to repeat the earlier investigation using 10 years (1989-1998) of daily data on mortality and PM10. The last 2.5 years of data also included daily measures of PM2.5, allowing examination of size-specific impacts. To ensure adequate statistical power, we attempted to develop predictive models for both fine and coarse particles to use in analyses of the full 10-year period. An acceptable fit was found only for coarse particles, which were found to be a cubic function of PM10 (R2 = 0.95). Outcome variables included several measures of daily mortality, including all-cause (minus accidents and homicides), cardiovascular and respiratory mortality. Multivariate Poisson regression analyses using generalized additive models were employed to explain the variation in these endpoints, controlling for temperature, humidity, day of the week, season, and time, using locally weighted smoothing techniques. Pollution lags of up to 4 days were examined. Several

  20. Plasmonically amplified bioassay - Total internal reflection fluorescence vs. epifluorescence geometry.

    PubMed

    Hageneder, Simone; Bauch, Martin; Dostalek, Jakub

    2016-08-15

    This paper investigates plasmonic amplification in two commonly used optical configurations for fluorescence readout of bioassays - epifluorescence (EPF) and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). The plasmonic amplification in the EPF configuration was implemented by using crossed gold diffraction grating and Kretschmann geometry of attenuated total reflection method (ATR) was employed in the TIRF configuration. Identical assay, surface architecture for analyte capture, and optics for the excitation, collection and detection of emitted fluorescence light intensity were used in both TIRF and EPF configurations. Simulations predict that the crossed gold diffraction grating (EPF) can amplify the fluorescence signal by a factor of 10(2) by the combination of surface plasmon-enhanced excitation and directional surface plasmon-coupled emission in the red part of spectrum. This factor is about order of magnitude higher than that predicted for the Kretschmann geometry (TIRF) which only took advantage of the surface plasmon-enhanced excitation. When applied for the readout of sandwich interleukin 6 (IL-6) immunoassay, the plasmonically amplified EPF geometry designed for Alexa Fluor 647 labels offered 4-times higher fluorescence signal intensity compared to TIRF. Interestingly, both geometries allowed reaching the same detection limit of 0.4pM despite of the difference in the fluorescence signal enhancement. This is attributed to inherently lower background of fluorescence signal for TIRF geometry compared to that for EPF which compensates for the weaker fluorescence signal enhancement. The analysis of the inflammation biomarker IL-6 in serum at medically relevant concentrations and the utilization of plasmonic amplification for the fluorescence measurement of kinetics of surface affinity reactions are demonstrated for both EPF and TIRF readout. PMID:27260457

  1. Plasmonically amplified bioassay - Total internal reflection fluorescence vs. epifluorescence geometry.

    PubMed

    Hageneder, Simone; Bauch, Martin; Dostalek, Jakub

    2016-08-15

    This paper investigates plasmonic amplification in two commonly used optical configurations for fluorescence readout of bioassays - epifluorescence (EPF) and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). The plasmonic amplification in the EPF configuration was implemented by using crossed gold diffraction grating and Kretschmann geometry of attenuated total reflection method (ATR) was employed in the TIRF configuration. Identical assay, surface architecture for analyte capture, and optics for the excitation, collection and detection of emitted fluorescence light intensity were used in both TIRF and EPF configurations. Simulations predict that the crossed gold diffraction grating (EPF) can amplify the fluorescence signal by a factor of 10(2) by the combination of surface plasmon-enhanced excitation and directional surface plasmon-coupled emission in the red part of spectrum. This factor is about order of magnitude higher than that predicted for the Kretschmann geometry (TIRF) which only took advantage of the surface plasmon-enhanced excitation. When applied for the readout of sandwich interleukin 6 (IL-6) immunoassay, the plasmonically amplified EPF geometry designed for Alexa Fluor 647 labels offered 4-times higher fluorescence signal intensity compared to TIRF. Interestingly, both geometries allowed reaching the same detection limit of 0.4pM despite of the difference in the fluorescence signal enhancement. This is attributed to inherently lower background of fluorescence signal for TIRF geometry compared to that for EPF which compensates for the weaker fluorescence signal enhancement. The analysis of the inflammation biomarker IL-6 in serum at medically relevant concentrations and the utilization of plasmonic amplification for the fluorescence measurement of kinetics of surface affinity reactions are demonstrated for both EPF and TIRF readout.

  2. Temporal variations and spatial distribution of ambient PM2.2 and PM10 concentrations in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Begum, Bilkis A; Biswas, Swapan K; Hopke, Philip K

    2006-04-01

    Concentrations and characteristics of airborne particulate matter (PM(10), PM(2.2) and BC) on air quality have been studied at two air quality-monitoring stations in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. One site is at the Farm Gate area, a hot spot with very high pollutant concentrations because of its proximity to major roadways. The other site is at a semi-residential area located at the Atomic Energy Centre, Dhaka Campus, (AECD) with relatively less traffic. The samples were collected using a 'Gent' stacked filter unit in two fractions of 0-2.2 mum and 2.2-10 mum sizes. Samples of fine (PM(2.2)) and coarse (PM(2.2-10)) airborne particulate matter fractions collected from 2000 to 2003 were studied. It has been observed that fine particulate matter has a decreasing trend, from prior year measurements, because of Government policy interventions like phase-wise plans to take two-stroke three-wheelers off the roads in Dhaka and finally banned from January 1, 2003. Other policy interventions were banning of old buses and trucks to ply on Dhaka city promotion of the using compressed natural gas (CNG), introducing air pollution control devices in vehicles, etc. It was found that both local (mostly from vehicular emissions) and possibly some regional emission sources are responsible for high PM(2.2) and BC concentrations in Dhaka. PM(2.2), PM(2.2-10) and black carbon concentration levels depend on the season, wind direction and wind speed. Transport related emissions are the major source of BC and long-range transportation from fossil fuel related sources and biomass burning could be another substantial source of BC. PMID:16165193

  3. Observations of Fine and Coarse Particle Nitrate at Several Rural Locations in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Taehyoung; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Ayres, Benjamin; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Malm, William C.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2008-04-01

    Nitrate comprises an important part of aerosol mass at many non-urban locations during some times of the year. Little is known, however, about the chemical form and size distribution of particulate nitrate in these environments. While submicron ammonium nitrate is often assumed to be the dominant species, this assumption is rarely tested. Properties of aerosol nitrate were characterized at several IMPROVE monitoring sites during a series of field studies. Study sites included Bondville, Illinois (February 2003), San Gorgonio Wilderness Area, California (April and July 2003), Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona (May 2003), Brigantine National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey (November 2003), and Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee (July/August 2004). Nitrate was found predominantly in submicron ammonium nitrate particles during the Bondville and San Gorgonio (April) campaigns. Coarse mode nitrate particles, resulting from reactions of nitric acid or its precursors with sea salt or soil dust, were more important at Grand Canyon and Great Smoky Mountains. Both fine and coarse mode nitrate were important during the studies at Brigantine and San Gorgonio (July). These results, which complement earlier findings about the importance of coarse particle nitrate at Yosemite and Big Bend National Parks, suggest a need to more closely examine common assumptions regarding the importance of ammonium nitrate at non-urban sites, to include pathways for coarse mode nitrate formation in regional models, and to consider impacts of coarse particle nitrate on visibility. Because coarse particle nitrate modes often extend well below 2.5 µm aerodynamic diameter, measurements of PM2.5 nitrate in these environments should not automatically be assumed to contain only ammonium nitrate.

  4. Characterization of coarse particulate matter in the western United States: a comparison between observation and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Baker, K. R.; Hannigan, M. P.

    2013-02-01

    We provide a regional characterization of coarse particulate matter (PM10-2.5) spanning the western United States based on the analysis of measurements from 50 sites reported in the US EPA Air Quality System (AQS) and two state agencies. We found that the observed PM10-2.5 concentrations show significant spatial variability and distinct spatial patterns, associated with the distributions of land use/land cover and soil moisture. The highest concentrations were observed in the southwestern US, where sparse vegetation, shrublands or barren lands dominate with lower soil moistures, whereas the lowest concentrations were observed in areas dominated by grasslands, forest, or croplands with higher surface soil moistures. The observed PM10-2.5 concentrations also show variable seasonal, weekly, and diurnal patterns, indicating a variety of sources and their relative importance at different locations. The observed results were compared to modeled PM10-2.5 concentrations from an annual simulation using the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system (CMAQ) that has been designed for regulatory or policy assessments of a variety of pollutants including PM10, which consists of PM10-2.5 and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). The model under-predicts PM10-2.5 observations at 49 of 50 sites, among which 14 sites have annual observation means that are at least five times greater than model means. Model results also fail to reproduce their spatial patterns. Important sources (e.g. pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, and geogenic dust) were not included in the emission inventory used and/or the applied emissions were greatly under-estimated. Unlike the observed patterns that are more complex, modeled PM10-2.5 concentrations show the similar seasonal, weekly, and diurnal pattern; the temporal allocations in the modeling system need improvement. CMAQ does not include organic materials in PM10-2.5; however, speciation measurements show that organics constitute a significant component

  5. Signal Amplification of Bioassay Using Zinc Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, Chad L.

    An emerging trend in the analytical detection sciences is the employment of nanomaterials for bioassay signal transduction to identify analytes critical to public health. These nanomaterials have been specifically investigated for applications which require identification of trace levels of cells, proteins, or other molecules that can have broad ranging impacts to human health in fields such as clinical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, food and drink control, and the prevention of bioterrorism. Oftentimes these nanoparticle-based signal transduction or amplification approaches offer distinct advantages over conventional methods such as increased sensitivity, rapidity, or stability. The biological application of nanoparticles however, does suffer from drawbacks that have limited more widespread adoption of these techniques. Some of these drawbacks are, high cost and toxicity, arduous synthesis methods, functionalization and bioconjugation challenges, and laboratory disposal and environmental hazard issues, all of which have impeded the progression of this technology in some way or another. This work aims at developing novel techniques that offer solutions to a number of these hurdles through the development of new nanoparticle-based signal transduction approaches and the description of a previously undescribed nanomaterial. Zinc-based nanomaterials offer the opportunity to overcome some of the limitations that are encountered when other nanomaterials are employed for bioassay signal transduction. On the other hand, the biological application of zinc nanomaterials has been difficult because in general their fluorescence is in the blue range and the reported quantum yields are usually too low for highly sensitive applications. The advantages of using zinc nanomaterials for biological applications, such as reduced toxicity, simple synthesis, low cost, and straightforward functionalization strategies contribute to the research interest in their application as

  6. Weekly cycle of magnetic characteristics of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHI, M.; Wu, H.; Zhang, S.; Li, H.; Yang, T.

    2013-12-01

    In urban areas,fine particle matter with aerodynamic diameter between 2.5 um and 10 um (PM2.5-10), and 2.5 um (PM2.5), as an important source of urban particulate matter (PM) pollutants, have significant negative effects on health, atmospheric visibility and climate. PM has increasingly become a significant index of indicating the atmospheric pollution of city. In recent years, Beijing, China has been listed as one of the most serious air pollution city in the world. In order to investigate the sources of air pollutants, a total of 283 pairs of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 samples were collected daily from July, 2010 to June, 2011 in Beijing. Mineral magnetic properties and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 were measured to verify the magnetic materials. Magnetic measures for PM indicated that the major magnetic phase was coarse-grained magnetite-like material. The χlf, χarm, SIRM and χarm/SIRM series of the PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 show seasonal dependences: high values in winter and low values in summer. In additional the parameters analyzed by Time-series methods show a strong cycle about 7 days above 95% confidence level. Weekly cycle of magnetic characteristics of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 show different pattern: the concentration of magnetic particles in PM2.5-10 show high values in mid-week, and particle sizes is steady, while the concentration of magnetic particles in PM2.5 show reverse a weekly cycle pattern, and particle sizes is smaller in the mid-week.Microscopy analyses reveal basically three morphologies of magnetic grains: aggregate, spherules and angular particles. The ultrafine carbonaceous particles which tend to form complex clusters and chain-like structures, most likely come from coal burning and motor vehicle exhaust. Spherical particles in PM2.5 are dominantly composed of Fe, O and C, grain-diameters of particles range from 0.3 to 2 um. Angular particles of Fe

  7. Nanoparticle-catalyzed reductive bleaching for fabricating turn-off and enzyme-free amplified colorimetric bioassays.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Qiang, Weibing; Li, Jie; Li, Hui; Dong, Yifan; Zhao, Yaju; Xu, Danke

    2014-01-15

    Nanoparticle-catalyzed reductive bleaching reactions of colored substrates are emerging as a class of novel indicator reactions for fabricating enzyme-free amplified colorimetric biosensing (turn-off mode), which are exactly opposite to the commonly used oxidative coloring processes of colorless substrates in traditional enzyme-catalyzed amplified colorimetric bioassays (turn-on mode). In this work, a simple theoretical analysis shows that the sensitivity of this colorimetric bioassay can be improved by increasing the amplification factor (kcatΔt), or enhancing the binding affinity between analyte and receptor (Kd), or selecting the colored substrates with high extinction coefficients (ε). Based on this novel strategy, we have developed a turn-off and cost-effective amplified colorimetric thrombin aptasensor. This aptasensor made full use of sandwich binding of two affinity aptamers for increased specificity, magnetic particles for easy separation and enrichment, and gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-catalyzed reductive bleaching reaction to generate the amplified colorimetric signal. With 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) as the non-dye colored substrate, colorimetric bioassay of thrombin was achieved by the endpoint method with a detection limit of 91pM. In particular, when using methylene blue (MB) as the substrate, for the first time, a more convenient and efficient kinetic-based colorimetric thrombin bioassay was achieved without the steps of acidification termination and magnetic removal of particles, with a low detection limit of 10pM, which was superior to the majority of the existing colorimetric thrombin aptasensors. The proposed colorimetric protocol is expected to hold great promise in field analysis and point-of-care applications.

  8. Near-road enhancement and solubility of fine and coarse particulate matter trace elements near a major interstate in Detroit, Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakes, Michelle M.; Burke, Janet M.; Norris, Gary A.; Kovalcik, Kasey D.; Pancras, J. Patrick; Landis, Matthew S.

    2016-11-01

    Communities near major roadways are disproportionately affected by traffic-related air pollution which can contribute to adverse health outcomes. The specific role of particulate matter (PM) from traffic sources is not fully understood due to complex emissions processes and physical/chemical properties of PM in the near-road environment. To investigate the spatial profile and water solubility of elemental PM species near a major roadway, filter-based measurements of fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM10-2.5) PM were simultaneously collected at multiple distances (10 m, 100 m, and 300 m) from Interstate I-96 in Detroit, Michigan during September-November 2010. Filters were extracted in water, followed by a hot acid extraction, and analyzed by magnetic sector field high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICPMS) to quantify water-soluble and acid-soluble trace elements for each PM size fraction. PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 species measured in the near-road samples included elements associated with traffic activity, local industrial sources, and regional pollution. Metals indicative of brake wear (Ba, Cu) were dramatically enriched near the roadway during downwind conditions (factor of 5 concentration increase), with the largest increase within 100 m of the roadway. Moderate near-roadway increases were observed for crustal elements and other traffic-related PM (Fe, Ca), and the lowest increases observed for regional PM species (S). Water solubility varied by PM species and size, and for PM2.5 included highly (S, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Ba), moderately (Cu, Mn, Sb, Pb), and minimally (Fe, Ti) water-soluble species, with lower water solubility for most species in PM10-2.5. Results from this study indicate that water-soluble PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 metals, particularly from brake/tire wear, were enhanced in the near-roadway environment which may have human health implications.

  9. Mass concentration and elemental composition of indoor PM 2.5 and PM 10 in University rooms in Thessaloniki, northern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemenetzis, Panagiotis; Moussas, Panagiotis; Arditsoglou, Anastasia; Samara, Constantini

    The mass concentration and the elemental composition of PM 2.5 and PM 10 were measured in 40 rooms (mainly offices or mixed office-lab rooms, and photocopying places) of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, northern Greece. A total of 27 major, minor and trace elements were determined by ED-XRF analysis. The PM 2.5/PM 10 concentration ratios averaged 0.8±0.2, while the corresponding elemental ratios ranged between 0.4±0.2 and 0.9±0.2. The concentrations of PM 2.5 and PM 10 were significantly higher (by 70% and 50%, respectively) in the smokers' rooms compared to the non-smokers' places. The total elemental concentrations were also higher in the smokers' rooms (11.5 vs 8.2 μg m -3 for PM 2.5, and 10.3 vs 7.6 μg m -3 for PM 2.5-10). Fine particle concentrations (PM 2.5) were found to be quite proportional to smoking strength. On the contrary, the two environments exhibited similar coarse (PM 2.5-10) particle fractions not related to the number of cigarettes smoked. A slight decrease of particle concentrations with increasing the floor level was also observed, particularly for PM 2.5, suggesting that high-level floors are less impacted by near ground-level sources like traffic emissions. Finally, the removal efficiency of air purification systems was evaluated.

  10. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) in PM2.5, PM10, TSP and Gas Phase in Office Environment in Shanghai, China: Occurrence and Human Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Chen, Ling; Ngoc, Duong Minh; Duan, Yan-Ping; Lu, Zhi-Bo; Wen, Zhi-Hao; Meng, Xiang-Zhou

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate risk via inhalation exposure of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in office environment, thirty-six pairs air samples including PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm), PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm), total suspended particles (TSP) with matching gas phase were collected in office environment in Shanghai, China. The average concentrations of PM2.5, PM10 and TSP were 20.4, 27.2 and 50.3 μg/m3, respectively. Σ15PBDEs mean concentrations in PM2.5, PM10, TSP and gas phase were 51.8, 110.7, 148 and 59.6 pg/m3, respectively. Much more PBDEs distributed in fine fractions than coarse ones. PBDEs congener profiles found in PM2.5, PM10 and TSP (dominated by BDE-209) were different from that in gas phase (dominated by the tri- to penta-BDEs). Approximately 3.20 pg/kg/d PM2.5 bound PBDEs can be inhaled into the lung; 3.62 pg/kg/d PM10-PM2.5(particles with aerodynamic diameter of 2.5-10 μm) bound PBDEs tended to be deposited in the upper part of respiratory system, and the intake of PBDEs via gas-phase was 2.74 pg/kg/d. The exposure of PBDEs was far below the minimal risk levels (MRLs), indicating lower risk from PBDEs via inhalation in the studied office in Shanghai. PMID:25793925

  11. Superluminescent variants of marine luciferases for bioassays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bae; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Sato, Moritoshi; Tao, Hiroaki

    2011-11-15

    In this study, a rational synthesis of superluminescent variants from marine luciferases with prolonged bioluminescence has been demonstrated. A putative active site of a model marine luciferase, Gaussia princeps Luciferase (GLuc), was assigned and modified by a site-directed mutagenesis. The potent variants were found to generate up to 10 times stronger bioluminescence, emitting red shifts of up to 33 nm with natural coelenterazine than native GLuc, rendering an efficient optical signature in bioassays. The advantageous properties were demonstrated with mammalian two-hybrid assays, single-chain probes, and metastases of murine B16 melanoma in BALB/c nude mice. The unique ideas for engineering GLuc are proved to be valid even for other marine luciferases. PMID:21951281

  12. Plasmonically amplified fluorescence bioassay with microarray format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogalic, S.; Hageneder, S.; Ctortecka, C.; Bauch, M.; Khan, I.; Preininger, Claudia; Sauer, U.; Dostalek, J.

    2015-05-01

    Plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal in bioassays with microarray detection format is reported. A crossed relief diffraction grating was designed to couple an excitation laser beam to surface plasmons at the wavelength overlapping with the absorption and emission bands of fluorophore Dy647 that was used as a label. The surface of periodically corrugated sensor chip was coated with surface plasmon-supporting gold layer and a thin SU8 polymer film carrying epoxy groups. These groups were employed for the covalent immobilization of capture antibodies at arrays of spots. The plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal on the developed microarray chip was tested by using interleukin 8 sandwich immunoassay. The readout was performed ex situ after drying the chip by using a commercial scanner with high numerical aperture collecting lens. Obtained results reveal the enhancement of fluorescence signal by a factor of 5 when compared to a regular glass chip.

  13. Ecotoxicity bioassays on leachates from poultry manure.

    PubMed

    Delgado, M; de Imperial, R Miralles; Alonso, F; Rodríguez, C; Martín, J V

    2013-04-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of different poultry manure landfill leachates, using a well-known toxicity test system (MS3). The bioassay was made using a battery of toxicity tests including acute toxicity with crustacean (Daphnia magna), algae (Chlorella vulgaris) and the in vitro toxicity test with the fish cell line RTG-2. On D. magna was high mortality for zero time and almost 100 % and 70 %-80 % mortality for sawdust and straw poultry manure respectively. No effects on C. vulgaris, was observed after the leachate exposure. None of the parameters considered: protein, EROD activity, β-gal activity and neutral red, showed differences between control test and the leachate collected from exposure to poultry manure. PMID:23283533

  14. Modelling larval movement data from individual bioassays.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Chris R; Worton, Bruce J; Deasy, William; Birch, A Nicholas E

    2015-05-01

    We consider modelling the movements of larvae using individual bioassays in which data are collected at a high-frequency rate of five observations per second. The aim is to characterize the behaviour of the larvae when exposed to attractant and repellent compounds. Mixtures of diffusion processes, as well as Hidden Markov models, are proposed as models of larval movement. These models account for directed and localized movements, and successfully distinguish between the behaviour of larvae exposed to attractant and repellent compounds. A simulation study illustrates the advantage of using a Hidden Markov model rather than a simpler mixture model. Practical aspects of model estimation and inference are considered on extensive data collected in a study of novel approaches for the management of cabbage root fly. PMID:25764283

  15. Cell-based bioassays in microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itle, Laura J.; Zguris, Jeanna C.; Pishko, Michael V.

    2004-12-01

    The development of cell-based bioassays for high throughput drug screening or the sensing of biotoxins is contingent on the development of whole cell sensors for specific changes in intracellular conditions and the integration of those systems into sample delivery devices. Here we show the feasibility of using a 5-(and-6)-carboxy SNARF-1, acetoxymethyl ester, acetate, a fluorescent dye capable of responding to changes in intracellular pH, as a detection method for the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide. We used photolithography to entrap cells with this dye within poly(ethylene) glyocol diacrylate hydrogels in microfluidic channels. After 18 hours of exposure to lipopolysaccharide, we were able to see visible changes in the fluorescent pattern. This work shows the feasibility of using whole cell based biosensors within microfluidic networks to detect cellular changes in response to exogenous agents.

  16. Modelling larval movement data from individual bioassays.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Chris R; Worton, Bruce J; Deasy, William; Birch, A Nicholas E

    2015-05-01

    We consider modelling the movements of larvae using individual bioassays in which data are collected at a high-frequency rate of five observations per second. The aim is to characterize the behaviour of the larvae when exposed to attractant and repellent compounds. Mixtures of diffusion processes, as well as Hidden Markov models, are proposed as models of larval movement. These models account for directed and localized movements, and successfully distinguish between the behaviour of larvae exposed to attractant and repellent compounds. A simulation study illustrates the advantage of using a Hidden Markov model rather than a simpler mixture model. Practical aspects of model estimation and inference are considered on extensive data collected in a study of novel approaches for the management of cabbage root fly.

  17. Circular Bioassay Platforms for Applications in Microwave-Accelerated Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Muzaffer; Clement, Travis C.; Aslan, Kadir

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design of four different circular bioassay platforms, which are suitable for homogeneous microwave heating, using theoretical calculations (i.e., COMSOL™ multiphysics software). Circular bioassay platforms are constructed from poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) for optical transparency between 400–800 nm, has multiple sample capacity (12, 16, 19 and 21 wells) and modified with silver nanoparticle films (SNFs) to be used in microwave-accelerated bioassays (MABs). In addition, a small monomode microwave cavity, which can be operated with an external microwave generator (100 W), for use with the bioassay platforms in MABs is also developed. Our design parameters for the circular bioassay platforms and monomode microwave cavity during microwave heating were: (i) temperature profiles, (ii) electric field distributions, (iii) location of the circular bioassay platforms inside the microwave cavity, and (iv) design and number of wells on the circular bioassay platforms. We have also carried out additional simulations to assess the use of circular bioassay platforms in a conventional kitchen microwave oven (e.g., 900 W). Our results show that the location of the circular bioassay platforms in the microwave cavity was predicted to have a significant effect on the homogeneous heating of these platforms. The 21-well circular bioassay platform design in our monomode microwave cavity was predicted to offer a homogeneous heating pattern, where inter-well temperature was observed to be in between 23.72–24.13°C and intra-well temperature difference was less than 0.21°C for 60 seconds of microwave heating, which was also verified experimentally. PMID:25568813

  18. Investigation of the relative fine and coarse mode aerosol loadings and properties in the Southern Arabian Gulf region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaku, Kathleen C.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Reid, Elizabeth A.; Ross-Langerman, Kristy; Piketh, Stuart; Cliff, Steven; Al Mandoos, Abdulla; Broccardo, Stephen; Zhao, Yongjing; Zhang, Jianglong; Perry, Kevin D.

    2016-03-01

    The aerosol chemistry environment of the Arabian Gulf region is extraordinarily complex, with high concentrations of dust aerosols from surrounding deserts mixed with anthropogenic aerosols originating from a large petrochemical industry and pockets of highly urbanized areas. Despite the high levels of aerosols experienced by this region, little research has been done to explore the chemical composition of both the anthropogenic and mineral dust portion of the aerosol burden. The intensive portion of the United Arab Emirates Unified Aerosol Experiment (UAE2), conducted during August and September 2004 was designed in part to resolve the aerosol chemistry through the use of multiple size-segregated aerosol samplers. The coarse mode mass (derived by subtracting the PM2.5 aerosol mass from the PM10 mass) is largely dust at 76% ± 7% of the total coarse mode mass, but is significantly impacted by anthropogenic pollution, primarily sulfate and nitrate. The PM2.5 aerosol mass also contains a large dust burden, at 38% ± 26%, but the anthropogenic component dominates. The total aerosol burden has significant impact not only on the atmosphere, but also the local population, as the air quality levels for both the PM10 and PM2.5 aerosol masses reached unhealthy levels for 24% of the days sampled.

  19. Influence of tobacco smoke on indoor PM 10 particulate matter characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletti, L.; De Berardis, B.; Arrizza, L.; Granato, V.

    In this study we evaluate the influence of tobacco smoke on the physico-chemical characteristics of PM 10 in different environments: outdoors, a smoking room, the same room after a 7-day absence of smokers and in a smoke-free office. The latter office was close to the smoking room, separated by a corridor. The coarse (PM 10-2.1) and fine (PM 2.1) fractions of PM 10 collected in the monitored areas were analysed by scanning electron microscopy, equipped with a thin-window system for X-ray microanalysis (SEM/EDX). Photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to study the elemental composition of the particulate and to identify the chemical state of atomic species detected. Four clusters of particles for both "fine" and "coarse" fractions were identified: carbonaceous particles, soil erosion particles, Ca-sulphates and metal compound particles. EDX spectra showed that a percentage of carbonaceous particles carried S, Si and metal traces. High-resolution XPS spectra of the C1s region showed a significant greater occurrence of the C-O/C-N functional group in the particulate fine fraction collected in the smoking room compared to that collected outdoors. The carbonaceous component of coarse fraction collected in the smoking room appeared dissimilar from the same component detected in the other areas. After the 7-day absence of smokers this component of the PM 10-2.1 fraction was similar to the corresponding coarse fraction collected at the outdoor location. The carbonaceous component of fine fraction collected in the smoking room, containing tobacco smoke products, such as organic carbon and nicotine, was traceable in the neighbouring areas, even several days after suspension of smoking activity.

  20. COARSE PARTICULATE MATTER CONCENTRATIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL OUTDOOR SITES ASSOCIATED WITH THE NORTH CAROLINA ASTHMA AND CHILDREN'S ENVIRONMENT STUDIES (NC-ACES)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coarse particulate matter (PM10-2.5) concentration data from residential outdoor sites were collected using portable samplers as part of an exposure assessment for the North Carolina Asthma and Children's Environment Study (NC-ACES). PMcoarse values were estimated usi...

  1. Source characterization of fine and coarse particles at the East Mediterranean coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamane, Yaacov; Perrino, Cinzia; Yossef, Osnat; Catrambone, Maria

    Fine and coarse atmospheric particles were collected in Ashdod—a midsize industrial city on the southeastern Mediterranean coast, and in Gedera—a rural site, to characterize ambient particles and to determine their long-range transport during two major seasons—winter and summer. Manual PM2.5 and PM10 samplers, dichotomous samplers, continuous automated PM10 samplers, and denuders were used to sample particulate and gaseous pollutants. Fine and coarse concentrations in Ashdod were 21.2 and 39.6 μg m -3, and 23.9 and 30.5 μg m -3 in the fall-winter and summer campaigns, respectively. Crustal material, as calcites or dolomites mixed with silicates, dominated the coarse fraction and also the fine fraction on dusty days. In the fall-winter, S, P, and Ni were coupled with minerals. Coarse Ni was associated with crustal material during dust storms, while P originated from shipping and deposition of phosphates in the urban area around. Sulfates dominated the fine fractions in the summer season averaging 12 μg m -3. Multivariate analysis indicated that S was associated with As and Se, V and Ni, both associated with heavy fuel combustion, and Zn and Pb. In winter, those mixed sources were local, but in summer they were part of long-range transport. In the fall-winter, Zn and Pb were strongly associated with Mn, Ga, and Cu—elements emitted from either traffic or metal processing plants. Although the influence of crustal material on both size fractions was significant, most heavy metals were associated with PM2.5. Higher concentrations were linked to a larger number of particles in this fraction, to a larger surface area available for biochemical reaction [Harrison, R., Shi, J., Xi, S., Khan, A., Mark, D., Kinnersley, R., Yin, J., Philos, T., 2000. Measurement of number, mass and size distribution of particles in the atmosphere. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society 358, 2567-2579], and finally to a larger concern in regards to health effects.

  2. Coarse Grid CFD for underresolved simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Class, Andreas G.; Viellieber, Mathias O.; Himmel, Steffen R.

    2010-11-01

    CFD simulation of the complete reactor core of a nuclear power plant requires exceedingly huge computational resources so that this crude power approach has not been pursued yet. The traditional approach is 1D subchannel analysis employing calibrated transport models. Coarse grid CFD is an attractive alternative technique based on strongly under-resolved CFD and the inviscid Euler equations. Obviously, using inviscid equations and coarse grids does not resolve all the physics requiring additional volumetric source terms modelling viscosity and other sub-grid effects. The source terms are implemented via correlations derived from fully resolved representative simulations which can be tabulated or computed on the fly. The technique is demonstrated for a Carnot diffusor and a wire-wrap fuel assembly [1]. [4pt] [1] Himmel, S.R. phd thesis, Stuttgart University, Germany 2009, http://bibliothek.fzk.de/zb/berichte/FZKA7468.pdf

  3. Coarse particulate matter concentrations from residential outdoor sites associated with the North Carolina Asthma and Children's Environment Studies (NC-ACES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fu-Lin; Williams, Ronald; Svendsen, Erik; Yeatts, Karin; Creason, John; Scott, James; Terrell, Dock; Case, Martin

    Coarse particulate matter (PM 10) concentration data from residential outdoor sites were collected using portable samplers as part of an exposure assessment for the North Carolina Asthma and Children's Environment Studies (NC-ACES). PM 10 values were estimated using the differential between independent PM 10 and PM 2.5 collocated MiniVol measurements. Repeated daily 24-h integrated PM 10 and PM 2.5 residential outdoor monitoring was performed at a total of 26 homes during September 2003-June 2004 in the Research Triangle Park, NC area. This effort resulted in the collection of 73 total daily measurements. This assessment was conducted to provide data needed to investigate the association of exposures to coarse particle PM mass concentrations with observed human health effects. Potential instrument bias between the differential MiniVol methodology and a dichotomous sampler were investigated. Results indicated that minimal bias of PM 10 mass concentration estimates (slope = 0.8, intercept =0.36μg m -3) existed between the dichotomous and differential MiniVol procedures. Residential outdoor PM 10 mass concentrations were observed to be highly variable across measurement days and ranged from 1.1 to 12.6μg m -3 (mean of 5.4μg m -3). An average correlation coefficient of r=0.75 existed between residential outdoor PM 10 mass concentrations and those obtained from the central ambient monitoring site. Temporal and spatial variability of PM 10 mass concentrations during the study were observed and are described in this report.

  4. Measuring Crack Length in Coarse Grain Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to a coarse grain structure, crack lengths in precracked spinel specimens could not be measured optically, so the crack lengths and fracture toughness were estimated by strain gage measurements. An expression was developed via finite element analysis to correlate the measured strain with crack length in four-point flexure. The fracture toughness estimated by the strain gaged samples and another standardized method were in agreement.

  5. Capture and transparency in coarse quantized images.

    PubMed

    Morrone, M C; Burr, D C

    1997-09-01

    This study examines the effect of coarse quantization (blocking) on image recognition, and explores possible mechanisms. Thresholds for noise corruption showed that coarse quantization reduces drastically the recognizability of both faces and letters, well beyond the levels expected by equivalent blurring. Phase-shifting the spurious high frequencies introduced by the blocking (with an operation designed to leave both overall and local contrast unaffected, and feature localization) greatly improved recognizability of both faces and letters. For large phase shifts, the low spatial frequencies appear in transparency behind a grid structure of checks or lines. We also studied a more simple example of blocking, the checkerboard, that can be considered as a coarse quantized diagonal sinusoidal plaid. When one component of the plaid was contrast-inverted, it was seen in transparency against the checkerboard, while the other remained "captured" within the block structure. If the higher harmonics are then phase-shifted by pi, the contrast-reversed fundamental becomes captured and the other seen in transparency. Intermediate phase shifts of the higher harmonics cause intermediate effects, which we measured by adjusting the relative contrast of the fundamentals until neither orientation dominated. The contrast match varied considerably with the phase of the higher harmonics, over a range of about 1.5 log units. Simulations with the local energy model predicted qualitatively the results of the recognizability of both faces and letters, and quantitatively the apparent orientation of the modified checkerboard pattern. More generally, the model predicts the conditions under which an image will be "captured" by coarse quantization, or seen in transparency.

  6. Information for establishing bioassay measurements and evaluations of tritium exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, A.

    1983-06-01

    This report summarizes information and references used in developing regulatory guidance on programs for the bioassay of tritium as well as information useful in planning and conducting tritium bioassay programs and evaluating bioassay data. A review of literature on tritium radiobiology is included to provide a ready source of information useful for estimating internal doses of tritium and risks for the various tritium compounds and forms, including elemental (gaseous) tritium. Simplified and conservative dose conversion factors are derived and tabulated for easy reference in program planning, safety evaluations, and compliance determinations.

  7. Estrogen Receptor Agonists and Antagonists in the Yeast Estrogen Bioassay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si; Bovee, Toine F H

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based bioassays can be used to predict the eventual biological activity of a substance on a living organism. In vitro reporter gene bioassays are based on recombinant vertebrate cell lines or yeast strains and especially the latter are easy-to-handle, cheap, and fast. Moreover, yeast cells do not express estrogen, androgen, progesterone or glucocorticoid receptors, and are thus powerful tools in the development of specific reporter gene systems that are devoid of crosstalk from other hormone pathways. This chapter describes our experience with an in-house developed RIKILT yeast estrogen bioassay for testing estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists, focusing on the applicability of the latter. PMID:26585147

  8. The Theory of Ultra Coarse-graining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Gregory

    2013-03-01

    Coarse-grained (CG) models provide a computationally efficient means to study biomolecular and other soft matter processes involving large numbers of atoms correlated over distance scales of many covalent bond lengths and long time scales. Variational methods based on information from simulations of finer-grained (e.g., all-atom) models, for example the multiscale coarse-graining (MS-CG) and relative entropy minimization methods, provide attractive tools for the systematic development of CG models. However, these methods have important drawbacks when used in the ``ultra coarse-grained'' (UCG) regime, e.g., at a resolution level coarser or much coarser than one amino acid residue per effective CG particle in proteins. This is due to the possible existece of multiple metastable states ``within'' the CG sites for a given UCG model configuration. In this talk I will describe systematic variational UCG methods specifically designed to CG entire protein domains and subdomains into single effective CG particles. This is accomplished by augmenting existing effective particle CG schemes to allow for discrete state transitions and configuration-dependent resolution. Additionally, certain conclusions of this work connect back to single-state force matching and open up new avenues for method development in that area. These results provide a formal statistical mechanical basis for UCG methods related to force matching and relative entropy CG methods and suggest practical algorithms for constructing optimal approximate UCG models from fine-grained simulation data.

  9. Passive sampling to capture the spatial variability of coarse particles by composition in Cleveland, OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawvel, Eric J.; Willis, Robert; West, Roger R.; Casuccio, Gary S.; Norris, Gary; Kumar, Naresh; Hammond, Davyda; Peters, Thomas M.

    2015-03-01

    Passive samplers deployed at 25 sites for three, week-long intervals were used to characterize spatial variability in the mass and composition of coarse particulate matter (PM10-2.5) in Cleveland, OH in summer 2008. The size and composition of individual particles determined using computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM-EDS) was then used to estimate PM10-2.5 concentrations (μg m-3) and its components in 13 particle classes. The highest PM10-2.5 mean mass concentrations were observed at three central industrial sites (35 μg m-3, 43 μg m-3, and 48 μg m-3), whereas substantially lower mean concentrations were observed to the west and east of this area at suburban background sites (13 μg m-3 and 15 μg m-3). PM10-2.5 mass and components associated with steel and cement production (Fe-oxide and Ca-rich) exhibited substantial heterogeneity with elevated concentrations observed in the river valley, stretching from Lake Erie south through the central industrial area and in the case of Fe-oxide to a suburban valley site. Other components (e.g., Si/Al-rich typical of crustal material) were considerably less heterogeneous. This work shows that some species of coarse particles are considerably more spatially heterogeneous than others in an urban area with a strong industrial core. It also demonstrates that passive sampling coupled with analysis by CCSEM-EDS is a useful tool to assess the spatial variability of particulate pollutants by composition.

  10. Coarse Particulate Air Pollution Associated with Increased Risk of Hospital Admissions for Respiratory Diseases in a Tropical City, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Meng-Hsuan; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether there was an association between coarse particles (PM2.5–10) levels and frequency of hospital admissions for respiratory diseases (RD) in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Hospital admissions for RD including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and pneumonia, and ambient air pollution data levels for Kaohsiung were obtained for the period from 2006 to 2010. The relative risk of hospital admissions for RD was estimated using a case-crossover approach, controlling for weather variables, day of the week, seasonality, and long-term time trends. For the single pollutant model (without adjustment for other pollutants), increased rate of admissions for RD were significantly associated with higher coarse PM levels only on cool days (<25 °C), with a 10 µg/m3 elevation in PM2.5–10 concentrations associated with a 3% (95% CI = 1%–5%) rise in COPD admissions, 4% (95% CI = 1%–7%) increase in asthma admissions, and 3% (95% CI = 2%–4%) rise in pneumonia admissions. No significant associations were found between coarse particle levels and the number of hospital admissions for RD on warm days. In the two-pollutant models, PM2.5–10 levels remained significantly correlated with higher rate of RD admissions even controlling for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, or ozone on cool days. This study provides evidence that higher levels of PM2.5–10 enhance the risk of hospital admissions for RD on cool days. PMID:26501308

  11. Evaporation-Driven Bioassays in Suspended Droplets.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Perez, Ruth; Fan, Z Hugh; Garcia-Cordero, Jose L

    2016-07-19

    The microtiter plate has been an essential tool for diagnostics, high-throughput screening, and biological assays. We present an alternative platform to perform bioassays in a microplate format that exploits evaporation to drive assay reactions. Our method consists of droplets suspended on plastic pillars; reactions occur in these droplets instead of the wells. The pillars are fabricated by milling, and the rough surface created by this fabrication method pins the droplet to a constant contact line during the assay and also acts as a hydrophobic surface. Upon evaporation, natural convection arising from Marangoni currents mixes solutions in the droplet, which speeds up assay reactions, decreases assay times, and increases limits of detection. As a proof of concept we implemented two colorimetric assays to detect glucose and proteins in only 1.5 μL, without any external devices for mixing and with a digital microscope as a readout mechanism. Our platform is an ideal alternative to the microtiter plate, works with different volumes, is compatible with commercially available reagent dispensers and plate-readers, and could have broad applications in diagnostics and high-throughput screening. PMID:27331825

  12. Bioassay-Directed Fractionation of Diesel and Biodiesel Emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofuels are being developed as alternatives to petroleum-derived products, but published research is contradictory regarding the mutagenic activity of such emissions relative to those from petroleum diesel. We performed bioassay-directed fractionation and analyzed the polycyclic...

  13. Bioassay Phantoms Using Medical Images and Computer Aided Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. X. Geroge Xu

    2011-01-28

    A radiation bioassay program relies on a set of standard human phantoms to calibrate and assess radioactivity levels inside a human body for radiation protection and nuclear medicine imaging purposes. However, the methodologies in the development and application of anthropomorphic phantoms, both physical and computational, had mostly remained the same for the past 40 years. We herein propose a 3-year research project to develop medical image-based physical and computational phantoms specifically for radiation bioassay applications involving internally deposited radionuclides. The broad, long-term objective of this research was to set the foundation for a systematic paradigm shift away from the anatomically crude phantoms in existence today to realistic and ultimately individual-specific bioassay methodologies. This long-term objective is expected to impact all areas of radiation bioassay involving nuclear power plants, U.S. DOE laboratories, and nuclear medicine clinics.

  14. Overview of bioassays for mutagens, carcinogens, and teratogens

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, J.N.

    1982-01-01

    Bioassays to determine the risk of health hazards of man-made chemical substances are reviewed. The standard approach to testing a substance is the tier system, consisting of three levels of testing that are increasingly complex, lengthy, and costly. The paper describes the biological basis of bioassays, identifies various assays for mutagens, carcinogens and teratogens, and explains the problems involved in extrapolating test data to human risk estimates. Future improvements in assay techniques are discussed. (CR)

  15. Ionic and carbonaceous compositions of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1.0 at Gosan ABC superstation and their ratios as source signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S.; Lee, M.; Lee, G.; Kim, S.; Yoon, S.; Kang, K.

    2011-07-01

    PM1.0, PM2.5, and PM10 were sampled at Gosan ABC Superstation on Jeju Island from August 2007 to September 2008. The carbonaceous aerosols were quantified with the thermal/optical reflectance (TOR) method, which produced five organic carbon (OC) fractions, OC1, OC2, OC3, OC4, and pyrolyzed organic carbon (OP), and three elemental carbon (EC) fractions, EC1, EC2, and EC3. The mean mass concentrations of PM1.0, PM2.5, and PM10 were 13.72 μg m-3, 17.24 μg m-3, and 28.37 μg m-3, respectively. The averaged mass fractions of OC and EC were 23.0 % and 10.4 % for PM1.0, 22.9 % and 9.8 % for PM2.5, and 16.4 % and 6.0 % for PM10. Among the OC and EC sub-components, OC2 and EC2+3 were enriched in the fine mode, but OC3 and OC4 in the coarse mode. The filter-based PM1.0 EC agreed well with black carbon (BC) measured by an Aethalometer, and PM10 EC was higher than BC, implying less light absorption by larger particles. EC was well correlated with sulfate, resulting in good relationships of sulfate with both aerosol scattering coefficient measured by Nephelometer and BC concentration. Our measurements of EC confirmed the definition of EC1 as char-EC emitted from smoldering combustion and EC2+3 as soot-EC generated from higher-temperature combustion such as motor vehicle exhaust and coal combustion. In particular, EC1 was strongly correlated with potassium, a traditional biomass burning indicator, except during the summer, when the ratio of EC1 to EC2+3 was the lowest. We also found the ratios of major chemical species to be a useful tool to constrain the main sources of aerosols, by which the five air masses were well distinguished: Siberia, Beijing, Shanghai, Yellow Sea, and East Sea types. Except Siberian air, the continental background of the study region, Beijing plumes showed the highest EC1 (and OP) to sulfate ratio, which implies that this air mass had the highest net warming by aerosols of the four air masses. Shanghai-type air, which was heavily influenced by

  16. Ionic and carbonaceous compositions of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1.0 at Gosan ABC Superstation and their ratios as source signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S.; Lee, M.; Lee, G.; Kim, S.; Yoon, S.; Kang, K.

    2012-02-01

    PM1.0, PM2.5, and PM10 were sampled at Gosan ABC Superstation on Jeju Island from August 2007 to September 2008. The carbonaceous aerosols were quantified with the thermal/optical reflectance (TOR) method, which produced five organic carbon (OC) fractions, OC1, OC2, OC3, OC4, and pyrolyzed organic carbon (OP), and three elemental carbon (EC) fractions, EC1, EC2, and EC3. The mean mass concentrations of PM1.0, PM2.5, and PM10 were 13.7 μg m-3, 17.2 μg m-3, and 28.4 μg m-3, respectively. The averaged mass fractions of OC and EC were 23.0% and 10.4% for PM1.0, 22.9% and 9.8% for PM2.5, and 16.4% and 6.0% for PM10. Among the OC and EC sub-components, OC2 and EC2+3 were enriched in the fine mode, but OC3 and OC4 in the coarse mode. The filter-based PM1.0 EC agreed well with black carbon (BC) measured by an Aethalometer, and PM10 EC was higher than BC, implying less light absorption by larger particles. EC was well correlated with sulfate, resulting in good relationships of sulfate with both aerosol scattering coefficient measured by Nephelometer and BC concentration. Our measurements of EC confirmed the definition of EC1 as char-EC emitted from smoldering combustion and EC2+3 as soot-EC generated from higher-temperature combustion such as motor vehicle exhaust and coal combustion (Han et al., 2010). In particular, EC1 was strongly correlated with potassium, a traditional biomass burning indicator, except during the summer, when the ratio of EC1 to EC2+3 was the lowest. We also found the ratios of major chemical species to be a useful tool to constrain the main sources of aerosols, by which the five air masses were well distinguished: Siberia, Beijing, Shanghai, Yellow Sea, and East Sea types. Except Siberian air, the continental background of the study region, Beijing plumes showed the highest EC1 (and OP) to sulfate ratio, which implies that this air mass had the highest net warming by aerosols of the four air masses. Shanghai-type air, which was heavily influenced

  17. Comparison of laboratory batch and flow-through microcosm bioassays.

    PubMed

    Clément, Bernard J P; Delhaye, Hélène L; Triffault-Bouchet, Gaëlle G

    2014-10-01

    Since 1997, we have been developing a protocol for ecotoxicological bioassays in 2-L laboratory microcosms and have applied it to the study of various pollutants and ecotoxicological risk assessment scenarios in the area of urban facilities and transport infrastructures. The effects on five different organisms (micro-algae, duckweeds, daphnids, amphipods, chironomids) are assessed using biological responses such as growth, emergence (chironomids), reproduction (daphnids) and survival, with a duration of exposure of 3 weeks. This bioassay has mainly been used as a batch bioassay, i.e., the water was not renewed during the test. A flow-through microcosm bioassay has been developed recently, with the assumption that conditions for the biota should be improved, variability reduced, and the range of exposure patterns enlarged (e.g., the possibility of maintaining constant exposure in the water column). This paper compares the results obtained in batch and flow-through microcosm bioassays, using cadmium as a model toxicant. As expected, the stabilization of physico-chemical parameters, increased organism fitness and reduced variability were observed in the flow-through microcosm bioassay. PMID:25086825

  18. Mycoplasma pulmonis and lymphoma in bioassays in rats.

    PubMed

    Schoeb, T R; McConnell, E E; Juliana, M M; Davis, J K; Davidson, M K; Lindsey, J R

    2009-09-01

    Lymphomas were reported to be induced in rats in bioassays of aspartame, methyl-tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), and other chemicals conducted by a nonprofit cancer research organization. European regulatory authorities concluded that lymphomas in the aspartame study were caused by Mycoplasma pulmonis and suggested that this also was the case for the MTBE bioassay. To assess the role of M. pulmonis in these bioassays, we reviewed the tumor data for the aspartame and MTBE bioassays and, additionally, the organization's bioassay of methanol. For all 3 studies, the most frequently reported hematopoietic neoplasm was lympho-immunoblastic lymphoma, the most frequently affected organ was the lung, and, in almost half of the rats with this diagnosis, the lung was the only affected organ. Lesions diagnosed as lymphoma in published illustrations had pleomorphic cellular morphology and appeared to contain neutrophils. Information from these reports and other sources indicated that lesions typical of M. pulmonis disease were prevalent among the aspartame and MTBE study rats and that the rats were not specific-pathogen-free. Because the lymphoma type, cellular morphology, and organ distribution reported in these studies are atypical of lymphoma in rats, because lymphocyte and plasma cell accumulation in the lung is characteristic of M. pulmonis disease, and because M. pulmonis disease can be exacerbated by experimental manipulations, including chemical treatment, we suggest that a plausible alternative explanation for the reported results of these bioassays is that the studies were confounded by M. pulmonis disease and that lesions of the disease were interpreted as lymphoma.

  19. Coarse woody debris dynamics in two old-growth ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, M.E. ); Chen Hua )

    1991-10-01

    In this article, the dynamics of coarse woody debris are compound deciduous old-growth forest system Changbai Mountain Biosphere Reserve in China, and a coniferous old-growth forest system, H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest in Oregon. The objective is to compare in these two ecosystems the amount of coarse woody debris; the processes that affect coarse woody debris, such as tree mortality and decay rates; and the role of coarse woody debris in nutrient cycling. To assess importance in the global carbon budget, these two old-growth ecosystems are used to estimate the upper and lower limits of coarse woody debris mass for undisturbed temperate forests.

  20. The Exposure Uncertainty Analysis: The Association between Birth Weight and Trimester Specific Exposure to Particulate Matter (PM2.5 vs. PM10)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Often spatiotemporal resolution/scale of environmental and health data do not align. Therefore, researchers compute exposure by interpolation or by aggregating data to coarse spatiotemporal scales. The latter is often preferred because of sparse geographic coverage of environmental monitoring, as interpolation method cannot reliably compute exposure using the small sample of sparse data points. This paper presents a methodology of diagnosing the levels of uncertainty in exposure at a given distance and time interval, and examines the effects of particulate matter (PM) ≤2.5 µm and ≤10 µm in diameter (PM2.5 and PM10, respectively) on birth weight (BW) and low birth weight (LBW), i.e., birth weight <2500 g in Chicago (IL, USA), accounting for exposure uncertainty. Two important findings emerge from this paper. First, uncertainty in PM exposure increases significantly with the increase in distance from the monitoring stations, e.g., 50.6% and 38.5% uncertainty in PM10 and PM2.5 exposure respectively for 0.058° (~6.4 km) distance from the monitoring stations. Second, BW was inversely associated with PM2.5 exposure, and PM2.5 exposure during the first trimester and entire gestation period showed a stronger association with BW than the exposure during the second and third trimesters. But PM10 did not show any significant association with BW and LBW. These findings suggest that distance and time intervals need to be chosen with care to compute exposure, and account for the uncertainty to reliably assess the adverse health risks of exposure. PMID:27649214

  1. The Exposure Uncertainty Analysis: The Association between Birth Weight and Trimester Specific Exposure to Particulate Matter (PM2.5 vs. PM10).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Often spatiotemporal resolution/scale of environmental and health data do not align. Therefore, researchers compute exposure by interpolation or by aggregating data to coarse spatiotemporal scales. The latter is often preferred because of sparse geographic coverage of environmental monitoring, as interpolation method cannot reliably compute exposure using the small sample of sparse data points. This paper presents a methodology of diagnosing the levels of uncertainty in exposure at a given distance and time interval, and examines the effects of particulate matter (PM) ≤2.5 µm and ≤10 µm in diameter (PM2.5 and PM10, respectively) on birth weight (BW) and low birth weight (LBW), i.e., birth weight <2500 g in Chicago (IL, USA), accounting for exposure uncertainty. Two important findings emerge from this paper. First, uncertainty in PM exposure increases significantly with the increase in distance from the monitoring stations, e.g., 50.6% and 38.5% uncertainty in PM10 and PM2.5 exposure respectively for 0.058° (~6.4 km) distance from the monitoring stations. Second, BW was inversely associated with PM2.5 exposure, and PM2.5 exposure during the first trimester and entire gestation period showed a stronger association with BW than the exposure during the second and third trimesters. But PM10 did not show any significant association with BW and LBW. These findings suggest that distance and time intervals need to be chosen with care to compute exposure, and account for the uncertainty to reliably assess the adverse health risks of exposure. PMID:27649214

  2. Source apportionment of PM10 and PM2.5 near a large mining zone in Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorquera, H.

    2008-12-01

    Chile's economic growth is mainly driven by intensive mining activities; currently Chile produces ~ 40% of copper worldwide. Most of those activities are located in northern Chile, in a desert region where strong regional winds contribute with soil erosion as well. The city of Calama (22.4°S, 68.9°W) is about 17 km south of Chuquicamata, one of the largest open pit copper mines in the world, both located on the west edge of the Andes; Calama is at 2,400 m asl and it is 215 km east of the Pacific Ocean. The mining complex releases ~ 21 kton/y of PM10 and ~ 78 kton/y of SO2 from a copper smelter. The levels of ambient PM10 have steadily increased at Calama in the last 5 years, so there is concern about the impacts from copper industry in the city´s inhabitants, most of who work in mining or related economic activities. A campaign was conducted at Calama between October and December 2007, sampling ambient PM10 and PM2.5 at several sites across the city. Filters were analyzed at the Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV for elemental composition by XRF and for elemental and organic carbon using thermal analysis. The application of positive matrix factorization (PMF) model identified four sources contributing to ambient PM2.5: secondary sulfates (49%), traffic emissions (37%), dust street (9%) and copper smelter emissions (5%). In the coarse fraction, four sources were identified: dust street (45%), wind erosion (34%), mineral processing (14%) and copper smelter emissions (7%). No natural background was found for PM2.5. For ambient PM10 the source apportionment obtained is: mining activities (33%), street dust (34%), wind erosion (22%) and traffic emissions (12%). With a current PM10 annual average of 58 μg/m3 and further mining activities projected in the area, there is a big challenge to improve air quality in the populated area close to the mining operations.

  3. Acarine attractants: Chemoreception, bioassay, chemistry and control.

    PubMed

    Carr, Ann L; Roe, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The Acari are of significant economic importance in crop production and human and animal health. Acaricides are essential for the control of these pests, but at the same time, the number of available pesticides is limited, especially for applications in animal production. The Acari consist of two major groups, the mites that demonstrate a wide variety of life strategies, i.e., herbivory, predation and ectoparasitism, and ticks which have evolved obligatory hematophagy. The major sites of chemoreception in the acarines are the chelicerae, palps and tarsi on the forelegs. A unifying name, the "foretarsal sensory organ" (FSO), is proposed for the first time in this review for the sensory site on the forelegs of all acarines. The FSO has multiple sensory functions including olfaction, gustation, and heat detection. Preliminary transcriptomic data in ticks suggest that chemoreception in the FSO is achieved by a different mechanism from insects. There are a variety of laboratory and field bioassay methods that have been developed for the identification and characterization of attractants but minimal techniques for electrophysiology studies. Over the past three to four decades, significant progress has been made in the chemistry and analysis of function for acarine attractants in mites and ticks. In mites, attractants include aggregation, immature female, female sex and alarm pheromones; in ticks, the attraction-aggregation-attachment, assembly and sex pheromones; in mites and ticks host kairomones and plant allomones; and in mites, fungal allomones. There are still large gaps in our knowledge of chemical communication in the acarines compared to insects, especially relative to acarine pheromones, and more so for mites than ticks. However, the use of lure-and-kill and lure-enhanced biocontrol strategies has been investigated for tick and mite control, respectively, with significant environmental advantages which warrant further study.

  4. Acarine attractants: Chemoreception, bioassay, chemistry and control.

    PubMed

    Carr, Ann L; Roe, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The Acari are of significant economic importance in crop production and human and animal health. Acaricides are essential for the control of these pests, but at the same time, the number of available pesticides is limited, especially for applications in animal production. The Acari consist of two major groups, the mites that demonstrate a wide variety of life strategies, i.e., herbivory, predation and ectoparasitism, and ticks which have evolved obligatory hematophagy. The major sites of chemoreception in the acarines are the chelicerae, palps and tarsi on the forelegs. A unifying name, the "foretarsal sensory organ" (FSO), is proposed for the first time in this review for the sensory site on the forelegs of all acarines. The FSO has multiple sensory functions including olfaction, gustation, and heat detection. Preliminary transcriptomic data in ticks suggest that chemoreception in the FSO is achieved by a different mechanism from insects. There are a variety of laboratory and field bioassay methods that have been developed for the identification and characterization of attractants but minimal techniques for electrophysiology studies. Over the past three to four decades, significant progress has been made in the chemistry and analysis of function for acarine attractants in mites and ticks. In mites, attractants include aggregation, immature female, female sex and alarm pheromones; in ticks, the attraction-aggregation-attachment, assembly and sex pheromones; in mites and ticks host kairomones and plant allomones; and in mites, fungal allomones. There are still large gaps in our knowledge of chemical communication in the acarines compared to insects, especially relative to acarine pheromones, and more so for mites than ticks. However, the use of lure-and-kill and lure-enhanced biocontrol strategies has been investigated for tick and mite control, respectively, with significant environmental advantages which warrant further study. PMID:27265828

  5. Confluence Scour in Coarse Braided Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashmore, Peter; Parker, Gary

    1983-04-01

    Laboratory models of a braided valley flat in coarse material were used in conjunction with field data to study confluence scour at braid anabranches. Correct prediction of the depth of scour is required for the design of buried pipeline crossings. Braid pattern and anabranches constantly shift and avulse so that scour holes have definable lifetimes. Although the scatter is large, the depth of water in the scour hole depends on confluence and relative anabranch discharge; this depth can be as high as six times the ambient depths in the anabranches.

  6. A Coarse Pointing Assembly for Optical Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szekely, G.; Blum, D.; Humphries, M.; Koller, A.; Mussett, D.; Schuler, S.; Vogt, P.

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of a contract with the European Space Agency, RUAG Space are developing a Coarse Pointing Assembly for an Optical Communication Terminal with the goal to enable high-bandwidth data exchange between GEO and/or LEO satellites as well as to earth-bound ground stations. This paper describes some development and testing aspects of such a high precision opto-mechanical device, with emphasis on the influence of requirements on the final design, the usage of a Bearing Active Preload System, some of the lessons learned on the BAPS implementation, the selection of a flex print design as rotary harness and some aspects of functional and environmental testing.

  7. Variation of PM2.5 concentrations in relation to street washing activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanasiou, Angeliki; Moreno, Teresa; Amato, Fulvio; Tobías, Aurelio; Boldo, Elena; Linares, Cristina; Lumbreras, Julio; Borge, Rafael; Alastuey, Andrés; Querol, Xavier

    2012-07-01

    Several studies conducted in urban areas have pointed out that road dust resuspension contributes significantly to PM concentration levels. Street washing is one of the methods proposed to reduce resuspended road dust contributions to ambient PM concentrations. As resuspended particles are mainly found in the coarse mode, published studies investigating the effects of street washing have focused on PM10 size fraction. As the PM2.5 mass fraction of particles originating from mechanical abrasion processes may still be significant we conducted a study in order to evaluate the effects of street washing on the mitigation of resuspension of fine particles. The PM2.5 mass concentration data were examined and integrated with the occurrence of street washing activities. In addition, the effect of the meteorological variability, traffic flow and street washing activities, on ambient PM2.5 levels was evaluated by means of a multivariate regression model. The results revealed that traffic flow is the most important factor that controls PM2.5 hourly concentrations while street washing activities did not influence fine particle mass levels.

  8. Early deterioration of coarse woody debris.

    SciTech Connect

    Tainter, Frank, H.; McMinn, James, W.

    1999-02-16

    Tainter, F.H., and J.W. McMinn. 1999. Early deterioration of coarse woody debris. In: Proc. Tenth Bien. South. Silv. Res. Conf. Shreveport, LA, February 16-18, 1999. Pp. 232-237 Abstract - Coarse woody debris (CWD) is an important structural component of southern forest ecosystems. CWD loading may be affected by different decomposition rates on sites of varying quality. Bolts of red oak and loblolly pine were placed on plots at each of three (hydric, mesic. and xerlc) sites at the Savannah River Site and sampled over a I6-week period. Major changes were in moisture content and nonstructural carbohydrate content (total carbohydrates, reducing sugars, and starch) of sapwood. Early changes in nonstructural carbohydrate levels following placement of the bolts were likely due to reallocation of these materials by sapwood parenchyma cells. These carbohydrates later formed pools increasingly metabolized by bacteria and invading fungi. Most prevalent fungi in sapwood were Ceratocysfis spp. in pine and Hypoxy/on spp. in oak. Although pine sapwood became blue stained and oak sapwood exhibited yellow soft decay with black zone lines, estimators of decay (specific gravity, sodium hydroxide solubility, and holocellulose content) were unchanged during the 16-week study period. A small effect of site was detected for starch content of sapwood of both species. Fungal biomass in sapwood of both species, as measured by ergosterol content, was detectable at week zero, increased somewhat by week three and increased significantly by week 16.

  9. Equilibrium behavior of coarse-grained chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egolf, David A.; Ballard, Christopher C.; Esty, C. Clark

    2015-03-01

    A wide variety of systems exhibiting spatiotemporal chaos have been shown to be extensive, in that their fractal dimensions grow linearly with volume. Ruelle argued that this extensivity is evidence that these systems can be viewed as a gas of weakly-interacting regions. We have tested this idea by performing large-scale computational studies of spatiotemporal chaos in the 1D complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, and we have found that aspects of the coarse-grained system are well-described not only as a gas, but as an equilibrium gas -- in particular, a Tonks gas (and variants) in the grand canonical ensemble. Furthermore, for small system sizes, the average number of particles in the corresponding Tonks gas exhibits oscillatory, decaying deviations from extensivity in agreement with deviations in the fractal dimension found by Fishman and Egolf. This result not only supports Ruelle's picture but also suggests that the coarse-grained behavior of this far-from-equilibrium system might be understood using equilibrium statistical mechanics.

  10. Coarse-Grain Modeling of Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, John

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical and thermal loading of energetic materials can incite responses over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales due to inherent nano- and microscale features. Many energy transfer processes within these materials are atomistically governed, yet the material response is manifested at the micro- and mesoscale. The existing state-of-the-art computational methods include continuum level approaches that rely on idealized field-based formulations that are empirically based. Our goal is to bridge the spatial and temporal modeling regimes while ensuring multiscale consistency. However, significant technical challenges exist, including that the multiscale methods linking the atomistic and microscales for molecular crystals are immature or nonexistent. To begin addressing these challenges, we have implemented a bottom-up approach for deriving microscale coarse-grain models directly from quantum mechanics-derived atomistic models. In this talk, a suite of computational tools is described for particle-based microscale simulations of the nonequilibrium response of energetic solids. Our approach builds upon recent advances both in generating coarse-grain models under high strains and in developing a variant of dissipative particle dynamics that includes chemical reactions.

  11. Short-term Associations between Fine and Coarse Particulate Matter and Hospitalizations in Southern Europe: Results from the MED-PARTICLES Project

    PubMed Central

    Samoli, Evangelia; Alessandrini, Ester; Cadum, Ennio; Ostro, Bart; Berti, Giovanna; Faustini, Annunziata; Jacquemin, Benedicte; Linares, Cristina; Pascal, Mathilde; Randi, Giorgia; Ranzi, Andrea; Stivanello, Elisa; Forastiere, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Background: Evidence on the short-term effects of fine and coarse particles on morbidity in Europe is scarce and inconsistent. Objectives: We aimed to estimate the association between daily concentrations of fine and coarse particles with hospitalizations for cardiovascular and respiratory conditions in eight Southern European cities, within the MED-PARTICLES project. Methods: City-specific Poisson models were fitted to estimate associations of daily concentrations of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5), ≤ 10 μm (PM10), and their difference (PM2.5–10) with daily counts of emergency hospitalizations for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. We derived pooled estimates from random-effects meta-analysis and evaluated the robustness of results to co-pollutant exposure adjustment and model specification. Pooled concentration–response curves were estimated using a meta-smoothing approach. Results: We found significant associations between all PM fractions and cardiovascular admissions. Increases of 10 μg/m3 in PM2.5, 6.3 μg/m3 in PM2.5–10, and 14.4 μg/m3 in PM10 (lag 0–1 days) were associated with increases in cardiovascular admissions of 0.51% (95% CI: 0.12, 0.90%), 0.46% (95% CI: 0.10, 0.82%), and 0.53% (95% CI: 0.06, 1.00%), respectively. Stronger associations were estimated for respiratory hospitalizations, ranging from 1.15% (95% CI: 0.21, 2.11%) for PM10 to 1.36% (95% CI: 0.23, 2.49) for PM2.5 (lag 0–5 days). Conclusions: PM2.5 and PM2.5–10 were positively associated with cardiovascular and respiratory admissions in eight Mediterranean cities. Information on the short-term effects of different PM fractions on morbidity in Southern Europe will be useful to inform European policies on air quality standards. Citation: Stafoggia M, Samoli E, Alessandrini E, Cadum E, Ostro B, Berti G, Faustini A, Jacquemin B, Linares C, Pascal M, Randi G, Ranzi A, Stivanello E, Forastiere F, the MED-PARTICLES Study Group. 2013. Short

  12. Primary Bioassay of Human Myeloma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamburger, Anne; Salmon, Sydney E.

    1977-01-01

    The ability to clone primary tumors in soft agar has proven useful in the study of the kinetics and biological properties of tumor stem cells. We report the development of an in vitro assay which permits formation of colonies of human monoclonal plasma cells in soft agar. Colony growth has been observed from bone marrow aspirates from 75% of the 70 patients with multiple myeloma or related monoclonal disorders studied. Growth was induced with either 0.02 ml of human type O erythrocytes or 0.25 ml of medium conditioned by the adherent spleen cells of mineral oil-primed BALB/c mice. 5-500 colonies appeared after 2-3 wk in culture yielding a plating efficiency of 0.001-0.1%. The number of myeloma colonies was proportional to the number of cells plated between concentrations of 105-106 and back-extrapolated through zero, suggesting that colonies were clones derived from single myeloma stem cells. Morphological, histochemical, and functional criteria showed the colonies to consist of immature plasmablasts and mature plasma cells. 60-80% of cells picked from colonies contained intracytoplasmic monoclonal immunoglobulin. Colony growth was most easily achieved from the bone marrow cells of untreated patients or those in relapse. Only 50% of bone marrow samples from patients in remission were successfully cultured. Tritiated thymidine suicide studies provided evidence that for most myeloma patients, a very high proportion of myeloma colony-forming cells was actively in transit through the cell cycle. Velocity sedimentation at 1 g showed myeloma stem cells sedimented in a broad band with a peak at 13 mm/h. Antibody to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not reduce the number or size of the colonies. Increased numbers of myeloma colonies were seen when the marrow was depleted of colony-stimulating factor elaborating adherent cells before plating. This bioassay should prove useful in studying the in vitro biological behavior of certain bone marrow-derived (B

  13. In vitro toxicity of particulate matter (PM) collected at different sites in the Netherlands is associated with PM composition, size fraction and oxidative potential - the RAPTES project

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure is associated with respiratory and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. To what extent such effects are different for PM obtained from different sources or locations is still unclear. This study investigated the in vitro toxicity of ambient PM collected at different sites in the Netherlands in relation to PM composition and oxidative potential. Method PM was sampled at eight sites: three traffic sites, an underground train station, as well as a harbor, farm, steelworks, and urban background location. Coarse (2.5-10 μm), fine (< 2.5 μm) and quasi ultrafine PM (qUF; < 0.18 μm) were sampled at each site. Murine macrophages (RAW 264.7 cells) were exposed to increasing concentrations of PM from these sites (6.25-12.5-25-50-100 μg/ml; corresponding to 3.68-58.8 μg/cm2). Following overnight incubation, MTT-reduction activity (a measure of metabolic activity) and the release of pro-inflammatory markers (Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, TNF-α; Interleukin-6, IL-6; Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-2, MIP-2) were measured. The oxidative potential and the endotoxin content of each PM sample were determined in a DTT- and LAL-assay respectively. Multiple linear regression was used to assess the relationship between the cellular responses and PM characteristics: concentration, site, size fraction, oxidative potential and endotoxin content. Results Most PM samples induced a concentration-dependent decrease in MTT-reduction activity and an increase in pro-inflammatory markers with the exception of the urban background and stop & go traffic samples. Fine and qUF samples of traffic locations, characterized by a high concentration of elemental and organic carbon, induced the highest pro-inflammatory activity. The pro-inflammatory response to coarse samples was associated with the endotoxin level, which was found to increase dramatically during a three-day sample concentration procedure in the laboratory. The underground samples

  14. Spatial & temporal variations of PM10 and particle number concentrations in urban air.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Christer; Norman, Michael; Gidhagen, Lars

    2007-04-01

    The size of particles in urban air varies over four orders of magnitude (from 0.001 microm to 10 microm in diameter). In many cities only particle mass concentrations (PM10, i.e. particles <10 microm diameter) is measured. In this paper we analyze how differences in emissions, background concentrations and meteorology affect the temporal and spatial distribution of PM10 and total particle number concentrations (PNC) based on measurements and dispersion modeling in Stockholm, Sweden. PNC at densely trafficked kerbside locations are dominated by ultrafine particles (<0.1 microm diameter) due to vehicle exhaust emissions as verified by high correlation with NOx. But PNC contribute only marginally to PM10, due to the small size of exhaust particles. Instead wear of the road surface is an important factor for the highest PM10 concentrations observed. In Stockholm, road wear increases drastically due to the use of studded tires and traction sand on streets during winter; up to 90% of the locally emitted PM10 may be due to road abrasion. PM10 emissions and concentrations, but not PNC, at kerbside are controlled by road moisture. Annual mean urban background PM10 levels are relatively uniformly distributed over the city, due to the importance of long range transport. For PNC local sources often dominate the concentrations resulting in large temporal and spatial gradients in the concentrations. Despite these differences in the origin of PM10 and PNC, the spatial gradients of annual mean concentrations due to local sources are of equal magnitude due to the common source, namely traffic. Thus, people in different areas experiencing a factor of 2 different annual PM10 exposure due to local sources will also experience a factor of 2 different exposure in terms of PNC. This implies that health impact studies based solely on spatial differences in annual exposure to PM10 may not separate differences in health effects due to ultrafine and coarse particles. On the other hand

  15. Spatial & temporal variations of PM10 and particle number concentrations in urban air.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Christer; Norman, Michael; Gidhagen, Lars

    2007-04-01

    The size of particles in urban air varies over four orders of magnitude (from 0.001 microm to 10 microm in diameter). In many cities only particle mass concentrations (PM10, i.e. particles <10 microm diameter) is measured. In this paper we analyze how differences in emissions, background concentrations and meteorology affect the temporal and spatial distribution of PM10 and total particle number concentrations (PNC) based on measurements and dispersion modeling in Stockholm, Sweden. PNC at densely trafficked kerbside locations are dominated by ultrafine particles (<0.1 microm diameter) due to vehicle exhaust emissions as verified by high correlation with NOx. But PNC contribute only marginally to PM10, due to the small size of exhaust particles. Instead wear of the road surface is an important factor for the highest PM10 concentrations observed. In Stockholm, road wear increases drastically due to the use of studded tires and traction sand on streets during winter; up to 90% of the locally emitted PM10 may be due to road abrasion. PM10 emissions and concentrations, but not PNC, at kerbside are controlled by road moisture. Annual mean urban background PM10 levels are relatively uniformly distributed over the city, due to the importance of long range transport. For PNC local sources often dominate the concentrations resulting in large temporal and spatial gradients in the concentrations. Despite these differences in the origin of PM10 and PNC, the spatial gradients of annual mean concentrations due to local sources are of equal magnitude due to the common source, namely traffic. Thus, people in different areas experiencing a factor of 2 different annual PM10 exposure due to local sources will also experience a factor of 2 different exposure in terms of PNC. This implies that health impact studies based solely on spatial differences in annual exposure to PM10 may not separate differences in health effects due to ultrafine and coarse particles. On the other hand

  16. A novel laboratory screening bioassay for crop seedling allelopathy.

    PubMed

    Belz, Regina G; Hurle, Karl

    2004-01-01

    Crops that control weeds by root exudation of allelochemicals are receiving increased attention, and there are efforts to breed allelopathic cultivars in several crops. The genetic improvement of allelopathic traits is based upon parental germ plasm with high allelopathic activity. Identification of allelopathic germplasm is done in laboratory screening bioassays, but experimental protocols are limited. We developed a fast and reliable laboratory screening bioassay for grain crops that includes dose-response considerations as an integral part of the experimental design. The bioassay was conducted in hydroponic culture, and a range of experiments with 2-(3H)-benzoxazolinone (BOA), an allelochemical of several grain crops, was carried out to define the basic protocol. Because of its sensitivity to BOA, Sinapis alba L. was selected as the receiver species. BOA affected growth (fresh weight and length of shoot and root), enzyme activities (ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase, peroxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase), and chlorophyll fluorescence, whereby root length was the most reliable response parameter. BOA sensitivity was dependent on nutrients for all parameters measured, and, thus, no nutrients were added. A set of experiments with Secale cereale L. and Triticum aestivum L. as donor species was carried out to optimize the protocol. Light and pH were eliminated as primary causes for the observed inhibition. The proposed bioassay has several methodological advantages over current bioassays.

  17. Soil bioassays and the {sup 129}I problem

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    Iodine-129 is a very long-lived radionuclide associated with spent nuclear fuel. Because {sup 129}I has a 10{sup 7}-year half-life, is very mobile in the environment and is a biologically essential element, it is the most limiting radionuclide affecting disposal of spent fuel. Traditionally, the potential impacts of {sup 129}I have been estimated for human receptors, with the implicit assumption that all other organisms are less at risk. Risk is the operative word, the objective for protection of humans is to protect individuals, whereas the objective for other biota is usually to protect populations. Here, {sup 129}I poses an interesting problem: the half-life is so long it is barely radioactive. Thus, the chemical toxicity may be more limiting than the radiological impact. A series of soil bioassays were employed, including a life-cycle plant (Brassica rapa) bioassay, a modified earthworm survival bioassay, a microarthropod colonization/survival bioassay, and a series of more common soil and aquatic bioassays. Chemical toxicity was indicated at soil concentrations as low as 5 mg kg{sup {minus}1}. At these levels, radiological impact on non-human biota would not be expected, and therefore the chemical toxicity effects are more critical. However, human food-chain model estimates show these levels, as pure {sup 129}I, would be unacceptable for human radiological exposure, so that for {sup 129}I, protection of the human environment should also be protective of non-human biota.

  18. Effect of Coarse Materials Percentage in the Shear Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshameri, B.; Bakar, I.; Madun, A.; Abdeldjouad, L.; Haimi Dahlan, S.

    2016-07-01

    There are several factors that affecting the shear strength and shear strength parameters (i.e. cohesion and friction angle). In this study, the effect of coarse material percentage was tested. Six different mixtures of soils (clay and sand) with different coarse material percentages (i.e. from 80% to 30% of coarse material percentage) were tested via using direct shear test under different moisture content percentage. The results indicated that the shear strength and friction angle were decreased by the increment of the percentage of coarse materials (sand). However, the cohesion results showed unique behavior. The cohesion (at every moisture content values) increased with the increment of the percentage of coarse materials until specific point then it started to decrease with the increment of the percentage of coarse materials.

  19. Coarse-grained modeling of DNA curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Gordon S.; Hinckley, Daniel M.; Lequieu, Joshua P.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of DNA with proteins occurs over a wide range of length scales, and depends critically on its local structure. In particular, recent experimental work suggests that the intrinsic curvature of DNA plays a significant role on its protein-binding properties. In this work, we present a coarse grained model of DNA that is capable of describing base-pairing, hybridization, major and minor groove widths, and local curvature. The model represents an extension of the recently proposed 3SPN.2 description of DNA [D. M. Hinckley, G. S. Freeman, J. K. Whitmer, and J. J. de Pablo, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 144903 (2013)], into which sequence-dependent shape and mechanical properties are incorporated. The proposed model is validated against experimental data including melting temperatures, local flexibilities, dsDNA persistence lengths, and minor groove width profiles.

  20. Coarse-grained model of glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Samsonov, Sergey A; Bichmann, Leon; Pisabarro, M Teresa

    2015-01-26

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) represent a class of anionic periodic linear polysaccharides, which mediate cell communication processes by interactions with their protein targets in the extracellular matrix. Due to their high flexibility, charged nature, periodicity, and polymeric nature, GAGs are challenging systems for computational approaches. To deal with the length challenge, coarse-grained (CG) modeling could be a promising approach. In this work, we develop AMBER-compatible CG parameters for GAGs using all-atomic (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent and the Boltzmann conversion approach. We compare both global and local properties of GAGs obtained in the simulations with AA and CG approaches, and we conclude that our CG model is appropriate for the MD approach of long GAG molecules at long time scales.

  1. Chemical composition and mass closure of ambient coarse particles at traffic and urban-background sites in Thessaloniki, Greece.

    PubMed

    Grigoratos, Theodoros; Samara, Constantini; Voutsa, Dimitra; Manoli, Evangelia; Kouras, Athanasios

    2014-06-01

    Concentrations and chemical composition of the coarse particle fraction (PMc) were investigated at two urban sites in the city of Thessaloniki, Greece, through concurrent sampling of PM10 and PM2.5 during the warm and the cold months of the year. PMc levels at the urban-traffic site (UT) were among the highest found in literature worldwide exhibiting higher values in the cold period. PMc levels at the urban-background site (UB) were significantly lower exhibiting a reverse seasonal trend. Concentration levels of minerals and most trace metals were also higher at the UT site suggesting a stronger impact from traffic-related sources (road dust resuspension, brake and tire abrasion, road wear). According to the chemical mass closure obtained, minerals (oxides of Si, Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, Ti, and K) dominated the PMc profile, regardless of the site and the period, with organic matter and secondary inorganic aerosols (mainly nitrate) also contributing considerably to the PMc mass, particularly in the warm period. The influence of wind speed to dilution and/or resuspension of coarse particles was investigated. The source of origin of coarse particles was also investigated using surface wind data and atmospheric back-trajectory modeling. Finally, the contribution of resuspension to PMc levels was estimated for air quality management perspectives.

  2. Glasses in coarse-grained micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, M. E.; Kurat, G.

    2009-06-01

    Micrometeorites (MMs, interplanetary dust particles with 25 - 500 μm diameters) carry the main mass of extraterrestrial matter that is captured by Earth. The coarse-grained MMs mainly consist of olivine aggregates, which - as their counterparts in CC chondrites - also contain pyroxenes and glass. We studied clear glasses in four coarse-grained crystalline MMs (10M12, M92-6b, AM9, and Mc7-10), which were collected from the ice at Cap Prudhomme, Antarctica. Previous studies of glasses (e.g., glass inclusions trapped in olivine and clear mesostasis glass) in carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites showed that these phases could keep memory of the physical-chemical conditions to which extraterrestrial matter was exposed. Here we compare the chemical compositions of MM glasses and glasses from CM chondrites with that in experimentally heated objects from the Allende CV chondrite and with glasses from cometary particles. Our results show that MMs were heated to variable degrees (during entry through the terrestrial atmosphere), which caused a range from very little chemical modification of the glass to total melting of the precursor object. Such modifications include dissolution of minerals in the melted glass precursor and some loss of volatile alkali elements. The chemical composition of all precursor glasses in the MMs investigated is not primitive such as glasses in CM and CR chondrite objects. It shows signs of pre-terrestrial chemical modification, e.g., metasomatic enrichments in Na and Fe 2+ presumably in the solar nebula. Glasses of MMs heated to very low degree have a chemical composition indistinguishable from that of glasses in comet Wild 2 particles; giving additional evidence that interplanetary dust (e.g., Antarctic MMs) possibly represents samples from comets.

  3. [Investigation on pattern and methods of quality control for Chinese materia medica based on dao-di herbs and bioassay - bioassay for Coptis chinensis].

    PubMed

    Yan, Dan; Xiao, Xiao-he

    2011-05-01

    Establishment of bioassay methods is the technical issues to be faced with in the bioassay of Chinese materia medica. Taking the bioassay of Coptis chinensis Franch. as an example, the establishment process and application of the bioassay methods (including bio-potency and bio-activity fingerprint) were explained from the aspects of methodology, principle of selection, experimental design, method confirmation and data analysis. The common technologies were extracted and formed with the above aspects, so as to provide technical support for constructing pattern and method of the quality control for Chinese materia medica based on the dao-di herbs and bioassay. PMID:21800546

  4. Method comparison for 241Am emergency urine bioassay.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunsheng; Sadi, Baki; Benkhedda, Karima; St-Amant, Nadereh; Moodie, Gerry; Ko, Raymond; Dinardo, Anthony; Kramer, Gary

    2010-10-01

    241Am is one of the high-risk radionuclides that might be used in a terrorist attack. 241Am in urine bioassay can identify the contaminated individuals who need immediate medical intervention and decontamination. This paper compares three methods for the measurement of 241Am in urine, namely liquid scintillation counting (LSC), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and gamma spectrometry (GS), at two levels, 20 and 2 Bq l(-1). All three methods satisfied the ANSI N13.30 radio-bioassay criteria for accuracy and repeatability. ICP-MS offered the best sensitivity and fastest sample turnaround; however, the ICP-MS system used in this work may not be available in many bioassay laboratories. LSC and GS are more commonly available instruments. GS requires minimal or no sample preparation, which makes it a good candidate method. Moreover, the sample throughput can be significantly improved if the GS and LSC methods are automated.

  5. Carbon-14 Bioassay for Decommissioning of Hanford Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Watson, David J.

    2012-05-01

    The old production reactors at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site used large graphite piles as the moderator. As part of long-term decommissioning plans, the potential need for 14C radiobioassay of workers was identified. Technical issues associated with 14C bioassay and worker monitoring were investigated, including anticipated graphite characterization, potential intake scenarios, and the bioassay capabilities that may be required to support the decommissioning of the graphite piles. A combination of urine and feces sampling would likely be required for the absorption type S 14C anticipated to be encountered. However the concentrations in the graphite piles appear to be sufficiently low that dosimetrically significant intakes of 14C are not credible, thus rendering moot the need for such bioassay.

  6. Carbon-14 bioassay for decommissioning of Hanford reactors.

    PubMed

    Carbaugh, Eugene H; Watson, David J

    2012-05-01

    The production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site used large graphite piles as the moderator. As part of long-term decommissioning plans, the potential need for ¹⁴C radiobioassay of workers was identified. Technical issues associated with ¹⁴C bioassay and worker monitoring were investigated, including anticipated graphite characterization, potential intake scenarios, and the bioassay capabilities that may be required to support the decommissioning of the graphite piles. A combination of urine and feces sampling would likely be required for the absorption type S ¹⁴C anticipated to be encountered. However, the concentrations in the graphite piles appear to be sufficiently low that dosimetrically significant intakes of ¹⁴C are not credible, thus rendering moot the need for such bioassay.

  7. The effect of pesticide residue on caged mosquito bioassays.

    PubMed

    Barber, J A S; Greer, Mike; Coughlin, Jamie

    2006-09-01

    Wind tunnel experiments showed that secondary pickup of insecticide residue by mosquitoes in cage bioassays had a significant effect on mortality. Cage bioassays using adult Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) investigated the effect of exposure time to a contaminated surface. Cages were dosed in a wind tunnel using the LC50 for naled (0.124 mg a.i./ml) and an LC25 (0.0772 mg a.i./ml) for naled. Half of the bioassay mosquitoes were moved directly into clean cages with the other half remaining in the sprayed, hence contaminated, cage. Treatment mortality was assessed at 8, 15, 30, 60, 120, 240, and 1,440 min postapplication. Cage contamination had a significant effect on mosquito mortality for both the LC25 and LC50 between 15 and 30 min postapplication. PMID:17067048

  8. Carbon-14 bioassay for decommissioning of Hanford reactors.

    PubMed

    Carbaugh, Eugene H; Watson, David J

    2012-05-01

    The production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site used large graphite piles as the moderator. As part of long-term decommissioning plans, the potential need for ¹⁴C radiobioassay of workers was identified. Technical issues associated with ¹⁴C bioassay and worker monitoring were investigated, including anticipated graphite characterization, potential intake scenarios, and the bioassay capabilities that may be required to support the decommissioning of the graphite piles. A combination of urine and feces sampling would likely be required for the absorption type S ¹⁴C anticipated to be encountered. However, the concentrations in the graphite piles appear to be sufficiently low that dosimetrically significant intakes of ¹⁴C are not credible, thus rendering moot the need for such bioassay. PMID:22469998

  9. Internal dosimetry performing dose assessments via bioassay measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.M.

    1993-05-11

    The Internal Dosimetry Department at the Y-12 Plant maintains a state-of-the-art bioassay program managed under the guidance and regulations of the Department of Energy. The two major bioassay techniques currently used at Y-12 are the in vitro (urinalysis) and in vivo (lung counting) programs. Fecal analysis (as part of the in vitro program) is another alternative; however, since both urine and fecal analysis provide essentially the same capabilities for detecting exposures to uranium, the urinalysis is the main choice primarily for aesthetic reasons. The bioassay frequency is based on meeting NCRP 87 objectives which are to monitor the accumulation of radioactive material in exposed individuals, and to ensure that significant depositions are detected.

  10. Bioassay-directed chemical analysis in environmental research

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetzle, D.; Lewtas, J.

    1986-01-01

    The use of short-term bioassay tests in conjunction with analytical measurements, constitute a powerful tool for identifying important environmental contaminants. The authors have coined the terminology bioassay directed chemical analysis to best describe this marriage of analytical chemistry and biology. The objective of this methodology is to identify key compounds in various types of air-pollutant samples. Once that task is completed, studies on metabolism, sources, environmental exposure and atmospheric chemistry can be undertaken. The principles and methodologies for bioassay directed chemical analysis are presented and illustrated in this paper. Most of this work has been directed toward the characterization of ambient air and diesel particulates, which are used as examples in this report to illustrate the analytical logic used for identifying the bio-active components of complex mixtures.

  11. The exposure to coarse, fine and ultrafine particle emissions from concrete mixing, drilling and cutting activities.

    PubMed

    Azarmi, Farhad; Kumar, Prashant; Mulheron, Mike

    2014-08-30

    Building activities generate coarse (PM10≤10μm), fine (PM2.5≤2.5μm) and ultrafine particles (<100nm) making it necessary to understand both the exposure levels of operatives on site and the dispersion of ultrafine particles into the surrounding environment. This study investigates the release of particulate matter, including ultrafine particles, during the mixing of fresh concrete (incorporating Portland cement with Ground Granulated Blastfurnace Slag, GGBS or Pulverised Fuel Ash, PFA) and the subsequent drilling and cutting of hardened concrete. Particles were measured in the 5-10,000nm size range using a GRIMM particle spectrometer and a fast response differential mobility spectrometer (DMS50). The mass concentrations of PM2.5-10 fraction contributed ∼52-64% of total mass released. The ultrafine particles dominated the total particle number concentrations (PNCs); being 74, 82, 95 and 97% for mixing with GGBS, mixing with PFA, drilling and cutting, respectively. Peak values measured during the drilling and cutting activities were 4 and 14 times the background. Equivalent emission factors were calculated and the total respiratory deposition dose rates for PNCs for drilling and cutting were 32.97±9.41×10(8)min(-1) and 88.25±58.82×10(8)min(-1). These are a step towards establishing number and mass emission inventories for particle exposure during construction activities.

  12. Do we really need in-situ bioassays?

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.H.; Salazar, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    In-situ bioassays are needed to validate the results from laboratory testing and to understand biological interactions. Standard laboratory protocols provide reproducible test results, and the precision of those tests can be mathematically defined. Significant correlations between toxic substances and levels of response (bioaccumulation and bioeffects) have also been demonstrated with natural field populations and suggest that the laboratory results can accurately predict field responses. An equal number of studies have shown a lack of correlation between laboratory bioassay results and responses of natural field populations. The best way to validate laboratory results is with manipulative field testing; i.e., in-situ bioassays with caged organisms. Bioaccumulation in transplanted bivalves has probably been the most frequently used form of an in-situ bioassay. The authors have refined those methods to include synoptic measurements of bioaccumulation and growth. Growth provides an easily-measured bioeffects endpoint and a means of calibrating bioaccumulation. Emphasis has been on minimizing the size range of test animals, repetitive measurements of individuals and standardization of test protocols for a variety of applications. They are now attempting to standardize criteria for accepting and interpreting data in the same way that laboratory bioassays have been standardized. Others have developed methods for in-situ bioassays using eggs, larvae, unicellular organisms, crustaceans, benthic invertebrates, bivalves, and fish. In the final analysis, the in-situ approach could be considered as an exposure system where any clinical measurements are possible. The most powerful approach would be to use the same species in laboratory and field experiments with the same endpoints.

  13. An emergency bioassay method for actinides in urine.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiongxin; Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila

    2011-08-01

    A rapid bioassay method has been developed for the sequential measurements of actinides in human urine samples. The method involves actinide separation from a urine matrix by co-precipitation with hydrous titanium oxide (HTiO), followed by anion exchange and extraction chromatography column purification, and final counting by alpha spectrometry after cerium fluoride micro-precipitation. The minimal detectable activities for the method were determined to be 20 mBq L(-1) or less for plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes, with an 8-h sample turn-around time. Spike tests showed that this method would meet the requirements for actinide bioassay following a radiation emergency.

  14. Chemical composition of PM10 and PM2.5 collected at ground level and 100 meters during a strong winter-time pollution episode in Xi'an, China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhenxing; Cao, Junji; Liu, Suixin; Zhu, Chongshu; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Ting; Xu, Hongmei; Hu, Tafeng

    2011-11-01

    An intensive sampling of aerosol particles from ground level and 100 m was conducted during a strong pollution episode during the winter in Xi'an, China. Concentrations of water-soluble inorganic ions, carbonaceous compounds, and trace elements were determined to compare the composition of particulate matter (PM) at the two heights. PM mass concentrations were high at both stations: PM10 (PM with aerodynamic diameter < or =10 microm) exceeded the China National Air Quality Standard Class II value on three occasions, and PM2.5 (PM with aerodynamic diameter < or =2.5 microm) exceeded the daily U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard more than 10 times. The PM10 organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were slightly lower at the ground than at 100 m, both in terms of concentration and percentage of total mass, but OC and EC in PM2.5 exhibited the opposite pattern. Major ionic species, such as sulfate and nitrate, showed vertical variations similar to the carbonaceous aerosols. High sulfate concentrations indicated that coal combustion dominated the PM mass both at the ground and 100 m. Correlations between K+ and OC and EC at 100 m imply a strong influence from suburban biomass burning, whereas coal combustion and motor vehicle exhaust had a greater influence on the ground PM. Stable atmospheric conditions apparently led to the accumulation of PM, especially at 100 m, and these conditions contributed to the similarities in PM at the two elevations. Low coefficient of divergence (CD) values reflect the similarities in the composition of the aerosol between sites, but higher CDs for fine particles compared with coarse ones were consistent with the differences in emission sources between the ground and 100 m.

  15. The Effects of Coarse Particles on Daily Mortality: A Case-Crossover Study in a Subtropical City, Taipei, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Meng-Hsuan; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have examined the effects of air pollution on daily mortality over the past two decades. However, information on the relationship between levels of coarse particles (PM2.5–10) and daily mortality is relatively sparse due to the limited availability of monitoring data. Furthermore, the results are inconsistent. In the current study, the association between coarse particle levels and daily mortality in Taipei, Taiwan’s largest city, which has a subtropical climate, was undertaken for the period 2006–2008 using a time-stratified case-crossover analysis. For the single pollutant model (without adjustment for other pollutants), PM2.5–10 showed statistically significant association with total mortality both on warm and cool days, with an interquartile range increase associated with a 11% (95% CI = 6%–17%) and 4% (95% CI = 1%–7%) rise in number of total deaths, respectively. In two-pollutant models, PM2.5–10 remained significant effects on total mortality after the inclusion of SO2 and O3 both on warm and cool days. We observed no significant associations between PM2.5–10 and daily mortality from respiratory diseases both on warm and cool days. For daily mortality from circulatory diseases, the effect of PM2.5–10 remained significant when SO2 or O3 was added in the regression model both on warm and cool days. Future studies of this type in cities with varying climates and cultures are needed. PMID:27011197

  16. Characterization of non-exhaust coarse and fine particles from on-road driving and laboratory measurements.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Ji-hyun; Kim, Hongsuk; Lee, Janghee; Lee, Seokhwan

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the physical and chemical properties of non-exhaust coarse and fine particles generated by on-road driving and in a laboratory setting using a mobile sampling system. The on-road driving and laboratory measurements performed under constant speed driving revealed that particles produced by tire wear had a size distribution in the range of 2-3 μm, while roadway particles (RWPs) measured behind the front tire during on-road driving largely comprised crustal materials such as road surface wear particles and road dust as well as tire wear particles (TWPs). The mode diameters of particles obtained from on-road driving under cornering conditions were similar to those obtained under constant speed conditions, but with higher concentrations of crustal elements. Under braking conditions, the particulate matter (PM) concentrations of brake wear particles (BWPs) sampled near the brake pad increased significantly and were much higher than the concentration of RWPs during deceleration, indicating that BWPs are one of the main sources of non-exhaust emissions. In addition, BWPs observed from on-road and laboratory measurements had a broader PM size range (1-10 μm) than RWPs. Size-segregated chemical analysis of PM samples indicated that the concentrations of Fe and Ca were highest in the coarse fraction emitted under constant speed and cornering conditions, while Fe, Ba, and Ti were most abundant in the fine fraction emitted during braking events.

  17. Modelling the fine and coarse fraction of heavy metals in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Vivanco, Marta; González, M. Angeles

    2014-05-01

    Heavy metals, such as cadmium, lead, nickel, arsenic, copper, chrome, zinc and selenium, are present in the air due to natural and anthropogenic emissions, normally joined to particles. These metals can affect life organisms via inhalation or ingestion, causing damages in human health and ecosystems. Small particles are inhaled and embebed in lungs and alveolus more easily than coarse particles. The CHIMERE model is a eulerian air quality model extensively used in air quality modelling. Metals have been recently included in this model in a special version developed in the CIEMAT (Madrid, Spain) modelling group. Vivanco et al. (2011) and González et al. (2012) showed the model performance for some metals in Spain and Europe. However, in these studies, metals were considered as fine particles. Some studies based on observed heavy metals air concentration indicate the presence of metals also in the coarse fraction, in special for Cu and Zn. For this reason, a new attempt of modelling metals considering a fine (<2.5 micrometres) and coarse (2.5-10 micrometres) fraction has been done. Measurements of metal concentration in PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 recorded in Spain (Fernández-Camacho et al., 2012; Querol et al., 2008) were used to obtain the new metal particle distribution size. Results and the evaluation of the model performance at some minoring sites in Spain is presented. References: - Vivanco, M. G., M.A: González, I. Palomino, J. L. Garrido, X. Querol, B. Bessagnet, J.de la Rosa, A.M. Sánchez de la Campa, 2011. Modelling Arsenic, Lead, Cadmium and Nickel Ambient Air Concentrations in Spain, 2011. Proceedings of the 11 th International Conference on Computational Science and Its Applications (ICCSA 11) 243-246 - González, Ma Vivanco, Marta; Palomino, Inmaculada; Garrido, Juan; Santiago, Manuel; Bessagnet, Bertrand Modelling Some Heavy Metals Air Concentration in Europe. // Water, Air & Soil Pollution;Sep2012, Vol. 223 Issue 8, p5227

  18. A statistical treatment of bioassay pour fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barengoltz, Jack; Hughes, David

    A bioassay is a method for estimating the number of bacterial spores on a spacecraft surface for the purpose of demonstrating compliance with planetary protection (PP) requirements (Ref. 1). The details of the process may be seen in the appropriate PP document (e.g., for NASA, Ref. 2). In general, the surface is mechanically sampled with a damp sterile swab or wipe. The completion of the process is colony formation in a growth medium in a plate (Petri dish); the colonies are counted. Consider a set of samples from randomly selected, known areas of one spacecraft surface, for simplicity. One may calculate the mean and standard deviation of the bioburden density, which is the ratio of counts to area sampled. The standard deviation represents an estimate of the variation from place to place of the true bioburden density commingled with the precision of the individual sample counts. The accuracy of individual sample results depends on the equipment used, the collection method, and the culturing method. One aspect that greatly influences the result is the pour fraction, which is the quantity of fluid added to the plates divided by the total fluid used in extracting spores from the sampling equipment. In an analysis of a single sample’s counts due to the pour fraction, one seeks to answer the question: What is the probability that if a certain number of spores are counted with a known pour fraction, that there are an additional number of spores in the part of the rinse not poured. This is given for specific values by the binomial distribution density, where detection (of culturable spores) is success and the probability of success is the pour fraction. A special summation over the binomial distribution, equivalent to adding for all possible values of the true total number of spores, is performed. This distribution when normalized will almost yield the desired quantity. It is the probability that the additional number of spores does not exceed a certain value. Of course

  19. A statistical treatment of bioassay pour fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barengoltz, Jack; Hughes, David

    A bioassay is a method for estimating the number of bacterial spores on a spacecraft surface for the purpose of demonstrating compliance with planetary protection (PP) requirements (Ref. 1). The details of the process may be seen in the appropriate PP document (e.g., for NASA, Ref. 2). In general, the surface is mechanically sampled with a damp sterile swab or wipe. The completion of the process is colony formation in a growth medium in a plate (Petri dish); the colonies are counted. Consider a set of samples from randomly selected, known areas of one spacecraft surface, for simplicity. One may calculate the mean and standard deviation of the bioburden density, which is the ratio of counts to area sampled. The standard deviation represents an estimate of the variation from place to place of the true bioburden density commingled with the precision of the individual sample counts. The accuracy of individual sample results depends on the equipment used, the collection method, and the culturing method. One aspect that greatly influences the result is the pour fraction, which is the quantity of fluid added to the plates divided by the total fluid used in extracting spores from the sampling equipment. In an analysis of a single sample’s counts due to the pour fraction, one seeks to answer the question: What is the probability that if a certain number of spores are counted with a known pour fraction, that there are an additional number of spores in the part of the rinse not poured. This is given for specific values by the binomial distribution density, where detection (of culturable spores) is success and the probability of success is the pour fraction. A special summation over the binomial distribution, equivalent to adding for all possible values of the true total number of spores, is performed. This distribution when normalized will almost yield the desired quantity. It is the probability that the additional number of spores does not exceed a certain value. Of course

  20. Ambient Coarse Particulate Matter and Hospital Admissions in the Medicare Cohort Air Pollution Study, 1999–2010

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Helen; Krall, Jenna R.; Wang, Yun; Bell, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years a number of studies have examined the short-term association between coarse particulate matter (PM10–2.5) and mortality and morbidity outcomes. These studies, however, have produced inconsistent conclusions. Objectives We estimated both the national- and regional-level associations between PM10–2.5 and emergency hospitalizations for both cardiovascular and respiratory disease among Medicare enrollees ≥ 65 years of age during the 12-year period 1999 through 2010. Methods Using air pollution data obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency air quality monitoring network and daily emergency hospitalizations for 110 large urban U.S. counties assembled from the Medicare Cohort Air Pollution Study (MCAPS), we estimated the association between short-term exposure to PM10–2.5 and hospitalizations using a two-stage Bayesian hierarchical model and Poisson log-linear regression models. Results A 10-μg/m3 increase in PM10–2.5 was associated with a significant increase in same-day cardiovascular hospitalizations [0.69%; 95% posterior interval (PI): 0.45, 0.92]. After adjusting for PM2.5, this association remained significant (0.63%; 95% PI: 0.38, 0.88). A 10-μg/m3 increase in PM10–2.5 was not associated with a significant increase in respiratory-related hospitalizations. Conclusions We found statistically significant evidence that daily variation in PM10–2.5 is associated with emergency hospitalizations for cardiovascular diseases among Medicare enrollees ≥ 65 years of age. This association was robust to adjustment for concentrations of PM2.5. Citation Powell H, Krall JR, Wang Y, Bell ML, Peng RD. 2015. Ambient coarse particulate matter and hospital admissions in the Medicare Cohort Air Pollution Study, 1999–2010. Environ Health Perspect 123:1152–1158; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408720 PMID:25872223

  1. PM Program Prevents Early AM Repairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRae, David

    1974-01-01

    Discusses how to initiate a preventive maintenance (PM) program: (1) make inventory of equipment that needs a PM program; (2) gather data about each piece of equipment; and (3) set maintenance goals. (Author/PG)

  2. Airborne Measurements of Coarse Mode Aerosol Composition and Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froyd, K. D.; Murphy, D. M.; Brock, C. A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.; Wilson, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Coarse aerosol particles impact the earth's radiative balance by direct scattering and absorption of light and by promoting cloud formation. Modeling studies suggest that coarse mode mineral dust and sea salt aerosol are the dominant contributors to aerosol optical depth throughout much of the globe. Lab and field studies indicate that larger aerosol particles tend to be more efficient ice nuclei, and recent airborne measurements confirm the dominant role of mineral dust on cirrus cloud formation. However, our ability to simulate coarse mode particle abundance in large scale models is limited by a lack of validating measurements above the earth's surface. We present airborne measurements of coarse mode aerosol abundance and composition over several mid-latitude, sub-tropical, and tropical regions from the boundary layer to the stratosphere. In the free troposphere the coarse mode constitutes 10-50% of the total particulate mass over a wide range of environments. Above North America mineral dust typically dominates the coarse mode, but biomass burning particles and sea salt also contribute. In remote environments coarse mode aerosol mainly consists of internally mixed sulfate-organic particles. Both continental and marine convection can enhance coarse aerosol mass through direct lofting of primary particles and by secondary accumulation of aerosol material through cloud processing.

  3. FINE AND COARSE PARTICLES: CONCENTRATION RELATIONSHIPS RELEVANT TO EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine particles and coarse particles are defined in terms of the modal structure of particle size distributions typically observed in the atmosphere. Differences among the various modes are discussed. The fractions of fine and coarse particles collected in specific size ranges, ...

  4. Assessment of acrylamide toxicity using a battery of standardised bioassays.

    PubMed

    Zovko, Mira; Vidaković-Cifrek, Željka; Cvetković, Želimira; Bošnir, Jasna; Šikić, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Acrylamide is a monomer widely used as an intermediate in the production of organic chemicals, e.g. polyacrylamides (PAMs). Since PAMs are low cost chemicals with applications in various industries and waste- and drinking water treatment, a certain amount of non-polymerised acrylamide is expected to end up in waterways. PAMs are non-toxic but acrylamide induces neurotoxic effects in humans and genotoxic, reproductive, and carcinogenic effects in laboratory animals. In order to evaluate the effect of acrylamide on freshwater organisms, bioassays were conducted on four species: algae Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, duckweed Lemna minor and water flea Daphnia magna according to ISO (International Organization for Standardisation) standardised methods. This approach ensures the evaluation of acrylamide toxicity on organisms with different levels of organisation and the comparability of results, and it examines the value of using a battery of low-cost standardised bioassays in the monitoring of pollution and contamination of aquatic ecosystems. These results showed that EC50 values were lower for Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata than for Daphnia magna and Lemna minor, which suggests an increased sensitivity of algae to acrylamide. According to the toxic unit approach, the values estimated by the Lemna minor and Daphnia magna bioassays, classify acrylamide as slightly toxic (TU=0-1; Class 1). The results obtained from algal bioassays (Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) revealed the toxic effect of acrylamide (TU=1-10; Class 2) on these organisms.

  5. Statistical considerations in the analysis of data from replicated bioassays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple-dose bioassay is generally the preferred method for characterizing virulence of insect pathogens. Linear regression of probit mortality on log dose enables estimation of LD50/LC50 and slope, the latter having substantial effect on LD90/95s (doses of considerable interest in pest management)...

  6. Bioassays for evaluation of medical products derived from bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Sesardic, Thea

    2012-06-01

    Bioassays play central role in evaluation of biological products and those derived from bacterial toxins often rely exclusively on in vivo models for assurance of safety and potency. This chapter reviews existing regulatory approved methods designed to provide information on potency and safety of complex biological medicines with an insight into strategies considered for alternative procedures.

  7. Soil bioassays as tools for sludge compost quality assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Domene, Xavier; Sola, Laura; Ramirez, Wilson; Alcaniz, Josep M.; Andres, Pilar

    2011-03-15

    Composting is a waste management technology that is becoming more widespread as a response to the increasing production of sewage sludge and the pressure for its reuse in soil. In this study, different bioassays (plant germination, earthworm survival, biomass and reproduction, and collembolan survival and reproduction) were assessed for their usefulness in the compost quality assessment. Compost samples, from two different composting plants, were taken along the composting process, which were characterized and submitted to bioassays (plant germination and collembolan and earthworm performance). Results from our study indicate that the noxious effects of some of the compost samples observed in bioassays are related to the low organic matter stability of composts and the enhanced release of decomposition endproducts, with the exception of earthworms, which are favored. Plant germination and collembolan reproduction inhibition was generally associated with uncomposted sludge, while earthworm total biomass and reproduction were enhanced by these materials. On the other hand, earthworm and collembolan survival were unaffected by the degree of composting of the wastes. However, this pattern was clear in one of the composting procedures assessed, but less in the other, where the release of decomposition endproducts was lower due to its higher stability, indicating the sensitivity and usefulness of bioassays for the quality assessment of composts.

  8. Activities of Jatropha curcas phorbol esters in various bioassays.

    PubMed

    Devappa, Rakshit K; Rajesh, Sanjay K; Kumar, Vikas; Makkar, Harinder P S; Becker, Klaus

    2012-04-01

    Jatropha curcas seeds contain 30-35% oil, which can be converted to high quality biodiesel. However, Jatropha oil is toxic, ascribed to the presence of phorbol esters (PEs). In this study, isolated phorbol ester rich fraction (PEEF) was used to evaluate the activity of PEs using three aquatic species based bioassays (snail (Physa fontinalis), brine shrimp (Artemeia salina), daphnia (Daphnia magna)) and microorganisms. In all the bioassays tested, increase in concentration of PEs increased mortality with an EC(50) (48 h) of 0.33, 26.48 and 0.95 mg L(-1) PEs for snail, artemia and daphnia, respectively. The sensitivity of various microorganisms for PEs was also tested. Among the bacterial species tested, Streptococcus pyogenes and Proteus mirabilis were highly susceptible with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 215 mg L(-1) PEs; and Pseudomonas putida were also sensitive with MIC of 251 mg L(-1) PEs. Similarly, Fusarium species of fungi exhibited EC(50) of 58 mg L(-1) PEs, while Aspergillus niger and Curvularia lunata had EC(50) of 70 mg L(-1). The snail bioassay was most sensitive with 100% snail mortality at 1 μg of PEs mL(-1). In conclusion, snail bioassay could be used to monitor PEs in Jatropha derived products such as oil, biodiesel, fatty acid distillate, kernel meal, cake, glycerol or for contamination in soil or other environmental matrices. In addition, PEs with molluscicidal/antimicrobial activities could be utilized for agricultural and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:22172520

  9. US Army Radiological Bioassay and Dosimetry: The RBD software package

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K. F.; Ward, R. C.; Maddox, L. B.

    1993-01-01

    The RBD (Radiological Bioassay and Dosimetry) software package was developed for the U. S. Army Material Command, Arlington, Virginia, to demonstrate compliance with the radiation protection guidance 10 CFR Part 20 (ref. 1). Designed to be run interactively on an IBM-compatible personal computer, RBD consists of a data base module to manage bioassay data and a computational module that incorporates algorithms for estimating radionuclide intake from either acute or chronic exposures based on measurement of the worker's rate of excretion of the radionuclide or the retained activity in the body. In estimating the intake,RBD uses a separate file for each radionuclide containing parametric representations of the retention and excretion functions. These files also contain dose-per-unit-intake coefficients used to compute the committed dose equivalent. For a given nuclide, if measurements exist for more than one type of assay, an auxiliary module, REPORT, estimates the intake by applying weights assigned in the nuclide file for each assay. Bioassay data and computed results (estimates of intake and committed dose equivalent) are stored in separate data bases, and the bioassay measurements used to compute a given result can be identified. The REPORT module creates a file containing committed effective dose equivalent for each individual that can be combined with the individual's external exposure.

  10. Plants as bioassay systems for monitoring atmospheric pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Feder, William A.

    1978-01-01

    Plant species act as natural bioindicators of atmospheric pollutants. Plants can be used as bioassay systems for monitoring atmospheric pollutants. Plant injury symptoms, altered growth and reproductive pattern, changes in yield and/or productivity, and changes in species distribution can be used singly or in combination as monitoring devices. The results must be accepted as semiquantitative, but within that constraint, air quality can be sufficiently well defined to enable the setting of air quality standards. Genetic variability of higher plant species has yielded cultivars which display a range of tolerance to gaseous and particulate atmospheric pollutants. Asexual propagation of these cultivars provides pollutant-sensitive and pollutant-tolerant plant material which can be grown on selected sites for observation. Gymnosperm and Angiosperm species as well as species of lichens and mosses have been used to establish field monitoring networks in Europe, Canada, and the United States. White pine, shade tobacco, mosses, and lichens have proven particularly useful as bioassay tools. Pollen from pollutant-sensitive and pollutant-tolerant plant cultivars has also been used as a sensitive laboratory bioassay tool for studying air quality. Epiphytic mosses are particularly efficient as monitors of particulate pollutants, especially heavy metals, some of which may act as chemical mutagens. The cost, complexity, and lack of reliability of instrumented systems for air quality monitoring make imperative the need to develop successful plant bioassay systems for monitoring air quality. PMID:738233

  11. Book Review: Bioassays with Arthropods: 2nd Edition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The technical book "Bioassays with Arthropods: 2nd Edition" (2007. Jacqueline L. Robertson, Robert M. Russell, Haiganoush K, Preisler and N. E. Nevin, Eds. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 224 pp.) was reviewed for the scientific readership of the peer-reviewed publication Journal of Economic Entomology. ...

  12. Microplate Bioassay for Determining Substrate Selectivity of "Candida rugosa" Lipase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shi-zhen; Fang, Bai-shan

    2012-01-01

    Substrate selectivity of "Candida rugosa" lipase was tested using "p"-nitrophenyl esters of increasing chain length (C[subscript 1], C[subscript 7], C[subscript 15]) using the high-throughput screening method. A fast and easy 96-well microplate bioassay was developed to help students learn and practice biotechnological specificity screen. The…

  13. 1. VIEW IN ROOM 125, BIOASSAY LABORATORY, SHOWN IS THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW IN ROOM 125, BIOASSAY LABORATORY, SHOWN IS THE FIRST STEP IN A SIX-STEP PROCESS TO ANALYZE URINE SAMPLES FOR PLUTONIUM AND URANIUM CONTAMINATION. IN THIS STEP, NITRIC ACID IS ADDED TO SAMPLE, AND THE SAMPLE IS BOILED DOWN TO A WHITE POWDER. - Rocky Flats Plant, Health Physics Laboratory, On Central Avenue between Third & Fourth Streets, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  14. Sensitive bioassay for detection of biologically active ricin in food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential use of ricin as an agent of biological warfare highlights the need to develop fast and effective methods to detect biologically active ricin. The current “gold standard” for ricin detection is an in vivo mouse bioassay; however, this method is not practical to test on a large number of...

  15. Assessment of acrylamide toxicity using a battery of standardised bioassays.

    PubMed

    Zovko, Mira; Vidaković-Cifrek, Željka; Cvetković, Želimira; Bošnir, Jasna; Šikić, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Acrylamide is a monomer widely used as an intermediate in the production of organic chemicals, e.g. polyacrylamides (PAMs). Since PAMs are low cost chemicals with applications in various industries and waste- and drinking water treatment, a certain amount of non-polymerised acrylamide is expected to end up in waterways. PAMs are non-toxic but acrylamide induces neurotoxic effects in humans and genotoxic, reproductive, and carcinogenic effects in laboratory animals. In order to evaluate the effect of acrylamide on freshwater organisms, bioassays were conducted on four species: algae Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, duckweed Lemna minor and water flea Daphnia magna according to ISO (International Organization for Standardisation) standardised methods. This approach ensures the evaluation of acrylamide toxicity on organisms with different levels of organisation and the comparability of results, and it examines the value of using a battery of low-cost standardised bioassays in the monitoring of pollution and contamination of aquatic ecosystems. These results showed that EC50 values were lower for Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata than for Daphnia magna and Lemna minor, which suggests an increased sensitivity of algae to acrylamide. According to the toxic unit approach, the values estimated by the Lemna minor and Daphnia magna bioassays, classify acrylamide as slightly toxic (TU=0-1; Class 1). The results obtained from algal bioassays (Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) revealed the toxic effect of acrylamide (TU=1-10; Class 2) on these organisms. PMID:26751864

  16. A coarse-grained spectral signature generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, K. P.; Austin, J. C.; Day, C. R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the method for object fingerprinting in the context of element specific x-ray imaging. In particular, the use of spectral descriptors that are illumination invariant and viewpoint independent for pattern identification was examined in some detail. To improve generating the relevant "signature", the spectral descriptor constructed is enhanced with a differentiator which has built-in noise filtration capability and good localisation properties, thus facilitating the extraction of element specific features at a coarse-grained level. In addition to the demonstrable efficacy in identifying significant image intensity transitions that are associated with the underlying physical process of interest, the method has the distinct advantage of being conceptually simple and computationally efficient. These latter properties allow the descriptor to be further utilised by an intelligent system capable of performing a fine-grained analysis of the extracted pattern signatures. The performance of the spectral descriptor has been studied in terms of the quality of the signature vectors that it generated, quantitatively based on the established framework of Spectral Information Measure (SIM). Early results suggested that such a multiscale approach of image sequence analysis offers a considerable potential for real-time applications.

  17. Coarse-grained models for biological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhe; Cui, Qiang; Yethiraj, Arun

    2011-03-01

    The large timescales and length-scales of interest in biophysics preclude atomistic study of many systems and processes. One appealing approach is to use coarse-grained (CG) models where several atoms are grouped into a single CG site. In this work we describe a new CG force field for lipids, surfactants, and amino acids. The topology of CG sites is the same as in the MARTINI force field, but the new model is compatible with a recently developed CG electrostatic water (Big Multiple Water, BMW) model. The model not only gives correct structural, elastic properties and phase behavior for lipid and surfactants, but also reproduces electrostatic properties at water-membrane interface that agree with experiment and atomistic simulations, including the potential of mean force for charged amino acid residuals at membrane. Consequently, the model predicts stable attachment of cationic peptides (i.e., poly-Arg) on lipid bilayer surface, which is not shown in previous models with non-electrostatic water.

  18. A comparative study on the varying exposure to atmospheric fine and coarse particles under urban and rural conditions.

    PubMed

    Wolf-Benning, Uta; Schultz, Eckart; Dietze, Volker; Kaminski, Uwe; Endlicher, Wilfried

    2012-11-01

    This paper is based on the results of three air quality studies conducted in Buenos Aires in Berlin, and in German spas between 2003 and 2007. A high comparability of results was ensured by using the same sampling techniques and analytical methods. Total particle sampling was achieved by active sampling of fine (PM2.5) and passive sampling of coarse particles > or = 2.5 microm and giant particles > or = 10 microm. The highly absorbing, black, predominantly carbonaceous particles (BC) of fine particle samples were determined by measuring the total light attenuation of filter samples and interpreting the extinction value as black carbon. The difference between the gravimetric total mass concentration of the PM2.5 samples and the BC is defined as the transparent, mostly mineral fine fraction. In coarse/giant particle samples the mean gray value was determined by means of automated light microscopy with subsequent single-particle analysis. "Opaque" particles were separated from the "transparent" particle fraction by applying a grey value threshold level. Microscopic measurement of individual particles was employed to establish the size distribution of the coarse and giant fraction. Due to different health effects, the separate detection of these components is suggested. Decline functions of particles are given, possibly providing useful information for a more detailed specification of the local particle distribution, and for a better estimate of the individual exposure. Atmospheric dispersal of particles was found effected mainly by source characteristics. An increased, spatially largely constant level of fine transparent particles in Berlin indicates a particle plume originating from photochemical processes. Buenos Aires, in contrast, is characterized by a lower background level of fine transparent particles but is considerably affected by fine black particles from diesel emissions and by a higher resuspension of coarse/giant transparent, mainly soil particles.

  19. Setting a protective PM standard: A view from the frontline

    SciTech Connect

    John Paul; Eddie Terrill

    2006-06-15

    Several aspects of the US EPA's recent proposal to revise the particulate matter (PM) standards deeply concern state and local air agencies and their representatives with the State and Territorial Air Pollution Program Administrators and the Association of Local Air Pollution Control Offices (STAPPA and ALAPCO). STAPPA and ALAPCO urge EPA to follow the recommendations of its appointed scientific experts and lower the annual average standard to 13 or 14 {mu}mg/m{sup 3} in addition to lowering the daily standard to 35 {mu}m/m{sup 3}. Unless EPA strengthens its proposal consistent with the recommendations of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC), STAPPA and ALAPCO are extremely concerned that we will continue to see significant increased premature mortality and adverse health effects throughout the country. For the reasons described in the article STAPPA and ALAPCO urge EPA to eliminate the exemptions for agriculture, mining and rural windblown dust. STAPPA and ALAPCO are troubled that EPA has ignored any commitment to funding the proposed coarse PM network scheduled for deployment in Fiscal Year (FY) 2008. EPA has estimated that the capital costs of this monitoring network could easily exceed US$ 14 million, with annual operating expenses of approximately US$ 13 million. State and local agencies will simply not be able to assume these significant costs. 33 refs.

  20. Genotoxicity of leachates from a landfill using three bioassays.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, G L; Rodriguez, D M

    1999-05-19

    In the city of Queretaro, around 500 tons of solid wastes are produced everyday and are deposited in a landfill. This is the result of social and economic activities of human beings or from their normal physiological functions. As a result of rain, leachates are produced, which, if not handled and treated correctly, may pollute the underground water. Among the bioassays developed for the detection of mutagenicity in environmental pollutants, plant systems have been proven to be sensitive, cheap, and effective. The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of genotoxic agents in the leachates of the landfill of the city using three bioassays: Tradescantia-micronucleus (Trad-MCN), Tradescantia stamen hair mutations (Trad-SHM) and Allium root anaphase aberrations (AL-RAA) and make a comparison of the results in the three assays. Leachates were sampled during both the dry and rainy seasons. Plant cuttings of Tradescantia or the roots of Allium were treated by submerging them in the leachates. Three replicates of each sample were analyzed in each of the three bioassays. As expected the samples of leachates collected during the dry season showed a higher genotoxicity than those collected during the rainy season. In conclusion, there are substances present in the leachates capable of inducing genotoxicity in the plant assays. On the other hand, the plant assays showed different degrees of sensitivity: the more sensitive was the Trad-MCN bioassay and the less sensitive the Trad-SHM assay. Therefore, when analyzing environmental pollutants it is recommended to use a battery of bioassays.

  1. Chemical and microbial components of urban air PM cause seasonal variation of toxicological activity.

    PubMed

    Jalava, Pasi I; Happo, Mikko S; Huttunen, Kati; Sillanpää, Markus; Hillamo, Risto; Salonen, Raimo O; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2015-09-01

    The chemical and microbial composition of urban air particulate matter (PM) displays seasonal variation that may affect its harmfulness on human health. We studied the in vitro inflammatory and cellular metabolic activity/cytotoxicity of urban air particulate samples collected in four size-ranges (PM10-2.5, PM2.5-1, PM1-0.2, PM0.2) during four seasons in relatively clean urban environment in Helsinki, Finland. The composition of the same samples were analyzed, including ions, elements, PAH compounds and endotoxins. In addition, microbial contribution on the detected responses was studied by inhibiting the endotoxin-induced responses with Polymyxin B both in the PM samples and by two different bacterial strains representing Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. Macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) was exposed to the size segregated particulate samples as well as to microbe samples for 24h and markers of inflammation and cytotoxicity were analyzed. The toxicological responses were dependent on the dose as well as size range of the particles, PM10-2.5 being the most potent and smaller size ranges having significantly smaller responses. Samples collected during spring and autumn had in most cases the highest inflammatory activity. Soil components and other non-exhaust particulate emissions from road traffic correlated with inflammatory responses in coarse particles. Instead, PAH-compounds and K(+) had negative associations with the particle-induced inflammatory responses in fine particles, suggesting the role of incomplete biomass combustion. Endotoxin content was the highest in PM10-2.5 samples and correspondingly, the largest decrease in the responses by Polymyxin B was seen with the very same samples. We found also that inhibitory effect of Polymyxin B was not completely specific for Gram-negative bacteria. Thus, in addition to endotoxin, also other microbial components may have a significant effect on the toxicological responses by ambient particulate matter.

  2. CARDIOVASCULAR MORTALITY IN PHOENIX: PM1 IS A BETTER INDICATOR THAN PM2.5.

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has obtained a 3-year database of particulate matter (PM) in Phoenix, AZ from 1995 - 1997 that includes elemental analysis by XRF of daily PM2.5. During this time period PM1 and PM2.5 TEOMs were run simultaneously for about 7 months during two periods of the year. Regressio...

  3. PREDICTING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO PM10 AND PM 2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved model for human exposure to particulate matter (PM), specifically PM10 and PM2.5 is under development by the U.S. EPA/NERL. This model will incorporate data from new PM exposure measurement and exposure factors research. It is intended to be used to predict exposure...

  4. Short-term exposure to fine and coarse particles and mortality: A multicity time-series study in East Asia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyewon; Honda, Yasushi; Hashizume, Masahiro; Guo, Yue Leon; Wu, Chang-Fu; Kan, Haidong; Jung, Kweon; Lim, Youn-Hee; Yi, Seungmuk; Kim, Ho

    2015-12-01

    Few studies on size-specific health effects of particulate matter have been conducted in Asia. We examined the association between both fine and coarse particles (PM2.5 and PM10-2.5) and mortality across 11 East Asian cities from 4 countries (Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and China). We performed a two-stage analysis: we generated city-specific estimates using a time-series analysis with a generalized additive model (Quasi-Poisson distribution), and estimated the overall effects by conducting a meta-analysis. Each 10-μg/m(3) increase in PM2.5 (lag01) was associated with an increase of 0.38% (95% confidence interval = 0.21%-0.55%) in all causes mortality, 0.96% (0.46%-1.46%) in cardiovascular mortality, and 1% (0.23%-1.78%) in respiratory mortality. Each 10-μg/m(3) increase in PM10-2.5 (lag01) was associated with cardiovascular mortality (0.69%, [0.05%-1.33%]), although this association attenuated after controlling for other pollutants, especially PM2.5. Increased mortality was associated with increasing PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 concentrations over 11 East Asian cities. PMID:26340298

  5. Characteristics and sources of formic, acetic and oxalic acids in PM 2.5 and PM 10 aerosols in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Zhuang, Guoshun; Chen, Shuang; An, Zhisheng; Zheng, Aihua

    2007-04-01

    Chemistry of formic, acetic and oxalic acids was studied at four sites representing the urban and rural conditions in Beijing from March 2002 to October 2003. The investigation was based on the PM 2.5 and PM 10 aerosols collected with virtual samplers. The total concentrations of these carboxylic acids averaged at 541 ng m - 3 in PM 2.5 and 615 ng m - 3 in PM 10, contributing 0.4% and 0.3% to the total mass of the aerosol, respectively. Oxalic acid was the most abundant carboxylic acids in aerosols. Formic and acetic acids displayed different seasonal variations (formic: spring < summer < autumn < winter; acetic: spring > summer > autumn > winter), and the variations of these acids were consistent among different sites in urban area. Formic and oxalic acids had a diurnal variation of nighttime < daytime. Formic and acetic acids had mass both in the fine and in the coarse modes, while oxalic acid predominated in the fine mode. The coarse mode fraction of these acids was elevated in summer. The traffic/dust/soil/vegetation emissions, coal/waste/biomass burnings, cooking and secondary formation from anthropogenic or natural gas-phase precursors could be the major sources of these acids. Acetic-to-formic acid ratio (A/F) was used to distinguish the primary sources and the secondary sources, and it indicated that the contribution of the primary sources was higher at rural site than at urban sites. A new method was developed to study the contribution of the biomass burning to these acids, which was estimated to be 30-60% for formic and oxalic acids in aerosols.

  6. Molecular Approaches to Understand Nutritional Potential of Coarse Cereals.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Singh, Rakesh; Subramani, Rajkumar; Kumar, Rajesh; Wankhede, Dhammaprakash P

    2016-06-01

    Coarse grains are important group of crops that constitutes staple food for large population residing primarily in the arid and semi-arid regions of the world. Coarse grains are designated as nutri-cereals as they are rich in essential amino acids, minerals and vitamins. In spite of having several nutritional virtues in coarse grain as mentioned above, there is still scope for improvement in quality parameters such as cooking qualities, modulation of nutritional constituents and reduction or elimination of anti-nutritional factors. Besides its use in traditional cooking, coarse grains have been used mainly in the weaning food preparation and other malted food production. Improvement in quality parameters will certainly increase consumer's preference for coarse grains and increase their demand. The overall genetic gain in quality traits of economic importance in the cultivated varieties will enhance their industrial value and simultaneously increase income of farmers growing these varieties. The urgent step for improvement of quality traits in coarse grains requires a detailed understanding of molecular mechanisms responsible for varied level of different nutritional contents in different genotypes of these crops. In this review we have discussed the progresses made in understanding of coarse grain biology with various omics tool coupled with modern breeding approaches and the current status with regard to our effort towards dissecting traits related to improvement of quality and nutritional constituents of grains. PMID:27252585

  7. Non-Galerkin Coarse Grids for Algebraic Multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Falgout, Robert D.; Schroder, Jacob B.

    2014-06-26

    Algebraic multigrid (AMG) is a popular and effective solver for systems of linear equations that arise from discretized partial differential equations. And while AMG has been effectively implemented on large scale parallel machines, challenges remain, especially when moving to exascale. Particularly, stencil sizes (the number of nonzeros in a row) tend to increase further down in the coarse grid hierarchy, and this growth leads to more communication. Therefore, as problem size increases and the number of levels in the hierarchy grows, the overall efficiency of the parallel AMG method decreases, sometimes dramatically. This growth in stencil size is due to the standard Galerkin coarse grid operator, $P^T A P$, where $P$ is the prolongation (i.e., interpolation) operator. For example, the coarse grid stencil size for a simple three-dimensional (3D) seven-point finite differencing approximation to diffusion can increase into the thousands on present day machines, causing an associated increase in communication costs. We therefore consider algebraically truncating coarse grid stencils to obtain a non-Galerkin coarse grid. First, the sparsity pattern of the non-Galerkin coarse grid is determined by employing a heuristic minimal “safe” pattern together with strength-of-connection ideas. Second, the nonzero entries are determined by collapsing the stencils in the Galerkin operator using traditional AMG techniques. The result is a reduction in coarse grid stencil size, overall operator complexity, and parallel AMG solve phase times.

  8. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations in underground and ground-level rail systems of the Los Angeles Metro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, Winnie; Cheung, Kalam; Daher, Nancy; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2011-03-01

    Elevated concentrations of particulate matter (PM) have been found in a number of worldwide underground transit systems, with major implications regarding exposure of commuters to PM and its associated health effects. An extensive sampling campaign was conducted in May-August 2010 to measure PM concentrations in two lines of the Los Angeles Metro system - an underground subway line (Metro red line) and a ground-level light-rail line (Metro gold line). The campaign goals were to: 1) determine personal PM exposure of commuters of both lines, and 2) measure and compare PM concentrations at station platforms and inside the train. Considering that a commuter typically spent 75% of time inside the train and 25% of time waiting at a station, subway commuters were exposed on average to PM 10 and PM 2.5 concentrations that were 1.9 and 1.8 times greater than the light-rail commuters. The average PM 10 concentrations for the subway line at station platforms and inside the train were 78.0 μg m -3 and 31.5 μg m -3, respectively; for the light-rail line, corresponding PM 10 concentrations were 38.2 μg m -3 and 16.2 μg m -3. Regression analysis demonstrated that personal exposure concentrations for the light-rail line are strongly associated with ambient PM levels ( R2 = 0.61), while PM concentrations for the subway line are less influenced by ambient conditions ( R2 = 0.38) and have a relatively stable background level of about 21 μg m -3. Our findings suggest that local emissions (i.e., vehicular traffic, road dust) are the main source of airborne PM for the light-rail line. The subway line, on the other hand, has an additional source of PM, most likely generated from the daily operation of trains. Strong inter-correlation of PM 10 between the train and station microenvironments shows that airborne PM at stations are the main source of PM inside the trains for both lines ( R2 = 0.91 and 0.81 for subway and light-rail line, respectively). In addition, PM 2.5 and coarse PM

  9. A magnetic nanobead-based bioassay provides sensitive detection of single- and biplex bacterial DNA using a portable AC susceptometer

    PubMed Central

    Strömberg, Mattias; Zardán Gómez de la Torre, Teresa; Nilsson, Mats; Svedlindh, Peter; Strømme, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Bioassays relying on magnetic read-out using probe-tagged magnetic nanobeads are potential platforms for low-cost biodiagnostic devices for pathogen detection. For optimal assay performance it is crucial to apply an easy, efficient and robust bead-probe conjugation protocol. In this paper, sensitive (1.5 pM) singleplex detection of bacterial DNA sequences is demonstrated in a portable AC susceptometer by a magnetic nanobead-based bioassay principle; the volume-amplified magnetic nanobead detection assay (VAM-NDA). Two bead sizes, 100 and 250 nm, are investigated along with a highly efficient, rapid, robust, and stable conjugation chemistry relying on the avidin–biotin interaction for bead-probe attachment. Avidin-biotin conjugation gives easy control of the number of detection probes per bead; thus allowing for systematic investigation of the impact of varying the detection probe surface coverage upon bead immobilization in rolling circle amplified DNA-coils. The existence of an optimal surface coverage is discussed. Biplex VAM-NDA detection is for the first time demonstrated in the susceptometer: Semi-quantitative results are obtained and it is concluded that the concentration of DNA-coils in the incubation volume is of crucial importance for target quantification. The present findings bring the development of commercial biodiagnostic devices relying on the VAM–NDA further towards implementation in point-of-care and outpatient settings. PMID:24174315

  10. Adaptive coarse graining, environment, strong decoherence, and quasiclassical realms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gell-Mann, Murray; Hartle, James B.

    2014-05-01

    Three ideas are introduced that when brought together characterize the realistic quasiclassical realms of our quantum universe as particular kinds of sets of alternative coarse-grained histories defined by quasiclassical variables: (i) branch-dependent adaptive coarse grainings that can be close to maximally refined and can simplify calculation, (ii) narrative coarse grainings that describe how features of the universe change over time and allow the construction of an environment, and (iii) a notion of strong decoherence that characterizes realistic mechanisms of decoherence.

  11. Coarse-grained Simulations of Viral Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrad, Oren M.

    2011-12-01

    The formation of viral capsids is a marvel of natural engineering and design. A large number (from 60 to thousands) of protein subunits assemble into complete, reproducible structures under a variety of conditions while avoiding kinetic and thermodynamic traps. Small single-stranded RNA viruses not only assemble their coat proteins in this fashion but also package their genome during the self-assembly process. Recent experiments have shown that the coat proteins are competent to assemble not merely around their own genomes but heterologous RNA, synthetic polyanions and even functionalized gold nanoparticles. Remarkably these viruses can even assemble around cargo not commensurate with their native state by adopting different morphologies. Understanding the properties that confer such exquisite precision and flexibility to the assembly process could aid biomedical research in the search for novel antiviral remedies, drug-delivery vehicles and contrast agents used in bioimaging. At the same time, viral assembly provides an excellent model system for the development of a statistical mechanical understanding of biological self-assembly, in the hopes of that we will identify some universal principles that underly such processes. This work consists of computational studies using coarse-grained representations of viral coat proteins and their cargoes. We find the relative strength of protein-cargo and protein-protein interactions has a profound effect on the assembly pathway, in some cases leading to assembly mechanisms that are markedly different from those found in previous work on the assembly of empty capsids. In the case of polymeric cargo, we find the first evidence for a previously theorized mechanism in which the polymer actively participates in recruiting free subunits to the assembly process through cooperative polymer-protein motions. We find that successful assembly is non-monotonic in protein-cargo affinity, such affinity can be detrimental to assembly if it

  12. PERFORMANCE AUDITING OF A HUMAN AIR POLLUTION EXPOSURE SYSTEM FOR COARSE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5-10)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Databases derived from human health effects research play a vital role in setting environmental standards. An underlying assumption in using these databases for standard setting purposes is that they are of adequate quality. The performance auditing program described in this ma...

  13. A wintertime study of PAHs in fine and coarse aerosols in São Paulo city, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourotte, Christine; Forti, Maria-Cristina; Taniguchi, Satie; Bícego, Marcia Caruso; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade

    The Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons PAHs (naphthalene, acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene and benzo(ghi)perylene) concentrations in fine (PM 2.5) and coarse (PM 2.5-10) atmospheric particulate matter were measured at São Paulo city, Brazil. The dominant PAH compounds were indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, benzo(ghi)perylene and benzo(b)fluoranthene for both the fractions. The calculated ratios of some specific PAHs were in close agreement with those attributed to direct emissions of car exhaust. The factor analysis for PM 2.5 produced four factors: Factor 1 was attributed to diesel emissions, Factor 2 was attributed to stationary combustion source, Factor 3 was attributed to vehicular emissions and Factor 4 to natural gas combustion and biomass burning. For PM 2.5-10, Factor 1 was attributed to vehicular emissions and Factor 2 was attributed to a mixture of combustion sources such as natural gas combustion, incineration emissions and oil combustion. Also, vehicular emissions were assumed to be the major source of PAHs in the São Paulo city atmosphere.

  14. A New Bioassay for Auxins and Cytokinins 1

    PubMed Central

    Boerjan, Wout; Genetello, Chris; Van Montagu, Marc; Inzé, Dirk

    1992-01-01

    The authors have developed a sensitive bioassay that can be used to detect auxins as well as cytokinins. The bioassay is based on the expression in transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mesophyll protoplasts of a chimeric gene, consisting of the upstream sequences of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens gene 5, coupled to the coding sequence of the β-glucuronidase. The expression of this gene is induced by the presence of both auxin and cytokinin in the culture medium. Using this assay, indole-3-acetic acid was detected at 5 × 10−8 molar, whereas trans-zeatin could be detected at 5 × 10−11 molar. The assay can be performed in microtiter plates, allowing numerous samples to be analyzed simultaneously. Only 2.5 × 105 protoplasts are required for one individual assay in 250 microliters of culture medium and for qualitative results, the reaction is readily visualized by ultraviolet light. ImagesFigure 3Figure 4Figure 6 PMID:16668975

  15. Lessons learned from interlaboratory comparisons of bioassay data interpretation.

    PubMed

    Doerfel, H; Andrasi, A; Bailey, M; Berkovski, V; Castellani, C M; Hurtgen, C; Jourdain, J R; LeGuen, B

    2003-01-01

    When a set of bioassay data is given to two different dosimetrists, it is likely that these data will be interpreted differently, that different methods and dosimetric models will be applied and therefore different numerical values will be obtained. Thus, it is important for laboratories dealing with internal dosimetry to undergo performance testing procedures such as interlaboratory comparisons of bioassay data interpretation. Several intercomparison exercises have already been organised at national and international levels. The largest one so far was the 3rd European Intercomparison Exercise on Internal Dose Assessment, which has been organised in the framework of the EULEP/EURADOS Action Group, 'Derivation of parameter values for application to the new model of the human respiratory tract for occupational exposure'. The most important lesson learned from these intercomparison exercises was the need to develop agreed guidelines for internal dose evaluation procedures to promote harmonisation of assessments between organisations and countries.

  16. Indicators reflecting local and transboundary sources of PM2.5 and PMCOARSE in Rome - Impacts in air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, Konstantinos; Kassomenos, Pavlos

    2014-10-01

    The keystone of this paper was to calculate and interpret indicators reflecting sources and air quality impacts of PM2.5 and PMCOARSE (PM10-PM2.5) in Rome (Italy), focusing on potential exogenous influences. A backward atmospheric trajectory cluster analysis was implemented. The likelihood of daily PM10 exceedances was studied in conjunction with atmospheric patterns, whereas a Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) based on air mass residence time was deployed on a grid of a 0.5° × 0.5° resolution. Higher PM2.5 concentrations were associated with short/medium range airflows originated from Balkan Peninsula, whereas potential PMCOARSE sources were localized across the Mediterranean and coastal North Africa, due to dust and sea spray transportation. According to the outcome of a daily Pollution Index (PI), a slightly increased degradation of air quality is induced due to the additional quantity of exogenous PM but nevertheless, average levels of PI in all trajectory clusters belong in the low pollution category. Gaseous and particulate pollutants were also elaborated by a Principal Component Analysis (PCA), which produced 4 components: [Traffic], [photochemical], [residential] and [Secondary Coarse Aerosol], reflecting local sources of air pollution. PM2.5 levels were strongly associated with traffic, whereas PMCOARSE were produced autonomously by secondary sources.

  17. Differences in Fine- Coarse Aerosol Ratios in Convective and Non-Convective Dust Events in a Desert City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, T. E.; Rivera Rivera, N. I.; Novlan, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    El Paso, Texas (USA) and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua (Mexico) form the Paso del Norte, the largest metropolitan area in North America's Chihuahuan Desert. The cities are subject to frequent dust storms presenting a hazard to local infrastructure and health, including synoptic-scale dust events during winter and spring, and dusty outflows from convective storms (haboobs) primarily during the summer. We evaluate particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10) concentrations over a decade of convective and non-convective dust events, based on hourly aerosol data collected by Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) continuous air monitors in El Paso cross-referenced to weather observations from the USA National Weather Service. A total of 219 dust events (95 convective and 124 non-convective) events occurred between 2001 and 2010. The PM2.5/PM10 ratio was significantly higher (proportionally greater concentration of fine aerosols) in convective episodes and during summertime events than during non-convective dust events and dust episodes in other seasons, although overall concentrations of both PM2.5 and PM10 were higher in the non-convective events, which were also longer-lasting. These differences in fine/coarse aerosol ratios are likely related to different atmospheric stability conditions, and/or different mechanisms of dust particle entrainment and transport in haboobs versus non-convective dust events. Since visibility degradation and adverse human health effects are known to be exacerbated by to fine aerosol concentrations, thunderstorm-related dust events may present a proportionally greater hazard.

  18. Coarse-grained dynamics of alignment in animal group models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Sung Joon; Levin, Simon; Kevrekidis, Yannis

    2006-03-01

    Coordinated motion in animal groups, such as bird flocks and fish schools, and their models gives rise to remarkable coherent structures. Using equation-free computational tools we explore the coarse-grained dynamics of a model for the orientational movement decision in animal groups, consisting of a small number of informed "leaders" and a large number of uninformed, nonidentical ``followers.'' The direction in which each group member is headed is characterized by a phase angle of a limit-cycle oscillator, whose dynamics are nonlinearly coupled with those of all the other group members. We identify a small number of proper coarse-grained variables (using uncertainty quantification methods) that describe the collective dynamics, and perform coarse projective integration and equation-free bifurcation analysis of the coarse-grained model behavior in these variables.

  19. Spectral coarse graining for random walks in bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Zeng, An; Di, Zengru; Fan, Ying

    2013-03-01

    Many real-world networks display a natural bipartite structure, yet analyzing and visualizing large bipartite networks is one of the open challenges in complex network research. A practical approach to this problem would be to reduce the complexity of the bipartite system while at the same time preserve its functionality. However, we find that existing coarse graining methods for monopartite networks usually fail for bipartite networks. In this paper, we use spectral analysis to design a coarse graining scheme specific for bipartite networks, which keeps their random walk properties unchanged. Numerical analysis on both artificial and real-world networks indicates that our coarse graining can better preserve most of the relevant spectral properties of the network. We validate our coarse graining method by directly comparing the mean first passage time of the walker in the original network and the reduced one.

  20. Two-level method with coarse space size independent convergence

    SciTech Connect

    Vanek, P.; Brezina, M.; Tezaur, R.; Krizkova, J.

    1996-12-31

    The basic disadvantage of the standard two-level method is the strong dependence of its convergence rate on the size of the coarse-level problem. In order to obtain the optimal convergence result, one is limited to using a coarse space which is only a few times smaller than the size of the fine-level one. Consequently, the asymptotic cost of the resulting method is the same as in the case of using a coarse-level solver for the original problem. Today`s two-level domain decomposition methods typically offer an improvement by yielding a rate of convergence which depends on the ratio of fine and coarse level only polylogarithmically. However, these methods require the use of local subdomain solvers for which straightforward application of iterative methods is problematic, while the usual application of direct solvers is expensive. We suggest a method diminishing significantly these difficulties.

  1. Modeling development of inhibition zones in an agar diffusion bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekar, Vaishnavi; Knabel, Stephen J; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C

    2015-01-01

    A two-temperature agar diffusion bioassay is commonly used to quantify the concentration of nisin using Micrococcus luteus as the indicator microorganism. A finite element computational model based on Fick's second law of diffusion was used to predict the radius of the inhibition zone in this diffusion bioassay. The model developed was used to calculate nisin concentration profiles as a function of time and position within the agar. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nisin against M. luteus was determined experimentally. The critical time (Tc) for growth of M. luteus within the agar diffusion bioassay was experimentally determined using incubation studies with nisin. The radius of the inhibition zone was predicted from the computational model as the location where the predicted nisin concentration at Tc was equal to MIC. The MIC was experimentally determined to be 0.156 μg mL−1, and Tc was determined to be 7 h. Good agreement (R2 = 0.984) was obtained between model-predicted and experimentally determined inhibition zone radii. PMID:26405525

  2. Liquid versus solid phase bioassays for dredged material toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Casado-Martínez, M C; Fernández, N; Forja, J M; DelValls, T A

    2007-05-01

    Since 1994 the results of the analyses of key chemical compounds (trace metals, polychlorinated biphenyls and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and the comparison with the corresponding sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) are used in decision-making for dredged material management in Spain. Nonetheless in the last decades a tiered testing approach is promoted for assessing the physical and chemical characteristics of dredged sediments and their potential biological effects in the environment. Bioassays have been used for sediment toxicity assessment in Spain but few or no experiences are reported on harbour sediments. We studied the incidence of toxicity in the 7 d bioassay using rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis) and the 48 h bioassay using sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) embryos over a series of experiments employing 22 different elutriates. The relative performance of this exposure phase was not comparable to data on the 10-d acute toxicity test using the burrowing amphipod Corophium volutator and the polychaete Arenicola marina, carried out on the whole sediments. These results evidence the importance of the exposure route and the test selected in decision-making, as the toxicity registered for the undiluted elutriates was largely due to the different solubility of sediment-bound contaminants. This work and other studies indicate that for many sediments, a complete battery of test is recommended together with physico-chemical analyses to decide whether dredged sediments are suitable for open water disposal or not. PMID:17174396

  3. Improved bioassay for detecting autoinducer of Rhodovulum sulfidophilum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Umekage, S.

    2015-02-01

    Quorum sensing is a bacterial gene regulation system that enables prompt environmental adaptation in response to cell density. Quorum sensing is driven by an extracellularly secreted chemical signal called autoinducer. Gram-negative bacteria produce one or several types of N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as autoinducers. Our previous study suggests that the gram-negative marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum produces AHL in the early stationary phase and plays a role in maintaining the bacterial cell aggregates called "floc". We performed conventional bioassay to identify AHL production by using Chromobacterium violaceum VIR07, which produces violet pigment (violacein) in response to AHL with side chains ranging from C10 to C18 in length. However, we were not able to observe the violacein with good reproducibility, suggesting that inhibitory chemical compounds co-existed in the AHL extract. Therefore, we improved the extraction method; the ethyl acetate-extracted AHLs were fractionated by using reverse phase TLC. By using the re-extracted AHLs for the bioassay, we observed an obvious production of violacein. This result clearly indicates that R. sulfidophilum produces AHLs with side chains ranging from C10 to C18 in length and suggests the utility of improved bioassay for AHL detection.

  4. Comparative sensitivity of 20 bioassays for soil quality.

    PubMed

    Bierkens, J; Klein, G; Corbisier, P; Van Den Heuvel, R; Verschaeve, L; Weltens, R; Schoeters, G

    1998-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the use of a single bioassay will never provide a full picture of the quality of the environment. Only a test battery, composed of bioassays of different animal and plant species from different trophic levels will reduce uncertainty, allowing an accurate assessment of the quality of the environment. In the present study, a test battery composed of 20 bioassays of varying biological endpoints has been compared. Apart from lethality and reproductive failure in earthworms, springtails, nematoda, algae and vascular plants, these endpoints also included bioavailibility of metals (bacteria), heat-shock induction (nematodes, algae), DNA damage (bacteria, earthworm, vascular plants), beta-galactosidase (Daphnia) and esterase activity (algae) and a range of immunological parameters (earthworm). Four chemicals (cadmium, phenol, pentachlorophenol and trifluralin)--each representing a different toxic mode of action--were applied in a dilution series (from 1 mg/kg up to 1000 mg/kg) onto OECD standard soil. The tests have been performed both on these artificially contaminated soil samples and on aqueous extracts subsequently obtained from these soils. The results show that the immunological parameters and the loss of weight in the earthworms were among the most sensitive solid-phase assays. Esterase inhibition and heat-shock induction in algae were shown to be extremely sensitive when applied to soil extracts. As previously shown at the species level, no single biological endpoint was shown to be the most sensitive for all four modes of toxic action. PMID:9839407

  5. Paper bioassay based on ceria nanoparticles as colorimetric probes.

    PubMed

    Ornatska, Maryna; Sharpe, Erica; Andreescu, Daniel; Andreescu, Silvana

    2011-06-01

    We report the first use of redox nanoparticles of cerium oxide as colorimetric probes in bioanalysis. The method is based on changes in the physicochemical properties of ceria nanoparticles, used here as chromogenic indicators, in response to the analyte. We show that these particles can be fully integrated in a paper-based bioassay. To construct the sensor, ceria nanoparticles and glucose oxidase were coimmobilized onto filter paper using a silanization procedure. In the presence of glucose, the enzymatically generated hydrogen peroxide induces a visual color change of the ceria nanoparticles immobilized onto the bioactive sensing paper, from white-yellowish to dark orange, in a concentration-dependent manner. A detection limit of 0.5 mM glucose with a linear range up to 100 mM and a reproducibility of 4.3% for n = 11 ceria paper strips were obtained. The assay is fully reversible and can be reused for at least 10 consecutive measurement cycles, without significant loss of activity. Another unique feature is that it does not require external reagents, as all the sensing components are fixed onto the paper platform. The bioassay can be stored for at least 79 days at room temperature while maintaining the same analytical performance. An example of analytical application was demonstrated for the detection of glucose in human serum. The results demonstrate the potential of this type of nanoparticles as novel components in the development of robust colorimetric bioassays. PMID:21524141

  6. Modeling development of inhibition zones in an agar diffusion bioassay.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Vaishnavi; Knabel, Stephen J; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C

    2015-09-01

    A two-temperature agar diffusion bioassay is commonly used to quantify the concentration of nisin using Micrococcus luteus as the indicator microorganism. A finite element computational model based on Fick's second law of diffusion was used to predict the radius of the inhibition zone in this diffusion bioassay. The model developed was used to calculate nisin concentration profiles as a function of time and position within the agar. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nisin against M. luteus was determined experimentally. The critical time (T c) for growth of M. luteus within the agar diffusion bioassay was experimentally determined using incubation studies with nisin. The radius of the inhibition zone was predicted from the computational model as the location where the predicted nisin concentration at T c was equal to MIC. The MIC was experimentally determined to be 0.156 μg mL(-1), and T c was determined to be 7 h. Good agreement (R (2) = 0.984) was obtained between model-predicted and experimentally determined inhibition zone radii.

  7. Novel bioassay using Bacillus megaterium to detect tetracycline in milk.

    PubMed

    Tumini, Melisa; Nagel, Orlando G; Molina, Pilar; Althaus, Rafael L

    2016-01-01

    Tetracyclines are used for the prevention and control of dairy cattle diseases. Residues of these drugs can be excreted into milk. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop a microbiological method using Bacillus megaterium to detect tetracyclines (chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline and tetracycline) in milk. In order to approximate the limits of detection of the bioassay to the Maximum Residue Limit (100μg/l) for milk tetracycline, different concentrations of chloramphenicol (0, 1000, 1500 and 2000μg/l) were tested. The detection limits calculated were similar to the Maximum Residue Limits when a bioassay using B. megaterium ATCC 9885 spores (2.8×10(8)spores/ml) and chloramphenicol (2000μg/l) was utilized. This bioassay detects 105μg/l of chlortetracycline, 100μg/l of oxytetracycline and 134μg/l of tetracycline in 5h. Therefore, this method is suitable to be incorporated into a microbiological multi-residue system for the identification of tetracyclines in milk.

  8. Energy-conserving coarse-graining of complex molecules.

    PubMed

    Español, Pep; Serrano, Mar; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Zúñiga, Ignacio

    2016-05-25

    Coarse-graining (CG) of complex molecules is a method to reach time scales that would be impossible to access through brute force molecular simulations. In this paper, we formulate a coarse-grained model for complex molecules using first principles caculations that ensures energy conservation. Each molecule is described in a coarse way by a thermal blob characterized by the position and momentum of the center of mass of the molecule, together with its internal energy as an additional degree of freedom. This level of description gives rise to an entropy-based framework instead of the usual one based on the configurational free energy (i.e. potential of mean force). The resulting dynamic equations, which account for an appropriate description of heat transfer at the coarse-grained level, have the structure of the dissipative particle dynamics with energy conservation (DPDE) model but with a clear microscopic underpinning. Under suitable approximations, we provide explicit microscopic expressions for each component (entropy, mean force, friction and conductivity coefficients) appearing in the coarse-grained model. These quantities can be computed directly using MD simulations. The proposed non-isothermal coarse-grained model is thermodynamically consistent and opens up a first principles CG strategy for the study of energy transport issues that are not accessible using current isothermal models. PMID:27127809

  9. Interlaced coarse-graining for the dynamical cluster approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haehner, Urs; Staar, Peter; Jiang, Mi; Maier, Thomas; Schulthess, Thomas

    The negative sign problem remains a challenging limiting factor in quantum Monte Carlo simulations of strongly correlated fermionic many-body systems. The dynamical cluster approximation (DCA) makes this problem less severe by coarse-graining the momentum space to map the bulk lattice to a cluster embedded in a dynamical mean-field host. Here, we introduce a new form of an interlaced coarse-graining and compare it with the traditional coarse-graining. We show that it leads to more controlled results with weaker cluster shape and smoother cluster size dependence, which with increasing cluster size converge to the results obtained using the standard coarse-graining. In addition, the new coarse-graining reduces the severity of the fermionic sign problem. Therefore, it enables calculations on much larger clusters and can allow the evaluation of the exact infinite cluster size result via finite size scaling. To demonstrate this, we study the hole-doped two-dimensional Hubbard model and show that the interlaced coarse-graining in combination with the DCA+ algorithm permits the determination of the superconducting Tc on cluster sizes, for which the results can be fitted with the Kosterlitz-Thouless scaling law. This research used resources of the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) awarded by the INCITE program, and of the Swiss National Supercomputing Center. OLCF is a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  10. Toxicity of copper-spiked sediments to Tubifex tubifex (Oligochaeta, Tubificidae): Comparison of the 28-day reproductive bioassay with an early-life-stage bioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchi, M.; Pasteris, A.; Bonomi, G. . Dipt. di Biologia Evoluzionistica Sperimentale); Reynoldson, T.B. . National Water Research Inst.)

    1999-06-01

    Two sediment bioassay methods using Tubifex tubifex (Mueller, 1774) as the test species were compared. The first was an adult reproduction test, the second an early-life-stage survival test. The duration of both bioassays is 28 d and the amount of work required was similar; they may be useful alternatives to each other in different circumstances (e.g., the early life stage bioassay could be carried out with smaller volumes of sediment). The two bioassays were performed simultaneously on copper-spiked sediments. Sediments from two freshwater and two terrestrial sites were used; five separate, nonsimultaneous experiments were performed, one for each sediment or soil and a further experiment with soil with a good supplement. In the adult bioassay, there were large differences in the production of cocoons, eggs, and young among the control treatments of the five experiments. There were also major differences in the NOEC and LOEC for copper between the tested substrates. The early life stage bioassay appears to be less sensitive to copper toxicity than the adult reproductive bioassay since NOECs and LOECs are higher for early survival than for the most sensitive endpoints of the adult bioassay in three experiments out of five.

  11. Chemical speciation of PM2.5 and PM10 in south Phoenix, AZ, USA.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Nabin; Clements, Andrea; Fraser, Matthew; Herckes, Pierre

    2011-03-01

    Phoenix, AZ, experiences high particulate matter (PM) episodes, especially in the wintertime. The spatial variation of the PM concentrations and resulting differences in exposure is of particular concern. In this study, PM2.s (PM with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 microm) and PM10 (PM with aerodynamic diameter <10 microm) samples were collected simultaneously from the east and west sides of South Phoenix and at a control site in Tempe and analyzed for trace elements and bulk elemental and organic carbon. Measurements showed that although PM2.5 concentrations had similar trends in temporal scale across all sites, concentrations of PM10 did not. The difference in PM10 concentrations and fluctuation across the three sites suggest effects of a local soil source as evidenced by high concentrations of Al, Ca, and Fe in PM10. K and anthropogenic elements (e.g., Cu, Pb, and Zn) in PM2.5 samples on January 1 were strikingly high, suggesting the influence of New Year's fireworks. Concentrations of toxic elements (e.g., Pb) in the study presented here are not different from similar studies in other U.S. cities. Application of principal component analysis indicated two broad categories of emission sources--soil and combustion--together accounting for 80 and 90% of variance, respectively, in PM2.5 and PM10. The soil and combustion components explained approximately 60 and 30% of the variance in PM10, respectively, whereas combustion sources dominated PM2.5 (>50% variance). Many elements associated with anthropogenic sources were highly enriched, with enrichment factors in PM2.5 an order of magnitude higher than in PM10 relative to surface soil composition in the study area.

  12. Systematic Coarse-graining of Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Gregory

    2015-03-01

    Coarse-grained (CG) models can provide a computationally efficient means to study biomolecular and other soft matter processes involving large numbers of atoms that are correlated over distance scales of many covalent bond lengths and at long time scales. Systematic variational coarse-graining methods based on information from molecular dynamics simulations of finer-grained (e.g., all-atom) models provide attractive tools for the systematic development of CG models. Examples include the multiscale coarse-graining (MS-CG) and relative entropy minimization methods, and results from the former theory will be presented in this talk. In addition, a new approach will be presented that is appropriate for the ``ultra coarse-grained'' (UCG) regime, e.g., at a coarse-grained resolution that is much coarser than one amino acid residue per CG particle in a protein. At this level of coarse-graining, one is faced with the possible existence of multiple metastable states ``within'' the CG sites for a given UCG model configuration. I will therefore describe newer systematic variational UCG methods specifically designed to CG entire protein domains and subdomains into single effective CG particles. This is accomplished by augmenting existing effective particle CG schemes to allow for discrete state transitions and configuration-dependent resolution. Additionally, certain aspects of this work connect back to single-state force matching and open up new avenues for method development. This general body of theory and algorithm provides a formal statistical mechanical basis for the coarse-graining of fine-grained molecular dynamics simulation data at various levels of CG resolution. Representative applications will be described as time allows.

  13. The PM-200 lubrication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma sprayed composite coating of metal-bonded chromium carbide with additions of silver and thermochemically stable fluorides were previously reported to be lubricative in pin on desk bench tests from room temperature to 900 C. An early coating formulation of this type, designated as PS-200, was successfully tested as a cylinder coating in a Stirling engine at a TRRT of 760 C in a hydrogen atmosphere, and as a backup lubricant for gas bearings to 650 C. A subsequent optimization program has shown that tribological properties are further improved by increasing the solid lubricant content. The improved coating is designated as PS-212. The same powder formulation was used to make free-standing powder metallurgy (PM-212) parts by sintering or hot isostatic pressing. The process is very attractive for making parts that cannot be readily plasma sprayed such as bushings and cylinders that have small bore diameters and/or high length to diameter ratios. The properties of coatings and free-standing parts fabricated from these powders are reviewed.

  14. Genotoxicity biomarkers for airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) in an area under petrochemical influence.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Andréia Torres; Lemos, Clarice Torres de; Flores, Andressa Negreiros; Pantoja, Eduarda Ozório; Rocha, Jocelita Aparecida Vaz; Vargas, Vera Maria Ferrão

    2016-09-01

    The effects of fine inhalable particles (PM2.5) were evaluated in an area under the influence of a petrochemical industry, investigating the sensitivity of different genotoxicity biomarkers. Organic extracts were obtained from PM2.5 samples at two sites, positioned in the first and second preferential wind direction in the area. The extracts were evaluated with Salmonella/microsome assay, microsuspension method, strains TA98, YG1021 and YG1024. The mammalian metabolization fraction (S9) was used to evaluate metabolite mutagenicity. The Comet Assay (CA) and Micronuclei Test were used in a Chinese hamster lung cell line (V79). All extracts showed mutagenicity in Salmonella, and nitrogenated compounds were strongly present. Genotoxicity were found in CA in almost all extracts and the micronuclei induction at the Site in the first (Autumn 1, Winter 1), and in the second (Spring 2) wind direction. V79 showed cytotoxicity in all samples. The three biomarkers were concordant in characterization Site NO with worse quality, compatible with the greater pollutants dispersion in the first wind direction. All PM2.5 concentrations were lower than those recommended by air quality standards but genotoxic effects were detected in all samples, corroborating that these standards are inadequate as quality indicators. The Salmonella/microsome assay proved sensitive to PM2.5 mutagenicity, with an outstanding influence of nitroarenes and aromatic amines. Analyses using CA and the micronucleus test broadened the levels of response that involve different damage induction mechanisms. Results show that the complex PM2.5 composition can provoke various genotoxic effects and the use of different bioassays is essential to understand its effects.

  15. Genotoxicity biomarkers for airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) in an area under petrochemical influence.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Andréia Torres; Lemos, Clarice Torres de; Flores, Andressa Negreiros; Pantoja, Eduarda Ozório; Rocha, Jocelita Aparecida Vaz; Vargas, Vera Maria Ferrão

    2016-09-01

    The effects of fine inhalable particles (PM2.5) were evaluated in an area under the influence of a petrochemical industry, investigating the sensitivity of different genotoxicity biomarkers. Organic extracts were obtained from PM2.5 samples at two sites, positioned in the first and second preferential wind direction in the area. The extracts were evaluated with Salmonella/microsome assay, microsuspension method, strains TA98, YG1021 and YG1024. The mammalian metabolization fraction (S9) was used to evaluate metabolite mutagenicity. The Comet Assay (CA) and Micronuclei Test were used in a Chinese hamster lung cell line (V79). All extracts showed mutagenicity in Salmonella, and nitrogenated compounds were strongly present. Genotoxicity were found in CA in almost all extracts and the micronuclei induction at the Site in the first (Autumn 1, Winter 1), and in the second (Spring 2) wind direction. V79 showed cytotoxicity in all samples. The three biomarkers were concordant in characterization Site NO with worse quality, compatible with the greater pollutants dispersion in the first wind direction. All PM2.5 concentrations were lower than those recommended by air quality standards but genotoxic effects were detected in all samples, corroborating that these standards are inadequate as quality indicators. The Salmonella/microsome assay proved sensitive to PM2.5 mutagenicity, with an outstanding influence of nitroarenes and aromatic amines. Analyses using CA and the micronucleus test broadened the levels of response that involve different damage induction mechanisms. Results show that the complex PM2.5 composition can provoke various genotoxic effects and the use of different bioassays is essential to understand its effects. PMID:27343868

  16. Method and apparatus for PM filter regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Opris, Cornelius N.; Verkiel, Maarten

    2006-01-03

    A method and apparatus for initiating regeneration of a particulate matter (PM) filter in an exhaust system in an internal combustion engine. The method and apparatus includes determining a change in pressure of exhaust gases passing through the PM filter, and responsively varying an opening of an intake valve in fluid communication with a combustion chamber.

  17. Quantifying the contribution of long-range transport to Particulate Matter (PM) mass loadings at a suburban site in the North-Western Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, H.; Garg, S.; Kumar, V.; Sachan, H.; Arya, R.; Sarkar, C.; Chandra, B. P.; Sinha, B.

    2015-04-01

    Many sites in the densely populated Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP) frequently exceed the national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) of 100 μg m-3 for 24 h average PM10 and 60 μg m-3 for 24 h average PM2.5 mass loadings, exposing residents to hazardous levels of PM throughout the year. We quantify the contribution of long range transport to elevated PM levels and the number of exceedance events through a back trajectory climatology analysis of air masses arriving at the IISER Mohali Atmospheric Chemistry facility (30.667° N, 76.729° E; 310 m a.m.s.l.) for the period August 2011-June 2013. Air masses arriving at the receptor site were classified into 6 clusters, which represent synoptic scale air mass transport patterns and the average PM mass loadings and number of exceedance events associated with each air mass type were quantified for each season. Long range transport from the west leads to significant enhancements in the average coarse mode PM mass loadings during all seasons. The contribution of long range transport from the west and south west (Source region: Arabia, Thar desert, Middle East and Afghanistan) to coarse mode PM varied between 9 and 57% of the total PM10-2.5 mass. Local pollution episodes (wind speed < 1 m s-1) contributed to enhanced coarse mode PM only during winter season. South easterly air masses (Source region: Eastern IGP) were associated with significantly lower coarse mode PM mass loadings during all seasons. For fine mode PM too, transport from the west usually leads to increased mass loadings during all seasons. Local pollution episodes contributed to enhanced PM2.5 mass loadings during winter and summer season. South easterly air masses were associated with significantly lower PM2.5 mass loadings during all seasons. Using simultaneously measured gas phase tracers we demonstrate that most PM2.5 originated from combustion sources. The fraction of days in each season during which the PM mass loadings exceeded the national ambient air

  18. Spatial variation of PM elemental composition between and within 20 European study areas--Results of the ESCAPE project.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Yi; Hoek, Gerard; Eeftens, Marloes; de Hoogh, Kees; Beelen, Rob; Beregszászi, Timea; Cesaroni, Giulia; Cirach, Marta; Cyrys, Josef; De Nazelle, Audrey; de Vocht, Frank; Ducret-Stich, Regina; Eriksen, Kirsten; Galassi, Claudia; Gražuleviciene, Regina; Gražulevicius, Tomas; Grivas, Georgios; Gryparis, Alexandros; Heinrich, Joachim; Hoffmann, Barbara; Iakovides, Minas; Keuken, Menno; Krämer, Ursula; Künzli, Nino; Lanki, Timo; Madsen, Christian; Meliefste, Kees; Merritt, Anne-Sophie; Mölter, Anna; Mosler, Gioia; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Pershagen, Göran; Phuleria, Harish; Quass, Ulrich; Ranzi, Andrea; Schaffner, Emmanuel; Sokhi, Ranjeet; Stempfelet, Morgane; Stephanou, Euripides; Sugiri, Dorothea; Taimisto, Pekka; Tewis, Marjan; Udvardy, Orsolya; Wang, Meng; Brunekreef, Bert

    2015-11-01

    An increasing number of epidemiological studies suggest that adverse health effects of air pollution may be related to particulate matter (PM) composition, particularly trace metals. However, we lack comprehensive data on the spatial distribution of these elements. We measured PM2.5 and PM10 in twenty study areas across Europe in three seasonal two-week periods over a year using Harvard impactors and standardized protocols. In each area, we selected street (ST), urban (UB) and regional background (RB) sites (totaling 20) to characterize local spatial variability. Elemental composition was determined by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of all PM2.5 and PM10 filters. We selected a priori eight (Cu, Fe, K, Ni, S, Si, V, Zn) well-detected elements of health interest, which also roughly represented different sources including traffic, industry, ports, and wood burning. PM elemental composition varied greatly across Europe, indicating different regional influences. Average street to urban background ratios ranged from 0.90 (V) to 1.60 (Cu) for PM2.5 and from 0.93 (V) to 2.28 (Cu) for PM10. Our selected PM elements were variably correlated with the main pollutants (PM2.5, PM10, PM2.5 absorbance, NO2 and NOx) across Europe: in general, Cu and Fe in all size fractions were highly correlated (Pearson correlations above 0.75); Si and Zn in the coarse fractions were modestly correlated (between 0.5 and 0.75); and the remaining elements in the various size fractions had lower correlations (around 0.5 or below). This variability in correlation demonstrated the distinctly different spatial distributions of most of the elements. Variability of PM10_Cu and Fe was mostly due to within-study area differences (67% and 64% of overall variance, respectively) versus between-study area and exceeded that of most other traffic-related pollutants, including NO2 and soot, signaling the importance of non-tailpipe (e.g., brake wear) emissions in PM. PMID:26342569

  19. Spatial variation of PM elemental composition between and within 20 European study areas--Results of the ESCAPE project.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Yi; Hoek, Gerard; Eeftens, Marloes; de Hoogh, Kees; Beelen, Rob; Beregszászi, Timea; Cesaroni, Giulia; Cirach, Marta; Cyrys, Josef; De Nazelle, Audrey; de Vocht, Frank; Ducret-Stich, Regina; Eriksen, Kirsten; Galassi, Claudia; Gražuleviciene, Regina; Gražulevicius, Tomas; Grivas, Georgios; Gryparis, Alexandros; Heinrich, Joachim; Hoffmann, Barbara; Iakovides, Minas; Keuken, Menno; Krämer, Ursula; Künzli, Nino; Lanki, Timo; Madsen, Christian; Meliefste, Kees; Merritt, Anne-Sophie; Mölter, Anna; Mosler, Gioia; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Pershagen, Göran; Phuleria, Harish; Quass, Ulrich; Ranzi, Andrea; Schaffner, Emmanuel; Sokhi, Ranjeet; Stempfelet, Morgane; Stephanou, Euripides; Sugiri, Dorothea; Taimisto, Pekka; Tewis, Marjan; Udvardy, Orsolya; Wang, Meng; Brunekreef, Bert

    2015-11-01

    An increasing number of epidemiological studies suggest that adverse health effects of air pollution may be related to particulate matter (PM) composition, particularly trace metals. However, we lack comprehensive data on the spatial distribution of these elements. We measured PM2.5 and PM10 in twenty study areas across Europe in three seasonal two-week periods over a year using Harvard impactors and standardized protocols. In each area, we selected street (ST), urban (UB) and regional background (RB) sites (totaling 20) to characterize local spatial variability. Elemental composition was determined by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of all PM2.5 and PM10 filters. We selected a priori eight (Cu, Fe, K, Ni, S, Si, V, Zn) well-detected elements of health interest, which also roughly represented different sources including traffic, industry, ports, and wood burning. PM elemental composition varied greatly across Europe, indicating different regional influences. Average street to urban background ratios ranged from 0.90 (V) to 1.60 (Cu) for PM2.5 and from 0.93 (V) to 2.28 (Cu) for PM10. Our selected PM elements were variably correlated with the main pollutants (PM2.5, PM10, PM2.5 absorbance, NO2 and NOx) across Europe: in general, Cu and Fe in all size fractions were highly correlated (Pearson correlations above 0.75); Si and Zn in the coarse fractions were modestly correlated (between 0.5 and 0.75); and the remaining elements in the various size fractions had lower correlations (around 0.5 or below). This variability in correlation demonstrated the distinctly different spatial distributions of most of the elements. Variability of PM10_Cu and Fe was mostly due to within-study area differences (67% and 64% of overall variance, respectively) versus between-study area and exceeded that of most other traffic-related pollutants, including NO2 and soot, signaling the importance of non-tailpipe (e.g., brake wear) emissions in PM.

  20. A PROBABILISTIC POPULATION EXPOSURE MODEL FOR PM10 AND PM 2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    A first generation probabilistic population exposure model for Particulate Matter (PM), specifically for predicting PM10, and PM2.5, exposures of an urban, population has been developed. This model is intended to be used to predict exposure (magnitude, frequency, and duration) ...

  1. Climatological classification of five sectors in the Iberian Peninsula using columnar (AOD, α) and surface (PM10, PM2.5) aerosol data supported by air mass apportioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachorro, Victoria; Mateos, David; Toledano, Carlos; Burgos, Maria A.; Bennouna, Yasmine; Torres, Benjamín; Fuertes, David; González, Ramiro; Guirado, Carmen; Román, Roberto; Velasco-Merino, Cristian; Marcos, Alberto; Calle, Abel; de Frutos, Angel M.

    2015-04-01

    The study of atmospheric aerosol over the Iberian Peninsula (IP) under a climatologic perspective is an interesting and meaningful aim due to the wide variety of conditions (geographical position, air masses, topography, among others) which cause a complex role of the distribution of aerosol properties. In the deeply investigation on the annual cycle and time evolution of the particulate matter lower than 10 µm (PM10, surface) and aerosol optical depth (AOD, columnar) in a large number of sites covering the period 2000-2013, five sectors can be distinguished in the IP. Both set of data belong to EMEP and AERONET networks respectively, as representative of aerosol air quality and climate studies, are complementary elements for a global aerosol research. The prevalence of fine-coarse particles is also analyzed over each sector. Seasonal bimodality of the PM10 annual cycle with a strong North-South gradient is observed in most sites, but this is only reported in the AOD climatology for the southern IP. The northern coast is clearly governed by the Atlantic Ocean influence, while the northeastern area is modulated by the Mediterranean Sea. The southern area, very close to the African continent, presents a large influence of desert dust intrusions. However, the southern Atlantic and Mediterranean coast present discrepancies and two sectors have been defined in this area. Finally, the center of the Peninsula is a mix of conditions, with north-south and east-west gradients of different magnitude. Overall, there is a relationship between PM10 and AOD with a proportional factor varying from 20 to 90, depending on the sector. The particular characteristic of PM10-AOD annual cycle of each geographical sector can be understood by the different climatology of the air mass origins observed at 500 and 1500 m (a.s.l.) and its apportioning to PM10 and AOD, respectively.

  2. Recycled Coarse Aggregate Produced by Pulsed Discharge in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namihira, Takao; Shigeishi, Mitsuhiro; Nakashima, Kazuyuki; Murakami, Akira; Kuroki, Kaori; Kiyan, Tsuyoshi; Tomoda, Yuichi; Sakugawa, Takashi; Katsuki, Sunao; Akiyama, Hidenori; Ohtsu, Masayasu

    In Japan, the recycling ratio of concrete scraps has been kept over 98 % after the Law for the Recycling of Construction Materials was enforced in 2000. In the present, most of concrete scraps were recycled as the Lower Subbase Course Material. On the other hand, it is predicted to be difficult to keep this higher recycling ratio in the near future because concrete scraps increase rapidly and would reach to over 3 times of present situation in 2010. In addition, the demand of concrete scraps as the Lower Subbase Course Material has been decreased. Therefore, new way to reuse concrete scraps must be developed. Concrete scraps normally consist of 70 % of coarse aggregate, 19 % of water and 11 % of cement. To obtain the higher recycling ratio, the higher recycling ratio of coarse aggregate is desired. In this paper, a new method for recycling coarse aggregate from concrete scraps has been developed and demonstrated. The system includes a Marx generator and a point to hemisphere mesh electrode immersed in water. In the demonstration, the test piece of concrete scrap was located between the electrodes and was treated by the pulsed discharge. After discharge treatment of test piece, the recycling coarse aggregates were evaluated under JIS and TS and had enough quality for utilization as the coarse aggregate.

  3. Fluorescent bioassays for toxic metals in milk and yoghurt

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background From a human health viewpoint, contaminated milk and its products could be a source of long-term exposure to toxic metals. Simple, inexpensive, and on-site assays would enable constant monitoring of their contents. Bioassays that can measure toxic metals in milk or yoghurt might reduce the risk. For this purpose, the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged trans factors, ArsR-GFP and CadC-GFP, together with their cis elements were used to develop such bioassays. Results ArsR-GFP or CadC-GFP, which binds either toxic metal or DNA fragment including cis element, was directly mixed with cow’s milk or yoghurt within a neutral pH range. The fluorescence of GFP, which is reflected by the association/dissociation ratio between cis element and trans factor, significantly changed with increasing externally added As (III) or Cd (II) whereas smaller responses to externally added Pb (II) and Zn (II) were found. Preparation and dilution of whey fraction at low pH were essential to intrinsic zinc quantification using CadC-GFP. Using the extraction procedure and bioassay, intrinsic Zn (II) concentrations ranging from 1.4 to 4.8 mg/l for milk brands and from 1.2 to 2.9 mg/kg for yoghurt brands were determined, which correlated to those determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Conclusions GFP-tagged bacterial trans factors and cis elements can work in the neutralized whole composition and diluted whey fraction of milk and yoghurt. The feature of regulatory elements is advantageous for establishment of simple and rapid assays of toxic metals in dairy products. PMID:23098077

  4. Relationship between physico-chemical characteristics and potential toxicity of PM10.

    PubMed

    Megido, Laura; Suárez-Peña, Beatriz; Negral, Luis; Castrillón, Leonor; Suárez, Susana; Fernández-Nava, Yolanda; Marañón, Elena

    2016-11-01

    PM10 was sampled at a suburban location affected by traffic and industry in the north of Spain. The samples were analysed to determine the chemical components of PM10 (organic and elemental carbon, soluble chemical species and metals). The aim of this study was to assess the toxicity of PM10 in terms of the bulk analysis and the physico-chemical properties of the particles. Total carbon, sulphates, ammonium, chlorides and nitrates were found to be the major constituents of PM10. The contribution of the last of these was found to increase significantly with PM10 concentration (Pearson coefficient correlation of 0.7, p-value < 0.001). Individual airborne particles were characterised morphologically and chemically via a combination of Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX). The subsequent image analysis revealed C-rich particles with shapes that pointed to combustion processes. Moreover, carbonaceous particles seemed to act as vehicles for sulphur compounds and metals (S, Na, Fe, Ca, Mg, K, Al, Mn, Zn and Cu). Coarse particles were found to be mainly constituted by crustal material and marine and carbonaceous particles. Although most of the studied individual particles in PM10 samples (86.0%) had a diameter within the 0.1-2.5 μm range, 1.8% of them had sizes lower than 0.1 μm 40.2% of the total studied particles were estimated to be inhaled and deposited in the human respiratory tract; 12.3% of these particles would reach the deepest zones, thereby posing a major risk to human health.

  5. An emergency bioassay method for (210)Po in urine.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Nicolas; Dai, Xiongxin

    2015-09-01

    A rapid method was developed to efficiently measure (210)Po in urine samples in an emergency situation. Polonium-210 in small urine samples (10 mL) was spontaneously deposited on a stainless steel disc in 1 M HCl at room temperature for 4 h in a polyethylene bottle. The metallic disc was then counted for 4 h by alpha spectrometry. The developed method allowed the preparation of large sample batch in a short time. The method meets the requirements for an emergency bioassay procedure.

  6. Field and Bioassay Indicators for Internal Dose Intervention Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.

    2007-05-01

    Guidance is presented that is used at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site to identify the potential need for medical intervention in response to intakes of radioactivity. The guidance, based on ICRP Publication 30 models and committed effective dose equivalents of 20 mSv and 200 mSv, is expressed as numerical workplace measurements and derived first-day bioassay results for large intakes. It is used by facility radiation protection staff and on-call dosimetry support staff during the first few days following an intake.

  7. Electroantennographic bioassay as a screening tool for host plant volatiles.

    PubMed

    Beck, John J; Light, Douglas M; Gee, Wai S

    2012-01-01

    Plant volatiles play an important role in plant-insect interactions. Herbivorous insects use plant volatiles, known as kairomones, to locate their host plant. When a host plant is an important agronomic commodity feeding damage by insect pests can inflict serious economic losses to growers. Accordingly, kairomones can be used as attractants to lure or confuse these insects and, thus, offer an environmentally friendly alternative to pesticides for insect control. Unfortunately, plants can emit a vast number volatiles with varying compositions and ratios of emissions dependent upon the phenology of the commodity or the time of day. This makes identification of biologically active components or blends of volatile components an arduous process. To help identify the bioactive components of host plant volatile emissions we employ the laboratory-based screening bioassay electroantennography (EAG). EAG is an effective tool to evaluate and record electrophysiologically the olfactory responses of an insect via their antennal receptors. The EAG screening process can help reduce the number of volatiles tested to identify promising bioactive components. However, EAG bioassays only provide information about activation of receptors. It does not provide information about the type of insect behavior the compound elicits; which could be as an attractant, repellent or other type of behavioral response. Volatiles eliciting a significant response by EAG, relative to an appropriate positive control, are typically taken on to further testing of behavioral responses of the insect pest. The experimental design presented will detail the methodology employed to screen almond-based host plant volatiles by measurement of the electrophysiological antennal responses of an adult insect pest navel orangeworm (Amyelois transitella) to single components and simple blends of components via EAG bioassay. The method utilizes two excised antennae placed across a "fork" electrode holder. The protocol

  8. How to Fabricate Functional Artificial Luciferases for Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Fujii, Rika

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol introduces fabrication of artificial luciferases (ALuc(®)) by extracting the consensus amino acids from the alignment of copepod luciferase sequences. The made ALucs have unique sequential identities that are phylogenetically distinctive from those of any existing copepod luciferase. Some ALucs exhibited heat stability, and strong and greatly prolonged optical intensities. The made ALucs are applicable to various bioassays as an optical readout, including live cell imaging, single-chain probes, and bioluminescent tags of antibodies. The present protocol guides on how to fabricate a unique artificial luciferase with designed optical properties and functionalities. PMID:27424894

  9. An emergency bioassay method for (210)Po in urine.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Nicolas; Dai, Xiongxin

    2015-09-01

    A rapid method was developed to efficiently measure (210)Po in urine samples in an emergency situation. Polonium-210 in small urine samples (10 mL) was spontaneously deposited on a stainless steel disc in 1 M HCl at room temperature for 4 h in a polyethylene bottle. The metallic disc was then counted for 4 h by alpha spectrometry. The developed method allowed the preparation of large sample batch in a short time. The method meets the requirements for an emergency bioassay procedure. PMID:26115206

  10. Lanthanide-doped upconverting phosphors for bioassay and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huichen; Sun, Shiqi

    2012-10-01

    Lanthanide-doped fluorescent materials have gained increasing attention in recent years due to their unique luminescence properties which have led to their use in wide-ranging fields including those of biological applications. Aside from being used as agents for in vivo imaging, lanthanide-doped fluorescent materials also present many advantages for use in bioassays and therapy. In this review, we summarize the applications of lanthanide-doped up-converting phosphors (UCPs) in protein and gene detection, as well as in photodynamic and gene therapy in recent years, and outline their future potential in biological applications. The current report could serve as a reference for researchers in relevant fields.

  11. Seasonal variability of PM2.5 composition and sources in the Klang Valley urban-industrial environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amil, Norhaniza; Talib Latif, Mohd; Firoz Khan, Md; Mohamad, Maznorizan

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the fine particulate matter (PM2.5) variability in the Klang Valley urban-industrial environment. In total, 94 daily PM2.5 samples were collected during a 1-year campaign from August 2011 to July 2012. This is the first paper on PM2.5 mass, chemical composition and sources in the tropical environment of Southeast Asia, covering all four seasons (distinguished by the wind flow patterns) including haze events. The samples were analysed for various inorganic components and black carbon (BC). The chemical compositions were statistically analysed and the temporal aerosol pattern (seasonal) was characterised using descriptive analysis, correlation matrices, enrichment factor (EF), stoichiometric analysis and chemical mass closure (CMC). For source apportionment purposes, a combination of positive matrix factorisation (PMF) and multi-linear regression (MLR) was employed. Further, meteorological-gaseous parameters were incorporated into each analysis for improved assessment. In addition, secondary data of total suspended particulate (TSP) and coarse particulate matter (PM10) sampled at the same location and time with this study (collected by Malaysian Meteorological Department) were used for PM ratio assessment. The results showed that PM2.5 mass averaged at 28 ± 18 µg m-3, 2.8-fold higher than the World Health Organisation (WHO) annual guideline. On a daily basis, the PM2.5 mass ranged between 6 and 118 µg m-3 with the daily WHO guideline exceeded 43 % of the time. The north-east (NE) monsoon was the only season with less than 50 % sample exceedance of the daily WHO guideline. On an annual scale, PM2.5 mass correlated positively with temperature (T) and wind speed (WS) but negatively with relative humidity (RH). With the exception of NOx, the gases analysed (CO, NO2, NO and SO2) were found to significantly influence the PM2.5 mass. Seasonal variability unexpectedly showed that rainfall, WS and wind direction (WD) did not significantly correlate

  12. Uplink coarse acquisition for a mobile user satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biederman, L.

    For the purpose of the present investigation, coarse time acquisition is defined as the time required to receive a successful acknowledgement from the satellite. This definition can be justified if the false alarm probability is selected to be relatively low. It is assumed that the ground platforms are mobile, the uplink signal is frequently hopped, and all users have a preassigned uplink time synchronization channel. Attention is given to acquisition algorithm and system concept, the optimum detector structure, aspects of optimum detector performance, and coarse acquisition performance tradeoffs. For the optimum choice, the detector performance is shown as a function of the number of hops accumulated by the video integrator. It is found that the coarse acquisition detector performance could be severely degraded if the uplink signal-to-noise ratio drops by more than 1 dB below the threshold requirement.

  13. Water-soluble ionic species of coarse and fine particulate matter and gas precursor characteristics at urban and rural sites of central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Tsai, Su-Mei; Wang, Wei-Chi; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2016-08-01

    Coarse and fine particulate matter (PM) were taken by a dichotomous sampler, and gas precursors were determined by a denuder sampler at two stations in central Taiwan. Water-soluble ionic constituents of PM and their precursor gases were analyzed by ionic chromatograph. In summer, the daytime/nighttime PM10 concentrations were 37 ± 10/41 ± 18 μg m(-3) and 36 ± 14/34 ± 18 μg m(-3) for Xitun and Jhushan, respectively. Average PM10 concentration in winter was 1.55 and 1.76 times that of summer for Xitun and Jhushan, respectively. PM mass concentrations were similar for both stations, although one station is located in the downtown area of Taichung, and the other is in a rural area with no heavy pollution sources. Water-soluble ionic species content was 38-53 % of PM2.5 and 43-48 % of PM10 mass concentration. HNO3, HCl, and SO2 were high in the daytime; the daytime-to-nighttime concentration ratio was 3.75-6.88 for HNO3,1.7-7.8 for HCl, and 1.45-2.77 for SO2. High NH3 levels were determined in the area, especially in winter, which could be a precursor of NH4 (+) to form particulate matter. In Xitun, motor vehicles downtown and in the industrial district could be sources of air pollution. In contrast, there are few industrial sources at Jhushan; therefore, the transport of air pollutants from upwind of other regions and the accumulation of pollutants could be important PM sources at Jhushan. PMID:27184148

  14. Water-soluble ionic species of coarse and fine particulate matter and gas precursor characteristics at urban and rural sites of central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Tsai, Su-Mei; Wang, Wei-Chi; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2016-08-01

    Coarse and fine particulate matter (PM) were taken by a dichotomous sampler, and gas precursors were determined by a denuder sampler at two stations in central Taiwan. Water-soluble ionic constituents of PM and their precursor gases were analyzed by ionic chromatograph. In summer, the daytime/nighttime PM10 concentrations were 37 ± 10/41 ± 18 μg m(-3) and 36 ± 14/34 ± 18 μg m(-3) for Xitun and Jhushan, respectively. Average PM10 concentration in winter was 1.55 and 1.76 times that of summer for Xitun and Jhushan, respectively. PM mass concentrations were similar for both stations, although one station is located in the downtown area of Taichung, and the other is in a rural area with no heavy pollution sources. Water-soluble ionic species content was 38-53 % of PM2.5 and 43-48 % of PM10 mass concentration. HNO3, HCl, and SO2 were high in the daytime; the daytime-to-nighttime concentration ratio was 3.75-6.88 for HNO3,1.7-7.8 for HCl, and 1.45-2.77 for SO2. High NH3 levels were determined in the area, especially in winter, which could be a precursor of NH4 (+) to form particulate matter. In Xitun, motor vehicles downtown and in the industrial district could be sources of air pollution. In contrast, there are few industrial sources at Jhushan; therefore, the transport of air pollutants from upwind of other regions and the accumulation of pollutants could be important PM sources at Jhushan.

  15. A Decoupled Finite Element Heterogeneous Coarse Mesh Transport Method.

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, S. W.; Rahnema, Farzad

    2005-01-01

    In a recent paper, an original finite element (FE) method was presented for solving eigenvalue transport problems on a coarse spatial mesh. The method employed a surface Green's function expansion of the angular flux trial functions, so that heterogeneous coarse-meshes could be treated with relative ease. Numerical problems were solved using the multigroup discrete ordinates approximation in one-dimensional (1-D) slab geometry. Unfortunately, difficulties were encountered in finding solutions to the algebraic finite element equations, which led to sizeable angular flux discontinuities at coarse-mesh interfaces and significant errors. For this reason, a nonvariational iterative technique was ultimately favored for converging the angular flux distribution, and was used in conjunction with a Rayleigh quotient for converging the eigenvalue. In this paper, a new derivation of finite element equations is presented, which seems to offer a remedy for at least some of the numerical ills that plagued the previous work. First, the equations are derived in terms of a generalized response function expansion. This allows a more efficient response basis to be employed and vastly reduces the overall computational effort without a substantial loss of accuracy. Second, the tight coupling between coarse-meshes in the original equations is effectively broken by assuming that an accurate estimate of the flux distribution entering a given coarse-mesh is known. With an additional assumption that an accurate eigenvalue estimate is known, an iterative approach to solving these decoupled finite element (DFE) equations is developed. The DFE method has been applied to both 1- and 2-D heterogeneous coarse-mesh problems with a far greater degree of success than the original FE method. However, some numerical difficulties remain to be overcome before the new approach can be considered robust.

  16. Screening of hormone-like activities in bottled waters available in Southern Spain using receptor-specific bioassays.

    PubMed

    Real, Macarena; Molina-Molina, José-Manuel; Jiménez-Díaz, Inmaculada; Arrebola, Juan Pedro; Sáenz, José-María; Fernández, Mariana F; Olea, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Bottled water consumption is a putative source of human exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Research has been conducted on the presence of chemicals with estrogen-like activity in bottled waters and on their estrogenicity, but few data are available on the presence of hormonal activities associated with other nuclear receptors (NRs). The aim of this study was to determine the presence of endocrine activities dependent on the activation of human estrogen receptor alpha (hERa) and/or androgen receptor (hAR) in water in glass or plastic bottles sold to consumers in Southern Spain. Hormone-like activities were evaluated in 29 bottled waters using receptor-specific bioassays based on reporter gene expression in PALM cells [(anti-)androgenicity] and cell proliferation assessment in MCF-7 cells [(anti-)estrogenicity] after optimized solid phase extraction (SPE). All of the water samples analyzed showed hormonal activity. This was estrogenic in 79.3% and anti-estrogenic in 37.9% of samples and was androgenic in 27.5% and anti-androgenic in 41.3%, with mean concentrations per liter of 0.113pM 17β-estradiol (E2) equivalent units (E2Eq), 11.01pM anti-estrogen (ICI 182780) equivalent units (ICI 182780Eq), 0.33pM methyltrienolone (R1881) equivalent units (R1881Eq), and 0.18nM procymidone equivalent units (ProcEq). Bottled water consumption contributes to EDC exposure. Hormone-like activities observed in waters from both plastic and glass bottles suggest that plastic packaging is not the sole source of contamination and that the source of the water and bottling process may play a role, among other factors. Further research is warranted on the cumulative effects of long-term exposure to low doses of EDCs.

  17. Coarse particulate matter apportionment around a steel smelter plant.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Federico; Prati, Paolo

    2009-05-01

    The results from a study carried out in the urban area of Genoa, Italy, where a large steel smelter recently shut down are presented. We had the opportunity to sample particulate matter (PM) before and after plant closure and, therefore, to measure the changes in concentration and composition of PM10 (atmospheric PM with aerodynamic diameter <10 microm). Elemental concentrations of Na to Pb were obtained through energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF), and the contributions of specific sources of PM10 were calculated by positive matrix factorization (PMF). The PM10 average concentration turned out to be surprisingly similar before and after closing of the smelter. Nevertheless, the comparison among data collected in the two periods (plant operating and closed), even with the limited information provided by ED-XRF, allowed us to single out two sources of PM related to the smelter activities, to extract their emission profile, and to quantify the impact of the plant on PM10 levels.

  18. Coarse-grid selection for parallel algebraic multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, A. J., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    The need to solve linear systems arising from problems posed on extremely large, unstructured grids has sparked great interest in parallelizing algebraic multigrid (AMG) To date, however, no parallel AMG algorithms exist We introduce a parallel algorithm for the selection of coarse-grid points, a crucial component of AMG, based on modifications of certain paallel independent set algorithms and the application of heuristics designed to insure the quality of the coarse grids A prototype serial version of the algorithm is implemented, and tests are conducted to determine its effect on multigrid convergence, and AMG complexity

  19. Levels and major sources of PM2.5 and PM10 in Bangkok Metropolitan Region.

    PubMed

    Chuersuwan, Nares; Nimrat, Subuntith; Lekphet, Sukanda; Kerdkumrai, Tida

    2008-07-01

    This research was the first long-term attempt to concurrently measure and identify major sources of both PM(10) and PM(2.5) in Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR). Ambient PM(10) and PM(2.5) were evaluated at four monitoring stations and analyzed for elemental compositions, water-soluble ions, and total carbon during February 2002-January 2003. Fifteen chemical elements, four water-soluble ions, and total carbon were analyzed to assist major source identification by a receptor model approach, known as chemical mass balance. PM(10) and PM(2.5) were significantly different (p<0.05) at all sites and 24 h averages were high at traffic location while two separated residential sites were similar. Seasonal difference of PM(10) and PM(2.5) concentrations was distinct between dry and wet seasons. Major source of PM(10) at the traffic site indicated that automobile emissions and biomass burning-related sources contributed approximately 33% each. Automobiles contributed approximately 39 and 22% of PM(10) mass at two residential sites while biomass burning contributed about 36 and 28%. PM(10) from re-suspended soil and cooking sources accounted for 10 to 15% at a residential site. Major sources of PM(2.5) at traffic site were automobile and biomass burning, contributing approximately 32 and 26%, respectively. Biomass burning was the major source of PM(2.5) mass concentrations at residential sites. Meat cooking also accounted for 31% of PM(2.5) mass at a low impact site. Automobile, biomass burning, and road dust were less significant, contributed 10, 6, and 5%, respectively. Major sources identification at some location had difficulty to achieve performance criteria due to limited source profiles. Improved in characterize other sources profiles will help local authority to better air quality. PMID:18258301

  20. Microfluidic bioassay to characterize parasitic nematode phenotype and anthelmintic resistance

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, BAOZHEN; DEUTMEYER, ALEX; CARR, JOHN; ROBERTSON, ALAN P.; MARTIN, RICHARD J.; PANDEY, SANTOSH

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY With increasing resistance to anti-parasitic drugs, it has become more important to detect and recognize phenotypes of resistant isolates. Molecular methods of detecting resistant isolates are limited at present. Here, we introduce a microfluidic bioassay to measure phenotype using parameters of nematode locomotion. We illustrate the technique on larvae of an animal parasite Oesophagostomum dentatum. Parameters of sinusoidal motion such as propagation velocity, wavelength, wave amplitude, and oscillation frequency depended on the levamisole-sensitivity of the isolate of parasitic nematode. The levamisole-sensitive isolate (SENS) had a mean wave amplitude of 135 μm, which was larger than 123 μm of the levamisole-resistant isolate (LEVR). SENS had a mean wavelength of 373 μm, which was less than 393 μm of LEVR. The mean propagation velocity of SENS, 149 μm s−1, was similar to LEVR, 143 μm s−1. The propagation velocity of the isolates was inhibited by levamisole in a concentration-dependent manner above 0.5 μM. The EC50 for SENS was 3 μM and the EC50 for LEVR was 10 μM. This microfluidic technology advances present-day nematode migration assays and provides a better quantification and increased drug sensitivity. It is anticipated that the bioassay will facilitate study of resistance to other anthelmintic drugs that affect locomotion. PMID:20663251

  1. Vicia faba bioassay for environmental toxicity monitoring: A review.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Munawar

    2016-02-01

    Higher plants are recognized as excellent genetic models to detect cytogenetic and mutagenic agents and are frequently used in environmental monitoring studies. Vicia faba (V. faba) bioassay have been used to study DNA damages i.e., chromosomal and nuclear aberrations induced by metallic compounds, pesticides, complex mixtures, petroleum derivates, toxins, nanoparticles and industrial effluents. The main advantages of using V. faba is its availability round the year, economical to use, easy to grow and handle; its use does not require sterile conditions, rate of cell division is fast, chromosomes are easy to score, less expensive and more sensitive as compared to other short-term tests that require pre-preparations. The V. faba test offers evaluation of different endpoints and tested agents can be classified as cytotoxic/genotoxic/mutagenic. This test also provides understanding about mechanism of action, whether the tested agent is clastogenic or aneugenic in nature. In view of advantages offered by V. faba test system, it is used extensively to assess toxic agents and has been emerged as an important bioassay for ecotoxicological studies. Based on the applications of V. faba test to assess the environmental quality, this article offers an overview of this test system and its efficiency in assessing the cytogenetic and mutagenic agents in different classes of the environmental concerns.

  2. Vicia faba bioassay for environmental toxicity monitoring: A review.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Munawar

    2016-02-01

    Higher plants are recognized as excellent genetic models to detect cytogenetic and mutagenic agents and are frequently used in environmental monitoring studies. Vicia faba (V. faba) bioassay have been used to study DNA damages i.e., chromosomal and nuclear aberrations induced by metallic compounds, pesticides, complex mixtures, petroleum derivates, toxins, nanoparticles and industrial effluents. The main advantages of using V. faba is its availability round the year, economical to use, easy to grow and handle; its use does not require sterile conditions, rate of cell division is fast, chromosomes are easy to score, less expensive and more sensitive as compared to other short-term tests that require pre-preparations. The V. faba test offers evaluation of different endpoints and tested agents can be classified as cytotoxic/genotoxic/mutagenic. This test also provides understanding about mechanism of action, whether the tested agent is clastogenic or aneugenic in nature. In view of advantages offered by V. faba test system, it is used extensively to assess toxic agents and has been emerged as an important bioassay for ecotoxicological studies. Based on the applications of V. faba test to assess the environmental quality, this article offers an overview of this test system and its efficiency in assessing the cytogenetic and mutagenic agents in different classes of the environmental concerns. PMID:26414739

  3. [Evaluation of Antilles fish ciguatoxicity by mouse and chick bioassays].

    PubMed

    Pottier, I; Vernoux, J P

    2003-03-01

    Ciguatera is a common seafood poisoning in Western Atlantic and French West Indies. Ciguatera fish poisoning in the Caribbean is a public health problem. A toxicological study was carried out on 178 Caribbean fish specimens (26 species) captured off Guadeloupe and Saint Barthelemy between 1993 and 1999. The mouse bioassay and the chick feeding test were used to control fish edibility. Ciguatoxins presence was assumed when symptomatology was typical of ciguatera in mouse and chick. Fishes were classified in three groups: non toxic fish (edible), low toxic fish (not edible) and toxic fish (not edible). 75% of fishes were non toxic. Toxic fish specimens belonged to four families of high trophic level carnivores: Carangidae, Lutjanidae, Serranidae et Sphyraenidae. Percentages of toxic fishes to humans reached 55% for Caranx latus and 33% for Caranx bartholomaei and Caranx lugubris. Only a significant correlation between weight and toxicity was only found for C. latus and snappers. Small carnivorous groupers (Serranidae) were also toxic. Atoxic fish species were (a) pelagic fish (Coryphaena hippurus, Auxis thazard and Euthynnus pelamis), (b) invertebrates feeders (Malacanthus plumieri, Balistes vetula), (c) small high-risk fish or (d) fish of edible benthic fish families. Liver of four fishes (Mycteroperca venenosa, Caranx bartholomaei, Seriola rivoliana, Gymnothorax funebris) contained ciguatoxins at a significant level although their flesh was safe. This study confirms the usefulness of mouse and chick bioassays for sanitary control of fish. PMID:12784589

  4. Diurnal and seasonal trends in the apparent density of ambient fine and coarse particles in Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Hasheminassab, Sina; Pakbin, Payam; Delfino, Ralph J; Schauer, James J; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2014-04-01

    Diurnal and seasonal variations in the apparent density of ambient fine and coarse particulate matter (PM2.5 and CPM [PM2.5-10], respectively) were investigated in a location near downtown Los Angeles. The apparent densities, determined by particle mass-to-volume ratios, showed strong diurnal and seasonal variations, with higher values during the warm phase (June to August 2013) compared to cold phase (November 2012 to February 2013). PM2.5 apparent density showed minima during the morning and afternoon rush hours of the cold phase (1.20g cm(-3)), mainly due to the increased contribution of traffic-emitted soot particles, and highest values were found during the midday in the warm phase (2.38g cm(-3)). The lowest CPM apparent density was observed during the morning rush hours of the cold phase (1.41g cm(-3)), while highest in early afternoon during the warm phase (2.91g cm(-3)), most likely due to the increased wind-induced resuspension of road dust.

  5. Diurnal and seasonal trends in the apparent density of ambient fine and coarse particles in Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Hasheminassab, Sina; Pakbin, Payam; Delfino, Ralph J.; Schauer, James J.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2014-01-01

    Diurnal and seasonal variations in the apparent density of ambient fine and coarse particulate matter (PM2.5 and CPM [PM2.5-10], respectively) were investigated in a location near downtown Los Angeles. The apparent densities, determined by particle mass-to-volume ratios, showed strong diurnal and seasonal variations, with higher values during the warm phase (June to August 2013) compared to cold phase (November 2012 to February 2013). PM2.5 apparent density showed minima during the morning and afternoon rush hours of the cold phase (1.20 g cm−3), mainly due to the increased contribution of traffic-emitted soot particles, and highest values were found during the midday in the warm phase (2.38 g cm−3). The lowest CPM apparent density was observed during the morning rush hours of the cold phase (1.41 g cm−3), while highest in early afternoon during the warm phase (2.91 g cm−3), most likely due to the increased wind-induced resuspension of road dust. PMID:24413160

  6. Size fractionation in mercury-bearing airborne particles (HgPM 10) at Almadén, Spain: Implications for inhalation hazards around old mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Teresa; Higueras, Pablo; Jones, Tim; McDonald, Iain; Gibbons, Wes

    Almadén has a >2000y mining history and an unprecedented legacy of mercury contamination. Resuspended airborne particles were extracted from mine waste (Las Cuevas), retort site soil (Almadenejos), and urban car park dust (Almadén), separated into fine (PM 10) and coarse (PM >10 μm ) fractions, analysed for mercury using ICP-MS, and individual HgPM characterised using SEM. Cold extractable mercury concentrations in PM 10 range from 100 to 150 μg g -1 (car parks), to nearly 6000 μg g -1 (mine waste), reaching a world record of 95,000 μg g -1 above the abandoned retort at Almadenejos where ultrafine HgPM have pervaded the brickwork and soil and entered the food chain: edible wild asparagus stem material from here contains 35-65 μg g -1 Hg, and pig hair from animals living, inhaling and ingesting HgPM 10 at the site yielded 8-10 μg g -1. The PM 10 fraction (dusts easily wind transported and deeply inhaled) contains much more mercury than the coarser fraction. The contribution of HgPM 10 to ecosystem contamination and potential human health effects around old mercury mines has been underestimated.

  7. Thioglucose-stabilized gold nanoparticles as a novel platform for colorimetric bioassay based on nanoparticle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shigeru; Yoshida, Kazuma; Shinkawa, Keitarou; Kumagawa, Daisuke; Seguchi, Hideki

    2010-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles stabilized with thioglucose (TGlu-AuNPs), which have carboxyl groups on the particle surface as anchoring sites for covalent immobilization of biomolecules, were prepared by the chemical reduction of HAuCl4 using 1-thio-β-D-glucose as a reducing and stabilizing agent, and their application to colorimetric bioassay was demonstrated using the carbohydrate-lectin system. p-Aminophenyl α-D-mannose (Man-NH2) was covalently attached by a conventional method to the activated carboxyl groups on the TGlu-AuNPs. On addition of Con A to the Man-AuNPs, multiple binding events occurred between Con A and the mannoses immobilized on the particle surface. This Con A-induced aggregation resulted in a significant red shift in local surface plasmon resonance. The binding isotherm showed a sigmoidal curve, indicating cooperativity in the binding of Con A and the Man-AuNPs. In addition, Hill plots showed two nonequivalent binding modes, with the Kd values for high- and low-affinity binding of 11.3 and 66.5 pM, respectively, which was significantly lower than that for methyl-α-D-mannose binding to Con A. The enhanced binding affinity between Man-AuNPs and Con A involves the cluster effect of the carbohydrate groups on the AuNPs. A linear correlation curve was obtained in the range 10-100 nM (R2=0.983). The limit of detection (LOD) for Con A was 9.0 nM in aqueous buffer, which is comparable to that of other conventional methods such as ELISA. PMID:20801619

  8. Seasonal and spatial relationship of chemistry and toxicity in atmospheric particulate matter using aquatic bioassays.

    PubMed

    Sheesley, Rebecca J; Schauer, James J; Hemming, Jocelyn D; Geis, Steve; Barman, Miel A

    2005-02-15

    In light of current interest in better understanding the environmental impact of atmospheric particulate matter (PM), a new strategy has been employed to screen the relative toxicities of ambient and source aerosols. Short-term and acute aquatic bioassays using Ceriodaphnia dubia and a green alga (Selenastrum capricornutum) as test organisms have been in use for many years in the regulation of wastewater effluents. These tests have been employed in the present study to compare the toxicity of water extracts of atmospheric particulate matter and dichloromethane (DCM) extracts that have been transferred to dimethyl sulfoxide and diluted in water. Atmospheric PM was collected at four sites located near the south shore of Lake Michigan and one site in Michigan's Upper Peninsula at discrete events during three seasons. Parallel chemical analyses of the two extracts directly assessed the relation between the chemical composition and the toxicity of the extract. Inductively coupled plasma analysis of the metals in the water extract and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy of the organics in the DCM extract showed a relationship between high toxicity and high water-soluble copper concentration and high secondary organic aerosol tracers in the extracted aerosol. Although previous fractionation studies have not looked at water-soluble copper, significant toxicity has been measured in the semipolar and polar organic fractions of ambient aerosols and diesel exhaust particles, which are the fractions in which secondary organic aerosol components would be expected. For the water extracts, the summer samples were consistently more toxic than the autumn or spring samples. There was not a seasonal pattern for the toxicity of the DCM extracts; however, spatial differences were apparent. The toxicity end points of select samples from one site qualitatively correlate with the high polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations. Additionally, high toxicity in the July DCM extracts from

  9. Modeling the spatio-temporal heterogeneity in the PM10-PM2.5 relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hone-Jay; Huang, Bo; Lin, Chuan-Yao

    2015-02-01

    This paper explores the spatio-temporal patterns of particulate matter (PM) in Taiwan based on a series of methods. Using fuzzy c-means clustering first, the spatial heterogeneity (six clusters) in the PM data collected between 2005 and 2009 in Taiwan are identified and the industrial and urban areas of Taiwan (southwestern, west central, northwestern, and northern Taiwan) are found to have high PM concentrations. The PM10-PM2.5 relationship is then modeled with global ordinary least squares regression, geographically weighted regression (GWR), and geographically and temporally weighted regression (GTWR). The GTWR and GWR produce consistent results; however, GTWR provides more detailed information of spatio-temporal variations of the PM10-PM2.5 relationship. The results also show that GTWR provides a relatively high goodness of fit and sufficient space-time explanatory power. In particular, the PM2.5 or PM10 varies with time and space, depending on weather conditions and the spatial distribution of land use and emission patterns in local areas. Such information can be used to determine patterns of spatio-temporal heterogeneity in PM that will allow the control of pollutants and the reduction of public exposure.

  10. Size-fractionated PM10 monitoring in relation to the contribution of endotoxins in different polluted areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traversi, D.; Alessandria, L.; Schilirò, T.; Gilli, G.

    2011-07-01

    Particulate pollution is an environmental concern that is widespread and difficult to resolve. Recently various regulatory improvements around the world have been agreed upon to tackle this problem, especially as related to the fine fraction of particulates, which more closely correlates to human health effects than other fractions. The size-fractionation of inhalable particles and their organic composition represent a new area of research that has been poorly explored thus far. Endotoxins are a type of natural organic compound that can be found in particulate matter. They are correlated with Gram-negative bacterial contamination. Health outcomes associated with exposure to these toxins are not specific and often overlap with the health effects of PM (Particulate Matter) exposure, including asthma, bronchitis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and organic dust toxic syndrome. Very little information is available on the endotoxin distribution in different PM10 size fractions. This study examined PM10 size fractions and their endotoxin content. Sampling was conducted at five different locations: one urban, two rural and two rural sites that were highly influenced by large-scale farm animal production facilities. For each location, six different PM10 fractions were evaluated. PM10 sub-fractions were categorised as follows: PM 10-7.2 (1.15-31.30 μg m -3); PM 7.2-3.0 (1.86-30.73 μg m -3); PM 3.0-1.5 (1.74-13.90 μg m -3); PM 1.5-0.95 (0.24-10.57 μg m -3); PM 0.95-0.49 (1.22-14.33 μg m -3) and PM <0.49 (13.15-85.49 μg m -3). The ranges of endotoxin levels determined were: PM 10-7.2 (0.051-5.401 endotoxin units (EU) m -3); PM 7.2-3.0 (0.123-7.801 EU m -3); PM 3.0-1.5 (0.057-1.635 EU m -3); PM 1.5-0.95 (0.040-2.477 EU m -3); PM 0.95-0.49 (0.007-3.159 EU m -3) and PM <0.49 (0.039-3.975 EU m -3). Our results indicated consistency of the PM1 fraction at all of the sites and the predominant presence of endotoxins in the coarse fraction. The observed abatement of the PM

  11. Coarse-Grained Prediction of RNA Loop Structures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2012-01-01

    One of the key issues in the theoretical prediction of RNA folding is the prediction of loop structure from the sequence. RNA loop free energies are dependent on the loop sequence content. However, most current models account only for the loop length-dependence. The previously developed “Vfold” model (a coarse-grained RNA folding model) provides an effective method to generate the complete ensemble of coarse-grained RNA loop and junction conformations. However, due to the lack of sequence-dependent scoring parameters, the method is unable to identify the native and near-native structures from the sequence. In this study, using a previously developed iterative method for extracting the knowledge-based potential parameters from the known structures, we derive a set of dinucleotide-based statistical potentials for RNA loops and junctions. A unique advantage of the approach is its ability to go beyond the the (known) native structures by accounting for the full free energy landscape, including all the nonnative folds. The benchmark tests indicate that for given loop/junction sequences, the statistical potentials enable successful predictions for the coarse-grained 3D structures from the complete conformational ensemble generated by the Vfold model. The predicted coarse-grained structures can provide useful initial folds for further detailed structural refinement. PMID:23144887

  12. On coarse projective integration for atomic deposition in amorphous systems.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Claire Y; Han, Sang M; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis A; Sinno, Talid

    2015-10-01

    Direct molecular dynamics simulation of atomic deposition under realistic conditions is notoriously challenging because of the wide range of time scales that must be captured. Numerous simulation approaches have been proposed to address the problem, often requiring a compromise between model fidelity, algorithmic complexity, and computational efficiency. Coarse projective integration, an example application of the "equation-free" framework, offers an attractive balance between these constraints. Here, periodically applied, short atomistic simulations are employed to compute time derivatives of slowly evolving coarse variables that are then used to numerically integrate differential equations over relatively large time intervals. A key obstacle to the application of this technique in realistic settings is the "lifting" operation in which a valid atomistic configuration is recreated from knowledge of the coarse variables. Using Ge deposition on amorphous SiO2 substrates as an example application, we present a scheme for lifting realistic atomistic configurations comprised of collections of Ge islands on amorphous SiO2 using only a few measures of the island size distribution. The approach is shown to provide accurate initial configurations to restart molecular dynamics simulations at arbitrary points in time, enabling the application of coarse projective integration for this morphologically complex system.

  13. Terrain aided navigation for autonomous underwater vehicles with coarse maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ling; Cheng, Xianghong; Zhu, Yixian

    2016-09-01

    Terrain aided navigation (TAN) is a form of geophysical localization technique for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) operating in GPS-denied environments. TAN performance on sensor-rich AUVs has been evaluated in sea trials. However, many challenges remain before TAN can be successfully implemented on sensor-limited AUVs, especially with coarse maps. To improve TAN performance over coarse maps, a Gaussian process (GP) is proposed for the modeling of bathymetric terrain and integrated into the particle filter (GP-PF). GP is applied to provide not only the bathymetric value prediction through learning a set of bathymetric data from coarse maps but also the variance of the prediction. As a measurement update, calculated on bathymetric deviation is performed through the PF to obtain absolute and bounded positioning accuracy. Through the analysis of TAN performance on experimental data for two different terrains with map resolutions of 10-50 m, both the ability of the proposed model to represent the actual bathymetric terrain with accuracy and the effect of the GP-PF for TAN on sensor-limited systems in suited terrain are demonstrated. The experiment results further verify that there is an inverse relationship between the coarseness of the map and the overall TAN accuracy in rough terrains, but there is hardly any relationship between them in relatively flat terrains.

  14. Coarse-Grained and Atomistic Modeling of Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    A coarse-grained model for a set of three polyimide isomers is developed. Each polyimide is comprised of BPDA (3,3,4,4' - biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride) and one of three APB isomers: 1,3-bis(4-aminophenoxy)benzene, 1,4-bis(4-aminophenoxy)benzene or 1,3-bis(3-aminophenoxy)benzene. The coarse-grained model is constructed as a series of linked vectors following the contour of the polymer backbone. Beads located at the midpoint of each vector define centers for long range interaction energy between monomer subunits. A bulk simulation of each coarse-grained polyimide model is performed with a dynamic Monte Carlo procedure. These coarsegrained models are then reverse-mapped to fully atomistic models. The coarse-grained models show the expected trends in decreasing chain dimensions with increasing meta linkage in the APB section of the repeat unit, although these differences were minor due to the relatively short chains simulated here. Considerable differences are seen among the dynamic Monte Carlo properties of the three polyimide isomers. Decreasing relaxation times are seen with increasing meta linkage in the APB section of the repeat unit.

  15. Terrain aided navigation for autonomous underwater vehicles with coarse maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ling; Cheng, Xianghong; Zhu, Yixian

    2016-09-01

    Terrain aided navigation (TAN) is a form of geophysical localization technique for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) operating in GPS-denied environments. TAN performance on sensor-rich AUVs has been evaluated in sea trials. However, many challenges remain before TAN can be successfully implemented on sensor-limited AUVs, especially with coarse maps. To improve TAN performance over coarse maps, a Gaussian process (GP) is proposed for the modeling of bathymetric terrain and integrated into the particle filter (GP-PF). GP is applied to provide not only the bathymetric value prediction through learning a set of bathymetric data from coarse maps but also the variance of the prediction. As a measurement update, calculated on bathymetric deviation is performed through the PF to obtain absolute and bounded positioning accuracy. Through the analysis of TAN performance on experimental data for two different terrains with map resolutions of 10–50 m, both the ability of the proposed model to represent the actual bathymetric terrain with accuracy and the effect of the GP-PF for TAN on sensor-limited systems in suited terrain are demonstrated. The experiment results further verify that there is an inverse relationship between the coarseness of the map and the overall TAN accuracy in rough terrains, but there is hardly any relationship between them in relatively flat terrains.

  16. 7. DETAIL OF ROOM BELOW GRIZZLY SHOWING BOTTOM OF COARSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL OF ROOM BELOW GRIZZLY SHOWING BOTTOM OF COARSE ORE BIN AND CHUTE TO BEGINNING OF CONVEYOR BELT, SOUTH VIEW. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Sampling Building & Ore Receiving Platform, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  17. Coarse-graining stochastic biochemical networks: adiabaticity and fast simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nemenman, Ilya; Sinitsyn, Nikolai; Hengartner, Nick

    2008-01-01

    We propose a universal approach for analysis and fast simulations of stiff stochastic biochemical kinetics networks, which rests on elimination of fast chemical species without a loss of information about mesoscoplc, non-Poissonian fluctuations of the slow ones. Our approach, which is similar to the Born-Oppenhelmer approximation in quantum mechanics, follows from the stochastic path Integral representation of the cumulant generating function of reaction events. In applications with a small number of chemIcal reactions, It produces analytical expressions for cumulants of chemical fluxes between the slow variables. This allows for a low-dimensional, Interpretable representation and can be used for coarse-grained numerical simulation schemes with a small computational complexity and yet high accuracy. As an example, we derive the coarse-grained description for a chain of biochemical reactions, and show that the coarse-grained and the microscopic simulations are in an agreement, but the coarse-gralned simulations are three orders of magnitude faster.

  18. On coarse projective integration for atomic deposition in amorphous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Claire Y. E-mail: meister@unm.edu Sinno, Talid; Han, Sang M. E-mail: meister@unm.edu; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis A. E-mail: meister@unm.edu

    2015-10-07

    Direct molecular dynamics simulation of atomic deposition under realistic conditions is notoriously challenging because of the wide range of time scales that must be captured. Numerous simulation approaches have been proposed to address the problem, often requiring a compromise between model fidelity, algorithmic complexity, and computational efficiency. Coarse projective integration, an example application of the “equation-free” framework, offers an attractive balance between these constraints. Here, periodically applied, short atomistic simulations are employed to compute time derivatives of slowly evolving coarse variables that are then used to numerically integrate differential equations over relatively large time intervals. A key obstacle to the application of this technique in realistic settings is the “lifting” operation in which a valid atomistic configuration is recreated from knowledge of the coarse variables. Using Ge deposition on amorphous SiO{sub 2} substrates as an example application, we present a scheme for lifting realistic atomistic configurations comprised of collections of Ge islands on amorphous SiO{sub 2} using only a few measures of the island size distribution. The approach is shown to provide accurate initial configurations to restart molecular dynamics simulations at arbitrary points in time, enabling the application of coarse projective integration for this morphologically complex system.

  19. Identification of a New Isotope 156Pm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Kotoyuki; Kawase, Yoichi; Funakoshi, Yoshihiro

    1986-03-01

    A new nuclide 156Pm has been identified among the fission products of 235U using the on-line isotope separator (KUR-ISOL) for mass separation and identification. The atomic number has been identified by the energies of X rays and γ rays emitted. The half-life of 29± 2 sec obtained for 156Pm is consistent with the prediction based on the gross theory of β-decay of Takahashi et al.

  20. Glucocorticoid activity detected by in vivo zebrafish assay and in vitro glucocorticoid receptor bioassay at environmental relevant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiyu; Jia, Ai; Snyder, Shane A; Gong, Zhiyuan; Lam, Siew Hong

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoids are pharmaceutical contaminants of emerging concern due to their incomplete removal during wastewater treatment, increased presence in aquatic environment and their biological potency. The zebrafish is a popular model for aquatic toxicology and environmental risk assessment. This study aimed to determine if glucocorticoids at environmental concentrations would perturb expression of selected glucocorticoid-responsive genes in zebrafish and to investigate their potentials as an in vivo zebrafish assay in complementing in vitro glucocorticoid receptor bioassay. The relative expression of eleven glucocorticoid-responsive genes in zebrafish larvae and liver of adult male zebrafish exposed to three representative glucocorticoids (dexamethasone, prednisolone and triamcinolone) was determined. The expression of pepck, baiap2 and pxr was up-regulated in zebrafish larvae and the expression of baiap2, pxr and mmp-2 was up-regulated in adult zebrafish exposed to glucocorticoids at concentrations equivalent to total glucocorticoids reported in environmental samples. The responsiveness of the specific genes were sufficiently robust in zebrafish larvae exposed to a complex environmental sample detected with in vitro glucocorticoid activity equivalent to 478 pM dexamethasone (DEX-EQ) and confirmed to contain low concentration (0.2 ng/L or less) of the targeted glucocorticoids, and possibly other glucocorticoid-active compounds. The findings provided in vivo relevance to the in vitro glucocorticoid activity and suggested that the environmental sample can perturb glucocorticoid-responsive genes in its original, or half the diluted, concentration as may be found in the environment. The study demonstrated the important complementary roles of in vivo zebrafish and in vitro bioassays coupled with analytical chemistry in monitoring environmental glucocorticoid contaminants.

  1. The distribution of PM10 and PM2.5 carbonaceous aerosol in Baotou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haijun; He, Jiang; Zhao, Boyi; Zhang, Lijun; Fan, Qingyun; Lü, Changwei; Dudagula; Liu, Tao; Yuan, Yinghui

    2016-09-01

    Particulate matter (PM), including PM10 and PM2.5, is one of the major impacts on air quality, visibility, climate change, earth radiation balance, and public health. Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) are the major components of PM. 804 samples (PM10 and PM2.5) were simultaneously collected from six urban sites covering 3 districts in Baotou, in January, April, September, and November 2014. As to a long-term study on the effects of carbonaceous aerosol, data were collected annually at Environmental Protection Agency of Baotou (EPB). The concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5, the spatial distribution and content of OC and EC, the relationship between OC and EC, and the formation of secondary organic carbon (SOC) have been investigated. The findings indicated that the concentrations of these particle matter are higher than that in US or European standards. The average concentrations of OC in PM10 and PM2.5 follow the order: January > November > April > September; and for EC in PM10 and PM2.5 follow the order: January > November > September > April. Affected by metrological factors, it was indicated that high wind speed and low relative humidity were beneficial for removal of OC and EC in January and November. Pearson correlations and cluster analysis on OC and EC concentrations in PM10 and PM2.5 with gaseous pollutants (SO2, NO2, and CO) suggested that OC shared the same emission sources with SO2 and CO from combustion, while EC's sources mainly came from vehicles exhaust and combustion which contributed to NO2 as well. The OC concentration is mainly primary in warm months, while it appears secondary in cold months in Baotou. There is a common characteristic among the cities with higher SOC in winter, wherever the coal combustion can lead to the severe pollution. This work is important for the construction of the database of OC and EC concentrations in PM10 and PM2.5 at spatial and time intervals, and it can provide scientific suggestion for similar PM

  2. Chemical-mineralogical characterisation of coarse recycled concrete aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Limbachiya, M.C. . E-mail: m.limbachiya@kingston.ac.uk; Marrocchino, E.; Koulouris, A.

    2007-07-01

    The construction industry is now putting greater emphasis than ever before on increasing recycling and promoting more sustainable waste management practices. In keeping with this approach, many sectors of the industry have actively sought to encourage the use of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) as an alternative to primary aggregates in concrete production. The results of a laboratory experimental programme aimed at establishing chemical and mineralogical characteristics of coarse RCA and its likely influence on concrete performance are reported in this paper. Commercially produced coarse RCA and natural aggregates (16-4 mm size fraction) were tested. Results of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses showed that original source of RCA had a negligible effect on the major elements and a comparable chemical composition between recycled and natural aggregates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses results indicated the presence of calcite, portlandite and minor peaks of muscovite/illite in recycled aggregates, although they were directly proportioned to their original composition. The influence of 30%, 50%, and 100% coarse RCA on the chemical composition of equal design strength concrete has been established, and its suitability for use in a concrete application has been assessed. In this work, coarse RCA was used as a direct replacement for natural gravel in concrete production. Test results indicated that up to 30% coarse RCA had no effect on the main three oxides (SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO) of concrete, but thereafter there was a marginal decrease in SiO{sub 2} and increase in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO contents with increase in RCA content in the mix, reflecting the original constituent's composition.

  3. Chemical-mineralogical characterisation of coarse recycled concrete aggregate.

    PubMed

    Limbachiya, M C; Marrocchino, E; Koulouris, A

    2007-01-01

    The construction industry is now putting greater emphasis than ever before on increasing recycling and promoting more sustainable waste management practices. In keeping with this approach, many sectors of the industry have actively sought to encourage the use of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) as an alternative to primary aggregates in concrete production. The results of a laboratory experimental programme aimed at establishing chemical and mineralogical characteristics of coarse RCA and its likely influence on concrete performance are reported in this paper. Commercially produced coarse RCA and natural aggregates (16-4 mm size fraction) were tested. Results of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses showed that original source of RCA had a negligible effect on the major elements and a comparable chemical composition between recycled and natural aggregates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses results indicated the presence of calcite, portlandite and minor peaks of muscovite/illite in recycled aggregates, although they were directly proportioned to their original composition. The influence of 30%, 50%, and 100% coarse RCA on the chemical composition of equal design strength concrete has been established, and its suitability for use in a concrete application has been assessed. In this work, coarse RCA was used as a direct replacement for natural gravel in concrete production. Test results indicated that up to 30% coarse RCA had no effect on the main three oxides (SiO2, Al2O3 and CaO) of concrete, but thereafter there was a marginal decrease in SiO2 and increase in Al2O3 and CaO contents with increase in RCA content in the mix, reflecting the original constituent's composition.

  4. Benthic invertebrate bioassays with toxic sediment and pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giesy, John P.; Rosiu, Cornell J.; Graney, Robert L.; Henry, Mary G.

    1990-01-01

    The relative sensitivities of bioassays to determine the toxicity of sediments were investigated and three methods of making the sample dilutions required to generate dose-response relationships were compared. The assays studied were: (a) Microtox®, a 15-min assay ofPhotobacterium phosphoreum bioluminescence inhibition by pore water; (b) 48-h Daphnia magnalethality test in pore water; (c) 10-d subchronic assay of lethality to and reduction of weight gain by Chironomus tentans performed in either whole sediment or pore water; (d) 168-h acute lethality assay of Hexagenia limbata in either whole sediment or pore water. The three methods of diluting sediments were: (a) extracting pore water from the toxic location and dilution with pore water from the control station; (b) diluting whole sediment from the toxic location with control whole sediment from a reference location, then extracting pore water; and (c) diluting toxic, whole sediment with whole sediment from a reference location, then using the whole sediment in bioassays. Based on lethality, H. limbata was the most sensitive organism to the toxicity of Detroit River sediment. Lethality of D. magna in pore water was similar to that of H. limbata in whole sediment and can be used to predict effects of whole sediment toxicity to H. limbata. The concentration required to cause a 50% reduction in C. tentans growth (10-d EC50) was approximately that which caused 50% lethality of D. magna (48-h LC50) and was similar to the toxicity that restricts benthic invertebrate colonization of contaminated sediments. While the three dilution techniques gave similar results with some assays, they gave very different results in other assays. The dose-response relationships determined by the three dilution techniques would be expected to vary with sediment, toxicant and bioassay type, and the dose-response relationship derived from each technique needs to be interpreted accordingly.

  5. Kerb and urban increment of highly time-resolved trace elements in PM10, PM2.5 and PM1.0 winter aerosol in London during ClearfLo 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, S.; Slowik, J. G.; Furger, M.; Zotter, P.; Bukowiecki, N.; Dressler, R.; Flechsig, U.; Appel, K.; Green, D. C.; Tremper, A. H.; Young, D. E.; Williams, P. I.; Allan, J. D.; Herndon, S. C.; Williams, L. R.; Mohr, C.; Xu, L.; Ng, N. L.; Detournay, A.; Barlow, J. F.; Halios, C. H.; Fleming, Z. L.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2015-03-01

    Ambient concentrations of trace elements with 2 h time resolution were measured in PM10-2.5, PM2.5-1.0 and PM1.0-0.3 size ranges at kerbside, urban background and rural sites in London during winter 2012. Samples were collected using rotating drum impactors (RDIs) and subsequently analysed with synchrotron radiation-induced X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-XRF). Quantification of kerb and urban increments (defined as kerb-to-urban and urban-to-rural concentration ratios, respectively), and assessment of diurnal and weekly variability provided insight into sources governing urban air quality and the effects of urban micro-environments on human exposure. Traffic-related elements yielded the highest kerb increments, with values in the range of 10.4 to 16.6 for SW winds (3.3-6.9 for NE) observed for elements influenced by brake wear (e.g. Cu, Sb, Ba) and 5.7 to 8.2 for SW (2.6-3.0 for NE) for other traffic-related processes (e.g. Cr, Fe, Zn). Kerb increments for these elements were highest in the PM10-2.5 mass fraction, roughly twice that of the PM1.0-0.3 fraction. These elements also showed the highest urban increments (~ 3.0), although no difference was observed between brake wear and other traffic-related elements. All elements influenced by traffic exhibited higher concentrations during morning and evening rush hours, and on weekdays compared to weekends, with the strongest trends observed at the kerbside site, and additionally enhanced by winds coming directly from the road, consistent with street canyon effects. Elements related to mineral dust (e.g. Al, Si, Ca, Sr) showed significant influences from traffic-induced resuspension, as evidenced by moderate kerb (3.4-5.4 for SW, 1.7-2.3 for NE) and urban (~ 2) increments and increased concentrations during peak traffic flow. Elements related to regional transport showed no significant enhancement at kerb or urban sites, with the exception of PM10-2.5 sea salt (factor of up to 2), which may be influenced by

  6. Kerb and urban increment of highly time-resolved trace elements in PM10, PM2.5 and PM1.0 winter aerosol in London during ClearfLo 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, S.; Slowik, J. G.; Furger, M.; Zotter, P.; Bukowiecki, N.; Dressler, R.; Flechsig, U.; Appel, K.; Green, D. C.; Tremper, A. H.; Young, D. E.; Williams, P. I.; Allan, J. D.; Herndon, S. C.; Williams, L. R.; Mohr, C.; Xu, L.; Ng, N. L.; Detournay, A.; Barlow, J. F.; Halios, C. H.; Fleming, Z. L.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2014-06-01

    Ambient concentrations of trace elements with 2 h time resolution were measured in PM10-2.5, PM2.5-1.0 and PM1.0-0.3 size ranges at kerbside, urban background and rural sites in London during winter 2012. Samples were collected using rotating drum impactors (RDIs) and subsequently analysed with synchrotron radiation-induced X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-XRF). Quantification of kerb and urban increments (defined as kerb-to-urban and urban-to-rural concentration ratios, respectively), and assessment of diurnal and weekly variability provided insight into sources governing urban air quality and the effects of urban micro-environments on human exposure. Traffic-related elements yielded the highest kerb increments, with values in the range of 11.6 to 18.5 for SW winds (3.6-9.4 for NE) observed for elements influenced by brake wear (e.g. Cu, Sb, Ba) and 5.6 to 8.0 for SW (2.6-6.5 for NE) for other traffic-related processes (e.g. Cr, Fe, Zn). Kerb increments for these elements were highest in the PM10-2.5 mass fraction, roughly 3 times that of the PM1.0-0.3 fraction. These elements also showed the highest urban increments (∼3.0), although no difference was observed between brake wear and other traffic-related elements. Traffic-related elements exhibited higher concentrations during morning and evening rush hour, and on weekdays compared to weekends, with the strongest trends observed at the kerbside site, and additionally enhanced by winds coming directly from the road, consistent with street canyon effects. Elements related to mineral dust (e.g. Al, Ca, Sr) showed significant influences from traffic-induced resuspension, as evidenced by moderate kerb (2.0-4.1 for SW, 1.4-2.1 for NE) and urban (1.7-2.3) increments and increased concentrations during peak traffic flow. Elements related to regional transport showed no significant enhancement at kerb or urban sites, with the exception of PM10-2.5 sea salt (factor of 1.5-2.0), which may be influenced by traffic

  7. Efficiency of Big Spring Number Eight (BSNE) and Modified Wilson and Cook (MWAC) samplers to collect PM10, PM2.5 and PM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Mariano J.; Funk, Roger; Buschiazzo, Daniel E.

    2016-06-01

    The internal efficiency of Big Spring Number Eight (BSNE) and Modified Wilson and Cook (MWAC) samplers for trapping PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 were tested in a wind tunnel, at two wind speeds (3.0 and 6.8 m s-1) in the saltation zone (SAZ) and the suspension zone (SAZ). PM concentrations measured in the inlet and the outlet of both samplers were correlated and the slopes of fitting equations were used for calculating sampling efficiencies. Results showed that BSNE efficiencies ranged from 12% to 32% for PM10, from 0% to 19% for PM2.5 and from 0% to 12% for PM1. The BSNE's efficiency decreased with decreasing particle sizes in SAZ and SUZ at both wind speeds as a consequence of the very low deposition velocity of the finest size particles. The BSNE's efficiency increased with increasing wind speed in SAZ for PM10 and PM2.5 and in SUZ for PM2.5. The MWAC's efficiency ranged from 1% to 20% for PM10, from 0% to 15% for PM2.5 and from 0% to 16% for PM1. The MWAC efficiency was 0% for PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 in the SUZ at 3 m s-1 and for PM2.5 and PM1 in the SUZ at 6.8 m s-1. These results provide evidence that the efficiency of BSNE and MWAC for trapping PM10 change with wind speed and position of the sampler. Results also show that BSNEs and MWACs can potentially be used for PM10 emission studies but more research is needed in order to understand and improve their efficiency.

  8. 40 CFR Table C-4 to Subpart C of... - Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Table C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of Environment... Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-4 Table C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5...

  9. 40 CFR Table C-4 to Subpart C of... - Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Table C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of Environment... Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-4 Table C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5...

  10. Improved high-throughput bioassay for Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As we gain more information through functional genomic studies of Rhyzopertha dominica (F.), we need a high throughput bioassay system to screen potential biopesticides. R. dominica is an internal feeder during immature stages and presents unique challenges with traditional bioassay methods. Our pri...

  11. A LABORATORY BIOASSAY FOR MONITORING RESISTANCE IN TARNISHED PLANT BUG POPULATIONS TO NEONICOTINOID INSECTICIDES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory bioassay was developed for testing tarnished plant bug populations for resistance development to the neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid and thiamethoxam. The bioassay allows for the determination of LC50 values by feeding known doses of the insecticides to adult tarnished plant bu...

  12. Comparison of two mosquito bioassay methods for the estimate of minimum effective dose in repellents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is expected that laboratory-based repellent bioassays should reliably evaluate the efficacy of compounds that deter mosquito feeding behavior. The variety of repellent bioassays available allows for flexibility in design, but makes it difficult to compare any two methods, including in vitro and i...

  13. Profiling animal toxicants by automatically mining public bioassay data: a big data approach for computational toxicology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Zhu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    In vitro bioassays have been developed and are currently being evaluated as potential alternatives to traditional animal toxicity models. Already, the progress of high throughput screening techniques has resulted in an enormous amount of publicly available bioassay data having been generated for a large collection of compounds. When a compound is tested using a collection of various bioassays, all the testing results can be considered as providing a unique bio-profile for this compound, which records the responses induced when the compound interacts with different cellular systems or biological targets. Profiling compounds of environmental or pharmaceutical interest using useful toxicity bioassay data is a promising method to study complex animal toxicity. In this study, we developed an automatic virtual profiling tool to evaluate potential animal toxicants. First, we automatically acquired all PubChem bioassay data for a set of 4,841 compounds with publicly available rat acute toxicity results. Next, we developed a scoring system to evaluate the relevance between these extracted bioassays and animal acute toxicity. Finally, the top ranked bioassays were selected to profile the compounds of interest. The resulting response profiles proved to be useful to prioritize untested compounds for their animal toxicity potentials and form a potential in vitro toxicity testing panel. The protocol developed in this study could be combined with structure-activity approaches and used to explore additional publicly available bioassay datasets for modeling a broader range of animal toxicities.

  14. A Bioassay for Determining Resistance Levels in Tarnished Plant Bug Populations to Neonicotinoid Insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory bioassay was developed and used to test field populations of the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), for resistance development to the neonicitinoid insecticides imidacloprid (Trimax®) and thiamethoxam (Centric®). The bioassay determined LC50 values by feeding...

  15. Immunochemical technologies for replacement of rodent bioassays in sensitive detection of toxins in foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid sensitive assays for biothreat toxins that can be used to detect intentionally contaminated foods are now typically performed via bioassay in live mice. While bioassay provides essential data on bioavailability, animal models are technically, fiscally, and ethically challenging. Through carefu...

  16. Chemical composition of PM2.5 and PM10 in Mexico City during winter 1997.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Edgerton, Sylvia A; Vega, Elizabeth

    2002-03-27

    PM2.5 and PM10 were measured over 24-h intervals at six core sites and at 25 satellite sites in and around Mexico City from 23 February to 22 March 1997. In addition, four 6-h samples were taken each day at three of the core sites. Sampling locations were selected to represent regional, central city, commercial, residential, and industrial portions of the city. Mass and light transmission concentrations were determined on all of the samples, while elements, ions and carbon were measured on approximately two-thirds of the samples. PM10 concentrations were highly variable, with almost three-fold differences between the highest and lowest concentrations. Fugitive dust was the major cause of PM10 differences, although carbon concentrations were also highly variable among the sampling sites. Approximately 50% of PM10 was in the PM2.5 fraction. The majority of PM mass was comprised of carbon, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and crustal components, but in different proportions on different days and at different sites. The largest fine-particle components were carbonaceous aerosols, constituting approximately 50% of PM2.5 mass, followed by approximately 30% secondary inorganic aerosols and approximately 15% geological material. Geological material is the largest component of PM10, constituting approximately 50% of PM10 mass, followed by approximately 32% carbonaceous aerosols and approximately 17% secondary inorganic aerosols. Sulfate concentrations were twice as high as nitrate concentrations. Sulfate and nitrate were present as ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate. Approximately two-thirds of the ammonium sulfate measured in urban areas appears to have been transported from regions outside of the study domain, rather than formed from emissions in the urban area. Diurnal variations are apparent, with two-fold increases in concentration from night-time to daytime. Morning samples had the highest PM2.5 and PM10 mass, secondary inorganic aerosols and carbon concentrations

  17. Intraurban variability of PM10 and PM2.5 in an Eastern Mediterranean city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoud, Rawad; Shihadeh, Alan. L.; Roumié, Mohamed; Youness, Myriam; Gerard, Jocelyne; Saliba, Nada; Zaarour, Rita; Abboud, Maher; Farah, Wehbeh; Saliba, Najat Aoun

    2011-09-01

    The results of the first large scale chemical characterization of PM10 and PM2.5 at three different sites in the urban city of Beirut, Lebanon, are presented. Between May 2009 and April 2010 a total of 304 PM10 and PM2.5 samples were collected by sampling every sixth day at three different sites in Beirut. Observed mass concentrations varied between 19.7 and 521.2 μg m - 3 for PM10 and between 8.4 and 72.2 μg m - 3 for PM2.5, respectively. Inorganic concentrations accounted for 29.7-35.6 μg m - 3 and 46.0-53.5 μg m - 3 of the total mass of PM10 and PM2.5, respectively. Intra-city temporal and spatial variations were assessed based on the study of three factors: correlation coefficients (R) for PM and chemical components, coefficient of divergence (CODs), and source apportionment using positive matrix factorization (PMF). Based on R and COD of PM concentrations, the three sites appear homogeneous. However, when individual elements were compared, heterogeneity among sites was found. This latter was attributed to the variability in the percent contribution of biogenic and local anthropogenic source factors such as traffic related sources and dust resuspension. Other factors included the proximity to the Mediterranean sea, the population density and the topographical structure of the city. Hence, despite its small size (20.8 km 2), one PM monitoring site does not reflect an accurate PM level in Beirut.

  18. On relationship between aerosols and PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Itaru; Mukai, Sonoyo; Nakata, Makiko

    2015-04-01

    of aerosols, i.e., AOT, volume fraction of fine and coarse mode particles, also single scattering albedo. Here is brief description of our aerosol retrieval and PM2.5 estimation. 1. Atmospheric correction is applied for each channel image based on AERONET measurements, Averaged surface albedo is calculated based on 1 month window, 2. Aerosol optical properties are estimated by using surface albedo and satellite imagery. 3. Obtained columnar AOT information is converted to surface AOT with LIDAR data. 4. PM2.5 distribution is obtained from the relationship given in the above item 3. [Holben et al., 1998] B. N. Holben, T. F. Eck, I. Slutsker, D. Tanré, J.P. Buis, A. Setzer, E. Vermote, J. A. Reagan, Y. Kaufman, T. Nakajima, F. Lavenu, I. Jankowiak, and A. Smirnov, "AERONET - A federated instrument network and data archive for aerosol characterization," Rem. Sens. Environ., Vol. 66, pp. 1-16, 1998. [Smirnov et al., 2000] A. Smirnov, B.N. Holben, D. Savoie, J.M. Prospero, Y.J. Kaufman, D. Tanré, T.F. Eck, and I. Slutsker, "Relationship between column aerosol optical thickness and in situ ground based dust concentrations over Barbados," Geophy. Res. Lett., Vol. 27, pp. 1643-1646, 2000. [Wang and Christopher, 2003] J. Wang and S. A. Christopher, "Intercomparison between satellite-derived aerosol optical thickness and PM2.5 mass: Implications for air quality studies," Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 30, 2095, doi:10.1029/2003GL018174, 2003. [Sano et al., 2010] I. Sano, M. Mukai (Nakata), N. Iguchi, and S. Mukai, "Suspended particulate matter sampling at an urban AERONET site in Japan, part 2: relationship between column aerosol optical thickness and PM2.5 concentration," J. Appl. Remote Sens., Vol. 4, 043504, doi:10.1117/1.3327930, 2010.

  19. Comparison of solid and liquid-phase bioassays using ecoscores to assess contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Lors, Christine; Ponge, Jean-François; Martínez Aldaya, Maite; Damidot, Denis

    2011-10-01

    Bioassays on aqueous and solid phases of contaminated soils were compared, belonging to a wide array of trophic and response levels and using ecoscores for evaluating ecotoxicological and genotoxicological endpoints. The method was applied to four coke factory soils contaminated mainly with PAHs, but also to a lesser extent by heavy metals and cyanides. Aquatic bioassays do not differ from terrestrial bioassays when scaling soils according to toxicity but they are complementary from the viewpoint of ecological relevance. Both aquatic and terrestrial endpoints are strongly correlated with concentrations of 3-ring PAHs. This evaluation procedure allows us to propose a cost-effective battery which embraces a wide array of test organisms and response levels: it includes two rapid bioassays (Microtox(®) and springtail avoidance), a micronucleus test and three bioassays of a longer duration (algal growth, lettuce germination and springtail reproduction). This battery can be recommended for a cost-effective assessment of polluted/remediated soils. PMID:21570756

  20. Evaluation of the mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of motor vehicle emissions in short-term bioassays.

    PubMed Central

    Lewtas, J

    1983-01-01

    Incomplete combustion of fuel in motor vehicles results in the emission of submicron carbonaceous particles which, after cooling and dilution, contain varying quantities of extractable organic constituents. These organics are mutagenic in bacteria. Confirmatory bioassays in mammalian cells provide the capability of detecting chromosomal and DNA damage in addition to gene mutations. In order to evaluate the mutagenicity of these organics in mammalian cells, extractable organics from particle emissions from several diesel and gasoline vehicles were compared in a battery of microbial, mammalian cell and in vivo bioassays. The mammalian cell mutagenicity bioassays were selected to detect gene mutations, DNA damage, and chromosomal effects. Carcinogenesis bioassays conducted included short-term assays for oncogenic transformation and skin tumorigenesis. The results in different assay systems are compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. Good quantitative correlations were observed between several mutagenesis and carcinogenesis bioassays for this series of diesel and gasoline emissions. PMID:6186475

  1. Validation of PM6 & PM7 semiempirical methods on polarizability calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Praveen, P. A.; Babu, R. Ramesh; Ramamurthi, K.

    2015-06-24

    Modern semiempirical methods such as PM6 and PM7 are often used to explore the electronic structure dependent properties of molecules. In this work we report the evaluation of PM6 and PM7 methods towards linear and nonlinear optical polarizability calculations for different molecules and solid nanoclusters. The results are compared with reported experimental results as well as theoretical results from other high level theories for the same systems. It is found that both methods produce accurate results for small molecules and the accuracy increases with the increase in asymmetry of the medium sized organic molecules and accuracy reduces for solid nanoclusters.

  2. A sediment suspension system for bioassays with small aquatic organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt-Dallmier, M. J.; Atchison, G.J.; Steingraeber, M.T.; Knights, B.C.

    1992-01-01

    Exposure of aquatic organisms to suspended sediments can impair growth and survival and increase bioaccumulation of sediment-associated contaminants. However, evaluation of the effects of suspended sediments and their associated contaminants on aquatic organisms has been hampered by the lack of a practical and inexpensive exposure system for conducting bioassays. We present a cost-effective system for assessing the effects of suspended sediments and associated contaminants on small aquatic organisms. A 7-day suspension test was conducted with nominal sediment concentrations ranging from 0.0 To 5.0 g 1-1. The system maintained relatively constant suspended sediment concentrations, as measured by turbidity, and caused minimal mortality to test organisms.

  3. Harvester ant bioassay for assessing hazardous chemical waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Gano, K.A.; Carlile, D.W.; Rogers, L.E.

    1984-12-01

    A technique was developed for using harvester ants, Pogonomyrmex owhyeei, in terrestrial bioassays. Procedures were developed for maintaining stock populations, handling ants, and exposing ants to toxic materials. Relative toxicities were determined by exposing ants to 10 different materials. These materials included three insecticides, Endrin, Aldrin, and Dieldrin; one herbicide, 2,4-D; three oil-like compounds, wood preservative, drilling fluid, and slop oil; and three heavy metals, copper, zinc, and cadmium. Ants were exposed in petri dishes containing soil amended with a particular toxicant. Under these test conditions, ants showed no sensitivity to the metals or 2,4-D. Ants were sensitive to the insecticides and oils in repeated tests, and relative toxicity remained consistent throughout. Aldrin was the most toxic material, followed by Dieldrin, Endrin, wood preservative, drilling fluid, and slop oil. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Efficient algal bioassay based on short-term photosynthetic response

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.M.; Stewart, A.J.; O'Neill, R.V.; Gardner, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for measuring effects of toxicants on algal photosynthesis (H/sup 14/CO/sub 3/ uptake) in 4-h experiments. Results for individual aromatic compounds and the waste-soluble fraction (WSF) of a synthetic oil are presented as examples of applications of the bioassay. The toxicity of the WSF varied among the seven algal species tested, and responses of some species were pH-dependent. Data presented here indicate that algal photosynthesis is inhibited at toxicant concentrations similar to those that cause acute effects in aquatic animals. A model of a pelagic ecosystem is used to demonstrate that even temporary (7-d) inhibition of algal photosynthesis can have a measurable impact on other trophic levels, particularly if the other trophic levels are also experiencing toxic effects.

  5. Use of bioassay methods to evaluate incinerator emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, R.R.; DeMarini, D.M.; Linak, W.P.; Lemieux, P.M.; McSorley, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    The organic components in combustion emissions are composed of thousands of chemicals. Analyzing such a complex mixture for the presence of even a few selected chemicals is difficult and provides information on only a fraction of the chemicals present. Reliance on such limited chemical analysis for determining possible health effects may ignore the contribution of many other chemical components of the effluent. Because combustion emissions are complex mixtures, they have been evaluated as such, rather than by studying a few selected chemicals that might be present. The Salmonella (Ames) assay was used to determine the mutagenicity associated with particles from the effluent of municipal-waste combustors, from ambient air collected near a municipal-waste combustor, and from the effluent of a pilot-sized rotary kiln in which polyethylene was combusted. Filter samples were extracted with dichloromethane, and concentrated extracts were solvent exchanged into dimethyl sulfoxide for bioassay.

  6. Toxicity assessment using different bioassays and microbial biosensors.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sedky H A; Van Ginkel, Steven W; Hussein, Mohamed A M; Abskharon, Romany; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Toxicity assessment of water streams, wastewater, and contaminated sediments, is a very important part of environmental pollution monitoring. Evaluation of biological effects using a rapid, sensitive and cost effective method can indicate specific information on ecotoxicity assessment. Recently, different biological assays for toxicity assessment based on higher and lower organisms such as fish, invertebrates, plants and algal cells, and microbial bioassays have been used. This review focuses on microbial biosensors as an analytical device for environmental, food, and biomedical applications. Different techniques which are commonly used in microbial biosensing include amperometry, potentiometry, conductometry, voltammetry, microbial fuel cells, fluorescence, bioluminescence, and colorimetry. Examples of the use of different microbial biosensors in assessing a variety of environments are summarized. PMID:27071051

  7. Bioassay-guided isolation of antiatherosclerotic phytochemicals from Artocarpus altilis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Deng, Tongle; Lin, Lin; Pan, Yuanjiang; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2006-12-01

    The cytoprotective effects of various solvent extracts of Artocarpus altilis (Parkinson) Fosberg were evaluated. The cytoprotective effects were determined in human U937 cells incubated with oxidized LDL (OxLDL) using the 4-[3-(4-iodophenyl)-2-(4-nitrophenyl)-2H-5-tetrazolio]-1, 3-benzene disulfonate (WST-1) assay. The results demonstrated that the ethyl acetate extract showed cytoprotective activities. To identify the main cytoprotective components, a bioassay guided isolation of the ethyl acetate extract afforded b-sitosterol (1) and six flavonoids (2-7). Their chemical structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic evidence and comparison with literature data. Of these compounds, compound 6 was obtained from A. altilis for the first time. The cytoprotective effect offers good prospects for the medicinal applications of A. altilis.

  8. Acute bioassays with benthic macroinvertebrates conducted in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Whaley, M.; Garcia, R.; Sy, J. )

    1989-10-01

    Several methods of toxicity testing using macroinvertebrates in controlled laboratory experiments have been reported. Researchers conducted bioassays with natural assemblages of benthic macroinvertebrates exposed to several petroleum refinery effluents. They found that the populations of invertebrates declined after only a few days of exposure. The objective of the study was to determine the acute toxic effects of discharge water from a petrochemical complex on a natural assemblage of benthic macroinvertebrates. The discharge water consisted of refinery wastewater and sanitary wastewater, as well as brine discharge from a power/desalination plant. The benthic macroinvertebrates were transplanted from a healthy reef area to the outfall channel receiving the discharge water. The study began on October 7, 1985, and concluded that same week. Any decrease in specific species would indicate that the discharge was toxic to these species. These species could also serve as indicators of toxic conditions at other locations.

  9. A novel bioassay using root re-growth in Lemna.

    PubMed

    Park, Areum; Kim, Youn-Jung; Choi, Eun-Mi; Brown, Murray T; Han, Taejun

    2013-09-15

    A new phytotoxicity test method based on root elongation of three Lemna species (Lemna gibba, L. minor, and L. paucicostata) has been developed. Tests with aquatic plants have, typically, favored measurements on fronds (e.g. frond number, area, biomass) rather than on roots, due, in part, to issues associated with handling fragile roots and the time-consuming procedures of selecting roots with identical root lengths. The present method differs in that roots were excised prior to exposure with subsequent measurements on newly developed roots. Results show that there were species-specific difference in sensitivity to the five metals tested (Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu and Hg), with Ag being the most toxic (EC50=5.3-37.6 μgL(-1)) to all three species, and Cr the least toxic for L. gibba and L. minor (1148.3 and 341.8 μgL(-1), respectively) and Cu for L. paucicostata (470.4 μgL(-1)). Direct comparisons were made with measurements of frond area, which were found to be less sensitive. More generally, root re-growth was shown to reflect the toxic responses of all three Lemna species to these five important metals. The root growth bioassay differs from three internationally standardized methods (ISO, OCED and US EPA) in that it is completed in 48 h, the required volume of test solutions is only 3 ml and non-axenic plants are used. Our results show that the Lemna root method is a simple, rapid, cost-effective, sensitive and precise bioassay to assess the toxic risks of metals and has practical application for monitoring municipal and industrial waste waters where metals are common constituents.

  10. A novel bioassay using root re-growth in Lemna.

    PubMed

    Park, Areum; Kim, Youn-Jung; Choi, Eun-Mi; Brown, Murray T; Han, Taejun

    2013-09-15

    A new phytotoxicity test method based on root elongation of three Lemna species (Lemna gibba, L. minor, and L. paucicostata) has been developed. Tests with aquatic plants have, typically, favored measurements on fronds (e.g. frond number, area, biomass) rather than on roots, due, in part, to issues associated with handling fragile roots and the time-consuming procedures of selecting roots with identical root lengths. The present method differs in that roots were excised prior to exposure with subsequent measurements on newly developed roots. Results show that there were species-specific difference in sensitivity to the five metals tested (Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu and Hg), with Ag being the most toxic (EC50=5.3-37.6 μgL(-1)) to all three species, and Cr the least toxic for L. gibba and L. minor (1148.3 and 341.8 μgL(-1), respectively) and Cu for L. paucicostata (470.4 μgL(-1)). Direct comparisons were made with measurements of frond area, which were found to be less sensitive. More generally, root re-growth was shown to reflect the toxic responses of all three Lemna species to these five important metals. The root growth bioassay differs from three internationally standardized methods (ISO, OCED and US EPA) in that it is completed in 48 h, the required volume of test solutions is only 3 ml and non-axenic plants are used. Our results show that the Lemna root method is a simple, rapid, cost-effective, sensitive and precise bioassay to assess the toxic risks of metals and has practical application for monitoring municipal and industrial waste waters where metals are common constituents. PMID:23917640

  11. Evolving BioAssay Ontology (BAO): modularization, integration and applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The lack of established standards to describe and annotate biological assays and screening outcomes in the domain of drug and chemical probe discovery is a severe limitation to utilize public and proprietary drug screening data to their maximum potential. We have created the BioAssay Ontology (BAO) project (http://bioassayontology.org) to develop common reference metadata terms and definitions required for describing relevant information of low-and high-throughput drug and probe screening assays and results. The main objectives of BAO are to enable effective integration, aggregation, retrieval, and analyses of drug screening data. Since we first released BAO on the BioPortal in 2010 we have considerably expanded and enhanced BAO and we have applied the ontology in several internal and external collaborative projects, for example the BioAssay Research Database (BARD). We describe the evolution of BAO with a design that enables modeling complex assays including profile and panel assays such as those in the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS). One of the critical questions in evolving BAO is the following: how can we provide a way to efficiently reuse and share among various research projects specific parts of our ontologies without violating the integrity of the ontology and without creating redundancies. This paper provides a comprehensive answer to this question with a description of a methodology for ontology modularization using a layered architecture. Our modularization approach defines several distinct BAO components and separates internal from external modules and domain-level from structural components. This approach facilitates the generation/extraction of derived ontologies (or perspectives) that can suit particular use cases or software applications. We describe the evolution of BAO related to its formal structures, engineering approaches, and content to enable modeling of complex assays and integration with other ontologies and

  12. Evolving BioAssay Ontology (BAO): modularization, integration and applications.

    PubMed

    Abeyruwan, Saminda; Vempati, Uma D; Küçük-McGinty, Hande; Visser, Ubbo; Koleti, Amar; Mir, Ahsan; Sakurai, Kunie; Chung, Caty; Bittker, Joshua A; Clemons, Paul A; Brudz, Steve; Siripala, Anosha; Morales, Arturo J; Romacker, Martin; Twomey, David; Bureeva, Svetlana; Lemmon, Vance; Schürer, Stephan C

    2014-01-01

    The lack of established standards to describe and annotate biological assays and screening outcomes in the domain of drug and chemical probe discovery is a severe limitation to utilize public and proprietary drug screening data to their maximum potential. We have created the BioAssay Ontology (BAO) project (http://bioassayontology.org) to develop common reference metadata terms and definitions required for describing relevant information of low-and high-throughput drug and probe screening assays and results. The main objectives of BAO are to enable effective integration, aggregation, retrieval, and analyses of drug screening data. Since we first released BAO on the BioPortal in 2010 we have considerably expanded and enhanced BAO and we have applied the ontology in several internal and external collaborative projects, for example the BioAssay Research Database (BARD). We describe the evolution of BAO with a design that enables modeling complex assays including profile and panel assays such as those in the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS). One of the critical questions in evolving BAO is the following: how can we provide a way to efficiently reuse and share among various research projects specific parts of our ontologies without violating the integrity of the ontology and without creating redundancies. This paper provides a comprehensive answer to this question with a description of a methodology for ontology modularization using a layered architecture. Our modularization approach defines several distinct BAO components and separates internal from external modules and domain-level from structural components. This approach facilitates the generation/extraction of derived ontologies (or perspectives) that can suit particular use cases or software applications. We describe the evolution of BAO related to its formal structures, engineering approaches, and content to enable modeling of complex assays and integration with other ontologies and

  13. Evolving BioAssay Ontology (BAO): modularization, integration and applications.

    PubMed

    Abeyruwan, Saminda; Vempati, Uma D; Küçük-McGinty, Hande; Visser, Ubbo; Koleti, Amar; Mir, Ahsan; Sakurai, Kunie; Chung, Caty; Bittker, Joshua A; Clemons, Paul A; Brudz, Steve; Siripala, Anosha; Morales, Arturo J; Romacker, Martin; Twomey, David; Bureeva, Svetlana; Lemmon, Vance; Schürer, Stephan C

    2014-01-01

    The lack of established standards to describe and annotate biological assays and screening outcomes in the domain of drug and chemical probe discovery is a severe limitation to utilize public and proprietary drug screening data to their maximum potential. We have created the BioAssay Ontology (BAO) project (http://bioassayontology.org) to develop common reference metadata terms and definitions required for describing relevant information of low-and high-throughput drug and probe screening assays and results. The main objectives of BAO are to enable effective integration, aggregation, retrieval, and analyses of drug screening data. Since we first released BAO on the BioPortal in 2010 we have considerably expanded and enhanced BAO and we have applied the ontology in several internal and external collaborative projects, for example the BioAssay Research Database (BARD). We describe the evolution of BAO with a design that enables modeling complex assays including profile and panel assays such as those in the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS). One of the critical questions in evolving BAO is the following: how can we provide a way to efficiently reuse and share among various research projects specific parts of our ontologies without violating the integrity of the ontology and without creating redundancies. This paper provides a comprehensive answer to this question with a description of a methodology for ontology modularization using a layered architecture. Our modularization approach defines several distinct BAO components and separates internal from external modules and domain-level from structural components. This approach facilitates the generation/extraction of derived ontologies (or perspectives) that can suit particular use cases or software applications. We describe the evolution of BAO related to its formal structures, engineering approaches, and content to enable modeling of complex assays and integration with other ontologies and

  14. Indoor/outdoor relationships and mass closure of quasi-ultrafine, accumulation and coarse particles in Barcelona schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, M.; Rivas, I.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; Sunyer, J.; Álvarez-Pedrerol, M.; Bouso, L.; Sioutas, C.

    2014-05-01

    The mass concentration, chemical composition and sources of quasi-ultrafine (quasi-UFP, PM0.25), accumulation (PM0.25-2.5) and coarse mode (PM2.5-10) particles were determined in indoor and outdoor air at 39 schools in Barcelona (Spain). Quasi-UFP mass concentrations measured (25.6 μg m-3 outdoors, 23.4 μg m-3 indoors) are significantly higher than those reported in other studies, and characterised by higher carbonaceous and mineral matter contents and a lower proportion of secondary inorganic ions. Results suggest that quasi-UFPs in Barcelona are affected by local sources in the schools, mainly human activity (e.g. organic material from textiles, etc., contributing 23-46% to total quasi-UFP mass) and playgrounds (in the form of mineral matter, contributing about 9% to the quasi-UFP mass). The particle size distribution patterns of toxicologically relevant metals and major aerosol components was characterised, displaying two modes for most elements and components, and one mode for inorganic salts (ammonium nitrate and sulfate) and elemental carbon (EC). Regarding metals, Ni and Cr were partitioned mainly in quasi-UFPs and could thus be of interest for epidemiological studies, given their high redox properties. Exposure of children to quasi-UFP mass and chemical species was assessed by comparing the concentrations measured at urban background and traffic areas schools. Finally, three main indoor sources across all size fractions were identified by assessing indoor / outdoor ratios (I / O) of PM species used as their tracers: human activity (organic material), cleaning products, paints and plastics (Cl- source), and a metallic mixed source (comprising combinations of Cu, Zn, Co, Cd, Pb, As, V and Cr). Our results support the need to enforce targeted legislation to determine a minimum "safe" distance between major roads and newly built schools to reduce exposure to traffic-derived metals in quasi-UFPs.

  15. Chronic and Initiation/Promotion Skin Bioassays of Petroleum Refinery Streams.

    PubMed Central

    Skisak, C; Furedi-Machacek, EM; Schmitt, SS; Swanson, MS; Vernot, EH

    1994-01-01

    Nine refinery streams were tested in both chronic and initiation/promotion (I/P) skin bioassays. In the chronic bioassay, groups of 50 C3H/HeJ mice received twice weekly applications of 50 microl of test article for at least 2 years. In the initiation phase of the I/P bioassay, groups of CD-1 mice received an initiating dose of 50 microl of test article for 5 consecutive days, followed by promotion with 50 microl of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (0.01% w/v in acetone) for 25 weeks. In the promotion phase of the I/P bioassay, CD-1 mice were initiated with 50 microl of 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (0.1% w/v in acetone) or acetone, followed by promotion with 50 microl of test article twice weekly for 25 weeks. The most volatile of the streams, sweetened naphtha, and the least volatile, vacuum residuum, were noncarcinogenic in both assays. Middle distillates, with a boiling range of 150 degrees-370 degreesC, demonstrated carcinogenic activity in the chronic bioassay and acted as promoters but not initiators in the I/P bioassay. Untreated mineral oil streams displayed initiating activity and were carcinogenic in the chronic bioassay, presumably due to the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of requisite size and structure. A highly solvent-refined mineral oil stream lacked initiating activity. These results indicate that the I/P bioassay, which takes 6 months to complete, may be a good qualitative predictor of the results of a chronic bioassay, at least for petroleum streams. Furthermore, the I/P bioassay can provide insight into possible mechanisms of tumor development. Images p82-a PMID:9719673

  16. Apparatus for alternatives to PM-10 sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Wente, M.; Wente, W.E.; Moore, M.E.

    1995-12-31

    Because of questions of whether PM-10 adequately characterizes the size fraction that is a challenge to human health, we have developed devices and samplers that will provide PM-2.5 and PM-1 size fractions. Each of these systems utilizes a cyclone for the fractionation process. Models have been developed to predict both the cutpoint and the fractional efficiency curves for single inlet cyclones are geometrically similar to a form that was utilized by Lapple. Modeling has been done with two geometrical forms of multiple inlet cyclones. Each form has six inlets, and one form has the body shape of a Lapple cyclone, while the other has a shortened body. The models for cutpoints are based on log-linear correlations between D{sub 0.5}/d{sub o} and a flow Reynolds number; where D{sub 0.5} = cutpoint size, d{sub o} = cyclone body diameter, and the flow Reynolds number is based on the inlet velocity and the outlet tube diameter. PM-1 and PM-2.5 fractionators with flow rates of 16.7 L/min have been tested in both laboratory and field environments. One version of the fractionator is a stand-alone cylone that has been commercialized by URG, Inc., and a second version is made as an adaptor to the Graseby Andersen Inc. Model 246 inlet for the dichotomous sampler. A third version of the PM-2.5 inlet is one that includes its own wind speed decelerator, bug screen and cyclonic pre-fractionator, where the latter device is used for reducing the aerosol mass that will be deposited in the PM-2.5 cyclone. A prototype field sampler has been developed that incorporates flow control, and a easily changeable filter cartridge.

  17. Source identification and apportionment of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 in iron and steel scrap smelting factory environment using PMF, PCFA and UNMIX receptor models.

    PubMed

    Ogundele, Lasun T; Owoade, Oyediran K; Olise, Felix S; Hopke, Philip K

    2016-10-01

    To identify the potential sources responsible for the particulate matter emission from secondary iron and steel smelting factory environment, PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 particles were collected using the low-volume air samplers twice a week for a year. The samples were analyzed for the elemental and black carbon content using x-ray fluorescence spectrometer and optical transmissometer, respectively. The average mass concentrations were 216.26, 151.68, and 138. 62 μg/m(3) for PM2.5 and 331.36, 190.01, and 184.60 μg/m(3) for PM2.5-10 for the production, outside M1 and outside M2 sites, respectively. The same size resolved data set were used as input for the positive matrix factorization (PMF), principal component factor analysis (PCFA), and Unmix (UNMIX) receptor modeling in order to identify the possible sources of particulate matter and their contribution. The PMF resolved four sources with their respective contributions were metal processing (33 %), e-waste (33 %), diesel emission (22 %) and soil (12 %) for PM2.5, and coking (50 %), soil (29 %), metal processing (16 %) and diesel combustion (5 %) for PM2.5-10. PCFA identified soil, metal processing, Pb source, and diesel combustion contributing 45, 41, 9, and 5 %, respectively to PM2.5 while metal processing, soil, coal combustion and open burning contributed 43, 38, 12, and 7 %, respectively to the PM2.5-10. Also, UNMIX identified metal processing, soil, and diesel emission with 43, 42 and 15 % contributions, respectively for the fine fraction, and metal processing (71 %), soil (21 %) and unidentified source (1 %) for the coarse fraction. The study concluded that metal processing and e-waste are the major sources contributing to the fine fraction while coking and soil contributed to the coarse fraction within the factory environment. The application of PMF, PCFA and UNMIX receptor models improved the source identification and apportionment of particulate matter drive in the study area. PMID:27645143

  18. Source identification and apportionment of PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 in iron and steel scrap smelting factory environment using PMF, PCFA and UNMIX receptor models.

    PubMed

    Ogundele, Lasun T; Owoade, Oyediran K; Olise, Felix S; Hopke, Philip K

    2016-10-01

    To identify the potential sources responsible for the particulate matter emission from secondary iron and steel smelting factory environment, PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 particles were collected using the low-volume air samplers twice a week for a year. The samples were analyzed for the elemental and black carbon content using x-ray fluorescence spectrometer and optical transmissometer, respectively. The average mass concentrations were 216.26, 151.68, and 138. 62 μg/m(3) for PM2.5 and 331.36, 190.01, and 184.60 μg/m(3) for PM2.5-10 for the production, outside M1 and outside M2 sites, respectively. The same size resolved data set were used as input for the positive matrix factorization (PMF), principal component factor analysis (PCFA), and Unmix (UNMIX) receptor modeling in order to identify the possible sources of particulate matter and their contribution. The PMF resolved four sources with their respective contributions were metal processing (33 %), e-waste (33 %), diesel emission (22 %) and soil (12 %) for PM2.5, and coking (50 %), soil (29 %), metal processing (16 %) and diesel combustion (5 %) for PM2.5-10. PCFA identified soil, metal processing, Pb source, and diesel combustion contributing 45, 41, 9, and 5 %, respectively to PM2.5 while metal processing, soil, coal combustion and open burning contributed 43, 38, 12, and 7 %, respectively to the PM2.5-10. Also, UNMIX identified metal processing, soil, and diesel emission with 43, 42 and 15 % contributions, respectively for the fine fraction, and metal processing (71 %), soil (21 %) and unidentified source (1 %) for the coarse fraction. The study concluded that metal processing and e-waste are the major sources contributing to the fine fraction while coking and soil contributed to the coarse fraction within the factory environment. The application of PMF, PCFA and UNMIX receptor models improved the source identification and apportionment of particulate matter drive in the study area.

  19. Redox activity and chemical speciation of size fractioned PM in the communities of the Los Angeles-Long Beach harbor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S.; Polidori, A.; Arhami, M.; Shafer, M. M.; Schauer, J. J.; Cho, A.; Sioutas, C.

    2008-11-01

    In this study, two different types of assays were used to quantitatively measure the redox activity of PM and to examine its intrinsic toxicity: 1) in vitro exposure to rat alveolar macrophage (AM) cells using dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) as the fluorescent probe (macrophage ROS assay), and: 2) consumption of dithiothreitol (DTT) in a cell-free system (DTT assay). Coarse (PM10-2.5), accumulation (PM2.5-0.25), and quasi-ultrafine (quasi-UF, PM0.25) mode particles were collected weekly at five sampling sites in the Los Angeles-Long Beach harbor and at one site near the University of Southern California campus (urban site). All PM samples were analyzed for organic (total and water-soluble) and elemental carbon, organic species, inorganic ions, and total and water-soluble elements. Quasi-UF mode particles showed the highest redox activity at all Long Beach sites (on both a per-mass and per-air volume basis). A significant association (R2=0.61) was observed between the two assays, indicating that macrophage ROS and DTT levels are affected at least partially by similar PM species. Relatively small variation was observed for the DTT measurements across all size fractions and sites, whereas macrophage ROS levels showed more significant ranges across the three different particle size modes and throughout the sites (coefficients of variation, or CVs, were 0.35, 0.24 and 0.53 for quasi-UF, accumulation, and coarse mode particles, respectively). Association between the PM constituents and the redox activity was further investigated using multiple linear regression models. The results showed that OC was the most important component influencing the DTT activity of PM samples. The variability of macrophage ROS was explained by changes in OC concentrations and water-soluble vanadium (probably originating from ship emissions bunker oil combustion). The multiple regression models were used to predict the average diurnal DTT levels as a function of the OC concentration at

  20. Size resolved metal distribution in the PM matter of the city of Turin (Italy).

    PubMed

    Malandrino, Mery; Casazza, Marco; Abollino, Ornella; Minero, Claudio; Maurino, Valter

    2016-03-01

    A work on the characterization of the air quality in the city of Turin was carried out in different sampling periods, reflecting early autumn and winter conditions, including a snow episode during the early 2012 European cold wave. The concentrations of 13 elements in eight size fractions of the aerosol were determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The collection was carried out with a Andersen MkII cascade impactor. The size distribution of elements allowed the identification of three main behavioural types: (a) elements associated with coarse particles (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo and Sn); (b) elements found within fine particles (As, Co, Pb and V) and (c) elements spread throughout the entire size range (Ni and Zn). Principal Component Analysis allowed to examine the relationships between the inorganic elements and to infer about their origin. Chemometric investigation and assessment of similarity in the distribution led to similar conclusions on the sources. The concentration of gaseous trace pollutants (O3, NOx and VOCs) was determined. The concentrations of these pollutants are scarcely correlated with the metal contents of all the size classes of the PM. The differences found in the O3, NO2 and VOCs levels of the two winter campaigns due to the high photochemical reactivity in the period after the snow episode, do not reflect in differences in the metals distribution in the PM. Since PM metals, NOx and VOC have common sources, this behaviour is due to relevant differences in the transformation and deposition processes. PMID:26802934

  1. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products... the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure has been shown... publications: (a) Bigland, C. H. and A. J. DaMassa, “A Bio-Assay for Mycoplasma Gallisepticum.” In:...

  2. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products... the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure has been shown... publications: (a) Bigland, C. H. and A. J. DaMassa, “A Bio-Assay for Mycoplasma Gallisepticum.” In:...

  3. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products... the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure has been shown... publications: (a) Bigland, C. H. and A. J. DaMassa, “A Bio-Assay for Mycoplasma Gallisepticum.” In:...

  4. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products... the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure has been shown... publications: (a) Bigland, C. H. and A. J. DaMassa, “A Bio-Assay for Mycoplasma Gallisepticum.” In:...

  5. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products... the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure has been shown... publications: (a) Bigland, C. H. and A. J. DaMassa, “A Bio-Assay for Mycoplasma Gallisepticum.” In:...

  6. A nucleotide-level coarse-grained model of RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Šulc, Petr; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Louis, Ard A.; Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P. K.

    2014-06-21

    We present a new, nucleotide-level model for RNA, oxRNA, based on the coarse-graining methodology recently developed for the oxDNA model of DNA. The model is designed to reproduce structural, mechanical, and thermodynamic properties of RNA, and the coarse-graining level aims to retain the relevant physics for RNA hybridization and the structure of single- and double-stranded RNA. In order to explore its strengths and weaknesses, we test the model in a range of nanotechnological and biological settings. Applications explored include the folding thermodynamics of a pseudoknot, the formation of a kissing loop complex, the structure of a hexagonal RNA nanoring, and the unzipping of a hairpin motif. We argue that the model can be used for efficient simulations of the structure of systems with thousands of base pairs, and for the assembly of systems of up to hundreds of base pairs. The source code implementing the model is released for public use.

  7. Linear mixing model applied to coarse resolution satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, Brent N.; Shimabukuro, Yosio E.

    1992-01-01

    A linear mixing model typically applied to high resolution data such as Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, Thematic Mapper, and Multispectral Scanner System is applied to the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer coarse resolution satellite data. The reflective portion extracted from the middle IR channel 3 (3.55 - 3.93 microns) is used with channels 1 (0.58 - 0.68 microns) and 2 (0.725 - 1.1 microns) to run the Constrained Least Squares model to generate fraction images for an area in the west central region of Brazil. The derived fraction images are compared with an unsupervised classification and the fraction images derived from Landsat TM data acquired in the same day. In addition, the relationship betweeen these fraction images and the well known NDVI images are presented. The results show the great potential of the unmixing techniques for applying to coarse resolution data for global studies.

  8. Origins of n-alkanes, carbonyl compounds and molecular biomarkers in atmospheric fine and coarse particles of Athens, Greece.

    PubMed

    Andreou, G; Rapsomanikis, S

    2009-10-15

    The abundance and origin of aliphatic hydrocarbons, carbonyl compounds and molecular biomarkers found in the aliphatic fraction of PM(10-2.5) and PM(2.5) in the centre of Athens Greece are discussed in an attempt to reveal seasonal air pollution characteristics of the conurbation. Each extract was fractionated into individual compound classes and was analyzed using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Normal alkanes, ranging from C(14) to C(35), were abundant in PM(10-2.5) and PM(2.5) samples during both sampling campaigns. The daily concentration of total n-alkanes was up to 438 ng m(-3) for PM(10-2.5) and up to 511 ng m(-3) for PM(2.5). Additionally, gaseous concentrations of n-alkanes were calculated, revealing that the relative proportions between gaseous and particle phases of individual compounds may differ significantly between summer and late winter. Normal alkanals and alkan-2-ones were only detected in the fine fraction of particulate matter and their concentrations were much lower than the n-alkane concentrations. Several geochemical parameters were used to qualitatively reconcile the sources of organic aerosol. The carbon preference index (CPI) of the coarse particles in August had the highest value, while in March the leaf wax contribution decreased significantly and the CPI value was very close to unity for both sites. Maximum concentrations of carbonyl compounds were reported in the range of C(15)-C(20), demonstrating that they were formed from anthropogenic activity or from atmospheric oxidative processes. 6, 10, 14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one, a marker of biogenic input, was also detected in our samples. Molecular biomarker compounds confirmed that ca. 60% of the aliphatic fraction on the sampled atmospheric particles originated from petroleum and not from any contemporary biogenic sources. Pristane and phytane were detected in the fine fraction with their presence indicating sources of fossil fuel in the range of C(16)-C(20). At all

  9. PM2.5 and PM10 Emission from Agricultural Soils by Wind Erosion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil tillage and wind erosion are a major source of particulate matter less than 2.5 and 10 µm (PM2.5 and PM10) emission from cultivated soil. Fifteen cultivated soils collected from 5 states were tested as crushed (<2.0 mm) and uncrushed (natural aggregation) at 8, 10, and 13 m s-1 wind velocity in...

  10. Enhancing physiologic simulations using supervised learning on coarse mesh solutions.

    PubMed

    Kolandaivelu, Kumaran; O'Brien, Caroline C; Shazly, Tarek; Edelman, Elazer R; Kolachalama, Vijaya B

    2015-03-01

    Computational modelling of physical and biochemical processes has emerged as a means of evaluating medical devices, offering new insights that explain current performance, inform future designs and even enable personalized use. Yet resource limitations force one to compromise with reduced order computational models and idealized assumptions that yield either qualitative descriptions or approximate, quantitative solutions to problems of interest. Considering endovascular drug delivery as an exemplary scenario, we used a supervised machine learning framework to process data generated from low fidelity coarse meshes and predict high fidelity solutions on refined mesh configurations. We considered two models simulating drug delivery to the arterial wall: (i) two-dimensional drug-coated balloons and (ii) three-dimensional drug-eluting stents. Simulations were performed on computational mesh configurations of increasing density. Supervised learners based on Gaussian process modelling were constructed from combinations of coarse mesh setting solutions of drug concentrations and nearest neighbourhood distance information as inputs, and higher fidelity mesh solutions as outputs. These learners were then used as computationally inexpensive surrogates to extend predictions using low fidelity information to higher levels of mesh refinement. The cross-validated, supervised learner-based predictions improved fidelity as compared with computational simulations performed at coarse level meshes--a result consistent across all outputs and computational models considered. Supervised learning on coarse mesh solutions can augment traditional physics-based modelling of complex physiologic phenomena. By obtaining efficient solutions at a fraction of the computational cost, this framework has the potential to transform how modelling approaches can be applied in the evaluation of medical technologies and their real-time administration in an increasingly personalized fashion. PMID:25652458

  11. Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics: Dissipation Due to Internal Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E

    2001-12-21

    We describe progress on the issue of pathological elastic wave reflection in atomistic and multiscale simulation. First we briefly review Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics (CGMD). Originally CGMD was formulated as a Hamiltonian system in which energy is conserved. This formulation is useful for many applications, but recently CGMD has been extended to include generalized Langevin forces. Here we describe how Langevin dynamics arise naturally in CGMD, and we examine the implication for elastic wave scattering.

  12. Enhancing physiologic simulations using supervised learning on coarse mesh solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kolandaivelu, Kumaran; O'Brien, Caroline C.; Shazly, Tarek; Edelman, Elazer R.; Kolachalama, Vijaya B.

    2015-01-01

    Computational modelling of physical and biochemical processes has emerged as a means of evaluating medical devices, offering new insights that explain current performance, inform future designs and even enable personalized use. Yet resource limitations force one to compromise with reduced order computational models and idealized assumptions that yield either qualitative descriptions or approximate, quantitative solutions to problems of interest. Considering endovascular drug delivery as an exemplary scenario, we used a supervised machine learning framework to process data generated from low fidelity coarse meshes and predict high fidelity solutions on refined mesh configurations. We considered two models simulating drug delivery to the arterial wall: (i) two-dimensional drug-coated balloons and (ii) three-dimensional drug-eluting stents. Simulations were performed on computational mesh configurations of increasing density. Supervised learners based on Gaussian process modelling were constructed from combinations of coarse mesh setting solutions of drug concentrations and nearest neighbourhood distance information as inputs, and higher fidelity mesh solutions as outputs. These learners were then used as computationally inexpensive surrogates to extend predictions using low fidelity information to higher levels of mesh refinement. The cross-validated, supervised learner-based predictions improved fidelity as compared with computational simulations performed at coarse level meshes—a result consistent across all outputs and computational models considered. Supervised learning on coarse mesh solutions can augment traditional physics-based modelling of complex physiologic phenomena. By obtaining efficient solutions at a fraction of the computational cost, this framework has the potential to transform how modelling approaches can be applied in the evaluation of medical technologies and their real-time administration in an increasingly personalized fashion. PMID:25652458

  13. Coarse pointing mechanism assembly for satellite interlink experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeusli, P. A.; Ivorra, M. T.; Gass, V.; Berthoud, J. F.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1975, MECANEX S.A. has been manufacturing components for solar array drives and mechanisms used in space applications. In 1991, work was started in an early phase C (Engineering Model) on a Coarse Pointing Mechanism Assembly (CPMA) for the Semiconductor-laser Inter-satellite Link EXperiment (SILEX). This paper deals with the history, the evolution, and the lessons learned from taking over a pre-design in 1991 to the delivery of last flight models (FM 5 & 6) in 1995.

  14. Systematic and Simulation-Free Coarse Graining of Polymeric Systems: A Structure-based Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Delian; Wang, Qiang

    2015-03-01

    We propose a systematic and simulation-free strategy for coarse graining of multicomponent polymeric systems, where we use the Polymer Reference Interaction Site Model theory, instead of many-chain molecular simulations, to calculate the structure and thermodynamic properties of both the original and coarse-grained (CG) models, and quantitatively examine how the effective CG pair potentials and properties of CG systems vary with the coarse-graining level. Our strategy is general and versatile, is much faster than those using many-chain simulations, and practically solves the transferability problem of coarse graining. As an example, here we apply it to structure-based coarse graining of homopolymer melts, which matches the structure correlations of CG segments between the original and CG systems. Our numerical results clearly show that structure-based coarse graining cannot give thermodynamic consistency between the original and CG systems at any coarse-graining level due to the information loss of coarse graining.

  15. Coarse-Grained Model of SNARE-Mediated Docking

    PubMed Central

    Fortoul, Nicole; Singh, Pankaj; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Bykhovskaia, Maria; Jagota, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic transmission requires that vesicles filled with neurotransmitter molecules be docked to the plasma membrane by the SNARE protein complex. The SNARE complex applies attractive forces to overcome the long-range repulsion between the vesicle and membrane. To understand how the balance between the attractive and repulsive forces defines the equilibrium docked state we have developed a model that combines the mechanics of vesicle/membrane deformation with an apparently new coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex. The coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex is calibrated by comparison with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations as well as by force measurements in laser tweezer experiments. The model for vesicle/membrane interactions includes the forces produced by membrane deformation and hydration or electrostatic repulsion. Combining these two parts, the coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex with membrane mechanics, we study how the equilibrium docked state varies with the number of SNARE complexes. We find that a single SNARE complex is able to bring a typical synaptic vesicle to within a distance of ∼3 nm from the membrane. Further addition of SNARE complexes shortens this distance, but an overdocked state of >4–6 SNAREs actually increases the equilibrium distance. PMID:25954883

  16. Coarse bedload routing and dispersion through tributary confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, Kurt S.; Wilcox, Andrew C.

    2016-07-01

    Sediment routing fundamentally influences channel morphology and the propagation of disturbances such as debris flows. The transport and storage of bedload particles across headwater channel confluences, which may be significant nodes of the channel network in terms of sediment routing, morphology, and habitat, are poorly understood, however. We investigated patterns and processes of sediment routing through headwater confluences by comparing them to published results from lower-gradient confluences and by comparing the dispersive behavior of coarse bedload particles between headwater confluence and non-confluence reaches. We addressed these questions with a field tracer experiment using passive-integrated transponder and radio-frequency identification technology in the East Fork Bitterroot River basin, Montana, USA. Within the confluence zone, tracers tended to be deposited towards scour-hole and channel margins, suggesting narrow, efficient transport corridors that mirror those observed in prior studies, many of which are from finer-grained systems. Coarse particles in some confluence reaches experienced reduced depositional probabilities within the confluence relative to upstream and downstream of the confluence. Analysis of particle transport data suggests that variation in the spatial distribution of coarse-sediment particles may be enhanced by passing through confluences, though further study is needed to evaluate confluence effects on dispersive regimes and sediment routing on broader spatial and temporal scales.

  17. REACH coarse-grained simulation of a cellulose fiber.

    PubMed

    Glass, Dennis C; Moritsugu, Kei; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C

    2012-09-10

    A molecular level understanding of the structure, dynamics and mechanics of cellulose fibers can aid in understanding the recalcitrance of biomass to hydrolysis in cellulosic biofuel production. Here, a residue-scale REACH (Realistic Extension Algorithm via Covariance Hessian) coarse-grained force field was derived from all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the crystalline Iβ cellulose fibril. REACH maps the atomistic covariance matrix onto coarse-grained elastic force constants. The REACH force field was found to reproduce the positional fluctuations and low-frequency vibrational spectra from the all-atom model, allowing elastic properties of the cellulose fibril to be characterized using the coarse-grained force field with a speedup of >20 relative to atomistic MD on systems of the same size. The calculated longitudinal/transversal Young's modulus and the velocity of sound are in agreement with experiment. The persistence length of a 36-chain cellulose microcrystal was estimated to be ~380 μm. Finally, the normal-mode analysis with the REACH force field suggests that intrinsic dynamics might facilitate the deconstruction of the cellulose fibril from the hydrophobic surface.

  18. Coarse Point Cloud Registration by Egi Matching of Voxel Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinhu; Lindenbergh, Roderik; Shen, Yueqian; Menenti, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Laser scanning samples the surface geometry of objects efficiently and records versatile information as point clouds. However, often more scans are required to fully cover a scene. Therefore, a registration step is required that transforms the different scans into a common coordinate system. The registration of point clouds is usually conducted in two steps, i.e. coarse registration followed by fine registration. In this study an automatic marker-free coarse registration method for pair-wise scans is presented. First the two input point clouds are re-sampled as voxels and dimensionality features of the voxels are determined by principal component analysis (PCA). Then voxel cells with the same dimensionality are clustered. Next, the Extended Gaussian Image (EGI) descriptor of those voxel clusters are constructed using significant eigenvectors of each voxel in the cluster. Correspondences between clusters in source and target data are obtained according to the similarity between their EGI descriptors. The random sampling consensus (RANSAC) algorithm is employed to remove outlying correspondences until a coarse alignment is obtained. If necessary, a fine registration is performed in a final step. This new method is illustrated on scan data sampling two indoor scenarios. The results of the tests are evaluated by computing the point to point distance between the two input point clouds. The presented two tests resulted in mean distances of 7.6 mm and 9.5 mm respectively, which are adequate for fine registration.

  19. Resuspension of coarse fuel hot particles in the Chernobyl area.

    PubMed

    Wagenpfeil, F; Tschiersch, J

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of resuspended aerosol in the Chernobyl 30-km exclusion zone have shown coarse fuel hot particles in the activity range 1-12 Bq 137Cs per particle. The particles were sampled with newly designed rotating arm impactors which simultaneously collect during the same experiment three samples with fuel particles in the size ranges larger than 3 microns, larger than 6 microns and larger than 9 microns in geometric diameter. The radionuclide ratios, determined after gamma-spectrometry, were in good agreement with the theoretical calculations for the radionuclide-composition of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant at the moment of the accident and the measured hot particles in soil in the early years after the accident. The number concentrations of airborne hot particles were derived from digital autoradiography. For wind resuspension, maximal concentrations of 2.6 coarse hot particles per 1000 m3 and during agricultural activities 36 coarse hot particles per 1000 m3 were measured. The geometric diameter of single hot particles was estimated to be between 6 and 12 microns.

  20. Coarse graining of force fields for metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Dürholt, Johannes P; Galvelis, Raimondas; Schmid, Rochus

    2016-03-14

    We have adapted our genetic algorithm based optimization approach, originally developed to generate force field parameters from quantum mechanic reference data, to derive a first coarse grained force field for a MOF, taking the atomistic MOF-FF as a reference. On the example of the copper paddle-wheel based HKUST-1, a maximally coarse grained model, using a single bead for each three and four coordinated vertex, was developed as a proof of concept. By adding non-bonded interactions with a modified Buckingham potential, the resulting MOF-FF-CGNB is able to predict local deformation energies of the building blocks as well as bulk properties like the tbovs.pto energy difference or elastic constants in a semi-quantitative way. As expected, the negative thermal expansion of HKUST-1 is not reproduced by the maximally coarse grained model. At the expense of atomic resolution, substantially larger systems (up to tens of nanometers in size) can be simulated with respect to structural and mechanical properties, bridging the gap to the mesoscale. As an example the deformation of the [111] surface of HKUST-1 by a "tip" could be computed without artifacts from periodic images. PMID:26732756

  1. Atomistic and Coarse-grained Simulations of Hexabenzocoronene Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziogos, G.; Megariotis, G.; Theodorou, D. N.

    2016-08-01

    This study concerns atomistic and coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics simulations of pristine hexabenzocoronene (HBC) molecular crystals. HBC is a symmetric graphene flake of nanometric size that falls in the category of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, finding numerous applications in the field of organic electronics. The HBC molecule is simulated in its crystalline phase initially by means of an all-atom representation, where the molecules self- organize into well aligned molecular stacks, which in turn create a perfect monoclinic molecular crystal. The atomistic model reproduces fairly well the structural experimental properties and thus can be used as a reliable starting point for the development of a coarsegrained model following a bottom-up approach. The coarse-grained model is developed by applying Iterative Boltzmann Inversion, a systematic coarse-graining method which reproduces a set of target atomistic radial distribution functions and intramolecular distributions at the coarser level of description. This model allows the simulation of HBC crystals over longer time and length scales. The crystalline phase is analyzed in terms of the Saupe tensor and thermomechanical properties are probed at the atomistic level.

  2. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. We synthesized 70–250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution, using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. Moreover, the material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250–1000 micron thick dense CDC films withmore » up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.« less

  3. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. We synthesized 70–250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution, using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. Moreover, the material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250–1000 micron thick dense CDC films with up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.

  4. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-02-01

    We report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. Using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor, we synthesized 70-250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. The material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250-1000 micron thick dense CDC films with up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.

  5. Tensile fracture of coarse-Grained cast austenitic manganese steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittel, D.; Roman, I.

    1988-09-01

    Tensile fracture of coarse-grained (0.25 to 1 mm) cast austenitic manganese (Hadfield) steels has been investigated. Numerous surface discontinuities nucleate in coarse slip bands, on the heavily deformed surface of tensile specimens. These discontinuities do not propagate radially and final fracture results from central specimen cracking at higher strains. On the microscopic scale, bulk voids nucleate during the entire plastic deformation and they do not coalesce by shear localization (e.g., void-sheet) mechanism. Close voids coalesce by internal necking, whereas distant voids are bridged by means of small voids which nucleate at later stages of the plastic deformation. The high toughness of Hadfield steels is due to their high strain-hardening capacity which stabilizes the plastic deformation, and avoids shear localization and loss of load-bearing capacity. The observed dependence of measured mechanical properties on the specimen’s geometry results from the development of a surface layer which charac-terizes the deformation of this coarse-grained material.

  6. Coarse-grained models for aqueous polyethylene glycol solutions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunsong; Mondal, Jagannath; Yethiraj, Arun

    2014-01-01

    A new coarse-grained force field is developed for polyethylene glycol (PEG) in water. The force field is based on the MARTINI model but with the big multipole water (BMW) model for the solvent. The polymer force field is reparameterized using the MARTINI protocol. The new force field removes the ring-like conformations seen in simulations of short chains with the MARTINI force field; these conformations are not observed in atomistic simulations. We also investigate the effect of using parameters for the end-group that are different from those for the repeat units, with the MARTINI and BMW/MARTINI models. We find that the new BMW/MARTINI force field removes the ring-like conformations seen in the MARTINI models and has more accurate predictions for the density of neat PEG. However, solvent-separated-pairs between chain ends and slow dynamics of the PEG reflect its own artifacts. We also carry out fine-grained simulations of PEG with bundled water clusters and show that the water bundling can lead to ring-like conformations of the polymer molecules. The simulations emphasize the pitfalls of coarse-graining several molecules into one site and suggest that polymer-solvent systems might be a stringent test for coarse-grained force fields. PMID:24350686

  7. Bayesian calibration of coarse-grained forces: Efficiently addressing transferability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrone, Paul N.; Rosch, Thomas W.; Phelan, Frederick R.

    2016-04-01

    Generating and calibrating forces that are transferable across a range of state-points remains a challenging task in coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics. In this work, we present a coarse-graining workflow, inspired by ideas from uncertainty quantification and numerical analysis, to address this problem. The key idea behind our approach is to introduce a Bayesian correction algorithm that uses functional derivatives of CG simulations to rapidly and inexpensively recalibrate initial estimates f0 of forces anchored by standard methods such as force-matching. Taking density-temperature relationships as a running example, we demonstrate that this algorithm, in concert with various interpolation schemes, can be used to efficiently compute physically reasonable force curves on a fine grid of state-points. Importantly, we show that our workflow is robust to several choices available to the modeler, including the interpolation schemes and tools used to construct f0. In a related vein, we also demonstrate that our approach can speed up coarse-graining by reducing the number of atomistic simulations needed as inputs to standard methods for generating CG forces.

  8. Coarse-graining two-dimensional turbulence via dynamical optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkington, Bruce; Chen, Qian-Yong; Thalabard, Simon

    2016-10-01

    A model reduction technique based on an optimization principle is employed to coarse-grain inviscid, incompressible fluid dynamics in two dimensions. In this reduction the spectrally-truncated vorticity equation defines the microdynamics, while the macroscopic state space consists of quasi-equilibrium trial probability densities on the microscopic phase space, which are parameterized by the means and variances of the low modes of the vorticity. A macroscopic path therefore represents a coarse-grained approximation to the evolution of a nonequilibrium ensemble of microscopic solutions. Closure in terms of the vector of resolved variables, namely, the means and variances of the low modes, is achieved by minimizing over all feasible paths the time integral of their mean-squared residual with respect to the Liouville equation. The equations governing the optimal path are deduced from Hamilton-Jacobi theory. The coarse-grained dynamics derived by this optimization technique contains a scale-dependent eddy viscosity, modified nonlinear interactions between the low mode means, and a nonlinear coupling between the mean and variance of each low mode. The predictive skill of this optimal closure is validated quantitatively by comparing it against direct numerical simulations. These tests show that good agreement is achieved without adjusting any closure parameters.

  9. Optimization of Analytical Potentials for Coarse-Grained Biopolymer Models.

    PubMed

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Maccari, Giuseppe; Spampinato, Giulia Lia Beatrice; Tozzini, Valentina

    2016-08-25

    The increasing trend in the recent literature on coarse grained (CG) models testifies their impact in the study of complex systems. However, the CG model landscape is variegated: even considering a given resolution level, the force fields are very heterogeneous and optimized with very different parametrization procedures. Along the road for standardization of CG models for biopolymers, here we describe a strategy to aid building and optimization of statistics based analytical force fields and its implementation in the software package AsParaGS (Assisted Parameterization platform for coarse Grained modelS). Our method is based on the use and optimization of analytical potentials, optimized by targeting internal variables statistical distributions by means of the combination of different algorithms (i.e., relative entropy driven stochastic exploration of the parameter space and iterative Boltzmann inversion). This allows designing a custom model that endows the force field terms with a physically sound meaning. Furthermore, the level of transferability and accuracy can be tuned through the choice of statistical data set composition. The method-illustrated by means of applications to helical polypeptides-also involves the analysis of two and three variable distributions, and allows handling issues related to the FF term correlations. AsParaGS is interfaced with general-purpose molecular dynamics codes and currently implements the "minimalist" subclass of CG models (i.e., one bead per amino acid, Cα based). Extensions to nucleic acids and different levels of coarse graining are in the course. PMID:27150459

  10. Experimental investigation of coarse particle conveying in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasak, Pavel; Chara, Zdenek; Konfrst, Jiri; Krupička, Jan

    2015-05-01

    The advanced knowledge of particle-water mixture flow behaviour is important for safe, reliable, and economical design and operation of the freight pipelines. The effect of the mixture velocity and concentration on the coarse particle - water mixtures flow behaviour was experimentally investigated on an experimental pipe loop of inner diameter D = 100 mm with horizontal, vertical, and inclined pipe sections. Narrow particle size distribution basalt pebbles were used as model of coarse-grained solid particles. The radiometric method was used to measure particle concentration distribution in pipe cross-section. Mixture flow behaviour and particles motion along the pipe invert were studied in a pipe viewing section. The study revealed that the coarse particlewater mixtures in the horizontal and inclined pipe sections were significantly stratified. The particles moved principally in a layer close to the pipe invert. However, for higher and moderate flow velocities the particles moved also in the central part of the pipe cross-section, and particle saltation was found to be dominant mode of particle conveying.

  11. Bayesian calibration of coarse-grained forces: Efficiently addressing transferability.

    PubMed

    Patrone, Paul N; Rosch, Thomas W; Phelan, Frederick R

    2016-04-21

    Generating and calibrating forces that are transferable across a range of state-points remains a challenging task in coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics. In this work, we present a coarse-graining workflow, inspired by ideas from uncertainty quantification and numerical analysis, to address this problem. The key idea behind our approach is to introduce a Bayesian correction algorithm that uses functional derivatives of CG simulations to rapidly and inexpensively recalibrate initial estimates f0 of forces anchored by standard methods such as force-matching. Taking density-temperature relationships as a running example, we demonstrate that this algorithm, in concert with various interpolation schemes, can be used to efficiently compute physically reasonable force curves on a fine grid of state-points. Importantly, we show that our workflow is robust to several choices available to the modeler, including the interpolation schemes and tools used to construct f0. In a related vein, we also demonstrate that our approach can speed up coarse-graining by reducing the number of atomistic simulations needed as inputs to standard methods for generating CG forces.

  12. Penetration Test Modelling in a Coarse Granular Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breul, P.; Benz, M.; Gourvès, R.; Saussine, G.

    2009-06-01

    Penetration test is a simple and useful test to characterize soils and granular materials. Several studies have shown the link between cone penetration resistance and density for a given material if the relation connecting these two parameters has been established beforehand. A granular materials bank currently including more than 35 granular materials has been developed to this end. Unfortunately, to be able to generalize and cover the broadest possible material range, it would be necessary to multiply the tests and the number of materials. Moreover in coarse granular media, it is necessary to carry out a large number of tests in order to achieve a reliable relation between density and cone resistance.Consequently, being able to model this test in a realistic way will enable increasing the number of tests on a material and carry out more precise parametric studies to evaluate the influence of any parameter on the test response. This article presents the work carried out to model a penetration test within a coarse granular medium. The penetrometer used is a light penetrometer with a 2 cm2 cone. The first part will present the experimental protocol developed with the material bank in order to establish the relation between cone resistance and material density. The results obtained on a coarse material of a railway ballast type will be presented. The second part will present the test modelling using discrete elements and parameter identification to obtain the relation found in the experimental tests and connecting cone resistance to material density.

  13. Computing the Free Energy Barriers for Less by Sampling with a Coarse Reference Potential while Retaining Accuracy of the Target Fine Model.

    PubMed

    Plotnikov, Nikolay V

    2014-08-12

    Proposed in this contribution is a protocol for calculating fine-physics (e.g., ab initio QM/MM) free-energy surfaces at a high level of accuracy locally (e.g., only at reactants and at the transition state for computing the activation barrier) from targeted fine-physics sampling and extensive exploratory coarse-physics sampling. The full free-energy surface is still computed but at a lower level of accuracy from coarse-physics sampling. The method is analytically derived in terms of the umbrella sampling and the free-energy perturbation methods which are combined with the thermodynamic cycle and the targeted sampling strategy of the paradynamics approach. The algorithm starts by computing low-accuracy fine-physics free-energy surfaces from the coarse-physics sampling in order to identify the reaction path and to select regions for targeted sampling. Thus, the algorithm does not rely on the coarse-physics minimum free-energy reaction path. Next, segments of high-accuracy free-energy surface are computed locally at selected regions from the targeted fine-physics sampling and are positioned relative to the coarse-physics free-energy shifts. The positioning is done by averaging the free-energy perturbations computed with multistep linear response approximation method. This method is analytically shown to provide results of the thermodynamic integration and the free-energy interpolation methods, while being extremely simple in implementation. Incorporating the metadynamics sampling to the algorithm is also briefly outlined. The application is demonstrated by calculating the B3LYP//6-31G*/MM free-energy barrier for an enzymatic reaction using a semiempirical PM6/MM reference potential. These modifications allow computing the activation free energies at a significantly reduced computational cost but at the same level of accuracy compared to computing full potential of mean force.

  14. Markers of Inflammation and Coagulation after Long-Term Exposure to Coarse Particulate Matter: A Cross-Sectional Analysis from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Jennifer; Mendelsohn-Victor, Kari; Jacobs, David R.; Cushman, Mary; Sheppard, Lianne; Thorne, Peter S.; Burke, Gregory L.; Daviglus, Martha L.; Szpiro, Adam A.; Roux, Ana V. Diez; Kaufman, Joel D.; Larson, Timothy V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Toxicological research suggests that coarse particles (PM10–2.5) are inflammatory, but responses are complex and may be best summarized by multiple inflammatory markers. Few human studies have investigated associations with PM10–2.5 and, of those, none have explored long-term exposures. Here we examine long-term associations with inflammation and coagulation in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Methods Participants included 3,295 adults (45–84 years of age) from three metropolitan areas. Site-specific spatial models were used to estimate 5-year concentrations of PM10–2.5 mass and copper, zinc, phosphorus, silicon, and endotoxin found in PM10–2.5. Outcomes included interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, total homocysteine, D-dimer, factor VIII, plasmin–antiplasmin complex, and inflammation and coagulation scores. We used multivariable regression with multiply imputed data to estimate associations while controlling for potential confounders, including co-pollutants such as fine particulate matter. Results Some limited evidence was found of relationships between inflammation and coagulation and PM10–2.5. Endotoxin was the PM10–2.5 component most strongly associated with inflammation, with an interquartile range (IQR) increase (0.08 EU/m3) associated with 0.15 (95% CI: 0.01, 0.28; p = 0.03) and 0.08 (95% CI: –0.07, 0.23; p = 0.28) higher inflammation scores before and after control for city, respectively. Copper was the component with the strongest association with coagulation, with a 4-ng/m3 increase associated with 0.19 (95% CI: 0.08, 0.30; p = 0.0008) and 0.12 (95% CI: –0.05, 0.30; p = 0.16) unit higher coagulation scores before and after city adjustment, respectively. Conclusions Our cross-sectional analysis provided some evidence that long-term PM10–2.5 exposure was associated with inflammation and coagulation, but associations were modest and depended on particle composition. Citation Adar SD, D’Souza J

  15. Functional specification of the Performance Measurement (PM) module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berliner, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The design of the Performance Measurement Module is described with emphasis on what the PM Module would do, and what it would look like to the user. The PM Module as described could take several man-years to develop. An evolutionary approach to the implementation of the PM Module is presented which would provide an operational baseline PM Module within a few months.

  16. 75 FR 45485 - Determination of Attainment for PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... standards. On July 1, 1987 (52 FR 24634), EPA promulgated two primary standards for PM 10 : A 24-hour..., 2006, EPA revoked the annual PM 10 standard but retained the 24-hour PM 10 standard. 71 FR 61144...). These areas included all former Group I PM 10 planning areas identified in 52 FR 29383 (August 7,...

  17. An in vitro rainbow trout cell bioassay for AhR-mediated toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, C.A.; Giesy, J.P.; Denison, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    The toxicity of PCBs, dioxins, and other halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHS) at environmentally relevant concentrations is in large part mediated through the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Bioassays which measure the activity of genes regulated by the receptor provide an integrative measure of the total AhR-mediated toxicity of a sample. The authors have recently developed and characterized a bioassay using recombinant rainbow trout hepatoma cells containing the firefly luciferase reporter gene under the regulation of the AhR. The cell line is designated Remodulated Lightning Trout (RLT). The RLT bioassay is relevant to fish, and is useful as a rapid screening device, a guide for chemical analysis, and a tool for studies of the AhR mechanism. The responses of the RLT cell line to various PCB congeners are similar to responses of in vivo fish bioassays. The authors now report on the responses of the bioassay to dioxins, dibenzofurans, and other related compounds as compared to in vivo fish bioassays. The authors will also report on the utility of the RLT bioassay in measuring the total TEQ of complex mixtures.

  18. Evaluation and simplification of the assimilable organic carbon nutrient bioassay for bacterial growth in drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, L A; Bott, T L; Reasoner, D J

    1993-01-01

    A modified assimilable organic carbon (AOC) bioassay is proposed. We evaluated all aspects of the AOC bioassay technique, including inoculum, incubation water, bioassay vessel, and enumeration technique. Other concerns included eliminating the need to prepare organic carbon-free glassware and minimizing the risks of bacterial and organic carbon contamination. Borosilicate vials (40 ml) with Teflon-lined silicone septa are acceptable incubation vessels. Precleaned vials are commercially available, and the inoculum can be injected directly through the septa. Both bioassay organisms, Pseudomonas fluorescens P-17 and Spirillum sp. strain NOX, are available from the American Type Culture Collection and grow well on R2A agar, making this a convenient plating medium. Turbid raw waters need to be filtered prior to an AOC analysis. Glass fiber filters used with either a peristaltic pump or a syringe-type filter holder are recommended for this purpose. A sampling design that emphasizes replication of the highest experimental level, individual batch cultures, is the most efficacious way to reduce the total variance associated with the AOC bioassay. Quality control for the AOC bioassay includes an AOC blank and checks for organic carbon limitation and inhibition of the bioassay organisms. PMID:8517748

  19. Establishment of a bioassay for the toxicity evaluation and quality control of Aconitum herbs.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi; Wang, Jia-bo; Zhao, Yan-ling; Shan, Li-mei; Li, Bao-cai; Fang, Fang; Jin, Cheng; Xiao, Xiao-he

    2012-01-15

    Currently, no bioassay is available for evaluating the toxicity of Aconitum herbs, which are well known for their lethal cardiotoxicity and neurotoxicity. In this study, we established a bioassay to evaluate the toxicity of Aconitum herbs. Test sample and standard solutions were administered to rats by intravenous infusion to determine their minimum lethal doses (MLD). Toxic potency was calculated by comparing the MLD. The experimental conditions of the method were optimized and standardized to ensure the precision and reliability of the bioassay. The application of the standardized bioassay was then tested by analyzing 18 samples of Aconitum herbs. Additionally, three major toxic alkaloids (aconitine, mesaconitine, and hypaconitine) in Aconitum herbs were analyzed using a liquid chromatographic method, which is the current method of choice for evaluating the toxicity of Aconitum herbs. We found that for all Aconitum herbs, the total toxicity of the extract was greater than the toxicity of the three alkaloids. Therefore, these three alkaloids failed to account for the total toxicity of Aconitum herbs. Compared with individual chemical analysis methods, the chief advantage of the bioassay is that it characterizes the total toxicity of Aconitum herbs. An incorrect toxicity evaluation caused by quantitative analysis of the three alkaloids might be effectively avoided by performing this bioassay. This study revealed that the bioassay is a powerful method for the safety assessment of Aconitum herbs.

  20. The multiscale coarse-graining method. XI. Accurate interactions based on the centers of charge of coarse-grained sites.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhen; Voth, Gregory A

    2015-12-28

    It is essential to be able to systematically construct coarse-grained (CG) models that can efficiently and accurately reproduce key properties of higher-resolution models such as all-atom. To fulfill this goal, a mapping operator is needed to transform the higher-resolution configuration to a CG configuration. Certain mapping operators, however, may lose information related to the underlying electrostatic properties. In this paper, a new mapping operator based on the centers of charge of CG sites is proposed to address this issue. Four example systems are chosen to demonstrate this concept. Within the multiscale coarse-graining framework, CG models that use this mapping operator are found to better reproduce the structural correlations of atomistic models. The present work also demonstrates the flexibility of the mapping operator and the robustness of the force matching method. For instance, important functional groups can be isolated and emphasized in the CG model. PMID:26723601

  1. The multiscale coarse-graining method. XI. Accurate interactions based on the centers of charge of coarse-grained sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Zhen; Voth, Gregory A.

    2015-12-28

    It is essential to be able to systematically construct coarse-grained (CG) models that can efficiently and accurately reproduce key properties of higher-resolution models such as all-atom. To fulfill this goal, a mapping operator is needed to transform the higher-resolution configuration to a CG configuration. Certain mapping operators, however, may lose information related to the underlying electrostatic properties. In this paper, a new mapping operator based on the centers of charge of CG sites is proposed to address this issue. Four example systems are chosen to demonstrate this concept. Within the multiscale coarse-graining framework, CG models that use this mapping operator are found to better reproduce the structural correlations of atomistic models. The present work also demonstrates the flexibility of the mapping operator and the robustness of the force matching method. For instance, important functional groups can be isolated and emphasized in the CG model.

  2. A bioassay for metals utilizing a human cell line.

    PubMed

    Shea, J; Moran, T; Dehn, P F

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of the HepG2 cell line to function as a bioassay for metal contamination in sediments, using metallothionein (MT) as a biomarker of exposure. Sediments were collected from the eastern and western ends of Lake Erie, extracted using EPA method 200.7, and analyzed for cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb) levels using ICP-AES. Sediment extracts were neutralized then used at a 2.5% final concentration in the exposure medium. MT levels were measured using the cadmium-hemoglobin affinity assay after a 48 h exposure. Fortified blanks from the ICP protocol served as positive controls. Also, HepG2 cells were exposed to Cd, Pb or combinations of Cd and Pb to determine whether or not induction of MT observed in cells exposed to sediment extracts was due to a single metal, combinations of metals, pH, or some other factor. Additionally, cells were exposed to a range of Cd concentrations approximating the levels found in the extracts (0.0005-0.1mg/L) to determine if a concentration-response occurred. Total metal levels ranged from 527 to 33.5mg/kg with lead the predominant metal, accounting for 100-88.9% of the total quantifiable metals in the sediments. The biomarker response (MT induction) was strongly correlated (r2=0.9919, r2=0.990) with total metal and lead levels in the sediments, respectively, which supports recent field studies indicating the biomarker can discern differences in the strength of the inducing agent. Statistically significant MT induction was associated with sediments which contained measurable Cd concentrations and no significant differences were observed when comparing Cd only and Cd+Pb exposed cells indicating no interactions between Cd and Pb were occurring and supporting our finding that Cd was the main inducing agent in sediment extracts. MT levels also increased significantly in a concentration-dependent manner when cells were exposed only to Cd. Results suggest this human bioassay and the MT

  3. Sensitive, Rapid, and Specific Bioassay for the Determination of Antilipogenic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ulitzur, S.; Goldberg, I.

    1977-01-01

    A sensitive and rapid bioassay for the determination of the antilipogenic compounds cerulenin and CM-55 is described. The bioassay is based on the inhibitory effect of cerulenin and CM-55 on the in vivo luminescence of an aldehyde-requiring mutant of the marine bacterium Beneckea harveyi. A total quantity as low as 0.1 μg of cerulenin can be determined within 15 min with an error of ±2%. The bioassay, as presented, is specific for compounds that are known to inhibit fatty acid biosynthesis and, as such, it might be used as a general screening method for the detection of antilipogenic compounds. PMID:303076

  4. 40 CFR 52.378 - Control strategy: PM10

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... maintenance plan (2006-2015). The State of Connecticut has committed to: maintain a PM10 monitoring network in... in the event the PM10 design value in the maintenance area exceeds 98 µgm/m3 for the 24-hour PM10... on maintaining levels of ambient PM10 below a PM10 design value criteria of 98 µgm/m3 for the...

  5. 40 CFR 93.117 - Criteria and procedures: Compliance with PM10 and PM2.5 control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with PM10 and PM2.5 control measures. 93.117 Section 93.117 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Programs, and Projects Developed, Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.117 Criteria and procedures: Compliance with PM10 and PM2.5 control measures. The FHWA/FTA...

  6. 40 CFR 93.117 - Criteria and procedures: Compliance with PM10 and PM2.5 control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with PM10 and PM2.5 control measures. 93.117 Section 93.117 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Programs, and Projects Developed, Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.117 Criteria and procedures: Compliance with PM10 and PM2.5 control measures. The FHWA/FTA...

  7. Wintertime simultaneous measurement and model analysis of fine- and coarse-mode sulfateand nitrate over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itahashi, S.; Uno, I.; PAN, X.; Kuribayashi, M.; Hara, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Shimohara, T.

    2014-12-01

    Sulfate and nitrate aerosols are major component of PM2.5. In East Asia, it is well known that sulfate aerosols are widely distributed due to large-scale trans-boundary air pollution. For nitrate aerosols, it is considered that fine-mode nitrate can be converted into coarse-mode nitrate on reactions with sea-salt aerosols over East China Sea when transported from China to Japan, however, contributions of trans-boundary air pollution on fine-mode nitrate is not clarified. We observed sulfate and nitrate aerosols on the basis of ACSA (Aerosol Chemical Speciation Analyzer; KIMOTO Electric Co., LTD.) in high-temporal resolution (1 hr) on fine- and coarse-mode at Dazaifu, Fukuoka located in western-part of Japan. Two-way nested (81-27 km) simulation in East Asia by WRF-CMAQ modeling system was developed to investigate the source contributions of fine- and coarse-mode nitrate when the trans-boundary air pollution was occurred. Observed monthly mean concentration in January 2014 at Dazaifu site were 3.41 μg/m3 for fine-mode nitrate, 1.51 μg/m3 for coarse-model nitrate, and 3.81 μg/m3 for fine-mode sulfate. Simulation in fine scale resolution can reproduce the observed concentration with 4.79 μg/m3 (r = 0.60) for fine-mode nitrate, 1.24 μg/m3 (r = 0.51) for coarse-model nitrate, and 3.36 μg/m3 (r = 0.46) for fine-mode sulfate. At urban site in Japan, local-scale contributions are also considered to attribute fine-mode nitrate, and in order to further examine the contributions of trans-boundary air pollution, emission sensitivity analysis with switching off the anthropogenic emissions from Japan was conducted. This sensitivity simulation calculated that monthly mean concentration of 1.19 μg/m3 for coarse-mode nitrate and 3.26 μg/m3 for fine-mode sulfate, suggesting the dominance of trans-boundary air pollution for coarse-mode nitrate and fine-mode sulfate. On the other hand, monthly mean concentration was 1.80 μg/m3 for fine-mode nitrate on sensitivity simulation

  8. Tribological and microstructural comparison of HIPped PM212 and PM212/Au self-lubricating composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanski, Michael S.; Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of replacing the silver with the volumetric equivalent of gold in the chromium carbide-based self-lubricating composite PM212 (70 wt percent NiCo-Cr3C2, 15 percent BaF2/CaF2 eutectic) was studied. The new composite, PM212/Au has the following composition: 62 wt percent NiCo-Cr3C2, 25 percent Au, 13 percent BaF2/CaF2 eutectic. The silver was replaced with gold to minimize the potential reactivity of the composite with possible environmental contaminants such as sulfur. The composites were fabricated by hot isostatic pressing (HIPping) and machined into pin specimens. The pins were slid against nickel-based superalloy disks. Sliding velocities ranged from 0.27 to 10.0 m/s and temperatures from 25 to 900 C. Frictions coefficients ranged from 0.25 to 0.40 and wear factors for the pin and disk were typically low 10(exp -5) cu mm/N-m. HIPped PM212 measured fully dense, whereas PM212/Au had 15 percent residual porosity. Examination of the microstructures with optical and scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of pores in PM212/Au that were not present in PM212. Though the exact reason for the residual porosity PM212/Au was not determined, it may be due to practice morphology differences between the gold and silver and their effect on powder metallurgy processing.

  9. Tribological and microstructural comparison of HIPped PM212 and PM212/Au self-lubricating composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanski, Michael S.; Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of replacing the silver with the volumetric equivalent of gold in the chromium carbide-based self-lubricating composite PM212 (70 wt. percent NiCo-Cr3C2, 15 percent BaF2/CaF2 eutectic) was studied. The new composite, PM212/Au has the following composition: 62 wt. percent NiCo-Cr3C2, 25 percent Au, 13 percent BaF2/CaF2 eutectic. The silver was replaced with gold to minimize the potential reactivity of the composite with possible environmental contaminants such as sulfur. The composites were fabricated by hot isostatic pressing (HIPping) and machined into pin specimens. The pins were slid against nickel-based superalloy disks. Sliding velocities ranged from 0.27 to 10.0 m/s and temperatures from 25 to 900 C. Friction coefficients ranged from 0.25 to 0.40 and wear factors for the pin and disk were typically low 10(exp -5) cu mm/N-m. HIPped PM212 measured fully dense, whereas PM212/Au had 15 percent residual porosity. Examination of the microstructures with optical and scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of pores in PM212/Au that were not present in PM212. Though the exact reason for the residual porosity in PM212/Au was not determined, it may be due to particle morphology differences between the gold and silver and their effect on powder metallurgy processing.

  10. Chemical Characterisation of the Coarse and Fine Particulate Matter in the Environment of an Underground Railway System: Cytotoxic Effects and Oxidative Stress—A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Spagnolo, Anna Maria; Ottria, Gianluca; Perdelli, Fernanda; Cristina, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Exposure to the particulate matter produced in underground railway systems is arousing increasing scientific interest because of its health effects. The aim of our study was to evaluate the airborne concentrations of PM10 and three sub-fractions of PM2.5 in an underground railway system environment in proximity to platforms and in underground commercial areas within the system, and to compare these with the outdoor airborne concentrations. We also evaluated the metal components, the cytotoxic properties of the various fractions of particulate matter (PM) and their capacity to induce oxidative stress. Method: We collected the coarse fraction (5–10 µm) and the fine fractions (1–2.5 µm; 0.5–1 µm; 0.25–0.5 µm). Chemical characterisation was determined by means of spectrometry. Cytotoxicity and oxidative stress were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) assessment. Results: The concentrations of both PM10 and PM2.5 proved to be similar at the three sampling sites. Iron and other transition metals displayed a greater concentration at the subway platform than at the other two sites. The 2.5–10 µm and 1–2.5 µm fractions of PM from all three sampling sites determined a greater increase in ROS; the intensity of oxidative stress progressively declined as particle diameter diminished. Moreover, ROS concentrations were correlated with the concentrations of some transition metals, namely Mn, Cr, Ti, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ni and Mo. All particulate matter fractions displayed lower or similar ROS values between platform level and the outdoor air. Conclusions: The present study revealed that the underground railway environment at platform level, although containing higher concentrations of some particularly reactive metallic species, did not display higher cytotoxicity and oxidative stress levels than the outdoor air. PMID:25872016

  11. Source identification and seasonal variation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons associated with atmospheric fine and coarse particles in the Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Elba Calesso; Agudelo-Castañeda, Dayana M.; Fachel, Jandyra Maria Guimarães; Leal, Karen Alam; Garcia, Karine de Oliveira; Wiegand, Flavio

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fine (PM2.5) and coarse particles (PM2.5-10) in an urban and industrial area in the Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre (MAPA), Brazil. Sixteen U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured. Filters containing ambient air particulate were extracted with dichloromethane using Soxhlet. Extracts were later analyzed, for determining PAH concentrations, using a gaseous chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were more concentrated in PM2.5 with an average of 70% of total PAHs in the MAPA. The target PAH apportionment among the main emission sources was carried out by diagnostic PAH concentration ratios, and principal component analysis (PCA). PAHs with higher molecular weight showed higher percentages in the fine particles in the MAPA. Based on the diagnostic ratios and PCA analysis, it may be concluded that the major contribution of PAHs was from vehicular sources (diesel and gasoline), especially in the PM2.5 fraction, as well as coal and wood burning. The winter/summer ratio in the PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 fractions in the MAPA was 3.1 and 1.8, respectively, revealing the seasonal variation of PAHs in the two fractions. The estimated toxicity equivalent factor (TEF), used to assess the contribution of the carcinogenic potency, confirms a significant presence of the moderately active carcinogenic PAHs BaP and DahA in the samples collected in the MAPA.

  12. Chemical compositions responsible for inflammation and tissue damage in the mouse lung by coarse and fine particulate samples from contrasting air pollution in Europe.

    PubMed

    Happo, Mikko S; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Halinen, Arja I; Jalava, Pasi I; Pennanen, Arto S; Sillanpaa, Markus; Hillamo, Risto; Salonen, Raimo O

    2008-11-01

    Inflammation is regarded as an important mechanism in mortality and morbidity associated with exposures of cardiorespiratory patients to urban air particulate matter. We investigated the association of the chemical composition and sources of urban air fine (PM(2.5-0.2)) and coarse (PM(10-2.5)) particulate samples with the inflammatory activity in the mouse lung. The particulate samples were collected during selected seasons in six European cities using a high-volume cascade impactor. Healthy C57BL/6J mice were intratracheally instilled with a single dose (10 mg/kg) of the particulate samples. At 4, 12, and 24 h after the exposure, the lungs were lavaged and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was assayed for indicators of inflammation and tissue damage: cell number, total protein, and cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-alpha, interleukin [IL]-6, and KC). Dicarboxylic acids and transition metals, especially Ni and V, in PM(2.5-0.2) correlated positively and some secondary inorganic ions (NO3(-), NH4(+)) negatively with the inflammatory activity. Total organic matter and SO4(2-) had no consistent correlations. In addition, the soil-derived constituents (Ca2+, Al, Fe, Si) showed positive correlations with the PM(2.5-0.2)-induced inflammatory activity, but their role in PM(10-2.5) remained obscure, possibly due to largely undefined biogenic material. Markers of poor biomass and coal combustion, i.e., monosaccharide anhydrides and As, were associated with elevated PAH contents in PM(2.5-0.2) and a consistent immunosuppressive effect. Overall, our results support epidemiological findings that the local sources of incomplete combustion and resuspended road dust are important in urban air particulate pollution-related health effects.

  13. INTERPOLATING VANCOUVER'S DAILY AMBIENT PM 10 FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this article we develop a spatial predictive distribution for the ambient space- time response field of daily ambient PM10 in Vancouver, Canada. Observed responses have a consistent temporal pattern from one monitoring site to the next. We exploit this feature of the field b...

  14. Molecularly imprinted polymers for (90)Sr urine bioassay.

    PubMed

    Bahraini, Negar; Lai, Edward P C; Li, Chunsheng; Sadi, Baki B; Kramer, Gary H

    2011-08-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) comprising dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6) was synthesized as a Sr-selective sorbent for urine bioassay purposes. MIP particles (326 ± 2 nm diameter) were formed using acetone and acetonitrile (1:3 v/v) as the porogen, methacrylic acid (MAA) as the functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker. The DCH18C6-MIP particles were impregnated with additional DCH18C6 and treated further with NaOH to attain better binding affinity for Sr(2+). The effects of pH, ionic strength and amount of particles were evaluated for optimal extraction of (90)Sr(2+) from urine samples, as measured by liquid scintillation analysis (LSA). After up to 94% of (90)Y was removed by precipitation with TiO(2), DCH18C6-MIP particles were applied for selective SPE of (90)Sr remaining in the urine matrix for final LSA.

  15. Cytochemical bioassay of parathyroid hormone in maternal and cord blood.

    PubMed Central

    Allgrove, J; Adami, S; Manning, R M; O'Riordan, J L

    1985-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone and calcium were measured in plasma taken from pregnant women at term and from the umbilical veins of their infants at birth. Three assays were used to measure parathyroid hormone, a cytochemical bioassay of bioactivity and two immunoradiometric assays, one specific for the amino terminus, the other specific for the carboxy terminus of the parathyroid hormone molecule. Plasma calcium was significantly higher in the infants than in the mothers. Maternal parathyroid hormone bioactivity and the amino terminus were both slightly raised, but the carboxy terminus value was normal; these findings supported the view that late pregnancy is a time of mild physiological hyperparathyroidism. In the infants, the amino terminus was undetectable and the carboxy terminus was either undetectable or towards the lower end of the normal range: bioactivity of parathyroid hormone was considerably raised and was related to the gradient of calcium across the placenta. This suggests that the parathyroid glands are not suppressed during fetal life and that they may play an important part in the maintenance of high fetal plasma calcium concentrations. PMID:3977382

  16. Detection of Organic Compounds with Whole-Cell Bioluminescent Bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Smartt, Abby; Ripp, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Natural and manmade organic chemicals are widely deposited across a diverse range of ecosystems including air, surface water, groundwater, wastewater, soil, sediment, and marine environments. Some organic compounds, despite their industrial values, are toxic to living organisms and pose significant health risks to humans and wildlife. Detection and monitoring of these organic pollutants in environmental matrices therefore is of great interest and need for remediation and health risk assessment. Although these detections have traditionally been performed using analytical chemical approaches that offer highly sensitive and specific identification of target compounds, these methods require specialized equipment and trained operators, and fail to describe potential bioavailable effects on living organisms. Alternatively, the integration of bioluminescent systems into whole-cell bioreporters presents a new capacity for organic compound detection. These bioreporters are constructed by incorporating reporter genes into catabolic or signaling pathways that are present within living cells and emit a bioluminescent signal that can be detected upon exposure to target chemicals. Although relatively less specific compared to analytical methods, bioluminescent bioassays are more cost-effective, more rapid, can be scaled to higher throughput, and can be designed to report not only the presence but also the bioavailability of target substances. This chapter reviews available bacterial and eukaryotic whole-cell bioreporters for sensing organic pollutants and their applications in a variety of sample matrices. PMID:25084996

  17. An inexpensive feeding bioassay technique for stored-product insects.

    PubMed

    Clark, Erin L; Isitt, Rylee; Plettner, Erika; Fields, Paul G; Huber, Dezene P W

    2014-02-01

    ABSTRACT We used the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum Herbst (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), to compare three feeding bioassay techniques using flour disks. The area (scanner or digital photographs) and mass (sensitive balance) of the same flour disks were measured daily for 1 or 2 wk to assess feeding by insects. The loss in mass and area over 4 h was measured, as some variation over time was noticed in the disks with no insects feeding on them. The gravimetric method correlated well with both measurements of the area for the disks held in a growth chamber: scanner (R2 = 0.96), digital photography (R2 = 0.96). There was also a high correlation (R2 = 0.86) between the disk weight and area scanned at normal lab conditions. There were differences in the percentage of the disks remaining over time depending on the temperature and whether they were weighed or scanned. Measuring the mass of the disks resulted in a relatively larger percent of disk remaining compared with the scanned area. Mass measurements required a sensitive balance, handling of the disks and the insects, and appeared slightly more sensitive to humidity and temperature changes over time. Scanning the disks requires flat bed scanner access but less handling of both insects and disks. Digital photographs could be taken quickly, requiring less equipment, although photographs had to be further processed to determine area Scanning or taking digital photographs of flour disk area was an effective technique for measuring insect feeding.

  18. Luminescent Lanthanide Reporters for High-Sensitivity Novel Bioassays.

    SciTech Connect

    Anstey, Mitchell R.; Fruetel, Julia A.; Foster, Michael E.; Hayden, Carl C.; Buckley, Heather L.; Arnold, John

    2013-09-01

    Biological imaging and assay technologies rely on fluorescent organic dyes as reporters for a number of interesting targets and processes. However, limitations of organic dyes such as small Stokes shifts, spectral overlap of emission signals with native biological fluorescence background, and photobleaching have all inhibited the development of highly sensitive assays. To overcome the limitations of organic dyes for bioassays, we propose to develop lanthanide-based luminescent dyes and demonstrate them for molecular reporting applications. This relatively new family of dyes was selected for their attractive spectral and chemical properties. Luminescence is imparted by the lanthanide atom and allows for relatively simple chemical structures that can be tailored to the application. The photophysical properties offer unique features such as narrow and non-overlapping emission bands, long luminescent lifetimes, and long wavelength emission, which enable significant sensitivity improvements over organic dyes through spectral and temporal gating of the luminescent signal.Growth in this field has been hindered due to the necessary advanced synthetic chemistry techniques and access to experts in biological assay development. Our strategy for the development of a new lanthanide-based fluorescent reporter system is based on chelation of the lanthanide metal center using absorbing chromophores. Our first strategy involves "Click" chemistry to develop 3-fold symmetric chelators and the other involves use of a new class of tetrapyrrole ligands called corroles. This two-pronged approach is geared towards the optimization of chromophores to enhance light output.

  19. Bioassays on Illinois waterway dredged material. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.W.; Gibson, A.B.; Dillon, T.M.

    1992-12-01

    Sediment from the Illinois Waterway navigation channel is hydraulically dredged by the US Army Engineer District, Rock Island, and placed in the nearshore environment via pipeline. Water returning to the river can have a high-suspended solids load approaching fluid mud consistency. There is a concern that this return water may exceed the State of Illinois water quality standards for ammonia and have adverse effects on aquatic life. To address these concerns, composite sediment samples and site water collected from selected sites in the Illinois Waterway were evaluated in toxicity tests. Acute (48-hr) toxicity tests were conducted with two species, Pimephales promelas (the fathead minnow) and Daphnia magna (a freshwater cladoceran). A chronic (21-day) toxicity test was also conducted using Daphnia magna. Animals were exposed separately to different concentrations of filtered and unfiltered elutriates prepared from Acute, Cadmium, Daphnia magna, Pimephales promela, Ammonia, Chronic, Elutriate, Sediment, Bioassay, Cladoceran, Fathead minnow. Illinois Waterway edged material. Total ammonia concentrations were measured in all tests and the un-ionized fraction was calculated by adjusting for temperature and pH. Tests were conducted at the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS. In addition, as part of an interlaboratory effort, a 48-hr acute toxicity test with Pimephales pomelas fry was conducted concurrently by the Hygienic Laboratory of the University of Iowa, Des Moines, IA.

  20. Evaluation of biotoxicity of textile dyes using two bioassays.

    PubMed

    Moawad, Hassan; El-Rahim, Wafaa M Abd; Khalafallah, M

    2003-01-01

    The toxicity of eight textile dyes was evaluated using two bioassays namely: Ames test and seed germination test. The Ames test is widely used for the evaluation of hazardous mutagenic effect of different chemicals, as a short-term screening test for environmental impact assessment. The eight-textile dyes and Eithidium bromide dye (as positive control) were tested with five "his" Salmonella typhimurium strains: TA 100; TA 98; TA 1535; TA 1537; TA 1538. Using six concentrations of each dye (2.5 microg/ml, 4.5 microg/ml, 9 microg/ml, 13.5 microg/ml, 18 microg/ml, and 22.5 microg/ml) revealed that, most of the dyes were mutagenic for the test strains used in this study. The high concentrations of dye eliminated microbial colonies due to the high frequency of mutation causing lethal effect on the cells. In this work the phytotoxicity of different soluble textile dyes was estimated by measuring the relative changes in seed germination of four plants: clover, wheat, tomato and lettuce. The changes in shooting percentages and root length as affected by dye were also measured. Seed germination percent and shoot growth as well as root length were recorded after 6 days of exposure to different concentrations of textile dyes in irrigation water. The results show that high concentrations of dyes were more toxic to seed germination as compared with the lower concentrations. However, the low concentrations of the tested dyes adversely affected the shooting percent significantly.

  1. Colorimetric paper bioassay for the detection of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Alkasir, Ramiz S J; Ornatska, Maryna; Andreescu, Silvana

    2012-11-20

    A new type of paper based bioassay for the colorimetric detection of phenolic compounds including phenol, bisphenol A, catechol and cresols is reported. The sensor is based on a layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly approach formed by alternatively depositing layers of chitosan and alginate polyelectrolytes onto filter paper and physically entrapping the tyrosinase enzyme in between these layers. The sensor response is quantified as a color change resulting from the specific binding of the enzymatically generated quinone to the multilayers of immobilized chitosan on the paper. The color change can be quantified with the naked eye but a digitalized picture can also be used to provide more sensitive comparison to a calibrated color scheme. The sensor was optimized with respect to the number of layers, pH, enzyme, chitosan and alginate amounts. The colorimetric response was concentration dependent, with a detection limit of 0.86 (±0.1) μg/L for each of the phenolic compounds tested. The response time required for the sensor to reach steady-state color varied between 6 and 17 min depending on the phenolic substrate. The sensor showed excellent storage stability at room temperature for several months (92% residual activity after 260 days storage) and demonstrated good functionality in real environmental samples. A procedure to mass-produce the bioactive sensors by inkjet printing the LbL layers of polyelectrolyte and enzyme on paper is demonstrated. PMID:23113670

  2. Bioassay-based risk assessment of complex mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, K.C.; Huebner, H.J.

    1996-12-31

    The baseline risk assessment often plays an integral role in various decision-making processes at Superfund sites. The present study reports on risk characterizations prepared for seven complex mixtures using biological and chemical analysis. Three of the samples (A, B, and C) were complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) extracted from coal tar; while four samples extracted from munitions-contaminated soil contained primarily nitroaromatic hydrocarbons. The chemical-based risk assessment ranked sample C as least toxic, while the risk associated with samples A and B was approximately equal. The microbial bioassay was in general agreement for the coal tar samples. The weighted activity of the coal tar extracts in Salmonella was 4,960 for sample C, and 162,000 and 206,000 for samples A and B, respectively. The bacterial mutagenicity of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene contaminated soils exhibited an indirect correlation with chemical-based risk assessment. The aqueous extract of sample 004 induced 1,292 net revertants in Salmonella, while the estimated risk to ingestion and dermal adsorption was 2E-9. The data indicate that the chemical-based risk assessment accurately predicted the genotoxicity of the PAHs, while the accuracy of the risk assessment for munitions contaminated soils was limited due to the presence of metabolites of TNT degradation. The biological tests used in this research provide a valuable compliment to chemical analysis for characterizing the genotoxic risk of complex mixtures.

  3. Characterization of Deoxynivalenol-Induced Anorexia using Mouse Bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Brenna M.; Wu, Wenda; Pestka, James J.

    2011-01-01

    A short-term mouse model was devised to investigate induction of food refusal by the common foodborne trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON). DON dose-dependently induced anorexia within 2 h of exposure when administered either by intraperitoneal (ip.) injection or by oral gavage. The no observed adverse effect and lowest observed adverse effect levels in this assay were 0.5 mg/kg bw and 1 mg/kg bw for ip. exposure and 1 mg/kg bw and 2.5 mg/kg bw for oral exposure, respectively. DON’s effects on food intake were transient, lasting up to 3 h at 1 mg/kg bw and up to 6 h at 5 mg/kg bw. Interestingly, a dose-dependent orexigenic response was observed in the 14 h following the initial 2 h food intake measurement. Toxin-treated mice exhibited partial resistance to feed refusal when exposed to DON subsequently after 2 d, but not after 7 d suggesting that this modest tolerance was reversible. The short-term mouse bioassay described here was useful in characterizing DON-induced anorexia and should be applicable to elucidating mechanisms underlying this adverse nutritional effect. PMID:21575669

  4. Sensitive bioassay for detection of biologically active ricin in food.

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Reuven; He, Xiaohua

    2012-05-01

    The potential use of ricin as an agent of biological warfare highlights the need to develop fast and effective methods to detect biologically active ricin. The current "gold standard" for ricin detection is an in vivo mouse bioassay; however, this method is not practical to test on a large number of samples and raises ethical concerns with regard to the use of experimental animals. In this work, we generated adenoviral vectors that express the green fluorescent protein gene and used the relative fluorescence units intensity inhibition by transduced cells for quantitative measurement of biologically active ricin. The detection limit of the assay was 200 pg/ml, which is over 500,000 times greater than the adult human lethal oral dose. The inhibition of fluorescence intensity between ricin treatment and control was higher in 72-h posttransduction Vero cells than 24-h human embryonic kidney cells. Therefore, to detect biologically active ricin in food matrices that might influence the assay, we used 72-h posttransduction Vero cells. This simple assay could be used for large-scale screening to detect biologically active ricin in food without added substrates or use of cell fixation methods.

  5. Using enzyme bioassays as a rapid screen for metal toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choate, LaDonna M.; Ross, P.E.; Blumenstein, E. P.; Ranville, James F.

    2005-01-01

    Mine tailings piles and abandoned mine soils are often contaminated by a suite of toxic metals, which were released in the mining process. Traditionally, toxicity of such areas has been determined by numerous chemical methods including the Toxicity Characteristic Leachate Procedure (TCLP) and traditional toxicity tests using organisms such as the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia. Such tests can be expensive and time-consuming. Enzymatic bioassays may provide an easier, less costly, and more time-effective toxicity screening procedure for mine tailings and abandoned mine soil leachates. This study evaluated the commercially available MetPLATE™ enzymatic toxicity assay test kit. The MetPLATE™ assay uses a modified strain of Escherichia coli bacteria as the test organism. Toxicity is defined by the activity of β-galactosidase enzyme which is monitored colorometrically with a 96-well spectrophotometer. The study used water samples collected from North Fork Clear Creek, a mining influenced water (MIW) located in Colorado. A great benefit to using the MetPLATE™ assay over the TCLP is that it shows actual toxicity of a sample by taking into account the bioavailability of the toxicants rather than simply measuring the metal concentration present. Benefits of the MetPLATE™ assay over the use of C. dubia include greatly reduced time for the testing process (∼2 hours), a more continuous variable due to a greater number of organisms present in each sample (100,000+), and the elimination of need to maintain a culture of organisms at all times.

  6. Detection of organic compounds with whole-cell bioluminescent bioassays.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Smartt, Abby; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Natural and manmade organic chemicals are widely deposited across a diverse range of ecosystems including air, surface water, groundwater, wastewater, soil, sediment, and marine environments. Some organic compounds, despite their industrial values, are toxic to living organisms and pose significant health risks to humans and wildlife. Detection and monitoring of these organic pollutants in environmental matrices therefore is of great interest and need for remediation and health risk assessment. Although these detections have traditionally been performed using analytical chemical approaches that offer highly sensitive and specific identification of target compounds, these methods require specialized equipment and trained operators, and fail to describe potential bioavailable effects on living organisms. Alternatively, the integration of bioluminescent systems into whole-cell bioreporters presents a new capacity for organic compound detection. These bioreporters are constructed by incorporating reporter genes into catabolic or signaling pathways that are present within living cells and emit a bioluminescent signal that can be detected upon exposure to target chemicals. Although relatively less specific compared to analytical methods, bioluminescent bioassays are more cost-effective, more rapid, can be scaled to higher throughput, and can be designed to report not only the presence but also the bioavailability of target substances. This chapter reviews available bacterial and eukaryotic whole-cell bioreporters for sensing organic pollutants and their applications in a variety of sample matrices.

  7. Modeling Reluctance-Assisted PM Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Otaduy, P.J.

    2006-01-13

    This report contains a derivation of the fundamental equations used to calculate the base speed, torque delivery, and power output of a reluctance-assisted PM motor which has a saliency ratio greater than 1 as a function of its terminal voltage, current, voltage-phase angle, and current-phase angle. The equations are applied to model Motor X using symbolically-oriented methods with the computer tool Mathematica to determine: (1) the values of current-phase angle and voltage-phase angle that are uniquely determined once a base speed has been selected; (2) the attainable current in the voltage-limited region above base speed as a function of terminal voltage, speed, and current-phase angle; (3) the attainable current in the voltage-limited region above base speed as a function of terminal voltage, speed, and voltage-phase angle; (4) the maximum-power output in the voltage-limited region above base speed as a function of speed; (5) the optimal voltage-phase angle in the voltage-limited region above base speed required to obtain maximum-power output; (6) the maximum-power speed curve which was linear from rest to base speed in the current limited region below base speed; (7) the current angle as a function of saliency ratio in the current-limited region below base speed; and (8) the torque as a function of saliency ratio which is almost linear in the current-limited region below base speed. The equations were applied to model Motor X using numerically-oriented methods with the computer tool LabVIEW. The equations were solved iteratively to find optimal current and voltage angles that yield maximum power and maximum efficiency from rest through the current-limited region to base speed and then through the voltage-limited region to high-rotational speeds. Currents, voltages, and reluctance factors were all calculated and external loops were employed to perform additional optimization with respect to PM pitch angle (magnet fraction) and with respect to magnet strength

  8. Assessment of Population Exposure to Coarse and Fine Particulate Matter in the Urban Areas of Chennai, India

    PubMed Central

    Prasannavenkatesh, Ramachandran; Andimuthu, Ramachandran; Kandasamy, Palanivelu; Rajadurai, Geetha; Subash Kumar, Divya; Radhapriya, Parthasarathy; Ponnusamy, Malini

    2015-01-01

    Research outcomes from the epidemiological studies have found that the course (PM10) and the fine particulate matter (PM2.5) are mainly responsible for various respiratory health effects for humans. The population-weighted exposure assessment is used as a vital decision-making tool to analyze the vulnerable areas where the population is exposed to critical concentrations of pollutants. Systemic sampling was carried out at strategic locations of Chennai to estimate the various concentration levels of particulate pollution during November 2013–January 2014. The concentration of the pollutants was classified based on the World Health Organization interim target (IT) guidelines. Using geospatial information systems the pollution and the high-resolution population data were interpolated to study the extent of the pollutants at the urban scale. The results show that approximately 28% of the population resides in vulnerable locations where the coarse particulate matter exceeds the prescribed standards. Alarmingly, the results of the analysis of fine particulates show that about 94% of the inhabitants live in critical areas where the concentration of the fine particulates exceeds the IT guidelines. Results based on human exposure analysis show the vulnerability is more towards the zones which are surrounded by prominent sources of pollution. PMID:26258167

  9. Statins attenuate the development of atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction induced by exposure to urban particulate matter (PM{sub 10})

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Ryohei; Hiraiwa, Kunihiko; Cheng, Jui Chih; Bai, Ni; Vincent, Renaud; Francis, Gordon A.; Sin, Don D.; Van Eeden, Stephan F.

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to ambient air particulate matter (particles less than 10 μm or PM{sub 10}) has been shown to be an independent risk factor for the development and progression of atherosclerosis. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) have well-established anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of statins on the adverse functional and morphological changes in blood vessels induced by PM{sub 10}. New Zealand White rabbits fed with a high fat diet were subjected to balloon injury to their abdominal aorta followed by PM{sub 10}/saline exposure for 4 weeks ± lovastatin (5 mg/kg/day) treatment. PM{sub 10} exposure accelerated balloon catheter induced plaque formation and increased intimal macrophages and lipid accumulation while lovastatin attenuated these changes and promoted smooth muscle cell recruitment into plaques. PM{sub 10} impaired vascular acetylcholine (Ach) responses and increased vasoconstriction induced by phenylephrine as assessed by wire myograph. Supplementation of nitric oxide improved the impaired Ach responses. PM{sub 10} increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in blood vessels and increased the plasma levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1). Incubation with specific inhibitors for iNOS, COX-2 or ET-1 in the myograph chambers significantly improved the impaired vascular function. Lovastatin decreased the expression of these mediators in atherosclerotic lesions and improved endothelial dysfunction. However, lovastatin was unable to reduce blood lipid levels to the baseline level in rabbits exposed to PM{sub 10}. Taken together, statins protect against PM{sub 10}-induced cardiovascular disease by reducing atherosclerosis and improving endothelial function via their anti-inflammatory properties. - Highlights: • Coarse particulate matter (PM{sub 10}) accelerated balloon injury-induced plaque formation. • Lovastatin decreased intimal

  10. Reconciling PM10 analyses by different sampling methods for Iron King Mine tailings dust.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Félix, Omar I; Gonzales, Patricia; Sáez, Avelino Eduardo; Ela, Wendell P

    2016-03-01

    The overall project objective at the Iron King Mine Superfund site is to determine the level and potential risk associated with heavy metal exposure of the proximate population emanating from the site's tailings pile. To provide sufficient size-fractioned dust for multi-discipline research studies, a dust generator was built and is now being used to generate size-fractioned dust samples for toxicity investigations using in vitro cell culture and animal exposure experiments as well as studies on geochemical characterization and bioassay solubilization with simulated lung and gastric fluid extractants. The objective of this study is to provide a robust method for source identification by comparing the tailing sample produced by dust generator and that collected by MOUDI sampler. As and Pb concentrations of the PM10 fraction in the MOUDI sample were much lower than in tailing samples produced by the dust generator, indicating a dilution of Iron King tailing dust by dust from other sources. For source apportionment purposes, single element concentration method was used based on the assumption that the PM10 fraction comes from a background source plus the Iron King tailing source. The method's conclusion that nearly all arsenic and lead in the PM10 dust fraction originated from the tailings substantiates our previous Pb and Sr isotope study conclusion. As and Pb showed a similar mass fraction from Iron King for all sites suggesting that As and Pb have the same major emission source. Further validation of this simple source apportionment method is needed based on other elements and sites.

  11. Reconciling PM10 analyses by different sampling methods for Iron King Mine tailings dust.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Félix, Omar I; Gonzales, Patricia; Sáez, Avelino Eduardo; Ela, Wendell P

    2016-03-01

    The overall project objective at the Iron King Mine Superfund site is to determine the level and potential risk associated with heavy metal exposure of the proximate population emanating from the site's tailings pile. To provide sufficient size-fractioned dust for multi-discipline research studies, a dust generator was built and is now being used to generate size-fractioned dust samples for toxicity investigations using in vitro cell culture and animal exposure experiments as well as studies on geochemical characterization and bioassay solubilization with simulated lung and gastric fluid extractants. The objective of this study is to provide a robust method for source identification by comparing the tailing sample produced by dust generator and that collected by MOUDI sampler. As and Pb concentrations of the PM10 fraction in the MOUDI sample were much lower than in tailing samples produced by the dust generator, indicating a dilution of Iron King tailing dust by dust from other sources. For source apportionment purposes, single element concentration method was used based on the assumption that the PM10 fraction comes from a background source plus the Iron King tailing source. The method's conclusion that nearly all arsenic and lead in the PM10 dust fraction originated from the tailings substantiates our previous Pb and Sr isotope study conclusion. As and Pb showed a similar mass fraction from Iron King for all sites suggesting that As and Pb have the same major emission source. Further validation of this simple source apportionment method is needed based on other elements and sites. PMID:26820180

  12. Comparison of solid-phase bioassays and ecoscores to evaluate the toxicity of contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Lors, Christine; Ponge, Jean-François; Martínez Aldaya, Maite; Damidot, Denis

    2010-08-01

    Five bioassays (inhibition of lettuce germination and growth, earthworm mortality, inhibition of springtail population growth, avoidance by springtails) were compared, using four coke factory soils contaminated by PAHs and trace elements, before and after biotreatment. For each bioassay, several endpoints were combined in an 'ecoscore', a measure of test sensitivity. Ecoscores pooled over all tested bioassays revealed that most organisms were highly sensitive to the concentration of 3-ring PAHs. When four soils were combined, behavioural tests using the springtail Folsomia candida showed higher ecoscores, i.e. they were most sensitive to soil contamination. However, despite overall higher sensitivity of behavioural tests, which could be used for cheap and rapid assessment of soil toxicity, especially at low levels of contamination, some test endpoints were more sensitive than others, and this may differ from a soil to another, pointing to the need for a battery of bioassays when more itemized results are expected. PMID:20537453

  13. Harmonia Axyridis Adults Avoid Catnip and Grapefruit-derived Terpenoids in Laboratory Bioassays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We observed the avoidance behavior of the multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), when adults were exposed to volatiles derived from catnip oil and grapefruit seed. In replicated laboratory bioassays, beetles avoided contact with volatiles emanating f...

  14. Comparative susceptibility of bemisia tabaci to imidacloprid in field- and laboratory-based bioassays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bemisia tabaci biotype B is a resistance-prone pest of protected and open agriculture. Systemic uptake bioassays used in resistance monitoring programs have provided important information on susceptibility to neonicotinoid insecticides, but have remained decoupled from field performance. Simultaneou...

  15. USING BIOASSAYS TO EVALUATE THE PERFORMANCE OF EDC RISK MANAGEMENT METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Superfund risk management research, the performance of risk management techniques is typically evaluated by measuring "the concentrations of the chemicals of concern before and after risk management efforts. However, using bioassays and chemical data provides a more robust und...

  16. IN SITU BIOASSAY CHAMBER FOR ASSESSMENT OF SEDIMENT TOXICITY AND BIOACCUMULATION USING BENTHIC INVERTEBRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we describe the construction of a simple, inexpensive bioassay chamber for testing sediment toxicity (survival and growth) and bioaccumulation under field conditions using the midge Chironomus tentans and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. The test chamber is ...

  17. Bioassay-guided antidiabetic study of Phaleria macrocarpa fruit extract.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rabyah B; Atangwho, Item J; Kaur, Navneet; Abraika, Omar Saad; Ahmad, Mariam; Mahmud, Roziahanim; Asmawi, Mohd Z

    2012-01-01

    An earlier anti-hyperglycemic study with serial crude extracts of Phaleria macrocarpa (PM) fruit indicated methanol extract (ME) as the most effective. In the present investigation, the methanol extract was further fractionated to obtain chloroform (CF), ethyl acetate (EAF), n-butanol (NBF) and aqueous (AF) fractions, which were tested for antidiabetic activity. The NBF reduced blood glucose (p < 0.05) 15 min after administration, in an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) similar to metformin. Moreover, it lowered blood glucose in diabetic rats by 66.67% (p < 0.05), similar to metformin (51.11%), glibenclamide (66.67%) and insulin (71.43%) after a 12-day treatment, hence considered to be the most active fraction. Further fractionation of NBF yielded sub-fractions I (SFI) and II (SFII), and only SFI lowered blood glucose (p < 0.05), in IPGTT similar to glibenclamide. The ME, NBF, and SFI correspondingly lowered plasma insulin (p < 0.05) and dose-dependently inhibited glucose transport across isolated rat jejunum implying an extra-pancreatic mechanism. Phytochemical screening showed the presence of flavonoids, terpenes and tannins, in ME, NBF and SFI, and LC-MS analyses revealed 9.52%, 33.30% and 22.50% mangiferin respectively. PM fruit possesses anti-hyperglycemic effect, exerted probably through extra-pancreatic action. Magniferin, contained therein may be responsible for this reported activity. PMID:22547320

  18. A simple, rapid bioassay for detecting effects of pollutants on bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, N.J.; Seidler, R.J.; Knittel, M.D.

    1981-12-01

    A screening bioassay needs to be rapid, and sensitive. The bioassay is described which is accurate, inexpensive, and which utilizes bacteria as the toxicity predictor. The basis of the test involves measuring the kinetics of dissolved oxygen depletion by a mixed microbial population following exposure to a pollutant and allows results to be obtained in as little as 40 min. Pollutants tested were cadmium, copper, nickel, sulfate, diuron, pentachlorophenol, atrazine, tricholoracetic acid, dimethylformamide, and diazinon. (JMT)

  19. A Standardized Lepidopteran Bioassay to Investigate the Bioactivity of Insecticidal Proteins Produced in Transgenic Crops.

    PubMed

    Graser, Gerson; Walters, Frederick S

    2016-01-01

    Insecticidal bioassays are the only reliable method to investigate the biological activity of an insecticidal protein and therefore provide an essential toolkit for the characterization and potency determination of these proteins. Here we present a standardized method for a lepidopteran larval bioassay, which is optimized to specifically estimate activity of insecticidal proteins produced in transgenic plants. The treatment can be either applied to the surface of the artificial diet, or blended into the diet. PMID:26614295

  20. The influence of ambient coarse particulate matter on asthma hospitalization in children: case-crossover and time-series analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mei; Chen, Yue; Burnett, Richard T; Villeneuve, Paul J; Krewski, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we used both case-crossover and time-series analyses to assess the associations between size-fractionated particulate matter and asthma hospitalization among children 6-12 years old living in Toronto between 1981 and 1993. Specifically, we used exposures averaged over periods varying from 1 to 7 days to assess the effects of particulate matter on asthma hospitalization. We calculated estimates of the relative risk of asthma hospitalization adjusted for daily weather conditions (maximum and minimum temperatures, and average relative humidity) for an incremental exposure corresponding to the interquartile range in particulate matter. Both bidirectional case-crossover and time-series analyses revealed that coarse particulate matter (PM10-2.5) averaged over 5-6 days was significantly associated with asthma hospitalization in both males and females. The magnitude of this effect appeared to increase with increasing number of days of exposure averaging for most models, with the relative risk estimates stabilizing at about 6 days. Using a bidirectional case-crossover analysis, the estimated relative risks were 1.14 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02, 1.28] for males and 1.18 (95% CI, 1.02, 1.36) for females, for an increment of 8.4 microg/m(3) in 6-day averages of PM10-2.5. The corresponding relative risk estimates were 1.10 and 1.18, respectively, when we used time-series analysis. The effect of PM10-2.5 remained positive after adjustment for the effects of the gaseous pollutants carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3). We did not find significant effects of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) or of thoracic particulate matter (PM10) on asthma hospitalizations using either of these two analytic approaches. For the most part, relative risk estimates from the unidirectional case-crossover analysis were more pronounced compared with both bidirectional case-crossover and time-series analyses. PMID:12055048

  1. Molecular Dynamics Trajectory Compression with a Coarse-Grained Model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi-Ming; Gopal, Srinivasa Murthy; Law, Sean M.; Feig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories are very data-intensive thereby limiting sharing and archival of such data. One possible solution is compression of trajectory data. Here, trajectory compression based on conversion to the coarse-grained model PRIMO is proposed. The compressed data is about one third of the original data and fast decompression is possible with an analytical reconstruction procedure from PRIMO to all-atom representations. This protocol largely preserves structural features and to a more limited extent also energetic features of the original trajectory. PMID:22025759

  2. Coarse-Grained Models for Protein-Cell Membrane Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Ryan; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    The physiological properties of biological soft matter are the product of collective interactions, which span many time and length scales. Recent computational modeling efforts have helped illuminate experiments that characterize the ways in which proteins modulate membrane physics. Linking these models across time and length scales in a multiscale model explains how atomistic information propagates to larger scales. This paper reviews continuum modeling and coarse-grained molecular dynamics methods, which connect atomistic simulations and single-molecule experiments with the observed microscopic or mesoscale properties of soft-matter systems essential to our understanding of cells, particularly those involved in sculpting and remodeling cell membranes. PMID:26613047

  3. Coarse fraction of soils from building rubble (WWII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekiffer, Beate; Wessolek, Gerd; Scheytt, Traugott; Bussert, Robert; Nehls, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Soils, resulting from building rubble of WWII are wide spread in whole Europe. The parent material for pedogenesis originates from different kinds of buildings, which where destroyed of different ways. Also the kind of sorting and disposing was varying for this material. So the most important feature of soils, resulting from building rubble of WWII, is their heterogeneity. We investigated samples of soils developed from building rubble to answer the following questions: ­ What are the amounts of coarse fraction and what are their main components? ­ What are the chemical properties and what is the crystalline mineral composition of technogenic components? ­ What is the release of ions from coarse technogenic components? We sieved and hand sorted the materials, used the X-ray diffractometry and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and measured the ions released in 1:2-extract. In most cases, the soils have a high amount of coarse fraction (> 2mm) (median 25% w/w, N=52). Dominating components in the coarse fraction are in the order of decreasing abundance: bricks, mortar (incl. plaster and stucco), slag, ashes and unburned coals. The analyzed components show alkalescent to alkaline pH-values. 75% of the samples show low electrical conductivities of up to 141 µS/cm. Bricks mainly consist of Si oxides, followed by oxides of Al, Ca, Fe, Mg and K. X-Ray-diffractometry of bricks showed, that most common minerals are clay minerals (Kaolinit, Illit, Montmorillonit and Chlorit), Quarz, and Carbonates (Calcite and Dolomite, Siderite). Bricks contain Fe-Oxides (Hematite, Goethite), Sulphates and Sulfides (Gypsum, Pyrite, Markasite) in lower amounts. 5-20 % of the minerals are x-ray-amorphous. Mortar is characterized by a high amount of silicates (nearby 80%). The samples showed a lower percentage of Al- and Ca-compounds than bricks. Chemical composition of ashes and slag varies in wide ranges, depending on their genesis. We found mainly ashes from stove heating. They contained

  4. The power of coarse graining in biomolecular simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Lopez, Cesar A; Uusitalo, Jaakko J; de Jong, Djurre H; Gopal, Srinivasa M; Periole, Xavier; Marrink, Siewert J

    2014-01-01

    Computational modeling of biological systems is challenging because of the multitude of spatial and temporal scales involved. Replacing atomistic detail with lower resolution, coarse grained (CG), beads has opened the way to simulate large-scale biomolecular processes on time scales inaccessible to all-atom models. We provide an overview of some of the more popular CG models used in biomolecular applications to date, focusing on models that retain chemical specificity. A few state-of-the-art examples of protein folding, membrane protein gating and self-assembly, DNA hybridization, and modeling of carbohydrate fibers are used to illustrate the power and diversity of current CG modeling. PMID:25309628

  5. Dynamical coarse grained models with realistic time dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Hans

    2015-03-01

    Coarse grained (CG) models of molecular systems, with fewer mechanical degrees of freedom than an all-atom model, are used extensively in chemical physics. It is generally accepted that a coarse grained model that accurately describes equilibrium structural properties (as a result of having a well constructed CG potential energy function) does not necessarily exhibit appropriate dynamical behavior when simulated using conservative Hamiltonian dynamics for the CG degrees of freedom on the CG potential energy surface. Attempts to develop accurate CG dynamic models usually focus on replacing Hamiltonian motion by stochastic but Markovian dynamics on that surface, such as Langevin or Brownian dynamics. However, depending on the nature of the system and the extent of the coarse graining, a Markovian dynamics for the CG degrees of freedom may not be appropriate. We consider the problem of constructing dynamic CG models within the context of the Multi-Scale Coarse Graining (MS-CG) method of Voth and coworkers. We propose a method of converting an MS-CG model into a dynamic CG model by adding degrees of freedom to it in the form of a small number of fictitious particles that interact with the CG degrees of freedom in simple ways and that are subject to Langevin forces. The dynamic models are members of a class of nonlinear systems interacting with special heat baths that was studied by Zwanzig [R. Zwanzig, J. Stat. Phys. 9, 215 (1973)]. The dynamic models generate a non-Markovian dynamics for the CG degrees of freedom, but they can be easily simulated using standard molecular dynamics simulation programs. We present tests of this method on a series of simple examples that demonstrate that the method provides realistic dynamical CG models that have non-Markovian or close to Markovian behavior that is consistent with the actual dynamical behavior of the all-atom system used to construct the CG model. The dynamic CG models have computational requirements that are similar to

  6. Coarse-node computations with an adaptive node structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P.

    1988-01-01

    The analysis with COMMIX of liquid metal reactor (LMR) intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) transients that are characterized by low flows, and especially imbalanced low flows, shows that if a coarse-node structure is used the predicted temperatures are significantly different than those given by a fine-node structure. If a fine-node structure is used, for problems that involve a large part of the plant, the computation time becomes excessive. This paper presents an improved version of an adaptive node structure. At this stage this version has been applied only to one-dimensional problems.

  7. Variability of fine and coarse aerosol over the Western Mediterranean Basin during the Minerva 2015 research cruise campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagna, Jessica; Carbone, Francesco; Naccarato, Attilio; Moretti, Sacha; Esposito, Giulio; Bencardino, Mariantonia; D'Amore, Francesco; Sprovieri, Francesca; Pirrone, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    The Mediterranean Basin, due to its semi-enclosed configuration, is heavily affected by air pollution and it is becoming, in the last years, a region of particular interest of study for its implications regarding both health effects and environmental impacts. The area is surrounded by a densely populated as well as industrialized coast, and even affected by natural sources. So, it is important to know how the various sources contributes to increase air pollution levels and discriminate among them. With special regard to aerosol pollution, natural sources, like Saharan dust, volcanoes, and fires, as well as anthropogenic sources, such as industry, road and marine traffic, and fuel combustion from heating, can equally increase the values of this dangerous pollutant. While on the land we can find numerous monitoring sites, there are not continuous measurements on the sea. For this reason, since 2000 the Institute of Atmospheric Pollution of the National Research Council (CNR-IIA) is conducting regular oceanographic campaigns of measurements in the Mediterranean Sea. In this context, here we report the results obtained during the last cruise campaign, which took place in the Western Mediterranean sector and was conducted on-board the Italian research vessel Minerva during summer 2015 (from June 27th to July 13th). Fine (PM2.5) and Coarse (PM2.5-10) particulate size fractions were collected on PTFE membrane filters (Advantec MFS) and their mass concentrations determined gravimetrically. Successively, all the filters were digested with a mixture of HNO3/H2O2 in an microwaves digestion system and then analyzed by ICP-MS for the determination of the major and trace elements. Outcomes regarding the particulate mass concentration, the content and the distribution of the analyzed elements over both PM size fractions will be discussed taking into account potential contributing sources as well as different meteorological conditions.

  8. INDOOR-OUTDOOR PM2.5 AND PM10 IN NEW YORK CITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    PM health effects have been reported to be highest in sensitive subpopulations such as COPD patients. Since such individuals are spend higher proportions of their day indoors, the relationship between indoor and outdoor concentrations is therefore particularly important. The ...

  9. In situ bioassay using Chironomus riparius: An intermediate between laboratory and field sediment quality assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Guchte, C. van de; Grootelaar, L.; Naber, A.

    1995-12-31

    Benthic macroinvertebrates like chironomid larvae are important indicators for sediment quality. Both in field surveys and laboratory bioassays effect parameters like abundance, survival, growth, larval development and morphological abnormalities of chironomids are recommended biological endpoints to assess the impact of sediment associated contaminants. Now and then results from field surveys on contaminated sites appeared to differ from results in laboratory bioassays on sediment field samples from the same sites. The impact of so-called modifying factors like temperature, oxygen levels and the availability of food could be studied in the laboratory. However, these factors could not fully explain the observed differences. In situ bioassays have been developed to bridge the gap between laboratory and field derived data with respect to the exposure of cultured Chironomus riparius larvae versus field collected Chironomus sp. larvae. Control survival in the in situ bioassays was within acceptable limits (> 80%). Effects observed during the caged exposure of laboratory cultured first instar larvae at contaminated sites were in agreement with the hypothesis that adequate in-field bioassessment reduces uncertainties inherent in the use of standardized laboratory bioassays. Although relative risk ranking of chemicals or contaminated sites can rely upon standard testing protocols, in situ bioassays can give a better insight in exposure-effect relationships under actual field conditions.

  10. Partitioning of trace elements and metals between quasi-ultrafine, accumulation and coarse aerosols in indoor and outdoor air in schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, M.; Rivas, I.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; Álvarez-Pedrerol, M.; Bouso, L.; Sioutas, C.; Sunyer, J.

    2015-04-01

    Particle size distribution patterns of trace elements and metals across three size fractions (<0.25 μm, quasi-ultrafine particles, q-UF; 0.25-2.5 μm, accumulation particles; 2.5-10 μm, coarse particles) were analysed in indoor and outdoor air at 39 primary schools across Barcelona (Spain). Special attention was paid to emission sources in each particle size range. Results evidenced the presence in q-UF particles of high proportions of elements typically found in coarse PM (Ca, Al, Fe, Mn or Na), as well as several potentially health-hazardous metals (Mn, Cu, Sn, V, Pb). Modal shifts (e.g., from accumulation to coarse or q-UF particles) were detected when particles infiltrated indoors, mainly for secondary inorganic aerosols. Our results indicate that the location of schools in heavily trafficked areas increases the abundance of q-UF particles, which infiltrate indoors quite effectively, and thus may impact children exposure to these health-hazardous particles.

  11. The interaction between PmHtrA2 and PmIAP and its effect on the activity of Pm caspase.

    PubMed

    Saleeart, Anchulee; Mongkorntanyatip, Karntichar; Sangsuriya, Pakkakul; Senapin, Saengchan; Rattanarojpong, Triwit; Khunrae, Pongsak

    2016-08-01

    Apoptosis is an essential mechanism in multicellular organisms which results in the induction of cell death. Important apoptotic proteins, including high temperature requirement A2 (PmHtrA2; also known as serine protease), inhibitor of apoptosis protein (PmIAP) and Pm caspase, have been previously identified in black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon. However, the relevance among these proteins in apoptosis regulation has not been established yet in shrimp. Here, we showed that PmHtrA2 was able to interact with PmIAP and the binding of the two proteins was mediated by the BIR2 domain of PmIAP. In addition, the BIR2 of PmIAP was shown to be able to inhibit Pm caspase activity. The inhibitory effect of the BIR2 domain on Pm caspase was impaired under the presence of the IBM peptide of PmHtrA2, implying a role for PmHtrA2 in apoptosis activation. Our combined results suggested that P. monodon possesses a conserved mechanism by which the caspase-3 activity is modulated by HtrA2 and IAP, as previously seen in insects and mammals. PMID:27328308

  12. Evaluation of biotoxicity of textile dyes using two bioassays.

    PubMed

    Moawad, Hassan; El-Rahim, Wafaa M Abd; Khalafallah, M

    2003-01-01

    The toxicity of eight textile dyes was evaluated using two bioassays namely: Ames test and seed germination test. The Ames test is widely used for the evaluation of hazardous mutagenic effect of different chemicals, as a short-term screening test for environmental impact assessment. The eight-textile dyes and Eithidium bromide dye (as positive control) were tested with five "his" Salmonella typhimurium strains: TA 100; TA 98; TA 1535; TA 1537; TA 1538. Using six concentrations of each dye (2.5 microg/ml, 4.5 microg/ml, 9 microg/ml, 13.5 microg/ml, 18 microg/ml, and 22.5 microg/ml) revealed that, most of the dyes were mutagenic for the test strains used in this study. The high concentrations of dye eliminated microbial colonies due to the high frequency of mutation causing lethal effect on the cells. In this work the phytotoxicity of different soluble textile dyes was estimated by measuring the relative changes in seed germination of four plants: clover, wheat, tomato and lettuce. The changes in shooting percentages and root length as affected by dye were also measured. Seed germination percent and shoot growth as well as root length were recorded after 6 days of exposure to different concentrations of textile dyes in irrigation water. The results show that high concentrations of dyes were more toxic to seed germination as compared with the lower concentrations. However, the low concentrations of the tested dyes adversely affected the shooting percent significantly. PMID:12761773

  13. Bioassay of thermal protection afforded by candidate flight suit fabrics.

    PubMed

    Knox, F S; Wachtel, T L; McCahan, G R

    1979-10-01

    The United States Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory (USAARL) porcine cutaneous bioassay technique was used to determine what mitigating effect four thermally protective flight suit fabrics would have on fire-induced skin damage. The fabrics were 4.8-ox twill weave Nomex aramide, 4.5-oz stabilized twill weave polybenzimidazole, 4.8-oz plain weave experimental high-temperature polymer (HT4), and 4.8-oz plain weave Nomex aramide (New Weave Nomex or NWN). Each fabric sample was assayed 20 times in each of four configurations: as a single layer in contact with the skin; as a single layer with a 6.35 mm (0.25 in) air gap between fabric and skin; in conjuction with a cotton T-shirt with no air gaps; and, finally, in conjuction with a T-shirt with a 6.35 mm air gap between T-shirt and fabric. Bare skin was used as a control. A JP-4 fueled furnace was used as a thermal source and was adjested to deliver a mean heat flux of 3.07 cal/cm2/s. The duration of exposure was 5 s. Four hundred burn sites were graded using clinical observation and microscopic techniques. Used as single layers, none of the fabrics demonstrated superiority in providing clinically significant protection. When used with a cotton T-shirt, protection was improved. Protection improved progressively for all fabrics and configuration when an air gap was introduced. The experimental high-temperature polymer consistently demonstrated lower heat flux transmission in all configurations, but did not significantly reduce clinical burns. PMID:518445

  14. Source Apportionment and Elemental Composition of PM2.5 and PM10 in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Khodeir, Mamdouh; Shamy, Magdy; Alghamdi, Mansour; Zhong, Mianhua; Sun, Hong; Costa, Max; Chen, Lung-Chi; Maciejczyk, Polina

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first comprehensive investigation of PM2.5 and PM10 composition and sources in Saudi Arabia. We conducted a multi-week multiple sites sampling campaign in Jeddah between June and September, 2011, and analyzed samples by XRF. The overall mean mass concentration was 28.4 ± 25.4 μg/m3 for PM2.5 and 87.3 ± 47.3 μg/m3 for PM10, with significant temporal and spatial variability. The average ratio of PM2.5/PM10 was 0.33. Chemical composition data were modeled using factor analysis with varimax orthogonal rotation to determine five and four particle source categories contributing significant amount of for PM2.5 and PM10 mass, respectively. In both PM2.5 and PM10 sources were (1) heavy oil combustion characterized by high Ni and V; (2) resuspended soil characterized by high concentrations of Ca, Fe, Al, and Si; and (3) marine aerosol. The two other sources in PM2.5 were (4) Cu/Zn source; (5) traffic source identified by presence of Pb, Br, and Se; while in PM10 it was a mixed industrial source. To estimate the mass contributions of each individual source category, the CAPs mass concentration was regressed against the factor scores. Cumulatively, resuspended soil and oil combustion contributed 77 and 82% mass of PM2.5 and PM10, respectively. PMID:24634602

  15. The multiscale coarse-graining method. X. Improved algorithms for constructing coarse-grained potentials for molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Avisek; Lu, Lanyuan; Andersen, Hans C.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-05-01

    The multiscale coarse-graining (MS-CG) method uses simulation data for an atomistic model of a system to construct a coarse-grained (CG) potential for a coarse-grained model of the system. The CG potential is a variational approximation for the true potential of mean force of the degrees of freedom retained in the CG model. The variational calculation uses information about the atomistic positions and forces in the simulation data. In principle, the resulting MS-CG potential will be an accurate representation of the true CG potential if the basis set for the variational calculation is complete enough and the canonical distribution of atomistic states is well sampled by the data set. In practice, atomistic configurations that have very high potential energy are not sampled. As a result there usually is a region of CG configuration space that is not sampled and about which the data set contains no information regarding the gradient of the true potential. The MS-CG potential obtained from a variational calculation will not necessarily be accurate in this unsampled region. A priori considerations make it clear that the true CG potential of mean force must be very large and positive in that region. To obtain an MS-CG potential whose behavior in the sampled region is determined by the atomistic data set, and whose behavior in the unsampled region is large and positive, it is necessary to intervene in the variational calculation in some way. In this paper, we discuss and compare two such methods of intervention, which have been used in previous MS-CG calculations for dealing with nonbonded interactions. For the test systems studied, the two methods give similar results and yield MS-CG potentials that are limited in accuracy only by the incompleteness of the basis set and the statistical error of associated with the set of atomistic configurations used. The use of such methods is important for obtaining accurate CG potentials.

  16. High spin states in {sup 139}Pm

    SciTech Connect

    Dhal, A.; Sinha, R. K.; Chaturvedi, L.; Agarwal, P.; Kumar, S.; Jain, A. K.; Kumar, R.; Govil, I. M.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Chakraborty, A.; Krishichayan; Ray, S.; Ghugre, S. S.; Sinha, A. K.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Pancholi, S. C.; Gupta, J. B.

    2009-07-15

    The odd mass nucleus {sup 139}Pm has been studied to high spins through the {sup 116}Cd({sup 27}Al,4n){sup 139}Pm reaction at an incident beam energy of 120 MeV. The de-exciting {gamma}-rays were detected using an array of 12 Compton suppressed Ge detectors. A total of 46 new levels have been proposed in the present work as a result of the observation of 60 new {gamma}-rays. Four new bands including a {delta}J=1 sequence have been identified and all the earlier reported bands, other than the yrast band, have been extended to higher spins and excitation energy. The spin assignments for most of the newly reported levels have been made using the observed coincidence angular anisotropy. Tilted axis cranking calculations support the interpretation of two of the observed magnetic dipole sequences as examples of magnetic rotational bands.

  17. Coarse bedload routing and dispersion through tributary confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, K. S.; Wilcox, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment routing fundamentally influences channel morphology and propagation of disturbances. However, the transport and storage of bedload particles in headwater channel confluences, which may be significant nodes of the channel network in terms of sediment routing, morphology, and habitat, is poorly understood. To characterize routing processes through confluences of headwater channels, we investigate how sediment routing patterns through headwater confluences compare to those described in low-gradient gravel bed river systems, and how confluences affect the dispersive behavior of coarse bedload particles compared to non-confluence reaches. We address these questions with a field tracer experiment using passive-integrated transponder and radio-frequency identification technology in the East Fork Bitterroot River basin, Montana, USA. Within the confluence zone, transport occurs along scour hole margins in narrow, efficient transport corridors that mirror those observed in finer-grained experiments and field studies. Coarse particles entering confluences experience reduced depositional probabilities, in contrast to the size-selective transport observed in a control reach. Stochastic transport modeling, tail analysis, and use of a dimensionless impulse (I*) suggest that transport distance and variance growth are enhanced through confluences for a given flow strength. We suggest that confluences absent of disturbances enhance sediment transport and dispersive growth through headwater networks.

  18. Simulating the Entropic Collapse of Coarse-Grained Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Shendruk, Tyler N.; Bertrand, Martin; de Haan, Hendrick W.; Harden, James L.; Slater, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    Depletion forces play a role in the compaction and decompaction of chromosomal material in simple cells, but it has remained debatable whether they are sufficient to account for chromosomal collapse. We present coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, which reveal that depletion-induced attraction is sufficient to cause the collapse of a flexible chain of large structural monomers immersed in a bath of smaller depletants. These simulations use an explicit coarse-grained computational model that treats both the supercoiled DNA structural monomers and the smaller protein crowding agents as combinatorial, truncated Lennard-Jones spheres. By presenting a simple theoretical model, we quantitatively cast the action of depletants on supercoiled bacterial DNA as an effective solvent quality. The rapid collapse of the simulated flexible chromosome at the predicted volume fraction of depletants is a continuous phase transition. Additional physical effects to such simple chromosome models, such as enthalpic interactions between structural monomers or chain rigidity, are required if the collapse is to be a first-order phase transition. PMID:25692586

  19. A coarse-grained model of microtubule self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, Chola; Cheng, Shengfeng

    Microtubules play critical roles in cell structures and functions. They also serve as a model system to stimulate the next-generation smart, dynamic materials. A deep understanding of their self-assembly process and biomechanical properties will not only help elucidate how microtubules perform biological functions, but also lead to exciting insight on how microtubule dynamics can be altered or even controlled for specific purposes such as suppressing the division of cancer cells. Combining all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the essential dynamics coarse-graining method, we construct a coarse-grained (CG) model of the tubulin protein, which is the building block of microtubules. In the CG model a tubulin dimer is represented as an elastic network of CG sites, the locations of which are determined by examining the protein dynamics of the tubulin and identifying the essential dynamic domains. Atomistic MD modeling is employed to directly compute the tubulin bond energies in the surface lattice of a microtubule, which are used to parameterize the interactions between CG building blocks. The CG model is then used to study the self-assembly pathways, kinetics, dynamics, and nanomechanics of microtubules.

  20. Effects of Elevated Temperature on Concrete with Recycled Coarse Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salau, M. A.; Oseafiana, O. J.; Oyegoke, T. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper discusses the effects of heating temperatures of 200°C, 400°C and 600°C each for 2 hours at a heating rate of 2.5°C/min on concrete with the content of Natural Coarse Aggregates (NCA) partially replaced with Recycled Coarse Aggregates (RCA), obtained from demolished building in the ratio of 0%, 15% and 30%.There was an initial drop in strength from 100°C to 200°C which is suspected to be due to the relatively weak interfacial bond between the RCA and the hardened paste within the concrete matrix;a gradual increase in strength continued from 200°C to 450°C and steady drop occurred again as it approached 600°C.With replacement proportion of 0%, 15% and 30% of NCA and exposure to peak temperature of 600°C, a relative concrete strength of 23.6MPa, 25.3MPa and 22.2MPa respectively can be achieved for 28 days curing age. Furthermore, RAC with 15% NCA replacement when exposed to optimum temperature of 450°C yielded high compressive strength comparable to that of control specimen (normal concrete). In addition, for all concrete samples only slight surface hairline cracks were noticed as the temperature approached 400°C. Thus, the RAC demonstrated behavior just like normal concrete and may be considered fit for structural use.

  1. Coarse-grained modeling of RNA 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Wayne K; Maciejczyk, Maciej; Jankowska, Elzbieta J; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2016-07-01

    Functional RNA molecules depend on three-dimensional (3D) structures to carry out their tasks within the cell. Understanding how these molecules interact to carry out their biological roles requires a detailed knowledge of RNA 3D structure and dynamics as well as thermodynamics, which strongly governs the folding of RNA and RNA-RNA interactions as well as a host of other interactions within the cellular environment. Experimental determination of these properties is difficult, and various computational methods have been developed to model the folding of RNA 3D structures and their interactions with other molecules. However, computational methods also have their limitations, especially when the biological effects demand computation of the dynamics beyond a few hundred nanoseconds. For the researcher confronted with such challenges, a more amenable approach is to resort to coarse-grained modeling to reduce the number of data points and computational demand to a more tractable size, while sacrificing as little critical information as possible. This review presents an introduction to the topic of coarse-grained modeling of RNA 3D structures and dynamics, covering both high- and low-resolution strategies. We discuss how physics-based approaches compare with knowledge based methods that rely on databases of information. In the course of this review, we discuss important aspects in the reasoning process behind building different models and the goals and pitfalls that can result.

  2. Effective mobility of dislocations from systematic coarse-graining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooiman, M.; Hütter, M.; Geers, MGD

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of large amounts of dislocations governs the plastic response of crystalline materials. In this contribution we discuss the relation between the mobility of discrete dislocations and the resulting flow rule for coarse-grained dislocation densities. The mobilities used in literature on these levels are quite different, for example in terms of their intrinsic the stress dependence. To establish the relation across the scales, we have derived the macroscopic evolution equations of dislocation densities from the equations of motion of individual dislocations by means of systematic coarse-graining. From this, we can identify a memory kernel relating the driving force and the flux of dislocations. This kernel can be considered as an effective macroscopic mobility with two contributions; a direct contribution related to the overdamped motion of individual dislocations, and an emergent contribution that arises from time correlations of fluctuations in the Peach-Koehler force. Scaling analysis shows that the latter contribution is dominant for dislocations in metals at room temperature. We also discuss several concerns related to the separation of timescales.

  3. Multiple Coarse Grid Multigrid Methods for Solving Elliptic Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiao, Shengyou; Young, David

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we describe some classes of multigrid methods for solving large linear systems arising in the solution by finite difference methods of certain boundary value problems involving Poisson's equation on rectangular regions. If parallel computing systems are used, then with standard multigrid methods many of the processors will be idle when one is working at the coarsest grid levels. We describe the use of Multiple Coarse Grid MultiGrid (MCGMG) methods. Here one first constructs a periodic set of equations corresponding to the given system. One then constructs a set of coarse grids such that for each grid corresponding to the grid size h there are four grids corresponding to the grid size 2*h. Multigrid operations such as restriction of residuals and interpolation of corrections are done in parallel at each grid level. For suitable choices of the multigrid operators the MCGMG method is equivalent to the Parallel Superconvergent MultiGrid (PSMG) method of Frederickson and McBryan. The convergence properties of MCGMG methods can be accurately analyzed using spectral methods.

  4. Measurement of coarse aerosols in workplaces. A review.

    PubMed

    Vincent, J H

    1994-01-01

    Coarse aerosol fractions in workplaces are sampled if it is felt that particles of all sizes may pose a risk to health. Although the so-called 'total' aerosol has been widely used to refer to the relevant coarse fraction, practical measurement has been very dependent on the actual sampling instrument used. This in turn has led to great uncertainty about what was being measured. In the 1980s, the concept of inhalability was proposed, based on the aerosol particle size fraction that enters the human head through the nose and/or mouth during breathing. Now there is substantial agreement by most of the world's major criteria-setting bodies on a quantitative definition taking the form of a single curve describing the probability of inhalation as a function of particle aerodynamic diameter. This definition now forms a truly health-related 'yardstick' against which to assess the performances of practical sampling devices. In turn, more and more countries are beginning to adopt the new criterion for health-related aerosol measurement in their standards, replacing the old 'total' aerosol concept. Experiments in wind tunnels to investigate the performances of previous samplers for 'total' aerosol show that most of them do not satisfactorily match the new inhalability criterion. A small number of samplers designed specifically for the inhalable fraction have been proposed and are available commercially. They include samplers for both static (or area) and personal sampling. PMID:8154594

  5. Performance of coarse pore filtration activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Alavi Moghaddam, M R; Satoh, H; Mino, T

    2002-01-01

    A coarse pore filter can be applied inside the aeration tank to facilitate the separation of sludge from liquid instead of sedimentation. This filter has pores, which are irregular in shape, and the pore size is bigger than those of MF. The objectives of the study were to maintain as much as MLSS in the activated sludge process with coarse pore filter and to investigate the performance under high MLSS condition. Small-scale reactor results so far show good quality of effluent specially after starting the sludge bulking in the system in terms of SS, TOC, DOC and turbidity. The average carbon removal for 62 days operation of this system was about 94% (based on effluent DOC) and 87% (based on effluent TOC). The average sludge yield in this system is about 0.44 kg MLSS/kg TOC which is about 0.24 kg MLSS/kg BOD. This amount is less than those of conventional activated sludge and trickling filter.

  6. Coarse-graining the structure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons clusters.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rojas, J; Calvo, F; Wales, D J

    2016-05-18

    Clusters of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are essential components of soot and may concentrate a significant fraction of carbon matter in the interstellar medium. In this contribution, coarse-grained potentials are parameterized using all-atom reference data to model PAH molecules, such as coronene (C24H12) or circumcoronene (C54H18), and their aggregates. Low-energy structures of pure coronene or circumcoronene clusters obtained using basin-hopping global optimization are found to agree with atomistic results, and consist of finite 1D columnar motifs, sometimes juxtaposed in larger clusters. The structures are only weakly perturbed when quadrupolar interactions are included. π-Stacking also dominates in binary coronene/circumcoronene aggregates, although intriguing motifs are predicted in which one or more molecules are sandwiched between the other PAH species. The coarse-grained model is also extended to account for interaction with a flat graphitic substrate. In this case, binding is stronger with the substrate than with other molecules, and the PAHs are predicted to arrange into a flat triangular monolayer. PMID:27055581

  7. Transport of fine sediment over a coarse, immobile riverbed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grams, Paul E.; Wilcock, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Sediment transport in cobble-boulder rivers consists mostly of fine sediment moving over a coarse, immobile bed. Transport rate depends on several interrelated factors: boundary shear stress, the grain size and volume of fine sediment, and the configuration of fine sediment into interstitial deposits and bed forms. Existing models do not incorporate all of these factors. Approaches that partition stress face a daunting challenge because most of the boundary shear is exerted on immobile grains. We present an alternative approach that divides the bed into sand patches and interstitial deposits and is well constrained by two clear end-member cases: full sand cover and absence of sand. Entrainment from sand patches is a function of their aerial coverage. Entrainment from interstices among immobile grains is a function of sand elevation relative to the size of the immobile grains. The bed-sand coverage function is used to predict the ratio of the rate of entrainment from a partially covered bed to the rate of entrainment from a completely sand-covered bed, which is determined using a standard sand transport model. We implement the bed-sand coverage function in a morphodynamic routing model and test it against observations of sand bed elevation and suspended sand concentration for conditions of nonuniform fine sediment transport in a large flume with steady uniform flow over immobile hemispheres. The results suggest that this approach may provide a simple and robust method for predicting the transport and migration of fine sediment through rivers with coarse, immobile beds.

  8. A coarse grain model for protein-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuai; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2013-09-01

    The interaction of proteins with surfaces is important in numerous applications in many fields—such as biotechnology, proteomics, sensors, and medicine—but fundamental understanding of how protein stability and structure are affected by surfaces remains incomplete. Over the last several years, molecular simulation using coarse grain models has yielded significant insights, but the formalisms used to represent the surface interactions have been rudimentary. We present a new model for protein surface interactions that incorporates the chemical specificity of both the surface and the residues comprising the protein in the context of a one-bead-per-residue, coarse grain approach that maintains computational efficiency. The model is parameterized against experimental adsorption energies for multiple model peptides on different types of surfaces. The validity of the model is established by its ability to quantitatively and qualitatively predict the free energy of adsorption and structural changes for multiple biologically-relevant proteins on different surfaces. The validation, done with proteins not used in parameterization, shows that the model produces remarkable agreement between simulation and experiment.

  9. Deformation Behaviour of Coarse Grain Alumina under Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Satish

    2013-06-01

    To develop better understanding of the shock wave induced deformation behavior of coarse grain alumina ceramics, and for measurement of its Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL), in-situ and recovery gas gun experiments have been carried out on coarse grain alumina (grain size ~ 10 μm), prepared in the form of discs (>99.9% TMD) by pressure-less sintering of alpha alumina powder at 1583 K. The HEL value of 1.9 GPa has been determined from the kink in the pressure history recorded using piezoresistance gauge and also from the free surface velocity history of the sample shocked to 9 GPa. The nano-indentation measurements on the alumina samples shocked to 6.5 GPa showed hardness value 15% lower than 21.3 GPa for unshocked alumina, and strong Indentation Size Effect (ISE); the hardness value was still lower and the ISE was stronger for the sample shocked to 12 GPa. The XRD measurements showed reduced particle size and increased microstrains in the shocked alumina fragments. SEM, FESEM and TEM measurements on shock treated samples showed presence of grain localized micro- and nano-scale deformations, micro-cleavages, grain-boundary microcracks, extensive shear induced deformations, and localized micro-fractures, etc. These observations led to the development of a qualitative model for the damage initiation and its subsequent growth mechanisms in shocked alumina. The work performed in collaboration with K.D. Joshi of BARC and A.K. Mukhopadhyay of CGCRI.