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Sample records for coarse sun sensor

  1. Autonomous Sun-Direction Estimation Using Partially Underdetermined Coarse Sun Sensor Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keefe, Stephen A.

    In recent years there has been a significant increase in interest in smaller satellites as lower cost alternatives to traditional satellites, particularly with the rise in popularity of the CubeSat. Due to stringent mass, size, and often budget constraints, these small satellites rely on making the most of inexpensive hardware components and sensors, such as coarse sun sensors (CSS) and magnetometers. More expensive high-accuracy sun sensors often combine multiple measurements, and use specialized electronics, to deterministically solve for the direction of the Sun. Alternatively, cosine-type CSS output a voltage relative to the input light and are attractive due to their very low cost, simplicity to manufacture, small size, and minimal power consumption. This research investigates using coarse sun sensors for performing robust attitude estimation in order to point a spacecraft at the Sun after deployment from a launch vehicle, or following a system fault. As an alternative to using a large number of sensors, this thesis explores sun-direction estimation techniques with low computational costs that function well with underdetermined sets of CSS. Single-point estimators are coupled with simultaneous nonlinear control to achieve sun-pointing within a small percentage of a single orbit despite the partially underdetermined nature of the sensor suite. Leveraging an extensive analysis of the sensor models involved, sequential filtering techniques are shown to be capable of estimating the sun-direction to within a few degrees, with no a priori attitude information and using only CSS, despite the significant noise and biases present in the system. Detailed numerical simulations are used to compare and contrast the performance of the five different estimation techniques, with and without rate gyro measurements, their sensitivity to rate gyro accuracy, and their computation time. One of the key concerns with reducing the number of CSS is sensor degradation and failure. In

  2. Sun-Direction Estimation Using a Partially Underdetermined Set of Coarse Sun Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keefe, Stephen A.; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2015-09-01

    A comparison of different methods to estimate the sun-direction vector using a partially underdetermined set of cosine-type coarse sun sensors (CSS), while simultaneously controlling the attitude towards a power-positive orientation, is presented. CSS are commonly used in performing power-positive sun-pointing and are attractive due to their relative inexpensiveness, small size, and reduced power consumption. For this study only CSS and rate gyro measurements are available, and the sensor configuration does not provide global triple coverage required for a unique sun-direction calculation. The methods investigated include a vector average method, a combination of least squares and minimum norm criteria, and an extended Kalman filter approach. All cases are formulated such that precise ground calibration of the CSS is not required. Despite significant biases in the state dynamics and measurement models, Monte Carlo simulations show that an extended Kalman filter approach, despite the underdetermined sensor coverage, can provide degree-level accuracy of the sun-direction vector both with and without a control algorithm running simultaneously. If no rate gyro measurements are available, and rates are partially estimated from CSS, the EKF performance degrades as expected, but is still able to achieve better than 10∘ accuracy using only CSS measurements.

  3. An Examination of Coarse Sun Sensor Contingencies in Attitude Determination and the Sun Vector Calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Brenman; Welch, Ray; Burt, Brad

    2012-01-01

    Satellite pointing is vital to the success of a mission. One element of that entails describing the position of the sun relative to the frame of the satellite. Coarse Sun Sensors (CSS) are typically used to provide the information to calculate the sun's position in Safe Modes or contingency operations. In the OCO-2 configuration there are 13 CSS total, which provide redundant 4 celestial coverage. Failures of the individual CSS elements can introduce holes in the celestial coverage resulting in potential loss of sun knowledge. These failures must be analyzed to determine if the contingency plan is sufficient to assure mission success. First the static case was looked at and determined that at a maximum, 3 CSS failures can be sustained on the body and 1 on the array without causing coverage holes. Also array sensors are more important to mission success. The Sun Vector calculation has been transcribed to MATLAB code and failure scenarios are being examined to determine the maximum error given a set of failure scenarios. This activity indicated that if there is a loss of the sun, the sun-searching algorithm could be modified to use XZ rotation as that is guaranteed to find it whereas the design using the YZ rotation misses the sun if it is at the + or - Y orientation.

  4. Attitude estimation from magnetometer and earth-albedo-corrected coarse sun sensor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Pontus

    2005-01-01

    For full 3-axes attitude determination the magnetic field vector and the Sun vector can be used. A Coarse Sun Sensor consisting of six solar cells placed on each of the six outer surfaces of the satellite is used for Sun vector determination. This robust and low cost setup is sensitive to surrounding light sources as it sees the whole sky. To compensate for the largest error source, the Earth, an albedo model is developed. The total albedo light vector has contributions from the Earth surface which is illuminated by the Sun and visible from the satellite. Depending on the reflectivity of the Earth surface, the satellite's position and the Sun's position the albedo light changes. This cannot be calculated analytically and hence a numerical model is developed. For on-board computer use the Earth albedo model consisting of data tables is transferred into polynomial functions in order to save memory space. For an absolute worst case the attitude determination error can be held below 2∘. In a nominal case it is better than 1∘.

  5. Safety Ellipse Motion with Coarse Sun Angle Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naasz, Bo

    2005-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope Robotic Servicing and De-orbit Mission (HRSDM) was t o be performed by the unmanned Hubble Robotic Vehicle (HRV) consisting of a Deorbit Module (DM), responsible for the ultimate disposal of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) at the end of science operations, and an Ejection Module (EM), responsible for robotically servicing the HST to extend its useful operational lifetime. HRSDM consisted of eight distinct phases, including: launch, pursuit, proximity operations, capture, servicing, EM jettison and disposal, science operations, and deorbit. The scope of this paper is limited to the Proximity Operations phase of HRSDM. It introduces a relative motion strategy useful for Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) or Formation Flying missions where safe circumnavigation trajectories, or close proximity operations (tens or hundreds of meters) are required for extended periods of time. Parameters and algorithms used to model the relative motion of HRV with respect to HST during the Proximity Operations phase of the HRSDM are described. Specifically, the Safety Ellipse (SE) concept, convenient parameters for describing SE motion, and a concept for initializing SE motion around a target vehicle to coarsely optimize sun and relative navigation sensor angles are presented. The effects of solar incidence angle variations on sun angle optimization, and the effects of orbital perturbations and navigation uncertainty on long term SE motion are discussed.

  6. Digital sun sensor multi-spot operation.

    PubMed

    Rufino, Giancarlo; Grassi, Michele

    2012-11-28

    The operation and test of a multi-spot digital sun sensor for precise sun-line determination is described. The image forming system consists of an opaque mask with multiple pinhole apertures producing multiple, simultaneous, spot-like images of the sun on the focal plane. The sun-line precision can be improved by averaging multiple simultaneous measures. Nevertheless, the sensor operation on a wide field of view requires acquiring and processing images in which the number of sun spots and the related intensity level are largely variable. To this end, a reliable and robust image acquisition procedure based on a variable shutter time has been considered as well as a calibration function exploiting also the knowledge of the sun-spot array size. Main focus of the present paper is the experimental validation of the wide field of view operation of the sensor by using a sensor prototype and a laboratory test facility. Results demonstrate that it is possible to keep high measurement precision also for large off-boresight angles.

  7. CRUQS: A Miniature Fine Sun Sensor for Nanosatellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heatwole, Scott; Snow, Carl; Santos, Luis

    2013-01-01

    A new miniature fine Sun sensor has been developed that uses a quadrant photodiode and housing to determine the Sun vector. Its size, mass, and power make it especially suited to small satellite applications, especially nanosatellites. Its accuracy is on the order of one arcminute, and it will enable new science in the area of nanosatellites. The motivation for this innovation was the need for high-performance Sun sensors in the nanosatellite category. The design idea comes out of the LISS (Lockheed Intermediate Sun Sensor) used by the sounding rocket program on their solar pointing ACS (Attitude Control System). This system uses photodiodes and a wall between them. The shadow cast by the Sun is used to determine the Sun angle. The new sensor takes this concept and miniaturizes it. A cruciform shaped housing and a surface-mount quadrant photodiode package allow for a two-axis fine Sun sensor to be packaged into a space approx.1.25xl x0.25 in. (approx.3.2x2.5x0.6 cm). The circuitry to read the photodiodes is a simple trans-impedance operational amplifier. This is much less complex than current small Sun sensors for nanosatellites that rely on photo-arrays and processing of images to determine the Sun center. The simplicity of the circuit allows for a low power draw as well. The sensor consists of housing with a cruciform machined in it. The cruciform walls are 0.5-mm thick and the center of the cruciform is situated over the center of the quadrant photodiode sensor. This allows for shadows to be cast on each of the four photodiodes based on the angle of the Sun. A simple operational amplifier circuit is used to read the output of the photodiodes as a voltage. The voltage output of each photodiode is summed based on rows and columns, and then the values of both rows or both columns are differenced and divided by the sum of the voltages for all four photodiodes. The value of both difference over sums for the rows and columns is compared to a table or a polynomial fit

  8. Application of the Langley plot for calibration of sun sensors for the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alvah S., Jr.; Mauldin, L. ED, III; Stump, Charles W.; Reagan, John A.; Fabert, Milton G.

    1989-01-01

    The calibration of the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) sun sensor is described. This system consists of two energy-balancing silicon detectors which provide coarse azimuth and elevation control signals and a silicon photodiode array which provides top and bottom solar edge data for fine elevation control. All three detectors were calibrated on a mountaintop near Tucson, Ariz., using the Langley plot technique. The conventional Langley plot technique was modified to allow calibration of the two coarse detectors, which operate wideband. A brief description of the test setup is given. The HALOE instrument is a gas correlation radiometer that is now being developed for the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite.

  9. As reliable as the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leijtens, J. A. P.

    2017-11-01

    Fortunately there is almost nothing as reliable as the sun which can consequently be utilized as a very reliable source of spacecraft power. In order to harvest this power, the solar panels have to be pointed towards the sun as accurately and reliably as possible. To this extend, sunsensors are available on almost every satellite to support vital sun-pointing capability throughout the mission, even in the deployment and save mode phases of the satellites life. Given the criticality of the application one would expect that after more than 50 years of sun sensor utilisation, such sensors would be fully matured and optimised. In actual fact though, the majority of sunsensors employed are still coarse sunsensors which have a proven extreme reliability but present major issues regarding albedo sensitivity and pointing accuracy.

  10. Linear wide angle sun sensor for spinning satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, M. P.; Kalakrishnan, B.; Jain, Y. K.

    1983-08-01

    A concept is developed which overcomes the defects of the nonlinearity of response and limitation in range exhibited by the V-slit, N-slit, and crossed slit sun sensors normally used for sun elevation angle measurements on spinning spacecraft. Two versions of sensors based on this concept which give a linear output and have a range of nearly + or - 90 deg of elevation angle are examined. Results are presented for the application of the twin slit version of the sun sensor in the three Indian satellites, Rohini, Apple, and Bhaskara II, which was successfully used for spin rate control and spin axis orientation control corrections as well as for sun elevation angle and spin period measurements.

  11. Design and research of sun sensor based on technology of optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ye; Zhou, Wang; Li, Dan

    2010-08-01

    A kind of sun sensor is designed based on the optical fiber. This project consists of three parts: optical head, photoelectric sensor and signal processing unit. The innovation of this design lies in the improvement of traditional sun sensor, where multi-fibers, used as a leader, are symmetrically distributed on the surface of a spacecraft. To determine the attitude of a spacecraft, the sun sensor should measure the direction of the sun. Because the fiber length can be adjusted according to the fact, photoelectric sensor can be placed deeply inside a spacecraft to protect the photoelectric sensor against the damage by the high-energy particles from outer space. The processing unit calculates the difference value of sun energy imported by each pair of opposite optical fiber so as to obtain the angle and the orientation between the spacecraft and the sun. This sun sensor can suit multi-field of view, both small and large. It improves the accuracy of small field of view and increases the precision of locating a spacecraft. This paper briefly introduces the design of processing unit. This sun sensor is applicable to detect the attitude of a spacecraft. In addition, it can also be used in solar tracking system of PV technology.

  12. Autonomous navigation accuracy using simulated horizon sensor and sun sensor observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pease, G. E.; Hendrickson, H. T.

    1980-01-01

    A relatively simple autonomous system which would use horizon crossing indicators, a sun sensor, a quartz oscillator, and a microprogrammed computer is discussed. The sensor combination is required only to effectively measure the angle between the centers of the Earth and the Sun. Simulations for a particular orbit indicate that 2 km r.m.s. orbit determination uncertainties may be expected from a system with 0.06 deg measurement uncertainty. A key finding is that knowledge of the satellite orbit plane orientation can be maintained to this level because of the annual motion of the Sun and the predictable effects of Earth oblateness. The basic system described can be updated periodically by transits of the Moon through the IR horizon crossing indicator fields of view.

  13. Development of a low-cost sun sensor for nanosatellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonello, Andrea; Olivieri, Lorenzo; Francesconi, Alessandro

    2018-03-01

    Sun sensors represent a common and reliable technology for attitude determination, employed in many space missions thanks to their limited size and weight. Typically, two-axis digital Sun sensors employ an array of active pixels arranged behind a small aperture; the position of the sunlight's spot allows to determine the direction of the Sun. With the advent of smaller vehicles such as CubeSats and Nanosats, there is the need to further reduce the size and weight of such devices: as a trade-off, this usually results in the curtail of the performances. Nowadays, state of the art Sun sensors for CubeSats have resolutions of about 0.5°, with fields of view in the ±45° to ±90° range, with off-the-self prices of several thousands of dollars. In this work we introduce a novel low-cost miniaturized Sun sensor, based on a commercial CMOS camera detector; its main feature is the reduced size with respect to state-of-the-art sensors developed from the same technology, making it employable on CubeSats. The sensor consists of a precisely machined pinhole with a 10 μm circular aperture, placed at a distance of 7 mm from the CMOS. The standoff distance and casing design allow for a maximum resolution of less than 0.03°, outperforming most of the products currently available for nano and pico platforms; furthermore, the nature of the technology allows for reduced size and lightweight characteristics. The design, development and laboratory tests of the sensor are here introduced, starting with the definition of the physical model, the geometrical layout and its theoretical resolution; a more accurate model was then developed in order to account for the geometrical deviations and deformations of the pinhole-projected light-spot, as well as to account for the background noise and disturbances to the electronics. Finally, the laboratory setup is presented along with the test campaigns: the results obtained are compared with the simulations, allowing for the validation of the

  14. Sun sensor boresight alignment testing for the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. S.; Laney, V. S.; Mauldin, L. E., III

    1987-01-01

    The boresight alignment testing for the sun sensor assembly on the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) is described. The sun sensor assembly consists of three sensors that provide feedback signals for controlling dual axes gimbals. Two energy balancing silicon detectors are operated as wideband sensors in the azimuth and elevation axes. The third sensor is a silicon photodiode array operated as a narrow-band sensor in the elevation axis. These sensors are mounted on a common Invar structure which is mounted to the HALOE telescope. A blackbody was used as the stimulating source to perform the initial boresight alignment and this was checked with a heliostat solar look and a direct solar look. These tests are explained with a comparison between each source used.

  15. Flight Qualified Micro Sun Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Carl Christian; Mobasser, Sohrab; Wrigley, Chris; Schroeder, Jeffrey; Bae, Youngsam; Naegle, James; Katanyoutanant, Sunant; Jerebets, Sergei; Schatzel, Donald; Lee, Choonsup

    2007-01-01

    A prototype small, lightweight micro Sun sensor (MSS) has been flight qualified as part of the attitude-determination system of a spacecraft or for Mars surface operations. The MSS has previously been reported at a very early stage of development in NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 1 (January 2004). An MSS is essentially a miniature multiple-pinhole electronic camera combined with digital processing electronics that functions analogously to a sundial. A micromachined mask containing a number of microscopic pinholes is mounted in front of an active-pixel sensor (APS). Electronic circuits for controlling the operation of the APS, readout from the pixel photodetectors, and analog-to-digital conversion are all integrated onto the same chip along with the APS. The digital processing includes computation of the centroids of the pinhole Sun images on the APS. The spacecraft computer has the task of converting the Sun centroids into Sun angles utilizing a calibration polynomial. The micromachined mask comprises a 500-micron-thick silicon wafer, onto which is deposited a 57-nm-thick chromium adhesion- promotion layer followed by a 200-nm-thick gold light-absorption layer. The pinholes, 50 microns in diameter, are formed in the gold layer by photolithography. The chromium layer is thin enough to be penetrable by an amount of Sunlight adequate to form measurable pinhole images. A spacer frame between the mask and the APS maintains a gap of .1 mm between the pinhole plane and the photodetector plane of the APS. To minimize data volume, mass, and power consumption, the digital processing of the APS readouts takes place in a single field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The particular FPGA is a radiation- tolerant unit that contains .32,000 gates. No external memory is used so the FPGA calculates the centroids in real time as pixels are read off the APS with minimal internal memory. To enable the MSS to fit into a small package, the APS, the FPGA, and other components are mounted

  16. Triana Safehold: A New Gyroless, Sun-Pointing Attitude Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.; Morgenstern, Wendy; Garrick, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Triana is a single-string spacecraft to be placed in a halo orbit about the sun-earth Ll Lagrangian point. The Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) hardware includes four reaction wheels, ten thrusters, six coarse sun sensors, a star tracker, and a three-axis Inertial Measuring Unit (IMU). The ACS Safehold design features a gyroless sun-pointing control scheme using only sun sensors and wheels. With this minimum hardware approach, Safehold increases mission reliability in the event of a gyroscope anomaly. In place of the gyroscope rate measurements, Triana Safehold uses wheel tachometers to help provide a scaled estimation of the spacecraft body rate about the sun vector. Since Triana nominally performs momentum management every three months, its accumulated system momentum can reach a significant fraction of the wheel capacity. It is therefore a requirement for Safehold to maintain a sun-pointing attitude even when the spacecraft system momentum is reasonably large. The tachometer sun-line rate estimation enables the controller to bring the spacecraft close to its desired sun-pointing attitude even with reasonably high system momentum and wheel drags. This paper presents the design rationale behind this gyroless controller, stability analysis, and some time-domain simulation results showing performances with various initial conditions. Finally, suggestions for future improvements are briefly discussed.

  17. MiniDSS: a low-power and high-precision miniaturized digital sun sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, B. M.; Durkut, M.; Laan, E.; Hakkesteegt, H.; Theuwissen, A.; Xie, N.; Leijtens, J. L.; Urquijo, E.; Bruins, P.

    2017-11-01

    A high-precision and low-power miniaturized digital sun sensor has been developed at TNO. The single-chip sun sensor comprises an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) on which an active pixel sensor (APS), read-out and processing circuitry as well as communication circuitry are combined. The design was optimized for low recurrent cost. The sensor is albedo insensitive and the prototype combines an accuracy in the order of 0.03° with a mass of just 72 g and a power consumption of only 65 mW.

  18. Silicon Nanotips Antireflection Surface for Micro Sun Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Sam Y.; Lee, Choonsup; Mobasser, Sohrab; Manohara, Harish

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new technique to fabricate antireflection surface using silicon nano-tips for use on a micro sun sensor for Mars rovers. We have achieved randomly distributed nano-tips of radius spanning from 20 nm to 100 nm and aspect ratio of 200 using a two-step dry etching process. The 30(deg) specular reflectance at the target wavelength of 1 (mu)m is only about 0.09 %, nearly three orders of magnitude lower than that of bare silicon, and the hemispherical reflectance is 8%. By changing the density and aspect ratio of these nanotips, the change in reflectance is demonstrated. Using surfaces covered with these nano-tips, the critical problem of ghost images that are caused by multiple internal reflections in a micro sun sensor was solved.

  19. A Novel Multi-Aperture Based Sun Sensor Based on a Fast Multi-Point MEANSHIFT (FMMS) Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    You, Zheng; Sun, Jian; Xing, Fei; Zhang, Gao-Fei

    2011-01-01

    With the current increased widespread interest in the development and applications of micro/nanosatellites, it was found that we needed to design a small high accuracy satellite attitude determination system, because the star trackers widely used in large satellites are large and heavy, and therefore not suitable for installation on micro/nanosatellites. A Sun sensor + magnetometer is proven to be a better alternative, but the conventional sun sensor has low accuracy, and cannot meet the requirements of the attitude determination systems of micro/nanosatellites, so the development of a small high accuracy sun sensor with high reliability is very significant. This paper presents a multi-aperture based sun sensor, which is composed of a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) mask with 36 apertures and an active pixels sensor (APS) CMOS placed below the mask at a certain distance. A novel fast multi-point MEANSHIFT (FMMS) algorithm is proposed to improve the accuracy and reliability, the two key performance features, of an APS sun sensor. When the sunlight illuminates the sensor, a sun spot array image is formed on the APS detector. Then the sun angles can be derived by analyzing the aperture image location on the detector via the FMMS algorithm. With this system, the centroid accuracy of the sun image can reach 0.01 pixels, without increasing the weight and power consumption, even when some missing apertures and bad pixels appear on the detector due to aging of the devices and operation in a harsh space environment, while the pointing accuracy of the single-aperture sun sensor using the conventional correlation algorithm is only 0.05 pixels. PMID:22163770

  20. Cassini Ring Plane Crossings: Hypervelocity Impact Risks to Sun Sensor Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Allan Y.

    2016-01-01

    For both F/G and D-ring crossings: Probability of a penetration damage of the SSH (Sun Sensor Head) window glass is very low; Optical attenuation due to craters on the surface of the window glass caused by direct HVI (Hyper-Velocity Impact) by dust particle is estimated to be less than 1 percent; Optical attenuation due to secondary debris cloud generated by the disintegrated ring dust particles is estimated to be less than 1 percent. To better manage the Sun sensor damage risk during selected proximal orbit crossings, it is highly desirable to follow the contingency procedures mentioned in Section VII of the paper: Details of this contingency procedure are given in the paper entitled "Cassini Operational Sun Sensor Risk Management During Proximal Orbit Saturn Ring Plane Crossings" authored by David M. Bates. Based on results of risk analyses documented in this work and contingency planning work described in the paper mentioned above, we judge that the proximal orbit campaign will be safe from the viewpoint of dust HVI hazard.

  1. A highly accurate wireless digital sun sensor based on profile detecting and detector multiplexing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Minsong; Xing, Fei; You, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    The advancing growth of micro- and nano-satellites requires miniaturized sun sensors which could be conveniently applied in the attitude determination subsystem. In this work, a profile detecting technology based high accurate wireless digital sun sensor was proposed, which could transform a two-dimensional image into two-linear profile output so that it can realize a high update rate under a very low power consumption. A multiple spots recovery approach with an asymmetric mask pattern design principle was introduced to fit the multiplexing image detector method for accuracy improvement of the sun sensor within a large Field of View (FOV). A FOV determination principle based on the concept of FOV region was also proposed to facilitate both sub-FOV analysis and the whole FOV determination. A RF MCU, together with solar cells, was utilized to achieve the wireless and self-powered functionality. The prototype of the sun sensor is approximately 10 times lower in size and weight compared with the conventional digital sun sensor (DSS). Test results indicated that the accuracy of the prototype was 0.01° within a cone FOV of 100°. Such an autonomous DSS could be equipped flexibly on a micro- or nano-satellite, especially for highly accurate remote sensing applications.

  2. Risk Assessment of Cassini Sun Sensor Integrity Due to Hypervelocity Impact of Saturn Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Allan Y.

    2016-01-01

    A sophisticated interplanetary spacecraft, Cassini is one of the heaviest and most sophisticated interplanetary spacecraft humans have ever built and launched. Since achieving orbit at Saturn in 2004, Cassini has collected science data throughout its four-year prime mission (2004-08), and has since been approved for first and second extended missions through September 2017. In late 2016, the Cassini spacecraft will begin a daring set of ballistic orbits that will hop the rings and dive between the upper atmosphere of Saturn and its innermost D-ring twenty-two times. The "dusty" environment of the inner D-ring region the spacecraft must fly through is hazardous because of the possible damage that dust particles, travelling at speeds as high as 31.4 km/s, can do to spacecraft hardware. During hazardous proximal ring-plane crossings, the Cassini mission operation team plans to point the high-gain antenna to the RAM vector in order to protect most of spacecraft instruments from the incoming energetic ring dust particles. However, this particular spacecraft attitude will expose two Sun sensors (that are mounted on the antenna dish) to the incoming dust particles. High-velocity impacts on the Sun sensor cover glass might penetrate the 2.54-mm glass cover of the Sun sensor. Even without penetration damage, craters created by these impacts on the surface of the cover glass will degrade the transmissibility of light through it. Apart from being directly impacted by the dust particles, the Sun sensors are also threatened by some fraction of ricochet ejecta that are produced by dust particle impacts on the large antenna dish (made of graphite fiber epoxy composite material). Finally, the spacecraft attitude control system must cope with disturbances due to both the translational and angular impulses imparted on the large antenna dish and the long magnetometer boom by the incoming high-velocity projectiles. Analyses performed to quantify the risks the Sun sensors must contend

  3. Normalization of time-series satellite reflectance data to a standard sun-target-sensor geometry using a semi-empirical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongguang; Li, Chuanrong; Ma, Lingling; Tang, Lingli; Wang, Ning; Zhou, Chuncheng; Qian, Yonggang

    2017-10-01

    Time series of satellite reflectance data have been widely used to characterize environmental phenomena, describe trends in vegetation dynamics and study climate change. However, several sensors with wide spatial coverage and high observation frequency are usually designed to have large field of view (FOV), which cause variations in the sun-targetsensor geometry in time-series reflectance data. In this study, on the basis of semiempirical kernel-driven BRDF model, a new semi-empirical model was proposed to normalize the sun-target-sensor geometry of remote sensing image. To evaluate the proposed model, bidirectional reflectance under different canopy growth conditions simulated by Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART) model were used. The semi-empirical model was first fitted by using all simulated bidirectional reflectance. Experimental result showed a good fit between the bidirectional reflectance estimated by the proposed model and the simulated value. Then, MODIS time-series reflectance data was normalized to a common sun-target-sensor geometry by the proposed model. The experimental results showed the proposed model yielded good fits between the observed and estimated values. The noise-like fluctuations in time-series reflectance data was also reduced after the sun-target-sensor normalization process.

  4. Wide angle sun sensor. [consisting of cylinder, insulation and pair of detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, L. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A single-axis sun sensor consists of a cylinder of an insulating material on which at least one pair of detectors is deposited on a circumference of the cylinder, was disclosed. At any time only one-half of the cylinder is illuminated so that the total resistance of the two detectors is a constant. Due to the round surface on which the detectors are deposited, the sensor exhibits a linear wide angle of + or - 50 deg to within an accuracy of about 2%. By depositing several pairs of detectors on adjacent circumferences, sufficient redundancy is realized to provide high reliability. A two-axis sensor is provided by depositing detectors on the surface of a sphere along at least two orthogonal great circles.

  5. Mars Rover Navigation Results Using Sun Sensor Heading Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volpe, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Upcoming missions to the surface of Mars will use mobile robots to traverse long distances from the landing site. To prepare for these missions, the prototype rover, Rocky 7, has been tested in desert field trials conducted with a team of planetary scientists. While several new capabilities have been demonstrated, foremost among these was sun-sensor based traversal of natural terrain totaling a distance of one kilometer. This paper describes navigation results obtained in the field tests, where cross-track error was only 6% of distance traveled. Comparison with previous results of other planetary rover systems shows this to be a significant improvement.

  6. A sun-crown-sensor model and adapted C-correction logic for topographic correction of high resolution forest imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuanchao; Koukal, Tatjana; Weisberg, Peter J.

    2014-10-01

    Canopy shadowing mediated by topography is an important source of radiometric distortion on remote sensing images of rugged terrain. Topographic correction based on the sun-canopy-sensor (SCS) model significantly improved over those based on the sun-terrain-sensor (STS) model for surfaces with high forest canopy cover, because the SCS model considers and preserves the geotropic nature of trees. The SCS model accounts for sub-pixel canopy shadowing effects and normalizes the sunlit canopy area within a pixel. However, it does not account for mutual shadowing between neighboring pixels. Pixel-to-pixel shadowing is especially apparent for fine resolution satellite images in which individual tree crowns are resolved. This paper proposes a new topographic correction model: the sun-crown-sensor (SCnS) model based on high-resolution satellite imagery (IKONOS) and high-precision LiDAR digital elevation model. An improvement on the C-correction logic with a radiance partitioning method to address the effects of diffuse irradiance is also introduced (SCnS + C). In addition, we incorporate a weighting variable, based on pixel shadow fraction, on the direct and diffuse radiance portions to enhance the retrieval of at-sensor radiance and reflectance of highly shadowed tree pixels and form another variety of SCnS model (SCnS + W). Model evaluation with IKONOS test data showed that the new SCnS model outperformed the STS and SCS models in quantifying the correlation between terrain-regulated illumination factor and at-sensor radiance. Our adapted C-correction logic based on the sun-crown-sensor geometry and radiance partitioning better represented the general additive effects of diffuse radiation than C parameters derived from the STS or SCS models. The weighting factor Wt also significantly enhanced correction results by reducing within-class standard deviation and balancing the mean pixel radiance between sunlit and shaded slopes. We analyzed these improvements with model

  7. Suppression of sun interference in the star sensor baffling stray light by total internal reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Hiroyuki; Shimoji, Haruhiko; Yoshikawa, Shoji; Miyatake, Katsumasa; Hama, Kazumori; Nakamura, Shuji

    2005-09-01

    We have developed a star sensor as an experimental device onboard the SERVIS-1 satellite launched in October 2003. The in-orbit data have verified its fundamental performance. One of the advantages of our star sensor is that the baffle has a small length of 120 mm instead of 182 mm in the conventional two-stage baffle design. The key concepts for light shielding are total internal reflection phenomena inside a nearly half sphere (NHS) lens and scattering light control by gloss black paint. However, undesirable background noise by the sun outside of the field of view (FOV) was observed in the corner of the FOV in the orbital experiment. Ray trace simulations revealed that slight scattering light on the specular baffle wall entered the NHS lens and reached the corner of the image sensor through the multi-reflection path inside the lens. It was found that the stray light path can be shielded effectively if the diameter of the aperture under the NHS lens was reduced. We redesigned the baffle and evaluated the light shielding ability with our sun interference test facility on the ground, and confirmed that the stray light was reduced below the acceptable level. As a result, the light shielding technique which we have proposed was proved to be effective for a small-size baffle. The redesigned star sensor is planned to be installed as a main attitude sensor for the SERVIS-2 satellite scheduled to be launched in February 2008.

  8. Optical techniques: using coarse and detailed scans for the preventive acquisition of fingerprints with chromatic white-light sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, Mario; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus; Leich, Marcus

    2011-11-01

    The preventive application of automated latent fingerprint acquisition devices can enhance the Homeland Defence, e.g. by improving the border security. Here, contact-less optical acquisition techniques for the capture of traces are subject to research; chromatic white light sensors allow for multi-mode operation using coarse or detailed scans. The presence of potential fingerprints could be detected using fast coarse scans. Those Regions-of- Interest can be acquired afterwards with high-resolution detailed scans to allow for a verification or identification of individuals. An acquisition and analysis of fingerprint traces on different objects that are imported or pass borders might be a great enhancement for security. Additionally, if suspicious objects require a further investigation, an initial securing of potential fingerprints could be very useful. In this paper we show current research results for the coarse detection of fingerprints to prepare the detailed acquisition from various surface materials that are relevant for preventive applications.

  9. A geometric model of a V-slit Sun sensor correcting for spacecraft wobble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmartin, W. P.; Gambhir, S. S.

    1994-01-01

    A V-Slit sun sensor is body-mounted on a spin-stabilized spacecraft. During injection from a parking or transfer orbit to some final orbit, the spacecraft may not be dynamically balanced. This may result in wobble about the spacecraft spin axis as the spin axis may not be aligned with the spacecraft's axis of symmetry. While the widely used models in Spacecraft Attitude Determination and Control, edited by Wertz, correct for separation, elevation, and azimuthal mounting biases, spacecraft wobble is not taken into consideration. A geometric approach is used to develop a method for measurement of the sun angle which corrects for the magnitude and phase of spacecraft wobble. The algorithm was implemented using a set of standard mathematical routines for spherical geometry on a unit sphere.

  10. Using the sun analog sensor (SAS) data to investigate solar array yoke motion on the GOES-8 and -9 spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phenneger, Milton; Knack, Jennifer L.

    1996-10-01

    The GOES-8 and -9 Sun analog sensor (SAS) flight data is analyzed to evaluate the attitude motion environment of payloads mounted on the solar array. The work was performed in part to extend analysis in progress to support the solar x-ray imager to be flown on the GOES-M. The SAS is a two axis sensor mounted on the x-ray sensor pointing (XRP) module to measure the east/west error angle between the SUn and the solar array normal and to provide a north south error angle for automatic solar pointing of the x-ray sensor by the XRP. The goal was to search for evidence of solar array vibrational modes in the 2 Hz and 0.5 Hz range and to test the predicted amplitudes. The results show that the solar array rotates at the rate of the mean Sun with unexpected oscillation periods of 5.6 minutes, 90 minutes, and 1440 minutes originating from the two 16.1 gear drive train stages between the solar array drive stepper motor and the solar array yoke. The higher frequency oscillations are detected as random noise at the 1/16 Hz telemetry sampling rate of the SAS. This supports the preflight predictions for the high frequency modes but provide s no detailed measurement of the frequency as expected for this data period. In addition to this the data indicates that the solar array is responding unexpectedly to GOES imager instrument blackbody calibration events.

  11. Solar maximum mission fine pointing sun sensor dawn and dusk errors flight data and model analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulp, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    SMM flight system control errors occurring at spacecraft dawn and dusk are analyzed. The errors are associated with the fine pointing sun sensor (FPSS), which is a primary component of the SMM attitude control system. It is shown that the source of the FPSS dawn/dusk distortion is the incomplete masking of sunlight reflected off the earth by the optical baffle covering the FPSS sensor heads onboard the SMM during periods of orbit dawn and dusk. For the most part, the modeled behavior of the FPSS under dawn and dusk lighting conditions matches the observed behavior in the SMM flight data.

  12. Panoramic attitude sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meek, I. C.

    1976-01-01

    Each subassembly, design analysis, and final calibration data on all assemblies for the Panormic Attitude Sensor (PAS) are described. The PAS is used for course attitude determination on the International Ultraviolet Explorer Spacecraft (IUE). The PAS contains a sun sensor which is sensitive only to the sun's radiation and a mechanically scanned sensor which is sensitive to the earth, moon, and the sun. The signals from these two sensors are encoded and sent back in the telemetry data stream to determine the spacecraft attitude.

  13. Differences in the day and night longwave fluxes at satellite altitude for sun-synchronous NOAA-9 nonscanning sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Paden, Jack; Lee, Robert B., III

    1990-01-01

    The outgoing LW flux determined by using the data measured by four nonscanning sensors at satellite altitude is reported. The outgoing LW fluxes for MFOV and WFOV sensors at satellite altitude are determined by subtracting the SW fluxes from the total sensors. Results for 1985 and 1986 are discussed. The nighttime LW flux determined by using the MFOV-T channel at the satellite altitude is found to be constant from month to month within 1 W/sq m, while the LW flux from WFOV-T channel varies within 2 to 3 W sq m. The high value for the WFOV-T channel is attributed to the effects of sun-blips on the measurements involved. The main advantage of using day/night longwave flux differences at satellite altitude is that the consistencies of nonscanner sensors can be checked very quickly.

  14. Signal Conditioning for the Kalman Filter: Application to Satellite Attitude Estimation with Magnetometer and Sun Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Segundo; Girón-Sierra, Jose M.; Polo, Óscar R.; Angulo, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Most satellites use an on-board attitude estimation system, based on available sensors. In the case of low-cost satellites, which are of increasing interest, it is usual to use magnetometers and Sun sensors. A Kalman filter is commonly recommended for the estimation, to simultaneously exploit the information from sensors and from a mathematical model of the satellite motion. It would be also convenient to adhere to a quaternion representation. This article focuses on some problems linked to this context. The state of the system should be represented in observable form. Singularities due to alignment of measured vectors cause estimation problems. Accommodation of the Kalman filter originates convergence difficulties. The article includes a new proposal that solves these problems, not needing changes in the Kalman filter algorithm. In addition, the article includes assessment of different errors, initialization values for the Kalman filter; and considers the influence of the magnetic dipole moment perturbation, showing how to handle it as part of the Kalman filter framework. PMID:27809250

  15. Signal Conditioning for the Kalman Filter: Application to Satellite Attitude Estimation with Magnetometer and Sun Sensors.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Segundo; Girón-Sierra, Jose M; Polo, Óscar R; Angulo, Manuel

    2016-10-31

    Most satellites use an on-board attitude estimation system, based on available sensors. In the case of low-cost satellites, which are of increasing interest, it is usual to use magnetometers and Sun sensors. A Kalman filter is commonly recommended for the estimation, to simultaneously exploit the information from sensors and from a mathematical model of the satellite motion. It would be also convenient to adhere to a quaternion representation. This article focuses on some problems linked to this context. The state of the system should be represented in observable form. Singularities due to alignment of measured vectors cause estimation problems. Accommodation of the Kalman filter originates convergence difficulties. The article includes a new proposal that solves these problems, not needing changes in the Kalman filter algorithm. In addition, the article includes assessment of different errors, initialization values for the Kalman filter; and considers the influence of the magnetic dipole moment perturbation, showing how to handle it as part of the Kalman filter framework.

  16. Sun-view angle effects on reflectance factors of corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, K. J.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Biehl, L. L.; Bauer, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of sun and view angles on reflectance factors of corn (Zea mays L.) canopies ranging from the six leaf stage to harvest maturity were studied on the Purdue University Agronomy Farm by a multiband radiometer. The two methods of acquiring spectral data, the truck system and the tower systrem, are described. The analysis of the spectral data is presented in three parts: solar angle effects on reflectance factors viewed at nadir; solar angle effects on reflectance factors viewed at a fixed sun angle; and both sun and view angles effect on reflectance factors. The analysis revealed that for nadir-viewed reflectance factors there is a strong solar angle dependence in all spectral bands for canopies with low leaf area index. Reflectance factors observed from the sun angle at different view azimuth angles showed that the position of the sensor relative to the sun is important in determining angular reflectance characteristics. For both sun and view angles, reflectance factors are maximized when the sensor view direction is towards the sun.

  17. Sun Safe Mode Controller Design for LADEE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusco, Jesse C.; Swei, Sean S. M.; Nakamura, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of sun safe controllers which are designed to keep the spacecraft power positive and thermally balanced in the event an anomaly is detected. Employed by NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), the controllers utilize the measured sun vector and the spacecraft body rates for feedback control. To improve the accuracy of sun vector estimation, the least square minimization approach is applied to process the sensor data, which is proven to be effective and accurate. To validate the controllers, the LADEE spacecraft model engaging the sun safe mode was first simulated and then compared with the actual LADEE orbital fight data. The results demonstrated the applicability of the proposed sun safe controllers.

  18. Coarse Scale In Situ Albedo Observations over Heterogeneous Land Surfaces and Validation Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Q.; Wu, X.; Wen, J.; BAI, J., Sr.

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate and improve the quality of coarse-pixel land surface albedo products, validation with ground measurements of albedo is crucial over the spatially and temporally heterogeneous land surface. The performance of albedo validation depends on the quality of ground-based albedo measurements at a corresponding coarse-pixel scale, which can be conceptualized as the "truth" value of albedo at coarse-pixel scale. The wireless sensor network (WSN) technology provides access to continuously observe on the large pixel scale. Taking the albedo products as an example, this paper was dedicated to the validation of coarse-scale albedo products over heterogeneous surfaces based on the WSN observed data, which is aiming at narrowing down the uncertainty of results caused by the spatial scaling mismatch between satellite and ground measurements over heterogeneous surfaces. The reference value of albedo at coarse-pixel scale can be obtained through an upscaling transform function based on all of the observations for that pixel. We will devote to further improve and develop new method that that are better able to account for the spatio-temporal characteristic of surface albedo in the future. Additionally, how to use the widely distributed single site measurements over the heterogeneous surfaces is also a question to be answered. Keywords: Remote sensing; Albedo; Validation; Wireless sensor network (WSN); Upscaling; Heterogeneous land surface; Albedo truth at coarse-pixel scale

  19. Attitude measurement: Principles and sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duchon, P.; Vermande, M. P.

    1981-01-01

    Tools used in the measurement of satellite attitude are described. Attention is given to the elements that characterize an attitude sensor, the references employed (stars, moon, Sun, Earth, magnetic fields, etc.), and the detectors (optical, magnetic, and inertial). Several examples of attitude sensors are described, including sun sensors, star sensors, earth sensors, triaxial magnetometers, and gyrometers. Finally, sensor combinations that make it possible to determine a complete attitude are considered; the SPOT attitude measurement system and a combined CCD star sensor-gyrometer system are discussed.

  20. Spectral Discrimination of Fine and Coarse Mode Aerosol Optical Depth from AERONET Direct Sun Data of Singapore and South-East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas Cortijo, S.; Chew, B.; Liew, S.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth combined with the Angstrom exponent and its derivative, are often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size, with Angstrom exp. values greater than 2 indicating small (fine mode) particles associated with urban pollution and bio-mass burning. Around this region, forest fires are a regular occurrence during the dry season, specially near the large land masses of Sumatra and Borneo. The practice of clearing land by burning the primary and sometimes secondary forest, results in a smog-like haze covering large areas of regional cities such as cities Singapore, Kuala Lumpur and sometimes the south of Thailand, often reducing visibility and increasing health problems for the local population. In Singapore, the sources of aerosols are mostly from fossil fuel burning (energy stations, incinerators, urban transport etc.) and from the industrial and urban areas. The proximity to the sea adds a possible oceanic source. However, as stated above and depending on the time of the year, there can be a strong bio-mass component coming from forest fires from various regions of the neighboring countries. Bio-mass related aerosol particles are typically characterized by showing a large optical depth and small, sub-micron particle size distributions. In this work, we analyze three years of direct Sun measurements performed with a multi-channel Cimel Sun-Photometer (part of the AERONET network) located at our site. In order to identify bio-mass burning events in this region, we perform a spectral discrimination between coarse and fine mode optical depth; subsequently, the fine mode parameters such as optical depth, optical ratio and fine mode Angstrom exponents (and its derivative) are used to identify possible bio-mass related events within the data set.

  1. Analog neural network control method proposed for use in a backup satellite control mode

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Frigo, J.R.; Tilden, M.W.

    1998-03-01

    The authors propose to use an analog neural network controller implemented in hardware, independent of the active control system, for use in a satellite backup control mode. The controller uses coarse sun sensor inputs. The field of view of the sensors activate the neural controller, creating an analog dead band with respect to the direction of the sun on each axis. This network controls the orientation of the vehicle toward the sunlight to ensure adequate power for the system. The attitude of the spacecraft is stabilized with respect to the ambient magnetic field on orbit. This paper develops a modelmore » of the controller using real-time coarse sun sensor data and a dynamic model of a prototype system based on a satellite system. The simulation results and the feasibility of this control method for use in a satellite backup control mode are discussed.« less

  2. Fast coarse-fine locating method for φ-OTDR.

    PubMed

    Mei, Xuanwei; Pang, Fufei; Liu, Huanhuan; Yu, Guoqin; Shao, Yuying; Qian, Tianyu; Mou, Chengbo; Lv, Longbao; Wang, Tingyun

    2018-02-05

    We proposed and demonstrated a coarse-fine method to achieve fast locating of external vibration for the phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometer (φ-OTDR) sensing system. Firstly, the acquired backscattered traces from heterodyne coherent φ-OTDR systems are spatially divided into a few segments along a sensing fiber for coarse locating, and most of the acquired data can be excluded by comparing the phase difference between the endpoints in adjacent segments. Secondly, the amplitude-based locating is implemented within the target segments for fine locating. By using the proposed coarse-fine locating method, we have numerically and experimentally investigated a distributed vibration sensor based on the heterodyne coherent φ-OTDR system with a 50-km-long sensing fiber. We find that the computation cost of signal processing for locating is significantly reduced in the long-haul sensing fiber, showing a potential application in real-time locating of external vibration.

  3. Cassini Operational Sun Sensor Risk Management During Proximal Orbit Saturn Ring Plane Crossings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, David M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Cassini Spacecraft, launched on October 15th, 1997 which arrived at Saturn on June 30th, 2004, is the largest and most ambitious interplanetary spacecraft in history. As the first spacecraft to achieve orbit at Saturn, Cassini has collected science data throughout its four-year prime mission (2004–08), and has since been approved for a first and second extended mission through 2017. As part of the final extended missions, Cassini will begin an aggressive and exciting campaign of high inclination, low altitude flybys within the inner most rings of Saturn, skimming Saturn’s outer atmosphere, until the spacecraft is finally disposed of via planned impact with the planet. This final campaign, known as the proximal orbits, requires a strategy for managing the Sun Sensor Assembly (SSA) health, the details of which are presented in this paper.

  4. The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Attitude Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Andrews, Stephen F.; ODonnell, James R., Jr.; Ward, David K.; Ericsson, Aprille J.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe mission is designed to produce a map of the cosmic microwave background radiation over the entire celestial sphere by executing a fast spin and a slow precession of its spin axis about the Sun line to obtain a highly interconnected set of measurements. The spacecraft attitude is sensed and controlled using an Inertial Reference Unit, two Autonomous Star Trackers, a Digital Sun Sensor, twelve Coarse Sun Sensors, three Reaction Wheel Assemblies, and a propulsion system. This paper describes the design of the attitude control system that carries out this mission and presents some early flight experience.

  5. The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Andrews, Stephen F.; ODonnell, James R., Jr.; Ward, David K.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe mission is designed to produce a map of the cosmic microwave background radiation over the entire celestial sphere by executing a fast spin and a slow precession of its spin axis about the Sun line to obtain a highly interconnected set of measurements. The spacecraft attitude is sensed and controlled using an inertial reference unit, two star trackers, a digital sun sensor, twelve coarse sun sensors, three reaction wheel assemblies, and a propulsion system. This paper presents an overview of the design of the attitude control system to carry out this mission and presents some early flight experience.

  6. The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Andrews, Stephen F.; ODonnell, James R., Jr.; Ward, David K.; Ericsson, Aprille J.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe mission is designed to produce a map of the cosmic microwave background radiation over the entire celestial sphere by executing a fast spin and a slow precession of its spin axis about the Sun line to obtain a highly interconnected set of measurements. The spacecraft attitude is sensed and controlled using an Inertial Reference Unit, two Autonomous Star Trackers, a Digital Sun Sensor, twelve Coarse Sun Sensors, three Reaction Wheel Assemblies, and a propulsion system. This paper describes the design of the attitude control system that carries out this mission and presents some early flight experience.

  7. Activity Monitors Help Users Get Optimum Sun Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Goddard scientist Shahid Aslam was investigating alternative methods for measuring extreme ultraviolet radiation on the Solar Dynamics Observatory when he hit upon semiconductors that measured wavelengths pertinent to human health. As a result, he and a partner established College Park, Maryland-based Sensor Sensor LLC and developed UVA+B SunFriend, a wrist monitor that lets people know when they've received their optimal amounts of sunlight for the day.

  8. Design and implementation of a Sun tracker with a dual-axis single motor for an optical sensor-based photovoltaic system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Min; Lu, Chia-Liang

    2013-03-06

    The dual threats of energy depletion and global warming place the development of methods for harnessing renewable energy resources at the center of public interest. Solar energy is one of the most promising renewable energy resources. Sun trackers can substantially improve the electricity production of a photovoltaic (PV) system. This paper proposes a novel design of a dual-axis solar tracking PV system which utilizes the feedback control theory along with a four-quadrant light dependent resistor (LDR) sensor and simple electronic circuits to provide robust system performance. The proposed system uses a unique dual-axis AC motor and a stand-alone PV inverter to accomplish solar tracking. The control implementation is a technical innovation that is a simple and effective design. In addition, a scaled-down laboratory prototype is constructed to verify the feasibility of the scheme. The effectiveness of the Sun tracker is confirmed experimentally. To conclude, the results of this study may serve as valuable references for future solar energy applications.

  9. Design and Implementation of a Sun Tracker with a Dual-Axis Single Motor for an Optical Sensor-Based Photovoltaic System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing-Min; Lu, Chia-Liang

    2013-01-01

    The dual threats of energy depletion and global warming place the development of methods for harnessing renewable energy resources at the center of public interest. Solar energy is one of the most promising renewable energy resources. Sun trackers can substantially improve the electricity production of a photovoltaic (PV) system. This paper proposes a novel design of a dual-axis solar tracking PV system which utilizes the feedback control theory along with a four-quadrant light dependent resistor (LDR) sensor and simple electronic circuits to provide robust system performance. The proposed system uses a unique dual-axis AC motor and a stand-alone PV inverter to accomplish solar tracking. The control implementation is a technical innovation that is a simple and effective design. In addition, a scaled-down laboratory prototype is constructed to verify the feasibility of the scheme. The effectiveness of the Sun tracker is confirmed experimentally. To conclude, the results of this study may serve as valuable references for future solar energy applications. PMID:23467030

  10. Sensor web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delin, Kevin A. (Inventor); Jackson, Shannon P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A Sensor Web formed of a number of different sensor pods. Each of the sensor pods include a clock which is synchronized with a master clock so that all of the sensor pods in the Web have a synchronized clock. The synchronization is carried out by first using a coarse synchronization which takes less power, and subsequently carrying out a fine synchronization to make a fine sync of all the pods on the Web. After the synchronization, the pods ping their neighbors to determine which pods are listening and responded, and then only listen during time slots corresponding to those pods which respond.

  11. Linear mixing model applied to coarse spatial resolution data from multispectral satellite sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, Brent N.; Shimabukuro, Yosio E.

    1993-01-01

    A linear mixing model was applied to coarse spatial resolution data from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The reflective component of the 3.55-3.95 micron channel was used with the two reflective channels 0.58-0.68 micron and 0.725-1.1 micron to run a constrained least squares model to generate fraction images for an area in the west central region of Brazil. The fraction images were compared with an unsupervised classification derived from Landsat TM data acquired on the same day. The relationship between the fraction images and normalized difference vegetation index images show the potential of the unmixing techniques when using coarse spatial resolution data for global studies.

  12. A Coarse-Alignment Method Based on the Optimal-REQUEST Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongyun

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed a coarse-alignment method for strapdown inertial navigation systems based on attitude determination. The observation vectors, which can be obtained by inertial sensors, usually contain various types of noise, which affects the convergence rate and the accuracy of the coarse alignment. Given this drawback, we studied an attitude-determination method named optimal-REQUEST, which is an optimal method for attitude determination that is based on observation vectors. Compared to the traditional attitude-determination method, the filtering gain of the proposed method is tuned autonomously; thus, the convergence rate of the attitude determination is faster than in the traditional method. Within the proposed method, we developed an iterative method for determining the attitude quaternion. We carried out simulation and turntable tests, which we used to validate the proposed method’s performance. The experiment’s results showed that the convergence rate of the proposed optimal-REQUEST algorithm is faster and that the coarse alignment’s stability is higher. In summary, the proposed method has a high applicability to practical systems. PMID:29337895

  13. Sun glitter imaging analysis of submarine sand waves in HJ-1A/B satellite CCD images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huaguo; He, Xiekai; Yang, Kang; Fu, Bin; Guan, Weibing

    2014-11-01

    Submarine sand waves are a widespread bed-form in tidal environment. Submarine sand waves induce current convergence and divergence that affect sea surface roughness thus become visible in sun glitter images. These sun glitter images have been employed for mapping sand wave topography. However, there are lots of effect factors in sun glitter imaging of the submarine sand waves, such as the imaging geometry and dynamic environment condition. In this paper, several sun glitter images from HJ-1A/B in the Taiwan Banks are selected. These satellite sun glitter images are used to discuss sun glitter imaging characteristics in different sensor parameters and dynamic environment condition. To interpret the imaging characteristics, calculating the sun glitter radiance and analyzing its spatial characteristics of the sand wave in different images is the best way. In this study, a simulated model based on sun glitter radiation transmission is adopted to certify the imaging analysis in further. Some results are drawn based on the study. Firstly, the sun glitter radiation is mainly determined by sensor view angle. Second, the current is another key factor for the sun glitter. The opposite current direction will cause exchanging of bright stripes and dark stripes. Third, brightness reversal would happen at the critical angle. Therefore, when using sun glitter image to obtain depth inversion, one is advised to take advantage of image properties of sand waves and to pay attention to key dynamic environment condition and brightness reversal.

  14. Spacecraft attitude calibration/verification baseline study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, L. C.

    1981-01-01

    A baseline study for a generalized spacecraft attitude calibration/verification system is presented. It can be used to define software specifications for three major functions required by a mission: the pre-launch parameter observability and data collection strategy study; the in-flight sensor calibration; and the post-calibration attitude accuracy verification. Analytical considerations are given for both single-axis and three-axis spacecrafts. The three-axis attitudes considered include the inertial-pointing attitudes, the reference-pointing attitudes, and attitudes undergoing specific maneuvers. The attitude sensors and hardware considered include the Earth horizon sensors, the plane-field Sun sensors, the coarse and fine two-axis digital Sun sensors, the three-axis magnetometers, the fixed-head star trackers, and the inertial reference gyros.

  15. A Solar Position Sensor Based on Image Vision.

    PubMed

    Ruelas, Adolfo; Velázquez, Nicolás; Villa-Angulo, Carlos; Acuña, Alexis; Rosales, Pedro; Suastegui, José

    2017-07-29

    Solar collector technologies operate with better performance when the Sun beam direction is normal to the capturing surface, and for that to happen despite the relative movement of the Sun, solar tracking systems are used, therefore, there are rules and standards that need minimum accuracy for these tracking systems to be used in solar collectors' evaluation. Obtaining accuracy is not an easy job, hence in this document the design, construction and characterization of a sensor based on a visual system that finds the relative azimuth error and height of the solar surface of interest, is presented. With these characteristics, the sensor can be used as a reference in control systems and their evaluation. The proposed sensor is based on a microcontroller with a real-time clock, inertial measurement sensors, geolocation and a vision sensor, that obtains the angle of incidence from the sunrays' direction as well as the tilt and sensor position. The sensor's characterization proved how a measurement of a focus error or a Sun position can be made, with an accuracy of 0.0426° and an uncertainty of 0.986%, which can be modified to reach an accuracy under 0.01°. The validation of this sensor was determined showing the focus error on one of the best commercial solar tracking systems, a Kipp & Zonen SOLYS 2. To conclude, the solar tracking sensor based on a vision system meets the Sun detection requirements and components that meet the accuracy conditions to be used in solar tracking systems and their evaluation or, as a tracking and orientation tool, on photovoltaic installations and solar collectors.

  16. Predictive coarse-graining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöberl, Markus; Zabaras, Nicholas; Koutsourelakis, Phaedon-Stelios

    2017-03-01

    We propose a data-driven, coarse-graining formulation in the context of equilibrium statistical mechanics. In contrast to existing techniques which are based on a fine-to-coarse map, we adopt the opposite strategy by prescribing a probabilistic coarse-to-fine map. This corresponds to a directed probabilistic model where the coarse variables play the role of latent generators of the fine scale (all-atom) data. From an information-theoretic perspective, the framework proposed provides an improvement upon the relative entropy method [1] and is capable of quantifying the uncertainty due to the information loss that unavoidably takes place during the coarse-graining process. Furthermore, it can be readily extended to a fully Bayesian model where various sources of uncertainties are reflected in the posterior of the model parameters. The latter can be used to produce not only point estimates of fine-scale reconstructions or macroscopic observables, but more importantly, predictive posterior distributions on these quantities. Predictive posterior distributions reflect the confidence of the model as a function of the amount of data and the level of coarse-graining. The issues of model complexity and model selection are seamlessly addressed by employing a hierarchical prior that favors the discovery of sparse solutions, revealing the most prominent features in the coarse-grained model. A flexible and parallelizable Monte Carlo - Expectation-Maximization (MC-EM) scheme is proposed for carrying out inference and learning tasks. A comparative assessment of the proposed methodology is presented for a lattice spin system and the SPC/E water model.

  17. Predictive coarse-graining

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Schöberl, Markus, E-mail: m.schoeberl@tum.de; Zabaras, Nicholas; Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, 365 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556

    We propose a data-driven, coarse-graining formulation in the context of equilibrium statistical mechanics. In contrast to existing techniques which are based on a fine-to-coarse map, we adopt the opposite strategy by prescribing a probabilistic coarse-to-fine map. This corresponds to a directed probabilistic model where the coarse variables play the role of latent generators of the fine scale (all-atom) data. From an information-theoretic perspective, the framework proposed provides an improvement upon the relative entropy method and is capable of quantifying the uncertainty due to the information loss that unavoidably takes place during the coarse-graining process. Furthermore, it can be readily extendedmore » to a fully Bayesian model where various sources of uncertainties are reflected in the posterior of the model parameters. The latter can be used to produce not only point estimates of fine-scale reconstructions or macroscopic observables, but more importantly, predictive posterior distributions on these quantities. Predictive posterior distributions reflect the confidence of the model as a function of the amount of data and the level of coarse-graining. The issues of model complexity and model selection are seamlessly addressed by employing a hierarchical prior that favors the discovery of sparse solutions, revealing the most prominent features in the coarse-grained model. A flexible and parallelizable Monte Carlo – Expectation–Maximization (MC-EM) scheme is proposed for carrying out inference and learning tasks. A comparative assessment of the proposed methodology is presented for a lattice spin system and the SPC/E water model.« less

  18. Investigating coarse sediment particles transport using PTV and "smart-pebbles" instrumented with inertial sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Farhadi, Hamed

    2017-04-01

    This study, reports on the analysis of appropriately designed fluvial experiments investigating the transport of coarse bed material using two approaches: particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) to extract bulk transport parameters and inertia sensor data (via the use of "smart-pebbles") to obtain refined statistics for the transport of the particle. The purpose of this study is to provide further insight on the use of technologies (optical techniques and inertial sensors) that are complementary one to another, towards producing improved estimates of bedload transport in natural rivers. The experiments are conducted in the Water Engineering Lab at the University of Glasgow on a tilting recirculating flume with 90 cm width. Ten different discharges have been implemented in this study. A couple of fake beds, made of well-packed beads of three different sizes have been set up in the flume. The particle motion is captured by two high-speed commercial cameras, responsible for recording the top view covering the full length of the fake beds over which the "smart-pebble" is allowed to be transported. "Smart-pebbles" of four different densities are initially located at the upstream end of the configuration, fully exposed to the instream flow. These are instrumented with appropriate inertial sensors that allow recording the particle's motion, in the Langrangian frame, in high resolution. Specifically, the "smart-pebble" employ a tri-axial gyroscope, magnetometer and accelerometer, which are utilized to obtain minute linear and angular displacements in high frequency (up to 200Hz). However, these are not enough to accurately reconstruct the full trajectory of the particles rolling downstream. To that goal optical methods are used. In particular, by using particle tracking velocimetry data and image processing techniques, the location, orientation and velocities of the "smart-pebble" are derived. Specific consideration is given to appropriately preprocess the obtained video, as

  19. A Solar Position Sensor Based on Image Vision

    PubMed Central

    Ruelas, Adolfo; Velázquez, Nicolás; Villa-Angulo, Carlos; Rosales, Pedro; Suastegui, José

    2017-01-01

    Solar collector technologies operate with better performance when the Sun beam direction is normal to the capturing surface, and for that to happen despite the relative movement of the Sun, solar tracking systems are used, therefore, there are rules and standards that need minimum accuracy for these tracking systems to be used in solar collectors’ evaluation. Obtaining accuracy is not an easy job, hence in this document the design, construction and characterization of a sensor based on a visual system that finds the relative azimuth error and height of the solar surface of interest, is presented. With these characteristics, the sensor can be used as a reference in control systems and their evaluation. The proposed sensor is based on a microcontroller with a real-time clock, inertial measurement sensors, geolocation and a vision sensor, that obtains the angle of incidence from the sunrays’ direction as well as the tilt and sensor position. The sensor’s characterization proved how a measurement of a focus error or a Sun position can be made, with an accuracy of 0.0426° and an uncertainty of 0.986%, which can be modified to reach an accuracy under 0.01°. The validation of this sensor was determined showing the focus error on one of the best commercial solar tracking systems, a Kipp & Zonen SOLYS 2. To conclude, the solar tracking sensor based on a vision system meets the Sun detection requirements and components that meet the accuracy conditions to be used in solar tracking systems and their evaluation or, as a tracking and orientation tool, on photovoltaic installations and solar collectors. PMID:28758935

  20. A coarse grain model for protein-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuai; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2013-09-01

    The interaction of proteins with surfaces is important in numerous applications in many fields—such as biotechnology, proteomics, sensors, and medicine—but fundamental understanding of how protein stability and structure are affected by surfaces remains incomplete. Over the last several years, molecular simulation using coarse grain models has yielded significant insights, but the formalisms used to represent the surface interactions have been rudimentary. We present a new model for protein surface interactions that incorporates the chemical specificity of both the surface and the residues comprising the protein in the context of a one-bead-per-residue, coarse grain approach that maintains computational efficiency. The model is parameterized against experimental adsorption energies for multiple model peptides on different types of surfaces. The validity of the model is established by its ability to quantitatively and qualitatively predict the free energy of adsorption and structural changes for multiple biologically-relevant proteins on different surfaces. The validation, done with proteins not used in parameterization, shows that the model produces remarkable agreement between simulation and experiment.

  1. Progress in Insect-Inspired Optical Navigation Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita; Chahl, Javaan; Zometzer, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Progress has been made in continuing efforts to develop optical flight-control and navigation sensors for miniature robotic aircraft. The designs of these sensors are inspired by the designs and functions of the vision systems and brains of insects. Two types of sensors of particular interest are polarization compasses and ocellar horizon sensors. The basic principle of polarization compasses was described (but without using the term "polarization compass") in "Insect-Inspired Flight Control for Small Flying Robots" (NPO-30545), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 1 (January 2005), page 61. To recapitulate: Bees use sky polarization patterns in ultraviolet (UV) light, caused by Rayleigh scattering of sunlight by atmospheric gas molecules, as direction references relative to the apparent position of the Sun. A robotic direction-finding technique based on this concept would be more robust in comparison with a technique based on the direction to the visible Sun because the UV polarization pattern is distributed across the entire sky and, hence, is redundant and can be extrapolated from a small region of clear sky in an elsewhere cloudy sky that hides the Sun.

  2. A novel capacitive absolute positioning sensor based on time grating with nanometer resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Hongji; Liu, Hongzhong; Liu, Xiaokang; Peng, Kai; Yu, Zhicheng

    2018-05-01

    The present work proposes a novel capacitive absolute positioning sensor based on time grating. The sensor includes a fine incremental-displacement measurement component combined with a coarse absolute-position measurement component to obtain high-resolution absolute positioning measurements. A single row type sensor was proposed to achieve fine displacement measurement, which combines the two electrode rows of a previously proposed double-row type capacitive displacement sensor based on time grating into a single row. To achieve absolute positioning measurement, the coarse measurement component is designed as a single-row type displacement sensor employing a single spatial period over the entire measurement range. In addition, this component employs a rectangular induction electrode and four groups of orthogonal discrete excitation electrodes with half-sinusoidal envelope shapes, which were formed by alternately extending the rectangular electrodes of the fine measurement component. The fine and coarse measurement components are tightly integrated to form a compact absolute positioning sensor. A prototype sensor was manufactured using printed circuit board technology for testing and optimization of the design in conjunction with simulations. Experimental results show that the prototype sensor achieves a ±300 nm measurement accuracy with a 1 nm resolution over a displacement range of 200 mm when employing error compensation. The proposed sensor is an excellent alternative to presently available long-range absolute nanometrology sensors owing to its low cost, simple structure, and ease of manufacturing.

  3. Sun Radio Interferometer Space Experiment (SunRISE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Justin C.; SunRISE Team

    2018-06-01

    The Sun Radio Interferometer Space Experiment (SunRISE) is a NASA Heliophysics Explorer Mission of Opportunity currently in Phase A. SunRISE is a constellation of spacecraft flying in a 10-km diameter formation and operating as the first imaging radio interferometer in space. The purpose of SunRISE is to reveal critical aspects of solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration at coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and transport into space by making the first spatially resolved observations of coherent Type II and III radio bursts produced by electrons accelerated at CMEs or released from flares. SunRISE will focus on solar Decametric-Hectometric (DH, 0.1 < f < 15 MHz) radio bursts that always are detected from space before major SEP events, but cannot be seen on Earth due to ionospheric absorption. This talk will describe SunRISE objectives and implementation. Presented on behalf of the entire SunRISE team.

  4. Sun sensitivity and sun protective behaviors during sun exposure among indoor office workers in the American Midwest.

    PubMed

    Jung, Alesia M; Dennis, Leslie K; Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Wondrak, Georg T

    2018-06-11

    Sun sensitivity, a confounder between sun exposure and sun protection, is often overlooked. We examined how sun exposure and sun protection behaviors among indoor workers varied by sun sensitivity. Sun exposure and sun protection diaries over a 45-day period from Midwestern United States indoor workers were examined. We categorized sun sensitivity (fair and non-fair complexion) using tanning inability and sunburn tendency. Total exposure (sunrise to sunset) and peak exposure (10 am and 4 pm) lasting at least 60 minutes were examined. Percentages of time using sun protection were reported. We determined associations between fair complexion, mean sun exposure and mean sun protection times with logistic regression. Fair individuals spent less time in the sun than non-fair individuals, but a greater proportion of time using sun protection behaviors, including sunscreen with SPF 30+ (odds ratio (OR)=1.36; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) =0.98, 1.87)), or wearing long-sleeved shirts (OR=2.89; 95% CI=1.24, 6.73). Fair individuals spent less time in the sun and practiced more sun protective behaviors than non-fair individuals. This complex association between sun sensitivity, sun protection and sun exposure has not consistently been addressed in studies of skin cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. The Aerosol Coarse Mode Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Adhikari, N.; Air, D.; Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.

    2014-12-01

    Many areas of the world show an aerosol volume distribution with a significant coarse mode and sometimes a dominant coarse mode. The large coarse mode is usually due to dust, but sea salt aerosol can also play an important role. However, in many field campaigns, the coarse mode tends to be ignored, because it is difficult to measure. This lack of measurements leads directly to a concomitant "lack of analysis" of this mode. Because, coarse mode aerosols can have significant effects on radiative forcing, both in the shortwave and longwave spectrum, the coarse mode -- and these forcings -- should be accounted for in atmospheric models. Forcings based only on fine mode aerosols have the potential to be misleading. In this paper we describe examples of large coarse modes that occur in areas of large aerosol loading (Mexico City, Barnard et al., 2010) as well as small loadings (Sacramento, CA; Kassianov et al., 2012; and Reno, NV). We then demonstrate that: (1) the coarse mode can contribute significantly to radiative forcing, relative to the fine mode, and (2) neglecting the coarse mode may result in poor comparisons between measurements and models. Next we describe -- in general terms -- the limitations of instrumentation to measure the coarse mode. Finally, we suggest a new initiative aimed at examining coarse mode aerosol generation mechanisms; transport and deposition; chemical composition; visible and thermal IR refractive indices; morphology; microphysical behavior when deposited on snow and ice; and specific instrumentation needs. Barnard, J. C., J. D. Fast, G. Paredes-Miranda, W. P. Arnott, and A. Laskin, 2010: Technical Note: Evaluation of the WRF-Chem "Aerosol Chemical to Aerosol Optical Properties" Module using data from the MILAGRO campaign, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 10, 7325-7340. Kassianov, E. I., M. S. Pekour, and J. C. Barnard, 2012: Aerosols in Central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing

  6. An Eulerian-Lagrangian description for fluvial coarse sediment transport: theory and verification with low-cost inertial sensors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniatis, Georgios

    2017-04-01

    Fluvial sediment transport is controlled by hydraulics, sediment properties and arrangement, and flow history across a range of time scales. One reference frame descriptions (Eulerian or Lagrangian) yield useful results but restrict the theoretical understanding of the process as differences between the two phases (liquid and solid) are not explicitly accounted. Recently, affordable Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs) that can be embedded in coarse (100 mm diameter scale) natural or artificial particles became available. These sensors are subjected to technical limitations when deployed for natural sediment transport. However, they give us the ability to measure for the first time the inertial dynamics (acceleration and angular velocity) of moving sediment grains under fluvial transport. Theoretically, the assumption of an ideal (IMU), rigidly attached at the centre of the mass of a sediment particle can simplify greatly the derivation of a general Eulerian-Lagrangian (E-L) model. This approach accounts for inertial characteristics of particles in a Lagrangian (particle fixed) frame, and for the hydrodynamics in an independent Eulerian frame. Simplified versions of the E-L model have been evaluated in laboratory experiments using real-IMUs [Maniatis et. al 2015]. Here, experimental results are presented relevant to the evaluation of the complete E-L model. Artificial particles were deployed in a series of laboratory and field experiments. The particles are equipped with an IMU capable of recording acceleration at ± 400 g and angular velocities at ± 1200 rads/sec ranges. The sampling frequency ranges from 50 to 200 Hz for the total IMU measurement. Two sets of laboratory experiments were conducted in a 0.9m wide laboratory flume. The first is a set of entrainment threshold experiments using two artificial particles: a spherical of D=90mm (A) and an ellipsoid with axes of 100, 70 and 30 mm (B). For the second set of experiments, a spherical artificial enclosure of D

  7. Removing sun glint from optical remote sensing images of shallow rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Overstreet, Brandon T.; Legleiter, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Sun glint is the specular reflection of light from the water surface, which often causes unusually bright pixel values that can dominate fluvial remote sensing imagery and obscure the water-leaving radiance signal of interest for mapping bathymetry, bottom type, or water column optical characteristics. Although sun glint is ubiquitous in fluvial remote sensing imagery, river-specific methods for removing sun glint are not yet available. We show that existing sun glint-removal methods developed for multispectral images of marine shallow water environments over-correct shallow portions of fluvial remote sensing imagery resulting in regions of unreliable data along channel margins. We build on existing marine glint-removal methods to develop a river-specific technique that removes sun glint from shallow areas of the channel without overcorrection by accounting for non-negligible water-leaving near-infrared radiance. This new sun glint-removal method can improve the accuracy of spectrally-based depth retrieval in cases where sun glint dominates the at-sensor radiance. For an example image of the gravel-bed Snake River, Wyoming, USA, observed-vs.-predicted R2 values for depth retrieval improved from 0.66 to 0.76 following sun glint removal. The methodology presented here is straightforward to implement and could be incorporated into image processing workflows for multispectral images that include a near-infrared band.

  8. Sun Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Sun? Are There Benefits to Spending Time Outdoors? Statistics Behavior Rates Sun Safety Tips for Men ... and yourself from skin cancer. Stay sun-safe outdoors and discourage indoor and outdoor tanning. Sun Safety ...

  9. Self-calibrating solar position sensor

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Maxey, Lonnie Curt

    A sun positioning sensor and method of accurately tracking the sun are disclosed. The sensor includes a position sensing diode and a disk having a body defining an aperture for accepting solar light. An extension tube having a body that defines a duct spaces the position sensing diode from the disk such that the solar light enters the aperture in the disk, travels through the duct in the extension tube and strikes the position sensing diode. The extension tube has a known length that is fixed. Voltage signals indicative of the location and intensity of the sun are generated bymore » the position sensing diode. If it is determined that the intensity values are unreliable, then historical position values are used from a table. If the intensity values are deemed reliable, then actual position values are used from the position sensing diode.« less

  10. Sun Exposure, Sun-Related Symptoms, and Sun Protection Practices in an African Informal Traditional Medicines Market.

    PubMed

    Wright, Caradee Y; Reddy, Tarylee; Mathee, Angela; Street, Renée A

    2017-09-28

    Informal workers in African market trade have little formal protection against sun exposure. We aimed to examine sun exposure, sun-related symptoms, and sun protection practices in an informal occupational setting. Trained fieldworkers asked 236 workers in the Warwick Junction market about their workplace, skin and eye sensitivity and skin colour, symptoms faced at work during the summer due to heat, and preventive measures. Data were analyzed using univariate logistic regression to assess the effect of gender and the risk of experiencing symptoms to sun exposure in relation to pre-existing diseases and perception of sun exposure as a hazard. Of the 236 participants, 234 were Black African and 141 (59.7%) were female. Portable shade was the most commonly used form of sun protection (69.9%). Glare from the sun (59.7%) and excessive sweating (57.6%) were commonly reported sun-related health symptoms. The use of protective clothing was more prevalent among those who perceived sun exposure as a hazard ( p = 0.003). In an informal occupational setting, sun exposure was high. Protective clothing and portable shade to eliminate heat and bright light were self-implemented. Action by local authorities to protect informal workers should consider sun exposure to support workers in their efforts to cope in hot weather.

  11. The Sun: the Earth light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrilli, Francesco; Giovannelli, Luca; Del Moro, Dario; Piazzesi, Roberto; Catena, Liu` Maria; Amicucci, Giordano; Vittorio, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    We have implemented at Department of Physics of University of Rome Tor Vergata a project called "The Sun: the Earth light source". The project obtained the official endorsement from the IAU Executive Committee Working Group for the International Year of Light. The project, specifically designed for high school students, is focused on the "scientific" study of Sun light by means of a complete acquisition system based on "on the shelf" appropriately CMOS low-cost sensor with free control s/w and self-assembled telescopes. The project (hereafter stage) plan is based on a course of two weeks (60 hours in total). The course contains 20 hours of theoretical lectures, necessary to learn basics about Sun, optics, telescopes and image sensors, and 40 hours of laboratory. During the course, scientists and astronomers share with high schools students, work activities in real research laboratories. High schools teachers are intensely involved in the project. Their role is to share activities with university teachers and realize outreach actions in the home institutions. Simultaneously, they are introduced to innovative teaching methods and the project in this way is regarded as a professional development course. Sun light analysis and Sun-Earth connection through light are the main scientific topics of this project. The laboratory section of the stage is executed in two phases (weeks): First phase aims are the realization of a keplerian telescope and low-cost acquisition system. During this week students are introduced to astronomical techniques used to safety collect and acquire solar light; Second phase aims is the realization of a low-cost instrument to analyse sunlight extracting information about the solar spectrum, solar irradiance and Sun-Earth connection. The proposed stage has been already tested in Italy reached the fifth edition in 2014. Since 2010, the project has been a cornerstone outreach program of the University of Rome Tor Vergata, the Italian Ministry of

  12. Sun and Sun Worship in Different Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    The Sun symbol is found in many cultures throughout history, it has played an important role in shaping our life on Earth since the dawn of time. Since the beginning of human existence, civilisations have established religious beliefs that involved the Sun's significance to some extent. As new civilisations and religions developed, many spiritual beliefs were based on those from the past so that there has been an evolution of the Sun's significance throughout cultural development. For comparing and finding the origin of the Sun we made a table of 66 languages and compared the roots of the words. For finding out from where these roots came from, we also made a table of 21 Sun Gods and Goddesses and proved the direct crossing of language and mythology.

  13. Skin Tone Dissatisfaction, Sun Exposure, and Sun Protection in Australian Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Amanda D; Prichard, Ivanka; Ettridge, Kerry; Wilson, Carlene

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the adoption of sun protection and sun exposure behaviors, the extent to which these behaviors group together, and the relationship between skin tone dissatisfaction and sun-related behaviors in South Australian adolescents (aged 12-17). A total of 2,875 secondary school students (1,461 male and 1,414 female) completed a questionnaire including questions about sun protection and sun exposure behaviors and skin tone dissatisfaction. Regular adoption of sun protection behaviors was low and ranged from 20% (wearing protective clothing) to 44% (sunscreen use). A principal components analysis identified four subgroups of sun-related behaviors: sun protection, appearance enhancement, sun avoidance, and sun exposure. Females had significantly higher skin tone dissatisfaction than males. Skin tone dissatisfaction was associated with decreased sun protection and avoidance and increased appearance enhancement and sun exposure in both males and females. Skin tone dissatisfaction plays an important role in Australian adolescents' sun-related behavior. Appearance-based interventions may be effective in reducing skin cancer risk through reduced sun exposure.

  14. Sun glint requirement for the remote detection of surface oil films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shaojie; Hu, Chuanmin

    2016-01-01

    Natural oil slicks in the western Gulf of Mexico are used to determine the sun glint threshold required for optical remote sensing of oil films. The threshold is determined using the same-day image pairs collected by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra (MODIST), MODIS Aqua (MODISA), and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) (N = 2297 images) over the same oil slick locations where at least one of the sensors captures the oil slicks. For each sensor, statistics of sun glint strengths, represented by the normalized glint reflectance (LGN, sr-1), when oil slicks can and cannot be observed are generated. The LGN threshold for oil film detections is determined to be 10-5-10-6 sr-1 for MODIST and MODISA, and 10-6-10-7 sr-1 for VIIRS. Below these thresholds, no oil films can be detected, while above these thresholds, oil films can always be detected except near the critical-angle zone where oil slicks reverse their contrast against the background water.

  15. Peculiar Traits of Coarse AP (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    coarse AP Bircumshaw, Newman Active centers are sources of AP decomposition gases AP low temperature decomposition (LTD) Most unstable AP particles ...delay before coarse AP ejection *Coarse AP particle flame retardancy 19 Air Force Research Laboratory Distribution A: Approved for public release...distribution unlimited. PA clearance #. Combustion bomb trials 2 AP phase change may enable coarse particle breakage Fractured coarse AP ejection agrees

  16. High-Resolution Coarse-Grained Modeling Using Oriented Coarse-Grained Sites.

    PubMed

    Haxton, Thomas K

    2015-03-10

    We introduce a method to bring nearly atomistic resolution to coarse-grained models, and we apply the method to proteins. Using a small number of coarse-grained sites (about one per eight atoms) but assigning an independent three-dimensional orientation to each site, we preferentially integrate out stiff degrees of freedom (bond lengths and angles, as well as dihedral angles in rings) that are accurately approximated by their average values, while retaining soft degrees of freedom (unconstrained dihedral angles) mostly responsible for conformational variability. We demonstrate that our scheme retains nearly atomistic resolution by mapping all experimental protein configurations in the Protein Data Bank onto coarse-grained configurations and then analytically backmapping those configurations back to all-atom configurations. This roundtrip mapping throws away all information associated with the eliminated (stiff) degrees of freedom except for their average values, which we use to construct optimal backmapping functions. Despite the 4:1 reduction in the number of degrees of freedom, we find that heavy atoms move only 0.051 Å on average during the roundtrip mapping, while hydrogens move 0.179 Å on average, an unprecedented combination of efficiency and accuracy among coarse-grained protein models. We discuss the advantages of such a high-resolution model for parametrizing effective interactions and accurately calculating observables through direct or multiscale simulations.

  17. Attitude Control System Design for the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starin, Scott R.; Bourkland, Kristin L.; Kuo-Chia, Liu; Mason, Paul A. C.; Vess, Melissa F.; Andrews, Stephen F.; Morgenstern, Wendy M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, part of the Living With a Star program, will place a geosynchronous satellite in orbit to observe the Sun and relay data to a dedicated ground station at all times. SDO remains Sun- pointing throughout most of its mission for the instruments to take measurements of the Sun. The SDO attitude control system is a single-fault tolerant design. Its fully redundant attitude sensor complement includes 16 coarse Sun sensors, a digital Sun sensor, 3 two-axis inertial reference units, 2 star trackers, and 4 guide telescopes. Attitude actuation is performed using 4 reaction wheels and 8 thrusters, and a single main engine nominally provides velocity-change thrust. The attitude control software has five nominal control modes-3 wheel-based modes and 2 thruster-based modes. A wheel-based Safehold running in the attitude control electronics box improves the robustness of the system as a whole. All six modes are designed on the same basic proportional-integral-derivative attitude error structure, with more robust modes setting their integral gains to zero. The paper details the mode designs and their uses.

  18. A fusion approach for coarse-to-fine target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkesson, Martin; Grönwall, Christina; Jungert, Erland

    2006-04-01

    A fusion approach in a query based information system is presented. The system is designed for querying multimedia data bases, and here applied to target recognition using heterogeneous data sources. The recognition process is coarse-to-fine, with an initial attribute estimation step and a following matching step. Several sensor types and algorithms are involved in each of these two steps. An independence of the matching results, on the origin of the estimation results, is observed. It allows for distribution of data between algorithms in an intermediate fusion step, without risk of data incest. This increases the overall chance of recognising the target. An implementation of the system is described.

  19. Hemodynamic, Autonomic, and Vascular Effects of Exposure to Coarse Particulate Matter Air Pollution from a Rural Location

    PubMed Central

    Bard, Robert L.; Morishita, Masako; Dvonch, J. Timothy; Wang, Lu; Yang, Hui-yu; Spino, Catherine; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Oral, Elif A.; Ajluni, Nevin; Sun, Qinghua; Harkema, Jack; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    EA, Ajluni N, Sun Q, Brook JR, Harkema J, Rajagopalan S. 2014. Hemodynamic, autonomic, and vascular effects of exposure to coarse particulate matter air pollution from a rural location. Environ Health Perspect 122:624–630; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306595 PMID:24618231

  20. Spotless Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-22

    The sun has been virtually spotless, as in no sunspots, over the past 11 days, a spotless stretch that we have not seen since the last solar minimum many years ago. The videos shows the past four days (Mar. 14-17, 2017) with a combination of an extreme ultraviolet image blended with just the filtered sun. If we just showed the filtered sun with no spots for reference points, any viewer would have a hard time telling that the sun was even rotating. The sun is trending again towards the solar minimum period of its 11 year cycle, which is predicted to be around 2020. Movies are available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21569

  1. Target Coverage in Wireless Sensor Networks with Probabilistic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Anxing; Xu, Xianghua; Cheng, Zongmao

    2016-01-01

    Sensing coverage is a fundamental problem in wireless sensor networks (WSNs), which has attracted considerable attention. Conventional research on this topic focuses on the 0/1 coverage model, which is only a coarse approximation to the practical sensing model. In this paper, we study the target coverage problem, where the objective is to find the least number of sensor nodes in randomly-deployed WSNs based on the probabilistic sensing model. We analyze the joint detection probability of target with multiple sensors. Based on the theoretical analysis of the detection probability, we formulate the minimum ϵ-detection coverage problem. We prove that the minimum ϵ-detection coverage problem is NP-hard and present an approximation algorithm called the Probabilistic Sensor Coverage Algorithm (PSCA) with provable approximation ratios. To evaluate our design, we analyze the performance of PSCA theoretically and also perform extensive simulations to demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. PMID:27618902

  2. Sun protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... age spots are caused by exposure to the sun. This is because the damage caused by the sun is permanent. ... The two types of sun rays that can injure the skin are ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB). UVA affects the deep layers of ...

  3. Automatic Hotspot and Sun Glint Detection in UAV Multispectral Images

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Terol, Damian; Ballesteros, Rocio

    2017-01-01

    Last advances in sensors, photogrammetry and computer vision have led to high-automation levels of 3D reconstruction processes for generating dense models and multispectral orthoimages from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) images. However, these cartographic products are sometimes blurred and degraded due to sun reflection effects which reduce the image contrast and colour fidelity in photogrammetry and the quality of radiometric values in remote sensing applications. This paper proposes an automatic approach for detecting sun reflections problems (hotspot and sun glint) in multispectral images acquired with an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), based on a photogrammetric strategy included in a flight planning and control software developed by the authors. In particular, two main consequences are derived from the approach developed: (i) different areas of the images can be excluded since they contain sun reflection problems; (ii) the cartographic products obtained (e.g., digital terrain model, orthoimages) and the agronomical parameters computed (e.g., normalized vegetation index-NVDI) are improved since radiometric defects in pixels are not considered. Finally, an accuracy assessment was performed in order to analyse the error in the detection process, getting errors around 10 pixels for a ground sample distance (GSD) of 5 cm which is perfectly valid for agricultural applications. This error confirms that the precision in the detection of sun reflections can be guaranteed using this approach and the current low-cost UAV technology. PMID:29036930

  4. Automatic Hotspot and Sun Glint Detection in UAV Multispectral Images.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Terol, Damian; Hernandez-Lopez, David; Ballesteros, Rocio; Gonzalez-Aguilera, Diego

    2017-10-15

    Last advances in sensors, photogrammetry and computer vision have led to high-automation levels of 3D reconstruction processes for generating dense models and multispectral orthoimages from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) images. However, these cartographic products are sometimes blurred and degraded due to sun reflection effects which reduce the image contrast and colour fidelity in photogrammetry and the quality of radiometric values in remote sensing applications. This paper proposes an automatic approach for detecting sun reflections problems (hotspot and sun glint) in multispectral images acquired with an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), based on a photogrammetric strategy included in a flight planning and control software developed by the authors. In particular, two main consequences are derived from the approach developed: (i) different areas of the images can be excluded since they contain sun reflection problems; (ii) the cartographic products obtained (e.g., digital terrain model, orthoimages) and the agronomical parameters computed (e.g., normalized vegetation index-NVDI) are improved since radiometric defects in pixels are not considered. Finally, an accuracy assessment was performed in order to analyse the error in the detection process, getting errors around 10 pixels for a ground sample distance (GSD) of 5 cm which is perfectly valid for agricultural applications. This error confirms that the precision in the detection of sun reflections can be guaranteed using this approach and the current low-cost UAV technology.

  5. Tuning the Solar Dynamics Observatory Onboard Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halverson, Julie Kay; Harman, Rick; Carpenter, Russell; Poland, Devin

    2017-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was launched in 2010. SDO is a sun pointing semi-autonomous spacecraft in a geosynchronous orbit that allows nearly continuous observations of the sun. SDO is equipped with coarse sun sensors, two star trackers, a digital sun sensor, and three two-axis inertial reference units (IRU). The IRUs are temperature sensitive and were designed to operate in a stable thermal environment. Due to battery degradation concerns the IRU heaters were not used on SDO and the onboard filter was tuned to accommodate the noisier IRU data. Since launch currents have increased on two IRUs, one had to eventually be powered off. Recent ground tests on a battery similar to SDO indicated the heaters would have negligible impact on battery degradation, so in 2016 a decision was made to turn the heaters on. This paper presents the analysis and results of updating the filter tuning parameters onboard SDO with the IRUs now operating in their intended thermal environment.

  6. Advanced Interrogation of Fiber-Optic Bragg Grating and Fabry-Perot Sensors with KLT Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tosi, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The Karhunen-Loeve Transform (KLT) is applied to accurate detection of optical fiber sensors in the spectral domain. By processing an optical spectrum, although coarsely sampled, through the KLT, and subsequently processing the obtained eigenvalues, it is possible to decode a plurality of optical sensor results. The KLT returns higher accuracy than other demodulation techniques, despite coarse sampling, and exhibits higher resilience to noise. Three case studies of KLT-based processing are presented, representing most of the current challenges in optical fiber sensing: (1) demodulation of individual sensors, such as Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) and Fabry-Perot Interferometers (FPIs); (2) demodulation of dual (FBG/FPI) sensors; (3) application of reverse KLT to isolate different sensors operating on the same spectrum. A simulative outline is provided to demonstrate the KLT operation and estimate performance; a brief experimental section is also provided to validate accurate FBG and FPI decoding. PMID:26528975

  7. Advanced Interrogation of Fiber-Optic Bragg Grating and Fabry-Perot Sensors with KLT Analysis.

    PubMed

    Tosi, Daniele

    2015-10-29

    The Karhunen-Loeve Transform (KLT) is applied to accurate detection of optical fiber sensors in the spectral domain. By processing an optical spectrum, although coarsely sampled, through the KLT, and subsequently processing the obtained eigenvalues, it is possible to decode a plurality of optical sensor results. The KLT returns higher accuracy than other demodulation techniques, despite coarse sampling, and exhibits higher resilience to noise. Three case studies of KLT-based processing are presented, representing most of the current challenges in optical fiber sensing: (1) demodulation of individual sensors, such as Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) and Fabry-Perot Interferometers (FPIs); (2) demodulation of dual (FBG/FPI) sensors; (3) application of reverse KLT to isolate different sensors operating on the same spectrum. A simulative outline is provided to demonstrate the KLT operation and estimate performance; a brief experimental section is also provided to validate accurate FBG and FPI decoding.

  8. Feasibility of using low-cost portable particle monitors for measurement of fine and coarse particulate matter in urban ambient air.

    PubMed

    Han, Inkyu; Symanski, Elaine; Stock, Thomas H

    2017-03-01

    Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) is known as a significant risk factor for mortality and morbidity due to cardiorespiratory causes. Owing to increased interest in assessing personal and community exposures to PM, we evaluated the feasibility of employing a low-cost portable direct-reading instrument for measurement of ambient air PM exposure. A Dylos DC 1700 PM sensor was collocated with a Grimm 11-R in an urban residential area of Houston Texas. The 1-min averages of particle number concentrations for sizes between 0.5 and 2.5 µm (small size) and sizes larger than 2.5 µm (large size) from a DC 1700 were compared with the 1-min averages of PM 2.5 (aerodynamic size less than 2.5 µm) and coarse PM (aerodynamic size between 2.5 and 10 µm) concentrations from a Grimm 11-R. We used a linear regression equation to convert DC 1700 number concentrations to mass concentrations, utilizing measurements from the Grimm 11-R. The estimated average DC 1700 PM 2.5 concentration (13.2 ± 13.7 µg/m 3 ) was similar to the average measured Grimm 11-R PM 2.5 concentration (11.3 ± 15.1 µg/m 3 ). The overall correlation (r 2 ) for PM 2.5 between the DC 1700 and Grimm 11-R was 0.778. The estimated average coarse PM concentration from the DC 1700 (5.6 ± 12.1 µg/m 3 ) was also similar to that measured with the Grimm 11-R (4.8 ± 16.5 µg/m 3 ) with an r 2 of 0.481. The effects of relative humidity and particle size on the association between the DC 1700 and the Grimm 11-R results were also examined. The calculated PM mass concentrations from the DC 1700 were close to those measured with the Grimm 11-R when relative humidity was less than 60% for both PM 2.5 and coarse PM. Particle size distribution was more important for the association of coarse PM between the DC 1700 and Grimm 11-R than it was for PM 2.5 . The performance of a low-cost particulate matter (PM) sensor was evaluated in an urban residential area. Both PM 2.5 and coarse PM (PM 10-2.5 ) mass concentrations

  9. How coarse is too coarse for salmon spawning substrates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooster, J. K.; Riebe, C. S.; Ligon, F. K.; Overstreet, B. T.

    2009-12-01

    Populations of Pacific salmon species have declined sharply in many rivers of the western US. Reversing these declines is a top priority and expense of many river restoration projects. To help restore salmon populations, managers often inject gravel into rivers, to supplement spawning habitat that has been depleted by gravel mining and the effects of dams—which block sediment and thus impair habitat downstream by coarsening the bed where salmon historically spawned. However, there is little quantitative understanding nor a methodology for determining when a river bed has become too coarse for salmon spawning. Hence there is little scientific basis for selecting sites that would optimize the restoration benefits of gravel injection (e.g., sites where flow velocities are suitable but bed materials are too coarse for spawning). To develop a quantitative understanding of what makes river beds too coarse for salmon spawning, we studied redds and spawning use in a series of California and Washington rivers where salmon spawning ability appears to be affected by coarse bed material. Our working hypothesis is that for a given flow condition, there is a maximum “threshold” particle size that a salmon of a given size is able to excavate and/or move as she builds her redd. A second, related hypothesis is that spawning use should decrease and eventually become impossible with increasing percent coverage by immovable particles. To test these hypotheses, we quantified the sizes and spatial distributions of immovably coarse particles in a series of salmon redds in each river during the peak of spawning. We also quantified spawning use and how it relates to percent coverage by immovable particles. Results from our studies of fall-run chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha) in the Feather River suggest that immovable particle size varies as a function of flow velocity over the redd, implying that faster water helps fish move bigger particles. Our Feather River study also

  10. Mimicking coarse-grained simulations without coarse-graining: enhanced sampling by damping short-range interactions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dongshan; Wang, Feng

    2010-08-28

    The damped-short-range-interaction (DSRI) method is proposed to mimic coarse-grained simulations by propagating an atomistic scale system on a smoothed potential energy surface. The DSRI method has the benefit of enhanced sampling provided by a typical coarse-grained simulation without the need to perform coarse-graining. Our method was used to simulate liquid water, alanine dipeptide folding, and the self-assembly of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipid. In each case, our method appreciably accelerated the dynamics without significantly changing the free energy surface. Additional insights from DSRI simulations and the promise of coupling our DSRI method with Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics are discussed.

  11. Mimicking coarse-grained simulations without coarse-graining: Enhanced sampling by damping short-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Dongshan; Wang, Feng

    2010-08-01

    The damped-short-range-interaction (DSRI) method is proposed to mimic coarse-grained simulations by propagating an atomistic scale system on a smoothed potential energy surface. The DSRI method has the benefit of enhanced sampling provided by a typical coarse-grained simulation without the need to perform coarse-graining. Our method was used to simulate liquid water, alanine dipeptide folding, and the self-assembly of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipid. In each case, our method appreciably accelerated the dynamics without significantly changing the free energy surface. Additional insights from DSRI simulations and the promise of coupling our DSRI method with Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics are discussed.

  12. An Attitude Filtering and Magnetometer Calibration Approach for Nanosatellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söken, Halil Ersin

    2018-04-01

    We propose an attitude filtering and magnetometer calibration approach for nanosatellites. Measurements from magnetometers, Sun sensor and gyros are used in the filtering algorithm to estimate the attitude of the satellite together with the bias terms for the gyros and magnetometers. In the traditional approach for the attitude filtering, the attitude sensor measurements are used in the filter with a nonlinear vector measurement model. In the proposed algorithm, the TRIAD algorithm is used in conjunction with the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) to form the nontraditional attitude filter. First the vector measurements from the magnetometer and Sun sensor are processed with the TRIAD algorithm to obtain a coarse attitude estimate for the spacecraft. In the second phase the estimated coarse attitude is used as quaternion measurements for the UKF. The UKF estimates the fine attitude, and the gyro and magnetometer biases. We evaluate the algorithm for a hypothetical nanosatellite by numerical simulations. The results show that the attitude of the satellite can be estimated with an accuracy better than 0.5{°} and the computational load decreases more than 25% compared to a traditional UKF algorithm. We discuss the algorithm's performance in case of a time-variance in the magnetometer errors.

  13. Sun-induced fluorescence - a new probe of photosynthesis: First maps from the imaging spectrometer HyPlant.

    PubMed

    Rascher, U; Alonso, L; Burkart, A; Cilia, C; Cogliati, S; Colombo, R; Damm, A; Drusch, M; Guanter, L; Hanus, J; Hyvärinen, T; Julitta, T; Jussila, J; Kataja, K; Kokkalis, P; Kraft, S; Kraska, T; Matveeva, M; Moreno, J; Muller, O; Panigada, C; Pikl, M; Pinto, F; Prey, L; Pude, R; Rossini, M; Schickling, A; Schurr, U; Schüttemeyer, D; Verrelst, J; Zemek, F

    2015-12-01

    Variations in photosynthesis still cause substantial uncertainties in predicting photosynthetic CO2 uptake rates and monitoring plant stress. Changes in actual photosynthesis that are not related to greenness of vegetation are difficult to measure by reflectance based optical remote sensing techniques. Several activities are underway to evaluate the sun-induced fluorescence signal on the ground and on a coarse spatial scale using space-borne imaging spectrometers. Intermediate-scale observations using airborne-based imaging spectroscopy, which are critical to bridge the existing gap between small-scale field studies and global observations, are still insufficient. Here we present the first validated maps of sun-induced fluorescence in that critical, intermediate spatial resolution, employing the novel airborne imaging spectrometer HyPlant. HyPlant has an unprecedented spectral resolution, which allows for the first time quantifying sun-induced fluorescence fluxes in physical units according to the Fraunhofer Line Depth Principle that exploits solar and atmospheric absorption bands. Maps of sun-induced fluorescence show a large spatial variability between different vegetation types, which complement classical remote sensing approaches. Different crop types largely differ in emitting fluorescence that additionally changes within the seasonal cycle and thus may be related to the seasonal activation and deactivation of the photosynthetic machinery. We argue that sun-induced fluorescence emission is related to two processes: (i) the total absorbed radiation by photosynthetically active chlorophyll; and (ii) the functional status of actual photosynthesis and vegetation stress. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Sun-Earth Day: Exposing the Public to Sun-Earth Connection Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J. R.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2001-12-01

    The year 2001 marked the first observance of Sun-Earth Day as an event to celebrate the strong interconnection of the life we have on Earth and the dependence of it on the dynamic influence of the Sun. The science of the Sun-Earth Connection has grown dramatically with new satellite and ground-based studies of the Sun and the Sun's extended "atmosphere" in which we live. Space weather is becoming a more common concept that people know can affect their lives. An understanding of the importance of the Sun's dynamic behavior and how this shapes the solar system and especially the Earth is the aim of Sun-Earth Day. The first Sun-Earth event actually took place over two days, April 27 and 28, 2001, in order to accommodate all the events which were planned both in the classroom on Friday the 27th and in more informal settings on Saturday the 28th. The Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF) organized the creation of ten thousand packets of educational materials about Sun-Earth Day and distributed them mostly to teachers who were trained to use them in the classroom. Many packets, however, went to science centers, museums, and planetariums as resource materials for programs associated with Sun-Earth Day. Over a hundred scientists used the event as an opportunity to communicate their love of science to audiences in these informal settings. Sun-Earth Day was also greatly assisted by the Amateur Astronomical Society which used the event as a theme for their annual promotion of astronomy in programs given around the country. The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), a satellite mission jointly sponsored by NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA), used Sun-Earth Day in conjunction with the fifth anniversary celebration of SOHO as a basis for many programs and events, especially a large number of happenings in Europe. These included observing parties, art exhibits, demonstrations, etc. Examples of some of the innovative ways that Sun-Earth Day was brought into people

  15. Mitochondrial DNA deletion percentage in sun exposed and non sun exposed skin.

    PubMed

    Powers, Julia M; Murphy, Gillian; Ralph, Nikki; O'Gorman, Susan M; Murphy, James E J

    2016-12-01

    The percentages of mitochondrial genomes carrying the mtDNA 3895 and the mtDNA 4977 (common) deletion were quantified in sun exposed and non sun exposed skin biopsies, for five cohorts of patients varying either in sun exposure profile, age or skin cancer status. Non-melanoma skin cancer diagnoses are rising in Ireland and worldwide [12] but most risk prediction is based on subjective visual estimations of sun exposure history. A quantitative objective test for pre-neoplastic markers may result in better adherence to sun protective behaviours. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is known to be subject to the loss of a significant proportion of specific sections of genetic code due to exposure to ultraviolet light in sunlight. Although one such deletion has been deemed more sensitive, another, called the mtDNA 4977 or common deletion, has proved to be a more useful indicator of possible risk in this study. Quantitative molecular analysis was carried out to determine the percentage of genomes carrying the deletion using non sun exposed and sun exposed skin biopsies in cohorts of patients with high or low sun exposure profiles and two high exposure groups undergoing treatment for NMSC. Results indicate that mtDNA deletions correlate to sun exposure; in groups with high sun exposure habits a significant increase in deletion number in exposed over non sun exposed skin occurred. An increase in deletion percentage was also seen in older cohorts compared to the younger group. The mtDNA 3895 deletion was detected in small amounts in exposed skin of many patients, the mtDNA 4977 common deletion, although present to some extent in non sun exposed skin, is suggested to be the more reliable and easily detected marker. In all cohorts except the younger group with relatively lower sun exposure, the mtDNA 4977 deletion was more frequent in sun exposed skin samples compared to non-sun exposed skin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sun Savvy Students: Free Teaching Resources from EPA's SunWise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall-Jordan, Luke

    2008-01-01

    With summer in full swing and the sun is naturally on our minds, what better time to take advantage of a host of free materials provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Sun Wise program. Sun Wise aims to teach students and teachers about the stratospheric ozone layer, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and how to be safe while in the Sun.…

  17. Coarse graining for synchronization in directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, An; Lü, Linyuan

    2011-05-01

    Coarse-graining model is a promising way to analyze and visualize large-scale networks. The coarse-grained networks are required to preserve statistical properties as well as the dynamic behaviors of the initial networks. Some methods have been proposed and found effective in undirected networks, while the study on coarse-graining directed networks lacks of consideration. In this paper we proposed a path-based coarse-graining (PCG) method to coarse grain the directed networks. Performing the linear stability analysis of synchronization and numerical simulation of the Kuramoto model on four kinds of directed networks, including tree networks and variants of Barabási-Albert networks, Watts-Strogatz networks, and Erdös-Rényi networks, we find our method can effectively preserve the network synchronizability.

  18. Sun behaviour in Canadian children: results of the 2006 National Sun Survey.

    PubMed

    Pichora, Erin C; Marrett, Loraine D

    2010-01-01

    Childhood sun exposure is a particularly important determinant of skin cancer, yet little data are available for children. This paper describes sun behaviour among Canadian children for the summer of 2006. As part of the Second National Sun Survey (NSS2), 1,437 parents reported on the time spent in the sun, and the frequency of sun protection behaviours and sunburning for one of their children aged 1 to 12 years. Analysis was carried out using complex survey procedures in SAS and STATA. The majority of children (94%) spend at least 30 minutes in the sun on a typical summer day; however, regular sun protection is only commonly reported for young children (1 to 5 years) and involves covering their heads and wearing sunscreen (85%). The frequency of other protective behaviours is much lower, and sun protection decreases with age. Older children are also twice as likely to spend extended time in the sun and to get a sunburn. Among older children, boys are more likely to cover their heads and girls are more likely to wear sunscreen. Regular sun protection among Canadian children is low, given their sun exposure. Heavy reliance on sunscreen is consistent with previous reports and indicates that other measures, such as seeking shade and wearing protective clothing, need to be promoted. Riskier sun behaviour among older children may reflect decreased parental control, as well as changing attitudes and peer pressure, and highlights the importance of adult role models and targeted interventions for this age group.

  19. Vitamin D Beliefs and Associations with Sunburns, Sun Exposure, and Sun Protection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bang Hyun; Glanz, Karen; Nehl, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine certain beliefs about vitamin D and associations with sun exposure, sun protection behaviors, and sunburns. A total of 3,922 lifeguards, pool managers, and parents completed a survey in 2006 about beliefs regarding vitamin D and sun-related behaviors. Multivariate ordinal regression analyses and linear regression analysis were used to examine associations of beliefs and other variables. Results revealed that Non-Caucasian lifeguards and pool managers were less likely to agree that they needed to go out in the sun to get enough vitamin D. Lifeguards and parents who were non-Caucasian were less likely to report that sunlight helped the body to produce vitamin D. A stronger belief about the need to go out in the sun to get enough vitamin D predicted more sun exposure for lifeguards. For parents, a stronger belief that they can get enough vitamin D from foods predicted greater sun protection and a stronger belief that sunlight helps the body produce vitamin D predicted lower sun exposure. This study provides information regarding vitamin D beliefs and their association with certain sun related behaviors across different demographic groups that can inform education efforts about vitamin D and sun protection. PMID:22851950

  20. On-board error correction improves IR earth sensor accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alex, T. K.; Kasturirangan, K.; Shrivastava, S. K.

    1989-10-01

    Infra-red earth sensors are used in satellites for attitude sensing. Their accuracy is limited by systematic and random errors. The sources of errors in a scanning infra-red earth sensor are analyzed in this paper. The systematic errors arising from seasonal variation of infra-red radiation, oblate shape of the earth, ambient temperature of sensor, changes in scan/spin rates have been analyzed. Simple relations are derived using least square curve fitting for on-board correction of these errors. Random errors arising out of noise from detector and amplifiers, instability of alignment and localized radiance anomalies are analyzed and possible correction methods are suggested. Sun and Moon interference on earth sensor performance has seriously affected a number of missions. The on-board processor detects Sun/Moon interference and corrects the errors on-board. It is possible to obtain eight times improvement in sensing accuracy, which will be comparable with ground based post facto attitude refinement.

  1. Sun exposure, sun protection and sunburn among Canadian adults.

    PubMed

    Pinault, Lauren; Fioletov, Vitali

    2017-05-17

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure and a history of sunburn are important risk factors for skin cancer. Sunburn is more common among men, younger age groups, and people in higher income households. Sun protection measures also vary by sex, age, and socioeconomic characteristics. Associations between ambient UVR and sunburn and sun safety measures have not been quantified. A total of 53,130 respondents aged 18 or older answered a Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) module on sun safety, which was administered in six provinces from 2005 to 2014. The module contained questions about sunburn, time in the sun, and sun protection. These respondents were linked to an ambient erythemal UVR dataset representing the June-to-August mean. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to examine associations between population characteristics, sunburn, sun safety, time in the sun, and ambient UVR. Sunburn was reported by 33% of respondents and was more common among men, younger age groups, people who were not members of visible minorities, residents of higher income households, and individuals who were employed. On a typical summer day, a larger percentage of women than men sought shade and wore sunscreen, whereas a larger percentage of men wore a hat or long pants. As ambient summer UVR increased, women were more likely to apply sunscreen to their face, seek shade, or wear a hat (OR~1.02 to 1.09 per increase of 187 J/m² of erythemally-weighted UVR, or 5.4% of the mean); these associations were not observed among men. Findings related to sunburn and sun protection were similar to those of previous studies. The association between ambient UVR and women's precautionary measures suggests that information about UVR may influence their decision to protect their skin.

  2. High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun: Hard X-Ray Balloon-Borne Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Apple, Jeff; StevensonChavis, Katherine; Dietz, Kurt; Holt, Marlon; Koehler, Heather; Lis, Tomasz; O'Connor, Brian; RodriquezOtero, Miguel; Pryor, Jonathan; hide

    2013-01-01

    Set to fly in the Fall of 2013 from Ft. Sumner, NM, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) mission is a collaborative effort between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Goddard Space Flight Center to upgrade an existing payload, the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope, to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES science payload consists of 8 mirror modules, housing a total of 109 grazing-incidence optics. These modules are mounted on a carbon-fiber - and Aluminum optical bench 6 m from a matching array of high pressure xenon gas scintillation proportional counters, which serve as the focal-plane detectors. The HERO gondola utilizes a differential GPS system (backed by a magnetometer) for coarse pointing in the azimuth and a shaft angle encoder plus inclinometer provides the coarse elevation. The HEROES payload will incorporate a new solar aspect system to supplement the existing star camera, for fine pointing during both the day and night. A mechanical shutter will be added to the star camera to protect it during solar observations. HEROES will also implement two novel alignment monitoring system that will measure the alignment between the optical bench and the star camera and between the optics and detectors for improved pointing and post-flight data reconstruction. The overall payload will also be discussed. This mission is funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist

  3. High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun: Hard X-ray balloon-borne telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskin, J.; Apple, J.; Chavis, K. S.; Dietz, K.; Holt, M.; Koehler, H.; Lis, T.; O'Connor, B.; Otero, M. R.; Pryor, J.; Ramsey, B.; Rinehart-Dawson, M.; Smith, L.; Sobey, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Christe, S.; Cramer, A.; Edgerton, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Shih, A.; Gregory, D.; Jasper, J.; Bohon, S.

    Set to fly in the Fall of 2013 from Ft. Sumner, NM, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) mission is a collaborative effort between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Goddard Space Flight Center to upgrade an existing payload, the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope, to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES science payload consists of 8 mirror modules, housing a total of 109 grazing-incidence optics. These modules are mounted on a carbon-fiber - and Aluminum optical bench 6 m from a matching array of high pressure xenon gas scintillation proportional counters, which serve as the focal-plane detectors. The HERO gondola utilizes a differential GPS system (backed by a magnetometer) for coarse pointing in the azimuth and a shaft angle encoder plus inclinometer provides the coarse elevation. The HEROES payload will incorporate a new solar aspect system to supplement the existing star camera, for fine pointing during both the day and night. A mechanical shutter will be added to the star camera to protect it during solar observations. HEROES will also implement two novel alignment monitoring system that will measure the alignment between the optical bench and the star camera and between the optics and detectors for improved pointing and post-flight data reconstruction. The overall payload will also be discussed. This mission is funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist.

  4. A high-precision CdS photodetector for sun sensor applications. [for Mariner Jupiter-Saturn flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, F. R.

    1975-01-01

    A sun detector developed for the Mariner Jupiter/Saturn mission is described. Redundant photopotentiometers for both pitch and yaw axes, positioned below slit apertures, provide spacecraft stabilization and biased operation over plus or minus 20-deg fields of view. The biased (off-sun) operation is required for pointing the 366-cm-diameter (spacecraft-fixed) radio antenna toward earth. Configuration and fabrication processes are presented, along with a summary of development history. Particular attention is given to the properties of cadmium sulfide as these affect adaptation to this application.

  5. Sunlight Intensity Based Global Positioning System for Near-Surface Underwater Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Javier V.; Sandnes, Frode E.; Fernández, Borja

    2012-01-01

    Water monitoring is important in domains including documenting climate change, weather prediction and fishing. This paper presents a simple and energy efficient localization strategy for near surface buoy based sensors. Sensors can be dropped randomly in the ocean and thus self-calibrate in terms of geographic location such that geo-tagged observations of water quality can be made without the need for costly and energy consuming GPS-hardware. The strategy is based on nodes with an accurate clock and light sensors that can regularly sample the level of light intensity. The measurements are fitted into a celestial model of the earth motion around the sun. By identifying the trajectory of the sun across the skies one can accurately determine sunrise and sunset times, and thus extract the longitude and latitude of the sensor. Unlike previous localization techniques for underwater sensors, the current approach does not rely on stationary or mobile reference points. PMID:22438746

  6. Sunlight intensity based global positioning system for near-surface underwater sensors.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Javier V; Sandnes, Frode E; Fernández, Borja

    2012-01-01

    Water monitoring is important in domains including documenting climate change, weather prediction and fishing. This paper presents a simple and energy efficient localization strategy for near surface buoy based sensors. Sensors can be dropped randomly in the ocean and thus self-calibrate in terms of geographic location such that geo-tagged observations of water quality can be made without the need for costly and energy consuming GPS-hardware. The strategy is based on nodes with an accurate clock and light sensors that can regularly sample the level of light intensity. The measurements are fitted into a celestial model of the earth motion around the sun. By identifying the trajectory of the sun across the skies one can accurately determine sunrise and sunset times, and thus extract the longitude and latitude of the sensor. Unlike previous localization techniques for underwater sensors, the current approach does not rely on stationary or mobile reference points.

  7. Sensor lighting considerations for earth observatory satellite missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooley, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Facets of sensor lighting conditions for Earth observatory satellite missions are considered. Assuming onboard sensors of a given width viewing perpendicular to the subsatellite ground track along sun-synchronous orbits with various nodes, the ground trace of the ends of the sensor coverage were found, as well as the variation in solar illumination on the ground across the line covered by the sensor during the day for any point along the orbit. The changes with season and variation during the year were also found.

  8. A Digital Solar Aspect Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albus, James S.

    1961-01-01

    The solar aspect sensor described herein performs the analog-to-digital conversion of data optically. To accomplish this, it uses a binary "Gray code" light mask to produce a digital indication, in vehicle-fixed coordinates, of the elevation and azimuth angles of incident light from the sun. This digital solar aspect sensor system, in Explorer X, provided measurements of both elevation and azimuth angles to +/- 2 degrees at a distance of over 140,000 statute miles.

  9. Sun: Friend and Foe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froschauer, Linda K.; Boudrot, Barbara

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the benefits and hazards that the sun provides. Describes activities which focus on the power of the sun and on the development of "Sun-sensible" behavior. Also included is a poster which contains puzzles and additional information and activities on safe sunning. (ML)

  10. Overview of the Miniature Sensor Technology Integration (MSTI) spacecraft attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, Rob

    1994-01-01

    Msti2 is a small, 164 kg (362 lb), 3-axis stabilized, low-Earth-orbiting satellite whose mission is missile booster tracking. The spacecraft is actuated by 3 reaction wheels and 12 hot gas thrusters. It carries enough fuel for a projected life of 6 months. The sensor complement consists of a Horizon Sensor, a Sun Sensor, low-rate gyros, and a high rate gyro for despin. The total pointing control error allocation is 6 mRad (.34 Deg), and this is while tracking a target on the Earth's surface. This paper describes the Attitude Control System (ACS) algorithms which include the following: attitude acquisition (despin, Sun and Earth acquisition), attitude determination, attitude control, and linear stability analysis.

  11. Personal, Seasonal Suns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutley, Jane

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an art project designed for upper-elementary students to (1) imagine visual differences in the sun's appearance during the four seasons; (2) develop ideas for visually translating their personal experiences regarding the seasons to their sun drawings; (3) create four distinctive seasonal suns using colors and imagery to…

  12. Sun and Skin: The Dark Side of Sun Exposure

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Print this issue Sun and Skin The Dark Side of Sun Exposure En español Send us ... says. Several factors—like cloudy days or having dark-colored skin—can reduce the amount of vitamin ...

  13. Project SunSHINE: A Student Based Solar Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, R.

    2000-12-01

    Eastchester Middle School (NY) is currently conducting an ongoing, interdisciplinary solar research program entitled Project SunSHINE, for Students Help Investigate Nature in Eastchester. Students are to determine how ultraviolet and visible light levels vary throughout the year at the school's geographic location, and to ascertain if any measured variations correlate to daily weather conditions or sunspot activity. The educational goal is to provide students the opportunity to conduct original and meaningful scientific research, while learning to work collaboratively with peers and teachers in accordance with national mathematics, science and technology standards. Project SunSHINE requires the student researchers to employ a number of technologies to collect and analyze data, including light sensors, astronomical imaging software, an onsite AirWatch Weather Station, Internet access to retrieve daily solar images from the National Solar Observatory's Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope, and two wide field telescopes for live sunspot observations. The program has been integrated into the science, mathematics, health and computer technology classes. Solar and weather datasets are emailed weekly to physicist Dr. Gil Yanow of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for inclusion in his global study of light levels. Dr. Yanow credited the Project SunSHINE student researchers last year for the discovery of an inverse relationship between relative humidity and ultraviolet light levels. The Journal News Golden Apple Awards named Project SunSHINE the 1999 New York Wired Applied Technology Award winner. This honor recognizes the year's outstanding educational technology program at both the elementary and secondary level, and included a grant of \\$20,000 to the research program. Teacher training and image processing software for Project SunSHINE has been supplied by The Use of Astronomy in Research Based Science Education (RBSE), a Teacher Enhancement Program funded by the National Science

  14. The Attitude Control System for the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Andrews, Stephen F.; ODonnell, James R., Jr.; Ward, David K.

    2003-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe mission produces a map of the cosmic microwave background radiation over the entire celestial sphere by executing a fast spin and a slow precession of its spin axis about the Sun line to obtain a highly interconnected set of measurements. The spacecraft attitude is sensed and controlled using an inertial reference unit, two star trackers, a digital sun sensor, twelve coarse sun sensors, three reaction wheel assemblies, and a propulsion system. Sufficient attitude knowledge is provided to yield instrument pointing to a standard deviation (l sigma) of 1.3 arc-minutes per axis. In addition, the spacecraft acquires and holds the sunline at initial acquisition and in the event of a failure, and slews to the proper orbit adjust orientations and to the proper off-sunline attitude to start the compound spin. This paper presents an overview of the design of the attitude control system to carry out this mission and presents some early flight experience.

  15. Coarse-graining and self-dissimilarity of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itzkovitz, Shalev; Levitt, Reuven; Kashtan, Nadav; Milo, Ron; Itzkovitz, Michael; Alon, Uri

    2005-01-01

    Can complex engineered and biological networks be coarse-grained into smaller and more understandable versions in which each node represents an entire pattern in the original network? To address this, we define coarse-graining units as connectivity patterns which can serve as the nodes of a coarse-grained network and present algorithms to detect them. We use this approach to systematically reverse-engineer electronic circuits, forming understandable high-level maps from incomprehensible transistor wiring: first, a coarse-grained version in which each node is a gate made of several transistors is established. Then the coarse-grained network is itself coarse-grained, resulting in a high-level blueprint in which each node is a circuit module made of many gates. We apply our approach also to a mammalian protein signal-transduction network, to find a simplified coarse-grained network with three main signaling channels that resemble multi-layered perceptrons made of cross-interacting MAP-kinase cascades. We find that both biological and electronic networks are “self-dissimilar,” with different network motifs at each level. The present approach may be used to simplify a variety of directed and nondirected, natural and designed networks.

  16. Structural alignment sensor. [laser applications and interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L.; Buholz, N. E.; Gillard, C. W.; Huang, C. C.; Wells, W. M., III

    1978-01-01

    Comparative Michelson interferometers are discussed as well as the operating range potential of a structural alignment sensor (SAS) which requires only one laser mode. Schematics are presented for the distance measurement logic, the basic SAS system, the SAS optical layout, the coarse measurement signal processor, and the measured range resolution.

  17. Sun Protection Practices and Sun Exposure among Children with a Parental History of Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Beth A.; Lin, Tiffany; Chang, L. Cindy; Okada, Ashley; Wong, Weng Kee; Glanz, Karen; Bastani, Roshan

    2014-01-01

    Background First-degree relatives of melanoma survivors have a substantially higher lifetime risk for melanoma than individuals with no family history. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is the primary modifiable risk factor for the disease. Reducing UV exposure through sun protection may be particularly important for children with a parental history of melanoma. Nonetheless, limited prior research has investigated sun protection practices and sun exposure among these children. Methods The California Cancer Registry was used to identify melanoma survivors eligible to participate in a survey to assess their children's sun protection practices and sun exposure. The survey was administered by mail, telephone, or web to Latino and non-Latino white melanoma survivors with at least one child (0–17 years; N = 324). Results Sun exposure was high and the rate of sunburn was equivalent to or higher than estimates from average risk populations. Use of sun protection was suboptimal. Latino children were less likely to wear sunscreen and hats and more likely to wear sunglasses, although these differences disappeared in adjusted analyses. Increasing age of the child was associated with lower sun protection and higher risk for sunburn whereas higher objective risk for melanoma predicted improved sun protection and a higher risk for sunburns. Perception of high barriers to sun protection was the strongest modifiable correlate of sun protection. Conclusions Interventions to improve sun protection and reduce sun exposure and sunburns in high risk children are needed. Impact Intervening in high risk populations may help reduce the burden of melanoma in the U.S. PMID:25587110

  18. Patterns of Variation for the Sun and Sun-like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radick, Richard R.; Lockwood, G. Wesley; Henry, Gregory W.; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2018-03-01

    We compare patterns of variation for the Sun and 72 Sun-like stars by combining total and spectral solar irradiance measurements between 2003 and 2017 from the SORCE satellite, Strömgren b, y stellar photometry between 1993 and 2017 from Fairborn Observatory, and solar and stellar chromospheric Ca II H+K emission observations between 1992 and 2016 from Lowell Observatory. The new data and their analysis strengthen the relationships found previously between chromospheric and brightness variability on the decadal timescale of the solar activity cycle. Both chromospheric H+K and photometric b, y variability among Sun-like stars are related to average chromospheric activity by power laws on this timescale. Young active stars become fainter as their H+K emission increases, and older, less active, more Sun-age stars tend to show a pattern of direct correlation between photometric and chromospheric emission variations. The directly correlated pattern between total solar irradiance and chromospheric Ca II emission variations shown by the Sun appears to extend also to variations in the Strömgren b, y portion of the solar spectrum. Although the Sun does not differ strongly from its stellar age and spectral class mates in the activity and variability characteristics that we have now studied for over three decades, it may be somewhat unusual in two respects: (1) its comparatively smooth, regular activity cycle, and (2) its rather low photometric brightness variation relative to its chromospheric activity level and variation, perhaps indicating that facular emission and sunspot darkening are especially well-balanced on the Sun.

  19. SUNBURN, SUN EXPOSURE, AND SUN SENSITIVITY IN THE STUDY OF NEVI IN CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Satagopan, Jaya M; Oliveria, Susan A; Arora, Arshi; Marchetti, Michael A; Orlow, Irene; Dusza, Stephen W; Weinstock, Martin A; Scope, Alon; Geller, Alan C; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Halpern, Allan C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the joint effect of sun exposure and sunburn on nevus counts (on the natural logarithm scale; log nevi) and the role of sun sensitivity. Methods We describe an analysis of cross-sectional data from 443 children enrolled in the prospective study of nevi in children. To evaluate the joint effect, we partitioned the sum of squares due to interaction between sunburn and sun exposure into orthogonal components representing: (i) monotonic increase in log nevi with increasing sun exposure (rate of increase of log nevi depends upon sunburn), and (ii) non-monotonic pattern. Results In unadjusted analyses, there was a marginally significant monotonic pattern of interaction (p-value = 0.08). In adjusted analyses, sun exposure was associated with higher log nevi among those without sunburn (p < 0.001), but not among those with sunburn (p = 0.14). Sunburn was independently associated with log nevi (p = 0.02), even though sun sensitivity explained 29% (95% CI: 2%-56%, p = 0.04) of its effect. Children with high sun sensitivity and sunburn had more nevi, regardless of sun exposure. Conclusions A program of increasing sun protection in early childhood as a strategy for reducing nevi, when applied to the general population, may not equally benefit everyone. PMID:26096189

  20. Sunburn, sun exposure, and sun sensitivity in the Study of Nevi in Children.

    PubMed

    Satagopan, Jaya M; Oliveria, Susan A; Arora, Arshi; Marchetti, Michael A; Orlow, Irene; Dusza, Stephen W; Weinstock, Martin A; Scope, Alon; Geller, Alan C; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Halpern, Allan C

    2015-11-01

    To examine the joint effect of sun exposure and sunburn on nevus counts (on the natural logarithm scale; log nevi) and the role of sun sensitivity. We describe an analysis of cross-sectional data from 443 children enrolled in the prospective Study of Nevi in Children. To evaluate the joint effect, we partitioned the sum of squares because of interaction between sunburn and sun exposure into orthogonal components representing (1) monotonic increase in log nevi with increasing sun exposure (rate of increase of log nevi depends on sunburn), and (2) nonmonotonic pattern. In unadjusted analyses, there was a marginally significant monotonic pattern of interaction (P = .08). In adjusted analyses, sun exposure was associated with higher log nevi among those without sunburn (P < .001), but not among those with sunburn (P = .14). Sunburn was independently associated with log nevi (P = .02), even though sun sensitivity explained 29% (95% confidence interval: 2%-56%, P = .04) of its effect. Children with high sun sensitivity and sunburn had more nevi, regardless of sun exposure. A program of increasing sun protection in early childhood as a strategy for reducing nevi, when applied to the general population, may not equally benefit everyone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Support requirements for remote sensor systems on unmanned planetary missions. Appendix A: Support requirement summary tables, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    An appendix containing one page summary tables of sensor observation objectives, measurement capabilities, support requirments, and worth values is presented. Tables are arranged according to (1) sensor type number, (2) flyby mission number, (3) for multi-planet missions, in order of increasing distance from the sun, (4) for orbiter mission, by planets in order of increasing distance from the sun, and (5) by orbit number.

  2. Creating a Sun-Safe Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landrey, Ann

    1996-01-01

    Strategies for minimizing sun exposure of campers and staff include educating campers about the sun's effect on their skin, scheduling activities when the sun is less intense, creating shade at the camp site, incorporating sun protection into camp dress code, and training staff regarding sun protection. Addresses OSHA and liability issues. (LP)

  3. [Intervention of coarse cereals on lipid metabolism in rats].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanbo; Zhai, Chengkai; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Qun; Ding, Zhoubo; Jin, Xin

    2010-03-01

    To observe the effect of coarse cereals on improving the disorder of lipid metabolism and the expression of PPARgamma mRNA in white adipose tissue in rats to investigate the mechanism of coarse cereals on lipid metabolism disorder. Forty four SPF rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: the negative control group was fed with normal diet and 3 experimental groups were fed with high-fat modeling diet for 6 weeks for model building. The 3 experimental groups, the coarse cereals group,rice-flour group and the hyperlipemia model group, were then fed with coarse cereals high-fat diet,rice-flour high-diet and high-fat modeling diet respectively for another 15 weeks. Compared with the hyperlipemia modeling group, serum TG, TC, IL-6 and TNF-alpha in the coarse cereals group were declined significantly (P < 0.05), serum HDL-C in coarse cereals group was higher than that in rice-flour group and hyperlipemia model group (P < 0.05), LPL, HL and TNF-alpha in coarse cereal group were close to the negative control group. Moreover, the expression of PPAR-gamma mRNA in white adipose tissue of the coarse cereals group was higher than other groups. The coarse cereals could activate PPARgamma and enhance the activity of key enzymes in lipids metabolism, so as to reduce the level of TG relieve inflammation and improve lipid dysmetabolism eventually.

  4. An automated method for the evaluation of the pointing accuracy of sun-tracking devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Dietmar J.; Rieder, Harald E.; Pötzi, Werner; Freislich, Heinrich; Strutzmann, Heinz

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy of measurements of solar radiation (direct and diffuse radiation) depends significantly on the accuracy of the operational sun-tracking device. Thus rigid targets for instrument performance and operation are specified for international monitoring networks, such as e.g., the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) operating under the auspices of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP). Sun-tracking devices fulfilling these accuracy targets are available from various instrument manufacturers, however none of the commercially available systems comprises a secondary accuracy control system, allowing platform operators to independently validate the pointing accuracy of sun-tracking sensors during operation. Here we present KSO-STREAMS (KSO-SunTRackEr Accuracy Monitoring System), a fully automated, system independent and cost-effective method for evaluating the pointing accuracy of sun-tracking devices. We detail the monitoring system setup, its design and specifications and results from its application to the sun-tracking system operated at the Austrian RADiation network (ARAD) site Kanzelhöhe Observatory (KSO). Results from KSO-STREAMS (for mid-March to mid-June 2015) show that the tracking accuracy of the device operated at KSO lies well within BSRN specifications (i.e. 0.1 degree accuracy). We contrast results during clear-sky and partly cloudy conditions documenting sun-tracking performance at manufacturer specified accuracies for active tracking (0.02 degrees) and highlight accuracies achieved during passive tracking i.e. periods with less than 300 W m-2 direct radiation. Furthermore we detail limitations to tracking surveillance during overcast conditions and periods of partial solar limb coverage by clouds.

  5. Source identification of coarse particles in the Desert ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Desert Southwest Coarse Particulate Matter Study was undertaken to further our understanding of the spatial and temporal variability and sources of fine and coarse particulate matter (PM) in rural, arid, desert environments. Sampling was conducted between February 2009 and February 2010 in Pinal County, AZ near the town of Casa Grande where PM concentrations routinely exceed the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for both PM10 and PM2.5. In this desert region, exceedances of the PM10 NAAQS are dominated by high coarse particle concentrations, a common occurrence in this region of the United States. This work expands on previously published measurements of PM mass and chemistry by examining the sources of fine and coarse particles and the relative contribution of each to ambient PM mass concentrations using the Positive Matrix Factorization receptor model (Clements et al., 2014). Highlights • Isolation of coarse particles from fine particle sources. • Unique chemical composition of coarse particles. • Role of primary biological particles on aerosol loadings.

  6. SunBlock '99: Young Scientists Investigate the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. W.; Pike, C. D.; Mason, H.; Young, P.; Ireland, J.; Galsgaard, K.

    1999-10-01

    SunBlock `99 is a Web-based Public Understanding of Science and educational project which seeks to present the very latest solar research as seen through the eyes of young British scientists. These ``solar guides'' discuss not only their scientific interests, but also their extra-curricular activities and the reasons they chose scientific careers; in other words the human face of scientific research. The SunBlock '99 pages gather a range of solar images and movies from current solar space observatories and discuss the underlying physics and its relationship to the school curriculum. The instructional level is pitched at UK secondary school children (aged 13-16 years). It is intended that the material should not only provide a visually appealing introduction to the study of the Sun, but that it should help bridge the often wide gap between classroom science lessons and the research scientist `out in the field'. SunBlock '99 is managed by a team from the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the Universities of St Andrews and Cambridge, together with educational consultants. The production has, in part, been sponsored by PPARC and the Millennium Mathematics Project. Web site addresss: http://www.sunblock99.org.uk

  7. Internal reflection sensors with high angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavirin, I.; Strelkov, O.; Vetskous, A.; Norton-Wayne, L.; Harwood, R.

    1996-07-01

    We discuss the use of total internal reflection for the production of sensors with high angular resolution. These sensors are intended for measurement of the angle between a sensor's axis and the direction to a source of radiation or reflecting object. Sensors of this type are used in controlling the position of machine parts in robotics and industry, orienting space vehicles and astronomic devices in relation to the Sun, and as autocollimators for checking angles of deviation. This kind of sensor was used in the Apollo space vehicle some 20 years ago. Using photodetectors with linear and area CCD arrays has opened up new application possibilities for appropriately designed sensors. A generalized methodology is presented applicable to a wide range of tasks. Some modifications that can improve the performance of the basic design are described.

  8. Column-integrated aerosol optical properties of coarse- and fine-mode particles over the Pearl River Delta region in China.

    PubMed

    Mai, B; Deng, X; Xia, X; Che, H; Guo, J; Liu, X; Zhu, J; Ling, C

    2018-05-01

    The sun-photometer data from 2011 to 2013 at Panyu site (Panyu) and from 2007 to 2013 at Dongguan site (Dg) in the Pearl River Delta region, were used for the retrieving of the aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), Ångström exponent (AE) and volume size distribution of coarse- and fine-mode particles. The coarse-mode particles presented low AOD (ranging from 0.05±0.03 to 0.08±0.05) but a strong absorption property (SSA ranged from 0.70±0.03 to 0.90±0.02) for the wavelengths between 440 and 1020nm. However, these coarse particles accounted for <10% of the total particles. The AOD of fine particles (AODf) was over 3 times as large as that of coarse particles (AODc). The fine particles SSA (SSAf) generally decreased as a function of wavelength, and the relatively lower SSAf value in summer was likely to be due to the stronger solar radiation and higher temperature. More than 70% of the aerosols at Panyu site were dominated by fine-mode absorbing particles, whereas about 70% of the particles at Dg site were attributed to fine-mode scattering particles. The differences of the aerosol optical properties between the two sites are likely associated with local emissions of the light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols and the scattering aerosols (e.g., sulfate and nitrate particles) caused by the gas-phase oxidation of gaseous precursors (e.g., SO 2 and NO 2 ). The size distribution exhibited bimodal structures in which the accumulation mode was predominant. The fine-mode volume showed positive dependence on AOD (500nm), and the growth of peak value of the fine-mode volume was higher than that of the coarse volume. Both the AOD and SSA increased with increasing relative humidity (RH), while the AE decreased with increasing RH. These correlations imply that the aerosol properties are greatly modified by condensation growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Highly Coarse-Grained Representations of Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Numerous biomolecules and biomolecular complexes, including transmembrane proteins (TMPs), are symmetric or at least have approximate symmetries. Highly coarse-grained models of such biomolecules, aiming at capturing the essential structural and dynamical properties on resolution levels coarser than the residue scale, must preserve the underlying symmetry. However, making these models obey the correct physics is in general not straightforward, especially at the highly coarse-grained resolution where multiple (∼3–30 in the current study) amino acid residues are represented by a single coarse-grained site. In this paper, we propose a simple and fast method of coarse-graining TMPs obeying this condition. The procedure involves partitioning transmembrane domains into contiguous segments of equal length along the primary sequence. For the coarsest (lowest-resolution) mappings, it turns out to be most important to satisfy the symmetry in a coarse-grained model. As the resolution is increased to capture more detail, however, it becomes gradually more important to match modular repeats in the secondary structure (such as helix-loop repeats) instead. A set of eight TMPs of various complexity, functionality, structural topology, and internal symmetry, representing different classes of TMPs (ion channels, transporters, receptors, adhesion, and invasion proteins), has been examined. The present approach can be generalized to other systems possessing exact or approximate symmetry, allowing for reliable and fast creation of multiscale, highly coarse-grained mappings of large biomolecular assemblies. PMID:28043122

  10. Design of a Solar Tracking System Using the Brightest Region in the Sky Image Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ching-Chuan; Song, Yu-Chang; Chang, Chia-Chi; Lin, Chuan-Bi

    2016-01-01

    Solar energy is certainly an energy source worth exploring and utilizing because of the environmental protection it offers. However, the conversion efficiency of solar energy is still low. If the photovoltaic panel perpendicularly tracks the sun, the solar energy conversion efficiency will be improved. In this article, we propose an innovative method to track the sun using an image sensor. In our method, it is logical to assume the points of the brightest region in the sky image representing the location of the sun. Then, the center of the brightest region is assumed to be the solar-center, and is mathematically calculated using an embedded processor (Raspberry Pi). Finally, the location information on the sun center is sent to the embedded processor to control two servo motors that are capable of moving both horizontally and vertically to track the sun. In comparison with the existing sun tracking methods using image sensors, such as the Hough transform method, our method based on the brightest region in the sky image remains accurate under conditions such as a sunny day and building shelter. The practical sun tracking system using our method was implemented and tested. The results reveal that the system successfully captured the real sun center in most weather conditions, and the servo motor system was able to direct the photovoltaic panel perpendicularly to the sun center. In addition, our system can be easily and practically integrated, and can operate in real-time. PMID:27898002

  11. Design of a Solar Tracking System Using the Brightest Region in the Sky Image Sensor.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ching-Chuan; Song, Yu-Chang; Chang, Chia-Chi; Lin, Chuan-Bi

    2016-11-25

    Solar energy is certainly an energy source worth exploring and utilizing because of the environmental protection it offers. However, the conversion efficiency of solar energy is still low. If the photovoltaic panel perpendicularly tracks the sun, the solar energy conversion efficiency will be improved. In this article, we propose an innovative method to track the sun using an image sensor. In our method, it is logical to assume the points of the brightest region in the sky image representing the location of the sun. Then, the center of the brightest region is assumed to be the solar-center, and is mathematically calculated using an embedded processor (Raspberry Pi). Finally, the location information on the sun center is sent to the embedded processor to control two servo motors that are capable of moving both horizontally and vertically to track the sun. In comparison with the existing sun tracking methods using image sensors, such as the Hough transform method, our method based on the brightest region in the sky image remains accurate under conditions such as a sunny day and building shelter. The practical sun tracking system using our method was implemented and tested. The results reveal that the system successfully captured the real sun center in most weather conditions, and the servo motor system was able to direct the photovoltaic panel perpendicularly to the sun center. In addition, our system can be easily and practically integrated, and can operate in real-time.

  12. Aztec Suns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    The Aztec Sun Stone is a revered Mexican artifact. It is said to be perhaps the most famous symbol of Mexico, besides its flag. It primarily depicts the four great disasters that led to the migration of the Mexica people to modern-day Mexico City. The Aztec Sun Stone also contains pictographs depicting the way the Mexica measured time, and was…

  13. Robust Multi Sensor Classification via Jointly Sparse Representation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-14

    rank, sensor network, dictionary learning REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) ARO 8...with ultrafast laser pulses, Optics Express, (04 2015): 10521. doi: Xiaoxia Sun, Nasser M. Nasrabadi, Trac D. Tran. Task-Driven Dictionary Learning...in dictionary design, compressed sensors design, and optimization in sparse recovery also helps. We are able to advance the state of the art

  14. Sun protection counseling by pediatricians has little effect on parent and child sun protection behavior.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Liza; Brown, Judith; Haukness, Heather; Walsh, Lori; Robinson, June K

    2013-02-01

    To compare counseling concerning sun protection and outdoor exercise with the parent's report of the behavior of a child aged 9-16 years old. Structured interviews of medical personnel in 3 Chicago area practices elicited information about counseling methods and recommendations. In each practice, a convenience sample of parents completed a self-reported survey of their and their child's behavior. Sun protection counseling occurred more frequently than exercise counseling in all practices (P = .014). Sun protection counseling was associated with parental prompting (P = .004), performing a summer camp physical (P = .002), and the child having a sunburn (P = .003). After controlling for the child's age, sex, and skin tone, sun protection counseling was not associated with the child's use of sun protection. In multivariate analysis of the child's sun protection behavior, parental sunburns, indoor tanning in the last 12 months, perception of skin cancer risk, and sun protection self-efficacy were significant (P = .02). Children who pursued outdoor sports were twice as likely to use inadequate sun protection and sustain sunburns (CI 1.3-1.7). The child's sun protection behavior was influenced by parental sun protection, parental perception of skin cancer risk, and parental sun protection self-efficacy; therefore, sun protection for children needs to be aimed at parents as well as children. Communication with parents in a way that incorporates the principles of motivational interviewing may be more effective in promoting behavioral change than admonitions to use sunscreen. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Work-time sun behaviours among Canadian outdoor workers: results from the 2006 National Sun Survey.

    PubMed

    Marrett, Loraine D; Pichora, Erin C; Costa, Michelle L

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to describe summer work-related sun behaviours among Canadian outdoor workers. Information on time in the sun and sun protection practices at work during the summer of 2006 were collected from 1,337 outdoor workers aged 16-64 years as part of the Second National Sun Survey. Proportions (and 95% confidence intervals) were estimated using procedures appropriate for complex survey designs. Twenty-six percent of all Canadians, 39% of males and 33% of those aged 16-24 years work outdoors during the summer. Although 41% spend four or more hours daily in the sun at work, just over half always or often protect themselves by covering their heads (58%), wearing protective clothing (56%) or wearing sunglasses (54%), and only 29% use sunscreen. Males and those aged 16-24 spend the most work time in the sun but are the least likely to use protection. The prevalence of outdoor work and sun behaviours varies among regions. Study findings confirm the need for strategies to reduce time in the sun and increase the use of sun protection among outdoor workers. In order to be effective, these strategies must include both enhanced workplace policies and practice, and increased individual use of sun protection.

  16. Quantum theory of multiscale coarse-graining.

    PubMed

    Han, Yining; Jin, Jaehyeok; Wagner, Jacob W; Voth, Gregory A

    2018-03-14

    Coarse-grained (CG) models serve as a powerful tool to simulate molecular systems at much longer temporal and spatial scales. Previously, CG models and methods have been built upon classical statistical mechanics. The present paper develops a theory and numerical methodology for coarse-graining in quantum statistical mechanics, by generalizing the multiscale coarse-graining (MS-CG) method to quantum Boltzmann statistics. A rigorous derivation of the sufficient thermodynamic consistency condition is first presented via imaginary time Feynman path integrals. It identifies the optimal choice of CG action functional and effective quantum CG (qCG) force field to generate a quantum MS-CG (qMS-CG) description of the equilibrium system that is consistent with the quantum fine-grained model projected onto the CG variables. A variational principle then provides a class of algorithms for optimally approximating the qMS-CG force fields. Specifically, a variational method based on force matching, which was also adopted in the classical MS-CG theory, is generalized to quantum Boltzmann statistics. The qMS-CG numerical algorithms and practical issues in implementing this variational minimization procedure are also discussed. Then, two numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the method. Finally, as an alternative strategy, a quasi-classical approximation for the thermal density matrix expressed in the CG variables is derived. This approach provides an interesting physical picture for coarse-graining in quantum Boltzmann statistical mechanics in which the consistency with the quantum particle delocalization is obviously manifest, and it opens up an avenue for using path integral centroid-based effective classical force fields in a coarse-graining methodology.

  17. Effect of fly ash on the strength of porous concrete using recycled coarse aggregate to replace low-quality natural coarse aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifi, Eva; Cahya, Evi Nur; Christin Remayanti, N.

    2017-09-01

    The performance of porous concrete made of recycled coarse aggregate was investigated. Fly ash was used as cement partial replacement. In this study, the strength of recycled aggregate was coMPared to low quality natural coarse aggregate which has high water absorption. Compression strength and tensile splitting strength test were conducted to evaluate the performance of porous concrete using fly ash as cement replacement. Results have shown that the utilization of recycled coarse aggregate up to 75% to replace low quality natural coarse aggregate with high water absorption increases compressive strength and splitting tensile strength of porous concrete. Using fly ash up to 25% as cement replacement improves compressive strength and splitting tensile strength of porous concrete.

  18. The Sun in Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.

    1998-01-01

    The presentation will include slides and documentation concerning archaeological sites where observations of the Sun may have taken place, as well as a discussion of the role the Sun played in the lives of the ancients. We will complete our discussion by contrasting ancient ideas of the Sun with those of the current era.

  19. Sun compensation by bees.

    PubMed

    Gould, J L

    1980-02-01

    In both their navigation and dance communication, bees are able to compensate for the sun's movement. When foragers are prevented from seeing the sun for 2 hours, they compensate by extrapolation, using the sun's rate of movement when last observed. These and other data suggest a time-averaging processing strategy in honey bee orientation.

  20. Seasons by the Sun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Meri-Lyn

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the Sun has challenged people since ancient times. Mythology from the Greek, Inuit, and Inca cultures attempted to explain the daily appearance and nightly disappearance of the Sun by relating it to a chariot being chased across the sky. While people no longer believe the Sun is a chariot racing across the sky, teachers are still…

  1. Resolution of the COBE Earth sensor anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedler, J.

    1993-01-01

    Since its launch on November 18, 1989, the Earth sensors on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) have shown much greater noise than expected. The problem was traced to an error in Earth horizon acquisition-of-signal (AOS) times. Due to this error, the AOS timing correction was ignored, causing Earth sensor split-to-index (SI) angles to be incorrectly time-tagged to minor frame synchronization times. Resulting Earth sensor residuals, based on gyro-propagated fine attitude solutions, were as large as plus or minus 0.45 deg (much greater than plus or minus 0.10 deg from scanner specifications (Reference 1)). Also, discontinuities in single-frame coarse attitude pitch and roll angles (as large as 0.80 and 0.30 deg, respectively) were noted several times during each orbit. However, over the course of the mission, each Earth sensor was observed to independently and unexpectedly reset and then reactivate into a new configuration. Although the telemetered AOS timing corrections are still in error, a procedure has been developed to approximate and apply these corrections. This paper describes the approach, analysis, and results of approximating and applying AOS timing adjustments to correct Earth scanner data. Furthermore, due to the continuing degradation of COBE's gyroscopes, gyro-propagated fine attitude solutions may soon become unavailable, requiring an alternative method for attitude determination. By correcting Earth scanner AOS telemetry, as described in this paper, more accurate single-frame attitude solutions are obtained. All aforementioned pitch and roll discontinuities are removed. When proper AOS corrections are applied, the standard deviation of pitch residuals between coarse attitude and gyro-propagated fine attitude solutions decrease by a factor of 3. Also, the overall standard deviation of SI residuals from fine attitude solutions decrease by a factor of 4 (meeting sensor specifications) when AOS corrections are applied.

  2. Sun-Earth Scientists and Native Americans Collaborate on Sun-Earth Day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y.; Lopez, R. E.; Hawkins, I.

    2004-12-01

    Sun-Earth Connection scientists have established partnerships with several minority professional societies to reach out to the blacks, Hispanics and Native American students. Working with NSBP, SACNAS, AISES and NSHP, SEC scientists were able to speak in their board meetings and national conferences, to network with minority scientists, and to engage them in Sun-Earth Day. Through these opportunities and programs, scientists have introduced NASA research results as well indigenous views of science. They also serve as role models in various communities. Since the theme for Sun-Earth Day 2005 is Ancient Observatories: Timeless Knowledge, scientists and education specialists are hopeful to excite many with diverse backgrounds. Sun-Earth Day is a highly visible annual program since 2001 that touches millions of students and the general public. Interviews, classroom activities and other education resources are available on the web at sunearthday.nasa.gov.

  3. Gradient Sun [still

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    To view a video of the Gradient Sun go to: www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/8103212817 Looking at a particularly beautiful image of the sun helps show how the lines between science and art can sometimes blur. But there is more to the connection between the two disciplines: science and art techniques are often quite similar, indeed one may inform the other or be improved based on lessons from the other arena. One such case is a technique known as a "gradient filter" – recognizable to many people as an option available on a photo-editing program. Gradients are, in fact, a mathematical description that highlights the places of greatest physical change in space. A gradient filter, in turn, enhances places of contrast, making them all the more obviously different, a useful tool when adjusting photos. Scientists, too, use gradient filters to enhance contrast, using them to accentuate fine structures that might otherwise be lost in the background noise. On the sun, for example, scientists wish to study a phenomenon known as coronal loops, which are giant arcs of solar material constrained to travel along that particular path by the magnetic fields in the sun's atmosphere. Observations of the loops, which can be more or less tangled and complex during different phases of the sun's 11-year activity cycle, can help researchers understand what's happening with the sun's complex magnetic fields, fields that can also power great eruptions on the sun such as solar flares or coronal mass ejections. The still here shows an unfiltered image from the sun next to one that has been processed using a gradient filter. Note how the coronal loops are sharp and defined, making them all the more easy to study. On the other hand, gradients also make great art. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center To download this video go to: svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11112 NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics

  4. Characterization of coarse particulate matter in school gyms

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Branis, Martin, E-mail: branis@natur.cuni.cz; Safranek, Jiri

    2011-05-15

    We investigated the mass concentration, mineral composition and morphology of particles resuspended by children during scheduled physical education in urban, suburban and rural elementary school gyms in Prague (Czech Republic). Cascade impactors were deployed to sample the particulate matter. Two fractions of coarse particulate matter (PM{sub 10-2.5} and PM{sub 2.5-1.0}) were characterized by gravimetry, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. Two indicators of human activity, the number of exercising children and the number of physical education hours, were also recorded. Lower mass concentrations of coarse particulate matter were recorded outdoors (average PM{sub 10-2.5} 4.1-7.4 {mu}g m{sup -3} andmore » PM{sub 2.5-1.0} 2.0-3.3 {mu}g m{sup -3}) than indoors (average PM{sub 10-2.5} 13.6-26.7 {mu}g m{sup -3} and PM{sub 2.5-1.0} 3.7-7.4 {mu}g m{sup -3}). The indoor concentrations of coarse aerosol were elevated during days with scheduled physical education with an average indoor-outdoor (I/O) ratio of 2.5-16.3 for the PM{sub 10-2.5} and 1.4-4.8 for the PM{sub 2.5-1.0} values. Under extreme conditions, the I/O ratios reached 180 (PM{sub 10-2.5}) and 19.1 (PM{sub 2.5-1.0}). The multiple regression analysis based on the number of students and outdoor coarse PM as independent variables showed that the main predictor of the indoor coarse PM concentrations is the number of students in the gym. The effect of outdoor coarse PM was weak and inconsistent. The regression models for the three schools explained 60-70% of the particular dataset variability. X-ray spectrometry revealed 6 main groups of minerals contributing to resuspended indoor dust. The most abundant particles were those of crustal origin composed of Si, Al, O and Ca. Scanning electron microscopy showed that, in addition to numerous inorganic particles, various types of fibers and particularly skin scales make up the main part of the resuspended dust in the gyms. In conclusion

  5. Photometer Tracks The Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, Tak; Mina, Cesar; Russell, Philip; Van Ark, William

    1988-01-01

    Airborne Sun-tracking photometer enables observations of Sun during much greater portion of flights than previously possible, without special maneuvers of airplane. Instrument occupies dome atop airplane. Fiberglass dome protects photometer and rotates to aim photometer in azimuth and elevation to track Sun. Provides controlled environment for instrument, including mechanical and electronic parts. Instrument calibrated without removing it from airplane.

  6. Guaranteeing Pointing Performance of the SDO Sun-Pointing Controllers in Light of Nonlinear Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starin, Scott R.; Bourkland, Kristin L.

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission is the first Space Weather Research Network mission, part of NASA s Living With a Star program.1 This program seeks to understand the changing Sun and its effects on the Solar System, life, and society. To this end, the SDO spacecraft will carry three Sun-observing instruments to geosynchronous orbit: Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), led by Stanford University; Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), led by Lockheed Martin Space and Astrophysics Laboratory; and Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE), led by the University of Colorado. Links describing the instruments in detail may be found through the SDO web site.2 The basic mission goals are to observe the Sun for a very high percentage of the 5-year mission (10-year goal) with long stretches of uninterrupted observations and with constant, high-data-rate transmission to a dedicated ground station. These goals guided the design of the spacecraft bus that will carry and service the three-instrument payload. At the time of this publication, the SDO spacecraft bus is well into the integration and testing phase at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). A three-axis stabilized attitude control system (ACS) is needed both to point at the Sun accurately and to keep the roll about the Sun vector correctly positioned. The ACS has four reaction wheel modes and 2 thruster actuated modes. More details about the ACS in general and the control modes in particular can be found in Refs. [3-6]. All four of SDO s wheel-actuated control modes involve Sun-pointing controllers, as might be expected from such a mission. Science mode, during which most science data is collected, uses specialized guide telescopes to point accurately at the Sun. Inertial mode has two sub-modes, one tracks a Sun-referenced target orientation, and another maintains an absolute (star-referenced) target orientation, that both employ a Kalman filter to process data from a digital Sun sensor and

  7. Child sun protection: sun-related attitudes mediate the association between children's knowledge and behaviours.

    PubMed

    Wright, Caradee; Reeder, Anthony I; Gray, Andrew; Cox, Brian

    2008-12-01

    To describe and investigate the relationship among the sun-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of New Zealand primary schoolchildren and consider the roles of sex and school year level. A randomly selected, two-stage cluster sample of 488 children from 27 primary schools in five regions of New Zealand was surveyed regarding their sun-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviours. A scoring system was used to assign a knowledge, attitude and behaviour score to each child. Although knowledge increased with school year level, there was a decline in sun protective attitudes and behaviours. There was little variation in knowledge, attitudes and behaviour between boys and girls, but sex-year level interactions were found for knowledge and behaviour. When considering children's knowledge, attitudes and behaviours simultaneously, knowledge was only significantly associated with behaviours when mediated by attitudes. When targeting child sun protection and skin cancer prevention programmes, a focus on attitudes towards sun exposure and a suntan may prove beneficial in influencing sun-related behaviours.

  8. Optical technologies for space sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Liu, Jie; Xue, Yaoke; Liu, Yang; Liu, Meiying; Wang, Lingguang; Yang, Shaodong; Lin, Shangmin; Chen, Su; Luo, Jianjun

    2015-10-01

    Space sensors are used in navigation sensor fields. The sun, the earth, the moon and other planets are used as frame of reference to obtain stellar position coordinates, and then to control the attitude of an aircraft. Being the "eyes" of the space sensors, Optical sensor system makes images of the infinite far stars and other celestial bodies. It directly affects measurement accuracy of the space sensor, indirectly affecting the data updating rate. Star sensor technology is the pilot for Space sensors. At present more and more attention is paid on all-day star sensor technology. By day and night measurements of the stars, the aircraft's attitude in the inertial coordinate system can be provided. Facing the requirements of ultra-high-precision, large field of view, wide spectral range, long life and high reliability, multi-functional optical system, we integration, integration optical sensors will be future space technology trends. In the meantime, optical technologies for space-sensitive research leads to the development of ultra-precision optical processing, optical and precision test machine alignment technology. It also promotes the development of long-life optical materials and applications. We have achieved such absolute distortion better than ±1um, Space life of at least 15years of space-sensitive optical system.

  9. AOT Retrieval Procedure for Distributed Measurements With Low-Cost Sun Photometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, F.; Garrido, C.; Díaz, M.; Rondanelli, R.; Jorquera, S.; Valdivieso, P.

    2018-01-01

    We propose a new application of inexpensive light-emitting diode (LED)-based Sun photometers, consisting of measuring the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) with high resolution within metropolitan scales. Previously, these instruments have been used at continental scales by the GLOBE program, but this extension is already covered by more expensive and higher-precision instruments of the AERONET global network. For this we built an open source two-channeled LED-based Sun photometer based on previous developments, with improvements in the hardware, software, and modifications on the calibration procedure. Among these we highlight the use of MODTRAN to characterize the effect introduced by using LED sensors in the AOT retrieval, an open design available for the scientific community and a calibration procedure that takes advantage of a CIMEL Sun photometer located within the city, enables the intercomparison of several LED Sun photometers with a common reference. We estimated the root-mean-square error in the AOT retrieved by the prototypes as 0.006 at the 564 nm and 0.009 at the 408 nm. This error is way under the magnitude of the AOT daily cycle variability measured by us in our campaigns, even for distances closer than 15 km. In addition to inner city campaigns, we also show aerosol-tracing applications by measuring AOT variations from the city of Santiago to the Andes glaciers. Measuring AOT at high spatial resolution in urban areas can improve our understanding of urban scale aerosol circulation, providing information for solar energy planning, health policies, and climatological studies, among others.

  10. Sun Glint and Sea Surface Salinity Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; LeVine, David M.

    2007-01-01

    A new mission in space, called Aquarius/SAC-D, is being built to measure the salinity of the world's oceans. Salinity is an important parameter for understanding movement of the ocean water. This circulation results in the transportation of heat and is important for understanding climate and climate change. Measuring salinity from space requires precise instruments and a careful accounting for potential sources of error. One of these sources of error is radiation from the sun that is reflected from the ocean surface to the sensor in space. This paper examines this reflected radiation and presents an advanced model for describing this effect that includes the effects of ocean waves on the reflection.

  11. Mercury Transit Across the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-09

    On May 9, 2016, Mercury passed directly between the Sun and Earth, making a transit of the Sun. Mercury transits happen about 13 times each century. NASA SDO studies the Sun 24/7 and captured the eight-hour event.

  12. Interlaced coarse-graining for the dynamical cluster approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haehner, Urs; Staar, Peter; Jiang, Mi; Maier, Thomas; Schulthess, Thomas

    The negative sign problem remains a challenging limiting factor in quantum Monte Carlo simulations of strongly correlated fermionic many-body systems. The dynamical cluster approximation (DCA) makes this problem less severe by coarse-graining the momentum space to map the bulk lattice to a cluster embedded in a dynamical mean-field host. Here, we introduce a new form of an interlaced coarse-graining and compare it with the traditional coarse-graining. We show that it leads to more controlled results with weaker cluster shape and smoother cluster size dependence, which with increasing cluster size converge to the results obtained using the standard coarse-graining. In addition, the new coarse-graining reduces the severity of the fermionic sign problem. Therefore, it enables calculations on much larger clusters and can allow the evaluation of the exact infinite cluster size result via finite size scaling. To demonstrate this, we study the hole-doped two-dimensional Hubbard model and show that the interlaced coarse-graining in combination with the DCA+ algorithm permits the determination of the superconducting Tc on cluster sizes, for which the results can be fitted with the Kosterlitz-Thouless scaling law. This research used resources of the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) awarded by the INCITE program, and of the Swiss National Supercomputing Center. OLCF is a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  13. Evaluation of various coarse aggregate concretes : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1983-10-01

    This study was initiated to determine the properties of concrete using three types of coarse aggregate. The coarse aggregates evaluated in this study included silicious gravel, the standard aggregate for concrete in the state, with sandstone and lime...

  14. Orbit-attitude coupled motion around small bodies: Sun-synchronous orbits with Sun-tracking attitude motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Shota; Howell, Kathleen C.; Tsuda, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro

    2017-11-01

    The motion of a spacecraft in proximity to a small body is significantly perturbed due to its irregular gravity field and solar radiation pressure. In such a strongly perturbed environment, the coupling effect of the orbital and attitude motions exerts a large influence that cannot be neglected. However, natural orbit-attitude coupled dynamics around small bodies that are stationary in both orbital and attitude motions have yet to be observed. The present study therefore investigates natural coupled motion that involves both a Sun-synchronous orbit and Sun-tracking attitude motion. This orbit-attitude coupled motion enables a spacecraft to maintain its orbital geometry and attitude state with respect to the Sun without requiring active control. Therefore, the proposed method can reduce the use of an orbit and attitude control system. This paper first presents analytical conditions to achieve Sun-synchronous orbits and Sun-tracking attitude motion. These analytical solutions are then numerically propagated based on non-linear coupled orbit-attitude equations of motion. Consequently, the possibility of implementing Sun-synchronous orbits with Sun-tracking attitude motion is demonstrated.

  15. SunSmart: evaluation of a pilot school-based sun protection intervention in Hispanic early adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Miller, K. A.; Langholz, B. M.; Ly, T.; Harris, S. C.; Richardson, J. L.; Peng, D. H.; Cockburn, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma is rising among Hispanic populations in the United States. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of a pilot sun safety educational intervention conducted from 2006 to 2012 on Hispanic early adolescents in a high ultraviolet environment. Nineteen schools with high Hispanic enrollment were recruited from urban neighborhoods in Los Angeles. The analytic sample was restricted to students identifying as Hispanic or Latino (n = 777). A mixed effects linear model was used to test mean changes from pre- to posttest on students’ sun protection knowledge, attitudes and behaviors. Significant improvements were observed across several cognitive outcomes related to sun protection, including knowledge of and attitudes toward sun protection and self-efficacy to wear sunscreen. However, changes in sun protective behaviors were not achieved. Although some improvements were observed, future studies should identify the factors that motivate sun protection in this population and develop tailored prevention strategies, as improving the sun safe behaviors of Hispanic youths may aid in reducing the risk of melanoma in adulthood in this population. PMID:25801103

  16. Effective Fingerprint Quality Estimation for Diverse Capture Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shan Juan; Yoon, Sook; Shin, Jinwook; Park, Dong Sun

    2010-01-01

    Recognizing the quality of fingerprints in advance can be beneficial for improving the performance of fingerprint recognition systems. The representative features to assess the quality of fingerprint images from different types of capture sensors are known to vary. In this paper, an effective quality estimation system that can be adapted for different types of capture sensors is designed by modifying and combining a set of features including orientation certainty, local orientation quality and consistency. The proposed system extracts basic features, and generates next level features which are applicable for various types of capture sensors. The system then uses the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier to determine whether or not an image should be accepted as input to the recognition system. The experimental results show that the proposed method can perform better than previous methods in terms of accuracy. In the meanwhile, the proposed method has an ability to eliminate residue images from the optical and capacitive sensors, and the coarse images from thermal sensors. PMID:22163632

  17. Role of translational entropy in spatially inhomogeneous, coarse-grained models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenberg, Marcel; Jackson, Nicholas E.; de Pablo, Juan J.; Müller, Marcus

    2018-03-01

    Coarse-grained models of polymer and biomolecular systems have enabled the computational study of cooperative phenomena, e.g., self-assembly, by lumping multiple atomistic degrees of freedom along the backbone of a polymer, lipid, or DNA molecule into one effective coarse-grained interaction center. Such a coarse-graining strategy leaves the number of molecules unaltered. In order to treat the surrounding solvent or counterions on the same coarse-grained level of description, one can also stochastically group several of those small molecules into an effective, coarse-grained solvent bead or "fluid element." Such a procedure reduces the number of molecules, and we discuss how to compensate the concomitant loss of translational entropy by density-dependent interactions in spatially inhomogeneous systems.

  18. Skin Cancer-Sun Knowledge and Sun Protection Behaviors of Liver Transplant Recipients in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Haney, Meryem Ozturk; Ordin, Yaprak Sarigol; Arkan, Gulcihan

    2017-09-08

    The aim of this study was to compare liver transplant recipients (LTRs) with the general population regarding their knowledge of skin cancer, sun health, sun protection behaviors, and affecting factors. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Turkey between March 2016 and September 2016 with 104 LTRs and 100 participants from the general population group (GPG). The mean age of the LTRs was 53.2 ± 11.8 and that of the GPG was 42.7 ± 14.5. The LTRs' skin cancer and sun knowledge were significantly lower than in the GPG, but there was no difference between the two groups in terms of their sun protection behavior scores. The most commonly used sun protection behaviors of LTRs were not being outside and not sunbathing between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., wearing clothing that covers the skin, and avoiding the solarium. Behaviors commonly practiced by the GPG were wearing sunglasses, wearing sunscreen with a sun protection factor of 15 or higher before going outside, wearing sunscreen at the beach, while swimming or doing physical activity outside, and reapplying it every 2 h. Results of our study will contribute to the development of education and training programs for LTRs on skin cancer. The results also demonstrated the importance of practicing adequate sun protection behaviors which will certainly impact their future health.

  19. Solar tracking control system Sun Chaser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. R.; White, P. R.

    1978-01-01

    The solar tracking control system, Sun Chaser, a method of tracking the Sun in all types of weather conditions is described. The Sun Chaser follows the Sun from east to west in clear or cloudy weather, and resets itself to the east position after sundown in readiness for the next sunrise.

  20. Relative entropy and optimization-driven coarse-graining methods in VOTCA

    DOE PAGES

    Mashayak, S. Y.; Jochum, Mara N.; Koschke, Konstantin; ...

    2015-07-20

    We discuss recent advances of the VOTCA package for systematic coarse-graining. Two methods have been implemented, namely the downhill simplex optimization and the relative entropy minimization. We illustrate the new methods by coarse-graining SPC/E bulk water and more complex water-methanol mixture systems. The CG potentials obtained from both methods are then evaluated by comparing the pair distributions from the coarse-grained to the reference atomistic simulations.We have also added a parallel analysis framework to improve the computational efficiency of the coarse-graining process.

  1. Coarse-Grained and Atomistic Modeling of Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    A coarse-grained model for a set of three polyimide isomers is developed. Each polyimide is comprised of BPDA (3,3,4,4' - biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride) and one of three APB isomers: 1,3-bis(4-aminophenoxy)benzene, 1,4-bis(4-aminophenoxy)benzene or 1,3-bis(3-aminophenoxy)benzene. The coarse-grained model is constructed as a series of linked vectors following the contour of the polymer backbone. Beads located at the midpoint of each vector define centers for long range interaction energy between monomer subunits. A bulk simulation of each coarse-grained polyimide model is performed with a dynamic Monte Carlo procedure. These coarsegrained models are then reverse-mapped to fully atomistic models. The coarse-grained models show the expected trends in decreasing chain dimensions with increasing meta linkage in the APB section of the repeat unit, although these differences were minor due to the relatively short chains simulated here. Considerable differences are seen among the dynamic Monte Carlo properties of the three polyimide isomers. Decreasing relaxation times are seen with increasing meta linkage in the APB section of the repeat unit.

  2. SunSmart: evaluation of a pilot school-based sun protection intervention in Hispanic early adolescents.

    PubMed

    Miller, K A; Langholz, B M; Ly, T; Harris, S C; Richardson, J L; Peng, D H; Cockburn, M G

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of melanoma is rising among Hispanic populations in the United States. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of a pilot sun safety educational intervention conducted from 2006 to 2012 on Hispanic early adolescents in a high ultraviolet environment. Nineteen schools with high Hispanic enrollment were recruited from urban neighborhoods in Los Angeles. The analytic sample was restricted to students identifying as Hispanic or Latino (n = 777). A mixed effects linear model was used to test mean changes from pre- to posttest on students' sun protection knowledge, attitudes and behaviors. Significant improvements were observed across several cognitive outcomes related to sun protection, including knowledge of and attitudes toward sun protection and self-efficacy to wear sunscreen. However, changes in sun protective behaviors were not achieved. Although some improvements were observed, future studies should identify the factors that motivate sun protection in this population and develop tailored prevention strategies, as improving the sun safe behaviors of Hispanic youths may aid in reducing the risk of melanoma in adulthood in this population. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Characteristics of columnar aerosol optical and microphysical properties retrieved from the sun photometer and its impact on radiative forcing over Skukuza (South Africa) during 1999-2010.

    PubMed

    Adesina, Ayodele Joseph; Piketh, Stuart; Kanike, Raghavendra Kumar; Venkataraman, Sivakumar

    2017-07-01

    The detailed analysis of columnar optical and microphysical properties of aerosols obtained from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) Cimel sun photometer operated at Skukuza (24.98° S, 31.60° E, 150 m above sea level), South Africa was carried out using the level 2.0 direct sun and inversion products measured during 1999-2010. The observed aerosol optical depth (AOD) was generally low over the region, with high values noted in late winter (August) and mid-spring (September and October) seasons. The major aerosol types found during the study period were made of 3.74, 69.63, 9.34, 8.83, and 8.41% for polluted dust (PD), polluted continental (PC), non-absorbing (NA), slightly absorbing (SA), and moderately absorbing (MA) aerosols, respectively. Much attention was given to the aerosol fine- and coarse-modes deduced from the particle volume concentration, effective radius, and fine-mode volume fraction. The aerosol volume size distribution pattern was found to be bimodal with the fine-mode showing predominance relative to coarse-mode during the winter and spring seasons, owing to the onset of the biomass burning season. The mean values of total, fine-, and coarse-mode volume particle concentrations were 0.07 ± 0.04, 0.03 ± 0.03, and 0.04 ± 0.02 μm 3  μm -2 , respectively, whereas the mean respective effective radii observed at Skukuza for the abovementioned modes were 0.35 ± 0.17, 0.14 ± 0.02, and 2.08 ± 0.02 μm. The averaged shortwave direct aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) observed within the atmosphere was found to be positive (absorption or heating effect), whereas the negative forcing in the surface and TOA depicted significant cooling effect due to more scattering type particles.

  4. Sun compass error model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blucker, T. J.; Ferry, W. W.

    1971-01-01

    An error model is described for the Apollo 15 sun compass, a contingency navigational device. Field test data are presented along with significant results of the test. The errors reported include a random error resulting from tilt in leveling the sun compass, a random error because of observer sighting inaccuracies, a bias error because of mean tilt in compass leveling, a bias error in the sun compass itself, and a bias error because the device is leveled to the local terrain slope.

  5. SunShot Initiative Portfolio Book 2014

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Solar Energy Technologies Office

    2014-05-01

    The 2014 SunShot Initiative Portfolio Book outlines the progress towards the goals outlined in the SunShot Vision Study. Contents include overviews of each of SunShot’s five subprogram areas, as well as a description of every active project in the SunShot’s project portfolio as of May 2014.

  6. Weekend sun protection and sunburn in Australia trends (1987-2002) and association with SunSmart television advertising.

    PubMed

    Dobbinson, Suzanne J; Wakefield, Melanie A; Jamsen, Kris M; Herd, Natalie L; Spittal, Matthew J; Lipscomb, John E; Hill, David J

    2008-02-01

    The Australian state of Victoria has run a population-based skin cancer prevention program called SunSmart since 1988, incorporating substantial public education efforts and environmental change strategies. Trends over 15 years in behavioral risk factors for skin cancer were examined in a population exposed to the SunSmart program. Whether outcomes were associated with extent of SunSmart television advertising was then assessed. In nine cross-sectional surveys from 1987 to 2002, 11,589 adults were interviewed by telephone about their sun exposure and sun protection during outdoor activities on summer weekends. Analyses completed in 2007 adjusted for ambient temperature and ultraviolet radiation. Sun protection and sunburn show substantial general improvement over time, but have stalled in recent years. Use of hats and sunscreens significantly increased over time and peaked during the mid to late 1990s, compared with the pre-SunSmart baseline. The mean proportion of unprotected skin was reduced and was lowest in the summer of 1997-1998. Summer sunburn incidence declined over time and was 9.1% in 2002, almost half baseline (OR=0.53; 95% CI=0.39-0.73). Higher exposure to SunSmart advertising in the 4 weeks before the interview increased: (1) preference for no tan, (2) hat and sunscreen use, and (3) proportion of body surface protected from the sun. The general improvement in sun-protective behaviors over time highlight that a population's sun-protective behaviors are amenable to change. Population-based prevention programs incorporating substantial television advertising campaigns into the mix of strategies may be highly effective in improving a population's sun-protective behaviors.

  7. A generic sun-tracking algorithm for on-axis solar collector in mobile platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, An-Chow; Chong, Kok-Keong; Lim, Boon-Han; Ho, Ming-Cheng; Yap, See-Hao; Heng, Chun-Kit; Lee, Jer-Vui; King, Yeong-Jin

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes a novel dynamic sun-tracking algorithm which allows accurate tracking of the sun for both non-concentrated and concentrated photovoltaic systems located on mobile platforms to maximize solar energy extraction. The proposed algorithm takes not only the date, time, and geographical information, but also the dynamic changes of coordinates of the mobile platforms into account to calculate the sun position angle relative to ideal azimuth-elevation axes in real time using general sun-tracking formulas derived by Chong and Wong. The algorithm acquires data from open-loop sensors, i.e. global position system (GPS) and digital compass, which are readily available in many off-the-shelf portable gadgets, such as smart phone, to instantly capture the dynamic changes of coordinates of mobile platforms. Our experiments found that a highly accurate GPS is not necessary as the coordinate changes of practical mobile platforms are not fast enough to produce significant differences in the calculation of the incident angle. On the contrary, it is critical to accurately identify the quadrant and angle where the mobile platforms are moving toward in real time, which can be resolved by using digital compass. In our implementation, a noise filtering mechanism is found necessary to remove unexpected spikes in the readings of the digital compass to ensure stability in motor actuations and effectiveness in continuous tracking. Filtering mechanisms being studied include simple moving average and linear regression; the results showed that a compound function of simple moving average and linear regression produces a better outcome. Meanwhile, we found that a sampling interval is useful to avoid excessive motor actuations and power consumption while not sacrificing the accuracy of sun-tracking.

  8. School Sun-Protection Policies--Does Being SunSmart Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Denise; Harrison, Simone L.; Buettner, Petra; Nowak, Madeleine

    2014-01-01

    Evaluate the comprehensiveness of primary school sun-protection policies in tropical North Queensland, Australia. Pre-determined criteria were used to assess publicly available sun-protection policies from primary schools in Townsville (latitude 19.3°S; n = 43), Cairns (16.9°S; n = 46) and the Atherton Tablelands (17.3°S; n = 23) during 2009-2012.…

  9. Study of. lambda. parameters and crossover phenomena in SU(N) x SU(N) sigma models in two dimensions

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Shigemitsu, J; Kogut, J B

    1981-01-01

    The spin system analogues of recent studies of the string tension and ..lambda.. parameters of SU(N) gauge theories in 4 dimensions are carried out for the SU(N) x SU(N) and O(N) models in 2 dimensions. The relations between the ..lambda.. parameters of both the Euclidean and Hamiltonian formulation of the lattice models and the ..lambda.. parameter of the continuum models are obtained. The one loop finite renormalization of the speed of light in the lattice Hamiltonian formulations of the O(N) and SU(N) x SU(N) models is calculated. Strong coupling calculations of the mass gaps of these spin models are donemore » for all N and the constants of proportionality between the gap and the ..lambda.. parameter of the continuum models are obtained. These results are contrasted with similar calculations for the SU(N) gauge models in 3+1 dimensions. Identifying suitable coupling constants for discussing the N ..-->.. infinity limits, the numerical results suggest that the crossover from weak to strong coupling in the lattice O(N) models becomes less abrupt as N increases while the crossover for the SU(N) x SU(N) models becomes more abrupt. The crossover in SU(N) gauge theories also becomes more abrupt with increasing N, however, at an even greater rate than in the SU(N) x SU(N) spin models.« less

  10. Integrating Metal-Oxide-Decorated CNT Networks with a CMOS Readout in a Gas Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunjoong; Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, Dai-Hong; Perello, David; Park, Young June; Hong, Seong-Hyeon; Yun, Minhee; Kim, Suhwan

    2012-01-01

    We have implemented a tin-oxide-decorated carbon nanotube (CNT) network gas sensor system on a single die. We have also demonstrated the deposition of metallic tin on the CNT network, its subsequent oxidation in air, and the improvement of the lifetime of the sensors. The fabricated array of CNT sensors contains 128 sensor cells for added redundancy and increased accuracy. The read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) was combined with coarse and fine time-to-digital converters to extend its resolution in a power-efficient way. The ROIC is fabricated using a 0.35 μm CMOS process, and the whole sensor system consumes 30 mA at 5 V. The sensor system was successfully tested in the detection of ammonia gas at elevated temperatures. PMID:22736966

  11. Increasing Sun Protection in Winter Outdoor Recreation

    PubMed Central

    Walkosz, Barbara J.; Buller, David B.; Andersen, Peter A.; Scott, Michael D.; Dignan, Mark B.; Cutter, Gary R.; Maloy, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Unprotected and excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the primary risk factor for skin cancer. Design A pair-matched, group-randomized, pre-test/post-test, quasi-experimental design, with ski resorts as the unit of randomization, tested the effectiveness of Go Sun Smart, a multi-channel skin cancer prevention program. Independent samples of guests were taken at baseline (2001) and follow-up (2002); data were analyzed in 2006. Setting and Participants A total of 6516 adult guests at 26 ski resorts in the western U.S. and Canada were recruited, consented, and interviewed on chairlifts. This study was nested within an occupational intervention for ski resort workers. Intervention Ski resorts were pair-matched and randomized to receive Go Sun Smart, which consisted of print, electronic, visual, and interpersonal skin cancer prevention messages. Main Outcome Measures Sun-protection behaviors, sunburning, recall of sun-protection messages, and the association of message exposure to sun protection. Results The difference in recall of all sun-protection messages, messages on signs and posters, and the Go Sun Smart logo was significant between the intervention and control resorts. Reported use of sun-protection practices was higher by guests at intervention ski areas using more (a higher dose of) Go Sun Smart materials. Intervention-group guests who recalled a sun-safety message were more likely to practice sun safety than intervention-group guests who did not recall a message and control-group guests. Conclusions While the mere implementation of Go Sun Smart did not produce sun-safety improvements, Go Sun Smart appeared to be effective for guests who encountered and remembered it. Many factors can work against message exposure. Signage seemed to produce the greatest increase in exposure to sun-safety messages. PMID:18471586

  12. Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer attitude control electronics box design and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, K.; Clagett, C.; Correll, T.; Gruner, T.; Quinn, T.; Shiflett, L.; Schnurr, R.; Wennersten, M.; Frederick, M.; Fox, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    The attitude Control Electronics (ACE) Box is the center of the Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) for the Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) satellite. This unit is the single point interface for all of the Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) related sensors and actuators. Commands and telemetry between the SAMPEX flight computer and the ACE Box are routed via a MIL-STD-1773 bus interface, through the use of an 80C85 processor. The ACE Box consists of the flowing electronic elements: power supply, momentum wheel driver, electromagnet driver, coarse sun sensor interface, digital sun sensor interface, magnetometer interface, and satellite computer interface. In addition, the ACE Box also contains an independent Safehold electronics package capable of keeping the satellite pitch axis pointing towards the sun. The ACE Box has dimensions of 24 x 31 x 8 cm, a mass of 4.3 kg, and an average power consumption of 10.5 W. This set of electronics was completely designed, developed, integrated, and tested by personnel at NASA GSFC. SAMPEX was launched on July 3, 1992, and the initial attitude acquisition was successfully accomplished via the analog Safehold electronics in the ACE Box. This acquisition scenario removed the excess body rates via magnetic control and precessed the satellite pitch axis to within 10 deg of the sun line. The performance of the SAMPEX ACS in general and the ACE Box in particular has been quite satisfactory.

  13. The Sun Sense Study: An Intervention to Improve Sun Protection in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasser, Alice; Shaheen, Magda; Glenn, Beth A.; Bastani, Roshan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effect of a multicomponent intervention on parental knowledge, sun avoidance behaviors, and sun protection practices in children 3-10 years. Methods: A randomized trial at a pediatric clinic recruited 197 caregiver-child pairs (90% parents). Intervention included a brief presentation and brochure for the parent and…

  14. Characterizing and contrasting instream and riparian coarse wood in western Montana basins

    Treesearch

    Michael K. Young; Ethan A. Mace; Eric T. Ziegler; Elaine K. Sutherland

    2006-01-01

    The importance of coarse wood to aquatic biota and stream channel structure is widely recognized, yet characterizations of large-scale patterns in coarse wood dimensions and loads are rare. To address these issues, we censused instream coarse wood ( 2 m long and 10 cm minimum diameter) and sampled riparian coarse wood and channel characteristics in and along 13 streams...

  15. Coarse-graining errors and numerical optimization using a relative entropy framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaimovich, Aviel; Shell, M. Scott

    2011-03-01

    The ability to generate accurate coarse-grained models from reference fully atomic (or otherwise "first-principles") ones has become an important component in modeling the behavior of complex molecular systems with large length and time scales. We recently proposed a novel coarse-graining approach based upon variational minimization of a configuration-space functional called the relative entropy, Srel, that measures the information lost upon coarse-graining. Here, we develop a broad theoretical framework for this methodology and numerical strategies for its use in practical coarse-graining settings. In particular, we show that the relative entropy offers tight control over the errors due to coarse-graining in arbitrary microscopic properties, and suggests a systematic approach to reducing them. We also describe fundamental connections between this optimization methodology and other coarse-graining strategies like inverse Monte Carlo, force matching, energy matching, and variational mean-field theory. We suggest several new numerical approaches to its minimization that provide new coarse-graining strategies. Finally, we demonstrate the application of these theoretical considerations and algorithms to a simple, instructive system and characterize convergence and errors within the relative entropy framework.

  16. Coarse-graining errors and numerical optimization using a relative entropy framework.

    PubMed

    Chaimovich, Aviel; Shell, M Scott

    2011-03-07

    The ability to generate accurate coarse-grained models from reference fully atomic (or otherwise "first-principles") ones has become an important component in modeling the behavior of complex molecular systems with large length and time scales. We recently proposed a novel coarse-graining approach based upon variational minimization of a configuration-space functional called the relative entropy, S(rel), that measures the information lost upon coarse-graining. Here, we develop a broad theoretical framework for this methodology and numerical strategies for its use in practical coarse-graining settings. In particular, we show that the relative entropy offers tight control over the errors due to coarse-graining in arbitrary microscopic properties, and suggests a systematic approach to reducing them. We also describe fundamental connections between this optimization methodology and other coarse-graining strategies like inverse Monte Carlo, force matching, energy matching, and variational mean-field theory. We suggest several new numerical approaches to its minimization that provide new coarse-graining strategies. Finally, we demonstrate the application of these theoretical considerations and algorithms to a simple, instructive system and characterize convergence and errors within the relative entropy framework. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  17. STOCK: Structure mapper and online coarse-graining kit for molecular simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Bevc, Staš; Junghans, Christoph; Praprotnik, Matej

    2015-03-15

    We present a web toolkit STructure mapper and Online Coarse-graining Kit for setting up coarse-grained molecular simulations. The kit consists of two tools: structure mapping and Boltzmann inversion tools. The aim of the first tool is to define a molecular mapping from high, e.g. all-atom, to low, i.e. coarse-grained, resolution. Using a graphical user interface it generates input files, which are compatible with standard coarse-graining packages, e.g. VOTCA and DL_CGMAP. Our second tool generates effective potentials for coarse-grained simulations preserving the structural properties, e.g. radial distribution functions, of the underlying higher resolution model. The required distribution functions can be providedmore » by any simulation package. Simulations are performed on a local machine and only the distributions are uploaded to the server. The applicability of the toolkit is validated by mapping atomistic pentane and polyalanine molecules to a coarse-grained representation. Effective potentials are derived for systems of TIP3P (transferable intermolecular potential 3 point) water molecules and salt solution. The presented coarse-graining web toolkit is available at http://stock.cmm.ki.si.« less

  18. 77 FR 34122 - Application of Sun Air Express, LLC, d/b/a Sun Air International for Commuter Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary [Docket DOT-OST-2011-0169] Application of Sun Air Express, LLC, d/b/a Sun Air International for Commuter Authority AGENCY: Department of... order finding Sun Air Express, LLC d/b/a Sun Air International fit, willing, and able, and awarding it...

  19. Residential indoor and outdoor coarse particles and associated endotoxin exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Amanda J.; Dobbin, Nina A.; Lyrette, Ninon; Wallace, Lance; Foto, Mark; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Kearney, Jill; Van Ryswyk, Keith; Gilbert, Nicolas L.; Harrison, Ian; Rispler, Kathleen; Héroux, Marie-Eve

    2011-12-01

    There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that coarse particles (PM 10-2.5) have detrimental impacts upon health, especially for respiratory effects. There are limited data available for indoor residential exposures. Some data exist regarding the composition of this PM size fraction with emphasis on crustal elements and biological components. This study includes data from 146 homes sampled in Regina, Saskatchewan (SK) where 5-day integrated concurrent monitoring of indoor and outdoor coarse particles was conducted during the winter and summer of 2007. The coarse particle filters were subsequently analysed for endotoxin content to determine the contribution of this compound. Winter indoor geometric mean concentrations of coarse particles exceeded outdoor concentrations (3.73 μg m -3 vs 2.49 μg m -3; paired t-test p < 0.0001); however the reverse was found in summer (4.34 μg m -3 vs 8.82 μg m -3; paired t-test p < 0.0001). Linear regression indicated that winter predictors of indoor coarse particles were outdoor coarse particles, ventilation and presence of at least two or more occupants. During the summer, increased use of central air conditioning was associated with reduced coarse particles, while smoking and the presence of two or more occupants resulted in increased coarse particles. Endotoxin concentrations (EU μg -1) were lower indoors than outdoors in both seasons. Spatial variability of ambient coarse particles was assessed to determine the suitability of using a single monitoring station within a city to estimate exposure. The coefficients of variation between homes sampled simultaneously and the central monitoring station were calculated (median COV in summer = 15% and winter = 24%) and showed significant variability by week, especially during the summer months, suggesting a single site may be insufficient for characterizing exposure. Future studies should consider daily measurements per home to understand shorter term exposures and day to day

  20. Use of Fuzzycones for Sun-Only Attitude Determination: THEMIS Becomes ARTEMIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashmall, Joseph A.; Felikson, Denis; Sedlak, Joseph E.

    2009-01-01

    In order for two THEMIS probes to successfully transition to ARTEMIS it will be necessary to determine attitudes with moderate accuracy using Sun sensor data only. To accomplish this requirement, an implementation of the Fuzzycones maximum likelihood algorithm was developed. The effect of different measurement uncertainty models on Fuzzycones attitude accuracy was investigated and a bin-transition technique was introduced to improve attitude accuracy using data with uniform error distributions. The algorithm was tested with THEMIS data and in simulations. The analysis results show that the attitude requirements can be met using Fuzzycones and data containing two bin-transitions.

  1. The Sun and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2012-01-01

    Thus the Sun forms the basis for life on Earth via the black body radiation it emits. The Sun also emits mass in the form of the solar wind and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Mass emission also occurs in the form of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which happens during CMEs and solar flares. Both the mass and electromagnetic energy output of the Sun vary over a wide range of time scales, thus introducing disturbances on the space environment that extends from the Sun through the entire heliosphere including the magnetospheres and ionospheres of planets and moons of the solar system. Although our habitat is located in the neutral atmosphere of Earth, we are intimately connected to the non-neutral space environment starting from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and to the vast interplanetary space. The variability of the solar mass emissions results in the interaction between the solar wind plasma and the magnetospheric plasma leading to huge disturbances in the geospace. The Sun ionizes our atmosphere and creates the ionosphere. The ionosphere can be severely disturbed by the transient energy input from solar flares and the solar wind during geomagnetic storms. The complex interplay between Earth's magnetic field and the solar magnetic field carried by the solar wind presents varying conditions that are both beneficial and hazardous to life on earth. This seminar presents some of the key aspects of this Sun-Earth connection that we have learned since the birth of space science as a scientific discipline some half a century ago.

  2. Coarse-grained hydrodynamics from correlation functions

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Palmer, Bruce

    This paper will describe a formalism for using correlation functions between different grid cells as the basis for determining coarse-grained hydrodynamic equations for modeling the behavior of mesoscopic fluid systems. Configuration from a molecular dynamics simulation are projected onto basis functions representing grid cells in a continuum hydrodynamic simulation. Equilbrium correlation functions between different grid cells are evaluated from the molecular simulation and used to determine the evolution operator for the coarse-grained hydrodynamic system. The formalism is applied to some simple hydrodynamic cases to determine the feasibility of applying this to realistic nanoscale systems.

  3. The Sun Magnetic Field

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-16

    This frame from an animation shows how the magnetic field lines emanating from our sun spiral out into the solar system as the sun rotates. NASA Voyager 1 is in an area scientists are calling the stagnation region, at the outer layer of the heliosphere.

  4. Activity of the Baby Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsova, M. M.; Livshits, M. A.; Mishenina, T. V.; Nizamov, B. A.

    2017-05-01

    An analysis of the X-ray radiation of G-stars shows that the youngest fast rotating stars are characterized by saturation of activity, but part of stars demonstrate the solar-type activity, starting from rotational periods of 1.4 days. This type of activity, the level of which is determined by the rate of axial rotation, includes the formation of spots, flares and etc; first, activity is irregular, and only then there are conditions for the formation of cycles. The Kepler data show that stars of the same spectral type demonstrate two activity levels. This bimodality of different distributions of stars, change in a character of cycles and a level of Жiзнь i Bceлeннaya flare activity are evidences for an evolution of activity versus the age. By the nature of activity, we call conditionally G-dwarfs with rotation periods from 1 day to 5-6 days by the term "the Baby Sun" (the maximal number of these stars has Prot = 3 d), and we refer G-stars with Prot from 10 to 18 days to "the Young Suns". Ages of the main amount of the Baby Sun are around 200-600 Myr and the Young Sun are of about 1-2 Gyr. The Baby Suns are characterized by enhanced lithium content. We estimate the quasi-stationary X-ray and farultraviolet radiation of the outer atmosphere of the Baby Sun. From the GALEX data we obtain the FUV flux in the range 1350-1750 A for this kind of stars at the distance of 1 AU is 12.8 ± 4.2 erg/(cm^2 c), that exceeds the FUV-flux of the contemporary Sun by more than 6 times. The Kepler data demonstrate that the superflares happen more often namely on the Baby Suns. Our estimate is that superflares of the total energies 10^35 erg occur on the Baby Sun of about one per year.

  5. Sun-Earth Day, 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Mortfield, P.; Hathaway, D. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To promote awareness of the Sun-Earth connection, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, in collaboration with the Stanford SOLAR Center, sponsored a one-day Sun-Earth Day event on April 27, 2001. Although "celebrated" on only one day, teachers and students from across the nation, prepared for over a month in advance. Workshops were held in March to train teachers. Students performed experiments, results of which were shared through video clips and an internet web cast. Our poster includes highlights from student experiments (grades 2 - 12), lessons learned from the teacher workshops and the event itself, and plans for Sun-Earth Day 2002.

  6. The Shared Preference Niche of Sympatric Asiatic Black Bears and Sun Bears in a Tropical Forest Mosaic

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Robert; Garshelis, David L.; Chutipong, Wanlop; Seuaturien, Naret

    2011-01-01

    Background Ecologically similar species often coexist by partitioning use of habitats or resources. Such partitioning can occur through divergent or shared niches. We investigated overlap in habitat use and spatial co-occurrence by sympatric Asiatic black bears and sun bears in three habitats in Thailand, and thereby assessed which niche model best accounts for their coexistence. Methods/Principal Findings We used density of species-specific signs to assess habitat use. Signs of both bear species occurred in all three habitats, and on >60% of sampling transects. Both species fed mostly on fruit; insect feeding signs were uncommon, and were mostly from sun bears. Significant differences in habitat use occurred only in montane forest, the habitat in which fruit was most abundant; incidence of black bear sign there was six times higher than that of sun bears. Habitat use was similar between the two species in the other habitats, which comprised 85% of the area. Of 10 habitat attributes examined, fruiting tree density was the best predictor of occurrence for both species. Models that included interspecific competition (fresh foraging activity of the other species) were less supported than the top models without competition. Conclusions/Significance Bear species co-occurrence at both coarse and fine spatial scales and use of the same resources (fruit trees) indicated common niche preferences. However, their habitat use differed in ways expected from their physical differences: larger black bears dominated in the most fruit-rich habitat, and smaller sun bears used less-preferred insects. These results indicate broadly overlapping fundamental niches combined with asymmetric competition—features consistent with the concept of shared preference niches. This model of the niche has received little attention in ecology, but appears to be relatively common in nature. PMID:21283792

  7. The Sun in STEREO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Parallax gives depth to life. Simultaneous viewing from slightly different vantage points makes binocular humans superior to monocular cyclopes, and fixes us in the third dimension of the Universe. We've been stunned by 3-d images of Venus and Mars (along with more familiar views of earth). Now astronomers plan to give us the best view of all, 3-d images of the dynamic Sun. That's one of the prime goals of NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories, also known as STEREO. STEREO is a pair of spacecraft observatories, one placed in orbit in front of earth, and one to be placed in an earth-trailing orbit. Simultaneous observations of the Sun with the two STEREO spacecraft will provide extraordinary 3-d views of all types of solar activity, especially the dramatic events called coronal mass ejections which send high energy particles from the outer solar atmosphere hurtling towards earth. The image above the first image of the sun by the two STEREO spacecraft, an extreme ultraviolet shot of the Sun's million-degree corona, taken by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager on the Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) instrument package. STEREO's first 3-d solar images should be available in April if all goes well. Put on your red and blue glasses!

  8. Resolving Dynamic Properties of Polymers through Coarse-Grained Computational Studies

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Salerno, K. Michael; Agrawal, Anupriya; Perahia, Dvora

    2016-02-05

    Coupled length and time scales determine the dynamic behavior of polymers and underlie their unique viscoelastic properties. To resolve the long-time dynamics it is imperative to determine which time and length scales must be correctly modeled. In this paper, we probe the degree of coarse graining required to simultaneously retain significant atomistic details and access large length and time scales. The degree of coarse graining in turn sets the minimum length scale instrumental in defining polymer properties and dynamics. Using linear polyethylene as a model system, we probe how the coarse-graining scale affects the measured dynamics. Iterative Boltzmann inversion ismore » used to derive coarse-grained potentials with 2–6 methylene groups per coarse-grained bead from a fully atomistic melt simulation. We show that atomistic detail is critical to capturing large-scale dynamics. Finally, using these models we simulate polyethylene melts for times over 500 μs to study the viscoelastic properties of well-entangled polymer melts.« less

  9. Relationship factors and couples' engagement in sun protection.

    PubMed

    Manne, S L; Coups, E J; Kashy, D A

    2016-08-01

    Individuals may be more motivated to adopt health practices if they consider the benefits of these behaviors for their close relationships. The goal of this study was to examine couple concordance with sun protection and use the interdependence and communal coping theory to evaluate the role of relationship factors in sun protection. One hundred and eighty-four married couples aged 50 years and older completed measures of objective skin cancer risk, perceived risk, sun protection benefits, relationship-centered motivations for sun protection, discussions about sun protection, and sun protection. A mediational model was evaluated. Results indicated a high level of couple concordance. Partners who adopted a relationship-centered motivation for sun protection were more likely to discuss sun protection with one another, and partners who discussed sun protection together were more likely to engage in sun protection. One partner's attitude about personal risk and sun protection benefits was associated with the other partner's sun protection. Wives had higher relationship-centered motivation and discussed sun protection more with their husbands. Behavioral interventions may benefit from encouraging couples to discuss sun protection and encouraging married individuals to consider the benefits of sun protection for their relationship and for their spouse's health. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Educating preschoolers about sun safety.

    PubMed Central

    Loescher, L J; Emerson, J; Taylor, A; Christensen, D H; McKinney, M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This feasibility study examined whether a sun safety curriculum designed for and administered to preschoolers affects their cognition (knowledge, comprehension, application) regarding sun safety. METHODS. Twelve classes of 4- to 5-year-olds were recruited from local preschools and randomly assigned to an intervention group or a control group. The intervention group received an investigator-developed sun safety curriculum; the control group did not. Children in both groups were tested at the beginning of the study about their cognition related to sun safety. They then received posttests 2 and 7 weeks following the pretest. RESULTS. The curriculum had a significant effect on the knowledge (P = .01) and comprehension (P = .006) components of cognition. The application component of cognition was not significantly changed by the curriculum. CONCLUSIONS. A structured curriculum was found to be an efficacious means of enhancing knowledge and comprehension of sun safety in preschool children. At the preoperational developmental stage, however, children may not be able to apply such knowledge and comprehension. PMID:7604917

  11. The Use of a Gyroless Wheel-Tach Controller in SDO Safehold Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourkland, Kristin L.; Starin, Scott R.; Mangus, David J.; Starin, Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the progression of the Safehold mode design on the Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite. Safehold uses coarse Sun sensors and reaction wheel tachometers to keep the spacecraft in a thermally safe and power-positive attitude. The control algorithm is described, and simulation results shown. Specific control issues arose when the spacecraft entered eclipse, and a description of the trade study which added gyroscopes to the mode is included. The paper concludes with the results from the linear and nonlinear stability analysis.

  12. Theory of wavelet-based coarse-graining hierarchies for molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rinderspacher, Berend Christopher; Bardhan, Jaydeep P; Ismail, Ahmed E

    2017-07-01

    We present a multiresolution approach to compressing the degrees of freedom and potentials associated with molecular dynamics, such as the bond potentials. The approach suggests a systematic way to accelerate large-scale molecular simulations with more than two levels of coarse graining, particularly applications of polymeric materials. In particular, we derive explicit models for (arbitrarily large) linear (homo)polymers and iterative methods to compute large-scale wavelet decompositions from fragment solutions. This approach does not require explicit preparation of atomistic-to-coarse-grained mappings, but instead uses the theory of diffusion wavelets for graph Laplacians to develop system-specific mappings. Our methodology leads to a hierarchy of system-specific coarse-grained degrees of freedom that provides a conceptually clear and mathematically rigorous framework for modeling chemical systems at relevant model scales. The approach is capable of automatically generating as many coarse-grained model scales as necessary, that is, to go beyond the two scales in conventional coarse-grained strategies; furthermore, the wavelet-based coarse-grained models explicitly link time and length scales. Furthermore, a straightforward method for the reintroduction of omitted degrees of freedom is presented, which plays a major role in maintaining model fidelity in long-time simulations and in capturing emergent behaviors.

  13. Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) EVA Fitchecks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    In the high bay of Kennedy Space Center's Space Station Processing Facility, Chris Hardcastle of Stinger-Ghaffarian Technologies performs spacewalk tool fit-checks of the integrated Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor-1 (TSIS-1) payload and the EXPRESS Pallet Adapter. TSIS-1 is designed to measure the Sun's energy input into Earth by seeing how it is distributed across different wavelengths of light. These measurements help scientists establish Earth's total energy and how our planet's atmosphere responds to changes in the Sun's energy output. TSIS-1 will launch on SpaceX's 13th commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station.

  14. Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) EVA Fitchecks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    In the high bay of Kennedy Space Center's Space Station Processing Facility, Chris Hardcastle of Stinger-Ghaffarian Technologies performs a sharp edge inspection of the integrated Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor-1 (TSIS-1) payload and the EXPRESS Pallet Adapter. TSIS-1 is designed to measure the Sun's energy input into Earth by seeing how it is distributed across different wavelengths of light. These measurements help scientists establish Earth's total energy and how our planet's atmosphere responds to changes in the Sun's energy output. TSIS-1 will launch on SpaceX's 13th commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station.

  15. Sun burn incidence and knowledge of greek elementary and high school children about sun protection.

    PubMed

    Saridi, Maria Ioannis; Toska, Aikaterini George; Rekleiti, Maria Dimitrios; Tsironi, Maria; Geitona, Maria; Souliotis, Kyriakos

    2015-01-01

    Overexposure to sun radiation and particularly its accumulation during childhood and adolescence is a significant risk factor for skin cancer development. The sun burn is particularly important. To estimate sun burn incidence in young pupils in a coastal area of Greece. Two surveys were conducted in a school population in the same district in Greece, over different periods of time, in young people 9 to 18 years old (n=2 977). Anonymous questionnaires were completed. Levels of significance were two- tailed and statistical significance was set at p=0.05. SPSS 17.0 software was used for statistical analysis. From the individual characteristics of the participants it was shown that the majority of them had dark hair and fair skin, whereas a significant percentage reported the existence of moles on face and their body (83.4% vs 68.1%). The sun burn incidence was high in adolescents and the younger pupils (41.9% vs 55.6%). The younger aged children who were living in an urban area had significantly higher rates of sun burn than those living in semi-urban areas (33.8% vs 24.8%, p=0.020). As far as the knowledge of pupils about the risks of sun radiation it was shown that the elementary school pupils had better knowledge than those at high school. Finally, those with better knowledge had the fewer sun burns (Mean 2.83 SD 0.87, p<0.001). The contribution of knowledge to the decrease of sun burn incidence is important as long as this is continuous. Therefore, the education should concern not only children but also teachers and parents in the context of continuous and systematic programs of health education.

  16. Earth Eclipses the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-21

    Several times a day for a few days the Earth completely blocked the Sun for about an hour due to NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory's orbital path (Feb. 15, 2017). The edge of the Earth is not crisp, but kind of fuzzy due to Earth's atmosphere. This frame from a video shows the ending of one such eclipse over -- just seven minutes. The sun is shown in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. These eclipses re-occur about every six months. The Moon blocks SDO's view of the sun on occasion as well. Movies are available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21461

  17. 7 CFR 3201.97 - Sun care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sun care products. 3201.97 Section 3201.97... Designated Items § 3201.97 Sun care products. (a) Definition. Products including sunscreens, sun blocks, and suntan lotions that are topical products that absorb or reflect the sun's ultraviolet radiation to...

  18. 7 CFR 3201.97 - Sun care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sun care products. 3201.97 Section 3201.97... Designated Items § 3201.97 Sun care products. (a) Definition. Products including sunscreens, sun blocks, and suntan lotions that are topical products that absorb or reflect the sun's ultraviolet radiation to...

  19. A combined coarse-grained and all-atom simulation of TRPV1 channel gating and heat activation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels act as key sensors of various chemical and physical stimuli in eukaryotic cells. Despite years of study, the molecular mechanisms of TRP channel activation remain unclear. To elucidate the structural, dynamic, and energetic basis of gating in TRPV1 (a founding member of the TRPV subfamily), we performed coarse-grained modeling and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based on the recently solved high resolution structures of the open and closed form of TRPV1. Our coarse-grained normal mode analysis captures two key modes of collective motions involved in the TRPV1 gating transition, featuring a quaternary twist motion of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) relative to the intracellular domains (ICDs). Our transition pathway modeling predicts a sequence of structural movements that propagate from the ICDs to the TMDs via key interface domains (including the membrane proximal domain and the C-terminal domain), leading to sequential opening of the selectivity filter followed by the lower gate in the channel pore (confirmed by modeling conformational changes induced by the activation of ICDs). The above findings of coarse-grained modeling are robust to perturbation by lipids. Finally, our MD simulation of the ICD identifies key residues that contribute differently to the nonpolar energy of the open and closed state, and these residues are predicted to control the temperature sensitivity of TRPV1 gating. These computational predictions offer new insights to the mechanism for heat activation of TRPV1 gating, and will guide our future electrophysiology and mutagenesis studies. PMID:25918362

  20. Pulses from the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-11

    The dark region seen on the face of the sun at the end of March 2013 is a coronal hole just above and to the right of the middle of the picture, which is a source of fast solar wind leaving the sun in this image from NASA Solar Dynamic Observatory.

  1. Coarse graining atomistic simulations of plastically deforming amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Adam R.; Rycroft, Chris H.; Shields, Michael D.; Falk, Michael L.

    2017-05-01

    The primary mode of failure in disordered solids results from the formation and persistence of highly localized regions of large plastic strains known as shear bands. Continuum-level field theories capable of predicting this mechanical response rely upon an accurate representation of the initial and evolving states of the amorphous structure. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of a metallic glass and propose a methodology for coarse graining discrete, atomistic quantities, such as the potential energies of the elemental constituents. A strain criterion is established and used to distinguish the coarse-grained degrees-of-freedom inside the emerging shear band from those of the surrounding material. A signal-to-noise ratio provides a means of evaluating the strength of the signal of the shear band as a function of the coarse graining. Finally, we investigate the effect of different coarse graining length scales by comparing a two-dimensional, numerical implementation of the effective-temperature description in the shear transformation zone (STZ) theory with direct molecular dynamics simulations. These comparisons indicate the coarse graining length scale has a lower bound, above which there is a high level of agreement between the atomistics and the STZ theory, and below which the concept of effective temperature breaks down.

  2. Comparison of iterative inverse coarse-graining methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberger, David; Hanke, Martin; van der Vegt, Nico F. A.

    2016-10-01

    Deriving potentials for coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations is frequently done by solving an inverse problem. Methods like Iterative Boltzmann Inversion (IBI) or Inverse Monte Carlo (IMC) have been widely used to solve this problem. The solution obtained by application of these methods guarantees a match in the radial distribution function (RDF) between the underlying fine-grained system and the derived coarse-grained system. However, these methods often fail in reproducing thermodynamic properties. To overcome this deficiency, additional thermodynamic constraints such as pressure or Kirkwood-Buff integrals (KBI) may be added to these methods. In this communication we test the ability of these methods to converge to a known solution of the inverse problem. With this goal in mind we have studied a binary mixture of two simple Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluids, in which no actual coarse-graining is performed. We further discuss whether full convergence is actually needed to achieve thermodynamic representability.

  3. Coarse-sediment bands on the inner shelf of southern Monterey Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, R.E.; Dingler, J.R.; Anima, R.J.; Richmond, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    Bands of coarse sand that trend parallel to the shore, unlike the approximately shore-normal bands found in many inner shelf areas, occur in southern Monterey Bay at water depths of 10-20 m, less than 1 km from the shore. The bands are 20-100 m wide and alternate with bands of fine sand that are of similar width. The coarse-sand bands are as much as 1 m lower than the adjacent fine-sand bands, which have margins inclined at angles of about 20??. The mean grain sizes of the coarse and fine sand are in the range of 0.354-1.0 mm and 0.125-0.354 mm, respectively. Wave ripples that average about 1 m in spacing always occur in the coarse-sand bands. Over a period of 3 yrs, the individual bands moved irregularly and changed in shape, as demonstrated by repeated sidescan sonar surveys and by the monitoring of rods jetted into the sea floor. However, the overall pattern and distribution of the bands remained essentially unchanged. Cores, 0.5-1.0 m long, taken in coarse-sand bands contain 0.2-0.5 m of coarse sand overlying fine sand or interbedded fine and coarse sand. Cores from fine-sand bands have at least one thin coarse sand layer at about the depth of the adjacent coarse-sand band. None of the cores revealed a thick deposit of coarse sand. The shore-parallel bands are of unknown origin. Their origin is especially puzzling because approximately shore-normal bands are present in parts of the study area and immediately to the north. ?? 1988.

  4. Associations between authoritative parenting and the sun exposure and sun protective behaviours of adolescents and their friends.

    PubMed

    Mewse, Avril J; Lea, Stephen E G; Ntala, Eleni; Eiser, J Richard

    2011-05-01

    Associations between the sun exposure and sun protective behaviours of adolescents and their friends were examined along with the role played by authoritative parenting and other family and peer socialisation factors. Four hundred and two adolescents (198 males, 204 females) participated in the research. It was found that these adolescents and their friends shared similar sun exposure and sun protective behaviours and had similar parenting backgrounds. Parental authoritativeness was positively associated with the use of sun protection, even after the effects of other familial and peer variables were controlled, but not with the time spent sunbathing which was associated with friends' behaviours. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. COARSEMAP: synthesis of observations and models for coarse-mode aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedinmyer, C.; Lihavainen, H.; Mahowald, N. M.; Alastuey, A.; Albani, S.; Artaxo, P.; Bergametti, G.; Batterman, S.; Brahney, J.; Duce, R. A.; Feng, Y.; Buck, C.; Ginoux, P. A.; Chen, Y.; Guieu, C.; Cohen, D.; Hand, J. L.; Harrison, R. M.; Herut, B.; Ito, A.; Losno, R.; Gomez, D.; Kanakidou, M.; Landing, W. M.; Laurent, B.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Mackey, K.; Maenhaut, W.; Hueglin, C.; Milando, C.; Miller, R. L.; Myriokefaitakis, S.; Neff, J. C.; Pandolfi, M.; Paytan, A.; Perez Garcia-Pando, C.; Prank, M.; Prospero, J. M.; Tamburo, E.; Varrica, D.; Wong, M.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Coarse mode aerosols influence Earth's climate and biogeochemistry by interacting with long-wave radiation, promoting ice nucleation, and contributing important elements to biogeochemical cycles during deposition. Yet coarse mode aerosols have received less emphasis in the scientific literature. Here we present first efforts to globally synthesize available mass concentration, composition and optical depth data and modeling for the coarse mode aerosols (<10 µm) in a new project called "COARSEMAP" (http://www.geo.cornell.edu/eas/PeoplePlaces/Faculty/mahowald/COARSEMAP/). We seek more collaborators who have observational data, especially including elemental or composition data, and/or who are interested in detailed modeling of the coarse mode. The goal will be publications synthesizing data with models, as well as providing synthesized results to the wider community.

  6. Quantifying the coarse-root biomass of intensively managed loblolly pine plantations

    Treesearch

    Ashley T. Miller; H. Lee Allen; Chris A. Maier

    2006-01-01

    Most of the carbon accumulation during a forest rotation is in plant biomass and the forest floor. Most of the belowground biomass in older loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forests is in coarse roots, and coarse roots persist longer after harvest than aboveground biomass and fine roots. The main objective was to assess the carbon accumulation in coarse...

  7. Quantifying the coarse-root biomass of intensively managed loblolly pine plantations

    Treesearch

    Ashley T. Miller; H. Lee Allen; Chris A. Maier

    2006-01-01

    Most of the carbon accumulation during a forest rotation is in plant biomass and the forest floor. Most of the belowground biomass in older loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forests is in coarse roots, and coarse roots ersist longer after harvest than aboveground biomass and fine oots. The main objective was to assess the carbon accumulation in coarse...

  8. If the Sun Were a Light Bulb.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adney, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    An activity in which students compare the sun's brightness with that of a light bulb of known luminosity (in watts) to determine the luminosity of the sun is presented. As an extension, the luminosity value that the student obtains for the sun can also be used to estimate the sun's surface temperature. (KR)

  9. Toward daily monitoring of vegetation conditions at field scale through fusing data from multiple sensors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vegetation monitoring requires remote sensing data at fine spatial and temporal resolution. While imagery from coarse resolution sensors such as MODIS/VIIRS can provide daily observations, they lack spatial detail to capture surface features for crop and rangeland monitoring. The Landsat satellite s...

  10. Characterization of coarse particulate matter in school gyms.

    PubMed

    Braniš, Martin; Šafránek, Jiří

    2011-05-01

    We investigated the mass concentration, mineral composition and morphology of particles resuspended by children during scheduled physical education in urban, suburban and rural elementary school gyms in Prague (Czech Republic). Cascade impactors were deployed to sample the particulate matter. Two fractions of coarse particulate matter (PM(10-2.5) and PM(2.5-1.0)) were characterized by gravimetry, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. Two indicators of human activity, the number of exercising children and the number of physical education hours, were also recorded. Lower mass concentrations of coarse particulate matter were recorded outdoors (average PM(10-2.5) 4.1-7.4 μg m(-3) and PM(2.5-1.0) 2.0-3.3 μg m(-3)) than indoors (average PM(10-2.5) 13.6-26.7 μg m(-3) and PM(2.5-1.0) 3.7-7.4 μg m(-3)). The indoor concentrations of coarse aerosol were elevated during days with scheduled physical education with an average indoor-outdoor (I/O) ratio of 2.5-16.3 for the PM(10-2.5) and 1.4-4.8 for the PM(2.5-1.0) values. Under extreme conditions, the I/O ratios reached 180 (PM(10-2.5)) and 19.1 (PM(2.5-1.0)). The multiple regression analysis based on the number of students and outdoor coarse PM as independent variables showed that the main predictor of the indoor coarse PM concentrations is the number of students in the gym. The effect of outdoor coarse PM was weak and inconsistent. The regression models for the three schools explained 60-70% of the particular dataset variability. X-ray spectrometry revealed 6 main groups of minerals contributing to resuspended indoor dust. The most abundant particles were those of crustal origin composed of Si, Al, O and Ca. Scanning electron microscopy showed that, in addition to numerous inorganic particles, various types of fibers and particularly skin scales make up the main part of the resuspended dust in the gyms. In conclusion, school gyms were found to be indoor microenvironments with high

  11. Trends in sunburns, sun protection practices, and attitudes toward sun exposure protection and tanning among US adolescents, 1998-2004.

    PubMed

    Cokkinides, Vilma; Weinstock, Martin; Glanz, Karen; Albano, Jessica; Ward, Elizabeth; Thun, Michael

    2006-09-01

    Sun exposure in childhood is an important risk factor for developing skin cancer as an adult. Despite extensive efforts to reduce sun exposure among the young, there are no population-based data on trends in sunburns and sun protection practices in the young. The aim of this study was to describe nationally representative trend data on sunburns, sun protection, and attitudes related to sun exposure among US youth. Cross-sectional telephone surveys of youth aged 11 to 18 years in 1998 (N = 1196) and in 2004 (N = 1613) were conducted using a 2-stage sampling process to draw population-based samples. The surveys asked identical questions about sun protection, number of sunburns experienced, and attitudes toward sun exposure. Time trends were evaluated using pooled logistic regression analysis. In 2004, 69% of subjects reported having been sunburned during the summer, not significantly less than in 1998 (72%). There was a significant decrease in the percentage of those aged 11 to 15 years who reported sunburns and a nonsignificant increase among the 16- to 18-year-olds. The proportion of youth who reported regular sunscreen use increased significantly from 31% to 39%. Little change occurred in other recommended sun protection practices. A small reduction in sunburn frequency and modest increases in sun protection practices were observed among youth between 1998 and 2004, despite widespread sun protection campaigns. Nevertheless, the decrease in sunburns among younger teens may be cause for optimism regarding future trends. Overall, there was rather limited progress in improving sun protection practices and reducing sunburns among US youth between 1998 and 2004.

  12. After the Bell: Developing Sun Sense--Learning about Protection from the Sun's Rays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Ness, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The American Academy of Dermatology (2008) reports that our students will experience 80% of their lifetime exposure to the Sun by the time they are 18. Further, research has demonstrated that continued exposure to the Sun's ultraviolet rays can lead to skin aging, sunburn, immune suppression, ocular melanoma, cataracts, corneal burns, and even…

  13. Vibration Based Sun Gear Damage Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Adrian; LaBerge, Kelsen; Lewicki, David; Pines, Darryll

    2013-01-01

    Seeded fault experiments were conducted on the planetary stage of an OH-58C helicopter transmission. Two vibration based methods are discussed that isolate the dynamics of the sun gear from that of the planet gears, bearings, input spiral bevel stage, and other components in and around the gearbox. Three damaged sun gears: two spalled and one cracked, serve as the focus of this current work. A non-sequential vibration separation algorithm was developed and the resulting signals analyzed. The second method uses only the time synchronously averaged data but takes advantage of the signal/source mapping required for vibration separation. Both algorithms were successful in identifying the spall damage. Sun gear damage was confirmed by the presence of sun mesh groups. The sun tooth crack condition was inconclusive.

  14. The Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, Joseph; Kasper, Justin; Maksimovic, Milan; Alibay, Farah; Amiri, Nikta; Bastian, Tim; Cohen, Christina; Landi, Enrico; Manchester, Ward; Reinard, Alysha; Schwadron, Nathan; Cecconi, Baptiste; Hallinan, Gregg; Hegedus, Alex; Krupar, Vratislav; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2017-04-01

    Radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is a direct tracer of particle acceleration in the inner heliosphere and potential magnetic connections from the lower solar corona to the larger heliosphere. Energized electrons excite Langmuir waves, which then convert into intense radio emission at the local plasma frequency, with the most intense acceleration thought to occur within 20 RS. The radio emission from CMEs is quite strong such that only a relatively small number of antennas is required to detect and map it, but many aspects of this particle acceleration and transport remain poorly constrained. Ground-based arrays would be quite capable of tracking the radio emission associated with CMEs, but absorption by the Earth's ionosphere limits the frequency coverage of ground-based arrays (ν ≳ 15 MHz), which in turn limits the range of solar distances over which they can track the radio emission (≲ 3RS). The state-of-the-art for tracking such emission from space is defined by single antennas (Wind/WAVES, Stereo/SWAVES), in which the tracking is accomplished by assuming a frequency-to-density mapping; there has been some success in triangulating the emission between the spacecraft, but considerable uncertainties remain. We describe the Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) mission concept: A constellation of small spacecraft in a geostationary graveyard orbit designed to localize and track radio emissions in the inner heliosphere. Each spacecraft would carry a receiving system for observations below 25 MHz, and SunRISE would produce the first images of CMEs more than a few solar radii from the Sun. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  15. The Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, J. C.; Lazio, J.; Alibay, F.; Amiri, N.; Bastian, T.; Cohen, C.; Landi, E.; Hegedus, A. M.; Maksimovic, M.; Manchester, W.; Reinard, A.; Schwadron, N.; Cecconi, B.; Hallinan, G.; Krupar, V.

    2017-12-01

    Radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is a direct tracer of particle acceleration in the inner heliosphere and potential magnetic connections from the lower solar corona to the larger heliosphere. Energized electrons excite Langmuir waves, which then convert into intense radio emission at the local plasma frequency, with the most intense acceleration thought to occur within 20 R_S. The radio emission from CMEs is quite strong such that only a relatively small number of antennas is required to detect and map it, but many aspects of this particle acceleration and transport remain poorly constrained. Ground-based arrays would be quite capable of tracking the radio emission associated with CMEs, but absorption by the Earth's ionosphere limits the frequency coverage of ground-based arrays (nu > 15 MHz), which in turn limits the range of solar distances over which they can track the radio emission (< 3 R_S). The state-of-the-art for tracking such emission from space is defined by single antennas (Wind/WAVES, Stereo/SWAVES), in which the tracking is accomplished by assuming a frequency-to-density mapping; there has been some success in triangulating the emission between the spacecraft, but considerable uncertainties remain. We describe the Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) mission concept: A constellation of small spacecraft in a geostationary graveyard orbit designed to localize and track radio emissions in the inner heliosphere. Each spacecraft would carry a receiving system for observations below 25 MHz, and SunRISE would produce the first images of CMEs more than a few solar radii from the Sun. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  16. Comet ISON Approaching the Sun [still

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-27

    This movie from NASA’s STEREO spacecraft's Heliospheric Imager shows Comet ISON, Mercury, Comet Encke and Earth over a five-day period from Nov. 20 to Nov. 25, 2013. The sun sits right of the field of view of this camera. Comet ISON, which will round the sun on Nov. 28, is what's known as a sungrazing comet, due to its close approach. Foreshortening or the angle at which these images were obtained make Earth appear as if it is closer to the sun than Mercury. If you look closely you will also see a dimmer and smaller comet Encke near comet ISON. A comet’s journey through the solar system is perilous and violent. A giant ejection of solar material from the sun could rip its tail off. Before it reaches Mars -- at some 230 million miles away from the sun -- the radiation of the sun begins to boil its water, the first step toward breaking apart. And, if it survives all this, the intense radiation and pressure as it flies near the surface of the sun could destroy it altogether. Even if the comet does not survive, tracking its journey will help scientists understand what the comet is made of, how it reacts to its environment, and what this explains about the origins of the solar system. Closer to the sun, watching how the comet and its tail interact with the vast solar atmosphere can teach scientists more about the sun itself. Image Credit: NASA/STEREO NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  17. Orientation in birds. The sun compass.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Koenig, K; Ganzhorn, J U; Ranvaud, R

    1991-01-01

    The sun compass was discovered by G. Kramer in caged birds showing migratory restlessness. Subsequent experiments with caged birds employing directional training and clock shifts, carried out by Hoffman and Schmidt-Koenig, showed that the sun azimuth is used, and the sun altitude ignored. In the laboratory, McDonald found the accuracy to be +/- 3 degrees(-)+/- 5 degrees. According to Hoffmann and Schmidt-Koenig, caged birds trained at medium northern latitudes were able to allow for the sun's apparent movement north of the arctic circle, but not in equatorial and trans-equatorial latitudes. In homing experiments, and employing clock shifts, Schmidt-Koenig demonstrated that the sun compass is used by homing pigeons during initial orientation. This finding is the principal evidence for the existence of a map-and-compass navigational system. Pigeons living in equatorial latitudes utilize the sun compass even under the extreme solar conditions of equinox, achieving angular resolution of about 3 degrees in homing experiments. According to preliminary analyses, the homing pigeons' ephemerides are retarded by several weeks (Ranvaud, Schmidt-Koenig, Ganzhorn et al.).

  18. An automated method for the evaluation of the pointing accuracy of Sun-tracking devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Dietmar J.; Pötzi, Werner; Freislich, Heinrich; Strutzmann, Heinz; Veronig, Astrid M.; Rieder, Harald E.

    2017-03-01

    The accuracy of solar radiation measurements, for direct (DIR) and diffuse (DIF) radiation, depends significantly on the precision of the operational Sun-tracking device. Thus, rigid targets for instrument performance and operation have been specified for international monitoring networks, e.g., the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) operating under the auspices of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP). Sun-tracking devices that fulfill these accuracy requirements are available from various instrument manufacturers; however, none of the commercially available systems comprise an automatic accuracy control system allowing platform operators to independently validate the pointing accuracy of Sun-tracking sensors during operation. Here we present KSO-STREAMS (KSO-SunTRackEr Accuracy Monitoring System), a fully automated, system-independent, and cost-effective system for evaluating the pointing accuracy of Sun-tracking devices. We detail the monitoring system setup, its design and specifications, and the results from its application to the Sun-tracking system operated at the Kanzelhöhe Observatory (KSO) Austrian radiation monitoring network (ARAD) site. The results from an evaluation campaign from March to June 2015 show that the tracking accuracy of the device operated at KSO lies within BSRN specifications (i.e., 0.1° tracking accuracy) for the vast majority of observations (99.8 %). The evaluation of manufacturer-specified active-tracking accuracies (0.02°), during periods with direct solar radiation exceeding 300 W m-2, shows that these are satisfied in 72.9 % of observations. Tracking accuracies are highest during clear-sky conditions and on days where prevailing clear-sky conditions are interrupted by frontal movement; in these cases, we obtain the complete fulfillment of BSRN requirements and 76.4 % of observations within manufacturer-specified active-tracking accuracies. Limitations to tracking surveillance arise during overcast conditions and

  19. Recycled Coarse Aggregate Produced by Pulsed Discharge in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namihira, Takao; Shigeishi, Mitsuhiro; Nakashima, Kazuyuki; Murakami, Akira; Kuroki, Kaori; Kiyan, Tsuyoshi; Tomoda, Yuichi; Sakugawa, Takashi; Katsuki, Sunao; Akiyama, Hidenori; Ohtsu, Masayasu

    In Japan, the recycling ratio of concrete scraps has been kept over 98 % after the Law for the Recycling of Construction Materials was enforced in 2000. In the present, most of concrete scraps were recycled as the Lower Subbase Course Material. On the other hand, it is predicted to be difficult to keep this higher recycling ratio in the near future because concrete scraps increase rapidly and would reach to over 3 times of present situation in 2010. In addition, the demand of concrete scraps as the Lower Subbase Course Material has been decreased. Therefore, new way to reuse concrete scraps must be developed. Concrete scraps normally consist of 70 % of coarse aggregate, 19 % of water and 11 % of cement. To obtain the higher recycling ratio, the higher recycling ratio of coarse aggregate is desired. In this paper, a new method for recycling coarse aggregate from concrete scraps has been developed and demonstrated. The system includes a Marx generator and a point to hemisphere mesh electrode immersed in water. In the demonstration, the test piece of concrete scrap was located between the electrodes and was treated by the pulsed discharge. After discharge treatment of test piece, the recycling coarse aggregates were evaluated under JIS and TS and had enough quality for utilization as the coarse aggregate.

  20. Sun Exposure and Sun Protection at Primary Schools in The Netherlands: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Boog, Matthijs C; Nederend, Annelies; Ultee, Jetske

    2016-01-01

    In The Netherlands, skin cancer incidence rates have dramatically increased during the last decades. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is the most important environmental risk factor for developing skin cancer. The present study aimed to determine the level of sun exposure and sun protection of children at Dutch primary schools. Registered members of an Internet panel of a private research company with a child 6 to 12 years of age completed a standardized questionnaire on sun exposure, sun protection and sunburn for their child on school days during the spring and summer. A total of 1103 parents completed the questionnaire. Most parents reported that their child spent 31 minutes to 1 hour (39.7%) or 1 hour to 1.5 hours (26.1%) outside at school during the spring and summer, 29.3% reported that sunscreen is always or often applied to the skin of their child in the morning on school days, 37% reported that they always or often paid attention to sun protection when selecting their child's outfit, 19.3% of the parents stated that their child could not play in the shade outside at school, and 19.9% of the parents reported that their child had ever had a sunburn at school. With most children, this consistent and repetitive pattern of sun exposure at school will probably lead to damage of exposed skin, because sun protection is insufficiently achieved among children during school days in the spring and summer. Future school-based interventions are necessary to alert and change behavior of parents, children, and primary school teachers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Coarse-grained hydrodynamics from correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Bruce

    2018-02-01

    This paper will describe a formalism for using correlation functions between different grid cells as the basis for determining coarse-grained hydrodynamic equations for modeling the behavior of mesoscopic fluid systems. Configurations from a molecular dynamics simulation or other atomistic simulation are projected onto basis functions representing grid cells in a continuum hydrodynamic simulation. Equilibrium correlation functions between different grid cells are evaluated from the molecular simulation and used to determine the evolution operator for the coarse-grained hydrodynamic system. The formalism is demonstrated on a discrete particle simulation of diffusion with a spatially dependent diffusion coefficient. Correlation functions are calculated from the particle simulation and the spatially varying diffusion coefficient is recovered using a fitting procedure.

  2. SunWise[R] Meteorologist Tool Kit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The SunWise Program is designed to help meteorologists raise sun safety awareness by addressing the science of the sun, the risk of overexposure to its ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and what students and their families can do to protect themselves from overexposure. This Tool Kit has been designed for use all over the United States and its…

  3. On-orbit calibration for star sensors without priori information.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Niu, Yanxiong; Lu, Jiazhen; Zhang, Chengfen; Yang, Yanqiang

    2017-07-24

    The star sensor is a prerequisite navigation device for a spacecraft. The on-orbit calibration is an essential guarantee for its operation performance. However, traditional calibration methods rely on ground information and are invalid without priori information. The uncertain on-orbit parameters will eventually influence the performance of guidance navigation and control system. In this paper, a novel calibration method without priori information for on-orbit star sensors is proposed. Firstly, the simplified back propagation neural network is designed for focal length and main point estimation along with system property evaluation, called coarse calibration. Then the unscented Kalman filter is adopted for the precise calibration of all parameters, including focal length, main point and distortion. The proposed method benefits from self-initialization and no attitude or preinstalled sensor parameter is required. Precise star sensor parameter estimation can be achieved without priori information, which is a significant improvement for on-orbit devices. Simulations and experiments results demonstrate that the calibration is easy for operation with high accuracy and robustness. The proposed method can satisfy the stringent requirement for most star sensors.

  4. 'My child did not like using sun protection': practices and perceptions of child sun protection among rural black African mothers.

    PubMed

    Kunene, Zamantimande; Albers, Patricia N; Lucas, Robyn M; Banwell, Cathy; Mathee, Angela; Wright, Caradee Y

    2017-08-25

    Photodamage is partially mitigated by darker skin pigmentation, but immune suppression, photoaging and cataracts occur among individuals with all skin types. To assess practices and acceptability to Black African mothers of sun protection equipment for their children living in a rural area, participants were recruited at the time of their child's 18-month vaccinations. Mothers completed a baseline questionnaire on usual sun behaviours and sun protection practices. They were then provided with sun protection equipment and advice. A follow-up questionnaire was administered two weeks later. Mothers reported that during the week prior to the baseline questionnaire, children spent on average less than 1 hour of time outdoors (most often spent in the shade). Most mothers (97%) liked the sun protection equipment. However, many (78 of 86) reported that their child did not like any of the sun protection equipment and two-thirds stated that the sun protection equipment was not easy to use. Among Black Africans in rural northern South Africa, we found a mismatch between parental preferences and child acceptance for using sun protection when outdoors. A better understanding of the health risks of incidental excess sun exposure and potential benefits of sun protection is required among Black Africans.

  5. Coarse-Grained Clustering Dynamics of Heterogeneously Coupled Neurons.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung Joon; Cook, Katherine A; Rajendran, Karthikeyan; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Cisternas, Jaime; Laing, Carlo R

    2015-12-01

    The formation of oscillating phase clusters in a network of identical Hodgkin-Huxley neurons is studied, along with their dynamic behavior. The neurons are synaptically coupled in an all-to-all manner, yet the synaptic coupling characteristic time is heterogeneous across the connections. In a network of N neurons where this heterogeneity is characterized by a prescribed random variable, the oscillatory single-cluster state can transition-through [Formula: see text] (possibly perturbed) period-doubling and subsequent bifurcations-to a variety of multiple-cluster states. The clustering dynamic behavior is computationally studied both at the detailed and the coarse-grained levels, and a numerical approach that can enable studying the coarse-grained dynamics in a network of arbitrarily large size is suggested. Among a number of cluster states formed, double clusters, composed of nearly equal sub-network sizes are seen to be stable; interestingly, the heterogeneity parameter in each of the double-cluster components tends to be consistent with the random variable over the entire network: Given a double-cluster state, permuting the dynamical variables of the neurons can lead to a combinatorially large number of different, yet similar "fine" states that appear practically identical at the coarse-grained level. For weak heterogeneity we find that correlations rapidly develop, within each cluster, between the neuron's "identity" (its own value of the heterogeneity parameter) and its dynamical state. For single- and double-cluster states we demonstrate an effective coarse-graining approach that uses the Polynomial Chaos expansion to succinctly describe the dynamics by these quickly established "identity-state" correlations. This coarse-graining approach is utilized, within the equation-free framework, to perform efficient computations of the neuron ensemble dynamics.

  6. Effects of a preschool staff intervention on children's sun protection: outcomes of sun protection is fun!

    PubMed

    Gritz, Ellen R; Tripp, Mary K; James, Aimee S; Harrist, Ronald B; Mueller, Nancy H; Chamberlain, Robert M; Parcel, Guy S

    2007-08-01

    The preschool is an important yet understudied setting for sun-protection interventions. This study evaluates the effects of Sun Protection is Fun! (SPF) on preschool staff behavioral and psychosocial outcomes related to protecting children from sun exposure. Twenty preschools participated in a 2-year, group-randomized trial to evaluate SPF, a behavioral intervention grounded in social cognitive theory and designed to be more extensive than previous preschool sun-protection interventions. The staff intervention included training, a video, newsletters, a curriculum, and sunscreen. Cross-sectional samples of staff completed surveys at baseline (N= 245), a 12 month intervention assessment (N = 192), and a 24-month intervention assessment (N = 225). At the 12-month and 24-month assessments, significant behavioral effects were seen for use of sunscreen, protective clothing, and shade. Knowledge, self-efficacy, and norms were among the psychosocial variables most affected by the intervention. This study demonstrates that the SPF intervention is effective in improving staff outcomes related to children's sun protection.

  7. Coarse graining of atactic polystyrene and its derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Anupriya; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-03-01

    Capturing large length scales in polymers and soft matter while retaining atomistic properties is imperative to computational studies of dynamic systems. Here we present a new methodology developing coarse-grain model based on atomistic simulation of atactic polystyrene (PS). Similar to previous work by Fritz et al., each monomer is described by two coarse grained beads. In contrast to this earlier work where intramolecular potentials were based on Monte Carlo simulation of both isotactic and syndiotactic single PS molecule to capture stereochemistry, we obtained intramolecular interactions from a single molecular dynamics simulation of an all-atom atactic PS melts. The non-bonded interactions are obtained using the iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) scheme. This methodology has been extended to coarse graining of poly-(t-butyl-styrene) (PtBS). An additional coarse-grained bead is used to describe the t-butyl group. Similar to the process for PS, the intramolecular interactions are obtained from a single all atom atactic melt simulation. Starting from the non-bonded interactions for PS, we show that the IBI method for the non-bonded interactions of PtBS converges relatively fast. A generalized scheme for substituted PS is currently in development. We would like to acknowledge Prof. Kurt Kremer for helpful discussions during this work.

  8. Caddo Sun Accounts across Time and Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerona, Carla

    2012-01-01

    Billy Day, a Tunica/Biloxi, recently described the significance of the sun for Caddoan people. Day quoted an "old Caddo relative" of his who said: "I used to go outside and hold my hands up and bless myself with the sun--'a'hat.' Well, I can't do that anymore because they say we are sun worshipers. We didn't worship the sun. We worshiped what was…

  9. Sun's influence on climate: Explored with SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundstedt, H.

    2010-09-01

    Stunning images and movies recorded of the Sun, with Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), makes one wonder: How would this change our view on the Sun-Earth climate coupling? SDO shows a much more variable Sun, on all spatial and temporal scales. Detailed pictures of solar storms are foreseen to improve our understanding of the direct Sun-Earth coupling. Dynamo models, described by dynamical systems using input from helioseismic observations, are foreseen to improve our knowledge of the the Sun's cyclic influence on climate. Both the direct-, and the cycle-influence will be discussed in view of the new SDO observations.

  10. Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) EVA Fitchecks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    In the high bay of Kennedy Space Center's Space Station Processing Facility, Chris Hardcastle, left, of Stinger-Ghaffarian Technologies, and other payload team members performs spacewalk tool fit-checks of the integrated Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor-1 (TSIS-1) payload and the EXPRESS Pallet Adapter. TSIS-1 is designed to measure the Sun's energy input into Earth by seeing how it is distributed across different wavelengths of light. These measurements help scientists establish Earth's total energy and how our planet's atmosphere responds to changes in the Sun's energy output. TSIS-1 will launch on SpaceX's 13th commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station.

  11. Total & Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) EVA Tool Fitchecks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    In the high bay of Kennedy Space Center's Space Station Processing Facility, Chris Hardcastle of Stinger-Ghaffarian Technologies, and other payload team members performs spacewalk tool fit-checks of the integrated Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor-1 (TSIS-1) payload and the EXPRESS Pallet Adapter. TSIS-1 is designed to measure the Sun's energy input into Earth by seeing how it is distributed across different wavelengths of light. These measurements help scientists establish Earth's total energy and how our planet's atmosphere responds to changes in the Sun's energy output. TSIS-1 will launch on SpaceX's 13th commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station.

  12. Sun Tracking Systems: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Yen; Chou, Po-Cheng; Chiang, Che-Ming; Lin, Chiu-Feng

    2009-01-01

    The output power produced by high-concentration solar thermal and photovoltaic systems is directly related to the amount of solar energy acquired by the system, and it is therefore necessary to track the sun's position with a high degree of accuracy. Many systems have been proposed to facilitate this task over the past 20 years. Accordingly, this paper commences by providing a high level overview of the sun tracking system field and then describes some of the more significant proposals for closed-loop and open-loop types of sun tracking systems. PMID:22412341

  13. Mediation analysis of decisional balance, sun avoidance and sunscreen use in the precontemplation and preparation stages for sun protection.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Rivas, Marimer; Velicer, Wayne F; Redding, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Mediation analyses of sun protection were conducted testing structural equation models using longitudinal data with three waves. An effect was said to be mediated if the standardised path between processes of change, decisional balance and sun protection outcomes was significant. Longitudinal models of sun protection using data from individuals in the precontemplation (N = 964) and preparation (N = 463) stages who participated of an expert system intervention. Nine processes of change for sun protection, decisional balance constructs of sun protection (pros and cons), sun avoidance behaviour and sunscreen use. With the exception of two processes in the preparation stage, processes of change predicted the pros (r = .126-.614), and the pros predicted the outcomes (r = .181-.272). Three models with the cons as mediator in the preparation stage, and none in the precontemplation stage, showed a mediated relationship between processes and outcomes. In general, mediation analyses found both the process of change-to-pros and pros-to-behaviour paths significant for both precontemplation and preparation stages, and for both sun avoidance and sunscreen use outcomes. Findings provide support for the importance of assessing the role of underlying risk cognitions in improving sun protection adherence.

  14. Coarse-Grained Models for Automated Fragmentation and Parametrization of Molecular Databases.

    PubMed

    Fraaije, Johannes G E M; van Male, Jan; Becherer, Paul; Serral Gracià, Rubèn

    2016-12-27

    We calibrate coarse-grained interaction potentials suitable for screening large data sets in top-down fashion. Three new algorithms are introduced: (i) automated decomposition of molecules into coarse-grained units (fragmentation); (ii) Coarse-Grained Reference Interaction Site Model-Hypernetted Chain (CG RISM-HNC) as an intermediate proxy for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD); and (iii) a simple top-down coarse-grained interaction potential/model based on activity coefficient theories from engineering (using COSMO-RS). We find that the fragment distribution follows Zipf and Heaps scaling laws. The accuracy in Gibbs energy of mixing calculations is a few tenths of a kilocalorie per mole. As a final proof of principle, we use full coarse-grained sampling through DPD thermodynamics integration to calculate log P OW for 4627 compounds with an average error of 0.84 log unit. The computational speeds per calculation are a few seconds for CG RISM-HNC and a few minutes for DPD thermodynamic integration.

  15. Quantum decimation in Hilbert space: Coarse graining without structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashmeet; Carroll, Sean M.

    2018-03-01

    We present a technique to coarse grain quantum states in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space. Our method is distinguished from other approaches by not relying on structures such as a preferred factorization of Hilbert space or a preferred set of operators (local or otherwise) in an associated algebra. Rather, we use the data corresponding to a given set of states, either specified independently or constructed from a single state evolving in time. Our technique is based on principle component analysis (PCA), and the resulting coarse-grained quantum states live in a lower-dimensional Hilbert space whose basis is defined using the underlying (isometric embedding) transformation of the set of fine-grained states we wish to coarse grain. Physically, the transformation can be interpreted to be an "entanglement coarse-graining" scheme that retains most of the global, useful entanglement structure of each state, while needing fewer degrees of freedom for its reconstruction. This scheme could be useful for efficiently describing collections of states whose number is much smaller than the dimension of Hilbert space, or a single state evolving over time.

  16. Coarse woody debris: Managing benefits and fire hazard in the recovering forest

    Treesearch

    James K. Brown; Elizabeth D. Reinhardt; Kylie A. Kramer

    2003-01-01

    Management of coarse woody debris following fire requires consideration of its positive and negative values. The ecological benefits of coarse woody debris and fire hazard considerations are summarized. This paper presents recommendations for desired ranges of coarse woody debris. Example simulations illustrate changes in debris over time and with varying management....

  17. The Sun in Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Bero, Elizabeth; Sever, Thomas L.

    1999-01-01

    Leveraging funds from NASA's Initiative to Develop Education through Astronomy and Space Science (IDEAS) program, we combined the expertise of an archaeoastronomer, a solar scientist, and a teacher to trace humankind's view of the Sun and how that has changed, from the time of Stonehenge in about 1800 B.C.E., to the time of the Maya in 700 C.E., up to the modem era. Our program was aimed at middle-school students in an attempt to explain not only how science is done today, but how science has evolved from the observations of ancient societies. From these varied cultures, we touched on methods of observing the Sun, ideas of the composition of the Sun, and the relationship of the Sun to everyday life. Further, using the von Braun Astronomical Society's Planetarium in Huntsville, Alabama as a test-bed for the program, we illustrated concepts such as solstices, equinoxes, and local noon with approximately 800 eighth grade students from the local area. Our presentation to SEPA will include a description of NASA's IDEAS program and how to go about partnering with a NASA astronomer, some slides from our planetarium program and web-site, and some hands-on activities.

  18. Sun-care product advertising in parenting magazines: what information does it provide about sun protection?

    PubMed

    Kang, Hannah; Walsh-Childers, Kim

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed the content of sun-care product advertisements in five major U.S. parenting magazines with high circulation: Family Circle, Parents, Family Fun, Parenting (Early Years), and Parenting (School Years). The study examined what information sun-care product advertisements tell parents about skin cancer prevention and about sunscreen use for themselves or for their children based on the Health Belief Model concepts of perceived benefits and perceived barriers. Results showed that the most commonly mentioned benefit of the product was that it blocks ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays. One-third of the ads promoted the product's effectiveness in overcoming four of the barriers that prevent people from using sunscreens: eye irritation, skin irritation, an unpleasant smell, and the need to reapply sunscreen too often or after physical activity. However, only a few of the ads provided information about the consequences of unprotected sun exposure or mentioned methods of sun protection or skin cancer prevention other than sunscreen use. We discuss the implications of these messages for parents' ability to understand correctly how to protect their children from damaging sun exposure.

  19. Remote sensing of atmospheric optical depth using a smartphone sun photometer.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tingting; Thompson, Jonathan E

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, smart phones have been explored for making a variety of mobile measurements. Smart phones feature many advanced sensors such as cameras, GPS capability, and accelerometers within a handheld device that is portable, inexpensive, and consistently located with an end user. In this work, a smartphone was used as a sun photometer for the remote sensing of atmospheric optical depth. The top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) irradiance was estimated through the construction of Langley plots on days when the sky was cloudless and clear. Changes in optical depth were monitored on a different day when clouds intermittently blocked the sun. The device demonstrated a measurement precision of 1.2% relative standard deviation for replicate photograph measurements (38 trials, 134 datum). However, when the accuracy of the method was assessed through using optical filters of known transmittance, a more substantial uncertainty was apparent in the data. Roughly 95% of replicate smart phone measured transmittances are expected to lie within ±11.6% of the true transmittance value. This uncertainty in transmission corresponds to an optical depth of approx. ±0.12-0.13 suggesting the smartphone sun photometer would be useful only in polluted areas that experience significant optical depths. The device can be used as a tool in the classroom to present how aerosols and gases effect atmospheric transmission. If improvements in measurement precision can be achieved, future work may allow monitoring networks to be developed in which citizen scientists submit acquired data from a variety of locations.

  20. Constructing Optimal Coarse-Grained Sites of Huge Biomolecules by Fluctuation Maximization.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhang, John Zenghui; Xia, Fei

    2016-04-12

    Coarse-grained (CG) models are valuable tools for the study of functions of large biomolecules on large length and time scales. The definition of CG representations for huge biomolecules is always a formidable challenge. In this work, we propose a new method called fluctuation maximization coarse-graining (FM-CG) to construct the CG sites of biomolecules. The defined residual in FM-CG converges to a maximal value as the number of CG sites increases, allowing an optimal CG model to be rigorously defined on the basis of the maximum. More importantly, we developed a robust algorithm called stepwise local iterative optimization (SLIO) to accelerate the process of coarse-graining large biomolecules. By means of the efficient SLIO algorithm, the computational cost of coarse-graining large biomolecules is reduced to within the time scale of seconds, which is far lower than that of conventional simulated annealing. The coarse-graining of two huge systems, chaperonin GroEL and lengsin, indicates that our new methods can coarse-grain huge biomolecular systems with up to 10,000 residues within the time scale of minutes. The further parametrization of CG sites derived from FM-CG allows us to construct the corresponding CG models for studies of the functions of huge biomolecular systems.

  1. Mechanical response of two polyimides through coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudarkodi, V.; Sooraj, K.; Nair, Nisanth N.; Basu, Sumit; Parandekar, Priya V.; Sinha, Nishant K.; Prakash, Om; Tsotsis, Tom

    2018-03-01

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations allow us to predict the mechanical responses of polymers, starting merely with a description of their molecular architectures. It is interesting to ask whether, given two competing molecular architectures, coarse-grained MD simulations can predict the differences that can be expected in their mechanical responses. We have studied two crosslinked polyimides PMR15 and HFPE52—both used in high- temperature applications—to assess whether the subtle differences in their uniaxial stress-strain responses, revealed by experiments, can be reproduced by carefully coarse-grained MD models. The coarse graining procedure for PMR15 is outlined in this work, while the coarse grain forcefields for HFPE52 are borrowed from an earlier one (Pandiyan et al 2015 Macromol. Theory Simul. 24 513-20). We show that the stress-strain responses of both these polyimides are qualitatively reproduced, and important insights into their deformation and failure mechanisms are obtained. More importantly, the differences in the molecular architecture between the polyimides carry over to the differences in the stress-strain responses in a manner that parallels the experimental results. A critical assessment of the successes and shortcomings of predicting mechanical responses through coarse-grained MD simulations has been made.

  2. Sun Shines in High-Energy X-rays

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-22

    X-rays stream off the sun in this first picture of the sun, overlaid on a picture taken by NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory SDO, taken by NASA NuSTAR. The field of view covers the west limb of the sun.

  3. The decomposition of fine and coarse roots: their global patterns and controlling factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyue; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Fine root decomposition represents a large carbon (C) cost to plants, and serves as a potential soil C source, as well as a substantial proportion of net primary productivity. Coarse roots differ markedly from fine roots in morphology, nutrient concentrations, functions, and decomposition mechanisms. Still poorly understood is whether a consistent global pattern exists between the decomposition of fine (<2 mm root diameter) and coarse (≥2 mm) roots. A comprehensive terrestrial root decomposition dataset, including 530 observations from 71 sampling sites, was thus used to compare global patterns of decomposition of fine and coarse roots. Fine roots decomposed significantly faster than coarse roots in middle latitude areas, but their decomposition in low latitude regions was not significantly different from that of coarse roots. Coarse root decomposition showed more dependence on climate, especially mean annual temperature (MAT), than did fine roots. Initial litter lignin content was the most important predictor of fine root decomposition, while lignin to nitrogen ratios, MAT, and mean annual precipitation were the most important predictors of coarse root decomposition. Our study emphasizes the necessity of separating fine roots and coarse roots when predicting the response of belowground C release to future climate changes. PMID:25942391

  4. Mediation Analysis of Decisional Balance, Sun Avoidance, and Sunscreen Use in the Precontemplation and Preparation Stages for Sun Protection

    PubMed Central

    Velicer, Wayne F.; Redding, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Mediation analyses of sun protection were conducted testing structural equation models using longitudinal data with three waves. An effect was said to be mediated if the standardized path between processes of change, decisional balance, and sun protection outcomes were significant. Design Longitudinal models of sun protection using data from individuals in the precontemplation (N=964) and preparation (N =463) stages who participated of an expert system intervention. Main Outcome Measures Nine processes of change for sun protection, decisional balance constructs of sun protection (pros and cons), sun avoidance behavior, and sunscreen use. Results With the exception of two processes in the preparation stage, processes of change predicted the pros (r= .126 to .614), and the pros predicted the outcomes (r= .181 to .272). Three models with the cons as mediator in the preparation stage, and none in the precontemplation stage, showed a mediated relationship between processes and outcomes. Conclusion In general, mediation analyses found both the process of change-to-pros and pros-to-behavior paths significant for both precontemplation and preparation stages, and for both sun avoidance and sunscreen use outcomes. Findings provide support for the importance of assessing the role of underlying risk cognitions in improving sun protection adherence. PMID:26040293

  5. Sun Exposure

    MedlinePlus

    ... pass through your skin and damage your skin cells. Sunburns are a sign of skin damage. Suntans ... after the sun's rays have already killed some cells and damaged others. UV rays can cause skin ...

  6. Sun Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurs on skin that has been exposed to sunlight. The most common form of sun allergy is ... have unusual, bothersome skin reactions after exposure to sunlight. For severe or persistent symptoms, you may need ...

  7. Systematic and simulation-free coarse graining of homopolymer melts: a relative-entropy-based study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Delian; Wang, Qiang

    2015-09-28

    We applied the systematic and simulation-free strategy proposed in our previous work (D. Yang and Q. Wang, J. Chem. Phys., 2015, 142, 054905) to the relative-entropy-based (RE-based) coarse graining of homopolymer melts. RE-based coarse graining provides a quantitative measure of the coarse-graining performance and can be used to select the appropriate analytic functional forms of the pair potentials between coarse-grained (CG) segments, which are more convenient to use than the tabulated (numerical) CG potentials obtained from structure-based coarse graining. In our general coarse-graining strategy for homopolymer melts using the RE framework proposed here, the bonding and non-bonded CG potentials are coupled and need to be solved simultaneously. Taking the hard-core Gaussian thread model (K. S. Schweizer and J. G. Curro, Chem. Phys., 1990, 149, 105) as the original system, we performed RE-based coarse graining using the polymer reference interaction site model theory under the assumption that the intrachain segment pair correlation functions of CG systems are the same as those in the original system, which de-couples the bonding and non-bonded CG potentials and simplifies our calculations (that is, we only calculated the latter). We compared the performance of various analytic functional forms of non-bonded CG pair potential and closures for CG systems in RE-based coarse graining, as well as the structural and thermodynamic properties of original and CG systems at various coarse-graining levels. Our results obtained from RE-based coarse graining are also compared with those from structure-based coarse graining.

  8. Investigation of Model Sunscreen Formulations Comparing the Sun Protection Factor, the Universal Sun Protection Factor and the Radical Formation Ratio.

    PubMed

    Syring, Felicia; Weigmann, Hans-Jürgen; Schanzer, Sabine; Meinke, Martina C; Knorr, Fanny; Lademann, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In view of globally rising skin cancer rates and harmful effects exerted by sunlight throughout the ultraviolet, visible and infrared ranges, an objective, safe and comprehensive method for determining sunscreen efficacy is required in order to warrant safe sun exposure. In this study, the influence of characteristic active ingredients (chemical filters, physical filters and antioxidants) on different sunscreen indicators, including the universal sun protection factor and the radical formation ratio, was determined and compared to their influence on sun protection factor values. Spectroscopic universal sun protection factor measurements were conducted ex vivo by analyzing tape strips taken from human skin, and radical formation ratio determination was performed via electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy using porcine ear skin ex vivo. The sun protection factor determination was conducted according to ISO standards (ISO 24444:2010). It was shown that chemical filters provide a protective effect which was measurable by all methods examined (spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and erythema formation). Physical filters, when used as single active ingredients, increased protective values in universal sun protection factor and sun protection factor measurements but exhibited no significant effect on universal sun protection factor measurements when used in combination with chemical filters or antioxidants. Antioxidants were shown to increase sun protection factor values. Radical formation ratio values were shown to be influenced merely by chemical filters, leading to the conclusion that the universal sun protection factor is the most suitable efficacy indicator for the ultraviolet range. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Distributed sensor management for space situational awareness via a negotiation game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Bin; Shen, Dan; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik; Chen, Genshe

    2015-05-01

    Space situational awareness (SSA) is critical to many space missions serving weather analysis, communications, and navigation. However, the number of sensors used in space situational awareness is limited which hinders collision avoidance prediction, debris assessment, and efficient routing. Hence, it is critical to use such sensor resources efficiently. In addition, it is desired to develop the SSA sensor management algorithm in a distributed manner. In this paper, a distributed sensor management approach using the negotiation game (NG-DSM) is proposed for the SSA. Specifically, the proposed negotiation game is played by each sensor and its neighboring sensors. The bargaining strategies are developed for each sensor based on negotiating for accurately tracking desired targets (e.g., satellite, debris, etc.) . The proposed NG-DSM method is tested in a scenario which includes eight space objects and three different sensor modalities which include a space based optical sensor, a ground radar, or a ground Electro-Optic sensor. The geometric relation between the sensor, the Sun, and the space object is also considered. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed NG-DSM sensor management methods, which facilitates an application of multiple-sensor multiple-target tracking for space situational awareness.

  10. NONLINEAR MULTIGRID SOLVER EXPLOITING AMGe COARSE SPACES WITH APPROXIMATION PROPERTIES

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Christensen, Max La Cour; Villa, Umberto E.; Engsig-Karup, Allan P.

    The paper introduces a nonlinear multigrid solver for mixed nite element discretizations based on the Full Approximation Scheme (FAS) and element-based Algebraic Multigrid (AMGe). The main motivation to use FAS for unstruc- tured problems is the guaranteed approximation property of the AMGe coarse spaces that were developed recently at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These give the ability to derive stable and accurate coarse nonlinear discretization problems. The previous attempts (including ones with the original AMGe method, [5, 11]), were less successful due to lack of such good approximation properties of the coarse spaces. With coarse spaces with approximation properties, ourmore » FAS approach on un- structured meshes should be as powerful/successful as FAS on geometrically re ned meshes. For comparison, Newton's method and Picard iterations with an inner state-of-the-art linear solver is compared to FAS on a nonlinear saddle point problem with applications to porous media ow. It is demonstrated that FAS is faster than Newton's method and Picard iterations for the experiments considered here. Due to the guaranteed approximation properties of our AMGe, the coarse spaces are very accurate, providing a solver with the potential for mesh-independent convergence on general unstructured meshes.« less

  11. Dissemination of go sun smart in outdoor recreation: effect of program exposure on sun protection of guests at high-altitude ski areas.

    PubMed

    Walkosz, Barbara J; Buller, David B; Andersen, Peter A; Scott, Michael D; Dignan, Mark B; Cutter, Gary R; Liu, Xia; Maloy, Julie A

    2014-09-01

    Go Sun Smart is a theory-based health communication program designed to influence sun-protection behaviors of employees and guests at high-altitude ski areas to reduce skin cancer risk. The effects of Go Sun Smart, in a Phase IV dissemination randomized posttest-only trial, on sun-protection behaviors of ski area guests are reported. Program use was assessed by on-site observation and guest message exposure, and sun protection was measured in intercept surveys at ski areas. Dissemination strategy-enhanced versus basic-was not significantly related to sun safety practices. Additional analyses examined the relation between message exposure and guests' sun safety practices. Ski areas displaying at least 6 Go Sun Smart materials in guest-only areas and 9 Go Sun Smart materials throughout the area increased guests' message exposure. Higher message exposure within the high-use ski areas was associated with improved sun protection by guests but not within the low-use ski areas. The authors underscore the importance of program implementation and message exposure on the success of evidence-based health communication efforts applied industrywide.

  12. Sun meter

    DOEpatents

    Younskevicius, Robert E.

    1978-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive device for measuring the radiation energy of the sun impinging on the device. The measurement of the energy over an extended period of time is accomplished without moving parts or tracking mechanisms.

  13. Sun tracker for clear or cloudy weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. R.; White, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    Sun tracker orients solar collector so that they absorb maximum possible sunlight without being fooled by bright clouds, holes in cloud cover, or other atmospheric conditions. Tracker follows sun within 0.25 deg arc and is accurate within + or - 5 deg when sun is hidden.

  14. The Award Winning Black Suns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, Jarita

    2018-01-01

    Black Suns: An Astrophysics Adventure is a documentary film focusing on the annular and total solar eclipses of 2012. We made a different kind of astronomy documentary showing the human aspects rather than just focusing on pretty astronomy pictures. The film combines personal stories with science. Our heroes are Hakeem Oluseyi and Alphonse Sterling, who valiantly travel to study the solar corona during total solar eclipses. The goals of the film included presenting three dimensional scientists, to show their paths to becoming astrophysicists, and to show them as they collect data and work as scientists. Drama and tension surround taking data during the small window of time during totality. The Black Suns was filmed in Tokyo, Cairns, Tucson, and Melbourne Florida. Uniquely, the film began through a Kickstarter campaign to fund travel and filming in Tokyo. Many American Astronomical Society members donated to the film! Black Suns won the Jury Prize at the 2017 Art of Brooklyn Film Festival. Black Suns will be screening in full on ???.

  15. Prototype of sun projector device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihsan; Dermawan, B.

    2016-11-01

    One way to introduce astronomy to public, including students, can be handled by solar observation. The widely held device for this purpose is coelostat and heliostat. Besides using filter attached to a device such as telescope, it is safest to use indirect way for observing the Sun. The main principle of the indirect way is deflecting the sun light and projecting image of the sun on a screen. We design and build a simple and low-cost astronomical device, serving as a supplement to increase public service, especially for solar observation. Without using any digital and intricate supporting equipment, people can watch and relish image of the Sun in comfortable condition, i.e. in a sheltered or shady place. Here we describe a design and features of our prototype of the device, which still, of course, has some limitations. In the future, this prototype can be improved for more efficient and useful applications.

  16. Biology of the Coarse Aerosol Mode: Insights Into Urban Aerosol Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueker, E.; O'Mullan, G. D.; Montero, A.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial aerosols have been understudied, despite implications for climate studies, public health, and biogeochemical cycling. Because viable bacterial aerosols are often associated with coarse aerosol particles, our limited understanding of the coarse aerosol mode further impedes our ability to develop models of viable bacterial aerosol production, transport, and fate in the outdoor environment, particularly in crowded urban centers. To address this knowledge gap, we studied aerosol particle biology and size distributions in a broad range of urban and rural settings. Our previously published findings suggest a link between microbial viability and local production of coarse aerosols from waterways, waste treatment facilities, and terrestrial systems in urban and rural environments. Both in coastal Maine and in New York Harbor, coarse aerosols and viable bacterial aerosols increased with increasing wind speeds above 4 m s-1, a dynamic that was observed over time scales ranging from minutes to hours. At a New York City superfund-designated waterway regularly contaminated with raw sewage, aeration remediation efforts resulted in significant increases of coarse aerosols and bacterial aerosols above that waterway. Our current research indicates that bacterial communities in aerosols at this superfund site have a greater similarity to bacterial communities in the contaminated waterway with wind speeds above 4 m s-1. Size-fractionated sampling of viable microbial aerosols along the urban waterfront has also revealed significant shifts in bacterial aerosols, and specifically bacteria associated with coarse aerosols, when wind direction changes from onshore to offshore. This research highlights the key connections between bacterial aerosol viability and the coarse aerosol fraction, which is important in assessments of production, transport, and fate of bacterial contamination in the urban environment.

  17. Comet ISON Streaks Toward the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-22

    Date: 19 Nov 2013 Comet ISON shows off its tail in this three-minute exposure taken on 19 Nov. 2013 at 6:10 a.m. EST, using a 14-inch telescope located at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The comet is just nine days away from its close encounter with the sun; hopefully it will survive to put on a nice show during the first week of December. The star images are trailed because the telescope is tracking on the comet, which is now exhibiting obvious motion with respect to the background stars over a period of minutes. At the time of this image, Comet ISON was some 44 million miles from the sun -- and 80 million miles from Earth -- moving at a speed of 136,700 miles per hour. Credit: NASA/MSFC/Aaron Kingery -------- More details on Comet ISON: Comet ISON began its trip from the Oort cloud region of our solar system and is now travelling toward the sun. The comet will reach its closest approach to the sun on Thanksgiving Day -- 28 Nov 2013 -- skimming just 730,000 miles above the sun's surface. If it comes around the sun without breaking up, the comet will be visible in the Northern Hemisphere with the naked eye, and from what we see now, ISON is predicted to be a particularly bright and beautiful comet. Catalogued as C/2012 S1, Comet ISON was first spotted 585 million miles away in September 2012. This is ISON's very first trip around the sun, which means it is still made of pristine matter from the earliest days of the solar system’s formation, its top layers never having been lost by a trip near the sun. Comet ISON is, like all comets, a dirty snowball made up of dust and frozen gases like water, ammonia, methane and carbon dioxide -- some of the fundamental building blocks that scientists believe led to the formation of the planets 4.5 billion years ago. NASA has been using a vast fleet of spacecraft, instruments, and space- and Earth-based telescope, in order to learn more about this time capsule from when the solar system first formed. The journey along the way

  18. Coarse coding and discourse comprehension in adults with right hemisphere brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, Connie A.; Scharp, Victoria L.; Meigh, Kimberly M.; Fassbinder, Wiltrud

    2009-01-01

    Background Various investigators suggest that some discourse-level comprehension difficulties in adults with right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) have a lexical-semantic basis. As words are processed, the intact right hemisphere arouses and sustains activation of a wide-ranging network of secondary or peripheral meanings and features—a phenomenon dubbed “coarse coding”. Coarse coding impairment has been postulated to underpin some prototypical RHD comprehension deficits, such as difficulties with nonliteral language interpretation, discourse integration, some kinds of inference generation, and recovery when a reinterpretation is needed. To date, however, no studies have addressed the hypothesised link between coarse coding deficit and discourse comprehension in RHD. Aims The current investigation examined whether coarse coding was related to performance on two measures of narrative comprehension in adults with RHD. Methods & Procedures Participants were 32 adults with unilateral RHD from cerebrovascular accident, and 38 adults without brain damage. Coarse coding was operationalised as poor activation of peripheral/weakly related semantic features of words. For the coarse coding assessment, participants listened to spoken sentences that ended in a concrete noun. Each sentence was followed by a spoken target phoneme string. Targets were subordinate semantic features of the sentence-final nouns that were incompatible with their dominant mental representations (e.g., “rotten” for apple). Targets were presented at two post-noun intervals. A lexical decision task was used to gauge both early activation and maintenance of activation of these weakly related semantic features. One of the narrative tasks assessed comprehension of implied main ideas and details, while the other indexed high-level inferencing and integration. Both comprehension tasks were presented auditorily. For all tasks, accuracy of performance was the dependent measure. Correlations were computed

  19. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M.

    1996-01-01

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position.

  20. CME leaving the Sun [Video

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Animation of a CME leaving the Sun, slamming into our magnetosphere. Credit: NASA/GSFC/SOHO/ESA Sound: Juan Carlos Garcia To learn more go to the SOHO website: sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/home.html To learn more about NASA's Sun Earth Day go here: sunearthday.nasa.gov/2010/index.php

  1. Knowledge and practice of sun protection in schools in South Africa where no national sun protection programme exists.

    PubMed

    Wright, Caradee Y; Reeder, Anthony I; Albers, Patricia N

    2016-04-01

    Interventions in primary schools that increase sun-protective behaviours and decrease ultraviolet radiation exposure, sunburn incidence and skin cancer risk can be effective. SunSmart School Accreditation Programmes (SSAP) are recommended. Prior to SSAP implementation in South Africa, we explored the feasibility of obtaining national baseline information and investigated possible associations between strategies regarding sun protection in schools and students' responses to a questionnaire. Principals from randomly selected urban government schools in all nine South African provinces completed a questionnaire and 679 students were surveyed. The mean sun-related knowledge and behaviour scores of students were 4 (range: 1-7) and 3 (range-0-8) out of 9, respectively. The mean school sun protection effort score was 4 out of 14. There were no statistically significant correlations between students' knowledge or behaviour scores and their school score. The World Health Organization recommends an SSAP to address policy, practice and curriculum changes to support sun protection of students. This cross-sectional study demonstrates the feasibility of, and need for, a larger baseline study with longitudinal, multi-variable follow-up which includes other influential factors, such as parent support. Such research could quantify the impact of the SSAP and identify which key factors influence the sun-related knowledge and behaviours of students. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Coarse-graining using the relative entropy and simplex-based optimization methods in VOTCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühle, Victor; Jochum, Mara; Koschke, Konstantin; Aluru, N. R.; Kremer, Kurt; Mashayak, S. Y.; Junghans, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    Coarse-grained (CG) simulations are an important tool to investigate systems on larger time and length scales. Several methods for systematic coarse-graining were developed, varying in complexity and the property of interest. Thus, the question arises which method best suits a specific class of system and desired application. The Versatile Object-oriented Toolkit for Coarse-graining Applications (VOTCA) provides a uniform platform for coarse-graining methods and allows for their direct comparison. We present recent advances of VOTCA, namely the implementation of the relative entropy method and downhill simplex optimization for coarse-graining. The methods are illustrated by coarse-graining SPC/E bulk water and a water-methanol mixture. Both CG models reproduce the pair distributions accurately. SYM is supported by AFOSR under grant 11157642 and by NSF under grant 1264282. CJ was supported in part by the NSF PHY11-25915 at KITP. K. Koschke acknowledges funding by the Nestle Research Center.

  3. Solar Spectral Irradiance at 782 nm as Measured by the SES Sensor Onboard Picard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Irbah, A.; Cessateur, G.; Bekki, S.; Damé, L.; Bolsée, D.; Pereira, N.

    2016-04-01

    Picard is a satellite dedicated to the simultaneous measurement of the total and solar spectral irradiance, the solar diameter, the solar shape, and to the Sun's interior through the methods of helioseismology. The satellite was launched on June 15, 2010, and pursued its data acquisitions until March 2014. A Sun Ecartometry Sensor (SES) was developed to provide the stringent pointing requirements of the satellite. The SES sensor produced an image of the Sun at 782 ± 2.5 nm. From the SES data, we obtained a new time series of the solar spectral irradiance at 782 nm from 2010 to 2014. During this period of Solar Cycle 24, the amplitude of the changes has been of the order of ± 0.08 %, corresponding to a range of about 2× 10^{-3} W m^{-2} nm^{-1}. SES observations provided a qualitatively consistent evolution of the solar spectral irradiance variability at 782 nm. SES data show similar amplitude variations with the semi-empirical model Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S), whereas the Spectral Irradiance Monitor instrument (SIM) onboard the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment satellite (SORCE) highlights higher amplitudes.

  4. Operational support for Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) attitude sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M.; Garber, A.; Lambertson, M.; Raina, P.; Underwood, S.; Woodruff, C.

    1994-01-01

    The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) has several sensors that can provide observations for attitude determination: star trackers, Sun sensors (gimbaled as well as fixed), magnetometers, Earth sensors, and gyroscopes. The accuracy of these observations is important for mission success. Analysts on the Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) UARS Attitude task monitor these data to evaluate the performance of the sensors taking corrective action when appropriate. Monitoring activities range from examining the data during real-time passes to constructing long-term trend plots. Increasing residuals (differences) between the observed and expected quantities is a prime indicator of sensor problems. Residual increases may be due to alignment shifts and/or degradation in sensor output. Residuals from star tracker data revealed and anomalous behavior that contributes to attitude errors. Compensating for this behavior has significantly reduced the attitude errors. This paper discusses the methods used by the FDF UARS attitude task for maintenance of the attitude sensors, including short- and long-term monitoring, trend analysis, and calibration methods, and presents the results obtained through corrective action.

  5. Sun safety measures among construction workers in Britain.

    PubMed

    Madgwick, P; Houdmont, J; Randall, R

    2011-09-01

    Relative to other occupational groups in Britain, construction workers have a high incidence of skin cancer attributable to sun exposure. The importance of sun safety measures to minimize the risk of skin cancer is recognized in the literature; however, little is known about the factors associated with their use by construction workers. Knowledge in this area could help inform interventions to encourage sun safety behaviour within the sector. To investigate socio-demographic and occupational characteristics associated with the use of sun safety measures among construction workers in Britain. Data collection was by means of a self-administered questionnaire, which was sent to 360 construction workers. Information collected included socio-demographic and occupational characteristics and the use of sun safety measures. Participants worked outdoors for an average of 6.6 h/day. Three specific sun safety measures were used by the majority of respondents. Logistic regression analyses showed that certain socio-demographic and occupational factors were associated with the use of sun safety measures. In particular, receipt of sun safety training was positively associated with the wearing of long sleeved, loose fitting tops and trousers (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.02-2.80) and sunglasses (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.10-3.13). The results highlight the importance of employer-led sun safety interventions in the British construction industry. Interventions that take account of demographic and occupational characteristics are likely to have a positive impact in terms of improving workers' use of sun safety measures.

  6. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Hively, L.M.

    1996-04-30

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position. 17 figs.

  7. Creation of a Digital Surface Model and Extraction of Coarse Woody Debris from Terrestrial Laser Scans in an Open Eucalypt Woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, J.; Phinn, S. R.; Armston, J.; Scarth, P.; Eyre, T.

    2014-12-01

    Coarse woody debris (CWD) provides important habitat for many species and plays a vital role in nutrient cycling within an ecosystem. In addition, CWD makes an important contribution to forest biomass and fuel loads. Airborne or space based remote sensing instruments typically do not detect CWD beneath the forest canopy. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) provides a ground based method for three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of surface features and CWD. This research produced a 3-D reconstruction of the ground surface and automatically classified coarse woody debris from registered TLS scans. The outputs will be used to inform the development of a site-based index for the assessment of forest condition, and quantitative assessments of biomass and fuel loads. A survey grade terrestrial laser scanner (Riegl VZ400) was used to scan 13 positions, in an open eucalypt woodland site at Karawatha Forest Park, near Brisbane, Australia. Scans were registered, and a digital surface model (DSM) produced using an intensity threshold and an iterative morphological filter. The DSMs produced from single scans were compared to the registered multi-scan point cloud using standard error metrics including: Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE), Mean Squared Error (MSE), range, absolute error and signed error. In addition the DSM was compared to a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) produced from Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS). Coarse woody debris was subsequently classified from the DSM using laser pulse properties, including: width and amplitude, as well as point spatial relationships (e.g. nearest neighbour slope vectors). Validation of the coarse woody debris classification was completed using true-colour photographs co-registered to the TLS point cloud. The volume and length of the coarse woody debris was calculated from the classified point cloud. A representative network of TLS sites will allow for up-scaling to large area assessment using airborne or space based sensors to monitor forest

  8. Comet Plunge and CME on the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    A small comet was streaking towards the Sun when the Sun blew out a "halo" coronal mass ejection (CME) Aug. 19-20, 2013). The CME originated from the far side of the Sun and did not have any interaction with the comet. The comet, only perhaps 30 meters across, was not seen after it went out of view, likely disintegrated by the heat and radiation from the Sun. We call this a "full halo" CME since the front edge of the CME is expanding in all directions around the Sun like a halo. The images were taken by SOHO's coronagraphs in which a disk (red) blocks the Sun and some of the area around it so we can see faint structures beyond that. Here we superimposed the Sun from NASA's SDO. The movie covers about five hours of activity and can be seen here: www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/9601034896/ Credit: NASA/Goddard/SOHO NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  9. Encouraging Sun Safety for Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Kathy; Tillotson, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    The rise in the number of cases of skin cancers, both melanomas and nonmelanomas, has prompted increased awareness and educational efforts to limit sun exposure. Because 80% of lifetime sun exposure occurs before the age of 18, educating parents and adolescents to incorporate sun-protective behaviors into daily routines is particularly important.…

  10. Acurex Parabolic Dish Concentrator (PDC-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overly, P.; Bedard, R.

    1982-01-01

    The design approach, rationale for the selected configuration, and the development status of a cost effective point-focus solar concentrator are discussed. The low-cost concentrator reflective surface design is based on the use of a thin, backsilvered mirror glass reflector bonded to a molded structural plastic substrate. The foundation, support, and drive subassembles are described. A hybrid, two-axis, Sun tracking control system based on microprocessor technology was selected. Coarse synthetic tracking is achieved through a microcomputer-based control system to calculate Sun position for transient periods of cloud cover as well as sundown and sunrise positioning. Accurate active tracking is achieved by two-axis optical sensors. Results of the reflective panel demonstration tests investigating slope error, hail impact survivability, temperature/humidity cycling, longitudinal strength/bending stiffness, and torsional stiffness are discussed.

  11. Cosmic Influence on the Sun-Earth Environment

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Saumitra

    2008-01-01

    SOHO satellite data reveals geophysical changes before sudden changes in the Earth's Sun-Earth environment. The influence of extragalactic changes on the Sun as well as the Sun-Earth environment seems to be both periodic and episodic. The periodic changes in terms of solar maxima and minima occur every 11 years, whereas the episodic changes can happen at any time. Episodic changes can be monitored by cosmic ray detectors as a sudden increase or decrease of activity. During these solar and cosmic anomaly periods the environment of the Earth is affected. The Star-Sun-Earth connection has the potential to influence the thermosphere, atmosphere, ionosphere and lithosphere. Initial correlation of the cosmic and Sun-Earth connection has shown the possibility of predicting earthquakes, sudden changes in atmospheric temperatures and erratic rainfall/snowfall patterns. PMID:27873955

  12. Innovations in the flotation of fine and coarse particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornasiero, D.; Filippov, L. O.

    2017-07-01

    Research on the mechanisms of particle-bubble interaction has provided valuable information on how to improve the flotation of fine (<20 µm) and coarse particles (>100 µm) with novel flotation machines which provide higher collision and attachment efficiencies of fine particles with bubbles and lower detachment of the coarse particles. Also, new grinding methods and technologies have reduced energy consumption in mining and produced better mineral liberation and therefore flotation performance.

  13. Comet ISON Approaching the Sun [hd video

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-27

    This movie from NASA’s STEREO spacecraft's Heliospheric Imager shows Comet ISON, Mercury, Comet Encke and Earth over a five-day period from Nov. 20 to Nov. 25, 2013. The sun sits right of the field of view of this camera. Comet ISON, which will round the sun on Nov. 28, is what's known as a sungrazing comet, due to its close approach. Foreshortening or the angle at which these images were obtained make Earth appear as if it is closer to the sun than Mercury. If you look closely you will also see a dimmer and smaller comet Encke near comet ISON. A comet’s journey through the solar system is perilous and violent. A giant ejection of solar material from the sun could rip its tail off. Before it reaches Mars -- at some 230 million miles away from the sun -- the radiation of the sun begins to boil its water, the first step toward breaking apart. And, if it survives all this, the intense radiation and pressure as it flies near the surface of the sun could destroy it altogether. Even if the comet does not survive, tracking its journey will help scientists understand what the comet is made of, how it reacts to its environment, and what this explains about the origins of the solar system. Closer to the sun, watching how the comet and its tail interact with the vast solar atmosphere can teach scientists more about the sun itself. Image Credit: NASA/STEREO NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  14. Resolving Properties of Polymers and Nanoparticle Assembly through Coarse-Grained Computational Studies.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Grest, Gary S.

    2017-09-01

    Coupled length and time scales determine the dynamic behavior of polymers and polymer nanocomposites and underlie their unique properties. To resolve the properties over large time and length scales it is imperative to develop coarse grained models which retain the atomistic specificity. Here we probe the degree of coarse graining required to simultaneously retain significant atomistic details a nd access large length and time scales. The degree of coarse graining in turn sets the minimum length scale instrumental in defining polymer properties and dynamics. Using polyethylene as a model system, we probe how the coarse - graining scale affects themore » measured dynamics with different number methylene group s per coarse - grained beads. Using these models we simulate polyethylene melts for times over 500 ms to study the viscoelastic properties of well - entangled polymer melts and large nanoparticle assembly as the nanoparticles are driven close enough to form nanostructures.« less

  15. Influence of age, gender, educational level and self-estimation of skin type on sun exposure habits and readiness to increase sun protection.

    PubMed

    Falk, M; Anderson, C D

    2013-04-01

    Sun exposure habits and the propensity to undertake sun protection differ between individuals. Not least in primary prevention of skin cancer, aiming at reducing ultraviolet (UV) exposure, knowledge about these factors may be of importance. The aim of the present study was to investigate, in a primary health care (PHC) population, the relationship between sun exposure habits/sun protection behaviour/readiness to increase sun protection and gender, age, educational level and skin UV-sensitivity. The baseline data from a previously performed RCT on skin cancer prevention was used. 415 patients, aged > 18 years, visiting a PHC centre in southern Sweden, filled-out a questionnaire mapping sun exposure, readiness to increase sun protection according to the Transtheoretical Model of Behaviour Change (TTM), and the above mentioned factors. Female gender was associated with more frequent suntanning (p < 0.001) and sunbed use (p < 0.05), but also with more extensive sunscreen use (p < 0.001). High age was in general associated with low level of sun exposure and high level of protection. Subjects with low educational level reported less frequent sunscreen use than those with higher educational level, and also chose lower SPF (p < 0.001). For almost all parameters, high skin UV-sensitivity was associated with markedly lower sun exposure (p < 0.001) and more pronounced readiness to increase sun protection. Females and subjects with high educational level reported higher readiness to increase sunscreen use than males and subjects with lower educational level (p < 0.001). Gender, age, educational level and skin type appear to be important factors affecting sun exposure habits and sun protection behaviour, which supports the idea of appropriate mapping of these factors in patients in order to individualise sun protection advice according to the individual patient situation and capabilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Adaptive sensor-based ultra-high accuracy solar concentrator tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkley, Jordyn; Hassanzadeh, Ali

    2017-09-01

    Conventional solar trackers use information of the sun's position, either by direct sensing or by GPS. Our method uses the shading of the receiver. This, coupled with nonimaging optics design allows us to achieve ultra-high concentration. Incorporating a sensor based shadow tracking method with a two stage concentration solar hybrid parabolic trough allows the system to maintain high concentration with acute accuracy.

  17. Fly me to the Sun! ESA inaugurates the European Project on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-11-01

    In an initiative mounted by ECSITE (European Collaborative for Science, Industry and Technology Exhibitions) with funding from the European Commission and under the supervision, coordination and co-sponsorship of ESA, five teams of youngsters (16-18 years old) from Belgium, France, Germany, Italy and the Netherlands were selected and coordinated by European science museums from each of their countries (Musée des Sciences et des Techniques - Parentville, B; Cité de l'Espace - Toulouse, F; Deutsches Museum - Munich, D; Fondazione IDIS - Naples, I; Foundation Noordwijk Space Expo - Noordwijk, NL). The teams each focused on a theme related to solar research: "How does the Sun work?" (I), "The Sun as a star" (F), "Solar activity" (NL), "Observing the Sun" (D), "Humans and the Sun" (B), and built exhibition "modules" that they will present at the inauguration, in the context of European Science and Technology Week 2000 (6-10 November), promoted by the European Commission. During the two-day event, a jury of representatives of other European science and technology museums, ESA scientists, a science journalist, and two ESA astronauts (Frank de Winne and Andre Kuipers) will judge the youngsters' exhibition modules on the basis of their scientific correctness, their museological value and the commitment shown by the young "communication experts". The winning team will be officially announced on 9 November. The prize is a weekend at the Space Camp in Redu, Belgium. The objective of the European Project on the Sun is educational. It aims, through the direct and "fresh" involvement of youngsters, to heighten European citizens' awareness of space research in general and the Sun's influence on our daily lives in particular. The role of the European Space Agency as reference point in Europe for solar research has been fundamental to the project. From ESA's perspective, EPOS is part of this autumn's wider communication initiative called the Solar Season, which is highlighting ESA

  18. Generating Land Surface Reflectance for the New Generation of Geostationary Satellite Sensors with the MAIAC Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Wang, Y.; Hashimoto, H.; Li, S.; Takenaka, H.; Higuchi, A.; Lyapustin, A.; Nemani, R. R.

    2017-12-01

    The latest generation of geostationary satellite sensors, including the GOES-16/ABI and the Himawari 8/AHI, provide exciting capability to monitor land surface at very high temporal resolutions (5-15 minute intervals) and with spatial and spectral characteristics that mimic the Earth Observing System flagship MODIS. However, geostationary data feature changing sun angles at constant view geometry, which is almost reciprocal to sun-synchronous observations. Such a challenge needs to be carefully addressed before one can exploit the full potential of the new sources of data. Here we take on this challenge with Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm, recently developed for accurate and globally robust applications like the MODIS Collection 6 re-processing. MAIAC first grids the top-of-atmosphere measurements to a fixed grid so that the spectral and physical signatures of each grid cell are stacked ("remembered") over time and used to dramatically improve cloud/shadow/snow detection, which is by far the dominant error source in the remote sensing. It also exploits the changing sun-view geometry of the geostationary sensor to characterize surface BRDF with augmented angular resolution for accurate aerosol retrievals and atmospheric correction. The high temporal resolutions of the geostationary data indeed make the BRDF retrieval much simpler and more robust as compared with sun-synchronous sensors such as MODIS. As a prototype test for the geostationary-data processing pipeline on NASA Earth Exchange (GEONEX), we apply MAIAC to process 18 months of data from Himawari 8/AHI over Australia. We generate a suite of test results, including the input TOA reflectance and the output cloud mask, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and the atmospherically-corrected surface reflectance for a variety of geographic locations, terrain, and land cover types. Comparison with MODIS data indicates a general agreement between the retrieved surface reflectance

  19. Simulating optoelectronic systems for remote sensing with SENSOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, Anko

    2003-04-01

    The consistent end-to-end simulation of airborne and spaceborne remote sensing systems is an important task and sometimes the only way for the adaptation and optimization of a sensor and its observation conditions, the choice and test of algorithms for data processing, error estimation and the evaluation of the capabilities of the whole sensor system. The presented software simulator SENSOR (Software ENvironment for the Simulation of Optical Remote sensing systems) includes a full model of the sensor hardware, the observed scene, and the atmosphere in between. It allows the simulation of a wide range of optoelectronic systems for remote sensing. The simulator consists of three parts. The first part describes the geometrical relations between scene, sun, and the remote sensing system using a ray tracing algorithm. The second part of the simulation environment considers the radiometry. It calculates the at-sensor radiance using a pre-calculated multidimensional lookup-table taking the atmospheric influence on the radiation into account. Part three consists of an optical and an electronic sensor model for the generation of digital images. Using SENSOR for an optimization requires the additional application of task-specific data processing algorithms. The principle of the end-to-end-simulation approach is explained, all relevant concepts of SENSOR are discussed, and examples of its use are given. The verification of SENSOR is demonstrated.

  20. The risks and benefits of sun exposure 2016.

    PubMed

    Hoel, David G; Berwick, Marianne; de Gruijl, Frank R; Holick, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Public health authorities in the United States are recommending that men, women and children reduce their exposure to sunlight, based on concerns that this exposure will promote skin cancer. On the other hand, data show that increasing numbers of Americans suffer from vitamin D deficiencies and serious health problems caused by insufficient sun exposure. The body of science concerning the benefits of moderate sun exposure is growing rapidly, and is causing a different perception of sun/UV as it relates to human health. Melanoma and its relationship to sun exposure and sunburn is not adequately addressed in most of the scientific literature. Reports of favorable health outcomes related to adequate serum 25(OH)D concentration or vitamin D supplementation have been inappropriately merged, so that benefits of sun exposure other than production of vitamin D are not adequately described. This review of recent studies and their analyses consider the risks and benefits of sun exposure which indicate that insufficient sun exposure is an emerging public health problem. This review considers the studies that have shown a wide range health benefits from sun/UV exposure. These benefits include among others various types of cancer, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer disease/dementia, myopia and macular degeneration, diabetes and multiple sclerosis. The message of sun avoidance must be changed to acceptance of non-burning sun exposure sufficient to achieve serum 25(OH)D concentration of 30 ng/mL or higher in the sunny season and the general benefits of UV exposure beyond those of vitamin D.

  1. Observing the Sun with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a space telescope primarily designed to detect high-energy X-rays from faint, distant astrophysical sources. Recently, however, its occasionally been pointing much closer to home, with the goal of solving a few longstanding mysteries about the Sun.Intensity maps from an observation of a quiet-Sun region near the north solar pole and an active region just below the solar limb. The quiet-Sun data will be searched for small flares that could be heating the solar corona, and the high-altitude emission above the limb may provide clues about particle acceleration. [Adapted from Grefenstette et al. 2016]An Unexpected TargetThough we have a small fleet of space telescopes designed to observe the Sun, theres an important gap: until recently, there was no focusing telescope making solar observations in the hard X-ray band (above ~3 keV). Conveniently, there is a tool capable of doing this: NuSTAR.Though NuSTARs primary mission is to observe faint astrophysical X-ray sources, a team of scientists has recently conducted a series of observations in which NuSTAR was temporarily repurposed and turned to focus on the Sun instead.These observations pose an interesting challenge precisely because of NuSTARs extreme sensitivity: pointing at such a nearby, bright source can quickly swamp the detectors. But though the instrument cant be used to observe the bright flares and outbursts from the Sun, its the perfect tool for examining the parts of the Sun weve been unable to explore in hard X-rays before now such as faint flares, or the quiet, inactive solar surface.In a recently published study led by Brian Grefenstette (California Institute of Technology), the team describes the purpose and initial results of NuSTARs first observations of the Sun.Solar MysteriesWhat is NuSTAR hoping to accomplish with its solar observations? There are two main questions that hard X-ray observations may help to answer.How are particles accelerated in

  2. Sun Tracker Operates a Year Between Calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    Low-cost modification of Sun tracker automatically compensates equation of time and seasonal variations in declination of Sun. Output of Scotch Yoke drive mechanism adjusted through proper sizing of crank, yoke and other components and through choice of gear ratios to approximate seasonal northand south motion of Sun. Used for industrial solar-energy monitoring and in remote meteorological stations.

  3. Coarse Grid CFD for underresolved simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Class, Andreas G.; Viellieber, Mathias O.; Himmel, Steffen R.

    2010-11-01

    CFD simulation of the complete reactor core of a nuclear power plant requires exceedingly huge computational resources so that this crude power approach has not been pursued yet. The traditional approach is 1D subchannel analysis employing calibrated transport models. Coarse grid CFD is an attractive alternative technique based on strongly under-resolved CFD and the inviscid Euler equations. Obviously, using inviscid equations and coarse grids does not resolve all the physics requiring additional volumetric source terms modelling viscosity and other sub-grid effects. The source terms are implemented via correlations derived from fully resolved representative simulations which can be tabulated or computed on the fly. The technique is demonstrated for a Carnot diffusor and a wire-wrap fuel assembly [1]. [4pt] [1] Himmel, S.R. phd thesis, Stuttgart University, Germany 2009, http://bibliothek.fzk.de/zb/berichte/FZKA7468.pdf

  4. Spotless Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-20

    NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory sees the sun has been virtually spotless, as in no sunspots, a 11-day spotless stretch not seen since the last solar minimum many years ago. Movies are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21582

  5. Efficient coarse simulation of a growing avascular tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kavousanakis, Michail E.; Liu, Ping; Boudouvis, Andreas G.; Lowengrub, John; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this work is the development and implementation of algorithms which accelerate the simulation of early stage tumor growth models. Among the different computational approaches used for the simulation of tumor progression, discrete stochastic models (e.g., cellular automata) have been widely used to describe processes occurring at the cell and subcell scales (e.g., cell-cell interactions and signaling processes). To describe macroscopic characteristics (e.g., morphology) of growing tumors, large numbers of interacting cells must be simulated. However, the high computational demands of stochastic models make the simulation of large-scale systems impractical. Alternatively, continuum models, which can describe behavior at the tumor scale, often rely on phenomenological assumptions in place of rigorous upscaling of microscopic models. This limits their predictive power. In this work, we circumvent the derivation of closed macroscopic equations for the growing cancer cell populations; instead, we construct, based on the so-called “equation-free” framework, a computational superstructure, which wraps around the individual-based cell-level simulator and accelerates the computations required for the study of the long-time behavior of systems involving many interacting cells. The microscopic model, e.g., a cellular automaton, which simulates the evolution of cancer cell populations, is executed for relatively short time intervals, at the end of which coarse-scale information is obtained. These coarse variables evolve on slower time scales than each individual cell in the population, enabling the application of forward projection schemes, which extrapolate their values at later times. This technique is referred to as coarse projective integration. Increasing the ratio of projection times to microscopic simulator execution times enhances the computational savings. Crucial accuracy issues arising for growing tumors with radial symmetry are addressed by

  6. Inverse Coarse-Graining: A New Tool for Molecular Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-16

    simulations. When compared with the more general multiscale coarse-graining (MS-CG) method, the EF-CG method retains the transferable part of the CG...Y.; Yan, T.; Voth, G. A., A Multiscale coarse-graining study of liquid/vacuum interface of room-temperature ionic liquids with alkyl substituents of...Energetic Room Temperature Ionic Liquid 1-Hydroxyethyl-4Amino-1, 2, 4-Triazolium Nitrate (HEATN). J. Phys. Chem. B 2008, 112, 3121-3131. 6. Liu, P

  7. Outburst on the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-11

    The Sun blew out a coronal mass ejection along with part of a solar filament over a three-hour period (Feb. 24, 2015). While some of the strands fell back into the Sun, a substantial part raced into space in a bright cloud of particles (as observed by the SOHO spacecraft). The activity was captured in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Because this occurred way over near the edge of the Sun, it was unlikely to have any effect on Earth. Download high res/video file: sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/gallery/potw/item/603 Credit: NASA/Solar Dynamics Observatory NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  8. Attitude sensor alignment calibration for the solar maximum mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitone, Daniel S.; Shuster, Malcolm D.

    1990-01-01

    An earlier heuristic study of the fine attitude sensors for the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) revealed a temperature dependence of the alignment about the yaw axis of the pair of fixed-head star trackers relative to the fine pointing Sun sensor. Here, new sensor alignment algorithms which better quantify the dependence of the alignments on the temperature are developed and applied to the SMM data. Comparison with the results from the previous study reveals the limitations of the heuristic approach. In addition, some of the basic assumptions made in the prelaunch analysis of the alignments of the SMM are examined. The results of this work have important consequences for future missions with stringent attitude requirements and where misalignment variations due to variations in the temperature will be significant.

  9. Sun exposure and risk of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Oliveria, S A; Saraiya, M; Geller, A C; Heneghan, M K; Jorgensen, C

    2006-01-01

    Background As skin cancer education programmes directed to children and adolescents continue to expand, an epidemiological basis for these programmes is necessary to target efforts and plan for further evaluation. Aims To summarise the epidemiological evidence on sun exposure during childhood and adolescence and melanoma risk. Methods A literature review was conducted using Medline (1966 to December 2004) to identify articles relating to sun exposure and melanoma. The review was restricted to studies that included sun exposure information on subjects 18 years of age or younger. Results Migrant studies generally indicate an increased melanoma risk in individuals who spent childhood in sunny geographical locations, and decreasing melanoma risk with older age at arrival. Individuals who resided in geographical locations close to the equator or close to the coast during childhood and/or adolescence have an increased melanoma risk compared to those who lived at higher latitudes or never lived near the coast. The intermittent exposure hypothesis remains controversial; some studies indicate that children and adolescents who received intermittent sun exposure during vacation, recreation, or occupation are at increased melanoma risk as adults, but more recent studies suggest intermittent exposure to have a protective effect. The majority of sunburn studies suggest a positive association between early age sunburn and subsequent risk of melanoma. Conclusion Future research efforts should focus on: (1) clarifying the relation between sun exposure and melanoma; (2) conducting prospective studies; (3) assessing sun exposure during different time periods of life using a reliable and quantitative method; (4) obtaining information on protective measures; and (5) examining the interrelations between ability to tan, propensity to burn, skin type, history of sunburns, timing and pattern of sun exposure, number of nevi, and other host factors in the child and adolescent populations

  10. Effects of the guard electrode on the photoelectron distribution around an electric field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Y.; Usui, H.; Kojima, H.

    2011-05-01

    We have developed a numerical model of a double-probe electric field sensor equipped with a photoelectron guard electrode for the particle-in-cell simulation. The model includes typical elements of modern double-probe sensors on, e.g., BepiColombo/MMO, Cluster, and THEMIS spacecraft, such as a conducting boom and a preamplifier housing called a puck. The puck is also used for the guard electrode, and its potential is negatively biased by reference to the floating spacecraft potential. We apply the proposed model to an analysis of an equilibrium plasma environment around the sensor by assuming that the sun illuminates the spacecraft from the direction perpendicular to the sensor deployment axis. As a simulation result, it is confirmed that a substantial number of spacecraft-originating photoelectrons are once emitted sunward and then fall onto the puck and sensing element positions. In order to effectively repel such photoelectrons coming from the sun direction, a potential hump for electrons, i.e., a negative potential region, should be created in a plasma region around the sunlit side of the guard electrode surface. The simulation results reveal the significance of the guard electrode potential being not only lower than the spacecraft body but also lower than the background plasma potential of the region surrounding the puck and the sensing element. One solution for realizing such an operational condition is to bias the guard potential negatively by reference to the sensor potential because the sensor is usually operated nearly at the background plasma potential.

  11. Functional association of Sun1 with nuclear pore complexes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Pante, Nelly; Misteli, Tom; Elsagga, Mohamed; Crisp, Melissa; Hodzic, Didier; Burke, Brian; Roux, Kyle J.

    2007-01-01

    Sun1 and 2 are A-type lamin-binding proteins that, in association with nesprins, form a link between the inner nuclear membranes (INMs) and outer nuclear membranes of mammalian nuclear envelopes. Both immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy reveal that Sun1 but not Sun2 is intimately associated with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Topological analyses indicate that Sun1 is a type II integral protein of the INM. Localization of Sun1 to the INM is defined by at least two discrete regions within its nucleoplasmic domain. However, association with NPCs is dependent on the synergy of both nucleoplasmic and lumenal domains. Cells that are either depleted of Sun1 by RNA interference or that overexpress dominant-negative Sun1 fragments exhibit clustering of NPCs. The implication is that Sun1 represents an important determinant of NPC distribution across the nuclear surface. PMID:17724119

  12. Heating the Chromosphere in the Quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-04-01

    The best-studied star the Sun still harbors mysteries for scientists to puzzle over. A new study has now explored the role of tiny magnetic-field hiccups in an effort to explain the strangely high temperatures of the Suns upper atmosphere.Schematic illustrating the temperatures in different layers of the Sun. [ESA]Strange Temperature RiseSince the Suns energy is produced in its core, the temperature is hottest here. As expected, the temperature decreases further from the Suns core up until just above its surface, where it oddly begins to rise again. While the Suns surface is 6,000 K, the temperature is higher above this: 10,000 K in the outer chromosphere.So how is the chromosphere of the Sun heated? Its possible that the explanation can be found not amid high solar activity, but in quiet-Sun regions.In a new study led by Milan Goi (Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Bay Area Environmental Research Institute), a team of scientists has examined a process that quietly happens in the background: the cancellation of magnetic field lines in the quiet Sun.Activity in a SupergranuleTop left: SDO AIA image of part of the solar disk. The next three panels are a zoom of the particular quiet-Sun region that the authors studied, all taken with IRIS at varying wavelengths: 1400 (top right), 2796 (bottom left), and 2832 (bottom right). [Goi et al. 2018]The Sun is threaded by strong magnetic field lines that divide it into supergranules measuring 30 million meters across (more than double the diameter of Earth!). Supergranules may seem quiet inside, but looks can be deceiving: the interiors of supergranules contain smaller, transient internetwork fields that move about, often resulting in magnetic elements of opposite polarity encountering and canceling each other.For those internetwork flux cancellations that occur above the Suns surface, a small amount of energy could be released that locally heats the chromosphere. But though each individual event has a small

  13. Computer Generated Snapshot of Our Sun's Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    These banana-shaped loops are part of a computer-generated snapshot of our sun's magnetic field. The solar magnetic-field lines loop through the sun's corona, break through the sun's surface, and cornect regions of magnetic activity, such as sunspots. This image --part of a magnetic-field study of the sun by NASA's Allen Gary -- shows the outer portion (skins) of interconnecting systems of hot (2 million degrees Kelvin) coronal loops within and between two active magnetic regions on opposite sides of the sun's equator. The diameter of these coronal loops at their foot points is approximately the same size as the Earth's radius (about 6,000 kilometers).

  14. Predictors of coarse particulate matter and associated endotoxin concentrations in residential environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, Md. Aynul; MacNeill, Morgan; Kindzierski, Warren B.; Wallace, Lance; Héroux, Marie-Ève; Wheeler, Amanda J.

    2014-08-01

    Exposure to coarse particulate matter (PM), i.e., particles with an aerodynamic diameter between 2.5 and 10 μm (PM10-2.5), is of increasing interest due to the potential for health effects including asthma, allergy and respiratory symptoms. Limited information is available on indoor and outdoor coarse PM and associated endotoxin exposures. Seven consecutive 24-h samples of indoor and outdoor coarse PM were collected during winter and summer 2010 using Harvard Coarse Impactors in a total of 74 Edmonton homes where no reported smoking took place. Coarse PM filters were subsequently analyzed for endotoxin content. Data were also collected on indoor and outdoor temperature, relative humidity, air exchange rate, housing characteristics and occupants' activities. During winter, outdoor concentrations of coarse PM (median = 6.7 μg/m3, interquartile range, IQR = 3.4-12 μg/m3) were found to be higher than indoor concentrations (median 3.4 μg/m3, IQR = 1.6-5.7 μg/m3); while summer levels of indoor and outdoor concentrations were similar (median 4.5 μg/m3, IQR = 2.3-6.8 μg/m3, and median 4.7 μg/m3, IQR = 2.1-7.9 μg/m3, respectively). Similar predictors were identified for indoor coarse PM in both seasons and included corresponding outdoor coarse PM concentrations, whether vacuuming, sweeping or dusting was performed during the sampling period, and number of occupants in the home. Winter indoor coarse PM predictors also included the number of dogs and indoor endotoxin concentrations. Summer median endotoxin concentrations (indoor: 0.41 EU/m3, outdoor: 0.64 EU/m3) were 4-fold higher than winter concentrations (indoor: 0.12 EU/m3, outdoor: 0.16 EU/m3). Other than outdoor endotoxin concentrations, indoor endotoxin concentration predictors for both seasons were different. Winter endotoxin predictors also included presence of furry pets and whether the vacuum had a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. Summer endotoxin predictors were problems with mice in the

  15. Coarse Resolution SAR Imagery to Support Flood Inundation Models in Near Real Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Schumann, Guy; Brandimarte, Luigia; Bates, Paul

    2009-11-01

    In recent years, the availability of new emerging data (e.g. remote sensing, intelligent wireless sensors, etc) has led to a sudden shift from a data-sparse to a data-rich environment for hydrological and hydraulic modelling. Furthermore, the increased socioeconomic relevance of river flood studies has motivated the development of complex methodologies for the simulation of the hydraulic behaviour of river systems. In this context, this study aims at assessing the capability of coarse resolution SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) imagery to support and quickly validate flood inundation models in near real time. A hydraulic model of a 98km reach of the River Po (Italy), previously calibrated on a high-magnitude flood event with extensive and high quality field data, is tested using a SAR flood image, acquired and processed in near real time, during the June 2008 low-magnitude event. Specifically, the image is an acquisition by the ENVISAT-ASAR sensor in wide swath mode and has been provided through ESA (European Space Agency) Fast Registration system at no cost 24 hours after the acquisition. The study shows that the SAR image enables validation and improvement of the model in a time shorter than the flood travel time. This increases the reliability of model predictions (e.g. water elevation and inundation width along the river reach) and, consequently, assists flood management authorities in undertaking the necessary prevention activities.

  16. Sun Protection by Beach Umbrella vs Sunscreen With a High Sun Protection Factor: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Hao; Jiang, Lily I; Meyer, Karen; Wang, Steve Q; Farberg, Aaron S; Rigel, Darrell S

    2017-03-01

    Sun-protective behavior affects skin cancer prevention. Shade works by physically shielding skin from direct harmful UV rays; however, skin may still remain exposed to reflected and indirect UV rays. There is no current standard metric to evaluate shade for its effectiveness in sun protection, and there is insufficient clinical evidence that a beach umbrella alone can provide adequate sun protection. To directly measure sunburn protection offered by a standard beach umbrella compared with that provided by sunscreen with a high sun protection factor under actual use conditions. A single-center, evaluator-blinded, randomized clinical study was conducted from August 13 to 15, 2014, in Lake Lewisville, Texas (elevation, 159 m above sea level), among 81 participants with Fitzpatrick skin types I (n = 1), II (n = 42), and III (n = 38). Participants were randomly assigned to 2 groups: 1 using only a beach umbrella, and the other using only sunscreen with a sun protection factor of 100. All participants remained at a sunny beach for 3½ hours at midday. Clinical sunburn evaluation of each individual for all exposed body sites was conducted 22 to 24 hours after sun exposure. The shade provided by a beach umbrella or protection provided by sunscreen with a sun protection factor of 100. Sunburn on all exposed body sites 22 to 24 hours after sun exposure. Among the 81 participants (25 male and 56 female; mean [SD] age, 41 [16] years) for all body sites evaluated (face, back of neck, upper chest, arms, and legs), the umbrella group showed a statistically significant increase in clinical sunburn scores compared with baseline and had higher postexposure global scores than the sunscreen group (0.75 vs 0.05; P < .001). There was a total of 142 sunburn incidences in the umbrella group vs 17 in the sunscreen group. Thirty-two of the 41 participants (78%) in the umbrella group showed erythema in 1 or more sites vs 10 of the 40 participants (25%) in the sunscreen group

  17. Our prodigal sun. [solar energy technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Characteristics of the sun are reported indicating it as a source of energy. Data from several space missions are discussed, and the solar activity cycle is presented. The corona, flares, prominences, spots, and wind of the sun are also discussed.

  18. Nonlinear evolution of coarse-grained quantum systems with generalized purity constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burić, Nikola

    2010-12-01

    Constrained quantum dynamics is used to propose a nonlinear dynamical equation for pure states of a generalized coarse-grained system. The relevant constraint is given either by the generalized purity or by the generalized invariant fluctuation, and the coarse-grained pure states correspond to the generalized coherent, i.e. generalized nonentangled states. Open system model of the coarse-graining is discussed. It is shown that in this model and in the weak coupling limit the constrained dynamical equations coincide with an equation for pointer states, based on Hilbert-Schmidt distance, that was previously suggested in the context of the decoherence theory.

  19. Adiabatic coarse-graining and simulations of stochastic biochemical networks

    PubMed Central

    Sinitsyn, N. A.; Hengartner, Nicolas; Nemenman, Ilya

    2009-01-01

    We propose a universal approach for analysis and fast simulations of stiff stochastic biochemical networks, which rests on elimination of fast chemical species without a loss of information about mesoscopic, non-Poissonian fluctuations of the slow ones. Our approach is similar to the Born–Oppenheimer approximation in quantum mechanics and follows from the stochastic path integral representation of the cumulant generating function of reaction events. In applications with a small number of chemical reactions, it produces analytical expressions for cumulants of chemical fluxes between the slow variables. This allows for a low-dimensional, interpretable representation and can be used for high-accuracy, low-complexity coarse-grained numerical simulations. As an example, we derive the coarse-grained description for a chain of biochemical reactions and show that the coarse-grained and the microscopic simulations agree, but the former is 3 orders of magnitude faster. PMID:19525397

  20. Method for estimating the atmospheric content of sub-micrometer aerosol using direct-sun photometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, S.; Filip, L.

    2009-04-01

    It is well known that the aerosol generated by human activity falls in the sub-micrometer rage [1]. The rapid increase of such emissions led to massive accumulations in the planetary boundary layer. Aerosol pollutants influence the quality of life on the Earth in at least two ways: by direct physiological effects following their penetration into living organisms and by the indirect implications on the overall energy balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. For these reasons monitoring the sub-micrometer aerosol on a global scale, become a stringent necessity in protecting the environment. The sun-photometry proved a very efficient way for such monitoring activities, mainly when vast networks of instruments (like AERONET [2]) are used. The size distribution of aerosols is currently a product of AERONET obtained through an inversion algorithm of sky-photometry data [3, 4]. Alternatively, various methods of investigating the aerosol size distribution have been developed through the use of direct-sun photometric data, with the advantages of simpler computation algorithms and a more convenient use [5, 6]. Our research aims to formulate a new simpler way to retrieve aerosol fine and coarse mode volume concentrations, as well as dimensional information, from direct-sun data. As in other works from the literature [3-6], the main hypothesis is that of a bi-modal shape of the size distribution of aerosols that can be reproduced rather satisfactorily by a linear combination of two lognormal functions. Essentially, the method followed in this paper relies on aerosol size information retrieval through fitting theoretical computations to measured aerosol optical depth (AOD) and related data. To this purpose, the experimental spectral dependence of AOD is interpolated and differentiated numerically to obtain the Ǻngström parameter. The reduced (i.e. normalized to the corresponding columnar volumetric content) contributions of the fine and coarse modes to the AOD have also been

  1. Sun and aureole spectrometer for airborne measurements to derive aerosol optical properties.

    PubMed

    Asseng, Hagen; Ruhtz, Thomas; Fischer, Jürgen

    2004-04-01

    We have designed an airborne spectrometer system for the simultaneous measurement of the direct Sun irradiance and aureole radiance. The instrument is based on diffraction grating spectrometers with linear image sensors. It is robust, lightweight, compact, and reliable, characteristics that are important for airborne applications. The multispectral radiation measurements are used to derive optical properties of tropospheric aerosols. We extract the altitude dependence of the aerosol volume scattering function and of the aerosol optical depth by using flight patterns with descents and ascents ranging from the surface level to the top of the boundary layer. The extinction coefficient and the product of single scattering albedo and phase function of separate layers can be derived from the airborne measurements.

  2. Regular sun exposure benefits health.

    PubMed

    van der Rhee, H J; de Vries, E; Coebergh, J W

    2016-12-01

    Since it was discovered that UV radiation was the main environmental cause of skin cancer, primary prevention programs have been started. These programs advise to avoid exposure to sunlight. However, the question arises whether sun-shunning behaviour might have an effect on general health. During the last decades new favourable associations between sunlight and disease have been discovered. There is growing observational and experimental evidence that regular exposure to sunlight contributes to the prevention of colon-, breast-, prostate cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple sclerosis, hypertension and diabetes. Initially, these beneficial effects were ascribed to vitamin D. Recently it became evident that immunomodulation, the formation of nitric oxide, melatonin, serotonin, and the effect of (sun)light on circadian clocks, are involved as well. In Europe (above 50 degrees north latitude), the risk of skin cancer (particularly melanoma) is mainly caused by an intermittent pattern of exposure, while regular exposure confers a relatively low risk. The available data on the negative and positive effects of sun exposure are discussed. Considering these data we hypothesize that regular sun exposure benefits health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation and comparison of the IRS-P6 and the landsat sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Coan, M.J.; Scaramuzza, P.L.

    2008-01-01

    The Indian Remote Sensing Satellite (IRS-P6), also called ResourceSat-1, was launched in a polar sun-synchronous orbit on October 17, 2003. It carries three sensors: the highresolution Linear Imaging Self-Scanner (LISS-IV), the mediumresolution Linear Imaging Self-Scanner (LISS-III), and the Advanced Wide-Field Sensor (AWiFS). These three sensors provide images of different resolutions and coverage. To understand the absolute radiometric calibration accuracy of IRS-P6 AWiFS and LISS-III sensors, image pairs from these sensors were compared to images from the Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and Landsat-7 Enhanced TM Plus (ETM+) sensors. The approach involves calibration of surface observations based on image statistics from areas observed nearly simultaneously by the two sensors. This paper also evaluated the viability of data from these nextgeneration imagers for use in creating three National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) products: land cover, percent tree canopy, and percent impervious surface. Individual products were consistent with previous studies but had slightly lower overall accuracies as compared to data from the Landsat sensors.

  4. Explosive events on the Sun.

    PubMed

    Harra, Louise K

    2002-12-15

    I describe two of the most dynamic and highly energetic phenomena in the Solar System--the explosive flares that can occur when plasma is confined by magnetic fields and the large-scale ejections of material known as 'coronal mass ejections'. These explosive events are poorly understood and yet occur in a variety of contexts in the Universe, ranging from planetary magnetospheres to active galactic nuclei. Understanding why flares and coronal mass ejections occur is a major goal across a wide range of space physics and astrophysics. Although explosive events from the Sun have dramatic effects on Earth, flares in other stars, for example, can be vastly more energetic and have an even more profound effect on their environment. We are now in the unprecedented position of having access to a number of space observatories dedicated to the Sun: the Yohkoh spacecraft, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer and the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. These cover a wide wavelength range from white light to gamma rays with both spectroscopy and imaging, and allow huge progress to be made in understanding the processes involved in such large explosions. The high-resolution data show dramatic and complex explosions of material on all spatial scales on the Sun. They have revealed that the Sun is constantly changing everywhere on its surface--something that was never imagined before. One of the mechanisms that has been proposed to account for the large energy release is magnetic reconnection. Recent observations from space increasingly support this view. This article will discuss those observations that support this model and also those that suggest different processes. The current space missions have given us an excellent insight into the actual explosive processes in the Sun. However, they have provided us with only a tantalizing glimpse of what causes the elusive trigger. Future missions such as Solar-B (the follow-on to

  5. A Low Power Digital Accumulation Technique for Digital-Domain CMOS TDI Image Sensor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changwei; Nie, Kaiming; Xu, Jiangtao; Gao, Jing

    2016-09-23

    In this paper, an accumulation technique suitable for digital domain CMOS time delay integration (TDI) image sensors is proposed to reduce power consumption without degrading the rate of imaging. In terms of the slight variations of quantization codes among different pixel exposures towards the same object, the pixel array is divided into two groups: one is for coarse quantization of high bits only, and the other one is for fine quantization of low bits. Then, the complete quantization codes are composed of both results from the coarse-and-fine quantization. The equivalent operation comparably reduces the total required bit numbers of the quantization. In the 0.18 µm CMOS process, two versions of 16-stage digital domain CMOS TDI image sensor chains based on a 10-bit successive approximate register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC), with and without the proposed technique, are designed. The simulation results show that the average power consumption of slices of the two versions are 6 . 47 × 10 - 8 J/line and 7 . 4 × 10 - 8 J/line, respectively. Meanwhile, the linearity of the two versions are 99.74% and 99.99%, respectively.

  6. SunPy: Python for Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobra, M.; Inglis, A. R.; Mumford, S.; Christe, S.; Freij, N.; Hewett, R.; Ireland, J.; Martinez Oliveros, J. C.; Reardon, K.; Savage, S. L.; Shih, A. Y.; Pérez-Suárez, D.

    2017-12-01

    SunPy is a community-developed open-source software library for solar physics. It is written in Python, a free, cross-platform, general-purpose, high-level programming language which is being increasingly adopted throughout the scientific community. SunPy aims to provide the software for obtaining and analyzing solar and heliospheric data. This poster introduces a new major release, SunPy version 0.8. The first major new feature introduced is Fido, the new primary interface to download data. It provides a consistent and powerful search interface to all major data providers including the VSO and the JSOC, as well as individual data sources such as GOES XRS time series. It is also easy to add new data sources as they become available, i.e. DKIST. The second major new feature is the SunPy coordinate framework. This provides a powerful way of representing coordinates, allowing simple and intuitive conversion between coordinate systems and viewpoints of different instruments (i.e., Solar Orbiter and the Parker Solar Probe), including transformation to astrophysical frames like ICRS. Other new features including new timeseries capabilities with better support for concatenation and metadata, updated documentation and example gallery. SunPy is distributed through pip and conda and all of its code is publicly available (sunpy.org).

  7. Calipso's Mission Design: Sun-Glint Avoidance Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mailhe, Laurie M.; Schiff, Conrad; Stadler, John H.

    2004-01-01

    CALIPSO will fly in formation with the Aqua spacecraft to obtain a coincident image of a portion of the Aqua/MODIS swath. Since MODIS pixels suffering sun-glint degradation are not processed, it is essential that CALIPSO only co- image the glint h e portion of the MODIS instrument swath. This paper presents sun-glint avoidance strategies for the CALIPSO mission. First, we introduce the Aqua sun-glint geometry and its relation to the CALIPSO-Aqua formation flying parameters. Then, we detail our implementation of the computation and perform a cross-track trade-space analysis. Finally, we analyze the impact of the sun-glint avoidance strategy on the spacecraft power and delta-V budget over the mission lifetime.

  8. Tensile fracture of coarse-Grained cast austenitic manganese steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittel, D.; Roman, I.

    1988-09-01

    Tensile fracture of coarse-grained (0.25 to 1 mm) cast austenitic manganese (Hadfield) steels has been investigated. Numerous surface discontinuities nucleate in coarse slip bands, on the heavily deformed surface of tensile specimens. These discontinuities do not propagate radially and final fracture results from central specimen cracking at higher strains. On the microscopic scale, bulk voids nucleate during the entire plastic deformation and they do not coalesce by shear localization (e.g., void-sheet) mechanism. Close voids coalesce by internal necking, whereas distant voids are bridged by means of small voids which nucleate at later stages of the plastic deformation. The high toughness of Hadfield steels is due to their high strain-hardening capacity which stabilizes the plastic deformation, and avoids shear localization and loss of load-bearing capacity. The observed dependence of measured mechanical properties on the specimen’s geometry results from the development of a surface layer which charac-terizes the deformation of this coarse-grained material.

  9. Thermodynamically consistent coarse graining of biocatalysts beyond Michaelis–Menten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachtel, Artur; Rao, Riccardo; Esposito, Massimiliano

    2018-04-01

    Starting from the detailed catalytic mechanism of a biocatalyst we provide a coarse-graining procedure which, by construction, is thermodynamically consistent. This procedure provides stoichiometries, reaction fluxes (rate laws), and reaction forces (Gibbs energies of reaction) for the coarse-grained level. It can treat active transporters and molecular machines, and thus extends the applicability of ideas that originated in enzyme kinetics. Our results lay the foundations for systematic studies of the thermodynamics of large-scale biochemical reaction networks. Moreover, we identify the conditions under which a relation between one-way fluxes and forces holds at the coarse-grained level as it holds at the detailed level. In doing so, we clarify the speculations and broad claims made in the literature about such a general flux–force relation. As a further consequence we show that, in contrast to common belief, the second law of thermodynamics does not require the currents and the forces of biochemical reaction networks to be always aligned.

  10. Hybrid continuum-coarse-grained modeling of erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Jinming; Chen, Paul G.; Boedec, Gwenn; Leonetti, Marc; Jaeger, Marc

    2018-06-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) membrane is a composite structure, consisting of a phospholipid bilayer and an underlying membrane-associated cytoskeleton. Both continuum and particle-based coarse-grained RBC models make use of a set of vertices connected by edges to represent the RBC membrane, which can be seen as a triangular surface mesh for the former and a spring network for the latter. Here, we present a modeling approach combining an existing continuum vesicle model with a coarse-grained model for the cytoskeleton. Compared to other two-component approaches, our method relies on only one mesh, representing the cytoskeleton, whose velocity in the tangential direction of the membrane may be different from that of the lipid bilayer. The finitely extensible nonlinear elastic (FENE) spring force law in combination with a repulsive force defined as a power function (POW), called FENE-POW, is used to describe the elastic properties of the RBC membrane. The mechanical interaction between the lipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton is explicitly computed and incorporated into the vesicle model. Our model includes the fundamental mechanical properties of the RBC membrane, namely fluidity and bending rigidity of the lipid bilayer, and shear elasticity of the cytoskeleton while maintaining surface-area and volume conservation constraint. We present three simulation examples to demonstrate the effectiveness of this hybrid continuum-coarse-grained model for the study of RBCs in fluid flows.

  11. Epic Filament Eruption from the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    NASA image captured December 6, 2010 To view a video of this event go here: www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/5258354738 A very long solar filament that had been snaking around the Sun erupted (Dec. 6, 2010) with a flourish. STEREO (Behind) caught the action in dramatic detail in extreme ultraviolet light of Helium. It had been almost a million km long (about half a solar radius) and a prominent feature on the Sun visible over two weeks earlier before it rotated out of view. Filaments, elongated clouds of cooler gases suspended above the Sun by magnetic forces, are rather unstable and often break away from the Sun. Credit: NASA/GSFC/SOHO NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  12. Integration of an On-Axis General Sun-Tracking Formula in the Algorithm of an Open-Loop Sun-Tracking System

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Kok-Keong; Wong, Chee-Woon; Siaw, Fei-Lu; Yew, Tiong-Keat; Ng, See-Seng; Liang, Meng-Suan; Lim, Yun-Seng; Lau, Sing-Liong

    2009-01-01

    A novel on-axis general sun-tracking formula has been integrated in the algorithm of an open-loop sun-tracking system in order to track the sun accurately and cost effectively. Sun-tracking errors due to installation defects of the 25 m2 prototype solar concentrator have been analyzed from recorded solar images with the use of a CCD camera. With the recorded data, misaligned angles from ideal azimuth-elevation axes have been determined and corrected by a straightforward changing of the parameters' values in the general formula of the tracking algorithm to improve the tracking accuracy to 2.99 mrad, which falls below the encoder resolution limit of 4.13 mrad. PMID:22408483

  13. Effects of coarse aggregate on the physical properties of Florida concrete mixes.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-10-01

    Portland cement concrete is a heterogeneous, composite material composed of coarse and fine granular material : embedded in a matrix of hardened paste. The coarse material is aggregate, which is primarily used as inexpensive filler : and comprises th...

  14. The depth of the honeybee's backup sun-compass systems.

    PubMed

    Dovey, Katelyn M; Kemfort, Jordan R; Towne, William F

    2013-06-01

    Honeybees have at least three compass mechanisms: a magnetic compass; a celestial or sun compass, based on the daily rotation of the sun and sun-linked skylight patterns; and a backup celestial compass based on a memory of the sun's movements over time in relation to the landscape. The interactions of these compass systems have yet to be fully elucidated, but the celestial compass is primary in most contexts, the magnetic compass is a backup in certain contexts, and the bees' memory of the sun's course in relation to the landscape is a backup system for cloudy days. Here we ask whether bees have any further compass systems, for example a memory of the sun's movements over time in relation to the magnetic field. To test this, we challenged bees to locate the sun when their known celestial compass systems were unavailable, that is, under overcast skies in unfamiliar landscapes. We measured the bees' knowledge of the sun's location by observing their waggle dances, by which foragers indicate the directions toward food sources in relation to the sun's compass bearing. We found that bees have no celestial compass systems beyond those already known: under overcast skies in unfamiliar landscapes, bees attempt to use their landscape-based backup system to locate the sun, matching the landscapes or skylines at the test sites with those at their natal sites as best they can, even if the matches are poor and yield weak or inconsistent orientation.

  15. Accurate reconstruction of 3D cardiac geometry from coarsely-sliced MRI.

    PubMed

    Ringenberg, Jordan; Deo, Makarand; Devabhaktuni, Vijay; Berenfeld, Omer; Snyder, Brett; Boyers, Pamela; Gold, Jeffrey

    2014-02-01

    We present a comprehensive validation analysis to assess the geometric impact of using coarsely-sliced short-axis images to reconstruct patient-specific cardiac geometry. The methods utilize high-resolution diffusion tensor MRI (DTMRI) datasets as reference geometries from which synthesized coarsely-sliced datasets simulating in vivo MRI were produced. 3D models are reconstructed from the coarse data using variational implicit surfaces through a commonly used modeling tool, CardioViz3D. The resulting geometries were then compared to the reference DTMRI models from which they were derived to analyze how well the synthesized geometries approximate the reference anatomy. Averaged over seven hearts, 95% spatial overlap, less than 3% volume variability, and normal-to-surface distance of 0.32 mm was observed between the synthesized myocardial geometries reconstructed from 8 mm sliced images and the reference data. The results provide strong supportive evidence to validate the hypothesis that coarsely-sliced MRI may be used to accurately reconstruct geometric ventricular models. Furthermore, the use of DTMRI for validation of in vivo MRI presents a novel benchmark procedure for studies which aim to substantiate their modeling and simulation methods using coarsely-sliced cardiac data. In addition, the paper outlines a suggested original procedure for deriving image-based ventricular models using the CardioViz3D software. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Occupational sun protection: workplace culture, equipment provision and outdoor workers' characteristics.

    PubMed

    Reeder, Anthony I; Gray, Andrew; McCool, Judith P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe outdoor workers' sun-protective practices, workplace sun-safety culture and sun-protective equipment provision; investigate the association of demographic, personal and occupational factors with sun-protective practices; and identify potential strategies for improving workers' sun protection. The present study used a clustered survey design with randomly identified employers in nine occupations. Employees provided questionnaire measures of demographics, personal characteristics (skin type, skin cancer risk perceptions, tanning attitudes, sun-exposure knowledge), personal occupational sun protection practices (exposure reduction, use of sun-protective clothing, sunscreen and shade), workplace sun-protective equipment provision and perceived workplace sun-safety culture. Summative scores were calculated for attitudes, knowledge, workplace provision and culture. A multivariable model was built with worker and workplace variables as plausible predictors of personal sun protection. In this study, 1,061 workers (69% participation) from 112 workplaces provided sufficient information for analysis. Sex, age, prioritized ethnicity, education and risk perception differed significantly between occupational groups (p<0.001), as did workers' sun-protective practices and workplace sun-protection equipment provision and supportive culture. After adjustment, each one-point increase in Workplace Sun-safety Culture 2013Score (range 12 points) was associated with a 0.16 higher Personal Sun-Protection Score (p<0.001), and each one-point increase in Workplace Provision Score (range 4 points) was associated with a 0.14 higher score (p<0.001). Sun Protection Score was significantly associated with skin response to sun exposure (p<0.001), female sex (p=0.021), tanning attitudes (p=0.022) and occupation (p=0.049), but not ethnicity, age education, knowledge or skin cancer risk perception. Protective equipment provision and sun-protective workplace

  17. Sun, Moon and Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolvankar, V. G.

    2013-12-01

    During a study conducted to find the effect of Earth tides on the occurrence of earthquakes, for small areas [typically 1000km X1000km] of high-seismicity regions, it was noticed that the Sun's position in terms of universal time [GMT] shows links to the sum of EMD [longitude of earthquake location - longitude of Moon's foot print on earth] and SEM [Sun-Earth-Moon angle]. This paper provides the details of this relationship after studying earthquake data for over forty high-seismicity regions of the world. It was found that over 98% of the earthquakes for these different regions, examined for the period 1973-2008, show a direct relationship between the Sun's position [GMT] and [EMD+SEM]. As the time changes from 00-24 hours, the factor [EMD+SEM] changes through 360 degree, and plotting these two variables for earthquakes from different small regions reveals a simple 45 degree straight-line relationship between them. This relationship was tested for all earthquakes and earthquake sequences for magnitude 2.0 and above. This study conclusively proves how Sun and the Moon govern all earthquakes. Fig. 12 [A+B]. The left-hand figure provides a 24-hour plot for forty consecutive days including the main event (00:58:23 on 26.12.2004, Lat.+3.30, Long+95.980, Mb 9.0, EQ count 376). The right-hand figure provides an earthquake plot for (EMD+SEM) vs GMT timings for the same data. All the 376 events including the main event faithfully follow the straight-line curve.

  18. Sun Grant - Western Regional Center | | Oregon State University

    Science.gov Websites

    Services Make a Gift Search Field Search Sun Grant - Western Regional Center Home About Us Mission Western States News Sun Grant Initiative Contacts The Five Regional Centers Center Activities Competitive Grant Territories Sun Grant Initiative Contacts The Five Regional Centers Center Activities Competitive Grant

  19. Coarse graining flow of spin foam intertwiners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Bianca; Schnetter, Erik; Seth, Cameron J.; Steinhaus, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    Simplicity constraints play a crucial role in the construction of spin foam models, yet their effective behavior on larger scales is scarcely explored. In this article we introduce intertwiner and spin net models for the quantum group SU (2 )k×SU (2 )k, which implement the simplicity constraints analogous to four-dimensional Euclidean spin foam models, namely the Barrett-Crane (BC) and the Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine/Freidel-Krasnov (EPRL/FK) model. These models are numerically coarse grained via tensor network renormalization, allowing us to trace the flow of simplicity constraints to larger scales. In order to perform these simulations we have substantially adapted tensor network algorithms, which we discuss in detail as they can be of use in other contexts. The BC and the EPRL/FK model behave very differently under coarse graining: While the unique BC intertwiner model is a fixed point and therefore constitutes a two-dimensional topological phase, BC spin net models flow away from the initial simplicity constraints and converge to several different topological phases. Most of these phases correspond to decoupling spin foam vertices; however we find also a new phase in which this is not the case, and in which a nontrivial version of the simplicity constraints holds. The coarse graining flow of the BC spin net models indicates furthermore that the transitions between these phases are not of second order. The EPRL/FK model by contrast reveals a far more intricate and complex dynamics. We observe an immediate flow away from the original simplicity constraints; however, with the truncation employed here, the models generically do not converge to a fixed point. The results show that the imposition of simplicity constraints can indeed lead to interesting and also very complex dynamics. Thus we need to further develop coarse graining tools to efficiently study the large scale behavior of spin foam models, in particular for the EPRL/FK model.

  20. Bryophyte species associations with coarse woody debris and stand ages in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rambo, T.; Muir, Patricia S.

    1998-01-01

    We quantified the relationships of 93 forest floor bryophyte species, including epiphytes from incorporated litterfall, to substrate and stand age in Pseudotsuga menziesii-Tsuga heterophylla stands at two sites in western Oregon. We used the method of Dufrêne and Legendre that combines a species' relative abundance and relative frequency, to calculate that species' importance in relation to environmental variables. The resulting "indicator value" describes a species' reliability for indicating the given environmental parameter. Thirty-nine species were indicative of either humus, a decay class of coarse woody debris, or stand age. Bryophyte community composition changed along the continuum of coarse woody debris decomposition from recently fallen trees with intact bark to forest floor humus. Richness of forest floor bryophytes will be enhanced when a full range of coarse woody debris decay classes is present. A suite of bryophytes indicated old-growth forest. These were mainly either epiphytes associated with older conifers or liverworts associated with coarse woody debris. Hardwood-associated epiphytes mainly indicated young stands. Mature conifers, hardwoods, and coarse woody debris are biological legacies that can be protected when thinning managed stands to foster habitat complexity and biodiversity, consistent with an ecosystem approach to forest management.

  1. The combustion of sound and rotten coarse woody debris: a review

    Treesearch

    Joshua C. Hyde; Alistair M.S. Smith; Roger D. Ottmar; Ernesto C. Alvarado; Penelope Morgan

    2011-01-01

    Coarse woody debris serves many functions in forest ecosystem processes and has important implications for fire management as it affects air quality, soil heating and carbon budgets when it combusts. There is relatively little research evaluating the physical properties relating to the combustion of this coarse woody debris with even less specifically addressing...

  2. Late Afternoon Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This image of the northern plains of Mars shows a surface texture of hundreds of small mounds and numerous small impact craters. The THEMIS imaging team is taking advantage of the late afternoon sun illumination to image places like this where the surface may contain small scale features that are 'washed-out' by higher illumination angles. As the sun dips towards the horizon (to the left side of the image), shadows are cast. The length of the shadows can be used to estimate the height of the feature casting them - or the depth of the crater that contains the shadow. In this image the craters - even very small ones - are now partially filled by shadow making it very easy to identify them. The small bumps are not casting shadows yet, but are easily seen. These small bumps were not easily identified when the sun angle was higher (earlier in the afternoon). As this image shows, late afternoon sun illumination is wonderful for making small scale morphologic features visible.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built

  3. Martian Moon Blocks Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the transit of Mars' moon Phobos across the Sun. It is made up of images taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on the morning of the 45th martian day, or sol, of its mission. This observation will help refine our knowledge of the orbit and position of Phobos. Other spacecraft may be able to take better images of Phobos using this new information. This event is similar to solar eclipses seen on Earth in which our Moon passes in front of the Sun. The images were taken by the rover's panoramic camera.

  4. Recent Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) experience with on-orbit calibration of attitude sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W.; Hashmall, J.; Harman, R.

    1992-01-01

    The results of on-orbit calibration for several satellites by the flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) at GSFC are reviewed. The examples discussed include attitude calibrations for sensors, including fixed-head star trackers, fine sun sensors, three-axis magnetometers, and inertial reference units taken from recent experience with the Compton Gamma Ray observatory, the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer calibration. The methods used and the results of calibration are discussed, as are the improvements attained from in-flight calibration.

  5. Program For Tracking The Sun From The Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Warren K.; Spires, Dustin S.

    1995-01-01

    SUNTRACKER program computes azimuth and elevation angles of Sun, as viewed from given position on Moon, during time defined by user. Program gets selenographic (moon-centered) position of Sun at given Julian date, then converts selenographic position of Sun into azimuth and elevation at given position on Moon. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  6. Characterization of sun and sky glint from wind ruffled sea surfaces for improved estimation of polarized remote sensing reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Robert; Ibrahim, Amir; Gilerson, Alex; El-Habashi, Ahmed; Carrizo, Carlos; Ahmed, Sam

    2015-09-01

    During two cruises in 2014, the polarized radiance of the ocean and the sky were continuously acquired using a HyperSAS-POL system. The system consists of seven hyperspectral radiometric sensors, three of which (one unpolarized and two polarized) look at the water and similarly three at the sky. The system autonomously tracks the Sun position and the heading of the research vessel to which it is attached in order to maintain a fixed relative azimuth angle with respect to the Sun (i.e. 90°) and therefore avoid the specular reflection of the sunlight. For the duration of both cruises, (NASA Ship Aircraft Bio-Optical Research (SABOR), and NOAA VIIRS Validation/Calibration), in situ inherent optical properties (IOPs) were continuously acquired using a set of instrument packages modified for underway measurement, and hyperspectral radiometric measurements were taken manually at all stations. During SABOR, an underwater polarimeter was deployed when conditions permitted. All measurements were combined in an effort to first develop a glint (sky + Sun) correction scheme for the upwelling polarized signal from a wind driven ocean surface and compare with one assuming that the ocean surface is flat.

  7. Two-wavelength quadrature multipoint detection of partial discharge in power transformers using fiber Fabry-Perot acoustic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Bo; Han, Ming; Wang, Anbo

    2012-06-01

    A reliable and low-cost two-wavelength quadrature interrogating method has been developed to demodulate optical signals from diaphragm-based Fabry-Perot interferometric fiber optic sensors for multipoint partial discharge detection in power transformers. Commercial available fused-silica parts (a wafer, a fiber ferrule, and a mating sleeve) and a cleaved optical single mode fiber were bonded together to form an extrinsic Fabry-Perot acoustic sensor. Two lasers with center wavelengths separated by a quarter of the period of sensor interference fringes were used to probe acousticwave- induced diaphragm vibration. A coarse wavelength-division multiplexing (CWDM) add/drop multiplexer was used to separate the reflected two wavelengths before two photo detectors. Optical couplers were used to distribute mixed laser light to each sensor-detector module for multiplexing purpose. Sensor structure, detection system design and experiment results are presented.

  8. Enhancement of sun-tracking with optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiunn-Chi

    2015-09-01

    Sun-tracking is one of the most challenging tasks in implementing CPV. In order to justify the additional complexity of sun-tracking, careful assessment of performance of CPV by monitoring the performance of sun-tracking is vital. Measurement of accuracy of sun-tracking is one of the important tasks in an outdoor test. This study examines techniques with three optoelectronic devices (i.e. position sensitive device (PSD), CCD and webcam). Outdoor measurements indicated that during sunny days (global horizontal insolation (GHI) > 700 W/m2), three devices recorded comparable tracking accuracy of 0.16˜0.3°. The method using a PSD has fastest sampling rate and is able to detect the sun's position without additional image processing. Yet, it cannot identify the sunlight effectively during low insolation. The techniques with a CCD and a webcam enhance the accuracy of centroid of sunlight via the optical lens and image processing. The image quality acquired using a webcam and a CCD is comparable but the webcam is more affordable than that of CCD because it can be assembled with consumer-graded products.

  9. Ocean Optics Protocols for Satellite Ocean Color Sensor Validation. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fargion, Giulietta S.; Mueller, James L.

    2000-01-01

    The document stipulates protocols for measuring bio-optical and radiometric data for the Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project activities and algorithm development. This document supersedes the earlier version (Mueller and Austin 1995) published as Volume 25 in the SeaWiFS Technical Report Series. This document marks a significant departure from, and improvement on, theformat and content of Mueller and Austin (1995). The authorship of the protocols has been greatly broadened to include experts specializing in some key areas. New chapters have been added to provide detailed and comprehensive protocols for stability monitoring of radiometers using portable sources, abovewater measurements of remote-sensing reflectance, spectral absorption measurements for discrete water samples, HPLC pigment analysis and fluorometric pigment analysis. Protocols were included in Mueller and Austin (1995) for each of these areas, but the new treatment makes significant advances in each topic area. There are also new chapters prescribing protocols for calibration of sun photometers and sky radiance sensors, sun photometer and sky radiance measurements and analysis, and data archival. These topic areas were barely mentioned in Mueller and Austin (1995).

  10. Factors associated with risky sun exposure behaviors among operating engineers.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Sonia A; Choi, Seung Hee; Hollern, Rachael; Ronis, David L

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the factors associated with sun exposure behaviors among Operating Engineers (heavy equipment operators). Operating Engineers (N = 498) were asked to complete a cross-sectional survey. Linear and logistic regression analyses were used to determine health behavioral, perceptional, and demographic factors associated with sun exposure behavior (sun burns, blistering, use of sunscreen, and interest in sun protection services). Almost half reported two or more sunburns/summer and the median times blistering was 2 with a range of 0-100. About one-third never used sun block, while just over one-third rarely used sun block. Almost one-quarter were interested in sun protection guidance. Multivariate analyses showed that perceptions of skin type, alcohol problems, fruit intake, BMI, sleep quality, age, sex, and race were significantly associated with at least one of the outcome variables (P < 0.05). Operating Engineers are at high risk for skin cancer due to high rates of exposure to ultraviolet light and low rates of sun block use. Subgroups of Operating Engineers are particularly at risk for sun damage. Interventions are needed to decrease sun exposure among Operating Engineers. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Two-Dimensional DOA and Polarization Estimation for a Mixture of Uncorrelated and Coherent Sources with Sparsely-Distributed Vector Sensor Array

    PubMed Central

    Si, Weijian; Zhao, Pinjiao; Qu, Zhiyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an L-shaped sparsely-distributed vector sensor (SD-VS) array with four different antenna compositions. With the proposed SD-VS array, a novel two-dimensional (2-D) direction of arrival (DOA) and polarization estimation method is proposed to handle the scenario where uncorrelated and coherent sources coexist. The uncorrelated and coherent sources are separated based on the moduli of the eigenvalues. For the uncorrelated sources, coarse estimates are acquired by extracting the DOA information embedded in the steering vectors from estimated array response matrix of the uncorrelated sources, and they serve as coarse references to disambiguate fine estimates with cyclical ambiguity obtained from the spatial phase factors. For the coherent sources, four Hankel matrices are constructed, with which the coherent sources are resolved in a similar way as for the uncorrelated sources. The proposed SD-VS array requires only two collocated antennas for each vector sensor, thus the mutual coupling effects across the collocated antennas are reduced greatly. Moreover, the inter-sensor spacings are allowed beyond a half-wavelength, which results in an extended array aperture. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and favorable performance of the proposed method. PMID:27258271

  12. On coarse projective integration for atomic deposition in amorphous systems

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Chuang, Claire Y., E-mail: yungc@seas.upenn.edu, E-mail: meister@unm.edu, E-mail: zepedaruiz1@llnl.gov; Sinno, Talid, E-mail: talid@seas.upenn.edu; Han, Sang M., E-mail: yungc@seas.upenn.edu, E-mail: meister@unm.edu, E-mail: zepedaruiz1@llnl.gov

    2015-10-07

    Direct molecular dynamics simulation of atomic deposition under realistic conditions is notoriously challenging because of the wide range of time scales that must be captured. Numerous simulation approaches have been proposed to address the problem, often requiring a compromise between model fidelity, algorithmic complexity, and computational efficiency. Coarse projective integration, an example application of the “equation-free” framework, offers an attractive balance between these constraints. Here, periodically applied, short atomistic simulations are employed to compute time derivatives of slowly evolving coarse variables that are then used to numerically integrate differential equations over relatively large time intervals. A key obstacle to themore » application of this technique in realistic settings is the “lifting” operation in which a valid atomistic configuration is recreated from knowledge of the coarse variables. Using Ge deposition on amorphous SiO{sub 2} substrates as an example application, we present a scheme for lifting realistic atomistic configurations comprised of collections of Ge islands on amorphous SiO{sub 2} using only a few measures of the island size distribution. The approach is shown to provide accurate initial configurations to restart molecular dynamics simulations at arbitrary points in time, enabling the application of coarse projective integration for this morphologically complex system.« less

  13. Coarse-grained Simulations of Conformational Changes in Multidrug Resistance Transporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewel, S. M. Yead; Dutta, Prashanta; Liu, Jin

    2016-11-01

    The overexpression of multidrug resistance (MDR) systems on the gram negative bacteria causes serious problems for treatment of bacterial infectious diseases. The system effectively pumps the antibiotic drugs out of the bacterial cells. During the pumping process one of the MDR components, AcrB undergoes a series of large-scale conformational changes which are responsible for drug recognition, binding and expelling. All-atom simulations are unable to capture those conformational changes because of computational cost. Here, we implement a hybrid coarse-grained force field that couples the united-atom protein models with the coarse-grained MARTINI water/lipid, to investigate the proton-dependent conformational changes of AcrB. The simulation results in early stage ( 100 ns) of proton-dependent conformational changes agree with all-atom simulations, validating the coarse-grained model. The coarse-grained force field allows us to explore the process in microsecond simulations. Starting from the crystal structures of Access(A)/Binding(B)/Extrusion(E) monomers in AcrB, we find that deprotonation of Asp407 and Asp408 in monomer E causes a series of large-scale conformational changes from ABE to AAA in absence of drug molecules, which is consistent with experimental findings. This work is supported by NIH Grant: 1R01GM122081-01.

  14. On Coarse Projective Integration for Atomic Deposition in Amorphous Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Chuang, Claire Y.; Han, Sang M.; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis A.; ...

    2015-10-02

    Direct molecular dynamics simulation of atomic deposition under realistic conditions is notoriously challenging because of the wide range of timescales that must be captured. Numerous simulation approaches have been proposed to address the problem, often requiring a compromise between model fidelity, algorithmic complexity and computational efficiency. Coarse projective integration, an example application of the ‘equation-free’ framework, offers an attractive balance between these constraints. Here, periodically applied, short atomistic simulations are employed to compute gradients of slowly-evolving coarse variables that are then used to numerically integrate differential equations over relatively large time intervals. A key obstacle to the application of thismore » technique in realistic settings is the ‘lifting’ operation in which a valid atomistic configuration is recreated from knowledge of the coarse variables. Using Ge deposition on amorphous SiO 2 substrates as an example application, we present a scheme for lifting realistic atomistic configurations comprised of collections of Ge islands on amorphous SiO 2 using only a few measures of the island size distribution. In conclusion, the approach is shown to provide accurate initial configurations to restart molecular dynamics simulations at arbitrary points in time, enabling the application of coarse projective integration for this morphologically complex system.« less

  15. Effects of Inner Nuclear Membrane Proteins SUN1/UNC-84A and SUN2/UNC-84B on the Early Steps of HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Torsten; Bulli, Lorenzo; Pollpeter, Darja; Betancor, Gilberto; Kutzner, Juliane; Apolonia, Luis; Herold, Nikolas; Burk, Robin; Malim, Michael H

    2017-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of dividing and nondividing cells involves regulatory interactions with the nuclear pore complex (NPC), followed by translocation to the nucleus and preferential integration into genomic areas in proximity to the inner nuclear membrane (INM). To identify host proteins that may contribute to these processes, we performed an overexpression screen of known membrane-associated NE proteins. We found that the integral transmembrane proteins SUN1/UNC84A and SUN2/UNC84B are potent or modest inhibitors of HIV-1 infection, respectively, and that suppression corresponds to defects in the accumulation of viral cDNA in the nucleus. While laboratory strains (HIV-1 NL4.3 and HIV-1 IIIB ) are sensitive to SUN1-mediated inhibition, the transmitted founder viruses RHPA and ZM247 are largely resistant. Using chimeric viruses, we identified the HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein as a major determinant of sensitivity to SUN1, and in vitro -assembled capsid-nucleocapsid (CANC) nanotubes captured SUN1 and SUN2 from cell lysates. Finally, we generated SUN1 -/- and SUN2 -/- cells by using CRISPR/Cas9 and found that the loss of SUN1 had no effect on HIV-1 infectivity, whereas the loss of SUN2 had a modest suppressive effect. Taken together, these observations suggest that SUN1 and SUN2 may function redundantly to modulate postentry, nuclear-associated steps of HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 causes more than 1 million deaths per year. The life cycle of HIV-1 has been studied extensively, yet important steps that occur between viral capsid release into the cytoplasm and the expression of viral genes remain elusive. We propose here that the INM components SUN1 and SUN2, two members of the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex, may interact with incoming HIV-1 replication complexes and affect key steps of infection. While overexpression of these proteins reduces HIV-1 infection, disruption of the individual SUN2 and SUN1 genes

  16. Ineffectiveness of sun awareness posters in dermatology clinics.

    PubMed

    Jung, G W; Senthilselvan, A; Salopek, T G

    2010-06-01

    Although sun awareness posters have been used in doctors' offices and clinics for decades to promote sun protective behaviour, there is no evidence of their usefulness. To investigate whether sun awareness posters lead to inquiry of skin cancer and sun protection measures. Patients considered at risk for skin cancer seen at a dermatology clinic were randomly asked to complete a questionnaire designed to assess the effectiveness of three different sun awareness posters placed in patient rooms. The posters were selected on the basis of their catchy slogan and eye-appealing images, and included those featuring parental interest, sex appeal and informative advice. Only half of the patients noticed the posters (50.6%). The poster with sex appeal garnered the most attention (67.8%), followed by the informative poster (49.2%) and the parental interest poster (35.8%) (P < 0.001). Although patients who noticed the sun awareness poster inquired about cutaneous cancers and sun protection practices twice as often as those who did not notice the poster, only one-tenth of such inquiries were attributed to the poster ( approximately 5% of the target population). As reported in the questionnaire, the posters themselves were less effective than the advice of physicians in influencing patient attitudes towards sun protection measures. Organizations that produce and disseminate posters should consider beyond focus groups when they design their posters and should consider field testing their products to ensure that they are reaching the targeted audience and are having the expected beneficial effect, otherwise their posters are simply decorative.

  17. Essential Outdoor Sun Safety Tips for Winter

    MedlinePlus

    ... the risk for damage. Both snow and strong wind can wear away sunscreen and reduce its effectiveness, ... protect your skin from the bitter cold, heavy winds and winter sun, follow these important sun protection ...

  18. Sun Protection Belief Clusters: Analysis of Amazon Mechanical Turk Data.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Rivas, Marimer; Schnur, Julie B; Jandorf, Lina

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed (i) to determine whether people could be differentiated on the basis of their sun protection belief profiles and individual characteristics and (ii) explore the use of a crowdsourcing web service for the assessment of sun protection beliefs. A sample of 500 adults completed an online survey of sun protection belief items using Amazon Mechanical Turk. A two-phased cluster analysis (i.e., hierarchical and non-hierarchical K-means) was utilized to determine clusters of sun protection barriers and facilitators. Results yielded three distinct clusters of sun protection barriers and three distinct clusters of sun protection facilitators. Significant associations between gender, age, sun sensitivity, and cluster membership were identified. Results also showed an association between barrier and facilitator cluster membership. The results of this study provided a potential alternative approach to developing future sun protection promotion initiatives in the population. Findings add to our knowledge regarding individuals who support, oppose, or are ambivalent toward sun protection and inform intervention research by identifying distinct subtypes that may best benefit from (or have a higher need for) skin cancer prevention efforts.

  19. Mutually unbiased coarse-grained measurements of two or more phase-space variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, E. C.; Walborn, S. P.; Tasca, D. S.; Rudnicki, Łukasz

    2018-05-01

    Mutual unbiasedness of the eigenstates of phase-space operators—such as position and momentum, or their standard coarse-grained versions—exists only in the limiting case of infinite squeezing. In Phys. Rev. Lett. 120, 040403 (2018), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.120.040403, it was shown that mutual unbiasedness can be recovered for periodic coarse graining of these two operators. Here we investigate mutual unbiasedness of coarse-grained measurements for more than two phase-space variables. We show that mutual unbiasedness can be recovered between periodic coarse graining of any two nonparallel phase-space operators. We illustrate these results through optics experiments, using the fractional Fourier transform to prepare and measure mutually unbiased phase-space variables. The differences between two and three mutually unbiased measurements is discussed. Our results contribute to bridging the gap between continuous and discrete quantum mechanics, and they could be useful in quantum-information protocols.

  20. Population and age-group trends in weekend sun protection and sunburn over two decades of the SunSmart programme in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Makin, J K; Warne, C D; Dobbinson, S J; Wakefield, M A; Hill, D J

    2013-01-01

    In response to the high skin cancer burden in Australia, the multicomponent, community-wide SunSmart programme has worked since 1988 to reduce excessive sun exposure.  To examine trends in key sun-protection behaviours and sunburn for the Melbourne population from 1987 to 2007, and examine for the first time patterns of change among age groups.   Representative cross-sectional weekly telephone surveys of weekend sun protection and sunburn were conducted over 11 of the summers in the period 1987-88 to 2006-07. Trends were analysed for the population and for age groups, adjusting for ambient temperature and ultraviolet radiation, which are environmental determinants of sun-related behaviour and sunburn.   The general pattern of trends suggests two distinct periods, one with rapid improvement in behaviours (more sunscreen use, less unprotected body exposure and less sunburn) from 1987-88 to 1994-95, and the second from 1997-98 to 2006-07 with fewer changes in behaviours noted. The age-group analyses showed a similar pattern of change over time across groups, with a few notable exceptions.  The similarity of the pattern of trends among age groups suggests that external influences including the SunSmart programme's activity had a relatively similar impact across the population. Sun-related behaviours continue to be amenable to change. More recent relative stability with some declines in sun protection suggests further intensive campaigns and other strategies may be needed to maintain previous successes and to achieve more universal use of sun protection. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  1. Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) EVA Fitchecks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    In the high bay of Kennedy Space Center's Space Station Processing Facility, Chris Hardcastle, left, of Stinger-Ghaffarian Technologies performs a sharp edge inspection of the integrated Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor-1 (TSIS-1) payload and the EXPRESS Pallet Adapter. Hardcastle is joined by Dwayne Swieter, right, a TSIS-1 payload team member from the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, a Research Institute at the University of Colorado (Boulder). TSIS-1 is designed to measure the Sun's energy input into Earth by seeing how it is distributed across different wavelengths of light. These measurements help scientists establish Earth's total energy and how our planet's atmosphere responds to changes in the Sun's energy output. TSIS-1 will launch on SpaceX's 13th commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station.

  2. Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) EVA Fitchecks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    In the high bay of Kennedy Space Center's Space Station Processing Facility, Chris Hardcastle, right, of Stinger-Ghaffarian Technologies performs a sharp edge inspection of the integrated Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor-1 (TSIS-1) payload and the EXPRESS Pallet Adapter. Hardcastle is joined by Norm Perish, left, a TSIS-1 payload team member from the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, a Research Institute at the University of Colorado (Boulder). TSIS-1 is designed to measure the Sun's energy input into Earth by seeing how it is distributed across different wavelengths of light. These measurements help scientists establish Earth's total energy and how our planet's atmosphere responds to changes in the Sun's energy output. TSIS-1 will launch on SpaceX's 13th commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station.

  3. Passive long range acousto-optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Dan

    2006-08-01

    Alexander Graham Bell's photophone of 1880 was a simple free space optical communication device that used the sun to illuminate a reflective acoustic diaphragm. A selenium photocell located 213 m (700 ft) away converted the acoustically modulated light beam back into sound. A variation of the photophone is presented here that uses naturally formed free space acousto-optic communications links to provide passive multichannel long range acoustic sensing. This system, called RAS (remote acoustic sensor), functions as a long range microphone with a demonstrated range in excess of 40 km (25 miles).

  4. ACTIVITY-BRIGHTNESS CORRELATIONS FOR THE SUN AND SUN-LIKE STARS

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Preminger, D. G.; Chapman, G. A.; Cookson, A. M.

    2011-10-01

    We analyze the effect of solar features on the variability of the solar irradiance in three different spectral ranges. Our study is based on two solar-cycles' worth of full-disk photometric images from the San Fernando Observatory, obtained with red, blue, and Ca II K-line filters. For each image we measure the photometric sum, {Sigma}, which is the relative contribution of solar features to the disk-integrated intensity of the image. The photometric sums in the red and blue continuum, {Sigma}{sub r} and {Sigma}{sub b}, exhibit similar temporal patterns: they are negatively correlated with solar activity, with strong short-term variability, and weakmore » solar-cycle variability. However, the Ca II K-line photometric sum, {Sigma}{sub K}, is positively correlated with solar activity and has strong variations on solar-cycle timescales. We show that we can model the variability of the Sun's bolometric flux as a linear combination of {Sigma}{sub r} and {Sigma}{sub K}. We infer that, over solar-cycle timescales, the variability of the Sun's bolometric irradiance is directly correlated with spectral line variability, but inversely correlated with continuum variability. Our blue and red continuum filters are quite similar to the Stroemgren b and y filters used to measure stellar photometric variability. We conclude that active stars whose visible continuum brightness varies inversely with activity, as measured by the Ca HK index, are displaying a pattern that is similar to that of the Sun, i.e., radiative variability in the visible continuum that is spot-dominated.« less

  5. Coarse-grained incompressible magnetohydrodynamics: Analyzing the turbulent cascades

    DOE PAGES

    Aluie, Hussein

    2017-02-21

    Here, we formulate a coarse-graining approach to the dynamics of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluids at a continuum of length-scales. In this methodology, effective equations are derived for the observable velocity and magnetic fields spatially-averaged at an arbitrary scale of resolution. The microscopic equations for the bare velocity and magnetic fields are renormalized by coarse-graining to yield macroscopic effective equations that contain both a subscale stress and a subscale electromotive force (EMF) generated by nonlinear interaction of eliminated fields and plasma motions. At large coarse-graining length-scales, the direct dissipation of invariants by microscopic mechanisms (such as molecular viscosity and Spitzer resistivity) ismore » shown to be negligible. The balance at large scales is dominated instead by the subscale nonlinear terms, which can transfer invariants across scales, and are interpreted in terms of work concepts for energy and in terms of topological flux-linkage for the two helicities. An important application of this approach is to MHD turbulence, where the coarse-graining length ℓ lies in the inertial cascade range. We show that in the case of sufficiently rough velocity and/or magnetic fields, the nonlinear inter-scale transfer need not vanish and can persist to arbitrarily small scales. Although closed expressions are not available for subscale stress and subscale EMF, we derive rigorous upper bounds on the effective dissipation they produce in terms of scaling exponents of the velocity and magnetic fields. These bounds provide exact constraints on phenomenological theories of MHD turbulence in order to allow the nonlinear cascade of energy and cross-helicity. On the other hand, we show that the forward cascade of magnetic helicity to asymptotically small scales is impossible unless 3rd-order moments of either velocity or magnetic field become infinite.« less

  6. From the Sun with Love

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    This Solar Dynamics Observatory image of the Sun taken on February 1, 2013 in extreme ultraviolet light captures a heart-shaped dark coronal hole. Coronal holes are areas of the Sun's surface that are the source of open magnetic field lines that head way out into space. They are also the source regions of the fast solar wind, which is characterized by a relatively steady speed of approximately 800 km/s (about 1.8 million mph).

  7. Peculiar Traits of Coarse AP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    propellant. Since coarse AP in particles larger than about 150 microns are used in great majority for AP oxidized solid propellants, the nature of...Microscopic amounts of liquid containing water were contained in the reactive centers. The maximum size for reactive centers was reasoned to be...bond in the original chlorate ion. Oxygen atom swapping between chlorate and perchlorate ions would provide chlorate migration without use of forces

  8. Sun Says "Keep Right"

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-28

    A pair of giant filaments on the face of the sun have formed what appears to be an enormous arrow. If straightened out, each filament would be about as long as the sun’s diameter, 1 million miles long. Filaments are cooler clouds of solar material suspended above the sun's surface by powerful magnetic forces. Filaments can float for days without much change, though they can also erupt, releasing solar material in a shower that either rains back down or escapes out into space, becoming a moving cloud known as a coronal mass ejection, or CME. This image was captured on May 28, 2015, in combined wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which observes the sun 24 hours a day. Credit: NASA/SDO NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  9. The Turbulent Sun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Sally, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Six articles review current understanding and research in solar physics. Included are topics on sunspots, the corona, solar flares, solar waves, and solar-energy generation. Also included is a resume of physical data relating to the sun. (SL)

  10. Calibration and validation of coarse-grained models of atomic systems: application to semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Kathryn; Oden, J. Tinsley

    2014-07-01

    Coarse-grained models of atomic systems, created by aggregating groups of atoms into molecules to reduce the number of degrees of freedom, have been used for decades in important scientific and technological applications. In recent years, interest in developing a more rigorous theory for coarse graining and in assessing the predictivity of coarse-grained models has arisen. In this work, Bayesian methods for the calibration and validation of coarse-grained models of atomistic systems in thermodynamic equilibrium are developed. For specificity, only configurational models of systems in canonical ensembles are considered. Among major challenges in validating coarse-grained models are (1) the development of validation processes that lead to information essential in establishing confidence in the model's ability predict key quantities of interest and (2), above all, the determination of the coarse-grained model itself; that is, the characterization of the molecular architecture, the choice of interaction potentials and thus parameters, which best fit available data. The all-atom model is treated as the "ground truth," and it provides the basis with respect to which properties of the coarse-grained model are compared. This base all-atom model is characterized by an appropriate statistical mechanics framework in this work by canonical ensembles involving only configurational energies. The all-atom model thus supplies data for Bayesian calibration and validation methods for the molecular model. To address the first challenge, we develop priors based on the maximum entropy principle and likelihood functions based on Gaussian approximations of the uncertainties in the parameter-to-observation error. To address challenge (2), we introduce the notion of model plausibilities as a means for model selection. This methodology provides a powerful approach toward constructing coarse-grained models which are most plausible for given all-atom data. We demonstrate the theory and

  11. Harvesting the Sun's Energy with Antennas

    ScienceCinema

    INL

    2017-12-09

    Researchers at Idaho National Laboratory, along with partners at Microcontinuum Inc. (Cambridge, MA) and Patrick Pinhero of the University of Missouri, are developing a novel way to collect energy from the sun with a technology that could potentially cost pennies a yard, be imprinted on flexible materials and still draw energy after the sun has set.

  12. The Dark Side of the Sun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Describes easy-to-implement strategies parents can use to ensure their children's safety in the sun and avoid skin cancer, which is the most prevalent form of cancer in United States. Suggestions include: limit the amount of time spent in the sun, wear protective clothing, use sunscreening agents, and have knowledge of skin cancer and its…

  13. Bayesian calibration of coarse-grained forces: Efficiently addressing transferability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrone, Paul N.; Rosch, Thomas W.; Phelan, Frederick R.

    2016-04-01

    Generating and calibrating forces that are transferable across a range of state-points remains a challenging task in coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics. In this work, we present a coarse-graining workflow, inspired by ideas from uncertainty quantification and numerical analysis, to address this problem. The key idea behind our approach is to introduce a Bayesian correction algorithm that uses functional derivatives of CG simulations to rapidly and inexpensively recalibrate initial estimates f0 of forces anchored by standard methods such as force-matching. Taking density-temperature relationships as a running example, we demonstrate that this algorithm, in concert with various interpolation schemes, can be used to efficiently compute physically reasonable force curves on a fine grid of state-points. Importantly, we show that our workflow is robust to several choices available to the modeler, including the interpolation schemes and tools used to construct f0. In a related vein, we also demonstrate that our approach can speed up coarse-graining by reducing the number of atomistic simulations needed as inputs to standard methods for generating CG forces.

  14. Simulation of APEX data: the SENSOR approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, Anko; Schaepman, Michael E.; Schlaepfer, Daniel; Wiest, Lorenz; Reulke, Ralf

    1999-10-01

    The consistent simulation of airborne and spaceborne hyperspectral data is an important task and sometimes the only way for the adaptation and optimization of a sensor and its observing conditions, the choice and test of algorithms for data processing, error estimations and the evaluation of the capabilities of the whole sensor system. The integration of three approaches is suggested for the data simulation of APEX (Airborne Prism Experiment): (1) a spectrally consistent approach (e.g. using AVIRIS data), (2) a geometrically consistent approach (e.g. using CASI data), and (3) an end-to- end simulation of the sensor system. In this paper, the last approach is discussed in detail. Such a technique should be used if there is no simple deterministic relation between input and output parameters. The simulation environment SENSOR (Software Environment for the Simulation of Optical Remote Sensing Systems) presented here includes a full model of the sensor system, the observed object and the atmosphere. The simulator consists of three parts. The first part describes the geometrical relations between object, sun, and sensor using a ray tracing algorithm. The second part of the simulation environment considers the radiometry. It calculates the at-sensor-radiance using a pre-calculated multidimensional lookup-table for the atmospheric boundary conditions and bi- directional reflectances. Part three consists of an optical and an electronic sensor model for the generation of digital images. Application-specific algorithms for data processing must be considered additionally. The benefit of using an end- to-end simulation approach is demonstrated, an example of a simulated APEX data cube is given, and preliminary steps of evaluation of SENSOR are carried out.

  15. SOHO reveals violent action on the quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-05-01

    SOHO's scientists are impressed by the vigorous action that they see going on every day, because the Sun is in the very quietest phase of its eleven-year cycle of activity. To ground-based observatories it appears extremely calm just now. The early indications of SOHO's performance amply justify the creation of a sungazing spacecraft capable of observing ultraviolet emissions that are blotted out by the Earth's atmosphere. Apart from the imager, two ultraviolet spectrometers and an ultraviolet coronagraph (an imager for the outer atmosphere) are busy analysing the violent processes at a wide range of wavelengths. Between them, these instruments should cure long-lasting ignorance concerning the Sun, especially about why the atmosphere is so hot and what drives the solar wind that blows non-stop into the Solar System. Scientists from other experimental teams use SOHO to explore the Sun from its deep interior to the far reaches of the solar wind. They have watched the supposedly quiet Sun belching huge masses of gas into space. They have mapped a hole burnt by the solar wind in a breeze of gas coming from the stars. And they have detected currents of gas flowing just below the visible surface. SOHO is a project of international cooperation between the European Space Agency and NASA. The spacecraft was built in Europe and instrumented by scientists on both sides of the Atlantic. NASA launched SOHO on 2 December 1995, and also provides the ground stations and an operations centre near Washington. The first results are the more remarkable because SOHO arrived at its vantage point 1,500,000 kilometres out in space only in February, and formally completed its commissioning on 16 April. It has a long life ahead of it. All scientific instruments are working well. The luminosity oscillation imager belonging to the VIRGO experiment had trouble with its lens cover. When opened, the cover rebounded on its hinges and closed again. Commands were devised that gave a shorter impulse

  16. The Sun/Earth System and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, Arthur I.; Fox, Nicola; Lucid, Shannon

    2003-01-01

    Solar variability and solar activity are now seen as significant drivers with respect to the Earth and human technology systems. Observations over the last 10 years have significantly advanced our understanding of causes and effects in the Sun/Earth system. On a practical level the interactions between the Sun and Earth dictate how we build our systems in space (communications satellites, GPS, etc), and some of our ground systems (power grids). This talk will be about the Sun/Earth system: how it changes with time, its magnetic interactions, flares, the solar wind, and how the Sun effects human systems. Data will be presented from some current spacecraft which show, for example, how we are able to currently give warnings to the scientific community, the Government and industry about space storms and how this data has improved our physical understanding of processes on the Sun and in the magnetosphere. The scientific advances provided by our current spacecraft has led to a new program in NASA to develop a 'Space Weather' system called 'Living With a Star'. The current plan for the 'Living With a Star' program will also be presented.

  17. Sensitivity of aerosol radiative forcing efficiency to the coarse mode contributions across aerosol regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComiskey, A. C.; Telg, H.; Sheridan, P. J.; Kassianov, E.

    2017-12-01

    The coarse mode contribution to the aerosol radiative effect in a range of clean and turbid aerosol regimes has not been well quantified. While the coarse-mode radiative effect in turbid conditions is generally assumed to be consequential, the effect in clean conditions has likely been underestimated. We survey ground-based in situ measurements of the coarse mode fraction of aerosol optical properties measured around the globe over the past 20 years by the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Facility and the NOAA Global Monitoring Division. The aerosol forcing efficiency is presented, allowing an evaluation of where the aerosol coarse mode might be climatologically significant.

  18. An oil film information retrieval method overcoming the influence of sun glitter, based on AISA+ airborne hyper-spectral image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Yuanzeng; Mao, Tianming; Gong, Fang; Wang, Difeng; Chen, Jianyu

    2010-10-01

    As an effective survey tool for oil spill detection, the airborne hyper-spectral sensor affords the potentiality for retrieving the quantitative information of oil slick which is useful for the cleanup of spilled oil. But many airborne hyper-spectral images are affected by sun glitter which distorts radiance values and spectral ratios used for oil slick detection. In 2005, there's an oil spill event leaking at oil drilling platform in The South China Sea, and an AISA+ airborne hyper-spectral image recorded this event will be selected for studying in this paper, which is affected by sun glitter terribly. Through a spectrum analysis of the oil and water samples, two features -- "spectral rotation" and "a pair of fixed points" can be found in spectral curves between crude oil film and water. Base on these features, an oil film information retrieval method which can overcome the influence of sun glitter is presented. Firstly, the radiance of the image is converted to normal apparent reflectance (NormAR). Then, based on the features of "spectral rotation" (used for distinguishing oil film and water) and "a pair of fixed points" (used for overcoming the effect of sun glitter), NormAR894/NormAR516 is selected as an indicator of oil film. Finally, by using a threshold combined with the technologies of image filter and mathematic morphology, the distribution and relative thickness of oil film are retrieved.

  19. Concurrent Psychosocial Predictors of Sun Safety among Middle School Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreeva, Valentina A.; Reynolds, Kim D.; Buller, David B.; Chou, Chih-Ping; Yaroch, Amy L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Sun-induced skin damage, which increases skin cancer risk, is initiated in early life and promoted through later sun exposure patterns. If sun safety determinants are well understood and addressed during the school years, skin cancer incidence might be reduced. This study tested psychosocial influences on youth's sun safety and…

  20. 7 CFR 3430.1008 - Sun Grant Information Analysis Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sun Grant Information Analysis Center. 3430.1008... OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS-GENERAL AWARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS Sun Grant Program § 3430.1008 Sun Grant Information Analysis...

  1. 7 CFR 3430.1008 - Sun Grant Information Analysis Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sun Grant Information Analysis Center. 3430.1008... OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS-GENERAL AWARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS Sun Grant Program § 3430.1008 Sun Grant Information Analysis...

  2. 7 CFR 3430.1008 - Sun Grant Information Analysis Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sun Grant Information Analysis Center. 3430.1008... OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS-GENERAL AWARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS Sun Grant Program § 3430.1008 Sun Grant Information Analysis...

  3. 7 CFR 3430.1008 - Sun Grant Information Analysis Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sun Grant Information Analysis Center. 3430.1008... OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS-GENERAL AWARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS Sun Grant Program § 3430.1008 Sun Grant Information Analysis...

  4. Knowledge and Practice of Sun Protection in Schools in South Africa Where No National Sun Protection Programme Exists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Caradee Y.; Reeder, Anthony I.; Albers, Patricia N.

    2016-01-01

    Interventions in primary schools that increase sun-protective behaviours and decrease ultraviolet radiation exposure, sunburn incidence and skin cancer risk can be effective. SunSmart School Accreditation Programmes (SSAP) are recommended. Prior to SSAP implementation in South Africa, we explored the feasibility of obtaining national baseline…

  5. The Real Reasons for Seasons--Sun-Earth Connections: Unraveling Misconceptions about the Earth and Sun. Grades 6-8. Teacher's Guide. LHS GEMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Alan; Willard, Carolyn; Pompea, Stephen

    This guide is aimed at helping students arrive at a clear understanding of seasons as they investigate the connections between the sun and the earth. Activities include: (1) "Name the Season"; (2) "Sun-Earth Survey"; (3) "Trip to the Sun"; (4) "What Shape is Earth's Orbit?"; (5) "Temperatures around the…

  6. Coarse and fine sediment transportation patterns and causes downstream of the Three Gorges Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Songzhe; Yang, Yunping; Zhang, Mingjin; Sun, Zhaohua; Zhu, Lingling; You, Xingying; Li, Kanyu

    2017-11-01

    Reservoir construction within a basin affects the process of water and sediment transport downstream of the dam. The Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) affects the sediment transport downstream of the dam. The impoundment of the TGR reduced total downstream sediment. The sediment group d≤0.125 mm (fine particle) increased along the path, but the average was still below what existed before the reservoir impoundment. The sediments group d>0.125 mm (coarse particle) was recharged in the Yichang to Jianli reach, but showed a deposition trend downstream of Jianli. The coarse sediment in the Yichang to Jianli section in 2003 to 2007 was above the value before the TGR impoundment. However, the increase of both coarse and fine sediments in 2008 to 2014 was less than that in 2003 to 2007. The sediment retained in the dam is the major reason for the sediment reduction downstream. However, the retention in different river reaches is affected by riverbed coarsening, discharge, flow process, and conditions of lake functioning and recharging from the tributaries. The main conclusions derived from our study are as follows: 1) The riverbed in the Yichang to Shashi section was relatively coarse, thereby limiting the supply of fine and coarse sediments. The fine sediment supply was mainly controlled by TGR discharge, whereas the coarse sediment supply was controlled by the duration of high flow and its magnitude. 2) The supply of both coarse and fine sediments in the Shashi to Jianli section was controlled by the amount of total discharge. The sediment supply from the riverbed was higher in flood years than that in the dry years. The coarse sediment tended to deposit, and the deposition in the dry years was larger than that in the flood years. 3) The feeding of the fine sediment in the Luoshan to Hankou section was mainly from the riverbed. The supply in 2008 to 2014 was more than that in 2003 to 2007. Around 2010, the coarse sediments transited from depositing to scouring that was

  7. The Effect of Sea-Surface Sun Glitter on Microwave Radiometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    A relatively simple model for the microwave brightness temperature of sea surface Sun glitter is presented. The model is an accurate closeform approximation for the fourfold Sun glitter integral. The model computations indicate that Sun glitter contamination of on orbit radiometer measurements is appreciable over a large swath area. For winds near 20 m/s, Sun glitter affects the retrieval of environmental parameters for Sun angles as large as 20 to 25 deg. The model predicted biases in retrieved wind speed and sea surface temperature due to neglecting Sun glitter are consistent with those experimentally observed in SEASAT SMMR retrievals. A least squares retrieval algorithm that uses a combined sea and Sun model function shows the potential of retrieving accurate environmental parameters in the presence of Sun glitter so long as the Sun angles and wind speed are above 5 deg and 2 m/s, respectively.

  8. The multiscale coarse-graining method. XI. Accurate interactions based on the centers of charge of coarse-grained sites

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Cao, Zhen; Voth, Gregory A., E-mail: gavoth@uchicago.edu

    It is essential to be able to systematically construct coarse-grained (CG) models that can efficiently and accurately reproduce key properties of higher-resolution models such as all-atom. To fulfill this goal, a mapping operator is needed to transform the higher-resolution configuration to a CG configuration. Certain mapping operators, however, may lose information related to the underlying electrostatic properties. In this paper, a new mapping operator based on the centers of charge of CG sites is proposed to address this issue. Four example systems are chosen to demonstrate this concept. Within the multiscale coarse-graining framework, CG models that use this mapping operatormore » are found to better reproduce the structural correlations of atomistic models. The present work also demonstrates the flexibility of the mapping operator and the robustness of the force matching method. For instance, important functional groups can be isolated and emphasized in the CG model.« less

  9. Australian primary school communities' understandings of SunSmart: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Winslade, Matthew; Wright, Bradley; Dudley, Dean; Cotton, Wayne; Brown, Alexandra

    2017-10-01

    Skin cancer represents a major health issue for Australia. Childhood sun exposure is an important risk factor and evidence suggests the use of sun protection measures by Australian school children could be improved. This study examines how the SunSmart Program, a school-based skin cancer prevention resource, can be supported to further increase sun protection behaviours to assist in lowering skin cancer incidence. The Health Promoting Schools (HPS) framework was adopted to select key stakeholders from a convenience sample of five school communities. Students, teaching staff and parents participated in semi-structured focus group and individual interviews. A thematic analysis was used to extract key themes from the data. Although these school communities were aware of sun protection practices and the risks associated with sun exposure, their understandings of the SunSmart Program were limited. Sun protection policy implementation was inconsistent and students were unlikely to engage in sun protection practices beyond the school setting. School communities require additional support and engagement to holistically enforce the principles of the SunSmart Program. © 2017 The Authors.

  10. The sun compass revisited

    PubMed Central

    Guilford, Tim; Taylor, Graham K.

    2014-01-01

    Many animals, and birds in particular, are thought to use directional information from the sun in the form of a time-compensated sun compass, with predictably deviated orientation under clock shift being regarded as the litmus test of this. We suggest that this paradigm obscures a number of other ways in which solar-derived information could be important in animal orientation. We distinguish between the known use of the sun's azimuth to provide absolute geographical direction (compass mechanism) and its possible use to detect changes in heading (heading indicator mechanism). Just as in an aircraft, these two kinds of information may be provided by separate mechanisms and used for different functions, for example for navigation versus steering. We also argue that although a solar compass must be time-referenced to account for the sun's apparent diurnal movement, this need not entail full time compensation. This is because animals might also use time-dependent solar information in an associatively acquired, and hence time-limited, way. Furthermore, we show that a solar heading indicator, when used on a sufficiently short timescale, need not require time compensation at all. Finally, we suggest that solar-derived cues, such as shadows, could also be involved in navigation in ways that depend explicitly upon position, and are therefore not strictly compass-related. This could include giving directionality to landmarks, or acting as time-dependent landmarks involved in place recognition. We conclude that clock shift experiments alone are neither necessary nor sufficient to identify the occurrence of all conceivable uses of solar information in animal orientation, so that a predictable response to clock shift should not be regarded as an acid test of the use of solar information in navigation. PMID:25389374

  11. Sun Tzu and Machiavelli in Syria: Attacking Alliances

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    means, as well as conducted data collection overseas. On the cover Left: statue of Chinese military strategist and philosopher Sun ...the issue. For now the purpose of this short work is to contextualize the ongoing conflict in Syria through the combined lens of Sun Tzu and...variables and intentions of the actors involved. The second part lays out the strategic principles of Sun Tzu as pertaining to the conflict to

  12. Assessment of Elementary School Students’ Sun Protection Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Seft; Wells, Kristen J.; Jacobsen, Paul B.; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Boulware, David; Love-Jackson, Kymia; Abdulla, Rania; Roetzheim, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Emerging studies suggest that excessive sun exposure in childhood contributes to the development of skin cancer later in life. Children rarely wear a wide-brimmed hat when outside although these hats offer the best protection to the areas on the face where children are most likely to be sunburned. The current study explores 4th grade student assessment of their sun protection behaviors outside at school and at times other than when they are at school. Method This study utilized baseline data collected in the Fall of 2006 for the Sun Protection for Florida’s Children (SPF) project. In brief, the SPF project is a group randomized trial to test the effectiveness of a school based intervention promoting sun protection in general, and hat use in particular. The project targets all 4th grade students in Hillsborough County Schools, FL. The data reported in this study were collected at baseline before any intervention activities was initiated. Approximately 2,086 4th grade students completed self-report surveys evaluating sun protection behaviors. Trained research assistants carried out 99 direct observations of physical education classes over a five week period during Fall 2006 in Tampa, Florida. Results In general, the self-reported use of various methods of sun protection was low. Approximately one third of students reported that they wore sunscreen (32.8%) or sunglasses (32.3%) before leaving home for school. Only a small percentage of students wore long sleeves (15.0%) or a hat with a brim (16.4%) before leaving for school. In addition, few students wore a hat with a wide brim when outside but not at school (16.4%). Students spent an average of 59.1 minutes per week outdoors while attending school and 35.5 minutes during peak sun exposure. In general, female students and Hispanic, African American, and students of other racial and ethnic groups were more likely to practice sun protection behaviors at school than white or male students. Students who

  13. Description of the Sun as a Star: General Physical Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Theresa; Crannell, Carol Jo

    2000-01-01

    Numerical parameters characterizing the size and energy output of the sun are presented. These values are the standard yardstick by which other stars are measured. The large number of significant digits tabulated here serve mainly to illustrate the precision to which these parameters are known. Also listed are parameters characterizing the earth's orbit around the sun and the intensity of the sun's radiation at the mean orbital distance. The appearance of the sun depends critically on how it is observed. Each type of radiation observed carries specific information about the physical processes at work on the sun. Special types of instruments reveal aspects otherwise invisible. Coronagraphs reveal the dimmer outer regions of the sun's atmosphere otherwise visible only during total solar eclipses. Spectroscopy can reveal motions, magnetic field strengths, temperatures and densities. In situ measurements have revealed the characteristics of the solar wind and extended our knowledge of the solar magnetic field both near the earth and beyond the orbits of the planets. As an example, the sun's disk observed almost simultaneously in six different wavelengths of light is shown. In visible light we can see the white disk of the sun with the dark spots known as sunspots. By analyzing the spectral lines produced by the sun we can measure the strength of the sun's magnetic field at its surface, producing a magnetogram. This magnetogram reveals that the sunspots are regions of intense magnetic field. Further images of the sun reveal that the sunspot regions are just the bases of systems of hot loops which emit radio-waves, ultraviolet light and X-rays. The sun imaged in a spectral line of hydrogen known as "H alpha" is shown. In this line we also see the long dark "filaments". These filaments form in long channels between areas of opposing magnetic field. Such channels can be seen in the ultraviolet image. Data concerning the sun are obtained with many different kinds of

  14. Sun protection policies of Australian primary schools in a region of high sun exposure.

    PubMed

    Harrison, S L; Garzón-Chavez, D R; Nikles, C J

    2016-06-01

    Queensland, Australia has the highest rates of skin cancer globally. Predetermined criteria were used to score the comprehensiveness of sun protection policies (SPP) of primary schools across Queensland. SPP were sought for schools in 10 regions (latitude range 16.3°S-28.1°S) from 2011 to 2014. Of the 723 schools sampled, 90.9% had a written SPP available publicly. Total SPP scores were low {mean 3.6 [95% CI: 3.4-3.9]; median 2 [interquartile range (IQR) 2, 4]}, with only 3.2% of schools achieving the maximum score of 12. Median SPP scores were higher in Northern and Central Queensland [both 2 (IQR 2, 6) and (IQR 2, 5), respectively] than in Southern Queensland [2 (IQR 2, 3); P = 0.004]. Clothing and hat-wearing were addressed in most policies (96% and 89%) while few schools used their SPP to plan outdoor events (5.2%) or reschedule activities to minimize sun exposure (11.7%). The SunSmart Schools program has been operating in Queensland for 17 years, and while most primary schools now have a written SPP, most are not comprehensive. Incentive-based approaches (5-star-rating award scheme and grants) may assist in addressing this issue, to reduce sun exposure of students and teachers. These data provide a baseline from which improvements in the comprehensiveness of school SPPs can be evaluated. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Near Sun Free-Space Optical Communications from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Khatri, F.; Boroson, D.

    2006-01-01

    Free-space optical communications offers expanded data return capacity, from probes distributed throughout the solar system and beyond. Space-borne and Earth-based optical transceivers used for communicating optically, will periodically encounter near Sun pointing. This will result in an increase in the scattered background light flux, often contributing to degraded link performance. The varying duration of near Sun pointing link operations relative to the location of space-probes, is discussed in this paper. The impact of near Sun pointing on link performance for a direct detection photon-counting communications system is analyzed for both ground- and space-based Earth receivers. Finally, impact of near Sun pointing on spaceborne optical transceivers is discussed.

  16. VUV Spectroscopy of the Sun as a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankelborg, Charles; Philip, Judge; Winebarger, Amy R.; Kobayashi, Ken; Smart, Roy

    2017-08-01

    We describe a new sounding rocket mission to obtain the first high resolution, high quality VUV (100-200 nm) spectrum of the Sun-as-a-star. Our immediate science goal is to understand better the processes of chromospheric and coronal heating. HST data exist for a dozen or so Sun-like stars of a quality already beyond our ability to construct a comparable sun-as-a-star UV spectrum. The solar spectrum we obtain will enable us to understand the nature of magnetic energy dissipation as a Sun-like star evolves, and the dependence of magnetic activity on stellar mass and metallicity. This poster presents the instrument design, scientific prospects, and broader impacts of the proposed mission.

  17. Optimal Design of Experiments by Combining Coarse and Fine Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alpha A.; Brenner, Michael P.; Colwell, Lucy J.

    2017-11-01

    In many contexts, it is extremely costly to perform enough high-quality experimental measurements to accurately parametrize a predictive quantitative model. However, it is often much easier to carry out large numbers of experiments that indicate whether each sample is above or below a given threshold. Can many such categorical or "coarse" measurements be combined with a much smaller number of high-resolution or "fine" measurements to yield accurate models? Here, we demonstrate an intuitive strategy, inspired by statistical physics, wherein the coarse measurements are used to identify the salient features of the data, while the fine measurements determine the relative importance of these features. A linear model is inferred from the fine measurements, augmented by a quadratic term that captures the correlation structure of the coarse data. We illustrate our strategy by considering the problems of predicting the antimalarial potency and aqueous solubility of small organic molecules from their 2D molecular structure.

  18. Evaluation of steel slag coarse aggregate in hot mix asphalt concrete.

    PubMed

    Ahmedzade, Perviz; Sengoz, Burak

    2009-06-15

    This paper presents the influences of the utilization of steel slag as a coarse aggregate on the properties of hot mix asphalt. Four different asphalt mixtures containing two types of asphalt cement (AC-5; AC-10) and coarse aggregate (limestone; steel slag) were used to prepare Marshall specimens and to determine optimum bitumen content. Mechanical characteristics of all mixtures were evaluated by Marshall stability, indirect tensile stiffness modulus, creep stiffness, and indirect tensile strength tests. The electrical sensitivity of the specimens were also investigated in accordance with ASTM D257-91. It was observed that steel slag used as a coarse aggregate improved the mechanical properties of asphalt mixtures. Moreover, volume resistivity values demonstrated that the electrical conductivity of steel slag mixtures were better than that of limestone mixtures.

  19. Predictors of sun protection behaviours and sunburn among Australian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Simone; Jongenelis, Michelle; Strickland, Mark; Minto, Carolyn; Slevin, Terry; Jalleh, Geoffrey; Lin, Chad

    2016-07-13

    Excessive sun exposure and sunburn increase individuals' risk of skin cancer. It is especially important to prevent sunburn in childhood due to the higher relative risk of skin cancer across the life span compared to risk associated with sunburn episodes experienced later in life. This study examined demographic and attitudinal factors associated with engagement in a range of sun protection behaviours (wearing a hat, wearing protective clothing, staying in the shade, and staying indoors during the middle of the day) and the frequency of sunburn among Western Australian adolescents to provide insights of relevance for future sun protection campaigns. Cross-sectional telephone surveys were conducted annually with Western Australians between 2005/06 and 2014/15. The results from 4150 adolescents aged 14-17 years were used to conduct a path analysis of factors predicting various sun protection behaviours and sunburn. Significant primary predictors of the sun protection behaviours included in the study were skin type (sun sensitivity), gender, tanning-related attitudes and behaviours, and perceived relevance of public service advertisements that advocate sun protection. Of the four sun protection behaviours investigated, staying in the shade and staying indoors during the middle of the day were associated with a lower frequency of sunburn. There is a particular need to target sun protection messages at adolescent males who are less likely to engage in the most effective sun protection behaviours and demonstrate an increased propensity to experience sunburn. The results suggest that such future sun protection messages should include a focus on the importance of staying in the shade or indoors during periods of high UV radiation to increase awareness of the efficacy of these methods of avoiding skin cancer.

  20. A Max-Flow Based Algorithm for Connected Target Coverage with Probabilistic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Anxing; Xu, Xianghua; Cheng, Zongmao; Wang, Wensheng

    2017-01-01

    Coverage is a fundamental issue in the research field of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Connected target coverage discusses the sensor placement to guarantee the needs of both coverage and connectivity. Existing works largely leverage on the Boolean disk model, which is only a coarse approximation to the practical sensing model. In this paper, we focus on the connected target coverage issue based on the probabilistic sensing model, which can characterize the quality of coverage more accurately. In the probabilistic sensing model, sensors are only be able to detect a target with certain probability. We study the collaborative detection probability of target under multiple sensors. Armed with the analysis of collaborative detection probability, we further formulate the minimum ϵ-connected target coverage problem, aiming to minimize the number of sensors satisfying the requirements of both coverage and connectivity. We map it into a flow graph and present an approximation algorithm called the minimum vertices maximum flow algorithm (MVMFA) with provable time complex and approximation ratios. To evaluate our design, we analyze the performance of MVMFA theoretically and also conduct extensive simulation studies to demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. PMID:28587084

  1. A Max-Flow Based Algorithm for Connected Target Coverage with Probabilistic Sensors.

    PubMed

    Shan, Anxing; Xu, Xianghua; Cheng, Zongmao; Wang, Wensheng

    2017-05-25

    Coverage is a fundamental issue in the research field of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Connected target coverage discusses the sensor placement to guarantee the needs of both coverage and connectivity. Existing works largely leverage on the Boolean disk model, which is only a coarse approximation to the practical sensing model. In this paper, we focus on the connected target coverage issue based on the probabilistic sensing model, which can characterize the quality of coverage more accurately. In the probabilistic sensing model, sensors are only be able to detect a target with certain probability. We study the collaborative detection probability of target under multiple sensors. Armed with the analysis of collaborative detection probability, we further formulate the minimum ϵ -connected target coverage problem, aiming to minimize the number of sensors satisfying the requirements of both coverage and connectivity. We map it into a flow graph and present an approximation algorithm called the minimum vertices maximum flow algorithm (MVMFA) with provable time complex and approximation ratios. To evaluate our design, we analyze the performance of MVMFA theoretically and also conduct extensive simulation studies to demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm.

  2. Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) EVA Fitchecks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    In the high bay of Kennedy Space Center's Space Station Processing Facility, Chris Hardcastle, center, of Stinger-Ghaffarian Technologies performs a sharp edge inspection of the integrated Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor-1 (TSIS-1) payload and the EXPRESS Pallet Adapter. Hardcastle is joined by Dwayne Swieter, left, and Norm Perish, right, TSIS-1 payload team members from the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, a Research Institute at the University of Colorado (Boulder). TSIS-1 is designed to measure the Sun's energy input into Earth by seeing how it is distributed across different wavelengths of light. These measurements help scientists establish Earth's total energy and how our planet's atmosphere responds to changes in the Sun's energy output. TSIS-1 will launch on SpaceX's 13th commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station.

  3. Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) EVA Fitchecks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    In the high bay of Kennedy Space Center's Space Station Processing Facility, Chris Hardcastle, left, of Stinger-Ghaffarian Technologies applies crew preference tape to the integrated Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor-1 (TSIS-1) payload and the EXPRESS Pallet Adapter. Hardcastle is joined by TSIS-1 payload team members from the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, a Research Institute at the University of Colorado (Boulder). Standing from left to right are Tom Patton, Greg Ucker and Norm Perish. TSIS-1 is designed to measure the Sun's energy input into Earth by seeing how it is distributed across different wavelengths of light. These measurements help scientists establish Earth's total energy and how our planet's atmosphere responds to changes in the Sun's energy output. TSIS-1 will launch on SpaceX's 13th commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station.

  4. Development of new test procedures for measuring fine and coarse aggregates specific gravity.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-09-01

    The objective of the research is to develop and evaluate new test methods at determining the specific gravity and absorption of both fine and coarse aggregates. Current methods at determining the specific gravity and absorption of fine and coarse agg...

  5. An Inexpensive High-Temporal Resolution Electronic Sun Journal for Monitoring Personal Day to Day Sun Exposure Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Nathan J.; Parisi, Alfio V.; Butler, Harry; Rawlings, Alex; Elrahoumi, Raja Salem

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to natural sunlight, specifically solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation contributes to lifetime risks of skin cancer, eye disease, and diseases associated with vitamin D insufficiency. Improved knowledge of personal sun exposure patterns can inform public health policy; and help target high-risk population groups. Subsequently, an extensive number of studies have been conducted to measure personal solar UV exposure in a variety of settings. Many of these studies, however, use digital or paper-based journals (self-reported volunteer recall), or employ cost prohibitive electronic UV dosimeters (that limit the size of sample populations), to estimate periods of exposure. A cost effective personal electronic sun journal (ESJ) built from readily available infrared photodiodes is presented in this research. The ESJ can be used to complement traditional UV dosimeters that measure total biologically effective exposure by providing a time-stamped sun exposure record. The ESJ can be easily attached to clothing and data logged to personal devices (including fitness monitors or smartphones). The ESJ improves upon self-reported exposure recording and is a cost effective high-temporal resolution option for monitoring personal sun exposure behavior in large population studies. PMID:29201865

  6. Convective penetration in a young sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Jane; Baraffe, Isabelle; Goffrey, Tom; MUSIC developers group

    2018-01-01

    To interpret the high-quality data produced from recent space-missions it is necessary to study convection under realistic stellar conditions. We describe the multi-dimensional, time implicit, fully compressible, hydrodynamic, implicit large eddy simulation code MUSIC. We use MUSIC to study convection during an early stage in the evolution of our sun where the convection zone covers approximately half of the solar radius. This model of the young sun possesses a realistic stratification in density, temperature, and luminosity. We approach convection in a stellar context using extreme value theory and derive a new model for convective penetration, targeted for one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations. This model provides a scenario that can explain the observed lithium abundance in the sun and in solar-like stars at a range of ages.

  7. Evaluation of pier-scour equations for coarse-bed streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chase, Katherine J.; Holnbeck, Stephen R.

    2004-01-01

    Streambed scour at bridge piers is among the leading causes of bridge failure in the United States. Several pier-scour equations have been developed to calculate potential scour depths at existing and proposed bridges. Because many pier-scour equations are based on data from laboratory flumes and from cohesionless silt- and sand-bottomed streams, they tend to overestimate scour for piers in coarse-bed materials. Several equations have been developed to incorporate the mitigating effects of large particle sizes on pier scour, but further investigations are needed to evaluate how accurately pier-scour depths calculated by these equations match measured field data. This report, prepared in cooperation with the Montana Department of Transportation, describes the evaluation of five pier-scour equations for coarse-bed streams. Pier-scour and associated bridge-geometry, bed-material, and streamflow-measurement data at bridges over coarse-bed streams in Montana, Alaska, Maryland, Ohio, and Virginia were selected from the Bridge Scour Data Management System. Pier scour calculated using the Simplified Chinese equation, the Froehlich equation, the Froehlich design equation, the HEC-18/Jones equation and the HEC-18/Mueller equation for flood events with approximate recurrence intervals of less than 2 to 100 years were compared to 42 pier-scour measurements. Comparison of results showed that pier-scour depths calculated with the HEC-18/Mueller equation were seldom smaller than measured pier-scour depths. In addition, pier-scour depths calculated using the HEC-18/Mueller equation were closer to measured scour than for the other equations that did not underestimate pier scour. However, more data are needed from coarse-bed streams and from less frequent flood events to further evaluate pier-scour equations.

  8. Pre-main sequence sun: a dynamic approach

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Newman, M.J.; Winkler, K.H.A.

    1979-01-01

    The classical pre-main sequence evolutionary behavior found by Hayashi and his coworkers for the Sun depends crucially on the choice of initial conditions. The Hayashi picture results from beginning the calculation with an already centrally condensed, highly Jeans unstable object not terribly far removed from the stellar state initially. The present calculation follows the work of Larson in investigating the hydrodynamic collapse and self-gravitational accretion of an initially uniform, just Jeans unstable interstellar gas-dust cloud. The resulting picture for the early history of the Sun is quite different from that found by Hayashi. A rather small (R approx. = 2more » R/sub sun/), low-luminosity (L greater than or equal to L/sub sun/) protostellar core develops. A fully convective stellar core, characteristic of Hayashi's work, is not found during the accretion process, and can only develop, if at all, in the subsequent pre-main sequence Kelvin-Helmholtz contraction of the core. 3 figures, 1 table.« less

  9. The Sun: Source of the Earth's Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Barbara J.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Sun is the primary source of the Earth's energy. However, due to the complexity in the way the energy affects Earth, the various solar sources of the energy, and the variation exhibited by the Sun it is difficult to understand and predict the Earth's response to solar drivers. In addition to visible light the radiant energy of the Sun can exhibit variation in nearly all wavelengths, which can vary over nearly all timescales. Depending on the wavelength of the incident radiation the light can deposit energy in a wide variety or locations and drive processes from below Earth's surface to interplanetary space. Other sources of energy impacting Earth include energetic particles, magnetic fields, and mass and flow variations in the solar wind. Many of these variable energetic processes cannot be coupled and recent results continue to demonstrate that the complex dynamics of the Sun can have a great range of measurable impacts on Earth.

  10. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-02-01

    We report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. Using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor, we synthesized 70-250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. The material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250-1000 micron thick dense CDC films with up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.

  11. Effects of Source-Apportioned Coarse Particulate Matter (PM) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Cleveland Multiple Air Pollutant Study (CMAPS) is one of the first comprehensive studies conducted to evaluate particulate matter (PM) over local and regional scales. Cleveland and the nearby Ohio River Valley impart significant regional sources of air pollution including coal combustion and steel production. Size-fractionated PM (coarse, fine and ultrafine) were collected from an urban site (G.T. Craig (GTC)) and a rural site (Chippewa Lake monitor (CLM) located 53 km southwest of Cleveland) from July 2009 to June 2010. Following collection, resulting speciated PM data were apportioned to identify local industrial emission sources for each size fraction and location, indicating these samples were enriched with resident emission sources. This study was designed to determine whether exposure of the CMAPS coarse PM contributes to the exacerbation of allergic asthma. Non-sensitized and house dust mite (HDM)-sensitized female Balb/cJ mice (n= 8/group) were exposed via oropharyngeal (OP) aspiration to 100 g coarse fractions of one of five source apportioned groups representative of distinct time periods of 4-6 weeks (traffic, coal, steel 1, steel 2, or winter PM) and OP challenge with HDM conducted 2 hr following dosing with PM. Two days later, airway responsiveness to methacholine aerosol was assessed in anesthetized ventilated control and HDM mice. The HDM-allergic mice demonstrated increased airway reactivity in comparison to control mice. Bronchoalveolar l

  12. Unintended Sunburn: A Potential Target for Sun Protection Messages.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Geraldine F H; Reeder, Anthony I; Gray, Andrew R; McGee, Rob

    2017-01-01

    New Zealand (NZ) has the highest melanoma incidence rate in the world. Primary prevention efforts focus on reducing sunburn incidence and increasing sun protective practices in the population. However, sunburn from excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR) remains common. To reduce sunburn incidence, it is important to examine those individuals who experience unintended sunburn. This study aims to use data from the NZ Triennial Sun Protection Survey to describe respondents who were not intending to tan but were sunburnt after outdoor UVR exposure. Information on sociodemographics, concurrent weather conditions, sun protection attitudes and knowledge, and outdoor behaviour was also collected. The results showed 13.5% of respondents' experienced unintended sunburn during the survey weekend but had not attempted to obtain a tan that summer. Respondents who reported unintended sunburn were more likely than others to have been near water and in unshaded areas, used sunscreen, had higher SunSmart knowledge scores, had lower positive attitudes towards tanning, and were outdoors for a longer duration with less body coverage. As sunburn was unintended these respondents' outdoor sun protective behaviours may be amenable to change. Future public health initiatives should focus on increasing sun protection (clothing and shade) and reducing potential barriers to sun protection.

  13. Unintended Sunburn: A Potential Target for Sun Protection Messages

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Rob

    2017-01-01

    New Zealand (NZ) has the highest melanoma incidence rate in the world. Primary prevention efforts focus on reducing sunburn incidence and increasing sun protective practices in the population. However, sunburn from excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR) remains common. To reduce sunburn incidence, it is important to examine those individuals who experience unintended sunburn. This study aims to use data from the NZ Triennial Sun Protection Survey to describe respondents who were not intending to tan but were sunburnt after outdoor UVR exposure. Information on sociodemographics, concurrent weather conditions, sun protection attitudes and knowledge, and outdoor behaviour was also collected. The results showed 13.5% of respondents' experienced unintended sunburn during the survey weekend but had not attempted to obtain a tan that summer. Respondents who reported unintended sunburn were more likely than others to have been near water and in unshaded areas, used sunscreen, had higher SunSmart knowledge scores, had lower positive attitudes towards tanning, and were outdoors for a longer duration with less body coverage. As sunburn was unintended these respondents' outdoor sun protective behaviours may be amenable to change. Future public health initiatives should focus on increasing sun protection (clothing and shade) and reducing potential barriers to sun protection. PMID:28473925

  14. Schools Uniting Neighborhoods: The SUN Initiative in Portland, Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iverson, Dianne

    2005-01-01

    The Schools Uniting Neighborhoods (SUN) Community Schools Initiative is a community-driven model that allows each school community to design the programs that fit neighborhood needs, while working toward core goals that stretch across all SUN Community Schools. In this article, the author describes the history of SUN Community Schools and its core…

  15. Hyperspectral Sun Photometer for Atmospheric Characterization and Vicarious Calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara

    2008-01-01

    A hyperspectral sun photometer and associated methods have been developed and demonstrated. Accurate sun photometer calibration is critical to properly measure the solar irradiance and characterize the atmosphere. Traditional sun photometer calibration requires solar observations over several hours. In contrast, the procedures for operating this photometer entail less data acquisition time and embody a more direct approach to calibration. The scientific value of the measurement data produced by this instrument is not adversely affected by atmospheric instability. In addition, this instrument yields hyperspectral data covering a large spectral range (350-2,500 nm) not available from most traditional sun photometers. The hyperspectral sun photometer components include (1) a commercially available spectroradiometer that has been laboratory-calibrated and (2) a commercially available reflectance standard panel that exhibits nearly Lambertian 99% reflectance. The spectroradiometer is positioned above, and aimed downward at, the panel. The procedure for operating this instrument calls for a series of measurements: one in which the panel is fully illuminated by the sun, one in which a shade is positioned between the panel and the sun, and two in which the shade is positioned to cast a shadow to either side of the panel. The total sequence of measurements can be performed in less than a minute. From these measurements, the total radiance, the diffuse radiance, and the direct solar radiance are calculated. The direct solar irradiance is calculated from the direct solar radiance and the known reflectance factor of the panel as a function of the solar zenith angle. Atmospheric characteristics are estimated from the optical depth at various wavelengths calculated from (1) the direct solar irradiance obtained as described above, (2) the air mass along a column from the measurement position to the Sun, and (3) the top-of-atmosphere solar irradiance. The instrumentation used to

  16. Sun-Earth Day - Teaching Heliophysics Through Education Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J.; Cline, T.; Lewis, E.

    2010-01-01

    Sun-Earth Day (SED) is an Education and Outreach program supported by the U.S, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The intent of the program is to teach students and the general public about Heliophysics (the science of the study of the Sun, how it varies, and how solar dynamics affect the rest of the solar system, especially the Earth). The program was begun ten years ago. Each year since that time a particular day has been designated as "Sun-Earth Day ,,. Usually the day of the spring equinox (March 20 or 21) is Sun-Earth Day, but other days have been used as well. Each year a theme is chosen relating to Heliophysics and events reflecting that theme are planned not only for Sun-Earth Day, but for the entire year. From the very beginning educational technology was emphasized in the events in order to effectively reach wide audiences with the SED message. The main approach has been to have a "webcast" related to each year's theme, often from a location that supports the theme as well. For example, a webcast took place from the Mayan pyramids at Chichen Itza, Mexico to highlight the theme of "Ancient Observatories, Timeless Knowledge". Webcasts were not the only technology employed, however. Many of the themes centered on the dynamic nature of the Sun and the effects that solar storms can have on interplanetary space and in our day-to-day life on Earth. Activities for tracking when solar storms happen and how they affect the Earth were developed and brought together in an educational package called Space Weather Action Centers. This project is explained in more detail in another presentation in this session being given by Norma Teresinha Oliveira Reis. Recent Sun-Earth Days have utilized "social networking" technologies to reach widespread groups on the internet. Podcasts, Vodcasts, Facebook, Twitter, and Second Life are the types of network technologies being employed now. The NASA Distance learning Network is another method for bringing Sun

  17. Early Deterioration of Coarse Woody Debris

    Treesearch

    F.H. Tainter; J.W. McMinn

    1999-01-01

    Coarse woody debris (CWD) is an important structural component of southern forest ecosystems. CWD loading may be affected by different decomposition rates on sites of varying quality. Bolts of red oak and loblolly pine were placed on plots at each of three (hydric, mesic. and xeric) sites at the Savannah River Site and sampled over a 16-week period. Major changes...

  18. Compact cell-centered discretization stencils at fine-coarse block structured grid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletzer, Alexander; Jamroz, Ben; Crockett, Robert; Sides, Scott

    2014-03-01

    Different strategies for coupling fine-coarse grid patches are explored in the context of the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method. We show that applying linear interpolation to fill in the fine grid ghost values can produce a finite volume stencil of comparable accuracy to quadratic interpolation provided the cell volumes are adjusted. The volume of fine cells expands whereas the volume of neighboring coarse cells contracts. The amount by which the cells contract/expand depends on whether the interface is a face, an edge, or a corner. It is shown that quadratic or better interpolation is required when the conductivity is spatially varying, anisotropic, the refinement ratio is other than two, or when the fine-coarse interface is concave.

  19. A Forest Fire Sensor Web Concept with UAVSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Y.; Chien, S.; Clark, D.; Doubleday, J.; Muellerschoen, R.; Zheng, Y.

    2008-12-01

    We developed a forest fire sensor web concept with a UAVSAR-based smart sensor and onboard automated response capability that will allow us to monitor fire progression based on coarse initial information provided by an external source. This autonomous disturbance detection and monitoring system combines the unique capabilities of imaging radar with high throughput onboard processing technology and onboard automated response capability based on specific science algorithms. In this forest fire sensor web scenario, a fire is initially located by MODIS/RapidFire or a ground-based fire observer. This information is transmitted to the UAVSAR onboard automated response system (CASPER). CASPER generates a flight plan to cover the alerted fire area and executes the flight plan. The onboard processor generates the fuel load map from raw radar data, used with wind and elevation information, predicts the likely fire progression. CASPER then autonomously alters the flight plan to track the fire progression, providing this information to the fire fighting team on the ground. We can also relay the precise fire location to other remote sensing assets with autonomous response capability such as Earth Observation-1 (EO-1)'s hyper-spectral imager to acquire the fire data.

  20. Spatio-thermal depth correction of RGB-D sensors based on Gaussian processes in real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heindl, Christoph; Pönitz, Thomas; Stübl, Gernot; Pichler, Andreas; Scharinger, Josef

    2018-04-01

    Commodity RGB-D sensors capture color images along with dense pixel-wise depth information in real-time. Typical RGB-D sensors are provided with a factory calibration and exhibit erratic depth readings due to coarse calibration values, ageing and thermal influence effects. This limits their applicability in computer vision and robotics. We propose a novel method to accurately calibrate depth considering spatial and thermal influences jointly. Our work is based on Gaussian Process Regression in a four dimensional Cartesian and thermal domain. We propose to leverage modern GPUs for dense depth map correction in real-time. For reproducibility we make our dataset and source code publicly available.

  1. THE UBV(RI){sub C} COLORS OF THE SUN

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ramirez, I.; Michel, R.; Schuster, W. J.

    2012-06-10

    Photometric data in the UBV(RI){sub C} system have been acquired for 80 solar analog stars for which we have previously derived highly precise atmospheric parameters T{sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H] using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra. UBV and (RI){sub C} data for 46 and 76 of these stars, respectively, are published for the first time. Combining our data with those from the literature, colors in the UBV(RI){sub C} system, with {approx_equal} 0.01 mag precision, are now available for 112 solar analogs. Multiple linear regression is used to derive the solar colors from these photometric data and the spectroscopically derivedmore » T{sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H] values. To minimize the impact of systematic errors in the model-dependent atmospheric parameters, we use only the data for the 10 stars that most closely resemble our Sun, i.e., the solar twins, and derive the following solar colors: (B - V){sub Sun} = 0.653 {+-} 0.005, (U - B){sub Sun} = 0.166 {+-} 0.022, (V - R){sub Sun} = 0.352 {+-} 0.007, and (V - I){sub Sun} = 0.702 {+-} 0.010. These colors are consistent, within the 1{sigma} errors, with those derived using the entire sample of 112 solar analogs. We also derive the solar colors using the relation between spectral-line-depth ratios and observed stellar colors, i.e., with a completely model-independent approach, and without restricting the analysis to solar twins. We find (B - V){sub Sun} = 0.653 {+-} 0.003, (U - B){sub Sun} = 0.158 {+-} 0.009, (V - R){sub Sun} = 0.356 {+-} 0.003, and (V - I){sub Sun} = 0.701 {+-} 0.003, in excellent agreement with the model-dependent analysis.« less

  2. Sun protection among Spanish beachgoers: knowledge, attitude and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Cercato, M C; Ramazzotti, V; Sperduti, I; Asensio-Pascual, A; Ribes, I; Guillén, C; Nagore, E

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the level of awareness on the risks related to sun exposure, attitude towards sun protection and sun protection behaviour in Spanish beachgoers. During the summer of 2009, trained assistants conducted a structured interview with 630 sunbathers at the beaches of Valencia, Spain, via administrating a questionnaire including the following: (a) general data (age, gender, education, profession), (b) "knowledge" and "attitude" items and (c) self-assessed sun sensitivity, sun exposure and sun protection characteristics. The health belief model was used to evaluate factors that may influence on engaging healthy behaviour. The median age was 30 (2-82) years; the M/F ratio was 0.60. Despite the widespread regular ("often" or "always", 80%) use of high (>15) sun-protective factor sunscreens, current recommendations on sun protection were not regularly followed, and a history of sunburns is very common (70%). At multivariate analysis, female gender, age, fair hair, freckles, all-day use of sunscreens and wearing sunglasses were independent factors associated with having sunburn history. A high knowledge and a fairly good attitude emerged (median scores, 6/7 and 22/30, respectively). Age class (p = 0.032), educational level (p < 0.0001), sunscreen use (p = 0.048) and adequate timing of the first application of sunscreens (p = 0.015) were predictors of awareness, while factors associated with a more favourable attitude were educational level (p < 0.0001) and regular use of hats (p = 0.001). Wrong beliefs mainly concern sunscreens (false safety); the attractiveness of a tanned look is the main unfavourable attitude. Physical and motivational barriers are common (80%). The findings by highlighting constitutional and psychosocial factors involved in unhealthy behaviour provide useful information to promote sun-safe interventions in this population.

  3. Path-space variational inference for non-equilibrium coarse-grained systems

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Harmandaris, Vagelis, E-mail: harman@uoc.gr; Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics; Kalligiannaki, Evangelia, E-mail: ekalligian@tem.uoc.gr

    In this paper we discuss information-theoretic tools for obtaining optimized coarse-grained molecular models for both equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular simulations. The latter are ubiquitous in physicochemical and biological applications, where they are typically associated with coupling mechanisms, multi-physics and/or boundary conditions. In general the non-equilibrium steady states are not known explicitly as they do not necessarily have a Gibbs structure. The presented approach can compare microscopic behavior of molecular systems to parametric and non-parametric coarse-grained models using the relative entropy between distributions on the path space and setting up a corresponding path-space variational inference problem. The methods can become entirelymore » data-driven when the microscopic dynamics are replaced with corresponding correlated data in the form of time series. Furthermore, we present connections and generalizations of force matching methods in coarse-graining with path-space information methods. We demonstrate the enhanced transferability of information-based parameterizations to different observables, at a specific thermodynamic point, due to information inequalities. We discuss methodological connections between information-based coarse-graining of molecular systems and variational inference methods primarily developed in the machine learning community. However, we note that the work presented here addresses variational inference for correlated time series due to the focus on dynamics. The applicability of the proposed methods is demonstrated on high-dimensional stochastic processes given by overdamped and driven Langevin dynamics of interacting particles.« less

  4. Exploring Young People's Beliefs and Images about Sun Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, K. M.; Robinson, N. G.; Young, R. McD.; Anderson, P. J.; Hyde, M. K.; Greenbank, S.; Keane, J.; Rolfe, T.; Vardon, P.; Baskerville, D.

    2008-01-01

    To understand young people's low levels of sun protection behaviour, 145 young people (aged 12 to 20 years) were recruited from Queensland, to participate in a one-hour focus group where they discussed issues related to sun protection and images of tanned and non-tanned people. Responses were content analysed to identify common sun protection…

  5. Could Ultracool Dwarfs Have Sun-Like Activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    Solar-like stars exhibit magnetic cycles; our Sun, for instance, displays an 11-year period in its activity, manifesting as cyclic changes in radiation levels, the number of sunspots and flares, and ejection of solar material. Over the span of two activity cycles, the Suns magnetic field flips polarity and then returns to its original state.An artists illustration comparing the Sun to TRAPPIST-1, an ultracool dwarf star known to host several planets. [ESO]But what about the magnetic behavior of objects near the cooler end of the stellar main sequence do they exhibit similar activity cycles?Effects of a Convecting InteriorDwarf stars have made headlines in recent years due to their potential to harbor exoplanets. Because these cooler stars have lower flux levels compared to the Sun, their habitable zones lie much closer to the stars. The magnetic behavior of these stars is therefore important to understand: could ultracool dwarfs exhibit solar-like activity cycles that would affect planets with close orbits?The differences in internal structure between different mass stars. Ultracool dwarfs have fully convective interiors. [www.sun.org]Theres a major difference between ultracool dwarfs (stars of spectral type higher than M7 and brown dwarfs) and Sun-like stars: their internal structures. Sun-like stars have a convective envelope that surrounds a radiative core. The interiors of cool, low-mass objects, on the other hand, are fully convective.Based on theoretical studies of how magnetism is generated in stars, its thought that the fully convective interiors of ultracool dwarfs cant support large-scale magnetic field formation. This should prevent these stars from exhibiting activity cycles like the Sun. But recent radio observations of dwarf stars have led scientist Matthew Route (ITaP Research Computing, Purdue University) to question these models.A Reversing Field?During observations of the brown dwarf star J1047+21 in 20102011, radio flares were detected with

  6. Infrared horizon sensor modeling for attitude determination and control - Analysis and mission experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, S. P.; Phenneger, M. C.; Stengle, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes the work of the Flight Dynamics Division of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center in analyzing and evaluating the performance of a variety of infrared horizon sensors on 12 spaceflight missions from 1973 to 1984. Earth infrared radiance modeling, using the LOWTRAN 5 Program, and the Horizon Radiance Modeling Utility are also described. Mission data are presented for Magsat and the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite, with analysis to assess the sensor modeling as well as cloud and sun interference effects. Recommendations are made regarding future directions for the infrared horizon technology.

  7. Ra: The Sun for Science and Humanity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    To guide the development of the Ra Strategic Framework, we defined scientific and applications objectives. For our primary areas of scientific interest, we choose the corona, the solar wind, the Sun's effect on the Earth, and solar theory and model development. For secondary areas of scientific interest, we selected sunspots, the solar constant, the Sun's gravitational field, helioseismology and the galactic cosmic rays. We stress the importance of stereoscopic imaging, observations at high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolutions, as well as of long duration measurements. Further exploration of the Sun's polar regions is also important, as shown already by the Ulysses mission. From an applications perspective, we adopted three broad objectives that would derive complementary inputs for the Strategic Framework. These were to identify and investigate: possible application spin-offs from science missions, possible solar-terrestrial missions dedicated to a particular application, and possible future applications that require technology development. The Sun can be viewed as both a source of resources and of threats. Our principal applications focus was that of threat mitigation, by examining ways to improve solar threat monitoring and early warning systems. We compared these objectives to the mission objectives of past, current, and planned international solar missions. Past missions (1962-1980) seem to have been focused on improvement of scientific knowledge, using multiple instrument spacecraft. A ten year gap followed this period, during which the results from previous missions were analyzed and solar study programmes were prepared in international organizations. Current missions (1990-1996) focus on particular topics such as the corona, solar flares, and coronal mass ejections. In planned missions, Sun/Earth interactions and environmental effects of solar activity are becoming more important. The corona is the centre of interest of almost all planned missions

  8. Invariant Solar Sail Formations in Elliptical Sun-Synchronous Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsay, Khashayar

    Current and past missions that study the Earth's geomagnetic tail require multiple spacecraft to fly in formation about a highly eccentric Keplerian reference orbit that has its apogee inside a predefined science region of interest. Because the geomagnetic tail is directed along the Sun-Earth line and therefore rotates annually, inertially fixed Keplerian orbits are only aligned with the geomagnetic tail once per year. This limitation reduces the duration of the science phase to less than a few months annually. Solar sails are capable of creating non-Keplerian, Sun-synchronous orbits that rotate with the geomagnetic tail. A solar sail flying in a Sun-synchronous orbit will have a continuous presence in the geomagnetic tail throughout the entire year, which significantly improves the in situ observations of the magnetosphere. To achieve a Sun-synchronous orbit, a solar sail is required to maintain a Sun-pointing attitude, which leads to the artificial precession of the orbit apse line in a Sun-synchronous manner, leaving the orbit apogee inside the science region of interest throughout entire the year. To study the spatial and temporal variations of plasma in the highly dynamic environment of the magnetosphere, multiple spacecraft must fly in a formation. The objective for this dissertation is to investigate the feasibility of solar sail formation flying in the Earth-centered, Sun-synchronous orbit regime. The focus of this effort is to enable formation flying for a group of solar sails that maintain a nominally fixed Sun-pointing attitude during formation flight, solely for the purpose of precessing their orbit apse lines Sun-synchronously. A fixed-attitude solar sail formation is motivated by the difficulties in the simultaneous control of orbit and attitude in flying solar sails. First, the secular rates of the orbital elements resulting from the effects of solar radiation pressure (SRP) are determined using averaging theory for a Sun-pointing attitude sail

  9. Coarse-to-fine construction for high-resolution representation in visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zaifeng; Ding, Xiaowei; Yang, Tong; Liang, Junying; Shui, Rende

    2013-01-01

    This study explored whether the high-resolution representations created by visual working memory (VWM) are constructed in a coarse-to-fine or all-or-none manner. The coarse-to-fine hypothesis suggests that coarse information precedes detailed information in entering VWM and that its resolution increases along with the processing time of the memory array, whereas the all-or-none hypothesis claims that either both enter into VWM simultaneously, or neither does. We tested the two hypotheses by asking participants to remember two or four complex objects. An ERP component, contralateral delay activity (CDA), was used as the neural marker. CDA is higher for four objects than for two objects when coarse information is primarily extracted; yet, this CDA difference vanishes when detailed information is encoded. Experiment 1 manipulated the comparison difficulty of the task under a 500-ms exposure time to determine a condition in which the detailed information was maintained. No CDA difference was found between two and four objects, even in an easy-comparison condition. Thus, Experiment 2 manipulated the memory array's exposure time under the easy-comparison condition and found a significant CDA difference at 100 ms while replicating Experiment 1's results at 500 ms. In Experiment 3, the 500-ms memory array was blurred to block the detailed information; this manipulation reestablished a significant CDA difference. These findings suggest that the creation of high-resolution representations in VWM is a coarse-to-fine process.

  10. Simple transfer calibration method for a Cimel Sun-Moon photometer: calculating lunar calibration coefficients from Sun calibration constants.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengqiang; Li, Kaitao; Li, Donghui; Yang, Jiuchun; Xu, Hua; Goloub, Philippe; Victori, Stephane

    2016-09-20

    The Cimel new technologies allow both daytime and nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements. Although the daytime AOD calibration protocols are well established, accurate and simple nighttime calibration is still a challenging task. Standard lunar-Langley and intercomparison calibration methods both require specific conditions in terms of atmospheric stability and site condition. Additionally, the lunar irradiance model also has some known limits on its uncertainty. This paper presents a simple calibration method that transfers the direct-Sun calibration constant, V0,Sun, to the lunar irradiance calibration coefficient, CMoon. Our approach is a pure calculation method, independent of site limits, e.g., Moon phase. The method is also not affected by the lunar irradiance model limitations, which is the largest error source of traditional calibration methods. Besides, this new transfer calibration approach is easy to use in the field since CMoon can be obtained directly once V0,Sun is known. Error analysis suggests that the average uncertainty of CMoon over the 440-1640 nm bands obtained with the transfer method is 2.4%-2.8%, depending on the V0,Sun approach (Langley or intercomparison), which is comparable with that of lunar-Langley approach, theoretically. In this paper, the Sun-Moon transfer and the Langley methods are compared based on site measurements in Beijing, and the day-night measurement continuity and performance are analyzed.

  11. Horizontal Residual Mean Circulation: Evaluation of Spatial Correlations in Coarse Resolution Ocean Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; McDougall, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    Coarse resolution ocean models lack knowledge of spatial correlations between variables on scales smaller than the grid scale. Some researchers have shown that these spatial correlations play a role in the poleward heat flux. In order to evaluate the poleward transport induced by the spatial correlations at a fixed horizontal position, an equation is obtained to calculate the approximate transport from velocity gradients. The equation involves two terms that can be added to the quasi-Stokes streamfunction (based on temporal correlations) to incorporate the contribution of spatial correlations. Moreover, these new terms do not need to be parameterized and is ready to be evaluated by using model data directly. In this study, data from a high resolution ocean model have been used to estimate the accuracy of this HRM approach for improving the horizontal property fluxes in coarse-resolution ocean models. A coarse grid is formed by sub-sampling and box-car averaging the fine grid scale. The transport calculated on the coarse grid is then compared to the transport on original high resolution grid scale accumulated over a corresponding number of grid boxes. The preliminary results have shown that the estimate on coarse resolution grids roughly match the corresponding transports on high resolution grids.

  12. Extreme temperature robust optical sensor designs and fault-tolerant signal processing

    DOEpatents

    Riza, Nabeel Agha [Oviedo, FL; Perez, Frank [Tujunga, CA

    2012-01-17

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) probe designs for extreme temperature and pressure sensing uses a single crystal SiC optical chip encased in a sintered SiC material probe. The SiC chip may be protected for high temperature only use or exposed for both temperature and pressure sensing. Hybrid signal processing techniques allow fault-tolerant extreme temperature sensing. Wavelength peak-to-peak (or null-to-null) collective spectrum spread measurement to detect wavelength peak/null shift measurement forms a coarse-fine temperature measurement using broadband spectrum monitoring. The SiC probe frontend acts as a stable emissivity Black-body radiator and monitoring the shift in radiation spectrum enables a pyrometer. This application combines all-SiC pyrometry with thick SiC etalon laser interferometry within a free-spectral range to form a coarse-fine temperature measurement sensor. RF notch filtering techniques improve the sensitivity of the temperature measurement where fine spectral shift or spectrum measurements are needed to deduce temperature.

  13. Neptune as a Mirror for the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    How would the Kepler mission see a star like the Sun? We now know the answer to this question due to a creative approach: a new study has used the Kepler K2 mission to detect signals from the Sun reflected off of the surface of Neptune.Asteroseismology uses different oscillation modes of a star to probe its internal structure and properties. [Tosaka]Information in OscillationsKeplers most glamorous work is in discovering new planets around other stars. To successfully do this, however, the spacecraft is also quietly doing a lot of very useful work in the background, characterizing the many stars in our vicinity that planets might be found around.One of the ways Kepler gets information about these stars is from oscillations of the stars intensities. In asteroseismology, we look at oscillatory modes that are caused by convection-driven pressure changes on the inside of the star. All stars with near-surface convection oscillate like this including the Sun and by measuring the oscillations in intensity of these stars, we can make inferences about the stars properties.A Planetary MirrorWe do this by first understanding our Suns oscillations especially well (made easier by the fact that its nearby!). Then we use asteroseimic scaling relations determined empirically that relate characteristics like mass and radius of other stars to those of the Sun, based on the relation between the stars oscillation properties to the Suns.The trouble is, those oscillation properties are difficult to measure, and different instruments often measure different values. For this reason, wed like to measure the Suns oscillations with the same instrument we use to measure other stars oscillations: Kepler.Top panel: Kepler K2 49-day light curve of Neptune. Bottom panel: power density spectrum as a function of frequency (grey). Neptunes rotation frequencies and harmonics appear toward the left side (blue); the excess power due to the solar modes is visible toward the bottom right. The green curve

  14. The Sun was Not Born in M67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichardo, Bárbara; Moreno, Edmundo; Allen, Christine; Bedin, Luigi R.; Bellini, Andrea; Pasquini, Luca

    2012-03-01

    Using the most recent proper-motion determination of the old, solar-metallicity, Galactic open cluster M67 in orbital computations in a non-axisymmetric model of the Milky Way, including a bar and three-dimensional spiral arms, we explore the possibility that the Sun once belonged to this cluster. We have performed Monte Carlo numerical simulations to generate the present-day orbital conditions of the Sun and M67, and all the parameters in the Galactic model. We compute 3.5 × 105 pairs of orbits Sun-M67 looking for close encounters in the past with a minimum distance approach within the tidal radius of M67. In these encounters we find that the relative velocity between the Sun and M67 is larger than 20 km s-1. If the Sun had been ejected from M67 with this high velocity by means of a three-body encounter, this interaction would have either destroyed an initial circumstellar disk around the Sun or dispersed its already formed planets. We also find a very low probability, much lower than 10-7, that the Sun was ejected from M67 by an encounter of this cluster with a giant molecular cloud. This study also excludes the possibility that the Sun and M67 were born in the same molecular cloud. Our dynamical results convincingly demonstrate that M67 could not have been the birth cluster of our solar system. This work relies partly on observations of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are The Ohio State University; The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; and The Research Corporation, on behalf of The University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota, and University of Virginia.

  15. The sun since the Bronze Age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddy, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the behavior of the sun during the last 7000 years. The C-14 content in carbonaceous fossil material can be used as an indicator regarding the level of solar activity at the time when the carbon was assimilated in the process of photosynthesis. Living trees, such as the bristlecone pine, provide a solar activity record to about 3000 B.C. The record can be extended with the aid of well-preserved dead wood to beyond 5000 B.C. The results of an analysis of solar activity levels as a function of time on the basis of C-14 contents are presented in a graph. Attention is given to the Maunder Minimum, a history of the sun in the last 5000 years, an interpretation of the major C-14 excursions, and the sun and climate history.

  16. Sun protection provided by regulation school uniforms in Australian schools: an opportunity to improve personal sun protection during childhood.

    PubMed

    Turner, Denise; Harrison, Simone L

    2014-01-01

    Childhood sun exposure is linked to excessive pigmented mole development and melanoma risk. Clothing provides a physical barrier, protecting skin from ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Extending sleeves to elbow length and shorts to knee length has been shown to significantly reduce mole acquisition in preschoolers from tropical Queensland. We used publicly available uniform images and guidelines from primary schools in Townsville (latitude 19.25°S, n = 43 schools), Cairns (16.87°S, n = 46) and the Atherton Tablelands (17.26°S, n = 23) in tropical Australia to objectively determine the body surface proportion covered by regulation school uniforms. Uniforms of nongovernment, large (≥800 students), urban, educationally advantaged schools with comprehensive sun protection policies covered more skin than those of government schools (63.2% vs 62.0%; P < 0.001), smaller schools (63.4% vs 62.3%; P = 0.009), rural (62.7% vs 61.9%; P = 0.002) and educationally disadvantaged schools (62.8% vs 62.3%; P < 0.001) with underdeveloped sun protection policies (62.8% vs 62.2%; P = 0.002). Overall, SunSmart and non-SunSmart school uniforms covered identical body surface proportions (62.4%, P = 0.084). Although wearing regulation school uniforms is mandatory at most Australian primary schools, this opportunity to improve children's sun protection is largely overlooked. Recent evidence suggests that even encouraging minor alterations to school uniforms (e.g. slightly longer sleeves/dresses/skirts/shorts) to increase skin coverage may reduce mole acquisition and melanoma risk, especially in high-risk populations. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  17. What encourages sun protection among outdoor workers from four industries?

    PubMed

    Janda, Monika; Stoneham, Melissa; Youl, Philippa; Crane, Phil; Sendall, Marguerite C; Tenkate, Thomas; Kimlin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to identify current practice of sun protection and factors associated with effective use in four outdoor worker industries in Queensland, Australia. Workplaces in four industries with a high proportion of outdoor workers (building/construction, rural/farming, local government, and public sector industries) were identified using an online telephone directory, screened for eligibility, and invited to participant via mail (n=15, recruitment rate 37%). A convenience sample of workers were recruited within each workplace (n=162). Workplaces' sun protective policies and procedures were identified using interviews and policy analysis with workplace representatives, and discussion groups and computer-assisted telephone interviews with workers. Personal characteristics and sun protection knowledge, attitudes and behaviors were collated and analysed. Just over half the workplaces had an existing policy which referred to sun protection (58%), and most provided at least some personal protective equipment (PPE), but few scheduled work outside peak sun hours (43%) or provided skin checks (21%). Several worker and workplace characteristics were associated with greater sun protection behaviour among workers, including having received education on the use of PPE (p<0.001), being concerned about being in the sun (p=0.002); and working in a smaller workplace (p=0.035). Uptake of sun protection by outdoor workers is affected by a complex interplay of both workplace and personal factors, and there is a need for effective strategies targeting both the workplace environment and workers' knowledge, attitudes and behaviors to decrease harmful sun exposure further.

  18. Parental use of sun protection for their children-does skin color matter?

    PubMed

    Tan, Marcus G; Nag, Shudeshna; Weinstein, Miriam

    2018-03-01

    Excessive sun exposure during childhood is a risk factor for skin cancer. This study aimed to compare the frequency of ideal sun protection use between parents with lighter- and darker-skinned children and explore their attitudes and beliefs on sun safety and their choice of sun protection. Parents of children aged 6 months to 6 years completed self-administered questionnaires about sun protection practices for their children. Parents assessed their child's Fitzpatrick phototype and were divided into lighter- (Fitzpatrick phototype I-III) and darker-skinned (Fitzpatrick phototype IV-VI) groups. Sun safety guidelines from the Canadian Dermatology Association were used to qualify ideal sun protection. A total of 183 parents were included. Overall, 31 parents (17%) used ideal sun protection for their children. As their children grew older, parents were less likely to use ideal sun protection (odds ratio = 0.69, 95% confidence interval = 0.53-0.90). Parents in the lighter-skinned group were more likely to use ideal sun protection for their children (odds ratio = 7.4, 95% confidence interval = 2.7-20.1), believe that sun exposure was harmful (odds ratio = 17.2, 95% confidence interval = 4.0-74.9), and perceive value in sun protection (odds ratio = 11.4, 95% confidence interval = 3.3-39.0); the darker-skinned group believed that darker skin tones provided more sun protection (odds ratio = 12.4, 95% confidence interval = 6.1-25.4). Ideal parental sun protection efforts are overall low, particularly in parents of darker-skinned children. The identified attitudes toward and beliefs about sun safety may aid in delivery of future sun protection interventions, especially in multiracial populations. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. HD 129333: The Sun in its infancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorren, J. David; Guinan, Edward F.

    1994-01-01

    HD 129333 is a remarkable young, nearby solar-type G star which offers a unique opportunity of studying the properties of the Sun at a time very shortly after in arrived on the main sequence. Its space motion suggest that it is a member of the Pleiades moving group, with an age of approximately 70 Myr; its lithium abundance is consistent with this. HD 129333 has the highest level of Ca II emission of any G star which is not a member of a close binary. Our observations in 1983 showed it to have low-amplitude (5%) light variations implying a rotation period of about 2.7 days, or about 10 times faster than the Sun. Modeling of the photometric variations on the assumption that they are due to starspots yields a spot temperature about 500 K cooler than the photosphere, and a coverage of about 6% of the stellar surface area. ROSAT observations in 1990 revealed the star to be an X-ray source, with an X-ray luminosity in the 0.2 to 2.4 keV range about 300 times that of the Sun. We have used International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations in conjuction with ground-based photometry to examine the magnetic activity of this star. The IUE emission-line fluxes reveal a level of chromospheric activity 3 to 20 times greater than the Sun's. The transition-region activity is 20 to 100 times that of the Sun. The activity level of HD 129333 is consistent with the Skumanich law relating activity to age, and with the rotation-activity relation, although it may be near saturation level. This star can yield valuable information about the magnetic dynamo of the young Sun, as well as about stellar dynamos in general. The 1988 IUE observations covered four phases of its rotational cycle. A phase dependence of the Mg II h and k emission flux suggests a close association of chromospheric plages with starspot regions at that time. Systematic variations in the mean brightness of HD 129333 between 1983 and 1993, and in the UV emission fluxes, indicate the presence of an activity cycle of an

  20. Neutrinos from cosmic ray interactions in the Sun

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Edsjö, J.; Elevant, J.; Niblaeus, C.

    Cosmic rays hitting the solar atmosphere generate neutrinos that interact and oscillate in the Sun and oscillate on the way to Earth. These neutrinos could potentially be detected with neutrino telescopes and will be a background for searches for neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Sun. We calculate the flux of neutrinos from these cosmic ray interactions in the Sun and also investigate the interactions near a detector on Earth that give rise to muons. We compare this background with both regular Earth-atmospheric neutrinos and signals from dark matter annihilation in the Sun. Our calculation is performed with anmore » event-based Monte Carlo approach that should be suitable as a simulation tool for experimental collaborations. Our program package is released publicly along with this paper.« less

  1. A suggested trajectory for a Venus-sun, earth-sun Lagrange points mission, Vela

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, D. F.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility is suggested of investigating the existence of small, as-yet undiscovered, asteroids orbiting in the solar system near the earth-sun or Venus-sun stable Lagrange points by means of a spacecraft which traverses these regions. The type of trajectory suggested lies in the ecliptic plane and has a period of 5/6 years and a perihelion at the Venus orbital distance. The regions in which stable orbits associated with the earth and with Venus may lie are estimated to be a thin and tadpole-shaped area extending from 35 deg to 100 deg from the planet. Crossings of the regions by the trajectory are described, and the requirements for detecting the presence of 1 km sized asteroids are presented and shown to be attainable.

  2. Coarse-grained stochastic processes and kinetic Monte Carlo simulators for the diffusion of interacting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsoulakis, Markos A.; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2003-11-01

    We derive a hierarchy of successively coarse-grained stochastic processes and associated coarse-grained Monte Carlo (CGMC) algorithms directly from the microscopic processes as approximations in larger length scales for the case of diffusion of interacting particles on a lattice. This hierarchy of models spans length scales between microscopic and mesoscopic, satisfies a detailed balance, and gives self-consistent fluctuation mechanisms whose noise is asymptotically identical to the microscopic MC. Rigorous, detailed asymptotics justify and clarify these connections. Gradient continuous time microscopic MC and CGMC simulations are compared under far from equilibrium conditions to illustrate the validity of our theory and delineate the errors obtained by rigorous asymptotics. Information theory estimates are employed for the first time to provide rigorous error estimates between the solutions of microscopic MC and CGMC, describing the loss of information during the coarse-graining process. Simulations under periodic boundary conditions are used to verify the information theory error estimates. It is shown that coarse-graining in space leads also to coarse-graining in time by q2, where q is the level of coarse-graining, and overcomes in part the hydrodynamic slowdown. Operation counting and CGMC simulations demonstrate significant CPU savings in continuous time MC simulations that vary from q3 for short potentials to q4 for long potentials. Finally, connections of the new coarse-grained stochastic processes to stochastic mesoscopic and Cahn-Hilliard-Cook models are made.

  3. Results of the Magnetometer Navigation (MAGNAV)lnflight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thienel, Julie K.; Harman, Richard R.; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Lambertson, Mike

    2004-01-01

    The Magnetometer Navigation (MAGNAV) algorithm is currently running as a flight experiment as part of the Wide Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) Post-Science Engineering Testbed. Initialization of MAGNAV occurred on September 4, 2003. MAGNAV is designed to autonomously estimate the spacecraft orbit, attitude, and rate using magnetometer and sun sensor data. Since the Earth's magnetic field is a function of time and position, and since time is known quite precisely, the differences between the computed magnetic field and measured magnetic field components, as measured by the magnetometer throughout the entire spacecraft orbit, are a function of the spacecraft trajectory and attitude errors. Therefore, these errors are used to estimate both trajectory and attitude. In addition, the time rate of change of the magnetic field vector is used to estimate the spacecraft rotation rate. The estimation of the attitude and trajectory is augmented with the rate estimation into an Extended Kalman filter blended with a pseudo-linear Kalman filter. Sun sensor data is also used to improve the accuracy and observability of the attitude and rate estimates. This test serves to validate MAGNAV as a single low cost navigation system which utilizes reliable, flight qualified sensors. MAGNAV is intended as a backup algorithm, an initialization algorithm, or possibly a prime navigation algorithm for a mission with coarse requirements. Results from the first six months of operation are presented.

  4. Licensing the Sun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demski, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The University of San Diego (USD) and Point Loma Nazarene University (PLNU) are licensing the sun. Both California schools are generating solar power on campus without having to sink large amounts of capital into equipment and installation. By negotiating power purchasing agreements (PPAs) with Amsolar and Perpetual Energy Systems, respectively,…

  5. Retrieval of atmospheric optical parameters from ground-based sun-photometer measurements for Zanjan, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, A.; Masoumi, A.; Khalesifard, H. R.

    2010-06-01

    We are reporting the results of ground-based spectroradiometric measurements on aerosols and water vapor in the atmosphere of Zanjan for the period of October 2006 to September 2008 using a Cimel CE318-2 sun-photometer. Zanjan is a city in Northwest Iran, located at 36.70° N, 48.51° E, and at an altitude of 1800 above m.s.l. The spectral aerosol optical depth, Ångström exponent, and columnar water vapor have been calculated using the data recorded by the sunphotometer through direct-beam irradiance measurements of sunlight (sun mode). The average values of aerosol optical depth at 440 nm, columnar water vapor, and the Ångström exponent, α, during the mentioned period are measured as, 0.27±0.16, 0.53±0.37 cm and 0.75±0.46, respectively. The maximum (minimum) value of the aerosol optical depth was recorded in May 2007 (January 2007), and that of columnar water vapor, in July 2007 (January 2008). Using the least-squares method, the Ångström exponent was calculated in the spectral interval 440-870 nm along with the coefficients of a second order polynomial fit (α1 and α2) to the log-log plot of aerosol optical depth versus the wavelength. The coefficient α2 shows that most of the aerosols in the Zanjan area have dimensions larger than 1 μm. The values calculated for α2-α1 indicate that 70% of the aerosols are in the coarse-mode (>1 μm) and 30% of them are in the fine-mode (<1 μm). Comparison of α2-α1 for the atmosphere over Zanjan with other regions indicates dust and anthropogenic aerosols are the most dominant aerosols in the region.

  6. Attitude ground support system for the solar maximum mission spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nair, G.

    1980-01-01

    The SMM attitude ground support system (AGSS) supports the acquisition of spacecraft roll attitude reference, performs the in-flight calibration of the attitude sensor complement, supports onboard control autonomy via onboard computer data base updates, and monitors onboard computer (OBC) performance. Initial roll attitude acquisition is accomplished by obtaining a coarse 3 axis attitude estimate from magnetometer and Sun sensor data and subsequently refining it by processing data from the fixed head star trackers. In-flight calibration of the attitude sensor complement is achieved by processing data from a series of slew maneuvers designed to maximize the observability and accuracy of the appropriate alignments and biases. To ensure autonomy of spacecraft operation, the AGSS selects guide stars and computes sensor occultation information for uplink to the OBC. The onboard attitude control performance is monitored on the ground through periodic attitude determination and processing of OBC data in downlink telemetry. In general, the control performance has met mission requirements. However, software and hardware problems have resulted in sporadic attitude reference losses.

  7. Sun and Sjogren's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... California, for authoring this Patient Education Sheet. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation emitted from the sun and other light ... autoantibody SSA/or Ro. To avoid reactions to UV light, try the following tips: Protect your skin ...

  8. Chemically specific coarse-grained models to investigate the structure of biomimetic membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Kowalik, Ma?gorzata; Schantz, Allen B.; Naqi, Abdullah; ...

    2017-11-29

    Biomimetic polymer/protein membranes are promising materials for DNA sequencing, sensors, drug delivery and water purification. These self-assembled structures are made from low molecular weight amphiphilic block copolymers (N hydrophobic < 40 for a diblock copolymer), including poly(ethylene oxide)–1,2-polybutadiene (EO–1,2-BD) and poly(ethylene oxide)–poly(ethyl ethylene) (EO–EE). To examine these membranes' nanoscale structure, we developed a coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG MD) model for EO–1,2-BD and assembled a CG MD model for EO–EE using parameters from two published force fields. We observe that the polymers' hydrophobic core blocks are slightly stretched compared to the random coil configuration seen at higher molecular weights. We alsomore » observe an increase in the interdigitation of the hydrophobic leaflets with increasing molecular weight (consistent with literature). The hydration level of the EO corona (which may influence protein incorporation) is higher for membranes with a larger area/chain, regardless of whether EE or 1,2-BD forms the hydrophobic block. Our results provide a molecular-scale view of membrane packing and hydrophobicity, two important properties for creating polymer–protein biomimetic membranes.« less

  9. Chemically specific coarse-grained models to investigate the structure of biomimetic membranes

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kowalik, Ma?gorzata; Schantz, Allen B.; Naqi, Abdullah

    Biomimetic polymer/protein membranes are promising materials for DNA sequencing, sensors, drug delivery and water purification. These self-assembled structures are made from low molecular weight amphiphilic block copolymers (N hydrophobic < 40 for a diblock copolymer), including poly(ethylene oxide)–1,2-polybutadiene (EO–1,2-BD) and poly(ethylene oxide)–poly(ethyl ethylene) (EO–EE). To examine these membranes' nanoscale structure, we developed a coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG MD) model for EO–1,2-BD and assembled a CG MD model for EO–EE using parameters from two published force fields. We observe that the polymers' hydrophobic core blocks are slightly stretched compared to the random coil configuration seen at higher molecular weights. We alsomore » observe an increase in the interdigitation of the hydrophobic leaflets with increasing molecular weight (consistent with literature). The hydration level of the EO corona (which may influence protein incorporation) is higher for membranes with a larger area/chain, regardless of whether EE or 1,2-BD forms the hydrophobic block. Our results provide a molecular-scale view of membrane packing and hydrophobicity, two important properties for creating polymer–protein biomimetic membranes.« less

  10. Coarse-grained simulations of cis- and trans-polybutadiene: A bottom-up approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarchand, Claire A.; Couty, Marc; Rousseau, Bernard

    2017-02-01

    We apply the dissipative particle dynamics strategy proposed by Hijón et al. [Faraday Discuss. 144, 301-322 (2010)] and based on an exact derivation of the generalized Langevin equation to cis- and trans-1,4-polybutadiene. We prove that it is able to reproduce not only the structural but also the dynamical properties of these polymers without any fitting parameter. A systematic study of the effect of the level of coarse-graining is done on cis-1,4-polybutadiene. We show that as the level of coarse-graining increases, the dynamical properties are better and better reproduced while the structural properties deviate more and more from those calculated in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We suggest two reasons for this behavior: the Markovian approximation is better satisfied as the level of coarse-graining increases, while the pair-wise approximation neglects important contributions due to the relative orientation of the beads at large levels of coarse-graining. Finally, we highlight a possible limit of the Markovian approximation: the fact that in constrained simulations, in which the centers-of-mass of the beads are kept constant, the bead rotational dynamics become extremely slow.

  11. Pioneer 10 at Silver Au Describes Sun's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Almost 4 billion kilometers from the Sun, Pioneer 10's findings paint a detailed picture of the solar atmosphere. The heliosphere is now believed to be a huge magnetic bubble created by the solar wind and gets its tear-shape from streamlining due to the motion of the solar system through the interstellar gas. The skin of the bubble, the region between stellar and interstellar gas, is believed to lie between 50 and 100 AU from the Sun. The solar wind drags the Sun's magnetic field with it. The bubble, probably extends far beyond Pluto, and is believed to breathe, expanding and contracting like a giant cosmic lung with each 11 year cycle. The most recent findings show that as storms on the Sun build up toward maximum solar activity, they send out shock waves throughout the bubble which cause ripples. This long lived solar storm turbulence accelerates low energy cosmic ray particles coming in from the galaxy, deflecting them out of the solar system, and shielding the planets. As distance from the Sun increases, more and more cosmic ray particles penetrate the heliosphere.

  12. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; ...

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. We synthesized 70–250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution, using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. Moreover, the material showcased capacitance above 100 F g -1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s -1 in organic electrolyte. 250–1000 micron thick dense CDCmore » films with up to 80 mg cm -2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.« less

  13. Sun-Earth Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Michael Sandras, a member of the Pontchartrain Astronomical Society, explains his solar telescope to students of Second Street in Bay St. Louis, Hancock County and Nicholson elementary schools in StenniSphere's Millennium Hall on April 10. The students participated in several hands-on activities at Stennis Space Center's Sun-Earth Day celebration.

  14. Sun-Earth Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-11

    Michael Sandras, a member of the Pontchartrain Astronomical Society, explains his solar telescope to students of Second Street in Bay St. Louis, Hancock County and Nicholson elementary schools in StenniSphere's Millennium Hall on April 10. The students participated in several hands-on activities at Stennis Space Center's Sun-Earth Day celebration.

  15. An Introduction to the Sun and Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Simon F.; Jones, Mark H.

    2015-02-01

    Introduction; 1. Seeing the Sun; 2. The working Sun; 3. Measuring stars; 4. Comparing stars; 5. The formation of stars; 6. The main sequence life of stars; 7. The life of stars beyond the main sequence; 8. The death of stars; 9. The remnants of stars; Conclusion; Answers and comments; Appendices; Glossary; Further reading; Acknowledgements; Figure references; Index.

  16. Sun-Smart Safety Tips: Avoiding the Burn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camping Magazine, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Skin cancer is the fastest increasing cancer, and children receive 80% of their lifetime sun exposure before age 18. Campers should apply sunscreen with a sun protection factor of at least 15 daily, 20 minutes before going outdoors and again every 2 hours. Seven strategies for preventing sunburn and reducing the risk of developing skin cancer are…

  17. Effects of coarse-graining on the scaling behavior of long-range correlated and anti-correlated signals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yinlin; Ma, Qianli D Y; Schmitt, Daniel T; Bernaola-Galván, Pedro; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2011-11-01

    We investigate how various coarse-graining (signal quantization) methods affect the scaling properties of long-range power-law correlated and anti-correlated signals, quantified by the detrended fluctuation analysis. Specifically, for coarse-graining in the magnitude of a signal, we consider (i) the Floor, (ii) the Symmetry and (iii) the Centro-Symmetry coarse-graining methods. We find that for anti-correlated signals coarse-graining in the magnitude leads to a crossover to random behavior at large scales, and that with increasing the width of the coarse-graining partition interval Δ, this crossover moves to intermediate and small scales. In contrast, the scaling of positively correlated signals is less affected by the coarse-graining, with no observable changes when Δ < 1, while for Δ > 1 a crossover appears at small scales and moves to intermediate and large scales with increasing Δ. For very rough coarse-graining (Δ > 3) based on the Floor and Symmetry methods, the position of the crossover stabilizes, in contrast to the Centro-Symmetry method where the crossover continuously moves across scales and leads to a random behavior at all scales; thus indicating a much stronger effect of the Centro-Symmetry compared to the Floor and the Symmetry method. For coarse-graining in time, where data points are averaged in non-overlapping time windows, we find that the scaling for both anti-correlated and positively correlated signals is practically preserved. The results of our simulations are useful for the correct interpretation of the correlation and scaling properties of symbolic sequences.

  18. Effects of coarse-graining on the scaling behavior of long-range correlated and anti-correlated signals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yinlin; Ma, Qianli D.Y.; Schmitt, Daniel T.; Bernaola-Galván, Pedro; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate how various coarse-graining (signal quantization) methods affect the scaling properties of long-range power-law correlated and anti-correlated signals, quantified by the detrended fluctuation analysis. Specifically, for coarse-graining in the magnitude of a signal, we consider (i) the Floor, (ii) the Symmetry and (iii) the Centro-Symmetry coarse-graining methods. We find that for anti-correlated signals coarse-graining in the magnitude leads to a crossover to random behavior at large scales, and that with increasing the width of the coarse-graining partition interval Δ, this crossover moves to intermediate and small scales. In contrast, the scaling of positively correlated signals is less affected by the coarse-graining, with no observable changes when Δ < 1, while for Δ > 1 a crossover appears at small scales and moves to intermediate and large scales with increasing Δ. For very rough coarse-graining (Δ > 3) based on the Floor and Symmetry methods, the position of the crossover stabilizes, in contrast to the Centro-Symmetry method where the crossover continuously moves across scales and leads to a random behavior at all scales; thus indicating a much stronger effect of the Centro-Symmetry compared to the Floor and the Symmetry method. For coarse-graining in time, where data points are averaged in non-overlapping time windows, we find that the scaling for both anti-correlated and positively correlated signals is practically preserved. The results of our simulations are useful for the correct interpretation of the correlation and scaling properties of symbolic sequences. PMID:25392599

  19. Transmittance Measurement of a Heliostat Facility used in the Preflight Radiometric Calibration of Earth-Observing Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Thome, K.; Anderson, N.; McCorkel, J.; Leisso, N.; Good, W.; Collins, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado, has developed a heliostat facility that will be used to determine the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors that operate in the solar-reflective regime. While automatically tracking the Sun, the heliostat directs the solar beam inside a thermal vacuum chamber, where the sensor under test resides. The main advantage to using the Sun as the illumination source for preflight radiometric calibration is because it will also be the source of illumination when the sensor is in flight. This minimizes errors in the pre- and post-launch calibration due to spectral mismatches. It also allows the instrument under test to operate at irradiance values similar to those on orbit. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona measured the transmittance of the heliostat facility using three methods, the first of which is a relative measurement made using a hyperspectral portable spectroradiometer and well-calibrated reference panel. The second method is also a relative measurement, and uses a 12-channel automated solar radiometer. The final method is an absolute measurement using a hyperspectral spectroradiometer and reference panel combination, where the spectroradiometer is calibrated on site using a solar-radiation-based calibration.

  20. The Sun as you never saw it before

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-02-01

    The remarkable images come from SOHO's visible-light coronagraph LASCO. It masks the intense rays from the Sun's surface in order to reveal the much fainter glow of the solar atmosphere, or corona. Operated with its widest field of view, in its C3 instrument, LASCO's unprecedented sensitivity enables it to see the thin ionized gas of the solar wind out to the edges of the picture, 22 million kilometres from the Sun's surface. Many stars are brighter than the gas, and they create the background scene. The results alter human perceptions of the Sun. Nearly 30 years ago, Apollo photographs of the Earth persuaded everyone of what until then they knew only in theory, that we live on a small planet. Similarly the new imagery shows our motion in orbit around the Sun, and depicts it as one star among - yet close enough to fill the sky emanations that engulf us. For many centuries even astrologers knew that the Sun was in Sagittarius in December and drifting towards the next zodiacal constellation, Capricornus. This was a matter of calculation only, because the Sun's own brightness prevented a direct view of the starfield. The SOHO-LASCO movie makes this elementary point of astronomy a matter of direct observation for the first time. The images are achievable only from a vantage point in space, because the blue glow of the Earth's atmosphere hides the stars during the day. A spacial allocation of observing time, and of data tranmission from the SOHO spacecraft, enabled the LASCO team to obtain large numbers of images over the period 22-28 December 1996. Since then, a sustained effort in image processing, frame by frame, has achieved a result of high technical and aesthetic quality. Only now is the leader of the LASCO team, Guenter Brueckner of the US Naval Research Laboratory, satisfied with the product and ready to authorize its release. "I spend my life examining the Sun," Brueckner says, "but this movie is a special thrill. For a moment I forget the years of effort that

  1. Insights into DNA-mediated interparticle interactions from a coarse-grained model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yajun; Mittal, Jeetain

    2014-11-01

    DNA-functionalized particles have great potential for the design of complex self-assembled materials. The major hurdle in realizing crystal structures from DNA-functionalized particles is expected to be kinetic barriers that trap the system in metastable amorphous states. Therefore, it is vital to explore the molecular details of particle assembly processes in order to understand the underlying mechanisms. Molecular simulations based on coarse-grained models can provide a convenient route to explore these details. Most of the currently available coarse-grained models of DNA-functionalized particles ignore key chemical and structural details of DNA behavior. These models therefore are limited in scope for studying experimental phenomena. In this paper, we present a new coarse-grained model of DNA-functionalized particles which incorporates some of the desired features of DNA behavior. The coarse-grained DNA model used here provides explicit DNA representation (at the nucleotide level) and complementary interactions between Watson-Crick base pairs, which lead to the formation of single-stranded hairpin and double-stranded DNA. Aggregation between multiple complementary strands is also prevented in our model. We study interactions between two DNA-functionalized particles as a function of DNA grafting density, lengths of the hybridizing and non-hybridizing parts of DNA, and temperature. The calculated free energies as a function of pair distance between particles qualitatively resemble experimental measurements of DNA-mediated pair interactions.

  2. Promoting sun awareness: evaluation of an educational children's book.

    PubMed

    Thornton, C M; Piacquadio, D J

    1996-07-01

    To assess the value of early childhood education as a means of increasing awareness and knowledge about the sun and related skin disease(s). A children's book promoting sun awareness and protection was developed. The next was incorporated into the health education curriculum of two third-grade classrooms (n = 82). The students completed a questionnaire before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after reading the text. Student sun awareness knowledge was compared using descriptive statistics and paired T-tests. Behaviors and attitudes that resulted in over-exposure to the sun's ultraviolet light were common among third-graders. Primary test areas included the sun's effect on skin, effective sunscreens, skin type, and skin cancer. Test scores showed a marked improvement (40% compared with baseline) in knowledge of sun protection at both posttests. Parents represented the greatest source of information for children (28 of 82) before this study, while doctors and teachers each accounted for only 1 of 82. Preventive measures in childhood have the potential to significantly reduce the incidence of sunrelated skin diseases; however, education to date has been directed primarily at presents. This study demonstrated that an educational book for elementary school students can be an effective tool to increase sun awareness and knowledge. The multifaceted approach to prevention recommended here is similar to that of the highly successful dental care campaign, consisting of direct education of children by physicians, teachers, parents, and the media.

  3. Plutonium isotopes offer an alternative approach to establishing chronological profiles in coarse sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pondell, C.; Kuehl, S. A.; Canuel, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    There are several methodologies used to determine chronologies for sediments deposited within the past 100 years, including 210Pb and 137Cs radioisotopes and organic and inorganic contaminants. These techniques are quite effective in fine sediments, which generally have a high affinity for metals and organic compounds. However, the application of these chronological tools becomes limited in systems where coarse sediments accumulate. Englebright Lake is an impoundment in northern California where sediment accumulation is characterized by a combination of fine and coarse sediments. This combination of sediment grain size complicated chronological analysis using the more traditional 137Cs chronological approach. This study established a chronology of these sediments using 239+240Pu isotopes. While most of the 249+240Pu activity was measured in the fine grain size fraction (<63 microns), up to 25% of the plutonium activity was detected in the coarse size fractions of sediments from Englebright Lake. Profiles of 239+240Pu were similar to available 137Cs profiles, verifying the application of plutonium isotopes for determining sediment chronologies and expanding the established geochronology for Englebright Lake sediments. This study of sediment accumulation in Englebright Lake demonstrates the application of plutonium isotopes in establishing chronologies in coarse sediments and highlights the potential for plutonium to offer new insights into patterns of coarse sediment accumulation.

  4. Fine-coarse semantic processing in schizophrenia: a reversed pattern of hemispheric dominance.

    PubMed

    Zeev-Wolf, Maor; Goldstein, Abraham; Levkovitz, Yechiel; Faust, Miriam

    2014-04-01

    Left lateralization for language processing is a feature of neurotypical brains. In individuals with schizophrenia, lack of left lateralization is associated with the language impairments manifested in this population. Beeman׳s fine-coarse semantic coding model asserts left hemisphere specialization in fine (i.e., conventionalized) semantic coding and right hemisphere specialization in coarse (i.e., non-conventionalized) semantic coding. Applying this model to schizophrenia would suggest that language impairments in this population are a result of greater reliance on coarse semantic coding. We investigated this hypothesis and examined whether a reversed pattern of hemispheric involvement in fine-coarse semantic coding along the time course of activation could be detected in individuals with schizophrenia. Seventeen individuals with schizophrenia and 30 neurotypical participants were presented with two word expressions of four types: literal, conventional metaphoric, unrelated (exemplars of fine semantic coding) and novel metaphoric (an exemplar of coarse semantic coding). Expressions were separated by either a short (250 ms) or long (750 ms) delay. Findings indicate that whereas during novel metaphor processing, controls displayed a left hemisphere advantage at 250 ms delay and right hemisphere advantage at 750 ms, individuals with schizophrenia displayed the opposite. For conventional metaphoric and unrelated expressions, controls showed left hemisphere advantage across times, while individuals with schizophrenia showed a right hemisphere advantage. Furthermore, whereas individuals with schizophrenia were less accurate than control at judging literal, conventional metaphoric and unrelated expressions they were more accurate when judging novel metaphors. Results suggest that individuals with schizophrenia display a reversed pattern of lateralization for semantic coding which causes them to rely more heavily on coarse semantic coding. Thus, for individuals with

  5. SunShot Identity Video

    ScienceCinema

    Le, Minh; Resch, Rhone

    2018-05-01

    Highlights of the SunShot program, the national targets for the program, and the "all of the above" approach to achieving those goals through research, tech transfer, permitting, tax incentives, and a comprehensive approach to installation.

  6. SunShot Identity Video

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Le, Minh; Resch, Rhone

    Highlights of the SunShot program, the national targets for the program, and the "all of the above" approach to achieving those goals through research, tech transfer, permitting, tax incentives, and a comprehensive approach to installation.

  7. Lennard-Jones type pair-potential method for coarse-grained lipid bilayer membrane simulations in LAMMPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, S.-P.; Peng, Z.; Yuan, H.; Kfoury, R.; Young, Y.-N.

    2017-01-01

    Lipid bilayer membranes have been extensively studied by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. Numerical efficiencies have been reported in the cases of aggressive coarse-graining, where several lipids are coarse-grained into a particle of size 4 ∼ 6 nm so that there is only one particle in the thickness direction. Yuan et al. proposed a pair-potential between these one-particle-thick coarse-grained lipid particles to capture the mechanical properties of a lipid bilayer membrane, such as gel-fluid-gas phase transitions of lipids, diffusion, and bending rigidity Yuan et al. (2010). In this work we implement such an interaction potential in LAMMPS to simulate large-scale lipid systems such as a giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) and red blood cells (RBCs). We also consider the effect of cytoskeleton on the lipid membrane dynamics as a model for RBC dynamics, and incorporate coarse-grained water molecules to account for hydrodynamic interactions. The interaction between the coarse-grained water molecules (explicit solvent molecules) is modeled as a Lennard-Jones (L-J) potential. To demonstrate that the proposed methods do capture the observed dynamics of vesicles and RBCs, we focus on two sets of LAMMPS simulations: 1. Vesicle shape transitions with enclosed volume; 2. RBC shape transitions with different enclosed volume. Finally utilizing the parallel computing capability in LAMMPS, we provide some timing results for parallel coarse-grained simulations to illustrate that it is possible to use LAMMPS to simulate large-scale realistic complex biological membranes for more than 1 ms.

  8. Comet Jacques Approaches the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-24

    NASA's Solar TErrestrial Relations Observatory, STEREO has observed the recently discovered Comet Jacques as it passed by its nearest approach to the Sun (July 1-6, 2014). The wide field instrument on board STEREO (Ahead) showed the comet with its elongated tail being stretched and pummeled by the gusty solar wind streaming from the Sun. Also visible near the center of the image is the bright planet Venus. The Sun is just out of the field of view to the right. Comet Jacques is traveling through space at about 180,000 km per hour (110,000 mph). It may brighten enough to be seen with the naked eye. High res still here: www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/14710024276/ Download original file: sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/pickoftheweek/old/11jul2014/ Credit: NASA/Goddard/STEREO NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  9. Integration and flight test of a biomimetic heading sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahl, Javaan; Mizutani, Akiko

    2013-04-01

    We report on the first successful development and implementation of an automatic polarisation compass as the primary heading sensor for a UAV. Polarisation compassing is the primary navigation sense of many flying and walking insects, including bees, ants and crickets. Manually operated polarisation astrolabes were fitted in some passenger airliners prior to the implementation of the global positioning system, to compensate for the overal degradation of magnetic and gyrocompass sensors in polar regions. The device we developed demonstrated accurate determination of the direction of the Sun, with repeatability of better than 0.2 degrees. These figures are comparable to any solid state magnetic compass, including flux gate based devices. Flight trials were undertaken in which the output of the polarimeter was the only heading reference used by the aircraft as it flew through GPS waypoints.

  10. Visualizing Sun-Earth-Moon Relationships through Hands-On Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Abby

    2013-04-01

    "Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn." -Benjamin Franklin Understanding the spatial relationships between the sun, Earth and Moon is fundamental to any basic earth science education. Since both of the following concepts involve shadows on three-dimensional spheres, seeing them on paper is not often conducive to understanding. In the first activity, students use five Styrofoam balls painted to look like the sun and the four positions of the earth in each season. Students position the Earth-balls in their correct order around the sun and translate what they are seeing onto paper. In the second activity, students hold up a Styrofoam ball painted half white, half black. A picture of the sun is projected at the front of the classroom. They move the ball around their heads as if they were the Earth, keeping the lit side of the moon always facing the sun. They then draw the phases of the moon as they see them.

  11. Chemical Characterization of Coarse Particulate Matter in the Desert Southwest - Pinal County Arizona, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Desert Southwest Coarse Particulate Matter Study was undertaken of ambient concentrations and the composition of fine and coarse particles in rural, arid environments. Sampling was conducted in Pinal County, Arizona between February 2009 and February 2010. The goals of this ...

  12. Source identification of coarse particles in the Desert Southwest, USA using Positive Matrix Factorization

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Desert Southwest Coarse Particulate Matter Study was undertaken to further our understanding of the spatial and temporal variability and sources of fine and coarse particulate matter (PM) in rural, arid, desert environments. Sampling was conducted between February 2009 and Fe...

  13. Conservative and dissipative force field for simulation of coarse-grained alkane molecules: A bottom-up approach

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Trément, Sébastien; Rousseau, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.rousseau@u-psud.fr; Schnell, Benoît

    2014-04-07

    We apply operational procedures available in the literature to the construction of coarse-grained conservative and friction forces for use in dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The full procedure rely on a bottom-up approach: large molecular dynamics trajectories of n-pentane and n-decane modeled with an anisotropic united atom model serve as input for the force field generation. As a consequence, the coarse-grained model is expected to reproduce at least semi-quantitatively structural and dynamical properties of the underlying atomistic model. Two different coarse-graining levels are studied, corresponding to five and ten carbon atoms per DPD bead. The influence of the coarse-graining levelmore » on the generated force fields contributions, namely, the conservative and the friction part, is discussed. It is shown that the coarse-grained model of n-pentane correctly reproduces self-diffusion and viscosity coefficients of real n-pentane, while the fully coarse-grained model for n-decane at ambient temperature over-predicts diffusion by a factor of 2. However, when the n-pentane coarse-grained model is used as a building block for larger molecule (e.g., n-decane as a two blobs model), a much better agreement with experimental data is obtained, suggesting that the force field constructed is transferable to large macro-molecular systems.« less

  14. COARSE PM EMISSIONS MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND INVENTORY VALIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed research will contribute to our understanding of the sources and controlling variables of coarse PM. This greater understanding, along with an increase in our ability to predict these emissions, will enable more efficient pollution control strategy development. Ad...

  15. Resolution-Adapted All-Atomic and Coarse-Grained Model for Biomolecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lin; Hu, Hao

    2014-06-10

    We develop here an adaptive multiresolution method for the simulation of complex heterogeneous systems such as the protein molecules. The target molecular system is described with the atomistic structure while maintaining concurrently a mapping to the coarse-grained models. The theoretical model, or force field, used to describe the interactions between two sites is automatically adjusted in the simulation processes according to the interaction distance/strength. Therefore, all-atomic, coarse-grained, or mixed all-atomic and coarse-grained models would be used together to describe the interactions between a group of atoms and its surroundings. Because the choice of theory is made on the force field level while the sampling is always carried out in the atomic space, the new adaptive method preserves naturally the atomic structure and thermodynamic properties of the entire system throughout the simulation processes. The new method will be very useful in many biomolecular simulations where atomistic details are critically needed.

  16. A New Way that Planets can Affect the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, Charles; Patrone, Paul

    2010-01-01

    As planets orbit the Sun, the Sun also has to move to keep the total momentum of the solar system constant. The Sun's small orbital motion plus its 25 day rotation about its axis combine to invigorate some solar instabilities. Occasional convection cells at the proper phase in their short life can be strengthened by factors of two or more. This local burst of extra kinetic energy eventually reaches the surface where it can increase the intensity of solar activity. It might explain some reports in the last century of how planetary positions correlate with solar activity. This is the first effect of planets that is large enough to cause a significant response on the Sun.

  17. An Algorithm for Converting Static Earth Sensor Measurements into Earth Observation Vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, R.; Hashmall, Joseph A.; Sedlak, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed that converts penetration angles reported by Static Earth Sensors (SESs) into Earth observation vectors. This algorithm allows compensation for variation in the horizon height including that caused by Earth oblateness. It also allows pitch and roll to be computed using any number (greater than 1) of simultaneous sensor penetration angles simplifying processing during periods of Sun and Moon interference. The algorithm computes body frame unit vectors through each SES cluster. It also computes GCI vectors from the spacecraft to the position on the Earth's limb where each cluster detects the Earth's limb. These body frame vectors are used as sensor observation vectors and the GCI vectors are used as reference vectors in an attitude solution. The attitude, with the unobservable yaw discarded, is iteratively refined to provide the Earth observation vector solution.

  18. Coarse mode aerosols in the High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baibakov, K.; O'Neill, N. T.; Chaubey, J. P.; Saha, A.; Duck, T. J.; Eloranta, E. W.

    2014-12-01

    Fine mode (submicron) aerosols in the Arctic have received a fair amount of scientific attention in terms of smoke intrusions during the polar summer and Arctic haze pollution during the polar winter. Relatively little is known about coarse mode (supermicron) aerosols, notably dust, volcanic ash and sea salt. Asian dust is a regular springtime event whose optical and radiative forcing effects have been fairly well documented at the lower latitudes over North America but rarely reported for the Arctic. Volcanic ash, whose socio-economic importance has grown dramatically since the fear of its effects on aircraft engines resulted in the virtual shutdown of European civil aviation in the spring of 2010 has rarely been reported in the Arctic in spite of the likely probability that ash from Iceland and the Aleutian Islands makes its way into the Arctic and possibly the high Arctic. Little is known about Arctic sea salt aerosols and we are not aware of any literature on the optical measurement of these aerosols. In this work we present preliminary results of the combined sunphotometry-lidar analysis at two High Arctic stations in North America: PEARL (80°N, 86°W) for 2007-2011 and Barrow (71°N,156°W) for 2011-2014. The multi-years datasets were analyzed to single out potential coarse mode incursions and study their optical characteristics. In particular, CIMEL sunphotometers provided coarse mode optical depths as well as information on particle size and refractive index. Lidar measurements from High Spectral Resolution lidars (AHSRL at PEARL and NSHSRL at Barrow) yielded vertically resolved aerosol profiles and gave an indication of particle shape and size from the depolarization ratio and color ratio profiles. Additionally, we employed supplementary analyses of HYSPLIT backtrajectories, OMI aerosol index, and NAAPS (Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System) outputs to study the spatial context of given events.

  19. The spectrum of darkonium in the Sun

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kouvaris, Chris; Langæble, Kasper; Nielsen, Niklas Grønlund

    Dark matter that gets captured in the Sun may form positronium-like bound states if it self-interacts via light dark photons. In this case, dark matter can either annihilate to dark photons or recombine in bound states which subsequently also decay to dark photons. The fraction of the dark photons that leave the Sun without decaying to Standard Model particles have a characteristic energy spectrum which is a mixture of the direct annihilation process, the decays of ortho- and para- bound states and the recombination process. The ultimate decay of these dark photons to positron-electron pairs (via kinetic mixing) outside themore » Sun creates a distinct signal that can either identify or set strict constraints on dark photon models.« less

  20. Solar flare leaves sun quaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-05-01

    Dr. Alexander G. Kosovichev, a senior research scientist from Stanford University, and Dr. Valentina V. Zharkova from Glasgow (United Kingdom) University found the tell-tale seismic signature in data on the Sun's surface collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft immediately following a moderate-sized flare on July 9, 1996. "Although the flare was a moderate one, it still released an immense amount of energy," said Dr. Craig Deforest, a researcher with the SOHO project. "The energy released is equal to completely covering the Earth's continents with a yard of dynamite and detonating it all at once." SOHO is a joint project of the European Space Agency and NASA. The finding is reported in the May 28 issue of the journal Nature, and is the subject of a press conference at the spring meeting of the American Geophysical Union in Boston, Mass., May 27. The solar quake that the science team recorded looks much like ripples spreading from a rock dropped into a pool of water. But over the course of an hour, the solar waves traveled for a distance equal to 10 Earth diameters before fading into the fiery background of the Sun's photosphere. Unlike water ripples that travel outward at a constant velocity, the solar waves accelerated from an initial speed of 22,000 miles per hour to a maximum of 250,000 miles per hour before disappearing. "People have looked for evidence of seismic waves from flares before, but they didn't have a theory so they didn't know where to look," says Kosovichev. Several years ago Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that can explain how a flare, which explodes in space above the Sun's surface, can generate a major seismic wave in the Sun's interior. According to the currently accepted model of solar flares, the primary explosion creates high-energy electrons (electrically charged subatomic particles). These are funneled down into a magnetic flux tube, an invisible tube of magnetic

  1. SENSOR: a tool for the simulation of hyperspectral remote sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Anko; Wiest, Lorenz; Keller, Peter; Reulke, Ralf; Richter, Rolf; Schaepman, Michael; Schläpfer, Daniel

    The consistent end-to-end simulation of airborne and spaceborne earth remote sensing systems is an important task, and sometimes the only way for the adaptation and optimisation of a sensor and its observation conditions, the choice and test of algorithms for data processing, error estimation and the evaluation of the capabilities of the whole sensor system. The presented software simulator SENSOR (Software Environment for the Simulation of Optical Remote sensing systems) includes a full model of the sensor hardware, the observed scene, and the atmosphere in between. The simulator consists of three parts. The first part describes the geometrical relations between scene, sun, and the remote sensing system using a ray-tracing algorithm. The second part of the simulation environment considers the radiometry. It calculates the at-sensor radiance using a pre-calculated multidimensional lookup-table taking the atmospheric influence on the radiation into account. The third part consists of an optical and an electronic sensor model for the generation of digital images. Using SENSOR for an optimisation requires the additional application of task-specific data processing algorithms. The principle of the end-to-end-simulation approach is explained, all relevant concepts of SENSOR are discussed, and first examples of its use are given. The verification of SENSOR is demonstrated. This work is closely related to the Airborne PRISM Experiment (APEX), an airborne imaging spectrometer funded by the European Space Agency.

  2. Efficient low-power wireless communication setup for an autonomous soil moisture sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surducan, Vasile; Surducan, Emanoil

    2017-12-01

    During July 2016 - September 2017, a micro-irrigation system was set up and tested in field and greenhouse-like conditions, using eight inexpensive soil moisture sensors designed and manufactured in our institute. Each sensor was powered by accumulators charged by an (8 × 14) cm2 solar panel. The energy budget was carefully managed to allow long operating time for both the moisture sensor and the irrigation automation. We present here the hardware-software setup implemented in our proprietary moisture sensor for wireless communication, using Bluetooth Low Energy modules (BLE). The autonomy of the system may reach 4-5 cloudy days without the need of recharging the accumulators from the sun. Over the entire operating period, the moisture sensors send data wirelessly every sampling time (15 to 30 minutes) following water drips on the soil for the next 30 seconds, pushed by a low power micro pump. The micro-irrigation process is repeated every sampling time, until the soil moisture threshold is reached. In between the operating states, the sensor and watering automation go to sleep. The software algorithm ensures low energy (max. 2.8 mWh) consumption for the moisture sensor and 20 mWh for the irrigation automation, substantially increasing the accumulators discharge cycle.

  3. 75 FR 7473 - SunZia Transmission, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL10-39-000] SunZia Transmission, LLC; Notice of Filing February 5, 2010. Take notice that on January 29, 2010, SunZia Transmission, LLC (SunZia) filed a petition for declaratory order pursuant to Rule 207(a)(2) of the Commission's...

  4. Ancient cults of the sun (German Title: Antike Sonnenkulte)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Rahlf

    In ancient astronomy, the heliocentric system of Aristarchus of Samos did not meet universal approval. Contrary to that, the cult of the sun gained immense importance in the Roman Empire. Relics of this significance we still find e.g. in the meaning of the Sunday in the week and in the date of Christmas. The rise of the sun cults is characterised by the merging of different gods from various cultures. Already in classical Greece the god of the sun, Helios, almagated with the god of light, Apollo. The resulting entity was regarded as the harmonic guide of the visible universe, symbolized by Apoll. As well as he plays the lyre, he conducts the cosmos harmonically as the sun. Plato recommends to politicians to study musical harmonics and astronomy in order to get a feeling of the right way to rule the state. In consequence to the conquests of Alexander the Great, the Babylonian star religion was mingled with Greek cosmology and the concept of transmigration of souls. The astrology resulting therefrom spread out over the whole Hellenistic world and was very common in the Roman Empire. The calendar with its religious division of time as the days of the week, following the principle of the gods of the planets governing the hour, was well known. The god of the sun was graded up by the adoption of the calendar of the sun from Egypt by Caesar. Augustus chose Apoll as his guardian god and built with “his” sundial a symbol of the god of the sun, which was visible from a long distance. Augustus used more astral symbols as propaganda of leadership. During the competition with the Parthians, another large empire, for world domination the focus fell on an Iranian god: the Iranian god of light and contract - Mithras. Shortly before 100 A.D., a new cult of mysteries arose in the Roman Empire, called cult of Mithras, and spread quickly. It combined the attributes of a classical sun-god with a religion of salvation, guaranteed by baptism, communion and seven degrees to be passed

  5. Preparation of Entangled Polymer Melts of Various Architecture for Coarse-Grained Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Simulator ( LAMMPS ). This report presents a theory overview and a manual how to use the method. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ammunition, coarse-grained model...polymer builder, LAMMPS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 26 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON...scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator ( LAMMPS ). Gel is an in house written C program of coarse- grained polymer builder, and LAMMPS is

  6. Our Explosive Sun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, D. S.

    2009-01-01

    The Sun's atmosphere is a highly structured but dynamic place, dominated by the solar magnetic field. Hot charged gas (plasma) is trapped on lines of magnetic force that can snap like an elastic band, propelling giant clouds of material out into space. A range of ground-based and space-based solar telescopes observe these eruptions, particularly…

  7. Go Sun Smart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Michael D.; Buller, David B.; Walkosz, Barbara J.; Andersen, Peter A.; Cutter, Gary R.; Dignan, Mark B.

    2008-01-01

    This is the story of Go Sun Smart, a worksite wellness program endorsed by the North American Ski Area Association and funded by the National Cancer Institute. Between 2000 and 2002 we designed and implemented a large-scale worksite intervention at over 300 ski resorts in North America with the objective of reducing ski area employees and guests…

  8. Intelligent data processing of an ultrasonic sensor system for pattern recognition improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Seung You; Park, Min-Sang; Hwang, Won-Gul; Kee, Chang-Doo

    1999-05-01

    Though conventional time-of-flight ultrasonic sensor systems are popular due to the advantages of low cost and simplicity, the usage of the sensors is rather narrowly restricted within object detection and distance readings. There is a strong need to enlarge the amount of environmental information for mobile applications to provide intelligent autonomy. Wide sectors of such neighboring object recognition problems can be satisfactorily handled with coarse vision data such as sonar maps instead of accurate laser or optic measurements. For the usage of object pattern recognition, ultrasonic senors have inherent shortcomings of poor directionality and specularity which result in low spatial resolution and indistinctiveness of object patterns. To resolve these problems an array of increased number of sensor elements has been used for large objects. In this paper we propose a method of sensor array system with improved recognition capability using electronic circuits accompanying the sensor array and neuro-fuzzy processing of data fusion. The circuit changes transmitter output voltages of array elements in several steps. Relying upon the known sensor characteristics, a set of different return signals from neighboring senors is manipulated to provide an enhanced pattern recognition in the aspects of inclination angle, size and shift as well as distance of objects. The results show improved resolution of the measurements for smaller targets.

  9. Cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope with a magnetic coarse approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, D. N.; Deltour, R.; Horii, N.; Timofeev, V. A.; Grokholski, A. S.

    1993-11-01

    A compact, rigid, and reliable cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope (CSTM) with a vertical electromagnetic coarse approach system was developed. This device can be used for topographic and local tunneling spectroscopy studies at liquid nitrogen and helium temperatures. Minimal step sizes of 28 nm for the electromagnetic translation device were achieved. The additional possibility of a coarse approach operation in the inertial slip-stick mode, without electromagnets, was successfully tested, making this STM compatible with external magnetic fields. A simple technique for characterizing the STM rigidity has been developed. Preliminary data, taken with this instrument are presented, demonstrating the achievement, at liquid helium temperature, of atomic resolution for topographic studies, and also the possibility of measuring simultaneously superconducting energy gap spectra.

  10. Essential role for SUN5 in anchoring sperm head to the tail

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lina; Ouyang, Ying-Chun; Dong, Ming-Zhe; Liu, Chao; Zhao, Haichao; Cui, Xiuhong; Ma, Dongyuan; Zhang, Zhiguo; Yang, Xiaoyu; Guo, Yueshuai; Liu, Feng; Yuan, Li

    2017-01-01

    SUN (Sad1 and UNC84 domain containing)-domain proteins are reported to reside on the nuclear membrane playing distinct roles in nuclear dynamics. SUN5 is a new member of the SUN family, with little knowledge regarding its function. Here, we generated Sun5−/− mice and found that male mice were infertile. Most Sun5-null spermatozoa displayed a globozoospermia-like phenotype but they were actually acephalic spermatozoa. Additional studies revealed that SUN5 was located in the neck of the spermatozoa, anchoring sperm head to the tail, and without functional SUN5 the sperm head to tail coupling apparatus was detached from nucleus during spermatid elongation. Finally, we found that healthy heterozygous offspring could be obtained via intracytoplasmic injection of Sun5-mutated sperm heads for both male mice and patients. Our studies reveal the essential role of SUN5 in anchoring sperm head to the tail and provide a promising way to treat this kind of acephalic spermatozoa-associated male infertility. PMID:28945193

  11. Correlates of Sun Protection and Sunburn in Children of Melanoma Survivors.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Mary K; Peterson, Susan K; Prokhorov, Alexander V; Shete, Sanjay S; Lee, Jeffrey E; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Gritz, Ellen R

    2016-09-01

    Sunburns during childhood increase melanoma risk. Children of melanoma survivors are at higher risk, but little is known about their sunburn and sun protection. One study showed that almost half of melanoma survivors' children experienced sunburn in the past year. This study evaluated sunburn and sun protection in melanoma survivors' children, and relevant survivor characteristics from Social Cognitive Theory and the Health Belief Model. Melanoma survivors (N=340) were recruited from a comprehensive cancer center. Survivors completed a baseline questionnaire administered by telephone to report on the behavior of their children (N=340) as part of an RCT of a sun protection intervention. Data were collected in 2008 and analyzed in 2015. In the prior 6 months, 28% of children experienced sunburn. "Always" or "frequent" sun protection varied by behavior: sunscreen, 69%; lip balm, 15%; wide-brimmed hats, 9%; sleeved shirts, 28%; pants, 48%; sunglasses, 10%; shade, 33%; and limiting time outdoors, 45%. Survivors' sunburn and sun protection were positively associated with these outcomes in children. Correlates of sunburn also included older child age and higher risk perceptions. Correlates of sun protection behaviors included younger child age; stronger intentions, higher self-efficacy, and more positive outcome expectations about sun protection; and greater number of melanomas in survivors. Melanoma survivors may have a heightened awareness of the importance of their children's sun protection, but their children are not routinely protected. Correlates of children's sunburn and sun protection suggest subgroups of survivors to target with interventions to improve sun protection. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Correlates of Sun Protection and Sunburn in Children of Melanoma Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Tripp, Mary K.; Peterson, Susan K.; Prokhorov, Alexander V.; S.Shete, Sanjay; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Gritz, Ellen R.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Sunburns during childhood increase melanoma risk. Children of melanoma survivors are at higher risk, but little is known about their sunburn and sun protection. One study showed that almost half of melanoma survivors’ children experienced sunburn in the past year. This study evaluated sunburn and sun protection in melanoma survivors’ children, and relevant survivor characteristics from Social Cognitive Theory and the Health Belief Model. Methods Melanoma survivors (N=340) were recruited from a comprehensive cancer center. Survivors completed a baseline questionnaire administered by telephone to report on the behavior of their children (N=340) as part of an RCT of a sun protection intervention. Data were collected in 2008 and analyzed in 2015. Results In the prior 6 months, 28% of children experienced sunburn. “Always” or “frequent” sun protection varied by behavior: sunscreen, 69%; lip balm, 15%; wide-brimmed hats, 9%; sleeved shirts, 28%; pants, 48%; sunglasses, 10%; shade, 33%; and limiting time outdoors, 45%. Survivors’ sunburn and sun protection were positively associated with these outcomes in children. Correlates of sunburn also included older child age and higher risk perceptions. Correlates of sun protection behaviors included younger child age; stronger intentions, higher self-efficacy, and more positive outcome expectations about sun protection; and greater number of melanomas in survivors. Conclusions Melanoma survivors may have a heightened awareness of the importance of their children’s sun protection, but their children are not routinely protected. Correlates of children’s sunburn and sun protection suggest subgroups of survivors to target with interventions to improve sun protection. PMID:27067306

  13. Sun Protection Among New Zealand Primary School Children.

    PubMed

    Gage, Ryan; Leung, William; Stanley, James; Reeder, Anthony; Mackay, Christina; Smith, Moira; Barr, Michelle; Chambers, Tim; Signal, Louise

    2017-12-01

    Schools are an important setting for raising skin cancer prevention awareness and encouraging sun protection. We assessed the clothes worn and shade used by 1,278 children in eight schools in the Wellington region of New Zealand. These children were photographed for the Kids'Cam project between September 2014 and March 2015 during school lunch breaks. Children's mean clothing coverage (expressed as a percentage of body area covered) was calculated. Data on school sun-safety policies were obtained via telephone. Mean total body clothing coverage was 70.3% (95% confidence interval = 66.3%, 73.8%). Body regions with the lowest mean coverage were the head (15.4% coverage), neck (36.1% coverage), lower arms (46.1% coverage), hands (5.3% coverage), and calves (30.1% coverage). Children from schools with hats as part of the school uniform were significantly more likely to wear a hat (52.2%) than children from schools without a school hat (2.7%). Most children (78.4%) were not under the cover of shade. Our findings suggest that New Zealand children are not sufficiently protected from the sun at school. Schools should consider comprehensive approaches to improve sun protection, such as the provision of school hats, sun-protective uniforms, and the construction of effective shade.

  14. How to improve adolescents' sun protection behavior? Age and gender issues.

    PubMed

    Paul, Christine; Tzelepis, Flora; Parfitt, Nicholas; Girgis, Afaf

    2008-01-01

    To explore adolescents' self-reported reasons for sun protection, as adolescents as a group continue to have poor sun protection practices. Seventeen age- and gender-segregated focus groups were conducted in Australian high schools. Reasons for using sun protection included personal comfort, appearance, policies, fear of skin cancer, expectations of authority figures, peer actions, and habit. Reasons for not using sun protection included desire for a tan, inconvenience, low perceived risk, and fashion. Age and gender effects were found. Avenues for intervention with adolescents include authority figures, peer advocacy, the fashion industry, and improved sun protection products.

  15. Multistage point relascope and randomized branch sampling for downed coarse woody debris estimation

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey H. Gove; Mark J. Ducey; Harry T. Valentine

    2002-01-01

    New sampling methods have recently been introduced that allow estimation of downed coarse woody debris using an angle gauge, or relascope. The theory behind these methods is based on sampling straight pieces of downed coarse woody debris. When pieces deviate from this ideal situation, auxillary methods must be employed. We describe a two-stage procedure where the...

  16. Sun Safety Practices Among Schools in the United States.

    PubMed

    Everett Jones, Sherry; Guy, Gery P

    2017-05-01

    Exposure to the sun's UV radiation is a leading cause of skin cancer. Positive attitudes and beliefs about sun safety behavior, which would make sun protective behavior more likely, could be promoted and supported by school policies and practices. To identify school characteristics associated with having adopted practices that promote sun safety. School-level data from the February 3 to July 23, 2014, School Health Policies and Practices Study's Healthy and Safe School Environment questionnaire were analyzed. The School Health Policies and Practices Study uses a 2-stage sampling design to select a nationally representative sample of schools. All public, state-administered, Catholic, and non-Catholic private schools with any of the grades from kindergarten through 12 were eligible for inclusion. All analyses were conducted using weighted data. Prevalence of sun safety practices. In a nationally representative sample of 828 US schools, representatives of 577 schools (69.7%) responded. Overall, sun safety practices were not common among schools. The most frequent practice was having teachers allow time for students to apply sunscreen at school (47.6%; 95% CI, 42.4%-52.9%). Few schools made sunscreen available for students to use (13.3%; 95% CI, 10.2%-17.0%), almost always or always scheduled outdoor activities to avoid times when the sun was at peak intensity (15.0%; 95% CI, 11.4%-19.6%), or asked parents to ensure that students applied sunscreen before school (16.4%; 95% CI, 12.9%-20.6%). High schools were less likely than elementary schools and middle schools to adopt several practices: for instance, 37.5% of high schools (95% CI, 29.7%-46.0%), 51.6% of middle schools (95% CI, 43.3%-59.7%), and 49.5% of elementary schools (95% CI, 42.0%-57.0%) had teachers allow time for students to apply sunscreen at school, and 11.8% of high schools (95% CI, 7.7%-17.5%), 18.2% of middle schools (95% CI, 13.3%-24.4%), and 14.7% of elementary schools (95% CI, 9.6%-21.8%) almost

  17. A Study of TRMM Static Earth Sensor Performance Using On-Orbit Sensor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natanson, Gregory; Glickman, Jonathan

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the Barnes static Earth sensor assembly (ESA) using on-orbit data collected from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. It is shown that there exist strong correlations between the large penetration angle residuals and the voltages produced by the Offset Radiation Source (ORS). It is conjectured that at certain times in the TRMM orbit the ORS is operating out of its calibrated range, and consequently corrupts the penetration angle information observed and processed by the ESA. The observed yaw drift between Digital Sun Sensor (DSS) observations is shown to be consistent with predictions by a simple roll-yaw coupling computation. This would explain the large drifts seen on TRMM, where the propagation of the yaw angle between DSS updates does not take into account the possibility of a non-zero roll angle error. Finally, the accuracy of the onboard algorithm used when only three of the four quadrants supply valid penetration angles is assessed. In terms of procedures used to perform this study, the analysis of ESA penetration angle residuals is discovered to be a very useful and insightful tool for assessing, the health and functionality of the ESA.

  18. Enhancement of properties of recycled coarse aggregate concrete using bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo; Arakha; Sarkar; P; Jha

    2016-01-01

    Due to rapid construction, necessity for raw materials of concrete, especially coarse aggregate, tends to increase the danger of early exhaustion of the natural resources. An alternative source of raw materials would perhaps delay the advent of this early exhaustion. Recycled coarse aggregate (RCA) plays a great role as an alternative raw material that can replace the natural coarse aggregate (NCA) for concrete. Previous studies show that the properties of RCA concrete are inferior in quality compared to NCA concrete. This article attempts to study the improvement of properties of RCA concrete with the addition of bacteria named as Bacillus subtilis. The experimental investigation was carried out to evaluate the improvement of the compressive strength, capillary water absorption, and drying shrinkage of RCA concrete incorporating bacteria. The compressive strength of RCA concrete is found to be increased by about 20% when the cell concentration of B. subtilis is 106 cells/ml. The capillary water absorption as well as drying shrinkage of RCA are reduced when bacteria is incorporated. The improvement of RCA concrete is confirmed to be due to the calcium carbonate precipitation as observed from the microstructure studies carried out on it such as EDX, SEM, and XRD.

  19. Coarse gaining of molecular crystals: limitations imposed by molecular flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picu, Catalin; Pal, Anirban

    Molecular crystals include molecular electronics, energetic materials, pharmaceuticals and some food components. In many of these applications the small scale mechanical behavior of the crystal is important such as for example in energetic materials where detonation is induced by the formation of hot spots which are induced thermomechanically, and in pharmaceuticals where phase stability is critical for the biochemical activity of the drug. Accurate modeling of these processes requires resolving the atomistic scale details of the material. However, the cost of these models is very large due to the complexity of the molecules forming the crystal, and some form of coarse graning is necessary. In this study we identify the limitations imposed by the need to accurately capture molecular flexibility on the development of coarse grained models for the energetic molecular crystal RDX. We define guidelines for the definition of coarse grained models that target elastic and plastic crystal scale properties such as elastic constants, thermal expansion, compressibility, the critical stress for the motion of dislocations (Peierls stress) and the stacking fault energy This work was supported by the ARO through Grant W911NF-09-1-0330 and AFRL through Grant FA8651-16-1-0004.

  20. Quantitative comparison of alternative methods for coarse-graining biological networks

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Gregory R.; Meng, Luming; Huang, Xuhui

    2013-01-01

    Markov models and master equations are a powerful means of modeling dynamic processes like protein conformational changes. However, these models are often difficult to understand because of the enormous number of components and connections between them. Therefore, a variety of methods have been developed to facilitate understanding by coarse-graining these complex models. Here, we employ Bayesian model comparison to determine which of these coarse-graining methods provides the models that are most faithful to the original set of states. We find that the Bayesian agglomerative clustering engine and the hierarchical Nyström expansion graph (HNEG) typically provide the best performance. Surprisingly, the original Perron cluster cluster analysis (PCCA) method often provides the next best results, outperforming the newer PCCA+ method and the most probable paths algorithm. We also show that the differences between the models are qualitatively significant, rather than being minor shifts in the boundaries between states. The performance of the methods correlates well with the entropy of the resulting coarse-grainings, suggesting that finding states with more similar populations (i.e., avoiding low population states that may just be noise) gives better results. PMID:24089717

  1. A coarse-grid-projection acceleration method for finite-element incompressible flow computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashefi, Ali; Staples, Anne; FiN Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Coarse grid projection (CGP) methodology provides a framework for accelerating computations by performing some part of the computation on a coarsened grid. We apply the CGP to pressure projection methods for finite element-based incompressible flow simulations. Based on it, the predicted velocity field data is restricted to a coarsened grid, the pressure is determined by solving the Poisson equation on the coarse grid, and the resulting data are prolonged to the preset fine grid. The contributions of the CGP method to the pressure correction technique are twofold: first, it substantially lessens the computational cost devoted to the Poisson equation, which is the most time-consuming part of the simulation process. Second, it preserves the accuracy of the velocity field. The velocity and pressure spaces are approximated by Galerkin spectral element using piecewise linear basis functions. A restriction operator is designed so that fine data are directly injected into the coarse grid. The Laplacian and divergence matrices are driven by taking inner products of coarse grid shape functions. Linear interpolation is implemented to construct a prolongation operator. A study of the data accuracy and the CPU time for the CGP-based versus non-CGP computations is presented. Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics in Nature.

  2. Seasonal Effect on Ocular Sun Exposure and Conjunctival UV Autofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Kristina M; Chandler, Heather L

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate feasibility and repeatability of measures for ocular sun exposure and conjunctival ultraviolet autofluorescence (UVAF), and to test for relationships between the outcomes. Fifty volunteers were seen for two visits 14 ± 2 days apart. Ocular sun exposure was estimated over a 2-week time period using questionnaires that quantified time outdoors and ocular protection habits. Conjunctival UVAF was imaged using a Nikon D7000 camera system equipped with appropriate flash and filter system; image analysis was done using ImageJ software. Repeatability estimates were made using Bland-Altman plots with mean differences and 95% limits of agreement calculated. Non-normally distributed data was transformed by either log10 or square root methods. Linear regression was conducted to evaluate relationships between measures. Mean (±SD) values for ocular sun exposure and conjunctival UVAF were 8.86 (±11.97) hours and 9.15 (±9.47) mm, respectively. Repeatability was found to be acceptable for both ocular sun exposure and conjunctival UVAF. Univariate linear regression showed outdoor occupation to be a predictor of higher ocular sun exposure; outdoor occupation and winter season of collection both predicted higher total UVAF. Furthermore, increased portion of day spent outdoors while working was associated with increased total conjunctival UVAF. We demonstrate feasibility and repeatability of estimating ocular sun exposure using a previously unreported method and for conjunctival UVAF in a group of subjects residing in Ohio. Seasonal temperature variation may have influenced time outdoors and ultimately calculation of ocular sun exposure. As winter season of collection and outdoor occupation both predicted higher total UVAF, our data suggests that ocular sun exposure is associated with conjunctival UVAF and, possibly, that UVAF remains for at least several months after sun exposure.

  3. Traditions of the Sun, One Model for Expanding Audience Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, I.; Paglierani, R.

    2006-12-01

    The Internet is a powerful tool with which to expand audience access, bringing students, teachers and the public to places and resources they might not otherwise visit or make use of. We will present Traditions of the Sun, an experiential Web site that invites exploration of the world's ancient observatories with special emphasis on Chaco Culture National Historic Park in the Four Corners region of the US and several sites in the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. Traditions of the Sun includes resources in English and Spanish along with a unique trilingual on-line book, "Traditions of the Sun, A Photographic Journal," containing explanatory text in Yucatec Maya as well. Traditions of the Sun offers rich opportunities for virtual visits to ancient sites used for solar observing while learning about current NASA research on the Sun and indigenous solar practices within a larger historical and cultural context. The site contains hundreds of photographs, historic images and rich multimedia to help tell the story of the Sun-Earth Connection. Visitors to the site can zoom in on the great Mayan cities of Chichen Itza, Uxmal, Dzibilchaltun, and Mayapan to learn about Mayan astronomy, history, culture, and science. They can also visit Chaco Canyon to watch sunrise over Pueblo Bonito on the summer solstice, take a virtual reality tour of the great kiva at Casa Rinconada or see panoramic vistas from Fajada Butte, an area which, for preservation purposes, is restricted to the public. Traditions of the Sun provides one model of how exploration and discovery can come to life for both formal and informal audiences via the Internet. Traditions of the Sun is a collaborative project between NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum, the National Park Service, Instituto National de Antropologia e Historia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, and Ideum.

  4. Seasonal Effect on Ocular Sun Exposure and Conjunctival UV Autofluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Kristina M.; Chandler, Heather L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate feasibility and repeatability of measures for ocular sun exposure and conjunctival ultraviolet autofluorescence (UVAF), and to test for relationships between the outcomes. Methods Fifty volunteers were seen for 2 visits 14±2 days apart. Ocular sun exposure was estimated over a two-week time period using questionnaires that quantified time outdoors and ocular protection habits. Conjunctival UVAF was imaged using a Nikon D7000 camera system equipped with appropriate flash and filter system; image analysis was done using ImageJ software. Repeatability estimates were made using Bland-Altman plots with mean differences and 95% limits of agreement calculated. Non-normally distributed data was transformed by either log10 or square root methods. Linear regression was conducted to evaluate relationships between measures. Results Mean (±SD) values for ocular sun exposure and conjunctival UVAF were 8.86 (±11.97) hours and 9.15 (±9.47) mm2, respectively. Repeatability was found to be acceptable for both ocular sun exposure and conjunctival UVAF. Univariate linear regression showed outdoor occupation to be a predictor of higher ocular sun exposure; outdoor occupation and winter season of collection both predicted higher total UVAF. Furthermore, increased portion of day spent outdoors while working was associated with increased total conjunctival UVAF. Conclusions We demonstrate feasibility and repeatability of estimating ocular sun exposure using a previously unreported method and for conjunctival UVAF in a group of subjects residing in Ohio. Seasonal temperature variation may have influenced time outdoors and ultimately calculation of ocular sun exposure. As winter season of collection and outdoor occupation both predicted higher total UVAF, our data suggests that ocular sun exposure is associated with conjunctival UVAF and possibly, that UVAF remains for at least several months following sun exposure. PMID:27820717

  5. Trends in reported sun bed use, sunburn, and sun care knowledge and attitudes in a U.K. region: results of a survey of the Northern Ireland population.

    PubMed

    Boyle, R; O'Hagan, A H; Donnelly, D; Donnelly, C; Gordon, S; McElwee, G; Gavin, A

    2010-12-01

    Sunburn and sun bed use increase risk of malignant melanoma, the incidence of which continues to rise. To document trends in reported sun bed use, sunburn, and sun care knowledge and attitudes in a U.K. region where there have been 20 years of sun-related health promotion campaigns. In 2000, 2004 and 2008, a 'care in the sun' module was included in the Northern Ireland (NI) Omnibus survey. Each year 2200 subjects aged 16 years and over were randomly selected and invited to complete a sun-related questionnaire. Proportions of respondents were analysed by demographic and socioeconomic factors, with differences tested using z-tests and the χ(2) -squared test. In total, 3623 persons responded (response rate 50-59%). Skin cancer knowledge in 2008 was high at 97%. Skin type reporting was inaccurate and since 2000 has become weighted towards the darker Fitzpatrick skin types IV and V (χ(2) = 21·5, P = 0·006). Reported sunburn rose over the 8-year period to 60% in 2008, with 39% of those aged 16-24 years reporting sunburn at least once in the previous year. Twenty per cent reported sun bed use in 2008, a fall from 28% in 2004 (P = 0·01), with greater reported use among those aged 16-24 years (24%) and among women (31% vs. 9% men, P < 0·001). Tanning was reported to make respondents feel healthier (42%) and more attractive (47%), with these attitudes more likely among young women. Skin cancer and sun care knowledge is good among the NI population but reported behaviours of sun bed use and sunburn pose risks for further rises in skin cancer. Barriers for future sun care campaigns to address include poorer sun care knowledge among men, poor skin type awareness, and women's attitudes regarding the health and attractiveness of tanning. Sun bed use, although high, has fallen, possibly in response to recent campaigns. © 2010 The Authors. BJD © 2010 British Association of Dermatologists.

  6. The relationship between sun protection policies and practices in schools with primary-age students: the role of school demographics, policy comprehensiveness and SunSmart membership.

    PubMed

    Dono, J; Ettridge, K A; Sharplin, G R; Wilson, C J

    2014-02-01

    Schools can implement evidence-based sun protection policies that guide practices to help protect children from harmful sun exposure. This national study assessed the relationship between the existence and comprehensiveness of written policies and the comprehensiveness of sun protection practices. The impact of school demographics on the strength of the relationship was also examined, as was the possibility that 'SunSmart' membership would have an additional impact on practices, beyond having any formal policy. In 2011-12, staff members of 1573 schools catering to primary-age students completed a self-administered survey about sun protection policies and practices (response rate of 57%). Results showed that schools with a written policy had more comprehensive practices than schools without a written policy. The relationship between having a written policy and sun protection practices was stronger for remote schools compared with metropolitan and regional schools, and for schools catering to both primary and secondary students compared with primary students only. In addition, policy comprehensiveness was associated with practice comprehensiveness, and SunSmart membership was indirectly related to practice comprehensiveness via policy comprehensiveness. These results indicate that written policies relate to practice comprehensiveness, but the strength of the association can vary according to the characteristics of the organization.

  7. Sun tanning-related burns--a 3-year experience.

    PubMed

    Piccolo-Lobo, M S; Piccolo, N S; Piccolo-Daher, M T; Cardoso, V M

    1992-04-01

    A retrospective study has analyzed 562 sun-related burns out of 19,643 patients treated at our institution from 1 March 1988 to 28 February 1991. These patients were analysed according to sex, age, burn area, mode and length of treatment and outcome. Females, mainly adults, represented 60.8 per cent of all patients presenting burned due to sun bathing. There is a marked seasonal incidence, proportionally constant throughout these 3 years. The main causes of injury were sun only (36.7 per cent), sun plus fig leaf 'tea' tanning lotion (17.7 per cent) and lemon juice (17.7 per cent). Healing to normal skin appearance was achieved in 99.1 per cent, 0.7 per cent healed with scarring and one patient died due to massive sepsis. The effect of sunlight on skin and the process of 'sunburn' when using homemade plant-derived tanning lotions containing substances which can induce a photodermatitis reaction is also discussed.

  8. Solar Power for Near Sun, High-Temperature Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Existing solar cells lose performance at the high temperatures encountered in Mercury orbit and inward toward the sun. For future missions designed to probe environments close to the sun, it is desirable to develop array technologies for high temperature and high light intensity. Approaches to solar array design for near-sun missions include modifying the terms governing temperature of the cell and the efficiency at elevated temperature, or use of techniques to reduce the incident solar energy to limit operating temperature. An additional problem is found in missions that involve a range of intensities, such as the Solar Probe + mission, which ranges from a starting distance of 1 AU from the sun to a minimum distance of 9.5 solar radii, or 0.044 AU. During the mission, the solar intensity ranges from one to about 500 times AM0. This requires a power system to operate over nearly three orders of magnitude of incident intensity.

  9. Characterizing protein conformations by correlation analysis of coarse-grained contact matrices.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Richard J; Siess, Jan; Lohry, David P; McGee, Trevor S; Ritchie, Jordan S; Johnson, Quentin R; Shen, Tongye

    2018-01-14

    We have developed a method to capture the essential conformational dynamics of folded biopolymers using statistical analysis of coarse-grained segment-segment contacts. Previously, the residue-residue contact analysis of simulation trajectories was successfully applied to the detection of conformational switching motions in biomolecular complexes. However, the application to large protein systems (larger than 1000 amino acid residues) is challenging using the description of residue contacts. Also, the residue-based method cannot be used to compare proteins with different sequences. To expand the scope of the method, we have tested several coarse-graining schemes that group a collection of consecutive residues into a segment. The definition of these segments may be derived from structural and sequence information, while the interaction strength of the coarse-grained segment-segment contacts is a function of the residue-residue contacts. We then perform covariance calculations on these coarse-grained contact matrices. We monitored how well the principal components of the contact matrices is preserved using various rendering functions. The new method was demonstrated to assist the reduction of the degrees of freedom for describing the conformation space, and it potentially allows for the analysis of a system that is approximately tenfold larger compared with the corresponding residue contact-based method. This method can also render a family of similar proteins into the same conformational space, and thus can be used to compare the structures of proteins with different sequences.

  10. Characterizing protein conformations by correlation analysis of coarse-grained contact matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Richard J.; Siess, Jan; Lohry, David P.; McGee, Trevor S.; Ritchie, Jordan S.; Johnson, Quentin R.; Shen, Tongye

    2018-01-01

    We have developed a method to capture the essential conformational dynamics of folded biopolymers using statistical analysis of coarse-grained segment-segment contacts. Previously, the residue-residue contact analysis of simulation trajectories was successfully applied to the detection of conformational switching motions in biomolecular complexes. However, the application to large protein systems (larger than 1000 amino acid residues) is challenging using the description of residue contacts. Also, the residue-based method cannot be used to compare proteins with different sequences. To expand the scope of the method, we have tested several coarse-graining schemes that group a collection of consecutive residues into a segment. The definition of these segments may be derived from structural and sequence information, while the interaction strength of the coarse-grained segment-segment contacts is a function of the residue-residue contacts. We then perform covariance calculations on these coarse-grained contact matrices. We monitored how well the principal components of the contact matrices is preserved using various rendering functions. The new method was demonstrated to assist the reduction of the degrees of freedom for describing the conformation space, and it potentially allows for the analysis of a system that is approximately tenfold larger compared with the corresponding residue contact-based method. This method can also render a family of similar proteins into the same conformational space, and thus can be used to compare the structures of proteins with different sequences.

  11. Eruptions from the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    The Sun often exhibits outbursts, launching material from its surface in powerful releases of energy. Recent analysis of such an outburst captured on video by several Sun-monitoring spacecraft may help us understand the mechanisms that launch these eruptions.Many OutburstsSolar jets are elongated, transient structures that are thought to regularly release magnetic energy from the Sun, contributing to coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs), on the other hand, are enormous blob-like explosions, violently ejecting energy and mass from the Sun at incredible speeds.But could these two types of events actually be related? According to a team of scientists at the University of Science and Technology of China, they may well be. The team, led by Jiajia Liu, has analyzed observations of a coronal jet that they believe prompted the launch of a powerful CME.Observing an ExplosionGif of a movie of the CME, taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly at a wavelength of 304. The original movie can be found in the article. [Liu et al.]An army of spacecraft was on hand to witness the event on 15 Jan 2013 including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The instruments on board these observatories captured the drama on the northern limb of the Sun as, at 19:32 UT, a coronal jet formed. Just eight minutes later, a powerful CME was released from the same active region.The fact that the jet and CME occurred in the same place at roughly the same time suggests theyre related. But did the initial motions of the CME blob trigger the jet? Or did the jet trigger the CME?Tying It All TogetherIn a recently published study, Liu and collaborators analyzed the multi-wavelength observations of this event to find the heights and positions of the jet and CME. From this analysis, they determined that the coronal jet triggered the release

  12. Structure-based coarse-graining for inhomogeneous liquid polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Motoo; Zhang, Hedong; Ishiguro, Takahiro; Fukuzawa, Kenji; Itoh, Shintaro

    2013-08-07

    The iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method is used to derive interaction potentials for coarse-grained (CG) systems by matching structural properties of a reference atomistic system. However, because it depends on such thermodynamic conditions as density and pressure of the reference system, the derived CG nonbonded potential is probably not applicable to inhomogeneous systems containing different density regimes. In this paper, we propose a structure-based coarse-graining scheme to devise CG nonbonded potentials that are applicable to different density bulk systems and inhomogeneous systems with interfaces. Similar to the IBI, the radial distribution function (RDF) of a reference atomistic bulk system is used for iteratively refining the CG nonbonded potential. In contrast to the IBI, however, our scheme employs an appropriately estimated initial guess and a small amount of refinement to suppress transfer of the many-body interaction effects included in the reference RDF into the CG nonbonded potential. To demonstrate the application of our approach to inhomogeneous systems, we perform coarse-graining for a liquid perfluoropolyether (PFPE) film coated on a carbon surface. The constructed CG PFPE model favorably reproduces structural and density distribution functions, not only for bulk systems, but also at the liquid-vacuum and liquid-solid interfaces, demonstrating that our CG scheme offers an easy and practical way to accurately determine nonbonded potentials for inhomogeneous systems.

  13. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A CONTINUOUS COARSE (PM10-PM2.5) PARTICLE MONITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper, we describe the development and laboratory and field evaluation of a continuous coarse (2.5-10 um) particle mass (PM) monitor that can provide reliable measurements of the coarse mass (CM) concentrations in time intervals as short as 5-10 min. The operating princ...

  14. Exploring the Sun with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, T. S.; Bárta, M.; Brajša, R.; Chen, B.; Pontieu, B. D.; Gary, D. E.; Fleishman, G. D.; Hales, A. S.; Iwai, K.; Hudson, H.; Kim, S.; Kobelski, A.; Loukitcheva, M.; Shimojo, M.; Skokić, I.; Wedemeyer, S.; White, S. M.; Yan, Y.

    2018-03-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Observatory opens a new window onto the Universe. The ability to perform continuum imaging and spectroscopy of astrophysical phenomena at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths with unprecedented sensitivity opens up new avenues for the study of cosmology and the evolution of galaxies, the formation of stars and planets, and astrochemistry. ALMA also allows fundamentally new observations to be made of objects much closer to home, including the Sun. The Sun has long served as a touchstone for our understanding of astrophysical processes, from the nature of stellar interiors, to magnetic dynamos, non-radiative heating, stellar mass loss, and energetic phenomena such as solar flares. ALMA offers new insights into all of these processes.

  15. Effectiveness of a Multicomponent Sun Protection Program for Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Byron K.; Reidy, Katie; Huerta, Imelda; Dilley, Kimberley; Crawford, Susan; Hultgren, Brittney A.; Mallett, Kimberly A.; Turrisi, Rob; Robinson, June K.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Emphasizing sun protection behaviors among young children may minimize sun damage and foster lifelong sun protection behaviors that will reduce the likelihood of developing skin cancer, especially melanoma. Objective To determine whether a multicomponent sun protection program delivered in pediatric clinics during the summer could increase summertime sun protection among young children. Design, Setting, and Participants Randomized controlled clinical trial with 4-week follow-up that included 300 parents or relatives (hereafter simply referred to as caregivers [mean age, 36.0 years]) who brought the child (2-6 years of age) in their care to an Advocate Medical Group clinic during the period from May 15 to August 14, 2015. Of the 300 caregiver-child pairs, 153 (51.0%) were randomly assigned to receive a read-along book, swim shirt, and weekly text-message reminders related to sun protection behaviors (intervention group) and 147 (49.0%) were randomly assigned to receive the information usually provided at a well-child visit (control group). Data analysis was performed from August 20 to 30, 2015. Intervention Multicomponent sun protection program composed of a read-along book, swim shirt, and weekly text-message reminders related to sun protection behaviors. Main Outcomes and Measures Outcomes were caregiver-reported use of sun protection by the child (seeking shade and wearing sun-protective clothing and sunscreen) using a 5-point Likert scale, duration of outdoor activities, and number of children who had sunburn or skin irritation. The biologic measurement of the skin pigment of a child's arm was performed with a spectrophotometer at baseline and 4 weeks later. Results Of the 300 caregiver-child pairs, the 153 children in the intervention group had significantly higher scores related to sun protection behaviors on both sunny (mean [SE], 15.748 [0.267] for the intervention group; mean [SE], 14.780 [0.282] for the control group; mean difference, 0.968) and

  16. Sun safety in construction: a U.K. intervention study.

    PubMed

    Houdmont, J; Madgwick, P; Randall, R

    2016-01-01

    Interventions to promote sun safety in the U.K. construction sector are warranted given the high incidence of skin cancer attributable to sun exposure relative to other occupational groups. To evaluate change in sun safety knowledge and practices among construction workers in response to an educational intervention. A baseline questionnaire was administered, followed by a bespoke sector-specific DVD-based intervention. At 12-month follow-up, participants completed a further questionnaire. Analyses were conducted on a sample of 120 workers (intervention group, n = 70; comparison group, n = 50). At follow-up, the proportion of intervention group participants that reported correct sun safety knowledge was not significantly greater than at baseline. However, the intervention group demonstrated significant positive change on 9 out of 10 behavioural measures, the greatest change being use of a shade/cover when working in the sun followed by regularly checking skin for moles or unusual changes. Exposure to this intervention was linked to some specific positive changes in construction workers' self-reported sun safety practices. These findings highlight the potential for educational interventions to contribute to tackling skin cancer in the UK construction sector. The findings support the development of bespoke educational interventions for other high-risk outdoor worker groups. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Summer sun exposure: knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of Midwest adolescents.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J K; Rademaker, A W; Sylvester, J A; Cook, B

    1997-01-01

    Extensive print, radio, and television coverage about the dangers of sun exposure and benefits of sun protection occurred over the past decade. Illinois teen knowledge and attitudes about sun exposure/protection, sun-exposure/protection behavior, and information sources were determined by a summer telephone survey. Telephone interviews with 658 teenagers between ages 11 and 19 included African-American, Asian, Hispanic, Native American, and white teenagers. Teens knew that too much sun was harmful as it caused skin cancer and sunburn. Sunburn was mentioned more often by those with skin types that burned easily and tanned poorly (I,II) (P < 0.001), was better known to girls than to boys (P < 0.001), and was recognized more by those with higher socioeconomic status (P < 0.001) but was not associated with age. Widely held sun exposure attitudes were socializing with friends and feeling better when outdoors. On weekdays, boys averaged 5.3 hr (SD, 1.65 hr) outside compared with 3.9 hr (SD, 0.75 hr) for girls (P < 0.001). Teenage boys were more likely to obtain occupational sun exposure, and girls sunbathed. Subjects with skin types I and II reported an average of 3.3 sunburns in the past year. During unprotected sun exposure, extensive numbers of teens with moderate-risk skin type experienced at least 1 sunburn per year. Indoor tanning use was more prevalent among older girls and those with skin types I and II. Sunscreen use was associated with water recreational activities (swimming, water sports, and going to the beach) by girls slightly more than by boys (P < 0.001). Hat-wearing was more common among boys than among girls. Teen knowledge that excessive sun exposure causes skin cancer and sunburns and that wearing sunscreens and hats were sun-protective methods did not enable sun protection that prevented burning. This is particularly troublesome because severe sunburns in youth are associated with an increased risk of melanoma. Existing teen sunscreen use could be

  18. Texture coarseness responsive neurons and their mapping in layer 2–3 of the rat barrel cortex in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Garion, Liora; Dubin, Uri; Rubin, Yoav; Khateb, Mohamed; Schiller, Yitzhak; Azouz, Rony; Schiller, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Texture discrimination is a fundamental function of somatosensory systems, yet the manner by which texture is coded and spatially represented in the barrel cortex are largely unknown. Using in vivo two-photon calcium imaging in the rat barrel cortex during artificial whisking against different surface coarseness or controlled passive whisker vibrations simulating different coarseness, we show that layer 2–3 neurons within barrel boundaries differentially respond to specific texture coarsenesses, while only a minority of neurons responded monotonically with increased or decreased surface coarseness. Neurons with similar preferred texture coarseness were spatially clustered. Multi-contact single unit recordings showed a vertical columnar organization of texture coarseness preference in layer 2–3. These findings indicate that layer 2–3 neurons perform high hierarchical processing of tactile information, with surface coarseness embodied by distinct neuronal subpopulations that are spatially mapped onto the barrel cortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03405.001 PMID:25233151

  19. Sun protection and skin self-examination in melanoma survivors.

    PubMed

    Mujumdar, Urvi J; Hay, Jennifer L; Monroe-Hinds, Yvette C; Hummer, Amanda J; Begg, Colin B; Wilcox, Homer B; Oliveria, Susan A; Berwick, Marianne

    2009-10-01

    Patients diagnosed with melanoma are at risk for developing recurrent and second primary disease. Skin self-examination (SSE) and sun protection are standard clinical recommendations to minimize risk. In this study we examined performance of these behaviors in individuals with melanoma drawn from the general population. Potential participants (N=148) with a first primary melanoma diagnosed in 2000 were identified through a population-based cancer registry in New Jersey, USA. One hundred and fifteen individuals participated in a 30 min telephone interview concerning behavioral adherence with SSE and sun protection, self-efficacy for performing these behaviors, and perceived risk of developing another skin cancer. We utilized logistic regression to estimate potential associations of demographic, medical, and psychosocial factors with SSE and sun protection, respectively. Seventeen percent of subjects reported performing comprehensive SSE at least once every two months and 23% engaged in regular sun protection. Utilization of SSE was related to the presence of moles (OR=4.2, 95% CI: 1.1-15) and higher SSE self-efficacy (OR=14.4, 95% CI: 1.9-112). Regular sun protection was related to older age (>60 years; OR=3.3, 95% CI: 1.3-8.7), being female (OR=2.8, 95% CI: 1.1-7.3), and higher sun protection self-efficacy (OR=5.0, 95% CI: 1.4-18). These factors remained significant in multivariate models. In this group of primary melanoma survivors, the rates of SSE and sun protection are comparable to, but do not exceed, general population estimates. This study provides justification for further research to address barriers to prevention and control behaviors in melanoma survivors.

  20. NuSTAR Stares at the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-08

    Flaring, active regions of our sun are highlighted in this image combining observations from several telescopes. High-energy X-rays from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) are shown in blue; low-energy X-rays from Japan's Hinode spacecraft are green; and extreme ultraviolet light from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is yellow and red. All three telescopes captured their solar images around the same time on April 29, 2015. The NuSTAR image is a mosaic made from combining smaller images. The active regions across the sun's surface contain material heated to several millions of degrees. The blue-white areas showing the NuSTAR data pinpoint the most energetic spots. During the observations, microflares went off, which are smaller versions of the larger flares that also erupt from the sun's surface. The microflares rapidly release energy and heat the material in the active regions. NuSTAR typically stares deeper into the cosmos to observe X-rays from supernovas, black holes and other extreme objects. But it can also look safely at the sun and capture images of its high-energy X-rays with more sensitivity than before. Scientists plan to continue to study the sun with NuSTAR to learn more about microflares, as well as hypothesized nanoflares, which are even smaller. In this image, the NuSTAR data shows X-rays with energies between 2 and 6 kiloelectron volts; the Hinode data, which is from the X-ray Telescope instrument, has energies of 0.2 to 2.4 kiloelectron volts; and the Solar Dynamics Observatory data, taken using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument, shows extreme ultraviolet light with wavelengths of 171 and 193 Angstroms. Note the green Hinode image frame edge does not extend as far as the SDO ultraviolet image, resulting in the green portion of the image being truncated on the right and left sides. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19821