Science.gov

Sample records for coastal subseafloor sediments

  1. Oxic and Anoxic Regions of Subseafloor Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hondt, S.; Pockalny, R. A.; Spivack, A. J.; Inagaki, F.; Murray, R. W.; Adhikari, R. R.; Gribsholt, B.; Kallmeyer, J.; McKinley, C. C.; Morono, Y.; Røy, H.; Sauvage, J.; Ziebis, W.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved oxygen content defines two broad categories of subseafloor sediment. In areas with high rates of microbial respiration, most of the sediment column is anoxic and active anaerobic microbial communities are present for hundreds of meters or more below the seafloor. In these regions, O2 and aerobic communities penetrate only millimeters to centimeters into the sediment from the sediment-water interface. In some areas of active fluid flow through the underlying basalt, O2 may also penetrate meters upward into the sediment from the basalt. In areas with low sedimentary respiration, O2 and aerobic communities penetrate tens of meters downward from the seafloor and may persist throughout the entire sediment column. IODP Expedition 329 showed that microbial cells and aerobic respiration persist through the entire sediment sequence (to depths of at least 75 meters below seafloor) in the South Pacific Gyre. Extrapolating from these results and a global relationship of O2 penetration depth to sedimentation rate and sediment thickness, we suggest that oxygen and aerobic communities occur throughout the entire sediment sequence in 15-44% of the Pacific and 9-37% of the global seafloor. Subduction of sediment from largely anoxic regions and subduction of sediment and basalt from fully oxic regions are respectively sources of reduced and oxidized material to the mantle. The balance between oxic and anoxic regions has presumably changed considerably throughout Earth history. Regions with largely anoxic sediment and regions with fully oxic sediment present fundamentally different opportunities for understanding of (i) paleoceanographic history and (ii) the nature of microbial life under extreme energy limitations.

  2. Global distribution of microbial abundance and biomass in subseafloor sediment

    PubMed Central

    Kallmeyer, Jens; Pockalny, Robert; Adhikari, Rishi Ram; Smith, David C.; D’Hondt, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The global geographic distribution of subseafloor sedimentary microbes and the cause(s) of that distribution are largely unexplored. Here, we show that total microbial cell abundance in subseafloor sediment varies between sites by ca. five orders of magnitude. This variation is strongly correlated with mean sedimentation rate and distance from land. Based on these correlations, we estimate global subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance to be 2.9⋅1029 cells [corresponding to 4.1 petagram (Pg) C and ∼0.6% of Earth’s total living biomass]. This estimate of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance is roughly equal to previous estimates of total microbial abundance in seawater and total microbial abundance in soil. It is much lower than previous estimates of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance. In consequence, we estimate Earth’s total number of microbes and total living biomass to be, respectively, 50–78% and 10–45% lower than previous estimates. PMID:22927371

  3. Global Distribution of Microbial Abundance and Biomass in Subseafloor Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallmeyer, J.; Pockalny, R. A.; Adhikari, R. R.; Smith, D. C.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Previously published cell counts were mostly from ocean margins and the eastern equatorial Pacific. Cell counts from these environments are generally similar from site to site and decrease logarithmically with sediment depth, although there can be sharp peaks of high cell densities in zones of anaerobic methane-oxidation. Recent counts from the South Pacific Gyre and the North Pacific Gyre are several orders of magnitude lower and show a more rapid decrease with depth than all previously published datasets. With these new data available, total microbial cell abundance in subseafloor sediment varies between sites by ca. five orders of magnitude. The differences between cell counts from ocean margins and upwelling areas and cell counts from oceanic gyres raise three questions. First, how does the abundance of microbes in subseafloor sediment vary throughout the world ocean? Second, what property or properties are likely to control that variation? Third, how does this variation affect estimates of total subseafloor sedimentary biomass and Earth's total biomass? To address these questions, we compiled our cell counts from the South Pacific Gyre, the North Pacific Gyre and the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean with previously published counts and parameterized the cell distribution at each site and determined two parameters, (i) cell concentration at 1 mbsf and (ii) rate of decrease in cell counts with depth. Both parameters are strongly correlated with mean sedimentation rate and distance to shore. Based on these correlations, we estimate global subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance to be 2.9*1029 cells (corresponding to 4.1 Pg C and ~0.6% of Earth's total living biomass). This estimate of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance is roughly equal to previous estimates of total microbial abundance in seawater and total microbial abundance in soil. It is much lower than previous estimates of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance. In consequence, we estimate

  4. Relationship of Bacterial Richness to Organic Degradation Rate and Sediment Age in Subseafloor Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Emily A.; Kirkpatrick, John B.; Pockalny, Robert; Sauvage, Justine; Spivack, Arthur J.; Murray, Richard W.; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Subseafloor sediment hosts a large, taxonomically rich, and metabolically diverse microbial ecosystem. However, the factors that control microbial diversity in subseafloor sediment have rarely been explored. Here, we show that bacterial richness varies with organic degradation rate and sediment age. At three open-ocean sites (in the Bering Sea and equatorial Pacific) and one continental margin site (Indian Ocean), richness decreases exponentially with increasing sediment depth. The rate of decrease in richness with increasing depth varies from site to site. The vertical succession of predominant terminal electron acceptors correlates with abundance-weighted community composition but does not drive the vertical decrease in richness. Vertical patterns of richness at the open-ocean sites closely match organic degradation rates; both properties are highest near the seafloor and decline together as sediment depth increases. This relationship suggests that (i) total catabolic activity and/or electron donor diversity exerts a primary influence on bacterial richness in marine sediment and (ii) many bacterial taxa that are poorly adapted for subseafloor sedimentary conditions are degraded in the geologically young sediment, where respiration rates are high. Richness consistently takes a few hundred thousand years to decline from near-seafloor values to much lower values in deep anoxic subseafloor sediment, regardless of sedimentation rate, predominant terminal electron acceptor, or oceanographic context. IMPORTANCE Subseafloor sediment provides a wonderful opportunity to investigate the drivers of microbial diversity in communities that may have been isolated for millions of years. Our paper shows the impact of in situ conditions on bacterial community structure in subseafloor sediment. Specifically, it shows that bacterial richness in subseafloor sediment declines exponentially with sediment age, and in parallel with organic-fueled oxidation rate. This result

  5. Bacterial dominance in subseafloor sediments characterized by methane hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Brandon R.; Inagaki, Fumio; Morono, Yuki; Futagami, Taiki; Huguet, Carme; Rosell-Mele, Antoni; Lorenson, T.D.; Colwell, Frederick S.

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of organic carbon in subseafloor sediments on continental margins contributes to the largest reservoir of methane on Earth. Sediments in the Andaman Sea are composed of ~ 1% marine-derived organic carbon and biogenic methane is present. Our objective was to determine microbial abundance and diversity in sediments that transition the gas hydrate occurrence zone (GHOZ) in the Andaman Sea. Microscopic cell enumeration revealed that most sediment layers harbored relatively low microbial abundance (103–105 cells cm−3). Archaea were never detected despite the use of both DNA- and lipid-based methods. Statistical analysis of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms revealed distinct microbial communities from above, within, and below the GHOZ, and GHOZ samples were correlated with a decrease in organic carbon. Primer-tagged pyrosequences of bacterial 16S rRNA genes showed that members of the phylum Firmicutes are predominant in all zones. Compared with other seafloor settings that contain biogenic methane, this deep subseafloor habitat has a unique microbial community and the low cell abundance detected can help to refine global subseafloor microbial abundance.

  6. Human-associated fungi in deep subseafloor sediment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulfer, V. M.; Kirkpatrick, J. B.; D'Hondt, S.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have reported fungi in marine sediment samples from depths as great as 1740 meters below seafloor (mbsf) (Rédou et al., 2014). Such studies have utilized a variety of techniques to identify fungi, including cultivation of isolates, amplicon sequencing, and metagenomics. Six recent studies of marine sediment collectively identify nearly 100 fungal taxa at the genus and species levels (Damare et al., 2006; Lai et al., 2007; Edgcomb et al., 2010; Singh et al., 2010; Orsi et al., 2013; Rédou et al., 2014). Known marine taxa are rarely identified by these studies. For individual studies with more than two taxa, between 16% and 57% of the fungal taxa are human microflora or associated with human environments (e.g., human skin or indoor air). For example, three of the six studies identified Malassezia species that are common skin inhabitants of humans and dogs. Although human-associated taxa have been identified in both shallow and deep sediment, they pose a particularly acute problem for deep subseafloor samples, where claims of a eukaryotic deep biosphere are most striking; depending on the study, 25% to 38% of species identified in sediment taken at depths greater than 40 meters are human-associated. Only one to three species have been reported from each of the four samples taken at depths greater than one km (eight species total; Rédou et al., 2014). Of these eight species, three are human-associated. This ubiquity of human-associated microflora is very problematic for interpretations of an indigenous deep subseafloor fungal community; either human-associated taxa comprise a large fraction of marine sedimentary fungi, or sample and analytical contamination is so widespread that the extent and ubiquity of a deep subseafloor fungal community remains uncertain. This highlights the need for stringent quality control measures throughout coring, sampling, and recovery of marine sediment, and when cultivating, extracting, and/or sequencing fungi from

  7. Viral activities and life cycles in deep subseafloor sediments.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Tim; Orsi, William D; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-12-01

    Viruses are highly abundant in marine subsurface sediments and can even exceed the number of prokaryotes. However, their activity and quantitative impact on microbial populations are still poorly understood. Here, we use gene expression data from published continental margin subseafloor metatranscriptomes to qualitatively assess viral diversity and activity in sediments up to 159 metres below seafloor (mbsf). Mining of the metatranscriptomic data revealed 4651 representative viral homologues (RVHs), representing 2.2% of all metatranscriptome sequence reads, which have close translated homology (average 77%, range 60-97% amino acid identity) to viral proteins. Archaea-infecting RVHs are exclusively detected in the upper 30 mbsf, whereas RVHs for filamentous inoviruses predominate in the deepest sediment layers. RVHs indicative of lysogenic phage-host interactions and lytic activity, notably cell lysis, are detected at all analysed depths and suggest a dynamic virus-host association in the marine deep biosphere studied here. Ongoing lytic viral activity is further indicated by the expression of clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat-associated cascade genes involved in cellular defence against viral attacks. The data indicate the activity of viruses in subsurface sediment of the Peruvian margin and suggest that viruses indeed cause cell mortality and may play an important role in the turnover of subseafloor microbial biomass. PMID:26109514

  8. Viral activities and life cycles in deep subseafloor sediments.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Tim; Orsi, William D; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-12-01

    Viruses are highly abundant in marine subsurface sediments and can even exceed the number of prokaryotes. However, their activity and quantitative impact on microbial populations are still poorly understood. Here, we use gene expression data from published continental margin subseafloor metatranscriptomes to qualitatively assess viral diversity and activity in sediments up to 159 metres below seafloor (mbsf). Mining of the metatranscriptomic data revealed 4651 representative viral homologues (RVHs), representing 2.2% of all metatranscriptome sequence reads, which have close translated homology (average 77%, range 60-97% amino acid identity) to viral proteins. Archaea-infecting RVHs are exclusively detected in the upper 30 mbsf, whereas RVHs for filamentous inoviruses predominate in the deepest sediment layers. RVHs indicative of lysogenic phage-host interactions and lytic activity, notably cell lysis, are detected at all analysed depths and suggest a dynamic virus-host association in the marine deep biosphere studied here. Ongoing lytic viral activity is further indicated by the expression of clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat-associated cascade genes involved in cellular defence against viral attacks. The data indicate the activity of viruses in subsurface sediment of the Peruvian margin and suggest that viruses indeed cause cell mortality and may play an important role in the turnover of subseafloor microbial biomass.

  9. Relationships between sedimentary subseafloor microbial abundance and sedimentation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallmeyer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Cell count data for estimates of global subseafloor microbial abundance need to be simplified in order to be used for model calculations All models rely on regressions of cell counts vs. depth. Different strategies are being used for simplifying the data, e.g. averaging over highly variable data from different oceanic provinces or excluding individual datasets that cannot be described by a single regression. While providing global estimates, these models fail to identify the finer details of the controls on subseafloor microbial abundance. Most subseafloor microbes are heterotrophic and gain energy by degrading buried organic matter. Because sedimentation rate is usually positively correlated with primary productivity and organic matter flux to the seafloor, it determines how much organic matter is deposited on the sea floor and how fast it is buried and reaches greater depths. At the same depth, in environments with low sed. rates the organic matter is older, more degraded and supports less metabolic activity than in those with high sed. rates. As a result, sed. rates control penetration depth of oxygen and other electron acceptors. Oxygen penetration remains in the mm to cm range over most sed. rates and it only penetrates significantly deeper at very low rates of ca. 1 mm/kyr or less. However, microbial abundance correlates with sed. rate over a wider range. In order to take a more detailed look at the influence of sed. rate and therefore sediment age on cell abundance, ages and additional geochemical information were assigned to individual cell counts. The new dataset shows the strong influence of sed. rates or rather sediment age on microbial abundance, while oxygen concentrations seem to have only a minor influence. Using data from IODP drill sites that have moved from high to low productivity zones or vice versa helps to differentiate between different factors that control microbial cell abundance.

  10. Distributions of microbial activities in deep subseafloor sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Hondt, Steven; Jorgensen, Bo Barker; Miller, D. Jay; Batzke, Anja; Blake, Ruth; Cragg, Barry A.; Cypionka, Heribert; Dickens, Gerald R.; Ferdelman, Timothy; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Holm, Nils G.; Mitterer, Richard; Spivack, Arthur; Wang, Guizhi; Bekins, Barbara; Engelen, Bert; Ford, Kathryn; Gettemy, Glen; Rutherford, Scott D.; Sass, Henrik; Skilbeck, C. Gregory; Aiello, Ivano W.; Guerin, Gilles; House, Christopher H.; Inagaki, Fumio

    2004-01-01

    Diverse microbial communities and numerous energy-yielding activities occur in deeply buried sediments of the eastern Pacific Ocean. Distributions of metabolic activities often deviate from the standard model. Rates of activities, cell concentrations, and populations of cultured bacteria vary consistently from one subseafloor environment to another. Net rates of major activities principally rely on electron acceptors and electron donors from the photosynthetic surface world. At open-ocean sites, nitrate and oxygen are supplied to the deepest sedimentary communities through the underlying basaltic aquifer. In turn, these sedimentary communities may supply dissolved electron donors and nutrients to the underlying crustal biosphere.

  11. Diversity of actinomycetes isolated from subseafloor sediments after prolonged low-temperature storage.

    PubMed

    Ulanova, Dana; Goo, Kian-Sim

    2015-05-01

    Subseafloor sediments present an untapped source of novel bacterial species with industrially important bioactivities. Subseafloor core samples collected during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expeditions 315, 316, and 331 and stored in Kochi Core Center at -80 °C for 1 to 4 years were used for cultivation-based study of viable actinomycetes. In total, more than 100 actinomycete-like colonies were isolated from two deep-frozen subseafloor sediment samples. Isolated actinomycetes showed close similarity to known Actinotalea, Dietzia, Gordonia, Isoptericola, Microbacterium, Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Pseudonocardia, Streptomyces, and Tsukamurella species and were halotolerant. Bioactivity assays revealed that two of the isolates were producing potent antibacterial compound(s) and one isolate was having antifungal activity. Our study demonstrated that deep-frozen subseafloor core samples could be a potential source of viable actinomycetes, which may be used in drug discovery. PMID:25381631

  12. Cultivation of methanogenic community from subseafloor sediments using a continuous-flow bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Imachi, Hiroyuki; Aoi, Ken; Tasumi, Eiji; Saito, Yumi; Yamanaka, Yuko; Saito, Yayoi; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Tomaru, Hitoshi; Takeuchi, Rika; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Takai, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Microbial methanogenesis in subseafloor sediments is a key process in the carbon cycle on the Earth. However, the cultivation-dependent evidences have been poorly demonstrated. Here we report the cultivation of a methanogenic microbial consortium from subseafloor sediments using a continuous-flow-type bioreactor with polyurethane sponges as microbial habitats, called down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor. We anaerobically incubated methane-rich core sediments collected from off Shimokita Peninsula, Japan, for 826 days in the reactor at 10 °C. Synthetic seawater supplemented with glucose, yeast extract, acetate and propionate as potential energy sources was provided into the reactor. After 289 days of operation, microbiological methane production became evident. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed the presence of metabolically active microbial cells with various morphologies in the reactor. DNA- and RNA-based phylogenetic analyses targeting 16S rRNA indicated the successful growth of phylogenetically diverse microbial components during cultivation in the reactor. Most of the phylotypes in the reactor, once it made methane, were more closely related to culture sequences than to the subsurface environmental sequence. Potentially methanogenic phylotypes related to the genera Methanobacterium, Methanococcoides and Methanosarcina were predominantly detected concomitantly with methane production, while uncultured archaeal phylotypes were also detected. Using the methanogenic community enrichment as subsequent inocula, traditional batch-type cultivations led to the successful isolation of several anaerobic microbes including those methanogens. Our results substantiate that the DHS bioreactor is a useful system for the enrichment of numerous fastidious microbes from subseafloor sediments and will enable the physiological and ecological characterization of pure cultures of previously uncultivated subseafloor microbial life. PMID:21654849

  13. Distribution of dehalogenation activity in subseafloor sediments of the Nankai Trough subduction zone

    PubMed Central

    Futagami, Taiki; Morono, Yuki; Terada, Takeshi; Kaksonen, Anna H.; Inagaki, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    Halogenated organic matter buried in marine subsurface sediment may serve as a source of electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration of subseafloor microbes. Detection of a diverse array of reductive dehalogenase-homologous (rdhA) genes suggests that subseafloor organohalide-respiring microbial communities may play significant ecological roles in the biogeochemical carbon and halogen cycle in the subseafloor biosphere. We report here the spatial distribution of dehalogenation activity in the Nankai Trough plate-subduction zone of the northwest Pacific off the Kii Peninsula of Japan. Incubation experiments with slurries of sediment collected at various depths and locations showed that degradation of several organohalides tested only occurred in the shallow sedimentary basin, down to 4.7 metres below the seafloor, despite detection of rdhA in the deeper sediments. We studied the phylogenetic diversity of the metabolically active microbes in positive enrichment cultures by extracting RNA, and found that Desulfuromonadales bacteria predominate. In addition, for the isolation of genes involved in the dehalogenation reaction, we performed a substrate-induced gene expression screening on DNA extracted from the enrichment cultures. Diverse DNA fragments were obtained and some of them showed best BLAST hit to known organohalide respirers such as Dehalococcoides, whereas no functionally known dehalogenation-related genes such as rdhA were found, indicating the need to improve the molecular approach to assess functional genes for organohalide respiration. PMID:23479745

  14. Archaeal communities associated with shallow to deep subseafloor sediments of the New Caledonia Basin.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Erwan G; Sauvadet, Anne-Laure; Chaduteau, Carine; Fouquet, Yves; Charlou, Jean-Luc; Prieur, Daniel; Cambon Bonavita, Marie-Anne

    2009-09-01

    The distribution of the archaeal communities in deep subseafloor sediments [0-36 m below the seafloor (mbsf)] from the New Caledonia and Fairway Basins was investigated using DNA- and RNA-derived 16S rRNA clone libraries, functional genes and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). A new method, Co-Migration DGGE (CM-DGGE), was developed to access selectively the active archaeal diversity. Prokaryotic cell abundances at the open-ocean sites were on average approximately 3.5 times lower than at a site under terrestrial influence. The sediment surface archaeal community (0-1.5 mbsf) was characterized by active Marine Group 1 (MG-1) Archaea that co-occurred with ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA) sequences affiliated to a group of uncultured sedimentary Crenarchaeota. However, the anoxic subsurface methane-poor sediments (below 1.5 mbsf) were dominated by less active archaeal communities, such as the Thermoplasmatales, Marine Benthic Group D and other lineages probably involved in the methane cycle (Methanosarcinales, ANME-2 and DSAG/MBG-B). Moreover, the archaeal diversity of some sediment layers was restricted to only one lineage (Uncultured Euryarchaeota, DHVE6, MBG-B, MG-1 and SAGMEG). Sequences forming two clusters within the Thermococcales order were also present in these cold subseafloor sediments, suggesting that these uncultured putative thermophilic archaeal communities might have originated from a different environment. This study shows a transition between surface and subsurface sediment archaeal communities.

  15. Phylogenetic Diversity of aprA Genes in Subseafloor Sediments on the Northwestern Pacific Margin off Japan.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masataka; Kakiuchi, Ryota; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Takai, Ken; Inagaki, Fumio; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Markedly diverse sequences of the adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase alpha subunit gene (aprA), which encodes a key enzyme in microbial sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation, were detected in subseafloor sediments on the northwestern Pacific off Japan. The aprA gene sequences were grouped into 135 operational taxonomic units (90% sequence identity), including genes related to putative sulfur-oxidizing bacteria predominantly detected in sulfate-depleted deep sediments. Our results suggest that microbial ecosystems in the subseafloor biosphere have phylogenetically diverse genetic potentials to mediate cryptic sulfur cycles in sediments, even where sulfate is rarely present. PMID:26156553

  16. Phylogenetic Diversity of aprA Genes in Subseafloor Sediments on the Northwestern Pacific Margin off Japan

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Masataka; Kakiuchi, Ryota; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Takai, Ken; Inagaki, Fumio; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Markedly diverse sequences of the adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate reductase alpha subunit gene (aprA), which encodes a key enzyme in microbial sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation, were detected in subseafloor sediments on the northwestern Pacific off Japan. The aprA gene sequences were grouped into 135 operational taxonomic units (90% sequence identity), including genes related to putative sulfur-oxidizing bacteria predominantly detected in sulfate-depleted deep sediments. Our results suggest that microbial ecosystems in the subseafloor biosphere have phylogenetically diverse genetic potentials to mediate cryptic sulfur cycles in sediments, even where sulfate is rarely present. PMID:26156553

  17. In situ time-series measurements of subseafloor sediment properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheatcroft, R.A.; Stevens, A.W.; Johnson, R.V.

    2007-01-01

    The capabilities and diversity of subsurface sediment sensors lags significantly from what is available for the water column, thereby limiting progress in understanding time-dependent seabed exchange and high-frequency acoustics. To help redress this imbalance, a new instrument, the autonomous sediment profiler (ASP), is described herein. ASP consists of a four-electrode, Wenner-type resistivity probe and a thermistor that log data at 0.1-cm vertical intervals over a 58-cm vertical profile. To avoid resampling the same spot on the seafloor, the probes are moved horizontally within a 20 times 100-cm-2 area in one of three preselected patterns. Memory and power capacities permit sampling at hourly intervals for up to 3-mo duration. The system was tested in a laboratory tank and shown to be able to resolve high-frequency sediment consolidation, as well as changes in sediment roughness. In a field test off the southern coast of France, the system collected resistivity and temperature data at hourly intervals for 16 d. Coupled with environmental data collected on waves, currents, and suspended sediment, the ASP is shown to be useful for understanding temporal evolution of subsurface sediment porosity, although no large depositional or erosional events occurred during the deployment. Following a rapid decrease in bottom-water temperature, the evolution of the subsurface temperature field was consistent with the 1-D thermal diffusion equation coupled with advection in the upper 3-4 cm. Collectively, the laboratory and field tests yielded promising results on time-dependent seabed change.

  18. Assessing the Potential for Expression of Metabolically Diverse Genes in Subseafloor Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, J. M.; Shock, E.

    2009-12-01

    A combination of geochemical and biochemical processes defines the transition between sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in subseafloor sediments. One line of investigation that promises to help elucidate this transition is metagenomic characterization of the subseafloor sediment column. Analysis of metagenomic data from sediment at the Peru Margin reveals that sequences homologous to known genes in the methanogenic and sulfate reductive pathways can be identified at different depths below the seafloor [1]. However, without metatranscriptomic or metaprotoeomic data it is unclear whether the presence of these genes implies that these metabolic pathways are being utilized. In this study, we describe a theoretical method for assessing the potential for gene expression. Constructing a thermodynamic model for the relative stabilities of proteins depends on knowing the amino acid sequences of the proteins and defining model environments, which can then be compared and refined using geochemical observations. We report the results of a series of stability calculations that are consistent with a greater overall energetic potential for the expression of enzymes for sulfate reduction and methanogenesis at shallow and deep horizons, respectively. The results are also consistent with a decrease in the oxidation state of the pore fluid with depth, which is mirrored in the chemical compositions of the proteins involved in methanogenesis. At sediment near the seafloor, where genes for both sulfate reduction and methanogenesis were identified [1], fluctuations in oxidation state could be responsible for differing levels of expression of these proteins and therefore contribute to a shift to a different metabolic strategy. [1] J. F. Biddle, S. Fitz-Gibbon, S. C. Schuster, J. E. Brenchley and C. H. House. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 105:10583, 2008. Relative stabilities of sulfite reductases ("sulf") and methylene-5,6,7,8-tetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenases ("meth") that are

  19. Isolation of sulfate-reducing bacteria from sediments above the deep-subseafloor aquifer.

    PubMed

    Fichtel, Katja; Mathes, Falko; Könneke, Martin; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2012-01-01

    On a global scale, crustal fluids fuel a large part of the deep-subseafloor biosphere by providing electron acceptors for microbial respiration. In this study, we examined bacterial cultures from sediments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Northeast Pacific (IODP Site U1301). The sediments comprise three distinctive compartments: an upper sulfate-containing zone, formed by bottom-seawater diffusion, a sulfate-depleted zone, and a second (∼140 m thick) sulfate-containing zone influenced by fluid diffusion from the basaltic aquifer. In order to identify and characterize sulfate-reducing bacteria, enrichment cultures from different sediment layers were set up, analyzed by molecular screening, and used for isolating pure cultures. The initial enrichments harbored specific communities of heterotrophic microorganisms. Strains affiliated to Desulfosporosinus lacus, Desulfotomaculum sp., and Desulfovibrio aespoeensis were isolated only from the top layers (1.3-9.1 meters below seafloor, mbsf), while several strains of Desulfovibrio indonesiensis and a relative of Desulfotignum balticum were obtained from near-basement sediments (240-262 mbsf). Physiological tests on three selected strains affiliated to Dv. aespoeensis, Dv. indonesiensis, and Desulfotignum balticum indicated that all reduce sulfate with a limited number of short-chain n-alcohols or fatty acids and were able to ferment either ethanol, pyruvate, or betaine. All three isolates shared the capacity of growing chemolithotrophically with H(2) as sole electron donor. Strain P23, affiliating with Dv. indonesiensis, even grew autotrophically in the absence of any organic compounds. Thus, H(2) might be an essential electron donor in the deep-subseafloor where the availability of organic substrates is limited. The isolation of non-sporeforming sulfate reducers from fluid-influenced layers indicates that they have survived the long-term burial as active populations even after the separation from the seafloor hundreds

  20. Isolation of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria from Sediments Above the Deep-Subseafloor Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Fichtel, Katja; Mathes, Falko; Könneke, Martin; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2011-01-01

    On a global scale, crustal fluids fuel a large part of the deep-subseafloor biosphere by providing electron acceptors for microbial respiration. In this study, we examined bacterial cultures from sediments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Northeast Pacific (IODP Site U1301). The sediments comprise three distinctive compartments: an upper sulfate-containing zone, formed by bottom-seawater diffusion, a sulfate-depleted zone, and a second (∼140 m thick) sulfate-containing zone influenced by fluid diffusion from the basaltic aquifer. In order to identify and characterize sulfate-reducing bacteria, enrichment cultures from different sediment layers were set up, analyzed by molecular screening, and used for isolating pure cultures. The initial enrichments harbored specific communities of heterotrophic microorganisms. Strains affiliated to Desulfosporosinus lacus, Desulfotomaculum sp., and Desulfovibrio aespoeensis were isolated only from the top layers (1.3–9.1 meters below seafloor, mbsf), while several strains of Desulfovibrio indonesiensis and a relative of Desulfotignum balticum were obtained from near-basement sediments (240–262 mbsf). Physiological tests on three selected strains affiliated to Dv. aespoeensis, Dv. indonesiensis, and Desulfotignum balticum indicated that all reduce sulfate with a limited number of short-chain n-alcohols or fatty acids and were able to ferment either ethanol, pyruvate, or betaine. All three isolates shared the capacity of growing chemolithotrophically with H2 as sole electron donor. Strain P23, affiliating with Dv. indonesiensis, even grew autotrophically in the absence of any organic compounds. Thus, H2 might be an essential electron donor in the deep-subseafloor where the availability of organic substrates is limited. The isolation of non-sporeforming sulfate reducers from fluid-influenced layers indicates that they have survived the long-term burial as active populations even after the separation from the seafloor hundreds

  1. Linking Microbial Heterotrophic Activity and Sediment Lithology in Oxic, Oligotrophic Sub-Seafloor Sediments of the North Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Aude; Ferdelman, Timothy G.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial heterotrophic activity was investigated in oxic sub-seafloor sediments at North Pond, a sediment pond situated at 23°N on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The North Pond sediments underlie the oligotrophic North Atlantic Gyre at 4580-m water depth and cover a 7–8 million-year-old basaltic crust aquifer through which seawater flows. Discrete samples for experimentation were obtained from up to ~9 m-long gravity cores taken at 14 stations in the North Pond area. Potential respiration rates were determined in sediment slurries incubated under aerobic conditions with 14C-acetate. Microbial heterotrophic activity, as defined by oxidation of acetate to CO2 (with O2 as electron acceptor), was detected in all 14 stations and all depths sampled. Potential respiration rates were generally low (<0.2 nmol of respired acetate cm−3 d−1) in the sediment, but indicate that microbial heterotrophic activity occurs in deep-sea, oxic, sub-seafloor sediments. Furthermore, discernable differences in activity existed between sites and within given depth profiles. At seven stations, activity was increased by several orders of magnitude at depth (up to ~12 nmol of acetate respired cm−3 d−1). We attempted to correlate the measures of activity with high-resolution color and element stratigraphy. Increased activities at certain depths may be correlated to variations in the sediment geology, i.e., to the presence of dark clay-rich layers, of sandy layers, or within clay-rich horizons presumably overlying basalts. This would suggest that the distribution of microbial heterotrophic activity in deeply buried sediments may be linked to specific lithologies. Nevertheless, high-resolution microbial examination at the level currently enjoyed by sedimentologists will be required to fully explore this link. PMID:22207869

  2. Changes in microbial communities associated with gas hydrates in subseafloor sediments from the Nankai Trough.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Taiki; Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Takahashi, Hiroshi A; Amo, Miki; Fujii, Tetsuya; Sakata, Susumu

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about the microbial distribution patterns in subseafloor sediments. This study examines microbial diversity and activities in sediments of the Nankai Trough, where biogenic gas hydrates are deposited. Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed that the prokaryotic community structure is correlated with hydrate occurrence and depth but not with the sedimentary facies. The bacterial phyla 'Atribacteria' lineage JS1 and Chloroflexi dominated in all samples, whereas lower taxonomic units of Chloroflexi accounted for community variation related to hydrate saturation. In archaeal communities, 'Bathyarchaeota' was significantly abundant in the hydrate-containing samples, whereas Marine Benthic Group-B dominated in the upper sediments without hydrates. mcrA gene sequences assigned to deeply branching groups and ANME-1 were detected only in hydrate-containing samples. A predominance of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, Methanomicrobiales and Methanobacteriales, over acetoclastic methanogens was found throughout the depth. Incubation tests on hydrate-containing samples with a stable isotope tracer showed anaerobic methane oxidation activities under both low- and seawater-like salinity conditions. These results indicate that the distribution patterns of microorganisms involved in carbon cycling changed with gas hydrate occurrence, possibly because of the previous hydrate dissociation followed by pore water salinity decrease in situ, as previously proposed by a geochemical study at the study site. PMID:27170363

  3. Changes in microbial communities associated with gas hydrates in subseafloor sediments from the Nankai Trough.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Taiki; Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Takahashi, Hiroshi A; Amo, Miki; Fujii, Tetsuya; Sakata, Susumu

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about the microbial distribution patterns in subseafloor sediments. This study examines microbial diversity and activities in sediments of the Nankai Trough, where biogenic gas hydrates are deposited. Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed that the prokaryotic community structure is correlated with hydrate occurrence and depth but not with the sedimentary facies. The bacterial phyla 'Atribacteria' lineage JS1 and Chloroflexi dominated in all samples, whereas lower taxonomic units of Chloroflexi accounted for community variation related to hydrate saturation. In archaeal communities, 'Bathyarchaeota' was significantly abundant in the hydrate-containing samples, whereas Marine Benthic Group-B dominated in the upper sediments without hydrates. mcrA gene sequences assigned to deeply branching groups and ANME-1 were detected only in hydrate-containing samples. A predominance of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, Methanomicrobiales and Methanobacteriales, over acetoclastic methanogens was found throughout the depth. Incubation tests on hydrate-containing samples with a stable isotope tracer showed anaerobic methane oxidation activities under both low- and seawater-like salinity conditions. These results indicate that the distribution patterns of microorganisms involved in carbon cycling changed with gas hydrate occurrence, possibly because of the previous hydrate dissociation followed by pore water salinity decrease in situ, as previously proposed by a geochemical study at the study site.

  4. Relationship of subseafloor microbial diversity to sediment age and organic carbon content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, E. A.; Kirkpatrick, J. B.; Sogin, M. L.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Our tag pyrosequencing investigation of four globally distant sites reveals sediment age and total organic carbon content to be significant components in understanding subseafloor diversity. Our sampling locations include two sites from high-productivity regions (Indian Ocean and Bering Sea) and two from moderate-productivity (eastern and central equatorial Pacific Ocean). Sediment from the high-productivity sites has much higher TOC than sediment from the moderate-productivity equatorial sites. We applied a high-resolution 16S V4-V6 tag pyrosequencing approach to 24 bacterial and 17 archaeal samples, totaling 602,502 reads. We identified1,291 archaeal and 15,910 bacterial OTUs (97%) from these reads. We analyzed bacterial samples from all four sites in addition to archaeal samples from our high productivity sites. These high productivity, high TOC sites have a pronounced methane-rich sulfate-free zone at depth from which archaea have been previously considered to dominate (Biddle et al., 2006). At all four locations, microbial diversity is highest near the seafloor and drops rapidly to low but stable values with increasing sediment depth. The depth at which diversity stabilizes varies greatly from site to site, but the age at which it stabilizes is relatively constant. At all four sites, diversity reaches low stable values a few hundred thousand years after sediment deposition. The sites with high total organic carbon (high productivity sites) generally exhibit higher diversity at each sediment age than the sites with lower total organic carbon (moderate-productivity sites). Archaeal diversity is lower than bacterial diversity at every sampled depth. Biddle, J.F., Lipp, J.S., Lever, M.A., Lloyd, K.G., Sørensen, K.B., Anderson, R. et al. (2006) Heterotrophic Archaea dominate sedimentary subsurface ecosystems off Peru. PNAS 103: 3846-3851.

  5. Whole-genome sequence of Sunxiuqinia dokdonensis DH1(T), isolated from deep sub-seafloor sediment in Dokdo Island.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sooyeon; Chang, Dong-Ho; Kim, Byoung-Chan

    2016-09-01

    Sunxiuqinia dokdonensis DH1(T) was isolated from deep sub-seafloor sediment at a depth of 900 m below the seafloor off Seo-do (the west part of Dokdo Island) in the East Sea of the Republic of Korea and subjected to whole genome sequencing on HiSeq platform and annotated on RAST. The nucleotide sequence of this genome was deposited into DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession LGIA00000000.

  6. Whole-genome sequence of Sunxiuqinia dokdonensis DH1(T), isolated from deep sub-seafloor sediment in Dokdo Island.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sooyeon; Chang, Dong-Ho; Kim, Byoung-Chan

    2016-09-01

    Sunxiuqinia dokdonensis DH1(T) was isolated from deep sub-seafloor sediment at a depth of 900 m below the seafloor off Seo-do (the west part of Dokdo Island) in the East Sea of the Republic of Korea and subjected to whole genome sequencing on HiSeq platform and annotated on RAST. The nucleotide sequence of this genome was deposited into DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession LGIA00000000. PMID:27437183

  7. Coastal sediment dynamics in Spitsbergen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloffre, J.; Lafite, R.; Baltzer, A.; Marlin, C.; Delangle, E.; Dethleff, D.; Petit, F.

    2010-12-01

    In arctic knowledge on coastal sediment dynamics and sedimentary processes is limited. The studied area is located in the microtidal Kongsfjorden glacial fjord on the North-western coast of Spitsbergen in the Artic Ocean (79°N). In this area sediment contributions to the coastal zone is provided by small temporary rivers that flows into the fjord. The objectives of this study are to (i) assess the origin and fate of fine-grained particles (<63µm) from the piedmont glacier to the coastal zone (0-30m depth), (ii) establish the role of this coastal zone in sediment transfer and (iii) identify the impact of sea ice cover on sediment dynamics. The sampling strategy is based on characterization of sediment and SPM (grain-size, X-rays diffraction, SEM images, carbonates and organic matter contents) from the glacier to the coastal zone completed by a bottom-sediment map on the nearshore using side-scan sonar validated with Ekman binge sampling. River inputs (i.e. river plumes) to the coastal zone were punctually followed using CTD (conductivity, temperature, depth and turbidity) profiles. OBS (water level, temperature and turbidity) operating at high-frequency and during at least 1 years (including under sea ice cover) was settled at the mouth of rivers at 10m depth. In the coastal zone the fine-grained sediment deposit is limited to mud patches located at river mouths that originate the piedmont glacier. However a significant amount of sediment originates the coastal glacier located in the eastern part of the fjord via two processes: direct transfer and ice-drop. Results from turbidity measurements show that the sediment dynamics is controlled by river inputs in particular during melting period. During winter sediment resuspension can occurs directly linked to significant wind-events. When the sea ice cover is present (January to April) no sediment dynamics is observed. Sediment processes in the coastal zone of arctic fjords is significant however only a small amount of

  8. Phylogenetic and enzymatic diversity of deep subseafloor aerobic microorganisms in organics- and methane-rich sediments off Shimokita Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tohru; Koide, Osamu; Mori, Kozue; Shimamura, Shigeru; Matsuura, Takae; Miura, Takeshi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Morono, Yuki; Nunoura, Takuro; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Takai, Ken; Horikoshi, Koki

    2008-07-01

    "A meta-enzyme approach" is proposed as an ecological enzymatic method to explore the potential functions of microbial communities in extreme environments such as the deep marine subsurface. We evaluated a variety of extra-cellular enzyme activities of sediment slurries and isolates from a deep subseafloor sediment core. Using the new deep-sea drilling vessel "Chikyu", we obtained 365 m of core sediments that contained approximately 2% organic matter and considerable amounts of methane from offshore the Shimokita Peninsula in Japan at a water depth of 1,180 m. In the extra-sediment fraction of the slurry samples, phosphatase, esterase, and catalase activities were detected consistently throughout the core sediments down to the deepest slurry sample from 342.5 m below seafloor (mbsf). Detectable enzyme activities predicted the existence of a sizable population of viable aerobic microorganisms even in deep subseafloor habitats. The subsequent quantitative cultivation using solid media represented remarkably high numbers of aerobic, heterotrophic microbial populations (e.g., maximally 4.4x10(7) cells cm(-3) at 342.5 mbsf). Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the predominant cultivated microbial components were affiliated with the genera Bacillus, Shewanella, Pseudoalteromonas, Halomonas, Pseudomonas, Paracoccus, Rhodococcus, Microbacterium, and Flexibacteracea. Many of the predominant and scarce isolates produced a variety of extra-cellular enzymes such as proteases, amylases, lipases, chitinases, phosphatases, and deoxyribonucleases. Our results indicate that microbes in the deep subseafloor environment off Shimokita are metabolically active and that the cultivable populations may have a great potential in biotechnology.

  9. Phylogenetic and enzymatic diversity of deep subseafloor aerobic microorganisms in organics- and methane-rich sediments off Shimokita Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tohru; Koide, Osamu; Mori, Kozue; Shimamura, Shigeru; Matsuura, Takae; Miura, Takeshi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Morono, Yuki; Nunoura, Takuro; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Takai, Ken; Horikoshi, Koki

    2008-07-01

    "A meta-enzyme approach" is proposed as an ecological enzymatic method to explore the potential functions of microbial communities in extreme environments such as the deep marine subsurface. We evaluated a variety of extra-cellular enzyme activities of sediment slurries and isolates from a deep subseafloor sediment core. Using the new deep-sea drilling vessel "Chikyu", we obtained 365 m of core sediments that contained approximately 2% organic matter and considerable amounts of methane from offshore the Shimokita Peninsula in Japan at a water depth of 1,180 m. In the extra-sediment fraction of the slurry samples, phosphatase, esterase, and catalase activities were detected consistently throughout the core sediments down to the deepest slurry sample from 342.5 m below seafloor (mbsf). Detectable enzyme activities predicted the existence of a sizable population of viable aerobic microorganisms even in deep subseafloor habitats. The subsequent quantitative cultivation using solid media represented remarkably high numbers of aerobic, heterotrophic microbial populations (e.g., maximally 4.4x10(7) cells cm(-3) at 342.5 mbsf). Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the predominant cultivated microbial components were affiliated with the genera Bacillus, Shewanella, Pseudoalteromonas, Halomonas, Pseudomonas, Paracoccus, Rhodococcus, Microbacterium, and Flexibacteracea. Many of the predominant and scarce isolates produced a variety of extra-cellular enzymes such as proteases, amylases, lipases, chitinases, phosphatases, and deoxyribonucleases. Our results indicate that microbes in the deep subseafloor environment off Shimokita are metabolically active and that the cultivable populations may have a great potential in biotechnology. PMID:18368287

  10. Sedimentological imprint on subseafloor microbial communities in Western Mediterranean Sea Quaternary sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, M.-C.; Rabineau, M.; Droz, L.; Révillon, S.; Ghiglione, J.-F.; Dennielou, B.; Jorry, S.-J.; Kallmeyer, J.; Etoubleau, J.; Pignet, P.; Crassous, P.; Vandenabeele-Trambouze, O.; Laugier, J.; Guégan, M.; Godfroy, A.; Alain, K.

    2012-09-01

    An interdisciplinary study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between geological and paleoenvironmental parameters and the bacterial and archaeal community structure of two contrasting subseafloor sites in the Western Mediterranean Sea (Ligurian Sea and Gulf of Lion). Both depositional environments in this area are well-documented from paleoclimatic and paleooceanographic point of views. Available data sets allowed us to calibrate the investigated cores with reference and dated cores previously collected in the same area, and notably correlated to Quaternary climate variations. DNA-based fingerprints showed that the archaeal diversity was composed by one group, Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group (MCG), within the Gulf of Lion sediments and of nine different lineages (dominated by MCG, South African Gold Mine Euryarchaeotal Group (SAGMEG) and Halobacteria) within the Ligurian Sea sediments. Bacterial molecular diversity at both sites revealed mostly the presence of the classes Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria within Proteobacteria phylum, and also members of Bacteroidetes phylum. The second most abundant lineages were Actinobacteria and Firmicutes at the Gulf of Lion site and Chloroflexi at the Ligurian Sea site. Various substrates and cultivation conditions allowed us to isolate 75 strains belonging to four lineages: Alpha-, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. In molecular surveys, the Betaproteobacteria group was consistently detected in the Ligurian Sea sediments, characterized by a heterolithic facies with numerous turbidites from a deep-sea levee. Analysis of relative betaproteobacterial abundances and turbidite frequency suggested that the microbial diversity was a result of main climatic changes occurring during the last 20 ka. Statistical direct multivariate canonical correspondence analyses (CCA) showed that the availability of electron acceptors and the quality of electron donors (indicated by age

  11. Nocardioides pacificus sp. nov., isolated from deep sub-seafloor sediment.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoyang; Qiao, Yanlu; Gao, Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-07-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, strictly aerobic, rod-shaped, non-motile bacterium, designated strain XH274(T), was isolated from a deep sub-seafloor sediment sample collected from the South Pacific Gyre (41° 58' S 163° 11' W) during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain XH274(T) belonged to the genus Nocardioides and shared the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Nocardioides kribbensis KSL-2(T) (96.81%), Nocardioides daedukensis MDN22(T) (96.74%) and Nocardioides psychrotolerans RHLT2-1(T) (96.61%). The DNA G+C content of strain XH274(T) was 74.6 mol%. The cell wall of strain XH274(T) contained ll-2,6-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid, and ribose, glucose, galactose and mannose as the major whole-cell sugars. The major fatty acids were iso-C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω9c and C17 : 1ω8c. The major respiratory quinone was menaquinone-8(H4). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and two unknown phospholipids. On the basis of data from the polyphasic analysis, strain XH274(T) is considered to represent a novel species in the genus Nocardioides, for which the name Nocardioides pacificus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XH274(T) ( = DSM 27278(T) = JCM 19260(T)). PMID:24699067

  12. Luteococcus sediminum sp. nov., isolated from deep subseafloor sediment of the South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Zenghu; Li, Zhao; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-08-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, strictly aerobic, coccus-shaped, non-motile, yellow-pigmented bacterium, designated strain XH208(T), was isolated from a deep subseafloor sediment sample collected from the South Pacific Gyre (41° 58' S 163° 11' W) during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain XH208(T) belonged to the genus Luteococcus and showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Luteococcus peritonei CCUG 38120(T) (96.9%), Luteococcus japonicus DSM 10546(T) (95.4%) and Luteococcus sanguinis CCUG 33897(T) (95.2%). The DNA G+C content of strain XH208(T) was 66.9 mol%. The cell wall of strain XH208(T) possessed a type A3γ peptidoglycan (ll-diaminopimelic acid-glycine), and ribose, glucose and galactose as the major whole-cell sugars. The major fatty acids were C(17 : 1)ω8c, C(17 : 1)ω6c, and C(16 : 1)ω6c and/or C(16 : 1)ω7c (summed feature 3). The major respiratory quinone was menaquinone MK-9(H4). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol. On the basis of data from the polyphasic analysis, strain XH208(T) is considered to represent a novel species in the genus Luteococcus, for which the name Luteococcus sediminum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XH208(T) ( = DSM 27277(T) = JCM 19259(T)). PMID:24812361

  13. Microbial provinces in the subseafloor.

    PubMed

    Schrenk, Matthew O; Huber, Julie A; Edwards, Katrina J

    2010-01-01

    The rocks and sediments of the oceanic subsurface represent a diverse mosaic of environments potentially inhabited by microorganisms. Understanding microbial ecosystems in subseafloor environments confounds standard ecological descriptions in part because we have difficulty elucidating and describing the scale of relevant processes. Habitat characteristics impact microbial activities and growth, which in turn affect microbial diversity, net production, and global biogeochemical cycles. Herein we provide descriptions of subseafloor microbial provinces, broadly defined as geologically and geographically coherent regions of the subseafloor that may serve as potential microbial habitats. The purpose of this review is to summarize and refine criteria for the definition and delineation of distinct subseafloor microbial habitats to aid in their exploration. This review and the criteria we outline aim to develop a unified framework to improve our understanding of subseafloor microbial ecology, enable quantification of geomicrobial processes, and facilitate their accurate assimilation into biogeochemical models. PMID:21141666

  14. Preliminary Insights Into the Interplay Among Oxygen, Organic Carbon, and Microbial Metabolism in North Atlantic Subseafloor Sediment Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amenabar, M. J.; Dore, J. E.; Spivack, A. J.; Murray, R. W.; D'Hondt, S.; Boyd, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    . Collectively, this research improves our understanding of the microbial activities present in subseafloor sediment of the deep North Atlantic Ocean and provides new insight into the interplay among O2 and organic carbon and microbial activity, viability, and productivity in deep marine sediments.

  15. Characterization of Metabolically Active Bacterial Populations in Subseafloor Nankai Trough Sediments above, within, and below the Sulfate–Methane Transition Zone

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Heath J.; Reese, Brandi Kiel; Shepard, Alicia K.; Riedinger, Natascha; Dowd, Scot E.; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    A remarkable number of microbial cells have been enumerated within subseafloor sediments, suggesting a biological impact on geochemical processes in the subseafloor habitat. However, the metabolically active fraction of these populations is largely uncharacterized. In this study, an RNA-based molecular approach was used to determine the diversity and community structure of metabolically active bacterial populations in the upper sedimentary formation of the Nankai Trough seismogenic zone. Samples used in this study were collected from the slope apron sediment overlying the accretionary prism at Site C0004 during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 316. The sediments represented microbial habitats above, within, and below the sulfate–methane transition zone (SMTZ), which was observed approximately 20 m below the seafloor (mbsf). Small subunit ribosomal RNA were extracted, quantified, amplified, and sequenced using high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing, indicating the occurrence of metabolically active bacterial populations to a depth of 57 mbsf. Transcript abundance and bacterial diversity decreased with increasing depth. The two communities below the SMTZ were similar at the phylum level, however only a 24% overlap was observed at the genus level. Active bacterial community composition was not confined to geochemically predicted redox stratification despite the deepest sample being more than 50 m below the oxic/anoxic interface. Genus-level classification suggested that the metabolically active subseafloor bacterial populations had similarities to previously cultured organisms. This allowed predictions of physiological potential, expanding understanding of the subseafloor microbial ecosystem. Unique community structures suggest very diverse active populations compared to previous DNA-based diversity estimates, providing more support for enhancing community characterizations using more advanced sequencing techniques. PMID:22485111

  16. A NATIONAL COASTAL ASSESSMENT OF COASTAL SEDIMENT CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    One element of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program's National Coastal Assessment is to estimate the current status, extent, changes and trends in the condition of the Nation's coastal sediments on a national basis. Based on NCA monitoring activities from 1999-2001...

  17. Culturable prokaryotic diversity of deep, gas hydrate sediments: first use of a continuous high-pressure, anaerobic, enrichment and isolation system for subseafloor sediments (DeepIsoBUG)

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, R John; Sellek, Gerard; Webster, Gordon; Martin, Derek; Anders, Erik; Weightman, Andrew J; Sass, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Deep subseafloor sediments may contain depressurization-sensitive, anaerobic, piezophilic prokaryotes. To test this we developed the DeepIsoBUG system, which when coupled with the HYACINTH pressure-retaining drilling and core storage system and the PRESS core cutting and processing system, enables deep sediments to be handled without depressurization (up to 25 MPa) and anaerobic prokaryotic enrichments and isolation to be conducted up to 100 MPa. Here, we describe the system and its first use with subsurface gas hydrate sediments from the Indian Continental Shelf, Cascadia Margin and Gulf of Mexico. Generally, highest cell concentrations in enrichments occurred close to in situ pressures (14 MPa) in a variety of media, although growth continued up to at least 80 MPa. Predominant sequences in enrichments were Carnobacterium, Clostridium, Marinilactibacillus and Pseudomonas, plus Acetobacterium and Bacteroidetes in Indian samples, largely independent of media and pressures. Related 16S rRNA gene sequences for all of these Bacteria have been detected in deep, subsurface environments, although isolated strains were piezotolerant, being able to grow at atmospheric pressure. Only the Clostridium and Acetobacterium were obligate anaerobes. No Archaea were enriched. It may be that these sediment samples were not deep enough (total depth 1126–1527 m) to obtain obligate piezophiles. PMID:19694787

  18. Radiolyis and life in deep subseafloor sediment of the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.; Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Smith, D. C.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 329 revealed the occurrence of a fundamentally different subsurface world below the South Pacific Gyre (SPG) compared to previously drilled sites. The organic-poor sediment that underlies this vast ultra-oligotrophic region harbors microbial communities characterized by cell abundances three to four orders of magnitude lower than has been found at similar depths outside the gyre. The sediment column is oxic and rich in major nutrients from the seafloor to beneath the sediment-basement interface. Statistical analysis of the dissolved O2 profiles for the six sites within the SPG (U1365 through U1370) demonstrates that measurable organic-fuelled O2 reduction is limited to the upper meters of SPG sediment. At greater depths, maximum mean organic-fueled respiration rates range from 10-5 to 10-3 fmol O2 cell-1 day-1, representing a tremendously low cellular metabolism. Hydrogen is continuously produced in this sedimentary environment by radioactive splitting of water, a process known as water radiolysis. However, measured dissolved hydrogen abundances are below detection in most samples at all six sites. This combination of continuous production and low concentration suggests that radiolytic hydrogen may be a biological electron donor in the organic-poor sediment of the SPG. Gibbs energy of reaction calculations for the knallgas reaction (H2 + ½ O2 = H2O) and other hydrogen-consuming reactions show that where hydrogen concentration is above detection in SPG sediment, hydrogen oxidation is energetically favorable for microbial life (in-situ ΔGreaction averaging -210, -190, and -12 kJ/mol H2 throughout the sequence for oxygen, nitrate and sulfate reduction, respectively). By applying the water radiolysis model of Blair et al. (2007) to our preliminary data from Site U1366, we presently estimate that on average 10-5 fmol radiolytic H2 cell-1 day-1 is available throughout the site's sediment column. By measuring the radioactive

  19. Diagenesis and Associated Sedimentary Environments of Subseafloor Argillaceous Sediments in the Eastern Margin of Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Kato, Y.; Matsumoto, R.

    2013-12-01

    The MD179 project was undertaken in 2010 by the Marion Dufresne aiming at recovering gas hydrate, methane induced carbonate and deep sediments to develop the geologic model of gas hydrate accumulation and evaluate the possible environmental impact of gas hydrate generation and decomposition for the last glacial-interglacial cycles. Sediment samples below the seafloor were retrieved as long as 40 meters at the Umitaka Spur, Joetsu Channel, Toyama Trough, Japan Basin, Nishi Tsugaru and Okushiri Ridge areas in Japan Sea. Small amounts of sandy sediment have been retrieved as thin intercalations in Pleistocene and Holocene muddy layers, where trace fossils and strong bioturbations are commonly observed. Those sandy sediments consist of very fine- to fine-grained sands, and are sometimes tuffaceous. These sandy sediments might have been transported approximately around 3 to 30 ka according to the tephra ages, where supplying sediments might have not been abundant due to sea level fluctuation during the Pleistocene ice age. It is important to clarify the relationship between burial depths and absolute porosities of the argillaceous sediments. Therefore, macroscopic observations and descriptions, measurements of porosities and the pore size distributions, thin-section observations, SEM-BEI (scanning electron microscope-backscattered electron image) observations, and the X-ray diffraction analyses have been performed. They consist of silt- to clay-grained particles, and they sometimes contain very fine- to medium-grained thin sandy layers. Average porosities are 50 % in all study areas, but mean pore sizes in the Nishi Tsugaru are around 1000 nm while 100 nm in the other areas, which tend to decrease as increasing of depths. It is suggested that repacking of the muddy particles dominantly advances by physical compaction in early diagenesis. They generally contain much opal-A, quartz, feldspar, illite and smectite that do not change definitely with depth, because they are

  20. Sediment chemoautotrophy in the coastal ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez-Cardenas, Diana; Meysman, Filip J. R.; van Breugel, Peter; Boschker, Henricus T. S.

    2016-04-01

    A key process in the biogeochemistry of coastal sediments is the reoxidation of reduced intermediates formed during anaerobic mineralization which in part is performed by chemoautotrophic micro-organisms. These microbes fix inorganic carbon using the energy derived from reoxidation reactions and in doing so can fix up to 32% of the CO2 released by mineralization. However the importance and distribution of chemoautotrophy has not been systematically investigated in these environments. To address these issues we surveyed nine coastal sediments by means of bacterial biomarker analysis (phospholipid derived fatty acids) combined with stable isotope probing (13C-bicarbonate) which resulted in an almost doubling of the number of observations on coastal sedimentary chemoautotrophy. Firstly, sediment chemoautotrophy rates from this study and rates compiled from literature (0.07 to 36 mmol C m-2 d-1) showed a power-law relation with benthic oxygen uptake (3.4 to 192 mmol O2 m-2 d-1). Benthic oxygen uptake was used as a proxy for carbon mineralization to calculate the ratio of the CO2 fixed by chemoautotrophy over the total CO2 released through mineralization. This CO2 efficiency was 3% in continental shelf, 9% in nearshore and 21% in salt marsh sediments. These results suggest that chemoautotrophy plays an important role in C-cycling in reactive intertidal sediments such as salt marshes rather than in the organic-poor, permeable continental shelf sediments. Globally in the coastal ocean our empirical results show that chemoautotrophy contributes ˜0.05 Pg C y-1 which is four times less than previous estimates. Secondly, five coastal sediment regimes were linked to the depth-distribution of chemoautotrophy: 1) permeable sediments dominated by advective porewater transport, 2) bioturbated sediments, and cohesive sediments dominated by diffusive porewater transport characterized by either 3) canonical sulfur oxidation, 4) nitrate-storing Beggiatoa, or 5) electrogenic sulfur

  1. Sediment chemoautotrophy in the coastal ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez-Cardenas, Diana; Meysman, Filip J. R.; van Breugel, Peter; Boschker, Henricus T. S.

    2016-04-01

    A key process in the biogeochemistry of coastal sediments is the reoxidation of reduced intermediates formed during anaerobic mineralization which in part is performed by chemoautotrophic micro-organisms. These microbes fix inorganic carbon using the energy derived from reoxidation reactions and in doing so can fix up to 32% of the CO2 released by mineralization. However the importance and distribution of chemoautotrophy has not been systematically investigated in these environments. To address these issues we surveyed nine coastal sediments by means of bacterial biomarker analysis (phospholipid derived fatty acids) combined with stable isotope probing (13C-bicarbonate) which resulted in an almost doubling of the number of observations on coastal sedimentary chemoautotrophy. Firstly, sediment chemoautotrophy rates from this study and rates compiled from literature (0.07 to 36 mmol C m‑2 d‑1) showed a power-law relation with benthic oxygen uptake (3.4 to 192 mmol O2 m‑2 d‑1). Benthic oxygen uptake was used as a proxy for carbon mineralization to calculate the ratio of the CO2 fixed by chemoautotrophy over the total CO2 released through mineralization. This CO2 efficiency was 3% in continental shelf, 9% in nearshore and 21% in salt marsh sediments. These results suggest that chemoautotrophy plays an important role in C-cycling in reactive intertidal sediments such as salt marshes rather than in the organic-poor, permeable continental shelf sediments. Globally in the coastal ocean our empirical results show that chemoautotrophy contributes ˜0.05 Pg C y‑1 which is four times less than previous estimates. Secondly, five coastal sediment regimes were linked to the depth-distribution of chemoautotrophy: 1) permeable sediments dominated by advective porewater transport, 2) bioturbated sediments, and cohesive sediments dominated by diffusive porewater transport characterized by either 3) canonical sulfur oxidation, 4) nitrate-storing Beggiatoa, or 5) electrogenic

  2. Microbial Nitrogen Cycling Associated with the Early Diagenesis of Organic Matter in Subseafloor Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.

    2015-12-01

    The early diagenesis of organic matter is the major energy source of marine sedimentary biosphere and thus controls its population size; however, the vertical distribution of any functional groups along with the diagenesis of organic matter is remained unclear, especially for those microbes involved in nitrogen transformation which serve as a major control on the nitrogen flux between reservoirs. Here we investigated the vertical distributions of various functional groups in five sediment cores retrieved from Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR), with emphasis on the nitrifiers, denitrifiers and anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (anammox). We observed the clear geochemical zonation associated with organic matter diagenesis in the sediments based on the pore water profiles of oxygen, nitrate, ammonium, manganese and sulfate, with distinct geochemical transition zones at the boundaries of geochemical zones, including oxic-anoxic transition zone (OATZ) and nitrate-manganese reduction zone (NMTZ). Nitrate was produced in surface oxygenated sediments and nitrate consumption mainly took place at the NMTZ, splitted between re-oxidation of ammonium and manganese (II). Abundances of ammonia oxidizers, nitrite oxidizers, and denitrifiers, estimated through quantitative PCR targeting their respective functional genes, generally decrease with depth, but constantly elevated around the OATZ, NMTZ, and manganese-reduction zone as well. Anammox bacteria were only detected around the NMTZ where both nitrate/nitrite and ammonium are available. These depth profiles of functional groups were also confirmed by the community structure profiling by prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing. Cell-specific rates of nitrification and denitrification, calculated from the bulk net reaction rates divided by functional group abundances, were similar to those values from oligotrophic sediments like North Pond and thus suggested that nitrifiers and denitirifiers populations were in maintenance

  3. Biogeography of Rhizobium radiobacter and distribution of associated temperate phages in deep subseafloor sediments

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, Tim; Sahlberg, Monika; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages might be the main ‘predators' in the marine deep subsurface and probably have a major impact on indigenous microbial communities. To identify their function within this habitat, we have determined their abundance and distribution along the sediment columns of two continental margin and two open ocean sites that were recovered during Leg 201 of the Ocean Drilling Program. For all investigated sites, viral abundance followed the total cell numbers with a virus-to-cell ratio between 1 and 10 in the upper 100 mbsf (meters below seafloor). An increasing ratio of about 20 in deeper layers indicated an ongoing viral production in up to 11 Ma old sediments. We have used Rhizobium radiobacter as the most frequently isolated organism from the deep subsurface with a high in situ abundance to identify the frequency of associated rhizobiophages. In this study, 16S rRNA gene copies of R. radiobacter accounted for up to 5.6% of total bacterial 16S rRNA genes (average: 0.75%) as detected by quantitative PCR. A distinctive distribution was identified for R. radiobacter as indicated by a site-specific arrangement of genetically similar populations. Whole genome information of rhizobiophage RR1-A was used to generate a primer system for quantitative PCR specifically targeting the prophage antirepressor gene, indicative for temperate phages. The quantification of this gene within various sediment horizons showed a contribution of temperate phages of up to 14.3% to the total viral abundance. Thus, the high amount of temperate phages within the sediments and among all investigated isolates indicates that lysogeny is the main viral proliferation mode in deep subsurface populations. PMID:22855213

  4. Biogeography of Rhizobium radiobacter and distribution of associated temperate phages in deep subseafloor sediments.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Tim; Sahlberg, Monika; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages might be the main 'predators' in the marine deep subsurface and probably have a major impact on indigenous microbial communities. To identify their function within this habitat, we have determined their abundance and distribution along the sediment columns of two continental margin and two open ocean sites that were recovered during Leg 201 of the Ocean Drilling Program. For all investigated sites, viral abundance followed the total cell numbers with a virus-to-cell ratio between 1 and 10 in the upper 100 mbsf (meters below seafloor). An increasing ratio of about 20 in deeper layers indicated an ongoing viral production in up to 11 Ma old sediments. We have used Rhizobium radiobacter as the most frequently isolated organism from the deep subsurface with a high in situ abundance to identify the frequency of associated rhizobiophages. In this study, 16S rRNA gene copies of R. radiobacter accounted for up to 5.6% of total bacterial 16S rRNA genes (average: 0.75%) as detected by quantitative PCR. A distinctive distribution was identified for R. radiobacter as indicated by a site-specific arrangement of genetically similar populations. Whole genome information of rhizobiophage RR1-A was used to generate a primer system for quantitative PCR specifically targeting the prophage antirepressor gene, indicative for temperate phages. The quantification of this gene within various sediment horizons showed a contribution of temperate phages of up to 14.3% to the total viral abundance. Thus, the high amount of temperate phages within the sediments and among all investigated isolates indicates that lysogeny is the main viral proliferation mode in deep subsurface populations.

  5. Species Richness and Adaptation of Marine Fungi from Deep-Subseafloor Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Rédou, Vanessa; Navarri, Marion; Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Barbier, Georges

    2015-01-01

    The fungal kingdom is replete with unique adaptive capacities that allow fungi to colonize a wide variety of habitats, ranging from marine habitats to freshwater and terrestrial habitats. The diversity, importance, and ecological roles of marine fungi have recently been highlighted in deep-subsurface sediments using molecular methods. Fungi in the deep-marine subsurface may be specifically adapted to life in the deep biosphere, but this can be demonstrated only using culture-based analyses. In this study, we investigated culturable fungal communities from a record-depth sediment core sampled from the Canterbury Basin (New Zealand) with the aim to reveal endemic or ubiquist adapted isolates playing a significant ecological role(s). About 200 filamentous fungi (68%) and yeasts (32%) were isolated. Fungal isolates were affiliated with the phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, including 21 genera. Screening for genes involved in secondary metabolite synthesis also revealed their bioactive compound synthesis potential. Our results provide evidence that deep-subsurface fungal communities are able to survive, adapt, grow, and interact with other microbial communities and highlight that the deep-sediment habitat is another ecological niche for fungi. PMID:25769836

  6. Species richness and adaptation of marine fungi from deep-subseafloor sediments.

    PubMed

    Rédou, Vanessa; Navarri, Marion; Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Barbier, Georges; Burgaud, Gaëtan

    2015-05-15

    The fungal kingdom is replete with unique adaptive capacities that allow fungi to colonize a wide variety of habitats, ranging from marine habitats to freshwater and terrestrial habitats. The diversity, importance, and ecological roles of marine fungi have recently been highlighted in deep-subsurface sediments using molecular methods. Fungi in the deep-marine subsurface may be specifically adapted to life in the deep biosphere, but this can be demonstrated only using culture-based analyses. In this study, we investigated culturable fungal communities from a record-depth sediment core sampled from the Canterbury Basin (New Zealand) with the aim to reveal endemic or ubiquist adapted isolates playing a significant ecological role(s). About 200 filamentous fungi (68%) and yeasts (32%) were isolated. Fungal isolates were affiliated with the phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, including 21 genera. Screening for genes involved in secondary metabolite synthesis also revealed their bioactive compound synthesis potential. Our results provide evidence that deep-subsurface fungal communities are able to survive, adapt, grow, and interact with other microbial communities and highlight that the deep-sediment habitat is another ecological niche for fungi.

  7. Sediment measurement in estuarine and coastal areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, P. E.

    1976-01-01

    A survey of uses of estuarine and coastal areas is given. Problems associated with these uses are discussed, and data needs for intelligent management of these valuable areas are outlined. Suspended sediment measurements are seen to be one of the greatest needs. To help understand the complexity of the problem, a brief discussion of sediment mechanics is given, including sediment sources, characteristics, and transport. The impact of sediment mechanics on its direct measurement (sampling and analysis) is indicated, along with recommendations for directly obtaining representative data. Indirect measurement of suspended sediment by remote sensors is discussed both theoretically and in the light of some recent experiences. The need for an integrated, multidisciplinary program to solve the problem of quantitatively measuring suspended sediment with remote sensors is stressed, and several important considerations of such a program and benefits to be derived therefrom are briefly addressed.

  8. Achromobacter sediminum sp. nov., isolated from deep subseafloor sediment of South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zenghu; Fan, Xiaoyang; Gao, Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-07-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped, motile bacterium with a subpolar or lateral flagellum, designated strain XH089(T), was isolated from deep-sea sediment sample collected from the South Pacific Gyre (41°51' S 153°06' W) during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain XH089(T) belonged to the genus Achromobacter and showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Achromobacter ruhlandii ATCC 15749(T) (96.95%), Achromobacter denitrificans DSM 30026(T) (96.70%) and Achromobacter marplatensis B2(T) (96.66%). The DNA G+C content of strain XH089(T) was 66.5 mol%. The major fatty acids were C16: 0 and C17: 0 cyclo. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, three unknown phospholipids and four unknown polar lipids. On the basis of data from the polyphasic analysis, strain XH089(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Achromobacter, for which the name Achromobacter sediminum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XH089(T) ( = DSM 27279(T) = JCM 19223(T)). PMID:24711589

  9. Achromobacter sediminum sp. nov., isolated from deep subseafloor sediment of South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zenghu; Fan, Xiaoyang; Gao, Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-07-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped, motile bacterium with a subpolar or lateral flagellum, designated strain XH089(T), was isolated from deep-sea sediment sample collected from the South Pacific Gyre (41°51' S 153°06' W) during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain XH089(T) belonged to the genus Achromobacter and showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Achromobacter ruhlandii ATCC 15749(T) (96.95%), Achromobacter denitrificans DSM 30026(T) (96.70%) and Achromobacter marplatensis B2(T) (96.66%). The DNA G+C content of strain XH089(T) was 66.5 mol%. The major fatty acids were C16: 0 and C17: 0 cyclo. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, three unknown phospholipids and four unknown polar lipids. On the basis of data from the polyphasic analysis, strain XH089(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Achromobacter, for which the name Achromobacter sediminum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XH089(T) ( = DSM 27279(T) = JCM 19223(T)).

  10. Abyssisolibacter fermentans gen. nov. sp. nov., isolated from deep sub-seafloor sediment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonduck; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Kwon, Kae Kyoung

    2016-05-01

    A Gram-staining-negative, thin rod-shaped, anaerobic bacterium designated MCWD3(T) was isolated from sediment of the deep sea in Ulleung Basin, East Sea, Korea. The ranges of temperature, pH and NaCl for growth of this strain were 15-40°C (optimum 29°C), 5.0-10.0 (optimum pH 6.5), and 1-5%, respectively. The major fatty acids were iso-C(15:0) (30%) and iso-C(15:0) dimethyl acetal (17%). The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and unidentified aminophospholipids, phospholipids, and aminolipids. The fermentation product from yeast extract was acetate. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA genes indicated that the isolate was related to Sporosalibacterium faouarense (92.8% sequence identity), Clostridiisalibacter paucivorans (92.6%), and Brassicibacter mesophilus (92.4%). However, the isolate was differentiated from these genera by both physiological and chemotaxonomical properties. On the basis of a polyphasic taxonomic analysis, we propose that MCWD3(T) represents a novel taxon with the name Abyssisolibacter fermentans gen. nov. sp. nov. PMID:27095453

  11. Brevundimonas denitrificans sp. nov., a denitrifying bacterium isolated from deep subseafloor sediment.

    PubMed

    Tsubouchi, Taishi; Koyama, Sumihiro; Mori, Kozue; Shimane, Yasuhiro; Usui, Keiko; Tokuda, Maki; Tame, Akihiro; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Maruyama, Tadashi; Hatada, Yuji

    2014-11-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, heterotrophic, stalked and capsulated bacterium with potential denitrification ability, designated strain TAR-002(T), was isolated from deep seafloor sediment in Japan. Colonies lacked lustre, and were viscous and translucent white. The ranges of temperature, pH and salt concentration for growth were 8-30 °C, pH 6.0-10.0 and 1-3% (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences confirmed that strain TAR-002(T) belongs to the genus Brevundimonas of the class Alphaproteobacteria. Levels of similarity between the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain TAR-002(T) and those of the type strains of species of the genus Brevundimonas were 93.5-98.9%; the most closely related species was Brevundimonas basaltis. In DNA-DNA hybridization assays between strain TAR-002(T) and its phylogenetic neighbours, Brevundimonas lenta DS-18(T), B. basaltis J22(T), Brevundimonas subvibrioides ATCC 15264(T) and Brevundimonas alba DSM 4736(T), mean hybridization levels were 6.4-27.7%. The G+C content of strain TAR-002(T) was 70.3 mol%. Q-10 was the major respiratory isoprenoid quinone. The major fatty acids were C(18:1)ω7c and C(16:0), and the presence of 1,2-di-O-acyl-3-O-[D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 4)-α-D-glucopyranuronosyl]glycerol (DGL) indicates the affiliation of strain TAR-002(T) with the genus Brevundimonas. On the basis of biological characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons, strain TAR-002(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Brevundimonas, for which the name Brevundimonas denitrificans sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is TAR-002(T) ( =NBRC 110107(T) =CECT 8537(T)).

  12. Sediment mediated species interactions in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reise, Karsten

    2002-10-01

    rival in overall importance in the self-structuring of the benthos in coastal marine sediments.

  13. The stable carbon isotope biogeochemistry of acetate and other dissolved carbon species in deep subseafloor sediments at the northern Cascadia Margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heuer, V.B.; Pohlman, J.W.; Torres, M.E.; Elvert, M.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

    2009-01-01

    Ocean drilling has revealed the existence of vast microbial populations in the deep subseafloor, but to date little is known about their metabolic activities. To better understand the biogeochemical processes in the deep biosphere, we investigate the stable carbon isotope chemistry of acetate and other carbon-bearing metabolites in sediment pore-waters. Acetate is a key metabolite in the cycling of carbon in anoxic sediments. Its stable carbon isotopic composition provides information on the metabolic processes dominating acetate turnover in situ. This study reports our findings for a methane-rich site at the northern Cascadia Margin (NE Pacific) where Expedition 311 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) sampled the upper 190 m of sediment. At Site U1329, ??13C values of acetate span a wide range from -46.0??? to -11.0??? vs. VPDB and change systematically with sediment depth. In contrast, ??13C values of both the bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (-21.6 ?? 1.3??? vs. VPDB) and the low-molecular-weight compound lactate (-20.9 ?? 1.8??? vs. VPDB) show little variability. These species are interpreted to represent the carbon isotopic composition of fermentation products. Relative to DOC, acetate is up to 23.1??? depleted and up to 9.1??? enriched in 13C. Broadly, 13C-depletions of acetate relative to DOC indicate flux of carbon from acetogenesis into the acetate pool while 13C-enrichments of pore-water acetate relative to DOC suggest consumption of acetate by acetoclastic methanogenesis. Isotopic relationships between acetate and lactate or DOC provide new information on the carbon flow and the presence and activity of specific functional microbial communities in distinct biogeochemical horizons of the sediment. In particular, they suggest that acetogenic CO2-reduction can coexist with methanogenic CO2-reduction, a notion contrary to the hypothesis that hydrogen levels are controlled by the thermodynamically most favorable electron-accepting process

  14. The stable carbon isotope biogeochemistry of acetate and other dissolved carbon species in deep subseafloor sediments at the northern Cascadia Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuer, Verena B.; Pohlman, John W.; Torres, Marta E.; Elvert, Marcus; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2009-06-01

    Ocean drilling has revealed the existence of vast microbial populations in the deep subseafloor, but to date little is known about their metabolic activities. To better understand the biogeochemical processes in the deep biosphere, we investigate the stable carbon isotope chemistry of acetate and other carbon-bearing metabolites in sediment pore-waters. Acetate is a key metabolite in the cycling of carbon in anoxic sediments. Its stable carbon isotopic composition provides information on the metabolic processes dominating acetate turnover in situ. This study reports our findings for a methane-rich site at the northern Cascadia Margin (NE Pacific) where Expedition 311 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) sampled the upper 190 m of sediment. At Site U1329, δ13C values of acetate span a wide range from -46.0‰ to -11.0‰ vs. VPDB and change systematically with sediment depth. In contrast, δ13C values of both the bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (-21.6 ± 1.3‰ vs. VPDB) and the low-molecular-weight compound lactate (-20.9 ± 1.8‰ vs. VPDB) show little variability. These species are interpreted to represent the carbon isotopic composition of fermentation products. Relative to DOC, acetate is up to 23.1‰ depleted and up to 9.1‰ enriched in 13C. Broadly, 13C-depletions of acetate relative to DOC indicate flux of carbon from acetogenesis into the acetate pool while 13C-enrichments of pore-water acetate relative to DOC suggest consumption of acetate by acetoclastic methanogenesis. Isotopic relationships between acetate and lactate or DOC provide new information on the carbon flow and the presence and activity of specific functional microbial communities in distinct biogeochemical horizons of the sediment. In particular, they suggest that acetogenic CO 2-reduction can coexist with methanogenic CO 2-reduction, a notion contrary to the hypothesis that hydrogen levels are controlled by the thermodynamically most favorable electron-accepting process

  15. Coastal sediment elevation change following anthropogenic mangrove clearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Heather L.; Granek, Elise F.

    2015-11-01

    Coastal mangrove forests along tropical shorelines serve as an important interface between land and sea. They provide a physical buffer protecting the coastline from erosion and act as sediment "traps" catching terrestrial sediment, thus preventing smothering of subtidal coral reefs. Coastal development that removes mangrove habitat may impact adjacent nearshore coral reefs through sedimentation and nutrient loading. We examined differences in sediment elevation change between patches of open-coast intact and anthropogenically cleared red mangroves (Rhizophora mangle) on the east side of Turneffe Atoll, Belize, to quantify changes following mangrove clearing. Samples were collected over a 24 month period at five study sites, each containing paired intact (+mangrove) and cleared (-mangrove) plots. Five sediment elevation pins were deployed in each plot: behind areas cleared of mangroves (-mangrove) and behind adjacent intact mangroves (+mangrove). Sediment elevation increased at intact mangrove sites (M = +3.83 mm, SE = 0.95) whereas cleared mangrove areas suffered elevation loss (M = -7.30 mm, SE = 3.38). Mangroves inshore of partial or continuous gaps in the adjacent fringing reefs had higher rates of elevation loss (M = -15.05 mm) than mangroves inshore of continuous fringing reefs (M = -1.90 mm). Our findings provide information on potential effects of mangrove clearing and the role of offshore habitat characteristics on coastal sediment trapping and maintenance of sediment elevation by mangroves. With implications for coastline capacity to adjust to sea level rise, these findings are relevant to management of coastal fringing mangrove forests across the Caribbean.

  16. Dispersal of fine sediment in nearshore coastal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Fine sediment (silt and clay) plays an important role in the physical, ecological, and environmental conditions of coastal systems, yet little is known about the dispersal and fate of fine sediment across coastal margin settings outside of river mouths. Here I provide simple physical scaling and detailed monitoring of a beach nourishment project near Imperial Beach, California, with a high portion of fines (40% silt and clay by weight). These results provide insights into the pathways and residence times of fine sediment transport across a wave-dominated coastal margin. Monitoring of the project used physical, optical, acoustic, and remote sensing techniques to track the fine portion of the nourishment sediment. The initial transport of fine sediment from the beach was influenced strongly by longshore currents of the surf zone that were established in response to the approach angles of the waves. The mean residence time of fine sediment in the surf zone—once it was suspended—was approximately 1 hour, and rapid decreases in surf zone fine sediment concentrations along the beach resulted from mixing and offshore transport in turbid rip heads. For example, during a day with oblique wave directions and surf zone longshore currents of approximately 25 cm/s, the offshore losses of fine sediment in rips resulted in a 95% reduction in alongshore surf zone fine sediment flux within 1 km of the nourishment site. However, because of the direct placement of nourishment sediment on the beach, fine suspended-sediment concentrations in the swash zone remained elevated for several days after nourishment, while fine sediment was winnowed from the beach. Once offshore of the surf zone, fine sediment settled downward in the water column and was observed to transport along and across the inner shelf. Vertically sheared currents influenced the directions and rates of fine sediment transport on the shelf. Sedimentation of fine sediment was greatest on the seafloor directly offshore

  17. Bacterial diversity and community composition from seasurface to subseafloor.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Emily A; Kirkpatrick, John B; Rutherford, Scott D; Smith, David C; Sogin, Mitchell; D'Hondt, Steven

    2016-04-01

    We investigated compositional relationships between bacterial communities in the water column and those in deep-sea sediment at three environmentally distinct Pacific sites (two in the Equatorial Pacific and one in the North Pacific Gyre). Through pyrosequencing of the v4-v6 hypervariable regions of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, we characterized 450,104 pyrotags representing 29,814 operational taxonomic units (OTUs, 97% similarity). Hierarchical clustering and non-metric multidimensional scaling partition the samples into four broad groups, regardless of geographic location: a photic-zone community, a subphotic community, a shallow sedimentary community and a subseafloor sedimentary community (⩾1.5 meters below seafloor). Abundance-weighted community compositions of water-column samples exhibit a similar trend with depth at all sites, with successive epipelagic, mesopelagic, bathypelagic and abyssopelagic communities. Taxonomic richness is generally highest in the water-column O2 minimum zone and lowest in the subseafloor sediment. OTUs represented by abundant tags in the subseafloor sediment are often present but represented by few tags in the water column, and represented by moderately abundant tags in the shallow sediment. In contrast, OTUs represented by abundant tags in the water are generally absent from the subseafloor sediment. These results are consistent with (i) dispersal of marine sedimentary bacteria via the ocean, and (ii) selection of the subseafloor sedimentary community from within the community present in shallow sediment. PMID:26430855

  18. Bacterial diversity and community composition from seasurface to subseafloor

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Emily A; Kirkpatrick, John B; Rutherford, Scott D; Smith, David C; Sogin, Mitchell; D'Hondt, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We investigated compositional relationships between bacterial communities in the water column and those in deep-sea sediment at three environmentally distinct Pacific sites (two in the Equatorial Pacific and one in the North Pacific Gyre). Through pyrosequencing of the v4–v6 hypervariable regions of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, we characterized 450 104 pyrotags representing 29 814 operational taxonomic units (OTUs, 97% similarity). Hierarchical clustering and non-metric multidimensional scaling partition the samples into four broad groups, regardless of geographic location: a photic-zone community, a subphotic community, a shallow sedimentary community and a subseafloor sedimentary community (⩾1.5 meters below seafloor). Abundance-weighted community compositions of water-column samples exhibit a similar trend with depth at all sites, with successive epipelagic, mesopelagic, bathypelagic and abyssopelagic communities. Taxonomic richness is generally highest in the water-column O2 minimum zone and lowest in the subseafloor sediment. OTUs represented by abundant tags in the subseafloor sediment are often present but represented by few tags in the water column, and represented by moderately abundant tags in the shallow sediment. In contrast, OTUs represented by abundant tags in the water are generally absent from the subseafloor sediment. These results are consistent with (i) dispersal of marine sedimentary bacteria via the ocean, and (ii) selection of the subseafloor sedimentary community from within the community present in shallow sediment. PMID:26430855

  19. Bacterial diversity and community composition from seasurface to subseafloor.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Emily A; Kirkpatrick, John B; Rutherford, Scott D; Smith, David C; Sogin, Mitchell; D'Hondt, Steven

    2016-04-01

    We investigated compositional relationships between bacterial communities in the water column and those in deep-sea sediment at three environmentally distinct Pacific sites (two in the Equatorial Pacific and one in the North Pacific Gyre). Through pyrosequencing of the v4-v6 hypervariable regions of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, we characterized 450,104 pyrotags representing 29,814 operational taxonomic units (OTUs, 97% similarity). Hierarchical clustering and non-metric multidimensional scaling partition the samples into four broad groups, regardless of geographic location: a photic-zone community, a subphotic community, a shallow sedimentary community and a subseafloor sedimentary community (⩾1.5 meters below seafloor). Abundance-weighted community compositions of water-column samples exhibit a similar trend with depth at all sites, with successive epipelagic, mesopelagic, bathypelagic and abyssopelagic communities. Taxonomic richness is generally highest in the water-column O2 minimum zone and lowest in the subseafloor sediment. OTUs represented by abundant tags in the subseafloor sediment are often present but represented by few tags in the water column, and represented by moderately abundant tags in the shallow sediment. In contrast, OTUs represented by abundant tags in the water are generally absent from the subseafloor sediment. These results are consistent with (i) dispersal of marine sedimentary bacteria via the ocean, and (ii) selection of the subseafloor sedimentary community from within the community present in shallow sediment.

  20. Characterizing Water, Sediment, Nutrients, and Contaminant Fluxes in Coastal Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Richard N.; El-Gamal, Ayman

    2010-03-01

    Marine Constituent Dynamics in Coastal Egypt; Alexandria, Egypt, 20 November 2009; The Egyptian coastal area is a highly dynamic region in which materials (water, sediment, nutrients, and contaminants) are transported from various sources to the Mediterranean and Red seas. At a workshop in Egypt, U.S. and Egyptian scientists discussed these largely unquantified processes and how they interact to drive coastal ecology. A major goal of the workshop was to identify the most pressing research priorities for the region for both scientific and management purposes. The workshop concluded by recommending that international multidisciplinary efforts be undertaken to characterize water, nutrient, sediment, and contaminant delivery fluxes and mechanisms to coastal regions of the Nile Delta.

  1. South Florida Coastal Sediment Ecological Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Julian, Paul

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the degree of sediment contamination in several South Florida estuaries. During the 2010 National Condition Assessment, Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute collected water column, sediment and biotic data from estuaries across the entire state of Florida. Sediments were analyzed for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, zinc and total polychlorinated biphenyls and were compared relative to empirically derived sediment quality guidelines. As a result of this data collection and assessment effort, it was determined that the degree of contamination with respect to sediment was low for all southern Florida estuaries assessed, except the Miami River which was determined to be considerably contaminated. However only one monitoring location was used to assess the Miami River, and as such should be viewed with caution. A low degree of contamination was determined for Biscayne Bay sediments, possibly indicating a recovery from its previously reported higher contaminant level. PMID:26084967

  2. Lead distribution in coastal and estuarine sediments around India.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sucharita; Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Nath, B Nagender

    2015-08-15

    This study describes the geochemical distribution of lead (Pb) and identifies the critical factors that significantly control Pb distribution and speciation in coastal and estuarine sediments around India by using published data from the literature. Crustal sources influence the abundance of Pb in coastal sediment from the south-east and central-west coast of India. Parts of north-east, north-west, and south-west coast of India were polluted by Pb. Distribution of Pb in sediments, from the north-east and north-west coasts of India, were controlled by Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide mineral phases of the sediments. However, organic carbon (OC) seemed to be a dominant factor in controlling the distribution of Pb in sediments from the central-east and south-west coasts of India. The outcome of this study may help in decision-making to predict the levels of Pb from natural and anthropogenic sources and to control Pb pollution in coastal and estuarine sediments around India.

  3. Organic carbon sources to SE Asian coastal sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, H.; Gacia, E.; Kennedy, D. P.; Papadimitriou, S.; Duarte, C. M.

    2004-05-01

    The carbon, nitrogen and the stable carbon isotopic composition, δ13C, of organic matter has been used to elucidate the source(s) of this material to coastal sediments. Sediments were collected at 15 coastal locations in the Philippines and Vietnam, which broadly represented different depositional environments ranging from seagrass meadows, through seagrass meadows located near mangroves and to mangrove stands. In addition, short-term sediment traps were deployed at 12 of the sites where seagrass was present. Mean sediment organic carbon concentration and C/N increased and δ13C of organic matter decreased from seagrass to mangrove dominated settings. The organic carbon flux measured by the sediment trap deployments was very variable (32±3 to ˜700 mmol m -2 d -1) and represented only a small fraction of the total particle flux. The importance of seagrass as a source of organic matter to the sediments was assessed by using a simple mixing model and the average δ13C values for seagrass, their epiphytic community and surface water particulate matter (seston). A positive correlation between seagrass leaf biomass and sediment δ13C in seagrass dominated settings suggests that these macrophytes do significantly influence the composition of sedimentary organic matter. Seagrass was however rarely found to be the dominant source of organic matter to the underlying sediments. Both sediment trap and sediment data suggest that material of planktonic origin was the dominant source of sedimentary organic matter in these settings. At the sites dominated by mangroves the concentration of organic matter ( ˜1-13 ×10 3 mmol g-1) in the sediment is generally higher than at seagrass dominated sites due to the outwelling of organic matter from the mangrove stands. Mangrove organic matter often dominates the sedimentary input but other sources of organic matter must contribute to cause the observed range in sediment δ13C.

  4. Fine Sediment Distribution in the Western Adriatic Coastal Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kineke, G. C.; Sherwood, C. R.; Geyer, W. R.; Mullenbach, B. L.

    2004-12-01

    A study of water properties and suspended sediments on the Apennine margin was conducted as part of the Po and Apennine Sediment Transport and Accumulation (PASTA) component of the EuroSTRATAFORM project. Repeated hydrographic transects encompassing a Bora wind event during February 2003 documented variability of the cross-shelf extent of the coastal current, significant changes in the width of the front, vertical stratification, and suspended sediment inventory over periods of a few days. During calm conditions, suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs) off the Apennine margin were generally low, 10 mg/l or less in water depths of < 10 m, with the maximum close to shore. During Bora conditions, the coastal current deepens and destratifies as the result of downwelling. The SSC maximum increases and moves seaward to approximately 15 m depth in the vicinity of the sand-mud transition (SMT), bounded on the seaward side by the cross-shelf density front. The maximum in SSC is likely the result of interrelated factors: a) the mix of grain sizes at the SMT are more easily resuspended than coarser sediments closer to shore and more cohesive sediments seaward; b) depth of resuspension due to waves; c) adjustment of the coastal current during Bora events and subsequent relaxation. The latter could be important with respect to moving sediment offshore, as well as governing the location of the sand-mud transition. Fine sediments from the Apennine Rivers initially deposited in shallow water are easily resuspended and transported along shore (most of the flux) within the coastal current. With wave resuspension and downwelling, sediments are distributed throughout the water column extending to greater depths, but are confined by the density front. With relaxation of the Bora event, stratification is re-established and sediments in the vicinity of the front are deposited in deeper water, resulting in net transport offshore. Comparison with realistic simulations from a 3-dimensional

  5. Recent Advances in Studies of Coastal Marsh Sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternack, G. B.; Leonard, L. A.

    2001-05-01

    Limited understanding of sedimentation processes in coastal marshes is a key constraint on the management of environmental impacts associated with sea level rise, degrading quality and quantity of aquatic habitats, and downstream impacts of watershed land use. The problem is exacerbated by complex interactions among physical, ecological, and chemical variables that impact sedimentation over a large range of spatio-temporal scales. These challenges are being met by increasingly sophisticated approaches which cross-fertilize from other disciplines or go even further to integrate multidisciplinary perspectives. One example of the former has been improved precision of fine scale measurements of fluid mechanics and sediment transport over marsh plains and application of those measurements in geomorphologic and coastal engineering models. This advancement has improved our understanding of marsh dynamics at a mechanistic level, which is key for improving the predictive capabilities of wetland models. An example of a multidisciplinary approach that has become very common is the combined usage of multiple monitoring, isotopic, and palynological methods for estimating sedimentation and erosion at a site over a range of time scales. By applying such combinations, it has been possible to piece apart the relative roles of natural processes such as sea level rise and storms from human impacts such as flow constrictions, channel dredging, and sediment supply changes. Beyond improving approaches used to study marshes, past work has led to new questions about marsh morphodynamics and how coastal marshes interact with upland watersheds. With the aid of chaos theory, some recent studies have asserted that coastal marsh channels are fractal and thus must follow universal laws in common with watershed drainages and other dendritic systems. Also, where marshes exist among a mosaic of habitats on a delta, research has revealed the relative roles of watershed versus coastal processes in

  6. Sediment yields from small, steep coastal watersheds of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Melack, John M.; Goodridge, Blair M.

    2015-01-01

    Global inventories of sediment discharge to the ocean highlight the importance of small, steep watersheds (i.e., those having drainage areas less than 100,000 km2 and over 1000 m of relief) that collectively provide a dominant flux of sediment. The smallest of these coastal watersheds (e.g., those that have drainage areas less than 1000 km2) can represent a large portion of the drainage areas of active margin coasts, such as California’s coast, but remain almost universally unmonitored. Here we report on the suspended-sediment discharge of several small coastal watersheds (10-56 km2) of the Santa Ynez Mountains, California, that were found to have ephemeral discharge and suspended-sediment concentrations ranging between 1 and over 200,000 mgL-1. Sediment concentrations were weakly correlated with discharge (r2 = 0.10–0.25), and all types of hysteresis patterns were observed during high flows (clockwise, counterclockwise, no hysteresis, and complex). Sediment discharge varied strongly with time and was measurably elevated in one watershed following a wildfire. Although sediment yields varied by over 100-fold across the watersheds (e.g., 15 – 2100 tkm-2 yr -1during the relatively wet 2005 water year), the majority of sediment discharge (65-80%) occurred during only 1% of the time for all watersheds. Furthermore, sampling of dozens of high flow events provides evidence that sediment yields were generally related to peak discharge yields, although these relationships were not consistent across the watersheds. These results suggest that small watersheds of active margins can provide large fluxes of sediment to the coast, but that the rates and timing of this sediment discharge is more irregular in time – and thus more difficult to characterize – than the better monitored and studied watersheds that are 1000-100,000 km2.

  7. Estimating the fluvial sediment input to the coastal sediment budget: A case study of Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boateng, Isaac; Bray, Malcolm; Hooke, Janet

    2012-02-01

    Knowledge of fluvial sediment supply to the coastal sediment budget is important for the assessment of the impacts on coastal stability. Such knowledge is valuable for designing coastal engineering schemes and the development of shoreline management planning policies. It also facilitates understanding of the connection between rivers in the hinterland and adjoining coastal systems. Ghana's coast has many fluvial sediment sources and this paper provides the first quantitative assessments of their contributions to the coastal sediment budget. The methods use largely existing data and attempt to cover all of Ghana's significant coastal rivers. Initially work was hindered by insufficient direct measured data. However, the problem was overcome by the application of a regression approach, which provides an estimated sediment yield for non-gauged rivers based on data from gauged rivers with similar characteristics. The regression approach was effective because a regional coherence in behaviour was determined between those rivers, where direct measured data were available. The results of the assessment revealed that Ghana's coast is dissected by many south-draining rivers, stream and lagoons. These rivers, streams and lagoons supply significant amounts of sediment to coastal lowlands and therefore contribute importantly to beaches. Anthropogenic impoundment of fluvial sediment, especially the Akosombo dam on the Volta River, has reduced the total fluvial sediment input to the coast from about 71 × 10 6 m 3/a before 1964 (pre-Akosombo dam) to about 7 × 10 6 m 3/a at present (post-Akosombo dam). This sharp reduction threatened the stability of the east coast and prompted an expensive ($83 million) defence scheme to be implemented to protect 8.4 km-long coastline at Keta. Sections of Ghana's coast are closely connected to the hinterland through the fluvial sediment input from local rivers. Therefore, development in the hinterland that alters the fluvial sediment input from

  8. Controls of Sediment Nitrogen Dynamics in Tropical Coastal Lagoons.

    PubMed

    Enrich-Prast, Alex; Figueiredo, Viviane; Esteves, Francisco de Assis; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Sediment denitrification rates seem to be lower in tropical environments than in temperate environments. Using the isotope pairing technique, we measured actual denitrification rates in the sediment of tropical coastal lagoons. To explain the low denitrification rates observed at all study sites (<5 μmol N2 m-2 h-1), we also evaluated potential oxygen (O2) consumption, potential nitrification, potential denitrification, potential anammox, and estimated dissimilatory nitrate (NO3-) reduction to ammonium (NH4+; DNRA) in the sediment. 15NO3- and 15NH4+ conversion was measured in oxic and anoxic slurries from the sediment surface. Sediment potential O2 consumption was used as a proxy for overall mineralization activity. Actual denitrification rates and different potential nitrogen (N) oxidation and reduction processes were significantly correlated with potential O2 consumption. The contribution of potential nitrification to total O2 consumption decreased from contributing 9% at sites with the lowest sediment mineralization rates to less than 0.1% at sites with the highest rates. NO3- reduction switched completely from potential denitrification to estimated DNRA. Ammonium oxidation and nitrite (NO2-) reduction by potential anammox contributed up to 3% in sediments with the lowest sediment mineralization rates. The majority of these patterns could be explained by variations in the microbial environments from stable and largely oxic conditions at low sediment mineralization sites to more variable conditions and the prevalences of anaerobic microorganisms at high sediment mineralization sites. Furthermore, the presence of algal and microbial mats on the sediment had a significant effect on all studied processes. We propose a theoretical model based on low and high sediment mineralization rates to explain the growth, activity, and distribution of microorganisms carrying out denitrification and DNRA in sediments that can explain the dominance or coexistence of DNRA and

  9. Controls of Sediment Nitrogen Dynamics in Tropical Coastal Lagoons.

    PubMed

    Enrich-Prast, Alex; Figueiredo, Viviane; Esteves, Francisco de Assis; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Sediment denitrification rates seem to be lower in tropical environments than in temperate environments. Using the isotope pairing technique, we measured actual denitrification rates in the sediment of tropical coastal lagoons. To explain the low denitrification rates observed at all study sites (<5 μmol N2 m-2 h-1), we also evaluated potential oxygen (O2) consumption, potential nitrification, potential denitrification, potential anammox, and estimated dissimilatory nitrate (NO3-) reduction to ammonium (NH4+; DNRA) in the sediment. 15NO3- and 15NH4+ conversion was measured in oxic and anoxic slurries from the sediment surface. Sediment potential O2 consumption was used as a proxy for overall mineralization activity. Actual denitrification rates and different potential nitrogen (N) oxidation and reduction processes were significantly correlated with potential O2 consumption. The contribution of potential nitrification to total O2 consumption decreased from contributing 9% at sites with the lowest sediment mineralization rates to less than 0.1% at sites with the highest rates. NO3- reduction switched completely from potential denitrification to estimated DNRA. Ammonium oxidation and nitrite (NO2-) reduction by potential anammox contributed up to 3% in sediments with the lowest sediment mineralization rates. The majority of these patterns could be explained by variations in the microbial environments from stable and largely oxic conditions at low sediment mineralization sites to more variable conditions and the prevalences of anaerobic microorganisms at high sediment mineralization sites. Furthermore, the presence of algal and microbial mats on the sediment had a significant effect on all studied processes. We propose a theoretical model based on low and high sediment mineralization rates to explain the growth, activity, and distribution of microorganisms carrying out denitrification and DNRA in sediments that can explain the dominance or coexistence of DNRA and

  10. Controls of Sediment Nitrogen Dynamics in Tropical Coastal Lagoons

    PubMed Central

    Enrich-Prast, Alex; Figueiredo, Viviane; Esteves, Francisco de Assis; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Sediment denitrification rates seem to be lower in tropical environments than in temperate environments. Using the isotope pairing technique, we measured actual denitrification rates in the sediment of tropical coastal lagoons. To explain the low denitrification rates observed at all study sites (<5 μmol N2 m-2 h-1), we also evaluated potential oxygen (O2) consumption, potential nitrification, potential denitrification, potential anammox, and estimated dissimilatory nitrate (NO3-) reduction to ammonium (NH4+; DNRA) in the sediment. 15NO3- and 15NH4+ conversion was measured in oxic and anoxic slurries from the sediment surface. Sediment potential O2 consumption was used as a proxy for overall mineralization activity. Actual denitrification rates and different potential nitrogen (N) oxidation and reduction processes were significantly correlated with potential O2 consumption. The contribution of potential nitrification to total O2 consumption decreased from contributing 9% at sites with the lowest sediment mineralization rates to less than 0.1% at sites with the highest rates. NO3- reduction switched completely from potential denitrification to estimated DNRA. Ammonium oxidation and nitrite (NO2-) reduction by potential anammox contributed up to 3% in sediments with the lowest sediment mineralization rates. The majority of these patterns could be explained by variations in the microbial environments from stable and largely oxic conditions at low sediment mineralization sites to more variable conditions and the prevalences of anaerobic microorganisms at high sediment mineralization sites. Furthermore, the presence of algal and microbial mats on the sediment had a significant effect on all studied processes. We propose a theoretical model based on low and high sediment mineralization rates to explain the growth, activity, and distribution of microorganisms carrying out denitrification and DNRA in sediments that can explain the dominance or coexistence of DNRA and

  11. Sediment quality in the north coastal basin of Massachusetts, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breault, Robert F.; Ashman, Mary S.; Heath, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, completed a reconnaissance-level study of bottom-sediment quality in selected lakes, rivers, and estuaries in the North Coastal Basin of Massachusetts. Bottom-sediment grab samples were collected from 20 sites in the North River, Lake Quannapowitt, Saugus River, Mill River, Shute Brook, Sea Plane Basin, Pines River, and Bear Creek. The samples were tested for various types of potentially harmful contaminants? including 33 elements, 17 polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 22 organochlorine pesticides, and 7 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixtures (Aroclors)?to benthic organisms (bottom-dwelling) and humans. The results were compared among sampling sites, to background concentrations, and to concen-trations measured in other urban rivers, and sediment-quality guidelines were used to predict toxicity at the sampling sites to benthic organisms and humans. Because there are no standards for human toxicity for aquatic sediment, standards for contaminated upland soil were used. Contaminant concentrations measured in sediment collected from the North Coastal Basin generally were equal to or greater than concentrations in sediment from uncontaminated rivers throughout New England. Contaminants in North Coastal Basin sediment with elevated concentrations (above back-ground levels) included arsenic, chromium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc, some of the PAHs, dichlorodiphenyltrichloro-ethane (DDT) and its metabolites, and dieldrin. No PCBs were measured above the detection limits. Measured concentrations of arsenic, chromium, and lead were also generally greater than those measured in other urban rivers throughout the conter-minous United States. With one exception (arsenic), local con-centrations measured in sediment samples collected from the North Coastal Basin were lower than concentrations measured in sediment collected from two of three urban rivers draining to Boston

  12. Ecosystem engineering and biodiversity in coastal sediments: posing hypotheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, Tjeerd J.; Olenin, Sergej; Reise, Karsten; Ysebaert, Tom

    2009-03-01

    Coastal sediments in sheltered temperate locations are strongly modified by ecosystem engineering species such as marsh plants, seagrass, and algae as well as by epibenthic and endobenthic invertebrates. These ecosystem engineers are shaping the coastal sea and landscape, control particulate and dissolved material fluxes between the land and sea, and between the benthos and the passing water or air. Above all, habitat engineering exerts facilitating and inhibiting effects on biodiversity. Despite a strongly growing interest in the functional role of ecosystem engineering over the recent years, compared to food web analyses, the conceptual understanding of engineering-mediated species interactions is still in its infancy. In the present paper, we provide a concise overview on current insights and propose two hypotheses on the general mechanisms by which ecosystem engineering may affect biodiversity in coastal sediments. We hypothesise that autogenic and allogenic ecosystem engineers have inverse effects on epibenthic and endobenthic biodiversity in coastal sediments. The primarily autogenic structures of the epibenthos achieve high diversity at the expense of endobenthos, whilst allogenic sediment reworking by infauna may facilitate other infauna and inhibits epibenthos. On a larger scale, these antagonistic processes generate patchiness and habitat diversity. Due to such interaction, anthropogenic influences can strongly modify the engineering community by removing autogenic ecosystem engineers through coastal engineering or bottom trawling. Another source of anthropogenic influences comes from introducing invasive engineers, from which the impact is often hard to predict. We hypothesise that the local biodiversity effects of invasive ecosystem engineers will depend on the engineering strength of the invasive species, with engineering strength defined as the number of habitats it can invade and the extent of modification. At a larger scale of an entire shore

  13. Assessing the sedimentation deficit problem in Louisiana's coastal salt marshes

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The imbalance between relative sea-level rise and vertical marsh accretion is frequently cited as a major factor in the problem of wetland loss in coastal Louisiana. Relative sea-level rise rates are high, compared to the rest of the Gulf coast, owing to subsidence of Holocene Mississippi deltaic plain sediments, and although marsh accretion rates are also high, in comparison with other coastal areas of the US, they are usually insufficient to maintain the relative elevation of the marsh surface. This situation is commonly referred to as a sedimentation deficit. One of the problems with evaluating the magnitude of the sedimentation deficit problem in Louisiana, and its spatial variation, is that measurements of subsidence and marsh accretion or sedimentation are rarely made on similar time scales. Subsidence affecting the marsh surface is composed of a number of factors, including compaction of recently deposited sediments, regional downwarping, and diagenesis of underlying Pleistocene and earlier sediments. The total effect of these factors, in combination with eustatic sea-level rise, is frequently obtained from tide gauge measurements over the last 50 years or so. Subsidence is also measured by dating sedimentary horizons of known depth that characterize surface environments. Carbon-14 is a common tool for this type of study and subsidence is then averaged over periods of up to several thousand years. In comparison, marsh accretion or sediment deposition can be measured over periods from several hundred years, using Lead-210 dating, to several days, using marsh surface sediment traps. The many techniques available for measuring the sedimentary status of the marsh surface can provide a variety of information concerning the processes responsible for sediment deposition and vertical accretion.

  14. Carbon mineralization pathways and bioturbation in coastal Brazilian sediments

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Cintia O.; Shimabukuro, Maurício; Pereira, Camila O.; Alves, Betina G. R.; Moraes, Paula C.; Valdemarsen, Thomas; Kristensen, Erik; Sumida, Paulo Y. G.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon mineralization processes and their dependence on environmental conditions (e.g. through macrobenthic bioturbation) have been widely studied in temperate coastal sediments, but almost nothing is known about these processes in subtropical coastal sediments. This study investigated pathways of organic carbon mineralization and associated effects of macrobenthic bioturbation in winter and summer (September 2012 and February 2014) at the SE Brazilian coast. Iron reduction (FeR) was responsible for 73–81% of total microbial carbon mineralization in September 2012 and 32–61% in February 2014. Similar high rates of FeR have only been documented a few times in coastal sediments and can be sustained by the presence of large bioturbators. Denitrification accounted for 5–27% of total microbial carbon mineralization while no SO42− reduction was detected in any season. Redox profiles suggested that conditions were less reduced in February 2014 than in September 2012, probably associated with low reactivity of the organic matter, higher rates of aerobic respiration and bioirrigation by the higher density of small-macrofauna. Bioturbation by small macrofauna may maintain the sediment oxidized in summer, while large-sized species stimulate the reoxidation of reduced compounds throughout the year. Therefore, bioturbation seems to have an important role modulating the pathways of carbon mineralization in the area. PMID:26525137

  15. Carbon mineralization pathways and bioturbation in coastal Brazilian sediments.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Cintia O; Shimabukuro, Maurício; Pereira, Camila O; Alves, Betina G R; Moraes, Paula C; Valdemarsen, Thomas; Kristensen, Erik; Sumida, Paulo Y G

    2015-01-01

    Carbon mineralization processes and their dependence on environmental conditions (e.g. through macrobenthic bioturbation) have been widely studied in temperate coastal sediments, but almost nothing is known about these processes in subtropical coastal sediments. This study investigated pathways of organic carbon mineralization and associated effects of macrobenthic bioturbation in winter and summer (September 2012 and February 2014) at the SE Brazilian coast. Iron reduction (FeR) was responsible for 73-81% of total microbial carbon mineralization in September 2012 and 32-61% in February 2014. Similar high rates of FeR have only been documented a few times in coastal sediments and can be sustained by the presence of large bioturbators. Denitrification accounted for 5-27% of total microbial carbon mineralization while no SO4(2-) reduction was detected in any season. Redox profiles suggested that conditions were less reduced in February 2014 than in September 2012, probably associated with low reactivity of the organic matter, higher rates of aerobic respiration and bioirrigation by the higher density of small-macrofauna. Bioturbation by small macrofauna may maintain the sediment oxidized in summer, while large-sized species stimulate the reoxidation of reduced compounds throughout the year. Therefore, bioturbation seems to have an important role modulating the pathways of carbon mineralization in the area.

  16. Ubiquitous Gammaproteobacteria dominate dark carbon fixation in coastal sediments

    PubMed Central

    Dyksma, Stefan; Bischof, Kerstin; Fuchs, Bernhard M.; Hoffmann, Katy; Meier, Dimitri; Meyerdierks, Anke; Pjevac, Petra; Probandt, David; Richter, Michael; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Mußmann, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Marine sediments are the largest carbon sink on earth. Nearly half of dark carbon fixation in the oceans occurs in coastal sediments, but the microorganisms responsible are largely unknown. By integrating the 16S rRNA approach, single cell genomics, metagenomics and -transcriptomics with 14C-carbon assimilation experiments, we show that uncultured Gammaproteobacteria account for 70 to 86% of dark carbon fixation in coastal sediments. First, we surveyed the bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity of 13 tidal and sublittoral sediments across Europe and Australia to identify ubiquitous core groups of Gammaproteobacteria mainly affiliating with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. These also accounted for a substantial fraction of the microbial community in anoxic, 490 cm-deep subsurface sediments. We then quantified dark carbon fixation by scintillography of specific microbial populations extracted and flow-sorted from sediments that were short-term incubated with 14C-bicarbonate. We identified three distinct gammaproteobacterial clades covering diversity ranges on family to order level (the Acidiferrobacter-, JTB255- and SSr-clades) that made up more than 50% of dark carbon fixation in a tidal sediment. Consistent with these activity measurements, environmental transcripts of sulfur oxidation and carbon fixation genes mainly affiliated with those of sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria. The co-localization of key genes of sulfur and hydrogen oxidation pathways and their expression in genomes of uncultured Gammaproteobacteria illustrates an unknown metabolic plasticity for sulfur oxidizers in marine sediments. Given their global distribution and high abundance, we propose that a stable assemblage of metabolically flexible Gammaproteobacteria drive important parts of marine carbon and sulfur cycles. PMID:26872043

  17. Coastal erosion vs riverline sediment discharge in the Arctic shelfx seas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rachold, V.; Grigoriev, M.N.; Are, F.E.; Solomon, Sean C.; Reimnitz, E.; Kassens, H.; Antonow, M.

    2000-01-01

    This article presents a comparison of sediment input by rivers and by coastal erosion into both the Laptev Sea and the Canadian Beaufort Sea (CBS). New data on coastal erosion in the Laptev Sea, which are based on field measurements and remote sensing information and existing data on coastal erosion in the CBS as well as riverine sediment discharge into both the Laptev Sea and the CBS are included. Strong regional differences in the percentages of coastal ero- sion and riverine sediment supply are observed. The CBS is dominated by the riverine sediment discharge (64.45x106 t a-1) mainly of the Mackenzie River. which is the largest single source of sediments in the Arctic. Riverine sediment discharge into the Laptev Sea amounts to 24.10x106 t a-1, more than 70% of which are related to the Lena River. In comparison with the CBS. the Laptev Sea coast on average delivers approximately twice as much sediment mass per kilometer, a result of higher erosion rates due to higher cliffs and seasonal ice melting. In the Laptev Sea sediment input by coastal erosion (58.4x106 t a-1) is therefore more important than in the CBS and the ratio between riverine and coastal sediment input amounts to 0.4. Coastal erosion supplying 5.6x106 t a-1 is less significant for the sediment budget of the CBS where riverine sediment discharge exceeds coastal sediment input by a factor of ca. 10.

  18. Sediment Retention Within Coastal Plain Bottomland Forested Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, K. M.; Hupp, C. R.

    2002-12-01

    Coastal Plain forested wetlands are unique ecosystems where fluvial geomorphic processes control sediment retention and vegetation patterns, which are intimately connected to each other. Yet, these inter-disciplinary associations are typically lacking in traditional ecologic or geomorphic research within these ecosystems. Floodplain sedimentation rates and patterns, suspended sediment concentrations, substrate characteristics, vegetation and fluvial geomorphology were measured in field studies in eight 1-ha sites along three tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay to determine the dominant physical processes controlling deposition, substrate, and vegetation patterns in forested wetlands. Annual deposition was measured at 104 locations with feldspar clay pads. Sedimentation rates across the floodplain sites are highly variable, ranging from 0.5 mm/yr to 26.6 mm/yr. Multiple regression analyses suggest that the spatial patterns in net-annual and long-term deposition and substrate properties (grain sizes, sand:clay, and sorting) are controlled by the frequency and duration of inundation events and the total number of inundated days per year, the manner that sediment is distributed through the floodplain (dominant flow paths and/or the presence of slough networks, for example), and the potential for deposition of suspended sediments. Similarly, floodplain community diversity is significantly related to fluvial geomorphic processes (annual net deposition rates, percent inundation per year, and inundation duration per event). The results of this study provide valuable information on the development and evolution of Coastal Plain floodplains in the context of vegetation diversity patterns that have significant implications for the restoration and conservation of these systems.

  19. Rapid Sediment Accumulation Results in High Methane Effluxes from Coastal Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Lenstra, Wytze; Jong, Dirk; Meysman, Filip J. R.; Sapart, Célia J.; van der Veen, Carina; Röckmann, Thomas; Gonzalez, Santiago; Slomp, Caroline P.

    2016-01-01

    Globally, the methane (CH4) efflux from the ocean to the atmosphere is small, despite high rates of CH4 production in continental shelf and slope environments. This low efflux results from the biological removal of CH4 through anaerobic oxidation with sulfate in marine sediments. In some settings, however, pore water CH4 is found throughout the sulfate-bearing zone, indicating an apparently inefficient oxidation barrier for CH4. Here we demonstrate that rapid sediment accumulation can explain this limited capacity for CH4 removal in coastal sediments. In a saline coastal reservoir (Lake Grevelingen, The Netherlands), we observed high diffusive CH4 effluxes from the sediment into the overlying water column (0.2–0.8 mol m-2 yr-1) during multiple years. Linear pore water CH4 profiles and the absence of an isotopic enrichment commonly associated with CH4 oxidation in a zone with high rates of sulfate reduction (50–170 nmol cm-3 d-1) both suggest that CH4 is bypassing the zone of sulfate reduction. We propose that the rapid sediment accumulation at this site (~ 13 cm yr-1) reduces the residence time of the CH4 oxidizing microorganisms in the sulfate/methane transition zone (< 5 years), thus making it difficult for these slow growing methanotrophic communities to build-up sufficient biomass to efficiently remove pore water CH4. In addition, our results indicate that the high input of organic matter (~ 91 mol C m-2 yr-1) allows for the co-occurrence of different dissimilatory respiration processes, such as (acetotrophic) methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in the surface sediments by providing abundant substrate. We conclude that anthropogenic eutrophication and rapid sediment accumulation likely increase the release of CH4 from coastal sediments. PMID:27560511

  20. Rapid Sediment Accumulation Results in High Methane Effluxes from Coastal Sediments.

    PubMed

    Egger, Matthias; Lenstra, Wytze; Jong, Dirk; Meysman, Filip J R; Sapart, Célia J; van der Veen, Carina; Röckmann, Thomas; Gonzalez, Santiago; Slomp, Caroline P

    2016-01-01

    Globally, the methane (CH4) efflux from the ocean to the atmosphere is small, despite high rates of CH4 production in continental shelf and slope environments. This low efflux results from the biological removal of CH4 through anaerobic oxidation with sulfate in marine sediments. In some settings, however, pore water CH4 is found throughout the sulfate-bearing zone, indicating an apparently inefficient oxidation barrier for CH4. Here we demonstrate that rapid sediment accumulation can explain this limited capacity for CH4 removal in coastal sediments. In a saline coastal reservoir (Lake Grevelingen, The Netherlands), we observed high diffusive CH4 effluxes from the sediment into the overlying water column (0.2-0.8 mol m-2 yr-1) during multiple years. Linear pore water CH4 profiles and the absence of an isotopic enrichment commonly associated with CH4 oxidation in a zone with high rates of sulfate reduction (50-170 nmol cm-3 d-1) both suggest that CH4 is bypassing the zone of sulfate reduction. We propose that the rapid sediment accumulation at this site (~ 13 cm yr-1) reduces the residence time of the CH4 oxidizing microorganisms in the sulfate/methane transition zone (< 5 years), thus making it difficult for these slow growing methanotrophic communities to build-up sufficient biomass to efficiently remove pore water CH4. In addition, our results indicate that the high input of organic matter (~ 91 mol C m-2 yr-1) allows for the co-occurrence of different dissimilatory respiration processes, such as (acetotrophic) methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in the surface sediments by providing abundant substrate. We conclude that anthropogenic eutrophication and rapid sediment accumulation likely increase the release of CH4 from coastal sediments. PMID:27560511

  1. Oxygen consumption in subseafloor basaltic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, B. N.; Wheat, C. G.; Hulme, S.; Edwards, K. J.; Bach, W.

    2012-12-01

    Oceanic crust is the largest potential habitat for life on Earth and may contain a significant fraction of Earth's total microbial biomass, yet little is known about the form and function of life in this vast subseafloor realm that covers nearly two-thirds of the Earth's surface. A deep biosphere hosted in subseafloor basalts has been suggested from several lines of evidence; yet, empirical analysis of metabolic reaction rates in basaltic crust is lacking. Here we report the first measure of oxygen consumption in young (~ 8 Ma) and cool (<25 degrees C) basaltic crust, calculated from modeling oxygen and strontium profiles in basal sediments collected during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 336 to 'North Pond', a sediment 'pond' on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), where vigorous fluid circulation within basaltic crust occurs. Dissolved oxygen concentrations increased towards the sediment-basement interface, indicating an upward diffusional supply from oxic fluids circulating within the crust. A parametric reaction-transport model suggests oxygen consumption rates on the order of 0.5-500 nmol per cubic centimeter fluid per day in young and cool basaltic crust, providing sufficient energy to support a subsurface crustal biosphere.

  2. Seagrass-sediment feedbacks in shallow coastal lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, J. A.; D'Odorico, P.; McGlathery, K.; Wiberg, P.

    2009-12-01

    Shallow coastal lagoons are environments where a delicate equilibrium exists between water quality and sea grass cover. Seagrass cover limits the resuspension of bed sediments thereby favoring a clearer water column. These conditions allow for the penetration of adequate levels of light, which in turn, is fundamental for the survival of seagrass. It is still unclear what role this positive feedback may play in the dynamics and restoration of seagrass communities. Positive feedbacks are often associated with the existence of bistable dynamics in ecosystems. In this specific case a bare and a fully vegetated sediment bed could be both stable states of the system. This study develops a one dimensional hydrodynamic model of vegetation-sediment-water flow interactions to investigate the strengths of positive feedbacks between sea grass cover, stabilization of bed sediments, turbidity of the water column, and the existence of a favorable light environment for seagrasses. The model is applied to Hog Island Bay, a shallow coastal lagoon on the eastern shore of Virginia. The effects of temperature, eutrophication, and bed grain size on bistability of seagrass ecosystems in the lagoon are explored. The results indicate that under typical conditions, seagrass is stable in water depths < 2.2 m (51% of the bay bottom deep enough for seagrass growth) and bistable conditions exist for depths of 2.2 - 3.6 m (23% of bay) where the preferred state depends in initial seagrass cover. The remaining 26% of the bay is too deep to sustain seagrass. Decreases in sediment size and increases in water temperature and degree of eutrophication shift the bistable range to shallower depths, with more of the bay bottom unable to sustain seagrass.

  3. Coastal sediment dynamics: Introduction to the thematic issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weill, Pierre; Tessier, Bernadette

    2016-07-01

    This thematic issue of Comptes rendus Geoscience gives an overview of the works presented in the frame of a session dedicated to "Coastal sediment dynamics" at the 14th Congress of the French Association of Sedimentologists, held in Paris, France, from 5 to 7 November 2013. In total, 23 papers were presented in this session, both in the form of oral communications and posters. This national conference is traditionally a gateway for PhD and Master students to share their first results and sharpen their oral skills in front of an audience of specialists.

  4. SEDIMENTATION IN PACIFIC NORTHWEST COASTAL STREAMS -- EVIDENCE FROM REGIONAL SURVEY OF BED SUBSTRATE SIZE AND STABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excessive erosion, transport and deposition of sediment are major problems in streams and rivers throughout the United States. We examined evidence of anthropogenic sedimentation in Oregon and Washington coastal streams using relatively rapid measurements taken from surveys duri...

  5. Dynamic behaviour of coastal sedimentation in the Lions Gulf. [France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, M. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A number of ERTS-1 images covering this geographical zone were studied and compared with cartographic maps, air photographs, and thermal-IR images. Old and recent sediments leave traces in the landscape which are decoded by interpreting the shapes of the clear zones forming a network against the black background representing water and humid zones. Current sedimentation and its mechanism were investigated. It had been hoped that a regular sequence of images would make it possible to follow the dynamics of the Rhone and the coastal rivers in relation to meteorological conditions. In any event only a small number of images spread over a wide period of time were obtained, and a complete study was therefore impossible. However, in comparing some of the ERTS-1 images certain thermal-IR images and information on the flow of the Rhone provided some clarification of mechanisms associated with river dynamics.

  6. Dynamic sediment trapping and episodic sediment accretion in fluviodeltaic environments: Implications for coastal restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z.; Tornqvist, T. E.; Chamberlain, E. L.; Esposito, C. R.; Marshak, J.; Nijhuis, A.; Sandoval, L.; Mauz, B.

    2013-12-01

    rates documented in this study suggest that coastal restoration by resuming the natural sedimentation processes has great potential to create net land elevation gain in the Mississippi Delta.

  7. The continental sediments of the Nigerian Coastal Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adediran, S. A.; Adegoke, O. S.; Oshin, I. O.

    The development of the coastal basins of Nigeria is examined in terms of a four-stage evolutionary model, viz: intracratonic, synrift, transitional and oceanic. The continental sediments range in age from early Cretaceous to Recent. The oldest sediments in the Western Dahomey Basin (Ise Formation) consist of a predrift sequence of basal conglomerates and loose sands interbedded with clays. Sedimentation in the eastern basins commenced later during the Albian times with the deposition of coarse grained, poorly sorted sands (Mamfe and Awi Formations) of fluviatile origin. These are overlain in all basins by transitional to marine strata. Continental sedimentation resumed in the Maastricthian with the deposition of coarse grained, poorly sorted, sometimes ferruginuous sands and clays (Owelli and Ajali Sandstones). Regression began during the Eocene resulting in the deposition of fine to coarse grained, poorly sorted sands with mudstones (Ilaro Formation) in the west, overlain by crossbedded sandstones with lignites and carbonaceous mudstone (Ogwashi-Asaba Formation). Miocene to Recent limonitic, coarse grained, subangular to well-rounded Benin Sands cap all the basins.

  8. Ecotoxicological characterization of marine sediment in Kostrena coastal area.

    PubMed

    Linsak, Zeljko; Linsak, Dijana Tomić; Glad, Marin; Cenov, Arijana; Coklo, Mirna; Coklo, Miran; Manestar, Dubravko; Mićović, Vladimir

    2012-12-01

    Samples of marine sediment were taken on 4 selected sites close to the shipyard industry in Kostrena coastal area. Concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Zn, Hg, Fe) were analyzed from chemical-analytical and toxicological aspect. For toxicity detection, the bacterial bioluminescence test (Vibrio fisheri) was used. Concentration of total PAHs varied in the range from 697 to 7807 microg/kg dry weight in marine sediments. The concentration of PCBs in sediment was 1.1 mg/kg dry weight. The highest concentrations of heavy metals were found at the station within the shipyard. PAH toxicity was not correlated with the toxic potential of sediments. The obtained results indicate a high degree of environmental risk, especially at stations within the shipyard, with the 54% possibility of toxic effects. Chemical determination of the concentration of conventional pollutants is not sufficient for assessing the quality of the marine environment and it is necessary to use other approaches in order to evaluate the biological impact.

  9. Mercury Concentrations in Coastal Sediment from Younger Lagoon, Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohn, R. A.; Ganguli, P. M.; Swarzenski, P. W.; Richardson, C. M.; Merckling, J.; Johnson, C.; Flegal, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Younger Lagoon Reserve, located in northern Monterey Bay, is one of the few relatively undisturbed wetlands that remain along the Central Coast of California. This lagoon system provides protected habitat for more than 100 bird species and for populations of fish, mammals, and invertebrates. Total mercury (HgT) concentrations in water within Younger Lagoon appear to vary with rainfall conditions and range from about 5-15 pM. These concentrations are similar to HgT in water from six nearby lagoon systems. However, Younger Lagoon contains elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (~1 mM) and monomethylmercury (MMHg, ~1 pM) relative to our comparison lagoon sites (DOC < 0.5 mM and MMHg < 0.5 pM). We attribute Younger Lagoon's high DOC and MMHg to its restricted connection to the ocean and minor riverine contribution. Coastal lagoons in this region typically form at the mouth of streams. They behave as small estuaries during the wet season when surface water discharge keeps the mouth of the stream open to the ocean, and then transition into lagoons in the dry season when a sand berm develops and effectively cuts off surface water exchange. At Younger Lagoon, the sand berm remains intact throughout the year, breaching only during particularly high tides or intense rain events. Therefore, the lagoon's connection to nearshore seawater is primarily via surface water - groundwater interaction through the sand berm. Because Younger Lagoon is largely isolated from a surface water connection with the ocean, runoff from upgradient urban and agricultural land has an enhanced impact on water (and presumably sediment) quality. As a result, the lagoon is eutrophic and experiences annual algal blooms. Groundwater surveys suggest surface water, groundwater, and coastal seawater are hydraulically connected at Younger Lagoon, and mixing among these water masses appears to influence water geochemistry. To date, no chemical analyses have been conducted on sediment from Younger

  10. An integrated coastal model for aeolian and hydrodynamic sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baart, F.; den Bieman, J.; van Koningsveld, M.; Luijendijk, A. P.; Parteli, E. J. R.; Plant, N. G.; Roelvink, J. A.; Storms, J. E. A.; de Vries, S.; van Thiel de Vries, J. S. M.; Ye, Q.

    2012-04-01

    Dunes are formed by aeolian and hydrodynamic processes. Over the last decades numerical models were developed that capture our knowledge of the hydrodynamic transport of sediment near the coast. At the same time others have worked on creating numerical models for aeolian-based transport. Here we show a coastal model that integrates three existing numerical models into one online-coupled system. The XBeach model simulates storm-induced erosion (Roelvink et al., 2009). The Delft3D model (Lesser et al., 2004) is used for long term morphology and the Dune model (Durán et al., 2010) is used to simulate the aeolian transport. These three models were adapted to be able to exchange bed updates in real time. The updated models were integrated using the ESMF framework (Hill et al., 2004), a system for composing coupled modeling systems. The goal of this integrated model is to capture the relevant coastal processes at different time and spatial scales. Aeolian transport can be relevant during storms when the strong winds are generating new dunes, but also under relative mild conditions when the dunes are strengthened by transporting sand from the intertidal area to the dunes. Hydrodynamic transport is also relevant during storms, when high water in combination with waves can cause dunes to avalanche and erode. While under normal conditions the hydrodynamic transport can result in an onshore transport of sediment up to the intertidal area. The exchange of sediment in the intertidal area is a dynamic interaction between the hydrodynamic transport and the aeolian transport. This dynamic interaction is particularly important for simulating dune evolution at timescales longer than individual storm events. The main contribution of the integrated model is that it simulates the dynamic exchange of sediment between aeolian and hydrodynamic models in the intertidal area. By integrating the numerical models, we hope to develop a model that has a broader scope and applicability than

  11. Heavy Metals Contamination in Coastal Sediments of Karachi, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, A.; Mumtaz, M.; Zaigham, N. A.; Mallick, K. A.; Saied, S.; Khwaja, H. A.

    2008-12-01

    Toxic compounds such as heavy metals exert chronic and lethal effects in animals, plants, and human health. With the rapid industrialization, urbanization, and economic development in Karachi, heavy metals are continuing to be introduced to estuarine and coastal environment through rivers, runoff and land-based point sources. Pollution in the Karachi coastal region (167 km long) is mainly attributed to Lyari and Malir Rivers flowing through the city of Karachi. Both rivers are served by various channels of domestic and industrial wastes carrying more than 300 million gallons per day untreated effluent of 6000 industries and ultimately drain into the beaches of Arabian Sea. Concentrations of selected heavy metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in surface sediments from eighty-eight sites in Karachi coastal region were studied in order to understand metal contamination due to industrialization, urbanization, and economic development in Karachi. Sediment samples were collected in 2005 and 2006. We have found that heavy metal concentrations in surface sediments varied from 0.006 to 24.3 ug/g for Cd, 5.1 to 95 ug/g for Co, 2.9 to 571 ug/g for Cr, 6.9 to 272 ug/g for Cu, 0.55 to 6.5% for Fe, 1.2 to 318 ug/g for Mn, 7.5 to 75 ug/g for Ni, 6.3 to 121 ug/g for Pb, and 3.3 to 389 ug/g for Zn. Enrichment factors (EFs) were calculated to assess whether the concentrations observed represent background or contaminated levels. The highest levels of metals were found to be at the confluence of the Lyari and Malir River streams at the Arabian Sea, indicating the impact of the effluents of the highly urbanized and industrialized city of Karachi. Furthermore, this study assessed heavy metal toxicity risk with the application of Sediment Quality Guideline (SQG) indices (effect range low/effect range median values, ERL/ERM). Results indicated that the potential toxicity of marine environment can cause adverse biological effects to the biota directly and the human health

  12. Factors controlling phosphorus release from sediments in coastal archipelago areas.

    PubMed

    Puttonen, Irma; Kohonen, Tuula; Mattila, Johanna

    2016-07-15

    In coastal archipelago areas of the northern Baltic Sea, significantly higher phosphate concentrations (6.0±4.5μmol/l, mean±SD) were measured in water samples close to the sediment surface compared with those from 1m above the seafloor (1.6±2.0μmol/l). The results indicated notable phosphate release from sediments under the bottom water oxygen concentrations of up to 250μmol/l, especially in areas that had experienced recent temporal fluctuation between oxic and hypoxic/anoxic conditions. No single factor alone was found to control the elevated PO4-P concentrations in the near-bottom water. In addition to the oxygen in the water, the contents of potentially mobile phosphorus fractions, grain-size, the organic content at the sediment surface, and the water depth were all important factors controlling the internal loading of phosphorus. The complexity of this process needs to be accounted for in assessments of the internal loading of phosphorus and in potential mitigation plans. PMID:27184132

  13. Sources and fate of amino sugars in coastal Peruvian sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niggemann, Jutta; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2006-05-01

    Amino sugars are involved in the marine carbon and nitrogen cycles and comprise a geochemically significant fraction of marine organic material (OM). However, information on abundance and distribution of these compounds in marine sediments is scarce. Three sediment cores (<50 cm) from the coastal region off Peru were investigated for concentrations of glucosamine (GlcN), galactosamine (GalN), mannosamine (ManN), and muramic acid (Mur). The sum of the four amino sugars accounted for 1.0-2.4% of organic carbon and 1.9-3.8% of nitrogen in the sediments. At the shallowest (102 m) and the deepest site (1278 m), carbon-normalized concentrations decreased down-core, suggesting preferential degradation of amino sugars compared to bulk sedimentary OM. At the site from the center of the oxygen minimum zone (238 m), amino sugar concentrations were high throughout the core, pointing to enhanced preservation of amino sugars under anoxic conditions. GlcN (44-56 mol%) and GalN (33-42 mol%) were the dominant amino sugars in all investigated samples, while ManN (6-14 mol%) and Mur (1-4 mol%) were significantly less abundant. Mur was predominantly associated with cell wall remains rather than with living bacteria, since bacterial abundances estimated based on Mur concentrations were up to 500 times higher than cell counts reported for sediments from this area. GlcN/GalN-ratios (1.1-1.7) indicated that chitin, a polymer of GlcN, was not a major contributor to the amino sugar pool of the investigated sediments. Furthermore, GlcN/Mur-ratios (13-68) are inconsistent with a predominant contribution of intact peptidoglycan, which exhibits a 1:1-ratio. The present study includes a compilation of previously published information on distribution and abundance of amino sugars in the marine environment. Both concentrations and ratios observed in the Peruvian sediments fall in the range of values reported for OM in water column and sediments from different oceanic regions and water depths

  14. Deciphering the forcing factors of coastal evolution from a numerical chronology for a coastal sediment succession, Eastern Hengchun Peninsula, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüthgens, Christopher; Ho, Lih-Der; Jen, Chia-Hung; Chyi, Shyh-Jeng

    2016-04-01

    Taiwan, an island with a high mountain area attaining almost 4000 m, is located in a unique position in East Asia at the transition from the subtropical to the tropical zone. The climate is driven by the East-Asian monsoon, which is responsible for a humid climate during the whole year. In addition, earthquakes, tropical storms, and typhoons trigger morphodynamic processes. Taiwan's coastal landscape is the result of complex interactions between marine and subaerial processes, sediment supply and local geology, plate tectonics, climate change, and global sea-level fluctuations. Unconsolidated sediments in coastal areas are known to preserve valuable information about these processes driving the coastal landscape evolution. In the Ganko river basin, located on the Eastern Hengchun peninsula in south-eastern Taiwan, climatic and tectonic forcing factors may have significantly influenced the natural sediment yield and sediment storage over time. In addition, in the recent past human influence within the river catchment may significantly have altered the sediment yield in the coastal areas close to the rivermouth. In order to reconstruct such variations and ideally relate them to either tectonic, climatic and anthropogenic forcing, a detailed analysis of sedimentary archives is essential. The area under investigation comprises a complex terrestrial river terrace record as well as a coastal sediment succession at the river outlet, both in parts aggraded above presumably tectonically uplifted near-shore sediments. Establishing a high resolution numerical chronology for these sediments may allow a reconstruction of sediment aggradation phases and stability phases for different sections of the catchment area from upstream fluvial terraces to coastal deposits, as well as the underlying near-shore deposits. A combination of two independent dating methods, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating using the pIRIR150 signal of feldspar, as well as radiocarbon dating, was

  15. Ground-Based Thermal Imaging of Coastal and Riverine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwinski, T.; McKenna, T. E.; Puleo, J. A.; Meehan, C. L.

    2010-12-01

    Ground-based remote sensing can provide information on spatio-temporal distributions of sediment and geotechnical properties in dynamic coastal and riverine environments where it can be difficult to collect representative in-situ data. The spatio-temporal variability of grain size, moisture content and biological activity in these environments presents a major challenge in the development of robust remote sensing applications. For ground-based thermal imaging, the radiation received by the imager is a function of the temperature and emissivity of the sediment, observation geometry, atmospheric transmittance (distance and humidity), and reflected background radiation. This study examines the effects of observation geometry on emissivity and the apparent temperature of sediments. A bench-scale multi-spectral imaging system was developed to assess the effects of viewing angle, heating/cooling and moisture variation on thermal imager response. Preliminary results show the expected decrease in emissivity with increasing view angle. Our goal is to parameterize this effect so that imagery from uncontrolled field conditions can be corrected. Combined with corrections for atmospheric transmittance and reflected radiation and an emissivity separation routine, this will allow for a more accurate evaluation of spatio-temporal variations in surface temperature and enable evaluation of the heat-transfer processes driving temporal variations. Of primary interest is estimating the thermal and hydraulic properties of the sediment which serve as proxies for grain size, porosity and moisture content (fundamental parameters for geotechnical applications). This is facilitated using a numerical model that couples heat transfer in the subsurface and atmosphere and allows for periodic inundation with surface water. Results from laboratory experiments and a recent field study on a sandy beach along the Wolf River in Mississippi will be presented.

  16. Soil characteristics of sediment-amended baldcypress (Taxodium distichum) swamps of coastal Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiang, Ming; Middleton, Beth A.

    2011-01-01

    Amendments of sediment from dredging activities have played an important role in raising the elevation of sinking coastal wetlands. This study compared the soil characteristics of sediment- amended coastal swamps in the Barataria Preserve unit of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve with natural swamps along Bayou des Familles. The sandy sediment amendments used in the coastal forests had different soil texture and characteristics than the more organic soils of the natural swamps. Three years after the application of these sediments on the sediment-amended swamps, dewatering and compaction of the sediment had occurred but the sediment still had high salinity and bulk density, and low organic matter content. The two sediment-amended swamps differed from each other in that Site 1 had a higher elevation (mean = 25 cm higher) and drier soil than Site 2. The effects of sediment in coastal forested wetlands require separate consideration from studies of salt marshes, e.g., the weight of the sediment might damage tree roots, or the amendments might influence soil stability during storms in a different way. Generally, this study suggests that shallower depths of sediment are more likely to yield environments beneficial to these sinking baldcypress swamps in coastal Louisiana.

  17. National Coastal Geology Program: a plan of geologic research on coastal erosion, coastal wetlands, polluted sediments, and coastal hard-mineral resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1990-01-01

    More than 50 percent of the U.S. population currently live within 50 miles of an ocean, Great Lake, or major estuary. According to forecasts, the concentration of people along our coastlines will continue to increase into the 21st century. In addition to residential and commercial buildings and facilities worth tens of billions of dollars, the coasts and associated wetlands are natural resources of tremendous value, with estimates in excess of $13 billion per year for commercial and recreational fisheries alone. Human activities and natural processes are stressing the coastal environment. * Each of the coastal states and island territories is suffering problems related to coastal erosion. * Deterioration of wetlands is widespread and of great public concern. * Pollutants carried by rivers or runoff are discharged directly into coastal waters and accumulate in the sediments on the sea floor, in some areas causing damage to living resources and presenting a threat to public health. * Onshore sources for hard-mineral resources, such as sand and gravel used for construction purposes, are becoming increasingly difficult to find. New sources are being sought in coastal waters. Coastal issues will become even more important into the next century if sea level is significantly influenced by climate change and other factors.

  18. Effect of physical sediments reworking on hydrocarbon degradation and bacterial community structure in marine coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Duran, Robert; Bonin, Patricia; Jezequel, Ronan; Dubosc, Karine; Gassie, Claire; Terrisse, Fanny; Abella, Justine; Cagnon, Christine; Militon, Cecile; Michotey, Valérie; Gilbert, Franck; Cuny, Philippe; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to examine whether the physical reworking of sediments by harrowing would be suitable for favouring the hydrocarbon degradation in coastal marine sediments. Mudflat sediments were maintained in mesocosms under conditions as closer as possible to those prevailing in natural environments with tidal cycles. Sediments were contaminated with Ural blend crude oil, and in half of them, harrowing treatment was applied in order to mimic physical reworking of surface sediments. Hydrocarbon distribution within the sediment and its removal was followed during 286 days. The harrowing treatment allowed hydrocarbon compounds to penetrate the first 6 cm of the sediments, and biodegradation indexes (such as n-C18/phytane) indicated that biodegradation started 90 days before that observed in untreated control mesocosms. However, the harrowing treatment had a severe impact on benthic organisms reducing drastically the macrofaunal abundance and diversity. In the harrowing-treated mesocosms, the bacterial abundance, determined by 16S rRNA gene Q-PCR, was slightly increased; and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses of 16S rRNA genes showed distinct and specific bacterial community structure. Co-occurrence network and canonical correspondence analyses (CCA) based on T-RFLP data indicated the main correlations between bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) as well as the associations between OTUs and hydrocarbon compound contents further supported by clustered correlation (ClusCor) analysis. The analyses highlighted the OTUs constituting the network structural bases involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Negative correlations indicated the possible shifts in bacterial communities that occurred during the ecological succession.

  19. Effect of physical sediments reworking on hydrocarbon degradation and bacterial community structure in marine coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Duran, Robert; Bonin, Patricia; Jezequel, Ronan; Dubosc, Karine; Gassie, Claire; Terrisse, Fanny; Abella, Justine; Cagnon, Christine; Militon, Cecile; Michotey, Valérie; Gilbert, Franck; Cuny, Philippe; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to examine whether the physical reworking of sediments by harrowing would be suitable for favouring the hydrocarbon degradation in coastal marine sediments. Mudflat sediments were maintained in mesocosms under conditions as closer as possible to those prevailing in natural environments with tidal cycles. Sediments were contaminated with Ural blend crude oil, and in half of them, harrowing treatment was applied in order to mimic physical reworking of surface sediments. Hydrocarbon distribution within the sediment and its removal was followed during 286 days. The harrowing treatment allowed hydrocarbon compounds to penetrate the first 6 cm of the sediments, and biodegradation indexes (such as n-C18/phytane) indicated that biodegradation started 90 days before that observed in untreated control mesocosms. However, the harrowing treatment had a severe impact on benthic organisms reducing drastically the macrofaunal abundance and diversity. In the harrowing-treated mesocosms, the bacterial abundance, determined by 16S rRNA gene Q-PCR, was slightly increased; and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses of 16S rRNA genes showed distinct and specific bacterial community structure. Co-occurrence network and canonical correspondence analyses (CCA) based on T-RFLP data indicated the main correlations between bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) as well as the associations between OTUs and hydrocarbon compound contents further supported by clustered correlation (ClusCor) analysis. The analyses highlighted the OTUs constituting the network structural bases involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Negative correlations indicated the possible shifts in bacterial communities that occurred during the ecological succession. PMID:25847440

  20. Role of sediment resuspension in the remobilization of particulate-phase metals from coastal sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalnejais, Linda H.; Martin, William R.; Signell, Richard P.; Bothner, Michael H.

    2007-01-01

    The release of particulate-phase trace metals due to sediment resuspension has been investigated by combining erosion chamber experiments that apply a range of shear stresses typically encountered in coastal environments with a shear stress record simulated by a hydrodynamic model. Two sites with contrasting sediment chemistry were investigated. Sediment particles enriched in silver, copper, and lead, 4−50 times greater than the bulk surface-sediment content, were the first particles to be eroded. As the shear-stress level was increased in the chamber, the total mass eroded increased, but the enrichment of these trace metals fell, approaching the bulk-sediment content. From the temporal distribution of shear stress generated by the hydrodynamic model for a site in Boston Harbor, resuspension fluxes were estimated. The erosion threshold of this site is exceeded during spring tides, releasing the particles enriched in trace metals into the water column. Due to the higher trace metal content and the regularity of resuspension, low-energy resuspension events (up to a shear stress of 0.2 N/m2) contribute up to 60% of the resuspension metal flux in an average year. The estimated annual quantity of copper and lead resuspended into the water column is higher than estimates of the total riverine flux for these metals. These results indicate that sediment resuspension is a very important mechanism for releasing metals into the water column and provide new insight into the chemical and physical processes controlling the long-term fate of trace metals in contaminated sediments.

  1. Microplastics in coastal sediments from Southern Portuguese shelf waters.

    PubMed

    Frias, J P G L; Gago, J; Otero, V; Sobral, P

    2016-03-01

    Microplastics are well-documented pollutants in the marine environment that result from fragmentation of larger plastic items. Due to their long chemical chains, they can remain in the environment for long periods of time. It is estimated that the vast majority (80%) of marine litter derives from land sources and that 70% will sink and remain at the bottom of the ocean. Microplastics that result from fragmentation of larger pieces of plastic are common to be found in beaches and in the water surface. The most common microplastics are pellets, fragments and fibres. This work provides original data of the presence of microplastics in coastal sediments from Southern Portuguese shelf waters, reporting on microplastic concentration and polymer types. Microplastic particles were found in nearly 56% of sediment samples, accounting a total of 31 particles in 27 samples. The vast majority were microfibers (25), identified as rayon fibres, and fragments (6) identified as polypropylene, through infrared spectroscopy (μ-FTIR). The concentration and polymer type data is consistent with other relevant studies and reports worldwide. PMID:26748246

  2. Microplastics in coastal sediments from Southern Portuguese shelf waters.

    PubMed

    Frias, J P G L; Gago, J; Otero, V; Sobral, P

    2016-03-01

    Microplastics are well-documented pollutants in the marine environment that result from fragmentation of larger plastic items. Due to their long chemical chains, they can remain in the environment for long periods of time. It is estimated that the vast majority (80%) of marine litter derives from land sources and that 70% will sink and remain at the bottom of the ocean. Microplastics that result from fragmentation of larger pieces of plastic are common to be found in beaches and in the water surface. The most common microplastics are pellets, fragments and fibres. This work provides original data of the presence of microplastics in coastal sediments from Southern Portuguese shelf waters, reporting on microplastic concentration and polymer types. Microplastic particles were found in nearly 56% of sediment samples, accounting a total of 31 particles in 27 samples. The vast majority were microfibers (25), identified as rayon fibres, and fragments (6) identified as polypropylene, through infrared spectroscopy (μ-FTIR). The concentration and polymer type data is consistent with other relevant studies and reports worldwide.

  3. Remote Sensing of Suspended Sediments and Shallow Coastal Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Rong-Rong; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Gao, Bo-Cai; Davis, Curtiss O.

    2002-01-01

    Ocean color sensors were designed mainly for remote sensing of chlorophyll concentrations over the clear open oceanic areas (case 1 water) using channels between 0.4 and 0.86 micrometers. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) launched on the NASA Terra and Aqua Spacecrafts is equipped with narrow channels located within a wider wavelength range between 0.4 and 2.5 micrometers for a variety of remote sensing applications. The wide spectral range can provide improved capabilities for remote sensing of the more complex and turbid coastal waters (case 2 water) and for improved atmospheric corrections for Ocean scenes. In this article, we describe an empirical algorithm that uses this wide spectral range to identifying areas with suspended sediments in turbid waters and shallow waters with bottom reflections. The algorithm takes advantage of the strong water absorption at wavelengths longer than 1 micrometer that does not allow illumination of sediments in the water or a shallow ocean floor. MODIS data acquired over the east coast of China, west coast of Africa, Arabian Sea, Mississippi Delta, and west coast of Florida are used in this study.

  4. Assessment of organic pollutants in coastal sediments, UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Gawad, Esam A.; Al Azab, Mohamed; Lotfy, M. M.

    2008-05-01

    Twenty-five stations were selected along the UAE coastal region to delineate the distribution and to determine the source of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), total organic carbon (TOC), total Kjeldhal nitrogen (TKN), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The concentrations of TPH ranged between 46 and 223 mg/kg and the level of TOC was in the range from 0.044 to 17.8 wt%, while TPAHs occupied the range of 5-102.2 μg/kg. On the other hand, TPCBs showed values between 60 and 205 μg/kg and TKN ranged from 104 to 1,073 mg/kg. The present study shows that the distribution of organic compounds in UAE sediments were within safe limits comparing with previous studies. The present study revealed that TOC can be used as an indicator of oil pollution in heavily oiled sediments. The highest values of TOC, TPH, TPAHs and TPCBs related to the stations covered in fine sand due to adsorption properties and the large surface areas of the grains. The evaporation of low-boiling point compounds from surface layers leads to the enrichment of sediments with a thick residual. Al Sharjah-1 exhibited the highest values of TPH and TOC at Ras Al-Khaima-5, Umm Al-Quwen-1 and Dubai-1, while the highest values of TPAHs were at KhorFakkan-9, the highest value of TPCBs was at Ajman-2, and the highest values of TKN were at KhorFakkan-1, KhorFakkan-6 and Dubai-1.

  5. Early Diagenesis of Subseafloor Sandy Sediments Closely Related to Gas Hydrate Occurrences and Their Provenances in the Eastern Margin of Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Sakai, H.; Horiuchi, S.; Matsumoto, R.

    2015-12-01

    A lot of effort have been put into recovering gas hydrate, methane induced carbonate, and associated sediments in order to develop the geologic model of gas hydrate accumulation and evaluate its possible environmental impact for the last glacial-interglacial cycles. Having investigated gas hydrate occurrences in the eastern margin of Japan Sea revealed wide distributions of chimney-shape gas hydrate concentrations beneath the seafloor, confirmed off Shimane and off Akita/Yamagata as well as off Joetsu (Niigata), which are quite different from the occurrences of pore space hydrate filling intergranular pore systems of sands recognized in Nankai Trough, Mallik and other sites. Many sediment samples have been obtained below from the Umitaka Spur, Joetsu Channel, Toyama Trough, Mogami Trough and Okushiri Ridge areas. Small amounts of sandy sediment have been retrieved as thin intercalations in Holocene and Pleistocene silty/muddy layers, where trace fossils and strong bioturbations are commonly observed. Sandy sediments consist of very fine- to fine-grained sand grains, and are sometimes tuffaceous. Pore-size distribution measurements and thin-section observations of these sands were carried out, which indicate that porosities of silty sediments are around 50 % but those of arenites range from 42 to 52 %, of which mean pore sizes and permeabilities are larger than those of silty sediments. These coarser sediments might have been transported approximately around 3 to 30 ka due to the tephra ages, where supplying sediments might be abundant due to sea level fluctuation during the Pleistocene ice age. Sandy sediments contain not only detrital quartz and feldspar but mafic minerals (pyroxene, amphibole and mica), contents of which may indicate their provenances. Silty/muddy sediments usually contain diatom tests, foraminifers and framboidal pyrites, and, in particular, the shapes of diatom are usually various, dominantly fragmental and infrequently preserved. It is

  6. Sedimentation in the coastal reefs of Abrolhos over the last decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. S.; Leão, Z. M. A. N.; Kikuchi, R. K. P.; Costa, A. B.; Souza, J. R. B.

    2013-11-01

    Coral reefs of the coastal area of Abrolhos are located in an environment with a high influx of terrigenous sediments that are carried out to the sea, either as a result of natural processes (river output, coastal erosion, and torrents) or due to anthropogenic influences (deforestation, coastal development, and dredging). Excessive terrigenous sediment in coastal areas has been identified as one of the major threats to coral reefs, leading to their worldwide decline. The present study assessed the evolution of sedimentation in the Abrolhos coastal reefs during the past decades by analyzing samples from sediment cores collected near the reefs of Coroa Vermelha (located 15 km from the coast), Pedra de Leste (located 12 km from the coast) and Popa Verde (located 35 km from the coast). The purpose of this assessment was to observe whether the previously described pattern of surficial bottom sediment distribution in Abrolhos, which consisted of terrigenous mud in the nearshore reefs, to carbonate-dominant sediments towards the offshore reefs, is still a prevalent feature. Sediment color, texture, CaCO3 percentage, biogenic compounds and clay minerals, as well as the sedimentation rate and the geochronology of the sediment cores were analyzed. The results showed indications of an increase in the deposition of terrigenous mud, over the last decade, in the vicinity of the reefs nearest to the coast, though this does not yet constitute a definitive evidence of such a change. However, this observation therefore suggests that local processes resulting from anthropogenic actions are most likely causing an increase of the sedimentation rate of continent-derived sediment runoff in the Abrolhos coastal areas. To minimize this situation, there is an urgent need for the development of new management strategies to protect the already disturbed Abrolhos coastal reefs, especially during times of global changes.

  7. An improved sample preparation method for non-destructive analyses of fine-grained subseafloor sediments using micro-focus X-ray CT and SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uramoto, G.; Morono, Y.; Uematsu, K.; Inagaki, F.

    2012-12-01

    Spatial arrangement of particles in fine-grained marine subsurface sediments is a key factor for the physical property of sediments. The pore space provides micro-niches for chemical, physical, and microbiological components in the subsurface geosphere and biosphere. However, the standard techniques conventionally used for the sample preparation have some critical issues to understand accurate nature of fine-scale particle arrangement because of the possible deformation of micro-structures during the sample fixation. Here we tested the resin-embedding method for ocean drilling core samples, which technique has been applied mainly for biological samples. Using micro-focus X-ray CT-computed tomography and SEM we compared the images with the conventional t-butyl alcohol freeze-drying methods. Using the t-butyl alcohol freeze-dried sediment samples, we observed large number of micrometer-scale cracks in both SEM and X-CT image analyses, indicating the significant disturbance of sediment microstructure during sample processing. On the other hand, when we employed mini-coring, agar infiltration, and related biological sample-processing techniques for the resin-embedding method, no observable cracks were evident, most likely due to the rapid resin impregnation into sediments without sample drying. On SEM images of the flattened sample surface, we compared the porosity assessed with the resin-embedded samples to those measured onboard by the moisture and density method, showing a good agreement of the porosity values. In high-porosity surficial sediments embedded with resin, we observed structures that sediment particles are floating in the space, which may represent the results of physico-chemical interaction among sediment particles. However, almost no such particle arrangements were observed in t-butyl alcohol freeze-dried samples, indicating that drying of interstitial fluids may impact on the physico-chemical forces within particulate compounds. Conclusively, our

  8. Leakage of CO2 from sub-seafloor CO2 storage sites to the seabed; Impacts on sediment microorganisms and geochemical parameters during in situ and laboratory leakage experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reigstad, L. J.; Hannisdal, B.; Hoffmann, F. U.; Sweetman, A. K.; Baumberger, T.; Eickmann, B.; Røy, H.; Thorseth, I. H.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    detected on all three levels in all depths investigated, but the response to acidification appeared among less-abundant prokaryotic groups in the sediment, rather than the numerically dominant groups. Quantification of the 16S rRNA genes (DNA level) indicated no increase in cell numbers in response to the treatment. However, an increase in the in situ microbial sulfate reduction rates and/or expression of marker genes for sulfate reduction (RNA level) was discovered. Analyses of marker gene expression for other prokaryotic metabolisms will be presented as well as correlations between specific organisms and geochemical parameters. Within the limitations of the experimental set up, our studies indicate that a leakage of CO2 from a sub-seafloor storage site may not dramatically change the composition of the active microbial community in the seabed sediment though we did register activity changes in some metabolisms.

  9. Assessment of heavy metal levels in surface sediments of estuaries and adjacent coastal areas in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianbin; Li, Deliang; Song, Guisheng

    2016-05-01

    This article investigates the variations of contamination levels of heavy metals such as copper, lead, chromium, cadmium, zinc, arsenic, and mercury over time in surface sediments of the Changjiang River Estuary (CRE), Yellow River Estuary (YRE), Pearl River Estuary (PRE), and their adjacent coastal areas in China. The contamination factor (CF), pollution load index (PLI), and geoaccumulation index (I geo) are used to evaluate the quality of the surface sediments in the study areas. The results showed that the CRE, YRE, and their adjacent coastal areas were at a low risk of contamination in terms of heavy metals, while the PRE and its adjacent coastal area were at a moderate level. By comparison, the concentrations of heavy metals in the surface sediments of the YRE and its adjacent coastal area were relatively lower than those in the CRE, PRE, and their adjacent coastal areas.

  10. DIATOM INDICATORS OF TOTAL PHOSPHORUS, SEDIMENTS, AND WATERSHED FOREST COVER IN LAKE MICHIGAN COASTAL, RIVERINE WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diatom assemblages are being investigated as response and diagnostic indicators as part of our Great Lakes coastal wetlands research designed to support the development of nutrient, habitat, and sediment criteria and to develop community- and landscape-level diagnostic indicator ...

  11. Evolution of radioactive dose rates in fresh sediment deposits along coastal rivers draining Fukushima contamination plume.

    PubMed

    Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Patin, Jeremy; Lepage, Hugo; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie; Ottlé, Catherine; Bonté, Philippe

    2013-10-29

    Measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand provides a solution to address the lack of continuous river monitoring in Fukushima Prefecture after Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. We show that coastal rivers of Eastern Fukushima Prefecture were rapidly supplied with sediment contaminated by radionuclides originating from inland mountain ranges, and that this contaminated material was partly exported by typhoons to the coastal plains as soon as by November 2011. This export was amplified during snowmelt and typhoons in 2012. In 2013, contamination levels measured in sediment found in the upper parts of the catchments were almost systematically lower than the ones measured in nearby soils, whereas their contamination was higher in the coastal plains. We thereby suggest that storage of contaminated sediment in reservoirs and in coastal sections of the river channels now represents the most crucial issue.

  12. Bacterial Growth, Necromass Turnover, And Endospore Abundance In The Deep Subseafloor Sediments Of The Greenland Shelf Using D:L Amino Acid Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhatre, S. S.; Braun, S.; Jaussi, M.; Røy, H.; Jørgensen, B. B.; Lomstein, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The subsurface realm is colonized by a large number of microorganisms- about 3 × 1029. Microbial cells in these very stable and oligotrophic settings catabolize at a much slower rate than model organisms in nutrient rich cultures. The aim of this work was to use recently developed D:L-amino acid racemization model for studying the turnover times of microbial biomass and microbial necromass in a ~12,000 years old Greenland shelf marine sediment samples. Sediments were analyzed for total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA), the bacterial endospore marker dipicolinic acid (DPA), and amino acid enantiomers of aspartic acid. The percentage amino acid carbon content (%TAAC) and the percentage amino acid nitrogen content (%TAAN) were used for determining the degradation state of the organic matter. Endospores quantified using DPA quantification method were found to be as abundant as vegetative cells. The microbial necromass turnover times were thousand years, and biomass turnover times were in the range of tens to hundred years. Studies with deeper sediment cores will further improve our understanding of the energetic limits of life in the deep biosphere.

  13. Bacterial diversity in oil-polluted marine coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Acosta-González, Alejandro; Marqués, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    Marine environments harbour a persistent microbial seed which can be shaped by changes of the environmental conditions such as contamination by petroleum components. Oil spills, together with small but continuous discharges of oil from transportation and recreational activities, are important sources of hydrocarbon pollution within the marine realm. Consequently, prokaryotic communities have become well pre-adapted toward oil pollution, and many microorganisms that are exposed to its presence develop an active degradative response. The natural attenuation of oil pollutants, as has been demonstrated in many sites, is modulated according to the intrinsic environmental properties such as the availability of terminal electron acceptors and elemental nutrients, together with the degree of pollution and the type of hydrocarbon fractions present. Whilst dynamics in the bacterial communities in the aerobic zones of coastal sediments are well characterized and the key players in hydrocarbon biodegradation have been identified, the subtidal ecology of the anaerobic community is still not well understood. However, current data suggest common patterns of response in these ecosystems. PMID:26773654

  14. Bacterial diversity in oil-polluted marine coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Acosta-González, Alejandro; Marqués, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    Marine environments harbour a persistent microbial seed which can be shaped by changes of the environmental conditions such as contamination by petroleum components. Oil spills, together with small but continuous discharges of oil from transportation and recreational activities, are important sources of hydrocarbon pollution within the marine realm. Consequently, prokaryotic communities have become well pre-adapted toward oil pollution, and many microorganisms that are exposed to its presence develop an active degradative response. The natural attenuation of oil pollutants, as has been demonstrated in many sites, is modulated according to the intrinsic environmental properties such as the availability of terminal electron acceptors and elemental nutrients, together with the degree of pollution and the type of hydrocarbon fractions present. Whilst dynamics in the bacterial communities in the aerobic zones of coastal sediments are well characterized and the key players in hydrocarbon biodegradation have been identified, the subtidal ecology of the anaerobic community is still not well understood. However, current data suggest common patterns of response in these ecosystems.

  15. Abrupt change of sedimentation rate recorded in lacustrine sediment from coastal lakes, Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, H.; Okamura, M.

    2014-12-01

    Nankai earthquakes are plate-boundary earthquakes associated with the Nankai subduction zone that have occurred repeatedly during historic times. In order to reveal pre-historical evidence of Nankai earthquakes, we investigated lacustrine sediments of small lakes on the coastal area of Shikoku Island, along the Nankai Trough. We studied over 150 piston- and vibro- core samples from 20 small lakes in this region, and found out many sedimentary evidences of tsunami events. Only three small lakes, Tadasu-Ike, Kaniga-Ike and Kamoda- Ike have over 5000 yaers sedimentary record. Tadasu-Ike and Kaniga-Ike have kept ten and several times tsunami events, on the other hand only one event preserved in though 6500 years sediments of Kamoda- Ike. These three small lakes have characteristic sedimentary conditions. Abrupt change of sedimentation rate was recorded 1-2 times through 5000-7000 years their history. This change was thought to reflect subsidence of the surrounding area. Co-seismic subsidence and gradual uplift during inter-seismic period are well known in this region. Several thousand-year cycle subsidences are assumed in addition to subsidences accompanied with 100-year cycle earthquakes.

  16. THE CONDITION OF THE NATION'S ESTURINE SEDIMENTS: EPA'S NATIONAL COASTAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Summers, J. Kevin. In press. Condition of the Nation's Estuarine Sediments: EPA's National Coastal Assessment (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB R1001).

    The purpose of EPA's National Coastal Asse...

  17. Use of sediment amendments to rehabilitate sinking coastal swamp forests in Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.; Jiang, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Coastal wetlands are losing elevation worldwide, so that techniques to increase elevation such as sediment amendment might benefit these wetlands. This study examined the potential of sediment amendment to raise elevation and support the production and regeneration of vegetation in coastal forests in Louisiana. Before sediment amendment, the vegetation did not differ in these Taxodium distichum–Nyssa aquatica forests with respect to herbaceous and tree seedling composition, and sapling and tree characteristics. After the application of sediment in January 2007, sediment-amended swamps had higher elevations and salinity levels than natural swamps. The layer of sediment applied to Treasure Island in Jean Lafitte National Historic Park and Preserve was relatively deep (sediment depth at Site One and Site Two: 0.89 and 0.69 m, respectively, six months after application), and may have exceeded an optimal threshold. Sediment-amended swamp with the highest elevation had some tree mortality and little tree growth of T. distichum. Also, sediment-amended swamp had higher root biomasses of ruderal species, and lower species richness and cover of herbaceous species. Nevertheless, during controlled water releases during an oil spill emergency in 2010, both sediment-amended and reference forest had higher production levels than in other years. While sediment amendment is a compelling management alternative for sinking coastal wetlands, optimal thresholds were not determined for these T. distichum–N. aquatica swamps.

  18. SEDIMENT HABITAT ASSESSMENT FOR TARGETED NEAR-COASTAL AREAS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO: A SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A. In press. Sediment Habitat Assessment for Targeted Near-Coastal Areas of the Gulf of Mexico: A Summary. In: Estuarine Indicators Workshop Proceedings. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL. 25 p. (ERL,GB 1201).

    Sediment chemical and biological quality is summarized ...

  19. SEDIMENT HAZARD ASSESSMENT FOR NEAR-COASTAL AREAS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment contamination is a major problem in many coastal areas in the U.S. and has emerged as an important ecological issue for several geographic areas. Sediment chemical and biological quality is unknown in many areas of the Gulf of Mexico. To provide some information on this ...

  20. TREATED WASTEWATER AS A SOURCE OF SEDIMENT CONTAMINATION IN GULF OF MEXICO NEAR-COASTAL AREAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this baseline survey was to provide some needed perspective on the magnitude of sediment contamination associated with wastewater outfalls discharged to Gulf of Mexico near-coastal areas. The chemical quality and toxicities of whole sediments and pore wa...

  1. Spatial variability and the fate of cesium in coastal sediments near Fukushima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, E.; Buesseler, K. O.

    2014-05-01

    Quantifying the amount of cesium incorporated into marine sediments as a result of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident has proven challenging due to the limited multi-core sampling from within the 30 km zone around the facility, the inherent spatial heterogeneities in ocean sediments, and the potential for inventory fluctuations due to physical, biological, and chemical processes. Using 210Pb, 234Th, 137Cs, and 134Cs profiles from 20 sediment cores, coastal sediment inventories were reevaluated. A minimum 137Cs sediment inventory of 100 ± 50 TBq was found for an area of 55 000 km2 using cores from this study and a total of 130 ± 60 TBq using an additional 181 samples. These inventories represent less than 1% of the estimated 15-30 PBq of cesium released during the FDNPP disaster and constitute ~ 90% of the total coastal inventory of 137Cs remaining in 2012. The time needed for surface sediment activities (0 to 3 cm) at the 20 locations to reduce by 50% via bioturbation was estimated to range from 0.4 to 26 years, indicating a much greater persistence of cesium in the sediments relative to coastal water activities. However, due to the observed variability in mixing rates, grain size, and inventories, additional cores are needed to further improve estimates and capture the full extent of cesium penetration into the shallow coastal sediments, which was deeper than 14 cm for all cores retrieved from water depths less than 150 m.

  2. How sea level rise affects sedimentation, plant growth, and carbon accumulation on coastal salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudd, S. M.; Howell, S. M.; Morris, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    The rate of accretion on coastal salt marshes depends on feedbacks between flow, macrophyte growth, and sedimentation. Under favourable conditions, marsh accretion rates will keep pace with the local rate of sea level rise. Marsh accretion is driven by both organic and inorganic sedimentation; mineral rich marshes will need less organic sedimentation to keep pace with sea level rise. Here we use a numerical model of marsh accretion, calibrated by sediment cores, to explore the relationship between sea level rise and carbon sequestration on salt marshes in the face of differing supplies of inorganic sediment. The model predicts that changes in carbon storage resulting from changing sediment supply or sea-level rise are strongly dependant on the background sediment supply: if inorganic sediment supply is reduced in an already sediment poor marsh the storage of organic carbon will increase to a far greater extent than in a sediment-rich marsh, provided that the rate of sea-level rise does not exceed a threshold. These results imply that altering sediment supply to estuaries (e.g., by damming upstream rivers or altering littoral sediment transport) could lead to significant changes in the carbon budgets of coastal salt marshes.

  3. Trends in the suspended-sediment yields of coastal rivers of northern California, 1955–2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Madej, M.A.; Goñi, M. A.; Wheatcroft, R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Time-dependencies of suspended-sediment discharge from six coastal watersheds of northern California – Smith River, Klamath River, Trinity River, Redwood Creek, Mad River, and Eel River – were evaluated using monitoring data from 1955 to 2010. Suspended-sediment concentrations revealed time-dependent hysteresis and multi-year trends. The multi-year trends had two primary patterns relative to river discharge: (i) increases in concentration resulting from both land clearing from logging and the flood of record during December 1964 (water year 1965), and (ii) continual decreases in concentration during the decades following this flood. Data from the Eel River revealed that changes in suspended-sediment concentrations occurred for all grain-size fractions, but were most pronounced for the sand fraction. Because of these changes, the use of bulk discharge-concentration relationships (i.e., “sediment rating curves”) without time-dependencies in these relationships resulted in substantial errors in sediment load estimates, including 2.5-fold over-prediction of Eel River sediment loads since 1979. We conclude that sediment discharge and sediment discharge relationships (such as sediment rating curves) from these coastal rivers have varied substantially with time in response to land use and climate. Thus, the use of historical river sediment data and sediment rating curves without considerations for time-dependent trends may result in significant errors in sediment yield estimates from the globally-important steep, small watersheds.

  4. Organic Phosphorus in the Deep Subseafloor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defforey, D.; Paytan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a macronutrient involved both in functional and structural components of all living cells. This makes it an essential nutrient for life, including microbial life in the deep subseafloor habitat. P availability in this environment is limited since organic matter is scarce and P is thought to be mainly present in refractory mineral phases. However, recent estimates suggest that the deep biosphere may contain up to 1% of Earth's total biomass, which implies that microorganisms may possess mechanisms to harvest recalcitrant phosphorus compounds in this environment. In addition, the role of the organic P pool in this setting is poorly understood and could be of great importance should it represent an important P pool fueling the deep biosphere. This study aims to identify and quantify organic P compounds in open ocean sediments using our newly developed sequential extraction procedure for 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P NMR). This method amplifies the signal of organic P in spectra by increasing its concentration and quantitatively removing the majority of inorganic P. Briefly, P bound to iron oxyhydroxides is removed from sediment samples during a reductive step; then, P in authigenic and biogenic apatite is solubilized over the course of an extraction in an acidic buffer. These two steps remove the majority of inorganic P from the sample. Lastly, the residue is extracted in 0.25M NaOH+ 0.05M Na2EDTA and the supernatant is frozen and lyophilized prior to 31P NMR analysis. This method will be applied to sediment samples from North Pond (IODP expedition 336), an isolated sediment pond on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic ridge. This work will provide valuable insight into the diagenetic processes affecting organic P in open ocean sediments and into possible nutrient sources to the deep biosphere.

  5. Fractionation of mercury in sediments from coastal zone inundated by tsunami and in freshwater sediments from the rivers.

    PubMed

    Boszke, Leonard; Astel, Aleksander

    2007-06-01

    The study was undertaken to compare the mobility and bioavailability of mercury in tsunami sediments from the coastal zone of Thailand left after the 26 December 2004 tsunami event and freshwater sediments from the Vistula and the Warta rivers in Poland. The mobility and bioavailability of mercury in these sediments were determined by sequential extraction method. The environmental similarity/differences were estimated by statistical tests and cluster imaging technique. The coastal post-tsunami sediments were characterized by higher contributions of organomercury species (median 14%) and mercury sulphide (75%) than the freshwater sediments (5.4-9.3% and 60-68%, respectively), however, the contributions of water-soluble fraction (0.6%) and mercury bound to humic matter (7.6%) in the former was lower. In the river sediments the contributions of water-soluble mercury and mercury bound to humic matter were: 2.0-5.7% and 16-24%, respectively. The contributions of acid-soluble mercury were generally very low, but relatively higher in the post-tsunami sediments (0.7%) than in the freshwater sediments (0.3-0.4%). PMID:17558764

  6. Sources, dispersal, and fate of fine sediment supplied to coastal California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farnsworth, Katherine L.; Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the sources, dispersal, and fate of fine sediment supplied to California coastal waters in a partnership between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the California Sediment Management Workgroup (CSMW). The purpose of this study was to document the rates and characteristics of these processes so that the State can better manage its coastal resources, including sediment. In this study, we made the following observations: - Rivers dominate the supply of fine sediment to the California coastal waters, with an average annual flux of 34 megatonnes (Mt). - Cliff and bluff erosion in central and southern California is a source of fine sediment, with a delivery rate of approximately 10 percent of river loads. In the southern most part of the State, however, where river-sediment loads are low, cliff and bluff erosion represent approximately 40 percent of the total fine-sediment flux. - Temporal variation in the sources of fine sediment is high. River floods and bluff erosion are episodic and dominated by winter storms, which supply most sediment flux to the coast. The magnitude of winter storms is generally related to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) climate cycles. - The three rivers that dominate fine-sediment flux to the California coast are the Eel, Salinas, and Santa Clara Rivers. Because the sediment delivery from these and all other California coastal watersheds is episodic, individual rivers discharge most of their annual loads over the course of only a few days per year. - Spatial variation in river-sediment discharge is high and generally related to such watershed characteristics as geology, precipitation, and drainage area. For example, the Transverse Range of southern California represents only 9 percent of the watershed-drainage area but 18 percent of the fine-sediment flux, a function of the young sedimentary bedrock and active tectonics of this region. The urban rivers of southern California

  7. Carbon and nitrogen assimilation in deep subseafloor microbial cells

    PubMed Central

    Morono, Yuki; Terada, Takeshi; Nishizawa, Manabu; Ito, Motoo; Hillion, François; Takahata, Naoto; Sano, Yuji; Inagaki, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    Remarkable numbers of microbial cells have been observed in global shallow to deep subseafloor sediments. Accumulating evidence indicates that deep and ancient sediments harbor living microbial life, where the flux of nutrients and energy are extremely low. However, their physiology and energy requirements remain largely unknown. We used stable isotope tracer incubation and nanometer-scale secondary ion MS to investigate the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen assimilation activities in individual microbial cells from 219-m-deep lower Pleistocene (460,000 y old) sediments from the northwestern Pacific off the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan. Sediment samples were incubated in vitro with 13C- and/or 15N-labeled glucose, pyruvate, acetate, bicarbonate, methane, ammonium, and amino acids. Significant incorporation of 13C and/or 15N and growth occurred in response to glucose, pyruvate, and amino acids (∼76% of total cells), whereas acetate and bicarbonate were incorporated without fostering growth. Among those substrates, a maximum substrate assimilation rate was observed at 67 × 10−18 mol/cell per d with bicarbonate. Neither carbon assimilation nor growth was evident in response to methane. The atomic ratios between nitrogen incorporated from ammonium and the total cellular nitrogen consistently exceeded the ratios of carbon, suggesting that subseafloor microbes preferentially require nitrogen assimilation for the recovery in vitro. Our results showed that the most deeply buried subseafloor sedimentary microbes maintain potentials for metabolic activities and that growth is generally limited by energy but not by the availability of C and N compounds. PMID:21987801

  8. Subseafloor basalts as fungal habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivarsson, M.; Bengtson, S.

    2013-12-01

    The oceanic crust makes up the largest potential habitat for life on Earth, yet next to nothing is known about the abundance, diversity and ecology of its biosphere. Our understanding of the deep biosphere of subseafloor crust is, with a few exceptions, based on a fossil record. Surprisingly, a majority of the fossilized microorganisms have been interpreted or recently re-interpreted as remnants of fungi rather than prokaryotes. Even though this might be due to a bias in fossilization the presence of fungi in these settings can not be neglected. We have examined fossilized microorganisms in drilled basalt samples collected at the Emperor Seamounts in the Pacific Ocean. Synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomography microscopy (SRXTM) studies has revealed a complex morphology and internal structure that corresponds to characteristic fungal morphology. Chitin was detected in the fossilized hyphae, which is another strong argument in favour of a fungal interpretation. Chitin is absent in prokaryotes but a substantial constituent in fungal cell walls. The fungal colonies consist of both hyphae and yeast-like growth states as well as resting structures and possible fruit bodies, thus, the fungi exist in vital colonies in subseafloor basalts. The fungi have also been involved in extensive weathering of secondary mineralisations. In terrestrial environments fungi are known as an important geobiological agent that promotes mineral weathering and decomposition of organic matter, and they occur in vital symbiosis with other microorganisms. It is probable to assume that fungi would play a similar role in subseafloor basalts and have great impact on the ecology and on biogeochemical cycles in such environments.

  9. Sources of sediment to the coastal waters of the Southern California Bight

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Farnsworth, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    The sources of sediment to the Southern California Bight were investigated with new calculations and published records of sediment fluxes, both natural and anthropogenic. We find that rivers are by far the largest source of sediment, producing over 10 ?? 106 t/yr on average, or over 80% of the sediment input to the Bight. This river flux is variable, however, over both space and time. The rivers draining the Transverse Ranges produce sediment at rates approximately an order of magnitude greater than the Peninsular Ranges (600-1500 t/km2/yr versus <90 t/km2/yr, respectively). Although the Transverse Range rivers represent only 23% of the total Southern California watershed drainage area, they are responsible for over 75% of the total sediment flux. River sediment flux is ephemeral and highly pulsed due to the semiarid climate and the influence of infrequent large storms. For more than 90% of the time, negligible amounts of sediment are discharged from the region's rivers, and over half of the post-1900 sediment load has been discharged during events with recurrence intervals greater than 10 yr. These rare, yet important, events are related to the El Ni??o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and the majority of sediment flux occurs during ENSO periods. Temporal trends in sediment discharge due to land-use changes and river damming are also observed. We estimate that there has been a 45% reduction in suspended-sediment flux due to the construction of dams. However, pre-dam sediment loads were likely artificially high due to the massive land-use changes of coastal California to rangeland during the nineteenth century. This increase in sediment production is observed in estuarine deposits throughout coastal California, which reveal that sedimentation rates were two to ten times higher during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries than during pre-European colonization. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  10. Terrestrial Sediment Delivery to Coastal and Marine Environments: US Virgin Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, R. A.; Brooks, G. R.; Devine, B.; Wallace, L. E.; Holmes, C. W.; Schwing, P. T.

    2007-05-01

    Understanding terrestrial sediment dynamics in high-relief, tropical island settings, such as St. Thomas and St. John, USVI, has become a critical issue, as sediments are a potential threat to the health of down-slope environments. The primary depositional sinks of terrestrial sediments are 1) coastal buffer zones such as salt ponds, which trap sediments and keep them from being input into the marine environment, and 2) near-shore marine environments (coral reefs, seagrasses, algal flats etc.), many of which are adversely affected by terrestrial sedimentation. Land use change by anthropogenic activities has been shown to alter terrestrial sediment dynamics and greatly increase sediment delivery and accumulation rates in coastal and marine environments. Sediment cores collected in salt ponds and the near-shore marine environment were used to determine the sedimentology (texture and composition) and geochronology (using 14C, and 210Pb) prior to anthropogenic activities to define the "natural signal", or "baseline", as well as recent deviations from the "natural signal", which may be attributed to anthropogenic activities. Salt pond and marine sediments in watersheds without anthropogenic activities exhibit no deviations from the "natural signal" in sedimentology or accumulation rate. Salt pond and marine sediments in watersheds with anthropogenic activities contain a deviation from the "natural signal" manifested as an increase in accumulation rate within the last 100 yrs (most likely within the last 25-50 yrs) ranging from 3 -10 times greater than the "natural" accumulation rate. Sedimentologically, salt ponds reflect no recent change, where as marine sediments do show a recent deviation in sedimentology. This marine deviation is represented by an increase in organic content, a decrease in grain size, and a decrease in carbonate content (marine-derived) compared to the "natural signal". This change reflects an increase in terrestrial (non- carbonate, finer

  11. Observations of coastal sediment dynamics of the Tijuana Estuary Fine Sediment Fate and Transport Demonstration Project, Imperial Beach, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Lam, Angela; Ferreiera, Joanne; Miller, Ian M.; Rippy, Meg; Svejkovsky, Jan; Mustain, Neomi

    2012-01-01

    Coastal restoration and management must address the presence, use, and transportation of fine sediment, yet little information exists on the patterns and/or processes of fine-sediment transport and deposition for these systems. To fill this information gap, a number of State of California, Federal, and private industry partners developed the Tijuana Estuary Fine Sediment Fate and Transport Demonstration Project ("Demonstration Project") with the purpose of monitoring the transport, fate, and impacts of fine sediment from beach-sediment nourishments in 2008 and 2009 near the Tijuana River estuary, Imperial Beach, California. The primary purpose of the Demonstration Project was to collect and provide information about the directions, rates, and processes of fine-sediment transport along and across a California beach and nearshore setting. To achieve these goals, the U.S. Geological Survey monitored water, beach, and seafloor properties during the 2008–2009 Demonstration Project. The project utilized sediment with ~40 percent fine sediment by mass so that the dispersal and transport of fine sediment would be easily recognizable. The purpose of this report is to present and disseminate the data collected during the physical monitoring of the Demonstration Project. These data are available online at the links noted in the "Additional Digital Information" section. Synthesis of these data and results will be provided in subsequent publications.

  12. Morphology of Mediterranean coastal sediments and its relation to oil pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Barakat, M.A.K.; Shimy, T.M.; Soliman, M.

    1997-02-01

    This study describes the hazards of marine oil pollution and associated chemicals and wastes and clarifies the importance of reducing oil inputs in coastal and offshore waters. It includes oil spill responses as well as wastes from offshore petroleum operations. This study is carried out mainly in order to clarify the morphological characteristics of the polluted coastal sediments along the Mediterranean shoreline from Marsa Matrouh to El-Arish.

  13. The impact of electrogenic sulfide oxidation on elemental cycling and solute fluxes in coastal sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Alexandra M. F.; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Hidalgo-Martinez, Silvia; Meysman, Filip J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous sulfide oxidizing cable bacteria are capable of linking the oxidation of free sulfide in deep anoxic layers of marine sediments to the reduction of oxygen or nitrate in surface sediments by conducting electrons over centimeter-scale distances. Previous studies have shown that this newly discovered microbial process, referred to as electrogenic sulfide oxidation (e-SOx), may alter elemental cycling in sediments, but the nature and rates of the resulting biogeochemical transformations and their influence on benthic-pelagic coupling remain largely unknown. Here we quantify changes in sediment geochemistry and solute fluxes at the sediment-water interface as e-SOx develops and declines over time in laboratory incubations of organic-rich sediments from a seasonally hypoxic coastal basin (Marine Lake Grevelingen, The Netherlands). Our results show that e-SOx enhanced sediment O2 consumption and acidified subsurface sediment, resulting in the dissolution of calcium carbonate and iron sulfide minerals in deeper sediment horizons and the associated accumulation of dissolved iron, manganese, and calcium in porewater. Remobilized Fe diffusing upward was reoxidized at the sediment-water interface, producing an amorphous Fe oxide crust, while dissolved Fe diffusing downward was reprecipitated in the form of FeS as it encountered the free sulfide horizon. The development of e-SOx enhanced the diffusive release of dissolved Mn at the sediment-water interface, capped the phosphate efflux, generated a buildup of organic matter in surface sediments, and strongly stimulated the release of alkalinity from the sediment. About 75% of this alkalinity production was associated with net CaCO3 dissolution, while the remaining 25% was attributed to a pumping mechanism that transfers alkalinity from anodic H2S oxidation (an alkalinity sink) in deeper sediments to cathodic O2 reduction (an alkalinity source) near the sediment-water interface. The resulting sediment alkalinity

  14. Application of Remote Sensing to Assess the Impact of Short Term Climate Variability on Coastal Sedimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzel, W. Paul; Huh, Oscar K.; Walker, Nan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this joint University of Wisconsin (UW) and Louisiana State University (LSU) project has been to relate short term climate variation to response in the coastal zone of Louisiana in an attempt to better understand how the coastal zone is shaped by climate variation. Climate variation in this case largely refers to variation in surface wind conditions that affect wave action and water currents in the coastal zone. The primary region of focus was the Atchafalaya Bay and surrounding bays in the central coastal region of Louisiana. Suspended solids in the water column show response to wind systems both in quantity (through resuspension) and in the pattern of dispersement or transport. Wind systems associated with cold fronts are influenced by short term climate variation. Wind energy was used as the primary signature of climate variation in this study because winds are a significant influence on sediment transport in the micro-tidal Gilf of Mexico coastal zone. Using case studies, the project has been able to investigate the influence of short term climate variation on sediment transport. Wind energy data, collected daily for National Weather Service (NWS) stations at Lake Charles and New Orleans, LA, were used as an indicator of short term climate variation influence on seasonal time scales. A goal was to relate wind energy to coastal impact through sediment transport. This goal was partially accomplished by combining remote sensing and wind energy data. Daily high resolution remote sensing observations are needed to monitor the complex coastal zone environment, where winds, tides, and water level all interact to influence sediment transport. The NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) era brings hope for documenting and revealing response of the complex coastal transport mosaic through regular high spatial resolution observations from the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument. MODIS observations were sampled in this project for

  15. Studies of the DOM aqueous extracts from coastal marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakellariadou, F.

    2012-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) represents a major exchangeable organic pool playing an outstanding role in the ocean carbon cycle. It has a complex chemical structure made up of a wide range of organic molecules. The composition of DOM depends on the sources proximity and the exposure to any sort of degradation mechanism. The coloured (or chromophoric) dissolved organic matter (CDOM), representing the optically active fraction of DOM, consists of aromatic rings able to absorb light in the visible and UV regions (Kirk, 1994) and fluorophoric molecules that emit light. The main fluorophoric moieties of CDOM are humic material with a blue fluorescence and protein material with an ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence (Mopper and Schultz, 1993). Dissolved organic matter interacts with pollutants either by enhancing their bioavailability or by influencing their transportation to the soluble phase. In addition, DOM affects the remineralisation of carbon and its preservation in marine sediments. Referring to its origin, it can be terrestrial, freshwater or marine one. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a technique widely applied for the identification and characterization of organic matter, being fast, simple, non-destructive and sensitive. In addition, the fluorescence analysis for the physico-chemical characterization of organic matter requires a small amount of aqueous sample at a low concentration, in comparison with the large sample volumes needed for conventional techniques. At the present study coastal sediment samples were collected from Messiniakos gulf in the south western Peloponnese in South Greece. Messiniakos gulf has a seabed dominated by very abrupt inclinations reaching depths of more than 1000m. All samples, according to their grain size, are classified as fine clayey silt. Dissolved organic matter was extracted under gentle extraction conditions (4 mM CaCl2 solution). The various classes of organic components present at the DOM aqueous extracts were characterised by

  16. The role of "pump action" in coastal and estuarine sediment resuspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y.; Zhang, S.

    2014-12-01

    Most of the sediment into sea carried by rivers deposited near the estuary,forming the subaqueous delta. However,previous researches has shown that sediment into sea carried by many rivers all over the world always forms a large scale of distribution along the estuarine coastal areas that thousands of kilometers away from the estuary. Resuspension of estuarine and coastal sediment plays an important role in the sediment long distance transport into sea. At present, it is widely recognized that sediment resuspension is caused by the wave and current scouring action on the surface of the seabed. This paper explored the process and mechanism of seabed sediment resuspension through flume simulation experiments; developed a conclusion that sediment resuspension is not only from the seabed surface, there is still a considerable part of sediments coming from the internal seabed through seepage "pump action";The proportion of the latter part in sediment resuspension is related to wave height, this experiment concluded that 5、10、15cm wave heights respectively accounted for 30.5%,43.8%,47.9%;The "pump action" is induced by the accumulation of excess pore water pressure inside the soil bed under the action of wave loading.

  17. Identification of the resting cyst of Cochlodinium polykrikoides Margalef (Dinophyceae, Gymnodiniales) in Korean coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhun; Han, Myung-Soo; Matsuoka, Kazumi; Kim, So-Young; Shin, Hyeon Ho

    2015-02-01

    This study provides the first morphological features of resting cysts of Cochlodinium polykrikoides collected from Korean coastal sediments. Evidence for the existence of resting cysts of C. polykrikoides is based on the morphological and molecular phylogenetic data of the germinated cells and a resting cyst. The morphology of the resting cysts differed from that reported previously in sediments and culture experiments. The distinct feature is that the cyst body was covered by the reticulate ornaments and spines. PMID:26986269

  18. Towards the development of a combined Norovirus and sediment transport model for coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, K.; O'Kane, J. P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Sewage effluent in coastal waters used for oyster culture poses a risk to human health. The primary pathogen in outbreaks of gastroenteritis following consumption of raw oysters is the Norovirus or "winter vomiting bug". The Norovirus is a highly infectious RNA virus of the Caliciviridae taxonomic family. It has a long survival time in coastal waters (T90 = 30 days in winter). Oysters selectively concentrate Norovirus in their digestive ducts. The virus cannot be removed by conventional depuration. The primary goal of the research is to quantify the risk of Norovirus infection in coastal waters through physically-based high-resolution numerical modelling. Cork Harbour and Clew Bay in Ireland provide case studies for the research. The models simulate a number of complex physical, chemical and biological processes which influence the transport and decay of the virus as well as its bioaccumulation in oyster tissue. The current phase of the research is concerned with the adsorption of the virus to suspended sediment in the water column. Adsorbed viruses may be taken out of the water column when sedimentation occurs and, subsequently, be added to it with resuspension of the bed sediment. Preliminary simulations of the Norovirus-sediment model indicate that suspended sediment can influence the transport of the virus in coastal waters when a high sediment-water partitioning coefficient is used and the model is run under calm environmental conditions. In this instance a certain fraction of the adsorbed viruses are taken out of the water column by sedimentation and end up locked in the bed sediment. Subsequently, under storm conditions, a large number of viruses in the bed are released into the water column by erosion of the bed and a risk of contamination occurs at a time different to when the viruses were initially released into the body of water.

  19. Characterization and evolution of the sediments of a Mediterranean coastal lagoon located next to a former mining area.

    PubMed

    García, Gregorio; Muñoz-Vera, Ana

    2015-11-15

    Coastal lagoons are ecosystems that are relatively enclosed water bodies under the influence of both the terrestrial and the marine environment, being vulnerable to human impacts. Human activities, such as mining extraction, are significant anthropogenic coastal stressors that can negatively affect ecosystems and communities. In light of the above, the objective of this research is to examine the influence of metal mining activities on the composition of sediments of a Mediterranean coastal lagoon, named Mar Menor. This paper presents a comprehensive characterization for grain size, mineralogy, geochemistry and organic matter of sediments of this coastal lagoon, investigating their variation along space and time. Sedimentation dynamics are ruling clearly the grain size predominant in each area of the Mar Menor coastal lagoon, determining the existence of entrainment, transport and sedimentation areas. For minerals, elements and organic matter, sedimentation dynamics are also determining their distribution. PMID:26371846

  20. Characterization and evolution of the sediments of a Mediterranean coastal lagoon located next to a former mining area.

    PubMed

    García, Gregorio; Muñoz-Vera, Ana

    2015-11-15

    Coastal lagoons are ecosystems that are relatively enclosed water bodies under the influence of both the terrestrial and the marine environment, being vulnerable to human impacts. Human activities, such as mining extraction, are significant anthropogenic coastal stressors that can negatively affect ecosystems and communities. In light of the above, the objective of this research is to examine the influence of metal mining activities on the composition of sediments of a Mediterranean coastal lagoon, named Mar Menor. This paper presents a comprehensive characterization for grain size, mineralogy, geochemistry and organic matter of sediments of this coastal lagoon, investigating their variation along space and time. Sedimentation dynamics are ruling clearly the grain size predominant in each area of the Mar Menor coastal lagoon, determining the existence of entrainment, transport and sedimentation areas. For minerals, elements and organic matter, sedimentation dynamics are also determining their distribution.

  1. Lineaments in coastal plain sediments as seen in ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withington, C. F.

    1973-01-01

    Examination of satellite imagery over the Atlantic Coastal Plain near Washington, D. C. shows numerous lineaments, which cannot be accounted for by any known cultural or natural features. At least some of these lineaments represent the surface expression of faults, for one of them has been correlated with the outcrop of a fault that had been traced for several miles in southern Prince Georges County, Maryland. If a substantial number of these lineaments do indeed represent fault traces, the fact that they show on the surface suggests that the geologic history of the Coastal Plain is much more complex than has previously been recognized, and that faulting may have occurred in the Holocene, much later than has generally been recognized. The importance that such recent movements could have on future development of the Coastal Plain should be emphasized.

  2. Impact of humans on the flux of terrestrial sediment to the global coastal ocean.

    PubMed

    Syvitski, James P M; Vörösmarty, Charles J; Kettner, Albert J; Green, Pamela

    2005-04-15

    Here we provide global estimates of the seasonal flux of sediment, on a river-by-river basis, under modern and prehuman conditions. Humans have simultaneously increased the sediment transport by global rivers through soil erosion (by 2.3 +/- 0.6 billion metric tons per year), yet reduced the flux of sediment reaching the world's coasts (by 1.4 +/- 0.3 billion metric tons per year) because of retention within reservoirs. Over 100 billion metric tons of sediment and 1 to 3 billion metric tons of carbon are now sequestered in reservoirs constructed largely within the past 50 years. African and Asian rivers carry a greatly reduced sediment load; Indonesian rivers deliver much more sediment to coastal areas. PMID:15831750

  3. Mobility and bioavailability of trace metals in sulfidic coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Sundelin, B; Eriksson, A K

    2001-04-01

    High concentrations of Hg, Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn were found in the euxinic sediment of the inner archipelago of Stockholm. In the sulfide-rich sediment, they are precipitated as metal sulfides with low dissolving capacity and bioavailability. In two experiments, the significance of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and dissolved sulfides for mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity of metals were studied by oxygenation of intact sediment cores. Influence of bioturbating deposit-feeding amphipods, that is, Monoporeia affinis, was examined on studied sediment processes. Results showed a low mobility of most metals except Cd and Zn. Bioturbation did not enhance mobility. Cd and Zn, released from the sediment, were not bioaccumulated in amphipods. In contrast, the less mobile metals Hg and Pb were bioaccumulated. A low toxicity of contaminated sediments, in terms of mortality and embryonic malformations of amphipods, was recorded. Results indicate that Cd, Zn, and Cu are comparatively unavailable after oxygenation of the metal sulfides. Similar results were recorded in contaminated sediments differing in redox potential, AVS, dissolved sulfides, and organic contents, suggesting that other metal ligands, in addition to AVS, are important for metal bioavailability and toxicity in anoxic and suboxic environments. PMID:11345449

  4. Field accumulative behavior of organochlorine pesticides. The role of crabs and sediment characteristics in coastal environments.

    PubMed

    Menone, Mirta L; Miglioranza, Karina S B; Botto, Florencia; Iribarne, Oscar; Aizpún de Moreno, Julia E; Moreno, Víctor J

    2006-12-01

    The influence of intertidal crab beds on the concentrations of organochlorine (OC) pesticides in sediment was studied in two different coastal environments in Argentina. Samples of male burrowing crabs (Chasmagnathus granulatus) were collected for this study. Our field data showed lower bioaccumulation of OC pesticides in crabs from sediments with a higher total organic carbon (TOC) and higher clay content. Thus, concentrations in crabs depend on the physico-chemical characteristics of the sediment where they live more than on the OC pesticide concentrations in the environment. The distribution patterns in sediment from inside and outside crab burrows were similar for both coastal areas being HCHs > or = gamma-chlordane > p,p'-DDE for San Antonio Bay (SAO), and HCHs > p,p'-DDE > or = gamma-chlordane for Mar Chiquita (MCh) coastal lagoon. OC pesticide concentrations in sediment were significantly lower inside than outside crab burrows, irrespective of the sediment physico-chemical characteristics due to the bioturbation activity of C. granulatus.

  5. Diploptene: an indicator of terrigenous organic carbon in Washington coastal sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahl, F. G.; Hayes, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The pentacyclic triterpene 17 beta(H),21 beta(H)-hop-22(29)-ene (diploptene) occurs in sediments throughout the Columbia River drainage basin and off the southern coast of Washington state in concentrations comparable to long-chain plantwax n-alkanes. The same relationship is evident for diploptene and long-chain n-alkanes in soils from the Willamette Valley. Microorganisms indigenous to soils and soil erosion are indicated as the biological source and physical process, respectively, for diploptene in coastal sediments. Similarity between the stable carbon isotopic composition (delta 13CPDB) of diploptene isolated from soil in the Willamette Valley (-31.2 +/- 0.3%) and from sediments deposited throughout the Washington coastal environment (-31.2 +/- 0.5%) supports this argument. Values of delta for diploptene in river sediments are variable and 8-17% lighter, indicating that an additional biological source such as methane-oxidizing bacteria makes a significant contribution to the diploptene record in river sediments. Selective biodegradation resulting from a difference in the physicochemical association within eroded particles can explain the absence of the more-13C-depleted form of diploptene in Washington coastal sediments, but this mechanism remains unproven.

  6. Diploptene: An indicator of terrigenous organic carbon in Washington coastal sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The pentacyclic triterpene 17[beta](H),21[beta](H)-hop-22(29)-ene (diploptene) occurs in sediments throughout the Columbia River drainage basin and off the southern coast of Washington state in concentrations comparable to long-chain plantwax n-alkanes. The same relationship is evident for diploptene and long-chain n-alkanes in soils from the Willamette Valley. Microorganisms indigenous to soils and soil erosion are indicated as the biological source and physical process, respectively, for diploptene in coastal sediments. Similarity between the stable carbon isotopic composition ([delta][sup 13]C[sub PDB]) of diploptene isolated from soil in the Willamette Valley (-31.2+/-0.3%) and from sediments deposited throughout the Washington coastal environment (-31.2+/-0.5%) supports this argument. Values of 6 for diploptene in river sediments are variable and 8-17[per thousand] lighter, indicating that an additional biological source such as methane-oxidizing bacteria makes a significant contribution to the diploptene record in river sediments. Selective biodegradation resulting from a difference in the physicochemical association within eroded particles can explain the absence of the more-[sup 13]C-depleted form of diploptene in Washington coastal sediments, but this mechanism remains unproven. 28 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Spatial variability and the fate of cesium in coastal sediments near Fukushima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, E. E.; Buesseler, K. O.

    2014-09-01

    Quantifying the amount of cesium incorporated into marine sediments as a result of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident has proven challenging due to the limited multi-core sampling from within the 30 km zone around the facility; the inherent spatial heterogeneities in ocean sediments; and the potential for inventory fluctuations due to physical, biological, and chemical processes. Using 210Pb, 234Th, 137Cs, and 134Cs profiles from 20 sediment cores, coastal sediment inventories were reevaluated. A 137Cs sediment inventory of 100 ± 50 TBq was found for an area of 55 000 km2 using cores from this study and a total of 130 ± 60 TBq using an additional 181 samples. These inventories represent less than 1% of the estimated 15-30 PBq of cesium released during the FDNPP disaster. The time needed for surface sediment activities (0 to 3 cm) at the 20 locations to be reduced by 50% via sediment mixing was estimated to range from 0.4 to 26 yr. Due to the observed variability in mixing rates, grain size, and inventories, additional cores are needed to improve these estimates and capture the full extent of cesium penetration into the shallow coastal sediments, which was deeper than 14 cm for all cores retrieved from water depths less than 150 m.

  8. Application of Remote Sensing to Assess the Impact of Short Term Climate Variability on Coastal Sedimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeller, Christopher C.; Gunshor, Mathew M.; Menzel, W. Paul; Huh, Oscar K.; Walker, Nan D.; Rouse, Lawrence J.; Frey, Herbert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin and Louisiana State University have teamed to study the forcing of winter season cold frontal wind systems on sediment distribution patterns and geomorphology in the Louisiana coastal zone. Wind systems associated with cold fronts have been shown to modify coastal circulation and resuspend sediments along the microtidal Louisiana coast. The assessment includes quantifying the influence of cumulative winter season atmospheric forcing (through surface wind observations) from year to year in response to short term climate variability, such as El Nino events. A correlation between winter cyclone frequency and the strength of El Nino events has been suggested. The atmospheric forcing data are being correlated to geomorphic measurements along western Louisiana's prograding muddy coast. Remote sensing data is being used to map and track sediment distribution patterns for various wind conditions. Transferring a suspended sediment concentration (SSC) algorithm to EOS MODIS observations will enable estimates of SSC in case 2 waters over the global domain. Progress in Year 1 of this study has included data collection and analysis of wind observations for atmospheric forcing characterization, a field activity (TX-2001) to collect in situ water samples with co-incident remote sensing measurements from the NASA ER-2 based MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) and the EOS Terra based MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, aerial photography and of sediment burial pipe field measurements along the prograding muddy Chenier Plain coast of western Louisiana for documenting coastal change in that dynamic region, and routine collection of MODIS 250 in resolution data for monitoring coastal sediment patterns. The data sets are being used in a process to transfer an SSC estimation algorithm to the MODIS platform. Work is underway on assessing coastal transport for the winter 2000-01 season. Water level data for use in a Geomorphic Impact

  9. Contaminated Coastal Sediments in the Northeastern United States: Changing Sources Over Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholtz ten Brink, M. R.; Bothner, M. H.; Mecray, E. L.

    2001-05-01

    Regional studies of coastal sediments in the northeastern United States, conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, show that trace metal contamination from land-based activities has occurred near all major urban centers. Concentrations of metals, such as Cu, Pb, Zn, Hg, and Ag, are 2-5 times background levels in sediments of Boston Harbor, Long Island Sound (LIS), offshore of Gulf of Maine coastal cities, and in the New York Bight (NYB). Contaminant accumulations are strongly influenced by sediment lithology and sediment transport properties in local areas, in addition to proximity to pollutant sources. Inventories are greatest in muddy depo-centers of the NYB, western LIS, and Boston Harbor. Based on sediment cores, the onset of metal contamination in the northeast occurs in the mid-1800s, with inputs increasing in the mid-1900s and decreasing (20-50%) from the 1970s to present. The increases correlate with local population growth and abundance of a bacterial sewage indicator, Clostridium perfringens. Increases of N and Corg in cores also reflect population growth and changing wastewater treatment practices. Corg values reach a high of 6% in buried sediments near the NYB disposal sites. Cores from western LIS have increasing values of C, N, and P in the most recently deposited sediments, in contrast to metal concentrations that have decreased in recent years. Cessation of sludge disposal and reduction of chemical discharges have been effective at reducing inputs; however, contaminated sediment deposits remain in rivers (e.g., the Charles), floodplains (e.g., the Housatonic), and coastal sediments. In the future, high concentrations of metal contaminants stored in buried sediments of marine and fluvial systems are likely to be a lingering and significant source of pollution to coastal environments. Until more effective source-reduction occurs, land-use and industrial practices associated with population growth in the northeast will remain dominant factors for

  10. Effects of Emergent Vegetation on Sediment Dynamics within a Retreating Coastal Marshland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellern, C.; Grossman, E.; Fuller, R.; Wallin, D.; Linneman, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal emergent vegetation in estuaries physically interrupts flow within the water column, reduces wave energy and increases sediment deposition. Previous workers conclude that wave attenuation rates decrease exponentially with distance from the marsh edge and are dependent on site and species-specific plant characteristics (Yang et al., 2011). Sediment deposition may exhibit similar patterns; however, sediment, geomorphic and habitat models seldom integrate site-specific biophysical plant parameters into change analyses. We paired vegetation and sediment dynamic studies to: (1) characterize vegetation structure, (2) estimate sediment available for deposition, (3) estimate rate, distribution and composition of sediment deposits, (4) determine sediment accumulation on vegetation, (5) compare sediment deposition within dense tidal wetland relative to non-vegetated tidal flat. These studies integrate a variety of monitoring methods, including the use of sediment traps, turbidity sensors, side-on photographs of vegetation and remote sensing image analysis. We compared sedimentation data with vegetation characteristics and spatial distribution data to examine the relative role of vegetation morphologic traits (species, stem density, biomass, distribution, tidal channels, etc.) on sediment dynamics. Our study is focused on Port Susan Bay of Washington State; a protected delta that has experienced up to 1 kilometer of marsh retreat (loss) over the past fifty years. Preliminary results show that the highest winter deposition occurred in the high marsh/mid-marsh boundary, up to 300m inland of the marsh edge, where bulrush species are most dense. These results will inform restoration efforts aimed at reestablishing sediment supply to the retreating marshland. This research is necessary to understand the vulnerability and adaptability of coastal marshlands to climate change related stressors such as, increased water levels (sea-level rise) and wave energy.

  11. Bacterial contribution to manganese oxidation in a deep coastal sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edenborn, H. M.; Paquin, Y.; Chateauneuf, G.

    1985-12-01

    The characteristics of Mn(II) removal from sediment porewater and the potential role of manganese-oxidizing bacteria in this process were examined in sediments from a 335-m deep station in the Laurentian Trough of the St. Lawrence estuary. Manganese-oxidizing bacteria were most abundant in the thin layer of oxidized surface sediment, where Mn(II) removal rates were also fastest. The first-order rate constants for Mn(II) removal decreased from 1·2 × 10 3 day -1 to 6·6 day -1 over the first 30-mm depth. In experimental slurries, sediments removed Mn(II) from reduced zone porewater by a two-step process: a rapid saturation of Mn(II) binding sites was followed by a slower O 2-enhanced removal rate which paralleled the apparent rate of Mn(II) oxidation. Sodium azide and mercuric chloride were tested specifically for their usefulness as bacterial poisons in sediment slurry systems. Sodium azide interfered with Mn(II) removal at low concentrations and was not an effective poison. Mercuric chloride inhibited bacterial activity at concentrations far lower than those at which significant interference of Mn(II) removal occurred. The response of sediment slurries treated with mercuric chloride indicated that the initial oxidation of sorbed Mn(II) was not bacterially-mediated under the experimental conditions tested.

  12. SEDIMENT CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICITY ASSOCIATED WITH A COASTAL GOLF COURSE COMPLEX.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing density of golf courses represents a potential source of sediment contamination to nearby coastal areas, the chemical and biological magnitude of which is almost unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of contaminants and toxicities...

  13. Effects of Stormwater Pipe Size and Rainfall on Sediment and Nutrients Delivered to a Coastal Bayou

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pollutants discharged from stormwater pipes can cause water quality and ecosystem problems in coastal bayous. A study was conducted to characterize sediment and nutrients discharged by small and large (, 20 cm and .20 cm in internal diameters, respectively) pipes under different ...

  14. Sediment loss and runoff from cropland in a Southeast Atlantic Coastal Plain landscape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Widespread implementation of conservation-tillage (CsT) systems during cotton and peanut production in the Atlantic Coastal Plain region (USA) has substantially reduced erosion and sediment loss. However, benefits of CsT in these cropping systems are being threatened by weather shifts that include i...

  15. PERIPHYTON AND SEDIMENT BIOASSESSMENT AS INDICATORS OF THE EFFECT OF A COASTAL PULP MILL WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two year study was conducted near Port St. Joe, Florida, in a coastal transportation canal and bay receiving combined municipal and pulp mill wastewater. The objective of the study was to determine the effectiveness of periphyton analysis techniques and sediment toxicity as ind...

  16. Sediment Quality in Near Coastal Waters of the Gulf of Mexico: Influence of Hurricane Katrina

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results from this study represent a synoptic analysis of sediment quality in coastal waters of Lake Pontchartrain and Mississippi Sound two months after the landfall of Hurricane Katrina. Post-hurricane conditions were compared to pre-hurricane (2000-2004) conditions, for se...

  17. Geostatistical Modeling of the Spatial Distribution of Sediment Oxygen Demand Within a Coastal Plain Blackwater Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blackwater streams of the Georgia Coastal Plain are often listed as impaired due to chronically low DO levels. Previous research has shown that high sediment oxygen demand (SOD) values, a hypothesized cause of lowered DO within these waters, are significantly positively correlated with TOC within th...

  18. Metal contamination in water, sediment and biota from a semi-enclosed coastal area.

    PubMed

    Aly, Walid; Williams, Ian D; Hudson, Malcolm D

    2013-05-01

    This study identifies and quantifies the spatial variations of metal contamination in water, sediment and biota: the common cockle (Cerastoderma edule) and the Mermaid's glove sponge (Haliclona oculata), within a heavily anthropogenically impacted semi-enclosed estuarine-coastal area with a low ability to disperse and flush contaminants (Poole Harbour, UK). The results showed that metal contamination was detected in all environmental compartments. Water was polluted with As, and Hg sediment metals were mostly within "the possible effect range" in which adverse effects occasionally occurs. Cockles had considerable concentrations of Ni, Ag and Hg in areas close to pollution sources, and sponges accumulate Cu and Zn with very high magnitude. A systematic monitoring approach that includes biological monitoring techniques, which covers all embayments, is needed, and an integrated management of the semi-enclosed coastal zones should be based on the overall hydrological characteristics of these sensitive areas and their ability to self-restore which is different than open coastal zones.

  19. Amino acid biogeo- and stereochemistry in coastal Chilean sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomstein, Bente Aa.; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Schubert, Carsten J.; Niggemann, Jutta

    2006-06-01

    The spatial distribution of total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA) and amino acid enantiomers ( D- and L-forms) was investigated in sediments underlying two contrasting Chilean upwelling regions: at ˜23 °S off Antofagasta and at ˜36 °S off Concepción. The contribution of amino acids to total organic carbon (%T AAC: 7-14%) and total nitrogen (%T AAN: 23-38%) in surface sediments decreased with increasing water depth (from 126 to 1350 m) indicating that organic matter becomes increasingly decomposed in surface sediments at greater water depth. Changes in the ratio between the protein amino acid aspartate and its non-protein degradation product β-alanine confirmed this observation. Furthermore, estimates of THAA mineralization showed that sedimentary amino acid reactivity decreased with both increasing water depth as well as progressive degradation status of the organic matter that was incorporated into the sediment. Reactivity of organic matter in the sediment was also assessed using the Degradation Index (DI) developed by [Dauwe, B., Middelburg, J.J., 1998. Amino acids and hexosamines as indicators of organic matter degradation state in North Sea sediments. Limnol. Oceanogr.43, pp. 782-798.]. Off Concepción, DI was successfully applied to examine the degradation status of sedimentary organic matter at different water depths. However, unexpected results were obtained at the Antofagasta stations as DI increased with sediment depth, suggesting more degraded organic matter at the surface than deeper in the cores. The contribution of peptidoglycan amino acids to THAA was estimated from the concentrations of D-aspartate, D-glutamic acid, D-serine, and D-alanine. Peptidoglycan amino acids accounted for >18% of THAA in all investigated samples. In surface sediments peptidoglycan amino acids accounted for a progressively larger fraction of THAA at increasing water depths (up to >26%). Further, the contribution of peptidoglycan amino acids to THAA increased with

  20. Integrated Assessment of Heavy Metal Contamination in Sediments from a Coastal Industrial Basin, NE China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyu; Liu, Lijuan; Wang, Yugang; Luo, Geping; Chen, Xi; Yang, Xiaoliang; Gao, Bin; He, Xingyuan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the current status of metal pollution of the sediments from urban-stream, estuary and Jinzhou Bay of the coastal industrial city, NE China. Forty surface sediment samples from river, estuary and bay and one sediment core from Jinzhou bay were collected and analyzed for heavy metal concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni and Mn. The data reveals that there was a remarkable change in the contents of heavy metals among the sampling sediments, and all the mean values of heavy metal concentration were higher than the national guideline values of marine sediment quality of China (GB 18668-2002). This is one of the most polluted of the world’s impacted coastal systems. Both the correlation analyses and geostatistical analyses showed that Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd have a very similar spatial pattern and come from the industrial activities, and the concentration of Mn mainly caused by natural factors. The estuary is the most polluted area with extremely high potential ecological risk; however the contamination decreased with distance seaward of the river estuary. This study clearly highlights the urgent need to make great efforts to control the industrial emission and the exceptionally severe heavy metal pollution in the coastal area, and the immediate measures should be carried out to minimize the rate of contamination, and extent of future pollution problems. PMID:22768107

  1. Integrated assessment of heavy metal contamination in sediments from a coastal industrial basin, NE China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyu; Liu, Lijuan; Wang, Yugang; Luo, Geping; Chen, Xi; Yang, Xiaoliang; Gao, Bin; He, Xingyuan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the current status of metal pollution of the sediments from urban-stream, estuary and Jinzhou Bay of the coastal industrial city, NE China. Forty surface sediment samples from river, estuary and bay and one sediment core from Jinzhou bay were collected and analyzed for heavy metal concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni and Mn. The data reveals that there was a remarkable change in the contents of heavy metals among the sampling sediments, and all the mean values of heavy metal concentration were higher than the national guideline values of marine sediment quality of China (GB 18668-2002). This is one of the most polluted of the world's impacted coastal systems. Both the correlation analyses and geostatistical analyses showed that Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd have a very similar spatial pattern and come from the industrial activities, and the concentration of Mn mainly caused by natural factors. The estuary is the most polluted area with extremely high potential ecological risk; however the contamination decreased with distance seaward of the river estuary. This study clearly highlights the urgent need to make great efforts to control the industrial emission and the exceptionally severe heavy metal pollution in the coastal area, and the immediate measures should be carried out to minimize the rate of contamination, and extent of future pollution problems. PMID:22768107

  2. Quantifying the dilution of the radiocesium contamination in Fukushima coastal river sediment (2011–2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Olivier; Laceby, J. Patrick; Onda, Yuichi; Wakiyama, Yoshifumi; Jaegler, Hugo; Lefèvre, Irène

    2016-10-01

    Fallout from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident resulted in a 3000-km2 radioactive contamination plume. Here, we model the progressive dilution of the radiocesium contamination in 327 sediment samples from two neighboring catchments with different timing of soil decontamination. Overall, we demonstrate that there has been a ~90% decrease of the contribution of upstream contaminated soils to sediment transiting the coastal plains between 2012 (median – M – contribution of 73%, mean absolute deviation – MAD – of 27%) and 2015 (M 9%, MAD 6%). The occurrence of typhoons and the progress of decontamination in different tributaries of the Niida River resulted in temporary increases in local contamination. However, the much lower contribution of upstream contaminated soils to coastal plain sediment in November 2015 demonstrates that the source of the easily erodible, contaminated material has potentially been removed by decontamination, diluted by subsoils, or eroded and transported to the Pacific Ocean.

  3. Quantifying the dilution of the radiocesium contamination in Fukushima coastal river sediment (2011–2015)

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, Olivier; Laceby, J. Patrick; Onda, Yuichi; Wakiyama, Yoshifumi; Jaegler, Hugo; Lefèvre, Irène

    2016-01-01

    Fallout from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident resulted in a 3000-km2 radioactive contamination plume. Here, we model the progressive dilution of the radiocesium contamination in 327 sediment samples from two neighboring catchments with different timing of soil decontamination. Overall, we demonstrate that there has been a ~90% decrease of the contribution of upstream contaminated soils to sediment transiting the coastal plains between 2012 (median – M – contribution of 73%, mean absolute deviation – MAD – of 27%) and 2015 (M 9%, MAD 6%). The occurrence of typhoons and the progress of decontamination in different tributaries of the Niida River resulted in temporary increases in local contamination. However, the much lower contribution of upstream contaminated soils to coastal plain sediment in November 2015 demonstrates that the source of the easily erodible, contaminated material has potentially been removed by decontamination, diluted by subsoils, or eroded and transported to the Pacific Ocean. PMID:27694832

  4. Using radiosilver and plutonium isotopes to trace the dispersion of contaminated sediment in Fukushima coastal catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, O.; Ayrault, S.; Pointurier, F.; Onda, Y.; Laceby, J. P.; Lepage, H.; Chartin, C.; Cirella, M.; Pottin, A. C.; Hubert, A.; Lefèvre, I.

    2015-12-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident in March 2011 resulted in a 3000-km² radioactive pollution plume consisting predominantly of radiocesium (137Cs and 134Cs). This plume is drained by several rivers to the Pacific Ocean after flowing through less contaminated, but densely inhabited coastal plains. As the redistribution of radionuclide contaminated sediment could expose the local population to higher radiation rates, novel fingerprinting methods were developed to trace the downstream dispersion of contaminated sediment. First, the heterogeneous deposition of metastable silver-110 (110mAg) across these coastal catchments was used to investigate sediment migration. In particular, the 110mAg/137Cs activity ratio was measured in soils and river sediment demonstrating the occurrence of a seasonal cycle of soil erosion during typhoons and spring snowmelt in 2011 and 2012. However, due to the rapid decay of 110mAg (half-life of 250 days), alternative methods were required to continue tracking sediment from 2013 onwards. One promising method includes the analyses of plutonium isotopes to further understand sediment migration in the Fukushima region. For example, 241Pu/239Pu atom ratios measured in sediment collected in Fukushima coastal rivers shortly after the accident were shown to be significantly higher (0.0017 - 0.0884) than corresponding values attributed to the global fallout (0.00113 ± 0.00008). Additional analyses were conducted on sediment sampled in 2013 and 2014 after the start of decontamination works. These analyses show that the 241Pu/239Pu atom ratios decreased towards the global fallout values in rivers draining decontaminated paddy fields, demonstrating the effectiveness of remediation works.

  5. Mercury contamination in the estuaries and coastal sediments of the Strait of Malacca.

    PubMed

    Looi, Ley Juen; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Hashim, Zailina

    2015-01-01

    Sediment is a great indicator for assessing coastal mercury contamination. This work profiled the magnitude of mercury pollution in the tropical estuaries and coastal sediments of the Strait of Malacca. Mercury was extracted through the ultrasound-assisted mercury extraction method and analyzed using the flow injection mercury system. The mean concentration of mercury in the sediment samples was 61.43 ± 23.25 μg/kg, ranging from 16.55 ± 0.61 to 114.02 ± 1.54 μg/kg. Geoaccumulation index revealed that a total of 13% of sampling sites were moderately enriched with mercury. The northern part of the Strait of Malacca had the highest mean mercury (Hg) concentration (76.36 ± 27.25 μg/kg), followed by the southern (64.59 ± 16.09 μg/kg) and central (39.33 ± 12.91 μg/kg) parts. Sediment mercury concentration in the current study was lower than other regions like Japan, China, Indian, east Mediterranean, and Taiwan. When compared to the Canadian interim marine and freshwater sediment, China's soil interim environmental guidelines, mercury contamination in the Strait of Malacca was found to be below these permissible limits. Sediment organic matter content was found to have significant correlation with sediment mercury concentration. This study could provide the latest benchmark of mercury pollution and prove beneficial to future pollution studies in relation to monitoring works in tropical estuaries and coastal sediments.

  6. Relative role of eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms in phenanthrene transformation in coastal sediments

    SciTech Connect

    MacGillivray, A.R.; Shiaris, M.P. )

    1994-04-01

    The relative role of eukaryotic versus prokaryotic microorganisms in phenanthrene transformation was measured in slurries of coastal sediment by two different approaches: detection of marker metabolites and use of selective inhibitors on phenanthrene biotransformation. Phenanthrene biotransformation was measured by polar metabolite formation and CO[sub 2] evolution from [9-[sup 14]C]phenanthrene. Both yeasts and bacteria transformed phenanthrene in slurries of coastal sediment. Two products of phenanthrene oxidation by fungi, phenanthrene trans-3,4-dihydrodiol and 3-phenanthrol, were produced in yeast-inoculated sterile sediment. However, only products of phenanthrene oxidation typical of bacterial transformation, 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid and phenanthrene cis-3,4-dihydrodiol, were isolated from slurries of coastal sediment with natural microbial populations. Phenanthrene trans-dihydrodiols or other products of fungal oxidation of phenanthrene were not detected in the slurry containing a natural microbial population. A predominant role for bacterial transformation of phenanthrene was also suggested from selective inhibitor experiments. Addition of streptomycin to slurries, at a concentration which suppressed bacterial viable counts and rates of [methyl-[sup 3]H]thymidine uptake, completely inhibited phenanthrene transformation. Treatment with colchicine, at a concentration which suppressed yeast viable counts, depressed phenanthrene transformation by 40%, and this was likely due to nontarget inhibition of bacterial activity. The relative contribution of eukaryotic microorganisms to phenanthrene transformation in inoculated sterile sediment was estimated to be less than 3% of the total activity. We conclude that the predominant degraders of phenanthrene in muddy coastal sediments are bacteria and not eukaryotic microorganisms. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Coastal circulation and sediment dynamics in Hanalei Bay, Kaua'i, Hawaii, part III, studies of sediment toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Robert S.; Nipper, Marion; Field, Michael; Biedenbach, James M.

    2006-01-01

    Toxicity tests are commonly conducted as a measure of the bioavailability of toxic chemicals to biota in an environment. Chemical analyses alone are insufficient to determine whether contaminants pose a threat to biota. Porewater toxicity tests are extremely sensitive to a broad range of contaminants in marine environments and provide ecologically relevant data on sensitive life stages. The inclusion of porewater toxicity testing as an additional indicator of sediment quality provides a more comprehensive picture of contaminant effects in these sensitive habitats. In this study purple-spined sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development porewater toxicity tests were used to evaluate the sediments collected from the coastal environment around Hanalei Bay, Kaua’i, Hawaii. These tests have been used previously to assess the bioavailability of contaminants associated with sediments in the vicinity of coral reefs.

  8. Physiological and evolutionary potential of microorganisms from the Canterbury Basin subseafloor, a metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Gaboyer, Frédéric; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Alain, Karine

    2015-05-01

    Subseafloor sediments represent a large reservoir of organic matter and are inhabited by microbial groups of the three domains of life. Besides impacting the planetary geochemical cycles, the subsurface biosphere remains poorly understood, notably questions related to possible metabolic pathways and selective advantages that may be deployed by buried microorganisms (sporulation, response to stress, dormancy). In order to better understand physiological potentials and possible lifestyles of subseafloor microbial communities, we analyzed two metagenomes from subseafloor sediments collected at 31 mbsf (meters below the sea floor) and 136 mbsf in the Canterbury Basin. Metagenomic phylogenetic and functional diversities were very similar. Phylogenetic diversity was mostly represented by Chloroflexi, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria for Bacteria and by Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota for Archaea. Predicted anaerobic metabolisms encompassed fermentation, methanogenesis and utilization of fatty acids, aromatic and halogenated substrates. Potential processes that may confer selective advantages for subsurface microorganisms included sporulation, detoxication equipment or osmolyte accumulation. Annotation of genomic fragments described the metabolic versatility of Chloroflexi, Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group and Euryarchaeota and showed frequent recombination events within subsurface taxa. This study confirmed that the subseafloor habitat is unique compared to other habitats at the (meta)-genomic level and described physiological potential of still uncultured groups. PMID:25873465

  9. Sediment distribution and coastal processes in Cook Inlet, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. M.; Gatto, L. W.; Mckim, H. L.; Petrone, A.

    1973-01-01

    Regional hydrologic and oceanographic relationships in Cook Inlet, Alaska have been recognized from sequential ERTS-1 MSS imagery. Current patterns are visible in the inlet because of differential concentrations of suspended sediment. The circulation patterns within Cook Inlet are controlled primarily by the interaction between the semi-diurnal tides and the counter clockwise Alaska current. In general, heavily sediment laden water is seen to be confined to portions of the inlet north of the Forelands and west of Kalgin Island. Tongues of clear oceanic water are observed to enter the inlet through Kennedy Channel along the east shoreline in the vicinity of Cape Elizabeth. A recurring counterclockwise circulation pattern observed around Kalgin Island seems to result from the interplay of the northerly moving water along the east shore and the southerly moving, sediment laden, water along the west side of the inlet. Prominent, fresh water plumes, heavily laden with sediment are visible at the mouths of all major rivers. Relect plumes from as many as three tidal stages have been recognized.

  10. Sediment budget variation at watershed scale due to anthropogenic pressures, and its relationship to coastal erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Antonello; Adamo, Maria; Canora, Filomena

    2014-05-01

    The transfer of sediments from hydrographic basins towards the coast is a significant pathway of material transfer on Earth. In sedimentary environment, the main portion of sediment that enters the coastal areas is derived originally from erosion in the coastal watersheds. Extensive anthropogenic pressures carried out within coastal basins have long shown negative impacts on littoral environments. In fluvial systems, sediments trapped behind dams and in-stream gravel mining cause the reduction in sediment supply to the coast. Along the Jonian littoral of the Basilicata Region (southern Italy), natural coastal processes have been severely disrupted since the second half of the 20th century as a result of riverbed sand and gravel mining and dam construction, when economic advantages were measured in terms of the development of infrastructure, water storage, and hydropower production for the agricultural, industrial and socio-economic development of the area. Particularly, the large numbers of dams and impoundments that have been built in the hydrographic basins have led a signi?cant reduction on river sediment loads. As a result, the Jonian littoral is experiencing a catalysed erosion phenomenon. In order to increase understanding of the morpho-dynamics of the Jonian littoral environment and more fully appreciate the amount of coastal erosion, an evaluation of the sediment budget change due to dam construction within the hydrographic basins of the Basilicata Region needs to be explored. Since quantitative data on decadal trends in river sediment supply before and after dam construction are lacking, as well as updated dam silting values, river basin assessment of the spatial patterns and estimated amount of sediment erosion and deposition are important in evaluating changes in the sediment budget. As coastal areas are being affected by an increasing number of population and socio-economic activities, the amount of sediment deficit at the littoral can permit to

  11. Coastal circulation and sediment dynamics in Hanalei Bay, Kaua'i, Hawaii: Part II: tracking recent fluvial sedimentation; isotope stratigraphy obtained in Summer 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Field, Michael E.; Bothner, Michael H.; Logan, Joshua B.; Casso, Michael A.; Baldwin, Sandra M.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2006-01-01

    Delivery and dispersal of fluvial sediment in Hanalei Bay, Kaua’i, Hawaii, have important implications for the health of local coral reefs. The reef community in Hanalei Bay represents a relatively healthy ecosystem. However, the reefs are periodically stressed by storm waves, and increases in sediment and dissolved substances from the Hanalei River have the potential to cause additional stress. Increased turbidity and sedimentation on corals during Hanalei River floods that occur in seasons of low wave energy, when sediment would not be readily remobilized and advected out of the bay, could affect the health and sustainability of coral reefs and the many associated species. Measurements of short-lived isotopes 7Be and 137Cs in sediment cores have been used to trace the thickness and distribution of terrestrial sediment in Hanalei Bay, in order to assess spatial and temporal patterns of sediment deposition and remobilization relative to coral-reef locations. A third isotope, 210Pb, derived primarily from seawater, provides additional information about recent sedimentary history. Isotope profiles and observations of sedimentary facies from cores collected at multiple locations in June 2005, and again in August 2005, indicate the presence of recent fluvial sediment and organic debris in the east part of the bay near the mouth of the Hanalei River. Away from the immediate vicinity of the river mouth, sediment in the uppermost 1 m below the sea floor had not retained a significant quantity of fluvial sediment within the eight months prior to either sampling effort. During the study interval in summer 2005 the Hanalei River had no major floods and there was relatively little sediment input to the bay. Sediment away from the river mouth was dominated by carbonate sand, although some terrestrial sediment was present in sub-sea-floor horizons. Sedimentary facies and isotope inventories throughout the bay showed substantial spatial heterogeneity. Sediment cores will be

  12. Integrating turbulent flow, biogeochemical, and poromechanical processes in rippled coastal sediment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. B.; Cook, P. L.; Jiang, H.; Traykovski, P.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal sediments are the locus of multiple coupled processes. Turbulent flow associated with waves and currents induces porewater flow through sediment leading to fluid exchange with the water column. This porewater flow is determined by the hydraulic and elastic properties of the sediment. Porewater flow also ultimately controls biogeochemical reactions in the sediment whose rates depend on delivery of reactants and export of products. We present results from numerical modeling studies directed at integrating these processes with the goal of shedding light on these complex environments. We show how denitrification rates inside ripples are largest at intermediate permeability which represents the optimal balance of reactant delivery and anoxic conditions. It is clear that nutrient cycling and distribution within the sediment is strongly dependent on the character of the multidimensional flow field inside of sediment. More recent studies illustrate the importance of the elastic properties of the saturated sediment on modulating fluid exchange between the water column and the sediment when pressure fluctuations along the sediment-water interface occur at the millisecond scale. Pressure fluctuations occur at this temporal scale due to turbulence and associated shedding of vortices due to the ripple geometry. This suggests that biogeochemical cycling may also be affected by these high-frequency elastic effects. Future studies should be directed towards this and should take advantage of modeling tools such as those we present.

  13. Linking the historic 2011 Mississippi River flood to coastal wetland sedimentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falcini, Federico; Khan, Nicole S.; Macelloni, Leonardo; Horton, Benjamin P.; Lutken, Carol B.; McKee, Karen L.; Santoleri, Rosalia; Colella, Simone; Li, Chunyan; Volpe, Gianluca; D’Emidio, Marco; Salusti, Alessandro; Jerolmack, Douglas J.

    2012-01-01

    Wetlands in the Mississippi River deltaic plain are deteriorating in part because levees and control structures starve them of sediment. In Spring of 2011 a record-breaking flood brought discharge on the lower Mississippi River to dangerous levels, forcing managers to divert up to 3500 m3/s-1 of water to the Atchafalaya River Basin. Here we quantify differences between the Mississippi and Atchafalaya River inundation and sediment-plume patterns using field-calibrated satellite data, and assess the impact these outflows had on wetland sedimentation. We characterize hydrodynamics and suspended sediment patterns of the Mississippi River plume using in-situ data collected during the historic flood. We show that the focused, high-momentum jet from the leveed Mississippi delivered sediment far offshore. In contrast, the plume from the Atchafalaya was more diffuse; diverted water inundated a large area; and sediment was trapped within the coastal current. Maximum sedimentation (up to several centimetres) occurred in the Atchafalaya Basin despite the larger sediment load carried by the Mississippi. Minimum accumulation occurred along the shoreline between these river sources. Our findings provide a mechanistic link between river-mouth dynamics and wetland sedimentation patterns that is relevant for plans to restore deltaic wetlands using artificial diversions.

  14. Short- and long-term sediment transport in western Bohai Bay and coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Huan; Zhang, Weiguo; Jia, Li; Weinstein, Michael P.; Zhang, Qiufeng; Yuan, Dekui; Tao, Jianhua; Yu, Lizhong

    2010-05-01

    Sediment cores (˜40-100 cm) were collected at 12 locations in the western Bohai Bay, the Haihe River estuary, the Yongding River estuary and the Tianjin Harbor, China, during 24-26 July 2007, and analyzed for 7Be and 210Pb activities. Due to localized hydrodynamic patterns and frequent disturbance from dredging activities, steady-state sedimentation features were not observed in this study. As demonstrated in the 7Be and 210Pb profiles, the temporal and spatial variations of these radionuclides support a non-steady state depositional environment in the study area. By comparing 7Be and 210Pb inventories in the sediments with those of the atmospheric source, we found that: 1) sediments dredged from the Tianjin Harbor or eroded from nearby estuarine and coastal areas are retained in the western Bohai Bay for relatively short intervals (several months), as reflected in the relatively high 7Be inventories in the western Bohai Bay; 2) over the long-term (years to decades), 210Pb inventories in the sediments imply that there is a net on-shore transport of sediments, and the sediments are mass-balanced in the entire study area. Overall, our results suggest that the sediments are retained in the estuaries and the western Bohai Bay despite local variability in sediment dynamics and disturbance due to human activities.

  15. Design of a semi-autonomous boat for measurements of coastal sedimentation and erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D.; Cross, L.; Rivet, J.; Hall, S.

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of sediment deposition and erosion in coastal areas is a challenge due to soft shifting sediments, but is critical to assessing loss or restoration of coastal sediments and wetlands. The aim of this project was to design and construct a semi-autonomous boat with water depth measuring capabilities. It was intended to map the depth of coastal wetlands to determine erosion rates and assess coastal restoration effects. Depth-measuring equipment was incorporated into an autonomous pontoon boat powered by solar panels. The propulsion system consisted of two paddlewheels and two-way motors to allow movement and positioning for measurements. Modifications included a lightweight, hard coating on the pontoons and powder-coating the frame to extend their usable life. A microcontroller controlled the boat and captured depth data from sensors and location data with a GPS system. The depth measuring system consisted of a pulley and counter system that completed each measurement in less than 45 seconds. This allowed the boat to take approximately 400 measurements per day. Net accuracy was approximately 3 cm in the tested configuration. The boat can continually measure the depth of specified areas in the wetlands; with this data, the change in depth can be monitored to see the effects of restoration projects.

  16. Mapping the in situ microscale distribution of microphytobenthic biomass in coastal sediments: a hyperspectral methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennu, A.; Volkenborn, N.; Janssen, F.; Polerecky, L.

    2012-04-01

    Microphytobenthic primary production is the fundament of the trophic food web in coastal marine sediments. The concentration of photopigments, which are a proxy for phototrophic biomass, in the surface sediment is considered as a basic environmental descriptor in benthic studies. The mechanisms that control the distribution of benthic microalgae are complex, ranging from physico-chemical drivers (e.g. tidal action, nutrient availability) to ecological drivers (e.g. grazing). Here we present a novel, field-deployable hyperspectral imaging system that allows non-invasive in situ mapping of the photosynthetic microalgal biomass distribution with a high spatial (<1mm) and temporal (minutes) resolution. Using this system, we found a remarkably heterogeneous and dynamic distribution of microalgae in surficial intertidal sediments. These distributions were tightly linked to sediment surface topography (e.g. ripples) and to the distribution and activity of benthic infauna. We hypothesize that this correlation is facilitated by the influence of these factors on the advective transport of porewater and the associated fluxes of dissolved nutrients across the sediment-water interface. We argue that the utility of the high-resolution hyperspectral imaging method overcomes the inadequate resolution of traditional methods based on sedimentary chlorophyll extraction, and significantly improves our understanding of the processes that control benthic productivity in coastal sediments.

  17. Iron-mediated anaerobic oxidation of methane in brackish coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Egger, Matthias; Rasigraf, Olivia; Sapart, Célia J; Jilbert, Tom; Jetten, Mike S M; Röckmann, Thomas; van der Veen, Carina; Bândă, Narcisa; Kartal, Boran; Ettwig, Katharina F; Slomp, Caroline P

    2015-01-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and its biological conversion in marine sediments, largely controlled by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), is a crucial part of the global carbon cycle. However, little is known about the role of iron oxides as an oxidant for AOM. Here we provide the first field evidence for iron-dependent AOM in brackish coastal surface sediments and show that methane produced in Bothnian Sea sediments is oxidized in distinct zones of iron- and sulfate-dependent AOM. At our study site, anthropogenic eutrophication over recent decades has led to an upward migration of the sulfate/methane transition zone in the sediment. Abundant iron oxides and high dissolved ferrous iron indicate iron reduction in the methanogenic sediments below the newly established sulfate/methane transition. Laboratory incubation studies of these sediments strongly suggest that the in situ microbial community is capable of linking methane oxidation to iron oxide reduction. Eutrophication of coastal environments may therefore create geochemical conditions favorable for iron-mediated AOM and thus increase the relevance of iron-dependent methane oxidation in the future. Besides its role in mitigating methane emissions, iron-dependent AOM strongly impacts sedimentary iron cycling and related biogeochemical processes through the reduction of large quantities of iron oxides.

  18. Organochlorines in sediments and mussels collected from coastal sites along the Pearl River Delta, South China.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhan-qiang

    2004-01-01

    The level and pattern of residues of organochlorine pesticide and polychlorinated biphenyls(PCBs) were analyzed in sediment and mussel (Perna viridis) samples from ten coastal sites along the Pearl River Delta, South China. The range of total HCH was < 0.01 to 0.29 ng/g freeze-dried weight in sediment, and < 0.01 to 1.35 ng/g lipid weight in mussels. Average total DDTs concentrations ranged from < 0.01 to 1.04 ng/g in sediment, and < 0.01 to 148.5 ng/g in mussels. Average total PCB concentrations ranged from 16.4 to 198.6 ng/g in sediment, and from 41 to 729.2 ng/g in mussels. Organochlorine pesticide and PCBs in mussels and sediments presented similar distribution patterns. The regression analysis indicated that PCBs concentrations in mussels were significantly correlated (p < 0.01) with concentrations in sediments. However, their concentrations in mussels were several times higher than the concentration detected in surrounding sediments. The major fraction of DDT related compounds measured in mussels and sediments was DDD. Based on average PCB concentrations, penta-, hexa-, and tetrachlorobiphenyls were preferentially accumulated by mussels as compared to the average sediment composition. According to the present results,three organochlorine polluted "hot spot" sites, including Victoria Harbour, Lingding Yang and Huangmao Sea, were found in the Pearl River estuarine zone. HCHs, DDTs and PCBs in all mussel samples were below the limits of 2, 0.2 and 5.0 microg/g wet weight recommended by the Technical Group of Guangdong Coastal Zone Resource Comprehensive Survey and U. S. Food and Drug Administration.

  19. Sea-level, sediment supply and coastal changes: Examples from the coast of Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, R. W. G.; Johnston, T. W.; McKenna, J.; Orford, J. D.

    Sediment supply and pre-existing shoreline morphology are crucial factors in controlling coastal changes due to sea-level rise. Using examples from both southeast and northeast Ireland, it can be shown that sea-level change may trigger a sequence of events which leads to both static and dynamic shoreline equilibrium. Cliff erosion and longshore sediment movement in east Co. Wexford has led to injection of sediment onto the shelf, and the growth, under both wave and tide regimes, of linear offshore shoals. These shoals now control the pattern of shoreline erosion and provide a template for possible stepwise evolution of the coast under any future sea-level rise. In contrast, the nearby coast of south Co. Wexford comprises a series of coarse clastic barriers moving monotonously onshore, via overwash processes. Here the behavior of the barrier is conditioned by the antecedent morphology of both the beach face and stream outlet bedforms. Finally, the rock platform coast of Co. Antrim presents a far more resistant shoreline to incident marine processes, yet even here there is strong evidence of present process control over so-called ‘raised’ platforms and embayments. It is concluded that coastal sediment supply and dynamics, together with coastal morphology and its interaction with waves, present a far more complex variety of sea-level indicators than is normally acknowledged.

  20. Remote sensing of water clarity and suspended sediments in coastal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumpf, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Processing of data for estimation of suspended sediment concentrations and water clarity in turbid coastal water requires three components: (1) correction of raw data to water reflectance; (2) establishment of appropriate general models relating reflectance characteristics to materials in the water; and (3) determination of the coefficients of the models appropriate for the area under study. This paper presents equations and procedures appropriate for this processing. It provides example coefficients and data for the NOAA advanced very high resolution radiometer, which is the most appropriate sensor for investigating larger estuaries and turbid coastal systems until the launch of an ocean color imager (SeaWiFS) in late 1993.

  1. Correlation of coprostanol to organic contaminants in coastal and estuarine sediments of the U. S

    SciTech Connect

    Shigenaka, G.; Price, J.E. )

    1988-10-01

    Results from the National Status and Trends Program, a nationwide effort to evaluate U.S. coastal and estuarine environmental quality, are analyzed to provide information about regional sources of organic contaminants in the benthic environment. Spearman's rank correlation procedure is applied to measurements of coprostanol, a chemical tracer of sewage, and three classes of organic compounds in sediments including selected major and trace elements, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The results suggest that discharges from publicly owned treatment works are responsible for concentrations of the organic compounds encountered in the northeastern coastal region, while other sources may predominate in the other regions of the country.

  2. Monitoring Sediment Size Distributions in a Regulated Gravel-Bed Coastal Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, M. D.; Lewis, J.; Andrew, G.

    2014-12-01

    Lagunitas Creek drains 282 km2 in coastal Marin County, California. The watershed contains water supply reservoirs, urban areas, parks and habitat for threatened species (e.g. coho salmon). Water quality is impaired by excess fine sediment, and a plan to improve water quality (i.e. TMDL) was adopted by State authorities in 2014. The TMDL asserts changes in sediment delivery, transport, and storage contributed to the decline of coho. A sediment source analysis found a 2x increase in sediment supply. Concentrations of sand and fine gravel in the channel are elevated and, during high flows, more mobile. The Federal Coho Salmon Recovery Plan (2012) describes sediment conditions affecting coho habitat as "fair". Reservoir managers were directed by the State in 1995 to reduce sedimentation and improve riparian vegetation and woody debris to improve fish habitat. Prior sediment monitoring found variability related primarily to intense winter runoff without identifying clear trends. A new sediment monitoring program was implemented in 2012 for ongoing quantification of sediment conditions. The goal of monitoring is to determine with specified statistical certainty changes in sediment conditions over time and variation among reaches throughout the watershed. Conditions were compared in 3 reaches of Lagunitas Cr. and 2 tributaries. In each of the 5 channel reaches, 4 shorter reaches were sampled in a systematic grid comprised of 30 cross-channel transects spaced at intervals of 1/2 bankfull width and 10 sample points per transect; n=1200 in 5 channel reaches. Sediment diameter class (one clast), sediment facies (a patch descriptor), and habitat type were observed at each point. Fine sediment depth was measured by probing the thickness of the deposit, providing a means to estimate total volume of fine sediment and a measure of rearing habitat occupied by fine sediment (e.g. V*). Sub-surface sediment samples were collected and analyzed for size distribution at two scales: a

  3. Detection and calibration of anthropogenic lead emission in coastal sediments of China during the past 250 years.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Sun, Liguang; Liu, Yi; Jia, Nan; Cheng, Wenhan; Wang, Yuhong

    2015-10-01

    The historical fluctuation of lead (Pb) content in coastal sediments of China and its link with human activities have been extensively studied. However, the determined Pb profiles from even the same regions could contradict each other, likely due to the fact that different methods are used in detecting anthropogenic Pb emission. In the present study, we analyzed grain size distribution and Pb levels in three sediment cores from Chinese coastal areas, and observed a significant enrichment of Pb in the sediment fraction of fine grain size. Based upon this observation, we normalized the Pb concentrations during the past 250 years by fine grain size content. The normalized Pb profiles showed consistent, increasing trends in the three cores and a remarkable rise after the Industrial Revolution. The regional characteristics in the normalized Pb profiles of Chinese offshore sediments are consistent with those of terrestrial sediments. This new normalization method is robust and cost-effective for studying anthropogenic Pb emissions in coastal sediments.

  4. Post-glacial Sediment Load and Subsidence in Coastal Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivins, Erik R.; Dokka, Roy K.; Blom, Ronald G.

    2007-01-01

    Sea level rise in the Gulf of Mexico has occurred at a rate of 1.8-2.2 mm/yr during the 20th century, or nearly the same as observed globally due to combined steric and water mass changes. Tide gauges in coastal Louisiana, however, record a substantially larger rate of rise and while a number of causal mechanisms may be responsible, their specific contribution is poorly understood. Using a realistic viscoelastic Earth model, detailed geologic parameters for south Louisiana and new GPS data, we demonstrate that Holocene sedimentary loading in the Gulf and Mississippi River delta is capable of contributing to 1-8 mm/yr of subsidence over areas of 30-0.75 x 10(exp 3) km(exp 2).

  5. Effects of dredged sediment disposal on the coastal marine macrobenthic assemblage in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Angonesi, L G; Bemvenuti, C E; Gandra, M S

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the deposition impact of dredged material from Patos lagoon estuary on a benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage structure in an adjacent coastal marine area. Nine sampling stations were chosen at random in the disposal area, and nine others in the same way in an adjacent control area. Samples were collected at a 19 m depth before sediment disposal (11 July 2000), during dredging and disposal operations (25 Oct. 2000), and three months thereafter (24 Aug. 2001). Statistical analysis indicated that sampling periods presented similar characteristics in both the control and disposal sites. Disposal of dredged sediment from Patos lagoon had no detectable detrimental effects upon macrobenthic faunal assemblage at the dumping site. This result is attributed both to adaptation of resident biota to dynamic sedimentary conditions and to the fine estuarine sediment dredged, the dispersion of which in the water column might have minimized sediment deposition and consequent damage to the benthic fauna. PMID:16862294

  6. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by nitrite (anammox): Implications for N 2 production in coastal marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engström, Pia; Dalsgaard, Tage; Hulth, Stefan; Aller, Robert C.

    2005-04-01

    The respiratory reduction of nitrate (denitrification) is acknowledged as the most important process that converts biologically available nitrogen to gaseous dinitrogen (N 2) in marine ecosystems. Recent findings, however, indicate that anaerobic ammonium oxidation by nitrite (anammox) may be an important pathway for N 2 formation and N removal in coastal marine sediments and in anoxic water columns of the oceans. In the present study, we explored this novel mechanism during N mineralization by 15N amendments (single and coupled additions of 15NH 4+, 14NO 3- and 15NO 3-) to surface sediments with a wide range of characteristics and overall reactivity. Patterns of 29/30N 2 production in the pore water during closed sediment incubations demonstrated anammox at all 7 of the investigated sites. Stoichiometric calculations revealed that 4% to 79% of total N 2 production was due to this novel route. The relative importance of anammox for N 2 release was inversely correlated with remineralized solute production, benthic O 2 consumption, and surface sediment Chl a. The observed correlations indicate competition between reductants for pore water nitrite during early diagenesis and that additional factors (e.g. availability of Mn-oxides), superimposed on overall patterns of diagenetic activity, are important for determining absolute and relative rates of anammox in coastal marine sediments.

  7. Analysis of Coastal Sediment Plume Dynamics in Puerto Rico using MODIS/Terra 250-m Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otis, D. B.; Muller-Karger, F. E.; Mendez-Lazaro, P.; McCarthy, M.; Chen, F. R.

    2014-12-01

    Anomalous events of suspended sediments can degrade water quality in nearshore ecosystems by reducing light penetration, inhibiting primary production, and delivering pollutants associated with the sediment particles. Coral reefs, for example, are subject to stress by anomalous sediment loads. The island of Puerto Rico has a diverse topography, with steep mountain slopes, episodic high-intensity rainfall events, and weathered soils that lead to episodes of high sediment volumes being delivered to the coastal zone by rivers. We developed a time series of turbidity observations based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery for use in the coastal areas of Puerto Rico. The product uses remote-sensing reflectance (Rrs) of Band 1 (645 nm) at a spatial resolution of 250 m. These estimates were compared to in-situ turbidity measurements collected in San Juan Bay. Sediment plumes from the major rivers of Puerto Rico were assessed quantitatively and compared with time-series of meteorological and other parameters, including precipitation, river discharge, and wind velocity. The spatial extent of plumes, the timing and duration of plume events, and their potential impact on coral reefs are examined. Results show that plume events are episodic and short-lived, but that they may affect coral reefs located several kilometers offshore.

  8. Microbial acetogenesis as a source of organic acids in ancient Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.; Bradley, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    Field and laboratory evidence shows that deeply buried (90-888 m) fine-grained sediments of the Atlantic Coastal Plain contain viable acetogenic microorganisms, and that these microorganisms actively produce organic acids. Concentrations of formate, acetate, and propionate in pore waters extracted from fine-grained sediments ranged from 50 ??M to 5 mM and were much higher than in adjacent pore waters associated with sandy sediments (<2 ??M). Laboratory studies showed that asceptically cored fine-grained sediments incubated under a H2 atmosphere produced formate and acetate, and that H14CO-3 was converted to 14C-acetate and 14C-formate over time. An enrichment culture of these acetogenic microorganisms was recovered from one long-term incubation that showed the presence of several morphologically distinct gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria. These microorganisms were capable of growth under autotrophic (H2 + CO2), heterotrophic (syringate), and mixotrophic (H2 + CO2 + syringate) conditions. These results suggest that microbial acetogenesis, rather than abiotic processes, is the most important organic acid-producing mechanism during low-temperature (???30 ??C) diagenesis of Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments.

  9. Methane in Sediments From Three Tropical, Coastal Lagoons on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, B.; Paytan, A.; Miller, L.; Herrera-Silveira, J.

    2002-12-01

    Tropical wetlands are significant sources of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere, and the majority of research on methane flux and cycling in the tropics has been conducted in fresh-water wetlands and lakes. However, several previous studies have shown that tropical coastal ecosystems can produce significant methane flux to the atmosphere despite the presence of moderate to marine salinities. Information regarding methane cycling within the sediments is crucial to understanding how natural and anthropogenic changes may influence these systems. We measured methane concentrations in sediments from two tropical coastal lagoons during different seasons, as well as in a third, heavily polluted, lagoon (Terminos) during the rainy season. These three lagoons, Celestun, Chelem, and Terminos, have similar vegetation, seasonal temperature and rainfall patterns, and substrate geology, but very different levels of ground water discharge and pollution. Methane concentrations in Celestun and Terminos lagoon showed high spatial variability(> 0.001 to 5 mmol kg-1 wet sediment), while sediments in Chelem Lagoon, which has near marine salinities and little sewage discharge, showed much lower variability of methane concentrations. Methane concentrations in Celestun sediments displayed two predominant patterns: some profiles contained a peak in methane concentration (1 to 2 mmole methane kg-1 wet sediment) between 5 and 15 cm below the surface while the other sediment profiles instead displayed a steady or monotonic increase in methane concentration with depth to approximately 0.025-0.080 mmol kg-1 at 10-15cm below surface followed by stable methane concentrations to the bottom of the cores (20-45 cm below the surface). A subsurface peak in methane concentrations was also found in some locations in Chelem, however, the concentrations were much lower than those measured in Celestun. Previous studies have shown that sewage pollution may drastically increase methane production in tropical

  10. Suspended sediment concentration and optical property observations of mixed-turbidity, coastal waters through multispectral ocean color inversion

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multispectral satellite ocean color data from high-turbidity areas of the coastal ocean contain information about the surface concentrations and optical properties of suspended sediments and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). Empirical and semi-analytical inversion algorit...

  11. Method 440.0 Determination of Carbon and Nitrogen in Sediments and Particulatesof Estuarine/Coastal Waters Using Elemental Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elemental analysis is used to determine particulate carbon (PC) and particulate nitrogen (PN) in estuarine and coastal waters and sediment. The method measures the total carbon and nitrogen irrespective of source (inorganic or organic).

  12. Assessment of metal contamination in coastal sediments, seawaters and bivalves of the Mediterranean Sea coast, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset S; Attiah, Abdullah

    2015-12-30

    In order to assess metal contamination on the Mediterranean coast of Egypt, 45 sediment samples, seawaters and bivalve specimens were collected from Rosetta coastal area for Mg, Al, K, Fe, Sr, Zn, Pb, Mn, As, Ce, Ni, Cr and Zr analyses by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer. The Enrichment Factor (EF), the Geoaccumulation Index (Igeo) and the Contamination Factor (CF) indicated that the coastal sediments of Rosetta area were severely enriched, strongly polluted with As, Pb and very highly contaminated with As, Pb, Ni, Ce, mostly as a result of anthropogenic inputs. Comparison with other samples from the Arabian Gulf, Red Sea and abroad coasts suggested that the studied samples have higher concentrations of Fe, Pb, As, Zn and Ni. The natural sources of heavy metals in the study area are attributed to weathering and decomposition of mountain ranges of the Sudan and Ethiopia, while the anthropogenic ones are the metals produced from industrial, sewage, irrigation and urban runoff.

  13. Assessment of metal contamination in coastal sediments, seawaters and bivalves of the Mediterranean Sea coast, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset S; Attiah, Abdullah

    2015-12-30

    In order to assess metal contamination on the Mediterranean coast of Egypt, 45 sediment samples, seawaters and bivalve specimens were collected from Rosetta coastal area for Mg, Al, K, Fe, Sr, Zn, Pb, Mn, As, Ce, Ni, Cr and Zr analyses by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer. The Enrichment Factor (EF), the Geoaccumulation Index (Igeo) and the Contamination Factor (CF) indicated that the coastal sediments of Rosetta area were severely enriched, strongly polluted with As, Pb and very highly contaminated with As, Pb, Ni, Ce, mostly as a result of anthropogenic inputs. Comparison with other samples from the Arabian Gulf, Red Sea and abroad coasts suggested that the studied samples have higher concentrations of Fe, Pb, As, Zn and Ni. The natural sources of heavy metals in the study area are attributed to weathering and decomposition of mountain ranges of the Sudan and Ethiopia, while the anthropogenic ones are the metals produced from industrial, sewage, irrigation and urban runoff. PMID:26563548

  14. Mercury Enrichment in Sediments of the Coastal Area of Northern Latium, Italy.

    PubMed

    Scanu, Sergio; Piazzolla, Daniele; Frattarelli, Francesco Manfredi; Mancini, Emanuele; Tiralongo, Francesco; Brundo, Maria Violetta; Tibullo, Daniele; Pecoraro, Roberta; Copat, Chiara; Ferrante, Margherita; Marcelli, Marco

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent of the Hg geochemical anomaly arising in the Amiata and Tolfa complex to the coastal area of northern Latium and to examine the possible influence on this area by the Mignone River, and by the small coastal basins, which are characterized by both previous mining activities and decades of past industrial impact. The results confirm the extension of the anomaly of concentrations of Hg in the coastal area of northern Latium, with the northern sector influenced by the contributions of the Fiora and Mignone Rivers and the southern sector influenced by the contributions of minor basins. The results show high values of the Adverse Effect Index throughout the considered area and highlight the need for further investigation in order to assess the impact of human activities on the present and past values of Hg in marine sediments.

  15. Mercury Enrichment in Sediments of the Coastal Area of Northern Latium, Italy.

    PubMed

    Scanu, Sergio; Piazzolla, Daniele; Frattarelli, Francesco Manfredi; Mancini, Emanuele; Tiralongo, Francesco; Brundo, Maria Violetta; Tibullo, Daniele; Pecoraro, Roberta; Copat, Chiara; Ferrante, Margherita; Marcelli, Marco

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent of the Hg geochemical anomaly arising in the Amiata and Tolfa complex to the coastal area of northern Latium and to examine the possible influence on this area by the Mignone River, and by the small coastal basins, which are characterized by both previous mining activities and decades of past industrial impact. The results confirm the extension of the anomaly of concentrations of Hg in the coastal area of northern Latium, with the northern sector influenced by the contributions of the Fiora and Mignone Rivers and the southern sector influenced by the contributions of minor basins. The results show high values of the Adverse Effect Index throughout the considered area and highlight the need for further investigation in order to assess the impact of human activities on the present and past values of Hg in marine sediments. PMID:26994618

  16. Corynebacterium marinum sp. nov. isolated from coastal sediment in Qingdao, China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A taxonomic study was performed on strain D7015T, which was isolated from coastal sediment close to a coal-fired power station in Qingdao, China. D7015T comprised Gram-positive, non-motile diphtheroid rods, which grew in 0-10 % (w/v) NaCl and 4-37°C, with optimum growth at 1% (w/v) NaCl and 30-32°C...

  17. Assessing effects of changing land use practices on sediment loads in Panther Creek, north coastal California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madej, MaryAnn; Bundros, Greg; Klein, Randy

    2011-01-01

    Revisions to the California Forest Practice Rules since 1974 were intended to increase protection of water quality in streams draining timber harvest areas. The effects of improved timber harvesting methods and road designs on sediment loading are assessed for the Panther Creek basin, a 15.4 km2 watershed in Humboldt County, north coastal California. We compute land use statistics, analyze suspended sediment discharge rating curves, and compare sediment yields in Panther Creek to a control (unlogged) stream, Little Lost Man Creek. From 1978 to 2008, 8.2 km2 (over half the watershed) was clearcut and other timber management activities (thinning, selection cuts, and so forth) affected an additional 5.9 km2. Since 1984, 40.7 km of streams in harvest units received riparian buffer strip protection. Between 2000 and 2009, 22 km of roads were upgraded and 9.7 km were decommissioned, reducing potential sediment production by an estimated 40,000 m3. Road density is currently 3.1 km/km2. Sediment rating curves from 2005 to 2010 indicate a decrease in suspended sediment concentrations when compared to the pre-1996 period, although Panther Creek still has a higher sediment yield on a per unit area basis than the control stream.

  18. Transcriptional analysis of sulfate reducing and chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria in the deep subseafloor.

    PubMed

    Orsi, William D; Barker Jørgensen, Bo; Biddle, Jennifer F

    2016-08-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) oxidize a significant proportion of subseafloor organic carbon, but their metabolic activities and subsistence mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we report in depth phylogenetic and metabolic analyses of SRB transcripts in the Peru Margin subseafloor and interpret these results in the context of sulfate reduction activity in the sediment. Relative abundance of overall SRB gene transcripts declines strongly whereas relative abundance of ribosomal protein transcripts from sulfate reducing δ-Proteobacteria peak at 90 m below seafloor (mbsf) within a deep sulfate methane transition zone. This coincides with isotopically heavy δ(34) S values of pore water sulfate (70‰), indicating active subseafloor microbial sulfate reduction. Within the shallow sulfate reduction zone (0-5 mbsf), a transcript encoding the beta subunit of dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrB) was related to Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans and environmental sequences from Aarhus Bay (Denmark). At 159 mbsf we discovered a transcript encoding the reversely operating dissimilatory sulfite reductase α-subunit (rdsrA), with basal phylogenetic relation to the chemolithoautotrophic SUP05 Group II clade. A diversity of SRB transcripts involved in cellular maintenance point toward potential subsistence mechanisms under low-energy over long time periods, and provide a detailed new picture of SRB activities underlying sulfur cycling in the deep subseafloor. PMID:26991974

  19. Carbon and nitrogen assimilation activities of deep subseafloor microbes analyzed by NanoSIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morono, Y.; Terada, T.; Inagaki, F.

    2009-12-01

    Deep subseafloor microbes play significant roles on biogeochemical cycles with extremely low metabolic activities. The subseafloor microbial community consists mainly of uncultured components; hence, their growth and metabolic characteristics remain almost completely unknown. Here, we presnet in vitro isotopic evidence that the deep subseafloor microbes actively incooporate multiple carbon and nitrogen compounds into their biomass using NanoSIMS. We incubated methane hydrate-bearing deep marine sediments with small 13C-labeled glucose, acetate, pyruvate, bicarbonate, amino-acids and methane in the presence of 15N-labeled ammonia as a nitrogen source for 2 and 6 monthes under the anaerobic condition. Using NanoSIMS, we observed the cells that incooprated 13C- or 15N-labeled substrates such as 13C-glucose, pyruvate, and 15N-ammonia up to 50% of their cellular carbon or nitrogen mass. Assimilation of 13C- and 15N-labeled amino acids as well as 13C-bicarbonates by autotrophs was also observed while 13C-methane was found to be difficult to be used for the carbon source, regardless of the presence of some additional electron acceptors for the energy respiration. These results indicate that the metabolic activities of deep subseafloor microbes can be stimulated in vitro by adding potential carbon and nitrogen sources, providing new insights into the biogeochemical functioning of the deep subseaflor microbes and its ecosystem.

  20. Assessment of changes in nutrient and sediment delivery to and carbon accumulation in coastal oceans of the Eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschi, B. A.; Smith, R. A.; Shih, J. S.; Sohl, T. L.; Sleeter, B. M.; Zhu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Land-use and land-cover distributions are primary determinants of terrestrial fluxes of sediments and nutrients to coastal oceans. Sediment and nutrient delivery to coastal waters have already been significantly altered by changes in population and land use, resulting in modified patterns of coastal production and carbon storage. Continued population growth and increasing agricultural areal extent and intensity are expected to accelerate these changes. The USGS LandCarbon project developed prospective future land use and land cover projections based on IPCC scenarios A1b, A2 and B1 to 2050 as the basis for a multitude of biogeochemical assessments. We assessed the impacts on delivery of nutrients and sediments to the coastal ocean, and concomitant carbon storage. Fluxes were estimated using the SPARROW model, calibrated on historical water quality measurements. Significantly greater fluxes of nutrients and sediments to coastal waters by 2050 are projected by the model. For example, for the Eastern United States, nitrate fluxes for 2050 are projected to be16 to 52 percent higher than the baseline year, depending on scenario. As a consequence, an associated increase in the frequency and duration of coastal and estuarine hypoxia events and harmful algal blooms could be expected. Model estimates indicate that these prospective future nutrient and sediment fluxes will increase carbon storage rates in coastal waters by 18 to 56 percent in some regions.

  1. Comparison of heavy metal contamination during the last decade along the coastal sediment of Pakistan: Multiple pollution indices approach.

    PubMed

    Saher, Noor Us; Siddiqui, Asmat Saleem

    2016-04-15

    Heavy metals concentrations (Fe, Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr, Co, Pb, and Cd) were scrutinized during two monitoring years (2001 and 2011) in the coastal sediment of Pakistan. The status of metal contamination in coastal sediment was interpreted using sediment quality guidelines, and single and combined metal pollution indices. Ni, Cr, and Cd were recognized for their significant (p<0.05) intensification in the sediment during the last decade. Sediment quality guidelines recognized the frequent adverse biological effect of Ni and the occasional adverse biological effect of Cu, Cr, Pb and Cd. Single metal pollution indices (Igeo, EF, CF, and ER) revealed that sediment pollution is predominantly caused by Pb and Cd. Low to moderate contamination was appraised along the coast by multi-metal pollution indices (CD and PERI). Correlation study specifies that heavy metals were presented diverse affiliations and carriers for distribution in the sediment during the last decade.

  2. Acoustic measurement of sediment dynamics in the coastal zones using wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakaran, A., II; Paramasivam, A.; Seshachalam, S.; A, C.

    2014-12-01

    Analyzing of the impact of constructive or low energy waves and deconstructive or high energy waves in the ocean are very much significant since they deform the geometry of seashore. The deformation may lead to productive result and also to the end of deteriorate damage. Constructive waves results deposition of sediment which widens the beach where as deconstructive waves results erosion which narrows the beach. Validation of historic sediment transportation and prediction of the direction of movement of seashore is essential to prevent unrecoverable damages by incorporating precautionary measurements to identify the factors that influence sediment transportation if feasible. The objective of this study is to propose a more reliable and energy efficient Information and communication system to model the Coastal Sediment Dynamics. Various factors influencing the sediment drift at a particular region is identified. Consequence of source depth and frequency dependencies of spread pattern in the presence of sediments is modeled. Property of source depth and frequency on sensitivity to values of model parameters are determined. Fundamental physical reasons for these sediment interaction effects are given. Shallow to deep water and internal and external wave model of ocean is obtained intended to get acoustic data assimilation (ADA). Signal processing algorithms are used over the observed data to form a full field acoustic propagation model and construct sound speed profile (SSP). The inversions of data due to uncertainties at various depths are compared. The impact of sediment drift over acoustic data is identified. An energy efficient multipath routing scheme Wireless sensor networks (WSN) is deployed for the well-organized communication of data. The WSN is designed considering increased life time, decreased power consumption, free of threats and attacks. The practical data obtained from the efficient system to model the ocean sediment dynamics are evaluated with remote

  3. Modelling Wave-Driven Coastal Sediment Transport in a Climate Change Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaldo, Davide; Benetazzo, Alvise; Bergamasco, Andrea; Carniel, Sandro; Marcello Falcieri, Francesco; Sclavo, Mauro

    2013-04-01

    Coastal morphodynamics is the result of a number of processes in which most of the driving factors strongly depend on climatic conditions. Thus, climate change is one of the most impacting constraints in governing long-term coastal landscape evolution: in particular, such influence acts through sea level rise and the effects of changes in atmospheric dynamics. While the former causes a general retreat of the shoreline and the flooding of the underlying coastal zones, with a direct effect on the coastal zone, changes in atmospheric dynamics modify landscape processes via storm surge and wave climate variations. In particular, modifications in wave storminess affect coastal sediment transport, with possibly relevant implications especially in environments with strong morphodynamic activity. In the present work we investigate the impact of a possible climate change scenario on wave-driven coastal sediment transport in a deltaic system in the Northern Adriatic Sea with reference to the period 2070-2099. To this aim, the results of a spectral wave model (SWAN) forced with climatological wind fields have been used. These were obtained by means of a high-resolution Regional Climate Model (COSMO-CLM) with reference to the IPCC A1B emission scenario. The resulting wave climate has been used as a constraint for a hydro- morphodynamic model, which was applied to a test site on the Po Delta (Northern Italy): relevant transport processes have been studied both at decadal and at storm time scales and compared with the corresponding results of a control analysis (1965-1995) representing the actual climate. A predicted reduction of the cyclonic activity in the Northern Adriatic Sea produces a decrease in significant wave height (Benetazzo et al., 2012), thus generating non-negligible impacts on sediment resuspension and transport processes along the western Adriatic coast. In particular, compared to cross-shore transport, long-shore sediment drift appears to be most affected by

  4. Development of numerical model for material circulation around seabed sediment at coastal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukahara, Y.; Nakatani, N.; Yamazaki, T.

    2012-12-01

    In enclosed coastal seas, many organic matters are deposited at the seabed because of excessive pollution load from rivers. Organic materials are decomposed by several bacteria with consumption of dissolved oxygen in the bottom water. Consequently, dysoxic water mass are formed and aerobium decreases drastically. Due to dysoxic water mass, some environmental problems are posed such as eluting hydrogen sulfide and blue tide. It is essential to grasp an understanding for decomposition of organic material and exchange of nutrients and oxygen between the seabed sediment and the bottom water. To clarify material circulation in seabed sediment, it is effective and useful to simulation using numerical model. Fossing et al. (2004) constructed numerical model represented material circulation included phosphorus dynamic state around the seabed sediment in Arhus Bay. Alternatively, Nagao et al. (2008) and Irie et al. (2010) estimated elution rate based on numerical model using Fossing's model. However, it is incomplete to describe the vertical profiles and elution rate of some materials. These results are thought to be due to lack of knowledge for degradation processes in the seabed and other chemical reactions. In this research, dynamic state of each material circulation is investigated using an experimental aquarium that enable to sampling pore water in seabed sediment intermittently. In additional approach, field work is conducted in Amagasaki Bay regarded as coastal area polluted significantly. Authors modified more precisely Fossing's model by comparing and applying these results of experiment and field works. Results of our research can accumulate a scientific knowledge about effect of deposition in the seabed sediment to coastal area.;

  5. Field experiments with painted sediments - a tool for understanding coastal processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tõnisson, Hannes; Kont, Are; Suursaar, Ülo; Orviku, Kaarel

    2014-05-01

    Surf and the swash zones comprise regions of the coastal zone where waves dissipate or reflect their remaining energy after propagation from the open sea towards the coast. Within this region most of the sediment transport occurs giving rise to the generation of rapid coastal changes. Current understanding of the morphodynamics in this region is limited. Therefore, swash/surf zone hydrodynamics and sediment transport have been active topics of research over the past decades. Several laboratory experiments have been conducted to quantify coastal processes over the past decades. However, few experiments have been carried out in the natural environment. Analysis of painted sediments was carried out for the current study. Sorted particles with the following diameters were used: 1-2.5 cm (yellow), 2.5-5 cm (red) and 5-10 cm (blue). The sediments were painted with non-fluorescent, water and wear resistant colors, stacked in piles and placed at depths of 0.5-10 m at several study sites all along the Estonian coast. The locations were positioned and were photographed. The sediment piles placed in the sea were monitored at least once after an intense storm or once before and after the storm season. Additional tests were carried out on the swash zone, where the sediments were accumulated in a continuous line from -0.5...+1.3 m. Distances from the initial source of the sediments as well as the elevation of the painted sediment particles was calculated and analyzed. Recorded changes were compared with the measured and modeled wave parameters (by using RDCP and simple point model). We may conclude that most storm waves break at depths of 2-4 m. However, this zone might extend seaward during strong storm events and wave braking may occur even at 6 m depth. There is very active sediment transport in this zone and particles with a 1-10 cm diameter are usually transported towards the shore. We were able to record that the painted sediments moved up to 20 meters towards the shore

  6. Assessment of trace pollutants in Korean coastal sediments using the triad approach: a review.

    PubMed

    Khim, Jong Seong; Hong, Seongjin

    2014-02-01

    Here we summarize and review the previous efforts on sediment assessment together with major scientific findings that were conducted in the Korean coastal waters since late 1990s. Towards integrated triad analysis, sediment data (>1700 samples) reported from the Korean coasts were collected and reviewed of which data collectively includes three components of chemical, toxicological, and ecological measures. First, the chemistry data suggested widespread and historic distribution of sedimentary pollutants along the Korean coasts. Spatial distributions suggested that their sources were independent of each other, while some localized areas (highlighted for Lake Shihwa, Masan Bay, and Ulsan Bay) and zones with extremely high pressures of certain pollutants were also identified. The mass balance analyses and/or direct correlations linking triad components reflected a general agreement between endpoints. The benthic community responses given by species occurrence and diversity also reflected the type and degree of sediment contamination, however, could not be fully explained by the known target chemicals. Overall, the triad assessment of trace pollutants in Korean coastal sediments seemed to be useful and much powerful when all the components are fully addressed. PMID:23972325

  7. Biotransformation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by yeasts isolated from coastal sediments.

    PubMed Central

    MacGillivray, A R; Shiaris, M P

    1993-01-01

    Yeast abundance in the sediments of 13 coastal sites in Massachusetts was quantified, and the potential of yeast isolates to biotransform polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was determined. Plate counts of yeasts varied between 10(2) to 10(7) CFU g (dry weight) of sediment-1. The most abundant genera isolated and identified included Candida, Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, Torulopsis, and Trichosporon. More than 50% of the isolates from heavily contaminated sites transformed phenanthrene, as determined by spray-plate screening. The plate counts of phenanthrene-transforming yeasts correlated significantly to the sediment concentrations of phenanthrene. Transformation of [9-14C]phenanthrene and [12-14C]benz[a]anthracene by individual isolates varied greatly, ranging from 0.15 to 8.15 mumol of PAH g-1 in 120-h incubations. Of the isolated yeasts, Trichosporon penicillatum exhibited the greatest capacity for phenanthrene transformation. The ability to transform PAHs appears to be widespread among yeasts in coastal sediments. PMID:8517753

  8. Motiliproteus sediminis gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from coastal sediment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zong-Jie; Xie, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Chao; Du, Zong-Jun; Chen, Guan-Jun

    2014-10-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, rod-to-spiral-shaped, oxidase- and catalase- positive and facultatively aerobic bacterium, designated HS6(T), was isolated from marine sediment of Yellow Sea, China. It can reduce nitrate to nitrite and grow well in marine broth 2216 (MB, Hope Biol-Technology Co., Ltd) with an optimal temperature for growth of 30-33 °C (range 12-45 °C) and in the presence of 2-3% (w/v) NaCl (range 0.5-7%, w/v). The pH range for growth was pH 6.2-9.0, with an optimum at 6.5-7.0. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated that the novel isolate was 93.3% similar to the type strain of Neptunomonas antarctica, 93.2% to Neptunomonas japonicum and 93.1% to Marinobacterium rhizophilum, the closest cultivated relatives. The polar lipid profile of the novel strain consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and some other unknown lipids. Major cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C(16:1) ω7c/iso-C15:0 2-OH), C(18:1) ω7c and C(16:0) and the main respiratory quinone was Q-8. The DNA G+C content of strain HS6(T) was 61.2 mol%. Based on the phylogenetic, physiological and biochemical characteristics, strain HS6(T) represents a novel genus and species and the name Motiliproteus sediminis gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is HS6(T) (=ATCC BAA-2613(T)=CICC 10858(T)).

  9. Sediment and nutrients transport in watershed and their impact on coastal environment

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Syunsuke; Osawa, Kazutoshi; Akamatsu, Yoshihisa

    2009-01-01

    Sediment and nutrients yields especially from farmlands were studied in a watershed in Ishigaki island, Okinawa, Japan. The transport processes of these materials in rivers, mangrove, lagoon and coastal zones were studied by using various observation methods including stable isotope analysis. They were simulated by using a WEPP model which was modified to be applicable to such small islands by identifying several factors from the observations. The model predicts that a proper combination of civil engineering countermeasure and change of farming method can reduce the sediment yield from the watershed by 74%. Observations of water quality and coral recruitment test in Nagura bay indicate that the water is eutrophicated and the corals cannot grow for a long time. Based on these observations, a quantitative target of the reduction of sediment and nutrients yield in watershed can be decided rationally. PMID:19907124

  10. Sediment and nutrients transport in watershed and their impact on coastal environment.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Syunsuke; Osawa, Kazutoshi; Akamatsu, Yoshihisa

    2009-01-01

    Sediment and nutrients yields especially from farmlands were studied in a watershed in Ishigaki island, Okinawa, Japan. The transport processes of these materials in rivers, mangrove, lagoon and coastal zones were studied by using various observation methods including stable isotope analysis. They were simulated by using a WEPP model which was modified to be applicable to such small islands by identifying several factors from the observations. The model predicts that a proper combination of civil engineering countermeasure and change of farming method can reduce the sediment yield from the watershed by 74%. Observations of water quality and coral recruitment test in Nagura bay indicate that the water is eutrophicated and the corals cannot grow for a long time. Based on these observations, a quantitative target of the reduction of sediment and nutrients yield in watershed can be decided rationally.

  11. Evaluation of submarine strain-gage systems for monitoring coastal sediment migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shideler, G. L.; Mcgrath, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    Single and multiple strain-gage systems were respectively evaluated as in situ point and areal sensors for monitoring sand-height variations in coastal environments. Static loading tests indicate that gage response pressure is linear for sand heights up to 24 inches. Response pressures are a function of both sand height and aggregate density, with density being influenced by both sediment texture and degree of compaction. Poorer sediment sorting and greater compaction result in higher response pressures. Field tests in a beach foreshore environment indicate that the gage systems are effective qualitative instruments for monitoring long-period migration trends of beach sediments; whereas, short-period responses are not sufficiently reliable. The durability and compactness of the gage systems must be substantially increased for effective field operations. It is recommended that the systems' qualitative potentials be further developed, whereas their development as quantitative instruments be terminated. Further development should emphasize the construction of remote recording systems designed for semipermanent installation.

  12. Bacteria in deep coastal plain sediments of Maryland: A possible source of CO2 to groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapelle, Francis H.; Zelibor, Joseph L., Jr.; Grimes, D. Jay; Knobel, Leroy L.

    1987-08-01

    Nineteen cores of unconsolidated Coastal Plain sediments obtained from depths of 14 to 182 m below land surface near Waldorf, Maryland, were collected and examined for metabolically active bacteria. The age of the sediments cored range from Miocene to Early Cretaceous. Acridine orange direct counts of total (viable and nonviable) bacteria in core subsamples ranged from 108 to 104 bacteria/g of dry sediment. Direct counts of viable bacteria ranged from 106 to 103 bacteria/g of dry sediment. Three cores contained viable methanogenic bacteria, and seven cores contained viable sulfate-reducing bacteria. The observed presence of bacteria in these sediments suggest that heterotrophic bacterial metabolism, with lignitic organic material as the primary substrate, is a plausible source of CO2 to groundwater. However, the possibility that abiotic processes also produce CO2 cannot be ruled out. Estimated rates of CO2 production in the noncalcareous Magothy/Upper Patapsco and Lower Patapsco aquifers based on mass balance of dissolved inorganic carbon, groundwater flow rates, and flow path segment lengths are in the range 10-3 to 10-5 mmol L-1 yr-1. Isotope balance calculations suggest that aquifer-generated CO2 is much heavier isotopically (˜—10 to + 5 per mil) than lignite (˜-24 per mil) present in these sediments. This may reflect isotopic fractionation during methanogenesis and possibly other bacterially mediated processes.

  13. Sediment quality in near coastal waters of the Gulf of Mexico: influence of Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Macauley, John M; Smith, Lisa M; Harwell, Linda C; Benson, William H

    2010-07-01

    The results of the present study represent a synoptic analysis of sediment quality in coastal waters of Lake Pontchartrain and Mississippi Sound two months after the landfall of Hurricane Katrina. Posthurricane conditions were compared to prehurricane (2000-2004) conditions, for sediment quality data. There were no exceedances of effects range median (ERM) sediment quality guideline values for chemical contaminants in any of the sediment samples collected from the Lake Pontchartrain or the Mississippi Sound study areas following the hurricane. Lower threshold effects range low (ERL) values were exceeded for As, Cd, and Ni at several stations in both survey areas, similar to levels of contamination observed prior to the hurricane. The comparison of sediment quality indicators before and after the hurricane suggests considerable stability of these systems with respect to short-term ecological impacts. Although other studies have shown storm-related changes could be detected (e.g., effects on benthic communities associated with shifts in salinity), there were no indications of widespread sediment contamination.

  14. Abundances, distribution, and sources of trace metals in Nakaumi-Honjo coastal lagoon sediments, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faruque; Bibi, M Hawa; Seto, Koji; Ishiga, Hiroaki; Fukushima, Takehiko; Roser, Barry P

    2010-08-01

    Bottom sediments from Nakaumi Lagoon and the Honjo Area in southwest Japan were analyzed to determine their geochemical compositions and to assess potential impacts by comparison with sediment quality guidelines. Present-day water quality was also assessed. Results showed that the water quality of Nakaumi Lagoon and the Honjo area contrasts between their upper and lower parts. Average abundances of As, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, and Cr in the Nakaumi sediments were 12, 25, 135, 32, 21, and 46 ppm, respectively, compared to 10, 24, 110, 26, 20, and 38 ppm in the Honjo area. All averages are greater than those of the upper continental crust. The elevated metal concentrations are probably related to the fine-grained nature of the sediments, reducing bottom conditions produced by abundant organic matter and possibly minor non-point anthropogenic sources. Trace metal contents are strongly correlated with Fe2O3, suggesting that Fe oxides play a role in controlling abundances. Metal concentrations exceed the NYSDEC lowest effect level and CCME interim sediment quality guidelines that indicate moderate impact on aquatic organisms. Average abundances of As and Zn are comparable to the Coastal Ocean Sediment Database threshold, whereas maximum concentrations exceed that value, indicating that the concentrations of these metals are potentially toxic. These enrichments suggest that regular monitoring may be desirable even where no point sources of metal pollution exist.

  15. Abiotic reduction of trifluralin and pendimethalin by sulfides in black-carbon-amended coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenwen; Liu, Xinhui; Xia, Shuhua; Liang, Baocui; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Dinitroaniline herbicides such as trifluralin and pendimethalin are persistent bioaccumulative toxins to aquatic organisms. Thus, in-situ remediation of contaminated sediments is desired. This study investigated whether black carbons (BCs), including apple wood charcoal (BC1), rice straw biochar (BC2), and activated carbon (BC3), could facilitate abiotic reduction of trifluralin and pendimethalin by sulfides of environmentally-relevant concentrations in anoxic coastal sediments. The reduction rates of trifluralin and pendimethalin increased substantially with increasing BC dosages in the sediments. This enhancing effect was dependent on BC type with the greatest for BC3 followed by BC1 and BC2, which well correlated with their specific surface area. The pseudo-first order reduction rate constants (kobs) for BC3-amended sediment (2%) were 13- and 14 times the rate constants in the BC-free sediment. The reduction rates increased with increasing temperature from 8 to 25°C in the BC-amended sediment, following the Arrhenius relationship. Finally, through molecular modeling by density functional theory and reaction species identification from mass spectra, molecular pathways of trifluralin and pendimethalin reduction were elucidated. In contrary to the separate sequential reduction of each nitro group to amine group, both nitro groups, first reduced to nitroso, then eventually to amine groups. PMID:26905610

  16. Vivianite represents a major sink for phosphorus in methanogenic coastal surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Matthias; Jilbert, Tom; Behrends, Thilo; Rivard, Camille; Slomp, Caroline P.

    2015-04-01

    Studies of authigenic phosphorus (P) minerals in marine sediments typically focus on authigenic carbonate fluorapatite, which is considered to be the major sink for P in marine sediments and can easily be quantified with the SEDEX sequential extraction method for P (Ruttenberg, 1992). The role of other potentially important authigenic P phases, such as the reduced iron (Fe) phosphate mineral vivianite (Fe(II)3(PO4)*8H2O) has so far largely been ignored. This is likely partly due to the fact that the SEDEX method does not distinguish between vivianite and P associated with Fe-oxides. In this study, we show that vivianite can be quantified in marine sediments by combining the SEDEX method with more direct technical and analytical tools such as scanning electron microscope energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) of wet-sieved sediment samples, as well as synchrotron-based microanalysis (X-ray absorption near-edge structure, XANES) of resin-embedded sediments. Our results demonstrate that vivianite represents a major burial sink for P below the sulfate/methane transition zone in Bothnian Sea sediments, accounting for up to 50 % of the total P burial. The vivianite in the brackish sediment contains significant amounts of Mn (~ 4-8 wt.%) but lower contents of Mg (~ 1-3 wt.%) similar to vivianite obtained from freshwater sediments. We further show that anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) drives a sink-switching from Fe-oxide bound P to vivianite by causing the release of both phosphate (AOM with sulfate and Fe-oxides) and ferrous Fe (AOM with Fe-oxides) to the porewater allowing supersaturation with respect to vivianite to be reached. Our results indicate that methane likely plays a key role in providing conditions that allow for vivianite authigenesis in coastal surface sediments. We suggest that vivianite formation may provide an important burial sink for P in many brackish coastal environments worldwide. References: Ruttenberg K. C

  17. Vivianite is a major sink for phosphorus in methanogenic coastal surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Matthias; Jilbert, Tom; Behrends, Thilo; Rivard, Camille; Slomp, Caroline P.

    2015-11-01

    Studies of authigenic phosphorus (P) minerals in marine sediments typically focus on authigenic carbonate fluorapatite, which is considered to be the major sink for P in marine sediments and can easily be semi-quantitatively extracted with the SEDEX sequential extraction method. The role of other potentially important authigenic P phases, such as the reduced iron (Fe) phosphate mineral vivianite (Fe(II)3(PO4)*8H2O) has so far largely been ignored in marine systems. This is, in part, likely due to the fact that the SEDEX method does not distinguish between vivianite and P associated with Fe-oxides. Here, we show that vivianite can be quantified in marine sediments by combining the SEDEX method with microscopic and spectroscopic techniques such as micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) elemental mapping of resin-embedded sediments, as well as scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). We further demonstrate that resin embedding of vertically intact sediment sub-cores enables the use of synchrotron-based microanalysis (X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy) to differentiate between different P burial phases in aquatic sediments. Our results reveal that vivianite represents a major burial sink for P below a shallow sulfate/methane transition zone in Bothnian Sea sediments, accounting for 40-50% of total P burial. We further show that anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) drives a sink-switching from Fe-oxide bound P to vivianite by driving the release of both phosphate (AOM with sulfate and Fe-oxides) and ferrous Fe (AOM with Fe-oxides) to the pore water allowing supersaturation with respect to vivianite to be reached. The vivianite in the sediment contains significant amounts of manganese (∼4-8 wt.%), similar to vivianite obtained from freshwater sediments. Our results indicate that methane dynamics play a key role in providing conditions that allow for vivianite authigenesis in coastal

  18. NEAR-COASTAL SEDIMENT AS A HABITAT IN THE GULF OF MEXICO: CHEMICAL QUALITY, TOXICITY, AND BENTHIC COMMUNITY COMPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment quality was determined in a multiyear study for 108 near-coastal sites located in Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. The primary objective of the study was to determine the relative impact of common stressor sources on sediment quality utilizing a weight-of-evidence appro...

  19. Recovery and validation of historical sediment quality data from coastal and estuarine areas: An integrated approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.; Buchholtz ten Brink, M. R.; Mecray, E.L.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive database of sediment chemistry and environmental parameters has been compiled for Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay. This work illustrates methodologies for rescuing and validating sediment data from heterogeneous historical sources. It greatly expands spatial and temporal data coverage of estuarine and coastal sediments. The database contains about 3500 samples containing inorganic chemical, organic, texture and other environmental data dating from 1955 to 1994. Cooperation with local and federal agencies as well as universities was essential in locating and screening documents for the database. More than 80% of references utilized came from sources with limited distribution (gray literature). Task sharing was facilitated by a comprehensive and clearly defined data dictionary for sediments. It also served as a data entry template and flat file format for data processing and as a basis for interpretation and graphical illustration. Standard QA/QC protocols are usually inapplicable to historical sediment data. In this work outliers and data quality problems were identified by batch screening techniques that also provide visualizations of data relationships and geochemical affinities. No data were excluded, but qualifying comments warn users of problem data. For Boston Harbor, the proportion of irreparable or seriously questioned data was remarkably small (<5%), although concentration values for metals and organic contaminants spanned 3 orders of magnitude for many elements or compounds. Data from the historical database provide alternatives to dated cores for measuring changes in surficial sediment contamination level with time. The data indicate that spatial inhomogeneity in harbor environments can be large with respect to sediment-hosted contaminants. Boston Inner Harbor surficial sediments showed decreases in concentrations of Cu, Hg, and Zn of 40 to 60% over a 17-year period.A comprehensive database of sediment chemistry and environmental

  20. Microbial processes and organic priority substances in marine coastal sediments (Adriatic Sea, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoppini, Annamaria; Ademollo, Nicoletta; Amalfitano, Stefano; Dellisanti, Walter; Lungarini, Silvia; Miserocchi, Stefano; Patrolecco, Luisa; Langone, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    PERSEUS EU FP7 Project aims to identify the interacting patterns of natural and human-derived pressures to assess their impact on marine ecosystems and, using the objectives and principles of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) as a vehicle, to design an effective and innovative research governance framework based on sound scientific knowledge. In the frame of this Project (subtask 1.3.3 ADREX: Adriatic and Ionian Seas Experiment), monitoring surveys were conducted in the Adriatic Sea (Italy) in order to study the variation of structural and functional characteristics of native bacterial communities and the occurrence of selected classes of organic priority substances in sediments. The study area represents a good natural laboratory sensitive to climate variability and human pressure, owing to the semi-enclosed nature of the Adriatic Sea and to the increasing trend of human activities in the coastal regions. During the cruise ADRI-13 (November 2013) and ADRI-14 (October 2014) we sampled several coastal sites from the mouth of the Po River to the Otranto strait. Surface sediments were collected in all areas, while sediment cores were sampled in selected sites. Microbes associated with marine sediments play an important role in the C-flux being responsible for the transformation of organic detritus (autochthonous and allochthonous) into biomass. The sediment bacterial abundance was determined by epifluorescence microscopy and the rate of bacterial carbon production by measuring the 3H-leucine uptake rates. The community respiration rate was estimated by the measurement of the electron transport system (ETS) activity. The sediment contamination level was determined by measuring the concentration of contaminants included in the list of organic priority substances: PAHs, bisphenol A (BPA), alkylphenols (APs). The extraction/clean-up of PAHs, BPA and APs was performed by ultrasonic bath with the appropriate solvents, followed by analytical determination with

  1. Brevetoxin persistence in sediments and seagrass epiphytes of east Florida coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, Gary L; Fourqurean, James W; Drake, Jeana L; Mead, Ralph N; Heil, Cynthia A

    2012-01-01

    A bloom of Karenia brevis Davis developed in September 2007 near Jacksonville, Florida and subsequently progressed south through east Florida coastal waters and the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (ICW). Maximum cell abundances exceeded 10(6) cells L(-1) through October in the northern ICW between Jacksonville and the Indian River Lagoon. The bloom progressed further south during November, and terminated in December 2007 at densities of 10(4) cells L(-1) in the ICW south of Jupiter Inlet, Florida. Brevetoxins were subsequently sampled in sediments and seagrass epiphytes in July and August 2008 in the ICW. Sediment brevetoxins occurred at concentrations of 11-15 ng PbTx-3 equivalents (g dry wt sediment)(-1) in three of five basins in the northern ICW during summer 2008. Seagrass beds occur south of the Mosquito Lagoon in the ICW. Brevetoxins were detected in six of the nine seagrass beds sampled between the Mosquito Lagoon and Jupiter Inlet at concentrations of 6-18 ng (g dry wt epiphytes)(-1). The highest brevetoxins concentrations were found in sediments near Patrick Air Force Base at 89 ng (g dry wt sediment)(-1). In general, brevetoxins occurred in either seagrass epiphytes or sediments. Blades of the resident seagrass species have a maximum life span of less than six months, so it is postulated that brevetoxins could be transferred between epibenthic communities of individual blades in seagrass beds. The occurrence of brevetoxins in east Florida coast sediments and seagrass epiphytes up to eight months after bloom termination supports observations from the Florida west coast that brevetoxins can persist in marine ecosystems in the absence of sustained blooms. Furthermore, our observations show that brevetoxins can persist in sediments where seagrass communities are absent.

  2. Age and correlation of tertiary sediments in the western South Carolina Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Laws, R.A.; Harris, W.B.; Zullo, V.A.; Fallaw, W.C.; Price, V.

    1987-01-01

    Integration of coastal onlap stratigraphy, calcareous nannofossil, dinoflagellate, and megafossil biostratigraphy provide new data for interpretation of age and interregional correlation of Paleocene to Oligocene deposits of the western South Carolina Coastal Plain. Clastic and calcareous sediments examined in cores and outcrops in the vicinity of the Savannah River Plant record at least seven coastal onlap cycles. Basal Tertiary sediments of the Ellenton Formation represent cycles TA1.1 - 1.3 and contain dinoflagellates of Midwayan to Sabinian age. The overlying Williamsburg Formation probably represents deposits of cycle TA2.1. The superjacent siliciclastics of the Congaree Formation contain few fossils, but may preserve transgressive and highstand deposits of cycles TA2.4 - 3.3. The overlying unit is commonly calcareous, contains nannofossils indicative of zones NP16-17 (Upper Claibornian), and marks a significant change in depositional style subsequent to the 49.5 Ma eustatic fall. ''Marls'' of the overlying Griffins Landing Member of the Dry Branch Formation contain micro- and megafossils of Late Eocene (Jacksonian) age and represent transgressive deposits of cycle TA4.1. The discontinuous lateral distribution of these calcareous units and overlying clastics of the Dry Branch and Tobacco Road Formations results largely from erosion and deep incision during the mid-Oligocene eustatic fall (30 Ma). The ''Upland'' unit is interpreted as being deposited on this erosional surface.

  3. Metal contamination in water, sediment and biota from a semi-enclosed coastal area.

    PubMed

    Aly, Walid; Williams, Ian D; Hudson, Malcolm D

    2013-05-01

    This study identifies and quantifies the spatial variations of metal contamination in water, sediment and biota: the common cockle (Cerastoderma edule) and the Mermaid's glove sponge (Haliclona oculata), within a heavily anthropogenically impacted semi-enclosed estuarine-coastal area with a low ability to disperse and flush contaminants (Poole Harbour, UK). The results showed that metal contamination was detected in all environmental compartments. Water was polluted with As, and Hg sediment metals were mostly within "the possible effect range" in which adverse effects occasionally occurs. Cockles had considerable concentrations of Ni, Ag and Hg in areas close to pollution sources, and sponges accumulate Cu and Zn with very high magnitude. A systematic monitoring approach that includes biological monitoring techniques, which covers all embayments, is needed, and an integrated management of the semi-enclosed coastal zones should be based on the overall hydrological characteristics of these sensitive areas and their ability to self-restore which is different than open coastal zones. PMID:23014922

  4. Hyperpycnal sediment discharge from semiarid southern California rivers: Implications for coastal sediment budgets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Milliman, John D.

    2003-01-01

    Southern California rivers discharge hyperpycnal (river density greater than ocean density) concentrations of suspended sediment (>40 g/L, according to buoyancy theory) during flood events, mostly during El Nin??o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) conditions. Because hyperpycnal river discharge commonly occurs during brief periods (hours to occasionally days), mean daily flow statistics often do not reveal the magnitude of these events. Hyperpycnal events are particularly important in rivers draining the Transverse Range and account for 75% of the cumulative sediment load discharged by the Santa Clara River over the past 50 yr. These events are highly pulsed, totaling only ??? 30 days (??? 0.15% of the total 50 yr period). Observations of the fate of sediment discharge, although rare, are consistent with hyperpycnal river dynamics and the high likelihood of turbidity currents during these events. We suggest that much of the sediment load initially bypasses the littoral circulation cells and is directly deposited on the adjacent continental shelf, thus potentially representing a loss of immediate beach sand supply. During particularly exceptional events (>100 yr recurrence intervals), flood underflows may extend past the shelf and escape to offshore basins.

  5. Hot-Alkaline DNA Extraction Method for Deep-Subseafloor Archaeal Communities

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Takeshi; Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Inagaki, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    A prerequisite for DNA-based microbial community analysis is even and effective cell disruption for DNA extraction. With a commonly used DNA extraction kit, roughly two-thirds of subseafloor sediment microbial cells remain intact on average (i.e., the cells are not disrupted), indicating that microbial community analyses may be biased at the DNA extraction step, prior to subsequent molecular analyses. To address this issue, we standardized a new DNA extraction method using alkaline treatment and heating. Upon treatment with 1 M NaOH at 98°C for 20 min, over 98% of microbial cells in subseafloor sediment samples collected at different depths were disrupted. However, DNA integrity tests showed that such strong alkaline and heat treatment also cleaved DNA molecules into short fragments that could not be amplified by PCR. Subsequently, we optimized the alkaline and temperature conditions to minimize DNA fragmentation and retain high cell disruption efficiency. The best conditions produced a cell disruption rate of 50 to 80% in subseafloor sediment samples from various depths and retained sufficient DNA integrity for amplification of the complete 16S rRNA gene (i.e., ∼1,500 bp). The optimized method also yielded higher DNA concentrations in all samples tested compared with extractions using a conventional kit-based approach. Comparative molecular analysis using real-time PCR and pyrosequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes showed that the new method produced an increase in archaeal DNA and its diversity, suggesting that it provides better analytical coverage of subseafloor microbial communities than conventional methods. PMID:24441163

  6. Marine coastal sediments microbial hydrocarbon degradation processes: contribution of experimental ecology in the omics’era

    PubMed Central

    Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Duran, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Coastal marine sediments, where important biological processes take place, supply essential ecosystem services. By their location, such ecosystems are particularly exposed to human activities as evidenced by the recent Deepwater Horizon disaster. This catastrophe revealed the importance to better understand the microbial processes involved on hydrocarbon degradation in marine sediments raising strong interests of the scientific community. During the last decade, several studies have shown the key role played by microorganisms in determining the fate of hydrocarbons in oil-polluted sediments but only few have taken into consideration the whole sediment’s complexity. Marine coastal sediment ecosystems are characterized by remarkable heterogeneity, owning high biodiversity and are subjected to fluctuations in environmental conditions, especially to important oxygen oscillations due to tides. Thus, for understanding the fate of hydrocarbons in such environments, it is crucial to study microbial activities, taking into account sediment characteristics, physical-chemical factors (electron acceptors, temperature), nutrients, co-metabolites availability as well as sediment’s reworking due to bioturbation activities. Key information could be collected from in situ studies, which provide an overview of microbial processes, but it is difficult to integrate all parameters involved. Microcosm experiments allow to dissect in-depth some mechanisms involved in hydrocarbon degradation but exclude environmental complexity. To overcome these lacks, strategies have been developed, by creating experiments as close as possible to environmental conditions, for studying natural microbial communities subjected to oil pollution. We present here a review of these approaches, their results and limitation, as well as the promising future of applying “omics” approaches to characterize in-depth microbial communities and metabolic networks involved in hydrocarbon degradation. In addition

  7. Marine protist diversity in European coastal waters and sediments as revealed by high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Massana, Ramon; Gobet, Angélique; Audic, Stéphane; Bass, David; Bittner, Lucie; Boutte, Christophe; Chambouvet, Aurélie; Christen, Richard; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Decelle, Johan; Dolan, John R; Dunthorn, Micah; Edvardsen, Bente; Forn, Irene; Forster, Dominik; Guillou, Laure; Jaillon, Olivier; Kooistra, Wiebe H C F; Logares, Ramiro; Mahé, Frédéric; Not, Fabrice; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pawlowski, Jan; Pernice, Massimo C; Probert, Ian; Romac, Sarah; Richards, Thomas; Santini, Sébastien; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Siano, Raffaele; Simon, Nathalie; Stoeck, Thorsten; Vaulot, Daniel; Zingone, Adriana; de Vargas, Colomban

    2015-10-01

    Although protists are critical components of marine ecosystems, they are still poorly characterized. Here we analysed the taxonomic diversity of planktonic and benthic protist communities collected in six distant European coastal sites. Environmental deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) from three size fractions (pico-, nano- and micro/mesoplankton), as well as from dissolved DNA and surface sediments were used as templates for tag pyrosequencing of the V4 region of the 18S ribosomal DNA. Beta-diversity analyses split the protist community structure into three main clusters: picoplankton-nanoplankton-dissolved DNA, micro/mesoplankton and sediments. Within each cluster, protist communities from the same site and time clustered together, while communities from the same site but different seasons were unrelated. Both DNA and RNA-based surveys provided similar relative abundances for most class-level taxonomic groups. Yet, particular groups were overrepresented in one of the two templates, such as marine alveolates (MALV)-I and MALV-II that were much more abundant in DNA surveys. Overall, the groups displaying the highest relative contribution were Dinophyceae, Diatomea, Ciliophora and Acantharia. Also, well represented were Mamiellophyceae, Cryptomonadales, marine alveolates and marine stramenopiles in the picoplankton, and Monadofilosa and basal Fungi in sediments. Our extensive and systematic sequencing of geographically separated sites provides the most comprehensive molecular description of coastal marine protist diversity to date.

  8. Monitoring of suspended sediment variation using Landsat and MODIS in the Saemangeum coastal area of Korea.

    PubMed

    Min, Jee-Eun; Ryu, Joo-Hyung; Lee, Seok; Son, Seunghyun

    2012-02-01

    Suspended sediment concentration (SS) is an important indicator of marine environmental changes due to natural causes such as tides, tidal currents, and river discharges, as well as human activities such as construction in coastal regions. In the Saemangeum area on the west coast of Korea, construction of a huge tidal dyke for land reclamation has strongly influenced the coastal environment. This study used remotely sensed data to analyze the SS changes in coastal waters caused by the dyke construction. Landsat and MODIS satellite images were used for the spatial analysis of finer patterns and for the detailed temporal analysis, respectively. Forty Landsat scenes and 105 monthly composite MODIS images observed during 1985-2010 were employed, and four field campaigns (from 2005 to 2006) were performed to verify the image-derived SS. The results of the satellite data analyses showed that the seawater was clear before the dyke construction, with SS values lower than 20 g/m(3). These values increased continuously as the dyke construction progressed. The maximum SS values appeared just before completion of the fourth dyke. Values decreased to below 5 g/m(3) after dyke construction. These changes indicated tidal current modification. Some eddies and plumes were observed in the images generated from Landsat data. Landsat and MODIS can reveal that coastal water turbidity was greatly reduced after completion of the construction.

  9. Monitoring of suspended sediment variation using Landsat and MODIS in the Saemangeum coastal area of Korea.

    PubMed

    Min, Jee-Eun; Ryu, Joo-Hyung; Lee, Seok; Son, Seunghyun

    2012-02-01

    Suspended sediment concentration (SS) is an important indicator of marine environmental changes due to natural causes such as tides, tidal currents, and river discharges, as well as human activities such as construction in coastal regions. In the Saemangeum area on the west coast of Korea, construction of a huge tidal dyke for land reclamation has strongly influenced the coastal environment. This study used remotely sensed data to analyze the SS changes in coastal waters caused by the dyke construction. Landsat and MODIS satellite images were used for the spatial analysis of finer patterns and for the detailed temporal analysis, respectively. Forty Landsat scenes and 105 monthly composite MODIS images observed during 1985-2010 were employed, and four field campaigns (from 2005 to 2006) were performed to verify the image-derived SS. The results of the satellite data analyses showed that the seawater was clear before the dyke construction, with SS values lower than 20 g/m(3). These values increased continuously as the dyke construction progressed. The maximum SS values appeared just before completion of the fourth dyke. Values decreased to below 5 g/m(3) after dyke construction. These changes indicated tidal current modification. Some eddies and plumes were observed in the images generated from Landsat data. Landsat and MODIS can reveal that coastal water turbidity was greatly reduced after completion of the construction. PMID:22136763

  10. Microplastics in the Mediterranean Sea: Deposition in coastal shallow sediments, spatial variation and preferential grain size.

    PubMed

    Alomar, Carme; Estarellas, Fernando; Deudero, Salud

    2016-04-01

    Marine litter loads in sea compartments are an emergent issue due to their ecological and biological consequences. This study addresses microplastic quantification and morphological description to test spatial differences along an anthropogenic gradient of coastal shallow sediments and further on to evaluate the preferential deposition of microplastics in a given sediment grain fraction. Sediments from Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) contained the highest concentrations of microplastics (MPs): up to 0.90 ± 0.10 MPs/g suggesting the transfer of microplastics from source areas to endpoint areas. In addition, a high proportion of microplastic filaments were found close to populated areas whereas fragment type microplastics were more common in MPAs. There was no clear trend between sediment grain size and microplastic deposition in sediments, although microplastics were always present in two grain size fractions: 2 mm > x > 1 mm and 1 mm > x 0.5 mm. PMID:26803229

  11. Evidencing the Impact of Coastal Contaminated Sediments on Mussels Through Pb Stable Isotopes Composition.

    PubMed

    Dang, Duc Huy; Schäfer, Jörg; Brach-Papa, Christophe; Lenoble, Véronique; Durrieu, Gaël; Dutruch, Lionel; Chiffoleau, Jean-Francois; Gonzalez, Jean-Louis; Blanc, Gérard; Mullot, Jean-Ulrich; Mounier, Stéphane; Garnier, Cédric

    2015-10-01

    Heavily contaminated sediments are a serious concern for ecosystem quality, especially in coastal areas, where vulnerability is high due to intense anthropogenic pressure. Surface sediments (54 stations), 50 cm interface cores (five specific stations), river particles, coal and bulk Pb plate from past French Navy activities, seawater and mussels were collected in Toulon Bay (NW Mediterranean Sea). Lead content and Pb stable isotope composition have evidenced the direct impact of sediment pollution stock on both the water column quality and the living organisms, through the specific Pb isotopic signature in these considered compartments. The history of pollution events including past and present contaminant dispersion in Toulon Bay were also demonstrated by historical records of Pb content and Pb isotope ratios in sediment profiles. The sediment resuspension events, as simulated by batch experiments, could be a major factor contributing to the high Pb mobility in the considered ecosystem. A survey of Pb concentrations in surface seawater at 40 stations has revealed poor seawater quality, affecting both the dissolved fraction and suspended particles and points to marina/harbors as additional diffuse sources of dissolved Pb.

  12. Potential nitrate removal in a coastal freshwater sediment (Haringvliet Lake, The Netherlands) and response to salinization.

    PubMed

    Laverman, Anniet M; Canavan, Richard W; Slomp, Caroline P; Cappellen, Philippe Van

    2007-07-01

    Nitrogen transformations and their response to salinization were studied in bottom sediment of a coastal freshwater lake (Haringvliet Lake, The Netherlands). The lake was formed as the result of a river impoundment along the south-western coast of the Netherlands, and is currently targeted for restoration of estuarine conditions. Nitrate porewater profiles indicate complete removal of NO(3)(-) within the upper few millimeters of sediment. Rapid NO(3)(-) consumption is consistent with the high potential rates of nitrate reduction (up to 200 nmol N cm(-3) h(-1)) measured with flow-through reactors (FTRs) on intact sediment slices. Acetylene-block FTR experiments indicate that complete denitrification accounts for approximately half of the nitrate reducing activity. The remaining NO(3)(-) reduction is due to incomplete denitrification and alternative reaction pathways, most likely dissimilatory nitrate reduction to NH(4)(+) (DNRA). Results of FTR experiments further indicate that increasing bottom water salinity may lead to a transient release of NH(4)(+) and dissolved organic carbon from the sediment, and enhance the rates of nitrate reduction and nitrite production. Increased salinity may thus, at least temporarily, increase the efflux of NH(4)(+) from the sediment to the surface water. This work shows that salinity affects the relative importance of denitrification compared to alternative nitrate reduction pathways, limiting the ability of denitrification to remove bioavailable nitrogen from aquatic ecosystems.

  13. Methane and sulfate dynamics in sediments from mangrove-dominated tropical coastal lagoons, Yucatan, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chuang, P. C.; Young, Megan B.; Dale, Andrew W.; Miller, Laurence G.; Herrera-Silveira, Jorge A.; Paytan, Adina

    2016-01-01

    Porewater profiles in sediment cores from mangrove-dominated coastal lagoons (Celestún and Chelem) on the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico, reveal the widespread coexistence of dissolved methane and sulfate. This observation is interesting since dissolved methane in porewaters is typically oxidized anaerobically by sulfate. To explain the observations we used a numerical transport-reaction model that was constrained by the field observations. The model suggests that methane in the upper sediments is produced in the sulfate reduction zone at rates ranging between 0.012 and 31 mmol m−2 d−1, concurrent with sulfate reduction rates between 1.1 and 24 mmol SO42− m−2 d−1. These processes are supported by high organic matter content in the sediment and the use of non-competitive substrates by methanogenic microorganisms. Indeed sediment slurry incubation experiments show that non-competitive substrates such as trimethylamine (TMA) and methanol can be utilized for microbial methanogenesis at the study sites. The model also indicates that a significant fraction of methane is transported to the sulfate reduction zone from deeper zones within the sedimentary column by rising bubbles and gas dissolution. The shallow depths of methane production and the fast rising methane gas bubbles reduce the likelihood for oxidation, thereby allowing a large fraction of the methane formed in the sediments to escape to the overlying water column.

  14. A depth-averaged 2-D model of flow and sediment transport in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Alejandro; Wu, Weiming; Beck, Tanya M.

    2016-11-01

    A depth-averaged 2-D model has been developed to simulate unsteady flow and nonuniform sediment transport in coastal waters. The current motion is computed by solving the phase-averaged 2-D shallow water flow equations reformulated in terms of total-flux velocity, accounting for the effects of wave radiation stresses and general diffusion or mixing induced by current, waves, and wave breaking. The cross-shore boundary conditions are specified by assuming fully developed longshore current and wave setup that are determined using the reduced 1-D momentum equations. A 2-D wave spectral transformation model is used to calculate the wave height, period, direction, and radiation stresses, and a surface wave roller model is adopted to consider the effects of surface roller on the nearshore currents. The nonequilibrium transport of nonuniform total-load sediment is simulated, considering sediment entrainment by current and waves, the lag of sediment transport relative to the flow, and the hiding and exposure effect of nonuniform bed material. The flow and sediment transport equations are solved using an implicit finite volume method on a variety of meshes including nonuniform rectangular, telescoping (quadtree) rectangular, and hybrid triangular/quadrilateral meshes. The flow and wave models are integrated through a carefully designed steering process. The model has been tested in three field cases, showing generally good performance.

  15. Fine Sediment Erosion and Transport to the Near Coastal Zone from Watersheds of St. Thomas, USVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, G.; Xuan, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The US Virgin Islands' landscape is characterized by steep slopes and short distances from ridge peaks to fringing reefs. Fine-grained sediments eroded from predominantly thin soils may be transported rapidly by streams (locally called guts) to the sea and cause stress to corals. We have studied erosion and transport processes on St Thomas by three methods: (1) continuous monitoring of suspended matter in one of the island's few perennial streams, Dorothea Gut, (2) measurement of 137Cs inventories in soil cores taken across the landscape, and (3) evaluation of sediment captured in most of the island's coastal ponds, through which a significant portion of runoff must pass. We find that, for areas that have not been recently disturbed, watersheds retain fine sediments surprisingly well. On the other hand, small patches of land, like building lots that have been recently disturbed and poorly managed, can produce disproportionate amounts of fine sediment. These results differ somewhat from nearby St John, USVI, where unpaved roads are the major source of eroded sediments.

  16. Deposit-Feeding Sea Cucumbers Enhance Mineralization and Nutrient Cycling in Organically-Enriched Coastal Sediments

    PubMed Central

    MacTavish, Thomas; Stenton-Dozey, Jeanie; Vopel, Kay; Savage, Candida

    2012-01-01

    Background Bioturbators affect multiple biogeochemical interactions and have been suggested as suitable candidates to mitigate organic matter loading in marine sediments. However, predicting the effects of bioturbators at an ecosystem level can be difficult due to their complex positive and negative interactions with the microbial community. Methodology/Principal Findings We quantified the effects of deposit-feeding sea cucumbers on benthic algal biomass (microphytobenthos, MPB), bacterial abundance, and the sediment–seawater exchange of dissolved oxygen and nutrients. The sea cucumbers increased the efflux of inorganic nitrogen (ammonium, NH4+) from organically enriched sediments, which stimulated algal productivity. Grazing by the sea cucumbers on MPB (evidenced by pheopigments), however, caused a net negative effect on primary producer biomass and total oxygen production. Further, there was an increased abundance of bacteria in sediment with sea cucumbers, suggesting facilitation. The sea cucumbers increased the ratio of oxygen consumption to production in surface sediment by shifting the microbial balance from producers to decomposers. This shift explains the increased efflux of inorganic nitrogen and concordant reduction in organic matter content in sediment with bioturbators. Conclusions/Significance Our study demonstrates the functional role and potential of sea cucumbers to ameliorate some of the adverse effects of organic matter enrichment in coastal ecosystems. PMID:23209636

  17. Microplastics in the Mediterranean Sea: Deposition in coastal shallow sediments, spatial variation and preferential grain size.

    PubMed

    Alomar, Carme; Estarellas, Fernando; Deudero, Salud

    2016-04-01

    Marine litter loads in sea compartments are an emergent issue due to their ecological and biological consequences. This study addresses microplastic quantification and morphological description to test spatial differences along an anthropogenic gradient of coastal shallow sediments and further on to evaluate the preferential deposition of microplastics in a given sediment grain fraction. Sediments from Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) contained the highest concentrations of microplastics (MPs): up to 0.90 ± 0.10 MPs/g suggesting the transfer of microplastics from source areas to endpoint areas. In addition, a high proportion of microplastic filaments were found close to populated areas whereas fragment type microplastics were more common in MPAs. There was no clear trend between sediment grain size and microplastic deposition in sediments, although microplastics were always present in two grain size fractions: 2 mm > x > 1 mm and 1 mm > x 0.5 mm.

  18. Subseafloor Macroscopic Biofilms Involved in Anaerobic Oxidization of Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, B. R.; Hieter, J.; Pohlman, J.; Torres, M. E.; Riedel, M.; Rose, K.; Joseph, C.; Colwell, F. S.

    2009-12-01

    The release of methane from seafloor sediments is moderated in part by the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), a process carried out by a consortium of archaea and bacteria within the sulfate methane transition zone (SMTZ). We collected macroscopic biofilms in subseafloor fractures that intersect the SMTZ and, for the first time, have conducted molecular analyses of these biofilms to describe their phylogenetic affiliations. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMS) of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (t-RFLP) profiles indicate archaea in the biofilm are similar to those present in sediment adjacent to the biofilm. However, cores lacking observable biofilms contained different archaeal taxa. By contrast, NMS also showed the bacterial taxa in the biofilm are distinct from sediment adjacent to the biofilm. Sequencing of 386 bacterial clones indicates a diverse presence of alpha, beta, delta and gammaproteobacteria related to sulfate reducers (52% of clones, 79-89% similarity) and iron reducers (20% of clones, 83-89% similarity,). In addition, 204 archaeal clones were sequenced and the major taxa found are related to ANME-1 (40% of clones, 95% similarity) and archaeoglobus (30% of clones, 93% similarity). Biofilms inhabiting fractures in very fine to fine-grained sediment may play a crucial role in the carbon cycle.

  19. Coastal flooding and storm protection program; field verification program. Mathematical modeling of three-dimensional coastal currents and sediment dispersion: model development and application. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Y.P.

    1983-09-01

    A comprehensive model of Coastal currents and sediment dispersion has been formulated and applied to the Mississippi Sound and adjacent continental shelf waters. The study combines mathematical modeling of various hydrodynamic and sedimentary processes with laboratory and field experiments. Of primary importance is the development of an efficient and comprehensive three-dimensional, finite-difference model of coastal, estuarine, and lake currents (CELC3D). The model resolves currents driven by tide, wind, and density gradient. It has been applied to the Mississippi Sound, and results agree well with measured surface displacements and currents during two episodes. Rates of entrainment and deposition of the Mississippi Sound sediments have been studied in a laboratory flume. Effects of (1) bottom shear stress, (2) bed properties, (3) salinity of water, and (4) sediment type on the erodability of sediments have been examined. Results of the laboratory study have been incorporated into the bottom boundary conditions for a three-dimensional sediment dispersion model. Gravitational settling and particle size distribution of the Mississippi Sound sediments were also studied in laboratories. Bottom boundary layer dynamics and wave effect on sediment dispersion have been studied by means of a turbulent transport model and a wave model. Model simulations of sediment dispersion in the Mississippi Sound agree well available data from ship surveys.

  20. Assessment of priority phenolic compounds in sediments from an extremely polluted coastal wetland (Lake Maryut, Egypt).

    PubMed

    Khairy, Mohammed A

    2013-01-01

    Although high concentrations of trace organic pollutants were recorded along the Egyptian Mediterranean Coast and its corresponding coastal wetlands, no published data are available for the levels of phenolic compounds. Thus, this work aimed to investigate the levels of phenolic compounds in sediments of a heavily polluted coastal wetland (Lake Maryut, Egypt). For that purpose, a method was optimized for the extraction and detection of chlorophenols, methylphenols, and nitrophenols in sediments using GC-MS. Sediments were extracted with 0.1 M NaOH/methanol by sonication. Cleanup of sediment extracts using liquid-liquid extraction and SPE was found important to remove most of the interfering co-extracts. The proposed analytical methodology was validated by analysis of matrix spikes. Detection limits were 0.063-0.694 μg/kg dw for sediments. Good recoveries (70-110%) and precision values (RSD < 20%) were obtained from the fortification experiments at the parts per billion level in sediments. The method was applied to investigate the level of contamination with phenols in 19 sediment samples from Lake Maryut. Results revealed that higher concentrations were observed in the main basin (MB) of Lake Maryut affected by the discharge of effluents from a primary wastewater treatment plant, direct discharge of industrial effluents, domestic wastes, and agricultural effluents from Qalaa Drain (QD). Chlorophenols (CPs) were the major group detected in the lake sediments followed by methylphenols (MPs) and nitrophenols (NPs). CPs were dominated by 2-, 4-, and 3-chlorophenols. Concentrations of CPs were higher at the north and northwestern parts of the MB indicating the influence of industrial effluents discharged into the lake. On the other hand, higher concentrations of NPs were observed at the south and southwestern parts of the MB, which is subjected to the discharge of agricultural and domestic effluents via QD. Results of the risk assessment revealed that phenol, cresols

  1. Ratio of the concentration of anthraquinone to anthracene in coastal marine sediments.

    PubMed

    McKinney, R A; Pruell, R J; Burgess, R M

    1999-04-01

    The ratio of the concentration of the oxidation product anthraquinone to that of its parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon anthracene is reported for several coastal marine sediments. The ratio ranges from 0.317 in a highly contaminated industrialized harbor to 2.81 in a remote, less contaminated site. We hypothesize that differences in this ratio result from the input source of PAHs, with input from atmospheric deposition at remote sites resulting in a predominance of anthraquinone (ratio > 1), and direct discharge to highly contaminated industrialized harbors resulting in a predominance of anthracene (ratio < 1). To support this hypothesis, the fate of anthracene in the marine environment was investigated with respect to conversion to its oxidation product, anthraquinone. Once associated with sediments, anthracene is believed to be relatively persistent; however, it can potentially be subjected to oxidation via biological (microbial degradation) and chemical (chemical oxidation and photooxidation) processes. An assessment of the extent of oxidation of anthracene associated with sediments was conducted both under conditions simulating those found in the marine environment and under rigorous conditions by exposure to UV radiation. Results of this study show that while anthracene associated with marine sediments does not readily undergo oxidation to anthraquinone under conditions normally encountered in the marine environment, under extreme conditions anthracene is photooxidized by exposure to UV radiation. The extent of oxidation is influenced by sediment characteristics such as percent organic carbon, humic acid content and sediment surface area. The relative stability of anthracene under normal conditions may help to validate the use of the anthraquinone to anthracene ratio in marine sediments as an environmental marker of contaminant source.

  2. Sediment fluxes from California Coastal Rivers: the influences of climate, geology, and topography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, E.D.; Antweiler, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    The influences of geologic and climatic factors on erosion and sedimentation processes in rivers draining the western flank of the California Coast Range are assessed. Annual suspended, bedload, and total sediment fluxes were determined for 16 river basins that have hydrologic records covering all or most of the period from 1950 to 2006 and have been relatively unaffected by flow storage, regulation, and depletion, which alter the downstream movement of water and sediment. The occurrence of relatively large annual sediment fluxes are strongly influenced by the El Nino–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The frequency of relatively large annual sediment fluxes decreases from north to south during La Nina phases and increases from north to south during El Nino phases. The influence of ENSO is modulated over a period of decades by the PDO, such that relatively large annual sediment fluxes are more frequent during a La Nina phase in conjunction with a cool PDO and during an El Nino phase in conjunction with a warm PDO. Values of mean annual sediment flux, , were regressed against basin and climatic characteristics. Basin area, bedrock erodibility, basin relief, and precipitation explain 87% of the variation in from the 16 river basins. Bedrock erodibility is the most significant characteristic influencing . Basin relief is a superior predictor of compared with basin slope. is nearly proportional to basin area and increases with increasing precipitation. For a given percentage change, basin relief has a 2.3-fold greater effect on than a similar change in precipitation. The estimated natural from all California coastal rivers for the period 1950–2006 would have been approximately 85 million tons without flow storage, regulation, and depletion; the actual has been approximately 50 million tons, because of the effects of flow storage, regulation, and depletion.

  3. Evaluating Multi-Proxy Records of Paleocyclones in Florida Coastal Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, M. R.; Jaeger, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    Cyclones are one of the most effective geomorphic agents, causing rapid changes in patterns of deposition and erosion through intense wind and wave energy and coastal flooding. Since historical records in the Atlantic Basin only extend back 370 years, a longer record is needed of past cyclone occurrences in order to better evaluate recurrence intervals (e.g. paleoclimate) and associated geomorphic change. Sand beds in coastal ponds and marshes have frequently been associated with cyclone overwash deposition, although other transport agents can result in similar type deposits. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a number of coastal pond sedimentary proxy records for their utility as paleocyclone indicators. Two sets of piston cores were taken ~30 m from the beach in coastal ponds on St. Vincent Island, Florida, a relatively undisturbed island on the panhandle that has been frequently disturbed by hurricane activity. A variety of different proxy records (grain size, magnetic susceptibility, gamma bulk density, sediment reflectance, micropaleontology, salinity, %C and N) were analyzed in these cores to detect two major hurricanes known to have severely impacted the island in 1894 and 1985, as well as additional minor hurricanes. Measurements of bulk density and magnetic susceptibility were obtained with a multi-sensor core logger, then cores were split and examined visually and x-radiographically for lithology. The cores were sampled at 1 cm intervals for measurements of radioisotopes (Pb-210, Ra-226, and Cs-137) and the aforementioned proxy records. Geochronological results indicate an average sedimentation rate of 1.5-2 mm/yr. Sorting and micropaleontological (foram abundance) data display some evidence of hurricane deposits corresponding to 1894 and 1985. However, none of the proxy records show clear evidence of all known hurricanes. Thus, these commonly measured proxies are unsuitable for paleocyclone studies in coastal ponds in Florida. Possible reasons for

  4. PCB contamination in surface sediments in the coastal waters of Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Spongberg, Alison L

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the initial investigation of PCB concentrations in four geographical regions (three on the Pacific and one in the Caribbean) of coastal Costa Rica: Bahia Culebra, Golfo Dulce, Golfo de Nicoya, and Limón. Overall total concentrations of PCB were low in all areas except around the port of Golfito (Golfo Dulce). Overall average concentration is 2.80 ng/g dw, with a standard deviation of 2.75. The low concentration could be due to lack of contamination or the subsequent degradation in the warm climate, or the low sorptive capacity of the sediment. Further investigation is ongoing.

  5. Levels of hydrocarbons in mussels, Mytilus edulis, and surface sediments from Danish coastal areas

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, K.

    1981-02-01

    Until recently, most effort in oil pollution research has been spent on investigating the effects of oil spills and use of detergents. The effects of long-term low level input to the marine environment are much less elucidated. This study represents the first step in a project concerning chronic oil pollution undertaken by the Marine Pollution Laboratory, Denmark. Results from previous studies on this subject in the area concerned, which have not been internationally published, are also included. In a series of Danish coastal localities, samples of surface sediments (top cm) were taken and samples of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, were collected by SCUBA diving.

  6. Diversity and composition of sediment bacteria in subtropical coastal wetlands of North Stradbroke Island, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvochina, Maria; Sampayo, Eugenia; Welti, Nina; Hayes, Matthew; Lu, Yang; Lovelock, Catherine; Lockington, David

    2013-04-01

    Coastal wetlands provide a wide variety of important ecosystem services but continue to suffer disturbance, degradation and deforestation. Sediment bacteria are responsible for major nutrient transformation and recycling in these ecosystems. Insight into microbial community composition and the factors that determine them may improve our understanding of biogeochemical processes, food web dynamics, biodegradation processes and, thus, help to develop the management strategies for preserving the ecosystem health and services. Characterizing shifts in community taxa along environmental gradients has been shown to provide a useful tool for determining the major drivers affecting community structure and function. North Stradbroke Island (NSI) in Southern Queensland presents considerable habitat diversity including variety of groundwater dependent ecosystems such as lakes, swamps, sedge-like salt marshes and mangroves. Ecological responses of continuous groundwater extraction for municipal purposes and sand mining operations on NSI are still need to be assessed in order to protect its unique environment. Changes in coastal hydrology due to either climate change or human activity may directly affect microbial populations and, thus, biogeochemical cycles of nutrients. These may result in altering/losing some ecosystem services provided by coastal wetlands. In this study we examine microbial diversity and determine environmental controls on bacterial community structure along a natural transition from freshwater forested wetland (melaleuca woodland), sedge-like salt marsh and into mangroves located at NSI. The study area is characterized by significant groundwater flow, nutrient limitation and sharp transition from one ecosystem type to another. Sediment cores (0-5 cm and 20-25 cm depth) were collected from three representative sites of each zone (mangroves - salt marsh - freshwater wetland) along the salinity gradient in August 2012. Subsamples were set aside for use in

  7. PCB contamination in surface sediments in the coastal waters of Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Spongberg, Alison L

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the initial investigation of PCB concentrations in four geographical regions (three on the Pacific and one in the Caribbean) of coastal Costa Rica: Bahia Culebra, Golfo Dulce, Golfo de Nicoya, and Limón. Overall total concentrations of PCB were low in all areas except around the port of Golfito (Golfo Dulce). Overall average concentration is 2.80 ng/g dw, with a standard deviation of 2.75. The low concentration could be due to lack of contamination or the subsequent degradation in the warm climate, or the low sorptive capacity of the sediment. Further investigation is ongoing. PMID:17469231

  8. Treated wastewater as a source of sediment contamination in Gulf of Mexico near-coastal areas: A survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.; Weber, D.; Stanley, R.; Albrecht, B.

    2000-01-01

    The primary objective of this baseline survey was to provide some needed perspective on the magnitude of sediment contamination associated with wastewater outfalls discharged to Gulf of Mexico near-coastal areas. The chemical quality and toxicities of whole sediments and pore waters collected from three coastal rivers and four coastal bays receiving wastewaters were assessed during a 2-year period. Rooted plants, invertebrates, and fish were used to assess the acute and chronic toxicities of sediments associated with a total of 10 industrial, municipal, steam electric-power generation and forest product wastewater outfalls. Effects on bacterial bioluminescence, early seedling biomass, survival, reproduction, fertility, and growth were determined in bioassays ranging from 30 min to 28 d duration. Sediment chemical contamination was localized and decreased with increasing distance from the discharge areas. The major sediment contaminants, with few exceptions, were divalent trace metals, which increased, on average, by 69% below 8 of the 10 outfalls. However, only a few concentrations exceeded proposed threshold sediment quality assessment guidelines. Toxicity to either the plant or animal test species was observed occasionally below 7 of the 10 outfalls, but its detection was dependent on the type of bioassay and the frequency of use. Consequently, a suite of bioassays conducted on multiple occasions appears to be needed for toxicity assessments of sediments collected below wastewater discharges in the Gulf region to ensure relevancy of the results. This is particularly true for low to moderately contaminated sediments where acute toxicity is uncommon, which was the case in this study.

  9. A statistical experiment design approach for optimizing biodegradation of weathered crude oil in coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Mohajeri, Leila; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Zahed, Mohammad Ali

    2010-02-01

    This work studied the bioremediation of weathered crude oil (WCO) in coastal sediment samples using central composite face centered design (CCFD) under response surface methodology (RSM). Initial oil concentration, biomass, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were used as independent variables (factors) and oil removal as dependent variable (response) in a 60 days trial. A statistically significant model for WCO removal was obtained. The coefficient of determination (R(2)=0.9732) and probability value (P<0.0001) demonstrated significance for the regression model. Numerical optimization based on desirability function were carried out for initial oil concentration of 2, 16 and 30 g per kg sediment and 83.13, 78.06 and 69.92 per cent removal were observed respectively, compare to 77.13, 74.17 and 69.87 per cent removal for un-optimized results. PMID:19773160

  10. Arsenic fractionation in estuarine sediments: Does coastal eutrophication influence As behavior?

    PubMed

    Sá, Fabian; Sanders, Christian J; Patchineelam, Sambasiva Rao; Machado, Eunice da Costa; Lombardi, Ana Teresa

    2015-07-15

    The Paranaguá Estuarine Complex (PEC) includes the naturally oligotrophic (NO) Mel Island which is surrounded by sea grasses, a naturally eutrophic (NE) Benito Inlet adjacent to mangrove wetlands and the highly impacted eutrophic (IE) Paranaguá Bay, home of one of Brazil's largest ports. The results from this study indicate that reactive As and pyrite increase with sediment depth near Paranaguá port in the IE region. At the NE region, near a mangrove fringe, the reactive As, Fe, Mn and pyrite remained relatively high along the sediment column while near the sea grasses at NO the As contents were low. The degree of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) and the degree of pyritization (DOP) was highest at the IE site, slightly increasing with depth. These baseline results indicate that influence of trophic conditions and presence of marine vegetation may be directly related to As behavior in coastal systems.

  11. An assessment of metal contamination in coastal sediments of the Caspian Sea.

    PubMed

    de Mora, Stephen; Sheikholeslami, Mohammad Reza; Wyse, Eric; Azemard, Sabine; Cassi, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    An assessment of marine pollution due to metals was made in the Caspian Sea based on coastal sediment collected in Azerbaijan, Iran, Kazakhstan, Russia and Turkmenistan. Despite the high carbonate content, the distribution of most metals was largely controlled by terrigenous inputs. Several metals (As, Cr, Ni) exhibited concentrations that exceed sediment quality guidelines. Such metals have a high natural background but anthropogenic activities, notably mining, may further enhance concentrations. This would explain hot spots for Cu and Zn in Azerbaijan and Iran, and Cr at the mouth of the Ural River in Kazakhstan. Contamination by Hg was observed to the south of Baku Bay, Azerbaijan. Some anomalously high concentrations of Ba in the central Caspian are probably from offshore drilling operations, but the elevated U concentrations (up to 11.1 microg g(-1)) may be natural in origin. Several metals (Ag, Cd, Pb) have relatively low levels that pose no environmental concerns. PMID:14725876

  12. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and black carbon in intertidal sediments of China coastal zones: Concentration, ecological risk, source and their relationship.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Hou, Lijun; Li, Ye; Liu, Min; Lin, Xianbiao; Cheng, Lv

    2016-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and black carbon (BC) have attracted many attentions, especially in the coastal environments. In this study, spatiotemporal distributions of PAHs and BC, and the correlations between BC and PAHs were investigated in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. BC in sediments was measured through dichromate oxidation (BCCr) and thermal oxidation (BCCTO). The concentrations of BCCr in the intertidal sediments ranged between 0.61 and 6.32mgg(-1), while BCCTO ranged between 0.57 and 4.76mgg(-1). Spatial variations of δ(13)C signatures in TOC and BC were observed, varying from -21.13‰ to -24.87‰ and from -23.53‰ to -16.78‰, respectively. PAH contents of sediments ranged from 195.9 to 4610.2ngg(-1) in winter and 98.2 to 2796.5ngg(-1) in summer, and significantly seasonal variations were observed at most sampling sites. However, the results of potential toxicity assessment indicated low ecological risk in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. Greater concentrations of PAHs measured in the sediments of estuarine environments indicated that rivers runoff may have been responsible for the higher PAH pollution levels in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. Pearson's correlation analysis suggested that pyrogenic compounds of PAH were significantly related to BC, due to that both BC and these compounds derived mainly from the combustion process of fossil fuels and biomass. Overall, increasing energy consumptions caused by anthropogenic activities can contribute more emissions of BC as well as PAHs and thus improve the importance of BC in indicating pyrogenic compounds of PAHs in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. PMID:27266522

  13. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and black carbon in intertidal sediments of China coastal zones: Concentration, ecological risk, source and their relationship.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Hou, Lijun; Li, Ye; Liu, Min; Lin, Xianbiao; Cheng, Lv

    2016-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and black carbon (BC) have attracted many attentions, especially in the coastal environments. In this study, spatiotemporal distributions of PAHs and BC, and the correlations between BC and PAHs were investigated in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. BC in sediments was measured through dichromate oxidation (BCCr) and thermal oxidation (BCCTO). The concentrations of BCCr in the intertidal sediments ranged between 0.61 and 6.32mgg(-1), while BCCTO ranged between 0.57 and 4.76mgg(-1). Spatial variations of δ(13)C signatures in TOC and BC were observed, varying from -21.13‰ to -24.87‰ and from -23.53‰ to -16.78‰, respectively. PAH contents of sediments ranged from 195.9 to 4610.2ngg(-1) in winter and 98.2 to 2796.5ngg(-1) in summer, and significantly seasonal variations were observed at most sampling sites. However, the results of potential toxicity assessment indicated low ecological risk in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. Greater concentrations of PAHs measured in the sediments of estuarine environments indicated that rivers runoff may have been responsible for the higher PAH pollution levels in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. Pearson's correlation analysis suggested that pyrogenic compounds of PAH were significantly related to BC, due to that both BC and these compounds derived mainly from the combustion process of fossil fuels and biomass. Overall, increasing energy consumptions caused by anthropogenic activities can contribute more emissions of BC as well as PAHs and thus improve the importance of BC in indicating pyrogenic compounds of PAHs in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones.

  14. Reactive transport modeling of the impact of ocean acidification on global carbon fluxes in coastal marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumins, Valdis; van Cappellen, Philippe; Regnier, Pierre

    2010-05-01

    Because of relatively high productivity of both calcifying and non-calcifying phytoplankton in coastal zones, coastal sediments can act as a significant carbon sink. Ocean acidification is likely to impact productivity of these groups differently, raising the question of the overall effect of ocean acidification on carbon burial in coastal sediments. We modeled the effect of varying depositional fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) on carbon cycling in coastal marine sediments using a one-dimensional reactive transport model. Transport processes include sediment burial, advection, diffusion, bioturbation and bioirrigation. The model incorporates the hydrolysis of macromolecular organic matter, the redox pathways of POC oxidation, re-oxidation reactions of the reduced compounds produced during POC decomposition, the acid-base chemical equilibria, and the dissolution of PIC (calcite, aragonite, and Mg-calcite) in the upper 50 cm of sediment. The following processes are also included: precipitation of iron sulfide and iron carbonate, sorption of Fe(II), ammonium and phosphate, sulfidization of organic matter, and pyritization. The global return fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkalinity are estimated by modeling sediments at 25 m, 75 m, and 150 m depths, and multiplying by the global area of seafloor depths 0-50 m, 50-100 m, and 100-200 m, respectively. We determined the sensitivity of carbon and nutrient return fluxes to changes in pH, PIC and POC fluxes, as well as to poorly constrained Fe(III) deposition fluxes. Inorganic carbon return fluxes are influenced most by the particulate organic and inorganic carbon depositional fluxes; the seawater pH has a limited effect. Modeled sediment pH profiles and PIC dissolution are also sensitive to the iron deposition flux. The overreaching goal of the research is to forecast the global response of coastal sediment return fluxes as a result of anthropogenic ocean

  15. Biogenic Mn-Oxides in Subseafloor Basalts

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Gustafsson, Håkan; Holm, Nils G.

    2015-01-01

    The deep biosphere of the subseafloor basalts is recognized as a major scientific frontier in disciplines like biology, geology, and oceanography. Recently, the presence of fungi in these environments has involved a change of view regarding diversity and ecology. Here, we describe fossilized fungal communities in vugs in subseafloor basalts from a depth of 936.65 metres below seafloor at the Detroit Seamount, Pacific Ocean. These fungal communities are closely associated with botryoidal Mn oxides composed of todorokite. Analyses of the Mn oxides by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy (EPR) indicate a biogenic signature. We suggest, based on mineralogical, morphological and EPR data, a biological origin of the botryoidal Mn oxides. Our results show that fungi are involved in Mn cycling at great depths in the seafloor and we introduce EPR as a means to easily identify biogenic Mn oxides in these environments. PMID:26107948

  16. Biogenic Mn-Oxides in Subseafloor Basalts.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Gustafsson, Håkan; Holm, Nils G

    2015-01-01

    The deep biosphere of the subseafloor basalts is recognized as a major scientific frontier in disciplines like biology, geology, and oceanography. Recently, the presence of fungi in these environments has involved a change of view regarding diversity and ecology. Here, we describe fossilized fungal communities in vugs in subseafloor basalts from a depth of 936.65 metres below seafloor at the Detroit Seamount, Pacific Ocean. These fungal communities are closely associated with botryoidal Mn oxides composed of todorokite. Analyses of the Mn oxides by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy (EPR) indicate a biogenic signature. We suggest, based on mineralogical, morphological and EPR data, a biological origin of the botryoidal Mn oxides. Our results show that fungi are involved in Mn cycling at great depths in the seafloor and we introduce EPR as a means to easily identify biogenic Mn oxides in these environments. PMID:26107948

  17. Heavy metal pollution status in surface sediments of the coastal Bohai Bay.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuelu; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur

    2012-04-15

    Bohai Bay, the second largest bay of Bohai Sea, largely due to the huge amount of pollutants discharged into it annually and its geohydrologic condition, is considered to be one of the most polluted marine areas in China. To slow down, halt and finally reverse the environmental deterioration of Bohai Sea, some researchers have proposed to connect it with Jiaozhou Bay in the western coast of Southern Yellow Sea by digging an interbasin canal through Shandong Peninsula. In order to assess the heavy metal pollution and provide background information for such a large geoengineering scheme, surface sediments from 42 stations covering both riverine and marine regions of the northwestern coast of Bohai Bay were analyzed for heavy metal content and fractionation (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn). Three empirically derived sediment quality guidelines were used to assess the pollution extent of these metals. The studied metals had low mobility except for Cd at all stations and Zn at some riverine stations. Although a high mobility of Cd was observed, it could hardly cause a bad effect on the environment owing to its low total concentrations. Anthropogenic influence on the accumulation of studied heavy metals in sediments of Bohai Bay was obvious, but their contents were relatively lower to date comparing with some other marine coastal areas that receive important anthropogenic inputs. Taking as a whole, surface sediments of northwestern Bohai Bay had a 21% probability of toxicity based on the mean effects range-median quotient.

  18. Risks posed by trace organic contaminants in coastal sediments in the Pearl River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Fung, C N; Zheng, G J; Connell, D W; Zhang, X; Wong, H L; Giesy, J P; Fang, Z; Lam, P K S

    2005-10-01

    Local marine environments in China's Pearl River Delta (PRD), the most rapidly developing region in one of the world's fastest growing economies, have been experiencing significant environmental stress during the past decades. This investigation was conducted to determine the status and trends of persistence organic pollutants (POPs) such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine (OC) pesticides and dioxin-related compounds in marine sediments collected from sixteen coastal stations in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) in March 2003. Elevated concentrations of PAHs (94-4300 ng/g), PCBs (6.0-290 ng/g), PHCs (14-150 microg/g), and DDTs (1.4-600 ng/g) were detected in sediment samples. In addition, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-like activities in the sediment samples were estimated to range from 0.3 to 440 pg TCDD-EQ/g. Sediments collected from Xiashan contained the greatest concentrations of trace organic contaminations amongst all the sampling stations in the present study. The degree of trace organic contamination was, in general, more severe at stations situated along the west shores of the PRD than their counterparts in the east. A preliminary assessment was performed to examine the probable risks to the marine ecosystem due to POPs. The results showed that OC pesticide contamination in the PRD was particularly serious and might pose a threat to the health of the marine inhabitants. PMID:16199239

  19. Chemical contamination and toxicity of sediment from a coastal area receiving industrial effluents in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Beg, M U; Al-Muzaini, S; Saeed, T; Jacob, P G; Beg, K R; Al-Bahloul, M; Al-Matrouk, K; Al-Obaid, T; Kurian, A

    2001-10-01

    The Shuaiba coastal area (12.5 x 1.5 km) was examined for contamination with total organic carbon, volatile organic matter, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, nickel, vanadium, and zinc in sediment; their desorption by aqueous elution; and toxicity to aquatic biota. The pollutants were mainly accumulated in the upstream area facing Mina Al-Ahmadi refinery to Shuaiba harbour. Solid-phase Microtox assays showed severe toxicity, and the LC(50) was negatively correlated with most of the chemical parameters, suggesting that toxicity was the function of collective effects of the pollutants present in sediment. Sea water elutriation showed poor desorption of pollutants from sediment, and the elutriates were not found toxic to Microtox and brine shrimp larvae. Whole sediment suspension in sea water reduced the survival of fingerlings in fish bioassays. Action from Shuaiba Area Authority is required to reduce pollutant accumulation in identified depositional area on the Shuaiba coast by facilitating unrestricted water flow in the area and restricting pollutant discharge at source. PMID:11503065

  20. Atrazine biodegradation to deisopropylatrazine and deethylatrazine in coastal sediments of different land uses.

    PubMed

    Aelion, C M; Mathur, P P

    2001-11-01

    Atrazine, a triazine herbicide widely used in the United States, contributes to surface-water and groundwater contamination, as can deisopropylatrazine (DIA) and deethylatrazine (DEA), two of its microbial degradation products. Production of DIA and DEA by native bacteria in aquatic sediments has not been investigated thoroughly. We assessed atrazine and production of DIA and DEA over time in coastal aquatic sediments associated with different land uses including creeks from an undeveloped preserve and a suburban development, a golf course drainage ditch, and a contaminated commercial harbor. Sediments were incubated in microcosms, spiked with U-14C-atrazine, extracted, and analyzed for 14C in a liquid scintillation counter. Atrazine, DIA, and DEA also were quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The amount of 14C recovered varied at each site as a function of the sediment organic carbon content and decreased significantly over time. Both DEA and DIA were measured primarily in the aqueous phase. Transformation was more extensive to DIA than to DEA. The ratio of DIA to atrazine recovered from the undeveloped preserve was as high as 0.13. In contrast, the golf course had limited biotransformation, and had the greatest atrazine recoveries so atrazine, not DEA and DIA, may have a greater impact at this site.

  1. The Influence of Coastal Wetland Zonation on Surface Sediment and Porewater Mercury Speciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Windham-Myers, L.; Wilson, A. M.; Buck, T.; Smith, E.

    2014-12-01

    An investigation of mercury (Hg) speciation in saltmarsh surface sediment (top 0-2 cm) and porewater (integrated 0-50 cm) was conducted along two monitoring well transects established within North Inlet Estuary (S. Carolina, USA) as part of the NOAA sponsored National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) network. Transects were perpendicular to the shoreline, from the forested uplands to the edge of the tidal channel, and traversed a range of vegetated zones from the high marsh (pickleweed, rush, and salt panne-dominated) to the low marsh (cordgrass dominated), as mediated by elevation and tidal inundation. Sediment grain size and organic content explained 95% of the variability in the distribution of total Hg (THg) in surface sediment. Tin-reducible 'reactive' mercury (HgR) concentration was 10X greater in the high marsh, compared to the low marsh, and increased sharply with decreasing sediment pH values below pH=6. The percentage of THg as HgR decreased as sediment redox conditions became more reducing. There were no significant differences in surface sediment methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations between high and low marsh zones. In contrast, porewater MeHg concentrations were 5X greater in the high marsh compared to the low marsh. As a percentage of THg, mean porewater %MeHg was 23% in the low marsh and 51% in the high marsh, reaching levels of 73-89% in a number of high marsh sites. Calculations of partitioning between porewater and the solid phase suggest stronger binding to particles in the low marsh and a shift towards the dissolved phase in the high marsh for both THg and MeHg. These results are consistent with a conceptual model for coastal wetlands where the less frequently inundated high marsh zone may be important in terms of MeHg production and enhanced subsurface mobilization, partially due to the subsurface mixing of saline estuarine water and freshwater draining in from the uplands area.

  2. Trace element fluxes in sediments of an environmentally impacted river from a coastal zone of Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Yuri Jacques Agra Bezerra; Cantalice, José Ramon Barros; Singh, Vijay P; do Nascimento, Clístenes Williams Araújo; Piscoya, Victor Casimiro; Guerra, Sérgio M S

    2015-10-01

    Data regarding trace element concentrations and fluxes in suspended sediments and bedload are scarce. To fill this gap and meet the international need to include polluted rivers in future world estimation of trace element fluxes, this study aimed to determine the trace element fluxes in suspended sediment and bedload of an environmentally impacted river in Brazil. Water, suspended sediment, and bedload from both the upstream and the downstream cross sections were collected. To collect both the suspended sediment and water samples, we used the US DH-48. Bedload measurements were carried out using the US BLH 84 sampler. Concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn were determined by inductively coupled plasma (ICP-OES). As and Hg were determined by an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AA-FIAS). The suspended sediments contributed more than 99 % of the trace element flux. By far Pb and to a less extent Zn at the downstream site represents major concerns. The yields of Pb and Zn in suspended sediments were 4.20 and 2.93 kg km(2) year(-1), respectively. These yields were higher than the values reported for Pb and Zn for Tuul River (highly impacted by mining activities), 1.60 and 1.30 kg km(2) year(-1), respectively, as well as the Pb yield (suspended + dissolved) to the sea of some Mediterranean rivers equal to 3.4 kg km(2) year(-1). Therefore, the highest flux and yield of Pb and Zn in Ipojuca River highlighted the importance to include medium and small rivers-often overlooked in global and regional studies-in the future estimation of world trace element fluxes in order to protect estuaries and coastal zones. PMID:25989857

  3. Trace element fluxes in sediments of an environmentally impacted river from a coastal zone of Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Yuri Jacques Agra Bezerra; Cantalice, José Ramon Barros; Singh, Vijay P; do Nascimento, Clístenes Williams Araújo; Piscoya, Victor Casimiro; Guerra, Sérgio M S

    2015-10-01

    Data regarding trace element concentrations and fluxes in suspended sediments and bedload are scarce. To fill this gap and meet the international need to include polluted rivers in future world estimation of trace element fluxes, this study aimed to determine the trace element fluxes in suspended sediment and bedload of an environmentally impacted river in Brazil. Water, suspended sediment, and bedload from both the upstream and the downstream cross sections were collected. To collect both the suspended sediment and water samples, we used the US DH-48. Bedload measurements were carried out using the US BLH 84 sampler. Concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn were determined by inductively coupled plasma (ICP-OES). As and Hg were determined by an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AA-FIAS). The suspended sediments contributed more than 99 % of the trace element flux. By far Pb and to a less extent Zn at the downstream site represents major concerns. The yields of Pb and Zn in suspended sediments were 4.20 and 2.93 kg km(2) year(-1), respectively. These yields were higher than the values reported for Pb and Zn for Tuul River (highly impacted by mining activities), 1.60 and 1.30 kg km(2) year(-1), respectively, as well as the Pb yield (suspended + dissolved) to the sea of some Mediterranean rivers equal to 3.4 kg km(2) year(-1). Therefore, the highest flux and yield of Pb and Zn in Ipojuca River highlighted the importance to include medium and small rivers-often overlooked in global and regional studies-in the future estimation of world trace element fluxes in order to protect estuaries and coastal zones.

  4. Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs used to determine sediment accretion rates at selected northern European coastal wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, J.C.; DeLaune, R.D.; Patrick, W.H. Jr.

    1996-05-01

    Sediment cores were collected form five coastal wetlands along the North Sea (England and Netherlands) and Baltic Sea (Poland). {sup 137}Cs dating was used to assess sediment accretion rates, including rates based on the {sup 137}Cs peak from the 1986 accident at Chernobyl. Peaks form the Chernobyl fallout were found in cores from the Oder and Vistula Rivers in Poland, from the Eastern Scheldt in the Netherlands, and in one of the two cores from Stiffkey Marsh, UK. No evidence of Chernobyl fallout was found in cores from Dengie Marsh, UK. The Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs peak serves as an excellent marker for short-term accretion rates because of its high activity. Vertical accretion rates (cm yr{sup {minus}1}) based on 1963 and 1986 peaks were similar at most sites; differences may be due to large inputs of sediment from storms or recent accumulation of organic matter. Large differences in sediment characteristics and accretion rates were found between samples from Poland and western Europe. Vertical accretion rates over the period 1963-1986 ranged from 0.26 to 0.85 cm{sup {minus}1} and from 0.30 to 1.90 cm yr{sup {minus}1} over the 1986-1991 period. Vertical accretion rates for the period these sites are in imminent danger of excessive flooding. The Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs peak will be especially useful for studies of short-term (i.e. very recent) sedimentation in the near future and for comparisons of sediment processes over different time scales. 33 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Phosphorus cycling in the deep subseafloor biosphere at North Pond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defforey, D.; Paytan, A.

    2013-12-01

    Phosphorus is a macronutrient involved both in functional and structural components of all living cells. This makes it an essential nutrient for life, including microbial life in the deep subseafloor habitat. Phosphorus availability in this environment is limited since it is thought to be mainly present in refractory mineral phases. However, recent estimates suggest that the deep biosphere may contain up to 1% of Earth's total biomass, which implies that microorganisms may possess mechanisms to harvest recalcitrant phosphorus compounds in this environment. This study sheds light on those mechanisms by investigating phosphorus cycling in deep open-ocean sediments using stable oxygen isotope ratios in phosphate. Furthermore, this study provides insight into changes in phosphorus bioavailability and mobility under a range of natural environmental conditions within the deep biosphere. Sediment samples were collected from four boreholes drilled during the IODP Expedition 336 to North Pond, an isolated sediment pond on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Sedimentary phosphorus compounds are characterized using sequential extractions (SEDEX), which separate them into five distinct pools. Phosphate from the various extracts are then concentrated, purified through a series of steps, then converted to silver phosphate, which is pyrolyzed and analyzed by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS). The isotopic signatures and/or fractionations associated with many of the potential reactions and transformations operating in the P cycle have been determined, and provide the basis for interpreting isotopic data that are obtained from the phosphate extracts.

  6. Coastal currents and mass transport of surface sediments over the shelf regions of Monterey Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, S.C.

    1970-01-01

    In Monterey Bay, the highest concentrations of medium and fine sands occur nearshore between ten and thirty fathoms. Silt and clay accumulate in greater depths. Contours of median diameter roughly parallel the isobaths. Fine-grained materials are supplied to the bay region from erosion of cliffs which partly surround Monterey Bay, from sediment laden river discharge, and from continual reworking of widespread Pleistocene and Recent sea floor sediments. These sediments in turn are picked up by coastal currents and distributed over the shelf regions by present day current regimes. Studies of bottom currents over the shelf regions and in Monterey Canyon have revealed patterns which vary with seasonal changes. Current patterns during August and September exhibit remarkable symmetry about the axis of Monterey Submarine Canyon. Central Shelf currents north and south of Monterey Canyon flowed northwest at an average rate of 0.2 knots and south at 0.3 knots respectively. On the North Shelf between January and March currents flowed east to southeast at 0.3-0.5 knots with mirror image patterns above the South Shelf during the same period. Irregular current flow in the canyon indicates a complex current structure with frequent shifts in counterclockwise and clockwise direction over very short periods of time. Bottom topography of the canyon complex often causes localization of canyon currents. One particular observation at a depth of 51 fathoms indicated up-canyon flow at a rate of 0.2 knots. Most of the observed currents are related to seasonal variations, upwelling, ocean swell patterns, and to changes in the California and Davidson currents. Changes in current regimes are reflected in the patterns of sediment distribution and transport. Sediment transport is chiefly parallel to the isobaths, particularly on the North and South Shelf regions. Complex dispersal patterns are observed near Monterey Canyon and Moss Landing Harbor jetties. Longshore currents move sediments

  7. Contrasting landscape influences on sediment supply and stream restoration priorities in northern Fennoscandia (Sweden and Finland) and coastal British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Jordan; Hogan, Daniel; Palm, Daniel; Lundquist, Hans; Nilsson, Christer; Beechie, Timothy J

    2011-01-01

    Sediment size and supply exert a dominant control on channel structure. We review the role of sediment supply in channel structure, and how regional differences in sediment supply and land use affect stream restoration priorities. We show how stream restoration goals are best understood within a common fluvial geomorphology framework defined by sediment supply, storage, and transport. Land-use impacts in geologically young landscapes with high sediment yields (e.g., coastal British Columbia) typically result in loss of in-stream wood and accelerated sediment inputs from bank erosion, logging roads, hillslopes and gullies. In contrast, northern Sweden and Finland are landscapes with naturally low sediment yields caused by low relief, resistant bedrock, and abundant mainstem lakes that act as sediment traps. Land-use impacts involved extensive channel narrowing, removal of obstructions, and bank armouring with boulders to facilitate timber floating, thereby reducing sediment supply from bank erosion while increasing export through higher channel velocities. These contrasting land-use impacts have pushed stream channels in opposite directions (aggradation versus degradation) within a phase-space defined by sediment transport and supply. Restoration in coastal British Columbia has focused on reducing sediment supply (through bank and hillslope stabilization) and restoring wood inputs. In contrast, restoration in northern Fennoscandia (Sweden and Finland) has focused on channel widening and removal of bank-armouring boulders to increase sediment supply and retention. These contrasting restoration priorities illustrate the consequences of divergent regional land-use impacts on sediment supply, and the utility of planning restoration activities within a mechanistic sediment supply-transport framework. PMID:21132293

  8. Contrasting landscape influences on sediment supply and stream restoration priorities in northern Fennoscandia (Sweden and Finland) and coastal British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Jordan; Hogan, Daniel; Palm, Daniel; Lundquist, Hans; Nilsson, Christer; Beechie, Timothy J

    2011-01-01

    Sediment size and supply exert a dominant control on channel structure. We review the role of sediment supply in channel structure, and how regional differences in sediment supply and land use affect stream restoration priorities. We show how stream restoration goals are best understood within a common fluvial geomorphology framework defined by sediment supply, storage, and transport. Land-use impacts in geologically young landscapes with high sediment yields (e.g., coastal British Columbia) typically result in loss of in-stream wood and accelerated sediment inputs from bank erosion, logging roads, hillslopes and gullies. In contrast, northern Sweden and Finland are landscapes with naturally low sediment yields caused by low relief, resistant bedrock, and abundant mainstem lakes that act as sediment traps. Land-use impacts involved extensive channel narrowing, removal of obstructions, and bank armouring with boulders to facilitate timber floating, thereby reducing sediment supply from bank erosion while increasing export through higher channel velocities. These contrasting land-use impacts have pushed stream channels in opposite directions (aggradation versus degradation) within a phase-space defined by sediment transport and supply. Restoration in coastal British Columbia has focused on reducing sediment supply (through bank and hillslope stabilization) and restoring wood inputs. In contrast, restoration in northern Fennoscandia (Sweden and Finland) has focused on channel widening and removal of bank-armouring boulders to increase sediment supply and retention. These contrasting restoration priorities illustrate the consequences of divergent regional land-use impacts on sediment supply, and the utility of planning restoration activities within a mechanistic sediment supply-transport framework.

  9. Temporal variation of coastal surface sediment bacterial communities along an environmental pollution gradient.

    PubMed

    Thiyagarajan, V; Tsoi, M M Y; Zhang, W; Qian, P Y

    2010-07-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) was used to track the changes of bacterial community compositions (BCC) in coastal surface sediments along an environmental pollution gradient between 2004 and 2006. BCC in the chronically contaminated sites showed the largest deviation from those in the adjacent sites. Surprisingly, BCC at two contrasting environments (oceanic vs. river-influenced) were more similar. Unexpectedly, the BCC did not recover (when compared to oceanic control site) even after 5 years of pollution abatement initiatives in Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong. On the other hand, disposal of treated sewage for 5 years in one of the sites did not significantly affect the BCC. A striking seasonal variation in the BCC was observed at only the polluted sites. Although factors other than pollution gradients may explain the observed BCC patterns, the information presented here can be useful in predicting long-term effects of pollution on BCC. Furthermore, this study suggests that BCC analysis using T-RFLP is a faster, reliable and easier approach to monitor microbenthic community response to environmental pollution gradient in coastal sediments. PMID:20359741

  10. Sediment transport in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System: an overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; Lester J. McKee,

    2013-01-01

    The papers in this special issue feature state-of-the-art approaches to understanding the physical processes related to sediment transport and geomorphology of complex coastal-estuarine systems. Here we focus on the San Francisco Bay Coastal System, extending from the lower San Joaquin-Sacramento Delta, through the Bay, and along the adjacent outer Pacific Coast. San Francisco Bay is an urbanized estuary that is impacted by numerous anthropogenic activities common to many large estuaries, including a mining legacy, channel dredging, aggregate mining, reservoirs, freshwater diversion, watershed modifications, urban run-off, ship traffic, exotic species introductions, land reclamation, and wetland restoration. The Golden Gate strait is the sole inlet connecting the Bay to the Pacific Ocean, and serves as the conduit for a tidal flow of ~ 8 x 109 m3/day, in addition to the transport of mud, sand, biogenic material, nutrients, and pollutants. Despite this physical, biological and chemical connection, resource management and prior research have often treated the Delta, Bay and adjacent ocean as separate entities, compartmentalized by artificial geographic or political boundaries. The body of work herein presents a comprehensive analysis of system-wide behavior, extending a rich heritage of sediment transport research that dates back to the groundbreaking hydraulic mining-impact research of G.K. Gilbert in the early 20th century.

  11. Renewed soil erosion and remobilisation of radioactive sediment in Fukushima coastal rivers after the 2013 typhoons.

    PubMed

    Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Lepage, Hugo; Cerdan, Olivier; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie

    2014-04-03

    Summer typhoons and spring snowmelt led to the riverine spread of continental Fukushima fallout to the coastal plains of Northeastern Japan and the Pacific Ocean. Four fieldwork campaigns based on measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine riverine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand were conducted between November 2011 and May 2013 to document the spread of fallout by rivers. After a progressive decrease in the fresh riverine sediment doses rates between 2011 and early spring in 2013, a fifth campaign conducted in November 2013 showed that they started to increase again after the occurrence of violent typhoons. We show that this increase in dose rates was mostly due to remobilization of contaminated material that was temporarily stored in river channels or, more importantly, in dam reservoirs of the region during the typhoons. In addition, supply of particles from freshly eroded soils in autumn 2013 was the most important in areas where decontamination works are under progress. Our results underline the need to monitor the impact of decontamination works and dam releases in the region, as they may provide a continuous source of radioactive contamination to the coastal plains and the Pacific Ocean during the coming years.

  12. PCDD/Fs in sediments of Central Vietnam coastal lagoons: in search of TCDD.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Rossano; Giuliani, Silvia; Bellucci, Luca Giorgio; Mugnai, Cristian; Cu, Nguyen Huu; Nhon, Dang Hoai; Vecchiato, Marco; Romano, Stefania; Frignani, Mauro

    2010-12-01

    Samples from nine Central Vietnam coastal lagoons, together with three soils and sediments collected in two freshwater reservoirs of the Thua Thien-Hué province, were analysed for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). Total concentrations are low, from 192 to 2912 pg g(-1) and depth profiles in Tam Giang-Cau Hai (TG-CH) sediment cores show only minor changes over time in PCDD/F input and composition. Octachloro dibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD) is the prevailing congener (approximately 90%), indicating combustion as the main PCDD/F source to these coastal systems, whereas natural formation might be partly responsible for the presence at depth. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachloro dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), largely sprayed together with Agent Orange over the study areas during the war (1961-1971), is absent or very low. This result supports the hypothesis of strong degradation soon after spraying. Multivariate statistical analyses account for the presence of local, short-range sources as observed in the northern part of the TG-CH lagoon. PMID:20952038

  13. Renewed soil erosion and remobilisation of radioactive sediment in Fukushima coastal rivers after the 2013 typhoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Lepage, Hugo; Cerdan, Olivier; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie

    2014-04-01

    Summer typhoons and spring snowmelt led to the riverine spread of continental Fukushima fallout to the coastal plains of Northeastern Japan and the Pacific Ocean. Four fieldwork campaigns based on measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine riverine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand were conducted between November 2011 and May 2013 to document the spread of fallout by rivers. After a progressive decrease in the fresh riverine sediment doses rates between 2011 and early spring in 2013, a fifth campaign conducted in November 2013 showed that they started to increase again after the occurrence of violent typhoons. We show that this increase in dose rates was mostly due to remobilization of contaminated material that was temporarily stored in river channels or, more importantly, in dam reservoirs of the region during the typhoons. In addition, supply of particles from freshly eroded soils in autumn 2013 was the most important in areas where decontamination works are under progress. Our results underline the need to monitor the impact of decontamination works and dam releases in the region, as they may provide a continuous source of radioactive contamination to the coastal plains and the Pacific Ocean during the coming years.

  14. Biogeochemical Insights into B-Vitamins in the Coastal Marine Sediments of San Pedro Basin, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteverde, D.; Berelson, W.; Baronas, J. J.; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal marine sediments support a high abundance of mircoorganisms which play key roles in the cycling of nutrients, trace metals, and carbon, yet little is known about many of the cofactors essential for their growth, such as the B-vitamins. The suite of B-vitamins (B1, B2, B6, B7, B12) are essential across all domains of life for both primary and secondary metabolism. Therefore, studying sediment concentrations of B-vitamins can provide a biochemical link between microbial processes and sediment geochemistry. Here we present B-vitamin pore water concentrations from suboxic sediment cores collected in September 2014 from San Pedro Basin, a silled, low oxygen, ~900 m deep coastal basin in the California Borderlands. We compare the B-vitamin concentrations (measured via LCMS) to a set of geochemical profiles including dissolved Fe (65-160 μM), dissolved Mn (30-300 nM), TCO2, solid phase organic carbon, and δ13C. Our results show high concentrations (0.8-3nM) of biotin (B7), commonly used for CO2 fixation as a cofactor in carboxylase enzymes. Thiamin (B1) concentrations were elevated (20-700nM), consistent with previous pore water measurements showing sediments could be a source of B1 to the ocean. Cobalamin (B12), a cofactor required for methyl transfers in methanogens, was also detected in pore waters (~4-40pM). The flavins (riboflavin [B2] and flavin mononucleotide[FMN]), molecules utilized in external electron transfer, showed a distinct increase with depth (10-90nM). Interestingly, the flavin profiles showed an inverse trend to dissolved Fe (Fe decreases with depth) providing a potential link to culture experiments which have shown extracellular flavin release to be a common trait in some metal reducers. As some of the first B-vitamin measurements made in marine sediments, these results illustrate the complex interaction between the microbial community and surrounding geochemical environment and provide exciting avenues for future research.

  15. Changes of freshwater-lens thickness in basaltic island aquifers overlain by thick coastal sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rotzoll, Kolja; Oki, Delwyn S.; El-Kadi, Aly I.

    2010-01-01

    Freshwater-lens thickness and long-term changes in freshwater volume in coastal aquifers are commonly assessed through repeated measurement of salinity profiles from monitor wells that penetrate into underlying salt water. In Hawaii, the thickest measured freshwater lens is currently 262 m in dike-free, volcanic-rock aquifers that are overlain by thick coastal sediments. The midpoint depth (depth where salinity is 50% salt water) between freshwater and salt water can serve as an indicator for freshwater thickness. Most measured midpoints have risen over the past 40 years, indicating a shrinking lens. The mean rate of rise of the midpoint from 1999–2009 varied locally, with faster rates in highly developed areas (1.0 m/year) and slower rates in less developed areas (0.5 m/year). The thinning of the freshwater lenses is the result of long-term groundwater withdrawal and reduced recharge. Freshwater/salt-water interface locations predicted from measured water levels and the Ghyben-Herzberg principle may be deeper than measured midpoints during some periods and shallower during other periods, although depths may differ up to 100 m in some cases. Moreover, changes in the midpoint are slower than changes in water level. Thus, water levels may not be a reliable indicator of the amount of freshwater in a coastal aquifer.

  16. Coastal ocean CO2-carbonic acid-carbonate sediment system of the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Andreas J.; MacKenzie, Fred T.; Lerman, Abraham

    2006-03-01

    There is little doubt that human activities such as burning of fossil fuels and land use practices have changed and will continue to change the cycling of carbon in the global coastal ocean. In the present study, two biogeochemical box models were used to investigate the consequences of increasing atmospheric CO2 and subsequent ocean acidification and increasing riverine transport of organic matter and nutrients arising from human activities on land on the global coastal ocean between the years 1700 and 2300. Numerical simulations show that the net flux of CO2 between coastal ocean surface water and the atmosphere is likely to change during this time from net evasion to net invasion owing to increasing atmospheric CO2, increasing net ecosystem production arising from increasing nutrient loading to this region, and decreasing net ecosystem calcification due to lower carbonate ion concentration and subsequent lower surface water saturation state with respect to carbonate minerals. Model calculations show that surface water saturation state with respect to calcite will decrease 73% by the year 2300 under a business-as-usual scenario, which in concert with increasing temperature will cause overall biogenic calcification rate to decrease by 90%. Dissolution of carbonate minerals increased by 267% throughout the model simulation. This increase was in part due to increased invasion of atmospheric CO2, but mainly due to greater deposition and remineralization of land-derived and in situ produced organic matter in the sediments, producing CO2 that caused pore water pH and carbonate saturation state to decrease. This decrease, in turn, drove selective dissolution of metastable carbonate minerals. As a consequence, the relative carbonate composition of the sediments changed in favor of carbonate phases with lower solubility than that of an average 15 mol% magnesian calcite phase. Model projected changes in surface water carbonate saturation state agree well with observations

  17. Heavy mineral analysis for assessing the provenance of sandy sediment in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Florence L.; Woodrow, Donald L.; McGann, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Heavy or high-specific gravity minerals make up a small but diagnostic component of sediment that is well suited for determining the provenance and distribution of sediment transported through estuarine and coastal systems worldwide. By this means, we see that surficial sand-sized sediment in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System comes primarily from the Sierra Nevada and associated terranes by way of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers and is transported with little dilution through the San Francisco Bay and out the Golden Gate. Heavy minerals document a slight change from the strictly Sierran-Sacramento mineralogy at the confluence of the two rivers to a composition that includes minor amounts of chert and other Franciscan Complex components west of Carquinez Strait. Between Carquinez Strait and the San Francisco Bar, Sierran sediment is intermingled with Franciscan-modified Sierran sediment. The latter continues out the Gate and turns southward towards beaches of the San Francisco Peninsula. The Sierran sediment also fans out from the San Francisco Bar to merge with a Sierran province on the shelf in the Gulf of the Farallones. Beach-sand sized sediment from the Russian River is transported southward to Point Reyes where it spreads out to define a Franciscan sediment province on the shelf, but does not continue southward to contribute to the sediment in the Golden Gate area.

  18. The effects of sea-level rise on water quality in coastal floodplain sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Vanessa; Johnston, Scott; Burton, Edward; Bush, Richard; Sullivan, Leigh; Slavich, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Sea level has risen approximately 1.2 mm/year over the last 100 years (Hennessy et al. 2004) and is predicted to rise up to 80 cm by 2100 relative to 1990 sea levels (IPCC 2007). The number of extreme events related to sea level such as higher sea levels and increased inter-annual variability have also increased in frequency in the same time period (Hennessy et al. 2004). Globally, large areas of coastal and estuarine floodplains are underlain by sulfidic sediments and acid sulfate soils (ASS). These sediments frequently contain high concentrations of acidity and trace metals. A significant portion of the stored acidity occurs in the form of exchangeable and hydrolysable acidic metal cations such as Al and Fe. Watertables in these environments are often close to the surface and intercepted by relatively shallow drains. Due to their low elevation and locations, these floodplains are highly susceptible to pulses of saline water caused by saltwater intrusion, storm surge and rising sea levels. Construction of extensive drainage systems has further increased the susceptibility of the floodplain to seawater inundation by increasing connectivity to the estuarine channel. This risk is likely to increase in the future with predicted increases in sea level and extreme events due to climate change. This study uses both batch experiments to determine the effects of increasing ionic strength on exchange processes and trace metal desorption in oxidised floodplain sediments and sulfidic drain sediments, and intact soil cores to determine the surface water-porewater interactions over the short term following seawater inundation in coastal floodplain sediments. We found that that saline inundation of oxidised ASS floodplain sediments, even by relatively brackish water may cause rapid, shorter-term water quality changes and a pulse release of acidity due to desorption of acidic metal cations (Wong et al. 2010). We also found that trace metals can be mobilised from sulfidic

  19. Trace metal distribution in sediments of the Pearl River Estuary and the surrounding coastal area, South China.

    PubMed

    Ip, Carman C M; Li, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Gan; Wai, Onyx W H; Li, Yok-Sheung

    2007-05-01

    Surface sediments and sediment cores collected at the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) and its surrounding coastal area were analysed for total metal concentrations, chemical partitioning, and Pb isotopic compositions. The distribution of Cu, Cr, Pb, and Zn demonstrated a typical diffusion pattern from the land to the direction of the sea. Two hotspots of trace metal contamination were located at the mixed zone between freshwater and marine waters. The enrichment of metals in the sediments could be attributed to the deposition of the dissolved and particulate trace metals in the water column at the estuarine area. The similar Pb isotopic signatures of the sediments at the PRE and its surrounding coastal area offered strong evidence that the PRE was a major source of trace metals to the adjacent coastal area. Slightly lower (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios in the coastal sediments may indicate other inputs of Pb in addition to the PRE sources, including the inputs from Hong Kong and other parts of the region.

  20. The release of dissolved nutrients and metals from coastal sediments due to resuspension

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalnejais, Linda H.; Martin, W. R.; Bothner, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Coastal sediments in many regions are impacted by high levels of contaminants. Due to a combination of shallow water depths, waves, and currents, these sediments are subject to regular episodes of sediment resuspension. However, the influence of such disturbances on sediment chemistry and the release of solutes is poorly understood. The aim of this study is to quantify the release of dissolved metals (iron, manganese, silver, copper, and lead) and nutrients due to resuspension in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, USA. Using a laboratory-based erosion chamber, a range of typical shear stresses was applied to fine-grained Harbor sediments and the solute concentration at each shear stress was measured. At low shear stress, below the erosion threshold, limited solutes were released. Beyond the erosion threshold, a release of all solutes, except lead, was observed and the concentrations increased with shear stress. The release was greater than could be accounted for by conservative mixing of porewaters into the overlying water, suggesting that sediment resuspension enhances the release of nutrients and metals to the dissolved phase. To address the long-term fate of resuspended particles, samples from the erosion chamber were maintained in suspension for 90. h. Over this time, 5-7% of the particulate copper and silver was released to the dissolved phase, while manganese was removed from solution. Thus resuspension releases solutes both during erosion events and over a longer timescale due to reactions of suspended particles in the water column. The magnitude of the annual solute release during erosion events was estimated by coupling the erosion chamber results with a record of bottom shear stresses simulated by a hydrodynamic model. The release of dissolved copper, lead, and phosphate due to resuspension is between 2% and 10% of the total (dissolved plus particulate phase) known inputs to Boston Harbor. Sediment resuspension is responsible for transferring a significant

  1. Porewater dynamics of silver, lead and copper in coastal sediments and implications for benthic metal fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalnejais, Linda H.; Martin, W. R.; Bothner, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the conditions that lead to a diffusive release of dissolved metals from coastal sediments, porewater profiles of Ag, Cu, and Pb have been collected over seven years at two contrasting coastal sites in Massachusetts, USA. The Hingham Bay (HB) site is a contaminated location in Boston Harbor, while the Massachusetts Bay (MB) site is 11 km offshore and less impacted. At both sites, the biogeochemical cycles include scavenging by Fe-oxyhydroxides and release of dissolved metals when Fe-oxyhydroxides are reduced. Important differences in the metal cycles at the two sites, however, result from different redox conditions. Porewater sulfide and seasonal variation in redox zone depth is observed at HB, but not at MB. In summer, as the conditions become more reducing at HB, trace metals are precipitated as sulfides and are no longer associated with Fe-oxyhydroxides. Sulfide precipitation close to the sediment–water interface limits the trace metal flux in summer and autumn at HB, while in winter, oxidation of the sulfide phases drives high benthic fluxes of Cu and Ag, as oxic conditions return. The annual diffusive flux of Cu at HB is found to be significant and contributes to the higher than expected water column Cu concentrations observed in Boston Harbor. At MB, due to the lower sulfide concentrations, the association of trace metals with Fe-oxyhydroxides occurs throughout the year, leading to more stable fluxes. A surface enrichment of solid phase trace metals was found at MB and is attributed to the persistent scavenging by Fe-oxyhydroxides. This process is important, particularly at sites that are less reducing, because it maintains elevated metal concentrations at the surface despite the effects of bioturbation and sediment accumulation, and because it may increase the persistence of metal contamination in surface sediments.

  2. Hydrologic controls on coastal suspended sediment plumes around the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, V. W.; Smith, L. C.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Forster, R. R.; Box, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Increasing surface melting on the Greenland ice sheet and rising sea level have furthered the need for direct observations of meltwater release from the ice sheet to ocean. Buoyant sediment plumes develop in fjords downstream of outlet glaciers and are controlled by a variety of complex factors, including ice sheet meltwater runoff and fluvial processes. This study classifies average plume suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) around the Greenland ice sheet derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite imagery and field data over the period 2000-2009. Spatial and temporal variations in SSC are compared with ice sheet positive-degree-days (PDD), a proxy for ice sheet surface melting, as modeled from the Polar MM5 regional climate model, and outlet glacier environment, as represented by land- or marine-terminating glaciers. Buoyant plume SSCs are successfully retrieved around most of Greenland. Higher ice sheet melting around Greenland produces higher SSCs in surrounding coastal waters. The southwest region, dominated by land-terminating glaciers, experiences highest PDDs and produces plumes with highest SSCs, which typically persist late into the meltwater runoff season. Interannual variations in ice sheet PDD and plume SSC are not coupled as previously demonstrated in Kangerlussuaq Fjord (Chu et al. 2009), suggesting plume dimensions better capture interannual runoff dynamics than SSC. This first exploration of coastal sediment plumes around Greenland demonstrates that while complex factors influence their development and detection, ice sheet hydrology is a dominant control on plume distribution. Satellite remote sensing thus offers a unique methodology for detecting meltwater release from the ice sheet to global ocean.

  3. Biogeochemical Radiocabon analysis of the Gulf Oil Spill: Sediments, Plankton and Coastal Fauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanton, J.; Cherrier, J.; Sarkadee-Adoo, J.; Joye, S. B.; Hollander, D. J.; Graham, W.; Brunner, C. A.; Bosman, S.; Mickel, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Gulf Oil Spill injected a unique tracer into the Gulf of Mexico, radiocarbon-free fossil organic matter. Most Gulf organic matter is fixed at the surface with a modern radiocarbon (14C) content. We have traced the input of petro-carbon into the Gulf by following input of radiocarbon dead organic matter into the sediments and fauna. Surface ocean organic production and measured oil are separated by 5-7‰ in stable carbon isotope (d13C) space, while in radiocarbon (D14C) space, these two potential sources are separated by more than 1000‰. Thus radiocarbon provides a more sensitive tracer by which to infer possible introduction of Macondo oil into the food web and sediments. We measured D14C and δ13C in plankton collected from within 100km of the spill site as well as in coastal and offshore DIC (Dissolved Inorganic Carbon) to constrain surface production values. On average, plankton values were depleted in 14C relative to surface DIC and we found a significant linear correlation between D14C and δ13C in plankton. Our results support the findings of petro-carbon entering the food web, but infer that methane input may be important. We have also mapped the distribution of radiocarbon in surficial sediments on the seafloor and which show a plume of radiocarbon depleted organic matter to the SW of the well head. Fauna show distinct radiocarbon depletions in Louisiana coastal embayments relative to Florida estuaries.igure 1. Seafloor radiocarbon map

  4. Seagrass dynamics in shallow coastal lagoons: Interactions with fluid dynamics, sediment resuspension and light conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, J. A.; D'Odorico, P.; McGlathery, K.; Wiberg, P. L.

    2010-12-01

    Sea grasses have been recognized for their ability to stabilize the benthic sediments of shallow coastal lagoons, thereby reducing the turbidity of the water column and providing a light environment that is more favorable for sea grass establishment and growth. Sea grasses are complex, in that they involve different strategies of carbon allocation between below and above ground biomass, and the partitioning of the overall biomass into a discrete number of stems and leaves. Stem density and canopy height, in turn, modify the flow field, sediment resuspension, and the light environment. It is still unclear how these seasonal and interannual dynamics of seagrass vegetation may be affected by and interact with the process of sediment resuspension under fluctuating climatic and hydrologic conditions. To this end, a coupled model hydrodynamic model of vegetation-sediment-water flow interactions and vegetation growth is developed and used to examine the feedback between seagrass vegetation density and sediment resuspension and water column turbidity. The daily growth model is designed to capture underground biomass and the growth and senescence of above ground biomass structural components (e.g., leaves and stems). This allows for investigating how the interseasonal and seasonal variability in shoot and leaf density within a meadow affects the strength of positive feedback between seagrass and their light environment. Eight years of hourly wind, light, tides and water temperature are used to drive the coupled model from an initial mature meadow state as well as a seedling state. The model demonstrates both the emergence of bistable behavior as well as the limited resilience of seagrass meadows due to the strength of the positive feedback. The effects of increased water depths and water temperatures on the health and resilience of a seagrass meadow were also investigated. As both water depth and water temperatures increase, the system only exhibits bistable behavior with

  5. Key geochemical factors regulating Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in coastal marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hui; Taillefert, Martial

    2014-05-01

    The reduction of Mn(IV) oxides coupled to the anaerobic oxidation of NH4+ has been proposed for more than a decade to contribute to the fixed nitrogen pool in marine sediments, yet the existence of this process is still under debate. In this study, surface sediments from an intertidal salt marsh were incubated with MnO2 in the presence of elevated concentrations of NH4+ to test the hypothesis that the reduction of Mn(IV) oxides catalyzes anaerobic NH4+ oxidation to NO2- or NO3-. Geochemical factors such as the ratio of Mn(IV) to NH4+, the type of Mn(IV) oxides (amorphous or colloidal MnO2), and the redox potential of the sediment significantly affect the activity of anaerobic nitrification. Incubations show that the net production of NO3- is stimulated under anaerobic conditions with external addition of colloidal but not amorphous MnO2 and is facilitated by the presence of high concentrations of NH4+. Mass balance calculations demonstrate that anaerobic NH4+ oxidation contributes to the net consumption of NH4+, providing another piece of evidence for the occurrence of Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in coastal marine sediments. Finally, anaerobic nitrification is stimulated by the amendment of small concentrations of NO3- or the absence of sulfate reduction, suggesting that moderately reducing conditions favor anaerobic NH4+ oxidation. Overall, these findings suggest that Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in suboxic sediments with high N/Mn concentration ratios and highly reactive manganese oxides may be an important source of NO2- and NO3- for subsequent marine nitrogen loss via denitrification or anammox.

  6. Stable isotope values in coastal sediment estimate subsidence near Girdwood during the 1964 great Alaska earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, A. M.; Witter, R. C.; Rogers, M.; Saenger, C. P.

    2013-12-01

    values shift positively from peat into mud across subsidence contacts, we analyzed samples above and below the 1964 contact in 11 sediment cores along the same transect. Across the 1964 contact, δ13C and δ15N shifts are consistently positive (up to +4‰) from peat to mud. To assess these shifts in terms of RSL change across the 1964 contact, we regressed modern sediment isotope values against elevation (δ13C R=0.60, avg. SE=×1.01‰, δ15N R=0.77, avg. SE=×0.50‰). These regressions predict elevations, referenced to a site-specific high water datum, for sediment above and below the 1964 contact. By subtracting the average δ13C and δ15N- predicted elevations of mud from peat we estimate an average 1.5×0.7m of RSL rise across the contact on the transect. Our method estimates elevation changes across the 1964 contact at Bird Point that are consistent with the ~1.5m subsidence observed near this location. We conclude that δ13C and δ15N show considerable promise as proxies for paleoelevation in coastal sediment, and may be useful to estimate vertical displacements of the coast during earthquakes.

  7. Rare earth elements in coastal sediments of the northern Galician shelf: Influence of geological features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prego, Ricardo; Caetano, Miguel; Bernárdez, Patricia; Brito, Pedro; Ospina-Alvarez, Natalia; Vale, Carlos

    2012-03-01

    The Northern coast of Galicia, NW Iberian Peninsula, exhibits a variety of geological features: Ortegal allochthonous complex, Ollo-de-Sapo autochthonous domain and massifs of Bares, Barqueiro and San-Ciprian. In order to examine the influence of terrestrial lithologies on coastal sediments, 103 samples were collected in the Rias of Ortigueira, Barqueiro and Viveiro, their neighbouring shelf and the estuaries of Mera, Sor and Landro rivers. Aluminium, Fe, Sc, particulate inorganic and organic carbon and rare earth elements (REE) were determined in the <2 mm fraction. In addition, calcite, muscovite, quartz and riebeckite minerals were identified and quantified in 33 selected samples. The distributions of riebeckite and Fe reflect the influence of Ortegal complex on the coastal areas around the Cape Ortegal. The highest concentrations of ΣREE were found in fine sediments from confined inner parts of the Rias (up to 233 mg kg-1), while most of the sands contained 11-70 mg kg-1. ΣREE normalised to European Shale (ES) highlights the relative abundance of lanthanides (ΣREEN>6) near Cape Ortegal and the innermost ria zones. The ratio between light and heavy REE (L/H) showed lower values (4-11) around Cape Ortegal and the shelf while higher ratios (15-23) were detected in west of the Cape Estaca-de-Bares and in the inner Viveiro Ria due to elevated contributions of La and Ce. The L/H values normalised to ES reflects the importance of HREE in the adjacent area to Ortegal Complex (LN/HN<0.8) and the LREE (LN/HN>1.4) in the inner estuaries and west Cape Estaca-de-Bares. The highest REE individual ES normalised were measured in fine-grained sediments of the Mera and Sor estuaries. Sediments from the eastern shelf of Cape Ortegal presented enhanced ratios only for HREE. These results indicate that distribution of REE in the northern Galician region is highly depending on the neighbouring lithological pattern, contrasting with the situation found in the western Galician

  8. Concentrations and annual fluxes of sediment-associated chemical constituents from conterminous US coastal rivers using bed sediment data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, Arthur J.; Stephens, Verlin C.; Elrick, Kent A.; Smith, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Coastal rivers represent a significant pathway for the delivery of natural and anthropogenic sediment-associated chemical constituents to the Atlantic, Pacific and Gulf of Mexico coasts of the conterminous USA. This study entails an accounting segment using published average annual suspended sediment fluxes with published sediment-associated chemical constituent concentrations for (1) baseline, (2) land-use distributions, (3) population density, and (4) worldwide means to estimate concentrations/annual fluxes for trace/major elements and total phosphorus, total organic and inorganic carbon, total nitrogen, and sulphur, for 131 coastal river basins. In addition, it entails a sampling and subsequent chemical analysis segment that provides a level of ‘ground truth’ for the calculated values, as well as generating baselines for sediment-associated concentrations/fluxes against which future changes can be evaluated. Currently, between 260 and 270 Mt of suspended sediment are discharged annually from the conterminous USA; about 69% is discharged from Gulf rivers (n = 36), about 24% from Pacific rivers (n = 42), and about 7% from Atlantic rivers (n = 54). Elevated sediment-associated chemical concentrations relative to baseline levels occur in the reverse order of sediment discharges:Atlantic rivers (49%)>Pacific rivers (40%)>Gulf rivers (23%). Elevated trace element concentrations (e.g. Cu, Hg, Pb, Zn) frequently occur in association with present/former industrial areas and/or urban centres, particularly along the northeast Atlantic coast. Elevated carbon and nutrient concentrations occur along both the Atlantic and Gulf coasts but are dominated by rivers in the urban northeast and by southeastern and Gulf coast (Florida) ‘blackwater’ streams. Elevated Ca, Mg, K, and Na distributions tend to reflect local petrology, whereas elevated Ti, S, Fe, and Al concentrations are ubiquitous, possibly because they have substantial natural as well as anthropogenic sources

  9. Cellular content of biomolecules in sub-seafloor microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Stefan; Morono, Yuki; Becker, Kevin W.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Kjeldsen, Kasper U.; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Lomstein, Bente Aa.

    2016-09-01

    Microbial biomolecules, typically from the cell envelope, can provide crucial information about distribution, activity, and adaptations of sub-seafloor microbial communities. However, when cells die these molecules can be preserved in the sediment on timescales that are likely longer than the lifetime of their microbial sources. Here we provide for the first time measurements of the cellular content of biomolecules in sedimentary microbial cells. We separated intact cells from sediment matrices in samples from surficial, deeply buried, organic-rich, and organic-lean marine sediments by density centrifugation. Amino acids, amino sugars, muramic acid, and intact polar lipids were analyzed in both whole sediment and cell extract, and cell separation was optimized and evaluated in terms of purity, separation efficiency, taxonomic resemblance, and compatibility to high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for biomolecule analyses. Because cell extracts from density centrifugation still contained considerable amounts of detrital particles and non-cellular biomolecules, we further purified cells from two samples by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Cells from these highly purified cell extracts had an average content of amino acids and lipids of 23-28 fg cell-1 and 2.3 fg cell-1, respectively, with an estimated carbon content of 19-24 fg cell-1. In the sediment, the amount of biomolecules associated with vegetative cells was up to 70-fold lower than the total biomolecule content. We find that the cellular content of biomolecules in the marine subsurface is up to four times lower than previous estimates. Our approach will facilitate and improve the use of biomolecules as proxies for microbial abundance in environmental samples and ultimately provide better global estimates of microbial biomass.

  10. Methane and sulfate dynamics in sediments from mangrove-dominated tropical coastal lagoons, Yucatán, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, P.-C.; Young, M. B.; Miller, L. G.; Herrera-Silveira, J. A.; Paytan, A.

    2015-11-01

    Methane, sulfate and chloride concentrations in sediment porewater from two coastal mangrove ecosystems (Celestún and Chelem Lagoons) on the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico were measured. In these sediments methane exists in shallow sediments where sulfate is not depleted, and sulfate reduction is actively occurring. A transport-reaction model depicting the various production and consumption processes for methane and sulfate is used to elucidate processes responsible for this observation. The model illustrates that methane in the upper sediments is produced in-situ supported by high dissolved organic matter as well as by non-competitive substrates. In addition methane is contributed to porewater in the upper sediments, where sulfate reduction occurs, by transport from deeper zones within the sedimentary column through bubbles dissolution and diffusion. The shallow methane production and accumulation depths in these sediments promote high methane fluxes to the water column and atmosphere.

  11. 241Pu and 241Am in sediments from coastal basins off California and Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, Minoru; Goldberg, Edward D.; Hodge, Vernon F.

    1980-07-01

    In sediments deposited in the coastal basins off the western North American continent since the early 1960's, there is more 241Am activity than one would predict if its presence was solely due to the decay of 241Pu that was produced during the testing of weapons in 1961-1962 (taken as July 1, 1962 for calculations). This excess can be accounted for by the decay of 241Pu, if pre-1962 fallout (fallout from the pre-moratorium testing) has been continuously introduced into the recent sediments along with fallout from post-moratorium testing. This hypothesis is supported by the plutonium depth profiles which do not reflect direct fallout from the atmosphere, as characterized by two peaks corresponding to the two major weapons testing periods, but continuously increasing plutonium and americium concentrations from 1954 to 1974. Thus, the nuclides may be coming from a large reservoir that has accumulated and mixed fallout since 1952. Such a concentration gradient for all of the nuclides requires their immobilization in the sediment after deposition.

  12. Assessment of heavy metal contamination in surface sediments of the west Guangdong coastal region, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangming; Lu, Qingyuan; Ye, Siyuan; Yuan, Hongming; Ding, Xigui; Wang, Jin

    2016-07-15

    Heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, Zn), organic carbon and grain size of 237 surface sediment samples and one sediment core, taken from the west Guangdong coastal region in January 2008, were analyzed to evaluate the spatial distribution and pollution status. Results show that the ranges of the measured heavy metal concentrations in sediments are as follows: 8.33-39.49mg/kg for As, 0.1-1.49mg/kg for Cd, 33-108mg/kg for Cr, 11.5-78.8mg/kg for Cu, 0.04-0.26mg/kg for Hg, 21-73mg/kg for Pb, 56-248mg/kg for Zn. The heavy metal enrichment is closely associated with Corg and grain size. Both the metal enrichment factor and geoaccumulation index indicate that there was no detected pollution on metals As, Cr, Cu, Pb in our study area and a slight to moderate contamination of Cd, Hg and Zn. However, As, Cr and Cu have showed a certain risk. PMID:27197765

  13. Distribution, source identification, and historical trends of organic micropollutants in coastal sediment in Jakarta Bay, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Rinawati; Koike, Tatsuya; Koike, Hiroaki; Kurumisawa, Rina; Ito, Maki; Sakurai, Shigeaki; Togo, Ayako; Saha, Mahua; Arifin, Zainal; Takada, Hideshige

    2012-05-30

    We determined concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), linear alkylbenzenes (LABs), and hopanes in coastal sediments collected from Jakarta Bay and Tokyo Bay. PAH concentrations in sediments from Jakarta Bay (257-1511 ng/g-dry) were lower than or comparable to those from Tokyo Bay (1372-1615 ng/g-dry). Ratios of alkyl-PAHs to parent PAHs showed a greater contribution of petrogenic inputs in Jakarta Bay than in Tokyo Bay. This difference is consistent with the higher ratio of hopanes to PAHs in Jakarta Bay. LAB concentrations in Jakarta Bay (geometric mean, 1400 ng/g-dry) were higher than those in Tokyo Bay (661 ng/g-dry). The internal to external (I/E) ratios of LABs in Jakarta Bay (0.92-2.88) were lower than those in Tokyo Bay (2.8-4.8), indicating that Jakarta Bay receives untreated or poorly treated sewage. Significant amounts of tetrapropylene-based alkylbenzenes were detected in several locations in Jakarta Bay, suggesting current usage of the non-degradable surfactants alkylbenzene sulfonates that are banned in many countries. The PCB concentration in Jakarta Bay was 1 order of magnitude lower than in Tokyo Bay, suggesting minimal usage of PCBs in industrial or commercial products in Jakarta. Analyses of a sediment core indicate increasing inputs of PAHs, hopanes, and LABs into Jakarta Bay during recent decades. PMID:22480710

  14. Cable Bacteria Control Iron-Phosphorus Dynamics in Sediments of a Coastal Hypoxic Basin.

    PubMed

    Sulu-Gambari, Fatimah; Seitaj, Dorina; Meysman, Filip J R; Schauer, Regina; Polerecky, Lubos; Slomp, Caroline P

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for life. The release of phosphorus from sediments is critical in sustaining phytoplankton growth in many aquatic systems and is pivotal to eutrophication and the development of bottom water hypoxia. Conventionally, sediment phosphorus release is thought to be controlled by changes in iron oxide reduction driven by variations in external environmental factors, such as organic matter input and bottom water oxygen. Here, we show that internal shifts in microbial communities, and specifically the population dynamics of cable bacteria, can also induce strong seasonality in sedimentary iron-phosphorus dynamics. Field observations in a seasonally hypoxic coastal basin demonstrate that the long-range electrogenic metabolism of cable bacteria leads to a dissolution of iron sulfides in winter and spring. Subsequent oxidation of the mobilized ferrous iron with manganese oxides results in a large stock of iron-oxide-bound phosphorus below the oxic zone. In summer, when bottom water hypoxia develops and cable bacteria are undetectable, the phosphorus associated with these iron oxides is released, strongly increasing phosphorus availability in the water column. Future research should elucidate whether formation of iron-oxide-bound phosphorus driven by cable bacteria, as observed in this study, contributes to the seasonality in iron-phosphorus cycling in aquatic sediments worldwide.

  15. Impact of Human Activities on the Flux of Terrestrial Sediments to the Coastal Ocean Offshore Northeastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tzu-Ting; Su, Chih-Chieh; Liu, Char-Shine; Huang, Chen-fen; Hsu, Ho-Han

    2016-04-01

    Land to ocean material fluxes play an important role in global biogeochemical cycles. Changes in sediment supply not only greatly influence the benthic environment of coastal estuaries but also might threaten human lives and properties. Artificial constructions, such as roads and reservoirs, could affect natural environments and change sediment discharges. Due to its high precipitation, steep slopes, small basin areas, and frequent flood events, Taiwan is characterized with rapid erosion rates and extremely high sediment yields. In northeastern Taiwan, the high mean annual precipitation lead to large amounts of sediments being delivered into the ocean through the Lanyang River. Since 1957, the road constructions along the Lanyang River greatly increased terrestrial sediment flux to the coastal ocean. However, its influence on offshore area is not yet clear. In this study, we combine geochemical and geophysical data to evaluate the modern sedimentation history and discuss the impact of human activities on the Ilan Shelf. The preliminary results of grain size and 210Pb analyses from five sediment cores taken from the upper South Guishan Channel indicate the existence of local differences on hydrodynamic conditions. In addition, we also applied similarity index which based on a quantitative analysis algorithm to the chirp sonar data on echo character classification and calculated continuous grain size variations of the seafloor surface sediments. By combining all geochemical and geophysical data, we may reconstruct the holistic picture of human impacts on offshore environment from sedimentology records.

  16. Artificially induced migration of redox layers in a coastal sediment from the Northern Adriatic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, E.; Langlet, D.; Viollier, E.; Koron, N.; Riedel, B.; Stachowitsch, M.; Faganeli, J.; Tharaud, M.; Geslin, E.; Jorissen, F.

    2014-04-01

    Long-term experimental studies suggest that, under transient anoxic conditions, redox fronts within the sediment shift upwards, causing sequential rise and fall of benthic fluxes of reduced species (Mn(II), Fe(II) and S(-II)). Infaunal benthic organisms are associated with different redox fronts as micro-habitats and must be affected by such changes during natural hypoxia events. In order to document the geochemical evolution of the sediment during prolonged anoxia in the framework of an in situ experiment designed to mimic natural conditions, benthic chambers were deployed on the seafloor of the Northern Adriatic and sampled after 9, 30 and 315 days of incubation. Oxygen and sulfide were measured continuously in the early stages (9 days) of the experiment. High-resolution pore water profiles were sampled by DET probes and redox-sensitive species (S(VI), Mn(II) and Fe(II)) and alkalinity were measured. Starting oxygen saturation was about 80% within the chamber. After 7 days, anoxia was established in the bottom waters within the chambers. Mn(II) and Fe(II) started diffusing towards the anoxic water column until they reached the surficial sediment. Being reoxidized there, Mn and Fe reprecipitated, giving a rusty coloration to the seafloor. Infaunal species appeared at the sediment surface. After 20 days, all macro-organisms were dead. Decomposition of macro-organisms at the sediment-water interface generated S(-II) within the entire height of the chamber, leading to a downward flux of sulfides into the sediment, where they were quickly oxidized by metallic oxides or precipitated as FeS. S(-II) was below detection in the water column and pore waters at the end of the experiment. Our results suggest that S(-II) enrichment in the water column of coastal systems, which are episodically anoxic, is strongly controlled by the biomass of benthic macrofauna and its decay during anoxia, whereas its residence time in the water column is controlled by iron availability (as

  17. 3D Airflow patterns over coastal foredunes: implications for aeolian sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Derek W. T.; Cooper, Andrew G.; Baas, Andreas C. W.; Lynch, Kevin; Beyers, Meiring

    2010-05-01

    A fundamental criterion for the development of coastal sand dunes is usually highlighted as a significant onshore wind component of the local wind field. The presence of large sand dune systems on coasts where the predominant wind blows offshore is therefore difficult to explain and usually they are attributed to the past occurrence of onshore winds and, by implication, subsequent changes in climate. Recent studies have shown that offshore winds can be deflected or 'steered' by existing dunes so that their direction changes. This can occur to such an extent that a process known as 'flow reversal' can arise, whereby the initially offshore wind actually flows onshore at the beach. This process is important because it can cause sand to be blown from the beach and into the dunes, causing them to grow. This may be central in explaining the presence of extensive dunes on coasts where the dominant wind is offshore, but is also important in how dunes recover after periods of wave erosion during storms. Offshore winds have traditionally been excluded from sediment budget calculations for coastal dunes, but when they do transport sand onshore, this may have been an important oversight leading to significant underestimates of the volume of sand being transported by wind. This work investigates the controls on the processes and the mechanisms involved in deformation of the flow and resulting sediment transport at coastal foredunes in Northern Ireland. We use a combination of field measurement of wind and sediment transport coupled with state-of-the-art aerodynamic modelling using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and 3-D sonic anemometry. Our working hypothesis is that offshore winds contribute substantially to foredune behaviour on leeside coasts. Preliminary results show strong reverse flow eddies in the seaward side of the foredunes during offshore wind events. These secondary flow reversals have been above velocity threshold and are transport capable. Using CFD modelling

  18. Influence of intermittent estuary outflow on coastal sediments of adjacent sandy beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Jessica L.; Quinn, Gerry P.; Matthews, Ty G.; Barton, Jan; Bellgrove, Alecia

    2011-03-01

    Outflows from estuaries potentially contribute to the productivity of adjacent coastal waters, although most previous work has been on estuaries with considerable river discharge. We investigated the influence of estuary outflow on aspects of coastal sediments adjacent to two seasonally intermittent estuaries, the Curdies and Anglesea Rivers, in southwest Victoria, Australia. For each estuary, we measured sediment organic matter, microphytobenthic chlorophyll a and microbial utilization of carbon sources at three locations associated with each estuary: (1) inside estuary mouth, (2) estuary swash and (3) control swash (an open beach distant from any estuarine influences). Sampling occurred one week before and at one and nine weeks after both an artificial mouth opening and a separate natural flood at both estuaries. Significant temporal changes were detected for all three variables at the estuary mouth and estuary swash but the direction of change was inconsistent across the two estuaries and between the artificial mouth opening and natural flood. Organic matter in both estuaries showed no difference after the artificial mouth openings. Only Anglesea showed an increase in organic matter in the estuary mouth and estuary swash after the floods. Microphytobenthic chlorophyll a concentrations were highest when the estuary mouths were closed. Concentrations decreased at all locations at Curdies after the mouth was artificially opened. The estuary mouth at Anglesea sustained high chlorophyll concentrations and the estuary swash increased one week post artificial opening. The flood event resulted in an increase in chlorophyll a at the estuary mouth and swash at both estuaries, one week post flood. At Curdies, the microbial utilization of different carbon sources changed after both mouth events; estuary mouth and estuary swash showed similar patterns at one and nine weeks post opening. At Anglesea, the bacteria utilized different carbon sources between locations and the

  19. Cyclic 100-ka (glacial-interglacial) migration of subseafloor redox zonation on the Peruvian shelf

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Sergio; Meister, Patrick; Liu, Bo; Prieto-Mollar, Xavier; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Khalili, Arzhang; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2013-01-01

    The coupling of subseafloor microbial life to oceanographic and atmospheric conditions is poorly understood. We examined diagenetic imprints and lipid biomarkers of past subseafloor microbial activity to evaluate its response to glacial-interglacial cycles in a sedimentary section drilled on the Peruvian shelf (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201, Site 1229). Multiple and distinct layers of diagenetic barite and dolomite, i.e., minerals that typically form at the sulfate−methane transition (SMT), occur at much shallower burial depth than the present SMT around 30 meters below seafloor. These shallow layers co-occur with peaks of 13C-depleted archaeol, a molecular fossil of anaerobic methane-oxidizing Archaea. Present-day, non-steady state distributions of dissolved sulfate also suggest that the SMT is highly sensitive to variations in organic carbon flux to the surface shelf sediments that may lead to shoaling of the SMT. Reaction-transport modeling substantiates our hypothesis that shallow SMTs occur in response to cyclic sediment deposition with a high organic carbon flux during interglacials and a low organic carbon flux during glacial stages. Long diffusion distances expectedly dampen the response of deeply buried microbial communities to changes in sediment deposition and other oceanographic drivers over relatively short geological time scales, e.g., glacial-interglacial periods. However, our study demonstrates how dynamically sediment biogeochemistry of the Peru Margin has responded to glacial-interglacial change and how these changes are now preserved in the geological record. Such changes in subsurface biogeochemical zonation need to be taken into account to assess the role of the subseafloor biosphere in global element and redox cycling. PMID:24145422

  20. Microbial Diversity in Coastal Subsurface Sediments: a Cultivation Approach Using Various Electron Acceptors and Substrate Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Köpke, Beate; Wilms, Reinhard; Engelen, Bert; Cypionka, Heribert; Sass, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    Microbial communities in coastal subsurface sediments are scarcely investigated and have escaped attention so far. But since they are likely to play an important role in biogeochemical cycles, knowledge of their composition and ecological adaptations is important. Microbial communities in tidal sediments were investigated along the geochemical gradients from the surface down to a depth of 5.5 m. Most-probable-number (MPN) series were prepared with a variety of different carbon substrates, each at a low concentration, in combination with different electron acceptors such as iron and manganese oxides. These achieved remarkably high cultivation efficiencies (up to 23% of the total cell counts) along the upper 200 cm. In the deeper sediment layers, MPN counts dropped significantly. Parallel to the liquid enrichment cultures in the MPN series, gradient cultures with embedded sediment subcores were prepared as an additional enrichment approach. In total, 112 pure cultures were isolated; they could be grouped into 53 different operational taxonomic units (OTU). The isolates belonged to the Proteobacteria, “Bacteroidetes,” “Fusobacteria,” Actinobacteria, and “Firmicutes.” Each cultivation approach yielded a specific set of isolates that in general were restricted to this single isolation procedure. Analysis of the enrichment cultures by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed an even higher diversity in the primary enrichments that was only partially reflected by the culture collection. The majority of the isolates grew well under anoxic conditions, by fermentation, or by anaerobic respiration with nitrate, sulfate, ferrihydrite, or manganese oxides as electron acceptors. PMID:16332756

  1. Artificially induced migration of redox layers in a coastal sediment from the Northern Adriatic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, E.; Langlet, D.; Viollier, E.; Koron, N.; Riedel, B.; Stachowitsch, M.; Faganeli, J.; Tharaud, M.; Geslin, E.; Jorissen, F.

    2013-07-01

    Long term experimental studies suggest that, under anoxic transient conditions, redox fronts within the sediment shift upwards causing sequential rise and fall of benthic fluxes of reduced species (Mn(II), Fe(II) than S(-II)). Infaunal benthic organisms are associated to different redox fronts as micro-habitats and must be affected by such changes during natural hypoxia events. In order to document geochemical evolution of the sediment during prolonged anoxia in a realistic system, benthic chambers were deployed on the seafloor of the Northern Adriatic and sampled after 9, 30 and 315 days of incubation. Oxygen and sulfide were measured continuously in the early stages of the experiment (during 9 days). High-resolution porewater profiles were sampled by DET probes and redox sensitive species were analysed (alkalinity, SO42-, Mn2+, Fe2+). After 7 days, anoxia was reached within the chambers. Mn and Fe started diffusing towards the water column giving a rusty color to the seafloor. Infaunal species appeared at the surface. After 20 days, all macro-organisms were dead. Macro-organisms decomposition laying on the seafloor generated important production of sulfides within the chamber generating a downward flux of sulfide towards the sediment where sulfides were quickly oxidized by metallic oxides or precipitated as FeS. Sulfide was no more detectable in the water column and porewaters at the end of the experiment. Therefore, our results suggest that sulfide enrichment in the water column in coastal systems is strongly controlled by the biomass of benthic macrofauna and its decay during hypoxia while its residence time in water column is controlled by iron content (as solid oxides or as dissolved reduced cation) within the sediment, even without water circulation.

  2. Physiological diversity and distributions of heterotrophic bacteria in deep cretaceous sediments of the atlantic coastal plain.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, J K; Balkwill, D L; Zachara, J M; Li, S M; Brockman, F J; Simmons, M A

    1991-02-01

    A series of 23 intact core segments was obtained from two distinct deep subsurface geological formations, the Middendorf and the Cape Fear formations, underlying the southeastern coastal plain of South Carolina. The Middendorf formation in this region consists of permeable, saturated, sandy sediments; the Cape Fear formation consists mainly of less permeable sediments. The core segments were separated by vertical distances ranging from several centimeters to 48 m. Aerobic chemoheterotrophic bacteria were enumerated on a dilute medium, and populations ranged from 3.1 to 6.4 log CFU g of sediment in the Middendorf cores and from below detection to 4.3 log CFU g in the Cape Fear cores. A total of 198 morphologically distinct colony types were isolated, purified, and subjected to 108 different physiological measurements. The isolates from the two formations were distinct (i.e., they produced substantially different response patterns to the various physiological measurements), as were those in different core samples from the same formation. Cluster analysis revealed 21 different biotypes based on similarities of 75% or higher in response patterns to 21 physiological assays. One biotype contained 57 (29%) of the subsurface isolates, 10 biotypes contained 5 or more isolates, and the remainder had 4 or fewer. The organic compounds that were most commonly metabolized by the subsurface bacteria included Tween 40 (85%) and beta-hydroxybutyric acid (60%). Organic acids, in general, were also commonly metabolized by the subsurface bacteria. Isolates from the Cape Fear core segments were capable of metabolizing a higher percentage of the substrates than were bacteria isolated from the Middendorf formation. Although the heterogeneous distributions of bacteria in deep subsurface sediments may make it difficult to use aquifer microcosms to predict in situ biotransformation rates, the diversity of the physiological properties of these organisms offers promise for in situ remediation

  3. Impact of natural (storm) and anthropogenic (trawling) sediment resuspension on particulate organic matter in coastal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusceddu, A.; Grémare, A.; Escoubeyrou, K.; Amouroux, J. M.; Fiordelmondo, C.; Danovaro, R.

    2005-12-01

    In order to assess the impact of natural and anthropogenic sediment resuspension on quantity, biochemical composition and bioavailability of particulate organic matter (POM), two field investigations were carried out in two shallow coastal areas of the Mediterranean Sea. In the Gulf of Lions, we investigated the impact of a storm resuspension of sediment, whereas in the Thermaikos Gulf we investigated the impact of bottom trawling. Resuspension in the Gulf of Lions determined the increase of sedimentation rates, modified the composition of the organic fraction of settling particles and decreased the labile fraction of POM, as indicated by a drop in the enzymatically hydrolysable amino acid fraction. The increase in the refractory fraction, following short-term storm-induced resuspension, increased also the contribution of glycine and decreased the contribution of aspartic acid contents to the total amino acid pools. Trawling activities in Thermaikos Gulf determined a significant increase in suspended POM concentrations and important changes in its biochemical composition. After trawling, the protein to carbohydrate ratio decreased (as a result of a major input of sedimentary carbohydrates at the water-sediment interface) and the fraction of enzymatically hydrolysable biopolymeric C decreased by ≈30%, thus reducing the bioavailability of resuspended organic particles. Results of the present study indicate that changes in suspended POM, induced by storms and trawling activities, can have similar consequences on benthic systems and on food webs. In fact, the potential benefit of increased organic particle concentration for suspension feeders, is depressed by the shift of suspended food particles towards a more refractory composition.

  4. An estimate of the influence of sediment concentration and type on remote sensing penetration depth for various coastal waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    Under the assumptions of collimated light, a homogenous water column, zero molecular scattering, and constant ratio of volume scattering function to scattering coefficient, estimates of the remote sensing depth parameter, Z90, are made for various coastal waters at 540 nm. Calculations indicate that sediment concentration and type have a strong influence on remote sensing depth when concentrations are below 5 mg/theta. Above 5 mg/theta, the absorption coefficient of the sediments becomes large in comparison to that of water, causing Z90 values to be less than 2 m with only small differences between various sediment types.

  5. Korean coastal water depth/sediment and land cover mapping /1:25,000/ by computer analysis of Landsat imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. Y.; Miller, L. D.

    1980-01-01

    Computer analysis was applied to single data Landsat MSS imagery of a coastal area near Seoul, Korea equivalent to a 1:50,000 topographic map, and featuring large dynamic sediment transport processes. Supervised image processing yielded a test classification map containing five water depth/sediment classes, two shoreline/tidal classes and five coastal land cover classes at a scale of 1:25,000 and with a training set accuracy of 76%; the training sets were selected by direct examination of the digitally displayed imagery. The unsupervised ISOCLAS (Senkus, 1976) clustering analysis was performed to assess the relative value of this approach to image classification in areas of sparse or nonexistent ground control. Results indicate that it is feasible to produce quantitative maps for detailed study of dynamic coastal processes given a Landsat image data base at sufficiently frequent time intervals.

  6. Microphytobenthic response to mussel farm biodeposition in coastal sediments of the northern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Franzo, Annalisa; Cibic, Tamara; Del Negro, Paola; Solidoro, Cosimo

    2014-02-15

    The effects of long-line mussel farming on microphytobenthos were investigated in a coastal area of the Gulf of Trieste. Sediment grain-size, organic matter content, microalgal abundance and community structure were analysed in September 2008 and March 2009. Four areas were sampled: a twenty-year farm, a four-year farm, a disused farm and a reference site. Principal component analysis (PCA) highlighted a decreasing gradient of organic matter content from the twenty-year farm to the control. Mussel farming seemed to influence microphytobenthic abundance with higher densities in the oldest farm. Three genera were dominant; Navicula and Gyrosigma seemed to be stimulated by the organic load under the active farms while we infer that Nitzschia proliferation was limited by shade caused by mussel ropes. In the PCA, samplings of the disused farm were placed in-between the still active farms and the control, indicating the partial recovery occurred in this site.

  7. Diverse Bacterial Groups Contribute to the Alkane Degradation Potential of Chronically Polluted Subantarctic Coastal Sediments.

    PubMed

    Guibert, Lilian M; Loviso, Claudia L; Borglin, Sharon; Jansson, Janet K; Dionisi, Hebe M; Lozada, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to gain insight into the alkane degradation potential of microbial communities from chronically polluted sediments of a subantarctic coastal environment using a combination of metagenomic approaches. A total of 6178 sequences annotated as alkane-1-monooxygenases (EC 1.14.15.3) were retrieved from a shotgun metagenomic dataset that included two sites analyzed in triplicate. The majority of the sequences binned with AlkB described in Bacteroidetes (32 ± 13 %) or Proteobacteria (29 ± 7 %), although a large proportion remained unclassified at the phylum level. Operational taxonomic unit (OTU)-based analyses showed small differences in AlkB distribution among samples that could be correlated with alkane concentrations, as well as with site-specific variations in pH and salinity. A number of low-abundance OTUs, mostly affiliated with Actinobacterial sequences, were found to be only present in the most contaminated samples. On the other hand, the molecular screening of a large-insert metagenomic library of intertidal sediments from one of the sampling sites identified two genomic fragments containing novel alkB gene sequences, as well as various contiguous genes related to lipid metabolism. Both genomic fragments were affiliated with the phylum Planctomycetes, and one could be further assigned to the genus Rhodopirellula due to the presence of a partial sequence of the 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. This work highlights the diversity of bacterial groups contributing to the alkane degradation potential and reveals patterns of functional diversity in relation with environmental stressors in a chronically polluted, high-latitude coastal environment. In addition, alkane biodegradation genes are described for the first time in members of Planctomycetes.

  8. Distribution of biologic, anthropogenic, and volcanic constituents as a proxy for sediment transport in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGann, Mary; Erikson, Li H.; Wan, Elmira; Powell, Charles L.; Maddocks, Rosalie F.

    2013-01-01

    Although conventional sediment parameters (mean grain size, sorting, and skewness) and provenance have typically been used to infer sediment transport pathways, most freshwater, brackish, and marine environments are also characterized by abundant sediment constituents of biological, and possibly anthropogenic and volcanic, origin that can provide additional insight into local sedimentary processes. The biota will be spatially distributed according to its response to environmental parameters such as water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, organic carbon content, grain size, and intensity of currents and tidal flow, whereas the presence of anthropogenic and volcanic constituents will reflect proximity to source areas and whether they are fluvially- or aerially-transported. Because each of these constituents have a unique environmental signature, they are a more precise proxy for that source area than the conventional sedimentary process indicators. This San Francisco Bay Coastal System study demonstrates that by applying a multi-proxy approach, the primary sites of sediment transport can be identified. Many of these sites are far from where the constituents originated, showing that sediment transport is widespread in the region. Although not often used, identifying and interpreting the distribution of naturally-occurring and allochthonous biologic, anthropogenic, and volcanic sediment constituents is a powerful tool to aid in the investigation of sediment transport pathways in other coastal systems.

  9. Concentrations and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface coastal sediments of the northern Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Coastal sediments in the northern Gulf of Mexico have a high potential of being contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), due to extensive petroleum exploration and transportation activities. In this study we evaluated the spatial distribution and contamination sources of PAHs, as well as the bioavailable fraction in the bulk PAH pool, in surface marsh and shelf sediments (top 5 cm) of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Results PAH concentrations in this region ranged from 100 to 856 ng g−1, with the highest concentrations in Mississippi River mouth sediments followed by marsh sediments and then the lowest concentrations in shelf sediments. The PAH concentrations correlated positively with atomic C/N ratios of sedimentary organic matter (OM), suggesting that terrestrial OM preferentially sorbs PAHs relative to marine OM. PAHs with 2 rings were more abundant than those with 5–6 rings in continental shelf sediments, while the opposite was found in marsh sediments. This distribution pattern suggests different contamination sources between shelf and marsh sediments. Based on diagnostic ratios of PAH isomers and principal component analysis, shelf sediment PAHs were petrogenic and those from marsh sediments were pyrogenic. The proportions of bioavailable PAHs in total PAHs were low, ranging from 0.02% to 0.06%, with higher fractions found in marsh than shelf sediments. Conclusion PAH distribution and composition differences between marsh and shelf sediments were influenced by grain size, contamination sources, and the types of organic matter associated with PAHs. Concentrations of PAHs in the study area were below effects low-range, suggesting a low risk to organisms and limited transfer of PAHs into food web. From the source analysis, PAHs in shelf sediments mainly originated from direct petroleum contamination, while those in marsh sediments were from combustion of fossil fuels. PMID:24641695

  10. An assessment of human influences on sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the estuarine and coastal sediments of China.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaoyong; Liu, Jinqing; Zhang, Daolai; Yin, Ping; Li, Yanxia; Li, Xianguo

    2015-08-15

    Sediments collected from the coastal area of China, embracing west coast of Bohai Sea, south coast of Shandong Peninsula, and the Changjiang estuary (listed in order of decreasing north latitude), were analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). ∑PAH (Sixteen US EPA priority PAHs) were 2.7-350.9ng/g. Petroleum residue was the major contributor of PAHs in the coastal sediments of China due to oil leakage from ships and offshore oil fields. The contribution of vehicular emissions in coast of North China was significantly lower than that in the Changjiang Estuary, and the reverse was true for coal combustion. PAH concentrations in the sediment core of the Changjiang estuary steadily increased upward and the variation was primarily due to economic development and severe floods. The impact on PAHs by vehicular emissions (37.2%) and petrogenic sources (45.8%) overwhelmed combustion sources (17.0%).

  11. Assessment of arsenic in coastal sediments, seawaters and molluscs in the Tarut Island, Arabian Gulf, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset S.; Youssef, Mohamed; Al-Kahtany, Khaled; Al-Otaiby, Naif

    2016-01-01

    In order to assess arsenic on the Tarut coast, Saudi Arabian Gulf, 38 sediment samples, 26 seawater samples and 40 gastropod and bivalve specimens were collected for analyses by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer. The Enrichment Factor (EF), the Geoaccumulation Index (Igeo) and the Contamination Factor (CF) indicated that coastal sediments of Tarut Island are severely enriched, strongly polluted and very highly contaminated with arsenic as a result of anthropogenic inputs. Comparison with arsenic in coastal sediments, seawaters and molluscs in the Red Sea, the Arabian Gulf and abroad coasts suggested that the studied samples have higher concentrations of As. The suggested natural sources of arsenic in the study area are the weathering and decomposition of neighboring deserts. The anthropogenic sources include the land reclamation, petrochemical industries, boat exhaust emissions, oil leakage, desalination plants and sewage effluents. These anthropogenic sources are the dominant sources of As in the study area and mostly came from Al Jubail industrial city to the north.

  12. Mercury profiles in sediments of the Pearl River Estuary and the surrounding coastal area of South China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian-bo; Ip, Carman C M; Zhang, Gan; Jiang, Gui-bin; Li, Xiang-dong

    2010-05-01

    The spatial and temporal variations of mercury (Hg) in sediments of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) and the surrounding coastal area (South China Sea) were studied. In surface sediments, the concentrations of Hg ranged from 1.5 to 201ng/g, with an average of 54.4ng/g, displaying a decreasing trend with the distance from the estuary to the open sea. This pattern indicates that the anthropogenic emissions from the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region are probably the main sources of Hg in this coastal region. Using the (210)Pb dating technique, the historical changes in the concentrations and influxes of Hg in the last 100 years were also investigated. The variations in Hg influxes in sediment cores obviously correlate with the economic development and urbanization that has occurred the PRD region, especially in the last three decades.

  13. Pathways of priority pesticides in sediments of coastal lagoons: The case study of Óbidos Lagoon, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M I; Vale, C; Sontag, G; Noronha, J P

    2016-05-15

    This study reports the concentrations of the priority pesticides (PPs) in 14 surface sediments and 21 layers of a sediment core from Óbidos Lagoon, a shallow Portuguese coastal lagoon. Results show that the PPs are confined to the upper part of the lagoon that receives most of the inputs from surface runoff of the surrounding agricultural fields and from small tributaries. Past and recent applied PPs were registered in sediments, aluminum normalized concentrations varying between 0.05×10(-7) and 6.85×10(-7). The PP risk assessment based on sediment quality guidelines like the "Probable Effect Level" (PEL) shows no biological effects in either sediments or aquatic organisms of Óbidos Lagoon, except for dieldrin, lindane, DDT, heptachlor epoxide and its parent compound heptachlor. PMID:27021267

  14. Pathways of priority pesticides in sediments of coastal lagoons: The case study of Óbidos Lagoon, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M I; Vale, C; Sontag, G; Noronha, J P

    2016-05-15

    This study reports the concentrations of the priority pesticides (PPs) in 14 surface sediments and 21 layers of a sediment core from Óbidos Lagoon, a shallow Portuguese coastal lagoon. Results show that the PPs are confined to the upper part of the lagoon that receives most of the inputs from surface runoff of the surrounding agricultural fields and from small tributaries. Past and recent applied PPs were registered in sediments, aluminum normalized concentrations varying between 0.05×10(-7) and 6.85×10(-7). The PP risk assessment based on sediment quality guidelines like the "Probable Effect Level" (PEL) shows no biological effects in either sediments or aquatic organisms of Óbidos Lagoon, except for dieldrin, lindane, DDT, heptachlor epoxide and its parent compound heptachlor.

  15. Concentration, composition and sources of PAHs in the coastal sediments of the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of Qatar, Arabian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Y S; Al Ansari, E M S; Wade, T L

    2014-08-30

    Surface sediments were collected from sixteen locations in order to assess levels and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediments of Qatar exclusive economic zone (EEZ). Samples were analyzed for 16 parent PAHs, 18 alkyl homologs and for dibenzothiophenes. Total PAHs concentration (∑PAHs) ranged from 2.6 ng g(-1) to 1025 ng g(-1). The highest PAHs concentrations were in sediments in and adjacent to harbors. Alkylated PAHs predominated most of the sampling locations reaching up to 80% in offshore locations. Parent PAHs and parent high molecular weight PAHs dominated location adjacent to industrial activities and urban areas. The origin of PAHs sources to the sediments was elucidated using ternary plot, indices, and molecular ratios of specific compounds such as (Ant/Phe+Ant), (Flt/Flt+Pyr). PAHs inputs to most coastal sites consisted of mixture of petroleum and combustion derived sources. However, inputs to the offshore sediments were mainly of petroleum origin. PMID:24798421

  16. Metal concentrations and mobility in marine sediment and groundwater in coastal reclamation areas: a case study in Shenzhen, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kouping; Jiao, Jiu J

    2008-02-01

    The concentrations of metals in the buried marine sediment and groundwater were differently affected by land reclamation. Nine metals (V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) in sediment and coastal groundwater from reclamation areas in Shenzhen were examined. The gradually decreased concentrations (V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn) in sediment and relatively higher concentrations (V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu and Cd) in groundwater within reclamation areas were observed. The increase of V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu and Cd concentrations in groundwater within reclamation areas subsequently after land reclamation should be resulted from the mobilization of these metals accumulated in the sediment. These metals appear to be easily mobilized from solid phase to solution phase after reclamation. The physico-chemical changes such as reduction in pH and salinity in water environment induced by land reclamation appear to be responsible for metal mobility in the sediment-groundwater system.

  17. Combined influence of sedimentation and vegetation on the soil carbon stocks of a coastal wetland in the Changjiang estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianyu; Chen, Huaipu; Cao, Haobing; Ge, Zhenming; Zhang, Liquan

    2016-08-01

    Coastal wetlands play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Large quantities of sediment deposited in the Changjiang (Yangtze) estuary by the Changjiang River promote the propagation of coastal wetlands, the expansion of saltmarsh vegetation, and carbon sequestration. In this study, using the Chongming Dongtan Wetland in the Changjiang estuary as the study area, the spatial and temporal distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and the influences of sedimentation and vegetation on the SOC stocks of the coastal wetland were examined in 2013. There was sediment accretion in the northern and middle areas of the wetland and in the Phragmites australis marsh in the southern area, and sediment erosion in the Scirpus mariqueter marsh and the bare mudflat in the southern area. More SOC accumulated in sediments of the vegetated marsh than in the bare mudflat. The total organic carbon (TOC) stocks increased in the above-ground biomass from spring to autumn and decreased in winter; in the below-ground biomass, they gradually increased from spring to winter. The TOC stocks were higher in the below-ground biomass than in the above-ground biomass in the P. australis and Spartina alterniflora marshes, but were lower in the below-ground biomass in S. mariqueter marsh. Stocks of SOC showed temporal variation and increased gradually in all transects from spring to winter. The SOC stocks tended to decrease from the high marsh down to the bare mudflat along the three transects in the order: P. australis marsh > S. alterniflora marsh > S. mariqueter marsh > bare mudflat. The SOC stocks of the same vegetation type were higher in the northern and middle transects than in the southern transect. These results suggest that interactions between sedimentation and vegetation regulate the SOC stocks in the coastal wetland in the Changjiang estuary.

  18. Depth shapes α- and β-diversities of microbial eukaryotes in surficial sediments of coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jun; Shi, Fei; Ma, Bin; Dong, Jun; Pachiadaki, Maria; Zhang, Xiaoli; Edgcomb, Virginia P

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about the relative influence of historic processes and environmental gradients on shaping the diversity of single-celled eukaryotes in marine benthos. By combining pyrosequencing of 18S ribosomal RNA genes with data on multiple environmental factors, we investigated the diversity of microeukaryotes in surficial sediments of three basins of the Yellow Sea Large Marine Ecosystem. A considerable proportion (about 20%) of reads was affiliated with known parasitoid protists. Dinophyta and Ciliophora appeared dominant in terms of relative proportion of reads and operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness. Overall, OTU richness of benthic microeukaryotes decreased with increasing water depth and decreasing pH. While community composition was significantly different among basins, partial Mantel tests indicated a depth-decay pattern of community similarity, whereby water depth, rather than geographic distance or environment, shaped β-diversity of benthic microeukaryotes (including both the abundant and the rare biosphere) on a regional scale. Similar hydrographic and mineralogical factors contributed to the biogeography of both the abundant and the rare OTUs. The trace metal vanadium had a significant effect on the biogeography of the rare biosphere. Our study sheds new light on the composition, diversity patterns and underlying mechanisms of single-celled eukaryote distribution in surficial sediments of coastal oceans. PMID:25581721

  19. Depth shapes α- and β-diversities of microbial eukaryotes in surficial sediments of coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jun; Shi, Fei; Ma, Bin; Dong, Jun; Pachiadaki, Maria; Zhang, Xiaoli; Edgcomb, Virginia P

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about the relative influence of historic processes and environmental gradients on shaping the diversity of single-celled eukaryotes in marine benthos. By combining pyrosequencing of 18S ribosomal RNA genes with data on multiple environmental factors, we investigated the diversity of microeukaryotes in surficial sediments of three basins of the Yellow Sea Large Marine Ecosystem. A considerable proportion (about 20%) of reads was affiliated with known parasitoid protists. Dinophyta and Ciliophora appeared dominant in terms of relative proportion of reads and operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness. Overall, OTU richness of benthic microeukaryotes decreased with increasing water depth and decreasing pH. While community composition was significantly different among basins, partial Mantel tests indicated a depth-decay pattern of community similarity, whereby water depth, rather than geographic distance or environment, shaped β-diversity of benthic microeukaryotes (including both the abundant and the rare biosphere) on a regional scale. Similar hydrographic and mineralogical factors contributed to the biogeography of both the abundant and the rare OTUs. The trace metal vanadium had a significant effect on the biogeography of the rare biosphere. Our study sheds new light on the composition, diversity patterns and underlying mechanisms of single-celled eukaryote distribution in surficial sediments of coastal oceans.

  20. Sediment transport in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System: an overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; McKee, Lester J.; Barnard, P.L.; Jaffee, B.E.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    The papers in this special issue feature state-of-the-art approaches to understanding the physical processes related to sediment transport and geomorphology of complex coastal–estuarine systems. Here we focus on the San Francisco Bay Coastal System, extending from the lower San Joaquin–Sacramento Delta, through the Bay, and along the adjacent outer Pacific Coast. San Francisco Bay is an urbanized estuary that is impacted by numerous anthropogenic activities common to many large estuaries, including a mining legacy, channel dredging, aggregate mining, reservoirs, freshwater diversion, watershed modifications, urban run-off, ship traffic, exotic species introductions, land reclamation, and wetland restoration. The Golden Gate strait is the sole inlet connecting the Bay to the Pacific Ocean, and serves as the conduit for a tidal flow of ~ 8 × 109 m3/day, in addition to the transport of mud, sand, biogenic material, nutrients, and pollutants. Despite this physical, biological and chemical connection, resource management and prior research have often treated the Delta, Bay and adjacent ocean as separate entities, compartmentalized by artificial geographic or political boundaries. The body of work herein presents a comprehensive analysis of system-wide behavior, extending a rich heritage of sediment transport research that dates back to the groundbreaking hydraulic mining-impact research of G.K. Gilbert in the early 20th century.

  1. Sediment resuspension in tidally dominated coastal environments: new insights into the threshold for initial movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Ya Ping; Gao, Shu; Wang, Xiao Hua; Shi, Ben Wei; Zhou, Liang; Wang, Dan Dan; Dai, Chen; Li, Gao Cong

    2016-03-01

    An understanding of sediment resuspension and its threshold, for initial movement in shallow marine environments, is of great importance in coastal geomorphology, ecology, and harbor/fishery management applications. In the present study, in situ measurements of tides, current velocities, waves, and suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs) were measured at three shallow water sites with different tidal current patterns and seabed sediment grain sizes. The sites were associated with the radial sand ridge system (B4 and D2, rectilinear currents) and the Great Yangtze Shoal (D1, rotatory currents), in the southern Yellow Sea, China, both representing tidally dominated environments. The SSC data were analyzed to identify the controlling factors associated with resuspension and advection processes. There is a significant correlation between the near-bed SSC and shear stress, indicating that SSC variations are dominated by resuspension processes. Based on integrated field measurements of SSCs and hydrodynamics, the bed shear stresses of currents and waves were calculated, and the critical shear stresses for seabed erosion of the three sites were determined. At D2 (non-cohesive sediment) and B4/D1 (cohesive sediment), the critical shear stresses for seabed erosion (or resuspension) were estimated to be 0.11 and 0.07/0.09 N m-2, respectively. Although this result is reasonable when only the three sites are compared, both values are lower than predicted by existing threshold models, with a difference between 30 and 83 %. Such discrepancies can be related to intermittent turbulence events. For both sites, statistical and quadrant analyses have revealed significant correlations between near-bed SSC variations and intermittent turbulence events. This observation implies that the threshold conditions using the critical bed shear stress, derived from the current velocity profile, have a spatial scale effect: on a small scale (e.g., a flume in laboratory), the threshold can be

  2. Seagrasses and sediment response to the changing physical forcing in a coastal lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo da Silva, J.; Duck, R. W.; Pereira, M. J.; Catarino, J. B.

    2003-04-01

    The Ria de Aveiro is an estuary - coastal lagoon system connected to the Atlantic Ocean by a channel with a cross-sectional area that has steadily increased over more than one century. Local ocean tides, with amplitudes of 1-3 m, are today transmitted to the lagoon by the single, engineered inlet channel and propagate to the end of the lagoon channels as a damped progressive wave. The natural channel connecting the lagoon to the ocean evolved during historical times, moving southward and reducing its cross-section. The natural evolution was reverted in 1808 by opening the new inlet channel that has since been protected by breakwaters and deepened by dredging. This controlled evolution has caused an increase in the tidal prism associated with a larger tidal oscillation inside the lagoon. The change in tidal amplitude has important effects on the lagoon ecosystem, which are related to the increase in tidal currents, water level and salinity of the water. The pollution load reaching the lagoon from its catchment area is now, however, more readily flushed to the ocean. Most affected by the change are mudflat and intertidal areas, including the old salt-pans, some showing signs of erosion while others accumulate sediment that is transported in suspension by the strong tidal currents. Important indicators of ecosystem change are the seagrass beds. Until 1980 large areas of the lagoon bed were covered by seagrasses (Zostera, Ruppia, Potamogeton), which were collected in large quantities for use in agriculture. After 1980, the collection declined and the seagrass beds became sediment-covered. This resulted in a large decrease in the area of seagrasses in spite of the decline in the quantity collected. Our results show a pattern in the change of the seagrass populations that can be related to the changes in the physical forcing associated with tidal wave propagation. A parallel change in sediment texture was also observed.

  3. Chronic Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contamination Is a Marginal Driver for Community Diversity and Prokaryotic Predicted Functioning in Coastal Sediments.

    PubMed

    Jeanbille, Mathilde; Gury, Jérôme; Duran, Robert; Tronczynski, Jacek; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Agogué, Hélène; Saïd, Olfa Ben; Taïb, Najwa; Debroas, Didier; Garnier, Cédric; Auguet, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Benthic microorganisms are key players in the recycling of organic matter and recalcitrant compounds such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coastal sediments. Despite their ecological importance, the response of microbial communities to chronic PAH pollution, one of the major threats to coastal ecosystems, has received very little attention. In one of the largest surveys performed so far on coastal sediments, the diversity and composition of microbial communities inhabiting both chronically contaminated and non-contaminated coastal sediments were investigated using high-throughput sequencing on the 18S and 16S rRNA genes. Prokaryotic alpha-diversity showed significant association with salinity, temperature, and organic carbon content. The effect of particle size distribution was strong on eukaryotic diversity. Similarly to alpha-diversity, beta-diversity patterns were strongly influenced by the environmental filter, while PAHs had no influence on the prokaryotic community structure and a weak impact on the eukaryotic community structure at the continental scale. However, at the regional scale, PAHs became the main driver shaping the structure of bacterial and eukaryotic communities. These patterns were not found for PICRUSt predicted prokaryotic functions, thus indicating some degree of functional redundancy. Eukaryotes presented a greater potential for their use as PAH contamination biomarkers, owing to their stronger response at both regional and continental scales.

  4. Chronic Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contamination Is a Marginal Driver for Community Diversity and Prokaryotic Predicted Functioning in Coastal Sediments.

    PubMed

    Jeanbille, Mathilde; Gury, Jérôme; Duran, Robert; Tronczynski, Jacek; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Agogué, Hélène; Saïd, Olfa Ben; Taïb, Najwa; Debroas, Didier; Garnier, Cédric; Auguet, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Benthic microorganisms are key players in the recycling of organic matter and recalcitrant compounds such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coastal sediments. Despite their ecological importance, the response of microbial communities to chronic PAH pollution, one of the major threats to coastal ecosystems, has received very little attention. In one of the largest surveys performed so far on coastal sediments, the diversity and composition of microbial communities inhabiting both chronically contaminated and non-contaminated coastal sediments were investigated using high-throughput sequencing on the 18S and 16S rRNA genes. Prokaryotic alpha-diversity showed significant association with salinity, temperature, and organic carbon content. The effect of particle size distribution was strong on eukaryotic diversity. Similarly to alpha-diversity, beta-diversity patterns were strongly influenced by the environmental filter, while PAHs had no influence on the prokaryotic community structure and a weak impact on the eukaryotic community structure at the continental scale. However, at the regional scale, PAHs became the main driver shaping the structure of bacterial and eukaryotic communities. These patterns were not found for PICRUSt predicted prokaryotic functions, thus indicating some degree of functional redundancy. Eukaryotes presented a greater potential for their use as PAH contamination biomarkers, owing to their stronger response at both regional and continental scales. PMID:27594854

  5. Chronic Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contamination Is a Marginal Driver for Community Diversity and Prokaryotic Predicted Functioning in Coastal Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Jeanbille, Mathilde; Gury, Jérôme; Duran, Robert; Tronczynski, Jacek; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Agogué, Hélène; Saïd, Olfa Ben; Taïb, Najwa; Debroas, Didier; Garnier, Cédric; Auguet, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Benthic microorganisms are key players in the recycling of organic matter and recalcitrant compounds such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coastal sediments. Despite their ecological importance, the response of microbial communities to chronic PAH pollution, one of the major threats to coastal ecosystems, has received very little attention. In one of the largest surveys performed so far on coastal sediments, the diversity and composition of microbial communities inhabiting both chronically contaminated and non-contaminated coastal sediments were investigated using high-throughput sequencing on the 18S and 16S rRNA genes. Prokaryotic alpha-diversity showed significant association with salinity, temperature, and organic carbon content. The effect of particle size distribution was strong on eukaryotic diversity. Similarly to alpha-diversity, beta-diversity patterns were strongly influenced by the environmental filter, while PAHs had no influence on the prokaryotic community structure and a weak impact on the eukaryotic community structure at the continental scale. However, at the regional scale, PAHs became the main driver shaping the structure of bacterial and eukaryotic communities. These patterns were not found for PICRUSt predicted prokaryotic functions, thus indicating some degree of functional redundancy. Eukaryotes presented a greater potential for their use as PAH contamination biomarkers, owing to their stronger response at both regional and continental scales.

  6. Chronic Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contamination Is a Marginal Driver for Community Diversity and Prokaryotic Predicted Functioning in Coastal Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Jeanbille, Mathilde; Gury, Jérôme; Duran, Robert; Tronczynski, Jacek; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Agogué, Hélène; Saïd, Olfa Ben; Taïb, Najwa; Debroas, Didier; Garnier, Cédric; Auguet, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Benthic microorganisms are key players in the recycling of organic matter and recalcitrant compounds such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coastal sediments. Despite their ecological importance, the response of microbial communities to chronic PAH pollution, one of the major threats to coastal ecosystems, has received very little attention. In one of the largest surveys performed so far on coastal sediments, the diversity and composition of microbial communities inhabiting both chronically contaminated and non-contaminated coastal sediments were investigated using high-throughput sequencing on the 18S and 16S rRNA genes. Prokaryotic alpha-diversity showed significant association with salinity, temperature, and organic carbon content. The effect of particle size distribution was strong on eukaryotic diversity. Similarly to alpha-diversity, beta-diversity patterns were strongly influenced by the environmental filter, while PAHs had no influence on the prokaryotic community structure and a weak impact on the eukaryotic community structure at the continental scale. However, at the regional scale, PAHs became the main driver shaping the structure of bacterial and eukaryotic communities. These patterns were not found for PICRUSt predicted prokaryotic functions, thus indicating some degree of functional redundancy. Eukaryotes presented a greater potential for their use as PAH contamination biomarkers, owing to their stronger response at both regional and continental scales. PMID:27594854

  7. Metal release from contaminated coastal sediments under changing pH conditions: Implications for metal mobilization in acidified oceans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zaosheng; Wang, Yushao; Zhao, Peihong; Chen, Liuqin; Yan, Changzhou; Yan, Yijun; Chi, Qiaoqiao

    2015-12-30

    To investigate the impacts and processes of CO2-induced acidification on metal mobilization, laboratory-scale experiments were performed, simulating the scenarios where carbon dioxide was injected into sediment-seawater layers inside non-pressurized chambers. Coastal sediments were sampled from two sites with different contamination levels and subjected to pre-determined pH conditions. Sediment samples and overlying water were collected for metal analysis after 10-days. The results indicated that CO2-induced ocean acidification would provoke increased metal mobilization causing adverse side-effects on water quality. The mobility of metals from sediment to the overlying seawater was correlated with the reduction in pH. Results of sequential extractions of sediments illustrated that exchangeable metal forms were the dominant source of mobile metals. Collectively, our data revealed that high metal concentrations in overlying seawater released from contaminated sediments under acidic conditions may strengthen the existing contamination gradients in Maluan Bay and represent a potential risk to ecosystem health in coastal environments.

  8. Modeling sediment transport processes and residence times in the shallow coastal bay complex of the Virginia Coast Reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safak, I.; Wiberg, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    Patterns of sediment transport and particle residence times influence the morphology and ecology of shallow coastal bays in important ways. The Virginia Coast Reserve (VCR), a barrier island-lagoon-marsh system on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, is typical of many shallow coastal bay complexes that lack a significant fluvial source of freshwater and sediment. Sediment redistribution within the bays in response to storms and sea-level rise, together with the dynamics of marsh and lagoon-bottom plants, largely governs the morphological evolution of this system. There are also important feedbacks between sediment and ecosystem dynamics. This is particularly true in the VCR, which is relatively unaffected by human activities. As a step towards evaluating the impact of hydrodynamics on sediment and ecological processes in the VCR, a single unified model that accounts for circulation, surface waves, wave-current interaction, and sediment processes is employed. This three-dimensional unstructured grid finite-volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) is validated with field observations of wind- and tide-induced water flow (water level and current velocities) in Hog Island Bay, centrally located within the VCR. Here, the resulting patterns of sediment transport and particle residence times over event and seasonal time scales are presented. Water and particle exchange within the VCR and between the VCR and the ocean is examined with the Lagrangian particle-tracking module in FVCOM. We focus on three bays with strongly varying bathymetry and coastline geometry, which are also located along a gradient of nitrogen input to the system. The results indicate that residence time of particles within the system vary greatly depending on the location of particle release, bay morphology, and wind conditions. The implications for morphologic evolution and ecosystem response to climate and land-use changes are evaluated.

  9. Comparing radiation dose rates in soils and riverine sediment to track the dispersion of radioactive contamination in Fukushima coastal rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Olivier; Onda, Yuichi; Lepage, Hugo; Chartin, Caroline; Lefèvre, Irène; Cerdan, Olivier; Bonté, Philippe; Ayrault, Sophie

    2014-05-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident that occurred in March 2011 led to the formation of a 3000-km² radioactive pollution plume on soils located up to 70 km to the northwest of the damaged site. Forests and paddy fields are the dominant land uses in this mountainous region drained to the Pacific Ocean by several rivers that flow across densely inhabited coastal plains. It is then crucial to track the dispersion of radioactive material conveyed by those rivers to estimate the continental supply of radionuclides to the Ocean and to assess redistribution of radioactive sediment in those catchments. Radiations emitted by this contaminated material may indeed lead to an external exposure threat for local populations. As river discharge and sediment concentration data were not available during the first two years that followed the accident, alternative methods had to be developed to track this dispersion. We therefore organized field campaigns every six months and conducted local ground dose rate measurements to estimate whether fresh sediment drape deposits were more or less contaminated compared to local soils. Overall, our results showed that, in those regions exposed to violent typhoons and spring snowmelt, transfers of sediment are massive and episodic, and that they followed a seasonal cycle in 2011-2012. Then, in May 2013, contamination levels measured in sediment found in the upper parts of the catchments were almost systematically lower than the ones measured in nearby soils, whereas their contamination was higher in the coastal plains. This could have indicated a drying-up of the upstream sources of contamination. However, after the violent typhoons that occurred during summer in 2013, dose rates measured in fresh sediment deposits in November 2013 increased again systematically across the region. We thereby suggest that remobilization of contaminated sediment by typhoons and their storage in reservoirs and in coastal sections of the

  10. 20th century sediment budget trends on the Western Gulf of Lions shoreface (France): An application of an integrated method for the study of sediment coastal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunel, C.; Certain, R.; Sabatier, F.; Robin, N.; Barusseau, J. P.; Aleman, N.; Raynal, O.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a shoreface sediment budget established for the 20th century (1895-1984-2009) along the microtidal wave-dominated coast of the western Gulf of Lions (Languedoc-Roussillon, Mediterranean Sea, SE France). The implementation of a diachronic bathymetric approach, coupled with the definition of sand reservoirs (upper sand unit - USU) by very high-resolution seismic surveys and the results of LiDAR investigations, offers a new means of defining precisely the magnitude and change trends of the sediment budget. The aim of this study is to link the Large Scale Coastal Behaviour (LSCB) of the littoral prism (expressed in terms of shoreface sediment budget, shoreface sediment volume and spatial distribution pattern of cells) to climatic change, river sediment input to the coast, longshore sediment transport distribution, impact of hard coastal defence structures and artificial beach nourishment. The results show a significant reduction of the volume of the western Gulf of Lions littoral prism over 114 years (- 26.1 ± 4.6 × 106 m3). From 1895 to 1984, the overall budget is slightly positive, with a volume estimated at 4.1 ± 3.5 × 106 m3. For 1984-2009, however, the estimated sediment budgets clearly indicate that erosion is dominant over the last 25 years, with a volume loss of - 30.2 ± 4.2 × 106 m3. In relation to the long-term sediment budget and longshore drift pattern, the long-term trend of the USU volume distribution displays strong spatio-temporal contrasts linked to longshore sediment drift, spatial distribution of fluvial sediment inputs and hard engineering structures. Locally, the sedimentary reservoir is significantly eroded within a century (- 80% of USU), since the initial amount present was low and not sustainable. The emphasis is on the importance of considering the volume changes of available sediment reservoirs rather than their losses and gains. Erosion of the Languedoc-Roussillon shoreface is likely to continue in the future due to

  11. [Regional distribution and ecological risk evaluation of heavy metals in surface sediments from coastal wetlands of the Yellow River Delta].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Jie; Li, Pei-Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Li, Ping; Zhu, Long-Hai

    2012-04-01

    Characteristics of heavy metal distributions in surface sediments of different areas in the Yellow River Delta coastal wetland are analyzed, and the influences of sediment environment on heavy metal distributions are discussed. Heavy metal pollution and potential ecological risk in surface sediments of the Yellow River Delta coastal wetland are estimated by using Hakanson potential ecological risk (PER) factors method. The analyzed results indicate that the average contents of Hg, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd and Cr are 0.034, 18.733, 19.393, 65.317, 0.235 and 62.940 microg x g(-1), respectively. The heavy metal distributions vary with regional environment changes. The accumulating index of heavy metals in the current outfall area is the highest of the three regions assigned by author,the second is that of the ancient Yellow River Delta in the north of Shandong province, and the lowest is that of the abandoned delta. Heavy metal distributions in the Yellow River Delta coastal wetland are affected significantly by hydrodynamic system. In addition, the content of clay in surface sediments plays an important role in the distribution and accumulation of heavy metals. The results also suggest that the heavy metal pollution in the Yellow River Delta coastal wetland is in a low pollution level, with a comprehensive pollution index varying from 0.10 to 4.14. And element Cr is the major pollution factor and its average of single pollution index is 0.63. The order of pollution extents of six typical pollutants is Cr > Cu > Zn > Cd > Pb > Hg. The comprehensive potential ecological risk index is between 0.46 and 51.88, indicating a low potential ecological risk. The order of potential ecological risk parameter is Cd > Hg > Cu > Cr > Pb > Zn. Element Cd is also the major factor of potential ecological risks in the Yellow River Delta coastal wetland.

  12. Climate oscillations reflected in the Arabian Sea subseafloor microbiome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, William; Coolen, Marco; He, Lijun; Wuchter, Cornelia; Irigoien, Xabier; Chust, Guillem; Johnson, Carl; Hemingway, Jordon; Lee, Mitchell; Galy, Valier; Giosan, Liviu

    2016-04-01

    Marine sediment contains a vast microbial biosphere that influences global biogeochemical cycles over geological timescales. However, the environmental factors controlling the stratigraphy of subseafloor microbial communities are poorly understood. We studied a sediment core directly underlying the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), which exhibits organic carbon rich sapropelic laminae deposited under low oxygen conditions. Consistent with several other cores from the same location, age dating revealed the sapropelic layers coincide with warm North Atlantic millennial-scale Dansgaard-Oeschger events, indicating a direct link between the strength of the OMZ and paleoclimate. A total of 214 samples spanning 13 m and 52 Kyr of deposition were selected for geochemical analyses and paleoclimate proxy measurements, as well as high-throughput metagenomic DNA sequencing of bacteria and archaea. A novel DNA extraction protocol was developed that allowed for direct (unamplified) metagenomic sequencing of DNA from each sample. This dataset represents the highest resolved sedimentary metagenomic sampling profile to date. Analysis of these data together with multiple paleoceanographic proxies show that millennial-scale paleoenvironmental conditions correlate with the metabolism and diversity of bacteria and archaea over the last glacial-interglacial cycle in the Arabian Sea. The metabolic potential for bacterial denitrification correlates with climate-driven OMZ strength and concomitant nitrogen stable isotope fractionation, whereas catabolic potential reflects changing marine organic matter sources across the Last Glacial Maximum. These results indicate that the subsisting microbial communities had been stratified to a large extent by paleoceanographic conditions at the time of deposition. Paleoenvironmental conditions should thus be considered as a mechanism that can help explain microbiome stratigraphy in marine sediment.

  13. Effects of composition of labile organic matter on biogenic production of methane in the coastal sediments of the Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Maria-Judith; Fernandes, Christabelle E G; Fernandes, Sheryl Oliveira; Kirchman, David L; Bharathi, P A Loka

    2011-11-01

    Coastal regions are potential zones for production of methane which could be governed by ecological/environmental differences or even sediment properties of a niche. In order to test the hypothesis that methanogenesis in most marine sediments could be driven more by proteins than by carbohydrates and lipid content of labile organic matter (LOM), incubation experiments were carried out with sediments from different environmental niches to measure methane production. The methane production rates were examined in relationship to the sediment biochemistry, i.e., carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids. The gas production measured by head space method ranged from 216 ng g( -1) day( -1) in the mangrove sediments to 3.1 μg g( -1) day( -1) in the shallow Arabian Sea. LOM ranged from 1.56 to 2.85 mg g( -1) in the shallow Arabian Sea, from 3.35 to 5.43 mg g( -1) in the mangrove estuary, and from 0.66 to 0.70 mg g( -1) in the sandy sediments with proteins contributing maximum to the LOM pool. Proteins influenced methane production in the clayey sediments of shallow depths of the Arabian Sea (r = 0.933, p < 0.001) and mangrove estuary (r = 0.981, p < 0.001) but in the sandy beach sediments, carbohydrates (r = 0.924, p < 0.001) governed the net methane production. The gas production was more pronounced in shallow and surface sediments and it decreased with depth apparently governed by the decrease in lability index. Thus, the lability index and protein content are important factors that determine methane production rates in these coastal ecosystems.

  14. Persistent organic pollutants in coastal sediment off South China in relation to the importance of anthropogenic inputs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang-Ying; Wang, Ji-Zhong; Qiu, Jian-Wen; Liang, Yan; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2012-06-01

    Surface sediments collected from the coastal region off South China were analyzed for persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). The concentrations of BDE-209, Σ(12)PBDE, Σ(15)PAH, Σ(7)PAH, and Σ(11)OCP were 0.22 to 26.3, 0.01 to 0.77, 13.9 to 271, 6 to 133, and 0.9 to 104 ng/g, respectively. The spatial distribution patterns of PBDEs and PAHs suggested that the eastern coastal region was slightly more contaminated than the western coast. In addition, the concentrations of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites (DDXs) were highly variable, with the highest level found at a site in Zhanjiang Bay, which might have been reflective of the impact of antifouling paints mainly used in boat maintenance in harbor areas. The predominance of BDE-209 in the study region was consistent with the usage pattern of penta-, octa-, and deca-BDEs in China, whereas sediment PAHs appeared to have been derived largely from coal or wood and petroleum combustion. Preliminary assessments indicated that terrestrial inputs, such as atmospheric transport and riverine runoff, may have been the major input pathways for PBDEs and PAHs, respectively, to accumulate in coastal sediment off South China. Conversely, residues of DDT-containing antifouling paints associated with shipping activities and boat maintenance accounted for most of the accumulated sediment DDTs.

  15. Mercury dispersal to arroyo and coastal sediments from abandoned copper mine operations, el Boléo, Baja California.

    PubMed

    Kot, Fyodor; Shumilin, Evgueni; Rodríguez-Figueroa, Griselda Margarita; Mirlean, Nicolai

    2009-01-01

    Evidence for mercury dispersal in an arid coastal region of central Baja California (Mexico) suggests that abandoned copper mining operations are a noticeable source of mercury in the environment. There is a generally elevated level of mercury in alluvium of arroyos throughout the mining district (0.14-0.18 mg kg(-1)). In the first several dozen meters surrounding two of the biggest mines, mercury levels range from 0.26 to 3.16 mg kg(-1), forming a halo of anomalously high concentrations. The coastal marine sediments, particularly those close to the copper smelter in the town of Santa Rosalía, also display some mercury enrichment. PMID:18800200

  16. Mercury dispersal to arroyo and coastal sediments from abandoned copper mine operations, el Boléo, Baja California.

    PubMed

    Kot, Fyodor; Shumilin, Evgueni; Rodríguez-Figueroa, Griselda Margarita; Mirlean, Nicolai

    2009-01-01

    Evidence for mercury dispersal in an arid coastal region of central Baja California (Mexico) suggests that abandoned copper mining operations are a noticeable source of mercury in the environment. There is a generally elevated level of mercury in alluvium of arroyos throughout the mining district (0.14-0.18 mg kg(-1)). In the first several dozen meters surrounding two of the biggest mines, mercury levels range from 0.26 to 3.16 mg kg(-1), forming a halo of anomalously high concentrations. The coastal marine sediments, particularly those close to the copper smelter in the town of Santa Rosalía, also display some mercury enrichment.

  17. Probing Metabolic Activity of Deep Subseafloor Life with NanoSIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morono, Y.; Terada, T.; Itoh, M.; Inagaki, F.

    2014-12-01

    There are very few natural environments where life is absent in the Earth's surface biosphere. However, uninhabitable region is expected to be exist in the deep subsurface biosphere, of which extent and constraining factor(s) have still remained largly unknown. Scientific ocean drilling have revealed that microbial communities in sediments are generally phylogenetically distinct from known spieces isolated from the Earth's surface biosphere, and hence metabolic functions of the deep subseafloor life remain unknown. In addition, activity of subseafloor microbial cells are thought to be extraordinally slow, as indicated by limited supply of neutrient and energy substrates. To understand the limits of the Earth's subseafloor biosphere and metabolic functions of microbial populations, detection and quantification of the deeply buried microbial cells in geological habitats are fundamentary important. Using newly developed cell separation techniques as well as an discriminative cell detection system, the current quantification limit of sedimentary microbial cells approaches to 102 cells/cm3. These techniques allow not only to assess very small microbial population close to the subsurface biotic fringe, but also to separate and sort the target cells using flow cytometric cell sorter. Once the deep subseafloor microbial cells are detached from mineral grains and sorted, it opens new windows to subsequent molecular ecological and element/isotopic analyses. With a combined use of nano-scale secondary ion masspectrometry (NanoSIMS) and stable isotope-probing techniques, it is possible to detect and measure activity of substrate incorporation into biomass, even for extremely slow metabolic processes such as uncharacteriszed deep subseafloor life. For example, it was evidenced by NanoSIMS that at least over 80% of microbial cells at ~200 meters-deep, 460,000-year-old sedimentary habitat are indeed live, which substrate incooporation was found to be low (10-15 gC/cell/day) even

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkylated PAHs in the coastal seawater, surface sediment and oyster from Dalian, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wen-Jun; Jia, Hongliang; Li, Yi-Fan; Sun, Yeqing; Liu, Xianjie; Wang, Luo

    2016-06-01

    A total of 46 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, 21 parent and 25 alkylated) were determined in seawater, surface sediment and oyster from coastal area of Dalian, North China. The concentration of Σ46PAHs in seawater, sediment, and oyster were 136-621 ng/L, 172-4700 ng/g dry weight (dw) and 60.0-129 ng/g wet weight (ww) in winter, and 65.0-1130 ng/L, 71.1-1090 ng/g dw and 72.8-216 ng/g ww in summer, respectively. High PAH levels were found in industrial area both in winter and summer. Selected PAH levels in sediments were compared with Sediments Quality Guidelines (ERM-ERL, TEL-PEL indexes) for evaluation probable toxic effects on marine organism and the results indicate that surface sediment from all sampling sites have a low to medium ecotoxicological risk. Daily intake of PAHs via oyster as seafood by humans were estimated and the results indicated that oyster intake would not pose a health risk to humans even 30 days after a oil spill accident near by. Water-sediment exchange analysis showed that, both in winter and summer, the fluxes for most high molecular weight PAHs were from seawater to sediment, while for low molecular weight PAHs, an equilibrium was reached between seawater and sediment.

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkylated PAHs in the coastal seawater, surface sediment and oyster from Dalian, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wen-Jun; Jia, Hongliang; Li, Yi-Fan; Sun, Yeqing; Liu, Xianjie; Wang, Luo

    2016-06-01

    A total of 46 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, 21 parent and 25 alkylated) were determined in seawater, surface sediment and oyster from coastal area of Dalian, North China. The concentration of Σ46PAHs in seawater, sediment, and oyster were 136-621 ng/L, 172-4700 ng/g dry weight (dw) and 60.0-129 ng/g wet weight (ww) in winter, and 65.0-1130 ng/L, 71.1-1090 ng/g dw and 72.8-216 ng/g ww in summer, respectively. High PAH levels were found in industrial area both in winter and summer. Selected PAH levels in sediments were compared with Sediments Quality Guidelines (ERM-ERL, TEL-PEL indexes) for evaluation probable toxic effects on marine organism and the results indicate that surface sediment from all sampling sites have a low to medium ecotoxicological risk. Daily intake of PAHs via oyster as seafood by humans were estimated and the results indicated that oyster intake would not pose a health risk to humans even 30 days after a oil spill accident near by. Water-sediment exchange analysis showed that, both in winter and summer, the fluxes for most high molecular weight PAHs were from seawater to sediment, while for low molecular weight PAHs, an equilibrium was reached between seawater and sediment. PMID:26874984

  20. Redox conditions and trace metal cycling in coastal sediments from the maritime Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monien, Patrick; Lettmann, Karsten Alexander; Monien, Donata; Asendorf, Sanja; Wölfl, Anne-Cathrin; Lim, Chai Heng; Thal, Janis; Schnetger, Bernhard; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-09-01

    Redox-sensitive trace metals (Mn, Fe, U, Mo, Re), nutrients and terminal metabolic products (NO3-, NH4+, PO43-, total alkalinity) were investigated for the first time in pore waters of Antarctic coastal sediments. The results of this study reveal a high spatial variability in redox conditions in surface sediments from Potter Cove, King George Island, western Antarctic Peninsula. Particularly in the shallower areas of the bay the significant correlation between sulphate depletion and total alkalinity, the inorganic product of terminal metabolism, indicates sulphate reduction to be the major pathway of organic matter mineralisation. In contrast, dissimilatory metal oxide reduction seems to be prevailing in the newly ice-free areas and the deeper troughs, where concentrations of dissolved iron of up to 700 μM were found. We suggest a combination of several factors to be responsible for the domination of metal oxide reduction over sulphate reduction in these areas. These include the increased accumulation of fine-grained material with high amounts of reducible metal oxides, a reduced availability of metabolisable organic matter and an enhanced physical and biological disturbance by bottom water currents, ice scouring and burrowing organisms. Based on modelled iron fluxes we calculate the contribution of the Antarctic shelf to the pool of potentially bioavailable iron (Feb) to be 6.9 × 103 to 790 × 103 t yr-1. Consequently, these shelf sediments would provide an Feb flux of 0.35-39.5 mg m-2 yr-1 (median: 3.8 mg m-2 yr-1) to the Southern Ocean. This contribution is in the same order of magnitude as the flux provided by icebergs and significantly higher than the input by aeolian dust. For this reason suboxic shelf sediments form a key source of iron for the high nutrient-low chlorophyll (HNLC) areas of the Southern Ocean. This source may become even more important in the future due to rising temperatures at the WAP accompanied by enhanced glacier retreat and the

  1. Luminescence dating of fluvial and coastal red sediments in the SE coast, India, and implications for paleoenvironmental changes and dune reddening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayangondaperumal, R.; Murari, M. K.; Sivasubramanian, P.; Chandrasekar, N.; Singhvi, A. K.

    2012-05-01

    The Holocene and late Pleistocene environmental history of the teri ('sandy waste' in local parlance) red sands in the southeast coastal Tamil Nadu was examined using remote sensing, stratigraphy, and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating. Geomorphological surveys enabled the classification of the teri red sands as, 1) inland fluvial teri, 2) coastal teri and, 3) near-coastal teri dunes. The inland teri sediments have higher clay and silty-sand component than the coastal and near-coastal teri, suggesting that these sediments were deposited by the fluvial process during a stronger winter monsoon around > 15 ka. The coastal teri dunes were deposited prior to 11.4 ± 0.9 ka, and the near-coastal dunes aggraded at around 5.6 ± 0.4 ka. We interpret that the coastal dunes were formed during a period of lower relative sea level and the near-coastal dunes formed during a period of higher sea level. Dune reddening is post deposition occurred after 11.4 ± 0.9 ka for the coastal teri dunes and after 5.6 ± 0.4 ka for the near-coastal teri dunes. Presence of microlithic sites associated with the coastal dunes suggest that the cultures existed in the region during 11.4 ± 0.9 ka and 5.6 ± 0.4 ka.

  2. Distribution, enrichment and sources of thallium in the surface sediments of the southwestern coastal Laizhou Bay, Bohai Sea.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Wen; Gao, Xuelu

    2015-07-15

    The concentrations of thallium (Tl) in the surface sediments of the southwestern coastal Laizhou Bay and the rivers it connects were determined. In riverine sediments, the Tl concentrations ranged from 0.34 to 0.76 μg g(-1) in summer; in autumn, the corresponding data were 0.35-1.08 μg g(-1). In marine sediments, the Tl concentrations ranged from 0.36 to 0.58 μg g(-1) in summer; and from 0.30 to 0.56 μg g(-1) in autumn. The grain size, Al and Fe oxides were major factors affecting Tl distribution. Tl in the surface sediments of the studied area was mainly from the natural input with the non-natural input as a subsidiary source. The low concentrations of Tl made it hard to cause potential negative environmental effects in this area.

  3. Interpretation of coastal sediment quality based on trace metal and PAH analysis, benthic foraminifera, and toxicity tests (Sardinia, Western Mediterranean).

    PubMed

    Schintu, Marco; Buosi, Carla; Galgani, François; Marrucci, Alessandro; Marras, Barbara; Ibba, Angelo; Cherchi, Antonietta

    2015-05-15

    An integrated approach for the assessment of coastal sediment quality was utilised in three areas of Sardinia (Western Mediterranean, Italy). Sediments were analysed for trace metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), while benthic foraminifera were used as bioindicators. Furthermore, the embryo-toxicity test was used to provide ecologically relevant information using rapid and cost-effective screening tools. The aim was to evaluate the usefulness of coupling different analytical tools. The results revealed the presence of polluted sediments in areas exposed to petrochemical industries, smelters or military settlements. However, while foraminifera have presented similar indications for chemical analysis of contamination levels in the different areas, the toxicity test exhibited a poor relationship with the contaminants measured individually. The results raise questions concerning the bioavailability of contaminants released by sediments in the water column. Overall, the toxicity rate was significant in many samples in comparison with other sites studied in other Mediterranean regions. PMID:25795553

  4. Regional background concentrations of heavy metals (Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb) in coastal sediments of the South Sea of Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, Yunho; Choi, Man Sik; Lee, Ji Youn; Jang, Dong Jun

    2014-06-01

    The background concentration (BC) of metals in coastal sediments may be a useful tool for assessing the extent of sediment contamination by human activities. This study presents an approach to establish BCs that are applicable at the regional scale, particularly for coastal areas with relatively tortuous coastlines and complex coastal geology and/or geomorphology like the South Sea of Korea. The approach is based on the sorption hypothesis for metal enrichment of coastal sediments and was verified using 33 core and 187 surface sediments. The concentrations of major and heavy metals, grain size parameters, organic carbon, and sedimentation rates were determined. Cs was selected as the most suitable geochemical normalizer to correct the grain-size effect. Non-contaminated samples from core sediments were selected according to the sedimentation rate, 32 types of profile pattern based on metal concentrations and metal/Cs ratios, and their variability in past sediments. Metal concentrations in the selected non-contaminated samples were well correlated with Cs, with a given Cs amounts in surface sediments corresponding to the lowest metal concentrations. This result supported the use of a procedure based on the sorption hypothesis, which was then used to synthesize all core samples and establish the regional BC of heavy metals in the coastal sediments. Linear regression equations between metal and Cs concentrations provided the following BCs of metals in coastal sediments in the South Sea of Korea: 70 (Cr), 13 (Co), 30 (Ni), 13 (Cu), 87 (Zn), and 23 (Pb)mg/kg at 8mg/kg of Cs (mean concentration of 393 sediments). PMID:24636889

  5. Regional background concentrations of heavy metals (Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb) in coastal sediments of the South Sea of Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, Yunho; Choi, Man Sik; Lee, Ji Youn; Jang, Dong Jun

    2014-06-01

    The background concentration (BC) of metals in coastal sediments may be a useful tool for assessing the extent of sediment contamination by human activities. This study presents an approach to establish BCs that are applicable at the regional scale, particularly for coastal areas with relatively tortuous coastlines and complex coastal geology and/or geomorphology like the South Sea of Korea. The approach is based on the sorption hypothesis for metal enrichment of coastal sediments and was verified using 33 core and 187 surface sediments. The concentrations of major and heavy metals, grain size parameters, organic carbon, and sedimentation rates were determined. Cs was selected as the most suitable geochemical normalizer to correct the grain-size effect. Non-contaminated samples from core sediments were selected according to the sedimentation rate, 32 types of profile pattern based on metal concentrations and metal/Cs ratios, and their variability in past sediments. Metal concentrations in the selected non-contaminated samples were well correlated with Cs, with a given Cs amounts in surface sediments corresponding to the lowest metal concentrations. This result supported the use of a procedure based on the sorption hypothesis, which was then used to synthesize all core samples and establish the regional BC of heavy metals in the coastal sediments. Linear regression equations between metal and Cs concentrations provided the following BCs of metals in coastal sediments in the South Sea of Korea: 70 (Cr), 13 (Co), 30 (Ni), 13 (Cu), 87 (Zn), and 23 (Pb)mg/kg at 8mg/kg of Cs (mean concentration of 393 sediments).

  6. Regional Comparisons of Coastal Sediment Contamination Detected by a Biomarker (P450 HRGS; EPA Method 4425)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jack W.; Hartwell, S I.; Hameedi, M J.

    2005-01-01

    Pollution investigations by the Center for Coastal Assessment and Monitoring of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have been conducted since 1984 and have incorporated extensive biological and chemical analyses. Since 1993, one of the suites of biological tests utilized in these studies has been the biomarker P450HRGS, which is more recently referred to as EPA Method 4425. Extracts of sediments are applied to a human cell line with a reporter gene at the CYP1A1 site. Light produced by the extracts is a function of the concentrations and potencies of those compounds with an affinity for Ah-receptor (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs], polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], dioxins/furans). These compounds are carcinogenic, can produce chronic toxicity, and those containing chlorine are persistent and bioaccumulated. Nineteen coastal regions and 1309 samples from the three U.S. coasts have been evaluated as part of the NOAA investigations. The stratified random sampling approach used by NOAA provides estimates of the areas (km2) of each region containing levels of the compounds above thresholds. From analysis of the data base, sediments with concentrations at or below 11 ?g benzo[a]pyrene equivalents (B[a]PEq)/g would not be expected to produce effects on the benthos. At 32 ?g B[a]PEq/g and above there is the potential for impacts on the biota, and above 60 ?g/g, the degradation of the benthic community has been observed. Several of the regional surveys found no samples at or above 60 ?g B[a]PEq/g, but 60% of the samples from New York Harbor (280 km2) were above this level. Analyses of data from Puget Sound and Chesapeake Bay demonstrate an increase in samples above 32 ?g B[a]PEq/g in more populated and industrial regions. A targeted investigation of the distribution of the three important classes of compounds identified by Method 4425 would be more cost effective by first screening samples by this method before expending substantial funds in

  7. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals in coastal lagoons of the Po River delta: sediment contamination, bioaccumulation and effects on Manila clams.

    PubMed

    Casatta, Nadia; Stefani, Fabrizio; Pozzoni, Fiorenzo; Guzzella, Licia; Marziali, Laura; Mascolo, Giuseppe; Viganò, Luigi

    2016-06-01

    The large estuary that the River Po forms at its confluence into the Adriatic Sea comprises a multitude of transitional environments, including coastal lagoons. This complex system receives the nutrients transported by the River Po but also its load of chemical contaminants, which may pose a substantial (eco)toxicological risk. Despite the high ecological and economic importance of these vulnerable environments, there is a substantial lack of information on this risk. In light of the recent amendments of the European Water Framework Directive (2013/39/EU), the present study investigated the sediment contamination of six coastal lagoons of the Po delta and its effects on Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum), exposed in situ for 3 months. Sediment contamination and clam bioaccumulation of a wide range of chemicals, i.e. trace metals (Cd, Cr, Ni, Hg, Pb, As), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), alkylphenols (APs), organochlorine compounds (PCBs, DDTs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organotins (TPhT, TBT), suggested a southward increase related to the riverine transports. Where the River Po influence was more direct, the concentrations of contaminants were higher, with nonylphenol and BDE-209 exceeding sediment quality guidelines. Biometric indicators suggested the influence of contamination on organism health; an inverse relationship between PBDEs in sediments and clam condition index has been found, as well as different biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) in the lagoons. PMID:26507734

  8. Stability and bistability of seagrass ecosystems in shallow coastal lagoons: Role of feedbacks with sediment resuspension and light attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, J.; D'Odorico, P.; McGlathery, K.; Wiberg, P.

    2010-09-01

    Shallow coastal lagoons are environments where a dynamic equilibrium exists between water quality and seagrass cover. Dense seagrass canopies limit the resuspension of bed sediments thereby creating a clearer water column and a positive feedback for seagrass growth. Positive feedbacks are often associated with the existence of bistable dynamics in ecosystems. For example, a bare and a seagrass covered sediment bed could both be stable states of the system. This study describes a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model of vegetation-sediment-water flow interactions and uses it to investigate the strengths of positive feedbacks between seagrass cover, stabilization of bed sediments, turbidity of the water column, and the existence of a favorable light environment for seagrasses. The model is applied to Hog Island Bay, a shallow coastal lagoon on the eastern shore of Virginia. The effects of temperature, eutrophication, and bed grain size on bistability of seagrass ecosystems in the lagoon are explored. The results indicate that under typical conditions, seagrass is stable in water depths < 2.2 m (51% of the bay bottom deep enough for seagrass growth) and bistable conditions exist for depths of 2.2-3.6 m (23% of bay) where the preferred state depends on initial seagrass cover. The remaining 26% of the bay is too deep to sustain seagrass. Decreases in sediment size and increases in water temperature and degree of eutrophication shift the bistable range to shallower depths, with more of the bay bottom unable to sustain seagrass.

  9. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals in coastal lagoons of the Po River delta: sediment contamination, bioaccumulation and effects on Manila clams.

    PubMed

    Casatta, Nadia; Stefani, Fabrizio; Pozzoni, Fiorenzo; Guzzella, Licia; Marziali, Laura; Mascolo, Giuseppe; Viganò, Luigi

    2016-06-01

    The large estuary that the River Po forms at its confluence into the Adriatic Sea comprises a multitude of transitional environments, including coastal lagoons. This complex system receives the nutrients transported by the River Po but also its load of chemical contaminants, which may pose a substantial (eco)toxicological risk. Despite the high ecological and economic importance of these vulnerable environments, there is a substantial lack of information on this risk. In light of the recent amendments of the European Water Framework Directive (2013/39/EU), the present study investigated the sediment contamination of six coastal lagoons of the Po delta and its effects on Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum), exposed in situ for 3 months. Sediment contamination and clam bioaccumulation of a wide range of chemicals, i.e. trace metals (Cd, Cr, Ni, Hg, Pb, As), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), alkylphenols (APs), organochlorine compounds (PCBs, DDTs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organotins (TPhT, TBT), suggested a southward increase related to the riverine transports. Where the River Po influence was more direct, the concentrations of contaminants were higher, with nonylphenol and BDE-209 exceeding sediment quality guidelines. Biometric indicators suggested the influence of contamination on organism health; an inverse relationship between PBDEs in sediments and clam condition index has been found, as well as different biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) in the lagoons.

  10. Tracing the anthropogenic lead sources in coastal sediments of SE-pacific (36 degrees Lat. S) using stable lead isotopes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Práxedes N V; Garbe-Schönberg, Carl-Dieter; Salamanca, Marco A

    2004-04-01

    This study evaluates the main sources of antropogenic Pb in one of the most industrialized centers of the southern Chilean coast (36 degrees S). Stable lead isotopes ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(207)Pb) were used to trace main Pb sources to coastal sediments, considering the suspended particulate matter (SPM) from marine (traps), continental (rivers) and industrial effluents, sediments and leaded gasoline samples. The atmospheric input was evaluated through natural collectors; i.e. Raqui-Tubul salt marsh. Results show that marine samples lie on a trend between industrial effluents ( approximately 1.16, 2.44) and natural sources (1.20, 2.50), not related to gasoline consumption. Salt marsh sediments show comparable isotopic composition to marine samples, suggesting the importance of the atmospheric input in the coastal sediments, not related to the leaded gasoline composition either. The continental input (1.18, 2.48) is highly influenced by precipitation, being difficult to separate both sources (atmosphere and continental runoff), showing also similar isotopic ratio to marine sediments. The signal of industrial emissions is masked with the introduction of Pb with higher isotopic ratios, compared to the values observed in the material collected from traps (SPM approximately 1.19, 2.48). The contribution of more radiogenic Pb by the upwelling is suggested.

  11. Quantifying rates of coastal subsidence since the last interglacial and the role of sediment loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simms, Alexander R.; Anderson, John B.; DeWitt, Regina; Lambeck, Kurt; Purcell, Anthony

    2013-12-01

    The rate of sea-level rise is expected to increase over the next century. In many areas, increasing rates of sea-level rise are exacerbated by subsidence. In order to develop proper mitigation strategies for coastal change, better estimates for the rates of subsidence are needed. In this study we outline a strategy for calculating long-term subsidence rates for coastlines based on the differential elevations of modern shorelines and their last interglacial (LIG) equivalent geomorphic features. We apply this strategy to the LIG shoreline of the USA Texas coast. We first obtained optically stimulated luminescence ages of features long conjectured to be LIG, but, until now have remained undated. We use a digital elevation model to calculate the difference in elevations between the modern and MIS5e shorelines. This difference is corrected for glacial-hydro-isostatic adjustments to the Texas coast over the last 120 ky. Our analysis shows spatial variability in the rate of subsidence that increases seaward and at locations closer to the Brazos/Colorado delta. The lowest rates of subsidence were 0.03 mm/yr at the most inland site. The highest rates were 0.09 mm/yr near the modern Brazos/Colorado Delta. The spatial pattern of subsidence suggests that most of the long-term vertical motion along the Texas coast is due to sediment loading. The rates of subsidence along the portions of the Texas coast are equal to, and in some places greater than, glacial-isostatic adjustments (GIA), thus highlighting the importance of other vertical motions such as sediment loading when using sea-level data to constrain GIA models even in the absence of active tectonics. In addition, these rates are two orders of magnitude less than modern rates of relative sea-level rise recorded at tide gauges along the Texas coast, highlighting the importance of Holocene compaction and fluid withdrawal in accelerating rates of subsidence along the Texas coast.

  12. Foraminiferal assemblages and trophic state in coastal sediments of the Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbatini, Anna; Bonatto, Sonia; Bianchelli, Silvia; Pusceddu, Antonio; Danovaro, Roberto; Negri, Alessandra

    2012-12-01

    The environmental variables that influence the abundance and biodiversity of foraminifera in shallow-water settings are poorly understood. In order to help address this problem, we investigated abundance, biomass and biodiversity of living (as Rose-Bengal stained) benthic foraminifera together with the quantity and biochemical composition (in terms of phytopigment, protein, lipid, carbohydrate and biopolymeric carbon) of the organic matter in coastal sediments of the Central Adriatic Sea. Sediment samples were collected in the Portonovo Bay in May, July and October 2008 and February 2009, and the organic matter quantity and biochemical composition and benthic foraminiferal abundance and assemblage composition were analysed in the top 1 cm. Uni- and multi-variate analyses of variance revealed clear temporal variability of all the investigated variables as well as relationships between the composition of the foraminiferal assemblages and the quantity and quality of the food sources. The foraminiferal abundance and species composition changed significantly between the four sampling periods, reflecting the temporal (seasonal) variability in the quantity and nutritional quality of the food sources. Lipids, among all other organic compounds, explain significant portions of the variance of both foraminiferal abundance and biomass. In winter, a strong phytoplankton bloom led to an increased quantity of nutritionally available organic matter on the sea floor, which in turn was associated with a bloom of Leptohalysis scottii and Psammophaga sp. 1. These two foraminiferal species thus displayed an opportunistic behaviour in response to the pulse of organic carbon of high nutritional quality. We suggest that these species can be used as indicators of benthic eutrophication in shallow waters.

  13. Physiological diversity and distributions of heterotrophic bacteria in deep cretaceous sediments of the Atlantic coastal plain

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Zachara, J.M.; Li, S.W.; Brockman, F.J.; Simmons, M.A. ); Balkwill, D.L. )

    1991-02-01

    A series of 23 intact core segments was obtained from two distinct deep subsurface geological formations, the Middendorf and the Cape Fear formations, underlying the southeastern coastal plain of South Carolina. Aerobic chemoheterotrophic bacteria were enumerated on a dilute medium, and populations ranged from 3.1 to 6.4 log CFU g of sediment[sup [minus]1] in the Middendorf cores and from below detection to 4.3 log CFU g[sup [minus]1] in the Cape Fear cores. A total of 198 morphologically distinct colony types were isolated, purified, and subjected to 108 different physiological measurements. The isolates from the two formations were distinct as were those in different core samples from the same formation. Cluster analysis revealed 21 different biotypes based on similarities of 75% or higher in response patterns to 21 physiological assays. One biotype contained 57 of the subsurface isolates, 10 biotypes contained 5 or more isolates, and the remainder had 4 or fewer. The organic compounds that were most commonly metabolized by the subsurface bacteria included Tween 40 and [beta]-hydroxybutyric acid. Organic acids, in general, were also commonly metabolized by the subsurface bacteria. Isolates from the Cape Fear core segments were capable of metabolizing a higher percentage of the substrates than were bacteria isolated from the Middendorf formation. Although the heterogeneous distributions of bacteria in deep subsurface sediments may make it difficult to use aquifer microcosms to predict in situ biotransformation rates, the diversity of the physiological properties of these organisms offers promise for in situ remediation of contaminants.

  14. Korean coastal water depth/sediment and land cover mapping (1:25,000) by computer analysis of LANDSAT imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. Y.; Miller, L. D.

    1978-01-01

    Computer analysis was applied to single date LANDSAT MSS imagery of a sample coastal area near Seoul, Korea equivalent to a 1:50,000 topographic map. Supervised image processing yielded a test classification map from this sample image containing 12 classes: 5 water depth/sediment classes, 2 shoreline/tidal classes, and 5 coastal land cover classes at a scale of 1:25,000 and with a training set accuracy of 76%. Unsupervised image classification was applied to a subportion of the site analyzed and produced classification maps comparable in results in a spatial sense. The results of this test indicated that it is feasible to produce such quantitative maps for detailed study of dynamic coastal processes given a LANDSAT image data base at sufficiently frequent time intervals.

  15. Sedimentation patterns across a Coastal Plain floodplain: The importance of hydrogeomorphic influences and cross-floodplain connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaase, Christopher T.; Kupfer, John A.

    2016-09-01

    The floodplains of large Coastal Plain rivers in the southeastern U.S. are important long-term storage sites for alluvial sediment and nutrients. Yet considerable uncertainty surrounds sediment dynamics on many large river floodplains and, in particular, the local scale factors that affect the flux of sediment and nutrients from rivers onto their floodplains and their subsequent deposition. This research quantifies short-term rates of sediment deposition from 2012 to 2014 on floodplain sites at Congaree National Park using feldspar pads. Sediment deposition rates ranged from 0.1 to 15.6 cm (median = 1.46 cm) and were closely associated with inundation frequency and geomorphic position. Cross-floodplain distributary channels served as particularly important conduits for moving sediment onto the floodplain. Physical and chemical analyses of soil samples demonstrated that the most flood-exposed sites had higher major nutrient and micronutrient levels (especially of phosphorus) and more diverse nutrient compositions. This research advances current understandings of lateral floodplain connectivity by demonstrating the complex effects of regional hydrology and local floodplain environmental characteristics on the supply of sediment and nutrients.

  16. Aquaculture-derived enrichment of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) in coastal sediments of Hong Kong and adjacent mainland China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Sheng; Chen, Zhuo-Jia; Cheng, Zhang; Du, Jun; Man, Yu-Bon; Leung, Ho-Man; Giesy, John P; Wong, Chris K C; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate contamination of sediments along the coast of Hong Kong and adjacent mainland China, concentrations of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) in surface and core sediments were measured in six mariculture zones. In surface sediments (0 to 5 cm), concentrations of ∑HCHs and ∑DDTs in mariculture sediments were approximately 1.3- and 7.7-fold greater, respectively, than those detected in sediments at corresponding reference sites, which were 1 to 2 km away in areas where there was no mariculture. Similarly, in cores of sediments, concentrations of ∑HCHs and ∑DDTs were 1.2- and 14-fold greater in mariculture zones, respectively. Enrichment relative to regional background concentrations, expressed as percentages was as large as 8.67 × 10(3)% for o,p'-DDD. The major sources of the enriched organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were hypothesized to be derived from the use of contaminated fish feeds and anti-fouling paints for maintaining fish cages. Results of ecological risk assessments revealed that enriched OCPs had a large potential to contaminate the surrounding marine environment and lead to adverse effects on the associated biota. To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the differences of OCP contaminations between mariculture and natural coastal sediments.

  17. Assessment of trace metal contamination level and toxicity in sediments from coastal regions of West Bengal, eastern part of India.

    PubMed

    Antizar-Ladislao, Blanca; Mondal, Priyanka; Mitra, Soumita; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar

    2015-12-30

    The work investigated concentration of trace metals in surface sediments (0-10 cm; < 63 μm grain size) from 15 sampling sites of diverse environmental stresses covering Hugli River Estuary (HRE) and Sundarban Mangrove Wetland (SMW), eastern coastal part of India. The trace metal concentrations in sediments exhibited an overall decreasing trend as follows: Cr (21.2-60.9)>Cu (11.60-102.47)>Ni (19.10-52.60)>Pb (7.09-183.88)>As (4.41-11.46)>Cd (0.02-4.4)>Ag (0.02-0.87). Both the geo-accumulation index (Igeo) and contamination factor (CF) values revealed significant pollution by Ag, Cd and Pb at Nurpur of HRE. Potential Ecological Risk Index (RI) (61.21 ± 112.40) showed wide range of variations from low (19.76) to serious (463.20) ecological risk. A positive significant correlation was found between metals and organic carbon in sediments. The ecological risk associated with the trace metals in sediment was considered on the consensus based Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs). The work suggests that the trace metals present in sediments posed adverse effects on the sediment-dwelling organisms. PMID:26581818

  18. Assessment of trace metal contamination level and toxicity in sediments from coastal regions of West Bengal, eastern part of India.

    PubMed

    Antizar-Ladislao, Blanca; Mondal, Priyanka; Mitra, Soumita; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar

    2015-12-30

    The work investigated concentration of trace metals in surface sediments (0-10 cm; < 63 μm grain size) from 15 sampling sites of diverse environmental stresses covering Hugli River Estuary (HRE) and Sundarban Mangrove Wetland (SMW), eastern coastal part of India. The trace metal concentrations in sediments exhibited an overall decreasing trend as follows: Cr (21.2-60.9)>Cu (11.60-102.47)>Ni (19.10-52.60)>Pb (7.09-183.88)>As (4.41-11.46)>Cd (0.02-4.4)>Ag (0.02-0.87). Both the geo-accumulation index (Igeo) and contamination factor (CF) values revealed significant pollution by Ag, Cd and Pb at Nurpur of HRE. Potential Ecological Risk Index (RI) (61.21 ± 112.40) showed wide range of variations from low (19.76) to serious (463.20) ecological risk. A positive significant correlation was found between metals and organic carbon in sediments. The ecological risk associated with the trace metals in sediment was considered on the consensus based Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs). The work suggests that the trace metals present in sediments posed adverse effects on the sediment-dwelling organisms.

  19. Comparison of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon distributions and sedimentary organic matter characteristics in contaminated, coastal sediments from Pensacola Bay, Florida.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Myrna J; Chefetz, Benny; Deshmukh, Ashish P; Hatcher, Patrick G

    2005-03-01

    In this study, we examined the distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a contaminated coastal area and the characteristics of the natural organic matter in tandem. We present a detailed study of PAH concentration, distribution, and organic matter characteristics of three core samples from Pensacola Bay, Florida. Solid-state 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), pyrolysis gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) thermochemolysis GC-MS were applied to obtain structural details about the sedimentary organic matter. Elemental compositions (carbon and nitrogen) and estimates of black carbon contents are also reported. These coastal sediments were found to contain more PAHs in the upper 15 cm layers than in the bottom 15-25 cm samples. The samples that contained the most PAHs also contained the least amount of aromatic carbon and contained a significant amount of paraffinic carbon. Lignin-derived pyrolysis and TMAH thermochemolysis products were abundant and generally higher in all of the samples in comparison to those reported for modern coastal sediments, indicating a large flux of terrestrial carbon. The black carbon contents were found to range from 4.3% to 6.8%, which are significantly lower than other reports of black carbon in sediments, which represent as much as 65% of the total organic carbon content. The low black carbon content suggests that this type of refractory carbon may not be as responsible for regulating PAH distribution as indicated by other researchers.

  20. Toxic heavy metals in sediments, seawater, and molluscs in the eastern and western coastal waters of Guangdong Province, South China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Shi, Zhen; Zhang, Jingping; Jiang, Zhijian; Wang, Fei; Huang, Xiaoping

    2016-05-01

    Heavy metal concentrations and distribution were studied in sediments, seawater, and molluscs, and the possible heavy metal sources in the coastal waters of Guangdong Province, South China were discussed. The results showed that the concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cr in sediments in eastern coastal waters were generally higher than those in the western coastal waters. However, concentrations of most metals in seawater and molluscs in western waters were higher than in the eastern waters, which was tightly related to the local economics and urbanization development, especially, the different industrial structure in two regions. The main heavy metal sources were attributed to the industrial and agricultural effluent, domestic sewage, and even waste gas. Furthermore, heavy metal contamination assessment indicated that high contamination levels of Cd, Zn, and Pb occurred in sediments in local areas, especially in the bays and harbors. The metal accumulation levels by molluscs ranked following the order of Cd > Cu > As > Zn > Pb > Cr, and the ecological risks introduced by heavy metals in different areas were in the order of Zhanjiang > Yangmao > Shantou > Shanhui. PMID:27126438

  1. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in sediments of the coastal East China Sea: occurrence, distribution and mass inventory.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanyuan; Lin, Tian; Chen, Yingjun; Hu, Limin; Guo, Zhigang; Zhang, Gan

    2012-12-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) of sixty-three sediment samples from the coastal East China Sea (ECS), extending ∼1000 km from the Yangtze River Estuary to the south, were measured. The levels of BDE-209 and ∑PBDE(7) (sum of BDE-28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183) were 0.3-44.6 ng/g (dry weight) and nd-8.0 ng/g, respectively. BDE-209 was the predominant congener, followed by BDE-99/100. This was consistent with the historical and current usage of PBDE mixtures in China. The compositions and distribution of PBDEs suggest that the PBDEs in this area could be mainly from the coastal electronic waste dismantling/recycling and Yangtze River input. The poor correlations between TOC, grain size of sediments with PBDEs imply that the PBDE distribution is more related to their land-based inputs rather than the sediment characters in the area. The coastal ECS is an important sink of PBDEs (7.5 t/yr) in the world.

  2. Toxic heavy metals in sediments, seawater, and molluscs in the eastern and western coastal waters of Guangdong Province, South China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Shi, Zhen; Zhang, Jingping; Jiang, Zhijian; Wang, Fei; Huang, Xiaoping

    2016-05-01

    Heavy metal concentrations and distribution were studied in sediments, seawater, and molluscs, and the possible heavy metal sources in the coastal waters of Guangdong Province, South China were discussed. The results showed that the concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cr in sediments in eastern coastal waters were generally higher than those in the western coastal waters. However, concentrations of most metals in seawater and molluscs in western waters were higher than in the eastern waters, which was tightly related to the local economics and urbanization development, especially, the different industrial structure in two regions. The main heavy metal sources were attributed to the industrial and agricultural effluent, domestic sewage, and even waste gas. Furthermore, heavy metal contamination assessment indicated that high contamination levels of Cd, Zn, and Pb occurred in sediments in local areas, especially in the bays and harbors. The metal accumulation levels by molluscs ranked following the order of Cd > Cu > As > Zn > Pb > Cr, and the ecological risks introduced by heavy metals in different areas were in the order of Zhanjiang > Yangmao > Shantou > Shanhui.

  3. Ammonia manipulates the ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in the coastal sediment-water microcosms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Chen, Lujun; Dai, Tianjiao; Sun, Renhua; Wen, Donghui

    2015-08-01

    Ammonia was observed as a potential significant factor to manipulate the abundance and activity of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms (AOMs) in water environments. For the first time, this study confirmed this phenomenon by laboratory cultivation. In a series of estuarine sediment-coastal water microcosms, we investigated the AOM's phylogenetic composition and activity change in response to ammonia concentration. Increase of ammonia concentration promoted bacterial amoA gene abundance in a linear pattern. The ratio of transcribed ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) amoA gene/ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) amoA gene increased from 0.1 to 43 as NH4 (+)-N increased from less than 0.1 to 12 mg L(-1), and AOA amoA transcription was undetected under 20 mg NH4 (+)-N L(-1). The incubation of stable isotope probing (SIP) microcosms revealed a faster (13)C-NaHCO3 incorporation rate of AOA amoA gene under 0.1 mg NH4 (+)-N L(-1) and a sole (13)C-NaHCO3 utilization of the AOB amoA gene under 20 mg NH4 (+)-N L(-1). Our results indicate that ammonia concentration manipulates the structure of AOM. AOA prefers to live and perform higher amoA transcription activity than AOB in ammonia-limited water environments, and AOB tends to take the first contributor place in ammonia-rich ones.

  4. Occurrence and microscopic analyses of multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes from coastal sediments in the Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ke; Pan, Hongmiao; Zhang, Shengda; Yue, Haidong; Xiao, Tian; Wu, Longfei

    2011-03-01

    Multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes (MMPs) are a group of aggregates composed of 7-45 gram-negative cells synthesizing intracellular magnetic crystals. Although they are thought to be globally distributed, MMPs have been observed only in marine environments in America and Europe. Most MMPs share a rosette-like morphology and biomineralize iron sulfide crystals. In the present study, abundant MMPs were observed, with a density of 26 ind./cm3, in the sediments of a coastal lagoon, Lake Yuehu, in the Yellow Sea. Optical microscopy showed that all of them were rosette shaped with a diameter of 5.5±0.8 μm. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that these MMPs were composed of 10-16 ovoid cells and flagellated peritrichously. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis indicated that they biomineralized bullet-shaped magnetite crystals in highly organized parallel chains within which the magnetosomes were oriented in the same direction. This is the first report of MMPs from Asia and demonstrates the ubiquitous distribution of MMPs.

  5. Nitrogen Fixation By Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Coastal and Deep-Sea Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertics, V. J.; Löscher, C.; Salonen, I.; Schmitz-Streit, R.; Lavik, G.; Kuypers, M. M.; Treude, T.

    2011-12-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can greatly impact benthic nitrogen (N) cycling, by for instance inhibiting coupled denitrification-nitrification through the production of sulfide or by increasing the availability of fixed N in the sediment via dinitrogen (N2)-fixation. Here, we explored several coastal and deep-sea benthic habitats within the Atlantic Ocean and Baltic Sea, for the occurrence of N2-fixation mediated by SRB. A combination of different methods including microbial rate measurements of N2-fixation and sulfate reduction, geochemical analyses (porewater nutrient profiles, mass spectrometry), and molecular analyses (CARD-FISH, HISH-SIMS, "nested" PCR, and QPCR) were applied to quantify and identify the responsible processes and organisms, respectively. Furthermore, we looked deeper into the question of whether the observed nitrogenase activity was associated with the final incorporation of N into microbial biomass or whether the enzyme activity served another purpose. At the AGU Fall Meeting, we will present and compare data from numerous stations with different water depths, temperatures, and latitudes, as well as differences in key geochemical parameters, such as organic carbon content and oxygen availability. Current metabolic and molecular data indicate that N2-fixation is occurring in many of these benthic environments and that a large part of this activity may linked to SRB.

  6. Novel aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase genes from coastal marine sediments of Patagonia

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Mariana; Riva Mercadal, Juan P; Guerrero, Leandro D; Di Marzio, Walter D; Ferrero, Marcela A; Dionisi, Hebe M

    2008-01-01

    Background Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), widespread pollutants in the marine environment, can produce adverse effects in marine organisms and can be transferred to humans through seafood. Our knowledge of PAH-degrading bacterial populations in the marine environment is still very limited, and mainly originates from studies of cultured bacteria. In this work, genes coding catabolic enzymes from PAH-biodegradation pathways were characterized in coastal sediments of Patagonia with different levels of PAH contamination. Results Genes encoding for the catalytic alpha subunit of aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases (ARHDs) were amplified from intertidal sediment samples using two different primer sets. Products were cloned and screened by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Clones representing each restriction pattern were selected in each library for sequencing. A total of 500 clones were screened in 9 gene libraries, and 193 clones were sequenced. Libraries contained one to five different ARHD gene types, and this number was correlated with the number of PAHs found in the samples above the quantification limit (r = 0.834, p < 0.05). Overall, eight different ARHD gene types were detected in the sediments. In five of them, their deduced amino acid sequences formed deeply rooted branches with previously described ARHD peptide sequences, exhibiting less than 70% identity to them. They contain consensus sequences of the Rieske type [2Fe-2S] cluster binding site, suggesting that these gene fragments encode for ARHDs. On the other hand, three gene types were closely related to previously described ARHDs: archetypical nahAc-like genes, phnAc-like genes as identified in Alcaligenes faecalis AFK2, and phnA1-like genes from marine PAH-degraders from the genus Cycloclasticus. Conclusion These results show the presence of hitherto unidentified ARHD genes in this sub-Antarctic marine environment exposed to anthropogenic contamination. This information

  7. N 2O accumulation in estuarine and coastal sediments: The influence of H 2S on dissimilatory nitrate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senga, Yukiko; Mochida, Kazuo; Fukumori, Ryouko; Okamoto, Norihisa; Seike, Yasushi

    2006-03-01

    The effects of H 2S on the production and accumulation of N 2O in surface sediments of the coastal lagoons of Lakes Shinji and Nakaumi were studied using sediment suspensions and isolated strains of halophilic N 2O producers. Denitrification and N 2O accumulation were determined by anaerobic incubations with and without C 2H 2, respectively. Denitrifying activities in the sediment suspensions of both lakes decreased markedly at an H 2S concentration of 3 mg S l -1, whereas N 2O accumulations in the sediment suspensions of Lakes Shinji and Nakaumi were highest at 75-100 mg S l -1 and 15-50 mg S l -1 H 2S, respectively. In addition, H 2S had marked inhibiting (about 30 h) and retarding effects on N 2O reduction in the suspensions of both lakes. Two strains of halophilic N 2O producers were isolated from the sediment of Lake Shinji ( Aeromonas sp. and Vibrio sp.). N 2O accumulation rates by Aeromonas sp. and Vibrio sp. were accelerated at 1-5 mg S l -1 and 1-10 mg S l -1 H 2S, respectively. Patterns of inorganic nitrogen compounds after the incubations revealed the accumulation of NH 4+ and NO 2-, with concomitant N 2O, were accelerated by H 2S. These results indicate that H 2S plays a key role in regulation of N 2O accumulation in the eutrophic estuarine or coastal sediments. Furthermore, the accumulation of N 2O in the sediments of Lakes Shinji and Nakaumi is predicted to derive through dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) not only denitrification in the presence of H 2S.

  8. The South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study: Numerical modeling of circulation and sediment transport in Long Bay, SC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, J. C.; Sullivan, C.; Voulgaris, G.; Work, P.; Haas, K.; Hanes, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    Long Bay, South Carolina, is a heavily populated coastal region that supports a large tourism industry. Sand resources are important for both recreation and coastal habitat. Earlier geological framework studies have identified a large sand deposit oblique to the shoreline, oriented clockwise in the offshore direction. This sand feature is ~ 10 km long, 2 km wide, and in excess of 3m thick, possibly providing a source for beach nourishment material. Objectives of this study are to describe the physical processes that control the transport of sediment in Long Bay, specifically off the coast of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Specifically we seek to 1) measure and model the oceanographic circulation in the region, 2) identify the processes that maintain the presence of the offshore sand feature, 3) quantify the control that the shoal exerts on the nearshore through changes in wave energy propagation, and 4) identify consequences of removal of the offshore sand feature. Both observational and numerical experiments are used to study the oceanographic circulation and transport of sediment. The observational study is described in an accompanying poster and consists of eight sites that measured tides, surface waves, currents, salinity, temperature, suspended sediment concentrations, and bed forms from October 2003 to April 2004. Numerical modeling for circulation and sediment transport in the study region uses a new version of ROMS (v2.1) that now includes transport of multiple grain sizes, coupling of sediment transport to wave bottom boundary layer models, and evolution of the bottom morphology. The SWAN model is used to compute wave propagation. Results indicate that currents in the study area are strongly influenced by both tidal motion and wind driven setup / setdown. The presence of the offshore sand feature alters the residual flows in the region. Sediment transport is more significant during periods of sustained strong winds that generate local waves. Wind direction

  9. Recent Monitoring of Suspended Sediment Patterns along Louisiana's Coastal Zone using ER-2 based MAS Data and Terra Based MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeller, Christopher C.; Gunshor, M. M.; Menzel, W. P.; Huh, O. K.; Walker, N. D.; Rouse, L. J.

    2001-01-01

    The University nf Wisconsin and Louisiana State University have teamed to study the forcing of winter season cold frontal wind systems on sediment distribution patterns and geomorphology in the Louisiana coastal zone. Wind systems associated with cold fronts have been shown to model coastal circulation and resuspend sediments along the micro tidal Louisiana coast (Roberts et at. 1987, Moeller et al. 1993). Remote sensing data is being used to map and track sediment distribution patterns for various wind conditions. Suspended sediment is a building material for coastal progradation and wetlands renewal, but also restricts access to marine nursery environments and impacts oyster bed health. Transferring a suspended sediment concentration (SSC) algorithm to EOS MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS; Barnes et al. 1998) observations may enable estimates of SSC globally.

  10. 3D model of radionuclide dispersion in coastal areas with multifraction cohesive and non-cohesive sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovchenko, Igor; Maderich, Vladimir; Jung, Kyung Tae

    2015-04-01

    We developed new radionuclide dispersion model that may be used in coastal areas, rivers and estuaries with non-uniform distribution of suspended and bed sediments both cohesive and non-cohesive types. Model describes radionuclides concentration in dissolved phase in water column, particulated phase on suspended sediments on each sediment class types, bed sediments and pore water. The transfer of activity between the water column and the pore water in the upper layer of the bottom sediment is governed by diffusion processes. The phase exchange between dissolved and particulate radionuclides is written in terms of desorption rate a12 (s-1) and distribution coefficient Kd,iw and Kd,ib (m3/kg) for water column and for bottom deposit, respectively. Following (Periáñez et al., 1996) the dependence of distribution coefficients is inversely proportional to the sediment particle size. For simulation of 3D circulation, turbulent diffusion and wave fields a hydrostatic model SELFE (Roland et. al. 2010) that solves Reynolds-stress averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations and Wave Action transport equation on the unstructured grids was used. Simulation of suspended sediment concentration and bed sediments composition is based on (L. Pinto et. al., 2012) approach that originally was developed for non-cohesive sediments. In present study we modified this approach to include possibility of simulating mixture of cohesive and non-cohesive sediments by implementing parameterizations for erosion and deposition fluxes for cohesive sediments and by implementing flocculation model for determining settling velocity of cohesive flocs. Model of sediment transport was calibrated on measurements in the Yellow Sea which is shallow tidal basin with strongly non-uniform distribution of suspended and bed sediments. Model of radionuclide dispersion was verified on measurements of 137Cs concentration in surface water and bed sediments after Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. References Peri

  11. Heavy mineral analysis for assessing the provenance of sandy sediment in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, F. L.; Woodrow, D. L.; McGann, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Heavy minerals have been used to trace the sources and transportation of sandy sediment in San Francisco Bay and nearby coastal areas since the 1960s. We have the opportunity to sample similar environments and revisit the heavy mineral populations under the current San Francisco Coastal System study of the provenance of beach sand. Most of the sandy sediment in San Francisco Bay can be traced to distant sources including the Sierra Nevada batholith and associated terranes with local contributions from the Franciscan Complex. Heavy minerals from Sierran sources include ordinary hornblende, metamorphic amphiboles, and hypersthene while those from the Franciscan Complex include other types of pyroxene, epidote, basaltic hornblende, and glaucophane... Tertiary strata and volcanics in the surrounding hills and displaced Sierran rocks found on the continental shelf west of the San Andreas Fault Zone introduce similar minerals, but perhaps in a lesser volume to be identified as major contributors... The primary result of cluster analysis of heavy minerals separated from sand-sized sediment taken within San Francisco Bay, the adjacent continental shelf, local beaches, cliffs outside the Golden Gate, and upstream drainages indicate a widespread occurrence of sediment traceable to the Sierra Nevada. A second cluster of samples identifies samples of mixed Sierran and Franciscan lineage within the strait of the Golden Gate, on the San Francisco bar, and on coastal beaches. Sediment samples with predominantly Franciscan mineral content appear on beaches around Point Reyes, possibly transported from the Russian River. The heavy mineral composition supports transport from the east, through San Francisco Bay and out the Golden Gate to the San Francisco bar and southward.

  12. Biogeochemical impact of a dilution plume (Rhone River) on coastal sediments - comparison between a surface water survey (1996-2000) and sediment composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliot, E.; Younes a, , W. A. N.; Romano, J.-C.; Rebouillon, P.; Massé, H.

    2003-05-01

    The Rhone River is the major source of nutrients and particulate matter to the Mediterranean basin. Its influence on coastal sediments was investigated by searching for the presence of continental markers. The composition of coastal sediments situated in the area influenced by the Rhone River inputs was compared with surface water salinity time-series records (five years bi-monthly survey). Sediment samples were analysed for grain-size, total and organic carbon and nitrogen, pigments, trace metals, carbohydrates, protein and lipid content. Comparisons show that changes in sediments are associated with the mean extension of the dilution plume of the river. The organic carbon content of sediments does not exhibit spatial changes related to the variations in the overlying water column. A large amount of inorganic carbon is discharged into the sea by the river and results in dilution of the organic carbon in the deposited material. The CaCO 3 fraction of the total carbon of sediments is influenced by the river inputs with lower values in front of the river mouth. Changes in the composition of organic matter are linked with the inputs of the Rhone River and associated with variations of concentrations of the chlorophyll b as a marker of the terrestrial origin of the organic matter. Chlorophyll b content of sediments showed statistically significant negative correlation with the five-year bi-monthly mean surface salinity values ( slope=-0.0233, R2=0.9437, n=22, p<0.001). Other parameters such as Mn content of sediments exhibit significant positive correlation with chlorophyll b and negative correlation with mean surface water salinity. Labile carbon fraction (carbohydrates, lipids and protein) shows significant correlation both with chlorophyll b and salinity. In the area influenced by the Rhone River dilution plume, there is enrichment in labile organic matter. The amounts of insoluble carbohydrates and phaeopigments suggest that this enrichment is mainly due to

  13. Sub-Seafloor Carbon Dioxide Storage Potential on the Juan de Fuca Plate, Western North America

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Fairley; Robert Podgorney

    2012-11-01

    The Juan de Fuca plate, off the western coast of North America, has been suggested as a site for geological sequestration of waste carbon dioxide because of its many attractive characteristics (high permeability, large storage capacity, reactive rock types). Here we model CO2 injection into fractured basalts comprising the upper several hundred meters of the sub-seafloor basalt reservoir, overlain with low-permeability sediments and a large saline water column, to examine the feasibility of this reservoir for CO2 storage. Our simulations indicate that the sub-seafloor basalts of the Juan de Fuca plate may be an excellent CO2 storage candidate, as multiple trapping mechanisms (hydrodynamic, density inversions, and mineralization) act to keep the CO2 isolated from terrestrial environments. Questions remain about the lateral extent and connectivity of the high permeability basalts; however, the lack of wells or boreholes and thick sediment cover maximize storage potential while minimizing potential leakage pathways. Although promising, more study is needed to determine the economic viability of this option.

  14. Marine organic geochemistry in industrially affected coastal areas in Greece: Hydrocarbons in surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzianestis, Ioannis

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbons are abundant components of the organic material in coastal zones. Their sources are mainly anthropogenic, but several natural ones have also been recognized. Among hydrocarbons, the polycyclic aromatic ones (PAHs) have received special attention since they considered as hazardous environmental chemicals and are included in priority pollutant lists. The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution, sources and transport pathways of hydrocarbons in marine areas in Greece directly influenced from the operation of major industrial units in the coastal zone by using a molecular marker approach, characteristic compositional patterns and related indices and also to evaluate their potential toxicity. Thirty two surface sediment samples were collected from three marine areas: a) Antikyra bay in Korinthiakos gulf, affected from the operation of an alumina and production plant b) Larymna bay in Noth Evoikos, affected from the operation of a nickel production plant and c) Aliveri bay in South Evoikos Gulf, affected from a cement production plant. In all the studied areas aquaculture and fishing activities have been also developed in the coastal zone. High aliphatic hydrocarbon (AHC) concentrations (~500 μg/g), indicating significant petroleum related inputs, were measured only in Antikyra bay. In all the other samples, AHC values were below 100 μg/g. N-alkanes were the most prominent resolved components (R) with an elevated odd to even carbon number preference, revealing the high importance of terrestrial inputs in the study areas. The unresolved complex mixture (UCM) was the major component of the aliphatic fraction (UCM/R > 4), indicating a chronic oil pollution. A series of hopanes were also identified, with patterns characteristic of oil-derived hydrocarbons, further confirming the presence of pollutant inputs from fossil fuel products. Extremely high PAH concentrations (> 100,000 ng/g) were found in the close vicinity of the alumina production

  15. Organic tracers in sediments from the coastal zone of Ras Abu el-Darag, Gulf of Suez

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushdi, Ahmed I.; Kassim, Tarek A. T. A.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    2009-10-01

    Sediment samples from the coastal zone of the Gulf of Suez contain a variety of organic compounds from anthropogenic and natural sources. A total of 12 surface samples of bottom sediments were collected with an Ekman grab sampler along an off-shore transect south of Ras Abu el-Darag. The samples were extracted with a mixture of dichloromethane and methanol (3:1 v/v) after drying and sieving through 250 μm mesh. The extracts were derivatized and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in order to characterize the chemical composition and sources of the organic components. Marine with minor terrestrial biota were the major natural sources of organic tracers and included n-alkanoic acids, sterols and saccharides (5.7-76.7%). Anthropogenic sources, from petroleum related activities, detergent usage for spill cleaning and littering, are indicated by the presence of n-alkanes with carbon preference index ≤1.0, hopanes, steranes, unresolved complex mixture of branched and cyclic hydrocarbons, alkyl nitriles, alkamides and plasticizers. Their total relative concentrations ranged from 23.3 to 97.3% of the total extracts. Petroleum residues from natural seepage may also be part of these hydrocarbons. The levels of anthropogenic inputs decrease from about 94% in coastal zone sediments to about 20% in sediments from the reef front.

  16. Secondary grain-size effects on Li and Cs concentrations and appropriate normalization procedures for coastal sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hoisoo; Lim, Dhongil; Xu, Zhaokai; Jeong, Kapsik

    2016-06-01

    The sediment grain-size effect (GSE), a fundamental factor relevant to the interpretation of elemental concentrations and isotopic compositions, has been normalized using conservative elements such as aluminum (Al), cesium (Cs), and lithium (Li) (C(Al,Cs,Li)), which serve as proxies for the natural metal-controlling variables of grain size, mineralogy, and organic matter. However, a secondary GSE reportedly remains even after compensation by the Al-normalization procedure, particularly for the concentrations of transition metals (CT.M). This secondary effect also occurred in the C(Li,Cs)/CAl ratios of the Korean coastal sediments examined in this study. The primary and secondary GSEs on Cs and Li concentrations can be explained by the quartz-dilution effect and the Cs- and Li-incorporation effect of phyllosilicate minerals, respectively, based on a model involving three component end-members: a Cs- and Li-free sand-dominated sediment component consisting mostly of quartz and feldspar, a Cs- and Li-bearing silt-dominated component of mica, and a Cs- and Li-enriched clay-dominated component of illite. Although the primary and secondary GSEs on the concentrations of transition metals (particularly Cu and Ni) in coastal sediments might be normalized by dividing the metal concentrations by the square of the Al concentration (CT.M./(CAl)2), the GSEs can also be normalized by dividing the concentrations by the exact Cs (or Li) concentration (CT.M./CCs).

  17. Seasonal patterns of bacterial communities in the coastal brackish sediments of the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetterli, Adrien; Hyytiäinen, Kirsi; Ahjos, Minttu; Auvinen, Petri; Paulin, Lars; Hietanen, Susanna; Leskinen, Elina

    2015-11-01

    Coastal areas are critical in mitigating the impact of nutrient runoffs and downstream eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems. In the Gulf of Finland, the easternmost sub-basin of the Baltic Sea, seasonal and long-term oxygen depletion at the surface of the sediment feeds back the eutrophication loop by promoting the release of nutrients locked in the sediment matrix. In order to understand how the bacterial community responds to the seasonal variations, we sequenced ribosomal gene fragments from the top sediment layer at two coastal sites in southern Finland in spring, summer and late autumn during two consecutive years. Analysis of the samples collected at a shallow (11 m) and deep site (33 m) revealed that the overall community composition was rather constant over time with an extensive collection of shared operational taxonomic units (OTU) between sites. The dominant taxa were related to organoheterotrophs and sulfate reducers and the variation in community structure was linked to the availability of organic matter in the surface sediment. Proteobacteria formed the most abundant and diverse group. The taxa characteristic of spring samples belonged primarily to Actinobacteria, possibly of fresh water origin and linked to humic carbon. Summer communities were characterized by an increase in the number of reads associated with heterotrophic bacteria such as Bacteroidetes which feed on labile organic matter from spring bloom. Taxa typical of autumn samples were linked to Cyanobacteria and other bloom-forming bacteria from the overlying water and to bacteria feeding on organic matter drifting from the phytal zone.

  18. Environmental availability of potentially toxic elements in estuarine sediments of the Cananéia-Iguape coastal system, Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tramonte, Keila Modesto; Figueira, Rubens Cesar Lopes; de Lima Ferreira, Paulo Alves; Ribeiro, Andreza Portella; Batista, Miriam Fernanda; de Mahiques, Michel Michaelovitch

    2016-02-15

    The Cananéia-Iguape system is located in a Southeastern Brazilian coastal region, acknowledged by UNESCO as Biosphere Reserve of the Atlantic Rainforest. This system underwent important environmental changes due to the opening of the artificial channel of Valo Grande and by past intensive Pb ore mining activities. In view of this scenario, this study evaluated Cu, Pb and Zn availability in sediments from Cananéia-Iguape system, based on the content associated with the main components of the sediments. Moreover, in order to assess local contamination, the metals' contents were compared to Canadian quality guidelines, the past levels of metals preceding the mining activities and background sediment values. Concerning Cu and Zn in a state of chemical remobilization, both elements would possibly present no harm to the local communities. However, Pb available content exceeded the comparison values in various sampling sites, suggesting the need of monitoring regarding its bioavailability. PMID:26707887

  19. Bacteria in deep coastal plain sediments of Maryland: a possible source of CO/sub 2/ to ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Chapelle, F.H.; Zelibor, J.L. Jr.; Grimes, D.J.; Knobel, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    Nineteen cores of unconsolidated Coastal Plain sediments obtained from depths of 14 to 182 m below land surface near Waldorf, Maryland, were collected and examined for metabolically active bacteria. The age of the sediments cored range from Miocene to Early Cretaceous. Acridine orange direct counts of total (viable and nonviable) bacteria in core subsamples ranged from 10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 4/ bacteria/g of dry sediment. Direct counts of viable bacteria ranged from 10/sup 6/ to 10/sup 3/ bacteria/g of dry sediment. Three cores contained viable methanogenic bacteria, and seven cores contained viable sulfate-reducing bacteria. The observed presence of bacteria in these sediments suggest that hetrotrophic bacterial metabolism, with lignitic organic material as the primary substrate, is a plausible source of CO/sub 2/ to ground water. However, the possibility that abiotic processes also produce CO/sub 2/ cannot be rules out. Estimated rates of CO/sub 2/ production in the noncalcareous Magothy/Upper Patapsco and Lower Patapsco aquifers based on mass balance of dissolved inorganic carbon, ground water flow rates, and flow path segment lengths are in the range 10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -5/ mmol L/sup -1/ yr/sup -1/. Isotope balance calculations suggest that aquifer-generated CO/sub 2/ is much heavier isotopically ( approx. - 10 to + 5 per mil) than lignite ( approx. - 24 per mil) present in these sediments. This may reflect isotopic fractionation during methanogenesis and possibly other bacterially mediated processes.

  20. Pore water distributions of dissolved copper and copper-complexing ligands in estuarine and coastal marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Skrabal, S.A.; Donat, J.R.; Burdige, D.J.

    2000-06-01

    The distributions and seasonal variability of total dissolved Cu (TDCu) and Cu-complexing ligands in sediment pore waters have been investigated at two contrasting sites in the Chesapeake Bay. Two ligand classes, which differ on the basis of the conditional stability constants (K{prime}{sub cond}) of their Cu complexes, were detected at all depths at both sites. For comparison, one pore water profile from a slope station off of the Chesapeake Bay also showed the presence of two ligand classes. Virtually all TDCu fluxing from these sediments is complexed during sediment-water exchange. A relatively small fraction of the TDCu is exchanged as inorganic species, which are widely regarded as the most bioavailable form of Cu. Total ligand concentrations are 15 to >100 times higher in the upper intervals of the pore waters relative to ligand concentrations in the bottom waters of the Chesapeake Bay (30--60 nM), consistent with previous observations of fluxes of these ligands from the sediments to overlying waters. These results suggest that sediments are potentially significant sources of Cu-complexing ligands to the overlying waters of the Chesapeake Bay, and perhaps, other shallow water estuarine and coastal environments. Copper-complexing ligands released from sediment pore waters may play an important role in influencing Cu speciation in overlying waters.

  1. Dating of coastal marine sediments: 210Pb versus 137Cs signal on the Danube-influenced Black Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Jana; Laptev, Gennady

    2010-05-01

    Coastal marine sediments represent a natural archive of pelagic processes, coastal erosion and river discharge of suspended matter. Correct dating of those sediments is a prerequisite for chronological reconstruction of the flux of pollutants and organic matter from the water column to the sediments and hence, the reconstruction of the pollution and eutrophication events. In the reconstruction of the sedimentation history during the pre-industrial and industrial periods, which usually spans the past 100 years, the natural occurring radionuclide 210Pb and the artificial radionuclides 137Cs and 241Am are widely applied tracers. 137Cs is used as an independent time marker for end the atmospheric bomb test fallout in 1963 and the Chernobyl accident in 1986. As the 137Cs signal is often weakened due to its mobility in sediments, 241Am, less mobile than 137Cs and derived from decay the bomb fallout of 241Pu, is used as a second time marker of the 1963 event. The northwestern shelf of the Black Sea has been seriously affected by eutrophication and pollution from the late 1960's to the mid-1990's, largely triggered by Danube River input of nutrients and pollutants. The aim of our study is ultimately to reconstruct the eutrophication history and recycling of nutrients following the deposition of organic matter. The ‘memory effect' of sediment recycling plays a critical role in maintaining eutrophic conditions in enclosed seas such as the Black Sea. Here we present results from sediment cores taken within the Danube River plume on the shallow northwestern shelf of the Black Sea. The cores have been dated in two laboratories to rule out artifacts. The sediment record is repeatedly interrupted by so-called turbidites that consist of stiff clay. The clay horizons display a drop in unsupported 210Pb and 137Cs and a higher signal of supported 210Pb than the non-clay horizons. Below the turbidite, the unsupported 210Pb and 137Cs increase again to values above the turbidite. This

  2. Modern sedimentation processes in a wave-dominated coastal embayment: Espírito Santo Bay, southeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, Alex Cardoso; Costa Moscon, Daphnne Moraes; Carmo, Dannilo; Neto, José Antonio Baptista; da Silva Quaresma, Valéria

    2015-02-01

    Sediment dynamics in wave-dominated coastal embayments are generally controlled by seasonal meteorological conditions, storms having a particularly strong influence. In the present study, such hydrodynamic processes and associated deposits have been investigated in a coastal embayment located along the southeast coast of Brazil, i.e. Espírito Santo Bay, in the winter (June/July) of 2008. The bay has undergone a series of human interventions that have altered the local hydrodynamic processes and, consequently, the sediment transport patterns. Facies distribution and sediment dynamics were examined by acoustic seabed mapping, sediment and core sampling, hydrodynamic measurements and sand transport modelling. The results show that sediment distribution can be described in terms of nearshore and offshore zones. The offshore bay sector is predominantly composed of "palimpsest" lithoclastic medium-coarse sands deposited in the course of the early Holocene transgression that peaked about 5,000 years ago. In the inner bay or nearshore zone (up to depths of 4-8 m), these older transgressive deposits are today overlain by a thin (up to 30-cm-thick) and partly patchy blanket of younger regressive fine sand/muddy fine sands. Both coarse- and fine-grained facies are being reworked during high-energy events (Hs>1.5 m) when fine sediment is resuspended, weak tide-induced drift currents causing the sand patches to be displaced. The coarser sediment, by contrast, is mobilized as bedload to produce wave ripples with spacings of up to 1.2 m. These processes lead to a sharp spatial delimitation between a fine sand/mud facies and a rippled coarse sand facies. The fine sand patches have a relief of about 20-30 cm and reveal a typical internal tempestite depositional sequence. Fair-weather wave-induced sediment transport (Hs<1 m), supported by weak tidal currents, seems to only affect the fine sediment facies. Sediment dynamics in Espírito Santo Bay is thus essentially controlled by

  3. Early Cretaceous continental sedimentation in the Coastal Cordillera (Atajaña Formation), Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, G.; Garcia, M.; Sepulveda, F.; Vasquez, P.

    2013-12-01

    Early Cretaceous continental sedimentation development at the Coastal Cordillera of northern Chile has been described in a broad sense. The Atajaña Formation represents this continental sedimentation, south of Arica (18°30S), where it exposes mostly as an elongated swath oriented N70°E, forming a 20 km long and 8 km wide area of outcrop. Northward, these deposits occur as isolated outcrops at the bottom of Chiza, Camarones, Vitor and Azapa valleys. The Atajaña succession was deposited in apparent angular unconformity over Cuya Formation (Middle-Late Jurassic) and Chiza Formation (Bajocian-Oxfordian). The Atajaña Formation is overlain, conformable and transitional, by the Blanco Formation (Aptian-Albian) and overlain in erosion unconformity by the Suca Formation (upper Early Cretaceous). Angular unconformity contact between Atajaña Formation and Cenozoic units (Azapa Formation and alluvial deposits) is exposed at previously named valleys. In the Camarones valley, the Atajaña Formation unconformably overlies Middle to Late Jurassic intrusive rocks. In this work, the Atajaña Formation is divided in three facies associations, exposed close to Atajaña hill and Chiza valley (Kia1, Kia2 y Kia2a). Reddish conglomerates and sedimentary breccias facies (Kia1) consists of an up to 850 m thick. These rocks are massive, polymictic and poorly-sorted, and form laterally extensive beds. Clasts are mostly composed by diorites, monzodiorites, grayish fine sandstones, fine calcareous sandstones, limestones, volcarenites and porphyric andesites. Facies Kia1 includes interbedded red calcareous sandstones and siltstones, some of them displaying low-angle cross bedding. Facies Kia2 consists of an up to 570 m thick of red sandstone and siltstone, interbedded with conglomerates. This well stratified succession, parallel bedded and minor cross bedded, form continuous beds with subrounded and well-sorted clasts. Previous authors described dessication cracks in the red siltstones

  4. Heavy metal pollution assessment in relation to sediment properties in the coastal sediments of the southern Caspian Sea.

    PubMed

    Bastami, Kazem Darvish; Neyestani, Mahmoud Reza; Shemirani, Farzaneh; Soltani, Farzaneh; Haghparast, Sarah; Akbari, Atefeh

    2015-03-15

    This study aimed to evaluate major elements and heavy metal concentrations of Arsenic (As), Copper (Cu), Chromium (Cr), Cobalt (Co), Vanadium (V), Nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and Zinc (Zn) in surface sediments of the southern Caspian Sea. Metal contents in the sediment were observed in the order of: V>Cr>Zn>Ni>Co>Cu>Pb>As. Correlations between elements showed that sediment TOM, grain size and chemical composition are the main factors that influence the distribution of heavy metals. According to the pollution load index (PLI), sediments from some sampling sites were polluted. Concentrations of Ni, As, Cr and Cu were higher than sediment quality guidelines at some sampling sites, implying potential adverse impacts of these metals. PMID:25583242

  5. Heavy metal pollution assessment in relation to sediment properties in the coastal sediments of the southern Caspian Sea.

    PubMed

    Bastami, Kazem Darvish; Neyestani, Mahmoud Reza; Shemirani, Farzaneh; Soltani, Farzaneh; Haghparast, Sarah; Akbari, Atefeh

    2015-03-15

    This study aimed to evaluate major elements and heavy metal concentrations of Arsenic (As), Copper (Cu), Chromium (Cr), Cobalt (Co), Vanadium (V), Nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and Zinc (Zn) in surface sediments of the southern Caspian Sea. Metal contents in the sediment were observed in the order of: V>Cr>Zn>Ni>Co>Cu>Pb>As. Correlations between elements showed that sediment TOM, grain size and chemical composition are the main factors that influence the distribution of heavy metals. According to the pollution load index (PLI), sediments from some sampling sites were polluted. Concentrations of Ni, As, Cr and Cu were higher than sediment quality guidelines at some sampling sites, implying potential adverse impacts of these metals.

  6. Spatially Resolving Ocean Color and Sediment Dispersion in River Plumes, Coastal Systems, and Continental Shelf Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aurin, Dirk Alexander; Mannino, Antonio; Franz, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing of ocean color in dynamic coastal, inland, and nearshorewaters is impeded by high variability in optical constituents, demands specialized atmospheric correction, and is limited by instrument sensitivity. To accurately detect dispersion of bio-optical properties, remote sensors require ample signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to sense small variations in ocean color without saturating over bright pixels, an atmospheric correction that can accommodate significantwater-leaving radiance in the near infrared (NIR), and spatial and temporal resolution that coincides with the scales of variability in the environment. Several current and historic space-borne sensors have met these requirements with success in the open ocean, but are not optimized for highly red-reflective and heterogeneous waters such as those found near river outflows or in the presence of sediment resuspension. Here we apply analytical approaches for determining optimal spatial resolution, dominant spatial scales of variability ("patches"), and proportions of patch variability that can be resolved from four river plumes around the world between 2008 and 2011. An offshore region in the Sargasso Sea is analyzed for comparison. A method is presented for processing Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Aqua and Terra imagery including cloud detection, stray lightmasking, faulty detector avoidance, and dynamic aerosol correction using short-wave- and near-infrared wavebands in extremely turbid regions which pose distinct optical and technical challenges. Results showthat a pixel size of approx. 520 mor smaller is generally required to resolve spatial heterogeneity in ocean color and total suspended materials in river plumes. Optimal pixel size increases with distance from shore to approx. 630 m in nearshore regions, approx 750 m on the continental shelf, and approx. 1350 m in the open ocean. Greater than 90% of the optical variability within plume regions is resolvable with

  7. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran residues in estuarine and coastal North Sea sediments: Sources and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Evers, E.H.G.; Klamer, H.J.C.; Laane, R.W.P.M. . Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management); Govers, H.A.J. . Dept. of Environmental and Toxicological Chemistry)

    1993-09-01

    Sediments from two depositional zones of the North Sea (the Wadden Sea and Oyster Grounds) and from the estuaries of the rivers Rhine, Meuse, Scheldt, Ems, and Humber were analyzed for polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) using a congener-specific procedure. A simple grain-size correction procedure was utilized for the comparison of PCDF and PCDD concentrations in sediments from different origin. PCDFs were more widely encountered than PCDDs in all sediments, except for the Ems-Dollard and the Humber estuary. The highest concentrations were found in the outflow sediments of the rivers Rhine and Humber. Concentrations up to 2,980 ng/kg PCDFs, principally 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDF and OCDF, and up to 1,760 ng/kg PCDDs, principally OCDD, were determined in the River Rhine sediments. Principal component analysis was used to visualize the compositional changes of Rhine sediments. Principal component analysis was used to visualize the compositional changes of PCDD and PCDF profiles in the sediments. Two-dimensional projections based on sample scores from the principal component models showed a marked influence of the River Rhine on the presence of these compounds in the western Wadden Sea and the Oyster Grounds. Based on a chemometric evaluation of chromatographic profiles of these coastal, estuarine and related freshwater sediments, the authors have deduced that these compounds originate from industrial operation discharges, related to the production of chloroaliphatic compounds and the chloralkali compounds and the chloralkali industry along the River Rhine. The atmospheric deposition of combustion-generated PCDDs and PCDFs appeared significant only for remote marine environments.

  8. Sediment transfer in coastal catchments exposed to typhoons: lessons learnt from catchments contaminated with Fukushima radioactive fallout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Olivier; Laceby, J. Patrick; Onda, Yuichi; Lefèvre, Irène

    2016-04-01

    Several coastal catchments located in Northeastern Japan received significant radioactive fallout following the Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011, with initial 137Cs activities exceeding 100 kBq m-2. Although radiocesium poses a considerable health risk for local populations, it also provides a relatively straightforward tracer to investigate sediment transfers in catchments exposed to spring floods and heavy typhoons in late summer and early fall. This study focused on two catchments (the Niida and Mano Rivers) covering a surface area of 450 km² that drain the main radioactive plume. A database of radiocesium activities measured in potential source samples (n=260) was used to model radiocesium dilution in 342 sediment deposit samples collected at 38 locations during 9 different sampling campaigns conducted every 6 months from Nov. 2011 to Nov. 2015. The dilution of the initial radiocesium contamination in sediment was individually calculated for each of the 342 samples using a distribution model. Results show that the proportion of heavily contaminated sediment increased from 27% to 39% after the occurrence of typhoons in 2013 (with rainfall amount exceeding 100 mm in 48 hours) and from 29% to 45% after the 2015 spring floods, illustrating the occurrence of soil erosion and resuspension of contaminated material stored in the river channel. In contrast, the occurrence of a very strong typhoon in September 2015 (up to 450 mm in 48h) led to the dilution and the flush of the contamination to the Pacific Ocean, with the proportion of heavily contaminated material decreasing from 45 to 21%. This case study in catchments impacted by the Fukushima accident illustrates their high reactivity to both human activities and rainfall. These results will improve our understanding of sediment transfers in similar coastal mountainous environments frequently exposed to heavy rainfall.

  9. Environmental quality assessment combining sediment metal levels, biomarkers and macrobenthic communities: application to the Óbidos coastal lagoon (Portugal).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patrícia; Carvalho, Susana; Pereira, Fábio; de Pablo, Hilda; Gaspar, Miguel B; Pacheco, Mário; Vale, Carlos

    2012-12-01

    Macroinvertebrate benthic communities are one of the key biological components considered for the assessment of benthic integrity in the context of the Water Framework Directive (WFD). However, under moderate contamination scenarios, the assessment of macrobenthic alterations at community level alone could be insufficient to discriminate the environmental quality of coastal and transitional waters. Keeping this in view, sediment quality of moderately contaminated sites in a coastal lagoon (Óbidos lagoon, Portugal) was assessed by the combination of sediment metal levels, Carcinus maenas biomarkers (accumulated metals and oxidative stress responses) and macrobenthic communities. Two sites were selected in confined inner branches (BS and BB) and a third one in the middle lagoon (ML). The site BB presented slightly higher levels of metals in sediment but biological variables calculated for macrobenthic data were not significantly different between sites. The biotic index M-AMBI that is being applied to assess environmental quality of transitional waters in the scope of the WFD pointed either to high (site ML) or good quality status (BS and BB) in the selected sites. However, crabs from BB site presented significantly higher levels of Ni in hepatopancreas than those from ML and macrobenthic community structure was significantly different between BB and ML. Additionally, spatial differences were obtained for oxidative stress parameters suggesting that BB site presented stressors for crabs (higher GST and lower GSH(t) at BB site). Factor analysis (PCA) integrating sediment contamination, biomarkers in crabs and macrobenthic data also distinguished BB site as the most environmentally disturbed. On the other hand, at ML site, some macrobenthic variables (equitability and polychaetes' diversity) were found to be enhanced by current environmental conditions, suggesting the existence of a better sediment quality. Current results pointed to the usefulness of integrating

  10. A Technique for Remote Sensing of Suspended Sediments and Shallow Coastal Waters Using MODIS Visible and Near-IR Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Rong-Rong; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm to detect suspended sediments and shallow coastal waters using imaging data acquired with the Moderate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS). The MODIS instruments on board the NASA Terra and Aqua Spacecrafts are equipped with one set of narrow channels located in a wide 0.4 - 2.5 micron spectral range. These channels were designed primarily for remote sensing of the land surface and atmosphere. We have found that the set of land and cloud channels are also quite useful for remote sensing of the bright coastal waters. We have developed an empirical algorithm, which uses the narrow MODIS channels in this wide spectral range, for identifying areas with suspended sediments in turbid waters and shallow waters with bottom reflections. In our algorithm, we take advantage of the strong water absorption at wavelengths longer than 1 micron that does not allow illumination of sediments in the water or a shallow ocean floor. MODIS data acquired over the east coast of China, west coast of Africa, Arabian Sea, Mississippi Delta, and west coast of Florida are used in this study.

  11. Wetland paleoecological study of southwest coastal Louisiana: sediment cores and diatom calibration dataset

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kathryn E. L.; Flocks, James G.; Steyer, Gregory D.; Piazza, Sarai C.

    2015-01-01

    Wetland sediment data were collected in 2009 and 2010 throughout the southwest Louisiana Chenier Plain as part of a pilot study to develop a diatom-based proxy for past wetland water chemistry and the identification of sediment deposits from tropical storms. The complete dataset includes forty-six surface sediment samples and nine sediment cores. The surface sediment samples were collected in fresh, intermediate, and brackish marsh and are located coincident with Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS) sites. The nine sediment cores were collected at the Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge (RWR) located in Grand Chenier, La.

  12. [Distribution, sources and risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediments of Yangtze estuary and Zhejiang coastal areas].

    PubMed

    Mu, Qing-Lin; Fang, Jie; Shao, Jun-Bo; Zhang, Qing-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Hua; Huang, Bei

    2015-03-01

    PAHs contents of surface sediments were tested from 62 sampling sites of the Yangtze River estuary and Zhejiang coastal zone in 2013. The results showed that: 16 kinds of PAHs, which are listed as priority pollutants by EPA, were found in all the samples. The total PAHs level (dry weight) reached 31. 8-384 μg x kg(-1) and the average amount was 131.1 μg x kg(-1). The distribution of PAHs was affected by terrigenous input and point source pollution, the high-value zones were found at 2# sampling site of the Yangtze River estuary and 21# sampling site of Ningbo. Compared with other sea areas, the survey sea area was at a low PAHs pollution level. PAHs were primarily tetracyclic or tricyclic, and source analysis showed that most of PAHs were originated from combustion of wood and coal. Based on the Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs), the assessment result showed that the PAHs content of surface sediments from survey sea area was at a relatively low level of ecological risk; While according to the assessment result of the Sediment Quality Standards (SQSs), PAHs pollution of surface sediments from survey sea area displayed an "Obviously negative ecological effect" to some extent, and some countermeasures are required to control and eliminate pollutions. PMID:25929049

  13. Methane and sulfate dynamics in sediments from mangrove-dominated tropical coastal lagoons, Yucatán, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Pei-Chuan; Young, Megan B.; Dale, Andrew W.; Miller, Laurence G.; Herrera-Silveira, Jorge A.; Paytan, Adina

    2016-05-01

    Porewater profiles in sediment cores from mangrove-dominated coastal lagoons (Celestún and Chelem) on the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico, reveal the widespread coexistence of dissolved methane and sulfate. This observation is interesting since dissolved methane in porewaters is typically oxidized anaerobically by sulfate. To explain the observations we used a numerical transport-reaction model that was constrained by the field observations. The model suggests that methane in the upper sediments is produced in the sulfate reduction zone at rates ranging between 0.012 and 31 mmol m-2 d-1, concurrent with sulfate reduction rates between 1.1 and 24 mmol SO42- m-2 d-1. These processes are supported by high organic matter content in the sediment and the use of non-competitive substrates by methanogenic microorganisms. Indeed sediment slurry incubation experiments show that non-competitive substrates such as trimethylamine (TMA) and methanol can be utilized for microbial methanogenesis at the study sites. The model also indicates that a significant fraction of methane is transported to the sulfate reduction zone from deeper zones within the sedimentary column by rising bubbles and gas dissolution. The shallow depths of methane production and the fast rising methane gas bubbles reduce the likelihood for oxidation, thereby allowing a large fraction of the methane formed in the sediments to escape to the overlying water column.

  14. Natural and Human Impacts on the Coastal Environment of Taiwan Recorded in Marine Sediments During the last century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Chen, Z.; Huh, C.; Chen, K.; Lin, Y.; Hsu, F.

    2012-12-01

    Located at tropical-to-subtropical region on the Pacific rim, Taiwan has very high erosion rate due to steep topography and heavy rainfall especially typhoons. The high sedimentation rates in Taiwan Strait allow us to retrieve high-resolution marine records which reveal natural changes and human impacts on the coastal environment of Taiwan over the past 100 years. Five gravity and box cores well dated by 210Pb and 137Cs methods were analyzed for elemental concentrations in the acid-leachable phase, total organic carbon (TOC), δ13CTOC, δ13C and δ18O of carbonates. The results show that: (1) Positive correlation between TOC and typhoon rainfall since 1940 indicate that decline of vegetation coverage resulted in intensification of soil erosion. The δ13CTOC values illustrate that the organic carbon in the sediments was originated mainly from land input. (2) The δ18O difference between foraminiferal shells and carbonate grains can be used for rainfall reconstruction. (3) The Ca concentrations mainly from carbonates in the sediments were decreased since AD 1940, reflecting changes in sedimentary source and ocean acidfication. As development of the land use, more and more soil erosion caused depletion of authigenic marine sediments in the coast region. Ocean acidification led to less carbonate formation in seawater. (4) Since 1920, Pb concentration rapidly increased and peaked at ~1970 as Pb input from gasoline usage. Pb concentration dropped from 1970 to 1975 perhaps due to unleaded gasoline replacement. (5) In the nearshore environment, heavy metals such as Mn, Cu and Pb in the acid-leachable phase of the sediments strongly increased from 1950 to 1965 then kept relatively high level, reflecting heavy metal contamination from industrial source. The human impact on the coastal region of Taiwan not only caused changes in marine sediments and ocean water, but also disturbed the marine ecosystem. This study has been funded by NSC-100-3113-E-002-009: Study of CO2 capture

  15. Impacts of maintenance channel dredging in a northern Adriatic coastal lagoon. I: Effects on sediment properties, contamination and toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Roberta; Pasteris, Andrea; Ponti, Massimo

    2009-10-01

    Conservation and management of coastal lagoons envisage direct human intervention. To prevent siltation and to preserve the hydrodynamics features of the lagoon system, the inner channels undergo regular maintenance dredging. Sediment properties (RDP, organic matter, grain size), trace metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Hg, Ni, and Pb), and toxicity vs. the amphipod Corophium insidiosum and the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri, were analysed before and after dredging operations in a coastal lagoon (Pialassa Baiona, Italy). To detect the actual impacts, disturbed sites were contrasted with multiple controls in two distinct times, i.e. before and after disturbance, according to a sampling design based on Beyond BACI principles. The integrated methodology here adopted suggests that dredging operations carried out are not likely to pose dramatic effects on environmental quality of the lagoon.

  16. 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene mineralization and bacterial production rates of natural microbial assemblages from coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Michael T; Coffin, Richard B; Boyd, Thomas J; Smith, Joseph P; Walker, Shelby E; Osburn, Christopher L

    2011-12-01

    The nitrogenous energetic constituent, 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT), is widely reported to be resistant to bacterial mineralization (conversion to CO(2)); however, these studies primarily involve bacterial isolates from freshwater where bacterial production is typically limited by phosphorus. This study involved six surveys of coastal waters adjacent to three biome types: temperate broadleaf, northern coniferous, and tropical. Capacity to catabolize and mineralize TNT ring carbon to CO(2) was a common feature of natural sediment assemblages from these coastal environments (ranging to 270+/-38 μg C kg(-1) d(-1)). More importantly, these mineralization rates comprised a significant proportion of total heterotrophic production. The finding that most natural assemblages surveyed from these ecosystems can mineralize TNT ring carbon to CO(2) is consistent with recent reports that assemblage components can incorporate TNT ring carbon into bacterial biomass. These data counter the widely held contention that TNT is recalcitrant to bacterial catabolism of the ring carbon in natural environments.

  17. Estimating of suspended sediment loads of rivers in the Seine downstream basin and coastal rivers in Southeastern Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landemaine, Valentin; Cerdan, Olivier; Laignel, Benoit; Fournier, Matthieu; Copard, Yoann

    2014-05-01

    Sediment exports in rivers constitute the essential of materials transfer from the land surface to the ocean and contribute significantly to the transfer of nutrients, pesticides, heavy metals which can affect water quality. Such problems of water pollution are particularly present at the Norman loess plateaus because soil erosion is a frequent phenomena and mudslides are common. In this context, the quantification of sediment load, as well as the short and long term variability analysis are a key component for any sustainable management project of water resources. The quantification of sediment fluxes is based on turbidity, suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) and discharge measurements. These measurements must be made with sufficient high frequency for integrating temporal variability of SSC and flows. However, the cost of a high frequency monitoring limits their use at large scale. In France, discharges are monitored using daily frequency (Banque Hydro), while SSC are measured in monthly or bimonthly frequency under the national water quality survey system (RNB). With these low frequency measurements, an algorithm must be used to reconstruct SSC temporal variability and to estimate a sediment flux. Many estimation algorithms have been developed in recent decades, from the simplest to the most elaborate, but no consensus has been reached on the use of a particular algorithm because of the complexity of SSC-discharge relationship. In this study, the analysis focuses on eight Channel coastal watersheds and nine Seine watersheds in the downstream part. We have a several years of high-frequency measurements on nine watersheds with highly variable area (10 km² to 10,000 km²) and low-frequency measurements for all watersheds. From these data, we compared the statistical performance of eleven algorithms to estimate sediment fluxes conventionally used in the literature. These algorithms are: averaging estimator, ratio estimator, linear interpolation, rating curve

  18. WETLAND PLANT SEEDLINGS AS INDICATORS OF NEAR-COASTAL SEDIMENT QUALITY: INTERSPECIFIC VARIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicities of whole sediments collected from an urbanized Florida bayou-estuary were determined for the epibenthic mysid, Mysidopsis bahia, and the infaunal amphipod, Ampelisca abdita. In addition, the phytotoxicities of the same sediments were evaluated using rooted macrophy...

  19. Quantification of octacalcium phosphate, authigenic apatite and detrital apatite in coastal sediments using differential dissolution and standard addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxmann, J. F.; Schwendenmann, L.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of calcium phosphate (Ca-P) solubility is crucial for understanding temporal and spatial variations of phosphorus (P) concentrations in water bodies and sedimentary reservoirs. In-situ relationships between liquid and solid-phase levels cannot be fully explained by dissolved analytes alone and need to be verified by determination of particular sediment P species. Lack of quantification methods for these species limits the knowledge of the P cycle. To address this issue, we (i) optimized a specifically developed conversion-extraction (CONVEX) method for P species quantification using standard additions; and (ii) simultaneously determined solubilities of Ca-P standards by measuring their pH-dependent contents in the sediment matrix. Ca-P minerals including various carbonate fluorapatite (CFAP) specimens from different localities, fluorapatite (FAP), fish bone apatite, synthetic hydroxylapatite (HAP) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP) were characterized by XRD, Raman, FTIR and elemental analysis. Sediment samples were incubated with and without these reference minerals and then sequentially extracted to quantify Ca-P species by their differential dissolution at pH values between 3 and 8. The quantification of solid-phase phosphates at varying pH revealed solubilities in the following order: OCP > HAP > CFAP (4.5% CO3) > CFAP (3.4% CO3) > CFAP (2.2% CO3) > FAP. Thus, CFAP was less soluble in sediment than HAP, and CFAP solubility increased with carbonate content. Unspiked sediment analyses together with standard addition analyses indicated consistent differential dissolution of natural sediment species vs. added reference species and therefore verified the applicability of the CONVEX method in separately determining the most prevalent Ca-P minerals. We found surprisingly high OCP contents in the analyzed coastal sediments which supports the hypothesis of apatite formation by an OCP precursor.

  20. Quantification of octacalcium phosphate, authigenic apatite and detrital apatite in coastal sediments using differential dissolution and standard addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxmann, J. F.; Schwendenmann, L.

    2014-06-01

    Knowledge of calcium phosphate (Ca-P) solubility is crucial for understanding temporal and spatial variations of phosphorus (P) concentrations in water bodies and sedimentary reservoirs. In situ relationships between liquid- and solid-phase levels cannot be fully explained by dissolved analytes alone and need to be verified by determining particular sediment P species. Lack of quantification methods for these species limits the knowledge of the P cycle. To address this issue, we (i) optimized a specifically developed conversion-extraction (CONVEX) method for P species quantification using standard additions, and (ii) simultaneously determined solubilities of Ca-P standards by measuring their pH-dependent contents in the sediment matrix. Ca-P minerals including various carbonate fluorapatite (CFAP) specimens from different localities, fluorapatite (FAP), fish bone apatite, synthetic hydroxylapatite (HAP) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP) were characterized by XRD, Raman, FTIR and elemental analysis. Sediment samples were incubated with and without these reference minerals and then sequentially extracted to quantify Ca-P species by their differential dissolution at pH values between 3 and 8. The quantification of solid-phase phosphates at varying pH revealed solubilities in the following order: OCP > HAP > CFAP (4.5% CO3) > CFAP (3.4% CO3) > CFAP (2.2% CO3) > FAP. Thus, CFAP was less soluble in sediment than HAP, and CFAP solubility increased with carbonate content. Unspiked sediment analyses together with standard addition analyses indicated consistent differential dissolution of natural sediment species vs. added reference species and therefore verified the applicability of the CONVEX method in separately determining the most prevalent Ca-P minerals. We found surprisingly high OCP contents in the coastal sediments analyzed, which supports the hypothesis of apatite formation by an OCP precursor mechanism.

  1. 224Ra:228Th disequilibrium in coastal sediments: Implications for solute transfer across the sediment-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Pinghe; Shi, Xiangming; Moore, Williard S.; Peng, Shiyun; Wang, Guizhi; Dai, Minhan

    2014-01-01

    We utilized 224Ra/228Th disequilibrium in the sediment to investigate processes that regulate solute transfer across the sediment-water interface. Depth profiles of dissolved and surface-bound 224Ra and 228Th in the upper 0-20 cm sediment column were measured using a delayed coincidence counter during a cruise to the Yangtze estuary from 15 to 24 August 2011. Along with 224Ra and 228Th, depth profiles of 234Th were collected to determine the bioturbation rate in the sediment. At most study sites, a significant deficit of 224Ra relative to 228Th was observed in the upper 0-10 cm. In contrast, 224Ra was in excess with respect to 228Th in the upper 0-5 cm at the river mouth, possibly due to redistribution of 224Ra from the mid-salinity region. By modeling the 224Ra depth profiles in the sediment using the general diagenetic equation, we demonstrated that in most cases molecular diffusion and bioturbation together can account for only ∼20-30% of the measured flux of 224Ra. We concluded that other mechanisms, especially irrigation, must be invoked to explain the remnant 70% of the observed deviation of 224Ra relative to 228Th. On the basis of the 224Ra/228Th disequilibrium in the sediment and a concept of increased surface area for exchange by irrigation as developed by early investigators, we proposed a new approach - the 224Ra/228Th disequilibrium approach to quantify the transfer rate of other dissolved species across the sediment-water interface. We have utilized this new approach to determine the benthic consumption rate of dissolved O2. The result reveals that benthic consumption is an important loss term of dissolved O2 in the Yangtze estuary and must be considered as one of the mechanisms that lead to hypoxia in this area.

  2. Toward a community coastal sediment transport modeling system: the second workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherwood, Christopher R.; Harris, Courtney K.; Geyer, W. Rockwell; Butman, Bradford

    2002-01-01

    Models for transport and the long-term fate of particles in coastal waters are essential for a variety of applications related to commerce, defense, public health, and the quality of the marine environment. Examples include: analysis of waste disposal and transport and the fate of contaminated materials; evaluation of burial rates for naval mines or archaeological artifacts; prediction of water-column optical properties; analysis of transport and the fate of biological particles; prediction of coastal flooding and coastal erosion; evaluation of impacts of sea-level or wave-climate changes and coastal development; planning for construction and maintenance of navigable waterways; evaluation of habitat for commercial fisheries; evaluation of impacts of natural or anthropogenic changes in coastal conditions on recreational activities; and design of intakes and outfalls for sewage treatment, cooling systems, and desalination plants.

  3. Variability of subseafloor viral abundance at the geographically and geologically distinct continental margins.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Katsunori; Morono, Yuki; Yoshida-Takashima, Yukari; Eitoku, Masamitsu; Sunamura, Michinari; Inagaki, Fumio; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Takai, Ken; Nunoura, Takuro

    2014-04-01

    We studied the relationship between viral particle and microbial cell abundances in marine subsurface sediments from three geographically distinct locations in the continental margins (offshore of the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan, the Cascadia Margin off Oregon, and the Gulf of Mexico) and found depth variations in viral abundances among these sites. Viruses in sediments obtained offshore of the Shimokita and in the Cascadia Margin generally decreased with increasing depth, whereas those in sediments from the Gulf of Mexico were relatively constant throughout the investigated depths. In addition, the abundance ratios of viruses to microbial cells notably varied among the sites, ranging between 10(-3) and 10(1) . The subseafloor viral abundance offshore of the Shimokita showed a positive relationship with the microbial cell abundance and the sediment porosity. In contrast, no statistically significant relationship was observed in the Cascadia Margin and the Gulf of Mexico sites, presumably due to the long-term preservation of viruses from enzymatic degradation within the low-porosity sediments. Our observations indicate that viral abundance in the marine subsurface sedimentary environment is regulated not only by in situ production but also by the balance of preservation and decay, which is associated with the regional sedimentation processes in the geological settings.

  4. Processes influencing the transport and fate of contaminated sediments in the coastal ocean: Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bothner, Michael H.; Butman, Bradford

    2007-01-01

    Most of the major urban centers of the United States including Boston, New York, Washington, Chicago, New Orleans, Miami, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Seattle—are on a coast (fig. 1.1). All of these cities discharge treated sewage effluent into adjacent waters. In 2000, 74 percent of the U.S. population lived within 200 kilometers (km) of the coast. Between 1980 and 2002, the population density in coastal communities increased approximately 4.5 times faster than in noncoastal areas of the U.S. (Perkins, 2004). More people generate larger volumes of wastes, increase the demands on wastewater treatment, expand the area of impervious land surfaces, and use more vehicles that contribute contaminants to street runoff. According to the National Coastal Condition Report II (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2005a), on the basis of coastal habitat, water and sediment quality, benthic index, and fish tissue, the overall national coastal condition is only poor to fair and the overall coastal condition in the highly populated Northeast is poor. Scientific information helps managers to prioritize and regulate coastal-ocean uses that include recreation, commercial fishing, transportation, waste disposal, and critical habitat for marine organisms. These uses are often in conflict with each other and with environmental concerns. Developing a strategy for managing competing uses while maintaining sustainability of coastal resources requires scientific understanding of how the coastal ocean system behaves and how it responds to anthropogenic influences. This report provides a summary of a multidisciplinary research program designed to improve our understanding of the transport and fate of contaminants in Massachusetts coastal waters. Massachusetts Bay and Boston Harbor have been a focus of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research because they provide a diverse geographic setting for developing a scientific understanding of the geology, geochemistry, and oceanography of

  5. Rheinheimera aestuari sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from coastal sediment.

    PubMed

    Baek, Kyunghwa; Jeon, Che Ok

    2015-08-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, non-pigmented, motile bacterium with a single polar flagellum, designated H29T, was isolated from coastal sediment of Jeju Island, South Korea. Cells were non-spore-forming rods showing catalase- and oxidase-positive reactions. Growth of strain H29T was observed at 10-40 °C (optimum, 20-25 °C) and pH 6.0-9.0 (optimum, pH 7.0-8.0), and in the presence of 1-4% (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 2-3%). Strain H29T contained C16 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 3-OH and summed feature 3 (comprising C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c) as the major fatty acids and ubiquinone-8 (Q-8) as the sole isoprenoid quinone. Phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol were identified as the major polar lipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 46.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain H29T formed a phyletic lineage with Rheinheimera hassiensis E48T within the genus Rheinheimera of the family Chromatiaceae. Strain H29T was most closely related to Rheinheimera pacifica KMM 1406T, Rheinheimera muenzenbergensis E49T, Rheinheimera hassiensis E48T and Rheinheimera baltica OSBAC1T with 97.8%, 97.6%, 97.4% and 97.2% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, respectively. However, DNA-DNA hybridization values of strain H29T with type strains of these species were lower than 70%. On the basis of the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and molecular properties, strain H29T represents a novel species of the genus Rheinheimera, for which the name Rheinheimeraaestuarii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is H29T ( = KACC 18251T = JCM 30404T). PMID:25957052

  6. Potential effects of sediment contaminants on diatom assemblages in coastal lagoons of New Jersey and New York States.

    PubMed

    Potapova, Marina; Desianti, Nina; Enache, Mihaela

    2016-06-30

    Sediment samples from the coastal lagoons and estuaries of New York and New Jersey were used to investigate the influence of contaminants on diatom assemblages. Multivariate analyses demonstrated correspondence between composition of diatom assemblages and concentrations of several metals and total PAH. The effects of the individual contaminants were difficult to disentangle because of the considerable correlations between their concentrations. The most conspicuous trend was the increase in the relative abundance of small centric planktonic diatoms in response to contamination and the corresponding decrease in the benthic flora. The high relative abundance of planktonic species on contaminated sediments apparently resulted not so much from their tolerance to pollution, but from the paucity of benthic species. A comparison of the assemblages on the surface and at the depth of approximately 8-10cm revealed a statistically significant temporal change in community composition towards planktonic diatoms. PMID:26851869

  7. [Diversity of the Key Biphenyl Destruction Genes in the Microbial Community of the Anadyr Bay Coastal Sediments].

    PubMed

    Shumkova, E S; Voronina, A O; Kuznetsova, N V; Plotnikova, E G

    2015-07-01

    Biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase is the key enzyme involved in the bacterial destruction of biphenyl and polychlo- rinated biphenyls (PCBs), which are highly stable toxic compounds. The diversity of bphA1 genes encoding the biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase a subunit of biphenyl-decomposing bacteria from the microbial community of the Bering Sea coastal sediments (the Anadyr port area) was studied. The enrichment culture was obtained by the incubation of bottom sediments samples with biphenyl as the only carbon source. It was followed by total DNA extraction and PCR analysis with degenerate primers specific to the bacterial biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase a subunit genes. Subsequent cloning of the PCR products led to the identification of three types of aromatic dioxygenase genes, which appeared to be phylogenetically close to the genes of the biphenyl/toluene dioxygenase and 3-phenylpropionate dioxygenase subfamilies of the Actinomycetales bacteria. PMID:26410940

  8. Developing a bioindicator in the northwestern Persian Gulf, Iran: trace elements in bird eggs and in coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Khademi, Nastaran; Riyahi-Bakhtiari, Alireza; Sobhanardakani, Soheil; Rezaie-Atagholipour, Mohsen; Burger, Joanna

    2015-02-01

    Levels of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), and vanadium (V) were evaluated in coastal sediments, egg contents, and eggshells of crab plover (Dromas ardeola), bridled tern (Sterna anaethetus), lesser crested tern (S. bengalensis), and western reef heron (Egretta gularis) breeding in the northwestern Persian Gulf. Levels of Cd, Pb, Ni, V, and Se were greater in eggs of terns than in eggs of crab plover, perhaps due to the higher trophic level of terns. Levels of all elements were lower than known effects levels for birds. However, levels of Se in eggs were greater than those known to cause toxic effects in birds. Eggs of terns are ideal for monitoring metal contaminants on the breeding grounds because the bioaccumulation ratios (egg/sediment) of some metals (As, Co, Se) in the eggs of terns are significantly greater compared with those of crab plovers.

  9. Potential effects of sediment contaminants on diatom assemblages in coastal lagoons of New Jersey and New York States.

    PubMed

    Potapova, Marina; Desianti, Nina; Enache, Mihaela

    2016-06-30

    Sediment samples from the coastal lagoons and estuaries of New York and New Jersey were used to investigate the influence of contaminants on diatom assemblages. Multivariate analyses demonstrated correspondence between composition of diatom assemblages and concentrations of several metals and total PAH. The effects of the individual contaminants were difficult to disentangle because of the considerable correlations between their concentrations. The most conspicuous trend was the increase in the relative abundance of small centric planktonic diatoms in response to contamination and the corresponding decrease in the benthic flora. The high relative abundance of planktonic species on contaminated sediments apparently resulted not so much from their tolerance to pollution, but from the paucity of benthic species. A comparison of the assemblages on the surface and at the depth of approximately 8-10cm revealed a statistically significant temporal change in community composition towards planktonic diatoms.

  10. Assessment of metal contamination in coastal sediments of the Maluan Bay (China) using geochemical indices and multivariate statistical approaches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zaosheng; Wang, Yushao; Chen, Liuqin; Yan, Changzhou; Yan, Yijun; Chi, Qiaoqiao

    2015-10-15

    Total concentrations and chemical forms of heavy metals in surface sediments of Maluan Bay were determined and multiple geochemical indices and guidelines were applied to assess potential contamination and environmental risks. Metal concentrations exhibited significant spatial variation and the speciation of Cr was presented dominantly in the residual fraction, while Cd was found mostly in the non-residual fraction and thus of high potential bioavailability. Cluster analysis separated four subgroups of sampling sites with different levels of contamination. Further, a multivariate method offered the specific interpretation of possible contaminant sources and/or pathways. Factor scores characterized the sampling locations and elucidated the pollution status, pointing out the impact of multiple "hidden hotspots" of contaminants and providing further evidence of the existence of clear pollution-risk gradients in lagoon areas. The study supports the integrative approach as powerful tool to diagnose the pollution status scientifically for management decisions in coastal sediment of complex environment.

  11. Pathways for arsenic from sediments to groundwater to streams: Biogeochemical processes in the Inner Coastal Plain, New Jersey, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, Julia L.; Mumford, Adam; Young, Lily Y.; Reilly, Pamela A.; Bonin, Jennifer L.; Rosman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The Cretaceous and Tertiary sediments that underlie the Inner Coastal Plain of New Jersey contain the arsenic-rich mineral glauconite. Streambed sediments in two Inner Coastal Plain streams (Crosswicks and Raccoon Creeks) that traverse these glauconitic deposits are enriched in arsenic (15–25 mg/kg), and groundwater discharging to the streams contains elevated levels of arsenic (>80 μg/L at a site on Crosswicks Creek) with arsenite generally the dominant species. Low dissolved oxygen, low or undetectable levels of nitrate and sulfate, detectable sulfide concentrations, and high concentrations of iron and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the groundwater indicate that reducing environments are present beneath the streambeds and that microbial activity, fueled by the DOC, is involved in releasing arsenic and iron from the geologic materials. In groundwater with the highest arsenic concentrations at Crosswicks Creek, arsenic respiratory reductase gene (arrA) indicated the presence of arsenic-reducing microbes. From extracted DNA, 16s rRNA gene sequences indicate the microbial community may include arsenic-reducing bacteria that have not yet been described. Once in the stream, iron is oxidized and precipitates as hydroxide coatings on the sediments. Arsenite also is oxidized and co-precipitates with or is sorbed to the iron hydroxides. Consequently, dissolved arsenic concentrations are lower in streamwater than in the groundwater, but the arsenic contributed by groundwater becomes part of the arsenic load in the stream when sediments are suspended during high flow. A strong positive relation between concentrations of arsenic and DOC in the groundwater samples indicates that any process—natural or anthropogenic—that increases the organic carbon concentration in the groundwater could stimulate microbial activity and thus increase the amount of arsenic that is released from the geologic materials.

  12. Towards Predicting Basin-Wide Invertebrate Organic Biomass and Production in Marine Sediments from a Coastal Sea

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Brenda J.; Macdonald, Tara A.; van Roodselaar, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of environmental conditions is required to understand faunal production in coastal seas with topographic and hydrographic complexity. We test the hypothesis that organic biomass and production of subtidal sediment invertebrates throughout the Strait of Georgia, west coast of Canada, can be predicted by depth, substrate type and organic flux modified to reflect lability and age of material. A basin-wide database of biological, geochemical and flux data was analysed using an empirical production/biomass (P/B) model to test this hypothesis. This analysis is unique in the spatial extent and detail of P/B and concurrent environmental measurements over a temperate coastal region. Modified organic flux was the most important predictor of organic biomass and production. Depth and substrate type were secondary modifiers. Between 69–74% of variability in biomass and production could be explained by the combined environmental factors. Organisms <1 mm were important contributors to biomass and production primarily in shallow, sandy sediments, where high P/B values were found despite low organic flux. Low biomass, production, and P/B values were found in the deep, northern basin and mainland fjords, which had silty sediments, low organic flux, low biomass of organisms <1 mm, and dominance by large, slow-growing macrofauna. In the highest organic flux and biomass areas near the Fraser River discharge, production did not increase beyond moderate flux levels. Although highly productive, this area had low P/B. Clearly, food input is insufficient to explain the complex patterns in faunal production revealed here. Additional environmental factors (depth, substrate type and unmeasured factors) are important modifiers of these patterns. Potential reasons for the above patterns are explored, along with a discussion of unmeasured factors possibly responsible for unexplained (30%) variance in biomass and production. We now have the tools for basin-wide first

  13. Taxonomic profiling of bacterial community structure from coastal sediment of Alang-Sosiya shipbreaking yard near Bhavnagar, India.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vilas; Munot, Hitendra; Shah, Varun; Shouche, Yogesh S; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-12-30

    The Alang-Sosiya shipbreaking yard (ASSBY) is considered the largest of its kind in the world, and a major source of anthropogenic pollutants. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of shipbreaking activities on the bacterial community structure with a combination of culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches. In the culture-dependent approach, 200 bacterial cultures were isolated and analyzed by molecular fingerprinting and 16S ribosomal RNA (r-RNA) gene sequencing, as well as being studied for degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In the culture-independent approach, operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were related to eight major phyla, of which Betaproteobacteria (especially Acidovorax) was predominantly found in the polluted sediments of ASSBY and Gammaproteobacteria in the pristine sediment sample. The statistical approaches showed a significant difference in the bacterial community structure between the pristine and polluted sediments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study investigating the effect of shipbreaking activity on the bacterial community structure of the coastal sediment at ASSBY.

  14. Profiles and inventories of organic pollutants in sediments from the central Beibu Gulf and its coastal mangroves.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, David; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E; Waniek, Joanna J

    2016-06-01

    Sediment cores from the central Beibu Gulf and its northern coastal mangroves were analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), the organo-chlorine pesticides dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), to reconstruct the organic pollution history of developing south-west China. Reflecting regional development, in the gulf ∑PAH (38-74 ng g(-1)) decreased towards the surface after peak concentrations near 10 cm, while ∑DDT (ND - 0.5 ng g(-1)) increased due to fresh inputs, and HCB (ND - 0.04 ng g(-1)) occurred only in surface sediments. Profiles in mangrove sediments showed a continuing local scale increase in ∑PAH (29-438 ng g(-1)) as well as ∑DDT (0.2-41.0 ng g(-1)) and HCB (0.01-1.01 ng g(-1)) pollution, despite some variability. No trend was evident for ∑PCB (ND - 0.22 ng g(-1)), which was not detected in the central gulf. Calculated loads estimate that 2816 ng cm(-2) PAHs and 7 ng cm(-2) DDTs are stored in depositional areas of the Beibu Gulf. Mangrove sediments, threatened by land-use-change, contain 1400-4600 ng cm(-2) PAHs and 34-39 ng cm(-2) DDTs. PMID:27010165

  15. Bedform facies in western Torres Strait and the influence of hydrodynamics, coastal geometry, and sediment supply on their distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniell, James J.

    2015-04-01

    This study uses outputs from hydrodynamic and bedload transport models combined with satellite imagery, aerial photography, and bathymetric data to understand the distributions and mechanisms maintaining six spatially extensive bedform facies in western Torres Strait. Changes in bedform morphology occur along north-south variations in coastal geometry and east-west variations in hydrodynamic regime. Numerous islands create an environment that favours the formation of banner banks in the south, while other sandbank morphologies occur on an extensive and comparatively 'flat' basement to the north. The western side of Torres Strait experiences net bedload transport that is directed to the west throughout the year and favours the formation of bedforms that prefer unidirectional bedload transport regimes (i.e. barchan-shaped sandbanks and sand ribbons). The eastern side of the strait experiences seasonal changes in the direction of net bedload transport and maintains 'S' and 'V' shaped sandbanks. Sediment availability also influences the bedform facies. Western Torres Strait experiences net westward bedload transport through the Strait. However, sandbanks (indicating high sediment availability) are found in the central shallow and high current velocity areas, while sand ribbons (indicating low sediment availability) are a distal facies on the western side of the Strait. This sequence of bedforms indicates that sediments are preferentially trapped within the central portion of the Strait and not transported further west into the Gulf of Carpentaria.

  16. A mid-Permian chert event: widespread deposition of biogenic siliceous sediments in coastal, island arc and oceanic basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murchey, B.L.; Jones, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Radiolarian and conodont of Permian siliceous rocks from twenty-three areas in teh the circum-Pacific and Mediterranean regions reveal a widespread Permian Chert Event during the middle Leonardian to Wordian. Radiolarian- and (or) sponge spicule-rich siliceous sediments accumulated beneath high productivity zones in coastal, island arc and oceanic basins. Most of these deposits now crop out in fault-bounded accreted terranes. Biogenic siliceous sediments did not accumulate in terranes lying beneath infertile waters including the marine sequences in terranes of northern and central Alaska. The Permian Chert Event is coeval with major phosphorite deposition along the western margin of Pangea (Phosphoria Formation and related deposits). A well-known analogue for this event is middle Miocene deposition of biogenic siliceous sediments beneath high productivity zones in many parts of the Pacific and concurrent deposition of phosphatic as well as siliceous sediments in basins along the coast of California. Interrelated factors associated with both the Miocene and Permian depositional events include plate reorientations, small sea-level rises and cool polar waters. ?? 1992.

  17. Distribution of polycyclic musks in surface sediments from the Pearl River Delta and Macao Coastal Region, South china.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangying; Mai, Bixian; Sheng, Guoying; Luo, Xiaojun; Shao, Wenlan; An, Taicheng; Fu, Jiamo

    2008-01-01

    Polycyclic musks were measured in surface sediments collected from the Pearl River Delta and Macao coastal region, South China, to investigate contamination from domestic sewage. Three polycyclic musk compounds-4-acetyl-1,1-dimethyl-6-tert-butylindan, 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethylcyclopenta(g)-2-benzopyran (HHCB), and 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (AHTN)-were detected in sediment samples. Two polycyclic musks, HHCB and AHTN, were dominant components in sediment, consistent with the use pattern of polycyclic musks by perfume industries in the Pearl River Delta region. The concentrations of total polycyclic musks ranged from 5.76 to 167 microg/kg. Because of the large amount of domestic sewage and industrial wastewater discharged from the city of Guangzhou, the highest concentration of polycyclic musks was found in sediments from the Zhujiang River. The significant positive correlation between the HHCB to AHTN ratios and the concentrations of polycyclic musks suggested that the HHCB to AHTN ratio could be used as a tracer for source discrimination and for the degree of degradation in the environment.

  18. Onshore-offshore gradient in reductive early diagenesis in coastal marine sediments of the Ria de Vigo, Northwest Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, K. J.; Rey, D.; Rubio, B.; Dekkers, M. J.; Roberts, A. P.; Vilas, F.

    2011-04-01

    Early diagenetic modification of magnetic properties is an important process in marine sediments, but temporal and spatial variability of diagenetic processes have rarely been reported for recent coastal sediments. The magnetic properties of sediments from the Ria de Vigo (NW Spain) define a marked three-part zonation with depth. The uppermost zone is magnetically dominated by (titano-)magnetite. In the intermediate zone, rapid down-core dissolution of (titano-)magnetite increases the relative influence of high-coercivity magnetic minerals, which react more slowly during reductive dissolution than (titano-)magnetite. This zone is characterized by the ubiquitous occurrence of framboidal iron sulphides. Pyrite is the dominant iron sulphide, but framboidal ferrimagnetic greigite is also frequently observed in association with pyrite. The lowermost zone is characterized by an almost complete depletion of magnetic minerals associated with progressive reduction of detrital iron oxides with depth. This zonation is controlled by organic matter diagenesis, which varies with water depth and wave-induced sediment resuspension and organic matter reoxidation in the water column. This leads to a shallowing and thinning of each zone with more intense reductive diagenesis toward the interior of the ria. Such a zonation seems to be a common feature in shallow water marine environments. If preserved, the described zonation and its spatial variability provide a potential tool for detecting estuarine-like environments in the geological record. Magnetic detection of current or past reductive conditions also has important implications for assessing paleoenvironmental proxies that are sensitive to diagenetic redox state.

  19. Effects of oxygen on recycling of biogenic elements from sediments of a stratified coastal Baltic Sea basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekeroth, Nils; Kononets, Mikhail; Walve, Jakob; Blomqvist, Sven; Hall, Per O. J.

    2016-02-01

    Benthic nutrient dynamics in the coastal basin Kanholmsfjärden, NW Baltic proper, were studied by in situ flux measurements and sediment samplings in 2010-2013. The benthic release of NH4 and DIP from anoxic sediments in Kanholmsfjärden were calculated to renew the standing stock inventories of DIN and DIP in the overlying water in roughly 1 year. Starting in summer 2012, mixing of oxygen-rich water into the deep part of the basin temporarily improved the oxygen conditions in the deep water. During the 1 year oxygenated period, the total phosphorus inventory in the surficial sediment increased by 0.4 g P m- 2 or 65%. This was most likely due to stimulated bacterial P assimilation under oxygenated conditions. By July 2013, the bottom water had again turned anoxic, and DIP and DSi fluxes were even higher than earlier in the study period. These high fluxes are attributed to degradation of sedimentary pools of P and Si that had accumulated during the bottom water oxygenation in 2012. The strong correlation between DIP and DSi fluxes and the similar dynamics of DIP and DSi in the sediment pore water and near bottom water, suggest a similar redox dependency of benthic-pelagic exchange for these nutrients.

  20. Influence of a collapsed coastal landfill on metal levels in sediments and biota--a portent for the future?

    PubMed

    Pope, N D; O'Hara, S C M; Imamura, M; Hutchinson, T H; Langston, W J

    2011-07-01

    In May 2008 a coastal landslide deposited landfill debris onto the shore near Lyme Regis, UK. Six months later, intertidal sediments and biota from the area were sampled to determine whether the landslip had affected distribution and bioavailability of metals in the area and if there were any biological effects. Highest sediment concentrations for the majority of metals occurred near the landslip zone and in several cases exceeded Threshold Effects or Probable Effects Levels (As, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Zn). The 1 M HCl-extractable fraction of Cd, Pb and Zn in sediments also increased near the landslip. Metal bioaccumulation by intertidal biota showed variability between different species and metals, but there were several instances of increased accumulation near the landslip through increased availability from seawater, sediment and dietary sources. In most cases, metal concentrations in molluscs exceeded Oslo and Paris Commission (OSPAR) background concentrations (BCs) together with background assessment concentrations (BACs) at some sites. Kidney tissues in winkles (Littorina littorea) were measured for evidence of oxidative stress using the Total Oxyradical Scavenging Capacity (TOSC) assay. Responses to peroxynitrite, peroxyl and hydroxyl radicals suggested raised levels of TOSC in animals from the sites close to or east of the landfill waste. There have been very few studies of direct impact of landfills on the marine environment and this study could serve as a practical model for similar events driven by sea level rise. PMID:21597644

  1. Empirical Evidence Reveals Seasonally Dependent Reduction in Nitrification in Coastal Sediments Subjected to Near Future Ocean Acidification

    PubMed Central

    Braeckman, Ulrike; Van Colen, Carl; Guilini, Katja; Van Gansbeke, Dirk; Soetaert, Karline; Vincx, Magda; Vanaverbeke, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Research so far has provided little evidence that benthic biogeochemical cycling is affected by ocean acidification under realistic climate change scenarios. We measured nutrient exchange and sediment community oxygen consumption (SCOC) rates to estimate nitrification in natural coastal permeable and fine sandy sediments under pre-phytoplankton bloom and bloom conditions. Ocean acidification, as mimicked in the laboratory by a realistic pH decrease of 0.3, significantly reduced SCOC on average by 60% and benthic nitrification rates on average by 94% in both sediment types in February (pre-bloom period), but not in April (bloom period). No changes in macrofauna functional community (density, structural and functional diversity) were observed between ambient and acidified conditions, suggesting that changes in benthic biogeochemical cycling were predominantly mediated by changes in the activity of the microbial community during the short-term incubations (14 days), rather than by changes in engineering effects of bioturbating and bio-irrigating macrofauna. As benthic nitrification makes up the gross of ocean nitrification, a slowdown of this nitrogen cycling pathway in both permeable and fine sediments in winter, could therefore have global impacts on coupled nitrification-denitrification and hence eventually on pelagic nutrient availability. PMID:25329898

  2. Profiles and inventories of organic pollutants in sediments from the central Beibu Gulf and its coastal mangroves.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, David; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E; Waniek, Joanna J

    2016-06-01

    Sediment cores from the central Beibu Gulf and its northern coastal mangroves were analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), the organo-chlorine pesticides dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), to reconstruct the organic pollution history of developing south-west China. Reflecting regional development, in the gulf ∑PAH (38-74 ng g(-1)) decreased towards the surface after peak concentrations near 10 cm, while ∑DDT (ND - 0.5 ng g(-1)) increased due to fresh inputs, and HCB (ND - 0.04 ng g(-1)) occurred only in surface sediments. Profiles in mangrove sediments showed a continuing local scale increase in ∑PAH (29-438 ng g(-1)) as well as ∑DDT (0.2-41.0 ng g(-1)) and HCB (0.01-1.01 ng g(-1)) pollution, despite some variability. No trend was evident for ∑PCB (ND - 0.22 ng g(-1)), which was not detected in the central gulf. Calculated loads estimate that 2816 ng cm(-2) PAHs and 7 ng cm(-2) DDTs are stored in depositional areas of the Beibu Gulf. Mangrove sediments, threatened by land-use-change, contain 1400-4600 ng cm(-2) PAHs and 34-39 ng cm(-2) DDTs.

  3. Suspended sediment behavior in a coastal dry-summer subtropical catchment: Effects of hydrologic preconditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, A. B.; Warrick, J. A.; Pasternack, G. B.; Watson, E. B.; Goñi, M. A.

    2014-06-01

    Variation in fluvial suspended sediment-discharge behavior is generally thought to be the product of changes in processes governing the delivery of sediment and water to the channel. The objective of this study was to infer sediment supply dynamics from the response of suspended sediment behavior to antecedent hydrologic factors. The Salinas River (California) is seasonally active, moderately sized, and potentially susceptible to lasting impacts of hydrologic event history because of aridity, high discharge variability, and in-channel terminating flows. Forty-five years of suspended sediment data from the lower Salinas and 80 years of hydrologic data were used to construct hydrologic descriptors of basin preconditioning and to test the effects of these preconditions on suspended sediment behavior. Hydrologic precondition factors - including change in mean daily discharge and increasing elapsed time since the last moderate discharge event (~ 10-20 times mean discharge (Qmean)) - were found to have significant positive effects on discharge-corrected, fine suspended-sediment concentrations. Conversely, increased elapsed time since the last low discharge event (~ 0.1-0.4 times Qmean), and the sum of low flow conditions over interannual time scales were found to cause significant negative trends in fine suspended sediment concentration residuals. Suspended sand concentrations are suppressed by increased elapsed time after threshold discharges of ~ 0.1-2 and 5-100 times Qmean, and increased low to no flow days over time scales from 1 to 2000 days. Current and previous year water yield and precipitation magnitudes correlate positively with sand concentration. Addition of fine sediment from lower Salinas hillslope or channel sources on the rising limb of the hydrograph is the major mechanism behind an overall positive hysteretic pattern, which was forensically supported by the annual occurrence of in-channel suspended sediment deposition by early season, channel

  4. Early diagenesis of trace metals used as an indicator of past productivity changes in coastal sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Lapp, B. ); Balzer, W. )

    1993-10-01

    In sediments of Kiel Bight, which differ significantly in their redox-states and the rates of C[sub org] degradation, depth profiles of both dissolved and solid-phase Fe, Mn, Cd, Cu, Ni, and Co were measured. Porewater fluxes of Cd, Cu and Ni were significantly higher at shallower (more oxic) stations as compared to highly reducing deeper subthermocline sediments, while Mn fluxes behaved the opposite way. When normalized to Fe for grain size correction the measured solid-phase metal contents revealed that the high porewater flux has led to near surface depletion of Mn from more anoxic sediments and to a reduced rate of accumulation of anthropogenic Cd in more oxic sediments. This difference in early diagenetic behaviour suggests the use of these metals as a proxy for the redox state and the intensity of carbon recycling. Contrary to the recent sediment layers the normalized metal contents of preindustrially deposited sediment layers were similar for both metals at all stations. Thus, at stations having highly anoxic sediments today, the preindustrial benthic flux must have been lower for Mn and higher for Cd, reflecting a shift from more oxic to more reducing conditions in subthermocline sediments during the last 100 years. This change of the redox state in subthermocline sediments reflects an increase of primary production and of subsequent C[sub org] input to the sediment due to eutrophication which accompanied industrialization.

  5. The effects of wildfire on the sediment yield of a coastal California watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Hatten, J.A.; Pasternack, G.B.; Gray, A.B.; Goni, M.A.; Wheatcroft, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of two wildfires separated by 31 yr in the chaparral-dominated Arroyo Seco watershed (293 km) of California provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the effects of wildfire on suspended-sediment yield. Here, we compile discharge and suspended-sediment sampling data from before and after the fires and show that the effects of the postfire responses differed markedly. The 1977 Marble Cone wildfire was followed by an exceptionally wet winter, which resulted in concentrations and fluxes of both fine and coarse suspended sediment that were ˜35 times greater than average (sediment yield during the 1978 water year was 11,000 t/km2/yr). We suggest that the combined 1977–1978 fire and flood had a recurrence interval of greater than 1000 yr. In contrast, the 2008 Basin Complex wildfire was followed by a drier than normal year, and although suspended-sediment fluxes and concentrations were significantly elevated compared to those expected for unburned conditions, the sediment yield during the 2009 water year was less than 1% of the post–Marble Cone wildfire yield. After the first postfire winters, sediment concentrations and yield decreased with time toward prefire relationships and continued to have significant rainfall dependence. We hypothesize that the differences in sediment yield were related to precipitation-enhanced hillslope erosion processes, such as rilling and mass movements. The millennial-scale effects of wildfire on sediment yield were explored further using Monte Carlo simulations, and these analyses suggest that infrequent wildfires followed by floods increase long-term suspended-sediment fluxes markedly. Thus, we suggest that the current approach of estimating sediment yield from sediment rating curves and discharge data—without including periodic perturbations from wildfires—may grossly underestimate actual sediment yields.

  6. Optimization of biostimulant for bioremediation of contaminated coastal sediment by response surface methodology (RSM) and evaluation of microbial diversity by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Subha, Bakthavachallam; Song, Young Chae; Woo, Jung Hui

    2015-09-15

    The present study aims to optimize the slow release biostimulant ball (BSB) for bioremediation of contaminated coastal sediment using response surface methodology (RSM). Different bacterial communities were evaluated using a pyrosequencing-based approach in contaminated coastal sediments. The effects of BSB size (1-5cm), distance (1-10cm) and time (1-4months) on changes in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and volatile solid (VS) reduction were determined. Maximum reductions of COD and VS, 89.7% and 78.8%, respectively, were observed at a 3cm ball size, 5.5cm distance and 4months; these values are the optimum conditions for effective treatment of contaminated coastal sediment. Most of the variance in COD and VS (0.9291 and 0.9369, respectively) was explained in our chosen models. BSB is a promising method for COD and VS reduction and enhancement of SRB diversity.

  7. Invertebrate colonization of leaves and roots within sediments of intermittent coastal plain streams across hydrologic phases

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared benthic invertebrate assemblages colonizing three types of buried substrates (leaves, roots and plastic roots) among three intermittent Coastal Plain streams over a one year period. Invertebrate density was significantly lower in root litterbags than in plastic root l...

  8. MICROBIAL GENOTOXICITY AS AN ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATOR FOR NEAR-COASTAL SEDIMENT PORE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A., Carol. B. Daniels and Cynthia A. Chancy. Submitted. The genotoxic potential of environmental media collected from coastal areas impacted by anthropogenic contaminants has not been reported frequently in the scientific literature, particularly in the Gulf of Mex...

  9. An evaluation of petrogenic hydrocarbons in northern Gulf of Alaska continental shelf sediments - The role of coastal oil seep inputs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Short, J.W.; Kolak, J.J.; Payne, J.R.; Van Kooten, G. K.

    2007-01-01

    We compared hydrocarbons in water, suspended particulate matter (SPM), and riparian sediment collected from coastal watersheds along the Yakataga foreland with corresponding hydrocarbons in Gulf of Alaska benthic sediments. This comparison allows an evaluation of hydrocarbon contributions to marine sediments from natural oil seeps, coal and organic matter (e.g., kerogen) associated with eroding siliciclastic rocks. The samples from oil seeps show extensive loss of low-molecular weight n-alkanes (sediment samples collected upstream from the oil seeps. After entering the fluvial systems, hydrocarbons from seep oils are rapidly diluted, and associate with the SPM phase as oil-mineral-aggregates (OMA). Johnston Creek, the watershed containing the most prolific seep, conveys detectable seep-derived hydrocarbons to the Gulf of Alaska, but overall seep inputs are largely attenuated by the (non-seep) petrogenic hydrocarbon content of the high SPM loads. In contrast to the geochemical signature of seep oil, Gulf of Alaska benthic sediments are characterized by abundant alkylated naphthalene homologues, relatively smooth n-alkane envelopes (n-C9 through n-C34, but with elevated levels of n-C27, n-C29, and n-C31), and small UCMs. Further, hydrocarbons in benthic sediments are highly intercorrelated. Taken together, these characteristics indicate that seep oil is a negligible petrogenic hydrocarbon source to the Gulf of Alaska continental shelf. Coaly material separated from the benthic sediment samples using a dense liquid (???2.00 g cm-3) also accounted for a minor portion of the total PAH (1-6%) and total n-alkanes (0.4-2%) in the benthic samples. Most of the hydrocarbon burden in the sediments is found in the denser sediment fraction and likely derives from organic matter contributed by denudation of siliciclastic formations in

  10. Communities of sediment ammonia-oxidizing bacteria along a coastal pollution gradient in the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Hou, Manhua; Xiong, Jinbo; Wang, Kai; Ye, Xiansen; Ye, Ran; Wang, Qiong; Hu, Changju; Zhang, Demin

    2014-09-15

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) discharges has caused eutrophication in coastal zones. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) convert ammonia to nitrite and play important roles in N transformation. Here, we used pyrosequencing based on the amoA gene to investigate the response of the sediment AOB community to an N pollution gradient in the East China Sea. The results showed that AOB assemblages were primarily affiliated with Nitrosospira-like lineages, and only 0.4% of those belonged to Nitrosomonas-like lineage. The Nitrosospira-like lineage was separated into four clusters that were most similar to the sediment AOB communities detected in adjacent marine regions. Additionally, one clade was out grouped from the AOB lineages, which shared the high similarities with pmoA gene. The AOB community structures substantially changed along the pollution gradient, which were primarily shaped by NH4(+)-N, NO3(-)-N, SO4(2)(-)-S, TP and Eh. These results demonstrated that coastal pollution could dramatically influence AOB communities, which, in turn, may change ecosystem function.

  11. Genetic assessment of meiobenthic community composition and spatial distribution in coastal sediments along northern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Brannock, Pamela M; Wang, Lei; Ortmann, Alice C; Waits, Damien S; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2016-08-01

    Meiobenthic (meiofauna and micro-eukaryotes) organisms are important contributors to ecosystem functioning in aquatic environments through their roles in nutrient transport, sediment stability, and food web interactions. Despite their ecological importance, information pertaining to variation of these communities at various spatial and temporal scales is not widely known. Many studies in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) have focused either on deep sea or continental shelf areas, while little attention has been paid to bays and coastal regions. Herein, we take a holistic approach by using high-throughput sequencing approaches to examine spatial variation in meiobenthic communities within Alabama bays and the coastal northern GOM region. Sediment samples were collected along three transects (Mississippi Sound: MS, FOCAL: FT, and Orange Beach: OB) from September 2010 to April 2012 and community composition was determined by metabarcoding the V9 hypervariable region of the nuclear18S rRNA gene. Results showed that Stramenopiles (diatoms), annelids, arthropods (copepods), and nematodes were the dominate groups within samples, while there was presence of other phyla throughout the dataset. Location played a larger role than time sampled in community composition. However, samples were collected over a short temporal scale. Samples clustered in reference to transect, with the most eastern transect (OB) having a distinct community composition in comparison to the other two transects (MS and FT). Communities also differed in reference to region (Bay versus Shelf). Bulk density and percent inorganic carbon were the only measured environmental factors that were correlated with community composition.

  12. Genetic assessment of meiobenthic community composition and spatial distribution in coastal sediments along northern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Brannock, Pamela M; Wang, Lei; Ortmann, Alice C; Waits, Damien S; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2016-08-01

    Meiobenthic (meiofauna and micro-eukaryotes) organisms are important contributors to ecosystem functioning in aquatic environments through their roles in nutrient transport, sediment stability, and food web interactions. Despite their ecological importance, information pertaining to variation of these communities at various spatial and temporal scales is not widely known. Many studies in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) have focused either on deep sea or continental shelf areas, while little attention has been paid to bays and coastal regions. Herein, we take a holistic approach by using high-throughput sequencing approaches to examine spatial variation in meiobenthic communities within Alabama bays and the coastal northern GOM region. Sediment samples were collected along three transects (Mississippi Sound: MS, FOCAL: FT, and Orange Beach: OB) from September 2010 to April 2012 and community composition was determined by metabarcoding the V9 hypervariable region of the nuclear18S rRNA gene. Results showed that Stramenopiles (diatoms), annelids, arthropods (copepods), and nematodes were the dominate groups within samples, while there was presence of other phyla throughout the dataset. Location played a larger role than time sampled in community composition. However, samples were collected over a short temporal scale. Samples clustered in reference to transect, with the most eastern transect (OB) having a distinct community composition in comparison to the other two transects (MS and FT). Communities also differed in reference to region (Bay versus Shelf). Bulk density and percent inorganic carbon were the only measured environmental factors that were correlated with community composition. PMID:27299291

  13. Occurrence of halogenated flame retardants in sediment off an urbanized coastal zone: association with urbanization and industrialization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Hui; Hu, Yuan-Jie; Luo, Pei; Bao, Lian-Jun; Qiu, Jian-Wen; Leung, Kenneth M Y; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2014-01-01

    To examine the impacts of urbanization and industrialization on the coastal environment, sediment samples were collected from an urbanized coastal zone (i.e., Daya Bay and Hong Kong waters of South China) and analyzed for 20 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and 10 alternative halogenated flame retardants (AHFRs). The sum concentration of PBDEs was in the range of 1.7-55 (mean: 17) ng g(-1), suggesting a moderate pollution level compared to the global range. The higher fractions of AHFRs (i.e., TBB+TBPH, BTBPE and DBDPE) than those of legacy PBDEs (i.e., penta-BDE, octa-BDE and deca-BDE) corresponded with the phasing out of PBDEs and increasing demand for AHFRs. Heavy contamination occurred at the estuary of Dan'ao River flowing through the Daya Bay Economic Zone, home to a variety of petrochemicals and electronics manufacturing facilities. The concentrations of HFRs in surface sediments of Hong Kong were the highest in Victoria Harbor, which receives around 1.4 million tons of primarily treated sewage daily, and a good relationship (r(2) = 0.80; p < 0.0001) between the HFR concentration and population density in each council district was observed, highlighting the effect of urbanization. Moreover, the AHFR concentrations were significantly correlated (r(2) > 0.73; p < 0.05) with the production volume of electronic devices, production value of electronic industries and population size, demonstrating the importance of industrializing and urbanizing processes in dictating the historical input patterns of AHFRs.

  14. Epidemic Escherichia coli ST131 and Enterococcus faecium ST17 in coastal marine sediments from an Italian beach.

    PubMed

    Vignaroli, C; Luna, G M; Pasquaroli, S; Di Cesare, A; Petruzzella, R; Paroncini, P; Biavasco, F

    2013-12-01

    Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) are used worldwide to assess water quality in coastal environments, but little is known about their genetic diversity and pathogenicity. This study examines the prevalence, antimicrobial resistance, virulence, and genetic diversity of FIB isolated from marine sediments from a central Adriatic seaside resort. FIB, recovered from 6 out of 7 sites, were significantly more abundant at sampling stations 300 m offshore than close to the shore. Escherichia coli accounted for 34.5% of fecal coliforms, and Enterococcus faecalis accounted for 32% of enterococci. Most isolates (27% of E. coli and 22% of enterococci) were recovered from the sediments that had the highest organic content. Multidrug-resistant E. coli (31%) and enterococci (22%) were found at nearly all sites, whereas 34.5% of E. coli and 28% of enterococci harboring multiple virulence factors were recovered from just two sites. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing showed wide genetic diversity among isolates. Human epidemic clones ( E. coli ST131 and Enterococcus faecium ST17) were identified for the first time by multilocus sequence typing in an area where bathing had not been prohibited. These clones were from sites far removed from riverine inputs, suggesting a wide diffusion of pathogenic FIB in the coastal environment and a high public health risk.

  15. Coastal surface sediment quality assessment in Leizhou Peninsula (South China Sea) based on SEM-AVS analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Lin, Jin-qin; Liang, Yan-yan; Gan, Hua-yang; Zeng, Xiang-yun; Duan, Zhi-peng; Liang, Kai; Liu, Xing; Huo, Zhen-hai; Wu, Chang-hua

    2014-07-15

    Surface sediments from the coastal area of the Leizhou Peninsula in the South China Sea were collected and analyzed and the potential ecological risks in the area were assessed based on acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) model. The AVS levels are between 0.109 and 55.6 μmol g(-1), with the average at 4.45 μmol g(-1). The high AVS-concentration zones include the aquaculture areas of Liusha Bay and the densely populated areas of Zhanjiang Bay. The simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) range from 0.026 μmol g(-1) to 8.61 μmol g(-1), with the average at 0.843 μmol g(-1). Most of high SEM-concentration stations were located in ports or aquaculture zones. Most of the coastal surface sediments of the Leizhou Peninsula (90%) had no adverse biological effects according to the criterion proposed by USEPA (2005); while adverse effects were uncertain in some stations (8%); even in 2 stations (2%) adverse biological effects may be expected.

  16. Chromium and nickel as indicators of source-to-sink sediment transfer in a Holocene alluvial and coastal system (Po Plain, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorosi, Alessandro

    2012-12-01

    A reliable quantitative estimate of changes in source-to-sink sediment transfer requires that high-resolution stratigraphic studies be coupled with accurate reconstructions of spatial and temporal variability of the sediment-routing system through time. Source-to-sink patterns from the contributing upland river catchments to the deltaic and coastal system are reconstructed from the Holocene succession of the Po Plain on the basis of selected geochemical indicators. Sediment supplied to the delta area by the major trunk river (the Po) exhibits naturally high Cr and Ni values, which invariably exceed the maximum permissible concentrations for unpolluted sites. This 'anomaly' reflects remarkable sediment contribution from ultramafic (ophiolitic) parent rocks cropping out in the Po drainage basin (Western Alps and NW Apennines). In contrast, alluvial and coastal plain deposits supplied by ophiolite-free, Apenninic catchments invariably display lower Cr and Ni contents. For constant sediment provenance domain, Cr and Ni distribution is observed to be controlled primarily by hydraulic sorting. Clay-silt deposits (floodplain, swamp and lagoon/bay facies associations) invariably show higher metal concentrations than their sandy counterparts (fluvial-channel, distributary-channel and beach-ridge facies associations). From a stratigraphic perspective, in sedimentary basins characterized by strong differences in sediment composition geochemical fingerprinting of individual facies associations framed by surfaces of chronostratigraphic significance is proposed as an invaluable approach towards an accurate quantitative assessment of sediment storage in alluvial and coastal depositional systems as opposed to volumetric reconstructions based on lithologic or geometric criteria alone.

  17. Metagenomic signatures of the Peru Margin subseafloor biosphere show a genetically distinct environment

    PubMed Central

    Biddle, Jennifer F.; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel; Schuster, Stephan C.; Brenchley, Jean E.; House, Christopher H.

    2008-01-01

    The subseafloor marine biosphere may be one of the largest reservoirs of microbial biomass on Earth and has recently been the subject of debate in terms of the composition of its microbial inhabitants, particularly on sediments from the Peru Margin. A metagenomic analysis was made by using whole-genome amplification and pyrosequencing of sediments from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1229 on the Peru Margin to further explore the microbial diversity and overall community composition within this environment. A total of 61.9 Mb of genetic material was sequenced from sediments at horizons 1, 16, 32, and 50 m below the seafloor. These depths include sediments from both primarily sulfate-reducing methane-generating regions of the sediment column. Many genes of the annotated genes, including those encoding ribosomal proteins, corresponded to those from the Chloroflexi and Euryarchaeota. However, analysis of the 16S small-subunit ribosomal genes suggests that Crenarchaeota are the abundant microbial member. Quantitative PCR confirms that uncultivated Crenarchaeota are indeed a major microbial group in these subsurface samples. These findings show that the marine subsurface is a distinct microbial habitat and is different from environments studied by metagenomics, especially because of the predominance of uncultivated archaeal groups. PMID:18650394

  18. Effects of sulfamethazine on denitrification and the associated N2O release in estuarine and coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lijun; Yin, Guoyu; Liu, Min; Zhou, Junliang; Zheng, Yanling; Gao, Juan; Zong, Haibo; Yang, Yi; Gao, Lei; Tong, Chunfu

    2015-01-01

    Denitrification is an important pathway of nitrogen removal and nitrous oxide (N2O) production in estuarine and coastal ecosystems, and plays a significant role in counteracting aquatic eutrophication induced by excessive nitrogen loads. Estuarine and coastal environments also suffer from increasing antibiotic contamination because of the growing production and usage of antibiotics. In this study, sediment slurry incubation experiments were conducted to determine the influence of sulfamethazine (SMT, a sulphonamide antibiotic) on denitrification and the associated N2O production. Genes important for denitrification and antibiotic resistance were quantified to investigate the microbial physiological mechanisms underlying SMT's effects on denitrification. SMT was observed to significantly inhibit denitrification rates, but increasing concentrations of SMT enhanced N2O release rates. The negative exponential relationships between denitrifying gene abundances and SMT concentrations showed that SMT reduced denitrification rates by restricting the growth of denitrifying bacteria, although the presence of the antibiotic resistance gene was detected during the incubation period. These results imply that the wide occurrence of residual antibiotics in estuarine and coastal ecosystems may influence eutrophication control, greenhouse effects, and atmospheric ozone depletion by inhibiting denitrification and stimulating the release of N2O.

  19. Effects of sulfamethazine on denitrification and the associated N2O release in estuarine and coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lijun; Yin, Guoyu; Liu, Min; Zhou, Junliang; Zheng, Yanling; Gao, Juan; Zong, Haibo; Yang, Yi; Gao, Lei; Tong, Chunfu

    2015-01-01

    Denitrification is an important pathway of nitrogen removal and nitrous oxide (N2O) production in estuarine and coastal ecosystems, and plays a significant role in counteracting aquatic eutrophication induced by excessive nitrogen loads. Estuarine and coastal environments also suffer from increasing antibiotic contamination because of the growing production and usage of antibiotics. In this study, sediment slurry incubation experiments were conducted to determine the influence of sulfamethazine (SMT, a sulphonamide antibiotic) on denitrification and the associated N2O production. Genes important for denitrification and antibiotic resistance were quantified to investigate the microbial physiological mechanisms underlying SMT's effects on denitrification. SMT was observed to significantly inhibit denitrification rates, but increasing concentrations of SMT enhanced N2O release rates. The negative exponential relationships between denitrifying gene abundances and SMT concentrations showed that SMT reduced denitrification rates by restricting the growth of denitrifying bacteria, although the presence of the antibiotic resistance gene was detected during the incubation period. These results imply that the wide occurrence of residual antibiotics in estuarine and coastal ecosystems may influence eutrophication control, greenhouse effects, and atmospheric ozone depletion by inhibiting denitrification and stimulating the release of N2O. PMID:25525860

  20. Influence of the Wax Lake Delta sediment diversion on aboveground plant productivity and carbon storage in deltaic island and mainland coastal marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLaune, R. D.; Sasser, C. E.; Evers-Hebert, E.; White, J. R.; Roberts, H. H.

    2016-08-01

    Coastal Louisiana is experiencing a significant loss of coastal wetland area due to increasing sea level rise, subsidence, sediment starvation and marsh collapse. The construction of large scale Mississippi River sediment diversions is currently being planned in an effort to help combat coastal wetlands losses at a rate of >50 km-2 y-1. The Wax Lake Delta (WLD) is currently being used as a model for evaluating potential land gain from large scale diversions of Mississippi River water and sediment. In this study, we determine the impact of the WLD diversion on plant production at newly formed islands within the delta and adjacent, mainland freshwater marshes. Plant aboveground productivity, sediment nutrient status and short term accretion were measured at three locations on a transect at each of three fresh water marsh sites along Hog Bayou and at six newly formed emerging island sites in the delta. Spring flooding has resulted in a greater increase in plant production and consequently, greater carbon sequestration potential in adjacent mainland marshes compared to the newly formed island sites, which contain less total carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) in the sediment. While sediment diversions are predicted to create land, as seen in island formation in the WLD, the greatest benefit of river sediment diversions from a carbon credit perspective might be to the adjacent freshwater mainland marshes for several reasons. Both greater plant production and sediment C accumulation are two important factors for marsh stability, while perhaps even more critical, is the prevention of the loss of stored sediment C in the marsh profile. This stored C would be lost without the introduction of freshwater, nutrients and sediment through river sediment diversion efforts.