Science.gov

Sample records for cobalt salen derivative

  1. Improved catalytic activity of homochiral dimeric cobalt-salen complex in hydrolytic kinetic resolution of terminal racemic epoxides.

    PubMed

    Kureshy, Rukhsana I; Singh, Surendra; Khan, Noor-Ul H; Abdi, Sayed H R; Ahmad, Irshad; Bhatt, Achyut; Jasra, Raksh V

    2005-11-01

    Enantiomerically pure epoxides (99%, ee) and diols (98%, ee) from racemic epichlorohydrin, 1,2-epoxypropane, 1,2-epoxyhexane, 1,2-epoxyoctane, and 1,2-epoxydodecane were obtained in 2-12 h by hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) using the recyclable dimeric homochiral Co(III)-salen complex 1' (0.2 mol %) derived from 5,5-(2',2'-dimethylpropane)-di-[(R,R)-{N-(3-tert-butylsalicylidine)-N'-(3',5'-di-tert-butylsalicylidine)}-1,2-cyclohexanediamine] with cobalt(II) acetate. Unlike its monomeric version, the catalyst could be recycled several times without loss in performance. The use of BF(4) as counter ion in HKR reactions was also investigated.

  2. Soluble monometallic salen complexes derived from O-functionalised diamines as metalloligands for the synthesis of heterobimetallic complexes.

    PubMed

    Schley, Michael; Fritzsche, Sebastian; Lönnecke, Peter; Hey-Hawkins, Evamarie

    2010-05-01

    O-Functionalised salen ligands were employed as bridging ligands in the synthesis of homo- and heterometallic salen complexes with early and late transition metals (H(2)salen: N,N'-bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine, systematic name: 2,2'-{ethane-1,2-diylbis(nitrilomethylidine)}diphenol). A new type of O-functionalised salen ligand was synthesised, which contains alkyl groups to enhance the solubility in organic solvents as well as carboxyl groups to allow introduction of an early transition metal. Two new salen ligands derived from O-functionalised diamines were synthesised from 3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylaldehyde (bsal) and 3,4-diaminobenzoic acid (4cpn) or (R)-2,3-diaminopropionic acid (cen). By using the aryl diamines, a conjugated backbone is obtained, and the alkyl diamines can be used to introduce a chiral centre. The salen ligand derived from 3,4-diaminobenzoic acid was accessible only via a zinc(II)-mediated template reaction. Monometallic salen complexes could be obtained by template synthesis with nickel(II) and copper(II). The analogous chromium(III), manganese(III) and molybdenum(IV) salen complexes were synthesised directly from the salen ligands. The crystal structures of the molybdenum(IV) salen complex and a decomposition product thereof gave insight into the stability of this compound. Starting from (R)-2,3-diaminopropionic acid the corresponding nickel(II), chromium(III), manganese(III) and molybdenum(IV) salen complexes were obtained. Reactions of the conjugated nickel(II) salen complex with metallocene derivatives resulted in the formation of soluble di- and trinuclear heterobimetallic complexes, depending on the stoichiometry used. The compounds were characterised by NMR, IR and EPR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and, for selected complexes, by X-ray crystallography. For selected mono- and bimetallic salen complexes the catalytic activity in the epoxidation of styrene was tested under different reaction conditions and with different oxidising

  3. The preparation and use of metal salen complexes derived from cyclobutane diamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Smita

    The helix is an important chiral motif in nature, there is increasing development in field of helical transition metal complexes and related supramolecular structures. Hence, the goals of this work are to apply the principles of helicity in order to produce metal complexes with predictable molecular shapes and to study their properties as asymmetric catalysts. Computational studies suggest that the (1R,2 R)-cyclobutyldiamine unit can produce highly twisted salen complexes with a large energy barrier between the M and P helical forms. To test this prediction, the tartrate salt of (1R,2R)-cyclobutyldiamine was synthesized and condensed with a series of saliclaldehydes to produce novel salen ligands. The salicylaldehydes chosen have extended phenanthryl or benz[a]anthryl sidearms to encourage formation of helical coordination complexes. These ligands were metallated with zinc, iron and manganese salts to produce salen metal complexes which were characterized by NMR analysis, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and IR spectroscopy. A second ligand type, neutral bis(pyridine-imine) has also been synthesized from (1R,2R)-cyclobutyldiamine and quinolylaldehydes. The synthesis of bis(pyridine-imine) ligands was conducted using greener method, solvent assisted grinding. These ligands, in-situ with nickel metal salts, showed good catalytic activity for asymmetric Diels-Alder reactions. The third ligand type studied was chiral acid-functionalized Schiff-base ligands. These were synthesized by the condensation of 3-formyl-5-methyl salicylic acid and (1R,2R)-cyclobutyldiamine. With this type of ligand, there is possibility of producing both mono and dinuclear metal complexes. In our studies, we were only able to synthesize mononuclear complexs. These were tested as catalysts for asymmetric direct Mannich-type reaction, but were found to be ineffective.

  4. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the... and to prevent “gushing.” (b) Food containing any added cobaltous salts is deemed to be adulterated...

  5. The enhanced catalytic performance of cobalt catalysts towards butadiene polymerization by introducing a labile donor in a salen ligand.

    PubMed

    Gong, Dirong; Wang, Baolin; Jia, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Xuequan

    2014-03-14

    A family of cobalt complexes supported by a tridentate Schiff base ligand with a labile donor (O, S, N) as a pendant arm (Co1-Co12, formulated as CoL2) were synthesized by the treatment of the corresponding ligands with cobalt acetate tetrahydrate. The resultant complexes were well characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, magnetic moment as well as EI-MS. The solid-state structures of Co7 and Co12 were determined by X-ray diffraction and both established a distorted octahedron geometry around the cobalt center. The butadiene polymerization capabilities of the 12 complexes were evaluated and compared in representative cases. Diethylaluminum chloride (AlEt2Cl) was found to be the compatible activator resulting in highly active catalysts for producing polybutadiene of 93.8-98.2% cis-1,4 enchainment with negligible 1,2-structure and trans-1,4 units. It appears that a certain degree of lability of the donor is beneficial for high catalytic activity, generally following the order of O > S > N, and the high cis-1,4 selectivity. Moreover, the remarkable thermal stability of these systems has been achieved: the catalytic systems have the ability of conducting a high level of active and selective polymerization, reaching an upper limit of polymerization temperature of about 70 °C. The enhanced catalytic performances were further rationalized by the established diene polymerization mechanism, which could shed light on developing highly selective and reactive industrially applicable catalysts with an enhanced thermal stability. PMID:24468706

  6. The enhanced catalytic performance of cobalt catalysts towards butadiene polymerization by introducing a labile donor in a salen ligand.

    PubMed

    Gong, Dirong; Wang, Baolin; Jia, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Xuequan

    2014-03-14

    A family of cobalt complexes supported by a tridentate Schiff base ligand with a labile donor (O, S, N) as a pendant arm (Co1-Co12, formulated as CoL2) were synthesized by the treatment of the corresponding ligands with cobalt acetate tetrahydrate. The resultant complexes were well characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, magnetic moment as well as EI-MS. The solid-state structures of Co7 and Co12 were determined by X-ray diffraction and both established a distorted octahedron geometry around the cobalt center. The butadiene polymerization capabilities of the 12 complexes were evaluated and compared in representative cases. Diethylaluminum chloride (AlEt2Cl) was found to be the compatible activator resulting in highly active catalysts for producing polybutadiene of 93.8-98.2% cis-1,4 enchainment with negligible 1,2-structure and trans-1,4 units. It appears that a certain degree of lability of the donor is beneficial for high catalytic activity, generally following the order of O > S > N, and the high cis-1,4 selectivity. Moreover, the remarkable thermal stability of these systems has been achieved: the catalytic systems have the ability of conducting a high level of active and selective polymerization, reaching an upper limit of polymerization temperature of about 70 °C. The enhanced catalytic performances were further rationalized by the established diene polymerization mechanism, which could shed light on developing highly selective and reactive industrially applicable catalysts with an enhanced thermal stability.

  7. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the chemicals, CoC4H6O4, CoCl2, and CoSO4.They have been used in...

  8. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the chemicals, CoC4H6O4, CoCl2, and CoSO4.They have been used in...

  9. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the chemicals, CoC4H6O4, CoCl2, and CoSO4.They have been used in...

  10. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the chemicals, CoC4H6O4, CoCl2, and CoSO4.They have been used in...

  11. Cobalt Derivatives as Promising Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Heffern, Marie C.; Yamamoto, Natsuho; Holbrook, Robert J.; Eckermann, Amanda L.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic complexes are versatile platforms for the development of potent and selective pharmaceutical agents. Cobalt possesses a diverse array of properties that can be manipulated to yield promising drug candidates. Investigations into the mechanism of cobalt therapeutic agents can provide valuable insight into the physicochemical properties that can be harnessed for drug development. This review presents examples of bioactive cobalt complexes with special attention to their mechanisms of action. Specifically, cobalt complexes that elicit biological effects through protein inhibition, modification of drug activity, and bioreductive activation are discussed. Insights gained from these examples reveal features of cobalt that can be rationally tuned to produce therapeutics with high specificity and improved efficacy for the biomolecule or pathway of interest. PMID:23270779

  12. The first salen-type ligands derived from 3',5'-diamino-3',5'-dideoxythymidine and -dideoxyxylothymidine and their corresponding copper(II) complexes

    PubMed Central

    Koth, Daniel; Gottschaldt, Michael; Görls, Helmar; Pohle, Karolin

    2006-01-01

    Background There are many nucleoside metal complexes known. According to observations made, only very few of them reveal their central ion to be co-ordinated by the sugar part of their molecules. The regio- and stereospecific exchange of the hydroxyl groups at the sugar moiety by chelating units improves its complexation ability and should give access to a new class of chiral ligands. Results In this paper we present the synthesis of 3',5'-diamino substituted thymidines with ribo- as well as xylo-configuration and the preparation of copper(II) complexes derived from their corresponding Schiff bases. Starting from thymidine, the amino derivatives were prepared in a three and four step reaction sequence respectively. The absolute configuration of the ligands was proved by the three-bond 1H-1H spin spin coupling constants 3J obtained by NMR-studies. Condensation of the amino derivatives with salicylic aldehydes resulted in the corresponding diimines, which represent a new class of chiral salen-type ligands. All ligands formed uncharged stable copper(II) complexes. The structure of 3',5'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylaldiminato)-3',5'-dideoxyxylothymidine-copper(II) could be determined by single crystal X-ray structure analysis. The copper centre in this complex has distorted tetrahedral coordination geometry. Conclusion For the synthesis of 3',5'-diamino-3',5'-dideoxy thymidines with xylo- as well as ribo-configuration an effective synthesis pathway has been developed. Their corresponding salicylidene imines form stable coordination compounds with copper(II) ions. They represent the first salen type complexes of nucleosides with this substitution pattern. PMID:16934149

  13. M(Salen)-derived Nitrogen-doped M/C (M = Fe, Co, Ni) Porous Nanocomposites for Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Cheng, Fangyi; Wang, Shiwen; Zhang, Tianran; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials containing non-precious metal and/or doped nitrogen have attracted tremendous attention in the field of electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Herein, we report the synthesis and electrochemical properties of a new family of nitrogen-doped metal/carbon (M/N/C, M = Fe, Co, Ni) nanocomposites. The M/N/C nanocomposites, in which metal nanoparticles are embedded in the highly porous nitrogen-doped carbon matrix, have been synthesized by simply pyrolyzing M(salen) (salen = N,N′-bis(salicylidene)-ethylenediamine) complex precursors. The prepared Co/N/C and Fe/N/C exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic activity (with onset potential of 0.96 V for Fe/N/C and half-wave potential of 0.80 V for Co/N/C) and high stability for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The superior performance of the nanocomposites is attributed to their bimodal-pore structure, high surface area, as well as uniform distribution of high-density nitrogen and metal active sites. PMID:24865606

  14. M(salen)-derived nitrogen-doped M/C (M = Fe, Co, Ni) porous nanocomposites for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing; Cheng, Fangyi; Wang, Shiwen; Zhang, Tianran; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials containing non-precious metal and/or doped nitrogen have attracted tremendous attention in the field of electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Herein, we report the synthesis and electrochemical properties of a new family of nitrogen-doped metal/carbon (M/N/C, M = Fe, Co, Ni) nanocomposites. The M/N/C nanocomposites, in which metal nanoparticles are embedded in the highly porous nitrogen-doped carbon matrix, have been synthesized by simply pyrolyzing M(salen) (salen = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-ethylenediamine) complex precursors. The prepared Co/N/C and Fe/N/C exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic activity (with onset potential of 0.96 V for Fe/N/C and half-wave potential of 0.80 V for Co/N/C) and high stability for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The superior performance of the nanocomposites is attributed to their bimodal-pore structure, high surface area, as well as uniform distribution of high-density nitrogen and metal active sites. PMID:24865606

  15. Formation of a cobalt(III)-phenoxyl radical complex by acetic acid promoted aerobic oxidation of a Co(II)salen complex.

    PubMed

    Vinck, Evi; Murphy, Damien M; Fallis, Ian A; Strevens, Robert R; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2010-03-01

    The activation of N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexane-diamino Co(II), [Co(II)(1)], by the addition of acetic acid under aerobic conditions has been investigated by a range of spectroscopic techniques including continuous-wave EPR, HYSCORE, pulsed ENDOR, and resonance Raman. These measurements have revealed for the first time the formation of a coordinated cobalt(III)-bound phenoxyl radical labeled [Co(III)(1(*))(OAc)(n)](OAc)(m) (n = m = 1 or n = 2, m = 0). This cobalt(III)-bound phenoxyl radical is characterized by the following spin Hamiltonian parameters: g(x) = 2.0060, g(y) = 2.0031, g(z) = 1.9943, A(x) = 17 MHz, A(y) = 55 MHz, and A(z) = 14 MHz. Although the radical contains coordinated acetate(s), the experiments unambiguously proved that the phenoxyl radical is situated on ligand (1) as opposed to a phenoxyl radical ligated to cobalt in the axial position. Density functional theory computations on different models corroborate the stability of such a phenoxyl radical species and suggest the ligation of one or two acetate molecules to the complex. A mechanism is proposed, which accounts for the formation of this unusual and extremely robust phenoxyl radical, never previously observed for [Co(1)].

  16. Asymmetric hydrolytic kinetic resolution with recyclable macrocyclic Co(III)-salen complexes: a practical strategy in the preparation of (R)-mexiletine and (S)-propranolol.

    PubMed

    Sadhukhan, Arghya; Khan, Noor-ul H; Roy, Tamal; Kureshy, Rukhsana I; Abdi, Sayed H R; Bajaj, Hari C

    2012-04-23

    A chiral cobalt(III) complex (1e) was synthesized by the interaction of cobalt(II) acetate and ferrocenium hexafluorophosphate with a chiral dinuclear macrocyclic salen ligand that was derived from 1R,2R-(-)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane with trigol bis-aldehyde. A variety of epoxides and glycidyl ethers were suitable substrates for the reaction with water in the presence of chiral macrocyclic salen complex 1e at room temperature to afford chiral epoxides and diols by hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR). Excellent yields (47% with respect to the epoxides, 53% with respect to the diols) and high enantioselectivity (ee>99% for the epoxides, up to 96% for the diols) were achieved in 2.5-16 h. The Co(III) macrocyclic salen complex (1e) maintained its performance on a multigram scale and was expediently recycled a number of times. We further extended our study of chiral epoxides that were synthesized by using HKR to the synthesis of chiral drug molecules (R)-mexiletine and (S)-propranolol. PMID:22422658

  17. CO2/ethylene oxide copolymerization and ligand variation for a highly active salen-cobalt(III) complex tethering 4 quaternary ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong Yeob; Lee, Jung Jae; Varghese, Jobi Kodiyan; Na, Sung Jae; Sujith, S; Go, Min Jeong; Lee, Junseong; Ok, Myung-Ahn; Lee, Bun Yeoul

    2013-07-01

    A cobalt(III) complex (1) of a salcy-type ligand tethering 4 quaternary ammonium salts, which is thought to act as a highly active catalyst for CO2/propylene oxide (PO) copolymerization, also shows high activity (TOF, 25,900 h(-1); TON, 518,000; 2.72 kg polymer per g cat) and selectivity (>98%) for CO2/ethylene oxide (EO) copolymerization that results in high-molecular-weight polymers (M(n), 200,000-300,000) that have strictly alternating repeating units. The related cobalt(III) complexes 11-14 were prepared through variations of the ligand framework of 1 by replacing the trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane unit with 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine, trans-1,2-diaminocyclopentane, or 1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diamine or by replacing the aldimine bond with ketimine. These ligand frameworks are thought to favour the formation of the cis-β configuration in complexation, and the formation of the cis-β configuration in 11-14 was confirmed through NMR studies or X-ray crystallographic studies of model complexes not bearing the quaternary ammonium salts. Complexes 11, 13, and 14, which adopt the cis-β configuration even in DMSO did not show any activity for CO2/PO copolymerization. Complex 12, which was constructed with trans-1,2-diaminocyclopentane and fluctuated in DMSO between the coordination and de-coordination of the acetate ligand as observed for 1, showed fairly high activity (TOF, 12,400 h(-1)). This fluctuating behaviour may play a role in polymerization. However, complex 12 did not compete with 1 in terms of activity, selectivity, and the catalyst cost.

  18. Crystal structure of an unknown solvate of {2,2'-[ethane-1,2-diylbis(nitrilo-methanylyl-idene)]diphenolato-κ(4) O,N,N',O'}(N-ferrocenylisonicotinamide-κN (1))cobalt(II): a Co(II)-salen complex that forms hydrogen-bonded dimers.

    PubMed

    Brautigam, Bryan; Herholdt, Chelsea; Farnsworth, William; Brudi, Ellen; McDonald, Eric; Wu, Guang; Contakes, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    The title compound, [CoFe(C5H5)(C16H14N2O2)(C11H9N2O)], was prepared as an air-stable red-brown solid by mixing equimolar amounts of {2,2'-[ethane-1,2-diylbis(nitrilo-methanylyl-idene)]diphenolato}cobalt(II) and N-ferrocenylisonicotinamide in dry di-chloro-methane under nitro-gen and was characterized by ESI-MS, IR, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure at 100 K has triclinic (P-1) symmetry and indicates that the complex crystallizes as a mixture of λ and δ conformers. It exhibits the expected square pyramidal geometry about Co, and forms hydrogen-bonded dimers through amide N-H groups and phenolate O atoms on an adjacent mol-ecule. The involvement of only half of the salen ring structure in hydrogen-bonding inter-actions results in slight folding of the salen ring away from the pyridine coordination site in the δ conformer with an inter-salicyl-idene fold angle of 9.9 (7)°. In contrast, the λ conformer is nearly planar. The dimers pack into an open structure containing channels filled with highly disordered solvent mol-ecules. These solvent molecules' contributions to the intensity data were removed with the SQUEEZE procedure [Spek (2015). Acta Cryst. C71, 9-18] available in PLATON.

  19. Crystal structure of an unknown solvate of {2,2'-[ethane-1,2-diylbis(nitrilo-methanylyl-idene)]diphenolato-κ(4) O,N,N',O'}(N-ferrocenylisonicotinamide-κN (1))cobalt(II): a Co(II)-salen complex that forms hydrogen-bonded dimers.

    PubMed

    Brautigam, Bryan; Herholdt, Chelsea; Farnsworth, William; Brudi, Ellen; McDonald, Eric; Wu, Guang; Contakes, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    The title compound, [CoFe(C5H5)(C16H14N2O2)(C11H9N2O)], was prepared as an air-stable red-brown solid by mixing equimolar amounts of {2,2'-[ethane-1,2-diylbis(nitrilo-methanylyl-idene)]diphenolato}cobalt(II) and N-ferrocenylisonicotinamide in dry di-chloro-methane under nitro-gen and was characterized by ESI-MS, IR, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure at 100 K has triclinic (P-1) symmetry and indicates that the complex crystallizes as a mixture of λ and δ conformers. It exhibits the expected square pyramidal geometry about Co, and forms hydrogen-bonded dimers through amide N-H groups and phenolate O atoms on an adjacent mol-ecule. The involvement of only half of the salen ring structure in hydrogen-bonding inter-actions results in slight folding of the salen ring away from the pyridine coordination site in the δ conformer with an inter-salicyl-idene fold angle of 9.9 (7)°. In contrast, the λ conformer is nearly planar. The dimers pack into an open structure containing channels filled with highly disordered solvent mol-ecules. These solvent molecules' contributions to the intensity data were removed with the SQUEEZE procedure [Spek (2015). Acta Cryst. C71, 9-18] available in PLATON. PMID:26396858

  20. Cobalt.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    Cobalt has been a recognized allergen capable of causing contact dermatitis for decades. Why, therefore, has it been named 2016 "Allergen of the Year"? Simply put, new information has come to light in the last few years regarding potential sources of exposure to this metallic substance. In addition to reviewing some background on our previous understanding of cobalt exposures, this article will highlight the recently recognized need to consider leather as a major site of cobalt and the visual cues suggesting the presence of cobalt in jewelry. In addition, a chemical spot test for cobalt now allows us to better identify its presence in suspect materials.

  1. Salen complexes with dianionic counterions

    DOEpatents

    Job, Gabriel E.; Farmer, Jay J.; Cherian, Anna E.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention describes metal salen complexes having dianionic counterions. Such complexes can be readily precipitated and provide an economical method for the purification and isolation of the complexes, and are useful to prepare novel polymer compositions.

  2. Derivation of a chronic oral reference dose for cobalt.

    PubMed

    Finley, Brent L; Monnot, Andrew D; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Gaffney, Shannon H

    2012-12-01

    Cobalt (Co) is an essential element in humans as a component of vitamin B12. However, at high levels Co exposure has been shown to have detrimental effects. This study was designed to identify a chronic oral reference dose (RfD) for Co. Currently available data indicate that non-cancer health effects associated with Co exposure may include hematological, neurological, immunological, reproductive, cardiovascular, and endocrine responses. This analysis employs the standard US EPA risk assessment methodology for establishing a chronic RfD. In this analysis, the Jaimet and Thode (1955) 10-week, multiple dose human study of thyroid effects (decreased iodine uptake) in children was determined to be the most robust and sensitive study for identifying a potential point of departure dose (POD). A dose of 0.9 mgCo/kg-day was chosen as the POD. Consistent with the US EPA's previous derivation of the perchlorate RfD, which is also based on decreased iodine uptake in humans, we considered several uncertainly factors (UFs), and determined that a factor of 10 for human variability was appropriate, as well as a factor of three for database adequacy. Applying an aggregate uncertainty factor of 30 to the POD yields a chronic oral RfD of 0.03 mg/kg-day. We believe this value would be protective of non-cancer health effects in the general population for a lifetime of daily exposure to Co.

  3. Cobalt Oxide Hollow Nanoparticles Derived by Bio-Templating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Choi, Sang H.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; King, Glen C.; Watt, Gerald D.

    2005-01-01

    We present here the first fabrication of hollow cobalt oxide nanoparticles produced by a protein-regulated site-specific reconstitution process in aqueous solution and describe the metal growth mechanism in the ferritin interior.

  4. Transition metal complexes of a salen-fullerene diad: redox and catalytically active nanostructures for delivery of metals in nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Maria A; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Davies, E Stephen; Mancel, Dorothée; Thomas, Bradley E; Suyetin, Mikhail; Bichoutskaia, Elena; Schröder, Martin; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2013-09-01

    A covalently-linked salen-C60 (H2L) assembly binds a range of transition metal cations in close proximity to the fullerene cage to give complexes [M(L)] (M=Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pd), [MCl(L)] (M=Cr, Fe) and [V(O)L]. Attaching salen covalently to the C60 cage only marginally slows down metal binding at the salen functionality compared to metal binding to free salen. Coordination of metal cations to salen-C60 introduces to these fullerene derivatives strong absorption bands across the visible spectrum from 400 to 630 nm, the optical features of which are controlled by the nature of the transition metal. The redox properties of the metal-salen-C60 complexes are determined both by the fullerene and by the nature of the transition metal, enabling the generation of a wide range of fullerene-containing charged species, some of which possess two or more unpaired electrons. The presence of the fullerene cage enhances the affinity of these complexes for carbon nanostructures, such as single-, double- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphitised carbon nanofibres, without detrimental effects on the catalytic activity of the metal centre, as demonstrated in styrene oxidation catalysed by [Cu(L)]. This approach shows promise for applications of salen-C60 complexes in heterogeneous catalysis.

  5. Exposure to cobalt causes transcriptomic and proteomic changes in two rat liver derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Permenter, Matthew G; Dennis, William E; Sutto, Thomas E; Jackson, David A; Lewis, John A; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt is a transition group metal present in trace amounts in the human diet, but in larger doses it can be acutely toxic or cause adverse health effects in chronic exposures. Its use in many industrial processes and alloys worldwide presents opportunities for occupational exposures, including military personnel. While the toxic effects of cobalt have been widely studied, the exact mechanisms of toxicity remain unclear. In order to further elucidate these mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of exposure or effect, we exposed two rat liver-derived cell lines, H4-II-E-C3 and MH1C1, to two concentrations of cobalt chloride. We examined changes in gene expression using DNA microarrays in both cell lines and examined changes in cytoplasmic protein abundance in MH1C1 cells using mass spectrometry. We chose to closely examine differentially expressed genes and proteins changing in abundance in both cell lines in order to remove cell line specific effects. We identified enriched pathways, networks, and biological functions using commercial bioinformatic tools and manual annotation. Many of the genes, proteins, and pathways modulated by exposure to cobalt appear to be due to an induction of a hypoxic-like response and oxidative stress. Genes that may be differentially expressed due to a hypoxic-like response are involved in Hif-1α signaling, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and other energy metabolism related processes. Gene expression changes linked to oxidative stress are also known to be involved in the NRF2-mediated response, protein degradation, and glutathione production. Using microarray and mass spectrometry analysis, we were able to identify modulated genes and proteins, further elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of cobalt, and identify biomarkers of exposure and effect in vitro, thus providing targets for focused in vivo studies.

  6. Exposure to Cobalt Causes Transcriptomic and Proteomic Changes in Two Rat Liver Derived Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Permenter, Matthew G.; Dennis, William E.; Sutto, Thomas E.; Jackson, David A.; Lewis, John A.; Stallings, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt is a transition group metal present in trace amounts in the human diet, but in larger doses it can be acutely toxic or cause adverse health effects in chronic exposures. Its use in many industrial processes and alloys worldwide presents opportunities for occupational exposures, including military personnel. While the toxic effects of cobalt have been widely studied, the exact mechanisms of toxicity remain unclear. In order to further elucidate these mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of exposure or effect, we exposed two rat liver-derived cell lines, H4-II-E-C3 and MH1C1, to two concentrations of cobalt chloride. We examined changes in gene expression using DNA microarrays in both cell lines and examined changes in cytoplasmic protein abundance in MH1C1 cells using mass spectrometry. We chose to closely examine differentially expressed genes and proteins changing in abundance in both cell lines in order to remove cell line specific effects. We identified enriched pathways, networks, and biological functions using commercial bioinformatic tools and manual annotation. Many of the genes, proteins, and pathways modulated by exposure to cobalt appear to be due to an induction of a hypoxic-like response and oxidative stress. Genes that may be differentially expressed due to a hypoxic-like response are involved in Hif-1α signaling, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and other energy metabolism related processes. Gene expression changes linked to oxidative stress are also known to be involved in the NRF2-mediated response, protein degradation, and glutathione production. Using microarray and mass spectrometry analysis, we were able to identify modulated genes and proteins, further elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of cobalt, and identify biomarkers of exposure and effect in vitro, thus providing targets for focused in vivo studies. PMID:24386269

  7. Spectroscopic studies and density functional theory investigations of a cobalt phthalocyanine derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo, Roberto; Pérez-Manríquez, Liliana; Sánchez-Vergara, M. E.

    2015-03-01

    Colloidal solutions at room temperature were used to obtain various polymorphic forms of a [PcCoCN]n and double potassium salt from 1,8 dihydroxyanthraquinone derivative. Nanocrystals in the form α and β were characterized using IR and UV-Vis spectroscopy techniques. Likewise in this context, an energy doublet in the absorption spectra of the monoclinic form at 1.8 and 2 eV was observed. The complex structure inherent to the spectra of the CoPc derivative is attributed to the simultaneous presence of both crystalline and molecular phases in the samples. The optical absorption of the compound was also investigated in order to evaluate changes in the electronic structure of these metal organic nanostructures. The absorption spectra of the CoPc derivative recorded in the UV-Vis region manifested two absorption bands, namely the Q- and B- bands. DFT calculations of this structure help to establish the source of the spectroscopic behavior and also lead to a particular phenomenon not known previously in this kind of complex, because the optimized structure of the cobalt complex manifests a very strange deformation of the bond between the anthraquinone derivative and the cobalt atom; the origin of this deformation is also discussed.

  8. Crystal structures and catalytic performance of three new methoxy substituted salen type nickel(II) Schiff base complexes derived from meso-1,2-diphenyl-1,2-ethylenediamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, Abolfazl; Behzad, Mahdi; Pooyan, Mahsa; Amiri Rudbari, Hadi; Bruno, Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    Three new nickel(II) complexes of a series of methoxy substituted salen type Schiff base ligands were synthesized and characterized by IR, UV-Vis and 1H NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The ligands were synthesized from the condensation of meso-1,2-diphenyl-1,2-ethylenediamine with n-methoxysalicylaldehyde (n = 3, 4 and 5). Crystal structures of these complexes were determined. Electrochemical behavior of the complexes was studied by means of cyclic voltammetry in DMSO solutions. Catalytic performance of the complexes was studied in the epoxidation of cyclooctene using tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBHP) as oxidant under various conditions to find the optimum operating parameters. Low catalytic activity with moderate epoxide selectivity was observed in in-solvent conditions but in the solvent-free conditions, enhanced catalytic activity with high epoxide selectivity was achieved.

  9. Characteristics of polyaniline cobalt supported catalysts for epoxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Grzegorz; Pielichowski, Jan; Grzesik, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    A study of polyaniline (PANI) doping with various cobalt compounds, that is, cobalt(II) chloride, cobalt(II) acetate, and cobalt(II) salen, is presented. The catalysts were prepared by depositing cobalt compounds onto the polymer surface. PANI powders containing cobalt ions were obtained by one- or two-step method suspending PANI in the following acetonitrile/acetic acid solution or acetonitrile and then acetic acid solution. Moreover different ratios of Co(II) : PANI were studied. Catalysts obtained with both methods and at all ratios were investigated using various techniques including AAS and XPS spectroscopy. The optimum conditions for preparation of PANI/Co catalysts were established. Catalytic activity of polyaniline cobalt(II) supported catalysts was tested in dec-1-ene epoxidation with molecular oxygen at room temperature. The relationship between the amount of cobalt species, measured with both AAS and XPS techniques, and the activity of PANI-Co catalysts has been established.

  10. Novel nanohybrids of cobalt(III) Schiff base complexes and clay: Synthesis and structural determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianfar, Ali Hossein; Mahmood, Wan Ahmad Kamil; Dinari, Mohammad; Azarian, Mohammad Hossein; Khafri, Fatemeh Zare

    2014-06-01

    The [Co(Me2Salen)(PBu3)(OH2)]BF4 and [Co(Me2Salen)(PPh3)(Solv)]BF4, complexes were synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis techniques. The coordination geometry of [Co(Me2Salen)(PPh3)(H2O)]BF4 was determined by X-ray crystallography. It has been found that the complex is containing [Co(Me2Salen)(PPh3)(H2O)]BF4 and [Co(Me2Salen)(PPh3)(EtOH)]BF4 hexacoordinate species in the solid state. Cobalt atom exhibits a distorted octahedral geometry and the Me2Salen ligand has the N2O2 coordinated environment in the equatorial plane. The [Co(Me2Salen)(PPh3)(H2O)]BF4 complex shows a dimeric structure via hydrogen bonding between the phenolate oxygen and hydrogens of coordinated H2O molecule. These complexes were incorporated into Montmorillonite-K10 nanoclay. The modified clays were identified by FT-IR, XRD, EDX, TGA/DTA, SEM and TEM techniques. According to the XRD results of the new nanohybrid materials, the Schiff base complexes are intercalated in the interlayer spaces of the clay. SEM and TEM micrographs show that the resulting hybrid nanomaterials have layer structures. Also, TGA/DTG results show that the intercalation reaction was taken place successfully.

  11. Core-double-shell Fe3O4@carbon@poly(In(III)-carboxylate) microspheres: cycloaddition of CO2 and epoxides on coordination polymer shells constituted by imidazolium-derived Al(III)-Salen bifunctional catalysts.

    PubMed

    An, Qiao; Li, Zifeng; Graff, Robert; Guo, Jia; Gao, Haifeng; Wang, Changchun

    2015-03-01

    A hydrid microsphere Fe3O4@carbon@poly(In(III)-carboxylate) consisting of a cluster of Fe3O4 nanoparticles as the core, a carbon layer as the inner shell and a porous In(III)-carboxylate coordination polymer as the outer shell was prepared and applied as a recyclable catalyst for the cycloaddition reaction of CO2 and epoxides. Construction of this hybrid microsphere was achieved in the two steps, including (1) the one-pot solvothermal synthesis of Fe3O4@C particles with the abundant carboxylic groups on the carbon surface and (2) the subsequent growth of the outer shell polymers based on the precipitation coordination polymerization. Imidazolium-substituted Salen ligands were synthesized and chelated with the In(III) ions using the terminal carboxylic groups. The coordination polymer shell was formed on the Fe3O4@C particles, and the structures including shell thickness, surface area and porosity could be varied by tuning the feeding ratios of the In(III) ions and the ligands. The optimal structure of the coordination polymers showed a shell thickness of ca. 45 nm with ∼5 nm of mesopore, 174.7 m(2)/g of surface area and 0.2175 cm(3)/g of pore volume. In light of gas uptake capability, catalytic activity and magnetic susceptibility, cycloaddition of CO2 with a series of epoxides were studied by using Al-complexed Fe3O4@C@In(III)-[IL-Salen] microspheres. The results validated that the self-supporting catalytic layer with high surface area was of remarkable advantages, which were attributed from great increment of effective active sites and combination of nucleophilic/electrophilic synergistic property and CO2 uptake capability. Therefore, these hybrid microspheres provided excellent catalytic activity, prominent selectivity to cyclic carbonates and outstanding recyclability with the assistance of an applied magnetic field.

  12. Cobalt-releasing 1393 bioactive glass-derived scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Alexander; Jokic, Bojan; Janackovic, Djordje; Fey, Tobias; Greil, Peter; Romeis, Stefan; Schmidt, Jochen; Peukert, Wolfgang; Lao, Jonathan; Jallot, Edouard; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-02-26

    Loading biomaterials with angiogenic therapeutics has emerged as a promising approach for developing superior biomaterials for engineering bone constructs. In this context, cobalt-releasing materials are of interest as Co is a known angiogenic agent. In this study, we report on cobalt-releasing three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds based on a silicate bioactive glass. Novel melt-derived "1393" glass (53 wt % SiO2, 6 wt % Na2O, 12 wt % K2O, 5 wt % MgO, 20 wt % CaO, and 4 wt % P2O5) with CoO substituted for CaO was fabricated and was used to produce a 3D porous scaffold by the foam replica technique. Glass structural and thermal properties as well as scaffold macrostructure, compressive strength, acellular bioactivity, and Co release in simulated body fluid (SBF) were investigated. In particular, detailed insights into the physicochemical reactions occurring at the scaffold-fluid interface were derived from advanced micro-particle-induced X-ray emission/Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analysis. CoO is shown to act in a concentration-dependent manner as both a network former and a network modifier. At a concentration of 5 wt % CoO, the glass transition point (Tg) of the glass was reduced because of the replacement of stronger Si-O bonds with Co-O bonds in the glass network. Compressive strengths of >2 MPa were measured for Co-containing 1393-derived scaffolds, which are comparable to values of human spongy bone. SBF studies showed that all glass scaffolds form a calcium phosphate (CaP) layer, and for 1393-1Co and 1393-5Co, CaP layers with incorporated traces of Co were observed. The highest Co concentrations of ∼12 ppm were released in SBF after reaction for 21 days, which are known to be within therapeutic ranges reported for Co(2+) ions.

  13. Ionic Polymer Microspheres Bearing a Co(III) -Salen Moiety as a Bifunctional Heterogeneous Catalyst for the Efficient Cycloaddition of CO2 and Epoxides.

    PubMed

    Leng, Yan; Lu, Dan; Zhang, Chenjun; Jiang, Pingping; Zhang, Weijie; Wang, Jun

    2016-06-01

    We report a unique strategy to obtain the bifunctional heterogeneous catalyst TBB-Bpy@Salen-Co (TBB=1,2,4,5-tetrakis(bromomethyl)benzene, Bpy=4,4'-bipyridine, Salen-Co=N,N'-bis({4-dimethylamino}salicylidene)ethylenediamino cobalt(III) acetate) by combining a cross-linked ionic polymer with a Co(III) -salen Schiff base. The catalyst showed extra high activity for CO2 fixation under mild, solvent-free reaction conditions with no requirement for a co-catalyst. The synthesized catalyst possessed distinctive spherical structural features, abundant halogen Br(-) anions with good leaving group ability, and accessible Lewis acidic Co metal centers. These unique features, together with the synergistic role of the Co and Br(-) functional sites, allowed TBB-Bpy@Salen-Co to exhibit enhanced catalytic conversion of CO2 into cyclic carbonates relative to the corresponding monofunctional analogues. This catalyst can be easily recovered and recycled five times without significant leaching of Co or loss of activity. Moreover, based on our experimental results and previous work, a synergistic cycloaddition reaction mechanism was proposed.

  14. Dinuclear Zinc Salen Catalysts for the Ring Opening Copolymerization of Epoxides and Carbon Dioxide or Anhydrides.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Arnaud; Garden, Jennifer A; White, Andrew J P; Williams, Charlotte K

    2015-12-21

    A series of four dizinc complexes coordinated by salen or salan ligands, derived from ortho-vanillin and bearing (±)-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (L1) or 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine (L2) backbones, is reported. The complexes are characterized using a combination of X-ray crystallography, multinuclear NMR, DOSY, and MALDI-TOF spectroscopies, and elemental analysis. The stability of the dinuclear complexes depends on the ligand structure, with the most stable complexes having imine substituents. The complexes are tested as catalysts for the ring-opening copolymerization (ROCOP) of CO2/cyclohexene oxide (CHO) and phthalic anhydride (PA)/CHO. All complexes are active, and the structure/activity relationships reveal that the complex having both L2 and imine substituents displays the highest activity. In the ROCOP of CO2/CHO its activity is equivalent to other metal salen catalysts (TOF = 44 h(-1) at a catalyst loading of 0.1 mol %, 30 bar of CO2, and 80 °C), while for the ROCOP of PA/CHO, its activity is slightly higher than other metal salen catalysts (TOF = 198 h(-1) at a catalyst loading of 1 mol % and 100 °C). Poly(ester-block-carbonate) polymers are also afforded using the most active catalyst by the one-pot terpolymerization of PA/CHO/CO2. PMID:26605983

  15. Paramagnetic Europium Salen Complex and Sickle-Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynter, Clive I.; Ryan, D. H.; May, Leopold; Oliver, F. W.; Brown, Eugene; Hoffman, Eugene J.; Bernstein, David

    2005-04-01

    A new europium salen complex, Eu(salen)2NH4, was synthesized, and its composition was confirmed by chemical analysis and infrared spectroscopy. Further characterization was carried out by 151 Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Mössbauer spectroscopic measurements were made at varying temperatures between 9 K and room temperature and a value of Debye temperature of 133 ±5 K was computed. Both Mössbauer and magnetic susceptibility measurements confirmed the paramagnetic behavior of this complex and the trivalent state of the europium ion. In view of the fact that the "odd" paramagnetic molecule NO has been shown to reverse sickling of red blood cells in sickle cell anemia, the interaction between the paramagnetic europium salen complex and sickle cells was examined after incubation with this europium complex and shown to have similar effects.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of two cobalt complexes derived from the system containing phenylphosphonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei; Ma, Cheng-Bing; Chen, Chang-Neng; Liu, Qiu-Tian

    2008-11-01

    A single-chain cobalt phosphonate complex [Co(phen)(4,4'-bpy)(PhPO 3H) 2] n·0.5H 2O 1 (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, 4,4'-bpy = 4,4'-bipyridine) and a mononuclear cobalt complex [Co(pic) 2(H 2O) 2]·0.5H 2O 2 (picH = picolinic acid) have been synthesized with identical procedure from similar system containing phenylphosphonic acid and N-containing ligands. Both complexes have been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, magnetic measurement and thermal analysis. Compound 1 crystallizes in the tetragonal system with a P4 32 12 space group, and exhibits a 1-D cobalt chain connected by 4,4'-bpy bridges propagated along a axis direction, and the chains are linked by strong hydrogen bonds to form a two-dimensional grid like coordination network, whereas compound 2 crystallizes in the monoclinic system with space group P2 1/ n, and the mononuclear molecules in 2 are linked by hydrogen bonds to form infinite double-chains and the double-chains are further crosslinked to create a two-dimensional supramolecular network. The magnetic measurement reveals overall weak antiferromagnetic exchange interactions between the cobalt ions in both complexes 1 and 2.

  17. High pseudocapacitive cobalt carbonate hydroxide films derived from CoAl layered double hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhiyi; Zhu, Wei; Lei, Xiaodong; Williams, Gareth R.; O'Hare, Dermot; Chang, Zheng; Sun, Xiaoming; Duan, Xue

    2012-05-01

    A thin nanosheet of mesoporous cobalt carbonate hydroxide (MPCCH) has been fabricated from a CoAl-LDH nanosheet following removal of the Al cations by alkali etching. The basic etched electrode exhibits enhanced specific capacitance (1075 F g-1 at 5 mA cm-2) and higher rate capability and cycling stability (92% maintained after 2000 cycles).A thin nanosheet of mesoporous cobalt carbonate hydroxide (MPCCH) has been fabricated from a CoAl-LDH nanosheet following removal of the Al cations by alkali etching. The basic etched electrode exhibits enhanced specific capacitance (1075 F g-1 at 5 mA cm-2) and higher rate capability and cycling stability (92% maintained after 2000 cycles). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedure, specific capacitance calculation, EDS and FTIR results, electrochemical results of CoAl-LDH and SEM image. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30617d

  18. Template-free hydrothermal derived cobalt oxide nanopowders: Synthesis, characterization, and removal of organic dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Nassar, Mostafa Y.; Ahmed, Ibrahim S.

    2012-09-15

    Graphical abstract: XRD patterns of the products obtained by hydrothermal treatment at 160 °C for 24 h, and at different [Co{sup 2+}]/[CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}] ratios: (a) 1:6, (b) 1:3, (c) 1:1.5, (d) 1:1, (e) 1:0.5. Highlights: ► Spinel cobalt oxide nanoparticles with different morphologies were prepared by hydrothermal approach. ► The optical characteristics of the as-prepared cobalt oxide revealed the presence of two band gaps. ► Adsorption of methylene blue dye on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} was investigated and the percent uptake was found to be >99% in 24 h. -- Abstract: Pure spinel cobalt oxide nanoparticles were prepared through hydrothermal approach using different counter ions. First, the pure and uniform cobalt carbonate (with particle size of 21.8–29.8 nm) were prepared in high yield (94%) in an autoclave in absence unfriendly organic surfactants or solvents by adjusting different experimental parameters such as: pH, reaction time, temperature, counter ions, and (Co{sup 2+}:CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}) molar ratios. Thence, the spinel Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} (with mean particle size of 30.5–47.35 nm) was produced by thermal decomposition of cobalt carbonate in air at 500 °C for 3 h. The products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and thermal analysis (TA). Also, the optical characteristics of the as-prepared Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles revealed the presence of two band gaps (1.45–1.47, and 1.83–1.93 eV). Additionally, adsorption of methylene blue dye on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles was investigated and the uptake% was found to be >99% in 24 h.

  19. Carbon-Coated Co(3+)-Rich Cobalt Selenide Derived from ZIF-67 for Efficient Electrochemical Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Siwen; Peng, Sijia; Huang, Linsong; Cui, Xiaoqi; Al-Enizi, Abdullah M; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2016-08-17

    Oxygen evolution reaction (OER) electrocatalysts are confronted with challenges such as sluggish kinetics, low conductivity, and instability, restricting the development of water splitting. In this study, we report an efficient Co(3+)-rich cobalt selenide (Co0.85Se) nanoparticles coated with carbon shell as OER electrocatalyst, which are derived from zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-67) precursor. It is proposed that the organic ligands in the ZIF-67 can effectively enrich and stabilize the Co(3+) ions in the inorganic-organic frameworks and subsequent carbon-coated nanoparticles. In alkaline media, the catalyst exhibits excellent OER performances, which are attributed to its abundant active sites, high conductivity, and superior kinetics. PMID:27488352

  20. [Complexes of cobalt (II, III) with derivatives of dithiocarbamic acid--effectors of peptidases of Bacillus thuringiensis and alpha-L-rhamnozidase of Eupenicillium erubescens and Cryptococcus albidus].

    PubMed

    Varbanets, L D; Matseliukh, E V; Seĭfullina, I I; Khitrich, N V; Nidialkova, N A; Hudzenko, E V

    2014-01-01

    The influence of cobalt (II, III) coordinative compounds with derivatives of dithiocarbamic acid on Bacillus thuringiensis IMV B-7324 peptidases with elastase and fibrinolytic activity and Eupenicillium erubescens and Cryptococcus albidus alpha-L-rhamnosidases have been studied. Tested coordinative compounds of cobalt (II, III) on the basis of their composition and structure are presented by 6 groups: 1) tetrachlorocobaltates (II) of 3,6-di(R,R')-iminio-1,2,4,5-tetratiane--(RR')2Ditt[CoCl4]; 2) tetrabromocobaltates (II) of 3,6-di(R,R')-iminio-1,2,4,5-tetratiane--(RR')2Ditt[CoBr4]; 3) isothiocyanates of tetra((R,R')-dithiocarbamatoisothiocyanate)cobalt (II)--[Co(RR'Ditc)4](NCS)2]; 4) dithiocarbamates of cobalt (II)--[Co(S2CNRR')2]; 5) dithiocarbamates of cobalt (III)--[Co(S2CNRR')3]; 6) molecular complexes of dithiocarbamates of cobalt (III) with iodine--[Co(S2CNRR')3] x 2I(2). These groups (1-6) are combined by the presence of the same complexing agent (cobalt) and a fragment S2CNRR' in their molecules. Investigated complexes differ by a charge of intrinsic coordination sphere: anionic (1-2), cationic (3) and neutral (4-6). The nature of substituents at nitrogen atoms varies in each group of complexes. It is stated that the studied coordination compounds render both activating and inhibiting effect on enzyme activity, depending on composition, structure, charge of complex, coordination number of complex former and also on the enzyme and strain producer. Maximum effect is achieved by activating of peptidases B. thuringiensis IMV B-7324 with elastase and fibrinolytic activity. So, in order to improve the catalytic properties of peptidase 1, depending on the type of exhibited activity, it is possible to recommend the following compounds: for elastase--coordinately nonsaturated complexes of cobalt (II) (1-4) containing short aliphatic or alicyclic substituents at atoms of nitrogen and increasing activity by 17-100% at an average; for fibrinolytic

  1. [Complexes of cobalt (II, III) with derivatives of dithiocarbamic acid--effectors of peptidases of Bacillus thuringiensis and alpha-L-rhamnozidase of Eupenicillium erubescens and Cryptococcus albidus].

    PubMed

    Varbanets, L D; Matseliukh, E V; Seĭfullina, I I; Khitrich, N V; Nidialkova, N A; Hudzenko, E V

    2014-01-01

    The influence of cobalt (II, III) coordinative compounds with derivatives of dithiocarbamic acid on Bacillus thuringiensis IMV B-7324 peptidases with elastase and fibrinolytic activity and Eupenicillium erubescens and Cryptococcus albidus alpha-L-rhamnosidases have been studied. Tested coordinative compounds of cobalt (II, III) on the basis of their composition and structure are presented by 6 groups: 1) tetrachlorocobaltates (II) of 3,6-di(R,R')-iminio-1,2,4,5-tetratiane--(RR')2Ditt[CoCl4]; 2) tetrabromocobaltates (II) of 3,6-di(R,R')-iminio-1,2,4,5-tetratiane--(RR')2Ditt[CoBr4]; 3) isothiocyanates of tetra((R,R')-dithiocarbamatoisothiocyanate)cobalt (II)--[Co(RR'Ditc)4](NCS)2]; 4) dithiocarbamates of cobalt (II)--[Co(S2CNRR')2]; 5) dithiocarbamates of cobalt (III)--[Co(S2CNRR')3]; 6) molecular complexes of dithiocarbamates of cobalt (III) with iodine--[Co(S2CNRR')3] x 2I(2). These groups (1-6) are combined by the presence of the same complexing agent (cobalt) and a fragment S2CNRR' in their molecules. Investigated complexes differ by a charge of intrinsic coordination sphere: anionic (1-2), cationic (3) and neutral (4-6). The nature of substituents at nitrogen atoms varies in each group of complexes. It is stated that the studied coordination compounds render both activating and inhibiting effect on enzyme activity, depending on composition, structure, charge of complex, coordination number of complex former and also on the enzyme and strain producer. Maximum effect is achieved by activating of peptidases B. thuringiensis IMV B-7324 with elastase and fibrinolytic activity. So, in order to improve the catalytic properties of peptidase 1, depending on the type of exhibited activity, it is possible to recommend the following compounds: for elastase--coordinately nonsaturated complexes of cobalt (II) (1-4) containing short aliphatic or alicyclic substituents at atoms of nitrogen and increasing activity by 17-100% at an average; for fibrinolytic

  2. Salen Promoted Enantioselective Nazarov Cyclizations of Activated and Unactivated Dienones

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A novel class of chiral 5,5′-di(2,4,6-trialkyl)aryl salen-metal complexes have been developed and shown to catalyze highly enantioselective Nazarov cyclization reactions, giving rise to cyclopentenoids in 90:10–98:2 er. Significantly, the catalysts also promote, for the first time, highly enantioselective Nazarov reactions of “unactivated” dienones, producing hydrindenone products having in place three contiguous chiral centers. PMID:23506509

  3. Influence of chirality using Mn(III) salen complexes on DNA binding and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Khan, Noor-Ul H; Pandya, Nirali; Kumar, Manoj; Bera, Prasanta Kumar; Kureshy, Rukhsana I; Abdi, Sayed H R; Bajaj, Hari C

    2010-10-01

    Chiral Mn(iii) salen complexes S-1, R-1, S-2, R-2, S-3 and R-3 derived from the respective chiral salen ligands, viz., (1S,2S)-N,N'-bis-[3-tert-butyl-5-chloromethyl-salicylidine]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine S-1'/(1R,2R)-N,N'-bis-[3-tert-butyl-5-chloromethyl-salicylidine]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine R-1'/(1S,2S)-N,N'-bis-[3-tert-butyl-5-N,N'N'triethylaminomethyl-salicylidine]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine dichloride S-2'/(1R,2R)-N,N'-bis-[3-tert-butyl-5-N,N'N'triethylaminomethyl-salicylidine]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine dichloride R-2'/(1S,2S)-N,N'-bis-[3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine S-3' and (1R,2R)-N,N'-bis-[3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine R-3', were synthesized. Characterization of the complexes was done by microanalysis, IR, LC-MS, UV-vis. and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Binding of these complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was studied by absorption spectroscopy, competitive binding study, viscosity measurements, circular dichroism measurements, thermal denaturation study and observation of their different antioxidant activities. Among all the complexes used, the best result in terms of binding constant (intercalative) (130.4 x 10(4)) was achieved with the complex S-1 by spectroscopic titration. The complex S-1 showed strong antioxidant activity as well. PMID:20717621

  4. Mini-ISES identifies promising carbafructopyranose-based salens for asymmetric catalysis: Tuning ligand shape via the anomeric effect

    PubMed Central

    Karukurichi, Kannan R.; Fei, Xiang; Swyka, Robert A.; Broussy, Sylvain; Shen, Weijun; Dey, Sangeeta; Roy, Sandip K.; Berkowitz, David B.

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces new methods of screening for and tuning chiral space and in so doing identifies a promising set of chiral ligands for asymmetric synthesis. The carbafructopyranosyl-1,2-diamine(s) and salens constructed therefrom are particularly compelling. It is shown that by removing the native anomeric effect in this ligand family, one can tune chiral ligand shape and improve chiral bias. This concept is demonstrated by a combination of (i) x-ray crystallographic structure determination, (ii) assessment of catalytic performance, and (iii) consideration of the anomeric effect and its underlying dipolar basis. The title ligands were identified by a new mini version of the in situ enzymatic screening (ISES) procedure through which catalyst-ligand combinations are screened in parallel, and information on relative rate and enantioselectivity is obtained in real time, without the need to quench reactions or draw aliquots. Mini-ISES brings the technique into the nanomole regime (200 to 350 nmol catalyst/20 μl organic volume) commensurate with emerging trends in reaction development/process chemistry. The best-performing β-d-carbafructopyranosyl-1,2-diamine–derived salen ligand discovered here outperforms the best known organometallic and enzymatic catalysts for the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of 3-phenylpropylene oxide, one of several substrates examined for which the ligand is “matched.” This ligand scaffold defines a new swath of chiral space, and anomeric effect tunability defines a new concept in shaping that chiral space. Both this ligand set and the anomeric shape-tuning concept are expected to find broad application, given the value of chiral 1,2-diamines and salens constructed from these in asymmetric catalysis. PMID:26501130

  5. Sol-gel derived mesoporous cobalt silica catalyst: Synthesis, characterization and its activity in the oxidation of phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andas, Jeyashelly; Adam, Farook; Rahman, Ismail Ab.

    2014-10-01

    Highly mesoporous cobalt silica rice husk catalysts with (5-15 wt.%) Co2+ loading were prepared via a simple sol-gel technique at room temperature. The successful insertion of cobalt ions into silica matrix was evidenced from FT-IR, NMR, XPS and AAS analyses. Preservation of the mesoporosity nature of silica upon incorporating Co2+ was confirmed from the N2-sorption studies. The topography and morphology viewed by TEM analysis differs as the cobalt concentration varies from 5 to 15 wt.%. Parallel pore channels and spherical nanoparticles of 9.44 nm were achieved for cobalt silica catalysts with 10 and 15 wt.% respectively. Cobalt catalysts were active in the liquid-phase oxidation of phenol with H2O2 as an oxygen source. The performances of the catalysts were greatly influenced by various parameters such as reaction temperature, catalyst amount, molar ratio of substrate to oxidant, nature of solvent, metal loading and homogeneous precursor salt. Water served as the best reaction medium for this oxidation system. The regeneration studies confirmed cobalt catalyst could be reused for five cycles without experiencing large loss in the conversion. Both leaching and reusability studies testified that the catalysts were truly heterogeneous.

  6. Direct measurements of atmospheric iron, cobalt, and aluminum-derived dust deposition at Kerguelen Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimburger, A.; Losno, R.; Triquet, S.; Dulac, F.; Mahowald, N.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition is one of the major sources of nutrients bringing trace metals to remote marine biota. In this study, total atmospheric deposition and crustal aerosol concentrations were monitored at Kerguelen Islands (49°18'S; 70°07'E) in the Southern Ocean during a short campaign in early 2005 and then continuously for about 2 years (2009-2010). Results show very low levels of atmospheric dust and trace metals concentrations but higher deposition fluxes than expected. The averaged total dust deposition flux as derived from Al deposition measurements is 659 μg m-2 d-1. Simultaneously measured Fe and Co deposition fluxes are respectively 29 μg m-2 d-1 (520 nmol m-2 d-1) and 0.014 μg m-2 d-1 (0.24 nmol m-2 d-1), giving typically crustal elemental ratios to Al of 0.54 and 2.6 10-4. Measured dust deposition is in relatively good agreement with those simulated by current atmospheric models, but suggest that previous indirect calculations from field experiments are too low by a factor of 20. Observations and model results show that dust is transported above the marine atmospheric boundary layer to Kerguelen Islands, and thus that surface concentrations are not representative of the total dust column. Indeed, using surface concentrations leads to very large computed wet scavenging ratios, and to the conclusion that it is not appropriate to derive deposition fluxes from surface concentrations at remote ocean sites.

  7. Antiferromagnetic Ordering of Mn(III)F(salen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, M. W.; Wang, Tong; Brown, S. E.; Botko, M.; Čižmár, E.; Risset, O. N.; Talham, D. R.

    2014-03-01

    Due to a report suggesting Mn(III)F(salen), salen = H14C16N2O2, is an S = 2 Haldane system with J /kB = 50 K and no long-range order down to 2 K based on standard magnetometry studies,[2] specific heat and NMR measurements were performed. Using small single crystals, specific heat studies revealed the presence of an anomaly near 23 K, and this response was robust in fields up to 9 T. The 1H NMR results performed on a single crystal in 1 T revealed a sharp transition characteristic of antiferromagnetic ordering at 22.5 K. Measuring the magnetic response of the same single crystal in a commercial magnetometer reveals the presence of a subtle feature, near 23 K, that is not resolved with as-grown, randomlly oriented microcrystalline samples. These findings provide insight into the results obtained in torque magnetometry, EPR, and neutron scattering data.[3] Supported by NSF via DMR-1202033 (MWM), DMR-1105531 (SEB), DMR-1005581 (DRT), and DMR-1157490 (NHMFL), by the Slovak Agency for Research and Development via APVV-0132-11 (EČ), and by the Fulbright Commission of the Slovak Republic (MWM).

  8. Coordination chemistry of 6-thioguanine derivatives with cobalt: toward formation of electrical conductive one-dimensional coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Amo-Ochoa, Pilar; Alexandre, Simone S; Hribesh, Samira; Galindo, Miguel A; Castillo, Oscar; Gómez-García, Carlos J; Pike, Andrew R; Soler, José M; Houlton, Andrew; Zamora, Félix; Harrington, Ross W; Clegg, William

    2013-05-01

    In this work we have synthetized and characterized by X-ray diffraction five cobalt complexes with 6-thioguanine (6-ThioGH), 6-thioguanosine (6-ThioGuoH), or 2'-deoxy-6-thioguanosine (2'-d-6-ThioGuoH) ligands. In all cases, these ligands coordinate to cobalt via N7 and S6 forming a chelate ring. However, independently of reagents ratio, 6-ThioGH provided monodimensional cobalt(II) coordination polymers, in which the 6-ThioG(-) acts as bridging ligand. However, for 2'-d-6-ThioGuoH and 6-ThioGuoH, the structure directing effect of the sugar residue gives rise to mononuclear cobalt complexes which form extensive H-bond interactions to generate 3D supramolecular networks. Furthermore, with 2'-d-6-ThioGuoH the cobalt ion remains in the divalent state, whereas with 6-ThioGuoH oxidation occurs and Co(III) is found. The electrical and magnetic properties of the coordination polymers isolated have been studied and the results discussed with the aid of DFT calculations, in the context of molecular wires.

  9. Soft-Landing of CoIII(salen)+ and MnIII(salen)+ on Self-Assembled Monolayer Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Wang, Peng; Hadjar, Omar

    2010-03-25

    Soft-landing of mass-selected CoIII(salen)+ and MnIII(salen)+ complexes was performed using self-assembled monolayer surfaces of alkanethiol (HSAM) and fluorinated alkanethiol (FSAM) on gold as targets. Physical processes associated with ion deposition were studied using time-resolved in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in a specially designed Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). We demonstrate charge retention by a significant fraction of precursor ions on the FSAM and complete neutralization on the HSAM surface. Our results indicate efficient electron transfer from gold to the deposited species for the HSAM surface and inefficient, if any, electron transfer on the FSAM surface. Formation of abundant cluster ions observed in SIMS spectra is attributed to gas-phase reactions in the SIMS plume. Detailed analysis allowed us to extract the kinetics of both ionic and neutral complexes trapped on the FSAM surface. The results indicate that neutralization on this surface most likely takes place on the defect sites.

  10. Manganese salen complexes with acid-base catalytic auxiliary: functional mimetics of catalase.

    PubMed

    Noritake, Yukinobu; Umezawa, Naoki; Kato, Nobuki; Higuchi, Tsunehiko

    2013-04-01

    Antioxidant therapies have been considered for a wide variety of disorders associated with oxidative stress, and synthetic catalytic scavengers of reactive oxygen species would be clinically superior to stoichiometric ones. Among them, salen-manganese complexes (Mn(Salen)) seem promising, because they exhibit dual functions, i.e. superoxide dismutase- and catalase-mimetic activities. We have been developing enzyme-mimetic Mn(Salen) complexes bearing a functional group that enhances their catalytic activity. Here, we describe the design and synthesis of novel Mn(Salen) complexes with general acid-base catalytic functionality, inspired by the reaction mechanism of catalase. As expected, these Mn(Salen) complexes showed superior catalase-like activity and selectivity, while retaining moderate SOD-like activity. An unsubstituted pyridyl group worked well as a functionality to promote catalase-like activity. The introduced functionality did not alter the redox potential suggesting that the auxiliary-modified complex acted as an acid-base catalyst analogous to catalase. We believe that our approach provides a new design principle for sophisticated catalyst design. Further, the compounds described here appear to be good candidates for use in antioxidant therapy.

  11. A broadly applicable and practical oligomeric (salen) Co catalyst for enantioselective epoxide ring-opening reactions

    PubMed Central

    White, David E.; Tadross, Pamela M.; Lu, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    The (salen) Co catalyst (4a) can be prepared as a mixture of cyclic oligomers in a short, chromatography-free synthesis from inexpensive, commercially available precursors. This catalyst displays remarkable enhancements in reactivity and enantioselectivity relative to monomeric and other multimeric (salen) Co catalysts in a wide variety of enantioselective epoxide ring-opening reactions. The application of catalyst 4a is illustrated in the kinetic resolution of terminal epoxides by nucleophilic ring-opening with water, phenols, and primary alcohols; the desymmetrization of meso epoxides by addition of water and carbamates; and the desymmetrization of oxetanes by intramolecular ring opening with alcohols and phenols. The favorable solubility properties of complex 4a under the catalytic conditions facilitated mechanistic studies, allowing elucidation of the basis for the beneficial effect of oligomerization. Finally, a catalyst selection guide is provided to delineate the specific advantages of oligomeric catalyst 4a relative to (salen) Co monomer 1 for each reaction class. PMID:25045188

  12. (Salen)Mn(III) Catalyzed Asymmetric Epoxidation Reactions by Hydrogen Peroxide in Water: A Green Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Ballistreri, Francesco Paolo; Gangemi, Chiara M. A.; Pappalardo, Andrea; Tomaselli, Gaetano A.; Toscano, Rosa Maria; Trusso Sfrazzetto, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Enantioselective epoxidation reactions of some chosen reactive alkenes by a chiral Mn(III) salen catalyst were performed in H2O employing H2O2 as oxidant and diethyltetradecylamine N-oxide (AOE-14) as surfactant. This procedure represents an environmentally benign protocol which leads to e.e. values ranging from good to excellent (up to 95%). PMID:27420047

  13. Spectroscopic, thermal analysis and DFT computational studies of salen-type Schiff base complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein Pasha; Hadi, Jabbar S.; Abdulnabi, Zuhair A.; Bolandnazar, Zeinab

    2014-01-01

    A new series of metal(II) complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II) have been synthesized from a salen-type Schiff base ligand derived from o-vanillin and 4-methyl-1,2-phenylenediamine and characterized by elemental analysis, spectral (IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and EI-mass), molar conductance measurements and thermal analysis techniques. Coats-Redfern method has been utilized to calculate the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the metal complexes. The molecular geometry, Mulliken atomic charges of the studied compounds were investigated theoretically by performing density functional theory (DFT) to access reliable results to the experimental values. The theoretical 13C chemical shift results of the studied compounds have been calculated at the B3LYP, PBEPBE and PW91PW91 methods and standard 6-311+G(d,p) basis set starting from optimized geometry. The comparison of the results indicates that B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) yields good agreement with the observed chemical shifts. The measured low molar conductance values in DMF indicate that the metal complexes are non-electrolytes. The spectral and thermal analysis reveals that all complexes have octahedral geometry except Cu(II) complex which can attain the square planner arrangement. The presence of lattice and coordinated water molecules are indicated by thermograms of the complexes. The thermogravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses confirm high stability for all complexes followed by thermal decomposition in different steps.

  14. PolyHIPE Derived Freestanding 3D Carbon Foam for Cobalt Hydroxide Nanorods Based High Performance Supercapacitor

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Umakant M.; Ghorpade, Ravindra V.; Nam, Min Sik; Nalawade, Archana C.; Lee, Sangrae; Han, Haksoo; Jun, Seong Chan

    2016-01-01

    The current paper describes enhanced electrochemical capacitive performance of chemically grown Cobalt hydroxide (Co(OH)2) nanorods (NRs) decorated porous three dimensional graphitic carbon foam (Co(OH)2/3D GCF) as a supercapacitor electrode. Freestanding 3D porous GCF is prepared by carbonizing, high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) polymerized styrene and divinylbenzene. The PolyHIPE was sulfonated and carbonized at temperature up to 850 °C to obtain graphitic 3D carbon foam with high surface area (389 m2 g−1) having open voids (14 μm) interconnected by windows (4 μm) in monolithic form. Moreover, entangled Co(OH)2 NRs are anchored on 3D GCF electrodes by using a facile chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The wide porous structure with high specific surface area (520 m2 g−1) access offered by the interconnected 3D GCF along with Co(OH)2 NRs morphology, displays ultrahigh specific capacitance, specific energy and power. The Co(OH)2/3D GCF electrode exhibits maximum specific capacitance about ~1235 F g−1 at ~1 A g−1 charge-discharge current density, in 1 M aqueous KOH solution. These results endorse potential applicability of Co(OH)2/3D GCF electrode in supercapacitors and signifies that, the porous GCF is a proficient 3D freestanding framework for loading pseudocapacitive nanostructured materials. PMID:27762284

  15. Mechanistic studies of the copolymerization reaction of oxetane and carbon dioxide to provide aliphatic polycarbonates catalyzed by (Salen)CrX complexes.

    PubMed

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Moncada, Adriana I; Choi, Wonsook; Reibenspies, Joseph H

    2008-05-21

    Chromium salen derivatives in the presence of anionic initiators have been shown to be very effective catalytic systems for the selective coupling of oxetane and carbon dioxide to provide the corresponding polycarbonate with a minimal amount of ether linkages. Optimization of the chromium(III) system was achieved utilizing a salen ligand with tert-butyl groups in the 3,5-positions of the phenolate rings and a cyclohexylene backbone for the diimine along with an azide ion initiator. The mechanism for the coupling reaction of oxetane and carbon dioxide has been studied. Based on binding studies done by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, kinetic data, end group analysis done by (1)H NMR, and infrared spectroscopy, a mechanism of the copolymerization reaction is proposed. The formation of the copolymer is shown to proceed in part by way of the intermediacy of trimethylene carbonate, which was observed as a minor product of the coupling reaction, and by the direct enchainment of oxetane and CO 2. The parity of the determined free energies of activation for these two processes, namely 101.9 kJ x mol (-1) for ring-opening polymerization of trimethylene carbonate and 107.6 kJ x mol (-1) for copolymerization of oxetane and carbon dioxide supports this conclusion.

  16. Importance of counterion reactivity on the deactivation of Co-salen catalysts in the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of epichlorohydrin.

    PubMed

    Jain, Surbhi; Zheng, Xiaolai; Jones, Christopher W; Weck, Marcus; Davis, Robert J

    2007-10-15

    Possible modes of deactivation of Jacobsen's Co-salen catalyst during the hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of epichlorohydrin were explored by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, combined with recycling studies. Although an active Co(III)-salen catalyst deactivated substantially after multiple cycles without regeneration, the catalyst maintained its +3 oxidation state throughout the runs. Thus, deactivation of Co-salen during HKR was not the result of Co reduction. The mass spectrum of a deactivated material showed that catalyst dimerization does not account for the loss of activity. Results from various catalyst pretreatment tests, as well as from catalysts containing various counterions (acetate, tosylate, chloride, iodide) indicated that the rate of addition of the Co-salen counterions to epoxide forming Co-OH during the reaction correlated with deactivation. The extent of counterion addition to epoxide was influenced by the exposure time and the nucleophilicity of the counterion. An oligo(cyclooctene)-supported Co-OAc salen catalyst, which was 25 times more active than the standard Co-salen catalyst, was recycled multiple times with negligible deactivation. PMID:17850142

  17. Importance of Counterion Reactivity on the Deactivation of Co-Salen Catalysts in the Hydrolytic Kinetic Resolution of Epichlorohydrin

    SciTech Connect

    Jain,S.; Zheng, X.; Jones, C.; Weck, M.; Davis, R.

    2007-01-01

    Possible modes of deactivation of Jacobsen's Co-salen catalyst during the hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of epichlorohydrin were explored by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, combined with recycling studies. Although an active Co(III)-salen catalyst deactivated substantially after multiple cycles without regeneration, the catalyst maintained its +3 oxidation state throughout the runs. Thus, deactivation of Co-salen during HKR was not the result of Co reduction. The mass spectrum of a deactivated material showed that catalyst dimerization does not account for the loss of activity. Results from various catalyst pretreatment tests, as well as from catalysts containing various counterions (acetate, tosylate, chloride, iodide) indicated that the rate of addition of the Co-salen counterions to epoxide forming Co-OH during the reaction correlated with deactivation. The extent of counterion addition to epoxide was influenced by the exposure time and the nucleophilicity of the counterion. An oligo(cyclooctene)-supported Co-OAc salen catalyst, which was 25 times more active than the standard Co-salen catalyst, was recycled multiple times with negligible deactivation.

  18. Crystal structures, DFT calculations and Hirshfeld surface analyses of three new cobalt(III) Schiff base complexes derived from meso-1,2-diphenyl-1,2-ethylenediamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, Mohaddeseh; Behzad, Mahdi; Arab, Ali; Tarahhomi, Atekeh; Rudbari, Hadi Amiri; Bruno, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Three new Cobalt(III) Schiff base complexes were synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic methods and x-ray crystallography. The DFT optimized structures of the complexes agreed well with the corresponding x-ray structures. According to the calculated vibrational normal modes, the observed signals in the IR spectra of the complexes were assigned. The experimental UV-Vis spectra of the complexes were also discussed considering the calculated excited states and molecular orbitals. Hirshfeld surface analysis was carried out to study the inter-contact interactions in these complexes. These studies provided comprehensive description of such inter-contact interactions by means of an appealing graphical approach using 3D Hirshfeld surfaces and 2D fingerprint plots derived from the surfaces. It indicated the dominant role of various hydrogen intermolecular interactions such as H⋯H (above 60%), C⋯H/H⋯C (near 15%-20%), O⋯H/H⋯O (about 16% or 17% for structures with counter ion ClO4-) and H⋯F (17% for structure with counter ion PF6-) contacts into the crystal packing which are discussed in details.

  19. Cobalt-Schiff base complex catalyzed oxidation of para-substituted phenolics. Preparation of benzoquinones

    SciTech Connect

    Bozell, J.J.; Hames, B.R.; Dimmel, D.R.

    1995-04-21

    Para-substituted phenolics, serving as models for lignin (a renewable source of carbon), are oxidized to the corresponding benzoquinone with oxygen in the presence of catalytic amounts of Co-Schiff base complexes. The reaction products observed depend on the structure of the catalyst. The 5-coordinate catalysts (pyridine)[bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine]cobalt[(pyr)Co(salen)]and[bis(salicylideneamino)ethylamine]cobalt [Co(n-Me salpr)] convert syringyl alcohol (3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol) to 2,6-dimethoxybenzoquinone in high yield. In contrast, syringaldehyde (3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde) is unreactive toward these catalysts. However, the 4-coordinate Co(salen) converts syringaldehyde to 2,6-dimethoxybenzoiquinone in 72% isolated yield. Phenols bearing a single methoxy group on the ring are unreactive toward any catalyst in MeOH. However, vanillyl alcohol (3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol) is converted to 2-methoxybenzo-quinone with Co(N-Me salpr) and oxygen in 43% yield in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and 58% yield in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} in the presence of 1% CuCl{sub 2}. The success of the oxidations appears to be related to the ease of removal of the phenolic hydrogen by the Co/O{sub 2} complex. Competitive deactivation of the catalyst occurs with substrates of lower reactivity. 84 tabs.

  20. Surprisingly facile CO2 insertion into cobalt alkoxide bonds: A theoretical investigation

    PubMed Central

    Offermans, Willem K; Bizzarri, Claudia; Leitner, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Summary Exploiting carbon dioxide as co-monomer with epoxides in the production of polycarbonates is economically highly attractive. More effective catalysts for this reaction are intensively being sought. To promote better understanding of the catalytic pathways, this study uses density functional theory calculations to elucidate the reaction step of CO2 insertion into cobalt(III)–alkoxide bonds, which is also the central step of metal catalysed carboxylation reactions. It was found that CO2 insertion into the cobalt(III)–alkoxide bond of [(2-hydroxyethoxy)CoIII(salen)(L)] complexes (salen = N,N”-bis(salicyliden-1,6-diaminophenyl)) is exothermic, whereby the exothermicity depends on the trans-ligand L. The more electron-donating this ligand is, the more exothermic the insertion step is. Interestingly, we found that the activation barrier decreases with increasing exothermicity of the CO2 insertion. Hereby, a linear Brønsted–Evans–Polanyi relationship was found between the activation energy and the reaction energy. PMID:26425188

  1. Structure-activity relationship for Fe(III)-salen-like complexes as potent anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Zahra; Housaindokht, Mohammad R; Izadyar, Mohammad; Bozorgmehr, Mohammad R; Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein; Bahrami, Ahmad R; Matin, Maryam M; Khoshkholgh, Maliheh Javan

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) for the anticancer activity of Fe(III)-salen and salen-like complexes was studied. The methods of density function theory (B3LYP/LANL2DZ) were used to optimize the structures. A pool of descriptors was calculated: 1497 theoretical descriptors and quantum-chemical parameters, shielding NMR, and electronic descriptors. The study of structure and activity relationship was performed with multiple linear regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN). In nonlinear method, the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was applied in order to choose the most effective descriptors. The ANN-ANFIS model with high statistical significance (R (2) train = 0.99, RMSE = 0.138, and Q (2) LOO = 0.82) has better capability to predict the anticancer activity of the new compounds series of this family. Based on this study, anticancer activity of this compound is mainly dependent on the geometrical parameters, position, and the nature of the substituent of salen ligand. PMID:24955417

  2. Structure-Activity Relationship for Fe(III)-Salen-Like Complexes as Potent Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Zahra; Housaindokht, Mohammad R.; Izadyar, Mohammad; Bozorgmehr, Mohammad R.; Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein; Bahrami, Ahmad R.; Matin, Maryam M.; Khoshkholgh, Maliheh Javan

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) for the anticancer activity of Fe(III)-salen and salen-like complexes was studied. The methods of density function theory (B3LYP/LANL2DZ) were used to optimize the structures. A pool of descriptors was calculated: 1497 theoretical descriptors and quantum-chemical parameters, shielding NMR, and electronic descriptors. The study of structure and activity relationship was performed with multiple linear regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN). In nonlinear method, the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was applied in order to choose the most effective descriptors. The ANN-ANFIS model with high statistical significance (R2train = 0.99, RMSE = 0.138, and Q2LOO = 0.82) has better capability to predict the anticancer activity of the new compounds series of this family. Based on this study, anticancer activity of this compound is mainly dependent on the geometrical parameters, position, and the nature of the substituent of salen ligand. PMID:24955417

  3. Reverse Catalase Reaction: Dioxygen Activation via Two-Electron Transfer from Hydroxide to Dioxygen Mediated By a Manganese(III) Salen Complex.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Takuya

    2015-09-01

    Although atmospheric dioxygen is regarded as the most ideal oxidant, O2 activation for use in oxygenation reactions intrinsically requires a costly sacrificial reductant. The present study investigated the use of aqueous alkaline solution for O2 activation. A manganese(III) salen complex, Mn(III)(salen)(Cl), in toluene reacts with aqueous KOH solution under aerobic conditions, which yields a di-μ-oxo dimanganese(IV) salen complex, [Mn(IV)(salen)]2(μ-O)2. The (18)O isotope experiments show that (18)O2 is indeed activated to give [Mn(IV)(salen)]2(μ-(18)O)2 via a peroxide intermediate. Interestingly, the (18)OH(-) ion in H2(18)O was also incorporated to yield [Mn(IV)(salen)]2(μ-(18)O)2, which implies that a peroxide species is also generated from (18)OH(-). The addition of benzyl alcohol as a stoichiometric reductant selectively inhibits the (18)O incorporation from (18)OH(-), indicating that the reaction of Mn(III)(salen)(Cl) with OH(-) supplies the electrons for O2 reduction. The conversion of both O2 and OH(-) to a peroxide species is exactly the reverse of a catalase-like reaction, which has a great potential as the most efficient O2 activation. Mechanistic investigations revealed that the reaction of Mn(III)(salen)(Cl) with OH(-) generates a transient species with strong reducing ability, which effects the reduction of O2 by means of a manganese(II) intermediate. PMID:26347290

  4. The O-P-O bridged Mn2(salen)2 chains showing coexistence of single chain magnet and metamagnet behaviour.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting-Ting; Ren, Min; Bao, Song-Song; Cai, Zhong-Sheng; Liu, Bin; Zheng, Ze-Hua; Xu, Zhong-Li; Zheng, Li-Min

    2015-03-01

    Three new chain compounds in which the Mn2(salen)2 dimers are bridged by O-P-O units are reported, namely, [Mn2(salen)2(C6H9PO3H)](ClO4) (1), [Mn2(salen)2(C6H5PO3H)](ClO4) (2) and [Mn2(salen)2(C6H5PHO2)](ClO4) (3). The phosphonate or phosphinate ligands adopt a syn-anti bidentate bridging mode in 1, while a syn-syn bidentate bridging mode in 2 and 3, thus leading to a difference in the Mn-O···O-Mn torsion angle over the O-P-O bridge. Compound 1 shows a paramagnetic behavior with dominant antiferromagnetic interactions. In compounds 2 and 3, the antiferromagnetic interactions through the O-P-O bridges are considerably stronger than those in 1. They display coexistence of single chain magnet (SCM) behaviour with a spin canted structure and metamagnetism at low temperature. The results demonstrate that the magnetic dynamics of the O-P-O bridged Mn2(salen)2 chains may be modulated by selecting suitable phosphonate or phosphinate ligands.

  5. Spectroscopic study on the interaction of ct-DNA with manganese Salen complex containing triphenyl phosphonium groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehkordi, Maryam Nejat; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Lincoln, Per; Mirkhani, Valiollah

    2012-05-01

    The DNA binding properties of a bulky and hydrophobic Schiff base complex of manganese(III) [N,N'-bis(5-(triphenyl phosphonium methyl)salicylidene)-1,2-ethylene diamine chloride Mn(III) acetate] was examined by spectroscopic techniques. UV-vis titration data indicate both hypo and hyperchromic effect with addition of DNA to complex. A competitive binding study showed that the enhanced emission intensity of ethidium bromide (EB) in the presence of DNA was quenched by adding Mn Salen complex. This finding indicates that Mn Salen complex displaces EB from its binding site in DNA. Helix melting studies indicate improvement in the helix stability, and an increase in the melting temperature. The analysis of CD spectra represents the structural changes in DNA due to the binding of Mn Salen complex. The binding constant has been calculated using absorbance and fluorescence data. The results also represent that the binding process proceeds by strong electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

  6. Specific features of electrical conduction of the poly-[NiSalen] metal-containing polymer thin-film structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanesyan, V. T.; Puchkov, M. Yu.

    2008-11-01

    The charge transfer in the oxidized and reduced forms of poly-[NiSalen] metal-containing polymer films is investigated. It is established that the voltage dependence of the differential conductivity for the polymer in the oxidized form exhibits a nonlinear behavior, which indicates a high electrical activity of this state. The microscopic parameters characterizing the charge transfer are calculated within the space-charge-limited current theory. Differences in the surface morphology of two forms of the poly-[NiSalen] films are revealed using atomic-force microscopy.

  7. Robust bifunctional aluminium–salen catalysts for the preparation of cyclic carbonates from carbon dioxide and epoxides

    PubMed Central

    Rulev, Yuri A; Gugkaeva, Zalina; Maleev, Victor I

    2015-01-01

    Summary Two new one-component aluminium-based catalysts for the reaction between epoxides and carbon dioxide have been prepared. The catalysts are composed of aluminium–salen chloride complexes with trialkylammonium groups directly attached to the aromatic rings of the salen ligand. With terminal epoxides, the catalysts induced the formation of cyclic carbonates under mild reaction conditions (25–35 °C; 1–10 bar carbon dioxide pressure). However, with cyclohexene oxide under the same reaction conditions, the same catalysts induced the formation of polycarbonate. The catalysts could be recovered from the reaction mixture and reused. PMID:26664580

  8. Lowering melting points in asymmetrically substituted Salen-copper(II) complexes exhibiting mesomorphic behavior. Structure of the mesogen Cu(5-hexyloxySalen).

    PubMed

    Paschke, Reinhard; Balkow, Dörte; Sinn, E

    2002-04-01

    In comparison with their symmetrical analogues, unsymmetrically substituted Cu-Salen complexes show mesophases with lowered melting points. For terminally substituted complexes, symmetrical ones (R(1) = R(2)) have only an S(A) phase, while for unsymmetrical alkoxy substitution a monotropic S(E) phase occurs and the melting temperature decreases with no loss in mesophase stability. Lateral substitution, when it is symmetrical (R(3) = R(4)), lowers mesophase stability but not melting temperature, and when it is unsymmetrical, it greatly lowers both mesophase stability and melting temperature compared with the parent compound. Substitution at the imine carbon (R(5), R(6)) also lowers chemical stability (decomposition) of the compounds. The structure of the 5-hexyloxy complex (R(1) = R(2) = OC(6)H(13), R(3) = R(4) = R(5) = H) shows the pre-mesophasic arrangement likely adopted after melting.

  9. Formation of bile pigments by coupled oxidation of cobalt-substituted haemoglobin and myoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, D I; Brown, S B

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of cobalt-substituted haemoglobin and myoglobin with ascorbate and molecular O2 (coupled oxidation) resulted in biliverdin formation from the cobalt(II) derivatives but not from the cobalt(III) derivatives. This was apparently due to the inability of ascorbate to reduce cobalt(III) haemoproteins. Isomer analysis of the biliverdins produced from coupled oxidation of cobalt(II) oxyhaemoglobin suggested that the orientation of the cobalt protoporphyrin IX in the haem pocket differed slightly from that of the haem in native haemoglobin. PMID:6497839

  10. Pharmacological Role of Anions (Sulphate, Nitrate, Oxalate and Acetate) on the Antibacterial Activity of Cobalt(II), Copper(II) and Nickel(II) Complexes With Nicotinoylhydrazine-Derived ONO, NNO and SNO Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Rauf, Abdur

    1996-01-01

    Mixed ligands biologically active complexes of cobalt(II), copper(II) and nickel(II) with nicotinoylhydrazine-derived ONO, NNO and SNO donor schiff-base ligands having the same metal ion but different anions such as sulphate, nitrate, oxalate and acetate have been synthesised and characterised on the basis of their physical, analytical and spectral data. In order to evaluate the role of anions on their bioability, these ligands and their synthesised metal complexes with various anions have been screened against bacterial species such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus and the title studies have proved a definative role of anions in increasing the biological activity PMID:18472896

  11. Macrocyclic cyclooctene-supported AlCl-salen catalysts for conjugated addition reactions: effect of linker and support structure on catalysis.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Nandita; Takatani, Tait; Sherrill, C David; Weck, Marcus

    2009-01-01

    AlCl-salen (salen=N,N'-bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine dianion) catalysts supported onto macrocyclic oligomeric cyclooctene through linkers of varying length and flexibility have been developed to demonstrate the importance of support architecture on catalyst activity. The role played by the support and the linkers in dictating catalyst activity was found to vary for reactions with contrasting mechanisms, such as the bimetallic cyanide and the monometallic indole addition reactions. While the flexible support significantly enhanced the cyanide addition reaction, most likely by improving salen-salen interactions in the transition state, it lowered the reaction rate for the monometallic indole reaction. For both reactions, significant increase in catalytic activity was observed for catalysts with the longest linkers. The effect of the flexible macrocyclic support on catalysis was further exemplified by the enhanced activity of the supported catalyst in comparison with its unsupported analogue for the conjugate addition of tetrazoles, which is known to be catalyzed by dimeric mu-oxo-salen catalysts. Our studies with the cyclooctene supported AlCl-salen catalysts provides significant insights for rationally designing highly efficient AlCl-salen catalysts for a diverse set of reactions.

  12. Anion-induced self-assembly of luminescent and magnetic homoleptic cyclic tetranuclear Ln4(salen)4 and Ln4(salen)2 complexes (Ln = Nd, Yb, Er, or Gd).

    PubMed

    Feng, Weixu; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Zhao; Lü, Xingqiang; Liu, Han; Shi, Guoxiang; Zou, Dan; Song, Jirong; Fan, Daidi; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jones, Richard A

    2012-11-01

    Unique homoleptic cyclic tetranuclear Ln(4)(Salen)(4) complexes [Ln(4)(L)(2)(HL)(2)(μ(3)-OH)(2)Cl(2)]·2Cl (Ln = Nd, 1; Ln = Yb, 2; Ln = Er, 3; Ln = Gd, 4) or Ln(4)(Salen)(2) complexes [Ln(4)(L)(2)(μ(3)-OH)(2)(OAc)(6)] (Ln = Nd, 5; Ln = Yb, 6; Ln = Er, 7; Ln = Gd, 8) have been self-assembled from the reaction of the hexadentate Salen-type Schiff-base ligand H(2)L with LnCl(3)·6H(2)O or Ln(OAc)(6)·6H(2)O (Ln = Nd, Yb, Er, or Gd), respectively (H(2)L: N,N'-bis(salicylidene)cyclohexane-1,2-diamine). The result of their photophysical properties shows that the strong and characteristic NIR luminescence for complexes 1-2 and 5-6 with emissive lifetimes in microsecond ranges are observed, and the sensitization arises from the excited state (both (1)LC and (3)LC) of the hexadentate Salen-type Schiff-base ligand with the flexible linker. Temperature dependence (1.8-300 K) magnetic susceptibility studies of the eight complexes suggest the presence of an antiferromagnetic interaction between the Ln(3+) ions.

  13. Alternating copolymerization of dihydrocoumarin and epoxides catalyzed by chromium salen complexes: a new route to functional polyesters.

    PubMed

    Van Zee, Nathan J; Coates, Geoffrey W

    2014-06-18

    We report the alternating ring-opening copolymerization of dihydrocoumarin with epoxides catalyzed by chromium(III) salen complexes. This process provides access to a range of perfectly alternating polyesters with high molecular weights and narrow molecular weight distributions. Atactic poly(cyclohexene dihydrocoumarate) and poly(cyclopentene dihydrocoumarate) were found to be semi-crystalline by differential scanning calorimetry.

  14. Colorimetric and fluorescent pH and Cu2+ probes induced by photoisomerization of a maleonitrile-based Salen ligand.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jinghui; Zhang, Yuhui; Ma, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Xiangge; Xiang, Haifeng

    2013-12-28

    Both photo-induced cis-trans-isomers of a maleonitrile-based Salen ligand can be used as pH probes covering a broad pH range through three different mechanisms but upon undergoing the formation of a stable complex and Cu(2+)-promoted hydrolysis, respectively, they exhibit totally different responses and mechanisms for sensing Cu(2+).

  15. Efficient elimination of caffeine from water using Oxone activated by a magnetic and recyclable cobalt/carbon nanocomposite derived from ZIF-67.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew; Chen, Bo-Chau

    2016-02-28

    To eliminate caffeine, one of the most common pharmaceuticals and personal care products, from water, Oxone (peroxymonosulfate salt) was proposed to degrade it. To accelerate the generation of sulfate radicals from Oxone, a magnetic cobalt/carbon nanocomposite (CCN) was prepared from a one-step carbonization of a cobalt-based Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework (ZIF-67). The resultant CCN exhibits immobilized cobalt and increased porosity, and can be magnetically manipulated. These characteristics make CCN a promising heterogeneous catalyst to activate Oxone for caffeine degradation. Factors affecting the caffeine degradation were investigated, including CCN loading, Oxone dosage, temperature, pH, surfactants, salts and inhibitors. A higher CCN loading, Oxone dosage and temperature greatly improved the caffeine degradation by CCN-activated Oxone. Acidic conditions were also preferable over basic conditions for caffeine degradation. The addition of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and NaCl both significantly hindered caffeine degradation because bromide from CTAB and chloride from NaCl scavenged sulfate radicals. Based on the effects of inhibitors (i.e., methanol and tert-butyl alcohol), the caffeine degradation by CCN-activated Oxone was considered to primarily involve sulfate radicals and, less commonly, hydroxyl radicals. The intermediates generated during the caffeine degradation were analyzed using GC-MS and a possible degradation pathway was proposed. CCN was also able to activate Oxone for caffeine degradation for multiple cycles without changing its catalytic activity. These features reveal that CCN is an effective and promising catalyst for the activation of Oxone for the degradation of caffeine.

  16. Magnetic Response of Mn(III)F(salen) at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J. - H.; Risset, O. N.; Shiddiq, M.; Peprah, M. K.; Knowles, E. S.; Andrus, Matthew; Beedle, C. C.; Ehlers, Georg; Podlesnyak, Andrey A; Cizmar, E.; Nagler, Stephen E; Hill, S.; Talham, Daniel R.; Meisel, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    The low temperature magnetic response of Mn(III)F(salen), salen = H14C16N2O2, an S = 2 linear-chain system, has been studied. Using a single crystal with the field applied perpendicular to the chain direction, torque magnetometry, down to 20 mK and up to 18 T, revealed a feature at 3.8 T when T 400 mK. ESR ( 200 GHz) studies, using single crystals at 4 K and in 5 T, have not detected any signal. In 10 mT, the temperature dependence of the susceptibility of powder-like samples can be reasonably fit when J/kB = 50 K and g = 2. In addition, these data are unchanged for P 1.0 GPa. Using a randomly-oriented, powder-like, deuterated (12 of 14 H replaced by D) sample of 2.2 g at 270 mK, neutron scattering data, acquired with the Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, show several well defined excitations that may be from the zero-field energy levels of antiferromagnetic S = 2 spins with g = 2, J/kB = 50 K, D/kB = 2.8 K, and E/kB = 0.5 K.

  17. Magnetic Response of Mn(III)F(salen) at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.-H.; Beedle, C. C.; Risset, O. N.; Andrus, M. J.; Talham, D. R.; Peprah, M. K.; Knowles, E. S.; Meisel, M. W.; Shiddiq, M.; Hill, S.; Podlesnyak, A.; Ehlers, G.; Nagler, S. E.

    2013-03-01

    Due to a report suggesting Mn(III)F(salen), salen = H14C16N2O2, is a S = 2 Haldane system with J /kB = 50 K and no long-range order down to 2 K,[2] we have studied its magnetic response. Torque magnetometry, down to 20 mK and up to 18 T, revealed a feature at 3.8 T when T < 400 mK. ESR (~ 200 GHz) studies, using single crystals at 4 K and in 5 T, have not detected any signal. The low-field, high- T susceptibility is unchanged for P < 1.0 GPa. Using a randomly-oriented, powder-like, deuterated (12 of 14 H replaced by D) sample, neutron scattering data, acquired with the CNCS at SNS, are not consistent with a uniform system consisting of S = 2 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chains. The INS data show strong, dispersionless excitations, suggesting the possibility of isolated magnetic clusters. Supported by NSF via DMR-1005581 (DRT), DMR-0804408 (SH), DMR-1202033 (MWM), and DMR-0654118 (NHMFL) and by the DOE BES Scientific User Facilities Division for work at ORNL.

  18. Prevention of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in Rats by Two Manganese-Salen Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Rezazadeh, Alireza; Yazdanparast, Razieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a progressive stage of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is characterized by steatosis with inflammation. Investigations have suggested that oxidative stress may play an important role in the progress of NAFLD to NASH. To provide further insights into beneficial effects of antioxidants in NASH prevention, we employed two manganese-superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetics, manganese N,N`-bis(salicyldene) ethylene diamine chloride (EUK-8) and manganese-3-methoxy N,N`-bis(salicyldene)ethylenediamine chloride (EUK-134), as two salen representatives and vitamin C as the standard antioxidant. Methods: Experimental NASH was induced in Male N-Mary rats by feeding a methionine/choline-deficient (MCD) diet to rats for 10 weeks. The rats (n = 5, 30 mg/kg/day) were randomly assigned to receive vitamin C, EUK-8, EUK-134 or vehicle orally. Results: Administration of salens together with the MCD diet reduced the serum aminotransferases, glutathione transferase and alkaline phosphatase, cholesterol, and LDL contents. In addition, the EUK-8 and EUK-134 improved NASH pathological features in liver of MCD-fed rats. Conclusion: EUK-8 and EUK-134 supplementation reduces NASH-induced abnormalities, pointing out that antioxidant strategy could be beneficial for prevention of NASH. PMID:24375162

  19. Bioextraction of cobalt from complex metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.L.; Noah, K.S.; Wichlacz, P.L.; Torma, A.E.

    1993-05-01

    The present study has investigated the bioleachability of naturally occurring cobaltite and synthetic cobalt sulfides using 29 pedigree and ``wild type`` strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. On the basis of a screening test, five strains of bacteria were selected for assessing the effects of leach parameters (pH, ferrous and ferric sulfates, ammonium sulfate, bipotassium hydrogen phosphate, and substrate concentrations) on cobalt extraction from Blackbird Mine ore and concentrate. The mechanisms of cobalt extraction were explained in terms of direct and indirect modes of bacterial activity, and the chemistry involved in these processes was identified. Using various size fractions of a high-grade cobaltite, the kinetic parameters of cobalt extraction were derived for the effect of specific surface area to be V{sub m} = 376 mg dm{sup {minus}3} h{sup {minus}1} and K 1.27 m{sup 2} g{sup {minus}1}.

  20. Bioextraction of cobalt from complex metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.L.; Noah, K.S.; Wichlacz, P.L.; Torma, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    The present study has investigated the bioleachability of naturally occurring cobaltite and synthetic cobalt sulfides using 29 pedigree and wild type'' strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. On the basis of a screening test, five strains of bacteria were selected for assessing the effects of leach parameters (pH, ferrous and ferric sulfates, ammonium sulfate, bipotassium hydrogen phosphate, and substrate concentrations) on cobalt extraction from Blackbird Mine ore and concentrate. The mechanisms of cobalt extraction were explained in terms of direct and indirect modes of bacterial activity, and the chemistry involved in these processes was identified. Using various size fractions of a high-grade cobaltite, the kinetic parameters of cobalt extraction were derived for the effect of specific surface area to be V[sub m] = 376 mg dm[sup [minus]3] h[sup [minus]1] and K 1.27 m[sup 2] g[sup [minus]1].

  1. Efficient elimination of caffeine from water using Oxone activated by a magnetic and recyclable cobalt/carbon nanocomposite derived from ZIF-67.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew; Chen, Bo-Chau

    2016-02-28

    To eliminate caffeine, one of the most common pharmaceuticals and personal care products, from water, Oxone (peroxymonosulfate salt) was proposed to degrade it. To accelerate the generation of sulfate radicals from Oxone, a magnetic cobalt/carbon nanocomposite (CCN) was prepared from a one-step carbonization of a cobalt-based Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework (ZIF-67). The resultant CCN exhibits immobilized cobalt and increased porosity, and can be magnetically manipulated. These characteristics make CCN a promising heterogeneous catalyst to activate Oxone for caffeine degradation. Factors affecting the caffeine degradation were investigated, including CCN loading, Oxone dosage, temperature, pH, surfactants, salts and inhibitors. A higher CCN loading, Oxone dosage and temperature greatly improved the caffeine degradation by CCN-activated Oxone. Acidic conditions were also preferable over basic conditions for caffeine degradation. The addition of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and NaCl both significantly hindered caffeine degradation because bromide from CTAB and chloride from NaCl scavenged sulfate radicals. Based on the effects of inhibitors (i.e., methanol and tert-butyl alcohol), the caffeine degradation by CCN-activated Oxone was considered to primarily involve sulfate radicals and, less commonly, hydroxyl radicals. The intermediates generated during the caffeine degradation were analyzed using GC-MS and a possible degradation pathway was proposed. CCN was also able to activate Oxone for caffeine degradation for multiple cycles without changing its catalytic activity. These features reveal that CCN is an effective and promising catalyst for the activation of Oxone for the degradation of caffeine. PMID:26804184

  2. Cobalt recycling in the United States in 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2002-01-01

    This report is one of a series of reports on metals recycling. It defines and quantifies the 1998 flow of cobalt-bearing materials in the United States, from imports and stock releases through consumption and disposition, with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap) and used products (old scrap). Because of cobalt?s many and diverse uses, numerous types of scrap were available for recycling by a wide variety of processes. In 1998, an estimated 32 percent of U.S. cobalt supply was derived from scrap. The ratio of cobalt consumed from new scrap to that from old scrap was estimated to be 50:50. Of all the cobalt in old scrap available for recycling, an estimated 68 percent was either consumed in the United States or exported to be recycled.

  3. DNA binding, antioxidant activity, and DNA damage protection of chiral macrocyclic Mn(III) salen complexes.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Nirali; Khan, Noor-ul H; Prathap, K Jeya; Kureshy, Rukhsana I; Abdi, Sayed H R; Mishra, Sandhya; Bajaj, Hari C

    2012-12-01

    We are reporting the synthesis, characterization, and calf thymus DNA binding studies of novel chiral macrocyclic Mn(III) salen complexes S-1, R-1, S-2, and R-2. These chiral complexes showed ability to bind with DNA, where complex S-1 exhibits the highest DNA binding constant 1.20 × 10(6) M(-1). All the compounds were screened for superoxide and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities; among them, complex S-1 exhibited significant activity with IC(50) 1.36 and 2.37 μM, respectively. Further, comet assay was used to evaluate the DNA damage protection in white blood cells against the reactive oxygen species wherein complex S-1 was found effective in protecting the hydroxyl radicals mediated plasmid and white blood cells DNA damage.

  4. Phenoxy-bridged binuclear Zn(II) complex holding salen ligand: Synthesis and structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, Mohammad; Al-Resayes, Saud I.

    2016-03-01

    A novel binuclear phenoxo-bridged zinc complex obtained from the interaction of ligand, 2,2-(1E,1E)-(2,2-dimethylpropane-1,3-diyl)bis(azanylylidene) bis(methanylylidene)diphenol with zinc chloride is reported. The synthesized and isolated zinc complex has been characterized by FT-IR, 1H- and 13C- NMR, ESI-MS, TGA/DTA and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The phenoxo-bridge in this binuclear Zn(II) complex is due to the phenolic oxygen of the salen liagnd. The complex crystallizes in monoclinic P-1 space group, and different geometry has been assigned for both zinc ions in the complex.

  5. Versatile coordination behaviour of an asymmetric half-salen ligand bearing a dansyl fluorophore.

    PubMed

    Romero, María J; Pedrido, Rosa; González-Noya, Ana M; Maneiro, Marcelino; Fernández-García, M Isabel; Zaragoza, Guillermo; Bermejo, Manuel R

    2012-09-21

    The coordinative chemistry of the tridentate half-salen ligand 5-(dimethylamino)-N-(2-((2-hydroxybenzylidene)amino)phenyl)naphthalene-1-sulfonamide (H(2)L, 1) has been studied by means of an electrochemical method. All of the complexes have been characterised using analytical and spectroscopic techniques. Ligand 1 and two nickel (6 and 7), copper (9), zinc (12) and cadmium (14) metal complexes have been studied by crystallography. Complexes 6 and 7 are octahedral and tetrahedral nickel(II) complexes, respectively, and both contain an [L](2-) molecule that behaves in an [N(2)O] tridentate manner. Nickel(II) completes its coordination kernel with three water molecules in complex 6, whereas in complex 7 the nickel ion is further bound to a molecule of dansylamine arising from a hydrolysis process. The copper(II) complex 9 is a monomeric compound that contains a bideprotonated ligand thread and a dimethylsulfoxide molecule coordinated through the sulfur atom. The zinc complex 12 is an unusual pentanuclear cluster compound whose structure consists of four anionic ligand units and two hydroxo anions bound to five zinc(II) centres. The appearance of the hydroxo anions in this complex provides new evidence for water reduction electrochemically promoted by zinc metal under mild conditions. The cadmium complex 14 is a dimeric compound that comprises two molecules of the anionic ligand and two dimethylsulfoxide molecules. The great structural variety exhibited by all these complexes demonstrates that the introduction of asymmetry in a salen skeleton by incorporating a dansyl pendant increases the versatility of the resulting ligand on coordination. All complexes are luminescent in solution at room temperature in acetonitrile solutions.

  6. Synthesis and structure of cobalt(II) complexes with hydroxyl derivatives of pyridinecarboxylic acids: Conformation analysis of ligands in the solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukovec, Boris-Marko; Popović, Zora; Pavlović, Gordana; Rajić Linarić, Maša

    2008-06-01

    Cobalt(II) complexes of 6-hydroxypicolinic acid (6-OHpicH), namely [Co(6-OHpic) 2(H 2O) 2] ( 1) and [Co(6-OHpic) 2(4-pic) 2]·4-pic ( 2), and of 2-hydroxynicotinic acid (2-OHnicH), [Co(2-OHnic) 2(H 2O) 2] ( 3) were prepared. The crystal structures of free 6-hydroxypicolinic acid monohydrate 6-OHpicH·H 2O ( 4), and the novel polymorph of 2-hydroxynicotinic acid 2-OHnicH ( 5) and complex 2 were determined by X-ray crystal structure analysis. All compounds were characterized by IR-spectroscopy and thermal methods (TGA/DSC) and data are in agreement with the structure analysis. It was established that 4 and 5 exist in solid state in keto tautomeric form. For 2, structure analysis revealed N,O-chelating mode of 6-hydroxypicolinic acid.

  7. Marine cobalt resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.

    1986-01-01

    Ferromanganese oxides in the open oceans are more enriched in cobalt than any other widely distributed sediments or rocks. Concentrations of cobalt exceed 1 percent in ferromanganese crusts on seamounts, ocean ridges, and other raised areas of the ocean. The cobalt-rich crusts may be the slowest growing of any earth material, accumulating one molecular layer every 1 to 3 months. Attention has been drawn to crusts as potential resources because they contain cobalt, manganese, and platinum, three of the four priority strategic metals for the United States. Moreover, unlike abyssal nodules, whose recovery is complicated by their dominant location in international waters, some of the most cobalt-rich crusts occur within the exclusive economic zone of the United States and other nations. Environmental impact statements for crust exploitation are under current development by the Department of the Interior.

  8. Ultrasound-mediated synthesis of camphoric acid-based chiral salens for the enantioselective trimethylsilylcyanation of aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Serra, Maria E Silva; Murtinho, Dina; Goth, Albertino; Rocha Gonsalves, António M D'A; Abreu, Paulo E; Pais, Alberto A C C

    2010-05-01

    New chiral salen ligands were prepared by the ultrasound-irradiated condensation of optically active (1R, 3S)-1,2,2-trimethyl-1,3-diaminocyclopentane with aromatic 1-hydroxyaldehydes. The ultrasound-mediated process is more convenient due to shorter reaction times, energy economy, and easier isolation of the products. The in situ formed Ti(IV)(salen) complexes, evaluated as catalysts in the enantioselective trimethylsilylcyanation of benzaldehyde, were found to be efficient for this process, originating the corresponding product in high yields (72-99%) and selectivities of up to 79%. The lowest energy transition states were determined by computational studies. These results were in qualitative agreement with the experimentally observed ones. PMID:19603482

  9. The structure and activity of titania supported cobalt catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ho Suiwen; Houalla, M.; Hercules, D.M. ); Cruz, J.M. )

    1992-05-01

    A series of titania supported cobalt catalysts (0.5-6%) were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation, and were characterized by ESCA, XRD, and hydrogen chemisorption. After calcination at 400 C, a surface CoTiO[sub 3]-like phase was the main species present in the 0.5 and 1% cobalt catalysts. For higher cobalt loadings, discrete Co[sub 3]O[sub 4] particles were formed in addition to surface CoTiO[sub 3]. ESCA indicates that after reduction the cobalt metal particle size (6-13 nm) increases with increasing cobalt loadings, but does not vary with reduction temperature (400-500 C). Hydrogen chemisorption was found to be activated and suppressed. The extent of hydrogen chemisorption suppression increases with increasing reduction temperature and decreasing cobalt particle size. The turnover frequency (based on cobalt dispersion derived from ESCA) for benzene and CO hydrogenation decreases with increasing reduction temperature and decreasing cobalt particle size. The decline in activity correlates with the extent of suppression of H[sub 2] chemisorption. The results were interpreted in terms of a decrease in the fraction of exposed surface cobalt due to site blocking by reduced TiO[sub 3] moieties.

  10. Oxidation of nitric oxide by oxomanganese-salen complexes: a new mechanism for cellular protection by superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetics.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Martyn A; Ollosson, Richard; Stewart, Victoria C; Clark, John B

    2002-08-15

    Manganese-salen complexes (Mn-Salen), including EUK-8 [manganese N,N'-bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine chloride] and EUK-134 [manganese 3-methoxy N,N'-bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine chloride], have been reported to possess combined superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase mimetic functions. Because of this SOD/catalase mimicry, EUK-8 and EUK-134 have been investigated as possible therapeutic agents in neurological disorders resulting from oxidative stress, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, stroke and multiple sclerosis. These actions have been explained by the ability of the Mn-Salen to remove deleterious superoxide (O(2)(-)) and H(2)O(2). However, in addition to oxidative stress, cells in models for neurodegenerative diseases may also be subjected to damage from reactive nitrogen oxides (nitrosative stress), resulting from elevated levels of NO and sister compounds, including peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). We have been examining the interaction of EUK-8 and EUK-134 with NO and ONOO(-). We find that in the presence of a per-species (H(2)O(2), ONOO(-), peracetate and persulphate), the Mn-Salen complexes are oxidized to the corresponding oxo-species (oxoMn-Salen). OxoMn-Salens are potent oxidants, and we demonstrate that they can rapidly oxidize NO to NO(2) and also oxidize nitrite (NO(2)(-) to nitrate (NO(2)(-)). Thus these Mn-Salens have the potential to ameliorate cellular damage caused by both oxidative and nitrosative stresses, by the catalytic breakdown of O(2)(-), H(2)O(2), ONOO(-) and NO to benign species: O(2), H(2)O, NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-). PMID:11994046

  11. A chemiluminescence method to detect hydroquinone with water-soluble sulphonato-(salen)manganese(III) complex as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangbin; Tang, Yuhai; Sun, Yang; Yu, Hua; Du, Wei; Fu, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    A water-soluble sulphonato-(salen)manganese(III) complex with excellent catalytic properties was synthesized and demonstrated to greatly enhance the chemiluminescence signal of the hydrogen peroxide - luminol reaction. Coupled with flow-injection technique, a simple and sensitive chemiluminescence method was first developed to detect hydroquinone based on the chemiluminescence system of the hydrogen peroxide-luminol-sulphonato-(salen)manganese(III) complex. Under optimal conditions, the assay exhibited a wide linear range from 0.1 to 10 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.05 ng mL(-1) for hydroquinone. The method was applied successfully to detect hydroquinone in tap-water and mineral-water, with a sampling frequency of 120 times per hour. The relative standard deviation for determination of hydroquinone was less than 5.6%, and the recoveries ranged from 96.8 to 103.0%. The ultraviolet spectra, chemiluminescence spectra, and the reaction kinetics for the peroxide-luminol-sulphonato-(salen)manganese(III) complex system were employed to study the possible chemiluminescence mechanism. The proposed chemiluminescence analysis technique is rapid and sensitive, with low cost, and could be easily extended and applied to other compounds.

  12. Platinum-Free Counter Electrode Comprised of Metal-Organic-Framework (MOF)-Derived Cobalt Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shao-Hui; Li, Chun-Ting; Chien, Heng-Ta; Salunkhe, Rahul R.; Suzuki, Norihiro; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Ho, Kuo-Chuan; Wu, Kevin C.-W.

    2014-01-01

    We fabricated a highly efficient (with a solar-to-electricity conversion efficiency (η) of 8.1%) Pt-free dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). The counter electrode was made of cobalt sulfide (CoS) nanoparticles synthesized via surfactant-assisted preparation of a metal organic framework, ZIF-67, with controllable particle sizes (50 to 320 nm) and subsequent oxidation and sulfide conversion. In contrast to conventional Pt counter electrodes, the synthesized CoS nanoparticles exhibited higher external surface areas and roughness factors, as evidenced by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) element mapping, and electrochemical analysis. Incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) results showed an increase in the open circuit voltage (VOC) and a decrease in the short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) for CoS-based DSSCs compared to Pt-based DSSCs, resulting in a similar power conversion efficiency. The CoS-based DSSC fabricated in the study show great potential for economically friendly production of Pt-free DSSCs. PMID:25382139

  13. Total Dissolved Cobalt and Labile Cobalt in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, M. A.; Noble, A.

    2012-12-01

    This study presents the total and labile dissolved cobalt distributions from the North Atlantic GEOTRACES Zonal Transect expeditions of the fall of 2010 and 2011. Labile cobalt was detected in much of the water column below the euphotic zone, suggesting that strong cobalt binding ligands were not present in excess of the total cobalt concentration. Near complete complexation of cobalt was observed in surface waters, and linear relationships were observed when both total and labile cobalt were compared to phosphate in surface waters, indicative of a strong biological influence on cobalt cycling. Decoupling of cobalt and macronutrients in the surface waters was observed approaching the North American coast, and a relationship between cobalt and salinity was observed, suggesting that coastal inputs may dominate the distributions of cobalt there. In deep waters, both total and labile cobalt were generally lower in concentration than at intermediate depths, which is evidence of scavenging processes removing cobalt from the water column. Elevated concentrations of labile and total cobalt were observed in samples taken within the TAG hydrothermal plume, and a reverse relationship between cobalt and oxygen was observed in the western basin OMZ.

  14. Marine cobalt resources.

    PubMed

    Manheim, F T

    1986-05-01

    Ferromanganese oxides in the open oceans are more enriched in cobalt than any other widely distributed sediments or rocks. Concentrations of cobalt exceed 1 percent in ferromanganese crusts on seamounts, ocean ridges, and other raised areas of the ocean. The cobaltrich crusts may be the slowest growing of any earth material, accumulating one molecular layer every 1 to 3 months. Attention has been drawn to crusts as potential resources because they contain cobalt, manganese, and platinum, three of the four priority strategic metals for the United States. Moreover, unlike abyssal nodules, whose recovery is complicated by their dominant location in international waters, some of the most cobalt-rich crusts occur within the exclusive economic zone of the United States and other nations. Environmental impact statements for crust exploitation are under current development by the Department of the Interior. PMID:17781410

  15. Marine cobalt resources.

    PubMed

    Manheim, F T

    1986-05-01

    Ferromanganese oxides in the open oceans are more enriched in cobalt than any other widely distributed sediments or rocks. Concentrations of cobalt exceed 1 percent in ferromanganese crusts on seamounts, ocean ridges, and other raised areas of the ocean. The cobaltrich crusts may be the slowest growing of any earth material, accumulating one molecular layer every 1 to 3 months. Attention has been drawn to crusts as potential resources because they contain cobalt, manganese, and platinum, three of the four priority strategic metals for the United States. Moreover, unlike abyssal nodules, whose recovery is complicated by their dominant location in international waters, some of the most cobalt-rich crusts occur within the exclusive economic zone of the United States and other nations. Environmental impact statements for crust exploitation are under current development by the Department of the Interior.

  16. Samarium/Cobalt Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, D.; Kumar, K.; Frost, R.; Chang, C.

    1985-01-01

    Intrinsic magnetic coercivities of samarium cobalt magnets made to approach theoretical limit of 350 kA/m by carefully eliminating oxygen from finished magnet by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). HIP process viable alternative to currently used sintering process.

  17. Podand-based dimeric chromium(III)-salen complex for asymmetric Henry reaction: cooperative catalysis promoted by complexation of alkali metal ions.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Guang-Hui; He, Yan-Mei; Fan, Qing-Hua

    2014-12-01

    A new kind of podand-based dimeric salen ligand was synthesized, and its association with potassium cations was investigated by (1) H NMR spectroscopy. The corresponding Cr(III) -salen dimer was assembled by a supramolecular host-guest self-assembly process and was then used as a catalyst in highly efficient and enantioselective asymmetric Henry reactions. Regulation by KBArF (BArF =[3,5-(CF3 )2 C6 H3 ]4 B) led to remarkable improvements in yield (by up to 58 %) and enantioselectivity (for example, from 80 % ee to 96 % ee). PMID:25346533

  18. Catalysis: Cobalt gets in shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Solid cobalt-based catalysts are used commercially to convert carbon monoxide and hydrogen into synthetic fuels. It emerges that much more valuable chemicals can be produced by using a different form of cobalt catalyst. See Letter p.84

  19. Biomass-Derived Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanofiber Network: A Facile Template for Decoration of Ultrathin Nickel-Cobalt Layered Double Hydroxide Nanosheets as High-Performance Asymmetric Supercapacitor Electrode.

    PubMed

    Lai, Feili; Miao, Yue-E; Zuo, Lizeng; Lu, Hengyi; Huang, Yunpeng; Liu, Tianxi

    2016-06-01

    The development of biomass-based energy storage devices is an emerging trend to reduce the ever-increasing consumption of non-renewable resources. Here, nitrogen-doped carbonized bacterial cellulose (CBC-N) nanofibers are obtained by one-step carbonization of polyaniline coated bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers, which not only display excellent capacitive performance as the supercapacitor electrode, but also act as 3D bio-template for further deposition of ultrathin nickel-cobalt layered double hydroxide (Ni-Co LDH) nanosheets. The as-obtained CBC-N@LDH composite electrodes exhibit significantly enhanced specific capacitance (1949.5 F g(-1) at a discharge current density of 1 A g(-1) , based on active materials), high capacitance retention of 54.7% even at a high discharge current density of 10 A g(-1) and excellent cycling stability of 74.4% retention after 5000 cycles. Furthermore, asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs) are constructed using CBC-N@LDH composites as positive electrode materials and CBC-N nanofibers as negative electrode materials. By virtue of the intrinsic pseudocapacitive characteristics of CBC-N@LDH composites and 3D nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber networks, the developed ASC exhibits high energy density of 36.3 Wh kg(-1) at the power density of 800.2 W kg(-1) . Therefore, this work presents a novel protocol for the large-scale production of biomass-derived high-performance electrode materials in practical supercapacitor applications. PMID:27135301

  20. Mechanistic aspects of the copolymerization reaction of carbon dioxide and epoxides, using a chiral salen chromium chloride catalyst.

    PubMed

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Yarbrough, Jason C

    2002-06-01

    The air-stable, chiral (salen)Cr(III)Cl complex (3), where H(2)salen = N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexene diamine, has been shown to be an effective catalyst for the coupling of cyclohexene oxide and carbon dioxide to afford poly(cyclohexenylene carbonate), along with a small quantity of its trans-cyclic carbonate. The thus produced polycarbonate contained >99% carbonate linkages and had a M(n) value of 8900 g/mol with a polydispersity index of 1.2 as determined by gel permeation chromatography. The turnover number (TON) and turnover frequency (TOF) values of 683 g of polym/g of Cr and 28.5 g of polym/g of Cr/h, respectively for reactions carried out at 80 degrees C and 58.5 bar pressure increased by over 3-fold upon addition of 5 equiv of the Lewis base cocatalyst, N-methyl imidazole. Although this chiral catalyst is well documented for the asymmetric ring-opening (ARO) of epoxides, in this instance the copolymer produced was completely atactic as illustrated by (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Whereas the mechanism for the (salen)Cr(III)-catalyzed ARO of epoxides displays a squared dependence on [catalyst], which presumably is true for the initiation step of the copolymerization reaction, the rate of carbonate chain growth leading to copolymer or cyclic carbonate formation is linearly dependent on [catalyst]. This was demonstrated herein by way of in situ measurements at 80 degrees C and 58.5 bar pressure. Hence, an alternative mechanism for copolymer production is operative, which is suggested to involve a concerted attack of epoxide at the axial site of the chromium(III) complex where the growing polymer chain for epoxide ring-opening resides. Preliminary investigations of this (salen)Cr(III)-catalyzed system for the coupling of propylene oxide and carbon dioxide reveal that although cyclic carbonate is the main product provided at elevated temperatures, at ambient temperature polycarbonate formation is dominant. A common reaction pathway for

  1. Suitability of cation substituted cobalt ferrite materials for magnetoelastic sensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nlebedim, Ikenna Catjetan; Jiles, David C

    2015-02-01

    The results of a study on the suitability of materials derived from cobalt ferrite for sensor and actuator applications are presented. The mechanism responsible for the superior sensor properties of Ge-substituted cobalt ferrite compared with Ti and other cation substituted cobalt ferrite materials is believed to be due to the tetrahedral site preference of Ge4+ and its co-substitution with Co2+. Results also showed that the higher strain derivative of Ge-substituted cobalt ferrite compared with Ti-substitution is due to a higher magnetostrictive coupling in response to applied field in the material.

  2. Environmentally Benign CO2-Based Copolymers: Degradable Polycarbonates Derived from Dihydroxybutyric Acid and Their Platinum-Polymer Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Fu-Te; Wang, Yanyan; Darensbourg, Donald J

    2016-04-01

    (S)-3,4-Dihydroxybutyric acid ((S)-3,4-DHBA), an endogenous straight chain fatty acid, is a normal human urinary metabolite and can be obtained as a valuable chiral biomass for synthesizing statin-class drugs. Hence, its epoxide derivatives should serve as promising monomers for producing biocompatible polymers via alternating copolymerization with carbon dioxide. In this report, we demonstrate the production of poly(tert-butyl 3,4-dihydroxybutanoate carbonate) from racemic-tert-butyl 3,4-epoxybutanoate (rac-(t)Bu 3,4-EB) and CO2 using bifunctional cobalt(III) salen catalysts. The copolymer exhibited greater than 99% carbonate linkages, 100% head-to-tail regioselectivity, and a glass-transition temperature (Tg) of 37 °C. By way of comparison, the similarly derived polycarbonate from the sterically less congested monomer, methyl 3,4-epoxybutanoate, displayed 91.8% head-to-tail content and a lower Tg of 18 °C. The tert-butyl protecting group of the pendant carboxylate group was removed using trifluoroacetic acid to afford poly(3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid carbonate). Depolymerization of poly(tert-butyl 3,4-dihydroxybutanoate carbonate) in the presence of strong base results in a stepwise unzipping of the polymer chain to yield the corresponding cyclic carbonate. Furthermore, the full degradation of the acetyl-capped poly(potassium 3,4-dihydroxybutyrate carbonate) resulted in formation of the biomasses, β-hydroxy-γ-butyrolacetone and 3,4-dihydroxybutyrate, in water (pH = 8) at 37 °C. In addition, water-soluble platinum-polymer conjugates were synthesized with platinum loading of 21.3-29.5%, suggesting poly(3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid carbonate) and related derivatives may serve as platinum drug delivery carriers. PMID:26974858

  3. Environmentally Benign CO2-Based Copolymers: Degradable Polycarbonates Derived from Dihydroxybutyric Acid and Their Platinum-Polymer Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Fu-Te; Wang, Yanyan; Darensbourg, Donald J

    2016-04-01

    (S)-3,4-Dihydroxybutyric acid ((S)-3,4-DHBA), an endogenous straight chain fatty acid, is a normal human urinary metabolite and can be obtained as a valuable chiral biomass for synthesizing statin-class drugs. Hence, its epoxide derivatives should serve as promising monomers for producing biocompatible polymers via alternating copolymerization with carbon dioxide. In this report, we demonstrate the production of poly(tert-butyl 3,4-dihydroxybutanoate carbonate) from racemic-tert-butyl 3,4-epoxybutanoate (rac-(t)Bu 3,4-EB) and CO2 using bifunctional cobalt(III) salen catalysts. The copolymer exhibited greater than 99% carbonate linkages, 100% head-to-tail regioselectivity, and a glass-transition temperature (Tg) of 37 °C. By way of comparison, the similarly derived polycarbonate from the sterically less congested monomer, methyl 3,4-epoxybutanoate, displayed 91.8% head-to-tail content and a lower Tg of 18 °C. The tert-butyl protecting group of the pendant carboxylate group was removed using trifluoroacetic acid to afford poly(3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid carbonate). Depolymerization of poly(tert-butyl 3,4-dihydroxybutanoate carbonate) in the presence of strong base results in a stepwise unzipping of the polymer chain to yield the corresponding cyclic carbonate. Furthermore, the full degradation of the acetyl-capped poly(potassium 3,4-dihydroxybutyrate carbonate) resulted in formation of the biomasses, β-hydroxy-γ-butyrolacetone and 3,4-dihydroxybutyrate, in water (pH = 8) at 37 °C. In addition, water-soluble platinum-polymer conjugates were synthesized with platinum loading of 21.3-29.5%, suggesting poly(3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid carbonate) and related derivatives may serve as platinum drug delivery carriers.

  4. High-Performance Electrochromic Devices Based on Poly[Ni(salen)]-Type Polymer Films.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Marta; Araújo, Mariana; Fonseca, Joana; Moura, Cosme; Hillman, Robert; Freire, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    We report the application of two poly[Ni(salen)]-type electroactive polymer films as new electrochromic materials. The two films, poly[Ni(3-Mesalen)] (poly[1]) and poly[Ni(3-MesaltMe)] (poly[2]), were successfully electrodeposited onto ITO/PET flexible substrates, and their voltammetric characterization revealed that poly[1] showed similar redox profiles in LiClO4/CH3CN and LiClO4/propylene carbonate (PC), while poly[2] showed solvent-dependent electrochemical responses. Both films showed multielectrochromic behavior, exhibiting yellow, green, and russet colors according to their oxidation state, and promising electrochromic properties with high electrochemical stability in LiClO4/PC supporting electrolyte. In particular, poly[1] exhibited a very good electrochemical stability, changing color between yellow and green (λ = 750 nm) during 9000 redox cycles, with a charge loss of 34.3%, an optical contrast of ΔT = 26.2%, and an optical density of ΔOD = 0.49, with a coloration efficiency of η = 75.55 cm(2) C(-1). On the other hand, poly[2] showed good optical contrast for the color change from green to russet (ΔT = 58.5%), although with moderate electrochemical stability. Finally, poly[1] was used to fabricate a solid-state electrochromic device using lateral configuration with two figures of merit: a simple shape (typology 1) and a butterfly shape (typology 2); typology 1 showed the best performance with optical contrast ΔT = 88.7% (at λ = 750 nm), coloration efficiency η = 130.4 cm(2) C(-1), and charge loss of 37.0% upon 3000 redox cycles. PMID:27175794

  5. High-Performance Electrochromic Devices Based on Poly[Ni(salen)]-Type Polymer Films.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Marta; Araújo, Mariana; Fonseca, Joana; Moura, Cosme; Hillman, Robert; Freire, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    We report the application of two poly[Ni(salen)]-type electroactive polymer films as new electrochromic materials. The two films, poly[Ni(3-Mesalen)] (poly[1]) and poly[Ni(3-MesaltMe)] (poly[2]), were successfully electrodeposited onto ITO/PET flexible substrates, and their voltammetric characterization revealed that poly[1] showed similar redox profiles in LiClO4/CH3CN and LiClO4/propylene carbonate (PC), while poly[2] showed solvent-dependent electrochemical responses. Both films showed multielectrochromic behavior, exhibiting yellow, green, and russet colors according to their oxidation state, and promising electrochromic properties with high electrochemical stability in LiClO4/PC supporting electrolyte. In particular, poly[1] exhibited a very good electrochemical stability, changing color between yellow and green (λ = 750 nm) during 9000 redox cycles, with a charge loss of 34.3%, an optical contrast of ΔT = 26.2%, and an optical density of ΔOD = 0.49, with a coloration efficiency of η = 75.55 cm(2) C(-1). On the other hand, poly[2] showed good optical contrast for the color change from green to russet (ΔT = 58.5%), although with moderate electrochemical stability. Finally, poly[1] was used to fabricate a solid-state electrochromic device using lateral configuration with two figures of merit: a simple shape (typology 1) and a butterfly shape (typology 2); typology 1 showed the best performance with optical contrast ΔT = 88.7% (at λ = 750 nm), coloration efficiency η = 130.4 cm(2) C(-1), and charge loss of 37.0% upon 3000 redox cycles.

  6. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    DOEpatents

    Hurlburt, P.K.; Abney, K.D.; Kinkead, S.A.

    1997-05-20

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10{prime} positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron. 1 fig.

  7. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    DOEpatents

    Hurlburt, Paul K.; Abney, Kent D.; Kinkead, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10' positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron.

  8. Coordination Complexes of Cobalt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Gregory M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment involving the synthesis and spectral studies of cobalt complexes that not only give general chemistry students an introduction to inorganic synthesis but allows them to conduct a systematic study on the effect of different ligands on absorption spectra. Background information, procedures, and experimental results are…

  9. Neuron-Inspired Interpenetrative Network Composed of Cobalt-Phosphorus-Derived Nanoparticles Embedded within Porous Carbon Nanotubes for Efficient Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Shen, Juanxia; Yang, Zhi; Ge, Mengzhan; Li, Ping; Nie, Huagui; Cai, Qiran; Gu, Cancan; Yang, Keqin; Huang, Shaoming

    2016-07-13

    The ongoing search for cheap and efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts to replace currently used catalysts based on Pt or its alloys has been considered as an prevalent strategy to produce renewable and clean hydrogen energy. Herein, inspired by the neuron structure in biological systems, we demonstrate a novel fabrication strategy via a simple two-step method for the synthesis of a neuronlike interpenetrative nanocomposite network of Co-P embedded in porous carbon nanotubes (NIN-Co-P/PCNTs). It is found that the interpenetrative network provides a natural transport path to accelerate the hydrogen production process. The embedded-type structure improves the utilization ratio of Co-P and the hollow, tubelike, and porous structure of PCNTs further promote charge and reactant transport. These factors allow the as-prepared NIN-Co-P/PCNTs to achieve a onset potential low to 43 mV, a Tafel slope as small as 40 mV/decade, an excellent stability, and a high turnover frequency value of 3.2 s(-1) at η = 0.2 V in acidic conditions. These encouraging properties derived from the neuronlike interpenetrative network structure might offer new inspiration for the preparation of more nanocomposites for applications in other catalytic and optoelectronic field.

  10. Neuron-Inspired Interpenetrative Network Composed of Cobalt-Phosphorus-Derived Nanoparticles Embedded within Porous Carbon Nanotubes for Efficient Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Shen, Juanxia; Yang, Zhi; Ge, Mengzhan; Li, Ping; Nie, Huagui; Cai, Qiran; Gu, Cancan; Yang, Keqin; Huang, Shaoming

    2016-07-13

    The ongoing search for cheap and efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts to replace currently used catalysts based on Pt or its alloys has been considered as an prevalent strategy to produce renewable and clean hydrogen energy. Herein, inspired by the neuron structure in biological systems, we demonstrate a novel fabrication strategy via a simple two-step method for the synthesis of a neuronlike interpenetrative nanocomposite network of Co-P embedded in porous carbon nanotubes (NIN-Co-P/PCNTs). It is found that the interpenetrative network provides a natural transport path to accelerate the hydrogen production process. The embedded-type structure improves the utilization ratio of Co-P and the hollow, tubelike, and porous structure of PCNTs further promote charge and reactant transport. These factors allow the as-prepared NIN-Co-P/PCNTs to achieve a onset potential low to 43 mV, a Tafel slope as small as 40 mV/decade, an excellent stability, and a high turnover frequency value of 3.2 s(-1) at η = 0.2 V in acidic conditions. These encouraging properties derived from the neuronlike interpenetrative network structure might offer new inspiration for the preparation of more nanocomposites for applications in other catalytic and optoelectronic field. PMID:27315228

  11. Effect of particle size on CO hydrogenation activity of silica supported cobalt catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Suiwen; Houalla, M.; Hercules, D.M. )

    1990-08-09

    Two series of silica supported cobalt catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation, one by varying the calcination temperature (200-400{degree}C, 3 wt % Co) and the other by changing the cobalt loading (1-10 wt % Co). Examination by ESCA, XRD, and H{sub 2} chemisorption showed that Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} is the dominant phase. The cobalt phase is reduced to cobalt metal at 400{degree}C. The cobalt particle sizes obtained from ESCA correlated well with those derived from H{sub 2} chemisorption and XRD line broadening. The turnover frequency of Co/SiO{sub 2} for CO hydrogenation was invariant with cobalt dispersion in the range of 6-20% dispersion.

  12. Cobalt sorption in silica-pillared clays.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, A; Fetter, G; Bosch, P; Bulbulian, S

    2006-01-01

    Silicon pillared samples were prepared following conventional and microwave irradiation methods. The samples were characterized and tested in cobalt sorption. Ethylenediammine was added before cobalt addition to improve the amount of cobalt retained. The amount of cobalt introduced in the original clay in the presence of ethylenediammine was the highest. In calcined pillared clays the cobalt retention with ethylenediammine was lower (ca. 40%). In all cases the presence of ethylenediammine increased twice the amount of cobalt sorption measured for aqueous solutions.

  13. Cobalt exposure and cancer risk

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, A.A.; Tuechsen, F. )

    1990-01-01

    Cobalt is a technically important metal, used mainly as a binder in the hard-metal industry and as a constituent of many alloys. Cobalt compounds are used as drying agents in paints and laquers. Since ancient times, cobalt compounds have been used as coloring agents for pottery, ceramics, and glass. Soluble cobalt salts interfere adversely with cell division, bind irreversibly to nucleic acids in the cell nucleus, induce chromosome aberrations in plants, and are weakly mutagenic in some in vitro tests with cultured animal cells, bacteria, and yeast. Injections or implantation of cobalt metal, cobalt alloys, and cobalt compounds induced local and sometimes metastasizing sarcomas in rats, rabbits, and mice. Mouse is the least susceptible animal. The only published inhalation study with hamsters exposed to CoO aerosols remained non-positive. Indication of possible carcinogenic effects of cobalt alloys or compounds in human populations has arisen from medical use, in hard-metal industries, and at cobalt production. Unfortunately, confounding by nickel and arsenic is a major problem, and the size of most of the investigated populations has been rather small, so none of the investigations alone gives sufficient evidence of a carcinogenic effect in humans, but taken together there is an indication of a carcinogenic potential that should be explored further. 92 references.

  14. Cobalt ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Varying concentrations of an organometallic cobalt complex were added to an epoxy system currently used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin. Methods for combining cobalt (III) acetylacetonate with a tetraglycidyl 4,4 prime - diaminodiphenylmethane-based epoxy were investigated. The effects of increasing cobalt ion concentration on the epoxy cure were demonstrated by epoxy gel times and differential scanning calorimetry cure exotherms. Analysis on cured cobalt-containing epoxy castings included determination of glass transition temperatures by thermomechanical analysis, thermooxidative stabilities by thermogravimetric analysis, and densities in a density gradient column. Flexural strength and stiffness were also measured on the neat resin castings.

  15. Cobalt(I) Olefin Complexes: Precursors for Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition of High Purity Cobalt Metal Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jeff A; Pugh, Thomas; Johnson, Andrew L; Kingsley, Andrew J; Richards, Stephen P

    2016-07-18

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a family of organometallic cobalt(I) metal precursors based around cyclopentadienyl and diene ligands. The molecular structures of the complexes cyclopentadienyl-cobalt(I) diolefin complexes are described, as determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Thermogravimetric analysis and thermal stability studies of the complexes highlighted the isoprene, dimethyl butadiene, and cyclohexadiene derivatives [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-CH2CHC(Me)CH2)] (1), [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-CH2C(Me)C(Me)CH2)] (2), and [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-C6H8)] (4) as possible cobalt metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) precursors. Atmospheric pressure MOCVD was employed using precursor 1, to synthesize thin films of metallic cobalt on silicon substrates under an atmosphere (760 torr) of hydrogen (H2). Analysis of the thin films deposited at substrate temperatures of 325, 350, 375, and 400 °C, respectively, by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy reveal temperature-dependent growth features. Films grown at these temperatures are continuous, pinhole-free, and can be seen to be composed of hexagonal particles clearly visible in the electron micrograph. Powder X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy all show the films to be highly crystalline, high-purity metallic cobalt. Raman spectroscopy was unable to detect the presence of cobalt silicides at the substrate/thin film interface. PMID:27348614

  16. Tailoring the structure of two-dimensional self-assembled nanoarchitectures based on ni(ii) -salen building blocks.

    PubMed

    Viciano-Chumillas, Marta; Li, Dongzhe; Smogunov, Alexander; Latil, Sylvain; Dappe, Yannick J; Barreteau, Cyrille; Mallah, Talal; Silly, Fabien

    2014-10-13

    The synthesis of a series of Ni(II) -salen-based complexes with the general formula of [Ni(H2 L)] (H4 L=R(2) -N,N'-bis[R(1) -5-(4'-benzoic acid)salicylidene]; H4 L1: R(2) =2,3-diamino-2,3-dimethylbutane and R(1) =H; H4 L2: R(2) =1,2-diaminoethane and R(1) =tert-butyl and H4 L3: R(2) =1,2-diaminobenzene and R(1) =tert-butyl) is presented. Their electronic structure and self-assembly was studied. The organic ligands of the salen complexes are functionalized with peripheral carboxylic groups for driving molecular self-assembly through hydrogen bonding. In addition, other substituents, that is, tert-butyl and diamine bridges (2,3-diamino-2,3-dimethylbutane, 1,2-diaminobenzene or 1,2-diaminoethane), were used to tune the two-dimensional (2D) packing of these building blocks. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that the spatial distribution of the LUMOs is affected by these substituents, in contrast with the HOMOs, which remain unchanged. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) shows that the three complexes self-assemble into three different 2D nanoarchitectures at the solid-liquid interface on graphite. Two structures are porous and one is close-packed. These structures are stabilized by hydrogen bonds in one dimension, while the 2D interaction is governed by van der Waals forces and is tuned by the nature of the substituents, as confirmed by theoretical calculations. As expected, the total dipolar moment is minimized. PMID:25225027

  17. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic oxidation properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes with a covalently attached copper(II) salen complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Bazarganipour, Mehdi

    2009-06-01

    Hydroxyl functionalized copper(II) Schiff-base, N,N'-bis(4-hydroxysalicylidene)-ethylene-1,2-diaminecopper(II), [Cu((OH) 2-salen)], has been covalently anchored on modified MWCNTs. The new modified MWCNTs ([Cu((OH) 2-salen)]-MWCNTs) have been characterized by TEM, thermal analysis, XRD, XPS, UV-vis, DRS, FT-IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The modified copper(II) MWCNTs solid was used to affect the catalytic oxidation of ethylbenzene with tert-butylhydroperoxide as the oxidant at 333 K. The system is truly heterogeneous (no leaching observed) and reusable (no decrease in activity) in three consecutive runs. Acetophenone was the major product though small amounts of o- and p-hydroxyacetophenones were also formed revealing that C-H bond activation takes place both at benzylic and aromatic ring carbon atoms. Ring hydroxylation was more over the "neat" complexes than over the encapsulated complexes.

  18. Cobalt source calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Rizvi, H.M.

    1999-12-03

    The data obtained from these tests determine the dose rate of the two cobalt sources in SRTC. Building 774-A houses one of these sources while the other resides in room C-067 of Building 773-A. The data from this experiment shows the following: (1) The dose rate of the No.2 cobalt source in Building 774-A measured 1.073 x 10{sup 5} rad/h (June 17, 1999). The dose rate of the Shepherd Model 109 Gamma cobalt source in Building 773-A measured 9.27 x 10{sup 5} rad/h (June 25, 1999). These rates come from placing the graduated cylinder containing the dosimeter solution in the center of the irradiation chamber. (2) Two calibration tests in the 774-A source placed the graduated cylinder with the dosimeter solution approximately 1.5 inches off center in the axial direction. This movement of the sample reduced the measured dose rate 0.92% from 1.083 x 10{sup 5} rad/h to 1.073 x 10{sup 5} rad/h. and (3) A similar test in the cobalt source in 773-A placed the graduated cylinder approximately 2.0 inches off center in the axial direction. This change in position reduced the measured dose rate by 10.34% from 1.036 x 10{sup 6} to 9.27 x 10{sup 5}. This testing used chemical dosimetry to measure the dose rate of a radioactive source. In this method, one determines the dose by the chemical change that takes place in the dosimeter. For this calibration experiment, the author used a Fricke (ferrous ammonium sulfate) dosimeter. This solution works well for dose rates to 10{sup 7} rad/h. During irradiation of the Fricke dosimeter solution the Fe{sup 2+} ions ionize to Fe{sup 3+}. When this occurs, the solution acquires a slightly darker tint (not visible to the human eye). To determine the magnitude of the change in Fe ions, one places the solution in an UV-VIS Spectrophotometer. The UV-VIS Spectrophotometer measures the absorbency of the solution. Dividing the absorbency by the total time (in minutes) of exposure yields the dose rate.

  19. Synthesis, structure and spectroscopic behaviors of a five- and six-coordinated tri-cobalt(II) cluster: [(CoL)2(OAc)2Co].2C2H5OH.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wen-Kui; Li, Li; Li, Cong-Fen; Xu, Li; Duan, Jin-Gui

    2008-11-15

    A tri-nuclear cobalt(II) cluster, [(CoL)2(OAc)2Co].2C2H5OH, has been synthesized by the reaction of cobalt(II) acetate tetrahydrate with a novel Salen-type bisoxime chelating ligand, 3,3'-dimethoxy-2,2'-[ethylenedioxybis(nitrilomethylidyne)]diphenol (H2L), and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, TG-DTA and molar conductances. UV-vis spectroscopic titration in methanol solution clearly indicated the exclusive formation of the 3:2 [Co3L2]2+ cluster. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction determination of the Co(II) cluster shows that there are two acetate ions coordinate to three cobalt(II) ions through Co-O-C-O-Co bridges, and quadruple mu-phenoxo oxygen atoms from two [CoL] chelates also coordinate to cobalt(II) ions. Interestingly, different conformational central ions: five- and six-coordinated geometries were found in the cluster.

  20. Cr(Salen)-catalyzed addition of 1,3-dichloropropene to aromatic aldehydes. A simple access to optically active vinyl epoxides.

    PubMed

    Bandini, M; Cozzi, P G; Melchiorre, P; Morganti, S; Umani-Ronchi, A

    2001-04-19

    [reaction: see text]. Chiral Cr(Salen) complex (1) prepared in situ from CrCl3 promotes the enantioselective addition of 1,3-dichloropropene to aromatic aldehydes in the presence of Mn as the stoichiometric reductant and Me3SiCl as a scavenger. The resulting 1,2-chlorohydrins obtained in good enantiomeric and diastereoisomeric excesses can be easily transformed into the corresponding chiral vinyl epoxides.

  1. Salen complexes of zirconium and hafnium: synthesis, structural characterization, controlled hydrolysis, and solvent-free ring-opening polymerization of cyclic esters and lactides.

    PubMed

    Saha, Tanmoy Kumar; Ramkumar, Venkatachalam; Chakraborty, Debashis

    2011-04-01

    Dinuclear salen compounds of zirconium and hafnium are efficient initiators for the solvent-free ring-opening polymerization of cyclic ester monomers and lactides. There is a correlation between the theoretical and experimental number-average molecular weights (M(n)'s) in these polymerizations. Polymerization of β-butyrolactone gives poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) with a good M(n) and molecular weight distribution.

  2. Evaluation of in vitro cytotoxicity of one-dimensional chain [Fe(salen)(L)](n) complexes against human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dvořák, Zdeněk; Starha, Pavel; Sindelář, Zdeněk; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2012-04-01

    The 1d-polymeric iron(III) complexes [Fe(salen)(μ-L)](n) (1-6), involving a deprotonated form of the N-donor heterocyclic compounds (L) imidazole (complex 1), 1,2,4-triazole (2), benztriazole (3), 5-methyltetrazole (4), 5-aminotetrazole (5) and 5-phenyltetrazole (6), were studied for their in vitro cytotoxic activity against human cancer cell lines including lung carcinoma (A549), cervix epithelial carcinoma (HeLa), osteosarcoma (HOS), malignant melanoma (G361), breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7), ovarian carcinoma (A2780) and cisplatin-resistant ovarian carcinoma (A2780cis). Cytotoxicity in vitro (IC50=0.39-0.48 μM) was achieved for 2-6 against A2780 (IC50 of cisplatin equals 11.5 μM) as well as for 5 and 6 against all the tested cells, with IC50=2.5-37.7 μM. The Uv-Vis spectroscopic study showed that the complexes are unstable in organic solvents (e.g., dimethyl sulfoxide, dimethylformamide) containing even trace amounts of water (and thus also in the medium, i.e., 0.1% DMF, v/v, used in the MTT assay), where they partially or completely decompose to the mixtures involving, besides [Fe(salen)(μ-L)](n) itself, also the starting compounds [{Fe(salen)}2(μ-O)] and appropriate organic compound (HL). In efforts to find how the resulting cytotoxicity of the most active compounds 5 and 6 is influenced by this fact, the in vitro cytotoxicity testing of mixtures of reactants [{Fe(salen)}2(μ-O)] and HL, as well as the respective reactants, was also performed. It has been found that the cytotoxicity of 5 and 6 against all the tested cell lines is probably caused by a combined effect of the individual components presented within the corresponding mixture in the medium used. PMID:22274660

  3. Novel Oligopyrrole Carboxamide based Nickel(II) and Palladium(II) Salens, Their Targeting of Human G-Quadruplex DNA, and Selective Cancer Cell Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ali, Asfa; Kamra, Mohini; Roy, Soma; Muniyappa, K; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2016-09-20

    DNA targeting by various metal complexes is a key strategy toward the restriction of cancer cell proliferation. Toward this end, we designed and synthesized novel salen-based Ni(II) and Pd(II) metal complexes with positively charged flanking side chains comprising N-methylpyrrole carboxamides of varying lengths. The compounds showed high specificity toward G-quadruplex DNA over duplex DNA. Sufficient inhibition of the telomerase activity was observed, which was ascertained by the prominent restriction of cancer cell proliferation in the long-term cell viability and telomerase inhibition assays. The compounds exhibited selective cancer cell death following an apoptotic pathway. Analysis of the binding mode showed partial stacking of the salen moiety over the G-tetrads and association of the pendant oligopyrrole carboxamide units with the grooves. The conjugation of the tetrad-binding metal salen core with groove-oriented flexible oligopyrrole moieties resulted in the high selectivity and stabilization of the human G-quadruplex DNA structures. PMID:27604686

  4. Asymmetric epoxidation of cis/trans-β-methylstyrene catalysed by immobilised Mn(salen) with different linkages: heterogenisation of homogeneous asymmetric catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haidong; Zou, Yu; Wang, Yi-Meng; Shen, Yu; Zheng, Xuxu

    2014-06-16

    Immobilised Mn(salen) catalysts with two different linkages were studied in the asymmetric epoxidation of cis/trans-β-methylstyrene using NaClO as oxidant. The immobilised Mn(salen) complexes inside nanopores can lead to different catalytic behaviour compared with that of homogeneous Jacobsen catalyst. The rigidity of the linkage was found to be a key factor affecting the catalytic performance of immobilised catalysts. The immobilised catalyst with a rigid linkage exhibited comparable chemical selectivity, enantioselectivity and cis/trans ratio of product formation to that obtained with homogeneous Jacobsen catalysts. In contrast, the immobilised catalyst with a flexible linkage gave remarkably lower chemical selectivity, enantioselectivity and inverted cis/trans ratio compared with the results obtained with the homogeneous Jacobsen catalyst and the immobilised catalyst with rigid linkage. Thus, for immobilised Mn(salen) catalysts, a rigid linkage connecting active centres to the support is essential to obtain activity and enantioselectivity as high as those obtained in homogeneous systems.

  5. Cobalt: for strength and color

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, Maeve A.; Kropschot, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cobalt is a shiny, gray, brittle metal that is best known for creating an intense blue color in glass and paints. It is frequently used in the manufacture of rechargeable batteries and to create alloys that maintain their strength at high temperatures. It is also one of the essential trace elements (or "micronutrients") that humans and many other living creatures require for good health. Cobalt is an important component in many aerospace, defense, and medical applications and is a key element in many clean energy technologies. The name cobalt comes from the German word kobold, meaning goblin. It was given this name by medieval miners who believed that troublesome goblins replaced the valuable metals in their ore with a substance that emitted poisonous fumes when smelted. The Swedish chemist Georg Brandt isolated metallic cobalt-the first new metal to be discovered since ancient times-in about 1735 and identified some of its valuable properties.

  6. New gravimetric method for cobalt.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, G P; Ray, H N; Biswas, K

    1966-10-01

    A new gravimetric method for the determination of cobalt is described, based on precipitation from acidic solution with a reagent prepared by heating alpha-nitroso-beta-naphthol in a mixture of glacial acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide and syrupy phosphoric acid. The cobalt is weighed, after ignition of the precipitate, as Co(3)O(4). Iron(III), copper, chromium(III), vanadium(V), tungsten(VI), aluminium, molybdenum, nickel, titanium, zirconium, uranium(VI) and cerium do not interfere. PMID:18960030

  7. An Efficient and Recyclable Nanoparticle-Supported Cobalt Catalyst for Quinoxaline Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Fatemeh; Alves, Diego; Luque, Rafael

    2015-11-19

    The syntheses of quinoxalines derived from 1,2-diamine and 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds under mild reaction conditions was carried out using a nanoparticle-supported cobalt catalyst. The supported nanocatalyst exhibited excellent activity and stability and it could be reused for at least ten times without any loss of activity. No cobalt contamination could be detected in the products by AAS measurements, pointing to the excellent activity and stability of the Co nanomaterial.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and X-ray crystal structures of Vanadium(IV), Cobalt(III), Copper(II) and Zinc(II) complexes derived from an asymmetric bidentate Schiff-base ligand at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorshidifard, Mahsa; Amiri Rudbari, Hadi; Kazemi-Delikani, Zahra; Mirkhani, Valiollah; Azadbakht, Reza

    2015-02-01

    An asymmetric bidentate Schiff-base ligand (HL: 2-((allylimino)methyl)phenol) was prepared from reaction of salicylaldehyde and Allylamine. Vanadium(IV), Cobalt(III), Copper(II) and Zinc(II) complexes, VOL2, CoL3, CuL2 and ZnL2 were synthesized from the reaction of VO(acac)2, CoCl2·6H2O, CuCl2·2H2O and Zn(NO3)2·6H2O with the bidentate Schiff base ligand (HL: 2-allyliminomethyl-phenol) in methanol at ambient temperature. The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analysis (CHN), FT-IR spectroscopy. In addition, 1H and 13C NMR techniques were employed for characterization of the ligand (HL) and diamagnetic complex ZnL2. The molecular structures of all complexes were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. In the ZnL2 and CuL2 complexes, the metal ion is coordinated by two nitrogen and two oxygen atoms from two Schiff base ligands in an approximately square planar trans-[MN2O2] coordination geometry. In the Vanadium(IV) complex, VOL2, the vanadium center in this structure has a distorted tetragonal pyramidal N2O3 coordination sphere and for Cobalt(III) complex, CoL3, the CoIII ion is six coordinated by three bidentate Schiff base ligands in a distorted octahedral environment.

  9. Controlling the misuse of cobalt in horses.

    PubMed

    Ho, Emmie N M; Chan, George H M; Wan, Terence S M; Curl, Peter; Riggs, Christopher M; Hurley, Michael J; Sykes, David

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt is a well-established inducer of hypoxia-like responses, which can cause gene modulation at the hypoxia inducible factor pathway to induce erythropoietin transcription. Cobalt salts are orally active, inexpensive, and easily accessible. It is an attractive blood doping agent for enhancing aerobic performance. Indeed, recent intelligence and investigations have confirmed cobalt was being abused in equine sports. In this paper, population surveys of total cobalt in raceday samples were conducted using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Urinary threshold of 75 ng/mL and plasma threshold of 2 ng/mL could be proposed for the control of cobalt misuse in raceday or in-competition samples. Results from administration trials with cobalt-containing supplements showed that common supplements could elevate urinary and plasma cobalt levels above the proposed thresholds within 24 h of administration. It would therefore be necessary to ban the use of cobalt-containing supplements on raceday as well as on the day before racing in order to implement and enforce the proposed thresholds. Since the abuse with huge quantities of cobalt salts can be done during training while the use of legitimate cobalt-containing supplements are also allowed, different urinary and plasma cobalt thresholds would be required to control cobalt abuse in non-raceday or out-of-competition samples. This could be achieved by setting the thresholds above the maximum urinary and plasma cobalt concentrations observed or anticipated from the normal use of legitimate cobalt-containing supplements. Urinary threshold of 2000 ng/mL and plasma threshold of 10 ng/mL were thus proposed for the control of cobalt abuse in non-raceday or out-of-competition samples.

  10. Cobalt(II) and Cobalt(III) Coordination Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Nicholas C.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment which illustrates the formation of tris(phenanthroline)cobalt complexes in the 2+ and 3+ oxidation states, the effect of coordination on reactions of the ligand, and the use of a ligand displacement reaction in recovering the transformed ligand. Uses IR, UV-VIS, conductivity, and NMR. (MVL)

  11. Cobalt in ferromanganese crusts as a monitor of hydrothermal discharge on the Pacific sea floor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.; Lane-Bostwick, C. M.

    1988-01-01

    Ferromanganese oxide crusts, which accumulate on unsedimented surfaces in the open ocean1-6, derive most of their metal content from dissolved and particulate matter in ambient bottom water7,8, in proportions modified by the variable scavenging efficiency of the oxide phase for susceptible ions9. They differ in this respect from abyssal nodules, much of whose metals are remobilized from host sediments. Here we present maps of cobalt concentration and inferred accumulation rate of ferromanganese crusts from the Pacific Ocean. We propose that depletion of cobalt in Pacific crusts measures the location and intensity of submarine hydrothermal discharge. Use of the 'cobalt chronometer', an algorithm inversely relating cobalt content and crust growth rate, permits mapping of the accumulation rate of ferromanganese crusts with only indirect recourse to radioactivity-based dating methods. These maps show that crusts in hydrothermal areas grow from two to more than four orders of magnitude faster than in the Central Pacific Ocean. Cobalt-enriched crusts are found where water masses are most isolated from continental-coastal and hydrothermal sources of metals, now and in the past. This relationship can resolve the problem of cobalt enrichment in crusts without recourse to hypotheses invoking special cobalt sources or enrichment mechanisms. ?? 1988 Nature Publishing Group.

  12. Effect of rare earth substitution in cobalt ferrite bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulai, G.; Diamandescu, L.; Dumitru, I.; Gurlui, S.; Feder, M.; Caltun, O. F.

    2015-09-01

    The study was focused on the influence of small amounts of rare earth (RE=La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) addition on the microstructure, phase content and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite bulk materials. The X-Ray diffraction measurements confirmed the formation of the spinel structure but also the presence of secondary phases of RE oxides or orthoferrite in small percentages (up to 3%). Density measurements obtained by Archimedes method revealed a ~1 g cm-3 decrease for the RE doped cobalt ferrite samples compared with stoichiometric one. Both the Mössbauer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrocopy analysis results confirmed the formation of the spinel phase. The saturation magnetization and coercive field values of the doped samples obtained by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry were close to those of the pure cobalt ferrite. For magnetostrictive property studies the samples were analyzed using the strain gauge method. Higher maximum magnetostriction coefficients were found for the Ho, Ce, Sm and Yb doped cobalt ferrite bulk materials as related to the stoichiometric CoFe2O4 sample. Moreover, improved strain derivative was observed for these samples but at higher magnetic fields due to the low increase of the coercive field values for doped samples.

  13. Two heterometallic-organic frameworks composed of iron(III)-salen-based ligands and d(10) metals: gas sorption and visible-light photocatalytic degradation of 2-chlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yang, Jin; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Jian-Fang

    2015-03-01

    Two examples of heterometallic-organic frameworks (HMOFs) composed of dicarboxyl-functionalized Fe(III)-salen complexes and d(10) metals (Zn, Cd), [Zn2(Fe-L)2(μ2-O)(H2O)2]⋅4 DMF⋅4 H2O (1) and [Cd2(Fe-L)2(μ2-O)(H2O)2]⋅2 DMF⋅H2O (2) (H4L = 1,2-cyclohexanediamino-N,N'-bis(3-methyl-5-carboxysalicylidene), have been synthesized and structurally characterized. In 1 and 2, each square-pyramidal Fe(III) atom is embedded in the [N2O2] pocket of an L(4-) anion, and these units are further bridged by a μ2-O anion to give an (Fe-L)2(μ2-O) dimer. The two carboxylate groups of each L(4-) anion bridge Zn(II) or Cd(II) atoms to afford a 3D porous HMOF. The gas sorption and magnetic properties of 1 and 2 have been studied. Remarkably, 1 and 2 show activity for the photocatalytic degradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) under visible-light irradiation, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first time that this has been observed for Fe(III)-salen-based HMOFs.

  14. Towards a better understanding of magnetic exchange mediated by hydrogen bonds in Mn(III)/Fe(III) salen-type supramolecular dimers.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Ivan; Herchel, Radovan; Šilha, Tomáš; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2014-11-01

    A thorough study of structural and magnetic properties was performed on a series of trinuclear and dinuclear Mn(III)/Fe(III) complexes consisting of [M(L4)(Solv)](+) and [Fe(CN)5(NO)](2-) moieties (M = Fe(III) or Mn(III), Solv = H2O or CH3OH, L4 = tetradentate salen-type ligands), in which dominant magnetic exchange is mediated by O(S)-H···O(Ph) hydrogen bonds in [M(L4)(Solv)](+)···[M(L4)(Solv)](+) supramolecular dimers. As deduced from magnetic analysis involving the determination of zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters for Mn(III) and Fe(III) ions, as well as from comprehensive DFT calculations and modelling, it may be concluded that the strength of the magnetic exchange is correlated with the number of hydrogen bonds and with the O(Ph)···O(S) distance between the phenolic oxygen atom of the salen-type ligand (O(Ph)) and the oxygen atom of the solvent molecule coordinated to the adjacent metal atom (O(S)). PMID:25208575

  15. Di-μ-oxo dimetal core of Mn(IV) and Ti(IV) as a linker between two chiral salen complexes leading to the stereoselective formation of different M- and P-helical structures.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Takuya; Hada, Masahiko; Fujii, Hiroshi

    2014-01-21

    Because of restricted rotational freedom along the metal-metal axis, a di-μ-oxo dimetal core could be an excellent building block to create dinuclear compounds with well-defined stereochemistry, but their stereoselective synthesis remains a challenge. We herein report the formation of di-μ-oxo dimanganese(IV) complexes with tetradentate salen ligands bearing different degrees of steric bulk, in order to study stereochemical aspects of the dimerization reaction that potentially generates multiple stereoisomers. X-ray crystallography shows that the di-μ-oxo dimanganese(IV) complex with salen, where salen is (R,R)-N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexanediamine, adopts a unique structure in which two salen complexes are arranged in an M-helical fashion. According to the solution study using (1)H, (2)H NMR, and circular dichroism spectroscopies, the dimerization reaction is highly diastereoselective in the presence of the tert-butyl group at the 3/3' position as a determinant steric factor. In contrast, the di-μ-oxo dititanium(IV) complex with the same salen ligand was previously reported to afford an opposite P-helical dimer. The present DFT study clarifies that a less-covalent Ti-O bonding causes a distortion of the di-μ-oxo dititanium(IV) core structure, generating a completely different framework for interligand interaction. The present study provides a solid basis to understand the stereochemistry for the formation of the di-μ-oxo dimetal core.

  16. Cosine (Cobalt Silicide Growth Through Nitrogen-Induced Epitaxy) Process For Epitaxial Cobalt Silicide Formation For High Performance Sha

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Chong Wee; Shin, Chan Soo; Gall, Daniel; Petrov, Ivan Georgiev; Greene, Joseph E.

    2004-09-28

    A method for forming an epitaxial cobalt silicide layer on a MOS device includes sputter depositing cobalt in an ambient to form a first layer of cobalt suicide on a gate and source/drain regions of the MOS device. Subsequently, cobalt is sputter deposited again in an ambient of argon to increase the thickness of the cobalt silicide layer to a second thickness.

  17. Polytypic transformations during the thermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, Thimmasandra Narayan

    2010-06-15

    The isothermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature leads to the formation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The phase evolution during the decomposition process was monitored using powder X-ray diffraction. The transformation of cobalt hydroxide to cobalt oxide occurs via three phase mixture while cobalt hydroxynitrate to cobalt oxide occurs through a two phase mixture. The nature of the sample and its preparation method controls the decomposition mechanism. The comparison of topotactical relationship between the precursors to the decomposed product has been reported in relation to polytypism. - Graphical abstract: Isothermal thermal decomposition studies of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature show the metastable phase formed prior to Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase.

  18. Cobalt single-molecule magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, En-Che; Hendrickson, David N.; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Nakano, Motohiro; Zakharov, Lev N.; Sommer, Roger D.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Ledezma-Gairaud, Marisol; Christou, George

    2002-05-01

    A cobalt molecule that functions as a single-molecule magnet, [Co4(hmp)4(MeOH)4Cl4], where hmp- is the anion of hydroxymethylpyridine, is reported. The core of the molecule consists of four Co(II) cations and four hmp- oxygen atom ions at the corners of a cube. Variable-field and variable-temperature magnetization data have been analyzed to establish that the molecule has a S=6 ground state with considerable negative magnetoanisotropy. Single-ion zero-field interactions (DSz2) at each cobalt ion are the origin of the negative magnetoanisotropy. A single crystal of the compound was studied by means of a micro-superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer in the range of 0.040-1.0 K. Hysteresis was found in the magnetization versus magnetic field response of this single crystal.

  19. Mineral resource of the month: cobalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2009-01-01

    Cobalt is a metal used in numerous commercial, industrial and military applications. On a global basis, the leading use of cobalt is in rechargeable lithium-ion, nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride battery electrodes. Cobalt use has grown rapidly since the early 1990s, with the development of new battery technologies and an increase in demand for portable electronics such as cell phones, laptop computers and cordless power tools.

  20. Oxidation of low cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Four high temperature alloys: U-700, Mar M-247, Waspaloy and PM/HIP U-700 were modified with various cobalt levels ranging from 0 percent to their nominal commercial levels. The alloys were then tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1150 C at times from 500 to 100 1 hour cycles. Specific weight change with time and X-ray diffraction analyses of the oxidized samples were used to evaluate the alloys. The alloys tend to be either Al2O3/aluminate spinel or Cr2O3/chromite spinel formers depending on the Cr/Al ratio in the alloy. Waspaloy with a ratio of 15:1 is a strong Cr2O3 former while this U-700 with a ratio of 3.33:1 tends to form mostly Cr2O3 while Mar M-247 with a ratio of 1.53:1 is a strong Al2O3 former. The best cyclic oxidation resistance is associated with the Al2O3 formers. The cobalt levels appear to have little effect on the oxidation resistance of the Al2O3/aluminate spinel formers while any tendency to form Cr2O3 is accelerated with increased cobalt levels and leads to increased oxidation attack.

  1. Thin films of tetrafluorosubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine: Structure and sensor properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyamer, Darya D.; Sukhikh, Aleksandr S.; Krasnov, Pavel O.; Gromilov, Sergey A.; Morozova, Natalya B.; Basova, Tamara V.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, thin films of tetrafluorosubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPcF4) were prepared by organic molecular beam deposition and their structure was studied using UV-vis, polarization dependent Raman spectroscopy, XRD and atomic force microscopy. Quantum chemical calculations (DFT) have been employed in order to determine the detailed assignment of the bands in the CoPcF4 IR and Raman spectra. The electrical sensor response of CoPcF4 films to ammonia vapours was investigated and compared with that of unsubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine films. In order to explain the difference in sensitivity of the unsubstituted and fluorinated phthalocyanines to ammonia, the nature and properties of chemical binding between CoPc derivatives and NH3 were described by quantum-chemical calculations utilizing DFT method. The effect of post-deposition annealing on surface morphology and gas sensing properties of CoPcF4 films was also studied.

  2. Study of cobalt sorption on polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Kolics, A.; Varga, K. . Dept. of Radiochemistry)

    1994-12-01

    The accumulation of cobalt on various surfaces, especially on oxides, has been the subject of intensive research for decades. Part of these studies were devoted to the analysis of cobalt uptake on oxides, which are transported in the primary coolant of water-cooled nuclear reactors. Radioactive isotopes of cobalt ([sup 60]Co and [sup 58]Co) make a predominant contribution to the radioactivity of corrosion products. The investigation of cobalt accumulation on inert surfaces in solutions of well-defined composition may contribute to the better understanding of the results of contamination-decontamination experiments carried out on noninert adsorbents in various solutions. The results gained from the study of cobalt accumulation on polyethylene are presented in this paper. To clarify the role of colloid formation, the presence of borate species, and the surface properties of polyethylene in accumulation process, several independent techniques such as the in situ radiotracer method, centrifugation, FTIR, and Raman spectroscopy are used. From the results, it can be stated that the kinetics of cobalt accumulation is dependent on the pH and composition of the solution phase. The accumulation of cobalt proceeds in both colloid and ionic forms; however, the amount of sorbed ionic cobalt species increases with pH due to their accumulation on colloids. The lower cobalt accumulation in borate-containing solution is attributed to the lower amount of colloid formation.

  3. Electrosynthesis of highly transparent cobalt oxide water oxidation catalyst films from cobalt aminopolycarboxylate complexes.

    PubMed

    Bonke, Shannon A; Wiechen, Mathias; Hocking, Rosalie K; Fang, Xi-Ya; Lupton, David W; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Spiccia, Leone

    2015-04-24

    Efficient catalysis of water oxidation represents one of the major challenges en route to efficient sunlight-driven water splitting. Cobalt oxides (CoOx ) have been widely investigated as water oxidation catalysts, although the incorporation of these materials into photoelectrochemical devices has been hindered by a lack of transparency. Herein, the electrosynthesis of transparent CoOx catalyst films is described by utilizing cobalt(II) aminopolycarboxylate complexes as precursors to the oxide. These complexes allow control over the deposition rate and morphology to enable the production of thin, catalytic CoOx films on a conductive substrate, which can be exploited in integrated photoelectrochemical devices. Notably, under a bias of 1.0 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), the film deposited from [Co(NTA)(OH2 )2 ](-) (NTA=nitrilotriacetate) decreased the transmission by only 10 % at λ=500 nm, but still generated >80 % of the water oxidation current produced by a [Co(OH2 )6 ](2+) -derived oxide film whose transmission was only 40 % at λ=500 nm.

  4. Electrosynthesis of highly transparent cobalt oxide water oxidation catalyst films from cobalt aminopolycarboxylate complexes.

    PubMed

    Bonke, Shannon A; Wiechen, Mathias; Hocking, Rosalie K; Fang, Xi-Ya; Lupton, David W; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Spiccia, Leone

    2015-04-24

    Efficient catalysis of water oxidation represents one of the major challenges en route to efficient sunlight-driven water splitting. Cobalt oxides (CoOx ) have been widely investigated as water oxidation catalysts, although the incorporation of these materials into photoelectrochemical devices has been hindered by a lack of transparency. Herein, the electrosynthesis of transparent CoOx catalyst films is described by utilizing cobalt(II) aminopolycarboxylate complexes as precursors to the oxide. These complexes allow control over the deposition rate and morphology to enable the production of thin, catalytic CoOx films on a conductive substrate, which can be exploited in integrated photoelectrochemical devices. Notably, under a bias of 1.0 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), the film deposited from [Co(NTA)(OH2 )2 ](-) (NTA=nitrilotriacetate) decreased the transmission by only 10 % at λ=500 nm, but still generated >80 % of the water oxidation current produced by a [Co(OH2 )6 ](2+) -derived oxide film whose transmission was only 40 % at λ=500 nm. PMID:25826458

  5. Oxovanadium(IV) and dioxomolybdenum(VI) salen complexes tethered onto amino-functionalized SBA-15 for the epoxidation of cyclooctene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Hao, Shijie; Zhang, Ying; Kan, Qiubin

    2011-11-01

    Oxovanadium(IV) and dioxomolybdenum(VI) salen complexes were firstly tethered onto amino-functionalized mesoporous SBA-15 materials by a stepwise procedure and were screened as catalysts for the epoxidation of cyclooctene. The mesoporous structural integrity throughout the tethering procedure, the successful tethering of the organometallic complexes, the loadings of metal ions and organic ligands as well as the catalyst surface constitution and location of active organometallic species on the SBA-15 support were determined by comprehensive characterization techniques such as XRD, N 2 adsorption/desorption, FT-IR, UV-vis spectroscopy, ICP-AES, XPS and TG/DTA. Catalytic properties in the epoxidation of cyclooctene demonstrate that both tethered oxovanadium(IV) and dioxomolybdenum(VI) catalysts were more active than their respective homogeneous analogue, and the tethered oxovanadium(IV) complex showed the best activity (64.3%) with H 2O 2 as the oxidant and CH 3CN as the solvent.

  6. A novel Schiff base bearing dopamine groups with tripodal structure. Synthesis and its salen/salophen-bridged Fe/Cr(III) capped complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocyigit, Ozcan

    2013-02-01

    This work presents the synthesis of a novel Schiff base and its complexation properties with Fe(III) and Cr(III). A Schiff base bearing dopamine (TRDPA) was synthesized using dopamine hydrochloride and 1,3,5-tris (formylphenoxymethyl)benzene in methanol media. The prepared TRDPA was then reacted with four new trinuclear Fe(III) and Cr(III) complexes involving tetradenta Schiff bases N,N-bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine-(salenH2) or bis(salicylidene)-o-phenylenediamine-(salophenH2). The structures of these compounds were characterized through 1H NMR, 13C NMR, FT-IR, thermal analysis (TG), elemental analysis, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The complexes were also characterized as low-spin distorted octahedral Fe(III) and Cr(III) bridged by a catechol group.

  7. A Class of Multiresponsive Colorimetric and Fluorescent pH Probes via Three Different Reaction Mechanisms of Salen Complexes: A Selective and Accurate pH Measurement.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jinghui; Gou, Fei; Zhang, Xiaohong; Shen, Guangyu; Zhou, Xiangge; Xiang, Haifeng

    2016-09-19

    We report a class of multiresponsive colorimetric and fluorescent pH probes based on three different reaction mechanisms including cation exchange, protonation, and hydrolysis reaction of K(I), Ca(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Al(III), and Pd(II) Salen complexes. Compared with traditional pure organic pH probes, these complex-based pH probes exhibited a much better selectivity due to the shielding function of the filled-in metal ion in the complex. Their pH sensing performances were affected by the ligand structure and the central metal ion. This work is the first report of "off-on-on'-off" colorimetric and fluorescent pH probes that possess three different reaction mechanisms and should inspire the design of multiple-responsive probes for important analytes in biological systems.

  8. A mild, three-component one-pot synthesis of 2,4,5-trisubstituted imidazoles using Mo(IV) salen complex in homogeneous catalytic system and Mo(IV) salen complex nanoparticles onto silica as a highly active, efficient, and reusable heterogeneous nanocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Sharghi, Hashem; Aberi, Mahdi; Doroodmand, Mohammad Mahdi

    2015-02-01

    Mo(IV) salen complex (2.5 mol%) was found to be a highly efficient catalyst for the one-pot synthesis of 2,4,5-triarylimidazoles via a three-component reaction using benzil or benzoin, aryl aldehydes, and ammonium acetate as a nitrogen source under mild conditions. In order to recover and the reuse of the catalyst, a new Mo(IV) salen-silica nanoparticle as heterogeneous catalyst was prepared by simple and successful immobilization of the catalyst onto silica (3-aminopropyl functionalized silica gel). This procedure can be applied to large-scale conditions with high efficiency. Experimental evidence showed that the catalyst is stable and can be easily recovered and reused for at least five times without significant loss of activity. The nanocatalyst was characterized using FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction , transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric instrument for analysis of nitrogen adsorption, and inductively coupled plasma spectrometer. PMID:25515148

  9. Electronic transitions of cobalt monoboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Y. W.; Pang, H. F.; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2011-11-01

    Electronic transition spectrum of cobalt monoboride (CoB) in the visible region between 495 and 560 nm has been observed and analyzed using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. CoB molecule was produced by the reaction of laser-ablated cobalt atom and diborane (B2H6) seeded in argon. Fifteen vibrational bands with resolved rotational structure have been recorded, which included transitions of both Co10B and Co11B isotopic species. Our analysis showed that the observed transition bands are ΔΩ = 0 transitions with Ω″ = 2 and Ω″ = 3 lower states. Four transition systems have been assigned, namely, the [18.1]3Π2-X3Δ2, the [18.3]3Φ3-X3Δ3, the [18.6]3- X3Δ3, and the [19.0]2-X3Δ2 systems. The bond length, ro, of the X 3Δ3 state of CoB is determined to be 1.705 Å. The observed rotational lines showed unresolved hyperfine structure arising from the nuclei, which conforms to the Hund's case (aβ) coupling scheme. This work represents the first experimental investigation of the CoB spectrum.

  10. Advances in cobalt complexes as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Catherine R; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan

    2015-08-21

    The evolution of resistance to traditional platinum-based anticancer drugs has compelled researchers to investigate the cytostatic properties of alternative transition metal-based compounds. The anticancer potential of cobalt complexes has been extensively studied over the last three decades, and much time has been devoted to understanding their mechanisms of action. This perspective catalogues the development of antiproliferative cobalt complexes, and provides an in depth analysis of their mode of action. Early studies on simple cobalt coordination complexes, Schiff base complexes, and cobalt-carbonyl clusters will be documented. The physiologically relevant redox properties of cobalt will be highlighted and the role this plays in the preparation of hypoxia selective prodrugs and imaging agents will be discussed. The use of cobalt-containing cobalamin as a cancer specific delivery agent for cytotoxins will also be described. The work summarised in this perspective shows that the biochemical and biophysical properties of cobalt-containing compounds can be fine-tuned to produce new generations of anticancer agents with clinically relevant efficacies.

  11. Prosthetic hip-associated cobalt toxicity.

    PubMed

    Pizon, Anthony F; Abesamis, Michael; King, Andrew M; Menke, Nathan

    2013-12-01

    Prosthetic hip-associated cobalt toxicity (PHACT) is gaining recognition due to the use of metal-on-metal total hip replacements. Identifying true toxicity from merely elevated cobalt levels can be extremely difficult due to the lack of available data. An extensive review of the medical literature was undertaken to characterize cobalt toxicity from prosthetic hips. As an objective approach to making the diagnosis of PHACT, we suggest the following criteria: (1) elevated serum or whole blood cobalt levels due to a prosthetic hip, (2) at least two test-confirmed findings consistent with cobalt toxicity, and (3) exclusion of other etiologies. Adhering to objective diagnostic data for PHACT is a realistic and prudent method by which to eliminate the subjectivity of vague or difficult to identify complaints. These diagnostic criteria are not meant to evaluate prosthetic hardware failure, but as a means to identify systemic cobalt toxicity. Finally, assessment of cobalt toxicity from prosthetic hips should be done in conjunction with a medical toxicologist. PMID:24258006

  12. Polyamide preparation with pentaamine cobalt (III) complex catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.Y.M.; Ball, L.E.; Coffey, G.P.

    1987-11-17

    A process is described for preparing a polyamide containing amide groups as integral parts of the main polymer chain comprising polymerizing a polyamide forming system, chosen from (1) an alpha, beta-unsaturated carboxylic acid and ammonia, (2) an ammonium salt of an alpha, beta unsaturated carboxylic acid, (3) an alpha, beta-unsaturated nitrile and water, (4) an alpha, beta-unsaturated amine and ammonia, (5) or a beta-amino propionic acid or its alkyl derivatives, in contact with a catalyst comprising a pentaamine cobalt (III) complex.

  13. Spectrophotometric estimation of cobalt with ninhydrin.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Karamat; Wattoo, Feroza Hamid; Wattoo, Muhammad Hamid Sarwar; Imran, Muhammad; Asad, Muhammad Javaid; Tirmizi, Syed Ahmed; Wadood, Abdul

    2012-04-01

    A violet coloured complex was developed when cobalt metal reacts with ninhydrin at pH 8.2, using sodium acetate buffer solution. Absorbance of the complex was measured at 395 nm. Various factors, such as volume of the ligand used, solution pH, stability of the complex with time and interference of other metals, which effect the complex formation have been studied in detail. Present developed method can be used for the spectrophotometric estimation of cobalt with ninhydrin complex. The method is simple, selective and cheap for the determination of cobalt in very less time.

  14. Galvanic cells including cobalt-chromium alloys.

    PubMed

    Gjerdet, N R

    1980-01-01

    Galvanic cells may be created when dentures made of cobalt-chromium alloys are placed on teeth with metallic restorations. The power of such cells was evaluated in an in vitro galvanic using amalgams, gold alloy, and nickel-chromium alloys. The amalgams and one of the nickel-chromium alloys revealed high corrosion currents when placed in contact with cobalt-chromium alloy, the conventional amalgam showing the highest values. The gold alloy and another nickel-chromium alloy exhibited low corrosion currents and they were noble with respect to cobalt-chromium.

  15. Role of cobalt in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R.; Barefoot, J.; Tien, J.; Sanchez, J.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of cobalt or substituting for cobalt on the mechanical properties of nickel-based superalloys is discussed. Waspaloy, UDIMET 700, and NIMONIC 115, which are representative of Ni-Cr-Co-Al-Ti-Mo superalloys having different gamma prime contents which are strengthened by a heavily alloyed matrix, coherent gamma prime precipitates, and carbides at the grain boundaries. Microstructure and in situ and extracted phase STEM micro-analysis were used to evaluate the three alloys.

  16. [Are the cobalt hip prosthesis dangerous?].

    PubMed

    Mistretta, Virginie; Kurth, William; Charlier, Corinne

    The placement of a hip prosthesis is one of the most common orthopedic surgical procedures. Some implants contain metal and are therefore capable of releasing metal particles like cobalt in patients who wear metal prostheses. Cobalt can be responsible of local toxicity (including metallosis, hypersensitivity reaction, and benign tumor) or systemic toxicity (including cardiomyopathy, polycythemia, hypothyroidism, and neurological disorders). To monitor potential toxicity of metal hip prostheses, an annual monitoring of patients implanted is recommended and includes clinical examination, radiological examination and blood cobalt determination. The cobalt concentration in blood allows to estimate the risk of toxicity and to evaluate the performance of the implant. The currently recommended threshold value is equal to 7 µg of cobalt per liter of blood. Our study, conducted on 251 patients over a period of 4 years, has shown that the cobalt concentration average was 2.51 µg/l in blood, with 51 patients having a cobaltemia higher than the threshold of 7 µg/l. PMID:27615181

  17. Intolerability of cobalt salt as erythropoietic agent.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Bastian; Jelkmann, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Unfair athletes seek ways to stimulate erythropoiesis, because the mass of haemoglobin is a critical factor in aerobic sports. Here, the potential misuse of cobalt deserves special attention. Cobalt ions (Co(2+) ) stabilize the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) that increase the expression of the erythropoietin (Epo) gene. Co(2+) is orally active, easy to obtain, and inexpensive. However, its intake can bear risks to health. To elaborate this issue, a review of the pertinent literature was retrieved by a search with the keywords 'anaemia', 'cobalt', 'cobalt chloride', 'erythropoiesis', 'erythropoietin', 'Epo', 'side-effects' and 'treatment', amongst others. In earlier years, cobalt chloride was administered at daily doses of 25 to 300 mg for use as an anti-anaemic agent. Co(2+) therapy proved effective in stimulating erythropoiesis in both non-renal and renal anaemia, yet there were also serious medical adverse effects. The intake of inorganic cobalt can cause severe organ damage, concerning primarily the gastrointestinal tract, the thyroid, the heart and the sensory systems. These insights should keep athletes off taking Co(2+) to stimulate erythropoiesis.

  18. [Are the cobalt hip prosthesis dangerous?].

    PubMed

    Mistretta, Virginie; Kurth, William; Charlier, Corinne

    The placement of a hip prosthesis is one of the most common orthopedic surgical procedures. Some implants contain metal and are therefore capable of releasing metal particles like cobalt in patients who wear metal prostheses. Cobalt can be responsible of local toxicity (including metallosis, hypersensitivity reaction, and benign tumor) or systemic toxicity (including cardiomyopathy, polycythemia, hypothyroidism, and neurological disorders). To monitor potential toxicity of metal hip prostheses, an annual monitoring of patients implanted is recommended and includes clinical examination, radiological examination and blood cobalt determination. The cobalt concentration in blood allows to estimate the risk of toxicity and to evaluate the performance of the implant. The currently recommended threshold value is equal to 7 µg of cobalt per liter of blood. Our study, conducted on 251 patients over a period of 4 years, has shown that the cobalt concentration average was 2.51 µg/l in blood, with 51 patients having a cobaltemia higher than the threshold of 7 µg/l.

  19. COBALT COMPOUNDS AS ANTIDOTES FOR HYDROCYANIC ACID.

    PubMed

    EVANS, C L

    1964-12-01

    The antidotal potency of a cobalt salt (acetate), of dicobalt edetate, of hydroxocobalamin and of cobinamide against hydrocyanic acid was examined mainly on mice and rabbits. All the compounds were active antidotes for up to twice the LD50; under some conditions for larger doses. The most successful was cobalt acetate for rabbits (5xLD50), which was effective at a molar cyanide/cobalt (CN/Co) ratio of 5, but had as a side-effect intense purgation. Hydroxocobalamin was irregular in action, but on the whole was most effective for mice (4.5xLD50 at a molar ratio of 1), and had no apparent side effects. Dicobalt edetate, at molar ratios of up to 2, was more effective for rabbits (3xLD50) than for mice (2xLD50), but had fewer side effects than cobalt acetate. The effect of thiosulphate was to augment the efficacy of dicobalt edetate and, in mice, that of hydroxocobalamin; but, apparently, in rabbits, to reduce that of hydroxocobalamin. Cobinamide, at a molar ratio of 1, was slightly more effective than hydroxocobalamin on rabbits and also less irregular in its action. Cobalt acetate by mouth was effective against orally administered hydrocyanic acid. The oxygen uptake of the body, reduced by cyanide, is rapidly reinstated when one of the cobalt antidotes has been successfully administered.

  20. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  1. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  2. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  3. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  4. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  5. Nickel acts as an adjuvant during cobalt sensitization.

    PubMed

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Nielsen, Morten Milek; Vennegaard, Marie T; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Geisler, Carsten; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2015-03-01

    Metal allergy is the most frequent form of contact allergy with nickel and cobalt being the main culprits. Typically, exposure comes from metal-alloys where nickel and cobalt co-exist. Importantly, very little is known about how co-exposure to nickel and cobalt affects the immune system. We investigated these effects by using a recently developed mouse model. Mice were epicutaneously sensitized with i) nickel alone, ii) nickel in the presence of cobalt, iii) cobalt alone, or iv) cobalt in the presence of nickel, and then followed by challenge with either nickel or cobalt alone. We found that sensitization with nickel alone induced more local inflammation than cobalt alone as measured by increased ear-swelling. Furthermore, the presence of nickel during sensitization to cobalt led to a stronger challenge response to cobalt as seen by increased ear-swelling and increased B and T cell responses in the draining lymph nodes compared to mice sensitized with cobalt alone. In contrast, the presence of cobalt during nickel sensitization only induced an increased CD8(+) T cell proliferation during challenge to nickel. Thus, the presence of nickel during cobalt sensitization potentiated the challenge response against cobalt more than the presence of cobalt during sensitization to nickel affected the challenge response against nickel. Taken together, our study demonstrates that sensitization with a mixture of nickel and cobalt leads to an increased immune response to both nickel and cobalt, especially to cobalt, and furthermore that the adjuvant effect appears to correlate with the inflammatory properties of the allergen.

  6. The immunobiology of cobalt: demonstration of a potential aetiology for inflammatory pseudotumours after metal-on-metal replacement of the hip.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, H; Deehan, D; Holland, J; Kirby, J; Tyson-Capper, A

    2014-09-01

    Abnormal wear of cobalt-containing metal-on-metal joints is associated with inflammatory pseudotumours. Cobalt ions activate human toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which normally responds to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in sepsis. Activation of TLR4 by LPS increases the expression of chemokines IL-8 and CXCL10, which recruit leukocytes and activated T-cells, respectively. This study was designed to determine whether cobalt induces a similar inflammatory response to LPS by promoting the expression of IL-8 and CXCL10. A human monocytic cell line, derived from acute monocytic leukaemia, was treated with cobalt ions and expression of IL-8 and CXCL10 measured at mRNA and protein levels. Cobalt-treated macrophages showed a 60-fold increase in IL-8 mRNA, and an eightfold increase in production of the mature chemokine (both p < 0.001); expression of the CXCL10 gene and protein was also significantly increased by cobalt (both p < 0.001). Experiments were also performed in the presence of CLI-095, a TLR4-specific antagonist which abrogated the cobalt-mediated increase in IL-8 and CXCL10 expression. These findings suggest that cobalt ions induce inflammation similar to that observed during sepsis by the simultaneous activation of two TLR4-mediated signalling pathways. These pathways result in increased production of IL-8 and CXCL10, and may be implicated in pseudotumour formation following metal-on-metal replacement.

  7. Series of dinuclear and tetranuclear lanthanide clusters encapsulated by salen-type and β-diketionate ligands: single-molecule magnet and fluorescence properties.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen-Bin; Han, Bing-Lu; Lin, Po-Heng; Li, Hong-Feng; Chen, Peng; Tian, Yong-Mei; Murugesu, Muralee; Yan, Peng-Fei

    2013-10-01

    Three dinuclear [Ln2H2OL(1)2(acac)2]·solvent (1, Ln = Gd, solvent = 2CH2Cl2; 2, Ln = Tb, no solvent; 3, Ln = Er, solvent = (C2H5)2O), and two tetranuclear lanthanide clusters [Ln4(μ3-OH)2L(2)2(acac)6]·2(solvent) (4, Ln = Tb, solvent = CH3OH; 5, Ln = Dy, solvent = CH3CN) were characterized in terms of structure, fluorescence and magnetism. The dinuclear lanthanide complexes were constructed by a rigid salen-type ligand H2L(1) = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-o-phenylenediamine and β-diketonate (acac = acetylacetonate) ligands, while the tetranuclear clusters were formed from the flexible ligand H2L(2) = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,2-ethanediamine. Crystal structure analysis indicates that the rigid ligand favors the double-decker sandwich structure (Ln2L(1)2), in which the two lanthanide ions have different coordination numbers and geometry, while the more flexible ligand (H2L(2)) leads to planar tetranuclear clusters. The relationship between their respective magnetic anisotropy and ligand-field geometries and their fluorescence properties was investigated. The Dy and Tb-containing clusters exhibit typical visible fluorescence properties, and single-molecule magnet behavior is seen in complex 5.

  8. Conformational study of an axially chiral Salen ligand in solution using two-photon circular dichroism and the fragment-recombination approach.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Carlos; Echevarria, Lorenzo; Hernández, Florencio E

    2013-09-01

    Herein we report on the conformational study of a chiral Salen ligand, AFX-155, in THF solution using two-photon absorption (TPA) and, even more importantly, two-photon circular dichroism (TPCD). The fragment-recombination approach (FRA), employed to perform computations on half-AXF-155 (AXF-169') and the center (C-AXF-155), allowed us to overcome the current computational limitations found in calculations of the TPCD spectra of large molecules. The comparative experimental-theoretical analysis of AXF-155 showed that its TPA is mainly determined by AXF-169' and validated, through TPCD, the presence of the two dominant Trans_R-Intra(NHB)//Trans_R-Extra(HB) and Trans_R-Intra(NHB)//Trans_R-Extra(NHB) structure in THF with a ΔΔ propeller chirality on the diphenylamine moieties at the end of each AXF-169'. The application of FRA for the analysis of the TPCD spectra of large chiral molecules has been proven to be effective. PMID:23937607

  9. Construction and NIR luminescent property of hetero-bimetallic Zn Nd complexes from two chiral salen-type Schiff-base ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Wei-Yu; Lü, Xing-Qiang; Chai, Wen-Li; Song, Ji-Rong; Wong, Wai-Yeung; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jones, Richard A.

    2008-11-01

    Two new near-infrared (NIR) luminescent Zn-Nd complexes [ZnL 1Nd(OAc)(NO 3) 2] ( 3) and [ZnL 2Nd(DMF) 2(NO 3) 3] ( 4) have been obtained with two salen-type Schiff-base ligands H 2L 1 and H 2L 2, ( H 2L 1 = N, N'-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-(1s, 2s)-(-)1,2-dipheneylethylenediamine and H 2L 2 = N, N'-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-(s)-2,2-diamine-1,1'-binaphthyl) from the reaction of different chiral diamines with o-vanillin. The X-ray crystal structure analysis reveals that both of them crystallize in the chiral space groups with P2(1), a = 10.1669(6), b = 19.3775(11), c = 17.4639(10) Å, β = 94.8710(10)°, V = 3428.1(3) Å 3, Z = 4 for 3, and C2, a = 22.1914(13), b = 9.7886(6), c = 22.0138(13) Å, β = 118.9590(10)°, V = 4372.5(4) Å 3, Z = 4 for 4. Complexes 3- 4 are both dinuclear Zn-Nd structures, while suitable choice of chiral Schiff-base ligands could induce the different complexions of ligands and metal ions, and the functional control of ligand character shows a potentially effective way to the fine-tuning properties of NIR luminescence from Nd ions.

  10. Mechanistic Studies of ε-Caprolactone Polymerization by (salen)AlOR Complexes and a Predictive Model for Cyclic Ester Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum alkoxide complexes (2) of salen ligands with a three-carbon linker and para substituents having variable electron-withdrawing capabilities (X = NO2, Br, OMe) were prepared, and the kinetics of their ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of ε-caprolactone (CL) were investigated as a function of temperature, with the aim of drawing comparisons to similar systems with two-carbon linkers investigated previously (1). While 1 and 2 exhibit saturation kinetics and similar dependences of their ROP rates on substituents X (invariant Keq, similar Hammett ρ = +1.4(1) and 1.2(1) for k2, respectively), ROP by 2 was significantly faster than for 1. Theoretical calculations confirm that, while the reactant structures differ, the transition state geometries are quite similar, and by analyzing the energetics of the involved distortions accompanying the structural changes, a significant contribution to the basis for the rate differences was identified. Using this knowledge, a simplified computational method for evaluating ligand structural influences on cyclic ester ROP rates is proposed that may have utility for future catalyst design. PMID:26900488

  11. Equilibrium sorption of cobalt, cesium, and strontium on Bandelier Tuff: analysis of alternative mathematical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Polzer, W.L.; Fuentes, H.R.; Essington, E.H.; Roensch, F.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sorption isotherms are derived from batch equilibrium data for cobalt, cesium and strontium on Bandelier Tuff. Experiments were conducted at an average temperature of 23/sup 0/C and equilibrium was defined at 48 hours. The solute concentrations ranged from 0 to 500 mg/L. The radioactive isotopes /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 85/Sr were used to trace the sorption of the stable solutes. The Linear, Langmuir, Freundlich and a Modified Freundlich isotherm equations are evaluated. The Modified Freundlich isotherm equation is validated as a preferred general mathematical tool for representing the sorption of the three solutes. The empirical constants derived from the Modified Freundlich isotherm equation indicate that under dynamic flow conditions strontium will move most rapidly and cobalt least rapidly. On the other hand, chemical dispersion will be greatest for cesium and least for strontium. Hill Plots of the sorption data suggest that in the region of low saturation sorption of all three solutes is impeded by interactions among sorption sites; cobalt exhibits the greatest effect of interactions and strontium shows only a minimal effect. In the saturation region of 50% or more, sorption of cobalt is enhanced slightly by interactions among sorption sites whereas sorption of cesium and strontium appears to be independent of site interactions. 9 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Synthesis of Samarium Cobalt Nanoblades

    SciTech Connect

    Darren M. Steele

    2010-08-25

    As new portable particle acceleration technologies become feasible the need for small high performance permanent magnets becomes critical. With particle accelerating cavities of a few microns, the photonic crystal fiber (PCF) candidate demands magnets of comparable size. To address this need, samarium cobalt (SmCo) nanoblades were attempted to be synthesized using the polyol process. Since it is preferable to have blades of 1-2 {micro}m in length, key parameters affecting size and morphology including method of stirring, reaction temperature, reaction time and addition of hydroxide were examined. Nanoparticles consisting of 70-200 nm spherical clusters with a 3-5 nm polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coating were synthesized at 285 C and found to be ferromagnetic. Nanoblades of 25nm in length were observed at the surface of the nanoclusters and appeared to suggest agglomeration was occurring even with PVP employed. Morphology and size were characterized using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis was conducted to determine composition but no supportive evidence for any particular SmCo phase has yet been observed.

  13. Cobalt: A vital element in the aircraft engine industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Recent trends in the United States consumption of cobalt indicate that superalloys for aircraft engine manufacture require increasing amounts of this strategic element. Superalloys consume a lion's share of total U.S. cobalt usage which was about 16 million pounds in 1980. In excess of 90 percent of the cobalt used in this country was imported, principally from the African countries of Zaire and Zambia. Early studies on the roles of cobalt as an alloying element in high temperature alloys concentrated on the simple Ni-Cr and Nimonic alloy series. The role of cobalt in current complex nickel base superalloys is not well defined and indeed, the need for the high concentration of cobalt in widely used nickel base superalloys is not firmly established. The current cobalt situation is reviewed as it applies to superalloys and the opportunities for research to reduce the consumption of cobalt in the aircraft engine industry are described.

  14. Partially oxidized atomic cobalt layers for carbon dioxide electroreduction to liquid fuel.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Lin, Yue; Jiao, Xingchen; Sun, Yongfu; Luo, Qiquan; Zhang, Wenhua; Li, Dianqi; Yang, Jinlong; Xie, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Electroreduction of CO2 into useful fuels, especially if driven by renewable energy, represents a potentially 'clean' strategy for replacing fossil feedstocks and dealing with increasing CO2 emissions and their adverse effects on climate. The critical bottleneck lies in activating CO2 into the CO2(•-) radical anion or other intermediates that can be converted further, as the activation usually requires impractically high overpotentials. Recently, electrocatalysts based on oxide-derived metal nanostructures have been shown to enable CO2 reduction at low overpotentials. However, it remains unclear how the electrocatalytic activity of these metals is influenced by their native oxides, mainly because microstructural features such as interfaces and defects influence CO2 reduction activity yet are difficult to control. To evaluate the role of the two different catalytic sites, here we fabricate two kinds of four-atom-thick layers: pure cobalt metal, and co-existing domains of cobalt metal and cobalt oxide. Cobalt mainly produces formate (HCOO(-)) during CO2 electroreduction; we find that surface cobalt atoms of the atomically thin layers have higher intrinsic activity and selectivity towards formate production, at lower overpotentials, than do surface cobalt atoms on bulk samples. Partial oxidation of the atomic layers further increases their intrinsic activity, allowing us to realize stable current densities of about 10 milliamperes per square centimetre over 40 hours, with approximately 90 per cent formate selectivity at an overpotential of only 0.24 volts, which outperforms previously reported metal or metal oxide electrodes evaluated under comparable conditions. The correct morphology and oxidation state can thus transform a material from one considered nearly non-catalytic for the CO2 electroreduction reaction into an active catalyst. These findings point to new opportunities for manipulating and improving the CO2 electroreduction properties of metal systems

  15. Partially oxidized atomic cobalt layers for carbon dioxide electroreduction to liquid fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Lin, Yue; Jiao, Xingchen; Sun, Yongfu; Luo, Qiquan; Zhang, Wenhua; Li, Dianqi; Yang, Jinlong; Xie, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Electroreduction of CO2 into useful fuels, especially if driven by renewable energy, represents a potentially ‘clean’ strategy for replacing fossil feedstocks and dealing with increasing CO2 emissions and their adverse effects on climate. The critical bottleneck lies in activating CO2 into the CO2•- radical anion or other intermediates that can be converted further, as the activation usually requires impractically high overpotentials. Recently, electrocatalysts based on oxide-derived metal nanostructures have been shown to enable CO2 reduction at low overpotentials. However, it remains unclear how the electrocatalytic activity of these metals is influenced by their native oxides, mainly because microstructural features such as interfaces and defects influence CO2 reduction activity yet are difficult to control. To evaluate the role of the two different catalytic sites, here we fabricate two kinds of four-atom-thick layers: pure cobalt metal, and co-existing domains of cobalt metal and cobalt oxide. Cobalt mainly produces formate (HCOO-) during CO2 electroreduction; we find that surface cobalt atoms of the atomically thin layers have higher intrinsic activity and selectivity towards formate production, at lower overpotentials, than do surface cobalt atoms on bulk samples. Partial oxidation of the atomic layers further increases their intrinsic activity, allowing us to realize stable current densities of about 10 milliamperes per square centimetre over 40 hours, with approximately 90 per cent formate selectivity at an overpotential of only 0.24 volts, which outperforms previously reported metal or metal oxide electrodes evaluated under comparable conditions. The correct morphology and oxidation state can thus transform a material from one considered nearly non-catalytic for the CO2 electroreduction reaction into an active catalyst. These findings point to new opportunities for manipulating and improving the CO2 electroreduction properties of metal systems

  16. Partially oxidized atomic cobalt layers for carbon dioxide electroreduction to liquid fuel.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Lin, Yue; Jiao, Xingchen; Sun, Yongfu; Luo, Qiquan; Zhang, Wenhua; Li, Dianqi; Yang, Jinlong; Xie, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Electroreduction of CO2 into useful fuels, especially if driven by renewable energy, represents a potentially 'clean' strategy for replacing fossil feedstocks and dealing with increasing CO2 emissions and their adverse effects on climate. The critical bottleneck lies in activating CO2 into the CO2(•-) radical anion or other intermediates that can be converted further, as the activation usually requires impractically high overpotentials. Recently, electrocatalysts based on oxide-derived metal nanostructures have been shown to enable CO2 reduction at low overpotentials. However, it remains unclear how the electrocatalytic activity of these metals is influenced by their native oxides, mainly because microstructural features such as interfaces and defects influence CO2 reduction activity yet are difficult to control. To evaluate the role of the two different catalytic sites, here we fabricate two kinds of four-atom-thick layers: pure cobalt metal, and co-existing domains of cobalt metal and cobalt oxide. Cobalt mainly produces formate (HCOO(-)) during CO2 electroreduction; we find that surface cobalt atoms of the atomically thin layers have higher intrinsic activity and selectivity towards formate production, at lower overpotentials, than do surface cobalt atoms on bulk samples. Partial oxidation of the atomic layers further increases their intrinsic activity, allowing us to realize stable current densities of about 10 milliamperes per square centimetre over 40 hours, with approximately 90 per cent formate selectivity at an overpotential of only 0.24 volts, which outperforms previously reported metal or metal oxide electrodes evaluated under comparable conditions. The correct morphology and oxidation state can thus transform a material from one considered nearly non-catalytic for the CO2 electroreduction reaction into an active catalyst. These findings point to new opportunities for manipulating and improving the CO2 electroreduction properties of metal systems

  17. Equilibrium phase boundary between hcp-cobalt and fcc-cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cynn, Hyunchae; Lipp, Magnus J.; Evans, William J.; Baer, Bruce J.

    In 2000 (Yoo et al., PRL), fcc-cobalt was reported as a new high pressure phase transforming from ambient hcp-cobalt starting at around 105 GPa and 300 K. Both cobalts coexist up to 150 GPa and thereafter only fcc-cobalt was found to be the only stable phase to 200 GPa. Our recent synchrotron x-ray diffraction data on cobalt are at odds with the previous interpretation. We will present our new finding and elaborate on our understanding in terms of the equilibrium phase boundary of cobalt. We will also compare our previous work on xenon (Cynn et al., 2001, PRL) with our new results on cobalt. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Portions of this work were performed at HPCAT (Sector 16), APS, Argonne National Laboratory. HPCAT operations are supported by DOE-NNSA under Award No. DENA0001974 and DOE-BES under Award No. DE-FG02-99ER45775. The Advanced Photon Source is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility operated for the DOE Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  18. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  19. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  20. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  1. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  2. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  3. Palladium-cobalt particles as oxygen-reduction electrocatalysts

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Huang, Tao

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates to palladium-cobalt particles useful as oxygen-reducing electrocatalysts. The invention also relates to oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells containing these palladium-cobalt particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for the production of electrical energy by using the palladium-cobalt particles of the invention.

  4. Controlled cobalt doping in biogenic magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, J. M.; Coker, V. S.; Moise, S.; Wincott, P. L.; Vaughan, D. J.; Tuna, F.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Lloyd, J. R.; Telling, N. D.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt-doped magnetite (CoxFe3 −xO4) nanoparticles have been produced through the microbial reduction of cobalt–iron oxyhydroxide by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. The materials produced, as measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, Mössbauer spectroscopy, etc., show dramatic increases in coercivity with increasing cobalt content without a major decrease in overall saturation magnetization. Structural and magnetization analyses reveal a reduction in particle size to less than 4 nm at the highest Co content, combined with an increase in the effective anisotropy of the magnetic nanoparticles. The potential use of these biogenic nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia applications is demonstrated. Further analysis of the distribution of cations within the ferrite spinel indicates that the cobalt is predominantly incorporated in octahedral coordination, achieved by the substitution of Fe2+ site with Co2+, with up to 17 per cent Co substituted into tetrahedral sites. PMID:23594814

  5. Nickel cobalt phosphorous low stress electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An electrolytic plating process is provided for electrodepositing a nickel or nickel cobalt alloy which contains at least about 2% to 25% by atomic volume of phosphorous. The process solutions contains nickel and optionally cobalt sulfate, hypophosphorous acid or a salt thereof, boric acid or a salt thereof, a monodentate organic acid or a salt thereof, and a multidentate organic acid or a salt thereof. The pH of the plating bath is from about 3.0 to about 4.5. An electroplating process is also provided which includes electroplating from the bath a nickel or nickel cobalt phosphorous alloy. This process can achieve a deposit with high microyield of at least about 84 kg/mm.sup.2 (120 ksi) and a density lower than pure nickel of about 8.0 gm/cc. This process can be used to plate a deposit of essentially zero stress at plating temperatures from ambient to 70.degree. C.

  6. Cobalt Nanopartciles for Enhanced Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmire, David; Romero, Danilo; Hight Walker, Angela

    2003-03-01

    Low-frequency Raman spectra of cobalt nanoparticles ( 10 nm) have been obtained. This optical characterization is supported by other methods such as TEM, AFM and SQUID magnetometry. A cryo-magnet coupled to a triple grating spectrometer enables the scattering measurements at a range of sample temperatures (4K to 300K) and magnetic field strengths (0T to 8T). Cobalt nanoparticles have a complicated phase diagram which reveals three unique crystal structures resulting in distinctive and tunable magnetic properties and a self-assembly capability well suited for building SERS-active substrates. Coating of the cobalt particles with a monolayer of gold is also being pursued to further enhance the Raman scattering signal while maintaining the unique magnetic properties of the particles.

  7. Rapid phase synthesis of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugavel, T.; Raj, S. Gokul; Rajarajan, G.; Kumar, G. Ramesh

    2014-04-24

    Synthesis of single phase nanocrystalline Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was achieved by single step autocombustion technique with the use of citric acid as a chelating agent in mono proportion with metal. Specimens prepared with this method showed significantly higher initial permeability's than with the conventional process. Single phase nanocrystalline cobalt ferrites were formed at very low temperature. Surface morphology identification were carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The average grain size and density at low temperature increased gradually with increasing the temperature. The single phase formation is confirmed through powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Magnetization measurements were obtained at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), which showed that the calcined samples exhibited typical magnetic behaviors. Temperature dependent magnetization results showed improved behavior for the nanocrystalline form of cobalt ferrite when compared to the bulk nature of materials synthesized by other methods.

  8. Cobalt-catalyzed oxidative isocyanide insertion to amine-based bisnucleophiles: diverse synthesis of substituted 2-aminobenzimidazoles, 2-aminobenzothiazoles, and 2-aminobenzoxazoles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tong-Hao; Wang, Shun-Yi; Wang, Gao-Nan; Ji, Shun-Jun

    2013-05-01

    Cobalt catalysis: Synthesis of substituted 2-aminobenzimidazoles, 2-aminobenzothiazoles, and 2-aminobenzoxazoles was achieved by using cobalt(II) acetate catalyzed isocyanide insertion to o-diaminobenzene, 2-aminobenzenethiol, and 2-aminophenol derivatives in 1,4-dioxane (see scheme). It was found that the reaction proceeded efficiently to give the desired products in up to 95 % isolated yields by C-N and C-S (O, N) formation in a single step.

  9. Cobalt and marine redox evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Robbins, Leslie J.; Bekker, Andrey; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Saito, Mak A.; Kappler, Andreas; Mojzsis, Stephen J.; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2014-03-01

    Cobalt (Co) is a bio-essential trace element and limiting nutrient in some regions of the modern oceans. It has been proposed that Co was more abundant in poorly ventilated Precambrian oceans based on the greater utilization of Co by anaerobic microbes relative to plants and animals. However, there are few empirical or theoretical constraints on the history of seawater Co concentrations. Herein, we present a survey of authigenic Co in marine sediments (iron formations, authigenic pyrite and bulk euxinic shales) with the goal of tracking changes in the marine Co reservoir throughout Earth's history. We further provide an overview of the modern marine Co cycle, which we use as a platform to evaluate how changes in the redox state of Earth's surface were likely to have affected marine Co concentrations. Based on sedimentary Co contents and our understanding of marine Co sources and sinks, we propose that from ca. 2.8 to 1.8 Ga the large volume of hydrothermal fluids circulating through abundant submarine ultramafic rocks along with a predominantly anoxic ocean with a low capacity for Co burial resulted in a large dissolved marine Co reservoir. We tentatively propose that there was a decrease in marine Co concentrations after ca. 1.8 Ga resulting from waning hydrothermal Co sources and the expansion of sulfide Co burial flux. Changes in the Co reservoir due to deep-water ventilation in the Neoproterozoic, if they occurred, are not resolvable with the current dataset. Rather, Co enrichments in Phanerozoic euxinic shales deposited during ocean anoxic events (OAE) indicate Co mobilization from expanded anoxic sediments and enhanced hydrothermal sources. A new record of marine Co concentrations provides a platform from which we can reevaluate the role that environmental Co concentrations played in shaping biological Co utilization throughout Earth's history.

  10. Pro-oxidative interactions of cobalt with human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ramafi, Grace J; Theron, Annette J; Anderson, Ronald

    2004-08-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of cobalt(II) chloride (Co, 1.5-25 microM) on the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 100 microM) or oxidants generated by activated human neutrophils. The prooxidative interactions of Co with H2O2 or cells were measured by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LECL), and according to the extent of oxidative inactivation of added alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (API). Cobalt dramatically potentiated the oxidation of luminol and API by both H2O2 and neutrophils activated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (5 ng/ml), without affecting the assembly of NADPH oxidase or the magnitude of oxygen consumption by the cells. Using 5,5-dimethyl-pyrolline 1-oxide-based electron spin resonance spectroscopy we were unable to detect hydroxyl radical formation by Co in the presence of either H2O2 or activated neutrophils, while the corresponding LECL responses were unaffected by the hydroxyl radical scavengers benzoate and mannitol (50 mM). These observations indicate that Co potentiates the reactivity of neutrophil-derived oxidants, primarily H2O2, which if operative in vivo during exposure to the heavy metal may pose the risk of oxidant- and protease-mediated tissue injury.

  11. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; cobalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crockett, R.N.; Chapman, G.R.; Forrest, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    Major world resources of cobalt are described in this summary report of information in the International Strategic Minerals Inventory {ISMI}. ISMI is a cooperative data-collection effort of earth-science and mineral-resource agencies in Australia, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Republic of South Africa, and the United States of America. This report, designed to be of benefit to policy analysts, contains two parts. Part I presents an overview of the resources and potential supply of cobalt on the basis of inventory information. Part II contains tables of some of the geologic information and mineral-resource and production data that were collected by ISMI participants.

  12. Cobalt plaque therapy of posterior uveal melanomas

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, J.A.; Augsburger, J.J.; Brady, L.W.; Day, J.L.

    1982-10-01

    One hundred patients with choroidal melanomas who were treated by the authors with cobalt plaque radiotherapy were analyzed with regard to tumor regression, visual results, complications, and mortality rate. The follow-up period at the time of this writing ranged from one to five years. These preliminary observations indicate that cobalt plaque radiotherapy induces tumor regression in 96% of cases, preserves useful vision in many cases and has fewer complications during the one- to five-year follow-up period than previously believed.

  13. Alterations of histone modifications by cobalt compounds

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin; Ke, Qingdong; Costa, Max

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the effects of CoCl2 on multiple histone modifications at the global level. We found that in both human lung carcinoma A549 cells and human bronchial epithelial Beas-2B cells, exposure to CoCl2 (≥200 μM) for 24 h increased H3K4me3, H3K9me2, H3K9me3, H3K27me3, H3K36me3, uH2A and uH2B but decreased acetylation at histone H4 (AcH4). Further investigation demonstrated that in A549 cells, the increase in H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 by cobalt ions exposure was probably through enhancing histone methylation processes, as methionine-deficient medium blocked the induction of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 by cobalt ions, whereas cobalt ions increased H3K9me3 and H3K36me3 by directly inhibiting JMJD2A demethylase activity in vitro, which was probably due to the competition of cobalt ions with iron for binding to the active site of JMJD2A. Furthermore, in vitro ubiquitination and deubiquitination assays revealed that the cobalt-induced histone H2A and H2B ubiquitination is the result of inhibition of deubiquitinating enzyme activity. Microarray data showed that exposed to 200 μM of CoCl2 for 24 h, A549 cells not only increased but also decreased expression of hundreds of genes involved in different cellular functions, including tumorigenesis. This study is the first to demonstrate that cobalt ions altered epigenetic homeostasis in cells. It also sheds light on the possible mechanisms involved in cobalt-induced alteration of histone modifications, which may lead to altered programs of gene expression and carcinogenesis since cobalt at higher concentrations is a known carcinogen. PMID:19376846

  14. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  15. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong; Smith, Leah J; Holmes, Amie L; Zheng, Tongzhang; Pierce Wise, John

    2016-05-01

    Cobalt is a toxic metal used in various industrial applications leading to adverse lung effects by inhalation. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells, especially normal lung epithelial cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in normal primary human lung epithelial cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble and particulate cobalt induced similar cytotoxicity while soluble cobalt was more genotoxic than particulate cobalt. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung epithelial cells.

  16. Cobalt-ruthenium catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesia, E.; Soled, S.L.; Fiato, R.A.

    1989-04-18

    A hydrocarbon synthesis process is described which comprises reacting hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a catalyst comprised of cobalt and ruthenium on titania, at reaction conditions suitable for the formation of higher hydrocarbons. The catalyst is prepared by impregnating titania with solutions of cobalt and ruthenium salts, drying the impregnated support, reducing the cobalt and ruthenium, treating the reduced metals with an oxygen containing stream at conditions sufficient to form oxides of cobalt and oxides of ruthenium and reducing the cobalt and ruthenium oxides.

  17. Copolymerization and terpolymerization of carbon dioxide/propylene oxide/phthalic anhydride using a (salen)Co(III) complex tethering four quaternary ammonium salts

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jong Yeob; Eo, Seong Chan; Varghese, Jobi Kodiyan

    2014-01-01

    Summary The (salen)Co(III) complex 1 tethering four quaternary ammonium salts, which is a highly active catalyst in CO2/epoxide copolymerizations, shows high activity for propylene oxide/phthalic anhydride (PO/PA) copolymerizations and PO/CO2/PA terpolymerizations. In the PO/PA copolymerizations, full conversion of PA was achieved within 5 h, and strictly alternating copolymers of poly(1,2-propylene phthalate)s were afforded without any formation of ether linkages. In the PO/CO2/PA terpolymerizations, full conversion of PA was also achieved within 4 h. The resulting polymers were gradient poly(1,2-propylene carbonate-co-phthalate)s because of the drift in the PA concentration during the terpolymerization. Both polymerizations showed immortal polymerization character; therefore, the molecular weights were determined by the activity (g/mol-1) and the number of chain-growing sites per 1 [anions in 1 (5) + water (present as impurity) + ethanol (deliberately fed)], and the molecular weight distributions were narrow (M w/M n, 1.05–1.5). Because of the extremely high activity of 1, high-molecular-weight polymers were generated (M n up to 170,000 and 350,000 for the PO/PA copolymerization and PO/CO2/PA terpolymerization, respectively). The terpolymers bearing a substantial number of PA units (f PA, 0.23) showed a higher glass-transition temperature (48 °C) than the CO2/PO alternating copolymer (40 °C). PMID:25161738

  18. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Leah J; Holmes, Amie L; Kandpal, Sanjeev Kumar; Mason, Michael D; Zheng, Tongzhang; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-08-01

    Cobalt exposure is increasing as cobalt demand rises worldwide due to its use in enhancing rechargeable battery efficiency, super-alloys, and magnetic products. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in human lung cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic than particulate cobalt while particulate and soluble cobalt induced similar levels of genotoxicity. However, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by the lack of metaphases at much lower intracellular cobalt concentrations compared to cobalt oxide. Accordingly, we investigated the role of particle internalization in cobalt oxide-induced toxicity and found that particle-cell contact was necessary to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity after cobalt exposure. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung fibroblasts, and solubility plays a key role in cobalt-induced lung toxicity.

  19. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Leah J; Holmes, Amie L; Kandpal, Sanjeev Kumar; Mason, Michael D; Zheng, Tongzhang; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-08-01

    Cobalt exposure is increasing as cobalt demand rises worldwide due to its use in enhancing rechargeable battery efficiency, super-alloys, and magnetic products. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in human lung cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic than particulate cobalt while particulate and soluble cobalt induced similar levels of genotoxicity. However, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by the lack of metaphases at much lower intracellular cobalt concentrations compared to cobalt oxide. Accordingly, we investigated the role of particle internalization in cobalt oxide-induced toxicity and found that particle-cell contact was necessary to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity after cobalt exposure. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung fibroblasts, and solubility plays a key role in cobalt-induced lung toxicity. PMID:24823294

  20. Cobalt processing - flask positioner location sensing system

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors offer unique opportunities for economical production of /sup 60/Co in the adjuster rods used for xenon override and maximization of core output. Cobalt is effectively a by-product in CANDU reactors with the standards stainless steel adjuster rods replaced with cobalt adjuster rods. The Flask Positioner unit is a part of the cobalt adjuster element processing system (CAEPS) equipment which is used for removing irradiated cobalt adjuster elements from the reactor and safely transporting them to the irradiated fuel bay, where they are dismantled and prepared for shipment. The flask positioner equipment is similar to a crane, carries the CAEPS flask and locates it in an accurate position concentric with any adjuster site centerline. This enables the required operations for safe transfer of the irradiated adjuster element into the flask. The positioner is located above the reactivity mechanism deck. The CAEPS system has been made operational on several CANDU reactors. The location sensing system has been demonstrated to work very satisfactorily on all installations.

  1. Magnetization dynamics of cobalt grown on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, A. J.; White, S. P.; Adur, R.; Pu, Y.; Hammel, P. C.; Amamou, W.; Kawakami, R. K.

    2014-05-07

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spin pumping is a rapidly growing field which has demonstrated promising results in a variety of material systems. This technique utilizes the resonant precession of magnetization in a ferromagnet to inject spin into an adjacent non-magnetic material. Spin pumping into graphene is attractive on account of its exceptional spin transport properties. This article reports on FMR characterization of cobalt grown on chemical vapor deposition graphene and examines the validity of linewidth broadening as an indicator of spin pumping. In comparison to cobalt samples without graphene, direct contact cobalt-on-graphene exhibits increased FMR linewidth—an often used signature of spin pumping. Similar results are obtained in Co/MgO/graphene structures, where a 1 nm MgO layer acts as a tunnel barrier. However, magnetometry, magnetic force microscopy, and Kerr microscopy measurements demonstrate increased magnetic disorder in cobalt grown on graphene, perhaps due to changes in the growth process and an increase in defects. This magnetic disorder may account for the observed linewidth enhancement due to effects such as two-magnon scattering or mosaicity. As such, it is not possible to conclude successful spin injection into graphene from FMR linewidth measurements alone.

  2. Localized comedo formation after cobalt irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Myskowski, P.L.; Safai, B.

    1981-10-01

    Following Cobalt-60 irradiation for a left frontotemporal tumor, a 61-year-old woman developed comedones on the forehead. These changes responded to conventional acne therapy with retinoic acid. Multiple acneigenic factors were implicated in the pathogenesis of her lesions.

  3. Water splitting: Taking cobalt in isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Aiqin; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The sustainable production of hydrogen is key to the delivery of clean energy in a hydrogen economy; however, lower-cost alternatives to platinum electrocatalysts are needed. Now, isolated, earth-abundant cobalt atoms dispersed over nitrogen-doped graphene are shown to efficiently electrolyse water to generate hydrogen.

  4. Controlled cobalt doping of magnetosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Staniland, Sarah; Williams, Wyn; Telling, Neil; Van Der Laan, Gerrit; Harrison, Andrew; Ward, Bruce

    2008-03-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize iron into magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles that are surrounded by lipid vesicles. These 'magnetosomes' have considerable potential for use in bio- and nanotechnological applications because of their narrow size and shape distribution and inherent biocompatibility. The ability to tailor the magnetic properties of magnetosomes by chemical doping would greatly expand these applications; however, the controlled doping of magnetosomes has so far not been achieved. Here, we report controlled in vivo cobalt doping of magnetosomes in three strains of the bacterium Magnetospirillum. The presence of cobalt increases the coercive field of the magnetosomes--that is, the field necessary to reverse their magnetization--by 36-45%, depending on the strain and the cobalt content. With elemental analysis, X-ray absorption and magnetic circular dichroism, we estimate the cobalt content to be between 0.2 and 1.4%. These findings provide an important advance in designing biologically synthesized nanoparticles with useful highly tuned magnetic properties. PMID:18654488

  5. Sol-gel entrapped cobalt complex

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Omar J. de; Papacidero, Andrea T.; Rocha, Lucas A.; Sacco, Herica C.; Nassar, Eduardo J.; Ciuffi, Katia J.; Bueno, Luciano A.; Messaddeq, Younes; Ribeiro, Sidney J.L

    2003-03-15

    This work describes optimized conditions for preparation of a cobalt complex entrapped in alumina amorphous materials in the form of powder. The hybrid materials, CoNHG, were obtained by a nonhydrolytic sol-gel route through condensation of aluminum chloride with diisopropylether in the presence of cobalt chloride. The materials were calcined at various temperatures. The presence of cobalt entrapped in the alumina matrix is confirmed by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy. The materials have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface area analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analyses (DTA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The prepared alumina matrix materials are amorphous, even after heat treatment up to 750 deg. C. The XRD, TGA/DTA and TEM data support the increase of sample crystallization with increasing temperature. The specific surface area, pore size and pore diameter changed as a function of the heat treatment temperature employed. Different heat treatment temperatures result in materials with different compositions and structures, and influence their catalytic activity. The entrapped cobalt materials calcined at 750 deg. C efficiently catalyzed the epoxidation of (Z)-cyclooctene using iodozylbenzene as the oxygen donor.

  6. Cobalt Biogeochemistry in the South Atlantic: A Full-Depth Zonal Ocean Section of Total Dissolved Cobalt, and Development of a High Throughput Cobalt ICP-MS Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, A. E.; Saito, M. A.; Goepfert, T. J.

    2008-12-01

    This study presents the first high-resolution full-depth zonal section of total dissolved cobalt from a recent cruise transecting the South Atlantic Ocean along approximately 11S. This section demonstrates that current electrochemical analytical techniques are capable of producing the high precision and high resolution datasets for total dissolved cobalt expected to be generated as a part of the international GEOTRACES Program. The micronutritive role of cobalt may affect community structure in different regions of the oceans, a compelling reason to include cobalt in the trace element analyses planned for the GEOTRACES Program. This cobalt section reveals an advective source of cobalt from the African coast near Namibia, which we propose to be due to the Benguela Current interacting with reducing shelf sediments. These high concentrations of cobalt were also observed within the oxygen minimum zone that extends across much of the South Atlantic basin in this section, and are likely indicative of redox cycling of cobalt in the water column. Nutrient-like vertical structure of cobalt was observed in the surface waters across the majority of the basin due to biological utilization, and the expected hybrid-type trend is observed at depth, with scavenging of cobalt below the nutricline. Deepwater concentrations of cobalt were around 50pM across the basin below 3000m. Analysis of the shelf-life of refrigerated filtered samples stored without acidification for electrochemical cobalt analysis demonstrated that those samples which were collected specifically within oxygen minimum zones may underestimate cobalt if not analyzed within a few weeks of collection. These results motivate our on-going development of a method to measure cobalt in acidified samples via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The benefit of this technique would be twofold: acidification would extend the shelf-life of the samples significantly, and samples would be preserved identically

  7. Degradation of atrazine by cobalt-mediated activation of peroxymonosulfate: Different cobalt counteranions in homogenous process and cobalt oxide catalysts in photolytic heterogeneous process.

    PubMed

    Chan, K H; Chu, W

    2009-05-01

    The degradation of atrazine (ATZ) by cobalt-mediated activation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) has been studied in this work. For the homogenous process, different cobalt counteranions: cobalt(II) nitrate Co(NO(3))(2), cobalt(II) sulfate CoSO(4), cobalt(II) chloride CoCl(2), and cobalt(II) acetate Co(CH(3)COO)(2), have been examined. The inhibitory effect was observed in the process initiated by CoCl(2). For the pH test, wide range of pH level (2-10) has been investigated. It was found that the higher rates were obtained in the normal pH levels. At extreme pH levels, the process was impeded by inactivation of PMS at acidic pH and prohibited by precipitation at basic pH. On the other hand, the recycling capability of cobalt oxide and the oxidative potential of cobalt-immobilized titanium dioxide Co-TiO(2) catalyst were analyzed in the heterogeneous process. It was found that the higher the cobalt content in the catalyst, the better the removal performance was resulted. At last, the Co-TiO(2) catalyst synthesized in this work was found to be very effective in transforming ATZ as well as its intermediate in the presence of UV-vis irradiation.

  8. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha} in modulating cobalt-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Saini, Yogesh; Kim, Kyung Y; Lewandowski, Ryan; Bramble, Lori A; Harkema, Jack R; Lapres, John J

    2010-02-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in development, cellular homeostasis, and pathological conditions, such as cancer and stroke. There is also growing evidence that hypoxia is an important modulator of the inflammatory process. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are a family of proteins that regulate the cellular response to oxygen deficit, and loss of HIFs impairs inflammatory cell function. There is little known, however, about the role of epithelial-derived HIF signaling in modulating inflammation. Cobalt is capable of eliciting an allergic response and promoting HIF signaling. To characterize the inflammatory function of epithelial-derived HIF in response to inhaled cobalt, a conditional lung-specific HIF1alpha, the most ubiquitously expressed HIF, deletion mouse, was created. Control mice showed classic signs of metal-induced injury following cobalt exposure, including fibrosis and neutrophil infiltration. In contrast, HIF1alpha-deficient mice displayed a Th2 response that resembled asthma, including increased eosinophilic infiltration, mucus cell metaplasia, and chitinase-like protein expression. The results suggest that epithelial-derived HIF signaling has a critical role in establishing a tissue's inflammatory response, and compromised HIF1alpha signaling biases the tissue towards a Th2-mediated reaction. PMID:19915160

  9. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung fibroblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Leah J.; Holmes, Amie L.; Kandpal, Sanjeev Kumar; Mason, Michael D.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-08-01

    Cobalt exposure is increasing as cobalt demand rises worldwide due to its use in enhancing rechargeable battery efficiency, super-alloys, and magnetic products. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in human lung cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic than particulate cobalt while particulate and soluble cobalt induced similar levels of genotoxicity. However, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by the lack of metaphases at much lower intracellular cobalt concentrations compared to cobalt oxide. Accordingly, we investigated the role of particle internalization in cobalt oxide-induced toxicity and found that particle-cell contact was necessary to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity after cobalt exposure. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung fibroblasts, and solubility plays a key role in cobalt-induced lung toxicity. - Highlights: • Particulate and soluble cobalt are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung cells. • Soluble cobalt induces more cytotoxicity compared to particulate cobalt. • Soluble and particulate cobalt induce similar levels of genotoxicity. • Particle-cell contact is required for particulate cobalt-induced toxicity.

  10. Reducing the cobalt inventory in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ocken, H.

    1985-01-01

    Reducing the cobalt content of materials used in nuclear power plants is one approach to controlling the radiation fields responsible for occupational radiation exposure; corrosion of steam generator tubing is the primary source in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Wear of the cobalt-base alloys used to hardface valves (especially feedwater regulator valves) and as pins and rollers in control blades are the primary boiling water reactor (BWR) sources. Routine valve maintenance can also be a significant source of cobalt. Wear, mechanical property, and corrosion measurements led to the selection of Nitronic-60/CFA and PH 13-8 Mo/Inconel X-750 as low-cobalt alloys for use as pin/roller combinations. These alloys are currently being tested in two commercial BWRs. Measurements show that Type 440C stainless steel wears less than the cobalt-base alloys in BWR feedwater regulator valves. Sliding wear tests performed at room temperature in simulated PWR water showed that Colmonoy 74 and 84, Deloro 40, and Vertx 4776 are attractive low-cobalt hardfacing alloys if the applied loads are less than or equal to103 MPa. The cobalt-base alloys performed best at high loads (207 MPa). Ongoing laboratory studies address the development and evaluation of cobalt-free iron-base hardfacing alloys and seek to improve the wear resistance of cobalt-base alloys by using lasers. Reducing cobalt impurity levels in core components that are periodically discharged should also help reduce radiation fields and disposal costs.

  11. Synthesis and structural characterization of zinc(II) and cobalt(II) complexes based on multidentate hydrazone ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Zhang, Yuan Zhuo; Liu, E.; Yang, Chengxiong; Golen, James A.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Zhang, Guoqi

    2016-04-01

    Two multidentate Schiff base ligands containing a hydrazone unit have been synthesized and investigated for zinc(II) and cobalt(II) coordination chemistry. The reactions of the 4-pyridyl derived hydrazone ligand HL1 with zinc(II) or cobalt(II) salts gave three mononuclear complexes that were structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. The results revealed that the ligand could adopt different coordination modes when various counter anions were employed. While in the case that zinc dichloride was used as a metal salt a neutral mononuclear mono-ligand complex was formed, the deprotonation of hydrazone occurred when zinc(II) or cobalt(II) nitrate were present and two new isostructural mononuclear bis-ligand complexes were isolated. Modification of the hydrazone ligand with oxygen donors was found to have a significant impact on the ligand reactivity, and a similar reaction of H2L2 with cobalt(II) nitrate gave a protonated product of H2L2 without the incorporation of cobalt(II), which features a one-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network in the solid state.

  12. Cobalt-Catalyzed [2π + 2π] Cycloadditions of Alkenes: Scope, Mechanism, and Elucidation of Electronic Structure of Catalytic Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Valerie A; Hoyt, Jordan M; Margulieux, Grant W; Chirik, Paul J

    2015-06-24

    Aryl-substituted bis(imino)pyridine cobalt dinitrogen compounds, ((R)PDI)CoN2, are effective precatalysts for the intramolecular [2π + 2π] cycloaddition of α,ω-dienes to yield the corresponding bicyclo[3.2.0]heptane derivatives. The reactions proceed under mild thermal conditions with unactivated alkenes, tolerating both amine and ether functional groups. The overall second order rate law for the reaction, first order with respect to both the cobalt precatalyst and the substrate, in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic studies established the catalyst resting state as dependent on the identity of the precatalyst and diene substrate. Planar S = ½ κ(3)-bis(imino)pyridine cobalt alkene and tetrahedral κ(2)-bis(imino)pyridine cobalt diene complexes were observed by EPR spectroscopy and in the latter case structurally characterized. The hemilabile chelate facilitates conversion of a principally ligand-based singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) in the cobalt dinitrogen and alkene compounds to a metal-based SOMO in the diene intermediates, promoting C-C bond-forming oxidative cyclization. Structure-activity relationships on bis(imino)pyridine substitution were also established with 2,4,6-tricyclopentyl-substituted aryl groups, resulting in optimized catalytic [2π + 2π] cycloaddition. The cyclopentyl groups provide a sufficiently open metal coordination sphere that encourages substrate coordination while remaining large enough to promote a challenging, turnover-limiting C(sp(3))-C(sp(3)) reductive elimination. PMID:26030841

  13. Cobalt-Catalyzed [2π + 2π] Cycloadditions of Alkenes: Scope, Mechanism, and Elucidation of Electronic Structure of Catalytic Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Valerie A; Hoyt, Jordan M; Margulieux, Grant W; Chirik, Paul J

    2015-06-24

    Aryl-substituted bis(imino)pyridine cobalt dinitrogen compounds, ((R)PDI)CoN2, are effective precatalysts for the intramolecular [2π + 2π] cycloaddition of α,ω-dienes to yield the corresponding bicyclo[3.2.0]heptane derivatives. The reactions proceed under mild thermal conditions with unactivated alkenes, tolerating both amine and ether functional groups. The overall second order rate law for the reaction, first order with respect to both the cobalt precatalyst and the substrate, in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic studies established the catalyst resting state as dependent on the identity of the precatalyst and diene substrate. Planar S = ½ κ(3)-bis(imino)pyridine cobalt alkene and tetrahedral κ(2)-bis(imino)pyridine cobalt diene complexes were observed by EPR spectroscopy and in the latter case structurally characterized. The hemilabile chelate facilitates conversion of a principally ligand-based singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) in the cobalt dinitrogen and alkene compounds to a metal-based SOMO in the diene intermediates, promoting C-C bond-forming oxidative cyclization. Structure-activity relationships on bis(imino)pyridine substitution were also established with 2,4,6-tricyclopentyl-substituted aryl groups, resulting in optimized catalytic [2π + 2π] cycloaddition. The cyclopentyl groups provide a sufficiently open metal coordination sphere that encourages substrate coordination while remaining large enough to promote a challenging, turnover-limiting C(sp(3))-C(sp(3)) reductive elimination.

  14. Intraprotein transmethylation via a CH3-Co(iii) species in myoglobin reconstituted with a cobalt corrinoid complex.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yoshitsugu; Oohora, Koji; Sawada, Akiyoshi; Doitomi, Kazuki; Ohbayashi, Jun; Kamachi, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Hisaeda, Yoshio; Hayashi, Takashi

    2016-02-28

    Myoglobin reconstituted with a cobalt tetradehydrocorrin derivative, rMb(Co(TDHC)), was investigated as a hybrid model to replicate the reaction catalyzed by methionine synthase. In the heme pocket, Co(I)(TDHC) is found to react with methyl iodide to form the methylated cobalt complex, CH3-Co(III)(TDHC), although it is known that a similar nucleophilic reaction of a cobalt(i) tetradehydrocorrin complex does not proceed effectively in organic solvents. Furthermore, we observed a residue- and regio-selective transmethylation from the CH3-Co(III)(TDHC) species to the Nε2 atom of the His64 imidazole ring in myoglobin at 25 °C over a period of 48 h. These findings indicate that the protein matrix promotes the model reaction of methionine synthase via the methylated cobalt complex. A theoretical calculation provides support for a plausible reaction mechanism wherein the axial histidine ligation stabilizes the methylated cobalt complex and subsequent histidine-flipping induces the transmethylation via heterolytic cleavage of the Co-CH3 bond in the hybrid model. PMID:26646210

  15. Effects of cobalt precursor on pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole as electrocatalyst toward oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A series of non-precious metal electrocatalysts, namely pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole, Co-PPy-TsOH/C, are synthesized with various cobalt precursors, including cobalt acetate, cobalt nitrate, cobalt oxalate, and cobalt chloride. The catalytic performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is comparatively investigated with electrochemical techniques of cyclic voltammogram, rotating disk electrode and rotating ring-disk electrode. The results are analyzed and discussed employing physiochemical techniques of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, elemental analysis, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure. It shows that the cobalt precursor plays an essential role on the synthesis process as well as microstructure and performance of the Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts towards ORR. Among the studied Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts, that prepared with cobalt acetate exhibits the best ORR performance. The crystallite/particle size of cobalt and its distribution as well as the graphitization degree of carbon in the catalyst greatly affects the catalytic performance of Co-PPy-TsOH/C towards ORR. Metallic cobalt is the main component in the active site in Co-PPy-TsOH/C for catalyzing ORR, but some other elements such as nitrogen are probably involved, too. PMID:24229351

  16. Effects of cobalt precursor on pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole as electrocatalyst toward oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xianxia; Hu, Xin-Xin; Ding, Xin-Long; Kong, Hai-Chuan; Sha, Hao-Dong; Lin, He; Wen, Wen; Shen, Guangxia; Guo, Zhi; Ma, Zi-Feng; Yang, Yong

    2013-11-14

    A series of non-precious metal electrocatalysts, namely pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole, Co-PPy-TsOH/C, are synthesized with various cobalt precursors, including cobalt acetate, cobalt nitrate, cobalt oxalate, and cobalt chloride. The catalytic performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is comparatively investigated with electrochemical techniques of cyclic voltammogram, rotating disk electrode and rotating ring-disk electrode. The results are analyzed and discussed employing physiochemical techniques of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, elemental analysis, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure. It shows that the cobalt precursor plays an essential role on the synthesis process as well as microstructure and performance of the Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts towards ORR. Among the studied Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts, that prepared with cobalt acetate exhibits the best ORR performance. The crystallite/particle size of cobalt and its distribution as well as the graphitization degree of carbon in the catalyst greatly affects the catalytic performance of Co-PPy-TsOH/C towards ORR. Metallic cobalt is the main component in the active site in Co-PPy-TsOH/C for catalyzing ORR, but some other elements such as nitrogen are probably involved, too.

  17. Biodegradation of cobalt citrate complexes: Implications for cobalt mobility in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Scott C.; Herman, Janet S.; Hornberger, George M.; Mills, Aaron L.

    1998-07-01

    The bacterial consumption of chelating agents that are present in low-level radioactive and mixed wastes may help to immobilize chelated metals and radionuclides accidentally released to groundwater. We investigated the influence of the bacterial consumption of citrate complexed with cobalt on cobalt transport through packed sand columns. Experiments were conducted using each of three types of column packing material using minerals common to subsurface environments: clean quartz sand; ferric oxide (Fe(OH) 3)-coated sand; hausmannite (Mn 3O 4)-coated sand. Separate control column experiments were conducted to examine citrate's influence on cobalt transport without the bacterial consumption of citrate. The bacterial community consumed all the citrate; the pore water pH decreased by up to one unit before reaching a steady-state value of 6.9-7.1, which was lower than the influent pH (7.4). These results were in contrast to open batch experiments conducted with the same culture, where the pH increased by more than one unit. The dissolved oxygen exhibited similar dynamics, reaching a steady-state value of 3-4 mg/l, well below the influent value of 7.5 mg/l. The dynamics in pore water pH and dissolved oxygen were associated with the presence of the bacterial community because these parameters remained steady in control experiments in which the bacteria were not included. Cobalt transport was most rapid for the columns packed with quartz sand followed by the Fe-coated sand and finally the Mn-coated sand. Most of the cobalt retained by the quartz sand and Fe-coated sand was easily exchanged with Mg 2+ whereas most of the cobalt retained by the Mn-coated sand required an acetic acid solution for its removal. The bacterially mediated pH decrease, driven by the consumption of citrate, decreased cobalt sorption to the solid phase resulting in enhanced cobalt transport. The results of these experiments suggest that geochemical changes, driven by the bacterial consumption of

  18. Interfacial Structure Dependent Spin Mixing Conductance in Cobalt Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Tokaç, M; Bunyaev, S A; Kakazei, G N; Schmool, D S; Atkinson, D; Hindmarch, A T

    2015-07-31

    Enhancement of Gilbert damping in polycrystalline cobalt thin-film multilayers of various thicknesses, overlayered with copper or iridium, was studied in order to understand the role of local interface structure in spin pumping. X-ray diffraction indicates that cobalt films less than 6 nm thick have strong fcc(111) texture while thicker films are dominated by hcp(0001) structure. The intrinsic damping for cobalt thicknesses above 6 nm is weakly dependent on cobalt thickness for both overlayer materials, and below 6 nm the iridium overlayers show higher damping enhancement compared to copper overlayers, as expected due to spin pumping. The interfacial spin mixing conductance is significantly enhanced in structures where both cobalt and iridium have fcc(111) structure in comparison to those where the cobalt layer has subtly different hcp(0001) texture at the interface. PMID:26274431

  19. Interfacial Structure Dependent Spin Mixing Conductance in Cobalt Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokaç, M.; Bunyaev, S. A.; Kakazei, G. N.; Schmool, D. S.; Atkinson, D.; Hindmarch, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Enhancement of Gilbert damping in polycrystalline cobalt thin-film multilayers of various thicknesses, overlayered with copper or iridium, was studied in order to understand the role of local interface structure in spin pumping. X-ray diffraction indicates that cobalt films less than 6 nm thick have strong fcc(111) texture while thicker films are dominated by hcp(0001) structure. The intrinsic damping for cobalt thicknesses above 6 nm is weakly dependent on cobalt thickness for both overlayer materials, and below 6 nm the iridium overlayers show higher damping enhancement compared to copper overlayers, as expected due to spin pumping. The interfacial spin mixing conductance is significantly enhanced in structures where both cobalt and iridium have fcc(111) structure in comparison to those where the cobalt layer has subtly different hcp(0001) texture at the interface.

  20. Are cobaltates conventional? An ARPES viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, M.Z. . E-mail: mzhasan@Princeton.edu; Qian, D.; Foo, M.L.; Cava, R.J.

    2006-07-15

    Recently discovered class of cobaltate superconductors (Na{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) is a novel realization of interacting quantum electron system in a triangular network with low-energy degrees of freedom. We employ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the quasiparticle parameters in the parent superconductors. Results reveal a large hole-like Fermi surface generated by the crossing of heavy quasiparticles. The measured quasiparticle parameters collectively suggest two orders of magnitude departure from the conventional weak coupling (such as Al) Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer electron dynamics paradigm and unveils cobaltates as a rather hidden class of relatively high temperature superconductors. These parameters also form the basis for a microscopic Hamiltonian of the system.

  1. Colloidal Synthesis of Hollow Cobalt Sulfide Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yadong; Erdonmez, Can K.; Cabot, Andreu; Hughes, Steven; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-03-16

    Formation of cobalt sulfide hollow nanocrystals through amechanism similar to the Kirkendall Effect has been investigated indetail. It was found that performing the reaction at>120oC leads tofast formation of a single void ins ide each shell, whereas at roomtemperature multiple voids are formed within each shell, which can beattributed to strongly temperature-dependent diffusivities for vacancies.The void formation process is dominated by outward diffusion of cobaltcations; still, significant inward transport of sulfur anions can beinferred to occur as the final voids are smaller in diameter than theoriginal cobalt nanocrystals. Comparison of volume distributions forinitial and final nanostructures indicates excess apparent volume inshells implying significant porosity and/or a defective structure.Indirect evidence for shells to fracture during growth at lowertemperatures was observed in shell size statisticsand TEM of as-grownshells. An idealized model of the diffusional process imposes two minimalrequirements on material parameters for shell growth to be obtainablewithin a specific synthetic system.

  2. Creep-fatigue of low cobalt superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Testing for the low cycle fatigue and creep fatigue resistance of superalloys containing reduced amounts of cobalt is described. The test matrix employed involves a single high temperature appropriate for each alloy. A single total strain range, again appropriate to each alloy, is used in conducting strain controlled, low cycle, creep fatigue tests. The total strain range is based upon the level of straining that results in about 10,000 cycles to failure in a high frequency (0.5 Hz) continuous strain-cycling fatigue test. No creep is expected to occur in such a test. To bracket the influence of creep on the cyclic strain resistance, strain hold time tests with ore minute hold periods are introduced. One test per composition is conducted with the hold period in tension only, one in compression only, and one in both tension and compression. The test temperatures, alloys, and their cobalt compositions that are under study are given.

  3. Low-cobalt single crystal Rene 150

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of cobalt content on a single crystal version of the advanced, high gamma prime content turbine airfoil alloy Rene 150 were investigated. Cobalt contents under investigation include 12 wt.% (composition level of Rene 150), 6 wt.%, and 0 wt.%. Preliminary test results are presented and compared with the properties of standard DS Rene 150. DTA results indicate that the liquidus goes through a maximum of about 1435 C near 6 wt.% Co. The solidus remains essentially constant at 1390 C with decreasing Co content. The gamma prime solvus appears to go through a minimum of about 1235 C near 6 wt.% Co content. Preliminary as-cast tensile and stress rupture results are presented along with heat treat schedules and future test plans.

  4. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Patrick L.

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  5. Ferromagnetism in cobalt-doped titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussier, Alexandre Francois

    Semiconductor spintronics is a promising new field of study in the ongoing quest to make electronic devices faster, cheaper, and more efficient. While current spintronics utilizes the spin property of electrons to achieve greater functionality, the integration of spintronics into conventional semiconductor electronics will lead to advances in opto-electronics, quantum computing, and other emerging fields of technology. This integration relies on effective generation, injection, transport, and detection of spin polarized electron currents. To these ends, the successful synthesis of room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors is mandatory. In this work, we study the properties of cobalt-doped titanium dioxide, a room temperature dilute ferromagnetic semiconductor discovered in 2001. We characterize the Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) of Co-doped TiO2 thin films, including the substrate-induced stabilization of the anatase structure of TiO2. We also confirm the substitutional nature of cobalt on titanium sites by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) techniques. The ferromagnetic interaction mechanism remains controversial. Yet, we provide experimental evidence for the polaron mediated ferromagnetic coupling mechanism recently suggested to mediate ferromagnetic interactions in this, and other magnetically doped oxides, in the dilute regime (approximately 0 to 3%). Our evidence is related to a previously unobserved and unreported XAS spectral feature. Finally, we demonstrate the surprising absence of an X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) signature at the cobalt L edge.

  6. Biocorrosion study of titanium-cobalt alloys.

    PubMed

    Chern Lin, J H; Lo, S J; Ju, C P

    1995-05-01

    The present work provides experimental results of corrosion behaviour in Hank's physiological solution and some other properties of in-house fabricated titanium-cobalt alloys with cobalt ranging from 25-30% in weight. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that, in water-quenched (WQ) alloys, beta-titanium is largely retained, whereas in furnace-cooled (FC) alloys, little beta-titanium is found. Hardness of the alloys increases with increasing cobalt content, ranging from 455 VHN for WQ Ti-25 wt% Co to 525 VHN for WQ Ti-30 wt% Co. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) indicates that melting temperatures of the alloys are lower than that of pure titanium by about 600 degrees C. Potentiodynamic polarization results show that all measured break-down potentials in Hank's solution at 37 degrees C are higher than 800 mV. The breakdown potential for the FC Ti-25 Wt% Co alloy is even as high as nearly 1200 mV.

  7. Kinetics of cobalt cementation on zinc powder

    SciTech Connect

    Polcaro, A.M.; Palmas, S.; Dernini, S.

    1995-09-01

    The cementation process may be considered an interesting method to treat dilute solutions containing metal ions. The aim of the process may be either the removal of pollutant metals or the recovery of economically valuable metals such as Ag from spent photographic liquors. The kinetics of cobalt cementation on Zn powder from zinc sulfate concentrated solutions in the presence of copper and antimony ions was investigated in stirred tank reactors. The composition of the solutions was in the range usually utilized in industrial zinc electrowinning plants. The results showed that the reaction occurs by means of the formation of crystallization nuclei of noble metals on the zinc powder, followed by the cementation of cobalt ions on these newly-formed nuclei. Mass transfer to the reaction surface is shown to be the controlling step in copper and antimony reduction, and an equation correlating mass transfer coefficients has been determined. A kinetic equation, which interprets the influence of stirring speed and solution composition on cobalt cementation, has also been proposed.

  8. Hot corrosion of low cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The hot corrosion attack susceptibility of various alloys as a function of strategic materials content are investigated. Preliminary results were obtained for two commercial alloys, UDIMET 700 and Mar-M 247, that were modified by varying the cobalt content. For both alloys the cobalt content was reduced in steps to zero. Nickel content was increased accordingly to make up for the reduced cobalt but all other constituents were held constant. Wedge bar test samples were produced by casting. The hot corrosion test consisted of cyclically exposing samples to the high velocity flow of combustion products from an air-fuel burner fueled with jet A-1 and seeded with a sodium chloride aqueous solution. The flow velocity was Mach 0.5 and the sodium level was maintained at 0.5 ppm in terms of fuel plus air. The test cycle consisted of holding the test samples at 900 C for 1 hour followed by 3 minutes in which the sample could cool to room temperature in an ambient temperature air stream.

  9. Preparation of Nickel Cobalt Sulfide Hollow Nanocolloids with Enhanced Electrochemical Property for Supercapacitors Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenhua; Wan, Zhanghui; Yang, Tiezhu; Zhao, Mengen; Lv, Xinyan; Wang, Hao; Ren, Xiuli; Mei, Xifan

    2016-04-01

    Nanostructured functional materials with hollow interiors are considered to be good candidates for a variety of advanced applications. However, synthesis of uniform hollow nanocolloids with porous texture via wet chemistry method is still challenging. In this work, nickel cobalt precursors (NCP) in sub-micron sized spheres have been synthesized by a facile solvothermal method. The subsequent sulfurization process in hydrothermal system has changed the NCP to nickel cobalt sulfide (NCS) with porous texture. Importantly, the hollow interiors can be tuned through the sulfurization process by employing different dosage of sulfur source. The derived NCS products have been fabricated into supercapacitor electrodes and their electrochemical performances are measured and compared, where promising results were found for the next-generation high-performance electrochemical capacitors.

  10. A cobalt complex with a bioinspired molybdopterin-like ligand: a catalyst for hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Fogeron, Thibault; Porcher, Jean-Philippe; Gomez-Mingot, Maria; Todorova, Tanya K; Chamoreau, Lise-Marie; Mellot-Draznieks, Caroline; Li, Yun; Fontecave, Marc

    2016-10-01

    Cobalt dithiolene complexes are a new class of H2-evolving catalysts. Here we describe the preparation, the structure and the catalytic activity of an original cobalt complex using a bioinspired ligand, a quinoxaline-pyran-fused dithiolene derivative (qpdt(2-)) that mimics the molybdopterin cofactor present in the active sites of formate dehydrogenases. This complex displays very good activity for electrochemical proton reduction under weak acid conditions in terms of turnover frequency, faradic yields and stability. Density functional theory calculations show that protonation of a nitrogen atom of the ligand decreases overpotentials by 520 mV and H2 formation proceeds via protonation of an intermediate Co-H hydride, with an adjacent S atom of the dithiolene ligand serving as a proton relay.

  11. Preparation of Nickel Cobalt Sulfide Hollow Nanocolloids with Enhanced Electrochemical Property for Supercapacitors Application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhua; Wan, Zhanghui; Yang, Tiezhu; Zhao, Mengen; Lv, Xinyan; Wang, Hao; Ren, Xiuli; Mei, Xifan

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured functional materials with hollow interiors are considered to be good candidates for a variety of advanced applications. However, synthesis of uniform hollow nanocolloids with porous texture via wet chemistry method is still challenging. In this work, nickel cobalt precursors (NCP) in sub-micron sized spheres have been synthesized by a facile solvothermal method. The subsequent sulfurization process in hydrothermal system has changed the NCP to nickel cobalt sulfide (NCS) with porous texture. Importantly, the hollow interiors can be tuned through the sulfurization process by employing different dosage of sulfur source. The derived NCS products have been fabricated into supercapacitor electrodes and their electrochemical performances are measured and compared, where promising results were found for the next-generation high-performance electrochemical capacitors. PMID:27114165

  12. Heteroatom-free arene-cobalt and arene-iron catalysts for hydrogenations.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Dominik; Welther, Alice; Rad, Babak Rezaei; Wolf, Robert; Jacobi von Wangelin, Axel

    2014-04-01

    75 years after the discovery of hydroformylation, cobalt catalysts are now undergoing a renaissance in hydrogenation reactions. We have evaluated arene metalates in which the low-valent metal species is--conceptually different from heteroatom-based ligands--stabilized by π coordination to hydrocarbons. Potassium bis(anthracene)cobaltate 1 and -ferrate 2 can be viewed as synthetic precursors of quasi-"naked" anionic metal species; their aggregation is effectively impeded by (labile) coordination to the various π acceptors present in the hydrogenation reactions of unsaturated molecules (alkenes, arenes, carbonyl compounds). Kinetic studies, NMR spectroscopy, and poisoning studies of alkene hydrogenations support the formation of a homogeneous catalyst derived from 1 which is stabilized by the coordination of alkenes. This catalyst concept complements the use of complexes with heteroatom donor ligands for reductive processes. PMID:24616276

  13. Preparation of Nickel Cobalt Sulfide Hollow Nanocolloids with Enhanced Electrochemical Property for Supercapacitors Application

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenhua; Wan, Zhanghui; Yang, Tiezhu; Zhao, Mengen; Lv, Xinyan; Wang, Hao; Ren, Xiuli; Mei, Xifan

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured functional materials with hollow interiors are considered to be good candidates for a variety of advanced applications. However, synthesis of uniform hollow nanocolloids with porous texture via wet chemistry method is still challenging. In this work, nickel cobalt precursors (NCP) in sub-micron sized spheres have been synthesized by a facile solvothermal method. The subsequent sulfurization process in hydrothermal system has changed the NCP to nickel cobalt sulfide (NCS) with porous texture. Importantly, the hollow interiors can be tuned through the sulfurization process by employing different dosage of sulfur source. The derived NCS products have been fabricated into supercapacitor electrodes and their electrochemical performances are measured and compared, where promising results were found for the next-generation high-performance electrochemical capacitors. PMID:27114165

  14. Itinerant Magnetism in Yttrium COBALT(2) and Related Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Donald William

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the pseudo-binary systems Y(Co,Al) _2, Y(Co,Si)_2, Y_{.7}Sc_ {.3}(Co,Al)_2, and Sc(Co,Si)_2. Measurements were made of magnetic susceptibility from 2 to 400K, resistivity from 1.5 to 300K, specific heat from 1.5 to 25K, and lattice constant at room temperature. In addition, some of the same measurements were made for (Y,Sc)Co_2 , Zr(Co,Al)_2 and Zr(Co,Si) _2. YCo_2 is a strongly paramagnetic system with a broad maximum in magnetic susceptibility versus temperature. A functional form for this maximum has been derived by proponents of fermi liquid theory. YCo _2 (and some related systems described in this work) can be driven to weak itinerant ferromagnetism by partial substitution of aluminum for cobalt. This can be explained qualitatively by either rigid band depletion or lattice expansion, either of which should increase the density of states at the fermi level. In this study we found that lattice expansion driven from the cobalt site was necessary for the appearance of ferromagnetism. Depletion of the d-electron band shifted the magnetic susceptibility maximum to lower temperatures without causing ferromagnetism; thus a rigid band model would appear inappropriate for ferromagnetism in these systems. The behavior of susceptibility in this study (as a function of impurity concentration) may represent an example of a modification of fermi liquid theory proposed in 1968, and correlates with the impurity behavior observed for the resistivity and specific heat. In addition, the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility of YCo_2 was found to have a strong field dependence at low magnetic fields. It is shown that this dependence may be explained by the presence of a ferromagnetic impurity with a high ordering temperature.

  15. Cobalt exposure in a carbide tip grinding process.

    PubMed

    Stebbins, A I; Horstman, S W; Daniell, W E; Atallah, R

    1992-03-01

    Reports relating hard metal disease or nonspecific respiratory symptoms to tungsten or cobalt exposure have been published in the past 20 yr. This report discusses a work site investigation of a small company, employing approximately 50 workers, producing carbide tip saw blades for the woodworking industry. Cobalt exposure was characterized by ambient air monitoring (area and personnel), particle size determination, and biological monitoring. Area sampling for cadmium, cobalt, and tungsten indicated low ambient air levels in all manufacturing areas except the grinding department, which had cobalt air levels approaching the threshold limit value of 0.05 mg/m3. Area airborne cobalt exposure levels measured over six shifts in the grinding department ranged from 0.017 to 0.12 mg/m3 for the total collection method and 0.002 to 0.028 mg/m3 for the method collecting respirable particles. Cobalt content in the total and respirable fractions was similar. Urine monitoring indicated production workers have elevated cobalt levels, and the grinders' levels were higher than other production workers. The grinding coolant was found to have elevated cobalt concentrations. A survey of coolants from nine carbide grinding shops indicated the elevated cobalt concentrations may be common.

  16. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  17. Solvent extraction of cobalt from laterite-ammoniacal leach liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, D.N.; Siemens, R.E.; Rhoads, S.C.

    1980-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines is developing a method to recover Ni, Co, and Cu from laterites containing less than 1.2% Ni and 0.25% Co. The method consists of the following basic unit operations: (1) reduction roasting, (2) leaching, (3) solvent extraction, and (4) electrowinning. The method reflects three Bureau of Mines objectives: (1) recovery of critical minerals that are domestically in short supply from low-grade domestic laterites, (2) lower processing energy requirements, and (3) solution recycling. This report deals with the extraction of cobalt and the preparation of a suitable cobalt electrolyte by solvent extraction from liquor produced by this method. Nickel and copper are coextracted with LIX64N from an ammoniacal ammonium sulfate leach liquor containing about 1.00 g/1 Ni, 0.30 g/1 Co, 0.03 g/1 Cu, and 0.02 g/1 Zn. Cobalt (III) in the nickel-copper barren raffinate is reduced to cobalt (II) with cobalt metal. Reduction of cobalt (III) to cobalt (II) greatly aids subsequent extraction. Commercially available XI-51 extracts about 94% of the cobalt from the treated raffinate in one stage in a laboratory mixer-settler continuous circuit. Ammonia loaded on the solvent is removed in two washing steps. About 94% of the cobalt then is stripped from the XI-51 in one stage with spent cobalt electrolyte containing about 77 g/1 Co and 18 g/1 sulfuric acid (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/). Electrolytes containing less H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ also may be used. Preliminary data indicate that coextracted zinc may be removed from pregnant cobalt electrolyte containing 3 g/1 or less H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ with di-(2 ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA).

  18. Novel chiral (salen)Mn(III) complexes containing a calix[4]arene unit in 1,3-alternate conformation as catalysts for enantioselective epoxidation reactions of (Z)-aryl alkenes.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, Carmela; Brancatelli, Giovanna; Ballistreri, Francesco P; Geremia, Silvano; Pappalardo, Andrea; Tomaselli, Gaetano A; Toscano, Rosa M; Sciotto, Domenico

    2014-02-01

    Two new chiral calix[4]arene-salen ligands 1a,b, based on calix[4]arene platforms in 1,3-alternate conformation, have been prepared by a new general synthetic pathway. Their Mn(III) complexes, 3a,b have shown fairly good efficiency in the asymmetric epoxidation of styrene and substituted styrenes, whereas excellent catalytic activity and selectivity were observed with rigid bicyclic alkenes, namely 1,2-dihydro-naphthalene and substituted 2,2'-dimethyl-chromene. The higher catalytic properties of 3a may be ascribed to the more rigid and inherently chiral structure as proved by molecular modelling, NMR spectroscopy and X-ray data of the similarly structured UO2 complexes 2a,b.

  19. Interpreting cobalt blood concentrations in hip implant patients.

    PubMed

    Paustenbach, Dennis J; Galbraith, David A; Finley, Brent L

    2014-02-01

    INTRODUCTION. There has been some recent concern regarding possible systemic health effects resulting from elevated blood cobalt concentrations in patients with cobalt containing hip implants. To date there are no blood cobalt criteria to help guide physicians when evaluating an individual hip implant patient's risk of developing systemic health effects because historically there was little or no concern about systemic cobalt toxicity in implant patients. OBJECTIVE. Our purpose is to describe recently completed research regarding the relationship between blood cobalt concentrations and clinical health effects. We discuss the possibility of systemic health effects in patients with metal containing implants and propose various blood cobalt concentrations that are not associated with an increased risk of developing certain adverse effects. METHODOLOGY. The primary literature search was conducted using PubMed and Web of Science using the following search terms: cobalt AND (toxicity OR health effects OR cardiotoxicity OR hematological OR endocrine OR immunological OR reproductive OR testicular effects OR neurological OR case report OR cohort OR Roncovite). The searches identified 6786 papers of which 122 were considered relevant. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry toxicological profile for cobalt and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research and Development's National Center for Environmental Assessment's documentation on the provisional peer-reviewed toxicity value for cobalt were also utilized to identify secondary literature sources. RESULTS. Our review of the toxicology and medical literature indicates that highly elevated blood cobalt concentrations can result in certain endocrine, hematological, cardiovascular, and neurological effects in animals and/or humans. These studies, in addition to historical clinical findings involving the therapeutic use of cobalt, indicate that significant systemic effects of cobalt will not occur

  20. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and... nickel oxide (PMN P-04-269; CAS No. 182442-95-1) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and... nickel oxide (PMN P-04-269; CAS No. 182442-95-1) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and... nickel oxide (PMN P-04-269; CAS No. 182442-95-1) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. Comparative toxicity and carcinogenicity of soluble and insoluble cobalt compounds.

    PubMed

    Behl, Mamta; Stout, Matthew D; Herbert, Ronald A; Dill, Jeffrey A; Baker, Gregory L; Hayden, Barry K; Roycroft, Joseph H; Bucher, John R; Hooth, Michelle J

    2015-07-01

    Occupational exposure to cobalt is of widespread concern due to its use in a variety of industrial processes and the occurrence of occupational disease. Due to the lack of toxicity and carcinogenicity data following exposure to cobalt, and questions regarding bioavailability following exposure to different forms of cobalt, the NTP conducted two chronic inhalation exposure studies in rats and mice, one on soluble cobalt sulfate heptahydrate, and a more recent study on insoluble cobalt metal. Herein, we compare and contrast the toxicity profiles following whole-body inhalation exposures to these two forms of cobalt. In general, both forms were genotoxic in the Salmonella T98 strain in the absence of effects on micronuclei. The major sites of toxicity and carcinogenicity in both chronic inhalation studies were the respiratory tract in rats and mice, and the adrenal gland in rats. In addition, there were distinct sites of toxicity and carcinogenicity noted following exposure to cobalt metal. In rats, carcinogenicity was observed in the blood, and pancreas, and toxicity was observed in the testes of rats and mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that both forms of cobalt, soluble and insoluble, appear to be multi-site rodent carcinogens following inhalation exposure.

  4. Microwave Mapping Demonstration Using the Thermochromic Cobalt Chloride Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Vu D.; Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    An update to the thermochromic cobalt(II) chloride equilibrium demonstration is described. Filter paper that has been saturated with aqueous cobalt(II) chloride is heated for seconds in a microwave oven, producing a color change. The resulting pink and blue map is used to colorfully demonstrate Le Châtelier's principle and to illuminate the…

  5. The role of cobalt on the creep of Waspaloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Chin, L.; Tien, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Cobalt was systematically replaced with nickel in Waspaloy (which normally contains 13% Co) to determine the effects of cobalt on the creep behavior of this alloy. Effects of cobalt were found to be minimal on tensile strengths and microstructure. The creep resistance and the stress rupture resistance determined in the range from 704 to 760 C (1300 to 1400 C) were found to decrease as cobalt was removed from the standard alloy at all stresses and temperatures. Roughly a ten-fold drop in rupture life and a corresponding increase in minimum creep rate were found under all test conditions. Both the apparent creep activation energy and the matrix contribution to creep resistance were found to increase with cobalt. These creep effects are attributed to cobalt lowering the stacking fault energy of the alloy matrix. The creep resistance loss due to the removal of cobalt is shown to be restored by slightly increasing the gamma' volume fraction. Results are compared to a previous study on Udimet 700, a higher strength, higher gamma' volume fraction alloy with similar phase chemistry, in which cobalt did not affect creep resistance. An explanation for this difference in behavior based on interparticle spacing and cross-slip is presented.

  6. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V.; Errandonea, D.

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  7. Unconventional magnetisation texture in graphene/cobalt hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Vu, A. D.; Coraux, J.; Chen, G.; N’Diaye, A. T.; Schmid, A. K.; Rougemaille, N.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic domain structure and spin-dependent reflectivity measurements on cobalt thin films intercalated at the graphene/Ir(111) interface are investigated using spin-polarised low-energy electron microscopy. We find that graphene-covered cobalt films have surprising magnetic properties. Vectorial imaging of magnetic domains reveals an unusually gradual thickness-dependent spin reorientation transition, in which magnetisation rotates from out-of-the-film plane to the in-plane direction by less than 10° per cobalt monolayer. During this transition, cobalt films have a meandering spin texture, characterised by a complex, three-dimensional, wavy magnetisation pattern. In addition, spectroscopy measurements suggest that the electronic band structure of the unoccupied states is essentially spin-independent already a few electron-Volts above the vacuum level. These properties strikingly differ from those of pristine cobalt films and could open new prospects in surface magnetism. PMID:27114039

  8. The Structural and Dynamic Properties of Cobalt Metal Under Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kien, P. H.; Hung, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, cobalt metal is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with the Pak-Doyam potential. The models of cobalt metal are constructed in a wide temperature range. The simulation reveals that the cobalt metal may exist in three phases: amorphous, nano-crystalline and liquid in the temperature range from 200 K to 1500 K. The structure of obtained models Co is analyzed through the radial distribution function (RDF), coordination number distribution and dependence of the Wendt-Abraham ratio defined as gmin/gmax under temperature. The simulation found a large number of native vacancies depending on the relaxation degree. The number of these native vacancies can play a role of diffusion vehicle for cobalt atom in amorphous matrix. The diffusion coefficient of cobalt atom in liquid and amorphous phases is evaluated by Einstein equation and concentration of native vacancies.

  9. Unconventional magnetisation texture in graphene/cobalt hybrids.

    PubMed

    Vu, A D; Coraux, J; Chen, G; N'Diaye, A T; Schmid, A K; Rougemaille, N

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic domain structure and spin-dependent reflectivity measurements on cobalt thin films intercalated at the graphene/Ir(111) interface are investigated using spin-polarised low-energy electron microscopy. We find that graphene-covered cobalt films have surprising magnetic properties. Vectorial imaging of magnetic domains reveals an unusually gradual thickness-dependent spin reorientation transition, in which magnetisation rotates from out-of-the-film plane to the in-plane direction by less than 10° per cobalt monolayer. During this transition, cobalt films have a meandering spin texture, characterised by a complex, three-dimensional, wavy magnetisation pattern. In addition, spectroscopy measurements suggest that the electronic band structure of the unoccupied states is essentially spin-independent already a few electron-Volts above the vacuum level. These properties strikingly differ from those of pristine cobalt films and could open new prospects in surface magnetism. PMID:27114039

  10. Electron transfer. 94. Internal redox in cobalt(III)-bound hypophosphite

    SciTech Connect

    Linn, D.E. Jr.; Gould, E.S.

    1988-09-07

    The hypophosphite derivative of Co(III), (NH/sub 3/)/sub 5/CoO/sub 2/PH/sub 2//sup 2+/, decomposes in basic media, yielding Co(II) quantitatively along with a 1:1 mixture of hypophosphite and phosphite. When this reaction is carried out in basic solution in the presence of Na/sub 4/EDTA, a strongly absorbing intermediate is formed and then undergoes decay. The results of reaction kinetic studies are reported, and isotope labelling with the PD/sub 2/ analog of the complex was used to determine the kinetic isotope effect. A reaction scheme in which the reaction is initiated by removal of a P-bound proton from the hypophosphite ligand to form a conjugate base I, which then reacts with a second OH/sup /minus// and undergoes a hydride shift from the phosphorus to cobalt(III) generating a cobalt(I) species, is suggested. This cobalt (I) species rapidly reduces an additional molecule of Co(III) reactant to Co(II). 30 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  11. Structure and magnetism of cobalt at high pressure and low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchio, R.; Marini, C.; Kvashnin, Y. O.; Kantor, I.; Mathon, O.; Garbarino, G.; Meneghini, C.; Anzellini, S.; Occelli, F.; Bruno, P.; Dewaele, A.; Pascarelli, S.

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic and structural properties of cobalt were investigated under high pressure (160 GPa) and low temperature (50 K), by synchrotron K-edge x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray diffraction. A quasihydrostatic equation of state was measured up to 160 GPa. We found that uniaxial stress plays a role in the hexagonal close packed-face centered cubic (hcp-fcc) structural transition pressure. Also, our data provide the first experimental evidence that changes of the c /a ratio pressure derivative are related to the magnetic behavior. The complete extinction of ferromagnetism is observed above 130 GPa in a mixed hcp-fcc phase with no recovery upon cooling to 50 K, indicating that cobalt at 150 GPa is very likely nonmagnetic, i.e., characterized by zero local spin polarization. Density functional theory calculations point out that the K-edge x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) signal is related to the 4 p orbital moment rather than to the total spin moment and allow us to get a deeper insight into the K-edge XMCD measurements interpretation. The combination of novel theoretical results and experimental outputs provides a detailed scenario of the structural and magnetic properties of cobalt at these extreme conditions answering some previously unsolved issues.

  12. Nitrogen oxides storage catalysts containing cobalt

    DOEpatents

    Lauterbach, Jochen; Snively, Christopher M.; Vijay, Rohit; Hendershot, Reed; Feist, Ben

    2010-10-12

    Nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) storage catalysts comprising cobalt and barium with a lean NO.sub.x storage ratio of 1.3 or greater. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be used to reduce NO.sub.x emissions from diesel or gas combustion engines by contacting the catalysts with the exhaust gas from the engines. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be one of the active components of a catalytic converter, which is used to treat exhaust gas from such engines.

  13. HYDROCARBON FORMATION ON POLYMER-SUPPORTED COBALT

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, Linda S.; Perkins, Patrick; Vollhardt, K.Peter C.

    1980-10-01

    In this report we detail the synthesis catalytic chemistry of polystyrene supported {eta}{sup 5} ~cyclopentadienyl- dicarbonyl cobalt, CpCo(CO){sub 2}. This material is active in the hydrogenation of CO to saturated linear hydrocarbons and appears to retain its "homogeneous", mononuclear character during the course of its catalysis, During ·the course of our work 18% and 20% crosslinked analogs of polystyrene supported CpCo(CO){sub 2} were shown to exhibit limited catalytic activity and no CO activation.

  14. Low-Cobalt Powder-Metallurgy Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Highly-stressed jet-engine parts made with less cobalt. Udimet 700* (or equivalent) is common nickel-based superalloy used in hot sections of jet engines for many years. This alloy, while normally used in wrought condition, also gas-atomized into prealloyed powder-metallurgy (PM) product. Product can be consolidated by hot isostatically pressing (HIPPM condition) and formed into parts such as turbine disk. Such jet-engine disks "see" both high stresses and temperatures to 1,400 degrees F (760 degrees C).

  15. Cold-Sprayed Nanostructured Pure Cobalt Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, P.; Perrone, A.; Silvello, A.

    2016-08-01

    Cold-sprayed pure cobalt coatings were deposited on carbon-steel substrate. Submicrometer particles for spraying were produced via cryomilling. Deposits were produced using different processing conditions (gas temperature and pressure, nozzle-to-substrate distance) to evaluate the resulting variations in grain size dimension, microhardness, adhesion strength, and porosity. The coating mechanical properties improved greatly with higher temperature and carrying-gas pressure. The coating microstructure was analyzed as a function of spraying condition by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, revealing many different microstructural features for coatings experiencing low or high strain rates during deposition.

  16. Microemulsion-mediated synthesis of cobalt (pure fcc and hexagonal phases) and cobalt-nickel alloy nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Jahangeer; Sharma, Shudhanshu; Ramanujachary, Kandalam V; Lofland, Samuel E; Ganguli, Ashok K

    2009-08-15

    By choosing appropriate microemulsion systems, hexagonal cobalt (Co) and cobalt-nickel (1:1) alloy nanoparticles have been obtained with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a cationic surfactant at 500 degrees C. This method thus stabilizes the hcp cobalt even at sizes (<10 nm) at which normally fcc cobalt is predicted to be stable. On annealing the hcp cobalt nanoparticles in H(2) at 700 degrees C we could transform them to fcc cobalt nanoparticles. Microscopy studies show the formation of spherical nanoparticles of hexagonal and cubic forms of cobalt and Co-Ni (1:1) alloy nanoparticles with the average size of 4, 8 and 20 nm, respectively. Electrochemical studies show that the catalytic property towards oxygen evolution is dependent on the applied voltage. At low voltage (less than 0.65 V) the Co (hexagonal) nanoparticles are superior to the alloy (Co-Ni) nanoparticles while above this voltage the alloy nanoparticles are more efficient catalysts. The nanoparticles of cobalt (hcp and fcc) and alloy (Co-Ni) nanoparticles show ferromagnetism. The saturation magnetization of Co-Ni nanoparticles is reduced compared to the bulk possibly due to surface oxidation.

  17. 40 CFR 421.230 - Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. 421.230 Section 421.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Nickel and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.230 Applicability: Description of the primary nickel... production of nickel or cobalt by primary nickel and cobalt facilities processing ore concentrate...

  18. 40 CFR 421.230 - Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. 421.230 Section 421.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Nickel and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.230 Applicability: Description of the primary nickel... production of nickel or cobalt by primary nickel and cobalt facilities processing ore concentrate...

  19. 40 CFR 421.230 - Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. 421.230 Section 421.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Nickel and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.230 Applicability: Description of the primary nickel... production of nickel or cobalt by primary nickel and cobalt facilities processing ore concentrate...

  20. 40 CFR 421.230 - Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. 421.230 Section 421.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Nickel and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.230 Applicability: Description of the primary nickel... production of nickel or cobalt by primary nickel and cobalt facilities processing ore concentrate...

  1. 40 CFR 421.230 - Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. 421.230 Section 421.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Nickel and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.230 Applicability: Description of the primary nickel... production of nickel or cobalt by primary nickel and cobalt facilities processing ore concentrate...

  2. Cobalt distribution during copper matte smelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kho, T. S.; Swinbourne, D. R.; Lehner, T.

    2006-04-01

    Many smelter operators subscribe to the “precautionary principle” and wish to understand the behavior of the metals and impurities during smelting, especially how they distribute between product and waste phases and whether these phases lead to environmental, health, or safety issues. In copper smelting, copper and other elements are partitioned between copper matte, iron silicate slag, and possibly the waste gas. Many copper concentrates contain small amounts of cobalt, a metal of considerable value but also of some environmental interest. In this work, the matte/slag distribution ratio (weight percent) of cobalt between copper matte (55 wt pct) and iron silicate slag was thermodynamically modeled and predicted to be approximately 5. Experiments were performed using synthetic matte and slag at 1250 °C under a low oxygen partial pressure and the distribution ratio was found to be 4.3, while between industrial matte and slag, the ratio was found to be 1.8. Both values are acceptably close to each other and to the predicted value, given the errors inherent in such measurements. The implications of these results for increasingly sustainable copper production are discussed.

  3. Cataractogenesis after Cobalt-60 eye plaque radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kleineidam, M.; Augsburger, J.J. ); Hernandez, C.; Glennon, P.; Brady, L.W. )

    1993-07-15

    This study was designed to estimate the actuarial incidence of typical postirradiation cataracts and to identify prognostic factors related to their development in melanoma-containing eyes treated by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy. A special interest was the impact of calculated radiation dose and dose-rate to the lens. The authors evaluated the actuarial occurrence of post-irradiation cataract in 365 patients with primary posterior uveal melanoma treated by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy between 1976 and 1986. Only 22% (S.E. = 4.6%) of the patients who received a total dose of 6 to 20 Gy at the center of the lens developed a visually significant cataract attributable to the radiation within 5 years after treatment. Using multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, the authors identified thickness of the tumor, location of the tumor's anterior margin relative to the equatorward and the ora serrata, and diameter of the eye plaque used as the best combination of covariables for predicting length of time until development of cataract. Surprisingly, the dose of radiation delivered to the lens, which was strongly correlated to all of these covariables, was not a significant predictive factor in multivariate analysis. The results suggest that success of efforts to decrease the occurrence rate of post-irradiation cataracts by better treatment planning might be limited in patients with posterior uveal melanoma. 21 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Cobalt Monoboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, H. F.; Ng, Y. W.; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2011-06-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectrum of cobalt monoboride (CoB) in the visible region between 465 and 560 nm has been observed. CoB molecule was produced by the reaction of laser ablated cobalt atom and diborane (B_2H_6) seeded in argon. Over twenty five vibronic bands have been recorded, and both Co10B and Co11B isotopic species have been observed and analyzed. Preliminary analysis of the rotational lines showed that the observed vibronic bands belong to two categories namely: the Ω' = 2 - Ω'' = 2 and the Ω' = 3 - Ω'' = 3 transitions, which indicated the ground state of CoB is consistent with an assignment of a ^3Δ_i state predicted from ab initio calculations. Unresolved hyperfine structure arising from the Co nucleus (I = 7/2) causes a broadening of spectral lines. This work represents the first experimental investigation of the spectrum of the CoB molecule. Financial support from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Project No. HKU 701008P) is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Preparation and characterization of electrodeposited cobalt nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irshad, M. I.; Ahmad, F.; Mohamed, N. M.; Abdullah, M. Z.

    2014-10-01

    Electrochemical deposition technique has been used to deposit cobalt nanowires into the nano sized channels of Anodized Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates. CoCl2˙6H 2 O salt solution was used, which was buffered with H3BO3 and acidified by dilute H2SO4 to increase the plating life and control pH of the solution. Thin film of copper around 150 nm thick on one side of AAO template coated by e-beam evaporation system served as cathode to create electrical contact. FESEM analysis shows that the as-deposited nanowires are highly aligned, parallel to one another and have high aspect ratio with a reasonably high pore-filing factor. The TEM results show that electrodeposited cobalt nanowires are crystalline in nature. The Hysteresis loop shows the magnetization properties for in and out of plane configuration. The in plane saturation magnetization (Ms) is lower than out of plane configuration because of the easy axis of magnetization is perpendicular to nanowire axis. These magnetic nanowires could be utilized for applications such as spintronic devices, high density magnetic storage, and magnetic sensor applications.

  6. Preparation and characterization of electrodeposited cobalt nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Irshad, M. I. Mohamed, N. M.; Ahmad, F. Abdullah, M. Z.

    2014-10-24

    Electrochemical deposition technique has been used to deposit cobalt nanowires into the nano sized channels of Anodized Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates. CoCl{sub 2}Ðœ‡6H2O salt solution was used, which was buffered with H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and acidified by dilute H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to increase the plating life and control pH of the solution. Thin film of copper around 150 nm thick on one side of AAO template coated by e-beam evaporation system served as cathode to create electrical contact. FESEM analysis shows that the as-deposited nanowires are highly aligned, parallel to one another and have high aspect ratio with a reasonably high pore-filing factor. The TEM results show that electrodeposited cobalt nanowires are crystalline in nature. The Hysteresis loop shows the magnetization properties for in and out of plane configuration. The in plane saturation magnetization (Ms) is lower than out of plane configuration because of the easy axis of magnetization is perpendicular to nanowire axis. These magnetic nanowires could be utilized for applications such as spintronic devices, high density magnetic storage, and magnetic sensor applications.

  7. Cobalt oxide silica membranes for desalination.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun Xiang C; Ding, Li Ping; Smart, Simon; da Costa, João C Diniz

    2012-02-15

    This work shows for the first time the potential of cobalt oxide silica (CoO(x)Si) membranes for desalination of brackish (1 wt.% NaCl), seawater (3.5 wt.% NaCl) and brine (7.5-15 wt.% NaCl) concentrations at feed temperatures between 25 and 75 °C. CoO(x)Si xerogels were synthesised via a sol-gel method including TEOS, cobalt nitrate hydrate and peroxide. Initial hydrothermal exposure (<2 days) of xerogels prepared with various pH (3-6) resulted in densification of the xerogel via condensation reactions within the silica matrix, with the xerogel synthesised at pH 5 the most resistant. Subsequent exposure was not found to significantly alter the pore structure of the xerogels, suggesting they were hydrostable and that the pore sizes remained at molecular sieving dimensions. Membranes were then synthesised using identical sol-gel conditions to the xerogel samples and testing showed that elevated feed temperatures resulted in increased water fluxes, whilst increasing the saline feed concentration resulted in decreased water fluxes. The maximum flux observed was 1.8 kg m(-2) h(-1) at 75 °C for a 1 wt.% NaCl feed concentration. The salt rejection was consistently in excess of 99%, independent of either the testing temperature or salt feed concentration.

  8. Dimerization of the octaethylporphyrin {pi} cation radical complex of cobalt(II): Thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Y.; Lee, S.; Wayland, B.B.

    1999-08-23

    One electron oxidation of cobalt(II) can occur from either the cobalt d or porphyrin {pi} orbitals depending on the choice of porphyrin and reaction media. Oxidation of (octaethylporphyrinato)cobalt(II), (OEP)Co{sup II} (1), in the presence of ligands such as H{sub 2}O and CO produces diamagnetic five and six coordinate complexes of cobalt(III). In the absence of additional ligands to coordinate with Co(III) the first oxidation of [(OEP)Co{sup II}]{sup +} (2). Metalloporphyrin {pi} cation radical complexes and dimers of the OEP derivatives have been extensively investigated. This article reports on the interconversion of the paramagnetic (S = 1) monomer, [(OEP)Co{sup II}]{sup +} (2), with a diamagnetic dimer, [(OEP)-Co{sup II}]{sub 2}{sup 2+} (3), in dichloromethane solvant. {sup 1}H NMR shift and line width studies in CD{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} are applied in evaluating the thermodynamic and activation parameters for homolytic dissociation of the diamagnetic dimer (3).

  9. High doses of cobalt induce optic and auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Apostoli, Pietro; Catalani, Simona; Zaghini, Anna; Mariotti, Andrea; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Vielmi, Valentina; Semeraro, Francesco; Duse, Sarah; Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; Padovani, Alessandro; Rizzetti, Maria Cristina; De Caro, Raffaele

    2013-09-01

    The adverse biological effects of continuous exposure to cobalt and chromium have been well defined. In the past, this toxicity was largely an industrial issue concerning workers exposed in occupational setting. Nevertheless, recent reports have described a specific toxicity mediated by the high levels of cobalt and chromium released by metallic prostheses, particularly in patients who had received hip implants. Clinical symptoms, including blindness, deafness and peripheral neuropathy, suggest a specific neurotropism. However, little is known about the neuropathological basis of this process, and experimental evidence is still lacking. We have investigated this issue in an experimental setting using New Zealand White rabbits treated with repeated intravenous injections of cobalt and chromium, alone or in combination. No evident clinical or pathological alterations were associated after chromium administration alone, despite its high levels in blood and tissue while cobalt-chromium and cobalt-treated rabbits showed clinical signs indicative of auditory and optic system toxicity. On histopathological examination, the animals showed severe retinal and cochlear ganglion cell depletion along with optic nerve damage and loss of sensory cochlear hair cells. Interestingly, the severity of the alterations was related to dosages and time of exposure. These data confirmed our previous observation of severe auditory and optic nerve toxicity in patients exposed to an abnormal release of cobalt and chromium from damaged hip prostheses. Moreover, we have identified the major element mediating neurotoxicity to be cobalt, although the molecular mechanisms mediating this toxicity still have to be defined.

  10. Effect of cobalt on the anaerobic thermophilic conversion of methanol.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Paula L; Jiang, Bo; Cysneiros, Denise; Stams, Alfons J M; Lettinga, Gatze

    2004-02-20

    The importance of cobalt on the anaerobic conversion of methanol under thermophilic conditions was studied in three parallel lab-scale UASB-reactors and in cobalt-limited enriched cultures. Reactors R1, R2, and R3 were fed with methanol in a bicarbonate-buffered medium, supplied with iron and macronutrients: in R1 all metals were supplied (control), R2 was cobalt deprived, and in R3 all metals were deprived. In the 136 days of continuous experiment, a drop in performance was observed over the last 30 days. Particularly in R3, both methanol removal and methane formation dropped by 7.1% and 13.7%, respectively, compared to the control reactor, R1. When the medium was cobalt-deprived, acetate was not produced and, as a consequence, the enriched consortium lost its capacity to degrade acetate, indicating that the acetotrophic microorganisms were washed out. The addition of 0.5 microM of cobalt to a cobalt-deprived enrichment culture led to acetate accumulation. The results obtained in this study indicate that the mixed consortium requires a proper amount of cobalt, and its addition to a concentration of 0.1 microM leads to the highest methanol conversion rate, with methane as the sole end product from methanol.

  11. Solar selective black cobalt: preparation, structure, and thermal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.B.; Ignatiev, A.; Zajac, G.

    1980-08-01

    In the quest for an electroplated selective black coating stable to 500 /sup 0/C in air, black cobalts have been prepared by three techniques to yield (a) plated cobalt sulphides, (b) plated cobalt oxide-hydroxide, and (c) cobalt oxide prepared by thermal oxidation of electropolated cobalt metal. The optical properties of the various coatings are analyzed before and after exposure to air for extended periods of time at temperatures in the 300 /sup 0/--500 /sup 0/C range. The sulfide black cobalt is not acceptable as a high-temperature selective absorber due to severe thermal degradation. The plated oxide is a good selective absorber to about 400 /sup 0/C, and the thermally oxidized black to a slightly higher temperature, but degrades at 500 /sup 0/C. Structure studies via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) are reported which yield a full account of the coating chemistry before and after heating. The studies reveal that the high solar absorptance of the acceptable black cobalt coatings is due to a continuation of a porous outer layer grading into nondense oxides of cobalt; either CoO or Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/, depending on the film. Absorption is intrinsic but not due to metal particles as in black chrome. A limited amount of optical degradation occurs upon heating the oxide black cobalt in air due to oxidation of hydroxide. However, the major degradation problem is shown to be substrate oxidation in contrast to black chrome where film oxidation is the principal problem.

  12. Elasticity of hcp cobalt at high pressure and temperature: a quasi-harmonic case

    SciTech Connect

    Antonangeli, D; Krisch, M; Farber, D L; Ruddle, D G; Fiquet, G

    2007-11-30

    We performed high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering measurements on a single crystal of hcp cobalt at simultaneous high pressure and high temperature, deriving 4 of the 5 independent elements of the elastic tensor. Our experiments indicate that the elasticity of hcp-Co is well described within the frame of a quasi-harmonic approximation and that anharmonic high-temperature effects on the elastic moduli, sound velocities and elastic anisotropy are minimal at constant density. These results support the validity of the Birch's law and represent an important benchmark for ab initio thermal lattice dynamics and molecular-dynamics simulations.

  13. Work function characterization of solution-processed cobalt silicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shihab Ullah, Syed; Robinson, Matt; Hoey, Justin; Sky Driver, M.; Caruso, A. N.; Schulz, Douglas L.

    2012-06-01

    Cobalt silicide thin films were prepared by spin-coating liquid cyclohexasilane-based inks onto silicon substrates followed by a thermal treatment. The work function of the solution-processed Co-Si was determined by both capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures as well as by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS). Variable frequency C-V of MOS structures with silicon oxide layers of variable thickness showed that solution-processed metal silicide films exhibit a work function of 4.36 eV with one Co-Si film on Si <1 0 0> giving a UPS-derived work function of 4.80 eV. Similar work function measurements were collected for vapor-deposited MOS capacitors where Al thin films were prepared according to standard class 100 cleanroom handling techniques. In both instances, the work function values established by the electrical measurements were lower than those measured by UPS and this difference appears to be a consequence of parasitic series resistance.

  14. Sensitivity of Anabaena spiroides to zinc and cobalt

    SciTech Connect

    Kostyayev, V. Ya.; Yagodka, S.N.; Sokolov, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of zinc and cobalt chlorous salts on destruction, nitrogen fixation photosynthesis, and Na/sup +/ and K/sup +/-ion concentrations in the cells was studied for the blue-green alga Anabaena spiroides. Stability of A. spiroides depends on the developmental stage. The algae are most sensitive to cobalt at the beginning of the growth lag-phase, and they are least sensitive to it at the end of this phase. Cobalt ions are more toxic for A. spiroides than zinc ions. Salts of heavy metals inhibit active ion transport, which results in a sharp decrease of K and Na ions concentration in the algae cells.

  15. Cobalt catalysis involving π components in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gandeepan, Parthasarathy; Cheng, Chien-Hong

    2015-04-21

    Over the last three decades, transition-metal-catalyzed organic transformations have been shown to be extremely important in organic synthesis. However, most of the successful reactions are associated with noble metals, which are generally toxic, expensive, and less abundant. Therefore, we have focused on catalysis using the abundant first-row transition metals, specifically cobalt. In this Account, we demonstrate the potential of cobalt catalysis in organic synthesis as revealed by our research. We have developed many useful catalytic systems using cobalt complexes. Overall, they can be classified into several broad types of reactions, specifically [2 + 2 + 2] and [2 + 2] cycloadditions; enyne reductive coupling; reductive [3 + 2] cycloaddition of alkynes/allenes with enones; reductive coupling of alkyl iodides with alkenes; addition of organoboronic acids to alkynes, alkenes, or aldehydes; carbocyclization of o-iodoaryl ketones/aldehydes with alkynes/electron-deficient alkenes; coupling of thiols with aryl and alkyl halides; enyne coupling; and C-H bond activation. Reactions relying on π components, specifically cycloaddition, reductive coupling, and enyne coupling, mostly afford products with excellent stereo- and regioselectivity and superior atom economy. We believe that these cobalt-catalyzed π-component coupling reactions proceed through five-membered cobaltacyclic intermediates formed by the oxidative cyclometalation of two coordinated π bonds of the substrates to the low-valent cobalt species. The high regio- and stereoselectivity of these reactions are achieved as a result of the electronic and steric effects of the π components. Mostly, electron-withdrawing groups and bulkier groups attached to the π bonds prefer to be placed near the cobalt center of the cobaltacycle. Most of these transformations proceed through low-valent cobalt complexes, which are conveniently generated in situ from air-stable Co(II) salts by Zn- or Mn-mediated reduction

  16. The structural evolution and diffusion during the chemical transformation from cobalt to cobalt phosphide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Don-Hyung; Moreau, Liane M.; Bealing, Clive R.; Zhang, Haitao; Hennig, Richard G.; Robinson, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    We report the structural evolution and the diffusion processes which occur during the phase transformation of nanoparticles (NPs), ε-Co to Co{sub 2}P to CoP, from a reaction with tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) investigations were used to elucidate the changes in the local structure of cobalt atoms which occur as the chemical transformation progresses. The lack of long-range order, spread in interatomic distances, and overall increase in mean-square disorder compared with bulk structure reveal the decrease in the NP’s structural order compared with bulk structure, which contributes to their deviation from bulk-like behavior. Results from EXAFS show both the Co{sub 2}P and CoP phases contain excess Co. Results from EXAFS, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and density functional theory calculations reveal that the inward diffusion of phosphorus is more favorable at the beginning of the transformation from ε-Co to Co{sub 2}P by forming an amorphous Co-P shell, while retaining a crystalline cobalt core. When the major phase of the sample turns to Co{sub 2}P, the diffusion processes reverse and cobalt atom out-diffusion is favored, leaving a hollow void, characteristic of the nanoscale Kirkendall effect. For the transformation from Co{sub 2}P to CoP theory predicts an outward diffusion of cobalt while the anion lattice remains intact. In real samples, however, the Co-rich nanoparticles continue Kirkendall hollowing. Knowledge about the transformation method and structural properties provides a means to tailor the synthesis and composition of the NPs to facilitate their use in applications.

  17. An Investigation into the Accuracy of Two Currently Available Dental Impression Materials in the Construction of Cobalt-Chromium Frameworks for Removable Partial Dentures.

    PubMed

    Dubal, Rajesh Kumar; Friel, Tim; Taylor, Philip D

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the suitability of irreversible hydrocolloid as an impression material for cobalt-chromium framework construction. Scans of casts derived from (1) alginate and (2) addition-cured polyvinylsiloxane impressions were superposed on to a control. The differences within and between groups were compared at fixed landmarks. The investigation revealed a high degree of scan coincidence within and between groups. However, certain features, such as undercuts, resulted in a lower degree of scan coincidence. Irreversible hydrocolloid appears to be a viable alternative to addition-cured polyvinyl-siloxane as an impression material for cobalt-chromium framework construction.

  18. Water-induced Formation of Cobalt Oxides Over Supported Cobalt/Ceria-Zirconia Catalysts under Ethanol-Steam Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Sean S.-Y.; Kim, Do Heui; Engelhard, Mark H.; Ha, Su Y.

    2010-07-28

    The formation of water-induced cobalt oxides by re-oxidizing the metallic cobalt in the pre-reduced 10% Co/CeO2-ZrO2 catalyst was verified by in-situ TPR and in-situ XPS studies under various ethanol-steam conditions. The formation and transformation of water-induced cobalt oxide species were affected by the pre-reduction conditions used for the catalysts and the feed stream composition used in the reaction. This result suggests that the surface composition of the cobalt species in 10% Co-CZ catalyst, initially governed by the catalyst pre-treatment, was changed toward an equilibrium state that governed by the feed stream composition as the reaction proceeds. In addition, the reducibility of the ceria sites may play a significant role in the redox process involved both cobalt and ceria sites under ethanol-steam environment. Finally, the effect of the water-induced cobalt oxides on the catalytic performance, in particular for the carbon-carbon bond cleavage of ethanol, is negligible. However, these water-induced oxides may show importance for the subsequent reaction steps that determine the product selectivity during ethanol steam reforming, as their coexistence with the metallic cobalt species was revealed by the in-situ study under ethanol-steam conditions.

  19. Role of Surface Cobalt Silicate in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis from Silica-Supported Cobalt Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Wang, X; Derrouiche, S; Haller, G; Pfefferle, L

    2010-01-01

    A silica-supported cobalt catalyst has been developed via incipient wetness impregnation for high-yield synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Co/SiO{sub 2}-impregnated catalysts have not been observed to be efficient for SWNT synthesis. Using an appropriately chosen precursor, we show that effective catalysts can be obtained for SWNT synthesis with yields up to 75 wt %. Detailed characterization indicates that the active sites for SWNT synthesis are small cobalt particles resulting from the reduction of a highly dispersed surface cobalt silicate species. The SWNTs produced by this catalyst are of high quality and easy to purify, and the process is simple and scalable.

  20. Role of surface cobalt silicate in single-walled carbon nanotube synthesis from silica-supported cobalt catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Wang, Xiaoming; Derrouiche, Salim; Haller, Gary L; Pfefferle, Lisa D

    2010-03-23

    A silica-supported cobalt catalyst has been developed via incipient wetness impregnation for high-yield synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Co/SiO2-impregnated catalysts have not been observed to be efficient for SWNT synthesis. Using an appropriately chosen precursor, we show that effective catalysts can be obtained for SWNT synthesis with yields up to 75 wt %. Detailed characterization indicates that the active sites for SWNT synthesis are small cobalt particles resulting from the reduction of a highly dispersed surface cobalt silicate species. The SWNTs produced by this catalyst are of high quality and easy to purify, and the process is simple and scalable. PMID:20201563

  1. Sulfur, carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen isotope geochemistry of the Idaho cobalt belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Craig A.; Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Slack, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Cobalt-copper ± gold deposits of the Idaho cobalt belt, including the deposits of the Blackbird district, have been analyzed for their sulfur, carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen isotope compositions to improve the understanding of ore formation. Previous genetic hypotheses have ranged widely, linking the ores to the sedimentary or diagenetic history of the host Mesoproterozoic sedimentary rocks, to Mesoproterozoic or Cretaceous magmatism, or to metamorphic shearing. The δ34S values are nearly uniform throughout the Blackbird dis- trict, with a mean value for cobaltite (CoAsS, the main cobalt mineral) of 8.0 ± 0.4‰ (n = 19). The data suggest that (1) sulfur was derived at least partly from sedimentary sources, (2) redox reactions involving sulfur were probably unimportant for ore deposition, and (3) the sulfur was probably transported to sites of ore for- mation as H2S. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of the ore-forming fluid, which are calculated from analyses of biotite-rich wall rocks and tourmaline, do not uniquely identify the source of the fluid; plausible sources include formation waters, metamorphic waters, and mixtures of magmatic and isotopically heavy meteoric waters. The calculated compositions are a poor match for the modified seawaters that form vol- canogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of siderite, a mineral that is widespread, although sparse, at Blackbird, suggest formation from mixtures of sedimentary organic carbon and magmatic-metamorphic carbon. The isotopic compositions of calcite in alkaline dike rocks of uncertain age are consistent with a magmatic origin. Several lines of evidence suggest that siderite postdated the emplacement of cobalt and copper, so its significance for the ore-forming event is uncertain. From the stable isotope perspective, the mineral deposits of the Idaho cobalt belt contrast with typical VMS and sedimentary exhalative deposits. They show characteristics of deposit

  2. Cobalt and antimony: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Marlies; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Lison, Dominique

    2003-12-10

    The purpose of this review is to summarise the data concerning genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of Co and Sb. Both metals have multiple industrial and/or therapeutical applications, depending on the considered species. Cobalt is used for the production of alloys and hard metal (cemented carbide), diamond polishing, drying agents, pigments and catalysts. Occupational exposure to cobalt may result in adverse health effects in different organs or tissues. Antimony trioxide is primarily used as a flame retardant in rubber, plastics, pigments, adhesives, textiles, and paper. Antimony potassium tartrate has been used worldwide as an anti-shistosomal drug. Pentavalent antimony compounds have been used for the treatment of leishmaniasis. Co(II) ions are genotoxic in vitro and in vivo, and carcinogenic in rodents. Co metal is genotoxic in vitro. Hard metal dust, of which occupational exposure is linked to an increased lung cancer risk, is proven to be genotoxic in vitro and in vivo. Possibly, production of active oxygen species and/or DNA repair inhibition are mechanisms involved. Given the recently provided proof for in vitro and in vivo genotoxic potential of hard metal dust, the mechanistic evidence of elevated production of active oxygen species and the epidemiological data on increased cancer risk, it may be advisable to consider the possibility of a new evaluation by IARC. Both trivalent and pentavalent antimony compounds are generally negative in non-mammalian genotoxicity tests, while mammalian test systems usually give positive results for Sb(III) and negative results for Sb(V) compounds. Assessment of the in vivo potential of Sb2O3 to induce chromosome aberrations (CA) gave conflicting results. Animal carcinogenicity data were concluded sufficient for Sb2O3 by IARC. Human carcinogenicity data is difficult to evaluate given the frequent co-exposure to arsenic. Possible mechanisms of action, including potential to produce active oxygen species and to interfere with

  3. Reaction of cobalt in SO2 atmospheric at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Worrell, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    The reaction rate of cobalt in SO2 argon environments was measured at 650 C, 700 C, 750 C and 800 C. Product scales consist primarily of an interconnected sulfide phase in an oxide matrix. At 700 C to 800 C a thin sulfide layer adjacent to the metal is also observed. At all temperatures, the rapid diffusion of cobalt outward through the interconnected sulfide appears to be important. At 650 C, the reaction rate slows dramatically after five minutes due to a change in the distribution of these sulfides. At 700 C and 750 C the reaction is primarily diffusion controlled values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from this work show favorable agreement with values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from previous sulfidation work. At 800 C, a surface step becomes rate limiting.

  4. Battery related cobalt and REE flows in WEEE treatment.

    PubMed

    Sommer, P; Rotter, V S; Ueberschaar, M

    2015-11-01

    In batteries associated with waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), battery systems can be found with a higher content of valuable and critical raw materials like cobalt and rare earth elements (REE) relative to the general mix of portable batteries. Based on a material flow model, this study estimates the flows of REE and cobalt associated to WEEE and the fate of these metals in the end-of-life systems. In 2011, approximately 40 Mg REE and 325 Mg cobalt were disposed of with WEEE-batteries. The end-of-life recycling rate for cobalt was 14%, for REE 0%. The volume of waste batteries can be expected to grow, but variation in the battery composition makes it difficult to forecast the future secondary raw material potential. Nevertheless, product specific treatment strategies ought to be implemented throughout the stages of the value chain.

  5. The Study of a Cobalt Complex--A Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loehlin, James H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes an 8-week project involving the synthesis of cobalt compounds. Once synthesized, compounds are qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. Background information, laboratory procedures, and results/discussion are provided for three project experiments. (Author/JN)

  6. Recovery of Silver and Cobalt from Laboratory Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foust, Donald F.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for recovering silver and cobalt from laboratory wastes (including those resulting from student experiments) are presented. The procedures are generally applicable since only common, inexpensive laboratory reagents are needed. (JN)

  7. Determination of traces of cobalt in soils: A field method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almond, H.

    1953-01-01

    The growing use of geochemical prospecting methods in the search for ore deposits has led to the development of a field method for the determination of cobalt in soils. The determination is based on the fact that cobalt reacts with 2-nitroso-1-naphthol to yield a pink compound that is soluble in carbon tetrachloride. The carbon tetrachloride extract is shaken with dilute cyanide to complex interfering elements and to remove excess reagent. The cobalt content is estimated by comparing the pink color in the carbon tetrachloride with a standard series prepared from standard solutions. The cobalt 2-nitroso-1-naphtholate system in carbon tetrachloride follows Beer's law. As little as 1 p.p.m. can be determined in a 0.1-gram sample. The method is simple and fast and requires only simple equipment. More than 40 samples can be analyzed per man-day with an accuracy within 30% or better.

  8. Rapid and sensitive colorimetric determination of cobalt(II).

    PubMed

    Eldawy, M A; Tawfik, A S; Elshabouri, S R

    1976-05-01

    A highly selective and sensitive spectrophotometric determination of cobalt (II) was developed. 7-Nitroso-8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid sodium salt was used as the chromogenic reagent for color development. Although other metals form colored chelates with the ligand, it was possible to develop a selective method using McIlvaine's pH 8 citric acid-phosphate buffer. Under these conditions, iron(II), iron (III), copper (II), zinc (II), and manganese (II), minerals likely to be compounded with cobalt (II) in geriatric formulations, do not interfere with the precision of the method or the color development. Calcium (II) and magnesium (II) do not form colored chelates with the used ligand. Hormones, vitamins, and additives likely to be present along with the cobalt ion in pharmaceutical formulations do not interfere. The sensitivity is 0.37 mug of cobalt (II)/ml of sample solution.

  9. Formation of cobalt silicide by ion beam mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Ye; Burte, Edmund P.; Ryssel, Heiner

    1991-07-01

    The formation of cobalt silicides by arsenic ion implantation through a cobalt film which causes a mixing of the metal with the silicon substrate was investigated. Furthermore, cobalt suicides were formed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Sheet resistance and silicide phases of implanted Co/Si samples depend on the As dose. Ion beam mixing at doses higher than 5 × 10 15 cm -2 and RTA at temperatures T ⩾ 900° C result in almost equal values of Rs. RBS and XRD spectra of these samples illustrate the formation of a homogeneous CoSi 2 layer. Significant lateral growth of cobalt silicide beyond the edge of patterned SiO 2 was observed in samples which were only subjected to an RTA process ( T ⩾ 900 ° C), while this lateral suicide growth could be reduced efficiently by As implantation prior to RTA.

  10. Initial nitride formation during plasma-nitridation of cobalt surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattson, E. C.; Michalak, D. J.; Cabrera, W.; Veyan, J. F.; Chabal, Y. J.

    2016-08-01

    Nitridation of metal surfaces is of central importance in microelectronics and spintronics due to the excellent mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of refractory nitrides. Here, we examine the chemical and structural modification of cobalt surfaces upon nitrogen plasma treatment, using in situ spectroscopic methods, as a method for synthesis of cobalt nitride thin films. We find that nitrogen is incorporated below the surface and forms an ultrathin film of CoN at temperatures as low as 50 °C. In addition, we observe the incorporation of oxygen and NO+ within the surface region. The nitrided cobalt surfaces are fully passivated by N, O, and NO+. These results provide a route for incorporation of cobalt nitride into a wide range applications.

  11. Reaction of cobalt in SO2 atmospheres at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Worrell, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction rate of cobalt in SO2 argon environments was measured at 650 C, 700 C, 750 C and 800 C. Product scales consist primarily of an interconnected sulfide phase in an oxide matrix. At 700 C to 800 C, a thin sulfide layer adjacent to the metal is also observed. At all temperatures, the rapid diffusion of cobalt outward through the interconnected sulfide appears to be important. At 650 C, the reaction rate slows dramatically after five minutes due to a change in the distribution of these sulfides. At 700 C and 750 C, the reaction is primarily diffusion controlled; values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from this work show favorable agreement with values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from previous sulfidation work. At 800 C, a surface step becomes rate limiting. Previously announced in STAR as N83-35104

  12. Studies of the Codeposition of Cobalt Hydroxide and Nickel Hydroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. H.; Murthy, M.; VanZee, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Topics considered include: chemistry, experimental measurements, planar film model development, impregnation model development, results and conclusion. Also included: effect of cobalt concentration on deposition/loading; effect of current density on loading distribution.

  13. Use of phosphate for separation of cobalt from iron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    North, V.; Wells, R.C.

    1942-01-01

    The well-known tendency of cobalt to be retained by the iron-alumina precipitate produced by ammonia has generally been ascribed to a specific adsorption by the large surface of this gelatinous precipitate. Whatever its cause, it can be overcome by precipitating the iron as phosphate at a pH of 3.5. The precipitate is easily filterable and practically all the cobalt passes into the filtrate.

  14. Annealing effects on microstrain of cobalt oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Deotale, Anjali Jain Nandedkar, R. V.; Sinha, A. K.; Singh, M. N.; Upadhyay, Anuj

    2014-04-24

    Cobalt oxide nanoparticles in different phases have been synthesized using ash supported method. The effect of isochronal annealing on micro-strain of cobalt oxide nanoparticles has been studied. The lattice strain contribution to the x-ray diffraction line broadening in the nanoparticles was analyzed using Williamson Hall (W-H) plot. It is observed that micro-strain was released at higher annealing temperature.

  15. Synthesis and structural characterization of polyaniline/cobalt chloride composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asha, Goyal, Sneh Lata; Kishore, Nawal

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) and PANI /cobalt chloride composites were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline with CoCl2.6H2O using ammonium peroxidisulphate as an oxidant. These composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD study reveals that both PANI and composites are amorphous. The XRD and SEM results confirm the presence of cobalt chloride in the composites.

  16. Synthesis of cobalt oxide nanoparticles via homogeneous precipitation using different synthetic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kishore, P N R; Jeevanandam, P

    2013-04-01

    Cobalt oxide nanoparticles have been prepared via homogeneous precipitation using different synthetic conditions. The effect of using cobalt salts with different anions (nitrate, acetate, chloride and sulphate) and concentrations on the final products has been investigated. The precursors to the cobalt oxide nanoparticles, obtained by the homogeneous precipitation, were found to be alpha-cobalt hydroxides with different stoichiometries. Pink and blue coloured alpha-cobalt hydroxides were obtained depending on the anion and concentration of the cobalt salt used. Co3O4 nanoparticles were obtained by thermal decomposition of the cobalt hydroxides in air at 350 degrees C. The precursors and the cobalt oxide nanoparticles were characterized by a variety of analytical techniques and magnetic properties of the different cobalt oxide nanoparticles have also been investigated.

  17. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  18. Coordination tuning of cobalt phosphates towards efficient water oxidation catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunah; Park, Jimin; Park, Inchul; Jin, Kyoungsuk; Jerng, Sung Eun; Kim, Sun Hee; Nam, Ki Tae; Kang, Kisuk

    2015-01-01

    The development of efficient and stable water oxidation catalysts is necessary for the realization of practically viable water-splitting systems. Although extensive studies have focused on the metal-oxide catalysts, the effect of metal coordination on the catalytic ability remains still elusive. Here we select four cobalt-based phosphate catalysts with various cobalt- and phosphate-group coordination as a platform to better understand the catalytic activity of cobalt-based materials. Although they exhibit various catalytic activities and stabilities during water oxidation, Na2CoP2O7 with distorted cobalt tetrahedral geometry shows high activity comparable to that of amorphous cobalt phosphate under neutral conditions, along with high structural stability. First-principles calculations suggest that the surface reorganization by the pyrophosphate ligand induces a highly distorted tetrahedral geometry, where water molecules can favourably bind, resulting in a low overpotential (∼0.42 eV). Our findings emphasize the importance of local cobalt coordination in the catalysis and suggest the possible effect of polyanions on the water oxidation chemistry. PMID:26365091

  19. Coordination tuning of cobalt phosphates towards efficient water oxidation catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunah; Park, Jimin; Park, Inchul; Jin, Kyoungsuk; Jerng, Sung Eun; Kim, Sun Hee; Nam, Ki Tae; Kang, Kisuk

    2015-09-01

    The development of efficient and stable water oxidation catalysts is necessary for the realization of practically viable water-splitting systems. Although extensive studies have focused on the metal-oxide catalysts, the effect of metal coordination on the catalytic ability remains still elusive. Here we select four cobalt-based phosphate catalysts with various cobalt- and phosphate-group coordination as a platform to better understand the catalytic activity of cobalt-based materials. Although they exhibit various catalytic activities and stabilities during water oxidation, Na2CoP2O7 with distorted cobalt tetrahedral geometry shows high activity comparable to that of amorphous cobalt phosphate under neutral conditions, along with high structural stability. First-principles calculations suggest that the surface reorganization by the pyrophosphate ligand induces a highly distorted tetrahedral geometry, where water molecules can favourably bind, resulting in a low overpotential (~0.42 eV). Our findings emphasize the importance of local cobalt coordination in the catalysis and suggest the possible effect of polyanions on the water oxidation chemistry.

  20. Coordination tuning of cobalt phosphates towards efficient water oxidation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunah; Park, Jimin; Park, Inchul; Jin, Kyoungsuk; Jerng, Sung Eun; Kim, Sun Hee; Nam, Ki Tae; Kang, Kisuk

    2015-01-01

    The development of efficient and stable water oxidation catalysts is necessary for the realization of practically viable water-splitting systems. Although extensive studies have focused on the metal-oxide catalysts, the effect of metal coordination on the catalytic ability remains still elusive. Here we select four cobalt-based phosphate catalysts with various cobalt- and phosphate-group coordination as a platform to better understand the catalytic activity of cobalt-based materials. Although they exhibit various catalytic activities and stabilities during water oxidation, Na2CoP2O7 with distorted cobalt tetrahedral geometry shows high activity comparable to that of amorphous cobalt phosphate under neutral conditions, along with high structural stability. First-principles calculations suggest that the surface reorganization by the pyrophosphate ligand induces a highly distorted tetrahedral geometry, where water molecules can favourably bind, resulting in a low overpotential (∼0.42 eV). Our findings emphasize the importance of local cobalt coordination in the catalysis and suggest the possible effect of polyanions on the water oxidation chemistry. PMID:26365091

  1. Effects of cobalt in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Jarrett, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    The role of cobalt in a representative wrought nickel-base superalloy was determined. The results show cobalt affecting the solubility of elements in the gamma matrix, resulting in enhanced gamma' volume fraction, in the stabilization of MC-type carbides, and in the stabilization of sigma phase. In the particular alloy studied, these microstructural and microchemistry changes are insufficient in extent to impact on tensile strength, yield strength, and in the ductilities. Depending on the heat treatment, creep and stress rupture resistance can be cobalt sensitive. In the coarse grain, fully solutioned and aged condition, all of the alloy's 17% cobalt can be replaced by nickel without deleteriously affecting this resistance. In the fine grain, partially solutioned and aged condition, this resistance is deleteriously affected only when one-half or more of the initial cobalt content is removed. The structure and property results are discussed with respect to existing theories and with respect to other recent and earlier findings on the impact of cobalt, if any, on the performance of nickel-base superalloys.

  2. Cobalt mineral exploration and supply from 1995 through 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The global mining industry has invested a large amount of capital in mineral exploration and development over the past 15 years in an effort to ensure that sufficient resources are available to meet future increases in demand for minerals. Exploration data have been used to identify specific sites where this investment has led to a significant contribution in global mineral supply of cobalt or where a significant increase in cobalt production capacity is anticipated in the next 5 years. This report provides an overview of the cobalt industry, factors affecting mineral supply, and circumstances surrounding the development, or lack thereof, of key mineral properties with the potential to affect mineral supply. Of the 48 sites with an effective production capacity of at least 1,000 metric tons per year of cobalt considered for this study, 3 producing sites underwent significant expansion during the study period, 10 exploration sites commenced production from 1995 through 2008, and 16 sites were expected to begin production by 2013 if planned development schedules are met. Cobalt supply is influenced by economic, environmental, political, and technological factors affecting exploration for and production of copper, nickel, and other metals as well as factors affecting the cobalt industry. Cobalt-rich nickel laterite deposits were discovered and developed in Australia and the South Pacific and improvements in laterite processing technology took place during the 1990s and early in the first decade of the 21st century when mining of copper-cobalt deposits in Congo (Kinshasa) was restricted because of regional conflict and lack of investment in that country's mining sector. There was also increased exploration for and greater importance placed on cobalt as a byproduct of nickel mining in Australia and Canada. The emergence of China as a major refined cobalt producer and consumer since 2007 has changed the pattern of demand for cobalt, particularly from Africa and

  3. Cobalt ferrite based magnetostrictive materials for magnetic stress sensor and actuator applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiles, David C. (Inventor); Paulsen, Jason A. (Inventor); Snyder, John E. (Inventor); Lo, Chester C. H. (Inventor); Ring, Andrew P. (Inventor); Bormann, Keith A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Magnetostrictive material based on cobalt ferrite is described. The cobalt ferrite is substituted with transition metals (such manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) or mixtures thereof) by substituting the transition metals for iron or cobalt to form substituted cobalt ferrite that provides mechanical properties that make the substituted cobalt ferrite material effective for use as sensors and actuators. The substitution of transition metals lowers the Curie temperature of the material (as compared to cobalt ferrite) while maintaining a suitable magnetostriction for stress sensing applications.

  4. Chemoselective amination of propargylic C(sp³)-H bonds by cobalt(II)-based metalloradical catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongjian; Li, Chaoqun; Jiang, Huiling; Lizardi, Christopher L; Zhang, X Peter

    2014-07-01

    Highly chemoselective intramolecular amination of propargylic C(sp(3))-H bonds has been demonstrated for N-bishomopropargylic sulfamoyl azides through cobalt(II)-based metalloradical catalysis. Supported by D(2h)-symmetric amidoporphyrin ligand 3,5-Di(t)Bu-IbuPhyrin, the cobalt(II)-catalyzed C-H amination proceeds effectively under neutral and nonoxidative conditions without the need of any additives, and generates N2 as the only byproduct. The metalloradical amination is suitable for both secondary and tertiary propargylic C-H substrates with an unusually high degree of functional-group tolerance, thus providing a direct method for high-yielding synthesis of functionalized propargylamine derivatives.

  5. Temperature-programmed sulfiding of precursor cobalt oxide genesis of highly active sites on sulfided cobalt catalyst for hydrogenation and isomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Inamura, Kazuhiro; Takyu, Toshiyuki ); Okamoto, Yasuaki; Nagata, Kozo; Imanaka, Toshinobu )

    1992-02-01

    It was found that the method of sulfidation of cobalt oxide strongly affects the catalytic activities and selectivities of the resultant cobalt sulfide catalyst, as well as the calcination temperature of the cobalt oxide. When cobalt oxide was sulfided at 673 K by a temperature-programmed sulfiding method (a heating rate of 6 K/min), catalytic activities for the hydrogenation of butadiene and the isomerization of 1-butene were considerably enhanced compared with those for cobalt sulfide prepared by isothermal sulfidation at 673 K. Results of temperature-programmed sulfiding (TPS), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) suggest that the catalysts showing high catalytic activities after sulfidation are partially sulfided at 673 K and consist of the unsulfided cobalt core phases (CoO or metallic Co). The sulfidation property of precursor cobalt oxides has been studied using TPS, simulating the sulfidation process of the cobalt sulfide catalysts. Two distinctly different kinds of sulfidation process are estimated by TPS measurements of the cobalt oxides. The calcination temperature of the precursor cobalt oxides strongly affects the sulfidation paths. They are differentiated in terms of the presence of a metallic Co intermediate. The relationship of the mechanism of sulfidation of the cobalt oxides to the generation of highly active sites is discussed.

  6. Electromagnetic containerless reaction of samarium with cobalt for the formation of samarium-cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. W.; Das, D. K.; Kumar, K.; Frost, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    The electromagnetic levitation technique has been used to obtain nearly stoichiometric SmCo5, with the reaction temperature controlled by a gas jet. The results of several experiments carried out at a 450 kHz, 25 kw RF power levitation facility using different reaction times and cooling rates are presented. It is shown that reaction rates achieved with the levitation technique are larger than the expected diffusion rate in the system liquid samarium-solid cobalt. It is also shown that substantial mixing occurs in the RF-levitated melt.

  7. Tuning of magnetic parameters in cobalt-polystyrene nanocomposites by reduction cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Swapna S.; Sunny, Vijutha; Anantharaman, M.R.

    2011-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Cobalt nanoparticles were prepared by a reduction process inside polymer pores. A porous polymer network (polystyrene) was chosen as the template for the synthesis of elementary cobalt as high surface area cobalt nanoparticles are prone to oxidation. The preliminary studies reveal that the cobalt is first formed with an oxide protective layer outside and upon repeating the reduction cycles, inner pores of the polymers are opened which enhanced the yield of metallic cobalt. These high surface area cobalt nanoparticles embedded in a polymer are ideal for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes as cobalt can act as a catalyst for the nanotube synthesis. The concentration of cobalt can be tuned in this technique by repeating the cycling process. Highlights: {yields} Elementary cobalt nanoparticles were synthesized inside polystyrene by a novel process. {yields} The self protection is achieved by the auto-shelling with the metal oxide. {yields} The magnetisation and coercivity could be tuned by repeating the cycles. {yields} Tuning of magnetic properties (both coercivity and magnetisation) could be achieved by the repetition of reduction cycles. {yields} Synthesized nanocomposite can act as a catalyst for carbon nanotube synthesis. -- Abstract: Cobalt nanoparticles were prepared by a reduction process inside polymer pores using CoSO{sub 4}.7H{sub 2}O and NaBH{sub 4}. A porous polymer network (sulphonated polystyrene) was chosen, as the template for the synthesis of elementary cobalt as high surface area cobalt nanoparticles are prone to oxidation. The preliminary studies reveal that the cobalt is first formed with an oxide protective layer outside and upon repeating the reduction cycles, inner pores of the polymers are opened which enhanced the yield of metallic cobalt. These high surface area cobalt nanoparticles embedded in a polymer are ideal for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes as cobalt can act as a catalyst for the nanotube synthesis. The

  8. A dissolved cobalt plume in the oxygen minimum zone of the eastern tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawco, Nicholas J.; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Resing, Joseph A.; Twining, Benjamin S.; Saito, Mak A.

    2016-10-01

    Cobalt is a nutrient to phytoplankton, but knowledge about its biogeochemical cycling is limited, especially in the Pacific Ocean. Here, we report sections of dissolved cobalt and labile dissolved cobalt from the US GEOTRACES GP16 transect in the South Pacific. The cobalt distribution is closely tied to the extent and intensity of the oxygen minimum zone in the eastern South Pacific with highest concentrations measured at the oxycline near the Peru margin. Below 200 m, remineralization and circulation produce an inverse relationship between cobalt and dissolved oxygen that extends throughout the basin. Within the oxygen minimum zone, elevated concentrations of labile cobalt are generated by input from coastal sources and reduced scavenging at low O2. As these high cobalt waters are upwelled and advected offshore, phytoplankton export returns cobalt to low-oxygen water masses underneath. West of the Peru upwelling region, dissolved cobalt is less than 10 pM in the euphotic zone and strongly bound by organic ligands. Because the cobalt nutricline within the South Pacific gyre is deeper than in oligotrophic regions in the North and South Atlantic, cobalt involved in sustaining phytoplankton productivity in the gyre is heavily recycled and ultimately arrives from lateral transport of upwelled waters from the eastern margin. In contrast to large coastal inputs, atmospheric deposition and hydrothermal vents along the East Pacific Rise appear to be minor sources of cobalt. Overall, these results demonstrate that oxygen biogeochemistry exerts a strong influence on cobalt cycling.

  9. Synthesis, spectroscopy, magnetic and redox behaviors of copper(II) complexes with tert-butylated salen type ligands bearing bis(4-aminophenyl)ethane and bis(4-aminophenyl)amide backbones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasumov, Veli T.; Yerli, Yusuf; Kutluay, Aysegul; Aslanoglu, Mehmet

    2013-03-01

    New salen type ligands, N,N'-bis(X-3-tert-butylsalicylidene)-4,4'-ethylenedianiline [(X = H (1), 5-tert-butyl (2)] and N,N'-bis(X-3-tert-butylsalicylidene)-4,4'-amidedianiline [X = H (3), 5-tert (4)] and their copper(II) complexes 5-8, have been synthesized. Their spectroscopic (IR, 1H NMR, UV/vis, ESR) properties, as well as magnetic and redox-reactivity behavior are reported. IR spectra of 7 and 8 indicate the coordination of amide oxygen atoms of 3 and 4 ligands to Cu(II). The solid state ESR spectra of 5-8 exhibits less informative exchange narrowed isotropic or anisotropic signals with weak unresolved low field patterns. The magnetic moments of 5 (2.92 μB per CuII) and 6 (2.79 μB per CuII) are unusual for copper(II) complexes and considerably higher than those for complexes 7 and 8. Cryogenic measurements (300-10 K) show weak antiferromagnetic exchange interactions between the copper(II) centers in complexes 6 and 8. The results of electrochemical and chemical redox-reactivity studies are discussed.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of dopamine substitue tripodal trinuclear [(salen/salophen/salpropen)M] (Mdbnd Cr(III), Mn(III), Fe(III) ions) capped s-triazine complexes: Investigation of their thermal and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, Şaban; Koç, Ziya Erdem

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we aimed to synthesize and characterize a novel tridirectional ligand including three catechol groups and its novel tridirectional-trinuclear triazine core complexes. For this purpose, we used melamine (2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazine) (MA) as starting material. 2,4,6-tris(4-carboxybenzimino)-1,3,5-triazine (II) was synthesized by the reaction of an equivalent melamine (I) and three equivalent 4-carboxybenzaldehyde. 4,4‧,4″-((1E,1‧E,1″E)-((1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyl)tris(azanylylidene))tris(methanylylidene))tris(N-(3,4-dihydroxyphenethyl)benzamide) L (IV) was synthesized by the reaction of one equivalent (II) and three equivalent dopamine (3,4-dihydroxyphenethylamine) (DA) by using two different methods. (II, III, IV) and nine novel trinuclear Cr(III), Mn(III) and Fe(III) complexes of (IV) were characterized by means of elemental analyses, 1H NMR, FT-IR spectrometry, LC-MS (ESI+) and thermal analyses. The metal ratios of the prepared complexes were performed using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS). We also synthesized novel tridirectional-trinuclear systems and investigated their effects on magnetic behaviors of [salen, salophen, salpropen Cr(III)/Mn(III)/Fe(III)] capped complexes. The complexes were determined to be low-spin distorted octahedral Mn(III) and Fe(III), and distorted octahedral Cr(III) all bridged by catechol group.

  11. Magnetization measurements on fine cobalt particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Respaud, M.; Broto, J. M.; Rakoto, H.; Ousset, J. C.; Osuna, J.; Ould Ely, T.; Amiens, C.; Chaudret, B.; Askenazy, S.

    1998-05-01

    We measure the magnetization of fine cobalt particles by SQUID and pulsed magnetic fields up to 35 T. These measurements have been made on two samples (C1, C2) with nonagglomerated particles. The analysis of the magnetic meaurements evidences very narrow log-normal size distribution centered around 1.5 nm (≅150 atoms) and 1.9 nm (≅310 atoms) for C1 and C2, respectively. Magnetization at 4.2 K seems to saturate in fields up to 5 T leading to an enhanced mean magnetic moment per atom compared to bulk value (1.72 μB). However, magnetization measurements up to 35 T do not permit to reach saturation, and show a continuous increase of μCo reaching 2.1±0.1 μB (C1) and 1.9±0.1 μB (C2). The effective magnetic anisotropies are found to be larger than those of bulk materials and decrease with increasing particle size. These features are associated with the large influence of the surface atoms.

  12. COBALT-60 Gamma Irradiation of Shrimp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Nancy L. B.

    Meta- and ortho-tyrosine were measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in conjunction with electrochemical detection in shrimp irradiated using cobalt-60 gamma radiation in the absorbed dose range 0.8 to 6.0 kGy, in nonirradiated shrimp, and in bovine serum albumin (BSA) irradiated in dilute aqueous solution at 25.0 kGy. Ortho-tyrosine was measured in nonirradiated BSA. Para-, meta-, and ortho-tyrosine were measured using HPLC in conjunction with uv-absorption detection in dilute aqueous solutions of phenylalanine irradiated in the absorbed dose range 16.0 to 195.0 kGy. The measured yields of tyrosine isomers were approximately linear as a function of absorbed dose in shrimp, and in irradiated solutions of phenylalanine up to 37.0 kGy. The occurrence of meta- and ortho-tyrosine, which had formerly been considered unique radiolytic products, has not previously been reported in nonirradiated shrimp or BSA. The conventional hydrolyzation and analytical techniques used in the present study to measure meta- and ortho-tyrosine may provide the basis for a method to detect and determine the dose used in food irradiation.

  13. Cobalt-60 gamma irradiation of shrimp

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, N.L.B.

    1993-01-01

    Meta- and ortho-tyrosine were measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in conjunction with electrochemical detection in shrimp irradiated using cobalt-60 gamma radiation in the absorbed dose range 0.8 to 6.0 kGy, in nonirradiated shrimp, and in bovine serum albumin (BSA) irradiated in dilute aqueous solution at 25.0 kGy. Ortho-tyrosine was measured in nonirradiated BSA. Para-, meta-, and ortho-tyrosine was measured using HPLC in conjunction with uv-absorption detection in dilute aqueous solutions of phenylalanine irradiated in the absorbed dose range 16.0 to 195.0 kGy. The measured yields of tyrosine isomers were approximately linear as a function of absorbed dose in shrimp, and in irradiated solutions of phenylalanine up to 37.0 kGy. The occurrence of meta- and ortho-tyrosine, which had formerly been considered unique radiolytic products, has not previously been reported in nonirradiated shrimp or BSA. The conventional hydrolyzation and analytical techniques used in the present study to measure meta- and ortho-tyrosine may provide the basis for a method to detect and determine the dose used in food irradiation.

  14. Cobalt in north-east Pacific waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, G. A.; Martin, J. H.; Gordon, R. M.

    1982-05-01

    Significant understanding has been gained recently about the biogeochemical cycling of trace metals in the ocean. This knowledge has mostly resulted from the accurate measurement of dissolved species in oceanic water columns. We report here that cobalt's vertical distribution is similar to that exhibited1-3 by Mn; that is, its surface enrichment/deep depletion (Fig. 1). However, amounts of Co (1-7 ng 1-1) are ~10-20 times less than those for Mn (Table 1), as might be expected from crustal abundance estimates4 for these elements (Mn=950; Co = 25 µg per g). The similarity between Mn and Co profiles implies the same biogeochemical pathways. The Co excess in nearshore surface waters probably results from continental weathering input processes, as suggested by the remarkable Co-salinity mirror-image relationship shown in Fig. 1, and the Co-salinity scatter diagram in Fig. 2a. The steady decrease in Co concentrations also indicates that Co is usually scavenged rather than regenerated at depth, as is the case with Mn (Fig. 1; Table 1).

  15. Analysis of cobalt(II) in 2-(5-cyanotetrazolato)pentaammine cobalt(III) perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, R.J.; Brown, N.E.; Deutsch, E.A.

    1985-10-30

    A new method of analysis is described for cobalt(II) complexes in 2-(5-cyanotetrazolato)pentaammine cobalt(III) perchlorate. The color reagent is 2,2'-dipyridyl-2-pyridyl hydrazone (DPPH), which complexes with the Co(II) and is oxidized to a substitution inert Co(III) (DPPH)/sub 2/ complex. Interferences from other ions is not a problem because the complex is stable at pH 2 - where complexes formed between DPPH and other ions are not stable. The usual air oxidant in this type of analysis has been replaced with ammonium peroxydisulfate improving both the precision and accuracy. The Sandell sensitivity is 0.0015 ..mu..g Co(II)/cm/sup 2/. The system obeys Beer's Law up to 4 ..mu..g in Co(II)mL of solution and has a molar absorptivity of 3.9 x 10/sup 4/ L/mole cm at 514 nm. The procedure was used to determine the degree of decomposition in samples that had undergone partial thermal decomposition. 11 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or tungsten carbide scrap raw materials. ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the...

  17. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... or tungsten carbide scrap raw materials. ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the...

  18. Cobalt chloride attenuates hypobaric hypoxia induced vascular leakage in rat brain: Molecular mechanisms of action of cobalt chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Kalpana, S.; Dhananjay, S.; Anju, B. Lilly, G.; Sai Ram, M.

    2008-09-15

    This study reports the efficacy of cobalt preconditioning in preventing hypobaric hypoxia induced vascular leakage (an indicator of cerebral edema) using male Sprague-Dawley rats as model system. Exposure of animals to hypobaric hypoxia led to a significant increase in vascular leakage, reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. There was a marked increase in Nuclear Factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) DNA binding activity and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), Interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}), Interleukin-1 (IL-1), and Tumor Necrosis Factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and cell adhesion molecules such as Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and P-selectin. Chemical preconditioning by cobalt for 7 days (12.5 mg Co/kg b.w., oral) significantly attenuated cerebral vascular leakage and the expression of inflammatory mediators induced by hypoxia. Administration of NF{kappa}B inhibitor, curcumin (50 mg/kg b.w.; i.p.) appreciably inhibited hypoxia induced vascular leakage indicating the involvement of NF{kappa}B in causing vascular leakage. Interestingly, cobalt when administered at 12.5 mg Co/kg b.w. (i.p.), 1 h before hypoxia could not prevent the vascular leakage indicating that cobalt per se did not have an effect on NF{kappa}B. The lower levels of NF{kappa}B observed in the brains of cobalt administered animals might be due to higher levels of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory proteins (hemeoxygenase-1 and metallothionein). To conclude cobalt preconditioning inhibited hypobaric hypoxia induced cerebral vascular leakage by lowering NF{kappa}B DNA binding activity and its regulated pro-inflammatory mediators. This is contemplated to be mediated by cobalt induced reduction in ROS/NO and increase in HO-1 and MT.

  19. Inhalation toxicity and carcinogenicity studies of cobalt sulfate.

    PubMed

    Bucher, J R; Hailey, J R; Roycroft, J R; Haseman, J K; Sills, R C; Grumbein, S L; Mellick, P W; Chou, B J

    1999-05-01

    Cobalt sulfate is a water-soluble cobalt salt with a variety of industrial and agricultural uses. Several cobalt compounds have induced sarcomas at injection sites in animals, and reports have suggested that exposure to cobalt-containing materials may cause lung cancer in humans. The present studies were done because no adequate rodent carcinogenicity studies had been performed with a soluble cobalt salt using a route relevant to occupational exposures. Groups of 50 male and 50 female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed to aerosols containing 0, 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/m3 cobalt sulfate hexahydrate, 6 h/day, 5 days/week, for 104 weeks. Survival and body weights of exposed rats and mice were generally unaffected by the exposures. In rats, proteinosis, alveolar epithelial metaplasia, granulomatous alveolar inflammation, and interstitial fibrosis were observed in the lung in all exposed groups. Nonneoplastic lesions of the nose and larynx were also attributed to exposure to all concentrations of cobalt sulfate. In 3.0 mg/m3 male rats and in female rats exposed to 1.0 or 3.0 mg/m3, the incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar neoplasms were increased over those in the control groups. Lung tumors occurred with significant positive trends in both sexes. The incidences of adrenal pheochromocytoma in 1.0 mg/m3 male rats and in 3.0 mg/m3 female rats were increased. Nonneoplastic lesions of the respiratory tract were less severe in mice than in rats. In mice, alveolar/bronchiolar neoplasms in 3.0 mg/m3 males and females were greater than those in the controls, and lung tumors occurred with significantly positive trends. Male mice had liver lesions consistent with a Helicobacter hepaticus infection. Incidences of liver hemangiosarcomas were increased in exposed groups of male mice; however, because of the infection, no conclusion could be reached concerning an association between liver hemangiosarcomas and cobalt sulfate. In summary, exposure to cobalt sulfate by inhalation

  20. Enhancement of trichothecene production in Fusarium graminearum by cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    Tsuyuki, Rie; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Sakamoto, Naoko; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2011-03-01

    The effects of cobalt chloride on the production of trichothecene and ergosterol in Fusarium graminearum were examined. Incorporation experiments with (13)C-labeled acetate and leucine confirmed that both 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol and ergosterol were biosynthesized via a mevalonate pathway by the fungus, although hydroxymethyl-glutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) from intact leucine was able to be partially used for ergosterol production. Addition of cobalt chloride at concentrations of 3-30 μM into liquid culture strongly enhanced 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol production by the fungus, whereas the amount of ergosterol and the mycelial weight of the fungus did not change. The mRNA levels of genes encoding trichothecene biosynthetic proteins (TRI4 and TRI6), ergosterol biosynthetic enzymes (ERG3 and ERG25), and enzymes involved in the mevalonate pathway (HMG-CoA synthase (HMGS) and HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR)) were all strongly up-regulated in the presence of cobalt chloride. Precocene II, a specific trichothecene production inhibitor, suppressed the effects of cobalt chloride on Tri4, Tri6, HMGS, and HMGR, but did not affect erg3 and erg25. These results indicate that cobalt chloride is useful for investigating regulatory mechanisms of trichothecene and ergosterol production in F. graminearum.

  1. Microstructure and Magnetic Properties of Electrodeposited Cobalt Film

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuiyan, Md S; Taylor, B. J.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Thompson, James R; Sinclair, J.

    2008-01-01

    Cobalt films were electrodeposited onto both iron and copper substrates from an aqueous solution containing a mixture of cobalt sulfate, boric acid, sodium citrate, and vanadyl sulfate. The structural, intermetallic diffusion and magnetic properties of the electrodeposited films were studied. Cobalt electrodeposition was carried out in a passively divided cell aided by addition of vanadyl sulfate to keep the counter electrode clean. The divided electrolytic cell with very negative current densities cause the electrodeposited Co to adopt a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure, which is more magnetically reversible than the hexagonally close-packed (hcp) structured Co. The coercive field is also significantly less in the fcc-electrodeposited cobalt than in the hcp. SEM images show dense, uniform Co films without any cracks or porosity. Beside the deposition current, thickness of the film was also found to affect the crystal orientation particularly on iron substrates. Diffusion of cobalt film into the iron substrate was studied under reduced environment and a fast process was observed.

  2. Graphene/cobalt nanocarrier for hyperthermia therapy and MRI diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hatamie, Shadie; Ahadian, Mohammad Mahdi; Ghiass, Mohammad Adel; Iraji Zad, Azam; Saber, Reza; Parseh, Benyamin; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Graphene/cobalt nanocomposites are promising materials for theranostic nanomedicine applications, which are defined as the ability to diagnose, provide targeted therapy and monitor the response to the therapy. In this study, the composites were synthesized via chemical method, using graphene oxide as the source material and assembling cobalt nanoparticles of 15nm over the surface of graphene sheets. Various characterization techniques were then employed to reveal the morphology, size and structure of the nanocomposites, such as X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and ultraviolet visible spectroscopy. Using ion-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, cobalt concentration in the nanocomposites was found to be 80%. In addition, cytotoxicity of graphene/cobalt nanocomposites were evaluated using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide or MTT assay. MTT viability assay exhibited biocompatibility to L929 mouse fibroblasts cells, under a high dose of 100μg/mL over 24h. Hyperthermia results showed the superior conversion of electromagnetic energy into heat at 350kHz frequency for 0.01 and 0.005g/L of the nanocomposites solution. The measured heat generation and energy transfer results were anticipated by the finite element analysis, conducted for the 3D structure. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics also showed that negatively charge graphene/cobalt nanocomposites are suitable for T1-weighted imaging. PMID:27351138

  3. Electrosynthesis and stabilization of α-cobalt hydroxide in the presence of trivalent cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Mridula; Vishnu Kamath, P.

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) of cobalt with aluminium and chromium, isostructural with α-cobalt(II) hydroxide, are electrosynthesized. This paves the way for their possible impregnation into porous metal plaques for ready use as electrodes in alkaline secondary cells. Unlike pure cobalt hydroxide, the LDHs of cobalt are not amphoteric and retain their α-like structure in strong alkali, even after prolonged ageing. In addition, they exhibit electrochemical activity as shown by cyclic voltammetric studies.

  4. Effects of cobalt/vitamin B12 status in ewes on ovum development and lamb viability at birth.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Linda M; Robinson, John J; Watt, Robert G; McEvoy, Thomas G; Ashworth, Cheryl J; Rooke, John A; Dwyer, Cathy M

    2007-01-01

    Scottish Blackface ewes from cobalt-deficient farmland were fed a diet containing 0.06 mg cobalt per kg dry matter from approximately 30 days before embryo recovery/transfer until lambing. Ewes remained untreated (-Co; n = 82) or were given an intraruminal cobalt-containing bolus to compensate for the dietary deficit (+Co; n = 82). Ewes used as embryo donors (-Co, n = 17; +Co, n = 16) were artificially inseminated with semen from a single Suffolk sire. Day 6 embryos obtained from -Co and +Co donors were transferred in singleton to -Co and +Co recipients in a 2 x 2 factorial-designed experiment to determine the effects of cobalt/vitamin B12 status during the periconception period (factor 1) and pregnancy (factor 2) on lamb viability at birth. Mean (+/- s.e.m.) circulating concentrations of vitamin B12 in -Co and +Co donors at ovum recovery were 182 +/- 10 and 1288 +/- 64 pmol L(-1), respectively (P < 0.001), and the number of corpora lutea per ewe ovulating was 9.9 +/- 1.6 and 14.4 +/- 1.3, respectively (P < 0.05). Treatment did not affect the proportion of recovered ova that contained >32 cells (viable) or the median stage of development (late morula), but viable ova recovered from -Co v. +Co ewes had a better morphological grade (2.0 +/- 0.1 v. 2.20 +/- 0.04, respectively; P < 0.01). There was no effect of treatment on the proportion of recipient ewes that became pregnant. Circulating concentrations of vitamin B12 were lower in -Co than +Co ewes during pregnancy (P < 0.001) and at birth in lambs born to -Co ewes compared with those born to +Co ewes (P < 0.001). There was no effect of donor or recipient cobalt/vitamin B12 status on lamb birthweight, neonatal vigour or neonatal rectal temperatures, but lambs derived from +Co v. -Co embryo donors were more active in the first 3 days after birth (P < 0.05). Results show that sub-clinical cobalt/vitamin B12 deficiency reduces ovulatory response in superovulated ewes and that periconception nutrition can affect neonatal

  5. Discrete and polymeric cobalt organophosphates: isolation of a 3-D cobalt phosphate framework exhibiting selective CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sandeep K; Kuppuswamy, Subramaniam; Walsh, James P S; McInnes, Eric J L; Murugavel, Ramaswamy

    2015-03-28

    Structurally diverse mononuclear, dinuclear, and tetranuclear cobalt organophosphates and a three-dimensional framework based on a D4R cobalt phosphate are reported. The role of auxiliary ligands in determining the nuclearity of the phosphate clusters has further been established. Reaction of cobalt acetate tetrahydrate with 2,6-di-iso-propylphenylphosphate (dippH2) in methanol or DMSO in the presence of ancillary N-donor ligands leads to the formation of mononuclear octahedral cobalt phosphate [Co(dippH)2(py)4] (1), dinuclear octahedral cobalt phosphates [Co(dipp)(NN)(MeOH)2]2·2MeOH (NN = bpy 2; phen 3), tetrahedral cobalt phosphates [Co(dipp)(L)2]2·2(MeOH) (L = imz 4; dmpz 5) and symmetric and asymmetric tetranuclear tetrahedral cobalt phosphates [Co(dipp)(2-apy)]4 (6) and [Co4(dipp)4(2-apy)3(DMSO)]·(DMSO)·(H2O) (7), in nearly quantitative yields. The use of a linear N-donor ditopic linker, 3,6-di(pyridin-4-yl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (dptz), as the ancillary ligand leads to the formation of a robust three dimensional, four-fold interpenetrated network based on the D4R platform, {[Co(dipp)(dptz)0.5]4}n (8), under ambient conditions. The new compounds have been characterized by analytical, thermo-analytical and spectroscopic techniques. Further, the molecular structures of compounds 1-8 have been established using single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Compound 1 is a mononuclear complex in which the dippH ligands occupy trans-positions around the octahedral cobalt ion. The core structure of compounds 2-5, a Co2P2O4 ring, resembles the S4R (single-4-ring) SBU of zeolites, whereas the Co4P4O12 inorganic core found in compounds 6 and 7 resembles the D4R (double-4-ring) SBU. Cobalt organophosphate framework 8 shows significant CO2 adsorption at 273 K (7.73 wt% at 1 bar and 18.21 wt% at 15.5 bar) with high selectivity to CO2 uptake over N2 and H2 at 273 K. Magnetic studies of these symmetric complexes indicate the presence of weak antiferromagnetic interactions

  6. Discrete and polymeric cobalt organophosphates: isolation of a 3-D cobalt phosphate framework exhibiting selective CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sandeep K; Kuppuswamy, Subramaniam; Walsh, James P S; McInnes, Eric J L; Murugavel, Ramaswamy

    2015-03-28

    Structurally diverse mononuclear, dinuclear, and tetranuclear cobalt organophosphates and a three-dimensional framework based on a D4R cobalt phosphate are reported. The role of auxiliary ligands in determining the nuclearity of the phosphate clusters has further been established. Reaction of cobalt acetate tetrahydrate with 2,6-di-iso-propylphenylphosphate (dippH2) in methanol or DMSO in the presence of ancillary N-donor ligands leads to the formation of mononuclear octahedral cobalt phosphate [Co(dippH)2(py)4] (1), dinuclear octahedral cobalt phosphates [Co(dipp)(NN)(MeOH)2]2·2MeOH (NN = bpy 2; phen 3), tetrahedral cobalt phosphates [Co(dipp)(L)2]2·2(MeOH) (L = imz 4; dmpz 5) and symmetric and asymmetric tetranuclear tetrahedral cobalt phosphates [Co(dipp)(2-apy)]4 (6) and [Co4(dipp)4(2-apy)3(DMSO)]·(DMSO)·(H2O) (7), in nearly quantitative yields. The use of a linear N-donor ditopic linker, 3,6-di(pyridin-4-yl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (dptz), as the ancillary ligand leads to the formation of a robust three dimensional, four-fold interpenetrated network based on the D4R platform, {[Co(dipp)(dptz)0.5]4}n (8), under ambient conditions. The new compounds have been characterized by analytical, thermo-analytical and spectroscopic techniques. Further, the molecular structures of compounds 1-8 have been established using single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Compound 1 is a mononuclear complex in which the dippH ligands occupy trans-positions around the octahedral cobalt ion. The core structure of compounds 2-5, a Co2P2O4 ring, resembles the S4R (single-4-ring) SBU of zeolites, whereas the Co4P4O12 inorganic core found in compounds 6 and 7 resembles the D4R (double-4-ring) SBU. Cobalt organophosphate framework 8 shows significant CO2 adsorption at 273 K (7.73 wt% at 1 bar and 18.21 wt% at 15.5 bar) with high selectivity to CO2 uptake over N2 and H2 at 273 K. Magnetic studies of these symmetric complexes indicate the presence of weak antiferromagnetic interactions

  7. Lignite recovery of cobalt(+3) from an ammoniacal ammonium sulfate solution. Report of investigations/1984

    SciTech Connect

    Slavens, G.J.; Traut, D.E.; Penner, L.R.; Henry, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines has devised technology to recover cobalt, nickel, and byproduct copper from domestic lateritic material using an oxidative, ammoniacal ammonium sulfate leach. Nickel, cobalt, and copper were recovered by solvent extraction and electrowinning. To reduce the cost and complexity of cobalt recovery, an alternate method using lignite to extract Co(+3) was investigated as reported herein.

  8. Toxicity of cobalt. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the toxicity effects of cobalt. Citations include cobalt fetotoxicity, renal toxicity, bioaccumulation, contact dermatitis, carcinogencity, and respiratory disorders. Toxicology assays and industrial sources of cobalt poisoning are considered. In vivo and in vitro human and animal studies are described. (Contains a minimum of 129 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 471.30 - Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. 471.30 Section 471.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel-Cobalt Forming Subcategory § 471.30 Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  11. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  12. 40 CFR 471.30 - Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. 471.30 Section 471.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel-Cobalt Forming Subcategory § 471.30 Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  13. 40 CFR 471.30 - Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. 471.30 Section 471.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel-Cobalt Forming Subcategory § 471.30 Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  14. 40 CFR 471.30 - Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. 471.30 Section 471.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel-Cobalt Forming Subcategory § 471.30 Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  15. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  16. 40 CFR 471.30 - Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. 471.30 Section 471.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel-Cobalt Forming Subcategory § 471.30 Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  17. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  18. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  19. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  20. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  1. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  2. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  3. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  4. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  6. The effect of cobalt content in U-700 type alloys on degradation of aluminide coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of cobalt content in U-700 type alloys on the behavior of aluminide coatings is studied in burner rig cyclic oxidation tests at 1100C. It is determined that aluminide coatings on alloys with higher cobalt offer better oxidation protection than the same coatings on alloys containing less cobalt.

  7. Comparison of different supplemental cobalt forms on digestion and cobalamin levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cobalt (Co) is essential for rumen microbial metabolism to synthesize methane, acetate and methionine. It also serves as a structural component of vitamin B12, which functions as a coenzyme in energy metabolism. A study was conducted to determine if Co form (cobalt carbonate vs cobalt glucoheptonat...

  8. Comparison of different supplemental cobalt forms on fiber digestion and cobalamin levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cobalt (Co) is essential for rumen microbial metabolism to synthesize methane, acetate and methionine. It also serves as a structural component of vitamin B*12, which functions as a coenzyme in energy metabolism. A study was conducted to determine if Co form (cobalt carbonate vs cobalt glucoheptona...

  9. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  10. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  11. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10600 - Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10600 Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide. (a... calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-272; CAS No. 1262279-30-0) is subject...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10600 - Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10600 Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide. (a... calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-272; CAS No. 1262279-30-0) is subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10599 - Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10599 Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical... cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-271; CAS No. 1262279-31-1) is subject to reporting...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10599 - Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10599 Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical... cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-271; CAS No. 1262279-31-1) is subject to reporting...

  16. Recovery of cobalt and copper from complex sulfide concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    Dannenberg, R.O.; Gardner, P.C.; Crane, S.R.; Seidel, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Bureau conducted bench-scale research on a process for treating cobaltite concentrates, comprising (1) oxidative pressure leaching, (2) jarosite precipitation followed by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ oxidation and pH control to remove iron and arsenic, (3) copper solvent extraction with a mixed hydroxyoxime-amine extractant, (4) copper electrowinning from recirculating acidic strip liquor, (5) selective cobalt extraction from copper solvent extraction raffinate with a phosphinic and extractant, and (6) electrowinning of cobalt from a recirculating weak acid strip liquor. Overall cobalt and copper recoveries were 91.7 and 84.1 pct, respectively. Electrowon products assayed 99.8 pct Co and 99.89 ct Cu.

  17. Sulfiding of cobalt molybdate catalysts: characterization by Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schrader, G.L.; Cheng, C.P.

    1984-02-01

    In situ laser Raman spectroscopic studies of the sulfiding of cobalt molybdate hydrodesulfurization catalysts were performed. Sulfiding in 10% H/sub 2/S/H/sub 2/ at 400/sup 0/C resulted in the formation of stable MoS/sub 2/ structures after 2h. However, the Raman spectra indicated that small crystallites or surface layers of perhaps distorted MoS/sub 2/ were present. Stepwise sulfiding of samples to 150, 250, and 350/sup 0/C permitted intermediate stages of sulfiding to be examined. Differences were observed for the relative rates of reduction versus sulfur incorporation for CoMoO/sub 4/, Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/, MoO/sub 3/, and aggregated or polymeric molybdate phases. Cobalt tended to increase the extent of reduction of the catalyst. A previously described model is extended to include the role of cobalt.

  18. Tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloy and method of producing same

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, James M.; Riley, Robert E.

    1977-03-15

    An improved tungsten alloy having a tungsten content of approximately 95 weight percent, a nickel content of about 3 weight percent, and the balance being cobalt of about 2 weight percent is described. A method for producing said tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloy is further described and comprises (a) coating the tungsten particles with a nickel-cobalt alloy, (b) pressing the coated particles into a compact shape, (c) heating said compact in hydrogen to a temperature in the range of 1400.degree. C and holding at this elevated temperature for a period of about 2 hours, (d) increasing this elevated temperature to about 1500.degree. C and holding for 1 hour at this temperature, (e) cooling to about 1200.degree. C and replacing the hydrogen atmosphere with an inert argon atmosphere while maintaining this elevated temperature for a period of about 1/2 hour, and (f) cooling the resulting alloy to room temperature in this argon atmosphere.

  19. Effect of Cobalt Particle Size on Acetone Steam Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Zhang, He; Yu, Ning; Davidson, Stephen D.; Wang, Yong

    2015-06-11

    Carbon-supported cobalt nanoparticles with different particle sizes were synthesized and characterized by complementary characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, N-2 sorption, acetone temperature-programmed desorption, transmission electron microscopy, and CO chemisorption. Using acetone steam reforming reaction as a probe reaction, we revealed a volcano-shape curve of the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency of acetone) and the CO2 selectivity as a function of the cobalt particle size with the highest activity and selectivity observed at a particle size of approximately 12.8nm. Our results indicate that the overall performance of acetone steam reforming is related to a combination of particle-size-dependent acetone decomposition, water dissociation, and the oxidation state of the cobalt nanoparticles.

  20. Effects of bathing on skin exposed to Cobalt-60 teletherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bohannan, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of this study was to determine the effects of bathing or not bathing on the degree of skin reaction occurring in patients receiving Cobalt-60 radiation therapy to the chest, back, or head and neck. A quasi experimental study was done using a 2 x 7 repeated measures design. Sixty-seven subjects receiving Cobalt-60 radiation therapy at the Moncrief Radiation Center in Fort Worth, Texas, were randomly assigned to an experimental group who did not bathe during therapy and a control group who did bathe with water during therapy. Observations were made after each 1000 rads of therapy and two weeks after the final treatment. Erythema and pigmentation measurements were taken using the Photovolt 670 and rates were assigned using the Baker-Leith Rating Scale. Findings from the study suggest that bathing the portal of entry with water during the treatment period does not influence the degree of skin response that occurs from Cobalt-60 teletherapy.

  1. Sorption and desorption of cobalt by Oscillatoria anguistissima.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, P; Gupta, R; Saxena, R K

    1999-07-01

    Oscillatoria anguistissima rapidly adsorbs appreciable amounts of cobalt from the aqueous solutions within 15 min of initial contact with the metal solution. O. anguistissima showed a high sequestration of cobalt at low equilibrium concentrations, and it followed the Freundlich model of adsorption. The adsorption is a strongly pH-dependent and temperature-independent phenomenon. The presence of Mg2+ and Ca2+ (100-200 ppm) resulted in decline in Co2+ adsorption capacity of Oscillatoria biomass. Sulphate and nitrate (0. 75-10 mM) drastically reduced the extent of Co2+ biosorption. The biosorption of cobalt is an ion-exchange process as the Co2+ binding was accompanied by release of a large amounts of Mg2+ ions. Na2CO3 (1.0 mM) resulted in about 76% desorption of Co2+ from the loaded biomass.

  2. Hepatic Cobalt and Copper Levels in Lambs in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Sivertsen, T; Plassen, C

    2004-01-01

    Cobalt and copper concentrations were measured in 599 lamb livers collected at slaughter from 58 sheep flocks in 6 different parts of Norway in 1993. Information about pasture, additional feeding and mineral supplements in the flocks was obtained through a questionnaire. Average hepatic levels of cobalt in the lamb flocks varied from <0.003 to 0.22 μg/g ww, and of copper from 5 to 240 μg/g ww. Flocks with deficient or marginal cobalt status were found in all parts of southern Norway, but primarily in the west and south-west. Some flocks with marginal copper status were found in the south-west, while flocks with signs of excessive hepatic copper concentrations were found mainly in inner parts of central and northern Norway. Hepatic copper concentrations were significantly higher in lambs that had grazed mountain pastures than in those that had grazed lowland pastures in the summer. PMID:15535087

  3. Laboratory evaluation of low cobalt wear materials for nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shiels, S.A.; Wilson, W.L.; Rosengarth, K.W.; Wire, G.L.

    1994-09-01

    Laboratory wear and corrosion screening tests were conducted on several commercially available, low-cobalt and cobalt-free hardsurfacing alloys to evaluate their relative wear and corrosion performance under simulated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary heat transport circuit conditions. Wear tests were performed under reciprocating, sliding contact. Corrosion performance was evaluated in both steady state and off-normal chemistry conditions. The wear behavior of the candidate hardsurfacing alloys was generally comparable to or better than that of Stellite 6, a material of proven wear performance under PWR operating conditions. With the exception of Tristelle 5183, the iron base alloys exhibited unacceptable corrosion behavior under wet layup conditions. The Tristelle 5183 experienced minor corrosion attack in primary coolant having elevated oxygen levels. The twelve percent cobalt alloy, Tristelle TS-2, performed well but exhibited some attack after a simulated decontamination treatment.

  4. Nanosize cobalt boride particles: Control of the size and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, C.; Pileni, M. P.

    1997-02-01

    Cobalt boride is obtained by the reduction of cobalt (2-ethyl hexyl) sulfosuccinate, Co(AOT) 2, by sodium borohydride either in reverse micelles or in a diphasic system. In Co(AOT) 2/Na(AOT)/H 2O reverse micellar solution, the size and polydispersity of the Co 2B particles is controlled by the size of the water droplets, which increases from 4 to 7.5 nm by increasing the water content. In a diphasic system of Co(AOT) 2/isooctane and sodium borohydride in aqueous solution, large and polydisperse particles of cobalt boride are formed (˜ 10 nm), and their magnetization properties are presented. The smallest particles are in a superparamagnetic regime at room temperature, whereas the largest particles show ferromagnetic behavior.

  5. BWR control-rod cobalt-alloy replacement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Aldred, P.

    1982-03-01

    Cobalt base pin and roller alloys in BWR Control Rods are a source for the Co-60 isotope which contributes to radiation buildup in the BWR core, the recirculation piping system and the spent fuel pool. It thereby influences personnel radiation exposure during BWR plant maintenance. The program objectives were (a) to identify non-cobalt alloys which could potentially replace the cobalt alloys, (b) evaluate the alloys by testing to qualify them for in-reactor surveillance testing, and (c) to initiate reactor tests at 2 BWRs. Wear resistance, an important requirement for pins and rollers, was measured in a simulated BWR environment (excluding irradiation). Prototypic wear tests were emphasized and a prototype control rod drive test facility was used to evaluate several pin and roller alloy combinations during prototype control rod operations.

  6. Activation of cobalt by neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.; Dyer, F.F.; Emery, J.F.; Pace, J.V. III ); Brodzinski, R.L. ); Marcum, J. )

    1990-02-01

    A study has been completed of cobalt activation in samples from two new locations in Hiroshima. The samples consisted of a piece of steel from a bridge located at a distance of about 1300 m from the hypocenter and pieces of both steel and concrete from a building located at approximately 700 m. The concrete was analyzed to obtain information needed to calculate the cobalt activation in the two steel samples. Close agreement was found between calculated and measured values for cobalt activation of the steel sample from the building at 700 m. It was found, however, that the measured values for the bridge sample at 1300 m were approximately twice the calculated values. Thus, the new results confirm the existence of a systematic error in the transport calculations for neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb. 52 refs., 32 figs., 16 tabs.

  7. Sorption and desorption of cobalt by Oscillatoria anguistissima.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, P; Gupta, R; Saxena, R K

    1999-07-01

    Oscillatoria anguistissima rapidly adsorbs appreciable amounts of cobalt from the aqueous solutions within 15 min of initial contact with the metal solution. O. anguistissima showed a high sequestration of cobalt at low equilibrium concentrations, and it followed the Freundlich model of adsorption. The adsorption is a strongly pH-dependent and temperature-independent phenomenon. The presence of Mg2+ and Ca2+ (100-200 ppm) resulted in decline in Co2+ adsorption capacity of Oscillatoria biomass. Sulphate and nitrate (0. 75-10 mM) drastically reduced the extent of Co2+ biosorption. The biosorption of cobalt is an ion-exchange process as the Co2+ binding was accompanied by release of a large amounts of Mg2+ ions. Na2CO3 (1.0 mM) resulted in about 76% desorption of Co2+ from the loaded biomass. PMID:10387117

  8. Thermal fatigue resistance of cobalt-modified UDIMET 700

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizon, P. T.

    1982-01-01

    The determination of comparative thermal fatigue resistances of five cobalt composition modifications of UDIMET 700 from fluidized bed tests is described. Cobalt compositional levels of 0.1, 4.3, 8.6, 12.8, 17.0 percent were being investigated in both the bare and coated (NiCrAlY overlay) conditions. Triplicate tests of each variation including duplicate tests of three control alloys are under investigation. Fluidized beds were maintained at 550 and 1850 F for the first 5500 cycles at which time the hot bed was increased to 1922 F. Immersion time in each bed is always 3 minutes. Upon the completion of 10,000 cycles, it appears that the 8.6 percent cobalt level gives the best thermal fatigue life. Considerable deformation of the test bars was observed.

  9. Dielectric, electrical transport and magnetic properties of Er3+substituted nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakade, S. G.; Kambale, R. C.; Kolekar, Y. D.; Ramana, C. V.

    2016-11-01

    Erbium substituted cobalt ferrite (CoFe2-xErxO4; x=0.0-0.2, referred to CFEO) materials were synthesized by sol-gel auto-combustion method. The effect of erbium (Er3+) substitution on the crystal structure, dielectric, electrical transport and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite is evaluated. CoFe2-xErxO4 ceramics exhibit the spinel cubic structure without any impurity phase for x≤0.10 whereas formation of the ErFeO3 orthoferrite secondary phase was observed for x≥0.15. All the CFEO samples demonstrate the typical hysteresis (M-H) behavior with a decrease in magnetization as a function of Er content due to weak superexchange interaction. The frequency (f) dependent dielectric constant (ε‧) revealed the usual dielectric dispersion. The ε‧-f dispersion (f=20 Hz to 1 MHz) fits to the modified Debye's function with more than one ion contributing to the relaxation. The relaxation time and spread factor derived are ∼10-4 s and ∼0.61(±0.04), respectively. Electrical and dielectric studies indicate that ε‧ increases and the dc electrical resistivity decreases as a function of Er content (x≤0.15). Complex impedance analyses confirm only the grain interior contribution to the conduction process. Temperature dependent electrical transport and room temperature ac conductivity (σac) analyses indicate the semiconducting nature and small polaron hopping.

  10. The effect of variations of cobalt content on the cyclic oxidation resistance of selected Ni-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.

    1987-01-01

    Cobalt levels were systematically varied in the Ni-base turbine alloys U-700 (cast), U-700m (PM/HIP), Waspaloy, Mar-M-247, In-738, Nimonic-115, U-720, and SX-R-150. the cobalt levels ranged from 0 wt pct to the nominal commercial content in each alloy. the alloys were tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at 1000, 1100 and 1150 C for 500, 200, and 100 hr, respectively. An oxidation attack parameter, Ka, derived from the specific weight change versus time data was used to evaluate the oxidation behavior of the alloys along with X-ray diffraction analysis of the surface oxides. The alloys tend to form either Cr2O3/chromite spinel or Al2O3/aluminate spinel depending on the Cr/Al ratio in the alloys. Alloys with a ratio of 3.5 or higher tend to favor the Cr oxides while those under 3.0 form mostly Al oxides. In general the Al2O3/aluminate spinel forming alloys have the better oxidation resistance. Increased cobalt content lowers the scaling resistance of the higher Cr allys while a 5.0 wt pct Co content is optimum for the Al controlling alloys. The refractory metals, particularly Ta, appear beneficial to both types of oxides, perhaps due to the formation of the omnipresent trirutile Ni(Ta, Cb, Mo, W)2O6. Both scales break down as increasing amounts of NiO are formed.

  11. The effect of variations of cobalt content on the cyclic oxidation resistance of selected Ni-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    Cobalt levels were systematically varied in the Ni-base turbine alloys U-700 (cast), U-700m(PM/HIP), Waspaloy, Mar-M-247, In-738, Nimonic-115, U-720, and SX-R-150. The cobalt levels ranged from 0 wt % to the nominal commercial content in each alloy. The alloys were tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at 1000, 1100 and 1150 C for 500, 200 and 100 hr respectively. An oxidation attack parameter, Ka derived from the specific weight change versus time data was used to evaluate the oxidation behavior of the alloys along with X-ray diffraction analysis of the surface oxides. The alloys tend to form either Cr2O3/chromite spinel or Al2O3/aluminate spinel depending on the CR/Al ratio in the alloys. Alloys with a ratio of 3.5 or higher tend to favor the Cr oxides while those under 3.0 form mostly Al oxides. In general the Al2O3/aluminate spinel forming alloys have the better oxidation resistance. Increased cobalt content lowers the scaling resistance of the higher Cr alloys while a 5.0 wt % Co content is optimum for the Al controlling alloys. The refractory metals, particularly Ta, appear beneficial to both types of oxides perhaps due to the formation of the omni-present trirutile Ni(Ta,Cb,Mo,W)2O6. Both scales break down as increasing amounts of NiO is formed.

  12. Preparation and use of tetra-alkyl cobalt dicarbollide for extraction of cesium and strontium into hydrocarbon solvents

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Rebecca L.; Pinkerton, Anthony B.; Abney, Kent D.; Kinkead, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    Preparation and use of tetra-C-alkyl cobalt dicarbollide for extraction of cesium and strontium into hydrocarbon solvents. Tetra-C-alkyl derivatives of cobalt dicarbollide, Co(C.sub.2 R.sub.2 B.sub.9 H.sub.9).sub.2.sup.- (CoB.sub.2 R.sub.4.sup.- ; R=CH.sub.3 and C.sub.6 H.sub.13) are demonstrated to be significant cesium and strontium extractants from acidic and alkaline solutions into non-toxic organic solvent systems. Extractions using mesitylene and diethylbenzene are compared to those with nitrobenzene as the organic phase. CoB.sub.2 -hexyl.sub.4.sup.- in diethylbenzene shows improved selectivity (10.sup.4) for Cs over Na in acidic solution. In dilute alkaline solution, CoB.sub.2 -hexyl.sub.4.sup.- extracts Cs less efficiently, but more effectively removes Sr from higher base concentrations. A general synthesis of tetra-C-alkyl cobalt dicarbollides is described.

  13. Preparation and use of tetra-alkyl cobalt dicarbollide for extraction of cesium and strontium into hydrocarbon solvents

    DOEpatents

    Miller, R.L.; Pinkerton, A.B.; Abney, K.D.; Kinkead, S.A.

    1997-02-11

    Preparation and use of tetra-C-alkyl cobalt dicarbollide for extraction of cesium and strontium into hydrocarbon solvents. Tetra-C-alkyl derivatives of cobalt dicarbollide, Co(C{sub 2}R{sub 2}B{sub 9}H{sub 9}){sub 2}{sup {minus}}(CoB{sub 2}R{sub 4}{sup {minus}}; R=CH{sub 3} and C{sub 6}H{sub 13}) are demonstrated to be significant cesium and strontium extractants from acidic and alkaline solutions into non-toxic organic solvent systems. Extractions using mesitylene and diethylbenzene are compared to those with nitrobenzene as the organic phase. CoB{sub 2}-hexyl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} in diethylbenzene shows improved selectivity (10{sup 4}) for Cs over Na in acidic solution. In dilute alkaline solution, CoB{sub 2}-hexyl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} extracts Cs less efficiently, but more effectively removes Sr from higher base concentrations. A general synthesis of tetra-C-alkyl cobalt dicarbollides is described. 6 figs.

  14. Hydrogen Production from Ethanol Steam Reforming over Supported Cobalt Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Sean S.-Y.; Kim, Do Heui; Ha, Su Y.

    2008-05-01

    Hydrogen production was carried out via ethanol steam reforming over supported cobalt catalysts. Wet incipient impregnation method was used to support cobalt on ZrO2, CeO2 and CeZrO4 followed by pre-reduction with H2 up to 677 °C to attain supported cobalt catalysts. It was found that the non-noble metal based 10 wt % Co/CeZrO4 is an efficient catalyst to achieve ethanol conversion of 100% and hydrogen yield of 82% (4.9 mol H2/ mol ethanol) at 450 oC , which is superior to 0.5 wt % Rh/Al2O3. The pre-reduction process is required to activate supported cobalt catalysts for high H2 yield of ethanol steam reforming. In addition, support effect is found significant for cobalt during ethanol steam reforming. 10% Co/CeO2 gave high H2 selectivity while suffered low conversion due to the poor thermal stability. In contrast to CeO2, 10 wt % Co/ZrO2 achieved high conversion while suffered lower H2 yield due to the production of methane. The synergistic effect of ZrO2 and CeO2 to promote high ethanol conversion while suppress methanation was observed when CeZrO4 was used as a support for cobalt. This synergistic effect of CeZrO4 support leads to a high hydrogen yield at low temperature for 10 wt % Co/CeZrO4 catalyst. Under the high weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of ethanol (2.5 h-1), the hydrogen yield over 10 wt % Co/CeZrO4 was found to gradually decrease to 70% of its initial value in 6 hours possibly due to the coke formation on the catalyst.

  15. Low energy sputtering of cobalt by cesium ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handoo, A.; Ray, Pradosh K.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental facility to investigate low energy (less than 500 eV) sputtering of metal surfaces with ions produced by an ion gun is described. Results are reported on the sputtering yield of cobalt by cesium ions in the 100 to 500 eV energy range at a pressure of 1 times 10(exp -6) Torr. The target was electroplated on a copper substrate. The sputtered atoms were collected on a cobalt foil surrounding the target. Co-57 was used as a tracer to determine the sputtering yield.

  16. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COBALT AND PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-NICKEL ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-08-25

    >New plutonium-base teroary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuels are described. The alloys consist of 10 to 20 atomic percent cobalt with the remainder plutonium and cerium in any desired proportion, with the plutonium not in excess of 88 atomic percent; or, of from 10 to 25 atomic percent nickel (or mixture of nickel and cobalt) with the remainder plutonium and cerium in any desired proportion, with the plutonium not in excess of 86 atomic percent. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are a lower melting point and a wide range of permissible plutonium dilution.

  17. [Lead adsorption and arsenite oxidation by cobalt doped birnessite].

    PubMed

    Yin, Hui; Feng, Xiong-Han; Qiu, Guo-Hong; Tan, Wen-Feng; Liu, Fan

    2011-07-01

    In order to study the effects of transition metal ions on the physic-chemical properties of manganese dioxides as environmental friendly materials, three-dimensional nano-microsphere cobalt-doped birnessite was synthesized by reduction of potassium permanganate by mixtures of concentrated hydrochloride and cobalt (II) chloride. Powder X-ray diffraction, chemical analysis, N2 physical adsorption, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) were used to characterize the crystal structure, chemical composition and micro-morphologies of products. In the range of molar ratios from 0.05 to 0.20, birnessite was fabricated exclusively. It was observed that cobalt incorporated into the layers of birnessite and had little effect on the crystal structure and micromorpholgy, but crystallinity decreased after cobalt doping. Both chemical analysis and XPS results showed that manganese average oxidation state decreased after cobalt doping, and the percentage of Mn3+ increased. Co(III) OOH existed mainly in the structure. With the increase of cobalt, hydroxide oxygen percentage in molar increased from 12.79% for undoped birnessite to 13.05%, 17.69% and 17.79% for doped samples respectively. Adsorption capacity for lead and oxidation of arsenite of birnessite were enhanced by cobalt doping. The maximum capacity of Pb2+ adsorption increased in the order HB (2 538 mmol/kg) < CoB5 (2798 mmol/kg) < CoB10 (2932 mmol/kg) < CoB20 (3 146 mmol/kg). Oxidation percentage of arsenite in simulated waste water by undoped birnessite was 76.5%, those of doped ones increased by 2.0%, 12.8% and 18.9% respectively. Partial of Co3+ substitution for Mn4+ results in the increase of negative charge of the layer and the content of hydroxyl group, which could account for the improved adsorption capacity of Pb2+. After substitution of manganese by cobalt, oxidation capacity of arsenite by birnessite increases likely due to the higher standard redox potential of

  18. Cobalt-Catalyzed N-Alkylation of Amines with Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqi; Yin, Zhiwei; Zheng, Shengping

    2016-01-15

    A well-defined nonprecious metal cobalt(II) catalyst based on a pincer PNP ligand has been employed for the efficient N-alkylation of both aromatic and aliphatic amines with alcohols. A subtle change of reaction conditions (simply adding 4 Å molecular sieves) was observed to readily switch the resulting products (amines vs imines) with high chemoselectivity. A range of alcohols and amines including both aromatic and aliphatic substrates were efficiently converted to secondary amines in good-to-excellent yields when 2 mol % cobalt catalyst was used. Additional experiments indicate that a hydrogen-borrowing mechanism is responsible for the tandem acceptorless dehydrogenation/condensation/hydrogenation process. PMID:26695594

  19. Hydrogen Evolution Catalyzed by Cobalt Diimine-Dioxime Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kaeffer, Nicolas; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Artero, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Mimicking photosynthesis and producing solar fuels is an appealing way to store the huge amount of renewable energy from the sun in a durable and sustainable way. Hydrogen production through water splitting has been set as a first-ranking target for artificial photosynthesis. Pursuing that goal requires the development of efficient and stable catalytic systems, only based on earth abundant elements, for the reduction of protons from water to molecular hydrogen. Cobalt complexes based on glyoxime ligands, called cobaloximes, emerged ten years ago as a first generation of such catalysts. They are now widely utilized for the construction of photocatalytic systems for hydrogen evolution. In this Account, we describe our contribution to the development of a second generation of catalysts, cobalt diimine-dioxime complexes. While displaying similar catalytic activities as cobaloximes, these catalysts prove more stable against hydrolysis under strongly acidic conditions thanks to the tetradentate nature of the diimine-dioxime ligand. Importantly, H2 evolution proceeds via proton-coupled electron transfer steps involving the oxime bridge as a protonation site, reproducing the mechanism at play in the active sites of hydrogenase enzymes. This feature allows H2 to be evolved at modest overpotentials, i.e. close to the thermodynamic equilibrium over a wide range of acid-base conditions in non-aqueous solutions. Derivatization of the diimine-dioxime ligand at the hydrocarbon chain linking the two imine functions enables the covalent grafting of the complex onto electrode surfaces in a more convenient manner than for the parent bis-bidentate cobaloximes. Accordingly we attached diimine-dioxime cobalt catalysts onto carbon nanotubes and demonstrated the catalytic activity of the resulting molecular-based electrode for hydrogen evolution from aqueous acetate buffer. The stability of immobilized catalysts was found to be orders of magnitude higher than that of catalysts

  20. Excessive erythrocytosis, chronic mountain sickness, and serum cobalt levels.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, J Ashley; Escudero, Elizabeth; Hurtado, Maria-Elena; Pando, Jacqueline; Tapia, Rosario; Swenson, Erik R; Prchal, Josef; Schreiner, George F; Schoene, Robert B; Hurtado, Abdias; Johnson, Richard J

    2002-02-01

    In a subset of high-altitude dwellers, the appropriate erythrocytotic response becomes excessive and can result in chronic mountain sickness. We studied men with (study group) and without excessive erythrocytosis (packed-cell volume >65%) living in Cerro de Pasco, Peru (altitude 4300 m), and compared them with controls living in Lima, Peru (at sea-level). Toxic serum cobalt concentrations were detected in 11 of 21 (52%) study participants with excessive erythrocytosis, but were undetectable in high altitude or sea-level controls. In the mining community of Cerro de Pasco, cobalt toxicity might be an important contributor to excessive erythrocytosis.

  1. Excessive erythrocytosis, chronic mountain sickness, and serum cobalt levels.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, J Ashley; Escudero, Elizabeth; Hurtado, Maria-Elena; Pando, Jacqueline; Tapia, Rosario; Swenson, Erik R; Prchal, Josef; Schreiner, George F; Schoene, Robert B; Hurtado, Abdias; Johnson, Richard J

    2002-02-01

    In a subset of high-altitude dwellers, the appropriate erythrocytotic response becomes excessive and can result in chronic mountain sickness. We studied men with (study group) and without excessive erythrocytosis (packed-cell volume >65%) living in Cerro de Pasco, Peru (altitude 4300 m), and compared them with controls living in Lima, Peru (at sea-level). Toxic serum cobalt concentrations were detected in 11 of 21 (52%) study participants with excessive erythrocytosis, but were undetectable in high altitude or sea-level controls. In the mining community of Cerro de Pasco, cobalt toxicity might be an important contributor to excessive erythrocytosis. PMID:11844517

  2. Hydrogen evolution catalyzed by cobalt diimine-dioxime complexes.

    PubMed

    Kaeffer, Nicolas; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Artero, Vincent

    2015-05-19

    Mimicking photosynthesis and producing solar fuels is an appealing way to store the huge amount of renewable energy from the sun in a durable and sustainable way. Hydrogen production through water splitting has been set as a first-ranking target for artificial photosynthesis. Pursuing that goal requires the development of efficient and stable catalytic systems, only based on earth abundant elements, for the reduction of protons from water to molecular hydrogen. Cobalt complexes based on glyoxime ligands, called cobaloximes, emerged 10 years ago as a first generation of such catalysts. They are now widely utilized for the construction of photocatalytic systems for hydrogen evolution. In this Account, we describe our contribution to the development of a second generation of catalysts, cobalt diimine-dioxime complexes. While displaying similar catalytic activities as cobaloximes, these catalysts prove more stable against hydrolysis under strongly acidic conditions thanks to the tetradentate nature of the diimine-dioxime ligand. Importantly, H2 evolution proceeds via proton-coupled electron transfer steps involving the oxime bridge as a protonation site, reproducing the mechanism at play in the active sites of hydrogenase enzymes. This feature allows H2 to be evolved at modest overpotentials, that is, close to the thermodynamic equilibrium over a wide range of acid-base conditions in nonaqueous solutions. Derivatization of the diimine-dioxime ligand at the hydrocarbon chain linking the two imine functions enables the covalent grafting of the complex onto electrode surfaces in a more convenient manner than for the parent bis-bidentate cobaloximes. Accordingly, we attached diimine-dioxime cobalt catalysts onto carbon nanotubes and demonstrated the catalytic activity of the resulting molecular-based electrode for hydrogen evolution from aqueous acetate buffer. The stability of immobilized catalysts was found to be orders of magnitude higher than that of catalysts in the

  3. Bipyridyl cobalt complex mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Michael J.

    Dye-sensitization of semiconductor substrates allows for efficient charge injection into the semiconductor conduction band. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) exploit this for conversion of light into electrical energy. By employing mesoporous TiO2 a significant portion of visible light can be absorbed. The mesoporous TiO2, deposited on a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) medium, constitutes the photoanode of the DSSC. A wide range of materials may be used as a cathode. A redox electrolyte solution completes the cell. Typically, the I-/I3- redox couple has been employed in DSSCs. The use of bipyridyl cobalt complexes allows for tuning of the cell's electrochemistry, exploration of diverse cathode materials, and investigation of mediator solution additives. Cobalt complexes with alkyl, ester, and amide functionalities were considered throughout this body of work. The cobalt complexes were investigated on the basis of time dependence and electrode dependence. The cobalt complexes are stable for at least a period of one week when dissolved in gamma-butyrolactone. Gold, carbon and modified TCO cathodes perform well in cells employing the alkyl substituted complex. Gold cathodes alone provide the best performance with cells employing the ester and amide substituted complex. An optically transparent cathode was developed for use in stacked DSSCs, allowing light that is not absorbed by the first DSSC in a stack to be absorbed by a second cell. A spectrally complementary dye in the second cell extends the light absorption to longer wavelengths. Spatial current images were obtained to investigate the local current behavior of cobalt mediated cells. Intentional electrode damage was visualized, and the effects of increased pressure on the cell were discussed. The use of phenothiazine (PTZ) moieties as co-mediators in cobalt mediated DSSCs was investigated. An anionic PTZ salt was most effective at reducing the photo-oxidized sensitizing dye. This PTZ salt enhanced the

  4. Biological fate of cobalt-60 released during the corrosion of neutron-activated stanless steel in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.S.

    1982-03-01

    Passing seawater over radioactive Type 347 stainless steel in a sediment/seawater laboratory system and exposing marine animals to this environment provided information on the bioaccumulation of /sup 60/Co from radioactive structural material. Exposure of marine organisms to radioactive corrosion products and directly to radioactive stainless steel in seawater simulated some of the possible conditions which could arise from the deposition of radioactive stainless steel on the ocean floor. Detectable levels of /sup 60/Co in marine animals were not observed on a short term basis (5 weeks). Longterm (13 months) exposure of marine animals in a sediment/seawater system resulted in /sup 60/Co bioaccumulation. The specific activity of /sup 60/Co in the organisms was as much as one million times less than that initially present in the radioactive stainless steel. This was due to the dilution of /sup 60/Co by stable cobalt in the seawater, sediments and organisms. As expected the /sup 60/Co specific activity of the organisms never increased above that of the radioactive source. This is because /sup 60/Co is chemicaly indistinguishable from stable Co. Increasing /sup 60/Co concentration factors with decreasing /sup 60/Co concentrations in the seawater and sediment media coupled with relatively constant /sup 60/Co specific activities suggest a possible homeostatic control of cobalt concentrations in certain marine organisms. The evidence indicates that the marine animals derived more of the accumulated /sup 60/Co from the sediments and interstitial water than from seawater. Cobalt-60 concentration factors were generally found to be lower than published cobalt concentration factors due to the predominantly insoluble nature of the corrosion products. Baseline information is provided on trace element concentrations in deep-sea organisms. Stable Co and twenty other elements were measured in abyssal invertebrates and a fish.

  5. Copper and cobalt in aquatic mosses and stream sediments from the Idaho Cobalt Belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erdman, J.A.; Modreski, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of stream sediments and aquatic mosses were collected from nine sites across several mineralized zones at the southeasternmost extension of the Idaho Cobalt Belt. Because the steepness of the terrain and the attendant high flow rate of the streams made it difficult to obtain adequate sediment samples, mosses were considered as an alternative sampling medium. The results not only showed that the Cu and Co content of the mosses correlated almost perfectly with that of the sediments, but that the contrast between samples taken from mineralized and background areas was greater in mosses, especially for Co. Maximum concentrations of 35,000 ??g/g Cu and 2000 ??g/g Co were observed in the ash of mosses, compared to maximum concentrations of 1700 ??g/g and 320 ??g/g, respectively, in the associated sediments. Species identification was considered unimportant, which should dispel some reluctance to use mosses in mineral exploration. ?? 1984.

  6. Fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    2003-04-29

    Systems and methods are described for fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing. A method of forming a lithium cobalt oxide film includes depositing a film of lithium cobalt oxide on a substrate; rapidly heating the film of lithium cobalt oxide to a target temperature; and maintaining the film of lithium cobalt oxide at the target temperature for a target annealing time of at most, approximately 60 minutes. The systems and methods provide advantages because they require less time to implement and are, therefore less costly than previous techniques.

  7. Fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    2002-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing. A method of forming a lithium cobalt oxide film includes depositing a film of lithium cobalt oxide on a substrate; rapidly heating the film of lithium cobalt oxide to a target temperature; and maintaining the film of lithium cobalt oxide at the target temperature for a target annealing time of at most, approximately 60 minutes. The systems and methods provide advantages because they require less time to implement and are, therefore less costly than previous techniques.

  8. Fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    2003-05-13

    Systems and methods are described for fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing. A method of forming a lithium cobalt oxide film includes depositing a film of lithium cobalt oxide on a substrate; rapidly heating the film of lithium cobalt oxide to a target temperature; and maintaining the film of lithium cobalt oxide at the target temperature for a target annealing time of at most, approximately 60 minutes. The systems and methods provide advantages because they require less time to implement and are, therefore less costly than previous techniques.

  9. Reduced N-alkyl substituted bis(imino)pyridine cobalt complexes: molecular and electronic structures for compounds varying by three oxidation states.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Amanda C; Milsmann, Carsten; Bill, Eckhard; Lobkovsky, Emil; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Wieghardt, Karl; Chirik, Paul J

    2010-07-01

    The stepwise 1-3 electron reduction of the N-alkyl substituted bis(imino)pyridine cobalt dichloride complexes, ((R)APDI)CoCl(2), was studied where (R)APDI = 2,6-(RN=CMe)(2)C(5)H(3)N, R = C(6)H(11) (Cy), CHMe(2) ((i)Pr). One electron reduction with either zinc metal or NaBEt(3)H furnished the bis(imino)pyridine cobalt monochloride compounds, ((R)APDI)CoCl. X-ray diffraction on the ((iPr)APDI)CoCl derivative established a distortion from square planar geometry where the chloride ligand is lifted out of the idealized cobalt-chelate plane. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometry on both compounds established spin crossover behavior with an S = 1 state being predominant at room temperature. Computational studies, in combination with experimental results, establish that the triplet spin isomer arises from a high spin Co(II) center (S(Co) = 3/2) antiferromagnetically coupled to a bis(imino)pyridine chelate radical anion, [PDI](-) (S(PDI) = 1/2). At lower temperatures, the Co(II) ion undergoes a spin transition to the low spin form (S(Co) = 1/2) and antiferromagnetic coupling gives rise to the observed diamagnetic ground state. Replacing the chloride ligand with a methyl group, namely ((R)APDI)CoCH(3), also yielded distorted compounds, albeit less pronounced, that are diamagnetic at room temperature. Two electron reduction of the ((R)APDI)CoCl(2) derivatives with excess 0.5% sodium amalgam or 2 equiv of NaBEt(3)H furnished the bis(chelate)cobalt complexes, ((R)APDI)(2)Co, while three electron reduction with 3 equiv of sodium naphthalenide yielded the cobalt dinitrogen anions, [Na(solv)(3)][((R)APDI)CoN(2)] (solv = THF, Et(2)O). Both bis(chelate) compounds were crystallographically characterized and determined to have S = 3/2 ground states by SQUID magnetometry and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Computational studies, in combination with metrical parameters determined from X-ray diffraction, establish a high spin (S(Co) = 3

  10. Gas phase catalytic hydrodechlorination of chlorobenzene over cobalt phosphide catalysts with different P contents.

    PubMed

    Cecilia, J A; Infantes-Molina, A; Rodríguez-Castellón, E; Jiménez-López, A

    2013-09-15

    The gas phase catalytic hydrodechlorination (HDC) of chlorobenzene (CB) at atmospheric pressure was investigated over silica-supported cobalt and cobalt phosphide catalysts containing different P loading and a fixed amount of cobalt (5 wt.%). The effect of the initial P/Co molar ratio on the stoichiometry of the cobalt phosphide phase, the acidity and the hydrogen activation capability were discussed and these properties correlated with the catalytic activity. Catalytic results indicated that the cobalt phosphide phase is much more active than the monometallic cobalt one. The activity raised with the P content present in the sample due to the formation of the CoP phase instead of the Co₂P one, which favored the formation of hydrogen spillover species, increased the amount of weak acid sites and the number of exposed superficial cobalt atoms probably related to a better dispersion of the active phase. All the catalysts gave rise benzene as the main reaction product.

  11. Tracking the metal of the goblins: cobalt's cycle of use.

    PubMed

    Harper, E M; Kavlak, G; Graedel, T E

    2012-01-17

    Cobalt is a vital element in many technological applications, which, together with its increasing end-use in batteries, makes it important to quantify its cycle of use. We have done so for the planet as a whole and for the three principal cobalt-using countries - China, Japan, and the United States - for 2005. Together, China, Japan, and the United States accounted for approximately 65% of the cobalt fabricated and manufactured into end-use products (a total of 37 Gg Co). A time residence model allowed calculations of in-use stock accumulation and recycled and landfilled flows. China had the largest accumulation of in-use stock at some 4.3 Gg Co, over half of which was comprised of consumer battery stock. More than half of the stock accumulation in the United States was estimated to be in aircraft, rocket, and gas turbine engines, with a total in-use stock accumulation of approximately 3 Gg Co. The largest amounts of cobalt landfilled in China, the United States, and the planet were from the "chemical and other uses" category, and Japan's largest landfilled flow was in consumer batteries.

  12. Energy levels scheme simulation of divalent cobalt doped bismuth germanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreici, Emiliana-Laura; Petkova, Petya; Avram, Nicolae M.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to simulate the energy levels scheme for Bismuth Germanate (BGO) doped with divalent cobalt, in order to give a reliable explanation for spectral experimental data. In the semiempirical crystal field theory we first modeled the Crystal Field Parameters (CFPs) of BGO:Cr2+ system, in the frame of Exchange Charge Model (ECM), with actually site symmetry of the impurity ions after doping. The values of CFPs depend on the geometry of doped host matrix and by parameter G of ECM. First, we optimized the geometry of undoped BGO host matrix and afterwards, that of doped BGO with divalent cobalt. The charges effect of ligands and covalence bonding between cobalt cations and oxygen anions, in the cluster approach, also were taken into account. With the obtained values of the CFPs we simulate the energy levels scheme of cobalt ions, by diagonalizing the matrix of the doped crystal Hamiltonian. Obviously, energy levels and estimated Racah parameters B and C were compared with the experimental spectroscopic data and discussed. Comparison of obtained results with experimental data shows quite satisfactory, which justify the model and simulation schemes used for the title system.

  13. Nickel, Manganese, Cobalt, and Iron-Catalyzed Deprotonative Arene Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thanh; Alvarado, Joseph; Tran, Ly Dieu; Daugulis, Olafs

    2010-01-01

    A number of first-row transition metal salts catalyze deprotonative dimerization of acidic arenes. Under the atmosphere of oxygen, nickel, manganese, cobalt, and iron chlorides have been shown to dimerize five- and six-membered ring heterocycles as well as electron-poor arenes. Both tetramethylpiperidide and dicyclohexylamide bases can be employed; however, the former afford slightly higher yields. PMID:20192197

  14. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts having improved selectivity

    DOEpatents

    Miller, James G.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1989-01-01

    A cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst having an improved steam treated, acid extracted LZ-210 support is taught. The new catalyst system demonstrates improved product selectivity at Fischer-Tropsch reaction conditions evidenced by lower methane production, higher C.sub.5.sup.+ yield and increased olefin production.

  15. Cobalt doped proangiogenic hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Kulanthaivel, Senthilguru; Roy, Bibhas; Agarwal, Tarun; Giri, Supratim; Pramanik, Krishna; Pal, Kunal; Ray, Sirsendu S; Maiti, Tapas K; Banerjee, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    The present study delineates the synthesis and characterization of cobalt doped proangiogenic-osteogenic hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite samples, doped with varying concentrations of bivalent cobalt (Co(2+)) were prepared by the ammoniacal precipitation method and the extent of doping was measured by ICP-OES. The crystalline structure of the doped hydroxyapatite samples was confirmed by XRD and FTIR studies. Analysis pertaining to the effect of doped hydroxyapatite on cell cycle progression and proliferation of MG-63 cells revealed that the doping of cobalt supported the cell viability and proliferation up to a threshold limit. Furthermore, such level of doping also induced differentiation of the bone cells, which was evident from the higher expression of differentiation markers (Runx2 and Osterix) and better nodule formation (SEM study). Western blot analysis in conjugation with ELISA study confirmed that the doped HAp samples significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in MG-63 cells. The analysis described here confirms the proangiogenic-osteogenic properties of the cobalt doped hydroxyapatite and indicates its potential application in bone tissue engineering.

  16. Cobalt doped proangiogenic hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Kulanthaivel, Senthilguru; Roy, Bibhas; Agarwal, Tarun; Giri, Supratim; Pramanik, Krishna; Pal, Kunal; Ray, Sirsendu S; Maiti, Tapas K; Banerjee, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    The present study delineates the synthesis and characterization of cobalt doped proangiogenic-osteogenic hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite samples, doped with varying concentrations of bivalent cobalt (Co(2+)) were prepared by the ammoniacal precipitation method and the extent of doping was measured by ICP-OES. The crystalline structure of the doped hydroxyapatite samples was confirmed by XRD and FTIR studies. Analysis pertaining to the effect of doped hydroxyapatite on cell cycle progression and proliferation of MG-63 cells revealed that the doping of cobalt supported the cell viability and proliferation up to a threshold limit. Furthermore, such level of doping also induced differentiation of the bone cells, which was evident from the higher expression of differentiation markers (Runx2 and Osterix) and better nodule formation (SEM study). Western blot analysis in conjugation with ELISA study confirmed that the doped HAp samples significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in MG-63 cells. The analysis described here confirms the proangiogenic-osteogenic properties of the cobalt doped hydroxyapatite and indicates its potential application in bone tissue engineering. PMID:26478356

  17. Photoeffects in cobalt doped pyrite (FeS 2) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B.; Ellmer, K.; Bohne, W.; Röhrich, J.; Kunst, M.; Tributsch, H.

    1999-07-01

    By indiffusion of a thin metallic cobalt layer into a pyrite film deposited by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD), cobalt doped pyrite (FeS 2) films have been prepared. The cobalt in these films acts as a donor and transforms the originally p-type into n-type conductivity. To our knowledge this is the first time that n-type pyrite films have been prepared. Compared to the undoped p-type pyrite films, the cobalt-diffused films exhibit a much higher photoconductivity, as revealed by time resolved microwave conductivity analysis. From Hall and conductivity measurements a charge carrier concentration of about 10 20 cm -3 and a Hall mobility of about 1.5 cm 2/(V s) was calculated. This has to be compared with p-type pyrite films which do not show a Hall mobility above 0.1 cm 2/(V s), the detection limit of our Hall system. By analytical techniques (Rutherford backscattering and photoelectron spectroscopy) it was confirmed that the increase of the photoactivity is a bulk property of the pyrite films and not merely due to a surface passivation (for instance, due to metallic CoS 2). The presented results stimulate further experiments on in-situ-doping of pyrite by MOCVD and open the opportunity for the preparation of pn-junctions and pn-solar cells with pyrite.

  18. Energy levels scheme simulation of divalent cobalt doped bismuth germanate

    SciTech Connect

    Andreici, Emiliana-Laura; Petkova, Petya; Avram, Nicolae M.

    2015-12-07

    The aim of this paper is to simulate the energy levels scheme for Bismuth Germanate (BGO) doped with divalent cobalt, in order to give a reliable explanation for spectral experimental data. In the semiempirical crystal field theory we first modeled the Crystal Field Parameters (CFPs) of BGO:Cr{sup 2+} system, in the frame of Exchange Charge Model (ECM), with actually site symmetry of the impurity ions after doping. The values of CFPs depend on the geometry of doped host matrix and by parameter G of ECM. First, we optimized the geometry of undoped BGO host matrix and afterwards, that of doped BGO with divalent cobalt. The charges effect of ligands and covalence bonding between cobalt cations and oxygen anions, in the cluster approach, also were taken into account. With the obtained values of the CFPs we simulate the energy levels scheme of cobalt ions, by diagonalizing the matrix of the doped crystal Hamiltonian. Obviously, energy levels and estimated Racah parameters B and C were compared with the experimental spectroscopic data and discussed. Comparison of obtained results with experimental data shows quite satisfactory, which justify the model and simulation schemes used for the title system.

  19. Duel cobalt speciation in Co/ZSM-5 catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Stencel, J.M.; Rao, V.U.S.; Diehl, J.R.; Rhee, K.H.; Dhere, A.G.; DeAngelis, R.J.

    1983-11-01

    X-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron sepctroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy are used to investigate cobalt speciation in Co/ZSM-5 catalysts containing 1.4 to 9.5 wt % cobalt. These catalysts, metal-impregnated using incipient wetness techniques with Co(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ . 6H/sub 2/O, are shown to contain highly dispersed ion-exchanged, non-reducible Co/sup 2 +/ species interior to the ZSM-5, and large, reducible cobalt oxide crystallites on the exterior of the ZSM-5 crystallite surface. The number of Co/sup 2 +/ ions located inside a unit cell of ZSM-5 and the number of pyridine molecules that coordinately bond to each of these ions are estimated by using infrared data characterizing pyridine chemisorption. The crystalline forms of cobalt on the surface of the ZSM-5 are identified and their sizes estimated after O/sub 2/ calcination, H/sub 2/ reduction, and CO + H/sub 2/ exposure. These data are then scrutinized for correlations of chemical and physical properties of the Co/ZSM-5 catalysts with conversion activity and selectivity for synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO + H/sub 2/ gas. 15 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  20. Dual cobalt speciation in Co/ZSM-5 catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Stencel, J.M.; Rao, V.U.S.; Diehl, J.R.; Rhee, K.H.; Dhere, A.G.; DeAngelis, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    X-Ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy are used to investigate cobalt speciation in Co/ZSM-5 catalysts containing 1.4 to 9.5 wt% cobalt. These catalysts, metal-impregnated using incipient wetness techniques with Co(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ x 6H/sub 2/O, are shown to contain highly dispersed, ion-exchanged, non-reducible Co/sup 2 +/ species interior to the ZSM-5, and large, reducible cobalt oxide crystallites on the exterior of the ZSM-5 crystallite surface. The number of Co/sup 2 +/ ions located inside a unit cell of ZSM-5 and the number of pyridine molecules that coordinately bond to each of these ions are estimated by using infrared data characterizing pyridine chemisorption. The crystalline forms of cobalt on the surface of the ZSM-5 are identified and their sizes estimated after O/sub 2/ calcination, H/sub 2/ reduction, and CO + H/sub 2/ exposure. These data are then scrutinized for correlations of chemical and physical properties of the Co/ZSM-5 catalysts with conversion activity and selectivity for synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO + H/sub 2/ gas. 15 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Magnetic and fluorescence properties of cobalt implanted hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozeri, H.; Gelir, A.; Alveroğlu, E.; Tulun, M.; Yilmaz, Y.

    2009-03-01

    Co-doped plain gels (PAAm) were prepared with and without pyranine fluoroprobe (8-hydroxypyrene-1, 3,6-trisulfonic acid, trisodium salt; POH), which have a OH- reactive group and three SO-3 ionic groups. Magnetization and fluorescence measurements were used for characterization of the gels. It was observed that both the plain gel itself and the gel including only POH (PAAm-POH) have a diamagnetic response to the external field. When the gels were synthesized together with cobalt (PAAm-Co) and cobalt/POH (PAAm-Co-POH), both gels magnetized in the direction of the magnetic field, as expected. However, the magnitude of the magnetization was different in the gels which were synthesized in the presence of POH and the one into which POH molecules were diffused after the synthesis, even though they have the same cobalt concentration. Fluorescence measurements and SEM micrographs were used to understand this surprising difference in the magnetization of PAAm-Co-POH gels. It was proposed that the electrostatic interaction between SO-3 groups of POH and free electrons of cobalt (Co+2) atoms led to the formation of Co-POH clusters having fewer unpaired electrons, and this results in a decrease in overall magnetization. It was also observed from the SEM images that the size of clusters depends on the Co-POH composition.

  2. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts having improved selectivity

    DOEpatents

    Miller, James G.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1989-01-01

    The promoter(s) Mn oxide or Mn oxide and Zr oxide are added to a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst combined with the molecular sieve TC-103 or TC-123 such that the resultant catalyst demonstrates improved product selectivity, stability and catalyst life. The improved selectivity is evidenced by lower methane production, higher C5+ yield and increased olefin production.

  3. Arthroprosthetic cobaltism: identification of the at-risk patient.

    PubMed

    Tower, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    MoM hip bearings are being scrutinized due to high early failure rates and concerns that the results of the revision surgeries will be poor. However, orthopedic surgeons and the general medical community are unaware that patients with MoM bearings are also at risk for cobaltism. Medical providers need to know that hip arthroplasty implantees that present with symptom complexes that include tinnitus, deafness, vertigo, visual changes, rashes, hypothyroidism, tremor, dyspnea on exertion, mood disorders, dementia, heart failure, and peripheral neuropathy may be presenting arthroprosthetic cobaltism. These patients need to be asked if they have had a hip replacement and if so what type. For those patients implanted with a MoM bearing or those with a history of hip revision for a failed ceramic bearing obtaining a [Co] is indicated. MoM implantees with renal failure are a particularly high risk for cobaltism. A [Co] can be measured by many reference laboratories from royal blue top trace elements tube of venous blood. Venipuncture with a standard needle is adequate as long as a red stoppered tube is drawn first. The radiographic appearance of a MoM bearing is readily apparent to an orthopedic surgeon. The patient's operative report will usually specify the bearing type. Given that the publicity of the recent ASR bearing recall medical providers will be contacted by worried patients concerned about their hip implants. Most patients with hip replacements will not know the brand or material of their bearings. Providing patients with copies of their hip implant inventory might avoid worry by the majority of patients with hip arthroplasties that are not at risk. Patients with a cobalt levels of greater than 7 mcg/l bear observation of neurologic and cardiac function. Those patients with levels greater than 20 should be advised to have revision of their hip arthroplasty to a bearing that eliminates cobalt. Most patients implanted with MoM bearing have cobalt levels greater

  4. Acrylate intercalation and in situ polymerization in iron-, cobalt-, or manganese-substituted nickel hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Vaysse, C; Guerlou-Demourgues, L; Duguet, E; Delmas, C

    2003-07-28

    A chimie douce route based on successive redox and exchange reactions has allowed us to prepare new hybrid organic-inorganic materials, composed of polyacrylate macromolecules intercalated into layered double hydroxides (LDHs), deriving from Ni(OH)(2). Monomer intercalation and in situ polymerization mechanisms have appeared to be strongly dependent upon the nature of the substituting cation in the slabs. In the case of iron-based LDHs, a phase containing acrylate monomeric intercalates has been isolated and identified by X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Second, interslab free-radical polymerization of acrylate anions has been successfully initiated using potassium persulfate. In cobalt- or manganese-based LDHs, one-step polymerization has been observed, leading directly to a material containing polyacrylate intercalate. PMID:12870945

  5. Human metabolism of orally administered radioactive cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    Holstein, H; Ranebo, Y; Rääf, C L

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the human gastrointestinal uptake (f1) and subsequent whole-body retention of orally administered inorganic radioactive cobalt. Of eight adult volunteers aged between 24 and 68 years, seven were given solutions of (57)Co (T1/2 = 272 d) containing a stable cobalt carrier, and six were given carrier-free (58)Co (T1/2 = 71 d). The administered activities ranged between 25 and 103 kBq. The observed mean f1, based on 6 days accumulated urinary excretion sampling and whole-body counting, was 0.028 ± 0.0048 for carrier-free (58)Co, and 0.016 ± 0.0021 for carrier-associated (57)Co. These values were in reasonable agreement with values reported from previous studies involving a single intake of inorganic cobalt. The time pattern of the total retention (including residual cobalt in the GI tract) included a short-term component with a biological half-time of 0.71 ± 0.03 d (average ± 1 standard error of the mean for the two nuclides), an intermediate component with a mean half-time of 32 ± 8.5 d, and a long-term component (observed in two volunteers) with half-times ranging from 80 to 720 d for the two isotopes. From the present data we conclude that for the short-lived (57)Co and (58)Co, more than 95% of the internal absorbed dose was delivered within 7 days following oral intake, with a high individual variation influenced by the transit time of the unabsorbed cobalt through the gastro-intestinal tract.

  6. A review of the health hazards posed by cobalt.

    PubMed

    Paustenbach, Dennis J; Tvermoes, Brooke E; Unice, Kenneth M; Finley, Brent L; Kerger, Brent D

    2013-04-01

    Cobalt (Co) is an essential element with ubiquitous dietary exposure and possible incremental exposure due to dietary supplements, occupation and medical devices. Adverse health effects, such as cardiomyopathy and vision or hearing impairment, were reported at peak blood Co concentrations typically over 700 µg/L (8-40 weeks), while reversible hypothyroidism and polycythemia were reported in humans at ~300 µg/L and higher (≥2 weeks). Lung cancer risks associated with certain inhalation exposures have not been observed following Co ingestion and Co alloy implants. The mode of action for systemic toxicity relates directly to free Co(II) ion interactions with various receptors, ion channels and biomolecules resulting in generally reversible effects. Certain dose-response anomalies for Co toxicity likely relate to rare disease states known to reduce systemic Co(II)-ion binding to blood proteins. Based on the available information, most people with clearly elevated serum Co, like supplement users and hip implant patients, have >90% of Co as albumin-bound, with considerable excess binding capacity to sequester Co(II) ions. This paper reviews the scientific literature regarding the chemistry, pharmacokinetics and systemic toxicology of Co, and the likely role of free Co(II) ions to explain dose-response relationships. Based on currently available data, it might be useful to monitor implant patients for signs of hypothyroidism and polycythemia starting at blood or serum Co concentrations above 100 µg/L. This concentration is derived by applying an uncertainty factor of 3 to the 300 µg/L point of departure and this should adequately account for the fact that persons in the various studies were exposed for less than one year. A higher uncertainty factor could be warranted but Co has a relatively fast elimination, and many of the populations studied were of children and those with kidney problems. Closer follow-up of patients who also exhibit chronic disease states

  7. A review of the health hazards posed by cobalt.

    PubMed

    Paustenbach, Dennis J; Tvermoes, Brooke E; Unice, Kenneth M; Finley, Brent L; Kerger, Brent D

    2013-04-01

    Cobalt (Co) is an essential element with ubiquitous dietary exposure and possible incremental exposure due to dietary supplements, occupation and medical devices. Adverse health effects, such as cardiomyopathy and vision or hearing impairment, were reported at peak blood Co concentrations typically over 700 µg/L (8-40 weeks), while reversible hypothyroidism and polycythemia were reported in humans at ~300 µg/L and higher (≥2 weeks). Lung cancer risks associated with certain inhalation exposures have not been observed following Co ingestion and Co alloy implants. The mode of action for systemic toxicity relates directly to free Co(II) ion interactions with various receptors, ion channels and biomolecules resulting in generally reversible effects. Certain dose-response anomalies for Co toxicity likely relate to rare disease states known to reduce systemic Co(II)-ion binding to blood proteins. Based on the available information, most people with clearly elevated serum Co, like supplement users and hip implant patients, have >90% of Co as albumin-bound, with considerable excess binding capacity to sequester Co(II) ions. This paper reviews the scientific literature regarding the chemistry, pharmacokinetics and systemic toxicology of Co, and the likely role of free Co(II) ions to explain dose-response relationships. Based on currently available data, it might be useful to monitor implant patients for signs of hypothyroidism and polycythemia starting at blood or serum Co concentrations above 100 µg/L. This concentration is derived by applying an uncertainty factor of 3 to the 300 µg/L point of departure and this should adequately account for the fact that persons in the various studies were exposed for less than one year. A higher uncertainty factor could be warranted but Co has a relatively fast elimination, and many of the populations studied were of children and those with kidney problems. Closer follow-up of patients who also exhibit chronic disease states

  8. Magnetic and microwave absorption properties of self-assemblies composed of core-shell cobalt-cobalt oxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongzhu; Bi, Hong; Wang, Peihong; Wang, Min; Liu, Zhiwei; Shen, Lei; Liu, Xiansong

    2015-02-01

    Core-shell structure cobalt-cobalt oxide nanocomposites were directly synthesized via annealing Co nanocrystals in air at 300 °C. Their microstructure and magnetic properties were characterized by XRD, TEM, XPS and VSM, respectively. The microwave absorbing properties of the nanocomposite powders by dispersing them in wax were investigated in the 2-18 GHz frequency range. The sample that was annealed for 1 h exhibits the maximum reflection loss of -30.5 dB and a bandwidth of less than -10 dB covering the 12.6-17.3 GHz range with the coating thickness of only 1.7 mm. At the same thickness, the sample annealed for 3 h exhibits the maximum reflection loss of -24 dB and a bandwidth that almost covers the whole X-band (8-11.5 GHz). With increase in the insulating cobalt oxide shell, the enhanced permeability could contribute to the decrease of eddy current loss, and the permittivity could be easily adjusted; thus, the microwave absorption properties of the cobalt oxide nanocrystals could be easily adjusted. PMID:25559407

  9. Interdependence between urinary cobalt concentrations and hemoglobin levels in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Fort, Marta; Grimalt, Joan O; Casas, Maribel; Sunyer, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt is an essential trace element but may cause toxic effects upon occupational or environmental exposure. Women accumulate more cobalt than men at similar exposure levels which may be related to higher metabolic iron loss. During pregnancy these losses are much stronger but their influence on cobalt intake has not been studied. We have studied the associations between changes in hemoglobin and cobalt urinary excretion during pregnancy. 391 pairs of urine and blood samples from pregnant women were collected during the 12th and 32nd weeks of pregnancy and were analyzed for cobalt and hemoglobin. Mean concentrations of urinary cobalt were 0.73 and 1.6 µg/g creatinine during the first and third trimesters, respectively (p<0.001). 84% of pregnant women had higher levels of cobalt in the third than in the first trimester. Cobalt concentrations were negatively associated to hemoglobin levels in the third trimester (p<0.05). Women with higher iron decreases between both trimesters had significant cobalt increases between these two periods. This correspondence involved a statistically significant difference in third trimester mean cobalt concentrations of anemic and non-anemic women, 1.8 and 1.5 µg/g creatinine, respectively (p<0.05). No significant differences between these two groups were found during the first trimester. These results were used to construct generalized additive models both in normal and anemic women. The strong association between the changes of both iron status and cobalt urine levels found in pregnant women may be related to higher intestinal absorption of cobalt at iron depletion such as in the last pregnancy period when iron body demands are high. Possible toxicity effects of these cobalt increases along pregnancy should be considered in cases of populations occupationally or environmentally exposed to this metal.

  10. Inorganic cobalt supplementation: prediction of cobalt levels in whole blood and urine using a biokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Unice, Kenneth M; Monnot, Andrew D; Gaffney, Shannon H; Tvermoes, Brooke E; Thuett, Kerry A; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Finley, Brent L

    2012-07-01

    Soluble cobalt (Co) supplements with recommended daily doses up to 1000 μg Co/day are increasingly being marketed to consumers interested in healthy living practices. For example, some athletes may consider using Co supplements as blood doping agents, as Co is known to stimulate erythropoesis. However, the distribution and excretion kinetics of ingested Co are understood in a limited fashion. We used a Co-specific biokinetic model to estimate whole blood and urine Co levels resulting from oral exposure or ingestion of Co in amounts exceeding typical dietary intake rates. Following 10 days of Co supplementation at a rate of 400 to 1000 μg/day, predicted adult Co concentrations range from 1.7 to 10 μg/L in whole blood, and from 20 to 120 μg/L in urine. Chronic supplementation (≥ 1 year) at a rate of 1000 μg Co/day is predicted to result in blood levels of 5.7 to 13 μg/L, and in urine levels from 65 to 150 μg/L. The model predictions are within those measured in humans following ingestion of known doses. The methodology presented in this paper can be used to predict urinary or blood Co levels following acute or chronic occupational incidental ingestion, medicinal therapy, supplemental intake, or other non-occupational exposures.

  11. Crystallization behaviour of hydroxide cobalt carbonates by aging: Environmental implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-López, Jorge; Fernández-González, Angeles; Jimenez, Amalia

    2014-05-01

    Cobalt is a naturally occurring element widely distributed in water, sediments and air that is essential for living species, since it is a component of B12 vitamin and it is also a strategic and critical element used in a number of commercial, industrial and military applications. However, relatively high accumulations of cobalt in environment can be toxic for human and animal health. Cobalt usually occurs as Co2+ and Co3+ in aqueous solutions, where Co2+ is the most soluble and hence its mobility in water is higher. The study of the precipitation of cobalt carbonates is of great interest due to the abundance of carbonate minerals in contact with surface water and groundwater which can be polluted with Co2+. Previous works have demonstrated that the formation of Co-bearing calcium carbonates and Co-rich low crystallinity phases takes place at ambient conditions. With the aim of investigating the crystallization behavior of Co- bearing carbonates at ambient temperature, macroscopic batch-type experiments have been carried out by mixing aqueous solutions of CoCl2 (0.05M) and Na2CO3 (0.05M) during increasing reaction times (5 minutes and 1, 5, 24, 48, 96, 168, 720 and 1440 hours). The main goals of this work were (i) to analyse the physicochemical evolution of the system and (ii) to study the evolution of the crystallinity of the solid phases during aging. After a given reaction period, pH, alkalinity and dissolved Co2+ in the aqueous solutions were analysed. The evolution of the morphology and chemical composition of the solids with aging time was examined by SEM and TEM. The precipitates were also analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and the crystallinity degree was followed by the intensity and the full width at high medium (FWHM) of the main peaks. The results show that a low crystallinity phase was obtained at the very beginning of aging. This phase evolves progressively to form hydroxide carbonate cobalt (Co2CO3(OH)2) which crystallize with the spatial

  12. A preliminary evaluation of stream sediment sampling for the detection of cobalt mineralization in the Bou Azzer District, Morocco

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foose, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Analyses of 28 stream sediment samples collected in the Bou Azzer district, Morocco, show that this sampling technique may be useful in locating the cobalt arsenide mineralization that exists in this area. The absence of exceptionally high values of cobalt and arsenic, the nearly lognormal distribution of cobalt values, and the lack of correlation between the highest values of cobalt and arsenic were unanticipated results that do not support the use of this sampling technique. However, highest values of several metals, including cobalt, were associated with an identified area of cobalt mineralization, and high cobalt was present near a second area in which cobalt mineralization is suspected. Although probably mostly reflecting the geochemistry of unexposed ultramafic rocks, the association of these metals with mineralization shows that this type of sampling can independently locate areas of known or potential cobalt mineralization.

  13. Topochemical synthesis of cobalt oxide-based porous nanostructures for high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng Chao; Yin, Xiao Ming; Li, Qiu Hong; Chen, Li Bao; Wang, Tai Hong

    2011-02-01

    Two kinds of topochemical conversion routes from cobalt hydroxide precursors to cobalt oxide-based porous nanostructures are presented: pyrolysis in air and hydrothermal treatment by the Kirkendall diffusion effect. These cobalt hydroxide precursors were synthesized by a simple hydrothermal approach with sodium acetate as mineralizer at 200 °C. Detailed proof indicates that the process of cobalt hydroxide precursor growth is dominated by a nucleation, dissolution, renucleation, growth, and exfoliation mechanism. By the topochemical conversion processes several Co(3)O(4) nanostructures, such as cobalt oxide-coated cobalt hydroxide carbonate nanowires, cobalt oxide nanotubes, hollow cobalt oxide spheres, and porous cobalt oxide nanowires, have been synthesized. The obtained Co(3)O(4) nanostructures have also been evaluated as the anode materials in lithium-ion batteries. It was found that the as-prepared Co(3)O(4) nanostructures exhibited high reversible capacity and good cycle performance due to their porous structure and small size.

  14. Effects of cobalt on structure, microchemistry and properties of a wrought nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Tien, J. K.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of cobalt on the basic mechanical properties and microstructure of wrought nickel-base superalloys has been investigated experimentally by systematically replacing cobalt by nickel in Udimet 700 (17 wt% Co) commonly used in gas turbine (jet engine) applications. It is shown that the room temperature tensile yield strength and tensile strength only slightly decrease in fine-grained (disk) alloys and are basically unaffected in coarse-grained (blading) alloys as cobalt is removed. Creep and stress rupture resistances at 760 C are found to be unaffected by cobalt level in the blading alloys and decrease sharply only when the cobalt level is reduced below 8 vol% in the disk alloys. The effect of cobalt is explained in terms of gamma prime strengthening kinetics.

  15. The modeling of cobalt ions adsorption on molecular sieves and zeolite AW-300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ćiçek, Ekrem; Aras, Erdal; Dede, Bülent; Kılıç, Ahmet

    2013-12-01

    High concentration heavy metals in the environment can cause serious problem on human health. Cobalt is a heavy metal that has a large application in different fields. In the present work, we aimed to investigate the adsorption of the cobalt ions from aqueous solutions on molecular sieves and zeolite AW-300. Molecular sieves and zeolites were activated at 873 K for two hours before the adsorption experiment. UV-Visible spectrometer was used to measure concentrations of cobalt ions. All adsorption experiments were performed according to statistical designs for response surface methodological approach. A response surface analysis was guided to advance understand the interactions between adsorbent dose and initial concentration of cobalt ions. The removal efficiencies of cobalt ions on sorbents were characterized. The results indicated that molecular sieves and zeolite AW-300 can be used to remove cobalt ions from aqueous solutions.

  16. Copper catalysis for enhancement of cobalt leaching and acid utilization efficiency in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaxuan; Shen, Jingya; Huang, Liping; Wu, Dan

    2013-11-15

    Enhancement of both cobalt leaching from LiCoO2 and acid utilization efficiency (AUE) in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was successfully achieved by the addition of Cu(II). A dosage of 10mg/L Cu(II) improved both cobalt leaching up to 308% and AUE of 171% compared to the controls with no presence of Cu(II). The apparent activation energy of cobalt leaching catalyzed by Cu(II) in MFCs was only 11.8 kJ/mol. These results demonstrate cobalt leaching in MFCs using Cu(II) as a catalyst may be an effective strategy for cobalt recovery and recycle of spent Li-ion batteries, and the evidence of influence factors including solid/liquid ratio, temperature, and pH and solution conductivity can contribute to improving understanding of and optimizing cobalt leaching catalyzed by Cu(II) in MFCs.

  17. Studies on electroless cobalt coatings for microencapsulation of hydrogen storage alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Haran, B.S.; Popov, B.N.; White, R.E.

    1998-09-01

    LaNi{sub 4.27}Sn{sub 0.24}alloy was microencapsulated with cobalt by electroless deposition from an alkaline hypophosphite bath. Discharge curves of the encapsulated alloy indicate an additional contribution to the capacity arising from the cobalt on the surface. Studies on cobalt thin films reveal the presence of adsorbed hydrogen in cobalt. The amount of hydrogen adsorbed was observed to increase with time of cathodic polarization and to reach a maximum. Polarization techniques have been used to characterize the cobalt-plated alloy as a function of state of charge. The equilibrium potential of the microencapsulated electrode at low hydrogen concentration is determined by the potential of the cobalt coating on the surface.

  18. Copper catalysis for enhancement of cobalt leaching and acid utilization efficiency in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaxuan; Shen, Jingya; Huang, Liping; Wu, Dan

    2013-11-15

    Enhancement of both cobalt leaching from LiCoO2 and acid utilization efficiency (AUE) in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was successfully achieved by the addition of Cu(II). A dosage of 10mg/L Cu(II) improved both cobalt leaching up to 308% and AUE of 171% compared to the controls with no presence of Cu(II). The apparent activation energy of cobalt leaching catalyzed by Cu(II) in MFCs was only 11.8 kJ/mol. These results demonstrate cobalt leaching in MFCs using Cu(II) as a catalyst may be an effective strategy for cobalt recovery and recycle of spent Li-ion batteries, and the evidence of influence factors including solid/liquid ratio, temperature, and pH and solution conductivity can contribute to improving understanding of and optimizing cobalt leaching catalyzed by Cu(II) in MFCs. PMID:24007993

  19. Sorption of cobalt on activated carbons from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Paajanen, A.; Lehto, J.; Santapakka, T.; Morneau, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The efficiencies of 15 commercially available activated carbons were tested for the separation of trace cobalt ({sup 60}Co) in buffer solutions at pH 5.0, 6.7, and 9.1. On the basis of the results four carbon products, Diahope-006, Eurocarb TN5, Hydraffin DG47, and Norit ROW Supra, were selected for further study. These carbons represented varying (low, medium and high) cobalt removal efficiencies and were prepared of three typical raw materials: peat, coconut shell, or coal. Study was made of the effects on sorption efficiencies of factors of interest in metal/radionuclide-bearing waste effluents. These factors were pH, sodium ions, borate, and citrate.

  20. Cobalt-chromium-titanium alloy for removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Iwama, C Y; Preston, J D

    1997-01-01

    Pure elemental titanium was alloyed with cobalt and chromium in dilutions of 4%, 5%, and 6% to evaluate the suitability of the resulting alloy for removable partial denture frameworks. The physical properties of the Co-Cr-Ti alloy were compared to the properties of a commercial pure titanium and Vitallium. Clasp replicas were cast in Co-Cr-Ti and Vitallium and subjected to cyclic deflection. Representative specimens from the fatigue failure tests were then evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and analyzed for elemental content. The 5% titanium dilution of cobalt-chromium proved to have the best physical properties and was used for comparison with the pure titanium and Vitallium. The Co-Cr-5% Ti had significantly better physical properties than pure titanium and a greater flexure fatigue limit than the Vitallium alloy.

  1. COPPER AND COBALT RELATED HEMOGLOBIN PRODUCTION IN EXPERIMENTAL ANEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.; Whipple, G. H.

    1942-01-01

    Copper added to a standard diet often effects a moderate increase in hemoglobin production in anemia due to blood loss. The copper response is quite irregular in contrast to the iron response. In these dogs there is no lack of copper held in reserve stores (liver and spleen) so the reaction is not related to an actual deficiency of the element. An effect upon enzyme complexes related to globin and hemoglobin production is to be considered. Cobalt under similar conditions causes no stimulus to hemoglobin production, rather an inhibitory effect when more than minimal doses are given. The claim that cobalt causes a polycythemia in dogs receives no support from our experiments. PMID:19871199

  2. Cobalt-based nanocatalysts for green oxidation and hydrogenation processes.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesh, Rajenahally V; Stemmler, Tobias; Surkus, Annette-Enrica; Bauer, Matthias; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Radnik, Jörg; Junge, Kathrin; Junge, Henrik; Brückner, Angelika; Beller, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    This protocol describes the preparation of cobalt-based nanocatalysts and their applications in environmentally benign redox processes for fine chemical synthesis. The catalytically active material consists of nanoscale Co3O4 particles surrounded by nitrogen-doped graphene layers (NGrs), which have been prepared by pyrolysis of phenanthroline-ligated cobalt acetate on carbon. The resulting materials have been found to be excellent catalysts for the activation of both molecular oxygen and hydrogen; in all tested reactions, water was the only by-product. By applying these catalysts, green oxidations of alcohols and hydrogenation of nitroarenes for the synthesis of nitriles, esters and amines are demonstrated. The overall time required for catalyst preparation and for redox reactions is 35 h and 10-30 h, respectively.

  3. Hierarchical cobalt-based hydroxide microspheres for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Cui, Bai; Derr, Olivia; Yao, Zhibo; Qin, Zhaotong; Deng, Xiangyun; Li, Jianbao; Lin, Hong

    2014-03-21

    3D hierarchical cobalt hydroxide carbonate hydrate (Co(CO3)0.5(OH)·0.11H2O) has been synthesized featuring a hollow urchin-like structure by a one-step hydrothermal method at modest temperature on FTO glass substrates. The functionalities of precursor surfactants were isolated and analyzed. A plausible formation mechanism of the spherical urchin-like microclusters has been furnished through time-dependent investigations. Introduction of other transitional metal doping (Cu, Ni) would give rise to a substantial morphological change associated with a surface area drop. The directly grown cobalt-based hydroxide composite electrodes were found to be capable of catalyzing oxygen evolution reaction (OER) under both neutral pH and alkaline conditions. The favorable 3D dendritic morphology and porous structure provide large surface areas and possible defect sites that are likely responsible for their robust electrochemical activity.

  4. Radiation dose distributions due to sudden ejection of cobalt device.

    PubMed

    Abdelhady, Amr

    2016-09-01

    The evaluation of the radiation dose during accident in a nuclear reactor is of great concern from the viewpoint of safety. One of important accident must be analyzed and may be occurred in open pool type reactor is the rejection of cobalt device. The study is evaluating the dose rate levels resulting from upset withdrawal of co device especially the radiation dose received by the operator in the control room. Study of indirect radiation exposure to the environment due to skyshine effect is also taken into consideration in order to evaluate the radiation dose levels around the reactor during the ejection trip. Microshield, SHLDUTIL, and MCSky codes were used in this study to calculate the radiation dose profiles during cobalt device ejection trip inside and outside the reactor building.

  5. Radiation dose distributions due to sudden ejection of cobalt device.

    PubMed

    Abdelhady, Amr

    2016-09-01

    The evaluation of the radiation dose during accident in a nuclear reactor is of great concern from the viewpoint of safety. One of important accident must be analyzed and may be occurred in open pool type reactor is the rejection of cobalt device. The study is evaluating the dose rate levels resulting from upset withdrawal of co device especially the radiation dose received by the operator in the control room. Study of indirect radiation exposure to the environment due to skyshine effect is also taken into consideration in order to evaluate the radiation dose levels around the reactor during the ejection trip. Microshield, SHLDUTIL, and MCSky codes were used in this study to calculate the radiation dose profiles during cobalt device ejection trip inside and outside the reactor building. PMID:27423021

  6. Towards the elimination of excessive cobalt supplementation in racing horses: A pharmacological review.

    PubMed

    Kinobe, Robert T

    2016-02-01

    Cobalt is an essential trace element for many vital physiological functions. Cobalt is also known to stabilise hypoxia-inducible transcription factors leading to increased expression of erythropoietin which activates production of red blood cells. This implies that cobalt can be used to enhance aerobic performance in racing horses. If this becomes a pervasive practice, the welfare of racing animals would be at risk because cobalt is associated with cardiovascular, haematological, thyroid gland and reproductive toxicity as observed in laboratory animals and humans. It is expected that similar effects may manifest in horses but direct evidence on equine specific effects of cobalt and the corresponding exposure conditions leading to such effects is lacking. Available pharmacokinetic data demonstrates that intravenously administered cobalt has a long elimination half-life (42-156 h) and a large volume of distribution (0.94 L/kg) in a horse implying that repeated administration of cobalt would accumulate in tissues over time attaining equilibrium after ~9-33 days. Based on these pharmacokinetic data and surveys of horses post racing, threshold cobalt concentrations of 2-10 μg/L in plasma and 75-200 μg/L in urine have been recommended. However, there is no clearly defined, presumably normal cobalt supplementation regimen for horses and characterisation of potential adverse effects of any established threshold cobalt concentrations has not been done. This review outlines the strengths and limitations of the existing literature on the pharmacological effects of cobalt in horses with some recommendations on what gaps to bridge to enable the determination of optimal threshold cobalt concentrations in racing horses. PMID:26850547

  7. Fabrication of Discrete Nanosized Cobalt Particles Encapsulated Inside Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zoican Loebick, C.; Majewska, M; Ren, F; Haller, G; Pfefferle, L

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with encapsulated nanosized cobalt particles have been synthesized by a facile and scalable method. In this approach, SWNT were filled with a cobalt acetylacetonate solution in dichloromethane by ultrasonication. In a second step, exposure to hydrogen at different temperatures released discrete cobalt particles of controllable size inside the SWNT cavity. The SWNT-Co particles systems were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis.

  8. Physicochemical state of cobalt and chromium in natural waters of the arid zone of the USSR

    SciTech Connect

    Isamatov, E.E.; Kist, A.A.; Kulmatov, R.A.; Volkov, A.A.; Rakhmatov, U.

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss results of a comprehensive study of the environmental and chemical behavior of trace amounts of cobalt and chromium ions and compounds in waters of the Aral Sea and Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers in the Soviet Union. The methods used in the determinations include thermodynamic assessments of the ionic composition of the waters and a direct determination of the cobalt and chromium compounds using neutron activation analysis and isotopic and ion exchange analysis for chromium 51 and cobalt 60.

  9. Defect and transport properties of nonstoichiometric cobaltous sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Danielewski, M.; Mrowec, S.; Wojtowicz, A. )

    1991-04-01

    A very high defect concentration in a number of common-metal sulfides is considered to be the main reason for the rapid degradation of high-temperature alloys, including cobalt-base superalloys, in sulfur-containing atmospheres. Deviations from stoichiometry and chemical diffusion in cobaltous sulfide, Co{sub 1{minus}y}S, have been studied as a function of temperature (923-1,073 K) and sulfur activity (1-10{sup 3} Pa) using a thermogravimetric technique. It has been shown that in agreement with Libowitz's model, the unusual dependence of nonstoichiometry in Co{sub 1{minus}y}S on equilibrium sulfur pressure and temperature may be interpreted in terms of repulsive interaction of cation vacancies in this compound. The chemical diffusion coefficient has been found to be essentially pressure-independent and can be described as a function of temperature by the equation: {tilde D} = 0.29 exp({minus}110 {plus minus} 8.4 kJ/mol)/RT. Recalculation of these results shows that the mobility of cation vacancies in cobaltous sulfide decreases with an increase in their concentrations, probably due to the site-blocking effect. The self-diffusion coefficient of cobalt in Co{sub 1{minus}y}S, calculated from defect-diffusion coefficients and nonstoichiometry data, has been found to be very weakly dependent on sulfur activity, and its pressure and temperature dependence can be described by the following empirical equation: D{sub Co} = 8.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} p{sub s{sub 2}}{sup 1/20} exp({minus}93.6 {plus minus} 7.5 kJ/mol)/RT.

  10. Protective Agent-Free Synthesis of Colloidal Cobalt Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Balela, M. D. L.; Lockman, Z.; Azizan, A.; Matsubara, E.; Amorsolo, A. V. Jr.

    2010-03-11

    Spherical colloidal cobalt (Co) nanoparticles of about 2-7 nm were synthesized by hydrazine reduction in ethylene glycol at 80 deg. C. The mean diameter of the Co nanoparticles was varied to some extent by changing the pH, temperature, Co(II) chloride hexahydrate concentration, and amount of hydrazine. The Co particle size was reduced by decreasing Co(II) chloride concentration and increasing amount of hydrazine.

  11. Polymer - supported cobalt (II) catalysts for the oxidation of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Błaz, Edyta; Pielichowski, Jan

    2006-01-31

    Polymer-supported heterogeneous catalysts in a form of complexes of 8-hydroxy- quinoline with cobalt acetate were synthesized. Conjugated polymers - polyaniline (PANI), poly-o-toluidine (POT), poly-o-anisidine (POA) - were used as supports. Oxidation reactions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were carried out in the presence of molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure and epoxides or ketones were obtained as the main products with high selectivity.

  12. Certain physical properties of cobalt and nickel borides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostetskiy, I. I.; Lvov, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity, the thermal conductivity, and the thermal emf of cobalt and nickel borides were studied. In the case of the nickel borides the magnetic susceptibility and the Hall coefficient were determined at room temperature. The results are discussed with allowance for the current carrier concentration, the effect of various mechanisms of current-carrier scattering and the location of the Fermi level in relation to the 3d band.

  13. Cobalt(III) porphyrin catalyzed aza-Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Ryota; Kurahashi, Takuya; Matsubara, Seijiro

    2012-09-21

    An efficient protocol for the aza-Diels-Alder reaction of electron-deficient 1,3-dienes with unactivated imines in the presence of a cationic cobalt(III) porphyrin complex was developed. The transformation proceeded smoothly to afford the desired piperidine scaffold within 2 h at ambient temperature. Highly chemoselective cycloaddition of imines with dienes in the presence of a variety of carbonyl compounds was also demonstrated.

  14. Lattice strain induced magnetism in substituted nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajnish; Kar, Manoranjan

    2016-10-01

    Strontium (Sr) substituted cobalt ferrite i.e. Co1-xSrxFe2O4 (x=0.00, 0.01, 0.015, 0.02, 0.05, 0.1) have been synthesized by the citric acid modified sol-gel method. Crystal structure and phase purity have been studied by the X-ray powder diffraction technique. The Rietveld refinement of XRD pattern using the space group Fd 3 bar m shows monotonically increasing of lattice parameter with the increase in Sr concentration. Magnetic hysteresis loops measurement has been carried out at room temperature using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) over a field range of ±1.5 T. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant were calculated by employing the Law of Approach (LA) to the saturation. It is observed that magnetocrystalline anisotropy has anomaly for x=0.01 (Co0.99Sr0.01Fe2O4) sample. Strain mediated modification of magnetic properties in Sr substituted cobalt ferrite has been observed. The saturation magnetization for doping concentration i.e. x=0.01 abruptly increase while for x>0.01 decreases with the increase in Sr concentration. A correlation between lattice strain and magnetic behavior in non-magnetic Sr- substituted nano-crystalline cobalt ferrite has been reported.

  15. Cobalt Nanocrystals as Starting Materials for Shape Modificationand Assembly Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Erdonmez, Can Kerem

    2005-01-01

    Surfactant-coated cobalt nanocrystals can be prepared with areasonable degree of control over particle size and shape using athermolytic route. The small crystallite size, enhanced reactivity andtunable interparticle interactions enable use of this material asstarting material for demonstration of achievement of novel structuresusing extremely simple solution-based approaches. In particular,formation of hollow cobalt sulfide nanocrystals upon chemicalmodification and emergence of long-range orientational order upondrying-mediated assembly of cobalt nanocrystals is reportedhere.Colloidal preparation of Co nanocrystals has been well-studied.Here, we emphasize general principles and crystallographic/morphologicalcharacterization of disk-shaped hcp-Co nanocrystals. Use of surfactantmolecules enables achievement of multiple morphologies in one syntheticsystem.Formation of hollow structures upon in-solution sulfidation of Conanocrystals is presented and discussed. A Kirkendall-type effect,involving dominant outward mass transport during formation of the ionicshell material explains the results naturally. It is expected that thisphenomenon will generalize extensively to formation of hollow structuresof an enormous variety of compositions. Detailed study of particlemorphology as a function of reaction conditions suggest phenomena likelyto be generally relevant to use of this approach. A short report ofcrystallographic co-alignment into vortex-like structures is alsoprovided. Our current best picture of this process involves an interplayof packing and magnetic interactions between facetedparticles.

  16. Formation of Cobalt Silicide Films by Ion Beam Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; McCready, David E.; Wang, Chong M.; Young, James S.; Mckinley, Mathew I.; Whitlow, Harry J.; Razpet, Alenka; Possnert, Göran; Zhang, Tonghe; Wu, Yuguang

    2006-01-01

    Thin films of cobalt silicide are widely used as metallization in very large-scale integrated electronic circuits. In this study, Co ions were deposited on Si (111) wafers by a high beam current filter metal vacuum arc deposition (FMEVAD) system. Surface silicide films were formed after annealing from 500 to 700 C for 30 minutes. Cobalt depth profiles and contaminations were determined using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and time-of-flight energy elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF-E ERDA). The polycrystalline cobalt silicide phases formed were characterized by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD). The surface topography development and interfaces have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that a thin CoSi2 surface layer with both a smooth surface topography and sharp interface can be achieved by annealing at 700 C. The CoSi phase and O contamination were observed in the samples that were annealed at lower temperatures.

  17. Cobalt carbide nanoprisms for direct production of lower olefins from syngas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Liangshu; Yu, Fei; An, Yunlei; Zhao, Yonghui; Sun, Yuhan; Li, Zhengjia; Lin, Tiejun; Lin, Yanjun; Qi, Xingzhen; Dai, Yuanyuan; Gu, Lin; Hu, Jinsong; Jin, Shifeng; Shen, Qun; Wang, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Lower olefins—generally referring to ethylene, propylene and butylene—are basic carbon-based building blocks that are widely used in the chemical industry, and are traditionally produced through thermal or catalytic cracking of a range of hydrocarbon feedstocks, such as naphtha, gas oil, condensates and light alkanes. With the rapid depletion of the limited petroleum reserves that serve as the source of these hydrocarbons, there is an urgent need for processes that can produce lower olefins from alternative feedstocks. The ‘Fischer–Tropsch to olefins’ (FTO) process has long offered a way of producing lower olefins directly from syngas—a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide that is readily derived from coal, biomass and natural gas. But the hydrocarbons obtained with the FTO process typically follow the so-called Anderson–Schulz–Flory distribution, which is characterized by a maximum C2–C4 hydrocarbon fraction of about 56.7 per cent and an undesired methane fraction of about 29.2 per cent (refs 1, 10, 11, 12). Here we show that, under mild reaction conditions, cobalt carbide quadrangular nanoprisms catalyse the FTO conversion of syngas with high selectivity for the production of lower olefins (constituting around 60.8 per cent of the carbon products), while generating little methane (about 5.0 per cent), with the ratio of desired unsaturated hydrocarbons to less valuable saturated hydrocarbons amongst the C2–C4 products being as high as 30. Detailed catalyst characterization during the initial reaction stage and theoretical calculations indicate that preferentially exposed {101} and {020} facets play a pivotal role during syngas conversion, in that they favour olefin production and inhibit methane formation, and thereby render cobalt carbide nanoprisms a promising new catalyst system for directly converting syngas into lower olefins.

  18. Cobalt carbide nanoprisms for direct production of lower olefins from syngas.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Liangshu; Yu, Fei; An, Yunlei; Zhao, Yonghui; Sun, Yuhan; Li, Zhengjia; Lin, Tiejun; Lin, Yanjun; Qi, Xingzhen; Dai, Yuanyuan; Gu, Lin; Hu, Jinsong; Jin, Shifeng; Shen, Qun; Wang, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Lower olefins-generally referring to ethylene, propylene and butylene-are basic carbon-based building blocks that are widely used in the chemical industry, and are traditionally produced through thermal or catalytic cracking of a range of hydrocarbon feedstocks, such as naphtha, gas oil, condensates and light alkanes. With the rapid depletion of the limited petroleum reserves that serve as the source of these hydrocarbons, there is an urgent need for processes that can produce lower olefins from alternative feedstocks. The 'Fischer-Tropsch to olefins' (FTO) process has long offered a way of producing lower olefins directly from syngas-a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide that is readily derived from coal, biomass and natural gas. But the hydrocarbons obtained with the FTO process typically follow the so-called Anderson-Schulz-Flory distribution, which is characterized by a maximum C2-C4 hydrocarbon fraction of about 56.7 per cent and an undesired methane fraction of about 29.2 per cent (refs 1, 10, 11, 12). Here we show that, under mild reaction conditions, cobalt carbide quadrangular nanoprisms catalyse the FTO conversion of syngas with high selectivity for the production of lower olefins (constituting around 60.8 per cent of the carbon products), while generating little methane (about 5.0 per cent), with the ratio of desired unsaturated hydrocarbons to less valuable saturated hydrocarbons amongst the C2-C4 products being as high as 30. Detailed catalyst characterization during the initial reaction stage and theoretical calculations indicate that preferentially exposed {101} and {020} facets play a pivotal role during syngas conversion, in that they favour olefin production and inhibit methane formation, and thereby render cobalt carbide nanoprisms a promising new catalyst system for directly converting syngas into lower olefins.

  19. Cobalt on rhenium(0001) an example of thermally activated layer intermixing and surface alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parschau, M.; Christmann, K.

    1999-03-01

    The growth and morphology of cobalt thin films deposited onto a Re(0001) surface at 300, 400 and 550 K were followed in the coverage range 0 ML< Θ<6 ML by combined low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The interaction phenomena are complex and depend strongly on temperature. At 300 K, cobalt nucleates homogeneously on terraces and heterogeneously at steps forming dendritic islands. Larger cobalt coverages lead to incomplete layer growth. Interdiffusion and alloying play a minor role only at 300 K, but become dominant for T>400 K in that different (2×2) phases form within the first Re-Co bilayer, one within the rhenium substrate surface, the others within the cobalt islands. The (2×2) phases can be associated with Re/Co surface alloys of different stoichiometry, depending on cobalt coverage. As the cobalt coverages exceed two monolayers (ML), genuine but incomplete cobalt layers grow. Within the third and fourth cobalt layer, periodic triangular features with a lattice constant of ~28 Å appear in STM, followed by a Moiré pattern for Θ>4 ML. Both structures produce an incomplete (10×10) LEED pattern. After growth of the fifth or sixth layer the lattice misfit is overcome, and cobalt essentially grows layer-by-layer in a pseudo Frank-van der Merwe mechanism, the details being strongly temperature-dependent.

  20. Reversible deactivation radical polymerization mediated by cobalt complexes: recent progress and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chi-How; Yang, Tsung-Yao; Zhao, Yaguang; Fu, Xuefeng

    2014-11-21

    Mediation of reversible deactivation radical polymerization (RDRP) by cobalt(II) complexes (CMRP) is the most highly developed subcategory of organometallic mediated RDRP (OMRP). Attention was paid to CMRP for its unusual high efficiency observed for the control of acrylate and vinyl acetate polymerization that produced homo- and block copolymers with narrow molecular weight distribution and a predictable molecular weight. The reactions of organic radicals with cobalt(II) metallo-radicals and organo-cobalt(III) complexes have a central role in the pathways that mediate this type of reversible deactivation radical polymerization. The reversible deactivation pathway dominates the polymerization when cobalt(II) complexes can reversibly deactivate the radicals to form organo-cobalt(III) complexes. Degenerative transfer becomes the major pathway when the cobalt(II) species fully convert to organo-cobalt(III) complexes and the radicals in solution rapidly exchange with radicals in organo-cobalt(III) complexes. This review describes the polymerization behavior and control mechanisms used by cobalt complexes in the mediation of reversible deactivation radical polymerization. The emerging developments for CMRP in the aqueous phase and with photo-initiation are also described, followed by the challenges and future applications of this method.

  1. Porous cobalt spheres for high temperature gradient magnetically assisted fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.; Jovanovic, Goran N.; Wheeler, Richard R.; Sornchamni, Thana

    2003-02-20

    Porous metallic cobalt spheres have been prepared as high temperature capable media for employment in gradient magnetically assisted fluidization and filtration technologies. Cobalt impregnated alginate beads are first formed by extrusion of an aqueous suspension of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} into a Co(II) chloride solution. The organic polymer is thermally decomposed yielding cobalt oxide spheres, followed by reduction to the metallic state, and densification. Cobalt beads have been produced with porosities ranging between 10 and 50%, depending upon sintering conditions. The product media have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption porosimetry, and vibrating sample magnetometry.

  2. Evaluation of cobalt sources in Westinghouse-designed three- and four-loop plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, C.A.

    1982-10-01

    Sources of cobalt input in two typical Westinghouse-designed three- and four-loop plants are identified. Quantification of the sources was based on a detailed analysis of the construction materials. The best available information was used to establish the corrosion and wear release rates. This analysis concludes that approximately 70% of the cobalt input arises from corrosion release of Inconel steam generator tubing. Corrosion and wear of high-cobalt alloys account for about 25%. Recommendations are made concerning cobalt reduction options based on a cost-benefit analysis.

  3. Porous cobalt spheres for high temperature gradient magnetically assisted fluidized beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.; Jovanovic, Goran N.; Wheeler, Richard R Jr; Sornchamni, Thana

    2003-01-01

    Porous metallic cobalt spheres have been prepared as high temperature capable media for employment in gradient magnetically assisted fluidization and filtration technologies. Cobalt impregnated alginate beads are first formed by extrusion of an aqueous suspension of Co3O4 into a Co(II) chloride solution. The organic polymer is thermally decomposed yielding cobalt oxide spheres, followed by reduction to the metallic state, and densification. Cobalt beads have been produced with porosities ranging between 10 and 50%, depending upon sintering conditions. The product media have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption porosimetry, and vibrating sample magnetometry. c2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones. PMID:26074206

  5. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones.

  6. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-06-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones.

  7. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones. PMID:26074206

  8. Wear-resistant coatings for cobalt-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    2000-04-01

    High interfacial stresses and coating failure are expected when a hard coating protects a more-compliant substrate in applications involving high-stress wear contact. Assuming that small differences in stiffness (or modulus) between the coating and substrate are required for a wear-resistant coating in such applications, four approaches have been taken to develop such coatings for cobalt-base alloys. Hardness, scratch adhesion, and nano-indentation testing identified the most promising candidates for cobalt-base alloys: A thin coating with hard Cr{sub 2}N and less-stiff Cr-N(ss) layers; a thick, four-layered coating with a 4{mu}m inner layer of Cr-N(ss)/ 1 {mu}m layer of Cr{sub 2}N/4 {micro}m layer of Cr-N(ss)/1 {micro} outer layer of Cr{sub 2}N; a duplex approach of ion nitriding to harden the subsurface,followed by application of a dual-layered Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coating; and ion nitriding alone. The low scratch adhesion values and high modulus/hardness values indicate that ZrN, TiN, and plasma carburized coatings represent less beneficial approaches. Two different cobalt-base alloys were studied in this work: Haynes 25 and Stellite 3 (Stoody Deloro Stellite). Based on weight change, profilometry measurements, and metallographic and SEM examinations after four-ball wear testing, the thin Cr{sub 2}N/CrN(ss) coated coupons exhibited a significantly lower wear rate than the uncoated Haynes 25 coupons. Of greater importance, the thin Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coatings were adherent on the Stellite 3 intermediate balls and Haynes 25 cups, and prevented the wear of the cobalt-base substrate. based on these results, the thin Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coating was the best coating candidate, and this coating could result in a reduced wear rate and less cobalt wear debris. The ion nitrided coupons exhibited slightly higher wear than the thin Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coated coupons, while the wear of the thin duplex coated coupons was the highest. However, the nitride layer was adherent

  9. cis-2,5-Diaminobicyclo[2.2.2]octane, a New Chiral Scaffold for Asymmetric Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Subrata; White, James D

    2016-09-20

    Catalysis of widely used chemical transformations in which the goal is to obtain the product as a pure enantiomer has become a major preoccupation of synthetic organic chemistry over the past three decades. A large number of chiral entities has been deployed to this end, many with considerable success, but one of the simplest and most effective catalytic systems to have emerged from this effort is that based on a chiral diamine, specifically trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane. While there have been attempts to improve upon this scaffold in asymmetric synthesis, few have gained the recognition needed to take their place alongside this classic diamine. The challenge is to design a scaffold that retains the assets of trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane while enhancing its intrinsic chirality and maximizing the scope of its applications. It occurred to us that cis-2,5-diaminobicyclo[2.2.2]octane could be such a scaffold. Synthesis of this diamine in enantiopure form was completed from benzoic acid, and the (1R,2R,4R,5R) enantiomer was used in all subsequent experiments in this laboratory. Condensation of the diamine with various salicyl aldehydes generated imine derivatives which proved to be excellent "salen" ligands for encapsulation of transition and other metals. In total, 12 salen-metal complexes were prepared from this ligand, many of which were crystalline and three of which, along with the ligand itself, yielded to X-ray crystallography. An advantage of this ligand is that it can be tuned sterically or electronically to confer specific catalytic properties on the salen-metal complex, and this feature was used in several applications of our salen-metal complexes in asymmetric synthesis. Thus, replacement of one of the tert-butyl groups in each benzenoid ring of the salen ligand by a methoxy substituent enhanced the catalytic efficiency of a cobalt(II)-salen complex used in asymmetric cyclopropanation of 1,1-disubstituted alkenes; the catalyst was employed in an improved

  10. cis-2,5-Diaminobicyclo[2.2.2]octane, a New Chiral Scaffold for Asymmetric Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Subrata; White, James D

    2016-09-20

    Catalysis of widely used chemical transformations in which the goal is to obtain the product as a pure enantiomer has become a major preoccupation of synthetic organic chemistry over the past three decades. A large number of chiral entities has been deployed to this end, many with considerable success, but one of the simplest and most effective catalytic systems to have emerged from this effort is that based on a chiral diamine, specifically trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane. While there have been attempts to improve upon this scaffold in asymmetric synthesis, few have gained the recognition needed to take their place alongside this classic diamine. The challenge is to design a scaffold that retains the assets of trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane while enhancing its intrinsic chirality and maximizing the scope of its applications. It occurred to us that cis-2,5-diaminobicyclo[2.2.2]octane could be such a scaffold. Synthesis of this diamine in enantiopure form was completed from benzoic acid, and the (1R,2R,4R,5R) enantiomer was used in all subsequent experiments in this laboratory. Condensation of the diamine with various salicyl aldehydes generated imine derivatives which proved to be excellent "salen" ligands for encapsulation of transition and other metals. In total, 12 salen-metal complexes were prepared from this ligand, many of which were crystalline and three of which, along with the ligand itself, yielded to X-ray crystallography. An advantage of this ligand is that it can be tuned sterically or electronically to confer specific catalytic properties on the salen-metal complex, and this feature was used in several applications of our salen-metal complexes in asymmetric synthesis. Thus, replacement of one of the tert-butyl groups in each benzenoid ring of the salen ligand by a methoxy substituent enhanced the catalytic efficiency of a cobalt(II)-salen complex used in asymmetric cyclopropanation of 1,1-disubstituted alkenes; the catalyst was employed in an improved

  11. Mechanistic insights into the cobalt-mediated radical polymerization (CMRP) of vinyl acetate with cobalt(III) adducts as initiators.

    PubMed

    Debuigne, Antoine; Champouret, Yohan; Jérôme, Robert; Poli, Rinaldo; Detrembleur, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few years, cobalt-mediated radical polymerization (CMRP) has proved efficient in controlling the radical polymerization of very reactive monomers, such as vinyl acetate (VAc). However, the reason for this success and the intimate mechanism remained basically speculative. Herein, two mechanisms are shown to coexist: the reversible termination of the growing poly(vinyl acetate) chains by the Co(acac)2 complex (acac: acetylacetonato), and a degenerative chain-transfer process. The importance of one contribution over the other strongly depends on the polymerization conditions, including complexation of cobalt by ligands, such as water and pyridine. This significant progress in the CMRP mechanism relies on the isolation and characterization of the very first cobalt adducts formed in the polymerization medium and their use as CMRP initiators. The structure proposed for these adducts was supported by DFT calculations. Beyond the control of the VAc polymerization, which is the best ever achieved by CMRP, extension to other monomers and substantial progress in macromolecular engineering are now realistic forecasts.

  12. Unprecedented cobalt-catalyzed isomerization reactions to single skipped 2,4,7-trienes applied in the synthesis of urushiol.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anastasia; Hilt, Gerhard

    2014-09-01

    The cobalt-catalyzed isomerization of 1,3-dienes to 2Z,4E-dienes was realized for the very challenging substrates with an additional double bond in the side chain. An isomerization to the conjugated 3,5,7-triene derivative was not observed, which is in stark contrast to observations with many other isomerization catalysts. Accordingly, the synthesis of the natural product urushiol, which has a sensitive 2Z,4E,7Z-triene subunit in the side chain, was investigated. The O-protected urushiol derivative was generated selectively without isomerization to the conjugated 3,5,7-triene or Z/E-isomerization of the double bond at position 7.

  13. The reductive supercritical hydrothermal process, a novel synthesis method for cobalt nanoparticles: synthesis and investigation on the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Seong, Gimyeong; Adschiri, Tadafumi

    2014-07-28

    Highly crystalline cobalt nanoparticles with low surface oxidation were synthesized by the reductive supercritical hydrothermal process in the temperature range from 340 to 420 °C. Under these reaction conditions, hydrogen generated from formic acid decomposition is maximally soluble in water, enabling the effective reduction of cobalt ions and cobalt oxide. The reaction mechanism was investigated by kinetic analysis on the formation of cobalt nanoparticles. This analysis assumed the first order irreversible reaction and two different types of shrinking core models (chemical reaction and inter-diffusion dominated). According to the proposed reaction mechanism, cobalt monoxide is probably formed at the early reaction stage, where insufficient H2 is available, or under high temperature conditions. Moreover, cobalt monoxide influences the entire reaction rate. Thus, suppressing the formation and growth of cobalt monoxide is of primary importance in the optimal synthesis of cobalt nanoparticles by the reductive supercritical hydrothermal process.

  14. Effect of cobalt supplementation and fractionation on the biological response in the biomethanization of Olive Mill Solid Waste.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Ibieta, F; Serrano, A; Jeison, D; Borja, R; Fermoso, F G

    2016-07-01

    Due to the low trace metals concentration in the Olive Mill Solid Waste (OMSW), a proposed strategy to improve its biomethanization is the supplementation of key metals to enhance the microorganism activity. Among essential trace metals, cobalt has been reported to have a crucial role in anaerobic degradation. This study evaluates the effect of cobalt supplementation to OMSW, focusing on the connection between fractionation of cobalt in the system and the biological response. The highest biological responses was found in a range from 0.018 to 0.035mg/L of dissolved cobalt (0.24-0.65mg total cobalt/L), reaching improvements up to 23% and 30% in the methane production rate and the methane yield coefficient, respectively. It was found that the dissolved cobalt fraction is more accurately related with the biological response than the total cobalt. The total cobalt is distorted by the contribution of dissolved and non-dissolved inert fractions. PMID:26998798

  15. Effect of cobalt supplementation and fractionation on the biological response in the biomethanization of Olive Mill Solid Waste.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Ibieta, F; Serrano, A; Jeison, D; Borja, R; Fermoso, F G

    2016-07-01

    Due to the low trace metals concentration in the Olive Mill Solid Waste (OMSW), a proposed strategy to improve its biomethanization is the supplementation of key metals to enhance the microorganism activity. Among essential trace metals, cobalt has been reported to have a crucial role in anaerobic degradation. This study evaluates the effect of cobalt supplementation to OMSW, focusing on the connection between fractionation of cobalt in the system and the biological response. The highest biological responses was found in a range from 0.018 to 0.035mg/L of dissolved cobalt (0.24-0.65mg total cobalt/L), reaching improvements up to 23% and 30% in the methane production rate and the methane yield coefficient, respectively. It was found that the dissolved cobalt fraction is more accurately related with the biological response than the total cobalt. The total cobalt is distorted by the contribution of dissolved and non-dissolved inert fractions.

  16. An hydrothermal experimental study of the cobalt-cobalt oxide redox buffer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemke, K.H.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Bischoff, J.L.; Bird, D.K.

    2008-01-01

    Equilibrium aqueous hydrogen concentration and corresponding energies of reaction, ??Grxno(T, P), for the reaction Co(s) + H2O(l) = CoO(s) + H2(aq) have been determined at temperatures between 256 and 355 ??C and at 400 bar. Steady-state concentrations of hydrogen were approached in experiments under conditions of both H2 excess and deficiency containing the solids Co, CoO and liquid water. All experiments were carried out in flexible gold and titanium reactors with the capability of on-line fluid sampling. Measured equilibrium molal concentrations of H2(aq) at 256, 274, 300, 324 and 355 ??C are 0.81(?? 0.01) ?? 10- 3 1.11(?? 0.01) ?? 10- 3, 1.92(?? 0.01) ?? 10- 3, 3.71(?? 0.06) ?? 10- 3, 7.54(?? 0.12) ?? 10- 3, respectively, and corresponding values of ??Grxno(T, P) in units kJ ?? mol- 1 are 31.4(?? 0.1), 31.0(?? 0.1), 29.8(?? 0.1), 27.7(?? 0.5) and 25.5(?? 0.9), respectively. Using published heat capacity data for Co(s) and CoO(s) and - 79.6 J ?? mol- 1 ?? K- 1 for the entropy of formation of CoO we calculated for this study a value for ??GCoO,Tr,Pro = - 214.5(?? 0.9) kJ ?? mol- 1 and ??HCoO,Tr,Pro = - 238.3(?? 0.9) kJ ?? mol- 1 at 25 ??C and 1 bar. The value of ??HCoO,Tr,Pro determined in this study compares well with the reported calorimetric value of - 238.9(?? 1.2) kJ ?? mol- 1 [Boyle, B.J., King, E.G., Conway, K.C., 1954. Heats of formation of nickel and cobalt oxides (NiO and CoO) by combustion calorimetry. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 76, 3835-3837]. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Photocatalytic synthesis of allylic trifluoromethyl substituted styrene derivatives in batch and flow.

    PubMed

    Kreis, Lukas M; Krautwald, Simon; Pfeiffer, Nicole; Martin, Rainer E; Carreira, Erick M

    2013-04-01

    A cobalt-catalyzed photochemical synthesis of allylic trifluoromethanes from styrene derivatives using 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl iodide is described. The method complements existing approaches, providing an alternative bond construction strategy to access these compounds. The process may be conducted in continuous mode in a novel photochemical flow reactor, resulting in a notable productivity increase. PMID:23517196

  18. Metallic phases of cobalt-based catalysts in ethanol steam reforming: The effect of cerium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Sean S.-Y.; Kim, Do Heui; Ha, Su Y.

    2009-02-28

    The catalytic activity of cobalt in the production of hydrogen via ethanol steam reforming has been investigated in its relation to the crystalline structure of metallic cobalt. At a reaction temperature of 350 8C, the specific hydrogen production rates show that hexagonal close-packed (hcp) cobalt possesses higher activity than face-centered cubic (fcc) cobalt. However, at typical reaction temperatures (400– 500 8C) for ethanol steam reforming, hcp cobalt is transformed to less active fcc cobalt, as confirmed by in situ X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The addition of CeO2 promoter (10 wt.%) stabilizes the hcp cobalt structure at reforming temperatures up to 600 8C. Moreover, during the pre-reduction process, CeO2 promoter prevents sintering during the transformation of Co3O4 to hcp cobalt. Both reforming experiments and in situ diffuse-reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) showed that the surface reactions were modified by CeO2 promoter on 10% Ce–Co (hcp) to give a lower CO selectivity and a higher H2 yield as compared with the unpromoted hcp Co.

  19. 76 FR 47996 - Cobalt Lithium Manganese Nickel Oxide; Significant New Use Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 9 and 721 RIN 2070-AB27 Cobalt Lithium Manganese Nickel Oxide; Significant New Use... chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide (CAS No. 182442-95-1), which was the... nickel oxide (PMN P-04-269; CAS No. 182442-95-1). This action requires persons who intend to...

  20. 77 FR 3750 - Notice of Intent To Grant a Partially Exclusive License; Cobalt Technologies, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant a Partially Exclusive License; Cobalt Technologies, Inc... notice of its intent to grant to Cobalt Technologies, Inc., a revocable, nonassignable,...

  1. Chitosan-modified cobalt oxide nanoparticles stimulate TNF-α-mediated apoptosis in human leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sourav; Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Kar Mahapatra, Santanu; Tripathy, Satyajit; Ghosh, Totan; Das, Balaram; Das, Debasis; Pramanik, Panchanan; Roy, Somenath

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop chitosan-based delivery of cobalt oxide nanoparticles to human leukemic cells and investigate their specific induction of apoptosis. The physicochemical properties of the chitosan-coated cobalt oxide nanoparticles were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The solubility of chitosan-coated cobalt oxide nanoparticles was higher at acidic pH, which helps to release more cobalt ions into the medium. Chitosan-coated cobalt oxide nanoparticles showed good compatibility with normal cells. However, our results showed that exposure of leukemic cells (Jurkat cells) to chitosan-coated cobalt oxide nanoparticles caused an increase in reactive oxygen species generation that was abolished by pretreatment of cells with the reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine. The apoptosis of Jurkat cells was confirmed by flow-cytometric analysis. Induction of TNF-α secretion was observed from stimulation of Jurkat cells with chitosan-coated cobalt oxide nanoparticles. We also tested the role of TNF-α in the induction of Jurkat cell death in the presence of TNF-α and caspase inhibitors. Treatment of leukemic cells with a blocker had a greater effect on cancer cell viability. From our findings, oxidative stress and caspase activation are involved in cancer cell death induced by chitosan-coated cobalt oxide nanoparticles.

  2. A Rapid Synthetic Method for the Preparation of Two Tris-Cobalt(III) Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Donald C.; Rillema, D. Paul

    1989-01-01

    Reports a method of preparation for tris(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III) and tris(2,2'-bipyridine)cobalt(III) that will shorten the preparation time by approximately 3 hours. Notes the time for synthesis and isolation of compound one was 1 hour (yield 38 percent) while compound two took 50 minutes (yield 71%). (MVL)

  3. The impact of rare earth cobalt permanent magnets on electromechanical device design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R. L.; Studer, P. A.

    1979-01-01

    Specific motor designs which employ rare earth cobalt magnets are discussed with special emphasis on their unique properties and magnetic field geometry. In addition to performance improvements and power savings, high reliability devices are attainable. Both the mechanism and systems engineering should be aware of the new performance levels which are currently becoming available as a result of the rare earth cobalt magnets.

  4. Cobalt-Catalyzed Alkyne Hydrosilylation and Sequential Vinylsilane Hydroboration with Markovnikov Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ziqing; Yang, Ji; Huang, Zheng

    2016-08-26

    A pyridinebis(oxazoline) cobalt complex is a very efficient precatalyst for the hydrosilylation of terminal alkynes with Ph2 SiH2 , providing α-vinylsilanes with high (Markovnikov) regioselectivity and broad functional-group tolerance. The vinylsilane products can be further converted into geminal borosilanes through Markovnikov hydroboration with pinacolborane and a bis(imino)pyridine cobalt catalyst. PMID:27479796

  5. Understanding the roles of the strategic element cobalt in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The United States imports over 90% of its cobalt, chromium, columbium, and tantalum, all key elements in high temperature nickel base superalloys for aircraft gas turbine disks and airfoils. Research progress in understanding the roles of cobalt and some possible substitutes effects on microstructure, mechanical properties, and environmental resistance of turbine alloys is discussed.

  6. Allergy to nickel or cobalt: tolerance to nickel and cobalt samples in man and in the guinea pig allergic or sensitized to these metals.

    PubMed

    Cavelier, C; Foussereau, J; Gille, P; Zissu, D

    1989-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in animals and humans sensitive to nickel or cobalt, the tolerance to manufactured metal samples of nickel and cobalt of a defined metallographic structure, plated or not with a layer of chrome or copper/chrome of a determined thickness. Under the defined experimental conditions, a guinea pig sensitized to one metal (nickel or cobalt) was intolerant to both metals (nickel and cobalt). A plating of chrome or copper/chrome did not act as a protection. In the human, it was not the same: the tolerance to metal samples was determined by the specific sensitivity. A plating of chrome or copper/chrome did not act as protection.

  7. Cobalt(III)Hexaammine-Dependent Photocrosslinks in the Hairpin Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer-Chant, Christina M.; Heckman, Joyce E.; Lambert, Dominic; Burke, John M.

    2014-01-01

    We have utilized the hairpin ribozyme, an RNA enzyme whose structure has been solved by high-resolution methods, to develop a new tool for mapping nucleobase-stacking interactions and potential metal-binding sites in RNA molecules. This tool involves the photoactivation of a specifically bound cobalt(III)hexaammine molecule at wavelengths corresponding to excitation of the metal ion complex only; no base excitation is involved. The photoexcitation initiates a process which strongly promotes the formation of a novel covalent bond or crosslink between one base (termed the “first base”), which is close in space to the excited cobalt(III)hexaammine complex, and another base upon which the first base is closely stacked. These crosslinked species can be isolated and sequenced; their activities can be analyzed to ensure that the crosslinked structures represent an active conformation of the molecule. We have shown that, as in electron transfer in DNA, several criteria must be met to result in the successful formation of these crosslinks. These include the appropriate oxidation potential of the first donor base, the stacking and close interaction of the two donor bases involved in the crosslink, and the binding of a specific cobalt(III)hexaammine molecule to the first donor base. Additionally, we have determined that this crosslinking is pH-sensitive, although the cause of this sensitivity remains unknown. This tool has proven useful in the past for the analysis of the hairpin ribozyme folded structure, and has been applied to identifying potential metal-binding sites on the hairpin and extended hammerhead ribozymes. PMID:24295878

  8. The effect of cobalt substitution on magnetic hardening of magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozaffari, M.; Hadadian, Y.; Aftabi, A.; Oveisy Moakhar, M.

    2014-03-01

    In this work cobalt-substituted magnetite (CoxFe1-xFe2O4, x=0, 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75) nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation method and their structural and magnetic properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction was carried out and the results show that all of the samples have single phase spinel structure. Microstructure of the samples was studied using a field emission scanning electron microscope and the results show that particle sizes of the prepared nanoparticles were uniform and in the 50-55 nm range. Room temperature magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were measured by an alternating gradient force magnetometer and the results revealed that substituting cobalt for iron in magnetite structure, changes the magnetite from a soft magnetic material to a hard one. So that coercivity changes from 0 (a superparamagnetic state) to 337 Oe (a hard magnetic material), which is a remarkable change. Curie temperatures of the samples were determined by recording their susceptibility-temperature (χ-T) curves and the results show that by increasing cobalt content, Curie temperature of the samples also increases. Also χ-T curves of the samples were recorded from above Curie temperature to room temperature (first cooling), while the curves in the second heating and second cooling have the same behaviour as the first cooling curve. The results depict that all samples have different behaviour in the first cooling and in the first heating processes. This shows remarkable changes of the cation distribution in the course of first heating.

  9. Cobalt-based magnetic nanocomposites: fabrication, fundamentals and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Tianlong; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2011-10-01

    Recently, magnetic nanocomposites (MNC) have aroused significant scientific and technological interests because their properties strongly rely on the interplay between those of the constituent components. Here, using three types of cobalt-based MNCs, we demonstrate how their physical behaviour, including thermal, electrical and magnetic, can be strongly affected by such interplays. First, using Aucore-Coshell nanoparticles (NPs), we demonstrate that their thermal stabilities are critically dependent on various boundaries and they structurally transform from the core-shells to the peanut structures via several intermediate states by a series of energy minimizations including the grain boundaries, Co/Au interface and strain. Second, the microstructures of the MNC are co-determined by the properties of the individual components, which in turn will strongly affect their overall properties. We illustrate this by a careful study of the electron transport in cobalt/poly (3-hexylthiophene, 2, 5-diyl) (P3HT) hybrid thin films, and show that they satisfy a fluctuation-induced tunnelling model that is strongly depended on their microstructures; moreover, a magnetoresistance in these thin films was also observed. Finally, the magnetic properties and phase stability of MNCs can also be strongly altered as a result of this interplay. Three phase transformations are observed in cobalt ferrofluids for T ~ 10-300 K, namely second order magnetic phase transformations (blocked-unblocked transition) at the blocking temperature of the magnetic NP, first order magnetic and structural phase transformations at the solvent melting temperature, TM, and second order premelting transformation at TPM < T < TM. These transformations show specific magnetic signatures in field-cool and zero-field-cool magnetization measurements and are qualitatively in agreement with predictions using M-spectrum theory.

  10. Preparation and characterization of cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect

    Saebel, Crystal E.; Carbone, Ryan; Dabous, John R.; Lo, Suet Y.; Siemann, Stefan

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor (CoLF) is highly active. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoLF can be prepared by bio-assimilation and direct exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lethal factor binds cobalt tightly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic spectrum of CoLF reveals penta-coordination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of CoLF with thioglycolic acid follows a 2-step mechanism. -- Abstract: Anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase involved in the cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases near their N-termini. The current report concerns the preparation of cobalt-substituted LF (CoLF) and its characterization by electronic spectroscopy. Two strategies to produce CoLF were explored, including (i) a bio-assimilation approach involving the cultivation of LF-expressing Bacillus megaterium cells in the presence of CoCl{sub 2}, and (ii) direct exchange by treatment of zinc-LF with CoCl{sub 2}. Independent of the method employed, the protein was found to contain one Co{sup 2+} per LF molecule, and was shown to be twice as active as its native zinc counterpart. The electronic spectrum of CoLF suggests the Co{sup 2+} ion to be five-coordinate, an observation similar to that reported for other Co{sup 2+}-substituted gluzincins, but distinct from that documented for the crystal structure of native LF. Furthermore, spectroscopic studies following the exposure of CoLF to thioglycolic acid (TGA) revealed a sequential mechanism of metal removal from LF, which likely involves the formation of an enzyme: Co{sup 2+}:TGA ternary complex prior to demetallation of the active site. CoLF reported herein constitutes the first spectroscopic probe of LF's active site, which may be utilized in future studies to gain further insight into the enzyme's mechanism and inhibitor interactions.

  11. Treatment of spent electropolishing solution for removal of cobalt-60

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.; Youngblood, E.L.; Macon, R.J.

    1996-02-01

    The Irradiated Materials Examination and Testing (IMET) Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory electropolishes various types of irradiated metal specimens prior to examination of metallurgical and mechanical properties. The standard electropolishing solution used at IMET for most specimens consists of a 7:1 methanol/sulfuric acid mixture, with smaller amounts of a 3:1 methanol/nitric acid solution and a 10:6:1 methanol/2-butoxyethanol/perchloric acid solution also being used. Cobalt-60 is the primary source of gamma radiation in the spent solutions, with lesser amounts from manganese-54 and iron-59. A treatment method is needed to remove most of the Co-60 from these solutions to allow the waste solutions to be contact-handled for disposal. A wide range of adsorbents was tested for removing cobalt from the electropolishing solutions. No adsorbent was found that would treat full strength solution, but a complexing ion exchange resin (Chelex 100, BioRad Labs, or Amberlite IRC-718, Rohm and Haas Co.) will remove cobalt and other heavy metals from partially neutralized (pH=3) solution. A 5 wt% sodium hydroxide solution is used for pH adjustment, since more concentrated caustic caused sodium sulfate precipitates to form. Lab-scale column tests have shown that about 10 bed volumes of methanol/sulfuric acid solution, 30 bed volumes of methanol/nitric acid solution or 15 bed volumes of methanol/2-butoxyethanol/perchloric acid solution can be treated prior to initial Co-60 breakthrough.

  12. Development of high efficiency 100% aqueous cobalt electrolyte dye-sensitised solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Hanna; Jiang, Roger; Ye, Sofie; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit

    2016-03-28

    In this study we report the application of three cobalt redox shuttles in 100% aqueous electrolyte dye-sensitised solar cells (DSCs). By using chloride as a counter-ion for cobalt bipyridine, cobalt phenanthroline and cobalt bipyridine pyrazole, the redox shuttles were made water soluble; no surfactant or further treatment was necessary. A simple system of merely the redox shuttles and 1-methylbenzimidazole (MBI) in water as an electrolyte in combination with an organic dye and a mesoporous PEDOT counter electrode was optimised. The optimisation resulted in an average efficiency of 5.5% (record efficiency of 5.7%) at 1 sun. The results of this study present promising routes for further improvements of aqueous cobalt electrolyte DSCs.

  13. Tailoring the oxidation state of cobalt through halide functionality in sol-gel silica

    PubMed Central

    Olguin, Gianni; Yacou, Christelle; Smart, Simon; Diniz da Costa, João C.

    2013-01-01

    The functionality or oxidation state of cobalt within a silica matrix can be tailored through the use of cationic surfactants and their halide counter ions during the sol-gel synthesis. Simply by adding surfactant we could significantly increase the amount of cobalt existing as Co3O4 within the silica from 44% to 77%, without varying the cobalt precursor concentration. However, once the surfactant to cobalt ratio exceeded 1, further addition resulted in an inhibitory mechanism whereby the altered pyrolysis of the surfactant decreased Co3O4 production. These findings have significant implications for the production of cobalt/silica composites where maximizing the functional Co3O4 phase remains the goal for a broad range of catalytic, sensing and materials applications. PMID:24022785

  14. Comparison of the dietary cobalt intake in three different Australian diets.

    PubMed

    Hokin, Bevan; Adams, Michelle; Ashton, John; Louie, Honway

    2004-01-01

    Differences in the dietary intake of cobalt were assessed for vegans, lacto-ovo-vegetarian and non-vegetarian Australians using food intake logs, and daily or average trend recall over three months. A significant decrease in cobalt intake was observed for the lacto-ovo-vegetarian population compared with the intake in vegans and omnivores. There is no RDI for cobalt, however, the cobalt intake of Australians was similar to that reported in other countries. Microflora above the terminal ileum have been shown to produce significant amounts of biologically available vitamin B12. This study was unable to demonstrate a correlation between elemental cobalt intake and serum vitamin B12 concentrations in humans, as has been shown in vitro.

  15. Structural, morphological, and electrical characteristics of the electrodeposited cobalt oxide electrode for supercapacitor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kandalkar, Sunil G.; Lee, Hae-Min; Chae, Heeyeop; Kim, Chang-Koo

    2011-01-15

    Cobalt oxide (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) thin films were prepared through electrodeposition on copper substrates using an ammonia-complexed cobalt chloride solution. The structural and morphological properties of the film were studied using an X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscopy, and the results showed that the electrodeposited cobalt oxide film had a nanocrystalline and porous structure. The electrochemical behavior of the electrodeposited cobalt oxide electrode was evaluated in a KOH solution using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The electrodeposited cobalt oxide electrode exhibited a specific capacitance of 235 F/g at a scan rate of 20 mV/s. The specific energy and the specific power of the electrode were 4.0 Wh/kg and 1.33 kW/kg, respectively.

  16. In situ formation of cobalt oxide nanocubanes as efficient oxygen evolution catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, Gregory S; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jian; Yonemoto, Bryan T; Zhou, Xinggui; Zhu, Kake; Jiao, Feng

    2015-04-01

    Oxygen evolution from water poses a significant challenge in solar fuel production because it requires an efficient catalyst to bridge the one-electron photon capture process with the four-electron oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Here, a new strategy was developed to synthesize nonsupported ultrasmall cobalt oxide nanocubanes through an in situ phase transformation mechanism using a layered Co(OH)(OCH3) precursor. Under sonication, the precursor was exfoliated and transformed into cobalt oxide nanocubanes in the presence of NaHCO3-Na2SiF6 buffer solution. The resulting cobalt catalyst with an average particle size less than 2 nm exhibited a turnover frequency of 0.023 per second per cobalt in photocatalytic water oxidation. X-ray absorption results suggested a unique nanocubane structure, where 13 cobalt atoms fully coordinated with oxygen in an octahedral arrangement to form 8 Co4O4 cubanes, which may be responsible for the exceptionally high OER activity.

  17. Effects of cobalt on the microstructure of Udimet 700. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Cobalt, a critical and "strategic" alloying element in many superalloys, was systematically substituted by nickel in experimental alloys Udimet 700 containing 0.1, 4.3, 8.6, 12.8 and the standard 17.0 wt.% cobalt. Electrolytic and chemical extraction techniques, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and optical microscopy were used for the microstructural studies. The total weight fraction of gamma' was not significantly affected by the cobalt content, although a difference in the size and quantities of the primary and secondary gamma' phases was apparent. The lattice parameters of the gamma' were found to increase with increasing cobalt content while the lattice mismatch between the gamma matrix and gamma' phases decreased. Other significant effects of cobalt on the weight fraction, distribution and formation of the carbide and boride phases as well as the relative stability of the experimental alloys during long-time aging are also discussed.

  18. Effective Pincer Cobalt Precatalysts for Lewis Acid Assisted CO2 Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Spentzos, Ariana Z; Barnes, Charles L; Bernskoetter, Wesley H

    2016-08-15

    The pincer ligand MeN[CH2CH2(P(i)Pr2)]2 ((iPr)PNP) was employed to support a series of cobalt(I) complexes, which were crystallographically characterized. A cobalt monochloride species, ((iPr)PNP)CoCl, served as a precursor for the preparation of several cobalt precatalysts for CO2 hydrogenation, including a cationic dicarbonyl cobalt complex, [((iPr)PNP)Co(CO)2](+). When paired with the Lewis acid lithium triflate, [((iPr)PNP)Co(CO)2](+) affords turnover numbers near 30 000 (at 1000 psi, 45 °C) for CO2-to-formate hydrogenation, which is a notable increase in activity from previously reported homogeneous cobalt catalysts. Though mechanistic information regarding the function of the precatalysts remains limited, multiple experiments suggest the active species is a molecular, homogeneous [((iPr)PNP)Co] complex. PMID:27454669

  19. Mechanical evaluation of long titanium alloy clip--comparison of cobalt alloy clip.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Ito, Kiyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro; Shibuya, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Long titanium aneurysm clips have recently been released. In the present study, comparative study of long titanium and cobalt alloy clips was performed. Two kinds of Sugita long clips (straight clips of 25- and 35-mm blade length) made of titanium and cobalt alloys were tested by measuring the closing force, the anti-scissoring torque, and the maximum opening width. There were some differences between the two materials. In the 25-mm blade length clip, closing force and maximum opening width of titanium alloy clip were greater than those of cobalt alloy clip. By contrast, the anti-scissoring torque of 35-mm blade length titanium clip was stronger than that of the cobalt. The long titanium clips would have equivalent endurance to long cobalt clip and are safe for clinical use.

  20. Facile fabrication of cobalt oxalate nanostructures with superior specific capacitance and super-long cycling stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guanhua; Si, Conghui; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Yang, Wanfeng; Dong, Chaoqun; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2016-04-01

    Transition metal oxalate materials have shown huge competitive advantages for applications in supercapacitors. Herein, nanostructured cobalt oxalate supported on cobalt foils has been facilely fabricated by anodization, and could directly serve as additive/binder-free electrodes for supercapacitors. The as-prepared cobalt oxalate electrodes present superior specific capacitance of 1269 F g-1 at the current density of 6 A g-1 in the galvanostatic charge/discharge test. Moreover, the retained capacitance is as high as 87.2% as the current density increases from 6 A g-1 to 30 A g-1. More importantly, the specific capacitance of cobalt oxalate retains 91.9% even after super-long cycling of 100,000 cycles. In addition, an asymmetric supercapacitor assembled with cobalt oxalate (positive electrode) and activated carbon (negative electrode) demonstrates excellent capacitive performance with high energy density and power density.

  1. Consequence of cobalt on structural, optical and dielectric properties in ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, Amir; Ahmed, S.; Shah, N. A.; Anis-ur-Rehman, M.; Khan, E. U.; Basit, M.

    2015-09-01

    The critical role of cobalt dopant in ZnO nanostructures with different cobalt concentrations has been explored on the basis of structural, optical and dielectric mechanisms. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that the Co+2 ions replace Zn+2 ions in the ZnO matrix, producing lattice strain. Diffused Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS) shows a red shift in optical energy band gap with increase in cobalt content, along with the presence of transitions in high spin states due to tetrahedrally coordinated cobalt ions. The dielectric characterization explains the disparity in dynamic dielectric parameters like capacitance, dielectric constant, tangent loss, AC conductivity and impedance as a function of frequency. Capacitance and both static and dynamic dielectric constants found to be decreasing with cobalt addition. The anomaly in these pronounced parameters can address the key problems of the material at higher frequencies device operation.

  2. Microstructure and characterization of a novel cobalt coating prepared by cathode plasma electrolytic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Cheng; He, Yedong

    2015-10-01

    A novel cobalt coating was prepared by cathode plasma electrolytic deposition (CPED). The kinetics of the electrode process in cathode plasma electrolytic deposition was studied. The composition and microstructure of the deposited coatings were investigated by SEM, EDS, XRD and TEM. The novel cobalt coatings were dense and uniform, showing a typically molten morphology, and were deposited with a rather fast rate. Different from the coatings prepared by conventional electrodeposition or chemical plating, pure cobalt coatings with face center cubic (fcc) structure were obtained by CPED. The deposited coatings were nanocrystalline structure with an average grain size of 40-50 nm, exhibited high hardness, excellent adhesion with the stainless steels, and superior wear resistance. The properties of the novel cobalt coatings prepared by CPED have been improved significantly, as compared with that prepared by conventional methods. It reveals that cathode plasma electrolytic deposition is an effective way to prepare novel cobalt coatings with high quality.

  3. Methylene bridge regulated geometrical preferences of ligands in cobalt(III) coordination chemistry and phenoxazinone synthase mimicking activity.

    PubMed

    Panja, Anangamohan; Shyamal, Milan; Saha, Amrita; Mandal, Tarun Kanti

    2014-04-14

    Two new azide bound cobalt(III) complexes, [Co(L(1))(N3)3] (fac-1) and [Co(L(2))(N3)3] (mer-2), where L(1) is bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine and L(2) is (2-pyridylmethyl)(2-pyridylethyl)amine, derived from tridentate reduced Schiff-base ligands have been reported. Interestingly, a methylene bridge regulated preferential coordination mode of ligands is noticed in their crystal structures: it is found in a facial arrangement in fac-1 and has a meridional disposition in mer-2. Both complexes show phenoxazinone synthase-like activity and the role of the structural factor on the catalytic activity is also explored. Moreover, the easily reducible cobalt(III) center in mer-2 favors the oxidation of o-aminophenol. The ESI-MS positive spectra together with UV-vis spectroscopy clearly suggest the formation of a catalyst-substrate adduct by substitution of the coordinated azide ions in the catalytic cycle.

  4. Quenching of singlet oxygen (1deltag) by cobalt complexes with four nitrogen atoms in the equatorial plane.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, P; Vidóczy, T

    2000-11-01

    The quenching of singlet oxygen (1deltag) by cobalt(III)-bis-1,2-benzosemiquinone-diiminato complexes (general structure LCo(111)(BQDI)2ClO4) has been studied in different solvents by measuring the singlet oxygen phosphorescence decay in time-resolved experiments. The axial ligand (Ph3As, Ph3Sb, N-methyl-imidazole, pyrrolidine) has practically no influence on the quenching; however, the chlorinated benzosemiquinone-diiminato complex has a markedly lower quenching rate constant. The solvent effects can be fully explained by the difference in viscosity, which supports the assumption that the quenching is diffusion controlled. The reactive radius of the encounter pair has been estimated to be 0.3 nm, shorter than the radius of the complex itself, which points to the fact that singlet oxygen must approach the central cobalt atom at the (partially) open axial position. The significance of these results regarding the quenching of singlet oxygen by vitamin B12 derivatives is discussed. PMID:11233642

  5. Mapping the magnetic and crystal structure in cobalt nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu-Valle, Jesus; Betancourt, Israel; Sanchez, John E.; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Mendoza-Santoyo, Fernando; Ponce, Arturo; Maqableh, Mazin M.; Stadler, Bethanie J. H.

    2015-07-14

    Using off-axis electron holography under Lorentz microscopy conditions to experimentally determine the magnetization distribution in individual cobalt (Co) nanowires, and scanning precession-electron diffraction to obtain their crystalline orientation phase map, allowed us to directly visualize with high accuracy the effect of crystallographic texture on the magnetization of nanowires. The influence of grain boundaries and disorientations on the magnetic structure is correlated on the basis of micromagnetic analysis in order to establish the detailed relationship between magnetic and crystalline structure. This approach demonstrates the applicability of the method employed and provides further understanding on the effect of crystalline structure on magnetic properties at the nanometric scale.

  6. Unusual dielectric response in cobalt doped reduced graphene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Akhtar, Abu Jahid; Gupta, Abhisek; Kumar Shaw, Bikash; Saha, Shyamal K.

    2013-12-09

    Intensive research on cobalt doped reduced graphene oxide (Co-RGO) to investigate the modification in graphene magnetism and spin polarization due to presence of transition metal atom has been carried out, however, its dielectric spectroscopy, particularly, how capacitance changes with impurity levels in graphene is relatively unexplored. In the present work, dielectric spectroscopy along with magneto-dielectric effect are investigated in Co-RGO. Contrary to other materials, here permittivity increases abruptly with frequency in the low frequency region and continues to increase till 10{sup 7} Hz. This unusual behavior is explained on the basis of trap induced capacitance created due to impurity levels.

  7. Gas atomization of cobalt ferrite-phosphate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; O'Handley, R. C.; Kalonji, G.

    1989-01-01

    XRD, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and EDXS have been used to characterize a rapidly-solidified (Co,Fe)3O4 spinel generated in a cobalt-iron-phosphate glass matrix by gas atomization of melts. Of the two compositions tested, that containing 20 mol pct P2O5 exhibited randomly-oriented ferrite crystallization whose growth appears to have been diffusion-controlled. Unlike the ferrite, in which the iron has both tetrahedral and octahedral coordination, the iron in the glassy matrix was primarily of distorted-octahedral coordination. Calculations indicate that the cooling rates obtained with oxide melts vary strongly with droplet size, but less strongly with melt temperature.

  8. Preparation of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles within a biopolymer template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garza, Marco; González, Virgilio; Torres-Castro, Alejandro; Hinojosa, Moisés; Ortíz, Ubaldo

    2008-03-01

    Using an in-situ co-precipitation reaction from solid dissolutions of stoichiometric amounts of Fe (III) and Co (II) inorganic salts, it was prepared highly loaded nanocomposites (as high as 75% w/w) of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles within a chitosan matrix, with particle size of about 7 nm, narrow particle size distribution and superparamagnetic character. Nanocomposite samples were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), UV-vis spectrometry and magnetic measurements by SQUID, using magnetization-field dependent, M(H), and magnetization-temperature dependent, M(T), studies.

  9. Hydrogenation of carboxylic acids with a homogeneous cobalt catalyst.

    PubMed

    Korstanje, Ties J; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar; Elsevier, Cornelis J; de Bruin, Bas

    2015-10-16

    The reduction of esters and carboxylic acids to alcohols is a highly relevant conversion for the pharmaceutical and fine-chemical industries and for biomass conversion. It is commonly performed using stoichiometric reagents, and the catalytic hydrogenation of the acids previously required precious metals. Here we report the homogeneously catalyzed hydrogenation of carboxylic acids to alcohols using earth-abundant cobalt. This system, which pairs Co(BF4)2·6H2O with a tridentate phosphine ligand, can reduce a wide range of esters and carboxylic acids under relatively mild conditions (100°C, 80 bar H2) and reaches turnover numbers of up to 8000. PMID:26472903

  10. Diffusion of Chromium in Alpha Cobalt-Chromium Solid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeton, John W

    1951-01-01

    Diffusion of chromium in cobalt-chromium solid solutions was investigated in the range 0 to 40 atomic percent at temperatures of 1360 degrees, 1300 degrees, 1150 degrees, and 10000 degrees c. The diffusion coefficients were found to be relatively constant within the composition range covered by each specimen. The activation heat of diffusion was determined to be 63,000 calories per mole. This value agrees closely with the value of 63,400 calories per mole calculated by means of the Dushman-Langmuir equation.

  11. Hydrocarboxylation of olefins in presence of carbonyl forms of cobalt

    SciTech Connect

    Gvozdovskii, G.N.; Gavrilova, V.M.; Rybakov, V.A.; Blanshtein, I.B.

    1987-09-10

    The increasing shortage of plant and animal fats for the production of the higher carboxylic acids has necessitated the development of methods for the production of these acids from petroleum. This paper studies the hydrocarboxylation of petroleum olefins in the presence of cobalt carbonyls and the effect of three promoters--pyridine, acetone, and cyclohexanone--on the hydrolysis rate and catalytic behavior of the carbonyls and the subsequent rate of hydrocarboxylation of the olefines. Ethylene is used as the sample olefin. The role of water in the reactions is also assessed.

  12. Ferric and cobaltous hydroacid complexes for forward osmosis (FO) processes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qingchun; Fu, Fengjiang; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2014-07-01

    Cupric and ferric hydroacid complexes have proven their advantages as draw solutes in forward osmosis in terms of high water fluxes, negligible reverse solute fluxes and easy recovery (Ge and Chung, 2013. Hydroacid complexes: A new class of draw solutes to promote forward osmosis (FO) processes. Chemical Communications 49, 8471-8473.). In this study, cobaltous hydroacid complexes were explored as draw solutes and compared with the ferric hydroacid complex to study the factors influencing their FO performance. The solutions of the cobaltous complexes produce high osmotic pressures due to the presence of abundant hydrophilic groups. These solutes are able to dissociate and form a multi-charged anion and Na(+) cations in water. In addition, these complexes have expanded structures which lead to negligible reverse solute fluxes and provide relatively easy approaches in regeneration. These characteristics make the newly synthesized cobaltous complexes appropriate as draw solutes. The FO performance of the cobaltous and ferric-citric acid (Fe-CA) complexes were evaluated respectively through cellulose acetate membranes, thin-film composite membranes fabricated on polyethersulfone supports (referred as TFC-PES), and polybenzimidazole and PES dual-layer (referred as PBI/PES) hollow fiber membranes. Under the conditions of DI water as the feed and facing the support layer of TFC-PES FO membranes (PRO mode), draw solutions at 2.0 M produced relatively high water fluxes of 39-48 LMH (L m(-2) hr(-1)) with negligible reverse solute fluxes. A water flux of 17.4 LMH was achieved when model seawater of 3.5 wt.% NaCl replaced DI water as the feed and 2.0 M Fe-CA as the draw solution under the same conditions. The performance of these hydroacid complexes surpasses those of the synthetic draw solutes developed in recent years. This observation, along with the relatively easy regeneration, makes these complexes very promising as a novel class of draw solutes.

  13. Hydrogenation of carboxylic acids with a homogeneous cobalt catalyst.

    PubMed

    Korstanje, Ties J; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar; Elsevier, Cornelis J; de Bruin, Bas

    2015-10-16

    The reduction of esters and carboxylic acids to alcohols is a highly relevant conversion for the pharmaceutical and fine-chemical industries and for biomass conversion. It is commonly performed using stoichiometric reagents, and the catalytic hydrogenation of the acids previously required precious metals. Here we report the homogeneously catalyzed hydrogenation of carboxylic acids to alcohols using earth-abundant cobalt. This system, which pairs Co(BF4)2·6H2O with a tridentate phosphine ligand, can reduce a wide range of esters and carboxylic acids under relatively mild conditions (100°C, 80 bar H2) and reaches turnover numbers of up to 8000.

  14. Size dependence of magnetorheological properties of cobalt ferrite ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhika, B.; Sahoo, Rasmita; Srinath, S.

    2015-06-01

    Cobalt Ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation method at reaction temperatures of 40°C and 80°C. X-Ray diffraction studies confirm cubic phase formation. The average crystallite sizes were found to be ˜30nm and ˜48nm for 40°C sample and 80°C sample respectively. Magnetic properties measured using vibrating sample magnetometer show higher coercivety and magnetization for sample prepared at 80°C. Magnetorheological properties of CoFe2O4 ferrofluids were measured and studied.

  15. Size dependence of magnetorheological properties of cobalt ferrite ferrofluid

    SciTech Connect

    Radhika, B.; Sahoo, Rasmita; Srinath, S.

    2015-06-24

    Cobalt Ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation method at reaction temperatures of 40°C and 80°C. X-Ray diffraction studies confirm cubic phase formation. The average crystallite sizes were found to be ∼30nm and ∼48nm for 40°C sample and 80°C sample respectively. Magnetic properties measured using vibrating sample magnetometer show higher coercivety and magnetization for sample prepared at 80°C. Magnetorheological properties of CoFe2O4 ferrofluids were measured and studied.

  16. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON AND COBALT FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Burtron H. Davis

    1999-01-30

    The effects of copper on Fischer-Tropsch activity, selectivity and water-gas shift activity were studied over a wide range of syngas conversion. Three catalyst compositions were prepared for this study: (a) 100Fe/4.6Si/1.4K, (b) 100Fe/4.6Si/0.10Cu/1.4K and (c) 100Fe/4.6Si/2.0Cu/1.4K. The results are reported in Task 2. The literature review for cobalt catalysts is approximately 90% complete. Due to the size of the document, it has been submitted as a separate report labeled Task 6.

  17. Ferric and cobaltous hydroacid complexes for forward osmosis (FO) processes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qingchun; Fu, Fengjiang; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2014-07-01

    Cupric and ferric hydroacid complexes have proven their advantages as draw solutes in forward osmosis in terms of high water fluxes, negligible reverse solute fluxes and easy recovery (Ge and Chung, 2013. Hydroacid complexes: A new class of draw solutes to promote forward osmosis (FO) processes. Chemical Communications 49, 8471-8473.). In this study, cobaltous hydroacid complexes were explored as draw solutes and compared with the ferric hydroacid complex to study the factors influencing their FO performance. The solutions of the cobaltous complexes produce high osmotic pressures due to the presence of abundant hydrophilic groups. These solutes are able to dissociate and form a multi-charged anion and Na(+) cations in water. In addition, these complexes have expanded structures which lead to negligible reverse solute fluxes and provide relatively easy approaches in regeneration. These characteristics make the newly synthesized cobaltous complexes appropriate as draw solutes. The FO performance of the cobaltous and ferric-citric acid (Fe-CA) complexes were evaluated respectively through cellulose acetate membranes, thin-film composite membranes fabricated on polyethersulfone supports (referred as TFC-PES), and polybenzimidazole and PES dual-layer (referred as PBI/PES) hollow fiber membranes. Under the conditions of DI water as the feed and facing the support layer of TFC-PES FO membranes (PRO mode), draw solutions at 2.0 M produced relatively high water fluxes of 39-48 LMH (L m(-2) hr(-1)) with negligible reverse solute fluxes. A water flux of 17.4 LMH was achieved when model seawater of 3.5 wt.% NaCl replaced DI water as the feed and 2.0 M Fe-CA as the draw solution under the same conditions. The performance of these hydroacid complexes surpasses those of the synthetic draw solutes developed in recent years. This observation, along with the relatively easy regeneration, makes these complexes very promising as a novel class of draw solutes. PMID:24768702

  18. Hot corrosion of S-57, 1 cobalt-base alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    A cobalt base alloy, S-57, was hot corrosion tested in Mach 0.3 burner rig combustion gases at maximum alloy temperatures of 900 and 1000 C. Various salt concentrations were injected into the burner: 0.5, 2, 5, and 10 ppm synthetic sea salt and 4 ppm sodium sulfate (Na2SO4). S-57 underwent accelerated corrosion only under the most severe test conditions, for example, 4 ppm Na2SO4 at 900 C. The process of the accelerated corrosion was primarily sulfidation.

  19. Mapping the magnetic and crystal structure in cobalt nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Cantu-Valle, Jesus; Betancourt, Israel; Sanchez, John E.; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Maqableh, Mazin M.; Mendoza-Santoyo, Fernando; Stadler, Bethanie J. H.; Ponce, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Using off-axis electron holography under Lorentz microscopy conditions to experimentally determine the magnetization distribution in individual cobalt (Co) nanowires, and scanning precession-electron diffraction to obtain their crystalline orientation phase map, allowed us to directly visualize with high accuracy the effect of crystallographic texture on the magnetization of nanowires. The influence of grain boundaries and disorientations on the magnetic structure is correlated on the basis of micromagnetic analysis in order to establish the detailed relationship between magnetic and crystalline structure. This approach demonstrates the applicability of the method employed and provides further understanding on the effect of crystalline structure on magnetic properties at the nanometric scale. PMID:26221057

  20. Pharmacokinetics and selected pharmacodynamics of cobalt following a single intravenous administration to horses.

    PubMed

    Knych, H K; Arthur, R M; Mitchell, M M; Holser, I; Poppenga, R; Smith, L L; Helm, M N; Sams, R A; Gaskill, C L

    2015-07-01

    Cobalt has been used by human athletes due to its purported performance-enhancing effects. It has been suggested that cobalt administration results in enhanced erythropoiesis, secondary to increased circulating erythropoietin (EPO) concentrations leading to improvements in athletic performance. Anecdotal reports of illicit administration of cobalt to horses for its suspected performance enhancing effects have led us to investigate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic effects of this compound when administered in horses, so as to better regulate its use. In the current study, 18 horses were administered a single intravenous dose of cobalt chloride or cobalt gluconate and serum and urine samples collected for up to 10 days post administration. Cobalt concentrations were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and pharmacokinetic parameters determined. Additional blood samples were collected for measurement of equine EPO concentrations as well as to assess any effects on red blood cell parameters. Horses were observed for adverse effects and heart rate monitored for the first 4 h post administration. Cobalt was characterized by a large volume of distribution (0.939 L/kg) and a prolonged gamma half-life (156.4 h). Cobalt serum concentrations were still above baseline values at 10 days post administration. A single administration of cobalt had no effect on EPO concentrations, red blood cell parameters or heart rate in any of the horses studied and no adverse effects were noted. Based on the prolonged gamma half-life and prolonged residence time, regulators should be able to detect administration of a single dose of cobalt to horses.