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Sample records for cobalt salen derivative

  1. Concerning the deactivation of cobalt(III)-based porphyrin and salen catalysts in epoxide/CO2 copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Salmeia, Khalifah A; Vagin, Sergei I; Rieger, Bernhard

    2015-03-09

    Functioning as active catalysts for propylene oxide (PO) and carbon dioxide copolymerization, cobalt(III)-based salen and porphyrin complexes have drawn great attention owing to their readily modifiable nature and promising catalytic behavior, such as high selectivity for the copolymer formation and good regioselectivity with respect to the polymer microstructure. Both cobalt(III)-salen and porphyrin catalysts have been found to undergo reduction reactions to their corresponding catalytically inactive cobalt(II) species in the presence of propylene oxide, as evidenced by UV/Vis and NMR spectroscopies and X-ray crystallography (for cobalt(II)-salen). Further investigations on a TPPCoCl (TPP = tetraphenylporphyrin) and NaOMe system reveal that such a catalyst reduction is attributed to the presence of alkoxide anions. Kinetic studies of the redox reaction of TPPCoCl with NaOMe suggests a pseudo-first order in cobalt(III)-porphyrin. The addition of a co-catalyst, namely bis(triphenylphosphine)iminium chloride (PPNCl), into the reaction system of cobalt(III)-salen/porphyrin and PO shows no direct stabilizing effect. However, the results of PO/CO2 copolymerization by cobalt(III)-salen/porphyrin with PPNCl suggest a suppressed catalyst reduction. This phenomenon is explained by a rapid transformation of the alkoxide into the carbonate chain end in the course of the polymer formation, greatly shortening the lifetime of the autoreducible PO-ring-opening intermediates, cobalt(III)-salen/porphyrin alkoxides.

  2. Improved catalytic activity of homochiral dimeric cobalt-salen complex in hydrolytic kinetic resolution of terminal racemic epoxides.

    PubMed

    Kureshy, Rukhsana I; Singh, Surendra; Khan, Noor-Ul H; Abdi, Sayed H R; Ahmad, Irshad; Bhatt, Achyut; Jasra, Raksh V

    2005-11-01

    Enantiomerically pure epoxides (99%, ee) and diols (98%, ee) from racemic epichlorohydrin, 1,2-epoxypropane, 1,2-epoxyhexane, 1,2-epoxyoctane, and 1,2-epoxydodecane were obtained in 2-12 h by hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) using the recyclable dimeric homochiral Co(III)-salen complex 1' (0.2 mol %) derived from 5,5-(2',2'-dimethylpropane)-di-[(R,R)-{N-(3-tert-butylsalicylidine)-N'-(3',5'-di-tert-butylsalicylidine)}-1,2-cyclohexanediamine] with cobalt(II) acetate. Unlike its monomeric version, the catalyst could be recycled several times without loss in performance. The use of BF(4) as counter ion in HKR reactions was also investigated.

  3. Unique ligand-radical character of an activated cobalt salen catalyst that is generated by aerobic oxidation of a cobalt(II) salen complex.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Takuya; Fujii, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    The Co(salen)(X) complex, where salen is chiral N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexanediamine and X is an external axial ligand, has been widely utilized as a versatile catalyst. The Co(salen)(X) complex is a stable solid that has been conventionally described as a Co(III)(salen)(X) complex. Recent theoretical calculations raised a new proposal that the Co(salen)(H2O)(SbF6) complex contains appreciable contribution from a Co(II)(salen(•+)) electronic structure (Kochem, A.; Kanso, H.; Baptiste, B.; Arora, H.; Philouze, C.; Jarjayes, O.; Vezin, H.; Luneau, D.; Orio, M.; Thomas, F. Inorg. Chem. 2012, 51, 10557-10571), while other theoretical calculations for Co(salen)(Cl) indicated a triplet Co(III)(salen) electronic structure (Kemper, S.; Hrobárik, P.; Kaupp, M.; Schlörer, N. E. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 4172-4173). However, there have been no experimental data to evaluate these theoretical proposals. We herein report key experimental data on the electronic structure of the Co(salen)(X) complex (X = CF3SO3(-), SbF6(-), and p-MeC6H4SO3(-)). The X-ray crystallography shows that Co(salen)(OTf) has a square-planar N2O2 equatorial coordination sphere with OTf as an elongated external axial ligand. Magnetic susceptibility data indicate that Co(salen)(OTf) complexes belong to the S = 1 spin system. (1)H NMR measurements provide convincing evidence for the Co(II)(salen(•+))(X) character, which is estimated to be about 40% in addition to 60% Co(III)(salen)(X) character. The CH2Cl2 solution of Co(salen)(X) shows an intense near-IR absorption, which is assigned as overlapped transitions from a ligand-to-metal charge transfer in Co(III)(salen)(X) and a ligand-to-ligand charge transfer in Co(II)(salen(•+))(X). The present experimental study establishes that the electronic structure of Co(salen)(X) contains both Co(II)(salen(•+))(X) and Co(III)(salen)(X) character.

  4. X-Ray crystal structures of five-coordinate (salen)MnN3 derivatives and their binding abilities towards epoxides: chemistry relevant to the epoxide-CO2 copolymerization process.

    PubMed

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Frantz, Eric B

    2008-10-07

    The synthesis of several (salen)MnN3 complexes in good yields and purities were achieved by the reaction of manganese(III) acetate and H2salen, followed by metathesis of the remaining acetate ligand with an aqueous solution of NaN3. The X-ray structures of two derivatives, where salen=N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-ethylenediamine and N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexenediamine respectively, were determined. The complexes were shown to be monomeric 5-coordinate derivatives displaying a distorted square pyramidal geometry, and to be d4 high-spin derivatives by solution magnetic moment measurements using the Evans method. Binding studies of the (salen)MnN3 derivatives with added azide ions or cyclohexene oxide showed these complexes to have modest affinities for binding a sixth ligand. These observations are used to rationalize the low activity exhibited by manganese(III) complexes relative to their chromium(III) and cobalt(III) analogs for serving as catalysts for the copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides.

  5. Ring-opening of unsymmetrical 1,2-dioxines using cobalt(II) salen complexes.

    PubMed

    Greatrex, Ben W; Taylor, Dennis K

    2005-01-21

    The regioselectivity of the metal-catalyzed ring opening of unsymmetrical 1,2-dioxines to cis-gamma-hydroxyenones was investigated using two different Co(II) salen complexes. Regioselectivity was determined by direct examination of the enone ratios and by derivitization with a stabilized phosphorus ylide. The steric influence of the substituents on the 1,2-dioxine was the primary influence on regioselectivity. Temperature played little role; however, solvent and selection of Co(II) complex could be used to mildly influence the outcome of the rearrangement for selected substrates. The origins of the selectivity for the reaction are discussed.

  6. [Co(salen)] derived Co/Co3O4 nanoparticle@carbon matrix as high-performance electrode for energy storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duraisamy, E.; Gurunathan, P.; Das, Himadri T.; Ramesha, K.; Elumalai, P.

    2017-03-01

    Cobalt/cobalt oxide nanoparticle-embedded in a carbon matrix was synthesized by one spot pyrolysis of cobalt salen complex [Co(salen)] at 800 °C in an argon atmosphere. The X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the presence of Co and Co3O4 in the carbon matrix. The SEM and TEM observations showed the homogeneous distribution of the Co/Co3O4 grains on the carbon matrix. Cyclic voltammograms and galvanostatic charge-discharge studies done on the CR2032 coin cell confirmed that the Co/Co3O4@carbon matrix was electrochemically active. A stable specific capacity as high as 1000 mA h g-1 has been observed over 50 charge-discharge cycles at C/5 rate. It is believed that the carbon matrix acted both as a spacer to accommodate volume changes during Li intercalation-deintercalation process and also as conductive network leading to the excellent electrochemical performance of the Co/Co3O4@carbon matrix. Further, supercapacitor studies revealed that a specific capacitance of 615 F g-1 at 1 A g-1 has been exhibited by the Co/Co3O4@carbon matrix electrode in 1 M KOH with high Coulombic efficiency (92%) as well as excellent cycling stability for 5000 cycles.

  7. The preparation and use of metal salen complexes derived from cyclobutane diamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Smita

    The helix is an important chiral motif in nature, there is increasing development in field of helical transition metal complexes and related supramolecular structures. Hence, the goals of this work are to apply the principles of helicity in order to produce metal complexes with predictable molecular shapes and to study their properties as asymmetric catalysts. Computational studies suggest that the (1R,2 R)-cyclobutyldiamine unit can produce highly twisted salen complexes with a large energy barrier between the M and P helical forms. To test this prediction, the tartrate salt of (1R,2R)-cyclobutyldiamine was synthesized and condensed with a series of saliclaldehydes to produce novel salen ligands. The salicylaldehydes chosen have extended phenanthryl or benz[a]anthryl sidearms to encourage formation of helical coordination complexes. These ligands were metallated with zinc, iron and manganese salts to produce salen metal complexes which were characterized by NMR analysis, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and IR spectroscopy. A second ligand type, neutral bis(pyridine-imine) has also been synthesized from (1R,2R)-cyclobutyldiamine and quinolylaldehydes. The synthesis of bis(pyridine-imine) ligands was conducted using greener method, solvent assisted grinding. These ligands, in-situ with nickel metal salts, showed good catalytic activity for asymmetric Diels-Alder reactions. The third ligand type studied was chiral acid-functionalized Schiff-base ligands. These were synthesized by the condensation of 3-formyl-5-methyl salicylic acid and (1R,2R)-cyclobutyldiamine. With this type of ligand, there is possibility of producing both mono and dinuclear metal complexes. In our studies, we were only able to synthesize mononuclear complexs. These were tested as catalysts for asymmetric direct Mannich-type reaction, but were found to be ineffective.

  8. Self-assembly approach toward chiral bimetallic catalysts: bis-urea-functionalized (salen)cobalt complexes for the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of epoxides.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongwoo; Lang, Kai; Abboud, Khalil A; Hong, Sukwon

    2011-02-11

    A series of novel bis-urea-functionalized (salen)Co complexes has been developed. The complexes were designed to form self-assembled structures in solution through intermolecular urea-urea hydrogen-bonding interactions. These bis-urea (salen)Co catalysts resulted in rate acceleration (up to 13 times) in the hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of rac-epichlorohydrin in THF by facilitating cooperative activation, compared to the monomeric catalyst. In addition, one of the bis-urea (salen)Co(III) catalyst efficiently resolves various terminal epoxides even under solvent-free conditions by requiring much shorter reaction time at low catalyst loading (0.03-0.05 mol %). A series of kinetic/mechanistic studies demonstrated that the self-association of two (salen)Co units through urea-urea hydrogen bonds was responsible for the observed rate acceleration. The self-assembly study with the bis-urea (salen)Co by FTIR spectroscopy and with the corresponding (salen)Ni complex by (1)H NMR spectroscopy showed that intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions exist between the bis-urea scaffolds in THF. This result demonstrates that self-assembly approach by using non-covalent interactions can be an alternative and useful strategy toward the efficient HKR catalysis.

  9. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the chemicals, CoC4H6O4, CoCl2, and CoSO4.They have been used in...

  10. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the chemicals, CoC4H6O4, CoCl2, and CoSO4.They have been used in...

  11. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the chemicals, CoC4H6O4, CoCl2, and CoSO4.They have been used in...

  12. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120... Generally Prohibited From Direct Addition or Use as Human Food § 189.120 Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. (a) Cobaltous salts are the chemicals, CoC4H6O4, CoCl2, and CoSO4.They have been used in...

  13. Cobalt

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.J.

    1994-12-01

    Traditionally, cobalt has been well-known for its chemical uses, including pigments used in ceramic glazes that create the popular cobalt blue color derived from cobalt aluminate. Because of its diverse physical properties, the element is linked to many other applications, including superalloys, permanent magnets, and chemical catalysts. Cobalt 60, a radioisotope of cobalt, continues to be a contributor to the success of high-technology advancements, including innovations in medical treatments. Typically a by-product of copper and nickel production, significant cobalt reserves are found in only a few countries. The African countries of Zaire and Zambia, as well as Canada, are leading cobalt producers. Although the USA is the world's largest consumer, accounting for about one-third of total consumption, it has no domestic production and relies solely upon foreign imports to satisfy demand. The world market has been plagued with the effects of economic and political factors throughout the years, and consequently, price instability has been common. Presently, supply and demand are moving toward a closer balance, and lower market prices are expected within the next year.

  14. Cobalt Derivatives as Promising Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Heffern, Marie C.; Yamamoto, Natsuho; Holbrook, Robert J.; Eckermann, Amanda L.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic complexes are versatile platforms for the development of potent and selective pharmaceutical agents. Cobalt possesses a diverse array of properties that can be manipulated to yield promising drug candidates. Investigations into the mechanism of cobalt therapeutic agents can provide valuable insight into the physicochemical properties that can be harnessed for drug development. This review presents examples of bioactive cobalt complexes with special attention to their mechanisms of action. Specifically, cobalt complexes that elicit biological effects through protein inhibition, modification of drug activity, and bioreductive activation are discussed. Insights gained from these examples reveal features of cobalt that can be rationally tuned to produce therapeutics with high specificity and improved efficacy for the biomolecule or pathway of interest. PMID:23270779

  15. M(Salen)-derived Nitrogen-doped M/C (M = Fe, Co, Ni) Porous Nanocomposites for Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Cheng, Fangyi; Wang, Shiwen; Zhang, Tianran; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials containing non-precious metal and/or doped nitrogen have attracted tremendous attention in the field of electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Herein, we report the synthesis and electrochemical properties of a new family of nitrogen-doped metal/carbon (M/N/C, M = Fe, Co, Ni) nanocomposites. The M/N/C nanocomposites, in which metal nanoparticles are embedded in the highly porous nitrogen-doped carbon matrix, have been synthesized by simply pyrolyzing M(salen) (salen = N,N′-bis(salicylidene)-ethylenediamine) complex precursors. The prepared Co/N/C and Fe/N/C exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic activity (with onset potential of 0.96 V for Fe/N/C and half-wave potential of 0.80 V for Co/N/C) and high stability for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The superior performance of the nanocomposites is attributed to their bimodal-pore structure, high surface area, as well as uniform distribution of high-density nitrogen and metal active sites. PMID:24865606

  16. Poly(styrene)-supported co-salen complexes as efficient recyclable catalysts for the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of epichlorohydrin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaolai; Jones, Christopher W; Weck, Marcus

    2005-12-23

    Here we describe an unprecedented synthetic approach to poly(styrene)-supported chiral salen ligands by the free radical polymerization of an unsymmetrical styryl-substituted salen monomer (H2salen = bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine). The new method allows for the attachment of salen moieties to the polymer main chain in a flexible, pendant fashion, avoiding grafting reactions that often introduce ill-defined species on the polymers. Moreover, the loading of the salen is controlled by the copolymerization of the styryl-substituted salen monomer with styrene in different ratios. The polymeric salen ligands are metallated with cobalt(II) acetate to afford the corresponding supported Co-salen complexes, which are used in the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of racemic epichlorohydrin, exhibiting high reactivity and enantioselectivity. Remarkably, the copolymer-supported Co-salen complexes showed a better catalytic performance (>99 % ee, 54 % conversion, one hour) in comparison to the homopolymeric analogues and the small molecule Co-salen complex. The soluble poly(styrene)-supported catalysts were recovered by precipitation after the catalytic reactions and were recycled three times to afford almost identical enantiomeric excesses as the first run, with slightly reduced reaction rates.

  17. Formation of a cobalt(III)-phenoxyl radical complex by acetic acid promoted aerobic oxidation of a Co(II)salen complex.

    PubMed

    Vinck, Evi; Murphy, Damien M; Fallis, Ian A; Strevens, Robert R; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2010-03-01

    The activation of N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexane-diamino Co(II), [Co(II)(1)], by the addition of acetic acid under aerobic conditions has been investigated by a range of spectroscopic techniques including continuous-wave EPR, HYSCORE, pulsed ENDOR, and resonance Raman. These measurements have revealed for the first time the formation of a coordinated cobalt(III)-bound phenoxyl radical labeled [Co(III)(1(*))(OAc)(n)](OAc)(m) (n = m = 1 or n = 2, m = 0). This cobalt(III)-bound phenoxyl radical is characterized by the following spin Hamiltonian parameters: g(x) = 2.0060, g(y) = 2.0031, g(z) = 1.9943, A(x) = 17 MHz, A(y) = 55 MHz, and A(z) = 14 MHz. Although the radical contains coordinated acetate(s), the experiments unambiguously proved that the phenoxyl radical is situated on ligand (1) as opposed to a phenoxyl radical ligated to cobalt in the axial position. Density functional theory computations on different models corroborate the stability of such a phenoxyl radical species and suggest the ligation of one or two acetate molecules to the complex. A mechanism is proposed, which accounts for the formation of this unusual and extremely robust phenoxyl radical, never previously observed for [Co(1)].

  18. Aluminum complexes derived from a hexadentate salen-type Schiff base: synthesis, structure, and catalysis for cyclic carbonate synthesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ya; Yuan, Dan; Wang, Yaorong; Yao, Yingming

    2017-04-12

    Different aluminum complexes were synthesized by the reaction of aluminum alkyls with a hexadentate salen-type Schiff base. The reaction of N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-2,2'-(ethylenedioxy)dianiline (LH2) with one equiv. of AlMe3 in toluene at 100 °C proceeded by methane elimination to produce the intermediate methyl complex [AlMeL] (1), and then subsequent intramolecular methyl migration to give the aluminum complex [AlL'] (2) [L' = (2-O-3,5-(t)Bu2C6H2)CH[double bond, length as m-dash]NC6H4OCH2CH2OC6H4NCH(Me)(2'-O-3',5'-(t)Bu2C6H2)]. The reaction of the same ligand with AlEt3 under the same experimental conditions involved ethane elimination, ethylene elimination and intramolecular hydrogen migration, and led to the complex [AlL''] (3) [L'' = (2-O-3,5-(t)Bu2C6H2)CH[double bond, length as m-dash]NC6H4OCH2CH2OC6H4NCH2(2'-O-3',5'-(t)Bu2C6H2)]. However, the interaction of two equivalents of AlMe3 and AlEt3 afforded the corresponding binuclear complexes [(AlMe2)2L] (4) and [(AlEt2)2L] (5), respectively, and no methyl or hydrogen migration was found. The solid-state structures of aluminum complexes 1-3 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. It was found that complexes 2-5 show a very effective catalytic activity for the cycloaddition of epoxides and CO2 in the presence of NBu4Br as a cocatalyst at atmospheric pressure.

  19. Cobalt.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    Cobalt has been a recognized allergen capable of causing contact dermatitis for decades. Why, therefore, has it been named 2016 "Allergen of the Year"? Simply put, new information has come to light in the last few years regarding potential sources of exposure to this metallic substance. In addition to reviewing some background on our previous understanding of cobalt exposures, this article will highlight the recently recognized need to consider leather as a major site of cobalt and the visual cues suggesting the presence of cobalt in jewelry. In addition, a chemical spot test for cobalt now allows us to better identify its presence in suspect materials.

  20. Asymmetric hydrolytic kinetic resolution with recyclable macrocyclic Co(III)-salen complexes: a practical strategy in the preparation of (R)-mexiletine and (S)-propranolol.

    PubMed

    Sadhukhan, Arghya; Khan, Noor-ul H; Roy, Tamal; Kureshy, Rukhsana I; Abdi, Sayed H R; Bajaj, Hari C

    2012-04-23

    A chiral cobalt(III) complex (1e) was synthesized by the interaction of cobalt(II) acetate and ferrocenium hexafluorophosphate with a chiral dinuclear macrocyclic salen ligand that was derived from 1R,2R-(-)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane with trigol bis-aldehyde. A variety of epoxides and glycidyl ethers were suitable substrates for the reaction with water in the presence of chiral macrocyclic salen complex 1e at room temperature to afford chiral epoxides and diols by hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR). Excellent yields (47% with respect to the epoxides, 53% with respect to the diols) and high enantioselectivity (ee>99% for the epoxides, up to 96% for the diols) were achieved in 2.5-16 h. The Co(III) macrocyclic salen complex (1e) maintained its performance on a multigram scale and was expediently recycled a number of times. We further extended our study of chiral epoxides that were synthesized by using HKR to the synthesis of chiral drug molecules (R)-mexiletine and (S)-propranolol.

  1. Cobalt

    SciTech Connect

    1993-02-01

    Cobalt is typical a by- or co-product with copper or nickel. The average crustal abundance of cobalt is 23 pans per million. Cobalt-containing minerals include cobaltite, skutterudite, and linnaeite. Due to the diversity of cobalt deposits, several techniques are used to extract the ore. The copper/cobalt-bearing ores of Zaire are extracted by open pit and underground methods. In Zambia, similar deposits are mined using modified sublevel, and cut-and-fill underground stoping methods. The sulfide and oxide ore concentrates mined in Zaire are roasted and leached in sulfuric acid. Copper is subsequently recovered by electrolysis, and cobalt is precipitated in the form of a hydrate. Finally, the hydrate is dissolved in acid and cobalt is recovered by electrolysis.

  2. CO2/ethylene oxide copolymerization and ligand variation for a highly active salen-cobalt(III) complex tethering 4 quaternary ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong Yeob; Lee, Jung Jae; Varghese, Jobi Kodiyan; Na, Sung Jae; Sujith, S; Go, Min Jeong; Lee, Junseong; Ok, Myung-Ahn; Lee, Bun Yeoul

    2013-07-07

    A cobalt(III) complex (1) of a salcy-type ligand tethering 4 quaternary ammonium salts, which is thought to act as a highly active catalyst for CO2/propylene oxide (PO) copolymerization, also shows high activity (TOF, 25,900 h(-1); TON, 518,000; 2.72 kg polymer per g cat) and selectivity (>98%) for CO2/ethylene oxide (EO) copolymerization that results in high-molecular-weight polymers (M(n), 200,000-300,000) that have strictly alternating repeating units. The related cobalt(III) complexes 11-14 were prepared through variations of the ligand framework of 1 by replacing the trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane unit with 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine, trans-1,2-diaminocyclopentane, or 1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diamine or by replacing the aldimine bond with ketimine. These ligand frameworks are thought to favour the formation of the cis-β configuration in complexation, and the formation of the cis-β configuration in 11-14 was confirmed through NMR studies or X-ray crystallographic studies of model complexes not bearing the quaternary ammonium salts. Complexes 11, 13, and 14, which adopt the cis-β configuration even in DMSO did not show any activity for CO2/PO copolymerization. Complex 12, which was constructed with trans-1,2-diaminocyclopentane and fluctuated in DMSO between the coordination and de-coordination of the acetate ligand as observed for 1, showed fairly high activity (TOF, 12,400 h(-1)). This fluctuating behaviour may play a role in polymerization. However, complex 12 did not compete with 1 in terms of activity, selectivity, and the catalyst cost.

  3. Crystal structure of an unknown solvate of {2,2'-[ethane-1,2-diylbis(nitrilo-methanylyl-idene)]diphenolato-κ(4) O,N,N',O'}(N-ferrocenylisonicotinamide-κN (1))cobalt(II): a Co(II)-salen complex that forms hydrogen-bonded dimers.

    PubMed

    Brautigam, Bryan; Herholdt, Chelsea; Farnsworth, William; Brudi, Ellen; McDonald, Eric; Wu, Guang; Contakes, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    The title compound, [CoFe(C5H5)(C16H14N2O2)(C11H9N2O)], was prepared as an air-stable red-brown solid by mixing equimolar amounts of {2,2'-[ethane-1,2-diylbis(nitrilo-methanylyl-idene)]diphenolato}cobalt(II) and N-ferrocenylisonicotinamide in dry di-chloro-methane under nitro-gen and was characterized by ESI-MS, IR, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure at 100 K has triclinic (P-1) symmetry and indicates that the complex crystallizes as a mixture of λ and δ conformers. It exhibits the expected square pyramidal geometry about Co, and forms hydrogen-bonded dimers through amide N-H groups and phenolate O atoms on an adjacent mol-ecule. The involvement of only half of the salen ring structure in hydrogen-bonding inter-actions results in slight folding of the salen ring away from the pyridine coordination site in the δ conformer with an inter-salicyl-idene fold angle of 9.9 (7)°. In contrast, the λ conformer is nearly planar. The dimers pack into an open structure containing channels filled with highly disordered solvent mol-ecules. These solvent molecules' contributions to the intensity data were removed with the SQUEEZE procedure [Spek (2015). Acta Cryst. C71, 9-18] available in PLATON.

  4. Chiral distortion in a Mn(IV)(salen)(N3)2 derived from Jacobsen's catalyst as a possible conformation model for its enantioselective reactions.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Takuya; Fujii, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    The Mn (IV)(salen)(N 3) 2 complex ( 3) from Jacobsen's catalyst is synthesized, and the X-ray crystal structures of 3 as well as the starting Mn (III)(salen)(N 3)(CH 3OH) complex ( 2) are determined in order to investigate the conformation of the high-valent Mn (IV)(salen) molecule in comparison with that of Mn (III)(salen). The asymmetric unit of the crystal of 3 contains four complexes, all of which adopt a nonplanar stepped conformation effectively distorted by the chirality of the diimine bridge. The asymmetric unit of 2 also contains four complexes. Two of them show a stepped conformation of a lesser degree, but the other two adopt a bowl-shaped conformation. Comparison of the structural parameters shows that the Mn center in 3 is coordinated from both sides by two external axial N 3 ligands with significantly shorter bond lengths, which could induce greater preference for the stepped conformation in 3. The CH 3CN solution of 3 shows circular dichroism with a significantly strong band at 275 nm as compared to 2, suggesting that 3 may adopt a more chirally distorted conformation also in solution. The circular dichroism spectrum of 3 is slightly altered with isodichroic points from 298 to 253 K and shows no further change at temperatures lower than 253 K, suggesting that the solution of 3 contains an equilibrium between two conformers, where a low-energy conformer with more chiral distortion is predominantly favored even at room temperature. Complexes 2 and 3 are thoroughly characterized using various techniques including cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, UV-vis, electron paramagnetic resonance, (1)H NMR, infrared spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

  5. Salen complexes with dianionic counterions

    DOEpatents

    Job, Gabriel E.; Farmer, Jay J.; Cherian, Anna E.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention describes metal salen complexes having dianionic counterions. Such complexes can be readily precipitated and provide an economical method for the purification and isolation of the complexes, and are useful to prepare novel polymer compositions.

  6. Derivation of a chronic oral reference dose for cobalt.

    PubMed

    Finley, Brent L; Monnot, Andrew D; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Gaffney, Shannon H

    2012-12-01

    Cobalt (Co) is an essential element in humans as a component of vitamin B12. However, at high levels Co exposure has been shown to have detrimental effects. This study was designed to identify a chronic oral reference dose (RfD) for Co. Currently available data indicate that non-cancer health effects associated with Co exposure may include hematological, neurological, immunological, reproductive, cardiovascular, and endocrine responses. This analysis employs the standard US EPA risk assessment methodology for establishing a chronic RfD. In this analysis, the Jaimet and Thode (1955) 10-week, multiple dose human study of thyroid effects (decreased iodine uptake) in children was determined to be the most robust and sensitive study for identifying a potential point of departure dose (POD). A dose of 0.9 mgCo/kg-day was chosen as the POD. Consistent with the US EPA's previous derivation of the perchlorate RfD, which is also based on decreased iodine uptake in humans, we considered several uncertainly factors (UFs), and determined that a factor of 10 for human variability was appropriate, as well as a factor of three for database adequacy. Applying an aggregate uncertainty factor of 30 to the POD yields a chronic oral RfD of 0.03 mg/kg-day. We believe this value would be protective of non-cancer health effects in the general population for a lifetime of daily exposure to Co.

  7. Cobalt Oxide Hollow Nanoparticles Derived by Bio-Templating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Choi, Sang H.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; King, Glen C.; Watt, Gerald D.

    2005-01-01

    We present here the first fabrication of hollow cobalt oxide nanoparticles produced by a protein-regulated site-specific reconstitution process in aqueous solution and describe the metal growth mechanism in the ferritin interior.

  8. Crystal structure of an unknown solvate of {2,2′-[ethane-1,2-diylbis(nitrilo­methanylyl­idene)]diphenolato-κ4 O,N,N′,O′}(N-ferrocenylisonicotinamide-κN 1)cobalt(II): a CoII–salen complex that forms hydrogen-bonded dimers

    PubMed Central

    Brautigam, Bryan; Herholdt, Chelsea; Farnsworth, William; Brudi, Ellen; McDonald, Eric; Wu, Guang; Contakes, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, [CoFe(C5H5)(C16H14N2O2)(C11H9N2O)], was prepared as an air-stable red–brown solid by mixing equimolar amounts of {2,2′-[ethane-1,2-diylbis(nitrilo­methanylyl­idene)]diphenolato}cobalt(II) and N-ferrocenylisonicotinamide in dry di­chloro­methane under nitro­gen and was characterized by ESI–MS, IR, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure at 100 K has triclinic (P-1) symmetry and indicates that the complex crystallizes as a mixture of λ and δ conformers. It exhibits the expected square pyramidal geometry about Co, and forms hydrogen-bonded dimers through amide N—H groups and phenolate O atoms on an adjacent mol­ecule. The involvement of only half of the salen ring structure in hydrogen-bonding inter­actions results in slight folding of the salen ring away from the pyridine coordination site in the δ conformer with an inter-salicyl­idene fold angle of 9.9 (7)°. In contrast, the λ conformer is nearly planar. The dimers pack into an open structure containing channels filled with highly disordered solvent mol­ecules. These solvent molecules’ contributions to the intensity data were removed with the SQUEEZE procedure [Spek (2015). Acta Cryst. C71, 9–18] available in PLATON. PMID:26396858

  9. Aluminum salen complexes and tetrabutylammonium salts: a binary catalytic system for production of polycarbonates from CO2 and cyclohexene oxide.

    PubMed

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Billodeaux, Damon R

    2005-03-07

    A series of complexes of the form (salen)AlZ, where H2salen = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,2-phenylenediimine and various other salen derivatives and Z = Et or Cl, have been synthesized. Several of these complexes have been characterized by X-ray crystallography. An investigation of the utilization of these aluminum derivatives along with both ionic and neutral bases as cocatalysts for the copolymerization of carbon dioxide and cyclohexene oxide has been conducted. By studying the reactivity of these complexes for this process as substituents on the diimine backbone and phenolate rings are altered, we have observed that aluminum prefers electron-withdrawing groups on the salen ligands, thereby producing an electrophilic metal center to be most active toward production of polycarbonates from CO2 and cyclohexene oxide. For example, the complex derived from H2salen = N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-ethylenediimine is essentially inactive when compared to the analogous derivative containing nitro substituents in the 3-positions of the phenolate groups. This is to be contrasted with the catalytic activity observed for the (salen)CrX systems, where electron-donating salen ligands greatly enhanced the reactivity of these complexes for the coupling of CO2 and epoxides. While (salen)AlZ complexes are capable of producing poly(cyclohexene oxide) carbonate with low amounts of polyether linkage along with small quantities of cyclic carbonate byproducts, their reactivities, covering a turnover frequency range of 5.2-35.4 mol of epoxide consumed/(mol of Al x h), are greatly reduced when compared to their (salen)CrX analogues under identical reaction conditions.

  10. Cyclohexene oxide/CO2 copolymerization catalyzed by chromium(III) salen complexes and N-methylimidazole: effects of varying salen ligand substituents and relative cocatalyst loading.

    PubMed

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Mackiewicz, Ryan M; Rodgers, Jody L; Fang, Cindy C; Billodeaux, Damon R; Reibenspies, Joseph H

    2004-09-20

    A detailed mechanistic study into the copolymerization of CO2 and cyclohexene oxide utilizing CrIII(salen)X complexes and N-methylimidazole, where H2salen = N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-ethylenediimine and other salen derivatives and X = Cl or N3, has been conducted. By studying salen ligands with various groups on the diimine backbone, we have observed that bulky groups oriented perpendicular to the salen plane reduce the activity of the catalyst significantly, while such groups oriented parallel to the salen plane do not retard copolymer formation. This is not surprising in that the mechanism for asymmetric ring opening of epoxides was found to occur in a bimetallic fashion, whereas these perpendicularly oriented groups along with the tert-butyl groups on the phenolate rings produce considerable steric requirements for the two metal centers to communicate and thus initiate the copolymerization process. It was also observed that altering the substituents on the phenolate rings of the salen ligand had a 2-fold effect, controlling both catalyst solubility as well as electron density around the metal center, producing significant effects on the rate of copolymer formation. This and other data discussed herein have led us to propose a more detailed mechanistic delineation, wherein the rate of copolymerization is dictated by two separate equilibria. The first equilibrium involves the initial second-order epoxide ring opening and is inhibited by excess amounts of cocatalyst. The second equilibrium involves the propagation step and is enhanced by excess cocatalyst. This gives the [cocatalyst] both a positive and negative effect on the overall rate of copolymerization.

  11. Tristability arising from singlet-triplet and quartet spin states for dimeric Co(II)salen.

    PubMed

    Min, Kil Sik; Arthur, Jordan; Shum, William W; Bharathy, Muktha; zur Loye, Hans-Conrad; Miller, Joel S

    2009-06-01

    The magnetic behavior of N,N'-ethylenebis(salicylideniminato)cobalt(II) (Co(II)Salen, 1) has been reinvestigated and reveals spin-crossover behavior above 295 K. It has a singlet ground state and a triplet excited state at 30 K (21 cm(-1); 60 cal/mol) above the ground state, and at a higher temperature spin crossover to the quartet, a second excited state occurs.

  12. Electrical and magnetic properties of chemically derived nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, N.; Narayanasamy, A.; Shinoda, K.; Chinnasamy, C. N.; Jeyadevan, B.; Greneche, J.-M.

    2007-07-01

    Nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite particles of 8nm grain size were synthesized by coprecipitation technique and subsequently suitably heat treated to obtain higher grain sizes. The experimentally observed changes in the dc electrical conductivity and Curie temperature with heat treatment have been attributed to the changes in the cation distributions as obtained from the Mössbauer and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements and to the grain size. The activation energies for conduction as determined from the Arrhenius plots suggest that the conductivity is due to hopping of both electrons and holes. The observed decrease in conductivity when the grain size is increased from 8to92nm is clearly due to the predominant effect of migration of some of the Fe3+ ions from octahedral to tetrahedral sites, as is evident from in-field Mössbauer and EXAFS measurements. But the higher conductivity of the 102 and 123nm particles compared to that of the 92nm particles is attributed to the higher grain size, since the cation distribution is found to be the same for all these three samples. The Néel temperature increases from 709K for the as-prepared particles (8nm)to809K for the 92nm particles because of the change in the cation distribution and it remains almost the same for the higher grain sizes as there is no further change in the cation distribution.

  13. Exposure to Cobalt Causes Transcriptomic and Proteomic Changes in Two Rat Liver Derived Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Permenter, Matthew G.; Dennis, William E.; Sutto, Thomas E.; Jackson, David A.; Lewis, John A.; Stallings, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt is a transition group metal present in trace amounts in the human diet, but in larger doses it can be acutely toxic or cause adverse health effects in chronic exposures. Its use in many industrial processes and alloys worldwide presents opportunities for occupational exposures, including military personnel. While the toxic effects of cobalt have been widely studied, the exact mechanisms of toxicity remain unclear. In order to further elucidate these mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of exposure or effect, we exposed two rat liver-derived cell lines, H4-II-E-C3 and MH1C1, to two concentrations of cobalt chloride. We examined changes in gene expression using DNA microarrays in both cell lines and examined changes in cytoplasmic protein abundance in MH1C1 cells using mass spectrometry. We chose to closely examine differentially expressed genes and proteins changing in abundance in both cell lines in order to remove cell line specific effects. We identified enriched pathways, networks, and biological functions using commercial bioinformatic tools and manual annotation. Many of the genes, proteins, and pathways modulated by exposure to cobalt appear to be due to an induction of a hypoxic-like response and oxidative stress. Genes that may be differentially expressed due to a hypoxic-like response are involved in Hif-1α signaling, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and other energy metabolism related processes. Gene expression changes linked to oxidative stress are also known to be involved in the NRF2-mediated response, protein degradation, and glutathione production. Using microarray and mass spectrometry analysis, we were able to identify modulated genes and proteins, further elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of cobalt, and identify biomarkers of exposure and effect in vitro, thus providing targets for focused in vivo studies. PMID:24386269

  14. Exposure to cobalt causes transcriptomic and proteomic changes in two rat liver derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Permenter, Matthew G; Dennis, William E; Sutto, Thomas E; Jackson, David A; Lewis, John A; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt is a transition group metal present in trace amounts in the human diet, but in larger doses it can be acutely toxic or cause adverse health effects in chronic exposures. Its use in many industrial processes and alloys worldwide presents opportunities for occupational exposures, including military personnel. While the toxic effects of cobalt have been widely studied, the exact mechanisms of toxicity remain unclear. In order to further elucidate these mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of exposure or effect, we exposed two rat liver-derived cell lines, H4-II-E-C3 and MH1C1, to two concentrations of cobalt chloride. We examined changes in gene expression using DNA microarrays in both cell lines and examined changes in cytoplasmic protein abundance in MH1C1 cells using mass spectrometry. We chose to closely examine differentially expressed genes and proteins changing in abundance in both cell lines in order to remove cell line specific effects. We identified enriched pathways, networks, and biological functions using commercial bioinformatic tools and manual annotation. Many of the genes, proteins, and pathways modulated by exposure to cobalt appear to be due to an induction of a hypoxic-like response and oxidative stress. Genes that may be differentially expressed due to a hypoxic-like response are involved in Hif-1α signaling, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and other energy metabolism related processes. Gene expression changes linked to oxidative stress are also known to be involved in the NRF2-mediated response, protein degradation, and glutathione production. Using microarray and mass spectrometry analysis, we were able to identify modulated genes and proteins, further elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of cobalt, and identify biomarkers of exposure and effect in vitro, thus providing targets for focused in vivo studies.

  15. Mechanistic aspects of metal valence change in SalenCo(III)OAc-catalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution of racemic epoxides.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei-Min; Wang, Yi-Ming; Zhang, Rong; Jiang, Jing-Yang; Lu, Xiao-Bing

    2013-05-17

    The chiral SalenCo(III)OAc-catalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of racemic terminal epoxides to afford both enantioenriched epoxides and diols presents one of the most important achievements in asymmetric synthesis chemistry. Previous studies mainly focused on the development of highly efficient catalysts, while rare reports concerned the mechanistic understanding of metal valence change, associated with the formation of inactive Co(II)-Salen complex. Herein, we report the mechanistic aspects of catalyst deactivation regarding the transformation of Co(III) to Co(II) derivative in the HKR of racemic epoxides catalyzed by SalenCo(III)OAc complexes with an appended 1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene on the ligand framework by means of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Continuous determination of transient cationic species in ESI-MS positive mode in conjunction with UV-vis spectroscopic studies at various time points provides evidence that a certain amount of SalenCo(III)OAc molecules were reduced to the corresponding Co(II) derivatives in the HKR of racemic propylene oxide or styrene oxide. To be accompanied by the reduction of Co(III) to Co(II), the resultant diols were oxidized to α-hydroxy ketones. These analyses along with some control experiments gave a mechanistic understanding of catalyst deactivation of SalenCo(III)OAc-catalyzed HKR of racemic epoxides regarding an unveiled redox reaction between Co(III)-Salen and diol, the hydrolyzed product.

  16. Enantioselective epoxidation of non-functionalized alkenes using carbohydrate based salen-Mn(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shanshan; Zhao, Jiquan; Zhao, Dongmin

    2007-02-05

    Three new salen ligands with carbohydrate moieties were prepared from a salicylaldehyde derivative obtained by reaction of 1,2:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-glucofuranose with 3-tert-butyl-5-(chloro-methyl)-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde. These ligands were coordinated with Mn(III) to give three chiral salen-Mn(III) complexes. The complexes were characterized and employed in the asymmetric epoxidation of unfunctionalized alkenes. Catalytic results showed that although there are no chiral groups on the diimine bridge, these complexes had some enantioselectivity, which indicates the carbohydrate moiety has an asymmetric inducing effect in the epoxidation reaction.

  17. Mechanistic aspects of the copolymerization of CO2 with epoxides using a thermally stable single-site cobalt(III) catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei-Min; Liu, Zhong-Wen; Wen, Ye-Qian; Zhang, Rong; Lu, Xiao-Bing

    2009-08-19

    The mechanism of the copolymerization of CO(2) and epoxides to afford the corresponding polycarbonates catalyzed by a highly active and thermally stable cobalt(III) complex with 1,5,7-triabicyclo[4,4,0] dec-5-ene (designated as TBD, a sterically hindered organic base) anchored on the ligand framework has been studied by means of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The single-site, cobalt-based catalyst exhibited excellent activity and selectivity for polymer formation during CO(2)/propylene oxide (PO) copolymerization even at temperatures up to 100 degrees C and high [epoxide]/[catalyst] ratios, and/or low CO(2) pressures. The anchored TBD on the ligand framework plays an important role in maintaining thermal stability and high activity of the catalyst. ESI-MS and FTIR studies, in combination with some control experiments, confirmed the formation of the carboxylate intermediate with regard to the anchored TBD on the catalyst ligand framework. This analysis demonstrated that the formed carboxylate intermediate helped to stabilize the active Co(III) species against decomposition to inactive Co(II) by reversibly intramolecular Co-O bond formation and dissociation. Previous studies of binary catalyst systems based on Co(III)-Salen complexes did not address the role of these nucleophilic cocatalysts in stabilizing active Co(III) species during the copolymerization. The present study provides a new mechanistic understanding of these binary catalyst systems in which alternating chain-growth and dissociation of propagating carboxylate species derived from the nucleophilic axial anion and the nucleophilic cocatalyst take turns at both sides of the Co(III)-Salen center. This significantly increases the reaction rate and also helps to stabilize the active SalenCo(III) against decomposition to inactive SalenCo(II) even at low CO(2) pressures and/or relatively high temperatures.

  18. Steric hindrance in a MnSalen expoxidation catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, K.W.; Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Asaro, M.F.

    1995-12-31

    Many transition metal epoxidation catalysts use porphyrin type ligands, as biomimetic models for the well-studied monooxygenase, Cyt P-450. Recently, non-porphyrin systems based on the Salen ligand have received attention, because high e.e. values are reported using chiral Salen ligands. These systems have yet to be rendered generally practical, however, because the catalyst lifetimes are very short and the turnover numbers low. The original Mn(III) Salen epoxidation catalysts became inactive within 1 h, showing only 5 to 10 turnovers. The modified, chiral Mn(III) Salen complexes show similarly low turnovers. The principal decomposition routes of the MnSalen epoxidation catalysts are not clear. The purpose of the present study is to determine whether incorporation of extreme steric hindrance into the Salen ligand could be used to increase the lifetime of the Mn(III) Salen epoxidation catalysts.

  19. Cyclic carbonate synthesis catalysed by bimetallic aluminium-salen complexes.

    PubMed

    Clegg, William; Harrington, Ross W; North, Michael; Pasquale, Riccardo

    2010-06-18

    The development of bimetallic aluminium-salen complexes [{Al(salen)}(2)O] as catalysts for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates (including the commercially important ethylene and propylene carbonates) from a wide range of terminal epoxides in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide as a cocatalyst is reported. The bimetallic structure of one complex was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. The bimetallic complexes displayed exceptionally high catalytic activity and in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide could catalyse cyclic carbonate synthesis at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Catalyst-reuse experiments demonstrated that one bimetallic complex was stable for over 60 reactions, though the tetrabutylammonium bromide decomposed in situ by a retro-Menschutkin reaction to form tributylamine and had to be regularly replaced. The mild reaction conditions allowed a full analysis of the reaction kinetics to be carried out and this showed that the reaction was first order in aluminium complex concentration, first order in epoxide concentration, first order in carbon dioxide concentration (except when used in excess) and unexpectedly second order in tetrabutylammonium bromide concentration. Further kinetic experiments demonstrated that the tributylamine formed in situ was involved in the catalysis and that addition of butyl bromide to reconvert the tributylamine into tetrabutylammonium bromide resulted in inhibition of the reaction. The reaction kinetics also indicated that no kinetic resolution of racemic epoxides was possible with this class of catalysts, even when the catalyst was derived from a chiral salen ligand. However, it was shown that if enantiomerically pure styrene oxide was used as substrate, then enantiomerically pure styrene carbonate was formed. On the basis of the kinetic and other experimental data, a catalytic cycle that explains why the bimetallic complexes display such high catalytic activity has been developed.

  20. Energetics and Dynamics of Electron Transfer and Proton Transfer in Dissociation of Metal III (salen)-Peptide Complexes in the Gas Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo; Chu, Ivan K.

    2008-03-12

    Time- and collision energy-resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) of ternary complexes of CoIII(salen)+, FeIII(salen)+, and MnIII(salen)+ with several angiotensin peptide analogs was studied using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) specially equipped to perform SID experiments. Time-resolved fragmentation efficiency curves (TFECs) were modeled using an RRKM-based approach developed in our laboratory. The approach utilizes a very flexible analytical expression for the internal energy deposition function that is capable of reproducing both single-collision and multiple-collision activation in the gas phase and excitation by collisions with a surface. The energetics and dynamics of competing dissociation pathways obtained from the modeling provides important insight on the competition between proton transfer, electron transfer, loss of neutral peptide ligand, and other processes that determine gas-phase fragmentation of these model systems. Similar fragmentation behavior was obtained for various CoIII(salen)-peptide systems of different angiotensin analogs. In contrast, dissociation pathways and relative stabilities of the complexes changed dramatically when cobalt was replaced with trivalent iron or manganese. We demonstrate that the electron transfer efficiency is correlated with redox properties of the metalIII(salen) complexes (Co > Fe > Mn), while differences in the types of fragments formed from the complexes reflect differences in the modes of binding between the metal-salen complex and the peptide ligand. RRKM modeling of time- and collision energy-resolved SID data suggests that the competition between proton transfer and electron transfer during dissociation of CoIII(salen)-peptide complexes is mainly determined by differences in entropy effects while the energetics of these two pathways are very similar.

  1. Characteristics of polyaniline cobalt supported catalysts for epoxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Grzegorz; Pielichowski, Jan; Grzesik, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    A study of polyaniline (PANI) doping with various cobalt compounds, that is, cobalt(II) chloride, cobalt(II) acetate, and cobalt(II) salen, is presented. The catalysts were prepared by depositing cobalt compounds onto the polymer surface. PANI powders containing cobalt ions were obtained by one- or two-step method suspending PANI in the following acetonitrile/acetic acid solution or acetonitrile and then acetic acid solution. Moreover different ratios of Co(II) : PANI were studied. Catalysts obtained with both methods and at all ratios were investigated using various techniques including AAS and XPS spectroscopy. The optimum conditions for preparation of PANI/Co catalysts were established. Catalytic activity of polyaniline cobalt(II) supported catalysts was tested in dec-1-ene epoxidation with molecular oxygen at room temperature. The relationship between the amount of cobalt species, measured with both AAS and XPS techniques, and the activity of PANI-Co catalysts has been established.

  2. Characteristics of Polyaniline Cobalt Supported Catalysts for Epoxidation Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Grzegorz; Pielichowski, Jan; Grzesik, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    A study of polyaniline (PANI) doping with various cobalt compounds, that is, cobalt(II) chloride, cobalt(II) acetate, and cobalt(II) salen, is presented. The catalysts were prepared by depositing cobalt compounds onto the polymer surface. PANI powders containing cobalt ions were obtained by one- or two-step method suspending PANI in the following acetonitrile/acetic acid solution or acetonitrile and then acetic acid solution. Moreover different ratios of Co(II) : PANI were studied. Catalysts obtained with both methods and at all ratios were investigated using various techniques including AAS and XPS spectroscopy. The optimum conditions for preparation of PANI/Co catalysts were established. Catalytic activity of polyaniline cobalt(II) supported catalysts was tested in dec-1-ene epoxidation with molecular oxygen at room temperature. The relationship between the amount of cobalt species, measured with both AAS and XPS techniques, and the activity of PANI-Co catalysts has been established. PMID:24701183

  3. Exposure to Cobalt Causes Transcriptomic and Proteomic Changes in Two Rat Liver Derived Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    phosphofructokinase, liver; phospho- glycerate kinase 1; proteasome (prosome, macropain) subunit, beta type 3; solute carrier family 2 (facilitated glucose...oxidative stress caused by cobalt particles. Arch Toxicol 76: 1–7. 20. Moger WH (1983) Effects of the calcium-channel blockers cobalt, verapamil, and D600

  4. Core-double-shell Fe3O4@carbon@poly(In(III)-carboxylate) microspheres: cycloaddition of CO2 and epoxides on coordination polymer shells constituted by imidazolium-derived Al(III)-Salen bifunctional catalysts.

    PubMed

    An, Qiao; Li, Zifeng; Graff, Robert; Guo, Jia; Gao, Haifeng; Wang, Changchun

    2015-03-04

    A hydrid microsphere Fe3O4@carbon@poly(In(III)-carboxylate) consisting of a cluster of Fe3O4 nanoparticles as the core, a carbon layer as the inner shell and a porous In(III)-carboxylate coordination polymer as the outer shell was prepared and applied as a recyclable catalyst for the cycloaddition reaction of CO2 and epoxides. Construction of this hybrid microsphere was achieved in the two steps, including (1) the one-pot solvothermal synthesis of Fe3O4@C particles with the abundant carboxylic groups on the carbon surface and (2) the subsequent growth of the outer shell polymers based on the precipitation coordination polymerization. Imidazolium-substituted Salen ligands were synthesized and chelated with the In(III) ions using the terminal carboxylic groups. The coordination polymer shell was formed on the Fe3O4@C particles, and the structures including shell thickness, surface area and porosity could be varied by tuning the feeding ratios of the In(III) ions and the ligands. The optimal structure of the coordination polymers showed a shell thickness of ca. 45 nm with ∼5 nm of mesopore, 174.7 m(2)/g of surface area and 0.2175 cm(3)/g of pore volume. In light of gas uptake capability, catalytic activity and magnetic susceptibility, cycloaddition of CO2 with a series of epoxides were studied by using Al-complexed Fe3O4@C@In(III)-[IL-Salen] microspheres. The results validated that the self-supporting catalytic layer with high surface area was of remarkable advantages, which were attributed from great increment of effective active sites and combination of nucleophilic/electrophilic synergistic property and CO2 uptake capability. Therefore, these hybrid microspheres provided excellent catalytic activity, prominent selectivity to cyclic carbonates and outstanding recyclability with the assistance of an applied magnetic field.

  5. Ionic Polymer Microspheres Bearing a Co(III) -Salen Moiety as a Bifunctional Heterogeneous Catalyst for the Efficient Cycloaddition of CO2 and Epoxides.

    PubMed

    Leng, Yan; Lu, Dan; Zhang, Chenjun; Jiang, Pingping; Zhang, Weijie; Wang, Jun

    2016-06-06

    We report a unique strategy to obtain the bifunctional heterogeneous catalyst TBB-Bpy@Salen-Co (TBB=1,2,4,5-tetrakis(bromomethyl)benzene, Bpy=4,4'-bipyridine, Salen-Co=N,N'-bis({4-dimethylamino}salicylidene)ethylenediamino cobalt(III) acetate) by combining a cross-linked ionic polymer with a Co(III) -salen Schiff base. The catalyst showed extra high activity for CO2 fixation under mild, solvent-free reaction conditions with no requirement for a co-catalyst. The synthesized catalyst possessed distinctive spherical structural features, abundant halogen Br(-) anions with good leaving group ability, and accessible Lewis acidic Co metal centers. These unique features, together with the synergistic role of the Co and Br(-) functional sites, allowed TBB-Bpy@Salen-Co to exhibit enhanced catalytic conversion of CO2 into cyclic carbonates relative to the corresponding monofunctional analogues. This catalyst can be easily recovered and recycled five times without significant leaching of Co or loss of activity. Moreover, based on our experimental results and previous work, a synergistic cycloaddition reaction mechanism was proposed.

  6. Dinuclear Zinc Salen Catalysts for the Ring Opening Copolymerization of Epoxides and Carbon Dioxide or Anhydrides.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Arnaud; Garden, Jennifer A; White, Andrew J P; Williams, Charlotte K

    2015-12-21

    A series of four dizinc complexes coordinated by salen or salan ligands, derived from ortho-vanillin and bearing (±)-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (L1) or 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine (L2) backbones, is reported. The complexes are characterized using a combination of X-ray crystallography, multinuclear NMR, DOSY, and MALDI-TOF spectroscopies, and elemental analysis. The stability of the dinuclear complexes depends on the ligand structure, with the most stable complexes having imine substituents. The complexes are tested as catalysts for the ring-opening copolymerization (ROCOP) of CO2/cyclohexene oxide (CHO) and phthalic anhydride (PA)/CHO. All complexes are active, and the structure/activity relationships reveal that the complex having both L2 and imine substituents displays the highest activity. In the ROCOP of CO2/CHO its activity is equivalent to other metal salen catalysts (TOF = 44 h(-1) at a catalyst loading of 0.1 mol %, 30 bar of CO2, and 80 °C), while for the ROCOP of PA/CHO, its activity is slightly higher than other metal salen catalysts (TOF = 198 h(-1) at a catalyst loading of 1 mol % and 100 °C). Poly(ester-block-carbonate) polymers are also afforded using the most active catalyst by the one-pot terpolymerization of PA/CHO/CO2.

  7. Exposure to Cobalt Causes Transcriptomic and Proteomic Changes in Two Rat Liver Derived Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-30

    prosome, macropain) subunit, beta type 3; solute carrier family 2 (facilitated glucose transporter), member 1; and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2H. The...1–7. 20. Moger WH (1983) Effects of the calcium-channel blockers cobalt, verapamil, and D600 on Leydig cell steroidogenesis. Biol Reprod 28: 528–535

  8. Carbon-Coated Co(3+)-Rich Cobalt Selenide Derived from ZIF-67 for Efficient Electrochemical Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Siwen; Peng, Sijia; Huang, Linsong; Cui, Xiaoqi; Al-Enizi, Abdullah M; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2016-08-17

    Oxygen evolution reaction (OER) electrocatalysts are confronted with challenges such as sluggish kinetics, low conductivity, and instability, restricting the development of water splitting. In this study, we report an efficient Co(3+)-rich cobalt selenide (Co0.85Se) nanoparticles coated with carbon shell as OER electrocatalyst, which are derived from zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-67) precursor. It is proposed that the organic ligands in the ZIF-67 can effectively enrich and stabilize the Co(3+) ions in the inorganic-organic frameworks and subsequent carbon-coated nanoparticles. In alkaline media, the catalyst exhibits excellent OER performances, which are attributed to its abundant active sites, high conductivity, and superior kinetics.

  9. Template-free hydrothermal derived cobalt oxide nanopowders: Synthesis, characterization, and removal of organic dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Nassar, Mostafa Y.; Ahmed, Ibrahim S.

    2012-09-15

    Graphical abstract: XRD patterns of the products obtained by hydrothermal treatment at 160 °C for 24 h, and at different [Co{sup 2+}]/[CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}] ratios: (a) 1:6, (b) 1:3, (c) 1:1.5, (d) 1:1, (e) 1:0.5. Highlights: ► Spinel cobalt oxide nanoparticles with different morphologies were prepared by hydrothermal approach. ► The optical characteristics of the as-prepared cobalt oxide revealed the presence of two band gaps. ► Adsorption of methylene blue dye on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} was investigated and the percent uptake was found to be >99% in 24 h. -- Abstract: Pure spinel cobalt oxide nanoparticles were prepared through hydrothermal approach using different counter ions. First, the pure and uniform cobalt carbonate (with particle size of 21.8–29.8 nm) were prepared in high yield (94%) in an autoclave in absence unfriendly organic surfactants or solvents by adjusting different experimental parameters such as: pH, reaction time, temperature, counter ions, and (Co{sup 2+}:CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}) molar ratios. Thence, the spinel Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} (with mean particle size of 30.5–47.35 nm) was produced by thermal decomposition of cobalt carbonate in air at 500 °C for 3 h. The products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and thermal analysis (TA). Also, the optical characteristics of the as-prepared Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles revealed the presence of two band gaps (1.45–1.47, and 1.83–1.93 eV). Additionally, adsorption of methylene blue dye on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles was investigated and the uptake% was found to be >99% in 24 h.

  10. Activation of Molecular Oxygen: Kinetic Studies of the Oxidation of Hindered Phenols with Cobalt-Dioxygen Complexes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-25

    containing nucleophiles on coordinated substrates; (3) oxygen atom transfers from high oxidation state elements; (4) epoxidation of olefins using metal...or polymers, depending -2- on the choice of catalyst or reagent. The oxidation of hindered phenols by cobalt- salen -dioxygen complexes was first

  11. Crystal structures of triazine-3-thione derivatives by reaction with copper and cobalt salts.

    PubMed

    López-Torres, Elena; Mendiola, Maria Antonia; Pastor, César J

    2006-04-03

    The reaction of 5-methoxy-5,6-diphenyl-4,5-dihydro-2H-[1,2,4]triazine-3-thione L1H2OCH3 with copper(II) chloride leads to the formation of an organic molecule L2 containing two triazine rings linked by a new S-S bond. A binuclear copper(II) complex, 1, containing L1 is also isolated. The reaction of L1H2OCH3 with copper(I) chloride yields a hexanuclear cluster of copper(I), 2, in which the copper atoms form a distorted octahedron with the ligand L1 acting as an NS chelate and sulfur bridge, giving to the copper ion a trigonal geometry by one N and two S atoms. In any reaction of the disulfide L2 with metal salts, complexes containing this molecule are isolated. Reactions with copper(I) and copper(II) chloride and nickel(II) and cadmium(II) nitrate produce the S-S bond cleavage, giving complexes containing the triazine L1 behaving as the NS anion, which show spectroscopic characteristics identical with those formed by reaction with L1H2OCH3. However, the reaction with cobalt(II) nitrate gives a low-spin octahedral cobalt(III) complex, in which an asymmetric rupture of the disulfide L2 has been produced, giving an unexpected complex with a new ligand and keeping the S-S bond.

  12. Synthesis, structures and antibacterial activities of benzoylthiourea derivatives and their complexes with cobalt.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Liu, Huanhuan; Li, Mengying; Wang, Fan; Zhou, Weiqun; Fan, Jianfen

    2012-11-01

    Four new thiocarbonyl fluorobenzamides and their complexes with cobalt have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR, and (1)H NMR. Five crystal structures of the thioylbenzamides complexes of Co(PTCB)(3), Co(2FPTCB)(3), Co(4FPTCB)(3), Co(2FMTCB)(2) and Co(4FMTCB)(3) have been determined by X-ray diffraction. The antibacterial properties of these compounds against the bacteria, E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, B. subtilis, P. aeruginosa, and Shewanella sp. were investigated. The experiments showed that both compounds and the complexes had the antibacterial activities against all of the studied bacteria. The thioylbenzamides had stronger controls for the bacteria of E. coli, S. aureus, B. subtilis and P. aeruginosa than their corresponding cobalt complexes. There was the contrary result against the bacteria of Shewanella sp. The para-substitution of fluorine atom increased antibacterial activities, while fluorine atom was substituted on ortho-benzoyl, the antibacterial activity weakened. The thioylbenzamides linked to piperidine instead of a morpholine group may increase the antibacterial activities.

  13. Hyperthermia and chemotherapy using Fe(Salen) nanoparticles might impact glioblastoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Ohtake, Makoto; Umemura, Masanari; Sato, Itaru; Akimoto, Taisuke; Oda, Kayoko; Nagasako, Akane; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Fujita, Takayuki; Yokoyama, Utako; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Hoshino, Yujiro; Ishiba, Mai; Tokura, Susumu; Hara, Masakazu; Muramoto, Tomoya; Yamada, Sotoshi; Masuda, Takatsugu; Aoki, Ichio; Takemura, Yasushi; Murata, Hidetoshi; Eguchi, Haruki; Kawahara, Nobutaka; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-02-20

    We previously reported that μ-oxo N,N'-bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine iron [Fe(Salen)], a magnetic organic compound, has direct anti-tumor activity, and generates heat in an alternating magnetic field (AMF). We showed that Fe(Salen) nanoparticles are useful for combined hyperthermia-chemotherapy of tongue cancer. Here, we have examined the effect of Fe(Salen) on human glioblastoma (GB). Fe(Salen) showed in vitro anti-tumor activity towards several human GB cell lines. It inhibited cell proliferation, and its apoptosis-inducing activity was greater than that of clinically used drugs. Fe(Salen) also showed in vivo anti-tumor activity in the mouse brain. We evaluated the drug distribution and systemic side effects of intracerebrally injected Fe(Salen) nanoparticles in rats. Further, to examine whether hyperthermia, which was induced by exposing Fe(Salen) nanoparticles to AMF, enhanced the intrinsic anti-tumor effect of Fe(Salen), we used a mouse model grafted with U251 cells on the left leg. Fe(Salen), BCNU, or normal saline was injected into the tumor in the presence or absence of AMF exposure. The combination of Fe(Salen) injection and AMF exposure showed a greater anti-tumor effect than did either Fe(Salen) or BCNU alone. Our results indicate that hyperthermia and chemotherapy with single-drug nanoparticles could be done for GB treatment.

  14. Hyperthermia and chemotherapy using Fe(Salen) nanoparticles might impact glioblastoma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ohtake, Makoto; Umemura, Masanari; Sato, Itaru; Akimoto, Taisuke; Oda, Kayoko; Nagasako, Akane; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Fujita, Takayuki; Yokoyama, Utako; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Hoshino, Yujiro; Ishiba, Mai; Tokura, Susumu; Hara, Masakazu; Muramoto, Tomoya; Yamada, Sotoshi; Masuda, Takatsugu; Aoki, Ichio; Takemura, Yasushi; Murata, Hidetoshi; Eguchi, Haruki; Kawahara, Nobutaka; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    We previously reported that μ-oxo N,N’-bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine iron [Fe(Salen)], a magnetic organic compound, has direct anti-tumor activity, and generates heat in an alternating magnetic field (AMF). We showed that Fe(Salen) nanoparticles are useful for combined hyperthermia-chemotherapy of tongue cancer. Here, we have examined the effect of Fe(Salen) on human glioblastoma (GB). Fe(Salen) showed in vitro anti-tumor activity towards several human GB cell lines. It inhibited cell proliferation, and its apoptosis-inducing activity was greater than that of clinically used drugs. Fe(Salen) also showed in vivo anti-tumor activity in the mouse brain. We evaluated the drug distribution and systemic side effects of intracerebrally injected Fe(Salen) nanoparticles in rats. Further, to examine whether hyperthermia, which was induced by exposing Fe(Salen) nanoparticles to AMF, enhanced the intrinsic anti-tumor effect of Fe(Salen), we used a mouse model grafted with U251 cells on the left leg. Fe(Salen), BCNU, or normal saline was injected into the tumor in the presence or absence of AMF exposure. The combination of Fe(Salen) injection and AMF exposure showed a greater anti-tumor effect than did either Fe(Salen) or BCNU alone. Our results indicate that hyperthermia and chemotherapy with single-drug nanoparticles could be done for GB treatment. PMID:28218292

  15. Paramagnetic Europium Salen Complex and Sickle-Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynter, Clive I.; Ryan, D. H.; May, Leopold; Oliver, F. W.; Brown, Eugene; Hoffman, Eugene J.; Bernstein, David

    2005-04-01

    A new europium salen complex, Eu(salen)2NH4, was synthesized, and its composition was confirmed by chemical analysis and infrared spectroscopy. Further characterization was carried out by 151 Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Mössbauer spectroscopic measurements were made at varying temperatures between 9 K and room temperature and a value of Debye temperature of 133 ±5 K was computed. Both Mössbauer and magnetic susceptibility measurements confirmed the paramagnetic behavior of this complex and the trivalent state of the europium ion. In view of the fact that the "odd" paramagnetic molecule NO has been shown to reverse sickling of red blood cells in sickle cell anemia, the interaction between the paramagnetic europium salen complex and sickle cells was examined after incubation with this europium complex and shown to have similar effects.

  16. Simultaneous Determination of Cobalt(II) and Nickel(II) by Fourth-Order Derivative Spectrophotometric Method Using 2-Hydroxy-3-Methoxy Benzaldehyde Thiosemicarbazone

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A. Praveen; Reddy, P. Raveendra; Reddy, V. Krishna

    2007-01-01

    A simple and new simultaneous fourth derivative spectrophotometric method is proposed for the analysis of a two-component system containing cobalt(II) and nickel(II) without separation using 2-hydroxy-3-methoxy benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (HMBATSC) as a chromophoric reagent. The reagent reacts with cobalt(II) and nickel(II) at pH 6.0, forming soluble brown and yellow colored species, respectively. Cobalt(II) and nickel(II) present in themixture are simultaneously determined without solving the simultaneous equations bymeasuring the fourth derivative amplitudes at 468.5 nm and 474.5 nm, respectively. The derivative amplitudes obey Beer's law at 468.5 nm and 474.5 nm for Co(II) and Ni(II) in the range 0.059–3.299 μg mL−1 and 0.058–3.285 μg mL−1 respectively. A large number of foreign ions do not interfere in the present method. The present simultaneous method is used for the determination of micro amounts of cobalt in biological samples, nickel in plant samples, and in some alloy steels and soil sample. PMID:17671609

  17. Structural and oxo-transfer reactivity differences of hexacoordinate and pentacoordinate (nitro)(tetraphenylporphinato)cobalt(III) derivatives.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, J; Bailey, R; Pennington, W; Rasberry, R; Green, T; Shasho, S; Yongsavanh, M; Echevarria, V; Tiedeken, J; Brown, C; Fromm, G; Lyerly, S; Watson, N; Long, A; De Nitto, N

    2001-08-13

    The oxo-transfer catalyst (nitro)(pyridyl)cobalt(III) tetraphenylporphyrin has been reinvestigated by substitution of the distal pyridine ligand with 4-N,N-dimethylaminopyridine and 3,5-dichloropyridine. Differences in their structures and in the reactivity of the compounds toward catalytic secondary oxo transfer were investigated by FT-IR and UV-visible spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, X-ray diffraction, semiempirical calculations, and reactions with alkenes in dichloromethane solution. Very modest differences in the hexacoordinate compounds' structures were predicted and observed, but the secondary oxo-transfer reactivity at the nitro ligand varies markedly with the basicity of the pyridine ligand and the position of the coordination equilibrium. Oxo transfer occurs rapidly through the pentacoordinate species (nitro)cobalt(III) tetraphenylporphyrin that is generated by dissociation of the pyridine ligand and therefore is strongly related to the Hammett parameters of these nitrogenous bases. The reactive pentacoordinate species CoTPP(NO(2)) can be generated in solution by addition of lithium perchlorate to (py)CoTPP(NO(2)) by Lewis acid-base interactions or more simply by using the weaker Lewis base Cl(2)py instead of py as the distal ligand. In contrast to pentacoordinate (nitro)iron porphyrins, disproportionation reactions of CoTPP(NO(2)) compound are not evident. This pentacoordinate derivative, CoTPP(NO(2)), is reactive enough to stoichiometrically oxidize allyl bromide in minutes. Preliminary catalytic oxidation reaction studies of alkenes also indicate the involvement of both radical and nonradical oxo-transfer steps in the mechanism, suggesting formation of a peroxynitro intermediate in the reaction of the reduced CoTPP(NO) with O(2).

  18. Role of oxygen in the regulation of Leydig tumor derived MA-10 cell steroid production: the effect of cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anand; Rani, Lata; Dhole, Bodhana

    2014-04-01

    We have earlier shown that cobalt chloride (CoCl2)-induced hypoxia and second messenger 8-bromoadenosine 3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP) stimulates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in Leydig tumor cell derived MA-10 cells. Both stimuli follow common signal transduction pathways including protein kinase A (PK-A), extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase/akt (PI3-K/Akt) pathways in the stimulation of VEGF by MA-10 cells. In the present study we investigated the role of CoCl2 and 8-Br-cAMP on steroid production in MA-10 cells. The MA-10 cells were cultured in Waymouth MB 752/1 medium, supplemented with 15% heat inactivated horse serum. Progesterone was estimated by radioimmunoassay (RIA).We report that 8-Br-cAMP stimulated progesterone production by the MA-10 cells whereas CoCl2 inhibited the same. Also, 8-Br-cAMP stimulated steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) mRNAs expression. However, CoCl2 had no effect on StAR mRNA. Cobalt chloride directly inhibited the expression of P450scc mRNA. The decrease in progesterone production could be attributed to three different mechanisms, (1) an increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), (2) an increase in HIF-1α activity, and (3) ultimately a decrease in the level of cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage (CYT P450scc). Hypoxia has an action and mechanism of action similar to that of gonadotropins on VEGF production, whereas they have a contrasting effect on steroidogenesis. This study suggests that hypoxia could be as important as gonadotropins in regulating Leydig cell steroidogenesis.

  19. Spectrophotometric Determination of Iron(II) and Cobalt(II) by Direct, Derivative, and Simultaneous Methods Using 2-Hydroxy-1-Naphthaldehyde-p-Hydroxybenzoichydrazone.

    PubMed

    Devi, V S Anusuya; Reddy, V Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Optimized and validated spectrophotometric methods have been proposed for the determination of iron and cobalt individually and simultaneously. 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde-p-hydroxybenzoichydrazone (HNAHBH) reacts with iron(II) and cobalt(II) to form reddish-brown and yellow-coloured [Fe(II)-HNAHBH] and [Co(II)-HNAHBH] complexes, respectively. The maximum absorbance of these complexes was found at 405 nm and 425 nm, respectively. For [Fe(II)-HNAHBH], Beer's law is obeyed over the concentration range of 0.055-1.373 μg mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.095 μg mL(-1) and molar absorptivity ɛ, 5.6 × 10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1). [Co(II)-HNAHBH] complex obeys Beer's law in 0.118-3.534 μg mL(-1) range with a detection limit of 0.04 μg mL(-1) and molar absorptivity, ɛ of 2.3 × 10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1). Highly sensitive and selective first-, second- and third-order derivative methods are described for the determination of iron and cobalt. A simultaneous second-order derivative spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of these metals. All the proposed methods are successfully employed in the analysis of various biological, water, and alloy samples for the determination of iron and cobalt content.

  20. Novel Pd(II)-salen complexes showing high in vitro anti-proliferative effects against human hepatoma cancer by modulating specific regulatory genes.

    PubMed

    Azam, Mohammad; Hussain, Zahid; Warad, Ismail; Al-Resayes, Saud I; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Shakir, Mohammad; Trzesowska-Kruszynska, Agata; Kruszynski, Rafal

    2012-09-21

    We have reported the synthesis of a novel salen ligand and its mononuclear Pd-salen complexes derived from 2-{[2-hydroxy-3-{[(E)-(2-hydroxyphenyl)methylidene]amino}propyl)imino]methyl}phenol. The newly synthesized and isolated Pd(II) complexes have been identified and fully characterized by various physico-chemical studies viz., elemental analyses, IR, UV-Vis, (1)H, (13)C NMR spectroscopy, electron spray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and TGA/DTA studies. The molecular structure of the salen ligand has been ascertained by single-crystal XRD and it is coordinated to Pd(II) ion through two nitrogen and two oxygen atoms. The UV-Vis data clearly suggest a square-planar environment around both the Pd(II) ions. The DNA binding studies of the synthesized compounds has been investigated by electron spectroscopy and fluorescence measurements. The results suggest that Pd(II) complexes bind to DNA strongly as compared to the free ligand. The free salen ligand and its Pd(II) complexes have also been tested against human hepatoma cancer cell line (Huh7) and results manifested exceptional anti-proliferative effects of the Pd(II) complexes. The anti-proliferative activity of Pd(II) complexes has been modulated by specific regulatory genes.

  1. Perfectly alternating copolymerization of CO2 and epichlorohydrin using cobalt(III)-based catalyst systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guang-Peng; Wei, Sheng-Hsuan; Ren, Wei-Min; Lu, Xiao-Bing; Xu, Tie-Qi; Darensbourg, Donald J

    2011-09-28

    Selective transformations of carbon dioxide and epoxides into biodegradable polycarbonates by the alternating copolymerization of the two monomers represent some of the most well-studied and innovative technologies for potential large-scale utilization of carbon dioxide in chemical synthesis. For the most part, previous studies of these processes have focused on the use of aliphatic terminal epoxides or cyclohexene oxide derivatives, with only rare reports concerning the synthesis of CO(2) copolymers from epoxides containing electron-withdrawing groups such as styrene oxide. Herein we report the production of the CO(2) copolymer with more than 99% carbonate linkages from the coupling of CO(2) with epichlorohydrin, employing binary and bifunctional (salen)cobalt(III)-based catalyst systems. Comparative kinetic studies were performed via in situ infrared measurements as a function of temperature to assess the activation barriers for the production of cyclic carbonate versus copolymer involving two electronically different epoxides: epichlorohydrin and propylene oxide. The relative small activation energy difference between copolymer versus cyclic carbonate formation for the epichlorohydrin/CO(2) process (45.4 kJ/mol) accounts in part for the selective synthesis of copolymer to be more difficult in comparison with the propylene oxide/CO(2) case (53.5 kJ/mol). Direct observation of the propagating polymer-chain species from the binary (salen)CoX/MTBD (X = 2,4-dinitrophenoxide and MTBD = 7-methyl-1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene) catalyst system by means of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry confirmed the perfectly alternating nature of the copolymerization process. This observation in combination with control experiments suggests possible intermediates involving MTBD in the CO(2)/epichlorohydrin copolymerization process.

  2. Preparation of dendritic and non-dendritic styryl-substituted Salens for cross-linking suspension copolymerization with styrene and multiple use of the corresponding Mn and Cr complexes in enantioselective epoxidations and hetero-Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Sellner, H; Karjalainen, J K; Seebach, D

    2001-07-02

    Following work with TADDOLs and BINOLs, we have now prepared Salen derivatives (2, 3, 14, 15, 18, 19, 20, 21) carrying two to eight styryl groups for cross-linking copolymerization with styrene. The Salen cores are either derived from (R,R)-diphenyl ethylene diamine (3, 15, 19, 21) or from (R,R)-cyclohexane diamine (2, 14, 18, 20). The styryl groups are attached to the salicylic aldehyde moieties, using Suzuki (cf. 1) or Sonogashira cross-coupling (cf. 11), and/or phenolic etherification (cf. 5, 7) with dendritic styryl-substituted Fréchet-type benzylic branch bromides. Subsequent condensation with the diamines provides the chiral Salens. Corresponding Salens lacking the peripheral vinyl groups (cf. 12, 13, 16, 17) were also prepared for comparison of catalytic activities in homogeneous solution with those in polystyrene. Cross-linking radical suspension copolymerization of styrene and the styryl Salens, following a procedure by Itsuno and Fréchet, gave beads (ca. 400 microm diameter) which were loaded with Mn or Cr (ca. 0.2 mmol of complex per g of polymer), with more than 95% of the Salen incorporated being actually accessible for complexation (by elemental analysis). The polymer-bound Mn and Cr complexes were used as catalysts for epoxidations of six phenyl-substituted olefins (m-CPBA/NMO; products 22a-f), and for dihydropyranone formation from the Danishefsky diene and aldehydes (PhCHO, C5H11CHO, C6H11CHO, products 23a-c). There are several remarkable features of the novel immobilized Salens: i) The dendritic branches do not slow down the catalytic activity of the complexes in solution; ii) the reactions with Salen catalysts incorporated in polystyrene give products of essentially the same enantiopurity as those observed in homogeneous solution with the dendritically substituted or with the original Jacobsen - Katsuki complexes; iii) some Mn-loaded beads have been stored for a year, without loss of activity; iv) especially the biphenyl- and the acetylene

  3. Chiral Co(III)(salen)-catalysed hydrolytic kinetic resolution of racemic epoxides in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chun Rim; Choo, Dong Joon; Shim, Woo Ho; Lee, Dong Hoon; Roh, Eun Joo; Lee, Sang-gi; Song, Choong Eui

    2003-05-07

    In the chiral Co(III)(salen)-catalysed HKR of racemic epoxides, in the presence of ionic liquids, Co(II)(salen) complex is oxidised without acetic acid to catalytically active Co(III)(salen) complex during reaction and, moreover, this oxidation state is stabilised against reduction to Co(II) complex which enables the reuse of the recovered catalyst for consecutive reactions without extra reoxidation.

  4. Sol-gel derived mesoporous cobalt silica catalyst: Synthesis, characterization and its activity in the oxidation of phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andas, Jeyashelly; Adam, Farook; Rahman, Ismail Ab.

    2014-10-01

    Highly mesoporous cobalt silica rice husk catalysts with (5-15 wt.%) Co2+ loading were prepared via a simple sol-gel technique at room temperature. The successful insertion of cobalt ions into silica matrix was evidenced from FT-IR, NMR, XPS and AAS analyses. Preservation of the mesoporosity nature of silica upon incorporating Co2+ was confirmed from the N2-sorption studies. The topography and morphology viewed by TEM analysis differs as the cobalt concentration varies from 5 to 15 wt.%. Parallel pore channels and spherical nanoparticles of 9.44 nm were achieved for cobalt silica catalysts with 10 and 15 wt.% respectively. Cobalt catalysts were active in the liquid-phase oxidation of phenol with H2O2 as an oxygen source. The performances of the catalysts were greatly influenced by various parameters such as reaction temperature, catalyst amount, molar ratio of substrate to oxidant, nature of solvent, metal loading and homogeneous precursor salt. Water served as the best reaction medium for this oxidation system. The regeneration studies confirmed cobalt catalyst could be reused for five cycles without experiencing large loss in the conversion. Both leaching and reusability studies testified that the catalysts were truly heterogeneous.

  5. Iron(III) [bond] Salen complexes as enzyme models: mechanistic study of oxo(salen)iron complexes oxygenation of organic sulfides.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramanian, Veluchamy Kamaraj; Ganesan, Muniyandi; Rajagopal, Seenivasan; Ramaraj, Ramasamy

    2002-03-08

    The oxidation of a series of para-substituted phenyl methyl sulfides was carried out with several oxo(salen)iron (salen = N,N'-bis(salicylidine)ethylenediaminato) complexes in acetonitrile. The oxo complex [O=Fe(IV)(salen)](*+), generated from an iron(III) [bond] salen complex and iodosylbenzene, effectively oxidizes the organic sulfides to the corresponding sulfoxides. The formation of [O [double bond] Fe(IV)(salen)](*+) as the active oxidant is supported by resonance Raman studies. The kinetic data indicate that the reaction is first-order in the oxidant and fractional-order with respect to sulfide. The observed saturation kinetics of the reaction and spectral data indicate that the substrate binds to the oxidant before the rate-controlling step. The rate constant (k) values for the product formation step determined using Michaelis-Menten kinetics correlate well with Hammett sigma constants, giving reaction constant (rho) values in the range of -0.65 to -1.54 for different oxo(salen)iron complexes. The log k values observed in the oxidation of each aryl methyl sulfide by substituted oxo(salen)iron complexes also correlate with Hammett sigma constants, giving positive rho values. The substituent effect, UV-vis absorption, and EPR spectral studies indicate oxygen atom transfer from the oxidant to the substrate in the rate-determining step.

  6. Direct measurements of atmospheric iron, cobalt, and aluminum-derived dust deposition at Kerguelen Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimburger, A.; Losno, R.; Triquet, S.; Dulac, F.; Mahowald, N.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition is one of the major sources of nutrients bringing trace metals to remote marine biota. In this study, total atmospheric deposition and crustal aerosol concentrations were monitored at Kerguelen Islands (49°18'S; 70°07'E) in the Southern Ocean during a short campaign in early 2005 and then continuously for about 2 years (2009-2010). Results show very low levels of atmospheric dust and trace metals concentrations but higher deposition fluxes than expected. The averaged total dust deposition flux as derived from Al deposition measurements is 659 μg m-2 d-1. Simultaneously measured Fe and Co deposition fluxes are respectively 29 μg m-2 d-1 (520 nmol m-2 d-1) and 0.014 μg m-2 d-1 (0.24 nmol m-2 d-1), giving typically crustal elemental ratios to Al of 0.54 and 2.6 10-4. Measured dust deposition is in relatively good agreement with those simulated by current atmospheric models, but suggest that previous indirect calculations from field experiments are too low by a factor of 20. Observations and model results show that dust is transported above the marine atmospheric boundary layer to Kerguelen Islands, and thus that surface concentrations are not representative of the total dust column. Indeed, using surface concentrations leads to very large computed wet scavenging ratios, and to the conclusion that it is not appropriate to derive deposition fluxes from surface concentrations at remote ocean sites.

  7. Gas-phase and solution-phase polymerization of epoxides by Cr(salen) complexes: evidence for a dinuclear cationic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Schön, Eva; Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhou, Zhiping; Chisholm, Malcolm H; Chen, Peter

    2004-11-15

    The gas-phase reactions of a series of mass-selected mononuclear and dinuclear Cr(salen) complexes with propylene oxide suggest that the enhanced reactivity of the dinuclear complexes in gas-phase and in solution may derive from a dicationic mechanism in which the alkoxide chain is mu(2)-coordinated to two Lewis acidic metal centers. The double coordination is proposed to suppress backbiting, and hence chain-transfer in the gas-phase homopolymerization of epoxides.

  8. Synthesis and structure of new mononuclear octahedral cobalt(III) dioximates derived from isonicotinic hydrazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocu, Maria; Bulhac, Ion; Coropceanu, Eduard; Melnic, Elena; Shova, Sergiu; Ciobanica, Olga; Gutium, Victoria; Bourosh, Paulina

    2014-04-01

    New organic ligand L (1) resulting from isonicotinic hydrazide and 2,4-pentanedione has been prepared and investigated by physicochemical methods, including elemental analysis, 1H and 13C NMR, IR spectroscopy and X-ray studies. The X-ray investigation revealed that the condensation of 2,4-pentanedione with isonicotinic hydrazide is accompanied by the formation of a five-membered ring including three carbon atoms of 2,4-pentanedione and two nitrogen atoms of the isonicotinic hydrazide fragment. The reaction between [Co(DfgH)2Br(H2O)] (DfgH2 = diphenylglyoxime) and L resulted in the formation of the mononuclear octahedral complex [Co(DfgH)2BrL] (2) with the substitution of the water molecule in the apical position by the ligand L. The reaction starting from [Co(DmgH)2Cl(H2O)] (DmgH = dimethylglyoxime) and L resulted in the mononuclear octahedral Co(III) complex with the composition [Co(DmgH)2ClL‧] (3), where L‧ unexpectedly represents a dehydrated derivative of L. The two coordination compounds are characterized by X-ray diffraction method. The IR, 1H NMR spectral studies of new compounds are also reported.

  9. Synthesis and photophysical properties of water-soluble sulfonato-Salen-type Schiff bases and their applications of fluorescence sensors for Cu2+ in water and living cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Cai, Peiying; Feng, Yan; Cheng, Jinghui; Xiang, Haifeng; Liu, Jin; Wu, Di; Zhou, Xiangge

    2012-07-20

    A series of water-soluble sulfonato-Salen-type ligands derived from different diamines including 1,2-ethylenediamine (Et-1-Et-4), 1,2-cyclohexanediamine (Cy-1 and Cy-2), 1,2-phenylenediamine (Ph-1-Ph-3 and PhMe-1-PhMe-4), and dicyano-1,2-ethenediamine (CN-1) has been designed and prepared. Sulfonate groups of ligands ensure good stability and solubility in water without affecting their excited state properties. These ligands exhibit strong UV/Vis-absorption and blue, green, or orange fluorescence. Time-dependent-density functional theory calculations have been undertaken to reveal the influence of ligand nature, especially sulfonate groups, on the frontier molecular orbitals. Since their fluorescence is selectively quenched by Cu(2+), the sulfonato-Salen-type ligands can be used as highly selective and sensitive turn-off fluorescence sensors for the detection of Cu(2+) in water and fluorescence imaging in living cells.

  10. Binding of transition metal ions [cobalt, copper, nickel and zinc] with furanyl-, thiophenyl-, pyrrolyl-, salicylyl- and pyridyl-derived cephalexins as potent antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Zahid H; Pervez, Humayun; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Rauf, A; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2004-02-01

    A method is described for the preparation of novel cephalexin-derived furanyl-, thiophenyl-, pyrrolyl-, salicylyl- and pyridyl-containing compounds showing potent antibacterial activity. The binding of these newly synthesized antibacterial agents with metal ions such as cobalt(II), copper(II), nickel(II) and zinc(II) has been studied and their inhibitory properties against various bacterial species such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae are also reported. These results suggest that metal ions to possess an important role in the designing of metal-based antibacterials and that such complexes are more effective against infectious diseases compared to the uncomplexed drugs.

  11. Influence of chirality using Mn(III) salen complexes on DNA binding and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Khan, Noor-Ul H; Pandya, Nirali; Kumar, Manoj; Bera, Prasanta Kumar; Kureshy, Rukhsana I; Abdi, Sayed H R; Bajaj, Hari C

    2010-10-07

    Chiral Mn(iii) salen complexes S-1, R-1, S-2, R-2, S-3 and R-3 derived from the respective chiral salen ligands, viz., (1S,2S)-N,N'-bis-[3-tert-butyl-5-chloromethyl-salicylidine]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine S-1'/(1R,2R)-N,N'-bis-[3-tert-butyl-5-chloromethyl-salicylidine]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine R-1'/(1S,2S)-N,N'-bis-[3-tert-butyl-5-N,N'N'triethylaminomethyl-salicylidine]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine dichloride S-2'/(1R,2R)-N,N'-bis-[3-tert-butyl-5-N,N'N'triethylaminomethyl-salicylidine]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine dichloride R-2'/(1S,2S)-N,N'-bis-[3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine S-3' and (1R,2R)-N,N'-bis-[3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine R-3', were synthesized. Characterization of the complexes was done by microanalysis, IR, LC-MS, UV-vis. and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Binding of these complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was studied by absorption spectroscopy, competitive binding study, viscosity measurements, circular dichroism measurements, thermal denaturation study and observation of their different antioxidant activities. Among all the complexes used, the best result in terms of binding constant (intercalative) (130.4 x 10(4)) was achieved with the complex S-1 by spectroscopic titration. The complex S-1 showed strong antioxidant activity as well.

  12. Mini-ISES identifies promising carbafructopyranose-based salens for asymmetric catalysis: Tuning ligand shape via the anomeric effect

    PubMed Central

    Karukurichi, Kannan R.; Fei, Xiang; Swyka, Robert A.; Broussy, Sylvain; Shen, Weijun; Dey, Sangeeta; Roy, Sandip K.; Berkowitz, David B.

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces new methods of screening for and tuning chiral space and in so doing identifies a promising set of chiral ligands for asymmetric synthesis. The carbafructopyranosyl-1,2-diamine(s) and salens constructed therefrom are particularly compelling. It is shown that by removing the native anomeric effect in this ligand family, one can tune chiral ligand shape and improve chiral bias. This concept is demonstrated by a combination of (i) x-ray crystallographic structure determination, (ii) assessment of catalytic performance, and (iii) consideration of the anomeric effect and its underlying dipolar basis. The title ligands were identified by a new mini version of the in situ enzymatic screening (ISES) procedure through which catalyst-ligand combinations are screened in parallel, and information on relative rate and enantioselectivity is obtained in real time, without the need to quench reactions or draw aliquots. Mini-ISES brings the technique into the nanomole regime (200 to 350 nmol catalyst/20 μl organic volume) commensurate with emerging trends in reaction development/process chemistry. The best-performing β-d-carbafructopyranosyl-1,2-diamine–derived salen ligand discovered here outperforms the best known organometallic and enzymatic catalysts for the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of 3-phenylpropylene oxide, one of several substrates examined for which the ligand is “matched.” This ligand scaffold defines a new swath of chiral space, and anomeric effect tunability defines a new concept in shaping that chiral space. Both this ligand set and the anomeric shape-tuning concept are expected to find broad application, given the value of chiral 1,2-diamines and salens constructed from these in asymmetric catalysis. PMID:26501130

  13. Mechanistic investigation of the reaction of epoxides with heterocumulenes catalysed by a bimetallic aluminium salen complex.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Christopher; North, Michael

    2014-06-23

    The bimetallic aluminium(salen) complex [(Al(salen))2O] is known to catalyse the reaction between epoxides and heterocumulenes (carbon dioxide, carbon disulfide and isocyanates) leading to five-membered ring heterocycles. Despite their apparent similarities, these three reactions have very different mechanistic features, and a kinetic study of oxazolidinone synthesis combined with previous kinetic work on cyclic carbonate and cyclic dithiocarbonate synthesis showed that all three reactions follow different rate equations. An NMR study of [Al(salen)]2O and phenylisocyanate provided evidence for an interaction between them, consistent with the rate equation data. A variable-temperature kinetics study on all three reactions showed that cyclic carbonate synthesis had a lower enthalpy of activation and a more negative entropy of activation than the other two heterocycle syntheses. The kinetic study was extended to oxazolidinone synthesis catalysed by the monometallic complex Al(salen)Cl, and this reaction was found to have a much less negative entropy of activation than any reaction catalysed by [Al(salen)]2O, a result that can be explained by the partial dissociation of an oligomeric Al(salen)Cl complex. A mechanistic rationale for all of the results is presented in terms of [Al(salen)]2O being able to function as a Lewis acid and/or a Lewis base, depending upon the susceptibility of the heterocumulene to reaction with nucleophiles.

  14. Prussian blue analogue derived magnetic carbon/cobalt/iron nanocomposite as an efficient and recyclable catalyst for activation of peroxymonosulfate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew; Chen, Bo-Jau

    2017-01-01

    A Prussian blue analogue, cobalt hexacyanoferrate Co3[Fe(CN)6]2, was used for the first time to prepare a magnetic carbon/cobalt/iron (MCCI) nanocomposite via one-step carbonization of Co3[Fe(CN)6]2. The resulting MCCI consisted of evenly-distributed cobalt and cobalt ferrite in a porous carbonaceous matrix, making it an attractive magnetic heterogeneous catalyst for activating peroxymonosulfate (PMS). As Rhodamine B (RhB) degradation was adopted as a model test for evaluating activation capability of MCCI, factors influencing RhB degradation were thoroughly examined, including MCCI and PMS dosages, temperature, pH, salt and radical scavengers. A higher MCCI dosage noticeably facilitated the degradation kinetics, whereas insufficient PMS dosage led to ineffective degradation. RhB degradation by MCCI-activated PMS was much more favorable at high temperatures and under neutral conditions. The presence of high concentration of salt slightly interfered with RhB degradation by MCCI-activated PMS. Through examining effects of radical scavengers, RhB degradation by MCCI-activated PMS can be primarily attributed to sulfate radicals instead of a combination of sulfate and hydroxyl radicals. Compared to Co3O4, a typical catalyst for PMS activation, MCCI also exhibited a higher catalytic activity for activating PMS. In addition, MCCI was proven as a durable and recyclable catalyst for activating PMS over multiple cycles without efficiency loss and significant changes of chemical characteristics. These features demonstrate that MCCI, simply prepared from a one-step carbonization of Co3[Fe(CN)6]2 is a promising heterogeneous catalyst for activating PMS to degrade organic pollutants.

  15. Antiferromagnetic Ordering of Mn(III)F(salen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, M. W.; Wang, Tong; Brown, S. E.; Botko, M.; Čižmár, E.; Risset, O. N.; Talham, D. R.

    2014-03-01

    Due to a report suggesting Mn(III)F(salen), salen = H14C16N2O2, is an S = 2 Haldane system with J /kB = 50 K and no long-range order down to 2 K based on standard magnetometry studies,[2] specific heat and NMR measurements were performed. Using small single crystals, specific heat studies revealed the presence of an anomaly near 23 K, and this response was robust in fields up to 9 T. The 1H NMR results performed on a single crystal in 1 T revealed a sharp transition characteristic of antiferromagnetic ordering at 22.5 K. Measuring the magnetic response of the same single crystal in a commercial magnetometer reveals the presence of a subtle feature, near 23 K, that is not resolved with as-grown, randomlly oriented microcrystalline samples. These findings provide insight into the results obtained in torque magnetometry, EPR, and neutron scattering data.[3] Supported by NSF via DMR-1202033 (MWM), DMR-1105531 (SEB), DMR-1005581 (DRT), and DMR-1157490 (NHMFL), by the Slovak Agency for Research and Development via APVV-0132-11 (EČ), and by the Fulbright Commission of the Slovak Republic (MWM).

  16. Bifunctional metal-salen complexes as efficient catalysts for the fixation of CO2 with epoxides under solvent-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Miao, Cheng-Xia; Wang, Jin-Quan; Wu, Ying; Du, Ya; He, Liang-Nian

    2008-01-01

    A bifunctional cobalt-salen complex containing a Lewis acidic metal center and a quaternary phosphonium salt unit anchored on the ligand effectively catalyzes the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from CO2 and epoxides under mild conditions without the utilization of additional organic solvents or co-catalysts. The effects of various reaction variables on the catalytic performance were studied in detail and indicate an optimized reaction temperature of about I00 degrees C and CO2 pressure of around 4 MPa, although the reaction proceeds smoothly even at pressures as low as 2 MPa. The catalyst is applicable to a variety of epoxides, producing the corresponding cyclic carbonates in good yields in most cases. Furthermore, the catalyst can be easily recovered and reused several times without significant loss of its catalytic activity. This process thus represents a greener pathway for the environmentally benign chemical fixation of CO2 to produce cyclic carbonates.

  17. Cobalt poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... the wear and tear of some cobalt/chromium metal-on-metal hip implants. This type of implant is an ... hip socket that is created by fitting a metal ball into a metal cup. Sometimes, metal particles ( ...

  18. Enhanced cooperativity through design: pendant Co(III)--salen polymer brush catalysts for the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of epichlorohydrin (salen=N,N'-bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine dianion).

    PubMed

    Gill, Christopher S; Venkatasubbaiah, Krishnan; Phan, Nam T S; Weck, Marcus; Jones, Christopher W

    2008-01-01

    The Co(III)--salen-catalyzed (salen=N,N'-bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine dianion) hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of racemic epoxides has emerged as a highly attractive and efficient method of synthesizing chiral C(3) building blocks for intermediates in larger, more complex molecules. HKR reaction rates have displayed a second order dependency on the concentration of active sites, and thus researchers have proposed a bimetallic transition state for the HKR mechanism. Here we report the utilization of pendant Co(III)--salen catalysts on silica supported polymer brushes as a catalyst for the HKR of epichlorohydrin. The novel polymer brush architecture provided a unique framework for promoting site-site interactions as required in the proposed bimetallic transition state of the HKR mechanism. Furthermore, the polymer brushes mimic the environment of soluble polymer-based catalysts, whereas the silica support permitted facile recovery and reuse of the catalyst. The polymer brush catalyst displayed increased activities over the soluble Jacobsen Co--salen catalyst and was observed to retain its high enantioselectivities (>99 %) after each of five reactions despite decreasing activities. Analysis indicated decomposition of the salen ligand as an underlying cause of catalyst deactivation.

  19. Soft-Landing of CoIII(salen)+ and MnIII(salen)+ on Self-Assembled Monolayer Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Wang, Peng; Hadjar, Omar

    2010-03-25

    Soft-landing of mass-selected CoIII(salen)+ and MnIII(salen)+ complexes was performed using self-assembled monolayer surfaces of alkanethiol (HSAM) and fluorinated alkanethiol (FSAM) on gold as targets. Physical processes associated with ion deposition were studied using time-resolved in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in a specially designed Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). We demonstrate charge retention by a significant fraction of precursor ions on the FSAM and complete neutralization on the HSAM surface. Our results indicate efficient electron transfer from gold to the deposited species for the HSAM surface and inefficient, if any, electron transfer on the FSAM surface. Formation of abundant cluster ions observed in SIMS spectra is attributed to gas-phase reactions in the SIMS plume. Detailed analysis allowed us to extract the kinetics of both ionic and neutral complexes trapped on the FSAM surface. The results indicate that neutralization on this surface most likely takes place on the defect sites.

  20. Binding, Electrochemical Activation and Cleavage of DNA by Cobalt(II)tetrakis-N-Methylpyridyl Porphyrin and its β-Pyrrole Brominated Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Yellappa, Shivaraj; Seetharamappa, Jaldappagari; Rogers, Lisa M.; Chitta, Raghu; Singhal, Ram P.; D’Souza, Francis

    2008-01-01

    The binding of nucleic acids by water soluble cobalt(II) tetrakis-N-methylpyridyl porphyrin, (TMPyP)Co and its highly electron deficient derivative, cobalt(II) tetrakis-N-methyl pyridyl-β-octabromoporphyrin, (Br8TMPyP)Co was investigated by UV-visible absorption, circular dichroism (CD), electrochemical and gel electrophoresis methods. The changes of the absorption spectra during the titration of these complexes with polynucleotides revealed a shift in the absorption maxima and a hypochromicity of the porphyrin Soret bands. The intrinsic binding constants were found to be in the range of 105 – 106 M−1. These values were higher for more electron deficient (Br8TMPyP)Co. Induced CD bands were noticed in the Soret region of the complexes due to the interaction of these complexes with different polynucleotides and an analysis of the CD spectra supported mainly external mode of binding. Electrochemical studies revealed the cleavage of polynucleotide by (TMPyP)Co and (Br8TMPyP)Co in the presence of oxygen preferentially at the A-T base pair region. Gel electrophoresis experiments further supported the cleavage of nucleic acids. The results indicate that the β-pyrrole brominated porphyrin, (Br8TMPyP)Co binds strongly and cleaves nucleic acids efficiently as compared to (TMPyP)Co. This electrolytic procedure offers a unique tool in biotechnology for cleaving double-stranded DNA with specificity at the A-T regions. PMID:17105219

  1. Mechanochemical effect in the iron(III) spin crossover complex [Fe(3-MeO-salenEt2]PF6 as studied by heat capacity calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Sorai, Michio; Burriel, Ramón; Westrum, Edgar F; Hendrickson, David N

    2008-04-10

    Magnetic and thermal properties of the iron(III) spin crossover complex [Fe(3MeO-salenEt)(2)]PF(6) are very sensitive to mechanochemical perturbations. Heat capacities for unperturbed and differently perturbed samples were precisely determined by adiabatic calorimetry at temperatures in the 10-300 K range. The unperturbed compound shows a cooperative spin crossover transition at 162.31 K, presenting a hysteresis of 2.8 K. The anomalous enthalpy and entropy contents of the transition were evaluated to be Delta(trs)H = 5.94 kJ mol(-1) and Delta(trs)S = 36.7 J K(-1) mol(-1), respectively. By mechanochemical treatments, (1) the phase transition temperature was lowered by 1.14 K, (2) the enthalpy and entropy gains at the phase transition due to the spin crossover phenomenon were diminished to Delta(trs)H = 4.94 kJ mol(-1) and Delta(trs)S = 31.1 J K(-1) mol(-1), and (3) the lattice heat capacities were larger than those of the unperturbed sample over the whole temperature range. In spite of different mechanical perturbations (grinding with a mortar and pestle and grinding in a ball-mill), two sets of heat capacity measurements provided basically the same results. The mechanochemical perturbation exerts its effect more strongly on the low-spin state than on the high-spin state. It shows a substantial increase of the number of iron(III) ions in the high-spin state below the transition temperature. The heat capacities of the diamagnetic cobalt(III) analogue [Co(3MeO-salenEt)(2)]PF(6) also were measured. The lattice heat capacity of the iron compounds has been estimated from either the measurements on the cobalt complex using a corresponding states law or the effective frequency distribution method. These estimations have been used for the evaluation of the transition anomaly.

  2. Pair of diastereomeric uranyl salen cavitands displaying opposite enantiodiscrimination of α-amino acid ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Andrea; Amato, Maria E; Ballistreri, Francesco P; Tomaselli, Gaetano A; Toscano, Rosa Maria; Trusso Sfrazzetto, Giuseppe

    2012-09-07

    A pair of diastereomeric salen cavitands and their uranyl complexes combine a chiral (R,R) salen bridge and an inherent chiral tris-bridged quinoxaline cup within the same molecule. Whereas the free ligands show a preference for the same enantiomer of an α-amino acid pair, the corresponding UO(2) complexes display opposite enantiodiscrimination and exceptionally high enantioselectivities (K(D)/K(L) = 26.4).

  3. Polyolefin-supported recoverable/reusable Cr(III)-salen catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bergbreiter, David E; Hobbs, Christopher; Hongfa, Chayanant

    2011-01-21

    The design of functional soluble polyolefins for use as supports for salen ligands and metal complexes is described. Examples and applications that use both polyisobutylene (PIB)- and polyethylene (PE(Olig))-bound recoverable/recyclable salen ligands/metal complexes are detailed. In the case of using PIB as a support, the polymer-bound complexes can be recovered through the use of latent biphasic or a thermomorphic mixed solvent systems. In the case of PE(Olig)-supported complexes, the thermomorphic PE(Olig)-bound salen species can be dissolved in "hot" solvents and quantitatively recovered as solids upon cooling to room temperature. Both the PIB- and PE(Olig)-bound salen catalysts were shown to catalyze the ring-opening of epoxides with various nucleophiles. Both sorts of polyolefin-bound catalysts can be recycled and reused with no observed loss in activity. However, limitations of catalyst concentration make chiral versions of these complexes uncompetitive in comparison to conventional chiral salen catalysts that can be used in neat substrate at higher concentration to produce high enantioselectivity in the ring-opening products. The preparation of a PIB-bound "half-salen" catalyst was also briefly examined.

  4. Mechanistic basis for high reactivity of (salen)Co-OTs in the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of terminal epoxides.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lars P C; Zuend, Stephan J; Ford, David D; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2012-03-02

    The (salen)Co(III)-catalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of terminal epoxides is a bimetallic process with a rate controlled by partitioning between a nucleophilic (salen)Co-OH catalyst and a Lewis acidic (salen)Co-X catalyst. The commonly used (salen)Co-OAc and (salen)Co-Cl precatalysts undergo complete and irreversible counterion addition to epoxide during the course of the epoxide hydrolysis reaction, resulting in quantitative formation of weakly Lewis acidic (salen)Co-OH and severely diminished reaction rates in the late stages of HKR reactions. In contrast, (salen)Co-OTs maintains high reactivity over the entire course of HKR reactions. We describe here an investigation of catalyst partitioning with different (salen)Co-X precatalysts and demonstrate that counterion addition to epoxide is reversible in the case of the (salen)Co-OTs. This reversible counterion addition results in stable partitioning between nucleophilic and Lewis acidic catalyst species, allowing highly efficient catalysis throughout the course of the HKR reaction.

  5. Mechanistic Basis for High Reactivity of (salen)Co–OTs in the Hydrolytic Kinetic Resolution of Terminal Epoxides

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Lars P. C.; Zuend, Stephan J.; Ford, David D.; Jacobsen, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    The (salen)Co(III)-catalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of terminal epoxides is a bimetallic process with a rate controlled by partitioning between a nucleophilic (salen)Co–OH catalyst and a Lewis acidic (salen)Co–X catalyst. The commonly used (salen)Co–OAc and (salen)Co–Cl precatalysts undergo complete and irreversible counterion addition to epoxide during the course of the epoxide hydrolysis reaction, resulting in quantitative formation of weakly Lewis acidic (salen)Co–OH, and severely diminished reaction rates in the late stages of HKR reactions. In contrast, (salen)Co–OTs maintains high reactivity over the entire course of HKR reactions. We describe here an investigation of catalyst partitioning with different (salen)Co–X precatalysts, and demonstrate that counterion addition to epoxide is reversible in the case of the (salen)Co–OTs. This reversible counterion addition results in stable partitioning between nucleophilic and Lewis acidic catalyst species, allowing highly efficient catalysis throughout the course of the HKR reaction. PMID:22292515

  6. Metal-Based Biologically Active Compounds: Synthesis, Spectral, and Antimicrobial Studies of Cobalt, Nickel, Copper, and Zinc Complexes of Triazole-Derived Schiff Bases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kiran; Kumar, Yogender; Puri, Parvesh; Sharma, Chetan; Aneja, Kamal Rai

    2011-01-01

    A series of cobalt, nickel, copper, and zinc complexes of bidentate Schiff bases derived from the condensation reaction of 4-amino-5-mercapto-3-methyl/ethyl-1,2,4-triazole with 2,4-dichlorobenzaldehyde were synthesized and tested as antimicrobial agents. The synthesized Schiff bases and their metal complexes were characterized with the aid of elemental analyses, magnetic moment measurements, spectroscopic and thermogravimetric techniques. The presence of coordinated water in metal complexes was supported by infrared and thermal gravimetric studies. A square planar geometry was suggested for Cu(II) and octahedral geometry proposed for Co(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) complexes. The Schiff bases and their metal complexes have been screened for antibacterial (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis) and antifungal activities (Aspergillus niger, A. flavus). The metal complexes exhibited significantly enhanced antibacterial and antifungal activity as compared to their simple Schiff bases. PMID:22216017

  7. High-level production of ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway-derived dicarboxylic acids by Methylobacterium extorquens under cobalt-deficient conditions and by polyhydroxybutyrate negative strains.

    PubMed

    Sonntag, Frank; Müller, Jonas E N; Kiefer, Patrick; Vorholt, Julia A; Schrader, Jens; Buchhaupt, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Bio-based production of dicarboxylic acids is an emerging research field with remarkable progress during the last decades. The recently established synthesis of the ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway (EMCP)-derived dicarboxylic acids, mesaconic acid and (2S)-methylsuccinic acid, from the alternative carbon source methanol (Sonntag et al., Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 98:4533-4544, 2014) gave a proof of concept for the sustainable production of hitherto biotechnologically inaccessible monomers. In this study, substantial optimizations of the process by different approaches are presented. Abolishment of mesaconic and (2S)-methylsuccinic acid reuptake from culture supernatant and a productivity increase were achieved by 30-fold decreased sodium ion availability in culture medium. Undesired flux from EMCP into polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) cycle was hindered by the knockout of polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase phaC which was concomitant with 5-fold increased product concentrations. However, frequently occurring suppressors of strain ΔphaC lost their beneficial properties probably due to redirected channeling of acetyl-CoA. Pool sizes of the product precursors were increased by exploiting the presence of two cobalt-dependent mutases in the EMCP: Fine-tuned growth-limiting cobalt concentrations led to 16-fold accumulation of mesaconyl- and (2S)-methylsuccinyl-CoA which in turn resulted in 6-fold increased concentrations of mesaconic and (2S)-methylsuccinic acids, with a combined titer of 0.65 g/l, representing a yield of 0.17 g/g methanol. This work represents an important step toward an industrially relevant production of ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway-derived dicarboxylic acids and the generation of a stable PHB synthesis negative Methylobacterium extorquens strain.

  8. Cobalt superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, P.

    1983-11-15

    Disclosed is a cobalt-base superalloy containing about 32% cobalt, 8% nickel, 26.5% chromium, 2.5% tungsten, 5% niobium, about 1% each manganese and silicon, about 0.4% carbon, and the balance about 23% iron plus incidental impurities and modifiers normally found in alloys of this class. The alloy is readily processed in the form of wrought products, castings, metal powder and all forms of welding and hardfacing materials. The outstanding characteristics of the new alloy include the resistance to cavitation erosion and galling, low cost and minimal use of strategic metals.

  9. Direct observation of enantiomer discrimination of epoxides by chiral salen complexes using ENDOR.

    PubMed

    Fallis, Ian A; Murphy, Damien M; Willock, David J; Tucker, Richard J; Farley, Robert D; Jenkins, Robert; Strevens, Robert R

    2004-12-08

    Electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy was used to investigate the weak enantioselective binding between chiral salen complexes [VO(1)] ((R,R)- and (S,S)-vanadyl N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalcylidene)-1,2-cyclohexanediamine) and chiral epoxides (e.g., (R)-/(S)-propylene epoxide, 5) in frozen (10 K) solution. Differences in epoxide binding by enatiomers of [VO(1)] was evidenced by changes to the 1H epoxide derived peaks in the ENDOR spectra, such that (R,R)-[VO(1)] + (R)-5 and (R,R)-[VO(1)] + (S)-5 yield noticeably different spectra. These changes were assigned to the small structural differences between the diastereomeric metal-epoxide adducts. Simulation of the spectra revealed differences in the VO...1Hepoxide distances for the diastereomeric pairs, which was confirmed by a complementary set of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. While the epoxide molecule is very weakly coordinated, ENDOR measurements of the racemic complex in racemic epoxide nevertheless indicated the preferential coordination of the (R)-5 to (R,R)-[VO(1)] (likewise (S)-(5) to (S,S)-[VO(1)]), which is favored over the binding of (S)-5 epoxide to (R,R)-[VO(1)] (and likewise (R)-5 epoxide to (S,S)-[VO(1)]). This demonstrates the unique power of the ENDOR technique to resolve weak chiral interactions for which EPR spectroscopy alone lacks sufficient resolution.

  10. Asymmetric epoxidation of unfunctionalized alkenes catalyzed by sugar moiety-modified chiral salen-Mn(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiquan; Zhang, Yuecheng; Han, Furong; Zhao, Shanshan

    2009-01-05

    Several chiral Schiff-base ligands with sugar moieties at C-3 (3') or C-5 (5') of salicylaldehyde were synthesized from reaction of salicylaldehyde derivatives with diamine. These ligands coordinated with Mn(III) to afford the corresponding chiral salen-Mn(III) complexes characterized by FT-IR, MS, and elementary analysis. These complexes were used as catalysts for the asymmetric epoxidation of unfunctionalized alkenes. Only weak enantioselectivity is induced by the chiral sugar moieties at C-3 (3') or C-5 (5') in the case of absence of chirality in the diimine bridge moiety. It was also shown that the sugars at C-5 (5') having the same rotation direction of polarized light as the diimine bridge in the catalyst could enhance the chiral induction in the asymmetric epoxidation, but the sugars with the opposite rotation direction would reduce the chiral induction.

  11. PolyHIPE Derived Freestanding 3D Carbon Foam for Cobalt Hydroxide Nanorods Based High Performance Supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Umakant M.; Ghorpade, Ravindra V.; Nam, Min Sik; Nalawade, Archana C.; Lee, Sangrae; Han, Haksoo; Jun, Seong Chan

    2016-10-01

    The current paper describes enhanced electrochemical capacitive performance of chemically grown Cobalt hydroxide (Co(OH)2) nanorods (NRs) decorated porous three dimensional graphitic carbon foam (Co(OH)2/3D GCF) as a supercapacitor electrode. Freestanding 3D porous GCF is prepared by carbonizing, high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) polymerized styrene and divinylbenzene. The PolyHIPE was sulfonated and carbonized at temperature up to 850 °C to obtain graphitic 3D carbon foam with high surface area (389 m2 g‑1) having open voids (14 μm) interconnected by windows (4 μm) in monolithic form. Moreover, entangled Co(OH)2 NRs are anchored on 3D GCF electrodes by using a facile chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The wide porous structure with high specific surface area (520 m2 g‑1) access offered by the interconnected 3D GCF along with Co(OH)2 NRs morphology, displays ultrahigh specific capacitance, specific energy and power. The Co(OH)2/3D GCF electrode exhibits maximum specific capacitance about ~1235 F g‑1 at ~1 A g‑1 charge-discharge current density, in 1 M aqueous KOH solution. These results endorse potential applicability of Co(OH)2/3D GCF electrode in supercapacitors and signifies that, the porous GCF is a proficient 3D freestanding framework for loading pseudocapacitive nanostructured materials.

  12. PolyHIPE Derived Freestanding 3D Carbon Foam for Cobalt Hydroxide Nanorods Based High Performance Supercapacitor

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Umakant M.; Ghorpade, Ravindra V.; Nam, Min Sik; Nalawade, Archana C.; Lee, Sangrae; Han, Haksoo; Jun, Seong Chan

    2016-01-01

    The current paper describes enhanced electrochemical capacitive performance of chemically grown Cobalt hydroxide (Co(OH)2) nanorods (NRs) decorated porous three dimensional graphitic carbon foam (Co(OH)2/3D GCF) as a supercapacitor electrode. Freestanding 3D porous GCF is prepared by carbonizing, high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) polymerized styrene and divinylbenzene. The PolyHIPE was sulfonated and carbonized at temperature up to 850 °C to obtain graphitic 3D carbon foam with high surface area (389 m2 g−1) having open voids (14 μm) interconnected by windows (4 μm) in monolithic form. Moreover, entangled Co(OH)2 NRs are anchored on 3D GCF electrodes by using a facile chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The wide porous structure with high specific surface area (520 m2 g−1) access offered by the interconnected 3D GCF along with Co(OH)2 NRs morphology, displays ultrahigh specific capacitance, specific energy and power. The Co(OH)2/3D GCF electrode exhibits maximum specific capacitance about ~1235 F g−1 at ~1 A g−1 charge-discharge current density, in 1 M aqueous KOH solution. These results endorse potential applicability of Co(OH)2/3D GCF electrode in supercapacitors and signifies that, the porous GCF is a proficient 3D freestanding framework for loading pseudocapacitive nanostructured materials. PMID:27762284

  13. Epoxidation of alkenes catalyzed by phenyl group-modified, periodic mesoporous organosilica-entrapped, dimeric manganese-salen complexes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianglei; Wu, Qingyin; Li, Wei; Ma, Ling; Su, Fang; Guo, Yihang; Qiu, Yongqing

    2011-12-16

    A series of reusable, recoverable, diamine-bridged dimeric manganese-salen complexes were prepared by the encapsulation of homogeneous dimeric Mn(salen) complexes into nanocages of a 3D periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) support followed by silylation of the support with organosilane. The composition, structure, morphology, and textural properties of the prepared PMO-entrapped dimeric Mn(salen) complexes were characterized, and their catalytic performances were tested in the epoxidation of alkenes (styrene, cyclohexene, and 1-phenylcyclohexene), with NaClO as an oxygen source and 4-phenylpyridine-N-oxide as an axial ligand. Furthermore, the influences of the textural and morphological properties of the entrapped dimeric Mn(salen) complexes and the key reaction parameters on the catalytic activity and selectivity are discussed. Finally, the reusability of the supported dimeric Mn(salen) complexes was evaluated over three catalytic runs.

  14. A Metal-Organic Framework Derived Porous Cobalt Manganese Oxide Bifunctional Electrocatalyst for Hybrid Na-Air/Seawater Batteries.

    PubMed

    Abirami, Mari; Hwang, Soo Min; Yang, Juchan; Senthilkumar, Sirugaloor Thangavel; Kim, Junsoo; Go, Woo-Seok; Senthilkumar, Baskar; Song, Hyun-Kon; Kim, Youngsik

    2016-12-07

    Spinel-structured transition metal oxides are promising non-precious-metal electrocatalysts for oxygen electrocatalysis in rechargeable metal-air batteries. We applied porous cobalt manganese oxide (CMO) nanocubes as the cathode electrocatalyst in rechargeable seawater batteries, which are a hybrid-type Na-air battery with an open-structured cathode and a seawater catholyte. The porous CMO nanocubes were synthesized by the pyrolysis of a Prussian blue analogue, Mn3[Co(CN)6]2·nH2O, during air-annealing, which generated numerous pores between the final spinel-type CMO nanoparticles. The porous CMO electrocatalyst improved the redox reactions, such as the oxygen evolution/reduction reactions, at the cathode in the seawater batteries. The battery that used CMO displayed a voltage gap of ∼0.53 V, relatively small compared to that of the batteries employing commercial Pt/C (∼0.64 V) and Ir/C (∼0.73 V) nanoparticles and without any catalyst (∼1.05 V) at the initial cycle. This improved performance was due to the large surface area (catalytically active sites) and the high oxidation states of the randomly distributed Co and Mn cations in the CMO. Using a hard carbon anode, the Na-metal-free seawater battery exhibited a good cycle performance with an average discharge voltage of ∼2.7 V and a discharge capacity of ∼190 mAh g(-1)hard carbon during 100 cycles (energy efficiencies of 74-79%).

  15. A broadly applicable and practical oligomeric (salen) Co catalyst for enantioselective epoxide ring-opening reactions

    PubMed Central

    White, David E.; Tadross, Pamela M.; Lu, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    The (salen) Co catalyst (4a) can be prepared as a mixture of cyclic oligomers in a short, chromatography-free synthesis from inexpensive, commercially available precursors. This catalyst displays remarkable enhancements in reactivity and enantioselectivity relative to monomeric and other multimeric (salen) Co catalysts in a wide variety of enantioselective epoxide ring-opening reactions. The application of catalyst 4a is illustrated in the kinetic resolution of terminal epoxides by nucleophilic ring-opening with water, phenols, and primary alcohols; the desymmetrization of meso epoxides by addition of water and carbamates; and the desymmetrization of oxetanes by intramolecular ring opening with alcohols and phenols. The favorable solubility properties of complex 4a under the catalytic conditions facilitated mechanistic studies, allowing elucidation of the basis for the beneficial effect of oligomerization. Finally, a catalyst selection guide is provided to delineate the specific advantages of oligomeric catalyst 4a relative to (salen) Co monomer 1 for each reaction class. PMID:25045188

  16. A broadly applicable and practical oligomeric (salen) Co catalyst for enantioselective epoxide ring-opening reactions.

    PubMed

    White, David E; Tadross, Pamela M; Lu, Zhe; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2014-07-08

    The (salen) Co catalyst (4a) can be prepared as a mixture of cyclic oligomers in a short, chromatography-free synthesis from inexpensive, commercially available precursors. This catalyst displays remarkable enhancements in reactivity and enantioselectivity relative to monomeric and other multimeric (salen) Co catalysts in a wide variety of enantioselective epoxide ring-opening reactions. The application of catalyst 4a is illustrated in the kinetic resolution of terminal epoxides by nucleophilic ring-opening with water, phenols, and primary alcohols; the desymmetrization of meso epoxides by addition of water and carbamates; and the desymmetrization of oxetanes by intramolecular ring opening with alcohols and phenols. The favorable solubility properties of complex 4a under the catalytic conditions facilitated mechanistic studies, allowing elucidation of the basis for the beneficial effect of oligomerization. Finally, a catalyst selection guide is provided to delineate the specific advantages of oligomeric catalyst 4a relative to (salen) Co monomer 1 for each reaction class.

  17. Inhalation cancer risk assessment of cobalt metal.

    PubMed

    Suh, Mina; Thompson, Chad M; Brorby, Gregory P; Mittal, Liz; Proctor, Deborah M

    2016-08-01

    Cobalt compounds (metal, salts, hard metals, oxides, and alloys) are used widely in various industrial, medical and military applications. Chronic inhalation exposure to cobalt metal and cobalt sulfate has caused lung cancer in rats and mice, as well as systemic tumors in rats. Cobalt compounds are listed as probable or possible human carcinogens by some agencies, and there is a need for quantitative cancer toxicity criteria. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has derived a provisional inhalation unit risk (IUR) of 0.009 per μg/m(3) based on a chronic inhalation study of soluble cobalt sulfate heptahydrate; however, a recent 2-year cancer bioassay affords the opportunity to derive IURs specifically for cobalt metal. The mechanistic data support that the carcinogenic mode of action (MOA) is likely to involve oxidative stress, and thus, non-linear/threshold mechanisms. However, the lack of a detailed MOA and use of high, toxic exposure concentrations in the bioassay (≥1.25 mg/m(3)) preclude derivation of a reference concentration (RfC) protective of cancer. Several analyses resulted in an IUR of 0.003 per μg/m(3) for cobalt metal, which is ∼3-fold less potent than the provisional IUR. Future research should focus on establishing the exposure-response for key precursor events to improve cobalt metal risk assessment.

  18. Olefin oxidation by zeolite-encapsulated Mn(salen) sup + complexes under ambient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, C.; Dutta, P.K. )

    1990-04-01

    Zeolite-encapsulated manganese complex of the salen ligand (N,N{prime}-ethylenebis(salicylideneaminato)) was synthesized, and its catalytic activity toward various olefins was examined. Iodosylbenzene was chosen to be the terminal oxidant. Oxidation products, which included the epoxide, alcohol, and aldehyde, are formed from cyclohexene, styrene, and trans- and cis-stilbene. In comparison with catalysis by Mn(salen){sup +} complexes in solution, encapsulation lowers the rate of reaction considerably, but provides for selective oxidation based on olefin size and ability to penetrate the zeolite cages.

  19. Crystal structures, DFT calculations and Hirshfeld surface analyses of three new cobalt(III) Schiff base complexes derived from meso-1,2-diphenyl-1,2-ethylenediamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, Mohaddeseh; Behzad, Mahdi; Arab, Ali; Tarahhomi, Atekeh; Rudbari, Hadi Amiri; Bruno, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Three new Cobalt(III) Schiff base complexes were synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic methods and x-ray crystallography. The DFT optimized structures of the complexes agreed well with the corresponding x-ray structures. According to the calculated vibrational normal modes, the observed signals in the IR spectra of the complexes were assigned. The experimental UV-Vis spectra of the complexes were also discussed considering the calculated excited states and molecular orbitals. Hirshfeld surface analysis was carried out to study the inter-contact interactions in these complexes. These studies provided comprehensive description of such inter-contact interactions by means of an appealing graphical approach using 3D Hirshfeld surfaces and 2D fingerprint plots derived from the surfaces. It indicated the dominant role of various hydrogen intermolecular interactions such as H⋯H (above 60%), C⋯H/H⋯C (near 15%-20%), O⋯H/H⋯O (about 16% or 17% for structures with counter ion ClO4-) and H⋯F (17% for structure with counter ion PF6-) contacts into the crystal packing which are discussed in details.

  20. Cobalt protoporphyrin pretreatment protects human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in vitro and increases graft size and vascularization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Weaver, Matthew S; Cao, Baohong; Dennis, James E; Van Biber, Benjamin; Laflamme, Michael A; Allen, Margaret D

    2014-06-01

    Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) can regenerate infarcted myocardium. However, when implanted into acutely infarcted hearts, few cells survive the first week postimplant. To improve early graft survival, hESC-CMs were pretreated with cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), a transcriptional activator of cytoprotective heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). When hESC-CMs were challenged with an in vitro hypoxia/reoxygenation injury, mimicking cell transplantation into an ischemic site, survival was significantly greater among cells pretreated with CoPP versus phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-pretreated controls. Compared with PBS-pretreated cells, CoPP-pretreated hESC-CM preparations exhibited higher levels of HO-1 expression, Akt phosphorylation, and vascular endothelial growth factor production, with reduced apoptosis, and a 30% decrease in intracellular reactive oxygen species. For in vivo translation, 1 × 10(7) hESC-CMs were pretreated ex vivo with CoPP or PBS and then injected intramyocardially into rat hearts immediately following acute infarction (permanent coronary ligation). At 1 week, hESC-CM content, assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction for human Alu sequences, was 17-fold higher in hearts receiving CoPP- than PBS-pretreated cells. On histomorphometry, cardiomyocyte graft size was 2.6-fold larger in hearts receiving CoPP- than PBS-pretreated cells, occupying up to 12% of the ventricular area. Vascular density of host-perfused human-derived capillaries was significantly greater in grafts composed of CoPP- than PBS-pretreated cells. Taken together, these experiments demonstrate that ex vivo pretreatment of hESC-CMs with a single dose of CoPP before intramyocardial implantation more than doubled resulting graft size and improved early graft vascularization in acutely infarcted hearts. These findings open the door for delivery of these, or other, stem cells during acute interventional therapy following myocardial infarction or ischemia.

  1. (Salen)Mn(III) Catalyzed Asymmetric Epoxidation Reactions by Hydrogen Peroxide in Water: A Green Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Ballistreri, Francesco Paolo; Gangemi, Chiara M. A.; Pappalardo, Andrea; Tomaselli, Gaetano A.; Toscano, Rosa Maria; Trusso Sfrazzetto, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Enantioselective epoxidation reactions of some chosen reactive alkenes by a chiral Mn(III) salen catalyst were performed in H2O employing H2O2 as oxidant and diethyltetradecylamine N-oxide (AOE-14) as surfactant. This procedure represents an environmentally benign protocol which leads to e.e. values ranging from good to excellent (up to 95%). PMID:27420047

  2. Spectroscopic, thermal analysis and DFT computational studies of salen-type Schiff base complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein Pasha; Hadi, Jabbar S.; Abdulnabi, Zuhair A.; Bolandnazar, Zeinab

    2014-01-01

    A new series of metal(II) complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II) have been synthesized from a salen-type Schiff base ligand derived from o-vanillin and 4-methyl-1,2-phenylenediamine and characterized by elemental analysis, spectral (IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and EI-mass), molar conductance measurements and thermal analysis techniques. Coats-Redfern method has been utilized to calculate the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the metal complexes. The molecular geometry, Mulliken atomic charges of the studied compounds were investigated theoretically by performing density functional theory (DFT) to access reliable results to the experimental values. The theoretical 13C chemical shift results of the studied compounds have been calculated at the B3LYP, PBEPBE and PW91PW91 methods and standard 6-311+G(d,p) basis set starting from optimized geometry. The comparison of the results indicates that B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) yields good agreement with the observed chemical shifts. The measured low molar conductance values in DMF indicate that the metal complexes are non-electrolytes. The spectral and thermal analysis reveals that all complexes have octahedral geometry except Cu(II) complex which can attain the square planner arrangement. The presence of lattice and coordinated water molecules are indicated by thermograms of the complexes. The thermogravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses confirm high stability for all complexes followed by thermal decomposition in different steps.

  3. Spectroscopic, thermal analysis and DFT computational studies of salen-type Schiff base complexes.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Hossein Pasha; Hadi, Jabbar S; Abdulnabi, Zuhair A; Bolandnazar, Zeinab

    2014-01-03

    A new series of metal(II) complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II) have been synthesized from a salen-type Schiff base ligand derived from o-vanillin and 4-methyl-1,2-phenylenediamine and characterized by elemental analysis, spectral (IR, UV-Vis, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and EI-mass), molar conductance measurements and thermal analysis techniques. Coats-Redfern method has been utilized to calculate the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the metal complexes. The molecular geometry, Mulliken atomic charges of the studied compounds were investigated theoretically by performing density functional theory (DFT) to access reliable results to the experimental values. The theoretical (13)C chemical shift results of the studied compounds have been calculated at the B3LYP, PBEPBE and PW91PW91 methods and standard 6-311+G(d,p) basis set starting from optimized geometry. The comparison of the results indicates that B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) yields good agreement with the observed chemical shifts. The measured low molar conductance values in DMF indicate that the metal complexes are non-electrolytes. The spectral and thermal analysis reveals that all complexes have octahedral geometry except Cu(II) complex which can attain the square planner arrangement. The presence of lattice and coordinated water molecules are indicated by thermograms of the complexes. The thermogravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses confirm high stability for all complexes followed by thermal decomposition in different steps.

  4. Chemical modification of silica gel with synthesized new Schiff base derivatives and sorption studies of cobalt (II) and nickel (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursunlu, Ahmed Nuri; Guler, Ersin; Dumrul, Hakan; Kocyigit, Ozcan; Gubbuk, Ilkay Hilal

    2009-08-01

    In this study, three Schiff base ligands and their complexes were synthesized and characterized by infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), elemental analysis and magnetic susceptibility apparatuses. Silica gel was respectively modified with Schiff base derivatives, (E)-2-[(2-chloroethylimino)methyl]phenol, (E)-4-[(2-chloroethylimino)methyl]phenol and N, N'-[1,4-phenilendi(E)methylidene]bis(2-chloroethanamine), after silanization of silica gel by (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane (APTS) by using a suitable method. Characterization of the surface modification was also performed with IR, TGA and elemental analysis. The immobilized surfaces were used for Co(II) and Ni(II) sorption from aqueous solutions and values of sorption were detected by atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS).

  5. Surprisingly facile CO2 insertion into cobalt alkoxide bonds: A theoretical investigation

    PubMed Central

    Offermans, Willem K; Bizzarri, Claudia; Leitner, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Summary Exploiting carbon dioxide as co-monomer with epoxides in the production of polycarbonates is economically highly attractive. More effective catalysts for this reaction are intensively being sought. To promote better understanding of the catalytic pathways, this study uses density functional theory calculations to elucidate the reaction step of CO2 insertion into cobalt(III)–alkoxide bonds, which is also the central step of metal catalysed carboxylation reactions. It was found that CO2 insertion into the cobalt(III)–alkoxide bond of [(2-hydroxyethoxy)CoIII(salen)(L)] complexes (salen = N,N”-bis(salicyliden-1,6-diaminophenyl)) is exothermic, whereby the exothermicity depends on the trans-ligand L. The more electron-donating this ligand is, the more exothermic the insertion step is. Interestingly, we found that the activation barrier decreases with increasing exothermicity of the CO2 insertion. Hereby, a linear Brønsted–Evans–Polanyi relationship was found between the activation energy and the reaction energy. PMID:26425188

  6. Nickel-Salen supported paramagnetic nanoparticles for 6-His-target recombinant protein affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Zahra; Ghahremanzadeh, Ramin; Nejadmoghaddam, Mohammad-Reza; Nazari, Mahboobeh; Shokri, Mohammad-Reza; Naeimi, Hossein; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2017-03-24

    In this research, a simple, efficient, inexpensive, rapid and high yield method for the purification of 6×histidine-tagged recombinant protein was developed. For this purpose, manganese ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized through a co-precipitation method and then they were conveniently surface-modified with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in order to prevent oxidation and form high density of hydroxyl groups. Next, the salen ligand was prepared from condensation reaction of salicylaldehyde and 3-aminopropyl (trimethoxy) silane (APTMS) in 1:1 molar ratio; followed by complexation with Ni(OAc)2.4H2O. Finally, the prepared Ni(II)-salen complex conjugated to silica coated MNPs and MnFe2O4@SiO2@Ni-Salen complex nanoparticles were obtained. The functionalized nanoparticles were spherical with an average diameter around 70nm. The obtained MNPs had a saturation magnetization about 54 emu/g and had super paramagnetic character. These MNPs were used efficiently to enrich recombinant histidine-tagged (His-tagged) protein-A from bacterial cell lysate. In about 45min, highly pure His-tagged recombinant protein was obtained, as judged by SDS-PAGE analysis and silver staining. The amount of target protein in flow through and washing fractions was minimal denoting the high efficiency of purification process. The average capacity of the matrix was found to be high and about 180±15mgg(-1) (protein/MnFe2O4@SiO2@Ni-Salen complex). Collectively, purification process with MnFe2O4@SiO2@Ni-Salen complex nanoparticles is rapid, efficient, selective and whole purification can be carried out in only a single tube without the need for expensive systems.

  7. Macroscale cobalt-MOFs derived metallic Co nanoparticles embedded in N-doped porous carbon layers as efficient oxygen electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hai-Sheng; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Rongrong; Zhang, Xian; Zhao, Huijun; Wang, Guozhong

    2017-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) materials have aroused great research interest in different areas owing to their unique properties, such as high surface area, various composition, well-organized framework and controllable porous structure. Controllable fabrication of MOFs materials at macro-scale may be more promising for their large-scale practical applications. Here we report the synthesis of macro-scale Co-MOFs crystals using 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid (H3BTC) linker in the presence of Co2+, triethylamine (TEA) and nonanoic acid by a facile solvothermal reaction. Further, the as-fabricated Co-MOFs as precursor was pyrolytically treated at different temperatures in N2 atmosphere to obtain metallic Co nanoparticles embedded in N-doped porous carbon layers (denoted as Co@NPC). The results demonstrate that the Co-MOFs derived sample obtained at 900 °C (Co@NPC-900) shows a porous structure (including micropore and mesopore) with a surface area of 110.8 m2 g-1 and an N doping level of 1.62 at.% resulted from TEA in the pyrolysis process. As electrocatalyst, the Co@NPC-900 exhibits bifunctional electrocatalytic activities toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline media which are key reactions in some renewable energy technologies such as fuel cells and rechargeable metal-air batteries. The results indicate that the Co@NPC-900 can afford an onset potential of 1.50 V (vs. RHE) and a potential value of 1.61 V (vs. RHE) at a current density of 10 mA cm-2 for ORR and OER with high applicable stability, respectively. The efficient catalytic activity of Co@NPC-900 as bifunctional oxygen electrocatalyst can be ascribed to N doping and embedded metallic Co nanoparticles in carbon structure providing catalytic active sites and porous structure favourable for electrocatalysis-related mass transport.

  8. Importance of Counterion Reactivity on the Deactivation of Co-Salen Catalysts in the Hydrolytic Kinetic Resolution of Epichlorohydrin

    SciTech Connect

    Jain,S.; Zheng, X.; Jones, C.; Weck, M.; Davis, R.

    2007-01-01

    Possible modes of deactivation of Jacobsen's Co-salen catalyst during the hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of epichlorohydrin were explored by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, combined with recycling studies. Although an active Co(III)-salen catalyst deactivated substantially after multiple cycles without regeneration, the catalyst maintained its +3 oxidation state throughout the runs. Thus, deactivation of Co-salen during HKR was not the result of Co reduction. The mass spectrum of a deactivated material showed that catalyst dimerization does not account for the loss of activity. Results from various catalyst pretreatment tests, as well as from catalysts containing various counterions (acetate, tosylate, chloride, iodide) indicated that the rate of addition of the Co-salen counterions to epoxide forming Co-OH during the reaction correlated with deactivation. The extent of counterion addition to epoxide was influenced by the exposure time and the nucleophilicity of the counterion. An oligo(cyclooctene)-supported Co-OAc salen catalyst, which was 25 times more active than the standard Co-salen catalyst, was recycled multiple times with negligible deactivation.

  9. Cobalt free maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Floreen, S.

    1984-04-17

    The subject invention is directed to ferrous-base alloys, particularly to a cobalt-free maraging steel of novel chemistry characterized by a desired combination of strength and toughness, notwithstanding that cobalt is non-essential.

  10. Pharmacological Role of Anions (Sulphate, Nitrate, Oxalate and Acetate) on the Antibacterial Activity of Cobalt(II), Copper(II) and Nickel(II) Complexes With Nicotinoylhydrazine-Derived ONO, NNO and SNO Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Rauf, Abdur

    1996-01-01

    Mixed ligands biologically active complexes of cobalt(II), copper(II) and nickel(II) with nicotinoylhydrazine-derived ONO, NNO and SNO donor schiff-base ligands having the same metal ion but different anions such as sulphate, nitrate, oxalate and acetate have been synthesised and characterised on the basis of their physical, analytical and spectral data. In order to evaluate the role of anions on their bioability, these ligands and their synthesised metal complexes with various anions have been screened against bacterial species such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus and the title studies have proved a definative role of anions in increasing the biological activity PMID:18472896

  11. In situ electrochemical surface derivation of cobalt phosphate from a Co(CO3)0.5(OH)·0.11H2O nanoarray for efficient water oxidation in neutral aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liang; Liu, Danni; Hao, Shuai; Qu, Fengli; Du, Gu; Liu, Jingquan; Asiri, Abdullah M; Sun, Xuping

    2017-03-02

    In this Communication, cobalt phosphate (Co-Pi) has been successfully developed on a Co(CO3)0.5(OH)·0.11H2O nanoarray (CCH NA) on Ti mesh in neutral phosphate-buffered solution (PBS) via in situ electrochemical surface derivation. The resulting core@shell structured CCH@Co-Pi NA/Ti exhibits remarkable activity toward water oxidation with the need of an overpotential of 460 mV to achieve a geometrical catalytic current density of 10 mA cm(-2) in 0.1 M PBS, with a high turnover frequency of and long-term electrochemical stability.

  12. Copolymerization of CO2 and epoxides catalyzed by metal salen complexes.

    PubMed

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Mackiewicz, Ryan M; Phelps, Andrea L; Billodeaux, Damon R

    2004-11-01

    The design of efficient metal catalysts for the selective coupling of epoxides and carbon dioxide to afford completely alternating copolymers has made significant gains over the past decade. Hence, it is becoming increasingly clear that this "greener" route to polycarbonates has the potential to supplement or supplant current processes for the production of these important thermoplastics, which involve the condensation polymerization of diols and phosgene or organic carbonates. On the basis of the experiences in our laboratory, this Account summarizes our efforts at optimizing (salen)CrIIIX catalysts for the selective formation of polycarbonates from alicyclic and aliphatic epoxides with CO2. An iterative catalyst design process is employed in which the salen ligand, initiator, cocatalyst, and reaction conditions are systematically varied, with the reaction rates and product selectivity being monitored by in situ infrared spectroscopy.

  13. Mechanistic insight into the initiation step of the coupling reaction of oxetane or epoxides and CO2 catalyzed by (salen)CrX complexes.

    PubMed

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Moncada, Adriana I

    2008-11-03

    The most active and robust current catalysts for the copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides or oxetanes, (salen)CrX in conjunction with PPNX (PPN(+) = (Ph3P)2N(+)) or n-Bu4NX (X = Cl, N3, CN, NCO), are characterized both in solution by infrared spectroscopy and in the solid-state by X-ray crystallography. All anions (X) afford six-coordinate chromium(III) PPN(+) or n-Bu4N(+) salts composed of trans-(salen)CrX2(-) species. Of the X groups investigated in (salen)CrX, chloride is easily displaced by the others, that is, the reaction of (salen)CrCl with 2 equiv of N3(-), CN(-), or NCO(-) quantitatively provide (salen)Cr(N3)2(-), (salen)Cr(CN)2(-), and (salen)Cr(NCO)2(-), respectively. On the other hand, addition of less than 2 equiv of azide to (salen)CrCl leads to a Schlenk (ligand redistribution) equilibrium of the three possible anions both in solution and in the solid-state as shown by X-ray crystallography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. It was further demonstrated that all trans-(salen)CrX2(-) anions react with the epoxide or oxetane monomers in TCE (tetrachloroethane) solution to afford an equilibrium mixture containing (salen)CrX x monomer, with the oxetane adduct being thermodynamically more favored. The ring-opening steps of the bound cyclic ether monomers by X(-) were examined, revealing the rate of ring-opening of the epoxides (cyclohexene oxide and propylene oxide) to be much faster than of oxetane, with propylene oxide faster than cyclohexene oxide. Furthermore, both X anions in (salen)CrX2(-) were shown to be directly involved in monomer ring-opening.

  14. Salen-complex-mediated formation of cyclic carbonates by cycloaddition of CO2 to epoxides.

    PubMed

    Decortes, Antonello; Castilla, Ana M; Kleij, Arjan W

    2010-12-17

    Metal complexes of salen ligands are an important class of compounds, and they have been widely studied in the past. Among their successful catalytic applications, the synthesis of cyclic carbonates by the coupling reaction of epoxides with CO(2) has received increased attention; this is mostly due to the importance of using a greenhouse gas as a feedstock for the synthesis of useful molecules. Herein the most relevant past and present research surrounding this topic is presented.

  15. Photoisomerization of a maleonitrile-type salen Schiff base and its application in fine-tuning infinite coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Wei; Chou, Pi-Tai; Liao, Yong-Hong; Lin, Ying-Chih; Chen, Ching-Ting; Chen, Yu-Chun; Lai, Chin-Hung; Chen, Bo-So; Liu, Yi-Hung; Wang, Chih-Chieh; Ho, Mei-Lin

    2010-03-22

    Strategically designed salen ligand 2,3-bis[4-(di-p-tolylamino)-2-hydroxybenzylideneamino]maleonitrile (1), which has pronounced excited-state charge-transfer properties, shows a previously unrecognized form of photoisomerization. On electronic excitation (denoted by an asterisk), 1Z*-->1E isomerization takes place by rotation about the C2--C3 bond, which takes on single-bond character due to the charge-transfer reaction. The isomerization takes place nonadiabatically from the excited-state (1Z) to the ground-state (1E) potential-energy surface in the singlet manifold; 1Z and 1E are neither thermally inconvertible at ambient temperature (25-30 degrees C), nor does photoinduced reverse 1E*-->1Z (or 1Z*) isomerization occur. Isomers 1Z and 1E show very different coordination chemistry towards a Zn(II) precursor. More prominent coordination chemistry is evidenced by a derivative of 1 bearing a carboxyl group, namely, N,N'-dicyanoethenebis(salicylideneimine)dicarboxylic acid (2). Applying 2Z and its photoinduced isomer 2E as building blocks, we then demonstrate remarkable differences in morphology (sphere- and needlelike nanostructure, respectively) of their infinite coordination polymers with Zn(II).

  16. Efficient elimination of caffeine from water using Oxone activated by a magnetic and recyclable cobalt/carbon nanocomposite derived from ZIF-67.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew; Chen, Bo-Chau

    2016-02-28

    To eliminate caffeine, one of the most common pharmaceuticals and personal care products, from water, Oxone (peroxymonosulfate salt) was proposed to degrade it. To accelerate the generation of sulfate radicals from Oxone, a magnetic cobalt/carbon nanocomposite (CCN) was prepared from a one-step carbonization of a cobalt-based Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework (ZIF-67). The resultant CCN exhibits immobilized cobalt and increased porosity, and can be magnetically manipulated. These characteristics make CCN a promising heterogeneous catalyst to activate Oxone for caffeine degradation. Factors affecting the caffeine degradation were investigated, including CCN loading, Oxone dosage, temperature, pH, surfactants, salts and inhibitors. A higher CCN loading, Oxone dosage and temperature greatly improved the caffeine degradation by CCN-activated Oxone. Acidic conditions were also preferable over basic conditions for caffeine degradation. The addition of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and NaCl both significantly hindered caffeine degradation because bromide from CTAB and chloride from NaCl scavenged sulfate radicals. Based on the effects of inhibitors (i.e., methanol and tert-butyl alcohol), the caffeine degradation by CCN-activated Oxone was considered to primarily involve sulfate radicals and, less commonly, hydroxyl radicals. The intermediates generated during the caffeine degradation were analyzed using GC-MS and a possible degradation pathway was proposed. CCN was also able to activate Oxone for caffeine degradation for multiple cycles without changing its catalytic activity. These features reveal that CCN is an effective and promising catalyst for the activation of Oxone for the degradation of caffeine.

  17. Co-, N-, and S-Tridoped Carbon Derived from Nitrogen- and Sulfur-Enriched Polymer and Cobalt Salt for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenfang; Jiang, Hongmei; Chen, Chao; Yang, Lu; Zhang, Youming; Peng, Shuqin; Wang, Shuqin; Tan, Yueming; Ma, Ming; Xie, Qingji

    2016-06-01

    A series of cobalt and heteroatom (N and/or S) doped carbon materials were prepared and explored as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The most active catalyst is a Co-, N-, and S-tridoped carbon (CoNS-C), which was prepared through heat treatment of nitrogen- and sulfur-enriched poly(m-aminobenzenesulfonic acid) and cobalt(II) nitrate, followed by acid leaching. The presence of cobalt-heteroatom complexes in CoNS-C is confirmed and identified as highly active molecule catalytic centers for HER. The overpotential of CoNS-C is 180 mV at 10 mA cm(-2) in 0.5 M aqueous H2SO4. Besides the high HER activity, the CoNS-C also shows excellent durability and can be produced readily in large quantities. This work may have provided a new and simple route in the design and batch-synthesis of highly active and durable carbonaceous electrocatalysts for HER.

  18. Bioextraction of cobalt from complex metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.L.; Noah, K.S.; Wichlacz, P.L.; Torma, A.E.

    1993-05-01

    The present study has investigated the bioleachability of naturally occurring cobaltite and synthetic cobalt sulfides using 29 pedigree and ``wild type`` strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. On the basis of a screening test, five strains of bacteria were selected for assessing the effects of leach parameters (pH, ferrous and ferric sulfates, ammonium sulfate, bipotassium hydrogen phosphate, and substrate concentrations) on cobalt extraction from Blackbird Mine ore and concentrate. The mechanisms of cobalt extraction were explained in terms of direct and indirect modes of bacterial activity, and the chemistry involved in these processes was identified. Using various size fractions of a high-grade cobaltite, the kinetic parameters of cobalt extraction were derived for the effect of specific surface area to be V{sub m} = 376 mg dm{sup {minus}3} h{sup {minus}1} and K 1.27 m{sup 2} g{sup {minus}1}.

  19. Bioextraction of cobalt from complex metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.L.; Noah, K.S.; Wichlacz, P.L.; Torma, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    The present study has investigated the bioleachability of naturally occurring cobaltite and synthetic cobalt sulfides using 29 pedigree and wild type'' strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. On the basis of a screening test, five strains of bacteria were selected for assessing the effects of leach parameters (pH, ferrous and ferric sulfates, ammonium sulfate, bipotassium hydrogen phosphate, and substrate concentrations) on cobalt extraction from Blackbird Mine ore and concentrate. The mechanisms of cobalt extraction were explained in terms of direct and indirect modes of bacterial activity, and the chemistry involved in these processes was identified. Using various size fractions of a high-grade cobaltite, the kinetic parameters of cobalt extraction were derived for the effect of specific surface area to be V[sub m] = 376 mg dm[sup [minus]3] h[sup [minus]1] and K 1.27 m[sup 2] g[sup [minus]1].

  20. Mechanism-guided development of VO(salen)X complexes as catalysts for the asymmetric synthesis of cyanohydrin trimethylsilyl ethers.

    PubMed

    Belokon, Yuri N; Clegg, William; Harrington, Ross W; Maleev, Victor I; North, Michael; Pujol, Marta Omedes; Usanov, Dmitry L; Young, Carl

    2009-01-01

    Catalyze this! Detailed study of the mechanism of asymmetric cyanohydrin synthesis catalyzed by VO(salen)X complexes (see figure) led to the development of VO(salen)NCS, as the most active vanadium-based catalyst yet developed for this reaction.The mechanism by which oxovanadium(V)(salen) complexes(1) VO(salen)X catalyze the asymmetric addition of trimethylsilyl cyanide to benzaldehyde has been studied. The reaction kinetics indicated that the structure of the counterion (X) had a significant influence on the rate, but not on the enantioselectivity of the reaction. The less coordinating the counterion, the lower the catalytic activity; a trend that was confirmed by a Hammett analysis. Variable temperature kinetics allowed the enthalpies and entropies of activation to be determined for some catalysts, and showed that, for others, the overall reaction order changes from second order to zero order as the temperature is reduced. The order with respect to the catalyst was determined for nine of the VO(salen)X complexes and showed that the less active catalysts were active predominantly as mononuclear species whilst the more active catalysts were active predominantly as dinuclear species. Mass spectrometry confirmed the formation of dinuclear species in situ from all of the VO(salen)X complexes and indicated that the dinuclear complexes contained one vanadium(V) and one vanadium(IV) ion. The latter conclusion was supported by cyclic voltammetry of the complexes, by fluorescence measurements and by the fact that catalyst deactivation occurs when reactions are carried out under an inert atmosphere. Based on this evidence, it has been deduced that the catalysis involves two catalytic cycles: one for catalysis by mononuclear VO(salen)X species and the other for catalysis by dinuclear species. The catalytic cycle involving dinuclear species involves activation of both the cyanide and aldehyde, whereas the catalytic cycle involving mononuclear species activates only the

  1. Spectroscopic study on the interaction of ct-DNA with manganese Salen complex containing triphenyl phosphonium groups.

    PubMed

    Dehkordi, Maryam Nejat; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Lincoln, Per; Mirkhani, Valiollah

    2012-05-01

    The DNA binding properties of a bulky and hydrophobic Schiff base complex of manganese(III) [N,N'-bis(5-(triphenyl phosphonium methyl)salicylidene)-1,2-ethylene diamine chloride Mn(III) acetate] was examined by spectroscopic techniques. UV-vis titration data indicate both hypo and hyperchromic effect with addition of DNA to complex. A competitive binding study showed that the enhanced emission intensity of ethidium bromide (EB) in the presence of DNA was quenched by adding Mn Salen complex. This finding indicates that Mn Salen complex displaces EB from its binding site in DNA. Helix melting studies indicate improvement in the helix stability, and an increase in the melting temperature. The analysis of CD spectra represents the structural changes in DNA due to the binding of Mn Salen complex. The binding constant has been calculated using absorbance and fluorescence data. The results also represent that the binding process proceeds by strong electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

  2. Spectroscopic study on the interaction of ct-DNA with manganese Salen complex containing triphenyl phosphonium groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehkordi, Maryam Nejat; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Lincoln, Per; Mirkhani, Valiollah

    2012-05-01

    The DNA binding properties of a bulky and hydrophobic Schiff base complex of manganese(III) [N,N'-bis(5-(triphenyl phosphonium methyl)salicylidene)-1,2-ethylene diamine chloride Mn(III) acetate] was examined by spectroscopic techniques. UV-vis titration data indicate both hypo and hyperchromic effect with addition of DNA to complex. A competitive binding study showed that the enhanced emission intensity of ethidium bromide (EB) in the presence of DNA was quenched by adding Mn Salen complex. This finding indicates that Mn Salen complex displaces EB from its binding site in DNA. Helix melting studies indicate improvement in the helix stability, and an increase in the melting temperature. The analysis of CD spectra represents the structural changes in DNA due to the binding of Mn Salen complex. The binding constant has been calculated using absorbance and fluorescence data. The results also represent that the binding process proceeds by strong electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes with Schiff base derived from 4-amino-3-mercapto-6-methyl-5-oxo-1,2,4-triazine.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kiran; Barwa, Manjeet Singh; Tyagi, Parikshit

    2007-03-01

    A few (1:1) and (1:2) metal complexes of cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) have been isolated with ligand derived from the condensation of 4-amino-3-mercapto-6-methyl-5-oxo-1,2,4-triazine with 2-acetylpyridine (L(1)) and characterized by elemental analysis, conductivity measurements, infrared, electronic, (1)H NMR spectral data, magnetic and thermogravimetric analyses. Due to insolubility in water and most of the common organic solvents and infusibility at higher temperatures, all the complexes are thought to be polymeric in nature. A square-planar geometry was suggested for copper(II) and octahedral proposed for cobalt(II), nickel(II) and zinc(II). Some of the chemically synthesized compounds have been screened in vitro against the three Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Bacillus subtilis) and two Gram-negative (Salmonella typhi and Escherichia coli) organisms. It is observed that the coordination of metal ion has pronounced effect on the microbial activities of the ligand. The metal complexes have higher antimicrobial effect than the free ligands.

  4. Enantioselective polymerization of epoxides using biaryl-linked bimetallic cobalt catalysts: a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Syud M; Poater, Albert; Childers, M Ian; Widger, Peter C B; LaPointe, Anne M; Lobkovsky, Emil B; Coates, Geoffrey W; Cavallo, Luigi

    2013-12-18

    The enantioselective polymerization of propylene oxide (PO) using biaryl-linked bimetallic salen Co catalysts was investigated experimentally and theoretically. Five key aspects of this catalytic system were examined: (1) the structural features of the catalyst, (2) the regio- and stereoselectivity of the chain-growth step, (3) the probable oxidation and electronic state of Co during the polymerization, (4) the role of the cocatalyst, and (5) the mechanism of monomer enchainment. Several important insights were revealed. First, density functional theory (DFT) calculations provided detailed structural information regarding the regio- and stereoselective chain-growth step. Specifically, the absolute stereochemistry of the binaphthol linker determines the enantiomer preference in the polymerization, and the interaction between the salen ligand and the growing polymer chain is a fundamental aspect of enantioselectivity. Second, a new bimetallic catalyst with a conformationally flexible biphenol linker was synthesized and found to enantioselectively polymerize PO, though with lower enantioselectivity than the binaphthol linked catalysts. Third, DFT calculations revealed that the active form of the catalyst has two active exo anionic ligands (chloride or carboxylate) and an endo polymer alkoxide which can ring-open an adjacent cobalt-coordinated epoxide. Fourth, calculations showed that initiation is favored by an endo chloride ligand, while propagation is favored by the presence of two exo carboxylate ligands.

  5. Robust bifunctional aluminium-salen catalysts for the preparation of cyclic carbonates from carbon dioxide and epoxides.

    PubMed

    Rulev, Yuri A; Gugkaeva, Zalina; Maleev, Victor I; North, Michael; Belokon, Yuri N

    2015-01-01

    Two new one-component aluminium-based catalysts for the reaction between epoxides and carbon dioxide have been prepared. The catalysts are composed of aluminium-salen chloride complexes with trialkylammonium groups directly attached to the aromatic rings of the salen ligand. With terminal epoxides, the catalysts induced the formation of cyclic carbonates under mild reaction conditions (25-35 °C; 1-10 bar carbon dioxide pressure). However, with cyclohexene oxide under the same reaction conditions, the same catalysts induced the formation of polycarbonate. The catalysts could be recovered from the reaction mixture and reused.

  6. Robust bifunctional aluminium–salen catalysts for the preparation of cyclic carbonates from carbon dioxide and epoxides

    PubMed Central

    Rulev, Yuri A; Gugkaeva, Zalina; Maleev, Victor I

    2015-01-01

    Summary Two new one-component aluminium-based catalysts for the reaction between epoxides and carbon dioxide have been prepared. The catalysts are composed of aluminium–salen chloride complexes with trialkylammonium groups directly attached to the aromatic rings of the salen ligand. With terminal epoxides, the catalysts induced the formation of cyclic carbonates under mild reaction conditions (25–35 °C; 1–10 bar carbon dioxide pressure). However, with cyclohexene oxide under the same reaction conditions, the same catalysts induced the formation of polycarbonate. The catalysts could be recovered from the reaction mixture and reused. PMID:26664580

  7. Cooperative activation in ring-opening hydrolysis of epoxides by Co-salen complexes: A first principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Keju; Li, Wei-Xue; Feng, Zhaochi; Li, Can

    2009-03-01

    Density functional theory calculations were used to study the cooperative activations of the epoxide ring-opening hydrolysis catalyzed by the Co-salen complexes. We find that the activation energies of the reactions with two Co-salen catalysts are significantly lower than that of single catalyst. The cooperation effect comes not only from the simultaneous activation of both reactants but also from the cooperative charge transfer during the reactions. The transition states analysis indicates that the preferential reaction pathway is a SN 2 reaction, which explains the second order kinetic dependence on the concentration of the catalysts found in the experiments.

  8. Zn(ii) assisted synthesis of porous salen as an efficient heterogeneous scaffold for capture and conversion of CO2.

    PubMed

    Bhunia, Subhajit; Molla, Rostam Ali; Kumari, Vandana; Islam, Sk Manirul; Bhaumik, Asim

    2015-11-07

    We have designed a unique strategy to obtain a zinc-salen functionalized porous polymer (Zn@SBMMP) with high zinc content (15.3 wt%) by an easy one-step, cost effective and scalable process, which shows unprecedented catalytic efficiency in the CO2 fixation reaction via cycloaddition of CO2 with epoxides. We hypothesize that a high density of Zn-Schiff base/salen units present in the porous polymer network is responsible for the exceptionally high catalytic performance of Zn@SBMMP.

  9. Unprecedented Carbonato Intermediates in Cyclic Carbonate Synthesis Catalysed by Bimetallic Aluminium(Salen) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Castro-Osma, José A; North, Michael; Offermans, Willem K; Leitner, Walter; Müller, Thomas E

    2016-04-21

    The mechanism by which [Al(salen)]2 O complexes catalyse the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide in the absence of a halide cocatalyst has been investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) studies, mass spectrometry and (1) H NMR, (13) C NMR and infrared spectroscopies provide evidence for the formation of an unprecedented carbonato bridged bimetallic aluminium complex which is shown to be a key intermediate for the halide-free synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide. Deuterated and enantiomerically-pure epoxides were used to study the reaction pathway. Based on the experimental and theoretical results, a catalytic cycle is proposed.

  10. Marine cobalt resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.

    1986-01-01

    Ferromanganese oxides in the open oceans are more enriched in cobalt than any other widely distributed sediments or rocks. Concentrations of cobalt exceed 1 percent in ferromanganese crusts on seamounts, ocean ridges, and other raised areas of the ocean. The cobalt-rich crusts may be the slowest growing of any earth material, accumulating one molecular layer every 1 to 3 months. Attention has been drawn to crusts as potential resources because they contain cobalt, manganese, and platinum, three of the four priority strategic metals for the United States. Moreover, unlike abyssal nodules, whose recovery is complicated by their dominant location in international waters, some of the most cobalt-rich crusts occur within the exclusive economic zone of the United States and other nations. Environmental impact statements for crust exploitation are under current development by the Department of the Interior.

  11. Magnetic carbon-supported cobalt derived from a Prussian blue analogue as a heterogeneous catalyst to activate peroxymonosulfate for efficient degradation of caffeine in water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew; Chen, Bo-Jau

    2017-01-15

    Extensive usage of caffeine (CAF) as a medicine and additives in beverages has led to increasing presence of CAF in wastewater and even drinking water. To remove CAF, peroxymonosulfate (PMS), is adopted to generate sulfate radical to degrade CAF in water. To facilitate PMS activation, a magnetic carbon-supported cobalt (MC/Co) hybrid material is prepared via carbonization of a cobalt-containing Prussian blue analogue framework (Co3[Co(CN)6]2). The resultant MC/Co contains Co and Co3O4 nanoparticles supported on a carbon matrix, making it an attractive magnetic catalyst to activate PMS for degrading CAF. MC/Co-activated PMS was shown to degrade CAF much more effectively than PMS and Co3O4-activated PMS. Parameters affecting CAF degradation by MC/Co-activated PMS were also examined, including MC/Co and PMS concentrations, temperature, pH, and salt. Effects of radical quenchers were also examined to provide insights into the CAF degradation mechanism. MC/Co-activated PMS was much more favorable at higher temperatures than ambient temperature, and under neutral conditions. Nevertheless, the presence of concentrated NaCl noticeably hindered CAF degradation. Through examining effects of radical quenchers, the mechanism of CAF degradation by MC/Co-activated PMS was attributed primarily to sulfate radicals and hydroxyl radicals to a lesser extent. The degradation products of CAF by MC/Co-activated PMS were also identified and a possible degradation pathway is proposed. MC/Co can activate PMS over multiple cycles without loss of catalytic activity. These findings demonstrate that MC/Co, simply prepared from simple carbonization of Co3[Co(CN)6]2 can be a promising heterogeneous catalyst for activating PMS to degrade CAF.

  12. Chiral Cu(salen)-Based Metal-Organic Framework for Heterogeneously Catalyzed Aziridination and Amination of Olefins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Li, Zijian; Yuan, Guozan; Xia, Qingchun; Yuan, Chen; Cui, Yong

    2016-12-19

    A homochiral 3D porous metal-organic framework was assembled from a chiral dicarboxylic acid-functionalized Cu(salen)-based catalyst and could serve as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for aziridination and allylic amination of olefins. Besides easy separation and reuse of the catalyst, the chiral framework confinement could impart substrate size selectivity, enhance catalyst activity, and induce product enantioselectivity.

  13. Mechanistic Basis for High Stereoselectivity and Broad Substrate Scope in the (salen)Co(III)-Catalyzed Hydrolytic Kinetic Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ford, David D.; Nielsen, Lars P. C.; Zuend, Stephan J.; Jacobsen, Eric N.

    2013-01-01

    In the (salen)Co(III)-catalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of terminal epoxides, the rate- and stereoselectivity-determining epoxide ring-opening step occurs by a cooperative bimetallic mechanism with one Co(III) complex acting as a Lewis acid and another serving to deliver the hydroxide nucleophile. In this paper, we analyze the basis for the extraordinarily high stereoselectivity and broad substrate scope observed in the HKR. We demonstrate that the stereochemistry of each of the two (salen)Co(III) complexes in the rate-determining transition structure is important for productive catalysis: a measurable rate of hydrolysis occurs only if the absolute stereochemistry of each of these (salen)Co(III) complexes is the same. Experimental and computational studies provide strong evidence that stereochemical communication in the HKR is mediated by the stepped conformation of the salen ligand, and not the shape of the chiral diamine backbone of the ligand. A detailed computational analysis reveals that the epoxide binds the Lewis acidic Co(III) complex in a well-defined geometry imposed by stereoelectronic, rather than steric effects. This insight serves as the basis of a complete stereochemical and transition structure model that sheds light on the reasons for the broad substrate generality of the HKR. PMID:24041239

  14. Mechanistic basis for high stereoselectivity and broad substrate scope in the (salen)Co(III)-catalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution.

    PubMed

    Ford, David D; Nielsen, Lars P C; Zuend, Stephan J; Musgrave, Charles B; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2013-10-16

    In the (salen)Co(III)-catalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of terminal epoxides, the rate- and stereoselectivity-determining epoxide ring-opening step occurs by a cooperative bimetallic mechanism with one Co(III) complex acting as a Lewis acid and another serving to deliver the hydroxide nucleophile. In this paper, we analyze the basis for the extraordinarily high stereoselectivity and broad substrate scope observed in the HKR. We demonstrate that the stereochemistry of each of the two (salen)Co(III) complexes in the rate-determining transition structure is important for productive catalysis: a measurable rate of hydrolysis occurs only if the absolute stereochemistry of each of these (salen)Co(III) complexes is the same. Experimental and computational studies provide strong evidence that stereochemical communication in the HKR is mediated by the stepped conformation of the salen ligand, and not the shape of the chiral diamine backbone of the ligand. A detailed computational analysis reveals that the epoxide binds the Lewis acidic Co(III) complex in a well-defined geometry imposed by stereoelectronic rather than steric effects. This insight serves as the basis of a complete stereochemical and transition structure model that sheds light on the reasons for the broad substrate generality of the HKR.

  15. Alternating copolymerization of dihydrocoumarin and epoxides catalyzed by chromium salen complexes: a new route to functional polyesters.

    PubMed

    Van Zee, Nathan J; Coates, Geoffrey W

    2014-06-18

    We report the alternating ring-opening copolymerization of dihydrocoumarin with epoxides catalyzed by chromium(III) salen complexes. This process provides access to a range of perfectly alternating polyesters with high molecular weights and narrow molecular weight distributions. Atactic poly(cyclohexene dihydrocoumarate) and poly(cyclopentene dihydrocoumarate) were found to be semi-crystalline by differential scanning calorimetry.

  16. Electrochemical sensor for ranitidine determination based on carbon paste electrode modified with oxovanadium (IV) salen complex.

    PubMed

    Raymundo-Pereira, Paulo A; Teixeira, Marcos F S; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando; Dockal, Edward R; Bonifácio, Viviane Gomes; Marcolino, Luiz H

    2013-10-01

    The preparation and electrochemical characterization of a carbon paste electrode modified with the N,N-ethylene-bis(salicyllideneiminato)oxovanadium (IV) complex ([VO(salen)]) as well as its application for ranitidine determination are described. The electrochemical behavior of the modified electrode for the electroreduction of ranitidine was investigated using cyclic voltammetry, and analytical curves were obtained for ranitidine using linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) under optimized conditions. The best voltammetric response was obtained for an electrode composition of 20% (m/m) [VO(salen)] in the paste, 0.10 mol L(-1) of KCl solution (pH 5.5 adjusted with HCl) as supporting electrolyte and scan rate of 25 mV s(-1). A sensitive linear voltammetric response for ranitidine was obtained in the concentration range from 9.9×10(-5) to 1.0×10(-3) mol L(-1), with a detection limit of 6.6×10(-5) mol L(-1) using linear sweep voltammetry. These results demonstrated the viability of this modified electrode as a sensor for determination, quality control and routine analysis of ranitidine in pharmaceutical formulations.

  17. Magnetic Response of Mn(III)F(salen) at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J. - H.; Risset, O. N.; Shiddiq, M.; Peprah, M. K.; Knowles, E. S.; Andrus, Matthew; Beedle, C. C.; Ehlers, Georg; Podlesnyak, Andrey A; Cizmar, E.; Nagler, Stephen E; Hill, S.; Talham, Daniel R.; Meisel, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    The low temperature magnetic response of Mn(III)F(salen), salen = H14C16N2O2, an S = 2 linear-chain system, has been studied. Using a single crystal with the field applied perpendicular to the chain direction, torque magnetometry, down to 20 mK and up to 18 T, revealed a feature at 3.8 T when T 400 mK. ESR ( 200 GHz) studies, using single crystals at 4 K and in 5 T, have not detected any signal. In 10 mT, the temperature dependence of the susceptibility of powder-like samples can be reasonably fit when J/kB = 50 K and g = 2. In addition, these data are unchanged for P 1.0 GPa. Using a randomly-oriented, powder-like, deuterated (12 of 14 H replaced by D) sample of 2.2 g at 270 mK, neutron scattering data, acquired with the Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, show several well defined excitations that may be from the zero-field energy levels of antiferromagnetic S = 2 spins with g = 2, J/kB = 50 K, D/kB = 2.8 K, and E/kB = 0.5 K.

  18. On the formation of aliphatic polycarbonates from epoxides with chromium(III) and aluminum(III) metal-salen complexes.

    PubMed

    Luinstra, Gerrit A; Haas, Gerhard R; Molnar, Ferenc; Bernhart, Volker; Eberhardt, Robert; Rieger, Bernhard

    2005-10-21

    A DFT-based description is given of the CO2/epoxide copolymerization with a catalyst system consisting of metal (chromium, iron, titanium, aluminum)-salen complexes (salen = N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicyliden-1,6-diaminophenyl) in combination with either chloride, acetate, or dimethylamino pyridine (DMAP) as external nucleophile. Calculations indicate that initiation proceeds through nucleophilic attack at a metal-coordinated epoxide, and the most likely propagation reaction is a bimolecular process in which a metal-bound nucleophile attacks a metal-bound epoxide. Carbon dioxide insertion occurs at a single metal center and is most likely the rate-determining step at low pressure. The prevalent chain terminating/degradation-the so-called backbiting, a reaction leading to formation of cyclic carbonate from the polymer chain-would involve attack of a carbonate nucleophile rather than an alkoxide at the last unit of the growing chain. The backbiting of a free carbonato chain end is particularly efficient. Anion dissociation from six-coordinate aluminum is appreciably easier than from chromium-salen complexes, indicating the reason why in the former case cyclic carbonate is the sole product. Experimental data were gathered for a series of chromium-, aluminum-, iron-, and zinc-salen complexes, which were used in combination with external nucleophiles like DMAP and mainly (tetraalkyl ammonium) chloride/acetate. Aluminum complexes transform PO (propylene oxide) and CO2 to give exclusively propylene carbonate. This is explained by rapid carbonate anion dissociation from a six-coordinate complex and cyclic formation. CO2 insertion or nucleophilic attack of an external nucleophile at a coordinated epoxide (at higher CO2 pressure) are the rate-determining steps. Catalysis with [Cr(salen)(acetate/chloride)] complexes leads to the formation of both cyclic carbonate and polypropylene carbonate with various quantities of ether linkages. The dependence of the activity and

  19. Platinum-Free Counter Electrode Comprised of Metal-Organic-Framework (MOF)-Derived Cobalt Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shao-Hui; Li, Chun-Ting; Chien, Heng-Ta; Salunkhe, Rahul R.; Suzuki, Norihiro; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Ho, Kuo-Chuan; Wu, Kevin C.-W.

    2014-01-01

    We fabricated a highly efficient (with a solar-to-electricity conversion efficiency (η) of 8.1%) Pt-free dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). The counter electrode was made of cobalt sulfide (CoS) nanoparticles synthesized via surfactant-assisted preparation of a metal organic framework, ZIF-67, with controllable particle sizes (50 to 320 nm) and subsequent oxidation and sulfide conversion. In contrast to conventional Pt counter electrodes, the synthesized CoS nanoparticles exhibited higher external surface areas and roughness factors, as evidenced by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) element mapping, and electrochemical analysis. Incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) results showed an increase in the open circuit voltage (VOC) and a decrease in the short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) for CoS-based DSSCs compared to Pt-based DSSCs, resulting in a similar power conversion efficiency. The CoS-based DSSC fabricated in the study show great potential for economically friendly production of Pt-free DSSCs. PMID:25382139

  20. Platinum-Free Counter Electrode Comprised of Metal-Organic-Framework (MOF)-Derived Cobalt Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shao-Hui; Li, Chun-Ting; Chien, Heng-Ta; Salunkhe, Rahul R.; Suzuki, Norihiro; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Ho, Kuo-Chuan; Wu, Kevin C.-W.

    2014-11-01

    We fabricated a highly efficient (with a solar-to-electricity conversion efficiency (η) of 8.1%) Pt-free dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). The counter electrode was made of cobalt sulfide (CoS) nanoparticles synthesized via surfactant-assisted preparation of a metal organic framework, ZIF-67, with controllable particle sizes (50 to 320 nm) and subsequent oxidation and sulfide conversion. In contrast to conventional Pt counter electrodes, the synthesized CoS nanoparticles exhibited higher external surface areas and roughness factors, as evidenced by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) element mapping, and electrochemical analysis. Incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) results showed an increase in the open circuit voltage (VOC) and a decrease in the short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) for CoS-based DSSCs compared to Pt-based DSSCs, resulting in a similar power conversion efficiency. The CoS-based DSSC fabricated in the study show great potential for economically friendly production of Pt-free DSSCs.

  1. Samarium/Cobalt Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, D.; Kumar, K.; Frost, R.; Chang, C.

    1985-01-01

    Intrinsic magnetic coercivities of samarium cobalt magnets made to approach theoretical limit of 350 kA/m by carefully eliminating oxygen from finished magnet by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). HIP process viable alternative to currently used sintering process.

  2. One-component bimetallic aluminium(salen)-based catalysts for cyclic carbonate synthesis and their immobilization.

    PubMed

    Meléndez, Jaisiel; North, Michael; Villuendas, Pedro; Young, Carl

    2011-04-21

    The development of one-component, bimetallic μ-oxoaluminium(salen) complexes as highly active catalysts for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from terminal epoxides is described. The resulting homogeneous catalysts are used in batch reactions at room temperature and one atmosphere pressure. The catalysts have also been immobilized onto various support materials and used in either batch reactions or gas-phase flow reactions with ethylene and propylene oxides. Catalyst lifetime, deactivation and reactivation have been studied in both batch and flow reactions, and it has been shown that of the impurities present in power station flue gas, only sulfur trioxide deactivates the catalyst and at the concentrations of sulfur trioxide present in flue gas, this deactivation would require more than one years exposure of the catalyst to flue gas.

  3. Mercury-based cobalt magnetic fluids and cobalt nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massart, R.; Rasolonjatovo, B.; Neveu, S.; Cabuil, V.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of a magnetic and conducting liquid consisting of cobalt nanoparticles dispersed in mercury. The magnetic nanoparticles are obtained in one step by the electroreduction of a cobalt(II) solution on mercury. These particles are then extracted using an organic solution of surfactant in order to obtain a ferrofluid based on cobalt nanoparticles.

  4. Catalysis: Cobalt gets in shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Solid cobalt-based catalysts are used commercially to convert carbon monoxide and hydrogen into synthetic fuels. It emerges that much more valuable chemicals can be produced by using a different form of cobalt catalyst. See Letter p.84

  5. Suitability of cation substituted cobalt ferrite materials for magnetoelastic sensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nlebedim, Ikenna Catjetan; Jiles, David C

    2015-02-01

    The results of a study on the suitability of materials derived from cobalt ferrite for sensor and actuator applications are presented. The mechanism responsible for the superior sensor properties of Ge-substituted cobalt ferrite compared with Ti and other cation substituted cobalt ferrite materials is believed to be due to the tetrahedral site preference of Ge4+ and its co-substitution with Co2+. Results also showed that the higher strain derivative of Ge-substituted cobalt ferrite compared with Ti-substitution is due to a higher magnetostrictive coupling in response to applied field in the material.

  6. Biomass-Derived Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanofiber Network: A Facile Template for Decoration of Ultrathin Nickel-Cobalt Layered Double Hydroxide Nanosheets as High-Performance Asymmetric Supercapacitor Electrode.

    PubMed

    Lai, Feili; Miao, Yue-E; Zuo, Lizeng; Lu, Hengyi; Huang, Yunpeng; Liu, Tianxi

    2016-06-01

    The development of biomass-based energy storage devices is an emerging trend to reduce the ever-increasing consumption of non-renewable resources. Here, nitrogen-doped carbonized bacterial cellulose (CBC-N) nanofibers are obtained by one-step carbonization of polyaniline coated bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers, which not only display excellent capacitive performance as the supercapacitor electrode, but also act as 3D bio-template for further deposition of ultrathin nickel-cobalt layered double hydroxide (Ni-Co LDH) nanosheets. The as-obtained CBC-N@LDH composite electrodes exhibit significantly enhanced specific capacitance (1949.5 F g(-1) at a discharge current density of 1 A g(-1) , based on active materials), high capacitance retention of 54.7% even at a high discharge current density of 10 A g(-1) and excellent cycling stability of 74.4% retention after 5000 cycles. Furthermore, asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs) are constructed using CBC-N@LDH composites as positive electrode materials and CBC-N nanofibers as negative electrode materials. By virtue of the intrinsic pseudocapacitive characteristics of CBC-N@LDH composites and 3D nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber networks, the developed ASC exhibits high energy density of 36.3 Wh kg(-1) at the power density of 800.2 W kg(-1) . Therefore, this work presents a novel protocol for the large-scale production of biomass-derived high-performance electrode materials in practical supercapacitor applications.

  7. Recent advances in phenoxyl radical complexes of salen-type ligands as mixed-valent galactose oxidase models

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Christopher T.; Stack, T. Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    The interplay between redox-active transition metal ions and redox-active ligands in metalloenzyme sites is an area of considerable research interest. Galactose oxidase (GO) is the archetypical example, catalyzing the aerobic oxidation of primary alcohols to aldehydes via two one-electron cofactors: a copper atom and a cysteine-modified tyrosine residue. The electronic structure of the oxidized form of the enzyme (GOox) has been investigated extensively through small molecule analogues including metal-salen phenoxyl radical complexes. Similar to GOox, one-electron oxidized metal-salen complexes are mixed-valent species, in which molecular orbitals (MOs) with predominantly phenolate and phenoxyl π-character act as redox-active centers bridged by mixing with metal d-orbitals. A detailed evaluation of the electronic distribution in these odd electron species using a variety of spectroscopic, electrochemical, and theoretical techniques has led to keen insights into the electronic structure of GOox. PMID:23264696

  8. Synthesis and conformational study of a novel macrocyclic chiral(salen) ligand and its uranyl and Mn complexes.

    PubMed

    Amato, Maria E; Ballistreri, Francesco P; Pappalardo, Andrea; Tomaselli, Gaetano A; Toscano, Rosa M

    2010-03-09

    A novel chiral macrocyclic ligand incorporating a chiral salen moiety into a framework containing two biphenyl units was synthesized. Structural properties and conformational aspects of the free ligand and an UO2 complex were studied by using NMR spectroscopy in solution and MM calculations. The Mn(III) complex was tested as catalyst in enantioselective oxidation of prochiral unfunctionalized olefins to the corresponding optically active epoxides under very mild conditions.

  9. Cobalt(II)-catalyzed 1,4-addition of organoboronic acids to activated alkenes: an application to highly cis-stereoselective synthesis of aminoindane carboxylic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min-Hsien; Mannathan, Subramaniyan; Lin, Pao-Shun; Cheng, Chien-Hong

    2012-11-19

    It all adds up: The 1,4-addition of organoboronic acids to activated alkenes catalyzed by [Co(dppe)Cl(2)] is described. A [3+2]-annulation reaction of ortho-iminoarylboronic acids with acrylates to give various aminoindane carboxylic acid derivatives with cis-stereoselectivity is also demonstrated (see scheme; dppe = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane).

  10. A chemiluminescence method to detect hydroquinone with water-soluble sulphonato-(salen)manganese(III) complex as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangbin; Tang, Yuhai; Sun, Yang; Yu, Hua; Du, Wei; Fu, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    A water-soluble sulphonato-(salen)manganese(III) complex with excellent catalytic properties was synthesized and demonstrated to greatly enhance the chemiluminescence signal of the hydrogen peroxide - luminol reaction. Coupled with flow-injection technique, a simple and sensitive chemiluminescence method was first developed to detect hydroquinone based on the chemiluminescence system of the hydrogen peroxide-luminol-sulphonato-(salen)manganese(III) complex. Under optimal conditions, the assay exhibited a wide linear range from 0.1 to 10 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.05 ng mL(-1) for hydroquinone. The method was applied successfully to detect hydroquinone in tap-water and mineral-water, with a sampling frequency of 120 times per hour. The relative standard deviation for determination of hydroquinone was less than 5.6%, and the recoveries ranged from 96.8 to 103.0%. The ultraviolet spectra, chemiluminescence spectra, and the reaction kinetics for the peroxide-luminol-sulphonato-(salen)manganese(III) complex system were employed to study the possible chemiluminescence mechanism. The proposed chemiluminescence analysis technique is rapid and sensitive, with low cost, and could be easily extended and applied to other compounds.

  11. Bimetallic salen aluminum complexes: cooperation between reactive centers in the ring-opening polymerization of lactides and epoxides.

    PubMed

    Isnard, Florence; Lamberti, Marina; Lettieri, Luana; D'auria, Ilaria; Press, Konstantin; Troiano, Rubina; Mazzeo, Mina

    2016-10-12

    Three dinuclear aluminum alkyl complexes of the general formula LAl2Me4, where L are salen ligands with an alkyl backbone of different lengths between the nitrogen atoms (1,3-propylene (1), 1,5-pentylene (2) and 1,12-dodecaylene (3)), have been prepared through alkane elimination reactions between each ligand and two equivalents of AlMe3. The related hemi-salen aluminum complex 4 was prepared by an analogous reaction between a phenoxy-imine ligand and a single equivalent of AlMe3. The activities of these aluminum complexes in the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of rac-lactide and of several epoxides have been investigated and compared. The dinuclear complex 1, bearing the salen ligand with the shortest alkyl bridge, was the most active in the ROP of LA producing isotactic enriched PLA. Otherwise, the other complexes (2 and 3), in which the metal centers are remote, produced atactic PLA with inferior activity. Analogous differences in terms of activity emerged in the ROP of epoxides. The comparison of the catalytic behavior of the dinuclear complexes as well as their mononuclear counterparts suggests the cooperation between the two aluminum metal centers of the dinuclear species in which these are close enough.

  12. A highly selective fluorescence-based polymer sensor incorporating an (R,R)-salen moiety for Zn(2+) detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Meng, Jie; Meng, Lingxing; Dong, Yu; Cheng, Yixiang; Zhu, Chengjian

    2010-11-15

    A chiral polymer incorporating an (R,R)-salen moiety was synthesized by the polymerization of (R,R)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane with 2,5-dibutoxy-1,4-di(salicyclaldehyde)-1,4-diethynyl-benzene by a nucleophilic addition-elimination reaction. The fluorescence responses of the (R,R)-salen-based polymer toward various metal ions were investigated by fluorescence spectra. Compared with other cations, such as Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Ag(+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+), and Pb(2+), Zn(2+) can lead to a pronounced fluorescence enhancement as high as 7.8-fold together with an obvious blue-shift change of the chiral polymer. More importantly, the fluorescent color of the polymer changed to bright blue instead of weak yellow after addition of Zn(2+), which can be easily detected by the naked eye. The results indicate that this kind of chiral polymer, incorporating an (R,R)-salen moiety as a receptor in the main chain backbone, can exhibit high sensitivity and selectivity for Zn(2+) recognition.

  13. Coordination Complexes of Cobalt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Gregory M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment involving the synthesis and spectral studies of cobalt complexes that not only give general chemistry students an introduction to inorganic synthesis but allows them to conduct a systematic study on the effect of different ligands on absorption spectra. Background information, procedures, and experimental results are…

  14. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    DOEpatents

    Hurlburt, P.K.; Abney, K.D.; Kinkead, S.A.

    1997-05-20

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10{prime} positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron. 1 fig.

  15. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    DOEpatents

    Hurlburt, Paul K.; Abney, Kent D.; Kinkead, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10' positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron.

  16. Magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite synthesized by hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaedini, Ghazaleh; Tasirin, Siti Masrinda; Aminayi, Payam

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the magnetic properties of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite synthesized via the hydrothermal method have been investigated. The structural properties of the produced powders were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The observed XRD pattern confirmed the spinel/cubic structure of the prepared cobalt ferrite. The SEM pictures show that the simple hydrothermal method produces uniform sphere-shaped nanopowders. Moreover, infrared spectroscopy was used to confirm the formation of cobalt ferrite particles. Magnetic hysteresis was measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer in a maximum field of 10 kOe. The magnetization of the prepared nanoparticles was investigated, and the saturation magnetization ( M s), remanence ( M r), and coercivity ( H c) were derived from the hysteresis loops. The results revealed that the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized via the simple hydrothermal method exhibit superior magnetic properties.

  17. Antibacterial cobalt (II), copper (II), nickel (II) and zinc (II) complexes of mercaptothiadiazole--derived furanyl, thienyl, pyrrolyl, salicylyl and pyridinyl Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Zahid H; Pervez, Humayun; Rauf, Abdul; Khan, Khalid M; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2006-04-01

    A series of Co (II), Cu (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) complexes of mercaptothiadiazole-derived furanyl, thienyl, pyrrorlyl, salicylyl and pyridinyl Schiff bases were synthesized, characterized and screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against four Gram-negative, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi and Shigella fexneri, and two Gram-positive; Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureous bacterial strains. The results of these studies show the metal complexes to be more antibacterial as compared to the prepared un-complexed Schiff bases.

  18. Structure and magnetic properties of the two-dimensional ferrimagnet (NEt4)[[Mn(salen)]2Fe(CN)6]: investigation of magnetic anisotropy on a single crystal.

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Ieda, Hidenori; Matsumoto, Naohide; Sugiura, Ken-ichi; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2003-06-02

    The title compound, (NEt(4))[[Mn(salen)](2)Fe(CN)(6)] (1), was synthesized via a 1:1 reaction of [Mn(salen)(H(2)O)]ClO(4) with (NEt(4))(3)[Fe(CN)(6)] in a methanol/ethanol medium (NEt(4)(+) = tetraethylammonium cation, salen(2)(-) = N,N'-ethylenebis(salicylidene)iminate). The two-dimensional layered structure of 1 was revealed by X-ray crystallographic analysis: 1 crystallizes in monoclinic space group P2(1)/c with cell dimensions of a = 12.3660(8) A, b = 15.311(1) A, c = 12.918(1) A, beta = 110.971(4) degrees, Z = 2 and is isostructural to the previously synthesized compound, (NEt(4))[[Mn(5-Clsalen)](2)Fe(CN)(6)] (5-Clsalen(2-) = N,N'-ethylenebis(5-chlorosalicylidene)iminate; Miyasaka, H.; Matsumoto, N.; Re, N.; Gallo, E.; Floriani, C. Inorg. Chem. 1997, 36, 670). The Mn ion is surrounded by an equatorial salen quadridentate ligand and two axial nitrogen atoms from the [Fe(CN)(6)](3-) unit, the four Fe[bond]CN groups of which coordinate to the Mn ions of [Mn(salen)](+) units, forming a two-dimensional network having [[bond]Mn[bond]NC[bond]Fe[bond]CN[bond

  19. Ring-expanding olefin metathesis: a route to highly active unsymmetrical macrocyclic oligomeric co-salen catalysts for the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of epoxides.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaolai; Jones, Christopher W; Weck, Marcus

    2007-02-07

    In the presence of the third generation Grubbs catalyst, the ring-expanding olefin metathesis of a monocyclooct-4-en-1-yl functionalized salen ligand and the corresponding Co(II)(salen) complex at low monomer concentrations results in the exclusive formation of macrocyclic oligomeric structures with the salen moieties being attached in an unsymmetrical, flexible, pendent manner. The TOF-MALDI mass spectrometry reveals that the resulting macrocyclic oligomers consist predominantly of dimeric to tetrameric species, with detectable traces of higher homologues up to a decamer. Upon activation under aerobic and acidic conditions, these Co(salen) macrocycles exhibit extremely high reactivities and selectivities in the hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of a variety of racemic terminal epoxides under neat conditions with very low catalyst loadings. The excellent catalytic properties can be explained in terms of the new catalyst's appealing structural features, namely, the flexible oligomer backbone, the unsymmetrical pendent immobilization motif of the catalytic sites, and the high local concentration of Co(salen) species resulting from the macrocyclic framework. This ring-expanding olefin metathesis is suggested to be a simple way to prepare tethered metal complexes that are endowed with key features--(i) a high local concentration of metal complexes and (ii) a flexible, single point of attachment to the support--that facilitate rapid and efficient catalysis when a bimetallic transition state is required.

  20. OMCVD of cobalt and cobalt silicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormans, G. J. M.; Meekes, G. J. B. M.; Staring, E. G. J.

    1991-11-01

    Cobalt and cobalt silicide layers were deposited by OMCVD using the Co precursors Co(C 5H 5) 2, Co 2(CO) 8, Co(C 5H 5)(CO) 2 and CoCF 3(CO) 4, and the Si precursors SiH 4 and Si 2H 6. Strongly textured (111)-β Co layers were grown from Co(C 5H 5) 2, Co(C 5H 5)(CO) 2 and CoCF 3(CO) 4 at temperatures above 300°C in H 2 at atmospheric pressure. Growth from Co(C 5H 5) 2 is inhibited on Si substrates. For temperatures ≥600°C the Co layers deposited from Co(C 5H 5)(CO) 2 react with the Si(100) substrate to form CoSi 2(00 l) aligned with the substrate orientation. Co 2(CO) 8 gives amorphous Co between 200 and 300°C. The upper temperature is set by the occurrence of homogeneous gas-phase reactions at atmospheric reactor pressure. Cobalt silicide layers can be grown from CO 2(CO) 8 and (di)silane at temperatures between 200 and 400°C. The Co/Si ratio in the layers decreases with increasing temperature and is independent of the gas-phase Co/Si ratio. Stoichiometric CoSi 2 is obtained at ~ 300°C. Both Co(C 5H 5) 2 and Co(C 5H 5)(CO) 2 react with (di)silane, leading to the incorporation of carbon in the layer. The Co/Si ration and the carbon content in the layers are practically independent of the deposition conditions. With CoCF 3(CO) 4 no contamination-free silicide could be grown. The carbon incorporation with Co(C 5H 5) 2 and Co(C 5H 5)(CO) 2 can be avoided by a pulsed growth method in which the Co precursor and the Si precursor are introduced alternately into the reactor. With Co(C 5H 5) 2 the growth is then inhibited on Si substrates.

  1. Environmentally Benign CO2-Based Copolymers: Degradable Polycarbonates Derived from Dihydroxybutyric Acid and Their Platinum-Polymer Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Fu-Te; Wang, Yanyan; Darensbourg, Donald J

    2016-04-06

    (S)-3,4-Dihydroxybutyric acid ((S)-3,4-DHBA), an endogenous straight chain fatty acid, is a normal human urinary metabolite and can be obtained as a valuable chiral biomass for synthesizing statin-class drugs. Hence, its epoxide derivatives should serve as promising monomers for producing biocompatible polymers via alternating copolymerization with carbon dioxide. In this report, we demonstrate the production of poly(tert-butyl 3,4-dihydroxybutanoate carbonate) from racemic-tert-butyl 3,4-epoxybutanoate (rac-(t)Bu 3,4-EB) and CO2 using bifunctional cobalt(III) salen catalysts. The copolymer exhibited greater than 99% carbonate linkages, 100% head-to-tail regioselectivity, and a glass-transition temperature (Tg) of 37 °C. By way of comparison, the similarly derived polycarbonate from the sterically less congested monomer, methyl 3,4-epoxybutanoate, displayed 91.8% head-to-tail content and a lower Tg of 18 °C. The tert-butyl protecting group of the pendant carboxylate group was removed using trifluoroacetic acid to afford poly(3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid carbonate). Depolymerization of poly(tert-butyl 3,4-dihydroxybutanoate carbonate) in the presence of strong base results in a stepwise unzipping of the polymer chain to yield the corresponding cyclic carbonate. Furthermore, the full degradation of the acetyl-capped poly(potassium 3,4-dihydroxybutyrate carbonate) resulted in formation of the biomasses, β-hydroxy-γ-butyrolacetone and 3,4-dihydroxybutyrate, in water (pH = 8) at 37 °C. In addition, water-soluble platinum-polymer conjugates were synthesized with platinum loading of 21.3-29.5%, suggesting poly(3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid carbonate) and related derivatives may serve as platinum drug delivery carriers.

  2. Influences On The Oceanic Biogeochemical Cycling Of The Hybrid-Type Metals: Cobalt, Iron, And Manganese

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    derived from these correlations changed over orders of magnitude, revealing dynamic variability in the utilization, demand, and sources of this...33 2.3.4. The upper water column cobalt-phosphate correlation : a mechanistic explanation and a minimum productivity...cobalt concentrating mechanism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Figure 7) Co:PO43- correlation plots

  3. Neuron-Inspired Interpenetrative Network Composed of Cobalt-Phosphorus-Derived Nanoparticles Embedded within Porous Carbon Nanotubes for Efficient Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Shen, Juanxia; Yang, Zhi; Ge, Mengzhan; Li, Ping; Nie, Huagui; Cai, Qiran; Gu, Cancan; Yang, Keqin; Huang, Shaoming

    2016-07-13

    The ongoing search for cheap and efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts to replace currently used catalysts based on Pt or its alloys has been considered as an prevalent strategy to produce renewable and clean hydrogen energy. Herein, inspired by the neuron structure in biological systems, we demonstrate a novel fabrication strategy via a simple two-step method for the synthesis of a neuronlike interpenetrative nanocomposite network of Co-P embedded in porous carbon nanotubes (NIN-Co-P/PCNTs). It is found that the interpenetrative network provides a natural transport path to accelerate the hydrogen production process. The embedded-type structure improves the utilization ratio of Co-P and the hollow, tubelike, and porous structure of PCNTs further promote charge and reactant transport. These factors allow the as-prepared NIN-Co-P/PCNTs to achieve a onset potential low to 43 mV, a Tafel slope as small as 40 mV/decade, an excellent stability, and a high turnover frequency value of 3.2 s(-1) at η = 0.2 V in acidic conditions. These encouraging properties derived from the neuronlike interpenetrative network structure might offer new inspiration for the preparation of more nanocomposites for applications in other catalytic and optoelectronic field.

  4. Protein-templated cobaltous phosphate nanocomposites for the highly sensitive and selective detection of platelet-derived growth factor-BB.

    PubMed

    He, Linghao; Zhang, Shuai; Ji, Hongfei; Wang, Minghua; Peng, Donglai; Yan, Fufeng; Fang, Shaoming; Zhang, Hongzhong; Jia, Chunxiao; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-05-15

    We synthesized novel Co3(PO4)2-based nanocomposites with 3D porous architectures via self-assembly; here, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and aptamer were used as organic phases to produce Co3(PO4)2@BSA and Co3(PO4)2@Apt nanocomposites, respectively. The formation mechanism of Co3(PO4)2-based nanocomposites was described based on characterizations of their physio-chemical performance, and the developed nanocomposites were applied as scaffold materials to construct a novel electrochemical aptasensor and detect platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB). The PDGF-BB targeting aptamer must be immobilized onto the Co3(PO4)2@BSA-modified electrode to detect PDGF-BB, whereas Co3(PO4)2@Apt-based aptasensor may be directly used to determine the target protein. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results showed that the developed Co3(PO4)2@BSA- and Co3(PO4)2@Apt-based aptasensors present highly sensitive detection ability toward PDGF-BB. Due to the special nanoflower structure, the Co3(PO4)2@BSA-based aptasensor features a detection limit of 3.7 pg mL(-1); while the limit of detection of the Co3(PO4)2@Apt-based aptasensor is 61.5 pg mL(-1), which is the possible bioactivity loss of the aptamer in Co3(PO4)2@Apt nanocomposite. The two detection limits obtained are still much lower than or comparable with those of previously reported aptasensors. The Co3(PO4)2@BSA- and Co3(PO4)2@Apt-based aptasensors showed high selectivity, stability, and applicability for detecting the desired protein. This finding indicates that the Co3(PO4)2-based nanocomposites could be used as an electrochemical biosensor for various detection procedures in the biomedical field.

  5. Cobalt sorption in silica-pillared clays.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, A; Fetter, G; Bosch, P; Bulbulian, S

    2006-01-03

    Silicon pillared samples were prepared following conventional and microwave irradiation methods. The samples were characterized and tested in cobalt sorption. Ethylenediammine was added before cobalt addition to improve the amount of cobalt retained. The amount of cobalt introduced in the original clay in the presence of ethylenediammine was the highest. In calcined pillared clays the cobalt retention with ethylenediammine was lower (ca. 40%). In all cases the presence of ethylenediammine increased twice the amount of cobalt sorption measured for aqueous solutions.

  6. Bioaccessibility testing of cobalt compounds.

    PubMed

    Stopford, Woodhall; Turner, John; Cappellini, Danielle; Brock, Tom

    2003-08-01

    Testing of metal compounds for solubility in artificial fluids has been used for many years to assist determining human health risk from exposure to specific compounds of concern. In lieu of obtaining bioavailability data from samples of urine, blood, or other tissues, these studies measured solubility of compounds in various artificial fluids as a surrogate for bioavailability. In this context, the measurement of metal "bioaccessibility" can be used as an in vitro substitute for measuring metal bioavailability. Bioaccessibility can be defined as a value representing the availability of metal for absorption when dissolved in in vitro surrogates of body fluids or juices. The aim of this study was to measure and compare the bioaccessibility of selected cobalt compounds in artificial human tissue fluids and human serum. A second aim was to initiate studies to experimentally validate an in vitro methodology that would provide a conservative estimate of cobalt bioavailability in the assessment of dose from human exposure to various species of cobalt compounds. This study evaluated the bioaccessibility of cobalt(II) from 11 selected cobalt compounds and an alloy in 2 physical forms in 5 surrogate human tissue fluids and human serum. Four (4) separate extraction times were used up to 72 hours. The effect of variables such as pH, dissolution time, and mass-ion effect on cobalt bioaccessibility were assessed as well. We found that the species of cobalt compound as well as the physico-chemical properties of the surrogate fluids, especially pH, had a major impact on cobalt solubility. Cobalt salts such as cobalt(II) sulfate heptahydrate were highly soluble, whereas cobalt alloys used in medical implants and cobalt aluminate spinels used as pigments, showed minimal dissolution over the period of the assay.

  7. Cobalt ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Varying concentrations of an organometallic cobalt complex were added to an epoxy system currently used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin. Methods for combining cobalt (III) acetylacetonate with a tetraglycidyl 4,4 prime - diaminodiphenylmethane-based epoxy were investigated. The effects of increasing cobalt ion concentration on the epoxy cure were demonstrated by epoxy gel times and differential scanning calorimetry cure exotherms. Analysis on cured cobalt-containing epoxy castings included determination of glass transition temperatures by thermomechanical analysis, thermooxidative stabilities by thermogravimetric analysis, and densities in a density gradient column. Flexural strength and stiffness were also measured on the neat resin castings.

  8. Structural investigation of high-valent manganese-salen complexes by UV/Vis, Raman, XANES, and EXAFS spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Feth, Martin P; Bolm, Carsten; Hildebrand, Jens P; Köhler, Manuela; Beckmann, Oliver; Bauer, Matthias; Ramamonjisoa, Rivo; Bertagnolli, Helmut

    2003-03-17

    XANES and EXAFS spectroscopic studies at the Mn-K- and Br-K-edge of reaction products of (S,S)-(+)-N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexanediaminomanganese(III) chloride ([(salen)Mn(III)Cl], 1) and (S,S)-(+)-N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexanediaminomanganese(III) bromide ([(salen)Mn(III)Br], 2) with 4-phenylpyridine N-oxide (4-PPNO) and 3-chloroperoxybenzoic acid (MCPBA) are reported. The reaction of the Mn(III) complexes with two equivalents of 4-PPNO leads to a hexacoordinated compound, in which the manganese atom is octahedrally coordinated by four oxygen/nitrogen atoms of the salen ligand at an average distance of approximately 1.90 A and two additional, axially bonded oxygen atoms of the 4-PPNO at 2.25 A. The oxidation state of this complex was determined as approximately +IV by a comparative study of Mn(III) and Mn(V) reference compounds. The green intermediate obtained in reactions of MCPBA and solutions of 1 or 2 in acetonitrile was investigated with XANES, EXAFS, UV/Vis, and Raman spectroscopy, and an increase of the coordination number of the manganese atoms from 4 to 5 and the complete abstraction of the halide was observed. A formal oxidation state of IV was deduced from the relative position of the pre-edge 1s-->3d feature of the X-ray absorption spectrum of the complex. The broad UV/Vis band of this complex in acetonitrile with lambda(max)=648 nm was consistent with a radical cation structure, in which a MCPBA molecule was bound to the Mn(IV) central atom. An oxomanganese(V) or a dimeric manganese(IV) species was not detected.

  9. Mechanistic aspects of the copolymerization reaction of carbon dioxide and epoxides, using a chiral salen chromium chloride catalyst.

    PubMed

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Yarbrough, Jason C

    2002-06-05

    The air-stable, chiral (salen)Cr(III)Cl complex (3), where H(2)salen = N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexene diamine, has been shown to be an effective catalyst for the coupling of cyclohexene oxide and carbon dioxide to afford poly(cyclohexenylene carbonate), along with a small quantity of its trans-cyclic carbonate. The thus produced polycarbonate contained >99% carbonate linkages and had a M(n) value of 8900 g/mol with a polydispersity index of 1.2 as determined by gel permeation chromatography. The turnover number (TON) and turnover frequency (TOF) values of 683 g of polym/g of Cr and 28.5 g of polym/g of Cr/h, respectively for reactions carried out at 80 degrees C and 58.5 bar pressure increased by over 3-fold upon addition of 5 equiv of the Lewis base cocatalyst, N-methyl imidazole. Although this chiral catalyst is well documented for the asymmetric ring-opening (ARO) of epoxides, in this instance the copolymer produced was completely atactic as illustrated by (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Whereas the mechanism for the (salen)Cr(III)-catalyzed ARO of epoxides displays a squared dependence on [catalyst], which presumably is true for the initiation step of the copolymerization reaction, the rate of carbonate chain growth leading to copolymer or cyclic carbonate formation is linearly dependent on [catalyst]. This was demonstrated herein by way of in situ measurements at 80 degrees C and 58.5 bar pressure. Hence, an alternative mechanism for copolymer production is operative, which is suggested to involve a concerted attack of epoxide at the axial site of the chromium(III) complex where the growing polymer chain for epoxide ring-opening resides. Preliminary investigations of this (salen)Cr(III)-catalyzed system for the coupling of propylene oxide and carbon dioxide reveal that although cyclic carbonate is the main product provided at elevated temperatures, at ambient temperature polycarbonate formation is dominant. A common reaction pathway for

  10. Enantioselective α-Hydroxylation by Modified Salen-Zirconium(IV)-Catalyzed Oxidation of β-Keto Esters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Zhao, Jingnan; Tang, Xiaofei; Zhou, Guangli; Song, Wangze; Meng, Qingwei

    2017-02-03

    The highly enantioselective α-hydroxylation of β-keto esters using cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) as the oxidant was realized by a chiral (1S,2S)-cyclohexanediamine backbone salen-zirconium(IV) complex as the catalyst. A variety of corresponding chiral α-hydroxy β-keto esters were obtained in excellent yields (up to 99%) and enantioselectivities (up to 98% ee). The zirconium-catalyzed enantioselective α-hydroxylation of β-keto esters was scalable, and the zirconium catalyst was recyclable. The reaction can be performed in gram scale, and corresponding chiral products were acquired in 95% yield and 99% ee.

  11. Homochiral nickel coordination polymers based on salen(Ni) metalloligands: synthesis, structure, and catalytic alkene epoxidation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanbiao; Liu, Tianfu; Lin, Jingxiang; Lü, Jian; Lin, Zujin; Cao, Rong

    2011-03-21

    One-dimensional (1D) homochiral nickel coordination polymers [Ni(3)(bpdc)(RR-L)(2)·(DMF)](n) (2R, RR-L = (R,R)-(-)-1,2-cyclohexanediamino-N,N'-bis(3-tert-butyl-5-(4-pyridyl)salicylidene), bpdc = 4,4'-biphenyldicarboxylic acid) and [Ni(3)(bpdc)(SS-L)(2)·(DMF)](n) (2S, SS-L = (S,S)-(-)-1,2-cyclohexanediamino-N,N'-bis(3-tert-butyl-5-(4-pyridyl)salicylidene) based on enantiopure pyridyl-functionalized salen(Ni) metalloligand units NiL ((1,2-cyclohexanediamino-N,N'-bis(3-tert-butyl-5-(4-pyridyl)salicylidene))Ni(II)) have been synthesized and characterized by microanalysis, IR spectroscopy, solid-state UV-vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetric measurement, and powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Each NiL as unbridging pendant metalloligand uses one terminal pyridyl group to coordinate achiral unit (nickel and bpdc(2-)) building a helical chain, while the other pyridyl group remains uncoordinated. Both 2R and 2S contain left- and right-handed helical chains made of the achiral building blocks, while the NiL as remote external chiral source is perpendicular to the backbone of the helices. The nickel coordination polymers 2R and 2S containing unsaturated active nickel center in metalloligand NiL can be used as self-supported heterogeneous catalysts. They show catalytic activity comparable with their homogeneous counterpart in alkene epoxidation and exhibit great potential as recyclable catalysts.

  12. High-Performance Electrochromic Devices Based on Poly[Ni(salen)]-Type Polymer Films.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Marta; Araújo, Mariana; Fonseca, Joana; Moura, Cosme; Hillman, Robert; Freire, Cristina

    2016-06-08

    We report the application of two poly[Ni(salen)]-type electroactive polymer films as new electrochromic materials. The two films, poly[Ni(3-Mesalen)] (poly[1]) and poly[Ni(3-MesaltMe)] (poly[2]), were successfully electrodeposited onto ITO/PET flexible substrates, and their voltammetric characterization revealed that poly[1] showed similar redox profiles in LiClO4/CH3CN and LiClO4/propylene carbonate (PC), while poly[2] showed solvent-dependent electrochemical responses. Both films showed multielectrochromic behavior, exhibiting yellow, green, and russet colors according to their oxidation state, and promising electrochromic properties with high electrochemical stability in LiClO4/PC supporting electrolyte. In particular, poly[1] exhibited a very good electrochemical stability, changing color between yellow and green (λ = 750 nm) during 9000 redox cycles, with a charge loss of 34.3%, an optical contrast of ΔT = 26.2%, and an optical density of ΔOD = 0.49, with a coloration efficiency of η = 75.55 cm(2) C(-1). On the other hand, poly[2] showed good optical contrast for the color change from green to russet (ΔT = 58.5%), although with moderate electrochemical stability. Finally, poly[1] was used to fabricate a solid-state electrochromic device using lateral configuration with two figures of merit: a simple shape (typology 1) and a butterfly shape (typology 2); typology 1 showed the best performance with optical contrast ΔT = 88.7% (at λ = 750 nm), coloration efficiency η = 130.4 cm(2) C(-1), and charge loss of 37.0% upon 3000 redox cycles.

  13. Mn-salen catalysed benzylic C-H activation for the synthesis of aryl [(18)F]CF3-containing PET probes.

    PubMed

    Carroll, L; Evans, H L; Spivey, A C; Aboagye, E O

    2015-05-18

    The development of a Mn-salen complex catalysed oxidative benzylic fluorination of non-activated C-H bonds using [(18)F]fluoride is described for installation of [(18)F]CHRF, [(18)F]CR2F and particularly [(18)F]CF3 containing groups in the presence of other functional groups.

  14. Cu(II) salen complex with propylene linkage: An efficient catalyst in the formation of Csbnd X bonds (X = N, O, S) and biological investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, Mohammad; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Al-Resayes, Saud I.; Adil, S. F.; Islam, Mohammad Shahidul; Trzesowska-Kruszynska, Agata; Kruszynski, Rafal; Lee, Dong-Ung

    2017-02-01

    The catalytic property of a mononuclear Cu(II) salen complex in Chan-Lam coupling reaction with phenyl boronic acid at room temperature is reported. The studied complex is found to be potential catalyst in the preparation of carbon-heteroatom bonds with excellent yields. The studied Cu(II) salen complex is monoclinic with cell parameters, a = 9.6807(5) (α 90°), (b = 17.2504(8) (β 112.429 (2), c = 11.1403 (6) (γ = 90°), and has distorted square planar environment around Cu(II) ion. Furthermore, there is no π⋯π interactions in the reported complex due to large distance between the centroid of aromatic rings. In addition, DNA binding study of Cu(II) salen complex by fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy is also reported. Moreover, the reported Cu(II) salen complex exhibits significant anticancer activity against MCF-7 cancer cell lines, and displays potential antimicrobial biofilm activity against P. aeruginosa, suggesting antimicrobial biofilm an important tool for suppression of resistant infections caused by P. aeruginosa.

  15. (Salen)Mn-catalyzed epoxidation of alkenes: a two-zone process with different spin-state channels as suggested by DFT study.

    PubMed

    Abashkin, Yuri G; Burt, Stanley K

    2004-01-08

    [structure: see text] A novel (two-zone process with different spin-state channels) mechanistic picture for the Jacobsen-Katsuki reaction is presented that provides insight into the still elusive understanding of the epoxidation mechanism. For the first time, we show that the salen moiety of the catalyst can be explicitly involved in the epoxidation process.

  16. Co(III)(salen)-catalyzed HKR of two stereocentered alkoxy- and azido epoxides: a concise enantioselective synthesis of (S,S)-reboxetine and (+)-epi-cytoxazone.

    PubMed

    Reddy, R Santhosh; Chouthaiwale, Pandurang V; Suryavanshi, Gurunath; Chavan, Vilas B; Sudalai, Arumugam

    2010-07-21

    The HKR of racemic syn- or anti- alkoxy- and azido epoxides catalyzed by Co(salen) complex affords a practical access to a series of enantioenriched syn- or anti- alkoxy- and azido epoxides and the corresponding 1,2-diols. This strategy has been successfully employed in the concise, enantioselective synthesis of bioactive molecules such as (S,S)-reboxetine and (+)-epi-cytoxazone.

  17. Enantioselective ring-opening reaction of meso-epoxides with ArSeH catalyzed by heterometallic Ti-Ga-Salen system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minghua; Zhu, Chengjian; Yuan, Fang; Huang, Yijun; Pan, Yi

    2005-05-12

    The first example of enantioselective ring-opening reaction of meso-epoxides with aryl selenols to give optically active beta-arylseleno alcohol in up to 97% ee was realized, using a chiral Ti-Ga-Salen heterometallic catalyst. A strong synergistic effect of different Lewis acids in the system was exhibited in the catalytic process.

  18. A cobalt complex of a microbial arene oxidation product

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We report the first synthesis of a cobalt Cp diene complex wherein the diene is derived by microbial dearomatising dihydroxylation of an aromatic ring. The complex has been characterised crystallographically and its structure is compared to that of an uncomplexed diene precursor. PMID:22152033

  19. Counterion and substrate effects on barrier heights of the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of terminal epoxides catalyzed by Co(III)-salen.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Matthew R; Burns, Lori A; Sherrill, C David

    2015-01-15

    Density functional theory (DFT) has been applied to the proposed rate-limiting step of the hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of terminal epoxides as catalyzed by Co-salen-X (X = counterion) in order to resolve questions surrounding the mechanism. The present results indicate that the bimetallic mechanism proposed by Jacobsen shows nonadditive, cooperative catalysis with a larger reduction in barrier height than the sum of the barrier height reductions from the two monometallic reaction pathways. We computed barrier heights for the reaction using several counterions (chloride, acetate, tosylate, and hydroxide). For the three counterions that are experimentally active (chloride, acetate, and tosylate) the barrier heights are 35, 38, and 34 kJ mol(-1), respectively, while for hydroxide it is 48 kJ mol(-1). The similarity of the barrier heights for chloride, acetate, and tosylate is in agreement with their similar peak reaction rates. The finding that Co-salen-X with these counterions leads to rather different overall reaction profiles suggests that they have quite different rates of reaction with epoxide to form the activated Co-salen-OH required for the bimetallic mechanism. Co-salen-OH is inactive as the sole catalyst for HKR, and this inactivity is ascribed to its larger barrier height for the ring-opening step, rather than to any inability to activate epoxide. Barrier heights were also computed using propylene oxide, 1-hexene oxide, and epichlorohydrin; propylene oxide and 1-hexene oxide have similar barrier heights, 35.5 and 33.2 kJ mol(-1), respectively, and epichlorohydrin has a significantly lower barrier height of 18.8 kJ mol(-1), which is qualitatively consistent with experiments showing faster reactions for epicholorohydrin than propylene oxide when catalyzed by Co-salen-OAc.

  20. Physiological Remediation of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles by Ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Volatron, Jeanne; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Javed, Yasir; Vuong, Quoc Lam; Gossuin, Yves; Neveu, Sophie; Luciani, Nathalie; Hémadi, Miryana; Carn, Florent; Alloyeau, Damien; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been increasingly suggested as prospective therapeutic nanoplatforms, yet their long-term fate and cellular processing in the body is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of an endogenous iron storage protein – namely the ferritin – in the remediation of biodegradable cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. Structural and elemental analysis of ferritins close to exogenous nanoparticles within spleens and livers of mice injected in vivo with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, suggests the intracellular transfer of degradation-derived cobalt and iron, entrapped within endogenous protein cages. In addition, the capacity of ferritin cages to accommodate and store the degradation products of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was investigated in vitro in the acidic environment mimicking the physiological conditions that are present within the lysosomes. The magnetic, colloidal and structural follow-up of nanoparticles and proteins in the lysosome-like medium confirmed the efficient remediation of nanoparticle-released cobalt and iron ions by ferritins in solution. Metal transfer into ferritins could represent a quintessential process in which biomolecules and homeostasis regulate the local degradation of nanoparticles and recycle their by-products. PMID:28067263

  1. Physiological Remediation of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles by Ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volatron, Jeanne; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Javed, Yasir; Vuong, Quoc Lam; Gossuin, Yves; Neveu, Sophie; Luciani, Nathalie; Hémadi, Miryana; Carn, Florent; Alloyeau, Damien; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been increasingly suggested as prospective therapeutic nanoplatforms, yet their long-term fate and cellular processing in the body is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of an endogenous iron storage protein – namely the ferritin – in the remediation of biodegradable cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. Structural and elemental analysis of ferritins close to exogenous nanoparticles within spleens and livers of mice injected in vivo with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, suggests the intracellular transfer of degradation-derived cobalt and iron, entrapped within endogenous protein cages. In addition, the capacity of ferritin cages to accommodate and store the degradation products of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was investigated in vitro in the acidic environment mimicking the physiological conditions that are present within the lysosomes. The magnetic, colloidal and structural follow-up of nanoparticles and proteins in the lysosome-like medium confirmed the efficient remediation of nanoparticle-released cobalt and iron ions by ferritins in solution. Metal transfer into ferritins could represent a quintessential process in which biomolecules and homeostasis regulate the local degradation of nanoparticles and recycle their by-products.

  2. Physiological Remediation of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles by Ferritin.

    PubMed

    Volatron, Jeanne; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Javed, Yasir; Vuong, Quoc Lam; Gossuin, Yves; Neveu, Sophie; Luciani, Nathalie; Hémadi, Miryana; Carn, Florent; Alloyeau, Damien; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-09

    Metallic nanoparticles have been increasingly suggested as prospective therapeutic nanoplatforms, yet their long-term fate and cellular processing in the body is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of an endogenous iron storage protein - namely the ferritin - in the remediation of biodegradable cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. Structural and elemental analysis of ferritins close to exogenous nanoparticles within spleens and livers of mice injected in vivo with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, suggests the intracellular transfer of degradation-derived cobalt and iron, entrapped within endogenous protein cages. In addition, the capacity of ferritin cages to accommodate and store the degradation products of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was investigated in vitro in the acidic environment mimicking the physiological conditions that are present within the lysosomes. The magnetic, colloidal and structural follow-up of nanoparticles and proteins in the lysosome-like medium confirmed the efficient remediation of nanoparticle-released cobalt and iron ions by ferritins in solution. Metal transfer into ferritins could represent a quintessential process in which biomolecules and homeostasis regulate the local degradation of nanoparticles and recycle their by-products.

  3. Splitting water with cobalt.

    PubMed

    Artero, Vincent; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Fontecave, Marc

    2011-08-01

    The future of energy supply depends on innovative breakthroughs regarding the design of cheap, sustainable, and efficient systems for the conversion and storage of renewable energy sources, such as solar energy. The production of hydrogen, a fuel with remarkable properties, through sunlight-driven water splitting appears to be a promising and appealing solution. While the active sites of enzymes involved in the overall water-splitting process in natural systems, namely hydrogenases and photosystem II, use iron, nickel, and manganese ions, cobalt has emerged in the past five years as the most versatile non-noble metal for the development of synthetic H(2)- and O(2)-evolving catalysts. Such catalysts can be further coupled with photosensitizers to generate photocatalytic systems for light-induced hydrogen evolution from water.

  4. Cobalt: for strength and color

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, Maeve A.; Kropschot, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cobalt is a shiny, gray, brittle metal that is best known for creating an intense blue color in glass and paints. It is frequently used in the manufacture of rechargeable batteries and to create alloys that maintain their strength at high temperatures. It is also one of the essential trace elements (or "micronutrients") that humans and many other living creatures require for good health. Cobalt is an important component in many aerospace, defense, and medical applications and is a key element in many clean energy technologies. The name cobalt comes from the German word kobold, meaning goblin. It was given this name by medieval miners who believed that troublesome goblins replaced the valuable metals in their ore with a substance that emitted poisonous fumes when smelted. The Swedish chemist Georg Brandt isolated metallic cobalt-the first new metal to be discovered since ancient times-in about 1735 and identified some of its valuable properties.

  5. Assessing the performance of density functional theory for the electronic structure of metal-salens: the 3d(0)-metals.

    PubMed

    Sears, John S; Sherrill, C David

    2008-04-17

    A series of metal-salen complexes of the 3d(0) metals Sc(III), Ti(IV), V(V), Cr(VI), and Mn(VII) have been explored using high-level electronic structure methods including coupled-cluster theory with singles, doubles, and perturbative triples as well as complete active-space third-order perturbation theory. The performance of three common density functional theory approaches has been assessed for both the geometries and the relative energies of the low-lying electronic states. The nondynamical correlation effects are demonstrated to be extremely large in all of the systems examined. Although density functional theory provides reasonable results for some of the systems, the overall agreement is quite poor. This said, the density functional theory approaches are shown to outperform the single-reference perturbation theory and coupled-cluster theory approaches for cases of strong nondynamical correlation.

  6. Comparing kinetic profiles between bifunctional and binary type of Zn(salen)-based catalysts for organic carbonate formation

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Summary Zn(salen) complexes have been employed as active catalysts for the formation of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and CO2. A series of kinetic experiments was carried out to obtain information about the mechanism for this process catalyzed by these complexes and in particular about the order-dependence in catalyst. A comparative analysis was done between the binary catalyst system Zn(salphen)/NBu4I and a bifunctional system Zn(salpyr)·MeI with a built-in nucleophile. The latter system demonstrates an apparent second-order dependence on the bifunctional catalyst concentration and thus follows a different, bimetallic mechanism as opposed to the binary catalyst that is connected with a first-order dependence on the catalyst concentration and a monometallic mechanism. PMID:25161742

  7. Enantioselective epoxidation with chiral MN(III)(salen) catalysts: kinetic resolution of aryl-substituted allylic alcohols.

    PubMed

    Adam, W; Humpf, H U; Roschmann, K J; Saha-Möller, C R

    2001-08-24

    A set of aryl-substituted allylic alcohols rac-2 has been epoxidized by chiral Mn(salen*) complexes 1 as the catalyst and iodosyl benzene (PhIO) as the oxygen source. Whereas one enantiomer of the allylic alcohol 2 is preferentially epoxidized to give the threo- or cis-epoxy alcohol 3 (up to 80% ee) as the main product (dr up to >95:5), the other enantiomer of 2 is enriched (up to 53% ee). In the case of 1,1-dimethyl-1,2-dihydronaphthalen-2-ol (2c), the CH oxidation to the enone 4c proceeds enantioselectively and competes with the epoxidation. The absolute configurations of the allylic alcohols 2 and their epoxides 3 have been determined by chemical correlation or CD spectroscopy. The observed diastereo- and enantioselectivities in the epoxidation reactions are rationalized in terms of a beneficial interplay between the hydroxy-directing effect and the attack along the Katsuki trajectory.

  8. Comparing kinetic profiles between bifunctional and binary type of Zn(salen)-based catalysts for organic carbonate formation.

    PubMed

    Martín, Carmen; Kleij, Arjan W

    2014-01-01

    Zn(salen) complexes have been employed as active catalysts for the formation of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and CO2. A series of kinetic experiments was carried out to obtain information about the mechanism for this process catalyzed by these complexes and in particular about the order-dependence in catalyst. A comparative analysis was done between the binary catalyst system Zn(salphen)/NBu4I and a bifunctional system Zn(salpyr)·MeI with a built-in nucleophile. The latter system demonstrates an apparent second-order dependence on the bifunctional catalyst concentration and thus follows a different, bimetallic mechanism as opposed to the binary catalyst that is connected with a first-order dependence on the catalyst concentration and a monometallic mechanism.

  9. Exceptionally active yttrium-salen complexes for the catalyzed ring opening of epoxides by TMSCN and TMSN(3).

    PubMed

    Saha, Biswajit; Lin, Mei-Huey; RajanBabu, T V

    2007-11-09

    Halide or alkoxide free yttrium-salen complexes are excellent catalysts for the ring opening of epoxides mediated by TMSCN and TMSN3. Substrate to catalyst ratios up to 10000 have been realized in these potentially useful reactions, which can be run under solvent-free conditions. Even though the enantioselectivities for the TMSCN-mediated reaction remains modest (best 77% ee), these studies with a highly tunable ligand system may provide further impetus for work in this important area of catalysis. Even though attempts to isolate a Y-cyanide complex, which was detected by in situ IR spectroscopy, failed, a related dimeric hydroxide complex was isolated. A kinetic study using in situ IR spectroscopy did not provide conclusive data to assign an order with respect to Y in this reaction.

  10. (Salen)CrIIIX catalysts for the copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides: role of the initiator and cocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Mackiewicz, Ryan M; Rodgers, Jody L; Phelps, Andrea L

    2004-03-22

    The copolymerization of CO(2) and cyclohexene or propylene oxide has been examined employing (salen)Cr(III)Nu complexes (Nu = Cl or N(3)) as catalysts. The addition of various cocatalysts, including phosphines and PPN+ or Bu4N+ Cl- salts serves to greatly enhance the rate of copolymer production. In these instances, the mechanism of the initiation step appears to be unimolecular in catalyst concentration, unlike the bimolecular process cocatalyzed by N-methylimidazole. The copolymers were produced with >95% carbonate linkages with TOFs in the range 39-494 mol epoxide consumed/mol Cr.h. In the presence of phosphine cocatalysts, no cyclic carbonate was produced as a byproduct.

  11. Influence of Electron-Withdrawing Substituents on the Electronic Structure of Oxidized Ni and Cu Salen Complexes.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Linus; Herasymchuk, Khrystyna; Thomas, Fabrice; Storr, Tim

    2015-06-15

    Nickel (Ni(Sal(CF3))) and copper (Cu(Sal(CF3))) complexes of an electron-poor salen ligand were prepared, and their one-electron oxidized counterparts were studied using an array of spectroscopic and theoretical methods. The electrochemistry of both complexes exhibited quasi-reversible redox processes at higher potentials in comparison to the M(Sal(R)) (R = (t)Bu, OMe, NMe2) analogues, in line with the electron-withdrawing nature of the para-CF3 substituent. Chemical oxidation, monitored by ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy, afforded their corresponding one-electron oxidized products. Ligand-based oxidation was observed for [Ni(Sal(CF3))](+•), as evidenced by sharp NIR transitions in the UV-vis-NIR spectrum and a broad isotropic signal at g = 2.067 by solution electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Such sharp NIR transitions observed for [Ni(Sal(CF3))](+•) are indicative of a delocalized electronic structure, which is in good agreement with electrochemical measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In addition, the increased Lewis acidity of [Ni(Sal(CF3))](+•), evident from the EPR g-value and DFT calculations, was further quantified by the binding affinity of axial ligands to [Ni(Sal(CF3))](+•). For [Cu(Sal(CF3))](+), an intense ligand-to-metal charge transfer band at 18 700 cm(-1) in the UV-vis-NIR spectrum was observed, which is diagnostic for the formation of a Cu(III) species [J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2008, 130, 15448-15459]. The Cu(III) character for [Cu(Sal(CF3))](+) is further confirmed by (19)F NMR analysis. Taken together, these results show that the electron-deficient salen ligand H2Sal(CF3) increases the Lewis acidity of the coordinating metal center.

  12. The monomer-to-dimer transition and bimodal growth of Co-salen on NaCl(001): a high resolution atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Fremy, S; Schwarz, A; Lämmle, K; Prosenc, M; Wiesendanger, R

    2009-10-07

    Molecules of Co-salen, a paramagnetic metal-organic Schiff base complex, self-assemble into two different well ordered morphologies on a NaCl(001) substrate: nanowires, which form networks, and compact nanocrystallites. Their growth can be controlled by adjusting the deposition parameters. It turns out that the nanowires are metastable. Molecular resolution images suggest that the packing in both morphologies is the same as in bulk Co-salen single crystals. Only the orientation of the c-axis with respect to the substrate is different. The origin of this intriguing bimodal growth is associated with a monomer-to-dimer transition, which probably takes place during initial nucleation at step edges.

  13. A new chiral Fe(III)-salen grafted mesoporous catalyst for enantioselective asymmetric ring opening of racemic epoxides at room temperature under solvent-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Roy, Susmita; Bhanja, Piyali; Safikul Islam, Sk; Bhaumik, Asim; Islam, Sk Manirul

    2016-01-31

    We have designed a new mesoporous SBA-15 supported chiral Fe(III)-salen material (Fe@SBSAL) having high BET surface area and porosity. The material showed excellent catalytic efficiency in regio- and enantioselective (ee > 99%) asymmetric ring opening (ARO) of racemic meso- and terminal-epoxides with various anilines at room temperature under solvent-free conditions within 1-3 h reaction time.

  14. Cr(Salen)-catalyzed addition of 1,3-dichloropropene to aromatic aldehydes. A simple access to optically active vinyl epoxides.

    PubMed

    Bandini, M; Cozzi, P G; Melchiorre, P; Morganti, S; Umani-Ronchi, A

    2001-04-19

    [reaction: see text]. Chiral Cr(Salen) complex (1) prepared in situ from CrCl3 promotes the enantioselective addition of 1,3-dichloropropene to aromatic aldehydes in the presence of Mn as the stoichiometric reductant and Me3SiCl as a scavenger. The resulting 1,2-chlorohydrins obtained in good enantiomeric and diastereoisomeric excesses can be easily transformed into the corresponding chiral vinyl epoxides.

  15. Axially coordinated chiral salen Mn(III) anchored onto azole onium modified ZnPS-PVPA as effective catalysts for asymmetric epoxidation of unfunctionalized olefins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Fu, Xiangkai; Wang, Gang; Miao, Qiang; Wang, Guomin

    2012-09-21

    A series of chiral salen Mn(III) immobilized onto azole onium modified zinc poly(styrene-phenylvinyl phosphonate)-phosphate (ZnPS-PVPA) were prepared. The catalysts were characterized by FT-IR, diffusion reflection UV-vis, AAS, N(2) volumetric adsorption, SEM, TEM, XPS, XRD, TG and elemental analysis. The results showed that the chiral salen Mn(III) complex was successfully immobilized onto ZnPS-PVPA. These prepared catalysts were evaluated in the asymmetric epoxidation of unfunctionalized olefins with m-CPBA and NaIO(4) as oxidants and demonstrated higher catalytic activities than those of the corresponding homogeneous chiral salen Mn(III) catalyst under the same conditions. Moreover, these heterogeneous catalysts were stable and could be recycled nine times without significant loss of activity. Furthermore, this novel type of catalyst could also be validly used in large-scale reactions with superior catalytic disposition being maintained at the same level, which indicated the potential for applications in industry.

  16. A bimetallic aluminum(salen) complex for the synthesis of 1,3-oxathiolane-2-thiones and 1,3-dithiolane-2-thiones.

    PubMed

    Clegg, William; Harrington, Ross W; North, Michael; Villuendas, Pedro

    2010-09-17

    The combined use of the bimetallic aluminum(salen) complex [Al(salen)](2)O and tetrabutylammonium bromide (or tributylamine) is found to catalyze the reaction between epoxides and carbon disulfide. In most cases, at 50 °C, the reaction produces 1,3-oxathiolane-2-thiones, while at 90 °C, 1,3-dithiolane-2-thiones are the main product. The structure and stereochemistry of three of the 1,3-dithiolane-2-thiones is unambiguously determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis, and this is used to correct errors in the literature concerning the synthesis of cyclic di- and trithiocarbonates. The kinetics of 1,3-oxathiolane-2-thione synthesis are determined, and the resulting rate equation, along with a stereochemical analysis of the reaction and catalyst modification studies, is used to determine a mechanism for the synthesis of 1,3-oxathiolane-2-thiones which contrasts with the mechanism previously determined for cyclic carbonate synthesis using the same bimetallic aluminum(salen) complex.

  17. Asymmetric epoxidation of cis/trans-β-methylstyrene catalysed by immobilised Mn(salen) with different linkages: heterogenisation of homogeneous asymmetric catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haidong; Zou, Yu; Wang, Yi-Meng; Shen, Yu; Zheng, Xuxu

    2014-06-16

    Immobilised Mn(salen) catalysts with two different linkages were studied in the asymmetric epoxidation of cis/trans-β-methylstyrene using NaClO as oxidant. The immobilised Mn(salen) complexes inside nanopores can lead to different catalytic behaviour compared with that of homogeneous Jacobsen catalyst. The rigidity of the linkage was found to be a key factor affecting the catalytic performance of immobilised catalysts. The immobilised catalyst with a rigid linkage exhibited comparable chemical selectivity, enantioselectivity and cis/trans ratio of product formation to that obtained with homogeneous Jacobsen catalysts. In contrast, the immobilised catalyst with a flexible linkage gave remarkably lower chemical selectivity, enantioselectivity and inverted cis/trans ratio compared with the results obtained with the homogeneous Jacobsen catalyst and the immobilised catalyst with rigid linkage. Thus, for immobilised Mn(salen) catalysts, a rigid linkage connecting active centres to the support is essential to obtain activity and enantioselectivity as high as those obtained in homogeneous systems.

  18. Controlling the misuse of cobalt in horses.

    PubMed

    Ho, Emmie N M; Chan, George H M; Wan, Terence S M; Curl, Peter; Riggs, Christopher M; Hurley, Michael J; Sykes, David

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt is a well-established inducer of hypoxia-like responses, which can cause gene modulation at the hypoxia inducible factor pathway to induce erythropoietin transcription. Cobalt salts are orally active, inexpensive, and easily accessible. It is an attractive blood doping agent for enhancing aerobic performance. Indeed, recent intelligence and investigations have confirmed cobalt was being abused in equine sports. In this paper, population surveys of total cobalt in raceday samples were conducted using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Urinary threshold of 75 ng/mL and plasma threshold of 2 ng/mL could be proposed for the control of cobalt misuse in raceday or in-competition samples. Results from administration trials with cobalt-containing supplements showed that common supplements could elevate urinary and plasma cobalt levels above the proposed thresholds within 24 h of administration. It would therefore be necessary to ban the use of cobalt-containing supplements on raceday as well as on the day before racing in order to implement and enforce the proposed thresholds. Since the abuse with huge quantities of cobalt salts can be done during training while the use of legitimate cobalt-containing supplements are also allowed, different urinary and plasma cobalt thresholds would be required to control cobalt abuse in non-raceday or out-of-competition samples. This could be achieved by setting the thresholds above the maximum urinary and plasma cobalt concentrations observed or anticipated from the normal use of legitimate cobalt-containing supplements. Urinary threshold of 2000 ng/mL and plasma threshold of 10 ng/mL were thus proposed for the control of cobalt abuse in non-raceday or out-of-competition samples.

  19. Cobalt in ferromanganese crusts as a monitor of hydrothermal discharge on the Pacific sea floor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.; Lane-Bostwick, C. M.

    1988-01-01

    Ferromanganese oxide crusts, which accumulate on unsedimented surfaces in the open ocean1-6, derive most of their metal content from dissolved and particulate matter in ambient bottom water7,8, in proportions modified by the variable scavenging efficiency of the oxide phase for susceptible ions9. They differ in this respect from abyssal nodules, much of whose metals are remobilized from host sediments. Here we present maps of cobalt concentration and inferred accumulation rate of ferromanganese crusts from the Pacific Ocean. We propose that depletion of cobalt in Pacific crusts measures the location and intensity of submarine hydrothermal discharge. Use of the 'cobalt chronometer', an algorithm inversely relating cobalt content and crust growth rate, permits mapping of the accumulation rate of ferromanganese crusts with only indirect recourse to radioactivity-based dating methods. These maps show that crusts in hydrothermal areas grow from two to more than four orders of magnitude faster than in the Central Pacific Ocean. Cobalt-enriched crusts are found where water masses are most isolated from continental-coastal and hydrothermal sources of metals, now and in the past. This relationship can resolve the problem of cobalt enrichment in crusts without recourse to hypotheses invoking special cobalt sources or enrichment mechanisms. ?? 1988 Nature Publishing Group.

  20. Cobalt(II) and Cobalt(III) Coordination Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Nicholas C.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment which illustrates the formation of tris(phenanthroline)cobalt complexes in the 2+ and 3+ oxidation states, the effect of coordination on reactions of the ligand, and the use of a ligand displacement reaction in recovering the transformed ligand. Uses IR, UV-VIS, conductivity, and NMR. (MVL)

  1. Cosine (Cobalt Silicide Growth Through Nitrogen-Induced Epitaxy) Process For Epitaxial Cobalt Silicide Formation For High Performance Sha

    DOEpatents

    Lim, Chong Wee; Shin, Chan Soo; Gall, Daniel; Petrov, Ivan Georgiev; Greene, Joseph E.

    2004-09-28

    A method for forming an epitaxial cobalt silicide layer on a MOS device includes sputter depositing cobalt in an ambient to form a first layer of cobalt suicide on a gate and source/drain regions of the MOS device. Subsequently, cobalt is sputter deposited again in an ambient of argon to increase the thickness of the cobalt silicide layer to a second thickness.

  2. Polytypic transformations during the thermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, Thimmasandra Narayan

    2010-06-15

    The isothermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature leads to the formation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The phase evolution during the decomposition process was monitored using powder X-ray diffraction. The transformation of cobalt hydroxide to cobalt oxide occurs via three phase mixture while cobalt hydroxynitrate to cobalt oxide occurs through a two phase mixture. The nature of the sample and its preparation method controls the decomposition mechanism. The comparison of topotactical relationship between the precursors to the decomposed product has been reported in relation to polytypism. - Graphical abstract: Isothermal thermal decomposition studies of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature show the metastable phase formed prior to Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase.

  3. On the cobalt and cobalt oxide electrodeposition from a glyceline deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Sakita, Alan M P; Della Noce, Rodrigo; Fugivara, Cecílio S; Benedetti, Assis V

    2016-09-14

    The electrodeposition of cobalt and cobalt oxides from a glyceline deep eutectic solvent is reported. Cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy are employed to study the Co deposition processes. Surface analysis reveals that metallic cobalt is deposited at potentials less negative than the current peak potential whereas cobalt oxides are detected and electrochemically observed when the deposition is done at more negative potentials. i-t transients are analyzed by applying the Scharifker and Hills (SH) theoretical model. It is concluded that cobalt deposition occurs via a progressive nucleation and growth mechanism for concentrations higher than 0.05 mol L(-1) cobalt ions. For concentrations ≤0.025 mol L(-1) cobalt ions and low overpotentials, the mechanism changes to instantaneous nucleation. The im-tm relationships of the SH model are used to determine the values of the kinetic parameters and the cobalt ion diffusion coefficient.

  4. Coordination modes of a schiff base pentadentate derivative of 4-aminoantipyrine with cobalt(II), nickel(II) and copper(II) metal ions: synthesis, spectroscopic and antimicrobial studies.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Sulekh; Jain, Deepali; Sharma, Amit Kumar; Sharma, Pratibha

    2009-01-01

    Transition metal complexes of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) metal ions with general stoichiometry [M(L)X]X and [M(L)SO(4)], where M = Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II), L = 3,3'-thiodipropionic acid bis(4-amino-5-ethylimino-2,3-dimethyl-1-phenyl-3-pyrazoline) and X = NO(3)(-), Cl(-) and OAc(-), have been synthesized and structurally characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements and spectral techniques like IR, UV and EPR. The nickel(II) complexes were found to have octahedral geometry, whereas cobalt(II) and copper(II) complexes were of tetragonal geometry. The covalency factor (beta) and orbital reduction factor (k) suggest the covalent nature of the complexes. The ligand and its complexes have been screened for their antifungal and antibacterial activities against three fungi, i.e. Alternaria brassicae, Aspergillus niger and Fusarium oxysporum and two bacteria, i.e. Xanthomonas compestris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  5. Synthesis and aggregation behaviour of luminescent mesomorphic zinc(II) complexes with 'salen' type asymmetric Schiff base ligands.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sutapa; Bhattacharjee, Chira R; Mondal, Paritosh; Prasad, S Krishna; Rao, D S Shankar

    2015-04-28

    A new series of photoluminescent Zn(II)-salen type asymmetric Schiff base complexes, [ZnL], H2L = [N,N'-bis-(4-n-alkoxysalicylidene)-1,2-diaminopropane] (n = 12, 14 and 16) have been accessed and their mesomorphic and photophysical properties investigated. Though the ligands are non-mesomorphic, coordination to Zn(2+) ion induces liquid crystalline behaviour. The complexes exhibited a lamello-columnar phase (Coll) as characterized by a variable temperature powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) study. Intense blue emissions were observed for the complexes at room temperature in solution, in the solid state and in the mesophase. Aggregation properties of the complexes were explored in different solvents through absorption and photoluminescence studies. While de-aggregation to monomers occurred in coordinating solvents due to axial coordination to Zn(II), aggregates were formed in the solution of non-coordinating solvents. Density functional theory (DFT) computation carried out on a representative complex using a GAUSSIAN 09 program at the B3LYP level suggested a distorted square planar geometry. The results of a time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) spectral correlative study showed the electronic properties of the complex molecule to be in compliance with the spectral data.

  6. Cu(I) complexes of bis(methyl)(thia/selena) salen ligands: Synthesis, characterization, redox behavior and DNA binding studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asatkar, Ashish K.; Tripathi, Mamta; Panda, Snigdha; Pande, Rama; Zade, Sanjio S.

    2017-01-01

    Mononuclear cuprous complexes 1 and 2, [{CH3E(o-C6H4)CH = NCH2}2Cu]ClO4; E = S/Se, have been synthesized by the reaction of bis(methyl)(thia/selena) salen ligands and [Cu(CH3CN)4]ClO4. Both the products were characterized by elemental analysis, ESI-MS, FT-IR, 1H/13C/77Se NMR, and cyclic voltammetry. The complexes possess tetrahedral geometry around metal center with the N2S2/N2Se2 coordination core. Cyclic voltammograms of complexes 1 and 2 displayed reversible anodic waves at E1/2 = + 0.08 V and + 0.10 V, respectively, corresponding to the Cu(I)/Cu(II) redox couple. DNA binding studies of both the complexes were performed applying absorbance, fluorescence and molecular docking techniques. Competitive binding experiment of complexes with ct-DNA against ethidium bromide is performed to predict the mode of binding. The results indicate the groove binding mode of complexes 1 and 2 to DNA. The binding constants revealed the strong binding affinity of complexes towards ct-DNA.

  7. Communication: DMRG-SCF study of the singlet, triplet, and quintet states of oxo-Mn(Salen)

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, Sebastian Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Van Neck, Dimitri; Bogaerts, Thomas; Van Der Voort, Pascal

    2014-06-28

    We use CHEMPS2, our free open-source spin-adapted implementation of the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) [S. Wouters, W. Poelmans, P. W. Ayers, and D. Van Neck, Comput. Phys. Commun. 185, 1501 (2014)], to study the lowest singlet, triplet, and quintet states of the oxo-Mn(Salen) complex. We describe how an initial approximate DMRG calculation in a large active space around the Fermi level can be used to obtain a good set of starting orbitals for subsequent complete-active-space or DMRG self-consistent field calculations. This procedure mitigates the need for a localization procedure, followed by a manual selection of the active space. Per multiplicity, the same active space of 28 electrons in 22 orbitals (28e, 22o) is obtained with the 6-31G{sup *}, cc-pVDZ, and ANO-RCC-VDZP basis sets (the latter with DKH2 scalar relativistic corrections). Our calculations provide new insight into the electronic structure of the quintet.

  8. Cobalt-Base Alloy Gun Barrel Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Cobalt -Base Alloy Gun Barrel Study by William S. de Rosset and Jonathan S. Montgomery ARL-RP-0491 July 2014 A reprint...21005-5069 ARL-RP-0491 July 2014 Cobalt -Base Alloy Gun Barrel Study William S. de Rosset and Jonathan S. Montgomery Weapons and Materials...DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) July 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Reprint 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) October–November 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cobalt -Base Alloy

  9. Mineral resource of the month: cobalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2009-01-01

    Cobalt is a metal used in numerous commercial, industrial and military applications. On a global basis, the leading use of cobalt is in rechargeable lithium-ion, nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride battery electrodes. Cobalt use has grown rapidly since the early 1990s, with the development of new battery technologies and an increase in demand for portable electronics such as cell phones, laptop computers and cordless power tools.

  10. [Neurotoxic effects of cobalt: an open question].

    PubMed

    Catalani, S; Apostoli, P

    2011-01-01

    Increased cobalt levels have been associated with neurological diseases (hand tremor, incoordination, cognitive decline, depression, vertigo, hearing loss and visual changes) in addition to "classic" and known cardiac diseases (arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies) and allergic or endocrine symptoms. Cobalt neurotoxicity is reported in isolated cases: old occupational or iatrogenic exposures and more recent releases of metallic ions by prosthesis. The studies of these cases have revealed a typical symptomatology of cobalt probably due to its ability to induce oxidative stress and mitochondrial alterations.

  11. Cobalt-catalyzed C-H borylation.

    PubMed

    Obligacion, Jennifer V; Semproni, Scott P; Chirik, Paul J

    2014-03-19

    A family of pincer-ligated cobalt complexes has been synthesized and are active for the catalytic C-H borylation of heterocycles and arenes. The cobalt catalysts operate with high activity and under mild conditions and do not require excess borane reagents. Up to 5000 turnovers for methyl furan-2-carboxylate have been observed at ambient temperature with 0.02 mol % catalyst loadings. A catalytic cycle that relies on a cobalt(I)-(III) redox couple is proposed.

  12. Thin films of tetrafluorosubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine: Structure and sensor properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyamer, Darya D.; Sukhikh, Aleksandr S.; Krasnov, Pavel O.; Gromilov, Sergey A.; Morozova, Natalya B.; Basova, Tamara V.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, thin films of tetrafluorosubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPcF4) were prepared by organic molecular beam deposition and their structure was studied using UV-vis, polarization dependent Raman spectroscopy, XRD and atomic force microscopy. Quantum chemical calculations (DFT) have been employed in order to determine the detailed assignment of the bands in the CoPcF4 IR and Raman spectra. The electrical sensor response of CoPcF4 films to ammonia vapours was investigated and compared with that of unsubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine films. In order to explain the difference in sensitivity of the unsubstituted and fluorinated phthalocyanines to ammonia, the nature and properties of chemical binding between CoPc derivatives and NH3 were described by quantum-chemical calculations utilizing DFT method. The effect of post-deposition annealing on surface morphology and gas sensing properties of CoPcF4 films was also studied.

  13. Solution for Depositing an Electroless Cobalt Alloy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SOLUTIONS(MIXTURES), *ELECTROLESS PLATING), (*PATENTS, ELECTROLESS PLATING), (*COBALT ALLOYS, ELECTROLESS PLATING), ADDITIVES, SODIUM COMPOUNDS... TUNGSTATES , POTASSIUM COMPOUNDS, NICKEL COMPOUNDS, SULFATES, THIOUREA, MAGNETIC PROPERTIES

  14. Electrosynthesis of highly transparent cobalt oxide water oxidation catalyst films from cobalt aminopolycarboxylate complexes.

    PubMed

    Bonke, Shannon A; Wiechen, Mathias; Hocking, Rosalie K; Fang, Xi-Ya; Lupton, David W; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Spiccia, Leone

    2015-04-24

    Efficient catalysis of water oxidation represents one of the major challenges en route to efficient sunlight-driven water splitting. Cobalt oxides (CoOx ) have been widely investigated as water oxidation catalysts, although the incorporation of these materials into photoelectrochemical devices has been hindered by a lack of transparency. Herein, the electrosynthesis of transparent CoOx catalyst films is described by utilizing cobalt(II) aminopolycarboxylate complexes as precursors to the oxide. These complexes allow control over the deposition rate and morphology to enable the production of thin, catalytic CoOx films on a conductive substrate, which can be exploited in integrated photoelectrochemical devices. Notably, under a bias of 1.0 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), the film deposited from [Co(NTA)(OH2 )2 ](-) (NTA=nitrilotriacetate) decreased the transmission by only 10 % at λ=500 nm, but still generated >80 % of the water oxidation current produced by a [Co(OH2 )6 ](2+) -derived oxide film whose transmission was only 40 % at λ=500 nm.

  15. Oxidation of low cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Four high temperature alloys: U-700, Mar M-247, Waspaloy and PM/HIP U-700 were modified with various cobalt levels ranging from 0 percent to their nominal commercial levels. The alloys were then tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1150 C at times from 500 to 100 1 hour cycles. Specific weight change with time and X-ray diffraction analyses of the oxidized samples were used to evaluate the alloys. The alloys tend to be either Al2O3/aluminate spinel or Cr2O3/chromite spinel formers depending on the Cr/Al ratio in the alloy. Waspaloy with a ratio of 15:1 is a strong Cr2O3 former while this U-700 with a ratio of 3.33:1 tends to form mostly Cr2O3 while Mar M-247 with a ratio of 1.53:1 is a strong Al2O3 former. The best cyclic oxidation resistance is associated with the Al2O3 formers. The cobalt levels appear to have little effect on the oxidation resistance of the Al2O3/aluminate spinel formers while any tendency to form Cr2O3 is accelerated with increased cobalt levels and leads to increased oxidation attack.

  16. Cobalt Reduction Guidelines, Revision 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This report, which updates and supersedes an earlier report (EPRI NP-6737) on the same subject, describes methods for establishing a program to identify nuclear power plant valves with high-cobalt hardfacing that are potential significant contributors to the cobalt inventory that is irradiated in the reactor core. The resulting radioactive cobalt isotope, cobalt-60, is a major contributor to plant radiation levels and therefore occupational doses received by plant operational and maintenance personnel. A methodology to determine whether hardfacing is actually required on specific valves is also described as is the physical, mechanical and wear properties of high-cobalt and potential replacement cobalt-free hardfacing and trim alloys. Discussions are presented of the general and specific design requirements for valve hardfacing in nuclear service. Current world-wide nuclear utility experience with cobalt-free hardfacing alloys is described. The regulatory and industry code issues related to replacing and/or changing valve hardfacing materials are discussed. The actions and responsibilities of utility management in implementing an effective cobalt-reduction program are also delineated.

  17. Serum cobalt in children with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nicoloff, G; Angelova, M; Christova, I; Nikolov, A; Alexiev, A

    2006-01-01

    The effect of cobalt on the cardiovascular system is one of many aspects of cobalt metabolism in humans. Elastin and collagen are the main proteins of the vascular wall. The aims of this study were: 1) to determine serum cobalt concentrations in children with hypertension; and 2) to study the correlation between serum cobalt and some biological markers of the extracellular matrix of the vascular wall, i.e., anti-elastin and anti-collagen type IV antibodies. Patients showed statistically significant higher levels of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and significantly lower serum cobalt concentrations, than controls. Children with hypertension showed significantly higher levels of total cholesterol (P = 0.0003) and collagen type IV IgM (P = 0.04). Collagen type IV IgG levels (P = 0.027) were lower than in controls. Serum cobalt in patients showed a correlation with systolic blood pressure (r = -0.44, P = 0.05), elastin IgM (r = 0.60, P = 0.007), and collagen type IV IgG (r = -0.46, P = 0.04). Our data suggest the existence of a correlation between changes in levels of serum cobalt, total cholesterol, anti-collagen type IV antibodies, and essential hypertension in children. This is the first study of serum cobalt in children with essential hypertension.

  18. Cobalt chloride pretreatment promotes cardiac differentiation of human embryonic stem cells under atmospheric oxygen level.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kwong-Man; Chan, Yau-Chi; Lee, Yee-Ki; Lai, Wing-Hon; Au, Ka-Wing; Fung, Man-Lung; Siu, Chung-Wah; Li, Ronald A; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2011-12-01

    Our previous study demonstrated the direct involvement of the HIF-1α subunit in the promotion of cardiac differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We report the use of cobalt chloride to induce HIF-1α stabilization in human ESCs to promote cardiac differentiation. Treatment of undifferentiated hES2 human ESCs with 50 μM cobalt chloride markedly increased protein levels of the HIF-1α subunit, and was associated with increased expression of early cardiac specific transcription factors and cardiotrophic factors including NK2.5, vascular endothelial growth factor, and cardiotrophin-1. When pretreated cells were subjected to cardiac differentiation, a notable increase in the occurrence of beating embryoid bodies and sarcomeric actinin-positive cells was observed, along with increased expression of the cardiac-specific markers, MHC-A, MHC-B, and MLC2V. Electrophysiological study revealed increased atrial- and nodal-like cells in the cobalt chloride-pretreated group. Confocal calcium imaging analysis indicated that the maximum upstroke and decay velocities were significantly increased in both noncaffeine and caffeine-induced calcium transient in cardiomyocytes derived from the cobalt chloride-pretreated cells, suggesting these cells were functionally more mature. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that cobalt chloride pretreatment of hES2 human ESCs promotes cardiac differentiation and the maturation of calcium homeostasis of cardiomyocytes derived from ESCs.

  19. Near-IR luminescence and field-induced single molecule magnet of four salen-type ytterbium complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian-Qi; Yan, Peng-Fei; Luan, Fang; Li, Yu-Xin; Sun, Jing-Wen; Chen, Chuan; Yang, Fan; Chen, Han; Zou, Xiao-Yan; Li, Guang-Ming

    2015-01-05

    A series of rigid hexadentate salen-type (H2L) ytterbium complexes, namely, [Yb2L3(CH3OH)]·3CH3CN (1), [Yb2LL'L″(CH3OH)(H2O)2](ClO4)2·CH3OH·H2O (2), [Yb2L(OAc)4(CH3OH)2]·2CH3OH (3), and {[Yb2L(OAc)4]·3H2O}n (4) (H2L = N,N'-bis(2-oxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)-1,2-phenylenediamine, HL' = 2-(2'-hydroxy-3'-methyloxy-phenyl)benzimidazole and HL" = 3-methoxysalicylaldehyde) have been synthesized by reactions of H2L with multifarious Yb(3+) salts. X-ray crystallographic analyses demonstrate that complex 1 is of a triple-decker sandwich-type Yb2L3 structure with a ratio of H2L/Yb = 3:2, 2 and 3 possess the unique Yb2 core with a ratio of H2L/Yb = 2:2 and 1:2, respectively, 4 exhibits one dimensional coordination polymers in which the polymeric structures are formed by acetate (OAc(-)) groups. All complexes 1-4 exhibit near-IR luminescence, which can be rationalized on the basis of the disparate structural effects. The magnetic analysis unveils that all complexes 1-4 are of field-induced single-molecule magnet behavior with the energy barriers (Ueff/kB) of 14.5, 2.0, 9.5, and 2.4 K at 3 kOe direct current fields, respectively.

  20. Enantioselective binding of structural epoxide isomers by a chiral vanadyl salen complex: a pulsed EPR, cw-ENDOR and DFT investigation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Damien M; Fallis, Ian A; Carter, Emma; Willock, David J; Landon, James; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Vinck, Evi

    2009-08-21

    The mode of chiral interaction between a series of asymmetric epoxides (propylene oxide, butylene oxide, epifluorohydrin and epichlorohydrin) and a chiral vanadyl salen complex, N, N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexane-diamino-vanadium (iv) oxide, [VO()], was investigated by a range of electron magnetic resonance techniques (EPR, ENDOR, HYSCORE) and DFT. Enantiomer discrimination of the weakly bound epoxides by the vanadyl complex was evident by cw-ENDOR. The origin of this discrimination was attributed to a number of factors including H-bonds, steric properties and electrostatic contributions, which collectively control the outcome of the chiral interaction. DFT revealed the role of a key H-bond, formed between the epoxide oxygen atom (O(epoxide)) and the methine proton (H(exo)) attached to the asymmetric carbon atom of the chiral vanadyl salen complex, thereby providing a direct pathway for stereochemical communication between complex and substrate. These findings reveal the potential importance of weak outer sphere interactions in stereoselectivities of enantioselective homogeneous catalysis.

  1. Exposure to cobalt in the production of cobalt and cobalt compounds and its effect on the heart

    PubMed Central

    Linna, A; Oksa, P; Groundstroem, K; Halkosaari, M; Palmroos, P; Huikko, S; Uitti, J

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To investigate whether exposure to cobalt in cobalt plants has any measurable effect on the cardiovascular system. Methods: Occupational, cross sectional study, using a self administered questionnaire, blood pressure measurement, electrocardiography, and laboratory tests in which 203 male workers with at least one year of exposure to cobalt and 94 unexposed controls participated. Echocardiography was performed on a subset of 122 most highly exposed cobalt workers, of which 109 were analysed, and on 60 controls, of which 57 were analysed. Analysis of covariance and a multiple regression analysis were used to evaluate the data. Results: Two of the echocardiography parameters measured were associated with cobalt exposure. In the higher exposure group the left ventricular isovolumic relaxation time (mean 53.3, 49.1, and 49.7 ms in the high exposure, low exposure, and control groups respectively) and the deceleration time of the velocity of the early rapid filling wave (mean 194.3, 180.5, and 171.7 ms for those in the high exposure, low exposure, and control groups respectively) were prolonged, indicating altered left ventricular relaxation and early filling. Conclusion: Cumulative exposure to cobalt was found to be associated with the results of Doppler echocardiography measurements, indicating altered diastole. This finding supports the hypothesis that cobalt accumulation in the myocardium could affect myocardial function. Whether this finding has clinical implications remains to be evaluated. PMID:15477280

  2. Advances in cobalt complexes as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Catherine R; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan

    2015-08-21

    The evolution of resistance to traditional platinum-based anticancer drugs has compelled researchers to investigate the cytostatic properties of alternative transition metal-based compounds. The anticancer potential of cobalt complexes has been extensively studied over the last three decades, and much time has been devoted to understanding their mechanisms of action. This perspective catalogues the development of antiproliferative cobalt complexes, and provides an in depth analysis of their mode of action. Early studies on simple cobalt coordination complexes, Schiff base complexes, and cobalt-carbonyl clusters will be documented. The physiologically relevant redox properties of cobalt will be highlighted and the role this plays in the preparation of hypoxia selective prodrugs and imaging agents will be discussed. The use of cobalt-containing cobalamin as a cancer specific delivery agent for cytotoxins will also be described. The work summarised in this perspective shows that the biochemical and biophysical properties of cobalt-containing compounds can be fine-tuned to produce new generations of anticancer agents with clinically relevant efficacies.

  3. Cobalt - poly(amido amine) superparamagnetic nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Atwater, James E; Akse, James R; Holtsnider, John T

    2008-06-30

    Metallic cobalt-dendrimer nanocomposites were prepared using generation 5 Poly(amido amine) dendrimers with primary amino termini. Cobalt loading of ~38 atoms per dendrimer was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Magnetic properties of the cobalt-dendrimer nanocomposites were investigated across the temperature range from 2-300 K by SQUID magnetometry. Magnetization as a function of temperature and applied field strength was studied in zero field cooled samples. Magnetization-demagnetization curves (hysteresis loops) were also acquired at temperatures between 10 - 300 K. These results clearly indicate superparamagnetism for the nanocomposites with a characteristic blocking temperature of ~50 K.

  4. Cobalt - poly(amido amine) superparamagnetic nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.; Holtsnider, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Metallic cobalt-dendrimer nanocomposites were prepared using generation 5 Poly(amido amine) dendrimers with primary amino termini. Cobalt loading of ~38 atoms per dendrimer was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Magnetic properties of the cobalt-dendrimer nanocomposites were investigated across the temperature range from 2–300 K by SQUID magnetometry. Magnetization as a function of temperature and applied field strength was studied in zero field cooled samples. Magnetization-demagnetization curves (hysteresis loops) were also acquired at temperatures between 10 – 300 K. These results clearly indicate superparamagnetism for the nanocomposites with a characteristic blocking temperature of ~50 K. PMID:20352068

  5. Magnetically isolated Cu(II)Gd(III) pairs in the series [Cu(acacen)Gd(pta)(3)], [Cu(acacen)Gd(hfa)(3)], [Cu(salen)Gd(pta)(3)], and [Cu(salen)Gd(hfa)(3)], [acacen = N,N'-ethylenebis(acetylacetoniminate(-)), salen = N,N'-ethylenebis(salicylideniminate(-)), hfa = 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoropentane-2,4-dionate(-), pta = 1,1,1-trifluoro-5,5-dimethylhexane-2,4-dionate(-)].

    PubMed

    Ryazanov, M; Nikiforov, V; Lloret, F; Julve, M; Kuzmina, N; Gleizes, A

    2002-04-08

    [Cu(salen)Gd(pta)(3)] (1), [Cu(acacen)Gd(pta)(3)] (2), and [Cu(acacen)Gd(hfa)(3)] (3) are three heterobimetallic [Cu(II)Gd(III)] complexes of general formula [Cu(SB)Gd(beta-dik)(3)], in which a N,N',O,O' Schiff base (SB) ligand [acacen = N,N'-ethylenebis(acetylacetoniminate(-)), salen = N,N'-ethylenebis(salicylideneiminate(-))] tetracoordinates Cu(II) and chelates Gd(III) as a tris(beta-diketonate) complex [hfa = 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoropentane-2,4-dionate(-); pta = 1,1,1-trifluoro-5,5-dimethylhexane-2,4-dionate(-)]. They crystallize as a triclinic structure (space group P). The cell parameters are a = 9.8616(10) A, b = 12.1976(13) A, c = 18.4187(22) A, alpha = 90.671(14) degrees, beta = 100.588(13) degrees, gamma = 103.684(12) degrees, V = 2113 A(3), and Z = 2 for 1; a = 9.7560(11) A, b = 12.2924(13) A, c = 18.9368(22) A, alpha = 88.449(14) degrees, beta = 87.269(14) degrees, gamma = 67.629(12) degrees, V = 2098 A(3), and Z = 2 for 2; and a = 12.5726(15) A, b = 15.5985(18) A, c = 18.3724(21) A, alpha = 85.963(13) degrees, beta = 85.411(14) degrees, gamma = 80.766(14) degrees, V = 3539 A(3), and Z = 4 for 3. The Cu(O,O')Gd bridging cores show folding angles about O,O' in the range 139 degrees -147 degrees and intramolecular Cu small middle dot small middle dot small middle dotGd distances of about 3.3 A. In the solid state, the molecules form centrosymmetric pseudodimers [Cu(SB)Gd(beta-dik)(3)](2), through the overlap of the Cu(SB) entities. Resulting intradimer Cu...Cu distances are 5.941(1) A for 1, 4.831(1) A for 2, and 4.511(1) and 3.868(1) A for 3 which comprises two symmetrically independent dimers. The temperature dependence of complexes 1-3 was investigated in the range 1.8-300 K and revealed weak ferromagnetic interactions. Results are discussed in light of the structural features and of available magnetostructural data for other heterobimetallic [Cu(II)Gd(III)] complexes, including [Cu(salen)Gd(hfa)(3)] (4) (Ramade, I.; Kahn, O.; Jeannin, Y.; Robert, F

  6. Perfluoroalkyl Cobalt(III) Fluoride and Bis(perfluoroalkyl) Complexes: Catalytic Fluorination and Selective Difluorocarbene Formation.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Matthew C; Bayne, Julia M; Lee, Graham M; Gorelsky, Serge I; Vasiliu, Monica; Korobkov, Ilia; Harrison, Daniel J; Dixon, David A; Baker, R Tom

    2015-12-30

    Four perfluoroalkyl cobalt(III) fluoride complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and powder X-ray diffraction. The remarkable cobalt fluoride (19)F NMR chemical shifts (-716 to -759 ppm) were studied computationally, and the contributing paramagnetic and diamagnetic factors were extracted. Additionally, the complexes were shown to be active in the catalytic fluorination of p-toluoyl chloride. Furthermore, two examples of cobalt(III) bis(perfluoroalkyl)complexes were synthesized and their reactivity studied. Interestingly, abstraction of a fluoride ion from these complexes led to selective formation of cobalt difluorocarbene complexes derived from the trifluoromethyl ligand. These electrophilic difluorocarbenes were shown to undergo insertion into the remaining perfluoroalkyl fragment, demonstrating the elongation of a perfluoroalkyl chain arising from a difluorocarbene insertion on a cobalt metal center. The reactions of both the fluoride and bis(perfluoroalkyl) complexes provide insight into the potential catalytic applications of these model systems to form small fluorinated molecules as well as fluoropolymers.

  7. [Occupational asthma and interstitial cobalt-induced changes in a dental technician: a case report].

    PubMed

    Wittczak, Tomasz; Walusiak, Jolanta; Krakowiak, Anna; Pałczyński, Cezary

    2003-01-01

    It is a case report on a 55-year-old non-smoking female, dental technician, with a 36-year history of cobalt exposure. The patient suffered from dyspnea, coughing and decrease in physical load tolerance about 20 years after the first occupational contact with cobalt-containing metal dentures. Skin tests performed with a battery of common allergens (metals: nickel, chrome, cobalt; acrylates; disinfectants; and natural rubber latex) were negative. In the patient, interstitial radiological changes, respiratory insufficiency and decrease in diffusion capacity were observed. While performing a provocation test with 0.05% cobaltous chloride, the patient developed dyspnea with concomitant decrease in 1 second forced expiratory volume (FEV1) and peak respiratory flow (PEF) from the beginning of the 3rd hour after provocation and maximum intensity at the 8th hour. These symptoms persisted until the 24th hour. The authors conclude that occupational exposure of the dental technician to cobalt dust derived from metal dentures may cause chronic airway disease with interstitial inflammation, fibrosis and occupational asthma.

  8. Cobalt-related defects in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, T. M.; Backlund, D. J.; Estreicher, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    Transition metals from the 3d series are unavoidable and unwanted contaminants in Si-based devices. Cobalt is one of the most poorly understood impurities with incomplete experimental information and few theoretical studies. In this contribution, the properties of interstitial cobalt (Coi) in Si and its interactions with the vacancy, self-interstitial, hydrogen, and substitutional boron are calculated using the first-principles tools. The stable configurations, gap levels, and binding energies are predicted. The activation energy for diffusing Coi is calculated with the nudged-elastic-band method and found to be slightly lower than that of interstitial copper and nickel. The binding energies and gap levels of the substitutional cobalt (Cos) and of the {Cos,H} and {Cos,H,H} complexes are close to the experimental data. The properties of the cobalt-boron pair are calculated.

  9. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  10. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  11. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  12. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  13. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts....

  14. The immunobiology of cobalt: demonstration of a potential aetiology for inflammatory pseudotumours after metal-on-metal replacement of the hip.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, H; Deehan, D; Holland, J; Kirby, J; Tyson-Capper, A

    2014-09-01

    Abnormal wear of cobalt-containing metal-on-metal joints is associated with inflammatory pseudotumours. Cobalt ions activate human toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which normally responds to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in sepsis. Activation of TLR4 by LPS increases the expression of chemokines IL-8 and CXCL10, which recruit leukocytes and activated T-cells, respectively. This study was designed to determine whether cobalt induces a similar inflammatory response to LPS by promoting the expression of IL-8 and CXCL10. A human monocytic cell line, derived from acute monocytic leukaemia, was treated with cobalt ions and expression of IL-8 and CXCL10 measured at mRNA and protein levels. Cobalt-treated macrophages showed a 60-fold increase in IL-8 mRNA, and an eightfold increase in production of the mature chemokine (both p < 0.001); expression of the CXCL10 gene and protein was also significantly increased by cobalt (both p < 0.001). Experiments were also performed in the presence of CLI-095, a TLR4-specific antagonist which abrogated the cobalt-mediated increase in IL-8 and CXCL10 expression. These findings suggest that cobalt ions induce inflammation similar to that observed during sepsis by the simultaneous activation of two TLR4-mediated signalling pathways. These pathways result in increased production of IL-8 and CXCL10, and may be implicated in pseudotumour formation following metal-on-metal replacement.

  15. Role of cobalt in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R.; Barefoot, J.; Tien, J.; Sanchez, J.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of cobalt or substituting for cobalt on the mechanical properties of nickel-based superalloys is discussed. Waspaloy, UDIMET 700, and NIMONIC 115, which are representative of Ni-Cr-Co-Al-Ti-Mo superalloys having different gamma prime contents which are strengthened by a heavily alloyed matrix, coherent gamma prime precipitates, and carbides at the grain boundaries. Microstructure and in situ and extracted phase STEM micro-analysis were used to evaluate the three alloys.

  16. Nickel acts as an adjuvant during cobalt sensitization.

    PubMed

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Nielsen, Morten Milek; Vennegaard, Marie T; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Geisler, Carsten; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2015-03-01

    Metal allergy is the most frequent form of contact allergy with nickel and cobalt being the main culprits. Typically, exposure comes from metal-alloys where nickel and cobalt co-exist. Importantly, very little is known about how co-exposure to nickel and cobalt affects the immune system. We investigated these effects by using a recently developed mouse model. Mice were epicutaneously sensitized with i) nickel alone, ii) nickel in the presence of cobalt, iii) cobalt alone, or iv) cobalt in the presence of nickel, and then followed by challenge with either nickel or cobalt alone. We found that sensitization with nickel alone induced more local inflammation than cobalt alone as measured by increased ear-swelling. Furthermore, the presence of nickel during sensitization to cobalt led to a stronger challenge response to cobalt as seen by increased ear-swelling and increased B and T cell responses in the draining lymph nodes compared to mice sensitized with cobalt alone. In contrast, the presence of cobalt during nickel sensitization only induced an increased CD8(+) T cell proliferation during challenge to nickel. Thus, the presence of nickel during cobalt sensitization potentiated the challenge response against cobalt more than the presence of cobalt during sensitization to nickel affected the challenge response against nickel. Taken together, our study demonstrates that sensitization with a mixture of nickel and cobalt leads to an increased immune response to both nickel and cobalt, especially to cobalt, and furthermore that the adjuvant effect appears to correlate with the inflammatory properties of the allergen.

  17. Intolerability of cobalt salt as erythropoietic agent.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Bastian; Jelkmann, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Unfair athletes seek ways to stimulate erythropoiesis, because the mass of haemoglobin is a critical factor in aerobic sports. Here, the potential misuse of cobalt deserves special attention. Cobalt ions (Co(2+) ) stabilize the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) that increase the expression of the erythropoietin (Epo) gene. Co(2+) is orally active, easy to obtain, and inexpensive. However, its intake can bear risks to health. To elaborate this issue, a review of the pertinent literature was retrieved by a search with the keywords 'anaemia', 'cobalt', 'cobalt chloride', 'erythropoiesis', 'erythropoietin', 'Epo', 'side-effects' and 'treatment', amongst others. In earlier years, cobalt chloride was administered at daily doses of 25 to 300 mg for use as an anti-anaemic agent. Co(2+) therapy proved effective in stimulating erythropoiesis in both non-renal and renal anaemia, yet there were also serious medical adverse effects. The intake of inorganic cobalt can cause severe organ damage, concerning primarily the gastrointestinal tract, the thyroid, the heart and the sensory systems. These insights should keep athletes off taking Co(2+) to stimulate erythropoiesis.

  18. COBALT COMPOUNDS AS ANTIDOTES FOR HYDROCYANIC ACID.

    PubMed

    EVANS, C L

    1964-12-01

    The antidotal potency of a cobalt salt (acetate), of dicobalt edetate, of hydroxocobalamin and of cobinamide against hydrocyanic acid was examined mainly on mice and rabbits. All the compounds were active antidotes for up to twice the LD50; under some conditions for larger doses. The most successful was cobalt acetate for rabbits (5xLD50), which was effective at a molar cyanide/cobalt (CN/Co) ratio of 5, but had as a side-effect intense purgation. Hydroxocobalamin was irregular in action, but on the whole was most effective for mice (4.5xLD50 at a molar ratio of 1), and had no apparent side effects. Dicobalt edetate, at molar ratios of up to 2, was more effective for rabbits (3xLD50) than for mice (2xLD50), but had fewer side effects than cobalt acetate. The effect of thiosulphate was to augment the efficacy of dicobalt edetate and, in mice, that of hydroxocobalamin; but, apparently, in rabbits, to reduce that of hydroxocobalamin. Cobinamide, at a molar ratio of 1, was slightly more effective than hydroxocobalamin on rabbits and also less irregular in its action. Cobalt acetate by mouth was effective against orally administered hydrocyanic acid. The oxygen uptake of the body, reduced by cyanide, is rapidly reinstated when one of the cobalt antidotes has been successfully administered.

  19. Chiral recyclable dimeric and polymeric Cr(III) salen complexes catalyzed aminolytic kinetic resolution of trans-aromatic epoxides under microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kureshy, Rukhsana I; Prathap, K Jeya; Singh, Surendra; Agrawal, Santosh; Khan, Noor-Ul H; Abdi, Sayed H R; Jasra, Raksh V

    2007-11-01

    Aminolytic kinetic resolution (AKR) of trans-stilbene oxide and trans-beta-methyl styrene oxide proceeded smoothly under microwave irradiation using chiral dimeric and polymeric Cr(III) salen complexes as efficient catalysts, giving regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselective anti-beta-amino alcohols in high yields (49%) and chiral purity (ee up to 94%) in case of 4-methylaniline within 2 min. The kinetic resolution system is approximately five times faster than traditional oil bath heating at 70 degrees C and 420 times faster than the reaction conducted at room temperature with concomitant recovery of respective chirally enriched epoxides (ee, 92%) in excellent yields (up to 48%). The catalyst 1 worked well in terms of enantioselectivity than the catalyst 2, but both the catalysts were easily recovered and reused five times with the retention of its efficiency.

  20. Calcium-assisted reduction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for nanostructured iron cobalt with enhanced magnetic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, B.; Andrew, J. S.; Arnold, D. P.

    2017-03-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential of a calcium-assisted reduction process for synthesizing fine-grain ( 100 nm) metal alloys from metal oxide nanoparticles. To demonstrate the process, an iron cobalt alloy (Fe66Co34) is obtained by hydrogen annealing 7-nm cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles in the presence of calcium granules. The calcium serves as a strong reducing agent, promoting the phase transition from cobalt ferrite to a metallic iron cobalt alloy, while maintaining high crystallinity. Magnetic measurements demonstrate the annealing temperature is the dominant factor of tuning the grain size and magnetic properties. Annealing at 700 °C for 1 h maximizes the magnetic saturation, up to 2.4 T (235 emu/g), which matches that of bulk iron cobalt.

  1. Synergetic interactions improve cobalt leaching from lithium cobalt oxide in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Li, Tianchi; Liu, Chuan; Quan, Xie; Chen, Lijie; Wang, Aijie; Chen, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt leaching from lithium cobalt oxide is a promising reduction process for recovery of cobalt and recycle of spent lithium ion batteries, but suffers from consumption of large amount of reductants and energy, and generation of excess secondary polluted sludge. Thus, effective and environmental friendly processes are needed to improve the existing process limitations. Here we reported microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to effectively reduce Co(III) in lithium cobalt oxide with concomitant energy generation. There was a synergetic interaction in MFCs, leading to a more rapid Co(III) leaching at a rate 3.4 times the sum of rates by conventional chemical processes and no-acid controls. External resistor, solid/liquid ratio, solution conductivity, pH and temperature affected system performance. This study provides a new process for recovery of cobalt and recycle of spent lithium ion batteries with concomitant energy generation from MFCs.

  2. Equilibrium sorption of cobalt, cesium, and strontium on Bandelier Tuff: analysis of alternative mathematical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Polzer, W.L.; Fuentes, H.R.; Essington, E.H.; Roensch, F.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sorption isotherms are derived from batch equilibrium data for cobalt, cesium and strontium on Bandelier Tuff. Experiments were conducted at an average temperature of 23/sup 0/C and equilibrium was defined at 48 hours. The solute concentrations ranged from 0 to 500 mg/L. The radioactive isotopes /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 85/Sr were used to trace the sorption of the stable solutes. The Linear, Langmuir, Freundlich and a Modified Freundlich isotherm equations are evaluated. The Modified Freundlich isotherm equation is validated as a preferred general mathematical tool for representing the sorption of the three solutes. The empirical constants derived from the Modified Freundlich isotherm equation indicate that under dynamic flow conditions strontium will move most rapidly and cobalt least rapidly. On the other hand, chemical dispersion will be greatest for cesium and least for strontium. Hill Plots of the sorption data suggest that in the region of low saturation sorption of all three solutes is impeded by interactions among sorption sites; cobalt exhibits the greatest effect of interactions and strontium shows only a minimal effect. In the saturation region of 50% or more, sorption of cobalt is enhanced slightly by interactions among sorption sites whereas sorption of cesium and strontium appears to be independent of site interactions. 9 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Importance of the HIF pathway in cobalt nanoparticle-induced cytotoxicity and inflammation in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nyga, Agata; Hart, Alister; Tetley, Teresa D

    2015-01-01

    Recent, unexpected high failure rates of metal-on-metal hip implants have reintroduced the issue of cobalt toxicity. An adverse reaction to cobalt ions and cobalt-induced lung injury occurs during environmental exposure and is now strictly controlled. Currently adverse reaction occurs to cobalt nanoparticles during wear and tear of metal-on-metal hip implants of which the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The putative role of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway in the mechanism of cobalt nanoparticle (Co-NPs) toxicity was examined using the U937 cell line, human alveolar macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages. Co-NPs (5-20 μg/ml)-induced cytotoxicity (viability ranged from 75% to <20% of control, respectively) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas a comparable concentration of cobalt ions (Co(II); up to 350 μM) did not. Co-NPs induced HIF-1α stabilization. Addition of ascorbic acid (100 µM) and glutathione (1 mM) both prevented the increased ROS. However, only treatment with ascorbic acid reduced HIF-1α levels and prevented cell death, indicating that a ROS-independent pathway is involved in Co-NPs-induced cytotoxicity. Replenishing intracellular ascorbate, which is crucial in preventing HIF pathway activation, modified Co-induced HIF target gene expression and the inflammatory response, by decreasing interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) mRNA and protein expression. Addition of glutathione had no effect on Co-NPs-induced HIF target gene expression or inflammatory response. Thus, Co-NPs induce the HIF pathway by depleting intracellular ascorbate, leading to HIF stabilization and pathway activation. This suggests a strong, ROS-independent role for HIF activation in Co-NPs-induced cytotoxicity and a possible role for HIF in metal-on-metal hip implant pathology.

  4. Partially oxidized atomic cobalt layers for carbon dioxide electroreduction to liquid fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Lin, Yue; Jiao, Xingchen; Sun, Yongfu; Luo, Qiquan; Zhang, Wenhua; Li, Dianqi; Yang, Jinlong; Xie, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Electroreduction of CO2 into useful fuels, especially if driven by renewable energy, represents a potentially ‘clean’ strategy for replacing fossil feedstocks and dealing with increasing CO2 emissions and their adverse effects on climate. The critical bottleneck lies in activating CO2 into the CO2•- radical anion or other intermediates that can be converted further, as the activation usually requires impractically high overpotentials. Recently, electrocatalysts based on oxide-derived metal nanostructures have been shown to enable CO2 reduction at low overpotentials. However, it remains unclear how the electrocatalytic activity of these metals is influenced by their native oxides, mainly because microstructural features such as interfaces and defects influence CO2 reduction activity yet are difficult to control. To evaluate the role of the two different catalytic sites, here we fabricate two kinds of four-atom-thick layers: pure cobalt metal, and co-existing domains of cobalt metal and cobalt oxide. Cobalt mainly produces formate (HCOO-) during CO2 electroreduction; we find that surface cobalt atoms of the atomically thin layers have higher intrinsic activity and selectivity towards formate production, at lower overpotentials, than do surface cobalt atoms on bulk samples. Partial oxidation of the atomic layers further increases their intrinsic activity, allowing us to realize stable current densities of about 10 milliamperes per square centimetre over 40 hours, with approximately 90 per cent formate selectivity at an overpotential of only 0.24 volts, which outperforms previously reported metal or metal oxide electrodes evaluated under comparable conditions. The correct morphology and oxidation state can thus transform a material from one considered nearly non-catalytic for the CO2 electroreduction reaction into an active catalyst. These findings point to new opportunities for manipulating and improving the CO2 electroreduction properties of metal systems

  5. Cobalt: A vital element in the aircraft engine industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Recent trends in the United States consumption of cobalt indicate that superalloys for aircraft engine manufacture require increasing amounts of this strategic element. Superalloys consume a lion's share of total U.S. cobalt usage which was about 16 million pounds in 1980. In excess of 90 percent of the cobalt used in this country was imported, principally from the African countries of Zaire and Zambia. Early studies on the roles of cobalt as an alloying element in high temperature alloys concentrated on the simple Ni-Cr and Nimonic alloy series. The role of cobalt in current complex nickel base superalloys is not well defined and indeed, the need for the high concentration of cobalt in widely used nickel base superalloys is not firmly established. The current cobalt situation is reviewed as it applies to superalloys and the opportunities for research to reduce the consumption of cobalt in the aircraft engine industry are described.

  6. Synthesis of Samarium Cobalt Nanoblades

    SciTech Connect

    Darren M. Steele

    2010-08-25

    As new portable particle acceleration technologies become feasible the need for small high performance permanent magnets becomes critical. With particle accelerating cavities of a few microns, the photonic crystal fiber (PCF) candidate demands magnets of comparable size. To address this need, samarium cobalt (SmCo) nanoblades were attempted to be synthesized using the polyol process. Since it is preferable to have blades of 1-2 {micro}m in length, key parameters affecting size and morphology including method of stirring, reaction temperature, reaction time and addition of hydroxide were examined. Nanoparticles consisting of 70-200 nm spherical clusters with a 3-5 nm polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coating were synthesized at 285 C and found to be ferromagnetic. Nanoblades of 25nm in length were observed at the surface of the nanoclusters and appeared to suggest agglomeration was occurring even with PVP employed. Morphology and size were characterized using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis was conducted to determine composition but no supportive evidence for any particular SmCo phase has yet been observed.

  7. Co(III)(salen)-catalyzed phenolic kinetic resolution of two stereocentered benzyloxy and azido epoxides: its application in the synthesis of ICI-118,551, an anti-hypertensive agent.

    PubMed

    Karabal, Pratibha U; Kamble, Dayanand A; Sudalai, Arumugam

    2014-04-21

    The salen Co(III)-catalyzed phenolic kinetic resolution of racemic anti- or syn-azido and benzyloxy epoxides provides a practical route to a range of enantioenriched anti- or syn-1-aryloxy-3-azido or benzyloxy-2-alcohols in excellent yields and ees. The synthetic potential of this protocol is illustrated with an enantioselective synthesis of ICI-118,551, a β-blocker, in a highly optically pure form (99% ee).

  8. Equilibrium phase boundary between hcp-cobalt and fcc-cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cynn, Hyunchae; Lipp, Magnus J.; Evans, William J.; Baer, Bruce J.

    In 2000 (Yoo et al., PRL), fcc-cobalt was reported as a new high pressure phase transforming from ambient hcp-cobalt starting at around 105 GPa and 300 K. Both cobalts coexist up to 150 GPa and thereafter only fcc-cobalt was found to be the only stable phase to 200 GPa. Our recent synchrotron x-ray diffraction data on cobalt are at odds with the previous interpretation. We will present our new finding and elaborate on our understanding in terms of the equilibrium phase boundary of cobalt. We will also compare our previous work on xenon (Cynn et al., 2001, PRL) with our new results on cobalt. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Portions of this work were performed at HPCAT (Sector 16), APS, Argonne National Laboratory. HPCAT operations are supported by DOE-NNSA under Award No. DENA0001974 and DOE-BES under Award No. DE-FG02-99ER45775. The Advanced Photon Source is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility operated for the DOE Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  9. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium...

  12. Palladium-cobalt particles as oxygen-reduction electrocatalysts

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Huang, Tao

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates to palladium-cobalt particles useful as oxygen-reducing electrocatalysts. The invention also relates to oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells containing these palladium-cobalt particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for the production of electrical energy by using the palladium-cobalt particles of the invention.

  13. [Suppression of activity of Candida albicans proteinases by cobalt chloride].

    PubMed

    Kutyreva, M P; Mukhametzianova, A R; Ulakhovich, N A

    2012-01-01

    Influence of cobalt (II) chloride on the system of Candida albicans proteinase (SAP C. alb.) (both in solution and immobilized on a surface of nitrocellulose membranes) has been investigated. In solution cobalt chloride inactivated inducible but not constitute enzyme. In the heterogenous sytem proteolitical effect of the cobalt ion on inductible proteinase was also observed.

  14. Magnetomechanical effects under torsional strain in iron, cobalt and nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Kriegermeier-Sutton, B. K.; Snyder, J. E.; Dennis, K. W.; McCallum, R. W.; Jiles, D. C.

    2001-10-01

    The change of magnetization as a function of applied torque has been investigated for cylindrical rods of 99.9% pure iron, cobalt and nickel. The relationship between the magnetomechanical effect and magnetostriction in these materials has also been investigated. Torque was applied with amplitude up to ±5 N m with no associated bending moment. The magnetic field near the sample surface was measured using a Hall effect sensor at the center of the sample. The results showed a linear dependence of this field on torque once the transient effects of the first few stress cycles had been overcome. The derivative of the surface circumferential magnetic field with respect to torque for a nickel rod was 19 A N -1 m -2. Cobalt and iron, on the other hand, showed smaller sensitivity to torsional stress, with changes less than 1 A N -1 m -2. The difference in behavior is due to the higher ratio of magnetostriction to anisotropy in nickel. Magnetostriction measurements were made and it was found that the piezomagnetic coefficient d, that is the slope of the magnetostriction curve d λ/d H, at low magnetic field is an important figure of merit in determining sensitivity of magnetization to torque. It is shown that the sensitivity of magnetic induction to stress d B/d σ is dependent on the ratio of magnetostriction to anisotropy.

  15. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong; Smith, Leah J; Holmes, Amie L; Zheng, Tongzhang; Pierce Wise, John

    2016-05-01

    Cobalt is a toxic metal used in various industrial applications leading to adverse lung effects by inhalation. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells, especially normal lung epithelial cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in normal primary human lung epithelial cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble and particulate cobalt induced similar cytotoxicity while soluble cobalt was more genotoxic than particulate cobalt. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung epithelial cells.

  16. Controlled cobalt doping in biogenic magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, J. M.; Coker, V. S.; Moise, S.; Wincott, P. L.; Vaughan, D. J.; Tuna, F.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Lloyd, J. R.; Telling, N. D.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt-doped magnetite (CoxFe3 −xO4) nanoparticles have been produced through the microbial reduction of cobalt–iron oxyhydroxide by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. The materials produced, as measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, Mössbauer spectroscopy, etc., show dramatic increases in coercivity with increasing cobalt content without a major decrease in overall saturation magnetization. Structural and magnetization analyses reveal a reduction in particle size to less than 4 nm at the highest Co content, combined with an increase in the effective anisotropy of the magnetic nanoparticles. The potential use of these biogenic nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia applications is demonstrated. Further analysis of the distribution of cations within the ferrite spinel indicates that the cobalt is predominantly incorporated in octahedral coordination, achieved by the substitution of Fe2+ site with Co2+, with up to 17 per cent Co substituted into tetrahedral sites. PMID:23594814

  17. Nickel cobalt phosphorous low stress electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An electrolytic plating process is provided for electrodepositing a nickel or nickel cobalt alloy which contains at least about 2% to 25% by atomic volume of phosphorous. The process solutions contains nickel and optionally cobalt sulfate, hypophosphorous acid or a salt thereof, boric acid or a salt thereof, a monodentate organic acid or a salt thereof, and a multidentate organic acid or a salt thereof. The pH of the plating bath is from about 3.0 to about 4.5. An electroplating process is also provided which includes electroplating from the bath a nickel or nickel cobalt phosphorous alloy. This process can achieve a deposit with high microyield of at least about 84 kg/mm.sup.2 (120 ksi) and a density lower than pure nickel of about 8.0 gm/cc. This process can be used to plate a deposit of essentially zero stress at plating temperatures from ambient to 70.degree. C.

  18. Rapid phase synthesis of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugavel, T.; Raj, S. Gokul; Rajarajan, G.; Kumar, G. Ramesh

    2014-04-24

    Synthesis of single phase nanocrystalline Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was achieved by single step autocombustion technique with the use of citric acid as a chelating agent in mono proportion with metal. Specimens prepared with this method showed significantly higher initial permeability's than with the conventional process. Single phase nanocrystalline cobalt ferrites were formed at very low temperature. Surface morphology identification were carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The average grain size and density at low temperature increased gradually with increasing the temperature. The single phase formation is confirmed through powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Magnetization measurements were obtained at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), which showed that the calcined samples exhibited typical magnetic behaviors. Temperature dependent magnetization results showed improved behavior for the nanocrystalline form of cobalt ferrite when compared to the bulk nature of materials synthesized by other methods.

  19. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  20. Alterations of histone modifications by cobalt compounds

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin; Ke, Qingdong; Costa, Max

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the effects of CoCl2 on multiple histone modifications at the global level. We found that in both human lung carcinoma A549 cells and human bronchial epithelial Beas-2B cells, exposure to CoCl2 (≥200 μM) for 24 h increased H3K4me3, H3K9me2, H3K9me3, H3K27me3, H3K36me3, uH2A and uH2B but decreased acetylation at histone H4 (AcH4). Further investigation demonstrated that in A549 cells, the increase in H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 by cobalt ions exposure was probably through enhancing histone methylation processes, as methionine-deficient medium blocked the induction of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 by cobalt ions, whereas cobalt ions increased H3K9me3 and H3K36me3 by directly inhibiting JMJD2A demethylase activity in vitro, which was probably due to the competition of cobalt ions with iron for binding to the active site of JMJD2A. Furthermore, in vitro ubiquitination and deubiquitination assays revealed that the cobalt-induced histone H2A and H2B ubiquitination is the result of inhibition of deubiquitinating enzyme activity. Microarray data showed that exposed to 200 μM of CoCl2 for 24 h, A549 cells not only increased but also decreased expression of hundreds of genes involved in different cellular functions, including tumorigenesis. This study is the first to demonstrate that cobalt ions altered epigenetic homeostasis in cells. It also sheds light on the possible mechanisms involved in cobalt-induced alteration of histone modifications, which may lead to altered programs of gene expression and carcinogenesis since cobalt at higher concentrations is a known carcinogen. PMID:19376846

  1. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; cobalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crockett, R.N.; Chapman, G.R.; Forrest, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    Major world resources of cobalt are described in this summary report of information in the International Strategic Minerals Inventory {ISMI}. ISMI is a cooperative data-collection effort of earth-science and mineral-resource agencies in Australia, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Republic of South Africa, and the United States of America. This report, designed to be of benefit to policy analysts, contains two parts. Part I presents an overview of the resources and potential supply of cobalt on the basis of inventory information. Part II contains tables of some of the geologic information and mineral-resource and production data that were collected by ISMI participants.

  2. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... chemicals, CoC4H6O4, CoCl2, and CoSO4.They have been used in fermented malt beverages as a foam stabilizer... violation of the act based upon an order published in the Federal Register of August 12, 1966 (31 FR 8788)....

  3. Effect of cobalt on the primary productivity of Spirulina platensis

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.M.; Panigrahi, S.; Azeez, P.A.

    1987-10-01

    Cobalt, a micronutrient for biological organisms, is a metal of wide use. Main sources of Co to the environment are combustion of fossil fuels, smelters, cobalt processing facilities, sewage and industrial wastes. Atomic power plants and nuclear weapon detonations form an important source of radioisotopes of this metal to the environment. Cobalt has been included in the 14 toxic trace elements of critical importance from the point of view of environmental pollution and health hazards. Cobalt deficiency leads to diseases like stunted growth. At toxic level, Co inhibits heme biosynthesis and enzyme activities. The present study reports the effect of cobalt on biomass productivity of blue-green alga Spirulina platensis.

  4. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Leah J; Holmes, Amie L; Kandpal, Sanjeev Kumar; Mason, Michael D; Zheng, Tongzhang; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-08-01

    Cobalt exposure is increasing as cobalt demand rises worldwide due to its use in enhancing rechargeable battery efficiency, super-alloys, and magnetic products. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in human lung cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic than particulate cobalt while particulate and soluble cobalt induced similar levels of genotoxicity. However, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by the lack of metaphases at much lower intracellular cobalt concentrations compared to cobalt oxide. Accordingly, we investigated the role of particle internalization in cobalt oxide-induced toxicity and found that particle-cell contact was necessary to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity after cobalt exposure. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung fibroblasts, and solubility plays a key role in cobalt-induced lung toxicity.

  5. Preparation of cobalt nanoparticles by hydrogen reduction of cobalt chloride in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Hee Dong; Hwang, Dae Won; Kim, Dong Pyo; Kim, Heon Chang; Lee, Byung Yoon; Jeong, In Bum

    2004-01-03

    Cobalt nanoparticles were produced by the hydrogen reduction of cobalt chloride vapor in a multistage tubular aerosol flow reactor. Reaction zone temperature, preheating temperature, mole fractions of CoCl{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, and residence time were considered as key process variables for the control of particle size and size distribution. Ranging from 50 to 78 nm in average diameter, cobalt nanoparticles with narrow size distributions were synthesized throughout our experiments. All of the considered process variables affected the particle size and size distribution in the synthesis of cobalt nanoparticles. As the reaction zone temperature and the CoCl{sub 2} mole fraction increased, the average particle diameter increased. But the average particle diameter decreased as the residence time of reactants increased.

  6. A Raney Cobalt Mediated Reductive Cyclization Route to the Uleine Alkaloid Gilbertine.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fei; Banwell, Martin G; Willis, Anthony C

    2016-11-04

    Reductive cyclization of the 2,4,5-trisubstituted cyclohexenone 16 using dihydogen in the presence of Raney cobalt afforded compound 17 (60%) that could be elaborated over a further five steps, including one involving a cationic cyclization process, into the racemic modification of the unusual uleine alkaloid gilbertine. Single-crystal X-ray analyses of compounds (±)-1, 16, and a derivative of 17 are reported.

  7. Sintered diamond compacts using metallic cobalt binders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libby, W. F.; Katzman, H.

    1972-01-01

    Method is developed for sintering diamond powder which uses metallic cobalt as binder. Present samples show maximum microhardness of over 3000 kg/sq mm on Knoop scale. Material may be used as hard surface coating or may compete with cubic boron nitride as abrasive grain.

  8. Magnetization dynamics of cobalt grown on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, A. J.; White, S. P.; Adur, R.; Pu, Y.; Hammel, P. C.; Amamou, W.; Kawakami, R. K.

    2014-05-07

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spin pumping is a rapidly growing field which has demonstrated promising results in a variety of material systems. This technique utilizes the resonant precession of magnetization in a ferromagnet to inject spin into an adjacent non-magnetic material. Spin pumping into graphene is attractive on account of its exceptional spin transport properties. This article reports on FMR characterization of cobalt grown on chemical vapor deposition graphene and examines the validity of linewidth broadening as an indicator of spin pumping. In comparison to cobalt samples without graphene, direct contact cobalt-on-graphene exhibits increased FMR linewidth—an often used signature of spin pumping. Similar results are obtained in Co/MgO/graphene structures, where a 1 nm MgO layer acts as a tunnel barrier. However, magnetometry, magnetic force microscopy, and Kerr microscopy measurements demonstrate increased magnetic disorder in cobalt grown on graphene, perhaps due to changes in the growth process and an increase in defects. This magnetic disorder may account for the observed linewidth enhancement due to effects such as two-magnon scattering or mosaicity. As such, it is not possible to conclude successful spin injection into graphene from FMR linewidth measurements alone.

  9. Evidence of Formation of Superdense Nonmagnetic Cobalt

    PubMed Central

    Banu, Nasrin; Singh, Surendra; Satpati, B.; Roy, A.; Basu, S.; Chakraborty, P.; Movva, Hema C. P.; Lauter, V.; Dev, B. N.

    2017-01-01

    Because of the presence of 3d transition metals in the Earth’s core, magnetism of these materials in their dense phases has been a topic of great interest. Theory predicts a dense face-centred-cubic phase of cobalt, which would be nonmagnetic. However, this dense nonmagnetic cobalt has not yet been observed. Recent investigations in thin film polycrystalline materials have shown the formation of compressive stress, which can increase the density of materials. We have discovered the existence of ultrathin superdense nonmagnetic cobalt layers in a polycrystalline cobalt thin film. The densities of these layers are about 1.2–1.4 times the normal density of Co. This has been revealed by X-ray reflectometry experiments, and corroborated by polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) experiments. Transmission electron microscopy provides further evidence. The magnetic depth profile, obtained by PNR, shows that the superdense Co layers near the top of the film and at the film-substrate interface are nonmagnetic. The major part of the Co film has the usual density and magnetic moment. These results indicate the possibility of existence of nonmagnetic Co in the earth’s core under high pressure. PMID:28157186

  10. Evidence of Formation of Superdense Nonmagnetic Cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banu, Nasrin; Singh, Surendra; Satpati, B.; Roy, A.; Basu, S.; Chakraborty, P.; Movva, Hema C. P.; Lauter, V.; Dev, B. N.

    2017-02-01

    Because of the presence of 3d transition metals in the Earth’s core, magnetism of these materials in their dense phases has been a topic of great interest. Theory predicts a dense face-centred-cubic phase of cobalt, which would be nonmagnetic. However, this dense nonmagnetic cobalt has not yet been observed. Recent investigations in thin film polycrystalline materials have shown the formation of compressive stress, which can increase the density of materials. We have discovered the existence of ultrathin superdense nonmagnetic cobalt layers in a polycrystalline cobalt thin film. The densities of these layers are about 1.2–1.4 times the normal density of Co. This has been revealed by X-ray reflectometry experiments, and corroborated by polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) experiments. Transmission electron microscopy provides further evidence. The magnetic depth profile, obtained by PNR, shows that the superdense Co layers near the top of the film and at the film-substrate interface are nonmagnetic. The major part of the Co film has the usual density and magnetic moment. These results indicate the possibility of existence of nonmagnetic Co in the earth’s core under high pressure.

  11. Localized comedo formation after cobalt irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Myskowski, P.L.; Safai, B.

    1981-10-01

    Following Cobalt-60 irradiation for a left frontotemporal tumor, a 61-year-old woman developed comedones on the forehead. These changes responded to conventional acne therapy with retinoic acid. Multiple acneigenic factors were implicated in the pathogenesis of her lesions.

  12. Hardfacing with cobalt and nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.B.C. ); Redman, J. , Los Angles, CA )

    1994-09-01

    The use of cobalt or nickel alloys for added wear resistance was initiated in the early 1900s with the development of the cobalt-chromium-tungsten family of alloys. The cobalt alloys were called the Stellite'' because of their bright, shiny, nontarnished appearance. Further development and characterization of this alloy system established its usage in unlubricated metal-to-metal contact or erosion by high-velocity fluid or solid particulate impingement. Initially, the alloys were used as solid castings but later were applied by welding to tougher or more ductile substrates, hence the birth of the hardfacing industry. Many of the original Stellite compositions are still in use, but many others, including the nickel and iron alloys, have been developed for special applications or for use by newer application procedures. Examining the microstructural features and wear properties of these families of hardfacing alloys can help in choosing the right alloy for the job. Various cobalt and nickel alloys, their available product forms and the corresponding hardfacing methods, are reviewed in this article.

  13. Water splitting: Taking cobalt in isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Aiqin; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The sustainable production of hydrogen is key to the delivery of clean energy in a hydrogen economy; however, lower-cost alternatives to platinum electrocatalysts are needed. Now, isolated, earth-abundant cobalt atoms dispersed over nitrogen-doped graphene are shown to efficiently electrolyse water to generate hydrogen.

  14. Sol-gel entrapped cobalt complex

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Omar J. de; Papacidero, Andrea T.; Rocha, Lucas A.; Sacco, Herica C.; Nassar, Eduardo J.; Ciuffi, Katia J.; Bueno, Luciano A.; Messaddeq, Younes; Ribeiro, Sidney J.L

    2003-03-15

    This work describes optimized conditions for preparation of a cobalt complex entrapped in alumina amorphous materials in the form of powder. The hybrid materials, CoNHG, were obtained by a nonhydrolytic sol-gel route through condensation of aluminum chloride with diisopropylether in the presence of cobalt chloride. The materials were calcined at various temperatures. The presence of cobalt entrapped in the alumina matrix is confirmed by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy. The materials have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface area analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analyses (DTA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The prepared alumina matrix materials are amorphous, even after heat treatment up to 750 deg. C. The XRD, TGA/DTA and TEM data support the increase of sample crystallization with increasing temperature. The specific surface area, pore size and pore diameter changed as a function of the heat treatment temperature employed. Different heat treatment temperatures result in materials with different compositions and structures, and influence their catalytic activity. The entrapped cobalt materials calcined at 750 deg. C efficiently catalyzed the epoxidation of (Z)-cyclooctene using iodozylbenzene as the oxygen donor.

  15. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha} in modulating cobalt-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Saini, Yogesh; Kim, Kyung Y; Lewandowski, Ryan; Bramble, Lori A; Harkema, Jack R; Lapres, John J

    2010-02-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in development, cellular homeostasis, and pathological conditions, such as cancer and stroke. There is also growing evidence that hypoxia is an important modulator of the inflammatory process. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are a family of proteins that regulate the cellular response to oxygen deficit, and loss of HIFs impairs inflammatory cell function. There is little known, however, about the role of epithelial-derived HIF signaling in modulating inflammation. Cobalt is capable of eliciting an allergic response and promoting HIF signaling. To characterize the inflammatory function of epithelial-derived HIF in response to inhaled cobalt, a conditional lung-specific HIF1alpha, the most ubiquitously expressed HIF, deletion mouse, was created. Control mice showed classic signs of metal-induced injury following cobalt exposure, including fibrosis and neutrophil infiltration. In contrast, HIF1alpha-deficient mice displayed a Th2 response that resembled asthma, including increased eosinophilic infiltration, mucus cell metaplasia, and chitinase-like protein expression. The results suggest that epithelial-derived HIF signaling has a critical role in establishing a tissue's inflammatory response, and compromised HIF1alpha signaling biases the tissue towards a Th2-mediated reaction.

  16. Aging effects on cobalt availability in soils.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Laura A; Kirby, Jason K; McLaughlin, Michael J

    2009-08-01

    Aging processes in soils can significantly affect the potential biological availability of introduced metals via incorporation into crystal lattices, diffusion into micropores, or formation of metal precipitates on the surfaces of soil minerals. Over time, metals in contact with the soil solid phase are less freely exchangeable with the soil solution and, hence, less available to soil biota. In the present study, the effects of aging on the fate and behavior of added divalent cobalt (Co2+) in a range of soils with varying physicochemical characteristics was assessed using isotope-exchange techniques, chemical extraction, and plant growth. Following addition to soil, the Co2+ salt rapidly partitioned to the soil solid phase. Particularly in soils with neutral to alkaline pH, a large percentage of the surface-bound Co was fixed in forms no longer in equilibrium with soil solution cobalt through aging reactions. Using techniques commonly applied to estimate metal bioavailability in soil, the lability (E values), plant availability (L values), and extractability of added Co2+ salts with the mild chemical extractants calcium chloride (CaCl2) and ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) were observed to markedly decrease with time, particularly in soils with high pH or those containing appreciable quantities of iron/ manganese oxyhydroxide minerals. Results indicated rapid partitioning of added Co2+ into isotopically nonexchangeable pools, with more than 60% of the aging occurring within 15 d in most soils. Soil pH was the primary factor controlling the rate of cobalt aging and extent of exchangeability in the soils examined. Understanding the influence of long-term aging on cobalt availability in soils is necessary to accurately assess the potential risk associated with cobalt contamination of soil environments.

  17. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung fibroblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Leah J.; Holmes, Amie L.; Kandpal, Sanjeev Kumar; Mason, Michael D.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-08-01

    Cobalt exposure is increasing as cobalt demand rises worldwide due to its use in enhancing rechargeable battery efficiency, super-alloys, and magnetic products. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in human lung cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic than particulate cobalt while particulate and soluble cobalt induced similar levels of genotoxicity. However, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by the lack of metaphases at much lower intracellular cobalt concentrations compared to cobalt oxide. Accordingly, we investigated the role of particle internalization in cobalt oxide-induced toxicity and found that particle-cell contact was necessary to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity after cobalt exposure. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung fibroblasts, and solubility plays a key role in cobalt-induced lung toxicity. - Highlights: • Particulate and soluble cobalt are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung cells. • Soluble cobalt induces more cytotoxicity compared to particulate cobalt. • Soluble and particulate cobalt induce similar levels of genotoxicity. • Particle-cell contact is required for particulate cobalt-induced toxicity.

  18. Intraprotein transmethylation via a CH3-Co(iii) species in myoglobin reconstituted with a cobalt corrinoid complex.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yoshitsugu; Oohora, Koji; Sawada, Akiyoshi; Doitomi, Kazuki; Ohbayashi, Jun; Kamachi, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Hisaeda, Yoshio; Hayashi, Takashi

    2016-02-28

    Myoglobin reconstituted with a cobalt tetradehydrocorrin derivative, rMb(Co(TDHC)), was investigated as a hybrid model to replicate the reaction catalyzed by methionine synthase. In the heme pocket, Co(I)(TDHC) is found to react with methyl iodide to form the methylated cobalt complex, CH3-Co(III)(TDHC), although it is known that a similar nucleophilic reaction of a cobalt(i) tetradehydrocorrin complex does not proceed effectively in organic solvents. Furthermore, we observed a residue- and regio-selective transmethylation from the CH3-Co(III)(TDHC) species to the Nε2 atom of the His64 imidazole ring in myoglobin at 25 °C over a period of 48 h. These findings indicate that the protein matrix promotes the model reaction of methionine synthase via the methylated cobalt complex. A theoretical calculation provides support for a plausible reaction mechanism wherein the axial histidine ligation stabilizes the methylated cobalt complex and subsequent histidine-flipping induces the transmethylation via heterolytic cleavage of the Co-CH3 bond in the hybrid model.

  19. Cobalt-Catalyzed [2π + 2π] Cycloadditions of Alkenes: Scope, Mechanism, and Elucidation of Electronic Structure of Catalytic Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Valerie A; Hoyt, Jordan M; Margulieux, Grant W; Chirik, Paul J

    2015-06-24

    Aryl-substituted bis(imino)pyridine cobalt dinitrogen compounds, ((R)PDI)CoN2, are effective precatalysts for the intramolecular [2π + 2π] cycloaddition of α,ω-dienes to yield the corresponding bicyclo[3.2.0]heptane derivatives. The reactions proceed under mild thermal conditions with unactivated alkenes, tolerating both amine and ether functional groups. The overall second order rate law for the reaction, first order with respect to both the cobalt precatalyst and the substrate, in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic studies established the catalyst resting state as dependent on the identity of the precatalyst and diene substrate. Planar S = ½ κ(3)-bis(imino)pyridine cobalt alkene and tetrahedral κ(2)-bis(imino)pyridine cobalt diene complexes were observed by EPR spectroscopy and in the latter case structurally characterized. The hemilabile chelate facilitates conversion of a principally ligand-based singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) in the cobalt dinitrogen and alkene compounds to a metal-based SOMO in the diene intermediates, promoting C-C bond-forming oxidative cyclization. Structure-activity relationships on bis(imino)pyridine substitution were also established with 2,4,6-tricyclopentyl-substituted aryl groups, resulting in optimized catalytic [2π + 2π] cycloaddition. The cyclopentyl groups provide a sufficiently open metal coordination sphere that encourages substrate coordination while remaining large enough to promote a challenging, turnover-limiting C(sp(3))-C(sp(3)) reductive elimination.

  20. Reducing the cobalt inventory in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ocken, H.

    1985-01-01

    Reducing the cobalt content of materials used in nuclear power plants is one approach to controlling the radiation fields responsible for occupational radiation exposure; corrosion of steam generator tubing is the primary source in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Wear of the cobalt-base alloys used to hardface valves (especially feedwater regulator valves) and as pins and rollers in control blades are the primary boiling water reactor (BWR) sources. Routine valve maintenance can also be a significant source of cobalt. Wear, mechanical property, and corrosion measurements led to the selection of Nitronic-60/CFA and PH 13-8 Mo/Inconel X-750 as low-cobalt alloys for use as pin/roller combinations. These alloys are currently being tested in two commercial BWRs. Measurements show that Type 440C stainless steel wears less than the cobalt-base alloys in BWR feedwater regulator valves. Sliding wear tests performed at room temperature in simulated PWR water showed that Colmonoy 74 and 84, Deloro 40, and Vertx 4776 are attractive low-cobalt hardfacing alloys if the applied loads are less than or equal to103 MPa. The cobalt-base alloys performed best at high loads (207 MPa). Ongoing laboratory studies address the development and evaluation of cobalt-free iron-base hardfacing alloys and seek to improve the wear resistance of cobalt-base alloys by using lasers. Reducing cobalt impurity levels in core components that are periodically discharged should also help reduce radiation fields and disposal costs.

  1. Construction and NIR luminescent property of hetero-bimetallic Zn Nd complexes from two chiral salen-type Schiff-base ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Wei-Yu; Lü, Xing-Qiang; Chai, Wen-Li; Song, Ji-Rong; Wong, Wai-Yeung; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jones, Richard A.

    2008-11-01

    Two new near-infrared (NIR) luminescent Zn-Nd complexes [ZnL 1Nd(OAc)(NO 3) 2] ( 3) and [ZnL 2Nd(DMF) 2(NO 3) 3] ( 4) have been obtained with two salen-type Schiff-base ligands H 2L 1 and H 2L 2, ( H 2L 1 = N, N'-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-(1s, 2s)-(-)1,2-dipheneylethylenediamine and H 2L 2 = N, N'-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-(s)-2,2-diamine-1,1'-binaphthyl) from the reaction of different chiral diamines with o-vanillin. The X-ray crystal structure analysis reveals that both of them crystallize in the chiral space groups with P2(1), a = 10.1669(6), b = 19.3775(11), c = 17.4639(10) Å, β = 94.8710(10)°, V = 3428.1(3) Å 3, Z = 4 for 3, and C2, a = 22.1914(13), b = 9.7886(6), c = 22.0138(13) Å, β = 118.9590(10)°, V = 4372.5(4) Å 3, Z = 4 for 4. Complexes 3- 4 are both dinuclear Zn-Nd structures, while suitable choice of chiral Schiff-base ligands could induce the different complexions of ligands and metal ions, and the functional control of ligand character shows a potentially effective way to the fine-tuning properties of NIR luminescence from Nd ions.

  2. Highly selective hydrolytic kinetic resolution of terminal epoxides catalyzed by chiral (salen)Co(III) complexes. Practical synthesis of enantioenriched terminal epoxides and 1,2-diols.

    PubMed

    Schaus, Scott E; Brandes, Bridget D; Larrow, Jay F; Tokunaga, Makoto; Hansen, Karl B; Gould, Alexandra E; Furrow, Michael E; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2002-02-20

    The hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of terminal epoxides catalyzed by chiral (salen)Co(III) complex 1 x OAc affords both recovered unreacted epoxide and 1,2-diol product in highly enantioenriched form. As such, the HKR provides general access to useful, highly enantioenriched chiral building blocks that are otherwise difficult to access, from inexpensive racemic materials. The reaction has several appealing features from a practical standpoint, including the use of H(2)O as a reactant and low loadings (0.2-2.0 mol %) of a recyclable, commercially available catalyst. In addition, the HKR displays extraordinary scope, as a wide assortment of sterically and electronically varied epoxides can be resolved to > or = 99% ee. The corresponding 1,2-diols were produced in good-to-high enantiomeric excess using 0.45 equiv of H(2)O. Useful and general protocols are provided for the isolation of highly enantioenriched epoxides and diols, as well as for catalyst recovery and recycling. Selectivity factors (k(rel)) were determined for the HKR reactions by measuring the product ee at ca. 20% conversion. In nearly all cases, k(rel) values for the HKR exceed 50, and in several cases are well in excess of 200.

  3. Photodegradation of organic dyes in the presence of [Fe(III)-salen]Cl complex and H2O2 under visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gazi, Sarifuddin; Rajakumar, Ananthakrishnan; Singh, N D Pradeep

    2010-11-15

    Photodegradation of persistent organic dyes (Rhodamine B (RhB), Malachite Green Oxalate (MG) and Crystal Violet 10B (CV)) is studied with Fe(III)-salen complex (λ(max) 494 nm), and hydrogen peroxide under visible light irradiation (λ≥400 nm). The complete decolourization of the dyes (60 mg/L each) was achieved in the aqueous medium. The pseudo-first-order degradation rate constants of RhB, MG, CV were found to be 2.83×10(-3) s(-1), 1.57×10(-3) s(-1) and 1.34×10(-3) s(-1), respectively. The effect of various parameters like concentration of H(2)O(2), pH of the medium, and influence of electrolytes are investigated on the degradation of RhB. A modified benzoic acid hydroxylation method has been used to detect the active oxygen species (OH radicals) in this study. The hydroxyl radical production is increased with the increase in irradiation time. Interestingly, even an excess amount of scavenger could not arrest the degradation of the dyes. This may be due to the formation of some secondary oxidants. Here, active ferryl ion was identified as the secondary oxidant. Degradation products of the dye (RhB) were determined by GC-MS, and phthalic acid was identified as the major one. From the results, a possible photodegradation mechanism has been proposed.

  4. Series of dinuclear and tetranuclear lanthanide clusters encapsulated by salen-type and β-diketionate ligands: single-molecule magnet and fluorescence properties.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen-Bin; Han, Bing-Lu; Lin, Po-Heng; Li, Hong-Feng; Chen, Peng; Tian, Yong-Mei; Murugesu, Muralee; Yan, Peng-Fei

    2013-10-07

    Three dinuclear [Ln2H2OL(1)2(acac)2]·solvent (1, Ln = Gd, solvent = 2CH2Cl2; 2, Ln = Tb, no solvent; 3, Ln = Er, solvent = (C2H5)2O), and two tetranuclear lanthanide clusters [Ln4(μ3-OH)2L(2)2(acac)6]·2(solvent) (4, Ln = Tb, solvent = CH3OH; 5, Ln = Dy, solvent = CH3CN) were characterized in terms of structure, fluorescence and magnetism. The dinuclear lanthanide complexes were constructed by a rigid salen-type ligand H2L(1) = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-o-phenylenediamine and β-diketonate (acac = acetylacetonate) ligands, while the tetranuclear clusters were formed from the flexible ligand H2L(2) = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,2-ethanediamine. Crystal structure analysis indicates that the rigid ligand favors the double-decker sandwich structure (Ln2L(1)2), in which the two lanthanide ions have different coordination numbers and geometry, while the more flexible ligand (H2L(2)) leads to planar tetranuclear clusters. The relationship between their respective magnetic anisotropy and ligand-field geometries and their fluorescence properties was investigated. The Dy and Tb-containing clusters exhibit typical visible fluorescence properties, and single-molecule magnet behavior is seen in complex 5.

  5. Effects of cobalt precursor on pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole as electrocatalyst toward oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A series of non-precious metal electrocatalysts, namely pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole, Co-PPy-TsOH/C, are synthesized with various cobalt precursors, including cobalt acetate, cobalt nitrate, cobalt oxalate, and cobalt chloride. The catalytic performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is comparatively investigated with electrochemical techniques of cyclic voltammogram, rotating disk electrode and rotating ring-disk electrode. The results are analyzed and discussed employing physiochemical techniques of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, elemental analysis, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure. It shows that the cobalt precursor plays an essential role on the synthesis process as well as microstructure and performance of the Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts towards ORR. Among the studied Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts, that prepared with cobalt acetate exhibits the best ORR performance. The crystallite/particle size of cobalt and its distribution as well as the graphitization degree of carbon in the catalyst greatly affects the catalytic performance of Co-PPy-TsOH/C towards ORR. Metallic cobalt is the main component in the active site in Co-PPy-TsOH/C for catalyzing ORR, but some other elements such as nitrogen are probably involved, too. PMID:24229351

  6. Pulsed Laser Deposition of Nanoporous Cobalt Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chunming; Nori, Sudhakar; Wei, Wei; Aggarwal, Ravi; Kumar, Dhananjay; Narayan, Roger J.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoporous cobalt thin films were deposited on anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes at room temperature using pulsed laser deposition. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the nanoporous cobalt thin films retained the monodisperse pore size and high porosity of the anodized aluminum oxide substrates. Temperature- and field-dependent magnetic data obtained between 10 K and 350 K showed large hysteresis behavior in these materials. The increase of coercivity values was larger for nanoporous cobalt thin films than for multilayered cobalt/alumina thin films. The average diameter of the cobalt nanograins in the nanoporous cobalt thin films was estimated to be ~5 nm for blocking temperatures near room temperature. These results suggest that pulsed laser deposition may be used to fabricate nanoporous magnetic materials with unusual properties for biosensing, drug delivery, data storage, and other technological applications. PMID:19198344

  7. The cellular magnetic response and biocompatibility of biogenic zinc- and cobalt-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Sandhya; Céspedes, Eva; Soukup, Dalibor; Byrne, James M.; El Haj, Alicia J.; Telling, Neil D.

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic moment and anisotropy of magnetite nanoparticles can be optimised by doping with transition metal cations, enabling their properties to be tuned for different biomedical applications. In this study, we assessed the suitability of bacterially synthesized zinc- and cobalt-doped magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications. To do this we measured cellular viability and activity in primary human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and human osteosarcoma-derived cells. Using AC susceptibility we studied doping induced changes in the magnetic response of the nanoparticles both as stable aqueous suspensions and when associated with cells. Our findings show that the magnetic response of the particles was altered after cellular interaction with a reduction in their mobility. In particular, the strongest AC susceptibility signal measured in vitro was from cells containing high-moment zinc-doped particles, whilst no signal was observed in cells containing the high-anisotropy cobalt-doped particles. For both particle types we found that the moderate dopant levels required for optimum magnetic properties did not alter their cytotoxicity or affect osteogenic differentiation of the stem cells. Thus, despite the known cytotoxicity of cobalt and zinc ions, these results suggest that iron oxide nanoparticles can be doped to sufficiently tailor their magnetic properties without compromising cellular biocompatibility. PMID:28045082

  8. The cellular magnetic response and biocompatibility of biogenic zinc- and cobalt-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moise, Sandhya; Céspedes, Eva; Soukup, Dalibor; Byrne, James M.; El Haj, Alicia J.; Telling, Neil D.

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic moment and anisotropy of magnetite nanoparticles can be optimised by doping with transition metal cations, enabling their properties to be tuned for different biomedical applications. In this study, we assessed the suitability of bacterially synthesized zinc- and cobalt-doped magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications. To do this we measured cellular viability and activity in primary human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and human osteosarcoma-derived cells. Using AC susceptibility we studied doping induced changes in the magnetic response of the nanoparticles both as stable aqueous suspensions and when associated with cells. Our findings show that the magnetic response of the particles was altered after cellular interaction with a reduction in their mobility. In particular, the strongest AC susceptibility signal measured in vitro was from cells containing high-moment zinc-doped particles, whilst no signal was observed in cells containing the high-anisotropy cobalt-doped particles. For both particle types we found that the moderate dopant levels required for optimum magnetic properties did not alter their cytotoxicity or affect osteogenic differentiation of the stem cells. Thus, despite the known cytotoxicity of cobalt and zinc ions, these results suggest that iron oxide nanoparticles can be doped to sufficiently tailor their magnetic properties without compromising cellular biocompatibility.

  9. Cobalt metabolism and toxicology--a brief update.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Lars Ole; Harbak, Henrik; Bennekou, Poul

    2012-08-15

    Cobalt metabolism and toxicology are summarized. The biological functions of cobalt are updated in the light of recent understanding of cobalt interference with the sensing in almost all animal cells of oxygen deficiency (hypoxia). Cobalt (Co(2+)) stabilizes the transcriptional activator hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and thus mimics hypoxia and stimulates erythropoietin (Epo) production, but probably also by the same mechanism induces a coordinated up-regulation of a number of adaptive responses to hypoxia, many with potential carcinogenic effects. This means on the other hand that cobalt (Co(2+)) also may have beneficial effects under conditions of tissue hypoxia, and possibly can represent an alternative to hypoxic preconditioning. Cobalt is acutely toxic in larger doses, and in mammalian in vitro test systems cobalt ions and cobalt metal are cytotoxic and induce apoptosis and at higher concentrations necrosis with inflammatory response. Cobalt metal and salts are also genotoxic, mainly caused by oxidative DNA damage by reactive oxygen species, perhaps combined with inhibition of DNA repair. Of note, the evidence for carcinogenicity of cobalt metal and cobalt sulfate is considered sufficient in experimental animals, but is as yet considered inadequate in humans. Interestingly, some of the toxic effects of cobalt (Co(2+)) have recently been proposed to be due to putative inhibition of Ca(2+) entry and Ca(2+)-signaling and competition with Ca(2+) for intracellular Ca(2+)-binding proteins. The tissue partitioning of cobalt (Co(2+)) and its time-dependence after administration of a single dose have been studied in man, but mainly in laboratory animals. Cobalt is accumulated primarily in liver, kidney, pancreas, and heart, with the relative content in skeleton and skeletal muscle increasing with time after cobalt administration. In man the renal excretion is initially rapid but decreasing over the first days, followed by a second, slow phase lasting several weeks

  10. Preparation of Nickel Cobalt Sulfide Hollow Nanocolloids with Enhanced Electrochemical Property for Supercapacitors Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenhua; Wan, Zhanghui; Yang, Tiezhu; Zhao, Mengen; Lv, Xinyan; Wang, Hao; Ren, Xiuli; Mei, Xifan

    2016-04-01

    Nanostructured functional materials with hollow interiors are considered to be good candidates for a variety of advanced applications. However, synthesis of uniform hollow nanocolloids with porous texture via wet chemistry method is still challenging. In this work, nickel cobalt precursors (NCP) in sub-micron sized spheres have been synthesized by a facile solvothermal method. The subsequent sulfurization process in hydrothermal system has changed the NCP to nickel cobalt sulfide (NCS) with porous texture. Importantly, the hollow interiors can be tuned through the sulfurization process by employing different dosage of sulfur source. The derived NCS products have been fabricated into supercapacitor electrodes and their electrochemical performances are measured and compared, where promising results were found for the next-generation high-performance electrochemical capacitors.

  11. Preparation of Nickel Cobalt Sulfide Hollow Nanocolloids with Enhanced Electrochemical Property for Supercapacitors Application

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenhua; Wan, Zhanghui; Yang, Tiezhu; Zhao, Mengen; Lv, Xinyan; Wang, Hao; Ren, Xiuli; Mei, Xifan

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured functional materials with hollow interiors are considered to be good candidates for a variety of advanced applications. However, synthesis of uniform hollow nanocolloids with porous texture via wet chemistry method is still challenging. In this work, nickel cobalt precursors (NCP) in sub-micron sized spheres have been synthesized by a facile solvothermal method. The subsequent sulfurization process in hydrothermal system has changed the NCP to nickel cobalt sulfide (NCS) with porous texture. Importantly, the hollow interiors can be tuned through the sulfurization process by employing different dosage of sulfur source. The derived NCS products have been fabricated into supercapacitor electrodes and their electrochemical performances are measured and compared, where promising results were found for the next-generation high-performance electrochemical capacitors. PMID:27114165

  12. Heteroatom-free arene-cobalt and arene-iron catalysts for hydrogenations.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Dominik; Welther, Alice; Rad, Babak Rezaei; Wolf, Robert; Jacobi von Wangelin, Axel

    2014-04-01

    75 years after the discovery of hydroformylation, cobalt catalysts are now undergoing a renaissance in hydrogenation reactions. We have evaluated arene metalates in which the low-valent metal species is--conceptually different from heteroatom-based ligands--stabilized by π coordination to hydrocarbons. Potassium bis(anthracene)cobaltate 1 and -ferrate 2 can be viewed as synthetic precursors of quasi-"naked" anionic metal species; their aggregation is effectively impeded by (labile) coordination to the various π acceptors present in the hydrogenation reactions of unsaturated molecules (alkenes, arenes, carbonyl compounds). Kinetic studies, NMR spectroscopy, and poisoning studies of alkene hydrogenations support the formation of a homogeneous catalyst derived from 1 which is stabilized by the coordination of alkenes. This catalyst concept complements the use of complexes with heteroatom donor ligands for reductive processes.

  13. Creep-fatigue of low cobalt superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Testing for the low cycle fatigue and creep fatigue resistance of superalloys containing reduced amounts of cobalt is described. The test matrix employed involves a single high temperature appropriate for each alloy. A single total strain range, again appropriate to each alloy, is used in conducting strain controlled, low cycle, creep fatigue tests. The total strain range is based upon the level of straining that results in about 10,000 cycles to failure in a high frequency (0.5 Hz) continuous strain-cycling fatigue test. No creep is expected to occur in such a test. To bracket the influence of creep on the cyclic strain resistance, strain hold time tests with ore minute hold periods are introduced. One test per composition is conducted with the hold period in tension only, one in compression only, and one in both tension and compression. The test temperatures, alloys, and their cobalt compositions that are under study are given.

  14. Gamma europium- and cobalt-sources

    SciTech Connect

    Klochkov, E.P.; Risovany, V.D.; Ponomarenko, B.V.

    1993-12-31

    The double-purpose control rods of nuclear reactors were made in which the inserts containing cobalt and europium oxide with natural {sup 151}Eu and {sup 153}Eu content were used as an absorbing core. The mass content of europium oxide is to exceed 15% to provide for a necessary reactivity. Cobalt and europium radionuclides were shown to be accumulated during the reactor operation allowing the inserts to be used as gamma sources after unloading of control rods at large commercial plants for radiation processing of different materials. Shape, geometry and composition of inserts were optimized allowing their specific activity to be obtained above 2 x 10 Bq/g (about 60 Ci/g). The spectral activity and radiation resistance of gamma sources were studied.

  15. Cobalt contraction of vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Dominiczak, A.; Clyde, E.; Bohr, D. )

    1991-03-11

    Although it has been reported that cobalt causes contraction of vascular smooth muscle, the mechanism responsible for this contraction has not been defined. The authors studied these contractions in rat aortic rings. Concentration-response studies indicated that the threshold for contraction was 10{sup {minus}8}M, maximum contraction occurred at 3 {times} 10{sup 7}M and relaxation began at 10{sup {minus}6}M. No contraction occurred in a calcium-free physiological salt solution and the contraction was not inhibited by H-7, a protein kinase C inhibitor. The authors conclude the cobalt in low concentrations causes contraction by activating calcium channels and that in high concentrations it causes relaxation by inactivating these same channels.

  16. Are cobaltates conventional? An ARPES viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, M.Z. . E-mail: mzhasan@Princeton.edu; Qian, D.; Foo, M.L.; Cava, R.J.

    2006-07-15

    Recently discovered class of cobaltate superconductors (Na{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) is a novel realization of interacting quantum electron system in a triangular network with low-energy degrees of freedom. We employ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the quasiparticle parameters in the parent superconductors. Results reveal a large hole-like Fermi surface generated by the crossing of heavy quasiparticles. The measured quasiparticle parameters collectively suggest two orders of magnitude departure from the conventional weak coupling (such as Al) Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer electron dynamics paradigm and unveils cobaltates as a rather hidden class of relatively high temperature superconductors. These parameters also form the basis for a microscopic Hamiltonian of the system.

  17. Electrochemical and optical characterization of cobalt, copper and zinc phthalocyanine complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehyun; Kim, Se Hun; Lee, Woosung; Lee, Jiwon; An, Byeong-Kwan; Oh, Se Young; Kim, Jae Pil; Park, Jongwook

    2013-06-01

    New phthalocyanine (Pc) derivatives that include the alkyl group in ligand were synthesized based on three core metals such as zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and cobalt (Co). Electrochemical behaviors and optical properties of the new phthalocyanine derivatives with ligand and different core metal were investigated by using cyclic voltammetry, UV-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. In UV-Vis data, maximum values of 2H, Co, Cu, and Zn complexes were 708 nm and 677 nm, 686 nm, 684 nm, respectively.

  18. Exploring the coordinative adaptation and molecular shapes of trinuclear CuM(II) (M = Zn/Cd) complexes derived from salen type Schiff bases: structural and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Hazari, Alokesh; Das, Lakshmi Kanta; Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Ghosh, Ashutosh

    2016-04-07

    Three new trinuclear hetero-metallic complexes [(CuL)2Zn(NCS)2] (1), [(CuL(R))2Zn(NCS)(μ1,1-NCS)] (2) and [(CuL(R))2Cd(μ1,3-NCS)2] (4) have been synthesized using [CuL] and [CuL(R)] as "metalloligands" (where H2L = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine and H2L(R) = N,N'-bis(2-hydroxybenzyl)-1,3-propanediamine). All three complexes are characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic methods and single crystal XRD. Complex 1 is an angular trinuclear species, in which two terminal four-coordinate square planar "metalloligands" [CuL] are coordinated to a central Zn(ii) through double phenoxido bridges along with two mutually cis nitrogen atoms of terminal isothiocyanate ions as is usually found in such complexes. In contrast, in complex 2, the two terminal "metalloligands" [CuL(R)] are square pyramidal, as one of the SCN(-) ions makes an unusual μ1,1-NCS bridge between copper centers while the other one coordinates to Zn(ii) through a N atom in a usual fashion making its geometry also square pyramidal. For 4 which possesses an angular trinuclear structure, in addition to double phenoxido bridges from two terminal [CuL(R)], both the SCN(-) ions are S-bonded to Cd(ii) and form a bridge (cis-μ1,3-SCN) between Cd(ii) and each of the terminal Cu(ii) ions. This structure is different from its unreduced analogue in which NCS(-) was N-terminal coordinated to Cd(ii) (3/3'). All the structures have been optimized using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It has been found that for H2L, optimized structures like 1 and 2 differ only by 0.4 kcal mol(-1) but the H2L(R) structure 2 is more stable by 5.5 kcal mol(-1) than the structure resembling 1. For Cd(ii) complexes also, H2L optimized structures such as 3 and 4 do not differ significantly in energy (1.0 kcal mol(-1)) but the H2L(R) structure 4 is more stable than that of 3 by 4.6 kcal mol(-1). In fact, structure 4 has been found to be the most stable one among the other possible isomers of H2L(R).

  19. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Patrick L.

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  20. Cobalt Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    keratitis, one of the major causes of blindness in industrial nations [9]. Studies using the CTC class of drugs were performed using a rabbit eye model...CTC-96 inhibits membrane fusion events preventing virus entry, CTC-96 inhibited plaque formation by VSV (vesicular stomatitis virus) and VZV...antibacterial properties of cobalt complexes have appeared in the literature, with Co(II) complexes being the most studied , presumably due to their

  1. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  2. Update on the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of cobalt compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lison, D; De Boeck, M; Verougstraete, V; Kirsch-Volders, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To integrate recent understandings of the mechanisms of genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of the different cobalt compounds.
METHOD—A narrative review of the studies published since the last IARC assessment in 1991 (genotoxicity, experimental carcinogenesis, and epidemiology).
RESULTS—Two different mechanisms of genotoxicity, DNA breakage induced by cobalt metal and especially hard metal particles, and inhibition of DNA repair by cobalt (II) ions contribute to the carcinogenic potential of cobalt compounds. There is evidence that soluble cobalt (II) cations exert a genotoxic and carcinogenic activity in vitro and in vivo in experimental systems but evidence in humans is lacking. Experimental data indicate some evidence of a genotoxic potential for cobalt metal in vitro in human lymphocytes but there is no evidence available of a carcinogenic potential. There is evidence that hard metal particles exert a genotoxic and carcinogenic activity in vitro and in human studies, respectively. There is insufficient information for cobalt oxides and other compounds.
CONCLUSION—Although many areas of uncertainty remain, an assessment of the carcinogenicity of cobalt and its compounds requires a clear distinction between the different compounds of the element and needs to take into account the different mechanisms involved.


Keywords: cobalt; DNA breakage; inhibition of DNA repair PMID:11555681

  3. Aggregate and Single-Crystalline Elasticity of hcp Cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonangeli, D.; Krisch, M.; Fiquet, G.; Badro, J.; Farber, D. L.

    2005-12-01

    The capability to produce detailed models of the internal structure of the Earth and other planets critically hinges on our knowledge of the pressure dependence of sound velocities and elastic moduli. Here we present data on the complete elastic tensor of hcp cobalt under hydrostatic compression to 39 GPa, derived by Inelastic X-Ray Scattering (IXS). These results are complemented by an IXS study on polycrystalline cobalt throughout the stability range of the hcp phase, to 99 GPa. Interestingly, the single crystal elastic anisotropy is only very weakly reflected in the effective anisotropy of the aggregate. A Voigt-Reuss-Hill average of the single crystal moduli reproduces the results on powder within 3%, up to 75 GPa. Above this pressure, we observe an anomalous softening in the density evolution of the aggregate velocities. This type of comparative analysis between single crystal and polycrystal is essential for characterizing the bulk properties of textured samples and provides a basis for the rigorous testing of the orientational averaging schemes currently employed to link the single crystal elastic moduli with the aggregate sound velocities. We note that only through the combined approach of experiment and theory (ab initio calculations) we can progress in both refining first principle methods and in getting more insights into the physics of the investigated system. In the specific case of Co, we inferred a magnetic transition to be the physical origin for the high pressure elastic anomaly. Finally, our study points out the importance of coupling between the electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom to elastic properties at high pressure. We suggest that these effects likely play an important role in elasticity of deep planetary interiors.

  4. Hot corrosion of low cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The hot corrosion attack susceptibility of various alloys as a function of strategic materials content are investigated. Preliminary results were obtained for two commercial alloys, UDIMET 700 and Mar-M 247, that were modified by varying the cobalt content. For both alloys the cobalt content was reduced in steps to zero. Nickel content was increased accordingly to make up for the reduced cobalt but all other constituents were held constant. Wedge bar test samples were produced by casting. The hot corrosion test consisted of cyclically exposing samples to the high velocity flow of combustion products from an air-fuel burner fueled with jet A-1 and seeded with a sodium chloride aqueous solution. The flow velocity was Mach 0.5 and the sodium level was maintained at 0.5 ppm in terms of fuel plus air. The test cycle consisted of holding the test samples at 900 C for 1 hour followed by 3 minutes in which the sample could cool to room temperature in an ambient temperature air stream.

  5. Heat capacity and thermodynamic functions of new cobalt manganites NdM2 I CoMnO5 (MI = Li, Na, and K) in the range of 298.15-673 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasenov, B. K.; Turtubaeva, M. O.; Amerkhanova, Sh. K.; Nikolov, R. N.; Kasenova, Sh. B.; Sagintaeva, Zh. I.

    2017-02-01

    Temperature dependences of the heat capacity of cobalt manganites NdM2 I CoMnO5 (MI = Li, Na, and K) are studied by means of dynamic calorimetry in the range of 298.15-673 K. It is found that λ-shaped effects are observed on the C p ° f ( T) curve of cobalt manganites, due probably to second order phase transitions. Based on the experimental data, equations for the temperature dependences of the heat capacity of cobalt manganite are derived with allowance for the temperatures of phase transitions. The values of thermodynamic functions H°( T)- H°(298.15), S°( T), and Vxx( T) are calculated.

  6. Solvent extraction of cobalt from laterite-ammoniacal leach liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, D.N.; Siemens, R.E.; Rhoads, S.C.

    1980-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines is developing a method to recover Ni, Co, and Cu from laterites containing less than 1.2% Ni and 0.25% Co. The method consists of the following basic unit operations: (1) reduction roasting, (2) leaching, (3) solvent extraction, and (4) electrowinning. The method reflects three Bureau of Mines objectives: (1) recovery of critical minerals that are domestically in short supply from low-grade domestic laterites, (2) lower processing energy requirements, and (3) solution recycling. This report deals with the extraction of cobalt and the preparation of a suitable cobalt electrolyte by solvent extraction from liquor produced by this method. Nickel and copper are coextracted with LIX64N from an ammoniacal ammonium sulfate leach liquor containing about 1.00 g/1 Ni, 0.30 g/1 Co, 0.03 g/1 Cu, and 0.02 g/1 Zn. Cobalt (III) in the nickel-copper barren raffinate is reduced to cobalt (II) with cobalt metal. Reduction of cobalt (III) to cobalt (II) greatly aids subsequent extraction. Commercially available XI-51 extracts about 94% of the cobalt from the treated raffinate in one stage in a laboratory mixer-settler continuous circuit. Ammonia loaded on the solvent is removed in two washing steps. About 94% of the cobalt then is stripped from the XI-51 in one stage with spent cobalt electrolyte containing about 77 g/1 Co and 18 g/1 sulfuric acid (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/). Electrolytes containing less H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ also may be used. Preliminary data indicate that coextracted zinc may be removed from pregnant cobalt electrolyte containing 3 g/1 or less H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ with di-(2 ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA).

  7. Copolymerization and terpolymerization of carbon dioxide/propylene oxide/phthalic anhydride using a (salen)Co(III) complex tethering four quaternary ammonium salts

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jong Yeob; Eo, Seong Chan; Varghese, Jobi Kodiyan

    2014-01-01

    Summary The (salen)Co(III) complex 1 tethering four quaternary ammonium salts, which is a highly active catalyst in CO2/epoxide copolymerizations, shows high activity for propylene oxide/phthalic anhydride (PO/PA) copolymerizations and PO/CO2/PA terpolymerizations. In the PO/PA copolymerizations, full conversion of PA was achieved within 5 h, and strictly alternating copolymers of poly(1,2-propylene phthalate)s were afforded without any formation of ether linkages. In the PO/CO2/PA terpolymerizations, full conversion of PA was also achieved within 4 h. The resulting polymers were gradient poly(1,2-propylene carbonate-co-phthalate)s because of the drift in the PA concentration during the terpolymerization. Both polymerizations showed immortal polymerization character; therefore, the molecular weights were determined by the activity (g/mol-1) and the number of chain-growing sites per 1 [anions in 1 (5) + water (present as impurity) + ethanol (deliberately fed)], and the molecular weight distributions were narrow (M w/M n, 1.05–1.5). Because of the extremely high activity of 1, high-molecular-weight polymers were generated (M n up to 170,000 and 350,000 for the PO/PA copolymerization and PO/CO2/PA terpolymerization, respectively). The terpolymers bearing a substantial number of PA units (f PA, 0.23) showed a higher glass-transition temperature (48 °C) than the CO2/PO alternating copolymer (40 °C). PMID:25161738

  8. (Salen)Mn(III)-catalyzed epoxidation reaction as a multichannel process with different spin states. Electronic tuning of asymmetric catalysis: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Abashkin, Y G; Collins, J R; Burt, S K

    2001-07-30

    The (salen)Mn(III)-catalyzed epoxidation reaction mechanism has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). There is considerable interest in and controversy over the mechanism of this reaction. The results of experimental studies have offered some support for three different reaction mechanisms: concerted, stepwise radical, and metallooxetane mediated. In this paper, a theoretical examination of the reaction suggests a novel mechanism that describes the reaction as a multichannel process combining both concerted and stepwise radical pathways. The competing channels have different spin states: the singlet, the triplet, and the quintet. The singlet reaction pathway corresponds to a concerted mechanism and leads exclusively to a cis epoxide product. In contrast, the triplet and quintet reactions follow a stepwise mechanism and lead to a product mixture of cis and trans epoxides. We show that the experimentally observed dependence of isomer product ratios on electronic effects connected with the substitution of the catalyst ligands is due to changing the relative position and, hence, the relative activities of the channels with different cis-trans yields. Because the results and conclusions of the present work dramatically differ from the results and conclusion of the recent DFT theoretical investigation (Linde, C.; Akermark, B; Norrby, P.-O.; Svensson, M. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1999, 121, 5083.), we studied possible sources for the deep contradictions between the two works. The choice of the DFT functional and a model has been shown to be crucial for accurate results. Using high level ab initio calculations (coupled cluster-CCSD(T)), we show that the computational procedure employed in this study generates significantly more reliable numerical results. It is also shown that the smaller cationic model without a chlorine ligand that was used by Linde et al. is too oversimplified with respect to our larger neutral model. For this reason, using the cationic model

  9. The role of cobalt on the creep of Waspaloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Chin, L.; Tien, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Cobalt was systematically replaced with nickel in Waspaloy (which normally contains 13% Co) to determine the effects of cobalt on the creep behavior of this alloy. Effects of cobalt were found to be minimal on tensile strengths and microstructure. The creep resistance and the stress rupture resistance determined in the range from 704 to 760 C (1300 to 1400 C) were found to decrease as cobalt was removed from the standard alloy at all stresses and temperatures. Roughly a ten-fold drop in rupture life and a corresponding increase in minimum creep rate were found under all test conditions. Both the apparent creep activation energy and the matrix contribution to creep resistance were found to increase with cobalt. These creep effects are attributed to cobalt lowering the stacking fault energy of the alloy matrix. The creep resistance loss due to the removal of cobalt is shown to be restored by slightly increasing the gamma' volume fraction. Results are compared to a previous study on Udimet 700, a higher strength, higher gamma' volume fraction alloy with similar phase chemistry, in which cobalt did not affect creep resistance. An explanation for this difference in behavior based on interparticle spacing and cross-slip is presented.

  10. Comparative toxicity and carcinogenicity of soluble and insoluble cobalt compounds.

    PubMed

    Behl, Mamta; Stout, Matthew D; Herbert, Ronald A; Dill, Jeffrey A; Baker, Gregory L; Hayden, Barry K; Roycroft, Joseph H; Bucher, John R; Hooth, Michelle J

    2015-07-03

    Occupational exposure to cobalt is of widespread concern due to its use in a variety of industrial processes and the occurrence of occupational disease. Due to the lack of toxicity and carcinogenicity data following exposure to cobalt, and questions regarding bioavailability following exposure to different forms of cobalt, the NTP conducted two chronic inhalation exposure studies in rats and mice, one on soluble cobalt sulfate heptahydrate, and a more recent study on insoluble cobalt metal. Herein, we compare and contrast the toxicity profiles following whole-body inhalation exposures to these two forms of cobalt. In general, both forms were genotoxic in the Salmonella T98 strain in the absence of effects on micronuclei. The major sites of toxicity and carcinogenicity in both chronic inhalation studies were the respiratory tract in rats and mice, and the adrenal gland in rats. In addition, there were distinct sites of toxicity and carcinogenicity noted following exposure to cobalt metal. In rats, carcinogenicity was observed in the blood, and pancreas, and toxicity was observed in the testes of rats and mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that both forms of cobalt, soluble and insoluble, appear to be multi-site rodent carcinogens following inhalation exposure.

  11. Microwave Mapping Demonstration Using the Thermochromic Cobalt Chloride Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Vu D.; Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    An update to the thermochromic cobalt(II) chloride equilibrium demonstration is described. Filter paper that has been saturated with aqueous cobalt(II) chloride is heated for seconds in a microwave oven, producing a color change. The resulting pink and blue map is used to colorfully demonstrate Le Châtelier's principle and to illuminate the…

  12. Effect of cobalt on Escherichia coli metabolism and metalloporphyrin formation.

    PubMed

    Majtan, Tomas; Frerman, Frank E; Kraus, Jan P

    2011-04-01

    Toxicity in Escherichia coli resulting from high concentrations of cobalt has been explained by competition of cobalt with iron in various metabolic processes including Fe-S cluster assembly, sulfur assimilation, production of free radicals and reduction of free thiol pool. Here we present another aspect of increased cobalt concentrations in the culture medium resulting in the production of cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX), which was incorporated into heme proteins including membrane-bound cytochromes and an expressed human cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS). The presence of CoPPIX in cytochromes inhibited their electron transport capacity and resulted in a substantially decreased respiration. Bacterial cells adapted to the increased cobalt concentration by inducing a modified mixed acid fermentative pathway under aerobiosis. We capitalized on the ability of E. coli to insert cobalt into PPIX to carry out an expression of CoPPIX-substituted heme proteins. The level of CoPPIX-substitution increased with the number of passages of cells in a cobalt-containing medium. This approach is an inexpensive method to prepare cobalt-substituted heme proteins compared to in vitro enzyme reconstitution or in vivo replacement using metalloporphyrin heme analogs and seems to be especially suitable for complex heme proteins with an additional coenzyme, such as human CBS.

  13. Potential for cobalt recovery from lateritic ores in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrington, R.

    2012-04-01

    Cobalt is one of the 'critical metals' identified under the EU Raw Materials Initiative. Annually the global mine production of cobalt is around 55,000 tonnes,with Europe's industries consuming around 30% of that figure. Currently Europe produces around 27 tonnes of cobalt from mines in Finland although new capacity is planned. Co-bearing nickel laterite ores being mined in Greece, Macedonia and Kosovo where the cobalt is currently not being recovered (ores have typical analyses of 0.055% Co and >1% Ni,). These ores are currently treated directly in pyrometallurgical plants to recover the contained nickel and this process means there is no separate cobalt product produced. Hydrometallurgical treatment of mineralogically suitable laterite ores can recover the cobalt; for example Cuba recovers 3,500 tonnes of cobalt from its laterite mining operations, which are of a similar scale to the current European operations. Implementation of hydrometallurgical techniques is in its infancy in Europe with one deposit in Turkey planning to use atmospheric heap leaching to recover nickel and copper from oxide-dominated ores. More widespread implementation of these methods to mineralogically suitable ore types could unlock the highly significant undeveloped resources (with metal contents >0.04% Co and >1% Ni), which have been defined throughout the Balkans eastwards into Turkey. At a conservative estimate, this region has the potential to supply up to 30% of the EU cobalt requirements.

  14. Synthesis, magnetic properties and dynamic behavior of cobalt complexes with an anthracene-containing dioxolene ligand.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Koichi; Hirotsu, Masakazu; Kinoshita, Isamu; Teki, Yoshio

    2014-09-21

    The anthracene-functionalized cobalt complexes [Co(L)(TPA)]PF6 (1) and [Co(L)(Me(n)TPA)]PF6 (2, n = 1; 3, n = 2; 4, n = 3) were synthesized by the combination of 9-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)anthracene (H2L) and tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TPA) or its derivatives (Me(n)TPA, n = 1, 2, 3). Characterization of complexes 1-4 was performed by UV-vis absorption, IR, (1)H NMR, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. In the solid state, the variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility data showed that complex 1 is low-spin cobalt(III) catecholate (Co(III)(LS)-Cat), while complex 4 is high-spin cobalt(II) semiquinonate (Co(II)(HS)-SQ) in the range 4.5-400 K. The susceptibility data of complexes 2 and 3 suggested valence tautomerism between the Co(III)(LS)-Cat and Co(II)(HS)-SQ forms. Light-induced valence tautomerism was observed in complexes 2 and 3 at 5 K by photo-irradiation. In solution, the temperature dependence of (1)H NMR spectra of 1 and 2 showed an equilibrium between their geometrical isomers.

  15. DFT study of the coverage-dependent chemisorption of molecular H2 on neutral cobalt dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeinalipour-Yazdi, Constantinos D.

    2017-02-01

    We have studied the coverage-dependent chemisorption of H2 on neutral cobalt dimers and found at θ < 0.4 the chemisorption is dissociative without a precursor-mediated physisorbed state and at 0.4 < θ < 1 it is both molecular and dissociative with a ratio of 6:1. During H2 chemisorption which is entirely side-on there is a very large quenching of the magnetic moment Δμ = 4.9 μB and a linear weakening of the metal-metal bond strength, given by calculated oscillator frequencies. An approximate equation is derived that can be implemented in kinetic models to take account of the coverage-dependent decrease of the adsorption energy of H2 on cobalt clusters. We show that sub-nanometer cobalt clusters when exposed to H2 have strong coverage-dependent properties useful for the development of very sensitive H2-trace gas sensors in the sub-ppm range.

  16. Cobalt-Catalyzed 1,1-Diboration of Terminal Alkynes: Scope, Mechanism, and Synthetic Applications.

    PubMed

    Krautwald, Simon; Bezdek, Máté J; Chirik, Paul J

    2017-03-15

    A cobalt-catalyzed method for the 1,1-diboration of terminal alkynes with bis(pinacolato)diboron (B2Pin2) is described. The reaction proceeds efficiently at 23 °C with excellent 1,1-selectivity and broad functional group tolerance. With the unsymmetrical diboron reagent PinB-BDan (Dan = naphthalene-1,8-diaminato), stereoselective 1,1-diboration provided products with two boron substituents that exhibit differential reactivity. One example prepared by diboration of 1-octyne was crystallized, and its stereochemistry established by X-ray crystallography. The utility and versatility of the 1,1-diborylalkene products was demonstrated in a number of synthetic applications, including a concise synthesis of the epilepsy medication tiagabine. In addition, a synthesis of 1,1,1-triborylalkanes was accomplished through cobalt-catalyzed hydroboration of 1,1-diborylalkenes with HBPin. Deuterium-labeling and stoichiometric experiments support a mechanism involving selective insertion of an alkynylboronate to a Co-B bond of a cobalt boryl complex to form a vinylcobalt intermediate. The latter was isolated and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. A competition experiment established that the reaction involves formation of free alkynylboronate and the two boryl substituents are not necessarily derived from the same diboron source.

  17. Structure and magnetism of cobalt at high pressure and low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchio, R.; Marini, C.; Kvashnin, Y. O.; Kantor, I.; Mathon, O.; Garbarino, G.; Meneghini, C.; Anzellini, S.; Occelli, F.; Bruno, P.; Dewaele, A.; Pascarelli, S.

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic and structural properties of cobalt were investigated under high pressure (160 GPa) and low temperature (50 K), by synchrotron K-edge x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray diffraction. A quasihydrostatic equation of state was measured up to 160 GPa. We found that uniaxial stress plays a role in the hexagonal close packed-face centered cubic (hcp-fcc) structural transition pressure. Also, our data provide the first experimental evidence that changes of the c /a ratio pressure derivative are related to the magnetic behavior. The complete extinction of ferromagnetism is observed above 130 GPa in a mixed hcp-fcc phase with no recovery upon cooling to 50 K, indicating that cobalt at 150 GPa is very likely nonmagnetic, i.e., characterized by zero local spin polarization. Density functional theory calculations point out that the K-edge x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) signal is related to the 4 p orbital moment rather than to the total spin moment and allow us to get a deeper insight into the K-edge XMCD measurements interpretation. The combination of novel theoretical results and experimental outputs provides a detailed scenario of the structural and magnetic properties of cobalt at these extreme conditions answering some previously unsolved issues.

  18. Unconventional magnetisation texture in graphene/cobalt hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Vu, A. D.; Coraux, J.; Chen, G.; N’Diaye, A. T.; Schmid, A. K.; Rougemaille, N.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic domain structure and spin-dependent reflectivity measurements on cobalt thin films intercalated at the graphene/Ir(111) interface are investigated using spin-polarised low-energy electron microscopy. We find that graphene-covered cobalt films have surprising magnetic properties. Vectorial imaging of magnetic domains reveals an unusually gradual thickness-dependent spin reorientation transition, in which magnetisation rotates from out-of-the-film plane to the in-plane direction by less than 10° per cobalt monolayer. During this transition, cobalt films have a meandering spin texture, characterised by a complex, three-dimensional, wavy magnetisation pattern. In addition, spectroscopy measurements suggest that the electronic band structure of the unoccupied states is essentially spin-independent already a few electron-Volts above the vacuum level. These properties strikingly differ from those of pristine cobalt films and could open new prospects in surface magnetism. PMID:27114039

  19. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V.; Errandonea, D.

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  20. Microemulsion-mediated synthesis of cobalt (pure fcc and hexagonal phases) and cobalt-nickel alloy nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Jahangeer; Sharma, Shudhanshu; Ramanujachary, Kandalam V; Lofland, Samuel E; Ganguli, Ashok K

    2009-08-15

    By choosing appropriate microemulsion systems, hexagonal cobalt (Co) and cobalt-nickel (1:1) alloy nanoparticles have been obtained with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a cationic surfactant at 500 degrees C. This method thus stabilizes the hcp cobalt even at sizes (<10 nm) at which normally fcc cobalt is predicted to be stable. On annealing the hcp cobalt nanoparticles in H(2) at 700 degrees C we could transform them to fcc cobalt nanoparticles. Microscopy studies show the formation of spherical nanoparticles of hexagonal and cubic forms of cobalt and Co-Ni (1:1) alloy nanoparticles with the average size of 4, 8 and 20 nm, respectively. Electrochemical studies show that the catalytic property towards oxygen evolution is dependent on the applied voltage. At low voltage (less than 0.65 V) the Co (hexagonal) nanoparticles are superior to the alloy (Co-Ni) nanoparticles while above this voltage the alloy nanoparticles are more efficient catalysts. The nanoparticles of cobalt (hcp and fcc) and alloy (Co-Ni) nanoparticles show ferromagnetism. The saturation magnetization of Co-Ni nanoparticles is reduced compared to the bulk possibly due to surface oxidation.

  1. Low-Cobalt Powder-Metallurgy Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Highly-stressed jet-engine parts made with less cobalt. Udimet 700* (or equivalent) is common nickel-based superalloy used in hot sections of jet engines for many years. This alloy, while normally used in wrought condition, also gas-atomized into prealloyed powder-metallurgy (PM) product. Product can be consolidated by hot isostatically pressing (HIPPM condition) and formed into parts such as turbine disk. Such jet-engine disks "see" both high stresses and temperatures to 1,400 degrees F (760 degrees C).

  2. Exafs data analysis of some cobalt complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A.; Vibhute, Vishakha; Jain, Garima; Ninama, Samrath

    2012-05-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has assumed great significance with its increasing application in the different fields of physics like solid state physics, chemical physics, atomic physics, Plasma Physics and Astro physics etc.in present paper we obtained bond lengths of cobalt metal complexes using Levy's, LSS and Lytle methods and are compared by FEFFIT (Fitting of EXAFS by Fast Fourier Inverse Transform) method. Bond length basically known as radial distance between ligand and metal complexes. FEFFIT is computer program for calculating bond length obtained theoretical data of EXAFS.

  3. Cobalt-phosphate oxygen-evolving compound.

    PubMed

    Kanan, Matthew W; Surendranath, Yogesh; Nocera, Daniel G

    2009-01-01

    The utilization of solar energy on a large scale requires efficient storage. Solar-to-fuels has the capacity to meet large scale storage needs as demonstrated by natural photosynthesis. This process uses sunlight to rearrange the bonds of water to furnish O2 and an H2-equivalent. We present a tutorial review of our efforts to develop an amorphous cobalt-phosphate catalyst that oxidizes water to O2. The use of earth-abundant materials, operation in water at neutral pH, and the formation of the catalyst in situ captures functional elements of the oxygen evolving complex of Photosystem II.

  4. Cyanidotetra-kis-(trimethyl-phosphine)cobalt(I).

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Feng, Lei; Li, Xiaoyan

    2011-04-01

    The title compound, [Co(CN)(C(3)H(9)P)(4)], was obtained as a product of the reaction of [Co(PMe(3))(4)] with a molar equivalent of 2,6-difluoro-benzonitrile in diethyl ether. This compound is stable in the air for several hours, but rapidly decomposes at room temperature in solution. The cobalt(I) atom has s trigonal-bipyramidal coordination enviroment in which the cyano group and one of the PMe(3) groups are in the axial positions.

  5. Synthesis of lithium cobaltate in halide melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modenov, D. V.; Dokutovich, V. N.; Khokhlov, V. A.; Antonov, B. D.; Kochedykov, V. A.; Zakir'yanova, I. D.

    2013-02-01

    A new method for the synthesis of lithium cobaltate LiCoo2 in salt melts is proposed and tested. The method is based on the oxidation of halide ions with molecular oxygen in Li X-CoCl2 mixtures ( X = Cl, Br, I). The chemical and phase compositions of the prepared powders and the crystal structure of the synthesized compound are studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The average size of LiCoO2 crystallites is estimated from the X-ray diffraction data.

  6. Nitrogen oxides storage catalysts containing cobalt

    DOEpatents

    Lauterbach, Jochen; Snively, Christopher M.; Vijay, Rohit; Hendershot, Reed; Feist, Ben

    2010-10-12

    Nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) storage catalysts comprising cobalt and barium with a lean NO.sub.x storage ratio of 1.3 or greater. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be used to reduce NO.sub.x emissions from diesel or gas combustion engines by contacting the catalysts with the exhaust gas from the engines. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be one of the active components of a catalytic converter, which is used to treat exhaust gas from such engines.

  7. Hot Corrosion of Cobalt-Base Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-01

    Cast Alloys : NASA VIA, B-1900, 713C and 738X", Report NASA TN D-7682, Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, August 1974. 36. Giggins, C.S. and...resistance of cobalt-base and nickel-base alloys . The contract was accomplished under the technical direction of Dr. H. C. Graham of the Aerospace Research...Interpretation of Results 3. SODIUM SULFATE INDUCED HOT CORROSION OF Co-25Al AND Co-35Cr ALLOYS a. Introduction b. Experimental Co-25Al c. Experimental

  8. The Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Particulate and Soluble Cobalt in Human Urothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Speer, Rachel M; The, Therry; Xie, Hong; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M; Wise, John Pierce

    2017-03-21

    Cobalt use is increasing particularly due to its use as one of the primary metals in cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) metal-on-metal prosthetics. CoCrMo is a high-strength, wear-resistant alloy with reduced risk for prosthetic loosening and device fracture. More than 500,000 people receive hip implants each year in the USA which puts them at potential risk for exposure to metal ions and particles released by the prosthetic implants. Data show cobalt ions released from prosthetics reach the bloodstream and accumulate in the bladder. As patients with failed hip implants show increased urinary and blood cobalt levels, no studies have considered the effects of cobalt on human urothelial cells. Accordingly, we investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of particulate and soluble cobalt in urothelial cells. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ions. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found, when compared to particulate cobalt, soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic, but induced similar levels of genotoxicity. Interestingly, at similar intracellular cobalt ion concentrations, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by a lack of metaphases not observed after particulate cobalt treatment. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human urothelial cells and solubility may play a key role in cobalt-induced toxicity.

  9. Comparison of supplemental cobalt form on fibre digestion and cobalamin concentrations in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cobalt is essential for rumen microbial metabolism to synthesize methane, acetate and methionine. It also serves as a structural component of vitamin B12, which functions as a coenzyme in energy metabolism. A study was conducted to determine if cobalt form (cobalt carbonate vs cobalt glucoheptonate...

  10. Cataractogenesis after Cobalt-60 eye plaque radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kleineidam, M.; Augsburger, J.J. ); Hernandez, C.; Glennon, P.; Brady, L.W. )

    1993-07-15

    This study was designed to estimate the actuarial incidence of typical postirradiation cataracts and to identify prognostic factors related to their development in melanoma-containing eyes treated by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy. A special interest was the impact of calculated radiation dose and dose-rate to the lens. The authors evaluated the actuarial occurrence of post-irradiation cataract in 365 patients with primary posterior uveal melanoma treated by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy between 1976 and 1986. Only 22% (S.E. = 4.6%) of the patients who received a total dose of 6 to 20 Gy at the center of the lens developed a visually significant cataract attributable to the radiation within 5 years after treatment. Using multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, the authors identified thickness of the tumor, location of the tumor's anterior margin relative to the equatorward and the ora serrata, and diameter of the eye plaque used as the best combination of covariables for predicting length of time until development of cataract. Surprisingly, the dose of radiation delivered to the lens, which was strongly correlated to all of these covariables, was not a significant predictive factor in multivariate analysis. The results suggest that success of efforts to decrease the occurrence rate of post-irradiation cataracts by better treatment planning might be limited in patients with posterior uveal melanoma. 21 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Cobalt Monoboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, H. F.; Ng, Y. W.; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2011-06-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectrum of cobalt monoboride (CoB) in the visible region between 465 and 560 nm has been observed. CoB molecule was produced by the reaction of laser ablated cobalt atom and diborane (B_2H_6) seeded in argon. Over twenty five vibronic bands have been recorded, and both Co10B and Co11B isotopic species have been observed and analyzed. Preliminary analysis of the rotational lines showed that the observed vibronic bands belong to two categories namely: the Ω' = 2 - Ω'' = 2 and the Ω' = 3 - Ω'' = 3 transitions, which indicated the ground state of CoB is consistent with an assignment of a ^3Δ_i state predicted from ab initio calculations. Unresolved hyperfine structure arising from the Co nucleus (I = 7/2) causes a broadening of spectral lines. This work represents the first experimental investigation of the spectrum of the CoB molecule. Financial support from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Project No. HKU 701008P) is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Preparation and characterization of electrodeposited cobalt nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Irshad, M. I. Mohamed, N. M.; Ahmad, F. Abdullah, M. Z.

    2014-10-24

    Electrochemical deposition technique has been used to deposit cobalt nanowires into the nano sized channels of Anodized Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates. CoCl{sub 2}Ðœ‡6H2O salt solution was used, which was buffered with H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and acidified by dilute H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to increase the plating life and control pH of the solution. Thin film of copper around 150 nm thick on one side of AAO template coated by e-beam evaporation system served as cathode to create electrical contact. FESEM analysis shows that the as-deposited nanowires are highly aligned, parallel to one another and have high aspect ratio with a reasonably high pore-filing factor. The TEM results show that electrodeposited cobalt nanowires are crystalline in nature. The Hysteresis loop shows the magnetization properties for in and out of plane configuration. The in plane saturation magnetization (Ms) is lower than out of plane configuration because of the easy axis of magnetization is perpendicular to nanowire axis. These magnetic nanowires could be utilized for applications such as spintronic devices, high density magnetic storage, and magnetic sensor applications.

  13. Adapting Ruthenium Sensitizers to Cobalt Electrolyte Systems.

    PubMed

    Amit Kumar, Sangeeta; Urbani, Maxence; Medel, María; Ince, Mine; González-Rodríguez, David; Chandiran, Aravind Kumar; Bhaskarwar, Ashok N; Torres, Tomás; Nazeeruddin, Md K; Grätzel, Michael

    2014-02-06

    In this work, we report the use of bulky substitutions in a new heteroleptic ruthenium(II) bipyridine complex, Ru(NCS)2LL', coded TT-230 to obtain high open-circuit potential in a dye-sensitized solar cell (where L is a bipyridine ligand appended with two cyclopenta(2,1-b;3,4-bA)dithiophene moieties, and L' = 4,4,'-dicarboxylic acid 2,2'-bipyridine). The electrolytes based on cobalt complexes have shown significant advantages in terms of attainable open-circuit potential compared to the standard iodide/tri-iodide redox mediators. These merits of the cobalt complexes were previously realized with a porphyrin sensitizer, achieving a VOC greater than 1 V in DSC. However, with conventional Ru(II)-polypyridyl complexes such as the C101 dye, similar increase in the VOC could not be attained due to the enhanced recombination. In this work, we have shown that the use of bulky substituents can prevent the back reaction of photogenerated electron and subsequently increase the open-circuit potential of the device. The recombination processes were investigated by transient photovoltage decay measurements.

  14. Nanocomposites of magnetic cobalt nanoparticles and cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirkkalainen, K.; Leppänen, K.; Vainio, U.; Webb, M. A.; Elbra, T.; Kohout, T.; Nykänen, A.; Ruokolainen, J.; Kotelnikova, N.; Serimaa, R.

    2008-10-01

    Polymeric matrices with stabilized metallic nanoparticles constitute an important class of nanostructured materials, because polymer technology allows fabrication of components with various electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties. The porous cellulose matrix has been shown to be a useful support material for platinum, palladium, silver, copper and nickel nanoparticles. In the present study, nanosized cobalt particles with enhanced magnetic properties were made by chemical reduction within a microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) matrix. Two different chemical reducers, NaBH4 and NaH2PO2, were used, and the so-formed nanoparticles were characterized with X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These experimental techniques were used to gain insight into the effect of different synthesis routes on structural properties of the nanoparticles. Magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were studied using a vibrating sample magnetometer. Particles made via the NaBH4 reduction were amorphous Co-B or Co oxide composites with diminished ferromagnetic behaviour and particles made via the NaH2PO2 reduction were well-ordered ferromagnetic hcp cobalt nanocrystals.

  15. Separation and Recovery of Cobalt from Copper Leach Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    Significant amounts of cobalt, a strategic and critical metal, are present in readily accessible copper recycling leach solutions. However, cost-effective technology is not available to separate and recover the cobalt from this low-grade domestic source. The Bureau of Mines has developed a procedure using a chelating ion-exchange resin from Dow Chemical Co. to successfully extract cobalt from a pH 3.0 copper recycling solution containing only 30 mg/1 cobalt. Cyclic tests with the commercial resin XFS-4195 in 4-ft-high by 1-in.-diameter columns gave an average cobalt extraction of 95% when 65 bed volumes of solution were processed at a flow rate of 4 gpm/ft.2 Elution of the cobalt using a 50 g/l H2SO4 solution yielded an eluate containing 0.5 gli Co. Selective elution of the loaded resin and solvent extraction procedures using di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) and Cyanex 272 removed the impurities and produced a cobalt sulfate solution containing 25 g/l Co.

  16. Cobalt ions induce chemokine secretion in primary human osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Queally, J M; Devitt, B M; Butler, J S; Malizia, A P; Murray, D; Doran, P P; O'Byrne, J M

    2009-07-01

    Chemokines are major regulators of the inflammatory response and have been shown to play an important role in periprosthetic osteolysis. Titanium particles have previously been shown to induce IL-8 and MCP-1 secretion in osteoblasts. These chemokines result in the chemotaxis and activation of neutrophils and macrophages, respectively. Despite a resurgence in the use of cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys in metal-on-metal arthroplasty, cobalt and chromium ion toxicity in the periprosthetic area has been insufficiently studied. In this study we investigate the in vitro effect of cobalt ions on primary human osteoblast activity. We demonstrate that cobalt ions rapidly induce the protein secretion of IL-8 and MCP-1 in primary human osteoblasts. This elevated chemokine secretion is preceded by an increase in the transcription of the corresponding chemokine gene. Using a Transwell migration chemotaxis assay we also demonstrate that the chemokines secreted are capable of inducing neutrophil and macrophage migration. Furthermore, cobalt ions significantly inhibit osteoblast function as demonstrated by reduced alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition. In aggregate these data demonstrate that cobalt ions can activate transcription of the chemokine genes IL-8 and MCP-1 in primary human osteoblasts. Cobalt ions are not benign and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of osteolysis by suppressing osteoblast function and stimulating the production and secretion of chemokines that attract inflammatory and osteoclastic cells to the periprosthetic area.

  17. Production of cobalt and nickel particles by hydrogen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsman, J.; Tapper, U.; Auvinen, A.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2008-05-01

    Cobalt and nickel nanoparticles were produced by hydrogen reduction reaction from cobalt or nickel chloride precursor vapour in nitrogen carrier gas. This aerosol phase method to produce nanoparticles is a scalable one-step process. Two different setups were introduced in particle production: a batch type reactor and a continuously operated reactor. Common feature in these setups was hydrogen mixing in a vertical flow reactor. The process was monitored on-line for particle mass concentration and for gas phase chemical reactions. Tapered element oscillating microbalance measured the particle mass concentration and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor relevant gas phase species. The produced cobalt and nickel particles were characterised using transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The produced cobalt and nickel particles were crystalline with cubic fcc structure. Twinning was often observed in cobalt particles while nickel particles were mostly single crystals. The cobalt particles formed typically long agglomerates. No significant neck growth between the primary particles was observed. The primary particle size for cobalt and nickel was below 100 nm.

  18. High doses of cobalt induce optic and auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Apostoli, Pietro; Catalani, Simona; Zaghini, Anna; Mariotti, Andrea; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Vielmi, Valentina; Semeraro, Francesco; Duse, Sarah; Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; Padovani, Alessandro; Rizzetti, Maria Cristina; De Caro, Raffaele

    2013-09-01

    The adverse biological effects of continuous exposure to cobalt and chromium have been well defined. In the past, this toxicity was largely an industrial issue concerning workers exposed in occupational setting. Nevertheless, recent reports have described a specific toxicity mediated by the high levels of cobalt and chromium released by metallic prostheses, particularly in patients who had received hip implants. Clinical symptoms, including blindness, deafness and peripheral neuropathy, suggest a specific neurotropism. However, little is known about the neuropathological basis of this process, and experimental evidence is still lacking. We have investigated this issue in an experimental setting using New Zealand White rabbits treated with repeated intravenous injections of cobalt and chromium, alone or in combination. No evident clinical or pathological alterations were associated after chromium administration alone, despite its high levels in blood and tissue while cobalt-chromium and cobalt-treated rabbits showed clinical signs indicative of auditory and optic system toxicity. On histopathological examination, the animals showed severe retinal and cochlear ganglion cell depletion along with optic nerve damage and loss of sensory cochlear hair cells. Interestingly, the severity of the alterations was related to dosages and time of exposure. These data confirmed our previous observation of severe auditory and optic nerve toxicity in patients exposed to an abnormal release of cobalt and chromium from damaged hip prostheses. Moreover, we have identified the major element mediating neurotoxicity to be cobalt, although the molecular mechanisms mediating this toxicity still have to be defined.

  19. Elasticity of hcp cobalt at high pressure and temperature: a quasi-harmonic case

    SciTech Connect

    Antonangeli, D; Krisch, M; Farber, D L; Ruddle, D G; Fiquet, G

    2007-11-30

    We performed high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering measurements on a single crystal of hcp cobalt at simultaneous high pressure and high temperature, deriving 4 of the 5 independent elements of the elastic tensor. Our experiments indicate that the elasticity of hcp-Co is well described within the frame of a quasi-harmonic approximation and that anharmonic high-temperature effects on the elastic moduli, sound velocities and elastic anisotropy are minimal at constant density. These results support the validity of the Birch's law and represent an important benchmark for ab initio thermal lattice dynamics and molecular-dynamics simulations.

  20. An Investigation into the Accuracy of Two Currently Available Dental Impression Materials in the Construction of Cobalt-Chromium Frameworks for Removable Partial Dentures.

    PubMed

    Dubal, Rajesh Kumar; Friel, Tim; Taylor, Philip D

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the suitability of irreversible hydrocolloid as an impression material for cobalt-chromium framework construction. Scans of casts derived from (1) alginate and (2) addition-cured polyvinylsiloxane impressions were superposed on to a control. The differences within and between groups were compared at fixed landmarks. The investigation revealed a high degree of scan coincidence within and between groups. However, certain features, such as undercuts, resulted in a lower degree of scan coincidence. Irreversible hydrocolloid appears to be a viable alternative to addition-cured polyvinyl-siloxane as an impression material for cobalt-chromium framework construction.

  1. Cobalt catalysis involving π components in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gandeepan, Parthasarathy; Cheng, Chien-Hong

    2015-04-21

    Over the last three decades, transition-metal-catalyzed organic transformations have been shown to be extremely important in organic synthesis. However, most of the successful reactions are associated with noble metals, which are generally toxic, expensive, and less abundant. Therefore, we have focused on catalysis using the abundant first-row transition metals, specifically cobalt. In this Account, we demonstrate the potential of cobalt catalysis in organic synthesis as revealed by our research. We have developed many useful catalytic systems using cobalt complexes. Overall, they can be classified into several broad types of reactions, specifically [2 + 2 + 2] and [2 + 2] cycloadditions; enyne reductive coupling; reductive [3 + 2] cycloaddition of alkynes/allenes with enones; reductive coupling of alkyl iodides with alkenes; addition of organoboronic acids to alkynes, alkenes, or aldehydes; carbocyclization of o-iodoaryl ketones/aldehydes with alkynes/electron-deficient alkenes; coupling of thiols with aryl and alkyl halides; enyne coupling; and C-H bond activation. Reactions relying on π components, specifically cycloaddition, reductive coupling, and enyne coupling, mostly afford products with excellent stereo- and regioselectivity and superior atom economy. We believe that these cobalt-catalyzed π-component coupling reactions proceed through five-membered cobaltacyclic intermediates formed by the oxidative cyclometalation of two coordinated π bonds of the substrates to the low-valent cobalt species. The high regio- and stereoselectivity of these reactions are achieved as a result of the electronic and steric effects of the π components. Mostly, electron-withdrawing groups and bulkier groups attached to the π bonds prefer to be placed near the cobalt center of the cobaltacycle. Most of these transformations proceed through low-valent cobalt complexes, which are conveniently generated in situ from air-stable Co(II) salts by Zn- or Mn-mediated reduction

  2. Divergent Reactivity via Cobalt Catalysis: An Epoxide Olefination.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Megan L; Hume, Paul A; Furkert, Daniel P; Brimble, Margaret A

    2016-02-05

    Cobalt salts exert an unexpected and profound influence on the reactivity of epoxides with dimethylsulfoxonium methylide. In the presence of a cobalt catalyst, conditions for epoxide to an oxetane ring expansion instead deliver homoallylic alcohol products, corresponding to a two-carbon epoxide homologation/ring-opening tandem process. The observed reactivity change appears to be specifically due to cobalt salts and is broadly applicable to a variety of epoxides, retaining the initial stereochemistry. This transformation also provides operationally simple access to enantiopure homoallylic alcohols from chiral epoxides without use of organometallic reagents. Tandem epoxidation-homologation of aldehydes in a single step is also demonstrated.

  3. Work function characterization of solution-processed cobalt silicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shihab Ullah, Syed; Robinson, Matt; Hoey, Justin; Sky Driver, M.; Caruso, A. N.; Schulz, Douglas L.

    2012-06-01

    Cobalt silicide thin films were prepared by spin-coating liquid cyclohexasilane-based inks onto silicon substrates followed by a thermal treatment. The work function of the solution-processed Co-Si was determined by both capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures as well as by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS). Variable frequency C-V of MOS structures with silicon oxide layers of variable thickness showed that solution-processed metal silicide films exhibit a work function of 4.36 eV with one Co-Si film on Si <1 0 0> giving a UPS-derived work function of 4.80 eV. Similar work function measurements were collected for vapor-deposited MOS capacitors where Al thin films were prepared according to standard class 100 cleanroom handling techniques. In both instances, the work function values established by the electrical measurements were lower than those measured by UPS and this difference appears to be a consequence of parasitic series resistance.

  4. Theoretical study of magnetic domain walls through a cobalt nanocontact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, László; Palotás, Krisztián; Udvardi, László; Szunyogh, László; Nowak, Ulrich

    2012-07-01

    To calculate the magnetic ground state of nanoparticles we present a self-consistent first-principles method in terms of a fully relativistic embedded cluster multiple scattering Green's function technique. Based on the derivatives of the band energy, a Newton-Raphson algorithm is used to find the ground-state configuration. The method is applied to a cobalt nanocontact that turned out to show a cycloidal domain wall configuration between oppositely magnetized leads. We found that a wall of cycloidal spin structure is about 30 meV lower in energy than the one of helical spin structure. A detailed analysis revealed that the uniaxial on-site anisotropy of the central atom is mainly responsible to this energy difference. This high uniaxial anisotropy energy is accompanied by a huge enhancement and anisotropy of the orbital magnetic moment of the central atom. By varying the magnetic orientation at the central atom, we identified the term related to exchange couplings (Weiss-field term), various on-site anisotropy terms, and also those due to higher order spin interactions.

  5. Cobalt-based particles formed upon electrocatalytic hydrogen production by a cobalt pyridine oxime complex.

    PubMed

    Ghachtouli, Sanae El; Guillot, Regis; Brisset, Francois; Aukauloo, Ally

    2013-12-01

    An open-coordination-sphere cobalt(III) oximato-based complex was designed as a putative catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Electrochemical alteration in the presence of acid occurs, leading to the formation of cobalt-based particles that act as an efficient catalyst for HER at pH 7. The exact chemical nature of these particles is yet to be determined. This study thus raises interesting issues regarding the fate of molecular-based complexes designed for the HER, and points to the challenging task of identifying the real catalytic species. Moreover, understanding and rationalizing the alteration pathways can be seen as a new route to reach catalytic particulates.

  6. Guided ion beam studies of the reactions of Con+ (n=1-18) with N2: Cobalt cluster mononitride and dinitride bond energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fuyi; Li, Ming; Tan, Lin; Armentrout, P. B.

    2008-05-01

    The reactions of Con+ (n=1-18) with N2 are measured as a function of kinetic energy over a range of 0-15eV in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. A variety of Com+, ComN+, and ComN2+ (m⩽n) product ions are observed, all in endothermic processes, with collision-induced dissociation dominating the products for all clusters. Bond dissociation energies for both cobalt cluster nitrides and dinitrides are derived from threshold analysis of the energy dependence of the endothermic reactions using several different approaches. These values show only a mild dependence on cluster size over the range studied, although the Co13+-N bond energy is relatively weak. The bond energies of Con+-N for larger clusters suggest that a reasonable value for the desorption energy of atomic nitrogen from bulk phase cobalt is 6.3±0.2eV, which is somewhat lower than the only available value in the literature, an estimate based on the enthalpy of formation of bulk cobalt nitride. The trends in the cobalt nitride thermochemistry are also compared to previously determined metal-metal bond energies, D0(Con+-Co), and to D0(Fen+-N). Implications for catalytic ammonia production using cobalt versus iron are discussed.

  7. Dynamic interactions of dissolution, surface adsorption, and precipitation in an aging cobalt(II)-clay-water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Hillary A.; Parks, George A.; Brown, Gordon E.

    1999-06-01

    We have studied the dynamic interactions of mineral dissolution, cation surface adsorption, and precipitation in aqueous slurries initially containing kaolinite and millimolar quantities of cobalt(II) in 0.1 molar NaNO 3 solution. Batch slurries spent an initial 24 hours at pH 4.2, then NaOH was added to increase pH to 7.8, where pH was maintained for several months. Dissolved Co, Al, and Si concentrations were monitored by ICP-MS; solid-phase products were characterized using EXAFS and TEM. At low pH, kaolinite dissolved, releasing Al and Si to solution. Aluminum hydroxide and aluminosilicate phases precipitated rapidly as pH increased. Cobalt uptake from solution began as pH increased and continued throughout the remainder of the experiment. Rapid surface adsorption and precipitation accounted for early Co uptake; much slower precipitation caused continued Co uptake. Cobalt adsorbed on kaolinite in the form of hydroxy-bridged polymers or multimers and precipitated as a hydrotalcite-like solid that contained aluminum ions derived from kaolinite and aluminum hydroxide dissolution. The cobalt hydrotalcite precipitate had the approximate stoichiometry [Co 6Al 2(OH) 16(A n-) 2/n], with nitrate or silicate anions occupying A sites. Precipitate particles were several nanometers in diameter and some probably precipitated homogeneously. Some of the Co originally adsorbed was later incorporated into precipitate. Slow kaolinite dissolution near neutral pH limited the rate of Co uptake by precipitation, thereby accounting for the slow second stage of Co uptake. Continued changes in solution composition indicate that even this relatively simple system did not reach equilibrium under fixed solution conditions after several months. For this set of conditions, cobalt hydrotalcite appears to be the stable Co-containing phase, and its precipitation can reduce dissolved metal ion concentrations below levels achievable by simple adsorption on kaolinite.

  8. Dynamic interactions of dissolution, surface adsorption, and precipitation in an aging cobalt(II)-clay-water system

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, H.A.; Parks, G.A.; Brown, G.E. Jr. |

    1999-06-01

    The authors have studied the dynamic interactions of mineral dissolution, cation surface adsorption, and precipitation in aqueous slurries initially containing kaolinite and millimolar quantities of cobalt(II) in 0.1 molar NaNO{sub 3} solution. Batch slurries spent an initial 24 hours at pH 4.2, then NaOH was added to increase pH to 7.8, where pH was maintained for several months. Dissolved Co, Al, and Si concentrations were monitored by ICP-MS; solid-phase products were characterized using EXAFS and TEM. At low pH, kaolinite dissolved, releasing Al and Si to solution. Aluminum hydroxide and aluminosilicate phases precipitated rapidly as pH increased. Cobalt uptake from solution began as pH increased and continued throughout the remainder of the experiment. Rapid surface adsorption and precipitation accounted for early Co uptake; much slower precipitation caused continued Co uptake. Cobalt adsorbed on kaolinite in the form of hydroxy-bridged polymers or multimers and precipitated as a hydrotalcite-like solid that contained aluminum ions derived from kaolinite and aluminum hydroxide dissolution. The cobalt hydrotalcite precipitate had the approximate stoichiometry [Co{sub 6}Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 16}(N{sup n{minus}}){sub 2/n}], with nitrate or silicate anions occupying A sites. Precipitate particles were several nanometers in diameter and some probably precipitated homogeneously. Some of the Co originally adsorbed was later incorporated into precipitate. Slow kaolinite dissolution near neutral pH limited the rate of Co uptake by precipitation, thereby accounting for the slow second stage of Co uptake. Continued changes in solution composition indicate that even this relatively simple system did not reach equilibrium under fixed solution conditions after several months. For this set of conditions, cobalt hydrotalcite appears to be the stable Co-containing phase, and its precipitation can reduce dissolved metal ion concentrations below levels achievable by simple

  9. Sulfur, carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen isotope geochemistry of the Idaho cobalt belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Craig A.; Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Slack, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Cobalt-copper ± gold deposits of the Idaho cobalt belt, including the deposits of the Blackbird district, have been analyzed for their sulfur, carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen isotope compositions to improve the understanding of ore formation. Previous genetic hypotheses have ranged widely, linking the ores to the sedimentary or diagenetic history of the host Mesoproterozoic sedimentary rocks, to Mesoproterozoic or Cretaceous magmatism, or to metamorphic shearing. The δ34S values are nearly uniform throughout the Blackbird dis- trict, with a mean value for cobaltite (CoAsS, the main cobalt mineral) of 8.0 ± 0.4‰ (n = 19). The data suggest that (1) sulfur was derived at least partly from sedimentary sources, (2) redox reactions involving sulfur were probably unimportant for ore deposition, and (3) the sulfur was probably transported to sites of ore for- mation as H2S. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of the ore-forming fluid, which are calculated from analyses of biotite-rich wall rocks and tourmaline, do not uniquely identify the source of the fluid; plausible sources include formation waters, metamorphic waters, and mixtures of magmatic and isotopically heavy meteoric waters. The calculated compositions are a poor match for the modified seawaters that form vol- canogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of siderite, a mineral that is widespread, although sparse, at Blackbird, suggest formation from mixtures of sedimentary organic carbon and magmatic-metamorphic carbon. The isotopic compositions of calcite in alkaline dike rocks of uncertain age are consistent with a magmatic origin. Several lines of evidence suggest that siderite postdated the emplacement of cobalt and copper, so its significance for the ore-forming event is uncertain. From the stable isotope perspective, the mineral deposits of the Idaho cobalt belt contrast with typical VMS and sedimentary exhalative deposits. They show characteristics of deposit

  10. Iron- and Cobalt-Catalyzed Alkene Hydrogenation: Catalysis with Both Redox-Active and Strong Field Ligands.

    PubMed

    Chirik, Paul J

    2015-06-16

    hydrogenation of a family of substituted styrene derivatives. Because improved hydrogenation performance was observed with more electron rich supporting ligands, phosphine cobalt(II) dialkyl complexes were synthesized and found to be active for the diastereoselective hydrogenation of various substituted alkenes. Notably, this class of catalysts was activated by hydroxyl functionality, representing a significant advance in the functional group tolerance of base metal hydrogenation catalysts. Through collaboration with Merck, enantioselective variants of these catalysts were discovered by high throughput experimentation. Catalysts for the hydrogenation of functionalized and essentially unfunctionalized alkenes have been discovered using this approach. Development of reliable, readily accessible cobalt precursors facilitated catalyst discovery and may, along with lessons learned from electronic structure studies, provide fundamental design principles for catalysis with earth abundant transition metals beyond alkene hydrogenation.

  11. Catalysts for the decomposition of hydrazine and its derivatives and a method for its production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasse, R.

    1986-01-01

    Catalysts of various types are used to decompose hydrazine and its derivatives. One type of catalyst is made as follows: the aluminum is dissolved out of an alloy of cobalt or nickel/aluminum so that a structure is produced that is chemically active for the monergol and that has a large active surface. The objective was to avoid difficulties and to create a catalyst that not only has a short start time but that can also be manufactured easily and relatively inexpensively. The solution to this task is to coat the base structure of the catalyst with oxides of copper, cobalt and cerium or oxides of copper, cobalt and cerite earth.

  12. Studies of the Codeposition of Cobalt Hydroxide and Nickel Hydroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. H.; Murthy, M.; VanZee, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Topics considered include: chemistry, experimental measurements, planar film model development, impregnation model development, results and conclusion. Also included: effect of cobalt concentration on deposition/loading; effect of current density on loading distribution.

  13. Reaction of cobalt in SO2 atmospheric at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Worrell, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    The reaction rate of cobalt in SO2 argon environments was measured at 650 C, 700 C, 750 C and 800 C. Product scales consist primarily of an interconnected sulfide phase in an oxide matrix. At 700 C to 800 C a thin sulfide layer adjacent to the metal is also observed. At all temperatures, the rapid diffusion of cobalt outward through the interconnected sulfide appears to be important. At 650 C, the reaction rate slows dramatically after five minutes due to a change in the distribution of these sulfides. At 700 C and 750 C the reaction is primarily diffusion controlled values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from this work show favorable agreement with values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from previous sulfidation work. At 800 C, a surface step becomes rate limiting.

  14. Recovery of Silver and Cobalt from Laboratory Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foust, Donald F.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for recovering silver and cobalt from laboratory wastes (including those resulting from student experiments) are presented. The procedures are generally applicable since only common, inexpensive laboratory reagents are needed. (JN)

  15. Battery related cobalt and REE flows in WEEE treatment.

    PubMed

    Sommer, P; Rotter, V S; Ueberschaar, M

    2015-11-01

    In batteries associated with waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), battery systems can be found with a higher content of valuable and critical raw materials like cobalt and rare earth elements (REE) relative to the general mix of portable batteries. Based on a material flow model, this study estimates the flows of REE and cobalt associated to WEEE and the fate of these metals in the end-of-life systems. In 2011, approximately 40 Mg REE and 325 Mg cobalt were disposed of with WEEE-batteries. The end-of-life recycling rate for cobalt was 14%, for REE 0%. The volume of waste batteries can be expected to grow, but variation in the battery composition makes it difficult to forecast the future secondary raw material potential. Nevertheless, product specific treatment strategies ought to be implemented throughout the stages of the value chain.

  16. The Study of a Cobalt Complex--A Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loehlin, James H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes an 8-week project involving the synthesis of cobalt compounds. Once synthesized, compounds are qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. Background information, laboratory procedures, and results/discussion are provided for three project experiments. (Author/JN)

  17. Reaction of cobalt in SO2 atmospheres at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Worrell, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction rate of cobalt in SO2 argon environments was measured at 650 C, 700 C, 750 C and 800 C. Product scales consist primarily of an interconnected sulfide phase in an oxide matrix. At 700 C to 800 C, a thin sulfide layer adjacent to the metal is also observed. At all temperatures, the rapid diffusion of cobalt outward through the interconnected sulfide appears to be important. At 650 C, the reaction rate slows dramatically after five minutes due to a change in the distribution of these sulfides. At 700 C and 750 C, the reaction is primarily diffusion controlled; values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from this work show favorable agreement with values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from previous sulfidation work. At 800 C, a surface step becomes rate limiting. Previously announced in STAR as N83-35104

  18. Exposure to cobalt in the welding process with stellite.

    PubMed

    Ferri, F; Candela, S; Bedogni, L; Piccinini, R; Sala, O

    1994-06-30

    In some small factories producing moulds for ceramic tiles using a cobalt alloy (stellite), environmental and biological (CoU) monitoring was conducted for eight workers employed in gas-shielded arc (MAG) and oxy-acetylene welding processes. During oxy-acetylene braze-welding, the exposure to cobalt is very low as are urinary cobalt concentrations. On the other hand, during the MAG welding process, the exposure levels can exceed the TLV-TWA levels and correlated well with CoU at the end of a working shift. Two MAG welders followed for two consecutive weeks, showed different patterns of urinary cobalt excretion: under the same environmental conditions, the higher CoU was found in the worker with greater past exposure. This aspect needs further evaluation before adopting CoU as a current indicator of occupational exposure to the metal.

  19. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...), not more than 30 parts per million. Arsenic (as As), not more than 3 parts per million. Total oxides of aluminum, chromium, and cobalt not less than 97 percent. Lead and arsenic shall be determined...

  20. Segregation of Fischer-Tropsch reactants on cobalt nanoparticle surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lewis, E A; Le, D; Jewell, A D; Murphy, C J; Rahman, T S; Sykes, E C H

    2014-06-21

    Using scanning tunnelling microscopy, we have visualized the segregation of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, the two reactants in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, on cobalt nanoparticles at catalytically relevant coverages. Density functional theory was used to interrogate the relevant energetics.

  1. Determination of traces of cobalt in soils: A field method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almond, H.

    1953-01-01

    The growing use of geochemical prospecting methods in the search for ore deposits has led to the development of a field method for the determination of cobalt in soils. The determination is based on the fact that cobalt reacts with 2-nitroso-1-naphthol to yield a pink compound that is soluble in carbon tetrachloride. The carbon tetrachloride extract is shaken with dilute cyanide to complex interfering elements and to remove excess reagent. The cobalt content is estimated by comparing the pink color in the carbon tetrachloride with a standard series prepared from standard solutions. The cobalt 2-nitroso-1-naphtholate system in carbon tetrachloride follows Beer's law. As little as 1 p.p.m. can be determined in a 0.1-gram sample. The method is simple and fast and requires only simple equipment. More than 40 samples can be analyzed per man-day with an accuracy within 30% or better.

  2. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  3. Cobalt and antimony: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Marlies; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Lison, Dominique

    2003-12-10

    The purpose of this review is to summarise the data concerning genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of Co and Sb. Both metals have multiple industrial and/or therapeutical applications, depending on the considered species. Cobalt is used for the production of alloys and hard metal (cemented carbide), diamond polishing, drying agents, pigments and catalysts. Occupational exposure to cobalt may result in adverse health effects in different organs or tissues. Antimony trioxide is primarily used as a flame retardant in rubber, plastics, pigments, adhesives, textiles, and paper. Antimony potassium tartrate has been used worldwide as an anti-shistosomal drug. Pentavalent antimony compounds have been used for the treatment of leishmaniasis. Co(II) ions are genotoxic in vitro and in vivo, and carcinogenic in rodents. Co metal is genotoxic in vitro. Hard metal dust, of which occupational exposure is linked to an increased lung cancer risk, is proven to be genotoxic in vitro and in vivo. Possibly, production of active oxygen species and/or DNA repair inhibition are mechanisms involved. Given the recently provided proof for in vitro and in vivo genotoxic potential of hard metal dust, the mechanistic evidence of elevated production of active oxygen species and the epidemiological data on increased cancer risk, it may be advisable to consider the possibility of a new evaluation by IARC. Both trivalent and pentavalent antimony compounds are generally negative in non-mammalian genotoxicity tests, while mammalian test systems usually give positive results for Sb(III) and negative results for Sb(V) compounds. Assessment of the in vivo potential of Sb2O3 to induce chromosome aberrations (CA) gave conflicting results. Animal carcinogenicity data were concluded sufficient for Sb2O3 by IARC. Human carcinogenicity data is difficult to evaluate given the frequent co-exposure to arsenic. Possible mechanisms of action, including potential to produce active oxygen species and to interfere with

  4. Use of phosphate for separation of cobalt from iron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    North, V.; Wells, R.C.

    1942-01-01

    The well-known tendency of cobalt to be retained by the iron-alumina precipitate produced by ammonia has generally been ascribed to a specific adsorption by the large surface of this gelatinous precipitate. Whatever its cause, it can be overcome by precipitating the iron as phosphate at a pH of 3.5. The precipitate is easily filterable and practically all the cobalt passes into the filtrate.

  5. Annealing effects on microstrain of cobalt oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Deotale, Anjali Jain Nandedkar, R. V.; Sinha, A. K.; Singh, M. N.; Upadhyay, Anuj

    2014-04-24

    Cobalt oxide nanoparticles in different phases have been synthesized using ash supported method. The effect of isochronal annealing on micro-strain of cobalt oxide nanoparticles has been studied. The lattice strain contribution to the x-ray diffraction line broadening in the nanoparticles was analyzed using Williamson Hall (W-H) plot. It is observed that micro-strain was released at higher annealing temperature.

  6. Synthesis and structural characterization of polyaniline/cobalt chloride composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asha, Goyal, Sneh Lata; Kishore, Nawal

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) and PANI /cobalt chloride composites were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline with CoCl2.6H2O using ammonium peroxidisulphate as an oxidant. These composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD study reveals that both PANI and composites are amorphous. The XRD and SEM results confirm the presence of cobalt chloride in the composites.

  7. Effects of cobalt in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Jarrett, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    The role of cobalt in a representative wrought nickel-base superalloy was determined. The results show cobalt affecting the solubility of elements in the gamma matrix, resulting in enhanced gamma' volume fraction, in the stabilization of MC-type carbides, and in the stabilization of sigma phase. In the particular alloy studied, these microstructural and microchemistry changes are insufficient in extent to impact on tensile strength, yield strength, and in the ductilities. Depending on the heat treatment, creep and stress rupture resistance can be cobalt sensitive. In the coarse grain, fully solutioned and aged condition, all of the alloy's 17% cobalt can be replaced by nickel without deleteriously affecting this resistance. In the fine grain, partially solutioned and aged condition, this resistance is deleteriously affected only when one-half or more of the initial cobalt content is removed. The structure and property results are discussed with respect to existing theories and with respect to other recent and earlier findings on the impact of cobalt, if any, on the performance of nickel-base superalloys.

  8. The biokinetics of inorganic cobalt in the human body.

    PubMed

    Leggett, R W

    2008-01-25

    This paper reviews information on the biological behavior of inorganic cobalt in humans and laboratory animals and proposes a model of the systemic biokinetics of inorganic cobalt in adult humans. The model was developed as part of an effort to update the models of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for addressing intakes of radionuclides by workers but is also applicable to environmental or medical exposures to inorganic forms of radiocobalt. The model can be used in conjunction with any respiratory, gastrointestinal, or wound model that provides predictions of the time-dependent feed of cobalt to blood. In contrast to the ICRP's current systemic model for cobalt, which is a simple open catenary system, the proposed model is constructed within a physiologically realistic framework that depicts recycling of cobalt between blood and tissues and transfer from blood to excretion pathways. Compared with the ICRP's current model, the proposed model yields similar predictions of whole-body retention but substantially different predictions of the systemic distribution of cobalt as a function of time after uptake to blood.

  9. Coordination tuning of cobalt phosphates towards efficient water oxidation catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunah; Park, Jimin; Park, Inchul; Jin, Kyoungsuk; Jerng, Sung Eun; Kim, Sun Hee; Nam, Ki Tae; Kang, Kisuk

    2015-01-01

    The development of efficient and stable water oxidation catalysts is necessary for the realization of practically viable water-splitting systems. Although extensive studies have focused on the metal-oxide catalysts, the effect of metal coordination on the catalytic ability remains still elusive. Here we select four cobalt-based phosphate catalysts with various cobalt- and phosphate-group coordination as a platform to better understand the catalytic activity of cobalt-based materials. Although they exhibit various catalytic activities and stabilities during water oxidation, Na2CoP2O7 with distorted cobalt tetrahedral geometry shows high activity comparable to that of amorphous cobalt phosphate under neutral conditions, along with high structural stability. First-principles calculations suggest that the surface reorganization by the pyrophosphate ligand induces a highly distorted tetrahedral geometry, where water molecules can favourably bind, resulting in a low overpotential (∼0.42 eV). Our findings emphasize the importance of local cobalt coordination in the catalysis and suggest the possible effect of polyanions on the water oxidation chemistry. PMID:26365091

  10. Cobalt silicon mixed oxide nanocomposites by modified sol gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Serena; Turco, Maria; Ramis, Gianguido; Bagnasco, Giovanni; Pernice, Pasquale; Pagliuca, Concetta; Bevilacqua, Maria; Aronne, Antonio

    2007-12-01

    Cobalt-silicon mixed oxide materials (Co/Si=0.111, 0.250 and 0.428) were synthesised starting from Co(NO 3) 2·6H 2O and Si(OC 2H 5) 4 using a modified sol-gel method. Structural, textural and surface chemical properties were investigated by thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyses (TG/DTA), XRD, UV-vis, FT-IR spectroscopy and N 2 adsorption at -196 °C. The nature of cobalt species and their interactions with the siloxane matrix were strongly depending on both the cobalt loading and the heat treatment. All dried gels were amorphous and contained Co 2+ ions forming both tetrahedral and octahedral complexes with the siloxane matrix. After treatment at 400 °C, the sample with lowest Co content appeared amorphous and contained only Co 2+ tetrahedral complexes, while at higher cobalt loading Co 3O 4 was present as the only crystalline phase, besides Co 2+ ions strongly interacting with siloxane matrix. At 850 °C, in all samples crystalline Co 2SiO 4 was formed and was the only crystallising phase for the nanocomposite with the lowest cobalt content. All materials retained high surface areas also after treatments at 600 °C and exhibited surface Lewis acidity, due to cationic sites. The presence of cobalt affected the textural properties of the siloxane matrix decreasing microporosity and increasing mesoporosity.

  11. Asymmetric aminolytic kinetic resolution of racemic epoxides using recyclable chiral polymeric Co(III)-salen complexes: a protocol for total utilization of racemic epoxide in the synthesis of (R)-Naftopidil and (S)-Propranolol.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Kureshy, Rukhsana I; Shah, Arpan K; Das, Anjan; Khan, Noor-ul H; Abdi, Sayed H R; Bajaj, Hari C

    2013-09-20

    Chiral polymeric Co(III) salen complexes with chiral ((R)/(S)-BINOL, diethyl tartrate) and achiral (piperazine and trigol) linkers with varying stereogenic centers were synthesized for the first time and used as catalysts for aminolytic kinetic resolution (AKR) of a variety of terminal epoxides and glycidyl ethers to get enantio-pure epoxides (ee, 99%) and N-protected β-amino alcohols (ee, 99%) with quantitative yield in 16 h at RT under optimized reaction conditions. This protocol was also used for the synthesis of two enantiomerically pure drug molecules (R)-Naftopidil (α1-blocker) and (S)-Propranolol (β-blocker) as a key step via AKR of single racemic naphthylglycidyl ether with Boc-protected isoproylamine with 100% epoxide utilization at 1 g level. The catalyst 1 was successfully recycled for a number of times.

  12. Novel chiral (salen)Mn(III) complexes containing a calix[4]arene unit in 1,3-alternate conformation as catalysts for enantioselective epoxidation reactions of (Z)-aryl alkenes.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, Carmela; Brancatelli, Giovanna; Ballistreri, Francesco P; Geremia, Silvano; Pappalardo, Andrea; Tomaselli, Gaetano A; Toscano, Rosa M; Sciotto, Domenico

    2014-02-07

    Two new chiral calix[4]arene-salen ligands 1a,b, based on calix[4]arene platforms in 1,3-alternate conformation, have been prepared by a new general synthetic pathway. Their Mn(III) complexes, 3a,b have shown fairly good efficiency in the asymmetric epoxidation of styrene and substituted styrenes, whereas excellent catalytic activity and selectivity were observed with rigid bicyclic alkenes, namely 1,2-dihydro-naphthalene and substituted 2,2'-dimethyl-chromene. The higher catalytic properties of 3a may be ascribed to the more rigid and inherently chiral structure as proved by molecular modelling, NMR spectroscopy and X-ray data of the similarly structured UO2 complexes 2a,b.

  13. Fabrication of novel TiO2 nanoparticles/Mn(III) salen doped carbon paste electrode: application as electrochemical sensor for the determination of hydrazine in the presence of phenol.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi Moghaddam, Hadi; Beitollahi, Hadi; Tajik, Somayeh; Sheikhshoaie, Iran; Biparva, Pourya

    2015-07-01

    Hydrazine and phenol are two important environmental pollutants. In this work, an electrochemical sensor for the selective and sensitive detection of hydrazine in presence of phenol was developed by the bulk modification of carbon paste electrode (CPE) with TiO2 nanoparticles and Mn(III) salen. Large peak separation, good sensitivity, and stability allow this modified electrode to analyze hydrazine individually and simultaneously along with phenol. Applying square wave voltammetry (SWV), a linear dynamic range of 3 × 10(-8)-4.0 × 10(-4) M with detection limit of 10.0 nM was obtained for hydrazine. Finally, the proposed method was applied to the determination of hydrazine and phenol in some real samples.

  14. Cobalt mineral exploration and supply from 1995 through 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The global mining industry has invested a large amount of capital in mineral exploration and development over the past 15 years in an effort to ensure that sufficient resources are available to meet future increases in demand for minerals. Exploration data have been used to identify specific sites where this investment has led to a significant contribution in global mineral supply of cobalt or where a significant increase in cobalt production capacity is anticipated in the next 5 years. This report provides an overview of the cobalt industry, factors affecting mineral supply, and circumstances surrounding the development, or lack thereof, of key mineral properties with the potential to affect mineral supply. Of the 48 sites with an effective production capacity of at least 1,000 metric tons per year of cobalt considered for this study, 3 producing sites underwent significant expansion during the study period, 10 exploration sites commenced production from 1995 through 2008, and 16 sites were expected to begin production by 2013 if planned development schedules are met. Cobalt supply is influenced by economic, environmental, political, and technological factors affecting exploration for and production of copper, nickel, and other metals as well as factors affecting the cobalt industry. Cobalt-rich nickel laterite deposits were discovered and developed in Australia and the South Pacific and improvements in laterite processing technology took place during the 1990s and early in the first decade of the 21st century when mining of copper-cobalt deposits in Congo (Kinshasa) was restricted because of regional conflict and lack of investment in that country's mining sector. There was also increased exploration for and greater importance placed on cobalt as a byproduct of nickel mining in Australia and Canada. The emergence of China as a major refined cobalt producer and consumer since 2007 has changed the pattern of demand for cobalt, particularly from Africa and

  15. Cobalt ferrite based magnetostrictive materials for magnetic stress sensor and actuator applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiles, David C. (Inventor); Paulsen, Jason A. (Inventor); Snyder, John E. (Inventor); Lo, Chester C. H. (Inventor); Ring, Andrew P. (Inventor); Bormann, Keith A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Magnetostrictive material based on cobalt ferrite is described. The cobalt ferrite is substituted with transition metals (such manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) or mixtures thereof) by substituting the transition metals for iron or cobalt to form substituted cobalt ferrite that provides mechanical properties that make the substituted cobalt ferrite material effective for use as sensors and actuators. The substitution of transition metals lowers the Curie temperature of the material (as compared to cobalt ferrite) while maintaining a suitable magnetostriction for stress sensing applications.

  16. Enhancement in the magnetostriction of sintered cobalt ferrite by making self-composites from nanocrystalline and bulk powders.

    PubMed

    Mohaideen, Kamal Khaja; Joy, Pattayil Alias

    2012-12-01

    Sintered polycrystalline cobalt ferrite is a potential magnetostrictive smart material for applications as sensors and actuators. A novel concept of enhancing the magnetostrictive strain of sintered cobalt ferrite by making self-composites from nanosized and bulk powders with different particle sizes of the same material as components is reported. The self-composites give higher magnetostriction coefficient and strain derivative when compared to the sintered products obtained from the individual powders. The individual components give a maximum magnetostriction up to ~310 ppm, whereas up to ~370 ppm is obtained for a two-component system consisting of powders of two different sizes. On the other hand, a three-component self-composite made from starting powders of 3 nm, 40 nm and >1 μm give very high magnetostriction of ~400 ppm at 800 kA/m, suitable for making devices.

  17. Nickel-cobalt alloy nanosheets obtained from reductive hydrothermal-treatment of nickel-cobalt hydroxide carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Ghotbi, Mohammad Yeganeh; Jolagah, Ali; Afrasiabi, Hasan-ali

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An anionic layered material, nickel-cobalt hydroxide carbonate was synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reductive hydrothermal-treatment of the layered precursor produced an alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The alloy is a bimetallic nanostructured nickel-cobalt and a soft magnet material. -- Abstract: Nickel-cobalt hydroxide carbonate, a layered material was synthesized by the co-precipitation method using urea as precipitant agent. This anionic layered material with hexagonal structure is constructed from nickel and cobalt ions within the layers and carbonate anions between the layers. Nickel-cobalt alloy with pure cubic phase was obtained by a reductive hydrothermal-treatment of the layered precursor. Powder X-ray diffraction pattern and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the formation of the initial layered material and its metallic alloy product. That is, the nickel-cobalt alloy has really produced via a wet chemical route for the first time. Magnetic measurement revealed that the alloy sample is a soft magnet material.

  18. Tuning of magnetic parameters in cobalt-polystyrene nanocomposites by reduction cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Swapna S.; Sunny, Vijutha; Anantharaman, M.R.

    2011-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Cobalt nanoparticles were prepared by a reduction process inside polymer pores. A porous polymer network (polystyrene) was chosen as the template for the synthesis of elementary cobalt as high surface area cobalt nanoparticles are prone to oxidation. The preliminary studies reveal that the cobalt is first formed with an oxide protective layer outside and upon repeating the reduction cycles, inner pores of the polymers are opened which enhanced the yield of metallic cobalt. These high surface area cobalt nanoparticles embedded in a polymer are ideal for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes as cobalt can act as a catalyst for the nanotube synthesis. The concentration of cobalt can be tuned in this technique by repeating the cycling process. Highlights: {yields} Elementary cobalt nanoparticles were synthesized inside polystyrene by a novel process. {yields} The self protection is achieved by the auto-shelling with the metal oxide. {yields} The magnetisation and coercivity could be tuned by repeating the cycles. {yields} Tuning of magnetic properties (both coercivity and magnetisation) could be achieved by the repetition of reduction cycles. {yields} Synthesized nanocomposite can act as a catalyst for carbon nanotube synthesis. -- Abstract: Cobalt nanoparticles were prepared by a reduction process inside polymer pores using CoSO{sub 4}.7H{sub 2}O and NaBH{sub 4}. A porous polymer network (sulphonated polystyrene) was chosen, as the template for the synthesis of elementary cobalt as high surface area cobalt nanoparticles are prone to oxidation. The preliminary studies reveal that the cobalt is first formed with an oxide protective layer outside and upon repeating the reduction cycles, inner pores of the polymers are opened which enhanced the yield of metallic cobalt. These high surface area cobalt nanoparticles embedded in a polymer are ideal for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes as cobalt can act as a catalyst for the nanotube synthesis. The

  19. A dissolved cobalt plume in the oxygen minimum zone of the eastern tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawco, Nicholas J.; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Resing, Joseph A.; Twining, Benjamin S.; Saito, Mak A.

    2016-10-01

    Cobalt is a nutrient to phytoplankton, but knowledge about its biogeochemical cycling is limited, especially in the Pacific Ocean. Here, we report sections of dissolved cobalt and labile dissolved cobalt from the US GEOTRACES GP16 transect in the South Pacific. The cobalt distribution is closely tied to the extent and intensity of the oxygen minimum zone in the eastern South Pacific with highest concentrations measured at the oxycline near the Peru margin. Below 200 m, remineralization and circulation produce an inverse relationship between cobalt and dissolved oxygen that extends throughout the basin. Within the oxygen minimum zone, elevated concentrations of labile cobalt are generated by input from coastal sources and reduced scavenging at low O2. As these high cobalt waters are upwelled and advected offshore, phytoplankton export returns cobalt to low-oxygen water masses underneath. West of the Peru upwelling region, dissolved cobalt is less than 10 pM in the euphotic zone and strongly bound by organic ligands. Because the cobalt nutricline within the South Pacific gyre is deeper than in oligotrophic regions in the North and South Atlantic, cobalt involved in sustaining phytoplankton productivity in the gyre is heavily recycled and ultimately arrives from lateral transport of upwelled waters from the eastern margin. In contrast to large coastal inputs, atmospheric deposition and hydrothermal vents along the East Pacific Rise appear to be minor sources of cobalt. Overall, these results demonstrate that oxygen biogeochemistry exerts a strong influence on cobalt cycling.

  20. Electromagnetic containerless reaction of samarium with cobalt for the formation of samarium-cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. W.; Das, D. K.; Kumar, K.; Frost, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    The electromagnetic levitation technique has been used to obtain nearly stoichiometric SmCo5, with the reaction temperature controlled by a gas jet. The results of several experiments carried out at a 450 kHz, 25 kw RF power levitation facility using different reaction times and cooling rates are presented. It is shown that reaction rates achieved with the levitation technique are larger than the expected diffusion rate in the system liquid samarium-solid cobalt. It is also shown that substantial mixing occurs in the RF-levitated melt.

  1. Cobalt monolayer islands on Ag(111) for ORR catalysis.

    PubMed

    Loglio, Francesca; Lastraioli, Elisa; Bianchini, Claudio; Fontanesi, Claudio; Innocenti, Massimo; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Vizza, Francesco; Foresti, Maria Luisa

    2011-08-22

    The design of a catalyst for one of the most important electrocatalytic reactions, the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), was done following the most recent guidelines of theoretical studies on this topic. Aim of this work was to achieve a synergic effect of two different metals acting on different steps of the ORR. The catalytic activity of Ag, already known and characterized, was enhanced by the presence of a monolayer of cobalt subdivided into nanosized islands. To obtain such a controlled nanostructure, a novel method utilizing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) as templates was employed. In a recent study, we were able to perform a confined electrodeposition of cobalt onto Ag(111) in a template formed by selectively desorbing a short-chain thiol (3-mercaptopropionic acid, MPA) from binary SAMs using 1-dodecanthiols (DDT). This method allows for an excellent control of the morphology of the deposit by varying the molar ratio of the two thiols. Because cobalt does not deposit on silver at an underpotential, the alternative approach of surface limited redox replacement (SLRR) was used. This method, recently developed by Adžić et al., consists of the use of a monolayer of a third metal, which can be deposited at an underpotential, as a template for the spontaneous deposition of a more noble metal. Herein, we choose zinc as template for the deposition of cobalt. Ag(111) crystals were covered by monolayer islands consisting of cobalt, with the surface atomic ratios ranging from 12 to 39% for cobalt. The catalytic activity of such samples towards ORR was evaluated and the best improvement in activity was found to be that of the sample with a cobalt percentage of approximately 30% with respect to the bare silver, which is in good agreement with theoretical hypotheses.

  2. Chronic cobalt treatment decreases hyperglycemia in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Harish; McNeill, John H

    2007-04-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by elevated blood glucose levels. Although conventional treatments such as insulin and other drugs reduce blood glucose, there is still a therapeutic need for effective orally administered drugs. Trace elements like vanadium and tungstate have been successfully demonstrated to reduce blood glucose in experimental diabetes with minimal chronic complications. We investigated the anti-hyperglycemic effects of cobalt in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Normal and diabetic rats were provided with drinking water containing 3.5 mM cobalt chloride for three weeks followed by 4 mM for four weeks. Body weights and fluid consumption were monitored on a daily basis, while food intake was recorded twice every week. Prior to termination, an oral glucose tolerance test was performed on the animals. Diabetic rats lost significant body weight (357 +/- 2 gm) compared to controls (482 +/- 3 gm). Body weight was further reduced by cobalt treatment (290 +/- 2 gm). Although it was difficult to establish a dosing regimen without weight loss, food and fluid consumption in cobalt-treated diabetic rats improved significantly compared to untreated diabetics. Plasma glucose levels were significantly reduced with reference to diabetic controls (29.3 +/- 0.9 mM) by the fourth week to a lower but still hyperglycemic level (13.6 +/- 3.4 mM). Cobalt-treated diabetic rats demonstrated an enhanced ability to clear a glucose load compared to untreated diabetics. Cobalt treatment neither affected the feeding and drinking patterns nor plasma glucose in normoglycemic animals although body weights decreased compared to untreated controls. We conclude that chronic cobalt treatment decreases plasma glucose levels in STZ-diabetic rats and improves tolerance to glucose.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of dinuclear macrocyclic cobalt(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes derived from 2,2,2('),2(')-S,S[bis(bis-N,N-2-thiobenzimidazolyloxalato-1,2-ethane)]: DNA binding and cleavage studies.

    PubMed

    Arjmand, Farukh; Aziz, Mubashira

    2009-02-01

    New homodinuclear macrocyclic complexes of cobalt(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) were isolated from the newly synthesized ligand 2,2,2',2'-S,S[bis(bis-N,N-2-thiobenzimidazolyloxalato-1,2-ethane)]. The structures of the complexes were elucidated by elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, electronic and ESI-MS spectroscopic techniques. In complex 1, Co(II) ions possess a tetrahedral coordination environment composed of O2S2 donor atoms while its Cu(II) and Zn(II) counterparts 2 and 3, respectively, reveal a six coordinate octahedral structure, defined by the O2S2 donors from the macrocyclic ring and two chloride ions. Molar conductance and spectroscopic data also support the proposed geometry of the complexes. DNA binding properties of complexes 1-3 were investigated using electronic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The absorption spectra of complexes 2 and 3 with calf thymus DNA showed hypochromism, while complex 1 showed hyperchromism attributed to a partial intercalation and electrostatic binding modes, respectively. The intrinsic binding constant K(b) of complexes 1-3 were determined as 16.6 x 10(4) M(-1), 4.25 x 10(4) M(-1) and 3.0 x 10(4) M(-1), respectively. The decrease in the relative specific viscosity of calf thymus DNA with increasing concentration of the complexes authenticates the partial intercalation binding mode. Gel electrophoresis of complex 2 with plasmid DNA demonstrated that complex exhibits excellent "artificial" nuclease activity.

  4. Cobalt-60 gamma irradiation of shrimp

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, N.L.B.

    1993-01-01

    Meta- and ortho-tyrosine were measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in conjunction with electrochemical detection in shrimp irradiated using cobalt-60 gamma radiation in the absorbed dose range 0.8 to 6.0 kGy, in nonirradiated shrimp, and in bovine serum albumin (BSA) irradiated in dilute aqueous solution at 25.0 kGy. Ortho-tyrosine was measured in nonirradiated BSA. Para-, meta-, and ortho-tyrosine was measured using HPLC in conjunction with uv-absorption detection in dilute aqueous solutions of phenylalanine irradiated in the absorbed dose range 16.0 to 195.0 kGy. The measured yields of tyrosine isomers were approximately linear as a function of absorbed dose in shrimp, and in irradiated solutions of phenylalanine up to 37.0 kGy. The occurrence of meta- and ortho-tyrosine, which had formerly been considered unique radiolytic products, has not previously been reported in nonirradiated shrimp or BSA. The conventional hydrolyzation and analytical techniques used in the present study to measure meta- and ortho-tyrosine may provide the basis for a method to detect and determine the dose used in food irradiation.

  5. Cobalt chloride attenuates hypobaric hypoxia induced vascular leakage in rat brain: molecular mechanisms of action of cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    Kalpana, S; Dhananjay, S; Anju, B; Lilly, G; Sai Ram, M

    2008-09-15

    This study reports the efficacy of cobalt preconditioning in preventing hypobaric hypoxia induced vascular leakage (an indicator of cerebral edema) using male Sprague-Dawley rats as model system. Exposure of animals to hypobaric hypoxia led to a significant increase in vascular leakage, reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. There was a marked increase in Nuclear Factor kappaB (NFkappaB) DNA binding activity and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), Interleukin-1 (IL-1), and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and cell adhesion molecules such as Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and P-selectin. Chemical preconditioning by cobalt for 7 days (12.5 mg Co/kg b.w., oral) significantly attenuated cerebral vascular leakage and the expression of inflammatory mediators induced by hypoxia. Administration of NFkappaB inhibitor, curcumin (50 mg/kg b.w.; i.p.) appreciably inhibited hypoxia induced vascular leakage indicating the involvement of NFkappaB in causing vascular leakage. Interestingly, cobalt when administered at 12.5 mg Co/kg b.w. (i.p.), 1 h before hypoxia could not prevent the vascular leakage indicating that cobalt per se did not have an effect on NFkappaB. The lower levels of NFkappaB observed in the brains of cobalt administered animals might be due to higher levels of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory proteins (hemeoxygenase-1 and metallothionein). To conclude cobalt preconditioning inhibited hypobaric hypoxia induced cerebral vascular leakage by lowering NFkappaB DNA binding activity and its regulated pro-inflammatory mediators. This is contemplated to be mediated by cobalt induced reduction in ROS/NO and increase in HO-1 and MT.

  6. Cobalt chloride attenuates hypobaric hypoxia induced vascular leakage in rat brain: Molecular mechanisms of action of cobalt chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Kalpana, S.; Dhananjay, S.; Anju, B. Lilly, G.; Sai Ram, M.

    2008-09-15

    This study reports the efficacy of cobalt preconditioning in preventing hypobaric hypoxia induced vascular leakage (an indicator of cerebral edema) using male Sprague-Dawley rats as model system. Exposure of animals to hypobaric hypoxia led to a significant increase in vascular leakage, reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. There was a marked increase in Nuclear Factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) DNA binding activity and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), Interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}), Interleukin-1 (IL-1), and Tumor Necrosis Factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and cell adhesion molecules such as Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and P-selectin. Chemical preconditioning by cobalt for 7 days (12.5 mg Co/kg b.w., oral) significantly attenuated cerebral vascular leakage and the expression of inflammatory mediators induced by hypoxia. Administration of NF{kappa}B inhibitor, curcumin (50 mg/kg b.w.; i.p.) appreciably inhibited hypoxia induced vascular leakage indicating the involvement of NF{kappa}B in causing vascular leakage. Interestingly, cobalt when administered at 12.5 mg Co/kg b.w. (i.p.), 1 h before hypoxia could not prevent the vascular leakage indicating that cobalt per se did not have an effect on NF{kappa}B. The lower levels of NF{kappa}B observed in the brains of cobalt administered animals might be due to higher levels of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory proteins (hemeoxygenase-1 and metallothionein). To conclude cobalt preconditioning inhibited hypobaric hypoxia induced cerebral vascular leakage by lowering NF{kappa}B DNA binding activity and its regulated pro-inflammatory mediators. This is contemplated to be mediated by cobalt induced reduction in ROS/NO and increase in HO-1 and MT.

  7. Effects of cobalt/vitamin B12 status in ewes on ovum development and lamb viability at birth.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Linda M; Robinson, John J; Watt, Robert G; McEvoy, Thomas G; Ashworth, Cheryl J; Rooke, John A; Dwyer, Cathy M

    2007-01-01

    Scottish Blackface ewes from cobalt-deficient farmland were fed a diet containing 0.06 mg cobalt per kg dry matter from approximately 30 days before embryo recovery/transfer until lambing. Ewes remained untreated (-Co; n = 82) or were given an intraruminal cobalt-containing bolus to compensate for the dietary deficit (+Co; n = 82). Ewes used as embryo donors (-Co, n = 17; +Co, n = 16) were artificially inseminated with semen from a single Suffolk sire. Day 6 embryos obtained from -Co and +Co donors were transferred in singleton to -Co and +Co recipients in a 2 x 2 factorial-designed experiment to determine the effects of cobalt/vitamin B12 status during the periconception period (factor 1) and pregnancy (factor 2) on lamb viability at birth. Mean (+/- s.e.m.) circulating concentrations of vitamin B12 in -Co and +Co donors at ovum recovery were 182 +/- 10 and 1288 +/- 64 pmol L(-1), respectively (P < 0.001), and the number of corpora lutea per ewe ovulating was 9.9 +/- 1.6 and 14.4 +/- 1.3, respectively (P < 0.05). Treatment did not affect the proportion of recovered ova that contained >32 cells (viable) or the median stage of development (late morula), but viable ova recovered from -Co v. +Co ewes had a better morphological grade (2.0 +/- 0.1 v. 2.20 +/- 0.04, respectively; P < 0.01). There was no effect of treatment on the proportion of recipient ewes that became pregnant. Circulating concentrations of vitamin B12 were lower in -Co than +Co ewes during pregnancy (P < 0.001) and at birth in lambs born to -Co ewes compared with those born to +Co ewes (P < 0.001). There was no effect of donor or recipient cobalt/vitamin B12 status on lamb birthweight, neonatal vigour or neonatal rectal temperatures, but lambs derived from +Co v. -Co embryo donors were more active in the first 3 days after birth (P < 0.05). Results show that sub-clinical cobalt/vitamin B12 deficiency reduces ovulatory response in superovulated ewes and that periconception nutrition can affect neonatal

  8. Analysis of cobalt(II) in 2-(5-cyanotetrazolato)pentaammine cobalt(III) perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, R.J.; Brown, N.E.; Deutsch, E.A.

    1985-10-30

    A new method of analysis is described for cobalt(II) complexes in 2-(5-cyanotetrazolato)pentaammine cobalt(III) perchlorate. The color reagent is 2,2'-dipyridyl-2-pyridyl hydrazone (DPPH), which complexes with the Co(II) and is oxidized to a substitution inert Co(III) (DPPH)/sub 2/ complex. Interferences from other ions is not a problem because the complex is stable at pH 2 - where complexes formed between DPPH and other ions are not stable. The usual air oxidant in this type of analysis has been replaced with ammonium peroxydisulfate improving both the precision and accuracy. The Sandell sensitivity is 0.0015 ..mu..g Co(II)/cm/sup 2/. The system obeys Beer's Law up to 4 ..mu..g in Co(II)mL of solution and has a molar absorptivity of 3.9 x 10/sup 4/ L/mole cm at 514 nm. The procedure was used to determine the degree of decomposition in samples that had undergone partial thermal decomposition. 11 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Graphene/cobalt nanocarrier for hyperthermia therapy and MRI diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hatamie, Shadie; Ahadian, Mohammad Mahdi; Ghiass, Mohammad Adel; Iraji Zad, Azam; Saber, Reza; Parseh, Benyamin; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Graphene/cobalt nanocomposites are promising materials for theranostic nanomedicine applications, which are defined as the ability to diagnose, provide targeted therapy and monitor the response to the therapy. In this study, the composites were synthesized via chemical method, using graphene oxide as the source material and assembling cobalt nanoparticles of 15nm over the surface of graphene sheets. Various characterization techniques were then employed to reveal the morphology, size and structure of the nanocomposites, such as X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and ultraviolet visible spectroscopy. Using ion-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, cobalt concentration in the nanocomposites was found to be 80%. In addition, cytotoxicity of graphene/cobalt nanocomposites were evaluated using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide or MTT assay. MTT viability assay exhibited biocompatibility to L929 mouse fibroblasts cells, under a high dose of 100μg/mL over 24h. Hyperthermia results showed the superior conversion of electromagnetic energy into heat at 350kHz frequency for 0.01 and 0.005g/L of the nanocomposites solution. The measured heat generation and energy transfer results were anticipated by the finite element analysis, conducted for the 3D structure. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics also showed that negatively charge graphene/cobalt nanocomposites are suitable for T1-weighted imaging.

  10. Microstructure and Magnetic Properties of Electrodeposited Cobalt Film

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuiyan, Md S; Taylor, B. J.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Thompson, James R; Sinclair, J.

    2008-01-01

    Cobalt films were electrodeposited onto both iron and copper substrates from an aqueous solution containing a mixture of cobalt sulfate, boric acid, sodium citrate, and vanadyl sulfate. The structural, intermetallic diffusion and magnetic properties of the electrodeposited films were studied. Cobalt electrodeposition was carried out in a passively divided cell aided by addition of vanadyl sulfate to keep the counter electrode clean. The divided electrolytic cell with very negative current densities cause the electrodeposited Co to adopt a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure, which is more magnetically reversible than the hexagonally close-packed (hcp) structured Co. The coercive field is also significantly less in the fcc-electrodeposited cobalt than in the hcp. SEM images show dense, uniform Co films without any cracks or porosity. Beside the deposition current, thickness of the film was also found to affect the crystal orientation particularly on iron substrates. Diffusion of cobalt film into the iron substrate was studied under reduced environment and a fast process was observed.

  11. Enhancement of trichothecene production in Fusarium graminearum by cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    Tsuyuki, Rie; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Sakamoto, Naoko; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2011-03-09

    The effects of cobalt chloride on the production of trichothecene and ergosterol in Fusarium graminearum were examined. Incorporation experiments with (13)C-labeled acetate and leucine confirmed that both 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol and ergosterol were biosynthesized via a mevalonate pathway by the fungus, although hydroxymethyl-glutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) from intact leucine was able to be partially used for ergosterol production. Addition of cobalt chloride at concentrations of 3-30 μM into liquid culture strongly enhanced 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol production by the fungus, whereas the amount of ergosterol and the mycelial weight of the fungus did not change. The mRNA levels of genes encoding trichothecene biosynthetic proteins (TRI4 and TRI6), ergosterol biosynthetic enzymes (ERG3 and ERG25), and enzymes involved in the mevalonate pathway (HMG-CoA synthase (HMGS) and HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR)) were all strongly up-regulated in the presence of cobalt chloride. Precocene II, a specific trichothecene production inhibitor, suppressed the effects of cobalt chloride on Tri4, Tri6, HMGS, and HMGR, but did not affect erg3 and erg25. These results indicate that cobalt chloride is useful for investigating regulatory mechanisms of trichothecene and ergosterol production in F. graminearum.

  12. Cobalt(II) complexes with hydroxypyridines and halogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dojer, Brina; Pevec, Andrej; Jagličić, Zvonko; Kristl, Matjaž

    2017-01-01

    We have synthesized and characterized two new cobalt(II) complexes: difluoridotetrakis(3-hydroxypyridine-κN)cobalt(II), [CoF2(C5H5NO)4] (1) and hexa(2-pyridone-κO)cobalt(II) tetrachloridocobaltate(II), [Co(C5H5NO)6][CoCl4] (2). The complexes were prepared by solvothermal synthesis. A methanol solution of hydroxypyridine was added to water solution of cobalt(II) acetate dihydrate followed by a few drops of concentrated hydrofluoric or hydrochloric acid into the mixture. The crystals of the compounds 1 and 2 are stable on air. The compounds were characterized structurally by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, spectrally by FT-IR spectroscopy and thermally. Thermal analysis showed that the final product of both complexes after heating to 900 °C is elemental cobalt. The interactions between building units in the crystal structures include intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in both compounds and π-π interactions in compound 2.

  13. Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of Cobalt Ferrite with Different Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Bibhuti B.; Nayak, Nadiya Bihary; Mallik, Rahul Kumar; Mondal, Aparna

    Different morphologies (spherical, flake and rod) of cobalt ferrite were synthesized using cobalt salt, iron salts, hydrazine hydrate (as a precipitating agent) and CTAB (surfactant) in water as well as ethylene glycol solvents. Four different synthesis ways (HIS, SIH, HISCO and HISG) were adopted to synthesize cobalt ferrite nanopowders using precipitation method. The as-prepared powders obtained after different synthesis ways were calcined at 800°C and structure, microstructure as well as magnetic properties are studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and magnetization studies using pulsed field loop tracer were employed to characterize these cobalt ferrite powders, prepared using different precipitation ways. All the samples are identified with single phase cobalt ferrite and the crystallite size was found to be around 40 nm. Nearly spherical (multifaceted), rod with flake-like, nearly spherical and rod-like morphologies are obtained while synthesizing using HIS, SIH, HISCO and HISG ways, respectively. Rod with flake-like (SIH sample) and rod-like morphologies (HISG sample) show higher coercivity, than the spherical-like (SIH and HISCO smaples) morphology. The highest coericivty was found to be around 925 Oe for HISG sample and highest magnetization is 67 emu/g for HISCO sample.

  14. Cobalt chloride induces apoptosis and zinc chloride suppresses cobalt-induced apoptosis by Bcl-2 expression in human submandibular gland HSG cells.

    PubMed

    Akita, Kazumi; Okamura, Hirohiko; Yoshida, Kaya; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Ogawa-Iyehara, Hiroaki; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2007-10-01

    To determine the effects of cobalt chloride on human submandibular gland cells, HSG cells were exposed to various concentrations of cobalt chloride. Cobalt chloride induced cytotoxicity and cell death in HSG cells as determined by phase-contrast microscopy and WST-1 cell viability assay. By using the Hoechst 33342 staining, marked nuclear condensation and fragmentation of chromatin were observed in cobalt chloride-treated cells. Cobalt chloride induced DNA ladder formation in HSG cells in both dose- and time-dependent manner with maximal effect at a concentration of 0.5 mM and 48 h, respectively. Cobalt chloride inhibited the expression of both Bcl-2 protein and mRNA in dose- and time-dependent manner. Zinc chloride recovered the cobalt-suppressed Bcl-2 expression and protected against cobalt-induced apoptosis in HSG cells. Our results show that the pathway of the apoptosis in HSG cells is regulated by cobalt chloride and zinc chloride. Our results also indicate that cobalt-induced apoptotic steps in HSG cells are related to the production of Bcl-2 protein.

  15. 40 CFR 471.30 - Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. 471.30 Section 471.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel-Cobalt Forming Subcategory § 471.30 Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  17. The effect of cobalt content in U-700 type alloys on degradation of aluminide coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of cobalt content in U-700 type alloys on the behavior of aluminide coatings is studied in burner rig cyclic oxidation tests at 1100C. It is determined that aluminide coatings on alloys with higher cobalt offer better oxidation protection than the same coatings on alloys containing less cobalt.

  18. 40 CFR 421.230 - Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. 421.230 Section 421.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Nickel and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.230 Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  20. 40 CFR 421.230 - Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. 421.230 Section 421.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Nickel and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.230 Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  1. 40 CFR 421.230 - Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. 421.230 Section 421.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Nickel and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.230 Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  2. 40 CFR 471.30 - Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. 471.30 Section 471.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel-Cobalt Forming Subcategory § 471.30 Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  3. 40 CFR 471.30 - Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. 471.30 Section 471.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel-Cobalt Forming Subcategory § 471.30 Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  4. 40 CFR 421.230 - Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. 421.230 Section 421.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Nickel and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.230 Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  5. 75 FR 70583 - Cobalt Lithium Manganese Nickel Oxide; Withdrawal of Significant New Use Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 9 and 721 RIN 2070-AB27 Cobalt Lithium Manganese Nickel Oxide; Withdrawal of... Control Act (TSCA) for the chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide (CAS No... cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide (PMN P-04-269; CAS No. 182442-95-1) at 40 CFR 721.10201 because...

  6. 40 CFR 471.30 - Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. 471.30 Section 471.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel-Cobalt Forming Subcategory § 471.30 Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  7. 40 CFR 421.230 - Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. 421.230 Section 421.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Nickel and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.230 Applicability: Description of the primary nickel and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  8. 40 CFR 471.30 - Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. 471.30 Section 471.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel-Cobalt Forming Subcategory § 471.30 Applicability; description of the nickel-cobalt forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  9. Comparison of different supplemental cobalt forms on fiber digestion and cobalamin levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cobalt (Co) is essential for rumen microbial metabolism to synthesize methane, acetate and methionine. It also serves as a structural component of vitamin B*12, which functions as a coenzyme in energy metabolism. A study was conducted to determine if Co form (cobalt carbonate vs cobalt glucoheptona...

  10. Comparison of different supplemental cobalt forms on digestion and cobalamin levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cobalt (Co) is essential for rumen microbial metabolism to synthesize methane, acetate and methionine. It also serves as a structural component of vitamin B12, which functions as a coenzyme in energy metabolism. A study was conducted to determine if Co form (cobalt carbonate vs cobalt glucoheptonat...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10599 - Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10599 Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical... cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-271; CAS No. 1262279-31-1) is subject to reporting...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10599 - Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10599 Calcium cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical... cobalt lead titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-271; CAS No. 1262279-31-1) is subject to reporting...

  13. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  14. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  15. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  16. 40 CFR 721.10600 - Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10600 Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide. (a... calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-272; CAS No. 1262279-30-0) is subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10600 - Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10600 Calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide. (a... calcium cobalt lead strontium titanium tungsten oxide (PMN P-11-272; CAS No. 1262279-30-0) is subject...

  18. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  19. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  20. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  1. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  2. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  3. Toxicity of cobalt. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the toxicity effects of cobalt. Citations include cobalt fetotoxicity, renal toxicity, bioaccumulation, contact dermatitis, carcinogencity, and respiratory disorders. Toxicology assays and industrial sources of cobalt poisoning are considered. In vivo and in vitro human and animal studies are described. (Contains a minimum of 129 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  6. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  7. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  9. The effect of variations of cobalt content on the cyclic oxidation resistance of selected Ni-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    Cobalt levels were systematically varied in the Ni-base turbine alloys U-700 (cast), U-700m(PM/HIP), Waspaloy, Mar-M-247, In-738, Nimonic-115, U-720, and SX-R-150. The cobalt levels ranged from 0 wt % to the nominal commercial content in each alloy. The alloys were tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at 1000, 1100 and 1150 C for 500, 200 and 100 hr respectively. An oxidation attack parameter, Ka derived from the specific weight change versus time data was used to evaluate the oxidation behavior of the alloys along with X-ray diffraction analysis of the surface oxides. The alloys tend to form either Cr2O3/chromite spinel or Al2O3/aluminate spinel depending on the CR/Al ratio in the alloys. Alloys with a ratio of 3.5 or higher tend to favor the Cr oxides while those under 3.0 form mostly Al oxides. In general the Al2O3/aluminate spinel forming alloys have the better oxidation resistance. Increased cobalt content lowers the scaling resistance of the higher Cr alloys while a 5.0 wt % Co content is optimum for the Al controlling alloys. The refractory metals, particularly Ta, appear beneficial to both types of oxides perhaps due to the formation of the omni-present trirutile Ni(Ta,Cb,Mo,W)2O6. Both scales break down as increasing amounts of NiO is formed.

  10. The effect of variations of cobalt content on the cyclic oxidation resistance of selected Ni-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.

    1987-01-01

    Cobalt levels were systematically varied in the Ni-base turbine alloys U-700 (cast), U-700m (PM/HIP), Waspaloy, Mar-M-247, In-738, Nimonic-115, U-720, and SX-R-150. the cobalt levels ranged from 0 wt pct to the nominal commercial content in each alloy. the alloys were tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at 1000, 1100 and 1150 C for 500, 200, and 100 hr, respectively. An oxidation attack parameter, Ka, derived from the specific weight change versus time data was used to evaluate the oxidation behavior of the alloys along with X-ray diffraction analysis of the surface oxides. The alloys tend to form either Cr2O3/chromite spinel or Al2O3/aluminate spinel depending on the Cr/Al ratio in the alloys. Alloys with a ratio of 3.5 or higher tend to favor the Cr oxides while those under 3.0 form mostly Al oxides. In general the Al2O3/aluminate spinel forming alloys have the better oxidation resistance. Increased cobalt content lowers the scaling resistance of the higher Cr allys while a 5.0 wt pct Co content is optimum for the Al controlling alloys. The refractory metals, particularly Ta, appear beneficial to both types of oxides, perhaps due to the formation of the omnipresent trirutile Ni(Ta, Cb, Mo, W)2O6. Both scales break down as increasing amounts of NiO are formed.

  11. Preparation and use of tetra-alkyl cobalt dicarbollide for extraction of cesium and strontium into hydrocarbon solvents

    DOEpatents

    Miller, R.L.; Pinkerton, A.B.; Abney, K.D.; Kinkead, S.A.

    1997-02-11

    Preparation and use of tetra-C-alkyl cobalt dicarbollide for extraction of cesium and strontium into hydrocarbon solvents. Tetra-C-alkyl derivatives of cobalt dicarbollide, Co(C{sub 2}R{sub 2}B{sub 9}H{sub 9}){sub 2}{sup {minus}}(CoB{sub 2}R{sub 4}{sup {minus}}; R=CH{sub 3} and C{sub 6}H{sub 13}) are demonstrated to be significant cesium and strontium extractants from acidic and alkaline solutions into non-toxic organic solvent systems. Extractions using mesitylene and diethylbenzene are compared to those with nitrobenzene as the organic phase. CoB{sub 2}-hexyl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} in diethylbenzene shows improved selectivity (10{sup 4}) for Cs over Na in acidic solution. In dilute alkaline solution, CoB{sub 2}-hexyl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} extracts Cs less efficiently, but more effectively removes Sr from higher base concentrations. A general synthesis of tetra-C-alkyl cobalt dicarbollides is described. 6 figs.

  12. Preparation and use of tetra-alkyl cobalt dicarbollide for extraction of cesium and strontium into hydrocarbon solvents

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Rebecca L.; Pinkerton, Anthony B.; Abney, Kent D.; Kinkead, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    Preparation and use of tetra-C-alkyl cobalt dicarbollide for extraction of cesium and strontium into hydrocarbon solvents. Tetra-C-alkyl derivatives of cobalt dicarbollide, Co(C.sub.2 R.sub.2 B.sub.9 H.sub.9).sub.2.sup.- (CoB.sub.2 R.sub.4.sup.- ; R=CH.sub.3 and C.sub.6 H.sub.13) are demonstrated to be significant cesium and strontium extractants from acidic and alkaline solutions into non-toxic organic solvent systems. Extractions using mesitylene and diethylbenzene are compared to those with nitrobenzene as the organic phase. CoB.sub.2 -hexyl.sub.4.sup.- in diethylbenzene shows improved selectivity (10.sup.4) for Cs over Na in acidic solution. In dilute alkaline solution, CoB.sub.2 -hexyl.sub.4.sup.- extracts Cs less efficiently, but more effectively removes Sr from higher base concentrations. A general synthesis of tetra-C-alkyl cobalt dicarbollides is described.

  13. Enantioselective Synthesis and Application to the Allylic Imidate Rearrangement of Amine-Coordinated Palladacycle Catalysts of Cobalt Sandwich Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cassar, Doyle J; Ilyashenko, Gennadiy; Ismail, Muhammad; Woods, James; Hughes, David L; Richards, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    The reaction of (η5-(N,N-dimethylaminomethyl)cyclopentadien-yl)(η4-tetraphenylcyclobutadiene)cobalt with sodium tetrachloropalladate and (R)-N-acetylphenylalanine gave planar chiral palladacycle di-μ-chloridebis[(η5-(Sp)-2-(N,N-dimethylaminomethyl)cyclopentadienyl,1-C,3′-N)(η4-tetraphenylcyclobutadiene)cobalt]dipalladium [(Sp)-Me2-CAP-Cl] in 92 % ee and 64 % yield. Enantiopurity (>98 % ee) was achieved by purification of the monomeric (R)-proline adducts and conversion back to the chloride dimer. Treatment with AgOAc gave (Sp)-Me2-CAP-OAc which was applied to asymmetric transcyclopalladation (up to 78 % ee). The (R)-N-acetylphenylalanine mediated palladation methodology was applicable also to the corresponding N,N-diethyl (82 % ee, 39 % yield) and pyrrolidinyl (>98 % ee, 43 % yield) cobalt sandwich complexes. A combination of 5 mol % of the latter [(Sp)-Pyrr-CAP-Cl] and AgNO3 (3.8 equiv) is a catalyst for the allylic imidate rearrangement of an (E)-N-aryltrifluoroacetimidate (up to 83 % ee), and this catalyst system is also applicable to the rearrangement of a range of (E)-trichloroacetimidates (up to 99 % ee). This asymmetric efficiency combined with the simplicity of catalyst synthesis provides accessible solutions to the generation of non-racemic allylic amine derivatives. PMID:24264943

  14. Dielectric, electrical transport and magnetic properties of Er3+substituted nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakade, S. G.; Kambale, R. C.; Kolekar, Y. D.; Ramana, C. V.

    2016-11-01

    Erbium substituted cobalt ferrite (CoFe2-xErxO4; x=0.0-0.2, referred to CFEO) materials were synthesized by sol-gel auto-combustion method. The effect of erbium (Er3+) substitution on the crystal structure, dielectric, electrical transport and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite is evaluated. CoFe2-xErxO4 ceramics exhibit the spinel cubic structure without any impurity phase for x≤0.10 whereas formation of the ErFeO3 orthoferrite secondary phase was observed for x≥0.15. All the CFEO samples demonstrate the typical hysteresis (M-H) behavior with a decrease in magnetization as a function of Er content due to weak superexchange interaction. The frequency (f) dependent dielectric constant (ε‧) revealed the usual dielectric dispersion. The ε‧-f dispersion (f=20 Hz to 1 MHz) fits to the modified Debye's function with more than one ion contributing to the relaxation. The relaxation time and spread factor derived are ∼10-4 s and ∼0.61(±0.04), respectively. Electrical and dielectric studies indicate that ε‧ increases and the dc electrical resistivity decreases as a function of Er content (x≤0.15). Complex impedance analyses confirm only the grain interior contribution to the conduction process. Temperature dependent electrical transport and room temperature ac conductivity (σac) analyses indicate the semiconducting nature and small polaron hopping.

  15. Thermal fatigue resistance of cobalt-modified UDIMET 700

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizon, P. T.

    1982-01-01

    The determination of comparative thermal fatigue resistances of five cobalt composition modifications of UDIMET 700 from fluidized bed tests is described. Cobalt compositional levels of 0.1, 4.3, 8.6, 12.8, 17.0 percent were being investigated in both the bare and coated (NiCrAlY overlay) conditions. Triplicate tests of each variation including duplicate tests of three control alloys are under investigation. Fluidized beds were maintained at 550 and 1850 F for the first 5500 cycles at which time the hot bed was increased to 1922 F. Immersion time in each bed is always 3 minutes. Upon the completion of 10,000 cycles, it appears that the 8.6 percent cobalt level gives the best thermal fatigue life. Considerable deformation of the test bars was observed.

  16. Effect of Cobalt Particle Size on Acetone Steam Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Zhang, He; Yu, Ning; Davidson, Stephen; Wang, Yong

    2015-06-11

    Carbon-supported cobalt nanoparticles with different particle sizes were synthesized and characterized by complementary characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, N-2 sorption, acetone temperature-programmed desorption, transmission electron microscopy, and CO chemisorption. Using acetone steam reforming reaction as a probe reaction, we revealed a volcano-shape curve of the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency of acetone) and the CO2 selectivity as a function of the cobalt particle size with the highest activity and selectivity observed at a particle size of approximately 12.8nm. Our results indicate that the overall performance of acetone steam reforming is related to a combination of particle-size-dependent acetone decomposition, water dissociation, and the oxidation state of the cobalt nanoparticles.

  17. Biocompatibility of transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanpo, Noppakun; Tharajak, Jirasak; Li, Yuncang; Berndt, Christopher C.; Wen, Cuie; Wang, James

    2014-07-01

    Transition metals of copper, zinc, manganese, and nickel were substituted into cobalt ferrite nanoparticles via a sol-gel route using citric acid as a chelating agent. The microstructure and elemental compositions of the nanoparticles were characterized using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The particle size of the nanoparticles was investigated using particle size analyzer, and the zeta potentials were measured using zeta potential analyzer. The phase components of the synthesized transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were studied using Raman spectroscopy. The biocompatibility of the nanoparticles was assessed using osteoblast-like cells. Results indicated that the substitution of transition metals strongly influences the physical, chemical properties, and biocompatibility of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  18. Hepatic cobalt and copper levels in lambs in Norway.

    PubMed

    Sivertsen, T; Plassen, C

    2004-01-01

    Cobalt and copper concentrations were measured in 599 lamb livers collected at slaughter from 58 sheep flocks in 6 different parts of Norway in 1993. Information about pasture, additional feeding and mineral supplements in the flocks was obtained through a questionnaire. Average hepatic levels of cobalt in the lamb flocks varied from < 0.003 to 0.22 microg/g ww, and of copper from 5 to 240 microg/g ww. Flocks with deficient or marginal cobalt status were found in all parts of southern Norway, but primarily in the west and south-west. Some flocks with marginal copper status were found in the south-west, while flocks with signs of excessive hepatic copper concentrations were found mainly in inner parts of central and northern Norway. Hepatic copper concentrations were significantly higher in lambs that had grazed mountain pastures than in those that had grazed lowland pastures in the summer.

  19. Activation of cobalt by neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.; Dyer, F.F.; Emery, J.F.; Pace, J.V. III ); Brodzinski, R.L. ); Marcum, J. )

    1990-02-01

    A study has been completed of cobalt activation in samples from two new locations in Hiroshima. The samples consisted of a piece of steel from a bridge located at a distance of about 1300 m from the hypocenter and pieces of both steel and concrete from a building located at approximately 700 m. The concrete was analyzed to obtain information needed to calculate the cobalt activation in the two steel samples. Close agreement was found between calculated and measured values for cobalt activation of the steel sample from the building at 700 m. It was found, however, that the measured values for the bridge sample at 1300 m were approximately twice the calculated values. Thus, the new results confirm the existence of a systematic error in the transport calculations for neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb. 52 refs., 32 figs., 16 tabs.

  20. Laboratory evaluation of low cobalt wear materials for nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shiels, S.A.; Wilson, W.L.; Rosengarth, K.W.; Wire, G.L.

    1994-09-01

    Laboratory wear and corrosion screening tests were conducted on several commercially available, low-cobalt and cobalt-free hardsurfacing alloys to evaluate their relative wear and corrosion performance under simulated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary heat transport circuit conditions. Wear tests were performed under reciprocating, sliding contact. Corrosion performance was evaluated in both steady state and off-normal chemistry conditions. The wear behavior of the candidate hardsurfacing alloys was generally comparable to or better than that of Stellite 6, a material of proven wear performance under PWR operating conditions. With the exception of Tristelle 5183, the iron base alloys exhibited unacceptable corrosion behavior under wet layup conditions. The Tristelle 5183 experienced minor corrosion attack in primary coolant having elevated oxygen levels. The twelve percent cobalt alloy, Tristelle TS-2, performed well but exhibited some attack after a simulated decontamination treatment.

  1. Microstructure and abrasive wear of cobalt-based laser coatings

    SciTech Connect

    de Mol van Otterloo, J.L.; De Hosson, J.T.M.

    1997-01-15

    Cobalt-based alloys are used as wear-resistant materials for hardfacing cheap steel substrates. A substantial enhancement in mechanical properties of cobalt-based superalloys is attributed to the martensitic fcc {yields} hcp phase transformation. Alloying elements can be classified as phase modifiers (Ni and Fe stabilize fcc whereas W and Cr stabilize hcp), solid-solution strengtheners (W and Mo), which affect only the matrix, and elements that form carbides (Cr-rich M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, M = metal). Of the different depositing techniques such as plasma spray, tungsten inert gas, oxyacetylene flame and laser cladding, the latter delivers coatings with a low dilution with the substrate material and no pores. Moreover, the laser cladding process has the advantage of being well controllable. This paper reports on the deposition of five different cobalt-based Stellite alloys on steel substrates by laser cladding.

  2. Tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloy and method of producing same

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, James M.; Riley, Robert E.

    1977-03-15

    An improved tungsten alloy having a tungsten content of approximately 95 weight percent, a nickel content of about 3 weight percent, and the balance being cobalt of about 2 weight percent is described. A method for producing said tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloy is further described and comprises (a) coating the tungsten particles with a nickel-cobalt alloy, (b) pressing the coated particles into a compact shape, (c) heating said compact in hydrogen to a temperature in the range of 1400.degree. C and holding at this elevated temperature for a period of about 2 hours, (d) increasing this elevated temperature to about 1500.degree. C and holding for 1 hour at this temperature, (e) cooling to about 1200.degree. C and replacing the hydrogen atmosphere with an inert argon atmosphere while maintaining this elevated temperature for a period of about 1/2 hour, and (f) cooling the resulting alloy to room temperature in this argon atmosphere.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of α-cobalt hydroxide nanobelts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, L.; Zhu, J. L.; Chen, L.; An, B.; Liu, Q. Q.; Huang, K. L.

    2011-08-01

    α-Cobalt hydroxide was synthesized by a facile hydrothermal process from Co(Ac)2 and NH3·H2O in the presence of 1,3-propanediol. The large-scale-prepared cobalt hydroxide has a uniform nanobelt morphology with a considerably high aspect-ratio more than 20 which may be advantageous for exploration of their physicochemical properties. This synthetic method is convenient, economical, and controllable. The samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectrum, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, CHN element analysis, thermogravimetric and differential-thermogravimetric analysis, which revealed the compound is lamellar structural cobalt organic-inorganic hybrid with the chemical formula of Co(OH)1.49(NH3)0.01(CO3 2-)0.22(Ac-)0.07(H2O)0.11 and single-crystalline.

  4. Cobalt 60 gamma irradiation current status, trends and insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corley, John T.

    1998-06-01

    This paper discusses the current status, trends and insights into the continued, safe use of cobalt 60 gamma irradiation. Also presented are some of the many initiatives undertaken at MDS Nordion. Topics covered include our investment for the future supply of raw materials and the latest news from source production. Briefly presented are the tasks associated with the safe transport of cobalt 60 around the world. Discussed is cobalt 60 usage at the customer site; more specifically maintaining source integrity, source utilization and irradiator design trends. Highlighted are industry trends for North America, Europe and the rest of the world. Finally presented are the challenges and opportunities for the industry. Stressed in the paper is the need to work together.

  5. Transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Sanpo, Noppakun; Berndt, Christopher C; Wen, Cuie; Wang, James

    2013-03-01

    Transition metals of copper, zinc, chromium and nickel were substituted into cobalt ferrite nanoparticles via a sol-gel route using citric acid as a chelating agent. The microstructure and elemental composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Phase analysis of transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was performed via X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was measured using the water contact angle technique. The surface roughness of all nanoparticles was measured using profilometry. Moreover, thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were performed to determine the temperature at which the decomposition and oxidation of the chelating agents took place. Results indicated that the substitution of transition metals influences strongly the microstructure, crystal structure and antibacterial property of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  6. Genotoxicity of cobalt nanoparticles and ions in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Vales, Gerard; Demir, Eşref; Kaya, Bülent; Creus, Amadeu; Marcos, Ricard

    2013-06-01

    Nanogenotoxicology is an emergent area of research, relevant for estimating the potential carcinogenic risk of nanomaterials. Since most of the approaches use in vitro studies, and neglecting the whole organism limits the accuracy of the obtained results, we have used Drosophila melanogaster to study the possible genotoxic potential of cobalt nanoparticles (Co NPs). The wing somatic mutation and recombination test has been the test of choice. This test is based on the principle that the loss of heterozygosis and the corresponding expression of the suitable recessive markers, multiple wing hairs and flare-3 can lead to the formation of mutant clone cells in growing up larvae, which are expressed as mutant spots on the wings of adult flies. Co NPs, as well as the ionic form cobalt chloride, were given to third instar larvae through the food, at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 mM. The results obtained indicate that both cobalt forms are able to induce significant increases in the frequency of mutant clones. Although at low concentrations only Co NPs were genotoxic, the level of genetic damage obtained at the highest dose tested of cobalt chloride (10 mM) showed a significant higher increase in the frequency of total spots than those observed after the treatment with cobalt nanoparticles. As conclusion, our results indicate that Co NPs were able to induce genotoxic activity in the wing-spot assay of D. melanogaster, mainly via the induction of somatic recombination. The differences observed in the behaviour of the two selected cobalt forms may result from differences in the uptake.

  7. Temporal Variability of Tungsten and Cobalt in Fallon, Nevada

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Paul R.; Speakman, Robert J.; Ridenour, Gary; Witten, Mark L.

    2007-01-01

    Background Since 1997, Fallon, Nevada, has experienced a cluster of childhood leukemia that has been declared “one of the most unique clusters of childhood cancer ever reported.” Multiple environmental studies have shown airborne tungsten and cobalt to be elevated within Fallon, but the question remains: Have these metals changed through time in correspondence with the onset of the leukemia cluster? Methods We used dendrochemistry, the study of element concentrations through time in tree rings, in Fallon to assess temporal variability of airborne tungsten and cobalt since the late 1980s. The techniques used in Fallon were also tested in a different town (Sweet Home, OR) that has airborne tungsten from a known source. Results The Sweet Home test case confirms the accuracy of dendrochemistry for showing temporal variability of environmental tungsten. Given that dendrochemistry works for tungsten, tree-ring chemistry shows that tungsten increased in Fallon relative to nearby comparison towns beginning by the mid-1990s, slightly before the onset of the cluster, and cobalt has been high throughout the last ~ 15 years. Other metals do not show trends through time in Fallon. Discussion Results in Fallon suggest a temporal correspondence between the onset of excessive childhood leukemia and elevated levels of tungsten and cobalt. Although environmental data alone cannot directly link childhood leukemia with exposure to metals, research by others has shown that combined exposure to tungsten and cobalt can be carcinogenic to humans. Conclusion Continued biomedical research is warranted to directly test for linkage between childhood leukemia and tungsten and cobalt. PMID:17520058

  8. Biological fate of cobalt-60 released during the corrosion of neutron-activated stanless steel in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.S.

    1982-03-01

    Passing seawater over radioactive Type 347 stainless steel in a sediment/seawater laboratory system and exposing marine animals to this environment provided information on the bioaccumulation of /sup 60/Co from radioactive structural material. Exposure of marine organisms to radioactive corrosion products and directly to radioactive stainless steel in seawater simulated some of the possible conditions which could arise from the deposition of radioactive stainless steel on the ocean floor. Detectable levels of /sup 60/Co in marine animals were not observed on a short term basis (5 weeks). Longterm (13 months) exposure of marine animals in a sediment/seawater system resulted in /sup 60/Co bioaccumulation. The specific activity of /sup 60/Co in the organisms was as much as one million times less than that initially present in the radioactive stainless steel. This was due to the dilution of /sup 60/Co by stable cobalt in the seawater, sediments and organisms. As expected the /sup 60/Co specific activity of the organisms never increased above that of the radioactive source. This is because /sup 60/Co is chemicaly indistinguishable from stable Co. Increasing /sup 60/Co concentration factors with decreasing /sup 60/Co concentrations in the seawater and sediment media coupled with relatively constant /sup 60/Co specific activities suggest a possible homeostatic control of cobalt concentrations in certain marine organisms. The evidence indicates that the marine animals derived more of the accumulated /sup 60/Co from the sediments and interstitial water than from seawater. Cobalt-60 concentration factors were generally found to be lower than published cobalt concentration factors due to the predominantly insoluble nature of the corrosion products. Baseline information is provided on trace element concentrations in deep-sea organisms. Stable Co and twenty other elements were measured in abyssal invertebrates and a fish.

  9. Pairing symmetry of the hydrated cobaltate superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guo-Qing

    2008-03-01

    We report NMR/NQR measurements on the hydrated cobaltate superconductor NaxCoO2*1.3H2O at elevated pressures. The spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) decreases below Tc with no coherence peak [1], and is in proportion to T^3 down to T˜Tc/10, which provides compelling evidence for the existence of line nodes in the gap function [2,3]. The spin susceptibility obtained from the Knight shift measurement in a single crystal decreases below Tc along all crystal-axis directions [4]. These results indicate anisotropic, spin-singlet pairing, and are most consistent with a d-wave gap. The electron correlations in the normal state are antiferromagnetic-like, which increases with decreasing Na-content [1,2]. The phase diagrams of Tc and various physical properties as functions of Na-content [2], and pressure [3] will be presented, and the inter-relation between the superconductivity and the spin correlations will be discussed. References: [1] T. Fujimoto, G. - q. Zheng, Y. Kitaoka, R.L. Meng, J. Cmaidalka, and C.W. Chu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 047004 (2004). [2] G. - q. Zheng, K. Matano, R.L. Meng, J. Cmaidalka, and C.W. Chu, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18, L63 (2006). [3] E. Kusano, S. Kawasaki, K. Matano, G. - q. Zheng, R.L. Meng, J. Cmaidalka, and C.W. Chu, Phys. Rev. B 76, 100506 (R) (2007). [4] G. - q. Zheng, K. Matano, D.P. Chen and C.T. Lin, Phys. Rev. B73, 180503 (R) (2006).

  10. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COBALT AND PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-NICKEL ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-08-25

    >New plutonium-base teroary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuels are described. The alloys consist of 10 to 20 atomic percent cobalt with the remainder plutonium and cerium in any desired proportion, with the plutonium not in excess of 88 atomic percent; or, of from 10 to 25 atomic percent nickel (or mixture of nickel and cobalt) with the remainder plutonium and cerium in any desired proportion, with the plutonium not in excess of 86 atomic percent. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are a lower melting point and a wide range of permissible plutonium dilution.

  11. The role of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in medical science.

    PubMed

    Amiri, S; Shokrollahi, H

    2013-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is rapidly growing and promises that the substantial changes that will have significant economic and scientific impacts be applicable to a wide range of areas, such as aerospace engineering, nano-electronics, environmental remediation and medical healthcare. In this area, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been regarded as one of the competitive candidates because of their suitable physical, chemical and magnetic properties like the high anisotropy constant, high coercivity and high Curie temperature, moderate saturation magnetization and ease of synthesis. This paper introduces the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and some medical applications, including the hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic separation and drug delivery of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  12. Hydrogen evolution catalyzed by cobalt diimine-dioxime complexes.

    PubMed

    Kaeffer, Nicolas; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Artero, Vincent

    2015-05-19

    Mimicking photosynthesis and producing solar fuels is an appealing way to store the huge amount of renewable energy from the sun in a durable and sustainable way. Hydrogen production through water splitting has been set as a first-ranking target for artificial photosynthesis. Pursuing that goal requires the development of efficient and stable catalytic systems, only based on earth abundant elements, for the reduction of protons from water to molecular hydrogen. Cobalt complexes based on glyoxime ligands, called cobaloximes, emerged 10 years ago as a first generation of such catalysts. They are now widely utilized for the construction of photocatalytic systems for hydrogen evolution. In this Account, we describe our contribution to the development of a second generation of catalysts, cobalt diimine-dioxime complexes. While displaying similar catalytic activities as cobaloximes, these catalysts prove more stable against hydrolysis under strongly acidic conditions thanks to the tetradentate nature of the diimine-dioxime ligand. Importantly, H2 evolution proceeds via proton-coupled electron transfer steps involving the oxime bridge as a protonation site, reproducing the mechanism at play in the active sites of hydrogenase enzymes. This feature allows H2 to be evolved at modest overpotentials, that is, close to the thermodynamic equilibrium over a wide range of acid-base conditions in nonaqueous solutions. Derivatization of the diimine-dioxime ligand at the hydrocarbon chain linking the two imine functions enables the covalent grafting of the complex onto electrode surfaces in a more convenient manner than for the parent bis-bidentate cobaloximes. Accordingly, we attached diimine-dioxime cobalt catalysts onto carbon nanotubes and demonstrated the catalytic activity of the resulting molecular-based electrode for hydrogen evolution from aqueous acetate buffer. The stability of immobilized catalysts was found to be orders of magnitude higher than that of catalysts in the

  13. Hydrogen Evolution Catalyzed by Cobalt Diimine-Dioxime Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kaeffer, Nicolas; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Artero, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Mimicking photosynthesis and producing solar fuels is an appealing way to store the huge amount of renewable energy from the sun in a durable and sustainable way. Hydrogen production through water splitting has been set as a first-ranking target for artificial photosynthesis. Pursuing that goal requires the development of efficient and stable catalytic systems, only based on earth abundant elements, for the reduction of protons from water to molecular hydrogen. Cobalt complexes based on glyoxime ligands, called cobaloximes, emerged ten years ago as a first generation of such catalysts. They are now widely utilized for the construction of photocatalytic systems for hydrogen evolution. In this Account, we describe our contribution to the development of a second generation of catalysts, cobalt diimine-dioxime complexes. While displaying similar catalytic activities as cobaloximes, these catalysts prove more stable against hydrolysis under strongly acidic conditions thanks to the tetradentate nature of the diimine-dioxime ligand. Importantly, H2 evolution proceeds via proton-coupled electron transfer steps involving the oxime bridge as a protonation site, reproducing the mechanism at play in the active sites of hydrogenase enzymes. This feature allows H2 to be evolved at modest overpotentials, i.e. close to the thermodynamic equilibrium over a wide range of acid-base conditions in non-aqueous solutions. Derivatization of the diimine-dioxime ligand at the hydrocarbon chain linking the two imine functions enables the covalent grafting of the complex onto electrode surfaces in a more convenient manner than for the parent bis-bidentate cobaloximes. Accordingly we attached diimine-dioxime cobalt catalysts onto carbon nanotubes and demonstrated the catalytic activity of the resulting molecular-based electrode for hydrogen evolution from aqueous acetate buffer. The stability of immobilized catalysts was found to be orders of magnitude higher than that of catalysts

  14. Structural changes in iron-cobalt oxide nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishchev, K. N.; Golub'ev, M. A.; Maksimov, Yu. V.; Beglov, V. I.; Kyashkin, V. M.; Panov, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    The structure of binary iron-cobalt oxide nanosystems—precursors of bimetallic catalysts—is studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and small-angle X-ray scattering. The oxide system under study represents a promising material for creating new metallic nanocatalysts for ammonia synthesis. The structural evolution in the composition range 100Fe/0Co-5Fe/95Co is found to correspond to the transition from fine-grained α-Fe2O3 to mixed iron-cobalt spinels of various compositions and degrees of dispersity.

  15. Low energy sputtering of cobalt by cesium ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handoo, A.; Ray, Pradosh K.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental facility to investigate low energy (less than 500 eV) sputtering of metal surfaces with ions produced by an ion gun is described. Results are reported on the sputtering yield of cobalt by cesium ions in the 100 to 500 eV energy range at a pressure of 1 times 10(exp -6) Torr. The target was electroplated on a copper substrate. The sputtered atoms were collected on a cobalt foil surrounding the target. Co-57 was used as a tracer to determine the sputtering yield.

  16. Fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    2002-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing. A method of forming a lithium cobalt oxide film includes depositing a film of lithium cobalt oxide on a substrate; rapidly heating the film of lithium cobalt oxide to a target temperature; and maintaining the film of lithium cobalt oxide at the target temperature for a target annealing time of at most, approximately 60 minutes. The systems and methods provide advantages because they require less time to implement and are, therefore less costly than previous techniques.

  17. Fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    2003-04-29

    Systems and methods are described for fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing. A method of forming a lithium cobalt oxide film includes depositing a film of lithium cobalt oxide on a substrate; rapidly heating the film of lithium cobalt oxide to a target temperature; and maintaining the film of lithium cobalt oxide at the target temperature for a target annealing time of at most, approximately 60 minutes. The systems and methods provide advantages because they require less time to implement and are, therefore less costly than previous techniques.

  18. Fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    2003-05-13

    Systems and methods are described for fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing. A method of forming a lithium cobalt oxide film includes depositing a film of lithium cobalt oxide on a substrate; rapidly heating the film of lithium cobalt oxide to a target temperature; and maintaining the film of lithium cobalt oxide at the target temperature for a target annealing time of at most, approximately 60 minutes. The systems and methods provide advantages because they require less time to implement and are, therefore less costly than previous techniques.

  19. In situ cobalt-cobalt oxide/N-doped carbon hybrids as superior bifunctional electrocatalysts for hydrogen and oxygen evolution.

    PubMed

    Jin, Haiyan; Wang, Jing; Su, Diefeng; Wei, Zhongzhe; Pang, Zhenfeng; Wang, Yong

    2015-02-25

    Remarkable hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) or superior oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalyst has been applied in water splitting, however, utilizing a bifunctional catalyst for simultaneously generating H2 and O2 is still a challenging issue, which is crucial for improving the overall efficiency of water electrolysis. Herein, inspired by the superiority of carbon conductivity, the propitious H atom binding energy of metallic cobalt, and better OER activity of cobalt oxide, we synthesized cobalt-cobalt oxide/N-doped carbon hybrids (CoOx@CN) composed of Co(0), CoO, Co3O4 applied to HER and OER by simple one-pot thermal treatment method. CoOx@CN exhibited a small onset potential of 85 mV, low charge-transfer resistance (41 Ω), and considerable stability for HER. Electrocatalytic experiments further indicated the better performance of CoOx@CN for HER can be attributed to the high conductivity of carbon, the synergistic effect of metallic cobalt and cobalt oxide, the stability of carbon-encapsulated Co nanoparticles, and the introduction of electron-rich nitrogen. In addition, when used as catalysts of OER, the CoOx@CN hybrids required 0.26 V overpotential for a current density of 10 mA cm(-2), which is comparable even superior to many other non-noble metal catalysts. More importantly, an alkaline electrolyzer that approached ∼20 mA cm(-2) at a voltage of 1.55 V was fabricated by applying CoOx@CN as cathode and anode electrocatalyst, which opened new possibilities for exploring overall water splitting catalysts.

  20. Gas phase catalytic hydrodechlorination of chlorobenzene over cobalt phosphide catalysts with different P contents.

    PubMed

    Cecilia, J A; Infantes-Molina, A; Rodríguez-Castellón, E; Jiménez-López, A

    2013-09-15

    The gas phase catalytic hydrodechlorination (HDC) of chlorobenzene (CB) at atmospheric pressure was investigated over silica-supported cobalt and cobalt phosphide catalysts containing different P loading and a fixed amount of cobalt (5 wt.%). The effect of the initial P/Co molar ratio on the stoichiometry of the cobalt phosphide phase, the acidity and the hydrogen activation capability were discussed and these properties correlated with the catalytic activity. Catalytic results indicated that the cobalt phosphide phase is much more active than the monometallic cobalt one. The activity raised with the P content present in the sample due to the formation of the CoP phase instead of the Co₂P one, which favored the formation of hydrogen spillover species, increased the amount of weak acid sites and the number of exposed superficial cobalt atoms probably related to a better dispersion of the active phase. All the catalysts gave rise benzene as the main reaction product.

  1. Development of hierarchically porous cobalt oxide for enhanced photo-oxidation of indoor pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J. P.; Shereef, Anas; Gray, Kimberly A.; Wu, Jinsong

    2015-03-01

    Porous cobalt oxide was successfully prepared by precipitation of cobalt hydroxide followed by low temperature thermal decomposition. The morphologies of the resultant oxides remained as the corresponding hydroxides, although the morphology of cobalt hydroxides was greatly influenced by the precursor salts. The cobalt oxides with average crystal size less than 20 nm were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, BET surface area, and XPS analysis. The photocatalytic activities of the various cobalt oxides morphologies were investigated by comparing the photo-degradation of acetaldehyde under simulated solar illumination. Relative to their low order structures and reference titania samples, the hierarchical nanostructures of cobalt oxide showed excellent abilities to rapidly degrade acetaldehyde, a model air pollutant. This was attributed to the unique nature of these hierarchical cobalt oxide nanoassemblies, which contained many catalytically active reaction sites and open pores.

  2. Cobalt Kβ valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy: a study of low-spin octahedral cobalt(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Schwalenstocker, Katarina; Paudel, Jaya; Kohn, Alexander W; Dong, Chao; Van Heuvelen, Katherine M; Farquhar, Erik R; Li, Feifei

    2016-09-28

    Kβ valence-to-core (V2C) X-emission spectroscopy (XES) has gained prominence as a tool for molecular inorganic chemists to probe the occupied valence orbitals of coordination complexes, as illustrated by recent evaluation of Kβ V2C XES ranging from titanium to iron. However, cobalt Kβ V2C XES has not been studied in detail, limiting the application of this technique to probe cobalt coordination in molecular catalysts and bioinorganic systems. In addition, the community still lacks a complete understanding of all factors that dictate the V2C peak area. In this manuscript, we report experimental cobalt Kβ V2C XES spectra of low-spin octahedral Co(iii) complexes with different ligand donors, in conjunction with DFT calculations. Cobalt Kβ V2C XES was demonstrated to be sensitive to cobalt-ligand coordination environments. Notably, we recognize here for the first time that there is a linear correlation between the V2C area and the spectrochemical series for low-spin octahedral cobalt(iii) complexes, with strong field π acceptor ligands giving rise to the largest V2C area. This unprecedented correlation is explained by invoking different levels of π-interaction between cobalt p orbitals and ligand orbitals that modulate the percentage of cobalt p orbital character in donor MOs, in combination with changes in the average cobalt-ligand distance.

  3. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts having improved selectivity

    DOEpatents

    Miller, James G.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1989-01-01

    The promoter(s) Mn oxide or Mn oxide and Zr oxide are added to a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst combined with the molecular sieve TC-103 or TC-123 such that the resultant catalyst demonstrates improved product selectivity, stability and catalyst life. The improved selectivity is evidenced by lower methane production, higher C5+ yield and increased olefin production.

  4. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts having improved selectivity

    DOEpatents

    Miller, James G.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1989-01-01

    A cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst having an improved steam treated, acid extracted LZ-210 support is taught. The new catalyst system demonstrates improved product selectivity at Fischer-Tropsch reaction conditions evidenced by lower methane production, higher C.sub.5.sup.+ yield and increased olefin production.

  5. Cobalt doped proangiogenic hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Kulanthaivel, Senthilguru; Roy, Bibhas; Agarwal, Tarun; Giri, Supratim; Pramanik, Krishna; Pal, Kunal; Ray, Sirsendu S; Maiti, Tapas K; Banerjee, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    The present study delineates the synthesis and characterization of cobalt doped proangiogenic-osteogenic hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite samples, doped with varying concentrations of bivalent cobalt (Co(2+)) were prepared by the ammoniacal precipitation method and the extent of doping was measured by ICP-OES. The crystalline structure of the doped hydroxyapatite samples was confirmed by XRD and FTIR studies. Analysis pertaining to the effect of doped hydroxyapatite on cell cycle progression and proliferation of MG-63 cells revealed that the doping of cobalt supported the cell viability and proliferation up to a threshold limit. Furthermore, such level of doping also induced differentiation of the bone cells, which was evident from the higher expression of differentiation markers (Runx2 and Osterix) and better nodule formation (SEM study). Western blot analysis in conjugation with ELISA study confirmed that the doped HAp samples significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in MG-63 cells. The analysis described here confirms the proangiogenic-osteogenic properties of the cobalt doped hydroxyapatite and indicates its potential application in bone tissue engineering.

  6. A Mercurial Route to a Cobalt Dihydrogen Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, R. Morris

    2011-03-30

    Recent results by Heinekey and co-workers provide evidence for an unusual route to a cobalt dihydrogen complex. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  7. Tracking the metal of the goblins: cobalt's cycle of use.

    PubMed

    Harper, E M; Kavlak, G; Graedel, T E

    2012-01-17

    Cobalt is a vital element in many technological applications, which, together with its increasing end-use in batteries, makes it important to quantify its cycle of use. We have done so for the planet as a whole and for the three principal cobalt-using countries - China, Japan, and the United States - for 2005. Together, China, Japan, and the United States accounted for approximately 65% of the cobalt fabricated and manufactured into end-use products (a total of 37 Gg Co). A time residence model allowed calculations of in-use stock accumulation and recycled and landfilled flows. China had the largest accumulation of in-use stock at some 4.3 Gg Co, over half of which was comprised of consumer battery stock. More than half of the stock accumulation in the United States was estimated to be in aircraft, rocket, and gas turbine engines, with a total in-use stock accumulation of approximately 3 Gg Co. The largest amounts of cobalt landfilled in China, the United States, and the planet were from the "chemical and other uses" category, and Japan's largest landfilled flow was in consumer batteries.

  8. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... drug application, pursuant to section 505 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, is in effect for... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73.1015 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  9. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... drug application, pursuant to section 505 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, is in effect for... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73.1015 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  10. Effects of cobalt in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Jarrett, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    A study has been carried out to assess the role of cobalt in Udimet 700, a representative nickel-base superalloy containing 17 percent or more cobalt. The study spans the spectrum of microstructural, microchemical, and mechanical behavior aspects which together form a basis for superalloy performance in jet engines. The results suggest that cobalt affects the solubility of elements in the gamma matrix, which leads to enhanced gamma-prime volume fraction and to the stabilization of MC-type carbides and sigma phase. However, these microstructural and microchemical changes are too slight to significantly affect the strength and ductile properties. Depending on the heat treatment, the creep and stress rupture resistance can be cobalt-sensitive. In the coarse-grained, fully solutioned and aged condition, all of the alloy's 17 percent Co can be replaced by nickel without decreasing the creep and stress rupture resistance. These findings are discussed with reference to existing theories and experimental data obtained by other workers.

  11. Energy levels scheme simulation of divalent cobalt doped bismuth germanate

    SciTech Connect

    Andreici, Emiliana-Laura; Petkova, Petya; Avram, Nicolae M.

    2015-12-07

    The aim of this paper is to simulate the energy levels scheme for Bismuth Germanate (BGO) doped with divalent cobalt, in order to give a reliable explanation for spectral experimental data. In the semiempirical crystal field theory we first modeled the Crystal Field Parameters (CFPs) of BGO:Cr{sup 2+} system, in the frame of Exchange Charge Model (ECM), with actually site symmetry of the impurity ions after doping. The values of CFPs depend on the geometry of doped host matrix and by parameter G of ECM. First, we optimized the geometry of undoped BGO host matrix and afterwards, that of doped BGO with divalent cobalt. The charges effect of ligands and covalence bonding between cobalt cations and oxygen anions, in the cluster approach, also were taken into account. With the obtained values of the CFPs we simulate the energy levels scheme of cobalt ions, by diagonalizing the matrix of the doped crystal Hamiltonian. Obviously, energy levels and estimated Racah parameters B and C were compared with the experimental spectroscopic data and discussed. Comparison of obtained results with experimental data shows quite satisfactory, which justify the model and simulation schemes used for the title system.

  12. Tailoring the magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Vega, A. Estrada; Garza-Navarro, M. A.; Durán-Guerrero, J. G.; Moreno Cortez, I. E.; Lucio-Porto, R.; González-González, V.

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution, we report on the tuning of magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters. The cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters were synthesized from a two-step approach that consists of the synthesis of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles in organic media, followed by their dispersion into aqueous dissolution to form an oil-in-water emulsion. These emulsions were prepared at three different concentrations of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), in order to control the size and clustering density of the nanoparticles in the nanoclusters. The synthesized samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and their related techniques, such as bright-field and Z-contrast imaging, electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry; as well as static magnetic measures. The experimental evidence indicates that the size, morphology, and nanoparticles clustering density in the nanoclusters is highly dependent of the cobalt-ferrite:CTAB molar ratio that is used in their synthesis. In addition, due to the clustering of the nanoparticles into the nanoclusters, their magnetic moments are blocked to relax cooperatively. Hence, the magnetic response of the nanoclusters can be tailored by controlling the size and nanoparticles clustering density.

  13. Study of DNA interaction with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pershina, A G; Sazonov, A E; Novikov, D V; Knyazev, A S; Izaak, T I; Itin, V I; Naiden, E P; Magaeva, A A; Terechova, O G

    2011-03-01

    Interaction of cobalt ferrite nanopowder and nucleic acid was investigated. Superparamagnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (6-12 nm) were prepared by mechanochemical synthesis. Structure of the nanopowder was characterized using X-ray diffraction. It was shown that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were associated with ssDNA and dsDNA in Tris-buffer resulting in bionanocomposite formation with mass weight relation nanoparticles: DNA 1:(0.083 +/- 0.003) and 1:(0.075 +/- 0.003) respectively. The mechanism of interaction between a DNA and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was considered basing on the whole set of obtained data: FTIR-spectroscopy, analyzing desorption of DNA from the surface of the particles while changing the chemical content of the medium, and on the modeling interaction of specific biomolecule fragments with surface of a inorganic material. It was supposed that the linkage was based on coordination interaction of the phosphate groups and oxygen atoms heterocyclic bases of DNA with metal ions on the particle surface. These data can be used to design specific magnetic DNA-nanoparticles hybrid structures.

  14. Acrylate intercalation and in situ polymerization in iron-, cobalt-, or manganese-substituted nickel hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Vaysse, C; Guerlou-Demourgues, L; Duguet, E; Delmas, C

    2003-07-28

    A chimie douce route based on successive redox and exchange reactions has allowed us to prepare new hybrid organic-inorganic materials, composed of polyacrylate macromolecules intercalated into layered double hydroxides (LDHs), deriving from Ni(OH)(2). Monomer intercalation and in situ polymerization mechanisms have appeared to be strongly dependent upon the nature of the substituting cation in the slabs. In the case of iron-based LDHs, a phase containing acrylate monomeric intercalates has been isolated and identified by X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Second, interslab free-radical polymerization of acrylate anions has been successfully initiated using potassium persulfate. In cobalt- or manganese-based LDHs, one-step polymerization has been observed, leading directly to a material containing polyacrylate intercalate.

  15. Arthroprosthetic cobaltism: identification of the at-risk patient.

    PubMed

    Tower, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    MoM hip bearings are being scrutinized due to high early failure rates and concerns that the results of the revision surgeries will be poor. However, orthopedic surgeons and the general medical community are unaware that patients with MoM bearings are also at risk for cobaltism. Medical providers need to know that hip arthroplasty implantees that present with symptom complexes that include tinnitus, deafness, vertigo, visual changes, rashes, hypothyroidism, tremor, dyspnea on exertion, mood disorders, dementia, heart failure, and peripheral neuropathy may be presenting arthroprosthetic cobaltism. These patients need to be asked if they have had a hip replacement and if so what type. For those patients implanted with a MoM bearing or those with a history of hip revision for a failed ceramic bearing obtaining a [Co] is indicated. MoM implantees with renal failure are a particularly high risk for cobaltism. A [Co] can be measured by many reference laboratories from royal blue top trace elements tube of venous blood. Venipuncture with a standard needle is adequate as long as a red stoppered tube is drawn first. The radiographic appearance of a MoM bearing is readily apparent to an orthopedic surgeon. The patient's operative report will usually specify the bearing type. Given that the publicity of the recent ASR bearing recall medical providers will be contacted by worried patients concerned about their hip implants. Most patients with hip replacements will not know the brand or material of their bearings. Providing patients with copies of their hip implant inventory might avoid worry by the majority of patients with hip arthroplasties that are not at risk. Patients with a cobalt levels of greater than 7 mcg/l bear observation of neurologic and cardiac function. Those patients with levels greater than 20 should be advised to have revision of their hip arthroplasty to a bearing that eliminates cobalt. Most patients implanted with MoM bearing have cobalt levels greater

  16. Human metabolism of orally administered radioactive cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    Holstein, H; Ranebo, Y; Rääf, C L

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the human gastrointestinal uptake (f1) and subsequent whole-body retention of orally administered inorganic radioactive cobalt. Of eight adult volunteers aged between 24 and 68 years, seven were given solutions of (57)Co (T1/2 = 272 d) containing a stable cobalt carrier, and six were given carrier-free (58)Co (T1/2 = 71 d). The administered activities ranged between 25 and 103 kBq. The observed mean f1, based on 6 days accumulated urinary excretion sampling and whole-body counting, was 0.028 ± 0.0048 for carrier-free (58)Co, and 0.016 ± 0.0021 for carrier-associated (57)Co. These values were in reasonable agreement with values reported from previous studies involving a single intake of inorganic cobalt. The time pattern of the total retention (including residual cobalt in the GI tract) included a short-term component with a biological half-time of 0.71 ± 0.03 d (average ± 1 standard error of the mean for the two nuclides), an intermediate component with a mean half-time of 32 ± 8.5 d, and a long-term component (observed in two volunteers) with half-times ranging from 80 to 720 d for the two isotopes. From the present data we conclude that for the short-lived (57)Co and (58)Co, more than 95% of the internal absorbed dose was delivered within 7 days following oral intake, with a high individual variation influenced by the transit time of the unabsorbed cobalt through the gastro-intestinal tract.

  17. The impact of cobalt-60 source age on biologically effective dose in high-dose functional Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Kann, Benjamin H; Yu, James B; Stahl, John M; Bond, James E; Loiselle, Christopher; Chiang, Veronica L; Bindra, Ranjit S; Gerrard, Jason L; Carlson, David J

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Functional Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) procedures have been increasingly used for treating patients with tremor, trigeminal neuralgia (TN), and refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder. Although its rates of toxicity are low, GKRS has been associated with some, if low, risks for serious sequelae, including hemiparesis and even death. Anecdotal reports have suggested that even with a standardized prescription dose, rates of functional GKRS toxicity increase after replacement of an old cobalt-60 source with a new source. Dose rate changes over the course of the useful lifespan of cobalt-60 are not routinely considered in the study of patients treated with functional GKRS, but these changes may be associated with significant variation in the biologically effective dose (BED) delivered to neural tissue. METHODS The authors constructed a linear-quadratic model of BED in functional GKRS with a dose-protraction factor to correct for intrafraction DNA-damage repair and used standard single-fraction doses for trigeminal nerve ablation for TN (85 Gy), thalamotomy for tremor (130 Gy), and capsulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder (180 Gy). Dose rate and treatment time for functional GKRS involving 4-mm collimators were derived from calibrations in the authors' department and from the cobalt-60 decay rate. Biologically plausible values for the ratio for radiosensitivity to fraction size (α/β) and double-strand break (DSB) DNA repair halftimes (τ) were estimated from published experimental data. The biphasic characteristics of DSB repair in normal tissue were accounted for in deriving an effective τ1 halftime (fast repair) and τ2 halftime (slow repair). A sensitivity analysis was performed with a range of plausible parameter values. RESULTS After replacement of the cobalt-60 source, the functional GKRS dose rate rose from 1.48 to 2.99 Gy/min, treatment time fell, and estimated BED increased. Assuming the most biologically plausible parameters, source

  18. Control of morphology and nanostructure of copper and cobalt oxalates: Effect of complexing ions, polymeric additives and molecular weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Paul; Pujol, Ollivier; Jongen, Nathalie; Lemaître, Jacques; Fink, Alke; Stadleman, Pierre; Hofmann, Heinrich

    2010-11-01

    Precipitated oxalates are often nanostructured and can be used as precursors for nanostructured oxides for different applications. The modification of the particle shape and nanostructures of both copper and cobalt oxalates has been demonstrated using polymeric additives or complexing counter-ions. In the case of cobalt oxalate the characteristic elongated rod particle shape (axial ratio of 10) can be modified by using polymethymethacrylate (PMMA) to produce particles with lower axial ratios of 2, through cubes all the way to platelets (axial ratio 0.2). The PMMA inhibits the growth of the particles along the [101] direction more and more strongly as the concentration of the polymer increases. The crystallite size from XRD line broadening is not modified by the PMMA indicating that the PMMA does not influence the nucleation and growth but modifies the aggregation kinetics. Copper oxalates precipitated in the presence of different cellulose derived polymers with different molecular weights and functional groups (methyl and propyl) showed sensitivity to both molecular weight and functional group. Higher molecular weights did not influence the copper oxalate particle shape, whereas methyl cellulose gave elongated particles and propyl celluloses gave platelet like particles. Copper oxalate precipitated in the presence of acetate counter ions gave platelets with an axial ratio of 0.15 compared to the cushion-like morphology (axial ratio 0.5). The primary crystallites were more elongated along the [001] direction in the presence of acetate, modifying the proportion of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces and hence influencing the aggregation kinetics and particle shape. The copper and cobalt oxalate particle formation seems to be dominated by the primary particle aggregation with the different additives interacting specifically with different crystallographic faces of the primary particles. By tuning this interaction particles with different shapes and substructures

  19. Cobalt toxicity: chemical and radiological combined effects on HaCaT keratinocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Gault, N; Sandre, C; Poncy, J-L; Moulin, C; Lefaix, J-L; Bresson, C

    2010-02-01

    Cobalt (Co) is an essential trace element well known as a constituent of vitamin B(12), but different compounds of Co are also described as highly toxic and/or radiotoxic for individuals or the environment. In nuclear power plants, (58)Co and (60)Co are radioactive isotopes of cobalt present as activation products of stable Co and Ni used in alloys. Skin exposure is a current occupational risk in the hard metal and nuclear industries. As biochemical and molecular cobalt-induced toxicological mechanisms are not fully identified, we investigated cobalt toxicity in a model human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT. In this study, we propose a model to determine the in vitro chemical impact on cell viability of a soluble form of cobalt (CoCl(2)) with or without gamma-ray doses to mimic contamination by (60)Co, to elucidate the mechanisms of cobalt intracellular chemical and radiological toxicity. Intracellular cobalt concentration was determined after HaCaT cell contamination and chemical toxicity was evaluated in terms of cellular viability and clonogenic survival. We investigated damage to DNA in HaCaT cells by combined treatment with chemical cobalt and a moderate gamma-ray dose. Additive effects of cobalt and irradiation were demonstrated. The underlying mechanism of cobalt toxicity is not clearly established, but our results seem to indicate that the toxicity of Co(II) and of irradiation arises from production of reactive oxygen species.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of dopamine substitue tripodal trinuclear [(salen/salophen/salpropen)M] (Mdbnd Cr(III), Mn(III), Fe(III) ions) capped s-triazine complexes: Investigation of their thermal and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, Şaban; Koç, Ziya Erdem

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we aimed to synthesize and characterize a novel tridirectional ligand including three catechol groups and its novel tridirectional-trinuclear triazine core complexes. For this purpose, we used melamine (2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazine) (MA) as starting material. 2,4,6-tris(4-carboxybenzimino)-1,3,5-triazine (II) was synthesized by the reaction of an equivalent melamine (I) and three equivalent 4-carboxybenzaldehyde. 4,4‧,4″-((1E,1‧E,1″E)-((1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyl)tris(azanylylidene))tris(methanylylidene))tris(N-(3,4-dihydroxyphenethyl)benzamide) L (IV) was synthesized by the reaction of one equivalent (II) and three equivalent dopamine (3,4-dihydroxyphenethylamine) (DA) by using two different methods. (II, III, IV) and nine novel trinuclear Cr(III), Mn(III) and Fe(III) complexes of (IV) were characterized by means of elemental analyses, 1H NMR, FT-IR spectrometry, LC-MS (ESI+) and thermal analyses. The metal ratios of the prepared complexes were performed using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS). We also synthesized novel tridirectional-trinuclear systems and investigated their effects on magnetic behaviors of [salen, salophen, salpropen Cr(III)/Mn(III)/Fe(III)] capped complexes. The complexes were determined to be low-spin distorted octahedral Mn(III) and Fe(III), and distorted octahedral Cr(III) all bridged by catechol group.

  1. Synthesis, spectroscopy, magnetic and redox behaviors of copper(II) complexes with tert-butylated salen type ligands bearing bis(4-aminophenyl)ethane and bis(4-aminophenyl)amide backbones.

    PubMed

    Kasumov, Veli T; Yerli, Yusuf; Kutluay, Aysegul; Aslanoglu, Mehmet

    2013-03-01

    New salen type ligands, N,N'-bis(X-3-tert-butylsalicylidene)-4,4'-ethylenedianiline [(X=H (1), 5-tert-butyl (2)] and N,N'-bis(X-3-tert-butylsalicylidene)-4,4'-amidedianiline [X=H (3), 5-tert (4)] and their copper(II) complexes 5-8, have been synthesized. Their spectroscopic (IR, (1)H NMR, UV/vis, ESR) properties, as well as magnetic and redox-reactivity behavior are reported. IR spectra of 7 and 8 indicate the coordination of amide oxygen atoms of 3 and 4 ligands to Cu(II). The solid state ESR spectra of 5-8 exhibits less informative exchange narrowed isotropic or anisotropic signals with weak unresolved low field patterns. The magnetic moments of 5 (2.92 μ(B) per Cu(II)) and 6 (2.79 μ(B) per Cu(II)) are unusual for copper(II) complexes and considerably higher than those for complexes 7 and 8. Cryogenic measurements (300-10 K) show weak antiferromagnetic exchange interactions between the copper(II) centers in complexes 6 and 8. The results of electrochemical and chemical redox-reactivity studies are discussed.

  2. Interdependence between urinary cobalt concentrations and hemoglobin levels in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Fort, Marta; Grimalt, Joan O; Casas, Maribel; Sunyer, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt is an essential trace element but may cause toxic effects upon occupational or environmental exposure. Women accumulate more cobalt than men at similar exposure levels which may be related to higher metabolic iron loss. During pregnancy these losses are much stronger but their influence on cobalt intake has not been studied. We have studied the associations between changes in hemoglobin and cobalt urinary excretion during pregnancy. 391 pairs of urine and blood samples from pregnant women were collected during the 12th and 32nd weeks of pregnancy and were analyzed for cobalt and hemoglobin. Mean concentrations of urinary cobalt were 0.73 and 1.6 µg/g creatinine during the first and third trimesters, respectively (p<0.001). 84% of pregnant women had higher levels of cobalt in the third than in the first trimester. Cobalt concentrations were negatively associated to hemoglobin levels in the third trimester (p<0.05). Women with higher iron decreases between both trimesters had significant cobalt increases between these two periods. This correspondence involved a statistically significant difference in third trimester mean cobalt concentrations of anemic and non-anemic women, 1.8 and 1.5 µg/g creatinine, respectively (p<0.05). No significant differences between these two groups were found during the first trimester. These results were used to construct generalized additive models both in normal and anemic women. The strong association between the changes of both iron status and cobalt urine levels found in pregnant women may be related to higher intestinal absorption of cobalt at iron depletion such as in the last pregnancy period when iron body demands are high. Possible toxicity effects of these cobalt increases along pregnancy should be considered in cases of populations occupationally or environmentally exposed to this metal.

  3. Inhibition of proteasomal degradation of Mcl-1 by cobalt chloride suppresses cobalt chloride-induced apoptosis in HCT116 colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Melanie; Lapham, Abigail; Brimmell, Matthew; Wilkinson, Helen; Packham, Graham

    2008-08-01

    Cobalt promotes apoptosis in multiple cell systems, however, the molecular mechanisms that influence cobalt-induced apoptosis are not fully understood. We investigated mechanisms of cobalt chloride induced apoptosis in HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. Cobalt chloride induced dose dependent apoptosis in HCT116 cells (250-750 muM) which, at higher concentrations (500-750 muM), was associated with an increase in the expression of the Bcl-2-related Mcl-1 survival protein. Cobalt chloride caused the accumulation of higher molecular weight ubiquitin-conjugates of Mcl-1 in intact HCT116 cells and inhibited the activity of the trypsin-like site of the 20S proteasome in an in vitro assay. Although siRNA-mediated knockdown of Mcl-1 increased apoptosis in HCT116 cells, the combination of Mcl-1 siRNA and cobalt chloride induced very high levels of cell killing. Therefore, inhibition of the proteasome by cobalt chloride leads to the accumulation of Mcl-1 which acts to limit cobalt chloride induced apoptosis.

  4. A preliminary evaluation of stream sediment sampling for the detection of cobalt mineralization in the Bou Azzer District, Morocco

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foose, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Analyses of 28 stream sediment samples collected in the Bou Azzer district, Morocco, show that this sampling technique may be useful in locating the cobalt arsenide mineralization that exists in this area. The absence of exceptionally high values of cobalt and arsenic, the nearly lognormal distribution of cobalt values, and the lack of correlation between the highest values of cobalt and arsenic were unanticipated results that do not support the use of this sampling technique. However, highest values of several metals, including cobalt, were associated with an identified area of cobalt mineralization, and high cobalt was present near a second area in which cobalt mineralization is suspected. Although probably mostly reflecting the geochemistry of unexposed ultramafic rocks, the association of these metals with mineralization shows that this type of sampling can independently locate areas of known or potential cobalt mineralization.

  5. Crystallization behaviour of hydroxide cobalt carbonates by aging: Environmental implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-López, Jorge; Fernández-González, Angeles; Jimenez, Amalia

    2014-05-01

    Cobalt is a naturally occurring element widely distributed in water, sediments and air that is essential for living species, since it is a component of B12 vitamin and it is also a strategic and critical element used in a number of commercial, industrial and military applications. However, relatively high accumulations of cobalt in environment can be toxic for human and animal health. Cobalt usually occurs as Co2+ and Co3+ in aqueous solutions, where Co2+ is the most soluble and hence its mobility in water is higher. The study of the precipitation of cobalt carbonates is of great interest due to the abundance of carbonate minerals in contact with surface water and groundwater which can be polluted with Co2+. Previous works have demonstrated that the formation of Co-bearing calcium carbonates and Co-rich low crystallinity phases takes place at ambient conditions. With the aim of investigating the crystallization behavior of Co- bearing carbonates at ambient temperature, macroscopic batch-type experiments have been carried out by mixing aqueous solutions of CoCl2 (0.05M) and Na2CO3 (0.05M) during increasing reaction times (5 minutes and 1, 5, 24, 48, 96, 168, 720 and 1440 hours). The main goals of this work were (i) to analyse the physicochemical evolution of the system and (ii) to study the evolution of the crystallinity of the solid phases during aging. After a given reaction period, pH, alkalinity and dissolved Co2+ in the aqueous solutions were analysed. The evolution of the morphology and chemical composition of the solids with aging time was examined by SEM and TEM. The precipitates were also analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and the crystallinity degree was followed by the intensity and the full width at high medium (FWHM) of the main peaks. The results show that a low crystallinity phase was obtained at the very beginning of aging. This phase evolves progressively to form hydroxide carbonate cobalt (Co2CO3(OH)2) which crystallize with the spatial

  6. Copper catalysis for enhancement of cobalt leaching and acid utilization efficiency in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaxuan; Shen, Jingya; Huang, Liping; Wu, Dan

    2013-11-15

    Enhancement of both cobalt leaching from LiCoO2 and acid utilization efficiency (AUE) in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was successfully achieved by the addition of Cu(II). A dosage of 10mg/L Cu(II) improved both cobalt leaching up to 308% and AUE of 171% compared to the controls with no presence of Cu(II). The apparent activation energy of cobalt leaching catalyzed by Cu(II) in MFCs was only 11.8 kJ/mol. These results demonstrate cobalt leaching in MFCs using Cu(II) as a catalyst may be an effective strategy for cobalt recovery and recycle of spent Li-ion batteries, and the evidence of influence factors including solid/liquid ratio, temperature, and pH and solution conductivity can contribute to improving understanding of and optimizing cobalt leaching catalyzed by Cu(II) in MFCs.

  7. Effects of cobalt on structure, microchemistry and properties of a wrought nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Tien, J. K.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of cobalt on the basic mechanical properties and microstructure of wrought nickel-base superalloys has been investigated experimentally by systematically replacing cobalt by nickel in Udimet 700 (17 wt% Co) commonly used in gas turbine (jet engine) applications. It is shown that the room temperature tensile yield strength and tensile strength only slightly decrease in fine-grained (disk) alloys and are basically unaffected in coarse-grained (blading) alloys as cobalt is removed. Creep and stress rupture resistances at 760 C are found to be unaffected by cobalt level in the blading alloys and decrease sharply only when the cobalt level is reduced below 8 vol% in the disk alloys. The effect of cobalt is explained in terms of gamma prime strengthening kinetics.

  8. Modulation of synthetic parameters of cobalt nanoparticles: TEM, EDS, spectral and thermal studies.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Sulekh; Kumar, Avdhesh

    2012-12-01

    The study focuses on the modulation of synthetic parameters in order to influence the size, structure, composition and arrangement of nanoparticles of cobalt. Cobalt nanoparticles were synthesized by ethanolic solution of benzildiethylenetriamine in cobalt nitrate solution at 60 °C with stirring and refluxing leads to nanoparticles of cobalt. The morphology and structure of the synthesized nanoparticles of cobalt were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Powder X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), QELS Data and Infrared Spectroscopy (IR). Crystalline size was 20 nm determined from the sharp peak at 2θ=25 °C from the powder XRD. TEM images of cobalt nanoparticles without reducing agent having the diameter 20 nm with spherical shape and black color.

  9. Controlled Growth of Nanostructured Biotemplates with Cobalt and Nitrogen Codoping as a Binderless Lithium-Ion Battery Anode.

    PubMed

    Huggins, Tyler M; Whiteley, Justin M; Love, Corey T; Lee, Kwangwon; Lee, Se-Hee; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Biffinger, Justin C

    2016-10-12

    Biomass can serve as a sustainable template for the synthesis of carbon materials but is limited by the intrinsic properties of the precursor organism. In this study we demonstrate that the properties of a fungal biotemplate can be tuned during cultivation, establishing a new electrode manufacturing process and ultimately improving the electrochemical performance of the biomass-derived electrode. More specifically, the carbon/nitrogen ratio of Neurospora crassa mycelia mats was shifted by 5-fold while generating cobalt nanoparticles into the hyphal structure originating from macroconidia spores. This shift was achieved through nitrate limitation and equal molar concentrations of Mg(2+) and Co(2+) in the growth media. The resulting mycelia mat was converted via a high-temperature pyrolysis process (800 °C) to produce a freestanding cobalt and nitrogen codoped electrode material with no postmodification. Ultimately, nitrogen doping resulted in one of the highest recorded specific reversible capacity for a freestanding biomass-derived lithium-ion anode (400 mAh g(-1) at C/10). We observed an additional improvement in capacity to 425 mAh g(-1) with the incorporation of 3 wt % Co. Our results show how shaping the chemical characteristics of an electrode during the growth of the biotemplate allows for sustainable carbon-based material manufacturing from a living (self-assembled) material.

  10. Towards the elimination of excessive cobalt supplementation in racing horses: A pharmacological review.

    PubMed

    Kinobe, Robert T

    2016-02-01

    Cobalt is an essential trace element for many vital physiological functions. Cobalt is also known to stabilise hypoxia-inducible transcription factors leading to increased expression of erythropoietin which activates production of red blood cells. This implies that cobalt can be used to enhance aerobic performance in racing horses. If this becomes a pervasive practice, the welfare of racing animals would be at risk because cobalt is associated with cardiovascular, haematological, thyroid gland and reproductive toxicity as observed in laboratory animals and humans. It is expected that similar effects may manifest in horses but direct evidence on equine specific effects of cobalt and the corresponding exposure conditions leading to such effects is lacking. Available pharmacokinetic data demonstrates that intravenously administered cobalt has a long elimination half-life (42-156 h) and a large volume of distribution (0.94 L/kg) in a horse implying that repeated administration of cobalt would accumulate in tissues over time attaining equilibrium after ~9-33 days. Based on these pharmacokinetic data and surveys of horses post racing, threshold cobalt concentrations of 2-10 μg/L in plasma and 75-200 μg/L in urine have been recommended. However, there is no clearly defined, presumably normal cobalt supplementation regimen for horses and characterisation of potential adverse effects of any established threshold cobalt concentrations has not been done. This review outlines the strengths and limitations of the existing literature on the pharmacological effects of cobalt in horses with some recommendations on what gaps to bridge to enable the determination of optimal threshold cobalt concentrations in racing horses.

  11. Cobalt chloride speciation, mechanisms of cytotoxicity on human pulmonary cells, and synergistic toxicity with zinc.

    PubMed

    Bresson, Carole; Darolles, Carine; Carmona, Asuncion; Gautier, Céline; Sage, Nicole; Roudeau, Stéphane; Ortega, Richard; Ansoborlo, Eric; Malard, Véronique

    2013-02-01

    Cobalt is used in numerous industrial sectors, leading to occupational diseases, particularly by inhalation. Cobalt-associated mechanisms of toxicity are far from being understood and information that could improve knowledge in this area is required. We investigated the impact of a soluble cobalt compound, CoCl(2)·6H(2)O, on the BEAS-2B lung epithelial cell line, as well as its impact on metal homeostasis. Cobalt speciation in different culture media, in particular soluble and precipitated cobalt species, was investigated via theoretical and analytical approaches. The cytotoxic effects of cobalt on the cells were assessed. Upon exposure of BEAS-2B cells to cobalt, intracellular accumulation of cobalt and zinc was demonstrated using direct in situ microchemical analysis based on ion micro-beam techniques and analysis after cell lysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Microchemical imaging revealed that cobalt was rather homogeneously distributed in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm whereas zinc was more abundant in the nucleus. The modulation of zinc homeostasis led to the evaluation of the effect of combined cobalt and zinc exposure. In this case, a clear synergistic increase in toxicity was observed as well as a substantial increase in zinc content within cells. Western blots performed under the same coexposure conditions revealed a decrease in ZnT1 expression, suggesting that cobalt could inhibit zinc release through the modulation of ZnT1. Overall, this study highlights the potential hazard to lung function, of combined exposure to cobalt and zinc.

  12. Importance of cobalt for individual trophic groups in an anaerobic methanol-degrading consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Florencio, L.; FIeld, J.A.; Lettinga, G. )

    1994-01-01

    Methanol is an important anaerobic substrate in industrial wastewater treatment and the natural environment. Previous studies indicate that cobalt greatly stimulates methane formation during anaerobic treatment of methanolic wastewaters. To evaluate the effect of cobalt in a mixed culture, a sludge with low background levels of cobalt was cultivated in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor. Specific inhibitors in batch assays were then utilized to study the effect of cobalt on the growth rate and activity of different microorganisms involved in the anaerboic degradation of methanol. Only methylotropic methanogens and acetogens were stimulated by cobalt additions, while the other trophic concentration of cobalt for the growth and activity of methanol-utilizing methanogens and acetogens were stimulated by cobalt additions, while the other trophic groups utilizing downstream intermediates, H[sub 2]-CO[sub 2] or acetate, were largely unaffected. The optimal concentration of cobalt for the growth and activity of methanol-utilizing methanogens and acetogens was 0.05 mg liter[sup [minus]1]. The higher requirement of cobalt is presumably due to the previously reported production of unique corrinoid-containing enzymes (or coenzymes) by direct utilizers of methanol. This distinctly high requirement of cobalt by methylotrophs should be considered during methanolic wastewater treatment. Methylotroph methanogens presented a 60-fold-higher affinity for methanol than acetogens. This result in combination with the fact that acetogens grow slightly faster than methanogens under optimal cobalt conditions indicates that acetogens can outcompete methanogens only when reactor methanol and cobalt concentrations are high, provided enough inorganic carbon is available.

  13. Fabrication of Discrete Nanosized Cobalt Particles Encapsulated Inside Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zoican Loebick, C.; Majewska, M; Ren, F; Haller, G; Pfefferle, L

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with encapsulated nanosized cobalt particles have been synthesized by a facile and scalable method. In this approach, SWNT were filled with a cobalt acetylacetonate solution in dichloromethane by ultrasonication. In a second step, exposure to hydrogen at different temperatures released discrete cobalt particles of controllable size inside the SWNT cavity. The SWNT-Co particles systems were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis.

  14. Preparation and characterization of copper-doped cobalt oxide electrodes.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Toro, A La; Berenguer, R; Quijada, C; Montilla, F; Morallón, E; Vazquez, J L

    2006-11-30

    Cobalt oxide (Co3O4) and copper-doped cobalt oxide (CuxCo(3-x)O4) films have been prepared onto titanium support by the thermal decomposition method. The electrodes have been characterized by different techniques such as cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect on the electrochemical and crystallographic properties and surface morphology of the amount of copper in the oxide layer has been analyzed. The XPS spectra correspond to a characteristic monophasic Cu-Co spinel oxides when x is below 1. However, when the copper content exceeds that for the stoichiometric CuCo2O4 spinel, a new CuO phase segregates at the surface. The analysis of the surface cation distribution indicates that Cu(II) has preference for octahedral sites.

  15. Cobalt-based nanocatalysts for green oxidation and hydrogenation processes.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesh, Rajenahally V; Stemmler, Tobias; Surkus, Annette-Enrica; Bauer, Matthias; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Radnik, Jörg; Junge, Kathrin; Junge, Henrik; Brückner, Angelika; Beller, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    This protocol describes the preparation of cobalt-based nanocatalysts and their applications in environmentally benign redox processes for fine chemical synthesis. The catalytically active material consists of nanoscale Co3O4 particles surrounded by nitrogen-doped graphene layers (NGrs), which have been prepared by pyrolysis of phenanthroline-ligated cobalt acetate on carbon. The resulting materials have been found to be excellent catalysts for the activation of both molecular oxygen and hydrogen; in all tested reactions, water was the only by-product. By applying these catalysts, green oxidations of alcohols and hydrogenation of nitroarenes for the synthesis of nitriles, esters and amines are demonstrated. The overall time required for catalyst preparation and for redox reactions is 35 h and 10-30 h, respectively.

  16. Molecular cobalt pentapyridine catalysts for generating hydrogen from water.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujie; Bigi, Julian P; Piro, Nicholas A; Tang, Ming Lee; Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J

    2011-06-22

    A set of robust molecular cobalt catalysts for the generation of hydrogen from water is reported. The cobalt complex supported by the parent pentadentate polypyridyl ligand PY5Me(2) features high stability and activity and 100% Faradaic efficiency for the electrocatalytic production of hydrogen from neutral water, with a turnover number reaching 5.5 × 10(4) mol of H(2) per mole of catalyst with no loss in activity over 60 h. Control experiments establish that simple Co(II) salts, the free PY5Me(2) ligand, and an isostructural PY5Me(2) complex containing redox-inactive Zn(II) are all ineffective for this reaction. Further experiments demonstrate that the overpotential for H(2) evolution can be tuned by systematic substitutions on the ancillary PY5Me(2) scaffold, presaging opportunities to further optimize this first-generation platform by molecular design.

  17. Electrodeposition of cobalt-chromium alloy from trivalent chromium solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dasarathy, H.; Riley, C.; Coble, H.D. . Dept. of Chemistry and Materials Science)

    1994-07-01

    Cobalt-chromium alloy was deposited from plating solutions containing cobalt(II) chloride and chromium(III) chloride at 3.5 pH. The deposits were obtained using both single and mixed complex solutions. Deposit morphology showed significant dependence on the complexing agent(s) used. Partitioning of the two components in the deposit as determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy depended on plating parameters such as concentration ratio of the two salts in the solution, complexing agent, type of current (both dc and pulsed current were studied), and current density. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra collected from as-deposited alloy revealed the presence of both oxides and metals. X-ray diffraction spectra for the alloy deposit indicated solid solution formation.

  18. Growth and stability of cobalt nanostructures on gold (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To¨lkes, Christian; Zeppenfeld, Peter; Krzyzowski, Michael A.; David, Rudolf; Comsa, George

    1997-12-01

    The nucleation, growth and stability of cobalt nanostructures on the (˜22 × √3) reconstructed Au(111) surface have been studied using thermal energy helium-atom scattering (TEAS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) in the temperature range 50-700 K. Helium atom diffraction provides information on the island distribution and step heights. The composition of the surface region was checked by AES. In addition, the presence of cobalt in the topmost layer was investigated by the adsorption of carbon monoxide, as monitored by the specularly reflected helium intensity. From the change in the CO adsorption characteristics on the Co-covered Au(111) surface and the AES data, we conclude that surface alloy formation or Au capping takes place between 300 and 350 K, whereas Co diffusion into the Au bulk only occurs above 450 K.

  19. High performance magnetorheological fluids with flower-like cobalt particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yu; Dong, Xufeng; Qi, Min

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies indicated the electrorhological (ER) effect of the ER fluids with flower-like particles were more significant than those with traditional sphere particles, but whether the special morphology can enhance the properties of magnetorheological (MR) fluids remains unclear. To address the issue, flower-like cobalt particles (FCP) and sphere cobalt particles (SCP) were synthesized, and the properties of the two kinds of MR fluids with the two kinds of particles were compared. Particle characterization results indicate the two kinds of particles have significant difference in morphology, but little difference in crystal structure, particle size, and magnetic properties. The FCP based MR fluids (FCP-MRFs) present higher zero-field viscosity, higher field-induced yield stress, higher storage modulus and better sedimentation stability than the SCP based samples (SCP-MRFs). The high performance of the FCP-MRF can be attributed to the special morphology of the flower-like particles.

  20. Interaction of cobalt with a stainless steel oxide surface

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.B. )

    1991-01-01

    The deposition of radioactive cobalt ions from aqueous solutions in the pH range from 1 to 12 onto the internal surface of a stainless steel vessel or pipework can lead to the buildup of tenacious surface activity. For liquid streams of low specific activity (measured in becquerels per millilitre), the surface activity buildup may create a more dominant gamma radiation field than the activity suspended in the liquid. Failure to adequately predict this buildup for an operational nuclear plant can lead to an underestimate of potential gamma dose rates. This may lead to an economic penalty if additional shielding or other protective measures are necessary following plant operation. A theoretical method of determining the cobalt mass/activity deposition from aqueous liquor onto stainless steel is outlined in this paper. A validation of the method is given, and the limits of its application are discussed.