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Sample records for cochrane review interventions

  1. Effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in eating disorders: an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marcelle Barrueco; Melnik, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eating disorders are psychiatric conditions originated from and perpetuated by individual, family and sociocultural factors. The psychosocial approach to treatment and prevention of relapse is crucial. To present an overview of the scientific evidence on effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in treatment of eating disorders. All systematic reviews published by the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Cochrane Library on the topic were included. Afterwards, as from the least recent date of these reviews (2001), an additional search was conducted at PubMed with sensitive search strategy and with the same keywords used. A total of 101 primary studies and 30 systematic reviews (5 Cochrane systematic reviews), meta-analysis, guidelines or narrative reviews of literature were included. The main outcomes were: symptomatic remission, body image, cognitive distortion, psychiatric comorbidity, psychosocial functioning and patient satisfaction. The cognitive behavioral approach was the most effective treatment, especially for bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and the night eating syndrome. For anorexia nervosa, the family approach showed greater effectiveness. Other effective approaches were interpersonal psychotherapy, dialectic behavioral therapy, support therapy and self-help manuals. Moreover, there was an increasing number of preventive and promotional approaches that addressed individual, family and social risk factors, being promising for the development of positive self-image and self-efficacy. Further studies are required to evaluate the impact of multidisciplinary approaches on all eating disorders, as well as the cost-effectiveness of some effective modalities, such as the cognitive behavioral therapy. PMID:27462898

  2. Interventions for rosacea: abridged updated Cochrane systematic review including GRADE assessments.

    PubMed

    van Zuuren, E J; Fedorowicz, Z

    2015-09-01

    Rosacea is a common chronic facial dermatosis. This update of our Cochrane review on interventions for rosacea summarizes the evidence, including Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group assessments, of the effects of the currently available treatments. Searches included the following: Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and the Science Citation Index, and ongoing trials registries (July 2014). We included 106 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 13 631 participants, a more than 80% increase since the last update in 2011. Pooling of data was feasible for a few outcomes, for topical metronidazole and azelaic acid and both appeared to be more effective than placebo (moderate and high-quality evidence, respectively). Topical ivermectin was more effective than placebo based on two studies (high-quality evidence), and slightly more effective than metronidazole in one study. Brimonidine was more effective than vehicle in reducing erythema in rosacea (high-quality evidence). Ciclosporin ophthalmic emulsion was effective for ocular rosacea (low-quality evidence). For oral treatments there was moderate-quality evidence for the effectiveness of tetracycline based on two old studies, and high-quality evidence for doxycycline 40 mg compared with placebo according to physician assessments. One study at high risk of bias demonstrated equivalent effectiveness for azithromycin and doxycycline 100 mg. Minocycline 45 mg may be effective for papulopustular rosacea (low-quality evidence). Low-dose isotretinoin appeared to be slightly more effective than doxycycline 50-100 mg (high-quality evidence). Laser and light-based therapies for erythema in rosacea were effective (low-quality evidence). Further RCTs are required for ocular rosacea.

  3. Effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in eating disorders: an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marcelle Barrueco; Melnik, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Eating disorders are psychiatric conditions originated from and perpetuated by individual, family and sociocultural factors. The psychosocial approach to treatment and prevention of relapse is crucial. To present an overview of the scientific evidence on effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in treatment of eating disorders. All systematic reviews published by the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Cochrane Library on the topic were included. Afterwards, as from the least recent date of these reviews (2001), an additional search was conducted at PubMed with sensitive search strategy and with the same keywords used. A total of 101 primary studies and 30 systematic reviews (5 Cochrane systematic reviews), meta-analysis, guidelines or narrative reviews of literature were included. The main outcomes were: symptomatic remission, body image, cognitive distortion, psychiatric comorbidity, psychosocial functioning and patient satisfaction. The cognitive behavioral approach was the most effective treatment, especially for bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and the night eating syndrome. For anorexia nervosa, the family approach showed greater effectiveness. Other effective approaches were interpersonal psychotherapy, dialectic behavioral therapy, support therapy and self-help manuals. Moreover, there was an increasing number of preventive and promotional approaches that addressed individual, family and social risk factors, being promising for the development of positive self-image and self-efficacy. Further studies are required to evaluate the impact of multidisciplinary approaches on all eating disorders, as well as the cost-effectiveness of some effective modalities, such as the cognitive behavioral therapy. RESUMO Transtornos alimentares são doenças psiquiátricas originadas de e perpetuadas por fatores individuais, familiares e socioculturais. A abordagem psicossocial é essencial para o tratamento e a prevenção de recaídas. Apresentar uma vis

  4. Effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in eating disorders: an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marcelle Barrueco; Melnik, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Eating disorders are psychiatric conditions originated from and perpetuated by individual, family and sociocultural factors. The psychosocial approach to treatment and prevention of relapse is crucial. To present an overview of the scientific evidence on effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in treatment of eating disorders. All systematic reviews published by the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Cochrane Library on the topic were included. Afterwards, as from the least recent date of these reviews (2001), an additional search was conducted at PubMed with sensitive search strategy and with the same keywords used. A total of 101 primary studies and 30 systematic reviews (5 Cochrane systematic reviews), meta-analysis, guidelines or narrative reviews of literature were included. The main outcomes were: symptomatic remission, body image, cognitive distortion, psychiatric comorbidity, psychosocial functioning and patient satisfaction. The cognitive behavioral approach was the most effective treatment, especially for bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and the night eating syndrome. For anorexia nervosa, the family approach showed greater effectiveness. Other effective approaches were interpersonal psychotherapy, dialectic behavioral therapy, support therapy and self-help manuals. Moreover, there was an increasing number of preventive and promotional approaches that addressed individual, family and social risk factors, being promising for the development of positive self-image and self-efficacy. Further studies are required to evaluate the impact of multidisciplinary approaches on all eating disorders, as well as the cost-effectiveness of some effective modalities, such as the cognitive behavioral therapy. RESUMO Transtornos alimentares são doenças psiquiátricas originadas de e perpetuadas por fatores individuais, familiares e socioculturais. A abordagem psicossocial é essencial para o tratamento e a prevenção de recaídas. Apresentar uma vis

  5. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Interventions for Improving Upper Limb Function after Stroke. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014,11:CD010820].

    PubMed

    Sousa Nanji, Liliana; Torres Cardoso, André; Costa, João; Vaz-Carneiro, António

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of the upper limbs is quite frequent after stroke, making rehabilitation an essential step towards clinical recovery and patient empowerment. This review aimed to synthetize existing evidence regarding interventions for upper limb function improvement after Stroke and to assess which would bring some benefit. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Reviews of Effects and PROSPERO databases were searched until June 2013 and 40 reviews have been included, covering 503 studies, 18 078 participants and 18 interventions, as well as different doses and settings of interventions. The main results were: 1- Information currently available is insufficient to assess effectiveness of each intervention and to enable comparison of interventions; 2- Transcranial direct current stimulation brings no benefit for outcomes of activities of daily living; 3- Moderate-quality evidence showed a beneficial effect of constraint-induced movement therapy, mental practice, mirror therapy, interventions for sensory impairment, virtual reality and repetitive task practice; 4- Unilateral arm training may be more effective than bilateral arm training; 5- Moderate-quality evidence showed a beneficial effect of robotics on measures of impairment and ADLs; 6- There is no evidence of benefit or harm for technics such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, music therapy, pharmacological interventions, electrical stimulation and other therapies. Currently available evidence is insufficient and of low quality, not supporting clear clinical decisions. High-quality studies are still needed. PMID:26667856

  6. Psychosocial interventions for men with prostate cancer: a Cochrane systematic review.

    PubMed

    Parahoo, Kader; McDonough, Suzanne; McCaughan, Eilis; Noyes, Jane; Semple, Cherith; Halstead, Elizabeth J; Neuberger, Molly M; Dahm, Philipp

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for men with prostate cancer in improving quality of life (QoL), self-efficacy and knowledge and in reducing distress, uncertainty and depression. We searched for trials using a range of electronic databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO to October 2013, together with hand searching of journals and reference lists. Randomised controlled trials were eligible if they included psychosocial interventions that explicitly used one or a combination of the following approaches: cognitive behavioural, psycho-educational, supportive and counselling. Interventions had to be delivered or facilitated by trained or lay personnel. Our outcomes were an improvement in QoL, self-efficacy and knowledge and a reduction in distress, uncertainty and depression. Pairs of review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We analysed data using standardised mean differences (SMDs), random-effects models and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In all, 19 studies with a total of 3 204 men, with a diagnosis of prostate cancer, comparing psychosocial interventions vs usual care were included in this review. Men in the psychosocial intervention group had a small, statistically significant improvement in the physical component of general health-related QoL (GHQoL) at end of intervention (SMD 0.12, 95% CI 0.01-0.22) based on low quality evidence. There was no clear evidence of benefit associated with psychosocial interventions for the mental component of GHQoL at end of intervention (SMD -0.04, 95% CI -0.15 to 0.06) based on moderate quality evidence. At end of intervention, cancer-related QoL showed a small improvement after psychosocial interventions (SMD 0.21, 95% CI 0.04-0.39). For prostate cancer-specific and symptom-related QoL, the differences between intervention and control groups were not significant. There was no clear evidence that

  7. Reviewing and interpreting the effects of brief alcohol interventions: comment on a Cochrane review about motivational interviewing for young adults

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Eric R.; Osilla, Karen Chan; Kulesza, Magdalena; D'Amico, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Cochrane recently published a systematic review on motivational interviewing (MI) for alcohol misuse in young adults. The review authors concluded that ‘there are no substantive, meaningful benefits of MI interventions for the prevention of alcohol misuse’ (p. 2), as effect sizes were ‘small and unlikely to be of any meaningful benefit in practice’ (p. 27). As most of these interventions were quite brief, we wish to open a dialogue about interpreting effect sizes in this review and of (brief) alcohol interventions more generally. Analysis We analyze four methodological aspects of the review that likely influenced the author's conclusions about intervention effects: (1) risk of bias assessments, (2) search strategies, (3) assessing the quality of the body of evidence and (4) definitions of sustainability and clinical significance. Conclusions We interpret the effect sizes found in this review to indicate modest yet beneficial and potentially meaningful effects of these interventions, given their brevity and low cost. This interpretation is consistent with other reviews on brief, MI‐based interventions and brief interventions more generally. We therefore encourage the field to re‐open dialogue about the clinical importance of the effects of MI on alcohol misuse by young adults. Rather than dismissing interventions with small effects, we believe a more fruitful way forward for the field would be to catalogue effect sizes for various alcohol interventions. Such a catalogue would help stakeholders themselves to choose which interventions meet their minimum desired impact, and thus may be suitable given their targeted populations, setting and resources. PMID:26508301

  8. Interventions for hirsutism excluding laser and photoepilation therapy alone: abridged Cochrane systematic review including GRADE assessments.

    PubMed

    van Zuuren, E J; Fedorowicz, Z

    2016-07-01

    Hirsutism is a common disorder with a major impact on quality of life. The most frequent cause is polycystic ovary syndrome. Effects of interventions (except laser and light-based therapies) were evaluated, including Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation assessments. Searches included Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase and five trials registers to June 2014. We included 157 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 10 550 participants. The majority were assessed as having a 'high risk' of bias (123 of 157). The quality of evidence was rated moderate to very low for most outcomes. Pooled data for an oral contraceptive (OCP) (ethinyl oestradiol and cyproterone acetate) compared with another OCP (ethinyl oestradiol and desogestrel) demonstrated that both treatments were effective in reducing Ferriman-Gallwey scores, but the mean difference (MD) was not statistically significant [-1·84, 95% confidence interval (CI): -3·86-0·18]. Flutamide was more effective than placebo in two studies (MD -7·60, 95% CI: -10·53 to -4·67 and MD -7·20, 95% CI: -10·15 to -4·25), as was spironolactone (MD -7·69, 95% CI: -10·12 to -5·26). Spironolactone appeared to be as effective as flutamide (two studies) and finasteride (two studies). However, finasteride and the gonadotropin-releasing analogues showed discrepant results in several RCTs. Metformin was ineffective. Cyproterone acetate combined with OCPs demonstrated greater reductions in Ferriman-Gallwey scores. Lifestyle interventions reduced body mass index but did not show improvement in hirsutism, and although cosmetic measures are frequently used, no RCTs investigating cosmetic treatments were identified. RCTs investigating OCPs in combination with antiandrogens or finasteride vs. OCP alone, or the different antiandrogens and 5α-reductase inhibitors are warranted. PMID:26892495

  9. Cochrane diagnostic test accuracy reviews.

    PubMed

    Leeflang, Mariska M G; Deeks, Jonathan J; Takwoingi, Yemisi; Macaskill, Petra

    2013-10-07

    In 1996, shortly after the founding of The Cochrane Collaboration, leading figures in test evaluation research established a Methods Group to focus on the relatively new and rapidly evolving methods for the systematic review of studies of diagnostic tests. Seven years later, the Collaboration decided it was time to develop a publication format and methodology for Diagnostic Test Accuracy (DTA) reviews, as well as the software needed to implement these reviews in The Cochrane Library. A meeting hosted by the German Cochrane Centre in 2004 brought together key methodologists in the area, many of whom became closely involved in the subsequent development of the methodological framework for DTA reviews. DTA reviews first appeared in The Cochrane Library in 2008 and are now an integral part of the work of the Collaboration.

  10. [Analysis of the Cochrane review: Multimedia educational interventions for consumers about prescribed and over-the-counter medications. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013;4:CD008416].

    PubMed

    Vaz Carneiro, António; Costa, João

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the relevant information is especially important in the area of drug treatment, to guarantee an appropriate and rational use of medications by patients. The relevant information must be delivered in a way that patients understand all aspects of the treatment regimen they are taking. In this systematic review the authors analyzed a set of studies on the effectiveness of multimedia educational interventions about medications (prescribed or not) in patients of all ages, concluding that the aforementioned interventions are more effective than usual care (non-standardized education provided by health professionals as part of usual clinical care) or no education.

  11. Service Engagement in Interventions for Street-Connected Children and Young People: A Summary of Evidence Supplementing a Recent Cochrane-Campbell Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Rosa; Coren, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Background: This paper builds on a Cochrane-Campbell systematic review of interventions that reduce harms and promote reintegration in street-connected children and young people focusing on intervention outcomes. The aim of the present analysis is to explore questions raised in the systematic review over the potential role of service engagement in…

  12. Intervention for replacing missing teeth: Alveolar ridge preservation techniques for dental implant site development - evidence summary of Cochrane review.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    The Cochrane reviews have transparent reporting of the methodology to clarify the reader the methods used for writing the review; hence, each review becomes a large volume of scientific literature. This evidence summary of the Cochrane review published in 2015 for the question, what are the clinical effects (preservation of both width and height of bone, esthetic outcomes, complications, and failure of implant) for different alveolar ridge preservation techniques (ARP) and materials used in patients planning implant placement following extraction after 6 months follow-up. This review provides evidence for efficacy of different ARP techniques, materials, and superiority of one over the other. It also tries to settle the controversy of timing of placement of implant after grafting. Of the 8 included studies from 50, two trials provide moderate evidence for xenografts versus extraction favoring xenografts in preserving the width and height of bone by 1.97 mm (2.48-1.46) and 2.60 mm (3.43-1.76), respectively in pooled estimates of meta-analysis. Using different material, five-trial were found; of which, two trials provide moderate evidence for alloplast versus xenografts favoring alloplast in preserving the width by 0.44 mm (0.90-0.02) and low-grade evidence for height of bone by 0.35 mm (0.86-0.16) in pooled estimates of meta-analysis. There is a paucity of randomized controlled trial to address other primary and secondary outcomes addressed in this review. PMID:26929543

  13. Parenting Training for Intellectually Disabled Parents: A Cochrane Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coren, Esther; Thomae, Manuela; Hutchfield, Jemeela

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This article presents a Cochrane/Campbell systematic review of the evidence on the effect of parent training to support the parenting of parents with intellectual disabilities. Method: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing parent training interventions for parents with intellectual disability with usual care or with a control…

  14. Avoidable Ignorance and the Role of Cochrane and Campbell Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambrill, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    The Campbell and Cochrane Collaborations were created to reveal the evidentiary status of claims focusing especially on the effectiveness of specific interventions. Such reviews are constrained by the population of studies available and biases that may influence this availability such as preferred framing of problems. This highlights the…

  15. Network meta-analysis of the outcome 'participant complete clearance' in nonimmunosuppressed participants of eight interventions for actinic keratosis: a follow-up on a Cochrane review.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Paquet, M

    2013-08-01

    The conclusions of pairwise meta-analyses of interventions for actinic keratosis (AK) are limited due to the lack of direct comparison between some interventions. Consequently, we performed a network meta-analysis for eight treatments [5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-photodynamic therapy (PDT), cryotherapy, diclofenac 3% in 2·5% hyaluronic acid (DCF/HA), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) 0·5% or 5·0%, imiquimod (IMI) 5%, ingenol mebutate (IMB) 0·015-0·05%, methyl aminolaevulinate (MAL)-PDT and placebo/vehicle (including placebo-PDT)] to determine their relative efficacies. As part of a prior Cochrane systematic review, different databases and grey literature were searched for randomized controlled trials up to April 2012. The inclusion criteria were parallel-group studies with nonimmunosuppressed participants: (i) reporting 'participant complete clearance' and (ii) comparing at least two of the interventions. Thirty-two publications met the criteria and they included the following number of individual or pooled studies (n) and total number of participants (N) for the different interventions: 5-FU 0·5% (n = 4, N = 169), 5-FU 5·0% (n = 2, N = 44), ALA-PDT (n = 6, N = 739), cryotherapy (n = 2, N = 174), DCF/HA (n = 5, N = 299), IMI (n = 14, N = 1411), IMB (n = 3, N = 560), MAL-PDT (n = 7, N = 557) and placebo (n = 32, N = 2520). Network analyses using a random-effects Bayesian model were carried out with the software ADDIS v1.16.1. The interventions were ranked as follows based on calculated probabilities and odd ratios: 5-FU > ALA-PDT ≈ IMI ≈ IMB ≈ MAL-PDT > cryotherapy > DCF/HA > placebo. This efficacy ranking was obtained based on the current available data on 'participant complete clearance' from randomized controlled trials and the analysis model used. However, several other factors should also be considered when prescribing a treatment for AK.

  16. Cochrane methods--twenty years experience in developing systematic review methods.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Jackie; Hopewell, Sally

    2013-09-20

    This year, The Cochrane Collaboration reached its 20th anniversary. It has played a pivotal role in the scientific development of systematic reviewing and in the development of review methods to synthesize research evidence, primarily from randomized trials, to answer questions about the effects of healthcare interventions. We introduce a series of articles, which form this special issue describing the development of systematic review methods within The Cochrane Collaboration. We also discuss the impact of Cochrane Review methods, and acknowledge the breadth and depth of methods development within The Cochrane Collaboration as part of the wider context of evidence synthesis. We conclude by considering the future development of methods for Cochrane Reviews.

  17. Assessing and presenting summaries of evidence in Cochrane Reviews.

    PubMed

    Langendam, Miranda W; Akl, Elie A; Dahm, Philipp; Glasziou, Paul; Guyatt, Gordon; Schünemann, Holger J

    2013-09-23

    Cochrane Reviews are intended to help providers, practitioners and patients make informed decisions about health care. The goal of the Cochrane Applicability and Recommendation Methods Group (ARMG) is to develop approaches, strategies and guidance that facilitate the uptake of information from Cochrane Reviews and their use by a wide audience with specific focus on developers of recommendations and on healthcare decision makers. This paper is part of a series highlighting developments in systematic review methodology in the 20 years since the establishment of The Cochrane Collaboration, and its aim is to present current work and highlight future developments in assessing and presenting summaries of evidence, with special focus on Summary of Findings (SoF) tables and Plain Language Summaries.A SoF table provides a concise and transparent summary of the key findings of a review in a tabular format. Several studies have shown that SoF tables improve accessibility and understanding of Cochrane Reviews.The ARMG and GRADE Working Group are working on further development of the SoF tables, for example by evaluating the degree of acceptable flexibility beyond standard presentation of SoF tables, developing SoF tables for diagnostic test accuracy reviews and interactive SoF tables (iSoF).The plain language summary (PLS) is the other main building block for dissemination of review results to end-users. The PLS aims to summarize the results of a review in such a way that health care consumers can readily understand them. Current efforts include the development of a standardized language to describe statistical results, based on effect size and quality of supporting evidence.Producing high quality PLS and SoF tables and making them compatible and linked would make it easier to produce dissemination products targeting different audiences (for example, providers, health policy makers, guideline developers).Current issues of debate include optimal presentation formats of So

  18. Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group: leading the field on health communication evidence.

    PubMed

    Prictor, Megan; Hill, Sophie

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the history and achievements of the Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group, part of the international Cochrane Collaboration. It surveys the Group's establishment and structure, the scope of its Cochrane Reviews and the growth in its publication output over its 16-year history. The paper examines the Group's developmental work in interventions and outcomes related to patient communication and involvement, as well as methodological resources for review authors. It also outlines the Review Group's research partnerships with state, national and international agencies, particularly in the areas of chronic disease management, medicines use, public involvement, and vaccines communication. The Group's strong contribution to an evidence-base for health communication and participation are acknowledged.

  19. Searching for unpublished data for Cochrane reviews: cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Bero, Lisa; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the experiences of authors of Cochrane reviews in searching for, getting access to, and using unpublished data. Design Cross sectional study. Setting Cochrane reviews. Participants 2184 corresponding authors of Cochrane reviews as of May 2012. Main outcome measure Frequencies of responses to open ended and closed questions in an online survey. Results Of 5915 authors contacted by email, 2184 replied (36.9% response rate). Of those, 1656 (75.8%) had searched for unpublished data. In 913 cases (55.1% of 1656), new data were obtained and we received details about these data for 794 data sources. The most common data source was “trialists/investigators,” accounting for 73.9% (n=587) of the 794 data sources. Most of the data were used in the review (82.0%, 651/794) and in 53.4% (424/794) of cases data were provided in less than a month. Summary data were most common, provided by 50.8% (403/794) of the data sources, whereas 20.5% (163/794) provided individual patient data. In only 6.3% (50/794) of cases were data reported to have been obtained from the manufacturers, and this group waited longer and had to make more contacts to get the data. The data from manufacturers were less likely to be for individual patients and less likely to be used in the review. Data from regulatory agencies accounted for 3.0% (24/794) of the obtained data. Conclusions Most authors of Cochrane reviews who searched for unpublished data received useful information, primarily from trialists. Our response rate was low and the authors who did not respond were probably less likely to have searched for unpublished data. Manufacturers and regulatory agencies were uncommon sources of unpublished data. PMID:23613540

  20. Global priority setting for Cochrane systematic reviews of health promotion and public health research

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, J; Waters, E; Yach, D; McQueen, D; De Francisco, A; Stewart, T; Reddy, P; Gulmezoglu, A; Galea, G; Portela, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: Systematic reviews of health promotion and public health interventions are increasingly being conducted to assist public policy decision making. Many intra-country initiatives have been established to conduct systematic reviews in their relevant public health areas. The Cochrane Collaboration, an international organisation established to conduct and publish systematic reviews of healthcare interventions, is committed to high quality reviews that are regularly updated, published electronically, and meeting the needs of the consumers. Aims: To identify global priorities for Cochrane systematic reviews of public health topics. Methods: Systematic reviews of public health interventions were identified and mapped against global health risks. Global health organisations were engaged and nominated policy-urgent titles, evidence based selection criteria were applied to set priorities. Results: 26 priority systematic review titles were identified, addressing interventions such as community building activities, pre-natal and early infancy psychosocial outcomes, and improving the nutrition status of refugee and displaced populations. Discussion: The 26 priority titles provide an opportunity for potential reviewers and indeed, the Cochrane Collaboration as a whole, to address the previously unmet needs of global health policy and research agencies. PMID:15709077

  1. Methods to improve recruitment to randomised controlled trials: Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Treweek, Shaun; Lockhart, Pauline; Pitkethly, Marie; Cook, Jonathan A; Kjeldstrøm, Monica; Johansen, Marit; Taskila, Taina K; Sullivan, Frank M; Wilson, Sue; Jackson, Catherine; Jones, Ritu; Mitchell, Elizabeth D

    2013-01-01

    This review is an abridged version of a Cochrane Review previously published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2010, Issue 4, Art. No.: MR000013 DOI: 10.1002/14651858.MR000013.pub5 (see www.thecochranelibrary.com for information). Cochrane Reviews are regularly updated as new evidence emerges and in response to feedback, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews should be consulted for the most recent version of the review. Objective To identify interventions designed to improve recruitment to randomised controlled trials, and to quantify their effect on trial participation. Design Systematic review. Data sources The Cochrane Methodology Review Group Specialised Register in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, ERIC, Science Citation Index, Social Sciences Citation Index, C2-SPECTR, the National Research Register and PubMed. Most searches were undertaken up to 2010; no language restrictions were applied. Study selection Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials, including those recruiting to hypothetical studies. Studies on retention strategies, examining ways to increase questionnaire response or evaluating the use of incentives for clinicians were excluded. The study population included any potential trial participant (eg, patient, clinician and member of the public), or individual or group of individuals responsible for trial recruitment (eg, clinicians, researchers and recruitment sites). Two authors independently screened identified studies for eligibility. Results 45 trials with over 43 000 participants were included. Some interventions were effective in increasing recruitment: telephone reminders to non-respondents (risk ratio (RR) 1.66, 95% CI 1.03 to 2.46; two studies, 1058 participants), use of opt-out rather than opt-in procedures for contacting potential participants (RR 1.39, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.84; one study, 152 participants) and open designs where participants know which treatment they are receiving in the trial (RR 1.22, 95

  2. Work of the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Review Group: making sense of complexity.

    PubMed

    Handoll, Helen

    2013-11-01

    This article examines the ways in which members of the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Review Group have tackled the intrinsic complexity of a large clinical area. This features a diversity of injuries in people of all ages, predominantly physical and surgical interventions that are inherently complex interventions, and a huge array of outcome measures. The methods described include a purposeful focus on common injuries, such as fragility fractures in older people; and the generation of groups of "all intervention" reviews whose structure is informed by a systematic approach, incorporating knowledge of clinical pathways and categorization of interventions. The article concludes with some thoughts about the challenges ahead, particularly in terms of selecting the scopes of future reviews. PMID:24325411

  3. Work of the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Review Group: making sense of complexity.

    PubMed

    Handoll, Helen

    2013-11-01

    This article examines the ways in which members of the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Review Group have tackled the intrinsic complexity of a large clinical area. This features a diversity of injuries in people of all ages, predominantly physical and surgical interventions that are inherently complex interventions, and a huge array of outcome measures. The methods described include a purposeful focus on common injuries, such as fragility fractures in older people; and the generation of groups of "all intervention" reviews whose structure is informed by a systematic approach, incorporating knowledge of clinical pathways and categorization of interventions. The article concludes with some thoughts about the challenges ahead, particularly in terms of selecting the scopes of future reviews.

  4. Twenty years of Cochrane reviews in menstrual disorders and subfertility.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, Cindy; Moore, Vivienne; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Blake, Debbie; Vail, Andy; Thomas, Jane; Cheong, Ying; Showell, Marian; Nagels, Helen; Marjoribanks, Jane

    2013-11-01

    The past three decades have seen considerable change in the understanding of clinical research methods. There has been an acceptance that RCTs are the best way of establishing treatment effectiveness and a recognition that, while single studies are useful, pooling knowledge from a complete body of work is likely to provide the best evidence. Advances in methodology have been mirrored by the many advances in the field of reproductive medicine, such as assisted reproduction, assessment of male fertility, ovulation induction and laparoscopic surgery. Together, they have led to welcome improvements in the outcomes of fertility treatments. In particular, systematic reviews have become important tools enabling clinicians and patients to make health-care decisions based on evidence from all the available high-quality studies. The move towards identifying and aggregating the highest quality evidence has been led by the Cochrane Collaboration, which this year celebrates 20 years of preparing and publishing systematic reviews. This paper outlines the achievements, progress and challenges of this enterprise to date, with a particular focus on systematic reviews of reproductive medicine. PMID:23990642

  5. Physical rehabilitation for critical illness myopathy and neuropathy: an abridged version of Cochrane Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mehrholz, J; Pohl, M; Kugler, J; Burridge, J; Mückel, S; Elsner, B

    2015-10-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) acquired or generalised weakness due to critical illness myopathy (CIM) and polyneuropathy (CIP) are major causes of chronically impaired motor function that can affect activities of daily living and quality of life. Physical rehabilitation of those affected might help to improve activities of daily living. Our primary objective was to assess the effects of physical rehabilitation therapies and interventions for people with CIP and CIM in improving activities of daily living such as walking, bathing, dressing and eating. Secondary objectives were to assess effects on muscle strength and quality of life, and to assess adverse effects of physical rehabilitation. On 16 July 2014 we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register and on 14 July 2014 we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL Plus. In July 2014, we searched the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and three trials registries for ongoing trials and further data about included studies with no language restrictions. We also handsearched relevant conference proceedings and screened reference lists to identify further trials. We planned to include randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs and randomised controlled cross-over trials of any rehabilitation intervention in people with acquired weakness syndrome due to CIP/CIM. We would have extracted data, assessed the risk of bias and classified the quality of evidence for outcomes in duplicate, according to the standard procedures of The Cochrane Collaboration. Outcome data collection would have been for activities of daily living (for example, mobility, walking, transfers and self care). Secondary outcomes included muscle strength, quality of life and adverse events. The search strategy retrieved 3587 references. After examination of titles and abstracts, we retrieved the full text of 24 potentially relevant studies. None of these studies met the inclusion criteria of our review. No data were

  6. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Influenza Vaccines for Preventing Cardiovascular Disease. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015;5:CD005050].

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Daniel; Costa, João; Vaz-Carneiro, António

    2015-01-01

    Influenza infections are associated to increased risk of cardiovascular events. The systematic review of Cochrane Collaboration evaluated the role of influenza vaccination on primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. The meta-analysis of four randomized controlled trials with moderate quality, including 1 682 patients with coronary artery disease, showed a 55% risk reduction on cardiovascular mortality. Data evaluating the role of vaccination in primary cardiovascular prevention were not robust. Portuguese and international recommendations for influenza vaccination in patients with coronary artery disease are then supported by this systematic review.

  7. Tweeting links to Cochrane Schizophrenia Group reviews: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Adams, C E; Bodart, A Y M; Sampson, S; Zhao, S; Montgomery, A A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of using health social media on web activity. Design Individually randomised controlled parallel group superiority trial. Setting Twitter and Weibo. Participants 170 Cochrane Schizophrenia Group full reviews with an abstract and plain language summary web page. Interventions Three randomly ordered slightly different 140 character or less messages, each containing a short URL to the freely accessible summary page sent on specific times on one single day. This was compared with no messaging. Outcome The primary outcome was web page visits at 1 week. Secondary outcomes were other metrics of web activity at 1 week. Results 85 reviews were randomised to each of the intervention and control arms. Google Analytics allowed 100% follow-up within 1 week of completion. Intervention and control reviews received a total of 1162 and 449 visits, respectively (IRR 2.7, 95% CI 2.2 to 3.3). Fewer intervention reviews had single page only visits (16% vs 31%, OR 0.41, 0.19 to 0.88) and users spent more time viewing intervention reviews (geometric mean 76 vs 31 s, ratio 2.5, 1.3 to 4.6). Other secondary metrics of web activity all showed strong evidence in favour of the intervention. Conclusions Tweeting in this limited area of healthcare increases ‘product placement’ of evidence with the potential for that to influence care. Trial registration number ISRCTN84658943. PMID:26956164

  8. Celebrating methodological challenges and changes: reflecting on the emergence and importance of the role of qualitative evidence in Cochrane reviews.

    PubMed

    Hannes, Karin; Booth, Andrew; Harris, Janet; Noyes, Jane

    2013-10-17

    Cochrane systematic reviews have proven to be beneficial for decision making processes, both on a practitioner and a policy level, and there are current initiatives to extend the types of evidence used by them, including qualitative research. In this article we outline the major achievements of the Cochrane Qualitative and Implementation Methods Group. Although the Group has encountered numerous challenges in dealing with the evolution of qualitative evidence synthesis, both outside and within the Cochrane Collaboration, it has successfully responded to the challenges posed in terms of incorporating qualitative evidence in systematic reviews. The Methods Group will continue to advocate for more flexible and inclusive approaches to evidence synthesis in order to meet the exciting challenges and opportunities presented by mixed methods systematic reviews and reviews of complex interventions.

  9. Celebrating methodological challenges and changes: reflecting on the emergence and importance of the role of qualitative evidence in Cochrane reviews

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cochrane systematic reviews have proven to be beneficial for decision making processes, both on a practitioner and a policy level, and there are current initiatives to extend the types of evidence used by them, including qualitative research. In this article we outline the major achievements of the Cochrane Qualitative and Implementation Methods Group. Although the Group has encountered numerous challenges in dealing with the evolution of qualitative evidence synthesis, both outside and within the Cochrane Collaboration, it has successfully responded to the challenges posed in terms of incorporating qualitative evidence in systematic reviews. The Methods Group will continue to advocate for more flexible and inclusive approaches to evidence synthesis in order to meet the exciting challenges and opportunities presented by mixed methods systematic reviews and reviews of complex interventions. PMID:24135194

  10. Impact of Including Korean Randomized Controlled Trials in Cochrane Reviews of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Hyung; Kong, Jae Cheol; Choi, Jun-Yong; Choi, Tae-Young; Shin, Byung-Cheul; McDonald, Steve; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Acupuncture is commonly practiced in Korea and is regularly evaluated in clinical trials. Although many Cochrane reviews of acupuncture include searches of both English and Chinese databases, there is no information on the value of searching Korean databases. This study aimed to investigate the impact of searching Korean databasesand journals for trials eligible for inclusion in existing Cochrane acupuncture reviews. Methods We searched 12 Korean databases and seven Korean journals to identify randomised trials meeting the inclusion criteria for acupuncture reviews in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. We compared risk of bias assessments of the Korean trials with the trials included in the Cochrane acupuncture reviews. Where possible, we added data from the Korean trials to the existing meta-analyses in the relevant Cochrane review and conducted sensitivity analyses to test the robustness of the results. Results Sixteen Korean trials (742 participants) met the inclusion criteria for eight Cochrane acupuncture reviews (125 trials; 13,041 participants). Inclusion of the Korean trials provided data for 20% of existing meta-analyses (24 out of 120). Inclusion of the Korean trials did not change the direction of effect in any of the existing meta-analyses. The effect size and heterogeneity remained mostly unchanged. In only one meta-analysis did the significance change. Compared to the studies included in the Cochrane acupuncture reviews, the risk of bias in the Korean trials was higher in terms of outcome assessor blinding and allocation concealment. Conclusions Many Korean studies contributed additional data to the existing meta-analyses in Cochrane acupuncture reviews. Although inclusion of these studies did not alter the results of the meta-analyses, comprehensive searches of the literature are important to avoid potential language bias. The identification and inclusion of eligible Korean trials should be considered for reviews of acupuncture

  11. The Next Wave of Biological Agents for the Treatment of IBD: Evidence from Cochrane Reviews.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Reena; Chande, Nilesh; Vermeire, Séverine; Sandborn, William J; Parker, Claire E; Feagan, Brian G

    2016-07-01

    Multiple new biological treatments for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are becoming available. Specifically, vedolizumab and ustekinumab are monoclonal antibodies that target molecular pathways relevant to disease pathogenesis. What can Cochrane reviews tell us about the efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity of these new agents? A Cochrane inflammatory bowel disease group symposium held at the 2015 Digestive Diseases Week annual meeting addressed these questions. This article reviews the data presented at that session. PMID:27306074

  12. Reporting and Handling Missing Outcome Data in Mental Health: A Systematic Review of Cochrane Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spineli, Loukia M.; Pandis, Nikolaos; Salanti, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the study was to provide empirical evidence about the reporting of methodology to address missing outcome data and the acknowledgement of their impact in Cochrane systematic reviews in the mental health field. Methods: Systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews after January 1, 2009 by…

  13. Extracts from the Cochrane Library: interventions for the prevention of postoperative ear discharge after insertion of ventilation tubes (grommets) in children.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Anne G M; Burton, Martin J; Shin, Jennifer J; Rosenfeld, Richard M

    2013-12-01

    The "Cochrane Corner" is a section in the journal that highlights systematic reviews relevant to otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, with invited commentary to aid clinical decision making. This installment features a Cochrane Review, "Interventions for the Prevention of Postoperative Ear Discharge after Insertion of Ventilation Tubes (Grommets) in Children," that concludes if a surgeon has a high rate of postoperative otorrhea in children, then saline irrigation or antibiotic ear drops at the time of surgery would significantly reduce that rate. If topical drops are chosen, a single application at the time of surgery is suggested to reduce the cost and potential for ototoxic damage (if applicable).

  14. Virtual reality for stroke rehabilitation: an abridged version of a Cochrane review.

    PubMed

    Laver, K; George, S; Thomas, S; Deutsch, J E; Crotty, M

    2015-08-01

    Virtual reality and interactive video gaming have emerged as new treatment approaches in stroke rehabilitation settings over the last ten years. The primary objective of this review was to determine the effectiveness of virtual reality on upper limb function and activity after stroke. The impact on secondary outcomes including gait, cognitive function and activities of daily living was also assessed. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing virtual reality with an alternative intervention or no intervention were eligible to be included in the review. The authors searched a number of electronic databases including: the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, PsycINFO, clinical trial registers, reference lists, Dissertation Abstracts and contacted key researchers in the field. Search results were independently examined by two review authors to identify studies meeting the inclusion criteria. A total of 37 randomized or quasi randomized controlled trials with a total of 1019 participants were included in the review. Virtual reality was found to be significantly more effective than conventional therapy in improving upper limb function (standardized mean difference [SMD] 0.28, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.08 to 0.49) based on 12 studies and significantly more effective than no therapy in improving upper limber function (SMD 0.44 [95% CI 0.15 to 0.73]) based on nine studies. The use of virtual reality also significantly improved activities of daily living function when compared to more conventional therapy approaches (SMD 0.43 [95% CI 0.18 to 0.69]) based on eight studies. While there are a large number of studies assessing the efficacy of virtual reality they tend to be small and many are at risk of bias. While there is evidence to support the use of virtual reality intervention as part of upper limb training programs, more research is required to determine whether it

  15. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Antihistamines for the Common Cold. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015;11:CD009345].

    PubMed

    Sterrantino, Carmel; Duarte, Gonçalo; Costa, João; Vaz-Carneiro, António

    2016-03-01

    The common cold is an acute, self-limiting inflammation of the mucosa of the upper airways, which may involve one or all the sinuses, nasopharynx, oropharynx and larynx. It is common to have at least one episode per year. Common cold symptoms, which may include sore throat, sneezing, nasal congestion, runny nose, headache, malaise and mild fever usually disappear within a few days without treatment. The causative agent of most colds is rhinovirus. Although not associated with mortality, common cold is associated with significant morbidity. There is no vaccine or cure for common cold and, therefore, their treatment is centered on relieving the symptoms. This Cochrane review aimed to synthesize the existing evidence about the clinical benefit of antihistamines, used as monotherapy, compared with placebo or no treatment in children and adult patients with common cold. A total of 18 randomized clinical trials with 4342 participants were included. Main results were: 1) Antihistamines have a small (days one and two) beneficial effect in the short term on the severity of overall symptoms in adult patients, although this effect is not present in the medium to long term; 2) antihistamines were not associated with a clinically significant beneficial effect on the individual symptoms (nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, and sneezing); 3) Antihistamines are not associated with an increased risk of adverse effects; 4) No conclusion can be made about the effectiveness of antihistamines in pediatric populations. Our interpretation of the results is that the available evidence is insufficient to support the prescription or buying OTC antihistamines to relieve the symptoms of common cold without allergic component. PMID:27285091

  16. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Antihistamines for the Common Cold. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015;11:CD009345].

    PubMed

    Sterrantino, Carmel; Duarte, Gonçalo; Costa, João; Vaz-Carneiro, António

    2016-03-01

    The common cold is an acute, self-limiting inflammation of the mucosa of the upper airways, which may involve one or all the sinuses, nasopharynx, oropharynx and larynx. It is common to have at least one episode per year. Common cold symptoms, which may include sore throat, sneezing, nasal congestion, runny nose, headache, malaise and mild fever usually disappear within a few days without treatment. The causative agent of most colds is rhinovirus. Although not associated with mortality, common cold is associated with significant morbidity. There is no vaccine or cure for common cold and, therefore, their treatment is centered on relieving the symptoms. This Cochrane review aimed to synthesize the existing evidence about the clinical benefit of antihistamines, used as monotherapy, compared with placebo or no treatment in children and adult patients with common cold. A total of 18 randomized clinical trials with 4342 participants were included. Main results were: 1) Antihistamines have a small (days one and two) beneficial effect in the short term on the severity of overall symptoms in adult patients, although this effect is not present in the medium to long term; 2) antihistamines were not associated with a clinically significant beneficial effect on the individual symptoms (nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, and sneezing); 3) Antihistamines are not associated with an increased risk of adverse effects; 4) No conclusion can be made about the effectiveness of antihistamines in pediatric populations. Our interpretation of the results is that the available evidence is insufficient to support the prescription or buying OTC antihistamines to relieve the symptoms of common cold without allergic component.

  17. Systematic Reviews Published in the April 2016 Issue of the Cochrane Library.

    PubMed

    Wiffen, Philip J

    2016-09-01

    The Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews is published quarterly as a DVD and monthly online ( http://www.thecochranelibrary.com ). The April 2016 issue (2nd DVD for 2016) contains 6875 complete reviews, 2417 protocols for reviews in production, and 36,600 short summaries of systematic reviews published in the general medical literature (this short summary database is no longer being updated). In addition, there are citations of 934,000 randomized controlled trials, and 15,700 cited papers in the Cochrane Methodology Register. The Health Technology Assessment database contains some 16,000 citations. One hundred and twenty-nine new reviews have been published in the previous 3 months, of which three have potential relevance for practitioners in pain and palliative medicine. The impact factor of the Cochrane Library stands at 5.939. Readers are encouraged to access the full report for any articles of interest, as only a brief commentary is provided. PMID:27541203

  18. Systematic Reviews Published in the April 2016 Issue of the Cochrane Library.

    PubMed

    Wiffen, Philip J

    2016-09-01

    The Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews is published quarterly as a DVD and monthly online ( http://www.thecochranelibrary.com ). The April 2016 issue (2nd DVD for 2016) contains 6875 complete reviews, 2417 protocols for reviews in production, and 36,600 short summaries of systematic reviews published in the general medical literature (this short summary database is no longer being updated). In addition, there are citations of 934,000 randomized controlled trials, and 15,700 cited papers in the Cochrane Methodology Register. The Health Technology Assessment database contains some 16,000 citations. One hundred and twenty-nine new reviews have been published in the previous 3 months, of which three have potential relevance for practitioners in pain and palliative medicine. The impact factor of the Cochrane Library stands at 5.939. Readers are encouraged to access the full report for any articles of interest, as only a brief commentary is provided.

  19. Systematic Reviews Published in the January 2016 Issue of the Cochrane Library.

    PubMed

    Wiffen, Philip J

    2016-06-01

    The Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews is published quarterly as a DVD and monthly online ( http://www.thecochranelibrary.com ). The January 2016 issue (first DVD for 2016) contains 6746 complete reviews, 2445 protocols for reviews in production, and 36,600 short summaries of systematic reviews published in the general medical literature (this short summary database is no longer being updated). In addition, there are citations of 921,000 randomized controlled trials, and 15,700 cited papers in the Cochrane Methodology Register. The Health Technology Assessment database contains some 15,000 citations. One hundred and twenty-four new reviews have been published in the previous 3 months, of which just two have potential relevance for practitioners in pain and palliative medicine. The impact factor of the Cochrane Library stands at 5.939. Readers are encouraged to access the full report for any articles of interest, as only a brief commentary is provided.

  20. Critique of Cochrane systematic review of home-like setting for birth.

    PubMed

    Fahy, Kathleen; Tracy, Sally K

    2007-09-01

    This paper is a critique of a Cochrane systematic review where the primary objective of the review was to evaluate the effects, on labour and birth outcomes, of care in a home-like birth setting compared with care in a conventional hospital labour ward. The unanticipated finding of that review was a trend towards higher perinatal mortality in the home-like setting group. Our critique focuses on one important question: is the Cochrane review of birth setting based on studies of sufficient scientific rigour to be able to establish whether or not there may be an added risk of perinatal mortality associated with intrapartum care in a home-like setting? In this commentary we critique two aspects of methodological quality in the studies underpinning the Cochrane review: the high levels of non-compliance with the planned treatment, and the low levels of 'treatment fidelity' even if subjects received the planned treatment. Of the 41 deaths in the home-like setting group 35 (85%) were not associated with intrapartum care in a home-like setting. We conclude that the Cochrane review of birth setting cannot be relied upon to make valid statements about whether there may be an added risk of perinatal mortality associated with experiencing intrapartum care in either setting. In the process of our analysis we uncovered what may be two broader problems for Cochrane systematic reviews. The Cochrane Reviewers' Handbook should be expanded to give specific guidance for researchers and reviewers about how to enhance or evaluate research quality in relation to non-compliance with assigned treatment and treatment fidelity. PMID:21631797

  1. Single versus multiple visits for endodontic treatment of permanent teeth: a Cochrane systematic review.

    PubMed

    Figini, Lara; Lodi, Giovanni; Gorni, Fabio; Gagliani, Massimo

    2008-09-01

    The Cochrane Collaboration promotes evidence-based healthcare decision making globally through systematic reviews of the effects of healthcare intervention. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate whether the effectiveness and frequency of short-term and long-term complications are different when endodontic procedure is completed in one or multiple visits. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials enrolling patients undergoing endodontic treatment were identified by searching biomedical databases and hand-searching relevant journals. The following outcomes were considered: tooth extraction as a result of endodontic problems and radiologic failure after 1 year, postoperative discomfort, swelling, analgesic use, or sinus track. Twelve studies were included in the review. No detectable difference was found in the effectiveness of root canal treatment in terms of radiologic success between single and multiple visits. Neither single-visit root canal treatment nor multiple-visit root canal treatment can prevent 100% of short-term and long-term complications. Patients undergoing a single visit might experience a slightly higher frequency of swelling and refer significantly more analgesic use. PMID:18718362

  2. The updated Cochrane review 2014 on GnRH agonist trigger: repeating the same errors.

    PubMed

    Kol, Shahar; Humaidan, Peter; Alsbjerg, Birgit; Engmann, Lawrence; Benadiva, Claudio; García-Velasco, Juan A; Fatemi, Human; Andersen, Claus Yding

    2015-06-01

    Cochrane reviews are powerful tools, internationally recognized as the highest standard in evidence-based health care. A Cochrane analysis makes use of precise, reproducible criteria in the selection of studies for review. In the context of a previous Cochrane review (2010) on the subject of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) trigger, we questioned whether a review should be conducted during the research phase when new concepts are being developed. Recently, an updated Cochrane review was published, reaching the same general conclusion as the first one, i.e., GnRHa triggers lower the chance of pregnancy in fresh autologous IVF and intracytoplasmic injection treatment cycles. We argue that the new review repeats previous errors by compiling data from studies that were not comparable as different luteal phase protocols were used. From the clinical point of view, the luteal support used is the variable which affects the pregnancy rate and not the use of the GnRHa trigger for final oocyte maturation. Therefore, a meaningful comparison between GnRHa and HCG trigger must be confined to outcome measures that are not affected by the luteal support used. We conclude that the updated review falls short of addressing meaningful clinical and fundamental questions in the context of GnRHa trigger.

  3. ω-3 Fatty acids for major depressive disorder in adults: an abridged Cochrane review

    PubMed Central

    Appleton, Katherine M; Sallis, Hannah M; Perry, Rachel; Ness, Andrew R; Churchill, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3PUFAs; also known as ω-3 fatty acids) compared with comparator for major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults. Design Systematic review and meta-analyses. Data sources The Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Review Group's Specialised Registers (CCDANCTR) and International Trial Registries searched to May 2015. CINAHL searched to September 2013. Trial selection Inclusion criteria: a randomised controlled trial (RCT); that provided n-3PUFAs as an intervention; used a comparator; measured depressive symptomology as an outcome; and was conducted in adults with MDD. Outcomes Primary outcomes were depressive symptomology and adverse events. Results 20 trials encompassing 26 relevant studies were found. For n-3PUFAs versus placebo, n-3PUFA supplementation resulted in a small-to-modest benefit for depressive symptomology: SMD=−0.32 (95% CI −0.52 to −0.12; 25 studies, 1373 participants, very low-quality evidence), but this effect is unlikely to be clinically meaningful, is very imprecise and, based on funnel plot inspection, sensitivity analyses and comparison with large well-conducted trials, is likely to be biased. Considerable evidence of heterogeneity between studies was also found, and was not explained by subgroup or sensitivity analyses. Numbers of individuals experiencing adverse events were similar in intervention and placebo groups (OR=1.24, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.62; 19 studies, 1207 participants; very low-quality evidence). For n-3PUFAs versus antidepressants, no differences were found between treatments in depressive symptomology (MD=−0.70 (95% CI −5.88 to 4.48); 1 study, 40 participants, very low-quality evidence). Conclusions At present, we do not have sufficient evidence to determine the effects of n-3PUFAs as a treatment for MDD. Further research in the form of adequately powered RCTs is needed. PMID:26936905

  4. Study flow diagrams in Cochrane systematic review updates: an adapted PRISMA flow diagram.

    PubMed

    Stovold, Elizabeth; Beecher, Deirdre; Foxlee, Ruth; Noel-Storr, Anna

    2014-05-29

    Cochrane systematic reviews are conducted and reported according to rigorous standards. A study flow diagram must be included in a new review, and there is clear guidance from the PRISMA statement on how to do this. However, for a review update, there is currently no guidance on how study flow diagrams should be presented. To address this, a working group was formed to find a solution and produce guidance on how to use these diagrams in review updates.A number of different options were devised for how these flow diagrams could be used in review updates, and also in cases where multiple searches for a review or review update have been conducted. These options were circulated to the Cochrane information specialist community for consultation and feedback. Following the consultation period, the working group refined the guidance and made the recommendation that for review updates an adapted PRISMA flow diagram should be used, which includes an additional box with the number of previously included studies feeding into the total. Where multiple searches have been conducted, the results should be added together and treated as one set of results.There is no existing guidance for using study flow diagrams in review updates. Our adapted diagram is a simple and pragmatic solution for showing the flow of studies in review updates.

  5. Evidence-based topical treatments for tinea cruris and tinea corporis: a summary of a Cochrane systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Zuuren, E J; Fedorowicz, Z; El-Gohary, M

    2015-03-01

    Tinea cruris and tinea corporis are common fungal infections. Most can be treated with a variety of topical antifungals. This review aimed to assess the evidence for the effectiveness and safety of topical treatments for tinea cruris and tinea corporis. Searches included the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, LILACS and ongoing trials registries (August 2013). One hundred and twenty-nine randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 18 086 participants evaluated a range of interventions - mostly azoles. Pooling of data for several outcomes was only possible for two individual treatments. In five studies, terbinafine showed a statistically significant higher clinical cure rate compared with placebo [risk ratio (RR) 4·51, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3·10-6·56]. Data for mycological cure could not be pooled owing to substantial heterogeneity. Across three studies, mycological cure rates favoured naftifine (1%) compared with placebo (RR 2·38, 95% CI 1·80-3·14) but the quality of the evidence was low. Combinations of azoles with corticosteroids were slightly more effective than azoles for clinical cure, but there was no statistically significant difference with regard to mycological cure. Sixty-five studies were assessed as 'unclear' and 64 as being at 'high risk' of bias; many were over 20 years old, and most were poorly designed and inadequately reported. Although most active interventions showed sufficient therapeutic effect, this review highlights the need for further, high-quality, adequately powered RCTs to evaluate the effects of these interventions, which can ultimately provide reliable evidence to inform clinical decision making.

  6. [The effect of zinc therapy on common cold--a survey of a Cochrane review].

    PubMed

    Valentiner-Branth, Palle

    2012-01-01

    The Cochrane review "Zinc and the common cold" included 15 randomized controlled double-blind trials. It was concluded, that zinc would shorten the duration of the episode of common cold and also could be used as a prevention so that the risk of developing an episode of common cold would be decreased. It is too early to give general recommendations for the use of zinc as we do not have sufficient knowledge about the optimal dose, formulation and duration of treatment. Further research should focus on the effect of zinc in patients who are at increased risk of developing complications after common cold.

  7. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Electronic Cigarettes for Smoking Cessation and Reduction. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014,12: CD010216].

    PubMed

    Vaz-Carneiro, António; Costa, João

    2015-01-01

    Smoking is one of the most important risk factors for various cardiovascular, cancer and respiratory diseases. There are a number of smoking cessation techniques involving psychological, pharmacological and behavioral interventions, with varying effectiveness and different costs. The electronic cigarettes are devices which produce a nicotine aerosol but without the toxic products of tobacco smoke, and they have become popular as a potential intervention for smoking cessation. The present review analyzed the evidence published of this approach for the treatment of tobacco dependence and concluded that there is reasonable evidence of its clinical effectiveness. We present and discuss the findings of this systematic review, with practical contextualization.

  8. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Antibiotics for acute otitis media in children. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013;1:CD000219].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Sara; Costa, João; Vaz Carneiro, António; Fernandes, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Acute otitis media is one of the most common infections in children and one of the leading causes for antibiotic prescription. In this paper, we assess and comment the Cochrane systematic review 'Antibiotics for acute otitis media in children', which aimed at assessing the efficacy and safety of antibiotics for acute otitis media in children and identifying subgroups of children who might benefit more than others from antibiotic treatment. This review showed spontaneous resolution of acute otitis media in most children (82%) and a favorable but modest effect of antibiotics, namely in pain control (number needed to treat to benefit: 20), reduction of tympanic membrane perforations and reduction of contralateral acute otitis media. Adverse effects such as vomiting, diarrhea or rash were more common in the antibiotic group (number needed to treat to harm: 14). Thus, for most children, an expectant observational approach during 48-72h without immediate antibiotic prescription seems justified. An additional meta-analysis found that antibiotics appear to be most useful in children with both acute otitis media and otorrhoea and children under two years of age with bilateral acute otitis media.

  9. Regional anaesthesia to prevent chronic pain after surgery: a Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Andreae, M. H.; Andreae, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Regional anaesthesia may reduce the risk of persistent (chronic) pain after surgery, a frequent and debilitating condition. We compared regional anaesthesia vs conventional analgesia for the prevention of persistent postoperative pain (PPP). Methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, EMBASE, and CINAHL from their inception to May 2012, limiting the results to randomized, controlled, clinical trials (RCTs), supplemented by a hand search in conference proceedings. We included RCTs comparing regional vs conventional analgesia with a pain outcome at 6 or 12 months. The two authors independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data. We report odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) as our summary statistic based on random-effects models. We grouped studies according to surgical interventions. Results We identified 23 RCTs. We pooled data from 250 participants in three trials after thoracotomy with outcomes at 6 months. Data favoured epidural anaesthesia for the prevention of PPP with an OR of 0.33 (95% CI 0.20–0.56). We pooled two studies investigating paravertebral block for breast cancer surgery; pooled data of 89 participants with outcomes ∼6 months favoured paravertebral block with an OR of 0.37 (95% CI 0.14–0.94). Adverse effects were reported sparsely. Conclusions Epidural anaesthesia and paravertebral block, respectively, may prevent PPP after thoracotomy and breast cancer surgery in about one out of every four to five patients treated. Small numbers, performance bias, attrition, and incomplete outcome data especially at 12 months weaken our conclusions. PMID:23811426

  10. Compared with what? An analysis of control-group types in Cochrane and Campbell reviews of psychosocial treatment efficacy with substance use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Patrik; Bergmark, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims A crucial, but under-appreciated, aspect in experimental research on psychosocial treatments of substance use disorders concerns what kinds of control groups are used. This paper examines how the distinction between different control-group designs have been handled by the Cochrane and the Campbell Collaborations in their systematic reviews of psychosocial treatments of substance abuse disorders. Methods We assessed Cochrane and Campbell reviews (n = 8) that were devoted to psychosocial treatments of substance use disorders. We noted what control groups were considered and analysed the extent to which the reviews provided a rationale for chosen comparison conditions. We also analysed whether type of control group in the primary studies influenced how the reviews framed the effects discussed and whether this was related to conclusions drawn. Results The reviews covered studies involving widely different control conditions. Overall, little attention was paid to the use of different control groups (e.g. head-to-head comparisons versus untreated controls) and what this implies when interpreting effect sizes. Seven of eight reviews did not provide a rationale for the choice of comparison conditions. Conclusions Cochrane and Campbell reviews of the efficacy of psychosocial interventions with substance use disorders seem to underappreciate that the use of different control-group types yields different effect estimates. Most reviews have not distinguished between different control-group designs and therefore have provided a confused picture regarding absolute and relative treatment efficacy. A systematic approach to treating different control-group designs in research reviews is necessary for meaningful estimates of treatment efficacy. PMID:25393504

  11. Update of strategies to translate evidence from cochrane musculoskeletal group systematic reviews for use by various audiences.

    PubMed

    Rader, Tamara; Pardo Pardo, Jordi; Stacey, Dawn; Ghogomu, Elizabeth; Maxwell, Lara J; Welch, Vivian A; Singh, Jasvinder A; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Légaré, France; Santesso, Nancy; Toupin April, Karine; O'Connor, Annette M; Wells, George A; Winzenberg, Tania M; Johnston, Renea; Tugwell, Peter

    2014-02-01

    For rheumatology research to have a real influence on health and well-being, evidence must be tailored to inform the decisions of various audiences. The Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group (CMSG), one of 53 groups of the not-for-profit international Cochrane Collaboration, prepares, maintains, and disseminates systematic reviews of treatments for musculoskeletal diseases. While systematic reviews provided by the CMSG fill a major gap in meeting the need for high-quality evidence syntheses, our work does not end at the completion of a review. The term "knowledge translation" (KT) refers to the activities involved in bringing research evidence to various audiences in a useful form so it can be used to support decision making and improve practices. Systematic reviews give careful consideration to research methods and analysis. Because the review is often long and detailed, the clinically relevant results may not be apparent or in the optimal form for use by patients and their healthcare practitioners. This paper describes 10 formats, many of them new, for ways that evidence from Cochrane Reviews can be translated with the intention of meeting the needs of various audiences, including patients and their families, practitioners, policy makers, the press, and members of the public (the "5 Ps"). Current and future knowledge tools include summary of findings tables, patient decision aids, plain language summaries, press releases, clinical scenarios in general medical journals, frequently asked questions (Cochrane Clinical Answers), podcasts, Twitter messages, Journal Club materials, and the use of storytelling and narratives to support continuing medical education. Future plans are outlined to explore ways of improving the influence and usefulness of systematic reviews by providing results in formats suitable to our varied audiences. PMID:24293571

  12. Update of strategies to translate evidence from cochrane musculoskeletal group systematic reviews for use by various audiences.

    PubMed

    Rader, Tamara; Pardo Pardo, Jordi; Stacey, Dawn; Ghogomu, Elizabeth; Maxwell, Lara J; Welch, Vivian A; Singh, Jasvinder A; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Légaré, France; Santesso, Nancy; Toupin April, Karine; O'Connor, Annette M; Wells, George A; Winzenberg, Tania M; Johnston, Renea; Tugwell, Peter

    2014-02-01

    For rheumatology research to have a real influence on health and well-being, evidence must be tailored to inform the decisions of various audiences. The Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group (CMSG), one of 53 groups of the not-for-profit international Cochrane Collaboration, prepares, maintains, and disseminates systematic reviews of treatments for musculoskeletal diseases. While systematic reviews provided by the CMSG fill a major gap in meeting the need for high-quality evidence syntheses, our work does not end at the completion of a review. The term "knowledge translation" (KT) refers to the activities involved in bringing research evidence to various audiences in a useful form so it can be used to support decision making and improve practices. Systematic reviews give careful consideration to research methods and analysis. Because the review is often long and detailed, the clinically relevant results may not be apparent or in the optimal form for use by patients and their healthcare practitioners. This paper describes 10 formats, many of them new, for ways that evidence from Cochrane Reviews can be translated with the intention of meeting the needs of various audiences, including patients and their families, practitioners, policy makers, the press, and members of the public (the "5 Ps"). Current and future knowledge tools include summary of findings tables, patient decision aids, plain language summaries, press releases, clinical scenarios in general medical journals, frequently asked questions (Cochrane Clinical Answers), podcasts, Twitter messages, Journal Club materials, and the use of storytelling and narratives to support continuing medical education. Future plans are outlined to explore ways of improving the influence and usefulness of systematic reviews by providing results in formats suitable to our varied audiences.

  13. Pharmacological treatments for fatigue associated with palliative care: executive summary of a Cochrane Collaboration systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mochamat; Cuhls, Henning; Peuckmann‐Post, Vera; Minton, Ollie; Stone, Patrick; Radbruch, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background In palliative care patients, fatigue can be severely debilitating and is often not counteracted with rest, thereby impacting daily activity and quality of life. Further complicating issues are the multidimensionality, subjective nature and lack of a consensus definition of fatigue. The review aimed to evaluate the efficacy of pharmacological treatments for fatigue in palliative care, with a focus on patients at an advanced stage of disease, including patients with cancer and other chronic diseases. Methods We considered randomized controlled trials concerning adult palliative care with a focus on pharmacological treatment of fatigue compared with placebo, application of two drugs, usual care or a non‐pharmacological intervention. The primary outcome had to be non‐specific fatigue (or related terms such as asthenia). We searched the CENTRAL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and EMBASE, and a selection of cancer journals up to 28 April 2014. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted the data. Results We screened 1645 publications of which 45 met the inclusion criteria. In total, we analysed data from 18 drugs and 4696 participants. There was a very high degree of statistical and clinical heterogeneity in the trials. Meta‐analysis of data was possible for modafinil, pemoline, and methylphenidate. Conclusions Due to the limited evidence, we cannot recommend a specific drug for the treatment of fatigue in palliative care patients. Some drugs, which may be beneficial for the treatment of fatigue associated with palliative care such as amantadine, methylphenidate, and modafinil, should be further researched. PMID:27066315

  14. Endovascular repair or open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: a Cochrane systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Badger, S A; Harkin, D W; Blair, P H; Ellis, P K; Kee, F; Forster, R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (eEVAR) may improve outcomes for patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). The study aim was to compare the outcomes for eEVAR with conventional open surgical repair for the treatment of RAAA. Setting A systematic review of relevant publications was performed. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing eEVAR with open surgical repair for RAAA were included. Participants 3 RCTs were included, with a total of 761 patients with RAAA. Interventions Meta-analysis was performed with fixed-effects models with ORs and 95% CIs for dichotomous data and mean differences with 95% CIs for continuous data. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome was short-term mortality. Secondary outcome measures included aneurysm-specific and general complication rates, quality of life and economic analysis. Results Overall risk of bias was low. There was no difference between the 2 interventions on 30-day (or in-hospital) mortality, OR 0.91 (95% CI 0.67 to 1.22; p=0.52). 30-day complications included myocardial infarction, stroke, composite cardiac complications, renal complications, severe bowel ischaemia, spinal cord ischaemia, reoperation, amputation and respiratory failure. Reporting was incomplete, and no robust conclusion was drawn. For complication outcomes that did include at least 2 studies in the meta-analysis, there was no clear evidence to support a difference between eEVAR and open repair. Longer term outcomes and cost per patient were evaluated in only a single study, thus precluding definite conclusions. Conclusions Outcomes between eEVAR and open repair, specifically 30-day mortality, are similar. However, further high-quality trials are required, as the paucity of data currently limits the conclusions. PMID:26873043

  15. Cochrane: the unfinished symphony of research synthesis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ian; Ker, Katharine

    2016-01-01

    The NHS needs valid information on the safety and effectiveness of healthcare interventions. Cochrane systematic reviews are an important source of this information. Traditionally, Cochrane has attempted to identify and include all relevant trials in systematic reviews on the basis that if all trials are identified and included, there should be no selection bias. However, a predictable consequence of the drive to include all trials is that some studies are included that are not trials (false positives). Including such studies in reviews might increase bias. More effort is needed to authenticate trials to be included in reviews, but this task is bedevilled by the enormous increase in the number of 'trials' conducted each year. We argue that excluding small trials from reviews would release resources for more detailed appraisal of larger trials. Conducting fewer but broader reviews that contain fewer but properly validated trials might better serve patients' interests.

  16. The Use of Transarterial Chemoembolization in the Treatment of Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Response to the Cochrane Collaboration Review of 2011

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Charles E.; Haskal, Ziv J; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H.; Funaki, Brian S.

    2015-01-01

    This commentary is written in response to a recent Cochrane Collaboration review published in March 2011 (1). The authors of this commentary would like to express their concerns over the conclusions of the Cochrane review, which state, “There is no firm evidence to support or refute transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) or transarterial embolization (TAE) for patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).” PMID:22035882

  17. Commentary on a Cochrane Review of Early Additional Food and Fluids for Healthy Breastfed Full-Term Infants.

    PubMed

    Maslin, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization recommends that infants should be exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months of life. A Cochrane Review assessed the benefits and harms of additional foods and fluids for full-term healthy breastfed infants. The review included randomized or quasirandomized controlled trials of full-term healthy breastfed infants up to the age of 6 months. Six studies met the inclusion criteria. Trials from early days after birth did not indicate that giving additional fluids was beneficial. Trials with 4- to 6-month-old infants did not indicate any benefit to supplementing with food at 4 months. This review did not find any evidence for disagreement with the recommendation that exclusive breastfeeding should be recommended for 6 months after birth.

  18. Commentary on a Cochrane Review of Early Additional Food and Fluids for Healthy Breastfed Full-Term Infants.

    PubMed

    Maslin, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization recommends that infants should be exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months of life. A Cochrane Review assessed the benefits and harms of additional foods and fluids for full-term healthy breastfed infants. The review included randomized or quasirandomized controlled trials of full-term healthy breastfed infants up to the age of 6 months. Six studies met the inclusion criteria. Trials from early days after birth did not indicate that giving additional fluids was beneficial. Trials with 4- to 6-month-old infants did not indicate any benefit to supplementing with food at 4 months. This review did not find any evidence for disagreement with the recommendation that exclusive breastfeeding should be recommended for 6 months after birth. PMID:27520599

  19. The occupational health field in the cochrane collaboration.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Jos

    2007-01-01

    It is the aim of the Cochrane Collaboration to gather, summarise and disseminate evidence of health care interventions. Recently, the Occupational Health Field has started to do so for occupational health interventions. In this article we would like to describe the organisation and the methods used by the Field. First, the use of research information to improve the quality of occupational health practice is explained. Next, the process and contents of Cochrane Reviews are described. The pros and cons of Cochrane Reviews are listed and what occupational health practitioners can learn from it. There is a great variety of occupational health interventions that requires flexibility in which research design to use. The Occupational Health Field will enhance our understanding of the effectiveness of occupational health interventions in the coming years.

  20. Critique of the review of 'Water fluoridation for the prevention of dental caries' published by the Cochrane Collaboration in 2015.

    PubMed

    Rugg-Gunn, A J; Spencer, A J; Whelton, H P; Jones, C; Beal, J F; Castle, P; Cooney, P V; Johnson, J; Kelly, M P; Lennon, M A; McGinley, J; O'Mullane, D; Sgan-Cohen, H D; Sharma, P P; Thomson, W M; Woodward, S M; Zusman, S P

    2016-04-01

    The Cochrane Review on water fluoridation for the prevention of dental caries was published in 2015 and attracted considerable interest and comment, especially in countries with extensive water fluoridation programmes. The Review had two objectives: (i) to evaluate the effects of water fluoridation (artificial or natural) on the prevention of dental caries, and (ii) to evaluate the effects of water fluoridation (artificial or natural) on dental fluorosis. The authors concluded, inter alia, that there was very little contemporary evidence, meeting the Review's inclusion criteria, that evaluated the effectiveness of water fluoridation for the prevention of dental caries. The purpose of this critique is to examine the conduct of the above Review, and to put it into context in the wider body of evidence regarding the effectiveness of water fluoridation. While the overall conclusion that water fluoridation is effective in caries prevention agrees with previous reviews, many important public health questions could not be answered by the Review because of the restrictive criteria used to judge adequacy of study design and risk of bias. The potential benefits of using wider criteria in order to achieve a fuller understanding of the effectiveness of water fluoridation are discussed. PMID:27056513

  1. Archie Cochrane and his vision for evidence-based medicine

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Hriday M.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    Archibald (Archie) Cochrane's most influential mark on healthcare was his 1971 publication, “Effectiveness and Efficiency.” This book strongly criticized the lack of reliable evidence behind many of the commonly accepted healthcare interventions at the time. His criticisms spurred rigorous evaluations of healthcare interventions and highlighted the need for evidence in medicine. His call for a collection of systematic reviews led to the creation of The Cochrane Collaboration. Archie Cochrane was a visionary person who helped lay down much of the foundation for evidence-based medicine. This paper will introduce evidence-based medicine to Plastic Surgery by tracing its history to the seminal efforts by Archie Cochrane. PMID:19730323

  2. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Helicobacter pylori Eradication for the Prevention of Gastric Neoplasia. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015;7:CD005583].

    PubMed

    Libãnio, Diogo; Azevedo, Luís Filipe

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma. Identification of individuals with this infection and its eradication may be considered as a primary prevention strategy to reduce the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma; however, the magnitude of benefit and the effectiveness of this strategy are still unclear. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials was conducted comparing the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma in infected individuals submitted to Helicobacter pylori eradication and individuals not submitted to this therapy. The results of the six included randomized clinical trials (all conducted in countries with high gastric cancer incidence) suggest that Helicobacter pylori eradication is associated with a relative risk reduction of 34% in gastric cancer incidence. However, generalization of the results to countries with lower gastric cancer incidence should be cautious and the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in this context remains uncertain.

  3. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Pedicle Screw Fixation for Traumatic Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013;05:CD009073].

    PubMed

    Linhares, Daniela; Neves, Nuno; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel; Almeida Fonseca, João

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine are common causes of spine surgery. Pedicle screw fixation is usually chosen, using monosegmentar, short or long segment instrumentations, with or without bone graft. This review aims to evaluate the effect of transpedicular fixation in traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine. A systematic search on controlled, randomized or quasi-randomized trials comparing different methods of surgical treatment of this fractures was performed, followed by a process of article selection, data extraction and bias assessment by 3 independent authors. Eight articles were included in a total of 5 comparisons, between different transpedicular fixation techniques. No significant differences on function or quality of life, neurologic status or limitation of motion were found. Only instrumentation with fracture level screw incorporation showed significant decrease of pain when compared with instrumentation alone. Several techniques resulted in significant improvements of different radiological parameters. Significantly, surgeries with smaller duration were associated with lesser blood loss. Bone graft use caused a significant raise in post-operative complications, namely donor site pain. So, this paper showed that significative improvements in radiological parameters do not associate with correspondent clinical benefits, and only instrumentation with level screw incorporation is associated with a clear benefit on pain. Moreover, the need for bone graft is questioned, since it leads to no clinic-radiological improvement with a raise of complications. However, a small number of controlled studies is available on this topic. PMID:27649012

  4. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Pedicle Screw Fixation for Traumatic Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013;05:CD009073].

    PubMed

    Linhares, Daniela; Neves, Nuno; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel; Almeida Fonseca, João

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine are common causes of spine surgery. Pedicle screw fixation is usually chosen, using monosegmentar, short or long segment instrumentations, with or without bone graft. This review aims to evaluate the effect of transpedicular fixation in traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine. A systematic search on controlled, randomized or quasi-randomized trials comparing different methods of surgical treatment of this fractures was performed, followed by a process of article selection, data extraction and bias assessment by 3 independent authors. Eight articles were included in a total of 5 comparisons, between different transpedicular fixation techniques. No significant differences on function or quality of life, neurologic status or limitation of motion were found. Only instrumentation with fracture level screw incorporation showed significant decrease of pain when compared with instrumentation alone. Several techniques resulted in significant improvements of different radiological parameters. Significantly, surgeries with smaller duration were associated with lesser blood loss. Bone graft use caused a significant raise in post-operative complications, namely donor site pain. So, this paper showed that significative improvements in radiological parameters do not associate with correspondent clinical benefits, and only instrumentation with level screw incorporation is associated with a clear benefit on pain. Moreover, the need for bone graft is questioned, since it leads to no clinic-radiological improvement with a raise of complications. However, a small number of controlled studies is available on this topic.

  5. False-positive findings in Cochrane meta-analyses with and without application of trial sequential analysis: an empirical review

    PubMed Central

    Imberger, Georgina; Thorlund, Kristian; Gluud, Christian; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many published meta-analyses are underpowered. We explored the role of trial sequential analysis (TSA) in assessing the reliability of conclusions in underpowered meta-analyses. Methods We screened The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and selected 100 meta-analyses with a binary outcome, a negative result and sufficient power. We defined a negative result as one where the 95% CI for the effect included 1.00, a positive result as one where the 95% CI did not include 1.00, and sufficient power as the required information size for 80% power, 5% type 1 error, relative risk reduction of 10% or number needed to treat of 100, and control event proportion and heterogeneity taken from the included studies. We re-conducted the meta-analyses, using conventional cumulative techniques, to measure how many false positives would have occurred if these meta-analyses had been updated after each new trial. For each false positive, we performed TSA, using three different approaches. Results We screened 4736 systematic reviews to find 100 meta-analyses that fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Using conventional cumulative meta-analysis, false positives were present in seven of the meta-analyses (7%, 95% CI 3% to 14%), occurring more than once in three. The total number of false positives was 14 and TSA prevented 13 of these (93%, 95% CI 68% to 98%). In a post hoc analysis, we found that Cochrane meta-analyses that are negative are 1.67 times more likely to be updated (95% CI 0.92 to 2.68) than those that are positive. Conclusions We found false positives in 7% (95% CI 3% to 14%) of the included meta-analyses. Owing to limitations of external validity and to the decreased likelihood of updating positive meta-analyses, the true proportion of false positives in meta-analysis is probably higher. TSA prevented 93% of the false positives (95% CI 68% to 98%). PMID:27519923

  6. Home-based versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation: abridged Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, S A; Taylor, R S; Jolly, K; Zawada, A; Dean, S G; Cowie, A; Norton, R J; Dalal, H M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To update the Cochrane review comparing the effects of home-based and supervised centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) on mortality and morbidity, quality of life, and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with heart disease. Methods Systematic review and meta-analysis. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL were searched up to October 2014, without language restriction. Randomised trials comparing home-based and centre-based CR programmes in adults with myocardial infarction, angina, heart failure or who had undergone coronary revascularisation were included. Results 17 studies with 2172 patients were included. No difference was seen between home-based and centre-based CR in terms of: mortality (relative risk (RR) 0.79, 95% CI 0.43 to 1.47); cardiac events; exercise capacity (mean difference (MD) −0.10, −0.29 to 0.08); total cholesterol (MD 0.07 mmol/L, −0.24 to 0.11); low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (MD −0.06 mmol/L, −0.27 to 0.15); triglycerides (MD −0.16 mmol/L, −0.38 to 0.07); systolic blood pressure (MD 0.2 mm Hg, −3.4 to 3.8); smoking (RR 0.98, 0.79 to 1.21); health-related quality of life and healthcare costs. Lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (MD −0.07 mmol/L, −0.11 to −0.03, p=0.001) and lower diastolic blood pressure (MD −1.9 mm Hg, −0.8 to −3.0, p=0.009) were observed in centre-based participants. Home-based CR was associated with slightly higher adherence (RR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.07). Conclusions Home-based and centre-based CR provide similar benefits in terms of clinical and health-related quality of life outcomes at equivalent cost for those with heart failure and following myocardial infarction and revascularisation. PMID:27738516

  7. What's in a name? The challenge of describing interventions in systematic reviews: analysis of a random sample of reviews of non-pharmacological stroke interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Tammy C; Walker, Marion F; Langhorne, Peter; Eames, Sally; Thomas, Emma; Glasziou, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess, in a sample of systematic reviews of non-pharmacological interventions, the completeness of intervention reporting, identify the most frequently missing elements, and assess review authors’ use of and beliefs about providing intervention information. Design Analysis of a random sample of systematic reviews of non-pharmacological stroke interventions; online survey of review authors. Data sources and study selection The Cochrane Library and PubMed were searched for potentially eligible systematic reviews and a random sample of these assessed for eligibility until 60 (30 Cochrane, 30 non-Cochrane) eligible reviews were identified. Data collection In each review, the completeness of the intervention description in each eligible trial (n=568) was assessed by 2 independent raters using the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist. All review authors (n=46) were invited to complete a survey. Results Most reviews were missing intervention information for the majority of items. The most incompletely described items were: modifications, fidelity, materials, procedure and tailoring (missing from all interventions in 97%, 90%, 88%, 83% and 83% of reviews, respectively). Items that scored better, but were still incomplete for the majority of reviews, were: ‘when and how much’ (in 31% of reviews, adequate for all trials; in 57% of reviews, adequate for some trials); intervention mode (in 22% of reviews, adequate for all trials; in 38%, adequate for some trials); and location (in 19% of reviews, adequate for all trials). Of the 33 (71%) authors who responded, 58% reported having further intervention information but not including it, and 70% tried to obtain information. Conclusions Most focus on intervention reporting has been directed at trials. Poor intervention reporting in stroke systematic reviews is prevalent, compounded by poor trial reporting. Without adequate intervention descriptions, the conduct, usability and

  8. [Abstract of Cochrane review].

    PubMed

    Carneiro, António Vaz; Costa, João

    2013-01-01

    Objectivos: Esta revisão sistemática destinou-se a determinar os efeitos sobre a mortalidade e morbilidade do rastreio do cancro da mama com mamografia em mulheres de risco baixo e em cuidados primários.Material e Métodos: Foram pesquisadas duas bases de dados - PubMed (Novembro 2012) e a World Health Organization’s International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (Novembro 2012) – para identificação de ensaios clínicos aleatorizados, prospectivos e controlados (Randomized Clinical trials – RCTs) comparando o rastreio com a não realização do rastreio. A extracção dos dados foi feita por dois investigadores que contactaram, quando necessário, os autores dos estudos para informação adicional.Resultados: Foram identificados 8 RCTs cujas amostras somaram 600 000 mulheres com idades entre 39-74 anos. Os resultados agregados dos ensaios de melhor qualidade metodológica (baixo risco de viés de selecção) não detectaram diferenças na mortalidade por cancro da mama aos 7 (risco relativo [RR] = 0,93; Intervalo de Confiança [IC] 95%: 0,79-1,09) ou aos 13 anos (RR = 0,90; IC 95%: 0,79-1,02). Os resultados agregados dos ensaios com maior risco de viés de selecção (por possível aleatorização inadequada) mostraram reduções significativas na mortalidade por cancro da mama aos 7 (RR = 0,71; IC95%: 0,61-0,83) e aos 13 anos (RR = 0,75; IC95%: 0,67-0,83). Não se verificou heterogeneidade entre os resultados dos estudos. Os resultados dos estudos de melhor epior qualidade metodológica foram semelhantes para as mulheres com menos e com mais de 50 anos de idade. Quer os resultados dos estudos de melhor qualidade, quer os resultados dos estudos com maior risco de viés, não encontraram diferenças na mortalidade oncológica (por todos os tipos de cancro) nem na mortalidade global, quer aos 7, quer aos 13 anos. Devido a deficiente classificação das causas de morte nas amostras dos RCTs, a mortalidade por cancro da mama revelou-se um resultado (outcome) enviesado a favor do rastreio. O número total de lumpectomias e mastectomias foi significativamente superior nos grupos rastreados (RR=1,31,IC95%: 1,22-1,42); no que se refere às mastectomias, os valores foram também mais altos: RR=1,20 (IC95%: 1,08-1,32). Verificou-se ainda uma utilização mais intensiva de radioterapia nos grupos rastreados (dados de 2 RCTs).Conclusões: Estes resultados indicam que não está demonstrado que o rastreio do cancro da mama com mamografia tenha umbenefício-risco favorável em mulheres de baixo risco rastreadas em cuidados primários.

  9. FIRST BH COCHRANE SYMPOSIUM HELD

    PubMed Central

    Mahmic-Kaknjo, Mersiha; Novo, Ahmed; Krleza-Jeric, Karmela

    2016-01-01

    The first BH Cochrane Symposium was held on 12 October 2015 in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina (BH), organized by the Agency for Quality and Accreditation in Healthcare in Federation of BH (AKAZ) and Medical Faculty University of Sarajevo. A group of ten national and international experts presented the Cochrane organization and systematic reviews, as well as the IMPACT Observatory, development of guidelines in BH, and the role of AKAZ. Examples of the development and use of Cochrane reviews in evidence informed decision making in health as well as research integrity were presented and discussed. Major BH decision makers and interested professionals from all over BH participated in a symposium and its lively discussion, especially from the perspective of Cochrane and its activities in BH, and the collaboration with the Croatian Cochrane. It can be expected that this symposium will inspire further growth of participation and use of Cochrane in BH and increase the awareness of various aspects of evidence informed medicine and research integrity. PMID:27047274

  10. Methylphenidate for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: Cochrane systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomised clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Krogh, Helle B; Ramstad, Erica; Moreira-Maia, Carlos R; Holmskov, Mathilde; Skoog, Maria; Nilausen, Trine Danvad; Magnusson, Frederik L; Zwi, Morris; Gillies, Donna; Rosendal, Susanne; Groth, Camilla; Rasmussen, Kirsten Buch; Gauci, Dorothy; Kirubakaran, Richard; Forsbøl, Bente; Simonsen, Erik; Gluud, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Study question Is methylphenidate beneficial or harmful for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents? Methods Electronic databases were searched up to February 2015 for parallel and crossover randomised clinical trials comparing methylphenidate with placebo or no intervention in children and adolescents with ADHD. Meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses (TSA) were conducted. Quality was assessed using GRADE. Teachers, parents, and observers rated ADHD symptoms and general behaviour. Study answer and limitations The analyses included 38 parallel group trials (n=5111, median treatment duration 49 days) and 147 crossover trials (n=7134, 14 days). The average age across all studies was 9.7 years. The analysis suggested a beneficial effect of methylphenidate on teacher rated symptoms in 19 parallel group trials (standardised mean difference (SMD) −0.77, n=1698), corresponding to a mean difference of −9.6 points on the ADHD rating scale. There was no evidence that methylphenidate was associated with an increase in serious adverse events (risk ratio 0.98, nine trials, n=1532; TSA adjusted intervention effect RR 0.91). Methylphenidate was associated with an increased risk of non-serious adverse events (1.29, 21 trials, n=3132; TSA adjusted RR 1.29). Teacher rated general behaviour seemed to improve with methylphenidate (SMD −0.87, five trials, n=668) A change of 7 points on the child health questionnaire (CHQ) has been deemed a minimal clinically relevant difference. The change reported in a meta-analysis of three trials corresponds to a mean difference of 8.0 points on the CHQ (range 0-100 points), which suggests that methylphenidate may improve parent reported quality of life (SMD 0.61, three trials, n=514). 96.8% of trials were considered high risk of bias trials according to the Cochrane guidelines. All outcomes were assessed very low quality according to GRADE. What this study adds The results suggest that

  11. Evidence from the Cochrane Collaboration for Traditional Chinese Medicine Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, Susan; Kimbrough, Elizabeth; Cheng, Ker; Berman, Brian M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The Cochrane Collaboration, an international not-for-profit organization that prepares and maintains systematic reviews of randomized trials of health care therapies, has produced reviews summarizing much of the evidence on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Our objective was to review the evidence base according to Cochrane systematic reviews. Methods In order to detect reviews focusing on TCM, we searched the titles and abstracts of all reviews in Issue 4, 2008 of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. For each review, we extracted data on the number of trials included and the total number of participants. We provided an indication of the strength of the review findings by assessing the reviewers' abstract conclusions statement. We supplemented our assessment of the abstract conclusions statements with a listing of the comparisons and outcomes showing statistically significant meta-analyses results. Results We identified 70 Cochrane systematic reviews of TCM, primarily acupuncture (n = 26) and Chinese herbal medicine (n = 42), and 1 each of moxibustion and t'ai chi. Nineteen (19) of 26 acupuncture reviews and 22/42 herbal medicine reviews concluded that there was not enough good quality trial evidence to make any conclusion about the efficacy of the evaluated treatment, while the remaining 7 acupuncture and 20 herbal medicine reviews and each of the moxibustion and t'ai chi reviews indicated a suggestion of benefit, which was qualified by a caveat about the poor quality and quantity of studies. Most reviews included many distinct interventions, controls, outcomes, and populations, and a large number of different comparisons were made, each with a distinct forest plot. Conclusions Most Cochrane systematic reviews of TCM are inconclusive, due specifically to the poor methodology and heterogeneity of the studies reviewed. Some systematic reviews provide preliminary evidence of Chinese medicine's benefits to certain patient populations

  12. [Acupuncture resources in Cochrane Library].

    PubMed

    Liu, Mai-Lan; Lan, Lei; Wu, Xi; Du, Huai-Bin; Tang, Hong-Zhi; Liang, Fan-Rong

    2011-07-01

    To identify acupuncture resources in six databases of Cochrane Library (CL) with computer retrieve. Seventy-two literatures were identified in Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR). Among them, 12 Cochrane systematic review (CSR) verified the effectiveness of acupuncture, 29 concerning the indeterminacy of the efficacy of acupuncture with 1 didn't support acupuncture for epilepsy and 31 remained as protocols; 121 literatures were found in Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) with more types of diseases or symptoms and rich modality comparing to CSR; 4218 randomized controlled trials and clinical controlled trials were identified in Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CCRCT); 43 literatures in Cochrane Methodology Register Database (CMRD) which focused on blindness study, quality assessment of methodology of research and publication bias and so on; 25 literatures in Health Technology Assessment Database (HTAD) and 18 in NHS Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED) which were centered on acupuncture analgesia. Consequently, acupuncture literatures in 6 databases of CL do provide good resources for acupuncture researchers due to its abundant content, concrete classification and high quality evidence.

  13. Perioperative increase in global blood flow to explicit defined goals and outcomes after surgery: a Cochrane Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Grocott, M P W; Dushianthan, A; Hamilton, M A; Mythen, M G; Harrison, D; Rowan, K

    2013-10-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis summarizes the clinical effects of increasing perioperative blood flow using fluids with or without inotropes/vasoactive drugs to explicit defined goals in adults. We included randomized controlled trials of adult patients (aged 16 years or older) undergoing surgery. We included 31 studies of 5292 participants. There was no difference in mortality at the longest follow-up: 282/2615 (10.8%) died in the control group and 238/2677 (8.9%) in the treatment group, RR of 0.89 (95% CI: 0.76-1.05; P=0.18). However, the results were sensitive to analytical methods and withdrawal of studies with methodological limitations. The intervention reduced the rate of three morbidities (renal failure, respiratory failure, and wound infections) but not the rates of arrhythmia, myocardial infarction, congestive cardiac failure, venous thrombosis, and other types of infections. The number of patients with complications was also reduced by the intervention. Hospital length of stay was reduced in the treatment group by 1.16 days. There was no difference in critical care length of stay. The primary analysis of this review showed no difference between groups but this result was sensitive to the method of analysis, withdrawal of studies with methodological limitations, and was dominated by a single large study. Patients receiving this intervention stayed in hospital 1 day less with fewer complications. It is unlikely that the intervention causes harm. The balance of current evidence does not support widespread implementation of this approach to reduce mortality but does suggest that complications and duration of hospital stay are reduced. PMID:23661403

  14. Research synthesis and dissemination as a bridge to knowledge management: the Cochrane Collaboration.

    PubMed Central

    Volmink, Jimmy; Siegfried, Nandi; Robertson, Katharine; Gülmezoglu, A. Metin

    2004-01-01

    In the current information age, research synthesis is a particularly useful tool for keeping track of scientific research and making sense of the large volumes of frequently conflicting data derived from primary studies. The Cochrane Collaboration is a global initiative "to help people make well-informed decisions about health care by preparing, maintaining and promoting the accessibility of systematic reviews of the effects of healthcare interventions". In this paper we set the work of the Cochrane Collaboration in historical perspective, explain what a Cochrane review is, and describe initiatives for promoting worldwide dissemination of synthesized information. We also consider emerging evidence of the Cochrane Collaboration's impact on health-care practice, policy, research and education. Finally, we highlight the need for increased investment in the preparation and maintenance of Cochrane reviews, particularly those that address health issues that are relevant to people living in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:15643800

  15. [Analysis of the Cochrane review: biomarkers as point-of-care tests to guide prescription of antibiotics in patients with acute respiratory infections in primary care. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014,11:CD10130].

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Pedro; Costa, João; Vaz-Carneiro, António

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the most frequent reason for prescribing antibiotics in primary health care. Since most acute respiratory infections are of viral or non-severe bacterial etiology, the use of antibiotics is not beneficial and exposes patients to side effects. In addition, the undifferentiated prescription of this drug group increases antibiotic resistance and promotes: 1. increased costs for health systems; 2. failure to future treatments, increased morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases. In the appropriate clinical setting, the use of biomarkers as point-of-care tests to assess the acute phase response to injury of tissue / organ, is a strategy in the therapeutic management of patients with acute respiratory infections in outpatient context. This Cochrane review compared the prescription of antibiotics to acute respiratory infections based: 1. exclusively in the clinic; 2. Iinn the use of biomarkers as point-of-care tests (eg C-reactive protein). The C-reactive protein in quick test seems to be associated with reduced use of antibiotics, however, there has not been a reduction in the lenght of treatment or the perception of recovery by the patient. There may be an increase of hospitalizations compared with the group of patients without the biomarker use; no mortality was register in either group.

  16. Are mass-media campaigns effective in preventing drug use? A Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Allara, Elias; Ferri, Marica; Bo, Alessandra; Gasparrini, Antonio; Faggiano, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there is evidence that mass-media campaigns can be effective in reducing illicit drug consumption and the intent to consume. Design Systematic review of randomised and non-randomised studies. Methods We searched four electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&I and CENTRAL) and further explored seven additional resources to obtain both published and unpublished materials. We appraised the quality of included studies using standardised tools. We carried out meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials and a pooled analysis of interrupted time-series and controlled before-and-after studies. Results We identified 19 studies comprising 184 811 participants. Pooled analyses and narrative synthesis provided mixed evidence of effectiveness. Eight interventions evaluated with randomised controlled trials leaned towards no evidence of an effect, both on drug use (standardised mean difference (SMD) −0.02; 95% CI −0.15 to 0.12) and the intention to use drugs (SMD −0.07; 95% CI −0.19 to 0.04). Four campaigns provided some evidence of beneficial effects in preventing drug use and two interventions provided evidence of iatrogenic effects. Conclusions Studies were considerably heterogeneous in type of mass-media intervention, outcome measures, underlying theory, comparison groups and design. Such factors can contribute to explaining the observed variability in results. Owing to the risk of adverse effects, caution is needed in disseminating mass-media campaigns tackling drug use. Large studies conducted with appropriate methodology are warranted to consolidate the evidence base. PMID:26338836

  17. Metformin for endometrial hyperplasia: a Cochrane protocol

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Naomi S; Oliver, Thomas R W; Shiwani, Hunain; Saner, Juliane R F; Mulvaney, Caroline A; Atiomo, William

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Endometrial hyperplasia is a precancerous lesion of the endometrium, commonly presenting with uterine bleeding. If managed expectantly, it frequently progresses to endometrial carcinoma, rates of which are increasing dramatically worldwide. However, the established treatment for endometrial hyperplasia (progestogens) involves multiple side effects and leaves the risk of recurrence. Metformin is the most commonly used oral hypoglycaemic agent in type 2 diabetes mellitus. It has also been linked to the reversal of endometrial hyperplasia and may therefore contribute to decreasing the prevalence of endometrial carcinoma without the fertility and side effect consequences of current therapies. However, the efficacy and safety of metformin being used for this therapeutic target is unclear and, therefore, this systematic review will aim to determine this. Methods and analysis We will search the following trials and databases with no language restrictions: Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Specialised Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; PubMed; Google Scholar; ClinicalTrials.gov; the WHO International Trials Registry Platform portal; OpenGrey and the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS). We will include randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of use of metformin compared with a placebo or no treatment, conventional medical treatment (eg, progestogens) or any other active intervention. Two review authors will independently assess the trial eligibility, risk of bias and extract appropriate data points. Trial authors will be contacted for additional data. The primary review outcome is the regression of endometrial hyperplasia histology towards normal histology. Secondary outcomes include hysterectomy rate; abnormal uterine bleeding; quality of life scores and adverse reactions to treatments. Ethics and dissemination

  18. Feasibility of a Knowledge Translation CME Program: "Courriels Cochrane"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluye, Pierre; Grad, Roland; Granikov, Vera; Theriault, Guylene; Fremont, Pierre; Burnand, Bernard; Mercer, Jay; Marlow, Bernard; Arroll, Bruce; Luconi, Francesca; Legare, France; Labrecque, Michel; Ladouceur, Roger; Bouthillier, France; Sridhar, Soumya Bindiganavile; Moscovici, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Systematic literature reviews provide best evidence, but are underused by clinicians. Thus, integrating Cochrane reviews into continuing medical education (CME) is challenging. We designed a pilot CME program where summaries of Cochrane reviews ("Courriels Cochrane") were disseminated by e-mail. Program participants automatically…

  19. Evidence-based interventions to reduce adverse events in hospitals: a systematic review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Zegers, Marieke; Hesselink, Gijs; Geense, Wytske; Vincent, Charles; Wollersheim, Hub

    2016-01-01

    Objective To provide an overview of effective interventions aimed at reducing rates of adverse events in hospitals. Design Systematic review of systematic reviews. Data sources PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE were searched for systematic reviews published until October 2015. Study selection English-language systematic reviews of interventions aimed at reducing adverse events in hospitals, including studies with an experimental design and reporting adverse event rates, were included. Two reviewers independently assessed each study's quality and extracted data on the study population, study design, intervention characteristics and adverse patient outcomes. Results Sixty systematic reviews with moderate to high quality were included. Statistically significant pooled effect sizes were found for 14 types of interventions, including: (1) multicomponent interventions to prevent delirium; (2) rapid response teams to reduce cardiopulmonary arrest and mortality rates; (3) pharmacist interventions to reduce adverse drug events; (4) exercises and multicomponent interventions to prevent falls; and (5) care bundle interventions, checklists and reminders to reduce infections. Most (82%) of the significant effect sizes were based on 5 or fewer primary studies with an experimental study design. Conclusions The evidence for patient-safety interventions implemented in hospitals worldwide is weak. The findings address the need to invest in high-quality research standards in order to identify interventions that have a real impact on patient safety. Interventions to prevent delirium, cardiopulmonary arrest and mortality, adverse drug events, infections and falls are most effective and should therefore be prioritised by clinicians. PMID:27687901

  20. Interventions to enhance work participation of workers with a chronic disease: a systematic review of reviews.

    PubMed

    Vooijs, Marloes; Leensen, Monique C J; Hoving, Jan L; Wind, Haije; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to provide an overview of the available effective interventions that enhance work participation of people with a chronic disease, irrespective of their diagnosis. A search was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library, searching for systematic reviews published between 2004 and February 2015. Systematic reviews were eligible for inclusion if they described an intervention aimed at enhancing work participation and included participants of working age (18-65 years) with a chronic disease. Reviews had to include populations having different chronic diseases. The quality of the included reviews was evaluated using the quality instrument AMSTAR. Results of reviews of medium and high quality were described in this review. The search resulted in 9 reviews, 5 of which were of medium quality. No high quality reviews were retrieved. 1 review reported inconclusive evidence for policy-based return to work initiatives. The 4 other reviews described interventions focused on changes at work, such as changes in work organisation, working conditions and work environment. Of these 4 reviews, 3 reported beneficial effects of the intervention on work participation. Interventions examined in populations having different chronic diseases were mainly focused on changes at work. The majority of the included interventions were reported to be effective in enhancing work participation of people with a chronic disease, indicating that interventions directed at work could be considered for a generic approach in order to enhance work participation in various chronic diseases.

  1. AAC Modeling Intervention Research Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sennott, Samuel C.; Light, Janice C.; McNaughton, David

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review of research on the effects of interventions that include communication partner modeling of aided augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) on the language acquisition of individuals with complex communication needs was conducted. Included studies incorporated AAC modeling as a primary component of the intervention,…

  2. What is a clinical pathway? Refinement of an operational definition to identify clinical pathway studies for a Cochrane systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Adegboyega K; Rotter, Thomas; Kinsman, Leigh; Machotta, Andreas; Ronellenfitsch, Ulrich; Scott, Shannon D; Goodridge, Donna; Plishka, Christopher; Groot, Gary

    2016-02-23

    Clinical pathways (CPWs) are a common component in the quest to improve the quality of health. CPWs are used to reduce variation, improve quality of care, and maximize the outcomes for specific groups of patients. An ongoing challenge is the operationalization of a definition of CPW in healthcare. This may be attributable to both the differences in definition and a lack of conceptualization in the field of clinical pathways. This correspondence article describes a process of refinement of an operational definition for CPW research and proposes an operational definition for the future syntheses of CPWs literature. Following the approach proposed by Kinsman et al. (BMC Medicine 8(1):31, 2010) and Wieland et al. (Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine 17(2):50, 2011), we used a four-stage process to generate a five criteria checklist for the definition of CPWs. We refined the operational definition, through consensus, merging two of the checklist's criteria, leading to a more inclusive criterion for accommodating CPW studies conducted in various healthcare settings. The following four criteria for CPW operational definition, derived from the refinement process described above, are (1) the intervention was a structured multidisciplinary plan of care; (2) the intervention was used to translate guidelines or evidence into local structures; (3) the intervention detailed the steps in a course of treatment or care in a plan, pathway, algorithm, guideline, protocol or other 'inventory of actions' (i.e. the intervention had time-frames or criteria-based progression); and (4) the intervention aimed to standardize care for a specific population. An intervention meeting all four criteria was considered to be a CPW. The development of operational definitions for complex interventions is a useful approach to appraise and synthesize evidence for policy development and quality improvement.

  3. Identifying gaps in research prioritization: The global burden of neglected tropical diseases as reflected in the Cochrane database of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Bhaumik, Soumyadeep; Karimkhani, Chante; Czaja, Christopher A.; Williams, Hywel C.; Rani, Monica; Nasser, Mona; Boyers, Lindsay N.; Dmitruk, Sergei; Dellavalle, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) impact disadvantaged populations in resource-scarce settings. Availability of synthesized evidence is paramount to end this disparity. The aim of the study was to determine whether NTD systematic reviews or protocols in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) reflect disease burden. Methods: Two authors independently searched the CDSR for reviews/protocols regarding the NTDs diseases. Each review or protocol was classified to a single NTD category. Any discrepancy was solved by consensus with third author. NTD systematic review or protocol from CDSR were matched with disability-adjusted life year (DALY) metrics from the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and associated P values were used to assess for correlation between the number of systematic reviews and protocols and the %2010 DALY associated with each NTD. Results: Overall, there was poor correlation between CDSR representation and DALYs. Yellow fever, echinococcus, onchocerciasis, and schistosomiasis representation was well-aligned with DALY. Leprosy, trachoma, dengue, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease representation was greater, while cysticercosis, human African trypanosomiasis, ascariasis, lymphatic filariasis, and hookworm representation was lower than DALY. Three of the 18 NTDs had reviews/protocols of diagnostic test accuracy. Conclusions: Our results indicate the need for increased prioritization of systematic reviews on NTDs, particularly diagnostic test accuracy reviews. PMID:26985407

  4. Risk of Bias in Systematic Reviews of Non-Randomized Studies of Adverse Cardiovascular Effects of Thiazolidinediones and Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors: Application of a New Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool

    PubMed Central

    Bilandzic, Anja; Fitzpatrick, Tiffany; Rosella, Laura; Henry, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Systematic reviews of the effects of healthcare interventions frequently include non-randomized studies. These are subject to confounding and a range of other biases that are seldom considered in detail when synthesizing and interpreting the results. Our aims were to assess the reliability and usability of a new Cochrane risk of bias (RoB) tool for non-randomized studies of interventions and to determine whether restricting analysis to studies with low or moderate RoB made a material difference to the results of the reviews. Methods and Findings We selected two systematic reviews of population-based, controlled non-randomized studies of the relationship between the use of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors and major cardiovascular events. Two epidemiologists applied the Cochrane RoB tool and made assessments across the seven specified domains of bias for each of 37 component studies. Inter-rater agreement was measured using the weighted Kappa statistic. We grouped studies according to overall RoB and performed statistical pooling for (a) all studies and (b) only studies with low or moderate RoB. Kappa scores across the seven bias domains ranged from 0.50 to 1.0. In the COX-2 inhibitor review, two studies had low overall RoB, 14 had moderate RoB, and five had serious RoB. In the TZD review, six studies had low RoB, four had moderate RoB, four had serious RoB, and two had critical RoB. The pooled odds ratios for myocardial infarction, heart failure, and death for rosiglitazone versus pioglitazone remained significantly elevated when analyses were confined to studies with low or moderate RoB. However, the estimate for myocardial infarction declined from 1.14 (95% CI 1.07–1.24) to 1.06 (95% CI 0.99–1.13) when analysis was confined to studies with low RoB. Estimates of pooled relative risks of cardiovascular events with COX-2 inhibitors compared with no nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug changed little when analyses were

  5. Systematic Review of School-Based Prevention and Early Intervention Programs for Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calear, Alison L.; Christensen, Helen

    2010-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to identify and describe school-based prevention and early intervention programs for depression and to evaluate their effectiveness in reducing depressive symptoms. Forty-two randomised controlled trials, relating to 28 individual school-based programs, were identified through the Cochrane Library, PsycInfo and…

  6. Low-molecular-weight heparins for managing vasoocclusive crises in people with sickle cell disease: a summary of a cochrane systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Zuuren, Esther J; Fedorowicz, Zbys

    2014-01-01

    We summarize a Cochrane systematic review that was conducted to assess the effects of low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) for managing vasoocclusive crises (VOC) in people with sickle cell disease. Sickle cell disease is one of the most common and severe genetic disorders in the world. It can be divided into three broadly distinct clinical phenotypes characterized by either hemolysis, pain syndromes or organ damage. Pain is the most prominent symptom of vasoocclusion, and hypercoagulability is a well-established pathogenic phenomenon in people with sickle cell disease. Searches included the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, abstract books of conference proceedings and several online trials registries (December 2012). One study (with an overall unclear to high risk of bias) comprising 253 participants was included. This study provided limited data, but concluded that tinzaparin resulted in a more rapid resolution of pain, and in a statistically significant lower number of hospitalization days compared to a placebo. Two minor bleeding events were reported as adverse events in the tinzaparin group. Based on the results from this single study, there is incomplete evidence to either support or refute the effectiveness of LMWH in people with sickle cell disease.

  7. Early versus late tracheostomy for critically ill patients: A clinical evidence synopsis of a recent Cochrane Review.

    PubMed

    Keeping, Allison

    2016-01-01

    The author questioned whether an early tracheostomy (within 10 days of intubation) was associated with lower mortality compared with a late tracheostomy for long-term mechanically ventilated patients. The present brief review of eight studies revealed that individuals receiving early tracheostomies had slightly lower mortality rates compared with those who received late tracheostomies. More standardized research is needed. However, if a patient is expected to need long-term mechanical ventilation, a tracheostomy should be performed before the 10-day mark. PMID:26909011

  8. Interventions for Enhancing Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART): A Systematic Review of High Quality Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sivaramalingam, Bhairavi; Navarro, Tamara; Hobson, Nicholas; Keepanasseril, Arun; Wilczynski, Nancy J.; Haynes, R. Brian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We sought to review the effectiveness of interventions designed to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) from studies included in a recent Cochrane review that reported a clinical and an adherence outcome, with at least 80% follow-up for 6 months or more. Data were extracted independently and in duplicate, with an adjudicator for disagreements. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Of 182 relevant studies in the Cochrane review, 49 were related to ART. Statistical pooling was not warranted due to heterogeneity in interventions, participants, treatments, adherence measures and outcomes. Many studies had high risk of bias in elements of design and outcome ascertainment. Only 10 studies improved both adherence and clinical outcomes. These used the following interventions: adherence counselling (two studies); a once-daily regimen (compared to twice daily); text messaging; web-based cognitive behavioral intervention; face-to-face multi-session intensive behavioral interventions (two studies); contingency management; modified directly observed therapy; and nurse-delivered home visits combined with telephone calls. Patient-related adherence interventions were the most frequently tested. Uniform adherence measures and higher quality studies of younger populations are encouraged. PMID:25825938

  9. Intimate Partner Violence and Pregnancy: A Systematic Review of Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Van Parys, An-Sofie; Verhamme, Annelien; Temmerman, Marleen; Verstraelen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) around the time of pregnancy is a widespread global health problem with many negative consequences. Nevertheless, a lot remains unclear about which interventions are effective and might be adopted in the perinatal care context. Objective The objective is to provide a clear overview of the existing evidence on effectiveness of interventions for IPV around the time of pregnancy. Methods Following databases PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched and expanded by hand search. The search was limited to English peer-reviewed randomized controlled trials published from 2000 to 2013. This review includes all types of interventions aiming to reduce IPV around the time of pregnancy as a primary outcome, and as secondary outcomes to enhance physical and/or mental health, quality of life, safety behavior, help seeking behavior, and/or social support. Results We found few randomized controlled trials evaluating interventions for IPV around the time of pregnancy. Moreover, the nine studies identified did not produce strong evidence that certain interventions are effective. Nonetheless, home visitation programs and some multifaceted counseling interventions did produce promising results. Five studies reported a statistically significant decrease in physical, sexual and/or psychological partner violence (odds ratios from 0.47 to 0.92). Limited evidence was found for improved mental health, less postnatal depression, improved quality of life, fewer subsequent miscarriages, and less low birth weight/prematurity. None of the studies reported any evidence of a negative or harmful effect of the interventions. Conclusions and implications Strong evidence of effective interventions for IPV during the perinatal period is lacking, but some interventions show promising results. Additional large-scale, high-quality research is essential to provide further evidence about the effect of certain

  10. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Intervention for Pediatric Obesity Using Mobile Technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jisan; Piao, Meihua; Byun, Ahjung; Kim, Jeongeun

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed the effect sizes of pediatric obesity intervention studies using mobile technology. Ten databases (Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, PubMed/Medline, KoreaMED, KMBASE, KISS, NDSL, KSITI, and RISS) were reviewed, and four studies were included in a qualitative synthesis. To obtain significant change in obesity-related outcomes among elementary school students, including parents and utilizing text messages in interventions are recommended. Furthermore, devices such as accelerometers may aid obesity management. A meta-analysis of four studies indicated that the mobile intervention positively influenced dropout rates but was ineffective for outcomes of weight control, exercise, and sugar-sweetened beverage intake. PMID:27332249

  11. A systematic review of psychosocial suicide prevention interventions for youth.

    PubMed

    Calear, Alison L; Christensen, Helen; Freeman, Alexander; Fenton, Katherine; Busby Grant, Janie; van Spijker, Bregje; Donker, Tara

    2016-05-01

    Youth suicide is a significant public health problem. A systematic review was conducted to examine the effectiveness of school, community and healthcare-based interventions in reducing and preventing suicidal ideation, suicide attempts and deliberate self-harm in young people aged 12-25 years. PsycInfo, PubMed and Cochrane databases were searched to the end of December 2014 to identify randomised controlled trials evaluating the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for youth suicide. In total, 13,747 abstracts were identified and screened for inclusion in a larger database. Of these, 29 papers describing 28 trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria for the current review. The results of the review indicated that just over half of the programs identified had a significant effect on suicidal ideation (Cohen's d = 0.16-3.01), suicide attempts (phi = 0.04-0.38) or deliberate self-harm (phi = 0.29-0.33; d = 0.42). The current review provides preliminary support for the implementation of universal and targeted interventions in all settings, using a diverse range of psychosocial approaches. Further quality research is needed to strengthen the evidence-base for suicide prevention programs in this population. In particular, the development of universal school-based interventions is promising given the potential reach of such an approach.

  12. Interventions for individuals with low health literacy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Stacey L; Halpern, David J; Viera, Anthony J; Berkman, Nancy D; Donahue, Katrina E; Crotty, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recently called for action on health literacy. An important first step is defining the current state of the literature about interventions designed to mitigate the effects of low health literacy. We performed an updated systematic review examining the effects of interventions that authors reported were specifically designed to mitigate the effects of low health literacy. We searched MEDLINE®, The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC), and the Cochrane Library databases (2003 forward for health literacy; 1966 forward for numeracy). Two reviewers independently reviewed titles, abstracts, and full-text articles for inclusion and included studies that examined outcomes by health literacy level and met other pre-specified criteria. One reviewer abstracted article information into evidence tables; a second checked accuracy. Two reviewers independently rated study quality using predefined criteria. Among 38 included studies, we found multiple discrete design features that improved comprehension in one or a few studies (e.g., presenting essential information by itself or first, presenting information so that the higher number is better, adding icon arrays to numerical information, adding video to verbal narratives). In a few studies, we also found consistent, direct, fair or good-quality evidence that intensive self-management interventions reduced emergency department visits and hospitalizations; and intensive self- and disease-management interventions reduced disease severity. Evidence for the effects of interventions on other outcomes was either limited or mixed. Multiple interventions show promise for mitigating the effects of low health literacy and could be considered for use in clinical practice.

  13. Public health interventions in midwifery: a systematic review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternity care providers, particularly midwives, have a window of opportunity to influence pregnant women about positive health choices. This aim of this paper is to identify evidence of effective public health interventions from good quality systematic reviews that could be conducted by midwives. Methods Relevant databases including MEDLINE, Pubmed, EBSCO, CRD, MIDIRS, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library and Econlit were searched to identify systematic reviews in October 2010. Quality assessment of all reviews was conducted. Results Thirty-six good quality systematic reviews were identified which reported on effective interventions. The reviews were conducted on a diverse range of interventions across the reproductive continuum and were categorised under: screening; supplementation; support; education; mental health; birthing environment; clinical care in labour and breast feeding. The scope and strength of the review findings are discussed in relation to current practice. A logic model was developed to provide an overarching framework of midwifery public health roles to inform research policy and practice. Conclusions This review provides a broad scope of high quality systematic review evidence and definitively highlights the challenge of knowledge transfer from research into practice. The review also identified gaps in knowledge around the impact of core midwifery practice on public health outcomes and the value of this contribution. This review provides evidence for researchers and funders as to the gaps in current knowledge and should be used to inform the strategic direction of the role of midwifery in public health in policy and practice. PMID:23134701

  14. Low-molecular-weight heparins are superior to vitamin K antagonists for the long term treatment of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer: a cochrane systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Elie A; Barba, Maddalena; Rohilla, Sandeep; Terrenato, Irene; Sperati, Francesca; Muti, Paola; Schünemann, Holger J

    2008-01-01

    Background Cancer and its therapies increase the risk of venous thromboembolism. Compared to patients without cancer, patients with cancer anticoagulated for venous thromboembolism are more likely to develop recurrent thrombotic events and major bleeding. Addressing all important outcomes including harm is of great importance to make evidence based health care decisions. The objective of this study was to compare low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and oral anticoagulants (vitamin K antagonist (VKA) and ximelagatran) for the long term treatment of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer. Methods A systematic review of the medical literature. We followed the Cochrane Collaboration methodology for conducting systematic reviews. We assessed methodological quality for each outcome by grading the quality of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. Results Eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were eligible and reported data for patients with cancer. The quality of evidence was low for death and moderate for recurrent venous thromboembolism. LMWH, compared to VKA provided no statistically significant survival benefit (Hazard ratio (HR) = 0.96; 95% CI 0.81 to 1.14) but a statistically significant reduction in venous thromboembolism (HR = 0.47; 95% (Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.32 to 0.71). There was no statistically significant difference between LMWH and VKA in bleeding outcomes (RR = 0.91; 95% CI = 0.64 to 1.31) or thrombocytopenia (RR = 1.02; 95% CI = 0.60 to 1.74). Conclusion For the long term treatment of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer, LMWH compared to VKA reduces venous thromboembolism but not death. PMID:18634550

  15. Non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists or surgical castration monotherapy for advanced prostate cancer: a Cochrane systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kunath, Frank; Grobe, Henrik R; Rücker, Gerta; Motschall, Edith; Antes, Gerd; Dahm, Philipp; Wullich, Bernd; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2015-07-01

    To assess the effects of non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists or surgical castration monotherapy for treating advanced hormone-sensitive stages of prostate cancer. We searched the Cochrane Prostatic Diseases and Urologic Cancers Group Specialized Register (PROSTATE), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science with Conference Proceedings, three trial registries and abstracts from three major conferences to 23 December 2013, together with reference lists, and contacted selected experts in the field and manufacturers. We included randomized controlled trials comparing non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy with medical or surgical castration monotherapy for men in advanced hormone-sensitive stages of prostate cancer. Two review authors independently examined full-text reports, identified relevant studies, assessed the eligibility of studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias as well as quality of evidence according to the GRADE working group guidelines. We used Review Manager 5.2 for data synthesis and the fixed-effect model as primary analysis (when heterogeneity was low with I(2) < 50%); we used a random-effects model when confronted with substantial or considerable heterogeneity (when I(2) ≥50%). A total of 11 studies involving 3060 randomly assigned participants were included in the present review. Use of non-steroidal antiandrogens resulted in lower overall survival times (hazard ratio [HR] 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.48, six studies, 2712 participants) and greater clinical progression (1 year: risk ratio [RR] 1.25, 95% CI 1.08-1.45, five studies, 2067 participants; 70 weeks: RR 1.26, 95% CI 1.08-1.45, six studies, 2373 participants; 2 years: RR 1.14, 95% CI 1.04-1.25, three studies, 1336 participants), as well as treatment failure (1 year: RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.02-1.38, four studies, 1539 participants; 70 weeks: RR 1

  16. The Cochrane Collaboration--advances and challenges in improving evidence-based decision making.

    PubMed

    Jadad, A R; Haynes, R B

    1998-01-01

    The Cochrane Collaboration is an international organization that aims to help people make well-informed decisions about health care by preparing, maintaining, and ensuring the accessibility of rigorous, systematic, and up-to-date reviews (and, where possible, meta-analyses) of the benefits and risks of health care interventions. This article describes the structure of the Cochrane Collaboration and the processes used to carry out the task of research transfer. The authors focus on recent achievements of the Collaboration, emphasize the current challenges and barriers the Collaboration is facing to live up to the expectations it has generated, and highlight the strategies that the organization is using to meet those challenges.

  17. Improving the uptake of systematic reviews: a systematic review of intervention effectiveness and relevance

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, John; Byrne, Charles; Clarke, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the barriers, facilitators and interventions that impact on systematic review uptake. The objective of this study was to identify how uptake of systematic reviews can be improved. Selection criteria Studies were included if they addressed interventions enhancing the uptake of systematic reviews. Reports in any language were included. All decisionmakers were eligible. Studies could be randomised trials, cluster-randomised trials, controlled-clinical trials and before-and-after studies. Data sources We searched 19 databases including PubMed, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library, covering the full range of publication years from inception to December 2010. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed quality according to the Effective Practice and Organisation of Care criteria. Results 10 studies from 11 countries, containing 12 interventions met our criteria. Settings included a hospital, a government department and a medical school. Doctors, nurses, mid-wives, patients and programme managers were targeted. Six of the studies were geared to improving knowledge and attitudes while four targeted clinical practice. Synthesis of results Three studies of low-to-moderate risk of bias, identified interventions that showed a statistically significant improvement: educational visits, short summaries of systematic reviews and targeted messaging. Promising interventions include e-learning, computer-based learning, inactive workshops, use of knowledge brokers and an e-registry of reviews. Juxtaposing barriers and facilitators alongside the identified interventions, it was clear that the three effective approaches addressed a wide range of barriers and facilitators. Discussion A limited number of studies were found for inclusion. However, the extensive literature search is one of the strengths of this review. Conclusions Targeted messaging, educational visits and summaries are recommended to enhance systematic review uptake. Identified

  18. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Direct thrombin inhibitors versus vitamin K antagonists for preventing cerebral or systemic embolism in people with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014,3:CD009893].

    PubMed

    Vaz Carneiro, António; Costa, João

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the most important complications of lone (non-valvular) atrial fibrillation. Its prevention is usually accomplished through oral anticoagulation. Until a few years ago warfarin was the most used agent, but recently two new pharmacologic classes have been introduced for stroke prevention in these patients: oral direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran and ximelagatran) and oral factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban). In this systematic review, oral direct thrombin inhibitors were compared with warfarin for efficacy and safety. The results indicate that there is no difference in terms of efficacy (except dabigatran 150 mg BID). Oral direct thrombin inhibitors presented less hemorrhages but increased treatment withdrawal due to adverse side-effects (the authors performed post-hoc analyses excluding ximelagatran because this drug was withdrawn from the market owing to safety concerns). There was no difference in terms of mortality between the agents.

  19. Methotrexate monotherapy and methotrexate combination therapy with traditional and biologic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs for rheumatoid arthritis: abridged Cochrane systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Barnabe, Cheryl; Tomlinson, George; Marshall, Deborah; Devoe, Dan; Bombardier, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare methotrexate based disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) treatments for rheumatoid arthritis in patients naive to or with an inadequate response to methotrexate. Design Systematic review and Bayesian random effects network meta-analysis of trials assessing methotrexate used alone or in combination with other conventional synthetic DMARDs, biologic drugs, or tofacitinib in adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Data sources Trials were identified from Medline, Embase, and Central databases from inception to 19 January 2016; abstracts from two major rheumatology meetings from 2009 to 2015; two trial registers; and hand searches of Cochrane reviews. Study selection criteria Randomized or quasi-randomized trials that compared methotrexate with any other DMARD or combination of DMARDs and contributed to the network of evidence between the treatments of interest. Main outcomes American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 50 response (major clinical improvement), radiographic progression, and withdrawals due to adverse events. A comparison between two treatments was considered statistically significant if its credible interval excluded the null effect, indicating >97.5% probability that one treatment was superior. Results 158 trials were included, with between 10 and 53 trials available for each outcome. In methotrexate naive patients, several treatments were statistically superior to oral methotrexate for ACR50 response: sulfasalazine and hydroxychloroquine (“triple therapy”), several biologics (abatacept, adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab, rituximab, tocilizumab), and tofacitinib. The estimated probability of ACR50 response was similar between these treatments (range 56-67%), compared with 41% with methotrexate. Methotrexate combined with adalimumab, etanercept, certolizumab, or infliximab was statistically superior to oral methotrexate for inhibiting radiographic progression, but the estimated mean change over one year with all

  20. Educational interventions in neurology: a comprehensive systematic review.

    PubMed

    McColgan, P; McKeown, P P; Selai, C; Doherty-Allan, R; McCarron, M O

    2013-07-01

    A fear of neurology and neural sciences (neurophobia) may have clinical consequences. There is therefore a need to formulate an evidence-based approach to neurology education. A comprehensive systematic review of educational interventions in neurology was performed. BEI, Cochrane Library, Dialog Datastar, EBSCO Biomedical, EBSCO Psychology & Behavioral Sciences, EMBASE, ERIC, First Search, MDConsult, Medline, Proquest Medical Library and Web of Knowledge databases were searched for all published studies assessing interventions in neurology education among undergraduate students, junior medical doctors and residents up to and including July 2012. Two independent literature searches were performed for relevant studies, which were then classified for level of evidence using the Centre of Evidence-based Medicine criteria and four levels of Kirkpatrick educational outcomes. One systematic review, 16 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), nine non-randomized cohort/follow-up studies, 33 case series or historically controlled studies and three mechanism-based reasoning studies were identified. Educational interventions showed favourable evaluation or assessment outcomes in 15 of 16 (94%) RCTs. Very few studies measured subsequent clinical behaviour (two studies) and patient outcomes (one study). There is very little high quality evidence of demonstrably effective neurology education. However, RCTs are emerging, albeit without meeting comprehensive educational criteria. An improving evidence base in the quality of neurology education will be important to reduce neurophobia.

  1. A review of web based interventions for managing tobacco use.

    PubMed

    Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Verma, Rohit

    2014-07-01

    Web based interventions (WBIs) have been developed for various health conditions. These include interventions for various psychoactive substance use disorders including tobacco and alcohol. Tobacco use has remained the single largest preventable cause of global mortality and morbidity for many years. It is responsible for around 6 million deaths annually world-wide. Ironically, most of the tobacco users reside in resource poor low and middle-income countries. The article reviews the existing literature on WBIs for management of tobacco use. The literature search was performed using MedLine, PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase and Cochrane Review for relevant English language articles published from 1998 up to 2013. There is limited support for effectiveness of WBIs for managing tobacco use among adolescents. Although most of the trials among adults found WBIs to be more effective at short term follow-up (a few days to weeks), the benefits failed to extend beyond 3 months in most of the studies. All but one interventions studied in a randomized controlled trial is for smoking forms.

  2. A Review of Web Based Interventions for Managing Tobacco Use

    PubMed Central

    Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Verma, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Web based interventions (WBIs) have been developed for various health conditions. These include interventions for various psychoactive substance use disorders including tobacco and alcohol. Tobacco use has remained the single largest preventable cause of global mortality and morbidity for many years. It is responsible for around 6 million deaths annually world-wide. Ironically, most of the tobacco users reside in resource poor low and middle-income countries. The article reviews the existing literature on WBIs for management of tobacco use. The literature search was performed using MedLine, PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase and Cochrane Review for relevant English language articles published from 1998 up to 2013. There is limited support for effectiveness of WBIs for managing tobacco use among adolescents. Although most of the trials among adults found WBIs to be more effective at short term follow-up (a few days to weeks), the benefits failed to extend beyond 3 months in most of the studies. All but one interventions studied in a randomized controlled trial is for smoking forms. PMID:25035543

  3. Mapping interventions that promote mental health in the general population: A scoping review of reviews.

    PubMed

    Enns, Jennifer; Holmqvist, Maxine; Wener, Pamela; Halas, Gayle; Rothney, Janet; Schultz, Annette; Goertzen, Leah; Katz, Alan

    2016-06-01

    Health policies and programs promoting mental health or preventing mental illness in the general public are under-recognized facets of primary prevention. Increasing awareness and adoption of such strategies could reduce the burden of mental illness in individuals, families, communities, and society as whole. We conducted a scoping review of reviews of interventions to promote mental health or prevent mental illness. We searched PubMed, PsycINFO, Scopus, Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL and ERIC from 2004 to 2014. Reviews were included if the authors indicated a systematic approach in their literature searches, and if they comprised interventions in Westernized countries targeting the general population. We identified 39 reviews that met the inclusion criteria. Mental health intervention approaches and outcomes varied across age groups and settings, and included functional, social, and cognitive measures. Most interventions aimed to prevent a specific mental illness or symptoms (depression, anxiety, burnout, or stress). Cognitive-behavioral therapy and educational components were common. School-based programs focused on outcomes involving social and academic development. Interventions for families, especially for young or disadvantaged parents, taught parenting skills to help improve the well-being of children and their care-givers. In the workplace, the focus was on managing stress, while programs for the elderly emphasized quality of life determinants. This review summarizes a wide variety of interventions to promote mental health or prevent mental illness, but the literature is primarily focused on the individual or family unit. More information is required about interventions at the community and societal levels. PMID:26896634

  4. Impact of Physical Activity Intervention Programs on Self-Efficacy in Youths: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cataldo, Rosa; John, Janice; Chandran, Latha; Pati, Susmita; Shroyer, A. Laurie W.

    2013-01-01

    Lack of physical activity has contributed to the nation's childhood obesity crisis, but the impact of physical activity on self-efficacy as a mediator of behavior change has not been examined. This systematic review (SR) describes the published evidence related to the impact of physical activity intervention programs on self-efficacy among youths. From January 2000 to June 2011, the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) standards were used to identify publications from PubMed, PsychInfo, Web of Knowledge, and the Cochran Database of Systematic Reviews. The Cochrane Population, Intervention, Control, Outcome, Study Design (PICOS) approach guided this SR articles selection and evaluation process. Of the 102 publications screened, 10 original studies matched the SR inclusion criteria. The types of physical activity interventions and self-efficacy assessments for these 10 studies were diverse. Of the 10 included articles, 6 articles identified an improvement in post-self-efficacy assessments compared to baseline and 4 showed no effect. In conclusion, physical activity intervention programs may improve self-efficacy in youths. A standardized approach to classify and measure self-efficacy is required. Further research is needed to quantify the association of self-efficacy ratings after completing physical activity interventions with objective health improvements, such as weight loss. PMID:24555151

  5. Interventions in the Alteration on Lingual Frenum: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Priscilla Poliseni; Cardoso, Carolina Louise; Gomes, Erissandra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  Altered lingual frenum modifies the normal tongue mobility, which may influence the stomatognathic functions, resulting in anatomical, physiological and social damage to the subject. It is necessary that health professionals are aware of the process of evaluation, diagnostics and treatment used today, guiding their intervention. Objective  To perform a systematic review of what are the treatment methods used in cases of lingual frenum alteration. Data Synthesis  The literature searches were conducted in MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO, Cochrane and IBECS, delimited by language (Portuguese, English, Spanish), date of publication (January 2000 to January 2014) and studies performed in humans. The selection order used to verify the eligibility of the studies were related to: full text availability; review the abstract; text analysis; final selection. Of the total 443 publications, 26 remained for analysis. The surgical approach was used in all studies, regardless of the study population (infants, children and adults), with a range of tools and techniques employed; speech therapy was recommended in the post surgical in 4 studies. Only 4 studies, all with infants, showed scientific evidence. Conclusion  Surgical intervention is effective for the remission of the limitations caused by the alteration on lingual frenum, but there is a deficit of studies with higher methodological quality. The benefits of speech therapy in the post surgical period are described from improvement in the language of mobility aspects and speech articulation. PMID:27413412

  6. Systematic review of stigma reducing interventions for African/Black diasporic women

    PubMed Central

    Loutfy, Mona; Tharao, Wangari; Logie, Carmen; Aden, Muna A; Chambers, Lori A; Wu, Wei; Abdelmaseh, Marym; Calzavara, Liviana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Literature indicates that racism, sexism, homophobia and HIV-related stigma have adverse impacts on health, well-being, and quality of life among HIV-positive women of African descent (African/Black diaspora). However, limited evidence exists on the effectiveness of interventions aimed at reducing stigma tailored for these women. This study systematically reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomized observational and quasi-experimental studies evaluating the effectiveness of interventions aimed at reducing stigma experienced by this population. Methods The Cochrane methodology was used to develop a search strategy in consultation with a librarian scientist. Databases searched included the Cochrane Library, Ovid EMBASE, PsycInfo, and 10 others. Two reviewers independently assessed the studies for potential relevance and conducted the Cochrane grading of RCTs to assess risk of bias and the Newcastle–Ottawa scale to assess the quality of non-randomized studies. Eligible papers were selected if they employed an intervention design with African/Black diasporic women living with HIV as the target population and had a primary outcome of stigma reduction. Results Of the five studies that met all of the eligibility criteria, four demonstrated the effectiveness of interventions in reducing HIV-related stigma. Only two of the five studies were designed specifically for HIV-positive African/Black diasporic women. Limitations included the absence of interventions addressing other forms of stigma and discrimination (e.g. gender discrimination, racism, heterosexism). Conclusions Our findings suggest that there are limited interventions designed to address multiple forms of stigma, including gender and racial discrimination, experienced by HIV-positive African/Black diasporic women. PMID:25862565

  7. The effectiveness of walking as an intervention for low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, P; Te Wake, A M; Tikkisetty, A S; Wulff, L; Yap, C; Milosavljevic, S

    2010-10-01

    As current low back pain (LBP) guidelines do not specifically advocate walking as an intervention, this review has explored for the effectiveness of walking in managing acute and chronic LBP. CINAHL, Medline, AMED, EMBASE, PubMed, Cochrane and Scopus databases, as well as a hand search of reference lists of retrieved articles, were searched. The search was restricted to studies in the English language. Studies were included when walking was identified as an intervention. Four studies met inclusion criteria, and were assessed with a quality checklist. Three lower ranked studies reported a reduction in LBP from a walking intervention, while the highest ranked study observed no effect. Heterogeneity of study design made it difficult to draw comparisons between studies. There is only low-moderate evidence for walking as an effective intervention strategy for LBP. Further investigation is required to investigate the strength of effect for walking as a primary intervention in the management of acute and chronic LBP. PMID:20414688

  8. The effectiveness of walking as an intervention for low back pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hendrick, P.; Te Wake, A. M.; Tikkisetty, A. S.; Wulff, L.; Yap, C.

    2010-01-01

    As current low back pain (LBP) guidelines do not specifically advocate walking as an intervention, this review has explored for the effectiveness of walking in managing acute and chronic LBP. CINAHL, Medline, AMED, EMBASE, PubMed, Cochrane and Scopus databases, as well as a hand search of reference lists of retrieved articles, were searched. The search was restricted to studies in the English language. Studies were included when walking was identified as an intervention. Four studies met inclusion criteria, and were assessed with a quality checklist. Three lower ranked studies reported a reduction in LBP from a walking intervention, while the highest ranked study observed no effect. Heterogeneity of study design made it difficult to draw comparisons between studies. There is only low–moderate evidence for walking as an effective intervention strategy for LBP. Further investigation is required to investigate the strength of effect for walking as a primary intervention in the management of acute and chronic LBP. PMID:20414688

  9. The Criticism Management System for the Cochrane Library.

    PubMed

    Ober, Melissa; Shohara, Ryo; Rennie, Drummond; Yank, Veronica; Bero, Lisa A

    2002-03-01

    In April 1997, the Cochrane Collaboration implemented the Criticism Management System for The Cochrane Library, allowing readers to electronically submit criticisms on Cochrane reviews and protocols. As a result of resource constraints and user feedback, the Criticism Management System evolved through three different versions. Major problems have included difficult access to the system, a lack of automation within the system, a low number of submissions (171 criticisms submitted per 1,388 reviews), and a low response rate to these criticisms by authors of reviews (26 criticisms have received published responses). These low figures suggest that users of The Cochrane Library are not commenting on the published reviews or not using the Criticism Management System to make their criticisms known to the authors. An easier-to-use system and better ways of encouraging feedback from readers and responses from reviewers are needed in the future.

  10. A Systematic Review of Mammography Educational Interventions for Low-income Women

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Tatiana M.; Delva, Jorge; Gretebeck, Kimberlee; Siefert, Kristine; Ismail, Amid

    2006-01-01

    Objective We conducted a systematic review to examine the effectiveness of educational interventions in increasing mammography screening among low-income women. Data Sources Bibliographic databases, including MEDLINE, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the ISI Web of Science, were searched for relevant articles. Study Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria Randomized, community-based trials targeting low-income women and published between January 1980 and March 2003 were included. Data Extraction The search yielded 242 studies; 24 met all inclusion criteria. Data Synthesis Three studies used mammography vans, three used low-cost vouchers or provided free mammograms, three used home visits, one used community education alone, one provided referrals, five incorporated multiple intervention strategies, two used phone calls, one used videos and print material, and five used primarily print material. Results Of nine studies that reduced barriers to care via mammography vans, cost vouchers, or home visits, eight showed statistically significant increases in mammography screening. Seven of the eight studies that used peer educators had significant increases in screening, as did four of the five studies that used multiple (intervention) components. Conclusions Interventions that used peer educators, incorporated multiple intervention strategies, or provided easy access via vans, cost vouchers, or home visits were effective in increasing screenings. Mailed letter or telephone reminders were not effective in trials involving low-income women, which is contrary to findings from middle/upper-income studies. PMID:16295701

  11. Interventions targeting social isolation in older people: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Targeting social isolation in older people is a growing public health concern. The proportion of older people in society has increased in recent decades, and it is estimated that approximately 25% of the population will be aged 60 or above within the next 20 to 40 years. Social isolation is prevalent amongst older people and evidence indicates the detrimental effect that it can have on health and wellbeing. The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of interventions designed to alleviate social isolation and loneliness in older people. Methods Relevant electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, ASSIA, IBSS, PsycINFO, PubMed, DARE, Social Care Online, the Cochrane Library and CINAHL) were systematically searched using an extensive search strategy, for randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies published in English before May 2009. Additional articles were identified through citation tracking. Studies were included if they related to older people, if the intervention aimed to alleviate social isolation and loneliness, if intervention participants were compared against inactive controls and, if treatment effects were reported. Two independent reviewers extracted data using a standardised form. Narrative synthesis and vote-counting methods were used to summarise and interpret study data. Results Thirty two studies were included in the review. There was evidence of substantial heterogeneity in the interventions delivered and the overall quality of included studies indicated a medium to high risk of bias. Across the three domains of social, mental and physical health, 79% of group-based interventions and 55% of one-to-one interventions reported at least one improved participant outcome. Over 80% of participatory interventions produced beneficial effects across the same domains, compared with 44% of those categorised as non-participatory. Of interventions categorised as having a theoretical basis, 87% reported beneficial effects across

  12. Promoting professional behaviour change in healthcare: what interventions work, and why? A theory-led overview of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mark J; May, Carl R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Translating research evidence into routine clinical practice is notoriously difficult. Behavioural interventions are often used to change practice, although their success is variable and the characteristics of more successful interventions are unclear. We aimed to establish the characteristics of successful behaviour change interventions in healthcare. Design We carried out a systematic overview of systematic reviews on the effectiveness of behaviour change interventions with a theory-led analysis using the constructs of normalisation process theory (NPT). MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsychINFO and the Cochrane Library were searched electronically from inception to July 2015. Setting Primary and secondary care. Participants Participants were any patients and healthcare professionals in systematic reviews who met the inclusion criteria of having examined the effectiveness of professional interventions in improving professional practice and/or patient outcomes. Interventions Professional interventions as defined by the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Review Group. Primary and secondary outcome measures Success of each intervention in changing practice or patient outcomes, and their mechanisms of action. Reviews were coded as to the interventions included, how successful they had been and which NPT constructs its component interventions covered. Results Searches identified 4724 articles, 67 of which met the inclusion criteria. Interventions fell into three main categories: persuasive; educational and informational; and action and monitoring. Interventions focusing on action or education (eg, Audit and Feedback, Reminders, Educational Outreach) acted on the NPT constructs of Collective Action and Reflexive Monitoring, and reviews using them tended to report more positive outcomes. Conclusions This theory-led analysis suggests that interventions which contribute to normative restructuring of practice, modifying peer group norms and expectations (eg

  13. Weight loss interventions in young people (18 to 25 year olds): a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Poobalan, A S; Aucott, L S; Precious, E; Crombie, I K; Smith, W C S

    2010-08-01

    This systematic review assesses weight loss interventions in young adults (18-25 years), who are vulnerable to weight gain. This age group experience critical life course points (leaving home for higher studies or job, pregnancy, cohabitation) and develop/establish lifestyle and behavioural patterns making this an opportune intervention period. Medline, Embase, Cinahl, PsychINFO and Cochrane Library were searched (1980 to March 2008). All trials and cohort studies with control groups that assessed weight loss interventions in this specific age group were included finally identifying 14 studies. Before and after comparison of behavioural/motivational interventions (-2.40 kg; 95% CI -5.4 to 0.6) and combination interventions (-2.96; 95% CI -4.4 to -1.5) consistently showed weight loss. Behavioural/motivational interventions increased self-efficacy, the desire to control weight, boosted self-esteem, and increased satisfaction with body areas and appearance. Interventions also showed improvements in HDL cholesterol, insulin, glucose and maximum oxygen uptake. However, recruitment to participation in interventions was a barrier for this age group with small sample sizes and short-term interventions. There may be gender differences in preference to participation in certain type of interventions. Further research to understand attitudes towards healthy lifestyle and preferences of interventions is needed to develop suitable interventions for this vulnerable age group.

  14. The Effectiveness of Public Health Interventions to Reduce the Health Impact of Climate Change: A Systematic Review of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Bouzid, Maha; Hooper, Lee; Hunter, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Climate change is likely to be one of the most important threats to public health in the coming years. Yet despite the large number of papers considering the health impact of climate change, few have considered what public health interventions may be of most value in reducing the disease burden. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of public health interventions to reduce the disease burden of high priority climate sensitive diseases. Methods and Findings For each disease, we performed a systematic search with no restriction on date or language of publication on Medline, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane CENTRAL and SCOPUS up to December 2010 to identify systematic reviews of public health interventions. We retrieved some 3176 records of which 85 full papers were assessed and 33 included in the review. The included papers investigated the effect of public health interventions on various outcome measures. All interventions were GRADE assessed to determine the strength of evidence. In addition we developed a systematic review quality score. The interventions included environmental interventions to control vectors, chemoprophylaxis, immunization, household and community water treatment, greening cities and community advice. For most reviews, GRADE showed low quality of evidence because of poor study design and high heterogeneity. Also for some key areas such as floods, droughts and other weather extremes, there are no adequate systematic reviews of potential public health interventions. Conclusion In conclusion, we found the evidence base to be mostly weak for environmental interventions that could have the most value in a warmer world. Nevertheless, such interventions should not be dismissed. Future research on public health interventions for climate change adaptation needs to be concerned about quality in study design and should address the gap for floods, droughts and other extreme weather events that pose a risk to health. PMID:23634220

  15. Portion size: review and framework for interventions

    PubMed Central

    Steenhuis, Ingrid HM; Vermeer, Willemijn M

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity has increased. A strong environmental factor contributing to the obesity epidemic is food portion size. This review of studies into the effects of portion size on energy intake shows that increased food portion sizes lead to increased energy intake levels. Important mechanisms explaining why larger portions are attractive and lead to higher intake levels are value for money and portion distortion. This review also shows that few intervention studies aiming to reverse the negative influence of portion size have been conducted thus far, and the ones that have been conducted show mixed effects. More intervention studies targeted at portion size are urgently needed. Opportunities for further interventions are identified and a framework for portion size interventions is proposed. Opportunities for intervention include those targeted at the individual as well as those targeted at the physical, economic, political and socio-cultural environment. PMID:19698102

  16. Systematic reviews of complex interventions: framing the review question.

    PubMed

    Squires, Janet E; Valentine, Jeffrey C; Grimshaw, Jeremy M

    2013-11-01

    The first and most important decision in preparing any systematic review is to clearly frame the question the review team seeks to answer. However, this is not always straightforward, particularly if synthesis teams are interested in the effects of complex interventions. In this article, we discuss how to formulate good systematic review questions of complex interventions. We describe the rationale for developing well-formulated review questions and review the existing guidance on formulating review questions. We discuss that complex interventions can contain a mix of effective and ineffective (or even harmful) actions, which may interact synergistically or dysynergistically or be interdependent, and how these interactions and interdependencies need to be considered when formulating systematic review questions. We discuss complexity specifically in terms of how it relates to the type of question, the scope of the review (i.e., lumping vs. splitting debate), and specification of the intervention. We offer several recommendations to assist review authors in developing a definition for their complex intervention of interest, which is an essential first step in formulating the review question. We end by identifying areas in which future methodological research aimed at improving question formulation, especially as it relates to complex interventions, is needed.

  17. Assessment of Fidelity in Interventions to Improve Hand Hygiene of Healthcare Workers: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Musuuza, Jackson S.; Barker, Anna; Ngam, Caitlyn; Vellardita, Lia; Safdar, Nasia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Compliance with hand hygiene in healthcare workers is fundamental to infection prevention yet remains a challenge to sustain. We examined fidelity reporting in interventions to improve hand hygiene compliance, and we assessed 5 measures of intervention fidelity: (1) adherence, (2) exposure or dose, (3) quality of intervention delivery, (4) participant responsiveness, and (5) program differentiation. DESIGN Systematic review METHODS A librarian performed searches of the literature in PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), Cochrane Library, and Web of Science of material published prior to June 19, 2015. The review protocol was registered in PROSPERO International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews, and assessment of study quality was conducted for each study reviewed. RESULTS A total of 100 studies met the inclusion criteria. Only 8 of these 100 studies reported all 5 measures of intervention fidelity. In addition, 39 of 100 (39%) failed to include at least 3 fidelity measures; 20 of 100 (20%) failed to include 4 measures; 17 of 100 (17%) failed to include 2 measures, while 16 of 100 (16%) of the studies failed to include at least 1 measure of fidelity. Participant responsiveness and adherence to the intervention were the most frequently unreported fidelity measures, while quality of the delivery was the most frequently reported measure. CONCLUSIONS Almost all hand hygiene intervention studies failed to report at least 1 fidelity measurement. To facilitate replication and effective implementation, reporting fidelity should be standard practice when describing results of complex behavioral interventions such as hand hygiene. PMID:26861117

  18. Interventions to Increase Physical Activity in Children Aged 2-5 Years: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jiying; Robbins, Lorraine B; Wen, Fujun; Peng, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Comprehensive evaluation of prior interventions designed to increase preschoolers' physical activity is lacking. This systematic review aimed to examine the effect of interventions on objectively measured physical activity in children aged 2-5 years. We followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. In May 2014, we searched PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ERIC, SPORTDiscus, Cochrane, and Embase. Two reviewers independently identified and appraised the studies. Twenty-four articles describing 23 independent studies and 20 unique interventions met inclusion criteria. Of the 8 interventions resulting in a significant effect in objectively measured physical activity, all were center-based and included a structured physical activity component, 6 included multiple components, 5 integrated theories or models, and 4 actively involved parents. Seven of the 8 were randomized controlled trials. Due to the heterogeneity of the study designs, physical activity measures, and interventions, drawing definitive conclusions was difficult. Although the overall intervention effect was less than optimal, the review indicated that theory-driven, multicomponent interventions including a structured physical activity component and targeting both parents and their children may be a promising approach for increasing preschoolers' physical activity and warrant continued investigation using rigorous designs to identify those that are most effective.

  19. Effect of Preventive Interventions in Mentally Ill Parents on the Mental Health of the Offspring: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegenthaler, Eliane; Munder, Thomas; Egger, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Mental illness in parents affects the mental health of their children. A systematic review and a meta-analysis of the effectiveness of interventions to prevent mental disorders or psychological symptoms in the offspring were performed. Method: The Cochrane, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched for randomized controlled…

  20. Interventions for smoking cessation in hospitalised patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Munafo, M; Rigotti, N; Lancaster, T; Stead, L; Murphy, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—An admission to hospital provides an opportunity to help people stop smoking. Individuals may be more open to help at a time of perceived vulnerability, and may find it easier to quit in an environment where smoking is restricted or prohibited. Providing smoking cessation services during hospitalisation may help more people to attempt and sustain an attempt to quit. The purpose of this paper is to systematically review the effectiveness of interventions for smoking cessation in hospitalised patients.
METHODS—We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group register, CINAHL, and the Smoking and Health database for studies of interventions for smoking cessation in hospitalised patients. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials of behavioural, pharmacological, or multi-component interventions to help patients stop smoking conducted with hospitalised patients who were current smokers or recent quitters were included. Studies of patients admitted for psychiatric disorders or substance abuse, those that did not report abstinence rates, and those with follow up of less than 6 months were excluded. Two of the authors extracted data independently for each paper, with assistance from others.
RESULTS—Intensive intervention (inpatient contact plus follow up for at least 1 month) was associated with a significantly higher cessation rate compared with controls (Peto odds ratio (OR) 1.82,95% CI 1.49 to 2.22). Any contact during hospitalisation followed by minimal follow up failed to detect a statistically significant effect on cessation rate, but did not rule out a 30% increase in smoking cessation (Peto OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.31). There was insufficient evidence to judge the effect of interventions delivered only during the hospital stay. Although the interventions increased quit rates irrespective of whether nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) was used, the results for NRT were compatible with other data indicating that it increases quit rates. There was no

  1. Involvement of informal caregivers in supporting patients with COPD: a review of intervention studies

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Jamie; Mansfield, Elise; Boyes, Allison W; Waller, Amy; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; Regan, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers of individuals with COPD have a key role in maintaining patient adherence and optimizing patient function. However, no systematic review has examined how the caregiver role has been operationalized in interventions to improve outcomes of individuals with COPD or the quality or effectiveness of these interventions. The aims of this review were to 1) determine whether caregivers have been involved as part of interventions to improve outcomes of individuals with COPD; 2) determine the risk of bias within included intervention studies; and 3) examine the effectiveness of interventions that have involved caregivers in improving outcomes of individuals with COPD. The electronic databases of Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Library were searched from January 2000 to November 2015. Experimental studies testing interventions that involved a caregiver to improve COPD patient outcomes were eligible. Nine studies involving caregivers met inclusion criteria. No studies reported any intervention components targeted solely at caregivers, with most instead including caregivers in dyadic or group education sessions about COPD delivered by health care professionals. The risk of bias identified in included studies was mixed. Seven of the nine studies were effective in improving a broad range of outcomes. These findings highlight that there is an urgent need for methodologically rigorous interventions to examine the effectiveness of strategies to assist caregivers to provide direct care, encourage adherence to health care provider recommendations, act as a health care advocate, and provide emotional and psychosocial support to individuals with COPD. PMID:27478372

  2. Behaviour change interventions to promote physical activity in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Louise; Gallagher, Stephen; Cramp, Fiona; Brand, Charles; Fraser, Alexander; Kennedy, Norelee

    2015-10-01

    Research has shown that people who have rheumatoid arthritis (RA) do not usually participate in enough physical activity to obtain the benefits of optimal physical activity levels, including quality of life, aerobic fitness and disease-related characteristics. Behaviour change theory underpins the promotion of physical activity. The aim of this systematic review was to explore behaviour change interventions which targeted physical activity behaviour in people who have RA, focusing on the theory underpinning the interventions and the behaviour change techniques utilised using specific behaviour change taxonomy. An electronic database search was conducted via EBSCOhost, PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Web of Science databases in August 2014, using Medical Subject Headings and keywords. A manual search of reference lists was also conducted. Randomised control trials which used behaviour change techniques and targeted physical activity behaviour in adults who have RA were included. Two reviewers independently screened studies for inclusion. Methodological quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Five studies with 784 participants were included in the review. Methodological quality of the studies was mixed. The studies consisted of behaviour change interventions or combined practical physical activity and behaviour change interventions and utilised a large variety of behaviour change techniques. Four studies reported increased physical activity behaviour. All studies used subjective methods of assessing physical activity with only one study utilising an objective measure. There has been varied success of behaviour change interventions in promoting physical activity behaviour in people who have RA. Further studies are required to develop and implement the optimal behaviour change intervention in this population.

  3. Non-Surgical Interventions for Adolescents with Idiopathic Scoliosis: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Płaszewski, Maciej; Bettany-Saltikov, Josette

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-surgical interventions for adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis remain highly controversial. Despite the publication of numerous reviews no explicit methodological evaluation of papers labeled as, or having a layout of, a systematic review, addressing this subject matter, is available. Objectives Analysis and comparison of the content, methodology, and evidence-base from systematic reviews regarding non-surgical interventions for adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis. Design Systematic overview of systematic reviews. Methods Articles meeting the minimal criteria for a systematic review, regarding any non-surgical intervention for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, with any outcomes measured, were included. Multiple general and systematic review specific databases, guideline registries, reference lists and websites of institutions were searched. The AMSTAR tool was used to critically appraise the methodology, and the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine and the Joanna Briggs Institute’s hierarchies were applied to analyze the levels of evidence from included reviews. Results From 469 citations, twenty one papers were included for analysis. Five reviews assessed the effectiveness of scoliosis-specific exercise treatments, four assessed manual therapies, five evaluated bracing, four assessed different combinations of interventions, and one evaluated usual physical activity. Two reviews addressed the adverse effects of bracing. Two papers were high quality Cochrane reviews, Three were of moderate, and the remaining sixteen were of low or very low methodological quality. The level of evidence of these reviews ranged from 1 or 1+ to 4, and in some reviews, due to their low methodological quality and/or poor reporting, this could not be established. Conclusions Higher quality reviews indicate that generally there is insufficient evidence to make a judgment on whether non-surgical interventions in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis are effective. Papers

  4. Interventions to reduce wrong blood in tube errors in transfusion: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Susan; Watson, Douglas; Eyre, Toby A; Brunskill, Susan J; Dorée, Carolyn; Murphy, Michael F

    2013-10-01

    This systematic review addresses the issue of wrong blood in tube (WBIT). The objective was to identify interventions that have been implemented and the effectiveness of these interventions to reduce WBIT incidence in red blood cell transfusion. Eligible articles were identified through a comprehensive search of The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cinahl, BNID, and the Transfusion Evidence Library to April 2013. Initial search criteria were wide including primary intervention or observational studies, case reports, expert opinion, and guidelines. There was no restriction by study type, language, or status. Publications before 1995, reviews or reports of a secondary nature, studies of sampling errors outwith transfusion, and articles involving animals were excluded. The primary outcome was a reduction in errors. Study characteristics, outcomes measured, and methodological quality were extracted by 2 authors independently. The principal method of analysis was descriptive. A total of 12,703 references were initially identified. Preliminary secondary screening by 2 reviewers reduced articles for detailed screening to 128 articles. Eleven articles were eventually identified as eligible, resulting in 9 independent studies being included in the review. The overall finding was that all the identified interventions reduced WBIT incidence. Five studies measured the effect of a single intervention, for example, changes to blood sample labeling, weekly feedback, handwritten transfusion requests, and an electronic transfusion system. Four studies reported multiple interventions including education, second check of ID at sampling, and confirmatory sampling. It was not clear which intervention was the most effective. Sustainability of the effectiveness of interventions was also unclear. Targeted interventions, either single or multiple, can lead to a reduction in WBIT; but the sustainability of effectiveness is uncertain. Data on the pre- and postimplementation of

  5. The effectiveness of self-management support interventions for men with long-term conditions: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Galdas, Paul; Fell, Jennifer; Bower, Peter; Kidd, Lisa; Blickem, Christian; McPherson, Kerri; Hunt, Kate; Gilbody, Simon; Richardson, Gerry

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effectiveness of self-management support interventions in men with long-term conditions. Methods A quantitative systematic review with meta-analysis. Data sources The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was searched to identify published reviews of self-management support interventions. Relevant reviews were screened to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of self-management support interventions conducted in men alone, or which analysed the effects of interventions by sex. Review methods Data on relevant outcomes, patient populations, intervention type and study quality were extracted. Quality appraisal was conducted using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. Meta-analysis was conducted to compare the effects of interventions in men, women, and mixed-sex sub-groups. Results 40 RCTs of self-management support interventions in men, and 20 eligible RCTs where an analysis by sex was reported, were included in the review. Meta-analysis suggested that physical activity, education, and peer support-based interventions have a positive impact on quality of life in men. However, there is currently insufficient evidence to make strong statements about whether self-management support interventions show larger, similar or smaller effects in men compared with women and mixed-sex groups. Conclusions Clinicians may wish to consider whether certain types of self-management support (eg, physical activity, education, peer support) are particularly effective in men, although more research is needed to fully determine and explore this. PMID:25795688

  6. An institutional review of antimicrobial stewardship interventions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Henry; Phe, Kady; Laine, Gregory A; Russo, Hannah R; Putney, Kimberly S; Tam, Vincent H

    2016-09-01

    In order to combat increasing rates of bacterial resistance, many institutions have implemented antimicrobial stewardship programmes (ASPs) to improve antibiotic use. To ascertain the potential impact of our stewardship programme at Baylor St Luke's Medical Center (Houston, TX), antimicrobial-related interventions were analysed over a 4-year period. ASP recommendations related to antimicrobial therapy from 2009 to 2012 were retrieved from the hospital electronic database and were retrospectively reviewed. The number of interventions for each time period was adjusted to the hospital census data. The interventions were randomly assessed and categorised for clinical significance based on established institutional guidelines. In total, 14654 non-duplicate antimicrobial therapy interventions were retrieved, of which 11874 (81.0%) were audited for accuracy. Approximately 13 interventions were made per 1000 patient-days, but there were no significant patterns observed regarding the number of interventions performed from month to month (range 8-21). The most frequent types of interventions were related to inappropriate dosing (39.0%), antimicrobial selection (20.5%) and drug allergy (13.0%). Serious adverse drug events (ADEs) were potentially avoided in 20.7% of all interventions. Cumulative potential cost avoidance was more than US$6.5 million. In our institution, proper drug and dose selection were the major components of the ASP. Without focusing solely on reduction of drug acquisition costs, implementation of an ASP could still be cost effective by improving the quality of patient care and avoiding ADEs with serious consequences. PMID:27530844

  7. Lida Cochran, Matriarch of Visual Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Harry

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the life and works of Lida Cochran, the matriarch of visual literacy. Lida was practicing "visual literacy" long before there was an association devoted to it. Lida has worked with the AECT, ECT Foundation (the Cochran Internship is named for her husband, Lee Cochran), and the International Visual Literacy…

  8. Effectiveness of interventions to reduce ordering of thyroid function tests: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rebecca; Rogers, Morwenna; Fleming, Simon; Patterson, Anthea; Hamilton, William Trevor; Heaton, Janet; Vaidya, Bijay; Hyde, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of behaviour changing interventions targeting ordering of thyroid function tests. Design Systematic review. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Database up to May 2015. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies We included studies evaluating the effectiveness of behaviour change interventions aiming to reduce ordering of thyroid function tests. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised controlled studies and before and after studies were included. There were no language restrictions. Study appraisal and synthesis methods 2 reviewers independently screened all records identified by the electronic searches and reviewed the full text of any deemed potentially relevant. Study details were extracted from the included papers and their methodological quality assessed independently using a validated tool. Disagreements were resolved through discussion and arbitration by a third reviewer. Meta-analysis was not used. Results 27 studies (28 papers) were included. They evaluated a range of interventions including guidelines/protocols, changes to funding policy, education, decision aids, reminders and audit/feedback; often intervention types were combined. The most common outcome measured was the rate of test ordering, but the effect on appropriateness, test ordering patterns and cost were also measured. 4 studies were RCTs. The majority of the studies were of poor or moderate methodological quality. The interventions were variable and poorly reported. Only 4 studies reported unsuccessful interventions but there was no clear pattern to link effect and intervention type or other characteristics. Conclusions The results suggest that behaviour change interventions are effective particularly in reducing the volume of thyroid function tests. However, due to the poor methodological quality and reporting of the studies, the likely presence of publication bias and the questionable relevance of some interventions to current

  9. Chronic health conditions and internet behavioral interventions: a review of factors to enhance user engagement.

    PubMed

    Schubart, Jane R; Stuckey, Heather L; Ganeshamoorthy, Ambika; Sciamanna, Christopher N

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to review the evidence about what factors influence user engagement in Internet-based behavioral interventions for chronic illness. We conducted a systematic review of the recent published literature. Searches of MEDLINE (using Ovid and PubMed), The Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO, from January 2000 to December 2008, were completed. Additional articles were identified from searching the bibliographies of retrieved articles. We identified studies of interactive health communication interventions delivered via the Internet that, apart from delivering health information, had another component such as interactive tools to manage illness, decision support for treatment, or social support. We restricted the age range to adulthood. The search identified 186 abstracts; 46 articles were reviewed. We used a qualitative approach called "positive deviance" to study those interventions that have succeeded in engaging users where most have failed. Some ways to improve user engagement in Internet interventions suggested by our review include addressing health concerns that are important and relevant to an individual patient or consumer and an individualized approach, such as personally tailored advice and feedback. Interventions that are part of larger health management programs that include clinicians appear to be especially promising.

  10. Systematic review and meta-analysis of Internet interventions for smoking cessation among adults

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Amanda L; Carpenter, Kelly M; Cha, Sarah; Cole, Sam; Jacobs, Megan A; Raskob, Margaret; Cole-Lewis, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of Internet interventions in promoting smoking cessation among adult tobacco users relative to other forms of intervention recommended in treatment guidelines. Methods This review followed Cochrane Collaboration guidelines for systematic reviews. Combinations of “Internet,” “web-based,” and “smoking cessation intervention” and related keywords were used in both automated and manual searches. We included randomized trials published from January 1990 through to April 2015. A modified version of the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool was used. We calculated risk ratios (RRs) for each study. Meta-analysis was conducted using random-effects method to pool RRs. Presentation of results follows the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Results Forty randomized trials involving 98,530 participants were included. Most trials had a low risk of bias in most domains. Pooled results comparing Internet interventions to assessment-only/waitlist control were significant (RR 1.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–2.21, I2=51.7%; four studies). Pooled results of largely static Internet interventions compared to print materials were not significant (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.63–1.10, I2=0%; two studies), whereas comparisons of interactive Internet interventions to print materials were significant (RR 2.10, 95% CI 1.25–3.52, I2=41.6%; two studies). No significant effects were observed in pooled results of Internet interventions compared to face-to-face counseling (RR 1.35, 95% CI 0.97–1.87, I2=0%; four studies) or to telephone counseling (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.79–1.13, I2=0%; two studies). The majority of trials compared different Internet interventions; pooled results from 15 such trials (24 comparisons) found a significant effect in favor of experimental Internet interventions (RR 1.16, 95% CI 1.03–1.31, I2=76.7%). Conclusion Internet

  11. Systematic review of paediatric weight management interventions delivered in the home setting.

    PubMed

    Appelhans, B M; Moss, O A; Cerwinske, L A

    2016-10-01

    To increase their accessibility, paediatric weight management interventions are increasingly designed to be delivered in the home setting by trained staff. This systematic review summarizes the available evidence for interventions featuring home visitation and identifies key gaps in the literature. PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane and PsycINFO were searched for intervention studies that reported change in objectively measured adiposity outcomes in youth ages 2-18 years. Studies published between 1 January 1995 and 12 February 2016 were analysed. Of 15 eligible studies, nine reported that interventions with home visitation were either superior to a control/comparison condition or achieved significant within-subjects reductions in adiposity. Interventions in which professional staff (e.g. dietitians and exercise trainers) conducted home visits tended to be more efficacious than those delivered by paraprofessional or community-based staff, as were interventions with more frequent contact. Most studies were judged to have low or unclear risk of bias across various domains. As most studies compared interventions with home visits with less intensive and qualitatively different approaches, it remains unclear whether home visitation per se enhances weight loss efficacy. Overall, paediatric weight management interventions that feature home visitation are promising, but the incremental benefit of the home visitation treatment modality remains to be rigorously evaluated. © 2016 World Obesity.

  12. Systematic review of paediatric weight management interventions delivered in the home setting.

    PubMed

    Appelhans, B M; Moss, O A; Cerwinske, L A

    2016-10-01

    To increase their accessibility, paediatric weight management interventions are increasingly designed to be delivered in the home setting by trained staff. This systematic review summarizes the available evidence for interventions featuring home visitation and identifies key gaps in the literature. PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane and PsycINFO were searched for intervention studies that reported change in objectively measured adiposity outcomes in youth ages 2-18 years. Studies published between 1 January 1995 and 12 February 2016 were analysed. Of 15 eligible studies, nine reported that interventions with home visitation were either superior to a control/comparison condition or achieved significant within-subjects reductions in adiposity. Interventions in which professional staff (e.g. dietitians and exercise trainers) conducted home visits tended to be more efficacious than those delivered by paraprofessional or community-based staff, as were interventions with more frequent contact. Most studies were judged to have low or unclear risk of bias across various domains. As most studies compared interventions with home visits with less intensive and qualitatively different approaches, it remains unclear whether home visitation per se enhances weight loss efficacy. Overall, paediatric weight management interventions that feature home visitation are promising, but the incremental benefit of the home visitation treatment modality remains to be rigorously evaluated. © 2016 World Obesity. PMID:27231126

  13. Community-based interventions to prevent fatal overdose from illegal drugs: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Okolie, Chukwudi; Evans, Bridie Angela; John, Ann; Moore, Chris; Russell, Daphne; Snooks, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Drug overdose is the most frequent cause of death among people who misuse illegal drugs. People who inject these drugs are 14–17 times more likely to die than their non-drug using peers. Various strategies to reduce drug-related deaths have failed to meet target reductions. Research into community-based interventions for preventing drug overdose deaths is promising. This review seeks to identify published studies describing community-based interventions and to evaluate their effectiveness at reducing drug overdose deaths. Methods and analysis We will systematically search key electronic databases using a search strategy which groups terms into four facets: (1) Overdose event, (2) Drug classification, (3) Intervention and (4) Setting. Searches will be limited where possible to international literature published in English between 1998 and 2014. Data will be extracted by two independent reviewers using a predefined table adapted from the Cochrane Collaboration handbook. The quality of included studies will be evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. We will conduct a meta-analysis for variables which can be compared across studies, using statistical methods to control for heterogeneity where appropriate. Where clinical or statistical heterogeneity prevents a valid numerical synthesis, we will employ a narrative synthesis to describe community-based interventions, their delivery and use and how effectively they prevent fatal overdoses. Ethics and dissemination We will publish findings from this systematic review in a peer-reviewed scientific journal and present results at national and international conferences. It will be disseminated electronically and in print. Trial registration number PROSPERO CRD42015017833. PMID:26534734

  14. Early interventions for PTSD: a review.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Megan C; Ressler, Kerry J; Zatzick, Doug; Rothbaum, Barbara Olasov

    2012-10-01

    The high prevalence of trauma exposure and subsequent negative consequences for both survivors and society as a whole emphasize the need for secondary prevention of posttraumatic stress disorder. However, clinicians and relief workers remain limited in their ability to intervene effectively in the aftermath of trauma and alleviate traumatic stress reactions that can lead to chronic PTSD. The scientific literature on early intervention for PTSD is reviewed, including early studies on psychological debriefing, pharmacological, and psychosocial interventions aimed at preventing chronic PTSD. Studies on fear extinction and memory consolidation are discussed in relation to PTSD prevention and the potential importance of immediate versus delayed intervention approaches and genetic predictors are briefly reviewed. Preliminary results from a modified prolonged exposure intervention applied within hours of trauma exposure in an emergency room setting are discussed, along with considerations related to intervention reach and overall population impact. Suggestions for future research are included. Prevention of PTSD, although currently not yet a reality, remains an exciting and hopeful possibility with current research approaches translating work from the laboratory to the clinic.

  15. EARLY INTERVENTIONS FOR PTSD: A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Megan C.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Zatzick, Doug; Rothbaum, Barbara Olasov

    2013-01-01

    The high prevalence of trauma exposure and subsequent negative consequences for both survivors and society as a whole emphasize the need for secondary prevention of posttraumatic stress disorder. However, clinicians and relief workers remain limited in their ability to intervene effectively in the aftermath of trauma and alleviate traumatic stress reactions that can lead to chronic PTSD. The scientific literature on early intervention for PTSD is reviewed, including early studies on psychological debriefing, pharmacological, and psychosocial interventions aimed at preventing chronic PTSD. Studies on fear extinction and memory consolidation are discussed in relation to PTSD prevention and the potential importance of immediate versus delayed intervention approaches and genetic predictors are briefly reviewed. Preliminary results from a modified prolonged exposure intervention applied within hours of trauma exposure in an emergency room setting are discussed, along with considerations related to intervention reach and overall population impact. Suggestions for future research are included. Prevention of PTSD, although currently not yet a reality, remains an exciting and hopeful possibility with current research approaches translating work from the laboratory to the clinic. PMID:22941845

  16. Interventions employing mobile technology for overweight and obesity: an early systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Bacigalupo, R; Cudd, P; Littlewood, C; Bissell, P; Hawley, M S; Buckley Woods, H

    2013-01-01

    Summary Obesity is a global epidemic with major healthcare implications and costs. Mobile technologies are potential interventions to promote weight loss. An early systematic review of this rapidly growing area of research was conducted. Electronic databases were searched for articles published between January 1998 and October 2011. Data sources included Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Ongoing research was searched for using clinical trials databases and registers. Out of 174 articles retrieved, 21 met the inclusion criteria of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on mobile technology interventions facilitating weight loss in overweight and obese adults with any other comparator. A narrative synthesis was undertaken. Seven articles were included and appraised using the Cochrane risk of bias tool: four presented a low risk of bias and three presented a high risk of bias. There is consistent strong evidence across the included multiple high-quality RCTs that weight loss occurs in the short-term because of mobile technology interventions, with moderate evidence for the medium-term. Recommendations for improving the reporting and quality of future trials are made including reporting weight loss in percent to meet clinical standards, and including features such as long-term follow-up, cost-effectiveness and patient acceptability. PMID:23167478

  17. Commentary on 'Interventions for restoring patency of central venous catheter lumens'.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Mary Elisabeth; Massicotte, Mary Patricia

    2013-03-01

    This is a commentary on a Cochrane review, published in this issue of EBCH, first published as: van Miert C, Hill R, Jones L. Interventions for restoring patency of occluded central venous catheter lumens. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD007119. DoI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007119.pub2. Further information for this Cochrane review is available in this issue of EBCH in the accompanying Summary article.

  18. A systematic review of interventions aimed at increasing physical activity in adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain—protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic musculoskeletal pain is highly prevalent, affecting around one in five people across Europe. Osteoarthritis, low back pain, neck pain and other musculoskeletal disorders are leading causes of disability worldwide and the most common source of chronic pain. Exercise and/or physical activity interventions have the potential to address not only the pain and disability associated with chronic pain but also the increased risk of morbidity and mortality seen in this population. Although exercise and/or physical activity is widely recommended, there is currently a paucity of research that offers an evidence base upon which the development or optimisation of interventions can be based. This systematic review will investigate the components of interventions associated with changes in physical activity levels in adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods/Design This systematic review will be reported in line with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidance. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of interventions aimed at increasing physical activity in adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain will be included. Articles will be identified through a comprehensive search of the following databases: CENTRAL in the Cochrane Library, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO and AMED. Two review authors will independently screen articles retrieved from the search for eligibility, extract relevant data on methodological issues and code interventions according to the behaviour change technique taxonomy (v1) of 93 hierarchically clustered techniques. As complex healthcare interventions can be modified by a wide variety of factors, data will be summarised statistically when the data are available, are sufficiently similar and are of sufficient quality. A narrative synthesis will be completed if there is insufficient data to permit a formal meta

  19. Managing patients with multimorbidity: systematic review of interventions in primary care and community settings

    PubMed Central

    Soubhi, Hassan; Fortin, Martin; Hudon, Catherine; O’Dowd, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the effectiveness of interventions designed to improve outcomes in patients with multimorbidity in primary care and community settings. Design Systematic review. Data sources Medline, Embase, CINAHL, CAB Health, Cochrane central register of controlled trials, the database of abstracts of reviews of effectiveness, and the Cochrane EPOC (effective practice and organisation of care) register (searches updated in April 2011). Eligibility criteria Randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series analyses reporting on interventions to improve outcomes for people with multimorbidity in primary care and community settings. Multimorbidity was defined as two or more chronic conditions in the same individual. Outcomes included any validated measure of physical or mental health and psychosocial status, including quality of life outcomes, wellbeing, and measures of disability or functional status. Also included were measures of patient and provider behaviour, including drug adherence, utilisation of health services, acceptability of services, and costs. Data selection Two reviewers independently assessed studies for eligibility, extracted data, and assessed study quality. As meta-analysis of results was not possible owing to heterogeneity in participants and interventions, a narrative synthesis of the results from the included studies was carried out. Results 10 studies examining a range of complex interventions totalling 3407 patients with multimorbidity were identified. All were randomised controlled trials with a low risk of bias. Two studies described interventions for patients with specific comorbidities. The remaining eight studies focused on multimorbidity, generally in older patients. Consideration of the impact of socioeconomic deprivation was minimal. All studies involved complex interventions with multiple components. In six of the 10 studies the predominant component was

  20. Evidence appraisal of Arrowsmith VA, Taylor R. Removal of nail polish and finger rings to prevent surgical infection (Review). Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014;8:CD003325.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nancy

    2015-06-01

    This systematic review revealed that there remains no evidence to indicate whether removing nail polish and finger rings affects the rate of SSIs after surgery. Given that there are no new studies on this topic, there is insufficient evidence to determine whether wearing finger rings or nail polish affects the number of bacteria on the skin after surgical hand scrubbing. PMID:26219110

  1. Interventions to improve delivery of isoniazid preventive therapy: an overview of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Uptake of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) to prevent tuberculosis has been poor, particularly in the highest risk populations. Interventions to improve IPT delivery could promote implementation. The large number of existing systematic reviews on treatment adherence has made drawing conclusions a challenge. To provide decision makers with the evidence they need, we performed an overview of systematic reviews to compare different organizational interventions to improve IPT delivery as measured by treatment completion among those at highest risk for the development of TB disease, namely child contacts or HIV-infected individuals. Methods We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), and MEDLINE up to August 15, 2012. Two authors used a standardized data extraction form and the AMSTAR instrument to independently assess each review. Results Six reviews met inclusion criteria. Interventions included changes in the setting/site of IPT delivery, use of quality monitoring mechanisms (e.g., directly observed therapy), IPT delivery integration into other healthcare services, and use of lay health workers. Most reviews reported a combination of outcomes related to IPT adherence and treatment completion rate but without a baseline or comparison rate. Generally, we found limited evidence to demonstrate that the studied interventions improved treatment completion. Conclusions While most of the interventions were not shown to improve IPT completion, integration of tuberculosis and HIV services yielded high treatment completion rates in some settings. The lack of data from high burden TB settings limits applicability. Further research to assess different IPT delivery interventions, including those that address barriers to care in at-risk populations, is urgently needed to identify the most effective practices for IPT delivery and TB control in high TB burden settings. PMID:24886159

  2. Review of Veterans Health Administration telemedicine interventions.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert D; Luptak, Marilyn K; Rupper, Randall W; Bair, Byron; Peterson, Cherie; Dailey, Nancy; Hicken, Bret L

    2010-12-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is a leader in developing and implementing innovative healthcare technology. We review 19 exemplary peer-reviewed articles published between 2000 and 2009 of controlled, VHA-supported telemedicine intervention trials that focused on health outcomes. These trials underscore the role of telemedicine in large managed healthcare organizations in support of (1) chronic disease management, (2) mental health service delivery through in-home monitoring and treatment, and (3) interdisciplinary team functioning through electronic medical record information interchange. Telemedicine is advantageous when ongoing monitoring of patient symptoms is needed, as in chronic disease care (eg, for diabetes) or mental health treatment. Telemedicine appears to enhance patient access to healthcare professionals and provides quick access to patient medical information. The sustainability of telemedicine interventions for the broad spectrum of veteran patient issues and the ongoing technology training of patients and providers are challenges to telemedicine-delivered care.

  3. Interventions to Increase Medication Adherence in African-American and Latino Populations: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Juarez, Deborah Taira; Yeboah, Michelle; Castillo, Theresa P

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to investigate the effectiveness of interventions to improve medication adherence in ethnic minority populations. A literature search from January 2000 to August 2012 was conducted through PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar. Search terms used included: medication (MeSH), adherence, medication adherence (MeSH), compliance (MeSH), persistence, race, ethnicity, ethnic groups (MeSH), minority, African-American, Hispanic, Latino, Asian, Pacific Islander, and intervention. Studies which did not have ≥75% of the sample population comprised of individuals of any one ethnic background were excluded, unless the authors performed sub-group analyses by race/ethnicity. Of the 36 studies identified, 20 studies showed significant post-intervention differences. Sample population sizes ranged from 10 to 520, with a median of 126.5. The studies in this review were conducted with patients of mainly African-American and Latino descent. No studies were identified which focused on Asians, Pacific Islanders, or Native Americans. Interventions demonstrating mixed results included motivational interviewing, reminder devices, community health worker (CHW) delivered interventions, and pharmacist-delivered interventions. Directly observed therapy (DOT) was a successful intervention in two studies. Interventions which did not involve human contact with patients were ineffective. In this literature review, studies varied significantly in their methods and design as well as the populations studied. There was a lack of congruence among studies in the way adherence was measured and reported. No single intervention has been seen to be universally successful, particularly for patients from ethnic minority backgrounds. PMID:24470982

  4. Interventions to increase medication adherence in African-American and Latino populations: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Hu, Daniel; Juarez, Deborah Taira; Yeboah, Michelle; Castillo, Theresa P

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to investigate the effectiveness of interventions to improve medication adherence in ethnic minority populations. A literature search from January 2000 to August 2012 was conducted through PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar. Search terms used included: medication (MeSH), adherence, medication adherence (MeSH), compliance (MeSH), persistence, race, ethnicity, ethnic groups (MeSH), minority, African-American, Hispanic, Latino, Asian, Pacific Islander, and intervention. Studies which did not have ≥75% of the sample population comprised of individuals of any one ethnic background were excluded, unless the authors performed sub-group analyses by race/ethnicity. Of the 36 studies identified, 20 studies showed significant post-intervention differences. Sample population sizes ranged from 10 to 520, with a median of 126.5. The studies in this review were conducted with patients of mainly African-American and Latino descent. No studies were identified which focused on Asians, Pacific Islanders, or Native Americans. Interventions demonstrating mixed results included motivational interviewing, reminder devices, community health worker (CHW) delivered interventions, and pharmacist-delivered interventions. Directly observed therapy (DOT) was a successful intervention in two studies. Interventions which did not involve human contact with patients were ineffective. In this literature review, studies varied significantly in their methods and design as well as the populations studied. There was a lack of congruence among studies in the way adherence was measured and reported. No single intervention has been seen to be universally successful, particularly for patients from ethnic minority backgrounds.

  5. Exercise-based interventions for cancer survivors in India: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Stephen R; Veluswamy, Sundar K; Maiya, Arun G; Fernandes, Donald J; McNeely, Margaret L

    2015-01-01

    Existing literature suggests that cancer survivors present with high rates of morbidity due to various treatment and disease induced factors. Research globally has shown exercise to be beneficial in improving treatment outcomes and quality of life. India has a high prevalence of cancer and not much is known about exercise interventions for cancer survivors in India. This review was planned to review the state of exercise based interventions for cancer survivors in India. A comprehensive literature search was performed in PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Scopus, Cochrane Library, PEDro, IndMed, and Shoda Ganga. The search results were screened and data extracted by two independent reviewers. All eligible studies were assessed for methodological quality rating using Downs and Black checklist. Data was extracted using a pilot tested pro forma to summarize information on site and stage of cancer, type of exercise intervention and outcome measures. The review identified 13 studies, published from 1991 to 2013, after screening 4060 articles. Exercise interventions fell into one of three categories: (1) yoga-based, (2) physiotherapy-based and (3) speech therapy based interventions; and exclusively involved either breast or head and neck cancers. Studies were generally of low to moderate quality. A broad range of outcomes were found including symptoms, speech and swallowing, and quality of life and largely supported the benefits of exercise-based interventions. At present, research involving exercise-based rehabilitation interventions in India is limited in volume, quality and scope. With the growing burden of cancer in the country, there is an immediate need for research on exercise based interventions for cancer survivors within the sociocultural context of India. PMID:26543789

  6. Stereotypic responding: a review of intervention research.

    PubMed

    LaGrow, S J; Repp, A C

    1984-05-01

    More than 60 studies using behavioral strategies to suppress stereotypic responding in handicapped individuals were reviewed in order to identify the populations studied, the behavior observed, the interventions employed, and the relative effectiveness of these interventions when used alone or in combinations. The target populations were distributed across nine categories, three of which (severely mentally retarded, profoundly mentally retarded, and severely emotionally disturbed) constituted approximately three-quarters of all subjects studied. Fifty types of target behavior were identified; body rocking was the target in approximately two-thirds of all studies, and mouthing and complex finger and hand movements were the targets in at least one-third. Ten interventions (seven aversive, three positive) were identified. The aversive interventions were used in approximately three-quarters of the studies whereas positive procedures were used in approximately one-third. One aversive procedure (overcorrection) was used in more than one-third of the studies, whereas another, shock, was the most effective. The other six aversive procedures, however, and three positive procedures were relatively equal in effectiveness. Discussion centered on the relative effectiveness of the interventions and their relationship to the concept of least restrictive alternatives. PMID:6377896

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Endovascular interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, L. W.; Bakker, C. J. G.

    2003-07-01

    Minimally invasive interventional radiological procedures, such as balloon angioplasty, stent placement or coiling of aneurysms, play an increasingly important role in the treatment of patients suffering from vascular disease. The non-destructive nature of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), its ability to combine the acquisition of high quality anatomical images and functional information, such as blood flow velocities, perfusion and diffusion, together with its inherent three dimensionality and tomographic imaging capacities, have been advocated as advantages of using the MRI technique for guidance of endovascular radiological interventions. Within this light, endovascular interventional MRI has emerged as an interesting and promising new branch of interventional radiology. In this review article, the authors will give an overview of the most important issues related to this field. In this context, we will focus on the prerequisites for endovascular interventional MRI to come to maturity. In particular, the various approaches for device tracking that were proposed will be discussed and categorized. Furthermore, dedicated MRI systems, safety and compatibility issues and promising applications that could become clinical practice in the future will be discussed.

  8. Behavior change interventions to prevent HIV infection among women living in low and middle income countries: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Sandra I; Kangwende, Rugare A; Padian, Nancy S

    2010-06-01

    We conducted a systematic review of behavioral change interventions to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV among women and girls living in low- and middle-income countries. PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and other databases and bibliographies were systematically searched for trials using randomized or quasi-experimental designs to evaluate behavioral interventions with HIV infection as an outcome. We identified 11 analyses for inclusion reporting on eight unique interventions. Interventions varied widely in intensity, duration, and delivery as well as by target population. Only two analyses showed a significant protective effect on HIV incidence among women and only three of ten analyses that measured behavioral outcomes reduced any measure of HIV-related risk behavior. Ongoing research is needed to determine whether behavior change interventions can be incorporated as independent efficacious components in HIV prevention packages for women or simply as complements to biomedical prevention strategies. PMID:19949847

  9. [Cochrane Corner: Intra-aortic balloon pump in patients with cardiogenic shock following myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Daniel; Pereira, Hélder; Costa, João; Vaz-Carneiro, António

    2016-04-01

    Improvement of hemodynamic parameters is the rationale for the use of intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation (IABP) in patients with cardiogenic shock following acute myocardial infarction (MI). This Cochrane systematic review evaluated the impact of this intervention in reducing mortality. Seven randomized controlled trials with a total of 790 patients were included (four using medical therapy as a comparator, and three comparing IABP with other ventricular assist devices). IABP did not reduce mortality in either the short or long term. Therefore, the systematic use of IABP in patients with cardiogenic shock following MI cannot be recommended.

  10. [Cochrane Corner: Intra-aortic balloon pump in patients with cardiogenic shock following myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Daniel; Pereira, Hélder; Costa, João; Vaz-Carneiro, António

    2016-04-01

    Improvement of hemodynamic parameters is the rationale for the use of intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation (IABP) in patients with cardiogenic shock following acute myocardial infarction (MI). This Cochrane systematic review evaluated the impact of this intervention in reducing mortality. Seven randomized controlled trials with a total of 790 patients were included (four using medical therapy as a comparator, and three comparing IABP with other ventricular assist devices). IABP did not reduce mortality in either the short or long term. Therefore, the systematic use of IABP in patients with cardiogenic shock following MI cannot be recommended. PMID:26992744

  11. Prophylactic cranial irradiation for preventing brain metastases in patients undergoing radical treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer: A Cochrane Review

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, Jason Francis . E-mail: jason.lester@velindre-tr.wales.nhs.uk; MacBeth, Fergus R.; Coles, Bernadette

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) has a role in the management of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with curative intent. Methods and Materials: A search strategy was designed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing PCI with no PCI in NSCLC patients treated with curative intent. The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and Cancerlit were searched, along with relevant journals, books, and review articles to identify potentially eligible trials. Four RCTs were identified and reviewed. A total of 951 patients were randomized in these RCTs, of whom 833 were evaluable and reported. Forty-two patients with small-cell lung cancer were excluded, leaving 791 patients in total. Because of the small patient numbers and trial heterogeneity, no meta-analysis was attempted. Results: Prophylactic cranial irradiation did significantly reduce the incidence of brain metastases in three trials. No trial reported a survival advantage with PCI over observation. Toxicity data were poorly collected and no quality of life assessments were carried out in any trial. Conclusion: Prophylactic cranial irradiation may reduce the incidence of brain metastases, but there is no evidence of a survival benefit. It was not possible to evaluate whether any radiotherapy regimen is superior, and the effect of PCI on quality of life is not known. There is insufficient evidence to support the use of PCI in clinical practice. Where possible, patients should be offered entry into a clinical trial.

  12. Interventions to delay functional decline in people with dementia: a systematic review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Laver, Kate; Dyer, Suzanne; Whitehead, Craig; Clemson, Lindy; Crotty, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarise existing systematic reviews that assess the effects of non-pharmacological, pharmacological and alternative therapies on activities of daily living (ADL) function in people with dementia. Design Overview of systematic reviews. Methods A systematic search in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE, Medline, EMBASE and PsycInfo in April 2015. Systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials conducted in people with Alzheimer's disease or dementia measuring the impact on ADL function were included. Methodological quality of the systematic reviews was independently assessed by two authors using the AMSTAR tool. The quality of evidence of the primary studies for each intervention was assessed using GRADE. Results A total of 23 systematic reviews were included in the overview. The quality of the reviews varied; however most (65%) scored 8/11 or more on the AMSTAR tool, indicating high quality. Interventions that were reported to be effective in minimising decline in ADL function were: exercise (6 studies, 289 participants, standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.68, 95% CI 0.08 to 1.27; GRADE: low), dyadic interventions (8 studies, 988 participants, SMD 0.37, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.69; GRADE: low) acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine (12 studies, 4661 participants, donepezil 10 mg SMD 0.18, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.32; GRADE: moderate), selegiline (7 studies, 810 participants, SMD 0.27, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.41; GRADE: low), huperzine A (2 studies, 70 participants, SMD 1.48, 95% CI 0.95 to 2.02; GRADE: very low) and Ginkgo biloba (7 studies, 2530 participants, SMD 0.36, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.44; GRADE: very low). Conclusions Healthcare professionals should ensure that people with dementia are encouraged to exercise and that primary carers are trained and supported to provide safe and effective care for the person with dementia. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors or memantine should be trialled unless contraindicated. Trial registration number CRD

  13. Web-Based and Mobile Suicide Prevention Interventions for Young People: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Yael; Werner-Seidler, Aliza; Calear, Alison L.; Christensen, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Suicide is a significant public health issue, and is especially concerning in adolescents and young adults, who are over-represented both in attempts and completed suicide. Emerging technologies represent a promising new approach to deliver suicide prevention interventions to these populations. The current systematic review aims to identify online and mobile psychosocial suicide prevention interventions for young people, and evaluate the effectiveness of these interventions. Method: PsycINFO, Medline, Embase and The Cochrane Library were electronically searched for all articles published between January, 2000 and May, 2015. Peer-reviewed journal articles reporting on interventions for young people aged 12–25 years with suicidality as a primary outcome were eligible for inclusion. No exclusions were placed on study design. Results: One study met inclusion criteria, and found significant reductions in the primary outcome of suicidal ideation, as well as depression and hopelessness. Two relevant protocol papers of studies currently underway were also identified. Conclusions: There is a paucity of current evidence for online and mobile interventions for suicide prevention in youth. More high quality empirical evidence is required to determine the effectiveness of these novel approaches to improving suicide outcomes in young people. PMID:27274742

  14. Effectiveness of intervention strategies exclusively targeting reductions in children's sedentary time: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Altenburg, Teatske M; Kist-van Holthe, Joana; Chinapaw, Mai J M

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of interventions targeting sedentary behaviour in children have emerged in recent years. Recently published reviews included sedentary behaviour and physical activity interventions. This review critically summarizes evidence on the effectiveness of intervention strategies that exclusively targeted reducing sedentary time in children and adolescents. We performed a systematic literature search in Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library through November 2015. Two independent reviewers selected eligible studies, extracted relevant data and rated the methodological quality using the assessment tool for quantitative studies. We included 21 intervention studies, of which 8 studies scored moderate on methodological quality and 13 studies scored weak. Four out of eight moderate quality studies reported significant beneficial intervention effects.Although descriptions of intervention strategies were not always clearly reported, we identified encouragement of a TV turnoff week and implementing standing desks in classrooms as promising strategies. Due to a lack of high quality studies and inconsistent findings, we found no convincing evidence for the effectiveness of existing interventions targeting solely sedentary behaviour. We recommend that future studies apply mediation analyses to explore which strategies are most effective. Furthermore, to increase the effectiveness of interventions, knowledge of children's motives to engage in sedentary behavior is required, as well as their opinion on potentially effective intervention strategies. PMID:27276873

  15. Does postural sway change in association with manual therapeutic interventions? A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Study design Literature Review Objectives The objective of this literature review was to determine if postural sway changes in association with manual therapeutic interventions and to investigate whether any changes occur in healthy individuals or in association with pain intensity. Summary of Background data Improving postural stability has been proposed as a goal of manual therapeutic interventions. So far, no literature review has addressed whether there is supportive evidence for this and if so, what factors may be associated or causative for observed sway alterations. Search methods Seven online databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, ScienceDirect and the Cochrane library) were systematically searched followed by a manual search of the retrieved papers. Selection criteria Studies comparing postural sway derived from bipedal force plate measurements in association with a manual therapeutic intervention, ideally compared to a control group. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts for relevance, conducted the data extraction and the risk of bias assessment which was conducted using the RTI item bank. A descriptive analysis was conducted as the heterogeneous study designs prevented pooling of data. Results Nine studies of varying methodological quality met the inclusion criteria. No direct comparison of data across the studies was possible. There was no evidence that manual interventions lead to a change in postural sway in healthy individuals regardless of the body regions addressed by the intervention. There was some indication that postural sway may change at follow-up measurements in pain sufferers; however, this may be due to variations in pain intensity rather than resulting from the intervention itself. Conclusions There is no conclusive scientific evidence that manual therapeutic interventions may exhibit any immediate or long-term effect on COP excursions. Any changes in sway may be

  16. Biomechanical analysis of hyoid bone displacement in videofluoroscopy: a systematic review of intervention effects.

    PubMed

    van der Kruis, Jolien G J; Baijens, Laura W J; Speyer, Renée; Zwijnenberg, Iris

    2011-06-01

    This systematic review explores studies using biomechanical analysis of hyoid bone displacement in videofluoroscopy of swallowing as a spatial outcome parameter to evaluate intervention effects. Two authors independently carried out the literature search using the electronic databases Embase, PubMed, and Cochrane Library. Differences in their search findings were settled by discussion. The search was limited to publications in the English, German, French, Spanish, or Dutch language. MeSH terms were used, supplemented by free-text words to identify the most recent publications. In addition, reference lists were searched by hand. Only studies using videofluoroscopy to evaluate the biomechanical effects of swallowing interventions in dysphagic subjects were included in the review. While the body of literature on measuring hyoid bone displacement in videofluoroscopy has grown, only 12 studies met the inclusion criteria. Several of the 12 studies had methodological shortcomings. In general, the conclusions could not be compared across the studies because of their heterogeneous designs and outcome measures. Overall, several intervention effect studies reported significant results. In particular, bolus modification and swallowing maneuvers showed a greater range of hyoid bone displacement. In light of this review, further research on hyoid bone displacement as a spatial variable in well-defined patient populations using well-defined videofluoroscopic protocols to measure intervention effects is recommended.

  17. Meta-analysis and The Cochrane Collaboration: 20 years of the Cochrane Statistical Methods Group

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Statistical Methods Group has played a pivotal role in The Cochrane Collaboration over the past 20 years. The Statistical Methods Group has determined the direction of statistical methods used within Cochrane reviews, developed guidance for these methods, provided training, and continued to discuss and consider new and controversial issues in meta-analysis. The contribution of Statistical Methods Group members to the meta-analysis literature has been extensive and has helped to shape the wider meta-analysis landscape. In this paper, marking the 20th anniversary of The Cochrane Collaboration, we reflect on the history of the Statistical Methods Group, beginning in 1993 with the identification of aspects of statistical synthesis for which consensus was lacking about the best approach. We highlight some landmark methodological developments that Statistical Methods Group members have contributed to in the field of meta-analysis. We discuss how the Group implements and disseminates statistical methods within The Cochrane Collaboration. Finally, we consider the importance of robust statistical methodology for Cochrane systematic reviews, note research gaps, and reflect on the challenges that the Statistical Methods Group faces in its future direction. PMID:24280020

  18. Interventions for waterpipe tobacco smoking prevention and cessation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Mohammed; Jawad, Sena; Waziry, Reem K; Ballout, Rami A; Akl, Elie A

    2016-01-01

    Waterpipe tobacco smoking is growing in popularity despite adverse health effects among users. We systematically reviewed the literature, searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science, for interventions targeting prevention and cessation of waterpipe tobacco smoking. We assessed the evidence quality using the Cochrane (randomised studies), GRADE (non-randomised studies) and CASP (qualitative studies) frameworks. Data were synthesised narratively due to heterogeneity. We included four individual-level, five group-level, and six legislative interventions. Of five randomised controlled studies, two showed significantly higher quit rates in intervention groups (bupropion/behavioural support versus placebo in Pakistan; 6 month abstinence relative risk (RR): 2.3, 95% CI 1.4-3.8); group behavioural support versus no intervention in Egypt, 12 month abstinence RR 3.3, 95% CI 1.4-8.9). Non-randomised studies showed mixed results for cessation, behavioural, and knowledge outcomes. One high quality modelling study from Lebanon calculated that a 10% increase in waterpipe tobacco taxation would reduce waterpipe tobacco demand by 14.5% (price elasticity of demand -1.45). In conclusion, there is a lack of evidence of effectiveness for most waterpipe interventions. While few show promising results, higher quality interventions are needed. Meanwhile, tobacco policies should place waterpipe on par with cigarettes. PMID:27167891

  19. Interventions for waterpipe tobacco smoking prevention and cessation: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Jawad, Mohammed; Jawad, Sena; Waziry, Reem K.; Ballout, Rami A.; Akl, Elie A.

    2016-01-01

    Waterpipe tobacco smoking is growing in popularity despite adverse health effects among users. We systematically reviewed the literature, searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science, for interventions targeting prevention and cessation of waterpipe tobacco smoking. We assessed the evidence quality using the Cochrane (randomised studies), GRADE (non-randomised studies) and CASP (qualitative studies) frameworks. Data were synthesised narratively due to heterogeneity. We included four individual-level, five group-level, and six legislative interventions. Of five randomised controlled studies, two showed significantly higher quit rates in intervention groups (bupropion/behavioural support versus placebo in Pakistan; 6 month abstinence relative risk (RR): 2.3, 95% CI 1.4–3.8); group behavioural support versus no intervention in Egypt, 12 month abstinence RR 3.3, 95% CI 1.4–8.9). Non-randomised studies showed mixed results for cessation, behavioural, and knowledge outcomes. One high quality modelling study from Lebanon calculated that a 10% increase in waterpipe tobacco taxation would reduce waterpipe tobacco demand by 14.5% (price elasticity of demand −1.45). In conclusion, there is a lack of evidence of effectiveness for most waterpipe interventions. While few show promising results, higher quality interventions are needed. Meanwhile, tobacco policies should place waterpipe on par with cigarettes. PMID:27167891

  20. Improving the governance of patient safety in emergency care: a systematic review of interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hesselink, Gijs; Berben, Sivera; Beune, Thimpe

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To systematically review interventions that aim to improve the governance of patient safety within emergency care on effectiveness, reliability, validity and feasibility. Design A systematic review of the literature. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and PsychInfo were searched for studies published between January 1990 and July 2014. We included studies evaluating interventions relevant for higher management to oversee and manage patient safety, in prehospital emergency medical service (EMS) organisations and hospital-based emergency departments (EDs). Two reviewers independently selected candidate studies, extracted data and assessed study quality. Studies were categorised according to study quality, setting, sample, intervention characteristics and findings. Results Of the 18 included studies, 13 (72%) were non-experimental. Nine studies (50%) reported data on the reliability and/or validity of the intervention. Eight studies (44%) reported on the feasibility of the intervention. Only 4 studies (22%) reported statistically significant effects. The use of a simulation-based training programme and well-designed incident reporting systems led to a statistically significant improvement of safety knowledge and attitudes by ED staff and an increase of incident reports within EDs, respectively. Conclusions Characteristics of the interventions included in this review (eg, anonymous incident reporting and validation of incident reports by an independent party) could provide useful input for the design of an effective tool to govern patient safety in EMS organisations and EDs. However, executives cannot rely on a robust set of evidence-based and feasible tools to govern patient safety within their emergency care organisation and in the chain of emergency care. Established strategies from other high-risk sectors need to be evaluated in emergency care settings, using an

  1. Interventions to Improve Adherence in Patients with Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Disorders: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Depont, Fanny; Berenbaum, Francis; Filippi, Jérome; Le Maitre, Michel; Nataf, Henri; Paul, Carle; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Thibout, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with immune-mediated inflammatory disorders, poor adherence to medication is associated with increased healthcare costs, decreased patient satisfaction, reduced quality of life and unfavorable treatment outcomes. Objective To determine the impact of different interventions on medication adherence in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory disorders. Design Systematic review. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library. Study eligibility criteria for selecting studies Included studies were clinical trials and observational studies in adult outpatients treated for psoriasis, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, psoriatic arthritis or multiple sclerosis. Study appraisal and synthesis methods Intervention approaches were classified into four categories: educational, behavioral, cognitive behavioral, and multicomponent interventions. The risk of bias/study limitations of each study was assessed using the GRADE system. Results Fifteen studies (14 clinical trials and one observational study) met eligibility criteria and enrolled a total of 1958 patients. Forty percent of the studies (6/15) was conducted in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, half (7/15) in rheumatoid arthritis patients, one in psoriasis patients and one in multiple sclerosis patients. Seven out of 15 interventions were classified as multicomponent, four as educational, two as behavioral and two as cognitive behavioral. Nine studies, of which five were multicomponent interventions, had no serious limitations according to GRADE criteria. Nine out of 15 interventions showed an improvement of adherence: three multicomponent interventions in inflammatory bowel disease; one intervention of each category in rheumatoid arthritis; one multicomponent in psoriasis and one multicomponent in multiple sclerosis. Conclusion The assessment of interventions designed for increasing medication adherence in IMID is rare in the literature and

  2. Technology-based interventions in the treatment of overweight and obesity: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, Lieke C H; Pouwels, Sjaak; Berghuis, Kim A; Nienhuijs, Simon W

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of obesity increases worldwide. The use of technology-based interventions can be beneficial in weight loss interventions. This review aims to provide insight in the effectiveness of technology-based interventions on weight loss and quality of life for patients suffering overweight or obesity compared to standard care. Pubmed, PsycInfo, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, CINAHL and Embase were searched from the earliest date (of each database) up to February 2015. Interventions needed to be aimed at reducing or maintaining weight loss in persons with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m(2) and have a technology aspect. Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias was used for rating the methodological quality. Twenty-seven trials met inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies showed significant effects on weight loss compared to controls. Most interventions used a web-based approach (42%). Interventions were screened for five technical key components: self-monitoring, counsellor feedback and communication, group support, use of a structured program and use of an individually tailored program. All interventions that used a combination of all five or four components showed significant decreases in weight compared to controls. No significant results for quality of life were found. Outcomes on program adherence were reported in six studies. No significant results were found between weight loss and program adherence. Evidence is lacking about the optimal use of technology in weight loss interventions. However, when the optimal combination of technological components is found, technology-based interventions may be a valid tool for weight loss. Furthermore, more outcomes on quality of life and information about the effect of technology-based intervention after bariatric surgery are needed.

  3. Technology-based interventions in the treatment of overweight and obesity: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, Lieke C H; Pouwels, Sjaak; Berghuis, Kim A; Nienhuijs, Simon W

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of obesity increases worldwide. The use of technology-based interventions can be beneficial in weight loss interventions. This review aims to provide insight in the effectiveness of technology-based interventions on weight loss and quality of life for patients suffering overweight or obesity compared to standard care. Pubmed, PsycInfo, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, CINAHL and Embase were searched from the earliest date (of each database) up to February 2015. Interventions needed to be aimed at reducing or maintaining weight loss in persons with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m(2) and have a technology aspect. Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias was used for rating the methodological quality. Twenty-seven trials met inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies showed significant effects on weight loss compared to controls. Most interventions used a web-based approach (42%). Interventions were screened for five technical key components: self-monitoring, counsellor feedback and communication, group support, use of a structured program and use of an individually tailored program. All interventions that used a combination of all five or four components showed significant decreases in weight compared to controls. No significant results for quality of life were found. Outcomes on program adherence were reported in six studies. No significant results were found between weight loss and program adherence. Evidence is lacking about the optimal use of technology in weight loss interventions. However, when the optimal combination of technological components is found, technology-based interventions may be a valid tool for weight loss. Furthermore, more outcomes on quality of life and information about the effect of technology-based intervention after bariatric surgery are needed. PMID:26165415

  4. Self-Management Support Interventions for Stroke Survivors: A Systematic Meta-Review

    PubMed Central

    Parke, Hannah L.; Epiphaniou, Eleni; Pearce, Gemma; Taylor, Stephanie J. C.; Sheikh, Aziz; Griffiths, Chris J.; Greenhalgh, Trish; Pinnock, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    Background There is considerable policy interest in promoting self-management in patients with long-term conditions, but it remains uncertain whether these interventions are effective in stroke patients. Design Systematic meta-review of the evidence for self-management support interventions with stroke survivors to inform provision of healthcare services. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AMED, BNI, Database of Abstracts of Reviews for Effectiveness, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for systematic reviews of self-management support interventions for stroke survivors. Quality was assessed using the R-AMSTAR tool, and data extracted using a customised data extraction form. We undertook a narrative synthesis of the reviews' findings. Results From 12,400 titles we selected 13 systematic reviews (published 2003-2012) representing 101 individual trials. Although the term ‘self-management’ was rarely used, key elements of self-management support such as goal setting, action planning, and problem solving were core components of therapy rehabilitation interventions. We found high quality evidence that supported self-management in the context of therapy rehabilitation delivered soon after the stroke event resulted in short-term (< 1 year) improvements in basic and extended activities of daily living, and a reduction in poor outcomes (dependence/death). There is some evidence that rehabilitation and problem solving interventions facilitated reintegration into the community. Conclusions Self-management terminology is rarely used in the context of stroke. However, therapy rehabilitation currently successfully delivers elements of self-management support to stroke survivors and their caregivers with improved outcomes. Future research should focus on managing the emotional, medical and social tasks of long-term survivorship. PMID:26204266

  5. What's the Point?: A Review of Reward Systems Implemented in Gamification Interventions.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Zakkoyya H; Swartz, Maria C; Lyons, Elizabeth J

    2016-04-01

    Rewards are commonly used in interventions to change behavior, but they can inhibit development of intrinsic motivation, which is associated with long-term behavior maintenance. Gamification is a novel intervention strategy that may target intrinsic motivation through fun and enjoyment. Before the effects of gamified interventions on motivation can be determined, there must be an understanding of how gamified interventions operationalize rewards, such as point systems. The purpose of this review is to determine the prevalence of different reward types, specifically point systems, within gamified interventions. Electronic databases were searched for relevant articles. Data sources included Medline OVID, Medline PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, Cochrane Central, and PsycINFO. Out of the 21 articles retrieved, 18 studies described a reward system and were included in this review. Gamified interventions were designed to target a myriad of clinical outcomes across diverse populations. Rewards included points (n = 14), achievements/badges/medals (n = 7), tangible rewards (n = 7), currency (n = 4), other unspecified rewards (n = 3), likes (n = 2), animated feedback (n = 1), and kudos (n = 1). Rewards, and points in particular, appear to be a foundational component of gamified interventions. Despite their prevalence, authors seldom described the use of noncontingent rewards or how the rewards interacted with other game features. The reward systems relying on tangible rewards and currency may have been limited by inhibited intrinsic motivation. As gamification proliferates, future research should explicitly describe how rewards were operationalized in the intervention and evaluate the effects of gamified rewards on motivation across populations and research outcomes. PMID:26812253

  6. Electronic Interventions for Alcohol Misuse and Alcohol Use Disorders A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Dedert, Eric. A.; McDuffie, Jennifer R.; Stein, Roy; McNiel, J. Murray; Kosinski, Andrzej S.; Freiermuth, Caroline E.; Hemminger, Adam; Williams, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of electronic interventions (e-interventions) may improve treatment of alcohol misuse. Purpose To characterize treatment intensity and systematically review the evidence for efficacy of e-interventions, relative to controls, for reducing alcohol consumption and alcohol-related impairment in adults and college students. Data Sources MEDLINE (via PubMed) from January 2000 to March 2015 and the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and PsycINFO from January 2000 to August 2014. Study Selection English-language, randomized, controlled trials that involved at least 50 adults who misused alcohol; compared an e-intervention group with a control group; and reported outcomes at 6 months or longer. Data Extraction Two reviewers abstracted data and independently rated trial quality and strength of evidence. Data Synthesis In 28 unique trials, the modal e-intervention was brief feedback on alcohol consumption. Available data suggested a small reduction in consumption (approximately 1 drink per week) in adults and college students at 6 months but not at 12 months. There was no statistically significant effect on meeting drinking limit guidelines in adults or on binge-drinking episodes or social consequences of alcohol in college students. Limitations E-interventions that ranged in intensity were combined in analyses. Quantitative results do not apply to short-term outcomes or alcohol use disorders. Conclusion Evidence suggests that low-intensity e-interventions produce small reductions in alcohol consumption at 6 months, but there is little evidence for longer-term, clinically significant effects, such as meeting drinking limits. Future e-interventions could provide more intensive treatment and possibly human support to assist persons in meeting recommended drinking limits. Primary Funding Source U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. PMID:26237752

  7. A Review of Marital Intimacy-Enhancing Interventions among Married Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Kardan-Souraki, Maryam; Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab; Asadpour, Ismail; Mohammadpour, Reza Ali; Khani, Soghra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lack of intimacy is currently the main concern rather than main concern of the experts in psychology and counseling. It is considered as one of the most important causes for divorce and as such to improve marital intimacy a great number of interventions have been proposed in the literature. Intimacy training and counseling make the couples take effective and successful steps to increase marital intimacy. No study has reviewed the interventions promoting marital intimacy after marriage. Thus, this review study aimed to classify the articles investigating the impact of interventional programs on marital intimacy after marriage. Search Methods: In April 2015, we performed a general search in Google Scholar search engines, and then we did an advanced search the databases of Science Direct, ProQuest, SID, Magiran, Irandoc, Pubmed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and Psych info; Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). Also, lists of the references of the relevant articles were reviewed for additional citations. Using Medical Subject Headings (MESH) keywords: Intervention (Clinical Trials, Non-Randomized Controlled Trials, Randomized Controlled Trials, Education), intimacy, marital (Marriage) and selected related articles to the study objective were from 1995 to April 2015. Clinical trials that evaluated one or more behavioral interventions to improve marital intimacy were reviewed in the study. Main Results: 39 trials met the inclusion criteria. Eleven interventions had follow-up, and 28 interventions lacked follow-up. The quality evidence for 22 interventions was low, for 15 interventions moderate, and for one intervention was considered high. Findings from studies were categorized in 11 categories as the intimacy promoting interventions in dimensions of emotional, psychological, physical, sexual, temporal, communicational, social and recreational, aesthetic, spiritual, intellectual intimacy, and total intimacy. Authors’ Conclusions

  8. Meditation Interventions for Chronic Disease Populations: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chan, Roxane Raffin; Larson, Janet L

    2015-12-01

    The rapidly growing body of research regarding the use of meditation interventions in chronic disease presents an opportunity to compare outcomes based on intervention content. For this review, meditation interventions were described as those interventions delivered to persons with chronic disease where sitting meditation was the main or only content of the intervention with or without the addition of mindful movement. This systematic review identified 45 individual research studies that examined meditations effect on levels of anxiety, depression, and chronic disease symptoms in persons with chronic disease. Individual studies were assessed based on interventional content, the consistency with which interventions were applied, and the research quality. This study identified seven categories of meditation interventions based on the meditation skills and mindful movement practices that were included in the intervention. Overall, half of the interventions had clearly defined and specific meditation interventions (25/45) and half of the studies were conducted using randomized control trials (24/45).

  9. An evidence-based review of enhanced recovery interventions in knee replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alazzawi, S; Nizam, I; Haddad, FS

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Total knee replacement (TKR) is a very common surgical procedure. Improved pain management techniques, surgical practices and the introduction of novel interventions have enhanced the patient’s postoperative experience after TKR. Safe, efficient pathways are needed to address the increasing need for knee arthroplasty in the UK. Enhanced recovery programmes can help to reduce hospital stays following knee replacements while maintaining patient safety and satisfaction. This review outlines common evidence-based pre, intra and postoperative interventions in use in enhanced recovery protocols following TKR. Methods A thorough literature search of the electronic healthcare databases (MEDLINE®, Embase™ and the Cochrane Library) was conducted to identify articles and studies concerned with enhanced recovery and fast track pathways for TKR. Results A literature review revealed several non-operative and operative interventions that are effective in enhanced recovery following TKR including preoperative patient education, pre-emptive and local infiltration analgesia, preoperative nutrition, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, pulsed electromagnetic fields, perioperative rehabilitation, modern wound dressings, different standard surgical techniques, minimally invasive surgery and computer assisted surgery. Conclusions Enhanced recovery programmes require a multidisciplinary team of dedicated professionals, principally involving preoperative education, multimodal pain control and accelerated rehabilitation; this will be boosted if combined with minimally invasive surgery. The current economic climate and restricted healthcare budget further necessitate brief hospitalisation while minimising costs. These non-operative interventions are the way forward to achieve such requirements. PMID:24025284

  10. Use of complementary and alternative medical interventions for the management of procedure-related pain, anxiety, and distress in pediatric oncology: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Landier, Wendy; Tse, Alice M

    2010-12-01

    This integrative review aims to identify evidence in four electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsyINFO, and COCHRANE) regarding the effectiveness of complementary and alternative medical interventions, either alone or as an adjunct to pharmacological therapy, in alleviating procedure-related pain, anxiety, and distress in children and adolescents with cancer. A total of 32 articles met inclusion criteria. Results suggest that mind-body interventions, including hypnosis, distraction, and imagery, may be effective, alone or as adjuncts to pharmacological interventions, in managing procedure-related pain, anxiety, and distress in pediatric oncology.

  11. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medical Interventions for the Management of Procedure-Related Pain, Anxiety, and Distress in Pediatric Oncology: An Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Landier, Wendy; Tse, Alice M.

    2016-01-01

    This integrative review aims to identify evidence in four electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsyINFO, and COCHRANE) regarding the effectiveness of complementary and alternative medical interventions, either alone or as an adjunct to pharmacological therapy, in alleviating procedure-related pain, anxiety, and distress in children and adolescents with cancer. A total of 32 articles met inclusion criteria. Results suggest that mind–body interventions, including hypnosis, distraction, and imagery, may be effective, alone or as adjuncts to pharmacological interventions, in managing procedure-related pain, anxiety, and distress in pediatric oncology. PMID:21035021

  12. Lifestyle Interventions Targeting Body Weight Changes during the Menopause Transition: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Jull, Janet; Stacey, Dawn; Beach, Sarah; Dumas, Alex; Strychar, Irene; Ufholz, Lee-Anne; Prince, Stephanie; Abdulnour, Joseph; Prud'homme, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effectiveness of exercise and/or nutrition interventions and to address body weight changes during the menopause transition. Methods. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using electronic databases, grey literature, and hand searching. Two independent researchers screened for studies using experimental designs to evaluate the impact of exercise and/or nutrition interventions on body weight and/or central weight gain performed during the menopausal transition. Studies were quality appraised using Cochrane risk of bias. Included studies were analyzed descriptively. Results. Of 3,564 unique citations screened, 3 studies were eligible (2 randomized controlled trials, and 1 pre/post study). Study quality ranged from low to high risk of bias. One randomized controlled trial with lower risk of bias concluded that participation in an exercise program combined with dietary interventions might mitigate body adiposity increases, which is normally observed during the menopause transition. The other two studies with higher risk of bias suggested that exercise might attenuate weight loss or weight gain and change abdominal adiposity patterns. Conclusions. High quality studies evaluating the effectiveness of interventions targeting body weight changes in women during their menopause transition are needed. Evidence from one higher quality study indicates an effective multifaceted intervention for women to minimize changes in body adiposity. PMID:24971172

  13. Intervention to Promote Patients' Adherence to Antimalarial Medication: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Fuangchan, Anjana; Dhippayom, Teerapon; Kongkaew, Chuenjid

    2014-01-01

    Non-adherence as a major contributor to poor treatment outcomes. This study aimed to explore the effectiveness of existing interventions promoting adherence to antimalarial drugs by systematic review. The following databases were used to identify potential articles: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane CENTRAL, and CINAHL (through March 2013). From 1,813 potential papers identified, 16 studies met the selection criteria comprising 9,247 patients. Interventions were classified as packaging aids, visual media, combined visual media and verbal information, community education, medication supervision, and convenient regimen. These interventions were shown to increase adherence to antimalarial drugs (median relative risk = 1.4, interquartile range 1.2–2.0). Although a most effective intervention did not emerge, community education and visual media/verbal information combinations may well have most potential to improve adherence to antimalarial medication. These interventions should be implemented in combination to optimize their beneficial effects. The current understanding on improved adherence would facilitate to contain outbreaks of malaria cost effectively. PMID:24166045

  14. Controlled flax interventions for the improvement of menopausal symptoms and postmenopausal bone health: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dew, Tristan P; Williamson, Gary

    2013-11-01

    Concerns regarding hormone therapy safety have led to interest in the use of phytoestrogens for a variety of menopause-related health complaints. Recent meta-analyses concerning soy and postmenopausal bone mineral density, flax and serum cholesterol indicate that significant benefits may be achieved in postmenopausal women. This study aimed to systematically review controlled flax interventions that had reported on menopausal symptoms and bone health in perimenopausal/postmenopausal women. A general search strategy was used to interrogate the Cochrane Library, Embase, MEDLINE, and SciFinder databases. Of 64 initial articles retrieved, we included 11 distinct interventions using flax without cotreatment. Interventions considering hot flush frequency/severity (five studies) and menopausal index scores (five studies) reported improvements from baseline with both flax and control treatments, with no significant difference between groups. There was little evidence to suggest that flax consumption alters circulating sex hormones, but flaxseed intervention increased the urinary 2α-hydroxyestrone/16α-hydroxyestrone ratio, which has been associated with a lower risk of breast cancer. Few studies considered bone mineral density (two studies) or markers of bone turnover (three studies). Flaxseed is currently not indicated for the alleviation of vasomotor symptoms in postmenopausal women. A paucity of appropriate randomized controlled trials means that the effects of flax intervention on postmenopausal bone mineral density are inconclusive.

  15. A systematic review of non-pharmacological interventions for primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Katie L.; Deane, Katherine H. O.; Strassheim, Victoria; Deary, Vincent; Rapley, Tim; Newton, Julia L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effects of non-pharmacological interventions for primary SS (pSS) on outcomes falling within the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health domains. Methods. We searched the following databases from inception to September 2014: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews; Medline; Embase; PsychINFO; CINAHL; and clinical trials registers. We included randomized controlled trials of any non-pharmacological intervention. Two authors independently reviewed titles and abstracts against the inclusion/exclusion criteria and independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Results. A total of 1463 studies were identified, from which 17 full text articles were screened and 5 studies were included in the review; a total of 130 participants were randomized. The included studies investigated the effectiveness of an oral lubricating device for dry mouth, acupuncture for dry mouth, lacrimal punctum plugs for dry eyes and psychodynamic group therapy for coping with symptoms. Overall, the studies were of low quality and at high risk of bias. Although one study showed punctum plugs to improve dry eyes, the sample size was relatively small. Conclusion. Further high-quality studies to evaluate non-pharmacological interventions for PSS are needed. PMID:26135587

  16. A systematic review of school-based interventions targeting physical activity and sedentary behaviour among older adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Hynynen, S-T.; van Stralen, M. M.; Sniehotta, F. F.; Araújo-Soares, V.; Hardeman, W.; Chinapaw, M. J. M.; Vasankari, T.; Hankonen, N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lack of physical activity (PA) and high levels of sedentary behaviour (SB) have been associated with health problems. This systematic review evaluates the effectiveness of school-based interventions to increase PA and decrease SB among 15–19-year-old adolescents, and examines whether intervention characteristics (intervention length, delivery mode and intervention provider) and intervention content (i.e. behaviour change techniques, BCTs) are related to intervention effectiveness. A systematic search of randomised or cluster randomised controlled trials with outcome measures of PA and/or SB rendered 10 results. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Intervention content was coded using Behaviour Change Technique Taxonomy v1. Seven out of 10 studies reported significant increases in PA. Effects were generally small and short-term (Cohen's d ranged from 0.132 to 0.659). Two out of four studies that measured SB reported significant reductions in SB. Interventions that increased PA included a higher number of BCTs, specific BCTs (e.g., goal setting, action planning and self-monitoring), and were delivered by research staff. Intervention length and mode of delivery were unrelated to effectiveness. More studies are needed that evaluate long-term intervention effectiveness and target SBs among older adolescents. PMID:26807143

  17. Self-help interventions for depressive disorders and depressive symptoms: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Amy J; Jorm, Anthony F

    2008-01-01

    Background Research suggests that depressive disorders exist on a continuum, with subthreshold symptoms causing considerable population burden and increasing individual risk of developing major depressive disorder. An alternative strategy to professional treatment of subthreshold depression is population promotion of effective self-help interventions that can be easily applied by an individual without professional guidance. The evidence for self-help interventions for depressive symptoms is reviewed in the present work, with the aim of identifying promising interventions that could inform future health promotion campaigns or stimulate further research. Methods A literature search for randomised controlled trials investigating self-help interventions for depressive disorders or depressive symptoms was performed using PubMed, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Reference lists and citations of included studies were also checked. Studies were grouped into those involving participants with depressive disorders or a high level of depressive symptoms, or non-clinically depressed participants not selected for depression. A number of exclusion criteria were applied, including trials with small sample sizes and where the intervention was adjunctive to antidepressants or psychotherapy. Results The majority of interventions searched had no relevant evidence to review. Of the 38 interventions reviewed, the ones with the best evidence of efficacy in depressive disorders were S-adenosylmethionine, St John's wort, bibliotherapy, computerised interventions, distraction, relaxation training, exercise, pleasant activities, sleep deprivation, and light therapy. A number of other interventions showed promise but had received less research attention. Research in non-clinical samples indicated immediate beneficial effects on depressed mood for distraction, exercise, humour, music, negative air ionisation, and singing; while potential for helpful longer-term effects

  18. Interventional Therapies for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Focused Review (Efficacy and Outcomes)

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vikram B.; Wasserman, Ronald; Imani, Farnad

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lower back pain is considered to be one of the most common complaints that brings a patient to a pain specialist. Several modalities in interventional pain management are known to be helpful to a patient with chronic low back pain. Proper diagnosis is required for appropriate intervention to provide optimal benefits. From simple trigger point injections for muscular pain to a highly complex intervention such as a spinal cord stimulator are very effective if chosen properly. The aim of this article is to provide the reader with a comprehensive reading for treatment of lower back pain using interventional modalities. Evidence Acquisition: Extensive search for published literature was carried out online using PubMed, Cochrane database and Embase for the material used in this manuscript. This article describes the most common modalities available to an interventional pain physician along with the most relevant current and past references for the treatment of lower back pain. All the graphics and images were prepared by and belong to the author. Results: This review article describes the most common modalities available to an interventional pain physician along with the most relevant current and past references for the treatment of lower back pain. All the graphics and images belong to the author. Although it is beyond the scope of this review article to include a very detailed description of each procedure along with complete references, a sincere attempt has been made to comprehensively cover this very complex and perplexing topic. Conclusion: Lower back pain is a major healthcare issue and this review article will help educate the pain practitioners about the current evidence based treatment options. PMID:26484298

  19. Physical rehabilitation interventions for adult patients during critical illness: an overview of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Bronwen; O'Neill, Brenda; Salisbury, Lisa; Blackwood, Bronagh

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical rehabilitation interventions aim to ameliorate the effects of critical illness-associated muscle dysfunction in survivors. We conducted an overview of systematic reviews (SR) evaluating the effect of these interventions across the continuum of recovery. Methods Six electronic databases (Cochrane Library, CENTRAL, DARE, Medline, Embase, and Cinahl) were searched. Two review authors independently screened articles for eligibility and conducted data extraction and quality appraisal. Reporting quality was assessed and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach applied to summarise overall quality of evidence. Results Five eligible SR were included in this overview, of which three included meta-analyses. Reporting quality of the reviews was judged as medium to high. Two reviews reported moderate-to-high quality evidence of the beneficial effects of physical therapy commencing during intensive care unit (ICU) admission in improving critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy, quality of life, mortality and healthcare utilisation. These interventions included early mobilisation, cycle ergometry and electrical muscle stimulation. Two reviews reported very low to low quality evidence of the beneficial effects of electrical muscle stimulation delivered in the ICU for improving muscle strength, muscle structure and critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy. One review reported that due to a lack of good quality randomised controlled trials and inconsistency in measuring outcomes, there was insufficient evidence to support beneficial effects from physical rehabilitation delivered post-ICU discharge. Conclusions Patients derive short-term benefits from physical rehabilitation delivered during ICU admission. Further robust trials of electrical muscle stimulation in the ICU and rehabilitation delivered following ICU discharge are needed to determine the long-term impact on patient care. This overview provides recommendations for

  20. Development and classification of an operational definition of complementary and alternative medicine for the Cochrane Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, L. Susan; Manheimer, Eric; Berman, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade the Cochrane Collaboration has been an increasingly important source of information on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies. From 2007 to 2008 the Cochrane CAM Field developed a topics list that allowed us to categorize all 396 Cochrane reviews related to CAM (as of The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2009). This topics list is an advance in making Cochrane reviews on CAM topics accessible to the public. In this paper, we discuss challenges in developing the topics list, including developing an operational definition of CAM, deciding which reviews should be included within the CAM Field’s scope, developing the structured list of CAM Field-specific topics, and determining where in the topics list the reviews should be placed. Although aspects of our operational definition of CAM are open to revision, a standardized definition provides us with an objective, reproducible and systematic method for defining and classifying CAM therapies. PMID:21717826

  1. The effect of dietary and exercise interventions on body weight in prostate cancer patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Hamdan; McNeill, Geraldine; Haseen, Farhana; N'Dow, James; Craig, Leone C A; Heys, Steven D

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer prognosis may therefore be improved by maintaining healthy weight through diet and physical activity. This systematic review looked at the effect of diet and exercise interventions on body weight among men treated for prostate cancer. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library databases were searched from the earliest record to August 2013. Randomized controlled trials of diet and exercise interventions in prostate cancer patients that reported body weight or body composition changes were included. A total of 20 trials were included in the review. Because of the heterogeneity of intervention components, a narrative review was conducted. Interventions were categorized as diet (n = 6), exercise (n = 8), or a combination of both diet and exercise (n = 6). The sample size ranged from 8 to 155 and the duration from 3 wk to 4 yr. Four diet interventions and 1 combined diet and exercise intervention achieved significant weight loss with mean values ranging from 0.8 kg to 6.1 kg (median 4.5 kg). Exercise alone did not lead to weight loss, though most of these trials aimed to increase fitness and quality of life rather than decrease body weight. Diet intervention, alone or in combination with exercise, can lead to weight loss in men treated for prostate cancer.

  2. A systematic review of community-based interventions for emerging zoonotic infectious diseases in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Halton, Kate; Sarna, Mohinder; Barnett, Adrian; Leonardo, Lydia; Graves, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Executive Summary Background Southeast Asia has been at the epicentre of recent epidemics of emerging and re-emerging zoonotic diseases. Community-based surveillance and control interventions have been heavily promoted but the most effective interventions have not been identified. Objectives This review evaluated evidence for the effectiveness of community-based surveillance interventions at monitoring and identifying emerging infectious disease; the effectiveness of community-based control interventions at reducing rates of emerging infectious disease; and contextual factors that influence intervention effectiveness. Inclusion criteria Participants Communities in Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam. Types of intervention(s) Non-pharmaceutical, non-vaccine, and community-based surveillance or prevention and control interventions targeting rabies, Nipah virus, dengue, SARS or avian influenza. Types of outcomes Primary outcomes: measures: of infection or disease; secondary outcomes: measures of intervention function. Types of studies Original quantitative studies published in English. Search strategy Databases searched (1980 to 2011): PubMed, CINAHL, ProQuest, EBSCOhost, Web of Science, Science Direct, Cochrane database of systematic reviews, WHOLIS, British Development Library, LILACS, World Bank (East Asia), Asian Development Bank. Methodological quality Two independent reviewers critically appraised studies using standard Joanna Briggs Institute instruments. Disagreements were resolved through discussion. Data extraction A customised tool was used to extract quantitative data on intervention(s), populations, study methods, and primary and secondary outcomes; and qualitative contextual information or narrative evidence about interventions. Data synthesis Data was synthesised in a narrative summary with the aid of tables. Meta-analysis was used to statistically pool quantitative results. Results

  3. Helping people make well-informed decisions about health care: old and new challenges to achieving the aim of the Cochrane Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Oxman, Andrew D

    2013-09-20

    The aim of the Cochrane Collaboration is to help people make well-informed decisions about health care by preparing, maintaining and promoting the accessibility of systematic reviews of the effects of health care interventions. This aim is as relevant now as it was 20 years ago, when the Cochrane Collaboration was established. Substantial progress has been made toward addressing challenges to achieving the Collaboration's aim. At the same time, a huge amount of work remains to be done. Current challenges include improving the quality of reviews, methodological challenges, meeting the needs of contributors and users and taking on new challenges while staying focused on the Collaboration's aim. Radical thinking and substantial change may be needed to identify and implement pragmatic strategies to ensure that reviews are up-to-date and informative. Methodological challenges include the development and application of better methods for addressing explanatory factors, incorporating non-randomized evidence and making comparisons across multiple interventions. Innovations in editorial processes and strategies to meet the needs of low- and middle-income countries and diverse users of Cochrane reviews are needed. Finally, although it is important to consider broadening the aims of the Collaboration to include types of questions other than the effects of interventions and types of products other than the Cochrane Library, we should not lose sight of the aim of the Cochrane Collaboration. Addressing that aim is still a major challenge that requires the collaboration of thousands of people around the world and continuing improvements in the methods used to achieve that aim.

  4. Lean interventions in healthcare: do they actually work? A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Moraros, John; Lemstra, Mark; Nwankwo, Chijioke

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lean is a widely used quality improvement methodology initially developed and used in the automotive and manufacturing industries but recently expanded to the healthcare sector. This systematic literature review seeks to independently assess the effect of Lean or Lean interventions on worker and patient satisfaction, health and process outcomes, and financial costs. Data sources We conducted a systematic literature review of Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Science, ABI/Inform, ERIC, EMBASE and SCOPUS. Study selection Peer reviewed articles were included if they examined a Lean intervention and included quantitative data. Methodological quality was assessed using validated critical appraisal checklists. Publically available data collected by the Saskatchewan Health Quality Council and the Saskatchewan Union of Nurses were also analysed and reported separately. Data extraction Data on design, methods, interventions and key outcomes were extracted and collated. Results of data synthesis Our electronic search identified 22 articles that passed methodological quality review. Among the accepted studies, 4 were exclusively concerned with health outcomes, 3 included both health and process outcomes and 15 included process outcomes. Our study found that Lean interventions have: (i) no statistically significant association with patient satisfaction and health outcomes; (ii) a negative association with financial costs and worker satisfaction and (iii) potential, yet inconsistent, benefits on process outcomes like patient flow and safety. Conclusion While some may strongly believe that Lean interventions lead to quality improvements in healthcare, the evidence to date simply does not support this claim. More rigorous, higher quality and better conducted scientific research is required to definitively ascertain the impact and effectiveness of Lean in healthcare settings. PMID:26811118

  5. The absolute spectrophotometric catalog by Anita Cochran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnashev, V. I.; Burnasheva, B. A.; Ruban, E. V.; Hagen-Torn, E. I.

    2014-06-01

    The absolute spectrophotometric catalog by Anita Cochran is presented in a machine-readable form. The catalog systematizes observations acquired at the McDonald Observatory in 1977-1978. The data are compared with other sources, in particular, the calculated broadband stellar magnitudes are compared with photometric observations by other authors, to show that the observational data given in the catalog are reliable and suitable for a variety of applications. Observations of variable stars of different types make Cochran's catalog especially valuable.

  6. Self-directed interventions to promote weight loss: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jason C H; Abraham, Charles; Greaves, Colin J; Nikolaou, Vasilis

    2016-09-01

    Many self-directed weight-loss interventions have been developed using a variety of delivery formats (e.g., internet and smartphone) and change techniques. Yet, little research has examined whether self-directed interventions can exclusively promote weight loss. MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library were systematically reviewed for randomised controlled trials evaluating self-directed interventions in relation to weight-loss outcomes in adults. Standardised mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using a random effects model. Twenty-seven trials incorporating 36 comparisons met our inclusion criteria. Participants using self-directed interventions lost significantly more weight (MD = -1.56 kg, CI -2.25, -0.86 ranging from 0.6 to 5.3 kg) compared to those in the minimal intervention or no-treatment groups (3.1-month follow-up median). The majority of interventions were internet based (18 evaluations) and these were effective at 3 months (MD = -1.74 kg, CI -2.65, -0.82 ranging from 0.6 to 4.8 kg) (SMD = -0.48, 95% CI -0.72, -0.24, I(2) = 82%; p < .0001; 16 evaluations) and 6 months follow-up (MD = -2.71 kg, CI -4.03, -1.39 ranging from 2.2 to 5.3 kg) (SMD = -0.59, 95% CI -0.99, -0.19, I(2) = 76%; p = .004; 4 evaluations). Self-directed weight-loss interventions can generate modest weight loss for up to 6 months but may need to be supplemented by other interventions to achieve sustained and clinically meaningful weight loss.

  7. Self-directed interventions to promote weight loss: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jason C H; Abraham, Charles; Greaves, Colin J; Nikolaou, Vasilis

    2016-09-01

    Many self-directed weight-loss interventions have been developed using a variety of delivery formats (e.g., internet and smartphone) and change techniques. Yet, little research has examined whether self-directed interventions can exclusively promote weight loss. MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library were systematically reviewed for randomised controlled trials evaluating self-directed interventions in relation to weight-loss outcomes in adults. Standardised mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using a random effects model. Twenty-seven trials incorporating 36 comparisons met our inclusion criteria. Participants using self-directed interventions lost significantly more weight (MD = -1.56 kg, CI -2.25, -0.86 ranging from 0.6 to 5.3 kg) compared to those in the minimal intervention or no-treatment groups (3.1-month follow-up median). The majority of interventions were internet based (18 evaluations) and these were effective at 3 months (MD = -1.74 kg, CI -2.65, -0.82 ranging from 0.6 to 4.8 kg) (SMD = -0.48, 95% CI -0.72, -0.24, I(2) = 82%; p < .0001; 16 evaluations) and 6 months follow-up (MD = -2.71 kg, CI -4.03, -1.39 ranging from 2.2 to 5.3 kg) (SMD = -0.59, 95% CI -0.99, -0.19, I(2) = 76%; p = .004; 4 evaluations). Self-directed weight-loss interventions can generate modest weight loss for up to 6 months but may need to be supplemented by other interventions to achieve sustained and clinically meaningful weight loss. PMID:27091296

  8. Computer-based interventions for sexual health promotion: systematic review and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J V; Murray, E; Rait, G; Mercer, C H; Morris, R W; Peacock, R; Cassell, J; Nazareth, I

    2012-06-01

    This systematic review was conducted to determine the effects of self-help interactive computer-based interventions (ICBIs) for sexual health promotion. We searched 40 databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of computer-based interventions, defining 'interactive' as programmes that require contributions from users to produce personally relevant material. We conducted searches and analysed data using Cochrane Collaboration methods. Results of RCTs were pooled using a random-effects model with standardized mean differences for continuous outcomes and odds ratios (ORs) for binary outcomes, with heterogeneity assessed using the I(2) statistic. We identified 15 RCTs of ICBIs (3917 participants). Comparing ICBIs to minimal interventions, there were significant effects on sexual health knowledge (standardized mean difference [SMD] 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.27-1.18); safer sex self-efficacy (SMD 0.17, 95% CI 0.05-0.29); safer-sex intentions (SMD 0.16, 95% CI 0.02-0.30); and sexual behaviour (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.18-2.59). ICBIs had a greater impact on sexual health knowledge than face-to-face interventions did (SMD 0.36, 95% CI 0.13-0.58). ICBIs are effective tools for learning about sexual health, and show promising effects on self-efficacy, intention and sexual behaviour. More data are needed to analyse biological outcomes and cost-effectiveness.

  9. Primary Care Interventions to Prevent or Treat Traumatic Stress in Childhood: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Anna; Fothergill, Kate E.; Wilcox, Holly C.; Coleclough, Elizabeth; Horwitz, Russell; Ruble, Anne; Burkey, Matthew D.; Wissow, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary care interventions addressing child traumatic stress exist but their range and effectiveness is unclear. Objectives To systematically assess the evidence base for prevention and treatment of child traumatic stress in primary care settings. Data Sources PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, Scopus, Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, the National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices, the National Child Traumatic Stress Network website, Google search. Study Eligibility Criteria, Participants, and Interventions Studies were eligible for inclusion if they described the results of intervention studies in a primary care setting addressing child traumatic stress. Study participants could include primary care providers, pediatric patients, and their parents or other caregivers. Study Appraisal and Synthesis Methods Each study was assessed for inclusion and each included study was assessed for risk of bias by two reviewers. Results We found 12 articles describing 10 different studies that met the inclusion criteria. The intervention approaches taken in the studies were diverse and included the implementation of screening programs/tools, training clinicians to recognize and discuss psychosocial issues with patients and their families, and providing primary care professionals with community resource lists. Nine out of 10 studies included in the review reported favorable results. Limitations Studies included in the review had relatively short follow-up periods and the diversity of studies identified precluded the possibility of conducting a meta-analysis. Conclusions and Implications of Key Findings Findings suggest that interventions in pediatric primary care settings are feasible and can favorably impact clinical practices and families’ outcomes. PMID:26344717

  10. Obesity Educational Interventions in U.S. Medical Schools: A Systematic Review and Identified Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Vitolins, Mara Z.; Crandall, Sonia; Miller, Davis; Ip, Eddie; Marion, Gail; Spangler, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Obesity is the second leading cause of preventable death in the U.S. However, physicians feel poorly trained to address the obesity epidemic. This review examines effective training methods for overweight and obesity intervention in undergraduate medical education. Data Sources Using indexing terms related to overweight, obesity and medical student education, we conducted a literature searched PubMed PsychInfo, Cochrane and ERIC for relevant articles in English. References from articles identified were also reviewed to located additional articles. Review Methods We included all studies that incorporated processor outcome evaluations of obesity educational interventions for US medical students. Of an initial 168 citations, 40 abstracts were retrieved; 11 studies were found to be pertinent to medical student obesity education, but only 5 included intervention and evaluation elements. Quality criteria for inclusion consisted of explicit evaluation of the educational methods used. Data extraction identified participants (e.g., year of medical students), interventions, evaluations and results. Results These five studies successfully used a variety of teaching methods including hands on training, didactic lectures, role playing and standardized patient interaction to increase medical students’ knowledge, attitudes and skills regarding overweight and obesity intervention. Two studies addressed medical student bias towards overweight and obese patients. No studies addressed health disparities in the epidemiology and bias of obesity. Conclusions Despite the commonly cited “obesity epidemic,” there are very few published studies that report the effectiveness of medical school obesity educational programs. Gaps still exist within undergraduate medical education including specific training that addresses obesity and long-term studies showing that such training is retained. PMID:22775792

  11. Efficacy of technology-based interventions for obesity prevention in adolescents: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jyu-Lin; Wilkosz, Mary Ellen

    2014-01-01

    About one third of adolescents in the USA are overweight and/or obese. Obesity during the adolescent years is associated with many adverse health consequences, including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and psychosocial problems. Because of substantial advances in technologies and wide acceptance by adolescents, it is now possible to use technology for healthy weight management and prevention of obesity. This systematic review used Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines and aimed to evaluate the existing literature reported on the effectiveness of technology-based intervention (web-based, e-learning, and active video games) in preventing obesity in adolescents. The primary aim of this review was to explore if components of specific interventions were associated with a reduction in body mass index. Research articles obtained from CINAHL, Embase, PubMed, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane database from1990 to 2014 were reviewed. A total of 131 published articles were identified, and 14 met the inclusion criteria of a randomized or nonrandomized clinical study with body mass index as primary outcome and/or secondary outcomes of diet/physical activity and/or psychosocial function, tested lifestyle interventions to prevent obesity, used technology, and studied adolescents (aged 12–18 years). The results indicated that six of 14 studies found body mass index and/or body fat decreased at short-term (less than 12 months) follow-up. Six of eleven studies that examined physical activity or physical activity-related outcomes found an improved physical activity outcome (time playing active video games and increase in physical activity time), while five of seven studies which assessed dietary outcomes indicated improvement in dietary behaviors. Five of seven studies suggested an improvement in psychosocial function (reduced depression, improved self-esteem and efficacy, improvement on Behavior Assessment Scale) in adolescents

  12. How Efficacious Are Patient Education Interventions to Improve Bowel Preparation for Colonoscopy? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kurlander, Jacob E.; Sondhi, Arjun R.; Waljee, Akbar K.; Menees, Stacy B.; Connell, Cathleen M.; Schoenfeld, Philip S.; Saini, Sameer D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Bowel preparation is inadequate in a large proportion of colonoscopies, leading to multiple clinical and economic harms. While most patients receive some form of education before colonoscopy, there is no consensus on the best approach. Aims This systematic review aimed to evaluate the efficacy of patient education interventions to improve bowel preparation. Methods We searched the Cochrane Database, CINAHL, EMBASE, Ovid, and Web of Science. Inclusion criteria were: (1) a patient education intervention; (2) a primary aim of improving bowel preparation; (3) a validated bowel preparation scale; (4) a prospective design; (5) a concurrent control group; and, (6) adult participants. Study validity was assessed using a modified Downs and Black scale. Results 1,080 abstracts were screened. Seven full text studies met inclusion criteria, including 2,660 patients. These studies evaluated multiple delivery platforms, including paper-based interventions (three studies), videos (two studies), re-education telephone calls the day before colonoscopy (one study), and in-person education by physicians (one study). Bowel preparation significantly improved with the intervention in all but one study. All but one study were done in a single center. Validity scores ranged from 13 to 24 (maximum 27). Four of five abstracts and research letters that met inclusion criteria also showed improvements in bowel preparation. Statistical and clinical heterogeneity precluded meta-analysis. Conclusion Compared to usual care, patient education interventions appear efficacious in improving the quality of bowel preparation. However, because of the small scale of the studies and individualized nature of the interventions, results of these studies may not be generalizable to other settings. Healthcare practices should consider systematically evaluating their current bowel preparation education methods before undertaking new interventions. PMID:27741260

  13. The Effectiveness of Prompts to Promote Engagement With Digital Interventions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Fiona L; Lau, Rosa; Webster, Rosie; Michie, Susan; Murray, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Background Digital interventions have been effective in improving numerous health outcomes and health behaviors; furthermore, they are increasingly being used in different health care areas, including self-management of long-term conditions, mental health, and health promotion. The full potential of digital interventions is hindered by a lack of user engagement. There is an urgent need to develop effective strategies that can promote users’ engagement with digital interventions. One potential method is the use of technology-based reminders or prompts. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of technology-based strategies for promoting engagement with digital interventions. Methods Cochrane Collaboration guidelines on systematic review methodology were followed. The search strategy was executed across 7 electronic databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC), PsycINFO, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). Databases were searched from inception to September 13, 2013, with no language or publication type restrictions, using three concepts: randomized controlled trials, digital interventions, and engagement. Gray literature and reference lists of included studies were also searched. Titles and abstracts were independently screened by 2 authors, then the full texts of potentially eligible papers were obtained and double-screened. Data from eligible papers were extracted by one author and checked for accuracy by another author. Bias was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Narrative synthesis was performed on all included studies and, where appropriate, data were pooled using meta-analysis. All findings were reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Results A total of 14 studies were included in the review with 8774 participants

  14. Tobacco Interventions and Anaesthesia- A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Usha

    2009-01-01

    Summary Tobacco use is the leading preventable agent of death in the world. It is manufactured on a large scale in India and has a huge international market also. Death toll from tobacco use is on the rise. Use of tobacco is also increasing esp. in developing countries, in teenagers & in women, despite government, WHO and intervention by other statutory bodies. Prolonged use of tobacco or its products, as smoke or chew, endows significant risk of developing various diseases. With advances in surgical and anaethesia techniques & prolonged life expectancy, anaesthetist will be faced with management of these patients. Tobacco consumption affects every major organ system of the body; esp. lung, heart and blood vessels. Perioperative smoking cessation can significantly reduce the risk of postoperative complications & duration of hospital stay. Anaesthetist can play an important role in motivating these patients to quit smoking preoperatively by providing brief counselling and nicotine replacement therapy in reluctant quitters. More of concern is the effect of passive smoking (second & third hand smoke) on non smokers. This is a review of tobacco & its products, their health consequences, diseases caused, anaesthetic considerations & their role in helping these patients quit smoking Preventing nicotine addiction and improving smoking cessation strategies should be the priority and despite these being only partially successful, strong measures at all levels should be continued & enforced. PMID:20640112

  15. Nutritional interventions in sarcopenia: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Hickson, Mary

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present paper is to critically review the details of the published nutrition intervention trials, with and without exercise, targeting sarcopenia. Sarcopenia is the loss of muscle mass, strength and/or performance with age. Since amino acids and energy are required for muscle synthesis it is possible that nutritional intake influences sarcopenia. Nutritional studies are challenging to carry out because of the complexity of modulating dietary intake. It is very difficult to change one nutrient without influencing many others, which means that many of the published studies are problematic to interpret. The studies included evaluate whole protein, essential amino acids and β-hydroxyl β-methylbutyrate (HMB). Whole-protein supplementation failed to show a consistent effect on muscle mass, strength or function. This can be explained by the variations in study design, composition of the protein supplement and the failure to monitor voluntary food intake, adherence and baseline nutritional status. Essential amino-acid supplements showed an inconsistent effect but there are only two trials that have significant differences in methodology and the supplement used. The HMB studies are suggestive of a beneficial effect on older adults, but larger well-controlled studies are required that measure outcomes relevant to sarcopenia, ideally in sarcopenic populations. The issues of timing and distribution of protein intake, and increased splanchnic amino-acid sequestration are discussed, and recommendations for future trials are made. PMID:25923603

  16. A Systematic Review Comparing Antiretroviral Adherence Descriptive and Intervention Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sandelowski, Margarete; Voils, Corrine I.; Chang, Yunkyung; Lee, Eun-Jeong

    2009-01-01

    We examined the extent to which studies aimed at testing interventions to improve antiretroviral adherence have targeted the facilitators of and barriers known to affect adherence. Of the 88 reports reviewed, 41 were reports of descriptive studies conducted with U.S. HIV-positive women and 47 were reports of intervention studies conducted with U.S. HIV-positive persons. We extracted from the descriptive studies all findings addressing any factor linked to antiretroviral adherence and from the intervention studies, information on the nature of the intervention, the adherence problem targeted, the persons targeted for the intervention, and the intervention outcomes desired. We discerned congruence between the prominence of substance abuse as a factor identified in the descriptive studies as a barrier to adherence and its prominence as the problem most addressed in those reports of intervention studies that specified the problems targeted for intervention. We also discerned congruence between the prominence of family and provider support as factors identified in the descriptive studies as facilitators of adherence and the presence of social support as an intervention component and outcome variable. Less discernible in the reports of intervention studies was specific attention to other factors prominent in the descriptive studies, which may be due to the complex nature of the problem, individualistic and rationalist slant of interventions, or simply the ways interventions were presented. Our review raises issues about niche standardization and intervention tailoring, targeting, and fidelity. PMID:20024751

  17. Interventions for atopic dermatitis in dogs: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Olivry, Thierry; Foster, Aiden P; Mueller, Ralf S; McEwan, Neil A; Chesney, Christopher; Williams, Hywel C

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this systematic review, which was performed following the guidelines of the Cochrane collaboration, was to assess the effects of interventions for treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) in dogs. Citations identified from three databases (MEDLINE, Thomson's Science Citation Index Expanded and CAB Abstracts) and trials published by December 2007 were selected. Proceedings books from the major veterinary dermatology international congresses were hand searched for relevant citations. The authors selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs), published from January 1980 to December 2007, which reported the efficacy of topical or systemic interventions for treatment or prevention of canine AD. Studies had to report assessments of either pruritus or skin lesions, or both. Studies were selected and data extracted by two reviewers, with discrepancies resolved by a third arbitrator. Missing data were requested from study authors of recently published trials. Pooling of results and meta-analyses were performed for studies reporting similar interventions and outcome measures. A total of 49 RCTs were selected, which had enrolled 2126 dogs. This review found some evidence of efficacy of topical tacrolimus (3 RCTs), topical triamcinolone (1), oral glucocorticoids (5), oral ciclosporin (6), subcutaneous recombinant gamma-interferon (1) and subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (3) to decrease pruritus and/or skin lesions of AD in dogs. One high-quality RCT showed that an oral essential fatty acid supplement could reduce prednisolone consumption by approximately half. Additional RCTs of high design quality must be performed to remedy previous flaws and to test interventions for prevention of flares of this disease.

  18. Intervention Now To Eliminate Repeat Unintended Pregnancy in Teenagers (INTERUPT): a systematic review of intervention effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, qualitative and realist synthesis of implementation factors and user engagement

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Rh; Hendry, M; Booth, A; Carter, B; Charles, J; Craine, N; Edwards, R T; Lyons, M; Noyes, J; Pasterfield, D; Rycroft-Malone, J; Williams, N

    2014-01-01

    Background The UK has the highest rate of teenage pregnancies in Western Europe, a fifth are repeat pregnancies. Unintended conceptions can result in emotional, psychological and educational harm to teenage girls, often with enduring implications for their life chances. Babies of teenage mothers have increased mortality in their first year and increased risk of poverty, educational underachievement and unemployment later in life, with associated societal costs. Methods and analysis We will conduct a streamed, mixed-methods systematic review to find and evaluate interventions designed to reduce repeat unintended teen pregnancies. Our aims are to identify  Who is at greater risk of repeat unintended pregnancies? Which interventions are effective, cost-effective, how they work, in what setting and for whom? What are the barriers and facilitators to intervention uptake? Traditional electronic database searches will be augmented by targeted searches for evidence ‘clusters’ and guided by an advisory group of experts and stakeholders. To address the topic's inherent complexities, we will use a highly structured, innovative and iterative approach combining methodological techniques tailored to each stream of evidence. Quantitative data will be synthesised with reference to Cochrane guidelines for public health interventions. Qualitative evidence addressing facilitators and barriers to the uptake of interventions, experience and acceptability of interventions will be synthesised thematically. We will apply the principles of realist synthesis to uncover theories and mechanisms underpinning interventions. We will conduct an integration and overarching narrative of findings authenticated by client group feedback. Ethics and dissemination We will publish the complete review in ‘Health Technology Assessment’ and sections in specialist peer-reviewed journals. We will present at national and international conferences in the fields of public health, reproductive medicine

  19. Dialogues with Marilyn Cochran-Smith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiorentini, Dario; Crecci, Vanessa Moreira

    2015-01-01

    For more than 30 years, Dr. Marilyn Cochran-Smith has developed and directed research and contributed to publications about education and "practitioner research," especially about teachers' research and learning in inquiry communities. Her primary topics are inquiry communities, teacher research, teacher education for social…

  20. Evidence of Physiotherapy Interventions for Patients with Chronic Neck Pain: A Systematic Review of Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Pia; Bartels, Else Marie; Ris, Inge; Christensen, Robin; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Chronic neck pain (CNP) is common and costly, and the effect of physiotherapeutic interventions on the condition is unclear. We reviewed the literature for evidence of effect of physiotherapy interventions on patients with CNP. Five bibliographic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and PEDro) were systematically searched. Randomised, placebo and active-treatment-controlled trials including physiotherapy interventions for adults with CNP were selected. Data were extracted primary outcome was pain. Risk of bias was appraised. Effect of an intervention was assessed, weighted to risk of bias. 42 trials reporting on randomised comparisons of various physiotherapy interventions and control conditions were eligible for inclusion involving 3919 patients with CNP. Out of these, 23 were unclear or at high risk of bias, and their results were considered moderate- or low-quality evidence. Nineteen were at low risk of bias, and here eight trials found effect on pain of a physiotherapy intervention. Only exercise therapy, focusing on strength and endurance training, and multimodal physiotherapy, cognitive-behavioural interventions, massage, manipulations, laser therapy, and to some extent also TNS appear to have an effect on CNP. However, sufficient evidence for application of a specific physiotherapy modality or aiming at a specific patient subgroup is not available. PMID:27335877

  1. Non–Emergency Department (ED) Interventions to Reduce ED Utilization: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Sofie Rahman; Chang, Anna Marie; Alqatari, Mahfood; Pines, Jesse M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recent health policy changes have focused efforts on reducing emergency department (ED) visits as a way to reduce costs and improve quality of care. This was a systematic review of interventions based outside the ED aimed at reducing ED use. Methods This study was designed as a systematic review. We reviewed the literature on interventions in five categories: patient education, creation of additional non-ED capacity, managed care, prehospital diversion, and patient financial incentives. Studies written in English, with interventions administered outside of the ED, and a comparison group where ED use was an outcome, were included. Two independent reviewers screened search results using MEDLINE, Cochrane, OAIster, or Scopus. The following data were abstracted from included studies: type of intervention, study design, population, details of intervention, effect on ED use, effect on non-ED health care use, and other health and financial outcomes. Quality of individual articles was assessed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) guidelines. Results Of 39 included studies, 34 were observational and five were randomized controlled trials. Two of five studies on patient education found reductions in ED use ranging from 21% to 80%. Out of 10 studies of additional non-ED capacity, four showed decreases of 9% to 54%, and one a 21% increase. Both studies on prehospital diversion found reductions of 3% to 7%. Of 12 studies on managed care, 10 had decreases ranging from 1% to 46%. Nine out of 10 studies on patient financial incentives found decreases of 3% to 50%, and one a 34% increase. Nineteen studies reported effect on non-ED use with mixed results. Seventeen studies included data on health outcomes, but 13 of these only included data on hospitalizations rather than morbidity and mortality. Seven studies included data on cost outcomes. According to the GRADE guidelines, all studies had at least some risk of bias, with four

  2. Technology-Based Interventions for Mental Health in Tertiary Students: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gulliver, Amelia; Chan, Jade KY; Batterham, Philip J; Reynolds, Julia; Calear, Alison; Tait, Robert; Bennett, Kylie; Griffiths, Kathleen M

    2013-01-01

    Background Mental disorders are responsible for a high level of disability burden in students attending university. However, many universities have limited resources available to support student mental health. Technology-based interventions may be highly relevant to university populations. Previous reviews have targeted substance use and eating disorders in tertiary students. However, the effectiveness of technology-based interventions for other mental disorders and related issues has not been reviewed. Objective To systematically review published randomized trials of technology-based interventions evaluated in a university setting for disorders other than substance use and eating disorders. Methods The PubMed, PsycInfo, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched using keywords, phrases, and MeSH terms. Retrieved abstracts (n=1618) were double screened and coded. Included studies met the following criteria: (1) the study was a randomized trial or a randomized controlled trial, (2) the sample was composed of students attending a tertiary institution, (3) the intervention was delivered by or accessed using a technological device or process, (4) the age range of the sample was between 18 and 25 years, and (5) the intervention was designed to improve, reduce, or change symptoms relating to a mental disorder. Results A total of 27 studies met inclusion criteria for the present review. Most of the studies (24/27, 89%) employed interventions targeting anxiety symptoms or disorders or stress, although almost one-third (7/24, 29%) targeted both depression and anxiety. There were a total of 51 technology-based interventions employed across the 27 studies. Overall, approximately half (24/51, 47%) were associated with at least 1 significant positive outcome compared with the control at postintervention. However, 29% (15/51) failed to find a significant effect. Effect sizes were calculated for the 18 of 51 interventions that provided sufficient

  3. Sexual and gender-based violence in areas of armed conflict: a systematic review of mental health and psychosocial support interventions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sexual and other forms of gender-based violence are common in conflict settings and are known risk factors for mental health and psychosocial wellbeing. We present findings from a systematic review of the academic and grey literature focused on the effectiveness of mental health and psychosocial support interventions for populations exposed to sexual and other forms of gender-based violence in the context of armed conflicts. Methods We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, PubMed/ Medline, psycINFO, and PILOTS, as well as grey literature to search for evaluations of interventions, without date limitations. Results Out of 5,684 returned records 189 full text papers were assessed for eligibility. Seven studies met inclusion criteria: 1 non-randomized controlled study; 3 non-controlled pre- post-test designs; 1 retrospective cohort with a matched comparison group; and 2 case studies. Studies were conducted in West and Central Africa; Albania; UK and USA, included female participants, and focused on individual and group counseling; combined psychological, medical, social and economic interventions; and cognitive behavioral therapy (two single case studies). Conclusions The seven studies, while very limited, tentatively suggest beneficial effects of mental health and psychosocial interventions for this population, and show feasibility of evaluation and implementation of such interventions in real-life settings through partnerships with humanitarian organizations. Robust conclusions on the effectiveness of particular approaches are not possible on the basis of current evidence. More rigorous research is urgently needed. PMID:23915821

  4. Does the Finnish intervention prevent obstetric anal sphincter injuries? A systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Mette Østergaard; Madsen, Mia Lund; Skriver-Møller, Anne-Cathrine; Overgaard, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A rise in obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) has been observed and a preventive approach, originating in Finland, has been introduced in several European hospitals. The aim of this paper was to systematically evaluate the evidence behind the ‘Finnish intervention’. Design A systematic review of the literature conducted according to the Preferred Reporting for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Outcome measures The primary outcome was OASIS. Secondary outcomes were (perinatal): Apgar scores, pH and standard base excess in the umbilical cord, and (maternal): episiotomy, intact perineum, first and second-degree perineal lacerations, duration of second stage, birth position and women's perceptions/birth experiences. Methods Multiple databases (Cochrane, Embase, Pubmed and SveMed) were systematically searched for studies published up to December 2014. Both randomised controlled trials and observational studies were eligible for inclusion. Studies were excluded if a full-text article was not available. Studies were evaluated by use of international reporting guidelines (eg, STROBE). Results Overall, 1042 articles were screened and 65 retrieved for full-text evaluation. Seven studies, all observational and with a level of evidence at 2c or lower, were included and consistently reported a significant reduction in OASIS. All evaluated episiotomy and found a significant increase. Three studies evaluated perinatal outcomes and reported conflicting results. No study reported on other perineal outcomes, duration of the second stage, birth positions or women's perceptions. Conclusions A reduction in OASIS has been contributed to the Finnish intervention in seven observational studies, all with a low level of evidence. Knowledge about the potential perinatal and maternal side effects and women's perceptions of the intervention is extremely limited and the biological mechanisms underlying the Finnish intervention are not well documented

  5. Dietary Interventions and Blood Pressure in Latin America - Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mazzaro, Caroline Cantalejo; Klostermann, Flávia Caroline; Erbano, Bruna Olandoski; Schio, Nicolle Amboni; Guarita-Souza, Luiz César; Olandoski, Marcia; Faria-Neto, José Rocha; Baena, Cristina Pellegrino

    2014-01-01

    Background High blood pressure is the major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Low blood pressure control rates in Latin American populations emphasize the need for gathering evidence on effective therapies. Objective To evaluate the effects of dietary interventions on blood pressure in Latin American populations. Methods Systematic review. Electronic databases (MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Science, Scopus, SciELO, LILACS and VHL) were searched and manual search for studies published up to April 2013 was performed. Parallel studies about dietary interventions in Latin American adult populations assessing arterial blood pressure (mm Hg) before and after intervention were included. Results Of the 405 studies identified, 10 randomized controlled trials were included and divided into 3 subgroups according to the proposed dietary intervention. There was a non-significant reduction in systolic blood pressure in the subgroups of mineral replacement (-4.82; 95% CI: -11.36 to 1.73) and complex pattern diets (-3.17; 95% CI: -7.62 to 1.28). Regarding diastolic blood pressure, except for the hyperproteic diet subgroup, all subgroups showed a significant reduction in blood pressure: -4.66 mmHg (95% CI: -9.21 to -0.12) and -4.55 mmHg (95% CI: -7.04 to -2.06) for mineral replacement and complex pattern diets, respectively. Conclusion Available evidence on the effects of dietary changes on blood pressure in Latin American populations indicates a homogeneous effect of those interventions, although not significant for systolic blood pressure. Samples were small and the quality of the studies was generally low. Larger studies are required to build robust evidence. PMID:24676220

  6. The Effectiveness of Technology-Based Strategies to Promote Engagement With Digital Interventions: A Systematic Review Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Fiona L; Lau, Rosa; Webster, Rosie; Michie, Susan; Murray, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Digital interventions provide effective and potentially cost-effective models for improving health outcomes as they deliver health information and services that are widely disseminated, confidential, and can be tailored to needs of the individual user. Digital interventions have been used successfully for health promotion, mental health, and for enabling self-management of long-term conditions. However, their effectiveness is limited by low usage rates, with non-engagement a major challenge. Hence, it is crucial to find effective strategies to increase user engagement with digital interventions. Objective This systematic review will aim to evaluate the effectiveness of technology-based strategies to promote engagement with digital interventions. Methods We will follow Cochrane Collaboration guidelines on systematic review methodology. The search strategy will be executed across seven e-databases (including MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL) using the concepts “digital intervention” and “engagement”, limited by study type (randomized controlled trial). Grey literature and reference lists of included studies will be searched. Titles and abstracts will be independently screened by 2 authors. Then the full text of potentially eligible papers will be obtained and double screened. Data from eligible papers will be extracted by 1 author and checked for accuracy by another author. Bias will be assessed using the Cochrane bias assessment tool. Narrative synthesis will report on all included studies, and where appropriate, data will be pooled using meta-analysis. All findings will be reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Sources of heterogeneity will be further investigated if required. Results Our research is in progress. The final draft of the systematic review is being written and will be submitted before the end of 2015. Conclusions The review findings will inform researchers and

  7. Interventions for the prevention of overweight and obesity in preschool children: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Monasta, L; Batty, G D; Macaluso, A; Ronfani, L; Lutje, V; Bavcar, A; van Lenthe, F J; Brug, J; Cattaneo, A

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse interventions for the prevention of overweight and obesity in children under 5 years of age. We carried out a systematic review focusing exclusively on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Data sources include Medline, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, CINHAL, PsychInfo and Web of Science. Data were extracted from seventeen articles describing seven RCTs identified through electronic search, screening of references in systematic reviews, own files and contact with authors. RCTs were assessed with the Jadad scale. Four trials were carried out in preschool settings, one with an exclusive educational component, two with an exclusive physical activity component and one with both. Two trials were family-based, with education and counselling for parents and children. The remaining trial was carried out in maternity hospitals, with a training intervention on breastfeeding. None of the interventions had an effect in preventing overweight and obesity. The failure to show an effect may be due to the choice of outcomes, the quality of the RCTs, the suboptimal implementation of the interventions, the lack of focus on social and environmental determinants. More rigorous research is needed on interventions and on social and environmental factors that could impact on lifestyle.

  8. Systematic Review of Interventions to Improve the Provision of Information for Adults with Primary Brain Tumors and Their Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Langbecker, Danette; Janda, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adults with primary brain tumors and their caregivers have significant information needs. This review assessed the effect of interventions to improve information provision for adult primary brain tumor patients and/or their caregivers. Methods: We included randomized or non-randomized trials testing educational interventions that had outcomes of information provision, knowledge, understanding, recall, or satisfaction with the intervention, for adults diagnosed with primary brain tumors and/or their family or caregivers. PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Reviews databases were searched for studies published between 1980 and June 2014. Results: Two randomized controlled, 1 non-randomized controlled, and 10 single group pre–post trials enrolled more than 411 participants. Five group, four practice/process change, and four individual interventions assessed satisfaction (12 studies), knowledge (4 studies), and information provision (2 studies). Nine studies reported high rates of satisfaction. Three studies showed statistically significant improvements over time in knowledge and two showed greater information was provided to intervention than control group participants, although statistical testing was not performed. Discussion: The trials assessed intermediate outcomes such as satisfaction, and only 4/13 reported on knowledge improvements. Few trials had a randomized controlled design and risk of bias was either evident or could not be assessed in most domains. PMID:25667919

  9. Interventions to Assist Health Consumers to Find Reliable Online Health Information: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kenneth; Hoti, Kreshnik; Hughes, Jeffery D.; Emmerton, Lynne M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Health information on the Internet is ubiquitous, and its use by health consumers prevalent. Finding and understanding relevant online health information, and determining content reliability, pose real challenges for many health consumers. Purpose To identify the types of interventions that have been implemented to assist health consumers to find reliable online health information, and where possible, describe and compare the types of outcomes studied. Data Sources PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL Plus and Cochrane Library databases; WorldCat and Scirus ‘gray literature’ search engines; and manual review of reference lists of selected publications. Study Selection Publications were selected by firstly screening title, abstract, and then full text. Data Extraction Seven publications met the inclusion criteria, and were summarized in a data extraction form. The form incorporated the PICOS (Population Intervention Comparators Outcomes and Study Design) Model. Two eligible gray literature papers were also reported. Data Synthesis Relevant data from included studies were tabulated to enable descriptive comparison. A brief critique of each study was included in the tables. This review was unable to follow systematic review methods due to the paucity of research and humanistic interventions reported. Limitations While extensive, the gray literature search may have had limited reach in some countries. The paucity of research on this topic limits conclusions that may be drawn. Conclusions The few eligible studies predominantly adopted a didactic approach to assisting health consumers, whereby consumers were either taught how to find credible websites, or how to use the Internet. Common types of outcomes studied include knowledge and skills pertaining to Internet use and searching for reliable health information. These outcomes were predominantly self-assessed by participants. There is potential for further research to explore other avenues for assisting health

  10. Achieving change in primary care—effectiveness of strategies for improving implementation of complex interventions: systematic review of reviews

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Rosa; Stevenson, Fiona; Ong, Bie Nio; Dziedzic, Krysia; Treweek, Shaun; Eldridge, Sandra; Everitt, Hazel; Kennedy, Anne; Qureshi, Nadeem; Rogers, Anne; Peacock, Richard; Murray, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify, summarise and synthesise available literature on the effectiveness of implementation strategies for optimising implementation of complex interventions in primary care. Design Systematic review of reviews. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and PsychINFO were searched, from first publication until December 2013; the bibliographies of relevant articles were screened for additional reports. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Eligible reviews had to (1) examine effectiveness of single or multifaceted implementation strategies, (2) measure health professional practice or process outcomes and (3) include studies from predominantly primary care in developed countries. Two reviewers independently screened titles/abstracts and full-text articles of potentially eligible reviews for inclusion. Data synthesis Extracted data were synthesised using a narrative approach. Results 91 reviews were included. The most commonly evaluated strategies were those targeted at the level of individual professionals, rather than those targeting organisations or context. These strategies (eg, audit and feedback, educational meetings, educational outreach, reminders) on their own demonstrated a small to modest improvement (2–9%) in professional practice or behaviour with considerable variability in the observed effects. The effects of multifaceted strategies targeted at professionals were mixed and not necessarily more effective than single strategies alone. There was relatively little review evidence on implementation strategies at the levels of organisation and wider context. Evidence on cost-effectiveness was limited and data on costs of different strategies were scarce and/or of low quality. Conclusions There is a substantial literature on implementation strategies aimed at changing professional practices or behaviour. It remains unclear which implementation strategies are more likely to be effective than others and under what conditions

  11. A Review of Interventions and System Changes to Improve Time to Reperfusion for ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Kelly A.; Helfrich, Christian D.; Rumsfeld, John S.; Ho, P. Michael; Fihn, Stephan D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Identify and describe interventions to reduce time to reperfusion for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Data Source Key word searches of five research databases: MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Clinical Trials Registry. Interventions We included controlled and uncontrolled studies of interventions to reduce time to reperfusion. One researcher reviewed abstracts and 2 reviewed full text articles. Articles were subsequently abstracted into structured data tables, which included study design, setting, intervention, and outcome variables. We inductively developed intervention categories from the articles. A second researcher reviewed data abstraction for accuracy. Measurements and Main Results We identified 666 articles, 42 of which met inclusion criteria. We identified 11 intervention categories and classified them as either process specific (e.g., emergency department administration of thrombolytic therapy, activation of the catheterization laboratory by emergency department personnel) or system level (e.g., continuous quality improvement, critical pathways). A majority of studies (59%) were single-site pre/post design, and nearly half (47%) had sample sizes less than 100 patients. Thirty-two studies (76%) reported significantly lower door to reperfusion times associated with an intervention, 12 (29%) of which met or exceeded guideline recommended times. Relative decreases in times to reperfusion ranged from 15 to 82% for door to needle and 13–64% for door to balloon. Conclusions We identified an array of process and system-based quality improvement interventions associated with significant improvements in door to reperfusion time. However, weak study designs and inadequate information about implementation limit the usefulness of this literature. Electronic supplementary materials The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11606

  12. Systematic Review of School-based Interventions to Modify Dietary Behavior: Does Intervention Intensity Impact Effectiveness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racey, Megan; O'Brien, Charlene; Douglas, Sabrina; Marquez, Olivia; Hendrie, Gilly; Newton, Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    Background: Owing to the associations between diet and health, it is important that effective health promotion strategies establish healthful eating behaviors from an early age. We reviewed the intensity of school-based interventions aimed to modify dietary behavior in preadolescent and adolescents and related intervention characteristics to…

  13. A systematic review of physical activity interventions in Hispanic adults.

    PubMed

    Ickes, Melinda J; Sharma, Manoj

    2012-01-01

    Healthy People 2020 aims to achieve health equity, eliminate disparities, and improve the health of all groups. Regular physical activity (PA) improves overall health and fitness and has the capability to reduce risk for chronic diseases. Identifying barriers which relate to the Hispanic population is important when designing PA interventions. Therefore, the purpose was to review existing PA interventions targeting Hispanic adults published between 1988 and 2011. This paper was limited to interventions which included more than 35% Hispanic adults (n = 20). Most of the interventions were community based (n = 16), although clinical, family-based, and faith-based settings were also represented. Interventions incorporated theory (n = 16), with social cognitive theory and transtheoretical model being used most frequently. Social support was integral, building on the assumption that it is a strong motivator of PA. Each of the interventions reported success related to PA, social support, and/or BMI. Lessons learned should be incorporated into future interventions. PMID:22496702

  14. Interventions to increase HPV vaccination coverage: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Smulian, Elizabeth A.; Mitchell, Krista R.; Stokley, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We reviewed intervention studies designed to increase human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage to further understand the impact interventions can have on HPV vaccination coverage. We searched 5 databases for intervention studies published from June 2006 to May 2015. Studies were included if they quantitatively measured HPV vaccination coverage as an outcome and were conducted in the United States. We abstracted outcomes, methods, and results from each study and classified by type of intervention conducted. Findings from 34 studies suggest many types of intervention strategies can increase HPV vaccination coverage in different settings, and with modest cost. Interventions were effective especially when implemented in combination at both provider and community levels. However, not all interventions showed significant effects on coverage. More research is needed to identify the best methods for widespread implementation of effective strategies. PMID:26838959

  15. A Review of Dietary Interventions Aimed at Controlling Hypertension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Deborah E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A review of literature related to the effectiveness of dietary interventions in controlling blood pressure concludes that the existing literature contains sufficient evidence to identify successful dietary intervention techniques, in either the short or long term, which modify sodium intake, fat intake, or calorie intake in middle-aged men. (IAH)

  16. Quality of Reporting of Randomised Controlled Trials of Herbal Interventions in ASEAN Plus Six Countries: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pratoomsoot, Chayanin; Sruamsiri, Rosarin; Dilokthornsakul, Piyameth; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2015-01-01

    Background Many randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of herbal interventions have been conducted in the ASEAN Communities. Good quality reporting of RCTs is essential for assessing clinical significance. Given the importance ASEAN placed on herbal medicines, the reporting quality of RCTs of herbal interventions among the ASEAN Communities deserved a special attention. Objectives To systematically review the quality of reporting of RCTs of herbal interventions conducted in the ASEAN Plus Six Countries. Methods Searches were performed using PubMed, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, and Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED), from inception through October 2013. These were limited to studies specific to humans and RCTs. Herbal species search terms were based on those listed in the National List of Essential Medicines [NLEM (Thailand, 2011)]. Studies conducted in the ASEAN Plus Six Countries, published in English were included. Results Seventy-one articles were identified. Thirty (42.25%) RCTs were from ASEAN Countries, whereas 41 RCTs (57.75%) were from Plus Six Group. Adherence to the recommended CONSORT checklist items for reporting of RCTs of herbal interventions among ASEAN Plus Six Countries ranged from 0% to 97.18%. Less than a quarter of the RCTs (18.31%) reported information on standardisation of the herbal products. However, the scope of our interventions of interest was limited to those developed from 20 herbal species listed in the NLEM of Thailand. Conclusions The present study highlights the need to improve reporting quality of RCTs of herbal interventions across ASEAN Plus Six Communities. PMID:25633206

  17. An empirical investigation of the potential impact of selective inclusion of results in systematic reviews of interventions: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Systematic reviewers may encounter a multiplicity of outcome data in the reports of randomised controlled trials included in the review (for example, multiple measurement instruments measuring the same outcome, multiple time points, and final and change from baseline values). The primary objectives of this study are to investigate in a cohort of systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials of interventions for rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, depressive disorders and anxiety disorders: (i) how often there is multiplicity of outcome data in trial reports; (ii) the association between selection of trial outcome data included in a meta-analysis and the magnitude and statistical significance of the trial result, and; (iii) the impact of the selection of outcome data on meta-analytic results. Methods/Design Forty systematic reviews (20 Cochrane, 20 non-Cochrane) of RCTs published from January 2010 to January 2012 and indexed in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) or PubMed will be randomly sampled. The first meta-analysis of a continuous outcome within each review will be included. From each review protocol (where available) and published review we will extract information regarding which types of outcome data were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis (for example, measurement instruments, time points, analyses). From the trial reports we will extract all outcome data that are compatible with the meta-analysis outcome as it is defined in the review and with the outcome data eligibility criteria and hierarchies in the review protocol. The association between selection of trial outcome data included in a meta-analysis and the magnitude and statistical significance of the trial result will be investigated. We will also investigate the impact of the selected trial result on the magnitude of the resulting meta-analytic effect estimates. Discussion The strengths of this empirical study are that our objectives and methods are pre

  18. A systematic review of interventions in primary care to improve health literacy for chronic disease behavioral risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions used in primary care to improve health literacy for change in smoking, nutrition, alcohol, physical activity and weight (SNAPW). Methods A systematic review of intervention studies that included outcomes for health literacy and SNAPW behavioral risk behaviors implemented in primary care settings. We searched the Cochrane Library, Johanna Briggs Institute, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Psychinfo, Web of Science, Scopus, APAIS, Australasian Medical Index, Google Scholar, Community of Science and four targeted journals (Patient Education and Counseling, Health Education and Behaviour, American Journal of Preventive Medicine and Preventive Medicine). Study inclusion criteria: Adults over 18 years; undertaken in a primary care setting within an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) country; interventions with at least one measure of health literacy and promoting positive change in smoking, nutrition, alcohol, physical activity and/or weight; measure at least one outcome associated with health literacy and report a SNAPW outcome; and experimental and quasi-experimental studies, cohort, observational and controlled and non-controlled before and after studies. Papers were assessed and screened by two researchers (JT, AW) and uncertain or excluded studies were reviewed by a third researcher (MH). Data were extracted from the included studies by two researchers (JT, AW). Effectiveness studies were quality assessed. A typology of interventions was thematically derived from the studies by grouping the SNAPW interventions into six broad categories: individual motivational interviewing and counseling; group education; multiple interventions (combination of interventions); written materials; telephone coaching or counseling; and computer or web based interventions. Interventions were classified by intensity of contact with the subjects (High ≥ 8 points of contact/hours; Moderate >3 and <8; Low

  19. The cost of a knowledge silo: a systematic re-review of water, sanitation and hygiene interventions

    PubMed Central

    Loevinsohn, Michael; Mehta, Lyla; Cuming, Katie; Nicol, Alan; Cumming, Oliver; Ensink, Jeroen H J

    2015-01-01

    Divisions between communities, disciplinary and practice, impede understanding of how complex interventions in health and other sectors actually work and slow the development and spread of more effective ones. We test this hypothesis by re-reviewing a Cochrane-standard systematic review (SR) of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions’ impact on child diarrhoea morbidity: can greater understanding of impacts and how they are achieved be gained when the same papers are reviewed jointly from health and development perspectives? Using realist review methods, researchers examined the 27 papers for evidence of other impact pathways operating than assumed in the papers and SR. Evidence relating to four questions was judged on a scale of likelihood. At the ‘more than possible’ or ‘likely’ level, 22% of interventions were judged to involve substantially more actions than the SR’s label indicated; 37% resulted in substantial additional impacts, beyond reduced diarrhoea morbidity; and unforeseen actions by individuals, households or communities substantially contributed to the impacts in 48% of studies. In 44%, it was judged that these additional impacts and actions would have substantially affected the intervention’s effect on diarrhoea morbidity. The prevalence of these impacts and actions might well be found greater in studies not so narrowly selected. We identify six impact pathways suggested by these studies that were not considered by the SR: these are tentative, given the limitations of the literature we reviewed, but may help stimulate wider review and primary evaluation efforts. This re-review offers a fuller understanding of the impacts of these interventions and how they are produced, pointing to several ways in which investments might enhance health and wellbeing. It suggests that some conclusions of the SR and earlier reviews should be reconsidered. Moreover, it contributes important experience to the continuing debate on appropriate

  20. Systematic literature review of Internet interventions across health behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Su-I; Charlery, Su-Anne Robyn; Roberson, Kiersten

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This review examines Internet interventions aiming to change health behaviors in the general population. Methods: Internet health interventions in the USA published between January 2005 and December 2013 were identified through Medline and CINAHL. Keywords used were (Internet or e-health or social media or web) paired with (intervention or program*). A total of 38 articles met all criteria and were reviewed. Results: Studies were analyzed by targeted health behavior interventions: tobacco (5), alcohol (4), weight loss (7), physical activity (PA) (7), nutrition (2), PA and nutrition combined (5), HIV or sexual health (4), and chronic diseases (4). Interventions ranged from one session to 24  weeks (average 6–12 weeks). Common strategies used, including web-based information, tailored feedback, weekly e-mails, goal setting, and self-assessment. Social cognitive theory and the transtheoretical models were the most commonly used frameworks. Recruitment strategies were typically media based varied by settings and populations. Except for the tobacco interventions, the majority studies yielded significant outcomes. Conclusion: This review provides updates and synthesized knowledge on the design and consistent effectiveness of Internet interventions across health behaviors. Results have implications for public health and healthcare professionals, as they play a key role in developing and delivering health promotion interventions as well as in assisting the communities and clients serviced obtaining evidence-based health information. PMID:25750795

  1. Non-adherence to telemedicine interventions for drug users: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Taís de Campos; Signor, Luciana; Figueiró, Luciana Rizzieri; Fernandes, Simone; Bortolon, Cassandra Borges; Benchaya, Mariana Canellas; Ferigolo, Maristela; Barros, Helena MT

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate rates of non-adherence to telemedicine strategies aimed at treating drug addiction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted of randomized controlled trials investigating different telemedicine treatment methods for drug addiction. The following databases were consulted between May 18, 2012 and June 21, 2012: PubMed, PsycINFO, SciELO, Wiley (The Cochrane Library), Embase, Clinical trials and Google Scholar. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation was used to evaluate the quality of the studies. The criteria evaluated were: appropriate sequence of data generation, allocation concealment, blinding, description of losses and exclusions and analysis by intention to treat. There were 274 studies selected, of which 20 were analyzed. RESULTS Non-adherence rates varied between 15.0% and 70.0%. The interventions evaluated were of at least three months duration and, although they all used telemedicine as support, treatment methods differed. Regarding the quality of the studies, the values also varied from very poor to high quality. High quality studies showed better adherence rates, as did those using more than one technique of intervention and a limited treatment time. Mono-user studies showed better adherence rates than poly-user studies. CONCLUSIONS Rates of non-adherence to treatment involving telemedicine on the part of users of psycho-active substances differed considerably, depending on the country, the intervention method, follow-up time and substances used. Using more than one technique of intervention, short duration of treatment and the type of substance used by patients appear to facilitate adherence. PMID:25119947

  2. A Systematic Review of Health Economic Analyses of Housing Improvement Interventions and Insecticide-Treated Bednets in the Home

    PubMed Central

    Pega, Frank; Wilson, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Background Housing improvements have considerable potential for improving health. So does the provision of insecticide-treated bednets for malaria prevention. Therefore we aimed to conduct updated systematic reviews of health economic analyses in both these intervention domains. Methods and findings The search strategy included economic analyses of housing improvement interventions and use of insecticide-treated bednets for community-dwelling, healthy populations (published between 1 January 2000 and 15 April 2014). We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and three health economics databases. Thirty-five economic analyses of seven types of intervention fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Most included studies adopted a health sector perspective and were cost-effectiveness analyses using decision analytic modeling or conducted alongside trials. The overall quality of the studies was generally likely to be adequate for informing policy-making (albeit with limitations in some areas). There was fairly consistent evidence for the cost-effectiveness/favorable cost-benefit of removing indoor lead to prevent lead poisoning and sequelae, and retrofitting insulation to prevent lung disease. But the value of assessing and improving home safety and providing smoke alarms to prevent injuries was more mixed and the economic evidence was inconclusive or insufficient for: home ventilation to prevent lung disease, installing heaters to prevent lung disease and regulating tap water temperatures to prevent scalding. Few studies (n = 4) considered health equity. The 12 studies of providing insecticide-treated bednets or hammocks to prevent malaria found these interventions to be moderately to highly cost-effective. Conclusions This systematic review provides updated evidence that several housing improvement interventions (such as removing indoor lead and retrofitting insulation) and also the provision of insecticide-treated bednets are cost

  3. School based interventions versus family based interventions in the treatment of childhood obesity- a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of childhood obesity, which has seen a rapid increase over the last decade, is now considered a major public health problem. Current treatment options are based on the two important frameworks of school- and family-based interventions; however, most research has yet to compare the two frameworks in the treatment of childhood obesity. The objective of this review is to compare the effectiveness of school-based intervention with family-based intervention in the treatment of childhood obesity. Methods Databases such as Medline, Pub med, CINAHL, and Science Direct were used to execute the search for primary research papers according to inclusion criteria. The review included a randomised controlled trial and quasi-randomised controlled trials based on family- and school-based intervention frameworks on the treatment of childhood obesity. Results The review identified 1231 articles of which 13 met the criteria. Out of the thirteen studies, eight were family-based interventions (n = 8) and five were school-based interventions (n = 5) with total participants (n = 2067). The participants were aged between 6 and 17 with the study duration ranging between one month and three years. Family-based interventions demonstrated effectiveness for children under the age of twelve and school-based intervention was most effective for those aged between 12 and 17 with differences for both long-term and short-term results. Conclusions The evidence shows that family- and school-based interventions have a considerable effect on treating childhood obesity. However, the effectiveness of the interventional frameworks depends on factors such as age, short- or long-term outcome, and methodological quality of the trials. Further research studies are required to determine the effectiveness of family- and school-based interventions using primary outcomes such as weight, BMI, percentage overweight and waist circumference in addition to the aforementioned

  4. Interventions for Menière's disease: protocol for an umbrella systematic review and a network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    van Esch, Babette F; van der Zaag-Loonen, Hester J; Bruintjes, Tjasse D; van Benthem, Peter Paul G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The large number of treatment modalities for patients diagnosed with Menière's disease (MD) complicates the selection of the best available treatment as the comparative efficacy of these interventions is not clear. We aim to identify the treatment or treatments with the highest efficacy of current pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for MD. Methods and analysis We will identify all available systematic reviews on the treatment of MD. An online database search will be conducted in association with the UK Cochrane Centre, particularly the Ear, Nose and Throat Group. We will screen the systematic reviews for eligible randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to execute a network meta-analysis. In addition, online databases will be checked for eligible RCTs on treatments that were published after the latest systematic search was conducted. The characteristics of each RCT will be summarised, including the general design, the participants, the interventions, the outcome measurements, the duration of therapy and adverse events. The risk of bias will be assessed by means of the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias tool. The included studies will be assessed for methodological and statistical heterogeneity; the latter will be quantified by means of the I2 statistic. The primary outcome will be the efficacy of treatment in terms of control of vertigo attacks. Secondary outcome measures will be the loss or improvement of hearing, severity of vertigo attacks and tinnitus, perception of aural fullness, quality of life, and the incidence of adverse events and complications. Ethics and dissemination Formal ethical approval is not required as primary data will not be collected. The review will be disseminated in peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. PROSPERO registration number CRD42015024243. PMID:27288370

  5. Type 2 diabetes–related foot care knowledge and foot self-care practice interventions in the United States: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Timethia; Foster, Margaret; Spears-Lanoix, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this systematic literature review is to review published studies on foot care knowledge and foot care practice interventions as part of diabetic foot care self-management interventions. Methods Medline, CINAHL, CENTRAL, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched. References from the included studies were reviewed to identify any missing studies that could be included. Only foot care knowledge and foot care practice intervention studies that focused on the person living with type 2 diabetes were included in this review. Author, study design, sample, intervention, and results were extracted. Results Thirty studies met the inclusion criteria and were classified according to randomized controlled trial (n=9), survey design (n=13), cohort studies (n=4), cross-sectional studies (n=2), qualitative studies (n=2), and case series (n=1). Improving lower extremity complications associated with type 2 diabetes can be done through effective foot care interventions that include foot care knowledge and foot care practices. Conclusion Preventing these complications, understanding the risk factors, and having the ability to manage complications outside of the clinical encounter is an important part of a diabetes foot self-care management program. Interventions and research studies that aim to reduce lower extremity complications are still lacking. Further research is needed to test foot care interventions across multiple populations and geographic locations. PMID:26899439

  6. A Decade of Progress Using Virtual Reality for Poststroke Lower Extremity Rehabilitation: Systematic Review of the Intervention Methods

    PubMed Central

    Luque-Moreno, Carlos; Ferragut-Garcías, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Blanco, Cleofás; Heredia-Rizo, Alberto Marcos; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Jesús; Kiper, Pawel; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To develop a systematic review of the literature, to describe the different virtual reality (VR) interventions and interactive videogames applied to the lower extremity (LE) of stroke patients, and to analyse the results according to the most frequently used outcome measures. Material and Methods. An electronic search of randomized trials between January 2004 and January 2014 in different databases (Medline, Cinahl, Web of Science, PEDro, and Cochrane) was carried out. Several terms (virtual reality, feedback, stroke, hemiplegia, brain injury, cerebrovascular accident, lower limb, leg, and gait) were combined, and finally 11 articles were included according to the established inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results. The reviewed trials showed a high heterogeneity in terms of study design and assessment tools, which makes it difficult to compare and analyze the different types of interventions. However, most of them found a significant improvement on gait speed, balance and motor function, due to VR intervention. Conclusions. Although evidence is limited, it suggests that VR intervention (more than 10 sessions) in stroke patients may have a positive impact on balance, and gait recovery. Better results were obtained when a multimodal approach, combining VR and conventional physiotherapy, was used. Flexible software seems to adapt better to patients' requirements, allowing more specific and individual treatments. PMID:26539480

  7. Cochrane Corner: Extracts from The Cochrane Library: Tonsillectomy or Adenotonsillectomy versus Non-Surgical Management for Obstructive Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Children.

    PubMed

    Burton, Martin J; Goldstein, Nira A; Rosenfeld, Richard M

    2016-04-01

    The "Cochrane Corner" is a section in the journal that highlights systematic reviews relevant to otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, with invited commentary to aid clinical decision making. This installment features a Cochrane Review on tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing (oSDB) in children, which finds moderate-quality evidence that surgery improves symptoms, behavior, and quality of life compared to nonsurgical management. The results apply to nonsyndromic children with SDB confirmed by polysomnography and must be balanced against a favorable natural history in many cases.

  8. Emerging mHealth and eHealth Interventions for Serious Mental Illness: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Naslund, John A.; Marsch, Lisa A.; McHugo, Gregory J.; Bartels, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Serious mental illness is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. Emerging mobile health (mHealth) and eHealth interventions may afford opportunities for reaching this at-risk group. Aim To review the evidence on using emerging mHealth and eHealth technologies among people with serious mental illness. Methods We searched MEDLINE, PsychINFO, CINAHL, Scopus, Cochrane Central, and Web of Science through July 2014. Only studies reporting outcomes for mHealth or eHealth interventions, defined as remotely delivered using mobile, online, or other devices, targeting people with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder, were included. Results Forty-six studies spanning 12 countries were included. Interventions were grouped into four categories: 1) illness self-management and relapse prevention; 2) promoting adherence to medications and/or treatment; 3) psychoeducation, supporting recovery, and promoting health and wellness; and 4) symptom monitoring. The interventions were consistently found to be highly feasible and acceptable, though clinical outcomes were variable but offered insight regarding potential effectiveness. Conclusions Our findings confirm the feasibility and acceptability of emerging mHealth and eHealth interventions among people with serious mental illness; however, it is not possible to draw conclusions regarding effectiveness. Further rigorous investigation is warranted to establish effectiveness and cost benefit in this population. PMID:26017625

  9. User experiences of evidence-based online resources for health professionals: User testing of The Cochrane Library

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Sarah E; Glenton, Claire; Cracknell, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Background Evidence-based decision making relies on easy access to trustworthy research results. The Cochrane Library is a key source of evidence about the effect of interventions and aims to "promote the accessibility of systematic reviews to anyone wanting to make a decision about health care". We explored how health professionals found, used and experienced The Library, looking at facets of user experience including findability, usability, usefulness, credibility, desirability and value. Methods We carried out 32 one-hour usability tests on participants from Norway and the UK. Participants both browsed freely and attempted to perform individually tailored tasks while "thinking aloud". Sessions were recorded and viewed in real time by researchers. Transcriptions and videos were reviewed by one researcher and one designer. Findings reported here reflect issues receiving a high degree of saturation and that we judge to be critical to the user experience of evidence-based web sites, based on principles for usability heuristics, web guidelines and evidence-based practice. Results Participants had much difficulty locating both the site and its contents. Non-native English speakers were at an extra disadvantage when retrieving relevant documents despite high levels of English-language skills. Many participants displayed feelings of ineptitude, alienation and frustration. Some made serious mistakes in correctly distinguishing between different information types, for instance reviews, review protocols, and individual studies. Although most expressed a high regard for the site's credibility, some later displayed a mistrust of the independence of the information. Others were overconfident, thinking everything on The Cochrane Library site shared the same level of quality approval. Conclusion Paradoxically, The Cochrane Library, established to support easy access to research evidence, has its own problems of accessibility. Health professionals' experiences of this and other

  10. Cultural Adaptation of Minimally Guided Interventions for Common Mental Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Eva; Chowdhary, Neerja; Maercker, Andreas; Albanese, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    Background Cultural adaptation of mental health care interventions is key, particularly when there is little or no therapist interaction. There is little published information on the methods of adaptation of bibliotherapy and e-mental health interventions. Objective To systematically search for evidence of the effectiveness of minimally guided interventions for the treatment of common mental disorders among culturally diverse people with common mental disorders; to analyze the extent and effects of cultural adaptation of minimally guided interventions for the treatment of common mental disorders. Methods We searched Embase, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO for randomized controlled trials that tested the efficacy of minimally guided or self-help interventions for depression or anxiety among culturally diverse populations. We calculated pooled standardized mean differences using a random-effects model. In addition, we administered a questionnaire to the authors of primary studies to assess the cultural adaptation methods used in the included primary studies. We entered this information into a meta-regression to investigate effects of the extent of adaptation on intervention efficacy. Results We included eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs) out of the 4911 potentially eligible records identified by the search: four on e-mental health and four on bibliotherapy. The extent of cultural adaptation varied across the studies, with language translation and use of metaphors being the most frequently applied elements of adaptation. The pooled standardized mean difference for primary outcome measures of depression and anxiety was -0.81 (95% CI -0.10 to -0.62). Higher cultural adaptation scores were significantly associated with greater effect sizes (P=.04). Conclusions Our results support the results of previous systematic reviews on the cultural adaptation of face-to-face interventions: the extent of cultural adaptation has an effect on intervention efficacy

  11. Are Non-Pharmacological Interventions Effective in Reducing Drug Use and Criminality? A Systematic and Meta-Analytical Review with an Economic Appraisal of These Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Amanda E.; Woodhouse, Rebecca; Neilson, Matthew; Martyn St James, Marrissa; Glanville, Julie; Hewitt, Catherine; Trépel, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    Background: The numbers of incarcerated people suffering from drug dependence has steadily risen since the 1980s and only a small proportion of these receive appropriate treatment. A systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness and economic evidence of non-pharmacological interventions for drug using offenders was conducted. Methods: Cochrane Collaboration criteria were used to identify trials across 14 databases between 2004 and 2014. A series of meta-analyses and an economic appraisal were conducted. Results: 43 trials were identified showing to have limited effect in reducing re-arrests RR 0.97 (95% CI 0.89–1.07) and drug use RR 0.90 (95% CI 0.80–1.00) but were found to significantly reduce re-incarceration RR 0.70 (95% CI 0.57–0.85). Therapeutic community programs were found to significantly reduce the number of re-arrests RR 0.70 (95% CI 0.56–0.87). 10 papers contained economic information. One paper presented a cost-benefit analysis and two reported on the cost and cost effectiveness of the intervention. Conclusions: We suggest that therapeutic community interventions have some benefit in reducing subsequent re-arrest. We recommend that economic evaluations should form part of standard trial protocols. PMID:27690077

  12. The Implementation of Internet Interventions for Depression: A Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Vaskinn, Linda; Bergsund, Hans Bugge; Haga, Silje Marie; Slinning, Kari; Bjørkli, Cato Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is one of the most common mental health problems among adults, but effective treatments are not widely accessible. The Internet holds promise as a cost-effective and convenient delivery platform of interventions for depression. However, studies suggest that Internet interventions are not widely available in routine settings. Objective The aim of this study was to review the literature and examine whether there are systematic differences in reporting of the various implementation components on Internet interventions for depression, and then to examine what is known about and is characteristic of the implementation of these Internet interventions in regular care settings. Methods We performed a scoping review, drawing upon a broad range of the literature on Internet interventions for depression in regular care, and used the active implementation framework to extract data. Results Overall, the results suggested that knowledge about the implementation of Internet interventions for depression in regular care is limited. However, guided support from health professionals emphasizing program adherence and recruitment of end users to the interventions emerged as 2 main themes. We identified 3 additional themes among practitioners, including their qualifications, training, and supervision, but these were scarcely described in the literature. The competency drivers (ie, staff and user selection, training, and supervision) have received the most attention, while little attention has been given to organizational (ie, decision support, administration, and system intervention) and leadership drivers. Conclusions Research has placed little emphasis on reporting on the implementation of interventions in practice. Leadership and organizational drivers, in particular, have been largely neglected. The results of this scoping review have implications for future research and efforts to successfully implement Internet interventions for depression in regular care

  13. Systematic review of active workplace interventions to reduce sickness absence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The workplace is used as a setting for interventions to prevent and reduce sickness absence, regardless of the specific medical conditions and diagnoses. Aims To give an overview of the general effectiveness of active workplace interventions aimed at preventing and reducing sickness absence. Methods We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, Psych-info, and ISI web of knowledge on 27 December 2011. Inclusion criteria were (i) participants over 18 years old with an active role in the intervention, (ii) intervention done partly or fully at the workplace or at the initiative of the workplace and (iii) sickness absence reported. Two reviewers independently screened articles, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. A narrative synthesis was used. Results We identified 2036 articles of which, 93 were assessed in full text. Seventeen articles were included (2 with low and 15 with medium risk of bias), with a total of 24 comparisons. Five interventions from four articles significantly reduced sickness absence. We found moderate evidence that graded activity reduced sickness absence and limited evidence that the Sheerbrooke model (a comprehensive multidisciplinary intervention) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) reduced sickness absence. There was moderate evidence that workplace education and physical exercise did not reduce sickness absence. For other interventions, the evidence was insufficient to draw conclusions. Conclusions The review found limited evidence that active workplace interventions were not generally effective in reducing sickness absence, but there was moderate evidence of effect for graded activity and limited evidence for the effectiveness of the Sheerbrooke model and CBT. PMID:23223750

  14. Economic evaluation of interventions to treat opiate dependence : a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Doran, Christopher M

    2008-01-01

    Opiate dependence imposes a significant economic burden on society in terms of treatment-related costs and prevention services, other healthcare costs, the work absenteeism of patients, productivity loss arising from premature death of patients, costs associated with crime, and social welfare expenditure. The objective of this research is to review the literature on economic evaluation of treatment of opiate dependence (including detoxification, maintenance and psychosocial support).A literature review was performed on several electronic databases, including MEDLINE (Ovid), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, NHS Economic Evaluation Library Database (via Cochrane Library), Web of Science, Social Science Citations Index, EMBASE and PsycINFO. A sensitive approach was used in order to maximize the number of articles retrieved; no language or publication year limitations were applied to the searches. A combination of subject heading term searches and natural word searches were used. The Drummond checklist was applied to assess the quality of economic evaluations.A total of 259 articles were considered relevant, with eight review studies identified. The treatment spectrum ranged from detoxification to maintenance treatments involving the use of agonist and/or antagonist treatments. The evidence suggests that, although the quality of economic evaluations is reasonably good, there is a dearth of knowledge about the cost effectiveness of treatments for opiate dependence. The majority of the literature reporting the results of cost-effectiveness analyses used surrogate outcome measures and adopted a narrow treatment provider perspective. Studies that have conducted cost-benefit analyses, in spite of methodological divergences, generally adopted a societal perspective and consistently demonstrated positive economic returns from opiate treatment. A paucity of research examined the extent to which psychosocial or behavioural interventions support or replace conventional

  15. Effectiveness of job search interventions: a meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Songqi; Huang, Jason L; Wang, Mo

    2014-07-01

    The current meta-analytic review examined the effectiveness of job search interventions in facilitating job search success (i.e., obtaining employment). Major theoretical perspectives on job search interventions, including behavioral learning theory, theory of planned behavior, social cognitive theory, and coping theory, were reviewed and integrated to derive a taxonomy of critical job search intervention components. Summarizing the data from 47 experimentally or quasi-experimentally evaluated job search interventions, we found that the odds of obtaining employment were 2.67 times higher for job seekers participating in job search interventions compared to job seekers in the control group, who did not participate in such intervention programs. Our moderator analysis also suggested that job search interventions that contained certain components, including teaching job search skills, improving self-presentation, boosting self-efficacy, encouraging proactivity, promoting goal setting, and enlisting social support, were more effective than interventions that did not include such components. More important, job search interventions effectively promoted employment only when both skill development and motivation enhancement were included. In addition, we found that job search interventions were more effective in helping younger and older (vs. middle-aged) job seekers, short-term (vs. long-term) unemployed job seekers, and job seekers with special needs and conditions (vs. job seekers in general) to find employment. Furthermore, meta-analytic path analysis revealed that increased job search skills, job search self-efficacy, and job search behaviors partially mediated the positive effect of job search interventions on obtaining employment. Theoretical and practical implications and future research directions are discussed.

  16. Effectiveness of job search interventions: a meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Songqi; Huang, Jason L; Wang, Mo

    2014-07-01

    The current meta-analytic review examined the effectiveness of job search interventions in facilitating job search success (i.e., obtaining employment). Major theoretical perspectives on job search interventions, including behavioral learning theory, theory of planned behavior, social cognitive theory, and coping theory, were reviewed and integrated to derive a taxonomy of critical job search intervention components. Summarizing the data from 47 experimentally or quasi-experimentally evaluated job search interventions, we found that the odds of obtaining employment were 2.67 times higher for job seekers participating in job search interventions compared to job seekers in the control group, who did not participate in such intervention programs. Our moderator analysis also suggested that job search interventions that contained certain components, including teaching job search skills, improving self-presentation, boosting self-efficacy, encouraging proactivity, promoting goal setting, and enlisting social support, were more effective than interventions that did not include such components. More important, job search interventions effectively promoted employment only when both skill development and motivation enhancement were included. In addition, we found that job search interventions were more effective in helping younger and older (vs. middle-aged) job seekers, short-term (vs. long-term) unemployed job seekers, and job seekers with special needs and conditions (vs. job seekers in general) to find employment. Furthermore, meta-analytic path analysis revealed that increased job search skills, job search self-efficacy, and job search behaviors partially mediated the positive effect of job search interventions on obtaining employment. Theoretical and practical implications and future research directions are discussed. PMID:24588365

  17. Yakson touch as a part of early intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A systematic narrative review.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Preeti; Samuel, Asir John; Bansal, Arpna; Aranka, Vencita Priyanka

    2016-06-01

    Yakson is a Korean therapeutic touch given to neonates and infants by caressing their abdomen with one hand while the other hand is placed on the back of the neonate\\infant either to relieve their pain or to calm them down. It was traditionally used by Koreans by caressing the aching body part of their children with a belief that it would relieve their pain. In spite of clinical evidence of its usefulness, there is limited literature available on Yakson touch. A systematic narrative review (SNR) was undertaken on studies that were carried out on the effectiveness of Yakson touch on infants and neonates. Only seven studies were detected from five major electronic databases, searched with the keywords: "Yakson," "Yakson touch," and "Yakson in neonates". One of the studies has been included in two Cochrane reviews by the same group of researchers published in 2011 and 2015, respectively, and also in a literature review. The evidence from these articles suggests that Yakson touch is able to increase the sleep scores of infants, affects their behavioral response, decreases the stress levels, increases maternal attachment, and has calming effects on them. However, the number of studies is limited, and thus the efficacy of this intervention has not been sufficiently established. Hence, there is a definite need for future studies to prove the efficacy of Yakson to include it in the early intervention programs. This SNR is aimed at compiling the studies which determined to prove the efficacy of the intervention of Yakson. PMID:27390459

  18. Educational interventions to increase HPV vaccination acceptance: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Linda Y.; Bonhomme, Lize-Anne; Cooper, Spring Chenoa; Joseph, Jill G.; Zimet, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has been available for protection against HPV-associated cervical cancer and genital warts since 2006. Nonetheless, uptake has varied among countries and populations within countries. Studies have found that individuals’ knowledge and attitudes toward the vaccine are associated with immunization uptake. The purpose of the current review is to summarize and evaluate the evidence for educational interventions to increase HPV vaccination acceptance. Methods We searched the databases of PubMed and Web of Science for English-language articles describing educational interventions designed to improve HPV vaccination uptake, intention or attitude. Results We identified 33 studies of HPV vaccination educational interventions: 7 tested the effectiveness of interventions with parents, 8 with adolescents or young adults, and 18 compared the effectiveness of different message frames in an educational intervention among adolescents, young adults or their parents. Most studies involved populations with higher educational attainment and most interventions required participants to be literate. The minority of studies used the outcome of HPV vaccine uptake. Well-designed studies adequately powered to detect change in vaccine uptake were rare and generally did not demonstrate effectiveness of the tested intervention. Conclusions There is not strong evidence to recommend any specific educational intervention for wide-spread implementation. Future studies are required to determine the effectiveness of culturally-competent interventions reaching diverse populations. PMID:24530401

  19. Effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce the use of imaging for low-back pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Hazel J.; Hancock, Mark J.; French, Simon D.; Maher, Chris G.; Engel, Roger M.; Magnussen, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rates of imaging for low-back pain are high and are associated with increased health care costs and radiation exposure as well as potentially poorer patient outcomes. We conducted a systematic review to investigate the effectiveness of interventions aimed at reducing the use of imaging for low-back pain. Methods: We searched MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from the earliest records to June 23, 2014. We included randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials and interrupted time series studies that assessed interventions designed to reduce the use of imaging in any clinical setting, including primary, emergency and specialist care. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We used raw data on imaging rates to calculate summary statistics. Study heterogeneity prevented meta-analysis. Results: A total of 8500 records were identified through the literature search. Of the 54 potentially eligible studies reviewed in full, 7 were included in our review. Clinical decision support involving a modified referral form in a hospital setting reduced imaging by 36.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 33.2% to 40.5%). Targeted reminders to primary care physicians of appropriate indications for imaging reduced referrals for imaging by 22.5% (95% CI 8.4% to 36.8%). Interventions that used practitioner audits and feedback, practitioner education or guideline dissemination did not significantly reduce imaging rates. Lack of power within some of the included studies resulted in lack of statistical significance despite potentially clinically important effects. Interpretation: Clinical decision support in a hospital setting and targeted reminders to primary care doctors were effective interventions in reducing the use of imaging for low-back pain. These are potentially low-cost interventions that would substantially decrease medical expenditures associated with the management of low-back pain. PMID

  20. Technology-based Interventions in Social Work Practice: A Systematic Review of Mental Health Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Despite concerns around the use of technology-based interventions, they are increasingly being employed by social workers as a direct practice methodology to address the mental health needs of vulnerable clients. Researchers have highlighted the importance of using innovative technologies within social work practice, yet little has been done to summarize the evidence and collectively assess findings. In this systematic review, we describe accounts of technology-based mental health interventions delivered by social workers over the past 10 years. Results highlight the impacts of these tools and summarize advantages and disadvantages to utilizing technologies as a method for delivering or facilitating interventions. PMID:25321935

  1. Technology-based interventions in social work practice: a systematic review of mental health interventions.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Alex T; Montgomery, Katherine

    2014-10-01

    Despite concerns around the use of technology-based interventions, they are increasingly being employed by social workers as a direct practice methodology to address the mental health needs of vulnerable clients. Researchers have highlighted the importance of using innovative technologies within social work practice, yet little has been done to summarize the evidence and collectively assess findings. In this systematic review, we describe accounts of technology-based mental health interventions delivered by social workers over the past 10 years. Results highlight the impacts of these tools and summarize advantages and disadvantages to utilizing technologies as a method for delivering or facilitating interventions. PMID:25321935

  2. Technology-based interventions in social work practice: a systematic review of mental health interventions.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Alex T; Montgomery, Katherine

    2014-10-01

    Despite concerns around the use of technology-based interventions, they are increasingly being employed by social workers as a direct practice methodology to address the mental health needs of vulnerable clients. Researchers have highlighted the importance of using innovative technologies within social work practice, yet little has been done to summarize the evidence and collectively assess findings. In this systematic review, we describe accounts of technology-based mental health interventions delivered by social workers over the past 10 years. Results highlight the impacts of these tools and summarize advantages and disadvantages to utilizing technologies as a method for delivering or facilitating interventions.

  3. Efficacy of interventions promoting blood donation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Godin, Gaston; Vézina-Im, Lydi-Anne; Bélanger-Gravel, Ariane; Amireault, Steve

    2012-07-01

    Findings about the efficacy of interventions promoting blood donation are scattered and sometime inconsistent. The aim of the present systematic review was to identify the most effective types of interventions and modes of delivery to increase blood donation. The following databases were investigated: MEDLINE/PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Proquest Dissertations and Theses. Additional studies were also included by checking the references of the articles included in the review and by looking at our personal collection. The outcomes of interest were either blood drive attendance or blood donations. A total of 29 randomized controlled trials or quasi-experimental studies were included in the review, detailing 36 interventions tested among independent samples. Interventions targeting psychosocial cognitions (s = 8, s to represent the number of independent samples; odds ratio [OR], 2.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.42-4.28), those stressing the altruistic motives to give blood (s = 4; OR, 3.89; 95% CI, 1.03-14.76), and reminders (s = 7; OR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.22-2.99) were the most successful in increasing blood donation. The results suggest that motivational interventions and reminders are the most effective in increasing blood donation, but additional studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of other types of interventions.

  4. Effectiveness of mHealth Interventions Targeting Health Care Workers to Improve Pregnancy Outcomes in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Borgstein, Alexander Berend-Jan; Sondaal, Stephanie FV; Grobbee, Diederick E; Miltenburg, Andrea Solnes; Verwijs, Mirjam; Ansah, Evelyn K; Browne, Joyce L; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Background Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) face the highest burden of maternal and neonatal deaths. Concurrently, they have the lowest number of physicians. Innovative methods such as the exchange of health-related information using mobile devices (mHealth) may support health care workers in the provision of antenatal, delivery, and postnatal care to improve maternal and neonatal outcomes in LMICs. Objective We conducted a systematic review evaluating the effectiveness of mHealth interventions targeting health care workers to improve maternal and neonatal outcomes in LMIC. Methods The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Global Health Library, and Popline were searched using predetermined search and indexing terms. Quality assessment was performed using an adapted Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. A strength, weakness, opportunity, and threat analysis was performed for each included paper. Results A total of 19 studies were included for this systematic review, 10 intervention and 9 descriptive studies. mHealth interventions were used as communication, data collection, or educational tool by health care providers primarily at the community level in the provision of antenatal, delivery, and postnatal care. Interventions were used to track pregnant women to improve antenatal and delivery care, as well as facilitate referrals. None of the studies directly assessed the effect of mHealth on maternal and neonatal mortality. Challenges of mHealth interventions to assist health care workers consisted mainly of technical problems, such as mobile network coverage, internet access, electricity access, and maintenance of mobile phones. Conclusions mHealth interventions targeting health care workers have the potential to improve maternal and neonatal health services in LMICs. However, there is a gap in the knowledge whether mHealth interventions directly affect maternal and neonatal outcomes and future research should employ experimental designs with relevant outcome measures to

  5. The Effectiveness of Disaster Risk Communication: A Systematic Review of Intervention Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Declan T; McFarland, Marie; Clarke, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A disaster is a serious disruption to the functioning of a community that exceeds its capacity to cope within its own resources. Risk communication in disasters aims to prevent and mitigate harm from disasters, prepare the population before a disaster, disseminate information during disasters and aid subsequent recovery. The aim of this systematic review is to identify, appraise and synthesise the findings of studies of the effects of risk communication interventions during four stages of the disaster cycle. Methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, MEDLINE, PsycInfo, Sociological Abstracts, Web of Science and grey literature sources for randomised trials, cluster randomised trials, controlled and uncontrolled before and after studies, interrupted time series studies and qualitative studies of any method of disaster risk communication to at-risk populations. Outcome criteria were disaster-related knowledge and behaviour, and health outcomes. Results: Searches yielded 5,224 unique articles, of which 100 were judged to be potentially relevant. Twenty-five studies met the inclusion criteria, and two additional studies were identified from other searching. The studies evaluated interventions in all four stages of the disaster cycle, included a variety of man-made, natural and infectious disease disasters, and were conducted in many disparate settings. Only one randomised trial and one cluster randomised trial were identified, with less robust designs used in the other studies. Several studies reported improvements in disaster-related knowledge and behaviour. Discussion: We identified and appraised intervention studies of disaster risk communication and present an overview of the contemporary literature. Most studies used non-randomised designs that make interpretation challenging. We do not make specific recommendations for practice but highlight the need for high-quality randomised trials and appropriately

  6. Interventions for increasing ankle joint dorsiflexion: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle joint equinus, or restricted dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM), has been linked to a range of pathologies of relevance to clinical practitioners. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated the effects of conservative interventions on ankle joint ROM in healthy individuals and athletic populations. Methods Keyword searches of Embase, Medline, Cochrane and CINAHL databases were performed with the final search being run in August 2013. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they assessed the effect of a non-surgical intervention on ankle joint dorsiflexion in healthy populations. Studies were quality rated using a standard quality assessment scale. Standardised mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated and results were pooled where study methods were homogenous. Results Twenty-three studies met eligibility criteria, with a total of 734 study participants. Results suggest that there is some evidence to support the efficacy of static stretching alone (SMDs: range 0.70 to 1.69) and static stretching in combination with ultrasound (SMDs: range 0.91 to 0.95), diathermy (SMD 1.12), diathermy and ice (SMD 1.16), heel raise exercises (SMDs: range 0.70 to 0.77), superficial moist heat (SMDs: range 0.65 to 0.84) and warm up (SMD 0.87) in improving ankle joint dorsiflexion ROM. Conclusions Some evidence exists to support the efficacy of stretching alone and stretching in combination with other therapies in increasing ankle joint ROM in healthy individuals. There is a paucity of quality evidence to support the efficacy of other non-surgical interventions, thus further research in this area is warranted. PMID:24225348

  7. Educational and Skills-Based Interventions for Preventing Relationship and Dating Violence in Adolescents and Young Adults. A Systematic Review. Campbell Systematic Reviews 2013:14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fellmeth, Gracia L. T.; Heffernan, Catherine; Nurse, Joanna; Habibula, Shakiba; Sethi, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Educational and skills-based interventions are often used to prevent relationship and dating violence among young people. Objectives: To assess the efficacy of educational and skills-based interventions designed to prevent relationship and dating violence in adolescents and young adults. Search Methods: We searched the Cochrane Central…

  8. Interventions to Increase the Uptake of Mammography amongst Low Income Women: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Michael P.; Adams, Abbey; Jeffreys, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Background Two previous reviews found that access-enhancing interventions were effective in increasing mammography uptake amongst low-income women. The purpose of this study was to estimate the magnitude of the effect of interventions used to increase uptake of mammography amongst low-income women. Methods Searches were conducted in MEDLINE and EMBASE (2002–April 2012) using relevant MeSH terms and keywords. Randomised controlled trials which aimed to increase mammography use in an asymptomatic low-income population and which had as an outcome receipt of a mammogram, were eligible for inclusion. The primary outcome was the post-intervention difference in the proportion of women who had a mammogram in the intervention and control groups. The quality of the studies was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. We calculated summary estimates using random effects meta-analyses. Possible reasons for heterogeneity were investigated using sub-group analyses and meta-regression. Publication bias was assessed using Egger's test. Results Twenty-one studies met the inclusion criteria, including 33 comparisons. Interventions increased the uptake of mammography in low income women by an additional 8.9% (95% CI 7.3 to 10.4%) compared to the control group. There was some evidence that interventions with multiple strategies were more effective than those with single strategies (p  = 0.03). There was some suggestion of publication bias. The quality of the included studies was often unclear. Omitting those with high risk of bias has little effect on the results. Conclusions Interventions can increase mammography uptake among low-income women, multiple interventions being the most effective strategy. Given the robustness of the results to sensitivity analyses, the results are likely to be reliable. The generalisability of the results beyond the US is unclear. PMID:23451028

  9. Are interventions for low-income groups effective in changing healthy eating, physical activity and smoking behaviours? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Eleanor R; Dombrowski, Stephan U; McCleary, Nicola; Johnston, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis examining the effectiveness of behavioural interventions targeting diet, physical activity or smoking in low-income adults. Design Systematic review with random effects meta-analyses. Studies before 2006 were identified from a previously published systematic review (searching 1995–2006) with similar but broader inclusion criteria (including non-randomised controlled trials (RCTs)). Studies from 2006 to 2014 were identified from eight electronic databases using a similar search strategy. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, ASSIA, CINAHL, Cochrane Controlled Trials, Cochrane Systematic Review and DARE. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies RCTs and cluster RCTs published from 1995 to 2014; interventions targeting dietary, physical activity and smoking; low-income adults; reporting of behavioural outcomes. Main outcome measures Dietary, physical activity and smoking cessation behaviours. Results 35 studies containing 45 interventions with 17 000 participants met inclusion criteria. At postintervention, effects were positive but small for diet (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.22, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.29), physical activity (SMD 0.21, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.36) and smoking (relative risk (RR) of 1.59, 95% CI 1.34 to 1.89). Studies reporting follow-up results suggested that effects were maintained over time for diet (SMD 0.16, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.25) but not physical activity (SMD 0.17, 95% CI −0.02 to 0.37) or smoking (RR 1.11, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.34). Conclusions Behaviour change interventions for low-income groups had small positive effects on healthy eating, physical activity and smoking. Further work is needed to improve the effectiveness of behaviour change interventions for deprived populations. PMID:25432903

  10. Improving understanding in the research informed consent process: a systematic review of 54 interventions tested in randomized control trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obtaining informed consent is a cornerstone of biomedical research, yet participants comprehension of presented information is often low. The most effective interventions to improve understanding rates have not been identified. Purpose To systematically analyze the random controlled trials testing interventions to research informed consent process. The primary outcome of interest was quantitative rates of participant understanding; secondary outcomes were rates of information retention, satisfaction, and accrual. Interventional categories included multimedia, enhanced consent documents, extended discussions, test/feedback quizzes, and miscellaneous methods. Methods The search spanned from database inception through September 2010. It was run on Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, Ovid CINAHL, Ovid PsycInfo and Cochrane CENTRAL, ISI Web of Science and Scopus. Five reviewers working independently and in duplicate screened full abstract text to determine eligibility. We included only RCTs. 39 out of 1523 articles fulfilled review criteria (2.6%), with a total of 54 interventions. A data extraction form was created in Distiller, an online reference management system, through an iterative process. One author collected data on study design, population, demographics, intervention, and analytical technique. Results Meta-analysis was possible on 22 interventions: multimedia, enhanced form, and extended discussion categories; all 54 interventions were assessed by review. Meta-analysis of multimedia approaches was associated with a non-significant increase in understanding scores (SMD 0.30, 95% CI, -0.23 to 0.84); enhanced consent form, with significant increase (SMD 1.73, 95% CI, 0.99 to 2.47); and extended discussion, with significant increase (SMD 0.53, 95% CI, 0.21 to 0.84). By review, 31% of multimedia interventions showed significant improvement in understanding; 41% for enhanced consent form; 50% for extended discussion; 33% for test/feedback; and 29% for

  11. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) as sole intervention for non-somatisation chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP): protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Lawrence; Han, Han; Martin, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) affects up to 50% of the world's population. It impacts negatively on quality of life; entailing high costs on our medical systems, and translates to economic burden due to work loss. Aetiology of CNCP is complex and multifactorial, embracing the somatosensory, cognitive and affective domains. Opioid analgesia and other invasive interventions are often inadequate for clinical management of CNCP. Recently, mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) has become a popular therapy for various medical conditions, including CNCP. However, studies reported varying efficacies, and relevant systematic reviews have included clinical trials with inherent heterogeneity either in study conditions or types of interventions used. Our study aims to provide an updated and more critical evaluation of the efficacy of MBSR as the intervention for non-somatisation CNCP. Methods and analysis A systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials published in English will be performed in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and the Cochrane Collaboration format. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials Intervention, will be searched independently by reviewers using defined MeSH terms. Studies with full texts using MBSR as the main intervention on patients with non-somatising CNCP will be included. Outcome measures include pain scores and disability assessment scales. Continuous data will be meta-analysed using the RevMan 5 Review Manager programme. Primary analysis will adopt the random effects model in view of heterogeneity between trials. The standardised mean difference will be expressed as the effect size with 95% CIs. Forest plots, funnel plots, the I2 statistic and the Cochrane Risks of Bias Assessment table will be included. Ethics and dissemination No ethics approval is deemed necessary. Results of this study

  12. Do telemedical interventions improve quality of life in patients with COPD? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, Thorbjørn L; Green, Allan; Frausing, Ejvind; Ringbæk, Thomas; Brøndum, Eva; Suppli Ulrik, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Objective Telehealth is an approach to disease management, which may hold the potential of improving some of the features associated with COPD, including positive impact on disease progression, and thus possibly limiting further reduction in quality of life (QoL). Our objective was, therefore, to summarize studies addressing the impact of telehealth on QoL in patients with COPD. Design Systematic review. Methods A series of systematic searches were carried out using the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and ClinicalTrials.gov (last updated November 2015). A predefined search algorithm was utilized with the intention to capture all results related to COPD, QoL, and telehealth published since year 2000. Outcome measures Primary outcome was QoL, assessed by validated measures. Results Out of the 18 studies fulfilling the criteria for inclusion in this review, three studies found statistically significant improvements in QoL for patients allocated to telemedical interventions. However, all of the other included studies found no statistically significant differences between control and telemedical intervention groups in terms of QoL. Conclusion Telehealth does not make a strong case for itself when exclusively looking at QoL as an outcome, since statistically significant improvements relative to control groups have been observed only in few of the available studies. Nonetheless, this does not only rule out the possibility that telehealth is superior to standard care with regard to other outcomes but also seems to call for more research, not least in large-scale controlled trials. PMID:27143872

  13. Pharmacological interventions to improve sleep in hospitalised adults: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kanji, Salmaan; Mera, Alexandru; Hutton, Brian; Burry, Lisa; Rosenberg, Erin; MacDonald, Erika; Luks, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Patients often suffer from disturbed sleep in hospital. Poor-quality sleep in hospitalised patients has been associated with significant morbidity and pharmacological sleep aids are often prescribed. The objective of this systematic review is to evaluate the comparative efficacy and safety of pharmacological interventions used for sleep in hospitalised patients. Setting/participants We searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane database and grey literature for prospective studies that evaluated sleep in hospitalised adults after a pharmacological intervention. Primary and secondary outcome measures Two reviewers assessed studies for inclusion and extracted data for efficacy outcomes, including sleep efficiency, sleep latency, sleep fragmentation and objectively measured sleep stage distribution. Risk of bias was assessed and meta-analyses were planned contingent upon homogeneity of the included studies. Results After screening 1920 citations, 15 studies involving 861 patients were included. Medications studied included benzodiazepines, nonbenzodiazepine sedatives, melatonin, propofol and dexmedetomidine. Five studies were deemed to be of high quality. Heterogeneity and variable outcome reporting precluded meta-analysis in most cases. No consistent trends with respect to sleep efficiency, quality or interruptions were observed identifying a drug or drug class as superior to another or no treatment. Benzodiazepines appeared to be better than no treatment with respect to sleep latency, but this was not consistently demonstrated across all studies. Sleep stage distribution shows that sleep in hospital is dominated by stages N1 and N2. Conclusions There is insufficient evidence to suggest that pharmacotherapy improves the quality or quantity of sleep in hospitalised patients suffering from poor sleep. No drug class or specific drug was identified as superior even when compared to placebo or no treatment. Although 15 studies were included, the quality of evidence

  14. Saving the Time of the Library User through Subject Access Innovation: Papers in Honor of Pauline Atherton Cochrane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, William J., Ed.

    This book contains the following papers in honor of Pauline Atherton Cochrane on subject access issues in library and information science: (1) "Obstacles in Progress in Mechanized Subject Access and the Necessity of a Paradigm Change" (Robert Fugmann); (2) "On MARC and the Nature of Text Searching: A Review of Pauline Cochrane's Inspirational…

  15. Digital Health Interventions for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, R. Jay; Collins, Nerissa M.; Collins, C. Scott; West, Colin P.; Lerman, Lilach O.; Lerman, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the potential benefit of digital health interventions (DHI) on cardiovascular disease outcomes (CVD events, all-cause mortality, hospitalizations) and risk factors compared to non-DHI interventions. Patients and Methods We conducted a systematic search of PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, OVID, CINHAL, ERIC, PsychInfo, Cochrane, and CENTRAL from January 1, 1990 and January 21, 2014. Included studies examined any element of DHI (telemedicine, web-based strategies, email, mobile phones, mobile applications, text messaging, and monitoring sensors) and CVD outcomes or risk factors. Two reviewers independently evaluated study quality utilizing a modified version of the Cochrane Collaboration risk assessment tool. Authors extracted CVD outcomes and risk factors for CVD such as weight, BMI, blood pressure, and lipids from 51 full-text articles that met validity and inclusion criteria. Results DHI significantly reduced CVD outcomes (RR=0.61, (95% CI, 0.45–0.83), P=.002; I2=22%). Concomitant reductions in weight (−3.35 lbs, (95% CI, −6.08 lbs, −1.01 lbs); P=.006; I2=96%) and BMI (−0.59 kg/m2, (95% CI, −1.15 kg/m2, −0.03 kg/m2); P=.04; I2=94%) but not blood pressure (+4.95 mmHg, (95% CI, −4.5 mmHg, 14.4 mmHg); P=.30; I2=100%) were found in these DHI trials compared to usual care. Framingham 10 year risk percentages were also significantly improved (−1.24%; 95% CI −1.73%, −0.76%; n=6; P<0.001; I2=94%). Results were limited by heterogeneity not fully explained by study population (primary or secondary prevention) or DHI modality. Conclusions Overall, these aggregations of data provide evidence that DHI can reduce CVD outcomes and have a positive impact on risk factors for CVD. PMID:25841251

  16. The effect of pharmacist-led interventions in optimising prescribing in older adults in primary care: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, David O; Walsh, Kieran A; Galvin, Rose; Sinnott, Carol; Kearney, Patricia M; Byrne, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate studies of pharmacist-led interventions on potentially inappropriate prescribing among community-dwelling older adults receiving primary care to identify the components of a successful intervention. Data sources: An electronic search of the literature was conducted using the following databases from inception to December 2015: PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE (through Ovid), Trip, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ISI Web of Science, ScienceDirect, ClinicalTrials.gov, metaRegister of Controlled Trials, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database (Theses in Great Britain, Ireland and North America). Review methods: Studies were included if they were randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised studies involving a pharmacist-led intervention compared to usual/routine care which aimed to reduce potentially inappropriate prescribing in older adults in primary care. Methodological quality of the included studies was independently assessed. Results: A comprehensive literature search was conducted which identified 2193 studies following removal of duplicates. Five studies met the inclusion criteria. Four studies involved a pharmacist conducting a medication review and providing feedback to patients or their family physician. One randomised controlled trial evaluated the effect of a computerised tool that alerted pharmacists when elderly patients were newly prescribed potentially inappropriate medications. Four studies were associated with an improvement in prescribing appropriateness. Conclusion: Overall, this review demonstrates that pharmacist-led interventions may improve prescribing appropriateness in community-dwelling older adults. However, the quality of evidence is low. The role of a pharmacist working as part of a multidisciplinary primary care team requires further investigation to optimise prescribing in this group of patients. PMID

  17. What implementation interventions increase cancer screening rates? a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Appropriate screening may reduce the mortality and morbidity of colorectal, breast, and cervical cancers. However, effective implementation strategies are warranted if the full benefits of screening are to be realized. As part of a larger agenda to create an implementation guideline, we conducted a systematic review to evaluate interventions designed to increase the rate of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. The interventions considered were: client reminders, client incentives, mass media, small media, group education, one-on-one education, reduction in structural barriers, reduction in out-of-pocket costs, provider assessment and feedback interventions, and provider incentives. Our primary outcome, screening completion, was calculated as the overall median post-intervention absolute percentage point (PP) change in completed screening tests. Methods Our first step was to conduct an iterative scoping review in the research area. This yielded three relevant high-quality systematic reviews. Serving as our evidentiary foundation, we conducted a formal update. Randomized controlled trials and cluster randomized controlled trials, published between 2004 and 2010, were searched in MEDLINE, EMBASE and PSYCHinfo. Results The update yielded 66 studies new eligible studies with 74 comparisons. The new studies ranged considerably in quality. Client reminders, small media, and provider audit and feedback appear to be effective interventions to increase the uptake of screening for three cancers. One-on-one education and reduction of structural barriers also appears effective, but their roles with CRC and cervical screening, respectively, are less established. More study is required to assess client incentives, mass media, group education, reduction of out-of-pocket costs, and provider incentive interventions. Conclusion The new evidence generally aligns with the evidence and conclusions from the original systematic reviews. This review served as

  18. Interventions in exclusive breastfeeding: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Gillian; Brown, Michelle

    Now recognised as a worldwide public health issue, the significance of promoting and encouraging exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) has been acknowledged by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Documented policies about the importance of facilitating the support of breastfeeding women is currently receiving worldwide recognition (WHO, 2011; WHO and UNICEF, 2003). This literature review will examine provision of support mechanisms for breastfeeding mothers, focusing on peer support in encouraging the starting and maintaining of EBF. Consideration will also be given to any barriers that may prevent higher success rates, as cultural and educational factors may have a significant impact on the starting and maintaining of EBF. These factors must be considered when starting support groups, networks or activities that aim to address this significant public health issue. PMID:24464112

  19. Effect of School-based Interventions to Control Childhood Obesity: A Review of Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Maryam; Djazayery, Abolghassem; Majdzadeh, Reza; Taghdisi, Mohammad-Hossein; Jazayeri, Shima

    2015-01-01

    Effectiveness of school-based interventions to prevent or control overweight and obesity among school children was reviewed for a 11-year period (January 2001 to December 2011). All English systematic reviews, meta-analyses, reviews of reviews, policy briefs and reports targeting children and adolescents which included interventional studies with a control group and aimed to prevent or control overweight and/or obesity in a school setting were searched. Four systematic reviews and four meta-analyses met the eligibility criteria and were included in the review. Results of the review indicated that implementation of multi-component interventions did not necessarily improve the anthropometric outcomes. Although intervention duration is a crucial determinant of effectiveness, studies to assess the length of time required are lacking. Due to existing differences between girls and boys in responding to the elements of the programs in tailoring of school-based interventions, the differences should be taken into consideration. While nontargeted interventions may have an impact on a large population, intervention specifically aiming at children will be more effective for at-risk ones. Intervention programs for children were required to report any unwanted psychological or physical adverse effects originating from the intervention. Body mass index was the most popular indicator used for evaluating the childhood obesity prevention or treatment trials; nonetheless, relying on it as the only indicator for adiposity outcomes could be misleading. Few studies mentioned the psychological theories of behavior change they applied. Recommendations for further studies on school-based interventions to prevent or control overweight/obesity are made at the end of this review. PMID:26330984

  20. Interventions to Prevent Child Marriage Among Young People in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review of the Published and Gray Literature.

    PubMed

    Kalamar, Amanda M; Lee-Rife, Susan; Hindin, Michelle J

    2016-09-01

    Child marriage, defined as marriage before the age of 18 years, is a human rights violation that can have lasting adverse educational and economic impacts. The objective of this review was to identify high-quality interventions and evaluations to decease child marriage in low- and middle-income countries. PubMed, Embase, PsycInfo, CINAHL Plus, Popline, and the Cochrane Databases were searched without language limitations for articles published through November 2015. Gray literature was searched by hand. Reference tracing was used, as well as the unpacking of systematic reviews. Retained articles were those that were evaluated as having high-quality interventions and evaluations using standardized scoring. Eleven high-quality interventions and evaluations were abstracted. Six found positive results in decreasing the proportion married or increasing age at marriage, one had both positive and negative findings, and four had no statistical impact on the proportion married or age at marriage. There is wide range of high-quality, impactful interventions included in this review which can inform researchers, donors, and policy makers about where to make strategic investments to eradicate marriage, a current target of the Sustainable Development Goals. Despite the cultural factors that promote child marriage, the diversity of interventions can allow decision makers to tailor interventions to the cultural context of the target population.

  1. Interventions to Prevent Child Marriage Among Young People in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review of the Published and Gray Literature.

    PubMed

    Kalamar, Amanda M; Lee-Rife, Susan; Hindin, Michelle J

    2016-09-01

    Child marriage, defined as marriage before the age of 18 years, is a human rights violation that can have lasting adverse educational and economic impacts. The objective of this review was to identify high-quality interventions and evaluations to decease child marriage in low- and middle-income countries. PubMed, Embase, PsycInfo, CINAHL Plus, Popline, and the Cochrane Databases were searched without language limitations for articles published through November 2015. Gray literature was searched by hand. Reference tracing was used, as well as the unpacking of systematic reviews. Retained articles were those that were evaluated as having high-quality interventions and evaluations using standardized scoring. Eleven high-quality interventions and evaluations were abstracted. Six found positive results in decreasing the proportion married or increasing age at marriage, one had both positive and negative findings, and four had no statistical impact on the proportion married or age at marriage. There is wide range of high-quality, impactful interventions included in this review which can inform researchers, donors, and policy makers about where to make strategic investments to eradicate marriage, a current target of the Sustainable Development Goals. Despite the cultural factors that promote child marriage, the diversity of interventions can allow decision makers to tailor interventions to the cultural context of the target population. PMID:27562449

  2. Effectiveness of Cultural Adaptations of Interventions Aimed at Smoking Cessation, Diet, and/or Physical Activity in Ethnic Minorities. A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Nierkens, Vera; Hartman, Marieke A.; Nicolaou, Mary; Vissenberg, Charlotte; Beune, Erik J. A. J.; Hosper, Karen; van Valkengoed, Irene G.; Stronks, Karien

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of cultural adaptations in behavioral interventions targeting ethnic minorities in high-income societies is widely recognized. Little is known, however, about the effectiveness of specific cultural adaptations in such interventions. Aim To systematically review the effectiveness of specific cultural adaptations in interventions that target smoking cessation, diet, and/or physical activity and to explore features of such adaptations that may account for their effectiveness. Methods Systematic review using MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials registers (1997–2009). Inclusion criteria: a) effectiveness study of a lifestyle intervention targeted to ethnic minority populations living in a high income society; b) interventions included cultural adaptations and a control group that was exposed to the intervention without the cultural adaptation under study; c) primary outcome measures included smoking cessation, diet, or physical activity. Results Out of 44904 hits, we identified 17 studies, all conducted in the United States. In five studies, specific cultural adaptations had a statistically significant effect on primary outcomes. The remaining studies showed no significant effects on primary outcomes, but some presented trends favorable for cultural adaptations. We observed that interventions incorporating a package of cultural adaptations, cultural adaptations that implied higher intensity and those incorporating family values were more likely to report statistically significant effects. Adaptations in smoking cessation interventions seem to be more effective than adaptations in interventions aimed at diet and physical activity. Conclusion This review indicates that culturally targeted behavioral interventions may be more effective if cultural adaptations are implemented as a package of adaptations, the adaptation includes family level, and where the adaptation results in a higher intensity of the

  3. Mindfulness Interventions in Physical Rehabilitation: A Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Hardison, Mark E; Roll, Shawn C

    2016-01-01

    A scoping review was conducted to describe how mindfulness is used in physical rehabilitation, identify implications for occupational therapy practice, and guide future research on clinical mindfulness interventions. A systematic search of four literature databases produced 1,524 original abstracts, of which 16 articles were included. Although only 3 Level I or II studies were identified, the literature included suggests that mindfulness interventions are helpful for patients with musculoskeletal and chronic pain disorders and demonstrate trends toward outcome improvements for patients with neurocognitive and neuromotor disorders. Only 2 studies included an occupational therapist as the primary mindfulness provider, but all mindfulness interventions in the selected studies fit within the occupational therapy scope of practice according to the American Occupational Therapy Association's Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process. Higher-level research is needed to evaluate the effects of mindfulness interventions in physical rehabilitation and to determine best practices for the use of mindfulness by occupational therapy practitioners.

  4. Interventional tools to improve medication adherence: review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Elísio; Giardini, Anna; Savin, Magda; Menditto, Enrica; Lehane, Elaine; Laosa, Olga; Pecorelli, Sergio; Monaco, Alessandro; Marengoni, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Medication adherence and persistence is recognized as a worldwide public health problem, particularly important in the management of chronic diseases. Nonadherence to medical plans affects every level of the population, but particularly older adults due to the high number of coexisting diseases they are affected by and the consequent polypharmacy. Chronic disease management requires a continuous psychological adaptation and behavioral reorganization. In literature, many interventions to improve medication adherence have been described for different clinical conditions, however, most interventions seem to fail in their aims. Moreover, most interventions associated with adherence improvements are not associated with improvements in other outcomes. Indeed, in the last decades, the degree of nonadherence remained unchanged. In this work, we review the most frequent interventions employed to increase the degree of medication adherence, the measured outcomes, and the improvements achieved, as well as the main limitations of the available studies on adherence, with a particular focus on older persons. PMID:26396502

  5. Mindfulness Interventions in Physical Rehabilitation: A Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Hardison, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    A scoping review was conducted to describe how mindfulness is used in physical rehabilitation, identify implications for occupational therapy practice, and guide future research on clinical mindfulness interventions. A systematic search of four literature databases produced 1,524 original abstracts, of which 16 articles were included. Although only 3 Level I or II studies were identified, the literature included suggests that mindfulness interventions are helpful for patients with musculoskeletal and chronic pain disorders and demonstrate trends toward outcome improvements for patients with neurocognitive and neuromotor disorders. Only 2 studies included an occupational therapist as the primary mindfulness provider, but all mindfulness interventions in the selected studies fit within the occupational therapy scope of practice according to the American Occupational Therapy Association’s Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process. Higher-level research is needed to evaluate the effects of mindfulness interventions in physical rehabilitation and to determine best practices for the use of mindfulness by occupational therapy practitioners. PMID:27089297

  6. Comparative efficacy of interventions to promote hand hygiene in hospital: systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hongsuwan, Maliwan; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Lubell, Yoel; Lee, Andie S; Harbarth, Stephan; Day, Nicholas P J; Graves, Nicholas; Cooper, Ben S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relative efficacy of the World Health Organization 2005 campaign (WHO-5) and other interventions to promote hand hygiene among healthcare workers in hospital settings and to summarize associated information on use of resources. Design Systematic review and network meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, Embase, CINAHL, NHS Economic Evaluation Database, NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, Cochrane Library, and the EPOC register (December 2009 to February 2014); studies selected by the same search terms in previous systematic reviews (1980-2009). Review methods Included studies were randomised controlled trials, non-randomised trials, controlled before-after trials, and interrupted time series studies implementing an intervention to improve compliance with hand hygiene among healthcare workers in hospital settings and measuring compliance or appropriate proxies that met predefined quality inclusion criteria. When studies had not used appropriate analytical methods, primary data were re-analysed. Random effects and network meta-analyses were performed on studies reporting directly observed compliance with hand hygiene when they were considered sufficiently homogeneous with regard to interventions and participants. Information on resources required for interventions was extracted and graded into three levels. Results Of 3639 studies retrieved, 41 met the inclusion criteria (six randomised controlled trials, 32 interrupted time series, one non-randomised trial, and two controlled before-after studies). Meta-analysis of two randomised controlled trials showed the addition of goal setting to WHO-5 was associated with improved compliance (pooled odds ratio 1.35, 95% confidence interval 1.04 to 1.76; I2=81%). Of 22 pairwise comparisons from interrupted time series, 18 showed stepwise increases in compliance with hand hygiene, and all but four showed a trend for increasing compliance after the intervention. Network meta-analysis indicated

  7. Efficacy of Internet-Based Self-Monitoring Interventions on Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes in Perinatal Diabetic Women: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Htun, Tha Pyai; Wong, Suei Nee; Tam, Wai San Wilson; Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-monitoring using the Internet offers new opportunities to engage perinatal diabetic women in self-management to reduce maternal and neonatal complications. Objective This review aims to synthesize the best available evidence to evaluate the efficacy of Internet-based self-monitoring interventions in improving maternal and neonatal outcomes among perinatal diabetic women. Methods The review was conducted using Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsyINFO, Scopus, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses to search for English-language research studies without any year limitation. A risk of bias table was used to assess methodological quality. Meta-analysis was performed with RevMan software. Cochran Q and I2 tests were used to assess heterogeneity. The overall effect was assessed using z tests at P<.05. Of the 438 studies identified through electronic searches and reference lists, nine experimental studies from 10 publications were selected. Results Half of the selected studies showed low risk of bias and comprised 852 perinatal diabetic women in six countries. The meta-analysis revealed that Internet-based self-monitoring interventions significantly decreased the level of maternal glycated hemoglobin A1c (z=2.23, P=.03) compared to usual care among perinatal diabetic women at postintervention. Moreover, Internet-based self-monitoring interventions significantly decreased the cesarean delivery rate (z=2.23, P=.03) compared to usual care among the mixed group at postintervention. Conclusions This review shows neonatal or other maternal outcomes are similar between Internet-based self-monitoring interventions and usual diabetes care among perinatal diabetic women. The long-term effects of the intervention must be confirmed in future studies using randomized controlled trials and follow-up data. PMID:27526637

  8. Intergenerational Energy Balance Interventions: A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Mark; Studts, Christina R.; Bardach, Shoshana H.; Bersamin, Andrea; Schoenberg, Nancy E.

    2011-01-01

    Many nations have witnessed a dramatic increase in the prevalence of obesity and overweight across their population. Recognizing the influence of the household environment on energy balance has led many researchers to suggest that intergenerational interventions hold promise for addressing this epidemic. Yet few comprehensive reviews of…

  9. Review of Sibling Interventions with Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banda, Devender R.

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen intervention studies were reviewed that included children with autism and their typical siblings. Overall, results across several studies reveal that siblings can have positive impacts on social and communication skills in children with autism. However, methodological variations and mixed results in studies that included siblings as…

  10. Communication Intervention in Rett Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigafoos, Jeff; Green, Vanessa A.; Schlosser, Ralf; O'eilly, Mark F.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Rispoli, Mandy; Lang, Russell

    2009-01-01

    We reviewed communication intervention studies involving people with Rett syndrome. Systematic searches of five electronic databases, selected journals, and reference lists identified nine studies meeting the inclusion criteria. These studies were evaluated in terms of: (a) participant characteristics, (b) target skills, (c) procedures, (d) main…

  11. Native American Youth and Culturally Sensitive Interventions: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Kelly F.; Hodge, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: A systematic evaluation of the effectiveness of culturally sensitive interventions (CSIs) with Native American youth was conducted. Method: Electronic bibliographic databases, Web sites, and manual searches were used to identify 11 outcome studies that examined CSI effectiveness with Native American youth. Results: This review found…

  12. Practitioner Review: Engaging fathers – recommendations for a game change in parenting interventions based on a systematic review of the global evidence

    PubMed Central

    Panter-Brick, Catherine; Burgess, Adrienne; Eggerman, Mark; McAllister, Fiona; Pruett, Kyle; Leckman, James F

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite robust evidence of fathers’ impact on children and mothers, engaging with fathers is one of the least well-explored and articulated aspects of parenting interventions. It is therefore critical to evaluate implicit and explicit biases manifested in current approaches to research, intervention, and policy. Methods We conducted a systematic database and a thematic hand search of the global literature on parenting interventions. Studies were selected from Medline, Psychinfo, SSCI, and Cochrane databases, and from gray literature on parenting programs, using multiple search terms for parent, father, intervention, and evaluation. We tabulated single programs and undertook systematic quality coding to review the evidence base in terms of the scope and nature of data reporting. Results After screening 786 nonduplicate records, we identified 199 publications that presented evidence on father participation and impact in parenting interventions. With some notable exceptions, few interventions disaggregate ‘father’ or ‘couple’ effects in their evaluation, being mostly driven by a focus on the mother–child dyad. We identified seven key barriers to engaging fathers in parenting programs, pertaining to cultural, institutional, professional, operational, content, resource, and policy considerations in their design and delivery. Conclusions Barriers to engaging men as parents work against father inclusion as well as father retention, and undervalue coparenting as contrasted with mothering. Robust evaluations of father participation and father impact on child or family outcomes are stymied by the ways in which parenting interventions are currently designed, delivered, and evaluated. Three key priorities are to engage fathers and coparenting couples successfully, to disaggregate process and impact data by fathers, mothers, and coparents, and to pay greater attention to issues of reach, sustainability, cost, equity, and scale-up. Clarity of purpose with

  13. Prenatal depression effects and interventions: a review.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2010-12-01

    This review covers research on the negative effects of prenatal depression and cortisol on fetal growth, prematurity and low birthweight. Although prenatal depression and cortisol were typically measured at around 20 weeks gestation, other research suggests the stability of depression and cortisol levels across pregnancy. Women with Dysthymia as compared to Major Depression Disorder had higher cortisol levels, and their newborns had lower gestational age and birthweight. The cortisol effects in these studies were unfortunately confounded by low serotonin and low dopamine levels which in themselves could contribute to non-optimal pregnancy outcomes. The negative effects of depression and cortisol were also potentially confounded by comorbid anxiety, by demographic factors including younger age, less education and lower SES of the mothers and by the absence of a partner or a partner who was unhappy about the pregnancy or a partner who was depressed. Substance use (especially caffeine use) was still another risk factor. All of these problems including prenatal depression, elevated cortisol, prematurity and low birthweight and even postpartum depression have been reduced by prenatal massage therapy provided by the women's partners. Massage therapy combined with group interpersonal psychotherapy was also effective for reducing depression and cortisol levels. Several limitations of these studies were noted and suggestions for future research included exploring other predictor variables like progesterone/estriol ratios, immune factors and genetic determinants. Further research is needed both on the potential use of cortisol as a screening measure and the use of other therapies that might reduce prenatal depression and cortisol in the women and prematurity and low birthweight in their infants.

  14. Lifestyle interventions for overweight and obese pregnant women to improve pregnancy outcome: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity pose a big challenge to pregnancy as they are associated with adverse maternal and perinatal outcome. Evidence of lifestyle intervention resulting in improved pregnancy outcome is conflicting. Hence the objective of this study is to determine the efficacy of antenatal dietary, activity, behaviour or lifestyle interventions in overweight and obese pregnant women to improve maternal and perinatal outcomes. Methods A systematic review and meta-analyses of randomised and non-randomised clinical trials following prior registration (CRD420111122 http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO) and PRISMA guidelines was employed. A search of the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Maternity and Infant care and eight other databases for studies published prior to January 2012 was undertaken. Electronic literature searches, study selection, methodology and quality appraisal were performed independently by two authors. Methodological quality of the studies was assessed according to Cochrane risk of bias tool. All appropriate randomised and non-randomised clinical trials were included while exclusions consisted of interventions in pregnant women who were not overweight or obese, had pre-existing diabetes or polycystic ovarian syndrome, and systematic reviews. Maternal outcome measures, including maternal gestational weight gain, gestational diabetes and Caesarean section, were documented. Fetal outcomes, including large for gestational age and macrosomia (birth weight > 4 kg), were also documented. Results Thirteen randomised and six non-randomised clinical trials were identified and included in the meta-analysis. The evidence suggests antenatal dietary and lifestyle intervention in obese pregnant women reduces maternal pregnancy weight gain (10 randomised clinical trials; n = 1228; -2.21 kg (95% confidence interval -2.86 kg to -1.59 kg)) and a trend towards a reduction in the prevalence of gestational diabetes (six randomised clinical trials; n

  15. Ayurvedic interventions for osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Christian S; Pinders, Lea; Michalsen, Andreas; Cramer, Holger

    2015-02-01

    Ayurveda is one of the fastest growing systems within complementary and alternative medicine. However, the evidence for its effectiveness is unsatisfactory. The aim of this work was to review and meta-analyze the effectiveness and safety of different Ayurvedic interventions in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). 138 electronic databases were searched through August 2013. Randomized controlled trials, randomized crossover studies, cluster-randomized trials, and non-randomized controlled clinical trials were eligible. Adults with pre-diagnosed OA were included as participants. Interventions were included as Ayurvedic if they were explicitly labeled as such. Main outcome measures were pain, physical function, and global improvement. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. 19 randomized and 14 non-randomized controlled trials on 12 different drugs and 3 non-pharmaceutical interventions with a total of 2,952 patients were included. For the compound preparation, Rumalaya, large and apparently unbiased effects beyond placebo were found for pain (standardized mean difference [SMD] -3.73; 95 % confidence interval [CI] -4.97, -2.50; P < 0.01) and global improvement (risk ratio 12.20; 95 % CI 5.83, 25.54; P < 0.01). There is also some evidence that effects of the herbal compound preparation Shunti-Guduchi are comparable to those of glucosamine for pain (SMD 0.08; 95 % CI -0.20, 0.36; P = 0.56) and function (SMD 0.15; 95 % CI -0.12, 0.36; P = 0.41). Based on single trials, positive effects were found for the compound preparations RA-11, Reosto, and Siriraj Wattana. For Boswellia serrata, Lepidium Sativum, a Boswellia serrata containing multicomponent formulation and the compounds Nirgundi Taila, Panchatikta Ghrita Guggulu, and Rhumayog, and for non-pharmacological interventions like Ayurvedic massage, steam therapy, and enema, no evidence for significant effects against potential methodological bias was found. No severe adverse events were observed in

  16. Ayurvedic interventions for osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Christian S; Pinders, Lea; Michalsen, Andreas; Cramer, Holger

    2015-02-01

    Ayurveda is one of the fastest growing systems within complementary and alternative medicine. However, the evidence for its effectiveness is unsatisfactory. The aim of this work was to review and meta-analyze the effectiveness and safety of different Ayurvedic interventions in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). 138 electronic databases were searched through August 2013. Randomized controlled trials, randomized crossover studies, cluster-randomized trials, and non-randomized controlled clinical trials were eligible. Adults with pre-diagnosed OA were included as participants. Interventions were included as Ayurvedic if they were explicitly labeled as such. Main outcome measures were pain, physical function, and global improvement. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. 19 randomized and 14 non-randomized controlled trials on 12 different drugs and 3 non-pharmaceutical interventions with a total of 2,952 patients were included. For the compound preparation, Rumalaya, large and apparently unbiased effects beyond placebo were found for pain (standardized mean difference [SMD] -3.73; 95 % confidence interval [CI] -4.97, -2.50; P < 0.01) and global improvement (risk ratio 12.20; 95 % CI 5.83, 25.54; P < 0.01). There is also some evidence that effects of the herbal compound preparation Shunti-Guduchi are comparable to those of glucosamine for pain (SMD 0.08; 95 % CI -0.20, 0.36; P = 0.56) and function (SMD 0.15; 95 % CI -0.12, 0.36; P = 0.41). Based on single trials, positive effects were found for the compound preparations RA-11, Reosto, and Siriraj Wattana. For Boswellia serrata, Lepidium Sativum, a Boswellia serrata containing multicomponent formulation and the compounds Nirgundi Taila, Panchatikta Ghrita Guggulu, and Rhumayog, and for non-pharmacological interventions like Ayurvedic massage, steam therapy, and enema, no evidence for significant effects against potential methodological bias was found. No severe adverse events were observed in

  17. Meditation as an intervention for chronic pain: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, M Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pain is a complex phenomenon that causes a significant disruption in the lives of those affected. Chronic pain is difficult to treat and challenges healthcare professionals' abilities to implement effective treatments. Therefore, chronic pain sufferers often seek complementary alternative medicine therapies such as meditation. Literature reviews have examined studies using mindfulness-based stress reduction program as an intervention for a variety of health problems. However, no reviews exist looking at a specific patient population's utilization of meditation-based programs. Therefore, the purpose of this integrative review is to examine studies that have investigated meditation as an intervention for chronic pain, identify gaps in the literature, and make recommendations for further research.

  18. A review of HIV/AIDS system-level interventions

    PubMed Central

    Bauermeister, José A.; Tross, Susan; Ehrhardt, Anke A.

    2010-01-01

    The escalating HIV/AIDS epidemic worldwide demands that on-going prevention efforts be strengthened, disseminated, and scaled-up. System-level interventions refer to programs aiming to improve the functioning of an agency as well as the delivery of its services to the community. System-level interventions are a promising approach to HIV/AIDS prevention because they focus on (a) improving the agency’s ability to adopt evidence-based HIV prevention and care programs; (b) develop and establish policies and procedures that maximize the sustainability of on-going prevention and care efforts; and (c) improve decision-making processes such as incorporating the needs of communities into their tailored services. We reviewed studies focusing on system-level interventions by searching multiple electronic abstracting indices, including PsycInfo, PubMed, and ProQuest. Twenty-three studies out of 624 peer-reviewed studies (published from January 1985 to February 2007) met study criteria. Most of the studies focused on strengthening agency infrastructure, while other studies included collaborative partnerships and technical assistance programs. Our findings suggest that system-level interventions are promising in strengthening HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment efforts. Based on our findings, we propose recommendations for future work in developing and evaluating system-level interventions. PMID:18369722

  19. Psychological Interventions for Poor Oral Health: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Werner, H; Hakeberg, M; Dahlström, L; Eriksson, M; Sjögren, P; Strandell, A; Svanberg, T; Svensson, L; Wide Boman, U

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to study the effectiveness of psychological interventions in adults and adolescents with poor oral health. The review follows the PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews. The PICO format (population, intervention, comparison, and outcome) was used to define eligible studies. The populations were adults or adolescents (≥13 y of age and independent of others) with poor oral health (defined as dental caries, periodontal disease, and/or peri-implantitis). The interventions were psychological and/or behavioral models and theories, in comparison with traditional oral health education/information. The primary outcomes were dental caries, periodontitis, gingivitis, and peri-implantitis. Secondary outcomes were dental plaque, oral health-related behavior, health-related quality of life, health beliefs and attitudes, self-perceived oral health, and complications/risks. The systematic literature search identified 846 articles in December 2013 and 378 articles in July 2015. In total, 11 articles on 9 randomized controlled trials were found to meet the inclusion criteria. These reported on adults with periodontal disease, and several used motivational interviewing (MI) as their mode of intervention. The CONSORT guidelines and the GRADE approach were used for study appraisal and rating of evidence. The meta-analysis showed no statistically significant differences in gingivitis or plaque presence. In addition, a meta-analysis on MI compared with education/information found no statistically significant differences in gingivitis presence. Only 1 meta-analysis-on psychological interventions versus education/information regarding the plaque index-showed a small but statistically significant difference. There were also statistically significant differences reported in favor of psychological interventions in oral health behavior and self-efficacy in toothbrushing. However, the clinical relevance of these differences is

  20. Sexual health education interventions for young people: a methodological review.

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, A.; Fullerton, D.; Holland, J.; Arnold, S.; France-Dawson, M.; Kelley, P.; McGrellis, S.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To locate reports of sexual health education interventions for young people, assess the methodological quality of evaluations, identify the subgroup with a methodologically sound design, and assess the evidence with respect to the effectiveness of different approaches to promoting young people's sexual health. DESIGN--Survey of reports in English by means of electronic databases and hand searches for relevant studies conducted in the developed world since 1982. Papers were reviewed for eight methodological qualities. The evidence on effectiveness generated by studies meeting four core criteria was assessed. Judgments on effectiveness by reviewers and authors were compared. PAPERS--270 papers reporting sexual health interventions. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--The methodological quality of evaluations. RESULTS--73 reports of evaluations of sexual health interventions examining the effectiveness of these interventions in changing knowledge, attitudes, or behavioural outcomes were identified, of which 65 were separate outcome evaluations. Of these studies, 45 (69%) lacked random control groups, 44 (68%) failed to present preintervention and 38 (59%) postintervention data, and 26 (40%) omitted to discuss the relevance of loss of data caused by drop outs. Only 12 (18%) of the 65 outcome evaluations were judged to be methodologically sound. Academic reviewers were more likely than authors to judge studies as unclear because of design faults. Only two of the sound evaluations recorded interventions which were effective in showing an impact on young people's sexual behaviour. CONCLUSIONS--The design of evaluations in sexual health intervention needs to be improved so that reliable evidence of the effectiveness of different approaches to promoting young people's sexual health may be generated. PMID:7833754

  1. Educational interventions to improve prescribing competency: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kamarudin, Gritta; Penm, Jonathan; Chaar, Betty; Moles, Rebekah

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on educational interventions to improve prescribing and identify educational methods that improve prescribing competency in both medical and non-medical prescribers. Design A systematic review was conducted. The databases Medline, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA), EMBASE and CINAHL were searched for articles in English published between January 1990 and July 2013. Setting Primary and secondary care. Participants Medical and non-medical prescribers. Intervention Education-based interventions to aid improvement in prescribing competency. Primary outcome Improvements in prescribing competency (knows how) or performance (shows how) as defined by Miller's competency model. This was primarily demonstrated through prescribing examinations, changes in prescribing habits or adherence to guidelines. Results A total of 47 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the systematic review. Studies were categorised by their method of assessment, with 20 studies assessing prescribing competence and 27 assessing prescribing performance. A wide variety of educational interventions were employed, with different outcome measures and methods of assessments. In particular, six studies demonstrated that specific prescribing training using the WHO Guide to Good Prescribing increased prescribing competency in a wide variety of settings. Continuing medical education in the form of academic detailing and personalised prescriber feedback also yielded positive results. Only four studies evaluated educational interventions targeted at non-medical prescribers, highlighting that further research is needed in this area. Conclusions A broad range of educational interventions have been conducted to improve prescribing competency. The WHO Guide to Good Prescribing has the largest body of evidence to support its use and is a promising model for the design of targeted prescribing courses. There is a need for further development and evaluation

  2. Computer-tailored dietary behaviour change interventions: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Leonie M.; O'Hara, Blythe; Milat, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Improving dietary behaviours such as increasing fruit and vegetable consumption and reducing saturated fat intake are important in the promotion of better health. Computer tailoring has shown promise as a strategy to promote such behaviours. A narrative systematic review was conducted to describe the available evidence on ‘second’-generation computer-tailored primary prevention interventions for dietary behaviour change and to determine their effectiveness and key characteristics of success. Systematic literature searches were conducted through five databases: Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL and All EBM Reviews and by examining the reference lists of relevant articles to identify studies published in English from January 1996 to 2008. Randomized controlled trials or quasi-experimental designs with pre-test and post-test behavioural outcome data were included. A total of 13 articles were reviewed, describing the evaluation of 12 interventions, seven of which found significant positive effects of the computer-tailored interventions for dietary behaviour outcomes, one also for weight reduction outcomes. Although the evidence of short-term efficacy for computer-tailored dietary behaviour change interventions is fairly strong, the uncertainty lies in whether the reported effects are generalizable and sustained long term. Further research is required to address these limitations of the evidence. PMID:19286893

  3. Expressive writing interventions in cancer patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Merz, Erin L; Fox, Rina S; Malcarne, Vanessa L

    2014-01-01

    Decades of research have suggested that expressive writing produces physical and psychological benefits in controlled laboratory experiments among healthy college students. This work has been extended to clinical and medical populations, including cancer patients. Although expressive writing could be a promising and inexpensive intervention for this population, the effects have not been systematically examined in oncology samples. A systematic review using PRISMA guidelines was conducted for experimental trials of cancer patients who participated in an expressive writing intervention. PsycINFO and PubMed/Medline were searched for peer-reviewed studies. Thirteen articles met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Although the majority of the intervention effects were null, there were several main effects for expressive writing on sleep, pain, and general physical and psychological symptoms. Several moderators were identified, suggesting that expressive writing may be more or less beneficial based on individual characteristics such as social constraints. The reviewed studies were limited due to representativeness of the samples, performance, detection and patient-reported outcomes biases, and heterogeneity of the intervention protocol and writing prompts. Future studies with rigorous designs are needed to determine whether expressive writing is therapeutically effective in cancer patients.

  4. Family interventions in traumatized immigrants and refugees: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Ortal; de Jong, Joop T V M

    2015-12-01

    The importance of the family as a unit in the aftermath of trauma necessitates the use of family interventions among immigrants and refugees. While abundant clinical material suggests that family-based trauma interventions are applicable across cultures, very little is known about the extent to which family treatment modalities are effective for immigrants and refugees. We conducted a systematic review of intervention studies that have been designed or modified specifically for traumatized immigrant and refugee families. The terms "trauma," "family," and "immigrants/refugees/culture" were used along with different terms for "intervention." Studies with no research methodology were excluded. Only 6 experimental studies met our inclusion criteria; 4 of them describe school-based interventions and 2 present multifamily support groups. The shortage of research in this area does not allow clear conclusions about the effectiveness of family interventions for traumatized immigrants or refugees. The complexity of employing methodologically rigorous research in small communities is discussed. Future trials should go beyond the individualistic approach and focus on posttraumatic stress disorder to address family-level processes, such as family relationship, communication, and resilience.

  5. Challenges in the Ethical Review of Peer Support Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, David; Bunn, Christopher; Nakwagala, Fred; Safford, Monika M.; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Riddell, Michaela; Graffy, Jonathan; Fisher, Edwin B.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Ethical review processes have become increasingly complex. We have examined how 8 collaborating diabetes peer-support clinical trials were assessed by ethics committees. METHODS The ethical reviews from the 8 peer-support studies were collated and subjected to a thematic analysis. We mapped the recommendations of local Institutional Review Boards and ethics committees onto the “4+1 ethical framework” (autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice, along with concern for their scope of application). RESULTS Ethics committees did not consistently focus on tasks within the 4+1 framework: many conducted reviews of scientific, organizational, and administrative activities. Of the 20 themes identified across the ethical reviews, only 4 fell within the scope of the 4+1 framework. Variation in processes and requirements for ethics committees were particularly evident between study countries. Some of the consent processes mandated by ethical review boards were disproportionate for peer support, increased participant burden, and reduced the practicality of testing an ethical intervention. Across the 8 studies, ethics committees’ reviews included the required elements to ensure participant safety; however, they created a range of hurdles that in some cases delayed the research and required consent processes that could hinder the spontaneity and/or empathy of peer support. CONCLUSION Ethics committees should avoid repeating the work of other trusted agencies and consider the ethical validity of “light touch” consent procedures for peer-support interventions. The investigators propose an ethical framework for research on peer support. PMID:26304976

  6. Digital interventions to promote self-management in adults with hypertension systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Gary; Band, Rebecca; Saunderson, Kathryn; Hanlon, Peter; Murray, Elizabeth; Little, Paul; McManus, Richard J.; Yardley, Lucy; Mair, Frances S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To synthesize the evidence for using interactive digital interventions (IDIs) to support patient self-management of hypertension, and to determine their impact on control and reduction of blood pressure. Method: Systematic review with meta-analysis was undertaken with a search performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ERIC, Cochrane Library, DoPHER, TROPHI, Social Science Citation Index and Science Citation Index. The population was adults (>18 years) with hypertension, intervention was an IDI and the comparator was usual care. Primary outcomes were change in SBP and DBP. Only randomized controlled trials and studies published in journals and in English were eligible. Eligible IDIs included interventions accessed through a computer, smartphone or other hand-held device. Results: Four out of seven studies showed a significantly greater reduction for intervention compared to usual care for SBP, with no difference found for three. Overall, IDIs significantly reduced SBP, with the weighted mean difference being −3.74 mmHg [95% confidence interval (CI) −2.19 to −2.58] with no heterogeneity observed (I-squared = 0.0%, P = 0.990). For DBP, four out of six studies indicated a greater reduction for intervention compared to controls, with no difference found for two. For DBP, a significant reduction of −2.37 mmHg (95% CI −0.40 to −4.35) was found, but considerable heterogeneity was noted (I-squared = 80.1%, P = <0.001). Conclusion: IDIs lower both SBP and DBP compared to usual care. Results suggest these findings can be applied to a wide range of healthcare systems and populations. However, sustainability and long-term clinical effectiveness of these interventions remain uncertain. PMID:26845284

  7. The long-term outcomes of interventions for the management of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jack; Wales, Gill; Chalhoub, Nevyne; Harpin, Val

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To systematically identify and review the currently available evidence on the long-term outcomes of recommended attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) interventions following randomized controlled trials with children and young people. Method A systematic search was conducted to identify trials >1 year in length using the following databases: CINAHL (January 1982– July 2012), MEDLINE (Ovid and Cambridge Scientific Abstracts [CSA]), Psych info, Science Direct (Elsevier), and Cochrane Library. Hand searches of key journals in the subject, book chapters, and conference proceedings were also carried out. Relevant papers were critically appraised using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Results Eight controlled trials were identified as being relevant, of duration ranging from 1 year to 8 years (at follow up). The total number of participants in the studies was 1,057, of whom 579 (54.7%) were from one cohort and included 26 different outcome measures. Results suggest there is moderate-to-high-level evidence that combined pharmacological and behavioral interventions, and pharmacological interventions alone can be effective in managing the core ADHD symptoms and academic performance at 14 months. However, the effect size may decrease beyond this period. Conclusion This review has highlighted the paucity and limitations of the evidence investigating the long-term outcomes of recommended interventions for managing ADHD symptoms. There is little evidence to suggest that the effects observed over the relatively short term are maintained throughout longer periods of impairment. Furthermore, much of the existing evidence examining effectiveness beyond 12 months does not include newer medications currently available or consider significant contextual and cultural differences, such as UK/European and Asian populations. Longitudinal studies are required to examine the long-term outcomes for children and young people with ADHD managed with currently recommended

  8. Are There Benefits from Teaching Yoga at Schools? A Systematic Review of Randomized Control Trials of Yoga-Based Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Vorkapic, C.; Feitoza, J. M.; Marchioro, M.; Simões, J.; Kozasa, E.; Telles, S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Yoga is a holistic system of varied mind-body practices that can be used to improve mental and physical health and it has been utilized in a variety of contexts and situations. Educators and schools are looking to include yoga as a cost-effective, evidence-based component of urgently needed wellness programs for their students. Objectives. The primary goal of this study was to systematically examine the available literature for yoga interventions exclusively in school settings, exploring the evidence of yoga-based interventions on academic, cognitive, and psychosocial benefits. Methods. An extensive search was conducted for studies published between 1980 and October 31, 2014 (PubMed, PsycInfo, Embase, ISI, and the Cochrane Library). Effect size analysis, through standardized mean difference and Hedges'g, allowed for the comparison between experimental conditions. Results and Conclusions. Nine randomized control trials met criteria for inclusion in this review. Effect size was found for mood indicators, tension and anxiety in the POMS scale, self-esteem, and memory when the yoga groups were compared to control. Future research requires greater standardization and suitability of yoga interventions for children. PMID:26491461

  9. Are There Benefits from Teaching Yoga at Schools? A Systematic Review of Randomized Control Trials of Yoga-Based Interventions.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Vorkapic, C; Feitoza, J M; Marchioro, M; Simões, J; Kozasa, E; Telles, S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Yoga is a holistic system of varied mind-body practices that can be used to improve mental and physical health and it has been utilized in a variety of contexts and situations. Educators and schools are looking to include yoga as a cost-effective, evidence-based component of urgently needed wellness programs for their students. Objectives. The primary goal of this study was to systematically examine the available literature for yoga interventions exclusively in school settings, exploring the evidence of yoga-based interventions on academic, cognitive, and psychosocial benefits. Methods. An extensive search was conducted for studies published between 1980 and October 31, 2014 (PubMed, PsycInfo, Embase, ISI, and the Cochrane Library). Effect size analysis, through standardized mean difference and Hedges'g, allowed for the comparison between experimental conditions. Results and Conclusions. Nine randomized control trials met criteria for inclusion in this review. Effect size was found for mood indicators, tension and anxiety in the POMS scale, self-esteem, and memory when the yoga groups were compared to control. Future research requires greater standardization and suitability of yoga interventions for children. PMID:26491461

  10. [Workaholism - indications for diagnosis and review of interventions].

    PubMed

    Malinowska, Diana; Staszczyk, Sabina; Tokarz, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Due to numerous psychological and health costs, the issue of workaholism requires taking appropriate actions by relevant specialists, including occupational medicine services. This paper presents the criteria and indicators used to diagnose this phenomenon, as well as the review of literature that discusses interventions aimed at preventing workaholism and reducing risk factors, workaholism detection and treatment. The review included 17 scientific publications from the science database Academic Search Complete, which met the basic criterion: the presentation of an intervention aimed directly at reducing workaholism/work addiction, not its side effects. The results of the review indicate a variety of potential actions, including individual, family and organization, which can be directly used in the practice of occupational medicine services (doctors and inspectors of working conditions). In addition, the review can be used as a reference material for other users, such as therapists, coaches, trainers, and human resources (HR) professionals. The article discusses the problem of the important role of occupational medicine services in both the diagnosis and the inhibition of workaholism development. It also presents guidelines how to conduct and analyse the effectiveness of interventions. PMID:26016047

  11. Primary care-based educational interventions to decrease risk factors for metabolic syndrome for adults with major psychotic and/or affective disorders: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals with major psychotic and/or affective disorders are at increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome due to lifestyle- and treatment-related factors. Numerous pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions have been tested in inpatient and outpatient mental health settings to decrease these risk factors. This review focuses on primary care-based non-pharmacological (educational or behavioral) interventions to decrease metabolic syndrome risk factors in adults with major psychotic and/or affective disorders. Methods The authors conducted database searches of PsychINFO, MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, as well as manual searches and gray literature searches to identify included studies. Results The authors were unable to identify any studies meeting a priori inclusion criteria because there were no primary care-based studies. Conclusions This review was unable to demonstrate effectiveness of educational interventions in primary care. Interventions to decrease metabolic syndrome risk have been demonstrated to be effective in mental health and other outpatient settings. The prevalence of mental illness in primary care settings warrants similar interventions to improve health outcomes for this population. PMID:24369749

  12. Social influence in childhood obesity interventions: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jalali, M S; Sharafi-Avarzaman, Z; Rahmandad, H; Ammerman, A S

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the pathways through which social influence at the family level moderates the impact of childhood obesity interventions. We conducted a systematic review of obesity interventions in which parents' behaviours are targeted to change children's obesity outcomes, because of the potential social and environmental influence of parents on the nutrition and physical activity behaviours of children. PubMed (1966-2013) and the Web of Science (1900-2013) were searched, and 32 studies satisfied our inclusion criteria. Results for existing mechanisms that moderate parents' influence on children's behaviour are discussed, and a causal pathway diagram is developed to map out social influence mechanisms that affect childhood obesity. We provide health professionals and researchers with recommendations for leveraging family-based social influence mechanisms to increase the efficacy of obesity intervention programmes. © 2016 World Obesity. PMID:27138986

  13. Social influence in childhood obesity interventions: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jalali, M S; Sharafi-Avarzaman, Z; Rahmandad, H; Ammerman, A S

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the pathways through which social influence at the family level moderates the impact of childhood obesity interventions. We conducted a systematic review of obesity interventions in which parents' behaviours are targeted to change children's obesity outcomes, because of the potential social and environmental influence of parents on the nutrition and physical activity behaviours of children. PubMed (1966-2013) and the Web of Science (1900-2013) were searched, and 32 studies satisfied our inclusion criteria. Results for existing mechanisms that moderate parents' influence on children's behaviour are discussed, and a causal pathway diagram is developed to map out social influence mechanisms that affect childhood obesity. We provide health professionals and researchers with recommendations for leveraging family-based social influence mechanisms to increase the efficacy of obesity intervention programmes. © 2016 World Obesity.

  14. Development of an algorithm to provide awareness in choosing study designs for inclusion in systematic reviews of healthcare interventions: a method study

    PubMed Central

    Peinemann, Frank; Kleijnen, Jos

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To develop an algorithm that aims to provide guidance and awareness for choosing multiple study designs in systematic reviews of healthcare interventions. Design Method study: (1) To summarise the literature base on the topic. (2) To apply the integration of various study types in systematic reviews. (3) To devise decision points and outline a pragmatic decision tree. (4) To check the plausibility of the algorithm by backtracking its pathways in four systematic reviews. Results (1) The results of our systematic review of the published literature have already been published. (2) We recaptured the experience from our four previously conducted systematic reviews that required the integration of various study types. (3) We chose length of follow-up (long, short), frequency of events (rare, frequent) and types of outcome as decision points (death, disease, discomfort, disability, dissatisfaction) and aligned the study design labels according to the Cochrane Handbook. We also considered practical or ethical concerns, and the problem of unavailable high-quality evidence. While applying the algorithm, disease-specific circumstances and aims of interventions should be considered. (4) We confirmed the plausibility of the pathways of the algorithm. Conclusions We propose that the algorithm can assist to bring seminal features of a systematic review with multiple study designs to the attention of anyone who is planning to conduct a systematic review. It aims to increase awareness and we think that it may reduce the time burden on review authors and may contribute to the production of a higher quality review. PMID:26289450

  15. Systematic review of fibrinolytic-facilitated percutaneous coronary intervention: Potential benefits and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Afilalo, Jonathan; Roy, Arup Michael; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Facilitated percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is defined as the administration of fibrinolytic therapy and/or glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa inhibitors to minimize myocardial ischemia time while waiting for PCI. A pooled meta-analysis suggested that facilitated PCI was associated with higher rates of mortality and morbidity compared with nonfacilitated PCI. OBJECTIVE: The heterogeneous and complex trials of facilitated PCI were systematically reviewed to identify where this strategy may be beneficial and deserving of further research. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane database, the Internet and conference proceedings were searched to obtain relevant trials. Human studies that randomly assigned patients to fibrinolytic-facilitated PCI (administration of fibrinolytic therapy alone or in combination with GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors before angiography) versus nonfacilitated PCI were included. RESULTS: Nine trials encompassing 3836 patients were reviewed. The facilitated PCI strategy was fibrinolytic therapy alone in seven trials and half-dose fibrinolytic therapy plus GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors in two trials. In patients who had fibrinolysis less than 2 h after symptom onset (mainly in the prehospital setting) and/or slightly delayed PCI 3 h to 24 h after fibrinolysis, facilitated PCI was associated with the greatest Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) grade 3 flow and a trend toward reduced mortality. Overall, facilitated PCI was associated with increased intracranial hemorrhage and reinfarction. Combining half-dose fibrinolytic therapy and GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors reduced reinfarction but increased major bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: Facilitated PCI cannot be recommended outside of experimental protocols at this time. Further research should focus on selecting patients with higher benefit-to-risk ratios and performing prehospital fibrinolysis with optimal antiplatelet or antithrombin therapy, as well as slightly delayed PCI in patients who are stable or

  16. Infant Safe Sleep Interventions, 1990-2015: A Review.

    PubMed

    Salm Ward, Trina C; Balfour, Giselle M

    2016-02-01

    Sleep-related infant deaths remain a major public health issue. Multiple interventions have been implemented in efforts to increase adherence to safe sleep recommendations. We conducted a systematic review of the international research literature to synthesize research on interventions to reduce the risk of sleep-related deaths and their effectiveness in changing infant sleep practices. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar for peer-reviewed articles published between 1990 and 2015 which described an intervention and reported results. Twenty-nine articles were included for review. Studies focused on infant caregivers, health care professionals, peers, and child care professionals. Targeted behaviors included sleep position, location, removing items from the crib, breastfeeding, smoke exposure, clothing, pacifier use, and knowledge of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Most articles described multi-faceted interventions, including: one-on-one or group education, printed materials, visual displays, videos, and providing resources such as cribs, pacifiers, wearable blankets, and infant t-shirts. Two described public education campaigns, one used an educative questionnaire, and one encouraged maternal note taking. Health professional interventions included implementing safe sleep policies, in-service training, printed provider materials, eliciting agreement on a Declaration of Safe Sleep Practice, and sharing adherence data. Data collection methods included self-report via surveys and observational crib audits. Over half of the studies utilized comparison groups which helped determine effectiveness. Most articles reported some degree of success in changing some of the targeted behaviors; no studies reported complete adherence to recommendations. Future studies should incorporate rigorous evaluation plans, utilize comparison groups, and collect demographic and collect follow-up data.

  17. Interventions to Prevent Unintended and Repeat Pregnancy Among Young People in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review of the Published and Gray Literature.

    PubMed

    Hindin, Michelle J; Kalamar, Amanda M; Thompson, Terri-Ann; Upadhyay, Ushma D

    2016-09-01

    Adolescent pregnancy, particularly unintended pregnancy, can have lasting social, economic, and health outcomes. The objective of this review is to identify high-quality interventions and evaluations to decrease unintended and repeat pregnancy among young people in low- and middle-income countries. PubMed, Embase, PsycInfo, Cinahl Plus, Popline, and the Cochrane Databases were searched for all languages for articles published through November 2015. Gray literature was searched by hand. Reference tracing was utilized, as well as unpacking systematic reviews. Selected articles were those that were evaluated as having high-quality interventions and evaluations using standardized scoring. Twenty-one high-quality interventions and evaluations were abstracted. Nine reported statistically significant declines in pregnancy rates (five cash transfer programs, one education curriculum, two life-skills curricula, and a provision of contraception intervention), seven reported increases in contraceptive use (three provision of contraception interventions, two life-skills curricula, a peer education program, and a mass media campaign), two reported decreases in sexual activity (a cash transfer program and an education and life-skills curriculum), and two reported an increase in age of sexual debut (both cash transfer programs). The selected high quality, effective interventions included in this review can inform researchers, donors, and policy makers about where to make strategic investments to decrease unintended pregnancy during young adulthood. Additionally, this review can assist with avoiding investments in interventions that failed to produce significant impact on the intended outcomes. The diversity of successful high-quality interventions, implemented in a range of venues, with a diversity of young people, suggests that there are multiple strategies that can work to prevent unintended pregnancy. PMID:27562452

  18. Interventions for Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity Behaviors in Adult African American Populations: A Systematic Review, January 2000 Through December 2011

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Brittny A.; Ilich, Jasminka Z.; Ralston, Penny A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of preventable chronic diseases is disproportionally high among African Americans and could be reduced through diet and physical activity interventions. Our objective was to systematically review the literature on clinical outcomes of diet and physical activity interventions conducted among adult African American populations in the United States. Methods We used the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta Analysis construct in our review. We searched Medline (PubMed and Ovid), Cochrane, and DARE databases and restricted our search to articles published in English from January 2000 through December 2011. We included studies of educational interventions with clinically relevant outcomes and excluded studies that dealt with nonadult populations or populations with pre-existing catabolic or other complicated disorders, that did not focus on African Americans, that provided no quantitative baseline or follow-up data, or that included no diet or physical activity education or intervention. We report retention and attendance rates, study setting, program sustainability, behavior theory, and education components. Results Nineteen studies were eligible for closer analysis. These studies described interventions for improving diet or physical activity as indicators of health promotion and disease prevention and that reported significant improvement in clinical outcomes. Conclusion Our review suggests that nutrition and physical activity educational interventions can be successful in improving clinically relevant outcomes among African Americans in the United States. Further research is needed to study the cost and sustainability of lifestyle interventions. Further studies should also include serum biochemical parameters to substantiate more specifically the effect of interventions on preventing chronic disease and reducing its incidence and prevalence. PMID:23786910

  19. Interventions to Prevent Unintended and Repeat Pregnancy Among Young People in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review of the Published and Gray Literature.

    PubMed

    Hindin, Michelle J; Kalamar, Amanda M; Thompson, Terri-Ann; Upadhyay, Ushma D

    2016-09-01

    Adolescent pregnancy, particularly unintended pregnancy, can have lasting social, economic, and health outcomes. The objective of this review is to identify high-quality interventions and evaluations to decrease unintended and repeat pregnancy among young people in low- and middle-income countries. PubMed, Embase, PsycInfo, Cinahl Plus, Popline, and the Cochrane Databases were searched for all languages for articles published through November 2015. Gray literature was searched by hand. Reference tracing was utilized, as well as unpacking systematic reviews. Selected articles were those that were evaluated as having high-quality interventions and evaluations using standardized scoring. Twenty-one high-quality interventions and evaluations were abstracted. Nine reported statistically significant declines in pregnancy rates (five cash transfer programs, one education curriculum, two life-skills curricula, and a provision of contraception intervention), seven reported increases in contraceptive use (three provision of contraception interventions, two life-skills curricula, a peer education program, and a mass media campaign), two reported decreases in sexual activity (a cash transfer program and an education and life-skills curriculum), and two reported an increase in age of sexual debut (both cash transfer programs). The selected high quality, effective interventions included in this review can inform researchers, donors, and policy makers about where to make strategic investments to decrease unintended pregnancy during young adulthood. Additionally, this review can assist with avoiding investments in interventions that failed to produce significant impact on the intended outcomes. The diversity of successful high-quality interventions, implemented in a range of venues, with a diversity of young people, suggests that there are multiple strategies that can work to prevent unintended pregnancy.

  20. Diabetes Prevention Interventions in Latin American Countries: a Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Heisler, Michele; Kaselitz, Elizabeth; Rana, Gurpreet K; Piette, John D

    2016-09-01

    Public policies, population health initiatives, and targeted behavioral change interventions for individuals at risk for developing diabetes are all essential for diabetes prevention in Latin American countries (LACs). This scoping review examines (1) the current evidence on diabetes prevention policies and interventions in LACs to identify components of effective diabetes prevention models in those countries and (2) effective diabetes prevention interventions targeting Latino populations in the USA to explore possible lessons from these interventions for LACs. Diabetes prevention programs in LACs evaluated to date consist of short-term health professional-led face-to-face behavioral counseling sessions. Intervention components of US-based programs for Latinos that might benefit diabetes prevention programs in Latin America include (1) deployment of community health workers ("promotoras") for diabetes screening and delivery of lifestyle modification programs, (2) multiple modes of program delivery beyond face-to-face sessions, (3) information technology to automate and enhance program delivery, (4) leveraging of pre-existing familial relationships to engage in and sustain lifestyle modifications, and (5) innovative environmental change strategies such as collaborations with local food stores and markets to promote healthy behaviors. PMID:27424069

  1. Diabetes Prevention Interventions in Latin American Countries: a Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Heisler, Michele; Kaselitz, Elizabeth; Rana, Gurpreet K; Piette, John D

    2016-09-01

    Public policies, population health initiatives, and targeted behavioral change interventions for individuals at risk for developing diabetes are all essential for diabetes prevention in Latin American countries (LACs). This scoping review examines (1) the current evidence on diabetes prevention policies and interventions in LACs to identify components of effective diabetes prevention models in those countries and (2) effective diabetes prevention interventions targeting Latino populations in the USA to explore possible lessons from these interventions for LACs. Diabetes prevention programs in LACs evaluated to date consist of short-term health professional-led face-to-face behavioral counseling sessions. Intervention components of US-based programs for Latinos that might benefit diabetes prevention programs in Latin America include (1) deployment of community health workers ("promotoras") for diabetes screening and delivery of lifestyle modification programs, (2) multiple modes of program delivery beyond face-to-face sessions, (3) information technology to automate and enhance program delivery, (4) leveraging of pre-existing familial relationships to engage in and sustain lifestyle modifications, and (5) innovative environmental change strategies such as collaborations with local food stores and markets to promote healthy behaviors.

  2. Effects of Mindfulness-Based Interventions on Salivary Cortisol in Healthy Adults: A Meta-Analytical Review

    PubMed Central

    Sanada, Kenji; Montero-Marin, Jesus; Alda Díez, Marta; Salas-Valero, Montserrat; Pérez-Yus, María C.; Morillo, Héctor; Demarzo, Marcelo M. P.; García-Toro, Mauro; García-Campayo, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to elucidate the effects of Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) on salivary cortisol levels in healthy adult populations. Method: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), published between January 1980 and June 2015 in PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO and the Cochrane library. The PRISMA and Cochrane guidelines were followed. The pooled effect sizes were calculated with the random-effects model, using Hedges' g-values, and heterogeneity was measured using the I2 statistic. The contribution of different characteristics of participants and programmes were assessed by meta-regression models, using beta coefficients. Results: Five RCTs with 190 participants in total were included in this systematic review. The overall effect size (ES) for improving the state of health related to cortisol levels was moderately low (g = 0.41; p = 0.025), although moderate heterogeneity was found (I2 = 55; p = 0.063). There were no significant differences between active (g = 0.33; p = 0.202) and passive (g = 0.48; p = 0.279) controls, but significant differences were found when comparing standard (g = 0.81; p = 0.002) and raw (g = 0.03; p = 0.896) measures. The percentage of women in each study was not related to ES. Nevertheless, age (beta = −0.03; p = 0.039), the number of sessions (beta = 0.33; p = 0.007) and the total hours of the MBI (beta = 0.06; p = 0.005) were significantly related to ES, explaining heterogeneity (R2 = 1.00). Conclusions: Despite the scarce number of studies, our results suggest that MBIs might have some beneficial effect on cortisol secretion in healthy adult subjects. However, there is a need for further RCTs implemented in accordance with standard programmes and measurements of salivary cortisol under rigorous strategies in healthy adult populations. PMID:27807420

  3. Effects of Home Telemonitoring Interventions on Patients With Chronic Heart Failure: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Paré, Guy; Jaana, Mirou

    2015-01-01

    Background Growing interest on the effects of home telemonitoring on patients with chronic heart failure (HF) has led to a rise in the number of systematic reviews addressing the same or very similar research questions with a concomitant increase in discordant findings. Differences in the scope, methods of analysis, and methodological quality of systematic reviews can cause great confusion and make it difficult for policy makers and clinicians to access and interpret the available evidence and for researchers to know where knowledge gaps in the extant literature exist. Objective This overview aims to collect, appraise, and synthesize existing evidence from multiple systematic reviews on the effectiveness of home telemonitoring interventions for patients with chronic heart failure (HF) to inform policy makers, practitioners, and researchers. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed on MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library to identify all relevant, peer-reviewed systematic reviews published between January 1996 and December 2013. Reviews were searched and screened using explicit keywords and inclusion criteria. Standardized forms were used to extract data and the methodological quality of included reviews was appraised using the AMSTAR (assessing methodological quality of systematic reviews) instrument. Summary of findings tables were constructed for all primary outcomes of interest, and quality of evidence was graded by outcome using the GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) system. Post-hoc analysis and subgroup meta-analyses were conducted to gain further insights into the various types of home telemonitoring technologies included in the systematic reviews and the impact of these technologies on clinical outcomes. Results A total of 15 reviews published between 2003 and 2013 were selected for meta-level synthesis. Evidence from high-quality reviews with meta-analysis indicated that taken collectively

  4. The Effect of Smartphone Interventions on Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alwashmi, Meshari; Davis, Erin; Marra, Carlo; Gamble, John-Michael; Abu Ashour, Waseem

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence and mortality rates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are increasing worldwide. Therefore, COPD remains a major public health problem. There is a growing interest in the use of smartphone technology for health promotion and disease management interventions. However, the effectiveness of smartphones in reducing the number of patients having a COPD exacerbation is poorly understood. Objective To summarize and quantify the association between smartphone interventions and COPD exacerbations through a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods A comprehensive search strategy was conducted across relevant databases (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, CINHA, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library Medline) from inception to October 2015. We included studies that assessed the use of smartphone interventions in the reduction of COPD exacerbations compared with usual care. Full-text studies were excluded if the investigators did not use a smartphone device or did not report on COPD exacerbations. Observational studies, abstracts, and reviews were also excluded. Two reviewers extracted the data and conducted a risk of bias assessment using the US Preventive Services Task Force quality rating criteria. A random effects model was used to meta-analyze the results from included studies. Pooled odds ratios were used to measure the effectiveness of smartphone interventions on COPD exacerbations. Heterogeneity was measured using the I2statistic. Results Of the 245 unique citations screened, 6 studies were included in the qualitative synthesis. Studies were relatively small with less than 100 participants in each study (range 30 to 99) and follow-up ranged from 4-9 months. The mean age was 70.5 years (SD 5.6) and 74% (281/380) were male. The studies varied in terms of country, type of smartphone intervention, frequency of data collection from the participants, and the feedback strategy. Three studies were included in the meta-analysis. The

  5. Seclusion theory reviewed--a benevolent or malevolent intervention?

    PubMed

    Mason, T

    1993-04-01

    The Special Hospital Service Authority for England and Wales undertook an extensive international literature review on seclusion as a basis for a proposed extended research project on seclusion in the Special Hospital system. The review highlighted the theoretical foundations of seclusion to be based on therapy, containment or punishment; however, there appeared little work carried out in examining the underlying attitude to these central themes. It was suggested that a further level of analysis, by measuring these attitudes along a benevolent-malevolent scale, may prove helpful in advancing our conceptual understanding of the role seclusion plays as a psychiatric intervention.

  6. Microenterprise development interventions for sexual risk reduction: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cui, Rosa R; Lee, Ramon; Thirumurthy, Harsha; Muessig, Kathryn E; Tucker, Joseph D

    2013-11-01

    Comprehensive interventions that address both individual and structural determinants associated with HIV/STI risk are gaining increasing attention over the past decade. Microenterprise development offers an appealing model for HIV prevention by addressing poverty and gender equality. This study systematically reviewed the effects of microenterprise development interventions on HIV/STI incidence and sexual risk behaviors. Microenterprise development was defined as developing small business capacity among individuals to alleviate poverty. Seven eligible research studies representing five interventions were identified and included in this review. All of the studies targeted women, and three focused on sex workers. None measured biomarker outcomes. All three sex worker studies showed significant reduction in sexual risk behaviors when compared to the control group. Non-sex worker studies showed limited changes in sexual risk behavior. This review indicates the potential utility of microenterprise development in HIV risk reduction programs. More research is needed to determine how microenterprise development can be effectively incorporated in comprehensive HIV control strategies. PMID:23963497

  7. Microenterprise Development Interventions for Sexual Risk Reduction: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ramon; Thirumurthy, Harsha; Muessig, Kathryn E.; Tucker, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive interventions that address both individual and structural determinants associated with HIV/STI risk are gaining increasing attention over the past decade. Microenterprise development offers an appealing model for HIV prevention by addressing poverty and gender equality. This study systematically reviewed the effects of microenterprise development interventions on HIV/STI incidence and sexual risk behaviors. Microenterprise development was defined as developing small business capacity among individuals to alleviate poverty. Seven eligible research studies representing five interventions were identified and included in this review. All of the studies targeted women, and three focused on sex workers. None measured biomarker outcomes. All three sex worker studies showed significant reduction in sexual risk behaviors when compared to the control group. Non-sex worker studies showed limited changes in sexual risk behavior. This review indicates the potential utility of microenterprise development in HIV risk reduction programs. More research is needed to determine how microenterprise development can be effectively incorporated in comprehensive HIV control strategies. PMID:23963497

  8. Barriers to the acceptance of electronic medical records by physicians from systematic review to taxonomy and interventions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The main objective of this research is to identify, categorize, and analyze barriers perceived by physicians to the adoption of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) in order to provide implementers with beneficial intervention options. Methods A systematic literature review, based on research papers from 1998 to 2009, concerning barriers to the acceptance of EMRs by physicians was conducted. Four databases, "Science", "EBSCO", "PubMed" and "The Cochrane Library", were used in the literature search. Studies were included in the analysis if they reported on physicians' perceived barriers to implementing and using electronic medical records. Electronic medical records are defined as computerized medical information systems that collect, store and display patient information. Results The study includes twenty-two articles that have considered barriers to EMR as perceived by physicians. Eight main categories of barriers, including a total of 31 sub-categories, were identified. These eight categories are: A) Financial, B) Technical, C) Time, D) Psychological, E) Social, F) Legal, G) Organizational, and H) Change Process. All these categories are interrelated with each other. In particular, Categories G (Organizational) and H (Change Process) seem to be mediating factors on other barriers. By adopting a change management perspective, we develop some barrier-related interventions that could overcome the identified barriers. Conclusions Despite the positive effects of EMR usage in medical practices, the adoption rate of such systems is still low and meets resistance from physicians. This systematic review reveals that physicians may face a range of barriers when they approach EMR implementation. We conclude that the process of EMR implementation should be treated as a change project, and led by implementers or change managers, in medical practices. The quality of change management plays an important role in the success of EMR implementation. The barriers and

  9. Interventions to combat or prevent drug counterfeiting: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    El-Jardali, Fadi; Akl, Elie A; Fadlallah, Racha; Oliver, Sandy; Saleh, Nadine; El-Bawab, Lamya; Rizk, Rana; Farha, Aida; Hamra, Rasha

    2015-01-01

    Objective Drug counterfeiting has serious public health and safety implications. The objective of this study was to systematically review the evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to combat or prevent drug counterfeiting. Data sources We searched multiple electronic databases and the grey literature up to March 2014. Two reviewers completed, in duplicate and independently, the study selection, data abstraction and risk of bias assessment. Study eligibility criteria, participants and interventions We included randomised trials, non-randomised studies, and case studies examining any intervention at the health system-level to combat or prevent drug counterfeiting. Outcomes of interest included changes in failure rates of tested drugs and changes in prevalence of counterfeit medicines. We excluded studies that focused exclusively on substandard, degraded or expired drugs, or that focused on medication errors. Appraisal and synthesis We assessed the risk of bias in each included study. We reported the results narratively and, where applicable, we conducted meta-analyses. Results We included 21 studies representing 25 units of analysis. Overall, we found low quality evidence suggesting positive effects of drug registration (OR=0.23; 95% CI 0.08 to 0.67), and WHO-prequalification of drugs (OR=0.06; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.35) in reducing the prevalence of counterfeit and substandard drugs. Low quality evidence suggests that licensing of drug outlets is probably ineffective (OR=0.66; 95% CI 0.41 to 1.05). For multifaceted interventions (including a mix of regulations, training of inspectors, public-private collaborations and legal actions), low quality evidence suggest they may be effective. The single RCT provided moderate quality evidence of no effect of ‘two extra inspections’ in improving drug quality. Conclusions Policymakers and stakeholders would benefit from registration and WHO-prequalification of drugs and may also consider multifaceted interventions

  10. Acceptance- and mindfulness-based interventions for the treatment of chronic pain: a meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Veehof, M M; Trompetter, H R; Bohlmeijer, E T; Schreurs, K M G

    2016-01-01

    The number of acceptance- and mindfulness-based interventions for chronic pain, such as acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), increased in recent years. Therefore an update is warranted of our former systematic review and meta-analysis of studies that reported effects on the mental and physical health of chronic pain patients. Pubmed, EMBASE, PsycInfo and Cochrane were searched for eligible studies. Current meta-analysis only included randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Studies were rated for quality. Mean quality did not improve in recent years. Pooled standardized mean differences using the random-effect model were calculated to represent the average intervention effect and, to perform subgroup analyses. Outcome measures were pain intensity, depression, anxiety, pain interference, disability and quality of life. Included were twenty-five RCTs totaling 1285 patients with chronic pain, in which we compared acceptance- and mindfulness-based interventions to the waitlist, (medical) treatment-as-usual, and education or support control groups. Effect sizes ranged from small (on all outcome measures except anxiety and pain interference) to moderate (on anxiety and pain interference) at post-treatment and from small (on pain intensity and disability) to large (on pain interference) at follow-up. ACT showed significantly higher effects on depression and anxiety than MBSR and MBCT. Studies' quality, attrition rate, type of pain and control group, did not moderate the effects of acceptance- and mindfulness-based interventions. Current acceptance- and mindfulness-based interventions, while not superior to traditional cognitive behavioral treatments, can be good alternatives. PMID:26818413

  11. Acceptance- and mindfulness-based interventions for the treatment of chronic pain: a meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Veehof, M M; Trompetter, H R; Bohlmeijer, E T; Schreurs, K M G

    2016-01-01

    The number of acceptance- and mindfulness-based interventions for chronic pain, such as acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), increased in recent years. Therefore an update is warranted of our former systematic review and meta-analysis of studies that reported effects on the mental and physical health of chronic pain patients. Pubmed, EMBASE, PsycInfo and Cochrane were searched for eligible studies. Current meta-analysis only included randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Studies were rated for quality. Mean quality did not improve in recent years. Pooled standardized mean differences using the random-effect model were calculated to represent the average intervention effect and, to perform subgroup analyses. Outcome measures were pain intensity, depression, anxiety, pain interference, disability and quality of life. Included were twenty-five RCTs totaling 1285 patients with chronic pain, in which we compared acceptance- and mindfulness-based interventions to the waitlist, (medical) treatment-as-usual, and education or support control groups. Effect sizes ranged from small (on all outcome measures except anxiety and pain interference) to moderate (on anxiety and pain interference) at post-treatment and from small (on pain intensity and disability) to large (on pain interference) at follow-up. ACT showed significantly higher effects on depression and anxiety than MBSR and MBCT. Studies' quality, attrition rate, type of pain and control group, did not moderate the effects of acceptance- and mindfulness-based interventions. Current acceptance- and mindfulness-based interventions, while not superior to traditional cognitive behavioral treatments, can be good alternatives.

  12. A Scoping Review of Interventions to Supplement Spoken Communication for Children with Limited Speech or Language Skills

    PubMed Central

    Costantino, Maria Antonella; Bonati, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Background Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) is used for treating children with severe disorders of speech-language production and/or comprehension. Various strategies are used, but research and debate on their efficacy have remained limited to a specific area and have rarely reached the general medical community. Objective To systematically evaluate outcomes of AAC interventions in children with limited speech or language skills. Methods Searches were conducted (up to December 2012) in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, DARE, and Cochrane Library databases. Furthermore, relevant journals were searched by hand. References from identified studies were examined. Only RCTs were considered. Trial quality was assessed according to a standardized and validated set of criteria. Results Fourteen of 1661 retrieved papers met inclusion criteria. A total of 666 children were included in the review and 7 papers involved only children <5 years old. Papers were of average quality and all but one had been published during the previous 10 years by one of 8 research groups, 5 of which from the United States. Seven studies directly addressed AAC use by children with different disabilities. Seven studies enrolled typically developing children: 5 evaluated the use of AAC technologies by children without disabilities in order to obtain results that could be used to improve interventions in peers with disabilities, and 2 evaluated peers’ attitudes towards children who used AAC. Both interventions and outcome measures varied widely between studies. Overall findings demonstrate the effectiveness of the AAC interventions considered, but the focus on RCTs alone appears too restrictive. Conclusions Solid evidence of the positive effects of AAC interventions in children with severe communication disorders must be generated, and different methods are needed besides RCTs. Moreover, it is important that knowledge, research, and debate extend to the medical community in order

  13. Efficacy of interventions for prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyoseung; Jo, Seong Jin; Kim, Do Hun; Kwon, Ohsang; Myung, Seung-Kwon

    2015-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is a highly distressing event for cancer patients, and hence, we here aimed to assess the efficacy of various interventions in the prevention of CIA. We searched PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library, from June 20, 2013 through August 31, 2013. Two of the authors independently reviewed and selected clinical trials that reported the efficacy of any intervention for prevention of CIA compared with that of controls. Two authors extracted data independently on dichotomized outcome in terms of CIA occurrence. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidential intervals (CIs) were calculated for efficacy of CIA prevention by using random-effect or fixed-effect models. Out of 691 articles retrieved, a total of eight randomized controlled trials and nine controlled clinical trials involving 1,098 participants (616 interventions and 482 controls), were included in the final analyses. Scalp cooling, scalp compression, a combination of cooling and compression, topical minoxidil and Panicum miliaceum were used as interventions. The participants were mainly breast cancer patients receiving doxorubicin- or epirubicin-containing chemotherapy. Scalp cooling, which is the most popular preventive method, significantly reduced the risk of CIA (RR = 0.38, 95% CI = 0.32-0.45), whereas topical 2% minoxidil and other interventions did not significantly reduce the risk of CIA. No serious adverse effects associated with scalp cooling were reported. Our results suggest that scalp cooling can prevent CIA in patients receiving chemotherapy. However, the long-term safety of scalp cooling should be confirmed in further studies. PMID:25081068

  14. Cochrane corner: is integrated disease management for patients with COPD effective?

    PubMed Central

    Kruis, Annemarije L; Smidt, Nynke; Assendelft, Willem J J; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Boland, Melinde R S; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen; Chavannes, Niels H

    2014-01-01

    Patients with COPD experience respiratory symptoms, impairments of daily living and recurrent exacerbations. The aim of integrated disease management (IDM) is to establish a programme of different components of care (ie, self-management, exercise, nutrition) in which several healthcare providers (ie, nurses, general practitioners, physiotherapists, pulmonologists) collaborate to provide efficient and good quality of care. The aim of this Cochrane systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of IDM on quality of life, exercise tolerance and exacerbation related outcomes. Searches for all available evidence were carried out in various databases. Included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) consisted of interventions with multidisciplinary (≥2 healthcare providers) and multitreatment (≥2 components) IDM interventions with duration of at least 3 months. Two reviewers independently searched, assessed and extracted data of all RCTs. A total of 26 RCTs were included, involving 2997 patients from 11 different countries with a follow-up varying from 3 to 24 months. In all 68% of the patients were men, with a mean age of 68 years and a mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) predicted value of 44.3%. Patients treated with an IDM programme improved significantly on quality of life scores and reported a clinically relevant improvement of 44 m on 6 min walking distance, compared to controls. Furthermore, the number of patients with ≥1 respiratory related hospital admission reduced from 27 to 20 per 100 patients. Duration of hospitalisation decreased significantly by nearly 4 days. PMID:24415716

  15. Cochrane corner: is integrated disease management for patients with COPD effective?

    PubMed

    Kruis, Annemarije L; Smidt, Nynke; Assendelft, Willem J J; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Boland, Melinde R S; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen; Chavannes, Niels H

    2014-11-01

    Patients with COPD experience respiratory symptoms, impairments of daily living and recurrent exacerbations. The aim of integrated disease management (IDM) is to establish a programme of different components of care (ie, self-management, exercise, nutrition) in which several healthcare providers (ie, nurses, general practitioners, physiotherapists, pulmonologists) collaborate to provide efficient and good quality of care. The aim of this Cochrane systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of IDM on quality of life, exercise tolerance and exacerbation related outcomes. Searches for all available evidence were carried out in various databases. Included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) consisted of interventions with multidisciplinary (≥2 healthcare providers) and multitreatment (≥2 components) IDM interventions with duration of at least 3 months. Two reviewers independently searched, assessed and extracted data of all RCTs. A total of 26 RCTs were included, involving 2997 patients from 11 different countries with a follow-up varying from 3 to 24 months. In all 68% of the patients were men, with a mean age of 68 years and a mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) predicted value of 44.3%. Patients treated with an IDM programme improved significantly on quality of life scores and reported a clinically relevant improvement of 44 m on 6 min walking distance, compared to controls. Furthermore, the number of patients with ≥1 respiratory related hospital admission reduced from 27 to 20 per 100 patients. Duration of hospitalisation decreased significantly by nearly 4 days.

  16. [News from the Cochrane Library: probiotics for the prevention of paediatric antibiotic-associated diarrhoea].

    PubMed

    Meerpohl, J J; Timmer, A

    2007-08-01

    Based on a meta-analysis published in 2006 on the prevention of paediatric antibiotic-associated diarrhoea with probiotics a Cochrane review by the same authors has been released within the current edition of the Cochrane Library (Issue 2, 2007). The per protocol analysis showed a relative risk for the incidence of AAD of 0.49 (0.32; 0.74). These findings could not be confirmed by the intention to treat analysis. These data are promising, but future studies will be necessary to clarify the role of probiotics for the prevention of AAD.

  17. Effects of School-Based Educational Interventions for Enhancing Adolescents Abilities in Critical Appraisal of Health Claims: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Espehaug, Birgitte; Guttersrud, Øystein; Flottorp, Signe

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Adolescents are frequent media users who access health claims from various sources. The plethora of conflicting, pseudo-scientific, and often misleading health claims in popular media makes critical appraisal of health claims an essential ability. Schools play an important role in educating youth to critically appraise health claims. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effects of school-based educational interventions for enhancing adolescents’ abilities in critically appraising health claims. Methods We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, AMED, Cinahl, Teachers Reference Centre, LISTA, ERIC, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, The Cochrane Library, Science Citation Index Expanded, Social Sciences Citation Index, and sources of grey literature. Studies that evaluated school-based educational interventions to improve adolescents’ critical appraisal ability for health claims through advancing the students’ knowledge about science were included. Eligible study designs were randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, and interrupted time series. Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias in included studies. Due to heterogeneity in interventions and inadequate reporting of results, we performed a descriptive synthesis of studies. We used GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) to assess the certainty of the evidence. Results Eight studies were included: two compared different teaching modalities, while the others compared educational interventions to instruction as usual. Studies mostly reported positive short-term effects on critical appraisal-related knowledge and skills in favour of the educational interventions. However, the certainty of the evidence for all comparisons and outcomes was very low. Conclusion Educational interventions in schools may have beneficial short-term effects on knowledge and skills relevant

  18. Yakson touch as a part of early intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A systematic narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Parashar, Preeti; Samuel, Asir John; Bansal, Arpna; Aranka, Vencita Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Yakson is a Korean therapeutic touch given to neonates and infants by caressing their abdomen with one hand while the other hand is placed on the back of the neonate\\infant either to relieve their pain or to calm them down. It was traditionally used by Koreans by caressing the aching body part of their children with a belief that it would relieve their pain. In spite of clinical evidence of its usefulness, there is limited literature available on Yakson touch. A systematic narrative review (SNR) was undertaken on studies that were carried out on the effectiveness of Yakson touch on infants and neonates. Only seven studies were detected from five major electronic databases, searched with the keywords: “Yakson,“ “Yakson touch,” and “Yakson in neonates”. One of the studies has been included in two Cochrane reviews by the same group of researchers published in 2011 and 2015, respectively, and also in a literature review. The evidence from these articles suggests that Yakson touch is able to increase the sleep scores of infants, affects their behavioral response, decreases the stress levels, increases maternal attachment, and has calming effects on them. However, the number of studies is limited, and thus the efficacy of this intervention has not been sufficiently established. Hence, there is a definite need for future studies to prove the efficacy of Yakson to include it in the early intervention programs. This SNR is aimed at compiling the studies which determined to prove the efficacy of the intervention of Yakson. PMID:27390459

  19. Obesity management interventions: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Yaskin, Joseph; Toner, Richard W; Goldfarb, Neil

    2009-12-01

    The burden of disease associated with the obesity epidemic shortens lives, and prevalence is accelerating. As with other chronic diseases, improved outcomes are associated with effective self-management of obesity across the life span. The disease of obesity, then, fits squarely within the disease management and chronic care models. This article reviews selected interventions, described in peer-reviewed literature, designed to achieve significant weight loss for individuals identified as overweight or obese. The study objective is to provide an overview of the full range of methods and models for weight loss, including some available without medical supervision. The intended audience includes individuals and organizations with an expressed interest in disease management and the chronic care models. Our review identified promising lines of investigation for future research that span diverse medical disciplines applied to obesity. The quality of the studies included in our review was uneven, and compromises the current evidence for effectiveness and efficacy. Generally, our results showed that combination approaches-surgical or pharmacologic, combined with a behavioral intervention-were most likely to be effective.

  20. Psychological Interventions for Poor Oral Health: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Werner, H; Hakeberg, M; Dahlström, L; Eriksson, M; Sjögren, P; Strandell, A; Svanberg, T; Svensson, L; Wide Boman, U

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to study the effectiveness of psychological interventions in adults and adolescents with poor oral health. The review follows the PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews. The PICO format (population, intervention, comparison, and outcome) was used to define eligible studies. The populations were adults or adolescents (≥13 y of age and independent of others) with poor oral health (defined as dental caries, periodontal disease, and/or peri-implantitis). The interventions were psychological and/or behavioral models and theories, in comparison with traditional oral health education/information. The primary outcomes were dental caries, periodontitis, gingivitis, and peri-implantitis. Secondary outcomes were dental plaque, oral health-related behavior, health-related quality of life, health beliefs and attitudes, self-perceived oral health, and complications/risks. The systematic literature search identified 846 articles in December 2013 and 378 articles in July 2015. In total, 11 articles on 9 randomized controlled trials were found to meet the inclusion criteria. These reported on adults with periodontal disease, and several used motivational interviewing (MI) as their mode of intervention. The CONSORT guidelines and the GRADE approach were used for study appraisal and rating of evidence. The meta-analysis showed no statistically significant differences in gingivitis or plaque presence. In addition, a meta-analysis on MI compared with education/information found no statistically significant differences in gingivitis presence. Only 1 meta-analysis-on psychological interventions versus education/information regarding the plaque index-showed a small but statistically significant difference. There were also statistically significant differences reported in favor of psychological interventions in oral health behavior and self-efficacy in toothbrushing. However, the clinical relevance of these differences is

  1. Body Image Change in Obese and Overweight Persons Enrolled in Weight Loss Intervention Programs: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Hai-Lun

    2015-01-01

    To report the results of a systematic review and meta-analysis examining whether weight loss interventions improve body image in obese/overweight individuals. Medline, Current Contents, and the Cochrane database were searched to identify studies involving obese/overweight adults who were enrolled in weight loss interventions in which body image was quantitatively assessed. Outcomes assessed were changes in body shape concern, body size dissatisfaction, and body satisfaction (intervention vs comparator/control group). Seven studies were included in the systematic review (4 in the meta-analysis). All but 1 study involved female participants only. The type of weight loss intervention varied between studies as did the type of control/comparator group. In 3 studies, there was no significant difference in body image outcomes, whereas in 4 studies, improvement in body image was significantly more pronounced in the intervention vs the control/comparator group. Meta-analysis revealed that improvements in body shape concern (standardized difference: -0.52; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -1.04 to 0.00), body size dissatisfaction (standardized difference: -0.66; 95% CI: -0.88 to -0.45), and body satisfaction (standardized difference: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.09 to 1.38) significantly favored the intervention over the comparator/control group (P<0.05). The results of this systematic review/meta-analysis lend support to the notion that weight loss interventions may improve body image. This is a noteworthy finding that has clear clinical applicability because body image affects psychological well-being and the ability of an individual to maintain weight loss. Future research should determine which weigh loss interventions are associated with optimal improvements in body image and maintenance of weight loss. PMID:25946138

  2. Body image change in obese and overweight persons enrolled in weight loss intervention programs: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hai-Lun

    2015-01-01

    To report the results of a systematic review and meta-analysis examining whether weight loss interventions improve body image in obese/overweight individuals. Medline, Current Contents, and the Cochrane database were searched to identify studies involving obese/overweight adults who were enrolled in weight loss interventions in which body image was quantitatively assessed. Outcomes assessed were changes in body shape concern, body size dissatisfaction, and body satisfaction (intervention vs comparator/control group). Seven studies were included in the systematic review (4 in the meta-analysis). All but 1 study involved female participants only. The type of weight loss intervention varied between studies as did the type of control/comparator group. In 3 studies, there was no significant difference in body image outcomes, whereas in 4 studies, improvement in body image was significantly more pronounced in the intervention vs the control/comparator group. Meta-analysis revealed that improvements in body shape concern (standardized difference: -0.52; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -1.04 to 0.00), body size dissatisfaction (standardized difference: -0.66; 95% CI: -0.88 to -0.45), and body satisfaction (standardized difference: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.09 to 1.38) significantly favored the intervention over the comparator/control group (P<0.05). The results of this systematic review/meta-analysis lend support to the notion that weight loss interventions may improve body image. This is a noteworthy finding that has clear clinical applicability because body image affects psychological well-being and the ability of an individual to maintain weight loss. Future research should determine which weigh loss interventions are associated with optimal improvements in body image and maintenance of weight loss.

  3. Therapeutic Intervention for Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS): A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, Akira; Whelan, Julia S.; Jackson, Jeffrey L.; Dimitrakoff, Jordan D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) has been treated with several different interventions with limited success. This meta-analysis aims to review all trials reporting on therapeutic intervention for CP/CPPS using the National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI). Methods We searched Medline, PubMed, the Cochrane Pain, Palliative & Supportive Care Trials, the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the NIDDK website between 1947 and December 31, 2011 without language or study type restrictions. All RCTs for CP/CPPS lasting at least 6 weeks, with a minimum of 10 participants per arm, and using the NIH-CPSI score, the criterion standard for CP/CPPS, as an outcome measure were included. Data was extracted from each study by two independent reviewers. Gillbraith and I-squared plots were used for heterogeneity testing and Eggers and Peters methods for publication bias. Quality was assessed using a component approach and meta-regression was used to analyze sources of heterogeneity. Results Mepartricin, percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS), and triple therapy comprised of doxazosin + ibuprofen + thiocolchicoside (DIT) resulted in clinically and statistically significant reduction in NIH-CPSI total score. The same agents and aerobic exercise resulted in clinically and statistically significant NIH-CPSI pain domain score reduction. Acupuncture, DIT, and PTNS were found to produce statistically and clinically significant reductions in the NIH-CPSI voiding domain. A statistically significant placebo effect was found for all outcomes and time analysis showed that efficacy of all treatments increased over time. Alpha-blockers, antibiotics, and combinations of the two failed to show statistically or clinically significant NIH-CPSI reductions. Conclusion Results from this meta-analysis reflect our current inability to effectively manage CP/CPPS. Clinicians and researchers must

  4. Online interventions for depression and anxiety – a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Saddichha, Sahoo; Al-Desouki, Majid; Lamia, Alsagob; Linden, Isabelle A.; Krausz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background: Access to mental health care is limited. Internet-based interventions (IBIs) may help bridge that gap by improving access especially for those who are unable to receive expert care. Aim: This review explores current research on the effectiveness of IBIs for depression and anxiety. Results: For depression, therapist-guided cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) had larger effect sizes consistently across studies, ranging from 0.6 to 1.9; while stand-alone CBT (without therapist guidance) had a more modest effect size of 0.3–0.7. Even other interventions for depression (non-CBT/non-randomized controlled trial (RCT)) showed modestly high effect sizes (0.2–1.7). For anxiety disorders, studies showed robust effect sizes for therapist-assisted interventions with effect sizes of 0.7–1.7 (efficacy similar to face-to-face CBT) and stand-alone CBT studies also showed large effect sizes (0.6–1.7). Non-CBT/Non-RCT studies (only 3) also showed significant reduction in anxiety scores at the end of the interventions. Conclusion: IBIs for anxiety and depression appear to be effective in reducing symptomatology for both depression and anxiety, which were enhanced by the guidance of a therapist. Further research is needed to identify various predictive factors and the extent to which stand-alone Internet therapies may be effective in the future as well as effects for different patient populations. PMID:25750823

  5. Interventions for coordination of walking following stroke: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Kristen L; Pelton, Trudy A; Tyson, Sarah F; Hollands, Mark A; van Vliet, Paulette M

    2012-03-01

    Impairments in gait coordination may be a factor in falls and mobility limitations after stroke. Therefore, rehabilitation targeting gait coordination may be an effective way to improve walking post-stroke. This review sought to examine current treatments that target impairments of gait coordination, the theoretical basis on which they are derived and the effects of such interventions. Few high quality RCTs with a low risk of bias specifically targeting and measuring restoration of coordinated gait were found. Consequently, we took a pragmatic approach to describing and quantifying the available evidence and included non-randomised study designs and limited the influence of heterogeneity in experimental design and control comparators by restricting meta-analyses to pre- and post-test comparisons of experimental interventions only. Results show that physiotherapy interventions significantly improved gait function and coordination. Interventions involving repetitive task-specific practice and/or auditory cueing appeared to be the most promising approaches to restore gait coordination. The fact that overall improvements in gait coordination coincided with increased walking speed lends support to the hypothesis that targeting gait coordination gait may be a way of improving overall walking ability post-stroke. However, establishing the mechanism for improved locomotor control requires a better understanding of the nature of both neuroplasticity and coordination deficits in functional tasks after stroke. Future research requires the measurement of impairment, activity and cortical activation in an effort to establish the mechanism by which functional gains are achieved.

  6. Occupational Therapy Interventions in Chronic Pain--A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hesselstrand, Malin; Samuelsson, Kersti; Liedberg, Gunilla

    2015-12-01

    The use of interventions based on the best available evidence in occupational therapy is essential, and evaluation of research is part of an evidence-based practice. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of studies describing and evaluating the effects of occupational therapy interventions on chronic pain. A systematic review of studies with diverse designs was carried out. A quality assessment was conducted, and the level of evidence was defined using the Research Pyramid Model. Of 19 included studies, three received the highest evidence level, and three were considered to be of high quality. The clinical recommendations that can be derived from this study are the following: occupational therapy interventions should start from the identified needs of the person with chronic pain; no support exists for the effectiveness of electromyographic biofeedback training as a supplement, more studies are needed to confirm this result; the efficacy of instructions on body mechanics was significant during work-hardening treatment; and occupational therapists need to perform and present more clinical studies of high quality and high-evidence level to build up a trustworthy arsenal of evidence-based interventions, for example, in persons with chronic pain.

  7. Identifying effective behavioural models and behaviour change strategies underpinning preschool- and school-based obesity prevention interventions aimed at 4-6-year-olds: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nixon, C A; Moore, H J; Douthwaite, W; Gibson, E L; Vogele, C; Kreichauf, S; Wildgruber, A; Manios, Y; Summerbell, C D

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this comprehensive systematic review was to identify the most effective behavioural models and behaviour change strategies, underpinning preschool- and school-based interventions aimed at preventing obesity in 4-6-year-olds. Searching was conducted from April 1995 to April 2010 using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and The Cochrane Library. Epidemiological studies relevant to the research question with controlled assignment of participants were included in the review, if they had follow-up periods of 6 months or longer. Outcomes included markers of weight gain; markers of body composition; physical activity behaviour changes and dietary behaviour changes. Twelve studies were included in the review. The most commonly used model was social cognitive theory (SCT)/social learning theory (SLT) either as a single model or in combination with other behavioural models. Studies that used SCT/SLT in the development of the intervention had significant favourable changes in one, or more, outcome measures. In addition, interventions that (i) combined high levels of parental involvement and interactive school-based learning; (ii) targeted physical activity and dietary change; and (iii) included long-term follow-up, appeared most effective. It is suggested that interventions should also be focused on developing children's (and parents') perceived competence at making dietary and physical changes.

  8. The role of The Cochrane Collaboration in support of the WHO Nutrition Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Tovey, David

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the background and contribution of The Cochrane Collaboration to the WHO Nutrition Guidelines program. Systematic reviews, augmented by the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology for assessing the quality of a body of evidence, form the evidence basis for WHO guidelines. Our shared experience of working together has highlighted a number of issues that are challenging, such as decisions made about selecting appropriate questions for evidence synthesis and the nature of study types that are included, in particular the decision on whether or not to extend a search beyond randomized studies. Although the skills and experience required for evidence synthesis are different from those needed to determine recommendations for policy and practice, our experience suggests that some engagement between the two groups is mutually beneficial. Finally, our experience highlights the recognition that evidence of effectiveness is essential but by no means sufficient to guide decisions on recommendations. Programmatic and implementation considerations are important to guide decision making and the evidence basis for this may be limited; therefore, it is essential that groups involved in delivering interventions to populations are also engaged in the guidelines process. PMID:24425720

  9. Physical interventions to interrupt or reduce the spread of respiratory viruses: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective To systematically review evidence for the effectiveness of physical interventions to interrupt or reduce the spread of respiratory viruses. Data extraction Search strategy of the Cochrane Library, Medline, OldMedline, Embase, and CINAHL, without language restriction, for any intervention to prevent transmission of respiratory viruses (isolation, quarantine, social distancing, barriers, personal protection, and hygiene). Study designs were randomised trials, cohort studies, case-control studies, and controlled before and after studies. Data synthesis Of 2300 titles scanned 138 full papers were retrieved, including 49 papers of 51 studies. Study quality was poor for the three randomised controlled trials and most of the cluster randomised controlled trials; the observational studies were of mixed quality. Heterogeneity precluded meta-analysis of most data except that from six case-control studies. The highest quality cluster randomised trials suggest that the spread of respiratory viruses into the community can be prevented by intervening with hygienic measures aimed at younger children. Meta-analysis of six case-control studies suggests that physical measures are highly effective in preventing the spread of SARS: handwashing more than 10 times daily (odds ratio 0.45, 95% confidence interval 0.36 to 0.57; number needed to treat=4, 95% confidence interval 3.65 to 5.52); wearing masks (0.32, 0.25 to 0.40; NNT=6, 4.54 to 8.03); wearing N95 masks (0.09, 0.03 to 0.30; NNT=3, 2.37 to 4.06); wearing gloves (0.43, 0.29 to 0.65; NNT=5, 4.15 to 15.41); wearing gowns (0.23, 0.14 to 0.37; NNT=5, 3.37 to 7.12); and handwashing, masks, gloves, and gowns combined (0.09, 0.02 to 0.35; NNT=3, 2.66 to 4.97). The incremental effect of adding virucidals or antiseptics to normal handwashing to decrease the spread of respiratory disease remains uncertain. The lack of proper evaluation of global measures such as screening at entry ports and social distancing prevent firm

  10. Multifactorial lifestyle interventions in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus--a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Angermayr, Lucia; Melchart, Dieter; Linde, Klaus

    2010-08-01

    This systematic review aims to summarize the available randomized trials of multifactorial lifestyle interventions in the primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Randomized trials investigating the effects of lifestyle interventions including the elements of diet, physical activity, and stress management in people at increased risk for or with manifest coronary heart disease or type 2 diabetes mellitus were searched for in five electronic database and by citation tracking. Quality was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias tool. Exploratory effect size calculations were performed for a variety of laboratory and clinical outcome measures. Twenty-five trials including a total of 7,703 participants met the inclusion criteria. Fifteen trials were in patients with coronary heart disease, seven in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and three on primary prevention. The interventions varied greatly regarding concept, intensity, and providers. Compared to participants in "usual care" control groups, there were no consistent effects on lipid levels and blood pressure and small effects on body mass index and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Composite cardiac event rates were significantly less in the intervention groups of the few trials reporting these outcomes. Mortality was also lower in the intervention groups, but the difference was not statistically significant, and confidence intervals were wide. The evidence base for multifactorial lifestyle interventions is weak. Effects on surrogate measures seem minor, but there may be clinically relevant effects on major clinical endpoints. PMID:20652464

  11. Tobacco industry denormalisation as a tobacco control intervention: a review

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Ruth E; Grundy, Quinn; Bero, Lisa A

    2012-01-01

    Objective To conduct a review of research examining the effects of tobacco industry denormalisation (TID) on smoking-related and attitude-related outcomes. Methods The authors searched Pubmed and Scopus databases for articles published through December 2010 (see figure 1). We included all peer-reviewed TID studies we could locate that measured smoking-related outcomes and attitudes toward the tobacco industry. Exclusion criteria included: non-English language, focus on tobacco use rather than TID, perceived ad efficacy as sole outcome, complex program interventions without a separately analysable TID component and non peer-reviewed literature. We analysed the literature qualitatively and summarised findings by outcome measured. Results After excluding articles not meeting the search criteria, the authors reviewed 60 studies examining TID and 9 smoking-related outcomes, including smoking prevalence, smoking initiation, intention to smoke and intention to quit. The authors also reviewed studies of attitudes towards the tobacco industry and its regulation. The majority of studies suggest that TID is effective in reducing smoking prevalence and initiation and increasing intentions to quit. Evidence is mixed for some other outcomes, but some of the divergent findings may be explained by study designs. Conclusions A robust body of evidence suggests that TID is an effective tobacco control intervention at the population level that has a clear exposure–response effect. TID may also contribute to other tobacco control outcomes not explored in this review (including efforts to ‘directly erode industry power’), and thus may enhance public support and political will for structural reforms to end the tobacco epidemic. PMID:22345240

  12. Non-pharmacological interventions for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) delivered in school settings: systematic reviews of quantitative and qualitative research.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Michelle; Moore, Darren A; Gwernan-Jones, Ruth; Thompson-Coon, Jo; Ukoumunne, Obioha; Rogers, Morwenna; Whear, Rebecca; Newlove-Delgado, Tamsin V; Logan, Stuart; Morris, Christopher; Taylor, Eric; Cooper, Paul; Stein, Ken; Garside, Ruth; Ford, Tamsin J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by age-inappropriate levels of inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity. School can be particularly challenging for children with ADHD. Few reviews have considered non-pharmacological interventions in school settings. OBJECTIVES To assess the effectiveness of non-pharmacological interventions delivered in school settings for pupils with, or at risk of, ADHD and to explore the factors that may enhance, or limit, their delivery. DATA SOURCES Twenty electronic databases (including PsycINFO, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Education Resources Information Centre, The Cochrane Library and Education Research Complete) were searched from 1980 to February-August 2013. Three separate searches were conducted for four systematic reviews; they were supplemented with forward and backwards citation chasing, website searching, author recommendations and hand-searches of key journals. REVIEW METHODS The systematic reviews focused on (1) the effectiveness of school-based interventions for children with or at risk of ADHD; (2) quantitative research that explores attitudes towards school-based non-pharmacological interventions for pupils with ADHD; (3) qualitative research investigating the attitudes and experiences of children, teachers, parents and others using ADHD interventions in school settings; and (4) qualitative research exploring the experience of ADHD in school among pupils, their parents and teachers more generally. Methods of synthesis included a random-effects meta-analysis, meta-regression and narrative synthesis for review 1, narrative synthesis for review 2 and meta-ethnography and thematic analysis for reviews 3 and 4. RESULTS For review 1, 54 controlled trials met the inclusion criteria. For the 36 meta-analysed randomised controlled trials, beneficial effects (p < 0.05) were observed for several symptom and scholastic outcomes. Mean weighted effect sizes ranged from

  13. Communication for Development Interventions in Fragile States: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Skuse, Andrew; Rodger, Dianne; Power, Gerry; Mbus, Domenic Friguglietti; Brimacombe, Tait

    2013-01-01

    Executive summary Background A wide range of contextual and programmatic factors frame, affect and constrain communication for development (C4D) interventions undertaken in fragile or conflict affected states. For the purposes of this review, contextual factors include culture, poverty, different stages of conflict (such as latent, open or post-conflict scenarios), policy, legislation and so on, while programmatic factors include the type of intervention, formative and summative evaluation, project design and management, human and financial resources and so on. Understanding the various factors that influence C4D interventions in fragile states is important to improving practice, implementation and evaluation, as well as to the future development of methodologies and frameworks that can be utilised in conflict or crisis situations. Objective The objective of this review is to assess the contextual and programmatic factors that influence communication for development interventions in fragile states. Types of participants Persons regardless of age, gender and ethnicity – living in fragile states. Phenomena of interest The contextual and programmatic factors that influence communication for development (C4D) interventions in fragile states. Types of studies Qualitative peer reviewed studies, expert opinion, discussion papers, project reports, policy papers, position papers and other text. Search strategy Searches were conducted for published and unpublished material (between January 2001 – September 2011), including grey literature, in the English language. Databases searched were: Academic Search Premier; African Women's Bibliographic Database; Anthropology Plus; Bibliography of Asian Studies; Educational Resources Information Centre; Ingenta Connect; JSTOR; Scopus; and Sociological Abstracts; Communication for Social Change Consortium; DevComm (World Bank); Eldis; Search for Common Ground; The Communication Initiative; United Nations Development Programme

  14. Transfusion interventions in critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    McQuilten, Zoe K; Crighton, Gemma; Engelbrecht, Sunelle; Gotmaker, Robert; Brunskill, Susan J; Murphy, Michael F; Wood, Erica M

    2015-04-01

    Critical bleeding (CB) requiring massive transfusion (MT) can occur in a variety of clinical contexts and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. In 2011, the Australian National Blood Authority (NBA) published patient blood management guidelines for CB and MT, which found limited high-quality evidence from which only 2 recommendations could be made. The aim of this systematic review (SR) was to update these guidelines and identify evidence gaps still to be addressed. A comprehensive search was performed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and SRs using MeSH index and free text terms in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library (Issue 11, 2012), EMBASE, CINHAL, PUBMED, and the Transfusion Evidence Library up to July 15, 2014. The evidence was grouped according to 4 questions based on the original guideline relating to transfusion interventions: (1) effect of dose, timing, and ratio of red blood cells (RBCs) to component therapy on patient outcomes; (2) effect of RBC transfusion on patient outcomes; (3) effect of fresh frozen plasma, platelet, cryoprecipitate, fibrinogen concentrate, and prothrombin complex concentrate on patient outcomes; and (4) effect of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) on patient outcomes. From this search, 19 studies were identified: 6 RCTs and 13 SRs. Two of the RCTs were pilot/feasibility studies, 3 were investigating rFVIIa, and 1 compared restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion in upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Overall, limited new evidence was identified and substantial evidence gaps remain, particularly with regard to the effect of component therapies, including ratio of RBC to component therapies, on patient outcomes. Clinical trials to address these questions are required. PMID:25716645

  15. Transfusion interventions in critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    McQuilten, Zoe K; Crighton, Gemma; Engelbrecht, Sunelle; Gotmaker, Robert; Brunskill, Susan J; Murphy, Michael F; Wood, Erica M

    2015-04-01

    Critical bleeding (CB) requiring massive transfusion (MT) can occur in a variety of clinical contexts and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. In 2011, the Australian National Blood Authority (NBA) published patient blood management guidelines for CB and MT, which found limited high-quality evidence from which only 2 recommendations could be made. The aim of this systematic review (SR) was to update these guidelines and identify evidence gaps still to be addressed. A comprehensive search was performed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and SRs using MeSH index and free text terms in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library (Issue 11, 2012), EMBASE, CINHAL, PUBMED, and the Transfusion Evidence Library up to July 15, 2014. The evidence was grouped according to 4 questions based on the original guideline relating to transfusion interventions: (1) effect of dose, timing, and ratio of red blood cells (RBCs) to component therapy on patient outcomes; (2) effect of RBC transfusion on patient outcomes; (3) effect of fresh frozen plasma, platelet, cryoprecipitate, fibrinogen concentrate, and prothrombin complex concentrate on patient outcomes; and (4) effect of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) on patient outcomes. From this search, 19 studies were identified: 6 RCTs and 13 SRs. Two of the RCTs were pilot/feasibility studies, 3 were investigating rFVIIa, and 1 compared restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion in upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Overall, limited new evidence was identified and substantial evidence gaps remain, particularly with regard to the effect of component therapies, including ratio of RBC to component therapies, on patient outcomes. Clinical trials to address these questions are required.

  16. Interventions That Affect Gender Bias in Hiring: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Carol; Lee, Barbara; Carnes, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To systematically review experimental evidence for interventions mitigating gender bias in employment. Unconscious endorsement of gender stereotypes can undermine academic medicine's commitment to gender equity. Method The authors performed electronic and hand searches for randomized controlled studies since 1973 of interventions that affect gender differences in evaluation of job applicants. Twenty-seven studies met all inclusion criteria. Interventions fell into three categories: application information, applicant features, and rating conditions. Results The studies identified gender bias as the difference in ratings or perceptions of men and women with identical qualifications. Studies reaffirmed negative bias against women being evaluated for positions traditionally or predominantly held by men (male sex-typed jobs). The assessments of male and female raters rarely differed. Interventions that provided raters with clear evidence of job-relevant competencies were effective. However, clearly competent women were rated lower than equivalent men for male sex-typed jobs unless evidence of communal qualities was also provided. A commitment to the value of credentials before review of applicants and women's presence at above 25% of the applicant pool eliminated bias against women. Two studies found unconscious resistance to “antibias” training, which could be overcome with distraction or an intervening task. Explicit employment equity policies and an attractive appearance benefited men more than women, whereas repeated employment gaps were more detrimental to men. Masculine-scented perfume favored the hiring of both sexes. Negative bias occurred against women who expressed anger or who were perceived as self-promoting. Conclusions High-level evidence exists for strategies to mitigate gender bias in hiring. PMID:19881440

  17. Recruiting participants to walking intervention studies: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Most researchers who are conducting physical activity trials face difficulties in recruiting participants who are representative of the population or from specific population groups. Participants who are often the hardest to recruit are often those who stand to benefit most (the least active, from ethnic and other minority groups, from neighbourhoods with high levels of deprivation, or have poor health). The aim of our study was to conduct a systematic review of published literature of walking interventions, in order to identify the impact, characteristics, and differential effects of recruitment strategies among particular population groups. Methods We conducted standard searches for studies from four sources, (i) electronic literature databases and websites, (ii) grey literature from internet sources, (iii) contact with experts to identify additional "grey" and other literature, and (iv) snowballing from reference lists of retrieved articles. Included studies were randomised controlled trials, controlled before-and-after experimental or observational qualitative studies, examining the effects of an intervention to encourage people to walk independently or in a group setting, and detailing methods of recruitment. Results Forty seven studies met the inclusion criteria. The overall quality of the descriptions of recruitment in the studies was poor with little detail reported on who undertook recruitment, or how long was spent planning/preparing and implementing the recruitment phase. Recruitment was conducted at locations that either matched where the intervention was delivered, or where the potential participants were asked to attend for the screening and signing up process. We identified a lack of conceptual clarity about the recruitment process and no standard metric to evaluate the effectiveness of recruitment. Conclusion Recruitment concepts, methods, and reporting in walking intervention trials are poorly developed, adding to other limitations in the

  18. Communication for Development Interventions in Fragile States: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Skuse, Andrew; Rodger, Dianne; Power, Gerry; Mbus, Domenic Friguglietti; Brimacombe, Tait

    2013-01-01

    Executive summary Background A wide range of contextual and programmatic factors frame, affect and constrain communication for development (C4D) interventions undertaken in fragile or conflict affected states. For the purposes of this review, contextual factors include culture, poverty, different stages of conflict (such as latent, open or post-conflict scenarios), policy, legislation and so on, while programmatic factors include the type of intervention, formative and summative evaluation, project design and management, human and financial resources and so on. Understanding the various factors that influence C4D interventions in fragile states is important to improving practice, implementation and evaluation, as well as to the future development of methodologies and frameworks that can be utilised in conflict or crisis situations. Objective The objective of this review is to assess the contextual and programmatic factors that influence communication for development interventions in fragile states. Types of participants Persons regardless of age, gender and ethnicity – living in fragile states. Phenomena of interest The contextual and programmatic factors that influence communication for development (C4D) interventions in fragile states. Types of studies Qualitative peer reviewed studies, expert opinion, discussion papers, project reports, policy papers, position papers and other text. Search strategy Searches were conducted for published and unpublished material (between January 2001 – September 2011), including grey literature, in the English language. Databases searched were: Academic Search Premier; African Women's Bibliographic Database; Anthropology Plus; Bibliography of Asian Studies; Educational Resources Information Centre; Ingenta Connect; JSTOR; Scopus; and Sociological Abstracts; Communication for Social Change Consortium; DevComm (World Bank); Eldis; Search for Common Ground; The Communication Initiative; United Nations Development Programme

  19. Interventions to improve cultural competency in healthcare: a systematic review of reviews

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cultural competency is a recognized and popular approach to improving the provision of health care to racial/ethnic minority groups in the community with the aim of reducing racial/ethnic health disparities. The aim of this systematic review of reviews is to gather and synthesize existing reviews of studies in the field to form a comprehensive understanding of the current evidence base that can guide future interventions and research in the area. Methods A systematic review of review articles published between January 2000 and June 2012 was conducted. Electronic databases (including Medline, Cinahl and PsycINFO), reference lists of articles, and key websites were searched. Reviews of cultural competency in health settings only were included. Each review was critically appraised by two authors using a study appraisal tool and were given a quality assessment rating of weak, moderate or strong. Results Nineteen published reviews were identified. Reviews consisted of between 5 and 38 studies, included a variety of health care settings/contexts and a range of study types. There were three main categories of study outcomes: patient-related outcomes, provider-related outcomes, and health service access and utilization outcomes. The majority of reviews found moderate evidence of improvement in provider outcomes and health care access and utilization outcomes but weaker evidence for improvements in patient/client outcomes. Conclusion This review of reviews indicates that there is some evidence that interventions to improve cultural competency can improve patient/client health outcomes. However, a lack of methodological rigor is common amongst the studies included in reviews and many of the studies rely on self-report, which is subject to a range of biases, while objective evidence of intervention effectiveness was rare. Future research should measure both healthcare provider and patient/client health outcomes, consider organizational factors, and utilize more

  20. The gap between policy and practice: a systematic review of patient-centred care interventions in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kane, P M; Murtagh, F E M; Ryan, K; Mahon, N G; McAdam, B; McQuillan, R; Ellis-Smith, C; Tracey, C; Howley, C; Raleigh, C; O'Gara, G; Higginson, I J; Daveson, B A

    2015-11-01

    Patient-centred care (PCC) is recommended in policy documents for chronic heart failure (CHF) service provision, yet it lacks an agreed definition. A systematic review was conducted to identify PCC interventions in CHF and to describe the PCC domains and outcomes. Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ASSIA, the Cochrane database, clinicaltrials.gov, key journals and citations were searched for original studies on patients with CHF staged II-IV using the New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification. Included interventions actively supported patients to play informed, active roles in decision-making about their goals of care. Search terms included 'patient-centred care', 'quality of life' and 'shared decision making'. Of 13,944 screened citations, 15 articles regarding 10 studies were included involving 2540 CHF patients. Three studies were randomised controlled trials, and seven were non-randomised studies. PCC interventions focused on collaborative goal setting between patients and healthcare professionals regarding immediate clinical choices and future care. Core domains included healthcare professional-patient collaboration, identification of patient preferences, patient-identified goals and patient motivation. While the strength of evidence is poor, PCC has been shown to reduce symptom burden, improve health-related quality of life, reduce readmission rates and enhance patient engagement for patients with CHF. There is a small but growing body of evidence, which demonstrates the benefits of a PCC approach to care for CHF patients. Research is needed to identify the key components of effective PCC interventions before being able to deliver on policy recommendations. PMID:26435042

  1. Assessing the Effect of mHealth Interventions in Improving Maternal and Neonatal Care in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sondaal, Stephanie Felicie Victoria; Browne, Joyce Linda; Amoakoh-Coleman, Mary; Borgstein, Alexander; Miltenburg, Andrea Solnes; Verwijs, Mirjam; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Maternal and neonatal mortality remains high in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Availability and use of mobile phones is increasing rapidly with 90% of persons in developing countries having a mobile-cellular subscription. Mobile health (mHealth) interventions have been proposed as effective solutions to improve maternal and neonatal health. This systematic review assessed the effect of mHealth interventions that support pregnant women during the antenatal, birth and postnatal period in LMIC. Methods The review was registered with Prospero (CRD42014010292). Six databases were searched from June 2014–April 2015, accompanied by grey literature search using pre-defined search terms linked to pregnant women in LMIC and mHealth. Quality of articles was assessed with an adapted Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. Because of heterogeneity in outcomes, settings and study designs a narrative synthesis of quantitative results of intervention studies on maternal outcomes, neonatal outcomes, service utilization, and healthy pregnancy education was conducted. Qualitative and quantitative results were synthesized with a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats analysis. Results In total, 3777 articles were found, of which 27 studies were included: twelve intervention studies and fifteen descriptive studies. mHealth interventions targeted at pregnant women increased maternal and neonatal service utilization shown through increased antenatal care attendance, facility-service utilization, skilled attendance at birth, and vaccination rates. Few articles assessed the effect on maternal or neonatal health outcomes, with inconsistent results. Conclusion mHealth interventions may be effective solutions to improve maternal and neonatal service utilization. Further studies assessing mHealth’s impact on maternal and neonatal outcomes are recommended. The emerging trend of strong experimental research designs with randomized controlled trials, combined with

  2. Social media interventions for diet and exercise behaviours: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gillian; Hamm, Michele P; Shulhan, Jocelyn; Vandermeer, Ben; Hartling, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) examining the use of social media to promote healthy diet and exercise in the general population. Data sources MEDLINE, CENTRAL, ERIC, PubMed, CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, Alt Health Watch, Health Source, Communication and Mass Media Complete, Web of Knowledge and ProQuest Dissertation and Thesis (2000–2013). Study eligibility criteria RCTs of social media interventions promoting healthy diet and exercise behaviours in the general population were eligible. Interventions using social media, alone or as part of a complex intervention, were included. Study appraisal and synthesis Study quality was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. We describe the studies according to the target populations, objectives and nature of interventions, outcomes examined, and results and conclusions. We extracted data on the primary and secondary outcomes examined in each study. Where the same outcome was assessed in at least three studies, we combined data in a meta-analysis. Results 22 studies were included. Participants were typically middle-aged Caucasian women of mid-to-high socioeconomic status. There were a variety of interventions, comparison groups and outcomes. All studies showed a decrease in programme usage throughout the intervention period. Overall, no significant differences were found for primary outcomes which varied across studies. Meta-analysis showed no significant differences in changes in physical activity (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.13 (95% CI −0.04 to 0.30), 12 studies) and weight (SMD −0.00 (95% CI −0.19 to 0.19), 10 studies); however, pooled results from five studies showed a significant decrease in dietary fat consumption with social media (SMD −0.35 (95% CI −0.68 to −0.02)). Conclusions Social media may provide certain advantages for public health interventions; however, studies of social media interventions to date relating to healthy

  3. Animal-Assisted Intervention for trauma: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    O'Haire, Marguerite E; Guérin, Noémie A; Kirkham, Alison C

    2015-01-01

    Animals have a long history of inclusion in psychiatric treatment. There has been a recent growth in the empirical study of this practice, known as Animal-Assisted Intervention (AAI). We conducted a systematic review of the empirical literature on AAI for trauma, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Ten studies qualified for inclusion, including six peer-reviewed journal articles and four unpublished theses. Participants were predominantly survivors of child abuse, in addition to military veterans. The presentation of AAI was highly variable across the studies. The most common animal species were dogs and horses. The most prevalent outcomes were reduced depression, PTSD symptoms, and anxiety. There was a low level of methodological rigor in most studies, indicating the preliminary nature of this area of investigation. We conclude that AAI may provide promise as a complementary treatment option for trauma, but that further research is essential to establish feasibility, efficacy, and manualizable protocols.

  4. Animal-Assisted Intervention for trauma: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    O'Haire, Marguerite E.; Guérin, Noémie A.; Kirkham, Alison C.

    2015-01-01

    Animals have a long history of inclusion in psychiatric treatment. There has been a recent growth in the empirical study of this practice, known as Animal-Assisted Intervention (AAI). We conducted a systematic review of the empirical literature on AAI for trauma, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Ten studies qualified for inclusion, including six peer-reviewed journal articles and four unpublished theses. Participants were predominantly survivors of child abuse, in addition to military veterans. The presentation of AAI was highly variable across the studies. The most common animal species were dogs and horses. The most prevalent outcomes were reduced depression, PTSD symptoms, and anxiety. There was a low level of methodological rigor in most studies, indicating the preliminary nature of this area of investigation. We conclude that AAI may provide promise as a complementary treatment option for trauma, but that further research is essential to establish feasibility, efficacy, and manualizable protocols. PMID:26300817

  5. Sensory-Based Intervention for Children with Behavioral Problems: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan Yunus, Farahiyah; Liu, Karen P.; Bissett, Michelle; Penkala, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Sensory-based intervention is a common approach used to address behavioral problems in children. Types of sensory-based intervention for children and details of the intervention effectiveness have not been systematically examined. This review examined the effectiveness and ideal types of sensory-based interventions for children with behavioral…

  6. A Systematic Review of Interventions Aimed at Reducing Binge Drinking among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Ledetra S.; Sharma, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to systematically review the interventions aimed at reducing binge drinking in college students. A total of 18 interventions published between 2010 and 2015 were evaluated in this review. Two main study designs were used by these interventions: randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-experimental designs, with…

  7. Fidelity in After-School Program Intervention Research: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Brandy R.; Peters, Kristen E.; Vaughn, Michael G.; Sarteschi, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, the number of after-school programs (ASP) and the number of students attending ASPs has markedly increased. Although several reviews and meta-analyses have examined the outcomes of ASPs, ASP intervention study reviews have not specifically examined intervention fidelity. Establishing intervention fidelity is critically…

  8. Predictors of Energy Compensation during Exercise Interventions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Riou, Marie-Ève; Jomphe-Tremblay, Simon; Lamothe, Gilles; Stacey, Dawn; Szczotka, Agnieszka; Doucet, Éric

    2015-01-01

    Weight loss from exercise-induced energy deficits is usually less than expected. The objective of this systematic review was to investigate predictors of energy compensation, which is defined as body energy changes (fat mass and fat-free mass) over the total amount of exercise energy expenditure. A search was conducted in multiple databases without date limits. Of 4745 studies found, 61 were included in this systematic review with a total of 928 subjects. The overall mean energy compensation was 18% ± 93%. The analyses indicated that 48% of the variance of energy compensation is explained by the interaction between initial fat mass, age and duration of exercise interventions. Sex, frequency, intensity and dose of exercise energy expenditure were not significant predictors of energy compensation. The fitted model suggested that for a shorter study duration, lower energy compensation was observed in younger individuals with higher initial fat mass (FM). In contrast, higher energy compensation was noted for younger individuals with lower initial FM. From 25 weeks onward, energy compensation was no longer different for these predictors. For studies of longer duration (about 80 weeks), the energy compensation approached 84%. Lower energy compensation occurs with short-term exercise, and a much higher level of energy compensation accompanies long-term exercise interventions. PMID:25988763

  9. A systematic review of how studies describe educational interventions for evidence-based practice: stage 1 of the development of a reporting guideline

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this systematic review was to identify which information is included when reporting educational interventions used to facilitate foundational skills and knowledge of evidence-based practice (EBP) training for health professionals. This systematic review comprised the first stage in the three stage development process for a reporting guideline for educational interventions for EBP. Methods The review question was ‘What information has been reported when describing educational interventions targeting foundational evidence-based practice knowledge and skills?’ MEDLINE, Academic Search Premier, ERIC, CINAHL, Scopus, Embase, Informit health, Cochrane Library and Web of Science databases were searched from inception until October - December 2011. Randomised and non-randomised controlled trials reporting original data on educational interventions specific to developing foundational knowledge and skills of evidence-based practice were included. Studies were not appraised for methodological bias, however, reporting frequency and item commonality were compared between a random selection of studies included in the systematic review and a random selection of studies excluded as they were not controlled trials. Twenty-five data items were extracted by two independent reviewers (consistency > 90%). Results Sixty-one studies met the inclusion criteria (n = 29 randomised, n = 32 non-randomised). The most consistently reported items were the learner’s stage of training, professional discipline and the evaluation methods used (100%). The least consistently reported items were the instructor(s) previous teaching experience (n = 8, 13%), and student effort outside face to face contact (n = 1, 2%). Conclusion This systematic review demonstrates inconsistencies in describing educational interventions for EBP in randomised and non-randomised trials. To enable educational interventions to be replicable and comparable, improvements in the

  10. Comparative effectiveness of chemopreventive interventions for colorectal cancer: protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Veettil, Sajesh K.; Saokaew, Surasak; Lim, Kean Ghee; Ching, Siew Mooi; Phisalprapa, Pochamana

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide and is associated with substantial socioeconomic burden. Despite considerable research, including numerous randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews assessed the effect of various chemopreventive interventions for CRC, there remains uncertainty regarding the comparative effectiveness of these agents. No network meta-analytic study has been published to evaluate the efficacies of these agents for CRC. Therefore, the aim of this study is to summarise the direct and indirect evidence for these interventions to prevent CRC in average-high risk individuals, and to rank these agents for practical consideration. Methods We will acquire eligible studies through a systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials, CINAHL plus, IPA and clinicaltrials.gov website. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool will be used to assess the quality of included studies. The primary outcomes are the incidence of CRC, the incidence/recurrence of any adenoma or change in polyp burden (number or size). Quantitative synthesis or meta-analysis will be considered. We will also construct a network meta-analysis (NMA) to improve precision of the comparisons among chemo-preventive interventions by combining direct and indirect evidence. The probability of each treatment being the best and/or safest, the number-needed-to-treat [NNT; 95% credible interval (CrIs)], and the number-needed-to-harm (NNH; 95% CrIs) will be calculated to provide measures of treatment efficacy. The GRADE approach will be used to rate the quality of evidence of estimates derived from NMA. Results This protocol has been registered (registration number: CRD42015025849) with the PROSPERO (International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews). The procedures of this systematic review and NMA will be conducted in accordance with the PRISMA-compliant guideline. The results of this systematic review and

  11. Efficacy and safety of pharmacological interventions in second- or later-line treatment of patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current guidelines recommend anthracycline-based chemotherapy primarily with doxorubicin either as monotherapy or in combination with ifosfamide as the first-line treatment for most advanced STS subtypes. Therapeutic options after failure of doxorubicin and/or ifosfamide are limited. This study aimed to comprehensively review available data on the activity and safety of interventions in second- or later-line treatment of advanced STS. Methods Electronic literature databases (Embase®, MEDLINE®, MEDLINE® In-Process, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews) were searched from 1980 to 01 March 2012 to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomised studies (both prospective and retrospective) evaluating pharmacological interventions in patients with advanced STS pre-treated with anthracycline- and/or ifosfamide-based therapy. Results The review identified six RCTs (one phase III and five phase II trials) and 94 non-randomised studies. Based on the primary trial endpoints, RCTs demonstrated favourable efficacy for pazopanib over placebo (PFS: 4.6 months vs. 1.6 months), gemcitabine plus dacarbazine over dacarbazine monotherapy (3-month PFS rate: 54.2% vs. 35.2%), and trabectedin 3-weekly schedule over weekly schedule (TTP: 3.7 months vs. 2.3 months. The non-randomised studies demonstrated heterogeneity in efficacy and safety results. Conclusions Across the RCTs, pazopanib over placebo, gemcitabine-dacarbazine over dacarbazine, and trabectedin 3-weekly over weekly regimen clearly demonstrated a PFS advantage in the second- and later-line treatment of advanced STS. With only one phase III trial in this setting, there is a clear need for additional comparative trials to better understand the risk: benefit ratios of available agents and combinations. PMID:23937858

  12. Prader-Willi Syndrome: A Review and Implications for Educational Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Ellen M.; Smith, Tom E. C.; Hendricks, Mary D.; Polloway, Edward A.

    1999-01-01

    This review of Prader-Willi Syndrome notes characteristics (mental retardation and excessive overeating). Educational interventions including weight management, cognitive and educational development, behavioral interventions, and transition to adulthood are discussed. (DB)

  13. Nutrition interventions for children aged less than 5 years following natural disasters: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Pranil Man Singh; Dhital, Rolina; Subhani, Huma

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Malnutrition among children is a serious public health problem in the aftermath of any natural disaster. We will review the various nutrition interventions for children aged <5 years in countries where natural disasters occurred and analyse the effect on nutrition-related outcomes. Methods and analysis We will conduct a systematic review on nutrition intervention studies following natural disasters that were published between January 2000 and December 2015. Study selection will follow the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The Cochrane Risk of Bias (RoB) tool will be used for randomised controlled trials and Risk of Bias Assessment for Non-Randomized Studies (RoBANS) will be used for non-randomised studies. The quality of evidence will be assessed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) guidelines. If sufficient data are available, we will conduct meta-analyses to establish the relationship between nutrition interventions and nutrition outcome indicators. All statistical analyses will be performed using Review Manager (Rev Man) V.5.3 for Windows. Heterogeneity of the data will be tested using the standard χ2 test. A fixed-effect model will be used for the studies with high heterogeneity (p value>0.10, I2≤50%). For dichotomous and continuous data, relative risk (RR) and mean difference with 95% CI will be used respectively. Subgroup analysis will be performed for studies with low heterogeneity (p value ≤0.10). We will use Z score with the level of significance set at p value <0.05 to test the total effect. Funnel plots will be used to detect publication bias. Ethics and dissemination As primary data will not be collected, formal ethical approval will not be required. The results will be disseminated by publication in peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations and the media. Registration details International Prospective Register for Systematic

  14. Efficacy of nonsurgical interventions for anterior knee pain: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Collins, Natalie J; Bisset, Leanne M; Crossley, Kay M; Vicenzino, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Anterior knee pain is a chronic condition that presents frequently to sports medicine clinics, and can have a long-term impact on participation in physical activity. Conceivably, effective early management may prevent chronicity and facilitate physical activity. Although a variety of nonsurgical interventions have been advocated, previous systematic reviews have consistently been unable to reach conclusions to support their use. Considering a decade has lapsed since publication of the most recent data in these reviews, it is timely to provide an updated synthesis of the literature to assist sports medicine practitioners in making informed, evidence-based decisions. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the evidence for nonsurgical interventions for anterior knee pain. A comprehensive search strategy was used to search MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Pre-CINAHL, PEDro, PubMed, SportDiscus, Web of Science, BIOSIS Previews, and the full Cochrane Library, while reference lists of included papers and previous systematic reviews were hand searched. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they were randomized clinical trials that used a measure of pain to evaluate at least one nonsurgical intervention over at least 2 weeks in participants with anterior knee pain. A modified version of the PEDro scale was used to rate methodological quality and risk of bias. Effect size calculation and meta-analyses were based on random effects models. Of 48 suitable studies, 27 studies with low-to-moderate risk of bias were included. There was minimal opportunity for meta-analysis because of heterogeneity of interventions, comparators and follow-up times. Meta-analysis of high-quality clinical trials supports the use of a 6-week multimodal physiotherapy programme (standardized mean difference [SMD] 1.08, 95% CI 0.73, 1.43), but does not support the addition of electromyography biofeedback to an exercise programme in the short-term (4 weeks: SMD -0.21, 95% CI -0.64, 0

  15. HIV behavioural interventions targeted towards older adults: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing number of people living with HIV aged 50 years and older has been recognised around the world yet non-pharmacologic HIV behavioural and cognitive interventions specifically targeted to older adults are limited. Evidence is needed to guide the response to this affected group. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the available published literature in MEDLINE, Embase and the Education Resources Information Center. A search strategy was defined with high sensitivity but low specificity to identify behavioural interventions with outcomes in the areas of treatment adherence, HIV testing uptake, increased HIV knowledge and uptake of prevention measures. Data from relevant articles were extracted into excel. Results Twelve articles were identified all of which originated from the Americas. Eight of the interventions were conducted among older adults living with HIV and four for HIV-negative older adults. Five studies included control groups. Of the included studies, four focused on general knowledge of HIV, three emphasised mental health and coping, two focused on reduced sexual risk behaviour, two on physical status and one on referral for care. Only four of the studies were randomised controlled trials and seven – including all of the studies among HIV-negative older adults – did not include controls at all. A few of the studies conducted statistical testing on small samples of 16 or 11 older adults making inference based on the results difficult. The most relevant study demonstrated that using telephone-based interventions can reduce risky sexual behaviour among older adults with control reporting 3.24 times (95% CI 1.79-5.85) as many occasions of unprotected sex at follow-up as participants. Overall however, few of the articles are sufficiently rigorous to suggest broad replication or to be considered representative and applicable in other settings. Conclusions More evidence is needed on what interventions work among older adults to

  16. Interventions to Prevent Sexually Transmitted Infections, Including HIV, Among Young People in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review of the Published and Gray Literature.

    PubMed

    Kalamar, Amanda M; Bayer, Angela M; Hindin, Michelle J

    2016-09-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, are prevalent among adolescents and can have lasting adverse health consequences. The objective of this review is to identify high-quality interventions and evaluations to decrease STI transmission and related risky behaviors among young people in low- and middle-income countries. PubMed, Embase, PsycInfo, Cinahl Plus, Popline, and the Cochrane Databases were searched without language limitations for articles published through November 2015. Gray literature was searched by hand. Reference tracing was utilized, as well as the unpacking of systematic reviews. Retained articles were those that were evaluated as having high-quality interventions and evaluations using standardized scoring. Twenty-one high-quality interventions and evaluations were abstracted. Three reported declines in STI diagnoses, three reported declines in STI symptoms, six showed declines in risky sexual behavior, seven reported increases in abstinence, 11 found increases in condom use, and five reported increases in health care utilization. There is a wide range of rigorously evaluated high-quality interventions included in this review that can inform researchers, donors, and policy makers about where to make strategic investments to decrease the spread of STIs, including HIV. With the recent advent of biomarkers, researchers can use a gold standard measure to assess intervention impact. The diversity of interventions can allow decision makers to tailor interventions to the context, age range, and gender of the target population. PMID:27562450

  17. Interventions to Prevent Sexually Transmitted Infections, Including HIV, Among Young People in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review of the Published and Gray Literature.

    PubMed

    Kalamar, Amanda M; Bayer, Angela M; Hindin, Michelle J

    2016-09-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, are prevalent among adolescents and can have lasting adverse health consequences. The objective of this review is to identify high-quality interventions and evaluations to decrease STI transmission and related risky behaviors among young people in low- and middle-income countries. PubMed, Embase, PsycInfo, Cinahl Plus, Popline, and the Cochrane Databases were searched without language limitations for articles published through November 2015. Gray literature was searched by hand. Reference tracing was utilized, as well as the unpacking of systematic reviews. Retained articles were those that were evaluated as having high-quality interventions and evaluations using standardized scoring. Twenty-one high-quality interventions and evaluations were abstracted. Three reported declines in STI diagnoses, three reported declines in STI symptoms, six showed declines in risky sexual behavior, seven reported increases in abstinence, 11 found increases in condom use, and five reported increases in health care utilization. There is a wide range of rigorously evaluated high-quality interventions included in this review that can inform researchers, donors, and policy makers about where to make strategic investments to decrease the spread of STIs, including HIV. With the recent advent of biomarkers, researchers can use a gold standard measure to assess intervention impact. The diversity of interventions can allow decision makers to tailor interventions to the context, age range, and gender of the target population.

  18. Behavioral Intervention Technologies: Evidence review and recommendations for future research

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, David C.; Burns, Michelle Nicole; Schueller, Stephen M.; Clarke, Gregory; Klinkman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings of a technical expert panel convened by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the National Institute of Mental Health, charged with reviewing the state of research on behavioral intervention technologies (BITs) in mental health and identifying the top research priorities. BITs is the comprehensive term used to refer to behavioral and psychological interventions that use information and communication technology features to address behavioral and mental health outcomes. Mental health BITs using videoconferencing and standard telephone technologies to deliver psychotherapy have been wellvalidated. Web-based interventions have shown efficacy across a broad range of mental health outcomes, although outcomes vary widely. Social media such as online support groups have produced generally disappointing outcomes when used alone. Mobile technologies have received limited attention for mental health outcomes, although findings from behavioral health suggest they are promising. Virtual reality has shown good efficacy for anxiety and pediatric disorders. Serious gaming has received relatively little work in mental health. Recommendations for next step research in each of these are made. Research focused on understanding of reach, adherence, barriers and cost is recommended. As BITs can generate large amounts of data, improvements in the collection, storage, analysis, and visualization of big data will be required. Traditional psychological and behavioral theories have proven insufficient to understand how BITs produce behavioral change. Thus new theoretical models, as well as new evaluation strategies, will be required. Finally, for BITs to have a public health impact, research on implementation and application to prevention will be required. PMID:23664503

  19. Family Interventions for Schizophrenia and the Psychoses: A Review.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, William R

    2016-09-01

    Family psychoeducation as a treatment for schizophrenia was developed 40 years ago almost simultaneously and independently by investigators who at the time were not family therapists. Although the original goal was to decrease high expressed emotion as a means of preventing relapse, later variations have gone beyond to focus on social and role functioning and family well-being. Explicitly disavowing the earlier assumptions that family pathology caused relapse and deterioration, family psychoeducation seeks to engage family members as more sophisticated partners, complementing interventions by clinicians with specialized interactions and coping skills that counter the neurologic deficits inherent to the disorder. It has proved to be one of the most consistently effective treatments available. Reports on outcome studies now number more than 100, while meta-analyses put relapse rate reduction at 50-60% over treatment as usual. The most recent application in first episode and prodromal psychosis, combined with other evidence-based interventions, is yielding perhaps the most promising results yet achieved-substantial return of functioning and avoidance of psychosis altogether. Reviewed here are its scientific, theoretical, and clinical sources, a description of the most commonly applied version-the multifamily group format, selected clinical trials spanning those four decades, international and ethnic adaptations, and studies on mechanisms of efficacy. PMID:27411376

  20. Family Interventions for Schizophrenia and the Psychoses: A Review.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, William R

    2016-09-01

    Family psychoeducation as a treatment for schizophrenia was developed 40 years ago almost simultaneously and independently by investigators who at the time were not family therapists. Although the original goal was to decrease high expressed emotion as a means of preventing relapse, later variations have gone beyond to focus on social and role functioning and family well-being. Explicitly disavowing the earlier assumptions that family pathology caused relapse and deterioration, family psychoeducation seeks to engage family members as more sophisticated partners, complementing interventions by clinicians with specialized interactions and coping skills that counter the neurologic deficits inherent to the disorder. It has proved to be one of the most consistently effective treatments available. Reports on outcome studies now number more than 100, while meta-analyses put relapse rate reduction at 50-60% over treatment as usual. The most recent application in first episode and prodromal psychosis, combined with other evidence-based interventions, is yielding perhaps the most promising results yet achieved-substantial return of functioning and avoidance of psychosis altogether. Reviewed here are its scientific, theoretical, and clinical sources, a description of the most commonly applied version-the multifamily group format, selected clinical trials spanning those four decades, international and ethnic adaptations, and studies on mechanisms of efficacy.

  1. A Systematic Review on Interventions Supporting Preceptor Development.

    PubMed

    Windey, Maryann; Lawrence, Carol; Guthrie, Kimberly; Weeks, Debra; Sullo, Elaine; Chapa, Deborah W

    2015-01-01

    Increases in newly licensed nurses and experienced nurses changing specialties create a challenge for nursing professional development specialists (NPDS). The NPDS must use the best available evidence in designing programs. A systematic review of interventions for developing preceptors is needed to inform the NPDS in best practice. A search was conducted for full-text, quantitative, and mixed-methods articles published after the year 2000. Over 4000 titles were initially identified, which yielded 12 research studies for evaluation and syntheses. Results identified a limited body of evidence reflecting a need for NPDS to increase efforts in measuring the effectiveness of preceptor development initiatives.(See CE Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPD/A9). PMID:26580462

  2. A review of interventions that promote eating by internal cues.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Julie T; Magnuson, Amy B

    2014-05-01

    Traditional diet programs that encourage individuals to consciously restrict their dietary intake have not only been ineffective in terms of weight outcomes, but have also been counterproductive, promoting psychological distress and unhealthy eating behaviors. Nondiet approaches shift the focus away from weight outcomes to the improvement of health outcomes and psychological well-being. One such approach, intuitive eating, promotes dietary intake based on internal cues of hunger and fullness, body acceptance, and making behavior choices based on health as well as enjoyment. Several studies have implemented such ideas into intervention programs. The purpose of our review was to examine the physical and psychological effects of these programs. Twenty interventions were identified. Overall, studies had positive results, demonstrating improvements in eating habits, lifestyle, and body image as measured by dietary restraint, restrictive dieting, physical activity, body satisfaction, and drive for thinness. Participants also experienced improved psychological health as measured by depression, ineffectiveness, anxiety, self-esteem, negative affect, and quality of life. Several improvements were sustained through follow-up periods as long as 2 years. Completion rates were as high as 92% in nondieting groups. In addition, improvements in eating behaviors and maintaining a nondiet approach, increased self-esteem, and decreased body dissatisfaction were sustained long-term. Overall, studies that encourage individuals to eat intuitively help participants abandon unhealthy weight control behaviors, improve metabolic fitness, increase body satisfaction, and improve psychological distress. Results from our review favor the promotion of programs that emphasize a nonrestrictive pattern of eating, body acceptance, and health rather than weight loss.

  3. Effecting change in primary care management of respiratory conditions: a global scoping exercise and literature review of educational interventions to inform the IPCRG's E-Quality initiative.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Juliet; Williams, Siân; Chavannes, Niels H; Correia de Sousa, Jaime; Fardy, H John; Fletcher, Monica; Stout, James; Tomlins, Ron; Yusuf, Osman M; Pinnock, Hilary

    2012-12-01

    This discussion paper describes a scoping exercise and literature review commissioned by the International Primary Care Respiratory Group (IPCRG) to inform their E-Quality programme which seeks to support small-scale educational projects to improve respiratory management in primary care. Our narrative review synthesises information from three sources: publications concerning the global context and health systems development; a literature search of Medline, CINAHL and Cochrane databases; and a series of eight interviews conducted with members of the IPCRG faculty. Educational interventions sit within complex healthcare, economic, and policy contexts. It is essential that any development project considers the local circumstances in terms of economic resources, political circumstances, organisation and administrative capacities, as well as the specific quality issue to be addressed. There is limited evidence (in terms of changed clinician behaviour and/or improved health outcomes) regarding the merits of different educational and quality improvement approaches. Features of educational interventions that were most likely to show some evidence of effectiveness included being carefully designed, multifaceted, engaged health professionals in their learning, provided ongoing support, were sensitive to local circumstances, and delivered in combination with other quality improvement strategies. To be effective, educational interventions must consider the complex healthcare systems within which they operate. The criteria for the IPCRG E-Quality awards thus require applicants not only to describe their proposed educational initiative but also to consider the practical and local barriers to successful implementation, and to propose a robust evaluation in terms of changed clinician behaviour or improved health outcomes. PMID:22875141

  4. Systematic review of cost effectiveness studies of telemedicine interventions

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, Pamela S; Mair, Frances S; Haycox, Alan; May, Carl R; Williams, Tracy L; Hellmich, Seth

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To systematically review cost benefit studies of telemedicine. Design Systematic review of English language, peer reviewed journal articles. Data sources Searches of Medline, Embase, ISI citation indexes, and database of Telemedicine Information Exchange. Studies selected 55 of 612 identified articles that presented actual cost benefit data. Main outcome measures Scientific quality of reports assessed by use of an established instrument for adjudicating on the quality of economic analyses. Results 557 articles without cost data categorised by topic. 55 articles with data initially categorised by cost variables employed in the study and conclusions. Only 24/55 (44%) studies met quality criteria justifying inclusion in a quality review. 20/24 (83%) restricted to simple cost comparisons. No study used cost utility analysis, the conventional means of establishing the “value for money” that a therapeutic intervention represents. Only 7/24 (29%) studies attempted to explore the level of utilisation that would be needed for telemedicine services to compare favourably with traditionally organised health care. None addressed this question in sufficient detail to adequately answer it. 15/24 (62.5%) of articles reviewed here provided no details of sensitivity analysis, a method all economic analyses should incorporate. Conclusion There is no good evidence that telemedicine is a cost effective means of delivering health care. What is already known on this topicThe use of telemedicine has garnered much attention in the past decadeHundreds of articles have been published claiming that telemedicine is cost effectiveHowever, missing from the literature is a synthesis or meta-analysis of these publicationsWhat this study addsA comprehensive literature search of cost related articles on telemedicine identified more than 600 articles, but only 9% contained any cost benefit dataOnly 4% of these articles met quality criteria justifying inclusion in a formalised quality

  5. Physical Activity Programs with Post-Intervention Follow-Up in Children: A Comprehensive Review According to Categories of Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Sally; Häcker, Anna-Luisa; Henderson, Melanie; Barnett, Tracie; Mathieu, Marie-Eve; Pagani, Linda; Bigras, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Only 9% of Canadian children meet the National Guidelines of 60 min of daily moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity. The aim of this review is to assess the mid- and long-term effectiveness of physical activity interventions and their impact on cardiovascular risk factors in children. We assessed the success of interventions within three different categories: those using a behavioural and social approach, an informational approach or an environmental approach. The average number of children included in these studies was 860 (range of 30–5106); the age range was from 2 to 18 years; and the mean intervention duration was 1607 min (range of 12–8160 min). The length of follow-up post-intervention averaged 13 months (ranging from 0.25 to 96 months). A positive impact on physical activity was found in 74% and on any measured outcomes in 90% of the studies reviewed. However, the benefits of physical activity interventions decreased with longer follow-up. Regardless of the approaches, physical activity interventions improved cardiovascular risk factors. However, the challenge of any program is to maintain beneficial effects once the intervention is completed. These findings will inform the development of future intervention programs in order to optimize sustained cardiovascular benefits. PMID:27376315

  6. Physical Activity Programs with Post-Intervention Follow-Up in Children: A Comprehensive Review According to Categories of Intervention.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Sally; Häcker, Anna-Luisa; Henderson, Melanie; Barnett, Tracie; Mathieu, Marie-Eve; Pagani, Linda; Bigras, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Only 9% of Canadian children meet the National Guidelines of 60 min of daily moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity. The aim of this review is to assess the mid- and long-term effectiveness of physical activity interventions and their impact on cardiovascular risk factors in children. We assessed the success of interventions within three different categories: those using a behavioural and social approach, an informational approach or an environmental approach. The average number of children included in these studies was 860 (range of 30-5106); the age range was from 2 to 18 years; and the mean intervention duration was 1607 min (range of 12-8160 min). The length of follow-up post-intervention averaged 13 months (ranging from 0.25 to 96 months). A positive impact on physical activity was found in 74% and on any measured outcomes in 90% of the studies reviewed. However, the benefits of physical activity interventions decreased with longer follow-up. Regardless of the approaches, physical activity interventions improved cardiovascular risk factors. However, the challenge of any program is to maintain beneficial effects once the intervention is completed. These findings will inform the development of future intervention programs in order to optimize sustained cardiovascular benefits. PMID:27376315

  7. Physical Activity Programs with Post-Intervention Follow-Up in Children: A Comprehensive Review According to Categories of Intervention.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Sally; Häcker, Anna-Luisa; Henderson, Melanie; Barnett, Tracie; Mathieu, Marie-Eve; Pagani, Linda; Bigras, Jean-Luc

    2016-06-30

    Only 9% of Canadian children meet the National Guidelines of 60 min of daily moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity. The aim of this review is to assess the mid- and long-term effectiveness of physical activity interventions and their impact on cardiovascular risk factors in children. We assessed the success of interventions within three different categories: those using a behavioural and social approach, an informational approach or an environmental approach. The average number of children included in these studies was 860 (range of 30-5106); the age range was from 2 to 18 years; and the mean intervention duration was 1607 min (range of 12-8160 min). The length of follow-up post-intervention averaged 13 months (ranging from 0.25 to 96 months). A positive impact on physical activity was found in 74% and on any measured outcomes in 90% of the studies reviewed. However, the benefits of physical activity interventions decreased with longer follow-up. Regardless of the approaches, physical activity interventions improved cardiovascular risk factors. However, the challenge of any program is to maintain beneficial effects once the intervention is completed. These findings will inform the development of future intervention programs in order to optimize sustained cardiovascular benefits.

  8. Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of eHealth Interventions in Somatic Diseases: A Systematic Review of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Elbert, Niels J; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; van Renselaar, Wilco; Ekeland, Anne G; Hakkaart-van Roijen, Leona; Raat, Hein; Nijsten, Tamar EC

    2014-01-01

    Background eHealth potentially enhances quality of care and may reduce health care costs. However, a review of systematic reviews published in 2010 concluded that high-quality evidence on the benefits of eHealth interventions was still lacking. Objective We conducted a systematic review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses on the effectiveness/cost-effectiveness of eHealth interventions in patients with somatic diseases to analyze whether, and to what possible extent, the outcome of recent research supports or differs from previous conclusions. Methods Literature searches were performed in PubMed, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, and Scopus for systematic reviews and meta-analyses on eHealth interventions published between August 2009 and December 2012. Articles were screened for relevance based on preset inclusion and exclusion criteria. Citations of residual articles were screened for additional literature. Included papers were critically appraised using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) Statement before data were extracted. Based on conclusions drawn by the authors of the included articles, reviews and meta-analyses were divided into 1 of 3 groups: suitable, promising, or limited evidence on effectiveness/cost-effectiveness. Cases of uncertainty were resolved by consensus discussion. Effect sizes were extracted from papers that included a meta-analysis. To compare our results with previous findings, a trend analysis was performed. Results Our literature searches yielded 31 eligible reviews, of which 20 (65%) reported on costs. Seven papers (23%) concluded that eHealth is effective/cost-effective, 13 (42%) underlined that evidence is promising, and others found limited or inconsistent proof. Methodological quality of the included reviews and meta-analyses was generally considered high. Trend analysis showed a considerable accumulation of literature on eHealth. However, a similar percentage of papers concluded that e

  9. How effective are brief interventions in reducing alcohol consumption: do the setting, practitioner group and content matter? Findings from a systematic review and metaregression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Lucy; Melendez-Torres, G J; O'Donnell, Amy; Bradley, Jennifer; Newbury-Birch, Dorothy; Kaner, Eileen; Ashton, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Background While the efficacy and effectiveness of brief interventions for alcohol (ABI) have been demonstrated in primary care, there is weaker evidence in other settings and reviews do not consider differences in content. We conducted a systematic review to measure the effect of ABIs on alcohol consumption and how it differs by the setting, practitioner group and content of intervention. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO; CINAHL, Social Science Citation Index, Cochrane Library and Global Health up to January 2015 for randomised controlled trials that measured effectiveness of ABIs on alcohol consumption. We grouped outcomes into measures of quantity and frequency indices. We used multilevel meta-analysis to estimate pooled effect sizes and tested for the effect of moderators through a multiparameter Wald test. Stratified analysis of a subset of quantity and frequency outcomes was conducted as a sensitivity check. Results 52 trials were included contributing data on 29 891 individuals. ABIs reduced the quantity of alcohol consumed by 0.15 SDs. While neither the setting nor content appeared to significantly moderate intervention effectiveness, the provider did in some analyses. Interventions delivered by nurses had the most effect in reducing quantity (d=−0.23, 95% CI (−0.33 to −0.13)) but not frequency of alcohol consumption. All content groups had statistically significant mean effects, brief advice was the most effective in reducing quantity consumed (d=−0.20, 95% CI (−0.30 to −0.09)). Effects were maintained in the stratified sensitivity analysis at the first and last assessment time. Conclusions ABIs play a small but significant role in reducing alcohol consumption. Findings show the positive role of nurses in delivering interventions. The lack of evidence on the impact of content of intervention reinforces advice that services should select the ABI tool that best suits their needs. PMID:27515753

  10. Addressing Parental Mental Health Within Interventions for Children: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Acri, Mary C.; Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Untreated parent mental health problems have deleterious effects upon the family, yet caregivers are unlikely to receive services for their emotional health. We conducted a review of treatments and services for children and adolescents that also offered services to parents. Methods Child treatment and service studies were included in the present study if they analyzed parent symptoms or diagnoses over time, and the intervention contained a parent component. Results Of 200 studies reviewed, 20 contained a component for the parent and assessed the parent’s emotional health at multiple time points. Depression and anxiety were the most commonly studied parental mental health problem; most parent components consisted of behavioral strategies in service of the child’s psychological health. Conclusion Major shifts in health care policy affecting mental health services provide an opportunity to create integrated and coordinated health and behavioral health systems. Attention must be given to ensure that the workforce of providers, the administrative structures, and the reimbursement strategies are strengthened and connected to serve the needs of parents/caregivers and children in order to enhance family outcomes. PMID:26527857

  11. Yoga intervention and functional pain syndromes: a selective review.

    PubMed

    Sutar, Roshan; Yadav, Suresh; Desai, Geetha

    2016-06-01

    The definition of functional pain syndromes is varied across literature. No effort has been made to see all functional pain disorder groups under broad nomenclature which would exclude conditions for which pathophysiology is strongly known. Since these disorders are commonly treated with alternative treatment modalities and impose significant burden on health utilization, an effort to look into studies on yoga-based interventions on 'functional pain syndromes' (FPS) was made. This study defined FPS as 'Chronic relapsing remitting pain conditions, the origin of which is difficult to trace with no definite physical pathology on clinical suspicion or available laboratory measures and are valid based on subjective pain reporting, associated distress and socio-occupational dysfunction'. Chronic headache, neck pain, back pain, fibromyalgia, pelvic pain, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and somatoform pain disorders were included for this review. The review found four meta-analyses on the selected topic both indicating modest efficacy and benefit of yoga in these disorders. Future efforts should be directed to do a large meta-analysis of functional pain syndromes. PMID:27291934

  12. Coaching as a Family-Centred, Occupational Therapy Intervention for Autism: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Desley

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapy interventions for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) require a sound evidence-base. In the context of emerging evidence on coaching interventions in paediatric occupational therapy practice, a review of the occupational therapy literature was conducted to investigate the use of coaching interventions for children and adolescents…

  13. Moving beyond Dropout towards School Completion: An Integrative Review of Data-Based Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehr, Camilla A.; Hansen, Anastasia; Sinclair, Mary F.; Christenson, Sandra L.

    2003-01-01

    This article provides an integrative review of prevention and intervention studies addressing dropout or school completion described in professional journals. Forty-five intervention studies were coded according to research design, participants, interventions, and outcomes to describe the range of data-based programs and approaches available in…

  14. The Effects of Interventions to Prevent Substance Use among Adolescents: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karki, Suyen; Pietila, Anna-Maija; Lansimies-Antikainen, Helena; Varjoranta, Pirjo; Pirskanen, Marjatta; Laukkanen, Eila

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to describe and evaluate the effects of interventions used for preventing or reducing substance use among adolescents under 18 years of age. Studies (N = 27) available in CINAHL and PubMed from 2007 to 2010 were included. Results showed that family-based interventions and combined interventions have significant…

  15. Faith-Based Mental Health Interventions with African Americans: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Krystal; Aranda, Maria P.

    2016-01-01

    Faith-based interventions have emerged culturally sensitive way to address mental health issues among African Americans. This systematic review explores the scope and efficacy of faith-based mental health intervention outcomes among African Americans. Extracted data included the study population, setting, study design, intervention, adaptations,…

  16. A Narrative Review of Generic Intervention Fidelity Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Rezze, Briano; Law, Mary; Gorter, Jan Willem; Eva, Kevin; Pollock, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    To increase the rigor of pediatric rehabilitation research, there is a need to evaluate the degree to which an intervention is conducted as planned (i.e., fidelity). Generic fidelity measures evaluate more than one intervention and often include nonspecific attributes of the therapy process common to both interventions. The objective of this study…

  17. Systematic Review of Early Intensive Behavioral Interventions for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howlin, Patricia; Magiati, Iliana; Charman, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Recent reviews highlight limitations in the evidence base for early interventions for children with autism. We conducted a systematic review of controlled studies of early intensive behavioral interventions (EIBI) for young children with autism. Eleven studies met inclusion criteria (including two randomized controlled trials). At group level,…

  18. Phonics Based Reading Interventions for Students with Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Teachers require interventions for students with intellectual disability (ID) that are simple, efficient, and can be implemented in the classroom versus interventions requiring isolation. The purpose of this review was to update the prior review by Joseph & Seery (2004) and to serve as a resource for parents, practitioners and researchers…

  19. Mathematics Interventions for Students with Learning Disabilities (LD) in Secondary School: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Jonté A.; Wang, Jun; Brownell, Mary T.; Gagnon, Joseph Calvin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our literature review was to extend and update Maccini, Mulcahy, and Wilson's (2007) review of the literature on mathematics interventions for secondary students with learning disabilities (LD). An extensive search of the research literature netted 15 research studies that focused on mathematics interventions for secondary students…

  20. Fidelity in After-School Program Intervention Research: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Brandy R.; Peters, Kristen E.; Vaughn, Michael G.; Sarteschi, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study examined whether and to what extent researchers addressed intervention fidelity in research of after-school programs serving at-risk students. Method: Systematic review procedures were used to search, retrieve, select, and analyze studies for this review. Fifty-five intervention studies were assessed on the following…

  1. A Review of Peer-Mediated Social Interaction Interventions for Students with Autism in Inclusive Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Laci; O'Reilly, Mark; Kuhn, Michelle; Gevarter, Cindy; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lang, Russell

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the use of peer-mediated interventions (PMI) to improve the social interaction skills of students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in inclusive settings. The purpose of this review is to (a) identify the characteristics and components of peer-mediated social interaction interventions, (b) evaluate the effectiveness of PMI…

  2. Secondary Prevention Interventions for Young Drug Users: A Systematic Review of the Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Lawrence; Orr, Linda; Watson, Lynsey; Jackson, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the international scientific evidence on the effectiveness of secondary prevention interventions for young drug users. The review provides insight into the effectiveness of interventions that have been evaluated using moderately strong research designs. Most of the studies included are from the United States of America. Some…

  3. Media Literacy Interventions: A Meta-Analytic Review.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Se-Hoon; Cho, Hyunyi; Hwang, Yoori

    2012-06-01

    Although numerous media literacy interventions have been developed and delivered over the past 3 decades, a comprehensive meta-analytic assessment of their effects has not been available. This study investigates the average effect size and moderators of 51 media literacy interventions. Media literacy interventions had positive effects (d=.37) on outcomes including media knowledge, criticism, perceived realism, influence, behavioral beliefs, attitudes, self-efficacy, and behavior. Moderator analyses indicated that interventions with more sessions were more effective, but those with more components were less effective. Intervention effects did not vary by the agent, target age, the setting, audience involvement, the topic, the country, or publication status.

  4. Interventions to reduce bullying in health care organizations: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Elizabeth; Robertson, Susan; Miller, Natasha; Robertson-Boersma, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    The problem of staff-to-staff bullying and its consequences in the health care sector has given rise to urgent knowledge needs among health care employers, union representatives, and professional associations. The purpose of this scoping review is to increase the uptake and application of synthesized research results of interventions designed to address bullying among coworkers within health care workplaces. The scoping review's methodology uses an adapted version of the Arksey and O'Malley framework to locate and review empirical studies involving interventions designed to address bullying in health care workplaces. The findings of the review reveal eight articles from three countries discussing interventions that included educative programming, bullying champions/advocates, and zero-tolerance policies. The reported evaluations extend beyond bullying to include organizational culture, trust in management, retention rates, and psychosocial health. The most promising reported outcomes are from participatory interventions. The results of the review make a compelling case for bullying interventions based on participatory principles.

  5. Scoping review of physical rehabilitation interventions in long-term care: protocol for tools, models of delivery, outcomes and quality indicators

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Caitlin; Gibbs, Jenna; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Hirdes, John; Milligan, James; Berg, Katherine; Giangregorio, Lora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A growing number of medically complex older adults reside in long-term care (LTC) and often require physical rehabilitation (PR). While PR is effective at maintaining or improving a patient's physical function, the breadth of PR interventions evaluated in LTC, which outcomes or quality indicators (QI) can be used to evaluate PR, and what tools or models can be used to determine eligibility for PR services remain unknown. Methods and analysis A scoping review will be conducted to address the following research questions: (1) What types of PR have been evaluated for efficacy or effectiveness in LTC? (2) Which outcomes or QIs have been used when evaluating PR interventions in LTC, and how can this inform evaluation of PR using existing QIs in the Canadian context? (3) What tools or models exist or have been validated for decision-making in the allocation of PR resources in LTC? We will conduct a comprehensive literature search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and Occupational Therapy Systematic Evaluation of Evidence database (OTseeker) and a structured grey literature search. Two team members will screen articles and abstract the data. The results will be displayed according to the research question they address. Data abstracted regarding outcomes and QIs will be mapped onto existing, publicly reported QIs used in Ontario, Canada. Ethics and dissemination The scoping review will synthesise the characteristics of PR interventions described in the literature, the outcomes used to evaluate them and tools to determine eligibility for services. The review will be the first step in formally identifying what outcomes and QIs have been used to evaluate PR in LTC, and will be used to inform a stakeholder consensus process exploring the same question. The scoping review may also identify knowledge gaps. The results will be disseminated via publication and presentation at conferences, in

  6. Diet and Physical Activity Interventions to Prevent or Treat Obesity in South Asian Children and Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tamara; Smith, Sarah; Bhopal, Raj; Kasim, Adetayo; Summerbell, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: The metabolic risks associated with obesity are greater for South Asian populations compared with White or other ethnic groups, and levels of obesity in childhood are known to track into adulthood. Tackling obesity in South Asians is therefore a high priority. The rationale for this systematic review is the suggestion that there may be differential effectiveness in diet and physical activity interventions in South Asian populations compared with other ethnicities. The research territory of the present review is an emergent, rather than mature, field of enquiry, but is urgently needed. Thus the aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the effectiveness of diet and physical activity interventions to prevent or treat obesity in South Asians living in or outside of South Asia and to describe the characteristics of effective interventions. Methods: Systematic review of any type of lifestyle intervention, of any length of follow-up that reported any anthropometric measure for children or adults of South Asian ethnicity. There was no restriction on the type of comparator; randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, and before-after studies were included. A comprehensive search strategy was implemented in five electronic databases: ASSIA, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Embase, Medline and Social Sciences Citation Index. The search was limited to English language abstracts published between January 2006 and January 2014. References were screened; data extraction and quality assessment were carried out by two reviewers. Results are presented in narrative synthesis and meta-analysis. Results: Twenty-nine studies were included, seven children, 21 adult and one mixed age. No studies in children under six were identified. Sixteen studies were conducted in South Asia, ten in Europe and three in USA. Effective or promising trials include physical activity interventions in South Asian men in Norway and South Asian school

  7. Theory of reasoned action and theory of planned behavior-based dietary interventions in adolescents and young adults: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hackman, Christine L; Knowlden, Adam P

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions in many nations around the world. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) and the theory of reasoned action (TRA) have been used to successfully plan and evaluate numerous interventions for many different behaviors. The aim of this study was to systematically review and synthesize TPB and TRA-based dietary behavior interventions targeting adolescents and young adults. Methods The following databases were systematically searched to find articles for this review: Academic Search Premier; Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL); Education Resources Information Center (ERIC); Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); and MEDLINE. Inclusion criteria for articles were: 1) primary or secondary interventions, 2) with any quantitative design, 3) published in the English language, 4) between January 2003 and March 2014, 5) that targeted adolescents or young adults, 6) which included dietary change behavior as the outcome, and 7) utilized TPB or TRA. Results Of the eleven intervention studies evaluated, nine resulted in dietary behavior change that was attributed to the treatment. Additionally, all but one study found there to be a change in at least one construct of TRA or TPB, while one study did not measure constructs. All of the studies utilized some type of quantitative design, with two employing quasi-experimental, and eight employing randomized control trial design. Among the studies, four utilized technology including emails, social media posts, information on school websites, web-based activities, audio messages in classrooms, interactive DVDs, and health-related websites. Two studies incorporated goal setting and four employed persuasive communication. Conclusion Interventions directed toward changing dietary behaviors in adolescents should aim to incorporate multi-faceted, theory-based approaches. Future studies should consider

  8. Internet-Based Physical Activity Interventions: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Schoones, Johannes W; Vliet Vlieland, Theodora PM

    2007-01-01

    Background Nowadays people are extensively encouraged to become more physically active. The Internet has been brought forward as an effective tool to change physical activity behavior. However, little is known about the evidence regarding such Internet-based interventions. Objective The aim of the study was to systematically assess the methodological quality and the effectiveness of interventions designed to promote physical activity by means of the Internet as evaluated by randomized controlled trials. Methods A literature search was conducted up to July 2006 using the databases PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Library. Only randomized controlled trials describing the effectiveness of an Internet-based intervention, with the promotion of physical activity among adults being one of its major goals, were included. Data extracted included source and year of publication, country of origin, targeted health behaviors, participants’ characteristics, characteristics of the intervention, and effectiveness data. In addition, the methodological quality was assessed. Results The literature search resulted in 10 eligible studies of which five met at least nine out of 13 general methodological criteria. The majority of the interventions were tailored to the characteristics of the participants and used interactive self-monitoring and feedback tools. Six studies used one or more theoretical models to compose the contents of the interventions. One study used an objective measure to assess the amount of physical activity (activity monitor), and six studies used multiple subjective measures of physical activity. Furthermore, half of the studies employed measures of physical fitness other than physical activity. In three studies, an Internet-based physical activity intervention was compared with a waiting list group. Of these three studies, two reported a significantly greater improvement in physical activity levels in the Internet-based intervention than in

  9. A systematic review of interventions to improve knowledge and self-management skills concerning contraception, pregnancy and breastfeeding in people with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Ilana N; Ngian, Gene-Siew; Van Doornum, Sharon; Briggs, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to determine the effectiveness of interventions for improving knowledge and/or self-management skills concerning contraception, pregnancy and breastfeeding in people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We searched four databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane Trials, PsycINFO) using a comprehensive search strategy. Studies were eligible if they were prospective, published in English from 2004 to 2015, included participants with RA and tested an intervention designed to improve knowledge and/or self-management skills relating to family planning, pregnancy or breastfeeding. As no studies met the latter criterion, the search strategy was expanded to include all prospective studies evaluating RA educational and/or self-management interventions. Data on study characteristics, participant characteristics and programme content were extracted to summarise the evidence base for interventions to support people with RA during their reproductive years. Expanded literature searches identified 2290 papers, of which 68 were eligible. Of these, nine papers (13%) specifically excluded pregnant women/breastfeeding mothers or recruited only older people. Only one study (1%) explicitly evaluated pregnancy-focused education via a motherhood decision aid, while eight studies (12%) incorporated relevant (albeit minor) components within broader RA educational or self-management interventions. Of these, three studies provided methotrexate education in relation to conception/pregnancy/breastfeeding; three incorporated discussions on RA and relationships, impact of RA on the family or sexual advice; one provided information regarding contraception and fertility; and one issued a warning regarding use of biologic therapy in pregnancy/breastfeeding. In conclusion, information regarding family planning, pregnancy or breastfeeding represents a negligible part of published RA educational interventions, with scope to develop targeted resources.

  10. A systematic review of interventions to improve knowledge and self-management skills concerning contraception, pregnancy and breastfeeding in people with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Ilana N; Ngian, Gene-Siew; Van Doornum, Sharon; Briggs, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to determine the effectiveness of interventions for improving knowledge and/or self-management skills concerning contraception, pregnancy and breastfeeding in people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We searched four databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane Trials, PsycINFO) using a comprehensive search strategy. Studies were eligible if they were prospective, published in English from 2004 to 2015, included participants with RA and tested an intervention designed to improve knowledge and/or self-management skills relating to family planning, pregnancy or breastfeeding. As no studies met the latter criterion, the search strategy was expanded to include all prospective studies evaluating RA educational and/or self-management interventions. Data on study characteristics, participant characteristics and programme content were extracted to summarise the evidence base for interventions to support people with RA during their reproductive years. Expanded literature searches identified 2290 papers, of which 68 were eligible. Of these, nine papers (13%) specifically excluded pregnant women/breastfeeding mothers or recruited only older people. Only one study (1%) explicitly evaluated pregnancy-focused education via a motherhood decision aid, while eight studies (12%) incorporated relevant (albeit minor) components within broader RA educational or self-management interventions. Of these, three studies provided methotrexate education in relation to conception/pregnancy/breastfeeding; three incorporated discussions on RA and relationships, impact of RA on the family or sexual advice; one provided information regarding contraception and fertility; and one issued a warning regarding use of biologic therapy in pregnancy/breastfeeding. In conclusion, information regarding family planning, pregnancy or breastfeeding represents a negligible part of published RA educational interventions, with scope to develop targeted resources. PMID:26638162

  11. Impact of food supplementation on weight loss in randomised-controlled dietary intervention trials: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wibisono, Cinthya; Probst, Yasmine; Neale, Elizabeth; Tapsell, Linda

    2016-04-01

    Dietary trials provide evidence for practice and policy guidelines, but poor adherence may confound results. Food supplementation may improve adherence to dietary interventions, but the impact of supplementation on study outcomes is not known. The aim of this review was to examine the impact of food supplementation on weight loss in dietary intervention trials. The databases Scopus, PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for dietary intervention trials published between January 2004 and March 2015 using the following keyword combinations: 'trial' OR 'intervention', 'food' OR 'diet', 'weight loss' and 'adherence' OR 'adherence'. Studies were included if food was provided to at least one study group and both 'weight change' and 'adherence' were reported. Random effects meta-analyses were conducted to assess weighted mean differences (WMD) in body weight (change or final mean values). The included studies formed two groups: trials involving an intervention group supplemented with a food and a control without food supplementation (food v. no food), and trials in which food was provided to all subjects (food v. food) (PROSPERO registration: CRD42015017563). In total, sixteen studies were included. Significant weight reduction was reported in the food v. no food studies (WMD -0·74 kg; 95 % CI -1·40, -0·08; P=0·03, I 2=63 %). A non-significant increase in weight was found among the food v. food studies (WMD 0·84 kg; 95 % CI -0·60, 2·27; P=0·25, I 2=0 %). Food supplementation appeared to result in greater weight loss in dietary trials. Energy restrictions and intensity of interventions were other significant factors influencing weight loss.

  12. Do Couple-Based Interventions Make a Difference for Couples Affected by Cancer?: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background With the growing recognition that patients and partners react to a cancer diagnosis as an interdependent system and increasing evidence that psychosocial interventions can be beneficial to both patients and partners, there has been a recent increase in the attention given to interventions that target couples. The aim of this systematic review was to identify existing couple-based interventions for patients with cancer and their partners and explore the efficacy of these interventions (including whether there is added value to target the couple versus individuals), the content and delivery of couple-based interventions, and to identify the key elements of couple-based interventions that promote improvement in adjustment to cancer diagnosis. Method A systematic review of the cancer literature was performed to identify experimental and quasi-experimental couple-based interventions published between 1990 and 2011. To be considered for this review, studies had to test the efficacy of a psychosocial intervention for couples affected by cancer. Studies were excluded if they were published in a language other than English or French, focused on pharmacological, exercise, or dietary components combined with psychosocial components, or did not assess the impact of the intervention on psychological distress (e.g., depression, anxiety) or quality of life. Data were extracted using a standardised data collection form, and were analysed independently by three reviewers. Results Of the 709 articles screened, 23 were included in this review. Couple-based interventions were most efficacious in improving couple communication, psychological distress, and relationship functioning. Interventions had a limited impact on physical distress and social adjustment. Most interventions focused on improving communication and increasing understanding of the cancer diagnosis within couples. Interventions were most often delivered by masters-level nurses or clinical psychologists

  13. Housing Interventions and Control of Asthma-Related Indoor Biologic Agents: A Review of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, James; Jacobs, David E.; Ashley, Peter J.; Baeder, Andrea; Chew, Ginger L.; Dearborn, Dorr; Hynes, H. Patricia; Miller, J. David; Morley, Rebecca; Rabito, Felicia; Zeldin, DC

    2014-01-01

    Subject matter experts systematically reviewed evidence on the effectiveness of housing interventions that affect health outcomes, primarily asthma, associated with exposure to moisture, mold, and allergens. Three of the 11 interventions reviewed had sufficient evidence for implementation: multifaceted, in-home, tailored interventions for reducing asthma morbidity; integrated pest management to reduce cockroach allergen; and combined elimination of moisture intrusion and leaks and removal of moldy items to reduce mold and respiratory symptoms. Four interventions needed more field evaluation, one needed formative research, and three either had no evidence of effectiveness or were ineffective. The three interventions with sufficient evidence all applied multiple, integrated strategies. This evidence review shows that selected interventions that improve housing conditions will reduce morbidity from asthma and respiratory allergies. PMID:20689369

  14. What interventions increase commuter cycling? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Glenn; Anokye, Nana Kwame; Pokhrel, Subhash

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify interventions that will increase commuter cycling. Setting All settings where commuter cycling might take place. Participants Adults (aged 18+) in any country. Interventions Individual, group or environmental interventions including policies and infrastructure. Primary and secondary outcome measures A wide range of ‘changes in commuter cycling’ indicators, including frequency of cycling, change in workforce commuting mode, change in commuting population transport mode, use of infrastructure by defined populations and population modal shift. Results 12 studies from 6 countries (6 from the UK, 2 from Australia, 1 each from Sweden, Ireland, New Zealand and the USA) met the inclusion criteria. Of those, 2 studies were randomised control trials and the remainder preintervention and postintervention studies. The majority of studies (n=7) evaluated individual-based or group-based interventions and the rest environmental interventions. Individual-based or group-based interventions in 6/7 studies were found to increase commuter cycling of which the effect was significant in only 3/6 studies. Environmental interventions, however, had small but positive effects in much larger but more difficult to define populations. Almost all studies had substantial loss to follow-up. Conclusions Despite commuter cycling prevalence varying widely between countries, robust evidence of what interventions will increase commuter cycling in low cycling prevalence nations is sparse. Wider environmental interventions that make cycling conducive appear to reach out to hard to define but larger populations. This could mean that environmental interventions, despite their small positive effects, have greater public health significance than individual-based or group-based measures because those interventions encourage a larger number of people to integrate physical activity into their everyday lives. PMID:26275902

  15. Mindfulness meditation as an intervention for binge eating, emotional eating, and weight loss: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Katterman, Shawn N; Kleinman, Brighid M; Hood, Megan M; Nackers, Lisa M; Corsica, Joyce A

    2014-04-01

    Mindfulness-based approaches are growing in popularity as interventions for disordered eating and weight loss. Initial research suggests that mindfulness meditation may be an effective intervention for binge eating; however, no systematic review has examined interventions where mindfulness meditation was the primary intervention and no review has examined its effect on subclinical disordered eating or weight. Using the PRISMA method for systematic reviews, we reviewed 14 studies that investigated mindfulness meditation as the primary intervention and assessed binge eating, emotional eating, and/or weight change. Results suggest that mindfulness meditation effectively decreases binge eating and emotional eating in populations engaging in this behavior; evidence for its effect on weight is mixed. Additional research is warranted to determine comparative effectiveness and long-term effects of mindfulness training.

  16. Interactive social media interventions to promote health equity: an overview of reviews

    PubMed Central

    Welch, V.; Petkovic, J.; Pardo, J. Pardo; Rader, T.; Tugwell, P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Social media use has been increasing in public health and health promotion because it can remove geographic and physical access barriers. However, these interventions also have the potential to increase health inequities for people who do not have access to or do not use social media. In this paper, we aim to assess the effects of interactive social media interventions on health outcomes, behaviour change and health equity. Methods: We conducted a rapid response overview of systematic reviews. We used a sensitive search strategy to identify systematic reviews and included those that focussed on interventions allowing two-way interaction such as discussion forums, social networks (e.g. Facebook and Twitter), blogging, applications linked to online communities and media sharing. Results: Eleven systematic reviews met our inclusion criteria. Most interventions addressed by the reviews included online discussion boards or similar strategies, either as stand-alone interventions or in combination with other interventions. Seven reviews reported mixed effects on health outcomes and healthy behaviours. We did not find disaggregated analyses across characteristics associated with disadvantage, such as lower socioeconomic status or age. However, some targeted studies reported that social media interventions were effective in specific populations in terms of age, socioeconomic status, ethnicities and place of residence. Four reviews reported qualitative benefits such as satisfaction, finding information and improved social support. Conclusion: Social media interventions were effective in certain populations at risk for disadvantage (youth, older adults, low socioeconomic status, rural), which indicates that these interventions may be effective for promoting health equity. However, confirmation of effectiveness would require further study. Several reviews raised the issue of acceptability of social media interventions. Only four studies reported on the

  17. Behavioral Interventions to Reduce Alcohol Use Among Patients with Hepatitis C: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Sims, Omar T; Maynard, Quentin R; Melton, Pam A

    2016-10-01

    Alcohol use is a barrier to pharmacologic treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV). It is advantageous for medical and clinical social workers engaged in HCV care to be knowledgeable of behavioral interventions that can be used to reduce alcohol use among patients with HCV. This article identifies and describes studies that designed and implemented behavioral interventions to reduce alcohol use among patients with HCV in clinical settings. To achieve this goal, this article conducts a rigorous systematic review to identify peer-reviewed articles, describes each behavioral intervention, and reports primary outcomes of each study included in the review. PMID:27295132

  18. Transcatheter Renal Interventions: A Review of Established and Emerging Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Minocha, Jeet; Parvinian, Ahmad; Bui, James T; Knuttinen, Martha Grace; Ray, Charles E; Gaba, Ron C

    2015-01-01

    Catheter-based interventions play an important role in the multidisciplinary management of renal pathology. The array of procedures available to interventional radiologists (IRs) includes established techniques such as angioplasty, stenting, embolization, thrombolysis, and thrombectomy for treatment of renovascular disease, as well as embolization of renal neoplasms and emerging therapies such as transcatheter renal artery sympathectomy for treatment of resistant hypertension. Here, we present an overview of these minimally invasive therapies, with an emphasis on interventional technique and clinical outcomes of the procedure. PMID:25806140

  19. Effectiveness of social marketing strategies to reduce youth obesity in European school-based interventions: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aceves-Martins, Magaly; Llauradó, Elisabet; Tarro, Lucia; Moreno-García, Carlos Francisco; Trujillo Escobar, Tamy Goretty; Giralt, Montse

    2016-01-01

    Context: The use of social marketing to modify lifestyle choices could be helpful in reducing youth obesity. Some or all of the 8 domains of the National Social Marketing Centre’s social marketing benchmark criteria (SMBC) are often used but not always defined in intervention studies. Objective: The aim of this review is to assess the effectiveness of European school-based interventions to prevent obesity relative to the inclusion of SMBC domains in the intervention. Data Sources: The PubMed, Cochrane, and ERIC databases were used. Study Selection: Nonrandomized and randomized controlled trials conducted from 1990 to April 2014 in participants aged 5 to 17 years were included. Data Extraction: After the study selection, the 8 domains of the SMBC were assessed in each included study. Results: Thirty-eight publications were included in the systematic review. For the meta-analysis, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting body mass index or prevalence of overweight and obesity were considered. Eighteen RCTs with a total of 8681 participants included at least 5 SMBC. The meta-analysis showed a small standardized mean difference in body mass index of −0.25 (95%CI, −0.45 to −0.04) and a prevalence of overweight and obesity odds ratio of 0.72 (95%CI, 0.5–0.97). Conclusion: Current evidence indicates that the inclusion of at least 5 SMBC domains in school-based interventions could benefit efforts to prevent obesity in young people. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42014007297. PMID:27018054

  20. Cost-effectiveness of adherence-enhancing interventions: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Simon-Tuval, Tzahit; Neumann, Peter J; Greenberg, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Low patient adherence to health-related interventions is a major barrier to achieving healthcare goals and is associated with very high avoidable costs. Although several studies suggest that adherence-enhancing interventions can improve health outcomes, economic evaluations of these interventions are scarce. Systematic reviews published to date are limited to interventions to enhance adherence to pharmaceuticals or to specific diseases and interventions. The authors' objective was to examine the evidence regarding the cost-effectiveness of adherence-enhancing interventions in healthcare and what conclusion could be drawn about these interventions. The present systematic review included 43 original studies and assessed the current evidence regarding the cost-effectiveness of a broad array of interventions aimed at enhancing adherence to medications, medical devices, screening tests and lifestyle behaviors. The authors found that although the majority of adherence-enhancing interventions were cost-effective or cost-saving, variation exists within different intervention types. Further research on the sustainability of adherence improvements is needed in order to accurately evaluate interventions' long-term benefits.

  1. Conducting systematic reviews of intervention questions I: Writing the review protocol, formulating the question and searching the literature.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, A M; Anderson, K M; Goodell, C K; Sargeant, J M

    2014-06-01

    This article is the fourth of six articles addressing systematic reviews in animal agriculture and veterinary medicine. Previous articles in the series have introduced systematic reviews, discussed study designs and hierarchies of evidence, and provided details on conducting randomized controlled trials, a common design for use in systematic reviews. This article describes development of a review protocol and the first two steps in a systematic review: formulating a review question, and searching the literature for relevant research. The emphasis is on systematic reviews of questions related to interventions. The review protocol is developed prior to conducting the review and specifies the plan for the conduct of the review, identifies the roles and responsibilities of the review team and provides structured definitions related to the review question. For intervention questions, the review question should be defined by the PICO components: population, intervention, comparison and outcome(s). The literature search is designed to identify all potentially relevant original research that may address the question. Search terms related to some or all of the PICO components are entered into literature databases, and searches for unpublished literature also are conducted. All steps of the literature search are documented to provide transparent reporting of the process.

  2. Interventions to Modify Health Care Provider Adherence to Asthma Guidelines: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Okelo, Sande O.; Butz, Arlene M.; Sharma, Ritu; Diette, Gregory B.; Pitts, Samantha I.; King, Tracy M.; Linn, Shauna T.; Reuben, Manisha; Chelladurai, Yohalakshmi

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Health care provider adherence to asthma guidelines is poor. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of interventions to improve health care providers’ adherence to asthma guidelines on health care process and clinical outcomes. METHODS: Data sources included Medline, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL Register of Controlled Trials, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Educational Resources Information Center, PsycINFO, and Research and Development Resource Base in Continuing Medical Education up to July 2012. Paired investigators independently assessed study eligibility. Investigators abstracted data sequentially and independently graded the evidence. RESULTS: Sixty-eight eligible studies were classified by intervention: decision support, organizational change, feedback and audit, clinical pharmacy support, education only, quality improvement/pay-for-performance, multicomponent, and information only. Half were randomized trials (n = 35). There was moderate evidence for increased prescriptions of controller medications for decision support, feedback and audit, and clinical pharmacy support and low-grade evidence for organizational change and multicomponent interventions. Moderate evidence supports the use of decision support and clinical pharmacy interventions to increase provision of patient self-education/asthma action plans. Moderate evidence supports use of decision support tools to reduce emergency department visits, and low-grade evidence suggests there is no benefit for this outcome with organizational change, education only, and quality improvement/pay-for-performance. CONCLUSIONS: Decision support tools, feedback and audit, and clinical pharmacy support were most likely to improve provider adherence to asthma guidelines, as measured through health care process outcomes. There is a need to evaluate health care provider-targeted interventions with standardized outcomes. PMID:23979092

  3. Interventions to reduce suicides at suicide hotspots: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ‘Suicide hotspots’ include tall structures (for example, bridges and cliffs), railway tracks, and isolated locations (for example, rural car parks) which offer direct means for suicide or seclusion that prevents intervention. Methods We searched Medline for studies that could inform the following question: ‘What interventions are available to reduce suicides at hotspots, and are they effective?’ Results There are four main approaches: (a) restricting access to means (through installation of physical barriers); (b) encouraging help-seeking (by placement of signs and telephones); (c) increasing the likelihood of intervention by a third party (through surveillance and staff training); and (d) encouraging responsible media reporting of suicide (through guidelines for journalists). There is relatively strong evidence that reducing access to means can avert suicides at hotspots without substitution effects. The evidence is weaker for the other approaches, although they show promise. Conclusions More well-designed intervention studies are needed to strengthen this evidence base. PMID:23496989

  4. Educational Interventions for Children with ASD: A Systematic Literature Review 2008-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Caroline; Symes, Wendy; Hebron, Judith; Humphrey, Neil; Morewood, Gareth; Woods, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Systematic literature reviews can play a key role in underpinning evidence-based practice. To date, large-scale reviews of interventions for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have focused primarily on research quality. To assist practitioners, the current review adopted a broader framework which allowed for greater consideration of…

  5. e-Health Interventions for Healthy Aging: A Systematic Review Protocol.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Beogo, Idrissa; Buyl, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    e-Health interventions could contribute to healthy aging (HA) but their effectiveness has not been synthesised. This study aims to systematically review the effectiveness of e-health interventions for supporting HA. We will perform standardized searches to identify experimental and quasi-experimental studies evaluating the effectiveness of e-health interventions for HA. Outcomes of interest are: wellbeing, quality of life, activities of daily living, leisure activities, knowledge, evaluation of care, social support, skill acquisition and healthy behaviours. We will also consider adverse effects such as social isolation, anxiety, and burden on informal caregivers. Two reviewers will independently assess studies for inclusion and extract data using a standardised tool. We will calculate effect sizes related to e-health interventions. If not possible, we will present the findings in a narrative form. This systematic review will provide unique knowledge on the effectiveness of e-health interventions for supporting HA. PMID:27332428

  6. e-Health Interventions for Healthy Aging: A Systematic Review Protocol.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Beogo, Idrissa; Buyl, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    e-Health interventions could contribute to healthy aging (HA) but their effectiveness has not been synthesised. This study aims to systematically review the effectiveness of e-health interventions for supporting HA. We will perform standardized searches to identify experimental and quasi-experimental studies evaluating the effectiveness of e-health interventions for HA. Outcomes of interest are: wellbeing, quality of life, activities of daily living, leisure activities, knowledge, evaluation of care, social support, skill acquisition and healthy behaviours. We will also consider adverse effects such as social isolation, anxiety, and burden on informal caregivers. Two reviewers will independently assess studies for inclusion and extract data using a standardised tool. We will calculate effect sizes related to e-health interventions. If not possible, we will present the findings in a narrative form. This systematic review will provide unique knowledge on the effectiveness of e-health interventions for supporting HA.

  7. Reviewing evidence on complex social interventions: appraising implementation in systematic reviews of the health effects of organisational-level workplace interventions

    PubMed Central

    Egan, M; Bambra, C; Petticrew, M; Whitehead, M

    2009-01-01

    Background: The reporting of intervention implementation in studies included in systematic reviews of organisational-level workplace interventions was appraised. Implementation is taken to include such factors as intervention setting, resources, planning, collaborations, delivery and macro-level socioeconomic contexts. Understanding how implementation affects intervention outcomes may help prevent erroneous conclusions and misleading assumptions about generalisability, but implementation must be adequately reported if it is to be taken into account. Methods: Data on implementation were obtained from four systematic reviews of complex interventions in workplace settings. Implementation was appraised using a specially developed checklist and by means of an unstructured reading of the text. Results: 103 studies were identified and appraised, evaluating four types of organisational-level workplace intervention (employee participation, changing job tasks, shift changes and compressed working weeks). Many studies referred to implementation, but reporting was generally poor and anecdotal in form. This poor quality of reporting did not vary greatly by type or date of publication. A minority of studies described how implementation may have influenced outcomes. These descriptions were more usefully explored through an unstructured reading of the text, rather than by means of the checklist. Conclusions: Evaluations of complex interventions should include more detailed reporting of implementation and consider how to measure quality of implementation. The checklist helped us explore the poor reporting of implementation in a more systematic fashion. In terms of interpreting study findings and their transferability, however, the more qualitative appraisals appeared to offer greater potential for exploring how implementation may influence the findings of specific evaluations. Implementation appraisal techniques for systematic reviews of complex interventions require further

  8. Patient education interventions to improve physical activity in patients with intermittent claudication: a protocol for a systematic mixed-studies review

    PubMed Central

    Abaraogu, Ukachukwu Okoroafor; Dall, Philippa Margaret; Seenan, Christopher Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and intermittent claudication (IC) decrease an individual's capacity to engage in physical activity (PA) with potentially negative effects on PA behaviour. Strategies to improve PA among this population may provide a range of positive health benefits. We present a protocol to assess the components of patient education interventions that improve PA capacity and PA behaviour in patients with PAD and IC. Methods and analysis Published peer-reviewed studies will be searched in the following databases: CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, OVID, ProQuest, AMED, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Web of Science Core Collection and PEDro, to identify literature investigating the effect of patient education on PA of patients with PAD and IC, or studies that investigated patients' perceptions or experience with these interventions. Two authors will independently perform screening for study eligibility, result synthesis and then appraise study quality. For interventions without follow-up, primary outcome measures will include change in PA capacity, or change in free-living PA behaviour; where there was a follow-up postintervention, the primary outcome will be rate of adherence to PA behaviour improvement. A three-phase sequential explanatory synthesis of mixed studies will be employed to answer the research questions. Homogenous quantitative data will be analysed using a random-effects model of meta-analysis with results presented as relative risk for dichotomous outcomes and as weighted or standardised means for continuous outcomes. Qualitative data will be analysed using thematic synthesis. This review protocol is reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P) 2015 guidelines. Trial registration number CRD42015027314. PMID:27207628

  9. [Empirically based early intervention programs for children with autistic disorders - a selective literature review].

    PubMed

    Freitag, Christine M

    2010-07-01

    Autistic Disorders (AD) are characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, as well as by stereotyped behaviors and interests. Early intervention programs in AD aim to improve several aspects of the child's abilities: joint attention, play abilities, language development, and especially social interaction and communication. In this review article based on a selective literature search, the relatively best empirically based early intervention programs will be discussed with a focus on the proven efficacy of these interventions.

  10. Promoting family meals: a review of existing interventions and opportunities for future research

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Laura; Oh, April; Patrick, Heather; Hennessy, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that regular family meals protect against unhealthy eating and obesity during childhood and adolescence. However, there is limited information on ways to promote family meals as part of health promotion and obesity prevention efforts. The primary aim of this review was to synthesize the literature on strategies to promote family meals among families with school-aged children and adolescents. First, we reviewed interventions that assess family meals as an outcome and summarized strategies that have been used in these interventions. Second, we reviewed correlates and barriers to family meals to identify focal populations and target constructs for consideration in new interventions. During May 26–27, 2014, PubMed and PsycInfo databases were searched to identify literature on family meals published between January 1, 2000 and May 27, 2014. Two reviewers coded 2,115 titles/abstracts, yielding a sample of 139 articles for full-text review. Six interventions and 43 other studies presenting data on correlates of or barriers to family meals were included in the review. Four interventions resulted in greater family meal frequency. Although there were a small number of interventions, intervention settings were diverse and included the home, community, medical settings, the workplace, and the Internet. Common strategies were goal setting and interactive group activities, and intervention targets included cooking and food preparation, cost, shopping, and adolescent influence. Although methodological nuances may contribute to mixed findings, key correlates of family meals were employment, socioeconomic and demographic factors, family structure, and psychosocial constructs. Barriers to consider in future interventions include time and scheduling challenges, cost, and food preferences. Increasing youth involvement in mealtime, tailoring interventions to family characteristics, and providing support for families experiencing time-related barriers are suggested

  11. Promoting family meals: a review of existing interventions and opportunities for future research.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Laura; Oh, April; Patrick, Heather; Hennessy, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that regular family meals protect against unhealthy eating and obesity during childhood and adolescence. However, there is limited information on ways to promote family meals as part of health promotion and obesity prevention efforts. The primary aim of this review was to synthesize the literature on strategies to promote family meals among families with school-aged children and adolescents. First, we reviewed interventions that assess family meals as an outcome and summarized strategies that have been used in these interventions. Second, we reviewed correlates and barriers to family meals to identify focal populations and target constructs for consideration in new interventions. During May 26-27, 2014, PubMed and PsycInfo databases were searched to identify literature on family meals published between January 1, 2000 and May 27, 2014. Two reviewers coded 2,115 titles/abstracts, yielding a sample of 139 articles for full-text review. Six interventions and 43 other studies presenting data on correlates of or barriers to family meals were included in the review. Four interventions resulted in greater family meal frequency. Although there were a small number of interventions, intervention settings were diverse and included the home, community, medical settings, the workplace, and the Internet. Common strategies were goal setting and interactive group activities, and intervention targets included cooking and food preparation, cost, shopping, and adolescent influence. Although methodological nuances may contribute to mixed findings, key correlates of family meals were employment, socioeconomic and demographic factors, family structure, and psychosocial constructs. Barriers to consider in future interventions include time and scheduling challenges, cost, and food preferences. Increasing youth involvement in mealtime, tailoring interventions to family characteristics, and providing support for families experiencing time-related barriers are suggested

  12. Uncovering the evidence for behavioral interventions with individuals with fragile X syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, Lauren J; Jones, Emily A

    2015-03-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is associated with a wide range of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral difficulties. Although there is considerable research on the behavioral phenotype of FXS, few empirical studies of behavioral interventions with this population have been identified. Through a hand search of 34 behavioral journals, we examined the evidence base for behavioral interventions with individuals with FXS and in light of the current state of knowledge regarding the FXS behavioral phenotype. Systematic review procedures were used to identify behavioral intervention studies that included at least one participant with FXS, extract and summarize the data on several relevant dimensions, and rate the methodological quality of the studies. Results revealed 31 intervention studies with a small number of participants with FXS. Overall, results suggest a behavioral approach to intervention with individuals with FXS shows promise. Future research focused on individuals with FXS will be necessary to continue to examine differences in response to intervention and interventions that specifically address phenotypic characteristics.

  13. Effect of Expressive Writing Intervention on Health Outcomes in Breast Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojin

    2015-01-01

    Background Numerous randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have arrived at conflicting conclusions on expressive writing (EW) as an intervention for breast cancer (BC) patients, but there has been no meta-analysis of these studies to assess the effectiveness of EW in BC population. Methods PubMed, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and CINAHL and the www.clinicaltrial.gov database on ongoing clinical trials were searched to identify all the RCTs investigating efficacy of EW on the physical and psychological health in BC patients. The risk of bias of the original studies was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool. Our primary outcomes for physical and psychological health were respectively negative somatic symptoms and negative mood which were stratified by emotional, benefit-finding and multiple prompts in sub-group analyses. The data were analyzed using Review Manager 5.2 and Stata version 12.0 statistical software. Results Of the 5,232 titles screened, we identified 11 RCTs with a total of 1,178 participants. The pooled results showed a significant effect of EW using either an emotional prompt or a benefit-finding prompt on reducing negative somatic symptoms in BC patients in the ≤3-month follow-up group [Mean Difference (MD), -13.03, 95% CI, -19.23 to -6.83, P<0.0001; MD, -9.18, 95% CI, -15.57 to -2.79, P = 0.005]. There was no significant effect of EW on physical health in the >3-month follow-up group. There were no significant differences regarding psychological health indexes between EW intervention and control groups at any of the follow-up time-points (P>0.05). Conclusion This systematic review and meta-analysis reveals that EW intervention may have a significantly positive impact on the physical health but not the psychological health in BC patients, but this benefit may not last long. However, further high-quality studies with more homogeneity are needed to confirm the current findings. PMID:26151818

  14. Problem Solving Interventions for Diabetes Self-management and Control: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Stephanie L.; Schumann, Kristina P.; Hill-Briggs, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    Aims Problem solving is deemed a core skill for patient diabetes self-management education. The purpose of this systematic review is to examine the published literature on the effect of problem-solving interventions on diabetes self-management and disease control. Data Sources We searched PubMed and PsychINFO electronic databases for English language articles published between November 2006 and September 2012. Reference lists from included studies were reviewed to capture additional studies. Study Selection Studies reporting problem-solving intervention or problem solving as an intervention component for diabetes self-management training and disease control were included. Twenty-four studies met inclusion criteria. Data Extraction Study design, sample characteristics, measures, and results were reviewed. Data Synthesis Sixteen intervention studies (11 adult, 5 children/adolescents) were randomized controlled trials, and 8 intervention studies (6 adult, 2 children/adolescents) were quasi-experimental designs. Conclusions Studies varied greatly in their approaches to problem-solving use in patient education. To date, 36% of adult problem-solving interventions and 42% of children/adolescent problem-solving interventions have demonstrated significant improvement in HbA1c, while psychosocial outcomes have been more promising. The next phase of problem-solving intervention research should employ intervention characteristics found to have sufficient potency and intensity to reach therapeutic levels needed to demonstrate change. PMID:23312614

  15. Healthcare interventions for depression in low socioeconomic status populations: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rojas-García, Antonio; Ruiz-Perez, Isabel; Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; Gonçalves Bradley, Daniela C; Pastor-Moreno, Guadalupe; Ricci-Cabello, Ignacio

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence and impact of depressive disorders in developed countries are associated with certain population characteristics, including socioeconomic status. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to identify, characterize and analyze the short- and long-term effectiveness of healthcare interventions for depressive disorders in low socioeconomic status populations. The main biomedical databases were searched and fifteen articles assessing seventeen interventions were included in the review. Most interventions were implemented in the US (n=11) and culturally adapted (n=11). We conducted two meta-analyses for assessing both the short- (n=11) and long-term effectiveness (n=12) of interventions. There was a statistically significant reduction in overall depressive symptoms (-0.58, 95% CI [-0.74, -0.41]) at short-term (up to three months after the intervention), especially for combined and psychotherapeutic interventions. The overall effect slightly decreased at long-term (-0.42, 95% CI [-0.63, -0.21]). Those interventions including culturally specific training for providers and booster sessions seemed to be more effective in reducing depressive disorders at short and long term, respectively. In conclusion, healthcare interventions are effective in decreasing clinically significant depressive disorders in low socioeconomic status populations. Future interventions should take into account the key characteristics identified in this review.

  16. A Review of Exercise as Intervention for Sedentary Hazardous Drinking College Students: Rationale and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstock, Jeremiah

    2010-01-01

    College students have high rates of alcohol problems despite a number of intervention initiatives designed to reduce alcohol use. Substance use, including heavy drinking, often occurs at the expense of other, substance-free, activities. This review examines the promotion of one specific substance-free activity--exercise--as an intervention for…

  17. A Review of Interventions To Increase Driving Safety among Teenage Drivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattox, John R., II

    Young drivers across the United States represent a persistent traffic safety problem. Many interventions have been imposed on these drivers but few studies have evaluated the impact of these interventions on risky behaviors or traffic safety measures. To fill this gap, a review was undertaken to examine the most rigorous methodological evaluations…

  18. A Review of Information and Communication Technology Enhanced Social Work Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Chitat; Holosko, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Information and communications technology (ICT) has impacted almost all human service disciplines and currently is evolving in social work. This study provides a systematic review of ICT-enhanced social work interventions, with particular reference to their intervention fidelity (IF), validity, and the role of ICT in the helping…

  19. Current Clinical Interventions for Smoking Cessation: A Review of Empirical Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcellino, Robert Leonard, Jr.

    This document reviews all empirical studies on clinically-based smoking cessation interventions that were reported in "Psychological Abstracts" between January 1982 and March 1990. Interventions are categorized as either physiological or psychological in orientation and are further grouped according to specific treatment type: acupuncture,…

  20. Psychosocial Interventions for Women with HIV/AIDS: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Julieta P.; Macgowan, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Recent research on psychosocial interventions addressing the well-being of women with HIV/AIDS has brought new options for practitioners. This study critically reviews the treatment features, methodological quality, and efficacy of these interventions. Methods: A comprehensive search between 2000 and 2011 identified 19 studies employing…

  1. Screening and Brief Interventions for Alcohol Use in College Health Centers: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seigers, Danielle K. L.; Carey, Kate B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To provide a critical review of the efficacy of brief interventions for alcohol use in college health centers. Methods: Studies were included if (a) they examined brief intervention trials that were conducted in college- or university-based student health centers or emergency departments, and (b) they provided pre-post data to estimate…

  2. A Review of Tier 2 Interventions Conducted within Multitiered Models of Behavioral Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruhn, Allison Leigh; Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Hirsch, Shanna Eisner

    2014-01-01

    To support students' academic, behavioral, and social needs, many schools have adopted multitiered models of prevention. Because Tier 3 interventions are costly in terms of time and resources, schools must find efficient and effective Tier 2 interventions prior to providing such intense supports. In this article, we review the literature base…

  3. Outpatient Interventions for Adolescent Substance Abuse: A Quality of Evidence Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Sara J.; Curry, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Previous reviews of outpatient interventions for adolescent substance abuse have been limited in the extent to which they considered the methodological quality of individual studies. The authors assessed 31 randomized trials of outpatient interventions for adolescent substance abuse on 14 attributes of trial quality. A quality of evidence score…

  4. The Health Effects of Worksite HIV/AIDS Interventions. A Review of the Research Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Mark G.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A literature review identified 12 studies reporting the impact of worksite HIV/AIDS intervention programs. Ten studies reported positive effects on knowledge and/or attitudes. Few had control or comparison groups. Given the small number of studies and poor methodology, the literature on worksite HIV/AIDS intervention was classified as weak.…

  5. A Systematic Review of Common Physiotherapy Interventions in School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Liz; Baker, Richard; Harvey, Adrienne

    2010-01-01

    This systematic review focused on the common conventional physiotherapy interventions used with children with cerebral palsy (CP), aged 4 to 18 years, and critically appraised the recent evidence of each of these interventions using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. The search strategy yielded 34 articles after…

  6. Transtheoretical Model-Based Dietary Interventions in Primary Care: A Review of the Evidence in Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmela, Sanna; Poskiparta, Marita; Kasila, Kirsti; Vahasarja, Kati; Vanhala, Mauno

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review the evidence concerning stage-based dietary interventions in primary care among persons with diabetes or an elevated diabetes risk. Search strategies were electronic databases and manual search. Selection criteria were randomized controlled studies with stage-based dietary intervention, conducted in…

  7. Review of Randomised Controlled Trials of Internet Interventions for Mental Disorders and Related Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Kathleen M.; Christensen, Helen

    2006-01-01

    Self-help Internet interventions have the potential to enable consumers to play a central role in managing their own health. This paper contains a systematic review of 15 randomised controlled trials of the effectiveness of self-help Internet interventions for mental disorders and related conditions. Conditions addressed by the interventions…

  8. Train the Trainer Effectiveness Trials of Behavioral Intervention for Individuals with Autism: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shire, Stephanie Yoshiko; Kasari, Connie

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review examines train the trainer (TTT) effectiveness trials of behavioral interventions for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Published methodological quality scales were used to assess studies including participant description, research design, intervention, outcomes, and analysis. Twelve studies including 9 weak…

  9. Child-Parent Interventions for Childhood Anxiety Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendel, Kristen Esposito; Maynard, Brandy R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study compared the effects of direct child-parent interventions to the effects of child-focused interventions on anxiety outcomes for children with anxiety disorders. Method: Systematic review methods and meta-analytic techniques were employed. Eight randomized controlled trials examining effects of family cognitive behavior…

  10. Interventions to decrease skin cancer risk in outdoor workers: update to a 2007 systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Outdoor workers are at high risk of harmful ultraviolet radiation exposure and are identified as an at risk group for the development of skin cancer. This systematic evidence based review provides an update to a previous review published in 2007 about interventions for the prevention of skin cancer in outdoor workers. Results This review includes interventions published between 2007-2012 and presents findings about sun protection behaviours and/or objective measures of skin cancer risk. Six papers met inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Large studies with extended follow-up times demonstrated the efficacy of educational and multi-component interventions to increase sun protection, with some higher use of personal protective equipment such as sunscreen. However, there is less evidence for the effectiveness of policy or specific intervention components. Conclusions Further research aimed at improving overall attitudes towards sun protection in outdoor workers is needed to provide an overarching framework. PMID:24397996

  11. [Effective interventions to prevent health damage related to ultraviolet exposure: a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Nguyen Thanh, Viêt; Clément, Juliette; Haroutunian, Laetitia; Léon, Christophe; Arwidson, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the current scientific knowledge on health promotion interventions designed to prevent health damage caused by natural ultraviolet (UV) exposure. The current state of knowledge in this area was assessed using a specific method including a review of literature reviews and a classification of health promotion interventions identified using scientific databases. We found a large number of promising programmes. Briefly, some interventions based on environmental changes and provision of shade were considered to be promising. Health education programmes delivered at school have been proven to be effective in various settings, from nursery school to college. Some parentbased interventions designed to promote children's sun protection behaviours have been shown to be relevant. Appearance-based actions, using for instance photoaging information, may be effective. Finally, some multi-component interventions in community settings appear to be promising. These findings present a number of limitations due to the marked diversity of outcome measures and the general quality of the documents reviewed. Furthermore, most interventions are poorly described in the reviews. The present study should therefore be considered to be a first step that needs to be completed by a more detailed description of the promising interventions and of their transposition to the French context. PMID:26751922

  12. Informing hot flash treatment decisions for breast cancer survivors: a systematic review of randomized trials comparing active interventions.

    PubMed

    Johns, Claire; Seav, Susan M; Dominick, Sally A; Gorman, Jessica R; Li, Hongying; Natarajan, Loki; Mao, Jun James; Su, H Irene

    2016-04-01

    Patient-centered decision making about hot flash treatments often incorporates a balance of efficacy and side effects in addition to patient preference. This systematic review examines randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing at least two non-hormonal hot flash treatments in breast cancer survivors. In July 2015, PubMed, SCOPUS, CINAHL, Cochrane, and Web of Science databases were searched for RCTs comparing active, non-hormonal hot flash treatments in female breast cancer survivors. Thirteen trials were included after identifying 906 potential studies. Four trials were dose comparison studies of pharmacologic treatments citalopram, venlafaxine, gabapentin, and paroxetine. Hot flash reduction did not differ by tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor use. Citalopram 10, 20, and 30 mg daily had comparable outcomes. Venlafaxine 75 mg daily improved hot flashes without additional side effects from higher dosing. Gabapentin 900 mg daily improved hot flashes more than 300 mg. Paroxetine 10 mg daily had fewer side effects than 20 mg. Among four trials comparing different pharmacologic treatments, venlafaxine alleviated hot flash symptoms faster than clonidine; participants preferred venlafaxine over gabapentin. Five trials compared pharmacologic to non-pharmacologic treatments. Acupuncture had similar efficacy to venlafaxine and gabapentin but may have longer durability after completing treatment and fewer side effects. We could not perform a pooled meta-analysis because outcomes were not reported in comparable formats. Clinical trial data on non-hormonal hot flash treatments provide comparisons of hot flash efficacy and other patient important outcomes to guide clinical management. Clinicians can use the information to help patients select hot flash interventions.

  13. Psychosocial outcomes and interventions among cancer survivors diagnosed during adolescence and young adulthood (AYA): a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Marie; McDonnell, Glynnis; DeRosa, Antonio; Schuler, Tammy; Philip, Errol; Peterson, Lisa; Touza, Kaitlin; Jhanwar, Sabrina; Atkinson, Thomas M.; Ford, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A cancer diagnosis during adolescence or young adulthood (AYA; defined as ages 15–39) generates unique medical and psychosocial needs as developmental milestones are simultaneously impacted. Past research highlights that AYAs’ experiences and psychosocial outcomes are different, and more research and attention is needed. We aimed to identify and synthesize literature regarding psychosocial outcomes, unique needs, and existing psychosocial interventions pertaining to individuals diagnosed with cancer exclusively during AYA, and to highlight areas for future research. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted using MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science, and PsycINFO (via OVID). Grey literature was searched using key term variations and combinations. Overall, 15,301 records were assessed by two independent reviewers, with 38 studies meeting inclusion criteria. Results Data synthesis of the 38 articles was organized by four main themes based on quality of life and survivorship: physical well-being (7 studies), psychological well-being (8 studies), social well-being (9 studies), and survivorship care (14 studies). The paucity of studies for such broad inclusion criteria highlights that this population is often combined or subsumed under other age groups, missing needs unique to these AYAs. Conclusions AYA cancer survivors’ experiences are nuanced, with interacting variables contributing to post-treatment outcomes. AYAs require age-appropriate and flexible care, informational needs and treatment-related education that foster autonomy for long-term survivorship, as well as improved follow-up care and psychological outcomes. Implications for Cancer Survivors By incorporating these findings into practice, the informational and unmet needs of AYAs can be addressed effectively. Education and programming is lacking specific and general subject matter specific to AYAs, incorporating ranging needs at different treatment stages. PMID

  14. Informing hot flash treatment decisions for breast cancer survivors: a systematic review of randomized trials comparing active interventions.

    PubMed

    Johns, Claire; Seav, Susan M; Dominick, Sally A; Gorman, Jessica R; Li, Hongying; Natarajan, Loki; Mao, Jun James; Su, H Irene

    2016-04-01

    Patient-centered decision making about hot flash treatments often incorporates a balance of efficacy and side effects in addition to patient preference. This systematic review examines randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing at least two non-hormonal hot flash treatments in breast cancer survivors. In July 2015, PubMed, SCOPUS, CINAHL, Cochrane, and Web of Science databases were searched for RCTs comparing active, non-hormonal hot flash treatments in female breast cancer survivors. Thirteen trials were included after identifying 906 potential studies. Four trials were dose comparison studies of pharmacologic treatments citalopram, venlafaxine, gabapentin, and paroxetine. Hot flash reduction did not differ by tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor use. Citalopram 10, 20, and 30 mg daily had comparable outcomes. Venlafaxine 75 mg daily improved hot flashes without additional side effects from higher dosing. Gabapentin 900 mg daily improved hot flashes more than 300 mg. Paroxetine 10 mg daily had fewer side effects than 20 mg. Among four trials comparing different pharmacologic treatments, venlafaxine alleviated hot flash symptoms faster than clonidine; participants preferred venlafaxine over gabapentin. Five trials compared pharmacologic to non-pharmacologic treatments. Acupuncture had similar efficacy to venlafaxine and gabapentin but may have longer durability after completing treatment and fewer side effects. We could not perform a pooled meta-analysis because outcomes were not reported in comparable formats. Clinical trial data on non-hormonal hot flash treatments provide comparisons of hot flash efficacy and other patient important outcomes to guide clinical management. Clinicians can use the information to help patients select hot flash interventions. PMID:27015968

  15. The Effect of Perioperative E-Health Interventions on the Postoperative Course: A Systematic Review of Randomised and Non-Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    van der Meij, Eva; Anema, Johannes R.; Otten, René H. J.; Huirne, Judith A. F.; Schaafsma, Frederieke G.

    2016-01-01

    Background E-health interventions have become increasingly popular, including in perioperative care. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of perioperative e-health interventions on the postoperative course. Methods We conducted a systematic review and searched for relevant articles in the PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL and COCHRANE databases. Controlled trials written in E