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Sample records for coding envelope genes

  1. Minimum cost model energy code envelope requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.; Turchen, S.J.

    1994-08-01

    This paper describes the analysis underlying development of the U.S. Department of Energy`s proposed revisions of the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. This analysis resulted in revised MEC envelope conservation levels based on an objective methodology that determined the minimum-cost combination of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for residences in different locations around the United States. The proposed MEC revision resulted from a cost-benefit analysis from the consumer`s perspective. In this analysis, the costs of the EEMs were balanced against the benefit of energy savings. Detailed construction, financial, economic, and fuel cost data were compiled, described in a technical support document, and incorporated in the analysis. A cost minimization analysis was used to compare the present value of the total long-nm costs for several alternative EEMs and to select the EEMs that achieved the lowest cost for each location studied. This cost minimization was performed for 881 cities in the United States, and the results were put into the format used by the MEC. This paper describes the methodology for determining minimum-cost energy efficiency measures for ceilings, walls, windows, and floors and presents the results in the form of proposed revisions to the MEC. The proposed MEC revisions would, on average, increase the stringency of the MEC by about 10%.

  2. [Characterization of Serial Passage of 1b/2a Chimera Hepatitis C Virus Cell Culture System Carrying Envelope E1E2 Coding Gene from Hebei Strain of China].

    PubMed

    Lu, Sha; Zhang, Ling; Tao, Gesi; Cai, Min; Bao Lili; LI, Lian; Deng, Yao; Shen, Xiaoling; Tan, Wenjie

    2015-11-01

    To character a novel chimera(1b/2a) hepatitis C virus cell culture (HCVcc) system carrying envelope E1E2 coding gene from Hebei strain of China, chimera HCVcc (cHCVcc) was developed from Huh7.5-CD81 cells after transfection with in vitro transcribed full-length 1b/2a chimera RNA, which carrying envelope E1E2 coding gene from Hebei strain of China. Then the replication, expression and infectious titer of serial passage HCVcc were assessed by Real Time RT-PCR, indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blotting (WB). In addition, chimeric envelope gene from HCVcc was sequenced after serial passage. We found that the number of HCV positive focus increased gradually in cell post-transfection with chimera HCVcc (1b/2a) RNA and reach a peak platform (80% to 90%) at 41 days post-transfection; the expression of HCV protein was also confirmed by WAB during serial passage. At meantime, HCV RNA copy number in the supernatant peaked at 10(4)-10(7) copies/mL and the highest infectious titer of this 1b/2a cHCVcc reinfection were tested as 10(4) ffu/mL. Sequence analysis indicated 6 of adaptive amino acid substitutes occur among chimeric envelope E1E2 during serial passages. We con:luded that a novel 1b/2a chimera HCVcc carrying envelope E1E2 coding gene from Hebei strain of China was developed and its infectious titer increased after serial passage of HCVcc. This novel cHCVcc will be an effective tool for further evaluation of anti-virus drugs and immune effects against the major genotype from Chinese.

  3. Preserving Envelope Efficiency in Performance Based Code Compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Brian A.; Sullivan, Greg P.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2015-06-20

    The City of Seattle 2012 Energy Code (Seattle 2014), one of the most progressive in the country, is under revision for its 2015 edition. Additionally, city personnel participate in the development of the next generation of the Washington State Energy Code and the International Energy Code. Seattle has pledged carbon neutrality by 2050 including buildings, transportation and other sectors. The United States Department of Energy (DOE), through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) provided technical assistance to Seattle in order to understand the implications of one potential direction for its code development, limiting trade-offs of long-lived building envelope components less stringent than the prescriptive code envelope requirements by using better-than-code but shorter-lived lighting and heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) components through the total building performance modeled energy compliance path. Weaker building envelopes can permanently limit building energy performance even as lighting and HVAC components are upgraded over time, because retrofitting the envelope is less likely and more expensive. Weaker building envelopes may also increase the required size, cost and complexity of HVAC systems and may adversely affect occupant comfort. This report presents the results of this technical assistance. The use of modeled energy code compliance to trade-off envelope components with shorter-lived building components is not unique to Seattle and the lessons and possible solutions described in this report have implications for other jurisdictions and energy codes.

  4. Neural coding of sound envelope in reverberant environments.

    PubMed

    Slama, Michaël C C; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2015-03-11

    Speech reception depends critically on temporal modulations in the amplitude envelope of the speech signal. Reverberation encountered in everyday environments can substantially attenuate these modulations. To assess the effect of reverberation on the neural coding of amplitude envelope, we recorded from single units in the inferior colliculus (IC) of unanesthetized rabbit using sinusoidally amplitude modulated (AM) broadband noise stimuli presented in simulated anechoic and reverberant environments. Although reverberation degraded both rate and temporal coding of AM in IC neurons, in most neurons, the degradation in temporal coding was smaller than the AM attenuation in the stimulus. This compensation could largely be accounted for by the compressive shape of the modulation input-output function (MIOF), which describes the nonlinear transformation of modulation depth from acoustic stimuli into neural responses. Additionally, in a subset of neurons, the temporal coding of AM was better for reverberant stimuli than for anechoic stimuli having the same modulation depth at the ear. Using hybrid anechoic stimuli that selectively possess certain properties of reverberant sounds, we show that this reverberant advantage is not caused by envelope distortion, static interaural decorrelation, or spectral coloration. Overall, our results suggest that the auditory system may possess dual mechanisms that make the coding of amplitude envelope relatively robust in reverberation: one general mechanism operating for all stimuli with small modulation depths, and another mechanism dependent on very specific properties of reverberant stimuli, possibly the periodic fluctuations in interaural correlation at the modulation frequency.

  5. Neural Coding of Sound Envelope in Reverberant Environments

    PubMed Central

    Slama, Michaël C.C.

    2015-01-01

    Speech reception depends critically on temporal modulations in the amplitude envelope of the speech signal. Reverberation encountered in everyday environments can substantially attenuate these modulations. To assess the effect of reverberation on the neural coding of amplitude envelope, we recorded from single units in the inferior colliculus (IC) of unanesthetized rabbit using sinusoidally amplitude modulated (AM) broadband noise stimuli presented in simulated anechoic and reverberant environments. Although reverberation degraded both rate and temporal coding of AM in IC neurons, in most neurons, the degradation in temporal coding was smaller than the AM attenuation in the stimulus. This compensation could largely be accounted for by the compressive shape of the modulation input–output function (MIOF), which describes the nonlinear transformation of modulation depth from acoustic stimuli into neural responses. Additionally, in a subset of neurons, the temporal coding of AM was better for reverberant stimuli than for anechoic stimuli having the same modulation depth at the ear. Using hybrid anechoic stimuli that selectively possess certain properties of reverberant sounds, we show that this reverberant advantage is not caused by envelope distortion, static interaural decorrelation, or spectral coloration. Overall, our results suggest that the auditory system may possess dual mechanisms that make the coding of amplitude envelope relatively robust in reverberation: one general mechanism operating for all stimuli with small modulation depths, and another mechanism dependent on very specific properties of reverberant stimuli, possibly the periodic fluctuations in interaural correlation at the modulation frequency. PMID:25762687

  6. Perception and coding of envelopes in weakly electric fishes.

    PubMed

    Stamper, Sarah A; Fortune, Eric S; Chacron, Maurice J

    2013-07-01

    Natural sensory stimuli have a rich spatiotemporal structure and can often be characterized as a high frequency signal that is independently modulated at lower frequencies. This lower frequency modulation is known as the envelope. Envelopes are commonly found in a variety of sensory signals, such as contrast modulations of visual stimuli and amplitude modulations of auditory stimuli. While psychophysical studies have shown that envelopes can carry information that is essential for perception, how envelope information is processed in the brain is poorly understood. Here we review the behavioral salience and neural mechanisms for the processing of envelopes in the electrosensory system of wave-type gymnotiform weakly electric fishes. These fish can generate envelope signals through movement, interactions of their electric fields in social groups or communication signals. The envelopes that result from the first two behavioral contexts differ in their frequency content, with movement envelopes typically being of lower frequency. Recent behavioral evidence has shown that weakly electric fish respond in robust and stereotypical ways to social envelopes to increase the envelope frequency. Finally, neurophysiological results show how envelopes are processed by peripheral and central electrosensory neurons. Peripheral electrosensory neurons respond to both stimulus and envelope signals. Neurons in the primary hindbrain recipient of these afferents, the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL), exhibit heterogeneities in their responses to stimulus and envelope signals. Complete segregation of stimulus and envelope information is achieved in neurons in the target of ELL efferents, the midbrain torus semicircularis (Ts).

  7. The neurovirulence and neuroinvasiveness of chimeric tick-borne encephalitis/dengue virus can be attenuated by introducing defined mutations into the envelope and NS5 protein genes and the 3' non-coding region of the genome

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, Amber R.; Rumyantsev, Alexander A.; Maximova, Olga A.; Speicher, James M.; Heiss, Brian; Murphy, Brian R.; Pletnev, Alexander G.

    2010-09-15

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a severe disease affecting thousands of people throughout Eurasia. Despite the use of formalin-inactivated vaccines in endemic areas, an increasing incidence of TBE emphasizes the need for an alternative vaccine that will induce a more durable immunity against TBE virus (TBEV). The chimeric attenuated virus vaccine candidate containing the structural protein genes of TBEV on a dengue virus genetic background (TBEV/DEN4) retains a high level of neurovirulence in both mice and monkeys. Therefore, attenuating mutations were introduced into the envelope (E{sub 315}) and NS5 (NS5{sub 654,655}) proteins, and into the 3' non-coding region ({Delta}30) of TBEV/DEN4. The variant that contained all three mutations (v{Delta}30/E{sub 315}/NS5{sub 654,655}) was significantly attenuated for neuroinvasiveness and neurovirulence and displayed a reduced level of replication and virus-induced histopathology in the brains of mice. The high level of safety in the central nervous system indicates that v{Delta}30/E{sub 315}/NS5{sub 654,655} should be further evaluated as a TBEV vaccine.

  8. Common Envelope Light Curves. I. Grid-code Module Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galaviz, Pablo; De Marco, Orsola; Passy, Jean-Claude; Staff, Jan E.; Iaconi, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    The common envelope (CE) binary interaction occurs when a star transfers mass onto a companion that cannot fully accrete it. The interaction can lead to a merger of the two objects or to a close binary. The CE interaction is the gateway of all evolved compact binaries, all stellar mergers, and likely many of the stellar transients witnessed to date. CE simulations are needed to understand this interaction and to interpret stars and binaries thought to be the byproduct of this stage. At this time, simulations are unable to reproduce the few observational data available and several ideas have been put forward to address their shortcomings. The need for more definitive simulation validation is pressing and is already being fulfilled by observations from time-domain surveys. In this article, we present an initial method and its implementation for post-processing grid-based CE simulations to produce the light curve so as to compare simulations with upcoming observations. Here we implemented a zeroth order method to calculate the light emitted from CE hydrodynamic simulations carried out with the 3D hydrodynamic code Enzo used in unigrid mode. The code implements an approach for the computation of luminosity in both optically thick and optically thin regimes and is tested using the first 135 days of the CE simulation of Passy et al., where a 0.8 M ⊙ red giant branch star interacts with a 0.6 M ⊙ companion. This code is used to highlight two large obstacles that need to be overcome before realistic light curves can be calculated. We explain the nature of these problems and the attempted solutions and approximations in full detail to enable the next step to be identified and implemented. We also discuss our simulation in relation to recent data of transients identified as CE interactions.

  9. Neural coding of echo-envelope disparities in echolocating bats.

    PubMed

    Borina, Frank; Firzlaff, Uwe; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2011-05-01

    The effective use of echolocation requires not only measuring the delay between the emitted call and returning echo to estimate the distance of an ensonified object. To locate an object in azimuth and elevation, the bat's auditory system must analyze the returning echoes in terms of their binaural properties, i.e., the echoes' interaural intensity and time differences (IIDs and ITDs). The effectiveness of IIDs for echolocation is undisputed, but when bats ensonify complex objects, the temporal structure of echoes may facilitate the analysis of the echo envelope in terms of envelope ITDs. Using extracellular recordings from the auditory midbrain of the bat, Phyllostomus discolor, we found a population of neurons that are sensitive to envelope ITDs of echoes of their sonar calls. Moreover, the envelope-ITD sensitivity improved with increasing temporal fluctuations in the echo envelopes, a sonar parameter related to the spatial statistics of complex natural reflectors like vegetation. The data show that in bats envelope ITDs may be used not only to locate external, prey-generated rustling sounds but also in the context of echolocation. Specifically, the temporal fluctuations in the echo envelope, which are created when the sonar emission is reflected from a complex natural target, support ITD-mediated echolocation.

  10. Predicted effects of sensorineural hearing loss on across-fiber envelope coding in the auditory nervea

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Jayaganesh; Heinz, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-channel envelope correlations are hypothesized to influence speech intelligibility, particularly in adverse conditions. Acoustic analyses suggest speech envelope correlations differ for syllabic and phonemic ranges of modulation frequency. The influence of cochlear filtering was examined here by predicting cross-channel envelope correlations in different speech modulation ranges for normal and impaired auditory-nerve (AN) responses. Neural cross-correlation coefficients quantified across-fiber envelope coding in syllabic (0–5 Hz), phonemic (5–64 Hz), and periodicity (64–300 Hz) modulation ranges. Spike trains were generated from a physiologically based AN model. Correlations were also computed using the model with selective hair-cell damage. Neural predictions revealed that envelope cross-correlation decreased with increased characteristic-frequency separation for all modulation ranges (with greater syllabic-envelope correlation than phonemic or periodicity). Syllabic envelope was highly correlated across many spectral channels, whereas phonemic and periodicity envelopes were correlated mainly between adjacent channels. Outer-hair-cell impairment increased the degree of cross-channel correlation for phonemic and periodicity ranges for speech in quiet and in noise, thereby reducing the number of independent neural information channels for envelope coding. In contrast, outer-hair-cell impairment was predicted to decrease cross-channel correlation for syllabic envelopes in noise, which may partially account for the reduced ability of hearing-impaired listeners to segregate speech in complex backgrounds. PMID:21682421

  11. Quantifying envelope and fine-structure coding in auditory nerve responses to chimaeric speech.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Michael G; Swaminathan, Jayaganesh

    2009-09-01

    Any sound can be separated mathematically into a slowly varying envelope and rapidly varying fine-structure component. This property has motivated numerous perceptual studies to understand the relative importance of each component for speech and music perception. Specialized acoustic stimuli, such as auditory chimaeras with the envelope of one sound and fine structure of another have been used to separate the perceptual roles for envelope and fine structure. Cochlear narrowband filtering limits the ability to isolate fine structure from envelope; however, envelope recovery from fine structure has been difficult to evaluate physiologically. To evaluate envelope recovery at the output of the cochlea, neural cross-correlation coefficients were developed that quantify the similarity between two sets of spike-train responses. Shuffled auto- and cross-correlogram analyses were used to compute separate correlations for responses to envelope and fine structure based on both model and recorded spike trains from auditory nerve fibers. Previous correlogram analyses were extended to isolate envelope coding more effectively in auditory nerve fibers with low center frequencies, which are particularly important for speech coding. Recovered speech envelopes were present in both model and recorded responses to one- and 16-band speech fine-structure chimaeras and were significantly greater for the one-band case, consistent with perceptual studies. Model predictions suggest that cochlear recovered envelopes are reduced following sensorineural hearing loss due to broadened tuning associated with outer-hair cell dysfunction. In addition to the within-fiber cross-stimulus cases considered here, these neural cross-correlation coefficients can also be used to evaluate spatiotemporal coding by applying them to cross-fiber within-stimulus conditions. Thus, these neural metrics can be used to quantitatively evaluate a wide range of perceptually significant temporal coding issues relevant to

  12. Magnified Neural Envelope Coding Predicts Deficits in Speech Perception in Noise.

    PubMed

    Millman, Rebecca E; Mattys, Sven L; Gouws, André D; Prendergast, Garreth

    2017-08-09

    Verbal communication in noisy backgrounds is challenging. Understanding speech in background noise that fluctuates in intensity over time is particularly difficult for hearing-impaired listeners with a sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). The reduction in fast-acting cochlear compression associated with SNHL exaggerates the perceived fluctuations in intensity in amplitude-modulated sounds. SNHL-induced changes in the coding of amplitude-modulated sounds may have a detrimental effect on the ability of SNHL listeners to understand speech in the presence of modulated background noise. To date, direct evidence for a link between magnified envelope coding and deficits in speech identification in modulated noise has been absent. Here, magnetoencephalography was used to quantify the effects of SNHL on phase locking to the temporal envelope of modulated noise (envelope coding) in human auditory cortex. Our results show that SNHL enhances the amplitude of envelope coding in posteromedial auditory cortex, whereas it enhances the fidelity of envelope coding in posteromedial and posterolateral auditory cortex. This dissociation was more evident in the right hemisphere, demonstrating functional lateralization in enhanced envelope coding in SNHL listeners. However, enhanced envelope coding was not perceptually beneficial. Our results also show that both hearing thresholds and, to a lesser extent, magnified cortical envelope coding in left posteromedial auditory cortex predict speech identification in modulated background noise. We propose a framework in which magnified envelope coding in posteromedial auditory cortex disrupts the segregation of speech from background noise, leading to deficits in speech perception in modulated background noise.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT People with hearing loss struggle to follow conversations in noisy environments. Background noise that fluctuates in intensity over time poses a particular challenge. Using magnetoencephalography, we demonstrate

  13. Characterization of a gene encoding a Ca(2+)-ATPase-like protein in the plastid envelope.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L; Berkelman, T; Franklin, A E; Hoffman, N E

    1993-01-01

    By screening an Arabidopsis expression library with an antiserum against chloroplast envelope proteins, we have isolated a partial cDNA with an open reading frame that encodes a polypeptide similar to P-type cation-transporting ATPases. The corresponding genomic clone was isolated and the complete coding sequence was deduced after identification and mapping of introns. The gene has been designated PEA1 (plastid envelope ATPase) and the predicted polypeptide PEA1p. PEA1p has 946 amino acids and a molecular mass of 104 kDa. This protein is 40-44% identical to various mammalian plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPases but lacks the C-terminal calmodulin binding domain present in the mammalian polypeptides. When aligned with mammalian plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPases, PEA1p has a 70- to 80-amino acid N-terminal region that extends beyond the N terminus of these enzymes. This extension has some similarity to the transit peptide of the plastid envelope phosphate translocator and may function to target the protein to the plastid. Antibodies raised against a portion of PEA1p recognize a single 90- to 95-kDa polypeptide in chloroplast inner envelope preparations. Transcript abundance as determined by RNase protection was found to be 7- to 9-fold higher in roots than in leaves. Possible roles for a plastid envelope calcium pump are suggested. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8234257

  14. NEURAL HETEROGENEITIES INFLUENCE ENVELOPE AND TEMPORAL CODING AT THE SENSORY PERIPHERY

    PubMed Central

    SAVARD, M.; KRAHE, R.; CHACRON, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral sensory neurons respond to stimuli containing a wide range of spatio-temporal frequencies. We investigated electroreceptor neuron coding in the gymnotiform wave-type weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. Previous studies used low to mid temporal frequencies (<256 Hz) and showed that electroreceptor neuron responses to sensory stimuli could be almost exclusively accounted for by linear models, thereby implying a rate code. We instead used temporal frequencies up to 425 Hz, which is in the upper behaviorally relevant range for this species. We show that electroreceptors can: (A) respond up to the highest frequencies tested and (B) display strong nonlinearities in their responses to such stimuli. These nonlinearities were manifested by the fact that the responses to repeated presentations of the same stimulus were coherent at temporal frequencies outside of those contained in the stimulus waveform. Specifically, these consisted of low frequencies corresponding to the time varying contrast or envelope of the stimulus as well as higher harmonics of the frequencies contained in the stimulus. Heterogeneities in the afferent population influenced nonlinear coding as afferents with the lowest baseline firing rates tended to display the strongest nonlinear responses. To understand the link between afferent heterogeneity and nonlinear responsiveness, we used a phenomenological mathematical model of electrosensory afferents. Varying a single parameter in the model was sufficient to account for the variability seen in our experimental data and yielded a prediction: nonlinear responses to the envelope and at higher harmonics are both due to afferents with lower baseline firing rates displaying greater degrees of rectification in their responses. This prediction was verified experimentally as we found that the coherence between the half-wave rectified stimulus and the response resembled the coherence between the responses to repeated presentations of the

  15. Regulation of bacterial virulence gene expression by cell envelope stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Kim, Josué; Darwin, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial cytoplasm lies within a multilayered envelope that must be protected from internal and external hazards. This protection is provided by cell envelope stress responses (ESRs), which detect threats and reprogram gene expression to ensure survival. Pathogens frequently need these ESRs to survive inside the host, where their envelopes face dangerous environmental changes and attack from antimicrobial molecules. In addition, some virulence genes have become integrated into ESR regulons. This might be because these genes can protect the cell envelope from damage by host molecules, or it might help ESRs to reduce stress by moderating the assembly of virulence factors within the envelope. Alternatively, it could simply be a mechanism to coordinate the induction of virulence gene expression with entry into the host. Here, we briefly describe some of the bacterial ESRs, followed by examples where they control virulence gene expression in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:25603429

  16. Sensorineural hearing loss amplifies neural coding of envelope information in the central auditory system of chinchillas

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ziwei; Henry, Kenneth S.; Heinz, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    People with sensorineural hearing loss often have substantial difficulty understanding speech under challenging listening conditions. Behavioral studies suggest that reduced sensitivity to the temporal structure of sound may be responsible, but underlying neurophysiological pathologies are incompletely understood. Here, we investigate the effects of noise-induced hearing loss on coding of envelope (ENV) structure in the central auditory system of anesthetized chinchillas. ENV coding was evaluated noninvasively using auditory evoked potentials recorded from the scalp surface in response to sinusoidally amplitude modulated tones with carrier frequencies of 1, 2, 4, and 8 kHz and a modulation frequency of 140 Hz. Stimuli were presented in quiet and in three levels of white background noise. The latency of scalp-recorded ENV responses was consistent with generation in the auditory midbrain. Hearing loss amplified neural coding of ENV at carrier frequencies of 2 kHz and above. This result may reflect enhanced ENV coding from the periphery and/or an increase in the gain of central auditory neurons. In contrast to expectations, hearing loss was not associated with a stronger adverse effect of increasing masker intensity on ENV coding. The exaggerated neural representation of ENV information shown here at the level of the auditory midbrain helps to explain previous findings of enhanced sensitivity to amplitude modulation in people with hearing loss under some conditions. Furthermore, amplified ENV coding may potentially contribute to speech perception problems in people with cochlear hearing loss by acting as a distraction from more salient acoustic cues, particularly in fluctuating backgrounds. PMID:24315815

  17. Sensorineural hearing loss amplifies neural coding of envelope information in the central auditory system of chinchillas.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ziwei; Henry, Kenneth S; Heinz, Michael G

    2014-03-01

    People with sensorineural hearing loss often have substantial difficulty understanding speech under challenging listening conditions. Behavioral studies suggest that reduced sensitivity to the temporal structure of sound may be responsible, but underlying neurophysiological pathologies are incompletely understood. Here, we investigate the effects of noise-induced hearing loss on coding of envelope (ENV) structure in the central auditory system of anesthetized chinchillas. ENV coding was evaluated noninvasively using auditory evoked potentials recorded from the scalp surface in response to sinusoidally amplitude modulated tones with carrier frequencies of 1, 2, 4, and 8 kHz and a modulation frequency of 140 Hz. Stimuli were presented in quiet and in three levels of white background noise. The latency of scalp-recorded ENV responses was consistent with generation in the auditory midbrain. Hearing loss amplified neural coding of ENV at carrier frequencies of 2 kHz and above. This result may reflect enhanced ENV coding from the periphery and/or an increase in the gain of central auditory neurons. In contrast to expectations, hearing loss was not associated with a stronger adverse effect of increasing masker intensity on ENV coding. The exaggerated neural representation of ENV information shown here at the level of the auditory midbrain helps to explain previous findings of enhanced sensitivity to amplitude modulation in people with hearing loss under some conditions. Furthermore, amplified ENV coding may potentially contribute to speech perception problems in people with cochlear hearing loss by acting as a distraction from more salient acoustic cues, particularly in fluctuating backgrounds.

  18. Technical support document for proposed revision of the model energy code thermal envelope requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.

    1993-02-01

    This report documents the development of the proposed revision of the council of American Building Officials` (CABO) 1993 supplement to the 1992 Model Energy Code (MEC) (referred to as the 1993 MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. The goal of this analysis was to develop revised guidelines based on an objective methodology that determined the most cost-effective (least total life-cycle cost [LCC]) combination of energy conservation measures (ECMs) for residences in different locations. The ECMs with the lowest LCC were used as a basis for proposing revised MEC maximum U{sub o}-value (thermal transmittance) curves in the MEC format. The changes proposed here affect the requirements for ``group R`` residences. The group R residences are detached one- and two-family dwellings (referred to as single-family) and all other residential buildings three stories or less (referred to as multifamily).

  19. Technical support document for proposed revision of the model energy code thermal envelope requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.

    1993-02-01

    This report documents the development of the proposed revision of the council of American Building Officials' (CABO) 1993 supplement to the 1992 Model Energy Code (MEC) (referred to as the 1993 MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. The goal of this analysis was to develop revised guidelines based on an objective methodology that determined the most cost-effective (least total life-cycle cost [LCC]) combination of energy conservation measures (ECMs) for residences in different locations. The ECMs with the lowest LCC were used as a basis for proposing revised MEC maximum U[sub o]-value (thermal transmittance) curves in the MEC format. The changes proposed here affect the requirements for group R'' residences. The group R residences are detached one- and two-family dwellings (referred to as single-family) and all other residential buildings three stories or less (referred to as multifamily).

  20. Psychophysiological analyses demonstrate the importance of neural envelope coding for speech perception in noise

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Jayaganesh; Heinz, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding speech in noisy environments is often taken for granted; however, this task is particularly challenging for people with cochlear hearing loss, even with hearing aids or cochlear implants. A significant limitation to improving auditory prostheses is our lack of understanding of the neural basis for robust speech perception in noise. Perceptual studies suggest the slowly varying component of the acoustic waveform (envelope, ENV) is sufficient for understanding speech in quiet, but the rapidly varying temporal fine structure (TFS) is important in noise. These perceptual findings have important implications for cochlear implants, which currently only provide ENV; however, neural correlates have been difficult to evaluate due to cochlear transformations between acoustic TFS and recovered neural ENV. Here, we demonstrate the relative contributions of neural ENV and TFS by quantitatively linking neural coding, predicted from a computational auditory-nerve model, with perception of vocoded speech in noise measured from normal-hearing human listeners. Regression models with ENV and TFS coding as independent variables predicted speech identification and phonetic-feature reception at both positive and negative signal-to-noise ratios. We found that 1) neural ENV coding was a primary contributor to speech perception, even in noise, and 2) neural TFS contributed in noise mainly in the presence of neural ENV, but rarely as the primary cue itself. These results suggest neural TFS has less perceptual salience than previously thought due to cochlear signal-processing transformations between TFS and ENV. Because these transformations differ between normal and impaired ears, these findings have important translational implications for auditory prostheses. PMID:22302814

  1. Development of HVJ envelope vector and its application to gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Yasufumi; Yamamoto, Seiji; Nakajima, Toshihiro

    2005-01-01

    To create a highly efficient vector system that is minimally invasive, we initially developed liposomes that contained fusion proteins from the hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ; Sendai virus). These HVJ-liposomes delivered genes and drugs to cultured cells and tissues. To simplify the vector system and develop more efficient vectors, the next approach was to convert viruses to non-viral vectors. Based on this concept, we recently developed the HVJ envelope vector. HVJ with robust fusion activity was inactivated, and exogenous DNA was incorporated into the viral envelope by detergent treatment and centrifugation. The resulting HVJ envelope vector introduced plasmid DNA efficiently and rapidly into both cultured cells in vitro and organs in vivo. Furthermore, proteins, synthetic oligonucleotides, and drugs have also been effectively introduced into cells using the HVJ envelope vector. The HVJ envelope vector is a promising tool for both ex vivo and in vivo gene therapy experiments. Hearing impairment in rats was prevented and treated by hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer to cerebrospinal fluid using HVJ envelope vector. For cancer treatment, tumor-associated antigen genes were delivered efficiently to mouse dendritic cells to evoke an anti-cancer immune response. HVJ envelope vector fused dendritic cells and tumor cells and simultaneously delivered cytokine genes, such as IL-12, to the hybrid cells. This strategy successfully prevented and treated cancers in mice by stimulating the presentation of tumor antigens and the maturation of T cells. For human gene therapy, a pilot plant to commercially produce clinical grade HVJ envelope vector has been established.

  2. Azimuth and envelope coding in the inferior colliculus of the unanesthetized rabbit: effect of reverberation and distance

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Brian; Kim, Duck O.

    2014-01-01

    Recognition and localization of a sound are the major functions of the auditory system. In real situations, the listener and different degrees of reverberation transform the signal between the source and the ears. The present study was designed to provide these transformations and examine their influence on neural responses. Using the virtual auditory space (VAS) method to create anechoic and moderately and highly reverberant environments, we found the following: 1) In reverberation, azimuth tuning was somewhat degraded with distance whereas the direction of azimuth tuning remained unchanged. These features remained unchanged in the anechoic condition. 2) In reverberation, azimuth tuning and envelope synchrony were degraded most for neurons with low best frequencies and least for neurons with high best frequencies. 3) More neurons showed envelope synchrony to binaural than to monaural stimulation in both anechoic and reverberant environments. 4) The percentage of envelope-coding neurons and their synchrony decreased in reverberation with distance, whereas it remained constant in the anechoic condition. 5) At far distances, for both binaural and monaural stimulation, the neural gain in reverberation could be as high as 30 dB and as much as 10 dB higher than those in the anechoic condition. 6) The majority of neurons were able to code both envelope and azimuth in all of the environments. This study provides a foundation for understanding the neural coding of azimuth and envelope synchrony at different distances in reverberant and anechoic environments. This is necessary to understand how the auditory system processes “where” and “what” information in real environments. PMID:24944219

  3. Ancestral capture of syncytin-Car1, a fusogenic endogenous retroviral envelope gene involved in placentation and conserved in Carnivora.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Guillaume; Heidmann, Odile; Bernard-Stoecklin, Sibylle; Reynaud, Karine; Véron, Géraldine; Mulot, Baptiste; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2012-02-14

    Syncytins are envelope protein genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Two such genes have already been identified in simians, two distinct, unrelated genes have been identified in Muridae, and a fifth gene has been identified in the rabbit. Here, we searched for similar genes in the Laurasiatheria clade, which diverged from Euarchontoglires--primates, rodents, and lagomorphs--shortly after mammalian radiation (100 Mya). In silico search for envelope protein genes with full-coding capacity within the dog and cat genomes identified several candidate genes, with one common to both species that displayed placenta-specific expression, which was revealed by RT-PCR analysis of a large panel of tissues. This gene belongs to a degenerate endogenous retroviral element, with precise proviral integration at a site common to dog and cat. Cloning of the gene for an ex vivo pseudotype assay showed fusogenicity on both dog and cat cells. In situ hybridization on placenta sections from both species showed specific expression at the level of the invasive fetal villi within the placental junctional zone, where trophoblast cells fuse into a syncytiotrophoblast layer to form the maternofetal interface. Finally, we show that the gene is conserved among a series of 26 Carnivora representatives, with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of fusogenic activity. The gene is not found in the Pholidota order and, therefore, it was captured before Carnivora radiation, between 60 and 85 Mya. This gene is the oldest syncytin gene identified to date, and it is the first in a new major clade of eutherian mammals.

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope gene structure and diversity in vivo and after cocultivation in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kusumi, K; Conway, B; Cunningham, S; Berson, A; Evans, C; Iversen, A K; Colvin, D; Gallo, M V; Coutre, S; Shpaer, E G

    1992-01-01

    Nested-primer polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been applied to the molecular cloning of 4.6-kb half-genome fragments of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) taken directly from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of an individual with neurological symptoms of HIV-1 infection. In a similar manner, gp120-coding portions of the envelope gene were cloned after PBMC from the same blood sample were cocultivated with uninfected PBMC for 28 days. The complete 1.6-kb nucleotide sequence of the gp120 gene was determined from each of 35 clones examined. Two of 13 (15%) PBMC-derived gp120 genes and 3 of 22 (14%) coculture-derived gp120 genes were defective as a result of frameshifts and an in-frame stop codon(s). Mean diversity between individual gp120-coding sequences in PBMC was fivefold greater (3.24%) than after coculture (0.65%). A predominant sequence of "strain" was found after coculture that was distinct from the diverse viral genotypes detected in vivo and therefore was selectively amplified during in vitro propagation. Multiple distinct third variable (V3) regions encoding the principal neutralizing domain of the envelope protein were detected in PBMC-derived genes, suggesting the presence of immunologic diversity of HIV env genes in vivo not reflected in the cocultured virus sample. The large size of the HIV fragments generated in this study will permit analysis of the diversity of immunologic reactivity, gene function, and pathogenicity of HIV genomes present within infected individuals, including the functional significance of the loss of diversity that occurs upon coculture. Images PMID:1731112

  5. Gene and genon concept: coding versus regulation

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    We analyse here the definition of the gene in order to distinguish, on the basis of modern insight in molecular biology, what the gene is coding for, namely a specific polypeptide, and how its expression is realized and controlled. Before the coding role of the DNA was discovered, a gene was identified with a specific phenotypic trait, from Mendel through Morgan up to Benzer. Subsequently, however, molecular biologists ventured to define a gene at the level of the DNA sequence in terms of coding. As is becoming ever more evident, the relations between information stored at DNA level and functional products are very intricate, and the regulatory aspects are as important and essential as the information coding for products. This approach led, thus, to a conceptual hybrid that confused coding, regulation and functional aspects. In this essay, we develop a definition of the gene that once again starts from the functional aspect. A cellular function can be represented by a polypeptide or an RNA. In the case of the polypeptide, its biochemical identity is determined by the mRNA prior to translation, and that is where we locate the gene. The steps from specific, but possibly separated sequence fragments at DNA level to that final mRNA then can be analysed in terms of regulation. For that purpose, we coin the new term “genon”. In that manner, we can clearly separate product and regulative information while keeping the fundamental relation between coding and function without the need to introduce a conceptual hybrid. In mRNA, the program regulating the expression of a gene is superimposed onto and added to the coding sequence in cis - we call it the genon. The complementary external control of a given mRNA by trans-acting factors is incorporated in its transgenon. A consequence of this definition is that, in eukaryotes, the gene is, in most cases, not yet present at DNA level. Rather, it is assembled by RNA processing, including differential splicing, from various

  6. A Betabaculovirus-Encoded gp64 Homolog Codes for a Functional Envelope Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel M. P.; Melo, Fernando L.; Clem, Rollie J.; Wolff, José L. C.

    2015-01-01

    The GP64 envelope fusion protein is a hallmark of group I alphabaculoviruses. However, the Diatraea saccharalis granulovirus genome sequence revealed the first betabaculovirus species harboring a gp64 homolog (disa118). In this work, we have shown that this homolog encodes a functional envelope fusion protein and could enable the infection and fusogenic abilities of a gp64-null prototype baculovirus. Therefore, GP64 may complement or may be in the process of replacing F protein activity in this virus lineage. PMID:26537678

  7. Hominoid-specific SPANXA/D genes demonstrate differential expression in individuals and protein localization to a distinct nuclear envelope domain during spermatid morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, V A; Schoppee, P D; Vanage, G R; Klotz, K L; Diekman, A B; Flickinger, C J; Coppola, M A; Herr, J C

    2006-11-01

    Human sperm protein associated with the nucleus on the X chromosome consists of a five-member gene family (SPANXA1, SPANXA2, SPANXB, SPANXC and SPANXD) clustered at Xq27.1. Evolved from an ancestral SPANX-N gene family (at Xq27 and Xp11) present in all primates as well as in rats and mice, the SPANXA/D family is present only in humans, bonobos, chimpanzees and gorillas. Among hominoid-specific genes, the SPANXA/D gene family is considered to be undergoing rapid positive selection in its coding region. In this study, RT-PCR of human testis mRNA from individuals showed that, although all SPANXA/D genes are expressed in humans, differences are evident. In particular, SPANXC is expressed only in a subset of men. The SPANXa/d protein localized to the nuclear envelope of round, condensing and elongating spermatids, specifically to regions that do not underlie the developing acrosome. During spermiogenesis, the SPANXa/d-positive domain migrated into the base of the head as the redundant nuclear envelope that protrudes into the residual cytoplasm. Post-testicular modification of the SPANXa/d proteins was noted, as were PEST (proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine rich regions) domains. It is concluded that the duplication of the SPANX-N gene family that occurred 6-11 MYA resulted in a new gene family, SPANXA/D, that plays a role during spermiogenesis. The SPANXa/d gene products are among the few examples of X-linked nuclear proteins expressed following meiosis. Their localization to non-acrosomal domains of the nuclear envelope adjacent to regions of euchromatin and their redistribution to the redundant nuclear envelope during spermiogenesis provide a biomarker for the redundant nuclear envelope of spermatids and spermatozoa.

  8. Retroviral envelope gene captures and syncytin exaptation for placentation in marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Carradec, Quentin; Souquere, Sylvie; Mulot, Baptiste; Catzeflis, François; Nilsson, Maria A.; Menzies, Brandon R.; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Pierron, Gérard; Zeller, Ulrich; Heidmann, Odile; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Syncytins are genes of retroviral origin captured by eutherian mammals, with a role in placentation. Here we show that some marsupials—which are the closest living relatives to eutherian mammals, although they diverged from the latter ∼190 Mya—also possess a syncytin gene. The gene identified in the South American marsupial opossum and dubbed syncytin-Opo1 has all of the characteristic features of a bona fide syncytin gene: It is fusogenic in an ex vivo cell–cell fusion assay; it is specifically expressed in the short-lived placenta at the level of the syncytial feto–maternal interface; and it is conserved in a functional state in a series of Monodelphis species. We further identify a nonfusogenic retroviral envelope gene that has been conserved for >80 My of evolution among all marsupials (including the opossum and the Australian tammar wallaby), with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of a canonical immunosuppressive domain, but with only limited expression in the placenta. This unusual captured gene, together with a third class of envelope genes from recently endogenized retroviruses—displaying strong expression in the uterine glands where retroviral particles can be detected—plausibly correspond to the different evolutionary statuses of a captured retroviral envelope gene, with only syncytin-Opo1 being the present-day bona fide syncytin active in the opossum and related species. This study would accordingly recapitulate the natural history of syncytin exaptation and evolution in a single species, and definitely extends the presence of such genes to all major placental mammalian clades. PMID:25605903

  9. Comprehensive analysis of the codon usage patterns in the envelope glycoprotein E2 gene of the classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Li, Xinxin; Chi, Xiaojuan; Wang, Song; Ma, Yanmei; Chen, Jilong

    2017-01-01

    The classical swine fever virus (CSFV), circulating worldwide, is a highly contagious virus. Since the emergence of CSFV, it has caused great economic loss in swine industry. The envelope glycoprotein E2 gene of the CSFV is an immunoprotective antigen that induces the immune system to produce neutralizing antibodies. Therefore, it is essential to study the codon usage of the E2 gene of the CSFV. In this study, 140 coding sequences of the E2 gene were analyzed. The value of effective number of codons (ENC) showed low codon usage bias in the E2 gene. Our study showed that codon usage could be described mainly by mutation pressure ENC plot analysis combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and translational selection-correlation analysis between the general average hydropathicity (Gravy) and aromaticity (Aroma), and nucleotides at the third position of codons (A3s, T3s, G3s, C3s and GC3s). Furthermore, the neutrality analysis, which explained the relationship between GC12s and GC3s, revealed that natural selection had a key role compared with mutational bias during the evolution of the E2 gene. These results lay a foundation for further research on the molecular evolution of CSFV.

  10. Capture of syncytin-Mar1, a Fusogenic Endogenous Retroviral Envelope Gene Involved in Placentation in the Rodentia Squirrel-Related Clade

    PubMed Central

    Redelsperger, François; Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Tennant, Bud C.; Catzeflis, François; Mulot, Baptiste; Heidmann, Odile; Dupressoir, Anne

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope protein (env) genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes have previously been identified in the mouse-related clade, allowing a demonstration of their essential role via knockout mice. Here, we searched for similar genes in a second major clade of the Rodentia order, the squirrel-related clade, taking advantage of the complete sequencing of the ground squirrel Ictidomys tridecemlineatus genome. In silico search for env genes with full coding capacity identified several candidate genes with one displaying placenta-specific expression, as revealed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of a large panel of tissues. This gene belongs to a degenerate endogenous retroviral element, with recognizable hallmarks of an integrated provirus. Cloning of the gene in an expression vector for ex vivo cell-cell fusion and pseudotype assays demonstrated fusogenicity on a large panel of mammalian cells. In situ hybridization on placenta sections showed specific expression in domains where trophoblast cells fuse into a syncytiotrophoblast at the fetomaternal interface, consistent with a role in syncytium formation. Finally, we show that the gene is conserved among the tribe Marmotini, thus dating its capture back to about at least 25 million years ago, with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of fusogenic activity. This gene that we named syncytin-Mar1 is distinct from all seven Syncytin genes identified to date in eutherian mammals and is likely to be a major effector of placentation in its related clade. IMPORTANCE Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope genes of retroviral origin, ancestrally captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes had been previously identified in the mouse-related clade. Here, in the squirrel-related rodent clade, we identified the envelope gene of an endogenous retrovirus with all the

  11. Capture of syncytin-Mar1, a fusogenic endogenous retroviral envelope gene involved in placentation in the Rodentia squirrel-related clade.

    PubMed

    Redelsperger, François; Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Tennant, Bud C; Catzeflis, François; Mulot, Baptiste; Heidmann, Odile; Heidmann, Thierry; Dupressoir, Anne

    2014-07-01

    Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope protein (env) genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes have previously been identified in the mouse-related clade, allowing a demonstration of their essential role via knockout mice. Here, we searched for similar genes in a second major clade of the Rodentia order, the squirrel-related clade, taking advantage of the complete sequencing of the ground squirrel Ictidomys tridecemlineatus genome. In silico search for env genes with full coding capacity identified several candidate genes with one displaying placenta-specific expression, as revealed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of a large panel of tissues. This gene belongs to a degenerate endogenous retroviral element, with recognizable hallmarks of an integrated provirus. Cloning of the gene in an expression vector for ex vivo cell-cell fusion and pseudotype assays demonstrated fusogenicity on a large panel of mammalian cells. In situ hybridization on placenta sections showed specific expression in domains where trophoblast cells fuse into a syncytiotrophoblast at the fetomaternal interface, consistent with a role in syncytium formation. Finally, we show that the gene is conserved among the tribe Marmotini, thus dating its capture back to about at least 25 million years ago, with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of fusogenic activity. This gene that we named syncytin-Mar1 is distinct from all seven Syncytin genes identified to date in eutherian mammals and is likely to be a major effector of placentation in its related clade. Importance: Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope genes of retroviral origin, ancestrally captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes had been previously identified in the mouse-related clade. Here, in the squirrel-related rodent clade, we identified the envelope gene of an endogenous retrovirus with all the features of a

  12. Syncytin-A and syncytin-B, two fusogenic placenta-specific murine envelope genes of retroviral origin conserved in Muridae

    PubMed Central

    Dupressoir, Anne; Marceau, Geoffroy; Vernochet, Cécile; Bénit, Laurence; Kanellopoulos, Colette; Sapin, Vincent; Heidmann, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Recently, we and others have identified two human endogenous retroviruses that entered the primate lineage 25–40 million years ago and that encode highly fusogenic retroviral envelope proteins (syncytin-1 and -2), possibly involved in the formation of the placenta syncytiotrophoblast layer generated by trophoblast cell fusion at the materno–fetal interface. A systematic in silico search throughout mouse genome databases presently identifies two fully coding envelope genes, present as unique copies and unrelated to any known murine endogenous retrovirus, that we named syncytin-A and -B. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrates placenta-specific expression for both genes, with increasing transcript levels in this organ from 9.5 to 14.5 days postcoitum. In situ hybridization of placenta cryosections further localizes these transcripts in the syncytiotrophoblast-containing labyrinthine zona. Consistently, we show that both genes can trigger cell–cell fusion in ex vivo transfection assays, with distinct cell type specificities suggesting different receptor usage. Genes orthologous to syncytin-A and -B and disclosing a striking conservation of their coding status are found in all Muridae tested (mouse, rat, gerbil, vole, and hamster), dating their entry into the rodent lineage ≈20 million years ago. Together, these data strongly argue for a critical role of syncytin-A and -B in murine syncytiotrophoblast formation, thus unraveling a rather unique situation where two pairs of endogenous retroviruses, independently acquired by the primate and rodent lineages, would have been positively selected for a convergent physiological role. PMID:15644441

  13. Genetic coding and gene expression - new Quadruplet genetic coding model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar Singh, Rama

    2012-07-01

    Successful demonstration of human genome project has opened the door not only for developing personalized medicine and cure for genetic diseases, but it may also answer the complex and difficult question of the origin of life. It may lead to making 21st century, a century of Biological Sciences as well. Based on the central dogma of Biology, genetic codons in conjunction with tRNA play a key role in translating the RNA bases forming sequence of amino acids leading to a synthesized protein. This is the most critical step in synthesizing the right protein needed for personalized medicine and curing genetic diseases. So far, only triplet codons involving three bases of RNA, transcribed from DNA bases, have been used. Since this approach has several inconsistencies and limitations, even the promise of personalized medicine has not been realized. The new Quadruplet genetic coding model proposed and developed here involves all four RNA bases which in conjunction with tRNA will synthesize the right protein. The transcription and translation process used will be the same, but the Quadruplet codons will help overcome most of the inconsistencies and limitations of the triplet codes. Details of this new Quadruplet genetic coding model and its subsequent potential applications including relevance to the origin of life will be presented.

  14. Hominoid-Specific De Novo Protein-Coding Genes Originating from Long Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chu-Jun; Zhou, Wei-Zhen; Li, Ying; Zhang, Mao; Zhang, Rongli; Wei, Liping; Li, Chuan-Yun

    2012-01-01

    Tinkering with pre-existing genes has long been known as a major way to create new genes. Recently, however, motherless protein-coding genes have been found to have emerged de novo from ancestral non-coding DNAs. How these genes originated is not well addressed to date. Here we identified 24 hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes with precise origination timing in vertebrate phylogeny. Strand-specific RNA–Seq analyses were performed in five rhesus macaque tissues (liver, prefrontal cortex, skeletal muscle, adipose, and testis), which were then integrated with public transcriptome data from human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque. On the basis of comparing the RNA expression profiles in the three species, we found that most of the hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes encoded polyadenylated non-coding RNAs in rhesus macaque or chimpanzee with a similar transcript structure and correlated tissue expression profile. According to the rule of parsimony, the majority of these hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes appear to have acquired a regulated transcript structure and expression profile before acquiring coding potential. Interestingly, although the expression profile was largely correlated, the coding genes in human often showed higher transcriptional abundance than their non-coding counterparts in rhesus macaque. The major findings we report in this manuscript are robust and insensitive to the parameters used in the identification and analysis of de novo genes. Our results suggest that at least a portion of long non-coding RNAs, especially those with active and regulated transcription, may serve as a birth pool for protein-coding genes, which are then further optimized at the transcriptional level. PMID:23028352

  15. Bacillus anthracis lcp Genes Support Vegetative Growth, Envelope Assembly, and Spore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Liszewski Zilla, Megan; Lunderberg, J. Mark; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacillus anthracis, a spore-forming pathogen, replicates as chains of vegetative cells by regulating the separation of septal peptidoglycan. Surface (S)-layer proteins and B. anthracis S-layer-associated proteins (BSLs) function as chain length determinants and are assembled in the envelope by binding to the secondary cell wall polysaccharide (SCWP). B. anthracis expresses six different genes encoding LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP) enzymes (lcpB1 to -4, lcpC, and lcpD), which when expressed in Staphylococcus aureus promote attachment of wall teichoic acid to peptidoglycan. Mutations in B. anthracis lcpB3 and lcpD cause aberrations in cell size and chain length that can be explained as discrete defects in SCWP assembly; however, the function of the other lcp genes is not known. By deleting combinations of lcp genes from the B. anthracis genome, we generated variants with single lcp genes. B. anthracis expressing lcpB3 alone displayed physiological cell size, vegetative growth, spore formation, and S-layer assembly. Strains expressing lcpB1 or lcpB4 displayed defects in cell size and shape, S-layer assembly, and spore formation yet sustained vegetative growth. In contrast, the lcpB2 strain was unable to grow unless the gene was expressed from a multicopy plasmid (lcpB2++), and variants expressing lcpC or lcpD displayed severe defects in growth and cell shape. The lcpB2++, lcpC, or lcpD strains supported neither S-layer assembly nor spore formation. We propose a model whereby LCP enzymes fulfill partially overlapping functions in transferring SCWP molecules to discrete sites within the bacterial envelope. IMPORTANCE Products of genes essential for bacterial envelope assembly represent targets for antibiotic development. The LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP) enzymes tether bactoprenol-linked intermediates of secondary cell wall polymers to the C6 hydroxyl of N-acetylmuramic acid in peptidoglycan; however, the role of LCPs as a target for antibiotic therapy is not defined. We show here

  16. Fast Screening Procedures for Random Transposon Libraries of Cloned Herpesvirus Genomes: Mutational Analysis of Human Cytomegalovirus Envelope Glycoprotein Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hobom, Urs; Brune, Wolfram; Messerle, Martin; Hahn, Gabriele; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.

    2000-01-01

    We have cloned the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) in Escherichia coli. Here, we have subjected the HCMV BAC to random transposon (Tn) mutagenesis using a Tn1721-derived insertion sequence and have provided the conditions for excision of the BAC cassette. We report on a fast and efficient screening procedure for a Tn insertion library. Bacterial clones containing randomly mutated full-length HCMV genomes were transferred into 96-well microtiter plates. A PCR screening method based on two Tn primers and one primer specific for the desired genomic position of the Tn insertion was established. Within three consecutive rounds of PCR a Tn insertion of interest can be assigned to a specific bacterial clone. We applied this method to retrieve mutants of HCMV envelope glycoprotein genes. To determine the infectivities of the mutant HCMV genomes, the DNA of the identified BACs was transfected into permissive fibroblasts. In contrast to BACs with mutations in the genes coding for gB, gH, gL, and gM, which did not yield infectious virus, BACs with disruptions of open reading frame UL4 (gp48) or UL74 (gO) were viable, although gO-deficient viruses showed a severe growth deficit. Thus, gO (UL74), a component of the glycoprotein complex III, is dispensable for viral growth. We conclude that our approach of PCR screening for Tn insertions will greatly facilitate the functional analysis of herpesvirus genomes. PMID:10933677

  17. The Envelope Gene of Transmitted HIV-1 Resists a Late Interferon Gamma-Induced Block

    PubMed Central

    Rihn, Suzannah J.; Foster, Toshana L.; Busnadiego, Idoia; Aziz, Muhamad Afiq; Hughes, Joseph; Neil, Stuart J. D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type I interferon (IFN) signaling engenders an antiviral state that likely plays an important role in constraining HIV-1 transmission and contributes to defining subsequent AIDS pathogenesis. Type II IFN (IFN-γ) also induces an antiviral state but is often primarily considered to be an immunomodulatory cytokine. We report that IFN-γ stimulation can induce an antiviral state that can be both distinct from that of type I interferon and can potently inhibit HIV-1 in primary CD4+ T cells and a number of human cell lines. Strikingly, we find that transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1 viruses can resist a late block that is induced by type II IFN, and the use of chimeric IFN-γ-sensitive/resistant viruses indicates that interferon resistance maps to the env gene. Simultaneously, in vitro evolution also revealed that just a single amino acid substitution in the envelope can confer substantial resistance to IFN-mediated inhibition. Thus, the env gene of transmitted HIV-1 confers resistance to a late block that is phenotypically distinct from blocks previously described to be resisted by env and is therefore mediated by unknown IFN-γ-stimulated factor(s) in human CD4+ T cells and cell lines. This important unidentified block could play a key role in constraining HIV-1 transmission. IMPORTANCE The human immune system can hinder invading pathogens through interferon (IFN) signaling. One consequence of this signaling is that cells enter an antiviral state, increasing the levels of hundreds of defenses that can inhibit the replication and spread of viruses. The majority of HIV-1 infections result from a single virus particle (the transmitted/founder) that makes it past these defenses and colonizes the host. Thus, the founder virus is hypothesized to be a relatively interferon-resistant entity. Here, we show that certain HIV-1 envelope genes have the unanticipated ability to resist specific human defenses mediated by different types of interferons. Strikingly, the envelope

  18. Molecular mechanisms of recombination restriction in the envelope gene of the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Galetto, Roman; Hamoudi, Meriem; Archer, John; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Martin, Darren P; Robertson, David L; Negroni, Matteo

    2009-05-01

    The ability of pathogens to escape the host's immune response is crucial for the establishment of persistent infections and can influence virulence. Recombination has been observed to contribute to this process by generating novel genetic variants. Although distinctive recombination patterns have been described in many viral pathogens, little is known about the influence of biases in the recombination process itself relative to selective forces acting on newly formed recombinants. Understanding these influences is important for determining how recombination contributes to pathogen genome and proteome evolution. Most previous research on recombination-driven protein evolution has focused on relatively simple proteins, usually in the context of directed evolution experiments. Here, we study recombination in the envelope gene of HIV-1 between primary isolates belonging to subtypes that recombine naturally in the HIV/AIDS pandemic. By characterizing the early steps in the generation of recombinants, we provide novel insights into the evolutionary forces that shape recombination patterns within viral populations. Specifically, we show that the combined effects of mechanistic processes that determine the locations of recombination breakpoints across the HIV-1 envelope gene, and purifying selection acting against dysfunctional recombinants, can explain almost the entire distribution of breakpoints found within this gene in nature. These constraints account for the surprising paucity of recombination breakpoints found in infected individuals within this highly variable gene. Thus, the apparent randomness of HIV evolution via recombination may in fact be relatively more predictable than anticipated. In addition, the dominance of purifying selection in localized areas of the HIV genome defines regions where functional constraints on recombinants appear particularly strong, pointing to vulnerable aspects of HIV biology.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Recombination Restriction in the Envelope Gene of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Galetto, Roman; Hamoudi, Meriem; Archer, John; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Martin, Darren P.; Robertson, David L.; Negroni, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    The ability of pathogens to escape the host's immune response is crucial for the establishment of persistent infections and can influence virulence. Recombination has been observed to contribute to this process by generating novel genetic variants. Although distinctive recombination patterns have been described in many viral pathogens, little is known about the influence of biases in the recombination process itself relative to selective forces acting on newly formed recombinants. Understanding these influences is important for determining how recombination contributes to pathogen genome and proteome evolution. Most previous research on recombination-driven protein evolution has focused on relatively simple proteins, usually in the context of directed evolution experiments. Here, we study recombination in the envelope gene of HIV-1 between primary isolates belonging to subtypes that recombine naturally in the HIV/AIDS pandemic. By characterizing the early steps in the generation of recombinants, we provide novel insights into the evolutionary forces that shape recombination patterns within viral populations. Specifically, we show that the combined effects of mechanistic processes that determine the locations of recombination breakpoints across the HIV-1 envelope gene, and purifying selection acting against dysfunctional recombinants, can explain almost the entire distribution of breakpoints found within this gene in nature. These constraints account for the surprising paucity of recombination breakpoints found in infected individuals within this highly variable gene. Thus, the apparent randomness of HIV evolution via recombination may in fact be relatively more predictable than anticipated. In addition, the dominance of purifying selection in localized areas of the HIV genome defines regions where functional constraints on recombinants appear particularly strong, pointing to vulnerable aspects of HIV biology. PMID:19424420

  20. De Novo Origin of Human Protein-Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dong-Dong; Irwin, David M.; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The de novo origin of a new protein-coding gene from non-coding DNA is considered to be a very rare occurrence in genomes. Here we identify 60 new protein-coding genes that originated de novo on the human lineage since divergence from the chimpanzee. The functionality of these genes is supported by both transcriptional and proteomic evidence. RNA–seq data indicate that these genes have their highest expression levels in the cerebral cortex and testes, which might suggest that these genes contribute to phenotypic traits that are unique to humans, such as improved cognitive ability. Our results are inconsistent with the traditional view that the de novo origin of new genes is very rare, thus there should be greater appreciation of the importance of the de novo origination of genes. PMID:22102831

  1. Genomic studies of envelope gene sequences from mosquito and human samples from Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pitaksajjakul, Pannamthip; Benjathummarak, Surachet; Son, Hyun Ngoc; Thongrungkiat, Supatra; Ramasoota, Pongrama

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an RNA virus showing a high degree of genetic variation as a consequence of its proofreading inability. This variation plays an important role in virus evolution and pathogenesis. Although levels of within-host genetic variation are similar following equilibrium, variation among different hosts is frequently different. To identify dengue quasispecies present among two hosts, we collected patient samples from six acute DENV cases and two pools of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and analyzed the genetic variation of regions of the viral envelope gene. Among human and mosquito samples, we found three major clusters originating from two subpopulations. Although several shared lineages were observed in the two hosts, only one lineage showing evidence of neutral selection was observed among two hosts. Taken together, our data provide evidence for the existence of a DENV quasispecies, with less genetic variation observed in mosquitoes than humans and with circulating lineages found in both host types.

  2. Nuclear envelope structural proteins facilitate nuclear shape changes accompanying embryonic differentiation and fidelity of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elizabeth R; Meng, Yue; Moore, Robert; Tse, Jeffrey D; Xu, Arn G; Xu, Xiang-Xi

    2017-01-14

    Nuclear size and shape are specific to a cell type, function, and location, and can serve as indicators of disease and development. We previously found that lamin A/C and associated nuclear envelope structural proteins were upregulated when murine embryonic stem (ES) cells differentiated to primitive endoderm cells. Here we further investigated the morphological changes of nuclei that accompany this differentiation. The nuclei of undifferentiated wild type cells were found shaped as flattened, irregular ovals, whereas nuclei of Gata4-positive endoderm cells were more spherical, less flattened, and with a slightly reduced volume. The morphological change was confirmed in the trophectoderm and primitive endoderm lineages of E4.5 blastocysts, compared to larger and more irregularly shaped of the nuclei of the inner cell mass. We established ES cells genetically null for the nuclear lamina proteins lamin A/C or the inner nuclear envelope protein emerin, or compound mutant for both lamin A/C and emerin. ES cells deficient in lamin A/C differentiated to endoderm but less efficiently, and the nuclei remained flattened and failed to condense. The size and shape of emerin-deficient nuclei also remained uncondensed after treatment with RA. The emerin/lamin A/C double knockout ES cells failed to differentiate to endoderm cells, though the nuclei condensed but retained a generally flattened ellipsoid shape. Additionally, ES cells deficient for lamin A/C and/or emerin had compromised ability to undergo endoderm differentiation, where the differentiating cells often exhibited coexpression of pluripotent and differentiation markers, such as Oct3/4 and Gata4, respectively, indicating an infidelity of gene regulation. The results suggest that changes in nuclear size and shape, which are mediated by nuclear envelope structural proteins lamin A/C and/or emerin, also impact gene regulation and lineage differentiation in early embryos. Nevertheless, mice lacking both lamin A/C and

  3. Nucleotide sequence variation of the envelope protein gene identifies two distinct genotypes of yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Chang, G J; Cropp, B C; Kinney, R M; Trent, D W; Gubler, D J

    1995-09-01

    The evolution of yellow fever virus over 67 years was investigated by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the envelope (E) protein genes of 20 viruses isolated in Africa, the Caribbean, and South America. Uniformly weighted parsimony algorithm analysis defined two major evolutionary yellow fever virus lineages designated E genotypes I and II. E genotype I contained viruses isolated from East and Central Africa. E genotype II viruses were divided into two sublineages: IIA viruses from West Africa and IIB viruses from America, except for a 1979 virus isolated from Trinidad (TRINID79A). Unique signature patterns were identified at 111 nucleotide and 12 amino acid positions within the yellow fever virus E gene by signature pattern analysis. Yellow fever viruses from East and Central Africa contained unique signatures at 60 nucleotide and five amino acid positions, those from West Africa contained unique signatures at 25 nucleotide and two amino acid positions, and viruses from America contained such signatures at 30 nucleotide and five amino acid positions in the E gene. The dissemination of yellow fever viruses from Africa to the Americas is supported by the close genetic relatedness of genotype IIA and IIB viruses and genetic evidence of a possible second introduction of yellow fever virus from West Africa, as illustrated by the TRINID79A virus isolate. The E protein genes of American IIB yellow fever viruses had higher frequencies of amino acid substitutions than did genes of yellow fever viruses of genotypes I and IIA on the basis of comparisons with a consensus amino acid sequence for the yellow fever E gene. The great variation in the E proteins of American yellow fever virus probably results from positive selection imposed by virus interaction with different species of mosquitoes or nonhuman primates in the Americas.

  4. Nucleotide sequence variation of the envelope protein gene identifies two distinct genotypes of yellow fever virus.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, G J; Cropp, B C; Kinney, R M; Trent, D W; Gubler, D J

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of yellow fever virus over 67 years was investigated by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the envelope (E) protein genes of 20 viruses isolated in Africa, the Caribbean, and South America. Uniformly weighted parsimony algorithm analysis defined two major evolutionary yellow fever virus lineages designated E genotypes I and II. E genotype I contained viruses isolated from East and Central Africa. E genotype II viruses were divided into two sublineages: IIA viruses from West Africa and IIB viruses from America, except for a 1979 virus isolated from Trinidad (TRINID79A). Unique signature patterns were identified at 111 nucleotide and 12 amino acid positions within the yellow fever virus E gene by signature pattern analysis. Yellow fever viruses from East and Central Africa contained unique signatures at 60 nucleotide and five amino acid positions, those from West Africa contained unique signatures at 25 nucleotide and two amino acid positions, and viruses from America contained such signatures at 30 nucleotide and five amino acid positions in the E gene. The dissemination of yellow fever viruses from Africa to the Americas is supported by the close genetic relatedness of genotype IIA and IIB viruses and genetic evidence of a possible second introduction of yellow fever virus from West Africa, as illustrated by the TRINID79A virus isolate. The E protein genes of American IIB yellow fever viruses had higher frequencies of amino acid substitutions than did genes of yellow fever viruses of genotypes I and IIA on the basis of comparisons with a consensus amino acid sequence for the yellow fever E gene. The great variation in the E proteins of American yellow fever virus probably results from positive selection imposed by virus interaction with different species of mosquitoes or nonhuman primates in the Americas. PMID:7637022

  5. High Expression of Endogenous Retroviral Envelope Gene in the Equine Fetal Part of the Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Stefanetti, Valentina; Marenzoni, Maria Luisa; Passamonti, Fabrizio; Cappelli, Katia; Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo; Coletti, Mauro; Capomaccio, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are proviral phases of exogenous retroviruses that have co-evolved with vertebrate genomes for millions of years. Previous studies have identified the envelope (env) protein genes of retroviral origin preferentially expressed in the placenta which suggests a role in placentation based on their membrane fusogenic capacity and therefore they have been named syncytins. Until now, all the characterized syncytins have been associated with three invasive placentation types: the endotheliochorial (Carnivora), the synepitheliochorial (Ruminantia), and the hemochorial placentation (human, mouse) where they play a role in the syncytiotrophoblast formation. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether EqERV env RNA is expressed in horse tissues as well and investigate if the horse, possessing an epitheliochorial placenta, has “captured” a common retroviral env gene with syncytin-like properties in placental tissues. Interestingly, although in the equine placenta there is no syncytiotrophoblast layer at the maternal-fetal interface, our results showed that EqERV env RNA is highly expressed at that level, as expected for a candidate syncytin-like gene but with reduced abundance in the other somatic tissues (nearly 30-fold lower) thus suggesting a possible role in the placental tissue. Although the horse is one of the few domestic animals with a sequenced genome, few studies have been conducted about the EqERV and their expression in placental tissue has never been investigated. PMID:27176223

  6. Gene coding for the E1 endoglucanase

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, S.R.; Laymon, R.A.; Himmel, M.E.

    1996-07-16

    The gene encoding Acidothermus cellulolyticus E1 endoglucanase is cloned and expressed in heterologous microorganisms. A new modified E1 endoglucanase enzyme is produced along with variants of the gene and enzyme. The E1 endoglucanase is useful for hydrolyzing cellulose to sugars for simultaneous or later fermentation into alcohol. 6 figs.

  7. Gene coding for the E1 endoglucanase

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Steven R.; Laymon, Robert A.; Himmel, Michael E.

    1996-01-01

    The gene encoding Acidothermus cellulolyticus E1 endoglucanase is cloned and expressed in heterologous microorganisms. A new modified E1 endoglucanase enzyme is produced along with variants of the gene and enzyme. The E1 endoglucanase is useful for hydrolyzing cellulose to sugars for simultaneous or later fermentation into alcohol.

  8. Diversity of envelope genes from an uncloned stock of SIVmac251.

    PubMed

    Bixby, Jacqueline G; Laur, Olga; Johnson, Welkin E; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2010-10-01

    AIDS vaccine and pathogenesis research will benefit from a more diverse array of cloned SIV challenge stocks from which to choose. Toward this end, 20 envelope genes were cloned from an extensively used, primary stock of uncloned SIVmac251. Each of the 20 clones had a unique sequence. Their translated sequences differed by as many as 26 amino acids from one another and by as many as 45 amino acids from the commonly used clone SIVmac239. Envelope sequences up to and including the membrane-spanning domain were exchanged into the infectious pathogenic SIVmac239 clone and virus stocks were produced by HEK293T cell transfection. Seventeen of the 20 recombinants were replication competent. The infectivities per ng p27 of the 17 new replication-competent recombinants in C8166-SEAP cells and in TZM-bl cells ranged from minus 32-fold to plus 7.6-fold relative to SIVmac239. A range of sensitivities to neutralization by sCD4 and by sera from SIV-infected macaques was observed but none was as sensitive to these neutralizing agents as SIVmac316, the highly macrophage-competent derivative of SIVmac239. Four strains that were most sensitive to sCD4 inhibition were also among the most sensitive to antibody-mediated neutralization. None of the new recombinant viruses replicated as well as SIVmac316 in primary alveolar macrophage cultures from rhesus monkeys but three of the strains did exhibit significant levels of delayed replication in these primary macrophages, reaching peak levels of virus production of ≥50 ng/ml p27 compared to 600-800 ng/ml p27 with SIVmac316. These new SIV clones are being contributed to the NIH AIDS Reagent Repository and are available to the scientific community.

  9. Gene regulation of mammalian long non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Heeyoun

    2017-09-11

    RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcribes two classes of RNAs, protein-coding and non-protein-coding (ncRNA) genes. ncRNAs are also synthesized by RNA polymerases I and III (Pol I and III). In humans, the number of ncRNA genes exceeds more than twice that of protein-coding genes. However, the history of studying Pol II-synthesized ncRNA is relatively short. Since early 2000s, important biological and pathological functions of these ncRNA genes have begun to be discovered and intensively studied. And transcription mechanisms of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) have been recently reported. Transcription of lncRNAs utilizes some transcription factors and mechanisms shared in that of protein-coding genes. In addition, tissue specificity in lncRNA gene expression has been shown. LncRNAs play essential roles in regulating the expression of neighboring or distal genes through different mechanisms. This leads to the implication of lncRNAs in a wide variety of biological pathways and pathological development. In this review, the newly discovered transcription mechanisms, characteristics, and functions of lncRNA are discussed.

  10. [Basic types of respiratory system structure in insect egg envelopes, and genes controlling their formation].

    PubMed

    Omelina, E S; Baricheva, É M; Fedorova, E V

    2012-01-01

    Insects is a taxon surprisingly rich with species and varieties, and its representatives are considered as the most fitted and "evolutionary successful" living things. Insects are distinguished by diversity and abundance of adaptations to environmental conditions, representatives of this class inhabit different ecological niches, they can be found practically in every corner of the Earth and, in particular, in close adjacency to man. Among them are those who man benefits from and those who man struggles against. This determines man's interest in studying peculiarities of their development as well as adaptations formed by them in the course of evolution to become more viable. In the paper, data are presented on morphological structure of respiratory systems in insect egg envelopes that ensure respiration process of developing embryo. Variability of these systems and their dependence on environmental conditions are demonstrated for different insect species. The information about genes controlling development of respiratory systems in fruit fly eggs is brought together, and occurrence of evolutionary conservative genes participating in development of such systems in other insect species is ascertained.

  11. The HP0256 gene product is involved in motility and cell envelope architecture of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is the causative agent for gastritis, and peptic and duodenal ulcers. The bacterium displays 5-6 polar sheathed flagella that are essential for colonisation and persistence in the gastric mucosa. The biochemistry and genetics of flagellar biogenesis in H. pylori has not been fully elucidated. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that the gene HP0256, annotated as hypothetical, was a FliJ homologue. In Salmonella, FliJ is a chaperone escort protein for FlgN and FliT, two proteins that themselves display chaperone activity for components of the hook, the rod and the filament. Results Ablation of the HP0256 gene in H. pylori significantly reduced motility. However, flagellin and hook protein synthesis was not affected in the HP0256 mutant. Transmission electron transmission microscopy revealed that the HP0256 mutant cells displayed a normal flagellum configuration, suggesting that HP0256 was not essential for assembly and polar localisation of the flagella in the cell. Interestingly, whole genome microarrays of an HP0256 mutant revealed transcriptional changes in a number of genes associated with the flagellar regulon and the cell envelope, such as outer membrane proteins and adhesins. Consistent with the array data, lack of the HP0256 gene significantly reduced adhesion and the inflammatory response in host cells. Conclusions We conclude that HP0256 is not a functional counterpart of FliJ in H. pylori. However, it is required for full motility and it is involved, possibly indirectly, in expression of outer membrane proteins and adhesins involved in pathogenesis and adhesion. PMID:20377912

  12. Jumping the nuclear envelop barrier: Improving polyplex-mediated gene transfection efficiency by a selective CDK1 inhibitor RO-3306.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuefei; Liu, Xiangrui; Zhao, Bingxiang; Liu, Xin; Zhu, Dingcheng; Qiu, Nasha; Zhou, Quan; Piao, Ying; Zhou, Zhuxian; Tang, Jianbin; Shen, Youqing

    2016-07-28

    Successful transfection of plasmid DNA (pDNA) requires intranuclear internalization of pDNA effectively and the nuclear envelope appears to be one of the critical intracellular barriers for polymer mediated pDNA delivery. Polyethylenimine (PEI), as the classic cationic polymer, compact the negatively charged pDNA tightly and make up stable polyplexes. The polyplexes are too large to enter the nuclear through nuclear pores and it is believed that the nuclear envelope breakdown in mitosis could facilitate the nuclear entry of polyplexes. To jump the nuclear envelope barrier, we used a selective and reversible CDK1 inhibitor RO-3306 to control the G2/M transition of the cell cycle and increased the proportion of mitotic cells which have disappeared nuclear envelope during transfection. Herein, we show that RO-3306 remarkably increases the transfection efficiency of PEI polyplexes through enhanced nuclear localization of PEI and pDNA. However, RO-3306 is less effective to the charge-reversal polymer poly[(2-acryloyl)ethyl(p-boronic acid benzyl)diethylammonium bromide] (B-PDEAEA) which responses to cellular stimuli and releases free pDNA in cytoplasm. Our findings not only offer new opportunities for improving non-viral based gene delivery but also provide theoretical support for the rational design of novel functional polymers for gene delivery. We also report current data showing that RO-3306 synergizes TRAIL gene induced apoptosis in cancer cells.

  13. Coronavirus virulence genes with main focus on SARS-CoV envelope gene.

    PubMed

    DeDiego, Marta L; Nieto-Torres, Jose L; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M; Regla-Nava, Jose A; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Usera, Fernando; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-12-19

    Coronavirus (CoV) infection is usually detected by cellular sensors, which trigger the activation of the innate immune system. Nevertheless, CoVs have evolved viral proteins that target different signaling pathways to counteract innate immune responses. Some CoV proteins act as antagonists of interferon (IFN) by inhibiting IFN production or signaling, aspects that are briefly addressed in this review. After CoV infection, potent cytokines relevant in controlling virus infections and priming adaptive immune responses are also generated. However, an uncontrolled induction of these proinflammatory cytokines can lead to pathogenesis and disease severity as described for SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The cellular pathways mediated by interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3 and -7, activating transcription factor (ATF)-2/jun, activator protein (AP)-1, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT), are the main drivers of the inflammatory response triggered after viral infections, with NF-κB pathway the most frequently activated. Key CoV proteins involved in the regulation of these pathways and the proinflammatory immune response are revisited in this manuscript. It has been shown that the envelope (E) protein plays a variable role in CoV morphogenesis, depending on the CoV genus, being absolutely essential in some cases (genus α CoVs such as TGEV, and genus β CoVs such as MERS-CoV), but not in others (genus β CoVs such as MHV or SARS-CoV). A comprehensive accumulation of data has shown that the relatively small E protein elicits a strong influence on the interaction of SARS-CoV with the host. In fact, after infection with viruses in which this protein has been deleted, increased cellular stress and unfolded protein responses, apoptosis, and augmented host immune responses were observed. In contrast, the presence of E protein activated a pathogenic inflammatory response that may cause death in animal

  14. CORONAVIRUS VIRULENCE GENES WITH MAIN FOCUS ON SARS-CoV ENVELOPE GENE

    PubMed Central

    DeDiego, Marta L.; Nieto-Torres, Jose L.; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M.; Regla-Nava, Jose A.; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Usera, Fernando; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Coronavirus (CoV) infection is usually detected by cellular sensors, which trigger the activation of the innate immune system. Nevertheless, CoVs have evolved viral proteins that target different signaling pathways to counteract innate immune responses. Some CoV proteins act as antagonists of interferon (IFN) by inhibiting IFN production or signaling, aspects that are briefly addressed in this review. After CoV infection, potent cytokines relevant in controlling virus infections and priming adaptive immune responses are also generated. However, an uncontrolled induction of these proinflammatory cytokines can lead to pathogenesis and disease severity as described for SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The cellular pathways mediated by interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3 and 7, activating transcription factor (ATF)-2/jun, activator protein (AP)-1, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT), are the main drivers of the inflammatory response triggered after viral infections, with NF-κB pathway the most frequently activated. Key CoV proteins involved in the regulation of these pathways and the proinflammatory immune response are revisited in this manuscript. It has been shown that the envelope (E) protein plays a variable role in CoV morphogenesis, depending on the CoV genus, being absolutely essential in some cases (genus α CoVs such as TGEV, and genus β CoVs such as MERS-CoV), but not in others (genus β CoVs such as MHV or SARS-CoV). A comprehensive accumulation of data has shown that the relatively small E protein elicits a strong influence on the interaction of SARS-CoV with the host. In fact, after infection with viruses in which this protein has been deleted, increased cellular stress and unfolded protein responses, apoptosis, and augmented host immune responses were observed. In contrast, the presence of E protein activated a pathogenic inflammatory response that may cause death in animal

  15. Optimal induction of hepatitis C virus envelope-specific immunity by bicistronic plasmid DNA inoculation with the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, S W; Cho, J H; Sung, Y C

    1998-10-01

    In this study, we have constructed various DNA vaccine vectors that carried hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope genes without and with the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene in several different ways. In Buffalo rats that received plasmids carrying the HCV envelope genes, which encode envelope proteins E1 and E2, both antibody and lymphoproliferative responses against these proteins were induced. These responses were greatly enhanced by the codelivery of the GM-CSF gene. In particular, inoculation with a bicistronic plasmid that independently expressed the GM-CSF gene and the envelope genes in the same construct generated the highest antibody titers and significantly increased lymphoproliferative responses against these proteins. Moreover, strong antibody responses to homologous and heterologous hypervariable region 1 peptides were elicited in the immunized rats.

  16. An improved canine genome and a comprehensive catalogue of coding genes and non-coding transcripts.

    PubMed

    Hoeppner, Marc P; Lundquist, Andrew; Pirun, Mono; Meadows, Jennifer R S; Zamani, Neda; Johnson, Jeremy; Sundström, Görel; Cook, April; FitzGerald, Michael G; Swofford, Ross; Mauceli, Evan; Moghadam, Behrooz Torabi; Greka, Anna; Alföldi, Jessica; Abouelleil, Amr; Aftuck, Lynne; Bessette, Daniel; Berlin, Aaron; Brown, Adam; Gearin, Gary; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, J Pendexter; Priest, Margaret; Shea, Terrance; Turner-Maier, Jason; Zimmer, Andrew; Lander, Eric S; di Palma, Federica; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Grabherr, Manfred G

    2014-01-01

    The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, is a well-established model system for mapping trait and disease loci. While the original draft sequence was of good quality, gaps were abundant particularly in promoter regions of the genome, negatively impacting the annotation and study of candidate genes. Here, we present an improved genome build, canFam3.1, which includes 85 MB of novel sequence and now covers 99.8% of the euchromatic portion of the genome. We also present multiple RNA-Sequencing data sets from 10 different canine tissues to catalog ∼175,000 expressed loci. While about 90% of the coding genes previously annotated by EnsEMBL have measurable expression in at least one sample, the number of transcript isoforms detected by our data expands the EnsEMBL annotations by a factor of four. Syntenic comparison with the human genome revealed an additional ∼3,000 loci that are characterized as protein coding in human and were also expressed in the dog, suggesting that those were previously not annotated in the EnsEMBL canine gene set. In addition to ∼20,700 high-confidence protein coding loci, we found ∼4,600 antisense transcripts overlapping exons of protein coding genes, ∼7,200 intergenic multi-exon transcripts without coding potential, likely candidates for long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) and ∼11,000 transcripts were reported by two different library construction methods but did not fit any of the above categories. Of the lincRNAs, about 6,000 have no annotated orthologs in human or mouse. Functional analysis of two novel transcripts with shRNA in a mouse kidney cell line altered cell morphology and motility. All in all, we provide a much-improved annotation of the canine genome and suggest regulatory functions for several of the novel non-coding transcripts.

  17. An Improved Canine Genome and a Comprehensive Catalogue of Coding Genes and Non-Coding Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Hoeppner, Marc P.; Lundquist, Andrew; Pirun, Mono; Meadows, Jennifer R. S.; Zamani, Neda; Johnson, Jeremy; Sundström, Görel; Cook, April; FitzGerald, Michael G.; Swofford, Ross; Mauceli, Evan; Moghadam, Behrooz Torabi; Greka, Anna; Alföldi, Jessica; Abouelleil, Amr; Aftuck, Lynne; Bessette, Daniel; Berlin, Aaron; Brown, Adam; Gearin, Gary; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, J. Pendexter; Priest, Margaret; Shea, Terrance; Turner-Maier, Jason; Zimmer, Andrew; Lander, Eric S.; di Palma, Federica

    2014-01-01

    The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, is a well-established model system for mapping trait and disease loci. While the original draft sequence was of good quality, gaps were abundant particularly in promoter regions of the genome, negatively impacting the annotation and study of candidate genes. Here, we present an improved genome build, canFam3.1, which includes 85 MB of novel sequence and now covers 99.8% of the euchromatic portion of the genome. We also present multiple RNA-Sequencing data sets from 10 different canine tissues to catalog ∼175,000 expressed loci. While about 90% of the coding genes previously annotated by EnsEMBL have measurable expression in at least one sample, the number of transcript isoforms detected by our data expands the EnsEMBL annotations by a factor of four. Syntenic comparison with the human genome revealed an additional ∼3,000 loci that are characterized as protein coding in human and were also expressed in the dog, suggesting that those were previously not annotated in the EnsEMBL canine gene set. In addition to ∼20,700 high-confidence protein coding loci, we found ∼4,600 antisense transcripts overlapping exons of protein coding genes, ∼7,200 intergenic multi-exon transcripts without coding potential, likely candidates for long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) and ∼11,000 transcripts were reported by two different library construction methods but did not fit any of the above categories. Of the lincRNAs, about 6,000 have no annotated orthologs in human or mouse. Functional analysis of two novel transcripts with shRNA in a mouse kidney cell line altered cell morphology and motility. All in all, we provide a much-improved annotation of the canine genome and suggest regulatory functions for several of the novel non-coding transcripts. PMID:24625832

  18. Circular code motifs in transfer and 16S ribosomal RNAs: a possible translation code in genes.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J

    2012-04-01

    In 1996, a common trinucleotide circular code, called X, is identified in genes of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (Arquès and Michel, 1996). This circular code X is a set of 20 trinucleotides allowing the reading frames in genes to be retrieved locally, i.e. anywhere in genes and in particular without start codons. This reading frame retrieval needs a window length l of 12 nucleotides (l ≥ 12). With a window length strictly less than 12 nucleotides (l < 12), some words of X, called ambiguous words, are found in the shifted frames (the reading frame shifted by one or two nucleotides) preventing the reading frame in genes to be retrieved. Since 1996, these ambiguous words of X were never studied. In the first part of this paper, we identify all the ambiguous words of the common trinucleotide circular code X. With a length l varying from 1 to 11 nucleotides, the type and the occurrence number (multiplicity) of ambiguous words of X are given in each shifted frame. Maximal ambiguous words of X, words which are not factors of another ambiguous words, are also determined. Two probability definitions based on these results show that the common trinucleotide circular code X retrieves the reading frame in genes with a probability of about 90% with a window length of 6 nucleotides, and a probability of 99.9% with a window length of 9 nucleotides (100% with a window length of 12 nucleotides, by definition of a circular code). In the second part of this paper, we identify X circular code motifs (shortly X motifs) in transfer RNA and 16S ribosomal RNA: a tRNA X motif of 26 nucleotides including the anticodon stem-loop and seven 16S rRNA X motifs of length greater or equal to 15 nucleotides. Window lengths of reading frame retrieval with each trinucleotide of these X motifs are also determined. Thanks to the crystal structure 3I8G (Jenner et al., 2010), a 3D visualization of X motifs in the ribosome shows several spatial configurations involving mRNA X motifs, A-tRNA and E-tRNA X

  19. Molecular clock of HIV-1 envelope genes under early immune selection.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Yong; Love, Tanzy M T; Perelson, Alan S; Mack, Wendy J; Lee, Ha Youn

    2016-06-01

    The molecular clock hypothesis that genes or proteins evolve at a constant rate is a key tool to reveal phylogenetic relationships among species. Using the molecular clock, we can trace an infection back to transmission using HIV-1 sequences from a single time point. Whether or not a strict molecular clock applies to HIV-1's early evolution in the presence of immune selection has not yet been fully examined. We identified molecular clock signatures from 1587 previously published HIV-1 full envelope gene sequences obtained since acute infection in 15 subjects. Each subject's sequence diversity linearly increased during the first 150 days post infection, with rates ranging from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] with a mean of [Formula: see text] per base per day. The rate of diversification for 12 out of the 15 subjects was comparable to the neutral evolution rate. While temporal diversification was consistent with evolution patterns in the absence of selection, mutations from the founder virus were highly clustered on statistically identified selection sites, which diversified more than 65 times faster than non-selection sites. By mathematically quantifying deviations from the molecular clock under various selection scenarios, we demonstrate that the deviation from a constant clock becomes negligible as multiple escape lineages emerge. The most recent common ancestor of a virus pair from distinct escape lineages is most likely the transmitted founder virus, indicating that HIV-1 molecular dating is feasible even after the founder viruses are no longer detectable. The ability of HIV-1 to escape from immune surveillance in many different directions is the driving force of molecular clock persistence. This finding advances our understanding of the robustness of HIV-1's molecular clock under immune selection, implying the potential for molecular dating.

  20. A Nuclear-coded Chloroplastic Inner Envelope Membrane Protein Uses a Soluble Sorting Intermediate upon Import into the Organelle

    PubMed Central

    Lübeck, Jens; Heins, Lisa; Soll, Jürgen

    1997-01-01

    The chloroplastic inner envelope protein of 110 kD (IEP110) is part of the protein import machinery in the pea. Different hybrid proteins were constructed to assess the import and sorting pathway of IEP110. The IEP110 precursor (pIEP110) uses the general import pathway into chloroplasts, as shown by the mutual exchange of presequences with the precursor of the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (pSSU). Sorting information to the chloroplastic inner envelope is contained in an NH2-proximal part of mature IEP110 (110N). The NH2-terminus serves to anchor the protein into the membrane. Large COOH-terminal portions of this protein (80–90 kD) are exposed to the intermembrane space in situ. Successful sorting and integration of IEP110 and the derived constructs into the inner envelope are demonstrated by the inaccessability of processed mature protein to the protease thermolysin but accessibility to trypsin, i.e., the imported protein is exposed to the intermembrane space. A hybrid protein consisting of the transit sequence of SSU, the NH2-proximal part of mature IEP110, and mature SSU (tpSSU-110N-mSSU) is completely imported into the chloroplast stroma, from which it can be recovered as soluble, terminally processed 110NmSSU. The soluble 110N-mSSU then enters a reexport pathway, which results not only in the insertion of 110N-mSSU into the inner envelope membrane, but also in the extrusion of large portions of the protein into the intermembrane space. We conclude that chloroplasts possess a protein reexport machinery for IEPs in which soluble stromal components interact with a membrane-localized translocation machinery. PMID:9182662

  1. SIMULATING THE COMMON ENVELOPE PHASE OF A RED GIANT USING SMOOTHED-PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS AND UNIFORM-GRID CODES

    SciTech Connect

    Passy, Jean-Claude; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; De Marco, Orsola; Fryer, Chris L.; Diehl, Steven; Rockefeller, Gabriel; Herwig, Falk; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Bryan, Greg L.

    2012-01-01

    We use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to study the rapid infall phase of the common envelope (CE) interaction of a red giant branch star of mass equal to 0.88 M{sub Sun} and a companion star of mass ranging from 0.9 down to 0.1 M{sub Sun }. We first compare the results obtained using two different numerical techniques with different resolutions, and find very good agreement overall. We then compare the outcomes of those simulations with observed systems thought to have gone through a CE. The simulations fail to reproduce those systems in the sense that most of the envelope of the donor remains bound at the end of the simulations and the final orbital separations between the donor's remnant and the companion, ranging from 26.8 down to 5.9 R{sub Sun }, are larger than the ones observed. We suggest that this discrepancy vouches for recombination playing an essential role in the ejection of the envelope and/or significant shrinkage of the orbit happening in the subsequent phase.

  2. Analogs of LDL Receptor Ligand Motifs in Dengue Envelope and Capsid Proteins as Potential Codes for Cell Entry.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Juan; Romo, Jamie; McWhorter, Troy; Guevara, Natalia Valentinova

    It is established that cell entry of low density lipoprotein particles (LLPs) containing Apo B100 and Apo E is mediated by receptors and GAGs. Receptor ligand motifs, XBBBXXBX, XBBXBX, and ΨBΨXB, and mono- and bipartite NLS sequences are abundant in Apo E and Apo B100 as well as in envelope and capsid proteins of Dengue viruses 1-4 (DENV1-4). Synthetic, fluorescence-labeled peptides of sequences in DENV2 envelope protein, and DENV3 capsid that include these motifs were used to conduct a qualitative assessment of cell binding and entry capacity using HeLa cells. DENV2 envelope peptide, Dsp2EP, (0564)Gly-Gly(0595), was shown to bind and remain at the cell surface. In contrast, DENV3 capsid protein peptide, Dsp3CP, (0002)Asn-Gln(0028), readily enters HeLa cells and accumulates at discrete loci in the nucleus. FITC-labeled dengue synthetic peptides colocalize with Low Density Lipoprotein-CM-DiI and Apo E-CM-DiI to a degree that suggests that Dengue viruses may utilize cell entry pathways used by LLPs.

  3. Analogs of LDL Receptor Ligand Motifs in Dengue Envelope and Capsid Proteins as Potential Codes for Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Juan; Romo, Jamie; McWhorter, Troy; Guevara, Natalia Valentinova

    2016-01-01

    It is established that cell entry of low density lipoprotein particles (LLPs) containing Apo B100 and Apo E is mediated by receptors and GAGs. Receptor ligand motifs, XBBBXXBX, XBBXBX, and ΨBΨXB, and mono- and bipartite NLS sequences are abundant in Apo E and Apo B100 as well as in envelope and capsid proteins of Dengue viruses 1–4 (DENV1–4). Synthetic, fluorescence-labeled peptides of sequences in DENV2 envelope protein, and DENV3 capsid that include these motifs were used to conduct a qualitative assessment of cell binding and entry capacity using HeLa cells. DENV2 envelope peptide, Dsp2EP, 0564Gly-Gly0595, was shown to bind and remain at the cell surface. In contrast, DENV3 capsid protein peptide, Dsp3CP, 0002Asn-Gln0028, readily enters HeLa cells and accumulates at discrete loci in the nucleus. FITC-labeled dengue synthetic peptides colocalize with Low Density Lipoprotein-CM-DiI and Apo E-CM-DiI to a degree that suggests that Dengue viruses may utilize cell entry pathways used by LLPs. PMID:27123468

  4. tRNA genes and the genetic code.

    PubMed

    Foltan, Jaromir S

    2008-08-07

    The genetic code describes translational assignments between codons and amino acids. tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are those molecules by means of which these assignments are established. Any aaRS recognizes its tRNAs according to some of their nucleotides called identity elements (IEs). Let a 1Mut-similarity Sim (1Mut) be the average similarity between such tRNA genes whose codons differ by one point mutation. We showed that: (1) a global maximum of Sim (1Mut) is reached at the standard genetic code 27 times for 4 sets of IEs of tRNA genes of eukaryotic species, while it is so only 5 times for similarities Sim (C&R) between all tRNA genes whose codons lie in the same column or row of the code. Therefore, point mutations of anticodons were tested by nature to recruit tRNAs from one isoaccepting group to another, (2) because plain similarities Sim (all) between tRNA genes of species within any of the three domains of life are higher than between tRNA genes of species belonging to different domains, tRNA genes retained information about early evolution of cells, (3) we searched the order of tRNAs in which they were most probably assigned to their codons and amino acids. The beginning Ala, (Val), Pro, Ile, Lys, Arg, Trp, Met, Asp, Cys, (Ser) of our resulting chronology lies under a plateau on a graph of Sim (1Mut,IE)(univ.ancestors) plotted over this chronology for a set S(IE) of all IEs of tRNA genes, whose universal ancestors were separately computed for each codon. This plateau has remained preserved along the whole line of evolution of the code and is consistent with observations of Ribas de Pouplana and Schimmel [2001. Aminoacy1-tRNA synthetases: potential markers of genetic code development. Trends Biochem. Sci. 26, 591-598] that specific pairs of aaRSs-one from each of their two classes-can be docked simultaneously onto the acceptor stem of tRNA and hence an interaction existed between their ancestors using a reduced code, (4) sharpness of a

  5. Enhancement of antitumor activity of gammaretrovirus carrying IL-12 gene through genetic modification of envelope targeting HER2 receptor: a promising strategy for bladder cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Y-S; Shiau, A-L; Chen, Y-F; Tsai, H-T; Tzai, T-S; Wu, C-L

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an HER2-targeted, envelope-modified Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based gammaretroviral vector carrying interleukin (IL)-12 gene for bladder cancer therapy. It displayed a chimeric envelope protein containing a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody to the HER2 receptor and carried the mouse IL-12 gene. The fragment of anti-erbB2scFv was constructed into the proline-rich region of the viral envelope of the packaging vector lacking a transmembrane subunit of the carboxyl terminal region of surface subunit. As compared with envelope-unmodified gammaretroviruses, envelope-modified ones had extended viral tropism to human HER2-expressing bladder cancer cell lines, induced apoptosis, and affected cell cycle progression despite lower viral titers. Moreover, animal studies showed that envelope-modified gammaretroviruses carrying IL-12 gene exerted higher antitumor activity in terms of retarding tumor growth and prolonging the survival of tumor-bearing mice than unmodified ones, which were associated with enhanced tumor cell apoptosis as well as increased intratumoral levels of IL-12, interferon-gamma, IL-1beta, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha proteins. Therefore, the antitumor activity of gammaretroviruses carrying the IL-12 gene was enhanced through genetic modification of the envelope targeting HER2 receptor, which may be a promising strategy for bladder cancer therapy.

  6. Microdissection of the gene expression codes driving nephrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brunskill, Eric W; Patterson, Larry T

    2010-01-01

    The kidney represents an excellent model system for learning the principles of organogenesis. It is intermediate in complexity, and employs many commonly used developmental processes. As such, kidney development has been the subject of intensive study, using a variety of techniques, including in situ hybridization, organ culture and gene targeting, revealing many critical genes and pathways. Nevertheless, proper organogenesis requires precise patterns of cell type specific differential gene expression, involving very large numbers of genes. This review is focused on the use of global profiling technologies to create an atlas of gene expression codes driving development of different mammalian kidney compartments. Such an atlas allows one to select a gene of interest, and to determine its expression level in each element of the developing kidney, or to select a structure of interest, such as the renal vesicle, and to examine its complete gene expression state. Novel component specific molecular markers are identified, and the changing waves of gene expression that drive nephrogenesis are defined. As the tools continue to improve for the purification of specific cell types and expression profiling of even individual cells it is possible to predict an atlas of gene expression during kidney development that extends to single cell resolution. PMID:21220959

  7. A Mycobacterium smegmatis mutant with a defective inositol monophosphate phosphatase gene homolog has altered cell envelope permeability.

    PubMed Central

    Parish, T; Liu, J; Nikaido, H; Stoker, N G

    1997-01-01

    A bacteriophage infection mutant (strain LIMP7) of Mycobacterium smegmatis was isolated following transposon mutagenesis. The mutant showed an unusual phenotype, in that all phages tested produced larger plaques on this strain compared to the parent strain. Other phenotypic characteristics of the mutant were slower growth, increased clumping in liquid culture, increased resistance to chloramphenicol and erythromycin, and increased sensitivity to isoniazid and several beta-lactam antibiotics. Permeability studies showed decreases in the accumulation of lipophilic molecules (norfloxacin and chenodeoxycholate) and a small increase with hydrophilic molecules (cephaloridine); taken together, these characteristics indicate an altered cell envelope. The DNA adjacent to the transposon in LIMP7 was cloned and was shown to be highly similar to genes encoding bacterial and mammalian inositol monophosphate phosphatases. Inositol is important in mycobacteria as a component of the major thiol mycothiol and also in the cell wall, with phosphatidylinositol anchoring lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in the cell envelope. In LIMP7, levels of phosphatidylinositol dimannoside, the precursor of LAM, were less than half of those in the wild-type strain, confirming that the mutation had affected the synthesis of inositol-containing molecules. The impA gene is located within the histidine biosynthesis operon in both M. smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, lying between the hisA and hisF genes. PMID:9401044

  8. Approaches to the study of neural coding of sound source location and sound envelope in real environments

    PubMed Central

    Kuwada, Shigeyuki; Bishop, Brian; Kim, Duck O.

    2012-01-01

    The major functions of the auditory system are recognition (what is the sound) and localization (where is the sound). Although each of these has received considerable attention, rarely are they studied in combination. Furthermore, the stimuli used in the bulk of studies did not represent sound location in real environments and ignored the effects of reverberation. Another ignored dimension is the distance of a sound source. Finally, there is a scarcity of studies conducted in unanesthetized animals. We illustrate a set of efficient methods that overcome these shortcomings. We use the virtual auditory space method (VAS) to efficiently present sounds at different azimuths, different distances and in different environments. Additionally, this method allows for efficient switching between binaural and monaural stimulation and alteration of acoustic cues singly or in combination to elucidate neural mechanisms underlying localization and recognition. Such procedures cannot be performed with real sound field stimulation. Our research is designed to address the following questions: Are IC neurons specialized to process what and where auditory information? How does reverberation and distance of the sound source affect this processing? How do IC neurons represent sound source distance? Are neural mechanisms underlying envelope processing binaural or monaural? PMID:22754505

  9. Analysis of Dengue Virus Enhancing Epitopes Using Peptide Antigens Derived from the Envelope Glycoprotein Gene Sequence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-27

    AD________ AD-A230 976 ARMY PROJECT NO: 89PP9961 TITLE: ANALYSIS OF DENGUE VIRUS ENHANCING EPITOPES USING PEPTIDE ANTIGENS DERIVED FROM THE ENVELOPE...INO. INO r CCESSION NO I1I TITLE (Include Security Classification) Analysis of Dengue Virus Enhancing Epitopes Using Peptide Antigens Derived From the...necessary and identify by block number) Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) ot dengue (DEN) virus infection in human mononuclear cells in vitro has been

  10. Programmed packaging of multicomponent envelope-type nanoparticle system for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, Daniela; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Marchini, Cristina; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2010-05-01

    A programmed packaging strategy to develop a multicomponent envelope-type nanoparticle system (MENS) is presented. To this end, we took specific advantage of using in-house tailored liposomes that have been recently shown to exhibit intrinsic endosomal rupture properties that allow plasmid DNA to escape from endosomes and to enter the nucleus with extremely high efficiency. Transfection efficiency experiments on NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts indicate that MENS is a promising transfection candidate.

  11. Coding and non-coding gene regulatory networks underlie the immune response in liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueming; Huang, Yongming; Yang, Zhengpeng; Zhang, Yuguo; Zhang, Weihui; Gao, Zu-hua; Xue, Dongbo

    2017-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is recognized as being the consequence of immune-mediated hepatocyte damage and repair processes. However, the regulation of these immune responses underlying liver cirrhosis has not been elucidated. In this study, we used GEO datasets and bioinformatics methods to established coding and non-coding gene regulatory networks including transcription factor-/lncRNA-microRNA-mRNA, and competing endogenous RNA interaction networks. Our results identified 2224 mRNAs, 70 lncRNAs and 46 microRNAs were differentially expressed in liver cirrhosis. The transcription factor -/lncRNA- microRNA-mRNA network we uncovered that results in immune-mediated liver cirrhosis is comprised of 5 core microRNAs (e.g., miR-203; miR-219-5p), 3 transcription factors (i.e., FOXP3, ETS1 and FOS) and 7 lncRNAs (e.g., ENTS00000671336, ENST00000575137). The competing endogenous RNA interaction network we identified includes a complex immune response regulatory subnetwork that controls the entire liver cirrhosis network. Additionally, we found 10 overlapping GO terms shared by both liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma including “immune response” as well. Interestingly, the overlapping differentially expressed genes in liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma were enriched in immune response-related functional terms. In summary, a complex gene regulatory network underlying immune response processes may play an important role in the development and progression of liver cirrhosis, and its development into hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:28355233

  12. Rational design of orthogonal libraries of protein coding genes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Daniel; Papamichail, Dimitris

    2013-05-17

    Array-based oligonucleotide synthesis technologies provide access to thousands of custom-designed sequence variants at low cost. Large-scale synthesis and high-throughput assays have become valuable experimental tools to study in detail the interplay between sequence and function. We have developed a methodology and corresponding algorithms for the design of diverse protein coding gene libraries, to exploit the potential of multiplex synthesis and help elucidate the effects of codon utilization and other factors in gene expression. Using our algorithm, we have computationally designed gene libraries with hundreds to thousands of orthogonal codon usage variants, uniformly exploring the design space of codon utilization, while demanding only a small fraction of the synthesis cost that would be required if these variants were synthesized independently.

  13. A highly conserved baculovirus gene p48 (ac103) is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Meijin; Wu Wenbi; Liu Chao; Wang Yanjie; Hu Zhaoyang; Yang Kai Pang Yi

    2008-09-15

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) p48 (ac103) is a highly conserved baculovirus gene of unknown function. In the present study, we generated a knockout of the p48 gene in an AcMNPV bacmid and investigated the role of P48 in baculovirus life cycle. The p48-null Bacmid vAc{sup P48-KO-PH-GFP} was unable to propagate in cell culture, while a 'repair' Bacmid vAc{sup P48-REP-PH-GFP} was able to replicate in a manner similar to a wild-type Bacmid vAc{sup PH-GFP}. Titration assays and Western blotting confirmed that vAc{sup P48-KO-PH-GFP} was unable to produce budded viruses (BVs). qPCR analysis showed that p48 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy indicated that P48 was required for nucleocapsid envelopment to form occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) and their subsequent occlusion. Confocal analysis showed that P48 prominently condensed in the centre of the nucleus. Our results demonstrate that P48 plays an essential role in BV production and ODV envelopment in the AcMNPV life cycle.

  14. A highly conserved baculovirus gene p48 (ac103) is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Meijin; Wu, Wenbi; Liu, Chao; Wang, Yanjie; Hu, Zhaoyang; Yang, Kai; Pang, Yi

    2008-09-15

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) p48 (ac103) is a highly conserved baculovirus gene of unknown function. In the present study, we generated a knockout of the p48 gene in an AcMNPV bacmid and investigated the role of P48 in baculovirus life cycle. The p48-null Bacmid vAc(P48-KO-PH-GFP) was unable to propagate in cell culture, while a 'repair' Bacmid vAc(P48-REP-PH-GFP) was able to replicate in a manner similar to a wild-type Bacmid vAc(PH-GFP). Titration assays and Western blotting confirmed that vAc(P48-KO-PH-GFP) was unable to produce budded viruses (BVs). qPCR analysis showed that p48 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy indicated that P48 was required for nucleocapsid envelopment to form occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) and their subsequent occlusion. Confocal analysis showed that P48 prominently condensed in the centre of the nucleus. Our results demonstrate that P48 plays an essential role in BV production and ODV envelopment in the AcMNPV life cycle.

  15. Chimeric porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus containing shuffled multiple envelope genes confers cross-protection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Debin; Ni, Yan-Yan; Zhou, Lei; Opriessnig, Tanja; Cao, Dianjun; Piñeyro, Pablo; Yugo, Danielle M; Overend, Christopher; Cao, Qian; Lynn Heffron, C; Halbur, Patrick G; Pearce, Douglas S; Calvert, Jay G; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2015-11-01

    The extensive genetic diversity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strains is a major obstacle for vaccine development. We previously demonstrated that chimeric PRRSVs in which a single envelope gene (ORF3, ORF4, ORF5 or ORF6) was shuffled via DNA shuffling had an improved heterologous cross-neutralizing ability. In this study, we incorporate all of the individually-shuffled envelope genes together in different combinations into an infectious clone backbone of PRRSV MLV Fostera(®) PRRS. Five viable progeny chimeric viruses were rescued, and their growth characteristics were characterized in vitro. In a pilot pig study, two chimeric viruses (FV-SPDS-VR2,FV-SPDS-VR5) were found to induce cross-neutralizing antibodies against heterologous strains. A subsequent vaccination/challenge study in 72 pigs revealed that chimeric virus FV-SPDS-VR2 and parental virus conferred partial cross-protection when challenged with heterologous strains NADC20 or MN184B. The results have important implications for future development of an effective PRRSV vaccine that confers heterologous protection.

  16. New genes from non-coding sequence: the role of de novo protein-coding genes in eukaryotic evolutionary innovation

    PubMed Central

    McLysaght, Aoife; Guerzoni, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The origin of novel protein-coding genes de novo was once considered so improbable as to be impossible. In less than a decade, and especially in the last five years, this view has been overturned by extensive evidence from diverse eukaryotic lineages. There is now evidence that this mechanism has contributed a significant number of genes to genomes of organisms as diverse as Saccharomyces, Drosophila, Plasmodium, Arabidopisis and human. From simple beginnings, these genes have in some instances acquired complex structure, regulated expression and important functional roles. New genes are often thought of as dispensable late additions; however, some recent de novo genes in human can play a role in disease. Rather than an extremely rare occurrence, it is now evident that there is a relatively constant trickle of proto-genes released into the testing ground of natural selection. It is currently unknown whether de novo genes arise primarily through an ‘RNA-first’ or ‘ORF-first’ pathway. Either way, evolutionary tinkering with this pool of genetic potential may have been a significant player in the origins of lineage-specific traits and adaptations. PMID:26323763

  17. Rare coding variants pinpoint genes that control human hematological traits

    PubMed Central

    Ntritsos, Georgios; Chen, Ming-Huei; Psaty, Bruce M.; Auer, Paul L.

    2017-01-01

    The identification of rare coding or splice site variants remains the most straightforward strategy to link genes with human phenotypes. Here, we analyzed the association between 137,086 rare (minor allele frequency (MAF) <1%) coding or splice site variants and 15 hematological traits in up to 308,572 participants. We found 56 such rare coding or splice site variants at P<5x10-8, including 31 that are associated with a blood-cell phenotype for the first time. All but one of these 31 new independent variants map to loci previously implicated in hematopoiesis by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). This includes a rare splice acceptor variant (rs146597587, MAF = 0.5%) in interleukin 33 (IL33) associated with reduced eosinophil count (P = 2.4x10-23), and lower risk of asthma (P = 2.6x10-7, odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 0.56 [0.45–0.70]) and allergic rhinitis (P = 4.2x10-4, odds ratio = 0.55 [0.39–0.76]). The single new locus identified in our study is defined by a rare p.Arg172Gly missense variant (rs145535174, MAF = 0.05%) in plasminogen (PLG) associated with increased platelet count (P = 6.8x10-9), and decreased D-dimer concentration (P = 0.018) and platelet reactivity (P<0.03). Finally, our results indicate that searching for rare coding or splice site variants in very large sample sizes can help prioritize causal genes at many GWAS loci associated with complex human diseases and traits. PMID:28787443

  18. Kinetic models of gene expression including non-coding RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-03-01

    In cells, genes are transcribed into mRNAs, and the latter are translated into proteins. Due to the feedbacks between these processes, the kinetics of gene expression may be complex even in the simplest genetic networks. The corresponding models have already been reviewed in the literature. A new avenue in this field is related to the recognition that the conventional scenario of gene expression is fully applicable only to prokaryotes whose genomes consist of tightly packed protein-coding sequences. In eukaryotic cells, in contrast, such sequences are relatively rare, and the rest of the genome includes numerous transcript units representing non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). During the past decade, it has become clear that such RNAs play a crucial role in gene expression and accordingly influence a multitude of cellular processes both in the normal state and during diseases. The numerous biological functions of ncRNAs are based primarily on their abilities to silence genes via pairing with a target mRNA and subsequently preventing its translation or facilitating degradation of the mRNA-ncRNA complex. Many other abilities of ncRNAs have been discovered as well. Our review is focused on the available kinetic models describing the mRNA, ncRNA and protein interplay. In particular, we systematically present the simplest models without kinetic feedbacks, models containing feedbacks and predicting bistability and oscillations in simple genetic networks, and models describing the effect of ncRNAs on complex genetic networks. Mathematically, the presentation is based primarily on temporal mean-field kinetic equations. The stochastic and spatio-temporal effects are also briefly discussed.

  19. Fact or fiction: updates on how protein-coding genes might emerge de novo from previously non-coding DNA.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Jonathan F; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich

    2017-01-01

    Over the last few years, there has been an increasing amount of evidence for the de novo emergence of protein-coding genes, i.e. out of non-coding DNA. Here, we review the current literature and summarize the state of the field. We focus specifically on open questions and challenges in the study of de novo protein-coding genes such as the identification and verification of de novo-emerged genes. The greatest obstacle to date is the lack of high-quality genomic data with very short divergence times which could help precisely pin down the location of origin of a de novo gene. We conclude that, while there is plenty of evidence from a genetics perspective, there is a lack of functional studies of bona fide de novo genes and almost no knowledge about protein structures and how they come about during the emergence of de novo protein-coding genes. We suggest that future studies should concentrate on the functional and structural characterization of de novo protein-coding genes as well as the detailed study of the emergence of functional de novo protein-coding genes.

  20. Fact or fiction: updates on how protein-coding genes might emerge de novo from previously non-coding DNA

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Jonathan F; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich

    2017-01-01

    Over the last few years, there has been an increasing amount of evidence for the de novo emergence of protein-coding genes, i.e. out of non-coding DNA. Here, we review the current literature and summarize the state of the field. We focus specifically on open questions and challenges in the study of de novo protein-coding genes such as the identification and verification of de novo-emerged genes. The greatest obstacle to date is the lack of high-quality genomic data with very short divergence times which could help precisely pin down the location of origin of a de novo gene. We conclude that, while there is plenty of evidence from a genetics perspective, there is a lack of functional studies of bona fide de novo genes and almost no knowledge about protein structures and how they come about during the emergence of de novo protein-coding genes. We suggest that future studies should concentrate on the functional and structural characterization of de novo protein-coding genes as well as the detailed study of the emergence of functional de novo protein-coding genes. PMID:28163910

  1. Perception of Interaural Phase Differences With Envelope and Fine Structure Coding Strategies in Bilateral Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Susan; Aschendorff, Antje; Laszig, Roland; Wesarg, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect a target signal masked by noise is improved in normal-hearing listeners when interaural phase differences (IPDs) between the ear signals exist either in the masker or in the signal. To improve binaural hearing in bilaterally implanted cochlear implant (BiCI) users, a coding strategy providing the best possible access to IPD is highly desirable. In this study, we compared two coding strategies in BiCI users provided with CI systems from MED-EL (Innsbruck, Austria). The CI systems were bilaterally programmed either with the fine structure processing strategy FS4 or with the constant rate strategy high definition continuous interleaved sampling (HDCIS). Familiarization periods between 6 and 12 weeks were considered. The effect of IPD was measured in two types of experiments: (a) IPD detection thresholds with tonal signals addressing mainly one apical interaural electrode pair and (b) with speech in noise in terms of binaural speech intelligibility level differences (BILD) addressing multiple electrodes bilaterally. The results in (a) showed improved IPD detection thresholds with FS4 compared with HDCIS in four out of the seven BiCI users. In contrast, 12 BiCI users in (b) showed similar BILD with FS4 (0.6 ± 1.9 dB) and HDCIS (0.5 ± 2.0 dB). However, no correlation between results in (a) and (b) both obtained with FS4 was found. In conclusion, the degree of IPD sensitivity determined on an apical interaural electrode pair was not an indicator for BILD based on bilateral multielectrode stimulation. PMID:27659487

  2. Gene Perturbation Atlas (GPA): a single-gene perturbation repository for characterizing functional mechanisms of coding and non-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Gong, Yonghui; Lv, Yanling; Lan, Yujia; Hu, Jing; Li, Feng; Xu, Jinyuan; Bai, Jing; Deng, Yulan; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Guanxiong; Yu, Fulong; Li, Xia

    2015-06-03

    Genome-wide transcriptome profiling after gene perturbation is a powerful means of elucidating gene functional mechanisms in diverse contexts. The comprehensive collection and analysis of the resulting transcriptome profiles would help to systematically characterize context-dependent gene functional mechanisms and conduct experiments in biomedical research. To this end, we collected and curated over 3000 transcriptome profiles in human and mouse from diverse gene perturbation experiments, which involved 1585 different perturbed genes (microRNAs, lncRNAs and protein-coding genes) across 1170 different cell lines/tissues. For each profile, we identified differential genes and their associated functions and pathways, constructed perturbation networks, predicted transcription regulation and cancer/drug associations, and assessed cooperative perturbed genes. Based on these transcriptome analyses, the Gene Perturbation Atlas (GPA) can be used to detect (i) novel or cell-specific functions and pathways affected by perturbed genes, (ii) protein interactions and regulatory cascades affected by perturbed genes, and (iii) perturbed gene-mediated cooperative effects. The GPA is a user-friendly database to support the rapid searching and exploration of gene perturbations. Particularly, we visualized functional effects of perturbed genes from multiple perspectives. In summary, the GPA is a valuable resource for characterizing gene functions and regulatory mechanisms after single-gene perturbations. The GPA is freely accessible at http://biocc.hrbmu.edu.cn/GPA/.

  3. Neighboring gene regulation by antisense long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Victoria E; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2015-02-03

    Antisense transcription, considered until recently as transcriptional noise, is a very common phenomenon in human and eukaryotic transcriptomes, operating in two ways based on whether the antisense RNA acts in cis or in trans. This process can generate long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), one of the most diverse classes of cellular transcripts, which have demonstrated multifunctional roles in fundamental biological processes, including embryonic pluripotency, differentiation and development. Antisense lncRNAs have been shown to control nearly every level of gene regulation--pretranscriptional, transcriptional and posttranscriptional--through DNA-RNA, RNA-RNA or protein-RNA interactions. This review is centered on functional studies of antisense lncRNA-mediated regulation of neighboring gene expression. Specifically, it addresses how these transcripts interact with other biological molecules, nucleic acids and proteins, to regulate gene expression through chromatin remodeling at the pretranscriptional level and modulation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes by altering the sense mRNA structure or the cellular compartmental distribution, either in the nucleus or the cytoplasm.

  4. Multiple Neuropeptide-Coding Genes Involved in Planarian Pharynx Extension.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Seira; Inoue, Takeshi; Kashima, Makoto; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2016-06-01

    Planarian feeding behavior involves three steps: moving toward food, extending the pharynx from their planarian's ventral side after arriving at the food, and ingesting the food through the pharynx. Although pharynx extension is a remarkable behavior, it remains unknown what neuronal cell types are involved in its regulation. To identify neurons involved in regulating pharynx extension, we quantitatively analyzed pharynx extension and sought to identify these neurons by RNA interference (RNAi) and in situ hybridization. This assay, when performed using planarians with amputation of various body parts, clearly showed that the head portion is indispensable for inducing pharynx extension. We thus tested the effects of knockdown of brain neurons such as serotonergic, GABAergic, and dopaminergic neurons by RNAi, but did not observe any effects on pharynx extension behavior. However, animals with RNAi of the Prohormone Convertase 2 (PC2, a neuropeptide processing enzyme) gene did not perform the pharynx extension behavior, suggesting the possible involvement of neuropeptide(s in the regulation of pharynx extension. We screened 24 neuropeptide-coding genes, analyzed their functions by RNAi using the pharynx extension assay system, and identified at least five neuropeptide genes involved in pharynx extension. These was expressed in different cells or neurons, and some of them were expressed in the brain, suggesting complex regulation of planarian feeding behavior by the nervous system.

  5. p63 Transcription Factor Regulates Nuclear Shape and Expression of Nuclear Envelope-Associated Genes in Epidermal Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Valentina; Malashchuk, Igor; Asamaowei, Inemo E; Poterlowicz, Krzysztof; Fessing, Michael Y; Sharov, Andrey A; Karakesisoglou, Iakowos; Botchkarev, Vladimir A; Mardaryev, Andrei

    2017-10-01

    The maintenance of a proper nuclear architecture and three-dimensional organization of the genes, enhancer elements, and transcription machinery plays an essential role in tissue development and regeneration. Here we show that in the developing skin, epidermal progenitor cells of mice lacking p63 transcription factor display alterations in the nuclear shape accompanied by a marked decrease in expression of several nuclear envelope-associated components (Lamin B1, Lamin A/C, Sun1, Nesprin-3, Plectin) compared with controls. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR assay showed enrichment of p63 on Sun1, Syne3, and Plec promoters, suggesting them as p63 targets. Alterations in the nuclei shape and expression of nuclear envelope-associated proteins were accompanied by altered distribution patterns of the repressive histone marks trimethylation on lysine 27 of histone H3, trimethylation on lysine 9 of histone H3, and heterochromatin protein 1-alpha in p63-null keratinocytes. These changes were also accompanied by downregulation of the transcriptional activity and relocation of the keratinocyte-specific gene loci away from the sites of active transcription toward the heterochromatin-enriched repressive nuclear compartments in p63-null cells. These data demonstrate functional links between the nuclear envelope organization, chromatin architecture, and gene expression in keratinocytes and suggest nuclear envelope-associated genes as important targets mediating p63-regulated gene expression program in the epidermis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of deletion of envelope-related genes of recombinant Sendai viruses on immune responses following pulmonary gene transfer of neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, S; Yonemitsu, Y; Yoshida, K; Okano, S; Kondo, H; Inoue, M; Hasegawa, M; Masumoto, K; Suita, S; Taguchi, T; Sueishi, K

    2007-07-01

    We demonstrated previously that the additive-type recombinant Sendai virus (rSeV) is highly efficient for use in pulmonary gene transfer; however, rSeV exhibits inflammatory responses. To overcome this problem, we tested newly developed non-transmissible constructs, namely, temperature-sensitive F-deleted vector, rSeV/dF (ts-rSeV/dF) and a rSeV with all the envelope-related genes deleted (rSeV/dFdMdHN), for pulmonary gene transfer in neonatal mice, by assessing their toxicity and immune responses. The gene expression in the lungs of neonatal ICR mice peaked on day 2, then gradually decreased until almost disappearing at 14 days after infection in all constructs. Loss of body weight and mortality rate, however, were dramatically improved in mice treated with SeV/dFdMdHN (mortality=0%, n=41) and ts-rSeV/dF (24.2%, n=33) compared with additive rSeV (70.7%, n=58). Although the deletion of envelope-related genes of SeV had a small impact on the production of antibody and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity in both adults and neonates, a dramatic reduction was found in the events related to innate responses, including the production of proinflammatory cytokines, particularly in the case of neonates. These results indicate that pulmonary gene transfer using SeV/dFdMdHN warrants further investigation for its possible use in developing safer therapeutics for neonatal lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis.

  7. Promoter analysis reveals globally differential regulation of human long non-coding RNA and protein-coding genes

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Tanvir; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Jia, Hui; Brown, James B.; Lipovich, Leonard; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Mantovani, Roberto

    2014-10-02

    Transcriptional regulation of protein-coding genes is increasingly well-understood on a global scale, yet no comparable information exists for long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes, which were recently recognized to be as numerous as protein-coding genes in mammalian genomes. We performed a genome-wide comparative analysis of the promoters of human lncRNA and protein-coding genes, finding global differences in specific genetic and epigenetic features relevant to transcriptional regulation. These two groups of genes are hence subject to separate transcriptional regulatory programs, including distinct transcription factor (TF) proteins that significantly favor lncRNA, rather than coding-gene, promoters. We report a specific signature of promoter-proximal transcriptional regulation of lncRNA genes, including several distinct transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Experimental DNase I hypersensitive site profiles are consistent with active configurations of these lncRNA TFBS sets in diverse human cell types. TFBS ChIP-seq datasets confirm the binding events that we predicted using computational approaches for a subset of factors. For several TFs known to be directly regulated by lncRNAs, we find that their putative TFBSs are enriched at lncRNA promoters, suggesting that the TFs and the lncRNAs may participate in a bidirectional feedback loop regulatory network. Accordingly, cells may be able to modulate lncRNA expression levels independently of mRNA levels via distinct regulatory pathways. Our results also raise the possibility that, given the historical reliance on protein-coding gene catalogs to define the chromatin states of active promoters, a revision of these chromatin signature profiles to incorporate expressed lncRNA genes is warranted in the future.

  8. Promoter analysis reveals globally differential regulation of human long non-coding RNA and protein-coding genes

    DOE PAGES

    Alam, Tanvir; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Jia, Hui; ...

    2014-10-02

    Transcriptional regulation of protein-coding genes is increasingly well-understood on a global scale, yet no comparable information exists for long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes, which were recently recognized to be as numerous as protein-coding genes in mammalian genomes. We performed a genome-wide comparative analysis of the promoters of human lncRNA and protein-coding genes, finding global differences in specific genetic and epigenetic features relevant to transcriptional regulation. These two groups of genes are hence subject to separate transcriptional regulatory programs, including distinct transcription factor (TF) proteins that significantly favor lncRNA, rather than coding-gene, promoters. We report a specific signature of promoter-proximal transcriptionalmore » regulation of lncRNA genes, including several distinct transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Experimental DNase I hypersensitive site profiles are consistent with active configurations of these lncRNA TFBS sets in diverse human cell types. TFBS ChIP-seq datasets confirm the binding events that we predicted using computational approaches for a subset of factors. For several TFs known to be directly regulated by lncRNAs, we find that their putative TFBSs are enriched at lncRNA promoters, suggesting that the TFs and the lncRNAs may participate in a bidirectional feedback loop regulatory network. Accordingly, cells may be able to modulate lncRNA expression levels independently of mRNA levels via distinct regulatory pathways. Our results also raise the possibility that, given the historical reliance on protein-coding gene catalogs to define the chromatin states of active promoters, a revision of these chromatin signature profiles to incorporate expressed lncRNA genes is warranted in the future.« less

  9. Promoter analysis reveals globally differential regulation of human long non-coding RNA and protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Alam, Tanvir; Medvedeva, Yulia A; Jia, Hui; Brown, James B; Lipovich, Leonard; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of protein-coding genes is increasingly well-understood on a global scale, yet no comparable information exists for long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes, which were recently recognized to be as numerous as protein-coding genes in mammalian genomes. We performed a genome-wide comparative analysis of the promoters of human lncRNA and protein-coding genes, finding global differences in specific genetic and epigenetic features relevant to transcriptional regulation. These two groups of genes are hence subject to separate transcriptional regulatory programs, including distinct transcription factor (TF) proteins that significantly favor lncRNA, rather than coding-gene, promoters. We report a specific signature of promoter-proximal transcriptional regulation of lncRNA genes, including several distinct transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Experimental DNase I hypersensitive site profiles are consistent with active configurations of these lncRNA TFBS sets in diverse human cell types. TFBS ChIP-seq datasets confirm the binding events that we predicted using computational approaches for a subset of factors. For several TFs known to be directly regulated by lncRNAs, we find that their putative TFBSs are enriched at lncRNA promoters, suggesting that the TFs and the lncRNAs may participate in a bidirectional feedback loop regulatory network. Accordingly, cells may be able to modulate lncRNA expression levels independently of mRNA levels via distinct regulatory pathways. Our results also raise the possibility that, given the historical reliance on protein-coding gene catalogs to define the chromatin states of active promoters, a revision of these chromatin signature profiles to incorporate expressed lncRNA genes is warranted in the future.

  10. Gene-based vaccination with a mismatched envelope protects against simian immunodeficiency virus infection in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Flatz, Lukas; Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Lingshu; Foulds, Kathryn E; Ko, Sung-Youl; Kong, Wing-Pui; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Shi, Wei; Bao, Saran; Todd, John-Paul; Asmal, Mohammed; Shen, Ling; Donaldson, Mitzi; Schmidt, Stephen D; Gall, Jason G D; Pinschewer, Daniel D; Letvin, Norman L; Rao, Srinivas; Mascola, John R; Roederer, Mario; Nabel, Gary J

    2012-08-01

    The RV144 trial demonstrated that an experimental AIDS vaccine can prevent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in humans. Because of its limited efficacy, further understanding of the mechanisms of preventive AIDS vaccines remains a priority, and nonhuman primate (NHP) models of lentiviral infection provide an opportunity to define immunogens, vectors, and correlates of immunity. In this study, we show that prime-boost vaccination with a mismatched SIV envelope (Env) gene, derived from simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239, prevents infection by SIVsmE660 intrarectally. Analysis of different gene-based prime-boost immunization regimens revealed that recombinant adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) prime followed by replication-defective lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (rLCMV) boost elicited robust CD4 and CD8 T-cell and humoral immune responses. This vaccine protected against infection after repetitive mucosal challenge with efficacies of 82% per exposure and 62% cumulatively. No effect was seen on viremia in infected vaccinated monkeys compared to controls. Protection correlated with the presence of neutralizing antibodies to the challenge viruses tested in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These data indicate that a vaccine expressing a mismatched Env gene alone can prevent SIV infection in NHPs and identifies an immune correlate that may guide immunogen selection and immune monitoring for clinical efficacy trials.

  11. Nuclear transport defects and nuclear envelope alterations are associated with mutation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NPL4 gene.

    PubMed Central

    DeHoratius, C; Silver, P A

    1996-01-01

    To identify components involved in nuclear protein import, we used a genetic selection to isolate mutants that mislocalized a nuclear-targeted protein. We identified temperature-sensitive mutants that accumulated several different nuclear proteins in the cytoplasm when shifted to the semipermissive temperature of 30 degrees C; these were termed npl (nuclear protein localization) mutants. We now present the properties of yeast strains bearing mutations in the NPL4 gene and report the cloning of the NPL4 gene and the characterization of the Np14 protein. The npl4-1 mutant was isolated by the previously described selection scheme. The second allele, npl4-2, was identified from an independently derived collection of temperature-sensitive mutants. The npl4-1 and npl4-2 strains accumulate nuclear-targeted proteins in the cytoplasm at the nonpermissive temperature consistent with a defect in nuclear protein import. Using an in vitro nuclear import assay, we show that nuclei prepared from temperature-shifted npl4 mutant cells are unable to import nuclear-targeted proteins, even in the presence of cytosol prepared from wild-type cells. In addition, npl4-2 cells accumulate poly(A)+ RNA in the nucleus at the nonpermissive temperature, consistent with a failure to export mRNA from the nucleus. The npl4-1 and npl4-2 cells also exhibit distinct, temperature-sensitive structural defects: npl4-1 cells project extra nuclear envelope into the cytoplasm, whereas npl4-2 cells from nuclear envelope herniations that appear to be filled with poly(A)+ RNA. The NPL4 gene encodes an essential M(r) 64,000 protein that is located at the nuclear periphery and localizes in a pattern similar to nuclear pore complex proteins. Taken together, these results indicate that this gene encodes a novel nuclear pore complex or nuclear pore complex-associated component required for nuclear membrane integrity and nuclear transport. Images PMID:8930904

  12. Analysis of bHLH coding genes using gene co-expression network approach.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Swati; Sanchita; Singh, Garima; Singh, Noopur; Srivastava, Gaurava; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-07-01

    Network analysis provides a powerful framework for the interpretation of data. It uses novel reference network-based metrices for module evolution. These could be used to identify module of highly connected genes showing variation in co-expression network. In this study, a co-expression network-based approach was used for analyzing the genes from microarray data. Our approach consists of a simple but robust rank-based network construction. The publicly available gene expression data of Solanum tuberosum under cold and heat stresses were considered to create and analyze a gene co-expression network. The analysis provide highly co-expressed module of bHLH coding genes based on correlation values. Our approach was to analyze the variation of genes expression, according to the time period of stress through co-expression network approach. As the result, the seed genes were identified showing multiple connections with other genes in the same cluster. Seed genes were found to be vary in different time periods of stress. These analyzed seed genes may be utilized further as marker genes for developing the stress tolerant plant species.

  13. Multiple sclerosis retrovirus-like envelope gene: Role of the chromosome 20 insertion

    PubMed Central

    Varadé, Jezabel; García-Montojo, Marta; de la Hera, Belén; Camacho, Iris; García-Martínez, Mª. Ángel; Arroyo, Rafael; Álvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Urcelay, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Background The genetic basis involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility was not completely revealed by genome-wide association studies. Part of it could lie in repetitive sequences, as those corresponding to human Endogenous Retroviruses (HERVs). Retrovirus-like particles were isolated from MS patients and the genome of the MS-associated retrovirus (MSRV) was the founder of the HERV-W family. We aimed to ascertain which chromosomal origin encodes the pathogenic ENV protein by genomic analysis of the HERV-W insertions. Methods/results In silico analyses allowed to uncover putative open reading frames containing the specific sequence previously reported for MSRV-like envelope (env) detection. Out of the 261 genomic insertions of HERV-W env, only 9 copies harbor the specific primers and probe featuring MSRV-like env. The copy from chromosome 20 was further studied considering its size, a truncated homologue of the functional HERV-W env sequence encoding syncytin. High Resolution Melting analysis of this sequence identified two single nucleotide polymorphisms, subsequently genotyped by Taqman chemistry in 668 MS patients and 678 healthy controls. No significant association of these polymorphisms with MS risk was evidenced. Transcriptional activity of this MSRV-like env copy was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients and controls. RNA expression levels of chromosome 20-specific MSRV-like env did not show significant differences between MS patients and controls, neither were related to genotypes of the two mentioned polymorphisms. Conclusions The lack of association with MS risk of the identified polymorphisms together with the transcription results discard chromosome 20 as genomic origin of MSRV-like env. PMID:26675450

  14. Molecular cloning and analysis of functional envelope genes from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 sequence subtypes A through G. The WHO and NIAID Networks for HIV Isolation and Characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, F; Morrison, S G; Robertson, D L; Thornton, C L; Craig, S; Karlsson, G; Sodroski, J; Morgado, M; Galvao-Castro, B; von Briesen, H

    1996-01-01

    Present knowledge of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunobiology has been derived almost exclusively from analyses of subtype B viruses, yet such viruses represent only a minority of strains currently spreading worldwide. To generate a more representative panel of genetically diverse envelope genes, we PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced complete gp160 coding regions of 35 primary (peripheral blood mononuclear cell-propagated) HIV-1 isolates collected at major epicenters of the current AIDS pandemic. Analysis of their deduced amino acid sequences revealed several important differences from prototypic subtype B strains, including changes in the number and distribution of cysteine residues, substantial length differences in hypervariable regions, and premature truncations in the gp41 domain. Moreover, transiently expressed glycoprotein precursor molecules varied considerably in both size and carbohydrate content. Phylogenetic analyses of full-length env sequences indicated that the panel included members of all major sequence subtypes of HIV-1 group M (clades A to G), as well as an intersubtype recombinant (F/B) from an infected individual in Brazil. In addition, all subtype E and three subtype G viruses initially classified on the basis of partial env sequences were found to cluster in subtype A in the 3' half of their gp41 coding region, suggesting that they are also recombinant. The biological activity of PCR-derived env genes was examined in a single-round virus infectivity assay. This analysis identified 20 clones, including 1 from each subtype (or recombinant), which expressed fully functional envelope glycoproteins. One of these, derived from a patient with rapid CD4 cell decline, contained an amino acid substitution in a highly conserved endocytosis signal (Y721C), as mediated virus entry with very poor efficiency, although they did not contain sequence changes predicted to alter protein function. These results indicate that the env

  15. A First Look at ARFome: Dual-Coding Genes in Mammalian Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wen-Yu; Wadhawan, Samir; Szklarczyk, Radek; Pond, Sergei Kosakovsky; Nekrutenko, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Coding of multiple proteins by overlapping reading frames is not a feature one would associate with eukaryotic genes. Indeed, codependency between codons of overlapping protein-coding regions imposes a unique set of evolutionary constraints, making it a costly arrangement. Yet in cases of tightly coexpressed interacting proteins, dual coding may be advantageous. Here we show that although dual coding is nearly impossible by chance, a number of human transcripts contain overlapping coding regions. Using newly developed statistical techniques, we identified 40 candidate genes with evolutionarily conserved overlapping coding regions. Because our approach is conservative, we expect mammals to possess more dual-coding genes. Our results emphasize that the skepticism surrounding eukaryotic dual coding is unwarranted: rather than being artifacts, overlapping reading frames are often hallmarks of fascinating biology. PMID:17511511

  16. Alterations in potential sites for glycosylation predominate during evolution of the simian immunodeficiency virus envelope gene in macaques.

    PubMed Central

    Overbaugh, J; Rudensey, L M

    1992-01-01

    Genetic diversity is a hallmark of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genome, but the role of distinct HIV variants in the development of AIDS is unclear. Envelope (env) is the most highly variable gene in HIV as well as in other retroviruses. We have previously demonstrated that variation in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) env is primarily localized in two regions (V1 and V4) during progression to simian AIDS. To determine whether there is a common genotype that evolves as AIDS develops, a total of 160 SIV env genes isolated directly from the tissue DNAs of four macaques infected with cloned virus were compared. Common amino acid sequence changes were identified within V1, V4, and, in the late stages of disease, near V3. At several positions, the same amino acid change was seen frequently in the variant genomes from all four animals. As AIDS developed, the majority of viruses evolved an extended sequence in V1 that was rich in serine and threonine residues and shared similarity with proteins modified by O-linked glycosylation. Several of the predominant common sequence changes in V1 and V4 created new sites for N-linked glycosylation. Thus, common features of the SIV variants that evolve during progression to AIDS are motifs that potentially allow for structural and functional changes in the env protein as a result of carbohydrate addition. PMID:1527847

  17. Analysis of the envelope (E) protein gene of tick-borne encephalitis viruses isolated in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seok-Min; Kim, Su-Yeon; Han, Myung Guk; Jeong, Young Eui; Yong, Tai-Soon; Lee, Chan-Hee; Ju, Young Ran

    2009-06-01

    We determined the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the complete envelope (E) protein gene of the five tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) strains KrM 93, KrM 213, KrM 215, KrM 216, and KrM 219, isolated from wild rodents in South Korea. We analyzed genetic variability within the isolates and compared them with 13 other TBEV strains. The complete E protein genes were amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), cloned into pGEM-T vectors, and sequenced. The five isolates were similar to the Western subtype in nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences (97%-99% identity) and by phylogenetic analysis. The deduced amino acid alignments had 13 unique amino acids, as in the Western subtypes. Among the signature amino acids, those at positions 206 and 317 were unique to each subtype. We were also able to identify amino acid substitutions in each of the three domains when comparing the 5 Korean isolates with the 13 other TBEV strains. Thus, we confirmed that the 5 Korean isolates belong to the Western subtype. These data will provide useful information for the development of an effective recombinant vaccine.

  18. Human coronavirus 229E encodes a single ORF4 protein between the spike and the envelope genes

    PubMed Central

    Dijkman, Ronald; Jebbink, Maarten F; Wilbrink, Berry; Pyrc, Krzysztof; Zaaijer, Hans L; Minor, Philip D; Franklin, Sally; Berkhout, Ben; Thiel, Volker; van der Hoek, Lia

    2006-01-01

    Background The genome of coronaviruses contains structural and non-structural genes, including several so-called accessory genes. All group 1b coronaviruses encode a single accessory protein between the spike and envelope genes, except for human coronavirus (HCoV) 229E. The prototype virus has a split gene, encoding the putative ORF4a and ORF4b proteins. To determine whether primary HCoV-229E isolates exhibit this unusual genome organization, we analyzed the ORF4a/b region of five current clinical isolates from The Netherlands and three early isolates collected at the Common Cold Unit (CCU) in Salisbury, UK. Results All Dutch isolates were identical in the ORF4a/b region at amino acid level. All CCU isolates are only 98% identical to the Dutch isolates at the nucleotide level, but more closely related to the prototype HCoV-229E (>98%). Remarkably, our analyses revealed that the laboratory adapted, prototype HCoV-229E has a 2-nucleotide deletion in the ORF4a/b region, whereas all clinical isolates carry a single ORF, 660 nt in size, encoding a single protein of 219 amino acids, which is a homologue of the ORF3 proteins encoded by HCoV-NL63 and PEDV. Conclusion Thus, the genome organization of the group 1b coronaviruses HCoV-NL63, PEDV and HCoV-229E is identical. It is possible that extensive culturing of the HCoV-229E laboratory strain resulted in truncation of ORF4. This may indicate that the protein is not essential in cell culture, but the highly conserved amino acid sequence of the ORF4 protein among clinical isolates suggests that the protein plays an important role in vivo. PMID:17194306

  19. Molecular clock of HIV-1 envelope genes under early immune selection

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Sung Yong; Love, Tanzy M. T.; Perelson, Alan S.; ...

    2016-06-01

    Here, the molecular clock hypothesis that genes or proteins evolve at a constant rate is a key tool to reveal phylogenetic relationships among species. Using the molecular clock, we can trace an infection back to transmission using HIV-1 sequences from a single time point. Whether or not a strict molecular clock applies to HIV-1’s early evolution in the presence of immune selection has not yet been fully examined.

  20. Molecular clock of HIV-1 envelope genes under early immune selection

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung Yong; Love, Tanzy M. T.; Perelson, Alan S.; Mack, Wendy J.; Lee, Ha Youn

    2016-06-01

    Here, the molecular clock hypothesis that genes or proteins evolve at a constant rate is a key tool to reveal phylogenetic relationships among species. Using the molecular clock, we can trace an infection back to transmission using HIV-1 sequences from a single time point. Whether or not a strict molecular clock applies to HIV-1’s early evolution in the presence of immune selection has not yet been fully examined.

  1. [Phylogenetic analysis of envelope gene of dengue virus serotype 2 in Guangzhou, 2001-2015].

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Jiang, L Y; Luo, L; Cao, Y M; Jing, Q L; Yang, Z C

    2017-01-10

    Objective: To investigate the molecular characteristics of dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV2) in Guangzhou during 2001-2015, and analyze the E gene of the strains isolated, the phylogenetic tree and molecular clock were constructed to know about the evolution of the strains. Methods: The serum samples of the patients were detected by real time PCR, and positive samples were used to isolate dengue virus by using C6/36 cells. The E gene of the isolated strains were sequenced. The phylogenetic tree was constructed by using software Mega 4.0, and the molecular clock was drawn by using software BEASTv1.8.2. Results: Twenty-six dengue virus strains were isolated between 2001 and 2015. They were all clustered into 2 genotypes, i.e. cosmopolitan genotype and Asian genotype Ⅰ. The strains isolated in Guangzhou shared high homology with Southeast Asian strains. The cosmopolitan genotype was divided into 2 sub-genotype at about 46 and 35 years ago. The substitution rate of dengue virus serotype 2 in Guangzhou was 7.1 × 10(-4) per year per site. Conclusions: There were close relationship between the Guangzhou strains and Southeast Asian strains. Guangzhou was at high risk of imported dengue fever, outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. There might be two ways of introduction of cosmopolitan genotype. The substitution rate of the strains in Guangzhou was similar to that in the neighbor countries.

  2. Avian hemangioma retrovirus induces cell proliferation via the envelope (env) gene.

    PubMed

    Alian, A; Sela-Donenfeld, D; Panet, A; Eldor, A

    2000-10-10

    Several years ago, a field strain retrovirus, avian hemangioma virus (AHV), was isolated from hemangioma tumors in layer hens. Sequence analysis indicated that the AHV genome contains the three prototypic retroviral genes, gag, pol, and env, and is devoid of an oncogene. In cultured endothelial cells, however, AHV induced a significant cytopathic effect through a typical apoptotic cascade. We now demonstrate that AHV also induces cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of BSC-1 epithelial cells and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. This was shown by measurements of (1) cell viability, (2) DNA synthesis, (3) flow cytometry analysis of the cell DNA content, and (4) clonogenic efficiency of the infected cells. Anchorage-independent cell growth was demonstrated by colony formation in soft agar. Moreover, the AHV env gene was cloned into a MuLV-based retroviral vector, and infection of NIH-3T3 cells with this vector induced cell proliferation as well as clonogenic growth. These results suggest that AHV, which is devoid of an oncogene, is a pleiotropic activator capable of inducing either apoptosis or cellular proliferation, depending on the infected cell type. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  3. Naturally enveloped AAV vectors for shielding neutralizing antibodies and robust gene delivery in vivo.

    PubMed

    György, Bence; Fitzpatrick, Zachary; Crommentuijn, Matheus H W; Mu, Dakai; Maguire, Casey A

    2014-08-01

    Recently adeno-associated virus (AAV) became the first clinically approved gene therapy product in the western world. To develop AAV for future clinical application in a widespread patient base, particularly in therapies which require intravenous (i.v.) administration of vector, the virus must be able to evade pre-existing antibodies to the wild type virus. Here we demonstrate that in mice, AAV vectors associated with extracellular vesicles (EVs) can evade human anti-AAV neutralizing antibodies. We observed different antibody evasion and gene transfer abilities with populations of EVs isolated by different centrifugal forces. EV-associated AAV vector (ev-AAV) was up to 136-fold more resistant over a range of neutralizing antibody concentrations relative to standard AAV vector in vitro. Importantly in mice, at a concentration of passively transferred human antibodies which decreased i.v. administered standard AAV transduction of brain by 80%, transduction of ev-AAV transduction was not reduced and was 4000-fold higher. Finally, we show that expressing a brain targeting peptide on the EV surface allowed significant enhancement of transduction compared to untargeted ev-AAV. Using ev-AAV represents an effective, clinically relevant approach to evade human neutralizing anti-AAV antibodies after systemic administration of vector.

  4. Genetic control of T cell responsiveness to the Friend murine leukemia virus envelope antigen. Identification of class II loci of the H-2 as immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    T cells primed specifically for the envelope glycoprotein of Friend murine leukemia helper virus (F-MuLV) were prepared by immunizing mice with a recombinant vaccinia virus that expressed the entire env gene of F-MuLV. Significant proliferative responses of F-MuLV envelope- specific, H-2a/b T cells were observed when the T cells were stimulated with antigen-pulsed peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) having the b allele at the K, A beta, A alpha, and E beta loci of the H-2. On the other hand, PEC having only the kappa allele at these loci did not induce the envelope-specific T cell proliferation, even when the PEC had the b allele at the E alpha, S, or D loci. F-MuLV envelope-specific proliferation of H-2a/b T cells under the stimulation of antigen- pulsed, H-2a/b PEC was specifically blocked with anti-I-Ab and anti-I- Ek mAbs but not with anti-Kb, anti-Kk, or anti-I-Ak mAbs. Moreover, (B10.MBR x A/WySn)F1 mice that have the b allele only at the K locus but not in I-A subregion were nonresponders to the envelope glycoprotein, and the bm12 mutation at the A beta locus completely abolished the T cell responsiveness to this antigen. These results indicate that proliferative T cells recognize a limited number of epitopes on F-MuLV envelope protein in the context of I-Ab, hybrid I- Ak/b, and/or hybrid I-Ek/b class II MHC molecules but fail to recognize the same envelope protein in the context of I-Ak or I-Ek molecules. This influence of the H-2I region on T cell recognition of the envelope glycoprotein appeared to control in vivo induction of protective immunity against Friend virus complex after immunization with the vaccinia-F-MuLV env vaccine. Thus, these results provide, for the first time, direct evidence for Ir gene-controlled responder/nonresponder phenotypes influencing the immune response to a pathogenic virus of mice. PMID:3141552

  5. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac142, a core gene that is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Christina B.; Da, Xiaojiang; Donly, Cam; Theilmann, David A.

    2008-03-15

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac142 is a baculovirus core gene and encodes a protein previously shown to associate with occlusion-derived virus (ODV). To determine its role in the baculovirus life cycle, we used the AcMNPV bacmid system to generate an ac142 deletion virus (AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP}). Fluorescence and light microscopy revealed that AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP} exhibits a single-cell infection phenotype. Titration assays and Western blot confirmed that AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP} is unable to produce budded virus (BV). However, viral DNA replication is unaffected and the development of occlusion bodies in AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP}-transfected cells evidenced progression to very late phases of the viral infection. Western blot analysis showed that AC142 is expressed in the cytoplasm and nucleus throughout infection and that it is a structural component of BV and ODV which localizes to nucleocapsids. Electron microscopy indicates that ac142 is required for nucleocapsid envelopment to form ODV and their subsequent occlusion, a fundamental process to all baculoviruses.

  6. Deletion of the late cornified envelope (LCE) 3B and 3C genes as a susceptibility factor for psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    de Cid, Rafael; Riveira-Munoz, Eva; Zeeuwen, Patrick L.J.M.; Robarge, Jason; Liao, Wilson; Dannhauser, Emma N.; Giardina, Emiliano; Stuart, Philip E.; Nair, Rajan; Helms, Cynthia; Escaramís, Georgia; Ballana, Ester; Martín-Ezquerra, Gemma; den Heijer, Martin; Kamsteeg, Marijke; Joosten, Irma; Eichler, Evan E.; Lázaro, Conxi; Pujol, Ramón M.; Armengol, Lluís; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Elder, James T.; Novelli, Giuseppe; Armour, John A.L.; Kwok, Pui; Bowcock, Anne; Schalkwijk, Joost; Estivill, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease with a prevalence of 2% to 3% in Caucasians1. In a genome-wide search for copy number variants (CNV) using a sample pooling approach we have identified a deletion comprising LCE3B and LCE3C, members of the late cornified envelope (LCE) gene cluster2. The absence of LCE3B and LCE3C (LCE3C-LCE3B-del) is significantly associated (p=1.38E-08) with risk of psoriasis in 2,831 samples from Spain, The Netherlands, Italy and the USA, and in a family-based study (p=5.4E-04). LCE3C-LCE3B-del is tagged by rs4112788 (r2=0.93), which is also strongly associated with psoriasis (p<6.6E-09). LCE3C-LCE3B-del shows epistatic effects with the HLA-Cw6 allele on the development of psoriasis in Dutch samples, and multiplicative effects in the other samples. LCE expression can be induced in normal epidermis by skin barrier disruption and is strongly expressed in psoriatic lesions, suggesting that compromised skin barrier function plays a role in psoriasis susceptibility. PMID:19169253

  7. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac142, a core gene that is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Christina B; Dai, Xiaojiang; Donly, Cam; Theilmann, David A

    2008-03-15

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac142 is a baculovirus core gene and encodes a protein previously shown to associate with occlusion-derived virus (ODV). To determine its role in the baculovirus life cycle, we used the AcMNPV bacmid system to generate an ac142 deletion virus (AcBAC(ac142KO-PH-GFP)). Fluorescence and light microscopy revealed that AcBAC(ac142KO-PH-GFP) exhibits a single-cell infection phenotype. Titration assays and Western blot confirmed that AcBAC(ac142KO-PH-GFP) is unable to produce budded virus (BV). However, viral DNA replication is unaffected and the development of occlusion bodies in AcBAC(ac142KO-PH-GFP)-transfected cells evidenced progression to very late phases of the viral infection. Western blot analysis showed that AC142 is expressed in the cytoplasm and nucleus throughout infection and that it is a structural component of BV and ODV which localizes to nucleocapsids. Electron microscopy indicates that ac142 is required for nucleocapsid envelopment to form ODV and their subsequent occlusion, a fundamental process to all baculoviruses.

  8. Deletion of the late cornified envelope LCE3B and LCE3C genes as a susceptibility factor for psoriasis.

    PubMed

    de Cid, Rafael; Riveira-Munoz, Eva; Zeeuwen, Patrick L J M; Robarge, Jason; Liao, Wilson; Dannhauser, Emma N; Giardina, Emiliano; Stuart, Philip E; Nair, Rajan; Helms, Cynthia; Escaramís, Georgia; Ballana, Ester; Martín-Ezquerra, Gemma; den Heijer, Martin; Kamsteeg, Marijke; Joosten, Irma; Eichler, Evan E; Lázaro, Conxi; Pujol, Ramón M; Armengol, Lluís; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Elder, James T; Novelli, Giuseppe; Armour, John A L; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Bowcock, Anne; Schalkwijk, Joost; Estivill, Xavier

    2009-02-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease with a prevalence of 2-3% in individuals of European ancestry. In a genome-wide search for copy number variants (CNV) using a sample pooling approach, we have identified a deletion comprising LCE3B and LCE3C, members of the late cornified envelope (LCE) gene cluster. The absence of LCE3B and LCE3C (LCE3C_LCE3B-del) is significantly associated (P = 1.38E-08) with risk of psoriasis in 2,831 samples from Spain, The Netherlands, Italy and the United States, and in a family-based study (P = 5.4E-04). LCE3C_LCE3B-del is tagged by rs4112788 (r(2) = 0.93), which is also strongly associated with psoriasis (P < 6.6E-09). LCE3C_LCE3B-del shows epistatic effects with the HLA-Cw6 allele on the development of psoriasis in Dutch samples and multiplicative effects in the other samples. LCE expression can be induced in normal epidermis by skin barrier disruption and is strongly expressed in psoriatic lesions, suggesting that compromised skin barrier function has a role in psoriasis susceptibility.

  9. DNA Packaging Mutant: Repression of the Vaccinia Virus A32 Gene Results in Noninfectious, DNA-Deficient, Spherical, Enveloped Particles

    PubMed Central

    Cassetti, Maria Cristina; Merchlinsky, Michael; Wolffe, Elizabeth J.; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Moss, Bernard

    1998-01-01

    The vaccinia virus A32 open reading frame was predicted to encode a protein with a nucleoside triphosphate-binding motif and a mass of 34 kDa. To investigate the role of this protein, we constructed a mutant in which the original A32 gene was replaced by an inducible copy. The recombinant virus, vA32i, has a conditional lethal phenotype: infectious virus formation was dependent on isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). Under nonpermissive conditions, the mutant synthesized early- and late-stage viral proteins, as well as viral DNA that was processed into unit-length genomes. Electron microscopy of cells infected in the absence of IPTG revealed normal-appearing crescents and immature virus particles but very few with nucleoids. Instead of brick-shaped mature particles with defined core structures, there were numerous electron-dense, spherical particles. Some of these spherical particles were wrapped with cisternal membranes, analogous to intracellular and extracellular enveloped virions. Mutant viral particles, purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, had low infectivity and transcriptional activity, and the majority were spherical and lacked DNA. Nevertheless, the particle preparation contained representative membrane proteins, cleaved and uncleaved core proteins, the viral RNA polymerase, the early transcription factor and several enzymes, suggesting that incorporation of these components is not strictly coupled to DNA packaging. PMID:9621036

  10. Pushing the endogenous envelope

    PubMed Central

    Henzy, Jamie E.; Johnson, Welkin E.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of retroviral envelope glycoproteins characterized to date are typical of type I viral fusion proteins, having a receptor binding subunit associated with a fusion subunit. The fusion subunits of lentiviruses and alpha-, beta-, delta- and gammaretroviruses have a very conserved domain organization and conserved features of secondary structure, making them suitable for phylogenetic analyses. Such analyses, along with sequence comparisons, reveal evidence of numerous recombination events in which retroviruses have acquired envelope glycoproteins from heterologous sequences. Thus, the envelope gene (env) can have a history separate from that of the polymerase gene (pol), which is the most commonly used gene in phylogenetic analyses of retroviruses. Focusing on the fusion subunits of the genera listed above, we describe three distinct types of retroviral envelope glycoproteins, which we refer to as gamma-type, avian gamma-type and beta-type. By tracing these types within the ‘fossil record’ provided by endogenous retroviruses, we show that they have surprisingly distinct evolutionary histories and dynamics, with important implications for cross-species transmissions and the generation of novel lineages. These findings validate the utility of env sequences in contributing phylogenetic signal that enlarges our understanding of retrovirus evolution. PMID:23938755

  11. The consensus coding sequence (CCDS) project: Identifying a common protein-coding gene set for the human and mouse genomes

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Kim D.; Harrow, Jennifer; Harte, Rachel A.; Wallin, Craig; Diekhans, Mark; Maglott, Donna R.; Searle, Steve; Farrell, Catherine M.; Loveland, Jane E.; Ruef, Barbara J.; Hart, Elizabeth; Suner, Marie-Marthe; Landrum, Melissa J.; Aken, Bronwen; Ayling, Sarah; Baertsch, Robert; Fernandez-Banet, Julio; Cherry, Joshua L.; Curwen, Val; DiCuccio, Michael; Kellis, Manolis; Lee, Jennifer; Lin, Michael F.; Schuster, Michael; Shkeda, Andrew; Amid, Clara; Brown, Garth; Dukhanina, Oksana; Frankish, Adam; Hart, Jennifer; Maidak, Bonnie L.; Mudge, Jonathan; Murphy, Michael R.; Murphy, Terence; Rajan, Jeena; Rajput, Bhanu; Riddick, Lillian D.; Snow, Catherine; Steward, Charles; Webb, David; Weber, Janet A.; Wilming, Laurens; Wu, Wenyu; Birney, Ewan; Haussler, David; Hubbard, Tim; Ostell, James; Durbin, Richard; Lipman, David

    2009-01-01

    Effective use of the human and mouse genomes requires reliable identification of genes and their products. Although multiple public resources provide annotation, different methods are used that can result in similar but not identical representation of genes, transcripts, and proteins. The collaborative consensus coding sequence (CCDS) project tracks identical protein annotations on the reference mouse and human genomes with a stable identifier (CCDS ID), and ensures that they are consistently represented on the NCBI, Ensembl, and UCSC Genome Browsers. Importantly, the project coordinates on manually reviewing inconsistent protein annotations between sites, as well as annotations for which new evidence suggests a revision is needed, to progressively converge on a complete protein-coding set for the human and mouse reference genomes, while maintaining a high standard of reliability and biological accuracy. To date, the project has identified 20,159 human and 17,707 mouse consensus coding regions from 17,052 human and 16,893 mouse genes. Three evaluation methods indicate that the entries in the CCDS set are highly likely to represent real proteins, more so than annotations from contributing groups not included in CCDS. The CCDS database thus centralizes the function of identifying well-supported, identically-annotated, protein-coding regions. PMID:19498102

  12. Differential DNA methylation profiles of coding and non-coding genes define hippocampal sclerosis in human temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F.C.; Bryan, Kenneth; Das, Sudipto; McKiernan, Ross C.; Bray, Isabella M.; Reynolds, James P.; Gwinn, Ryder; Stallings, Raymond L.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression in the hippocampus. Epigenetic changes to DNA are attractive mechanisms to explain the sustained hyperexcitability of chronic epilepsy. Here, through methylation analysis of all annotated C-phosphate-G islands and promoter regions in the human genome, we report a pilot study of the methylation profiles of temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis. Furthermore, by comparative analysis of expression and promoter methylation, we identify methylation sensitive non-coding RNA in human temporal lobe epilepsy. A total of 146 protein-coding genes exhibited altered DNA methylation in temporal lobe epilepsy hippocampus (n = 9) when compared to control (n = 5), with 81.5% of the promoters of these genes displaying hypermethylation. Unique methylation profiles were evident in temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis, in addition to a common methylation profile regardless of pathology grade. Gene ontology terms associated with development, neuron remodelling and neuron maturation were over-represented in the methylation profile of Watson Grade 1 samples (mild hippocampal sclerosis). In addition to genes associated with neuronal, neurotransmitter/synaptic transmission and cell death functions, differential hypermethylation of genes associated with transcriptional regulation was evident in temporal lobe epilepsy, but overall few genes previously associated with epilepsy were among the differentially methylated. Finally, a panel of 13, methylation-sensitive microRNA were identified in temporal lobe epilepsy including MIR27A, miR-193a-5p (MIR193A) and miR-876-3p (MIR876), and the differential methylation of long non-coding RNA documented for the first time. The present study therefore reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes in human temporal lobe epilepsy that may contribute to the molecular architecture of the epileptic brain. PMID

  13. Chromatin poises miRNA- and protein-coding genes for expression.

    PubMed

    Barski, Artem; Jothi, Raja; Cuddapah, Suresh; Cui, Kairong; Roh, Tae-Young; Schones, Dustin E; Zhao, Keji

    2009-10-01

    Chromatin modifications have been implicated in the regulation of gene expression. While association of certain modifications with expressed or silent genes has been established, it remains unclear how changes in chromatin environment relate to changes in gene expression. In this article, we used ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing) to analyze the genome-wide changes in chromatin modifications during activation of total human CD4(+) T cells by T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Surprisingly, we found that the chromatin modification patterns at many induced and silenced genes are relatively stable during the short-term activation of resting T cells. Active chromatin modifications were already in place for a majority of inducible protein-coding genes, even while the genes were silent in resting cells. Similarly, genes that were silenced upon T-cell activation retained positive chromatin modifications even after being silenced. To investigate if these observations are also valid for miRNA-coding genes, we systematically identified promoters for known miRNA genes using epigenetic marks and profiled their expression patterns using deep sequencing. We found that chromatin modifications can poise miRNA-coding genes as well. Our data suggest that miRNA- and protein-coding genes share similar mechanisms of regulation by chromatin modifications, which poise inducible genes for activation in response to environmental stimuli.

  14. cut11+: A Gene Required for Cell Cycle-dependent Spindle Pole Body Anchoring in the Nuclear Envelope and Bipolar Spindle Formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    West, Robert R.; Vaisberg, Elena V.; Ding, Rubai; Nurse, Paul; McIntosh, J. Richard

    1998-01-01

    The “cut” mutants of Schizosaccharomyces pombe are defective in spindle formation and/or chromosome segregation, but they proceed through the cell cycle, resulting in lethality. Analysis of temperature-sensitive alleles of cut11+ suggests that this gene is required for the formation of a functional bipolar spindle. Defective spindle structure was revealed with fluorescent probes for tubulin and DNA. Three-dimensional reconstruction of mutant spindles by serial sectioning and electron microscopy showed that the spindle pole bodies (SPBs) either failed to complete normal duplication or were free floating in the nucleoplasm. Localization of Cut11p tagged with the green fluorescent protein showed punctate nuclear envelope staining throughout the cell cycle and SPBs staining from early prophase to mid anaphase. This SPB localization correlates with the time in the cell cycle when SPBs are inserted into the nuclear envelope. Immunoelectron microscopy confirmed the localization of Cut11p to mitotic SPBs and nuclear pore complexes. Cloning and sequencing showed that cut11+ encodes a novel protein with seven putative membrane-spanning domains and homology to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene NDC1. These data suggest that Cut11p associates with nuclear pore complexes and mitotic SPBs as an anchor in the nuclear envelope; this role is essential for mitosis. PMID:9763447

  15. Evolutionary hallmarks of the human proteome: chasing the age and coregulation of protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Katia de Paiva; Campos-Laborie, Francisco José; Vialle, Ricardo Assunção; Ortega, José Miguel; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2016-10-25

    The development of large-scale technologies for quantitative transcriptomics has enabled comprehensive analysis of the gene expression profiles in complete genomes. RNA-Seq allows the measurement of gene expression levels in a manner far more precise and global than previous methods. Studies using this technology are altering our view about the extent and complexity of the eukaryotic transcriptomes. In this respect, multiple efforts have been done to determine and analyse the gene expression patterns of human cell types in different conditions, either in normal or pathological states. However, until recently, little has been reported about the evolutionary marks present in human protein-coding genes, particularly from the combined perspective of gene expression and protein evolution. We present a combined analysis of human protein-coding gene expression profiling and time-scale ancestry mapping, that places the genes in taxonomy clades and reveals eight evolutionary major steps ("hallmarks"), that include clusters of functionally coherent proteins. The human expressed genes are analysed using a RNA-Seq dataset of 116 samples from 32 tissues. The evolutionary analysis of the human proteins is performed combining the information from: (i) a database of orthologous proteins (OMA), (ii) the taxonomy mapping of genes to lineage clades (from NCBI Taxonomy) and (iii) the evolution time-scale mapping provided by TimeTree (Timescale of Life). The human protein-coding genes are also placed in a relational context based in the construction of a robust gene coexpression network, that reveals tighter links between age-related protein-coding genes and finds functionally coherent gene modules. Understanding the relational landscape of the human protein-coding genes is essential for interpreting the functional elements and modules of our active genome. Moreover, decoding the evolutionary history of the human genes can provide very valuable information to reveal or uncover their

  16. DNA methylation patterns of protein-coding genes and long non-coding RNAs in males with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qi; Wang, Yunliang; Cheng, Jia; Dai, Dongjun; Zhou, Xingyu; Zhang, Yuzheng; Li, Jinfeng; Yin, Honglei; Gao, Shugui; Duan, Shiwei

    2015-11-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is one of the most complex mental illnesses affecting ~1% of the population worldwide. SCZ pathogenesis is considered to be a result of genetic as well as epigenetic alterations. Previous studies have aimed to identify the causative genes of SCZ. However, DNA methylation of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) involved in SCZ has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation was conducted using samples from two male patients with paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, respectively. Methyl-CpG binding domain protein-enriched genome sequencing was used. In the two patients with paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, 1,397 and 1,437 peaks were identified, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that peaks were enriched in protein-coding genes, which exhibited nervous system and brain functions. A number of these peaks in gene promoter regions may affect gene expression and, therefore, influence SCZ-associated pathways. Furthermore, 7 and 20 lncRNAs, respectively, in the Refseq database were hypermethylated. According to the lncRNA dataset in the NONCODE database, ~30% of intergenic peaks overlapped with novel lncRNA loci. The results of the present study demonstrated that aberrant hypermethylation of lncRNA genes may be an important epigenetic factor associated with SCZ. However, further studies using larger sample sizes are required.

  17. Enhancement of neutralizing humoral response of DNA vaccine against duck hepatitis B virus envelope protein by co-delivery of cytokine genes.

    PubMed

    Saade, Fadi; Buronfosse, Thierry; Pradat, Pierre; Abdul, Fabien; Cova, Lucyna

    2008-09-19

    We explored in the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) model the impact of duck interferon gamma (Du-IFNgamma) or interleukin 2 (Du-IL2) co-delivery on humoral neutralizing response induced by DNA-based vaccine encoding DHBV preS/S large envelope protein. Co-delivery of either Du-IL2 or Du-IFNgamma encoding plasmids considerably increased the magnitude of anti-preS humoral response. Moreover, co-administration of cytokine genes led to a significant (p<0.001) enhancement of neutralizing anti-DHBV antibody response, which was more pronounced for Du-IFNgamma. Our data suggest that co-delivery of cytokine and envelope protein encoding plasmids will be a valuable approach for the development of a potent therapeutic DNA vaccine against chronic hepatitis B.

  18. CCG: an integrative resource of cancer protein-coding genes and long noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengrong; Yang, Yu-Cheng T; Xu, Gang; Tan, Chang; Lu, Zhi John

    2016-12-01

    The identification of cancer genes remains a main aim of cancer research. With the advances of high-throughput sequencing technologies, thousands of novel cancer genes were identified through recurrent mutation analyses and differential expression analyses between normal tissues and tumors in large populations. Many databases were developed to document the cancer genes. However, no public database providing both cancer protein-coding genes and cancer lncRNAs is available presently. Here, we present the Catalogue of Cancer Genes (CCG) database (http://ccg.xingene.net), a catalogue of cancer genes. It includes both well-supported and candidate cancer protein-coding genes and cancer lncRNAs collected from literature search and public databases. In addition, uniform genomic aberration information (such as somatic mutation and copy number variation) and drug-gene interactions were assigned to cancer genes in the database. CCG represents an effort on integrative assembly of well-supported and candidate cancer protein-coding and long noncoding RNA genes and takes advantages of high-throughput sequencing results on large populations. With the help of CCG, users can easily access a comprehensive list of cancer genes as well as genomic aberration related with these genes. The availability of integrative information will facilitate the understanding of cancer mechanisms. In addition, drug-gene information in CCG provides a useful guide to the development of new anti-cancer drugs and selection of rational combination therapies.

  19. Coding exon-structure aware realigner (CESAR) utilizes genome alignments for accurate comparative gene annotation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Virag; Elghafari, Anas; Hiller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Identifying coding genes is an essential step in genome annotation. Here, we utilize existing whole genome alignments to detect conserved coding exons and then map gene annotations from one genome to many aligned genomes. We show that genome alignments contain thousands of spurious frameshifts and splice site mutations in exons that are truly conserved. To overcome these limitations, we have developed CESAR (Coding Exon-Structure Aware Realigner) that realigns coding exons, while considering reading frame and splice sites of each exon. CESAR effectively avoids spurious frameshifts in conserved genes and detects 91% of shifted splice sites. This results in the identification of thousands of additional conserved exons and 99% of the exons that lack inactivating mutations match real exons. Finally, to demonstrate the potential of using CESAR for comparative gene annotation, we applied it to 188 788 exons of 19 865 human genes to annotate human genes in 99 other vertebrates. These comparative gene annotations are available as a resource (http://bds.mpi-cbg.de/hillerlab/CESAR/). CESAR (https://github.com/hillerlab/CESAR/) can readily be applied to other alignments to accurately annotate coding genes in many other vertebrate and invertebrate genomes. PMID:27016733

  20. Origin and evolution of the long non-coding genes in the X-inactivation center.

    PubMed

    Romito, Antonio; Rougeulle, Claire

    2011-11-01

    Random X chromosome inactivation (XCI), the eutherian mechanism of X-linked gene dosage compensation, is controlled by a cis-acting locus termed the X-inactivation center (Xic). One of the striking features that characterize the Xic landscape is the abundance of loci transcribing non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including Xist, the master regulator of the inactivation process. Recent comparative genomic analyses have depicted the evolutionary scenario behind the origin of the X-inactivation center, revealing that this locus evolved from a region harboring protein-coding genes. During mammalian radiation, this ancestral protein-coding region was disrupted in the marsupial group, whilst it provided in eutherian lineage the starting material for the non-translated RNAs of the X-inactivation center. The emergence of non-coding genes occurred by a dual mechanism involving loss of protein-coding function of the pre-existing genes and integration of different classes of mobile elements, some of which modeled the structure and sequence of the non-coding genes in a species-specific manner. The rising genes started to produce transcripts that acquired function in regulating the epigenetic status of the X chromosome, as shown for Xist, its antisense Tsix, Jpx, and recently suggested for Ftx. Thus, the appearance of the Xic, which occurred after the divergence between eutherians and marsupials, was the basis for the evolution of random X inactivation as a strategy to achieve dosage compensation. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Transcriptional enhancers in protein-coding exons of vertebrate developmental genes.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Deborah I; Dong, Zhiqiang; Guo, Su; Chuang, Jeffrey H

    2012-01-01

    Many conserved noncoding sequences function as transcriptional enhancers that regulate gene expression. Here, we report that protein-coding DNA also frequently contains enhancers functioning at the transcriptional level. We tested the enhancer activity of 31 protein-coding exons, which we chose based on strong sequence conservation between zebrafish and human, and occurrence in developmental genes, using a Tol2 transposable GFP reporter assay in zebrafish. For each exon we measured GFP expression in hundreds of embryos in 10 anatomies via a novel system that implements the voice-recognition capabilities of a cellular phone. We find that 24/31 (77%) exons drive GFP expression compared to a minimal promoter control, and 14/24 are anatomy-specific (expression in four anatomies or less). GFP expression driven by these coding enhancers frequently overlaps the anatomies where the host gene is expressed (60%), suggesting self-regulation. Highly conserved coding sequences and highly conserved noncoding sequences do not significantly differ in enhancer activity (coding: 24/31 vs. noncoding: 105/147) or tissue-specificity (coding: 14/24 vs. noncoding: 50/105). Furthermore, coding and noncoding enhancers display similar levels of the enhancer-related histone modification H3K4me1 (coding: 9/24 vs noncoding: 34/81). Meanwhile, coding enhancers are over three times as likely to contain an H3K4me1 mark as other exons of the host gene. Our work suggests that developmental transcriptional enhancers do not discriminate between coding and noncoding DNA and reveals widespread dual functions in protein-coding DNA.

  2. The Evolution and Expression Pattern of Human Overlapping lncRNA and Protein-coding Gene Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Qianqian; Li, Yixue; Wang, Zhen; Zhou, Songwen; Sun, Hong; Yu, Guangjun

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNA overlapping with protein-coding gene (lncRNA-coding pair) is a special type of overlapping genes. Protein-coding overlapping genes have been well studied and increasing attention has been paid to lncRNAs. By studying lncRNA-coding pairs in human genome, we showed that lncRNA-coding pairs were more likely to be generated by overprinting and retaining genes in lncRNA-coding pairs were given higher priority than non-overlapping genes. Besides, the preference of overlapping configurations preserved during evolution was based on the origin of lncRNA-coding pairs. Further investigations showed that lncRNAs promoting the splicing of their embedded protein-coding partners was a unilateral interaction, but the existence of overlapping partners improving the gene expression was bidirectional and the effect was decreased with the increased evolutionary age of genes. Additionally, the expression of lncRNA-coding pairs showed an overall positive correlation and the expression correlation was associated with their overlapping configurations, local genomic environment and evolutionary age of genes. Comparison of the expression correlation of lncRNA-coding pairs between normal and cancer samples found that the lineage-specific pairs including old protein-coding genes may play an important role in tumorigenesis. This work presents a systematically comprehensive understanding of the evolution and the expression pattern of human lncRNA-coding pairs. PMID:28344339

  3. Distinguishing protein-coding and noncoding genes in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Clamp, Michele; Fry, Ben; Kamal, Mike; Xie, Xiaohui; Cuff, James; Lin, Michael F; Kellis, Manolis; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Lander, Eric S

    2007-12-04

    Although the Human Genome Project was completed 4 years ago, the catalog of human protein-coding genes remains a matter of controversy. Current catalogs list a total of approximately 24,500 putative protein-coding genes. It is broadly suspected that a large fraction of these entries are functionally meaningless ORFs present by chance in RNA transcripts, because they show no evidence of evolutionary conservation with mouse or dog. However, there is currently no scientific justification for excluding ORFs simply because they fail to show evolutionary conservation: the alternative hypothesis is that most of these ORFs are actually valid human genes that reflect gene innovation in the primate lineage or gene loss in the other lineages. Here, we reject this hypothesis by carefully analyzing the nonconserved ORFs-specifically, their properties in other primates. We show that the vast majority of these ORFs are random occurrences. The analysis yields, as a by-product, a major revision of the current human catalogs, cutting the number of protein-coding genes to approximately 20,500. Specifically, it suggests that nonconserved ORFs should be added to the human gene catalog only if there is clear evidence of an encoded protein. It also provides a principled methodology for evaluating future proposed additions to the human gene catalog. Finally, the results indicate that there has been relatively little true innovation in mammalian protein-coding genes.

  4. Distinguishing protein-coding and noncoding genes in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Clamp, Michele; Fry, Ben; Kamal, Mike; Xie, Xiaohui; Cuff, James; Lin, Michael F.; Kellis, Manolis; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Lander, Eric S.

    2007-01-01

    Although the Human Genome Project was completed 4 years ago, the catalog of human protein-coding genes remains a matter of controversy. Current catalogs list a total of ≈24,500 putative protein-coding genes. It is broadly suspected that a large fraction of these entries are functionally meaningless ORFs present by chance in RNA transcripts, because they show no evidence of evolutionary conservation with mouse or dog. However, there is currently no scientific justification for excluding ORFs simply because they fail to show evolutionary conservation: the alternative hypothesis is that most of these ORFs are actually valid human genes that reflect gene innovation in the primate lineage or gene loss in the other lineages. Here, we reject this hypothesis by carefully analyzing the nonconserved ORFs—specifically, their properties in other primates. We show that the vast majority of these ORFs are random occurrences. The analysis yields, as a by-product, a major revision of the current human catalogs, cutting the number of protein-coding genes to ≈20,500. Specifically, it suggests that nonconserved ORFs should be added to the human gene catalog only if there is clear evidence of an encoded protein. It also provides a principled methodology for evaluating future proposed additions to the human gene catalog. Finally, the results indicate that there has been relatively little true innovation in mammalian protein-coding genes. PMID:18040051

  5. Chromatin remodeling inactivates activity genes and regulates neural coding.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yue; Yamada, Tomoko; Hill, Kelly K; Hemberg, Martin; Reddy, Naveen C; Cho, Ha Y; Guthrie, Arden N; Oldenborg, Anna; Heiney, Shane A; Ohmae, Shogo; Medina, Javier F; Holy, Timothy E; Bonni, Azad

    2016-07-15

    Activity-dependent transcription influences neuronal connectivity, but the roles and mechanisms of inactivation of activity-dependent genes have remained poorly understood. Genome-wide analyses in the mouse cerebellum revealed that the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex deposits the histone variant H2A.z at promoters of activity-dependent genes, thereby triggering their inactivation. Purification of translating messenger RNAs from synchronously developing granule neurons (Sync-TRAP) showed that conditional knockout of the core NuRD subunit Chd4 impairs inactivation of activity-dependent genes when neurons undergo dendrite pruning. Chd4 knockout or expression of NuRD-regulated activity genes impairs dendrite pruning. Imaging of behaving mice revealed hyperresponsivity of granule neurons to sensorimotor stimuli upon Chd4 knockout. Our findings define an epigenetic mechanism that inactivates activity-dependent transcription and regulates dendrite patterning and sensorimotor encoding in the brain. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. RNA-Seq improves annotation of protein-coding genes in the cucumber genome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As more and more genomes are sequenced, genome annotation becomes increasingly important in bridging the gap between sequence and biology. Gene prediction, which is at the center of genome annotation, usually integrates various resources to compute consensus gene structures. However, many newly sequenced genomes have limited resources for gene predictions. In an effort to create high-quality gene models of the cucumber genome (Cucumis sativus var. sativus), based on the EVidenceModeler gene prediction pipeline, we incorporated the massively parallel complementary DNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) reads of 10 cucumber tissues into EVidenceModeler. We applied the new pipeline to the reassembled cucumber genome and included a comparison between our predicted protein-coding gene sets and a published set. Results The reassembled cucumber genome, annotated with RNA-Seq reads from 10 tissues, has 23, 248 identified protein-coding genes. Compared with the published prediction in 2009, approximately 8, 700 genes reveal structural modifications and 5, 285 genes only appear in the reassembled cucumber genome. All the related results, including genome sequence and annotations, are available at http://cmb.bnu.edu.cn/Cucumis_sativus_v20/. Conclusions We conclude that RNA-Seq greatly improves the accuracy of prediction of protein-coding genes in the reassembled cucumber genome. The comparison between the two gene sets also suggests that it is feasible to use RNA-Seq reads to annotate newly sequenced or less-studied genomes. PMID:22047402

  7. Transcriptional dysregulation of coding and non-coding genes in cellular models of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Bithell, Angela; Johnson, Rory; Buckley, Noel J

    2009-12-01

    HD (Huntington's disease) is a late onset heritable neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by neuronal dysfunction and death, particularly in the cerebral cortex and medium spiny neurons of the striatum. This is followed by progressive chorea, dementia and emotional dysfunction, eventually resulting in death. HD is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the first exon of the HD gene that results in an abnormally elongated polyQ (polyglutamine) tract in its protein product, Htt (Huntingtin). Wild-type Htt is largely cytoplasmic; however, in HD, proteolytic N-terminal fragments of Htt form insoluble deposits in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, provoking the idea that mutHtt (mutant Htt) causes transcriptional dysfunction. While a number of specific transcription factors and co-factors have been proposed as mediators of mutHtt toxicity, the causal relationship between these Htt/transcription factor interactions and HD pathology remains unknown. Previous work has highlighted REST [RE1 (repressor element 1)-silencing transcription factor] as one such transcription factor. REST is a master regulator of neuronal genes, repressing their expression. Many of its direct target genes are known or suspected to have a role in HD pathogenesis, including BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor). Recent evidence has also shown that REST regulates transcription of regulatory miRNAs (microRNAs), many of which are known to regulate neuronal gene expression and are dysregulated in HD. Thus repression of miRNAs constitutes a second, indirect mechanism by which REST can alter the neuronal transcriptome in HD. We will describe the evidence that disruption to the REST regulon brought about by a loss of interaction between REST and mutHtt may be a key contributory factor in the widespread dysregulation of gene expression in HD.

  8. Differential DNA methylation profiles of coding and non-coding genes define hippocampal sclerosis in human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F C; Bryan, Kenneth; Das, Sudipto; McKiernan, Ross C; Bray, Isabella M; Reynolds, James P; Gwinn, Ryder; Stallings, Raymond L; Henshall, David C

    2015-03-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression in the hippocampus. Epigenetic changes to DNA are attractive mechanisms to explain the sustained hyperexcitability of chronic epilepsy. Here, through methylation analysis of all annotated C-phosphate-G islands and promoter regions in the human genome, we report a pilot study of the methylation profiles of temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis. Furthermore, by comparative analysis of expression and promoter methylation, we identify methylation sensitive non-coding RNA in human temporal lobe epilepsy. A total of 146 protein-coding genes exhibited altered DNA methylation in temporal lobe epilepsy hippocampus (n = 9) when compared to control (n = 5), with 81.5% of the promoters of these genes displaying hypermethylation. Unique methylation profiles were evident in temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis, in addition to a common methylation profile regardless of pathology grade. Gene ontology terms associated with development, neuron remodelling and neuron maturation were over-represented in the methylation profile of Watson Grade 1 samples (mild hippocampal sclerosis). In addition to genes associated with neuronal, neurotransmitter/synaptic transmission and cell death functions, differential hypermethylation of genes associated with transcriptional regulation was evident in temporal lobe epilepsy, but overall few genes previously associated with epilepsy were among the differentially methylated. Finally, a panel of 13, methylation-sensitive microRNA were identified in temporal lobe epilepsy including MIR27A, miR-193a-5p (MIR193A) and miR-876-3p (MIR876), and the differential methylation of long non-coding RNA documented for the first time. The present study therefore reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes in human temporal lobe epilepsy that may contribute to the molecular architecture of the epileptic brain. © The

  9. Studies on the role of neutralizing antibodies against envelope genes in resolving HCV pseudo-particles infection.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Shazia; Idrees, Muhammad; Ali, Amjad; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2014-06-01

    Characterization of antibodies targeting the attachment and entry of the viral particles into host cells is important for studding antibody mediated neutralization. Antibodies against the envelope glycoproteins (EGP) have neutralizing capacity and can prevent HCV infections. System based on HCV pseudo typed-particles (HCVpp) stably expressing EGP can be used for screening of HCV anti envelope neutralizing antibodies in the serum of patients with acute and chronic HCV infections. The aim of the current study was to check HCVpp as a useful tool for the detection of anti-HCV envelope antibodies in the serum of HCV infected patients and to test the binding potential of these antiviral molecules to EGP of HCV 3a. Previously developed HCVpp harboring unmodified glycoproteins from local isolates in 293T cell line were used in this study. HCVpp were pre incubated with different concentrations of anti E1 antibody and different E2 antibodies to check antiviral activity. Further we used serum samples with low/medium (≤800,000 IU/mL), and high (>800,000 IU/mL) viral titer from chronic HCV male and female patients. Infection was done in Huh-7 cells for 1 h at 37 oC. Infectivity was checked through Luciferase assay. Considerable decrease in HCVpp infectivity with anti-envelope antibodies was observed in dose dependent manner. Maximum inhibition was seen when 5 µg/ml of monoclonal anti E1 antibody used. Further increase in concentration exhibited no decrease in infectivity which suggests that other factors are also involved in causing infection. Various well characterized E2-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been screened for their capability to reduce infection in Huh-7 cells. Three of the four mAbs specific for the E2 had no effect on the infectivity of HCVpp. Confirmation sensitive antibody H53 showed maximum inhibition of infectivity. HCV ELISA positive samples from both male and female patients were used to neutralize the HCVpp. The neutralizing antibody response

  10. Identification and characterization of the gene expression profiles for protein coding and non-coding RNAs of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, María Laura; Corchete, Luis; Teodosio, Cristina; Sarasquete, María Eugenia; Abad, María del Mar; Iglesias, Manuel; Esteban, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Significant advances have been achieved in recent years in the identification of the genetic and the molecular alterations of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Despite this, at present the understanding of the precise mechanisms involved in the development and malignant transformation of PDAC remain relatively limited. Here, we evaluated for the first time, the molecular heterogeneity of PDAC tumors, through simultaneous assessment of the gene expression profile (GEP) for both coding and non-coding genes of tumor samples from 27 consecutive PDAC patients. Overall, we identified a common GEP for all PDAC tumors, characterized by an increased expression of genes involved in PDAC cell proliferation, local invasion and metastatic capacity, together with a significant alteration of the early steps of the cellular immune response. At the same time, we confirm and extend on previous observations about the genetic complexity of PDAC tumors as revealed by the demonstration of two clearly distinct and unique GEPs (e.g. epithelial-like vs. mesenchymal-like) reflecting the alteration of different signaling pathways involved in the oncogenesis and progression of these tumors. Our results also highlight the potential role of the immune system microenvironment in these tumors, with potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:26053098

  11. Measles virus P gene codes for two proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, W J; Englund, G; Rozenblatt, S; Arnheiter, H; Richardson, C D

    1985-01-01

    The entirety of the phosphoprotein gene of measles virus has been sequenced. The gene is composed of 1,657 nucleotides and specifies a 507-amino-acid protein (P). A second overlapping reading frame was predicted from the sequence and specifies a 186-amino-acid protein (C). Through the use of antisynthetic peptide antibodies, we show that both proteins are expressed in virally infected cells. Both proteins are expressed from a functionally bicistronic mRNA through independent initiation of ribosomes at the respective AUG codons. Using immunofluorescent microscopy, we localized the C protein in the nucleus and in cytoplasmic inclusions within the infected cells. Images PMID:3882996

  12. Synonymous Substitutions in the Xdh Gene of Drosophila: Heterogeneous Distribution along the Coding Region

    PubMed Central

    Comeron, J. M.; Aguade, M.

    1996-01-01

    The Xdh (rosy) region of Drosophila subobscura has been sequenced and compared to the homologous region of D. pseudoobscura and D. melanogaster. Estimates of the numbers of synonymous substitutions per site (Ks) confirm that Xdh has a high synonymous substitution rate. The distributions of both nonsynonymous and synonymous substitutions along the coding region were found to be heterogeneous. Also, no relationship has been detected between Ks estimates and codon usage bias along the gene, in contrast with the generally observed relationship among genes. This heterogeneous distribution of synonymous substitutions along the Xdh gene, which is expression-level independent, could be explained by a differential selection pressure on synonymous sites along the coding region acting on mRNA secondary structure. The synonymous rate in the Xdh coding region is lower in the D. subobscura than in the D. pseudoobscura lineage, whereas the reverse is true for the Adh gene. PMID:8913749

  13. SAFEGUARDS ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Duc Cao; Richard Metcalf

    2010-07-01

    The Safeguards Envelope is a strategy to determine a set of specific operating parameters within which nuclear facilities may operate to maximize safeguards effectiveness without sacrificing safety or plant efficiency. This paper details advanced statistical techniques that will be applied to real plant process monitoring (PM) data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). In a simulation based on this data, multi-tank and multi-attribute correlations were tested against synthetic diversion scenarios. Kernel regression smoothing was used to fit a curve to the historical data, and multivariable, residual analysis and cumulative sum techniques set parameters for operating conditions. Diversion scenarios were created and tested, showing improved results when compared with a previous study utilizing only one-variable Z-testing. A brief analysis of the impact of the safeguards optimization on the rest of plant efficiency, criticality concerns, and overall requirements is presented.

  14. Identification and characterization of a prawn white spot syndrome virus gene that encodes an envelope protein VP31

    SciTech Connect

    Li Li; Xie Xixian; Yang Feng . E-mail: mbiotech@public.xm.fj.cn

    2005-09-15

    Based on a combination of SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry, a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 31 kDa (termed as VP31) was identified from purified shrimp white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) envelope fraction. The resulting amino acid (aa) sequence matched an open reading frame (WSV340) of the WSSV genome. This ORF contained 783 nucleotides (nt), encoding 261 aa. A fragment of WSV340 was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein with a 6His-tag, and then specific antibody was raised. Western blot analysis and the immunoelectron microscope method (IEM) confirmed that VP31 was present exclusively in the viral envelope fraction. The neutralization experiment suggested that VP31 might play an important role in WSSV infectivity.

  15. Coding potential of transfected human placental lactogen genes.

    PubMed Central

    Reséndez-Pérez, D; Ramírez-Solís, R; Varela-Echavarría, A; Martínez-Rodríguez, H G; Barrera-Saldaña, H A

    1990-01-01

    We have joined the promoter-less sequences of the three hPL genes (hPL-1, hPL-3 and hPL-4) to strong transcriptional control elements. in vivo 35S-labeled proteins from the culture medium of cells transfected with the genes were resolved on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. The presence of characteristic labeled bands, visualized by autoradiography, determined that hPL-4 and hPL-3, but not hPL-1, contribute to the production of mature hPL. In these experiments hPL-3 expressed more RNA and protein than hPL-4. By exchanging the first two exons among hPL and hGH genes, we determined that the abundance of chimeric proteins depended on the genetic origin of the first two exons. Finally, we found evidence indicating that the splice mutation (G----A) at the beginning of the second intron of hPL-1, is not the only cause of the apparent lack of inactivity of this gene, since its reversion does not restore expression. Images PMID:2395633

  16. An evaluation of mitochondrial tRNA gene evolution and its relation to the genetic code.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, R J

    1982-04-01

    Extensive sequence data on mitochondrial (mt) tRNAs give for the first time an opportunity to evaluate tRNA gene evolution in this organelle. Deductions from these gene structures relate to the evolution of tRNA genes in other cellular systems and to the origin of the genetic code. Mt tRNAs, in contrast to the prokaryotic nature of chloroplastic tRNA structure, can not at the present time be definitely related to either prokaryotic or eukaryotic tRNAs, probably because of a higher mutation rate in mitochondria. Fungal mt tRNAs having the same anticodon and function are generally similar enough to be considered homologous. Comparisons af all mt tRNA sequences contained in the same mitochondrion indicate that some tRNAs originated by duplication of a prototypic gene which, after divergence, led to tRNAs having different amino acid specificities. The deviant mt genetic code, although admittedly permitting a simpler decoding mechanism, is not useful in determining whether the origin of mitochondria had preceded or was derived from prokaryotes or eukaryotes, since the genetic code is variable even among mitochondria. Variants of the mt genetic code lead to speculation on the nature of the primordial code and its relation to the present "universal" code.

  17. Regulation of protein homeostasis in neurodegenerative diseases: the role of coding and non-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Sin, Olga; Nollen, Ellen A A

    2015-11-01

    Protein homeostasis is fundamental for cell function and survival, because proteins are involved in all aspects of cellular function, ranging from cell metabolism and cell division to the cell's response to environmental challenges. Protein homeostasis is tightly regulated by the synthesis, folding, trafficking and clearance of proteins, all of which act in an orchestrated manner to ensure proteome stability. The protein quality control system is enhanced by stress response pathways, which take action whenever the proteome is challenged by environmental or physiological stress. Aging, however, damages the proteome, and such proteome damage is thought to be associated with aging-related diseases. In this review, we discuss the different cellular processes that define the protein quality control system and focus on their role in protein conformational diseases. We highlight the power of using small organisms to model neurodegenerative diseases and how these models can be exploited to discover genetic modulators of protein aggregation and toxicity. We also link findings from small model organisms to the situation in higher organisms and describe how some of the genetic modifiers discovered in organisms such as worms are functionally conserved throughout evolution. Finally, we demonstrate that the non-coding genome also plays a role in maintaining protein homeostasis. In all, this review highlights the importance of protein and RNA homeostasis in neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. The nuclear protein-coding gene ANKRD23 negatively regulates myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojing; Zeng, Rui; Xu, Haiyang; Xu, Zaiyan; Zuo, Bo

    2017-09-20

    Muscle fiber formation is a complex process and subject to fine regulation of a variety of protein-coding genes and non-coding RNA. In this study, we identified a nuclear protein-coding gene ANKRD23 which was highly expressed in muscle. Quantitative real-time PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to detect the expression change of myoblast differentiation marker genes after knockdown and overexpression of ANKRD23. The results showed that the expression of myoblast differentiation marker genes were increased by interference and reduced by ANKRD23 overexpression, indicating that ANKRD23 played a negative role in the myoblast differentiation. Interestingly, we discovered a long non-coding RNA-AK004293 which was overlapped with the 3'UTR of ANKRD23 gene. Then we detected the effect of AK004293 on the expression of ANKRD23 and myoblast differentiation marker genes in C2C12 myoblasts. The results showed that AK004293 had no significant effect on the expression of myoblast differentiation maker genes and ANKRD23. In conclusion, our results established the foundation for further studies about the regulation mechanism of ANKRD23 in muscle development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The structure of common-envelope remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Philip D.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the structure and evolution of the remnants of common-envelope evolution in binary star systems. In a common-envelope phase, two stars become engulfed in a gaseous envelope and, under the influence of drag forces, spiral to smaller separations. They may merge to form a single star or the envelope may be ejected to leave the stars in a shorter period orbit. This process explains the short orbital periods of many observed binary systems, such as cataclysmic variables and low-mass X-ray binary systems. Despite the importance of these systems, and of common-envelope evolution to their formation, it remains poorly understood. Specifically, we are unable to confidently predict the outcome of a common-envelope phase from the properties at its onset. After presenting a review of work on stellar evolution, binary systems, common-envelope evolution and the computer programs used, we describe the results of three computational projects on common-envelope evolution. Our work specifically relates to the methods and prescriptions which are used for predicting the outcome. We use the Cambridge stellar-evolution code STARS to produce detailed models of the structure and evolution of remnants of common-envelope evolution. We compare different assumptions about the uncertain end-of-common envelope structure and envelope mass of remnants which successfully eject their common envelopes. In the first project, we use detailed remnant models to investigate whether planetary nebulae are predicted after common-envelope phases initiated by low-mass red giants. We focus on the requirement that a remnant evolves rapidly enough to photoionize the nebula and compare the predictions for different ideas about the structure at the end of a common-envelope phase. We find that planetary nebulae are possible for some prescriptions for the end-of-common envelope structure. In our second contribution, we compute a large set of single-star models and fit new formulae to the core radii of

  20. Cloning of a Streptococcus mutans glucosyltransferase gene coding for insoluble glucan synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, H; Shiroza, T; Hayakawa, M; Sato, S; Kuramitsu, H K

    1986-01-01

    The gtfB gene coding for a glucosyltransferase (GTF) activity of Streptococcus mutans GS-5 was isolated on a 15.4-kilobase DNA fragment by using a lambda L47.1 gene library. The activity was catalyzed by gene products of 150 and 145 kilodaltons which reacted with antibodies directed against both soluble and insoluble glucan-synthesizing GTFs. The enzyme present in crude Escherichia coli extracts synthesized both soluble and insoluble glucans. The enzyme was partially purified from lysates of the lambda DS-76 clone and synthesized both types of glucans in a primer-independent fashion. In addition, the purified enzyme exhibited a pI of approximately 5.0. Southern blot analysis indicated that the cloned GTF gene represented a contiguous nucleotide sequence on the strain GS-5 chromosome. Furthermore, evidence for the existence of a distinct gene sharing partial homology with gtfB was also obtained. The gtfB gene was subcloned into plasmid pACYC184 into E. coli and exhibited GTF activity when carried on GS-5 inserts as small as 5 kilobases. The approximate location of the GTF promoter and the direction of gene transcription were also determined. The cloned enzyme was not secreted through the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, since most of the activity was found in the cytoplasm and, in lesser amounts, associated with the cytoplasmic membrane. The gtfB gene was insertionally inactivated by introducing a gene fragment coding for erythromycin resistance into the GTF coding region. After transformation of strain GS-5 with the altered gene, transformants defective in insoluble glucan synthesis were identified. These results indicate that the gtfB gene codes for a GTF involved in insoluble glucan synthesis in strain GS-5. Images PMID:3017865

  1. Identification of genes in the σ²² regulon of Pseudomonas aeruginosa required for cell envelope homeostasis in either the planktonic or the sessile mode of growth.

    PubMed

    Wood, Lynn F; Ohman, Dennis E

    2012-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracytoplasmic functioning (ECF) sigma factor σ(22) is encoded by algT/algU and is inhibited by anti-sigma factor MucA. σ(22) was originally discovered for its essential role in the expression of the exopolysaccharide alginate by mucoid strains associated with chronic pulmonary infection. However, σ(22) is now known to also have a large regulon associated with the response to cell wall stress. Our recent transcriptome analysis identified 293 open reading frames (ORFs) in the σ(22) stress stimulon that include genes for outer envelope biogenesis and remodeling, although most of the genes have undefined functions. To better understand the σ(22)-dependent stress response, mutants affected in 27 genes of the σ(22) stimulon were examined and expression was studied with lacZ fusions. Mutants constructed in the 27 genes showed no major change in response to cell wall-acting antibiotics or growth at elevated temperatures nor in alginate production. The mutants were examined for their effects on the expression of the σ(22)-dependent promoter of the alginate biosynthetic operon (PalgD) as a measure of σ(22) derepression from MucA. By testing PalgD expression under both planktonic and sessile growth conditions, 11 genes were found to play a role in the stress response that activates σ(22). Some mutations caused an increase or a decrease in the response to cell wall stress. Interestingly, mutations in 7 of the 11 genes caused constitutive PalgD expression under nonstressed conditions and thus showed that these genes are involved in maintaining envelope homeostasis. Mutations in PA0062 and PA1324 showed constitutive PalgD expression during both the planktonic and the sessile modes of growth. However, the PA5178 mutation caused constitutive PalgD expression only during planktonic growth. In contrast, mutations in PA2717, PA0567, PA3040, and PA0920 caused constitutive PalgD expression only in the sessile/biofilm mode of growth. This provides

  2. Transposable Element Insertions in Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Sivakumar; Chernikova, Diana; Rogozin, Igor B.; Poliakov, Eugenia; Managadze, David; Koonin, Eugene V.; Milanesi, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are abundant in mammalian genomes and appear to have contributed to the evolution of their hosts by providing novel regulatory or coding sequences. We analyzed different regions of long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes in human and mouse genomes to systematically assess the potential contribution of TEs to the evolution of the structure and regulation of expression of lincRNA genes. Introns of lincRNA genes contain the highest percentage of TE-derived sequences (TES), followed by exons and then promoter regions although the density of TEs is not significantly different between exons and promoters. Higher frequencies of ancient TEs in promoters and exons compared to introns implies that many lincRNA genes emerged before the split of primates and rodents. The content of TES in lincRNA genes is substantially higher than that in protein-coding genes, especially in exons and promoter regions. A significant positive correlation was detected between the content of TEs and evolutionary rate of lincRNAs indicating that inserted TEs are preferentially fixed in fast-evolving lincRNA genes. These results are consistent with the repeat insertion domains of LncRNAs hypothesis under which TEs have substantially contributed to the origin, evolution, and, in particular, fast functional diversification, of lincRNA genes. PMID:26106594

  3. Revisiting the protein-coding gene catalog of Drosophila melanogaster using 12 fly genomes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Michael F.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Crosby, Madeline A.; Matthews, Beverley B.; Yu, Charles; Park, Soo; Wan, Kenneth H.; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Gramates, L. Sian; St. Pierre, Susan E.; Roark, Margaret; Wiley, Kenneth L.; Kulathinal, Rob J.; Zhang, Peili; Myrick, Kyl V.; Antone, Jerry V.; Celniker, Susan E.; Gelbart, William M.; Kellis, Manolis

    2007-01-01

    The availability of sequenced genomes from 12 Drosophila species has enabled the use of comparative genomics for the systematic discovery of functional elements conserved within this genus. We have developed quantitative metrics for the evolutionary signatures specific to protein-coding regions and applied them genome-wide, resulting in 1193 candidate new protein-coding exons in the D. melanogaster genome. We have reviewed these predictions by manual curation and validated a subset by directed cDNA screening and sequencing, revealing both new genes and new alternative splice forms of known genes. We also used these evolutionary signatures to evaluate existing gene annotations, resulting in the validation of 87% of genes lacking descriptive names and identifying 414 poorly conserved genes that are likely to be spurious predictions, noncoding, or species-specific genes. Furthermore, our methods suggest a variety of refinements to hundreds of existing gene models, such as modifications to translation start codons and exon splice boundaries. Finally, we performed directed genome-wide searches for unusual protein-coding structures, discovering 149 possible examples of stop codon readthrough, 125 new candidate ORFs of polycistronic mRNAs, and several candidate translational frameshifts. These results affect >10% of annotated fly genes and demonstrate the power of comparative genomics to enhance our understanding of genome organization, even in a model organism as intensively studied as Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:17989253

  4. Epigenetics: intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) modifies the histone code along the rat hepatic IGF-1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qi; Yu, Xing; Callaway, Christopher W.; Lane, Robert H.; McKnight, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) decreases serum insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels. IGF-1 is an epigenetically regulated gene that has two promoters, alternative exon 5 splicing, and multiple termination sites. The regulation of gene expression involves the whole gene, as evidenced by the aforementioned IGF-1 paradigm. We hypothesized that IUGR in the rat would affect hepatic IGF-1 expression and alter the epigenetic characteristics of the IGF-1 gene along its length. IUGR was induced through a bilateral uterine artery ligation of the pregnant rat, a well-characterized model of IUGR. Pups from anesthesia and sham-operated dams were used as controls. Real-time RT-PCR and ELISA was used to measure expression at day of life (DOL) 0 and 21. Bisulfite sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) quantified IGF-1 epigenetic characteristics. A nontranscribed intergenic control was used for ChIP studies. IUGR decreased hepatic and serum IGF-1. Concurrently, IUGR modified epigenetic characteristics, particularly the histone code, along the length of the hepatic IGF-1 gene. Many changes persisted postnatally, and the postnatal effect of IUGR on the histone code was gender-specific. We conclude that IUGR modifies epigenetic characteristics of the rat hepatic IGF-1 gene along the length of the whole gene.—Fu, Q., Yu, X., Callaway, C. W., Lane, R. H., McKnight, R. A. Epigenetics: intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) modifies the histone code along the rat hepatic IGF-1 gene. PMID:19364764

  5. Intact coding region of the serotonin transporter gene in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Altemus, M.; Murphy, D.L.; Greenberg, B.; Lesch, K.P.

    1996-07-26

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that obsessive-compulsive disorder is genetically transmitted in some families, although no genetic abnormalities have been identified in individuals with this disorder. The selective response of obsessive-compulsive disorder to treatment with agents which block serotonin reuptake suggests the gene coding for the serotonin transporter as a candidate gene. The primary structure of the serotonin-transporter coding region was sequenced in 22 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, using direct PCR sequencing of cDNA synthesized from platelet serotonin-transporter mRNA. No variations in amino acid sequence were found among the obsessive-compulsive disorder patients or healthy controls. These results do not support a role for alteration in the primary structure of the coding region of the serotonin-transporter gene in the pathogenesis of obsessive-compulsive disorder. 27 refs.

  6. Structural annotation of equine protein-coding genes determined by mRNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Coleman, S J; Zeng, Z; Wang, K; Luo, S; Khrebtukova, I; Mienaltowski, M J; Schroth, G P; Liu, J; MacLeod, J N

    2010-12-01

    The horse, like the majority of animal species, has a limited amount of species-specific expressed sequence data available in public databases. As a result, structural models for the majority of genes defined in the equine genome are predictions based on ab initio sequence analysis or the projection of gene structures from other mammalian species. The current study used Illumina-based sequencing of messenger RNA (RNA-seq) to help refine structural annotation of equine protein-coding genes and for a preliminary assessment of gene expression patterns. Sequencing of mRNA from eight equine tissues generated 293,758105 sequence tags of 35 bases each, equalling 10.28 gbp of total sequence data. The tag alignments represent approximately 207 × coverage of the equine mRNA transcriptome and confirmed transcriptional activity for roughly 90% of the protein-coding gene structures predicted by Ensembl and NCBI. Tag coverage was sufficient to refine the structural annotation for 11,356 of these predicted genes, while also identifying an additional 456 transcripts with exon/intron features that are not listed by either Ensembl or NCBI. Genomic locus data and intervals for the protein-coding genes predicted by the Ensembl and NCBI annotation pipelines were combined with 75,116 RNA-seq-derived transcriptional units to generate a consensus equine protein-coding gene set of 20,302 defined loci. Gene ontology annotation was used to compare the functional and structural categories of genes expressed in either a tissue-restricted pattern or broadly across all tissue samples. © 2010 The Authors, Journal compilation © 2010 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  7. Using a Euclid distance discriminant method to find protein coding genes in the yeast genome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Ting; Wang, Ju; Zhang, Ren

    2002-02-01

    The Euclid distance discriminant method is used to find protein coding genes in the yeast genome, based on the single nucleotide frequencies at three codon positions in the ORFs. The method is extremely simple and may be extended to find genes in prokaryotic genomes or eukaryotic genomes with less introns. Six-fold cross-validation tests have demonstrated that the accuracy of the algorithm is better than 93%. Based on this, it is found that the total number of protein coding genes in the yeast genome is less than or equal to 5579 only, about 3.8-7.0% less than 5800-6000, which is currently widely accepted. The base compositions at three codon positions are analyzed in details using a graphic method. The result shows that the preference codons adopted by yeast genes are of the RGW type, where R, G and W indicate the bases of purine, non-G and A/T, whereas the 'codons' in the intergenic sequences are of the form NNN, where N denotes any base. This fact constitutes the basis of the algorithm to distinguish between coding and non-coding ORFs in the yeast genome. The names of putative non-coding ORFs are listed here in detail.

  8. Highly efficient and minimally invasive in-vivo gene transfer to the mouse uterus using haemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ) envelope vector.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hitomi; Kimura, Tadashi; Ikegami, Hiroyuki; Ogita, Kazuhide; Koyama, Shinsuke; Shimoya, Koichiro; Tsujie, Tomoko; Koyama, Masayasu; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Murata, Yuji

    2003-10-01

    The uterus is obviously critical in implantation, development of the fetus and parturition. Endometrial cancer derived from endometrial epithelium is one of the common malignancies in the female reproductive tract. In order to clarify the local mechanisms of reproductive physiology and establish a non-systemic therapeutic strategy for reproductive failure as well as for endometrial cancer, we applied haemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) vector to in-vivo gene transfer into the uterine cavity of IVCS mice. Injection of HVJ-E vector into mouse uterine cavity on day 1.5 post coitum (p.c.) introduced a reporter gene approximately 120-fold more efficiently than introduction using the cationic liposome method. The expression of the introduced gene continued for at least 3 days. The plasmid vector was localized in the endometrial epithelium, whereas oligo deoxynucleotides were distributed throughout the epithelium, stromal cells and myometrium. HVJ-E vector did not affect the pregnancy rate, course of pregnancy, litter size, fetal growth in utero or parturition, and did not transfect the exogenous gene to the fetus. These results indicate that gene transfer into the uterus using HVJ-E vector is highly efficient and safe during pregnancy, and results in a well controlled distribution of the exogenous DNA. We believe that this procedure should be widely applicable for investigations of reproductive physiology as well as for methods of local gene therapy in the uterus.

  9. Coding-noncoding gene expression in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianguo; Xie, Haiyang; Ling, Qi; Lu, Di; Lv, Zhen; Zhuang, Runzhou; Liu, Zhikun; Wei, Xuyong; Zhou, Lin; Xu, Xiao; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play crucial roles in human cancers. However, the function of lncRNAs and their downstream mechanisms are largely unknown in the molecular pathogenesis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). In the present study, we performed transcriptomic profiling of ICC and paired adjacent noncancerous tissues (N) by using lncRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) microarrays. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to validate the microarray results. We tested for correlations between the expression levels of lncRNAs and target genes. Clinicopathologic characteristics and overall survival were compared using the t test and the Kaplan-Meier method, respectively. A total of 2773 lncRNAs were significantly upregulated in ICC tissues compared with the noncancerous tissues, whereas 2392 lncRNAs were downregulated. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that most of the genes were involved in carcinogenesis, hepatic system diseases, and signal transductions. Positive correlations were found between 4 lncRNA-mRNA pairs (RNA43085 and SULF1, RNA47504 and KDM8, RNA58630 and PCSK6, and RNA40057 and CYP2D6). When the clinicopathologic characteristics were accounted for, the cumulative overall survival rate was found to be associated with low expression levels of CYP2D6 (P = 0.005) and PCSK6 (P = 0.038). Patients with high expression levels of CYP2D6 and RNA40057 had a better prognosis (P = 0.014). Our results suggested that the lncRNA expression profiling in ICC tissues is profoundly different from that in noncancerous tissues. Thus, lncRNA may be a potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for ICC. Furthermore, the combined assessment of lncRNA and mRNA expressions might predict the survival of patients with ICC.

  10. Naming 'junk': human non-protein coding RNA (ncRNA) gene nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Wright, Mathew W; Bruford, Elspeth A

    2011-01-01

    Previously, the majority of the human genome was thought to be 'junk' DNA with no functional purpose. Over the past decade, the field of RNA research has rapidly expanded, with a concomitant increase in the number of non-protein coding RNA (ncRNA) genes identified in this 'junk'. Many of the encoded ncRNAs have already been shown to be essential for a variety of vital functions, and this wealth of annotated human ncRNAs requires standardised naming in order to aid effective communication. The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) is the only organisation authorised to assign standardised nomenclature to human genes. Of the 30,000 approved gene symbols currently listed in the HGNC database (http://www.genenames.org/search), the majority represent protein-coding genes; however, they also include pseudogenes, phenotypic loci and some genomic features. In recent years the list has also increased to include almost 3,000 named human ncRNA genes. HGNC is actively engaging with the RNA research community in order to provide unique symbols and names for each sequence that encodes an ncRNA. Most of the classical small ncRNA genes have now been provided with a unique nomenclature, and work on naming the long (>200 nucleotides) non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) is ongoing.

  11. Enhancement of reporter gene detection sensitivity by insertion of specific mini-peptide-coding sequences.

    PubMed

    Cutrera, J; Dibra, D; Xia, X; Li, S

    2010-02-01

    Two important aspects of gene therapy are to increase the level of gene expression and track the gene delivery site and expression, and a sensitive reporter gene may be one of the options for preclinical studies and possibly for human clinical trials. We report the novel concept of increasing the activity of the gene products. With the insertion of the mini-peptide-coding sequence CWDDWLC into the plasmid DNA of a SEAP reporter gene, we observed vast increases in the enzyme activity in vitro in all murine and human cell lines used. In addition, in vivo injection of this CWDDWLC-SEAP-encoding gene resulted in the same increases in reporter gene activity, but these increases did not correspond to alterations in the level of the gene products in the serum. Minor sequence changes in this mini-peptide negate the activity increase of the reporter gene. We report the novel concept of increasing the activity of gene products as another method to improve the reporting sensitivity of reporter genes. This improved reporter gene could complement any improved vector for maximizing the reporter sensitivity. Moreover, this strategy has the potential to be used to discover peptides that improve the activity of therapeutic genes.

  12. Enhancement of Reporter Gene Detection Sensitivity by Insertion of Specific Mini-Peptide-Coding Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Cutrera, Jeffry; Dibra, Denada; Xia, Xueqing; Li, Shulin

    2009-01-01

    Two important aspects for gene therapy are to increase the level of gene expression and track the gene delivery site and expression, and a sensitive reporter gene may be one of the options for preclinical studies and possibly for human clinical trials. We report the novel concept of increasing the activity of the gene products. With the insertion of the mini-peptide-coding sequence CWDDWLC into the plasmid DNA of a SEAP reporter gene, we observed vast increases in the enzyme activity in vitro in all murine and human cell lines used. Also, in vivo injection of this CWDDWLC-SEAP encoding gene resulted in the same increases in reporter gene activity, but these increases did not correspond to alterations in the level of the gene products in the serum. Minor sequence changes in this mini-peptide negate the activity increase of the reporter gene. We report the novel concept of increasing the activity of gene products as another method to improve the reporting sensitivity of reporter genes. This improved reporter gene could complement any improved vector for maximizing the reporter sensitivity. Also, this strategy has the potential to be used to discover peptides that improve the activity of therapeutic genes. PMID:19713998

  13. POLYMORPHISM IN THE CODING REGION SEQUENCE OF GDF8 GENE IN INDIAN SHEEP.

    PubMed

    Pothuraju, M; Mishra, S K; Kumar, S N; Mohamed, N F; Kataria, R S; Yadav, D K; Arora, R

    2015-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to identify polymorphism in the coding sequence of GDF8gene across indigenous meat type sheep breeds. A 1647 bp sequence was generated, encompassing 208 bp of the 5'UTR, 1128 bp of coding region (exon1, 2 and 3) as well as 311 bp of 3'UTR. The sheep and goat GDF8 gene sequences were observed to be highly conserved as compared to cattle, buffalo, horse and pig. Several nucleotide variations were observed across coding sequence of GDF8 gene in Indian sheep. Three polymorphic sites were identified in the 5'UTR, one in exon 1 and one in the exon 2 regions. Both SNPs in the exonic region were found to be non-synonymous. The mutations c.539T > G and c.821T > A discovered in this study in the exon 1 and exon 2, respectively, have not been previously reported. The information generated provides preliminary indication of the functional diversity present in Indian sheep at the coding region of GDF8gene. The novel as well as the previously reported SNPs discovered in the Indian sheep warrant further analysis to see whether they affect the phenotype. Future studies will need to establish the affect of reported SNPs in the expression of the GDF8 gene in Indian sheep population.

  14. Genome-Wide Screening of Retroviral Envelope Genes in the Nine-Banded Armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus, Xenarthra) Reveals an Unfixed Chimeric Endogenous Betaretrovirus Using the ASCT2 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Malicorne, Sébastien; Vernochet, Cécile; Cornelis, Guillaume; Mulot, Baptiste; Delsuc, Frédéric; Heidmann, Odile

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retroviruses enter host cells through the interaction of their envelope (Env) protein with a cell surface receptor, which triggers the fusion of viral and cellular membranes. The sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter ASCT2 is the common receptor of the large RD114 retrovirus interference group, whose members display frequent env recombination events. Germ line retrovirus infections have led to numerous inherited endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) in vertebrate genomes, which provide useful insights into the coevolutionary history of retroviruses and their hosts. Rare ERV-derived genes display conserved viral functions, as illustrated by the fusogenic syncytin env genes involved in placentation. Here, we searched for functional env genes in the nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) genome and identified dasy-env1.1, which clusters with RD114 interference group env genes and with two syncytin genes sharing ASCT2 receptor usage. Using ex vivo pseudotyping and cell-cell fusion assays, we demonstrated that the Dasy-Env1.1 protein is fusogenic and can use both human and armadillo ASCT2s as receptors. This gammaretroviral env gene belongs to a provirus with betaretrovirus-like features, suggesting acquisition through recombination. Provirus insertion was found in several Dasypus species, where it has not reached fixation, whereas related family members integrated before diversification of the genus Dasypus >12 million years ago (Mya). This newly described ERV lineage is potentially useful as a population genetic marker. Our results extend the usage of ASCT2 as a retrovirus receptor to the mammalian clade Xenarthra and suggest that the acquisition of an ASCT2-interacting env gene is a major selective force driving the emergence of numerous chimeric viruses in vertebrates. IMPORTANCE Retroviral infection is initiated by the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein to a host cell receptor(s), triggering membrane fusion. Ancient germ line infections

  15. Activity-Dependent Human Brain Coding/Noncoding Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lipovich, Leonard; Dachet, Fabien; Cai, Juan; Bagla, Shruti; Balan, Karina; Jia, Hui; Loeb, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    While most gene transcription yields RNA transcripts that code for proteins, a sizable proportion of the genome generates RNA transcripts that do not code for proteins, but may have important regulatory functions. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, a key regulator of neuronal activity, is overlapped by a primate-specific, antisense long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) called BDNFOS. We demonstrate reciprocal patterns of BDNF and BDNFOS transcription in highly active regions of human neocortex removed as a treatment for intractable seizures. A genome-wide analysis of activity-dependent coding and noncoding human transcription using a custom lncRNA microarray identified 1288 differentially expressed lncRNAs, of which 26 had expression profiles that matched activity-dependent coding genes and an additional 8 were adjacent to or overlapping with differentially expressed protein-coding genes. The functions of most of these protein-coding partner genes, such as ARC, include long-term potentiation, synaptic activity, and memory. The nuclear lncRNAs NEAT1, MALAT1, and RPPH1, composing an RNAse P-dependent lncRNA-maturation pathway, were also upregulated. As a means to replicate human neuronal activity, repeated depolarization of SY5Y cells resulted in sustained CREB activation and produced an inverse pattern of BDNF-BDNFOS co-expression that was not achieved with a single depolarization. RNAi-mediated knockdown of BDNFOS in human SY5Y cells increased BDNF expression, suggesting that BDNFOS directly downregulates BDNF. Temporal expression patterns of other lncRNA-messenger RNA pairs validated the effect of chronic neuronal activity on the transcriptome and implied various lncRNA regulatory mechanisms. lncRNAs, some of which are unique to primates, thus appear to have potentially important regulatory roles in activity-dependent human brain plasticity. PMID:22960213

  16. Phenotypic profiling of ABC transporter coding genes in Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jinyuan; Bradley, Michael D.; Friedman, Jannice; Welch, Roy D.

    2014-01-01

    Information about a gene sometimes can be deduced by examining the impact of its mutation on phenotype. However, the genome-scale utility of the method is limited because, for nearly all model organisms, the majority of mutations result in little or no observable phenotypic impact. The cause of this is often attributed to robustness or redundancy within the genome, but that is only one plausible hypothesis. We examined a standard set of phenotypic traits, and applied statistical methods commonly used in the study of natural variants to an engineered mutant strain collection representing disruptions in 180 of the 192 ABC transporters within the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. These strains display continuous variation in their phenotypic distributions, with a small number of “outlier” strains at both phenotypic extremes, and the majority within a confidence interval about the mean that always includes wild type. Correlation analysis reveals substantial pleiotropy, indicating that the traits do not represent independent variables. The traits measured in this study co-cluster with expression profiles, thereby demonstrating that these changes in phenotype correspond to changes at the molecular level, and therefore can be indirectly connected to changes in the genome. However, the continuous distributions, the pleiotropy, and the placement of wild type always within the confidence interval all indicate that this standard set of M. xanthus phenotypic assays is measuring a narrow range of partially overlapping traits that do not directly reflect fitness. This is likely a significant cause of the observed small phenotypic impact from mutation, and is unrelated to robustness and redundancy. PMID:25101061

  17. Methylation of coding region alone inhibits gene expression in plant protoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Hohn, T; Corsten, S; Rieke, S; Müller, M; Rothnie, H

    1996-01-01

    Derivatives of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter lacking CG and CNG methylation targets were constructed and used to direct transcription of reporter gene constructs in transiently transformed protoplasts. Such methylation-target-free (MTF) promoters, although weaker than the 35S promoter, retain significant activity despite mutation of the as-1 element. The effect of methylation on gene expression in MTF- and 35S-promoter driven constructs was examined. Even when the promoter region was free of methylation targets, reporter gene expression was markedly reduced when cytosine residues in CG dinucleotides were methylated in vitro prior to transformation. Mosaic methylation experiments, in which only specific parts of the plasmids were methylated, revealed that methylation of the coding region alone has a negative effect on reporter gene expression. Methylation nearer the 5' end of the coding region was more inhibitory, consistent with inhibition of transcription elongation. Images Fig. 5 PMID:8710871

  18. Transcriptome interrogation of human myometrium identifies differentially expressed sense-antisense pairs of protein-coding and long non-coding RNA genes in spontaneous labor at term.

    PubMed

    Romero, Roberto; Tarca, Adi L; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Miranda, Jezid; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Jia, Hui; Hassan, Sonia S; Kalita, Cynthia A; Cai, Juan; Yeo, Lami; Lipovich, Leonard

    2014-09-01

    To identify differentially expressed long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes in human myometrium in women with spontaneous labor at term. Myometrium was obtained from women undergoing cesarean deliveries who were not in labor (n = 19) and women in spontaneous labor at term (n = 20). RNA was extracted and profiled using an Illumina® microarray platform. We have used computational approaches to bound the extent of long non-coding RNA representation on this platform, and to identify co-differentially expressed and correlated pairs of long non-coding RNA genes and protein-coding genes sharing the same genomic loci. We identified co-differential expression and correlation at two genomic loci that contain coding-lncRNA gene pairs: SOCS2-AK054607 and LMCD1-NR_024065 in women in spontaneous labor at term. This co-differential expression and correlation was validated by qRT-PCR, an experimental method completely independent of the microarray analysis. Intriguingly, one of the two lncRNA genes differentially expressed in term labor had a key genomic structure element, a splice site, that lacked evolutionary conservation beyond primates. We provide, for the first time, evidence for coordinated differential expression and correlation of cis-encoded antisense lncRNAs and protein-coding genes with known as well as novel roles in pregnancy in the myometrium of women in spontaneous labor at term.

  19. Successful Recovery of Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes from Small Insects in Museums Using Illumina Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Kojun; Pflug, James M; Sproul, John S; Dasenko, Mark A; Maddison, David R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore high-throughput Illumina sequencing of nuclear protein-coding, ribosomal, and mitochondrial genes in small, dried insects stored in natural history collections. We sequenced one tenebrionid beetle and 12 carabid beetles ranging in size from 3.7 to 9.7 mm in length that have been stored in various museums for 4 to 84 years. Although we chose a number of old, small specimens for which we expected low sequence recovery, we successfully recovered at least some low-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from all specimens. For example, in one 56-year-old beetle, 4.4 mm in length, our de novo assembly recovered about 63% of approximately 41,900 nucleotides in a target suite of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments, and 70% using a reference-based assembly. Even in the least successfully sequenced carabid specimen, reference-based assembly yielded fragments that were at least 50% of the target length for 34 of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments. Exploration of alternative references for reference-based assembly revealed few signs of bias created by the reference. For all specimens we recovered almost complete copies of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes. We verified the general accuracy of the sequences through comparisons with sequences obtained from PCR and Sanger sequencing, including of conspecific, fresh specimens, and through phylogenetic analysis that tested the placement of sequences in predicted regions. A few possible inaccuracies in the sequences were detected, but these rarely affected the phylogenetic placement of the samples. Although our sample sizes are low, an exploratory regression study suggests that the dominant factor in predicting success at recovering nuclear protein-coding genes is a high number of Illumina reads, with success at PCR of COI and killing by immersion in ethanol being secondary factors; in analyses of only high-read samples, the primary significant explanatory variable was body length, with small beetles

  20. The Maximal C³ Self-Complementary Trinucleotide Circular Code X in Genes of Bacteria, Archaea, Eukaryotes, Plasmids and Viruses.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J

    2017-04-18

    In 1996, a set X of 20 trinucleotides was identified in genes of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes which has on average the highest occurrence in reading frame compared to its two shifted frames. Furthermore, this set X has an interesting mathematical property as X is a maximal C 3 self-complementary trinucleotide circular code. In 2015, by quantifying the inspection approach used in 1996, the circular code X was confirmed in the genes of bacteria and eukaryotes and was also identified in the genes of plasmids and viruses. The method was based on the preferential occurrence of trinucleotides among the three frames at the gene population level. We extend here this definition at the gene level. This new statistical approach considers all the genes, i.e., of large and small lengths, with the same weight for searching the circular code X . As a consequence, the concept of circular code, in particular the reading frame retrieval, is directly associated to each gene. At the gene level, the circular code X is strengthened in the genes of bacteria, eukaryotes, plasmids, and viruses, and is now also identified in the genes of archaea. The genes of mitochondria and chloroplasts contain a subset of the circular code X . Finally, by studying viral genes, the circular code X was found in DNA genomes, RNA genomes, double-stranded genomes, and single-stranded genomes.

  1. Feasibility of establishing deletion of the late cornified envelope genes LCE3B and LCE3C as a susceptibility factor for psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Safia; Hassan, Iffat; Majid, Sabhiya; Bhat, Yasmeen Jabeen; Farooq, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Psoriasis is a chronic hyperproliferative inflammatory disease of the skin, genetic predisposition to which is well-established. The late cornified envelope genes LCE3B and LCE3C are involved in maintaining the integrity of skin barrier especially following skin barrier disruption. The deletion of these genes would lead to an impaired epidermal response following damage to the skin barrier thus predisposing to psoriatic lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the common deletion of late cornified envelope genes (LCE 3B/3C) in psoriasis patients of Kashmiri ethnic population of North India. Materials and Methods: It was a hospital-based, case-control study which included 100 psoriasis cases and an equal number of controls. Blood samples were obtained, and DNA was extracted from all the samples by a kit-based method. To determine the LCE3C_LCE3B-del genotype, a three-primer polymerase chain reaction assay was performed. Results: The genotype for the common LCE3C_LCE3B deletion in 100 psoriasis patients and 100 controls was determined. Among the cases, 17 cases were homozygous for insertion genotype (I/I), 40 cases were heterozygous for insertion/deletion genotype (I/D) and 43 cases were homozygous for deletion genotype (D/D), compared to controls where 20 cases were homozygous for insertion genotype (I/I), 45 cases were heterozygous for insertion/deletion genotype (I/D), and 35 cases were homozygous for deletion genotype (D/D). The del/del frequency was higher among psoriatic patients compared to controls (43% vs. 35%) although the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.507). Conclusion: We hereby infer that LCE3C_LCE3B deletion does not appear to be associated with the risk of psoriasis in our population. PMID:27376048

  2. Synthetic long non-coding RNAs [SINEUPs] rescue defective gene expression in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Indrieri, Alessia; Grimaldi, Claudia; Zucchelli, Silvia; Tammaro, Roberta; Gustincich, Stefano; Franco, Brunella

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs provide additional regulatory layers to gene expression as well as the potential to being exploited as therapeutic tools. Non-coding RNA-based therapeutic approaches have been attempted in dominant diseases, however their use for treatment of genetic diseases caused by insufficient gene dosage is currently more challenging. SINEUPs are long antisense non-coding RNAs that up-regulate translation in mammalian cells in a gene-specific manner, although, so far evidence of SINEUP efficacy has only been demonstrated in in vitro systems. We now show that synthetic SINEUPs effectively and specifically increase protein levels of a gene of interest in vivo. We demonstrated that SINEUPs rescue haploinsufficient gene dosage in a medakafish model of a human disorder leading to amelioration of the disease phenotype. Our results demonstrate that SINEUPs act through mechanisms conserved among vertebrates and that SINEUP technology can be successfully applied in vivo as a new research and therapeutic tool for gene-specific up-regulation of endogenous functional proteins. PMID:27265476

  3. Diversity, Function and Evolution of Genes Coding for Putative Ni-Containing Superoxide Dismutases

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont,C.; Neupane, K.; Shearer, J.; Palenik, B.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the phylogenetic distribution, functionality and evolution of the sodN gene family, which has been shown to code for a unique Ni-containing isoform of superoxide dismutase (Ni-SOD) in Streptomyces. Many of the putative sodN sequences retrieved from public domain genomic and metagenomic databases are quite divergent from structurally and functionally characterized Ni-SOD. Structural bioinformatics studies verified that the divergent members of the sodN protein family code for similar three-dimensional structures and identified evolutionarily conserved amino acid residues. Structural and biochemical studies of the N-terminus 'Ni-hook' motif coded for by the putative sodN sequences confirmed both Ni (II) ligating and superoxide dismutase activity. Both environmental and organismal genomes expanded the previously noted phylogenetic distribution of sodN, and the sequences form four well-separated clusters, with multiple subclusters. The phylogenetic distribution of sodN suggests that the gene has been acquired via horizontal gene transfer by numerous organisms of diverse phylogenetic background, including both Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes. The presence of sodN correlates with the genomic absence of the gene coding for Fe-SOD, a structurally and evolutionarily distinct isoform of SOD. Given the low levels of Fe found in the marine environment from where many sequences were attained, we suggest that the replacement of Fe-SOD with Ni-SOD may be an evolutionary adaptation to reduce iron requirements.

  4. ANGIOGENES: knowledge database for protein-coding and noncoding RNA genes in endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Raphael; Weirick, Tyler; John, David; Militello, Giuseppe; Chen, Wei; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Uchida, Shizuka

    2016-09-01

    Increasing evidence indicates the presence of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) is specific to various cell types. Although lncRNAs are speculated to be more numerous than protein-coding genes, the annotations of lncRNAs remain primitive due to the lack of well-structured schemes for their identification and description. Here, we introduce a new knowledge database “ANGIOGENES” (http://angiogenes.uni-frankfurt.de) to allow for in silico screening of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs expressed in various types of endothelial cells, which are present in all tissues. Using the latest annotations of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs, publicly-available RNA-seq data was analyzed to identify transcripts that are expressed in endothelial cells of human, mouse and zebrafish. The analyzed data were incorporated into ANGIOGENES to provide a one-stop-shop for transcriptomics data to facilitate further biological validation. ANGIOGENES is an intuitive and easy-to-use database to allow in silico screening of expressed, enriched and/or specific endothelial transcripts under various conditions. We anticipate that ANGIOGENES serves as a starting point for functional studies to elucidate the roles of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs in angiogenesis.

  5. Polycistronic peptide coding genes in eukaryotes--how widespread are they?

    PubMed

    Tautz, Diethard

    2009-01-01

    The classical textbook assumption for the structure of an eukaryotic gene is that it codes for a single polypeptide of more than 100 amino acids in length. This is also the implicit assumption in most gene annotation pipelines. A gene family has now been discovered in insects that shows that an eukaryotic mRNA can code for peptides as short as eleven amino acids and that a single mRNA can code for several such peptides. This raises the question whether short open reading frames might also have a functional potential in other mRNAs, in particular those that occur in the 5'-UTR of many mRNAs. A number of these have been shown to act in cis to regulate the translation of the main open reading frame of the mRNA. But there may be others that could act in trans on other biological processes. The question of how many peptide-coding genes may exist is therefore worth revisiting. This poses new bioinformatic challenges that can only be resolved through multiple genome comparisons within a range of evolutionary distances.

  6. ANGIOGENES: knowledge database for protein-coding and noncoding RNA genes in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Raphael; Weirick, Tyler; John, David; Militello, Giuseppe; Chen, Wei; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Uchida, Shizuka

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates the presence of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) is specific to various cell types. Although lncRNAs are speculated to be more numerous than protein-coding genes, the annotations of lncRNAs remain primitive due to the lack of well-structured schemes for their identification and description. Here, we introduce a new knowledge database “ANGIOGENES” (http://angiogenes.uni-frankfurt.de) to allow for in silico screening of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs expressed in various types of endothelial cells, which are present in all tissues. Using the latest annotations of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs, publicly-available RNA-seq data was analyzed to identify transcripts that are expressed in endothelial cells of human, mouse and zebrafish. The analyzed data were incorporated into ANGIOGENES to provide a one-stop-shop for transcriptomics data to facilitate further biological validation. ANGIOGENES is an intuitive and easy-to-use database to allow in silico screening of expressed, enriched and/or specific endothelial transcripts under various conditions. We anticipate that ANGIOGENES serves as a starting point for functional studies to elucidate the roles of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs in angiogenesis. PMID:27582018

  7. Biallelic insertion of a transcriptional terminator via the CRISPR/Cas9 system efficiently silences expression of protein-coding and non-coding RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangyang; Han, Xiao; Yuan, Junting; Geng, Tuoyu; Chen, Shihao; Hu, Xuming; Cui, Isabelle H; Cui, Hengmi

    2017-04-07

    The type II bacterial CRISPR/Cas9 system is a simple, convenient, and powerful tool for targeted gene editing. Here, we describe a CRISPR/Cas9-based approach for inserting a poly(A) transcriptional terminator into both alleles of a targeted gene to silence protein-coding and non-protein-coding genes, which often play key roles in gene regulation but are difficult to silence via insertion or deletion of short DNA fragments. The integration of 225 bp of bovine growth hormone poly(A) signals into either the first intron or the first exon or behind the promoter of target genes caused efficient termination of expression of PPP1R12C, NSUN2 (protein-coding genes), and MALAT1 (non-protein-coding gene). Both NeoR and PuroR were used as markers in the selection of clonal cell lines with biallelic integration of a poly(A) signal. Genotyping analysis indicated that the cell lines displayed the desired biallelic silencing after a brief selection period. These combined results indicate that this CRISPR/Cas9-based approach offers an easy, convenient, and efficient novel technique for gene silencing in cell lines, especially for those in which gene integration is difficult because of a low efficiency of homology-directed repair.

  8. Both noncoding and protein-coding RNAs contribute to gene expression evolution in the primate brain.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Courtney C; Fedrigo, Olivier; Pfefferle, Adam D; Boyle, Alan P; Horvath, Julie E; Furey, Terrence S; Wray, Gregory A

    2010-01-18

    Despite striking differences in cognition and behavior between humans and our closest primate relatives, several studies have found little evidence for adaptive change in protein-coding regions of genes expressed primarily in the brain. Instead, changes in gene expression may underlie many cognitive and behavioral differences. Here, we used digital gene expression: tag profiling (here called Tag-Seq, also called DGE:tag profiling) to assess changes in global transcript abundance in the frontal cortex of the brains of 3 humans, 3 chimpanzees, and 3 rhesus macaques. A substantial fraction of transcripts we identified as differentially transcribed among species were not assayed in previous studies based on microarrays. Differentially expressed tags within coding regions are enriched for gene functions involved in synaptic transmission, transport, oxidative phosphorylation, and lipid metabolism. Importantly, because Tag-Seq technology provides strand-specific information about all polyadenlyated transcripts, we were able to assay expression in noncoding intragenic regions, including both sense and antisense noncoding transcripts (relative to nearby genes). We find that many noncoding transcripts are conserved in both location and expression level between species, suggesting a possible functional role. Lastly, we examined the overlap between differential gene expression and signatures of positive selection within putative promoter regions, a sign that these differences represent adaptations during human evolution. Comparative approaches may provide important insights into genes responsible for differences in cognitive functions between humans and nonhuman primates, as well as highlighting new candidate genes for studies investigating neurological disorders.

  9. Influence of Coding Variability in APP-Aβ Metabolism Genes in Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sassi, Celeste; Ridge, Perry G.; Nalls, Michael A.; Gibbs, Raphael; Ding, Jinhui; Lupton, Michelle K.; Troakes, Claire; Lunnon, Katie; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Brown, Kristelle S.; Medway, Christopher; Lord, Jenny; Turton, James; Morgan, Kevin; Powell, John F.; Kauwe, John S.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Bras, Jose; Goate, Alison M.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Guerreiro, Rita; Hardy, John

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral deposition of Aβ42, a neurotoxic proteolytic derivate of amyloid precursor protein (APP), is a central event in Alzheimer’s disease (AD)(Amyloid hypothesis). Given the key role of APP-Aβ metabolism in AD pathogenesis, we selected 29 genes involved in APP processing, Aβ degradation and clearance. We then used exome and genome sequencing to investigate the single independent (single-variant association test) and cumulative (gene-based association test) effect of coding variants in these genes as potential susceptibility factors for AD, in a cohort composed of 332 sporadic and mainly late-onset AD cases and 676 elderly controls from North America and the UK. Our study shows that common coding variability in these genes does not play a major role for the disease development. In the single-variant association analysis, the main hits, none of which statistically significant after multiple testing correction (1.9e-4coding variants (0.009%genes mainly involved in Aβ extracellular degradation (TTR, ACE), clearance (LRP1) and APP trafficking and recycling (SORL1). These results were partially replicated in the gene-based analysis (c-alpha and SKAT tests), that reports ECE1, LYZ and TTR as nominally associated to AD (1.7e-3 coding variability in APP-Aβ genes is not a critical factor for AD development and 2) Aβ degradation and clearance, rather than Aβ production, may play a key role in the etiology of sporadic AD. PMID:27249223

  10. Influence of Coding Variability in APP-Aβ Metabolism Genes in Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Celeste; Ridge, Perry G; Nalls, Michael A; Gibbs, Raphael; Ding, Jinhui; Lupton, Michelle K; Troakes, Claire; Lunnon, Katie; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Brown, Kristelle S; Medway, Christopher; Lord, Jenny; Turton, James; Morgan, Kevin; Powell, John F; Kauwe, John S; Cruchaga, Carlos; Bras, Jose; Goate, Alison M; Singleton, Andrew B; Guerreiro, Rita; Hardy, John

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral deposition of Aβ42, a neurotoxic proteolytic derivate of amyloid precursor protein (APP), is a central event in Alzheimer's disease (AD)(Amyloid hypothesis). Given the key role of APP-Aβ metabolism in AD pathogenesis, we selected 29 genes involved in APP processing, Aβ degradation and clearance. We then used exome and genome sequencing to investigate the single independent (single-variant association test) and cumulative (gene-based association test) effect of coding variants in these genes as potential susceptibility factors for AD, in a cohort composed of 332 sporadic and mainly late-onset AD cases and 676 elderly controls from North America and the UK. Our study shows that common coding variability in these genes does not play a major role for the disease development. In the single-variant association analysis, the main hits, none of which statistically significant after multiple testing correction (1.9e-4coding variants (0.009%genes mainly involved in Aβ extracellular degradation (TTR, ACE), clearance (LRP1) and APP trafficking and recycling (SORL1). These results were partially replicated in the gene-based analysis (c-alpha and SKAT tests), that reports ECE1, LYZ and TTR as nominally associated to AD (1.7e-3 coding variability in APP-Aβ genes is not a critical factor for AD development and 2) Aβ degradation and clearance, rather than Aβ production, may play a key role in the etiology of sporadic AD.

  11. Predicting non-coding RNA genes in Escherichia coli with boosted genetic programming.

    PubMed

    Saetrom, Pål; Sneve, Ragnhild; Kristiansen, Knut I; Snøve, Ola; Grünfeld, Thomas; Rognes, Torbjørn; Seeberg, Erling

    2005-01-01

    Several methods exist for predicting non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes in Escherichia coli (E.coli). In addition to about sixty known ncRNA genes excluding tRNAs and rRNAs, various methods have predicted more than thousand ncRNA genes, but only 95 of these candidates were confirmed by more than one study. Here, we introduce a new method that uses automatic discovery of sequence patterns to predict ncRNA genes. The method predicts 135 novel candidates. In addition, the method predicts 152 genes that overlap with predictions in the literature. We test sixteen predictions experimentally, and show that twelve of these are actual ncRNA transcripts. Six of the twelve verified candidates were novel predictions. The relatively high confirmation rate indicates that many of the untested novel predictions are also ncRNAs, and we therefore speculate that E.coli contains more ncRNA genes than previously estimated.

  12. Transcriptional regulation at the yeast nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Steglich, Babett; Sazer, Shelley; Ekwall, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The spatial organization of the genome inside the nucleus affects many nuclear processes, such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and gene transcription. In metazoans, the nuclear periphery harbors mainly repressed genes that associate with the nuclear lamina. This review discusses how peripheral positioning is connected to transcriptional regulation in yeasts. Tethering of reporter genes to the nuclear envelope was found to result in transcriptional silencing. Similarly, repression of the silent mating type loci and subtelomeric genes is influenced by their position close to the nuclear envelope. In contrast, active genes are bound by nucleoporins and inducible genes associate with the nuclear pore complex upon activation. Taken together, these results portray the nuclear envelope as a platform for transcriptional regulation, both through activation at nuclear pores and silencing at the nuclear envelope. PMID:24021962

  13. Elevated temperature envelope forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, Bruce M. (Inventor); Gane, David H. (Inventor); Starowski, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Elevated temperature envelope forming includes enclosing a part blank and form tool within an envelope sealed against the atmosphere, heat treating the combination while forming pressure holds the envelope and part against the form tool, and allowing part cool down to occur in an inert atmosphere with forming pressure removed. The forming pressure is provided by evacuating the envelope and may be aided by differential force applied between the envelope and the form tool.

  14. Long antisense non-coding RNAs and the epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vadaie, Nadia; Morris, Kevin V

    2013-08-01

    Shortly after the completion of the human genome project in 2003, the Encode project was launched. The project was set out to identify the functional elements in the human genome, and unexpectedly it was found that >80% of the genome is transcribed. The Encode project identified those transcribed regions of the genome to be encoded by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). With only 2% of the genome carrying gene-encoding proteins, the conundrum was then, what is the function, if any, of these non-coding regions of the genome? These ncRNAs included both short and long RNAs. The focus of this review will be on antisense long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), as these transcripts have been observed to play a role in gene expression of protein-coding genes. Some lncRNAs have been found to regulate protein-coding gene transcription at the epigenetic level, whereby they suppress transcription through the recruitment of protein complexes to target loci in the genome. Conversely, there are lncRNAs that have a positive role in gene expression with less known about mechanism, and some lncRNAs have been shown to be involved in post-transcriptional processes. Additionally, lncRNAs have been observed to regulate their own expression in a positive feedback loop by functioning as a decoy. The biological significance of lncRNAs is only just now becoming evident, with many lncRNAs found to play a significant role in several human diseases.

  15. Analysis of the multi-copied genes and the impact of the redundant protein coding sequences on gene annotation in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia-Feng; Chen, Qing-Li; Ren, Jing; Yang, Yan-Ling; Wang, Ji-Hua; Sun, Xiao

    2015-07-07

    The important roles of duplicated genes in evolutional process have been recognized in bacteria, archaebacteria and eukaryotes, while there is very little study on the multi-copied protein coding genes that share sequence identity of 100%. In this paper, the multi-copied protein coding genes in a number of prokaryotic genomes are comprehensively analyzed firstly. The results show that 0-15.93% of the protein coding genes in each genome are multi-copied genes and 0-16.49% of the protein coding genes in each genome are highly similar with the sequence identity ≥ 80%. Function and COG (Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins) analysis shows that 64.64% of multi-copied genes concentrate on the function of transposase and 86.28% of the COG assigned multi-copied genes concentrate on the COG code of 'L'. Furthermore, the impact of redundant protein coding sequences on the gene prediction results is studied. The results show that the problem of protein coding sequence redundancies cannot be ignored and the consistency of the gene annotation results before and after excluding the redundant sequences is negatively related with the sequences redundancy degree of the protein coding sequences in the training set.

  16. Glioma microvesicles carry selectively packaged coding and non-coding RNAs which alter gene expression in recipient cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheryl CY; Eaton, Sally A; Young, Paul E; Lee, Maggie; Shuttleworth, Rupert; Humphreys, David T; Grau, Georges E; Combes, Valery; Bebawy, Mary; Gong, Joyce; Brammah, Susan; Buckland, Michael E; Suter, Catherine M

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between glioma cells and their local environment are critical determinants of brain tumor growth, infiltration and neovascularisation. Communication with host cells and stroma via microvesicles represents one pathway by which tumors can modify their surroundings to achieve a tumor-permissive environment. Here we have taken an unbiased approach to identifying RNAs in glioma-derived microvesicles, and explored their potential to regulate gene expression in recipient cells. We find that glioma microvesicles are predominantly of exosomal origin and contain complex populations of coding and noncoding RNAs in proportions that are distinct from those in the cells from which they are derived. Microvesicles show a relative depletion in microRNA compared with their cells of origin, and are enriched in unusual or novel noncoding RNAs, most of which have no known function. Short-term exposure of brain microvascular endothelial cells to glioma microvesicles results in many gene expression changes in the endothelial cells, most of which cannot be explained by direct delivery of transcripts. Our data suggest that the scope of potential actions of tumor-derived microvesicles is much broader and more complex than previously supposed, and highlight a number of new classes of small RNA that remain to be characterized. PMID:23807490

  17. Glioma microvesicles carry selectively packaged coding and non-coding RNAs which alter gene expression in recipient cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheryl C Y; Eaton, Sally A; Young, Paul E; Lee, Maggie; Shuttleworth, Rupert; Humphreys, David T; Grau, Georges E; Combes, Valery; Bebawy, Mary; Gong, Joyce; Brammah, Susan; Buckland, Michael E; Suter, Catherine M

    2013-08-01

    Interactions between glioma cells and their local environment are critical determinants of brain tumor growth, infiltration and neovascularisation. Communication with host cells and stroma via microvesicles represents one pathway by which tumors can modify their surroundings to achieve a tumor-permissive environment. Here we have taken an unbiased approach to identifying RNAs in glioma-derived microvesicles, and explored their potential to regulate gene expression in recipient cells. We find that glioma microvesicles are predominantly of exosomal origin and contain complex populations of coding and noncoding RNAs in proportions that are distinct from those in the cells from which they are derived. Microvesicles show a relative depletion in microRNA compared with their cells of origin, and are enriched in unusual or novel noncoding RNAs, most of which have no known function. Short-term exposure of brain microvascular endothelial cells to glioma microvesicles results in many gene expression changes in the endothelial cells, most of which cannot be explained by direct delivery of transcripts. Our data suggest that the scope of potential actions of tumor-derived microvesicles is much broader and more complex than previously supposed, and highlight a number of new classes of small RNA that remain to be characterized.

  18. Expression profile of key immune-related genes in Penaeus monodon juveniles after oral administration of recombinant envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ancy; Sudheer, Naduvilamuriparampu Saidumuhammed; Kiron, Viswanath; Bright Singh, Issac S; Narayanan, Rangarajan Badri

    2016-07-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most catastrophic pathogen the shrimp industry has ever encountered. VP28, the abundant envelope protein of WSSV was expressed in bacteria, the purified protein administered orally to Penaeus monodon juveniles and its immune modulatory effects examined. The results indicated significant up-regulation of caspase, penaeidin, crustin, astakine, syntenin, PmRACK, Rab7, STAT and C-type lectin in animals orally administered with this antigen. This revealed the immune modulations in shrimps followed by oral administration of rVP28P which resulted in the reduced transcription of viral gene vp28 and delay in mortality after WSSV challenge. The study suggests the potential of rVP28P to elicit a non-specific immune stimulation in shrimps.

  19. A gene-expression-based neural code for food abundance that modulates lifespan.

    PubMed

    Entchev, Eugeni V; Patel, Dhaval S; Zhan, Mei; Steele, Andrew J; Lu, Hang; Ch'ng, QueeLim

    2015-05-12

    How the nervous system internally represents environmental food availability is poorly understood. Here, we show that quantitative information about food abundance is encoded by combinatorial neuron-specific gene-expression of conserved TGFβ and serotonin pathway components in Caenorhabditis elegans. Crosstalk and auto-regulation between these pathways alters the shape, dynamic range, and population variance of the gene-expression responses of daf-7 (TGFβ) and tph-1 (tryptophan hydroxylase) to food availability. These intricate regulatory features provide distinct mechanisms for TGFβ and serotonin signaling to tune the accuracy of this multi-neuron code: daf-7 primarily regulates gene-expression variability, while tph-1 primarily regulates the dynamic range of gene-expression responses. This code is functional because daf-7 and tph-1 mutations bidirectionally attenuate food level-dependent changes in lifespan. Our results reveal a neural code for food abundance and demonstrate that gene expression serves as an additional layer of information processing in the nervous system to control long-term physiology.

  20. Non-coding RNA in control of gene regulatory programs in cardiac development and disease.

    PubMed

    Philippen, Leonne E; Dirkx, Ellen; da Costa-Martins, Paula A; De Windt, Leon J

    2015-12-01

    Organogenesis of the vertebrate heart is a highly specialized process involving progressive specification and differentiation of distinct embryonic cardiac progenitor cell populations driven by specialized gene programming events. Likewise, the onset of pathologies in the adult heart, including cardiac hypertrophy, involves the reactivation of embryonic gene programs. In both cases, these intricate genomic events are temporally and spatially regulated by complex signaling networks and gene regulatory networks. Apart from well-established transcriptional mechanisms, increasing evidence indicates that gene programming in both the developing and the diseased myocardium are under epigenetic control by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). MicroRNAs regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, and numerous studies have now established critical roles for this species of tiny RNAs in a broad range of aspects from cardiogenesis towards adult heart failure. Recent reports now also implicate the larger family of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in these processes as well. Here we discuss the involvement of these two ncRNA classes in proper cardiac development and hypertrophic disease processes of the adult myocardium. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Non-coding RNAs.

  1. Polycomb group protein gene silencing, non-coding RNA, stem cells, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Gieni, Randall S; Hendzel, Michael J

    2009-10-01

    Epigenetic programming is an important facet of biology, controlling gene expression patterns and the choice between developmental pathways. The Polycomb group proteins (PcGs) silence gene expression, allowing cells to both acquire and maintain identity. PcG silencing is important for stemness, X chromosome inactivation (XCI), genomic imprinting, and the abnormally silenced genes in cancers. Stem and cancer cells commonly share gene expression patterns, regulatory mechanisms, and signalling pathways. Many microRNA species have oncogenic or tumor suppressor activity, and disruptions in these networks are common in cancer; however, long non-coding (nc)RNA species are also important. Many of these directly guide PcG deposition and gene silencing at the HOX locus, during XCI, and in examples of genomic imprinting. Since inappropriate HOX expression and loss of genomic imprinting are hallmarks of cancer, disruption of long ncRNA-mediated PcG silencing likely has a role in oncogenesis. Aberrant silencing of coding and non-coding loci is critical for both the genesis and progression of cancers. In addition, PcGs are commonly abnormally overexpressed years prior to cancer pathology, making early PcG targeted therapy an option to reverse tumor formation, someday replacing the blunt instrument of eradication in the cancer therapy arsenal.

  2. A gene-expression-based neural code for food abundance that modulates lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Entchev, Eugeni V; Patel, Dhaval S; Zhan, Mei; Steele, Andrew J; Lu, Hang; Ch'ng, QueeLim

    2015-01-01

    How the nervous system internally represents environmental food availability is poorly understood. Here, we show that quantitative information about food abundance is encoded by combinatorial neuron-specific gene-expression of conserved TGFβ and serotonin pathway components in Caenorhabditis elegans. Crosstalk and auto-regulation between these pathways alters the shape, dynamic range, and population variance of the gene-expression responses of daf-7 (TGFβ) and tph-1 (tryptophan hydroxylase) to food availability. These intricate regulatory features provide distinct mechanisms for TGFβ and serotonin signaling to tune the accuracy of this multi-neuron code: daf-7 primarily regulates gene-expression variability, while tph-1 primarily regulates the dynamic range of gene-expression responses. This code is functional because daf-7 and tph-1 mutations bidirectionally attenuate food level-dependent changes in lifespan. Our results reveal a neural code for food abundance and demonstrate that gene expression serves as an additional layer of information processing in the nervous system to control long-term physiology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06259.001 PMID:25962853

  3. Free energy analysis on the coding region of the individual genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Xing, Chuanhua; Bitzer, D L; Alexander, W E; Stomp, A M; Vouk, M A

    2006-01-01

    Two methods, power spectrum density analysis (PSD) and synchronization signal approximation, were investigated to determine if underlying periodic, free energy signals could be detected for the individual genes in this paper. These signals could be revealed assuming Watson-Crick type hybridization between the eight, 3'-terminal nucleotides of the 18S rRNA and pre- and mature-mRNA sequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a manner similar to that used to analyze coding region sequences in prokaryotic genes. Using PSD, a periodic signal could only be detected in 35 of 106 genes tested; using the synchronization signal approximation, 91 of 106 genes showed linearly increasing magnitude and phase, characteristics consistent with the presence of an underlying periodic signal with an assumed frequency of one-third. The majority of introns did not show magnitude and phase behavior consistent with an underlying non-periodic signal. The periodicity property for the free energy on the protein-coding regions can contribute to finding the approximate boundaries of the exons (protein coding regions) and the introns, which provides a foundation for future studies in identifying the exact positions of the splice sites, especially for the higher eukaryotic genes.

  4. Coupled enhancer and coding sequence evolution of a homeobox gene shaped leaf diversity

    PubMed Central

    Vuolo, Francesco; Mentink, Remco A.; Hajheidari, Mohsen; Bailey, C. Donovan; Filatov, Dmitry A.; Tsiantis, Miltos

    2016-01-01

    Here we investigate mechanisms underlying the diversification of biological forms using crucifer leaf shape as an example. We show that evolution of an enhancer element in the homeobox gene REDUCED COMPLEXITY (RCO) altered leaf shape by changing gene expression from the distal leaf blade to its base. A single amino acid substitution evolved together with this regulatory change, which reduced RCO protein stability, preventing pleiotropic effects caused by its altered gene expression. We detected hallmarks of positive selection in these evolved regulatory and coding sequence variants and showed that modulating RCO activity can improve plant physiological performance. Therefore, interplay between enhancer and coding sequence evolution created a potentially adaptive path for morphological evolution. PMID:27852629

  5. Synthetic neomycin-kanamycin phosphotransferase, type II coding sequence for gene targeting in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seung-Gi; Mann, Jeffrey R

    2005-07-01

    The bacterial neomycin-kanamycin phosphotransferase, type II enzyme is encoded by the neo gene and confers resistance to aminoglycoside drugs such as neomycin and kanamycin-bacterial selection and G418-eukaryotic cell selection. Although widely used in gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells, the neo coding sequence contains numerous cryptic splice sites and has a high CpG content. At least the former can cause unwanted effects in cis at the targeted locus. We describe a synthetic sequence, sneo, which encodes the same protein as that encoded by neo. This synthetic sequence has no predicted splice sites in either strand, low CpG content, and increased mammalian codon usage. In mouse embryonic stem cells sneo expressability is similar to neo. The use of sneo in gene targeting experiments should substantially reduce the probability of unwanted effects in cis due to splicing, and perhaps CpG methylation, within the coding sequence of the selectable marker.

  6. Polarity Effects in the Hisg Gene of Salmonella Require a Site within the Coding Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Ciampi, M. S.; Roth, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    A single site in the middle of the coding sequence of the hisG gene of Salmonella is required for most of the polar effect of mutations in this gene. Nonsense and insertion mutations mapping upstream of this point in the hisG gene all have strong polar effects on expression of downstream genes in the operon; mutations mapping promotor distal to this site have little or no polar effect. Two previously known hisG mutations, mapping in the region of the polarity site, abolish the polarity effect of insertion mutations mapping upstream of this region. New polarity site mutations have been selected which have lost the polar effect of upstream nonsense mutations. All mutations abolishing the function of the site are small deletions; three are identical, 28-bp deletions which have arisen independently. A fourth mutation is a deletion of 16 base pairs internal to the larger deletion. Several point mutations within this 16-bp region have no effect on the function of the polarity site. We believe that a small number of polarity sites of this type are responsible for polarity in all genes. The site in the hisG gene is more easily detected than most because it appears to be the only such site in the hisG gene and because it maps in the center of the coding sequence. PMID:3282985

  7. Polymerase chain reaction-mediated gene synthesis: synthesis of a gene coding for isozyme c of horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, K; Fingar, S A; Shah, J; Fyles, J

    1991-05-15

    The synthesis of a gene coding for horseradish peroxidase (HRP, isozyme c; EC 1.11.1.7) is described using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated gene synthesis approach developed in our laboratory. In this approach, all the oligonucleotides making up the gene are ligated in a single step by using the two outer oligonucleotides as PCR primers and the crude ligation mixture as the target. The PCR facilitates synthesis and purification of the gene simultaneously. The gene for HRP was synthesized by ligating all 40 oligonucleotides in a single step followed by PCR amplification. The gene was also synthesized from its fragments by using an overlap extension method similar to the procedure as described [Horton, R. M., Hunt, H. D., Ho, S. N., Pullen, J. K. & Pease, L. R. (1989) Gene 77, 61-68]. A method for combining different DNA fragments, in-frame, by using the PCR was also developed and used to synthesize the HRP gene from its gene fragments. This method is applicable to the synthesis of even larger genes and to combine any DNA fragments in-frame. After the synthesis, preliminary characterization of the HRP gene was also carried out by the PCR to confirm the arrangement of oligonucleotides in the gene. This was done by carrying out the PCR with several sets of primers along the gene and comparing the product sizes with the expected sizes. The gene and the fragments generated by PCR were cloned in Escherichia coli and the sequence was confirmed by manual and automated DNA sequencing.

  8. Polymerase chain reaction-mediated gene synthesis: synthesis of a gene coding for isozyme c of horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, K; Fingar, S A; Shah, J; Fyles, J

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis of a gene coding for horseradish peroxidase (HRP, isozyme c; EC 1.11.1.7) is described using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated gene synthesis approach developed in our laboratory. In this approach, all the oligonucleotides making up the gene are ligated in a single step by using the two outer oligonucleotides as PCR primers and the crude ligation mixture as the target. The PCR facilitates synthesis and purification of the gene simultaneously. The gene for HRP was synthesized by ligating all 40 oligonucleotides in a single step followed by PCR amplification. The gene was also synthesized from its fragments by using an overlap extension method similar to the procedure as described [Horton, R. M., Hunt, H. D., Ho, S. N., Pullen, J. K. & Pease, L. R. (1989) Gene 77, 61-68]. A method for combining different DNA fragments, in-frame, by using the PCR was also developed and used to synthesize the HRP gene from its gene fragments. This method is applicable to the synthesis of even larger genes and to combine any DNA fragments in-frame. After the synthesis, preliminary characterization of the HRP gene was also carried out by the PCR to confirm the arrangement of oligonucleotides in the gene. This was done by carrying out the PCR with several sets of primers along the gene and comparing the product sizes with the expected sizes. The gene and the fragments generated by PCR were cloned in Escherichia coli and the sequence was confirmed by manual and automated DNA sequencing. Images PMID:1851991

  9. A systematic survey of loss-of-function variants in human protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    MacArthur, Daniel G; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Frankish, Adam; Huang, Ni; Morris, James; Walter, Klaudia; Jostins, Luke; Habegger, Lukas; Pickrell, Joseph K; Montgomery, Stephen B; Albers, Cornelis A; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Conrad, Donald F; Lunter, Gerton; Zheng, Hancheng; Ayub, Qasim; DePristo, Mark A; Banks, Eric; Hu, Min; Handsaker, Robert E; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey A; Fromer, Menachem; Jin, Mike; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Khurana, Ekta; Ye, Kai; Kay, Mike; Saunders, Gary Ian; Suner, Marie-Marthe; Hunt, Toby; Barnes, If H A; Amid, Clara; Carvalho-Silva, Denise R; Bignell, Alexandra H; Snow, Catherine; Yngvadottir, Bryndis; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Cooper, David N; Xue, Yali; Romero, Irene Gallego; Wang, Jun; Li, Yingrui; Gibbs, Richard A; McCarroll, Steven A; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Harrow, Jennifer; Hurles, Matthew E; Gerstein, Mark B; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2012-02-17

    Genome-sequencing studies indicate that all humans carry many genetic variants predicted to cause loss of function (LoF) of protein-coding genes, suggesting unexpected redundancy in the human genome. Here we apply stringent filters to 2951 putative LoF variants obtained from 185 human genomes to determine their true prevalence and properties. We estimate that human genomes typically contain ~100 genuine LoF variants with ~20 genes completely inactivated. We identify rare and likely deleterious LoF alleles, including 26 known and 21 predicted severe disease-causing variants, as well as common LoF variants in nonessential genes. We describe functional and evolutionary differences between LoF-tolerant and recessive disease genes and a method for using these differences to prioritize candidate genes found in clinical sequencing studies.

  10. A systematic survey of loss-of-function variants in human protein-coding genes

    PubMed Central

    MacArthur, Daniel G.; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Frankish, Adam; Huang, Ni; Morris, James; Walter, Klaudia; Jostins, Luke; Habegger, Lukas; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Albers, Cornelis A.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Conrad, Donald F.; Lunter, Gerton; Zheng, Hancheng; Ayub, Qasim; DePristo, Mark A.; Banks, Eric; Hu, Min; Handsaker, Robert E.; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Fromer, Menachem; Jin, Mike; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Khurana, Ekta; Ye, Kai; Kay, Mike; Saunders, Gary Ian; Suner, Marie-Marthe; Hunt, Toby; Barnes, If H.A.; Amid, Clara; Carvalho-Silva, Denise R.; Bignell, Alexandra H; Snow, Catherine; Yngvadottir, Bryndis; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Cooper, David N.; Xue, Yali; Romero, Irene Gallego; Wang, Jun; Li, Yingrui; Gibbs, Richard A.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Harrow, Jennifer; Hurles, Matthew E.; Gerstein, Mark B.; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Genome sequencing studies indicate that all humans carry many genetic variants predicted to cause loss of function (LoF) of protein-coding genes, suggesting unexpected redundancy in the human genome. Here we apply stringent filters to 2,951 putative LoF variants obtained from 185 human genomes to determine their true prevalence and properties. We estimate that human genomes typically contain ~100 genuine LoF variants with ~20 genes completely inactivated. We identify rare and likely deleterious LoF alleles, including 26 known and 21 predicted severe disease-causing variants, as well as common LoF variants in non-essential genes. We describe functional and evolutionary differences between LoF-tolerant and recessive disease genes, and a method for using these differences to prioritize candidate genes found in clinical sequencing studies. PMID:22344438

  11. Classification of Lactococcus lactis cell envelope proteinase based on gene sequencing, peptides formed after hydrolysis of milk, and computer modeling.

    PubMed

    Børsting, M W; Qvist, K B; Brockmann, E; Vindeløv, J; Pedersen, T L; Vogensen, F K; Ardö, Y

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis strains depend on a proteolytic system for growth in milk to release essential AA from casein. The cleavage specificities of the cell envelope proteinase (CEP) can vary between strains and environments and whether the enzyme is released or bound to the cell wall. Thirty-eight Lc. lactis strains were grouped according to their CEP AA sequences and according to identified peptides after hydrolysis of milk. Finally, AA positions in the substrate binding region were suggested by the use of a new CEP template based on Streptococcus C5a CEP. Aligning the CEP AA sequences of 38 strains of Lc. lactis showed that 21 strains, which were previously classified as group d, could be subdivided into 3 groups. Independently, similar subgroupings were found based on comparison of the Lc. lactis CEP AA sequences and based on normalized quantity of identified peptides released from αS1-casein and β-casein. A model structure of Lc. lactis CEP based on the crystal structure of Streptococcus C5a CEP was used to investigate the AA positions in the substrate-binding region. New AA positions were suggested, which could be relevant for the cleavage specificity of CEP; however, these could only explain 2 out of 3 found subgroups. The third subgroup could be explained by 1 to 5 AA positions located opposite the substrate binding region. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Multiple evidence strands suggest that there may be as few as 19,000 human protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Ezkurdia, Iakes; Juan, David; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Frankish, Adam; Diekhans, Mark; Harrow, Jennifer; Vazquez, Jesus; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2014-11-15

    Determining the full complement of protein-coding genes is a key goal of genome annotation. The most powerful approach for confirming protein-coding potential is the detection of cellular protein expression through peptide mass spectrometry (MS) experiments. Here, we mapped peptides detected in seven large-scale proteomics studies to almost 60% of the protein-coding genes in the GENCODE annotation of the human genome. We found a strong relationship between detection in proteomics experiments and both gene family age and cross-species conservation. Most of the genes for which we detected peptides were highly conserved. We found peptides for >96% of genes that evolved before bilateria. At the opposite end of the scale, we identified almost no peptides for genes that have appeared since primates, for genes that did not have any protein-like features or for genes with poor cross-species conservation. These results motivated us to describe a set of 2001 potential non-coding genes based on features such as weak conservation, a lack of protein features, or ambiguous annotations from major databases, all of which correlated with low peptide detection across the seven experiments. We identified peptides for just 3% of these genes. We show that many of these genes behave more like non-coding genes than protein-coding genes and suggest that most are unlikely to code for proteins under normal circumstances. We believe that their inclusion in the human protein-coding gene catalogue should be revised as part of the ongoing human genome annotation effort. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Multiple evidence strands suggest that there may be as few as 19 000 human protein-coding genes

    PubMed Central

    Ezkurdia, Iakes; Juan, David; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Frankish, Adam; Diekhans, Mark; Harrow, Jennifer; Vazquez, Jesus; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the full complement of protein-coding genes is a key goal of genome annotation. The most powerful approach for confirming protein-coding potential is the detection of cellular protein expression through peptide mass spectrometry (MS) experiments. Here, we mapped peptides detected in seven large-scale proteomics studies to almost 60% of the protein-coding genes in the GENCODE annotation of the human genome. We found a strong relationship between detection in proteomics experiments and both gene family age and cross-species conservation. Most of the genes for which we detected peptides were highly conserved. We found peptides for >96% of genes that evolved before bilateria. At the opposite end of the scale, we identified almost no peptides for genes that have appeared since primates, for genes that did not have any protein-like features or for genes with poor cross-species conservation. These results motivated us to describe a set of 2001 potential non-coding genes based on features such as weak conservation, a lack of protein features, or ambiguous annotations from major databases, all of which correlated with low peptide detection across the seven experiments. We identified peptides for just 3% of these genes. We show that many of these genes behave more like non-coding genes than protein-coding genes and suggest that most are unlikely to code for proteins under normal circumstances. We believe that their inclusion in the human protein-coding gene catalogue should be revised as part of the ongoing human genome annotation effort. PMID:24939910

  14. Protein-coding genes in B chromosomes of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Domínguez, Beatriz; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J.; Cabrero, Josefa; Corral, José María; López-León, María Dolores; Sharbel, Timothy F.; Camacho, Juan Pedro M.

    2017-01-01

    For many years, parasitic B chromosomes have been considered genetically inert elements. Here we show the presence of ten protein-coding genes in the B chromosome of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans. Four of these genes (CIP2A, GTPB6, KIF20A, and MTG1) were complete in the B chromosome whereas the six remaining (CKAP2, CAP-G, HYI, MYCB2, SLIT and TOP2A) were truncated. Five of these genes (CIP2A, CKAP2, CAP-G, KIF20A, and MYCB2) were significantly up-regulated in B-carrying individuals, as expected if they were actively transcribed from the B chromosome. This conclusion is supported by three truncated genes (CKAP2, CAP-G and MYCB2) which showed up-regulation only in the regions being present in the B chromosome. Our results indicate that B chromosomes are not so silenced as was hitherto believed. Interestingly, the five active genes in the B chromosome code for functions related with cell division, which is the main arena where B chromosome destiny is played. This suggests that B chromosome evolutionary success can lie on its gene content. PMID:28367986

  15. Protein-coding genes in B chromosomes of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Domínguez, Beatriz; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J; Cabrero, Josefa; Corral, José María; López-León, María Dolores; Sharbel, Timothy F; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2017-04-03

    For many years, parasitic B chromosomes have been considered genetically inert elements. Here we show the presence of ten protein-coding genes in the B chromosome of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans. Four of these genes (CIP2A, GTPB6, KIF20A, and MTG1) were complete in the B chromosome whereas the six remaining (CKAP2, CAP-G, HYI, MYCB2, SLIT and TOP2A) were truncated. Five of these genes (CIP2A, CKAP2, CAP-G, KIF20A, and MYCB2) were significantly up-regulated in B-carrying individuals, as expected if they were actively transcribed from the B chromosome. This conclusion is supported by three truncated genes (CKAP2, CAP-G and MYCB2) which showed up-regulation only in the regions being present in the B chromosome. Our results indicate that B chromosomes are not so silenced as was hitherto believed. Interestingly, the five active genes in the B chromosome code for functions related with cell division, which is the main arena where B chromosome destiny is played. This suggests that B chromosome evolutionary success can lie on its gene content.

  16. The Arabidopsis HOMOLOGY-DEPENDENT GENE SILENCING1 Gene Codes for an S-Adenosyl-l-Homocysteine Hydrolase Required for DNA Methylation-Dependent Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Pedro S.C.F.; Sheikh, Mazhar; Melchiorre, Rosalba; Fagard, Mathilde; Boutet, Stéphanie; Loach, Rebecca; Moffatt, Barbara; Wagner, Conrad; Vaucheret, Hervé; Furner, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Genes introduced into higher plant genomes can become silent (gene silencing) and/or cause silencing of homologous genes at unlinked sites (homology-dependent gene silencing or HDG silencing). Mutations of the HOMOLOGY-DEPENDENT GENE SILENCING1 (HOG1) locus relieve transcriptional gene silencing and methylation-dependent HDG silencing and result in genome-wide demethylation. The hog1 mutant plants also grow slowly and have low fertility and reduced seed germination. Three independent mutants of HOG1 were each found to have point mutations at the 3′ end of a gene coding for S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (SAH) hydrolase, and hog1-1 plants show reduced SAH hydrolase activity. A transposon (hog1-4) and a T-DNA tag (hog1-5) in the HOG1 gene each behaved as zygotic embryo lethal mutants and could not be made homozygous. The results suggest that the homozygous hog1 point mutants are leaky and result in genome demethylation and poor growth and that homozygous insertion mutations result in zygotic lethality. Complementation of the hog1-1 point mutation with a T-DNA containing the gene coding for SAH hydrolase restored gene silencing, HDG silencing, DNA methylation, fast growth, and normal seed viability. The same T-DNA also complemented the zygotic embryo lethal phenotype of the hog1-4 tagged mutant. A model relating the HOG1 gene, DNA methylation, and methylation-dependent HDG silencing is presented. PMID:15659630

  17. Long non-coding RNAs differentially expressed between normal versus primary breast tumor tissues disclose converse changes to breast cancer-related protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Reiche, Kristin; Kasack, Katharina; Schreiber, Stephan; Lüders, Torben; Due, Eldri U; Naume, Bjørn; Riis, Margit; Kristensen, Vessela N; Horn, Friedemann; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hackermüller, Jörg; Baumbusch, Lars O

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in women, is a highly heterogeneous disease, characterized by distinct genomic and transcriptomic profiles. Transcriptome analyses prevalently assessed protein-coding genes; however, the majority of the mammalian genome is expressed in numerous non-coding transcripts. Emerging evidence supports that many of these non-coding RNAs are specifically expressed during development, tumorigenesis, and metastasis. The focus of this study was to investigate the expression features and molecular characteristics of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in breast cancer. We investigated 26 breast tumor and 5 normal tissue samples utilizing a custom expression microarray enclosing probes for mRNAs as well as novel and previously identified lncRNAs. We identified more than 19,000 unique regions significantly differentially expressed between normal versus breast tumor tissue, half of these regions were non-coding without any evidence for functional open reading frames or sequence similarity to known proteins. The identified non-coding regions were primarily located in introns (53%) or in the intergenic space (33%), frequently orientated in antisense-direction of protein-coding genes (14%), and commonly distributed at promoter-, transcription factor binding-, or enhancer-sites. Analyzing the most diverse mRNA breast cancer subtypes Basal-like versus Luminal A and B resulted in 3,025 significantly differentially expressed unique loci, including 682 (23%) for non-coding transcripts. A notable number of differentially expressed protein-coding genes displayed non-synonymous expression changes compared to their nearest differentially expressed lncRNA, including an antisense lncRNA strongly anticorrelated to the mRNA coding for histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), which was investigated in more detail. Previously identified chromatin-associated lncRNAs (CARs) were predominantly downregulated in breast tumor samples, including CARs located in the

  18. Long Non-Coding RNAs Differentially Expressed between Normal versus Primary Breast Tumor Tissues Disclose Converse Changes to Breast Cancer-Related Protein-Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Reiche, Kristin; Kasack, Katharina; Schreiber, Stephan; Lüders, Torben; Due, Eldri U.; Naume, Bjørn; Riis, Margit; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Horn, Friedemann; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hackermüller, Jörg; Baumbusch, Lars O.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in women, is a highly heterogeneous disease, characterized by distinct genomic and transcriptomic profiles. Transcriptome analyses prevalently assessed protein-coding genes; however, the majority of the mammalian genome is expressed in numerous non-coding transcripts. Emerging evidence supports that many of these non-coding RNAs are specifically expressed during development, tumorigenesis, and metastasis. The focus of this study was to investigate the expression features and molecular characteristics of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in breast cancer. We investigated 26 breast tumor and 5 normal tissue samples utilizing a custom expression microarray enclosing probes for mRNAs as well as novel and previously identified lncRNAs. We identified more than 19,000 unique regions significantly differentially expressed between normal versus breast tumor tissue, half of these regions were non-coding without any evidence for functional open reading frames or sequence similarity to known proteins. The identified non-coding regions were primarily located in introns (53%) or in the intergenic space (33%), frequently orientated in antisense-direction of protein-coding genes (14%), and commonly distributed at promoter-, transcription factor binding-, or enhancer-sites. Analyzing the most diverse mRNA breast cancer subtypes Basal-like versus Luminal A and B resulted in 3,025 significantly differentially expressed unique loci, including 682 (23%) for non-coding transcripts. A notable number of differentially expressed protein-coding genes displayed non-synonymous expression changes compared to their nearest differentially expressed lncRNA, including an antisense lncRNA strongly anticorrelated to the mRNA coding for histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), which was investigated in more detail. Previously identified chromatin-associated lncRNAs (CARs) were predominantly downregulated in breast tumor samples, including CARs located in the

  19. The mitochondrial genome of Iberobaenia (Coleoptera: Iberobaeniidae): first rearrangement of protein-coding genes in the beetles.

    PubMed

    Andujar, Carmelo; Arribas, Paula; Linard, Benjamin; Kundrata, Robin; Bocak, Ladislav; Vogler, Alfried P

    2017-03-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the recently discovered beetle family Iberobaeniidae is described and compared with known coleopteran mitogenomes. The mitochondrial sequence was obtained by shotgun metagenomic sequencing using the Illumina Miseq technology and resulted in an average coverage of 130 × and a minimum coverage of 35×. The mitochondrial genome of Iberobaeniidae includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs genes, and 1 putative control region, and showed a unique rearrangement of protein-coding genes. This is the first rearrangement affecting the relative position of protein-coding and ribosomal genes reported for the order Coleoptera.

  20. Transcriptome interrogation of human myometrium identifies differentially expressed sense-antisense pairs of protein-coding and long non-coding RNA genes in spontaneous labor at term

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Roberto; Tarca, Adi; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Miranda, Jezid; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Jia, Hui; Hassan, Sonia S.; Kalita, Cynthia A.; Cai, Juan; Yeo, Lami; Lipovich, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Objective The mechanisms responsible for normal and abnormal parturition are poorly understood. Myometrial activation leading to regular uterine contractions is a key component of labor. Dysfunctional labor (arrest of dilatation and/or descent) is a leading indication for cesarean delivery. Compelling evidence suggests that most of these disorders are functional in nature, and not the result of cephalopelvic disproportion. The methodology and the datasets afforded by the post-genomic era provide novel opportunities to understand and target gene functions in these disorders. In 2012, the ENCODE Consortium elucidated the extraordinary abundance and functional complexity of long non-coding RNA genes in the human genome. The purpose of the study was to identify differentially expressed long non-coding RNA genes in human myometrium in women in spontaneous labor at term. Materials and Methods Myometrium was obtained from women undergoing cesarean deliveries who were not in labor (n=19) and women in spontaneous labor at term (n=20). RNA was extracted and profiled using an Illumina® microarray platform. The analysis of the protein coding genes from this study has been previously reported. Here, we have used computational approaches to bound the extent of long non-coding RNA representation on this platform, and to identify co-differentially expressed and correlated pairs of long non-coding RNA genes and protein-coding genes sharing the same genomic loci. Results Upon considering more than 18,498 distinct lncRNA genes compiled nonredundantly from public experimental data sources, and interrogating 2,634 that matched Illumina microarray probes, we identified co-differential expression and correlation at two genomic loci that contain coding-lncRNA gene pairs: SOCS2-AK054607 and LMCD1-NR_024065 in women in spontaneous labor at term. This co-differential expression and correlation was validated by qRT-PCR, an independent experimental method. Intriguingly, one of the two lnc

  1. Ribosome Profiling Reveals Pervasive Translation Outside of Annotated Protein-Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ingolia, Nicholas T.; Brar, Gloria A.; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Harris, Michael S.; Talhouarne, Gaëlle J. S.; Jackson, Sarah E.; Wills, Mark R.; Weissman, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Ribosome profiling suggests that ribosomes occupy many regions of the transcriptome thought to be non-coding, including 5′ UTRs and lncRNAs. Apparent ribosome footprints outside of protein-coding regions raise the possibility of artifacts unrelated to translation, particularly when they occupy multiple, overlapping open reading frames (ORFs). Here we show hallmarks of translation in these footprints: co-purification with the large ribosomal subunit, response to drugs targeting elongation, trinucleotide periodicity, and initiation at early AUGs. We develop a metric for distinguishing between 80S footprints and nonribosomal sources using footprint size distributions, which validates the vast majority of footprints outside of coding regions. We present evidence for polypeptide production beyond annotated genes, including induction of immune responses following human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. Translation is pervasive on cytosolic transcripts outside of conserved reading frames, and direct detection of this expanded universe of translated products enables efforts to understand how cells manage and exploit its consequences. PMID:25159147

  2. Human-specific amino acid changes found in 103 protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Takashi; Liu, Yu-Hua; Ueda, Shintaroh; Saitou, Naruya

    2004-05-01

    We humans have many characteristics that are different from those of the great apes. These human-specific characters must have arisen through mutations accumulated in the genome of our direct ancestor after the divergence of the last common ancestor with chimpanzee. Gene trees of human and great apes are necessary for extracting these human-specific genetic changes. We conducted a systematic analysis of 103 protein-coding genes for human, chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan. Nucleotide sequences for 18 genes were newly determined for this study, and those for the remaining genes were retrieved from the DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank database. The total number of amino acid changes in the human lineage was 147 for 26,199 codons (0.56%). The total number of amino acid changes in the human genome was, thus, estimated to be about 80,000. We applied the acceleration index test and Fisher's synonymous/nonsynonymous exact test for each gene tree to detect any human-specific enhancement of amino acid changes compared with ape branches. Six and two genes were shown to have significantly higher nonsynonymous changes at the human lineage from the acceleration index and exact tests, respectively. We also compared the distribution of the differences of the nonsynonymous substitutions on the human lineage and those on the great ape lineage. Two genes were more conserved in the ape lineage, whereas one gene was more conserved in the human lineage. These results suggest that a small proportion of protein-coding genes started to evolve differently in the human lineage after it diverged from the ape lineage.

  3. Gene regulation by the act of long non-coding RNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Long non-protein-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are proposed to be the largest transcript class in the mouse and human transcriptomes. Two important questions are whether all lncRNAs are functional and how they could exert a function. Several lncRNAs have been shown to function through their product, but this is not the only possible mode of action. In this review we focus on a role for the process of lncRNA transcription, independent of the lncRNA product, in regulating protein-coding-gene activity in cis. We discuss examples where lncRNA transcription leads to gene silencing or activation, and describe strategies to determine if the lncRNA product or its transcription causes the regulatory effect. PMID:23721193

  4. GeneValidator: identify problems with protein-coding gene predictions

    PubMed Central

    Drăgan, Monica-Andreea; Moghul, Ismail; Priyam, Anurag; Bustos, Claudio; Wurm, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Genomes of emerging model organisms are now being sequenced at very low cost. However, obtaining accurate gene predictions remains challenging: even the best gene prediction algorithms make substantial errors and can jeopardize subsequent analyses. Therefore, many predicted genes must be time-consumingly visually inspected and manually curated. We developed GeneValidator (GV) to automatically identify problematic gene predictions and to aid manual curation. For each gene, GV performs multiple analyses based on comparisons to gene sequences from large databases. The resulting report identifies problematic gene predictions and includes extensive statistics and graphs for each prediction to guide manual curation efforts. GV thus accelerates and enhances the work of biocurators and researchers who need accurate gene predictions from newly sequenced genomes. Availability and implementation: GV can be used through a web interface or in the command-line. GV is open-source (AGPL), available at https://wurmlab.github.io/tools/genevalidator. Contact: y.wurm@qmul.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26787666

  5. An analytical model of gene evolution with 9 mutation parameters: an application to the amino acids coded by the common circular code.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J

    2007-02-01

    We develop here an analytical evolutionary model based on a trinucleotide mutation matrix 64 x 64 with nine substitution parameters associated with the three types of substitutions in the three trinucleotide sites. It generalizes the previous models based on the nucleotide mutation matrices 4 x 4 and the trinucleotide mutation matrix 64 x 64 with three and six parameters. It determines at some time t the exact occurrence probabilities of trinucleotides mutating randomly according to these nine substitution parameters. An application of this model allows an evolutionary study of the common circular code [Formula: see text] of eukaryotes and prokaryotes and its 12 coded amino acids. The main property of this code [Formula: see text] is the retrieval of the reading frames in genes, both locally, i.e. anywhere in genes and in particular without a start codon, and automatically with a window of a few nucleotides. However, since its identification in 1996, amino acid information coded by [Formula: see text] has never been studied. Very unexpectedly, this evolutionary model demonstrates that random substitutions in this code [Formula: see text] and with particular values for the nine substitutions parameters retrieve after a certain time of evolution a frequency distribution of these 12 amino acids very close to the one coded by the actual genes.

  6. A Conserved Structural Signature of the Homeobox Coding DNA in HOX genes.

    PubMed

    Fongang, Bernard; Kong, Fanping; Negi, Surendra; Braun, Werner; Kudlicki, Andrzej

    2016-10-14

    The homeobox encodes a DNA-binding domain found in transcription factors regulating key developmental processes. The most notable examples of homeobox containing genes are the Hox genes, arranged on chromosomes in the same order as their expression domains along the body axis. The mechanisms responsible for the synchronous regulation of Hox genes and the molecular function of their colinearity remain unknown. Here we report the discovery of a conserved structural signature of the 180-base pair DNA fragment comprising the homeobox. We demonstrate that the homeobox DNA has a characteristic 3-base-pair periodicity in the hydroxyl radical cleavage pattern. This periodic pattern is significant in most of the 39 mammalian Hox genes and in other homeobox-containing transcription factors. The signature is present in segmented bilaterian animals as evolutionarily distant as humans and flies. It remains conserved despite the fact that it would be disrupted by synonymous mutations, which raises the possibility of evolutionary selective pressure acting on the structure of the coding DNA. The homeobox coding DNA may therefore have a secondary function, possibly as a regulatory element. The existence of such element may have important consequences for understanding how these genes are regulated.

  7. The genomic fingerprinting of the coding region of the beta-tubulin gene in Leishmania identification.

    PubMed

    Luis, L; Ramírez, A; Aguilar, C M; Eresh, S; Barker, D C; Mendoza-León, A

    1998-06-01

    We have demonstrated the polymorphism of the beta-tubulin gene region in Leishmania and its value in the identification of the parasite. In this work we have shown that the coding region of the gene has sufficient variation to accurately discriminate these parasites at the subgenus level. Nevertheless, intrasubgenus diversity, for particular restriction enzymes, was found in New World Leishmania belonging to the Leishmania subgenus. For instance, differences were found between mexicana and amazonensis strains. A unique pattern at the species level was found in particular species of both subgenera, e.g. L. (L.) major strain P and L. (L.) tropica belonging to the Leishmania subgenus, and L. (V.) panamensis strain LS94 from the Viannia subgenus. Particular endonucleases are diagnostic in Leishmania species discrimination as in the case of PvuII for the mexicana and amazonensis. This variation evidenced in the beta-tubulin gene region of Leishmania also occurred in other Kinetoplastida e.g. Trypanosoma cruzi, Leptomonas spp. and Crithidia spp. Moreover, these organisms showed a different genomic fingerprinting for the beta-tubulin gene among them and also Leishmania. Thus, the polymorphism of the coding region of the beta-tubulin gene can be used as a molecular marker for the identification of Leishmania.

  8. RNA editing sites exist in protein-coding genes in the chloroplast genome of Cycas taitungensis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyan; Deng, Likun; Jiang, Yuan; Lu, Ping; Yu, Jianing

    2011-12-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process that results in modifications of ribonucleotides at specific locations. In land plants editing can occur in both mitochondria and chloroplasts and most commonly involves C-to-U changes, especially in seed plants. Using prediction and experimental determination, we investigated RNA editing in 40 protein-coding genes from the chloroplast genome of Cycas taitungensis. A total of 85 editing sites were identified in 25 transcripts. Comparison analysis of the published editotypes of these 25 transcripts in eight species showed that RNA editing events gradually disappear during plant evolution. The editing in the first and third codon position disappeared quicker than that in the second codon position. ndh genes have the highest editing frequency while serine and proline codons were more frequently edited than the codons of other amino acids. These results imply that retained RNA editing sites have imbalanced distribution in genes and most of them may function by changing protein structure or interaction. Mitochondrion protein-coding genes have three times the editing sites compared with chloroplast genes of Cycas, most likely due to slower evolution speed.

  9. A Conserved Structural Signature of the Homeobox Coding DNA in HOX genes

    PubMed Central

    Fongang, Bernard; Kong, Fanping; Negi, Surendra; Braun, Werner; Kudlicki, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The homeobox encodes a DNA-binding domain found in transcription factors regulating key developmental processes. The most notable examples of homeobox containing genes are the Hox genes, arranged on chromosomes in the same order as their expression domains along the body axis. The mechanisms responsible for the synchronous regulation of Hox genes and the molecular function of their colinearity remain unknown. Here we report the discovery of a conserved structural signature of the 180-base pair DNA fragment comprising the homeobox. We demonstrate that the homeobox DNA has a characteristic 3-base-pair periodicity in the hydroxyl radical cleavage pattern. This periodic pattern is significant in most of the 39 mammalian Hox genes and in other homeobox-containing transcription factors. The signature is present in segmented bilaterian animals as evolutionarily distant as humans and flies. It remains conserved despite the fact that it would be disrupted by synonymous mutations, which raises the possibility of evolutionary selective pressure acting on the structure of the coding DNA. The homeobox coding DNA may therefore have a secondary function, possibly as a regulatory element. The existence of such element may have important consequences for understanding how these genes are regulated. PMID:27739488

  10. The artificial zinc finger coding gene 'Jazz' binds the utrophin promoter and activates transcription.

    PubMed

    Corbi, N; Libri, V; Fanciulli, M; Tinsley, J M; Davies, K E; Passananti, C

    2000-06-01

    Up-regulation of utrophin gene expression is recognized as a plausible therapeutic approach in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have designed and engineered new zinc finger-based transcription factors capable of binding and activating transcription from the promoter of the dystrophin-related gene, utrophin. Using the recognition 'code' that proposes specific rules between zinc finger primary structure and potential DNA binding sites, we engineered a new gene named 'Jazz' that encodes for a three-zinc finger peptide. Jazz belongs to the Cys2-His2 zinc finger type and was engineered to target the nine base pair DNA sequence: 5'-GCT-GCT-GCG-3', present in the promoter region of both the human and mouse utrophin gene. The entire zinc finger alpha-helix region, containing the amino acid positions that are crucial for DNA binding, was specifically chosen on the basis of the contacts more frequently represented in the available list of the 'code'. Here we demonstrate that Jazz protein binds specifically to the double-stranded DNA target, with a dissociation constant of about 32 nM. Band shift and super-shift experiments confirmed the high affinity and specificity of Jazz protein for its DNA target. Moreover, we show that chimeric proteins, named Gal4-Jazz and Sp1-Jazz, are able to drive the transcription of a test gene from the human utrophin promoter.

  11. Identification of a conserved sequence in the non-coding regions of many human genes.

    PubMed Central

    Donehower, L A; Slagle, B L; Wilde, M; Darlington, G; Butel, J S

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed a sequence of approximately 70 base pairs (bp) that shows a high degree of similarity to sequences present in the non-coding regions of a number of human and other mammalian genes. The sequence was discovered in a fragment of human genomic DNA adjacent to an integrated hepatitis B virus genome in cells derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue. When one of the viral flanking sequences was compared to nucleotide sequences in GenBank, more than thirty human genes were identified that contained a similar sequence in their non-coding regions. The sequence element was usually found once or twice in a gene, either in an intron or in the 5' or 3' flanking regions. It did not share any similarities with known short interspersed nucleotide elements (SINEs) or presently known gene regulatory elements. This element was highly conserved at the same position within the corresponding human and mouse genes for myoglobin and N-myc, indicating evolutionary conservation and possible functional importance. Preliminary DNase I footprinting data suggested that the element or its adjacent sequences may bind nuclear factors to generate specific DNase I hypersensitive sites. The size, structure, and evolutionary conservation of this sequence indicates that it is distinct from other types of short interspersed repetitive elements. It is possible that the element may have a cis-acting functional role in the genome. Images PMID:2536922

  12. Successful Recovery of Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes from Small Insects in Museums Using Illumina Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dasenko, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore high-throughput Illumina sequencing of nuclear protein-coding, ribosomal, and mitochondrial genes in small, dried insects stored in natural history collections. We sequenced one tenebrionid beetle and 12 carabid beetles ranging in size from 3.7 to 9.7 mm in length that have been stored in various museums for 4 to 84 years. Although we chose a number of old, small specimens for which we expected low sequence recovery, we successfully recovered at least some low-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from all specimens. For example, in one 56-year-old beetle, 4.4 mm in length, our de novo assembly recovered about 63% of approximately 41,900 nucleotides in a target suite of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments, and 70% using a reference-based assembly. Even in the least successfully sequenced carabid specimen, reference-based assembly yielded fragments that were at least 50% of the target length for 34 of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments. Exploration of alternative references for reference-based assembly revealed few signs of bias created by the reference. For all specimens we recovered almost complete copies of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes. We verified the general accuracy of the sequences through comparisons with sequences obtained from PCR and Sanger sequencing, including of conspecific, fresh specimens, and through phylogenetic analysis that tested the placement of sequences in predicted regions. A few possible inaccuracies in the sequences were detected, but these rarely affected the phylogenetic placement of the samples. Although our sample sizes are low, an exploratory regression study suggests that the dominant factor in predicting success at recovering nuclear protein-coding genes is a high number of Illumina reads, with success at PCR of COI and killing by immersion in ethanol being secondary factors; in analyses of only high-read samples, the primary significant explanatory variable was body length, with small beetles

  13. Characterization of the cDNA and gene coding for the biotin synthase of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, L M; Yu, F; Wurtele, E S; Nikolau, B J

    1996-01-01

    Biotin, an essential cofactor, is synthesized de novo only by plants and some microbes. An Arabidopsis thaliana expressed sequence tag that shows sequence similarity to the carboxyl end of biotin synthase from Escherichia coli was used to isolate a near-full-length cDNA. This cDNA was shown to code for the Arabidopsis biotin synthase by its ability to complement a bioB mutant of E. coli. Site-specific mutagenesis indicates that residue threonine-173, which is highly conserved in biotin synthases, is important for catalytic competence of the enzyme. The primary sequence of the Arabidopsis biotin synthase is most similar to biotin synthases from E. coli, Serratia marcescens, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (about 50% sequence identity) and more distantly related to the Bacillus sphaericus enzyme (33% sequence identity). The primary sequence of the amino terminus of the Arabidopsis biotin synthase may represent an organelle-targeting transit peptide. The single Arabidopsis gene coding for biotin synthase, BIO2, was isolated and sequenced. The biotin synthase coding sequence is interrupted by five introns. The gene sequence upstream of the translation start site has several unusual features, including imperfect palindromes and polypyrimidine sequences, which may function in the transcriptional regulation of the BIO2 gene. PMID:8819873

  14. Optical coding of fusion genes using multicolor quantum dots for prostate cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyojin; Kim, Chloe; Lee, Dongjin; Park, Jea Ho; Searson, Peter C; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have found that prostate cancer expresses abnormal genetic markers including multiple types of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion genes. The expression level of different TMPRSS2-ERG fusion genes is correlated to pathologic variables of aggressive prostate cancer and disease progression. State-of-the-art methods for detection of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion genes include reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with a detection limit of 1 fmol at urinary condition. RT-PCR is time consuming, costly, and inapplicable for multiplexing. Ability to identify multiple fusion genes in a single sample has become important for diagnostic and clinical purposes. There is a need for a sensitive diagnostic test to detect multiple TMPRSS2-ERG fusion genes for an early diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. Here, we propose to develop an assay for prostate cancer diagnosis using oligonucleotide-functionalized quantum dot and magnetic microparticle for optical detection of rearranged TMPRSS2-ERG fusion genes at a low concentration in urine. We found that our assay was able to identify three different types of fusion gene with a wide detection range and detection limit of 1 fmol (almost the same level of the RT-PCR result reported). Here, we show detection of multiple TMPRSS2-ERG fusion genes using color-coded oligonucleotides in cell lysate and urine.

  15. Computer-aided codon-pairs deoptimization of the major envelope GP5 gene attenuates porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Zhao; Opriessnig, Tanja; Subramaniam, Sakthivel; Zhou, Lei; Cao, Dianjun; Cao, Qian; Yang, Hanchun; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic attenuated virus engineering (SAVE) is an emerging technology that enables rapid attenuation of viruses. In this study, by using SAVE we demonstrated rapid attenuation of an arterivirus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). The major envelope GP5 gene of PRRSV was codon-pair deoptimized aided by a computer algorithm. The codon-pair deoptimized virus, designated as SAVE5 with a deoptimized GP5 gene, was successfully rescued in vitro. The SAVE5 virus replicated at a lower level in vitro with a significant decrease of GP5 protein expression compared to the wild-type PRRSV VR2385 virus. Pigs experimentally infected with the SAVE5 virus had significantly lower viremia level up to 14 days post-infection as well as significantly reduced gross and histological lung lesions when compared to wild-type PRRSV VR2385 virus-infected pigs, indicating the attenuation of the SAVE5 virus. This study proved the feasibility of rapidly attenuating PRRSV by SAVE.

  16. Transcriptional and functional studies of Human Endogenous Retrovirus envelope EnvP(b) and EnvV genes in human trophoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Amandine Thiery, Maxime Lafond, Julie Barbeau, Benoit

    2012-03-30

    HERV (Human Endogenous Retrovirus)-encoded envelope proteins are implicated in the development of the placenta. Indeed, Syncytin-1 and -2 play a crucial role in the fusion of human trophoblasts, a key step in placentation. Other studies have identified two other HERV env proteins, namely EnvP(b) and EnvV, both expressed in the placenta. In this study, we have fully characterized both env transcripts and their expression pattern and have assessed their implication in trophoblast fusion. Through RACE analyses, standard spliced transcripts were detected, while EnvV transcripts demonstrated alternative splicing at its 3 Prime end. Promoter activity and expression of both genes were induced in forskolin-stimulated BeWo cells and in primary trophoblasts. Although we have confirmed the fusogenic activity of EnvP(b), overexpression or silencing experiments revealed no impact of this protein on trophoblast fusion. Our results demonstrate that both env genes are expressed in human trophoblasts but are not required for syncytialization.

  17. Comparison on virulence and immunogenicity of two recombinant vaccinia vaccines, Tian Tan and Guang9 strains, expressing the HIV-1 envelope gene.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rong; Huang, Weijin; Wang, Wenbo; Liu, Qiang; Nie, Jianhui; Meng, Shufang; Yu, Yongxin; Wang, Youchun

    2012-01-01

    The vaccinia virus Guang9 strain (VG9), derived from the vaccinia virus Tian Tan strain (VTT) has been found to be less virulent than VTT. To investigate whether VG9 could be a potential replicating virus vector, the TK genes in VG9 and VTT were replaced with the HIV-1 envelope gene via homologous recombination, resulting in the recombinant viruses, VG9-E and VTT-E. The biology, virulence, humoral and cellular immunological responses of VG9-E and VTT-E were evaluated. Our results indicated no obvious difference in range of host cells and diffusion between two recombinant viruses. Neurovirulence for VG9-E in weanling and suckling mice, and skin virulence in rabbits, were lower than that of VTT-E. The humoral immune responses, including binding antibody and neutralizing antibody responses, induced by VG9-E were not significantly different from those for VTT-E whilst IFN-γ response which represented cellular immune response induced by VG9-E was significantly higher than that did by VTT-E. Our results indicated that VG9-E was less virulent, yet induced higher cellular immune response than VTT-E. Therefore, it could be an ideal replicating vaccinia vector for HIV vaccine research and development.

  18. Comparison on Virulence and Immunogenicity of Two Recombinant Vaccinia Vaccines, Tian Tan and Guang9 Strains, Expressing the HIV-1 Envelope Gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Rong; Huang, Weijin; Wang, Wenbo; Liu, Qiang; Nie, Jianhui; Meng, Shufang; Yu, Yongxin; Wang, Youchun

    2012-01-01

    Background The vaccinia virus Guang9 strain (VG9), derived from the vaccinia virus Tian Tan strain (VTT) has been found to be less virulent than VTT. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate whether VG9 could be a potential replicating virus vector, the TK genes in VG9 and VTT were replaced with the HIV-1 envelope gene via homologous recombination, resulting in the recombinant viruses, VG9-E and VTT-E. The biology, virulence, humoral and cellular immunological responses of VG9-E and VTT-E were evaluated. Our results indicated no obvious difference in range of host cells and diffusion between two recombinant viruses. Neurovirulence for VG9-E in weanling and suckling mice, and skin virulence in rabbits, were lower than that of VTT-E. The humoral immune responses, including binding antibody and neutralizing antibody responses, induced by VG9-E were not significantly different from those for VTT-E whilst IFN-γ response which represented cellular immune response induced by VG9-E was significantly higher than that did by VTT-E. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicated that VG9-E was less virulent, yet induced higher cellular immune response than VTT-E. Therefore, it could be an ideal replicating vaccinia vector for HIV vaccine research and development. PMID:23139778

  19. Mutations in variable domains of the HIV-1 envelope gene can have a significant impact on maraviroc and vicriviroc resistance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance to CCR5 inhibitors, such as maraviroc and vicriviroc is characterized by reduction of maximal percent inhibition which indicates the use of an inhibitor-bound conformation of CCR5 for human immunodeficiency virus-1(HIV-1) entry. It is accompanied by substitutions in gp120 and gp41. Variable domain 3 (V3) plays the most important role, but substitutions outside V3 could also be involved in phenotype resistance. In this work, we investigated how mutations in variable regions of the viral envelope protein gp120 can contribute to CCR5 inhibitor resistance. Methods Resistant isolates were selected by passaging CC1/85 and BaL viruses with sub-inhibitory MVC and VCV concentrations. Mutations in gp160 were identified and mutants containing V2 (V169M), V3 (L317W) and V4 (I408T) were constructed. Results MVC and VCV susceptibility and viral tropism were assessed by single cycle assay. Mutant I408T showed 4-fold change (FC) increase in the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) to MVC, followed by L317W (1.52-FC), V169M (1.23-FC), V169M/I408T (4-FC) L317W/I408T (3-FC), V169M/L317W (1.30-FC), and V169M/L317W/I408T (3.31-FC). MPI reduction was observed for mutants I408T (85%), L317W (95%), V169M/I408T (84%), L317W/I408T (85%) and V169M/L317W/I408T (83%). For VCV, I408T increased the IC50 by 2-FC and few mutants showed MPI reduction less than 95%: I408T (94%), L317W/I408T (94%) and V169M/L317W/I408T (94%). All mutants remained R5-tropic and presented decreased infectivity. Conclusions These results suggest that mutations in the V4 loop of HIV-1 may contribute to MVC and VCV resistance alone or combined with mutations in V2 and V3 loops. PMID:23758814

  20. Origins of gene, genetic code, protein and life: comprehensive view of life systems from a GNC-SNS primitive genetic code hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Ikehara, K

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the origin of genes, the genetic code, proteins and life using six indices (hydropathy, alpha-helix, beta-sheet and beta-turn formabilities, acidic amino acid content and basic amino acid content) necessary for appropriate three-dimensional structure formation of globular proteins. From the analysis of microbial genes, we have concluded that newly-born genes are products of nonstop frames (NSF) on antisense strands of microbial GC-rich genes [GC-NSF(a)] and from SNS repeating sequences [(SNS)n] similar to the GC-NSF(a) (S and N mean G or C and either of four bases, respectively). We have also proposed that the universal genetic code used by most organisms on the earth presently could be derived from a GNC-SNS primitive genetic code. We have further presented the [GADV]-protein world hypothesis of the origin of life as well as a hypothesis of protein production, suggesting that proteins were originally produced by random peptide formation of amino acids restricted in specific amino acid compositions termed as GNC-, SNS- and GC-NSF(a)-0th order structures of proteins. The [GADV]-protein world hypothesis is primarily derived from the GNC-primitive genetic code hypothesis. It is also expected that basic properties of extant genes and proteins could be revealed by considerations based on the scenario with four stages.

  1. The maximal C(3) self-complementary trinucleotide circular code X in genes of bacteria, eukaryotes, plasmids and viruses.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J

    2015-09-07

    In 1996, a set X of 20 trinucleotides is identified in genes of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes which has in average the highest occurrence in reading frame compared to the two shifted frames (Arquès and Michel, 1996). Furthermore, this set X has an interesting mathematical property as X is a maximal C(3) self-complementary trinucleotide circular code (Arquès and Michel, 1996). In 2014, the number of trinucleotides in prokaryotic genes has been multiplied by a factor of 527. Furthermore, two new gene kingdoms of plasmids and viruses contain enough trinucleotide data to be analysed. The approach used in 1996 for identifying a preferential frame for a trinucleotide is quantified here with a new definition analysing the occurrence probability of a complementary/permutation (CP) trinucleotide set in a gene kingdom. Furthermore, in order to increase the statistical significance of results compared to those of 1996, the circular code X is studied on several gene taxonomic groups in a kingdom. Based on this new statistical approach, the circular code X is strengthened in genes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and now also identified in genes of plasmids. A subset of X with 18 or 16 trinucleotides is identified in genes of viruses. Furthermore, a simple probabilistic model based on the independent occurrence of trinucleotides in reading frame of genes explains the circular code frequencies and asymmetries observed in the shifted frames in all studied gene kingdoms. Finally, the developed approach allows to identify variant X codes in genes, i.e. trinucleotide codes which differ from X. In genes of bacteria, eukaryotes and plasmids, 14 among the 47 studied gene taxonomic groups (about 30%) have variant X codes. Seven variant X codes are identified with at least 16 trinucleotides of X. Two variant X codes XA in cyanobacteria and plasmids of cyanobacteria, and XD in birds are self-complementary, without permuted trinucleotides but non-circular. Five variant X codes XB in

  2. DNA methylation patterns of protein coding genes and long noncoding RNAs in female schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qi; Wang, Yunliang; Cheng, Jia; Dai, Dongjun; Zhou, Xingyu; Zhang, Yuzheng; Gao, Shugui; Duan, Shiwei

    2015-02-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a complex mental disorder contributed by both genetic and epigenetic factors. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) was recently found playing an important regulatory role in mental disorders. However, little was known about the DNA methylation of lncRNAs, although numerous SCZ studies have been performed on genetic polymorphisms or epigenetic marks in protein coding genes. We presented a comprehensive genome wide DNA methylation study of both protein coding genes and lncRNAs in female patients with paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ. Using the methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) protein-enriched genome sequencing (MBD-seq), 8,163 and 764 peaks were identified in paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, respectively (p < 1 × 10-5). Gene ontology analysis showed that the hypermethylated regions were enriched in the genes related to neuron system and brain for both paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ (p < 0.05). Among these peaks, 121 peaks were located in gene promoter regions that might affect gene expression and influence the SCZ related pathways. Interestingly, DNA methylation of 136 and 23 known lncRNAs in Refseq database were identified in paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, respectively. In addition, ∼20% of intergenic peaks annotated based on Refseq genes were overlapped with lncRNAs in UCSC and gencode databases. In order to show the results well for most biological researchers, we created an online database to display and visualize the information of DNA methyation peaks in both types of SCZ (http://www.bioinfo.org/scz/scz.htm). Our results showed that the aberrant DNA methylation of lncRNAs might be another important epigenetic factor for SCZ.

  3. Role of Conserved Non-Coding Regulatory Elements in LMW Glutenin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Angéla; Makai, Szabolcs; Sebestyén, Endre; Tamás, László; Balázs, Ervin

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of LMW glutenin genes were investigated in-silico, using publicly available gene sequences and expression data. Genes were grouped into different LMW glutenin types and their promoter profiles were determined using cis-acting regulatory elements databases and published results. The various cis-acting elements belong to some conserved non-coding regulatory regions (CREs) and might act in two different ways. There are elements, such as GCN4 motifs found in the long endosperm box that could serve as key factors in tissue-specific expression. Some other elements, such as the AACA/TA motifs or the individual prolamin box variants, might modulate the level of expression. Based on the promoter sequences and expression characteristic LMW glutenin genes might be transcribed following two different mechanisms. Most of the s- and i-type genes show a continuously increasing expression pattern. The m-type genes, however, demonstrate normal distribution in their expression profiles. Differences observed in their expression could be related to the differences found in their promoter sequences. Polymorphisms in the number and combination of cis-acting elements in their promoter regions can be of crucial importance in the diverse levels of production of single LMW glutenin gene types. PMID:22242127

  4. Nucleotide Sequence of the Envelope Gene of Gardner-Arnstein Feline Leukemia Virus B Reveals Unique Sequence Homologies with a Murine Mink Cell Focus-Forming Virus †

    PubMed Central

    Elder, John H.; Mullins, James I.

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the envelope gene and the adjacent 3′ long terminal repeat (LTR) of Gardner-Arnstein feline leukemia virus of subgroup B (GA-FeLV-B) has been determined. Comparison of the derived amino acid sequence of the gp70-p15E polyprotein to those of several previously reported murine retroviruses revealed striking homologies between GA-FeLV-B gp70 and the gp70 of a Moloney virus-derived mink cell focus-forming virus. These homologies were located within the substituted (presumably xenotropic) portion of the mink cell focus-forming virus envelope gene and comprised amino acid sequences not present in three ecotropic virus gp70s. In addition, areas of insertions and deletions, in general, were the same between GA-FeLV-B and Moloney mink cell focus-forming virus, although the sizes of the insertions and deletions differed. Homologies between GA-FeLV-B and mink cell focus-forming virus gp70s is functionally significant in that they both possess expanded host ranges, a property dictated by gp70. The amino acid sequence of FeLV-B contains 12 Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequences, indicating 12 possible sites of N-linked glycosylation as compared with 7 or 8 for its murine counterparts. Comparison of the 3′ LTR of GA-FeLV-B to AKR and Moloney virus LTRs revealed extensive conservation in several regions including the “CCAAT” and Goldberg-Hogness (TATA) boxes thought to be involved in promotion of transcription and in the repeat region of the LTR. The inverted repeats that flanked the LTR of GA-FeLV-B were identical to the murine inverted repeats, but were one base longer than the latter. The region of U3 corresponding to the approximately 75-nucleotide “enhancer sequence” is present in GA-FeLV-B, but contains deletions relative to AKR and Moloney virus and is not repeated. An interesting pallindrome in the repeat region immediately 3′ to the U3 region was noted in all the LTRs, but was particularly pronounced in GA-FeLV-B. Possible roles for this

  5. Accelerated Evolution of Schistosome Genes Coding for Proteins Located at the Host–Parasite Interface

    PubMed Central

    Philippsen, Gisele S.; Wilson, R. Alan; DeMarco, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Study of proteins located at the host–parasite interface in schistosomes might provide clues about the mechanisms utilized by the parasite to escape the host immune system attack. Micro-exon gene (MEG) protein products and venom allergen-like (VAL) proteins have been shown to be present in schistosome secretions or associated with glands, which led to the hypothesis that they are important components in the molecular interaction of the parasite with the host. Phylogenetic and structural analysis of genes and their transcripts in these two classes shows that recent species-specific expansion of gene number for these families occurred separately in three different species of schistosomes. Enrichment of transposable elements in MEG and VAL genes in Schistosoma mansoni provides a credible mechanism for preferential expansion of gene numbers for these families. Analysis of the ratio between synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates (dN/dS) in the comparison between schistosome orthologs for the two classes of genes reveals significantly higher values when compared with a set of a control genes coding for secreted proteins, and for proteins previously localized in the tegument. Additional analyses of paralog genes indicate that exposure of the protein to the definitive host immune system is a determining factor leading to the higher than usual dN/dS values in those genes. The observation that two genes encoding S. mansoni vaccine candidate proteins, known to be exposed at the parasite surface, also display similar evolutionary dynamics suggests a broad response of the parasite to evolutionary pressure imposed by the definitive host immune system. PMID:25567667

  6. NONCODEv4: exploring the world of long non-coding RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chaoyong; Yuan, Jiao; Li, Hui; Li, Ming; Zhao, Guoguang; Bu, Dechao; Zhu, Weimin; Wu, Wei; Chen, Runsheng; Zhao, Yi

    2014-01-01

    NONCODE (http://www.bioinfo.org/noncode/) is an integrated knowledge database dedicated to non-coding RNAs (excluding tRNAs and rRNAs). Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been implied in diseases and identified to play important roles in various biological processes. Since NONCODE version 3.0 was released 2 years ago, discovery of novel ncRNAs has been promoted by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). In this update of NONCODE, we expand the ncRNA data set by collection of newly identified ncRNAs from literature published in the last 2 years and integration of the latest version of RefSeq and Ensembl. Particularly, the number of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) has increased sharply from 73 327 to 210 831. Owing to similar alternative splicing pattern to mRNAs, the concept of lncRNA genes was put forward to help systematic understanding of lncRNAs. The 56 018 and 46 475 lncRNA genes were generated from 95 135 and 67 628 lncRNAs for human and mouse, respectively. Additionally, we present expression profile of lncRNA genes by graphs based on public RNA-seq data for human and mouse, as well as predict functions of these lncRNA genes. The improvements brought to the database also include an incorporation of an ID conversion tool from RefSeq or Ensembl ID to NONCODE ID and a service of lncRNA identification. NONCODE is also accessible through http://www.noncode.org/. PMID:24285305

  7. Mutation analysis of the coding sequence of the MECP2 gene in infantile autism.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Kim S; Blasi, Francesca; Bacchelli, Elena; Klauck, Sabine M; Maestrini, Elena; Poustka, Annemarie

    2002-10-01

    Mutations in the coding region of the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 ( MECP2) gene cause Rett syndrome and have also been reported in a number of X-linked mental retardation syndromes. Furthermore, such mutations have recently been described in a few autistic patients. In this study, a large sample of individuals with autism was screened in order to elucidate systematically whether specific mutations in MECP2 play a role in autism. The mutation analysis of the coding sequence of the gene was performed by denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. Taken together, 14 sequence variants were identified in 152 autistic patients from 134 German families and 50 unrelated patients from the International Molecular Genetic Study of Autism Consortium affected relative-pair sample. Eleven of these variants were excluded for having an aetiological role as they were either silent mutations, did not cosegregate with autism in the pedigrees of the patients or represented known polymorphisms. The relevance of the three remaining mutations towards the aetiology of autism could not be ruled out, although they were not localised within functional domains of MeCP2 and may be rare polymorphisms. Taking into account the large size of our sample, we conclude that mutations in the coding region of MECP2 do not play a major role in autism susceptibility. Therefore, infantile autism and Rett syndrome probably represent two distinct entities at the molecular genetic level.

  8. Nuclear envelopathies: a complex LINC between nuclear envelope and pathology.

    PubMed

    Janin, Alexandre; Bauer, Delphine; Ratti, Francesca; Millat, Gilles; Méjat, Alexandre

    2017-08-30

    Since the identification of the first disease causing mutation in the gene coding for emerin, a transmembrane protein of the inner nuclear membrane, hundreds of mutations and variants have been found in genes encoding for nuclear envelope components. These proteins can be part of the inner nuclear membrane (INM), such as emerin or SUN proteins, outer nuclear membrane (ONM), such as Nesprins, or the nuclear lamina, such as lamins A and C. However, they physically interact with each other to insure the nuclear envelope integrity and mediate the interactions of the nuclear envelope with both the genome, on the inner side, and the cytoskeleton, on the outer side. The core of this complex, called LINC (LInker of Nucleoskeleton to Cytoskeleton) is composed of KASH and SUN homology domain proteins. SUN proteins are INM proteins which interact with lamins by their N-terminal domain and with the KASH domain of nesprins located in the ONM by their C-terminal domain.Although most of these proteins are ubiquitously expressed, their mutations have been associated with a large number of clinically unrelated pathologies affecting specific tissues. Moreover, variants in SUN proteins have been found to modulate the severity of diseases induced by mutations in other LINC components or interactors. For these reasons, the diagnosis and the identification of the molecular explanation of "nuclear envelopathies" is currently challenging.The aim of this review is to summarize the human diseases caused by mutations in genes coding for INM proteins, nuclear lamina, and ONM proteins, and to discuss their potential physiopathological mechanisms that could explain the large spectrum of observed symptoms.

  9. Significant inhibition of Tembusu virus envelope and NS5 gene using an adenovirus-mediated short hairpin RNA delivery system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Feng, Qiang; Wei, Lei; Zhuo, Liling; Chen, Hao; Diao, Youxiang; Tang, Yi

    2017-10-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus, which was first isolated in the tropics during the 1970s. Recently, a disease characterized by ovarian haemorrhage and neurological symptoms was observed in ducks in China, which threatens poultry production. However, there is no suitable vaccination strategy or effective antiviral drugs to combat TMUV infections. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop a new anti-TMUV therapy. In this study, we report an efficient short hairpin RNA (shRNA) delivery strategy for the inhibition of TMUV production using an adenovirus vector system. Using specifically designed shRNAs based on the E and NS5 protein genes of TMUV, the vector-expressed viral genes, TMUV RNA replication and infectious virus production were downregulated at different levels in Vero cells, where the shRNA (NS52) was highly effective in inhibiting TMUV. Using the human adenovirus type 5 shRNA delivery system, the recombinant adenovirus (rAd-NS52) inhibited TMUV multiplication with high efficiency. Furthermore, the significant dose-dependent inhibition of viral RNA copies induced by rAd-NS52 was found in TMUV-infected cells, which could last for at least 96h post infection. Our results indicated that the adenovirus-mediated delivery of shRNAs could play an active role in future TMUV antiviral therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Tissue-Specific Evolution of Protein Coding Genes in Human and Mouse.

    PubMed

    Kryuchkova-Mostacci, Nadezda; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Protein-coding genes evolve at different rates, and the influence of different parameters, from gene size to expression level, has been extensively studied. While in yeast gene expression level is the major causal factor of gene evolutionary rate, the situation is more complex in animals. Here we investigate these relations further, especially taking in account gene expression in different organs as well as indirect correlations between parameters. We used RNA-seq data from two large datasets, covering 22 mouse tissues and 27 human tissues. Over all tissues, evolutionary rate only correlates weakly with levels and breadth of expression. The strongest explanatory factors of purifying selection are GC content, expression in many developmental stages, and expression in brain tissues. While the main component of evolutionary rate is purifying selection, we also find tissue-specific patterns for sites under neutral evolution and for positive selection. We observe fast evolution of genes expressed in testis, but also in other tissues, notably liver, which are explained by weak purifying selection rather than by positive selection.

  11. Variation in the Number of Genes Coding for Salivary Amylase in the Bank Vole, CLETHRIONOMYS GLAREOLA

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Jørn Tønnes

    1977-01-01

    A Danish population of bank voles is polymorphic for three electrophoretically different salivary amylases, A, H and S, of which A is the most common. Both single-, double- and triple banded phenotypes were observed, and in several crosses two electrophoretic forms cosegregated. In addition to the qualitative variation, some individuals show consistent quantitative variation in the relative activities of their amylase bands. This variation has been qualified by spectrophotometrical measurements of the relative amounts of amylase protein in the various bands.—Seventy wild chromosomes were analyzed by determining the amounts of amylase they produced when heterozygous with a laboratory stock chromosome known to carry two closely linked amylase genes, both coding for a fourth electrophoretic variant, B. The amount of A-protein divided by half the amount of B-protein was used as an estimate of the number of A-genes on the tested chromosomes. The wild chromosomes fell into three clearly distinguishable classes: 9 clustered around a gene number estimate of one, 45 chromosomes yielded estimates around two genes, and the gene number estimate of the remaining 16 was close to three. The integer values of the gene number estimates and the cosegregation of electrophoretically different salivary amylases are consistent with the model that the population is polymorphic for chromosomes with either one, two, or three closely linked amylase genes. It is suggested that such gene number variation may be more common than generally recognized, and some other reported cases of quantitative enzyme variation, for instance that of human red cell acid phosphatase, are interpreted in terms of variation in the number of genes involved. PMID:320091

  12. Deciphering the mRNP Code: RNA-Bound Determinants of Post-Transcriptional Gene Regulation.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Niels H; Wahle, Elmar; Fischer, Utz

    2017-03-03

    Eukaryotic cells determine the final protein output of their genetic program not only by controlling transcription but also by regulating the localization, translation and turnover rates of their mRNAs. Ultimately, the fate of any given mRNA is determined by the ensemble of all associated RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), non-coding RNAs and metabolites collectively known as the messenger ribonucleoprotein particle (mRNP). Although many mRNA-associated factors have been identified over the past years, little is known about the composition of individual mRNPs and the cooperation of their constituents. In this review we discuss recent progress that has been made on how this 'mRNP code' is established on individual transcripts and how it is interpreted during gene expression in eukaryotic cells.

  13. Ribosome profiling reveals pervasive translation outside of annotated protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Ingolia, Nicholas T; Brar, Gloria A; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Harris, Michael S; Talhouarne, Gaëlle J S; Jackson, Sarah E; Wills, Mark R; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2014-09-11

    Ribosome profiling suggests that ribosomes occupy many regions of the transcriptome thought to be noncoding, including 5' UTRs and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). Apparent ribosome footprints outside of protein-coding regions raise the possibility of artifacts unrelated to translation, particularly when they occupy multiple, overlapping open reading frames (ORFs). Here, we show hallmarks of translation in these footprints: copurification with the large ribosomal subunit, response to drugs targeting elongation, trinucleotide periodicity, and initiation at early AUGs. We develop a metric for distinguishing between 80S footprints and nonribosomal sources using footprint size distributions, which validates the vast majority of footprints outside of coding regions. We present evidence for polypeptide production beyond annotated genes, including the induction of immune responses following human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. Translation is pervasive on cytosolic transcripts outside of conserved reading frames, and direct detection of this expanded universe of translated products enables efforts at understanding how cells manage and exploit its consequences.

  14. 187-gene phylogeny of protozoan phylum Amoebozoa reveals a new class (Cutosea) of deep-branching, ultrastructurally unique, enveloped marine Lobosa and clarifies amoeba evolution.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Chao, Ema E; Lewis, Rhodri

    2016-06-01

    Monophyly of protozoan phylum Amoebozoa, and subdivision into subphyla Conosa and Lobosa each with different cytoskeletons, are well established. However early diversification of non-ciliate lobose amoebae (Lobosa) is poorly understood. To clarify it we used recently available transcriptomes to construct a 187-gene amoebozoan tree for 30 species, the most comprehensive yet. This robustly places new genus Atrichosa (formerly lumped with Trichosphaerium) within lobosan class Tubulinea, not Discosea as previously supposed. We identified an earliest diverging lobosan clade comprising marine amoebae armoured by porose scaliform cell-envelopes, here made a novel class Cutosea with two pseudopodially distinct new families. Cutosea comprise Sapocribrum, ATCC PRA-29 misidentified as 'Pessonella', plus from other evidence Squamamoeba. We confirm that Acanthamoeba and ATCC 50982 misidentified as Stereomyxa ramosa are closely related. Discosea have a strongly supported major subclade comprising Thecamoebida plus Glycostylida (suborders Dactylopodina, Stygamoebina; Vannellina) phylogenetically distinct from Centramoebida. Stygamoeba is sister to Dactylopodina. Himatismenida are either sister to Centramoebida or deeper branching. Discosea usually appear holophyletic (rarely paraphyletic). Paramoeba transcriptomes include prokinetoplastid Perkinsela-like endosymbiont sequences. Cunea, misidentified as Mayorella, is closer to Paramoeba than Vexillifera within holophyletic Dactylopodina. Taxon-rich site-heterogeneous rDNA trees confirm cutosan distinctiveness, allow improved conosan taxonomy, and reveal previous dictyostelid tree misrooting.

  15. Human endogenous retrovirus W family envelope gene activates the small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel in human neuroblastoma cells through CREB.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Liu, Z C; Yin, S J; Chen, Y T; Yu, H L; Zeng, J; Zhang, Q; Zhu, F

    2013-09-05

    Numerous studies have shown that human endogenous retrovirus W family (HERV-W) envelope gene (env) is related to various diseases but the underlying mechanism has remained poorly understood. Our previous study showed that there was abnormal expression of HERV-W env in sera of patients with schizophrenia. In this paper, we reported that overexpression of the HERV-W env elevated the levels of small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel protein 3 (SK3) in human neuroblastoma cells. Using a luciferase reporter system and RNA interference method, we found that functional cAMP response element site was required for the expression of SK3 triggered by HERV-W env. In addition, it was also found that the SK3 channel was activated by HERV-W env. Further study indicated that cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) was required for the activation of the SK3 channel. Thus, a novel signaling mechanism of how HERV-W env influences neuronal activity and contributes to mental illnesses such as schizophrenia was proposed.

  16. A novel coding method for gene mutation correction during protein translation process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Tian, Fengchun; Wang, Shiyuan; Liu, Xiao

    2012-03-07

    In gene expression, gene mutations often lead to negative effect of protein translation in prokaryotic organisms. With consideration of the influences produced by gene mutation, a novel method based on error-correction coding theory is proposed for modeling and detection of translation initiation in this paper. In the proposed method, combined with a one-dimensional codebook from block coding, a decoding method based on the minimum hamming distance is designed for analysis of translation efficiency. The results show that the proposed method can recognize the biologically significant regions such as Shine-Dalgarno region within the mRNA leader sequences effectively. Also, a global analysis of single base and multiple bases mutations of the Shine-Dalgarno sequences are established. Compared with other published experimental methods for mutation analysis, the translation initiation can not be disturbed by multiple bases mutations using the proposed method, which shows the effectiveness of this method in improving the translation efficiency and its biological relevance for genetic regulatory system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of a conserved sequence in the non-coding regions of many human genes

    SciTech Connect

    Donehower, L.A.; Slagle, B.L.; Wilde, M.; Darlington, G.; Butel, J.S. )

    1989-01-25

    The authors have analyzed a sequence of approximately 70 base pairs (bp) that shows a high degree of similarity to sequences present in the non-coding regions of a number of human and other mammalian genes. The sequence was discovered in a fragment of human genomic DNA adjacent to an integrated hepatitis B virus genome in cells derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue. When one of the viral flanking sequences was compared to nucleotide sequences in GenBank, more than thirty human genes were identified that contained a similar sequence in their non-coding regions. This element was highly conserved at the same position within the corresponding human and mouse genes for myoglobin and N-myc, indicating evolutionary conservation and possible functional importance. Preliminary DNase I footprinting data suggested that the element or its adjacent sequences may bind nuclear factors to generate specific DNase I hypersensitive sites. The size, structure, and evolutionary conservation of this sequence indicates that it is distinct from other types of short interspersed repetitive elements. It is possible that the element may have a cis-acting functional role in the genome.

  18. Most highly expressed protein-coding genes have a single dominant isoform.

    PubMed

    Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Carrillo-de Santa Pau, Enrique; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2015-04-03

    Although eukaryotic cells express a wide range of alternatively spliced transcripts, it is not clear whether genes tend to express a range of transcripts simultaneously across cells, or produce dominant isoforms in a manner that is either tissue-specific or regardless of tissue. To date, large-scale investigations into the pattern of transcript expression across distinct tissues have produced contradictory results. Here, we attempt to determine whether genes express a dominant splice variant at the protein level. We interrogate peptides from eight large-scale human proteomics experiments and databases and find that there is a single dominant protein isoform, irrespective of tissue or cell type, for the vast majority of the protein-coding genes in these experiments, in partial agreement with the conclusions from the most recent large-scale RNAseq study. Remarkably, the dominant isoforms from the experimental proteomics analyses coincided overwhelmingly with the reference isoforms selected by two completely orthogonal sources, the consensus coding sequence variants, which are agreed upon by separate manual genome curation teams, and the principal isoforms from the APPRIS database, predicted automatically from the conservation of protein sequence, structure, and function.

  19. Cell-surface area codes: mobile-element related gene switches generate precise and heritable cell-surface displays of address molecules that are used for constructing embryos.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, W J; Roman-Dreyer, J

    1999-01-01

    We present an updated area code hypothesis supporting the proposal that cell surface display of seven-transmembrane olfactory receptors, protocadherins and other cell surface receptors provide codes that enable cells to find their correct partners as they sculpture embryos. The genetic mechanisms that program the expression of such displays have been largely unknown until very recently. However, increasing evidence now suggests that precise developmental control of the expression of these genes during embryogenesis is achieved in part by permanent and heritable changes in DNA. Using the developing immune system as a model, we discuss two different types of developmentally programmed genetic switches, each of which relies on recombination mechanisms related to mobile elements. We review new evidence suggesting the involvement of mobile element related switch mechanisms in the generation of protocadherin molecules, and their possible involvement in the control of expressions of olfactory receptors. As both recombinase and reverse transcriptase mechanisms play a role in the switching of the immunoglobulin genes, we searched the databases of expressed sequence tags (dbEST) for expression of related genes in other tissues. We present data revealing that transposases and reverse transcriptases are widely expressed in most tissues. We also searched these databases for expression of env (envelope) gene products, stimulated by provocative results suggesting that these molecules might function as cellular address receptors. We found that env genes are also expressed in large numbers in normal human tissues. One must assume that these three different types of mobile-element-related messenger RNA molecules (transposases, reverse transcriptases, and env proteins) are expressed for use in functions of value in the various tissues and have been preserved in the genome because of their selective advantages. We conclude that it is possible that many specific cell lineage decisions

  20. Maternally Expressed Gene 3, an imprinted non-coding RNA gene, is associated with meningioma pathogenesis and progression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xun; Gejman, Roger; Mahta, Ali; Zhong, Ying; Rice, Kimberley A.; Zhou, Yunli; Cheunsuchon, Pornsuk; Louis, David N.; Klibanski, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Meningiomas are common tumors, representing 15-25% of all central nervous system tumors. NF2 gene inactivation on chromosome 22 has been shown as an early event in tumorigenesis; however, few factors underlying tumor growth and progression have been identified. Chromosomal abnormalities of 14q32 are often associated with meningioma pathogenesis and progression; therefore it has been proposed that an as yet unidentified tumor suppressor is present at this locus. MEG3 is an imprinted gene located at 14q32 that encodes a non-coding RNA with an anti-proliferative function. We found that MEG3 mRNA is highly expressed in normal arachnoidal cells. However, MEG3 is not expressed in the majority of human meningiomas or the human meningioma cell lines IOMM-Lee and CH157-MN. There is a strong association between loss of MEG3 expression and tumor grade. Allelic loss at the MEG3 locus is also observed in meningiomas, with increasing prevalence in higher grade tumors. In addition, there is an increase in CpG methylation within the promoter and the imprinting control region of MEG3 gene in meningiomas. Functionally, MEG3 suppresses DNA synthesis in both IOMM-Lee and CH157-MN cells by approximately 60% in BrdU incorporation assays. Colony-forming efficiency assays show that MEG3 inhibits colony formation in CH157-MN cells by approximately 80%. Furthermore, MEG3 stimulates p53-mediated transactivation in these cell lines. Therefore, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that MEG3, which encodes a non-coding RNA, may be a tumor suppressor gene at chromosome 14q32 involved in meningioma progression via a novel mechanism. PMID:20179190

  1. Multisubunit RNA Polymerases IV and V: Purveyors of Non-Coding RNA for Plant Gene Silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2011-08-01

    In all eukaryotes, nuclear DNA-dependent RNA polymerases I, II and III synthesize the myriad RNAs that are essential for life. Remarkably, plants have evolved two additional multisubunit RNA polymerases, RNA polymerases IV and V, which orchestrate non-coding RNA-mediated gene silencing processes affecting development, transposon taming, antiviral defence and allelic crosstalk. Biochemical details concerning the templates and products of RNA polymerases IV and V are lacking. However, their subunit compositions reveal that they evolved as specialized forms of RNA polymerase II, which provides the unique opportunity to study the functional diversification of a eukaryotic RNA polymerase family.

  2. Short communication: phylodynamics analysis of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope gene in mother and child pairs.

    PubMed

    Santos, Luciane Amorim; Gray, Rebecca R; Monteiro-Cunha, Joana Paixão; Strazza, Evandra; Kashima, Simone; Santos, Edson de Souza; Araújo, Thessika Hialla Almeida; Gonçalves, Marilda de Souza; Salemi, Marco; Alcantara, Luiz Carlos Junior

    2015-09-01

    Characterizing the impact of HIV transmission routes on viral genetic diversity can improve the understanding of the mechanisms of virus evolution and adaptation. HIV vertical transmission can occur in utero, during delivery, or while breastfeeding. The present study investigated the phylodynamics of the HIV-1 env gene in mother-to-child transmission by analyzing one chronically infected pair from Brazil and three acutely infected pairs from Zambia, with three to five time points. Sequences from 25 clones from each sample were obtained and aligned using Clustal X. ML trees were constructed in PhyML using the best evolutionary model. Bayesian analyses testing the relaxed and strict molecular clock were performed using BEAST and a Bayesian Skyline Plot (BSP) was construed. The genetic variability of previously described epitopes was investigated and compared between each individual time point and between mother and child sequences. The relaxed molecular clock was the best-fitted model for all datasets. The tree topologies did not show differentiation in the evolutionary dynamics of the virus circulating in the mother from the viral population in the child. In the BSP, the effective population size was more constant in time in the chronically infected patients while in the acute patients it was possible to detect bottlenecks. The genetic variability within viral epitopes recognized by the human immune system was considerably higher among the chronically infected pair in comparison with acutely infected pairs. These results contribute to a better understanding of HIV-1 evolutionary dynamics in mother-to-child transmission.

  3. Two lamprey Hedgehog genes share non-coding regulatory sequences and expression patterns with gnathostome Hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Kano, Shungo; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Osório, Joana; Ekker, Marc; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Müller, Ferenc; Casane, Didier; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2010-10-13

    Hedgehog (Hh) genes play major roles in animal development and studies of their evolution, expression and function point to major differences among chordates. Here we focused on Hh genes in lampreys in order to characterize the evolution of Hh signalling at the emergence of vertebrates. Screening of a cosmid library of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and searching the preliminary genome assembly of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus indicate that lampreys have two Hh genes, named Hha and Hhb. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that Hha and Hhb are lamprey-specific paralogs closely related to Sonic/Indian Hh genes. Expression analysis indicates that Hha and Hhb are expressed in a Sonic Hh-like pattern. The two transcripts are expressed in largely overlapping but not identical domains in the lamprey embryonic brain, including a newly-described expression domain in the nasohypophyseal placode. Global alignments of genomic sequences and local alignment with known gnathostome regulatory motifs show that lamprey Hhs share conserved non-coding elements (CNE) with gnathostome Hhs albeit with sequences that have significantly diverged and dispersed. Functional assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrate gnathostome-like midline enhancer activity for CNEs contained in intron2. We conclude that lamprey Hh genes are gnathostome Shh-like in terms of expression and regulation. In addition, they show some lamprey-specific features, including duplication and structural (but not functional) changes in the intronic/regulatory sequences.

  4. Patterns of Nucleotide Substitution in Mitochondrial Protein Coding Genes of Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S.

    1996-01-01

    Maximum likelihood methods were used to study the differences in substitution rates among the four nucleotides and among different nucleotide sites in mitochondrial protein-coding genes of vertebrates. In the 1st+2nd codon position data, the frequency of nucleotide G is negatively correlated with evolutionary rates of genes, substitution rates vary substantially among sites, and the transition/transversion rate bias (R) is two to five times larger than that expected at random. Generally, largest transition biases and greatest differences in substitution rates among sites are found in the highly conserved genes. The 3rd positions in placental mammal genes exhibit strong nucleotide composition biases and the transitional rates exceed transversional rates by one to two orders of magnitude. Tamura-Nei and Hasegawa-Kishino-Yano models with gamma distributed variable rates among sites (gamma parameter, α) adequately describe the nucleotide substitution process in 1st+2nd position data. In these data, ignoring differences in substitution rates among sites leads to largest biases while estimating substitution rates. Kimura's two-parameter model with variable-rates among sites performs satisfactorily in likelihood estimation of R, α, and overall amount of evolution for 1st+2nd position data. It can also be used to estimate pairwise distances with appropriate values of α for a majority of genes. PMID:8722802

  5. Gene arrangement convergence, diverse intron content, and genetic code modifications in mitochondrial genomes of sphaeropleales (chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Paul O; González-Halphen, Diego; Lewis, Louise A

    2014-08-08

    The majority of our knowledge about mitochondrial genomes of Viridiplantae comes from land plants, but much less is known about their green algal relatives. In the green algal order Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyta), only one representative mitochondrial genome is currently available-that of Acutodesmus obliquus. Our study adds nine completely sequenced and three partially sequenced mitochondrial genomes spanning the phylogenetic diversity of Sphaeropleales. We show not only a size range of 25-53 kb and variation in intron content (0-11) and gene order but also conservation of 13 core respiratory genes and fragmented ribosomal RNA genes. We also report an unusual case of gene arrangement convergence in Neochloris aquatica, where the two rns fragments were secondarily placed in close proximity. Finally, we report the unprecedented usage of UCG as stop codon in Pseudomuriella schumacherensis. In addition, phylogenetic analyses of the mitochondrial protein-coding genes yield a fully resolved, well-supported phylogeny, showing promise for addressing systematic challenges in green algae. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. Two Lamprey Hedgehog Genes Share Non-Coding Regulatory Sequences and Expression Patterns with Gnathostome Hedgehogs

    PubMed Central

    Ekker, Marc; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Müller, Ferenc; Casane, Didier; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) genes play major roles in animal development and studies of their evolution, expression and function point to major differences among chordates. Here we focused on Hh genes in lampreys in order to characterize the evolution of Hh signalling at the emergence of vertebrates. Screening of a cosmid library of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and searching the preliminary genome assembly of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus indicate that lampreys have two Hh genes, named Hha and Hhb. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that Hha and Hhb are lamprey-specific paralogs closely related to Sonic/Indian Hh genes. Expression analysis indicates that Hha and Hhb are expressed in a Sonic Hh-like pattern. The two transcripts are expressed in largely overlapping but not identical domains in the lamprey embryonic brain, including a newly-described expression domain in the nasohypophyseal placode. Global alignments of genomic sequences and local alignment with known gnathostome regulatory motifs show that lamprey Hhs share conserved non-coding elements (CNE) with gnathostome Hhs albeit with sequences that have significantly diverged and dispersed. Functional assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrate gnathostome-like midline enhancer activity for CNEs contained in intron2. We conclude that lamprey Hh genes are gnathostome Shh-like in terms of expression and regulation. In addition, they show some lamprey-specific features, including duplication and structural (but not functional) changes in the intronic/regulatory sequences. PMID:20967201

  7. Gene Arrangement Convergence, Diverse Intron Content, and Genetic Code Modifications in Mitochondrial Genomes of Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Paul O.; González-Halphen, Diego; Lewis, Louise A.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of our knowledge about mitochondrial genomes of Viridiplantae comes from land plants, but much less is known about their green algal relatives. In the green algal order Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyta), only one representative mitochondrial genome is currently available—that of Acutodesmus obliquus. Our study adds nine completely sequenced and three partially sequenced mitochondrial genomes spanning the phylogenetic diversity of Sphaeropleales. We show not only a size range of 25–53 kb and variation in intron content (0–11) and gene order but also conservation of 13 core respiratory genes and fragmented ribosomal RNA genes. We also report an unusual case of gene arrangement convergence in Neochloris aquatica, where the two rns fragments were secondarily placed in close proximity. Finally, we report the unprecedented usage of UCG as stop codon in Pseudomuriella schumacherensis. In addition, phylogenetic analyses of the mitochondrial protein-coding genes yield a fully resolved, well-supported phylogeny, showing promise for addressing systematic challenges in green algae. PMID:25106621

  8. The plant nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Rose, Annkatrin; Patel, Shalaka; Meier, Iris

    2004-01-01

    This review summarizes our present knowledge about the composition and function of the plant nuclear envelope. Compared with animals or yeast, our molecular understanding of the nuclear envelope in higher plants is in its infancy. However, fundamental differences in the structure and function of the plant and animal nuclear envelope have already been found. Here, we compare and contrast these differences with respect to nuclear pore complexes, targeting of Ran signaling to the nuclear envelope, inner nuclear envelope proteins, and the role and fate of the nuclear envelope during mitosis. Further investigation of the emerging fundamental differences as well as the similarities between kingdoms might illuminate why there appears to be more than one blueprint for building a nucleus.

  9. Disruption of the baculovirus core gene ac78 results in decreased production of multiple nucleocapsid-enveloped occlusion-derived virions and the failure of primary infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Sai-Nan; Wang, Jin-Yu; Yuan, Mei-Jin; Yang, Kai

    2014-10-13

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac78 gene is one of the baculovirus core genes. Recent studies showed that ac78 is essential for budded virion (BV) production and the embedding of occlusion-derived virion (ODV) into occlusion body during the AcMNPV life cycle. Here, we report that an ac78-knockout AcMNPV (vAc78KO) constructed in this study had different phenotypes than those described in the previous studies. A few infectious BVs were detected using titer assays, immunoblot analyses and plaque assays, indicating that ac78 is not essential for BV formation. Electron microscopy confirmed that the ac78 deletion did not affect nucleocapsid assembly and ODV formation. However, the numbers of multiple nucleocapsid-enveloped ODVs and ODV-embedded occlusion bodies were significantly decreased. Subsequently, the highly conserved amino acid residues 2-25 and 64-88 of Ac78, which are homologous to an oxidoreductase and cytochrome c oxidase, respectively, were demonstrated to play a crucial role in the morphogenesis of multiple nucleocapsid-enveloped ODV. Immunoblot analysis found that Ac78 was an ODV envelope-associated protein. Consistently, amino acid residues 56-93 of Ac78 were identified as an inner nuclear membrane sorting motif, which may direct the localization of Ac78 to the ODV envelope. In vivo infectivity assays showed that the occlusion bodies of vAc78KO were unable to establish primary infection in the midgut of Trichoplusia ni larvae. Taken together, our results suggest that ac78 plays an important role in BV production and proper multiple nucleocapsid-enveloped ODV formation, as well as AcMNPV primary infection in vivo.

  10. Evidence for a novel exon in the coding region of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ling; St. Denis, K.A.; Bapat, B.

    1995-08-10

    Germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene APC cause familial adenomatous polyposis. Somatic APC alterations are involved in several sporadic neoplasma, including colorectal, duodenal, gastric, and esophageal carcinoma. The APC mRNA is encoded by 15 exons. Additional transcripts have been reported, due to alternative splicing of coding as well as noncoding regions. Two mRNA isoforms occur due to a deletion of exon 7 or a partial deletion of exon 9. We have identified a novel exon, flanked by APC exons 10 and 11, which is expressed as an alternatively transcribed product of the gene. Further, we have shown that the novel exon consists of a heptad repeat motif and is conserved across species. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Long non-coding RNAs: spatial amplifiers that control nuclear structure and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Engreitz, Jesse M; Ollikainen, Noah; Guttman, Mitchell

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decade, it has become clear that mammalian genomes encode thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), many of which are now implicated in diverse biological processes. Recent work studying the molecular mechanisms of several key examples - including Xist, which orchestrates X chromosome inactivation - has provided new insights into how lncRNAs can control cellular functions by acting in the nucleus. Here we discuss emerging mechanistic insights into how lncRNAs can regulate gene expression by coordinating regulatory proteins, localizing to target loci and shaping three-dimensional (3D) nuclear organization. We explore these principles to highlight biological challenges in gene regulation, in which lncRNAs are well-suited to perform roles that cannot be carried out by DNA elements or protein regulators alone, such as acting as spatial amplifiers of regulatory signals in the nucleus.

  12. Role of non-coding RNA transcription around gene regulatory elements in transcription factor recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Kunihiro

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eukaryotic cells produce a variety of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), many of which have been shown to play pivotal roles in biological processes such as differentiation, maintenance of pluripotency of stem cells, and cellular response to various stresses. Genome-wide analyses have revealed that many ncRNAs are transcribed around regulatory DNA elements located proximal or distal to gene promoters, but their biological functions are largely unknown. Recently, it has been demonstrated in yeast and mouse that ncRNA transcription around gene promoters and enhancers facilitates DNA binding of transcription factors to their target sites. These results suggest universal roles of promoter/enhancer-associated ncRNAs in the recruitment of transcription factors to their binding sites. PMID:27763805

  13. Molecular characterization of nosRZDFYLX genes coding for denitrifying nitrous oxide reductase of Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Leonardo; Mesa, Socorro; Xu, Chang-Ai; Delgado, María J; Bedmar, Eulogio J

    2004-04-01

    The nosRZDFYLX gene cluster for the respiratory nitrous oxide reductase from Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain USDA110 has been cloned and sequenced. Seven protein coding regions corresponding to nosR, nosZ, the structural gene, nosD, nosF, nosY, nosL, and nosX were detected. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited a high degree of similarity to other nitrous oxide reductases from various sources. The NosZ protein included a signal peptide for protein export. Mutant strains carrying either a nosZ or a nosR mutation accumulated nitrous oxide when cultured microaerobically in the presence of nitrate. Maximal expression of a P nosZ-lacZ fusion in strain USDA110 required simultaneously both low level oxygen conditions and the presence of nitrate. Microaerobic activation of the fusion required FixLJ and FixK(2).

  14. Genome-wide Analysis of RNA Polymerase II Termination at Protein-Coding Genes.

    PubMed

    Baejen, Carlo; Andreani, Jessica; Torkler, Phillipp; Battaglia, Sofia; Schwalb, Bjoern; Lidschreiber, Michael; Maier, Kerstin C; Boltendahl, Andrea; Rus, Petra; Esslinger, Stephanie; Söding, Johannes; Cramer, Patrick

    2017-03-06

    At the end of protein-coding genes, RNA polymerase (Pol) II undergoes a concerted transition that involves 3'-processing of the pre-mRNA and transcription termination. Here, we present a genome-wide analysis of the 3'-transition in budding yeast. We find that the 3'-transition globally requires the Pol II elongation factor Spt5 and factors involved in the recognition of the polyadenylation (pA) site and in endonucleolytic RNA cleavage. Pol II release from DNA occurs in a narrow termination window downstream of the pA site and requires the "torpedo" exonuclease Rat1 (XRN2 in human). The Rat1-interacting factor Rai1 contributes to RNA degradation downstream of the pA site. Defects in the 3'-transition can result in increased transcription at downstream genes.

  15. Proteomic Detection of Non-Annotated Protein-Coding Genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Wook; Silby, Mark W.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Nicoll, Julie S.; Hixson, Kim K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Levy, Stuart B.

    2009-12-24

    Genome sequences are annotated by computational prediction of coding sequences, followed by similarity searches such as BLAST, which provide a layer of (possible) functional information. While the existence of processes such as alternative splicing complicates matters for eukaryote genomes, the view of bacterial genomes as a linear series of closely spaced genes leads to the assumption that computational annotations which predict such arrangements completely describe the coding capacity of bacterial genomes. We undertook a proteomic study to identify proteins expressed by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 from genes which were not predicted during the genome annotation. Mapping peptides to the Pf0-1 genome sequence identified sixteen non-annotated protein-coding regions, of which nine were antisense to predicted genes, six were intergenic, and one read in the same direction as an annotated gene but in a different frame. The expression of all but one of the newly discovered genes was verified by RT-PCR. Few clues as to the function of the new genes were gleaned from informatic analyses, but potential orthologues in other Pseudomonas genomes were identified for eight of the new genes. The 16 newly identified genes improve the quality of the Pf0-1 genome annotation, and the detection of antisense protein-coding genes indicates the under-appreciated complexity of bacterial genome organization.

  16. Transcription control region within the protein-coding portion of adenovirus E1A genes.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, T F; Arvidson, D N; Tyau, E S; Dunsworth-Browne, M; Berk, A J

    1984-01-01

    A single-base deletion within the protein-coding region of the adenovirus type 5 early region 1A (E1A) genes, 399 bases downstream from the transcription start site, depresses transcription to 2% of the wild-type rate. Complementation studies demonstrated that this was due to two effects of the mutation: first, inactivation of an E1A protein, causing a reduction by a factor of 5; second, a defect which acts in cis to depress E1A mRNA and nuclear RNA concentrations by a factor of 10. A larger deletion within the protein-coding region of E1A which overlaps the single-base deletion produces the same phenotype. In contrast, a linker insertion which results in a similar truncated E1A protein does not produce the cis-acting defect in E1A transcription. These results demonstrate that a critical cis-acting transcription control region occurs within the protein coding sequence in adenovirus type 5 E1A. The single-base deletion occurs in a sequence which shows extensive homology with a sequence from the enhancer regions of simian virus 40 and polyomavirus. This region is not required for E1A transcription during the late phase of infection. Images PMID:6334230

  17. In silico screening of the chicken genome for overlaps between genomic regions: microRNA genes, coding and non-coding transcriptional units, QTL, and genetic variations.

    PubMed

    Zorc, Minja; Kunej, Tanja

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs involved in posttranscriptional regulation of target genes. Regulation requires complementarity between target mRNA and the mature miRNA seed region, responsible for their recognition and binding. It has been estimated that each miRNA targets approximately 200 genes, and genetic variability of miRNA genes has been reported to affect phenotypic variability and disease susceptibility in humans, livestock species, and model organisms. Polymorphisms in miRNA genes could therefore represent biomarkers for phenotypic traits in livestock animals. In our previous study, we collected polymorphisms within miRNA genes in chicken. In the present study, we identified miRNA-related genomic overlaps to prioritize genomic regions of interest for further functional studies and biomarker discovery. Overlapping genomic regions in chicken were analyzed using the following bioinformatics tools and databases: miRNA SNiPer, Ensembl, miRBase, NCBI Blast, and QTLdb. Out of 740 known pre-miRNA genes, 263 (35.5 %) contain polymorphisms; among them, 35 contain more than three polymorphisms The most polymorphic miRNA genes in chicken are gga-miR-6662, containing 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the pre-miRNA region, including five consecutive SNPs, and gga-miR-6688, containing ten polymorphisms including three consecutive polymorphisms. Several miRNA-related genomic hotspots have been revealed in chicken genome; polymorphic miRNA genes are located within protein-coding and/or non-coding transcription units and quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with production traits. The present study includes the first description of an exonic miRNA in a chicken genome, an overlap between the miRNA gene and the exon of the protein-coding gene (gga-miR-6578/HADHB), and the first report of a missense polymorphism located within a mature miRNA seed region. Identified miRNA-related genomic hotspots in chicken can serve researchers as a

  18. Systematic analyses of the cancer genome: lessons learned from sequencing most of the annotated human protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Sjöblom, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    The availability of a reference human genome sequence has enabled unbiased mutational analyses of tumor genomes to identify the mutated genes that cause cancer. This review discusses recent insights from such analyses of protein-coding genes in breast and colorectal cancers. Mutational analyses of approximately 18,000 human protein-coding genes in breast and colorectal cancers have identified 280 candidate cancer genes. These include known cancer genes, but most had not previously been linked to cancer. There are few frequently mutated cancer genes among hundreds of less frequently mutated candidate cancer genes, and the compendium of mutated genes differs among tumors of the same tissue origin. Recent work has shown the feasibility of coding cancer genome sequencing, and new technologies promise to facilitate these mutational analyses. Whereas cancer genetics can identify candidate genes in a rapid and scalable fashion, careful functional studies of mutated genes are required for ultimate proof of cancer gene status and translation into clinical utility. The rapid progress of cancer genetics has yielded novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, and cancer genome sequencing will accelerate this development to the benefit of cancer patients.

  19. A common transcriptional activator is located in the coding region of two replication-dependent mouse histone genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, M M; Bowman, T L; Marzluff, W F

    1991-01-01

    There is a region in the mouse histone H3 gene protein-encoding sequence required for high expression. The 110-nucleotide coding region activating sequence (CRAS) from codons 58 to 93 of the H3.2 gene restored expression when placed 520 nucleotides 5' of the start of transcription in the correct orientation. Since identical mRNA molecules are produced by transcription of the original deletion gene and the deletion gene with the CRAS at -520, effects of the deletions on mRNA stability or other posttranscriptional events are completely ruled out. Inversion of the CRAS sequence in its proper position in the H3 gene resulted in only a threefold increase in expression, and placing the CRAS sequence 5' of the deleted gene in the wrong orientation had no effect on expression. In-frame deletions in the coding region of an H2a.2 gene led to identification of a 105-nucleotide sequence in the coding region between amino acids 50 and 85 necessary for high expression of the gene. Additionally, insertion of the H3 CRAS into the deleted region of the H2a.2 gene restored expression of the H2a gene. Thus, the CRAS element has an orientation-dependent, position-independent effect. Gel mobility shift competition studies indicate that the same proteins interact with both the H3 and H2a CRAS elements, suggesting that a common factor is involved in expression of histone genes. Images PMID:2038312

  20. RNA editing of non-coding RNA and its role in gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Chammiran; Lagergren, Jens; Öhman, Marie

    2015-10-01

    It has for a long time been known that repetitive elements, particularly Alu sequences in human, are edited by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA, ADAR, family. The functional interpretation of these events has been even more difficult than that of editing events in coding sequences, but today there is an emerging understanding of their downstream effects. A surprisingly large fraction of the human transcriptome contains inverted Alu repeats, often forming long double stranded structures in RNA transcripts, typically occurring in introns and UTRs of protein coding genes. Alu repeats are also common in other primates, and similar inverted repeats can frequently be found in non-primates, although the latter are less prone to duplex formation. In human, as many as 700,000 Alu elements have been identified as substrates for RNA editing, of which many are edited at several sites. In fact, recent advancements in transcriptome sequencing techniques and bioinformatics have revealed that the human editome comprises at least a hundred million adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) editing sites in Alu sequences. Although substantial additional efforts are required in order to map the editome, already present knowledge provides an excellent starting point for studying cis-regulation of editing. In this review, we will focus on editing of long stem loop structures in the human transcriptome and how it can effect gene expression.

  1. The evolution of small insertions and deletions in the coding genes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Chong, Zechen; Zhai, Weiwei; Li, Chunyan; Gao, Min; Gong, Qiang; Ruan, Jue; Li, Juan; Jiang, Lan; Lv, Xuemei; Hungate, Eric; Wu, Chung-I

    2013-12-01

    Studies of protein evolution have focused on amino acid substitutions with much less systematic analysis on insertion and deletions (indels) in protein coding genes. We hence surveyed 7,500 genes between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans, using D. yakuba as an outgroup for this purpose. The evolutionary rate of coding indels is indeed low, at only 3% of that of nonsynonymous substitutions. As coding indels follow a geometric distribution in size and tend to fall in low-complexity regions of proteins, it is unclear whether selection or mutation underlies this low rate. To resolve the issue, we collected genomic sequences from an isogenic African line of D. melanogaster (ZS30) at a high coverage of 70× and analyzed indel polymorphism between ZS30 and the reference genome. In comparing polymorphism and divergence, we found that the divergence to polymorphism ratio (i.e., fixation index) for smaller indels (size ≤ 10 bp) is very similar to that for synonymous changes, suggesting that most of the within-species polymorphism and between-species divergence for indels are selectively neutral. Interestingly, deletions of larger sizes (size ≥ 11 bp and ≤ 30 bp) have a much higher fixation index than synonymous mutations and 44.4% of fixed middle-sized deletions are estimated to be adaptive. To our surprise, this pattern is not found for insertions. Protein indel evolution appear to be in a dynamic flux of neutrally driven expansion (insertions) together with adaptive-driven contraction (deletions), and these observations provide important insights for understanding the fitness of new mutations as well as the evolutionary driving forces for genomic evolution in Drosophila species.

  2. MitoNuc: a database of nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins. Update 2002.

    PubMed

    Attimonelli, Marcella; Catalano, Domenico; Gissi, Carmela; Grillo, Giorgio; Licciulli, Flavio; Liuni, Sabino; Santamaria, Monica; Pesole, Graziano; Saccone, Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    Mitochondria, besides their central role in energy metabolism, have recently been found to be involved in a number of basic processes of cell life and to contribute to the pathogenesis of many degenerative diseases. All functions of mitochondria depend on the interaction of nuclear and organelle genomes. Mitochondrial genomes have been extensively sequenced and analysed and data have been collected in several specialised databases. In order to collect information on nuclear coded mitochondrial proteins we developed MitoNuc, a database containing detailed information on sequenced nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins in Metazoa. The MitoNuc database can be retrieved through SRS and is available via the web site http://bighost.area.ba.cnr.it/mitochondriome where other mitochondrial databases developed by our group, the complete list of the sequenced mitochondrial genomes, links to other mitochondrial sites and related information, are available. The MitoAln database, related to MitoNuc in the previous release, reporting the multiple alignments of the relevant homologous protein coding regions, is no longer supported in the present release. In order to keep the links among entries in MitoNuc from homologous proteins, a new field in the database has been defined: the cluster identifier, an alpha numeric code used to identify each cluster of homologous proteins. A comment field derived from the corresponding SWISS-PROT entry has been introduced; this reports clinical data related to dysfunction of the protein. The logic scheme of MitoNuc database has been implemented in the ORACLE DBMS. This will allow the end-users to retrieve data through a friendly interface that will be soon implemented.

  3. PSP: rapid identification of orthologous coding genes under positive selection across multiple closely related prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Su, Fei; Ou, Hong-Yu; Tao, Fei; Tang, Hongzhi; Xu, Ping

    2013-12-27

    With genomic sequences of many closely related bacterial strains made available by deep sequencing, it is now possible to investigate trends in prokaryotic microevolution. Positive selection is a sub-process of microevolution, in which a particular mutation is favored, causing the allele frequency to continuously shift in one direction. Wide scanning of prokaryotic genomes has shown that positive selection at the molecular level is much more frequent than expected. Genes with significant positive selection may play key roles in bacterial adaption to different environmental pressures. However, selection pressure analyses are computationally intensive and awkward to configure. Here we describe an open access web server, which is designated as PSP (Positive Selection analysis for Prokaryotic genomes) for performing evolutionary analysis on orthologous coding genes, specially designed for rapid comparison of dozens of closely related prokaryotic genomes. Remarkably, PSP facilitates functional exploration at the multiple levels by assignments and enrichments of KO, GO or COG terms. To illustrate this user-friendly tool, we analyzed Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus genomes and found that several genes, which play key roles in human infection and antibiotic resistance, show significant evidence of positive selection. PSP is freely available to all users without any login requirement at: http://db-mml.sjtu.edu.cn/PSP/. PSP ultimately allows researchers to do genome-scale analysis for evolutionary selection across multiple prokaryotic genomes rapidly and easily, and identify the genes undergoing positive selection, which may play key roles in the interactions of host-pathogen and/or environmental adaptation.

  4. 10 CFR 434.516 - Building exterior envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Building exterior envelope. 434.516 Section 434.516 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative § 434.516 Building exterior envelope. 516.1...

  5. Identification and expression profiling of Ceratitis capitata genes coding for β-hexosaminidases.

    PubMed

    Pasini, Maria E; Intra, Jari; Gomulski, Ludvik M; Calvenzani, Valentina; Petroni, Katia; Briani, Federica; Perotti, Maria Elisa

    2011-02-15

    The goal of this study was to identify the genes coding for β-N-acetylhexosaminidases in the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly) Ceratitis capitata, one of the most destructive agricultural pests, belonging to the Tephritidae family, order Diptera. Two dimeric β-N-acetylhexosaminidases, HEXA and HEXB, have been recently identified on Drosophila sperm. These enzymes are involved in egg binding through interactions with complementary carbohydrates on the surface of the egg shell. Three genes, Hexosaminidase 1 (Hexo1), Hexosaminidase 2 (Hexo2) and fused lobes (fdl), encode for HEXA and HEXB subunits. The availability of C. capitata EST libraries derived from embryos and adult heads allowed us to identify three sequences homologous to the D. melanogaster Hexo1, Hexo2 and fdl genes. Here, we report the expression profile analysis of CcHexo1, CcHexo2 and Ccfdld in several tissues, organs and stages. Ccfdl expression was highest in heads of both sexes and in whole adult females. In the testis and ovary the three genes showed distinct spatial and temporal expression patterns. All the mRNAs were detectable in early stages of spermatogenesis; CcHexo2 and Ccfdl were also expressed in early elongating spermatid cysts. All three genes are expressed in the ovarian nurse cells. CcHexo1 and Ccfdl are stage specific, since they have been observed in stages 12 and 13 during oocyte growth, when programmed cell death occurs in nurse cells. The expression pattern of the three genes in medfly gonads suggests that, as their Drosophila counterparts, they may encode for proteins involved in gametogenesis and fertilization.

  6. Partitioning of genetic variation between regulatory and coding gene segments: the predominance of software variation in genes encoding introvert proteins.

    PubMed

    Mitchison, A

    1997-01-01

    In considering genetic variation in eukaryotes, a fundamental distinction can be made between variation in regulatory (software) and coding (hardware) gene segments. For quantitative traits the bulk of variation, particularly that near the population mean, appears to reside in regulatory segments. The main exceptions to this rule concern proteins which handle extrinsic substances, here termed extrovert proteins. The immune system includes an unusually large proportion of this exceptional category, but even so its chief source of variation may well be polymorphism in regulatory gene segments. The main evidence for this view emerges from genome scanning for quantitative trait loci (QTL), which in the case of the immune system points to a major contribution of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Further support comes from sequencing of major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II promoters, where a high level of polymorphism has been detected. These Mhc promoters appear to act, in part at least, by gating the back-signal from T cells into antigen-presenting cells. Both these forms of polymorphism are likely to be sustained by the need for flexibility in the immune response. Future work on promoter polymorphism is likely to benefit from the input from genome informatics.

  7. Conservation of the Exon-Intron Structure of Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes in Eutherian Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Chernikova, Diana; Managadze, David; Glazko, Galina V.; Makalowski, Wojciech; Rogozin, Igor B.

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of mammalian long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes is high, yet their functions remain largely unknown. One possible way to study this important question is to use large-scale comparisons of various characteristics of lincRNA with those of protein-coding genes for which a large body of functional information is available. A prominent feature of mammalian protein-coding genes is the high evolutionary conservation of the exon-intron structure. Comparative analysis of putative intron positions in lincRNA genes from various mammalian genomes suggests that some lincRNA introns have been conserved for over 100 million years, thus the primary and/or secondary structure of these molecules is likely to be functionally important. PMID:27429005

  8. Diversity and Recombination of Dispersed Ribosomal DNA and Protein Coding Genes in Microsporidia

    PubMed Central

    Ironside, Joseph Edward

    2013-01-01

    Microsporidian strains are usually classified on the basis of their ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences. Although rDNA occurs as multiple copies, in most non-microsporidian species copies within a genome occur as tandem arrays and are homogenised by concerted evolution. In contrast, microsporidian rDNA units are dispersed throughout the genome in some species, and on this basis are predicted to undergo reduced concerted evolution. Furthermore many microsporidian species appear to be asexual and should therefore exhibit reduced genetic diversity due to a lack of recombination. Here, DNA sequences are compared between microsporidia with different life cycles in order to determine the effects of concerted evolution and sexual reproduction upon the diversity of rDNA and protein coding genes. Comparisons of cloned rDNA sequences between microsporidia of the genus Nosema with different life cycles provide evidence of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection. This suggests a birth and death process of evolution. However, some concerted evolution is suggested by clustering of rDNA sequences within species. Variability of protein-coding sequences indicates that considerable intergenomic variation also occurs between microsporidian cells within a single host. Patterns of variation in microsporidian DNA sequences indicate that additional diversity is generated by intragenomic and/or intergenomic recombination between sequence variants. The discovery of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection in microsporidian rRNA sequences supports the hypothesis that concerted evolution is reduced when copies of a gene are dispersed rather than repeated tandemly. The presence of intragenomic variability also renders the use of rDNA sequences for barcoding microsporidia questionable. Evidence of recombination in the single-copy genes of putatively asexual microsporidia suggests that these species may undergo cryptic sexual reproduction, a

  9. Diversity and recombination of dispersed ribosomal DNA and protein coding genes in microsporidia.

    PubMed

    Ironside, Joseph Edward

    2013-01-01

    Microsporidian strains are usually classified on the basis of their ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences. Although rDNA occurs as multiple copies, in most non-microsporidian species copies within a genome occur as tandem arrays and are homogenised by concerted evolution. In contrast, microsporidian rDNA units are dispersed throughout the genome in some species, and on this basis are predicted to undergo reduced concerted evolution. Furthermore many microsporidian species appear to be asexual and should therefore exhibit reduced genetic diversity due to a lack of recombination. Here, DNA sequences are compared between microsporidia with different life cycles in order to determine the effects of concerted evolution and sexual reproduction upon the diversity of rDNA and protein coding genes. Comparisons of cloned rDNA sequences between microsporidia of the genus Nosema with different life cycles provide evidence of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection. This suggests a birth and death process of evolution. However, some concerted evolution is suggested by clustering of rDNA sequences within species. Variability of protein-coding sequences indicates that considerable intergenomic variation also occurs between microsporidian cells within a single host. Patterns of variation in microsporidian DNA sequences indicate that additional diversity is generated by intragenomic and/or intergenomic recombination between sequence variants. The discovery of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection in microsporidian rRNA sequences supports the hypothesis that concerted evolution is reduced when copies of a gene are dispersed rather than repeated tandemly. The presence of intragenomic variability also renders the use of rDNA sequences for barcoding microsporidia questionable. Evidence of recombination in the single-copy genes of putatively asexual microsporidia suggests that these species may undergo cryptic sexual reproduction, a

  10. Mutational analysis of the promoter and the coding region of the 5-HT1A gene

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, J.; Noethen, M.M.; Shimron-Abarbanell, D.

    1994-09-01

    Disturbances of serotonergic pathways have been implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Serotonin (5HT) receptors can be subdivided into at least three major families (5HT1, 5HT2, and 5HT3). Five human 5HT1 receptor subtypes have been cloned, namely 1A, 1D{alpha}, 1D{beta}, 1E, and 1F. Of these, the 5HT1A receptor is the best characterized subtype. In the present study we sought to identify genetic variation in the 5HT1A receptor gene which through alteration of protein function or level of expression might contribute to the genetics of neuropsychiatric diseases. The coding region and the 5{prime} promoter region of the 5HT1A gene from 159 unrelated subjects (45 schizophrenic, 46 bipolar affective, and 43 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 25 controls) were analyzed using SSCA. SSCA revealed the presence of two mutations both located in the coding region of the 5HT1A receptor gene. The first mutation is a rare silent C{r_arrow}T substitution at nucleotide position 549. The second mutation is characterized by a base pair substitution (A{r_arrow}G) at the first position of codon 28 and results in an amino acid exchange (Ile{r_arrow}Val). Since Val28 was found only in a single schizophrenic patient and in none of the other patients or controls, we decided to extend our samples and to use a restriction assay for screening a further 74 schizophrenic, 95 bipolar affective, and 49 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 185 controls, for the presence of the mutation. In total, the mutation was found in 2 schizophrenic patients, in 3 bipolars, in 1 Tourette patient, and in 5 controls. To our knowledge the Ile-28-Val substitution reported here is the first natural occuring molecular variant which has been identified for a serotonin receptor so far.

  11. Identification and analysis of unitary loss of long-established protein-coding genes in Poaceae shows evidences for biased gene loss and putatively functional transcription of relics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Tang, Liang; Li, Zhe; Jin, Jinpu; Luo, Jingchu; Gao, Ge

    2015-04-18

    Long-established protein-coding genes may lose their coding potential during evolution ("unitary gene loss"). Members of the Poaceae family are a major food source and represent an ideal model clade for plant evolution research. However, the global pattern of unitary gene loss in Poaceae genomes as well as the evolutionary fate of lost genes are still less-investigated and remain largely elusive. Using a locally developed pipeline, we identified 129 unitary gene loss events for long-established protein-coding genes from four representative species of Poaceae, i.e. brachypodium, rice, sorghum and maize. Functional annotation suggested that the lost genes in all or most of Poaceae species are enriched for genes involved in development and response to endogenous stimulus. We also found that 44 mutated genomic loci of lost genes, which we referred as relics, were still actively transcribed, and of which 84% (37 of 44) showed significantly differential expression across different tissues. More interestingly, we found that there were totally five expressed relics may function as competitive endogenous RNA in brachypodium, rice and sorghum genome. Based on comparative genomics and transcriptome data, we firstly compiled a comprehensive catalogue of unitary gene loss events in Poaceae species and characterized a statistically significant functional preference for these lost genes as well showed the potential of relics functioning as competitive endogenous RNAs in Poaceae genomes.

  12. Resolving arthropod phylogeny: exploring phylogenetic signal within 41 kb of protein-coding nuclear gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Regier, Jerome C; Shultz, Jeffrey W; Ganley, Austen R D; Hussey, April; Shi, Diane; Ball, Bernard; Zwick, Andreas; Stajich, Jason E; Cummings, Michael P; Martin, Joel W; Cunningham, Clifford W

    2008-12-01

    This study attempts to resolve relationships among and within the four basal arthropod lineages (Pancrustacea, Myriapoda, Euchelicerata, Pycnogonida) and to assess the widespread expectation that remaining phylogenetic problems will yield to increasing amounts of sequence data. Sixty-eight regions of 62 protein-coding nuclear genes (approximately 41 kilobases (kb)/taxon) were sequenced for 12 taxonomically diverse arthropod taxa and a tardigrade outgroup. Parsimony, likelihood, and Bayesian analyses of total nucleotide data generally strongly supported the monophyly of each of the basal lineages represented by more than one species. Other relationships within the Arthropoda were also supported, with support levels depending on method of analysis and inclusion/exclusion of synonymous changes. Removing third codon positions, where the assumption of base compositional homogeneity was rejected, altered the results. Removing the final class of synonymous mutations--first codon positions encoding leucine and arginine, which were also compositionally heterogeneous--yielded a data set that was consistent with a hypothesis of base compositional homogeneity. Furthermore, under such a data-exclusion regime, all 68 gene regions individually were consistent with base compositional homogeneity. Restricting likelihood analyses to nonsynonymous change recovered trees with strong support for the basal lineages but not for other groups that were variably supported with more inclusive data sets. In a further effort to increase phylogenetic signal, three types of data exploration were undertaken. (1) Individual genes were ranked by their average rate of nonsynonymous change, and three rate categories were assigned--fast, intermediate, and slow. Then, bootstrap analysis of each gene was performed separately to see which taxonomic groups received strong support. Five taxonomic groups were strongly supported independently by two or more genes, and these genes mostly belonged to the slow

  13. Emerging Putative Associations between Non-Coding RNAs and Protein-Coding Genes in Neuropathic Pain: Added Value from Reusing Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Hemalatha B.; Tsinoremas, Nicholas F.; Capobianco, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of injured nerves is likely occurring in the peripheral nervous system, but not in the central nervous system. Although protein-coding gene expression has been assessed during nerve regeneration, little is currently known about the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). This leaves open questions about the potential effects of ncRNAs at transcriptome level. Due to the limited availability of human neuropathic pain (NP) data, we have identified the most comprehensive time-course gene expression profile referred to sciatic nerve (SN) injury and studied in a rat model using two neuronal tissues, namely dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and SN. We have developed a methodology to identify differentially expressed bioentities starting from microarray probes and repurposing them to annotate ncRNAs, while analyzing the expression profiles of protein-coding genes. The approach is designed to reuse microarray data and perform first profiling and then meta-analysis through three main steps. First, we used contextual analysis to identify what we considered putative or potential protein-coding targets for selected ncRNAs. Relevance was therefore assigned to differential expression of neighbor protein-coding genes, with neighborhood defined by a fixed genomic distance from long or antisense ncRNA loci, and of parental genes associated with pseudogenes. Second, connectivity among putative targets was used to build networks, in turn useful to conduct inference at interactomic scale. Last, network paths were annotated to assess relevance to NP. We found significant differential expression in long-intergenic ncRNAs (32 lincRNAs in SN and 8 in DRG), antisense RNA (31 asRNA in SN and 12 in DRG), and pseudogenes (456 in SN and 56 in DRG). In particular, contextual analysis centered on pseudogenes revealed some targets with known association to neurodegeneration and/or neurogenesis processes. While modules of the olfactory receptors were clearly identified in protein

  14. Comparison of protein coding gene contents of the fungal phyla Pezizomycotina and Saccharomycotina

    PubMed Central

    Arvas, Mikko; Kivioja, Teemu; Mitchell, Alex; Saloheimo, Markku; Ussery, David; Penttila, Merja; Oliver, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Background Several dozen fungi encompassing traditional model organisms, industrial production organisms and human and plant pathogens have been sequenced recently and their particular genomic features analysed in detail. In addition comparative genomics has been used to analyse specific sub groups of fungi. Notably, analysis of the phylum Saccharomycotina has revealed major events of evolution such as the recent genome duplication and subsequent gene loss. However, little has been done to gain a comprehensive comparative view to the fungal kingdom. We have carried out a computational genome wide comparison of protein coding gene content of Saccharomycotina and Pezizomycotina, which include industrially important yeasts and filamentous fungi, respectively. Results Our analysis shows that based on genome redundancy, the traditional model organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa are exceptional among fungi. This can be explained by the recent genome duplication in S. cerevisiae and the repeat induced point mutation mechanism in N. crassa. Interestingly in Pezizomycotina a subset of protein families related to plant biomass degradation and secondary metabolism are the only ones showing signs of recent expansion. In addition, Pezizomycotina have a wealth of phylum specific poorly characterised genes with a wide variety of predicted functions. These genes are well conserved in Pezizomycotina, but show no signs of recent expansion. The genes found in all fungi except Saccharomycotina are slightly better characterised and predicted to encode mainly enzymes. The genes specific to Saccharomycotina are enriched in transcription and mitochondrion related functions. Especially mitochondrial ribosomal proteins seem to have diverged from those of Pezizomycotina. In addition, we highlight several individual gene families with interesting phylogenetic distributions. Conclusion Our analysis predicts that all Pezizomycotina unlike Saccharomycotina can potentially

  15. A Review of Computational Methods for Finding Non-Coding RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Qaisar; Raza, Syed Mansoor; Biyabani, Azizuddin Ahmed; Jaffar, Muhammad Arfan

    2016-01-01

    Finding non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes has emerged over the past few years as a cutting-edge trend in bioinformatics. There are numerous computational intelligence (CI) challenges in the annotation and interpretation of ncRNAs because it requires a domain-related expert knowledge in CI techniques. Moreover, there are many classes predicted yet not experimentally verified by researchers. Recently, researchers have applied many CI methods to predict the classes of ncRNAs. However, the diverse CI approaches lack a definitive classification framework to take advantage of past studies. A few review papers have attempted to summarize CI approaches, but focused on the particular methodological viewpoints. Accordingly, in this article, we summarize in greater detail than previously available, the CI techniques for finding ncRNAs genes. We differentiate from the existing bodies of research and discuss concisely the technical merits of various techniques. Lastly, we review the limitations of ncRNA gene-finding CI methods with a point-of-view towards the development of new computational tools. PMID:27918472

  16. A novel sparse coding algorithm for classification of tumors based on gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Kolali Khormuji, Morteza; Bazrafkan, Mehrnoosh

    2016-06-01

    High-dimensional genomic and proteomic data play an important role in many applications in medicine such as prognosis of diseases, diagnosis, prevention and molecular biology, to name a few. Classifying such data is a challenging task due to the various issues such as curse of dimensionality, noise and redundancy. Recently, some researchers have used the sparse representation (SR) techniques to analyze high-dimensional biological data in various applications in classification of cancer patients based on gene expression datasets. A common problem with all SR-based biological data classification methods is that they cannot utilize the topological (geometrical) structure of data. More precisely, these methods transfer the data into sparse feature space without preserving the local structure of data points. In this paper, we proposed a novel SR-based cancer classification algorithm based on gene expression data that takes into account the geometrical information of all data. Precisely speaking, we incorporate the local linear embedding algorithm into the sparse coding framework, by which we can preserve the geometrical structure of all data. For performance comparison, we applied our algorithm on six tumor gene expression datasets, by which we demonstrate that the proposed method achieves higher classification accuracy than state-of-the-art SR-based tumor classification algorithms.

  17. The genomic nucleotide sequences of two differentially expressed actin-coding genes from the sea star Pisaster ochraceus.

    PubMed

    Kowbel, D J; Smith, M J

    1989-04-30

    The genomic sequences of two differentially expressed actin genes from the sea star Pisaster ochraceus are reported. The cytoplasmic actin gene (Cy) is expressed in eggs and early development. The muscle actin gene (M) is expressed in tube feet and testes. Both genes contain an 1125-nucleotide coding region interrupted by three introns at codons 41, 121 and 204. Gene M contains two additional introns at codons 150 and 267. The intron position at codon 150, although present in higher vertebrate actins, has not been reported in actin genes from invertebrates. The M gene coding region has 89.5% nucleotide homology to the Cy gene, and differs from the Cy actin gene in 13 of 375 amino acids (aa), 11 of which are found in the C-terminal half of the gene. The C-terminal half of the M gene contains a significant number of muscle isotype codons. Even though there is only 1 aa change in the first 150 codons, there have been limited substitutions at many four-fold degenerate sites which may indicate selection pressure upon the secondary structure of the mRNA and/or a biased codon usage. Variant CCAAT, TATA, and poly(A)-addition signals have been identified in the 5' and 3' flanking regions. The presence of 5' and 3' splice junction sequences in the 5' flanking region of the Cy gene suggests the potential for an intron there.

  18. Circumplanetary disc or circumplanetary envelope?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulágyi, J.; Masset, F.; Lega, E.; Crida, A.; Morbidelli, A.; Guillot, T.

    2016-08-01

    We present three-dimensional simulations with nested meshes of the dynamics of the gas around a Jupiter mass planet with the JUPITER and FARGOCA codes. We implemented a radiative transfer module into the JUPITER code to account for realistic heating and cooling of the gas. We focus on the circumplanetary gas flow, determining its characteristics at very high resolution (80 per cent of Jupiter's diameter). In our nominal simulation where the temperature evolves freely by the radiative module and reaches 13000 K at the planet, a circumplanetary envelope was formed filling the entire Roche lobe. Because of our equation of state is simplified and probably overestimates the temperature, we also performed simulations with limited maximal temperatures in the planet region (1000, 1500, and 2000 K). In these fixed temperature cases circumplanetary discs (CPDs) were formed. This suggests that the capability to form a CPD is not simply linked to the mass of the planet and its ability to open a gap. Instead, the gas temperature at the planet's location, which depends on its accretion history, plays also fundamental role. The CPDs in the simulations are hot and cooling very slowly, they have very steep temperature and density profiles, and are strongly sub-Keplerian. Moreover, the CPDs are fed by a strong vertical influx, which shocks on the CPD surfaces creating a hot and luminous shock-front. In contrast, the pressure supported circumplanetary envelope is characterized by internal convection and almost stalled rotation.

  19. Morphometric Analysis of Recognized Genes for Autism Spectrum Disorders and Obesity in Relationship to the Distribution of Protein-Coding Genes on Human Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Austen B; Rafi, Syed K; Manzardo, Ann M; Butler, Merlin G

    2016-05-05

    Mammalian chromosomes are comprised of complex chromatin architecture with the specific assembly and configuration of each chromosome influencing gene expression and function in yet undefined ways by varying degrees of heterochromatinization that result in Giemsa (G) negative euchromatic (light) bands and G-positive heterochromatic (dark) bands. We carried out morphometric measurements of high-resolution chromosome ideograms for the first time to characterize the total euchromatic and heterochromatic chromosome band length, distribution and localization of 20,145 known protein-coding genes, 790 recognized autism spectrum disorder (ASD) genes and 365 obesity genes. The individual lengths of G-negative euchromatin and G-positive heterochromatin chromosome bands were measured in millimeters and recorded from scaled and stacked digital images of 850-band high-resolution ideograms supplied by the International Society of Chromosome Nomenclature (ISCN) 2013. Our overall measurements followed established banding patterns based on chromosome size. G-negative euchromatic band regions contained 60% of protein-coding genes while the remaining 40% were distributed across the four heterochromatic dark band sub-types. ASD genes were disproportionately overrepresented in the darker heterochromatic sub-bands, while the obesity gene distribution pattern did not significantly differ from protein-coding genes. Our study supports recent trends implicating genes located in heterochromatin regions playing a role in biological processes including neurodevelopment and function, specifically genes associated with ASD.

  20. Morphometric Analysis of Recognized Genes for Autism Spectrum Disorders and Obesity in Relationship to the Distribution of Protein-Coding Genes on Human Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Austen B.; Rafi, Syed K.; Manzardo, Ann M.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian chromosomes are comprised of complex chromatin architecture with the specific assembly and configuration of each chromosome influencing gene expression and function in yet undefined ways by varying degrees of heterochromatinization that result in Giemsa (G) negative euchromatic (light) bands and G-positive heterochromatic (dark) bands. We carried out morphometric measurements of high-resolution chromosome ideograms for the first time to characterize the total euchromatic and heterochromatic chromosome band length, distribution and localization of 20,145 known protein-coding genes, 790 recognized autism spectrum disorder (ASD) genes and 365 obesity genes. The individual lengths of G-negative euchromatin and G-positive heterochromatin chromosome bands were measured in millimeters and recorded from scaled and stacked digital images of 850-band high-resolution ideograms supplied by the International Society of Chromosome Nomenclature (ISCN) 2013. Our overall measurements followed established banding patterns based on chromosome size. G-negative euchromatic band regions contained 60% of protein-coding genes while the remaining 40% were distributed across the four heterochromatic dark band sub-types. ASD genes were disproportionately overrepresented in the darker heterochromatic sub-bands, while the obesity gene distribution pattern did not significantly differ from protein-coding genes. Our study supports recent trends implicating genes located in heterochromatin regions playing a role in biological processes including neurodevelopment and function, specifically genes associated with ASD. PMID:27164088

  1. The Psp system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis integrates envelope stress-sensing and envelope-preserving functions.

    PubMed

    Datta, Pratik; Ravi, Janani; Guerrini, Valentina; Chauhan, Rinki; Neiditch, Matthew B; Shell, Scarlet S; Fortune, Sarah M; Hancioglu, Baris; Igoshin, Oleg A; Gennaro, Maria Laura

    2015-08-01

    The bacterial envelope integrates essential stress-sensing and adaptive functions; thus, envelope-preserving functions are important for survival. In Gram-negative bacteria, envelope integrity during stress is maintained by the multi-gene Psp response. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was thought to lack the Psp system since it encodes only pspA and no other psp ortholog. Intriguingly, pspA maps downstream from clgR, which encodes a transcription factor regulated by the MprAB-σ(E) envelope-stress-signaling system. clgR inactivation lowered ATP concentration during stress and protonophore treatment-induced clgR-pspA expression, suggesting that these genes express Psp-like functions. We identified a four-gene set - clgR, pspA (rv2744c), rv2743c, rv2742c - that is regulated by clgR and in turn regulates ClgR activity. Regulatory and protein-protein interactions within the set and a requirement of the four genes for functions associated with envelope integrity and surface-stress tolerance indicate that a Psp-like system has evolved in mycobacteria. Among Actinobacteria, the four-gene module occurred only in tuberculous mycobacteria and was required for intramacrophage growth, suggesting links between its function and mycobacterial virulence. Additionally, the four-gene module was required for MprAB-σ(E) stress-signaling activity. The positive feedback between envelope-stress-sensing and envelope-preserving functions allows sustained responses to multiple, envelope-perturbing signals during chronic infection, making the system uniquely suited to tuberculosis pathogenesis.

  2. Reprogramming the genetic code: the emerging role of ribosomal frameshifting in regulating cellular gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Vivek M.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Reading frame maintenance is a critical property of ribosomes. However, a number of genetic elements have been described that can induce ribosomes to shift on mRNAs, the most well understood of which are a class that directs ribosomal slippage by one base in 5′ (-1) direction. This is referred to as programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF). Recently, a new -1 PRF promoting element was serendipitously discovered in a study examining the effects of stretches of adenosines in the coding sequences of mRNAs. Here, we discuss this finding, recent studies describing how -1 PRF is used to control gene expression in eukaryotes, and how -1 PRF is itself regulated. The implications of dysregulation of -1 PRF on human health are examined, as are possible new areas in which novel -1 PRF promoting elements might be discovered. PMID:26661048

  3. Large-scale parsimony analysis of metazoan indels in protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Belinky, Frida; Cohen, Ofir; Huchon, Dorothée

    2010-02-01

    Insertions and deletions (indels) are considered to be rare evolutionary events, the analysis of which may resolve controversial phylogenetic relationships. Indeed, indel characters are often assumed to be less homoplastic than amino acid and nucleotide substitutions and, consequently, more reliable markers for phylogenetic reconstruction. In this study, we analyzed indels from over 1,000 metazoan orthologous genes. We studied the impact of different species sampling, ortholog data sets, lengths of included indels, and indel-coding methods on the resulting metazoan tree. Our results show that, similar to sequence substitutions, indels are homoplastic characters, and their analysis is sensitive to the long-branch attraction artifact. Furthermore, improving the taxon sampling and choosing a closely related outgroup greatly impact the phylogenetic inference. Our indel-based inferences support the Ecdysozoa hypothesis over the Coelomata hypothesis and suggest that sponges are a sister clade to other animals.

  4. Distribution of SR protein exonic splicing enhancer motifs in human protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhua; Smith, Philip J; Krainer, Adrian R; Zhang, Michael Q

    2005-01-01

    Exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs) are pre-mRNA cis-acting elements required for splice-site recognition. We previously developed a web-based program called ESEfinder that scores any sequence for the presence of ESE motifs recognized by the human SR proteins SF2/ASF, SRp40, SRp55 and SC35 (http://rulai.cshl.edu/tools/ESE/). Using ESEfinder, we have undertaken a large-scale analysis of ESE motif distribution in human protein-coding genes. Significantly higher frequencies of ESE motifs were observed in constitutive internal protein-coding exons, compared with both their flanking intronic regions and with pseudo exons. Statistical analysis of ESE motif frequency distributions revealed a complex relationship between splice-site strength and increased or decreased frequencies of particular SR protein motifs. Comparison of constitutively and alternatively spliced exons demonstrated slightly weaker splice-site scores, as well as significantly fewer ESE motifs, in the alternatively spliced group. Our results underline the importance of ESE-mediated SR protein function in the process of exon definition, in the context of both constitutive splicing and regulated alternative splicing.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a gene coding for a novel aspartate aminotransferase from Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, J R; Kahn, M L

    1993-01-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) is an important enzyme in aspartate catabolism and biosynthesis and, by converting tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates to amino acids, AAT is also significant in linking carbon metabolism with nitrogen metabolism. To examine the role of AAT in symbiotic nitrogen fixation further, plasmids encoding three different aminotransferases from Rhizobium meliloti 104A14 were isolated by complementation of an Escherichia coli auxotroph that lacks three aminotransferases. pJA10 contained a gene, aatB, that coded for a previously undescribed AAT, AatB. pJA30 encoded an aromatic aminotransferase, TatA, that had significant AAT activity, and pJA20 encoded a branched-chain aminotransferase designated BatA. Genes for the latter two enzymes, tatA and batA, were previously isolated from R. meliloti. aatB is distinct from but hybridizes to aatA, which codes for AatA, a protein required for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. The DNA sequence of aatB contained an open reading frame that could encode a protein 410 amino acids long and with a monomer molecular mass of 45,100 Da. The amino acid sequence of aatB is unusual, and AatB appears to be a member of a newly described class of AATs. AatB expressed in E. coli has a Km for aspartate of 5.3 mM and a Km for 2-oxoglutarate of 0.87 mM. Its pH optimum is between 8.0 and 8.5. Mutations were constructed in aatB and tatA and transferred to the genome of R. meliloti 104A14. Both mutants were prototrophs and were able to carry out symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Images PMID:8320232

  6. A long non-coding RNA promotes full activation of adult gene expression in the chicken α-globin domain

    PubMed Central

    Arriaga-Canon, Cristian; Fonseca-Guzmán, Yael; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Arzate-Mejía, Rodrigo; Guerrero, Georgina; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were recently shown to regulate chromatin remodelling activities. Their function in regulating gene expression switching during specific developmental stages is poorly understood. Here we describe a nuclear, non-coding transcript responsive for the stage-specific activation of the chicken adult αD globin gene. This non-coding transcript, named α-globin transcript long non-coding RNA (lncRNA-αGT) is transcriptionally upregulated in late stages of chicken development, when active chromatin marks the adult αD gene promoter. Accordingly, the lncRNA-αGT promoter drives erythroid-specific transcription. Furthermore, loss of function experiments showed that lncRNA-αGT is required for full activation of the αD adult gene and maintenance of transcriptionally active chromatin. These findings uncovered lncRNA-αGT as an important part of the switching from embryonic to adult α-globin gene expression, and suggest a function of lncRNA-αGT in contributing to the maintenance of adult α-globin gene expression by promoting an active chromatin structure. PMID:24196393

  7. A long non-coding RNA promotes full activation of adult gene expression in the chicken α-globin domain.

    PubMed

    Arriaga-Canon, Cristian; Fonseca-Guzmán, Yael; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Arzate-Mejía, Rodrigo; Guerrero, Georgina; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were recently shown to regulate chromatin remodelling activities. Their function in regulating gene expression switching during specific developmental stages is poorly understood. Here we describe a nuclear, non-coding transcript responsive for the stage-specific activation of the chicken adult α(D) globin gene. This non-coding transcript, named α-globin transcript long non-coding RNA (lncRNA-αGT) is transcriptionally upregulated in late stages of chicken development, when active chromatin marks the adult α(D) gene promoter. Accordingly, the lncRNA-αGT promoter drives erythroid-specific transcription. Furthermore, loss of function experiments showed that lncRNA-αGT is required for full activation of the α(D) adult gene and maintenance of transcriptionally active chromatin. These findings uncovered lncRNA-αGT as an important part of the switching from embryonic to adult α-globin gene expression, and suggest a function of lncRNA-αGT in contributing to the maintenance of adult α-globin gene expression by promoting an active chromatin structure.

  8. Mutations analysis of C1 inhibitor coding sequence gene among Portuguese patients with hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Martinho, A; Mendes, J; Simões, O; Nunes, R; Gomes, J; Dias Castro, E; Leiria-Pinto, P; Ferreira, M B; Pereira, C; Castel-Branco, M G; Pais, L

    2013-04-01

    Mutations that modify the amino acid sequence of C1-INH (except Val458Met) are associated with HAE. More than 200 different mutations scattering the entire C1-INH gene have been reported. The main objective of this study was to report the mutational findings in a HAE cohort of 138 Portuguese patients followed in specialized consultation all over the country. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood with QiaSymphony BioRobot (QIAGEN Portugal). The sequence reactions were performed by using a DNA sequencing kit (Big Dye terminator cycle sequencing v1.1/v3.1 from Applied Biosystems) and sequencing products were immediately submitted to direct sequencing on an Applied Biosystem 3130 DNA Analyser. DNA sequences were analyzed at four different stages. Raw data and sequence alignments of all 8 exons and intron-exon boundaries were performed for each patient individually with SeqScape software and using SERPING1 gene NG_009625 of 24,300 bp (12-March-2011) as reference sequence. Sequence comparisons among patients and controls were performed with software CodonCode Aligner v.3.7 from CodonCode Corp and with Geneious 4.5 from Biomatters Lda. A total of 94 point mutations were observed among patients, and 67% of them were located on exon 8. In addition, we noticed one not described stop codon at position c.1459 C>T in three different patients. Translation termination was also found on exon 3 and 7, as a result of mutations at positions c.481A>7, c.1174C>T. In this population, the prevalence of the missense mutation p.Arg444Cys was 39 out of 42. Mutational analysis revealed 22 different pathogenic mutations, of which 64% were not described on HAE database. Although identification of disease causing mutations is not necessary to establish HAE diagnosis, studies on gene expression and characterization of rearrangements in SERPING1 gene are suggested in order to get new insights on function and genetic tests of C1 inhibitor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Expression Level of Genes Coding for Cell Adhesion Molecules of Cadherin Group in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lorenc, Zbigniew; Opiłka, Mieszko Norbert; Kruszniewska-Rajs, Celina; Rajs, Antoni; Waniczek, Dariusz; Starzewska, Małgorzata; Lorenc, Justyna; Mazurek, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and also one of the main death causes. Cell adhesion molecules are taking part in specific junctions, contributing to tissue integrality. Lower expression of the cadherins may be correlated with poorer differentiation of the CRC, and its more aggressive phenotype. The aim of the study is to designate the cadherin genes potentially useful for the diagnostics, prognostics, and the treatment of CRC. Material/Method Specimens were collected from 28 persons (14 female and 14 male), who were operated for CRC. The molecular analysis was performed using oligonucleotide microarrays, mRNA used was collected from adenocarcinoma, and macroscopically healthy tissue. The results were validated using qRT-PCR technique. Results Agglomerative hierarchical clustering of normalized mRNA levels has shown 4 groups with statistically different gene expression. The control group was divided into 2 groups, the one was appropriate control (C1), the second (C2) had the genetic properties of the CRC, without pathological changes histologically and macroscopically. The other 2 groups were: LSC (Low stage cancer) and HSC (High stage cancer). Consolidated results of the fluorescency of all of the differential genes, designated two coding E-cadherin (CDH1) with the lower expression, and P-cadherin (CDH3) with higher expression in CRC tissue. Conclusions The levels of genes expression are different for several groups of cadherins, and are related with the stage of CRC, therefore could be potentially the useful marker of the stage of the disease, also applicable in treatment and diagnostics of CRC. PMID:26167814

  10. CAHM, a long non-coding RNA gene hypermethylated in colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Susanne K; Mitchell, Susan M; Graham, Lloyd D; McEvoy, Aidan; Thomas, Melissa L; Baker, Rohan T; Ross, Jason P; Xu, Zheng-Zhou; Ho, Thu; LaPointe, Lawrence C; Young, Graeme P; Molloy, Peter L

    2014-01-01

    The CAHM gene (Colorectal Adenocarcinoma HyperMethylated), previously LOC100526820, is located on chromosome 6, hg19 chr6:163 834 097–163 834 982. It lacks introns, encodes a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) and is located adjacent to the gene QKI, which encodes an RNA binding protein. Deep bisulphite sequencing of ten colorectal cancer (CRC) and matched normal tissues demonstrated frequent hypermethylation within the CAHM gene in cancer. A quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP) was used to characterize additional tissue samples. With a threshold of 5% methylation, the CAHM assay was positive in 2/26 normal colorectal tissues (8%), 17/21 adenomas (81%), and 56/79 CRC samples (71%). A reverse transcriptase-qPCR assay showed that CAHM RNA levels correlated negatively with CAHM % methylation, and therefore CAHM gene expression is typically decreased in CRC. The CAHM qMSP assay was applied to DNA isolated from plasma specimens from 220 colonoscopy-examined patients. Using a threshold of 3 pg methylated genomic DNA per mL plasma, methylated CAHM sequences were detected in the plasma DNA of 40/73 (55%) of CRC patients compared with 3/73 (4%) from subjects with adenomas and 5/74 (7%) from subjects without neoplasia. Both the frequency of detection and the amount of methylated CAHM DNA released into plasma increased with increasing cancer stage. Methylated CAHM DNA shows promise as a plasma biomarker for use in screening for CRC. PMID:24799664

  11. Characterization and Genetic Analyses of New Genes Coding for NOD2 Interacting Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lecine, Patrick; Mahfouz, Batoul; Hermant, Aurelie; Nicoletti, Cendrine; Parnis, Stephane; Perroy, Julie; Borg, Jean-Paul; Pascoe, Leigh; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Ollendorff, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    NOD2 contributes to the innate immune response and to the homeostasis of the intestinal mucosa. In response to its bacterial ligand, NOD2 interacts with RICK and activates the NF-κB and MAPK pathways, inducing gene transcription and synthesis of proteins required to initiate a balanced immune response. Mutations in NOD2 have been associated with an increased risk of Crohn’s Disease (CD), a disabling inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Because NOD2 signaling plays a key role in CD, it is important to further characterize the network of protein interacting with NOD2. Using yeast two hybrid (Y2H) screens, we identified new NOD2 interacting proteins (NIP). The primary interaction was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and/or bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments for 11 of these proteins (ANKHD1, CHMP5, SDCCAG3, TRIM41, LDOC1, PPP1R12C, DOCK7, VIM, KRT15, PPP2R3B, and C10Orf67). These proteins are involved in diverse functions, including endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT), cytoskeletal architecture and signaling regulation. Additionally, we show that the interaction of 8 NIPs is compromised with the 3 main CD associated NOD2 mutants (R702W, G908R and 1007fs). Furthermore, to determine whether these NOD2 protein partners could be encoded by IBD susceptibility genes, a transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) was performed on 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the main corresponding haplotypes in genes coding for 15 NIPs using a set of 343 IBD families with 556 patients. Overall this work did not increase the number of IBD susceptibility genes but extends the NOD2 protein interaction network and suggests that NOD2 interactome and signaling depend upon the NOD2 mutation profile in CD. PMID:27812135

  12. Evidence for gene-specific rather than transcription rate-dependent histone H3 exchange in yeast coding regions.

    PubMed

    Gat-Viks, Irit; Vingron, Martin

    2009-02-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, histones are dynamically exchanged independently of DNA replication. Recent reports show that different coding regions differ in their amount of replication-independent histone H3 exchange. The current paradigm is that this histone exchange variability among coding regions is a consequence of transcription rate. Here we put forward the idea that this variability might be also modulated in a gene-specific manner independently of transcription rate. To that end, we study transcription rate-independent replication-independent coding region histone H3 exchange. We term such events relative exchange. Our genome-wide analysis shows conclusively that in yeast, relative exchange is a novel consistent feature of coding regions. Outside of replication, each coding region has a characteristic pattern of histone H3 exchange that is either higher or lower than what was expected by its RNAPII transcription rate alone. Histone H3 exchange in coding regions might be a way to add or remove certain histone modifications that are important for transcription elongation. Therefore, our results that gene-specific coding region histone H3 exchange is decoupled from transcription rate might hint at a new epigenetic mechanism of transcription regulation.

  13. Rare coding variants in the phospholipase D3 gene confer risk for Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several risk variants for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). These common variants have replicable but small effects on LOAD risk and generally do not have obvious functional effects. Low-frequency coding variants, not detected by GWAS, are predicted to include functional variants with larger effects on risk. To identify low-frequency coding variants with large effects on LOAD risk, we carried out whole-exome sequencing (WES) in 14 large LOAD families and follow-up analyses of the candidate variants in several large LOAD case-control data sets. A rare variant in PLD3 (phospholipase D3; Val232Met) segregated with disease status in two independent families and doubled risk for Alzheimer's disease in seven independent case-control series with a total of more than 11,000 cases and controls of European descent. Gene-based burden analyses in 4,387 cases and controls of European descent and 302 African American cases and controls, with complete sequence data for PLD3, reveal that several variants in this gene increase risk for Alzheimer's disease in both populations. PLD3 is highly expressed in brain regions that are vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease pathology, including hippocampus and cortex, and is expressed at significantly lower levels in neurons from Alzheimer's disease brains compared to control brains. Overexpression of PLD3 leads to a significant decrease in intracellular amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) and extracellular Aβ42 and Aβ40 (the 42- and 40-residue isoforms of the amyloid-β peptide), and knockdown of PLD3 leads to a significant increase in extracellular Aβ42 and Aβ40. Together, our genetic and functional data indicate that carriers of PLD3 coding variants have a twofold increased risk for LOAD and that PLD3 influences APP processing. This study provides an example of how densely affected families may help to identify rare variants with large effects on risk for disease or other complex

  14. Rare coding variants in the phospholipase D3 gene confer risk for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cruchaga, Carlos; Karch, Celeste M; Jin, Sheng Chih; Benitez, Bruno A; Cai, Yefei; Guerreiro, Rita; Harari, Oscar; Norton, Joanne; Budde, John; Bertelsen, Sarah; Jeng, Amanda T; Cooper, Breanna; Skorupa, Tara; Carrell, David; Levitch, Denise; Hsu, Simon; Choi, Jiyoon; Ryten, Mina; Sassi, Celeste; Bras, Jose; Gibbs, Raphael J; Hernandez, Dena G; Lupton, Michelle K; Powell, John; Forabosco, Paola; Ridge, Perry G; Corcoran, Christopher D; Tschanz, JoAnn T; Norton, Maria C; Munger, Ronald G; Schmutz, Cameron; Leary, Maegan; Demirci, F Yesim; Bamne, Mikhil N; Wang, Xingbin; Lopez, Oscar L; Ganguli, Mary; Medway, Christopher; Turton, James; Lord, Jenny; Braae, Anne; Barber, Imelda; Brown, Kristelle; Pastor, Pau; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Brkanac, Zoran; Scott, Erick; Topol, Eric; Morgan, Kevin; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Singleton, Andy; Hardy, John; Kamboh, M Ilyas; George-Hyslop, Peter St; Cairns, Nigel; Morris, John C; Kauwe, John S K; Goate, Alison M

    2014-01-23

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several risk variants for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). These common variants have replicable but small effects on LOAD risk and generally do not have obvious functional effects. Low-frequency coding variants, not detected by GWAS, are predicted to include functional variants with larger effects on risk. To identify low-frequency coding variants with large effects on LOAD risk, we carried out whole-exome sequencing (WES) in 14 large LOAD families and follow-up analyses of the candidate variants in several large LOAD case-control data sets. A rare variant in PLD3 (phospholipase D3; Val232Met) segregated with disease status in two independent families and doubled risk for Alzheimer's disease in seven independent case-control series with a total of more than 11,000 cases and controls of European descent. Gene-based burden analyses in 4,387 cases and controls of European descent and 302 African American cases and controls, with complete sequence data for PLD3, reveal that several variants in this gene increase risk for Alzheimer's disease in both populations. PLD3 is highly expressed in brain regions that are vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease pathology, including hippocampus and cortex, and is expressed at significantly lower levels in neurons from Alzheimer's disease brains compared to control brains. Overexpression of PLD3 leads to a significant decrease in intracellular amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) and extracellular Aβ42 and Aβ40 (the 42- and 40-residue isoforms of the amyloid-β peptide), and knockdown of PLD3 leads to a significant increase in extracellular Aβ42 and Aβ40. Together, our genetic and functional data indicate that carriers of PLD3 coding variants have a twofold increased risk for LOAD and that PLD3 influences APP processing. This study provides an example of how densely affected families may help to identify rare variants with large effects on risk for disease or other complex

  15. Identification of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope genes recombinant between subtypes B and F in two epidemiologically linked individuals from Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Sabino, E C; Shpaer, E G; Morgado, M G; Korber, B T; Diaz, R S; Bongertz, V; Cavalcante, S; Galvão-Castro, B; Mullins, J I; Mayer, A

    1994-01-01

    Sequence analysis of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 env gene PCR amplified from a Brazilian woman's peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA (sample RJIO1) showed that it was likely to have been derived from a double recombination event between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtypes B and F. The major portion of the gp120 coding sequence belonged to the B lineage, but a segment of the C2 to V3 region (approximately 135 nucleotides) clearly associated with sequences of the F lineage. The subtype F-like segment had 15 noncontiguous signature nucleotides in common with Brazilian subtype F sequences that were not found, or were rare, in subtype B sequences. In contrast, this same segment had only 3 signature nucleotides shared with subtype B sequences and not present in the Brazilian subtype F sequences. Phylogenetic analysis, amino acid signature pattern analysis, and the pattern of synonymous mutations all supported the hypothesis of a recombinational origin of the RJIO1 sequence. Related recombinant genes were also detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA obtained from the woman's recent sexual partner, indicating that the recombination event probably occurred at some previous time in the chain of virus transmission. Divergent viral sequences in the V3 region were found in the male sexual partner, while a relatively homogeneous viral population was detected in the woman, consistent with her recent infection. PMID:8083973

  16. Restriction of V3 region sequence divergence in the HIV-1 envelope gene during antiretroviral treatment in a cohort of recent seroconverters

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dynamic changes in Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) sequence diversity and divergence are associated with immune control during primary infection and progression to AIDS. Consensus sequencing or single genome amplification sequencing of the HIV-1 envelope (env) gene, in particular the variable (V) regions, is used as a marker for HIV-1 genome diversity, but population diversity is only minimally, or semi-quantitatively sampled using these methods. Results Here we use second generation deep sequencing to determine inter-and intra-patient sequence heterogeneity and to quantify minor variants in a cohort of individuals either receiving or not receiving antiretroviral treatment following seroconversion; the SPARTAC trial. We show, through a cross-sectional study of sequence diversity of the env V3 in 30 antiretroviral-naive patients during primary infection that considerable population structure diversity exists, with some individuals exhibiting highly constrained plasma virus diversity. Diversity was independent of clinical markers (viral load, time from seroconversion, CD4 cell count) of infection. Serial sampling over 60 weeks of non-treated individuals that define three initially different diversity profiles showed that complex patterns of continuing HIV-1 sequence diversification and divergence could be readily detected. Evidence for minor sequence turnover, emergence of new variants and re-emergence of archived variants could be inferred from this analysis. Analysis of viral divergence over the same time period in patients who received short (12 weeks, ART12) or long course antiretroviral therapy (48 weeks, ART48) and a non-treated control group revealed that ART48 successfully suppressed viral divergence while ART12 did not have a significant effect. Conclusions Deep sequencing is a sensitive and reliable method for investigating the diversity of the env V3 as an important component of HIV-1 genome diversity. Detailed insights into the complex

  17. The spatial distribution of fixed mutations within genes coding for proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmquist, R.; Goodman, M.; Conroy, T.; Czelusniak, J.

    1983-01-01

    An examination has been conducted of the extensive amino acid sequence data now available for five protein families - the alpha crystallin A chain, myoglobin, alpha and beta hemoglobin, and the cytochromes c - with the goal of estimating the true spatial distribution of base substitutions within genes that code for proteins. In every case the commonly used Poisson density failed to even approximate the experimental pattern of base substitution. For the 87 species of beta hemoglobin examined, for example, the probability that the observed results were from a Poisson process was the minuscule 10 to the -44th. Analogous results were obtained for the other functional families. All the data were reasonably, but not perfectly, described by the negative binomial density. In particular, most of the data were described by one of the very simple limiting forms of this density, the geometric density. The implications of this for evolutionary inference are discussed. It is evident that most estimates of total base substitutions between genes are badly in need of revision.

  18. Phylogenomic analyses reveal the diversity of laccase-coding genes in Fonsecaea genomes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Leandro Ferreira; Feng, Peiying; Weiss, Vinicius Almir; Vicente, Vania Aparecida; Stielow, J Benjamin; de Hoog, Sybren

    2017-01-01

    The genus Fonsecaea comprises black yeast-like fungi of clinical relevance, including etiologic agents of chromoblastomycosis and cerebral phaeohyphomycosis. Presence of melanin and assimilation of monoaromatic hydrocarbons and alkylbenzenes have been proposed as virulence factors. Multicopper oxidase (MCO) is a family of enzymes including laccases, ferroxidases and ascorbate oxidases which are able to catalyze the oxidation of various aromatic organic compounds with the reduction of molecular oxygen to water. Additionally, laccases are required for the production of fungal melanins, a cell-wall black pigment recognized as a key polymer for pathogenicity and extremotolerance in black yeast-like fungi. Although the activity of laccase enzymes has previously been reported in many wood-rotting fungi, the diversity of laccase genes in Fonsecaea has not yet been assessed. In this study, we identified and characterized laccase-coding genes and determined their genomic location in five clinical and environmental Fonsecaea species. The identification of laccases sensu stricto will provide insights into carbon acquisition strategies as well as melanin production in Fonsecaea.

  19. The spatial distribution of fixed mutations within genes coding for proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmquist, R.; Goodman, M.; Conroy, T.; Czelusniak, J.

    1983-01-01

    An examination has been conducted of the extensive amino acid sequence data now available for five protein families - the alpha crystallin A chain, myoglobin, alpha and beta hemoglobin, and the cytochromes c - with the goal of estimating the true spatial distribution of base substitutions within genes that code for proteins. In every case the commonly used Poisson density failed to even approximate the experimental pattern of base substitution. For the 87 species of beta hemoglobin examined, for example, the probability that the observed results were from a Poisson process was the minuscule 10 to the -44th. Analogous results were obtained for the other functional families. All the data were reasonably, but not perfectly, described by the negative binomial density. In particular, most of the data were described by one of the very simple limiting forms of this density, the geometric density. The implications of this for evolutionary inference are discussed. It is evident that most estimates of total base substitutions between genes are badly in need of revision.

  20. Phylogenomic analyses reveal the diversity of laccase-coding genes in Fonsecaea genomes

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Peiying; Weiss, Vinicius Almir; Vicente, Vania Aparecida; Stielow, J. Benjamin; de Hoog, Sybren

    2017-01-01

    The genus Fonsecaea comprises black yeast-like fungi of clinical relevance, including etiologic agents of chromoblastomycosis and cerebral phaeohyphomycosis. Presence of melanin and assimilation of monoaromatic hydrocarbons and alkylbenzenes have been proposed as virulence factors. Multicopper oxidase (MCO) is a family of enzymes including laccases, ferroxidases and ascorbate oxidases which are able to catalyze the oxidation of various aromatic organic compounds with the reduction of molecular oxygen to water. Additionally, laccases are required for the production of fungal melanins, a cell-wall black pigment recognized as a key polymer for pathogenicity and extremotolerance in black yeast-like fungi. Although the activity of laccase enzymes has previously been reported in many wood-rotting fungi, the diversity of laccase genes in Fonsecaea has not yet been assessed. In this study, we identified and characterized laccase-coding genes and determined their genomic location in five clinical and environmental Fonsecaea species. The identification of laccases sensu stricto will provide insights into carbon acquisition strategies as well as melanin production in Fonsecaea. PMID:28187150

  1. Multiple transcription factor codes activate epidermal wound-response genes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Joseph C; Juarez, Michelle T; Kim, Myungjin; Drivenes, Øyvind; McGinnis, William

    2009-02-17

    Wounds in Drosophila and mouse embryos induce similar genetic pathways to repair epidermal barriers. However, the transcription factors that transduce wound signals to repair epidermal barriers are largely unknown. We characterize the transcriptional regulatory enhancers of 4 genes-Ddc, ple, msn, and kkv-that are rapidly activated in epidermal cells surrounding wounds in late Drosophila embryos and early larvae. These epidermal wound enhancers all contain evolutionarily conserved sequences matching binding sites for JUN/FOS and GRH transcription factors, but vary widely in trans- and cis-requirements for these inputs and their binding sites. We propose that the combination of GRH and FOS is part of an ancient wound-response pathway still used in vertebrates and invertebrates, but that other mechanisms have evolved that result in similar transcriptional output. A common, but largely untested assumption of bioinformatic analyses of gene regulatory networks is that transcription units activated in the same spatial and temporal patterns will require the same cis-regulatory codes. Our results indicate that this is an overly simplistic view.

  2. Classifier assessment and feature selection for recognizing short coding sequences of human genes.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai; Zhang, Ze; Tong, Tuo-Peng; Wu, Fang

    2012-03-01

    With the ever-increasing pace of genome sequencing, there is a great need for fast and accurate computational tools to automatically identify genes in these genomes. Although great progress has been made in the development of gene-finding algorithms during the past decades, there is still room for further improvement. In particular, the issue of recognizing short exons in eukaryotes is still not solved satisfactorily. This article is devoted to assessing various linear and kernel-based classification algorithms and selecting the best combination of Z-curve features for further improvement of the issue. Eight state-of-the-art linear and kernel-based supervised pattern recognition techniques were used to identify the short (21-192 bp) coding sequences of human genes. By measuring the prediction accuracy, the tradeoff between sensitivity and specificity and the time consumption, partial least squares (PLS) and kernel partial least squares (KPLS) algorithms were verified to be the most optimal linear and kernel-based classifiers, respectively. A surprising result was that, by making good use of the interpretability of the PLS and the Z-curve methods, 93 Z-curve features were proved to be the best selective combination. Using them, the average recognition accuracy was improved as high as 7.7% by means of KPLS when compared with what was obtained by the Fisher discriminant analysis using 189 Z-curve variables (Gao and Zhang, 2004 ). The used codes are freely available from the following approaches (implemented in MATLAB and supported on Linux and MS Windows): (1) SVM: http://www.support-vector-machines.org/SVM_soft.html. (2) GP: http://www.gaussianprocess.org. (3) KPLS and KFDA: Taylor, J.S., and Cristianini, N. 2004. Kernel Methods for Pattern Analysis. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. (4) PLS: Wise, B.M., and Gallagher, N.B. 2011. PLS-Toolbox for use with MATLAB: ver 1.5.2. Eigenvector Technologies, Manson, WA. Supplementary Material for this article is

  3. Large-scale prediction of long non-coding RNA functions in a coding–non-coding gene co-expression network

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Qi; Liu, Changning; Yuan, Xiongying; Kang, Shuli; Miao, Ruoyu; Xiao, Hui; Zhao, Guoguang; Luo, Haitao; Bu, Dechao; Zhao, Haitao; Skogerbø, Geir; Wu, Zhongdao; Zhao, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Although accumulating evidence has provided insight into the various functions of long-non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), the exact functions of the majority of such transcripts are still unknown. Here, we report the first computational annotation of lncRNA functions based on public microarray expression profiles. A coding–non-coding gene co-expression (CNC) network was constructed from re-annotated Affymetrix Mouse Genome Array data. Probable functions for altogether 340 lncRNAs were predicted based on topological or other network characteristics, such as module sharing, association with network hubs and combinations of co-expression and genomic adjacency. The functions annotated to the lncRNAs mainly involve organ or tissue development (e.g. neuron, eye and muscle development), cellular transport (e.g. neuronal transport and sodium ion, acid or lipid transport) or metabolic processes (e.g. involving macromolecules, phosphocreatine and tyrosine). PMID:21247874

  4. Transcription of genes coding for metabolic key functions in Nitrosomonas europaea during aerobic and anaerobic growth.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Sonja; Gilch, Stefan; Meyer, Ortwin; Schmidt, Ingo

    2009-01-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea can grow under conditions of chemolithoautotrophic aerobic (oxygen as oxidant) as well as anaerobic [nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) as oxidant] nitrification or chemoorganotrophic anaerobic pyruvate-dependent denitrification. In this study, the adaptation of the transcription (mRNA synthesis/concentration) of N. europaea to aerobic and anaerobic growth conditions was evaluated and the transcription of genes coding for metabolic key functions was analyzed: nitrogen and energy metabolism (amoA, hao, rh1, nirK, norB, nsc, aceE, ldhA, ppc, gltA, odhA, coxA), carbon dioxide fixation (cbbL), gluconeogenesis (ppsA), cell growth (ftsZ), and oxidative stress (sodB). During aerobic ammonia oxidation the specific activities of ammonia oxidation, nitrite reduction, and the growth rates correlated with the transcription level of the corresponding genes amoA/hao, nirK/norB/nsc, and cbbL/ftsZ. In anaerobically ammonia-oxidizing cells of N. europaea, the cellular mRNA concentrations of amoA, hao, rh1,coxA, cbbL, ftsZ, and sodB were reduced compared with aerobically nitrifying cells, but the mRNA levels of nirK, norB, and nsc were significantly increased. During anaerobic pyruvate-dependent denitrification, the mRNA abundance of nirK, norB, nsc, aceE, gltA, and odhA was increased, while the concentrations of amoA,hao, rh1, coxAcbbL, ftsZ, and sodB were significantly reduced. Temperature, pH value, and NH(4)(+), O(2), NO, and NO(2) concentrations had comparatively small effects on the transcription of the studied genes.

  5. Computational promoter analysis of mouse, rat and human antimicrobial peptide-coding genes

    PubMed Central

    Brahmachary, Manisha; Schönbach, Christian; Yang, Liang; Huang, Enli; Tan, Sin Lam; Chowdhary, Rajesh; Krishnan, SPT; Lin, Chin-Yo; Hume, David A; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2006-01-01

    Background Mammalian antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effectors of the innate immune response. A multitude of signals coming from pathways of mammalian pathogen/pattern recognition receptors and other proteins affect the expression of AMP-coding genes (AMPcgs). For many AMPcgs the promoter elements and transcription factors that control their tissue cell-specific expression have yet to be fully identified and characterized. Results Based upon the RIKEN full-length cDNA and public sequence data derived from human, mouse and rat, we identified 178 candidate AMP transcripts derived from 61 genes belonging to 29 AMP families. However, only for 31 mouse genes belonging to 22 AMP families we were able to determine true orthologous relationships with 30 human and 15 rat sequences. We screened the promoter regions of AMPcgs in the three species for motifs by an ab initio motif finding method and analyzed the derived promoter characteristics. Promoter models were developed for alpha-defensins, penk and zap AMP families. The results suggest a core set of transcription factors (TFs) that regulate the transcription of AMPcg families in mouse, rat and human. The three most frequent core TFs groups include liver-, nervous system-specific and nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs). Out of 440 motifs analyzed, we found that three represent potentially novel TF-binding motifs enriched in promoters of AMPcgs, while the other four motifs appear to be species-specific. Conclusion Our large-scale computational analysis of promoters of 22 families of AMPcgs across three mammalian species suggests that their key transcriptional regulators are likely to be TFs of the liver-, nervous system-specific and NHR groups. The computationally inferred promoter elements and potential TF binding motifs provide a rich resource for targeted experimental validation of TF binding and signaling studies that aim at the regulation of mouse, rat or human AMPcgs. PMID:17254313

  6. Identification and Molecular Characterization of Genes Coding Pharmaceutically Important Enzymes from Halo-Thermo Tolerant Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Safary, Azam; Moniri, Rezvan; Hamzeh-Mivehroud, Maryam; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: Robust pharmaceutical and industrial enzymes from extremophile microorganisms are main source of enzymes with tremendous stability under harsh conditions which make them potential tools for commercial and biotechnological applications. Methods: The genome of a Gram-positive halo-thermotolerant Bacillus sp. SL1, new isolate from Saline Lake, was investigated for the presence of genes coding for potentially pharmaceutical enzymes. We determined gene sequences for the enzymes laccase (CotA), l-asparaginase (ansA3, ansA1), glutamate-specific endopeptidase (blaSE), l-arabinose isomerase (araA2), endo-1,4-β mannosidase (gmuG), glutaminase (glsA), pectate lyase (pelA), cellulase (bglC1), aldehyde dehydrogenase (ycbD) and allantoinases (pucH) in the genome of Bacillus sp. SL1. Results: Based on the DNA sequence alignment results, six of the studied enzymes of Bacillus sp. SL-1 showed 100% similarity at the nucleotide level to the same genes of B. licheniformis 14580 demonstrating extensive organizational relationship between these two strains. Despite high similarities between the B. licheniformis and Bacillus sp. SL-1 genomes, there are minor differences in the sequences of some enzyme. Approximately 30% of the enzyme sequences revealed more than 99% identity with some variations in nucleotides leading to amino acid substitution in protein sequences. Conclusion: Molecular characterization of this new isolate provides useful information regarding evolutionary relationship between B. subtilis and B. licheniformis species. Since, the most industrial processes are often performed in harsh conditions, enzymes from such halo-thermotolerant bacteria may provide economically and industrially appealing biocatalysts to be used under specific physicochemical situations in medical, pharmaceutical, chemical and other industries.

  7. [Analysis of correlation of local GC level in human protein coding genes].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-Gui; Hu, Jun; Yang, Xiao

    2008-09-01

    GC level is an important feature of genomic composition, which significantly improve our understanding of structure, function and evolution of genes. In this paper, the nonredundant DNA sequence of 7,992 human protein coding genes were retrieved from public database and the local GC level of different sequence regions and correlation between GC levels were analyzed.. The results showed that the GC levels of different sequence regions were strikingly nonuniform. 5' untranslated regions were of richest GC, with average GC content being 62.5%. 3'-untranslated regions were of poorest GC, with average GC content being 43.97%. GC contents of 3' flanking sequences profoundly matched the GC levels of DNA large fragments where the genes were located. Although the GC contents of open reading frames (ORFs) were higher than that of intron, 3' non-translated region and 3' flanking sequences, high correlation existed among the GC contents of the four regions. Average GC content of the third codon position (GC3) was 58.9%, higher than that of the fist and second position, and showed high correlation to GC contents of ORFs, with correlation coefficients being 0.91, besides of its significant association with GC contents of intron, 3'-untranslated region and 3' flanking sequences. Moreover, the linear regression of GC3 against GC contents of 3' flanking sequences yielded a slope of 1.25. Thus, GC3 was a sensitive indicator for GC change of local genome. As for 5' flanking sequences, 5' untranslated regions, fist and second codon position, however, their GC level exhibited weaker correlation with that of other regions. These results suggest that the third codon positions, introns, 3'-untranslated regions and 3' flanking sequences may evolve similarly while first and second codon positions, 5' flanking sequences and 5' untranslated region were expected to bear more selective stress for holding their functions.

  8. Identification and Molecular Characterization of Genes Coding Pharmaceutically Important Enzymes from Halo-Thermo Tolerant Bacillus

    PubMed Central

    Safary, Azam; Moniri, Rezvan; Hamzeh-Mivehroud, Maryam; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Robust pharmaceutical and industrial enzymes from extremophile microorganisms are main source of enzymes with tremendous stability under harsh conditions which make them potential tools for commercial and biotechnological applications. Methods: The genome of a Gram-positive halo-thermotolerant Bacillus sp. SL1, new isolate from Saline Lake, was investigated for the presence of genes coding for potentially pharmaceutical enzymes. We determined gene sequences for the enzymes laccase (CotA), l-asparaginase (ansA3, ansA1), glutamate-specific endopeptidase (blaSE), l-arabinose isomerase (araA2), endo-1,4-β mannosidase (gmuG), glutaminase (glsA), pectate lyase (pelA), cellulase (bglC1), aldehyde dehydrogenase (ycbD) and allantoinases (pucH) in the genome of Bacillus sp. SL1. Results: Based on the DNA sequence alignment results, six of the studied enzymes of Bacillus sp. SL-1 showed 100% similarity at the nucleotide level to the same genes of B. licheniformis 14580 demonstrating extensive organizational relationship between these two strains. Despite high similarities between the B. licheniformis and Bacillus sp. SL-1 genomes, there are minor differences in the sequences of some enzyme. Approximately 30% of the enzyme sequences revealed more than 99% identity with some variations in nucleotides leading to amino acid substitution in protein sequences. Conclusion: Molecular characterization of this new isolate provides useful information regarding evolutionary relationship between B. subtilis and B. licheniformis species. Since, the most industrial processes are often performed in harsh conditions, enzymes from such halo-thermotolerant bacteria may provide economically and industrially appealing biocatalysts to be used under specific physicochemical situations in medical, pharmaceutical, chemical and other industries. PMID:28101462

  9. Isolation, characterization and expression of a gene coding for a 2S albumin from Bertholletia excelsa (Brazil nut).

    PubMed

    Gander, E S; Holmstroem, K O; De Paiva, G R; De Castro, L A; Carneiro, M; Grossi de Sá, M F

    1991-03-01

    Two genes, BE2S1 and BE2S2, coding for methionine-rich albumins of Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K.) have been cloned and their sequence determined. The genes are members of a multigene family and one of them, i.e. BE2S1, codes for one of the dominant 2S isoforms. Its expression is highly regulated during seed development and with respect to tissue specificity. Sequence analysis has shown that the genes contain one intron and that the promoter of BE2S1 shows a canonical TATA motif. The transcription initiation site is located 26 nucleotides downstream from the TATA box. Sequence comparison of the promoter regions of 2S genes from Brassica napus, Arabidopsis thaliana and B. excelsa revealed the presence of TGCA palindromic sequence that appear to be arranged in a 2S-specific manner.

  10. ChIPBase v2.0: decoding transcriptional regulatory networks of non-coding RNAs and protein-coding genes from ChIP-seq data

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ke-Ren; Liu, Shun; Sun, Wen-Ju; Zheng, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2017-01-01

    The abnormal transcriptional regulation of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and protein-coding genes (PCGs) is contributed to various biological processes and linked with human diseases, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we developed ChIPBase v2.0 (http://rna.sysu.edu.cn/chipbase/) to explore the transcriptional regulatory networks of ncRNAs and PCGs. ChIPBase v2.0 has been expanded with ∼10 200 curated ChIP-seq datasets, which represent about 20 times expansion when comparing to the previous released version. We identified thousands of binding motif matrices and their binding sites from ChIP-seq data of DNA-binding proteins and predicted millions of transcriptional regulatory relationships between transcription factors (TFs) and genes. We constructed ‘Regulator’ module to predict hundreds of TFs and histone modifications that were involved in or affected transcription of ncRNAs and PCGs. Moreover, we built a web-based tool, Co-Expression, to explore the co-expression patterns between DNA-binding proteins and various types of genes by integrating the gene expression profiles of ∼10 000 tumor samples and ∼9100 normal tissues and cell lines. ChIPBase also provides a ChIP-Function tool and a genome browser to predict functions of diverse genes and visualize various ChIP-seq data. This study will greatly expand our understanding of the transcriptional regulations of ncRNAs and PCGs. PMID:27924033

  11. ChIPBase v2.0: decoding transcriptional regulatory networks of non-coding RNAs and protein-coding genes from ChIP-seq data.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ke-Ren; Liu, Shun; Sun, Wen-Ju; Zheng, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2017-01-04

    The abnormal transcriptional regulation of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and protein-coding genes (PCGs) is contributed to various biological processes and linked with human diseases, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we developed ChIPBase v2.0 (http://rna.sysu.edu.cn/chipbase/) to explore the transcriptional regulatory networks of ncRNAs and PCGs. ChIPBase v2.0 has been expanded with ∼10 200 curated ChIP-seq datasets, which represent about 20 times expansion when comparing to the previous released version. We identified thousands of binding motif matrices and their binding sites from ChIP-seq data of DNA-binding proteins and predicted millions of transcriptional regulatory relationships between transcription factors (TFs) and genes. We constructed 'Regulator' module to predict hundreds of TFs and histone modifications that were involved in or affected transcription of ncRNAs and PCGs. Moreover, we built a web-based tool, Co-Expression, to explore the co-expression patterns between DNA-binding proteins and various types of genes by integrating the gene expression profiles of ∼10 000 tumor samples and ∼9100 normal tissues and cell lines. ChIPBase also provides a ChIP-Function tool and a genome browser to predict functions of diverse genes and visualize various ChIP-seq data. This study will greatly expand our understanding of the transcriptional regulations of ncRNAs and PCGs. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Individual letters of the RNA polymerase II CTD code govern distinct gene expression programs in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Schwer, Beate; Bitton, Danny Asher; Sanchez, Ana M.; Bähler, Jürg; Shuman, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    The primary structure and phosphorylation pattern of the tandem Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7 repeats of the RNA polymerase II carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) comprise an informational code that coordinates transcription, chromatin modification, and RNA processing. To gauge the contributions of individual CTD coding “letters” to gene expression, we analyzed the poly(A)+ transcriptomes of fission yeast mutants that lack each of the four inessential CTD phosphoacceptors: Tyr1, Ser2, Thr4, and Ser7. There was a hierarchy of CTD mutational effects with respect to the number of dysregulated protein-coding RNAs, with S2A (n = 227) >> Y1F (n = 71) > S7A (n = 58) >> T4A (n = 7). The majority of the protein-coding RNAs affected in Y1F cells were coordinately affected by S2A, suggesting that Tyr1-Ser2 constitutes a two-letter code “word.” Y1F and S2A elicited increased expression of genes encoding proteins involved in iron uptake (Frp1, Fip1, Fio1, Str3, Str1, Sib1), without affecting the expression of the genes that repress the iron regulon, implying that Tyr1-Ser2 transduces a repressive signal. Y1F and S2A cells had increased levels of ferric reductase activity and were hypersensitive to phleomycin, indicative of elevated intracellular iron. The T4A and S7A mutations had opposing effects on the phosphate response pathway. T4A reduced the expression of two genes encoding proteins involved in phosphate acquisition (the Pho1 acid phosphatase and the phosphate transporter SPBC8E4.01c), without affecting the expression of known genes that regulate the phosphate response pathway, whereas S7A increased pho1+ expression. These results highlight specific cellular gene expression programs that are responsive to distinct CTD cues. PMID:24591591

  13. Genetic diversity of koala retroviral envelopes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqin; Gorman, Kristen; Santiago, Jan Clement; Kluska, Kristen; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2015-03-17

    Genetic diversity, attributable to the low fidelity of reverse transcription, recombination and mutation, is an important feature of infectious retroviruses. Under selective pressure, such as that imposed by superinfection interference, gammaretroviruses commonly adapt their envelope proteins to use alternative receptors to overcome this entry block. The first characterized koala retroviruses KoRV subgroup A (KoRV-A) were remarkable in their absence of envelope genetic variability. Once it was determined that KoRV-A was present in all koalas in US zoos, regardless of their disease status, we sought to isolate a KoRV variant whose presence correlated with neoplastic malignancies. More than a decade after the identification of KoRV-A, we isolated a second subgroup of KoRV, KoRV-B from koalas with lymphomas. The envelope proteins of KoRV-A and KoRV-B are sufficiently divergent to confer the ability to bind and employ distinct receptors for infection. We have now obtained a number of additional KoRV envelope variants. In the present studies we report these variants, and show that they differ from KoRV-A and KoRV-B envelopes in their host range and superinfection interference properties. Thus, there appears to be considerable variation among KoRVs envelope genes suggesting genetic diversity is a factor following the KoRV-A infection process.

  14. Genetic Diversity of Koala Retroviral Envelopes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenqin; Gorman, Kristen; Santiago, Jan Clement; Kluska, Kristen; Eiden, Maribeth V.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity, attributable to the low fidelity of reverse transcription, recombination and mutation, is an important feature of infectious retroviruses. Under selective pressure, such as that imposed by superinfection interference, gammaretroviruses commonly adapt their envelope proteins to use alternative receptors to overcome this entry block. The first characterized koala retroviruses KoRV subgroup A (KoRV-A) were remarkable in their absence of envelope genetic variability. Once it was determined that KoRV-A was present in all koalas in US zoos, regardless of their disease status, we sought to isolate a KoRV variant whose presence correlated with neoplastic malignancies. More than a decade after the identification of KoRV-A, we isolated a second subgroup of KoRV, KoRV-B from koalas with lymphomas. The envelope proteins of KoRV-A and KoRV-B are sufficiently divergent to confer the ability to bind and employ distinct receptors for infection. We have now obtained a number of additional KoRV envelope variants. In the present studies we report these variants, and show that they differ from KoRV-A and KoRV-B envelopes in their host range and superinfection interference properties. Thus, there appears to be considerable variation among KoRVs envelope genes suggesting genetic diversity is a factor following the KoRV-A infection process. PMID:25789509

  15. 5'-coding sequence of the nasA gene of Azotobacter vinelandii is required for efficient expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baomin; Wang, Yumei; Kennedy, Christina

    2014-10-01

    The operon nasACBH in Azotobacter vinelandii encodes nitrate and nitrite reductases that sequentially reduce nitrate to nitrite and to ammonium for nitrogen assimilation into organic molecules. Our previous analyses showed that nasACBH expression is subject to antitermination regulation that occurs upstream of the nasA gene in response to the availability of nitrate and nitrite. In this study, we continued expression analyses of the nasA gene and observed that the nasA 5'-coding sequence plays an important role in gene expression, as demonstrated by the fact that deletions caused over sixfold reduction in the expression of the lacZ reporter gene. Further analysis suggests that the nasA 5'-coding sequence promotes gene expression in a way that is not associated with weakened transcript folding around the translational initiation region or codon usage bias. The findings from this study imply that there exists potential to improve gene expression in A. vinelandii by optimizing 5'-coding sequences. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Natural selection on coding and noncoding DNA sequences is associated with virulence genes in a plant pathogenic fungus.

    PubMed

    Rech, Gabriel E; Sanz-Martín, José M; Anisimova, Maria; Sukno, Serenella A; Thon, Michael R

    2014-09-04

    Natural selection leaves imprints on DNA, offering the opportunity to identify functionally important regions of the genome. Identifying the genomic regions affected by natural selection within pathogens can aid in the pursuit of effective strategies to control diseases. In this study, we analyzed genome-wide patterns of selection acting on different classes of sequences in a worldwide sample of eight strains of the model plant-pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. We found evidence of selective sweeps, balancing selection, and positive selection affecting both protein-coding and noncoding DNA of pathogenicity-related sequences. Genes encoding putative effector proteins and secondary metabolite biosynthetic enzymes show evidence of positive selection acting on the coding sequence, consistent with an Arms Race model of evolution. The 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) of genes coding for effector proteins and genes upregulated during infection show an excess of high-frequency polymorphisms likely the consequence of balancing selection and consistent with the Red Queen hypothesis of evolution acting on these putative regulatory sequences. Based on the findings of this work, we propose that even though adaptive substitutions on coding sequences are important for proteins that interact directly with the host, polymorphisms in the regulatory sequences may confer flexibility of gene expression in the virulence processes of this important plant pathogen.

  17. Natural Selection on Coding and Noncoding DNA Sequences Is Associated with Virulence Genes in a Plant Pathogenic Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Rech, Gabriel E.; Sanz-Martín, José M.; Anisimova, Maria; Sukno, Serenella A.; Thon, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection leaves imprints on DNA, offering the opportunity to identify functionally important regions of the genome. Identifying the genomic regions affected by natural selection within pathogens can aid in the pursuit of effective strategies to control diseases. In this study, we analyzed genome-wide patterns of selection acting on different classes of sequences in a worldwide sample of eight strains of the model plant-pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. We found evidence of selective sweeps, balancing selection, and positive selection affecting both protein-coding and noncoding DNA of pathogenicity-related sequences. Genes encoding putative effector proteins and secondary metabolite biosynthetic enzymes show evidence of positive selection acting on the coding sequence, consistent with an Arms Race model of evolution. The 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) of genes coding for effector proteins and genes upregulated during infection show an excess of high-frequency polymorphisms likely the consequence of balancing selection and consistent with the Red Queen hypothesis of evolution acting on these putative regulatory sequences. Based on the findings of this work, we propose that even though adaptive substitutions on coding sequences are important for proteins that interact directly with the host, polymorphisms in the regulatory sequences may confer flexibility of gene expression in the virulence processes of this important plant pathogen. PMID:25193312

  18. Evaluation of chimeric DNA vaccines consisting of premembrane and envelope genes of Japanese encephalitis and dengue viruses as a strategy for reducing induction of dengue virus infection-enhancing antibody response.

    PubMed

    Sjatha, Fithriyah; Kuwahara, Miwa; Sudiro, T Mirawati; Kameoka, Masanori; Konishi, Eiji

    2014-02-01

    Neutralizing antibodies induced by dengue virus (DENV) infection show viral infection-enhancing activities at sub-neutralizing doses. On the other hand, preimmunity against Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a congener of DENV, does not increase the severity of DENV infection. Several studies have demonstrated that neutralizing epitopes in the genus Flavivirus are mainly located in domain III (DIII) of the envelope (E) protein. In this study, chimeric premembrane and envelope (prM-E) gene-based expression plasmids of JEV and DENV1 with DIII substitution of each virus were constructed for use as DNA vaccines and their immunogenicity evaluated. Sera from C3H/He and ICR mice immunized with a chimeric gene containing DENV1 DIII on a JEV prM-E gene backbone showed high neutralizing antibody titers with less DENV infection-enhancing activity. Our results confirm the applicability of this approach as a new dengue vaccine development strategy. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. EMdeCODE: a novel algorithm capable of reading words of epigenetic code to predict enhancers and retroviral integration sites and to identify H3R2me1 as a distinctive mark of coding versus non-coding genes

    PubMed Central

    Santoni, Federico Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Existence of some extra-genetic (epigenetic) codes has been postulated since the discovery of the primary genetic code. Evident effects of histone post-translational modifications or DNA methylation over the efficiency and the regulation of DNA processes are supporting this postulation. EMdeCODE is an original algorithm that approximate the genomic distribution of given DNA features (e.g. promoter, enhancer, viral integration) by identifying relevant ChIPSeq profiles of post-translational histone marks or DNA binding proteins and combining them in a supermark. EMdeCODE kernel is essentially a two-step procedure: (i) an expectation-maximization process calculates the mixture of epigenetic factors that maximize the Sensitivity (recall) of the association with the feature under study; (ii) the approximated density is then recursively trimmed with respect to a control dataset to increase the precision by reducing the number of false positives. EMdeCODE densities improve significantly the prediction of enhancer loci and retroviral integration sites with respect to previous methods. Importantly, it can also be used to extract distinctive factors between two arbitrary conditions. Indeed EMdeCODE identifies unexpected epigenetic profiles specific for coding versus non-coding RNA, pointing towards a new role for H3R2me1 in coding regions. PMID:23234700

  20. Introns Structure Patterns of Variation in Nucleotide Composition in Arabidopsis thaliana and Rice Protein-Coding Genes.

    PubMed

    Ressayre, Adrienne; Glémin, Sylvain; Montalent, Pierre; Serre-Giardi, Laurana; Dillmann, Christine; Joets, Johann

    2015-10-07

    Plant genomes present a continuous range of variation in nucleotide composition (G + C content). In coding regions, G + C-poor species tend to have unimodal distributions of G + C content among genes within genomes and slight 5'-3' gradients along genes. In contrast, G + C-rich species display bimodal distributions of G + C content among genes and steep 5'-3' decreasing gradients along genes. The causes of these peculiar patterns are still poorly understood. Within two species (Arabidopsis thaliana and rice), each representative of one side of the continuum, we studied the consequences of intron presence on coding region and intron G + C content at different scales. By properly taking intron structure into account, we showed that, in both species, intron presence is associated with step changes in nucleotide, codon, and amino acid composition. This suggests that introns have a barrier effect structuring G + C content along genes and that previous continuous characterizations of the 5'-3' gradients were artifactual. In external gene regions (located upstream first or downstream last introns), species-specific factors, such as GC-biased gene conversion, are shaping G + C content whereas in internal gene regions (surrounded by introns), G + C content is likely constrained to remain within a range common to both species.

  1. Introns Structure Patterns of Variation in Nucleotide Composition in Arabidopsis thaliana and Rice Protein-Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ressayre, Adrienne; Glémin, Sylvain; Montalent, Pierre; Serre-Giardi, Laurana; Dillmann, Christine; Joets, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Plant genomes present a continuous range of variation in nucleotide composition (G + C content). In coding regions, G + C-poor species tend to have unimodal distributions of G + C content among genes within genomes and slight 5′–3′ gradients along genes. In contrast, G + C-rich species display bimodal distributions of G + C content among genes and steep 5′–3′ decreasing gradients along genes. The causes of these peculiar patterns are still poorly understood. Within two species (Arabidopsis thaliana and rice), each representative of one side of the continuum, we studied the consequences of intron presence on coding region and intron G + C content at different scales. By properly taking intron structure into account, we showed that, in both species, intron presence is associated with step changes in nucleotide, codon, and amino acid composition. This suggests that introns have a barrier effect structuring G + C content along genes and that previous continuous characterizations of the 5′–3′ gradients were artifactual. In external gene regions (located upstream first or downstream last introns), species-specific factors, such as GC-biased gene conversion, are shaping G + C content whereas in internal gene regions (surrounded by introns), G + C content is likely constrained to remain within a range common to both species. PMID:26450849

  2. Opacities for Stellar Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, M. J.; Yan, Y.; Mihalas, D.; Pradhan, A. K.

    1994-02-01

    We define stellar envelopes to be those regions of stellar interiors in which atoms exist and are not markedly perturbed by the plasma environment. Availability of accurate and extensive atomic data is a prime requirement for the calculation of envelope opacities. For envelopes we adopt the criterion of mass density p < 0.01 ρ≥g cm-3. We present radiative Rosseland mean opacities for envelopes obtained using atomic data calculated in an international collaboration referred to as the Opacity Project, or OP. Equations of state are calculated using an occupation-probability formalism. To a good approximation, ionization equilibria and level populations in envelopes depend only on the temperature T and electron density Ne and are insensitive to chemical mixtures. Monochromatic opacities for all abundant chemical elements are therefore calculated on a grid of (T, Ne) values and are archived. Rosseland mean opacities are then readily calculated for any chemical mixture. Tables of Rosseland means, for any required mixtures and as functions of ρ and T, are available on request in computer-readable form. The present, op, results are compared with those from another recent study, referred to as OPAL, by C. A. Iglesias and F. A. Rogers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The agreement between the OP and OPAL calculations is generally good, although there are some differences. Both calculations give results larger than those obtained in earlier work, by factors of up to 3 or more.

  3. Gypsy transposition correlates with the production of a retroviral envelope-like protein under the tissue-specific control of the Drosophila flamenco gene.

    PubMed

    Pélisson, A; Song, S U; Prud'homme, N; Smith, P A; Bucheton, A; Corces, V G

    1994-09-15

    Gypsy displays striking similarities to vertebrate retroviruses, including the presence of a yet uncharacterized additional open reading frame (ORF3) and the recent evidence for infectivity. It is mobilized with high frequency in the germline of the progeny of females homozygous for the flamenco permissive mutation. We report the characterization of a gypsy subgenomic ORF3 RNA encoding typical retroviral envelope proteins. In females, env expression is strongly repressed by one copy of the non-permissive allele of flamenco. A less dramatic reduction in the accumulation of other transcripts and retrotranscripts is also observed. These effects correlate well with the inhibition of gypsy transposition in the progeny of these females, and are therefore likely to be responsible for this phenomenon. The effects of flamenco on gypsy expression are apparently restricted to the somatic follicle cells that surround the maternal germline. Moreover, permissive follicle cells display a typically polarized distribution of gypsy RNAs and envelope proteins, both being mainly accumulated at the apical pole, close to the oocyte. We propose a model suggesting that gypsy germinal transposition might occur only in individuals that have maternally inherited enveloped gypsy particles due to infection of the maternal germline by the soma.

  4. Gypsy transposition correlates with the production of a retroviral envelope-like protein under the tissue-specific control of the Drosophila flamenco gene.

    PubMed Central

    Pélisson, A; Song, S U; Prud'homme, N; Smith, P A; Bucheton, A; Corces, V G

    1994-01-01

    Gypsy displays striking similarities to vertebrate retroviruses, including the presence of a yet uncharacterized additional open reading frame (ORF3) and the recent evidence for infectivity. It is mobilized with high frequency in the germline of the progeny of females homozygous for the flamenco permissive mutation. We report the characterization of a gypsy subgenomic ORF3 RNA encoding typical retroviral envelope proteins. In females, env expression is strongly repressed by one copy of the non-permissive allele of flamenco. A less dramatic reduction in the accumulation of other transcripts and retrotranscripts is also observed. These effects correlate well with the inhibition of gypsy transposition in the progeny of these females, and are therefore likely to be responsible for this phenomenon. The effects of flamenco on gypsy expression are apparently restricted to the somatic follicle cells that surround the maternal germline. Moreover, permissive follicle cells display a typically polarized distribution of gypsy RNAs and envelope proteins, both being mainly accumulated at the apical pole, close to the oocyte. We propose a model suggesting that gypsy germinal transposition might occur only in individuals that have maternally inherited enveloped gypsy particles due to infection of the maternal germline by the soma. Images PMID:7925283

  5. The expression level of small non-coding RNAs derived from the first exon of protein-coding genes is predictive of cancer status.

    PubMed

    Zovoilis, Athanasios; Mungall, Andrew J; Moore, Richard; Varhol, Richard; Chu, Andy; Wong, Tina; Marra, Marco; Jones, Steven J M

    2014-04-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (smRNAs) are known to be significantly enriched near the transcriptional start sites of genes. However, the functional relevance of these smRNAs remains unclear, and they have not been associated with human disease. Within the cancer genome atlas project (TCGA), we have generated small RNA datasets for many tumor types. In prior cancer studies, these RNAs have been regarded as transcriptional "noise," due to their apparent chaotic distribution. In contrast, we demonstrate their striking potential to distinguish efficiently between cancer and normal tissues and classify patients with cancer to subgroups of distinct survival outcomes. This potential to predict cancer status is restricted to a subset of these smRNAs, which is encoded within the first exon of genes, highly enriched within CpG islands and negatively correlated with DNA methylation levels. Thus, our data show that genome-wide changes in the expression levels of small non-coding RNAs within first exons are associated with cancer.

  6. Identification and characterisation of coding tandem repeat variants in incA gene of Chlamydophila pecorum.

    PubMed

    Yousef Mohamad, Khalil; Rekiki, Abdessalem; Myers, Garry; Bavoil, Patrik M; Rodolakis, Annie

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria of the family Chlamydiaceae are obligate intracellular pathogens of human and animals. Chlamydophila pecorum is associated with different pathological conditions in ruminants, swine and koala. To characterize a coding tandem repeat (CTR) identified at the 3' end of incA gene of C. pecorum, 51 strains of different chlamydial species were examined. The CTR were observed in 18 of 18 tested C. pecorum isolates including symptomatic and asymptomatic animals from diverse geographical origins. The CTR were also found in two strains of C. abortus respectively isolated from faeces from a healthy ewe and from a goat belonging to asymptomatic herds, but were absent in C. abortus strains isolated from clinical disease specimens, and in tested strains of C. psittaci, C. caviae, C. felis and C. trachomatis. The number of CTR repeats is variable and encode several motifs that are rich in alanine and proline. The CTR-derived variable structure of incA, which encode the Chlamydiaceae-specific type III secreted inclusion membrane protein, IncA, may be involved in the adaptation of C. pecorum to its environment by allowing it to persist in the host cell.

  7. Rotational dynamics of bases in the gene coding interferon alpha 17 (IFNA17).

    PubMed

    Krasnobaeva, L A; Yakushevich, L V

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, rotational oscillations of nitrogenous bases in the DNA with the sequence of the gene coding interferon alpha 17 (IFNA17), are investigated. As a mathematical model simulating oscillations of the bases, we use a system of two coupled nonlinear partial differential equations that takes into account effects of dissipation, action of external fields and dependence of the equation coefficients on the sequence of bases. We apply the methods of the theory of oscillations to solve the equations in the linear approach and to construct the dispersive curves determining the dependence of the frequency of the plane waves (ω) on the wave vector (q). In the nonlinear case, the solutions in the form of kink are considered, and the main characteristics of the kink: the rest energy (E0), the rest mass (m0), the size (d) and sound velocity (C0), are calculated. With the help of the energetic method, the kink velocity (υ), the path (S), and the lifetime (τ) are also obtained.

  8. Evaluating phylogenetic informativeness and data-type usage for new protein-coding genes across Vertebrata.

    PubMed

    Fong, Jonathan J; Fujita, Matthew K

    2011-11-01

    As a resource for vertebrate phylogenetics, we developed 75 new protein-coding genes using a combination of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) available in Genbank, and targeted amplification of complementary DNA (cDNA). In addition, we performed three additional analyses in order to assess the utility of our approach. First, we profiled the phylogenetic informativeness of these new markers using the online program PhyDesign. Next, we compared the utility of four different data-types used in phylogenetics: nucleotides (NUCL), amino acids (AA), 1st and 2nd codon positions only (N12), and modified sequences to account for codon degeneracy (DEGEN1; Regier et al., 2010). Lastly, we use these new markers to construct a vertebrate phylogeny and address the uncertain relationship between higher-level mammal groups: monotremes, marsupials, and placentals. Our results show that phylogenetic informativeness of the 75 new markers varies, both in the amount of phylogenetic signal and optimal timescale. When comparing the four data-types, we find that the NUCL data-type, due to the high level of phylogenetic signal, performs the best across all divergence times. The remaining three data-types (AA, N12, DEGEN1) are less subject to homoplasy, but have greatly reduced levels of phylogenetic signal relative to NUCL. Our phylogenetic inference supports the Theria hypothesis of mammalian relationships, with marsupials and placentals being sister groups.

  9. Genome-wide analysis of transcriptional regulators in human HSPCs reveals a densely interconnected network of coding and noncoding genes.

    PubMed

    Beck, Dominik; Thoms, Julie A I; Perera, Dilmi; Schütte, Judith; Unnikrishnan, Ashwin; Knezevic, Kathy; Kinston, Sarah J; Wilson, Nicola K; O'Brien, Tracey A; Göttgens, Berthold; Wong, Jason W H; Pimanda, John E

    2013-10-03

    Genome-wide combinatorial binding patterns for key transcription factors (TFs) have not been reported for primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), and have constrained analysis of the global architecture of molecular circuits controlling these cells. Here we provide high-resolution genome-wide binding maps for a heptad of key TFs (FLI1, ERG, GATA2, RUNX1, SCL, LYL1, and LMO2) in human CD34(+) HSPCs, together with quantitative RNA and microRNA expression profiles. We catalog binding of TFs at coding genes and microRNA promoters, and report that combinatorial binding of all 7 TFs is favored and associated with differential expression of genes and microRNA in HSPCs. We also uncover a previously unrecognized association between FLI1 and RUNX1 pairing in HSPCs, we establish a correlation between the density of histone modifications that mark active enhancers and the number of overlapping TFs at a peak, we demonstrate bivalent histone marks at promoters of heptad target genes in CD34(+) cells that are poised for later expression, and we identify complex relationships between specific microRNAs and coding genes regulated by the heptad. Taken together, these data reveal the power of integrating multifactor sequencing of chromatin immunoprecipitates with coding and noncoding gene expression to identify regulatory circuits controlling cell identity.

  10. EzEditor: a versatile sequence alignment editor for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon-Seong; Lee, Kihyun; Park, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Bong-Soo; Cho, Yong-Joon; Ha, Sung-Min; Chun, Jongsik

    2014-02-01

    EzEditor is a Java-based molecular sequence editor allowing manipulation of both DNA and protein sequence alignments for phylogenetic analysis. It has multiple features optimized to connect initial computer-generated multiple alignment and subsequent phylogenetic analysis by providing manual editing with reference to biological information specific to the genes under consideration. It provides various functionalities for editing rRNA alignments using secondary structure information. In addition, it supports simultaneous editing of both DNA sequences and their translated protein sequences for protein-coding genes. EzEditor is, to our knowledge, the first sequence editing software designed for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes with the visualization of biologically relevant information and should be useful in molecular phylogenetic studies. EzEditor is based on Java, can be run on all major computer operating systems and is freely available from http://sw.ezbiocloud.net/ezeditor/.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial protein coding genes confirms the reciprocal paraphyly of Hexapoda and Crustacea

    PubMed Central

    Carapelli, Antonio; Liò, Pietro; Nardi, Francesco; van der Wath, Elizabeth; Frati, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Background The phylogeny of Arthropoda is still a matter of harsh debate among systematists, and significant disagreement exists between morphological and molecular studies. In particular, while the taxon joining hexapods and crustaceans (the Pancrustacea) is now widely accepted among zoologists, the relationships among its basal lineages, and particularly the supposed reciprocal paraphyly of Crustacea and Hexapoda, continues to represent a challenge. Several genes, as well as different molecular markers, have been used to tackle this problem in molecular phylogenetic studies, with the mitochondrial DNA being one of the molecules of choice. In this study, we have assembled the largest data set available so far for Pancrustacea, consisting of 100 complete (or almost complete) sequences of mitochondrial genomes. After removal of unalignable sequence regions and highly rearranged genomes, we used nucleotide and inferred amino acid sequences of the 13 protein coding genes to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships among major lineages of Pancrustacea. The analysis was performed with Bayesian inference, and for the amino acid sequences a new, Pancrustacea-specific, matrix of amino acid replacement was developed and used in this study. Results Two largely congruent trees were obtained from the analysis of nucleotide and amino acid datasets. In particular, the best tree obtained based on the new matrix of amino acid replacement (MtPan) was preferred over those obtained using previously available matrices (MtArt and MtRev) because of its higher likelihood score. The most remarkable result is the reciprocal paraphyly of Hexapoda and Crustacea, with some lineages of crustaceans (namely the Malacostraca, Cephalocarida and, possibly, the Branchiopoda) being more closely related to the Insecta s.s. (Ectognatha) than two orders of basal hexapods, Collembola and Diplura. Our results confirm that the mitochondrial genome, unlike analyses based on morphological data or nuclear

  12. A close relative of the adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) gene codes for a peroxisomal protein with a specific expression pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Lombard-Platet, G; Savary, S; Sarde, C O; Mandel, J L; Chimini, G

    1996-01-01

    Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a severe demyelinating disease, is caused by mutations in a gene coding for a peroxisomal membrane protein (ALDP), which belongs to the superfamily of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters and has the structure of a half transporter. ALDP showed 38% sequence identity with another peroxisomal membrane protein, PMP70, up to now its closest homologue. We describe here the cloning and characterization of a mouse ALD-related gene (ALDR), which codes for a protein with 66% identity with ALDP and shares the same half transporter structure. The ALDR protein was overexpressed in COS cells and was found to be associated with the peroxisomes. The ALD and ALDR genes show overlapping but clearly distinct expression patterns in mouse and may thus play similar but nonequivalent roles. The ALDR gene, which appears highly conserved in man, is a candidate for being a modifier gene that could account for some of the extreme phenotypic variability of ALD. The ALDR gene is also a candidate for being implicated in one of the complementation groups of Zellweger syndrome, a genetically heterogeneous disorder of peroxisome biogenesis, rare cases of which were found to be associated with mutations in the PMP70 (PXMP1) gene. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8577752

  13. Polarity effects in the hisG gene of salmonella require a site within the coding sequence.

    PubMed

    Ciampi, M S; Roth, J R

    1988-02-01

    A single site in the middle of the coding sequence of the hisG gene of Salmonella is required for most of the polar effect of mutations in this gene. Nonsense and insertion mutations mapping upstream of this point in the hisG gene all have strong polar effects on expression of downstream genes in the operon; mutations mapping promotor distal to this site have little or no polar effect. Two previously known hisG mutations, mapping in the region of the polarity site, abolish the polarity effect of insertion mutations mapping upstream of this region. New polarity site mutations have been selected which have lost the polar effect of upstream nonsense mutations. All mutations abolishing the function of the site are small deletions; three are identical, 28-bp deletions which have arisen independently. A fourth mutation is a deletion of 16 base pairs internal to the larger deletion. Several point mutations within this 16-bp region have no effect on the function of the polarity site. We believe that a small number of polarity sites of this type are responsible for polarity in all genes. The site in the hisG gene is more easily detected than most because it appears to be the only such site in the hisG gene and because it maps in the center of the coding sequence.

  14. Non-coding-regulatory regions of human brain genes delineated by bacterial artificial chromosome knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The next big challenge in human genetics is understanding the 98% of the genome that comprises non-coding DNA. Hidden in this DNA are sequences critical for gene regulation, and new experimental strategies are needed to understand the functional role of gene-regulation sequences in health and disease. In this study, we build upon our HuGX ('high-throughput human genes on the X chromosome’) strategy to expand our understanding of human gene regulation in vivo. Results In all, ten human genes known to express in therapeutically important brain regions were chosen for study. For eight of these genes, human bacterial artificial chromosome clones were identified, retrofitted with a reporter, knocked single-copy into the Hprt locus in mouse embryonic stem cells, and mouse strains derived. Five of these human genes expressed in mouse, and all expressed in the adult brain region for which they were chosen. This defined the boundaries of the genomic DNA sufficient for brain expression, and refined our knowledge regarding the complexity of gene regulation. We also characterized for the first time the expression of human MAOA and NR2F2, two genes for which the mouse homologs have been extensively studied in the central nervous system (CNS), and AMOTL1 and NOV, for which roles in CNS have been unclear. Conclusions We have demonstrated the use of the HuGX strategy to functionally delineate non-coding-regulatory regions of therapeutically important human brain genes. Our results also show that a careful investigation, using publicly available resources and bioinformatics, can lead to accurate predictions of gene expression. PMID:24124870

  15. Tissue specificity in the nuclear envelope supports its functional complexity.

    PubMed

    de Las Heras, Jose I; Meinke, Peter; Batrakou, Dzmitry G; Srsen, Vlastimil; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair Rw; Schirmer, Eric C

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear envelope links to inherited disease gave the conundrum of how mutations in near-ubiquitous proteins can yield many distinct pathologies, each focused in different tissues. One conundrum-resolving hypothesis is that tissue-specific partner proteins mediate these pathologies. Such partner proteins may have now been identified with recent proteome studies determining nuclear envelope composition in different tissues. These studies revealed that the majority of the total nuclear envelope proteins are tissue restricted in their expression. Moreover, functions have been found for a number these tissue-restricted nuclear envelope proteins that fit with mechanisms proposed to explain how the nuclear envelope could mediate disease, including defects in mechanical stability, cell cycle regulation, signaling, genome organization, gene expression, nucleocytoplasmic transport, and differentiation. The wide range of functions to which these proteins contribute is consistent with not only their involvement in tissue-specific nuclear envelope disease pathologies, but also tissue evolution.

  16. Tissue specificity in the nuclear envelope supports its functional complexity

    PubMed Central

    de las Heras, Jose I; Meinke, Peter; Batrakou, Dzmitry G; Srsen, Vlastimil; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair RW; Schirmer, Eric C

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear envelope links to inherited disease gave the conundrum of how mutations in near-ubiquitous proteins can yield many distinct pathologies, each focused in different tissues. One conundrum-resolving hypothesis is that tissue-specific partner proteins mediate these pathologies. Such partner proteins may have now been identified with recent proteome studies determining nuclear envelope composition in different tissues. These studies revealed that the majority of the total nuclear envelope proteins are tissue restricted in their expression. Moreover, functions have been found for a number these tissue-restricted nuclear envelope proteins that fit with mechanisms proposed to explain how the nuclear envelope could mediate disease, including defects in mechanical stability, cell cycle regulation, signaling, genome organization, gene expression, nucleocytoplasmic transport, and differentiation. The wide range of functions to which these proteins contribute is consistent with not only their involvement in tissue-specific nuclear envelope disease pathologies, but also tissue evolution. PMID:24213376

  17. Transcription of a protein-coding gene on B chromosomes of the Siberian roe deer (Capreolus pygargus)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most eukaryotic species represent stable karyotypes with a particular diploid number. B chromosomes are additional to standard karyotypes and may vary in size, number and morphology even between cells of the same individual. For many years it was generally believed that B chromosomes found in some plant, animal and fungi species lacked active genes. Recently, molecular cytogenetic studies showed the presence of additional copies of protein-coding genes on B chromosomes. However, the transcriptional activity of these genes remained elusive. We studied karyotypes of the Siberian roe deer (Capreolus pygargus) that possess up to 14 B chromosomes to investigate the presence and expression of genes on supernumerary chromosomes. Results Here, we describe a 2 Mbp region homologous to cattle chromosome 3 and containing TNNI3K (partial), FPGT, LRRIQ3 and a large gene-sparse segment on B chromosomes of the Siberian roe deer. The presence of the copy of the autosomal region was demonstrated by B-specific cDNA analysis, PCR assisted mapping, cattle bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone localization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). By comparative analysis of B-specific and non-B chromosomal sequences we discovered some B chromosome-specific mutations in protein-coding genes, which further enabled the detection of a FPGT-TNNI3K transcript expressed from duplicated genes located on B chromosomes in roe deer fibroblasts. Conclusions Discovery of a large autosomal segment in all B chromosomes of the Siberian roe deer further corroborates the view of an autosomal origin for these elements. Detection of a B-derived transcript in fibroblasts implies that the protein coding sequences located on Bs are not fully inactivated. The origin, evolution and effect on host of B chromosomal genes seem to be similar to autosomal segmental duplications, which reinforces the view that supernumerary chromosomal elements might play an important role in genome

  18. Nitrogen depletion in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe causes nucleosome loss in both promoters and coding regions of activated genes

    PubMed Central

    Kristell, Carolina; Orzechowski Westholm, Jakub; Olsson, Ida; Ronne, Hans; Komorowski, Jan; Bjerling, Pernilla

    2010-01-01

    Gene transcription is associated with local changes in chromatin, both in nucleosome positions and in chemical modifications of the histones. Chromatin dynamics has mostly been studied on a single-gene basis. Those genome-wide studies that have been made primarily investigated steady-state transcription. However, three studies of genome-wide changes in chromatin during the transcriptional response to heat shock in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed nucleosome eviction in promoter regions but only minor effects in coding regions. Here, we describe the short-term response to nitrogen starvation in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Nitrogen depletion leads to a fast induction of a large number of genes in S. pombe and is thus suitable for genome-wide studies of chromatin dynamics during gene regulation. After 20 min of nitrogen removal, 118 transcripts were up-regulated. The distribution of regulated genes throughout the genome was not random; many up-regulated genes were found in clusters, while large parts of the genome were devoid of up-regulated genes. Surprisingly, this up-regulation was associated with nucleosome eviction of equal magnitudes in the promoters and in the coding regions. The nucleosome loss was not limited to induction by nitrogen depletion but also occurred during cadmium treatment. Furthermore, the lower nucleosome density persisted for at least 60 min after induction. Two highly induced genes, urg1+ and urg2+, displayed a substantial nucleosome loss, with only 20% of the nucleosomes being left in the coding region. We conclude that nucleosome loss during transcriptional activation is not necessarily limited to promoter regions. PMID:20086243

  19. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FEED ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-03-19

    Laboratory work was completed on a set of evaporation tests designed to establish a feed envelope for the fractional crystallization process. The feed envelope defines chemical concentration limits within which the process can be operated successfully. All 38 runs in the half-factorial design matrix were completed successfully, based on the qualitative definition of success. There is no feed composition likely to be derived from saltcake dissolution that would cause the fractional crystallization process to not meet acceptable performance requirements. However, some compositions clearly would provide more successful operation than other compositions.

  20. Analysis of the H gene, the central untranslated region and the proximal coding part of the F gene of wild-type and vaccine canine distemper viruses.

    PubMed

    Haas, L; Liermann, H; Harder, T C; Barrett, T; Löchelt, M; von Messling, V; Baumgärtner, W; Greiser-Wilke, I

    1999-09-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the genetic analysis of several parts of the genome of canine distemper virus (CDV) field isolates and vaccine viruses. The haemagglutinin (H) gene analysis showed that recent viruses did not differ significantly from vaccine strains. The analysis of the long untranslated region between the matrix (M) and fusion (F) gene revealed distinct genetic heterogeneity. The putative F protein start codon AUG461 of vaccine strain Onderstepoort was found to be mutated in all wild-type isolates and in another vaccine strain. The proximal coding part of the F gene was well conserved. Phylogenetic analysis of this segment showed the presence of several cocirculating CDV genotypes.

  1. Trans-acting GC-rich non-coding RNA at var expression site modulates gene counting in malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Guizetti, Julien; Barcons-Simon, Anna; Scherf, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Monoallelic expression of the var multigene family enables immune evasion of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in its human host. At a given time only a single member of the 60-member var gene family is expressed at a discrete perinuclear region called the ‘var expression site’. However, the mechanism of var gene counting remains ill-defined. We hypothesize that activation factors associating specifically with the expression site play a key role in this process. Here, we investigate the role of a GC-rich non-coding RNA (ncRNA) gene family composed of 15 highly homologous members. GC-rich genes are positioned adjacent to var genes in chromosome-central gene clusters but are absent near subtelomeric var genes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrates that GC-rich ncRNA localizes to the perinuclear expression site of central and subtelomeric var genes in trans. Importantly, overexpression of distinct GC-rich ncRNA members disrupts the gene counting process at the single cell level and results in activation of a specific subset of var genes in distinct clones. We identify the first trans-acting factor targeted to the elusive perinuclear var expression site and open up new avenues to investigate ncRNA function in antigenic variation of malaria and other protozoan pathogens. PMID:27466391

  2. Trans-acting GC-rich non-coding RNA at var expression site modulates gene counting in malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Guizetti, Julien; Barcons-Simon, Anna; Scherf, Artur

    2016-11-16

    Monoallelic expression of the var multigene family enables immune evasion of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in its human host. At a given time only a single member of the 60-member var gene family is expressed at a discrete perinuclear region called the 'var expression site'. However, the mechanism of var gene counting remains ill-defined. We hypothesize that activation factors associating specifically with the expression site play a key role in this process. Here, we investigate the role of a GC-rich non-coding RNA (ncRNA) gene family composed of 15 highly homologous members. GC-rich genes are positioned adjacent to var genes in chromosome-central gene clusters but are absent near subtelomeric var genes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrates that GC-rich ncRNA localizes to the perinuclear expression site of central and subtelomeric var genes in trans. Importantly, overexpression of distinct GC-rich ncRNA members disrupts the gene counting process at the single cell level and results in activation of a specific subset of var genes in distinct clones. We identify the first trans-acting factor targeted to the elusive perinuclear var expression site and open up new avenues to investigate ncRNA function in antigenic variation of malaria and other protozoan pathogens. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. The gene coding for the DOPA dioxygenase involved in betalain biosynthesis in Amanita muscaria and its regulation.

    PubMed

    Hinz, U G; Fivaz, J; Girod, P A; Zyrd, J P

    1997-09-01

    Genomic and cDNA clones derived from the gene (dodA) coding for DOPA dioxygenase, a key enzyme in the betalain pathway, were obtained from the basidiomycete Amanita muscaria. A cDNA library was established in the phage lambda ZapII and dodA clones were isolated using polyclonal antibodies raised against the purified enzyme. Their identity was confirmed by comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with the sequence of several tryptic peptide fragments of DOPA dioxygenase. The gene coded for a 228-amino acid protein that showed no homology to published sequences. The coding region was interrupted by five short introns. Regulation was shown to occur at the transcriptional level; the mRNA accumulated to high levels only in the coloured cap tissue. dodA was found to be a single-copy gene in A. muscaria. To our knowledge, this is the first gene from the betalain pathway to be cloned. It encodes a type of aromatic ring-cleaving dioxygenase that has not been previously described.

  4. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    DOEpatents

    Caulfield, Michael; Cupo, Albert; Dean, Hansi; Hoffenberg, Simon; King, C. Richter; Klasse, P. J.; Marozsan, Andre; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ward, Andrew; Wilson, Ian; Julien, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-22

    The present application relates to novel HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, which may be utilized as HIV-1 vaccine immunogens, and antigens for crystallization, electron microscopy and other biophysical, biochemical and immunological studies for the identification of broad neutralizing antibodies. The present invention encompasses the preparation and purification of immunogenic compositions, which are formulated into the vaccines of the present invention.

  5. Jacketed lamp bulb envelope

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Bass, Gary K.; Dolan, James T.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang; Levin, Izrail; Roy, Robert J.; Shanks, Bruce; Smith, Malcolm; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a partially closed end, the partially closed end defining an aperture, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material at least partially covering a portion of the bulb not abutting the aperture. The reflective ceramic material may substantially fill an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. The ceramic cup may include a structural feature for aiding in alignment of the jacketed lamp bulb envelope in a lamp. The ceramic cup may include an external flange about a periphery thereof. One example of a jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a closed end, a ceramic washer covering the open end of the ceramic cup, the washer defining an aperture therethrough, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material filling an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. A method of packing a jacketed lamp bulb envelope of the type comprising a ceramic cup with a lamp bulb disposed therein includes the steps of filling the ceramic cup with a flowable slurry of reflective material, and applying centrifugal force to the cup to pack the reflective material therein.

  6. Biased gene conversion and GC-content evolution in the coding sequences of reptiles and vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Figuet, Emeric; Ballenghien, Marion; Romiguier, Jonathan; Galtier, Nicolas

    2014-12-19

    Mammalian and avian genomes are characterized by a substantial spatial heterogeneity of GC-content, which is often interpreted as reflecting the effect of local GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC), a meiotic repair bias that favors G and C over A and T alleles in high-recombining genomic regions. Surprisingly, the first fully sequenced nonavian sauropsid (i.e., reptile), the green anole Anolis carolinensis, revealed a highly homogeneous genomic GC-content landscape, suggesting the possibility that gBGC might not be at work in this lineage. Here, we analyze GC-content evolution at third-codon positions (GC3) in 44 vertebrates species, including eight newly sequenced transcriptomes, with a specific focus on nonavian sauropsids. We report that reptiles, including the green anole, have a genome-wide distribution of GC3 similar to that of mammals and birds, and we infer a strong GC3-heterogeneity to be already present in the tetrapod ancestor. We further show that the dynamic of coding sequence GC-content is largely governed by karyotypic features in vertebrates, notably in the green anole, in agreement with the gBGC hypothesis. The discrepancy between third-codon positions and noncoding DNA regarding GC-content dynamics in the green anole could not be explained by the activity of transposable elements or selection on codon usage. This analysis highlights the unique value of third-codon positions as an insertion/deletion-free marker of nucleotide substitution biases that ultimately affect the evolution of proteins.

  7. Phylogeny of pteromalid parasitic wasps (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae): initial evidence from four protein-coding nuclear genes.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Christopher A; Regier, Jerome C; Mitter, Charles

    2007-11-01

    Chalcidoidea (approximately 22,000 described species) is the most ecologically diverse superfamily of parasitic Hymenoptera and plays a major role in the biological control of insect pests. However, phylogenetic relationships both within and between chalcidoid families have been poorly understood, particularly for the large family Pteromalidae and relatives. Forty-two taxa, broadly representing Chalcidoidea but concentrated in the 'pteromalid lineage,' were sequenced for 4620 bp of protein-coding sequence from four nuclear genes for which we present new primers. These are: CAD (1719 bp) DDC (708 bp), enolase (1149 bp), and PEPCK (1044 bp). The combined data set was analyzed using parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods. Statistical significance of the apparent non-monophyly of some taxonomic groups on our trees was evaluated using the approximately unbiased test of Shimodaira [Shimodaira, H. 2002. An approximately unbiased test of phylogenetic tree selection. Syst. Biol. 51(3), 492-508]. In accord with previous studies, we find moderate to strong support for monophyly of Chalcidoidea, a sister-group relationship of Mymaridae to the remainder of Chalcidoidea, and a relatively basal placement of Encarsia (Aphelinidae) within the latter. The 'pteromalid lineage' of families is generally recovered as monophyletic, but the hypothesis of monophyly for Pteromalidae, which appear paraphyletic with respect to all other families sampled in that lineage, is decisively rejected (P < 10(-14)). Within Pteromalidae, monophyly was strongly supported for nearly all tribes represented by multiple exemplars, and for two subfamilies. All other multiply-represented subfamilies appeared para- or polyphyletic in our trees, although monophyly was significantly rejected only for Miscogasterinae, Ormocerinae, and Colotrechninae. The limited resolution obtained in the analyses presented here reinforces the idea that reconstruction of pteromalid phylogeny is a difficult problem

  8. Biased Gene Conversion and GC-Content Evolution in the Coding Sequences of Reptiles and Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Figuet, Emeric; Ballenghien, Marion; Romiguier, Jonathan; Galtier, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian and avian genomes are characterized by a substantial spatial heterogeneity of GC-content, which is often interpreted as reflecting the effect of local GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC), a meiotic repair bias that favors G and C over A and T alleles in high-recombining genomic regions. Surprisingly, the first fully sequenced nonavian sauropsid (i.e., reptile), the green anole Anolis carolinensis, revealed a highly homogeneous genomic GC-content landscape, suggesting the possibility that gBGC might not be at work in this lineage. Here, we analyze GC-content evolution at third-codon positions (GC3) in 44 vertebrates species, including eight newly sequenced transcriptomes, with a specific focus on nonavian sauropsids. We report that reptiles, including the green anole, have a genome-wide distribution of GC3 similar to that of mammals and birds, and we infer a strong GC3-heterogeneity to be already present in the tetrapod ancestor. We further show that the dynamic of coding sequence GC-content is largely governed by karyotypic features in vertebrates, notably in the green anole, in agreement with the gBGC hypothesis. The discrepancy between third-codon positions and noncoding DNA regarding GC-content dynamics in the green anole could not be explained by the activity of transposable elements or selection on codon usage. This analysis highlights the unique value of third-codon positions as an insertion/deletion-free marker of nucleotide substitution biases that ultimately affect the evolution of proteins. PMID:25527834

  9. Rate heterogeneity in six protein-coding genes from the holoparasite Balanophora (Balanophoraceae) and other taxa of Santalales.

    PubMed

    Su, Huei-Jiun; Hu, Jer-Ming

    2012-11-01

    The holoparasitic flowering plant Balanophora displays extreme floral reduction and was previously found to have enormous rate acceleration in the nuclear 18S rDNA region. So far, it remains unclear whether non-ribosomal, protein-coding genes of Balanophora also evolve in an accelerated fashion and whether the genes with high substitution rates retain their functionality. To tackle these issues, six different genes were sequenced from two Balanophora species and their rate variation and expression patterns were examined. Sequences including nuclear PI, euAP3, TM6, LFY and RPB2 and mitochondrial matR were determined from two Balanophora spp. and compared with selected hemiparasitic species of Santalales and autotrophic core eudicots. Gene expression was detected for the six protein-coding genes and the expression patterns of the three B-class genes (PI, AP3 and TM6) were further examined across different organs of B. laxiflora using RT-PCR. Balanophora mitochondrial matR is highly accelerated in both nonsynonymous (d(N)) and synonymous (d(S)) substitution rates, whereas the rate variation of nuclear genes LFY, PI, euAP3, TM6 and RPB2 are less dramatic. Significant d(S) increases were detected in Balanophora PI, TM6, RPB2 and d(N) accelerations in euAP3. All of the protein-coding genes are expressed in inflorescences, indicative of their functionality. PI is restrictively expressed in tepals, synandria and floral bracts, whereas AP3 and TM6 are widely expressed in both male and female inflorescences. Despite the observation that rates of sequence evolution are generally higher in Balanophora than in hemiparasitic species of Santalales and autotrophic core eudicots, the five nuclear protein-coding genes are functional and are evolving at a much slower rate than 18S rDNA. The mechanism or mechanisms responsible for rapid sequence evolution and concomitant rate acceleration for 18S rDNA and matR are currently not well understood and require further study in Balanophora

  10. Rate heterogeneity in six protein-coding genes from the holoparasite Balanophora (Balanophoraceae) and other taxa of Santalales

    PubMed Central

    Su, Huei-Jiun; Hu, Jer-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The holoparasitic flowering plant Balanophora displays extreme floral reduction and was previously found to have enormous rate acceleration in the nuclear 18S rDNA region. So far, it remains unclear whether non-ribosomal, protein-coding genes of Balanophora also evolve in an accelerated fashion and whether the genes with high substitution rates retain their functionality. To tackle these issues, six different genes were sequenced from two Balanophora species and their rate variation and expression patterns were examined. Methods Sequences including nuclear PI, euAP3, TM6, LFY and RPB2 and mitochondrial matR were determined from two Balanophora spp. and compared with selected hemiparasitic species of Santalales and autotrophic core eudicots. Gene expression was detected for the six protein-coding genes and the expression patterns of the three B-class genes (PI, AP3 and TM6) were further examined across different organs of B. laxiflora using RT-PCR. Key Results Balanophora mitochondrial matR is highly accelerated in both nonsynonymous (dN) and synonymous (dS) substitution rates, whereas the rate variation of nuclear genes LFY, PI, euAP3, TM6 and RPB2 are less dramatic. Significant dS increases were detected in Balanophora PI, TM6, RPB2 and dN accelerations in euAP3. All of the protein-coding genes are expressed in inflorescences, indicative of their functionality. PI is restrictively expressed in tepals, synandria and floral bracts, whereas AP3 and TM6 are widely expressed in both male and female inflorescences. Conclusions Despite the observation that rates of sequence evolution are generally higher in Balanophora than in hemiparasitic species of Santalales and autotrophic core eudicots, the five nuclear protein-coding genes are functional and are evolving at a much slower rate than 18S rDNA. The mechanism or mechanisms responsible for rapid sequence evolution and concomitant rate acceleration for 18S rDNA and matR are currently not well

  11. Pinstripe: a suite of programs for integrating transcriptomic and proteomic datasets identifies novel proteins and improves differentiation of protein-coding and non-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Gascoigne, Dennis K; Cheetham, Seth W; Cattenoz, Pierre B; Clark, Michael B; Amaral, Paulo P; Taft, Ryan J; Wilhelm, Dagmar; Dinger, Marcel E; Mattick, John S

    2012-12-01

    Comparing transcriptomic data with proteomic data to identify protein-coding sequences is a long-standing challenge in molecular biology, one that is exacerbated by the increasing size of high-throughput datasets. To address this challenge, and thereby to improve the quality of genome annotation and understanding of genome biology, we have developed an integrated suite of programs, called Pinstripe. We demonstrate its application, utility and discovery power using transcriptomic and proteomic data from publicly available datasets. To demonstrate the efficacy of Pinstripe for large-scale analysis, we applied Pinstripe's reverse peptide mapping pipeline to a transcript library including de novo assembled transcriptomes from the human Illumina Body Atlas (IBA2) and GENCODE v10 gene annotations, and the EBI Proteomics Identifications Database (PRIDE) peptide database. This analysis identified 736 canonical open reading frames (ORFs) supported by three or more PRIDE peptide fragments that are positioned outside any known coding DNA sequence (CDS). Because of the unfiltered nature of the PRIDE database and high probability of false discovery, we further refined this list using independent evidence for translation, including the presence of a Kozak sequence or functional domains, synonymous/non-synonymous substitution ratios and ORF length. Using this integrative approach, we observed evidence of translation from a previously unknown let7e primary transcript, the archetypical lncRNA H19, and a homolog of RD3. Reciprocally, by exclusion of transcripts with mapped peptides or significant ORFs (>80 codon), we identify 32 187 loci with RNAs longer than 2000 nt that are unlikely to encode proteins. Pinstripe (pinstripe.matticklab.com) is freely available as source code or a Mono binary. Pinstripe is written in C# and runs under the Mono framework on Linux or Mac OS X, and both under Mono and .Net under Windows. m.dinger@garvan.org.au or j.mattick@garvan.org.au Supplementary

  12. A functional survey of the enhancer activity of conserved non-coding sequences from vertebrate Iroquois cluster gene deserts

    PubMed Central

    de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Feijóo, Cármen Gloria; Manzanares, Miguel; Tena, Juan J.; Rodríguez-Seguel, Elisa; Letizia, Annalisa; Allende, Miguel L.; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies of the genome architecture of vertebrates have uncovered two unforeseen aspects of its organization. First, large regions of the genome, called gene deserts, are devoid of protein-coding sequences and have no obvious biological role. Second, comparative genomics has highlighted the existence of an array of highly conserved non-coding regions (HCNRs) in all vertebrates. Most surprisingly, these structural features are strongly associated with genes that have essential functions during development. Among these, the vertebrate Iroquois (Irx) genes stand out on both fronts. Mammalian Irx genes are organized in two clusters (IrxA and IrxB) that span >1 Mb each with no other genes interspersed. Additionally, a large number of HCNRs exist within Irx clusters. We have systematically examined the enhancer activity of HCNRs from the IrxB cluster using transgenic Xenopus and zebrafish embryos. Most of these HCNRs are active in subdomains of endogenous Irx expression, and some are candidates to contain shared enhancers of neighboring genes, which could explain the evolutionary conservation of Irx clusters. Furthermore, HCNRs present in tetrapod IrxB but not in fish may be responsible for novel Irx expression domains that appeared after their divergence. Finally, we have performed a more detailed analysis on two IrxB ultraconserved non-coding regions (UCRs) duplicated in IrxA clusters in similar relative positions. These four regions share a core region highly conserved among all of them and drive expression in similar domains. However, inter-species conserved sequences surrounding the core, specific for each of these UCRs, are able to modulate their expression. PMID:16024824

  13. Automated conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) discovery reveals differences in gene content and promoter evolution among grasses.

    PubMed

    Turco, Gina; Schnable, James C; Pedersen, Brent; Freeling, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Conserved non-coding sequences (CNS) are islands of non-coding sequence that, like protein coding exons, show less divergence in sequence between related species than functionless DNA. Several CNSs have been demonstrated experimentally to function as cis-regulatory regions. However, the specific functions of most CNSs remain unknown. Previous searches for CNS in plants have either anchored on exons and only identified nearby sequences or required years of painstaking manual annotation. Here we present an open source tool that can accurately identify CNSs between any two related species with sequenced genomes, including both those immediately adjacent to exons and distal sequences separated by >12 kb of non-coding sequence. We have used this tool to characterize new motifs, associate CNSs with additional functions, and identify previously undetected genes encoding RNA and protein in the genomes of five grass species. We provide a list of 15,363 orthologous CNSs conserved across all grasses tested. We were also able to identify regulatory sequences present in the common ancestor of grasses that have been lost in one or more extant grass lineages. Lists of orthologous gene pairs and associated CNSs are provided for reference inbred lines of arabidopsis, Japonica rice, foxtail millet, sorghum, brachypodium, and maize.

  14. Systematic screening for mutations in the promoter and the coding region of the 5-HT{sub 1A} gene

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, J.; Shimron-Abarbanell, D.; Cichon, S.

    1995-10-09

    In the present study we sought to identify genetic variation in the 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor gene which through alteration of protein function or level of expression might contribute to the genetic predisposition to neuropsychiatric diseases. Genomic DNA samples from 159 unrelated subjects (including 45 schizophrenic, 46 bipolar affective, and 43 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 25 healthy controls) were investigated by single-strand conformation analysis. Overlapping PCR (polymerase chain reaction) fragments covered the whole coding sequence as well as the 5{prime} untranslated region of the 5-HT{sub 1A} gene. The region upstream to the coding sequence we investigated contains a functional promoter. We found two rare nucleotide sequence variants. Both mutations are located in the coding region of the gene: a coding mutation (A{yields}G) in nucleotide position 82 which leads to an amino acid exchange (Ile{yields}Val) in position 28 of the receptor protein and a silent mutation (C{yields}T) in nucleotide position 549. The occurrence of the Ile-28-Val substitution was studied in an extended sample of patients (n = 352) and controls (n = 210) but was found in similar frequencies in all groups. Thus, this mutation is unlikely to play a significant role in the genetic predisposition to the diseases investigated. In conclusion, our study does not provide evidence that the 5-HT{sub 1A} gene plays either a major or a minor role in the genetic predisposition to schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, or Tourette`s syndrome. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Complete female mitochondrial genome of Anodonta anatina (Mollusca: Unionidae): confirmation of a novel protein-coding gene (F ORF).

    PubMed

    Soroka, Marianna; Burzyński, Artur

    2015-04-01

    Freshwater mussels are among animals having two different, gender-specific mitochondrial genomes. We sequenced complete female mitochondrial genomes from five individuals of Anodonta anatina, a bivalve species common in palearctic ecozone. The length of the genome was variable: 15,637-15,653 bp. This variation was almost entirely confined to the non-coding parts, which constituted approximately 5% of the genome. Nucleotide diversity was moderate, at 0.3%. Nucleotide composition was typically biased towards AT (66.0%). All genes normally seen in animal mtDNA were identified, as well as the ORF characteristic for unionid mitochondrial genomes, bringing the total number of genes present to 38. If this additional ORF does encode a protein, it must evolve under a very relaxed selection since all substitutions within this gene were non-synonymous. The gene order and structure of the genome were identical to those of all female mitochondrial genomes described in unionid bivalves except the Gonideini.

  16. Automation of a primer design and evaluation pipeline for subsequent sequencing of the coding regions of all human Refseq genes

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Daniel; Love, Donald R

    2012-01-01

    Screening for mutations in human disease-causing genes in a molecular diagnostic environment demands simplicity with a view to allowing high throughput approaches. In order to advance these requirements, we have developed and applied a primer design program, termed BatchPD, to achieve the PCR amplification of coding exons of all known human Refseq genes. Primer design, in silico PCR checks and formatted primer information for subsequent web-based interrogation are queried from existing online tools. BatchPD acts as an intermediate to automate queries and results processing and provides exon-specific information that is summarised in a spreadsheet format. PMID:22570517

  17. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of a gene coding for a secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Kawada, N; Matsuyama, A; Kobayashi, Y

    1999-06-01

    A gene encoding a stereo-specific secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (CpSADH) that catalyzed the oxidation of (S)-1,3-BDO to 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was cloned from Candida parapsilosis. This CpSADH-gene consisted of 1,009 nucleotides coding for a protein with M(r) 35,964. A recombinant Escherichia coli JM109 strain harboring the expression plasmid, pKK-CPA1, produced (R)-1,3-BDO (93.5% ee., 94.7% yield) from the racemate without any additive to regenerate NAD+ from NADH.

  18. Improved structural annotation of protein-coding genes in the Meloidogyne hapla genome using RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuelong; Bird, David McK; Nielsen, Dahlia M

    2014-01-01

    As high-throughput cDNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is increasingly applied to hypothesis-driven biological studies, the prediction of protein coding genes based on these data are usurping strictly in silico approaches. Compared with computationally derived gene predictions, structural annotation is more accurate when based on biological evidence, particularly RNA-Seq data. Here, we refine the current genome annotation for the Meloidogyne hapla genome utilizing RNA-Seq data. Published structural annotation defines 14 420 protein-coding genes in the M. hapla genome. Of these, 25% (3751) were found to exhibit some incongruence with RNA-Seq data. Manual annotation enabled these discrepancies to be resolved. Our analysis revealed 544 new gene models that were missing from the prior annotation. Additionally, 1457 transcribed regions were newly identified on the ends of as-yet-unjoined contigs. We also searched for trans-spliced leaders, and based on RNA-Seq data, identified genes that appear to be trans-spliced. Four 22-bp trans-spliced leaders were identified using our pipeline, including the known trans-spliced leader, which is the M. hapla ortholog of SL1. In silico predictions of trans-splicing were validated by comparison with earlier results derived from an independent cDNA library constructed to capture trans-spliced transcripts. The new annotation, which we term HapPep5, is publically available at www.hapla.org.

  19. Polymorphism, shared functions and convergent evolution of genes with sequences coding for polyalanine domains.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Hugo; Debeane, Francois; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Turcotte, Jean-Francois; Corbeil-Girard, Louis-Philippe; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Saint-Denis, Anik; Pagé, Martin; Rouleau, Guy A; Brais, Bernard

    2003-11-15

    Mutations causing expansions of polyalanine domains are responsible for nine hereditary diseases. Other GC-rich sequences coding for some polyalanine domains were found to be polymorphic in human. These observations prompted us to identify all sequences in the human genome coding for polyalanine stretches longer than four alanines and establish their degree of polymorphism. We identified 494 annotated human proteins containing 604 polyalanine domains. Thirty-two percent (31/98) of tested sequences coding for more than seven alanines were polymorphic. The length of the polyalanine-coding sequence and its GCG or GCC repeat content are the major predictors of polymorphism. GCG codons are over-represented in human polyalanine coding sequences. Our data suggest that GCG and GCC codons play a key role in polyalanine-coding sequence appearance and polymorphism. The grouping by shared function of polyalanine-containing proteins in Homo sapiens, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans shows that the majority are involved in transcriptional regulation. Phylogenetic analyses of HOX, GATA and EVX protein families demonstrate that polyalanine domains arose independently in different members of these families, suggesting that convergent molecular evolution may have played a role. Finally polyalanine domains in vertebrates are conserved between mammals and are rarer and shorter in Gallus gallus and Danio rerio. Together our results show that the polymorphic nature of sequences coding for polyalanine domains makes them prime candidates for mutations in hereditary diseases and suggests that they have appeared in many different protein families through convergent evolution.

  20. Coding genes and molecular structures of the diffusible signalling proteins (pheromones) of the polar ciliate, Euplotes nobilii.

    PubMed

    Vallesi, Adriana; Alimenti, Claudio; Pedrini, Bill; Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Dini, Fernando; Wüthrich, Kurt; Luporini, Pierangelo

    2012-12-01

    In protozoan ciliates, diffusible signalling proteins (pheromones) regulate the vegetative growth and mating interactions. Here, the coding genes and the structures of the encoded pheromones were studied in genetically distinct wild-type strains representing interbreeding Antarctic and Arctic populations of the marine ciliate Euplotes nobilii. Determination of seven allelic pheromone-coding DNA sequences revealed that an unusual extension and high structural conservation of the 5' non-coding region are peculiar traits of this gene family, implying that this region is directly involved in the mechanism of pheromone gene expression, possibly through phenomena of intron splicing and/or frame-shifting. For four pheromones, the three-dimensional structures were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in solution. These structures show that the pheromones represent a protein family which adapts to its polar environment by combining a structurally stable core of a three-helix bundle with extended polypeptide segments that are devoid of regular secondary structures and concomitantly show enhanced structural flexibility. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. miRNA gene counts in chromosomes vary widely in a species and biogenesis of miRNA largely depends on transcription or post-transcriptional processing of coding genes

    PubMed Central

    Ghorai, Atanu; Ghosh, Utpal

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs target specific mRNA(s) to silence its expression and thereby regulate various cellular processes. We have investigated miRNA gene counts in chromosomes for 20 different species and observed wide variation. Certain chromosomes have extremely high number of miRNA gene compared with others in all the species. For example, high number of miRNA gene in X chromosome and the least or absence of miRNA gene in Y chromosome was observed in all species. To search the criteria governing such variation of miRNA gene counts in chromosomes, we have selected three parameters- length, number of non-coding and coding genes in a chromosome. We have calculated Pearson's correlation coefficient of miRNA gene counts with length, number of non-coding and coding genes in a chromosome for all 20 species. Major number of species showed that number of miRNA gene was not correlated with chromosome length. Eighty five percent of species under study showed strong positive correlation coefficient (r ≥ 0.5) between the numbers of miRNA gene vs. non-coding gene in chromosomes as expected because miRNA is a sub-set of non-coding genes. 55% species under study showed strong positive correlation coefficient (r ≥ 0.5) between numbers of miRNA gene vs. coding gene. We hypothesize biogenesis of miRNA largely depends on coding genes, an evolutionary conserved process. Chromosomes having higher number of miRNA genes will be most likely playing regulatory roles in several cellular processes including different disorders. In humans, cancer and cardiovascular disease associated miRNAs are mostly intergenic and located in Chromosome 19, X, 14, and 1. PMID:24808907

  2. miRNA gene counts in chromosomes vary widely in a species and biogenesis of miRNA largely depends on transcription or post-transcriptional processing of coding genes.

    PubMed

    Ghorai, Atanu; Ghosh, Utpal

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs target specific mRNA(s) to silence its expression and thereby regulate various cellular processes. We have investigated miRNA gene counts in chromosomes for 20 different species and observed wide variation. Certain chromosomes have extremely high number of miRNA gene compared with others in all the species. For example, high number of miRNA gene in X chromosome and the least or absence of miRNA gene in Y chromosome was observed in all species. To search the criteria governing such variation of miRNA gene counts in chromosomes, we have selected three parameters- length, number of non-coding and coding genes in a chromosome. We have calculated Pearson's correlation coefficient of miRNA gene counts with length, number of non-coding and coding genes in a chromosome for all 20 species. Major number of species showed that number of miRNA gene was not correlated with chromosome length. Eighty five percent of species under study showed strong positive correlation coefficient (r ≥ 0.5) between the numbers of miRNA gene vs. non-coding gene in chromosomes as expected because miRNA is a sub-set of non-coding genes. 55% species under study showed strong positive correlation coefficient (r ≥ 0.5) between numbers of miRNA gene vs. coding gene. We hypothesize biogenesis of miRNA largely depends on coding genes, an evolutionary conserved process. Chromosomes having higher number of miRNA genes will be most likely playing regulatory roles in several cellular processes including different disorders. In humans, cancer and cardiovascular disease associated miRNAs are mostly intergenic and located in Chromosome 19, X, 14, and 1.

  3. GFP expression by intracellular gene delivery of GFP-coding fragments using nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Fujioka, Kouki; Hanada, Sanshiro; Yasuhara, Masato; Kondo, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2008-12-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive approach to supplement a deficient gene function. Although there has been some success with specific gene delivery using various methods including viral vectors and liposomes, most of these methods have a limited efficiency or also carry a risk for oncogenesis. We herein report that quantum dots (QDs) conjugated with nuclear localizing signal peptides (NLSP) successfully introduced gene-fragments with promoter elements, which promoted the expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene in mammalian cells. The expression of eGFP protein was observed when the QD/gene-construct was added to the culture media. The gene-expression efficiency varied depending on multiple factors around QDs, such as (1) the reading direction of the gene-fragments, (2) the quantity of gene-fragments attached on the surface of the QD-constructs, (3) the surface electronic charges varied according to the structure of the QD/gene-constructs, and (4) the particle size of QD/gene complex varied according to the structure and amounts of gene-fragments. Using this QD/gene-construct system, eGFP protein could be detected 28 days after the gene-introduction whereas the fluorescence of QDs had disappeared. This system therefore provides another method for the intracellular delivery of gene-fragments without using either viral vectors or specific liposomes.

  4. Detergent fractionation with subsequent subtractive suppression hybridization as a tool for identifying genes coding for plasma membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Lange, Andreas; Kistler, Claudia; Jutzi, Tanja B; Bazhin, Alexandr V; Klemke, Claus Detlev; Schadendorf, Dirk; Eichmüller, Stefan B

    2009-06-01

    The identification of tumor-specific proteins located at the plasma membrane is hampered by numerous methodological pitfalls many of which are associated with the post-translational modification of such proteins. Here, we present a new combination of detergent fractionation of cells and of subtractive suppression hybridization (SSH) to gain overexpressed genes coding for membrane-associated or secreted proteins. Fractionation of subcellular components by digitonin allowed sequestering mRNA of the rough Endoplasmatic reticulum and thereby increasing the percentage of sequences coding for membrane-bound proteins. Fractionated mRNAs from the cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) cell line HuT78 and from normal peripheral blood monocytes were used for SSH leading to the enrichment of sequences overexpressed in the tumor cells. We identified some 21 overexpressed genes, among them are GPR137B, FAM62A, NOMO1, HSP90, SLIT1, IBP2, CLIF, IRAK and ARC. mRNA expression was tested for selected genes in CTCL cell lines, skin specimens and peripheral blood samples from CTCL patients and healthy donors. Several of the detected sequences are clearly related to cancer, but have not yet been associated with CTCL. qPCR confirmed an enrichment of these mRNAs in the rough endoplasmic reticulum fraction. RT-PCR confirmed the expression of these genes in skin specimens and peripheral blood of CTCL patients. Western blotting verified protein expression of HSP90 and IBP2 in HuT78. GPR137B could be detected by immunohistology in HuT78 and in keratinocytes of dysplastic epidermis, but also in sweat glands of healthy skin. In summary, we developed a new technique, which allows identifying overexpressed genes coding preferentially for membrane-associated proteins.

  5. Differential Regulation of Genes Coding for Organelle and Cytosolic ClpATPases under Biotic and Abiotic Stresses in Wheat.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, Senthilkumar K; Dalal, Monika; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Bansal, Kailash C

    2016-01-01

    A sub-group of class I Caseinolytic proteases (Clps) function as molecular chaperone and confer thermotolerance to plants. We identified class I Clp family consisting of five ClpB/HSP100, two ClpC, and two ClpD genes from bread wheat. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these genes were highly conserved across grass genomes. Subcellular localization prediction revealed that TaClpC and TaClpD subgroup proteins and TaClpB1 proteins are potentially targeted to chloroplast, while TaClpB5 to mitochondria, and TaClpB2, TaClpB3, and TaClpB4 to cytoplasm. Spatio-temporal expression pattern analysis revealed that four TaClpB and TaClpD2 genes are expressed in majority of all tissues and developmental stages of wheat. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of expression levels of Clp genes in seven wheat genotypes under different abiotic stresses revealed that genes coding for the cytosolic Clps namely TaClpB2 and TaClpB3 were upregulated under heat, salt and oxidative stress but were downregulated by cold stress in most genotypes. In contrast, genes coding for the chloroplastic Clps TaClpC1, TaClpC2, and TaClpD1 genes were significantly upregulated by mainly by cold stress in most genotypes, while TaClpD2 gene was upregulated >2 fold by salt stress in DBW16. The TaClpB5 gene coding for mitochondrial Clp was upregulated in all genotypes under heat, salt and oxidative stresses. In addition, we found that biotic stresses also upregulated TaClpB4 and TaClpD1. Among biotic stresses, Tilletia caries induced TaClpB2, TaClpB3, TaClpC1, and TaClpD1. Differential expression pattern under different abiotic and biotic stresses and predicted differential cellular localization of Clps suggest their non-redundant organelle and stress-specific roles. Our results also suggest the potential role of Clps in cold, salt and biotic stress responses in addition to the previously established role in thermotolerance of wheat.

  6. Differential Regulation of Genes Coding for Organelle and Cytosolic ClpATPases under Biotic and Abiotic Stresses in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Muthusamy, Senthilkumar K.; Dalal, Monika; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Bansal, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    A sub-group of class I Caseinolytic proteases (Clps) function as molecular chaperone and confer thermotolerance to plants. We identified class I Clp family consisting of five ClpB/HSP100, two ClpC, and two ClpD genes from bread wheat. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these genes were highly conserved across grass genomes. Subcellular localization prediction revealed that TaClpC and TaClpD subgroup proteins and TaClpB1 proteins are potentially targeted to chloroplast, while TaClpB5 to mitochondria, and TaClpB2, TaClpB3, and TaClpB4 to cytoplasm. Spatio-temporal expression pattern analysis revealed that four TaClpB and TaClpD2 genes are expressed in majority of all tissues and developmental stages of wheat. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of expression levels of Clp genes in seven wheat genotypes under different abiotic stresses revealed that genes coding for the cytosolic Clps namely TaClpB2 and TaClpB3 were upregulated under heat, salt and oxidative stress but were downregulated by cold stress in most genotypes. In contrast, genes coding for the chloroplastic Clps TaClpC1, TaClpC2, and TaClpD1 genes were significantly upregulated by mainly by cold stress in most genotypes, while TaClpD2 gene was upregulated >2 fold by salt stress in DBW16. The TaClpB5 gene coding for mitochondrial Clp was upregulated in all genotypes under heat, salt and oxidative stresses. In addition, we found that biotic stresses also upregulated TaClpB4 and TaClpD1. Among biotic stresses, Tilletia caries induced TaClpB2, TaClpB3, TaClpC1, and TaClpD1. Differential expression pattern under different abiotic and biotic stresses and predicted differential cellular localization of Clps suggest their non-redundant organelle and stress-specific roles. Our results also suggest the potential role of Clps in cold, salt and biotic stress responses in addition to the previously established role in thermotolerance of wheat. PMID:27446158

  7. A 5′- Regulatory Region and Two Coding Region Polymorphisms Modulate Promoter Activity and Gene Expression of the Growth Suppressor Gene ZBED6 in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong-Zhen; Li, Ming-Xun; Wang, Jing; Zhan, Zhao-Yang; Sun, Yu-Jia; Sun, Jia-Jie; Li, Cong-Jun; Lan, Xian-Yong; Lei, Chu-Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. Polymorphisms in its promoter and coding regions are likely to impact ZBED6 transcription and growth traits. In this study, rapid amplification of 5’ cDNA ends (5'-RACE) analysis revealed two transcription start sites (TSS) for the bovine ZBED6 starting within exon 1 of the ZC3H11A gene (TSS-1) and upstream of the translation start codon of the ZBED6 gene (TSS-2). There was one SNP in the promoter and two missense mutations in the coding region of the bovine ZBED6 by sequencing of the pooled DNA samples (Pool-Seq, n = 100). The promoter and coding region are the key regions for gene function; polymorphisms in these regions can alter gene expression. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis showed that ZBED6 has a broad tissue distribution in cattle and is highly expressed in skeletal muscle. Eleven promoter-detection vectors were constructed, which enabled the cloning of putative promoter sequences and analysis of ZBED6 transcriptional activity by luciferase reporter gene assays. The core region of the basal promoter of bovine ZBED6 is located within region -866 to -556. The activity of WT-826G-pGL3 in driving reporter gene transcription is significantly higher than that of the M-826A-pGL3 construct (P < 0.01). Analysis of gene expression patterns in homozygous full-sibling Chinese Qinchuan cattle showed that the mutant-type Hap-AGG exhibited a lower mRNA level than the wild-type Hap-GCA (P < 0.05) in longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM). Moreover, ZBED6 mRNA expression was low in C2C12 cells overexpressing the mutant-type ZBED6 (pcDNA3.1+-Hap-GG) (P < 0.01). Our results suggest that the polymorphisms in the promoter and coding regions may modulate the promoter activity and gene expression of bovine ZBED6 in the skeletal muscles of these cattle breeds. PMID:24223190

  8. Proteogenomics produces comprehensive and highly accurate protein-coding gene annotation in a complete genome assembly of Malassezia sympodialis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yafeng; Engström, Pär G; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Baudo, Charles D; Kennell, John C; Sun, Sheng; Billmyre, R Blake; Schröder, Markus S; Andersson, Anna; Holm, Tina; Sigurgeirsson, Benjamin; Wu, Guangxi; Sankaranarayanan, Sundar Ram; Siddharthan, Rahul; Sanyal, Kaustuv; Lundeberg, Joakim; Nystedt, Björn; Boekhout, Teun; Dawson, Thomas L; Heitman, Joseph; Scheynius, Annika; Lehtiö, Janne

    2017-01-18

    Complete and accurate genome assembly and annotation is a crucial foundation for comparative and functional genomics. Despite this, few complete eukaryotic genomes are available, and genome annotation remains a major challenge. Here, we present a complete genome assembly of the skin commensal yeast Malassezia sympodialis and demonstrate how proteogenomics can substantially improve gene annotation. Through long-read DNA sequencing, we obtained a gap-free genome assembly for M. sympodialis (ATCC 42132), comprising eight nuclear and one mitochondrial chromosome. We also sequenced and assembled four M. sympodialis clinical isolates, and showed their value for understanding Malassezia reproduction by confirming four alternative allele combinations at the two mating-type loci. Importantly, we demonstrated how proteomics data could be readily integrated with transcriptomics data in standard annotation tools. This increased the number of annotated protein-coding genes by 14% (from 3612 to 4113), compared to using transcriptomics evidence alone. Manual curation further increased the number of protein-coding genes by 9% (to 4493). All of these genes have RNA-seq evidence and 87% were confirmed by proteomics. The M. sympodialis genome assembly and annotation presented here is at a quality yet achieved only for a few eukaryotic organisms, and constitutes an important reference for future host-microbe interaction studies.

  9. Computational prediction of over-annotated protein-coding genes in the genome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain C58

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia-Feng; Sui, Tian-Xiang; Wang, Hong-Mei; Wang, Chun-Ling; Jing, Li; Wang, Ji-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain C58 is a type of pathogen that can cause tumors in some dicotyledonous plants. Ever since the genome of A. tumefaciens strain C58 was sequenced, the quality of annotation of its protein-coding genes has been queried continually, because the annotation varies greatly among different databases. In this paper, the questionable hypothetical genes were re-predicted by integrating the TN curve and Z curve methods. As a result, 30 genes originally annotated as “hypothetical” were discriminated as being non-coding sequences. By testing the re-prediction program 10 times on data sets composed of the function-known genes, the mean accuracy of 99.99% and mean Matthews correlation coefficient value of 0.9999 were obtained. Further sequence analysis and COG analysis showed that the re-annotation results were very reliable. This work can provide an efficient tool and data resources for future studies of A. tumefaciens strain C58. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61302186 and 61271378) and the Funding from the State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics of Southeast University.

  10. Non-coding transcripts in the H19 imprinting control region mediate gene silencing in transgenic Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Smits, Guillaume; Fraser, Peter; Reik, Wolf; Paro, Renato

    2007-11-01

    The imprinting control region (ICR) upstream of H19 is the key regulatory element conferring monoallelic expression on H19 and Igf2 (insulin-like growth factor 2). Epigenetic marks in the ICR regulate its interaction with the chromatin protein CCCTC-binding factor and with other control factors to coordinate gene silencing in the imprinting cluster. Here, we show that the H19 ICR is biallelically transcribed, producing both sense and antisense RNAs. We analyse the function of the non-coding transcripts in a Drosophila transgenic system in which the H19 upstream region silences the expression of a reporter gene. We show that knockdown of H19 ICR non-coding RNA (ncRNA) by RNA interference leads to the loss of reporter gene silencing. Our results are, to the best of our knowledge, the first to show that ncRNAs in the H19 ICR are functionally significant, and also indicate that they have a role in regulating gene expression and perhaps epigenetic marks at the H19/Igf2 locus.

  11. Proteogenomics produces comprehensive and highly accurate protein-coding gene annotation in a complete genome assembly of Malassezia sympodialis

    PubMed Central

    Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Baudo, Charles D.; Kennell, John C.; Sun, Sheng; Billmyre, R. Blake; Schröder, Markus S.; Andersson, Anna; Holm, Tina; Sigurgeirsson, Benjamin; Wu, Guangxi; Sankaranarayanan, Sundar Ram; Siddharthan, Rahul; Sanyal, Kaustuv; Lundeberg, Joakim; Nystedt, Björn; Boekhout, Teun; Dawson, Thomas L.; Heitman, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Complete and accurate genome assembly and annotation is a crucial foundation for comparative and functional genomics. Despite this, few complete eukaryotic genomes are available, and genome annotation remains a major challenge. Here, we present a complete genome assembly of the skin commensal yeast Malassezia sympodialis and demonstrate how proteogenomics can substantially improve gene annotation. Through long-read DNA sequencing, we obtained a gap-free genome assembly for M. sympodialis (ATCC 42132), comprising eight nuclear and one mitochondrial chromosome. We also sequenced and assembled four M. sympodialis clinical isolates, and showed their value for understanding Malassezia reproduction by confirming four alternative allele combinations at the two mating-type loci. Importantly, we demonstrated how proteomics data could be readily integrated with transcriptomics data in standard annotation tools. This increased the number of annotated protein-coding genes by 14% (from 3612 to 4113), compared to using transcriptomics evidence alone. Manual curation further increased the number of protein-coding genes by 9% (to 4493). All of these genes have RNA-seq evidence and 87% were confirmed by proteomics. The M. sympodialis genome assembly and annotation presented here is at a quality yet achieved only for a few eukaryotic organisms, and constitutes an important reference for future host-microbe interaction studies. PMID:28100699

  12. Structure of transcripts from the homeotic Antennapedia gene of Drosophila melanogaster: two promoters control the major protein-coding region.

    PubMed Central

    Laughon, A; Boulet, A M; Bermingham, J R; Laymon, R A; Scott, M P

    1986-01-01

    The Antennapedia (Antp) homeotic gene of Drosophila melanogaster regulates segmental identity in the thorax. Loss of Antp function results in altered development of the embryonic thoracic segments or can cause legs to be transformed into antennae. Certain combinations of Antp recessive lethal alleles complement to permit normal development. The structure of the Antp gene, analyzed by sequencing cDNA clones and exons and by transcript mapping, revealed some of the basis for its genetic complexity. It has two promoters governing two nested transcription units, one unit 36 and one 103 kilobase pairs (kb) long. Both units incorporated the same protein-coding exons, all of which are located in the 3'-most 13 kb of the gene. The two promoters resulted in the attachment of either of two long noncoding leader sequences (1.5 and 1.7 kb) to a 1.1-kb open reading frame. Both transcription units used the same pair of alternative polyadenylation sites 1.4 kb apart; the choice of sites was developmentally regulated. Some of the mutations that disrupt the larger transcription unit complemented a mutation affecting the smaller one. Dominant mutations that transform antennae into legs split the gene but left the coding exons intact. The encoded protein has unusually long runs of glutamine and a homeodomain near the C terminus. Images PMID:2879223

  13. The gene coding for small ribosomal subunit RNA in the basidiomycete Ustilago maydis contains a group I intron.

    PubMed Central

    De Wachter, R; Neefs, J M; Goris, A; Van de Peer, Y

    1992-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for small ribosomal subunit RNA in the basidiomycete Ustilago maydis was determined. It revealed the presence of a group I intron with a length of 411 nucleotides. This is the third occurrence of such an intron discovered in a small subunit rRNA gene encoded by a eukaryotic nuclear genome. The other two occurrences are in Pneumocystis carinii, a fungus of uncertain taxonomic status, and Ankistrodesmus stipitatus, a green alga. The nucleotides of the conserved core structure of 101 group I intron sequences present in different genes and genome types were aligned and their evolutionary relatedness was examined. This revealed a cluster including all group I introns hitherto found in eukaryotic nuclear genes coding for small and large subunit rRNAs. A secondary structure model was designed for the area of the Ustilago maydis small ribosomal subunit RNA precursor where the intron is situated. It shows that the internal guide sequence pairing with the intron boundaries fits between two helices of the small subunit rRNA, and that minimal rearrangement of base pairs suffices to achieve the definitive secondary structure of the 18S rRNA upon splicing. PMID:1561081

  14. Three genes coding for subunits of the membrane sector (F0) of the Escherichia coli adenosine triphosphatase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Downie, J A; Cox, G B; Langman, L; Ash, G; Becker, M; Gibson, F

    1981-01-01

    Two mutant unc alleles, unc-469 and unc-476, have been characterized as affecting a previously undescribed gene, designated uncF. The uncF gene is part of the unc operon (with the gene order being uncBFEAGDC), although some uncertainty remains as to the relative order of the uncF and uncE genes. Mutant strains carrying the uncF469 or uncF476 allele lack the 18,000-molecular-weight component of the F0 sector of the adenosine triphosphatase in the cell membrane but retain the dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding protein (molecular weight, 8,400). Conversely, strains carrying mutations in the uncE gene lack the dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding protein but retain the 18,000-molecular-weight protein in the cell membrane. Strains carrying mutations in the uncB gene have both the 18,000-molecular-weight protein and the dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding protein present in the cell membranes. The three proteins of the F0 portion of the adenosine triphosphatase, viz., 24,000, 18,000, and 8,400 molecular weights, became membrane associated after in vitro transcription-translation with plasmid pAN51 as template. Plasmids carrying deletions which affected the UncBFE region were isolated from plasmid pAN51 and characterized genetically. A comparison of the genes that were absent from the various deletion plasmids with the membrane-associated products formed after in vitro transcription-translation indicated that the uncB gene coded for the 24,000-molecular-weight protein and that the gene order was probably uncBFE. A correlation between length of deoxyribonucleic acid, genes present, and their products is presented in relation to plasmid pAN51. Images PMID:6450744

  15. Deletion of 5'-coding sequences of the cellular p53 gene in mouse erythroleukemia: a novel mechanism of oncogene regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Rovinski, B; Munroe, D; Peacock, J; Mowat, M; Bernstein, A; Benchimol, S

    1987-01-01

    The p53 gene is rearranged in an erythroleukemic cell line (DP15-2) transformed by Friend retrovirus. Here, we characterize the mutation and identify a deletion of approximately equal to 3.0 kilobases that removes exon 2 coding sequences. The gene is expressed in DP15-2 cells and results in synthesis of a 44,000-dalton protein that is missing the N-terminal amino acid residues of p53. The truncated protein is unusually stable and accumulates to high levels intracellularly. Moreover, it appears to have undergone a change in conformation as revealed by epitope mapping studies. This study represents the first description of an altered p53 gene product arising by mutation during neoplastic progression and identifies a region in the p53 protein molecule that plays a role in determining p53 stability in vivo. Images PMID:3547084

  16. Lineage-Specific Genome Architecture Links Enhancers and Non-coding Disease Variants to Target Gene Promoters.

    PubMed

    Javierre, Biola M; Burren, Oliver S; Wilder, Steven P; Kreuzhuber, Roman; Hill, Steven M; Sewitz, Sven; Cairns, Jonathan; Wingett, Steven W; Várnai, Csilla; Thiecke, Michiel J; Burden, Frances; Farrow, Samantha; Cutler, Antony J; Rehnström, Karola; Downes, Kate; Grassi, Luigi; Kostadima, Myrto; Freire-Pritchett, Paula; Wang, Fan; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Todd, John A; Zerbino, Daniel R; Stegle, Oliver; Ouwehand, Willem H; Frontini, Mattia; Wallace, Chris; Spivakov, Mikhail; Fraser, Peter

    2016-11-17

    Long-range interactions between regulatory elements and gene promoters play key roles in transcriptional regulation. The vast majority of interactions are uncharted, constituting a major missing link in understanding genome control. Here, we use promoter capture Hi-C to identify interacting regions of 31,253 promoters in 17 human primary hematopoietic cell types. We show that promoter interactions are highly cell type specific and enriched for links between active promoters and epigenetically marked enhancers. Promoter interactomes reflect lineage relationships of the hematopoietic tree, consistent with dynamic remodeling of nuclear architecture during differentiation. Interacting regions are enriched in genetic variants linked with altered expression of genes they contact, highlighting their functional role. We exploit this rich resource to connect non-coding disease variants to putative target promoters, prioritizing thousands of disease-candidate genes and implicating disease pathways. Our results demonstrate the power of primary cell promoter interactomes to reveal insights into genomic regulatory mechanisms underlying common diseases.

  17. The MTCY428.08 Gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Codes for NAD+ Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Cantoni, Rita; Branzoni, Manuela; Labò, Monica; Rizzi, Menico; Riccardi, Giovanna

    1998-01-01

    The product of the MTCY428.08 gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis shows sequence homology with several NAD+ synthetases. The MTCY428.08 gene was cloned into the expression vectors pGEX-4T-1 and pET-15b. Expression in Escherichia coli led to overproduction of glutathione S-transferase fused and His6-tagged gene products, which were enzymatically assayed for NAD synthetase activity. Our results demonstrate that the MTCY428.08 gene of M. tuberculosis is the structural gene for NAD+ synthetase. PMID:9620974

  18. The water-born protein pheromones of the polar protozoan ciliate, Euplotes nobilii: Coding genes and molecular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallesi, Adriana; Alimenti, Claudio; Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Dini, Fernando; Pedrini, Bill; Wüthrich, Kurt; Luporini, Pierangelo

    2010-08-01

    The protozoan ciliate Euplotes nobilii found in Antarctic and Arctic coastal waters relies on secretion of water-soluble cell type-specific signal proteins (pheromones) to regulate its vegetative growth and sexual mating. For three of these psychrophilic pheromones we previously determined the three-dimensional structures by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with protein solutions purified from the natural sources, which led to evidence that their adaptation to cold is primarily achieved by increased flexibility through an extension of regions free of regular secondary structures, and by increased exposure of negative charges on the protein surface. Then we cloned the coding genes of these E. nobilii pheromones from the transcriptionally active cell somatic nucleus (macronucleus) and characterized the full-length sequences. These sequences all contain an open reading frame of 252-285 nucleotides, which is specific for a cytoplasmic pheromone precursor that requires two proteolytic cleavages to remove a signal peptide and a pro segment before release of the mature protein into the extracellular environment. The 5‧ and 3‧ non-coding regions are two- to three-fold longer than the coding region and appear to be tightly conserved, probably in relation to the inclusion of intron sequences destined to be alternatively removed to play key regulatory roles in the mechanism of the pheromone gene expression.

  19. Multiplexed optical coding nanobeads and their application in single-molecule counting analysis for multiple gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Shen, Liping; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Shui, Lingling; Sui, Benhui; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhao, Xiaofan; Jin, Wenrui

    2015-07-30

    A method for fabrication of multiplexed optical coding nanobeads (MOCNBs) was developed by hybridizing three types of coding DNAs labeled with different dyes (Cy5, FAM and AMCA) at precisely controlled ratios with biotinylated reporter DNA modified to magnetic streptavidin-coated nanobeads with a diameter of 300 nm. The color of the MOCNBs could be observed by overlapping three single-primary-color fluorescence images of the MOCNBs corresponding to emission of Cy5 (red), FAM (green) and AMCA (blue). The MOCNBs could be easily identified under a conventional fluorescence microscope. The MOCNBs with different colors could serve as the multiplexed optical coding labels for single-molecule counting analysis (SMCA) and be used in multi-gene expression analysis (MGEA). In the SMCA-based MGEA technique, multiple messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in cells could be simultaneously quantified through their complementary DNAs (cDNAs) by counting the bright dots with the same color corresponding to the single cDNA molecules labeled with the MOCNBs. We measured expression profiles of three genes from Lepidoptera insect Helicoverpa armigera in ∼100 HaEpi cells with and without steroid hormone inductions to demonstrate the SMCA-based MGEA technique using MOCNBs.

  20. Development-related expression patterns of protein-coding and miRNA genes involved in porcine muscle growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, F J; Jin, L; Guo, Y Q; Liu, R; He, M N; Li, M Z; Li, X W

    2014-11-27

    Muscle growth and development is associated with remarkable changes in protein-coding and microRNA (miRNA) gene expression. To determine the expression patterns of genes and miRNAs related to muscle growth and development, we measured the expression levels of 25 protein-coding and 16 miRNA genes in skeletal and cardiac muscles throughout 5 developmental stages by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The Short Time-Series Expression Miner (STEM) software clustering results showed that growth-related genes were downregulated at all developmental stages in both the psoas major and longissimus dorsi muscles, indicating their involvement in early developmental stages. Furthermore, genes related to muscle atrophy, such as forkhead box 1 and muscle ring finger, showed unregulated expression with increasing age, suggesting a decrease in protein synthesis during the later stages of skeletal muscle development. We found that development of the cardiac muscle was a complex process in which growth-related genes were highly expressed during embryonic development, but they did not show uniform postnatal expression patterns. Moreover, the expression level of miR-499, which enhances the expression of the β-myosin heavy chain, was significantly different in the psoas major and longissimus dorsi muscles, suggesting the involvement of miR-499 in the determination of skeletal muscle fiber types. We also performed correlation analyses of messenger RNA and miRNA expression. We found negative relationships between miR-486 and forkhead box 1, and miR-133a and serum response factor at all developmental stages, suggesting that forkhead box 1 and serum response factor are potential targets of miR-486 and miR-133a, respectively.

  1. Model scattering envelopes of young stellar objects. II - Infalling envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.; Hartmann, Lee

    1993-01-01

    We present scattered light images for models of young stellar objects surrounded by dusty envelopes. The envelopes are assumed to have finite angular momentum and are falling in steady flow onto a disk. The model envelopes include holes, such as might be created by energetic bipolar flows. We calculate images using the Monte Carlo method to follow the light scattered in the dusty envelope and circumstellar disk, assuming that the photons originate from the central source. Adopting typical interstellar medium dust opacities and expected mass infall rates for protostars of about 10 exp -6 solar mass/yr, we find that detectable amounts of optical radiation can escape from envelopes falling into a disk as small as about 10-100 AU, depending upon the viewing angle and the size of the bipolar flow cavity. We suggest that the extended optical and near-IR light observed around several young stars is scattered by dusty infalling envelopes rather than disks.

  2. Model scattering envelopes of young stellar objects. II - Infalling envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.; Hartmann, Lee

    1993-01-01

    We present scattered light images for models of young stellar objects surrounded by dusty envelopes. The envelopes are assumed to have finite angular momentum and are falling in steady flow onto a disk. The model envelopes include holes, such as might be created by energetic bipolar flows. We calculate images using the Monte Carlo method to follow the light scattered in the dusty envelope and circumstellar disk, assuming that the photons originate from the central source. Adopting typical interstellar medium dust opacities and expected mass infall rates for protostars of about 10 exp -6 solar mass/yr, we find that detectable amounts of optical radiation can escape from envelopes falling into a disk as small as about 10-100 AU, depending upon the viewing angle and the size of the bipolar flow cavity. We suggest that the extended optical and near-IR light observed around several young stars is scattered by dusty infalling envelopes rather than disks.

  3. Cloning and sequencing of the gene coding for the large subunit of methylamine dehydrogenase from Thiobacillus versutus.

    PubMed Central

    Huitema, F; van Beeumen, J; van Driessche, G; Duine, J A; Canters, G W

    1993-01-01

    The gene that codes for the alpha-subunit of methylamine dehydrogenase from Thiobacillus versutus, madA, was cloned and sequenced. It codes for a protein of 395 amino acids preceded by a leader sequence of 31 amino acids. The derived amino acid sequence was confirmed by partial amino acid sequencing. The start of the mature protein could not be determined by direct sequencing, since the N terminus appeared to be blocked. Instead, it was determined by electrospray mass spectrometry. Confirmation of the results was obtained by sequencing the N terminus after pyroglutamate aminopeptidase digestion. The sequence is homologous to the Paracoccus denitrificans nucleotide sequence. A second open reading frame, called open reading frame 3, is located immediately downstream of madA. PMID:8407797

  4. The vicilin gene family of pea (Pisum sativum L.): a complete cDNA coding sequence for preprovicilin.

    PubMed Central

    Lycett, G W; Delauney, A J; Gatehouse, J A; Gilroy, J; Croy, R R; Boulter, D

    1983-01-01

    A cDNA plasmid bank has been constructed using mRNA from developing pea seeds and three cDNAs coding for vicilin polypeptides have been selected. These cDNAs have been sequenced and between them cover the whole of the coding sequence plus part of the 5' and 3' untranslated regions. Comparison with amino acid sequence data from the protein indicates that vicilin is synthesised as preprovicilin with subsequent removal of a signal peptide and a C-terminal peptide as well as post translational endo-proteolytic cleavage. The cDNAs represent two different classes of vicilin genes whilst amino acid data show that there are at least three major classes of vicilin polypeptide. The vicilin sequences show extensive homology with conglycinin and phaseolin except in the regions of the internal proteolytic cleavages. The evolutionary significance of this relationship is discussed. Images PMID:6687941

  5. Novel insights into the response of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to Piscirickettsia salmonis: Interplay of coding genes and lncRNAs during bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Miranda, Diego; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2016-12-01

    Despite the high prevalence and impact to Chilean salmon aquaculture of the intracellular bacterium Piscirickettsia salmonis, the molecular underpinnings of host-pathogen interactions remain unclear. Herein, the interplay of coding and non-coding transcripts has been proposed as a key mechanism involved in immune response. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evidence how coding and non-coding transcripts are modulated during the infection process of Atlantic salmon with P. salmonis. For this, RNA-seq was conducted in brain, spleen, and head kidney samples, revealing different transcriptional profiles according to bacterial load. Additionally, while most of the regulated genes annotated for diverse biological processes during infection, a common response associated with clathrin-mediated endocytosis and iron homeostasis was present in all tissues. Interestingly, while endocytosis-promoting factors and clathrin inductions were upregulated, endocytic receptors were mainly downregulated. Furthermore, the regulation of genes related to iron homeostasis suggested an intracellular accumulation of iron, a process in which heme biosynthesis/degradation pathways might play an important role. Regarding the non-coding response, 918 putative long non-coding RNAs were identified, where 425 were newly characterized for S. salar. Finally, co-localization and co-expression analyses revealed a strong correlation between the modulations of long non-coding RNAs and genes associated with endocytosis and iron homeostasis. These results represent the first comprehensive study of putative interplaying mechanisms of coding and non-coding RNAs during bacterial infection in salmonids.

  6. Coding strategy differences between constant and variable segments of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, P

    1984-01-01

    Vertebrate immunoglobulin (Ig) mRNAs reveal intraspecies variation in codon usage distinct from that seen with yeast or bacterial genes. Comparison of all available Ig gene sequences shows that %(G + C) in codon position III is consistently lower in variable (V) segments than in constant (C) segments. I find an even lower %(G + C) in the hypervariable domains of V segments. This analysis suggests that base substitution in Ig genes correlates positively with local A + T content. PMID:6462913

  7. Refrigerated cryogenic envelope

    DOEpatents

    Loudon, John D.

    1976-11-16

    An elongated cryogenic envelope including an outer tube and an inner tube coaxially spaced within said inner tube so that the space therebetween forms a vacuum chamber for holding a vacuum. The inner and outer tubes are provided with means for expanding or contracting during thermal changes. A shield is located in the vacuum chamber intermediate the inner and outer tubes; and, a refrigeration tube for directing refrigeration to the shield is coiled about at least a portion of the inner tube within the vacuum chamber to permit the refrigeration tube to expand or contract along its length during thermal changes within said vacuum chamber.

  8. RNA editing differently affects protein-coding genes in D. melanogaster and H. sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Luigi; Leoni, Guido; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    When an RNA editing event occurs within a coding sequence it can lead to a different encoded amino acid. The biological significance of these events remains an open question: they can modulate protein functionality, increase the complexity of transcriptomes or arise from a loose specificity of the involved enzymes. We analysed the editing events in coding regions that produce or not a change in the encoded amino acid (nonsynonymous and synonymous events, respectively) in D. melanogaster and in H. sapiens and compared them with the appropriate random models. Interestingly, our results show that the phenomenon has rather different characteristics in the two organisms. For example, we confirm the observation that editing events occur more frequently in non-coding than in coding regions, and report that this effect is much more evident in H. sapiens. Additionally, in this latter organism, editing events tend to affect less conserved residues. The less frequently occurring editing events in Drosophila tend to avoid drastic amino acid changes. Interestingly, we find that, in Drosophila, changes from less frequently used codons to more frequently used ones are favoured, while this is not the case in H. sapiens. PMID:26169954

  9. RNA editing differently affects protein-coding genes in D. melanogaster and H. sapiens.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Luigi; Leoni, Guido; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-07-14

    When an RNA editing event occurs within a coding sequence it can lead to a different encoded amino acid. The biological significance of these events remains an open question: they can modulate protein functionality, increase the complexity of transcriptomes or arise from a loose specificity of the involved enzymes. We analysed the editing events in coding regions that produce or not a change in the encoded amino acid (nonsynonymous and synonymous events, respectively) in D. melanogaster and in H. sapiens and compared them with the appropriate random models. Interestingly, our results show that the phenomenon has rather different characteristics in the two organisms. For example, we confirm the observation that editing events occur more frequently in non-coding than in coding regions, and report that this effect is much more evident in H. sapiens. Additionally, in this latter organism, editing events tend to affect less conserved residues. The less frequently occurring editing events in Drosophila tend to avoid drastic amino acid changes. Interestingly, we find that, in Drosophila, changes from less frequently used codons to more frequently used ones are favoured, while this is not the case in H. sapiens.

  10. Chromothripsis in Healthy Individuals Affects Multiple Protein-Coding Genes and Can Result in Severe Congenital Abnormalities in Offspring

    PubMed Central

    de Pagter, Mirjam S.; van Roosmalen, Markus J.; Baas, Annette F.; Renkens, Ivo; Duran, Karen J.; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Hochstenbach, Ron; van der Veken, Lars T.; Cuppen, Edwin; Kloosterman, Wigard P.

    2015-01-01

    Chromothripsis represents an extreme class of complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs) with major effects on chromosomal architecture. Although recent studies have associated chromothripsis with congenital abnormalities, the incidence and pathogenic effects of this phenomenon require further investigation. Here, we analyzed the genomes of three families in which chromothripsis rearrangements were transmitted from a mother to her child. The chromothripsis in the mothers resulted in completely balanced rearrangements involving 8–23 breakpoint junctions across three to five chromosomes. Two mothers did not show any phenotypic abnormalities, although 3–13 protein-coding genes were affected by breakpoints. Unbalanced but stable transmission of a subset of the derivative chromosomes caused apparently de novo complex copy-number changes in two children. This resulted in gene-dosage changes, which are probably responsible for the severe congenital phenotypes of these two children. In contrast, the third child, who has a severe congenital disease, harbored all three chromothripsis chromosomes from his healthy mother, but one of the chromosomes acquired de novo rearrangements leading to copy-number changes. These results show that the human genome can tolerate extreme reshuffling of chromosomal architecture, including breakage of multiple protein-coding genes, without noticeable phenotypic effects. The presence of chromothripsis in healthy individuals affects reproduction and is expected to substantially increase the risk of miscarriages, abortions, and severe congenital disease. PMID:25799107

  11. Chromothripsis in healthy individuals affects multiple protein-coding genes and can result in severe congenital abnormalities in offspring.

    PubMed

    de Pagter, Mirjam S; van Roosmalen, Markus J; Baas, Annette F; Renkens, Ivo; Duran, Karen J; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Hochstenbach, Ron; van der Veken, Lars T; Cuppen, Edwin; Kloosterman, Wigard P

    2015-04-02

    Chromothripsis represents an extreme class of complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs) with major effects on chromosomal architecture. Although recent studies have associated chromothripsis with congenital abnormalities, the incidence and pathogenic effects of this phenomenon require further investigation. Here, we analyzed the genomes of three families in which chromothripsis rearrangements were transmitted from a mother to her child. The chromothripsis in the mothers resulted in completely balanced rearrangements involving 8-23 breakpoint junctions across three to five chromosomes. Two mothers did not show any phenotypic abnormalities, although 3-13 protein-coding genes were affected by breakpoints. Unbalanced but stable transmission of a subset of the derivative chromosomes caused apparently de novo complex copy-number changes in two children. This resulted in gene-dosage changes, which are probably responsible for the severe congenital phenotypes of these two children. In contrast, the third child, who has a severe congenital disease, harbored all three chromothripsis chromosomes from his healthy mother, but one of the chromosomes acquired de novo rearrangements leading to copy-number changes. These results show that the human genome can tolerate extreme reshuffling of chromosomal architecture, including breakage of multiple protein-coding genes, without noticeable phenotypic effects. The presence of chromothripsis in healthy individuals affects reproduction and is expected to substantially increase the risk of miscarriages, abortions, and severe congenital disease. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic characterization of cysteine-rich type-b avenin-like protein coding genes in common wheat.

    PubMed

    Chen, X Y; Cao, X Y; Zhang, Y J; Islam, S; Zhang, J J; Yang, R C; Liu, J J; Li, G Y; Appels, R; Keeble-Gagnere, G; Ji, W Q; He, Z H; Ma, W J

    2016-08-09

    The wheat avenin-like proteins (ALP) are considered atypical gluten constituents and have shown positive effects on dough properties revealed using a transgenic approach. However, to date the genetic architecture of ALP genes is unclear, making it impossible to be utilized in wheat breeding. In the current study, three genes of type-b ALPs were identified and mapped to chromosomes 7AS, 4AL and 7DS. The coding gene sequence of both TaALP-7A and TaALP-7D was 855 bp long, encoding two identical homologous 284 amino acid long proteins. TaALP-4A was 858 bp long, encoding a 285 amino acid protein variant. Three alleles were identified for TaALP-7A and four for TaALP-4A. TaALP-7A alleles were of two types: type-1, which includes TaALP-7A1 andTaALP-7A2, encodes mature proteins, while type-2, represented byTaALP-7A3, contains a stop codon in the coding region and thus does not encode a mature protein. Dough quality testing of 102 wheat cultivars established a highly significant association of the type-1 TaALP-7A allele with better wheat processing quality. This allelic effects were confirmed among a range of commercial wheat cultivars. Our research makes the ALP be the first of such genetic variation source that can be readily utilized in wheat breeding.

  13. Genetic characterization of cysteine-rich type-b avenin-like protein coding genes in common wheat

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X. Y.; Cao, X. Y.; Zhang, Y. J.; Islam, S.; Zhang, J. J.; Yang, R. C.; Liu, J. J.; Li, G. Y.; Appels, R.; Keeble-Gagnere, G.; Ji, W. Q.; He, Z. H.; Ma, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    The wheat avenin-like proteins (ALP) are considered atypical gluten constituents and have shown positive effects on dough properties revealed using a transgenic approach. However, to date the genetic architecture of ALP genes is unclear, making it impossible to be utilized in wheat breeding. In the current study, three genes of type-b ALPs were identified and mapped to chromosomes 7AS, 4AL and 7DS. The coding gene sequence of both TaALP-7A and TaALP-7D was 855 bp long, encoding two identical homologous 284 amino acid long proteins. TaALP-4A was 858 bp long, encoding a 285 amino acid protein variant. Three alleles were identified for TaALP-7A and four for TaALP-4A. TaALP-7A alleles were of two types: type-1, which includes TaALP-7A1 andTaALP-7A2, encodes mature proteins, while type-2, represented byTaALP-7A3, contains a stop codon in the coding region and thus does not encode a mature protein. Dough quality testing of 102 wheat cultivars established a highly significant association of the type-1 TaALP-7A allele with better wheat processing quality. This allelic effects were confirmed among a range of commercial wheat cultivars. Our research makes the ALP be the first of such genetic variation source that can be readily utilized in wheat breeding. PMID:27503660

  14. Molecular differentiation of Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae based on species-specific sequence differences in a protein coding gene.

    PubMed

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2013-05-01

    Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae are two microsporidian pathogens of the European honey bee, Apis mellifera. There is evidence that N. ceranae is more virulent than N. apis subject to environmental factors like climate. This makes N. ceranae one of the suspects in the increasing colony losses recently observed in many regions of the world. Correct differentiation between N. apis and N. ceranae is important and best accomplished by molecular methods. So far only protocols based on species-specific sequence differences in the 16S rRNA gene are available. However, recent studies indicated that these methods may lead to confusing results due to polymorphisms in and recombination between the multi-copy 16S rRNA genes. To solve this problem and to provide a reliable molecular tool for the differentiation between the two bee pathogenic microsporidia we here present and evaluate a duplex-PCR protocol based on species-specific sequence differences in the highly conserved gene coding for the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II largest subunit. A total of 102 honey bee samples were analyzed by the novel PCR protocol and the results were compared with the results of the originally published PCR-RFLP analysis and two recently published differentiation protocols, based on 16S rRNA sequence differences. Although the novel PCR protocol proved to be as reliable as the 16S rRNA gene based PCR-RFLP it was superior to simple 16S rRNA based PCR protocols which tended to overestimate the rate of N. ceranae infections. Therefore, we propose that species-specific sequence differences of highly conserved protein coding genes should become the preferred molecular tool for differentiation of Nosema spp. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional Class I and II Amino Acid-activating Enzymes Can Be Coded by Opposite Strands of the Same Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Rodriguez, Luis; Erdogan, Ozgün; Jimenez-Rodriguez, Mariel; Gonzalez-Rivera, Katiria; Williams, Tishan; Li, Li; Weinreb, Violetta; Collier, Martha; Chandrasekaran, Srinivas Niranj; Ambroggio, Xavier; Kuhlman, Brian; Carter, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) catalyze both chemical steps that translate the universal genetic code. Rodin and Ohno offered an explanation for the existence of two aaRS classes, observing that codons for the most highly conserved Class I active-site residues are anticodons for corresponding Class II active-site residues. They proposed that the two classes arose simultaneously, by translation of opposite strands from the same gene. We have characterized wild-type 46-residue peptides containing ATP-binding sites of Class I and II synthetases and those coded by a gene designed by Rosetta to encode the corresponding peptides on opposite strands. Catalysis by WT and designed peptides is saturable, and the designed peptides are sensitive to active-site residue mutation. All have comparable apparent second-order rate constants 2.9–7.0E-3 m−1 s−1 or ∼750,000–1,300,000 times the uncatalyzed rate. The activities of the two complementary peptides demonstrate that the unique information in a gene can have two functional interpretations, one from each complementary strand. The peptides contain phylogenetic signatures of longer, more sophisticated catalysts we call Urzymes and are short enough to bridge the gap between them and simpler uncoded peptides. Thus, they directly substantiate the sense/antisense coding ancestry of Class I and II aaRS. Furthermore, designed 46-mers achieve similar catalytic proficiency to wild-type 46-mers by significant increases in both kcat and Km values, supporting suggestions that the earliest peptide catalysts activated ATP for biosynthetic purposes. PMID:26088142

  16. Functional Class I and II Amino Acid-activating Enzymes Can Be Coded by Opposite Strands of the Same Gene.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rodriguez, Luis; Erdogan, Ozgün; Jimenez-Rodriguez, Mariel; Gonzalez-Rivera, Katiria; Williams, Tishan; Li, Li; Weinreb, Violetta; Collier, Martha; Chandrasekaran, Srinivas Niranj; Ambroggio, Xavier; Kuhlman, Brian; Carter, Charles W

    2015-08-07

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) catalyze both chemical steps that translate the universal genetic code. Rodin and Ohno offered an explanation for the existence of two aaRS classes, observing that codons for the most highly conserved Class I active-site residues are anticodons for corresponding Class II active-site residues. They proposed that the two classes arose simultaneously, by translation of opposite strands from the same gene. We have characterized wild-type 46-residue peptides containing ATP-binding sites of Class I and II synthetases and those coded by a gene designed by Rosetta to encode the corresponding peptides on opposite strands. Catalysis by WT and designed peptides is saturable, and the designed peptides are sensitive to active-site residue mutation. All have comparable apparent second-order rate constants 2.9-7.0E-3 M(-1) s(-1) or ∼750,000-1,300,000 times the uncatalyzed rate. The activities of the two complementary peptides demonstrate that the unique information in a gene can have two functional interpretations, one from each complementary strand. The peptides contain phylogenetic signatures of longer, more sophisticated catalysts we call Urzymes and are short enough to bridge the gap between them and simpler uncoded peptides. Thus, they directly substantiate the sense/antisense coding ancestry of Class I and II aaRS. Furthermore, designed 46-mers achieve similar catalytic proficiency to wild-type 46-mers by significant increases in both kcat and Km values, supporting suggestions that the earliest peptide catalysts activated ATP for biosynthetic purposes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Detecting selection in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, using DNA sequence data from multiple nuclear protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Yednock, Bree K; Neigel, Joseph E

    2014-01-01

    The identification of genes involved in the adaptive evolution of non-model organisms with uncharacterized genomes constitutes a major challenge. This study employed a rigorous and targeted candidate gene approach to test for positive selection on protein-coding genes of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Four genes with putative roles in physiological adaptation to environmental stress were chosen as candidates. A fifth gene not expected to play a role in environmental adaptation was used as a control. Large samples (n>800) of DNA sequences from C. sapidus were used in tests of selective neutrality based on sequence polymorphisms. In combination with these, sequences from the congener C. similis were used in neutrality tests based on interspecific divergence. In multiple tests, significant departures from neutral expectations and indicative of positive selection were found for the candidate gene trehalose 6-phosphate synthase (tps). These departures could not be explained by any of the historical population expansion or bottleneck scenarios that were evaluated in coalescent simulations. Evidence was also found for balancing selection at ATP-synthase subunit 9 (atps) using a maximum likelihood version of the Hudson, Kreitmen, and Aguadé test, and positive selection favoring amino acid replacements within ATP/ADP translocase (ant) was detected using the McDonald-Kreitman test. In contrast, test statistics for the control gene, ribosomal protein L12 (rpl), which presumably has experienced the same demographic effects as the candidate loci, were not significantly different from neutral expectations and could readily be explained by demographic effects. Together, these findings demonstrate the utility of the candidate gene approach for investigating adaptation at the molecular level in a marine invertebrate for which extensive genomic resources are not available.

  18. Detecting Selection in the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus, Using DNA Sequence Data from Multiple Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yednock, Bree K.; Neigel, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of genes involved in the adaptive evolution of non-model organisms with uncharacterized genomes constitutes a major challenge. This study employed a rigorous and targeted candidate gene approach to test for positive selection on protein-coding genes of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Four genes with putative roles in physiological adaptation to environmental stress were chosen as candidates. A fifth gene not expected to play a role in environmental adaptation was used as a control. Large samples (n>800) of DNA sequences from C. sapidus were used in tests of selective neutrality based on sequence polymorphisms. In combination with these, sequences from the congener C. similis were used in neutrality tests based on interspecific divergence. In multiple tests, significant departures from neutral expectations and indicative of positive selection were found for the candidate gene trehalose 6-phosphate synthase (tps). These departures could not be explained by any of the historical population expansion or bottleneck scenarios that were evaluated in coalescent simulations. Evidence was also found for balancing selection at ATP-synthase subunit 9 (atps) using a maximum likelihood version of the Hudson, Kreitmen, and Aguadé test, and positive selection favoring amino acid replacements within ATP/ADP translocase (ant) was detected using the McDonald-Kreitman test. In contrast, test statistics for the control gene, ribosomal protein L12 (rpl), which presumably has experienced the same demographic effects as the candidate loci, were not significantly different from neutral expectations and could readily be explained by demographic effects. Together, these findings demonstrate the utility of the candidate gene approach for investigating adaptation at the molecular level in a marine invertebrate for which extensive genomic resources are not available. PMID:24896825

  19. TNFα signals through specialized factories where responsive coding and miRNA genes are transcribed

    PubMed Central

    Papantonis, Argyris; Kohro, Takahide; Baboo, Sabyasachi; Larkin, Joshua D; Deng, Binwei; Short, Patrick; Tsutsumi, Shuichi; Taylor, Stephen; Kanki, Yasuharu; Kobayashi, Mika; Li, Guoliang; Poh, Huay-Mei; Ruan, Xiaoan; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Ruan, Yijun; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Wada, Youichiro; Cook, Peter R

    2012-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is a potent cytokine that signals through nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) to activate a subset of human genes. It is usually assumed that this involves RNA polymerases transcribing responsive genes wherever they might be in the nucleus. Using primary human endothelial cells, variants of chromosome conformation capture (including 4C and chromatin interaction analysis with paired-end tag sequencing), and fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect single nascent transcripts, we show that TNFα induces responsive genes to congregate in discrete ‘NFκB factories'. Some factories further specialize in transcribing responsive genes encoding micro-RNAs that target downregulated mRNAs. We expect all signalling pathways to contain this extra leg, where responding genes are transcribed in analogous specialized factories. PMID:23103767

  20. Interspecific comparison of the period gene of Drosophila reveals large blocks of non-conserved coding DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Colot, H V; Hall, J C; Rosbash, M

    1988-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the coding region of the period (per) gene from Drosophila pseudoobscura and D. virilis. A comparison with that of D. melanogaster reveals that the conceptual translation products consist of interspersed blocks of conserved and non-conserved amino acid sequence. The non-conserved portion, comprising approximately 33% of the protein sequence, includes the perfect Thr-Gly repeat of D. melanogaster, which is absent from the D. pseudoobscura and D. virilis proteins. Based on these observations and cross-species transformation experiments, we suggest that the interspecific variability in the per primary amino acid sequence contributes to the control of species-specific behaviors. PMID:3208754

  1. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes of non-coding area in the CP gene are correlated with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Xiao, Jianqiu; Zheng, Zhiyong; Fei, Guoqiang; Zhang, Feng; Jin, Lirong; Zhong, Chunjiu

    2015-04-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that ceruloplasmin (CP) dysmetabolism is correlated with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the causes of decreased serum CP levels in PD patients remain to be clarified. This study aimed to explore the potential association between genetic variants of the CP gene and PD. Clinical features, serum CP levels, and the CP gene (both promoter and coding regions) were analyzed in 60 PD patients and 50 controls. A luciferase reporter system was used to investigate the function of promoter single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). High-density comparative genomic hybridization microarrays were also used to detect large-scale copy-number variations in CP and an additional 47 genes involved in PD and/or copper/iron metabolism. The frequencies of eight SNPs (one intronic SNP and seven promoter SNPs of the CP gene) and their haplotypes were significantly different between PD patients, especially those with lowered serum CP levels, and controls. However, the luciferase reporter system revealed no significant effect of the risk haplotype on promoter activity of the CP gene. Neither these SNPs nor their haplotypes were correlated with the Hoehn and Yahr staging of PD. The results of this study suggest that common genetic variants of CP are associated with PD and further investigation is needed to explore their functions in PD.

  2. Epigenetic regulation of protein-coding and microRNA genes by the Gfi1-interacting tumor suppressor PRDM5.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhijun; Person, Richard E; Lee, Hu-Hui; Huang, Shi; Donadieu, Jean; Badolato, Raffaele; Grimes, H Leighton; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Horwitz, Marshall S

    2007-10-01

    Gfi1 transcriptionally governs hematopoiesis, and its mutations produce neutropenia. In an effort to identify Gfi1-interacting proteins and also to generate new candidate genes causing neutropenia, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen with Gfi1. Among other Gfi1-interacting proteins, we identified a previously uncharacterized member of the PR domain-containing family of tumor suppressors, PRDM5. PRDM5 has 16 zinc fingers, and we show that it acts as a sequence-specific, DNA binding transcription factor that targets hematopoiesis-associated protein-coding and microRNA genes, including many that are also targets of Gfi1. PRDM5 epigenetically regulates transcription similarly to Gfi1: it recruits the histone methyltransferase G9a and class I histone deacetylases to its target gene promoters and demonstrates repressor activity on synthetic reporters; on endogenous target genes, however, it functions as an activator, in addition to a repressor. Interestingly, genes that PRDM5 activates, as opposed to those it represses, are also targets of Gfi1, suggesting a competitive mechanism through which two repressors could cooperate in order to become transcriptional activators. In neutropenic patients, we identified PRDM5 protein sequence variants perturbing transcriptional function, suggesting a potentially important role in hematopoiesis.

  3. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene coding for an antigenic 120-kilodalton protein of Rickettsia conorii.

    PubMed Central

    Schuenke, K W; Walker, D H

    1994-01-01

    Several high-molecular-mass (above 100 kDa) antigens are recognized by sera from humans infected with spotted fever group rickettsiae and may be important stimulators of the host immune response. Molecular cloning techniques were used to make genomic Rickettsia conorii (Malish 7 strain) libraries in expression vector lambda gt11. The 120-kDa R. conorii antigen was identified by monospecific antibodies to the recombinant protein expressed on construct lambda 4-7. The entire gene DNA sequence was obtained by using this construct and two other overlapping constructs. An open reading frame of 3,068 bp with a calculated molecular mass of approximately 112 kDa was identified. Promoters and a ribosome-binding site were identified on the basis of their DNA sequence homology to other rickettsial genes and their relative positions in the sequence. The DNA coding region shares no significant homology with other spotted fever group rickettsial antigen genes (i.e., the R. rickettsii 190-, 135-, and 17-kDa antigen-encoding genes). The PCR technique was used to amplify the gene from eight species of spotted fever group rickettsiae. A 75-kDa portion of the 120-kDa antigen was overexpressed in and purified from Escherichia coli. This polypeptide was recognized by antirickettsial antibodies and may be a useful diagnostic reagent for spotted fever group rickettsioses. Images PMID:8112862

  4. Simulation of random envelope processes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.-N.

    1972-01-01

    Efficient and practical methods of simulating stationary and nonstationary random envelope processes are presented. The stationary envelope processes are simulated by using the fast Fourier transform while the nonstationary envelope processes are simulated as the square root of the sum of a series of cosine functions and a series of sine functions with random phase angles. Typical applications of the envelope simulation are the simulations of peaks and troughs which play an important role in the analyses of the first excursion probability, fatigue and crack propagation. In particular, applications to the crack propagation under random loadings are demonstrated in detail.

  5. Evolutionary mechanisms driving the evolution of a large polydnavirus gene family coding for protein tyrosine phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene duplications have been proposed to be the main mechanism involved in genome evolution and in acquisition of new functions. Polydnaviruses (PDVs), symbiotic viruses associated with parasitoid wasps, are ideal model systems to study mechanisms of gene duplications given that PDV genomes consist of virulence genes organized into multigene families. In these systems the viral genome is integrated in a wasp chromosome as a provirus and virus particles containing circular double-stranded DNA are injected into the parasitoids’ hosts and are essential for parasitism success. The viral virulence factors, organized in gene families, are required collectively to induce host immune suppression and developmental arrest. The gene family which encodes protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) has undergone spectacular expansion in several PDV genomes with up to 42 genes. Results Here, we present strong indications that PTP gene family expansion occurred via classical mechanisms: by duplication of large segments of the chromosomally integrated form of the virus sequences (segmental duplication), by tandem duplications within this form and by dispersed duplications. We also propose a novel duplication mechanism specific to PDVs that involves viral circle reintegration into the wasp genome. The PTP copies produced were shown to undergo conservative evolution along with episodes of adaptive evolution. In particular recently produced copies have undergone positive selection in sites most likely involved in defining substrate selectivity. Conclusion The results provide evidence about the dynamic nature of polydnavirus proviral genomes. Classical and PDV-specific duplication mechanisms have been involved in the production of new gene copies. Selection pressures associated with antagonistic interactions with parasitized hosts have shaped these genes used to manipulate lepidopteran physiology with evidence for positive selection involved in adaptation to host targets. PMID

  6. Improved canine exome designs, featuring ncRNAs and increased coverage of protein coding genes

    PubMed Central

    Broeckx, Bart J.G.; Hitte, Christophe; Coopman, Frank; Verhoeven, Geert E.C.; De Keulenaer, Sarah; De Meester, Ellen; Derrien, Thomas; Alfoldi, Jessica; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Bosmans, Tim; Gielen, Ingrid; Van Bree, Henri; Van Ryssen, Bernadette; Saunders, Jimmy H.; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    By limiting sequencing to those sequences transcribed as mRNA, whole exome sequencing is a cost-efficient technique often used in disease-association studies. We developed two target enrichment designs based on the recently released annotation of the canine genome: the exome-plus design and the exome-CDS design. The exome-plus design combines the exons of the CanFam 3.1 Ensembl annotation, more recently discovered protein-coding exons and a variety of non-coding RNA regions (microRNAs, long non-coding RNAs and antisense transcripts), leading to a total size of ≈152 Mb. The exome-CDS was designed as a subset of the exome-plus by omitting all 3’ and 5’ untranslated regions. This reduced the size of the exome-CDS to ≈71 Mb. To test the capturing performance, four exome-plus captures were sequenced on a NextSeq 500 with each capture containing four pre-capture pooled, barcoded samples. At an average sequencing depth of 68.3x, 80% of the regions and well over 90% of the targeted base pairs were completely covered at least 5 times with high reproducibility. Based on the performance of the exome-plus, we estimated the performance of the exome-CDS. Overall, these designs provide flexible solutions for a variety of research questions and are likely to be reliable tools in disease studies. PMID:26235384

  7. cDNA sequence of human transforming gene hst and identification of the coding sequence required for transforming activity

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, M.; Yoshida, T.; Miyagawa, K.; Sakamoto, H.; Terada, M.; Sugimura, T.

    1987-05-01

    The hst gene was originally identified as a transforming gene in DNAs from human stomach cancers and from a noncancerous portion of stomach mucosa by DNA-mediated transfection assay using NIH3T3 cells. cDNA clones of hst were isolated from the cDNA library constructed from poly(A)/sup +/ RNA of a secondary transformant induced by the DNA from a stomach cancer. The sequence analysis of the hst cDNA revealed the presence of two open reading frames. When this cDNA was inserted into an expression vector containing the simian virus 40 promoter, it efficiently induced the transformation of NIH3T3 cells upon transfection. It was found that one of the reading frames, which coded for 206 amino acids, was responsible for the transforming activity.

  8. Two mitochondrial genomes from the families Bethylidae and Mutillidae: independent rearrangement of protein-coding genes and higher-level phylogeny of the Hymenoptera.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shu-Jun; Li, Qian; van Achterberg, Kees; Chen, Xue-Xin

    2014-08-01

    In animal mitochondrial genomes, gene arrangements are usually conserved across major lineages but might be rearranged within derived groups, and might provide valuable phylogenetic characters. Here, we sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of Cephalonomia gallicola (Chrysidoidea: Bethylidae) and Wallacidia oculata (Vespoidea: Mutillidae). In Cephalonomia at least 11 tRNA and 2 protein-coding genes were rearranged, which is the first report of protein-coding gene rearrangements in the Aculeata. In the Hymenoptera, three types of protein-coding gene rearrangement events occur, i.e. reversal, transposition and reverse transposition. Venturia (Ichneumonidae) had the greatest number of common intervals with the ancestral gene arrangement pattern, whereas Philotrypesis (Agaonidae) had the fewest. The most similar rearrangement patterns are shared between Nasonia (Pteromalidae) and Philotrypesis, whereas the most differentiated rearrangements occur between Cotesia (Braconidae) and Philotrypesis. It is clear that protein-coding gene rearrangements in the Hymenoptera are evolutionarily independent across the major lineages but are conserved within groups such as the Chalcidoidea. Phylogenetic analyses supported the sister-group relationship of Orrussoidea and Apocrita, Ichneumonoidea and Aculeata, Vespidae and Apoidea, and the paraphyly of Vespoidea. The Evaniomorpha and phylogenetic relationships within Aculeata remain controversial, with discrepancy between analyses using protein-coding and RNA genes.

  9. prbA, a Gene Coding for an Esterase Hydrolyzing Parabens in Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter gergoviae Strains

    PubMed Central

    Valkova, Nelly; Lépine, François; Bollet, Claude; Dupont, Maryse; Villemur, Richard

    2002-01-01

    The new gene prbA encodes an esterase responsible for the hydrolysis of the ester bond of parabens in Enterobacter cloacae strain EM. This gene is located on the chromosome of strain EM and was cloned by several PCR approaches. The prbA gene codes for an immature protein of 533 amino acids, the first 31 of which represent a proposed signal peptide yielding a mature protein of a putative molecular mass of 54.6 kDa. This enzyme presents analogies with other type B carboxylesterases, mainly of eukaryotic origin. The cloning and expression of the prbA gene in a strain of Escherichia coli previously unable to hydrolyze parabens resulted in the acquisition of a hydrolytic capacity comparable to the original activity of strain EM, along with an increased resistance of the transformed strain to methyl paraben. The presence of homologues of prbA was tested in additional ubiquitous bacteria, which may be causative factors in opportunistic infections, including Enterobacter gergoviae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Pseudomonas agglomerans, E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Burkholderia cepacia. Among the 41 total strains tested, 2 strains of E. gergoviae and 1 strain of Burkholderia cepacia were able to degrade almost completely 800 mg of methyl paraben liter−1. Two strains of E. gergoviae, named G1 and G12, contained a gene that showed high homology to the prbA gene of E. cloacae and demonstrated comparable paraben esterase activities. The significant geographical distance between the locations of the isolated E. cloacae and E. gergoviae strains suggests the possibility of an efficient transfer mechanism of the prbA gene, conferring additional resistance to parabens in ubiquitous bacteria that represent a common source of opportunistic infections. PMID:12193616

  10. A cytogenetic abnormality and rare coding variants identify ABCA13 as a candidate gene in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression.

    PubMed

    Knight, Helen M; Pickard, Benjamin S; Maclean, Alan; Malloy, Mary P; Soares, Dinesh C; McRae, Allan F; Condie, Alison; White, Angela; Hawkins, William; McGhee, Kevin; van Beck, Margaret; MacIntyre, Donald J; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J; Visscher, Peter M; Porteous, David J; Cannon, Ronald E; St Clair, David; Muir, Walter J; Blackwood, Douglas H R

    2009-12-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are leading causes of morbidity across all populations, with heritability estimates of approximately 80% indicating a substantial genetic component. Population genetics and genome-wide association studies suggest an overlap of genetic risk factors between these illnesses but it is unclear how this genetic component is divided between common gene polymorphisms, rare genomic copy number variants, and rare gene sequence mutations. We report evidence that the lipid transporter gene ABCA13 is a susceptibility factor for both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. After the initial discovery of its disruption by a chromosome abnormality in a person with schizophrenia, we resequenced ABCA13 exons in 100 cases with schizophrenia and 100 controls. Multiple rare coding variants were identified including one nonsense and nine missense mutations and compound heterozygosity/homozygosity in six cases. Variants were genotyped in additional schizophrenia, bipolar, depression (n > 1600), and control (n > 950) cohorts and the frequency of all rare variants combined was greater than controls in schizophrenia (OR = 1.93, p = 0.0057) and bipolar disorder (OR = 2.71, p = 0.00007). The population attributable risk of these mutations was 2.2% for schizophrenia and 4.0% for bipolar disorder. In a study of 21 families of mutation carriers, we genotyped affected and unaffected relatives and found significant linkage (LOD = 4.3) of rare variants with a phenotype including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression. These data identify a candidate gene, highlight the genetic overlap between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression, and suggest that rare coding variants may contribute significantly to risk of these disorders.

  11. The complete coding region sequence of river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) SRY gene.

    PubMed

    Parma, Pietro; Feligini, Maria; Greppi, Gianfranco; Enne, Giuseppe

    2004-02-01

    The Y-linked SRY gene is responsible for testis determination in mammals. Mutations in this gene can lead to XY Gonadal Dysgenesis, an abnormal sexual phenotype described in humans, cattle, horses and river buffalo. We report here the complete river buffalo SRY sequence in order to enable the genetic diagnosis of this disease. The SRY sequence was also used to confirm the evolutionary divergence time between cattle and river buffalo 10 million years ago.

  12. Radiative accelerations in stellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, M. J.

    1997-08-01

    In stars which are sufficiently quiescent, changes in the relative abundances of the chemical elements can result from gravitational settling and from levitation produced by radiation pressure forces, usually expressed as radiative accelerations g_rad. Those changes can affect the structure of such stars, due to modifications in opacities, and can lead to marked peculiarities in observed atmospheric abundances. It is necessary to consider diffusive movements both in the atmospheres and in much deeper layers of the stellar envelopes. For the envelopes the equation of radiative transfer can be solved in a diffusion approximation and, for an element k in ionization stage j, one obtains expressions for g_rad(j, k) proportional to the total radiative flux, to the Rosseland-mean opacity kappa_R (which may depend on the abundance of k), and to a dimensionless quantity gamma(j, k) which, due to saturation effects, can be sensitive to the abundance of k. The radiative accelerations are required for each ionization stage, because the diffusion coefficients depend on j. Using atomic data obtained in the course of the work of the Opacity Project (OP), we calculate kappa_R and gamma(j, k) for the chemical elements C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni. We start from standard Solar system abundances, and then vary the abundance of one element at a time (element k) by a factor chi. The following results are obtained and are available at the Centre de Donnees astronomiques de Strasbourg (CDS). (1) Files stages.zz (where zz specifies the nuclear charge of the selected element k) containing values of kappa_R and gamma(j, k) on a mesh of values of (T, N_e, chi), where T is temperature, and N_e is electron density. We include derivatives of kappa_R and gamma(j, k) with respect to chi, which are used for making interpolations. (2) A code add.f which reads a file stages.zz and writes a file acc.zz containing values of gamma(k) obtained on summing the gamma(j, k

  13. An experimental approach to enumerate the genes coding for immunoglobulin variable-regions.

    PubMed Central

    Zeelon, E P; Bothwell, A L; Kantor, F; Schechter, I

    1981-01-01

    Critical to our understanding of the immune system diversity is the determination of the number of germ line V genes. The total number of V genes is given by the product: number of subgroups x number of germ line genes per subgroup. Studies of kappa chains and of embryonic DNA indicate 5-10 V genes per subgroup. Statistical analysis of the limited sequence data of mouse kappa chains suggest about 50 V kappa subgroups. We report here a general approach for direct estimation of the number of VL and VH subgroups expressed in normal spleen, and present data for V kappa. The kappa mRNA of the spleen is a heterogeneous population where different V kappa are linked to the same C kappa, i.e. C kappa equals total V kappa. The ratio C kappa/distinct V kappa approximates the number of subgroups since V kappa of the same subgroup cross hybridize while V kappa of different subgroups do not. This ratio was determined by molecular hybridization of cloned C kappa and V kappa DNA probes with spleen mRNA. The results indicate the expression of 280 V kappa subgroups in mouse. Assuming an average of 7 genes per subgroup, we estimate about 2000 V kappa germ line genes. Images PMID:6169011

  14. The use of an optimized chimeric envelope glycoprotein enhances the efficiency of retrograde gene transfer of a pseudotyped lentiviral vector in the primate brain.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Soshi; Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Tsuge, Hitomi; Uezono, Shiori; Nagaya, Kiyomi; Fijiwara, Maki; Kato, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Takada, Masahiko

    2017-02-28

    Lentiviral vectors have been used not only for various basic research experiments, but also for a wide range of gene therapy trials in animal models. The development of a pseudotyped lentiviral vector with the property of retrograde infection allows us to introduce foreign genes into neurons that are localized in regions innervating the site of vector injection. Here, we report the efficiency of retrograde gene transfer of a recently developed FuG-E pseudotyped lentiviral vector in the primate brain by comparing its transduction pattern with that of the parental FuG-C pseudotyped vector. After injection of the FuG-E vector encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) into the striatum of macaque monkeys, many GFP-immunoreactive neurons were found in regions projecting to the striatum, such as the cerebral cortex, thalamus, and substantia nigra. Quantitative analysis revealed that in all regions, the number of neurons retrogradely transduced with the FuG-E vector was larger than in the FuG-C vector injection case. It was also confirmed that the FuG-E vector displayed explicit neuronal specificity to the same extent as the FuG-C vector. This vector might promote approaches to pathway-selective gene manipulation and provide a powerful tool for effective gene therapy trials against neurological disorders through enhanced retrograde delivery.

  15. Signalign: An Ontology of DNA as Signal for Comparative Gene Structure Prediction Using Information-Coding-and-Processing Techniques.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ning; Guo, Xuan; Gu, Feng; Pan, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Conventional character-analysis-based techniques in genome analysis manifest three main shortcomings-inefficiency, inflexibility, and incompatibility. In our previous research, a general framework, called DNA As X was proposed for character-analysis-free techniques to overcome these shortcomings, where X is the intermediates, such as digit, code, signal, vector, tree, graph network, and so on. In this paper, we further implement an ontology of DNA As Signal, by designing a tool named Signalign for comparative gene structure analysis, in which DNA sequences are converted into signal series, processed by modified method of dynamic time warping and measured by signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The ontology of DNA As Signal integrates the principles and concepts of other disciplines including information coding theory and signal processing into sequence analysis and processing. Comparing with conventional character-analysis-based methods, Signalign can not only have the equivalent or superior performance, but also enrich the tools and the knowledge library of computational biology by extending the domain from character/string to diverse areas. The evaluation results validate the success of the character-analysis-free technique for improved performances in comparative gene structure prediction.

  16. Plasmid pGA1 from Corynebacterium glutamicum codes for a gene product that positively influences plasmid copy number.

    PubMed Central

    Nesvera, J; Pátek, M; Hochmannová, J; Abrhámová, Z; Becvárová, V; Jelínkova, M; Vohradský, J

    1997-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence (4,826 bp) of the cryptic plasmid pGA1 from Corynebacterium glutamicum was determined. DNA sequence analysis revealed four putative coding regions (open reading frame A [ORFA], ORFA2, ORFB, and ORFC). ORFC was identified as a rep gene coding for an initiator of plasmid replication (Rep) according to the high level of homology of its deduced amino acid sequence with the Rep proteins of plasmids pSR1 (from C. glutamicum) and pNG2 (from Corynebacterium diphtheriae). This function was confirmed by deletion mapping of the minimal replicon of pGA1 (1.7 kb) which contains only ORFC. Deletion derivatives of pGA1 devoid of ORFA exhibited significant decreases in the copy number in C. glutamicum cells and displayed segregational instability. Introduction of ORFA in trans into the cells harboring these deletion plasmids dramatically increased their copy number and segregational stability. The ORFA gene product thus positively influences plasmid copy number. This is the first report on such activity associated with a nonintegrating bacterial plasmid. The related plasmids pGA1, pSR1, and pNG2 lacking significant homology with any other plasmid seem to be representatives of a new group of plasmids replicating in the rolling-circle mode. PMID:9045809

  17. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for aspartokinase II from a thermophilic methylotrophic Bacillus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Schendel, F J; Flickinger, M C

    1992-01-01

    The structural gene coding for the lysine-sensitive aspartokinase II of the methylotrophic thermotolerant Bacillus sp. strain MGA3 was cloned from a genomic library by complementation of an Escherichia coli auxotrophic mutant lacking all three aspartokinase isozymes. The nucleotide sequence of the entire 2.2-kb PstI fragment was determined, and a single open reading frame coding for the aspartokinase II enzyme was found. Aspartokinase II was shown to be an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer (M(r) 122,000) with the beta subunit (M(r) 18,000) encoded within the alpha subunit (M(r) 45,000) in the samea reading frame. The enzyme was purified, and the N-terminal sequences of the alpha and beta subunits were identical with those predicted from the gene sequences. The predicted amino acid sequence was 76% identical with the sequence of the Bacillus subtilis aspartokinase II. The transcription initiation site was located approximately 350 bp upstream of the translation start site, and putative promoter regions at -10 (TATGCT) and -35 (ATGACA) were identified. A 300-nucleotide intervening sequence between the transcription initiation and translational start sites suggests a possible attenuation mechanism for the regulation of transcription of this enzyme in the presence of lysine. Images PMID:1444390

  18. Identification of coding exon 3 duplication in the BMPR1A gene in a patient with juvenile polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Junya; Nagayama, Satoshi; Chino, Akiko; Sakata, Ai; Yamamoto, Noriko; Sato, Yuri; Ashihara, Yuumi; Kita, Mizuho; Nomura, Sachio; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Igarashi, Masahiro; Ueno, Masashi; Arai, Masami

    2014-10-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by multiple juvenile polyps arising in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancers, specifically colon cancer. BMPR1A and SMAD4 germline mutations have been found in patients with juvenile polyposis syndrome. We identified a BMPR1A mutation, which involves a duplication of coding exon 3 (c.230+452_333+441dup1995), on multiple ligation dependent probe amplification in a patient with juvenile polyposis syndrome. The mutation causes a frameshift, producing a truncated protein (p.D112NfsX2). Therefore, the mutation is believed to be pathogenic. We also identified a duplication breakpoint in which Alu sequences are located. These results suggest that the duplication event resulted from recombination between Alu sequences. To our knowledge, partial duplication in the BMPR1A gene has not been reported previously. This is the first case report to document coding exon 3 duplication in the BMPR1A gene in a patient with juvenile polyposis syndrome.

  19. 10 CFR 434.516 - Building exterior envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... default assumptions for computing the Design Energy Consumption. The solar absorptivity of opaque elements... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Building exterior envelope. 434.516 Section 434.516 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE...

  20. 10 CFR 434.516 - Building exterior envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... default assumptions for computing the Design Energy Consumption. The solar absorptivity of opaque elements... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Building exterior envelope. 434.516 Section 434.516 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE...

  1. 10 CFR 434.516 - Building exterior envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... default assumptions for computing the Design Energy Consumption. The solar absorptivity of opaque elements... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Building exterior envelope. 434.516 Section 434.516 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE...

  2. 10 CFR 434.516 - Building exterior envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... default assumptions for computing the Design Energy Consumption. The solar absorptivity of opaque elements... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Building exterior envelope. 434.516 Section 434.516 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE...

  3. Characterization and regulation of the gene coding for human glutathione-insulin transhydrogenase (protein-disulfide interchange enzyme)

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.I.; Varandani, P.T.

    1987-05-01

    Glutathione-insulin transhydrogenase (GIT) is an ubiquitious enzyme whose action is to catalyze the rearrangement of disulfide bonds in proteins, resulting in either the activation or inactivation of protein molecules. The interaction of GIT with insulin results in the cleavage of the hormone into its constituent subunits, the A and B chains. GIT levels found in several tissue types have been shown to be modulated by circulating levels of insulin. An increased level of blood insulin is associated with increased levels of GIT and decreased levels of insulin are associated with decreased levels of GIT, indicating that insulin regulates its own degradation. A cDNA probe coding for the GIT gene was isolated from a human liver cDNA expression library constructed in lambda gt11. Sequencing of this clone indicates that it codes for the 3' half of the gene through the poly-A tail region. There is high homology between this cDNA to human GIT and a published sequence for rat liver cDNA. The clone was used as a probe for quantitation and characterization of GIT mRNA in rat tissues by use of RNA Dot blots and Northern blots. Only one species of mRNA having 2300 bases was found in tissues screened thus far (liver, spleen, kidney, and testis). This mRNA is sufficiently large to code for a protein the size of GIT (58,000 d). Work is in progress to compare mRNA levels as influenced by insulin levels.

  4. Mice with Alopecia, Osteoporosis, and Systemic Amyloidosis Due to Mutation in Zdhhc13, a Gene Coding for Palmitoyl Acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Ya-Wen; Huang, Hong-Wen; Kao, Hsiao-Jung; Liu, Kai-Ming; Shen, Li-Fen; Song, I-wen; Tu, Chen-Pei D.; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Kikuchi, Tateki; Justice, Monica J.; Yen, Jeffrey J. Y.; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2010-01-01

    Protein palmitoylation has emerged as an important mechanism for regulating protein trafficking, stability, and protein–protein interactions; however, its relevance to disease processes is not clear. Using a genome-wide, phenotype driven N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea–mediated mutagenesis screen, we identified mice with failure to thrive, shortened life span, skin and hair abnormalities including alopecia, severe osteoporosis, and systemic amyloidosis (both AA and AL amyloids depositions). Whole-genome homozygosity mapping with 295 SNP markers and fine mapping with an additional 50 SNPs localized the disease gene to chromosome 7 between 53.9 and 56.3 Mb. A nonsense mutation (c.1273A>T) was located in exon 12 of the Zdhhc13 gene (Zinc finger, DHHC domain containing 13), a gene coding for palmitoyl transferase. The mutation predicted a truncated protein (R425X), and real-time PCR showed markedly reduced Zdhhc13 mRNA. A second gene trap allele of Zdhhc13 has the same phenotypes, suggesting that this is a loss of function allele. This is the first report that palmitoyl transferase deficiency causes a severe phenotype, and it establishes a direct link between protein palmitoylation and regulation of diverse physiologic functions where its absence can result in profound disease pathology. This mouse model can be used to investigate mechanisms where improper palmitoylation leads to disease processes and to understand molecular mechanisms underlying human alopecia, osteoporosis, and amyloidosis and many other neurodegenerative diseases caused by protein misfolding and amyloidosis. PMID:20548961

  5. A bioinformatics analysis of alternative exon usage in human genes coding for extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Sakabe, Noboru Jo; Vibranovski, Maria Dulcetti; de Souza, Sandro José

    2004-12-30

    Alternative splicing increases protein diversity through the generation of different mRNA molecules from the same gene. Although alternative splicing seems to be a widespread phenomenon in the human transcriptome, it is possible that different subgroups of genes present different patterns, related to their biological roles. Analysis of a subgroup may enhance common features of its members that would otherwise disappear amidst a heterogeneous population. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are a good set for such analyses since they are structurally and functionally related. This family of proteins is involved in a large variety of functions, probably achieved by the combinatorial use of protein domains through exon shuffling events. To determine if ECM genes have a different pattern of alternative splicing, we compared clusters of expressed sequences of ECM to all other genes regarding features related to the most frequent type of alternative splicing, alternative exon usage (AEU), such as: the number of alternative exon-intron structures per cluster, the number of AEU events per exon-intron structure, the number of exons per event, among others. Although we did not find many differences between the two sets, we observed a higher frequency of AEU events involving entire protein domains in the ECM set, a feature that could be associated with their multi-domain nature. As other subgroups or even the ECM set in different tissues could present distinct patterns of AEU, it may be premature to conclude that alternative splicing is homogeneous among groups of related genes.

  6. DNA polymorphism in morels: complete sequences of the internal transcribed spacer of genes coding for rRNA in Morchella esculenta (yellow morel) and Morchella conica (black morel).

    PubMed

    Wipf, D; Munch, J C; Botton, B; Buscot, F

    1996-09-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the gene coding for rRNA was sequenced in both directions with the gene walking technique in a black morel (Morchella conica) and a yellow morel (M. esculenta) to elucidate the ITS length discrepancy between the two species groups (750-bp ITS in black morels and 1,150-bp ITS in yellow morels.

  7. Translational regulation of gene expression by an anaerobically induced small non-coding RNA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Anders; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Kallipolitis, Birgitte; Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Overgaard, Martin

    2010-04-02

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNA) have emerged as important elements of gene regulatory circuits. In enterobacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella many of these sRNAs interact with the Hfq protein, an RNA chaperone similar to mammalian Sm-like proteins and act in the post-transcriptional regulation of many genes. A number of these highly conserved ribo-regulators are stringently regulated at the level of transcription and are part of major regulons that deal with the immediate response to various stress conditions, indicating that every major transcription factor may control the expression of at least one sRNA regulator. Here, we extend this view by the identification and characterization of a highly conserved, anaerobically induced small sRNA in E. coli, whose expression is strictly dependent on the anaerobic transcriptional fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator (FNR). The sRNA, named FnrS, possesses signatures of base-pairing RNAs, and we show by employing global proteomic and transcriptomic profiling that the expression of multiple genes is negatively regulated by the sRNA. Intriguingly, many of these genes encode enzymes with "aerobic" functions or enzymes linked to oxidative stress. Furthermore, in previous work most of the potential target genes have been shown to be repressed by FNR through an undetermined mechanism. Collectively, our results provide insight into the mechanism by which FNR negatively regulates genes such as sodA, sodB, cydDC, and metE, thereby demonstrating that adaptation to anaerobic growth involves the action of a small regulatory RNA.

  8. Translational Regulation of Gene Expression by an Anaerobically Induced Small Non-coding RNA in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, Anders; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Kallipolitis, Birgitte; Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Overgaard, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNA) have emerged as important elements of gene regulatory circuits. In enterobacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella many of these sRNAs interact with the Hfq protein, an RNA chaperone similar to mammalian Sm-like proteins and act in the post-transcriptional regulation of many genes. A number of these highly conserved ribo-regulators are stringently regulated at the level of transcription and are part of major regulons that deal with the immediate response to various stress conditions, indicating that every major transcription factor may control the expression of at least one sRNA regulator. Here, we extend this view by the identification and characterization of a highly conserved, anaerobically induced small sRNA in E. coli, whose expression is strictly dependent on the anaerobic transcriptional fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator (FNR). The sRNA, named FnrS, possesses signatures of base-pairing RNAs, and we show by employing global proteomic and transcriptomic profiling that the expression of multiple genes is negatively regulated by the sRNA. Intriguingly, many of these genes encode enzymes with “aerobic” functions or enzymes linked to oxidative stress. Furthermore, in previous work most of the potential target genes have been shown to be repressed by FNR through an undetermined mechanism. Collectively, our results provide insight into the mechanism by which FNR negatively regulates genes such as sodA, sodB, cydDC, and metE, thereby demonstrating that adaptation to anaerobic growth involves the action of a small regulatory RNA. PMID:20075074

  9. Sources of signal in 62 protein-coding nuclear genes for higher-level phylogenetics of arthropods.

    PubMed

    Regier, Jerome C; Zwick, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the strength of various sources of phylogenetic information that led to recent seemingly robust conclusions about higher-level arthropod phylogeny and to assess the role of excluding or downweighting synonymous change for arriving at those conclusions. The current study analyzes DNA sequences from 68 gene segments of 62 distinct protein-coding nuclear genes for 80 species. Gene segments analyzed individually support numerous nodes recovered in combined-gene analyses, but few of the higher-level nodes of greatest current interest. However, neither is there support for conflicting alternatives to these higher-level nodes. Gene segments with higher rates of nonsynonymous change tend to be more informative overall, but those with lower rates tend to provide stronger support for deeper nodes. Higher-level nodes with bootstrap values in the 80% - 99% range for the complete data matrix are markedly more sensitive to substantial drops in their bootstrap percentages after character subsampling than those with 100% bootstrap, suggesting that these nodes are likely not to have been strongly supported with many fewer data than in the full matrix. Data set partitioning of total data by (mostly) synonymous and (mostly) nonsynonymous change improves overall node support, but the result remains much inferior to analysis of (unpartitioned) nonsynonymous change alone. Clusters of genes with similar nonsynonymous rate properties (e.g., faster vs. slower) show some distinct patterns of node support but few conflicts. Synonymous change is shown to contribute little, if any, phylogenetic signal to the support of higher-level nodes, but it does contribute nonphylogenetic signal, probably through its underlying heterogeneous nucleotide composition. Analysis of seemingly conservative indels does not prove useful. Generating a robust molecular higher-level phylogeny of Arthropoda is currently possible with large amounts of data and an exclusive reliance on

  10. Sources of Signal in 62 Protein-Coding Nuclear Genes for Higher-Level Phylogenetics of Arthropods